operations and maintenance workers safety

operations and maintenance workers safety
OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE
WORKERS SAFETY
October 2013
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety Policy and Guidelines
All information herein is applicable to staff, visitors, and contractors involved in the operations and maintenance of
Qatar University. Any request for amendment of this policy shall be forwarded in writing to the Office of the Chief
Operations Officer, Business Operations Department.
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
1.0 STATEMENT OF POLICY
A safe, healthful work environment is one of the elements to have a successful operations and
maintenance implementation. Qatar University believes that safety of everybody is a shared
responsibility between employer and workers.
In the interest to improve the General Safety practices, we shall provide the whole campus facilities
free of health and safety hazards. To accomplish this, Qatar University shall comply with all
occupational safety, health and environmental laws mandated by the state, and relevant international
standards and regulations.
To prevent accident and incident in the QU campus that may result to injuries of employees,
operations and maintenance contractors, damage to property and equipment, Business Operations
Department – Environmental and Safety Office shall provide guidelines and shall require compliance
with safety regulations and procedures. In turn, each person is ultimately responsible for personal
safety, and shall follow safety and health policies and procedures, exercise caution in the
performance of his/her duties, use normal safe working practices, observe and obey safety postings
and rules, use and maintain personal protective equipment when needed and approved, and
promptly report all accidents to the appropriate government and school authorities.
2.0 SCOPE AND APPLICATION
The primary objective of this policy is to protect the health and well being of all employees, faculties,
students, contractors and visitors of the University by:
 Eliminating and preventing accidents and injuries;
 Instituting adequate procedures to protect all property from loss and damage due to accidents
 Assuring that all employees, faculties and students clearly understand the risks that directly affect
them in the performance of their respective responsibilities.
 Requiring all employees, faculties and students to be in compliance with all safety regulations and
procedures;
 Reducing, controlling, or avoiding employee and faculty exposure to all known or suspected
occupational health and safety risks
 Reducing, controlling, or avoiding employee and faculty exposure to all known or suspected
occupational health and safety risks
 Establishing and maintaining communication with all employees and faculties to keep them aware
of the safety and health factors related to their job; and
 Maintaining an effective emergency preparedness and response procedures.
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Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
3.0 GUIDELINES
The Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety Policy shall provide guidelines which describe the
minimum level of safe practices and requirements that are expected from all individuals (faculty, staff,
and Contractors) involved in the operations and maintenance of Qatar University Equipment facilities.
3.1 Hazard Management
The Contractor/s will use hazard management for identifying, assessing, mitigating and controlling
hazards in their respective work area.
3.1.1 Definitions
Hazard -
source or situation with potential for harm in terms of human injury or ill health,
damage to property, damage to the workplace environment, or a combination of
these.
Risk
-
combination of the likelihood and consequence (s) of a specified hazardous event
occurring.
3.1.2 Hazard identification
Hazard identification is the process of identifying hazards in the workplace or for a work
procedure. In order to understand what hazard identification involves, it is first necessary to
understand the nature of hazards.
Identify hazards through:

Walk through surveys

Inspection checklists

Past records

Accident investigation

Consultation

Documentation

Job safety analysis
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3.1.3 Risk Assessment
Risk assessment is the process of assessing all of the risks associated with each of the hazards
identified during the hazard identification process.
In assessing the risks, three essential steps are taken:

The probability or likelihood of an incident occurring is evaluated.

The severity of the potential consequences is calculated or estimated.

Based on these two factors, the risks are assigned priority for risk control through the use of a
risk rating.
Risk assessment involves examining and evaluating the likelihood and severity (or consequence)
of the potential outcomes in order to prioritize risks for control.
3.1.4 Risk Control
Risk control provides a means by which risks can be systematically evaluated against a set of
control options (the hierarchy of controls) to determine the most effective control method(s) for the
risk(s) associated with each hazard. This process involves analyzing the data collected during the
hazard identification and risk assessment processes, and developing a strategic plan to control
the risks identified.
The risk control process starts by considering the highest ranked risks, working down to the least
significant. Each risk should be examined having regard to the "hierarchy of controls". This
provides a method of systematically evaluating each risk to determine, firstly, if the causal hazard
can be eliminated and otherwise, to find the most effective control method for each risk.
The "Hierarchy of Controls" shall be used at all times when implementing controls to eliminate the
hazard or reduce the risk of a hazard causing loss at the University.
The hierarchy of controls is as follows:

Eliminate the hazard.

Substitute with a lesser hazard.

Use engineering controls to reduce hazard.

Administrative controls such as workplace procedures.

Personal Protective Equipment.
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In many cases, it will be necessary to use more than one control method. Back-up controls (such
as personal protective equipment and administrative controls) should only be used as a last resort
or as a support to other control measures.
3.1.5 Evaluation
Monitoring and review is the final stage in the process. It is the means by which risk management
is kept current and effective, as new hazards and those overlooked in the original process are
identified and controlled.
Monitoring and review involves the systematic re-implementation of the original safety program
steps of hazard identification, risk assessment and risk control
This is to ensure that the process was undertaken properly and that, in hindsight, the conclusions
were correct.
Contractor shall prepare the risk assessment of all activities in the respective work area, reviewed
and approved by BOD Environmental and Safety Office.
The following Risk Assessment tools/ forms shall be used for hazard and risk assessment:
Appendix 1 - Hazard Assessment Matrix
Appendix 2 - Risk Assessment Form
Appendix 3 - Risk Assessment Listed and Review Dates
Appendix 4 - Work Equipment Assessment
3.2 Personal Protective Equipment
Provision for new or additional Personal Protective Equipment shall be the responsibility of the
contractor. QU BOD Environmental and Safety Office has the right to require the contractor/s to
issue/ re-issue new Personal Protective Equipment if it is deem necessary due to work
requirements.
3.2.1 Head Protection.

Workers must wear protective helmets when working in areas where there is a potential for
injury to the head from employee initiated impact or impact from falling or other moving
objects.
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Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety

Protective helmets designed to reduce electrical shock hazards will be worn by each worker
when exposed near electrical conductors which could contact the head. Helmets will comply
with ANSI Z89.1-1986 or be equally effective.

Class C head protection shall be used for protection from minor scalp abrasion and minor
bump hazards. Class B head protection shall be used for electrical hazard. Class G (formerly
known as class A) head protection shall be used for construction.

Head protection shall be replaced if cranked, chopped or otherwise damaged.

Employees and contractors shall not paint or deface hard hat or bump cap.

Each employee and contractor shall be issued one head protection according to usage.

Employees, contractors and visitors shall wear head protection on the following areas:
construction site, central service unit, energy center, chiller plants (like but not limited to Food
court, women’s sports center, men & women’s activity center) and those areas when working
requires lifting and excavation.

Operations and Maintenance contractors shall wear head protection at all times while
working.
3.2.2 Eye and Face Protection.

Use appropriate eye or face protection when exposed to eye or face hazards from flying
particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustic liquids, chemical gases or vapors, or
potentially injurious light radiation.

Eye and Face PPE must comply with ANSI Z87.1-1989 or be demonstrated to be equally
effective.

Contractors/ workers shall wear approved eye protection at work site where protection to the
eyes is needed (e.g. welding, grinding, cooling tower monitoring, laboratory analysis,
chipping, polishing, lathe turning work).

Safety glasses shall be furnished by contractor to his/her employees.

Eye and face protection that are already blurred and damaged shall be replaced immediately.

Eye and Face Protection shall comply with Occupational Safety and Health Standard
1910.133 and passed ANSI Z87.1-1989 and/or EN-166.
3.2.2.1 Safety Glasses

Do not use ordinary prescription as they not provide adequate protection from injury to
the eyes.

Use hardened-glass or plastic spectacles with side shield.

Safety glasses use must comply with the Standard for Occupational and Educational Eye
and Face Protection (Z87.1).

Wearing of contact lenses is allowable provided only if wearing additional eye protection.
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3.2.2.2 Goggles
Wear goggles when there is a hazard from splashing chemicals or flying particles, e. g. when
using glassware under reduced or elevated pressure, or using glass apparatus in combustion or
other high temperature operations.
3.2.2.3 Face Shields

Wear face shield when there is a need for greater protection from flying particles and
harmful liquids to protect face and neck.

Consider using a face shield when operating a vacuum system (which may implode), or
conducting a reaction with potential for mild explosions.
3.2.3 Hand Protection.

Use appropriate hand protection when their hands are exposed to hazards such as those
from skin absorption of harmful substances; severe cuts or lacerations; severe abrasions;
punctures; chemical burns; thermal burns and harmful temperature extremes.

Supervisors must base the selection of hand protection on evaluation of the performance
characteristics of the hand protection relative to the specific tasks to be performed, conditions
present, duration of use and the hazards and potential hazards identified.

Employees, students, and contractors shall wear hand protection when exposed to potential
hand injuries and minimize exposure to hazards such as chemical absorption through the
skin, severe lacerations or cut, punctures and chemical or thermal burn.

Employees, students and contractors shall use protective leather gloves for cutting and
welding work.

The Material Safety Data Sheet shall be used to determine the appropriate gloves to be used
during handling of chemicals.

Contractors working with rigging wire and chains shall use cotton work gloves.

Employees, students and contractors shall maintain (clean, safe keep) the hand protection
equipment to maximize useful life.

Hand Protection shall comply with Occupational Health and Safety Standard 1910.138 and
passed European Standard EN-388.
3.2.3.1 Gloves

Wear proper protective gloves for potential contact with corrosive or toxic material,
materials of unknown toxicity, sharp edged object, and very hot or cold materials.
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
Select gloves based on material handled, the particular hazard involved and their suitability
for the operation conducted.

Consider double gloving (the wearing of two gloves on each hand) when handling highly
toxic or carcinogenic materials.

Before each use, inspect gloves for discoloration, punctures and tears.

Before removal, wash gloves if the material is impermeable to water.

Do not reuse single-use disposable gloves.

Store gloves properly.

Dispose gloves if already old; shelf life is stamped on the box.

Dispose contaminated gloves in the proper waste bin.

Do not wear gloves outside the working area as this may contaminate surface if touch such
as doorknobs, elevator buttons or rest fixtures.

Do not use gloves containing asbestos for high temperature operation, use synthetic
material such as Kevlar.
3.2.3.2 Electrical Gloves

Defective insulating gloves shall not be used.

Insulating gloves with the following defects shall not be worn: holes; tears; punctures or
cuts; imbedded foreign objects; texture changes such as swelling, hardening or becoming
stick or inflexible.

Rubber insulating gloves that have been used without protectors shall not be used without
protective gloves.

Protective gloves shall not be used if they have holes, tears or other defects that affect their
ability to give mechanical protection to the insulating glove.

Protective gloves shall not be used if they have holes, tears or other defects that affect their
ability to give mechanical protection to the insulating glove.

Protective gloves that have been used for any other purpose shall not be used to protect
insulating gloves.

Gloves that have been rejected and are not suitable for electrical services shall have the
fingers removed and the gloves disposed.

Rubber gloves and protective gloves which have oil, grease or other damaging substance
on them, shall be cleaned properly before use.

Rubber gloves shall be turned inside out and rinsed as necessary to remove perspiration.
Excess water shall be removed by shaking and the gloves shall be air-dried.

Insulating gloves shall be visually inspected by the wearer for defects. Before using,
visually inspect the glove especially around the fingers to detect cracks or deterioration.

Insulating gloves shall be given an air test by rolling the cuffs tightly toward the palm in
such a manner that air is trapped inside the gloves or by using a mechanical inflator. When
using the latter care shall be taken to avoid over-inflation.
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Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety

Gloves shall be air tested each day before use and time there is cause to suspect damage.

A periodic inspection of the gloves shall be conducted by the Electrical Engineer to
determine that such equipment is being maintained in a satisfactory condition by the user.

Gloves shall be stored in a designated location (e.g. tool room) as cool, dark and dry as
possible with no other material or equipment nearby that could cause damage.

Gloves when not in use must be inside the protectors and in a bag, box or container
designed for and used exclusively for them. These gloves shall be stored in their natural
shape.

The protector gloves shall be sized and shaped so the insulating gloves shall not be
deformed from their natural shape.

Electrical gloves shall comply with Occupational Health and Safety Standard 1910.137.
3.2.4 Protective Apparel / Coverall (Long Sleeve)

Coverall or protective aprons shall be worn at all times in while working.

Wearing loose (e.g. saris, dangling neckties, oversized or ragged coats) in the working area is
prohibited.

It is strictly prohibited to strap the coverall in the waist line portion of the body as this does not
served the purpose of protecting the half portion of the body.

Cover-all shall be worn during operation, maintenance of equipment. Shirt and pants shall be
worn for other operational duties and light maintenance.

Trouser legs shall not be rolled above the ankles and shirttails shall be tacked in one's pants.

Clothing saturated with oil shall be removed as soon as practical and the affected part of the
body shall be washed with soap and water.

Only clean clothing in good condition (free of tears, frays, rips and patches) shall be worn
during work.

Finger rings, watches, bracelets and other jewelry shall be removed while performing
maintenance work.

Wear cover-all under welding aprons and chaps during welding work. Button cover-all to the
neck and button pockets to prevent sparks and slag from burning the skin. Do not use
clothing to clean torch tips.

Cover-all shall be worn by contractors at all times during his work at the University.
3.2.5 Respiratory Protection

Employees will wear appropriate respiratory protection when adequate ventilation or
substitution with non-toxic chemicals, etc., is not possible or feasible. Respirator protection
must comply with ANSI Z288.2.
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
Respiratory protection is necessary when working with highly toxic chemicals, biological
hazards, or dust known to cause asthma or pulmonary fibrosis. However, respirators are a
“last line” of defense, and should not be used until all engineering controls (e.g. ventilation)
and work practice controls are exhausted.

Respirators to be use shall comply with Respiratory Protection Standard OSHA 29 CFR
1910.134.

Do not use “comfort masks” or surgical masks.

Respirator shall be used while working at chemicals with toxic fumes.

Respirator shall be used during construction where dust accumulation is very heavy.

Respirator shall be used in confined spaces.

Refer to Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for proper selection of respirator.

Respirator fit shall be conducted annually for employees required to wear respirator.

Employees with facial hair shall not be given mask respirator as the gas will still penetrate the
sealing surface of the respirator.

Contact lenses shall not be used with respirator.

Respirator shall be inspected before and after use by employee for tightness of connections;
condition of face piece; head band; valves and connecting tubes, pliability and signs of
deterioration of rubber parts; proper air pressure and proper functioning.

Clean and disinfect equipment after each use according to manufacturer recommendation.

Positive pressure respirator shall be serviced only by experienced person using parts
designed for the particular respirator.

Respirator shall be stored where they are protected from dust, sunlight, heat, extreme cold,
excessive moisture and damaging chemicals. Store respirator with the face piece and
exhalation valve resting in a normal position to prevent distortion. Do not store respirator in
places, such as lockers or toolboxes, unless they are in carrying cases or cartons supplied by
the manufacturer.

Chemical cartridges shall be replaced as necessary to provide complete protection.

Replacement of cartridge shall be installed by experienced personnel. Change a defective
respirator for a new one.

Respirator located at stations and work areas for emergency use shall be readily accessible
at all times. They shall be stored in a specially designed compartment.

Respirator shall comply with Occupational Safety and Health Standard 1910.134
3.2.6 Fall Protection.

Fall protection must be provided when employees are exposed to:

a vertical fall of 1.8 meters or more over a lower level or

any height over dangerous equipment.
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
Fall protection will consist of either passive or active fall protection. Fall protection must
comply with ANSI A10.14-1991.

Safety harness shall be worn at all times while working above 1.8 meters or more above
ground unless other adequate protection against falling is provided.

All safety harness shall be regularly inspected for excessive wear or damage that could
cause them to fail. Harnesses and lanyards that are worn or damaged to the extent that
they could fail shall be discarded and not be used.

Safety harness or lanyards shall be a minimum of 13 mm nylon or the equivalent, with a
maximum length of 1.8 meter. They shall have a minimum breaking strength of 2,700 kg.

The use of shock absorbing lanyard shall consider the total length of the lanyard in
consideration of the height of work.

The use of double lanyard safety harness is mandatory if there is a necessity for the
worker to remove his lanyard in order to move.

Lifelines shall be a minimum of 20 mm, or equivalent, with a minimum breaking strength
of 2,700 kg. Steel cables are recommended for horizontal anchor lines with a minimum
breaking strength of 2,700 kg or five times the load.

Fall protection equipment shall comply with Occupational Health and Safety Standard
1926.104 and passed European Standard EN-361, EN-354, EN-355, EN-353-2 and EN362.
3.2.7 Foot Protection

Employees must wear protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of
foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or from object piercing the sole, and where
employees’ feet are exposed to electrical hazards. PPE for foot protection must comply with
ANSI Z41.1991 or be equally effective.

Workers shall wear employer issued safety shoes at work site at all times. Exceptions are as
follows: offices, meeting rooms, change rooms. Avoid borrowing safety shoes.

Each employee's shall wear protective footwear when working in areas where there is danger
of foot injuries due to falling or rolling piercing the sole, or where the feet are exposed to
electrical or chemical hazards.

Shoes with toe or metal guards, oil and chemical resistant sole shall be used as foot
protection.

If safety shoes are inadvertently destroyed as a result of assigned duties (but not caused by
employee's negligence) safety shoes shall be replaced at company's expense.

Contractual workers working inside the University premises shall wear foot protection,
provided by the contractors.

Visitors shall wear foot protection at areas that require safety shoes and shall be provided by
the University and/ or contractors.
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
Safety shoes shall comply with Occupational Health and Safety Standard 1910.136 and
passed ANSI Z41-1991 and/or European Standard EN-345.
3.2.8 Electrical Protection
Electrical protective equipment such as insulating blankets, mating, covers, line hoses, gloves,
gloves and sleeves must be provided to employees who are exposed to electrical hazards.
3.3 Electrical Safety
Equipment and electronic systems must conform to the National Electric Code, National Fire
Protection Association Code (NFPA) 70E and KAHRAMAA requirements. Compliance must be
adjudicated by licensed electricians or duly trained personnel.
Electrically powered equipment is essential elements of many facilities such as substation area,
distribution board/ panel, switch gear room, etc. These devices can pose a significant hazard to
workers, particularly when mishandled or not maintained. Many electrical devices have high voltage
or high power requirements, carrying even more risk. Large capacitors found in many systems are
capable of storing lethal amounts of electrical energy and pose a serious danger even if the power
source has been disconnected.
3.3.1 Electrical Hazards
The major hazards associated with electricity are electrical shock and fire. Hazards include burn,
faulty electrical discharge, electrocution and overloading due to “octopus” connection using multi
receptacle outlet adaptor. Electrical shock occurs when the body becomes part of the electric
circuit, either when an individual comes in contact with both wires of an electrical circuit, one wire
of an energized circuit and the ground, or a metallic part that has become energized by contact
with an electrical conductor.
Electricity travels in a closed circuit, normally through a conductor. Shock results when the body
becomes part of the electrical circuit; current enters the body at one point and leaves at another.
Typically, shock occurs when a person contacts.
The severity and effects of an electrical shock depend on a number of factors, such as the
pathway through the body, the amount of current and the length of time of the exposure. Other
factors that may affect the severity of the shock are the voltage of the current, presence of
moisture in the environment, the phase of the heart cycle when the shock occurs, the general
health of the person prior to the shock.
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Conductor is a substance with very little resistance to the flow of electrical current. Water is a
great conductor of electricity, allowing current to flow more easily in wet conditions and through
wet skin.
The effect of the shock may range from a slight tingle to severe burns to cardiac arrest. The chart
below shows the general relationship between the degree of injury and amount of current for a
60-cycle hand-to-foot path of one second's duration of shock. While reading this chart, keep in
mind that most electrical circuits can provide, under normal conditions, up to 20,000 milliamperes
of current flow.
Current
Reaction
1 Milliampere
Perception level
5 Milliamperes
Slight shock felt; not painful but disturbing
6-30 Milliamperes
Painful shock; "let-go" range
50-150 Milliamperes
Extreme pain, respiratory arrest, severe
muscular contraction
1000-4,300 Milliamperes
Ventricular fibrillation
10,000+ Milliamperes
Cardiac arrest, severe burns and probable
death
In addition to the electrical shock hazards, sparks from electrical equipment can serve as an
ignition source for flammable or explosive vapors or combustible materials.
In addition to the electrical shock hazards, sparks from electrical equipment can serve as an
ignition source for flammable or explosive vapors or combustible materials.
3.3.2 Preventing Electrical Hazards
There are various ways of protecting people from the hazards caused by electricity, including
insulation, guarding, grounding, and electrical protective devices. Workers/ Electricians can
significantly reduce electrical hazards by following some basic precautions:

Electrician shall be a competent person.

Use double-insulated tools.

Ground all exposed metal parts of equipment.

Use all equipment according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Do not modify cords or use them incorrectly.

Inspect wiring of equipment before each use. Replace damaged or frayed electrical cords
immediately.

Use safe work practices every time electrical equipment is used.
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
Know the location and how to operate shut-off switches and/or circuit breaker panels. Use
these devices to shut off equipment in the event of a fire or electrocution.

Limit the use of extension cords. Use only for temporary operations and then only for short
periods of time. In all other cases, request installation of a new electrical outlet.

Multi-plug adapters must have circuit breakers or fuses.

Place exposed electrical conductors (such as those sometimes used with electrophoresis
devices) behind shields.

Minimize the potential for water or chemical spills on or near electrical equipment.

Electrical equipment, tools, cords, and usage are to be in full compliance with National Fire
Protection Association (NFPA) 70E.
3.3.3 Insulation
Insulator is a substance with such a high resistance that they can be used to prevent the flow of
electrical current. All electrical cords should have sufficient insulation to prevent direct contact
with wires. In a laboratory, it is particularly important to check all cords before each use, since
corrosive chemicals or solvents may erode the insulation.
Damaged cords should be repaired or taken out of service immediately, especially in wet
environments such as cold rooms and near water baths.
Insulations shall conform to QCS 2010 Electrical Standards.
3.3.4 Guarding
Live parts of electric equipment operating at 50 volts or more must be guarded against accidental
contact. Plexiglas shields may be used to protect against exposed live parts.
3.3.5 Grounding
Ground – refers to a conductive body, usually earth. “Grounding” a tool or electrical system
intentionally creating a low resistance path to the earth. When properly done, current from a short
or from lightning follows this path, thus preventing the build up of voltages that would otherwise
result in electrical shock, injury and even death.
System or service ground – a wire called “the neutral conductor” is grounded at the transformer,
and again at the service entrance of the building. This is primarily designed to protect machines,
tools and insulation against damage.
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Equipment ground is intended to offer enhanced protection to the workers themselves. If a
malfunction causes the metal frame of a tool to become energized, the equipment ground
provides another path for the current to flow through the tool to the ground.
Only equipment with three-prong plugs should be used in the laboratory. The third prong provides
a path to ground for internal electrical short circuits, thereby protecting the user from a potential
electrical shock.
3.3.6 Circuit Protection Devices
Circuit protection devices are designed to automatically limit or shut off the flow of electricity in the
event of a ground-fault, overload or short circuit in the wiring system. Ground-fault circuit
interrupters, circuit breakers and fuses are three well-known examples of such devices.
Fuses and circuit breakers prevent over-heating of wires and components that might otherwise
create fire hazards. They disconnect the circuit when it becomes overloaded. This overload
protection is very useful for equipment that is left on for extended periods of time.
The ground-fault circuit interrupter, or GFCI, is designed to shutoff electric power if a ground fault
is detected, protecting the user from a potential electrical shock. The GFCI is particularly useful
near sinks and wet locations. Since GFCIs can cause equipment to shutdown unexpectedly, they
may not be appropriate for certain apparatus. Portable GFCI adapters (available in most safety
supply catalogs) may be used with a non-GFCI outlet.
3.3.7 Motors
Motor-driven electrical equipment should be equipped with non-sparking induction motors or air
motors. These motors must meet National Electric Safety Code, NFPA 70E, Class 1, Division 2,
Group C-D explosion resistance specifications and/or QCS 2007 Electrical Standards.
Avoid series-wound motors, such as those generally found in some vacuum pumps, rotary
evaporators and stirrers. Series-wound motors are also usually found in household appliances
such as blenders, mixers, vacuum cleaners and power drills. These appliances should not be
used unless flammable vapors are adequately controlled.
Although some newer equipment has spark-free induction motors, the on-off switches and speed
controls may be able to produce a spark when they are adjusted because they have exposed
contacts. One solution is to remove any switches located on the device and insert a switch on the
cord near the plug end.
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3.3.8 Guidelines on Safe Work Practices
The following practices may reduce risk of injury or fire when working with electrical equipment:

Avoid contact with energized electrical circuits.

Buddy system must be applied for electrical works.

Disconnect the power source before servicing or repairing electrical equipment.

When it is necessary to handle equipment that is plugged in, be sure hands are dry and,
when possible, wear nonconductive gloves and shoes with insulated soles.

If it is safe to do so, work with only one hand, keeping the other hand at your side or in your
pocket, away from all conductive material. This precaution reduces the likelihood of accidents
that result in current passing through the chest cavity.

Minimize the use of electrical equipment in cold rooms or other areas where condensation is
likely. If equipment must be used in such areas, mount the equipment on a wall or vertical
panel.

If water or a chemical is spilled onto equipment, shut off power at the main switch or circuit
breaker and unplug the equipment.

If an individual comes in contact with a live electrical conductor, do not touch the equipment,
cord or person. Disconnect the power source from the circuit breaker or pull out the plug
using a leather belt.

Post known hazards such as “high voltage”, “high temperature”, “possible shock”, “wear
protective equipment”, etc.

Repairs of high voltage or high current equipment should be performed only by competent
electricians.

Before employees and contractors may be exposed to or work on or near live parts or circuits
they must be de-energized unless the employer can demonstrate that de-energizing
introduces additional or increased hazards or is unfeasible due to equipment design or
operational limitations. Live parts that operate at less than 50 volts to ground need not be
de-energized if there will be no increased exposure to electrical burns or to explosion due to
electric arcs.

If the exposed live parts are not de-energized (i.e., for reasons of increased or additional
hazards or unfeasibility), other safety related work practices shall be used to protect
employees and contractors who may be exposed to the electrical hazards involved. Such
work practices shall protect employees and contractors against contact with energized circuit
parts directly with any part of their body or through some other conductive object. The work
practices that are used shall be suitable for the conditions under which the work is to be
performed and for the voltage level of the exposed electric conductors or circuit parts

Employees and contractors working on de-energized parts or near enough to them to expose
the employee to any electrical hazard they present, must follow the following safety work
practices:
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
Conductors and parts of electric equipment that have been de-energized but have not
been properly locked out or tagged out shall be treated as energized.

While any employee and contractor are exposed to contact with parts of fixed electric
equipment or circuits which have been de-energized, the circuits energizing the parts
shall be locked out or tagged out or both.

The following procedures shall be followed for de-energizing equipment:

Safe procedures for de-energizing circuits and equipment shall be determined before
circuits or equipment are de-energized.

The circuits and equipment to be worked on shall be disconnected from all electric energy
sources. Control circuit devices, such as push buttons, selector switches, and interlocks,
may not be used as the sole means for de-energizing circuits or equipment. Interlocks for
electric equipment may not be used as a substitute for lockout and tagging procedures.

Stored electrical energy which might endanger personnel is released such as discharging
capacitors and short-circuiting and grounding high capacitance elements, if the stored
electrical energy might endanger personnel. If the capacitors or associated equipment
are handled in meeting this requirement they are treated as energized.

Stored non-electrical energy (hydraulic, pneumatic, etc.) in devices that could re-energize
electric circuit parts shall be blocked or relieved to the extent that the circuit parts cannot
be accidentally energized by the device.

Application of Locks and Tags (see 4.1.4 Lock Out / Tag Out System).

The following requirements shall be met before any circuit or equipment is considered deenergized or worked on as de-energized.

A qualified person operates the equipment, operating controls or otherwise verifies that
the equipment cannot be restarted.

A qualified person uses test equipment to test the circuit elements and electrical parts of
equipment to which employees will be exposed and verifies that the circuit elements and
equipment parts are de-energized.
The test shall also determine if any energized
condition exists as a result of inadvertently induced voltage or unrelated voltage backfeed
even though specific parts of the circuit have been de-energized and presumed to be
safe.
When voltage over 600 volts, nominal are tested the test equipment shall be
checked for proper operation immediately before and immediately after the test.

The following requirements shall be met, in the order given, before circuits or equipment is reenergized, even temporarily.
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
A qualified person conducts test and visual inspections, as necessary, to verify that all
tools, electrical jumpers, shorts, grounds and other such devices have been removed, so
that circuits and equipment can be safely energized.

Employees and contractors exposed to the hazards associated with re-energizing the
circuit or equipment shall be warned to stay clear of circuits and equipment.

Each lock and tag shall be removed by the employee who applied it or under his or her
direct supervision. However, if the person is absent from the workplace, then the lock or
tag may be removed by a qualified person designated to perform this task provided that
the supervisor ensures the person who applied the lock or tag is not available at the
workplace, ensures that the employee is aware that his or her tag has been removed
before he or she resumes work at that workplace, and a visual determination is made to
ensure that all people are clear of the circuits and equipment.

Only qualified persons may work on electric circuit parts or equipment that have not been deenergized. The qualified person shall be capable of working safely on energized circuits and
shall be familiar with the proper use of special precautionary techniques, personal protective
equipment, insulating and shielding materials, and insulated tools.

When work is to be performed near overhead lines, the lines shall be de-energized and
grounded or other protective measures shall be provided before work is started. If the lines
are to be de-energized, arrangements shall be made with the electric utility company, person
or organization that operates or controls the electric circuits involved to de-energize and
ground them. If protective measures, such as guarding, isolating, or insulating, are to be
provided, these precautions shall prevent employees from contacting such lines directly with
any part of their body or indirectly through conductive materials, tools, or equipment. Only
qualified persons of the electric utility, power transmission and distribution organizations are
allowed to install insulating devices on overhead power transmission and distribution lines.

Employees and contractors shall not enter spaces containing exposed energized parts,
unless illumination is provided that enables the employees to perform the work safely.
Employees and contractors are not to perform tasks on or near exposed energized parts
where there is a lack of illumination or an obstruction which precludes observation of work to
be performed.

For confined or enclosed work spaces, prior to entry employees and contractors must be
trained in the confined space entry requirements. For employees and contractors working in
confined or enclosed spaces such as manholes or vaults that contain exposed energized
parts, they shall be provide with protective shields, protective barriers, or insulating materials
as necessary to avoid inadvertent contact with these parts. Doors, hinged panels and the like
shall be secured to prevent their swinging into an employee and causing the employee and
contractor to contact exposed energized parts.

Conductive materials or equipment that is in contact with any part of an employee's or
contractor’s body shall be handled in a manner that will prevent the employee from contacting
exposed energized conductors or circuit parts.
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
If an employee and contractor must handle long dimensional conductive objects (such as
ducts and pipes) in areas with exposed live parts, the employer shall institute work practices
(such as the use of insulation, guarding, and material handling techniques) which will
minimize the hazard.

All portable ladders shall be non conductive if to be use by employees and contractors
exposed to energized parts.

Employees and contractors are not allowed to wear conductive articles of jewelry and clothing
such as watch bands, bracelets, rings, key chains, necklaces, metalized aprons, cloth with
conductive thread, or metal headgear if they might contact exposed energized parts.
However, such articles may be worn if rendered non conductive by covering, wrapping, or
other insulating means.

Housekeeping duties shall not be performed close enough for possible contact with live parts,
unless adequate safeguards such as insulating equipment or barriers are provided.

Electrically conductive cleaning materials including conductive solids such as steel wool,
metalized cloth, and silicon carbide, as well as conductive liquid solutions shall not be used
near energized parts unless procedures are followed which prevent electrical contact.

Only qualified persons are allowed to defeat an electrical safety interlock following the above
specified procedures for working on or near exposed energized parts, and then only
temporarily while they are working on the equipment.
Also, the interlock system will be
returned to its operable condition when this work is completed and verified to be operational.

Use of Equipment

Portable electrical equipment applies to the use of cord-and-plug connected equipment
and flexible cord sets (extension cords).

Portable equipment shall be handled in a manner which will not cause damage. Flexible
electric cords connected to equipment may not be used for raising or lowering the
equipment.

Flexible cords are not to be fastened with staples or otherwise hung in such a fashion as
to damage the outer jacket or insulation.

Portable cord-and-plug connected equipment and flexible cord sets (extension cords)
shall be visually inspected before use on any shift for external defects such as loose
parts, deformed and missing pins, or damage to outer jacket or insulation and for possible
internal damage such as pinched or crushed outer jacket.

When defects or evidence of damage which might expose employees to injury are
detected, the defective or damaged item shall be removed from service and no person
shall use it until it is repaired and tested to ensure it is safe for use.

Grounding-Type Equipment

Flexible cords used with grounding-type equipment shall contain an equipment grounding
conductor.
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
Attachment plugs and receptacles may not be connected or altered in any manner which
would prevent proper continuity of the equipment grounding conductor at the point where
plugs are attached to receptacles. Additionally, these devices may not be altered to allow
the grounding pole to be inserted into current connector slots. Clipping the grounding
prong from an electrical plug is prohibited.

Adapters which interrupt the continuity of the equipment grounding connection may not
be used.

All portable electric equipment and flexible cords used in highly conductive work locations,
such as those with water or other conductive liquids, or in places where employees are likely
to contact water or conductive liquids must be approved for those locations.

Employees and contractors hands shall not be wet when plugging and unplugging flexible
cords and cord-and-plug connected equipment, if energized equipment is involved. If the
connection could provide a conducting path to employees hands, (if, for example, a cord
connector is wet from being immersed in water) the energized plug and receptacle
connections must be handled only with insulating protective equipment. Locking-type
connectors shall be properly locked into connector.

Electric Power and Lightings Circuits

Load rated switches, circuit breakers, or other devices specifically designed as
disconnecting means shall be used for the opening, reversing, or closing of circuits under
load conditions. Cable connectors not of the load-break type, fuses, terminal lugs, and
cable splice connections may not be used for opening, reversing, or closing circuits under
load conditions except in an emergency.

After a circuit is de-energized by a circuit protective device, the circuit may not be
manually re-energized until it has been determined that the equipment and circuit can be
safely energized. The repetitive manual re-closing of circuit breakers or re-energizing
circuits through replaced fuses is prohibited. When it can be determined from the design
of the circuit and over current devices involved that the automatic operation of a device
was caused by an overload rather than a fault condition, no examination of the circuit or
connected equipment is needed before the circuit is re-energized.

Over-current protection of circuits and conductors may not be modified, even on a
temporary basis.

Test Equipment and Instruments

Only qualified persons may perform testing work on electric circuits or equipment.

Test instruments and equipment including all associated test leads, cables, power cords,
probes and connectors shall be visually inspected for external defects and damage
before the equipment is used. If there is a defect or evidence of damage that might
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expose an employee to injury, the defective or damaged item shall be removed from
service, tagged out of service and no employee may use it until repairs and tests
necessary to render the equipment safe have been made.

Test instruments, equipment, and their accessories shall be rated for the circuits and
equipment to which they will be connected and designed for the environment in which
they will be used.

Where flammable or ignitable materials are present only occasionally, electric equipment
capable of igniting them shall not be used unless measures are taken to prevent hazardous
conditions from developing.
Materials include, but are not limited to; flammable gases,
vapors, or liquids; combustible dust; and ignitable fibers or filings.

Safeguards for Personnel Protection

Employees working in areas where there are potential electrical hazards shall be
provided with and shall use electrical protective equipment that is appropriate for the
specific parts of the body to be protected and for the work to be performed.

Protective equipment shall be maintained in a safe, reliable condition, and periodically
inspected or tested.

If the insulating capability of protective equipment may be subject to damage during use,
the insulating material shall be protected by covering with leather or other appropriate
materials.

Nonconductive head protection shall be worn whenever there is danger of head injury
from electric shock or burn due to contact with exposed energized parts.

Protective equipment for the eyes or face shall be worn whenever there is danger of
injury to the eyes or face from electric arcs, flashes or flying objects resulting from
electrical explosion.

General Protective Equipment and Tools

Insulated tools or handling equipment shall be used by employees working near exposed
energized conductors or circuit parts if the tools or handling equipment might make
contact with such conductors or parts.

If the insulating capability of insulated tools or handling equipment is subject to damage,
the insulating material shall be protected.

Protective shields, protective barriers, or insulating materials must be used to protect
each employee from shock, burns, or other electrically related injuries while employees
are working near exposed energized parts which might be accidentally contacted or
where dangerous electric heating or arcing might occur.

When normally enclosed live parts are exposed for maintenance or repair, they are to be
guarded to protect unqualified persons from contact with the live parts.
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
Fuse Handling Equipment - insulated for the circuit voltage, shall be used to remove or
install fuses when the fuse terminals are energized.


Ropes and Hand-lines - used near exposed energized parts shall be nonconductive.
The following alerting techniques are used to warn and protect employees from electrical
shock hazards, burns, or failure of electric equipment parts.

Safety signs, safety symbols, or accident prevention tags are to be used where necessary
to warn employees about electrical hazards which may endanger them.

Barricades - are used in conjunction with safety signs where necessary to prevent or limit
employee access to work areas exposing employees to un-insulated energized
conductors or circuit parts. Conductive barricades may not be used where they might
cause an electrical contact hazard.

If signs and barricades do not provide sufficient warning from electrical hazards, an
attendant is to be stationed to warn and protect employees.
3.3.9 Altering Building Wiring and Utilities
Any modifications to existing electrical service in a building must be completed and approved by
Business Operations Department.
All modifications must meet both safety standards and
facilities engineering design requirements.
3.4 Lock Out / Tag Out System
Lockout is the preferred method of isolating machines or equipment from energy sources. All
electrical equipment shall be locked out or tagged out to protect against accidental or inadvertent
operation when such operation could cause injury to personnel. Do not attempt to operate any
switch, valve, or other energy isolating device when it is locked or tagged out.
A tagout system is to be used only if an isolating device cannot be locked out; or, it is demonstrated
that a tagout system does provide full workers protection.
The electrical lockout/ tagout procedure is to be implemented in coordination with appropriate
procedures for safely isolating other energy systems such as hydraulic, pneumatic, thermal,
process gases and fluids, chemical, and mechanical, in order to provide for the isolation of all
energy sources that could endanger workers.
The lockout/tagout procedure shall be documented by the Business Operations Department (BOD)
- Electromechanical Section and shall contain requirements to safeguard workers while they are
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working on or near de-energized circuits, parts or equipment in any situation where there is danger
of injury due to unexpected energization of the circuit’s parts or unexpected start-up of the
equipment.
Procedures shall require preplanning to determine where and how electric energy
sources can be disconnected to safely de-energize circuits and equipment that are to be worked on.
Equipment shutdown procedures shall be included so that the electric equipment involved is safely
shut down before circuits are de-energized. Lock out/ tag out permit shall be secured for works that
need de-energization or energization of equipment.
3.4.1 Responsibility and Requirements

The QU Electrical Engineer is responsible for the implementation of the lockout/tagout
procedures. Employees and contractors shall be trained to understand the safety significance
of their responsibilities in implementing the procedures. The lockout/tagout procedures shall
be complied with when work is performed on or near de-energized circuit parts or equipment
in any situation where there is a danger of injury due to unexpected energization of the circuit
parts or unexpected start-up of the equipment.

Training is to be provided to ensure that the purpose and function of the program are
understood by employees and contractors (knowledge, skills, application, use, removal).
Training shall include:

Recognition of hazardous energy sources, type and magnitude of energy available, the
methods and means for isolation and control.

Purpose and use of the procedure.

Other employees whose work is in or may be in an area where lockouts/tagouts are used.
Instruct about procedure, and prohibition concerning starting locked and/or tagged
equipment.
3.4.2 Training
When tagout systems are used, training should include the following limitations of tags:

Tags are essentially warning devices and do not provide physical restraint.

Tags must not be removed without authorization of the authorized person using it, and never
be bypassed, ignored, or otherwise defeated.

Tags must be legible and understandable to be effective.

Tags and their means of attachment must withstand environment.

Tags may evoke a false sense of security and must be understood as part of an overall
program.
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
Tags must be securely attached.
3.4.3 Employee Retraining

Retraining shall be provided annually or when there is a change in job assignments, or
change in machines, equipment, or process that present a new hazard, or a change in energy
control procedures.

Retrain when inspections reveal a need, or whenever the employer sees a need.

Retraining shall reestablish proficiency and introduce new or revised control methods.
3.4.4 Coordination with Other Procedures
The electrical lockout/ tagout procedure is to be implemented in coordination with appropriate
procedures for safely isolating other energy systems such as hydraulic, pneumatic, thermal,
process gases and fluids, chemical, and mechanical, in order to provide for the isolation of all
energy sources that could endanger employees.
3.4.5 Identifiable
Lockout/ tagout devices must indicate the identity of the employee and tagout devices must warn
against hazardous conditions. Messages must include:

DO NOT START

DO NOT OPEN

DO NOT CLOSE

DO NOT ENERGIZE

DO NOT OPERATE
3.4.6 Procedural Requirements

The lockout/tagout procedure shall be documented by the Electromechanical Section and
shall contain requirements to safeguard employees, contractors while they are working on or
near de-energized circuits, parts or equipment in any situation where there is danger of injury
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due to unexpected energization of the circuit parts or unexpected start-up of the equipment.
Procedures shall require preplanning to determine where and how electric energy sources
can be disconnected to safely de-energize circuits and equipment that are to be worked on.

Equipment shutdown procedures shall be included so that the electric equipment involved is
safely shut down before circuits are de-energized.

Employees shall be instructed in the safety significance of the lockout/tagout procedure
(Name/Job Title of employees authorized to lockout/tagout). Each new or transferred affected
employee and other employees whose work operations are or may be in the area shall be
instructed in the purpose and use of the lockout or tagout procedure (Names/Job Title of
affected employees and how to notify).

Contractor shall secure logout/ tagout permit for works that need de-energization or
energization of equipment.
3.4.7 Preparation for Lockout or Tagout
Inspect carefully and locate and identify all isolating devices.
Be certain which switch(s),
valves(s) or other energy isolating devices control the equipment to be locked or tagged out.
More than one energy source (electrical, mechanical, or others) may be involved. All type(s) and
location(s) of energy isolating means must be found and managed.
3.4.8 Exceptions
Employees and contractors need not document required procedures for a particular machine or
piece of equipment when all of the following elements exist:

The machine/equipment has no potential for stored energy or re-accumulation of stored
energy after shutdown, which would endanger employees and contractors.

The machine/equipment has a single energy source that can be readily identified and
isolated.

The isolation and locking out of the energy source will completely de-energize the
machine/equipment.

The machine/equipment is isolated from that energy source and is locked out during servicing
or maintenance.

A single lockout device will achieve a locked out condition.

The lockout device is under the exclusive control of the authorized employee performing the
service or maintenance.

The servicing or maintenance does not create hazards for other employees and contractors.

In utilizing this exception, authorized personnel have had no previous accidents involving the
unexpected activation or re-energization of the machine during service or maintenance.
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3.4.9 Implementing Lockout/Tagout
Employees and contractors shall implement an orderly shutdown of machinery to avoid any
additional or increased hazards resulting from equipment stoppage. The following is a list of steps
to be used during shutdown.

Preparing for Shutdown


Identify the types of energy and sources.

Notify affected employees of intent to service equipment.
Shutting Down the Equipment


Turn off equipment .

Deactivate energy .

Release all stored or residual energy .

Attach locking and tagging devices.

Verify that equipment is secure and deactivated.
Preparing to Return Equipment to Service

Remove all tools from the equipment .

Inspect the controls to verify they are in the "off" position.

Remove all locking and tagging devices.

Re-energize the equipment.

Notify affected employees when machine is back in service.
3.4.9.1 Preparation for Shutdown

Identification of the Energy Type or Source
Determine where and how equipment is being energized. Since some equipment is
powered by several sources (e.g., electrical, mechanical, pneumatic, chemical, thermal and
hydraulic), all energizing sources shall be identified. For complex equipment, refer to the
manufacturer's control diagram detailing the locations of all isolating points. These points
may include breaker panels, switches and valves. Furthermore, possible residual energy
and methods used to dissipate or restrain that energy shall be identified. In addition to
identifying energy sources, the employee must determine the magnitude of the energy, the
hazards of the energy to be controlled and the methods or means to control the energy. If
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authorized employees are unable to determine each form of energy, they must consult their
supervisors before work is started.
 Notification of employees
Affected employees must be notified by authorized personnel of the intent to service
equipment. Notification shall be given before lock out/ tag out controls are applied and
should contain the name and job titles of authorized employees, location of equipment
being serviced, and duration/date of service.
3.4.9.2

Shutdown of Machine
Shut Off Equipment
If the machine or equipment is operating, employees shall shut it down by the normal
stopping procedures (depress the stop button, open the switch, close valve, etc.).

Deactivate the Energy
Disconnect the device from all energy sources and release all residual energies that may
present a hazard. Inspect the equipment to ensure all energy sources are disconnected.

Release of Stored or Residual Energy
Release stored or residual energy, such as that in capacitors, springs,
elevated machine
members, rotating flywheels, hydraulic systems and pressurized systems (air, gas, steam,
or water). If energy is incapable of being released, the employee shall reposition, block or
utilize some other protective measure to prevent the release of residual energy while
service is in progress.

Attach a Lock and Tag
Attach a lock and tag, of designated color, type and descriptive warning, on each
disconnecting means used to de-energize circuits and equipment on which work is to be
performed. The lock shall be attached to prevent persons from operating the equipment.
Tags must be securely attached to energy isolating devices so that they cannot be
inadvertently or accidentally detached during use. Additionally, tags shall be attached to all
points where equipment or circuits can be energized. If multiple employees are servicing
the same equipment, each shall attach their own lock to a multiple lock plate.
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
Verify that equipment is secure and deactivated
Test the deactivation of the equipment to ensure that equipment cannot be energized and
potential energy sources secured. This should be done by:
 Checking that no personnel are exposed.
 Verifying the isolation of equipment by operating the push button or other normal
operating controls. Secure all switches to prevent movement to the "on" or "start" position.
 Checking pressure gauges to ensure de-pressurization of lines.
 Inspecting electrical circuits to confirm zero voltage.
3.4.9.3 Returning Equipment to Service
After service has been completed and the machine is ready to be tested or returned to service
the following steps must be followed.

Inspect the machine and work area.
Inspect the machine(s) to insure that non-essential materials have been removed and the
machine is in operating order. Visual inspections shall be conducted to ensure: a) tools and
equipment are removed and secured safe guards are in place; and b) blocks, pins and
chain (used during the lockout) are removed. Additionally, employees shall verify all
equipment components are fully assembled and operational. Finally, employees shall
inspect the work area to ensure that all employees and contractors have been safely
positioned or removed from the area.

Inspect the controls.
Verify the controls are in neutral or the "off" position.

Remove the lock devices.
Each lock shall be removed by the authorized employee that applied it or under his/her
direct supervision. If the authorized employee is absent from the work place then the lock or
tag can be removed by a qualified person designated to perform this task provided that the
immediate supervisor:

Verifies that the employee is not present and therefore unable to remove the lock.
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
Makes all reasonable efforts to inform the authorized employee that the lockout/tagout
device has been removed.

Ensures that the authorized employee knows the lockout/ tagout device has been
removed before work resumes.

Re-energize the machine.
After completing the above steps, restore the energy to the machine.

Notify affected employees.
Notify affected employees that the servicing or maintenance is completed, and the machine
or equipment is ready for use.
3.5 Hot Work Permitting System
The purpose of Hot Work Permitting is to protect personnel and property from a fire caused by hot
work. The permitting system defines the responsibilities and requirements for performing hot work
and establishes controls through the use of a hot work permit.
This system establishes the means to assess the work area and the planned hot work activity to
ensure sufficient and necessary controls are in place to prevent a fire.
Hot work will only be performed in areas that are or have been made fire safe. Where fire
prevention precautions, such as a fire suppression system or a fire or smoke detection system, are
not sufficient a fire watch person shall be assigned to monitor the area for fire, as needed.
3.5.1 Scope

This procedure applies to all hot work performed on QU property, including work performed
by QU employees and contractors. Hot work includes any temporary operation, scheduled or
emergency, indoor or outdoor, involving open flames or producing heat and/or sparks.

The following activities requires hot work include torch cutting, welding, soldering, brazing,
grinding.

Permanent areas which are designated areas for long term or permanent performance of hot
work, such as a maintenance shop or a detached outside location are not considered hot
work as defined above.
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3.5.2 Hot Work Limitation
A hot work permit is not required for:
 Operations performed that do not generate sufficient heat or sparks to be considered a
significant source of ignition to surrounding combustibles.
 Operations performed in permanent areas, which are designated areas for long term or
permanent performance of hot work, such as a maintenance shop or a detached outside
location.
 Permanent areas where welding, torching, or cutting will be performed must have the following
conditions to be exempt from this procedure:
 Area constructed of noncombustible or fire resistive material.
 Essentially free of combustible and flammable content.
 Suitably segregated from adjacent areas.
 Equipped with a suitable exhaust system capable of removing the fumes and spent gases
associated with Hot Work.
3.5.3 Responsibilities
3.5.3.1 Business Operations Department (BOD) - Environmental and Safety Office is
responsible for the following:

Overseeing the Hot Work Policy to provide for regulatory compliance.

Assisting in evaluating specific work to determine if potential hot work exists.

Inspecting and approving the job site for hot work, as needed.

Prescribing any additional personal protective equipment (PPE) beyond the minimum
required PPE.

Maintaining copies of hot work permits for one year.
3.5.3.2 Authorized Person

An Authorized Person shall be responsible for ensuring compliance with this hot work
permitting system.

The authorized person shall have sufficient technical knowledge, training and practical
experience in the hot work processes and their associated hazards.

The authorized person is the Operations & Maintenance Engineer or Supervisor
responsible for:
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
Ensuring hot work is identified and performed in accordance with the permitting system
requirements.

Performing a hazard assessment of the scheduled hot work and the work area, as
needed, to establish controls and fire watch requirements (see 3.5.4 Precautions &
Requirements)

Notifying the Safety Officer of scheduled Hot Work

Obtaining any alarm system bypass that may be necessary and ensuring such alarm
system is reactivated upon completion of hot work.

Making sure that persons who will perform hot work have read and understand the Hot
Work Permitting System.

Assuring that persons who will perform hot work have demonstrated competency in the
use of hot work equipment and are trained in performing hot work.

Ensuring that high energy sources are isolated as needed in accordance with the
lockout/tagout procedure.

Approving hot work permits.

Submit a copy of the permit to the Safety Officer.
3.5.3.3 Hot Work Employee
The worker who is performing the hot work is responsible for:

Completing hot work orientation/ training to the requirements of this policy.

Performing hot work in accordance with the requirements of this policy.

Familiar with the facility and how to sound an alarm in the event of a fire.

Filling out the work area preparation section of the hot work permit.

Making the work area fire safe and verifying on the permit that work can start.

Insuring the required safety precautions per the hot work permit are followed.
3.5.3.4 Fire Watch
The Fire Watch, which simultaneously can be the worker, is responsible for:

Being alert to all conditions that may directly involve the safety of the cutter or welder and
observing the cutter or welder for sparks, flame, or slag that lands on clothing or protective
equipment.

Being trained to the requirements of this policy.

Having the appropriate fire extinguishing readily available.

Being familiar with the facility and how to sound an alarm in the event of a fire.

Extinguishing a fire and/or sounding the fire alarm.

Calling emergency services at 4403 3600; 4403 3999 and Environmental and Safety Office
4403 3581.
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
Completing the Closeout section of the permit.
3.5.4 Precautions and Requirements

A hot work permit must be completed prior to initiating hot work and posted at the work area.
The work process shall include (1) an assessment of the facility condition, (2) preparation of
the work area, (3) hot work activity, (4) closeout.

Hot work must be approved by the Authorized Person. For externally contracted work the
applicable Project Manager is the Authorized Person.

Hot Work is permitted only in areas that are or have been made fire safe.

Hot Work equipment shall be in good working condition and fully inspected.

The Authorized Person shall perform a hazard assessment of the scheduled hot work in the
work area where the following conditions exist:
 Fire suppression system is not operable or does not exist.
 Fire/smoke detection system is localized only or does not exist.
 Special potential hazards such as work in a confined area, attic, or crawlspace in which
an increased fire risk may exist. This hazard assessment includes the identification on the
permit any special precautions and controls and the fire watch requirements, which will be
at least 60 minutes after completion and may include periodic checks for 2 or 3 hours.
 The floor around the area where the hot work is to be performed shall be swept clean and
clear of debris for a radius of 35 feet.
 Combustibles shall be adequately protected or shielded, using flameproof materials. For
torch cutting or welding, combustibles shall be relocated at least 35 ft horizontally from
the work area. The edges of covers at the floor shall be tight to prevent sparks from going
under the covers.
 Openings or cracks in walls, floors, or ducts within 35 feet of the Site shall be tightly
covered to prevent the passage of sparks to adjacent areas.
 When torch cutting or welding is performed near combustible partitions or ceilings, fire
resistant guards shall be provided to prevent ignition.
 Welding shall not be attempted on a metal partition, wall, ceiling, or roof having a
combustible covering. Oil based paints and epoxies shall be no closer than three feet in
any direction.
 Fully charged and operable fire extinguishers shall be available in the hot work area. The
use of wall mounted fire extinguishers, provided in the facility, is prohibited. Available
portable fire extinguishers shall include as a minimum, one 4A:40B:C rated extinguisher
within 40 feet of the activity.
 Special precautions shall be taken to avoid accidental operation of automatic fire
detection or suppression systems. If the possibility exists that automatic fire detection or
suppression systems will be activated as a result of the work activities, then the
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automatic fire detection or suppression systems shall be isolated from the detectors
located in the immediate area.
 Nearby personnel shall be relocated or suitably protected from heat, sparks, slag and
arc.
3.6 Safe Lifting and Back Safety
Workers shall follow the proper safe lifting methods to prevent back injury during lifting of materials.

Avoid lifting and bending whenever you can.

Avoid the following:

Heavy lifting especially repetitive lifting over a long period of time.

Twisting at the waist while lifting or holding a heavy load, this frequently happens when
using a shovel.

Reaching and lifting over your head, across over your head, across a table, or out the back
of a truck.

Lifting or carrying objects with awkward or odd shapes.

Sitting or standing too long in one position, sitting can be very hard on the lower back.

Place objects up off the floor.

Raise / lower shelves.

Use carts.

Test the weight of an object before lifting by picking up a corner.

Wear Back Support if necessary.

Get help if it is too heavy for you to lift it alone.

Use the following steps when lifting:

Take a balanced stance, feet shoulder-width apart.

Squat down to lift, get as close as you can.

Get a secure grip; hug the load.

Lift gradually using your legs, keep load close to you, keep back and neck straight.

Once standing, change directions by pointing your feet and turn your whole body. Avoid
twisting at your waist.


To put load down. Use item 9.0 in reverse.
Use cranes, hoist, forklift, lift tables and other lift-assist devices for lifting heavy objects (e.g.
pump, motor, pipes).

Exercise regularly.
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3.7 Use of Scaffolding
The proper use of scaffolding shall be complied by contractors and workers to prevent incident and
accident associated with scaffold work activities.
3.7.1 General Requirements

The footing or anchorage for scaffolds shall be sound, rigid, and capable of carrying the
maximum intended load without settling or displacement. Unstable objects such as barrels,
boxes, loose brick, or concrete blocks, shall not be used to support scaffolds or planks.

No scaffold shall be erected, moved, dismantled, or altered except under the supervision of
competent persons or as requested for corrective actions by the Safety Officer.

Guardrails and toe boards shall be installed on all open sides and ends of platforms more
than 10 feet above the ground or floor, except needle beam scaffolds and floats. Scaffolds 4
feet to 10 feet in height having a minimum horizontal dimension in either direction of less than
45 inches, shall have standard guardrails installed on all open sides and ends of the platform.

Guardrails must be 2 X 4 inches, or the equivalent, approximately 42 inches high, with a midrail, when required. Supports must be at intervals not to exceed 8 feet. Toe board and the
guardrail, extending along the entire opening, consisting of No. 18 gauge U.S. standard wire
1/2 inch mesh, or the equivalent.

Scaffolds and their components must be capable of supporting without failure at least 4 times
the maximum intended load.

Any scaffold including accessories such as braces, brackets, trusses, screw legs, ladders,
etc., damaged or weakened from any cause must be immediately repaired or replaced.

All load-carrying timber members of scaffold framing shall be a minimum of 1,500 fiber
(Stress Grade) construction grade lumber.

All planking must be Scaffold Grades, or equivalent, as recognized by approved grading rules
for the species of wood used. The maximum permissible span for 1-1/4 X 9 inch or wider
plank of full thickness shall be 4 feet with medium duty loading of 50 psf.

All planking or platforms must be overlapped (minimum 12 inches), or secured from
movement.

An access ladder or equivalent safe access must be provided.

Scaffold planks must extend over their end supports not less than 6 inches nor more than 18
inches.

The poles, legs, or uprights of scaffolds must be plumb, and securely and rigidly braced to
prevent swaying and displacement.

Overhead protection must be provided for men on a scaffold exposed to overhead hazards.

Slippery conditions on scaffolds shall be eliminated immediately after they occur.
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
No welding, burning, riveting or open flame work shall be performed on any staging
suspended by means of fiber or synthetic rope. Only treated or protected fiber or synthetic
ropes shall be used for or near any work involving the use of corrosive substances or
chemicals.

Wire synthetic, or fiber rope used for scaffold suspension shall be capable of supporting at
least 6 times the rated load.

All scaffoldings must be inspected and tagged safe to use by competent person prior to its
use.

All unsafe scaffoldind must be tagged unsafe and shall be immediately dismantled or rectified.
3.7.2 Wood Scaffolding

All lumber used in constructing ramps, platforms, staging, scaffolding, etc., must be of good
quality, seasoned and straight grained, free of large loose or dead knots and knots in groups,
checks, splits and other defects which tend to decrease the structural strength.

No nail should be subjected to direct pull. A minimum of four nails per joint is recommended.
The size of the nail used will depend upon the load that must be carried by the joint and the
thickness of the material being joined, one inch stock requiring 8d nails, two inch stock
requiring 16d nails, etc.
3.7.3 Tabular Steel Scaffolding

Steel scaffolding should be erected and used in accordance with manufacturer's
recommendations. Proper seating and locking of all connections is of extreme importance

light duty tube and coupler scaffold shall have all posts, bearers, runners, and bracing of
nominal 2 inch O.D. steel tubing. The posts shall be spaced no more than 6 feet apart by 10
feet along the length of the scaffold. Other structural metals when used must be designed to
carry an equivalent load. No dissimilar metals shall be used together on any tube coupler
scaffold.

A medium duty tube and coupler scaffold shall have all posts, runners, and bracing of nominal
2 inch O.D. steel tubing. Posts spaced not more than 6 feet apart by 8 feet along the length
of the scaffold must be bearers of nominal 2 1/2 O.D. steel tubing.

A heavy duty tube and coupler scaffold shall have all posts, runners, and bracing of nominal 2
inch O.D. Steel tubing, with the posts spaced not more than 6 feet by 6 feet 6 inches.

Posts must be accurately spaced, erected on suitable bases, and maintained plumb.

Runners shall be erected along the length of the scaffold, located on both the inside and the
outside posts at even heights. Runners shall be interlocked to the inside and the outside
posts at even heights. Runners shall be interlocked to form continuous lengths and coupled
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to each post. The bottom runners must be located as close to the base as possible. Runners
must be placed not more than 6 feet-6 inches on centers.

Bearers must be at least 4 inches but not more than 12 inches longer than the post spacing or
running spacing.
3.7.4 Manually Propelled Mobile Scaffolds

Cross bracing must be installed across the width of the scaffold at least every third set of
posts horizontally and every fourth runner vertically. Such bracing must extend diagonally
from the inner and outer runners upward to the next outer and inner runners.

Longitudinal diagonal bracing on the inner and outer rows of poles shall be installed at
approximately a 45 degree angle from near the base of the first outer post upward to the
extreme top of the scaffold. Where the longitudinal length of the scaffold permits, such
bracing shall be duplicated beginning at every fifth post. In a similar manner, longitudinal
diagonal bracing shall also be installed from the last post extending back and upward toward
the first post. Where conditions preclude the attachment of the bracing to the posts, it may be
attached to the runners.

The entire scaffold shall be tied to and securely braced against the building at intervals not to
exceed 30 feet horizontally and 26 feet vertically.

Guardrails made of lumber not less than 2 x 4 inches (or other material providing equivalent
protection), approximately 42 inches high, with a mid-rail of 1 x 6 inch lumber (or other
material providing equivalent protection), and toe boards shall be installed at all open sides
and ends on all scaffolds more than 10 feet above the ground or floor. Toe boards shall be a
minimum of 4 inches in height. Wire mesh shall be installed when needed.
3.8 Use of Stairways and Ladders
Employees and contractors shall follow this guideline on safe use of stairways and ladders. This
can also provide as reference for the design and construction of fixed general industrial stairways
(interior and exterior), portable extension ladders, stepladders, permanent fixed ladders and ladders
used for construction.
3.8.1 Requirements of Stairway or Ladder

A stairway or ladder must be provided at all worker points of access where there is a break in
elevation of 19 inches (48 cm) or more and no ramp, runway, embankment or personnel hoist
is provided.
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
Where there is only one point of access between levels, it must be kept clear to permit free
passage by workers. If free passage becomes restricted, a second point of access must be
provided and used.

All construction stairway and ladder fall protection systems required by these rules must be
installed and all duties required by the stairway and ladder rules must be performed before
employees begin to work that requires them to use stairways or ladders and their respective
fall protective systems.

Fixed stairs shall be provided for access from one structure to another where operations
necessitate regular travel between levels and for access to operating platforms at any
equipment which requires attention routinely during operations. Fixed stairs shall also be
provided where access to elevations is daily or at each shift for such purposes as gauging,
inspection, regular maintenance, etc., where such work may expose employees to acids,
caustics, gases, or other harmful substances, or for which purposes the carrying of tools or
equipment by hand is normally required. (This does not preclude the use of fixed ladders for
access to fixed tanks, towers, and similar structures, overhead traveling cranes, etc. where
the use of fixed ladders is a common practice.) Spiral stairways shall not be permitted except
for special limited usage and secondary access situations where it is not practical to provide a
conventional stairway.
Winding stairways may be installed on tanks and similar round
structures where the diameter of the structure is not less than five (5) feet.
3.8.2 Stair-rails and Handrails.
The following apply to all stair-rails and handrails

Stairways having four or more rises, or rising more than 30 inches (76 cm) in height,
whichever is less, must have at least one handrail provided on closed stairways preferably on
the right side descending. A stair-rail must also be installed along each unprotected side or
edge. When the top edge of a stair-rail system also serves as a handrail, the height of the top
edge must not be more than 37 inches (94 cm) nor less than 36 inches (91.5 cm) from the
upper surface of the stair-rail to the surface of the tread.

Vertical clearance above any stair tread to an overhead obstruction shall be at least 7 feet
measured from the leading edge of the tread.

Employees should always use handrails whenever ascending or descending stairs.
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3.8.3 Safety Precautions on the Use of Ladder.
The following safety precautions shall be observed in the use of all ladders:

When portable ladders are used for access to an upper landing surface, the side rails must
extend at least 3 feet (.9 m) above the upper landing surface. The ladder must be secured
and a grasping device, such as a grab rail, must be provided to assist workers in mounting
and dismounting the ladder. A ladder extension must not deflect under a load that would
cause the ladder to slip off its support.

Ladders must be maintained free of oil, grease and other slipping hazards.

Ladders must not be loaded beyond the maximum intended load for which they were built
beyond their manufacturers' rated capacity.

Ladders must be used only for the purpose for which they were designed.

Non self-supporting ladders must be used at an angle where the horizontal distance from the
top support to the foot of the ladder is approximately one-quarter of the working length of the
ladder. Wood job-made ladders with spliced side rails must be used at an angle where the
horizontal distance is one-eighth the working length of the ladder.

Fixed ladders must be used at a pitch no greater than 90 degrees from the horizontal,
measured from the back side of the ladder.

Ladders must be used only on stable and level surfaces unless secured to prevent accidental
movement.

Ladders must not be used on slippery surfaces unless secured or provided with slip-resistant
feet to prevent accidental movement. Slip-resistant feet must not be used as a substitute for
care in placing, lashing, or holding a ladder upon slippery surfaces.

Ladders placed in areas such as passageways, doorways, driveways or where they can be
displaced by workplace activities or traffic, must be secured to prevent accidental movement,
or a barricade must be used to keep traffic or activities away from the ladder.

The area around the top and bottom of the ladders must be kept clear.

The top of a non self-supporting ladder must be placed with two rails supported equally
unless it is equipped with a single support attachment.

Ladders must not be moved, shifted or extended while in use.

Ladders must have non conductive side-rails if they are used where the worker or the ladder
could contact exposed energized electrical equipment.

Users are cautioned to take proper safety measures when metal ladders are used in areas
containing electrical circuits to prevent short circuits or electrical shock.

The top or top step of a step-ladder must not be used as a step.

Cross-bracing on the rear section of step-ladder must not be used for climbing unless the
ladders are designed and provided with steps for climbing on both front and rear sections.

Ladders must be inspected by a competent person for visible defects on a periodic basis and
after any incident that could affect their safe use.
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
Single-rail ladders must not be used.

When ascending or descending a ladder, employees must face the ladder.

Employee, contractors must use at least one hand to grasp the ladder when moving up or
down the ladder.

An employee on a ladder must not carry any object or load that could cause the worker to
lose balance and fall.
3.8.4 Structural Defects in Ladders.

Portable ladders with structural defects, such as broken or missing rungs, cleats, or steps,
broken or split rails, corroded components, or other faulty or defective components, must
immediately be marked defective, or tagged with "DO NOT USE" or similar language and
must be withdrawn from service until repaired.

Fixed ladders with structural defects, such as broken or missing rungs, cleats, or steps,
broken or split rails, or corroded components, must be withdrawn from service until repaired.

Defective fixed ladders are considered withdrawn from use when they are immediately tagged
with "DO NOT USE" or similar language; marked in a manner that identifies them as
defective; or blocked (such as with a plywood attachment that spans several rungs).

Ladder repairs must restore the ladder to a condition meeting its original design criteria,
before the ladder is returned to use.
3.8.5 Care and Maintenance of Ladders

To get maximum serviceability, safety and to eliminate unnecessary damage of equipment,
good safe practices in the use and care of ladder equipment must be employed by the users.
The following rules and regulations are essential to the life of the equipment and the safety of
the user.

Ladders must be maintained in good usable condition at all times; the joint between the steps
and side rails shall be tight, all hardware and fittings securely attached and the moveable
parts shall operate freely without binding or undue play.

Metal bearings of locks, wheel pulleys, etc., shall be frequently lubricated.

Frayed or badly worn rope shall be replaced.

Safety feet and other auxiliary equipment shall be kept in good condition to insure proper
performance.

Ladders shall be inspected frequently and those with defects shall be withdrawn from service
for repair or destruction and tagged or marked as "DANGEROUS - DO NOT USE".

If ladders tip over, inspect ladder side rails for dents or bends, or excessive dented rungs;
check all rung to side rail connections; check hardware connections; check rivets for shear.
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
If ladders are exposed to oil and grease, equipment should be cleaned of oil, grease, or
slippery materials. This can easily be done with a solvent or steam cleaning.
3.8.6 Cages for Fixed Ladders

Horizontal bands must be fastened to the side rail ladders or directly to the structure, building
or equipment for individual rung ladders.

Vertical bars must be on the inside of the horizontal bands and must be fastened to them.

Cages must not extend less than 27 inches (68 cm) or more than 30 inches (76 cm) from the
center line of the step or rung and must not be less than 27 inches (68 cm) wide

The inside of the cage must be clear of projections.

Horizontal bands must be spaced at intervals not more than 4 feet (1.2m) apart measured
from center line to center line.

Vertical bars must be spaced at intervals not more than 9 1/2 inches (24 cm) apart measured
from center line to center line.

The bottom of the cage must be between 7 feet (2.1 m) and 8 feet (2.4m) above the point of
access to the bottom of the ladder. The bottom of the cage must be flared not less than 4
inches (10 cm) between the bottom horizontal band and next higher band.

The top of the cage must be a minimum of 42 inches (1.1 m) above the top of the platform or
the point of access at the top of the ladder. Provisions must be made for access to the
platform or the point of access.
3.8.7 Wells for Fixed Ladders

Wells must completely encircle the ladder.

Wells must be free of projections.

The inside face of the well on the climbing side of the ladder must extend between 27 inches
(68 cm) and 30 inches (76 cm) from the center line of the step or rung.

The inside width of the well must be at least 30 inches (76 cm).

The bottom of the well above the point of access to the bottom of the ladder, must be
between 7 feet (2.1 m) and 8 feet (2.4 m).
3.8.8 Ladder Safety Devices and Related Support Systems for Fixed Ladders

All safety devices must be capable of withstanding, without failure, a drop test consisting of a
500 pound weight (226 kg) dropping 18 inches (41 cm).

All safety devices must permit the worker to ascend or descend without continually having to
hold, push or pull any part of the device, leaving both hands free for climbing.
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
All safety devices must be activated within 2 feet (.61 m) after a fall occurs and limit the
descending velocity of an employee to 7 feet/sec (2.1 m/sec or less).

The connection between the carrier or lifeline and the point of attachment to the body belt or
harness must not exceed 9 inches (23 cm) in length.
3.8.9 Training Requirements.
A training program must be provided for each employee using ladders and stairways. The
program must enable each employee to recognize hazards related to ladders and stairways
and to use proper procedures to minimize these hazards.
For construction operations,
additional employee training is required.
Employees and contractors must be trained by a competent person in the following areas, as
applicable:

The nature of fall hazards in the work area.

The correct procedure for erecting, maintaining and disassembling the fall protection
systems to be used.

The proper construction, use, placement and care in handling of all stairways and ladders.

The maximum intended load-carry capacities of ladders used.
3.9 Walking - Working Surfaces, Floor Openings
3.9.1 Walking-Working Surfaces

All shop areas, utility rooms, halls, and storerooms shall be kept clean and orderly.

All floors shall be kept clean and dry as possible.

Aisles used by material handling equipment shall be appropriately marked on the floor.

Aisles, passageways and floors shall be kept free of any obstructions such as protruding
rails, splinters, holes or loose boards.

Covers or guardrails shall be provided to protect employees from open holes, ditches, etc.
3.9.2 Guarding Floor Openings, Wall Openings And Holes

Floor opening is any opening measuring at least 12 inches (30.48 cm) or more in any floor,
roof, or platform through which a person may fall.

Every stairway floor opening shall be guarded by a standard railing.
All exposed sides
(except entrance) shall be guarded.
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
All ladder-way floor openings shall be guarded by a railing with toe boards and a swinging
gate.

Every hatchway and chute floor opening shall be guarded by either a hinged floor opening
with standard railing or a removable railing with toe board on two sides and fixed railings
opening with standard railing or a removable railing with toe board on two sides and fixed
railings with toe boards on all other exposed sides.

All pit and trap door openings infrequently used when the cover is not in place shall either be
constantly attended by an employee or protected on all exposed sides by removable railings.

Every temporary floor opening including manholes, when the cover is not in place shall be
constantly attended by an employee until the work requiring the opening has ended or
protected by removable railings if posting of an employee is ineffective or not feasible.
3.9.3 Wall Openings

All wall openings where there is a drop of more than 4 feet (1.22 meters) shall be protected by
a rail, roller, picket fence, half door or equivalent barrier.

Every temporary wall opening shall have adequate guards.
3.9.4 Open Sided Floors, Platforms and Runways

Every open sided floor or platform 4 feet (1.22 meters) or more above the adjacent floor or
ground level shall be guarded by standard railings.

Toe boards shall be provided when employees can pass beneath the open sides or falling
materials could cause a hazard.
3.10 Use of Hand and Power Tools
Employees, contractors working at the University where the use of hand or power tools are
employed shall use the following safety guidelines.

Select the right tool for the job. Examples of unsafe practices are: striking hardened faces of
hand tools together (such as using a carpenter's hammer to strike another hammer, hatchet, or
metal chisel), using a file for a pry, a wrench for a hammer, and pliers instead of the proper
wrench.

Keep tools in good condition. Wrenches with cracked work jaws, screw drivers with broken
points or broken handles, hammers with loose heads, dull saws, and extension cords or electric
tools with broken plugs, improper or removed grounding lugs, or split insulation are examples of
tools in poor conditions. Tools that have deteriorated in this manner must be taken out of
service.
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
Use tools in the right way. Screw drivers applied to objects held in the hand, knives pulled
toward the body, and failure to ground electrical equipment are common causes of accidents.

Keep tools in a safe place. Many accidents have been caused by tools falling from overhead
and by knives, chisels, and other sharp tools carried in pockets or left in tool boxes with cutting
edges exposed.


Steps to be used to control tool accidents.

Supervisors are to ensure that employees are trained to select the right tools for each job.

Tools shall be inspected prior to use.

Proper storage shall be provided for all tools, in the tool room and/or on the job.
The employee, contractor is to never carry tools, which in any way may interfere with his/her
using both hands freely on a ladder or while climbing on a structure.
A strong bag, bucket, or
similar container is to be used to hoist tools from the ground to the job.
Tools are to be
returned in the same manner, not brought down by hand, carried in pockets or dropped to the
ground.
Mislaid and loose tools cause a substantial portion of hand tool injuries. Tools should not be left
where employees, contractors are moving or walking.
Chisels, screwdrivers, and pointed tools shall never be carried in a worker's pocket. They are to
be carried in a tool box or cart, in a carrying belt (sharp or pointed end down) like those used by
electricians and steel workers, in a pocket tool pouch, or in the hand with points and cutting
edges pointing away from the body.
Employees, contractors carrying tools on their shoulders should pay close attention to
clearances when turning around and should handle the tools so that they will not strike other
employees.

Appropriate personal protective equipment, e.g. safety goggles, gloves, etc. should be worn due
to hazards that may be encountered while using portable power tools and hand tools.
Employees, contractors using hand and power tools and exposed to the hazard of falling, flying,
abrasive and splashing objects, or exposed to harmful dusts, fumes, vapors, or gases are to be
provided with the particular personal protective equipment necessary to protect them from the
hazard.
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3.10.1 Metal Cutting Hand Tools

Chisels
Factors determining the selection of cold chisels are the materials to be cut, the size and
shape of the tool, and the depth of the cut to be made.
The chisel should be made heavy enough so that they will not buckle or spring when struck.
A chisel no larger than the job should be selected so that the blade is used rather than the
point or corner. Also, a hammer heavy enough to do the job should be used.
Employees, contractors shall wear safety goggles when using a chisel and should set up a
shield or screen to prevent injury to other workers from flying chips. If a shield does not afford
positive protection to all exposed employees, then glasses with side protection should be
worn.

Tap and Die Work
Tap and die work requires certain precautions. The work should be firmly mounted in the
vise. Only a T-handle wrench or adjustable tap wrench should be used. When threads are
being cut with a hand die, hands and arms should be kept clear of the sharp threads coming
through the die, and metal cuttings should be cleared away with a brush

Hack Saws
Hacksaws should be adjusted in the frame to prevent buckling and breaking, but should not
be tight enough to break off the pins that support the blade. Install blade with teeth pointing
forward.
Pressure should be applied on the forward stroke not on the back stroke. If the blade is
twisted or too much pressure is applied, the blade may break and cause injury to the hands or
arms of the user.

Files
Selection of the right kind of file for the job will prevent injuries and lengthen the life of the file.
Inasmuch as the extremely hard and brittle steel of the file chips easily, the file should never
be cleaned by being struck against a vise or other metal object. A file-cleaning card or brush
should be used.
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For the same reason, a file is not to be hammered or used as a pry. Such abuse frequently
results in the file's chipping or breaking causing injury to the user. A file should not be made
into a center punch, chisel, or any other type of tool because the hardened steel may fracture
in use.
A file is never to be used without a smooth, crack-free handle; if the file should bind, the tang
may puncture the palm of the hand, the wrist, or other part of the body. Under some
conditions, a clamp-on raised offset handle may be useful to give extra clearance for the
hands. Files are not to be used on lathe stock turning at high speed (faster than three turns
per file stroke) because the end of the file may strike the chuck, dog, or face plate and throw
the file (or metal chip) back at the operator hard enough to inflict serious injury.

Tin Snips
Tin snips should be heavy enough to cut the material so easily that the worker needs only one
hand on the snips and can use the other to hold the material. The material is to be well
supported before the last cut is made so that cut edges do not press against the hands.
Jaws of snips are to be kept tight and well lubricated.
Employees and contractors shall wear safety goggles when trimming corners or slivers of
metal because small particles often fly with considerable force.
They shall always wear
gloves.

Cutters
Cutters used on wire, reinforcing rods, or bolts should have ample capacity for the stock;
otherwise, the jaws may be sprung or spread. Also, a chip may fly from the cutting edge and
injure the user.
Cutters require frequent lubrication. To keep cutting edges from becoming nicked or chipped,
cutters are not to be used as nail pullers or pry bars.
Cutter jaws should have the hardness specified by the manufacturer for the particular kind of
material to be cut. By adjustment of the bumper stop behind the jaws, cutting edges are to be
set to have a clearance of 0.003 inch when closed.
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3.10.2 Wood Cutting Tools
Edged tools are to be used so that if a slip should occur, the direction of force will be away from
the body. For efficient and safe work, edged tools are to be kept sharp and ground to the proper
angle. A dull tool does a poor job and may stick or bind.

Chisels
Inexperienced employees and contractors shall be instructed in the proper method of holding
and using chisels. Handles are to be free of splinters.
The wood handle of a chisel struck by a mallet is to be protected by a metal or leather cap to
prevent it from splitting.
The work to be cut must be free of nails to avoid damage to the blade or cause a chip to fly
into the user's face or eye.

Saws
Saws should be carefully selected for the work they are to do. For crosscut work on green
wood, a coarse saw (4 to 5 points per inch) is to be used. A fine saw is better for smooth,
accurate cutting in dry wood. Saws are to be kept sharp and well set to prevent binding.

Axes
An axe person is to make sure that there is a clear circle in which to swing the axe before
starting to chop. Also, all vines, brush, and shrubbery within the range should be removed,
especially overhead vines that may catch or deflect the axe.
Axe blades shall be protected with a sheath or metal guard wherever possible. When the
blade cannot be guarded, it is safer to carry the axe at one's side.
The blade on a
single-edged axe shall be pointed down.

Hatchets
Hatchets shall not be used for striking hard metal surfaces since the tempered head may
injure the user or others by flying chips. When using a hatchet in a crowded area, employee
shall take special care to prevent injury to themselves and other workers. Using a hatchet to
drive nails is prohibited.
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3.10.3

Miscellaneous Cutting Tools
Planes, Scrapers, Bits, and Drawknives
Planes, scrapers, bits, and drawknives are to be used only by experienced employees.
These tools are to be kept sharp and in good condition.
The principal hazard in the use of knives is that hands may slip from the handle onto the
blade or that the knife may strike the body or the free hand. A handle guard or a finger ring
(and swivel) on the handle eliminates these hazards. Adequate guarding is important.
Employees and contractors who must carry knives with them on the job shall keep them in
sheaths or holders. Never carry a sheathe knife on the front part of a belt. Always carry it
over the right or left hip, toward the back. This will prevent severing a leg artery or vein in
case of a fall.
Knives must never be left lying on benches or in other places where they may cause hand
injuries. Safe placing and storing of knives is important to knife safety.
Supervisors must make certain that employees and contractors who handle knives have
ample room in which to work so they are not in danger of being bumped by other workers.
Supervisors should be particularly careful about the hazard of employees and contractors
leaving knives hidden under a product, under scrap paper or wiping rags, or among other
tools in work boxes or drawers. Knives are to be kept separate from other tools to protect the
cutting edge of the knife as well as to protect the employee.
Horseplay shall be prohibited around knife operations.
Throwing, "fencing", trying to cut
objects into smaller and smaller pieces, and similar practices are not only dangerous but
reflect inadequate supervision. .
Supervisors shall assure that nothing is cut that requires excessive pressure on the knife.
Knives shall not be used as a substitute for can openers, screwdrivers, or ice picks.
3.10.4 Torsion Tools
Socket wrenches are safer to use than adjustable or open-end wrenches.

Open-End or Box Wrenches
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Open-end or box wrenches shall be inspected to make sure that they fit properly and are
never to be used if jaws are sprung or cracked. When defective they shall be taken out of
service until repaired.

Socket Wrenches
Socket wrenches give great flexibility in hard-to-reach places. The use of special types shall
be encouraged where there is danger of injury.

Adjustable Wrenches
Adjustable wrenches are used for many purposes. They are not intended, however, to take
the place of standard open-end, box or socket wrenches. They are used mainly for nuts and
bolts that do not fit a standard wrench. Pressure is always applied to the fixed jaw.

Pipe Wrenches
Pipe wrenches, both straight and chain tong, shall have sharp jaws and be kept clean to
prevent slipping.
The adjusting nut of the wrench is to be inspected frequently. If it is cracked, the wrench shall
be taken out of service. A cracked nut may break under strain, causing complete failure of
the wrench and possible injury to the user.
A piece of pipe "cheater" slipped over the handle shall not be used to give added leverage
because this can strain a pipe wrench to the breaking point. The handle of every wrench is
designed to be long enough for the maximum allowable safe pressure.
A pipe wrench should never be used on nuts or bolts, the corners of which will break the teeth
of the wrench, making it unsafe to use on pipe and fittings. Also, a pipe wrench, when used
on nuts and bolts, damages their heads. A pipe wrench shall not be used on valves, struck
with a hammer, nor used as a hammer.

Pliers
Side-cutting pliers sometimes cause injuries when short ends of wires are cut. A guard over
the cutting edge and the use of safety glasses will help prevent eye injuries.
The handles of electricians' pliers are to be insulated. In addition, employees shall wear the
proper electrical rated gloves if they are to work on energized lines.
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Pliers shall not be used as a substitute for a wrench.

Special Cutters
Special cutters include those for cutting banding wire and strap. Claw hammers and pry bars
shall not be used to snap metal banding material.

Pipe Tongs
Employees and contractors must neither stand nor jump on the tongs nor place extensions on
the handles to obtain more leverage. They should use larger tongs.

Screwdrivers
The practice of using screwdrivers for punches, wedges, pinch bars, or pries shall not be
allowed.
Cross-slot (Phillips-head) screwdrivers are safer than the square bit type, because they have
less tendency to slip. The tip must be kept clean and sharp, however, to permit a good grip
on the head of the screw.
The part to be worked upon must never be held in the hands; it should be laid on a bench or
flat surface or held in a vise.
No screwdriver used for electrical work shall have the blade or rivet extending through the
handle. Both blade and handle shall be insulated except at the tip.
3.10.5

Shock Tools
Hammers
A hammer is to have a securely wedged handle suited to the type of head used. The handle
shall be smooth, without cracks or splinters, free of oil, shaped to fit the hand, and of the
specified size and length. Employees and contractors shall be warned against using a steel
hammer on hardened steel surfaces.
Instead, a soft-head hammer or one with a plastic, wood, or rawhide head should be used.
Safety goggles or safety glasses shall be worn to protect against flying chips, nails, or scale.
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
Riveting Hammers
Riveting hammers, often used by sheet metal workers, must have the same kind of use and
care as ball pen hammers and should be watched closely for cracked or chipped faces.

Carpenter's or Claw Hammers
The faces shall be kept well dressed at all times to reduce the hazard of flying nails while they
are being started into a piece of wood. A checker-faced head is sometimes used to reduce
this hazard.
Eye protection is advisable for all nailers and all employees working in the same area.

Spark-Resistant Tools
Around flammable substances, sparks produced by iron and steel hand tools can be a
dangerous ignition source. Where this hazard exists, spark-resistant tools made from brass,
plastic, aluminum, or wood will provide for safety.
3.10.6
Power Tools
Power tools can be hazardous when improperly used. There are several types of power tools,
based on the power source they use: electric, pneumatic, liquid fuel, hydraulic, and powderactuated.
Employees and contractors should be trained in the use of all tools - not just power tools. They
should understand the potential hazards as well as the safety precautions to prevent those
hazards from occurring.
The following general precautions should be observed by power tool users:

Never carry a tool by the cord or hose.

Never yank the cord or the hose to disconnect it from the receptacle.

Keep cords and hoses away from heat, oil, and sharp edges.

Disconnect tools when not in use, before servicing, and when changing accessories such as
blades, bits and cutters.

All observers should be kept at a safe distance away from the work area.

Secure work with clamps or a vise, freeing both hands to operate the tool.

Avoid accidental starting. The worker should not hold a finger on the switch button while
carrying a plugged-in tool.
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
Tools should be maintained with care. They should be kept sharp and clean for the best
performance. Follow instructions in the user's manual for lubricating and changing
accessories.

Be sure to keep good footing and maintain good balance.

The proper apparel should be worn. Loose clothing, ties, or jewelry can become caught in
moving parts.

All portable electric tools that are damaged shall be removed from use and tagged "Do Not
Use."

Guards
Hazardous moving parts of a power tool need to be safeguarded. For example, belts, gears,
shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, drums, fly wheels, chains, or other reciprocating, rotating, or
moving parts of equipment must be guarded if such parts are exposed to contact by employees.
Guards, as necessary, should be provided to protect the operator and others from the following:

Point of operation

In-running nip points

Rotating parts

Flying chips and sparks
Safety guards must never be removed when a tool is being used. For example, portable circular
saws must be equipped with guards. An upper guard must cover the entire blade of the saw. A
retractable lower guard must cover the teeth of the saw, except when it makes contact with the
work material. The lower guard must automatically return to the covering position when the tool is
withdrawn from the work.

Safety Switches
The following hand-held powered tools must be equipped with a momentary contact "on-off"
control switch: drills, tappers, fastener drivers, horizontal, vertical and angle grinders with wheels
larger than 2 inches in diameter, disc and belt sanders, reciprocating saws, saber saws, and other
similar tools. These tools also may be equipped with a lock-on control provided that turnoff can be
accomplished by a single motion of the same finger or fingers that turn it on.
The following hand-held powered tools may be equipped with only a positive "on-off" control
switch: platen sanders, disc sanders with discs 2 inches or less in diameter; grinders with wheels
2 inches or less in diameter; routers, planers, laminate trimmers, nibblers, shears, scroll saws and
jigsaws with blade shanks <-inch wide or less.
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Other hand-held powered tools such as circular saws having a blade diameter greater than 2
inches, chain saws, and percussion tools without positive accessory holding means must be
equipped with a constant pressure switch that will shut off the power when the pressure is
released.

Electric Tools
Employees, contractors using electric tools must be aware of several
dangers; the most serious is the possibility of electrocution.
Among the primary hazards of electric-powered tools are burns and
slight shocks which can lead to injuries or even heart failure. Under
certain conditions, even a small amount of current can result in fibrillation
of the heart and eventual death. A shock also can cause the user to fall off a ladder or other
elevated work surface.
To protect the user from shock, tools must either have a three-wire cord with ground and be
grounded, be double insulated, or be powered by a low-voltage isolation transformer. Three-wire
cords contain two current-carrying conductors and a grounding conductor. One end of the
grounding conductor connects to the tool's metal housing. The other end is grounded through a
prong on the plug. Anytime an adapter is used to accommodate a two-hole receptacle, the
adapter wire must be attached to a known ground. The third prong should never be removed from
the plug.
Double insulation is more convenient. The user and the tools are protected in two ways: by
normal insulation on the wires inside, and by a housing that cannot conduct electricity to the
operator in the event of a malfunction.
These general practices should be followed when using electric tools:

Electric tools should be operated within their design limitations.

Gloves and safety footwear are recommended during use of electric tools.

When not in use, tools should be stored in a dry place.

Electric tools should not be used in damp or wet locations.

Work areas should be well lighted.

Electric cords shall be inspected periodically and kept in good condition. Heavy-duty plugs
that clamp to the cord should be used to prevent strain on the current-carrying parts, if the
cord is accidentally pulled.
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
Although no guards are available for drill bits, some protection is afforded if drill bits are
carefully chosen for the work to be done, such as being no longer than necessary to do the
work.

Where the operator must guide the drill with the hand, the drill is to be equipped with a
sleeve that fits over the drill bit. Oversized bits shall not be ground down to fit small electric
drills; instead, an adapter should be used that will fit the large bit and provide extra power
through a speed reduction gear; however this again is an indication of improper drill size.
When drills are used, the pieces of work are to be clamped or anchored to prevent
whipping.

Electric saws are usually well guarded by the manufacturer, but employees must be trained
to use the guard as intended. The guard should be checked frequently to be sure that it
operates freely and encloses the teeth completely when it is cutting.

Circular saws shall not be jammed or crowded into the work. The saw is to be started and
stopped outside the work.

Powered Abrasive Wheel Tools
Powered abrasive grinding, cutting, polishing, and wire buffing wheels create special safety
problems because they may throw off flying fragments.
Before an abrasive wheel is mounted, it should be inspected closely and sound- or ring-tested to
be sure that it is free from cracks or defects. To test, wheels should be tapped gently with a light
non-metallic instrument. If they sound cracked or dead, they could fly apart in operation and so
must not be used. A sound and undamaged wheel will give a clear metallic tone or "ring."
To prevent the wheel from cracking, the user should be sure it fits freely on the spindle. The
spindle nut must be tightened enough to hold the wheel in place, without distorting the flange.
Follow the manufacturer's recommendations. Care must be taken to assure that the spindle wheel
will not exceed the abrasive wheel specifications.
Due to the possibility of a wheel disintegrating (exploding) during start-up, the employee should
never stand directly in front of the wheel as it accelerates to full operating speed.
Portable grinding tools need to be equipped with safety guards to protect workers not only from
the moving wheel surface, but also from flying fragments in case of breakage.
In addition, when using a powered grinder:

Always use eye protection.

Turn off the power when not in use.

Never clamp a hand-held grinder in a vise.
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Use of Abrasive Wheels

Floor stand and bench mounted abrasive wheels, used for external grinding shall be provided
with safety guards (protection hoods). The maximum regular exposure of the grinding wheel
periphery and sides shall be not more than 90 degrees except that, when work requires
contact with the wheel below the horizontal plane of the spindle, the angular exposure shall
not exceed 125 degrees.
Safety guards shall be strong enough to withstand the effect of a bursting wheel.

Floor and bench-mounted grinders shall be provided with work rests which are rigidly
supported and readily adjustable.
Such work rests shall be kept at a distance not to exceed one-eighth inch from the surface of
the wheel.

Cup type wheels used for external grinding shall be protected by either a revolving cup guard
or a band type guard. All other portable abrasive wheels used for external grinding shall be
provided with safety guards (protection hoods), except as follows:
When the work location makes it impossible, a wheel equipped with safety flanges shall be
used.
When wheels 2 inches or less in diameter which are securely mounted on the end of a steel
mandrel are used.

All abrasive wheels shall be closely inspected and ring-tested before mounting to ensure that
they are free from cracks and defects.

Grinding wheels shall fit freely on the spindle and shall not be forced on. The spindle nut
shall be tightened only enough to hold the wheel in place.

All employees using abrasive wheels shall be protected by eye protection equipment.
Dust-type safety goggles or plastic face shields should be worn and, if dust is created, a
respirator approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) for the
exposure should be worn.
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If a sander is used steadily, it should be dismantled periodically, as well as thoroughly
cleaned every day by being blown out with low-pressure air. If compressed air is used the
operator shall wear safety goggles or work with a transparent chip guard between his body
and the air blast.
Because wood dust presents a fire and explosion hazard, keep dust to a minimum; sanders
can be equipped with a dust collection or vacuum bag.
designed to minimize the explosion hazard.
Electrical equipment shall be
Fire extinguishers approved for Class C
(electrical) fires should be available
3.10.7 Pneumatic Tools
Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air and include chippers, drills, hammers, and
sanders.
There are several dangers encountered in the use of pneumatic tools. The main one is the danger
of getting hit by one of the tool's attachments or by some kind of fastener the worker is using with
the tool.
Eye protection is required and face protection is recommended for employees working with
pneumatic tools.
Noise is another hazard. Working with noisy tools such as jackhammers requires proper, effective
use of hearing protection.
When using pneumatic tools, employees must check to see that they are fastened securely to the
hose to prevent them from becoming disconnected. A short wire or positive locking device
attaching the air hose to the tool will serve as an added safeguard.
A safety clip or retainer must be installed to prevent attachments, such as chisels on a chipping
hammer, from being unintentionally shot from the barrel.
Screens must be set up to protect nearby workers from being struck by flying fragments around
chippers, riveting guns, staplers, or air drills.
Compressed air guns should never be pointed toward anyone. Users should never "dead-end" it
against themselves or anyone else.
Use the following safety tips:
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
The operating trigger on portable hand-operated utilization equipment shall be so located as
to minimize the possibility of its accidental operation and shall be arranged to close the air
inlet valve automatically when the pressure of the operator's hand is removed.

Pneumatic power tools shall be secured to the hose or whip by some positive means to
prevent the tools from becoming accidentally disconnected.

Safety clips or retainers shall be securely installed and maintained on pneumatic impact
(percussion) tools to prevent attachments from being accidentally expelled.

All pneumatically driven nailers, staplers, and other similar equipment provided with automatic
fastener feed, which operate at more than 100 p.s.i. pressure at the tool shall have a safety
device on the muzzle to prevent the tool from ejecting fasteners, unless the muzzle is in
contact with the work surface.

Compressed air shall not be used for cleaning purposes except with an air blow gun limited to
30 p.s.i. static pressure at the outlet nozzle and then only with effective chip guard and
personal protective equipment.

The manufacturer's safe operating pressure for hoses, pipes, valves, filters, and other fitting
shall not be exceeded.

The use of hoses for hoisting or lowering tools shall not be permitted.

All hoses exceeding 1/2-inch inside diameter shall have a safety device at the source of
supply or branch line to reduce pressure in case of hose failure.

Airless spray guns of the type which atomize paints and fluids at high pressures (1,000
pounds or more per square inch) shall be equipped with automatic or visible manual safety
devices which will prevent pulling of the trigger to prevent release of the paint or fluid until the
safety device is manually released.

In lieu of the above, a diffuser net which will prevent high pressure, high velocity release,
while the nozzle tip is removed, plus a nozzle tip guard which will prevent the tip from coming
in contact with the operator, or other equivalent protection shall be provided.
3.10.8 Fuel Powered Tools

All fuel powered tools shall be stopped while being refueled, serviced, or maintained, and fuel
shall be transported, handled, and stored in approved safety cans.

Leakage or spillage of flammable or combustible liquids shall be disposed of promptly and
safely.

When fuel powered tools are used in enclosed spaces, the applicable requirement for
concentrations of toxic gases and use of personal protective equipment shall apply.
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3.10.9 Hydraulic Power Tools

The fluid used in hydraulic powered tools shall be fire-resistant and shall retain its operating
characteristics at the most extreme temperatures to which it will be exposed.

The manufacturer's safe operating pressures for hoses, valves, pipes, filters, and other fittings
shall not be exceeded.

All jacks – lever and rachet jacks, screw jacks, and hydraulic jacks - must have a device that
stops them from jacking up too high. Also, the manufacturer's load limit must be permanently
marked in a prominent place on the jack and should not be exceeded.
A jack should never be used to support a lifted load. Once the load has been lifted, it must
immediately be blocked up.
Use wooden blocking under the base if necessary to make the jack level and secure. If the lift
surface is metal, place a 1-inch-thick hardwood block or equivalent between it and the metal
jack head to reduce the danger of slippage.
To set up a jack, make certain of the following:

the base rests on a firm level surface,

the jack is correctly centered,

the jack head bears against a level surface, and

the lift force is applied evenly.
Proper maintenance of jacks is essential for safety. All jacks must be inspected before each
use and lubricated regularly. If a jack is subjected to an abnormal load or shock, it should be
thoroughly examined to make sure it has not been damaged.
3.10.10 Use and Maintenance of Power-Actuated Tools

These tools should not be used in an explosive or flammable atmosphere.

Only employees and contractors who have been trained in the operation of the particular tool
in use shall be allowed to operate a powder-activated tool.

The tool shall be tested each day before loading to see that safety devices are in proper
working condition. The method of testing shall be in accordance with the manufacturer's
recommended procedure.

Any tool found not in proper working order or one that has developed a defect during use
shall be removed from service immediately and not used until properly repaired.
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
Adequate eye, head, face and/or personal protective equipment as necessitated by working
conditions shall be utilized by the operators and persons working in the area.

The tool shall be designed so that it cannot be fired unless it is equipped with a standard
protective shield or guard or a special shield, guard, fixture, or jib.

The firing mechanism shall be designed so that the tool cannot fire during loading or
preparation to fire or if the tool is dropped while loaded. Firing of the tools shall be dependent
upon at least two separate and distinct operations of the operator, with the final firing
movement being separate from the operation of bringing the tool into the firing position

The tool shall be designed so as not to be operable other than against a work surface and
unless the operator is holding the tool against the work surface with force at least 5 pounds
greater than the weight of the tool.

The tool shall be designed so that it will not operate when equipped with the standard guard
indexed to the center position if any bearing surface of the guard is tilted more than 8 degrees
from contact with the work surface.

The tool shall be designed so that positive means of varying the power are available or can
be made available to the operator as part of the tool or as an auxiliary, to facilitate selection of
a power level adequate to perform the desired work without excessive force.

The tool shall be designed so that all breeching parts will be reasonably visible to allow a
check for any foreign matter that may be present.

Tools shall not be loaded until just prior to the intended firing time. Neither loaded nor empty
tools are to be pointed at any employees. Hands shall be kept clear of the open barrel end.

Loaded tools shall not be left unattended.

Fasteners shall not be driven into very hard or brittle materials including, but not limited to,
cast iron, glazed tile, surface-hardened steel, glass block, live rock, face brick, or hollow tile.

Driving into materials easily penetrated shall be avoided unless such materials are backed by
a substance that will prevent the pin or fastener from passing completely through and creating
a flying missile hazard on the other side.

Power-assisted, hammer-driven tools are used for the same purposes as powder-actuated
tools and generally the same precautions are to be followed.
3.10.11 Woodworking Tools

Personal Protective Equipment - All employees using woodworking tools shall be protected by
eye protection equipment.

Guarding - All portable, power-driven circular saws shall be equipped with guards above and
below the base plate or shoe. The upper guard shall cover the saw to the depth of the teeth,
except for the minimum arc required to permit the base to be tilted for beveled cuts. The
lower guard shall cover the saw to the depth of the teeth, except for the minimum arc required
to allow proper retraction and contact with the work. When the tool is withdrawn from the
work, the lower guard shall automatically and instantly return to the covering position.
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
Disconnect Switches - All "fixed" power driven wood-working tools shall be provided with a
disconnect switch that can either be locked or tagged in the "off" position.

Self-feed - Automatic feeding devices shall be installed on machines whenever the nature of
the work will permit. Feeder attachments shall have the feed rolls or other moving parts
covered or guarded so as to protect the operator from hazardous points

Speeds - The operating speed shall be etched or otherwise permanently marked on all
circular saws over 20 inches in diameter or operating at over 10,000 peripheral feet per
minute. Any saw so marked shall not be operated at a speed other than that marked on the
blade.
When a marked saw is re-tensioned for a different speed, the marking shall be
corrected to show the new speed.
3.11 Welding and Cutting Materials
3.11.1 Definition
Gas – Slower and easier to control than electric arc. Uses gas flame over metals until molten
puddle is formed. Most popular fuels used with oxygen include acetylene.
Arc – Two metals are joined by generating an electric arc between a covered metal electrode
and the base metal.
Oxygen Cutting - Metal is heated by gas flame and an oxygen jet does the cutting
Arc Cutting - Intense heat of electric arc melts away the metal.
3.11.2 General Requirement

When combustibles cannot be moved from the welding/cutting area, the requirements of
NFPA 51B shall be followed. No cutting and welding operation will be permitted without
authorization from the BOD- Environmental and Safety Office.

Suitable fire extinguishers shall be available.

Fire watches are required if welding of cutting and combustibles in the area could be easily
ignited by sparks. This could be greater than or less than 35 feet (10.67 meters) from point of
operation.

Cutting or welding shall not be conducted in areas not specifically authorized by the BODEnvironmental and Safety Office., in the presence of explosive atmospheres which exist or
may develop, and where quantities of combustibles are store.

Contractor’s Maintenance Engineer is responsible for the safe handling and use of the cutting
and welding equipment.
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
Areas shall be made fire safe before cutting or welding is conducted.

No welding or cutting shall be done on used drums, barrels, tanks, or containers until they
have been cleaned thoroughly.

All welding cables shall be placed so they are clear of passageways, ladders and stairways.
3.11.3 Oxygen-Fuel, Gas Welding and Cutting

Transporting, Moving, and Storing Compressed Gas Cylinders

Valve protection caps shall be in place.

Cylinders shall not be intentionally dropped, struck, or permitted to strike each other
violently.

Cylinders shall be secured in an upright position by a chain or other suitable means.

Cylinder valves shall be closed when work is finished and when cylinders are empty or
are moved.

When transporting cylinders by cranes, a cradle or suitable platform shall be used.

Valve protection caps shall not be used for lifting.

Cylinders shall not be moved unless the regulators are removed and valve protection
caps are in place, unless they are secured on a special truck.

Cylinders shall not be placed so close to work that sparks, hot slag, or flame will reach
them.

Cylinders shall be placed so that they will not become part of an electrical circuit.

Cylinders shall be placed in an upright position, chained or otherwise restrained to
prevent falling.

Use of Fuel Gases

Only properly instructed and qualified employees, contractors will operate equipment
using fuel gases.

Fuel gas shall not be taken into confined spaces.

Fuel gas and oxygen manifolds must be clearly identified and placed in well-ventilated
area.
The manifold hose connections must be such that the hose cannot be
interchanged between fuel gas and oxygen manifolds.
Header connections will be
supplied.

Oxygen and fuel gas hoses must be easily distinguished from each other by color or
surface characteristics. Torches must be inspected at the beginning of each shift for
leaking valves, couplings, and connections. Pressure regulators must be in proper
working order while in use.
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
Cylinders not having fixed hand wheels shall have keys, handles or non-adjustable
wrenches on valves stems while in service.

Valves shall be closed before moving cylinders.

Valves shall be closed when work is finished.

Empty cylinder valves shall be closed.

Before connecting the regulator, the valve shall be opened slightly and closed
immediately while the operator stands to one side of the outlet.

Acetylene cylinder valves shall be opened as little as one-half turn of the spindle preferably no more than three-fourths of a turn.

When a special wrench is required, it shall be left in position on the stem of the valve
while the cylinder is in use.

Acetylene shall never be utilized at a pressure in excess of 15 pounds per square inch
gage (p.s.i.g.) (1.06 kilograms per square centimeter).

Arc Welding and Cutting

Oxygen cylinders and fitting shall be kept away from combustible material, especially oil
and grease, as oxygen is not compatible with these products.

Only the correct manual electrode holders shall be used. If the portion gripped by the
hand contains current, it must be fully insulated against the maximum voltage
encountered to ground.

Proper welding cables and connectors must be used and must be completely insulated.
Splicing, if used, shall be equal to the insulating quality of the cable and shall not be
located within 3.05 meters (10 feet) of the electrode holder.

Ground return cables must have a safe current-carrying capacity equal to or greater than
the specified maximum output capacity of the units serviced.
pipeline is employed as a ground circuit, a
When a structure or
determination must be made that the
required electric contact exists at all joints.

The frames of all arc welding and cutting machines shall be grounded with a third wire or
a separate wire which is grounded at the source of the current.

Arc welding or cutting operations shall be shielded by noncombustible or flameproof
screens to protect employees and other persons in the vicinity from the direct rays of the
arc.

Employees and contractors performing any type of welding, cutting or heating shall be
protected by suitable eye protection equipment.

Resistance Welding

All equipment shall be installed by a qualified electrician.
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
A safety type disconnecting switch, circuit breaker or circuit interrupter shall be provided
near the machine.

Operators shall be properly trained and judged competent to operate the equipment
before being designated to do so.

Controls of all automatic air and hydraulic chargers shall be guarded against accidental
activation.

All doors and panels shall be kept blocked on the resistance welding machines.

Appropriate shields shall be provided to protect workers and passing employees from the
sparks.


Fire curtains shall be provided.

For spot and seam welding, voltage shall not exceed 480 volts during operation.
Welding, Cutting, and Heating Relative to Preservation Coatings

The flammability of protective coatings must be determined before welding, cutting, or
heating is commenced on such surfaces.

When coatings are highly flammable, they shall be stripped from the area to prevent
ignition. Protective measures must be taken when the preservative coating is toxic.
3.12 Heat Stress
3.12.1 Background
Heat Stress is influenced by several risk factors: climatic conditions, the work environment,
demands of the work, clothing and personal characteristics.

Climatic and environmental conditions that affect the risk of heat-related disorders are air
temperature and humidity, air movement, and the temperature of surrounding surfaces which
affects radiant heat exchange.

Demands of the work influence the stress on the temperature regulation system. Individual
responses to a given work load vary but, as an employee expends more energy, the body’s
internal metabolic heat production rises. This increases stress on the cardiovascular system
to regulate body temperature (i.e., by increasing blood flow to skin). Work-related factors that
influence heat stress include work rate, level of physical effort, and duration of activity.

Clothing characteristics such as insulation, permeability, weight, fit and ventilation affect the
body’s ability to regulate internal temperatures. Other factors that may increase the risk of
heat-related disorders include additional equipment, the use of a respirator, or other personal
protective equipment (PPE).
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
Personal characteristics such as age, weight, previous heat stress injury, underlying medical
conditions (e.g., diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, chronic pulmonary disease, and thyroid
disorders), medication use and overall health and physical fitness contribute to an employee’s
susceptibility of contracting a heat-related illness.
Working in an environment with heat stress not only increases the risk for specific heat
related conditions such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke, but also increases the risk for
other adverse events.
3.12.2 Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Disorders
Heat related disorders may occur when there is an exposure to heat risk factors. The chart below
illustrates some of the signs and symptoms associated with heat stress. If the employee is
experiencing any of these symptoms, the employee should be taken to the medical clinic for
treatment immediately.
DISORDER
Dehydration
SIGNS
SYMPTOMS
Loss of work capacity
Fatigue
Delayed response to
Weakness
stimuli
Dry mouth
Heat Exhaustion
High pulse rate,
Fatigue, malaise
confusion, anxiety
Weakness
Profuse sweating
Low blood pressure
Blurred vision
Pale face, or flushing
Dizziness
Body temperature
increased but below 104
Headache
degrees F.
Nausea
Excessive thirst,
Heat rash
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Loss of appetite
Skin eruptions
Itching skin, prickly sensation
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Heat Stroke
Red face
May be same as those for
heat exhaustion (see above)
Mental status changes
such as disorientation,
confusion or irritability
Hot, dry skin
Erratic behavior
Collapse
Shivering
Body temperature >104 F
Heat Cramps
Incapacitating
pain
muscle
in
Muscle cramps (abdominal
and lower extremities)
Fatigued muscles
Heat Syncope
Brief fainting or near
Blurred vision
fainting behavior
3.12.3 Preventive Controls
A control is a mechanism used to minimize or eliminate an exposure to a hazard, such as heat.
There are three types of controls (e.g. engineering, administrative and personal protective
equipment) that can be implemented to reduce exposure to excessive heat. Each person and
situation is unique, so controls and their application will vary. Suggested controls are given in
Suggested Measures to Prevent Heat Stress. Contact BOD- Environmental and Safety Office at
telephone number 4403 3581 for help in selecting the most appropriate preventive measures for
your work.

Administrative Controls
Administrative controls, also known as work strategy controls, are strategies used by
supervisors to limit exposure to a hazard. For example, changes to the work schedule
(i.e., when and how the job is performed) can limit the amount of time an employee is
exposed to elevated temperatures
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
Engineering Controls
Engineering controls are physical changes made to the work environment, such as adding
fans or air conditioning to an indoor environment.

Work Practices and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Other than hats and loose-fitting clothing, there is a limited selection of personal protective
equipment to reduce the risk of heat stress. Contact BOD- Environmental and Safety Office
for help in evaluating the effectiveness of available personal protective equipment.
In some cases, personal protective equipment—such as impermeable protective clothing and
respirators—may increase the risk of developing a heat-related disorder. If such PPE is truly
necessary, administrative and engineering controls may be necessary to allow work in heat
risk environments. Contact BOD- Environmental and Safety Office for help with these
decisions.
3.12.4 Monitoring for Signs and Symptoms of Heat Stress
Supervisors, coworkers and employees themselves are responsible for monitoring for the signs
and symptoms of heat-related disorders. See the above table for information on recognizing the
signs and symptoms of impending heat stress. A supervisor or coworker is often in the best
position to observe the onset of a heat-related disorder.

When heat stress risks are present, supervisors should regularly check workers (by
observation and questions) for signs and symptoms of heat stress.

Take extra care to monitor those at high risk, such as employees who are older or overweight,
employees who overexert themselves, and employees with chronic medical conditions
including diabetes, heart or lung disease, thyroid disease or high blood pressure. Employees
who take certain medications may also be at increased risk and need to check with their
physician.

If you need to work outdoors or within indoor environments with elevated temperatures,
monitor yourself for the signs and symptoms of heat-related illness, such as taking your own
pulse.

Use a buddy system. When working in the heat, monitor the condition of your coworkers and
have someone do the same for you.

Supervisors should check to ensure that employees are self-monitoring, and ask for their
determinations.
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3.12.5 Issue Heat Alerts
When conditions are present that contribute to heat stress, departments and work units are to
alert at risk employees and implement their preventive measures for working in heat. The alert
should include a reminder of signs and symptoms, how to control exposure, and a re-emphasis of
the preventive work strategies to be followed.
3.13 Confined Space
3.13.1 Definition
Confined Space - A confined space by design has limited or restricted means for entry and exit
and is not intended for continuous employee occupancy. Confined spaces include but are not
limited to manholes, pipelines, sewers, tunnels, pressure vessels
3.13.2 Permit-Required Confined Space (PRCS)
A Permit-Required Confined Space is required if one or more of the following characteristics are
met:

Contains or has a known potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere. Three of the most
common atmospheric conditions that constitute hazards are oxygen deficiency, presence of
combustible gases and vapors, and toxic gases and vapors.

Contains a material with the potential for engulfment of an entrant.

Contains any other recognized serious safety or health hazard.
Use the Confined Space Entry Permit in Appendix 7.
3.13.3 Authorized Personnel

Authorized Entrant - An employee who is authorized by the employer to enter a permit
required space. Only employees who are trained as an entrant and have obtained a permit
signed by the entry supervisor may enter a permit required confined space.

Attendant - An individual who is stationed outside and monitors authorized entrants. At least
one individual must be stationed outside the permit required confined space.

Entry Supervisor – is a supervisor or foreman responsible for determining if acceptable entry
conditions are present at a permit space where entry is planned, for authorizing entry, for
overseeing entry, and for terminating entry.
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3.13.4 Identification of Permit-Required Confined Spaces (PRCS)
Each department is to identify all confined spaces and those suspected of being a PRCS.
Subsequent to identification, the department should contact the BOD- Environmental and Safety
Office to assist in the evaluation of those spaces.
3.13.5 Warning Signs
PRCSs must be posted with warning signs notifying employees of any hazards that are present,
and that only authorized entrants may enter the PRCS. An example warning sign may be:
DANGER
PERMIT- REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE
DO NOT ENTER
3.13.6 Evaluation of Permit-Required Confined Space Condition (PRCS)
Each PRCS must be evaluated to identify hazards; determine the severity the hazards; and
establish control procedures and practices by which the space may be entered safely.
A
"Confined Space Hazard Evaluation" form must be completed for each PRCS.
Before entry into a PRCS is authorized, the conditions within the space must be tested to
determine if acceptable entry conditions exist. The space must be monitored during the course of
entry operations to determine if acceptable entry conditions are being maintained. When testing
for atmospheric hazards first test for oxygen deficiency, then for combustible gases and vapors,
and then for toxic gases and vapors.
3.13.7 Pre-Entry and Entry Practices and Procedures
Business Operations Department (BOD) - Environmental and Safety Office shall review and
approved the pre-entry and entry procedures prior to entry. Practices and procedures to be
addressed include:

Isolating (locking and tagging) the PRCS.

Ventilation of the PRCS.

Providing vehicle and pedestrian barriers to protect entrants from external hazards.

Verifying that conditions are acceptable for entry.
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3.13.8 Locking and Tagging
No work is to be performed until appropriate locking, tagging and/or isolation is accomplished to
prevent the inadvertent actuation of operations or processes associated with the space which
might expose employees to hazardous conditions.
3.13.9 Required Equipment
The following equipment is to be provided and maintained to ensure their proper use:

Testing and monitoring equipment

Ventilating equipment

Communications equipment

Personal protective equipment

Lighting equipment

Barriers and shields

Ladders

Rescue equipment

Other equipment necessary for safe entry
3.13.10 Permit System
Before entering a PRCS an authorized employee must complete a "Confined Space Entry Permit"
for approval by the entry supervisor. A copy must also be sent to the Environmental and Safety
Office. The permit must include: identity of the space; purpose of entry; date and duration of
entry; list of authorized entrants; eligible attendants and individuals to be in charge of entry;
hazards of the PRCS; measures for isolation of the space; measures to control potential hazards;
the acceptable entry conditions; testing and monitoring equipment and procedures; rescue
services in the event of an emergency; rescue equipment to be provided on-site, if necessary;
communication procedures between authorized entrants and attendants; and personal protective
equipment.
3.13.11 Rescue Team
If an emergency arises that requires a rescue team, the Emergency Medical Service is to be
contacted through CSU Control Room 4403 3600. Control Operator shall call 999. The rescue
service is to be provided access to all PRCSs from which rescue may be necessary so that the
rescue service can develop appropriate rescue plans and practice rescue operations. Non-entry
retrieval methods are to be used unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of
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entry. Each authorized entrant is to use a chest or full body harness, with a retrieval line attached
at the center of the entrant's back near shoulder level. For vertical type PRCSs more than 5 feet
deep, a mechanical device for retrieval is to be available.
3.13.12 Training
Employees who are assigned duties that may require entry into PRCS must receive training on
confined space entry procedures, the permit system, and hazard recognition and control
procedures. Authorized entrants, attendants, and supervisors in charge of entry are to receive
training in their respective confined space duties and responsibilities. Training is to be provided:
before employees are first assigned duties pertaining to PRCSs; whenever there is a change in
assigned duties; whenever there is a change in PRCS operations that present a hazard about
which an employee has not been trained; and whenever there are deviations from the entry
permit procedures or inadequacies in the employees' use or knowledge of these procedures.
3.13.13 Entry Into Non-Permit Confined Spaces
Precautions must be taken for entry into non-permit required spaces. The space atmosphere
must be tested for oxygen concentration, combustible gas or vapor, and potential toxic
contaminants. Any hazardous conditions detected must be reported to the supervisor and BODEnvironmental and Safety Office. Manholes and confined spaces with limited ventilation must be
power ventilated with a blower (minimum capacity 750 cfm) operating at its maximum rated speed
for a minimum of 5 minutes. Larger confined spaces (greater than 1000 cubic feet) must be
ventilated for at least 10 minutes. The blower must be in continuous operation while anyone is in
the confined space.
3.13.14 Confined Space and PRCS Recognition Checklist
3.13.14.1 PART I

Is the space large enough so an employee can bodily enter and perform work?

Does the space have limited or restricted means of entry and exit?

Is the space not designed for continuous occupancy?
If the answer is yes to all items in Part I, continue to Part II. If the answer is no to any of the
items in Part I, the space is not considered a confined space.
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3.13.14.2 PART II

Does the space contain or potentially contain a hazardous atmosphere?

Does the space contain any chemicals or chemical residues?

Does the space contain any flammable/combustible substances?

Does the space contain or potentially contain any decomposing organic matter?

Does the space have any pipes which bring chemicals into it?

Does the space have any materials that can trap or potentially trap, engulf, or drown an
entrant?

Is vision obscured by dust at 5 feet or less?

Does the space contain any mechanical equipment servicing the space?

Does the space have converging walls, sloped floors or tapered floor to smaller crosssections which could trap or asphyxiate an entrant?

Does the tank or vessel contains rusted interior surfaces?

Does the space contains thermal hazards (e.g. cold, hot)?

Does the space contain excessive noise levels which could interfere with communication
with an attendant?

Does the space presents any slip, trip, or fall hazards?

Are there any operations conducted near the space opening which could present a hazard
to the entrant?

Are there any hazards from falling objects?

Are there lines under pressure servicing the space?

Are cleaning solvents or paints going to be used in the space?

Is welding, cutting, brazing, riveting, scraping, or sanding going to be performed in the
space?

Is electrical equipment located in or required to be used in the space?

Does the space have poor natural ventilation which would allow an atmospheric hazard to
develop?

Are there any corrosives which could irritate the eyes in the space?

Are there any conditions which could prevent any entrant’s self rescue from the space?

Are there any substances used in the space which have acute hazards?

Is mechanical ventilation needed to maintain a safe environment?

Is air monitoring necessary to ensure the space is safe for entry due to a potential
hazardous atmosphere?

Will the entry be made into a dike area where the dike is 5 feet or more in height?

Are residues going to be scraped off the interior surfaces of the vessel?

Are non-sparking tools required to remove residues?

Does the space restrict mobility to the extent that it could trap an irritant?

Is respiratory protection required because of a hazardous atmosphere?
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
Does the space present a hazard other than those noted above which would make it a
permit space?
If any other questions in PART II have been checked yes, the confined space is a PermitRequired Confined Space (PRCS). As such, entry into these spaces must be performed under
the protection of PRCS program.
3.14 Fire Safety
The following are some of the specific fire safety requirements and precautions to be observed in
the work area:

Building shall comply with the International Building Code of 2006 Section 414.

Building shall comply with the requirements of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 45
for construction, ventilation and fire protection, covering the building (s) units and work areas

Building shall comply with the requirement of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1,
Chapter 26 and 60.4.10.3 and 60.4.10.2.3

Smoking is one of the major causes of fires in the work area. At Qatar University, smoking is
prohibited in all work area where the employees and contractor/s performed their specific
activities.

Access key custody of offices, laboratories, stores, etc. should be assigned to the Security incharged at respective buildings. Users should maintain a duplicate key.

All fire exits must be clearly marked with exit signs. Fire exit signs should be visible at any
location in the office. All fire doors must be kept closed to prevent the spread of fire and smoke
during a fire. However, these doors MUST NOT be locked when people are working in the area.

Floor plans showing fire escape routes and fire assembly points, together with the fire
evacuation procedure should be posted at conspicuous locations in the office and classroom

Hose reels, sprinkler heads and fire extinguishers (if installed) must not be blocked or
obstructed. A minimum clearance of 450 mm should be maintained below sprinkler heads.

Use of Fire Extinguisher. There are four types of fires and using extinguisher improperly or
using the wrong extinguisher could result in additional property damage and injury.

Class A fires consist of combustibles, such as wood, paper or cloth. This type of fire can be
put out with water-filled extinguishers. When using these extinguishers, get as close to the
fire as possible without endangering yourself, and aim the nozzle toward the base of the
flames. Continue spraying until all smoldering material is wet down.
A multipurpose dry-chemical extinguisher can also be used on Class A fires. With this type
of extinguisher the flames are attacked at the edge of the fire with the nozzle directed at the
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fire in a sweeping motion. The powdered chemical becomes sticky when heated, allowing it
to form a film that clings to the heated material and smother the fire.
 Class B fires includes flammable liquids, such as oil, gasoline, solvents and paint. Dry
chemical extinguishers are usually used to fight this type of fire. When using this
extinguisher stand approximately 10 feet away from the fire to apply the powder. Then
gradually move in closer; applying the powder from side to side near the base of tie fire.
Carbon dioxide extinguishers are also effective on flammable liquid fires. Use this type of
extinguisher near the edge of the fire at close range in an enclosed area where no wind or
draft exists. Since fires can spread with the presence of oxygen, carbon dioxide is used to
decrease the amount of oxygen surrounding the fire until the air can no longer support the
combustion.

Class C fires are electrical fires. If at all possible, turn off the power in the area before
attempting to combat the fire. When electrical equipment is de-energized, extinguishers for
Class A or B fire may be safely used; otherwise, the best extinguishers are carbon dioxide
and dry chemical extinguishers.
Carbon dioxide in on conductive and noncorrosive, because dry chemical extinguisher
leave sticky film, cleaning is easy.
Foam or dry-chemical powder can be used to control fires due to liquid or gas leak, such as
methane, propane or butane.

Class D fires involve combustible metal, such magnesium, sodium and potassium.
The most reactive combustible metals are alkali metals. Water causes these metals to
release hydrogen and a large amount of heat, causing the hydrogen to ignite and explode.
Even the moisture on your hand may cause the metal to react. Special dry-compound
powders, such as powdered graphite and sodium chloride, powdered talc, soda ash and
limestone, are made to extinguish these fires. In cases of emergency dry sand can be used.

Extinguishers should be placed in locations where they are easily seen and aren't apt to be
damaged. They should be hung at an appropriate height above the floor within easy reach.
These extinguishers come in sizes that allow for easy handling, and there should be an
adequate number of them in the area they protect. Contact Business Operations
Department – Environmental and Safety Office, 4403 3581, for any information on the
proper use of fire extinguisher.
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
Business Operations Department – Environmental and Safety Office shall ensure that
periodic fire safety building inspections (e.g. fire extinguishers, fire hose reel, fire alarm
system, fire blanket) is conducted.

Provision for additional and replacement of fire extinguishers and fire blankets shall be the
responsibility of each Department/ College.

Refilling of fire extinguisher shall be the responsibility of Business Operations Department.
3.15 Emergency Preparedness and Response
The following procedures in case emergency shall be cascaded to all employees, faculties, students
and visitors.
3.15.1 Fire Evacuation
Be Prepared. Know your evacuation route and alternate route. Remain calm.
3.15.1.1 If you discover fire

Manually activate the fire alarm system

Determine if it is safe for you to attempt to extinguish the fire (see fire extinguisher
instructions).

Immediately exit the building, using the stairs and closing doors behind you. Do not use lifts.

Call 4403 – 3999 to provide more details about the fire.
3.15.1.2 Using Fire Extinguisher
If you have been trained and it is safe to do so, you may fight small, contained fires with a fire
extinguisher.
Fire Extinguisher Instructions:

Pull the safety pin from handle.

Aim at base of fire.

Squeeze the trigger handle.

Sweep from side to side at base of fire.
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3.15.1.3 Once alarm is activated

Walk to the nearest exit closing doors between you and the fire.

Assist people who have special needs. Contact the Business Operations Department Fire
Section for assistance: 4403 -3999.

Notify fire personnel if you suspect someone is trapped inside the building.

Gather at designated building assembly area. Do not attempt to reenter the building until
instructed to do so by Civil Defense, QU fire section personnel, or your building coordinator.
3.15.1.3 If trapped in a room

Wet and place cloth material around or under the door to prevent smoke from entering the
room.

Close as many doors as possible between you and the fire.

Be prepared to signal to someone outside.
3.15.1.3 If caught in smoke

Drop to hands and knees and crawl toward exit.

Stay low, as smoke will rise to ceiling level.

Hold your breath as much as possible.

Breath shallowly through nose, and use a filter such as shirt or towel.
3.15.1.3 If forced to advanced through flames

Hold your breath.

Move quickly.

Cover your head and hair.

Keep your head down and your eyes closed as much as possible.
3.15.1.3 Individual requiring assistance

Individual requiring assistance should proceed to the nearest stairway and requested
assistance from other evacuees.

Do not obstruct the stairway or door leading to the stairway.

If the location becomes unsafe, move to a different exit stairway and call for help until
rescued.
3.15.2 Medical Emergencies
Serious and Minor Medical Emergencies

Ensure your own safety and that of the injured person.

Call 4403 – 3294/ 4403 – 5050 (Medical Clinic) during week days.

Call 5556 – 8713/ 4403 – 3566 (Campus Security) after office hours during week days and
during weekends.

Advise the Emergency Responder of the nature of the injury or illness and location (building,
floor, room number).
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
Do not move injured person unless there is a high risk of further injury or death.

Keep calm and do not leave person unattended.
3.15.3 Utility Failure
3.15.3.1 Electrical/Light Failure

Remain calm. University buildings are equipped with emergency lightings. However, it is
recommended to consider keeping a flashlight in laboratory in case of electrical/ light failure
for safe exiting.

Call Business Operations Department CSU Control Room at telephone no. 4403 3600.

Provide the following information to CSU Control Operator

Your name

Location of building where the water leak.

Contact number
3.15.3.2 Plumbing Failure/ Water Leak

Cease all electrical equipment.

Call Business Operations Department CSU Control Room at telephone no. 4403 3600

Provide the following information to CSU Control Operator

Your name

Location of building where the water leak.

Contact number
3.15.3.3 Gas Leak

Do not panic

Cease all operations.

Exit the area immediately.

Do not attempt to correct the problem yourself.

Call Business Operations Department CSU Control Room at telephone no. 4403 3600.

Provide the following information to CSU Control Operator

Your name

Location of building where the gas leak.

Contact number
3.15.4 Person Trapped in a Lift
Any person trapped in a lift should take the following course of action:

Remain calm, do not panic.

Push the lift alarm and/or call BOD CSU Control Room at 4403 – 3600 / 6630 – 3663 and ask
for help.

Provide the following information to the Control Room Operator:
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 Your name
 Your exact location, name of building
 Your contact number

Do not touch anything on the controller.

Wait for the arrival of QU Response Team.

QU Response Team will conduct rescue operation.
If you hear someone who is trapped in a lift, call BOD CSU Control Room at 4403 – 3600/ 6630 –
3662 and follow the above procedure.
3.16
Incident and Accident
An Incident is a near miss, or, more nearly correct, a near hit. It has been described as a “lucky
accident”.
An Accident is, by definition, “an unplanned, unwanted event that disrupts the orderly flow of the
work process. It involves the motion (energy) of people, objects, or substances. It is indicated by
physical injury and/or property damage.
3.16.1 Incident Reporting
All incident related to the operation and maintenance of University shall be recorded, investigated
and reported. An incident does not result in injury or property damaged. A hazard and exposure
to the hazard must be present before an accident can occur.
Remove the hazard and you
remove the exposure and the accident
3.16.2 Accident Reporting
All accident involving fire, chemical spills, chemical exposure and any property damaged or
injuries related to the operations and maintenance of University must be recorded, investigated
and reported. This is to determine and document properly the cause of an incident or accident
occurrence and to recommend and implement corrective and preventive actions.
Incident / Accident Report form is included in appendix 8 for proper reporting.
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4.0 IMPLEMENTATION
4.1 Roles and Responsibility
The Business Operations Department and the Contractor for the operations and maintenance of
Qatar University are the primary organization responsible to implement and maintain sound safety
practices and that assure safety compliance in the operation and maintenance of Qatar University.
4.1.1 Business Operations Department Head
Department Head have the primary responsibility of directing and managing the Operations and
Maintenance Workers Safety and therefore have responsibility for assuring sound safety practices
and compliance at Qatar University.
4.1.2 Operations and Maintenance Contractor Head
The Head of the Operations and Maintenance contractor is
responsible for compliance with
safety regulations and good practices for the operations and maintenance at Qatar University.
4.1.3 Employees and Contractors
Employees and contractors
are responsible for compliance with safety regulations and
requirements in their work areas. They have the responsibility to complete required training prior
to commencing their regulated or hazardous work and duties and perform inspections in their or
work areas.
4.1.4 Business Operations Department – Environmental and Safety Office
Business Operation Department (BOD) Environmental and Safety Office is responsible for
Operations and Maintenance Orientation/ Training at the beginning of each semester or as need
arises to Business Operations Department employees. BOD – Environmental and Safety Office is
also responsible for periodic workplace safety inspection. Refer to Appendix 9 for Safety
Inspection Checklist.
4.2 Disciplinary Action for Noncompliance to Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
A consequence for noncompliance to Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety is promulgated
to uphold the University’s values on excellence in everything we do, honesty, integrity, and respect
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for every individual. It also enables those comprising the University to work together as a cohesive
and competent team deeply committed to duty and responsibility.
A disciplinary action shall be given for those who fail to implement and comply with Operations and
Maintenance Workers Safety. The objective of disciplinary action is to change the erroneous
performance, to deter others from similar actions and to maintain consistent, effective group
standard. It should be clear that it is a particular performance that is being criticized and penalized;
it is not personal attack on the individual.
The imposition of disciplinary action will depend on the gravity of the infraction. The penalties may
be waived in favor of more severe penalty.
Appropriate administrators shall take disciplinary action to Operations and Maintenance employee
and contractor who violate Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety guidelines. Disciplinary
actions shall follow those procedures set forth by Human Resources and Administration of the
University.
The recommended schedule of disciplinary action for noncompliance to Operations and
Maintenance Workers Safety is attached in Appendix 10.
4.3 Review and Improvement
On a selective basis, compliance reviews will be conducted by teams that include people with
related expertise to determine compliance with this policy. In order to ensure the credibility and
effectiveness of the review, the team members must be detached from the operation being
reviewed. Conducted every two years or as needed, management reviews provide input to the
organization improvement processes.
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Once per year
Rarely
Below 5
Frequency (F)
(how often or how frequent)
Exposure (E)
(how often or how long is the
exposure)
Number of person exposed
(N)
14 - 19
Extreme Risk
High Risk
10 - 13
Above 20
Low Risk
Medium Risk
Below 10
RISK LEVEL
21 to 50
Regular
Once per week
5
Work should not be started until the impacts/ risk has been reduced. If it is not possible to reduce the impacts/risk even w ith limited
resources, w ork has to remain prohibited. Record the hazard and risk. Document corrective action taken.
Considerable resources may have to be allocated to reduce the impacts/risk. Where impacts/risk involves w ork in progress,
im m ediate management action must be taken. Record the hazard and risk. Document corrective actions taken.
>50
Full Time
Once per day or more
Death and multiple
injuries/ irreversible
damage
Will happen (known to
common or repeating
occurrence)
Monitoring required to ensure existing controls are maintained. Implement additional mitigating measures, if necessary.
ACTION AND TIME SCALE
10 to 20
Occasionally
Once per month
Extensive number of
injuries/ reversible
damage
Injuries requiring
medical treatment/
multiple damage
4
Very probable (Has
happened in the past)
3
Possible (C ould occur,
heard of happening)
Continuous implementation of mitigating measures
NOTES:
Hazard with medium, high and extreme risks are considered significant.
5 to 9
Not often
Once in six months
Minor injuries requiring
first aid/ minor damage
Minor injuries/ very
minor damage
SEVERITY OF RISK (S)
(potential damage or injury)
2
Possible but unlikely
1
Practically impossible
POINTS
PROBABILITY OF
OCCURRENCE (P) (likelihood of
occurrence/ recurrence)
FACTORS
HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK
HAZARD ASSESSMENT MATRIX
QATAR UNIVERSITY
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APPENDIX 1
Hazard Assessment Matrix
79
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APPENDIX 2
Risk Assessment Form
STATE OF QATAR
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Business Operations Department
RISK ASSESSMENT FORM
Room/ Area
Reference No.:
Department:
ACTIVITY
A. HAZARDS
B. WHO IS AT RISK
C. ACTUAL AND
POTENTIAL RISK
C. EXISTING CONTROL MEASURES
RISK RATING
Probability of Occurrence Score (P)
Severity of Risk (S)
Freqency (F)
Exposure (E)
Number of Person Exposed (N)
Risk Rating (P+S+F+E+N)
Risk Level
D. PROPOSED MITIGATING MEASURES
E. Assessed by:
F. Reviewed by:
Supervisor
Date
Safety Officer
Date
Section Head
Date
F. Approved by:
Department Head
Date:
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Revision No.:
Risk Assessment No. Assessor
Area:
Date:
Date Assessed
Review Date
Changes Yes/ No
Review Date
Department:
Changes Yes/ No
Review Date
Reference No.:
RISK ASSESSMENT SUMMARY AND REVIEW DATES
QATAR UNIVERSITY
STATE OF QATAR
Changes Yes/ No
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 3
RISK ASSESSMENT SUMMARY AND REVIEW DATES
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APPENDIX 4
WORK EQUIPMENT ASSESSMENT
Reference No. ____________
Equipment Description
Assessment No.: ______________
Assessor: _______________
Assessment Date: _____________
Signature: ______________
Suitability
YES
NO
Is Action
Required
YES
NO
Action Taken
Is the equipment suitable for:
The purpose for which it is
intended?
The location in which it is being
used?
Does the equipment itself pose
any significant risks (fumes etc)?
Maintenance / Use
For maintenance purposes does
the equipment require:
A simple visual inspection?
Portable electrical appliance
test?
Statutory inspection?
Planned preventive
maintenance?
Maintenance log?
Are there any specific risk that
require the equipment to be:
Used by authorized person
only?
Maintained by authorized
person only?
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APPENDIX 4
WORK EQUIPMENT ASSESSMENT
Information, Instruction,
Training & Supervision
YES
NO
Is Action
Required
YES
NO
Action Taken
Have all the users been given use
instruction?
Verbal
Written
Is documentary evidence for the
above available?
Have all the users been given
Health and Safety information?
Verbal
Written
Is documentary evidence for the
above available?
Dangerous Parts
Does the equipment present any
specific hazards?
If "yes" have adequate control
measures been implemented?
Does the equipment have any
guards fitted?
If "yes" are they inspected in a
regular basis?
Does the equipment present any
risk from high or low
temperature?
If "yes" have adequate control
measures been taken?
Does the equipment require
Personal Protective Equipment?
If "yes" have the adequate
control measures been under
taken?
Is the documentary evidence for
the above available?
Control Systems and Stop
Measures
Does the equipment have any
control systems (start/stop
buttons etc.)?
If "yes" are they suitably
marked?
Does the equipment have an
emergency stop?
If "yes" is it suitably marked?
Can the equipment be isolated
from an energy source?
If "yes" is the method of
isolation accessible?
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APPENDIX 4
WORK EQUIPMENT ASSESSMENT
General
Is the item of equipment stable?
YES
NO
Is Action
Required
YES
NO
Action Taken
Is the lighting for the equipment
adequate?
Can the maintenance on the
equipment be carried out without
risk to health?
Does the equipment require any
specific warning signs other than
those previously covered under
the control section?
Have all relevant Supervisor’s
been given use instructions?
Verbal
Written
Is the documentary evidence for
the above available?
Have all relevant Supervisor’s
been given suitable and sufficient
training?
Verbal
Written
Is the documentary evidence for
the above available?
Defect Reporting
Is there a written defect reporting
system?
If "yes" are defects signed off
when complete?
Is there a system for taking
defected equipment out of service
if the defect poses a risk to
safety?
Are equipment users aware of
defect reporting system?
Is the documentary evidence for
the above available?
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APPENDIX 5
Lock Out/ Tag Out Permit
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APPENDIX 6
Hot Work Permit
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APPENDIX 7
Confined Space Entry Permit
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PERMIT
Date & Time Issued
Job Supervisor
Equipment to be worked on
Work to be performed
Entrants
Date & Time Expires
Stand-by personnel
1. Atmospheric Checks
Time
Oxygen, %
Explosive, % LFL
Toxic, ppm
:
:
:
:
Tester Siganature
2. Source isolation (NO ENTRY)
YES
NO
NA
YES
NO
NA
Training completed?
YES
NO
Training current?
YES
NO
Pumps or lines blinded,
disconnected or blocked
3. Ventillation Modification
4. Atmospheric check after isolation
and ventilation
Time
:
Oxygen, %, > 19.5 %
:
Explosive, % LFL < 10 %
:
Toxic, PPM, < 10 PPM H2 :
Tester Signature
5. Communication procedures
6. Rescue procedures
7. Entry, Stand-by, Back-up persons
8. Equipment
8.1 Direct reading gas monitor tested?
8.2 Safety harness/ lifelines for entrants/ stand-by crew?
8.3 Hoist
8.4 Powered communications?
8.5 SCBA's for entrants and stand-by crew?
8.6 Protective clothing?
8.7 All electric equipment listed Class I, Div I, Group D and non-spark producing?
10. Periodic atmospheric tests
Time:
Time:
Time:
Time:
Time:
Time:
Time:
Time:
O2,
O2,
O2,
O2,
O2,
O2,
O2,
O2,
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
Explosive,
Explosive,
Explosive,
Explosive,
Explosive,
Explosive,
Explosive,
Explosive,
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
Toxic,
Toxic,
Toxic,
Toxic,
Toxic,
Toxic,
Toxic,
Toxic,
YES
NO
NA
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
We have reviewed the work authorized by this permit and the information contained herein. Written instructions and
safety procedures have been received and are understood. Entry cannot be approved if any column is marked “no”.
This permit is not valid unless all appropriate items are completed.
Permit prepared by: (Supervisor)
Reviewed by:
Approved by:
Printed Name
Signature
Printed Name
Signature
Printed Name
Signature
(Safety Officer)
(BOD-Safety Unit Head)
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APPENDIX 8
Incident / Accident Report Form
STATE OF QATAR
QATAR UNIVERSITY
INCIDENT / ACCIDENT REPORT FORM
Section C: General Information
Supervisor’s Last Name
Supervisor’s First Name
Department
Position
Telephone No.
Email
If there was a delay in reporting this event, list reason (s)
Material Damage
YES
Approximate Value:
NO
Section D: Preventive Measure
Cause of event – Root Causes ( e.g. unsafe equipment, lack of training, etc)
What corrective actions are being taken to prevent recurrence?
Frequency of the task or activity that led to the event:
Often (daily or weekly)
Occasionally (monthly)
rare (1-4 times per year)
Has a risk assessment been carried out for the process/ activity
Have person (s) involved receive training or instruction in the
work or activity being carried out?
Was there any supervisor of the work being carried out?
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO
Supervisor’s Comment (Additional information on event)
If injury occurred, please check one
No First Aid administered, returned to work
Saw a physician, reurned to light duty
First Aid administered, returned to work
Saw a physicam, time loss
Saw a physician, returm to work
Safety Committee Use only
Reviewed by:
Distribution
Department
HR
Refused medical treatment
Date
Operations and Maintenance Contractor Head
Follow up
Supervisor
Department Head
Others ______________
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APPENDIX 9
Safety Inspection Checklist
Item #
1
Particular
Hazard
Management

Is the hazard identified in the
workplace?

Is Risk Assessment conducted
after hazard identification?

2
3
4
Personal
Protective
Equipment
Electrical Safety
Insulation
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
Compliance
Yes
No
N/A
Checklist
Control measure implemented?

Are the workers use PPE’s as
needed?

Are PPEs comply with international
standard?

Are the PPE’s
damaged?

Are equipment and electronic
systems conforms to the National
Electric
Code,
National
Fire
Protection Association Code or
state electrical code?

Are wiring of equipment damaged
or frayed?

Are personnel knew the location
and how to operate shut-off
switches and/or circuit breaker
panels?

Is extension cords use only for
temporary operations or for short
periods of time?

Are multi-plug adapters
circuit breakers or fuses?

Are exposed electrical conductors
place behind shields?

Is there a chemical spills on or
near electrical equipment?

Are
electrical
cords
sufficient insulation?

Is the damaged cords repaired or
taken out of service?
replace
upon
having
having
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APPENDIX 9
Safety Inspection Checklist
Item #
Particular
5
Guarding
6
Grounding
7
Circuit
Protection
Devices
Motors
8
Checklist
Compliance
Yes
No
N/A
 Electric equipment operating at
50 volts or more guarded
against accidental contact?
 Is the equipment with threeprong
plugs
use
in
the
laboratory having grounding?
 Is circuit protection devices are
automatically limits or shut off?
 Are
motor-driven
electrical
equipments equipped with nonsparking induction motors or
air motors?
 Are motors the meet National
Electric Safety Code Class 1,
Division 2, Group C-D explosion
resistance specifications?
 Is
the
power
source
disconnected before servicing
or
repairing
electrical
equipment?
 Is nonconductive gloves and
shoes with insulated soles wear
and hands are dry when
handling equipment that is plug
in?
 Is work handle properly from
all conductive material?
 Is
the
use
of
electrical
equipment in cold rooms or
other
areas
where
condensation is likely to occur
is minimized?
 Is the equipment use in the
cold room was mounting on a
wall or vertical panel.
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APPENDIX 9
Safety Inspection Checklist
Item #
Particular
9
Motors
Checklist
Compliance
No
Yes
N/A
 Is the power shut off at the
main switch or circuit breaker
and the equipment is unplug if
water or a chemical is spilled
onto equipment?
 Is the power switch off when
not in use?
 Are there known hazards post
such as “high voltage”, “high
temperature”, “possible shock”,
“wear protective equipment”,
etc.?
 Is the repairs of high voltage or
high
current
equipment,
performed only by trained
electricians
10
Altering
Building Wiring
and Utilities
 Are
the
modifications
to
existing electrical service in a
laboratory or building approved
by
Business
Operation
Department?
11
Lock Out Tag
Out
 Is the lock out/ tag out system
implemented?
 Are the personnel using the
lock out/ tag out have proper
training?
 Is the re-training conducted?
How often?
 Are the lock out / tag out
devices properly used?
12
Hot Work
Permit
 Is the hot work permit system
being implemented?
 Is the authorized person have
sufficient technical knowledge,
training
and
practical
experience in the hot work
process?
 Is the employee performing the
hot
work
have
proper
orientation/ training?
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
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QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 9
Safety Inspection Checklist
Item #
12
Particular
Hot Work
Permit
Checklist
Compliance
Yes
No
N/A
 Is there person designated as
fire watch properly trained on
what to do in case of
emergency?
 Is
the
hot
work
permit
completed prior to initiating the
hot work job?
 Is
the
hot
work
permit
approved by the authorized
persons?
 Is
there
available
fire
suppression during hot work?
12
Safe Lifting and
Back Safety
 Are the workers follow the
proper safe lifting methods to
prevent injury during lifting of
materials?
13
Use of
Scaffolding
 Is the guidelines for the proper
use
of
scaffolding
implemented?
14
Use of
Stairways and
Ladders
15
Walking and
Working
Surfaces, Floor
Openings
16
Use of Hand
and Power
Tools
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
 Are the scaffolds remove from
service
or
replace
when
damaged?
 Is the guidelines for the proper
use of stairways and ladders
implemented?
 Are the ladders remove from
service
or
replace
when
damaged?
 Is the guidelines for walkingworking and floor openings
implemented?
 Is the guidelines for the use of
hand
and
power
tools
implemented?
92
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 9
Safety Inspection Checklist
Item #
17
Particular
Compliance
Yes
No
N/A
Checklist
18
Welding and
Cutting
Materials
Heat Stress
 Is the guidelines for welding
and
cutting
materials
implemented?
 Are the preventive control to
minimized exposure to heat
used?
 Are heat alert being issued to
employees during conditions
that contribute to heat stress?
19
Confined Space
 Is the guidelines during work in
a confined space implemented?
 Are the authorized personnel to
perform work in a confined
space have proper orientation/
training?
 Are safety signs for confined
space work available?
20
Fire Safety
Fire Safety Management
 Have the means to control the
risk and protection of people in
the event of the fire have been
carried out?
 Have staffs been suitably
trained for these measures?
 Is there suitable monitoring of
fire safety measures in place?
 Can it be demonstrated that
monitoring is regularly carried
out?
Fire Prevention - General
 Are smoking areas
marked and used?
properly
Fire Prevention – General
 Are all employees in high risk
properly
informed
of
the
particular risks and the means
to control these risks?
 Prior to leaving the premises,
are all areas inspected for
potential fire and unnecessary
equipment turned off?
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
93
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 9
Safety Inspection Checklist
Item #
20
Particular
Fire Safety
Checklist
Compliance
Yes
No
N/A
 Have all staffs received basic
fire prevention instruction?
 Do staffs understand the role of
self-closing and other fireresisting doors – the need to
keep them closed and free of
obstruction to ensure that they
will control the spread of fire
and smoke?
Fire Prevention – Electrical Safety
 Are staffs aware that only
trained personnel authorized by
management can repairs or
alterations to electrical systems
and equipment?
Fire Prevention – Heating Appliances
 Are appropriately qualified and
registered contractors used to
carry out all installation and
maintenance
of
liquid
or
gaseous gel supply equipment?
 Are staffs aware that only
trained personnel authorized by
management can make repairs
or alterations to liquid or
gaseous fuel-fired equipment
and fuel supply systems?
Fire Prevention - Buildings
 Are all fire and smoke barriers
in good condition with any
openings for pipe ducts, etc.
properly protected by provision
of fire-resisting materials or fire
dampers?
Fire Prevention – Buildings
 Are
fire
dampers
tested
regularly for correct operations
and results recorded?
 Are there proper systems and
procedures in place to control
work on alterations, repairs and
decoration of premises, such
that no fire hazards are
introduced?
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
94
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 9
Safety Inspection Checklist
Item #
20
Particular
Fire Safety
Checklist
Compliance
Yes
No
N/A
 Are regular checks undertaken
and recorded off the condition
of all fire safety measures
within the premises?
Fire Prevention – Means of Escape
 Are fire exits of a sufficient
number and of sufficient width
to enable the people present in
any and all areas to evacuate
safely?
 Do all final exits lead to a place
of total safety?
 Are all fire exits readily
available?
 Are
all
final
exits
and
intermediate
doors
easily
operable
from
the
inside
without the use of a key?
 Are all corridors, gangways and
stairways forming part of
escape
routes
free
from
obstruction and not used for
storage?
 Are
floor
and
stairways
surfaces in good condition and
free from tripping and slipping
hazards particularly including
any external stairs and paths?
 Are fire-resisting and smokestop doors in good condition,
with fully operating self-closing
devices and the doors closing
fully onto rebates?
Fire Prevention – Means of Escape
 Do all doors on escape routes
open in the direction of travel?
 Are all escape routes clearly
and properly signed throughout
their lengths, with internal
doors not forming part of a
route clearly labeled as such?
 Are all escape routes provided
with adequate lightings at all
times of the day and night?
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
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QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 9
Safety Inspection Checklist
Item #
20
Particular
Fire Safety
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
Checklist
Compliance
Yes
No
N/A
 Is adequate emergency lighting
provided
and
is
it
fully
serviceable?
 Have appropriate provisions
been made for the safety of
persons with special needs,
such as young, old and
disabled?
Fire Prevention – Action in the Event
of Fire
 Are
there
clearly
defined
written
fire
action
and
emergency
evacuation
procedures, including provision
for ensuring that everyone is
out of the building?
 Are all employees fully aware
of these procedures and their
own particular duties and
responsibilities in the event of
an evacuation?
 Are
suitable
“Fire
Action”
notices prominently displayed
around the premises?
 Have appropriate staffs been
appointed to take control in the
event of fire (Fire Marshal) and
to summon the fire brigade for
all fires, no matter how small?
 Are
there
sufficient
fire
responders
available
to
provide for all working hours
(including
lunch
and
tea
breaks), taking into account
holidays and sick live
 Have appropriate arrangements
been made for dealing with
those who are not normally on
the premises such as members
of the public, visitors and
contractors?
 Are
the
fire
evacuation
assembly
areas
in
safe
locations, clear of the building
and away from fire brigade
vehicle access and parking?
96
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 9
Safety Inspection Checklist
Item #
Particular
20
Fire Safety
21
Emergency
Preparedness
and Response
Checklist
Compliance
Yes
No
N/A
 Are
there
alternative
evacuation areas available in
the event that the nominated
ones are not available?
 Are
emergency
evacuation
routes and procedures checked
by carrying out drills at least
once per year?
 Do you know what to do in
case of fire?
 Do
you
have
emergency
telephone numbers posted?
 Do you know how to use the
Fire Extinguisher?
 Do you have push button fire
alarm?
 Do you know what to do incase there is an injured
persons in your area?
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
97
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 10
Schedule of Disciplinary Actions
The disciplinary action for noncompliance to Operation and Maintenance Workers
Safety is categorized as follows:
1. Very Minor Injury/ Illness/ Damage to Property - Unsafe act or condition
that has a very little effect on employee safety, health or property; a first
aid only incident with less that 30 minutes off work.
2. Minor Injury/ Illness/ Damage to Property - Unsafe act or condition that
may result in either the employee being unable to undertake normal
duties for 5 days, no significant property damage.
3. Major Injury/Illness/ Damage to Property – Unsafe act or condition that
may cause severe injury, permanent partial loss of one or more bodily
functions, severe illness or with property damage. Requires 2 weeks - 4
months off work.
CODE
A
B
C
D
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
DISCIPLINARY ACTION
 Counseling with documentation to the employee
or contractor, plus a notation or copy of the
document to employee or contractor personal
file.
 Copy shall be given to Department Head or
Operations and Maintenance Contractor Head/
Representative.
 Written warning to the employee or contractor,
plus a notation or copy of the warning filed in
the employee or contractor personnel file.
 Copy shall be given to Department Head or
Operations and Maintenance Contractor Head/
Representative.
 Time Off Without Pay shall be recommended to
the employee or contractor for repeated and/or
more serious violation but not serious enough
for termination. The number of days is indicated
after the code
 Copy of the document recommending for Time
Off Without Pay shall be given to Department
Head or Operations and Maintenance Contractor
Head/ Representative.
 Termination from service shall be recommended
to the employee or contractor for very serious
violation
and
/or
totally
unsatisfactory
performance.
 Copy of the document recommending for
Discharge shall be given to Department Head or
Operations and Maintenance Contractor Head/
Representative.
98
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 10
Schedule of Disciplinary Actions
1.0 Very Minor Injury/ Illness/ Damage to Property
Violation/ Infraction
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
Failure to safe keep personal
protective equipment
Failure to comply with the
proper posting of safety
signs
Failure
to
seriously
participate during emergency
preparedness and response
drill
Failure to implement good
housekeeping
in
the
workplace.
st
1
Offense
Disciplinary Action
2nd
3rd
Offense Offense
4th
Offense
A
B
C1
C2
A
B
C1
C2
A
B
C1
C2
A
B
C1
C2
2.0 Minor Injury/ Illness/ Damage to University Property
Violation/ Infraction
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
Failure to comply Electrical
Safety with no significant
damage
to
University
property
Failure to comply with Lock
Out Tag Out System with no
significant
damage
to
University property
Failure to comply with Hot
Work
System
with
no
significant
damage
to
University property
Failure to comply with safe
lifting with no significant
damage
to
University
property.
Failure to comply with back
safety with minor injury.
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
1st
Offense
Disciplinary Action
2nd
3rd
Offense Offense
4th
Offense
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
99
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 10
Schedule of Disciplinary Actions
2.0 Minor Injury/ Illness/ Damage to University Property
Violation/ Infraction
6.0
7.0
8.0
9.0
10.0
11.0
12.0
13.0
14.0
15.0
5.0
Failure to comply with the
proper use of scaffolding
with no significant damage
to University property.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of stairways and
ladders with no significant
damage
to
University
property.
Failure to comply with safe
walking-working surfaces.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of hand and
power
tools
with
no
significant
damage
to
University property.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of welding and
cutting with no significant
damage
to
University
property.
Failure to comply with heat
stress guidelines.
Failure to comply with
confined space guidelines
with no significant damage
to University property.
Failure to comply with the
“No Smoking” policy.
Failure to use personal
protective equipment during
work.
Failure to report accident/
incident.
Failure to comply wearing of
personal protective
equipment as required.
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
st
1
Offense
Disciplinary Action
2nd
3rd
Offense Offense
4th
Offense
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
B
C2
C4
C6
100
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 10
Schedule of Disciplinary Actions
3.0 Major Injury/Injury/ Damage to University Property
Violation/ Infraction
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
7.0
8.0
9.0
10.0
Failure to comply Electrical
Safety with minimal damage
to property.
Failure to comply with Lock
Out Tag Out System with
minimal
damage
to
University property
Failure to comply with Hot
Work System with minimal
damage
to
University
property
Failure to comply with safe
lifting with minimal damage
to University property.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of scaffolding
with minimal damage.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of stairways and
ladders
with
minimal
damage
to
University
property.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of hand and
power tools with minimal
damage
to
University
property.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of welding and
cutting with minor damage
to University property.
Failure to comply with
confined space guidelines
with minimal damage to
University property.
Failure to comply Electrical
Safety with major damage
to property
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
1st
Offense
Disciplinary Action
2nd
3rd
Offense Offense
4th
Offense
C2
C4
C6
D
C2
C4
C6
D
C2
C4
C6
D
C2
C4
C6
D
C2
C4
C6
D
C2
C4
C6
D
C2
C4
C6
D
C2
C4
C6
D
C2
C4
C6
D
D
101
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 10
Schedule of Disciplinary Actions
3.0 Major Injury/Injury/ Damage to University Property
Violation/ Infraction
11.0
12.0
13.0
14.0
15.0
16.0
17.0
18.0
19.0
Failure to comply with Lock
Out Tag Out System with
major damage to University
property
Failure to comply with Hot
Work System with major
damage
to
University
property
Failure to comply with safe
lifting with major damage to
University property.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of scaffolding
with major damage to
University property.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of hand and
power tools with major
damage
to
University
property.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of stairways and
ladders with major damage
to University property.
Failure to comply with back
safety with major injury.
Failure to comply with the
proper use of welding and
cutting with major damage
to University property.
Failure to comply with
confined space guidelines
with major injury.
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
1st
Offense
Disciplinary Action
2nd
3rd
Offense Offense
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
102
4th
Offense
QATAR UNIVERSITY
Operations and Maintenance Workers Safety
APPENDIX 11
Emergency Telephone Number
S N
STATION / OFFICE
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
1
Business Operations Dept. –CSU Control Room
4403 3600/ 6630 3662
2
Fire Section
4403 3999
3
Security
4403 3566/ 5556 -8713
4
Environmental and Safety Office
4403 3581
5
BOD Helpdesk
4403 3500
6
Medical Clinic
4403 3294 / 4403 5050
7
Qatar Emergency Line (Police, Fire, and Ambulance)
999
8
Hamad Hospital – Accident and Emergency
4439 2111/ 4439 4444
9
Ministry of Environment
4420 7777
QUBOD-SAFETY-004. Revision 2
103
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