Texas Instruments 3000 WinSX User manual

Texas Instruments 3000 WinSX User manual
Texas
Instruments
TravelMate 3000 WinSX
Notebook Computer
User’s Manual
Contents
Preface..................................................................................v
1 Taking a First Look
Learning About Hardware................................................. 1-2
Learning About Options.................................................... 1-7
Learning About Software ................................................ 1-10
2 Learning About Your Computer
LCD Screen ...................................................................... 2-3
Connectors and Ports ........................................................ 2-6
Keyboard Keyrs............................................................... 2-10
Indicator Lights .............................................................. 2-19
3 Getting Started
Guidelines & Precautions.................................................. 3-3
Providing Power................................................................ 3-6
Handling the Battery Pack................................................. 3-9
Sarting Your Computer................................................... 3-16
Restarting the Computer ................................................. 3-18
Using the Floppy Drive ................................................... 3-19
TravelPoing Pointing Device........................................... 3-22
Getting Online Help........................................................ 3-29
4 Customizing Your Computer
Accessing the Setup Program ............................................ 4-3
System Options, Page 1..................................................... 4-7
User Features, Page 2...................................................... 4-12
External Communications, Page 3................................... 4-20
5 Installing and Using Application
Programs
Guidelines for Installing Applications ............................... 5-2
Using Laptop Manager...................................................... 5-7
Using Microsoft Windows................................................. 5-9
Using a Password............................................................ 5-10
ii
Contents
6 TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
Numeric Keypad ........................................................................................................ 6-2
RAM Modules ........................................................................................................... 6-3
Internal Modem ......................................................................................................... 6-8
Math Coprocessor Option........................................................................................... 6-9
Other Options .......................................................................................................... 6-15
7 Taking Care of Your Computer
Do's and Don'ts .......................................................................................................... 7-2
Cleaning the TravelMate 3000 WinSX....................................................................... 7-3
Conserving Battery Power.......................................................................................... 7-4
Care and Handling of the Battery ............................................................................... 7-6
Appendixes
Specifications............................................................................................................ A-1
Character Sets............................................................................................................B-1
Keyboard Layouts ......................................................................................................C-1
Diagnostics ............................................................................................................... D-1
Troubleshooting .........................................................................................................E-1
Configuring Memory ................................................................................................. F-1
Connector Pin Assignments ...................................................................................... G-1
Screen Standards....................................................................................................... H-1
Glossary
Index
Getting Support for Your TI Product
Warranty and Service
Repair Request Form
iii
[email protected] 1991 Texas Instruments Incorporated
All Rights Reserved - Printed in U.S.A.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer User's Manual Part No. 2608455-0001
Original Issue: September 1991
Changes may be made periodically to the information in this publication. Such changes
will be incorporated in new editions of this manual.
Record the serial number, purchase date, and model number in the spaces provided below.
The serial number and model number are recorded on the label affixed to the case. All
correspondence concerning your unit should include the serial number, model number,
and date of purchase.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer:
Serial Number:
Purchase Date:
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted
in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise,
without the prior written permission of Texas Instruments Incorporated.
The equipment, as well as the programs that TI has created to use with them, are tools
that can help people better manage the information used in their business. But toolsincluding TI products-cannot replace sound judgment nor make the manager's business
decisions.
Consequently, TI cannot warrant that its products are suitable for any specific customer
application. The manager must rely on judgment of what is best for Ws or her business.
TravelMate, TravelPoint, WinSX, and BatteryPro are trademarks of Texas Instruments Incorporated. The icons used
in the Windows Notebook group menus are copyrighted by Texas Instruments incorporated.
BitCom and BitFax are trademarks of BIT Software, Inc.
Hayes is a registered trademark and SmartModem 2400 is a trademark of
Hayes Microcomputer Products Inc.
IBM, PC, XT, OS/2, AT, and PS/2 are trademarks of International Business
Machines Corporation.
INSTALL program is copyrighted by Knowledge Dynamics Corp.
Intel, 386, and 387 are trademarks of Intel Corporation.
Lotus is a trademark of Lotus Development Corporation.
Microcom is a trademark and MNP is a registered trademark of Microcom, Inc.
Microsoft, GW-BASIC, and MS-DOS are registered trademarks and Windows and Excel are trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
Paintbrush is a registered trademark of ZSoft Corporation.
Preface
Your new Texas Instruments TravelMate TM 3000 WinSX TM Notebook Computer is a
lightweight, full-function computer with features and power exceeding many desktop
personal computers. The TravelMate 3000 WinSX is equipped with a standard 60megabyte (MB) internal hard disk drive, standard 4-MB random access memory (RAM),
an 80386 TM SX microprocessor, and factory-installed MS-DOS (version 5.0) and
Microsoft Windows TM (version 3.0).
Note: Your TravelMate 3000 WinSX Computer's hard disk drive is already formatted
and loaded with MS-DOS 5.0, Microsoft Windows, GW-BASIC ®, BatteryPro TM powerconservation utilities, Laptop Manager, Laptop File Manager, diagnostics, and other
useful programs. Therefore, do not format the hard disk (drive C) or you will delete
these programs. Any data you have entered into the computer will be lost forever if you
reformat the hard disk-unless you have backed up the data on floppy diskettes. However,
the aforementioned programs also are stored on the 3.5-inch floppy diskettes furnished
with your new computer so that you can restore the programs to the hard disk if
necessary. See "Restoring MS-DOS System Files" in Appendix E for instructions.
The following options, described in Chapter 6 of this manual, are available to make your
TravelMate 3000 WinSX more powerful and more useful for your particular applications.
q
2400-bps V.22bis Internal Modem with fax transmission capabilities or
a V.32, 9600-bps Internal Modem with V.42 error-checking protocol
q
80387
q
Internal RAM Modules
TM
SX Math Coprocessor
V
Preface
q
EthernetTM adapter
q
SCSI adapter
q
Expansion station
q
External monitors
q
Numeric Keypad
q
Deluxe carrying case
q
External printers
All these options are available from Texas Instruments. Contact your dealer or telephone
TI-Express, 1-800-TI PARTS.
Unpacking
When you open the container in which your computer is packed, you should find the
following items:
vi
q
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer
q
AC Adapter and detachable wall receptacle cord
q
TravelPointTM rollerball pointing device, holder, serial port adapter, and
case
q
Two tilt legs that insert into the bottom rear corners of the unit to
increase the keyboard angle
q
The MS-DOS User's Guide and Reference, the Microsoft Windows
User's Guide, the BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual,
the Battery Power Management Quick Reference, and this manual
q
Three MS-DOS floppies, four 3.5-inch Microsoft Windows floppies, one
BatteryPro and Productivity Software floppy, and one VGA Utilities
floppy
Preface
q
One function key template strip
If any of the above items are missing, contact your Texas Instruments dealer.
Conventions and Symbols
Throughout this manual, the following conventions are used to distinguish elements of
text:
italics
Used to denote Setup Program items and settings, key words,
and references to other publications
Monospace
Used for prompts and menus that display during operation of
your computer, including prompts (text generated by the
computer) and entries you are supposed to type on the keyboard
Bold
Used for keys, key sequences, and drive designator prompts
Several international symbols are used throughout this manual to advise you of important
information.
This symbol indicates a Note concerning operating procedures or
information you should know to help you operate your TravelMate
3000 WinSX.
This symbol alerts you to a Warning or Caution that can prevent
you from causing injury to yourself or damage to your equipment.
This symbol tells you that more information about the same subject
is continued on the next page.
Commands in the manual are shown in all capital letters, but you can type commands in
capital or lower case letters.
vii
Preface
About this Manual
This manual describes the operation of your Texas Instruments TravelMate 3000 WinSX
Notebook Computer. We have tried to design this manual so that you can locate
information quickly and easily. Each chapter begins with a title page that lists the major
sections in the chapter and a table of contents.
Keyboard keys are listed several ways in this manual, depending on the number of keys
you must press to produce a character or function. For example, some key fronts on the
keyboard are labeled with blue to indicate their use only in conjunction with the Fn key.
The text refers to these keys according to their function, preceded by the additional key
you must also press. Your application programs may use various other key combinations;
refer to your application program documentation for specific information.
The word floppy is used in this manual to refer to diskettes, microdiskettes, disks, and
other terms commonly used to describe a removable, nonvolatile, magnetic-media
diskette. The words disk and diskette are used in direct quotations, for example, in
describing a displayed error message, Setup Program menu, and like items.
Contents of this Manual
Here is an overview of what to expect in each chapter:
Chapter 1 - Taking A First Look gives users who are not familiar with computers some
basic information about the parts of a computer, the software it uses, and a brief overview
of the TravelMate 3000 WinSX and its options. Experienced users may only need to skim
this chapter.
Chapter 2 - Learning More About Your Computer describes specific TravelMate 3000
WinSX hardware features and explains their functions.
viii
Preface
Chapter 3 - Getting Started lists recommended operating and storage environments and
tells you how to connect the AC Adapter, how to care for the battery pack, and how to
start and restart your TravelMate 3000 WinSX.
Chapter 4 - Customizing Your Computer describes how to use the Setup Program to
customize your TravelMate 3000 WinSX for your working environment.
Chapter 5 - Installing and Using Application Programs briefly describes guidelines for
installing your own application programs plus some of the software installed at the factory
in your TravelMate 3000 WinSX, including the Laptop Manager, Microsoft Windows,
and password utilities.
Chapter 6 - TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options describes several options that can
enhance the performance of your TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer.
Chapter 7- Taking Care of Your Computer provides information on cleaning your
TravelMate 3000 WinSX, as well as caring for your battery and conserving battery power.
Appendix A - Specifications lists operating and environmental specifications for your
TravelMate 3000 WinSX.
Appendix B - Character Sets illustrates U.S. and international character sets used by the
TravelMate 3000 WinSX.
Appendix C - Keyboard Layouts illustrates the characters generated by the U.S. and
other national keyboards.
Appendix D - Diagnostics describes the diagnostic routines you can run to ensure that
your TravelMate 3000 WinSX is functioning properly.
Appendix E - Troubleshooting describes problems that can occur with your TravelMate
3000 WinSX and what to
ix
Preface
do about them, plus how to restore MS-DOS system files to your hard disk in case they are
erased for some reason.
Appendix F - Configuring Memory describes the TravelMate 3000 WinSX's standard
memory and the memory options available for the computer.
Appendix G - Connector Pin Assignments lists the signals produced by the connectors
provided on the TravelMate 3000 WinSX.
Appendix H - Screen Standards lists the characteristics of the various display adapters
supported by the TravelMate 3000 WinSX.
A Glossary of frequently used technical terms and an
Index are included near the back of the manual to help you.
Getting Support for Your TI Product, Warranty and Service, and a Repair Request
Form at the back of the manual describe the standard warranty and outline the proccdure
to follow if your TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer ever needs service.
x
1
Taking A First Look
This chapter tells you about:
q
Computer hardware such as the main circuit board, the display, and the
keyboard
q
Hardware options available for your TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook
Computer
q
Software operating systems and application programs
Contents
Learning About Hardware.......................................................................................... 1-2
System Board ...................................................................................................... 1-3
Microprocessor.................................................................................................... 1-3
RAM................................................................................................................... 1-4
ROM................................................................................................................... 1-4
Keyboard............................................................................................................. 1-4
LCD Screen ........................................................................................................ 1-4
Ports and Connectors........................................................................................... 1-5
Hard Disk............................................................................................................ 1-5
Hard Disk Formatting ......................................................................................... 1-6
Floppy Diskette Drive.......................................................................................... 1-6
Learning About Options............................................................................................. 1-7
RAM Modules..................................................................................................... 1-7
Internal Modem .................................................................................................. 1-7
Numeric Keypad ................................................................................................. 1-8
Extra Internal Battery Pack ................................................................................. 1-8
80387SX 20-MHz Math Coprocessor .................................................................. 1-8
Cables ................................................................................................................. 1-8
Printers ............................................................................................................... 1-9
Ethernet LAN Adapter ........................................................................................ 1-9
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) Adapter............................................... 1-9
Expansion Station ............................................................................................... 1-9
External Monitors ............................................................................................... 1-9
Learning About Software ......................................................................................... 1-10
Taking A First Look 1-1
Learning About Hardware
The standard Texas Instruments TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer looks like
this when it is closed.
The standard TravelMate 3000 WinSX looks like this when it is set up and ready to
operate.
1-2 Taking A First Look
Learning About Hardware
If you are already familiar with the main components of a computer, you may want to
skim the remainder of this chapter and skip ahead to Chapter 2 to learn more about your
new TravelMate 3000 WinSX's standard hardware and available options. Otherwise,
please continue on.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX's standard hardware consists of a system circuit board, a
keyboard, an LCD (liquid ciystal display) screen, a hard disk drive, a 3.5-inch floppy
diskette drive, serial and parallel I/O (input/output) ports, TravelPoint pointing device
port, and other electronic circuits needed to control the display and external options.
System Board
The system board holds the integrated circuits that make up the microprocessor and
memory. The system board also contains the hardware that controls the screen and
keyboard. The optional RAM modules, optional Internal Modems, and the optional
80387SX Math Coprocessor all plug into the system board.
Microprocessor
The microprocessor is the 'brain' of the computer. It processes data-or information-at
speeds so fast, its performance is measured in millionths of a second. The microprocessor
handles information in binary code, using the digit 0 or 1. Any piece of information (for
example, a number or character) is represented by a string of O's and I's.
For example, the number 23 in binary code is 10111. A 0 or 1 in the binary system is
referred to as a bit, the smallest piece of information handled by the processor. A byte is a
group of eight bits, and represents a single character or number, such as "H" or "9". The
microprocessor in the TravelMate 3000 WinSX is a high-speed 80386SX microprocessor,
running at a clock speed of up to 20 MHz.
Taking A First Look 1-3
Learning About Hardware
RAM
RAM (random access memory) stores data and application software for the processor.
You can write to or read from RAM freely, but once the power is turned off, the data in
RAM is lost. RAM size is described by the amount of information (bytes) it can store.
Symbols often used for this are "K" and "M". One K byte (1 K byte) represents 1024 bytes
and one M byte (1 M byte) represents 1024 K bytes. K bytes and M bytes are shown in
this manual as KB and MB, respectively.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX has a standard RAM size of 4 MB. This can be increased
up to 6 MB by installing optional RAM modules.
ROM
ROM (read-only memory) contains factory-programmed information that remains stored
even with the power switch turned off. You cannot change the contents of ROM. The
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Rom, sometimes called firmware, is used to store the IPL (initial
program loader), BIOS (basic input/output system), and Setup Program functions.
Keyboard
You communicate with a computer by typing on the keyboard. Many of the keys work
like those on a standard typewriter. However, some keys have special functions not
available on a typewriter, The TravelMate 3000 WinSX keyboard is modeled after the
IBM 101/102-key enhanced keyboard layout.
LCD Screen
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX LCD (liquid crystal display) screen acts as a window for the
computer to send information for you to view. Information you enter on the keyboard, or
information read from the hard disk or a floppy, or sent via a modem, is displayed on the
screen.
1-4 Taking A First Look
Learning About Hardware
You can set the LCD screen to emulate industry-standard display modes, including the
vGA (video graphics ar-ray) mode used by IBM in its latest PS/2TM series of personal
computers. The screen displays colors as various shades of gray. The illuminated, triple
supertwist, LCD screen gives you maximum readability in all lighting conditions with a
true black-on-white display. Screen standards are summarized in Appendix H of this
manual.
Ports and Connectors
The parallel port (connector) is used to connect a parallel printer. The RS-232C serial
port is used to connect a mouse, an external modem, a serial printer, or other device that
uses a serial connector. The TravelMate 3000 WinSX also provides a 15-pin connector
for an external analog monitor.
The six-pin mini-DIN connector on the left side of the case accepts the TravelPoint
pointing device.
Hard Disk
The built-in hard disk is a permanently installed magnetic disk. Information is read from
and written to both sides of the disk at extremely high speeds by heads that float above the
disk surface on a cushion of air. When you turn off the computer or the computer enters
the Standby or low power mode, the heads automatically 'park" themselves out of the way
to prevent the disk surface from being damaged by head movement.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX's standard hard disk can store up to 60 MB of informationthe equivalent of about more than 40 high-density floppies-and can write and read data
very quickly. This makes the hard disk the best place to store the programs you use most
frequently.
Taking A First Look 1-5
Learning About Hardware
Hard Disk Formatting
The hard disk consists of a platter divided into cylinders. A cylinder is a collection of
tracks in the same position on different sides of the hard disk platter.
The tracks of each cylinder are further divided into sectors. Each sector is numbered and
holds 512 bytes of data. The computer locates data on the disk by looking for its sector
number.
The hard disk in your new TravelMate 3000 WinSX is formatted and loaded with
software by Texas Instruments during manufacture. Do not format the hard disk.
Caution:
erased.
If you format the hard disk, all data on the hard disk wi1l be
Floppy Diskette Drive
A floppy diskette is a magnetic device that stores information created on a computer.
Once data is stored on a floppy, as diskettes are called in this manual, you can access the
data whenever necessary, or you can replace the old data with new when you no longer
need the old data.
During operation, the floppy rotates inside its plastic casing. As it rotates, the read/write
head of the drive moves from one track to another, locating information or finding space
available to store new information.
1-6 Taking A First Look
Learning About Options
You can enhance the performance of a standard TravelMate 3000 WinSX by adding
hardware options available from Texas Instruments. These options enable you to send
and receive data over telephone lines, increase memory, enter numeric data more easily,
and several other features.
The following hardware options are available from your Texas Instruments dealer or TIExpress, 1-800-TI-PARTS. See Chapter 6 for more information on most of these options.
RAM Modules
Your TravelMate 3000 WinSX comes with 4 MB of standard RAM. You can increase
this capacity to 6 MB by installing an optional RAM Module Kit (TI Part No. 25669960001).
The memory on the optional RAM can be used as Extended memory or as Expanded
memory, conforming to version 4.0 of the LotuSTM/IntelTM/Microsoft Expanded Memory
Specifications. See Chapter 4 for Setup Program instructions and Appendix F for
information on Expanded and Extended memory.
Internal Modem
The 2400-bps CCITT V. 22bis Internal Modem option (TI Part No. 2566941-0006) with
fax-sending and MNP Class 5 error-correcting capabilities in your TravelMate 3000
WinSX enables you to send data and facsimile (fax) information over standard telephone
lines.
Also available is a 9600-bps CCrIT V.32 Internal Modem option (TI Part No. 25809450001) with CCITT V.42 error-correcting and MNP Class 5 data compression capabilities.
This modem option transfers data four times faster than the 2400-bps modem option.
Note: The Internal Modem options may not be available in all countries. For
availability of these options, contact your dealer.
Taking A First Look 1-7
Learning About Options
Numeric Keypad
The Numeric Keypad option (TI Part No. 2568033-0001) connects to the right side of the
TravelMate 3000 WinSX case, enabling you to more easily type numeric data. The
Numeric Keypad layout is similar to the keypad on a fullsized IBM enhanced ATTM
keyboard.
Extra Internal Battery Pack
With an extra internal battery pack (TI Part No. 2566962000 1) you can double the time
you can operate your computer on battery power. You can charge the extra battery in the
computer.
Note:
Turn off the computer before removing or installing the battery pack.
80387SX 20-MHz Math Coprocessor
Adding the 80387SX Coprocessor option (TI Part No. 2566997-0001) to the TravelMate
3000 WinSX system board significantly improves processing performance of application
programs that support a math coprocessor.
Note: Use only the TravelMate 3000 WinSX or TravelMate 3000 Coprocessor option
or equivalent. Some coprocessors exceed the computer's power capacity.
Cables
You can order a parallel printer cable (TI Part No. 25518040001) or a serial interface
cable (TI Part No. 2557455-0001) for use with your computer. Pin assignments for both
cables are listed in Appendix G of this manual.
1-8 Taking A First Look
Learning About 0ptions
Printers
Texas Instruments makes a variety of laser and impact printers you can use with the
TravelMate 3000 WinSX, enabling you to a produce hard copy of information you have
created. You can connect almost any parallel printer to the TravelMate 3000 WinSX
parallel printer port or serial printer to the serial port.
Ethernet LAN Adapter
The Ethernet LAN Interface Adapter (TI Part No. 25670360001) provides both 10BaseT
and 10Base5 (AUI) connectors for 16-bit 2-MB burst-mode data transfer over local area
networks. The Adapter also has a PS/2 keyboard connector and an ac power adapter to
provide power to an external transceiver for coax cable schemes.
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) Adapter
The Small Computer System Interface Adapter (TI Part No. 2567029-0001) provides an
interface supporting up to seven devices such as CD-ROMs, hard disk drives, and tape
drives that are compatible with SCSI I or SCSI II specifications. The Adapter also
features a PS/2 keyboard connector.
Expansion Station
The Expansion Station (TI Part No. 2566953-0001) provides three full-size AT card slots
and three 3.5-inch bays for external options such as hard disk drives, floppy disk drives,
and magnetic tape backup recorders.
External Monitors
Your TravelMate 3000 WinSX has a CRT connector to which you can connect an
external, analog CRT monitor. See Chapter 6 for a list of monitor types supported by the
computer.
Taking A First Look 1-9
Learning About Software
A computer system needs software before it can carry out any useful task. Without
software, your computer is just a collection of electrical components. In order to use
computer hardware for tasks like writing memos or balancing a checking account,
software is necessary.
Software is a series of instructions that direct the computer to perform specific tasks.
Generally, these instructions are loaded from a floppy diskette or your hard disk into main
memory where they remain until you exit the software program or turn off the computer.
Your computer needs three levels of software to functionan input/output system, an
operating system, and an application program.
1-10 Taking A First Look
q
The BIOS (basic input/output system) is stored in ROM on the system
board. The BIOS controls the input/output functions of the hardware
itself, according to information received from the operating system or
software program, also known as BIOS calls.
q
The operating system is a software program that manages the computer's
resources, such as disk drives and printers. By performing these general
routines, the operating system is the base on which application programs
run. The operating system for this computer is MS-DOS, version 5.0.
q
An application program is software that helps you perform business and
personal tasks such as word processing, spreadsheet analyses, and
graphics presentations. Almost all application programs written to run
under MS-DOS on IBM and compatible personal computers can be used
with the TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer.
2
Learning About Your Computer
This chapter tells you about:
q
The LCD screen and how to adjust it
q
Ports and connectors on the side panels of the computer case
q
The keyboard and common key assignments
q
The status indicator lights and their meaning
Contents
LCD Screen ............................................................................................................... 2-3
Resolution ........................................................................................................... 2-3
Screen Angle....................................................................................................... 2-3
Screen Controls................................................................................................... 2-4
Brightness Control ....................................................................................... 2-4
Contrast Control........................................................................................... 2-5
Standard/Reverse Switch .............................................................................. 2-5
Connectors and Ports ................................................................................................. 2-6
Right Side Panel.................................................................................................. 2-6
Left Side Panel.................................................................................................... 2-6
Parallel (Printer) Port ................................................................................... 2-7
External Monitor Connector......................................................................... 2-7
TravelPoint Connector.................................................................................. 2-7
Modem Connector........................................................................................ 2-7
Serial (RS-232C) Port................................................................................... 2-7
Rear Panel........................................................................................................... 2-8
AC Adapter Jack .......................................................................................... 2-8
Expansion Bus Connector............................................................................. 2-8
Bottom Panel....................................................................................................... 2-9
Operator Panel .................................................................................................... 2-9
Power Switch ............................................................................................... 2-9
Option Card Slot Cover ................................................................................ 2-9
Keyboard Keys......................................................................................................... 2-10
Color Coded Keys ............................................................................................. 2-10
Learning About Your Computer 2-1
LCD screen
Function Keys ................................................................................................... 2-10
Enter ................................................................................................................. 2-11
Shift.................................................................................................................. 2-11
Caps Lock ......................................................................................................... 2-11
Tab ................................................................................................................... 2-11
Backspace ......................................................................................................... 2-12
Ctrl ................................................................................................................... 2-12
Alt ................................................................................................................... 2-12
Fn ................................................................................................................... 2-12
SysRq................................................................................................................ 2-12
PrtSC ................................................................................................................ 2-12
Cursor Control Keys.......................................................................................... 2-13
Esc ................................................................................................................... 2-13
Ins ................................................................................................................... 2-13
Del ................................................................................................................... 2-14
Using the NumLk Key and
the Embedded Numeric Keypad ........................................................................ 2-14
Num Lock On............................................................................................. 2-15
Num Lock Off ............................................................................................ 2-15
ScrLk ................................................................................................................ 2-16
Pause................................................................................................................. 2-16
Combination Keys............................................................................................. 2-16
Set Up ........................................................................................................ 2-17
Stndby (Standby) ........................................................................................ 2-17
Turbo ......................................................................................................... 2-18
Speed Control Keys .................................................................................... 2-18
Indicator Lights ....................................................................................................... 2-19
Power................................................................................................................ 2-19
Low Batt (Battery)............................................................................................. 2-19
Turbo ................................................................................................................ 2-20
Floppy Disk....................................................................................................... 2-20
Hard Disk.......................................................................................................... 2-20
Caps Lock ......................................................................................................... 2-20
Num Lock (Numeric Keypad Lock)................................................................... 2-20
Scroll Lock........................................................................................................ 2-21
2-2 Learning About Your Computer
LCD Screen
Your Texas Instruments TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer displays text and
graphics on a triple supertwist, illuminated, liquid crystal display (LCD) with cold
cathode fluorescent tube (CCFT) backlight, giving true black-onwhite contrast. The
TravelMate 3000 WinSX is able to emulate IBM's video graphics array (VGA) by
displaying colors as shades of gray.
You can also connect an external monitor to your TravelMate 3000 WinSX. External
monitor display modes are described in Appendix H of this manual.
Resolution
The LCD screen displays a maximum resolution of 640 dots horizontally by 480 dots
vertically. Resolution depends on which display mode you select on page 2 of the Setup
Program described in Chapter 4. The TravelMate 3000 WinSX enables you to select
display modes for both the LCD and external monitors.
Screen Angle
You can tilt your TravelMate 3000 WinSX combination cover/screen to adjust it to the
best viewing angle. Do not attempt to tilt the screen more than approximately 130
degrees: damage to the hinge can result.
If you close the screen with the power still on, the TravelMate 3000 WinSX may beep for
about 10 seconds (continuously if OS/2TM is executing) and then turn off the display. You
can transport the TravelMate 3000 WinSX with the power on if the Setup Program Cover
Closed Action item is set to Suspend (the default: see Chapter 4 for details).
Learning About Your Computer
2-3
LCD Screen
You can use the computer with the cover/screen closed, for example, to connect an
external monitor to your computer to run a demonstration program. For this purpose, you
can disable the cover-closed alarm by changing the Cover Closed Action setting in the
Setup Program to Disabled (see Chapter 4).
Screen Controls
The LCD screen is illuminated to enable you to control background brightness and
contrast for better readability. The backlight turns on automatically when you turn on the
computer.
Note: To conserve battery power and prolong screen life, you can set the backlight to
turn off automatically if you do not use the keyboard for a preset time. Set the delay
period at the Setup Program menu described in Chapter 4. Press the Shift key
(recommended) or almost any other key on the keyboard to turn the backlight on again.
Brightness Control
The Brightness rotary control adjusts the brightness of the illuminated screen. Adjust
this control in conjunction with the Contrast control.
Note the index mark on the Brightness control. Set the index mark to the up position for
the brightest image, but the highest battery power consumption. Set the index mark
facing left for medium brightness and lower power use. Set the index mark facing down
for the least battery power consumption.
2-4 Learning About Your Computer
LCD Screen
Contrast Control
The Contrast rotary control adjusts the contrast between the displayed image and the
background for the best viewing condition. Adjust this control in conjunction with the
Brightness control.
The Contrast control does not affect power consumption.
Standard/Reverse Switch
The screen normally displays black characters on a white background. You can reverse
this image to white on black by setting the standard/reverse switch to the q (reverse)
position.
Some graphics programs, Microsoft Windows for example, may display like a
photographic negative on the LCD screen. Reversing the image should correct this effect.
Leaming About Your Computer 2-5
Connectors and Ports
Caution:
Turn off the computer before connecting any external devices to the
computer's connectors.
Right Side Panel
The right side panel of the computer contains the numeric keypad connector to connect
the optional Numeric Keypad to your computer.
A dust cap is provided for the numeric keypad connector. Remove and store this cap in a
safe place while the connector is in use.
Also remove the connector cover to attach the TravelPoint pointing device holder (see
"TravelPoint Pointing Device' in Chapter 3).
Left Side Panel
On the left side panel of the computer are the following five connectors (also shown in the
figure inside the back cover).
2-6 Learning About Your Computer
Connectors and Ports
Parallel (Printer) Port
You can connect a parallel printer or other device that uses a standard parallel interface to
this 25-pin female connector. The cable from the printer or other device must terminate
in a 25-pin IBM PC-style male connector to connect to this port. Pin assignments for this
connector are listed in Appendix G.
External Monitor Connector
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX can display data on either its built-in LCD screen or on an
external analog VGA monitor connected to the 15-pin VGA monitor connector. See
Chapter 6 for details on compatible external monitors and how to connect them to your
computer. Pin assignments for this connector are listed in Appendix G.
TravelPoint Connector
The round, six-pin mini-DIN port accepts the furnished TravelPoint trackball pointing
device for use with application programs that support a mouse. Pin assignments for this
connector are listed in Appendix G.
Modem Connector
If your TravelMate 3000 WinSX is equipped with the optional Internal Modem, the
modular RJ-11-C telephone jack is located on the left side panel next to the TravelPoint
connector.
Serial (RS-232C) Port
The RS-232C serial port can be used to connect external devices such as a serial printer, a
mouse, or an external modem. The cable used to connect to this port must terminate in a
nine-pin female IBM AT-style connector. See Appendix G for a list of pin assignments
for the serial port.
Leaming About Your Computer 2-7
Connectors and Ports
RearPanel
The rear panel of the computer has the expansion bus connector and the AC Adapter jack.
AC Adapter Jack
The AC Adapter mini-DIN jack connects to this jack to recharge the battery and supply ac
power to the computer. See Chapter 3 for instructions on charging and conditioning the
internal battery pack.
Caution:
Use only the supplied AC Adapter with your TravelMate 3000
WinSX Notebook Computer. Other A adapters may not match the power
requirements of the TravelMate 3000 WinSX and can cause serious damage to the
electronic circuits.
Expansion Bus Connector
The 120-pin expansion bus connector is provided to attach optional devices such as the
Ethernet Adapter and the Expansion Station to your TravelMate 3000 WinSX.
2-8 Leaming About Your Computer
Connectors and Ports
Bottom Panel
The bottom panel of the computer provides access to remove and install the supplied
internal battery pack. See Chapter 3 for battery pack removal and installation
instructions.
Tilt Legs - In the rear corners of the bottom panel are two holes into which you can insert
the furnished tilt legs to increase the angle of the keyboard.
Operator Panel
The computer's operator panel has a power switch, an optional card slot cover, the
keyboard, and eight status indicator lights. The keyboard and the indicator lights are
described in the next section of this chapter.
Power Switch
The power switch turns the power to the computer on and off for both battery-powered
and ac operation. Set the switch to the on
the off (i) position to turn off the computer.
position to turn on the computer and to
Option Card Slot Cover
A cover for the option card slot is located at the rear left comer of the operator panel. The
optional Internal Modem card can be installed in this slot. For details, see the instructions
furnished with the Internal Modem kit.
Learning About Your Computer 2-9
Keyboard Keys
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX keyboard provides all the functions of the IBM AT - I 0 1 style enhanced keyboard. Many keys on the keyboard are similar to those on a standard
typewriter, but you may not be familiar with some keys. The following sections describe
special function keys not found on a standard typewriter.
Note: MS-DOS and most application programs use keys for special purposes not
defined here. Refer to your application program documentation and the MS-DOS User's
Guide and Reference provided with your TravelMate 3000 WinSX.
Color Coded Keys
Note that the fronts of some keys (for example, F11, F12, Home, End) are labeled in blue
to indicate that these keys work in conjunction with the Fn key to produce their function.
Function Keys
Along the top row of the keyboard are 10 function keys labeled F1 through F10. Two
additional function keys, labeled in blue as F11 and F 12, are available for many
applications by pressing them in conjunction with the Fn key.
2-10 Learning About Your Computer
Keyboard Keys
The function keys perform editing functions in MS-DOS (see the MS-DOS User's Guide
and Reference supplied with your computer). Applications programs use the function
keys for various purposes; see your application program documentation.
Note: Above the function keys is a slot to hold the furnished blank template where you
can write the specific functions of the keys in your application program.
Enter
The Enter key is generally used to end a line or menu entry and move to the next one.
This key is also called the Return key by some application programs.
Shift
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX provides two identical Shift keys. Pressing any
alphanumeric key while you press and hold the Shift key generates that key's uppercase
character or the symbol at the top of two-character keys. When the Caps Lock key
function is on, the Shift keys work in reverse, generating a lowercase character.
Caps Lock
The Caps Lock key makes all alphabet letters you type uppercase. It is a toggle key;
pressing it once turns it on and pressing it again turns it off. This key has no effect on
numeric characters or symbols. When the Caps Lock function is on, the Caps Lock
indicator fight comes on.
Tab
With most applications the Tab key works like the tab key on a regular typewriter,
moving the cursor to the next preset tab position. Pressing the Shift-Tab keys causes the
cursor to move left to the previous preset tab position.
Learning About Your Computer 2-11
Keyboard Keys
Backspace
With most applications the ← (Backspace) key moves the cursor to the left one space at a
time, erasing any character it passes.
Ctrl
The keyboard has two identical Ctrl (Control) keys. With many applications the Ctrl key
changes the function of another key when both keys are pressed simultaneously. For
example, under MS-DOS, pressing the Ctrl-Pause keys sends a Break signal to stop
execution of the current program.
Alt
The U.S. keyboard has two identical Alt (Alternate) keys. Like the Ctrl key, the Alt key
generates an alternate function for another key in many applications.
Fn
With many applications the Fn (Function) key is used to access numbers, characters, or
the functions printed in blue on the fronts of some keys on the TravelMate 3000 WinSX
keyboard.
SysRq
The function of SysRq (System Request), produced by pressing the Alt-PrtSc keys, varies
by application program. Not all programs use this key; check your application program
documentation for details.
PrtSc
With many applications pressing the PrtSc (Print Screen) key causes your printer to print
whatever is displayed on the screen if your printer is connected, turned on, and online.
2-12 Learning About Your Computer
Keyboard Keys
Note: You must first run the MS-DOS utility, GRAPHICS.com, before you can print
graphic displays; if not, only text characters are printed. See your MS-DOS User's Guide
and Reference for details.
You can press the Ctrl-PrtSc keys to toggle on the 'echo" function, during which your
printer prints the currently displayed line of data each time you press the Enter key.
Cursor Control Keys
The four arrow keys move the cursor in the direction of the arrow: left and right one space
or up and down one line. With most applications, if you press and hold an arrow key for
more than a half second, the cursor moves at a faster speed. You can adjust the speed
using the Setup Program described in Chapter 4 and with some application programs.
Pressing the Fn key with the arrow keys generates the functions shown on the front of the
keycaps: Home, End, PgUp, and PgDn. Some applications use the arrow keys for
different and additional functions: see your application program documentation for
particular arrow key functions.
ESC
The Esc (Escape) key is used in many applications to cancel a command, exit the
application, or introduce a special command called an escape sequence. See your
application program documentation for particular Esc key functions.
Ins
The Ins (Insert) key toggles on and off the insert mode in MS-DOS and many
applications. In insert mode you can move the cursor anywhere on the line of text and
insert characters, pushing existing characters on the line to the right. Press the Ins key
again to cancel insert mode: in many applications pressing other keys also cancels insert
mode.
Learning About Your Computer 2-13
Keyboard Keys
Del
Press the Del (Delete) key to delete the character at the cursor. In MS-DOS and many
applications, characters on the line to the right of the cursor are pulled to the left.
Using the NumLk Key and
the Embedded Numeric Keypad
Your TravelMate 3000 WinSX features an embedded keypad (built into the keyboard) that
provides the same functions as the discrete numeric keypad on an AT enhanced keyboard.
An AT-style numeric keypad provides cursor movement, paging, and other functions in
normal mode. In the number lock mode the AT-style numeric keypad keys generate
numerals.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX embedded numeric keypad keys shown in the following
figure generate AT-keypad characters and functions when pressed in conjunction with the
NumLk key and the Fn key.
Note: If you have installed the optional external Numeric Keypad, the embedded
numeric keypad does not function.
2-14 Learning About Your Computer
Keyboard Keys
The embedded numeric keypad has three modes you can enter by toggling the Fn-F7
(NumLk) keys as signaled by the Num Lock indicator light: off, on, or blinking. The
three modes are described below.
Num Lock On
When the Num Lock indicator light is on, pressing the Fn key with the appropriate keys
generates the characters shown in this figure.
Num Lock Off
When the Num Lock indicator light is off, pressing the Fn key with the appropriate keys
generates the characters shown in the following figure.
Learning About Your Computer 2-15
Keyboard Keys
Nurn Lock Blinking
When the Num Lock indicator light is blinking-caused by pressing the Fn-F7 (NumLk)
keys-the embedded numeric keypad becomes a temporary numeric keypad that does not
require you to press any other key. This mode is particularly useful when you have to
enter a large quantity of numbers. If you press and hold the Fn key in this mode, the
keypad keys generate their normal characters.
Note: If you press the Shift key in addition to the keys shown in the figures above, the
shifted status is reversed; that is, shifted is unshifted and unshifted is shifted.
ScrLk
Press the ScrLk (Scroll Lock) key to toggle on and off the scroll-lock function. The Scroll
Lock indicator above the keyboard also lights. This key has no fixed function; see your
application program documentation.
Pause
In MS-DOS and many applications, pressing the Pause key stops the displayed text from
scrolling. Pressing any other key restarts scrolling.
Combination Keys
Several functions are generated on the keyboard by pressing the Ctrl and Fn keys in
conjunction with the keys described below to produce the functions labeled on the front of
the key.
2-16 Learning About Your Computer
Keyboard Keys
Break
Pressing the Ctrl-Pause (Break) keys sends a Break signal to stop current program
execution. Your application program may have other or additional functions for the Break
signal.
Set Up
Pressing the Fn-Esc (Set Up) keys when the computer displays the MS-DOS C:\> prompt
loads the Setup Program from the hard disk. The Setup Program permits you to configure
the computer's basic functions. Although not recommended, you also can load the Setup
Program from ROM while you are working in some application programs (but not
Windows) by pressing the Ctrl-Alt-Esc keys.
See Chapter 4 for details on using the Setup Program.
Stndby (Standby)
Pressing the Fn-F4 (Stndby) keys sets the TravelMate 3000 WinSX to the Standby mode
and the processor to the " sleep" mode that turns off both the LCD display and the hard
disk drive. In this mode the processor responds only to pressing the Fn-F4 keys again,
which causes the system to resume normal operation.
The Power indicator light glows orange when the computer is in the Standby mode.
You can use the Standby mode to transport the computer for short distances. You also can
close the display/cover to transport the unit (after the five beeps are completed).
Note: See Chapter 4 of this manual and see the BatteryPro & Productivity Software
User’s Manual furnished with your computer for more details on the Standby and other
power-saving modes.
Learning About Your Computer 2-17
Keyboard Keys
Turbo
Pressing the Fn-F5 (Turbo) keys increases the CPU processing speed to 20 MHz-if the
Turbo indicator is on, the speed is already 20 MHz. When the Turbo feature is off, the
CPU runs at 5 or 10 MHz. The Turbo feature uses more battery power but provides faster
processing.
When you set the computer to 20-MHz (using the Setup Program, the Windows Notebook
menu Setup icon, or the speed control keys described below), the Turbo indicator comes
on.
Speed Control Keys
Pressing the Ctrl-Alt-↑ keys increases the CPU processing speed in the range of 5, 10,
and 20 MHz, and the computer sounds low, medium, and high frequency tones. Pressing
the Ctrl-Alt-↓ keys decreases CPU speed.
2-18 Learning About Your Computer
Indicator Lights
Above the keyboard are eight indicator lights that show the status of certain operating
features.
Power
The Power indicator glows green when you turn on the Power switch (located above the
right side of the keyboard). If the light does not come on, the AC Adapter may not be
connected, or the battery may be discharged.
The Power indicator glows orange when the computer is set to the Standby mode and
alternately glows orange and green when the computer enters the Auto Suspend mode.
Low Batt (Battery)
If the internal battery pack is installed in the TravelMate 3000 WinSX, the Low Batt
light indicates the following:
q
The Low Batt indicator remains off if the battery has more than I to 10
minutes charge remaining.
q
The Low Batt indicator blinks red and the alarm sounds (if enabled
using the Setup Program) when the battery has approximately 1 to 10
minutes charge remaining. Both the indicator and the alarm remain on
until the computer shuts itself off. You should update work in progress
as soon as possible.
The time variations in the Low Batt indicator functions are affected by the battery charge
remaining when you turn on power and may also vary slightly among individual
computers. See 'Conditioning the Battery Pack" in Chapter 3 for more details on the
Power and Low Batt indicators.
Learning About Your Computer 2-19
Indicator Lights
Turbo
The Turbo indicator comes on when you set the computer to 20-MHz (using the Setup
Program, the Windows Notebook menu Setup icon, or the speed control keys described
previously). The Turbo indicator goes off while the computer is in the Standby mode and
while the computer is accessing the floppy drive.
Floppy Disk
The Floppy Disk indicator comes on when the computer writes to or reads from the builtin 3.5-inch microdiskette drive. Also note that the indicator light on the front of the
floppy drive also comes on during floppy drive accesses.
Caution:
Never remove a floppy from the drive while the Floppy Disk
indicator is on. You could destroy data and damage the drive.
Hard Disk
The Hard Disk indicator comes on when the computer writes to or reads from the built-in
hard disk drive.
CapsLock
The Caps Lock indicator comes on when you press the Caps Lock key to toggle on the
caps lock function and turns off the next time you press the Caps Lock key.
Num Lock (Numeric Keypad Lock)
The Num Lock indicator comes on when you press the Fn-F7 (NumLk) keys to toggle on
the numeric keypad lock function. See "Using the NumLk Key and the Embedded
Numeric Keypad" earlier in this chapter for full details.
2-20 Learning About Your Computer
Indicator Lights
Scroll Lock
The Scroll Lock indicator comes on when you press the ScrLk key to toggle on the scroll
lock function and turns off the next time you press the ScrLk key.
Learning About Your Computer 2-21
3
Getting Started
This chapter tells you about:
q
Recommended operating and storage environments for your Texas
Instruments TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer
q
How to take care of the computer's hard disk
q
Connecting the AC Adapter and installing, removing, and charging the
internal battery pack
q
Starting up your TravelMate 3000 WinSX
q
Using the floppy diskette drive and how to take care of your floppies
q
Using the TravelPoint pointing device furnished with your new
computer
q
Help displays you can view to help you use your computer
Contents
Guidelines & Precautions........................................................................................... 3-3
Operating Environment....................................................................................... 3-3
Operating Guidelines .......................................................................................... 3-3
Taking Care of the Hard Disk.............................................................................. 3-4
Providing Power......................................................................................................... 3-6
Connecting the AC Adapter ................................................................................ 3-6
AC Adapter Indicator Lights ............................................................................... 3-8
Handling the Battery Pack.......................................................................................... 3-9
Installing the Battery Pack .................................................................................. 3-9
Conditioning the Battery Pack........................................................................... 3-10
Automatic Discharge......................................................................................... 3-12
Using the Battery Pack ...................................................................................... 3-12
Removing the Battery Pack ............................................................................... 3-14
Getting Started 3-1
Contents
Starting Your Computer........................................................................................... 3-16
Restarting the Computer .......................................................................................... 3-18
Using the Floppy Drive ............................................................................................ 3-19
Taking Care of Your Floppies ........................................................................... 3-19
Using Your Floppies ......................................................................................... 3-20
Inserting a Floppy Into the Drive....................................................................... 3-21
TravelPoint Pointing Device .................................................................................... 3-22
Installing TravelPoint........................................................................................ 3-22
Using TravelPoint Controls and Indicators ........................................................ 3-24
Adjusting the TravelPoint Cursor ...................................................................... 3-26
Adjusting Appearance ................................................................................ 3-26
Adjusting Cursor Speed.............................................................................. 3-27
Installing Applications for Use With TravelPoint .............................................. 3-27
Changing the CONFIG.SYS File....................................................................... 3-28
Getting Online Help................................................................................................. 3-29
Microsoft Windows Help................................................................................... 3-29
DOS Commands Description............................................................................. 3-29
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Utilities Description .................................................. 3-30
3-2 Getting Started
Guidelines & Precaution
Operate your Texas Instruments TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer according
to the following environmental specifications and operating guidelines.
Operating Environment
When using your computer, always try to ensure that the temperature and humidity of the
surroundings fall within the following ranges.
Temperature
Operating:
Storage:
50 to 95o F (10 to 35o C)
-4 to 140o F (-20 to 60o C)
Relative Humidity (Noncondensing)
Operating:
20 to 80%
Storage:
10 to 90%
See Appendix A for additional specifications.
Operating Guidelines
q
When operating your TravelMate 3000 WinSX with the AC Adapter,
make sure the wall outlet supplies the correct voltage. Check the label
on the bottom of the computer case and on the AC Adapter.
q
For information on installing hardware options, see Chapter 6 of this
manual and the instructions supplied with the option.
q
For instructions on configuring the computer for your operating
environment, see Chapter 4, "Customizing Your Computer."
Getting Started 3-3
Guidelines& Precautions
Taking Care of the Hard Disk
The hard disk in your TravelMate 3000 WinSX is specially designed to withstand the
rigors of travel. The hard disk heads automatically park themselves when the computer is
turned off. However, it is still a precision device and careful treatment will prolong its
life.
Follow these guidelines to get the most out of your hard disk's performance:
q
Never move the computer when the hard disk is being accessed.
q
Never subject the computer to strong vibration or sudden shocks,
especially during transportation.
q
You can move your computer with the power on; however, it is a good
idea to put the computer in Standby mode (press the Fn-F4 keys) or
simply close the cover if the Setup Program Cover Closed Action item is
set to Suspend (the default).
q
Always keep backup floppies of all programs and data stored on your
hard disk in case of a hard disk accident or failure. The time spent
backing up your data is always worthwhile.
Caution:
You should back up your hard disk to floppies on a regular basis to
protect against loss of data because of a hard disk failure. Follow the backup
procedure outlined in your MS-DOS User's Guide and Reference or use a A backup
procedure provided by your application program. If your hard disk fails, TI service
personnel may or may not be able to save some or most of the contents of your hard
disk if replacement is required.
3-4 Getting Started
Guidelines & Precaution
q
When moving your computer to a location where the temperature is
more than 18o F (10o C) different from the current location, do the move
in two stages:
(1) First, leave the computer in a place where the temperature is
somewhere between that of the new location and the old location for
about 1 hour.
(2) Then move the computer to the new location. This ensures that the
hard disk mechanisms have time to adjust to the new environment and
prevents moisture from condensing on vital parts.
q
In case of a hard disk failure, telephone Texas Instruments at 1-800847-5757 for information about data recovery.
Getting Started 3-5
Providing Power
You can operate your TravelMate 3000 WinSX from ac power of the correct voltage via
the furnished AC Adapter. You also can run the computer using the internal battery pack
provided with your computer. The first time you use the computer or after the computer
has been out of service for several weeks, connect the AC Adapter as described below,
both to operate the computer and to recharge the battery pack.
Refer to 'Handling the Battery Pack" later in this chapter to learn how to install, remove,
charge, and condition the battery pack for optimum service.
Connecting the AC Adapter
The AC Adapter supplied with your TravelMate 3000 WinSX both charges the internal
NiCad battery pack and, of course, operates the computer on ac power. You can operate
your TravelMate 3000 WinSX on ac power with the battery pack removed or installed.
Cautions:
1. Use only the AC Adapter supplied with your TravelMate 3000 WinSX. Using
another adapter can damage your computer. Be sure to plug the AC Adapter into a
grounded outlet or use a grounded plug adapter.
2. Before connecting or disconnecting the AC Adapter to the computer, always turn
off computer power or set the computer to Standby mode (press the Fn-F4 [Stndby]
keys; the normally green Power indicator light changes to orange) or close the cover
and wait until the alarm stops (five beeps). After you disconnect or connect the AC
Adapter, again press the Fn-F4 keys to return to normal mode (the orange Power
indicator light changes to green) or lift the cover.
3-6 Getting Started
Providing Power
Connect the AC Adapter to your TravelMate 3000 WinSX as follows.
1.
Set the computer's power switch to the off
position.
2.
Connect the female connector of the supplied ac cord to the inlet on the
AC Adapter body.
Note: Do not remove the female connector from the AC Adapter while the AC Adapter
is connected to the computer.
3.
Connect the male end of the ac cord into a grounded wall receptacle of
the correct voltage. Use a grounded plug adapter if necessary.
4.
Holding the round mini-DIN jack from the AC Adapter so that the
arrow embossed on the connector faces up, press the connector into the
matching jack on the rear panel of the computer.
Note: For best air circulation, set the AC Adapter on your work surface on its short
side with the indicator lights up.
Getting Started 3-7
Providing Power
5.
If you plan to use the TravelPoint pointing device, an external monitor,
a printer, or other external devices, connect them to the computer before
setting the computer power switch to the on (1) position.
AC Adapter Indicator Lights
The two status indicator lights on the AC Adapter signal the following states.
x
The amber indicator comes on when the AC Adapter is connected to
both the computer and a wall outlet, and the installed battery is being
charged.
Note: To obtain the maximum computer battery charge, always leave the AC Adapter
connected to the computer an additional 11/2 hours after the amber indicator light on the
AC Adapter goes off and the green light turns on.
q
3-8 Getting Started
The green indicator comes on when the AC Adapter is connected to both
the computer and a wall outlet and the battery is installed and is no
longer charging, or the battery is not installed and the computer is
turned on.
Handling the Battery Pack
The battery pack is equipped with thermal fuses to prevent unsafe computer operation.
However, if your computer is stored in a very warm place (an automobile trunk, for
example), it may not turn on under battery power until the thermal fuses cool to a safe
temperature.
Installing the Battery Pack
Install the internal NiCad battery pack as follows. If the battery is new or not fully
charged, condition and/or charge the battery as described later in this chapter.
Note: The internal NiCad battery pack and its cover are built as one unit; do not try to
separate the cover from the battery pack. Do not short out the battery pack.
1.
Turn off the computer, disconnect the AC Adapter and any other
external devices, and carefully lay the computer upside down on a
padded surface.
2.
Insert the battery pack and integral cover into the computer's battery
compartment so that the two smaller tabs in the cover engage the
matching slots in the rear of the compartment.
Getting Started 3-9
Handling the Battery Pack
3.
Lower the battery pack into the computer battery compartment so that
the cover is flush with the bottom of the computer case. Then slide the
locking latch toward the
4.
(closed padlock) symbol.
Turn the computer right side up and reconnect the AC Adapter and any
other external devices to the computer.
Conditioning the Battery Pack
An unconditioned battery-one that is brand-new, one installed in a computer that has not
been used for a long time, one that refuses a full charge, or one that has sat 'on the shelf
for several months-must be conditioned before it will accept a full charge. Condition and
charge the battery pack as follows.
3-10 Getting Started
1.
Install the internal battery pack in your computer (if not already
installed) as described earlier in this chapter.
2.
Unplug the AC Adapter from the computer and allow the battery to
discharge fully by using the computer on battery power (or just leave the
computer turned on).
Handling the Battery Pack
3.
When the Low Batt indicator light starts blinking and the audible alarm
starts beeping, update any work in progress and exit to the MS-DOS
prompt. Allow the battery to deep discharge by leaving the computer on
until the Low Batt, Power and all other indicators turn off.
You can turn off the beeper if it is irritating by pressing the Fn-Ctrl-F4
keys.
4.
After the battery is discharged fully, recharge the battery completely by
connecting the AC Adapter as described earlier in this chapter.
The AC Adapter's amber indicator glows while the battery is charging.
The green indicator comes on when the battery is at least 90-percent
charged.
5.
Keep the AC Adapter connected for another 12 hours (or longer if more
convenient) after the AC Adapter's green indicator comes on to tricklecharge the battery.
6.
After the 12-hour trickle charge is complete, unplug the AC Adapter
and repeat steps 2, 3, and 4 one more time.
Note: If the AC Adapter's amber indicator turned off after at least 2.5 hours of fast
charge while the computer is turned off, you can reduce the trickle charge in step 5 to 1.5
hours. If the battery seems to refuse to accept a full charge, trickle-charge for 12 hours.
The battery pack should now be fully conditioned. Conditioning should be required only
two or three times over the life of the battery if you follow the suggestions in this section
for battery care. Note that all NiCad batteries eventually wear out, but usually only after
many, many hundreds of charge cycles if you take proper care of them.
Getting Started 3- 11
Handling the Battery Pack
If the battery pack seems to hold less and less charge after several conditioning cycles,
consider replacing the battery pack. If the battery pack does not condition properly (the
fast charge cycle in step 4 continues to complete in less than 2.5 hours), also consider
replacing the battery pack.
Note: You can use the computer while charging the battery, but a full charge may
require more time-around 3 hours if the power-saving features are active (BatteryPro,
hard disk and display time-outs, Standby mode, etc.).
Automatic Discharge
Your TravelMate 3000 WinSX has an automatic battery discharge circuit that activates
when the Low Batt indicator begins blinking. This circuit automatically discharges the
battery at a rate sufficient to ensure proper battery conditioning. The automatic discharge
circuit remains on as long as the computer's power switch is in the on (I) position, even
after the display blanks and the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock indicators come
on.
If the Low Batt indicator is still blinking and the Power indicator is on, the automatic
discharge cycle is not complete. The battery pack is fully deep discharged only when all
indicators turn off.
Using the Battery Pack
As long as you get a satisfactory charge life from your battery pack, you should use the
normal battery charge cycle described below. If the charge life starts to decrease,
complete the procedure under "Conditioning the Battery Pack" earlier in this chapter.
Under normal conditions, use and charge the battery pack as follows.
Note: The batteries shipped with a new TravelMate 300 WinSX are not conditioned.
Complete the procedures under "Conditioning the Battery Pack" earlier in this chapter.
3-12 Getting Started
Handling the Battery Pack
1.
Install the internal battery pack in your computer (if not already
installed) as described earlier in this chapter,
2.
Unplug the AC Adapter and use your computer on battery power. The
battery eventually will discharge and the Low Batt indicator will start
blinking. Save any work in progress and exit to the MS-DOS prompt.
(Press the Fn-Ctrl-F4 keys to turn off the beeper if it irritates you.)
You have from I to 10 minutes of battery charge life remaining. When
the Caps Lock, Num Lock, and Scroll Lock indicators come on, the
battery has reached the point where it does not have enough power to
reliably power the system and the computer automatically shuts down.
Every five to seven battery charge cycles, you should use the computer's
automatic discharge feature. Leave the computer on until all indicators
turn off. Ms deep discharges the battery pack. Otherwise, you can turn
your unit off now, or start recharging the battery.
3.
To recharge the battery, connect the AC Adapter as described earlier in
this chapter. The AC Adapter's amber indicator glows while the battery
is fast charging. The green indicator comes on when the battery is at
least 90-percent charged. The green indicator turns on after about 3
hours of charging.
If the batteries are fully discharged and the amber indicator turns off less
than 2.5 hours after the start of a fast charge while the computer is
turned off, the batteries may need conditioning.
Getting Started 3-13
Handling the Battery Pack
4.
Leave the AC Adapter connected for 1.5 hours (or more) after the green
indicator comes on to charge the battery pack to the 100-percent level.
If you must use your computer on battery power without charging the
extra 1. 5 hours, remember that you do not have a complete charge.
You should charge the battery pack to the 100-percent level at least
during the cycles you have performed automatic discharge. The battery
pack is now ready for use. If the battery pack seems to refuse to hold a
full charge, you should recondition the battery pack.
Note: You can use the computer while charging the battery, but a full charge may
require more time-around 3 hours if the power-saving features are active (BatteryPro,
hard disk and display time-outs, Standby mode, etc.).
Removing the Battery Pack
Remove the battery pack from the computer as follows.
1.
Turn off the computer and disconnect the AC Adapter and any other
external device connectors.
2.
Close the display and carefully lay the computer upside down on a
padded surface.
3.
Slide the battery pack locking latch toward the
symbol.
4.
Holding the computer in one hand, carefully turn the computer right
side up and allow the battery pack to fall out of the computer into your
other hand.
(open padlock)
Note: The internal NiCad battery pack and its cover are built as one unit: do not try to
separate the cover from the battery pack. Do not short out the battery pack.
3-14 Getting Started
Handling the Battery Pack
You now can operate the computer solely on ac power via the AC Adapter, or you can
install a fully charged battery pack for battery operation.
Getting Started 3-15
Starting Your Computer
Your new TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer is shipped from the factory with
the following software already installed on the hard disk.
q
MS-DOS disk operating system, version 5.0
q
Microsoft Windows graphical environment, version 3.0, with the custom
Notebook group menu
q
BatteryPro battery power conservation utility package
q
Laptop File Manager
q
Laptop Manager applications control utility
q
RPAL palette utility and other software programs that make your
computer more powerful and easier to use.
Follow these steps to start your computer.
1.
If you have not done so, set up your computer for either battery
operation or AC Adapter operation as described earlier in this chapter.
2.
Set the computer power switch to the on (1) position. The TravelMate
3000 WinSX begins its internal memory checks and displays copyright
and version-number data.
Note: Do not turn the power switch off and on quickly. Leave the power off at least 5
seconds before turning it on again.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX then loads into memory the Windows memory driver,
BatteryPro, MS-DOS, and other utilities, displaying copyright and version-number
messages on the screen as each program loads. The computer then loads Windows and
displays its Program Manager and Main menus.
3-16 Getting Started
Starting Your Computer
Note: After Windows appears, try changing the setting of the standard/reverse video
switch for the most pleasing LCD image.
See the Microsoft Windows User's Guide furnished with your new computer for detailed
instructions on configuring and using the Windows program.
Getting Started 3-17
Restarting the Computer
You occasionally may want to return the system to its startup state without turning off the
power. This is called restarting or rebooting the system (sometimes called a warm boot,
as opposed to a cold boot, which involves turning the power off and on again).
Caution:
Any data In main memory (RAM) will be erased when you restart
the computer. Be sure to save the file you are working on before you restart the
computer.
To restart the computer, press and hold the Ctrl and Alt keys, then press the Del key and
release all three keys. The computer responds as if power was just turned on-it performs
an internal check, then loads MS-DOS from the hard disk. When restarting, the computer
bypasses the initial memory check it performs during a cold start.
3-18 Getting Started
Using the Floppy
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX floppy drive can read from and write to 3.5-inch, doublesided, high-density (2HD), 1.44 MB floppy diskettes-the equivalent of approximately 800
typed sheets. The floppy drive also can read/write to the lower capacity, 3.5-inch, 720
KB, double-density (2DD) floppies.
Before data can be stored on a new floppy, the operating system must first prepare-formatthe floppy. Formatting enables stored information to be easily located. During
formatting, the floppy is divided into circular tracks. Floppy formatting instructions are
included in the MS-DOS User's Guide and Reference furnished with your computer.
Taking Care of Your Floppies
To safeguard information stored on your floppies, you should handle floppies with the
following in mind.
Storage - Although your 3.5-inch floppies are housed in a durable plastic casing, keep all
floppies you are not using in a disk box to protect them against damage or loss. Plastic
disk boxes are available from most computer stores.
Labels - When you purchase blank floppies, labels are usually supplied. Get into the
habit of labeling your floppies with the names of the directories or programs and the date
you made the copy. This is particularly important when making backup floppies.
Access Shutter - The metal access shutter allows the disk head to read from and write to
the floppy. The shutter opens automatically when you insert the floppy into the drive. Do
not open the shutter manually; this exposes the delicate recording surface to dust.
Getting Started 3-19
Using the Floppy Drive
Write-Protect Tab - The write-protect tab is used to prevent changes being made
inadvertently to important files. To write-protect a floppy, slide the write-protect tab to
the open position; to allow the computer to write on the floppy, slide the tab to the closed
position.
Using Your Floppies
Follow these guidelines when handling your floppies:
3-20 Getting Started
q
When inserting a floppy into the floppy drive on the right front side of
your TravelMate 3000 WinSX, be sure the floppy clicks into place. An
improperly inserted floppy can damage both the drive and the floppy.
q
Never open the metal shutter. This exposes the recording surface of the
floppy to dust.
q
Keep floppies away from strong magnetic fields such as those generated
by audio system speakers and telephone handsets.
q
Never remove a floppy from the drive while the computer is reading
from or writing to the floppy. Be sure the Floppy Disk indicator light
above the keyboard is off.
Using the Floppy Drive
q
If a floppy appears to be damaged, make a copy of it, if you can, and
immediately discard the damaged floppy.
q
Before turning off the computer, always remove a floppy from the floppy
drive.
Inserting a Floppy Into the Drive
Insert a floppy diskette into the TravelMate 3000 WinSX floppy drive as follows.
1.
Insert the floppy into the drive slot with the label side up and the metalshutter end first.
2.
Gently push the floppy into the slot until the floppy clicks into place.
3.
To remove a floppy, press the eject button until the floppy pops out.
Cautions:
Failure to observe the following precautions can damage both the
data on the floppy and the floppy drive.
* Never remove a floppy from the drive while the indicator light on the floppy drive
and the Floppy Disk indicator light on the indicator panel are on.
* Always remove a floppy from the drive before turning off the computer.
Getting Started 3-21
TravelPoint Pointing Device
The compact, lightweight TravelPoint pointing device furnished with your new
TravelMate 3000 WinSX was developed as a mouse-like device to use in the palm of your
hand rather than rolling it around on a flat surface.
You also can attach the TravelPoint holder to the right side of the TravelMate 3000
WinSX and place the TravelPoint in the holder for use as a fixed pointer. TravelPoint
also is convenient to use for stand-up presentations and lectures, requiring only your
thumb for operation.
Installing TravelPoint
Install TravelPoint on your computer as follows.
1.
Turn off the computer and disconnect the AC Adapter from the rear of
the computer.
Note: You can connect TravelPoint to the computer while power is on, but you then
must press the Ctrl-Alt-Del keys (warm start) or cycle power so the computer recognizes
TravelPoint's presence.
2.
3-22 Getting Started
Connect the TravelPoint cable connector (with the flat side up) to the
round, six-pin mini-DIN connector on the computer's left side panel
shown below.
TravelPoint Pointing Device
3.
If you plan to use the TravelPoint holder, remove the Numeric Keypad
connector cover, attach the holder to the right side of the computer as
shown in the figure, and tighten the attachment screw.
4.
Reconnect the AC Adapter and turn on the computer. Your computer
warms up and displays the Microsoft Windows menus.
You now can use TravelPoint with Windows with no further action, but other application
programs may require adding the TIMOUSE device driver to your CONFIG.SYS file as
described later in this chapter.
Getting Started 3-23
TravelPoint Pointing Device
Using TravelPoint Controls and Indicators
Hold TravelPoint in your hand as shown in the figure, with the two round buttons facing
up and the cable coming out at the bottom of your hand. TravelPoint has four controls
and one indicator as shown in the following figure.
Roller Ball - Moving the roller ball with your thumb (or other digit) moves the pointer on
your computer screen just as if you were 'dragging' a conventional mouse about a flat
surface. Use sufficient thumb pressure to rotate the ball, but not so much as to be
uncomfortable. Rotate the ball in the direction you want to move the arrow (or other
cursor) on the screen. That is, slide your thumb to the left over the ball to move the cursor
to the left on the display, and slide your thumb upward over the ball to move the cursor
upward on the display.
Note: You can adjust the speed and sensitivity of the cursor movement on the display
in Windows by using the Control Panel menu Mouse box.
Point Button - The point button corresponds to the left (or main) button of a conventional
mouse. Press this button when you want to select an item you have pointed to on your
display. If a double click is directed, press the point button twice in quick succession.
3-24 Getting Started
TravelPoint Pointing Device
Alternate Button - The alternate button corresponds to the right button on a conventional
mouse. Press this button when your application program instructs you to press the
alternate button.
Drag Lock - The drag lock is a special square button enabling you to simulate 'dragging"
a mouse across the table (screen) while holding down a button. This lets you select and
move items without having to hold down a button and roll the ball at the same time.
Pressing any button turns off drag lock and the indicator light.
To drag an item or icon to a new location on the display, move the pointer to the displayed
item and then press the drag lock (the indicator described below comes on); next, rotate
the rollerball with your thumb in the direction you want to drag the item. When the item
is placed on the display where you want it, press any button to "release" the item.
Drag Lock Indicator - The drag lock indicator light comes on whenever you press the
drag lock button. The indicator turns off when you press any button.
Reassigning Drag Lock - You can reassign the drag lock button to work with the
alternate button (the right-hand round button) as follows: Press and hold the alternate
button, press the drag lock button once, and release the alternate button. To reassign the
drag lock function back to the point button: Press and hold the point button, press the drag
lock button once, and release the point button.
You should do this procedure any time you use your application program to switch
functions between the point button and the alternate button.
Getting Started 3-25
TravelPoint Pointing Device
Adjusting the TravelPoint Cursor
You can adjust the appearance (and color if you are using an external color monitor) and
speed of the TravelPoint cursor as follows.
Adjusting Appearance
You can adjust the shape and appearance of the TravelPoint cursor-the factory default
shape is an arrow-by using the Change Cursor feature at the Windows Notebook group
menu. To access the Change Cursor menu, use TravelPoint to point to the Change Cursor
icon and double click the point button.
Windows then displays the Change Cursor menu at which you can change the appearance
of the three Windows cursors or select the default cursors. Windows uses seven default
cursors for different purposes: an arrow, an hourglass, an I-beam, and four 'sizer' cursors.
Note: Change Cursor must always run in background so as to make the custom cursors
available for other Windows applications. Always exit the Change Cursor menu by
clicking on the Exit command in the File pulldown dialog box. This keeps Change
Cursor running in background. Do not use the Close command in the Control-menu box
unless you want to stop running Change Cursor and revert to the default cursors.
Refer to the TravelMate 3000 WinSX Battery Pro & Productivity Software Utilities User's
Manual furnished with your new computer for details on using the Change Cursor utility.
See the extensive Help displays available while using Windows for details on adjusting the
cursor. Also refer to the Microsoft Windows User's Guide for general information on
Windows and cursors.
3-26 Getting Started
TravelPoint Pointing Device
Adjusting Cursor Speed
You can adjust TravelPoint cursor speed, which is the time the pointer image reacts to
your manual commands. A faster speed may be better for menu operations: a slower
speed may be preferable for detailed work.
You can adjust speed while operating within Windows by selecting the Control Panel
from the Main Menu, double click on the mouse icon, and adjust speed up or down.
If you are operating in other application programs under the TravelPoint device driver,
you can adjust speed by typing, under the directory containing the mouse driver, the
command
TIMOUSE/Snn
and pressing the Enter key; where nn is a number between 10 and 100. A value of 10 is
the slowest speed, while 50 is medium speed, and 100 is the highest speed.
If you are operating -under a Microsoft mouse driver, see their documentation for
instructions on changing ballistic gain.
Installing Applications for Use With
TravelPoint
TravelPoint is compatible with Microsoft and PS/2, so you can use TravelPoint with any
software that uses the Microsoft and/or PS/2 mouse. When you install or set up your
software applications, the applications ask you what type input device you are using. If
TravelPoint is not listed as an option, select the IBM PS/2 mouse.
Getting Started 3-27
TravelPoint Pointing Device
Changing the CONFIG.SYS File
If one of your own application programs works with a mouse but you must supply the
mouse device driver, change the CONFIG.SYS file as follows using the furnished MSDOS Edit program or your own word processor.
If the CONFIG.SYS file is the original file delivered with your computer, delete the
characters REM and the space following on the last line of the file reading "REM
DEVICE=C:... etc."
If the file has been modified, add the following line to the
CONFIG.SYS file:
DEVICE=C:\UTILS\TIMOUSE.SYS
Note: Placement of this line in the file is not important to the TIMOUSE device driver
but may be to other drivers. Check your other documentation.
3-28 Getting Started
Getting Online Help
Your TravelMate 3000 WinSX offers a variety of easily accessed online help displays of
general and specific information to help you use your computer.
Microsoft Windows Help
Windows offers extensive onscreen help displays, accessible by clicking your TravelPoint
(or other mouse device) on the menus or by pressing the F1 key or the Alt-H keys at most
Windows menus. The Microsoft Windows User's Guide also is furnished with your new
TravelMate 3000 WinSX.
DOS Commands Description
You can view an MS-DOS help display by typing at the
MS-DOS C:\> prompt:
HELP
and pressing the Enter key.
This help file briefly describes most of the MS-DOS commands and their options and
switches. Press any key to page through the help display. To exit the help display, press
any key several times (up to four times).
For even more details on specific MS-DOS commands, at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt type
HELP plus a command name; for example
HELP COPY
displays a half screen of information about the COPY command. Of course, for the most
detailed information refer to the MS-DOS User's Guide and Reference furnished with
your new computer.
Getting Started 3-29
Getting Online Help
Note that you can add the Dos help file to your Laptop Manager main menu for quicker
access; see the BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual furnished with your
computer for instructions.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Utilities Description
You can view the Utilities Description help file by pressing the F1 key at the Laptop
Manager main menu, or by typing at the MS-DOS C:\> Prompt:
NBHELP
and pressing the Enter key.
This help file briefly describes most utility programs available under the UTILS directory.
See your BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual for more detailed
information about these utilities.
Press the F1 key at this help display for help in using or printing this help display. To exit
the help display press the Esc key.
3-30 Getting Started
4
Customizing Your Computer
This chapter tells you about:
q
How to enter and exit the Setup Program to customize your TravelMate
3000 WinSX Notebook Computer
q
Using the Setup Program to configure the computer for your operating
environment
Contents
Accessing the Setup Program ..................................................................................... 4-3
Disk-Based Setup Program.................................................................................. 4-3
Windows-Based Setup Program........................................................................... 4-4
ROM-Based Setup Program ................................................................................ 4-4
Making Selections on the Menus......................................................................... 4-4
Exiting the Disk and ROM Setup Programs ........................................................ 4-5
Exiting the Windows-Based Setup Program ........................................................ 4-6
System Options, Page 1.............................................................................................. 4-7
Clock .............................................................................................................. 4-7
Time ............................................................................................................ 4-7
Date ............................................................................................................. 4-7
Date Display................................................................................................. 4-8
Memory .............................................................................................................. 4-8
Standard Memory......................................................................................... 4-8
Extended Memory ........................................................................................ 4-8
Shadow ROM............................................................................................... 4-8
Unused Memory ........................................................................................... 4-9
Guidelines for Allocating Memory................................................................ 4-9
Diskette Drives.................................................................................................. 4-10
Diskette A .................................................................................................. 4-10
Diskette B .................................................................................................. 4-10
Hard Disk Drives .............................................................................................. 4-10
Hard Disk 1................................................................................................ 4-10
Hard Disk 2................................................................................................ 4-11
User Features, Page 2............................................................................................... 4-12
Customizing Your Computer 4-1
Contents
Power Savings................................................................................................... 4-12
Timeout Interval......................................................................................... 4-13
Timeout Action .......................................................................................... 4-13
Wakeup Interval......................................................................................... 4-14
Wakeup Action........................................................................................... 4-14
Cover Closed Action................................................................................... 4-14
HDD Motor Timeout .................................................................................. 4-14
Default CPU Speed..................................................................................... 4-15
LCD Power ................................................................................................ 4-15
Screen ............................................................................................................ 4-16
CRT type.................................................................................................... 4-17
Display Mode ............................................................................................. 4-17
Cursor Type ............................................................................................... 4-17
Keyboard........................................................................................................... 4-18
Caps Lock .................................................................................................. 4-18
Num. Lock ................................................................................................. 4-18
Scroll Lock................................................................................................. 4-18
Repeat Rate ................................................................................................ 4-18
System Configurations ...................................................................................... 4-18
Battery Alarm............................................................................................. 4-18
Cover Alarm .............................................................................................. 4-19
Quick Boot ................................................................................................. 4-19
External Communications, Page 3............................................................................ 4-20
Parallel Port ...................................................................................................... 4-20
TravelPoint ....................................................................................................... 4-20
Standard Comm ................................................................................................ 4-21
Baud Rate................................................................................................... 4-21
Data Bits .................................................................................................... 4-21
Stop Bits..................................................................................................... 4-21
Parity ......................................................................................................... 4-21
CTS (Clear to Send) ................................................................................... 4-21
DSR (Data Set Ready) ................................................................................ 4-22
DCD (Data Carrier Detect)......................................................................... 4-22
Option Comm ................................................................................................... 4-22
4-2 Customizing Your Computer
Accessing the Setup Program
You can customize many computer operating parameters so that your Texas Instruments
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer always powers up with your settings. You
can access any of the three Setup Programs to specify hardware and software
configurations. The Setup Program factory default settings are satisfactory for most
working environments and applications, but you can select the settings best for your
operating environment.
The program is divided into three pages: the first page lists system operating options; the
second page covers user features; and the third page lists external communication
parameters.
You can press the F1 key to get context-sensitive help displays for each Setup Program
page.
Disk-Based Setup Program
One Setup Program is resident on the hard disk under the UTILS directory. You should
use this disk-based Setup Program in almost all cases.
You can access the hard disk-based Setup Program one of two ways: At the MS-DOS C:\>
prompt, press the Fn-Esc (Set Up) keys. This executes the SET-UP command in the
UTILS directory and displays the first Setup Program menu page.
You also can access this Setup Program by typing at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt
SET_UP
and pressing the Enter key. The program loads and displays the first page of the Setup
Program.
Customizing Your Computer 4-3
Accessing the Setup Program
Windows-Based Setup Program
You can also access a condensed version of the Setup Program from the Windows
Notebook menu (the first page categories are omitted). You can click on the categories
and items to make your changes and selections.
To view help displays describing each item, click on the menu bar Help item, or press the
F1 key.
ROM-Based Setup Program
The third Setup Program is resident on the internal ROM (read-only memory) and is
identical to the hard disk-based program, except that no help displays are available. You
should access this version of the program only if a major configuration error prevents the
computer from booting.
You can also access the ROM-based Setup Program directly from most application
programs (but not Windows) by pressing the Ctrl-Alt-Esc keys.
Making Selections on the Menus
You can use the keyboard keys summarized in the following table at the disk- and ROMbased Setup Program menus.
4-4 Customizing Your Computer
Accessing the Setup Program
Disk and ROM Setup Program Key Functions
Key
+, Space Bar, →
-, ←
Tab
Shift-Tab
↓
↑
Home
End
PgDn
PgUp
F1*
F2
Esc
Function
select next available value for highlighted item
select previous available value for highlighted item
move highlight to first item in next category
move highlight to first item in previous category
move highlight to next item
move highlight to previous item
move highlight to first category on current page
move highlight to last category on current page
show next menu page
show previous menu page
show help display for this page
show system information display
show exit menu
*Not available with the ROM-based program.
Pressing the F1 key displays a context-sensitive Help screen briefly describing each item.
(The Help screen is not available if you entered the Setup Program by pressing the CtrlAlt-Esc keys.)
Pressing the F2 (Sys Info) key displays an informational screen listing the computer's
firmware version numbers, coprocessor type (if installed), port addresses (in
hexadecimal), and option Rom data.
Exiting the Disk and ROM Setup Programs
When you have completed your Rom-based or disk-based Setup Program settings, press
the Esc key. The system then displays a menu prompting you for one of the following
choices:
q
Press the Ese key to quit the exit menu and remain in the Setup
Program.
q
Press the F4 key to save your settings and exit the Setup Program. The
computer will restart.
Customizing Your Computer 4-5
Accessing the Setup Program
q
Press the F5 key to set all items to the factory default and remain in the
Setup Program. This also automatically sets the Hard Disk type in the
Setup Program to the type of hard disk installed in your computer.
q
Press the F6 key to discard any changes you may have made and return
to MS-DOS without updating.
Exiting the Windows-Based Setup Program
When you have completed your Setup Program settings, click on the word File on the
menu bar (or press the Alt-F keys) and then click on the word Exit. If you have made any
changes to the Setup Program paramters, Windows displays an exit menu at which you
can click on the three buttons to save, not save, or cancel the exit request and return to the
Setup menu. Windows returns to the Notebook menu unless you click on the cancel
option.
Each item on the Setup Program menus is described on the following pages.
4-6 Customizing Your Computer
System Options, Page 1
When you first load the Setup Program, it displays page of the three-page Setup Program.
Clock
The computer has a battery-operated clock that keeps track of the time and date. This
category enables you to set or correct the current time and date.
Time
This item sets the current time. When seconds are highlighted, pressing the Space Bar
resets seconds to 00.
Date
This item specifies the current date. The day of the week (Mon, Tue, Wed ... ) is set
automatically when you select the date.
Customizing Your Computer 4-7
System Options, Page 1
Date Display
This item enables you to choose either the U.S. 12-hour or European 24-hour time display.
Memory
The memory category specifies the type and amount of memory and how you want
memory allocated in the computer.
Standard Memory
This item specifies the amount of memory to allocate to the main memory. Select the 640
KB value unless your application program specifically requires a different value.
Extended Memory
This item specifics the amount of memory to allocate to the processor's extended memory
system. Extended memory is directly addressed by application programs that use a high
memory manager or by IBM's OS/2TM operating system. EMS emulation drivers such as
EMM386 supplied by MS-DOS use this memory to emulate LIM 4.0 memory. Some MSDOS programs can use this memory directly. The factory default value is 3328 KB with
the standard 4 MB memory and 5376 KB with the optional 6 MB memory.
Shadow ROM
This item selects whether or not to use shadow ROM in the computer. If set to YES (128
KB), the BIOS (basic input/output system) is loaded into faster Extended RAM memory
when the computer boots. The BIOS and your application programs then operate much
faster. Select the YES (I 28 KB) setting unless your application program needs the 128
KB this feature uses. The factory default is YES.
4-8 Customizing Your Computer
System Options, Page 1
Unused Memory
This item is informational, showing the amount of memory not currently allocated to the
other memory items. Unused memory should always equal 0 (zero). Use the guidelines
for allocating memory in the next section to make the Unused item equal 0.
Guidelines for Allocating Memory
Consider the following guidelines when allocating memory among the memory items.
1.
Set Shadow ROM to Yes unless your application program needs the 128
KB that Shadow ROM uses.
2.
Move the highlight to the memory item you want to reduce and press the
Space bar to select the new value you want. Note that the difference is
added to the Unused item value.
3.
Move the highlight to the memory item you want to increase and press
the Space bar to select the new value you want. Note that the difference
is subtracted from the Unused item value.
4.
Check that the Unused item equals 0 (zero). If not, repeat steps 2 and 3
as necessary.
Note: Do not exit the Setup Program with the Unused item showing any value except
0. Allocate memory to the other memory items until Unused equals 0; otherwise, the
computer will report an error condition the next time you try to start it.
Customizing Your Computer 4-9
System Options, Page 1
When you start (boot or reboot) the TravelMate 3000 WinSX, the Setup Program checks
the total memory available. If your settings exceed total available memory, the computer
displays an error message the next time it boots, asking you to run the 'SET_UP" program.
Press the Enter key, follow the prompts, and check your memory settings.
Diskette Drives
The Diskette category enables you to select the type of floppy in use. The settings
available are 5.25" 360 KB, 5.25" 1.2 MB, 3.5" 720 KB, and 3.5" 1.44 MB, or Not
Installed.
Diskette A
This item specifies the standard floppy drive (drive A) installed in your computer. Set
Diskette A to 3.5" 1.44 MB (the factory default) unless you are using an external drive you
want to address as drive A that requires a different setting.
Diskette B
Set this item to Not Installed unless you have an external floppy drive connected to your
computer. Then set this item to match the external drive, and address the external drive
as drive B. The default is Not Installed.
Hard Disk Drives
The Hard Disk category specifies the built-in hard disk drive and a future external hard
disk option.
Hard Disk 1
The Hard Disk 1 category is the standard built-in 60 MB hard disk drive. The system sets
this category automatically; you should never have to reset it from Type 34 unless you
replace the standard disk drive.
4- 1 0 Customizing Your Computer
System Options, Page 1
Hard Disk 2
The Hard Disk 2 category is provided to configure a future hard disk drive option or thirdparty drive. If you connect an external Type 48 drive, you must also set the Cylinders,
Heads, Write Precompensation, Landing Zone, and Sectors items.
The other items in this category are automatically set with any type except the Type 48
setting.
The drive types are summarized in the following table.
Hard Disk Drive Sizes
Type
2
33
34
35
36
48
Size (nominal)
20 MB
40 MB
60 MB (default)
30 MB
80 MB
define custom size
Customizing Your Computer 4-1 1
User Features, Page 2
Press the Fn-dd (PgDn) keys to continue to page 2 of the Setup Program. Page 2 provides
power-savings, display control, keyboard-lock, and alarm configuration categories.
Power Savings
The Power Savings category enables you to specify the timeout (or delay) period of several
power-saving functions. This category is designed to help you gain the most computer
run-time from a battery charge.
As you may notice from the categories, a time-out interval and action is provided, along
with a wakeup interval and action. The time-out function turns off the selected devices
after a selected time interval. The wakeup function turns on the selected devices-if no
keyboard or mouse activity occurs that would turn them on-after a selected time interval.
4-12 Customizing Your Computer
User Features, Page 2
Note: See the BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual for more information
on getting the most computer run-time from a battery charge.
Timeout Interval
After a selected period of no input from the keyboard or the TravelPoint, the system
automatically turns off the display and/or enters a low power mode-called Auto Suspend
mode-which is similar to the Standby mode invoked by pressing the Stndby (Fn-F4) keys.
However, in the auto suspend mode, you can reactivate the computer by any TravelPoint
movement and by pressing almost any key (the Shift key is recommended because it does
not cause any inadvertent action when pressed by itself). In the Standby mode, you can
reactivate the computer only by again pressing the Stndby (Fn-F4) keys.
The Timeout Interval item sets the time delay period. The values are 1, 2, 5, 10, 15
Minutes, and Always On. The default setting is 2 Minutes.
Timeout Action
This item selects if only the LCD turns off (the Backlight Off setting) after the selected
Timeout Interval, or the computer enters the low power mode (the Auto Suspend setting).
In the Auto Suspend mode, the LCD turns off and the Cm enters a low power mode. On
ac power, the action is Backlight Off even if Auto Suspend is selected.
Pressing any key on the keyboard-preferably the Shift key-returns the computer to full
operation. Auto Suspend is the default setting.
Customizing Your Computer 4-13
User Features, Page 2
Wakeup Interval
The Wakeup Interval item sets the time delay period for the Wakeup Action described
below. The values are 5, 10, 15, and 20 Minutes. The default setting is 10 Minutes.
Wakeup Action
The Wakeup Action item selects if the LCD comes on when the Wakeup Interval period
ends (Backlight On) or if the LCD remains off (Backlight Off) when the computer "wakes
up.' The default is Backlight On. On ac power, Wakeup Action is disabled.
Cover Closed Action
If you close the display/cover with computer power still turned on, you can select how the
computer reacts. The Backlight Off setting turns off the LCD.
The Suspend setting causes the computer to beep about 10 seconds (unless you turn off the
beeper at the Cover Alarm item described later under 'System Configurations'). The
computer then enters the Suspend mode, in which the LCD and the hard disk drive turn
off.
If you select the Disable setting, the computer does not react: it remains on and
continuously beeps.
The default setting is Suspend. The computer beeps in any case when you close the cover
if the Cover Alarm item is On.
HDD Motor Timeout
To conserve battery charge life, you can set the hard disk motor to turn off automatically
after a period of no accesses to the hard disk. Delay times available are 1, 2, 5, and 10
minutes. You also can select the Always On setting which cancels the time out. The
default setting is 5 minutes.
4-14 Customizing Your Computer
User Features, Page 2
Note: Although turning off the hard disk when not in use conserves battery charge life,
you may note slower disk access times because the computer must wait for the disk motor
to reach operating speed before accessing data.
Default CPU Speed
This item specifies the CPU speed used when the computer boots. The default setting is
High. The Low setting corresponds to 5 MHz CPU speed, Medium to 10 MHz, and High
to 20 MHz. The lower speeds increase battery charge life but may slow processing of
some application programs.
The Auto setting adjusts the computer to operate as follows.
q
When operated on ac power, the computer sets the CPU speed to 20
MHz when it powers up.
q
When operated on battery power, the computer sets the CPU speed to 10
MHz when it powers up.
Note:
drive.
CPU speed always reverts to 5 MHz when the computer accesses the floppy
You also can change CPU speed while the computer is running by using the SPEED
Utility (described in your BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual) at the MSDOS prompt. And you can use the speed keys: Ctrl-Alt-uu and Ctrl-Alt-dd that set CPU
speed higher and lower, respectively, or you can use the Turbo key (Fn-F5) to change
CPU speed to 20 MHz. The SPEED utility and the speed keys all override the Auto
setting described above.
LCD Power
This item specifies the sharpness of, and power used by, theLCD screen. The default
setting is Medium.
Customizing Your Computer 4-15
User Features, Page 2
Low - The LCD consumes the least power at the Low setting. This setting delivers the
best combination of video and CPU performance, and some application programs may
require this setting for compatibility.
Medium - The LCD consumes more power at this setting but produces a sharper image.
High - The LCD consumes the most power at this setting but produces the sharpest
image.
Auto - Under the Auto setting the computer operates as follows.
q
When operated on ac power, the computer sets the LCD Power to
Medium.
q
When operated on battery power, the computer sets the LCD Power to
Low.
When you are using graphics programs with icons (for example, Microsoft Windows),
select a higher setting to increase sharpness.
Screen
The Screen category enables you to select several operating features for the built-in LCD
screen or for an external monitor connected to your TravelMate 3000 WinSX. The
computer automatically powers up using the built-in LCD. Switch to your external
monitor by entering ALTVID or CRT at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt.
Caution:
Before connecting or disconnecting an external monitor to your
computer, turn off power to both A the computer and the monitor to prevent possible
electrostatic discharge damage to both devices.
4-16 Customizing Your Computer
User Features, Page 2
CRT Type
If you have an external monitor connected to your TravelMate 3000 WinSX, set this item
to match your external monitor. This item does not affect your built-in LCD screen. The
possible settings are VGA Color, Multiscan, and VGA Mono (black and white). The
default is VGA Color. The TravelMate 3000 WinSX supports the following types of
external monitors.
q
Multiscanning monitors covering 15.75 to 31.5 kHz, 50 to 70 Hz
q
31 kHz/70 Hz (400/200 line mode), 60 Hz (480 line mode) IBM PS/2
(VGA) monitors
You must select the appropriate monitor device driver tomatch your external monitor and
your application program. Most applications using 640-by-480 resolution do not require a
device driver. Applications requiring super VGA (800 by 600 or 1024 by 768) also
require an appropriate device driver. See your BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's
Manual for more details.
Display Mode
This item selects the display mode for either the built-in LCD screen or a connected
external monitor. Possible setting are VGA Mode, EGA Mode, CGA Mode, MDA Mode,
or, for external monitors only, HGC Mode. Select the setting required by your LCD or
external monitor and/or application program. The default setting is VGA Mode.
Cursor Type
You can change the shape of the cursor to one of the following settings: Underline,
Underbar, or Block. The default setting is Block.
Customizing Your Computer 4-17
User Features, Page 2
Keyboard
This category specifies the state of the three lock keys and the key repeat rate (also called
the typematic feature) when you turn on the computer.
Caps Lock
This item specifies the power-up state of the Caps Lock key. The possible settings are On
or Off. The default setting is Off.
Num Lock
This item specifies the power-up state of the NumLk key (FnF7). The possible settings
are On or Off. The default setting is On.
Scroll Lock
This item specifies the power-up state of the ScrLk key. The possible settings are On or
Off. The default setting is Off.
Repeat Rate
This item specifies the key repeat ratc-also called the typematic rate-that is, the speed at
which a character repeats on the screen when you press and hold down a key. The
possible settings are Fast, Slow, and Normal. The default setting is Normal.
System Configurations
This category specifies various settings concerning the system configuration.
Battery Alarm
This item enables you to turn off the audible alarm that sounds for the low-battery
condition with the computer power on. The possible settings are On or Off. The default
setting is On.
4-18 Customizing Your Computer
User Features, Page 2
Cover Alarm
This item enables you to turn off the audible alarm that sounds if the cover is closed when
computer power is on. The possible settings are On or Off. The default setting is On.
Quick Boot
This item selects quick loading of the system. When this item is set to On, the system
bypasses some of the power up self checks (including memory check) when you turn on
the computer. The possible settings are On or Off. The default setting is On.
Customizing Your Computer 4-19
External Communications, Page 3
Press the Fn-dd (PgDn) keys to continue to page 3 of the Setup Program. Page 3 provides
communication-configuration categories.
Parallel Port
This item assigns the 25-pin parallel port on the left side panel to LPT1 (or disables the
port). The default setting is LPT1. If you are not using the port, set this item to Disabled
to conserve battery power.
TravelPoint
This item enables you to turn on/off the six-pin mini-DIN TravelPoint port on the left side
panel. The default setting is On. Leave this item set to On if you are using TravelPoint
connected to the port. The Off setting conserves battery power, and you must select Off if
you connect a mouse to the nine-pin serial port.
4-20 Customizing Your Computer
External Communications, Page 3
Standard Comm
This item assigns the standard nine-pin serial port (sometimes called the SIO for serial
input/output) on the left side of the computer case as Port 1 (or disables the port). The
default setting is Port 1. The Disable setting conserves battery power if you are not using
this port.
Set the following communication parameters to meet the requirements of the serial device
connected to the serial port.
Baud Rate
Possible Baud Rate settings are 110, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, or 9600 bits per
second (bps). The default setting is 9600.
Data Bits
Possible Data Bits settings are 7 data bits or 8 data bits. The default setting is 8.
Stop Bits
Possible Stop Bits settings are I stop bit or 2 stop bits. The default setting is 1.
Parity
Possible settings are None, Odd, or Even parity. The default setting is None.
CTS (Clear to Send)
The RS-232C clear to send (CTS) signal can be forced on for application programs
requiring this signal. Possible settings are Normal and Force On. The default setting is
Normal.
Customizing Your Computer 4-21
External communications, Page 3
DSR (Data Set Ready)
The RS-232C data set ready (DSR) signal can be forced on for application programs
requiring this signal. Possible settings are Normal and Force On. The default setting is
Normal.
DCD (Data Carrier Detect)
The RS-232C data carrier detect (DCD) signal can be forced on for application programs
requiring this signal. Possible settings are Normal and Force On. The default setting is
Normal.
Option Comm
The Option Comm(unication) category defines the communications settings for a second
serial port if your computer is equipped with the optional Internal Modem.
Possible settings for the Option Comm item are Port 2 and Disable. The default setting is
Disable. The Disable setting conserves battery power. Select the Disable setting if the
Internal Modem option is not installed in your computer.
Set the other communication items (Baud Rate, Data Bits ... ) to meet the requirements of
your communication application program and/or the host that will be connected to your
computer.
4-22 Customizing Your Computer
5
Installing and Using Application Programs
This chapter tells you about
q
Guidelines for loading IBM AT-compatible application programs
q
How to set up and use the furnished Laptop Manager program for your
operating environment
Contents
Guidelines for Installing Applications ........................................................................ 5-2
Installation Considerations.................................................................................. 5-2
Display......................................................................................................... 5-2
Keyboard...................................................................................................... 5-2
Communication Ports ................................................................................... 5-2
Processing Speed.......................................................................................... 5-3
Memory........................................................................................................ 5-3
AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS Files ........................................................ 5-4
Default AUTOEXEC.BAT File .................................................................... 5-4
Default CONFIG.SYS File ........................................................................... 5-6
Using Laptop Manager............................................................................................... 5-7
Laptop Manager Main Menu............................................................................... 5-7
Quick Commands Box.................................................................................. 5-8
Single-Character Quick Commands.............................................................. 5-8
Using Microsoft Windows.......................................................................................... 5-9
Using a Password..................................................................................................... 5-10
Loading the Password Utility............................................................................. 5-10
Installing a Password ........................................................................................ 5-11
Changing a Password ........................................................................................ 5-12
Removing a Password ....................................................................................... 5-13
Entering the Password....................................................................................... 5-14
Installing and Using Application Programs 5-1
Guidelines for Installing Applications
Your TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer is fully compatible with IBM AT
computers. All application programs written to execute on AT computers will execute on
the TravelMate 3000 WinSX, and you can install the programs in much the same way on
the TravelMate 3000 WinSX. However, as with most computers, you must consider the
characteristics of the TravelMate 3000 WinSX before you install application programs.
Installation Considerations
The following configuration items will influence how you in l stall application programs
into your TravelMate 3000 WinSX (or any computer).
Display
The Texas Instruments TravelMate 3000 WinSX has an 80column by 25-line display with
640-by-480 (VGA) resolution and four other lower-resolution displays. When installing
an application program, select the highest-resolution monitor configuration that both the
program and the TravelMate 3000 WinSX can support.
Keyboard
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX keyboard emulates all functions of an IBM AT- 1 0 1
enhanced keyboard. When installing an application program, select the IBM 101 or ATenhanced keyboard configuration.
Communication Ports
The serial port is Port 1, and the optional Internal Modem, if installed, is Port 2. When
installing an application program requiring communication support, select Port 1 or Port
2, as appropriate.
5-2 Installing and Using Application Programs
Guidelines for Installing Applications
Processing Speed
Some application programs do not execute at the high speed (20 MHz) available with the
TravelMate 3000 WinSX. Check the program documentation for the required processing
speed and, if necessary, change the speed using one of the following methods.
q
Using the Setup Program (see Chapter 4)
q
By pressing the Ctrl-Alt-uu or Ctrl-Alt-dd keys.
q
By pressing the Fn-F5 (Turbo) keys.
q
Using the SPEED utility described in your BatteryPro & Productivity
Software User's Manual.
q
With the Laptop Manager Change menu process described in your
BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual.
If you use the Laptop Manager utility to load your application programs, you can
configure Laptop Manager to load the program with all necessary settings. Then you do
not have to change the Setup Program settings each time you load a different application
program that requires a different processing speed.
Memory
The standard TravelMate 3000 WinSX has 4 MB of memory, 640 KB of system memory
plus 3328 KB of extended memory. You can add 2 MB of additional optional memory to
your TravelMate 3000 WinSX that can be configured either as extended memory or LIM
EMS (expanded) memory. See Appendix F for details on these two types of memory.
Installing and Using Application Programs 5-3
Guidelines for Installing Applications
AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS Files
If your application program requires additions or changes to the TravelMate 3000 winsx's
AuToExEc.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files-as suggested several times in this chapter and
other chapters of this manual-carefully consider the consequences that may result from
changes or deletions to these two files. The factory-installed (default) files are listed and
described in the following two sections.
Please read and understand these two files before you change them. See the MS-DOS
User's Guide and Reference furnished with your TravelMate 3000 WinSX for more
details on constructing these files and their significance.
Note: If you need to restore the default AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files to
your hard disk, they are included on the BatteryPro & Productivity Software floppy
furnished with your computer.
Default AUTOEXEC.BAT File
Each line of the AUTOEXEC.BAT file and its purpose are defined in the table following
the file listing.
@ECHO OFF
PROMPT $P$G
PATH=C:\WINDOWS;C:\UTILS;C:\;C:\DOS
SET TEMP=C:\DOS
SET COMSPEC=C:\DOS\COMMAND.COM
SET MFILE=C:\UTILS
REM = To run RPAL, remove the REM from the RPAL line REM
REM RPAL /I
GETSTAT /B
IF ERRORLEVEL -1 COTO BATTERY
COTO DONE
:BATTERY
VERIFY ON
:DONE
MPOWER OFF >NUL
REM
REM = To run LM, remove the REM from the LM line and REM = place a REM in front
of WIN/3.
REM
REM LM
WIN /3
5-4 Installing and Using Application Programs
Guidelines for Installing Applications
Line
1
2
3
4
5
6
7, 8, 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18, 19,
20,21
22
23
Factory Default AUTOEXEC.BAT File
Purpose
turns off echoing (displaying) of commands on screen
tells MS-DOS to display the current drive and directory
defines the directories and order in which to search for files entered on
the command line; you can add additional directories to this line as
required
set environment variable-some programs use for temporary files
tells MS-DOS where to find the command processor
tells Laptop Manager in which directory to find its data file; this line is
required by Laptop Manager
comment block describing the palette control program
deleting the REM enables RPAL, a color palette control program, to
install
determines whether computer on ac or battery power and turns
on command that verifies files are correctly written to disk
turns off modem if installed
comment block describing the Laptop Manager (LM) program
deleting the REM enables Laptop Manager to install
loads Windows to run in 386 enhanced mode and displays its Program
Manager and Main menu
Installing and Using Application Programs 5-5
Guidelines for Installing Applications
Default CONFIG.SYS File
Each line of the TravelMate 3000 WinSX default CONFIG.SYS file and its purpose are
defined in the table following the file listing. You can add commands required by your
application program(s), but do not delete the existing default commands.
DEVICE=C:\DOS\SETVER.EXE
DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS
DOS-HTGH
FILES=30
BUFFERS=30
STACKS=0,0
FCBS-I
SHELL=C:\DOS\COMMAND.COM /P /E:256
DEVICE=C:\DOS\SMARTDRV.SYS 2048 1024
DEVICE=C:\UTILS\BATTERY.PRO
INSTALL=C:\D0S\FAST0PEN.EXE C:=(60,30)
REM To enable the TI mouse unREM the line containing
TIMOUSE.SYS
REM DEVICE=C:\UTILS\TIMOUSE.SYS
Factory Default CONFIG.SYS File
(Modify but do not delete these commnand lines)
Line
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
5-6 Installing and Using Application Programs
Purpose
tells some applications current DOS version
installs extended memory manager device driver
loads MS-DOS into extended memory
tells MS-Dos how many files can be open at any one time; you can
adjust the value as required by your application
tells MS-DOS how many buffers will be used for file input/ output; you
can adjust the value as required by your application to maximize
processing speed
reserves memory for MS-DOS to process hardware interrupts
number of file control blocks MS-DOS can concurrently open
tells applications path to command processor
installs device driver that creates disk cache in extended memory with
initial and minimum cache sizes
loads the device driver used to save battery power
loads the fastopen command, which decreases time needed to open files
and directories
comment line describing the TIMoUSE mouse driver
delete the REM to enable the mouse device driver to install
Using Laptop Manager
Laptop Manager, one of the utilities installed on the hard disk at the factory, is an
application control program. The program also is furnished on the BatteryPro &
Productivity Software diskette.
Laptop Manager provides two submenus into which you can insert your own application
programs you have installed on the hard disk. You can then load application programs
from one of the submenus with one keystroke, and from the other submenu using the
arrow keys and the Enter key.
Note: Do not confuse Laptop Manager with the Laptop File Manager program also
furnished with your computer and described in the TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook
Computer BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual furnished with your new
computer.
Laptop Manager Main Menu
The Laptop Manager main menu enables you to select application programs with one
keystroke. Procedures for adding items to the Applications list and Quick Commands box
are described in the BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual furnished with
your computer.
Pressing the F12 key at the Laptop Manager main menu loads the Laptop Manager
Change Menu screen. It enables you to add, delete, or modify items on the main menu.
Procedures for using the Change Menu are provided in the BatteryPro & Productivity
Software User's Manual.
To exit Laptop Manager to the MS-DOS prompt from the Laptop Manager main menu,
press the Esc key.
Installing and Using Application Programs 5-7
Using Laptop Manager
To return to the Laptop Manager main menu from the MS-DOS C:\> prompt, type
LM
and press the Enter key.
Quick Commands Box
You can select application programs you add to the Quick Commands box by pressing the
function key (F1 to F 11) you assign to it. The Laptop File Manager and several other
utilities are assigned to the function keys at the factory, but you can replace them with
your own application programs using the Change Menu procedure explained in the
BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual.
Pressing the F1 key displays the Utilities Description help displays described in Chapter 3
of this manual.
Single-Character Quick Commands
At the bottom of the Laptop Manager menu Quick Commands box are two singlecharacter commands:
q
Press the D key and Laptop Manager displays a prompt at the bottom of
the screen at which you can enter MS-DOS commands of up to 67
characters. Pressing the Enter key starts the command. When the
command is executed, pressing any key returns you to the Laptop
Manager main menu.
q
Press the P key and Laptop Manager displays a prompt at the bottom of
the screen at which you can change drives and/or directories. For
example, you can change from the C:\ prompt to the A:\ prompt by
typing P and A: and pressing the Enter key. Note that the C:\ prompt
at the bottom left corner of the menu changes to an A:\ prompt.
5-8 Installing and Using Application Programs
Using Microsoft Windows
In addition to Microsoft Windows' application programs, you can set up Windows to
access your own application programs. After installing your application programs on your
TravelMate 3000 WinSX, click on the Windows Setup icon at the Main menu. At the
Windows Setup menu, click on the Options submenu, where you can choose the "Set Up
Applications..." option.
Windows then displays a dialog box at which you can ask Windows to search all drives on
the TravelMate 3000 WinSX for application programs. Click on OK and Windows then
will search drive C and display yet another dialog box for you to choose which
applications you want Windows to set up for loading from Windows icons. See your
Microsoft Windows User's Guide if you need more information.
Caution:
When you want to exit Windows, use the Shutdown icon on the
Windows Program Manager menu, or be sure to exit and save each application
program running in Windows. Otherwise, you could damage software and the hard
disk drive. Refer to the BatteryPro and Windows manuals for details.
Installing and Using Application Programs 5-9
Using a Password
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX provides the Password utility, a program that limits access
to your computer. Only those who know the password you specify using this utility can
access your files. The password is valid until you remove or change it using the Password
utility.
In addition, Laptop Manager also provides password protection on a per-application
program basis. See the BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's Manual for more
information about the Password feature for Laptop Manager.
Loading the Password Utility
Load the Password utility as follows.
1.
At the MS-DOS C:\> prompt, type
PW
and press the Enter key. The following Password Utility menu displays:
From the Password Utility menu you can install, change or remove a password, or you can
exit the menu.
2.
To select a Password command, move the highlight to the desired
command using the uu key or the dd key and press the Enter key, or
press the initial character of the prompt (for example, I for Install, C for
Change...
5- 10 Installing and Using Application Programs
Using a Password
Installing a Password
Install a password as follows.
1.
Highlight Install Password on the Password Utility menu and press the
Enter key. The following menu displays:
2.
Type a password of up to eight characters and press the Enter key.
3.
Press the Enter key again to install the new password, or press the Esc
key to cancel the action and return to the Password Utility menu.
If you have already installed a password, when you select Install Password, the computer
displays the following message:
Password already exists
Press any key on the keyboard to return to the Password Utility menu.
Installing and Using Application Programs 5-11
Using a Password
Changing a Password
Change the current password as follows.
1.
Highlight the Change Password command on the Password Utility menu
and press the Enter key. The following menu displays:
2.
Type the current password and press the Enter key.
If you type the correct password, the message
Password check OK
displays on the next fine and you are prompted to enter a new password.
If you type the wrong password, the message
Incorrect Password
displays on the next line and you are prompted to press any key to return
to the Password Utility menu. You can try to change the password
again, or you can exit the Password Utility menu by selecting Exit.
3.
Type a new password of up to eight characters and press the Enter key.
4.
Press the Enter key again to install the new password, or press the Esc
key to abort the process and return to the Password Utility menu.
5-12 Installing and Using Apphcation Programs
Using a Password
Removing a Password
Remove the current password as follows.
1.
Highlight the Remove Password command on the Password Utility
menu and press the Enter key. The following menu displays:
2.
Type the current password and press the Enter key. If you type the
correct password, the message
Password check OK
displays on the next line. Press the Enter key to remove the current
password, or press the Esc key to abort the process and return to the
Password Utility menu.
If you type the wrong password, the message
Incorrect Password
displays on the next line, and you are prompted to press any key to
return to the Password Utility menu. You can try to remove the
password again, or you can exit the Password Utility menu by selecting
Exit.
Installing and Using Application Programs 5-13
Using a Password
Entering the Password
Once you install the password, you will see the following message every time you start up
the computer:
Enter Password:
Type your password in uppercase or lowercase letters and press the Enter key.
q
If you type the correct password, the screen clears and the system begins
to load.
q
If you type the wrong password, the message 'Wrong Password"
displays, and you are prompted to enter the password again. You have
three chances to enter the correct password. If you enter the wrong
password three times, the system locks and the computer starts beeping.
If this happens, turn off the computer, wait 5 seconds, and turn it on
again. This time, you have only one chance to enter the correct
password before the system locks.
q
If you enter the correct password after several incorrect passwords, the
following message displays:
Enter Password: * * * * *
Previous invalid password attempts = q
Press any key to continue
This message shows how many times (up to three) the computer has
been turned off and on to attempt to enter the password since you last
entered the correct password.
Once you enter the correct password, you again have three chances to
enter the password at the next system start-up.
5-14 Installing and Using Application Programs
Using a Password
Always make a note of the password you installed in case you forget it.
Store the password note in a secure place away from where you store or
operate your computer.
Caution:
If you forget the system password, you will not be able to use your
computer. To regain access, it is necessary to send your computer to a Texas
Instruments Service facility (see back of manual). This operation is not covered by
warranty.
Installing and Using Application Programs 5-15
6
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
This chapter tells you about:
q
Options available for your Texas Instruments TravelMate 3000 WinSX
Notebook Computer
q
How to install and use some of the options
Contents
Numeric Keypad ........................................................................................................ 6-2
Attaching the Keypad.......................................................................................... 6-2
RAM Modules ........................................................................................................... 6-3
Installing the RAM Modules ............................................................................... 6-3
Removing the Keyboard ............................................................................... 6-3
Installing the Modules.................................................................................. 6-5
Replacing the Keyboard................................................................................ 6-6
Changing Memory Setup..................................................................................... 6-7
Internal Modem ......................................................................................................... 6-8
Math Coprocessor Option........................................................................................... 6-9
Parts Furnished ................................................................................................... 6-9
Tools Required.................................................................................................... 6-9
Disassembling the Computer............................................................................. 6-10
Reassembling the Computer .............................................................................. 6-13
Operation .......................................................................................................... 6-14
Other Options .......................................................................................................... 6-15
Extra Battery Pack ............................................................................................ 6-15
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) .......................................................... 6-15
Ethernet Adapter............................................................................................... 6-15
Expansion Station ............................................................................................. 6-16
Printers ............................................................................................................ 6-16
Mouse ............................................................................................................ 6-16
External Monitor............................................................................................... 6-17
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options 6-1
Numeric Keypad
The optional Numeric Keypad (TI Part No. 2568033-0001) enables you to type numeric
data more conveniently while still permitting data entry on the keyboard. You also have
the convenience of direct access to some functions (such as the PgUp, PgDn, Home keys)
without the need to also press the Fn key. Note that when the Numeric Keypad is
installed, the embedded numeric keypad does not function.
Attaching the Keypad
Attach the Numeric Keypad to the computer as follows.
1.
Turn off the computer.
2.
Remove the dust cap from the Numeric Keypad connector on the right
side of the computer case.
3.
Attach the Numeric Keypad to the computer by joining the connector on
the left side of the Numeric Keypad with the connector on the right side
of the computer.
4.
Rotate the thumbscrew on the Numeric Keypad clockwise until just
tight; do not force.
Note: Do not transport the TravelMate 3000 WinSX with the Numeric Keypad
attached.
6-2 TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
RAM Modules
The standard TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer is equipped with 4 MB of
main memory (RAM). If you need more RAM capacity, you can install four more RAM
modules (TI Part No. 2566996-0001) to increase total main memory to 6 MB.
Installing the RAM Modules
To install the RAM modules, you need only a small, flatblade screwdriver. Installing the
RAM modules involves removing the keyboard, Installing the modules, and replacing the
keyboard. Read this procedure before starting and, if you do not feel comfortable doing
the steps, contact your Texas Instruments dealer.
Removing the Keyboard
Remove the keyboard from the computer case as follows.
1.
Turn off computer power, disconnect the AC Adapter, and disconnect
any external devices and cables connected to the computer.
2.
Carefully insert the blade of a small, flat-blade screwdriver about 1/4
inch into the leftmost of three slots, behind the F1 key and between the
keyboard and the computer case as shown in the figure.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options 6-3
RAM Modules
3.
Rotate the screwdriver toward the rear of the computer about 30 degrees
until the top left corner of the keyboard loosens and raises about 1/4 inch
(6 mm) above the computer case.
4.
Holding the top left corner of the keyboard above the case with one
hand, insert the screwdriver blade into the center slot (behind the F8
key) and rotate the screwdriver 30 degrees toward the rear to release the
middle catch.
5.
Continue holding the top left corner of the keyboard while inserting the
screwdriver blade into the rightmost slot (behind the Ins key). Then
rotate the screwdriver 30 degrees toward the rear; the keyboard should
now be fully released from the rear catches.
6.
Raise the rear of the keyboard several inches, rotate the rear of the
keyboard 180 degrees toward you, and place the keyboard in front of you
with the keys facing down as shown in the following figure.
Note:
Do not disconnect the cable connecting the keyboard to the computer case.
6-4 TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
RAM Modules
Installing the Modules
After removing the keyboard, install the four RAM modules as follows. You do not need
any tools.
Caution:
Prevent component damage caused by electrostatic discharge
(ESD). Use a high-impedance, groundedconductive floor mat or wrist strap to
prevent ESD. Before touching the integrated circuit devices, discharge static
electricity from your hands, tools, and containers by touching them to a grounded
surface.
1.
Remove the RAM modules from their shipping container, one by one, to
prevent bending their pins and possible static damage.
2.
Holding the first module so that the label side faces the left side of the
computer and the beveled corner faces the rear of the computer,
carefully insert the module pins into the 20-pin socket (labeled XU14).
Gently press down on the module to fully insert the pins into their
sockets.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
6-5
RAM Modules
3
Repeat steps 1 and 2 for the remaining three modules in the set, except
insert the second module into socket XU15, the third module into socket
XU16, and the fourth module into socket XU17.
4.
Replace the keyboard as described in the next section.
Replacing the Keyboard
Replace the keyboard into the computer case as follows.
1.
Rotate the keyboard right side up and insert the three tabs on the front
side of the keyboard panel into the three matching slots on the computer
case.
2.
Hold the front of the keyboard in place while you lower the rear of the
keyboard onto the computer case.
6-6 TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
RAM Modules
3.
Insert the screwdriver blade between the F1 key and the I key and gently
press down on the keyboard until the leftmost catch snaps locked.
4.
Insert the screwdriver blade between the F8 key and the 7 key and
gently press down on the keyboard until the center catch snaps locked.
5.
Insert the small screwdriver blade between the Ins key and the
Backspace key and gently press down on the keyboard until the
rightmost catch snaps locked.
6.
Test the installation by closing the computer display/cover. If the
display closes securely with no resistance, the keyboard is correctly
installed.
Changing Memory Setup
After installing the RAM modules, turn on the computer, load the Setup Program, and
reset the Extended item to match the computer's new RAm capacity. See Chapter 4 for
information on the Setup Program. See Appendix F for details on Extended and
Expanded memory.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options 6-7
Internal Modem
The optional 2400-bps (bits-per-second) internal Modem with Send-Fax and MNP Class 5
error-correcting (TI Part No. 2566941-0003) adds a built-in modem to your TravelMate
3000 WinSX.
Also available is a 9600-bps V.32 Internal Modem option (TI Part No. 2580945-0001)
with V.42 error-correcting and data compression capabilities. This modem option
transfers data four times faster than the 2400-bps modem option.
Note: The Internal Modem options may not be available in some countries. For
availability of this option, contact your dealer.
With an internal modem installed, you can connect your TravelMate 3000 WinSX to the
telephone network and communicate with a remote modem. With the 2400-bps modem
option installed, you also can make facsimile (fax) transmissions to remote fax machines
at 4800 bps.
For more information on installing and using the Internal Modem option, see the Internal
Modem User's Manual and the other User's Manuals furnished with the TravelMate 3000
WInSX Internal Modem Option Kits.
6-8 TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
Math Coprocessor Option
The 80387SX Math Coprocessor (TI Part No. 2566997000 1) option for your TravelMate
3000 WinSX speeds up processing and improves throughput of calculations with
application programs that support a math coprocessor.
You can install the 80387SX Math Coprocessor option yourself, but installation requires
partial disassembly of the computer. If you do not feel comfortable installing the
coprocessor, have your dealer or qualified TI Service personnel install the coprocessor
option.
Caution:
Prevent possible component damage caused by electrostatic
discharge (ESD). Use a high-impedance grounded-conductive floor mat or wrist strap
to prevent ESD. Before touching the integrated circuit devices, discharge static
electricity from your hands, tools, and containers by touching them to a grounded
surface.
Parts Furnished
The following parts are furnished in the Math Coprocessor kit.
q
Cyrix 387 coprocessor chip
q
Cyrix Installation Manual
Tools Required
You will need the following tools to disassemble and reassemble the computer.
q
No. 9 Torx screwdriver or a 1/8-inch wide, flat-blade screwdriver
Note: Some versions of the TravellMate 3000 WlnSX Notebook Computer may require
use of a No. 1 Phillips-head screwdriver instead of, or in addition to, the Torx
screwdriver.
q
Small needle-nose pliers
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options 6-9
Math Coprocessor Option
Disassembling the Computer
Disassemble the computer as follows to gain access to the coprocessor chip socket located
on the computer's main board.
1.
Turn off the computer, close the display/cover, and disconnect the AC
Adapter and any other external devices connected to the computer.
2.
Remove the internal battery pack from the computer as described in
Chapter 3 of this manual.
3.
Carefully lay the computer upside down on a padded work surface and
remove the four recessed screws from the corners of the bottom panel.
4.
Remove the three recessed screws from the corners of the battery
compartment.
6-10 TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
Math Coprocessor Option
5.
Holding the top and bottom units together, turn the computer right side
up on your work surface.
6.
With the display/cover still closed, press with your thumbs against the
front of the top unit (the display/cover) to release snap latches and
separate the top unit from the bottom unit.
7.
Raise the front of the top unit about 2 to 3 inches (50 to 75 mm) to gain
access to the coprocessor socket. Do not separate the rear of the top
and bottom units. The key scan board will likely fall out of the inside
front of the top unit.
8.
Prop up the front of the top unit with nonmetallic objects on both sides
or have another person hold the units separated.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
6-11
Math Coprocessor Option
9.
Lift up the folded keyscan board cable about I inch (25 mm)-but do not
disconnect the cable-to gain access to the coprocessor socket (XU02).
10.
Remove the new coprocessor chip from its plastic container and orient
the chip above the coprocessor socket (XU02) so that the white dot on
one corner of the chip matches the corresponding bevel in one corner of
the socket.
Caution:
Incorrect orientation of the coprocessor chip can destroy the chip.
11.
Carefully insert the coprocessor chip into socket XU02 and press it
down firmly until it snaps into place. The top of the chip must be level
with the raised edges of the socket. The coprocessor chip is now
installed.
12.
Using the needle-nose pliers, remove and discard jumper J I (if
installed) located in the front left corner of the bottom unit.
6-12 TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
Math Coprocessor Option
Reassembling the Computer
After you have installed the coprocessor chip, reassemble the computer as follows.
1.
Insert the keyscan board into the inside front of the top unit and lower
the front of the top unit down, almost engaging it with the bottom unit.
Be sure the plastic strip covering the LEDs is in place.
2.
Check all around the case to be sure no wires protrude, then press down
on the front of the top unit so that it engages with the bottom unit.
3.
Holding the top and bottom units together, turn the computer upside
down and lay it on your work surface.
4.
Loosely reinsert the seven screws removed during disassembly. Again
be sure no wires protrude from between the top and bottom units.
Then tighten the seven screws.
5.
Install the internal battery pack as instructed in Chapter 3 of this
manual.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options 6-13
Math Coprocessor Option
6.
Reconnect the AC Adapter and any external device connectors removed
during disassembly.
You can verify operation of the coprocessor by pressing the F2 key in the Setup Program.
Refer to the Cyrtx Installation Manual also furnished in the kit for instructions.
Operation
The Math Coprocessor option operates automatically in conjunction with your application
programs that can use the coprocessor's capabilities. No user setup or intervention is
required; therefore, no operating instructions are necessary.
6-14 TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
Other Options
Extra Battery Pack
Keeping an extra, fully charged battery pack (TI Part No. 2566962-0001) on hand can
extend the time you can operate your computer on its internal battery. Install and remove
the battery pack as described in Chapter 3.
Note: When not in use, always keep the battery pack in its protective case to prevent
accidental shorting or other damage.
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI)
The SCSI Adapter option enables you to use the TravalMate 3000 WinSX with up to
seven external SCSI devices such as CD-ROM drives, tape backup drives, and external
hard disk drives. The SCSI Adapter transfers synchronous data at 4 MB per second and
asynchronous data at 1.25 MB per second.
The SCSI Adapter supports MS-DOS, XeniXTM, OS/2, and Unix operating systems and
Novell NetWare ®
. The Adapter also provides a connector for external PS/2-compatible
101key keyboards. Windows 3.00 files are included.
Ethernet Adapter
The Ethernet Adapter option enables you to connect the computer to a local area network.
The Ethernet Adapter supports both the thick Ethernet (IEEE802.3, 1013ase5) and
twisted-pair Ethernet (IEEE802.3, 1013aseT) standards.
The Ethernet Adapter is compatible with industry-standard LAN software, including
NetWare, LAN Manager, and NetBios environments. The Adapter also provides a
connector for external PS/2-compatible 1 0 1 -key keyboards.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options 6-15
Other Options
Expansion Station
The Expansion Station option is designed to support thirdparty circuit boards and
input\output devices such as tape backup drives, high capacity disk drives, and CD-ROM
drives. The chassis provides three bays and three full-size AT slots plus a PS/2compatible 101 -key keyboard connector. The Expansion Station connects to the
expansion port at the rear of the TravelMate 3000-series Computers.
Printers
Texas Instruments makes a variety of laser and impact printers you can use with your
TravelMate 3000 WinSX. And you can connect almost any parallel printer to the 25pin
parallel port or a serial printer to the nine-pin RS-232C serial port. Both ports are located
on the left side panel of the TravelMate 3000 WinSX case.
To use a serial printer, load the Setup Program as described in Chapter 4 and set the
Standard Comm category to match your serial printer. Then connect the printer to the
serial port on the left side panel of the TravelMate 3000 WinSX case.
Mouse
The TravelPoint pointing device (described in Chapter 3) is furnished with your new
TravelMate 3000 WinSX. You also may be able to use some other mouse-type devices
with the computer. Be sure to add a mouse device driver line to your CONFIG.SYS file,
or include a TSR (terminate and stay resident) mouse program (such as TIMOUSE.COM)
in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. See the documentation furnished with your mouse for
details.
Also set the TravelPoint item on Page 3 of the TravelMate 3000 WinSX Setup Program to
On; see Chapter 4 for details.
6-16 TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options
Other Options
External Monitor
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX supports the following multifrequency external and VGA
monitors.
q
31 kHz/70 Hz (400/200 line mode)
q
60 Hz (480 line mode)
q
IBM PS/2 monitors
q
Multiscanning monitors covering 15.75 to 31.5 kHz, 50 to 70 Hz
You can connect an external VGA monitor to the 15-pin connector on the left side of the
TravelMate 3000 WinSX as follows.
Caution:
monitor.
Always turn off the computer before connecting an external
1.
Turn off power to both the external monitor and the TravelMate 3000
WinSX.
2.
Connect the 15-pin external VGA monitor cable from the external
monitor to the 15-pin connector on the left side panel of the computer.
3.
Turn on power to the TravelMate 3000 WinSX first, then turn on the
external monitor.
4.
Switch the display between the TravelMate 3000 WinSX's LCD and the
external monitor by double clicking the Windows Notebook group menu
Altvid icon. Or at the MS-DOS C:\> prompt type
ALTVID
and press the Enter key to switch the display between the units.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Options 6-17
7
Taking Care of Your Computer
This chapter tells you about:
q
Recommendations on how and where to use your TravelMate 3000
WinSX Notebook Computer
q
Cleaning the case and screen
q
How to get the most work from a battery charge and how to care for the
battery
Contents
Do's and Don'ts .......................................................................................................... 7-2
Cleaning the TravelMate 3000 WinSX....................................................................... 7-3
Cleaning the Case ............................................................................................... 7-3
Cleaning the Screen ............................................................................................ 7-3
Conserving Battery Power.......................................................................................... 7-4
Typical Power Consumption................................................................................ 7-5
Care and Handling of the Battery ............................................................................... 7-6
Taking Care of Your Computer 7-1
Do's and Don'ts
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer is a precision instrument containing
many sensitive components. It should be handled with care. Here are some suggestions
you can consider to help you get reliable service from your computer for many years:
q
Never use the TravelMate 3000 WinSX in harsh environments where it
could be subjected to rapid temperature changes and excessive dust.
q
Never expose the TravelMate 3000 WinSX to excessive vibration.
q
Never place anything on top of the computer when it is recharging or
operating; this can cause overheating.
q
Do not transport the computer with power turned on.
q
Do not try to force the LCD screen beyond its fully opened positionabout 130 degrees.
q
Always remove a floppy from the floppy diskette drive before turning off
the computer.
Caution:
In the rare event that you should see or smell anything that
indicates overheating (smoke or a A strange smell), turn off the power immediately
and contact your Texas Instruments dealer.
7-2 Taking Care of Your Computer
Cleaning the TravelMate 3000 WinSX
Regularly take the time to check over your TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer
and clean the screen, keyboard, and case. You may spot trouble before it starts, and help
continue to get efficient, trouble-free computing with your TravelMate 3000 WinSX.
Cleaning the Case
It is important to keep the case of the TravelMate 3000 WinSX free of dust. Apply a
small amount of liquid cleaner to a dry, lint-free cloth and wipe the case with the cloth.
Caution:
Never use alcohol, benzine, thinner, or other strong chemical agents
that could damage the TravelMate 3000 WinSX's case, and never apply liquid
directly to the computer, only to a clean cloth.
Cleaning the Screen
The surface of the screen is covered with a protective plastic film that may become
smeared and accumulate dust during use. Try not to touch the screen with your fingers.
Clean the screen regularly by applying a small amount of a diluted neutral detergent to a
dry, lint-free cloth. Gently rub the surface of the screen with the cloth.
Caution:
screen.
Never spray cleaning fluid or any liquid directly onto the case or
Taking Care of Your Computer 7-3
Conserving Battery Power
With a little care, you can maximize the time your TravelMate 3000 WinSX can operate
on a battery charge. The following tips can help you run your computer on battery power
for the longest possible time. Refer to your BatteryPro & Productivity Software User's
Manual and the Battery Power Management Quick Reference for more hints on
conserving battery power.
q
Keep the LCD screen at the lowest comfortable brightness level.
Reducing brightness even a small amount can significantly reduce
power consumption and increase operating time up to 30 minutes.
q
Use the Power Saving items on the Setup Program to turn off the LCD
screen when not in use, and to ensure that the hard disk is not powered
for long periods when it is not being accessed. However, if the HDD
Motor Off period is too short, hard disk access time increases several
seconds for the drive motor to power up before disk accesses can occur.
This can increase operating time up to 10 percent.
q
You can choose between three CPU speeds: 20, 10, and 5 MHz. The
computer uses less power at lower CPU speeds. When using an
application program that is not CPU-intensive (for example, many word
processing programs), set the CPU speed to the lowest setting on the
Setup Program. This can add up to 15 minutes of operating time per
speed difference.
q
The fewer options connected to the computer, the lower the power
consumption. Note, however, that printers and external monitors are
not powered by the computer and have no effect on power consumption.
However, some external options, such as keyboards, use power from the
computer, so run the TravelMate 3000 WinSX with the AC Adapter
connected when using external devices that use power.
7-4 Taking Care of Your Computer
Conserving Battery Power
Typical Power Consumption
The following table summarizes approximate power consumption using various computer
power-saving features, manual and automatic.
Power-Saving Modes Power Consumption
Typical Power Consumption
Operating Mode
Manual Standby* with DOS background tasks
4 - 6 watts
Manual Standby* with no background tasks
3.5 - 4 watts
Auto Suspendt with DOS background tasks
3.5 - 5 watts
Auto Suspendt with Windows background tasks
3 - 5 watts
Auto Suspendt without background tasks
3.2 - 3.5 watts
Cover Closed Suspend mode
3 - 3.2 watts
Operation with hard disk access#
9 - 10 watts
Operation with no hard disk access#
8 - 9 watts
Operation with LCD off
Setup Program LCD Power set to Low
4.5 - 6.5 watts
0.5 watts
LCD brightness, minimum to maximum
1. 5 - 3.5 watts
Typical full-charge battery capacity
22 - 24 watts
Maximum power consumption, all options
17.5 watts
* Press Fn-F4 (Stndby) keys to enter manual Standby mode.
dag Select Auto Suspend under the Setup Program's Power Savings category.
++ Add 3 to 3.5 watts if BatteryPro is not activated (level 0).
Taking Care of Your Computer 7-5
Care and Handling of the Battery
The battery should be handled carefully to ensure maximum life. In particular:
q
Do not drop the battery or subject it to shocks.
q
Do not expose the battery to direct sunlight.
q
Do not expose the battery to moisture or chemicals.
q
Do not short the battery leads or connect the battery with the wrong
polarity.
q
If you have a spare battery pack, always keep it stored in the furnished
protective covering.
q
Never use the battery to power other products.
q
Never recharge the battery differently than described in Chapter 3 of this
manual.
q
Never dispose of an old battery in fire.
q
Always charge the battery after the automatic deep discharge cycle
completes. When the LowBatt indicator starts to blink, this warns you
that the computer is about to turn off automatically to prevent damage to
the computer hardware. After the computer turns off, leave the power
switch set to on (1) until the Low Batt indicator stops blinking.
q
When charging the battery allow 1 1/2 hours of trickle charge after the
amber indicator goes out on the AC Adapter to gain the maximum
battery charge.
7-6 Taking Care of Your Computer
Care and Handling of the Battery
Note: The battery is fully charged when the AC Adapter's amber light goes off and its
green light comes on and remains on for at least 1 1/2 hours.
q
All batteries naturally discharge if unused for a long period of time. If
you are not going to use your TravelMate 3000 WinSX for an extended
period, be sure to recharge the battery every 3 to 6 months.
q
When using the computer for the first time, or after prolonged storage in
temperatures above 95' F (35' C), a battery charge may not last as long
as normal. This condition disappears after a few full discharge/recharge
cycles. See "Conditioning the Battery" in Chapter 3 for details.
Taking Care of Your Computer 7-7
A
Specifications
Central Processing Unit (CPU)
Type:
Clock Speeds:
16-bit 80386SX
5 MHz/10 MHz/20 MHz
Memory
RAM:
4 MB standard; 640 KB for conventional, 3328 KB for
extended memory or shadow VGA/AT BIOS support
LIM/EMS 4.0 support 16-bit bus width, 0 wait state
Expandable up to 6 MB using RAM Module option
ROM:
128 KB, 8-bit bus; contains IPL, self-test, Setup, AT/BIOS,
and VGA/BIOS
Display
Technology:
Size:
Characters/line:
Lines/screen:
Resolution:
Gray scales:
Emulations:
Video memory:
Video bus:
Illuminated, triple supertwist
liquid crystal display (LCD)
8 by 6 inches (203 by 153 mm),
10 inches (254 mm) diagonal
80
25
640-by-480 pixels bit-mapped
32
VGA, EGA, CGA, MDA
1 MB
16/32 bits
Specifications A- I
Specifications
Physical Dimensions
Size
Width:
Depth:
Height:
Weight:
1 1 inches (279 mm)
8.5 inches (216 mm)
1.8 inches (46 mm)
5.7 lbs (2.6 kg), including battery,
without options
Power Source
NiCad battery:
AC Adapter
Input:
Output:
24 watt hours
100 to 250 Vac, 0.7 to 0.4 A,
50 to 60 Hz
+5 Vdc, 3.5 A max
+7 Vdc, 1. 5 A max
+8.5 Vdc, 1. 5 A max
Total output not to exceed 3.8 A
Temperature
Operating:
Storage/Transit:
50o to 95o F (10o to 35o C)
-4o to 140o F (-20o to 60o C
Humidity
Operating:
Storage/Transit:
20% to 80%, non-condensing
10% to 90%, non-condensing
Vibration
Operating:
Storage/Transit:
A-2 Specifications
0.5 G, 5 to 250 Hz
5.0 G, 5 to 250 Hz
Specifications
Shock
Operating:
Storage/Transit:
10 G applied in six orientations
(positive and negative X, Y, and
Z axes)
40 G applied in six orientations
(positive and negative X, Y, and
Z axes)
Standard Ports
Parallel Port:
Serial Port:
Numeric Keypad:
VGA Monitor:
TravelPoint/mouse:
Centronics-type, 25-pin
RS-232C, 9-pin male DB-9
connector for full duplex
asynchronous transmission at
up to 9600 baud
10-pin special
15-pin DB-15 analog
Mini-DIN (PS/2-compatible)
standard
Drives
Hard disk drive:
Floppy Drive:
60 MB hard disk, average access
time = 19 ms
Reads/writes 3.5-inch, 720 KB
and 1.44 MB floppy diskettes
Keyboard
Keys:
79 (U.S. keyboard only)/80
including 12 function keys and
Fn key; supports all functions
of IBM AT enhanced keyboard
Specifications A-3
Specifications
Agency Approvals
Main Unit:
(including
AC Adapter)
FCC, Part 15, Class B (U.S.A.)
FCC Part 68 (U.S.A.)
DOC (Canada)
UL, TUV, and CSA safety
Options
Refer to the individual publications furnished with each option for specifications.
A-4 Specifications
B
Character Sets
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer character sets are identical to the
IBM Code Pages for DOS version 5.00. This appendix shows the character sets for Code
Page 437 (United States), 850 (Multilingual), 863 (Canadian-French), and 865 (Nordic),
with the decimal and hexadecimal codes for each character.
The four character sets contain differences in the international, symbol, and graphics
characters above decimal code 128 (extended ASCII characters).
Note: The extended ASCII characters that are not on the keyboard (128 to 255
decimal) can be displayed at the MS-DOS prompt and in many application programs as
follows. Hold down the Alt key, type the ASCII decimal code for the character using
the keys with numbers on their front face with the Fn key also held down or with the
Num Lk key on. Release the Alt key and the character is displayed on the screen.
Your printer may or may not print the extended characters. Refer to the character code
tables in your printer documentation.
Character Sets B-1
Character Sets
Code Page 437, United States
B-2 Character Sets
Character Sets
Code Page 850, MultLingual
Character Sets B-3
Character Sets
Code Page 863 (Canadian-French)
B-4 Character Sets
Character Sets
Code Page 865, Nordic
Character Sets B-5
C
Keyboard Layouts
The following diagrams show the TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer keyboard
layouts for the U.S.A. and international versions.
Keyboard Layouts C-1
Keyboard Layouts
C-2 Keyboard Layouts
Keyboard Layouts
Keyboard Layouts C-3
Keyboard Layouts
C-4 Keyboard Layouts
Keyboard Layouts
Keyboard Layouts C-5
D
Diagnostics
Your TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer provides two diagnostic routines to
make sure the computer and its peripherals are functioning as they should. One routine is
automatic and takes place every time you turn on the computer. The other is accessed
from a separate diagnostic program installed on the hard disk during manufacture.
Power-On Diagnostics
When you turn on the computer, an automatic self-test begins. The self-test checks
internal memory and displays the number of kilobytes available for use.
After a few seconds, MS-DOS starts to load. If MS-DOS fails to load from the hard disk
or a floppy, an error message appears.
Turn off the computer, wait 5 seconds, then turn the computer on again. If the error
message displays repeatedly, call your Texas Instruments dealer or call TI Service at 1800-847-5757.
Refer to "Error Messages" in Appendix E for a list of power-up error messages.
Diagnostics Program
To load the Diagnostics Program, insert your BatteryPro & Productivity Software floppy
diskette into drive A and press the Ctrl-Alt-Del keys or turn on the computer. The
diagnostics automatically loads from the floppy.
After the Diagnostics Program loads, it displays its main menu. Press the uu and dd keys
to highlight the test you want performed and then press the Enter key to start the test.
Diagnostics D-1
Diagnostics
Park Fixed Disks
The Park Fixed Disk function prepares the fixed disks for relocation. The fixed disk
heads are placed over the diagnostic cylinder so that vibrations will not cause errors on the
usable media. The heads are also automatically parked for safe travel when you turn off
the computer or the computer enters the Standby mode.
Diagnostics
If you select the Diagnostics Program, a warning and informational menu displays. Press
the N key to abort the diagnostics or the Y key to continue, and the diagnostics menu
displays.
Each test listed indicates the hardware item to be tested and the configuration of that
hardware item. Some items are listed only present (P) or not present (N), while others
specify a hardware type; for example, Keyboard can be an 84-key keyboard, a 101 -key
keyboard, or not present (N). The diskette types are defined as they are in the Setup
Program menu.
The diagnostics menu reflects the hardware the Diagnostics Program detects in your
computer. The selection process overrides this automatic selection process or excludes
specific tests from a complete suite of tests to be performed.
Press the Arrow keys to highlight an item you want to test or change, and press the F5
and F6 keys to select new items in each field.
You can test a single item by moving the highlight to a particular test and pressing the
F10 key. You must select something other than not present (N) or None.
D-2 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
Pressing the F9 key tests all currently selected devices. If you do not want to perform
specific tests, set these test selections to not present (N); this tells the diagnostic program
not to test these items.
When a single test or suite of tests is initiated, the Test Control Options and Test Results
menu displays. On the left side of this menu is information relating to the test currently
being performed. The right side of the menu contains the results of previously completed
tests.
Test Control Options
The fields at the top of the menu represent options that control how tests are performed.
These options must be set before a single test or suite of tests is initiated.
Continuous Test - This field causes the tests to be performed continuously until you
specifically stop them by pressing the Esc key. When you press the Esc key, you can
continue again by pressing the Space Bar, or abort the suite of tests by again pressing the
Esc key. If you select a single test using the F10 key, the single test is repeated if the
continuous test field is set to Yes. If you select a suite of tests using the F9 key, the entire
suite is repeated.
Stop On Error - If an error is detected during a suite of tests, the diagnostic program
stops after the error is reported, depending of the status of this field. If set to Yes (the
default), the program reports the error and then stops testing until you press the Space
Bar to continue or press the Esc key to end testing.
Echo to LPT1 - This field permits you to send the test results to a parallel printer attached
to Lpt1 and turned on. The information written to the right side of the menu is echoed to
LPT1 if this option is set to Yes. This is useful if you set the Continuous Test field to
Yes, the Stop on Error field to No, and want to run a test or tests unattended.
Diagnostics D-3
Diagnostics
Choosing Specific Suites of Tests
Many of the tests have submenus that permit you to select which parts of the test you want
performed. When you select any of these tests, either individually (using F10) or as part
of suite of tests (using F9), the submenus ask for additional information about the tests. If
the tests are run multiple times, the submenus are displayed only before the first pass.
Each of the test submenus displays whether or not the test is interactive and whether or
not it is destructive to data. Interactive tests require some user intervention to operate.
For example, if you select the interactive keyboard test, you must press keys on the
keyboard to verify that it is operating properly. In general, if you are performing
continuous tests, you should not select any interactive tests, permitting the suite of tests to
run unattended.
The following component tests and their respective options can be selected.
Keyboard Test
Keyboard test (interactive)
Controller test (non-interactive)
Floppy Disk Test
Seek tracks
Verify tracks
Disk change (interactive)
Read/Write (destructive)
Format (destructive)
Fixed Disk Drive Test
Controller test
Head select test
Seek test
D-4 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
Monochrome Adapter Test
Attribute test
Character test
Text test
Memory test
Color Graphics Adapter Test
Attribute test
Character test
Text test
Page test
Graphics test
Background test
Memory test
EGA Adapter Test
Attribute test
Character test
Text test
Page test
Graphics test
Background test
Memory test
VGA Adapter Test
Attribute test
Character test
Text test
Page test
Graphics test
Background test
Memory test
Parallel Port Test
Internal loopback
Printed pattern (requires connected printer)
External loopback (requires loopback connector)
Diagnostics D-5
Diagnostics
Asynchronous Communications Port Test
Baud rate clock
Internal transmit/receive
Modem control fines
External loopback (requires loopback connector)
Additional Diagnostics
The diagnostic program hard disk tests are all nondestructive except on the diagnostic
cylinder. The tests perform seek tests, head tests, and controller tests, but do not perform
read/write tests on the entire media. Additional tests for the hard disk are contained in the
hard disk format system, which is described later in this appendix.
Diagnostic Error Codes
When an error is detected by the diagnostics system, a twobyte hexadecimal code is
displayed. The first byte is the class of the error and the second byte is the sub-class. The
error code class generally corresponds to a specific hardware system or group of hardware
systems. For example, class one (01) is used for the system planar board. The last byte of
the code (sub-class) describes the actual test that failed on the specified peripheral. For
example, error 0108 indicates that the 8253 counter test failed during the system planar
board test.
D-6 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
The following table lists the classes of error codes. The numbers are in hexadecimal.
Diagnostics Error Code Classes
Code
Description
01q
System planar board tests
07q
Keyboard tests
10q
Math coprocessor tests
17q
Video tests
20q
Asynchronous ports tests
27q
LPT ports tests
30q
Memory tests
37q
Diskette/Fdisk tests
The following table lists the error codes that could be displayed by the diagnostics
program. The codes are displayed by class, followed by sub-class.
Diagnostics Program Error Codes
Code
Description
0101
Class
Failure
System board
DMA registers
0102
System board
DMA memory
0103
System board
Interrupt mask
0104
System board
Hot interrupt line
0105
System board
Stuck NMI
0106
System board
Processor registers
move
Diagnostics D-7
Diagnostics
Diagnostics Program Error Codes (continued)
Code
0107
0108
0109
010A
010B
0110
0111
0120
0701
0702
1001
1002
1701
1702
1703
1704
1705
1706
1707
1708
1709
170A
170B
170C
D-8 Diagnostics
Class
System board
System board
System board
System board
System board
System board
System board
System board
Keyboard
Keyboard
Coprocessor
Coprocessor
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Video
Failure Description
System timer
8253 counters
System timer interrupts (1)
System timer interrupts (2)
Processor flags
CMOs memory
Real time clock
BIOS checksum
Controller
Keyboard map
Registers
Calculations
Text attributes
Background colors
Character set
Text page registration
Text pages
Graphics display
EGA/VGA palette
Memory
VGA sequencer
VGA controller registers
VGA attribute controller
VGA DAC
Diagnostics
Diagnostics Program Error Codes (continued)
Code
1730
2001
2002
2003
2004
2701
2702
2703
2704
2705
2706
2707
2708
3001
3002
3003
3701
3702
3703
3704
3705
3706
3707
3708
Class
Video
Serial
Serial
Serial
Serial
LPT
LPT
LPT
LPT
LPT
LPT
LPT
LPT
Memory
Memory
Memory
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Fai1ure Description
Cannot initialize video
Baud rate clock
Internal loopback data
Internal loopback control
External loopback data
Registers read/write
Control loopback
Printed pattern
Printer not ready
Unknown error
No paper/paper jam
Printer timeout
Printer busy
Address lines
Data patterns
Walking bits
Invalid parameter
Address mark not found
Write protect error
Sector not found
Reset failed
Change line active
Drive parameter error
DMA overrun
Diagnostics D-9
Diagnostics
Diagnostics Program Error Codes (concluded)
Code
3709
370A
370B
370C
3700
370E
3710
3711
3720
3740
3750
3780
37BB
37CC
37E0
37FF
D-10 Diagnostics
Class
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Disk
Failure Description
Attempt to DMA across 64 KB
Bad sector flag found
Bad cylinder detected
Media type not found
Invalid format sectors count
Control data mark detected
cRC or Ecc error detected
ECC corrected error
General controller failure
Seek operation
Change line test
Drive not ready
Undefined error occurred
Write fault on selected drive
Status error
Sense operation failed
Diagnostics
Loopback Connections
The serial and parallel communication tests in the Diagnostics Program offer optional
loopback tests that expect loopback connectors to be placed on the output ports of the
computer. The loopback connector pin assignments are listed in the following tables.
Loopback Connector Pin Assignments
Serial Loopback Connections
DB9 Pin
1-7-8
2-3
4-6
Signal
CD-RTS-CTS
TX-RX
DTR-DSR
Parallel Loopback Connections
DB25 Pin
15-2
13-1
16-10
17-11
14-12
Signal
DO-ERR
STRB-SLCT
INIT-ACK
SLCTIN-BUSY
AuToFEED-PE
Diagnostics D-11
Diagnostics
Hard Disk Format
When you select the Hard Disk Format, the program displays the Format Fixed Disk
menu.
Use the Arrow keys to highlight the hard disk you want formatted or analyzed and press
the Enter key. Of course, you can select only hard disks installed in your computer.
After you have selected a hard disk, the program displays a warning that the formatting
operation will erase any data currently stored on the hard disk.
If you do not intend to format or analyze your hard disk, press N at this time; otherwise,
press Y to continue, and the program displays a menu listing the drives, heads, and
cylinders under test.
Bad Track Table
The center portion of the Format Fixed Disk menu displays the list of currently recorded
bad tracks. This list is central to the processing of most of the format functions.
Bad tracks are areas of the hard disk that cannot store data properly. A list of the bad
tracks detected by the drive manufacturer are usually provided with the hard disk drive
when it is purchased. Some of these areas may work intermittently, but are not
dependable for storing data. The program formats these tracks with a special attribute so
that other programs or commands (such as the MS-DOS FORMAT command) will not
attempt to use bad areas on the disk.
The bad track list is modified automatically by the Scan Bad Tracks command, the
Analyze Surface command, and the Format Preformatted Drive command. Each of these
functions add bad tracks they detect during their processing to the list.
D-12 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
To manually add a bad track to the table, press the Ins key. Use the Arrow keys or the
Enter key to select between cylinder and head fields. After the cylinder and head are
entered, press the F IO or Enter key and the new entry will be added to the table. If an
invalid head or cylinder value is entered, the program displays a menu permitting you to
delete a bad track.
To delete a bad track, use the Arrow keys to highlight the bad track to delete and press the
Del key. You are not prompted to verily the deletion, so use this function with care.
To clear the bad track table, press the F2 key; the program displays a warning message to
be sure you want to continue. Press the Y key to clear all entries from the bad track table
or press the N key to abort. To print the bad track table, press the F3 key (be sure your
printer is connected).
You can search the disk for all existing bad tracks if the drive has already been formatted
by selecting F5 (scan for bad tracks). This causes the program to quickly test each track
on the hard disk to determine if it has already been formatted as bad. Each track found to
be bad is added to the list if not already there.
Setting Interleave
Press the F4 key to set the interleave, which is the value used by the format operation to
interleave the hard disk tracks. If you do not set the interleave manually, the default value
of 1 is used. Note that the interleave set is the value which will be used to format, not
necessarily the current value for your hard disk.
Note: Always use interleave 1.
Diagnostics D-13
Diagnostics
Analyzing the Hard Disk Surface
If you do not need to reformat the entire hard disk but want to perform a thorough test of
the media to detect any bad or marginal areas, select F6 to analyze the surface.
Caution:
This performs a destructive analysis of the hard disk media (all data
on the hard disk will be erased).
Any bad tracks found during the analysis are automatically added to the bad track table.
As bad tracks are found, they are reformatted as bad so that a subsequent MS-DOS
FORMAT operation does not attempt to use these areas on the disk.
Formatting a New Hard Disk Drive
After installing a new hard disk drive, you should enter the bad track information
provided by the manufacturer into the bad track table (see above). After this is done, press
the F7 key. This option is specifically for formatting a hard disk drive which was
previously unformatted; it performs the following operations.
q
Each track of the hard disk is reformatted using the current interleave
value.
q
Each track in the bad track table is reformatted as bad so that it cannot
be used.
When the format operation is complete, run a surface analysis to verify that no additional
bad tracks axe found.
Formatting an Already Formatted Hard Disk
If your hard disk was previously formatted, you can press the F8 key to automatically
format preformatted drives. This causes the following operations.
D-14 Diagnostics
Diagnostics
q
The program scans the drive for tracks that have already been marked as
bad and adds them to the bad track table.
q
Each track of the hard disk is reformatted using the current interleave
value.
q
Each track in the bad track table is reformatted as bad so that it cannot
be used.
q
The program performs a surface analysis on the media, reformats any
additional bad tracks as bad, and adds them to the list.
Using this option is equivalent to performing a scan for bad tracks operation (F5),
followed by a format unformatted drive operation (F7), followed by an analyze hard disk
operation (F6). The only differences are that all three operations are done automatically
and the surface analysis performed is not as thorough or as time-consuming as that
performed when you select F6.
If the bad track table from the manufacturer is available when the reformat of the drive is
done, enter that map before this operation is performed. This ensures that all tracks in
that list are reformatted as bad regardless of whether or not they are found by the scan for
bad track part of this operation.
After Format is Complete
The Hard Disk Format commands perform low level format operations on the hard disk
drives. After these operations are complete, insert the MS-DOS 5.0 Disk I floppy into the
floppy drive and reboot the computer. Follow the instructions displayed to install MSDOS and utilities onto the hard disk. If you are using another operating system, see its
documentation for formatting and installation instructions.
Diagnostics D-15
E
Troubleshooting
This appendix is designed to help you solve common problems you may encounter while
using your TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer. If you encounter a problem
not listed here, please contact your Texas Instruments reseller, or you can telephone or
fax Texas Instruments at one of the numbers listed on the page near the end of this
manual entitled 'Getting Help for Your Computer'.
Solving Problems Yourself
Computer does not
come on when power
switch in ON position.
Low battery-Plug in AC
Adapter and run unit from
ac power. After finishing
operation, leave the computer turned off but still connected to power for about 3
hours to fully charge the
battery.
AC Adapter plugged into faulty outlet-Check ac outlet by
plugging in another appliance (for example, a lamp).
AC Adapter plugs not securely connected- Be sure the
AC Adapter connecters are
fully plugged in to the wall
outlet, the AC Adapter body,
and the computer.
None of the above-Contact
your Texas Instruments
reseller.
Troubleshooting E- 1
Troubleshooting
Computer comes on
when turned on but
turns off before booting.
Internal battery pack still too
warm-Wait about 3 more
minutes and try agian.
Computer Power indicator light on, Low
Batt inidcator blinking, screen blank, and
computer will not run.
Automatic discharge cycle
not complete-Leave Power
switch in On position until
all indicator lights go out;
then plug in AC Adapter
after automatic battery disharge cycle completes and
run computer on ac power.
If Power indicator is orangepress the Fn-F4 (Stndby)
keys to resume operation.
Blinking Low Batt indicator
signals that computer will
shut off in about 1 minute.
None of the above-Contact
your Texas Instruments
reseller
The built-in LCD screen
is blank.
Screen contrast/brightness
controls-Adjust the contrast
and brightness controls on
the right side of the LCD
screen.
Computer set up for external
monitor-Turn computer off,
wait 5 seconds, turn computer on; or use ALTVID command to switch back to the
LCD (see Chapter 6 of this
manual).
E-2 Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Computer in automatic powersaving mode-Press Shift
key to turn on display. If
Power indicator is orange,
press Fn-F4 (stndby) keys to
resume operation.
None of the above-Screen
power unit may be faulty.
Contact your Texas
Instruments reseller.
When using a mouse
connected to the serial
port, the built-in LCD
screen goes blank after
a few minutes.
Setup Program Backlight Off
set to N minutes-Set Backlight Off item to Always On
to prevent LCD from blanking
because of mouse or keyboard inactivity.
LCD screen backlight
does not light, even
when brightness control fully turned up.
Display unit turned off because of keyboard inactivity
(see “The Setup Program” in
Chapter 4 of this manual)Press the Shift key to turn
backlight on again.
In Standby mode-If Power
indicator ir orange, unit is in
Standby mode; press the
Fn-F4 keys to turn off
Standby mode.
None of the above-Screen
power unit may be faulty.
Contact your Texas
Instruments reseller.
Troubleshooting E-3
Troubleshooting
Special functions do
not work (Setup, AltCtrl-Esc, speed control
keys)
Application program overriding computer BIOS interrupts
- Contact your application
program provider.
The unit starts up but
a message indicates
that a power-up test
has failed.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX
hardware-Turn the unit off,
wait 5 seconds, then turn
unit on again. If the same
message appears, check
against the list of power-up
error messages in the next
section and, if necessary,
make a note of the message
and contact your Texas Instruments reseller.
Setup Program setting--Check
the settings on the Setup Program (see Chapter 4).
E-4 Troubleshooting
Embedded numeric
keypad does not work.
Embedded numeric keypad
is automatically disabled
when the optional Numeric
Keypad is installed.
Optional Numeric
Keypad does not work.
Check thumb screw and connectors for good fit, then
reboot the computer.
Amber indicator on
the AC Adapter does
not come on, but
green indicator is on.
No internal battery pack is
installed or battery pack is
fully charged.
Green indicator on AC
Adapter does not come
on.
No ac power--Check wall outlet, plugs, and AC Adapter
connectors.
Troubleshooting
Amber indicator on-Internal
battery pack not fully
charged.
Amber indicator off, internal
battery pack not installed,
and power switch set to offSet computer power switch
to on and run on ac power or
install battery pack.
Amber indicator off-Internal
fault', contact your Texas
Instruments reseller.
Pressing Fn-F4 keys
does not put computer
in Standby mode
The BatteryPro /V switch
may be set in the device
driver which disables the
Standby mode-View the
CONFIG.SYS file to be sure the
line "DEVICE=C:\UTILS\
BATTERY-PRO" does not have
the /V switch.
Auto Suspend mode active
(Power indicator blinking,
changes from green to
orange, orange to green)Press any key, preferably
Shift.
Troubleshooting E-5
Error Messages
Power-up self-tests are the system tests and component initialization processes performed
by the TravelMate 3000 WinSX AT-compatible ROM BIOS.The self-tests first initialize
and test the central hardware. The central hardware must function properly before further
system tests can be run. In general, a failure in a test of the system board or its
components halts the test and causes a beep. A failure in optional boards or memory is
reported on the screen. The tests display two types of messages if the TravelMate 3000
WinSX fails one of the power-up tests:
q
Error messages indicating a failure in the hardware, software, or
firmware
q
Informational messages about the power-up and booting processes
Power-Up Self Test Error Messages
The following error messages list possible causes and solutions. Error messages not listed
indicate hardware problems that can be corrected only by internal checks. Write out the
error message and contact your Texas Instruments reseller, or you can telephone or fax
Texas Instruments at one of the numbers listed on the page near the end of this manual
titled "Getting Help for Your Computer".
E-6 Troubleshooting
Diskette drive 0 failure
Drive A failed - Run the
DIAG program to check drive
A as described in Appendix D.
Diskette read failure press F1 to retry boot
Floppy notformatted or defective -Try another formatted
or known good floppy.
Error Messages
Fixed disk failure
Turn off the computer, wait
5 seconds, and turn the computer on again, or press the
Ctrl-Alt-Del keys to reboot
the system. If that does not
work, run the DIAG program
to check the hard disk drive
as described in Appendix D,
then contact your Texas
Instruments reseller.
Fixed disk read failure press F1 to retry
boot
Defective working diskette or
hard disk - Boot the system
again. If that does not work,
replace the floppy. Run the
DIAG program to check
drives as described in Appendix D. If the hard disk drive
is at fault, contact your
Texas Instruments reseller.
Invalid Configuration
Information
-Press Enter to run
Set _Up.
-Press the F1 key to
continue.
Wrong configuration settings
- Check the settings on the
Setup Program menus, particularly Memory category
selections (Unused must
equal 0) and number of Diskette drives (see Chapter 4 to
run Setup Program).
Keyboard clock/data
line failure
Defective keyboard or external keyboard connector Make sure your external keyboard is connected correctly;
if it is, the problem could be
keyboard failure. Contact
your Texas Instruments
reseller.
Troubleshooting
E-7
Error Messages
E-8 Troubleshooting
Keyboard stuck key
failure
Jammed key - Try pressing
the key again. Run the DIAG
program to check all keys as
described in Appendix D.
Missing operating
system
System bootfiles on hard
disk bad or missing. Hard
disk type incorrect in Setup
Program--Press the Ctrl-AltSetup keys to access the
Setup Program and check
the Hard Disk type (see
"Hard Disk Drive Sizes" table
in Chapter 4). If Hard Disk
type is correct, boot the computer from your MS-DOS floppy and run the SYS.COM
program from MS-DOS to restore the boot files to the
hard disk.
No boot device available - press F I to retry
boot
Drive A, hard disk, or diskette defective - Boot the
system again; replace the
floppy. If the hard disk is at
fault, run the DIAG program
described in Appendix D.
Contact your Texas
Instruments reseller.
No boot sector on fixed
disk - press F1 to retry
boot
Hard disk notformatted. Format the hard disk as
described in Appendix D.
Error Messages
Non-System disk or
disk error. Replace and
press any key when
ready
Floppy in drive A not a
bootablefloppy - Replace
the floppy in drive A with a
bootable floppy. When formatting MS-Dos bootable
floppies, be sure to add the
/S option to the FORMAT command (see your MS-DOS
User's Guide and Reference).
Time-of-day not set
Failed RTC chip - Reset the
time and date on the Setup
Program (see Chapter 4).
Informational Messages
The following informational messages do not necessarily indicate a problem or failure, but
are provided by the computer to inform you.
NNN Main memory,
NNN Extended
This message lists the
amount of standard memory
and optional extended
memory that has tested successfully.
Memory tests terminated by keystroke
This message informs you
that you pressed the Space
Bar while memory tests were
running; this stops the tests.
Press the F1 key to
continue
This message indicates that
an error was found during
the power-up tests. Press
the F1 key to cause the system to attempt to boot.
Troubleshooting E-9
Restoring MS-DOS System Files
The MS-DOS files COMMAND.COM, 1O.SYS, EXTMSDOS.SYS, and MSDOS.SYS
are necessary for the operation of your computer. If any of these files are accidentally
deleted or modified, your computer will not function. This appendix describes the
procedure for restoring these files without affecting the applications and data files that
may be on your hard disk.
If you need more information, see the MS-DOS User's Guide and Reference furnished
with your new computer.
Note: IO.SYS, EXTMSDOS.SYS, and MSDOS.SYS are hidden files. You will not see
these files if you view a directory of drive C using the DIR command.
If COMMAND.COM is Missing
If COMMAND.COM is missing from your hard disk, the screen displays this message
during the boot process:
Bad or missing Command Interpreter
The computer then becomes inactive. Complete the steps in the next section to restore
COMMAND.COM to your hard disk.
If SYS Files are Missing
If the IO.sys, EXTMSDOS.SYS, and/or the MSDOS.SYS files are missing from your hard
disk, the screen displays the following message during the boot process:
Non-System disk or disk error
Replace and press any key when ready
This message is repeated when any key is pressed. Complete the following steps to restore
the SYS files to your hard disk.
E-10 Troubleshooting
Restoring MS-DOS System Files
1.
Turn off the computer and insert the furnished 3.5-inch Microsoft MSDOS 5.0, Disk I floppy into the floppy drive.
2.
Turn on the computer and when the computer displays the 'Welcome to
Setup" menu, press the Enter key and follow the directions.
Restoring BatteryPro Utilities
After you restore the MS-DOS files as explained previously in this appendix, install the
BatteryPro utilities as follows.
1.
Insert the BatteryPro and Productivity Software floppy into drive A and
at the MS-DOS A:\> prompt, type
INSTALL
and press the Enter key.
2.
Follow the instructions on the screen.
If you need more information, see the TravelMate 3000 WinSX BatteryPro and
Productivity Software User's Manual furnished with your new computer.
Restoring Windows
After you restore the MS-DOS and BatteryPro files as explained previously in this
appendix, install the Microsoft Windows program as follows.
1.
Insert the Microsoft Windows 3.0, Disk 1 floppy into drive A and at the
MS-DOS A:\> prompt, type
SETUP
and press the Enter key.
Troubleshooting E-11
Restoring MS-DOS System Files
2.
Follow the instructions on the screen. If you need help, press the F1 key
for on-line displays.
If you need more information, see the Microsoft Windows User's Guide furnished with
your new computer.
Note: After your restore Windows to the hard disk, be sure you are using the HIMEM,
SMARTDRV, and RAMDRivE device drivers from MS-DOS, not Windows. Check the
CONFIG.SYS file and edit the paths if necessary to match the default file listed in
Chapter 5.
E- 12 Troubleshooting
F
Configuring Memory
Introduction
Computers handle information as strings of binary digits: ones and zeros. A single I or 0
is referred to as a bit, the smallest unit of information handled by the computer. A group
of eight bits, referred to as a byte, is used to represent single characters or numbers such
as 'A" or "5".
The size of the computer's RAm (main memory) is measured by the number of bytes the
memory can store. Since this number usually involves thousands and even millions of
bytes, the letter K (kilo) is used to represent thousands of bytes and M (mega) is used to
represent millions of bytes. Because of differences between the binary and decimal
number systems, one K byte actually represents 1024 bytes, and one M byte represents
1024 K bytes. (These values are abbreviated as KB and MB in this manual.)
Computers use two main types of internal memory: Rom and RAM. (Although floppy
drives and hard disk drives are usually incorporated into a computer's case or cabinet,
these memory devices are external memory and could theoretically be located anywhere.)
ROM (Read Only Memory) - Rom is memory that permanently stores programs or data
on integrated circuits mounted on the computer's system board. Information is
programmed into the circuits in the manufacturing process and cannot be changed by the
user.
RAM (Random Access Memory) - RAM is memory that temporarily stores data or
programs-that is, information can be easily erased and rewritten. Also called main
memory, conventional memory, or system memory, RAM is used by the computer to store
data and programs only while the system is running. When the power is turned off, any
information stored in RAM is lost. C
Configuring Memory F-1
Configuring Memory
This appendix describes the various areas of memory (RAm) and how you can make
memory more efficient by configuring it in conjunction with the memory management
device drivers supplied with your TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer.
F-2 Configuring Memory
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Memory Areas
MS-DOS directly accesses up to 640 KB of RAM for the execution of programs and
commands and for storing temporary data. MS-DOS cannot directly access memory
beyond this 640-KB limit. The amount of standard default RAM (640 KB) in the
TravelMate 3000 WinSX is displayed on the Setup Program menu as Standard (Memory),
and it can be changed in 64-KB increments if your application program requires it.
MS-DOS accesses different areas of the computer's memory in different ways. The
following memory map shows the available memory and how MS-DOS uses it.
Configuring Memory F-3
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Memory Areas
Extended Memory
Extended memory is internal RAM above 1024 KB. MS-DOS cannot directly access
Extended memory as system memory, but the memory can be configured as one or more
RAM disks. It can also be accessed by application programs specially written to use
Extended memory. The HIMEM.SYS device driver described later in this appendix
enables MSDOS programs to use an extra 64-KB region located just above the 1-MB
mark for storage of code and data.
Note: Some application programs that run in 386 enhanced mode (such as Windows
3.0) require special extended memory managers. Use the extended memory manager
provided with your application, if available. Otherwise, use the MS-DOS 5.0 version
furnished with your computer.
Expanded Memory
Expanded memory is memory conforming to the Expanded Memory Specification (EMS)
developed by Lotus/Intel/Microsoft, and is known as LIM-EMS. The TravelMate 3000
WinSX supports EMS version 4. O.
Expanded memory is accessed by allocating an area (usually 64 KB) of system memory
between 640 KB and 1 MB (and between 256 KB and 640 KB when the /O option is used)
as a "window." Pages of data are passed to and from Expanded memory through this
window, which is called the pageframe. The page frame is divided into at least four
physical pages of 16 KB each.
The total amount of internal memory above 640 KB can be assigned to either Extended
memory or Expanded memory.
The Expanded Memory Manager (EMM386.EXE) manages the interface between the
program and Expanded memory, bringing data in and out through the page frame as
required.
F-4 Configuring Memory
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Memory
Before you can use Expanded memory, you must install the EMM386.EXE device driver
as described in the next section, "Memory Device Drivers." You need not install the
Expanded memory driver if your application program does not support use of Expanded
memory.
Configuring Memory F-5
Memory Device Drivers
The following four device drivers are provided to manage the TravelMate 3000 WinSX
memory:
q
HIMEM.SYS - device driver, furnished on the C:\DOS directory, is an
extended memory manager that supervises the use of the computer's
Extended memory so that no two application programs can use the same
memory at the same time.
q
EMM386.EXE - device driver, furnished on the C:\DOS directory,
supports LIM-EMS Expanded memory.
q
RAMDRIVE.sys - device driver, furnished on the C:\DOS directory,
supports RAM disks in standard, Extended and Expanded memory.
q
SMARTDRV.SYS - device driver, furnished on the C: \DOS directory,
for use with a hard disk and Extended or Expanded memory that
supports disk-caching to speed up reading from the hard disk.
Installing Device Drivers
To install a driver, add a DEVICE command line to your CONFIG.SYS file sililar to the
following, using the MS-DOS EIT utility or a word processor that saves text files in
ASCII format.
DEVICE=C:\DOS\QQQQ.QX [options]
You must then restart the computer to load the new - CONFIG.SYS settings and activate
the driver(s).
F-6 Configuring Memory
Memory Device. Drivers
EMM386.EXE
The EMS memory manager provided with your TravelMate 3000 WinSX, the
EMM386.EXE device driver, conforms to version 4.00 of the Lotus/Intel/Microsoft
Expanded Memory Specification (EMS). EMM386.EXE enables areas of system memory
to be used as Expanded memory.
The EMM386.ExE device driver must be installed before you can use Expanded memory.
To install EMM386.EXE in its simplest form, include the following command line in
your CONFIG.SYS file before any other DEVICE commands that use Expanded memory
(for example, RAMDRIVE.SYS) so that the any other device drivers can use the memory
manager, but after the HIMEM.SYS command line:
DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE [options]
Parameters (also called switches or options) for the EMM386.ExE driver are described in
the Microsoft Windows User's Guide furnished with your new computer. After it loads,
the memory manager determines the amount of Expanded memory in the system and
performs any required initialization.
Note: Do not use EMM386.EXE with Windows 3.0 in 386 enhanced mode. If the
EMM386.EXE line has been added to your CONFIG.SYS file, delete the line when using
Windows 3.0 furnished with your computer.
Some application programs may require 'backfill' memory, which is the unused area of
standard memory that can be used by EMM386.EXE as Expanded memory. For example,
an application program may require only 256 KB or 512 KB of standard memory, leaving
384 KB and 128 KB of backfill memory space, respectively, for use as Expanded memory.
Configuring Memory
F-7
Memory Device Drivers
The Shadow Rom memory you can select at the Setup Program enables mapping the B10S
and Video BIOS into high speed memory for faster operation. When not selected, the
shadow memory is available for use as Expanded or Extended memory. The shadow
memory area is limited to 128 KB.
Your TravelMate 3000 WinSX provides 4 MB of RAM (main memory) standard. Only
the standard 4 MB can be used as system base memory (640 KB) and shadow memory
(128 KB), and cannot be increased by adding additional memory. However, up to 2 MB
of optional additional memory can be used as Extended and/or Expanded memory and can
be combined with any of the standard 4 MB of memory not used for base or shadow
memory.
See the Microsoft MS-DOS User's Guide and Reference furnished with your new
computer for detailed instructions on installing and configuring expanded memory.
HIMEM.SYS
HIMEM.SYS is an eXtended Memory Manager (XMM) conforming to eXtended Memory
Specifications (XMS), version 2. O. HIMEM.SYS uses 64 KB of the high-memory area
(HMA) at the beginning of Extended memory to store a single TSR program or device
driver, or it uses this area for data storage. This effectively increases the size of standard
memory for use by your main application program. In order to use HMA, you must have
at least 64 KB of Extended memory.
To install HIMEM.SYS in its simplest form, include the following command line in your
CONFIG.SYS file before any other device commands that use Extended memory:
DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS
In this form, HIMEM.SYS will use default values, and access to HMA will be on a 'first
come-first served' basis.
F-8 Configuring Memory
Memory Device Drivers
Note: When using Windows 3.0, always use the HIMEM.SYS device driver included
on your Microsoft MS-DOS 5.0 floppy. See 'EMM386.EXE" earlier in this appendix for
operating instructions in 386 enhanced or standard mode, and see your Windows and
MS-DOS manuals for more details.
RAMDRIVE.SYS
A RAM disk is a portion of your computer's memory configured to simulate a disk drive.
Such a disk, which may be called a virtual disk, can be accessed much faster than a
normal disk drive.
The data stored on a RAM disk disappears when computer power is turned off, so you
must copy the contents of the RAM disk to a floppy disk or to the hard disk before turning
off power. You can do this using the furnished Laptop File Manager utility or the MSDOS COPY command to copy all files from the RAM disk, or you can set up a batch file
to do it automatically. Unlike a normal disk, a RAM disk does not require formatting
before use.
To set up a RAM disk, include the following line in your CONFIG.SYS file:
DEVICE=C:\DOS\RAMDRIVE.SYS [size]
Specify the size in kilobytes. The minimum size is 16 KB, and the default value is 64 KB.
Several other options are available for setting up a RAM disk. Refer to your BatteryPro &
Productivity Software User's Manual for details.
Configuring Memory
F-9
Memory Device Drivers
The RAM disk is given the drive letter that follows the last drive letter being used by your
system. For example:
q
If your hard disk is configured as drive C, the RAM disk is drive D.
q
If your ROM disk is drive C and your hard disk drive is drive D, the
RAM disk is Drive E.
SMARTDRV.SYS
SMARTDRV.SYS is a disk-caching program used to reduce the time it takes your
computer to read data from the hard disk.
When SMARTDRV.SYS is installed, information from the hard disk is temporarily stored
in a cache in Extended or Expanded memory. When needed, the data can be accessed by
the processor directly from the cache memory. The data on the hard disk is updated
automatically to reflect the changes in the data stored in the cache. SMARTDRV.SYS
works best when set up in Expanded memory, but also performs well in Extended
memory.
To install SMARTDRV.SYS in its simplest form, include the following command line in
your CONFIG.SYS file:
DEVICE=C:\DOS\SMARTDRV.SYS
In this form, a 256-KB cache will be set up in Extended memory.
If you need to specify a particular size for the cache, or if you want the cache to be in
Expanded memory, refer to your MS-DOS and Windows manuals.
F-10 Configuring Memory
G
Connector Pin Assignments
RS-232C Connector
Nine-Pin RS-232C Serial ConneCtor
Pin No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Signal Name
Abbreviation
Carrier detect
Receive data
Transmit data
Data terminal ready
Signal ground
Data set ready
Request to send
Clear to send
Ring indicator
Direction
CD
RD
TD
DTR
SG
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
Input
Input
Output
Output
Input
Output
Input
Input
25-Pin CentroniCS-Type
Parallel Connector
Pin No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18-25
Signal Name
Strobe
Data 0
Data 1
Data 2
Data 3
Data 4
Data 5
Data 6
Data 7
Acknowledge
Busy
Paper empty
Select
Auto feed
Printer error
Initialize printer
Select input
Ground
Abbreviation
STROBEDATAO
DATAI.
DATA2
DATA3
DATA4
DATA5
DATA6
DATA7
ACKBUSY
PE
SLCT
AUTO FEEDPERRORINITSLCT INGND
Direction
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Input
Input
Input
Input
Output
Input
Output
Output
Connector Pin Assignments G- 1
Connector Pin Assignments
15-Pin VGA External
Monitor Connector
Pin No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Note:
Signal Name
Red video
Green video
Blue video
Not used
Ground
Red return
Green return
Blue return
Not used
Ground
Not used
Not used
Horizontal sync
Vertical sync
Not used
Direction
Output
Output
Output
Input
Input
Input
Output
Output
Monochrome monitors use green video for all video input and ignore red and blue video.
Six-Pin TravelPoint/Mouse
Connector
Pin No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
G-2 Connector Pin Assignments
Signal Name
Data`
Not used
Ground
+5 volts
Mouse clock
Not used
Abbreviation
MDATA
GND
VCC
MCLK
H
Screen Standards
This appendix summarizes the screen standards supported by the TravelMate 3000
WinSX Notebook Computer's internal display adapter.
MDA (Monochrome Display Adapter)
The MDA standard supports a 720-by-350 monochrome text display using a 9-by- 14
pixel character box. The TravelMate 3000 WinSX LCD screen supports MDA by
displaying an 80column by 25-line monochrome text in an 8-by-16 pixel character box in
a 640-by-400 pixel display area centered on the screen.
CGA (Color Graphics Adapter)
The CGA standard supports 640-by-200 pixel two-color graphics or 320-by-200 pixel
four-color graphics and uses an 8-by-8 pixel character box in text mode.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX LCD screen supports CGA by displaying text in an 80column by 25-line text display in an 8-by- 16 pixel character box in a 640-by-400 pixel
display area centered on the screen.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX supports color graphics by displaying color in two
resolutions:
Resolution: 320 by 200 pixels with four shades of gray
One pixel is converted to a 2 x 2 cell
Display area:
640 x 400
Resolution: 640 by 200 pixels with two shades of gray
One pixel is converted to a 1 x 2 cell
Display area:
640 x 400
Screen Standards H-1
Screen Standards
EGA (Enhanced Graphics Adapter)
The EGA standard supports 640-by-350 pixel monochrome or 16-color graphics, 640-by200 pixel and 320-by-200 pixel 16-color graphics. The EGA standard also uses an 8-by14 pixel character box for text displays.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX LCD screen Supports EGA by displaying text in an 80column by 25-line text display with 16 shades of gray (selectable from 32 shades) in an 8by- 16 pixel character box in a 640-by-400 pixel display area centered on the screen.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX LCD supports color graphics in three resolutions:
Resolution: 320 by 200 In 16 of 32 shades of gray
One pixel is converted to a 2 x 2 cell
Display area:
640 x 400
Resolution: 640 by 200 in 16 of 32 shades of gray
One pixel is converted to a 1 x 2 cell
Display area:
640 x 400
Resolution: 640 by 350 pixels with 2 shades of gray or monochrome
One pixel is displayed as a 1 x 1 cell
Display area:
640 x 350
VGA (Video Graphics Array)
The VGA standard supports 640-by-480 pixel monochrome or 16 of 64 color graphics and
320-by-200 pixel 256-color graphics. The VGA standard uses an 8-by- 16 pixel character
box for text display.
H-2 Screen Standards
Screen Standards
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX LCD screen supports vGA by displaying text in an 80column by 25-line text display with 16 shades of gray (selectable from 32 shades) in an 8by- 1 6 pixel character box in a 640-by-400 pixel display area centered on the screen.
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX supports color graphics by displaying colors as 32 shades of
gray in two modes:
Resolution: 320 by 200 pixels with 256 shades of gray mapped into 32 shades
One pixel is converted to a 2 x 2 cell
Display area:
640 x 400
Resolution: 640 by 480 with 16 shades of 32 shades of gray
One pixel is displayed as a 1 x 1 cell
Display area:
640 x 480
HGC (Hercules Graphics Card)
The HGC standard supports a high-resolution 720-by-348 pixel monochrome text or
graphics display. The text display for HGC mode is the same as for MDA mode. The
TravelMate 3000 WinSX LCD screen does not Support HGC graphics mode. To display
HGC graphics, connect a multifrequency monitor to the external monitor connector on the
left side panel of the computer.
Screen Standards H-3
Screen Standards
External Monitor Support
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX supports all IBM standard VGA video in addition to 800 by
600, 1024 by 768, and 132column Paradise TM extended modes.
Paradise Modes Supported
Mode No.
(hex)
Resolution
Font
Size
132-column Text Modes (Supported on CRT only)*
54
32 x 43 x 16
8x8
55
132 x 25 x 16
9x 16
56
132 x 43 (mono)
8x8
57
132 x 25 (mono)
9 x 16
Clock
Memory
44.7 MHz
44.7 MHz
44.7 MHz
44.7 MHz
256 KB
256 KB
256 KB
256 KB
640 x 400 Modes
5E
640 x 400 x 256
9x 16
25 Mhz
256 KB
640 x 480 Modes
5F
640 x 480 x 256
9x 16
25 MHz
512 KB
800 x 600 Super VGA Modes (Supported on CRT only)
58/6A
800 x 600 x 16
8x8
59/613
800 x 600 (mono)
8x8
44.7 MHz
44.7 MHz
256 KB
256 KB
1024 x 768 Modes (Supported on CRT only)
5A
1024 x 768 x 2
9 x 16
5B
1024 x 768 x 4
9x 16
5D
1024 x 768 x 16
9 x 16
44.7 MHz
44.7 MHz
44.7 MHz
256 KB
256 KB
512 KB
*The 132-column text mode requires special software drivers; you should specify
PARADISE as the type of VGA controller. Some drivers are provided by TI, and some
are provided by application programs.
dag Super vGA modes are not supported on IBM PS/2 8503, 8512, 8513, or 8514
monitors or the equivalent fixed-frequency displays (the 8503 is a monochrome display).
The vertical and horizontal size and position controls on monitors can be adjusted to
display the entire 800-by-600 graphics mode Image without distortion.
H-4 Screen Standards
Glossary
This glossary explains many of the terms found in this manual as well as other computerrelated terms you may encounter.
access - The ability to obtain data from or place data into internal memory, a floppy
diskette, or the hard disk.
access shutter - A metal cover on a floppy diskette that slides open to allow the computer
to read or write data.
adapter - A device that connects an option to the computer.
application program - A program that instructs the operating system to perform specific
tasks by using either prepared programs, such as a word-processing program, or
programming languages such as BASIC, that allow you to design your own programs.
archiving - The process of storing back-up copies of data files in a specific location.
ASCII - An acronym for the American Standard Code for Information Interchange; an
agreed-upon standard for the assignment of numeric values to letters, digits, punctuation
marks, and control codes. The computer processes only numbers even though characters,
letters, and graphic symbols appear on the screen. The ASCII list is a set of numeric
values for the most frequently used characters. The computer converts these numeric
values to their binary equivalents.
asynchronous communications software - The software used to communicate with a
subscription information service, send or receive electronic mail, or process data using a
remote computer.
Glossary 1
Glossary
backlight - A feature that allows you to control background brightness for better
readability.
backing up - Duplicating a program or file onto a separate storage medium so that a copy
will be preserved against possible loss or damage to the original.
backup - A duplicate copy of information or programs, usually stored on a diskette and
kept in a separate location in case the original is lost or damaged.
BASIC - An acronym for Beginner's AR-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code; a
programming language widely used because many of its commands resemble everyday
language.
battery, battery pack - An electrical power storage device that can be installed in, or
affixed to, your computer to provide electrical power.
baud - A signal element change per second. If a signal element change has only one bit,
baud equals bits per second.
binary - A system of numbering that uses patterns of only zero's and one's. Each item of
information, whether a letter, graphic symbol, or an instruction, is converted to a binary
number before it is processed by your computer.
BIOS - An acronym for Basic Input-Output System; instructions stored in read-only
memory (Rom) at the factory that check hardware components and load the computer
operating system (MS-DOS, for example) into the computer when you boot it.
bit - A binary digit (0 or 1); the smallest unit of information used by your computer.
bits per second - The speed at which your computer receives or sends data to a device
such as a modem or serial printer.
2 Glossary
Glossary
boot - To start your computer; also called start-up and power-up.
bps - See bits per second.
brightness control - A control that allows you to adjust the brightness of the display.
buffer - A portion of the computer's memory that temporarily holds information used by a
program; for example, the portion of a document you are working on while using a word
processor.
bug - An error in the hardware or software of your computer that causes an operation to
perform incorrectly.
byte - A grouping of eight binary digits (bits) that your computer treats as one unit;
usually represents one character.
cache - A software device that accumulates copies of recently used disk sectors in RAM.
The application program can then read these copies without accessing the disk, thereby
speeding up the performance of the application.
central processing unit (CPU) - The electronic circuits in your computer where most
processing of information takes place.
character - One of a set of symbols, such as letters, numerals, or punctuation marks, that
can express information when collectively arranged. Although these symbols are
intelligible to humans, they are not understood by your computer. For this reason,
standardized character codes consisting of groups of binary digits have been developed to
allow characters to be processed by computers. In most cases, a character is represented
by 8 bits or I byte.
Glossary 3
Glossary
character set - A system of codes, such as ASCII, that assigns a special standardized
group of binary digits to each character.
clock - A timing device that coordinates all internal events in your computer.
CMOS - An acronym for Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor; a large-scale
integration technology that requires low power consumption and is therefore used for
battery-assisted memory systems.
command - The portion of a computer instruction that specifies what operation is to be
performed.
communications - The electronic transfer of information between computers or between a
terminal and a computer. An example is sending a data file to another computer by using
telephone lines and a modem.
compiler - A program that translates a language, such as BASIC, into a language your
computer can understand. A compiler translates the entire program just once.
computer - A combination of a central processing unit (CPu) and memory designed to
process information. Although a combination of the central processing unit and memory
is defined as a computer, an input device (such as a keyboard) and an output device (such
as a display unit) are required to make the computer useful.
configure - To adapt software so that it sends the correct control codes to external devices
such as printers. Also called customize and set up.
connector - A coupling device that allows your computer to communicate with an
external hardware device such as a printer or another computer.
4 Glossary
Glossary
contrast control - A control that allows you to adjust how data shows up against the
background of the display screen.
control code - A code that initiates some kind of physical control action that is not printed
(such as line feed and tab), turns off an external device, or, in combination with other
characters, defines unique commands (for example, pressing the Ctrl and C keys might
tell the computer to abort a program); a numeric value that instructs the computer or an
external device to perform a specific instruction.
controller - The electronic circuitry that allows communication between the computer
unit and an external device.
conventional memory - Internal RAM up to 640 KB, accessed by MS-DOS directly; also
called main memory and RAM.
coprocessor - An auxiliary processing unit designed to speed up the processing of certain
types of information.
CPU - See central processing unit.
CRT - Abbreviation for cathode ray tube, a common term for a television-like computer
monitor.
CRT Adapter - A hardware option that allows you to use a CRT with your computer.
cursor - A special graphic character on the screen (usually a block or underline shape,
sometimes blinking) that indicates the next position at which a character will be entered
or deleted from the keyboard.
customize - See configure.
Glossary 5
Glossary
data - Information that is input to your computer and is then processed by mathematical
and logical operations so that, ultimately, it can be output in a sensible form. It usually
consists of numerals, letters, or symbols that describe an object, idea, condition,
relationship, or other information.
data base - A collection of related information; usually a large number of data files stored
in one or more storage media.
data file - A grouping of information with common descriptive attributes. For example, a
customer data file might consist of basic customer information. Each file might represent
one customer.
data processing - The input, storage, manipulation, and dissemination of information
using sequences of mathematical and logical operations.
default value - A value that your computer assumes as a response to a prompt, unless
instructed otherwise.
device driver -The small programs used to control external devices or to run other
programs. A device driver directs production, manipulation, and presentation of
appropriate signals by the computer so that the external device will perform as required.
diagnostics programs - The programs that test the components of your computer to verify
proper operation or to diagnose problems.
directory - The list of all files, which itself is a Me, on your computer storage medium for
easy reference.
disk controller - A device that controls how information is transferred between the
system unit and the hard disk or diskette drives.
6 Glossary
Glossary
disk drive - A device that rotates magnetic media and accesses data by means of a
read/write head.
diskette - See floppy diskette.
DOS - The disk operating system, programs that act as translator between you and your
computer; also see operating system.
expanded memory - The memory that utilizes an area of the computer memory as a
window, through which pages of data are "passed."
expansion bus connector - A coupling device that connects an external device to your
computer.
extended memory - The internal RAM above the 1,024 KB of conventional memory.
external commands - The utility programs of an operating system (for example, MSDOS) that enable you to perform occasional operations such as copying an entire floppy or
partitioning a hard disk drive.
external devices -The devices, usually for input and output, connected to your computer
to increase its capability and usefulness. Examples include printers and modems.
file - A group of organized data assembled for one particular purpose, considered as one
unit, and stored in permanent offline storage, such as a disk drive or tape.
filename - A name that distinguishes one file from another; may consist of alphabetical
characters, numeric characters, or a combination of both.
firmware - The software that is built into the hardware of a computer and controls the
functions of the hardware.
Glossary 7
Glossary
fixed disk drive - See hard disk drive.
floppy diskette - A flexible, flat, circular medium that magnetically records and provides
access to stored data. It is divided into concentric circular tracks and wedge-shaped
sectors. The diskette is sealed in a protective square envelope that is lined with a soft
material that cleans as the diskette rotates. The cover has several openings and notches to
accommodate the drive.
formatting - The preparation of various types of magnetic media to accept data. For
example, before you can use diskettes, track and sector information must be set for the
controller. After the diskette is formatted, it can be used for normal input-output and
retrieval operations.
function keys - The keys that perform editing functions in MS-DOS and have
application-defined functions at other times.
graphics - Visual patterns displayed on the screen or produced on a printer; usually
formed by patterns of dots.
hard disk drive - A combination of a drive mechanism and permanently sealed storage
medium; capable of storing large amounts of information.
hardware - The physical components of a computer: central processing unit, internal
memory, drives, printer, display unit, option boards, external devices, etc. Contrast with
software.
hardware options - Any of several devices that can make your computer more efficient
and powerful for your applications.
head - A small electromagnetic device that reads, records, and erases data on a magnetic
storage medium, such as a drive or tape cartridge. Also called a read-write head.
8 Glossary
Glossary
hexadecimal - A numbering system that consists of 16 symbols, 0 to 9 and A to F; used by
programmers as a convenient method of expressing binary values.
input - Information that enters the computer.
input/output - An operation that transfers information from the central processing unit to
a device or from a device to the central processing unit. An example is storing and
retrieving information with a diskette.
integrated circuit - A microscopic grouping of electronic components and their
connections mounted on a small chip of material, usually silicon.
internal commands - The core program of the operating system (for example, MS-DOS)
that consists of commands necessary for day-to-day operations, such as copying files.
internal memory - A temporary storage area for information (programs and data) in
binary form.
KB - An abbreviation for 1,024 bytes; used to designate the memory capacity of a
computer or the storage capacity of a storage device.
keyboard - A device, similar to a typewriter keyboard, that allows you to communicate
with your computer.
kilobyte - 1,024 bytes, abbreviated KB.
LCD - See liquid crystal display.
liquid crystal display (LCD)- A display made of material, the reflectance or
transmittance of which changes when an electric field is applied.
Glossary 9
Glossary
load - To copy information from a storage device, such as a diskette or a hard disk drive,
into internal memory of the computer. Also called download.
loop - A series of instructions or one instruction in a program that is repeated a prescribed
number of times, followed by a branch instruction that exits the program from the loop.
main directory - The primary directory of a diskette or a hard disk drive. Also called a
root directory.
math coprocessor - An auxiliary processing unit used to speed up the processing of
mathematical calculations.
MB - An abbreviation for megabyte; used to designate the memory capacity of a computer
or the storage capacity of a storage device.
megabyte - 1,024 kilobytes.
microprocessor - A central processing unit assembled on a single silicon integratedcircuit chip.
modem - A device, separate from or installed in your computer, that allows it to use
telephone lines to communicate with other devices such as computers.
monitor - A view screen to which a computer sends graphics or text data you can see.
mouse - A device, manipulated by hand, that moves a cursor or pointer in the same
direction as the movement created when the mouse is moved.
multitasking - The concurrent execution of two or more programs.
10 Glossary
Glossary
multiuser System - A system in which the computer and other external devices are shared
in any one of several arrangements by several people.
operating system - A set of programs that control the operation of the computer.
Typically, the operating system regulates space allocation, keeps track of files, saves and
retrieves files, and manages other control functions associated with data storage. Also see
DOS.
partitioning - Dividing a hard disk drive into work areas, usually approximately 20 MB
in size, to accommodate the working capacity of the operating system.
path, pathname - A sequence of directory names, usually ending in a filename, all
separated by backslashes (\), to tell your computer where to find particular subdirectories
and files.
port - An input-output connection between external devices and the computer. The port
has both male and female connectors that contain a specific number of pins.
processing - The calculating, sorting, storing, and retrieving of information.
program - A list of instructions that tells your computer how to perform a specific task.
program file - A program stored on a storage medium such as a floppy diskette or hard
disk drive.
Glossary 11
Glossary
programming language - A set of words, abbreviations, or symbols that are converted
into the binary numbers that represent instructions to the computer. Programming
languages enable programmers to write instructions using words or symbols and avoid the
time-consuming task of entering the long string of 0s and ls that represent the numeric
language of the computer. A programmer can use any one of several different
programming languages designed for a particular computer. Some programming
languages have more than one version (for example, Ms-BASIC and Gw-BAsic).
RAM - See random access memory.
random-access memory (RAM) - A type of internal memory used for the temporary
storage of information. The contents of random-access memory can be altered, allowing
information stored there to be processed. Unlike read-only memory, information in RAM
is usually lost when power is turned off. For this reason, information in RAM must be
saved on a storage device before the computer is turned off. Also called main memory
and system memory.
read - To access information from a storage device.
read-only memory - A type of internal memory that contains permanent instructions for
your computer, The contents of read-only memory cannot be altered. For this reason,
essential instructions are permanently stored in Rom. These instructions, such as those
that execute the self-test, are not lost when the computer is turned off.
resolution - The contrast between the display and the background on an LCD screen.
ROM - See read-only memory.
self-test - An automatic check the computer performs every time it is turned on.
12 Glossary
Glossary
Set UP - See configure.
software - Computer programs, usually supplied on floppies or on Rom. Contrast with
hardware.
system board - An internal circuit board that holds the integrated circuits for the
microprocessor, memory, and clock in your computer.
turbo operation - A feature of a computer that increases its data processing speed by 50
to 100 percent.
typematic - A feature that generates a character as long as an alphanumeric key is
pressed.
working copy - A copy of a floppy that is used in day-today operations while the original
is kept in storage. This term also can mean a floppy that has both an operating system
and an application program on it.
working directory - the default directory used by an application program when it first is
loaded onto the hard disk.
write - To record information on a storage device.
write-protect tab - A switch on a floppy diskette that prevents recording data over
existing data on the diskette.
Glossary 13
..............................................................
.................................................... Index
a ............................................................
bits................................................... 1-3
AC Adapter ...........................................
boot
connecting...................................3-6
quick .........................................4-19
indicator lights ............................3-8
warm .........................................3-18
AC Adapter jack ...............................2-8
bottom panel .................................... 2-9
adjusting, TravelPoint cursor .......... 3-26
Break key........................................2-17
agency approvals ............................. A-4
brightness control............................. 2-4
alarms....................................................
bytes................................................. 1-3
cover closed............................... 4-14
C
audible, see beeper..................... 4-18
cable options .................................... 1-8
Alt (alternate) key........................... 2-12
cache.............................................. F-10
ALTVID command......................... 6-17
cache memory ................................ F-10
application program........................ 1-10
Caps Lock indicator ........................2-20
application programs .............................
Caps Lock key........................2-11, 4-18
guidelines for installing...............5-2
card slot cover, option ...................... 2-9
using with TravelPoint .............. 3-27caring for, battery pack ............................... 7-6
arrow keys, ............................................
case, cleaning................................... 7-3
see cursor control keys .............. 2-13 CGA ........................................................H-1
AUTOEXEC file, default..................5-4
character sets
AUTOEXEC.BAT file......................5-4
Canadian-French ........................ B-5
b............................................................
multilingual................................ B-3
Backspace key................................. 2-12
Portuguese .................................. B-4
backup ..............................................3-4
United States .............................. B-2
battery ...................................................
cleaning
removing................................... 3-14
case ............................................ 7-3
automatic discharge................... 3-12
screen ......................................... 7-3
caring for ....................................7-6
the computer............................... 7-3
conditioning .............................. 3-10
clock, setting.................................... 4-7
using normally .......................... 3-12
color coding, keyboard ....................2-10
battery pack, extra....................1-8, 6-15
combination keys ............................2-16
battery power .........................................
commands, ALTVID.......................6-17
conserving power ........................7-4
conditioning the battery...................3-10
saving .........................................2-3
CONFIG.SYS file ............................ 5-4
BatteryPro, restoring...................... E-11
changing for mouse ...................3-28
baud rate, setting ............................ 4-21
default ........................................ 5-6
beeper, setting................................. 4-18
configuration, system ......................4-18
binary digits......................................F-1
configuring, memory........................ F-2
BIOS .......................................1-4, 1-10
BIOS self-tests ..........................E-7, E-9
Index 1
Index
connectors........................................................... 1-5, 2-6
AC Adapter..........................................................2-8
expansion bus.......................................................2-8
external monitor...........................................2-7, G-2
modem.................................................................2-7
mouse ..........................................................2-7, G-2
parallel................................................................G-1
parallel interface ..................................................2-7
pin assignments ..................................................G-1
RS-232C .............................................................G-1
serial....................................................................2-7
TravelPoint ..................................................2-7, G-2
conserving battery power.............................................7-4
Contrast control ..........................................................2-5
controls
brightness ............................................................2-4
Contrast ...............................................................2-5
display .................................................................2-4
standard/revers (video).........................................2-5
TravelPoint ........................................................3-24
conventions used in manual .........................................vii
cover alar, setting......................................................4-19
cover-closed alarm ....................................................4-14
CPU specifications .....................................................A-1
CPU speed ..................................................................7-4
keys....................................................................2-18
setting ................................................................2-15
Ctrl (control) key ......................................................2-12
CTS, setting..............................................................4-21
cursor
control keys........................................................2-13
setting ................................................................4-17
mode, setting ..................................................... 4-17
specifications ...................................................... A-1
time-out setting......................................... 4-13, 4-14
drive, floppy, using................................................... 3-19
drivers, epanded
memory ...............................................................F-6
drives specifications................................................... A-3
DSR, setting ............................................................. 4-22
d
databits, setting.........................................................4-21
date, setting ................................................................4-7
DCD, setting.............................................................4-22
default AUTOEXEC file .............................................5-4
default CONFIG.SYS file............................................5-6
Del (delete) key.........................................................2-14
device drivers
EMM.EXE.......................................................... F-7
installing............................................................. F-6
diagnostics
error codes ..........................................................D-6
power-on.............................................................D-1
AUTOEXEC.BAT............................................... 5-4
CONFIG.SYS...................................................... 5-4
floppies
caring for........................................................... 3-19
inserting ............................................................ 3-21
using ................................................................. 3-20
proram ................................................................D-1
self-test ...............................................................D-1
dimensions.................................................................A-2
dircharge, automatic battery......................................3-12
display
controls ................................................................2-4
LCD.....................................................................2-2
e
echo print function ................................................... 2-13
EGA.......................................................................... H-2
embedded numeric keypad........................................ 2-14
EMM.EXE device driver ............................................F-6
Enter key.................................................................. 2-11
error cods, diagnostics ............................................... D-6
error messages, power-up ...........................................E-7
Esc (escape) key ....................................................... 2-13
Ethernet adapter option ............................................ 6-15
Ethernet, LAN adapter option..................................... 1-9
expanded, memory ..............................................F-4, F-7
expanded, memmeory specification ............................F-4
expansion bus connector............................................. 2-8
expansion station option .................................... 1-9, 6-16
exetneded memory....................................... 4-8, F-4, F-8
eXtended memory manager ........................................F-8
external monitro ........................................................ H-4
connector..................................................... 2-7, G-2
option ................................................................ 6-17
switching to ....................................................... 6-17
f
files
2 Index
Index
Floppy Disk indicator.........................................2-20
floppy diskette......................................................1-6
floppy drive..........................................................1-6
setting .........................................................4-10
using ...........................................................3-19
Fn (function) key................................................2-12
formatting, hard disk drive...................................1-6
function key .......................................................2-10
..........................................................................
g
guidelines..................................................................
allocating memory.........................................4-9
installing applications ...................................5-2
operating.......................................................3-3
h
hard disk .................................................................1
caring for ......................................................3-4
formatting .....................................................1-6
indicator......................................................2-20
setting .........................................................4-10
time-out setting ...........................................4-14
hardware options..................................................1-7
hardware, computer..............................................1-2
help, online ...............................................3-29, 3-30
help displays .............................................3-29, 3-30
MS-DOS commands....................................3-29
utilities........................................................3-30
Hercules Graphics Card ......................................H-3
HGC ...................................................................H-3
high-memory area ............................................... F-8
HIMEM.SYS ...................................................... F-8
HIMEM.SYS device driver ................................. F-6
humidity, specifications.......................................A-2
i
I/O, serial...........................................................4-21
indicator lights ...................................................2-19
indicators ..................................................................
AC Adapter...................................................3-8
Caps Lock ...................................................2-20
Floppy Disk.................................................2-20
Hard Disk....................................................2-20
Low Battery.................................................2-19
Num Lock ..........................................2-15, 2-20
Power.................................................2-17, 2-19
Scroll Lock..................................................2-21
Turbo ..........................................................2-20
initial program loader ..........................................1-4
Ins (insert) key ...................................................2-13
installing
application programs.....................................5-2
device drivers ............................................... F-6
TravelPoint .................................................3-22
installing the internal battery ...............................3-9
internal battery, installing ....................................3-9
internal modem options.................................1-7, 6-8
IPL .....................................................................1-4
j
jack, ac adapter ....................................................2-8
k
keyboard ...................................................... 1-4, C-1
color coding ................................................2-10
installing.......................................................6-6
layouts.......................................................... C-1
overview......................................................2-10
setting .........................................................4-18
specifications................................................A-3
U.S............................................................... C-1
keys
function.......................................................2-10
Alt ..............................................................2-12
arrow ..........................................................2-13
Backspace ...................................................2-12
Break ..........................................................2-17
Caps Lock ..........................................2-11, 4-18
combination ................................................2-16
Ctrl (control)...............................................2-12
cursor control ..............................................2-13
Del..............................................................2-14
Enter ...........................................................2-11
Esc..............................................................2-13
Fn ...............................................................2-12
Ins...............................................................2-13
Index 3
Index
keys (continued)..............................................................
Num Lock ......................................................... 4-18
NumLk.............................................................. 2-14
Pause................................................................. 2-16
PrtSc ................................................................. 2-12
repeat rate ......................................................... 4-18
ScrLk ....................................................... 2-16, 4-18
Setup................................................................. 2-17
Shift .................................................................. 2-11
speed................................................................. 4-15
Stndby............................................................... 2-17
SysRq................................................................ 2-12
Tab.................................................................... 2-11
Turbo ................................................................ 2-18
l
Laptop Manager..............................................................
main menu .......................................................... 5-7
quick commands ................................................. 5-8
single-character commands ................................. 5-8
using ................................................................... 5-7
LCD screen ......................................................... 1-4, 2-2
LCD screen controls................................................... 2-4
left side panel............................................................. 2-6
lock keys .................................................................. 4-18
Low Battery indicator............................................... 2-19
m
M byte........................................................................ 1-4
main memory, see RAM............................................. F-1
main menu, Laptop Manager ..................................... 5-7
maintenance, computer .............................................. 7-2
math coprocessor option..................................... 1-8, 6-9,
MDA .........................................................................H-1
memory
areas......................................................F-3, F-4, F-5
cache................................................................. F-10
configuring.......................................................... F-2
expanded....................................................... F-4, F7
expanded memory specification........................... F-4
extended................................................4-8, F-4, F-8
guidelines for allocating ...................................... 4-9
high-memory area ............................................... F-8
HIMEM.SYS....................................................... F-8
RAMDRIVE.SYS ............................................... F-9
4 Index
setting ..................................................................5-3
setting up .............................................................4-8
standard ...............................................................4-8
message, informational .............................................. E-9
microprocessor............................................................1-3
modem connector........................................................2-7
monitor, external connector ........................................2-7
mouse
also see TravelPoint ...........................................3-22
and CONFIG.SYS file........................................3-28
connector ............................................................G-2
option.................................................................6-16
port ......................................................................2-7
setting ................................................................4-20
MS-DOS, restoring .................................................. E-10
MS-DOS help display ...............................................3-29
n
Num Lock
(number lock) indicator.............................2-15, 2-20
key.....................................................................4-18
numeric keypad...........................................................6-2
attaching ..............................................................6-2
connector .............................................................2-6
embedded...........................................................2-14
numeric keypad option................................................1-8
NumLk (number lock) key ........................................2-14
operating environment ................................................3-3
humidity ..............................................................3-3
temperature..........................................................3-3
operating system .......................................................1-10
operator panel .............................................................2-9
option communication port
setting ................................................................4-22
options
battery pack, extra................................................1-8
cables...................................................................1-8
Ethernet adapter.................................................6-15
Ethernet LAN adapter ..........................................1-9
expansion station ........................................1-9, 6-16
external monitors ...............................................6-17
extra battery pack...............................................6-15
internal modem ....................................................1-7
Index
options (continued)
internal modems.................................................. 6-8
math coprocessor.......................................... 1-8, 6-9
mouse................................................................ 6-16
numeric keypad ............................................ 1-8, 6-2
overview.............................................................. 1-7
printers....................................................... 1-9, 6-16
RAM modules ....................................... 1-7, 6-3, 6-4
........................................................................... 6-5
SCSI .......................................................... 1-9, 6-15
overview of manual .................................................... viii
battery..................................................................7-4
settings...............................................................4-12
time-out .............................................................4-13
power source specifications ........................................A-2
power switch...............................................................2-9
power-on diagnostics .................................................D-1
power-up messages .............................................E-7, E-9
printer options ............................................................1-9
problems, solving....................................................... E-1
programs, setup...........................................................4-3
PrtSc (print screen) key.............................................2-12
p
panel
bottom................................................................. 2-9
leftside ................................................................ 2-6
operator............................................................... 2-9
rear ..................................................................... 2-8
right side ............................................................. 2-6
parallel
connector ............................................................G-1
port ..................................................................... 2-7
ports setting....................................................... 4-20
parity, setting ........................................................... 4-21
password
changing ........................................................... 5-12
incorrect............................................................ 5-14
installing ........................................................... 5-11
loading.............................................................. 5-10
removing........................................................... 5-13
typing................................................................ 5-14
using ................................................................. 5-10
Pause key ................................................................. 2-16
physical dimensions ...................................................A-2
pin assignments, connector ........................................G-1
ports.................................................................... 1-5, 2-6
mouse................................................................ 4-20
setting ............................................................... 4-22
Power indicator ............................................... 2-17, 2-19
power savings
backlight off ............................................. 4-13, 4-14
q
quick boot .................................................................4-19
quick commands
Laptop Manager...................................................5-8
r
RAM explained................................................... 1-4, F-1
RAM disk, explained ................................................. F-9
RAM disks................................................................. F-6
RAM module option ...................................................6-3
installing..............................................................6-3
RAM Modules ............................................................1-7
RAMDRIVE.SYS device driver .......................... F-6, F-9
random-access memory...............................................1-4
read-only memory .......................................................1-4
rear panel....................................................................2-8
rebooting...................................................................3-18
removing the battery .................................................3-14
repeat rate.................................................................4-18
resolution, LCD ..........................................................2-3
restarting the system .................................................3-18
restoring
BatteryPro......................................................... E-11
MS-DOS system files ....................................... E-10,
......................................................................... E-11
Windows.................................................................. E-11
right side panel ...........................................................2-6
ROM explained................................................... 1-4, F-1
RS-232C connector ....................................................G-1
Index 5
Index
s
screen........................................................................
cleaning ........................................................7-3
controls .........................................................2-4
screen angle, adjusting .........................................2-3
screen standards..................................................H-1
CGA ............................................................H-1
EGA.............................................................H-2
HGC.............................................................H-3
MDA............................................................H-1
VGA ............................................................H-2
ScrLk (scroll lock) key .......................................2-16
Scroll Lock indicator..........................................2-21
SCSI option.................................................1-9, 6-15
self-test ...............................................................D-1
BIOS.....................................................E-7, E-9
serial I/O............................................................4-21
serial port.............................................................2-7
optional I/O.................................................4-22
setting up, memory...............................................4-8
settings......................................................................
baud rate .....................................................4-21
beeper .........................................................4-18
clock .............................................................4-7
cover alarm .................................................4-19
CPU speed...................................................4-15
cursor..........................................................4-17
data bits.......................................................4-21
date ...............................................................4-7
display.........................................................4-16
display mode ...............................................4-17
floppy drive .................................................4-10
hard disk .....................................................4-10
hard disk drive time-out ..............................4-14
keyboard......................................................4-18
memory.........................................................5-3
option communication port..........................4-22
parallel port.................................................4-20
parity...........................................................4-21
power saving ...............................................4-12
screen..........................................................4-16
standard communication port ..................... 4-21
stop bits...................................................... 4-21
time.............................................................. 4-7
6 Index
time display .........................................................4-8
time-out ......................................................4-13
Setup key ...........................................................2-17
setup program
exiting...........................................................4-5
exiting Windows-based .................................4-6
external communications.............................4-20
hard disk-based .............................................4-3
keyboard keys................................................4-4
ROM-based ...................................................4-4
system options...............................................4-7
user features ................................................4-12
Windows-based .............................................4-4
shadow ROM, setting...........................................4-8
Shift key ............................................................2-11
shock, specifications............................................A-3
SMARTDRV.SYS device driver .............. F-6,F- 1 0
software, learning about .....................................1-10
solving problems................................................. E-1
specifications ......................................................A-1
CPU .............................................................A-1
dimensions...................................................A-2
display .........................................................A-1
drives ...........................................................A-3
humidity.......................................................A-2
keyboard ......................................................A-3
memory........................................................A-1
power source ................................................A-2
shock............................................................A-3
standard ports...............................................A-3
temperature ..................................................A-2
vibration.......................................................A-2
speed
control keys.................................................2-18
key ..............................................................4-15
setting .........................................................4-15
SPEED utility ....................................................4-15
standard communication port
setting .........................................................4-21
standard memory .................................................4-8
standard ports specifications................................A-3
standard/reverse switch ........................................2-5
Index
start-up, system ..................................................3-16
starting the computer .........................................3-16
Stndby (stand by) key .........................................2-17
stop bits, setting .................................................4-21
switches ....................................................................
power ............................................................2-9
standard/reverse ............................................2-5
symbols used in manual ................................... 1 -vii
SysRq (system request) key ................................2-12
system, restarting ...............................................3-18
system board ...............................................1-3, 1-10
system configurations.........................................4-18
t
Tab key ..............................................................2-11
taking care of the computer ..................................7-2
temperature specifications ...................................A-2
time, setting .........................................................4-7
time-out interval.................................................4-13
TravelPoint ...............................................................
adjusting the cursor .....................................3-26
applications, using with...............................3-27
connector ..............................................2-7, G-2
controls and indicators ................................3-24
installing.....................................................3-22
TravelPoint pointing device ...............................3-22
troubleshooting ................................................... E-1
Turbo indicator ..................................................2-20
Turbo key...........................................................2-18
typematic feature, setting ...................................4-18
u
unpacking your computer................................... I -vi
unused memory, setting........................................4-9
utilities
help display.................................................3-30
SPEED.........................................................4-i5
Windows.......................................................5-9
v
VGA ................................................................... H-2
vibration, specifications.......................................A-2
w
Windows
restoring..................................................... E-11
using .............................................................5-9
Index 7
Getting Support for Your TI Product
Texas Instruments and your Texas Instruments authorized reseller want you to succeed with your TI
product. If you have questions about or operating difficulties with your TI product, follow these steps to get
support.
1 . Call your dealer.
Your dealer should be the first person you call when you have questions or difficulties. Your dealer is
familiar with your system requirements and should be able to provide you with the needed information or
service.
2.
Call the appropriate TI number.
For operational support
512-250-7407 (FAX 512-250-6660)
Call the Customer Satisfaction Line when your TI product is functioning, but you have questions about how
to operate it. The Customer Satisfaction Line is available Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 4:30
p.m. CST. The FAX number is available 24 hours/day, 7 days/week. Please have the following information
available when calling (or FAXing):
yy
yy
yy
Name, address, daytime phone number
Product model
Brief description of the symptoms being observed (include the host computer and software
application you are using)
A specialist for your TI product will return your call, usually within eight working hours. All return calls
are free.
For hardware support
Type of Service
Times available
Phone number
Ordering options,
consumable supplies,
or spare parts
8a.m.-6p.m. CST, M-F
8:30a.m.-5p.m. EST, M-F
1-800-847-2787 (U.S.A.)
1-800-268-6314 (Canada)
416-884-9181 (Toronto area)
24 hrs/day FAX
713-894-3950 (U.S.A.)
416-770-2303 (Canada)
1-800-572-3300 (U.S.A.)
1-800-848-3927 (Canada)
Requesting equipment
repair
24 hrs/day, 7 days/wk
Requesting information
about service contracts
or warranty
7:30a.m.-5:30p.m., M-F
8:30a.m.-5p.m. EST, M-F
1-800-847-5757 (U.S.A.)
1-800-268-6314 (Canada)
416-884-9181 (Toronto area)
24 hrs/day FAX
713-894-3808 (U.S.A)
416-770-2303 (Canada)
1-800-336-5236
For information about other TI products
If you have a question about any other TI product, the Customer Response Center can put you in touch with
the right person.
Warranty and Service
The TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer and its Texas Instruments options are warranted for 12 months from
the purchase date.
Standard Warranty
Texas Instruments offers a 1 -day turnaround for domestic units carried in to local Customer Service Centers and a 5day turnaround from receipt time at the National Service Center for units sent to one of the National Service Centers
(Cypress, Texas, U.S.A. for domestic units; Toronto, Canada for Canadian units; or Plymouth, U.K. for international
units) for repair.
The warranty does not include the following:
q
Installation or removal of the computer's options
q
User's required preventive maintenance
q
Routine operational difficulties, such as software problems
For more information about upgrading your warranty, maintenance contract, or customer center locations, please contact
your distributor or telephone Texas Instruments at 1-800-847-5757 (toll free).
If you must return your computer or an option for service, please complete the steps on the following checklist to speed
processing of your order and lessen your inconvenience.
q
Complete a separate Repair Request form (on the next page) for each computer or option you are
returning and include the completed form or forms with your shipment. Make photocopies of the
form if necessary.
q
If you are returning the entire computer and all options, please use the original shipping container,
if possible, or be certain your computer is carefully packed as a delicate electronic instrument.
Note:
Damage caused in shipment because of inadequate packing is not covered by the warranty or maintenance
contract.
q
If your computer or option is still within warranty, attach a copy of your proof of purchase
to the completed Repair Request form. If this repair is covered by a maintenance
agreement, enter the agreement number of the maintenance contract on the form.
Otherwise, attach a purchase order number to authorize payment for repairs.
q
Return the computer and/or options to one of the following addresses:
In the U.S.A.
Texas Instruments Incorporated
ATTN: TI-CURE
24500 Highway 290
Cypress, TX 77429
Telephone 1-800-522-4535 (toll-free)
In Canada
Texas Instruments Canada Limited
ATTN: ITG Customer Service
70 Newkirk Road North
Richmond Hill, Ontario L4C 3G3
Telephone 416-884-9181
Repair Request Form
Your name and address
Your Name
Company Name
Address
City
State
Zip Code
Phone number (
)
Ext.
Product serial number
Unit(s) you are returning (check where applicable)
q
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Computer
q
Expansion Station
q
2 MB RAM Module Kit
q
SCSI Adapter
q
Numeric Keypad
q
Ethernet LAN Adapter
q
80387SX Math Coprocessor
q
Internal Modem
q
AC Adapter
q
Internal Battery
Type of Claim
q
Warranty claim (attach proof of purchase)
q
Maintenance contract (Agreement No.
q
My purchase order number
q
My check is enclosed.
q
Charge to my credit card.
Card Number
q
)
MC
q
Exp. Date
Description of Problem (attach extra sheet if necessary)
VISA
q
AMEX
Texas Instruments reserves the right to change
its product and service offerings at any
time without notice.
TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer
Major Components
Notice
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with th elimits for a Class B digital device pursuant to
Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential instalation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to
radio communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment
does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the
equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the
following measures
Reoriient or relocate the receiving antenna
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is
connected
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for help
Notice: Shielded Cables
All connections to other computing deices must be made using shielded cables to maintain compliance with
FCC regulations.
Notice: Peripheral Devices
Only peripherals (input/output devices, terminals, printers, etc.) certified to comply with the Class B limits
may be attached to this equipment. Operation with non-certified peripherals is likely to result in
interference to radio and TV reception.
Caution
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the manufacturer could void the user’s authority, which
is granted by the Federal Communications Commission, to operate this computer.
Use Conditions
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operations is subject to the following two conditions:
(1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device musta ccept any interference
received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Notice: Canadian Users
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise emissions from digital apparatus
set out in the Radio interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.
Please fold out this cover for an illustration of the TravelMate 3000 WinSX Notebook Computer.
Manual Part No. 2608455-0001
Printed in U.S.A.
Texas
Instruments
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