RAS Series Service and Maintenance Instructions

RAS Series Service and Maintenance Instructions
RAS Series
7.5 to 12.5 Ton
Package Electric Cooling Units
With R−410A Refrigerant
And Micro−channel Condenser Coils
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
ECONOMIZER SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
UNIT ARRANGEMENT AND ACCESS . . . . . . . . . . . 3
WIRING DIAGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
SUPPLY FAN (BLOWER) SECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
PRE START−UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
COOLING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
START−UP, GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
R−410A REFRIGERANT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
OPERATING SEQUENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
COOLING CHARGING CHARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
FASTENER TORQUE VALUES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
CONVENIENCE OUTLETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
APPENDIX I. MODEL NUMBER SIGNIFICANCE
SMOKE DETECTORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
APPENDIX II. PHYSICAL DATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
SENSOR AND CONTROLLER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
APPENDIX III. FAN PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . . 39
INDICATORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
APPENDIX IV. ELECTRICAL DATA . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
APPENDIX V. MOTORMASTER SENSOR
LOCATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
PROTECTIVE DEVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
ELECTRIC HEATERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
38
UNIT START-UP CHECKLIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Service and Maintenance Instructions
513 08 3203 00
06/02/10
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS
Installation and servicing of air-conditioning equipment
can be hazardous due to system pressure and electrical
components. Only trained and qualified service personnel
should install, repair, or service air-conditioning
equipment. Untrained personnel can perform the basic
maintenance functions of replacing filters. Trained service
personnel should perform all other operations.
When working on air-conditioning equipment, observe
precautions in the literature, tags and labels attached to
the unit, and other safety precautions that may apply.
Follow all safety codes. Wear safety glasses and work
gloves. Use quenching cloth for unbrazing operations.
Have fire extinguishers available for all brazing
operations.
Follow all safety codes. Wear safety glasses and work
gloves. Use quenching cloth for brazing operations. Have
fire extinguisher available. Read these instructions
thoroughly and follow all warnings or cautions attached to
the unit. Consult local building codes and National
Electrical Code (NEC) for special requirements.
Recognize safety information. This is the safety−alert
symbol
. When you see this symbol on the unit and in
instructions or manuals, be alert to the potential for
personal injury.
Understand the signal words DANGER, WARNING, and
CAUTION. These words are used with the safety−alert
symbol. DANGER identifies the most serious hazards
which will result in severe personal injury or death.
WARNING signifies a hazard which could result in
personal injury or death. CAUTION is used to identify
unsafe practices which may result in minor personal injury
or product and property damage. NOTE is used to
highlight suggestions which will result in enhanced
installation, reliability, or operation.
!
WARNING
ELECTRICAL OPERATION HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal
injury or death.
Before performing service or maintenance operations
on unit, turn off main power switch to unit. Electrical
shock and rotating equipment could cause injury.
2
!
WARNING
ELECTRICAL OPERATION HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal
injury or death.
Units with convenience outlet circuits may use multiple
disconnects. Check convenience outlet for power
status before opening unit for service. Locate its
disconnect switch, if appropriate, and open it. Tag−out
this switch, if necessary.
!
WARNING
UNIT OPERATION AND SAFETY HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could cause personal
injury, death and/or equipment damage.
R−410A refrigerant systems operate at higher
pressures than standard R−22 systems. Do not use
R−22 service equipment or components on R−410A
refrigerant equipment.
!
CAUTION
CUT HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personal
injury.
Sheet metal parts may have sharp edges or burrs.
Use care and wear appropriate protective clothing,
safety glasses and gloves when handling parts and
servicing air conditioning units.
UNIT ARRANGEMENT AND ACCESS
Air Conditioning
Condenser fan motor mounting bolts tightness
General
FIGURE 1 and FIGURE 2 show general unit arrangement
and access locations.
Compressor mounting bolts
Condenser fan blade positioning
Control box cleanliness and wiring condition
FIGURE 1
Typical Access Panel Location
Wire terminal tightness
FILTER ACCESS PANEL
Refrigerant charge level
Evaporator coil cleaning
Evaporator blower motor amperage
Heating
Power wire connections
Fuses ready
Manual−reset limit switch is closed
INDOOR COIL ACCESS PANEL
Economizer or Outside Air Damper
Inlet filters condition
FIGURE 2
Check damper travel (Economizer)
Blower Access Panel Location
Check gear and dampers for debris and dirt
Air Filters and Screens
Each unit is equipped with return air filters. If the unit has
an Economizer, it will also have an outside air screen. If a
manual outside air damper is added, an inlet air screen
will also be present.
BLOWER
ACCESS
PANEL
CONTROL BOX
COMPRESSOR
Routine Maintenance
These items should be part of a routine maintenance
program, to be checked every month or two, until a
specific schedule for each can be identified for this
installation:
Quarterly Inspection (and 30 days after initial start)
Return air filter replacement
Outdoor hood inlet filters cleaned
Belt tension checked
Belt condition checked
Pulley alignment checked
Fan shaft bearing locking collar tightness checked
Condenser coil cleanliness checked
Condensate drain checked
Seasonal Maintenance
These items should be checked at the beginning of each
season (or more often if local conditions and usage
patterns dictate):
Each of these filters and screens will need to be
periodically replaced or cleaned.
Return Air Filters
Return air filters are disposable fiberglass media type.
Access to the filters is through the small lift−out panel
located on the rear side of the unit, above the
evaporator/return air access panel. (See Fig. 1.)
To remove the filters:
1. Grasp the bottom flange of the upper panel.
2. Lift up and swing the bottom out until the panel
disengages and pulls out.
3. Reach inside and extract the filters from the filter rack.
4. Replace these filters as required with similar
replacement filters of same size.
To re−install the access panel:
1. Slide the top of the panel up under the unit top panel.
2. Slide the bottom into the side channels.
3. Push the bottom flange down until it contacts the top
of the lower panel (or Economizer top).
IMPORTANT: DO NOT OPERATE THE UNIT WITHOUT
THESE FILTERS!
Outside Air Hood (Optional)
Outside air hood inlet screens are permanent
aluminum−mesh type filters. Check these for cleanliness.
Remove the screens when cleaning is required. Clean by
3
washing with hot low−pressure water and soft detergent
and replace all screens before restarting the unit. Observe
the flow direction arrows on the side of each filter frame.
To remove the filter, open the spring clips. Re−install the
filter by placing the frame in its track, then closing the
spring clips.
Economizer Inlet Air Screen
Manual Outside Air Hood Screen (Optional)
This air screen is retained by spring clips under the top
edge of the hood. (See FIGURE 3.)
This inlet screen is secured by a retainer angle across the
top edge of the hood. (See Fig. 4.)
FIGURE 3
Filter Installation
FIGURE 4
Screens Installed on Outdoor Air Hood
(7-1/2 to 10 Ton Shown)
22 3/8 (569 mm)
DIVIDER
OUTSIDE
AIR
HOOD
CLEANABLE
ALUMINUM
FILTER
FILTER
BAROMETRIC
RELIEF
FILTER
CAP
To remove the screen, loosen the screws in the top
retainer and slip the retainer up until the filter can be
removed. Re−install by placing the frame in its track,
rotating the retainer back down and tighten all screws.
SUPPLY FAN (BLOWER) SECTION
!
WARNING
ELECTRICAL SHOCK HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could cause personal
injury or death.
Before performing service or maintenance operations
on the fan system, shut off all unit power and tag−out
the unit disconnect switch. Do not reach into the fan
section with power still applied to unit.
Supply Fan (Belt−Drive)
The supply fan system consists of a forward−curved
centrifugal blower wheel on a solid shaft with two
concentric type bearings, one on each side of the blower
housing. A fixed−pitch driven pulley is attached to the fan
shaft and an adjustable−pitch driver pulley is on the
motor. The pulleys are connected using a “V” type belt.
(See Fig. 5.)
FIGURE 5
Belt Drive Motor Mounting
Belt
Check the belt condition and tension quarterly. Inspect the
belt for signs of cracking, fraying or glazing along the
inside surfaces. Check belt tension by using a
spring−force tool (such as Browning’s Part Number “Belt
Tension Checker” or equivalent tool); tension should be
6−lbs at a 5/8−in. deflection when measured at the
centerline of the belt span. This point is at the center of
the belt when measuring the distance between the motor
shaft and the blower shaft.
NOTE: Without the spring−tension tool, place a straight
edge across the belt surface at the pulleys, then deflect
the belt at mid−span using one finger to a 1/2−in.
deflection.
Adjust belt tension by loosening the motor mounting plate
front bolts and rear bolt and sliding the plate toward the
fan (to reduce tension) or away from fan (to increase
tension). Ensure the blower shaft and the motor shaft are
parallel to each other (pulleys aligned). Tighten all bolts
when finished.
To replace the belt:
1. Use a belt with same section type or similar size. Do
not substitute a “FHP” type belt. When installing the
new belt, do not use a tool (screwdriver or pry−bar) to
force the belt over the pulley flanges, this will stress
the belt and cause a reduction in belt life.
2. Loosen the motor mounting plate front bolts and rear
bolts.
4
3. Push the motor and its mounting plate towards the
blower housing as close as possible to reduce the
center distance between fan shaft and motor shaft.
4. Remove the belt by gently lifting the old belt over one
of the pulleys.
5. Install the new belt by gently sliding the belt over both
pulleys and then sliding the motor and plate away
from the fan housing until proper tension is achieved.
6. Check the alignment of the pulleys, adjust if
necessary.
7. Tighten all bolts.
8. Check the tension after a few hours of runtime and
re−adjust as required.
Adjustable−Pitch Pulley on Motor
The motor pulley is an adjustable−pitch type that allows a
servicer to implement changes in the fan wheel speed to
match as−installed ductwork systems. The pulley consists
of a fixed flange side that faces the motor (secured to the
motor shaft) and a movable flange side that can be
rotated around the fixed flange side that increases or
reduces the pitch diameter of this driver pulley. (See Fig.
6.)
FIGURE 6
5. Set movable flange at nearest keyway of pulley hub
and tighten setscrew to torque specifications.
To align fan and motor pulleys:
1. Loosen fan pulley setscrews.
2. Slide fan pulley along fan shaft. Make angular
alignment by loosening motor from mounting.
3. Tighten fan pulley setscrews and motor mounting
bolts to torque specifications.
4. Recheck belt tension.
Bearings
This fan system uses bearings featuring concentric split
locking collars. The collars are tightened through a cap
screw bridging the split portion of the collar. The cap
screw has a Torx T25 socket head. To tighten the locking
collar: Hold the locking collar tightly against the inner race
of the bearing and torque the cap screw to 65−70 in−lb
(7.4−7.9 Nm). See Fig. 7.
FIGURE 7
Tightening Locking Collar
Supply Fan Pulley Adjustment
Motor
As the pitch diameter is changed by adjusting the position
of the movable flange, the centerline on this pulley shifts
laterally (along the motor shaft). This creates a
requirement for a realignment of the pulleys after any
adjustment of the movable flange. Also reset the belt
tension after each realignment.
Check the condition of the motor pulley for signs of wear.
Glazing of the belt contact surfaces and erosion on these
surfaces are signs of improper belt tension and/or belt
slippage. Pulley replacement may be necessary.
To change fan speed:
1. Shut off unit power supply.
2. Loosen belt by loosening fan motor mounting nuts.
(See Fig.5.)
3. Loosen movable pulley flange setscrew. (See Fig.6.)
4. Screw movable flange toward fixed flange to increase
speed and away from fixed flange to decrease speed.
Increasing fan speed increases load on motor. Do not
exceed maximum speed specified.
When replacing the motor, also replace the external−tooth
lock washer (star washer) under the motor mounting
base; this is part of the motor grounding system. Ensure
the teeth on the lock washer are in contact with the
motor’s painted base. Tighten motor mounting bolts to
120 +/− 12 in−lbs.
Changing fan wheel speed by changing pulleys: The
horsepower rating of the belt is primarily dictated by the
pitch diameter of the smaller pulley in the drive system
(typically the motor pulley in these units). Do not install a
replacement motor pulley with a smaller pitch diameter
than provided on the original factory pulley. Change fan
wheel speed by changing the fan pulley (larger pitch
diameter to reduce wheel speed, smaller pitch diameter to
increase wheel speed) or select a new system (both
pulleys and matching belt(s)).
Before changing pulleys to increase fan wheel speed,
check the fan performance at the target speed and airflow
rate to determine new motor loading (bhp). Use the fan
performance tables or use the Packaged Rooftop Builder
software program. Confirm that the motor in this unit is
capable of operating at the new operating condition. Fan
shaft loading increases dramatically as wheel speed is
increased.
5
To reduce vibration, replace the motor’s adjustable pitch
pulley with a fixed pitch pulley (after the final airflow
balance adjustment). This will reduce the amount of
vibration generated by the motor/belt−drive system.
COOLING
!
WARNING
UNIT OPERATION AND SAFETY HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could cause personal
injury, death and/or equipment damage.
This system uses R−410A refrigerant which has higher
pressures than R−22 and other refrigerants. No other
refrigerant may be used in this system. Gauge set,
hoses, and recovery system must be designed to
handle R−410A refrigerant. If unsure about equipment,
consult the equipment manufacturer.
Condenser Coil
The condenser coil is new Micro−channel Heat
Exchanger Technology.
This is an all−aluminum
construction with louvered fins over single−depth
crosstubes.
The crosstubes have multiple small
passages through which the refrigerant passes from
header to header on each end. Tubes and fins are both
aluminum construction with various optional coatings (see
Model Number Format). Connection tube joints are
copper. The coil may be one−row or two−row. Two−row
coils are spaced apart to assist in cleaning.
FIGURE 8
Micro-channel Heat Exchanger Coils
TUBES
FINS
MANIFOLD
MICROCHANNELS
Evaporator Coil
Condenser Coil Maintenance and Cleaning
Recommendation
Routine cleaning of coil surfaces is essential to maintain
proper operation of the unit. Elimination of contamination
and removal of harmful residues will greatly increase the
life of the coil and extend the life of the unit. The following
maintenance and cleaning procedures are recommended
as part of the routine maintenance activities to extend the
life of the coil.
Remove Surface Loaded Fibers
Surface loaded fibers or dirt should be removed with a
vacuum cleaner. If a vacuum cleaner is not available, a
soft non−metallic bristle brush may be used. In either
case, the tool should be applied in the direction of the fins.
6
Coil surfaces can be easily damaged (fin edges can be
easily bent over and damage to the coating of a protected
coil) if the tool is applied across the fins.
NOTE: Use of a water stream, such as a garden hose,
against a surface loaded coil will drive the fibers and dirt
into the coil. This will make cleaning efforts more difficult.
Surface loaded fibers must be completely removed prior
to using low velocity clean water rinse.
Periodic Clean Water Rinse
A periodic clean water rinse is very beneficial for coils that
are applied in coastal or industrial environments.
However, it is very important that the water rinse is made
with a very low velocity water stream to avoid damaging
the fin edges. Monthly cleaning as described below is
recommended.
Routine Cleaning of Micro−channel Condenser Coil
Surfaces
To clean the Micro−channel condenser coil, chemicals are
NOT to be used; only water is approved as the cleaning
solution. Only clean potable water is authorized for
cleaning Micro−channel condensers. Carefully remove
any foreign objects or debris attached to the coil face or
trapped within the mounting frame and brackets. Using a
high pressure water sprayer, purge any soap or industrial
cleaners from hose and/or dilution tank prior to wetting the
coil.
Clean condenser face by spraying the coil core steadily
and uniformly from top to bottom, directing the spray
straight into or toward the coil face. Do not exceed 900
psig or a 45 degree angle; nozzle must be at least 12 in.
(30 cm) from the coil face. Reduce pressure and use
caution to prevent damage to air centers (fins). Do not
fracture the braze between air centers and refrigerant
tubes. Allow water to drain from the coil core and check
for refrigerant leaks prior to start−up.
NOTE:
Please see the Micro−channel Condenser
Service section for specific information on the coil.
!
CAUTION
PERSONAL INJURY HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personal
injury or equipment damage.
Chemical cleaning should NOT be used on the
aluminum microchannel condenser. Damage to the coil
may occur. Only approved cleaning is recommended.
Routine Cleaning of Evaporator Coil Surfaces
Monthly cleaning with environmentally sound coil cleaner
is essential to extend the life of coils. This cleaner is
available from FAST parts It is recommended that all
round tube coil cleaner as described below. Coil cleaning
should be part of the unit’s regularly scheduled
maintenance procedures to ensure long life of the coil.
Failure to clean the coils may result in reduced durability
in the environment.
Avoid the use of
coil brighteners
acid cleaning prior to painting
high pressure washers
poor quality water for cleaning
Environmentally sound coil cleaner is non-flammable,
hypoallergenic, non-bacterial, and a USDA accepted
biodegradable agent that will not harm coil or surrounding
components such as electrical wiring, painted metal
surfaces, or insulation. Use of non-recommended coil
cleaners is strongly discouraged since coil and unit
durability could be affected.
Coil Cleaner Application Equipment
2-1/2 gallon garden sprayer
water rinse with low velocity spray nozzle
!
CAUTION
PERSONAL INJURY HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in corrosion
and damage to the unit.
Harsh chemicals, household bleach or acid or basic
cleaners should not be used to clean outdoor or indoor
coils of any kind. These cleaners can be very difficult
to rinse out of the coil and can accelerate corrosion at
the fin/tube interface where dissimilar materials are in
contact. If there is dirt below the surface of the coil, use
the Totaline environmentally sound coil cleaner as
described above.
!
CAUTION
PERSONAL INJURY HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in reduced unit
performance.
High velocity water from a pressure washer, garden
hose, or compressed air should never be used to clean
a coil. The force of the water or air jet will bend the fin
edges and increase airside pressure drop.
Coil Cleaner Application Instructions
1. Proper eye protection such as safety glasses is
recommended during mixing and application.
2. Remove all surface loaded fibers and dirt with a
vacuum cleaner as described above.
3. Thoroughly wet finned surfaces with clean water
and a low velocity garden hose, being careful not
to bend fins.
4. Mix environmentally sound coil cleaner in a 2-1/2
gallon garden sprayer according to the instructions
included with the cleaner. The optimum solution
temperature is 100°F (38°C).
NOTE: Do NOT USE water in excess of 130°F (54°C), as
the enzymatic activity will be destroyed.
5. Thoroughly apply coil cleaner solution to all coil
surfaces including finned area, tube sheets and
coil headers.
6. Hold garden sprayer nozzle close to finned areas
and apply cleaner with a vertical, up−and−down
motion. Avoid spraying in horizontal pattern to
minimize potential for fin damage.
7. Ensure cleaner thoroughly penetrates deep into
finned areas.
8. Interior and exterior finned areas must be
thoroughly cleaned.
9. Finned surfaces should remain wet with cleaning
solution for 10 minutes.
10. Ensure surfaces are not allowed to dry before
rinsing. Reapply cleaner as needed to ensure
10−minute saturation is achieved.
11. Thoroughly rinse all surfaces with low velocity
clean water using downward rinsing motion of
water spray nozzle. Protect fins from damage from
the spray nozzle.
Evaporator Coil Metering Devices
The metering devices are multiple fixed−bore devices
swaged into the horizontal outlet tubes from the liquid
header, located at the entrance to each evaporator coil
circuit path. These are non−adjustable. Service requires
replacing the entire liquid header assembly.
To check for possible blockage of one or more of these
metering devices, disconnect the supply fan contactor
(IFC) coil, then start the compressor and observe the
frosting pattern on the face of the evaporator coil. A frost
pattern should develop uniformly across the face of the
coil starting at each horizontal header tube. Failure to
develop frost at an outlet tube can indicate a plugged or a
missing orifice.
Refrigerant System Pressure Access Ports
There are two access ports in each system − on the
suction tube near the compressor and on the discharge
tube near the compressor. These are brass fittings with
black plastic caps. The hose connection fittings are
standard 1/4 SAE Male Flare couplings.
The brass fittings are two−piece High Flow valves, with a
receptacle base brazed to the tubing and an integral
spring−closed check valve core screwed into the base.
(See Fig.9.) This check valve is permanently assembled
into this core body and cannot be serviced separately.
Replace the entire core body if necessary. Service tools
are available from FAST that allow the replacement of the
check valve core without having to recover the entire
system refrigerant charge. Apply compressor refrigerant
7
oil to the check valve core’s bottom O-ring. Install the
fitting body with 96 +/ −10 in−lbs of torque; do not
overtighten.
R−410A REFRIGERANT
Because R−410A refrigerant is a blend, it is strongly
recommended that refrigerant always be removed from
the cylinder as a liquid. Admit liquid refrigerant into the
system in the discharge line. If adding refrigerant into the
suction line, use a commercial metering/expansion device
at the gauge manifold. Remove liquid from the cylinder,
pass it through the metering device at the gauge set and
then pass it into the suction line as a vapor. Do not
remove R−410A refrigerant from the cylinder as a vapor.
This unit is designed for use with R−410A refrigerant. Do
not use any other refrigerant in this system.
R−410A refrigerant is provided in pink (rose) colored
cylinders. These cylinders are available with and without
dip tubes; cylinders with dip tubes will have a label
indicating this feature. For a cylinder with a dip tube, place
the cylinder in the upright position (access valve at the
top) when removing liquid refrigerant for charging. For a
cylinder without a dip tube, invert the cylinder (access
valve on the bottom) when removing liquid refrigerant.
FIGURE 9
CoreMax Access Port Assembly
SEAT
CORE
(Part No. EC39EZ067)
1/2-20 UNF RH
0.596
45
o
o
30
WASHER
O-RING
5/8” HEX
1/2" HEX
.47
This surface provides a metal to metal seal when
torqued into the seat. Appropriate handling is
required to not scratch or dent the surface.
Refrigerant Charge
Amount of refrigerant charge is listed on the unit’s
nameplate. Refer to Recovery, Recycling and
Reclamation training manual and the following
procedures.
DEPRESSOR PER ARI 720
+.01/-.035
FROM FACE OF BODY
7/16-20 UNF RH
Unit panels must be in place when unit is operating during
the charging procedure.
No Charge
Use standard evacuating techniques. After evacuating
system, weigh in the specified amount of refrigerant.
Low−Charge Cooling
To Use Cooling Charging Charts
Using Cooling Charging Charts, (Fig.10,11,12 and 13)
vary refrigerant until the conditions of the appropriate
chart are met. Note the charging charts are different from
type normally used. Charts are based on charging the
units to the correct superheat for the various operating
conditions. Accurate pressure gauge and temperature
sensing device are required. Connect the pressure gauge
to the service port on the suction line. Mount the
temperature sensing device on the suction line and
insulate it so that outdoor ambient temperature does not
affect the reading. Indoor−air cfm must be within the
normal operating range of the unit.
Select the appropriate unit charging chart. For size
RAS090 use Fig.10. For size RAS120 use Fig.11. For size
RAS150, use separate charts for each circuit as marked
in Fig.12 and Fig.13.
RAS090−150 Charging
For Circuit 2: Repeat the procedure using “Circuit 2” chart.
To prepare the unit for charge adjustment:
Disable/bypass all head pressure controls. Start/run both
compressors. On sizes 08 and 12, ensure both condenser
fans are running.
EXAMPLE:
For Circuit 1: Take the outdoor ambient temperature and
read the Circuit 1 suction pressure gauge. Refer to unit
charging chart to determine what the suction temperature
should be. If suction temperature is high, add refrigerant.
If suction temperature is low, carefully recover some of
the charge. Recheck the suction pressure as charge is
adjusted.
Model RAS150
Circuit 1:
8
Outdoor Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . 85F (29C)
Suction Pressure . . . . . . . . . . 125 psig (860 kPa)
!
CAUTION
Compressors
UNIT DAMAGE HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in damage to
components.
The compressor is in a R−410A refrigerant system and
uses a polyolester (POE) oil. This oil is extremely
hygroscopic, meaning it absorbs water readily. POE oils
can absorb 15 times as much water as other oils
designed for HCFC and CFC refrigerants. Avoid
exposure of the oil to the atmosphere.
Lubrication
Replacing Compressor
Compressors are charged with the correct amount of oil at
the factory.
The compressor used with R−410A refrigerant contains a
POE oil. This oil has a high affinity for moisture. Do not
remove the compressor’s tube plugs until ready to insert
the unit suction and discharge tube ends.
Suction Temperature should be . . . 58F (14C)
Circuit 2:
Outdoor Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . 85F (29C)
Suction Pressure . . . . . . . . . . 120 psig (830 kPa)
Suction Temperature should be . . . 60F (16C)
Compressor mounting bolt torque is 65−75 in−lbs
(7.3−8.5 Nm).
FIGURE 10
COOLING CHARGING CHARTS 7.5 Tons
9
FIGURE 11
10
COOLING CHARGING CHARTS 10 Tons
Fig. 12
Cooling Charging Charts - 12.5 Ton
Fig. 12 − Cooling Charging Chart (Circuit 1)
Fig. 13 − Cooling Charging Chart (Circuit 2)
11
Compressor Rotation
Condenser−Fan Location
On 3−phase units with scroll compressors, it is important
to be certain compressor is rotating in the proper
direction. To determine whether or not compressor is
rotating in the proper direction:
See Fig.14.
1. Connect service gauges to suction and discharge
pressure fittings.
2. Energize the compressor.
3. The suction pressure should drop and the discharge
pressure should rise, as is normal on any start−up.
NOTE: If the suction pressure does not drop and the
discharge pressure does not rise to normal levels:
. . . . . . . . 1. Note that the evaporator fan is probably also
........
rotating in the wrong direction.
. . . . . . . . 2. Turn off power to the unit.
. . . . . . . . 3. Reverse any two of the unit power leads.
. . . . . . . . 4. Reapply power to the compressor.
1. Shut off unit power supply. Install lockout tag.
2. Remove condenser−fan assembly (grille, motor, and
fan).
3. Loosen fan hub setscrews.
4. Adjust fan height as shown in Fig.14.
5. Tighten setscrews to 84 in−lbs (9.5 Nm).
6. Replace condenser−fan assembly.
Fig. 14
Condenser Fan Adjustment
The suction and discharge pressure levels should now
move to their normal start−up levels.
NOTE: When the compressor is rotating in the wrong
direction, the unit makes an elevated level of noise and
does not provide cooling.
Filter Drier
Troubleshooting Cooling System
Replace whenever refrigerant system is exposed to
atmosphere. Only use factory specified liquid−line filter
driers with working pressures no less than 650 psig. Do
not install a suction−line filter drier in liquid line. A
liquid−line filter drier designed for use with R−410A
refrigerant is required on every unit.
Refer to Table 1 for additional troubleshooting topics.
12
Table 1 − Cooling Service Analysts
PROBLEM
Compressor and Condenser Fan
Will Not Start.
Compressor Will Not Start But
Condenser Fan Runs.
CAUSE
Power failure.
Fuse blown or circuit breaker tripped.
Defective thermostat, contactor, transformer,
or control relay.
Insufficient line voltage.
Incorrect or faulty wiring.
Thermostat setting too high.
Faulty wiring or loose connections in
compressor circuit.
Compressor motor burned out, seized, or
internal overload open.
Defective run/start capacitor, overload, start
relay.
One leg of three−phase power dead.
Refrigerant overcharge or undercharge.
Compressor Cycles (other than
normally satisfying thermostat).
Compressor Operates
Continuously.
Excessive Head Pressure.
Head Pressure Too Low.
Excessive Suction Pressure.
Suction Pressure Too Low.
Evaporator Fan Will Not Shut
Off.
Compressor Makes Excessive
Noise.
Defective compressor.
Insufficient line voltage.
Blocked condenser.
Defective run/start capacitor, overload, or
start relay.
Defective thermostat.
Faulty condenser−fan motor or capacitor.
Restriction in refrigerant system.
Dirty air filter.
Unit undersized for load.
Thermostat set too low.
Low refrigerant charge.
Leaking valves in compressor.
Air in system.
Condenser coil dirty or restricted.
Dirty air filter.
Dirty condenser coil.
Refrigerant overcharged.
Air in system.
Condenser air restricted or air short−cycling.
Low refrigerant charge.
Compressor valves leaking.
Restriction in liquid tube.
High head load.
Compressor valves leaking.
Refrigerant overcharged.
Dirty air filter.
Low refrigerant charge.
Metering device or low side restricted.
REMEDY
Call power company.
Replace fuse or reset circuit breaker.
Replace component.
Determine cause and correct.
Check wiring diagram and rewire correctly.
Lower thermostat setting below room temperature.
Check wiring and repair or replace.
Determine cause. Replace compressor.
Determine cause and replace.
Replace fuse or reset circuit breaker. Determine
cause.
Recover refrigerant, evacuate system, and recharge
to nameplate.
Replace and determine cause.
Determine cause and correct.
Determine cause and correct.
Determine cause and replace.
Temperature too low in conditioned area.
Outdoor ambient below 25 F.
Replace thermostat.
Replace.
Locate restriction and remove.
Replace filter.
Decrease load or increase unit size.
Reset thermostat.
Locate leak; repair and recharge.
Replace compressor.
Recover refrigerant, evacuate system, and recharge.
Clean coil or remove restriction.
Replace filter.
Clean coil.
Recover excess refrigerant.
Recover refrigerant, evacuate system, and recharge.
Determine cause and correct.
Check for leaks; repair and recharge.
Replace compressor.
Remove restriction.
Check for source and eliminate.
Replace compressor.
Recover excess refrigerant.
Replace filter.
Check for leaks; repair and recharge.
Remove source of restriction.
Increase air quantity. Check filter and replace if
necessary.
Reset thermostat.
Install low−ambient kit.
Time off delay not finished.
Wait for 30−second off delay.
Compressor rotating in wrong direction.
Reverse the 3−phase power leads.
Insufficient evaporator airflow.
13
CONVENIENCE OUTLETS
!
WARNING
Fig. 16
Weatherproof Cover Installation
COVER - WHILE-IN-USE
WEATHERPROOF
ELECTRICAL OPERATION HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal
injury or death.
Units with convenience outlet circuits may use multiple
disconnects. Check convenience outlet for power
status before opening unit for service. Locate its
disconnect switch, if appropriate, and open it. Tag−out
this switch, if necessary.
A non−powered convenience outlet is offered and
provides a125−volt GFCI (ground−fault circuit−interrupter)
duplex receptacle rated at 15−A behind a hinged
waterproof access cover, located on the end panel of the
unit. (See Fig.15.)
Fig. 15
BASE PLATE FOR
GFCI RECEPTACLE
Types of Convenience Outlets
Convenience Outlet Locations
Conv Outlet
GFCI
Non−Powered Type
This type requires the field installation of a
general−purpose 125−volt 15−A circuit powered from a
source elsewhere in the building. Observe national and
local codes when selecting wire size, fuse or breaker
requirements and disconnect switch size and location.
Route 125−v power supply conductors into the bottom of
the utility box containing the duplex receptacle.
Maintenance
Weatherproof Cover Installation
A weatherproof while-in-use cover for the factory-installed
convenience outlets is now required by UL standards.
This cover cannot be factory-mounted due to its depth. It
must be installed at unit installation. For shipment, the
convenience outlet is covered with a blank cover plate.
The weatherproof cover kit is shipped in the unit’s control
box. The kit includes the hinged cover, a backing plate
and gasket.
IMPORTANT: DISCONNECT ALL POWER TO UNIT AND
CONVENIENCE OUTLET.
1. Remove the blank cover plate at the convenience
outlet. Discard the blank cover.
2. Loosen the two screws at the GFCI duplex outlet, until
approximately 1/2−in (13 mm) under screw heads are
exposed.
3. Press the gasket over the screw heads.
4. Slip the backing plate over the screw heads at the
keyhole slots and align with the gasket. Tighten the
two screws until snug (do not over-tighten).
5. Mount the weatherproof cover to the backing plate as
shown in Fig.16.
6. Remove two slot fillers in the bottom of the cover to
permit service tool cords to exit the cover.
7. Check for full closing and latching.
14
Periodically test the GFCI receptacle by pressing the
TEST button on the face of the receptacle. This should
cause the internal circuit of the receptacle to trip and open
the receptacle. Check for proper grounding wires and
power line phasing if the GFCI receptacle does not trip as
required. Press the RESET button to clear the tripped
condition.
Using Unit−Mounted Convenience Outlets
Units with unit−mounted convenience outlet circuits will
often require that two disconnects be opened to
de−energize all power to the unit. Treat all units as
electrically energized until the convenience outlet power is
also checked and de−energization is confirmed. Observe
National Electrical Code Article 210, Branch Circuits, for
use of convenience outlets.
SMOKE DETECTORS
Supply Air Smoke detectors are available as
factory−installed options on RAS models. Smoke
detectors may be specified for Supply Air only or for
Return Air without or with economizer. All components
necessary for operation are factory−provided and
mounted. The unit is factory−configured for immediate
smoke detector shutdown operation; additional wiring or
modifications to unit terminal board may be necessary to
complete the unit and smoke detector configuration to
meet project requirements.
System
The smoke detector system consists of a four−wire
controller and one or two sensors. Its primary function is
to shut down the rooftop unit in order to prevent smoke
from circulating throughout the building. It is not to be
used as a life saving device.
Controller Assembly
Fig. 17
The sampling tube varies in length depending on the size
of the rooftop unit. The clear plastic cover permits visual
inspections without having to disassemble the sensor.
The cover attaches to the sensor housing using four
captive screws and forms an airtight chamber around the
sensing electronics. Each sensor includes a harness with
an RJ45 terminal for connecting to the controller. Each
sensor has four LEDs (Power, Trouble, Alarm and Dirty)
and a manual test/reset button (on the left−side of the
housing).
Air is introduced to the duct smoke detector sensor’s
sensing chamber through a sampling tube that extends
into the HVAC duct and is directed back into the
ventilation system through a (shorter) exhaust tube. The
difference in air pressure between the two tubes pulls the
sampled air through the sensing chamber. When a
sufficient amount of smoke is detected in the sensing
chamber, the sensor signals an alarm state and the
controller automatically takes the appropriate action to
shut down fans and blowers, change over air handling
systems, notify the fire alarm control panel, etc.
Smoke Detector Sensor
Fig. 18
Duct smoke sensor
controller
Exhaust tube
Condui t support pl ate
Duct smoke sensor
Exhaust gasket
Sensor housing
and electronics
Terminal block cover
Contr oll er housi ng
and electronics
See Detail A
Contr oll er cover
Intake
Gasket
Fastener
(2X)
Cover Gasket
Pl ug
Tr o ub l e
Al arm
TSD−CO2
(ordering option)
Sensor cover
Sampling tube
(ordered separately)
Power
Coupli ng
Detail A
Test/reset
switch
Controller
The controller includes a controller housing, a printed
circuit board, and a clear plastic cover. (See Fig 17.) The
controller can be connected to one or two compatible duct
smoke sensors. The clear plastic cover is secured to the
housing with a single captive screw for easy access to the
wiring terminals. The controller has three LEDs (for
Power, Trouble and Alarm) and a manual test/reset button
(on the cover face).
Sensor
The sensor includes a plastic housing, a printed circuit
board, a clear plastic cover, a sampling tube inlet and an
exhaust tube. (See Fig.18.) The sampling tube (when
used) and exhaust tube are attached during installation.
Magnetic
test/reset
switch
Al arm
Tr o ub l e
Power
Dirty
The sensor uses a process called differential sensing to
prevent gradual environmental changes from triggering
false alarms. A rapid change in environmental conditions,
such as smoke from a fire, causes the sensor to signal an
alarm state, but dust and debris accumulated over time
does not.
For installations using two sensors, the duct smoke
detector does not differentiate which sensor signals an
alarm or trouble condition.
15
Smoke Detector Locations
Typical Supply Air Smoke Detector Sensor
Location
Fig. 19
Supply Air
The Supply Air smoke detector sensor is located to the
left of the unit’s indoor (supply) fan. (See Fig.19.) Access
is through the fan access panel. There is no sampling
tube used at this location. The sampling tube inlet extends
through the side plate of the fan housing (into a high
pressure area). The controller is located on a bracket to
the right of the return filter, accessed through the lift−off
filter panel.
FIOP Smoke Detector Wiring and Response
All Units
Smoke Detector Sensor
FIOP smoke detector is configured to automatically shut
down all unit operations when smoke condition is
detected. See Fig.20, Smoke Detector Wiring.
Highlight A
JMP 3 is factory−cut, transferring unit control to smoke
detector.
Highlight B
Smoke detector NC contact set will open on smoke alarm
condition, de−energizing the ORN conductor.
Highlight C
24−v power signal via ORN lead is removed at Smoke
Detector input on LCTB; all unit operations cease
immediately.
Highlight D
On smoke alarm condition, the smoke detector NO Alarm
contact will close, supplying 24−v power to GRA
conductor.
Highlight E
GRA lead at Smoke Alarm input on LCTB provides 24−v
signal to FIOP DDC control.
Fig. 20
Typical Smoke Detector System Wiring
B
D
C
F
E
A
16
Using Remote Logic
Dirty Controller Test
Five conductors are provided for field use (see Highlight
F) for additional annunciation functions.
The dirty controller test checks the controller’s ability to
initiate a dirty sensor test and indicate its results.
Additional Application Data — Refer to Catalog No.
HKRNKA−1XA for discussions on additional control
features of these smoke detectors including multiple unit
coordination. (See Fig.20.)
Sensor and Controller Tests
Sensor Alarm Test
The sensor alarm test checks a sensor’s ability to signal
an alarm state. This test requires that you use a field
provided SD−MAG test magnet.
!
CAUTION
OPERATIONAL TEST HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personnel
and authority concern.
This test places the duct detector into the alarm state.
Unless part of the test, disconnect all auxiliary
equipment from the controller before performing the
test. If the duct detector is connected to a fire alarm
system, notify the proper authorities before performing
the test.
Sensor Alarm Test Procedure
1. Hold the test magnet where indicated on the side of
the sensor housing for seven seconds.
2. Verify that the sensor’s Alarm LED turns on.
3. Reset the sensor by holding the test magnet against
the sensor housing for two seconds.
4. Verify that the sensor’s Alarm LED turns off.
Controller Alarm Test
The controller alarm test checks the controller’s ability to
initiate and indicate an alarm state.
!
CAUTION
OPERATIONAL TEST HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in
personnel and authority concern.
This test places the duct detector into the alarm
state. Disconnect all auxiliary equipment from the
controller before performing the test. If the duct
detector is connected to a fire alarm system, notify
the proper authorities before performing the test.
!
CAUTION
OPERATIONAL TEST HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personnel
and authority concern.
Pressing the controller’s test/reset switch for longer
than seven seconds will put the duct detector into the
alarm state and activate all automatic alarm
responses.
Dirty Controller Test Procedure
1. Press the controller’s test/reset switch for two
seconds.
2. Verify that the controller’s Trouble LED flashes.
Dirty Sensor Test
The dirty sensor test provides an indication of the
sensor’s ability to compensate for gradual environmental
changes. A sensor that can no longer compensate for
environmental changes is considered 100% dirty and
requires cleaning or replacing. You must use a field
provided SD−MAG test magnet to initiate a sensor dirty
test. The sensor’s Dirty LED indicates the results of the
dirty test as shown in Table 2.
!
CAUTION
OPERATIONAL TEST HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personnel
and authority concern.
Holding the test magnet against the sensor housing for
more than seven seconds will put the duct detector into
the alarm state and activate all automatic alarm
responses.
Table 2 Dirty LED Test
FLASHES
DESCRIPTION
1
0−25% dirty. (Typical of a newly installed detector)
2
25−50% dirty
3
51−75% dirty
4
76−99% dirty
Dirty Sensor Test Procedure
1. Hold the test magnet where indicated on the side of
the sensor housing for two seconds.
2. Verify that the sensor’s Dirty LED flashes.
Controller Alarm Test Procedure
1. Press the controller’s test/reset switch for seven
seconds.
2. Verify that the controller’s Alarm LED turns on.
3. Reset the sensor by pressing the test/reset switch for
two seconds.
4. Verify that the controller’s Alarm LED turns off.
17
!
CAUTION
OPERATIONAL TEST HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personnel
and authority concern.
Changing the dirty sensor test operation will put the
detector into the alarm state and activate all automatic
alarm responses. Before changing dirty sensor test
operation, disconnect all auxiliary equipment from the
controller and notify the proper authorities if connected
to a fire alarm system.
Remote Test/Reset Station Dirty Sensor Test
The test/reset station dirty sensor test checks the
test/reset station’s ability to initiate a sensor dirty test and
indicate the results. It must be wired to the controller as
shown in Fig.21 and configured to operate the controller’s
supervision relay. For more information, see “Changing
the Dirty Sensor Test.”
Remote Test/Reset Station Connections
Fig. 21
12
Changing the Dirty Sensor Test
Smoke Detector Controller
1
TB3
By default, sensor dirty test results are indicated by:
The sensor’s Dirty LED flashing.
The controller’s Trouble LED flashing.
The controller’s supervision relay contacts toggle.
3
The operation of a sensor’s dirty test can be changed so
that the controller’s supervision relay is not used to
indicate test results. When two detectors are connected to
a controller, sensor dirty test operation on both sensors
must be configured to operate in the same manner.
To Configure the Dirty Sensor Test Operation
1. Hold the test magnet where indicated on the side of
the sensor housing until the sensor’s Alarm LED turns
on and its Dirty LED flashes twice (approximately 60
seconds).
2. Reset the sensor by removing the test magnet then
holding it against the sensor housing again until the
sensor’s Alarm LED turns off (approximately 2
seconds).
Remote Station Test
The remote station alarm test checks a test/reset station’s
ability to initiate and indicate an alarm state.
!
CAUTION
OPERATIONAL TEST HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personnel
and authority concern.
This test places the duct detector into the alarm state.
Unless part of the test, disconnect all auxiliary
equipment from the controller before performing the
test. If the duct detector is connected to a fire alarm
system, notify the proper authorities before performing
the test.
SD−TRK4 Remote Alarm Test Procedure
1. Turn the key switch to the RESET/TEST position for
seven seconds.
2. Verify that the test/reset station’s Alarm LED turns on.
3. Reset the sensor by turning the key switch to the
RESET/TEST position for two seconds.
4. Verify that the test/reset station’s Alarm LED turns off.
18
1
−
2
+
Auxiliary
equipment
14
SD-TRK4
Supervision relay
contacts [3]
Trouble
13
19
Wire must be
added by installer
5
18 Vdc ( +)
Power
4
Alarm
15
1
2
3
Reset/Test
20
!
18 Vdc ( −)
2
CAUTION
OPERATIONAL TEST HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personnel
and authority concern.
If the test/reset station’s key switch is left in the
RESET/TEST position for longer than seven seconds,
the detector will automatically go into the alarm state
and activate all automatic alarm responses.
!
CAUTION
OPERATIONAL TEST HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personnel
and authority concern.
Holding the test magnet to the target area for longer
than seven seconds will put the detector into the alarm
state and activate all automatic alarm responses.
Dirty Sensor Test Using an SD−TRK4
1. Turn the key switch to the RESET/TEST position for
two seconds.
2. Verify that the test/reset station’s Trouble LED
flashes.
Detector Cleaning
Cleaning the Smoke Detector
Clean the duct smoke sensor when the Dirty LED is
flashing continuously or sooner if conditions warrant.
!
CAUTION
4. Gently remove dirt and debris from around the optic
plate and inside the optic housing.
5. Replace the optic housing and sensor cover.
6. Connect power to the duct detector then perform a
sensor alarm test.
Sensor Cleaning Diagram
Fig. 22
OPERATIONAL TEST HAZARD
Failure to follow this caution may result in personnel
and authority concern.
If the smoke detector is connected to a fire alarm
system, first notify the proper authorities that the
detector is undergoing maintenance then disable the
relevant circuit to avoid generating a false alarm.
Sampling
tube
Airflow
1. Disconnect power from the duct detector then remove
the sensor’s cover. (See Fig.22.)
2. Using a vacuum cleaner, clean compressed air, or a
soft bristle brush, remove loose dirt and debris from
inside the sensor housing and cover.
Use isopropyl alcohol and a lint−free cloth to remove
dirt and other contaminants from the gasket on the
sensor’s cover.
3. Squeeze the retainer clips on both sides of the optic
housing then lift the housing away from the printed
circuit board.
HVAC duct
Sensor
housing
Optic
plate
Retainer
clip
Optic
housing
Table 3 − Detector Indicator
CONTROL OR INDICATOR
Magnetic test/reset switch
DESCRIPTION
Resets the sensor when it is in the alarm or trouble state. Activates or tests the sensor when it is in the normal
state.
Alarm LED
Trouble LED
Dirty LED
Indicates the sensor is in the alarm state.
Indicates the sensor is in the trouble state.
Indicates the amount of environmental compensation used by the sensor
(flashing continuously = 100%)
Power LED
Indicates the sensor is energized.
19
Indicators
Resetting Alarm and Trouble Condition Trips
Normal State
Manual reset is required to restore smoke detector
systems to Normal operation. For installations using two
sensors, the duct smoke detector does not differentiate
which sensor signals an alarm or trouble condition. Check
each sensor for Alarm or Trouble status (indicated by
LED). Clear the condition that has generated the trip at
this sensor. Then reset the sensor by pressing and
holding the reset button (on the side) for 2 seconds. Verify
that the sensor’s Alarm and Trouble LEDs are now off. At
the controller, clear its Alarm or Trouble state by pressing
and holding the manual reset button (on the front cover)
for 2 seconds. Verify that the controller’s Alarm and
Trouble LEDs are now off. Replace all panels.
The smoke detector operates in the normal state in the
absence of any trouble conditions and when its sensing
chamber is free of smoke. In the normal state, the Power
LED on both the sensor and the controller are on and all
other LEDs are off.
Alarm State
The smoke detector enters the alarm state when the
amount of smoke particulate in the sensor’s sensing
chamber exceeds the alarm threshold value. (See Table
3.) Upon entering the alarm state:
The sensor’s Alarm LED and the controller’s Alarm LED
turn on.
The contacts on the controller’s two auxiliary relays
switch positions.
The contacts on the controller’s alarm initiation relay
close.
The controller’s remote alarm LED output is activated
(turned on).
The controller’s high impedance multiple fan shutdown
control line is pulled to ground Trouble state.
The Super Duct duct smoke detector enters the trouble
state under the following conditions:
A sensor’s cover is removed and 20 minutes pass before
it is properly secured.
A sensor’s environmental compensation limit is reached
(100% dirty).
A wiring fault between a sensor and the controller is
detected.
An internal sensor fault is detected upon entering the
trouble state:
The contacts on the controller’s supervisory relay switch
positions. (See Fig. 23.)
If a sensor trouble, the sensor ’s Trouble LED the
controller’s Trouble LED turn on.
If 100% dirty, the sensor’s Dirty LED turns on and the
controller’s Trouble LED flashes continuously.
If a wiring fault between a sensor and the controller, the
controller’s Trouble LED turns on but not the sensor’s.
Fig. 23
Controller Assembly
Trouble
Alarm
Power
Test/reset
switch
NOTE: All troubles are latched by the duct smoke
detector. The trouble condition must be cleared and then
the duct smoke detector must be reset in order to restore
it to the normal state.
20
Troubleshooting
Controller’s Trouble LED is On
1. Check the Trouble LED on each sensor connected to
the controller. If a sensor’s Trouble LED is on,
determine the cause and make the necessary repairs.
2. Check the wiring between the sensor and the
controller. If wiring is loose or missing, repair or
replace as required.
Controller’s Trouble LED is Flashing
1. One or both of the sensors is 100% dirty.
2. Determine which Dirty LED is flashing then clean that
sensor assembly as described in the detector
cleaning section.
Sensor’s Trouble LED is On
1. Check the sensor’s Dirty LED. If it is flashing, the
sensor is dirty and must be cleaned.
2. Check the sensor’s cover. If it is loose or missing,
secure the cover to the sensor housing.
3. Replace sensor assembly.
Sensor’s Power LED is Off
1. Check the controller’s Power LED. If it is off,
determine why the controller does not have power
and make the necessary repairs.
2. Check the wiring between the sensor and the
controller. If wiring is loose or missing, repair or
replace as required.
Controller’s Power LED is Off
1. Make sure the circuit supplying power to the controller
is operational. If not, make sure JP2 and JP3 are set
correctly on the controller before applying power.
2. Verify that power is applied to the controller’s supply
input terminals. If power is not present, replace or
repair wiring as required.
Remote Test/Reset Station’s Trouble LED Does Not
Flash When Performing a Dirty Test, But the
Controller’s Trouble LED Does
1. Verify that the remote test/station is wired as shown in
Fig.21. Repair or replace loose or missing wiring.
2. Configure the sensor dirty test to activate the
controller’s supervision relay. See “Changing sensor
dirty test operation.”
Sensor’s Trouble LED is On, But the Controller’s
Trouble LED is OFF
Remove JP1 on the controller.
PROTECTIVE DEVICES
Compressor Protection
Overcurrent
Each compressor has internal linebreak motor protection.
Reset is automatic after compressor motor has cooled.
Overtemperature
Each compressor has an internal protector to protect it
against excessively high discharge gas temperatures.
Reset is automatic.
High Pressure Switch
Each system is provided with a high pressure switch
mounted on the discharge line. The switch is
stem−mounted and brazed into the discharge tube. Trip
setting is 630 psig +/− 10 psig (4344 +/− 69 kPa) when
hot. Reset is automatic at 505 psig (3482 kPa).
Low Pressure Switch
Each system is protected against a loss of charge and low
evaporator coil loading condition by a low pressure switch
located on the suction line near the compressor. The
switch is stem−mounted. Trip setting is 54 psig +/− 5 psig
(372 +/− 34 kPa). Reset is automatic at 117 +/− 5 psig
(807 +/− 34 kPa).
The
External
motor
overload
device
is
a
specially−calibrated circuit breaker that is UL recognized
as a motor overload controller. It is an overcurrent device.
When the motor current exceeds the circuit breaker
setpoint, the device opens all motor power leads and the
motor shuts down. Reset requires a manual reset at the
overload switch. This device (designated IFCB) is located
on the side of the supply fan housing, behind the fan
access panel.
Troubleshooting Supply Fan Motor Overload Trips
The supply fan used in RAS units is a forward−curved
centrifugal wheel. At a constant wheel speed, this wheel
has a characteristic that causes the fan shaft load to
DECREASE when the static pressure in the unit−duct
system increases and to INCREASE when the static
pressure in the unit−duct system decreases (and fan
airflow rate increases). Motor overload conditions typically
develop when the unit is operated with an access panel
removed,
with
unfinished
duct
work,
in
an
economizer−open mode, or a leak develops in the duct
system that allows a bypass back to unit return opening.
Condenser Fan Motor Protection
The condenser fan motors are internally protected against
overtemperature.
Control Circuit, 24−V
The control circuit is protected against overcurrent
conditions by a circuit breaker mounted on control
transformer TRAN. Reset is manual.
ELECTRIC HEATERS
Supply (Indoor) Fan Motor Protection
Disconnect and lockout power when servicing fan motor.
The supply fan motor is equipped with an overcurrent
protection device. The type of device depends on the
motor size. (See Table 4.)
Table 4 − Supply Fan Motor Protection Devices
Motor Size (bhp)
Overload Device
Reset
1.7
Internal linebreak
Automatic
2.4
Internal linebreak
Automatic
2.9
Thermik
Automatic
3.7
Thermik
Automatic
5.2
External (circuit
breaker)
Manual
The Internal Linebreak type is an imbedded switch that
senses both motor current and internal motor
temperature. When this switch reaches its trip setpoint,
the switch opens the power supply to the motor and the
motor stops. Reset is automatic when the motor windings
cool down.
The Thermik device is a snap−action overtemperature
protection device that is imbedded in the motor windings.
It is a pilot−circuit device that is wired into the unit’s 24−v
control circuit. When this switch reaches its trip setpoint, it
opens the 24−v control circuit and causes all unit
operation to cease. This device resets automatically when
the motor windings cool. Do not bypass this switch to
correct trouble. Determine the cause and correct it.
RAS units may be equipped with field−installed accessory
electric heaters. The heaters are modular in design, with
heater frames holding open coil resistance wires strung
through ceramic insulators, line−break limit switches and
a control contactor. One or two heater modules may be
used in a unit.
Heater modules are installed in the compartment below
the indoor (supply) fan outlet. Access is through the
indoor access panel. Heater modules slide into the
compartment on tracks along the bottom of the heater
opening. (See Fig.24−26.)
Not all available heater modules may be used in every
unit. Use only those heater modules that are UL listed for
use in a specific size unit. Refer to the label on the unit
cabinet for the list of approved heaters.
Unit heaters are marked with Heater Model Numbers. But
heaters are ordered as and shipped in cartons marked
with a corresponding heater Sales Package part number.
See Table 5 for correlation between heater Model Number
and Sales Package part number.
NOTE: The value in position 9 of the part number differs
between the sales package part number (value is 1) and a
bare heater model number (value is 0).
21
Typical Access Panel Location
Fig. 24
Typical Module Installation
Fig. 26
DISCONNECT MOUNTING
LOCATION
TRACK
UNIT BLOCK-OFF
PANEL
Fig. 25
DISCONNECT
MOUNTING
LOCATION
INDOOR
ACCESS
PANEL
OUTDOOR
ACCESS PANEL
FLANGE
Typical Component Location
EMT OR RIGID CONDUIT SINGLE
(FIELD-SUPPLIED)
POINT BOX
CENTER MANUAL RESET
POST
LIMIT SWITCH
HEATER
COVERS
Single Point Boxes and Supplementary Fuses
When the unit MOCP device value exceeds 60−A,
unit−mounted supplementary fuses are required for each
heater circuit. These fuses are included in accessory
Single Point Boxes, with power distribution and fuse
blocks. The single point box will be installed directly under
the unit control box, just to the left of the partition
separating the indoor section (with electric heaters) from
the outdoor section. The Single Point Box has a hinged
access cover. (See Fig.27.) The Single Point Box also
includes a set of power taps to complete the wiring
between the Single Point Box and the unit’s main control
box terminals. Refer to accessory heater and Single Point
Box installation instructions for details on tap connections.
SINGLE POINT
MAIN
BRACKET AND BOX
HEATER
HEATER
HEATER
CONTROL CONDUIT
MOUNTING
MODULE
MODULE
MOUNTING
BOX
DRIP BOOT
SCREW
(LOCATION 1) (LOCATION 2) BRACKET
CONTROL WIRE TERMINAL BLOCK
Table 5 − Heater Model Number
Bare Heater Model
Number
C
R
H
E
A
T
E
R
0
0
1
A
0
0
Heater Sales Package
PNO
Includes:
Bare Heater
Carton and packing
materials
Installation sheet
C
R
H
E
A
T
E
R
1
0
1
A
0
0
22
Typical Single Point Installation
Fig. 27
21
11
23
13
CONTROL
BOX
Typical Location of Heater Limit
Switches (3−phase heater shown)
Fig. 28
BUSHING
SINGLE
POINT BOX
MOUNTING
SCREWS
Line-Break
Limit Switches
21
DRIP BOOT
BRACKET
MOUNTING
SCREWS
23
11
13
POWER
WIRES
ALLIED PA
MODEL NO.
OD
21
23
11
13
FOAM
BUSHING
ERIAL NO.
ALLIED PA
CORP.
MODEL NO.
OD
ERIAL NO.
22.2
ISTED AIR
NDITIONING
UIP ACCESS
346N.
P/N
23
2-
ISTED AIR
NDITIONING
UIP ACCESS
346N
23
P/N
2-
.
1
3
5610-4
REV
HEATER
RELAYS
HEATER
MOUNTING
SCREWS
On RAS units, all fuses are 60−A. Single point boxes
containing fuses for 208/230−V applications use UL Class
RK5 250−V fuses (Bussman FRNR 60 or Shawmut TR
60R). Single point boxes for 460−V and 575−V
applications use UL Class T 600−V fuses (Bussman JJS
60 or Shawmut A6T 60). (Note that all heaters are
qualified for use with a 60−A fuse, regardless of actual
heater ampacity, so only 60−A fuses are necessary.)
Unit heater applications not requiring supplemental fuses
require a special Single Point Boxes without fuses. The
accessory Single Point Boxes contain a terminal block
and a set of power taps to complete the wiring between
the Single Point Box and the unit’s main control box
terminals. Refer to accessory heater and Single Point
Box installation instructions for details on tap connections.
Safety Devices
Electric heater applications use a combination of
line−break/auto−reset
limit
switches
and
a
pilot−circuit/manual reset limit switch to protect the unit
against over−temperature situations.
Line−break/auto−reset limit switches are mounted on the
base plate of each heater module. (See Fig.28.) These
are accessed through the indoor access panel. Remove
the switch by removing two screws into the base plate
and extracting the existing switch.
Pilot−circuit/manual reset limit switch is located in the side
plate of the indoor (supply) fan housing. (See Fig.25.)
1
3
5610-4
REV
Low−Voltage Control Connections
Pull the low−voltage control leads from the heater
module(s) − VIO and BRN (two of each if two modules are
installed; identify for Module #1) − to the 4−pole terminal
board TB4 located on the heater bulkhead to the left of
Heater #1. Connect the VIO lead from Heater #1 to
termin−1. Connect the VIO lead from Heater #2 to
terminal TB4−2. Connect both BRN leads to terminal
TB4−3. (See Fig.29.)
CONDENSER COIL
SERVICE CONDENSER COIL
The condenser coil is new Micro−channel
Heat
Exchanger Technology.
This is an all−aluminum
construction with louvered fins over single−depth
crosstubes.
The crosstubes have multiple small
passages through which the refrigerant passes from
header to header on each end. Tubes and fins are both
aluminum construction.
Connection tube joints are
copper. The coil may be one−row or two−row. Two−row
coils are spaced apart to assist in cleaning.
Repairing Micro−channel Condenser Tube Leaks
FAST offers service repair kit for repairing tube leaks in
the Micro−channel coil crosstubes. This kit includes
approved braze materials (aluminum flux core braze
rods), a heat shield, a stainless steel brush, replacement
fin segments, adhesive for replacing fin segments, and
instructions specific to the Micro−channel aluminum coil.
The repair procedure requires the use of MAPP gas and
torch (must be supplied by servicer) instead of
conventional oxyacetylene fuel and torch. While the flame
temperature for MAPP is lower than that of oxyacetylene
(and thus provides more flexibility when working on
aluminum), the flame temperature is still higher than the
melting temperature of aluminum, so user caution is
required. Follow instructions carefully. Use the heat
shield.
Replacing Micro−channel Condenser Coil
The service replacement coil is preformed and is
equipped with transition joints with copper stub tubes.
When brazing the connection joints to the unit tubing, use
a wet cloth around the aluminum tube at the transition
joint.
23
Avoid applying torch flame directly onto the aluminum
tubing.
Accessory Electric Heater Control
Connections
Fig. 29
LCTB
Fig. 30
VIO
3
ORN
12
BRN
TB4
Field
Connections
Economizer Component Locations
ECONOMIZER
CONTROLLER
WIRING
HARNESS
ACTUATOR
(HIDDEN)
ORN
VIO
BRN
1
2
3
VIO
VIO
BRN
VIO
LOW TEMPERATURE
COMPRESSOR
LOCKOUT SWITCH
OUTSIDE AIR
TEMPERATURE SENSOR
(OPERATING LOCATION)
BRN
Elec Htr
VIO
HR2
HR1
BRN
BRN
HR1: On Heater 1 in Position #1
HR2: On Heater 2 in Position #2 (if installed)
24
The RAS units may be equipped with a factory−installed
or accessory (field−installed) economizer system. See
Fig.30 for component location See Fig. 31 for economizer
section wiring diagrams.
Economizers use direct−drive damper actuators.
CONTL
BOARD
2
ECONOMIZER SYSTEMS
Fig. 31
Economizer Wiring
Table 6 − Economizer Input/Output Logic
Demand Control
Ventilation (DCV)
Below set
(DCV LED Off)
Above set
(DCV LED On)
Enthalpy*
Outdoor
Return
High
(Free Cooling LED Off)
Low
Low
(Free Cooling LED On)
High
High
(Free Cooling LED Off)
Low
Low
(Free Cooling LED On)
High
Y1
On
On
Off
On
On
Off
On
On
Off
On
On
Off
Y2
On
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
Compressor
Stage Stage
1
2
On
On
On
Off
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
On
On
On
Off
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
N Terminal†
Occupied
Unoccupied
Damper
Minimum position
Closed
Modulating** (between min.
position and full-open)
Minimum position
Modulating†† (between min.
position and DCV
maximum)
Modulating** (between
closed and full-open)
Closed
Modulating†† (between
closed and DCV
maximum)
Modulating***
Modulating†††
*
†
**
††
***
For single enthalpy control, the module compares outdoor enthalpy to the ABCD setpoint.
Power at N terminal determines Occupied/Unoccupied setting: 24 vac (Occupied), no power (Unoccupied).
Modulation is based on the supply-air sensor signal.
Modulation is based on the DCV signal.
Modulation is based on the greater of DCV and supply-air sensor signals, between minimum position and either maximum position (DCV) or fully
open (supply-air signal).
††† Modulation is based on the greater of DCV and supply-air sensor signals, between closed and either maximum position (DCV) or fullyopen
(supply-air signal).
25
Fig. 32
Economizer Functional View
Economizer
Table 6 provides a summary of
Troubleshooting instructions are enclosed.
Economizer
A functional view of the Economizer is shown in Fig.32.
Typical settings, sensor ranges, and jumper positions are
also shown.
Economizer Standard Sensors
Outdoor Air Temperature (OAT) Sensor
The outdoor air temperature sensor (HH57AC074) is a 10
to 20 mA device used to measure the outdoor-air
temperature. The outdoor-air temperature is used to
determine when the Economizer can be used for free
cooling. The sensor is factory-installed on the Economizer
in the outdoor airstream. (See Fig.33) The operating
range of temperature measurement is 40 to 100F (4 to
38C). (See Fig.35)
Supply Air Temperature (SAT) Sensor
The supply air temperature sensor is a 3 K thermistor
located at the inlet of the indoor fan. (See Fig.33.) This
sensor is factory installed. The operating range of
temperature measurement is 0° to 158F (−18 to 70C).
See Table 6 for sensor temperature/resistance values.
Fig. 33
Supply Air Sensor Location
SUPPLY AIR
TEMPERATURE
SENSOR
MOUNTING
LOCATION
SUPPLY AIR
TEMPERATURE
SENSOR
26
The temperature sensor looks like an eyelet terminal with
wires running to it. The sensor is located in the “crimp
end” and is sealed from moisture.
Outdoor Air Lockout Sensor
The Economizer is equipped with an ambient temperature
lockout switch located in the outdoor airstream which is
used to lock out the compressors below a 42F (6C)
ambient temperature. (See Fig.30)
Economizer Control Modes
Determine the Economizer control mode before set up of
the control. Some modes of operation may require
different sensors. (See Table 7.) The Economizer is
supplied from the factory with a supply−air temperature
sensor and an outdoor− air temperature sensor. This
allows for operation of the Economizer with outdoor air
dry bulb changeover control. Additional accessories can
be added to allow for different types of changeover control
and operation of the Economizer and unit.
Outdoor Dry Bulb Changeover
The standard controller is shipped from the factory
configured for outdoor dry bulb changeover control. The
outdoor air and supply air temperature sensors are
included as standard. For this control mode, the outdoor
temperature is compared to an adjustable setpoint
selected on the control. If the outdoor-air temperature is
above the setpoint, the Economizer will adjust the outside
air dampers to minimum position. If the outdoor-air
temperature is below the setpoint, the position of the
outside air dampers will be controlled to provided free
cooling using outdoor air. When in this mode, the LED
next to the free cooling setpoint potentiometer will be on.
The changeover temperature setpoint is controlled by the
free cooling setpoint potentiometer located on the control.
(See Fig.34) The scale on the potentiometer is A, B, C,
and D. See Fig.35 for the corresponding temperature
changeover values.
Economizer Controller Potentiometer and
LED Locations
Fig. 34
accessory
dry
bulb
sensor
(part
number
DNTEMPSN002A00). The accessory sensor must be
mounted in the return airstream. (See Fig.37.) Wiring is
provided in the Economizer wiring harness.
Fig. 37
Return Air Temperature or Enthalpy Sensor
Mounting Locations
ECONOMIZER
CONTROLLER
ECONOMIZER
GROMMET
RETURN AIR
SENSOR
Outside Air Temperature
Changeover setpoints
Fig. 35
RETURN DUCT
(FIELD−PROVIDED)
19
LED ON
18
D
17
C
mA
15
14
LED OFF
13
12
LED ON
B
LED OFF
LED ON
A
11
10
Outdoor Enthalpy Changeover
LED OFF
9
40
45
50
55
60
65 70 75 80
DEGREES FAHRENHEIT
85
90
100
95
Outdoor−Air Damper Leakage
Fig. 36
FLOW IN CUBIC FEET PER MINUTE (cfm)
In this mode of operation, the outdoor-air temperature is
compared to the return-air temperature and the lower
temperature airstream is used for cooling. When using
this mode of changeover control, turn the enthalpy
setpoint potentiometer fully clockwise to the D setting.
(See Fig.33)
LED ON
LED OFF
16
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
0.13
0.20 0.22
0.25
0.30 0.35 0.40
0.45
For enthalpy control, accessory enthalpy sensor (part
number AXB078ENT) is required. Replace the standard
outdoor dry bulb temperature sensor with the accessory
enthalpy sensor in the same mounting location. (See Fig.
38.) When the outdoor air enthalpy rises above the
outdoor enthalpy changeover setpoint, the outdoor-air
damper moves to its minimum position. The outdoor
enthalpy changeover setpoint is set with the outdoor
enthalpy setpoint potentiometer on the Economizer
controller. The setpoints are A, B, C, and D. (See Fig.38.)
The factory-installed 620-ohm jumper must be in place
across terminals SR and SR+ on the Economizer
controller.
0.50
STATIC PRESSURE (in. wg)
Differential Dry Bulb Control
For differential dry bulb control the standard outdoor dry
bulb sensor is used in conjunction with an additional
27
Enthalpy Changeover Setpoints
Fig. 38
CONTROL CONTROL POINT
CURVE
APPROX. deg. F (deg. C)
AT 50% RH
EN
T
HA
LP
Y
BT
U
RE
LA
TIV
E
PE
R
HU
MID
I
PO
UN
D
TY
(
DR
Y
%)
AI
R
A
B
C
D
A
A
35
HIGH LIMIT
CURVE
40
APPROXIMATE DRY BULB TEMPERATURE--degrees F (degrees C)
Fig. 39
Economizer Control
EXH
N1
N
2V
EXH
P1
P
Min
Pos
T1
DCV
2V
SO+
SO
SR
24
Vac
HOT
24 Vac
COM
+
_
Max
10V
1
2
5
DCV
AQ
SR+
TR1
Open
T
AQ1
TR
Set
10V
2V
DCV
Set
10V
Free
Cool
B
C
A
D
3
4
EF
EF1
Differential Enthalpy Control
For differential enthalpy control, the Economizer controller
uses two enthalpy sensors (AXB078ENT and
DNENTDIF004A00), one in the outside air and one in the
28
return air duct. The Economizer controller compares the
outdoor air enthalpy to the return air enthalpy to
determine Economizer use. The controller selects the
lower enthalpy air (return or outdoor) for cooling. For
example, when the outdoor air has a lower enthalpy than
the return air, the Economizer opens to bring in outdoor
air for free cooling.
Replace the standard outside air dry bulb temperature
sensor with the accessory enthalpy sensor in the same
mounting location. (See Fig.30.) Mount the return air
enthalpy sensor in the return air duct. (See Fig.37.) Wiring
is provided in the Economizer IV wiring harness. (See
Fig.30.) The outdoor enthalpy changeover setpoint is set
with the outdoor enthalpy setpoint potentiometer on the
Economizer controller. When using this mode of
changeover control, turn the enthalpy setpoint
potentiometer fully clockwise to the D setting.
Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Sensor Input
The IAQ input can be used for demand control ventilation
control based on the level of CO2 measured in the space
or return air duct.
Mount the accessory IAQ sensor according to
manufacturer specifications. The IAQ sensor should be
wired to the AQ and AQ1 terminals of the controller.
Adjust the DCV potentiometers to correspond to the DCV
voltage output of the indoor air quality sensor at the
user-determined setpoint. (See Fig.40.)
CO2 Sensor Maximum Range Settings
Fig. 40
CO2 SENSOR MAX RANGE SETTING
RANGE CONFIGURATION (ppm)
6000
5000
4000
800 ppm
900 ppm
1000 ppm
1100 ppm
3000
2000
requirements. The maximum demand ventilation position
is used for fully occupied ventilation.
When demand ventilation control is not being used, the
minimum position potentiometer should be used to set the
occupied ventilation position. The maximum demand
ventilation position should be turned fully clockwise.
Adjust the minimum position potentiometer to allow the
minimum amount of outdoor air, as required by local
codes, to enter the building. Make minimum position
adjustments with at least 10F temperature difference
between the outdoor and return-air temperatures.
To determine the minimum position setting, perform the
following procedure:
1. Calculate the appropriate mixed air temperature using
the following formula:
1000
0
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
DAMPER VOLTAGE FOR MAX VENTILATION RATE
(TO x
OA + (TR
)
100
x
RA
) =TM
100
TO = Outdoor-Air Temperature
If a separate field-supplied transformer is used to power
the IAQ sensor, the sensor must not be grounded or the
Economizer control board will be damaged.
When using demand ventilation, the minimum damper
position represents the minimum ventilation position for
VOC
(volatile
organic
compounds)
ventilation
requirements. The maximum demand ventilation position
is used for fully occupied ventilation.
When demand ventilation control is not being used, the
minimum position potentiometer should be used to set the
occupied ventilation position. The maximum demand
ventilation position should be turned fully clockwise.
Exhaust Setpoint Adjustment
The exhaust setpoint will determine when the exhaust fan
runs based on damper position (if accessory power
exhaust is installed). The setpoint is modified with the
Exhaust Fan Setpoint (EXH SET) potentiometer. (See Fig.
33.) The setpoint represents the damper position above
which the exhaust fans will be turned on. When there is a
call for exhaust, the Economizer controller provides a 45 ±
15 second delay before exhaust fan activation to allow the
dampers to open. This delay allows the damper to reach
the appropriate position to avoid unnecessary fan
overload.
OA = Percent of Outdoor Air
TR = Return-Air Temperature
RA = Percent of Return Air
TM = Mixed-Air Temperature
As an example, if local codes require 10% outdoor air
during occupied conditions, outdoor-air temperature is
60F, and return-air temperature is 75F.
(60 x .10) + (75 x .90) = 73.5F
2. Disconnect the supply air sensor from terminals T and
T1.
3. Ensure that the factory-installed jumper is in place
across terminals P and P1. If remote damper
positioning is being used, make sure that the
terminals are wired according to Fig. 50 and that the
minimum position potentiometer is turned fully
clockwise.
4. Connect 24 vac across terminals TR and TR1.
5. Carefully adjust the minimum position potentiometer
until the measured mixed air temperature matches
the calculated value.
6. Reconnect the supply air sensor to terminals T and
T1.
There is a minimum damper position potentiometer on the
Economizer controller. (See Fig.34.) The minimum
damper position maintains the minimum airflow into the
building during the occupied period.
Remote control of the Economizer IV damper is desirable
when requiring additional temporary ventilation. If a
field-supplied remote potentiometer (Honeywell part
number S963B1128) is wired to the Economizer
controller, the minimum position of the damper can be
controlled from a remote location.
When using demand ventilation, the minimum damper
position represents the minimum ventilation position for
VOC
(volatile
organic
compound)
ventilation
To control the minimum damper position remotely, remove
the factory-installed jumper on the P and P1 terminals on
the Economizer controller. Wire the field-supplied
Minimum Position Control
29
potentiometer to the P and P1 terminals on the
Economizer controller. (See Fig.39)
Damper Movement
Damper movement from full open to full closed (or vice
versa) takes 21/2 minutes.
Thermostats
The Economizer control works with conventional
thermostats that have a Y1 (cool stage 1), Y2 (cool stage
2), W1 (heat stage 1), W2 (heat stage 2), and G (fan).
The Economizer control does not support space
temperature sensors. Connections are made at the
thermostat terminal connection board located in the main
control box.
Occupancy Control
The factory default configuration for the Economizer
control is occupied mode. Occupied status is provided by
installing a field-supplied timeclock function on the
OCCUPANCY terminals on the LCTB (Light Commercial
Terminal Board) in the unit’s main control box and cutting
the “CUT FOR OCCUPANCY” jumper on the LCTB. (See
Fig.41). When the timeclock contacts are closed, the
Economizer control will be in occupied mode. When the
timeclock contacts are open (removing the 24v signal
from terminal N). (See Fig.41.) The Economizer will be in
unoccupied mode.
Fig. 41
LCTB, Occupancy Terminals
Typically the maximum ventilation rate will be about 5 to
10% more than the typical cfm required per person, using
normal outside air design criteria.
A proportional anticipatory strategy should be taken with
the following conditions: a zone with a large area, varied
occupancy, and equipment that cannot exceed the
required ventilation rate at design conditions. Exceeding
the required ventilation rate means the equipment can
condition air at a maximum ventilation rate that is greater
than the required ventilation rate for maximum occupancy.
A proportional-anticipatory strategy will cause the fresh air
supplied to increase as the room CO2 level increases
even though the CO2 setpoint has not been reached. By
the time the CO2 level reaches the setpoint, the damper
will be at maximum ventilation and should maintain the
setpoint.
In order to have the CO2 sensor control the economizer
damper in this manner, first determine the damper voltage
output for minimum or base ventilation. Base ventilation is
the ventilation required to remove contaminants during
unoccupied periods. The following equation may be used
to determine the percent of outside air entering the
building for a given damper position. For best results
there should be at least a 10 degree difference in outside
and return-air temperatures.
(TO x
OA + (TR
)
100
x
RA
) =TM
100
TO = Outdoor-Air Temperature
OA = Percent of Outdoor Air
TR = Return-Air Temperature
RA = Percent of Return Air
TM = Mixed-Air Temperature
Once base ventilation has been determined, set the
minimum damper position potentiometer to the correct
position.
Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)
When using the Economizer for demand controlled
ventilation, there are some equipment selection criteria
which should be considered. When selecting the heat
capacity and cool capacity of the equipment, the
maximum ventilation rate must be evaluated for design
conditions. The maximum damper position must be
calculated to provide the desired fresh air.
30
The same equation can be used to determine the
occupied or maximum ventilation rate to the building. For
example, an output of 3.6 volts to the actuator provides a
base ventilation rate of 5% and an output of 6.7 volts
provides the maximum ventilation rate of 20% (or base
plus 15 cfm per person). Use Fig.40 to determine the
maximum setting of the CO2 sensor. For example, an
1100 ppm setpoint relates to a 15 cfm per person design.
Use the 1100 ppm curve on Fig.40 to find the point when
the CO2 sensor output will be 6.7 volts. Line up the point
on the graph with the left side of the chart to determine
that the range configuration for the CO2 sensor should be
1800 ppm. The Economizer controller will output the 6.7
volts from the CO2 sensor to the actuator when the CO2
concentration in the space is at 1100 ppm. The DCV
setpoint may be left at 2 volts since the CO2 sensor
voltage will be ignored by the Economizer controller until it
rises above the 3.6 volt setting of the minimum position
potentiometer.
Once the fully occupied damper position has been
determined, set the maximum damper demand control
ventilation potentiometer to this position. Do not set to the
maximum position as this can result in over-ventilation to
the space and potential high humidity levels.
CO2 Sensor Configuration
The CO2 sensor has preset standard voltage settings that
can be selected anytime after the sensor is powered up.
(See Table 7.)
Use setting 1 or 2 for (See Table 7.)
1. Press Clear and Mode buttons. Hold at least 5
seconds until the sensor enters the Edit mode.
2. Press Mode twice. The STDSET Menu will appear.
Table 7 − Economizer Sensor Usage
APPLICATION
Outdoor Air
Dry Bulb
Differential
Dry Bulb
Single Enthalpy
Differential
Enthalpy
CO2 for DCV
Control using a
Duct-Mounted CO2
Sensor
*
ECONOMIZER WITH OUTDOOR AIR DRY
BULB SENSOR
Accessories Required
None. The outdoor air dry bulb sensor is
factory installed.
DNTEMPSN002A00*
AXB078ENT
DNENTDIF004A00*
DNCBDIOX005A00
DNENTDIF004A00 and DNTEMPSN002A00 accessories are used
on many different base units. As such, these kits may contain parts
that will not be needed for installation.
3. Use the Up/Down button to select the preset number.
(See Table 6.)
4. Press Enter to lock in the selection.
5. Press Mode to exit and resume normal operation.
The custom settings of the CO2 sensor can be changed
anytime after the sensor is energized. Follow the steps
below to change the non-standard settings:
1. Press Clear and Mode buttons. Hold at least 5
seconds until the sensor enters the Edit mode.
2. Press Mode twice. The STDSET Menu will appear.
3. Use the Up/Down button to toggle to the NONSTD
menu and press Enter.
4. Use the Up/Down button to toggle through each of the
nine variables, starting with Altitude, until the desired
setting is reached.
5. Press Mode to move through the variables.
6. Press Enter to lock in the selection, then press Mode
to continue to the next variable.
Dehumidification of Fresh Air with DCV (Demand
Controlled Ventilation) Control
If normal rooftop heating and cooling operation is not
adequate for the outdoor humidity level, an energy
recovery unit and/or a dehumidification option should be
considered.
Economizer Preparation
This procedure is used to prepare the Economizer for
troubleshooting. No troubleshooting or testing is done by
performing the following procedure.
NOTE: This procedure requires a 9−v battery, 1.2
kilo−ohm resistor, and a 5.6 kilo−ohm resistor which are
not supplied with the Economizer.
IMPORTANT: Be sure to record the positions of all
potentiometers before starting troubleshooting.
1. Disconnect power at TR and TR1. All LEDs should be
off. Exhaust fan contacts should be open.
2. Disconnect device at P and P1.
3. Jumper P to P1.
4. Disconnect wires at T and T1. Place 5.6 kilo−ohm
resistor across T and T1.
5. Jumper TR to 1.
6. Jumper TR to N.
7. If connected, remove sensor from terminals SO and
+. Connect 1.2 kilo−ohm 4074EJM checkout resistor
across terminals SO and +.
8. Put 620−ohm resistor across terminals SR and +.
9. Set minimum position, DCV setpoint, and exhaust
potentiometers fully CCW (counterclockwise).
10. Set DCV maximum position potentiometer fully CW
(clockwise).
11. Set enthalpy potentiometer to D.
12. Apply power (24 vac) to terminals TR and TR1.
Differential Enthalpy
To check differential enthalpy:
1. Make sure Economizer preparation procedure has
been performed.
2. Place 620−ohm resistor across SO and +.
3. Place 1.2 kilo−ohm resistor across SR and +. The
Free Cool LED should be lit.
4. Remove 620−ohm resistor across SO and +. The
Free Cool LED should turn off.
5. Return Economizer settings and wiring to normal after
completing troubleshooting.
Single Enthalpy
To check single enthalpy:
1. Make sure Economizer preparation procedure has
been performed.
2. Set the enthalpy potentiometer to A (fully CCW). The
Free Cool LED should be lit.
3. Set the enthalpy potentiometer to D (fully CW). The
Free Cool LED should turn off.
4. Return Economizer settings and wiring to normal after
completing troubleshooting.
DCV (Demand Controlled Ventilation) and Power
Exhaust
To check DCV and Power Exhaust:
1. Make sure Economizer preparation procedure has
been performed.
31
2. Ensure terminals AQ and AQ1 are open. The LED for
both DCV and Exhaust should be off. The actuator
should be fully closed.
3. Connect a 9−v battery to AQ (positive node) and AQ1
(negative node). The LED for both DCV and Exhaust
should turn on. The actuator should drive to between
90 and 95% open.
4. Turn the Exhaust potentiometer CW until the Exhaust
LED turns off. The LED should turn off when the
potentiometer is approximately 90%. The actuator
should remain in position.
5. Turn the DCV setpoint potentiometer CW until the
DCV LED turns off. The DCV LED should turn off
when the potentiometer is approximately 9−v. The
actuator should drive fully closed.
6. Turn the DCV and Exhaust potentiometers CCW until
the Exhaust LED turns on. The exhaust contacts will
close 30 to 120 seconds after the Exhaust LED turns
on.
7. Return Economizer settings and wiring to normal after
completing troubleshooting.
DCV Minimum and Maximum Position
To check the DCV minimum and maximum position:
1. Make sure Economizer preparation procedure has
been performed.
2. Connect a 9−v battery to AQ (positive node) and AQ1
(negative node). The DCV LED should turn on. The
actuator should drive to between 90 and 95% open.
3. Turn the DCV Maximum Position potentiometer to
midpoint. The actuator should drive to between 20
and 80% open.
4. Turn the DCV Maximum Position potentiometer to
fully CCW. The actuator should drive fully closed.
5. Turn the Minimum Position potentiometer to midpoint.
The actuator should drive to between 20 and 80%
open.
6. Turn the Minimum Position Potentiometer fully CW.
The actuator should drive fully open.
7. Remove the jumper from TR and N. The actuator
should drive fully closed.
8. Return Economizer settings and wiring to normal
+after completing troubleshooting.
Supply−Air Sensor Input
To check supply−air sensor input:
1. Make sure Economizer preparation procedure has
been performed.
2. Set the Enthalpy potentiometer to A. The Free Cool
LED turns on. The actuator should drive to between
20 and 80% open.
3. Remove the 5.6 kilo−ohm resistor and jumper T to T1.
The actuator should drive fully open.
4. Remove the jumper across T and T1. The actuator
should drive fully closed.
5. Return Economizer settings and wiring to normal after
completing troubleshooting.
Economizer Troubleshooting Completion
This procedure is used to return the Economizer to
operation. No troubleshooting or testing is done by
performing the following procedure.
1. Disconnect power at TR and TR1.
2. Set enthalpy potentiometer to previous setting.
3. Set DCV maximum position potentiometer to previous
setting.
4. Set minimum position, DCV setpoint, and exhaust
potentiometers to previous settings.
5. Remove 620−ohm resistor from terminals SR and +.
6. Remove 1.2 kilo−ohm checkout resistor from
terminals SO and +. If used, reconnect sensor from
terminals SO and +.
7. Remove jumper from TR to N.
8. Remove jumper from TR to 1.
9. Remove 5.6 kilo−ohm resistor from T and T1.
Reconnect wires at T and T1.
10. Remove jumper from P to P1. Reconnect device at P
and P1.
11. Apply power (24 vac) to terminals TR and TR1.
WIRING DIAGRAMS
See Fig. 42 and Fig. 43 for typical wiring diagrams.
32
Fig. 42
Typical Unit Wiring Diagram−Power (208/230−3−60)
33
Fig. 43
34
Typical Unit Wiring Diagram−Control (208/230−3−60)
PRE−START−UP
!
WARNING
PERSONAL INJURY HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal
injury or death.
1. Follow recognized safety practices and wear
protective goggles when checking or servicing
refrigerant system.
2. Do not operate compressor or provide any
electric power to unit unless compressor terminal
cover is in place and secured.
3. Do not remove compressor terminal cover until all
electrical sources are disconnected.
4. Relieve all pressure from system before touching
or disturbing anything inside terminal box if
refrigerant leak is suspected around compressor
terminals.
5. Never attempt to repair soldered connection while
refrigerant system is under pressure.
6. Do not use torch to remove any component.
System contains oil and refrigerant under
pressure. To remove a component, wear
protective goggles and proceed as follows:
a. Shut off electrical power to unit.
b. Recover refrigerant to relieve all pressure from
system using both high−pressure and low
pressure ports.
c. Cut component connection tubing with tubing
cutter and remove component from unit.
d. Carefully unsweat remaining tubing stubs
when necessary. Oil can ignite when exposed
to torch flame.
!
!
WARNING
ELECTRICAL OPERATION HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal
injury or death.
Relieve pressure and recover all refrigerant before
system repair or final unit disposal. Wear safety and
gloves when handling refrigerants. Keep torches and
other ignition sources away from refrigerants and oils.
3. Make the following inspections:
a. Inspect for shipping and handling damages such
as broken lines, loose parts, or disconnected
wires, etc.
b. Inspect for oil at all refrigerant tubing connections
and on unit base. Detecting oil generally indicates
a refrigerant leak. Leak−test all refrigerant tubing
connections using electronic leak detector, halide
torch, or liquid−soap solution.
c. Inspect all field−wiring and factory−wiring
connections. Be sure that connections are
completed and tight. Be sure that wires are not in
contact with refrigerant tubing or sharp edges.
d. Inspect coil fins. If damaged during shipping and
handling, carefully straighten fins with a fin comb.
4. Verify the following conditions:
a. Make sure that condenser−fan blade are correctly
positioned in fan orifice. See Condenser−Fan
Adjustment section for more details.
b. Make sure that air filter(s) is in place.
c. Make sure that condensate drain trap is filled with
water to ensure proper drainage.
d. Make sure that all tools and miscellaneous loose
parts have been removed.
WARNING
ELECTRICAL OPERATION HAZARD
Failure to follow this warning could result in personal
injury or death.
The unit must be electrically grounded in accordance
with local codes and NEC ANSI/NFPA 70 (American
National Standards Institute/National Fire Protection
Association.)
Proceed as follows to inspect and prepare the unit for
initial start−up:
1. Remove all access panels.
2. Read and follow instructions on all WARNING,
CAUTION, and INFORMATION labels attached to, or
shipped with, unit.
35
START−UP, GENERAL
Unit Preparation
Check unit charge. Refer to Refrigerant Charge section.
Make sure that unit has been installed in accordance with
installation instructions and applicable codes.
Reset thermostat at a position above room temperature.
Both compressors will shut off. Evaporator fan will shut off
after a 30−second delay. The supply fan and both
compressors will shut off.
Return−Air Filters
Make sure correct filters are installed in unit (see
Appendix II − Physical Data). Do not operate unit without
return−air filters.
Outdoor−Air Inlet Screens
Outdoor−air inlet screen must be in place before
operating unit.
Compressor Mounting
Compressors are internally spring mounted. Do not
loosen or remove compressor hold down bolts.
Internal Wiring
Check all electrical connections in unit control boxes.
Tighten as required.
Refrigerant Service Ports
Each unit system has two 1/4” SAE flare (with check
valves) service ports: one on the suction line, and one on
the compressor discharge line. Be sure that caps on the
ports are tight.
Compressor Rotation
On 3−phase units with scroll compressors, it is important
to be certain compressor is rotating in the proper
direction. To determine whether or not compressor is
rotating in the proper direction:
1. Connect service gauges to suction and discharge
pressure fittings.
2. Energize the compressor.
3. The suction pressure should drop and the discharge
pressure should rise, as is normal on any start−up.
If the suction pressure does not drop and the discharge
pressure does not rise to normal levels:
1. Note that the evaporator fan is probably also rotating
in the wrong direction.
2. Turn off power to the unit and install lockout tag.
3. Reverse any two of the unit power leads.
4. Re−energize to the compressor. Check pressures.
The suction and discharge pressure levels should now
move to their normal start−up levels.
NOTE: When the compressor is rotating in the wrong
direction, the unit will make an elevated level of noise and
will not provide cooling.
Cooling
Set space thermostat to OFF position. To start unit, turn
on main power supply. Set system selector switch at
COOL position and fan switch at AUTO. position. Adjust
thermostat to a setting approximately 5F (3C) below
room temperature. Both compressors start on closure of
contactors.
36
To shut off unit, set system selector switch at OFF
position. Resetting thermostat at a position above room
temperature shuts unit off temporarily until space
temperature exceeds thermostat setting.
Heating
To start unit, turn on main power supply.
Set system selector switch at HEAT position and set
thermostat at a setting above room temperature. Set fan
at AUTO position.
First stage of thermostat energizes the first−stage electric
heater elements; second stage energizes second−stage
electric heater elements, if installed. Check heating
effects at air supply grille(s).
If electric heaters do not energize, reset limit switch
(located on evaporator−fan scroll) by pressing button
located between terminals on the switch.
To Shut Off Unit
Set system selector switch at OFF position. Resetting
thermostat at a position below room temperature
temporarily shuts unit off until space temperature falls
below thermostat setting.
Ventilation (Continuous Fan)
Set fan and system selector switches at ON and OFF
positions, respectively. Evaporator fan operates
continuously to provide constant air circulation.
OPERATING SEQUENCE
Base Unit Controls
Cooling, Unit Without Economizer
When thermostat calls for Stage 1 cooling, terminals G
and Y1 are energized. The indoor−fan contactor (IFC),
outdoor fan contactor (OFC) and Compressor 1 contactor
(C1) are energized and indoor-fan motor, outdoor fan and
Compressor 1 start. The outdoor fan motor runs
continuously while unit is in Stage 1 or Stage 2 cooling.
(090 and 120 units have two outdoor fans; both run while
unit is in Stage 1 or Stage 2 cooling.)
If Stage 1 cooling does not satisfy the space load , the
space temperature will rise until thermostat calls for Stage
2 cooling (Y2 closes). Compressor 2 contactor (C2) is
energized; Compressor 2 starts and runs.
Heating, Unit Without Economizer
When the thermostat calls for heating, Terminal W1 will be
energized with 24v. The IFC and heater contactor No. 1
(HC1) are energized. Indoor fan motor starts; electric
heater module No. 1 is energized. If Stage 1 heating
does not satisfy the space load, the space temperature
will drop until thermostat calls for Stage 2 heating (W2
Closes). Heater contactor No. 2 (HC2) will be energized
and heater module No. 2 is energized.
Cooling, Unit With Economizer
For Occupied mode operation of Economizer, there must
be a 24-v signal at terminals TR and N (provided through
PL6−3 from the unit’s IFC coil). Removing the signal at N
places the Economizer control in Unoccupied mode.
During Occupied mode operation, indoor fan operation
will be accompanied by economizer dampers moving to
Minimum Position setpoint for ventilation. If indoor fan is
off, dampers will close. During Unoccupied mode
operation, dampers will remain closed unless a Cooling
(by free cooling) or DCV demand is received.
When free cooling using outside air is not available, the
unit cooling sequence will be controlled directly by the
space thermostat as described above as Cooling, Unit
Without Economizer. Outside air damper position will be
closed or Minimum Position as determined by occupancy
mode and fan signal.
When free cooling is available as determined by the
appropriate changeover command (dry bulb, outdoor
enthalpy, differential dry bulb or differential enthalpy), a
call for cooling (Y1 closes at the thermostat) will cause the
economizer control to modulate the dampers open and
closed to maintain the unit supply air temperature at 50 to
55F. Compressor will not run.
During free cooling operation, a supply air temperature
(SAT) above 50F will cause the dampers to modulate
between Minimum Position setpoint and 100% open. With
SAT from 50F to 45F, the dampers will maintain at the
Minimum Position setting. With SAT below 45F, the
outside air dampers will be closed. When SAT rises to
48F, the dampers will re-open to Minimum Position
setting.
Should 100% outside air not be capable of satisfying the
space temperature, space temperature will rise until Y2 is
closed. The economizer control will call for compressor
operation. Dampers will modulate to maintain SAT at 50
to 55F concurrent with Compressor 1 operation. The
Low Ambient Lockout Thermostat will block compressor
operation with economizer operation below 42F outside
air temperature.
Heating With Economizer
During Occupied mode operation, indoor fan operation
will be accompanied by economizer dampers moving to
Minimum Position setpoint for ventilation. If indoor fan is
off, dampers will close. During Unoccupied mode
operation, dampers will remain closed unless a DCV
demand is received.
When the room temperature calls for heat (W1 closes),
the heating controls are energized as described in
Heating, Unit Without Economizer above.
Demand Controlled Ventilation
If a field-installed CO2 sensor is connected to the
Economize control, a Demand Controlled Ventilation
strategy will operate automatically. As the CO2 level in the
space increases above the setpoint (on the Economizer
controller), the minimum position of the dampers will be
increased proportionally, until the Maximum Ventilation
setting is reached. As the space CO2 level decreases
because of the increase in fresh air, the outdoor-damper
will follow the higher demand condition from the DCV
mode or from the free-cooling mode.
DCV operation is available in Occupied and Unoccupied
periods with Economizer However, a control modification
will be required on the RAS unit to implement the
Unoccupied period function.
Demand Controlled Ventilation
If a field-installed CO2 sensor is connected to the
Economize control, a Demand Controlled Ventilation
strategy will operate automatically. As the CO2 level in the
space increases above the setpoint (on the Economizer
controller), the minimum position of the dampers will be
increased proportionally, until the Maximum Ventilation
setting is reached. As the space CO2 level decreases
because of the increase in fresh air, the outdoor-damper
will follow the higher demand condition from the DCV
mode or from the free-cooling mode.
DCV operation is available in Occupied and Unoccupied
periods with Economizer. However, a control modification
will be required on the unit to implement the Unoccupied
period function.
When space temperature demand is satisfied (thermostat
Y1 opens), the dampers will return to Minimum Damper
position if indoor fan is running or fully closed if fan is off.
If accessory power exhaust is installed, the power
exhaust fan motors will be energized by the economizer
control as the dampers open above the PE−On setpoint
and will be de-energized as the dampers close below the
PE−On setpoint.
Damper movement from full closed to full open (or vice
versa) will take between 1-1/2 and 2-1/2 minutes.
37
FASTENER TORQUE VALUES
See Table 8 for torque values.
Table 8− Torque Values
Supply fan motor mounting
Supply fan motor adjustment plate
Motor pulley setscrew
Fan pulley setscrew
Blower wheel hub setscrew
Bearing locking collar setscrew
Compressor mounting bolts
Condenser fan motor mounting bolts
Condenser fan hub setscrew
120 12 in−lbs
120 12 in−lbs
72 5 in−lbs
72 5 in−lbs
72 5 in−lbs
65 to 70 in−lbs
65 to 75 in−lbs
20h 2 in−lbs
84 12 in−lbs
13.5 1.4 Nm
13.5 1.4 Nm
8.1 0.6 Nm
8.1 0.6 Nm
8.1 0.6 Nm
7.3 to 7.9 Nm
7.3 to 7.9 Nm
2.3 0.2 Nm
9.5 1.4 Nm
APPENDIX I. MODEL SIGNIFICANCE
MODEL NOMENCLATURE
MODEL SERIES
R
A
S
0
9
0
H
D
A
B
0
A
G
A
Position Number
R = Rooftop
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
A = Air Conditioning (Cooling Only)
G = Gas/Electric
S = Standard ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Efficiency
Type
Efficiency
090 = 7.5 Tons (Two Compressors)
120 = 10 Tons (Two Compressors)
150 = 12.5 Tons (Two Compressors)
Nominal Cooling Capacity
H = 208/230-3-60
L = 460-3-60
S = 575-3-60
0 = No Heat
A = Standard Motor
B = High Static Motor
A = None
B = Economizer w/Bara-relief, OA Temp sensor
B = Economizer w/Bara-relief + CO2 Sensor, OA Temp sensor
H = Economizer w/Bara-relief, enthalpy sensor
H = Economizer w/Bara-relief + CO2 Sensor,, enthalpy sensor
P = 2-Position damper
0A = No Options
4B = Non-Fused Disconnect
AT = Non-powered 115v C.O.
BR = Supply Air Smoke Detector
7C = Non-Fused Disconnect + Non-Powered 115v C.O.
7K = Non-Fused Disconnect + Non-Powered 115v C.O.+ SA Smoke detector
8A = Non-Fused Disconnect + SA Smoke detector
G = Alum / Alum Cond & Alum / Cu Evap
K = E-Coated Alum / Alum Cond Coil, Std Alum / Cu Evap Coil
A = Standard
38
Voltage
Heating Capacity
Motor Option
Outdoor Air Options / Control
Factory Installed Options
Condenser / Evaporator Coil Configuration
Unit Packaging
APPENDIX II. PHYSICAL DATA
Physical Data (Cooling)
7.5 − 12.5TONS
Refrigeration System
# Circuits / # Comp. / Type
R−410a charge A/B (lbs)
Oil A/B (oz)
Metering Device
High−press. Trip / Reset (psig)
Low−press. Trip / Reset (psig)
Evaporator Coil
Material
Coil type
Rows / FPI
Total Face Area (ft2)
Condensate Drain Conn. Size
RAS090
RAS120
RAS150
2 / 2 / Scroll
4−6 / 4−6
42 / 42
Fixed Metering Device
630 / 505
54 / 117
2 / 2 / Scroll
6−0 / 6−0
42 / 42
Fixed Metering Device
630 / 505
54 / 117
2 / 2 / Scroll
7−6/8−0
56 / 56
Fixed Metering Device
630 / 505
54 / 117
Cu / Al
3/8” RTPF
4 / 15
11.1
3/4”
Cu / Al
3/8” RTPF
4 / 15
11.1
3/4”
Standard Static
1 phase
Motor Qty / Drive Type
Max BHP
RPM Range
Motor Frame Size
Fan Qty / Type
Fan Diameter (in)
1 / Belt
1.7
489−747
56
1 / Centrifugal
15 x 15
1 / Belt
2.4
591−838
56
1 / Centrifugal
15 x 15
1 / Belt
2.9*
652−843
56
1 / Centrifugal
15 x 15
Medium Static
3 phase
Motor Qty / Drive Type
Max BHP
RPM Range
Motor Frame Size
Fan Qty / Type
Fan Diameter (in)
1 / Belt
2.9
733−949
56
1 / Centrifugal
15 x 15
1 / Belt
3.7
838−1084
56
1 / Centrifugal
15 x 15
1 / Belt
3.7
838−1084
56
1 / Centrifugal
15 x 15
High Static
3 phase
Cu / Al
3/8” RTPF
3 / 15
8.9
3/4”
Evaporator Fan and Motor
Motor Qty / Drive Type
Max BHP
RPM Range
Motor Frame Size
Fan Qty / Type
Fan Diameter (in)
1 / Belt
4.7
909−1102
145TY
1 / Centrifugal
15 x 15
1 / Belt
4.7
1022−1240
145TY
1 / Centrifugal
15 x 15
1 / Belt
4.7
1022−1240
145TY
1 / Centrifugal
15 x 15
Al / Al
MICRO−CHANNEL
1 / 20
20.5
Al / Al
MICRO−CHANNEL
1 / 20
25.1
Al / Al
MICRO−CHANNEL
2 / 20
25.1
2/ Direct
1/4 / 1100
22
2 / Direct
1/4 / 1100
22
1/ Direct
1 / 1175
30
4 / 16 x 20 x 2
1 / 20 x 24 x 1
4 / 20 x 20 x 2
1 / 20 x 24 x 1
4 / 20 x 20 x 2
1 / 20 x 24 x 1
Condenser Coil
Material
Coil type
Rows / FPI
Total Face Area (ft2)
Condenser fan / motor
Qty / Motor Drive Type
Motor HP / RPM
Fan diameter (in)
Filters
RA Filter # / Size (in)
OA inlet screen # / Size (in)
AI / AI: Aluminum Tube / Aluminum Fin
Cu / AI: Copper Tube / Aluminum Fin
RTPF: Round Tube / Plate Fin
General Fan Performance Notes:
1. Interpolation is permissible. Do not extrapolate.
2. External static pressure is the static pressure difference between the return duct and the supply duct plus the static
pressure caused by any FIOPs or accessories.
3. Tabular data accounts for pressure loss due to clean filters, unit casing, and wet coils. Factory options and
accessories may add static pressure losses.
4. The Fan Performance tables offer motor/drive recommendations. In cases when two motor/drive combinations would
work, Use the lower horsepower option.
5. For information on the electrical properties of motors, please see the Electrical information section of this book.
APPENDIX III. FAN PERFORMANCE
39
RAS090
CFM
2250
2438
2625
2813
3000
3188
3375
3563
3750
3 PHASE
0.2
RPM
BHP
Field Supplied Drive1
465
0.43
488
0.51
510
0.60
533
0.70
557
0.82
581
0.94
606
1.08
630
1.24
655
1.41
RPM
555
575
595
616
637
659
681
703
726
7.5 TON HORIZONTAL SUPPLY
AVAILABLE EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (IN. WG)
0.4
0.6
0.8
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Standard Static Option
0.64
629
0.86
694
0.73
648
0.97
712
0.84
666
1.09
729
0.95
686
1.22
748
1.08
705
1.36
766
1.23
726
1.51
785
1.38
746
1.68
805
1.55
767
1.87
825
1.74
789
2.07
845
BHP
1.10
1.21
1.34
1.49
1.64
1.81
2.00
2.20
2.41
AVAILABLE EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (IN. WG)
1.4
1.6
1.8
CFM
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Medium Static Option
2250
806
1.60
856
1.87
903
2.15
947
2438
822
1.74
872
2.03
918
2.32
961
2625
839
1.90
887
2.19
933
2.49
977
2813
856
2.06
904
2.37
949
2.68
992
3000
873
2.24
921
2.56
966
2.89
1008
3188
891
2.44
938
2.77
982
3.10
1025
3375
909
2.65
955
2.99
1000
3.34
1041
3563
927
2.88
973
3.23
1017
3.59
1059
3750
946
3.12
992
3.48
1035
3.86
1076
NOTE: For more information, see General Fan Performance Notes on page 13.
Boldface indicates field−supplied drive is required.
1.2
BHP
2.45
2.62
2.81
3.01
3.22
3.45
3.70
3.96
4.24
1.0
RPM
BHP
Medium Static Option
753
1.34
769
1.47
786
1.62
804
1.77
822
1.94
840
2.12
859
2.32
878
2.53
897
2.76
2.0
RPM
BHP
High Static Option
988
2.75
1003
2.93
1018
3.13
1033
3.34
1049
3.56
1065
3.81
1081
4.06
1098
4.34
1115
4.632
1. Recommend using field-supplied fan pulley (part no. 1178189), motor pulley (part no. 1175832) and belt (part no. 1178128).
2. Recommend using field-supplied fan pulley (part no. 1175896) and belt (part no. 1178182).
RAS090
CFM
2250
2438
2625
2813
3000
3188
3375
3563
3750
3 PHASE
0.2
RPM
BHP
RPM
511
540
569
599
630
661
692
723
755
0.53
0.64
0.76
0.90
1.06
1.23
1.43
1.65
1.89
591
616
642
669
696
724
753
782
811
7.5 TON VERTICAL SUPPLY
AVAILABLE EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (IN. WG)
0.4
0.6
0.8
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Standard Static Option
0.73
660
0.95
722
0.85
683
1.08
743
0.99
706
1.23
765
1.14
731
1.39
788
1.31
756
1.58
811
1.50
782
1.78
836
1.71
809
2.00
861
1.94
836
2.25
887
2.20
864
2.52
913
AVAILABLE EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (IN. WG)
1.4
1.6
1.8
CFM
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Medium Static Option
2250
832
1.71
882
1.99
928
2.29
973
2438
851
1.87
899
2.16
945
2.46
989
2625
870
2.04
918
2.34
2.66
1006
963
2813
890
2.24
937
2.55
982
2.87
1024
3000
912
2.46
958
2.78
1001
3.11
1043
3188
934
2.69
979
3.02
1022
3.36
1063
3375
956
2.95
1000
3.29
1042
3.64
1083
3563
980
3.23
1023
3.58
1064
3.94
1104
3750
1004
3.54
1046
3.90
1086
4.27
1125
NOTE: For more information, see General Fan Performance Notes on page 13.
Boldface indicates field−supplied drive is required.
BHP
1.19
1.33
1.49
1.66
1.86
2.07
2.31
2.56
2.84
1.0
RPM
BHP
Medium Static Option
779
1.44
799
1.59
819
1.76
841
1.94
863
2.15
886
2.38
910
2.62
934
2.89
959
3.18
1.2
2.0
BHP
RPM
High Static Option
2.59
1015
2.78
1031
2.98
1048
3.21
1065
3.45
1083
3.72
1102
4.00
1122
4.32
1142
4.65
−
1. Recommend using field-supplied fan pulley (part no. 1175896) and belt (part no. 1178182).
40
BHP
2.92
3.11
3.32
3.55
3.80
4.08
4.38
4.70
−
APPENDIX III. FAN PERFORMANCE (cont.)
RAS120
CFM
3000
3250
3500
3750
4000
4250
4500
4750
5000
3 PHASE
0.2
RPM
BHP
Field Supplied Drive1
523
0.58
555
0.71
588
0.86
621
1.03
655
1.23
689
1.45
723
1.69
758
1.96
793
2.26
RPM
592
620
649
679
709
741
773
805
838
10 TON HORIZONTAL SUPPLY
AVAILABLE EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (IN. WG)
0.4
0.6
0.8
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Standard Static Option
0.73
657
0.88
718
0.87
681
1.04
739
1.03
707
1.21
762
1.21
734
1.40
786
1.42
761
1.61
812
1.65
790
1.86
838
1.90
820
2.12
866
2.19
850
2.42
894
2.50
881
2.74
923
AVAILABLE EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (IN. WG)
1.4
1.6
1.8
CFM
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Standard Static Opt.
Medium Static Option
3000
830
1.39
883
1.57
934
1.76
982
3250
847
1.57
897
1.76
946
1.96
993
3500
865
1.77
914
1.97
961
2.18
1007
3750
885
1.99
932
2.20
978
2.42
1022
4000
907
2.24
952
2.46
996
2.68
1038
4250
930
2.51
973
2.74
1015
2.97
1057
4500
954
2.81
996
3.05
1037
3.29
1076
4750
979
3.13
1019
3.38
1059
3.63
1097
5000
1005
3.49
1044
3.74
1082
4.01
1119
NOTE: For more information, see General Fan Performance Notes on page 13.
Boldface indicates field−supplied drive is required.
1.0
BHP
RPM
BHP
1.05
1.21
1.39
1.59
1.82
2.07
2.35
2.65
2.98
775
794
815
837
860
885
910
937
965
1.22
1.39
1.58
1.79
2.03
2.29
2.57
2.89
3.23
BHP
RPM
BHP
1.95
2.16
2.38
2.64
2.91
3.21
3.54
3.89
4.27
1029
1039
1051
1065
1080
1097
1115
1135
1156
2.14
2.36
2.60
2.86
3.14
3.45
3.79
4.15
4.55
1.2
1. Recommend using field-supplied fan pulley (part no. 1178190) and belt (part no. 1178181).
RAS120
CFM
3000
3250
3500
3750
4000
4250
4500
4750
5000
CFM
3000
3250
3500
3750
4000
4250
4500
4750
5000
3 PHASE
0.2
RPM
BHP
Field Supplied Drive1
556
0.65
590
0.79
625
0.96
661
1.16
697
1.37
733
1.62
770
1.89
807
2.20
844
2.54
RPM
623
655
687
719
753
787
821
856
891
1.2
RPM
BHP
RPM
836
861
886
912
940
968
996
1026
1056
1.42
1.63
1.86
2.12
2.40
2.71
3.05
3.42
3.82
881
904
929
954
980
1007
1035
1063
1093
2.0
10 TON VERTICAL SUPPLY
AVAILABLE EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (IN. WG)
0.4
0.6
0.8
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Standard Static Option
0.80
684
0.95
738
0.96
713
1.13
766
1.14
742
1.32
794
1.35
773
1.54
822
1.58
804
1.79
852
1.84
836
2.06
883
2.13
869
2.36
914
2.45
902
2.69
945
2.80
936
3.06
978
AVAILABLE EXTERNAL STATIC PRESSURE (IN. WG)
1.4
1.6
1.8
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Medium Static Option
1.57
923
1.73
963
1.79
945
1.96
985
2.04
969
2.22
1008
2.31
994
2.50
1031
2.61
1019
2.81
1056
2.93
1045
3.15
1081
3.28
1072
3.51
1108
3.66
1100
3.91
1135
4.08
1128
4.34
1162
1.0
BHP
RPM
BHP
1.11
1.29
1.50
1.73
1.99
2.28
2.59
2.94
3.31
789
815
841
869
897
926
956
986
1018
1.26
1.46
1.68
1.93
2.20
2.49
2.82
3.18
3.57
BHP
RPM
BHP
1.89
2.13
2.40
2.70
3.02
3.36
3.74
4.15
4.59
1001
1023
1045
1068
1092
1117
1142
1168
−
2.05
2.30
2.58
2.89
3.22
3.58
3.97
4.39
−
2.0
NOTE: For more information, see General Fan Performance Notes on page 13.
Boldface indicates field−supplied drive is required.
41
FAN PERFORMANCE (cont.)
RAS150
CFM
3438
3750
4063
4375
4688
5000
5313
5625
5938
6250
3 PHASE
0.2
RPM
BHP
Field Supplied Drive1
580
0.82
621
1.03
663
1.28
706
1.56
749
1.89
793
2.26
837
2.69
882
3.16
926
3.68
971
4.26
RPM
0.4
642
679
717
757
797
838
880
922
964
1007
12.5 TON HORIZONTAL SUPPLY
Available External Static Pressure (in. wg)
0.6
0.8
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Standard Static Option
0.99
700
1.16
756
1.21
734
1.40
786
1.47
769
1.67
818
1.77
805
1.98
852
2.11
843
2.34
887
2.50
881
2.74
923
2.93
921
3.19
961
3.42
961
3.68
999
3.96
1001
4.23
1038
4.55
−
−
−
Available External Static Pressure (in. wg)
1.6
1.8
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Medium Static Option
3438
860
1.72
910
1.92
957
2.12
1003
3750
885
1.99
932
2.20
978
2.42
1022
4063
912
2.31
957
2.53
1001
2.75
1043
4375
941
2.66
984
2.89
1026
3.13
1066
4688
972
3.05
1013
3.29
1053
3.54
1092
5000
1005
3.49
1044
3.74
1082
4.01
1119
5313
1038
3.97
1076
4.24
1113
4.52
−
5625
1073
4.51
−
−
−
−
−
5938
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
6250
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
NOTE: For more information, see General Fan Performance Notes on page 13.
Boldface indicates field−supplied drive is required.
CFM
1.2
1.4
BHP
RPM
1.34
1.59
1.88
2.20
2.57
2.98
3.44
3.95
4.52
−
809
837
866
897
930
965
1000
1037
−
−
BHP
RPM
2.32
2.64
2.98
3.37
3.80
4.27
−
−
−
−
1048
1065
1084
1106
1130
1156
−
−
−
−
1.0
BHP
1.53
1.79
2.09
2.43
2.81
3.23
3.71
4.23
−
−
2.0
BHP
2.54
2.86
3.22
3.62
4.06
4.55
−
−
−
−
1. Recommend using field-supplied fan pulley (part no. 1178189) and belt (part no. 1178450).
2. Recommend using field-supplied fan pulley (part no. 1175896), motor pulley (part no. 1178133) and belt (part no. 1178182).
RAS150
3 PHASE
12.5 TON VERTICAL SUPPLY
Available External Static Pressure (in. wg)
0.6
0.8
CFM
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Field Supplied Drive1
Standard Static Option
3438
616
0.92
679
1.10
735
1.27
786
3750
661
1.16
719
1.35
773
1.54
822
4063
706
1.43
761
1.64
812
1.85
860
4375
752
1.75
804
1.98
852
2.20
898
4688
798
2.12
847
2.36
894
2.60
937
5000
844
2.54
891
2.80
936
3.06
978
5313
891
3.01
936
3.28
978
3.56
1019
5625
938
3.53
981
3.83
1022
4.12
1060
5938
986
4.12
1026
4.43
−
−
−
6250
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
Available External Static Pressure (in. wg)
1.2
1.4
1.6
1.8
CFM
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
BHP
RPM
Medium Static Option
3438
880
1.80
922
1.98
963
2.15
1002
3750
912
2.12
954
2.31
994
2.50
1031
4063
947
2.48
987
2.68
1025
2.89
1062
4375
982
2.88
1021
3.10
1058
3.32
1094
4688
1018
3.33
1056
3.57
1093
3.81
1128
5000
1056
3.82
1093
4.08
1128
4.34
1162
5313
1094
4.38
1130
4.65
−
−
−
5625
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
5938
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
6250
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
NOTE: For more information, see General Fan Performance Notes on page 13.
Boldface indicates field−supplied drive is required.
0.2
0.4
BHP
RPM
1.45
1.73
2.06
2.43
2.85
3.31
3.83
4.41
−
−
835
869
904
941
979
1018
1057
1097
−
−
BHP
RPM
2.33
2.70
3.10
3.55
4.04
4.59
−
−
−
−
1039
1068
1098
1129
1162
−
−
−
−
−
1.0
BHP
1.62
1.93
2.27
2.65
3.09
3.57
4.11
4.70
−
−
2.0
BHP
2.51
2.89
3.31
3.77
4.29
−
−
−
−
−
1. Recommend using field-supplied fan pulley (part no. 1178189) and belt (part no. 1178450).
2. Recommend using field-supplied fan pulley (part no. 1175896), motor pulley (part no. 1178133) and belt (part no. 1178182).
42
APPENDIX III. FAN PERFORMANCE (cont.)
Pulley Adjustment
3 phase
3 phase
3 phase
150
120
090
RAS
MOTOR/DRIVE
COMBO
0.0
0.5
1.0
MOTOR PULLEY TURNS OPEN
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
Standard Static
747
721
695
670
644
618
592
566
541
515
489
Medium Static
949
927
906
884
863
841
819
798
776
755
733
High Static
1102
1083
1063
1044
1025
1006
986
967
948
928
909
Standard Static
838
813
789
764
739
715
690
665
640
616
591
Medium Static
1084
1059
1035
1010
986
961
936
912
887
863
838
High Static
1240
1218
1196
1175
1153
1131
1109
1087
1066
1044
1022
Standard Static
838
813
789
764
739
715
690
665
640
616
591
Medium Static
1084
1059
1035
1010
986
961
936
912
887
863
838
High Static
1240
1218
1196
1175
1153
1131
1109
1087
1066
1044
1022
NOTE: Do not adjust pulley further than 5 turns open.
- Factory settings
43
APPENDIX IV. ELECTRICAL DATA
RAS090
VOLTAGE
V−Ph−Hz
RANGE
COMP (Cir 1)
COMP (Cir 2)
OFM (ea)
RLA
LRA
RLA
LRA
WATTS
FLA
253
13.6
83
13.6
83
325
1.5
187
253
13.6
83
13.6
83
325
1.5
460−3−60
414
506
6.1
41
6.1
41
325
0.8
575−3−60
518
633
4.2
33
4.2
33
325
0.6
MIN
MAX
208−3−60
187
230−3−60
IFM
TYPE
Max
WATTS
Max
AMP Draw
EFF at Full Load
FLA
STD
MED
HIGH
STD
MED
HIGH
STD
MED
HIGH
STD
MED
HIGH
1448
2278
4400
1448
2278
4400
1448
2278
4400
1379
3775
4400
5.5
7.9
15.0
5.5
7.9
15.0
2.7
3.6
7.4
2.5
2.9
5.9
80%
81%
81%
80%
81%
81%
80%
81%
81%
80%
81%
81%
5.2
7.5
15.0
5.2
7.5
15.0
2.6
3.4
7.4
2.4
2.8
5.6
TYPE
Max
WATTS
Max
AMP Draw
EFF at Full Load
FLA
STD
MED
HIGH
STD
MED
HIGH
STD
MED
HIGH
STD
MED
HIGH
2120
3775
4400
2120
3775
4400
2120
3775
4400
1390
3775
4400
5.5
10.5
15.0
5.5
10.5
15.0
2.7
4.6
7.4
2.1
2.9
5.9
80%
81%
81%
80%
81%
81%
80%
81%
81%
80%
81%
81%
5.2
10.0
15.0
5.2
10.0
15.0
2.6
4.4
7.4
2.0
2.8
5.6
TYPE
Max
WATTS
Max
AMP Draw
EFF at Full Load
FLA
STD
MED
HIGH
STD
MED
HIGH
STD
MED
HIGH
STD
MED
HIGH
2615
3775
4400
2615
3775
4400
2615
3775
4400
3775
3775
4400
7.9
10.5
15.0
7.9
10.5
15.0
3.6
4.6
7.4
2.9
2.9
5.9
81%
81%
81%
81%
81%
81%
81%
81%
81%
81%
81%
81%
7.5
10.0
15.0
7.5
10.0
15.0
3.4
4.4
7.4
2.8
2.8
5.6
RAS120
VOLTAGE
V−Ph−Hz
RANGE
COMP (Cir 1)
COMP (Cir 2)
OFM (ea)
RLA
LRA
RLA
LRA
WATTS
FLA
253
15.6
110
15.9
110
325
1.5
187
253
15.6
110
15.9
110
325
1.5
460−3−60
414
506
7.7
52
7.7
52
325
0.8
575−3−60
518
633
5.8
39
5.7
39
325
0.6
MIN
MAX
208−3−60
187
230−3−60
IFM
RAS150
VOLTAGE
V−Ph−Hz
RANGE
COMP (Cir 1)
COMP (Cir 2)
OFM
IFM
RLA
LRA
RLA
LRA
WATTS
FLA
253
19.0
123
22.4
149
1288
6.2
187
253
19.0
123
22.4
149
1288
6.2
460−3−60
414
506
9.7
62
10.6
75
1288
3.1
575−3−60
518
633
7.4
50
7.7
54
1288
2.5
MIN
MAX
208−3−60
187
230−3−60
44
APPENDIX IV. ELECTRICAL DATA (cont)
NOM. V-PH-HZ
UNIT
MCA/MOCP DETERMINATION NO C.O. OR UNPWRD C.O.
ELECTRIC HEATER
IFM
TYPE
NO C.O. or UNPWRD C.O.
NO P.E.
Nom
(kW)
FLA
MCA
MOCP
575-3-60
460-3-60
RAS090
208/230-3-60
−
−
39.5
60
7.8/10.4
21.7/25.0
39.5/39.5
60/60
12.0/16.0
33.4/38.5
48.3/54.6
60/60
STD
18.6/24.8
51.7/59.7
71.1/81.1
80/90
24.0/32.0
66.7/77.0
89.9/102.8
90/110
31.8/42.4 88.4/102.0
117.0/134.0 125/150
−
−
41.8
60
7.8/10.4
21.7/25.0
41.8/41.8
60/60
12.0/16.0
33.4/38.5
51.1/57.5
60/60
MED
18.6/24.8
51.7/59.7
74.0/84.0
80/90
24.0/32.0
66.7/77.0
92.8/105.6
100/110
31.8/42.4 88.4/102.0
119.9/136.9 125/150
−
−
49.3
60
7.8/10.4
21.7/25.0
49.3/50.0
60/60
12.0/16.0
33.4/38.5
60.5/66.9
70/70
HIGH
18.6/24.8
51.7/59.7
83.4/93.4
90/100
24.0/32.0
66.7/77.0
102.1/115.0 110/125
31.8/42.4 88.4/102.0 129.3/146.3 150/150
−
−
19.5
30
13.9
16.7
24.1
30
16.5
19.8
28.0
30
STD
27.8
33.4
45.0
50
33.0
39.7
52.9
60
41.7
50.2
66.0
70
−
−
20.3
30
13.9
16.7
25.1
30
16.5
19.8
29.0
30
MED
27.8
33.4
46.0
50
33.0
39.7
53.9
60
41.7
50.2
67.0
70
−
−
24.3
30
13.9
16.7
30.1
35
16.5
19.8
34.0
35
HIGH
27.8
33.4
51.0
60
33.0
39.7
58.9
60
41.7
50.2
72.0
80
−
−
14.9
20
STD
17.0
20.4
28.5
30
34.0
40.9
54.1
60
−
−
15.3
20
MED
17.0
20.4
29.0
30
34.0
40.9
54.6
60
−
−
18.1
25
HIGH
17.0
20.4
32.5
35
34.0
40.9
58.1
60
* Nominal valves, listed as 208/240V, 480V or 600V as appropriate.
See Legend and calculations.
w/ P.E. (pwrd fr/unit)
DISC. SIZE
FLA
LRA
38
38/38
44/50
65/75
83/95
108/123
41
41/41
47/53
68/77
85/97
110/126
49
49/49
56/62
77/86
94/106
119/135
19
22
26
41
49
61
20
23
27
42
50
62
24
28
31
47
54
66
14
26
50
15
27
50
18
30
53
191
191/191
191/191
191/191
191/191
191/191
228
228/228
228/228
228/228
228/228
228/228
254
254/254
254/254
254/254
254/254
254/254
113
113
113
113
113
113
132
132
132
132
132
132
145
145
145
145
145
145
89
89
89
104
104
104
118
118
118
MCA
MOCP
43.3
43.3/43.3
53.0/59.4
75.9/85.9
94.6/107.5
121.8/138.8
45.6
45.6/45.6
55.9/62.3
78.8/88.8
97.5/110.4
124.6/141.6
53.1
53.1/54.8
65.3/71.6
88.1/98.1
106.9/119.8
134.0/151.0
21.3
26.4
30.3
47.3
55.1
68.3
22.1
27.4
31.3
48.3
56.1
69.3
26.1
32.4
36.3
53.3
61.1
74.3
18.7
33.3
58.9
19.1
33.8
59.4
21.9
37.3
62.9
60
60/60
60/60
80/90
100/110
125/150
60
60/60
60/70
80/90
100/125
125/150
60
60/60
70/80
90/100
110/125
150/175
30
30
35
50
60
70
30
30
35
50
60
70
30
35
40
60
70
80
25
35
60
25
35
60
30
40
70
DISC. SIZE
FLA
LRA
43
43/43
49/55
70/79
87/99
112/128
45
45/45
51/57
72/82
90/102
115/130
54
54/54
60/66
81/90
98/110
123/139
21
24
28
43
51
63
22
25
29
44
52
64
26
30
33
49
56
68
19
31
54
19
31
55
23
34
58
195
195/195
195/195
195/195
195/195
195/195
232
232/232
232/232
232/232
232/232
232/232
258
258/258
258/258
258/258
258/258
258/258
115
115
115
115
115
115
134
134
134
134
134
134
147
147
147
147
147
147
93
93
93
108
108
108
122
122
122
45
APPENDIX IV. ELECTRICAL DATA (cont)
NOM. V-PH-HZ
UNIT
MCA/MOCP DETERMINATION NO C.O. OR UNPWRD C.O. (cont)
ELECTRIC HEATER
IFM
TYPE
NO C.O. or UNPWRD C.O.
NO P.E.
Nom
(kW)
FLA
MCA
MOCP
460-3-60
575-3-60
RAS120
208/230-3-60
−
−
45.8
60
7.8/10.4
21.7/25.0
45.8/45.8
60/60
12.0/16.0
33.4/38.5
48.3/54.6
60/60
STD
24.0/32.0
66.7/77.0
89.9/102.8
90/110
31.8/42.4 88.4/102.0
117.0/134.0 125/150
37.6/50.0 104.2/120.3 136.8/126.8 150/150
−
−
50.6
60
7.8/10.4
21.7/25.0
50.6/50.6
60/60
12.0/16.0
33.4/38.5
54.3/60.6
60/80
MED
24.0/32.0
66.7/77.0
95.9/108.8
100/110
31.8/42.4 88.4/102.0 123.0/140.0 125/150
37.6/50.0 104.2/120.3 142.8/132.8 150/150
−
−
55.6
80
7.8/10.4
21.7/25.0
55.6/55.6
80/80
12.0/16.0
33.4/38.5
60.5/66.9
80/80
HIGH
24.0/32.0
66.7/77.0
102.1/115.0 110/125
31.8/42.4 88.4/102.0 129.3/146.3 150/150
37.6/50.0 104.2/120.3 149.0/139.1 150/175
−
−
25.1
30
13.9
16.7
25.1
30
16.5
19.8
28.0
30
STD
33.0
39.7
52.9
60
41.7
50.2
66.0
70
50.0
60.1
63.4
70
−
−
26.9
40
13.9
16.7
26.9
40
16.5
19.8
30.3
40
MED
33.0
39.7
55.1
60
41.7
50.2
68.3
70
50.0
60.1
65.6
80
−
−
29.9
45
13.9
16.7
30.1
45
16.5
19.8
34.0
45
HIGH
33.0
39.7
58.9
60
41.7
50.2
72.0
80
50.0
60.1
69.4
80
−
−
18.5
30
17.0
20.4
28.0
30
STD
34.0
40.9
53.6
60
51.0
61.3
63.8
70
−
−
19.3
30
17.0
20.4
29.0
30
MED
34.0
40.9
54.6
60
51.0
61.3
64.8
70
−
−
22.1
30
17.0
20.4
32.5
35
HIGH
34.0
40.9
58.1
60
51.0
61.3
68.3
80
* Nominal valves, listed as 208/240V, 480V or 600V as appropriate.
See Legend and calculations.
46
w/ P.E. (pwrd fr/unit)
DISC. SIZE
FLA
LRA
44
44/44
44/50
83/95
108/123
126/144
50
50/50
50/56
88/100
113/129
131/150
55
55/55
56/62
94/106
119/135
137/156
24
24
26
49
61
72
26
26
28
51
63
74
30
30
31
54
66
78
18
26
49
73
19
27
50
74
22
30
53
77
263
263/263
263/263
263/263
263/263
263/263
306
306/306
306/306
306/306
306/306
306/306
315
315/315
315/315
315/315
315/315
315/315
133
133
133
133
133
133
155
155
155
155
155
155
159
159
159
159
159
159
95
95
95
95
106
106
106
106
120
120
120
120
MCA
MOCP
49.6
49.6/49.6
53.0/59.4
94.6/107.5
121.8/138.8
141.5/131.6
54.4
54.4/54.4
59.0/65.4
100.6/113.5
127.8/144.8
147.5/137.6
59.4
59.4/59.4
65.3/71.6
106.9/119.8
134.0/151.0
153.8/143.8
26.9
26.9
30.3
55.1
68.3
65.6
28.7
28.7
32.5
57.4
70.5
67.9
31.7
32.4
36.3
61.1
74.3
71.6
22.3
32.8
58.4
68.6
23.1
33.8
59.4
69.6
25.9
37.3
62.9
73.1
60
60/60
60/60
100/110
125/150
150/150
80
80/80
80/80
110/125
150/150
150/150
80
80/80
80/80
110/125
150/175
175/175
40
40
40
60
70
70
45
45
45
60
80
80
45
45
45
70
80
80
30
35
60
80
30
35
60
80
30
40
70
80
DISC. SIZE
FLA
LRA
48
48/48
49/55
87/99
112/128
130/149
54
54/54
54/60
93/104
118/133
136/154
60
60/60
60/66
98/110
123/139
141/160
26
26
28
51
63
74
28
28
30
53
65
76
32
32
33
56
68
80
22
30
54
77
23
31
55
78
26
34
58
81
267
267/267
267/267
267/267
267/267
267/267
310
310/310
310/310
310/310
310/310
310/310
319
319/319
319/319
319/319
319/319
319/319
135
135
135
135
135
135
157
157
157
157
157
157
161
161
161
161
161
161
99
99
99
99
110
110
110
110
124
124
124
124
NOM. V−PH−HZ
UNIT
MCA/MOCP DETERMINATION NO C.O. OR UNPWRD C.O. (cont)
ELECTRIC HEATER
IFM
TYPE
NO C.O. or UNPWRD C.O.
NO P.E.
Nom*
(kW)
FLA
MCA
MOCP
575−3−60
460−3−60
RAS150
208/230−3−60
−
−
60.7
80
7.8/10.4
21.7/25.0
60.7/60.7
80/80
12.0/16.0
33.4/38.5
60.7/60.7
80/80
STD
24.0/32.0
66.7/77.0
92.8/105.6
100/110
31.8/42.4
88.4/102.0
119.9/136.9 125/150
37.6/50.0 104.2/120.3
139.6/129.7 150/150
−
−
63.2
80
7.8/10.4
21.7/25.0
63.2/63.2
80/80
12.0/16.0
33.4/38.5
63.2/63.2
80/80
MED
24.0/32.0
66.7/77.0
95.9/108.8
100/110
31.8/42.4
88.4/102.0
123.0/140.0 125/150
37.6/50.0 104.2/120.3
142.8/132.8 150/150
−
−
68.2
80
7.8/10.4
21.7/25.0
68.2/68.2
80/80
12.0/16.0
33.4/38.5
68.2/68.2
80/80
HIGH
24.0/32.0
66.7/77.0
102.1/115.0 110/125
31.8/42.4
88.4/102.0
129.3/146.3 150/150
37.6/50.0 104.2/120.3
149.0/139.1 150/175
−
−
29.5
40
13.9
16.7
29.5
40
16.5
19.8
29.5
40
STD
33.0
39.7
53.9
60
41.7
50.2
67.0
70
50.0
60.1
64.4
70
−
−
30.5
40
13.9
16.7
30.5
40
16.5
19.8
30.5
40
MED
33.0
39.7
55.1
60
41.7
50.2
68.3
70
50.0
60.1
65.6
80
−
−
33.5
40
13.9
16.7
33.5
40
16.5
19.8
34.0
40
HIGH
33.0
39.7
58.9
60
41.7
50.2
72.0
80
50.0
60.1
69.4
80
−
−
22.3
30
17.0
20.4
29.0
30
STD
34.0
40.9
54.6
60
51.0
61.3
64.8
70
−
−
22.3
30
17.0
20.4
29.0
30
MED
34.0
40.9
54.6
60
51.0
61.3
64.8
70
−
−
25.1
30
17.0
20.4
32.5
35
HIGH
34.0
40.9
58.1
60
51.0
61.3
68.3
80
* Nominal valves, listed as 208/240V, 480V or 600V as appropriate.
See Legend and calculations.
w/ P.E. (pwrd fr/unit)
DISC. SIZE
FLA
LRA
63
63/63
63/63
85/97
110/126
128/147
66
66/66
66/66
88/100
113/129
131/150
72
72/72
72/72
94/106
119/135
137/156
31
31
31
50
62
73
32
32
32
51
63
74
35
35
35
54
66
78
23
27
50
74
23
27
50
74
27
30
53
77
360
360/360
360/360
360/360
360/360
360/360
377
377/377
377/377
377/377
377/377
377/377
386
386/386
386/386
386/386
386/386
386/386
181
181
181
181
181
181
190
190
190
190
190
190
194
194
194
194
194
194
142
142
142
142
142
142
142
142
156
156
156
156
MCA
MOCP
64.5
64.5/64.5
64.5/64.5
97.5/110.4
124.6/141.6
144.4/134.4
67.0
67.0/67.0
67.0/67.0
100.6/113.5
127.8/144.8
147.5/137.6
72.0
72.0/72.0
72.0/72.0
106.9/119.8
134.0/151.0
153.8/143.8
31.3
31.3
31.3
56.1
69.3
66.6
32.3
32.3
32.5
57.4
70.5
67.9
35.3
35.3
36.3
61.1
74.3
71.6
26.1
33.8
59.4
69.6
26.1
33.8
59.4
69.6
28.9
37.3
62.9
73.1
80
80/80
80/80
100/125
125/150
150/150
80
80/80
80/80
110/125
150/150
150/150
80
80/80
80/80
110/125
150/175
175/175
40
40
40
60
70
70
40
40
40
60
80
80
45
45
45
70
80
80
30
35
60
80
30
35
60
80
35
40
70
80
DISC. SIZE
FLA
LRA
68
68/68
68/68
90/102
115/130
133/151
71
71/71
71/71
93/104
118/133
136/154
76
76/76
76/76
98/110
123/139
141/160
33
33
33
52
64
75
34
34
34
53
65
76
37
37
37
56
68
80
28
31
55
78
28
31
55
78
31
34
58
81
364
364/364
364/364
364/364
364/364
364/364
381
381/381
381/381
381/381
381/381
381/381
390
390/390
390/390
390/390
390/390
390/390
183
183
183
183
183
183
192
192
192
192
192
192
196
196
196
196
196
196
146
146
146
146
146
146
146
146
160
160
160
160
47
APPENDIX V. MOTORMASTER SENSOR LOCATIONS
090
120
Fig. 44 RAS090 and RAS120
48
START-UP CHECKLIST
(Remove and Store in Job File)
I.
PRELIMINARY INFORMATION
MODEL NO.:
DATE:
SERIAL NO.:
TECHNICIAN:
II.
PRE-START-UP (insert checkmark in box as each item is completed)
VERIFY THAT JOBSITE VOLTAGE AGREES WITH VOLTAGE LISTED ON RATING PLATE
VERIFY THAT ALL PACKAGING MATERIALS HAVE BEEN REMOVED FROM UNIT
REMOVE ALL SHIPPING HOLD DOWN BOLTS AND BRACKETS PER INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
VERIFY THAT CONDENSATE CONNECTION IS INSTALLED PER INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
CHECK REFRIGERANT PIPING FOR INDICATIONS OF LEAKS; INVESTIGATE AND REPAIR IF NECESSARY
CHECK ALL ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS AND TERMINALS FOR TIGHTNESS
CHECK THAT RETURN (INDOOR) AIR FILTERS ARE CLEAN AND IN PLACE
VERIFY THAT UNIT INSTALLATION IS LEVEL
CHECK FAN WHEELS AND PROPELLER FOR LOCATION IN HOUSING/ORIFICE AND SETSCREW
TIGHTNESS
CHECK TO ENSURE THAT ELECTRICAL WIRING IS NOT IN CONTACT WITH REFRIGERANT LINES
OR SHARP METAL EDGES
CHECK PULLEY ALIGNMENT AND BELT TENSION PER INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
III. START-UP
ELECTRICAL
SUPPLY VOLTAGE
COMPRESSOR 1
COMPRESSOR 2
INDOOR-FAN AMPS
L1-L2
L1
L1
L1
L2-L3
L2
L2
L2
L3-L1
L3
L3
L3
TEMPERATURES
OUTDOOR-AIR TEMPERATURE
RETURN-AIR TEMPERATURE
DB
DB
DB
COOLING SUPPLY AIR
WB
WB
PRESSURES (Cooling Mode)
Cir 1
REFRIGERANT SUCTION
REFRIGERANT DISCHARGE
Cir 2
PSIG
F
PSIG
F
PSIG
F
VERIFY THAT 3-PHASE FAN MOTOR AND BLOWER ARE ROTATING IN CORRECT DIRECTION.
VERIFY THAT 3-PHASE SCROLL COMPRESSORS ARE ROTATING IN THE CORRECT DIRECTION
VERIFY REFRIGERANT CHARGE USING CHARGING CHARTS
GENERAL
SET ECONOMIZER MINIMUM VENT AND CHANGEOVER SETTINGS TO MATCH JOB REQUIREMENTS
(IF EQUIPPED)
49
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