Handbook UG September 16 draft

Handbook UG September 16 draft
PO Box 413
Milwaukee, WI 53201
phone 414-229-4947
fax 414-229-3335
www.arts.uwm.edu/dance
[email protected]
DEPARTMENT CONTACT INFORMATION
Faculty and Departmental Staff
Daniel Burkholder
Assistant Professor
Mitchell 345B
Ph: 414-229-2648
Email: [email protected]
Simone Ferro
Mitchell 345D
Ph: 414-229-4178
Department Mediator, MFA Program Director, Professor
Email: [email protected]
Maria Gillespie
Assistant Professor
Email: [email protected]
Zelazo 372
Ph: 414-229-5161
Dani Kuepper
Ph: 414-587-3062
Recruitment Coordinator, Senior Lecturer
Email: [email protected]
Marcia Parsons
Professor
Email: [email protected]
Mitchell 345A
Ph: 414-229-5050
Tim Russell
KSE 579
Music Director, Lecturer
Email: [email protected]
Dan Schuchart
Community & Outreach Liaison, Lecturer
Email: [email protected]
Darci Wutz
Chair, Professor
Mitchell 343B
Ph: 414-229-3058
Email: [email protected]
Jessica Berlin Krivsky Art 271
Production Manager
Ph: 414-229-5903
Email: [email protected]
Barb Garncarz
Programs Assistant
Art 259
Ph: 414-229-5216
Email: [email protected]
Kayla Premeau
Programs Manager
Art 265
Ph: 414-229-5217
Email: [email protected]
Performing Arts Staff
Page 2
MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR
Welcome to the world of UWM Dance!
Here you’ll find top-ranked professionals engaged in each student’s individual goals, needs and
aspirations. Our faculty commitment to each student’s uniqueness is displayed in the pluralistic
nature of our programs’ structures. Our BA in Dance, BFA in Contemporary Performance
& Choreography, and MFA in Dance degree programs are designed to prepare our students
for a multitude of careers in the field of dance. In addition, we offer two BFA in Inter-Arts
Tracks - Dual Discipline and Interdisciplinary Arts & Technology, and a Minor in
Somatics.
Training UWM dance artists is one of the most professionally skilled and diverse faculty in any
school that I have ever come across. Prepare to be impressed! In addition to the remarkable
faculty, the Terpsichorean People (our student organization, named after the Greek muse of
dance), promotes the activities of the Department and advocate for resources from student
government. Their activities enhance the student experience by providing support for
production activities, travel opportunities, and guest artist fees. In addition, student
representatives sit on the Black and Gold Committee, meeting regularly with the Dean and
faculty to determine the future of the Peck School of the Arts.
This year, the Department of Dance celebrates its 53nd year of existence and continues to
honor the work of our faculty, students, alumni and all who have helped to elevate this
Department to the level of excellence it sustains today. In December, our undergraduate
students will present their daring capstone works in New Dancemakers: Reshaping
Perceptions. In February, the Department will feature works by dance faculty and New Work
Award recipient Dan Schuchart in Winterdances 2017. In late April, we will produce
Springdances 2017, featuring works by the dance faculty and guest artists at Inova. In July
2017, our graduate program will feature theses and new works by nationally-recognized MFA
students in our Dancemakers 2017.
The 2016-2017 academic year brings us artists from across the United States. The Department
will continue to partner with the Oni Dance, Daniel Burkholder/The PlayGround,
Danceworks Performance Company, Milwaukee Ballet, and Wild Space Dance
Company, as well as our company-in-residence Ko-Thi Dance Company.
From coast to coast, the achievements of our alumni continue to leave lasting fingerprints of
the work we develop at UWM Dance. From Pilobolus in the east to Bobbevy in Portland,
Oregon, and teaching positions in many academic institutions across the United States, our
former students – now mature working professionals – are the best evidence of our
commitment to living an artistic life.
What will be your legacy? It starts here, it starts now – let’s begin!
Darci Wutz
Chair, UWM Department of Dance
Page 3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Department Mission ........................................................................................ 6
Advising, PAWS Information, Admissions ....................................................... 7
Undergraduate Program Information ............................................................. 8
Continuation Requirements ............................................................................ 8
BFA Degree Requirements .............................................................................. 10
BA Degree Requirements ................................................................................ 16
Somatics Minor Requirements ........................................................................ 22
Inter-Arts Dual Discipline Track Requirements ............................................... 23
MFA Degree Information and Requirements ................................................... 24
Dance Alumni and Student Organizations ....................................................... 24
Departmental Information and Policies .......................................................... 25
Health
Studio and Class Etiquette
Class Placement and Level Advancement and Independent Study
No Absence Policy
Course Requirements Policy ...................................................................... 26
Written Work
Dance Incomplete Policy
Evaluations and End-of-Term Conferences
Changing Degrees within Dance Program ................................................... 27
Mid-Program Portfolio Review
Scholarships
Studio Attire
Call Boards............................................................................................. 28
Residencies
Studio Space Guidelines
Rehearsal Reservations ............................................................................ 29
Hand Scan System
Performance Opportunities and Policies (including New Dancemakers)
Internships ............................................................................................ 30
Study Abroad ......................................................................................... 31
American College Dance Association
Community Participation
Laptop Guidelines
Video Portfolio Request Procedure ............................................................. 32
Academic Honesty Policy
Grievances: Department Mediator and Student Mediators ............................. 33
Grade Appeals
Page 4
University Policies: ......................................................................................... 34
Students with Disabilities
Religious Observances
Active Military Duty
Incompletes
Discriminatory Conduct
Academic Misconduct
Complaint Procedures
Grade Appeal Procedures
Final Examination Policy
FERPA
S.A.F.E Campaign
Health and Accident Insurance .................................................................. 35
Safety
Financial Obligations
More Campus Information
Accessibility Resource Center
Accounts Receivable/Bursar’s Office
UWM Virtual Bookstore
Career Planning and Resource Center
Children’s Center .................................................................................... 36
Computer and Copy Center Information and UWM Mobile app
Email/Internet/Software Access
UW-Credit Union
Cultures and Communities Certificate
On-Campus Entertainment/Enrichment
Office of Equity/Diversity Services
Golda Meir Library ................................................................................... 37
Health Insurance
Norris Student Health Center
UWM Housing Options (including Dance Foundations LLC)
ID Cards ................................................................................................ 38
Legal Services
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
Klotsche Center
Parking and Transit Office
Student Success Center
Dean of Students Office ........................................................................... 39
Center for Student Involvement
Women’s Resource Center
Department of Dance Partners........................................................................ 39
Dance Faculty, Staff, Lecturers, Accompanists ................................................ 41
Department of Dance Summary by Ed Burgess ............................................... 43
Page 5
UWM Department of Dance Mission Statement
The Department of Dance at UWM is committed to the development of skillful and vibrant
dance artists and educators in their pursuit of a comprehensive education built upon diverse
dance practices, research and community engagement. Our department supports a thriving
local and regional presence, while it opens avenues and opportunities for national and global
perspectives. We offer undergraduate and graduate programs that emphasize artistic
individuality and the development of professional skills required for successful careers in dance
performance, choreography and education. Our innovative curriculum integrates multiple
dance disciplines and somatic practices, creating a learning environment that prioritizes a
balance of body and mind knowledge with informed, creative expression.
We offer an eclectic yet dynamic and encompassing curriculum, with specialized degree
programs that include MFA in Dance, BFA in Dance (Contemporary Performance &
Choreography), BFA in Inter-Arts: Dual Discipline Track, BA in Dance, and a Somatics Minor.
Our training environment consists of full-time faculty, lecturers and guest artists who reflect
strong beliefs in multiple points of view, a passionate commitment to individual development
and dedication to serving the versatile interests of our students. Renowned guest artists
contribute to the dance department’s curriculum each semester by providing students direct
experience with current and diverse global practices in the field. These programs ensure that
we offer our students directed, relevant training as the foundation for successful and
sustainable careers in dance and related fields.
The creative research of both the faculty and students reflects our commitment to investigate
the historical and cultural relevance of contemporary and traditional world dance forms. These
pursuits ensure that we examine and support the vibrancy of cultural traditions while
generating new knowledge. Intertwining creativity, scholarship and interdisciplinary dialogue,
our program is dedicated to the exploration and development of somatic inquiry, technology
integration, critical thought and original choreography.
UWM Peck School of the Arts Mission Statement
The mission of the Peck School of the Arts is to provide the highest quality education and
professional training in the arts at the baccalaureate and master's degree levels. The school is
committed to recruiting faculty, staff, and students who reflect the richness and diversity of art
making in a variety of cultures. As the only school of the arts in Wisconsin in a major urban
environment, the Peck School of the Arts encourages collaboration with community arts
organizations and artists to provide professional experiences for its students.
Page 6
ADVISING
Please note: It is REQUIRED that you schedule appointments to see BOTH your Academic
Advisor and your assigned Dance Faculty Advisor.
PSOA ACADEMIC ADVISORS
The Peck School of the Arts (PSOA) Student Services Office will offer guidance and advice
on what classes to take outside of the Department of Dance to keep you on track for
graduation. Located in the Theatre Building, Room 120, you can make an appointment in
advance or stop in during walk-in advising hours. 414-229-4763
http://www4.uwm.edu/psoa/admissions/
Office Hours: M-F, 8am-12pm, 1-4:30pm
Walk-in Advising Hours: First week of the semester
Email Addresses:
Recruitment Coordinator: Lori Sieckert ([email protected])
Senior Academic Advisor: Louis Molina ([email protected]) 2nd degree & post-bac
Advisor: Shelly Bednar ([email protected]) H-N
Advisor: Sarah Glaser ([email protected]) O-Z
Advisor: Rebecca Reece ([email protected]) A-G
DANCE FACULTY ADVISORS
You must make an appointment to see your Dance Faculty Advisor each semester. An advising
list is posted at the beginning of each term. Each faculty member will have a minimum of one
office hour per week for students to just stop in. You are also free to contact faculty members
individually to set up a meeting time.
PAWS INFORMATION
PAWS is UWM’s online service. Log on with your ePantherID and password at
www.paws.uwm.edu to obtain information on registration, grades, course availability, financial
aid and other administrative functions.
ADMISSIONS
The Dance Program offers two undergraduate degree programs which lead to a bachelor's
degree in dance: the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance (Contemporary Performance &
Choreography), and the Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Dance. Also available is a Minor in Somatics.
Admission Requirements for the Dance BFA and BA and the Inter-Arts Dual Discipline
Please see arts.uwm.edu/admission for information on admission starting spring 2017.
UWM priority application deadline is March 1.
Transfer students must complete a minimum of half of the required dance credits while in
residence at UWM in order to graduate. The exact total is available upon admission to the
program. Transcript evaluation by a dance advisor is required before placement into dance
major courses.
Admission Requirements for the Somatics Minor
Students must meet general university admission requirements to be admitted to any of the
undergraduate curricula as a freshman or transfer student. Prior to completing 6-8 credits of
the Somatics Minor coursework, students must apply for and be accepted into the minor.
Application consists of: a) online application at arts.uwm.edu/dance click on Somatics Minor
and b) submission of unofficial UWM transcript via email to [email protected] No more
than 6-8 credits (2-3 courses) will be applied toward the minor until after a student has been
admitted and a Dance Faculty Advisor has been assigned.
Page 7
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM INFORMATION
The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance (Contemporary Performance &
Choreography) prepares students to perform and create original dance choreography for
theatrical productions. Dance BFA students complete a rigorous technical and creative
curriculum designed to develop the student's individual artistic voice. Contemporary Track
majors additionally study body/mind sciences, dance pedagogy, historical and cultural contexts
for dance and the interactive collaboration skills necessary to bring dance to the theatre with a
high degree of excellence.
The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Dance prepares students to teach participatory movement
traditions in community settings, and to lead community groups in creating and performing
their own dances and movement rituals. Community-based service-learning experiences
provide many opportunities to realize these goals. Many Dance BA students pursue a double
major at UWM; the service-learning component provides an opportunity to integrate the
content of the two areas of study.
The Minor in Somatics prepares students to undertake further study in an array of artistic,
teaching/learning, and health/wellness disciplines. Students will study a wide range of somatic
practices, including Laban Movement Analysis, Bartenieff Fundamentals, Alexander Technique,
Pilates Method, Ideokinesis, Body-Mind Centering, Authentic Movement, Iyengar Yoga and
Martial Arts.
The
BFA
in
Inter-Arts
is
designed
to
nurture
and
develop
a
mature
interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary artist, critic, or scholar. Each track leading to the Inter-Arts
BFA degree – Dual-Discipline and Interactive Arts and Technology – lays a strong
developmental foundation coupled with advanced project creation. In the Dual-Discipline Track
in Dance (alongside the Art&Design, Film, Music or Theatre department’s 36 credits), students
study multiple levels of dance technique and composition to prepare them for a variety of
projects after they graduate.
Students in both the BFA and BA dance degree programs must complete the following
Dance Foundations Curriculum in their freshman year:
Dance 110
Introduction to the Art of Dance
3
Dance 111
Ballet I
3
Dance 113
Modern Dance Technique I
3
Dance 135
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
3
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
1
Dance 233
Improvisation for Dancemaking
3
Total
16
Continuation Requirements (for BA, BFA, IADD majors)
Each undergraduate dance major's coursework will be reviewed at the end of his/her
sophomore year to determine continuance in the major, as part of the Mid-Program Portfolio
Review. Students must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in the dance major.
All students are expected to demonstrate a strong commitment to their health and overall
conditioning in order to fulfill the department's academic requirements. Each student's ability
to undertake the demands of the dance program, including his/her overall physical ability to
perform in classes, auditions, rehearsals, and/or performances, will be a factor in the
following: grading at the end of each semester; the audition/rehearsal/performance process
for departmental productions and outreach events; the Mid-Program Portfolio Review
assessment; determining "probation" status; and potentially removing a student from the
program.
Page 8
Dance BA and BFA students are required to have a laptop computer (or comparable tablet
meeting minimum specifications) by the beginning of their sophomore year, but are strongly
encouraged to have one when they enter the program. The hardware and software must meet
or exceed the current departmental requirements, as stated on the website
(arts.uwm.edu/laptop). Website also includes information on using financial aid to fund this
expense.
Continuation Requirements (Somatics Minor)
Students are required to submit a one-page paper each time they complete a class in the
Minor, reflecting on how the class fits within the broader context of somatic integration. The
paper should be submitted via email to the Director of the program at [email protected] If the paper is not emailed within a week of the end of the term, that course
may not count towards Minor requirements.
Students must maintain a 2.75 GPA overall to remain in the Somatics Minor.
All students are expected to demonstrate a strong commitment to their health and overall
conditioning in order to fulfill the department’s academic requirements for the Somatics Minor.
Page 9
BFA IN DANCE (CONTEMPORARY PERFORMANCE & CHOREOGRAPHY)
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS (for students entering fall 2015 or thereafter)
Completion of 130 credits. fulfilling the following curriculum requirements:
1. General University Core Curriculum, 42 cr., which includes the following:
o Courses that fulfill the university-wide Oral and Written Communication Competency
Part A (OWC-A) and Quantitative Literacy Competency Part A (QL-A) requirements.
These should be completed within the first 30 credits of the degree.
o Nine (9) credits from Peck School of the Arts non-Dance courses, chosen from three
of the five other departments in PSOA: Art & Design, Fine Arts, Music (required),
Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation and New Genres. Three of the nine credits must be
chosen from the following Music course list, or alternate approved by Dance Faculty
Advisor: Music 100 Intro to Classical Music, 101 Fundamentals of Music, 102 American
Popular Music, 130 Beginning Piano, 140 Class Voice, 150 Beginning Guitar, 309
American Folk and Popular Music, 310 Intro to World Musics (OWC-B), 317 Intro to
American Music, 356 Music in Society, 449 Women in Music, 450 Intro to Musicology,
489 Workshop w/ Sub-topics, 680 Special Studies in Music w/ Sub-topics
2. Required Dance Courses, 88 cr., which includes the following:
o Dance Foundations courses, 16 cr.
o Dance courses that fulfill the university-wide Oral and Written Communication
Competency Part B (OWC-B) and Quantitative Literacy Competency Part B (QL-B)
requirements.
Dance Technique Courses
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition - minimum of 6 semesters (16 credits).
Chosen from Dance 113, 114, 213, 214, 317, 318 – 2 or 3 credits each.
(100-200 level technique classes taken for 3 credits; 300 level for 2 credits)
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition - minimum of 6 semesters (16 credits).
Chosen from Dance 111, 112, 211, 212, 311, 312 – 2 or 3 credits each.
(100-200 level technique classes taken for 3 credits; 300 level for 2 credits)
Complementary Dance Technique – minimum of 2 semesters (4 credits).
Africa and the Diaspora Technique I (Dance 122), Jazz I (Dance 115) – 2 credits each.
One Jazz or African technique class is required during sophomore year. If GER-Cultural
Diversity credits are desired for Dance 122, 3-credit section is mandatory.
Option: Students wishing to substitute one or two semester(s) of either ballet or modern
(minimum 5 semesters of ballet and modern are required) for additional Complementary
Dance Technique course(s) in Jazz, Africa and Diaspora Technique, Tap, Dance for the Musical
Theatre: chosen from Dance 116, 117, 123, 217, 222, 327, 427. Student must approach
his/her dance advisor the semester prior to enrollment for substitution approval.
Somatic and Conditioning Practices - minimum of 3 semesters (6 credits).
Yoga, Pilates, Body Sense, Alexander Technique: Chosen from Dance 103, 220, 321, 323, 403,
421, 623 – 2 or 3 credits each.
Total Technique Credits: 42
Dance Creative Courses
Dance 135^
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 231^
Music and Dancers
Dance 233^
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Dance 352
Digital Media Portfolio for Performers
Dance 412^
Dance Composition I
Dance 413
Dance Composition II
Dance 414
Dance Composition III (Dance 415 may be substituted
only with prior dance faculty approval)
Dance 490*
Repertoire & Ensemble
Total Creative
Credits
Page 10
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
Dance Academic Courses
Dance 110^
Introduction to the Art of Dance
3
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
1
Dance 209^
Dance Production
2
Dance 250
Dance Sophomore Seminar
0
Dance 251
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
3
Dance 309^
Dance Production Practicum
1
Dance 314
Contemporary Dance History (OWC-B)
3
Dance 350
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
0
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy
3
Dance 460
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
3
Dance 601
Senior Project
3
Total Academic
22
Credits
*Any dancer cast in faculty or guest artist choreography must be enrolled in at least 3 UWM
Department of Dance technique classes per week during the rehearsal semester.
^ Coursework involved in MPPR guidelines
Recommended Course of Study (revised as of 3/23/16)
Freshman Year (Includes Foundations Curriculum)
Fall Semester
Dance 111
Ballet I
Dance 113
Modern Dance Technique I
Dance 135^
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
Dance 209^
Dance Production
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 110^
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Dance 112
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition II
Dance 114
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition II
Dance 233^
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Dance 309^
Dance Production Practicum
University Core
Total Freshman
Year
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Dance 103, 321, or
323
Dance 122 or 115^
Dance 213
Dance 250
Dance 412^
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 211
Dance 231^
Dance 371
Dance 490**
University Core
Total Sophomore
Year
Introduction to Iyengar Yoga, Alexander Technique, or
Body Conditioning: Pilates Method
African Dance & Diaspora Technique I (3 cr if GER-CD
is desired), or Jazz Dance I
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition III
Dance Sophomore Seminar
Dance Composition I
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition III
Music and Dancers
Applied Anatomy
Repertoire and Ensemble
3
3
3
1
2
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
31
2
2
3
0
3
6
3
3
3
1
6
32
Page 11
Junior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 214
Dance 251
Dance 314
Dance 350
Dance 413
Dance 490**
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 103, 321, or
323
Dance 212
Dance 352
Dance 414
University Core
Total Junior Year
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition IV
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Contemporary Dance History (OWC-B)
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Dance Composition II
Repertoire and Ensemble
3
3
3
0
3
1
3
Introduction to Yoga, Alexander Technique for the
Performer, or Body Conditioning: Pilates Method
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition IV
Digital Media Portfolio for Performers
Dance Composition III
2
3
3
3
6
33
Senior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 403, 421 or
Intermediate Yoga for Dancers, Alexander Technique
2
623
Practicum, or Body Conditioning: Pilates Method II
Dance 311
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition V
2
Dance 317
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition V
2
Dance 460
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
3
Dance 601
Senior Project
3
University Core
6
Spring Semester
Dance 115, 116,
Jazz Dance I or II, African Dance & Diaspora Technique 2
122, 123
I or II
Dance 312
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition VI
2
Dance 318
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition VI
2
Dance 490**
Repertoire and Ensemble
1
University Core
9
Total Senior Year
34
**Per departmental policy, any time a student is cast in a faculty or guest artist work and is
enrolled for under 18 credits, he/she must enroll in Dance 490 for 1 credit during the
appropriate semester.
TOTAL REQUIRED DANCE CREDITS: 88
BFA IN DANCE (CONTEMPORARY PERFORMANCE & CHOREOGRAPHY)
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS (for students admitted prior to fall 2015)
Completion of 130 credits, fulfilling the following curriculum requirements:
• General University Core Curriculum, 45 cr. (includes 3 credits in Music per fall 2015
curriculum)
• Required Dance Courses, 85 cr. (includes Dance Foundations credits)
Dance Technique Courses:
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition – minimum of 6 semesters
Chosen from Dance 113, 114, 213, 214, 317, 318 – 2 or 3 credits each
(100-200 level technique classes taken for 3 credits; 300 level for 2 credits)
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition – minimum of 6 semesters
Chosen from Dance 111, 112, 211, 212, 311, 312 – 2 or 3 credits each
(100-200 level technique classes taken for 3 credits; 300 level for 2 credits)
Page 12
16 credits
16 credits
Complementary Dance Technique (African, Jazz, Tap, Musical Thr)
4 credits
Chosen from Dance 115, 116, 117, 122, 123, 217, 327, 427 – 2 credits each
One Jazz or African technique class is required during sophomore year
Somatic and Conditioning Practices – minimum of 3 semesters
(Yoga, Pilates, Body Sense, Alexander Tech.)
Chosen from Dance 103, 220, 321, 323, 403, 421, 623 – 2 or 3 credits each
Total Technique Credits
Dance Creative Courses
Dance 135^
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 231^
Music and Dancers
Dance 233^
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Dance 352
Digital Media Portfolio for Dancers
Dance 412^
Dance Composition I
Dance 413
Dance Composition II
Dance 414
Dance Composition III or equivalent
Dance 490*
Repertoire & Ensemble
Total
Creative Credits
6 credits
42 credits
3
3
3
1 or 3
3
3
3
3
22
Dance Academic Courses
Dance 110^ Introduction to the Art of Dance
3
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
1
Dance 209^ Fundamentals of Dance Production
2
Dance 250
Dance Sophomore Seminar
0
Dance 251
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
3
Dance 309^ Dance Production Practicum
1
Dance 314
Contemporary Dance History (OWC-B) 3
Dance 350
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
0
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy
3
Dance 460
Teaching Dance in Community
3
Settings
Dance 601
Senior Project
3
Total
Academic Credits
21
*Any dancer cast in faculty or guest artist choreography must be enrolled in at least 3 UWM
Department of Dance technique classes per week during the rehearsal semester.
^ Coursework involved in MPPR guidelines
REVISED Course of Study (as of 3/23/16):
Freshman Year (includes Foundations Curriculum)
Fall Semester
Dance 111
Ballet I
Dance 113
Modern Dance Technique I
Dance 135^
Intro to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
Dance 209^
Dance Production
University Core
3
3
3
1
2
3
Spring Semester
Dance 110^
Dance 112
3
3
Dance 114
Dance 233^
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Contemporary Dance Practice:
Ballet Tradition II
Contemporary Dance Practice:
Modern Tradition II
Improvisation
Page 13
3
3
Dance 309^
University Core
Total
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Dance 103, 321,
323
Dance 122, 115^
Dance 213
Dance 250
Dance 412^
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 211
Dance 231^
Dance 371
Dance 490**
University Core
Total
Junior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 214
Dance 251
Dance 314
Dance 350
Dance 413
Dance 490
University Core
Dance Production Practicum
Freshman Year
1
3
31
Intro to Iyengar Yoga, Alexander Tech, or
Body Cond: Pilates
African Dance & Diaspora Tech I (3 cr if
GER-CD is desired), or Jazz I
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern
Tradition III (5 days/wk)
Dance Sophomore Seminar
Dance Composition I
2
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet
Tradition III (5 days/wk)
Music and Dancers
Applied Anatomy
Repertoire and Ensemble
3
2
3
0
3
6
3
3
1
6
32
Sophomore Year
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern
Tradition IV (5 days/wk)
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Contemporary Dance History (OWC-B)
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Dance Composition II
Repertoire and Ensemble
3
3
3
0
3
1
3
3
Spring Semester
Dance 103, 321,
323
Dance 212
Dance 352
Dance 414
University Core
Total
Senior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 403, 421 or
623
Dance 311
Dance 317
Intro to Iyengar Yoga, Alexander Tech,
Body Cond: Pilates
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet
Tradition IV (5 days/wk)
Digital Media Portfolio for Dancers
Dance Composition III
Junior Year
2
3
1 or 3
3
6
31 or 33
Intermediate Yoga for Dancers, Alexander
Technique Practicum or Body Conditioning:
Pilates Method II
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet
Tradition V
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern
Tradition V (5 days/wk)
Page 14
2
2
2
Dance 460
Dance 601
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 115, 116,
122, 123
Dance 312
Dance 318
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
Senior Project
3
3
6
Jazz Dance I or II, African Dance & Diaspora
Technique I or II
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet
Tradition VI (5 days/wk)
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern
Tradition VI
Repertoire and Ensemble
2
2
2
Dance 490
1
University Core
9
Total
Senior Year
34
** Per departmental policy, any time a student is cast in a faculty or guest artist work, he/she
must enroll in Dance 490 for a minimum of 1 credit during the appropriate semester.
Page 15
BA IN DANCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
(for students entering fall 2015 and thereafter)
Completion of 120 credits. fulfilling the following curriculum requirements:
1. General University Core Curriculum, 45 cr., which includes the following:
o Courses that fulfill the university-wide Oral and Written Communication
Competency Part A (OWC-A) and Quantitative Literacy Competency Part A (QLA) requirements. These should be completed within the first 30 credits of the
degree.
o Nine (9) credits from Peck School of the Arts non-Dance courses, chosen from
three of the five other departments in PSOA: Art & Design, Fine Arts, Music
(required), Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation and New Genres. Three of the
nine credits must be chosen from the following Music course list, or alternate
approved by Dance Faculty Advisor: Music 100 Intro to Classical Music, 101
Fundamentals of Music, 102 American Popular Music, 130 Beginning Piano, 140
Class Voice, 150 Beginning Guitar, 309 American Folk and Popular Music, 310
Intro to World Musics (OWC-B), 317 Intro to American Music, 356 Music in
Society, 449 Women in Music, 450 Intro to Musicology, 489 Workshop w/ Subtopics, 680 Special Studies in Music w/ Sub-topics
2. Required Dance Courses, 66 cr., which includes the following:
a. Dance Foundations courses, 16 cr.
b. Dance courses fulfill the university-wide Oral and Written Communication
Competency Part B (OWC-B) and Quantitative Literacy Competency Part B (QLB) requirements.
3. Electives, 9 cr.
Dance Technique
Dance 103
Dance 111
Dance 113
Dance 112, 211,
and 212
or
Dance 114, 213
and 214
Dance 122 or
335 or 338 or
370
Dance 220
Dance 336 or
338 or 370
Dance 334 or
370
Dance 337 or
370
Total Technique
and Somatics
Credits
and Somatics Courses
Introduction to Iyengar Yoga
Ballet I
Modern Dance Technique I
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition (students
must pass 212 with a B minimum)
2
3
3
9
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition
(students must pass 214 with a B minimum)
African Form: African Dance and Diaspora Technique I or
Hip Hop 1 or Capoeira: Afro-Brazilian Dance or approved
World Movement Traditions sub-topic (3 credits if GERCD is desired for Dance 122)
Body Sense
Latino/Hispanic Form: Salsa & Merengue 1 or Capoeira:
Afro-Brazilian Dance or approved World Movement
Traditions sub-topic
Asian Form: Tai Chi Chuan or approved World Movement
Traditions sub-topic
European Form: Ballroom Forms 1 or approved World
Movement Traditions sub-topic
2
3
2
2
2
28
Dance Creative and Academic Courses
Dance 110^
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Dance 135^
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
Dance 219^
Arts in Community Service
Dance 233^
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Page 16
3
3
1
3
3
Dance 250
Dance 251
Dance 313 or
314 or 315
Dance 319
Dance 320^
Dance 350
Dance 352
Dance 371
Dance 420^
Dance 460
Dance 601
Total Creative
and Academic
Credits
Dance Sophomore Seminar
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
History of Dance in the African Diaspora, Contemporary
Dance History or History of the American Musical Theater
(OWC-B)
Dance Service-Learning
Rituals and Culture
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Digital Media Portfolio for Performers
Applied Anatomy
Creating Dance in the Community
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
Senior Project
0
3
3
1
3
0
3
3
3
3
3
38
Recommended Electives
Dance, Movement, and Theatre electives from the following Dance and Theatre courses.
Dance 115 and
Jazz Dance I and 2
2 each
116
Dance 117 and
Tap I and 2
2 each
217
Dance 313, 314
History of Dance in the African Diaspora, Contemporary
3 each
and/or 315
Dance History and/or History of the American Musical
Theater
Dance 321, 421
Alexander Technique for the Performer, Alexander
2 each
Technique Practicum
Dance 323 and
Body Conditioning: Pilates Method, Body Conditioning:
2 each
623
Pilates Method II
Dance 327 and
Dance for the Musical Theatre I and II
2 each
427
Dance 403
Intermediate Yoga
2
Dance 490/491*
Repertoire and Ensemble, Repertory/Student
0-3**
Choreographer
Theatre 101
Acting for Non-majors
3
Theatre 260
Storytelling
3
Theatre 275
Performing Arts Management
3
Theatre 320
Performing Community
3
*Any dancer cast in faculty or guest artist choreography must be enrolled in at least 3 UWM
Department of Dance technique classes per week during the rehearsal semester.
**Per departmental policy, any time a student is cast in a faculty or guest artist work and is
enrolled for less than 18 credits, he/she must enroll in Dance 490 for 1 credit during the
appropriate semester.
^ Coursework involved in MPPR guidelines
Course of Study
Freshman Year
Fall Semester
Dance 111
Dance 135
Dance 192
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 110^
Dance 113
Ballet I
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance Freshman Seminar
3
3
1
9
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Modern Dance Technique I
3
3
Page 17
Dance 219^
Dance 233^
University Core
Total Freshman
Year
Arts in Community Service
Improvisation for Dancemaking
3
3
3
31
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Dance 122 or 335
or 338 or 370
Dance 220
Dance 250
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 112 or 114
Dance 319^
Dance 320 or 420^
Dance 371
University Core
Total Sophomore
Year
Junior Year
Dance 313, 314 or
315 (either fall or
spring)
Fall Semester
Dance 251
Dance 350
Dance 336 or 338
or 370
Dance 460
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 211 or 213
Dance 320 or 420
Dance 352
University Core
Total Junior Year
Senior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 103
Dance 337 or 370
African Form: African Dance & Diaspora Technique I or
Hip Hop 1 or Capoeira: Afro-Brazilian Dance or
approved World Movement Traditions sub-topic
Body Sense
Dance Sophomore Seminar
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition II or
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition II
Dance Service-Learning
Rituals and Culture (even years) or Creating Dance in
the Community (odd years)
Applied Anatomy
3
0
9
3
1
3
3
6
30
History of Dance in the African Diaspora, Contemporary
Dance History or History of the American Musical
Theater (OWC-B)
3
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Latin Form: Salsa & Merengue 1 or Capoeira: AfroBrazilian Dance or approved World Movement
Traditions sub-topic
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
3
0
2
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition III or
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition III
Rituals and Culture (even years) or Creating Dance in
the Community (odd years)
Digital Media Portfolio for Performers
Introduction to Iyengar Yoga
European Form: Ballroom Forms 1 or approved World
Movement Traditions sub-topic
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 212 or 214
2
3
3
3
3
3
6
29
2
2
12
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition IV or
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition IV
Page 18
3
Dance 334 or 370
Asian Form: Tai Chi Chuan or approved World
Movement Traditions sub-topic
Senior Project
Dance 601
University Core
Total Senior Year
TOTAL REQUIRED DANCE CREDITS: 66
2
3
6
30
BA IN DANCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
(for students admitted prior to fall 2015)
Completion of 120 credits, fulfilling the following curriculum requirements:
• General University Core Curriculum, 45 cr. (includes 3 credits in Music per fall 2015
curriculum revision)
• Required Dance Courses, 61 cr. (includes Dance Foundations credits)
• General Electives, 14 cr.
Dance Technique and Somatics Courses:
Dance 103
Intro to Iyengar Yoga
Dance 111
Ballet I
Dance 113
Modern Dance Technique I
Dance 112, 211,
Contemporary Dance Practice:
and 212 OR 114,
Modern or Ballet Tradition II-IV
213 and 214
Dance 122 or 370
African Form: African I or Hip Hop
Dance 220
Body Sense
Dance 370
One subtitle from each choice below
Latin Form: Salsa/Merengue OR
Tango or Capoeira
Asian Form: Martials Arts OR Tai Chi
European Form: Ballroom OR Dances
of the World
Total
Technique and Somatics Courses
Dance Creative and Academic Courses
Dance 110^ Intro to the Art of Dance
Dance 135^ Intro to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
Dance 219^ Arts in Community Service
Dance 233^ Improvisation for Dancemaking
Dance 250
Dance Sophomore Seminar
Dance 251
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Dance 313,
History of Dance in the African
314 or 315
Diaspora, Contemporary Dance
History, History of American
Musical Theatre (OWC-B)
Dance 319^ Dance Service-Learning
Dance 320^ Rituals and Culture
Dance 350
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Dance 352
Digital Media Portfolio for Dancers
Dance 360
Movement and Learning
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy
Dance 420^ Creating Community Rituals
Dance 601
Senior Project
Total
Creative and Academic Courses
Page 19
3
3
1
3
3
0
3
3
1
3
0
1 or 3
3
3
3
3
33
2
3
3
9
3
2
2
2
28
Recommended General Electives
Please see list in Fall 2015 curriculum.
* Students participating in department productions must be enrolled in one ballet, modern or
Africa & the Diaspora technique class per department performance criteria.
** Per departmental policy, any time a student is cast in a faculty or guest artist work, he/she
must enroll in Dance 490 for a minimum of 0 or 1 credit during the appropriate semester.
^ Coursework involved in MPPR guidelines
REVISED Course of Study (as of 9/2/2015):
Freshman Year (includes Foundations Curriculum)
Fall Semester
Dance 111
Ballet I
Dance 135^
Intro to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 110^
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Dance 113
Modern Dance Technique I
Dance 219^
Arts in Community Service
Dance 233^
Improvisation
University Core
Total
Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Dance 122 or 370
Dance 213
Dance 220
Dance 250
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 112 or 114
Dance 319^
Dance 320 or
420^
Dance 371
University Core
Total
Junior Year
Dance 313, 314 or
315
Fall Semester
Dance 251
Dance 350
Dance 370
Dance 360
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 211 or 213
3
3
1
9
3
3
3
3
3
31
African Form: African I or Hip Hop or
Capoeira
Modern Dance Technique III (if taking
Modern sequence)
Body Sense
Dance Sophomore Seminar
2
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet or
Modern Tradition II
Dance Service-Learning
Rituals and Culture or Creating Dance in
the Community
Applied Anatomy
3
3
3
0
9
1
3
3
6
30
Sophomore Year
Dance History (OWC-B)
3
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Latin Form: Salsa & Merengue or
Capoeira
Movement and Learning
3
0
2
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet or
Page 20
3
3
3
Dance 320 or 420
Dance 352
University Core
Total
Senior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 103
Dance 370
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 211 or 213
Dance 370
Dance 601
University Core
Total
Modern Tradition III
Rituals and Culture or Creating Dance in
the Community
Digital Media Portfolio
Junior Year
1
1 or 3
6
29
Intro to Iyengar Yoga
European Form: Ballroom
2
2
12
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet or
Modern Tradition III
Asian Form: Tai Chi
Senior Project
3
Senior Year
Page 21
2
3
6
30
SOMATICS MINOR REQUIREMENTS
(for students entering fall 2015 and thereafter)
Required Courses in Dance
Dance 103
Introduction to Iyengar Yoga
Dance 220
Body Sense
Dance 133 or
Creative Movement (for Non-Dance majors) or
233
Improvisation for Dancemaking (for Dance majors)
Dance 251
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Dance 321
Alexander Technique for the Performer
Dance 414 or
Capstone Course: Dance Composition III (for Dance BFA
601
majors) or Senior Project (for Dance BA or Non-Dance
majors)
Total
Electives in Dance (please choose 12 cr. from the following):
Dance 323
Body Conditioning: Pilates Method
Dance 360
Movement and Learning
Dance 122 OR
African Dance and Diaspora Technique I OR
334 OR
Tai Chi Chuan OR
370
Approved World Movement Traditions sub-topic
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy (strongly recommended for students
whose major doesn’t include anatomy/kinesiology)
Dance 403
Intermediate Yoga
Dance 421
Alexander Technique Practicum
Dance 489
Workshop in Dance: approved Somatic sub-topic(s) only
Dance 623
Body Conditioning: Pilates Method II
Total
Total Credits for Somatics Minor
2
3
3
3
2
3
16
2
3
2
3
2
2
2-3
2
12
28
Recommended Course of Study
Freshmen Year
Fall Semester: Dance 220 taught by Dance Faculty
Spring Semester: Dance 321
Sophomore Year
Dance 103, Dance 133 or 233, Dance 371
Junior Year
Dance 251, Dance 323 or 421, Dance 360
Senior Year
Dance 334, Dance 414 or 601
SOMATICS MINOR REQUIREMENTS (for students admitted prior to fall 2015)
Required Courses in Dance
Dance 103
Introduction to Iyengar Yoga
Dance 122
African Dance & Diaspora Technique I
OR
Dance 370
World Movement Traditions or dance equiv.
Dance 133
Creative Movement
OR
Dance 135
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 220
Body Sense
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy
Page 22
2
2
3
3
3
Total
13 cr.
Electives in Dance (please choose from the following)
Dance 221
Body Sense II
Dance 233
Improvisation
Dance 321
Alexander Technique for the Performer
Dance 251
Laban Movement Analysis
Dance 323
Body Conditioning: Pilates Method
Dance 360
Movement and Learning
Dance 370
World Movement Traditions or dance equivalent
(retakeable to 6 cr.)
Dance 421
Alexander Technique Practicum
Total
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
2
15 cr.
Suggested course of study
Freshmen Year
Fall Semester – Dance 220 taught by Dance Faculty
Spring Semester – Dance 321
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester – Dance 103, Dance 133 or 135
Spring Semester – Dance 371, Dance 323 or 421
Junior Year
Fall Semester – Dance 251, Dance 360
Spring Semester – Dance 233, Dance 122 or 370 (Tai Chi suggested)
INTER-ARTS BFA DUAL DISCIPLINE TRACK REQUIREMENTS
Required Courses
Catalog #
Course Name
Cr.
Dance 110
Intro to the Art of Dance
3
Dance 135
Intro to Dancemaking Skills
3
Dance 213
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern
3
Tradition III*
Dance 214
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern
3
Tradition IV
Dance 233
Improvisation
3
Dance 314
Contemporary Dance History
3
Dance 317
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern
2
Tradition V
Dance 318
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern
2
Tradition VI
Dance 412
Dance Composition I
3
Dance 415
Movement & New Media Collaborations
3
Dance 490
Repertoire and Ensemble**
3
Dance 601
Senior Project
3
Dance 122/370
African Dance or subtopic of
2
World Movement Traditions
Total
36
* Pre-requisites for Dance 213 are Dance 113 and Dance 114 – these 4-6 credits are not
counted towards the Inter-Arts Dual Discipline degree requirements (i.e. ghost credits).
** Students participating in department productions must be enrolled in one ballet, modern or
Africa & the Diaspora technique class per department performance criteria.
Page 23
Suggested course of study
Freshmen Year
Fall Semester – Dance 113*, Dance 135
Spring Semester – Dance 110, Dance 114*
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester – Dance 213, Dance 412
Spring Semester – Dance 122/370, Dance 233
Junior Year
Fall Semester – Dance 214, Dance 415
Spring Semester – Dance 314
Senior Year
Fall Semester – Dance 317, Dance 601
Spring Semester – Dance 318, Dance 490
MFA DEGREE INFORMATION
The Department of Dance offers a low-residency graduate program leading to the Master of Fine Arts in
Dance. The program follows an intense hybrid schedule (part online and part on campus) that includes
two 7-week retreat-like summers on an urban campus. The MFA consists of 60 credits with an emphasis
on contemporary choreography and performance, focusing on the candidate’s independent
creative research. The program prepares future university dance professors and provides secondary
school educators with the means to expand their theoretical and choreographic skills, while increasing
their earning potential in academic institutions and K-12 public and private schools.
For further information on the MFA in Dance Program, please consult the MFA Student Handbook
available on the web (arts.uwm.edu/dance, click on MFA).
Simone Ferro, Director of Graduate Studies in Dance
[email protected], 414-229-4178
DEPARTMENT OF DANCE ALUMNI
Through the years, UWM has developed a strong partnership with its alumni. This relationship
consists in supporting not only local companies, which in its majority are directed or composed
by UWM alumni, but also the Milwaukee Public Schools. All alumni are welcome to our daily
technique classes (reduced price voucher via the PSOA Box Office) and invited to guest
lectures and other events. Regular emails, Facebook groups and the UWM Alumni Association
maintain our active relationship with alumni and communicate all dance events and alumni
privileges.
Simone Ferro, Alumni Faculty Liaison
[email protected]
PECK SCHOOL OF THE ARTS STUDENT ORGANIZATION
Black and Gold Committee
Started in the fall of 2002, the Black and Gold Committee strives to improve the campus
environment (both physical and educational) for the students in the Peck School of the Arts.
Dance student representatives meet regularly with Peck School of the Arts administration to
make sure that student voices are heard. Accomplishments include the first PSOA Graduation
held in May of 2006, updating student lounges and creating additional interdisciplinary events
and performance opportunities across the school. Committee members are actively involved in
the deliberations for Differential Tuition allocations each year.
Page 24
DEPARTMENTAL INFORMATION AND POLICIES
All students are expected to understand and abide by the policies below as well as work at
100% concentration and consistency. These policies are in keeping with the serious study of
any art and are crucial to your work and success in the program.
HEALTH
All students are expected to demonstrate a strong commitment to their health and overall
conditioning in order to fulfill the department’s academic requirements. Each student’s ability
to undertake the demands of the dance program, including his/her overall physical ability to
perform in classes, auditions, rehearsals, and/or performances will be a factor in the following:
grading at the end of each semester; the audition/rehearsal/performance process for
departmental productions and outreach events; the Mid-Program Portfolio Review assessment;
determining ‘probation’ status; and potentially removing a student from the program.
Selection of Health Resources available to Dance Majors
• ATI Athletic Trainers (in partnership with Department of Athletics and Sports Medicine):
atipt.com
• Nutritionists at Norris Health Center
• Performance & Injury Center:
http://uwm.edu/healthsciences/research/centers/performance-injury-center/
STUDIO and CLASS ETIQUETTE
• Departures from class prior to the instructor’s dismissal will not be tolerated.
• You may be excused from the class due to an emergency by speaking to the instructor
first.
• Please inform the instructor of all injuries, special needs, and personal considerations
prior to each class.
• Injured or ill students are expected to attend class if possible. A written critique of
another student participating in class is mandatory and must be submitted at the end of
that class.
• Respect for the technique being taught and basic common courtesies will be extended
to the instructor, and all fellow students. Professional dance etiquette is demanded at
all times.
• No children or guests are allowed in class unless first approved by the instructor.
• Lockers are available (reserve via the PSOA Box Office, $7 for fall/UWinteriM, $7 for
spring/summer). There are locker rooms in the Commuter Facilities located in rooms
340 for the women and 372 for men, for changing purposes.
• The study of dance requires the instructor to sometimes physically manipulate the body
of the student in order to effectively apply corrections to aid in instruction, if you have a
concern with this, please speak with the instructor.
CLASS PLACEMENT and LEVEL ADVANCEMENTS and INDEPENDENT STUDY
Students must participate in a placement class for all ballet and modern classes at the
beginning of each semester.
The primary teacher for each class recommends class level advancements. Advancement to a
higher level is determined at the end of the term.
Any technique course taken under Dance 699, Independent Study, does not count toward
degree requirements.
NO ABSENCE POLICY
The Department of Dance has a No Absence Policy. Dance instruction is delivered in-class and
students must be present to understand course information. For any absence beyond those
permitted by campus policy (religious, military, jury duty, etc), a student may (outside of the
Page 25
class meeting time) submit written documentation for consideration by the instructor. All
absence penalties are determined by the individual instructor. Any modifications to the No
Absence Policy are at the instructor’s discretion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS POLICY
All course requirements must be fulfilled in order to pass the course. This includes all class
projects, written assignments or essays, written or movement exams, or any other
assignments noted on the course syllabus.
WRITTEN WORK
Your written work often tells us as much about your progress as your physical and creative
work. Your grade for almost any coursework in the curriculum is always partly based on your
written accomplishments for that class. Sample assignments include self-reflective work,
performance critiques, technical analysis, and artistic profiles. We expect thorough preparation
of all assignments and a final product that is well-crafted and professionally presented.
Succeeding in any area of our curriculum requires advanced writing abilities. For mentoring on
any written project (at any step in the process), we recommend that you contact the Writing
Center (uwm.edu/writingcenter) or the Panther Academic Support Services (uwm.edu/pass).
The majority of UWM Dance courses require MLA (Modern Language Association) style, which
specifies the guidelines for formatting and English language usage in writing. It also provides
writers with a system for referencing their sources through parenthetical citation in their
essays and Works Cited pages. Please reference the MLA Handbook (7th or 8th edition) as
necessary, or Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab website at http://owl.english.purdue.edu
(click on MLA).
DANCE INCOMPLETE POLICY (9/2/16)
An incomplete is appropriate only when the following conditions are present:
• You have done satisfactory work on a substantial fraction of the course requirements
prior to grading time, and provide the instructor with evidence of potential success in
completing the remaining work.
• Extraordinary circumstances not related to class performance, such as illness or family
emergency, have prevented you from finishing the course requirements on time.
An Incomplete will not be given to enable you to do additional work to improve a
grade. It is your responsibility to initiate a request for an Incomplete. If approved, the
instructor will indicate the conditions for the removal of the Incomplete, including the dates for
submitting all remaining work (which must be no longer than 10 months from the end of the
semester of the assigned Incomplete). The instructor is responsible for changing the
Incomplete to the new letter grade within 12 months of the end of the term.
The instructor may deny a request for an Incomplete and assign a letter grade based on the
work completed to that point.
EVALUATIONS and End-of-Term Conferences
Evaluations are done twice a semester. Midterm evaluations are done one-on-one with the
student and their primary instructor for the course. End-of-Term Conferences are done at the
end of the semester with the student and the entire faculty. Freshmen, juniors and December
graduates are required to attend the December conferences; sophomores, seniors and May
graduates are required to attend the May conferences (additional students may be called when
situations warrant). Students also meet with individual academic and departmental advisors
for further personal and curricular advisement. Failure to attend a midterm evaluation, end-ofterm conference and/or dance advising sessions will cause a full grade reduction in a single
Dance course to be applied.
Page 26
CHANGING DEGREES OR ADVISORS WITHIN DANCE PROGRAM
All BA or BFA students wanting to switch to a different Dance degree program or to switch
Dance Faculty advisor must follow this procedure:
1. Pick up form from the envelope on the Mitchell 254/256 bulletin board and fill it out.
2. Schedule a meeting with your current Dance Advisor and bring the completed form to
the meeting (if the first two steps are reversed or happen simultaneously, that’s fine).
3. Following the meeting, the current Dance Advisor will discuss this degree change with
the Dance Faculty, and the faculty will vote to either approve or deny the request.
4. The Dance Department Chair will notify the student and PSOA Student Services Office
of the results of the vote (approved or denied) via email. If the request has been
approved, that email will also include the name of the new Dance Advisor.
MID-PROGRAM PORTFOLIO REVIEW (updated 9/2/16)
The Mid-Program Portfolio Review (MPPR) will take place at the end of the second/sophomore
year during the spring semester, and will serve as a gateway review for continuance in the
Dance Program. The MPPR will consist of an essay, solo performance or research presentation
or video submission, technique class(es), and an enrollment progress check (subject to
change). Afterwards, each student will meet with the dance faculty to review progress in the
program. A 3.0 GPA in the program is required to continue in the major.
The specific guidelines for MPPR students in spring 2017 will be sent via email.
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Dance Department distributes around $15-20,000 in scholarships and awards to
undergraduate students each year, ranging from $400-2000 per year (amount split over
fall/spring semesters, summer available upon request). Students may be awarded multiple
awards over their time in the Dance Program.
arts.uwm.edu/dance/scholarships
1. Incoming Student Award: no application required; award is faculty-nominated based
on the student's entrance audition for admission to the program. Scholarships may
not be available after the UWM priority application deadline (March 1). Award may
be for one year only, or for up to four years, as long as the student continues to
meet the stated requirements.
2. Dance Undergraduate Student Scholarship: application required, and students must
have completed at least one semester of the Dance Program. Demonstrated
excellence in the Dance Major is the main criteria.
3. Ed Burgess Legacy Scholarship: no application required; award is faculty-nominated
for a student who embodies and demonstrates the highest qualities of commitment
and professional dedication to the art of dance, and has an established record of
excellence in all aspects of the program. Award is for one year only, and student
must have completed at least 2 semesters in the Dance Program, and be attending
full-time during the award semesters.
To be eligible for any Dance Scholarship, students must meet the following criteria:
• Full-time enrollment (6 or more Dance credits each semester)
• Dance GPA of 3.5 or above
• Adherence to departmental curricular requirements
Students who do not meet these criteria for all semesters of their award may forfeit all or part
of their scholarship.
STUDIO ATTIRE
• For Modern/Ballet/Jazz/Tap – Class clothing must be form-fitting in solid colors only,
and cover the full torso and leg to the knee. Undergarment support required as
appropriate (dance belts for men/bras for women). Footwear requirements as
appropriate (ballet slippers, tap or jazz shoes, etc). Failure to adhere to the dress code
may affect your course grade.
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•
•
For Hip Hop, Salsa/Merengue, Ballroom, Swing, Capoeira, Tai Chi, etc – No street shoes
are allowed. To keep our studios clean, a separate, clean pair of shoes used only for
class is required. (lockers are available for reserve via the PSOA Box Office, $7 for
fall/UWinteriM, $7 for spring/summer.) Failure to adhere to the dress code may affect
your course grade.
No hats or cumbersome jewelry while taking class, and long hair must be kept out of
the face. Proper hygiene is expected at all times.
CALL BOARDS
All student information is posted on bulletin boards outside Mitchell 254 and 256, in the
student lounge. Make a habit to check it regularly. Information is also documented via UWM
email.
RESIDENCIES
Special workshops and guest artist residencies are scheduled throughout the academic year.
These events are intended to provide students with opportunities to train with established
artists. Included in these residencies are performances, technique and repertory classes which
provide opportunities to learn excerpts from both renowned and experimental choreographers’
works. Please see the bulletin board in the Mit 254/256 Lounge for this year’s guest artists’
biographies.
STUDIO SPACE GUIDELINES (revised 9/1/16)
To keep UWM Dance studios and all equipment contained therein in working condition, please
follow these rules:
1. Eating, drinking, smoking and chewing gum are NOT permitted in the dance studios.
Water in sealed containers is permitted.
2. Street shoes and/or rain/winter boots are not permitted on dance studio floors.
Footwear should be removed prior to entering the studio, and placed on the floor mats
or in shoe cubbies provided for that purpose. If your class, rehearsal or event requires
dance shoes of any kind, they must not be the ones worn into the building (keep a
separate pair of shoes just for class or rehearsal – see #9).
3. When you are in the studio, you are responsible for all of the material stored in it. All
damaged or stolen materials will be prosecuted to the extent allowable by law.
4. If you are using the departmental sound systems, please keep them at a reasonable
volume level (you must lower volume level if requested), and turn the system off when
you are done (use the appropriately marked switches to not confuse the next person).
If you do not know how to use the system, please ask for assistance in the Dance
Office.
5. The studios must be neatened at the end of each class, rehearsal or event. Return
mirror curtains to their ‘open’ position. Do not leave chairs, blankets/mats, clothing
items, set pieces, water bottles, or anything else scattered around that will get in the
way of the next person to use the space.
6. At the end of your scheduled time, please turn off the lights (saving energy & money),
close the windows and ASSURE THE DOORS ARE CLOSED TIGHT and LOCKED (including
the west lobby and east lounge doors for Mitchell 254/256).
7. For safety reasons, always bring your belongings into the studio with you and work with
the doors closed, especially during late hours and weekends.
8. Scheduled users are encouraged to have their hand scanned at the Box Office on the
first floor of the Zelazo Center to ensure access to studios in the evenings and on
weekends.
9. Lockers are available for check out from Peck School of the Arts Box Office (Zelazo 144,
located at 2419 E Kenwood Blvd). There are Commuter Facilities available, located in
Mitchell 340 for women and Mitchell 372 for men, for changing/showering purposes.
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Rehearsal Reservations
Dance majors are permitted to reserve a limited number of hours in dance studios each week
(new guidelines will be posted on the Mitchell 254/256 bulletin boards when available).
In order to reserve studio time, you must visit the PSOA Faculty & Staff Services Office in Art
203, where a PSOA Student Assistant will enter a tentative reservation for your desired
rehearsal day/time(s). Recurring weekly times are preferred. That tentative reservation will
then be approved or denied by PSOA Performing Arts Programs Staff. If it’s approved, you will
receive an email with the appropriate keybox code. That keybox code is only for your use – it
should not be shared with anyone else.
Misuse of studios or failing to follow the Studio Space Guidelines (above) will result in
immediate changing of the keybox code(s) and your ability to reserve/use the Dance Studios.
Hand Scan System
All Peck School of the Arts buildings are equipped with a hand scan door unlocking system,
that permits studio use during evening hours and weekends, when the buildings may not be
officially open. This allows for complete security without the hassle of keys or security passes
or building guards. The hand scan system takes an image of the top of your right hand (no
fingerprints!). That image, coupled with a PIN number, is what will get you into the building.
To get yourself into the hand scan system, you'll need to stop by the Peck School of the Arts
Box Office, located at 2419 E Kenwood Blvd (enter from the south side of the building off the
parking lot). Please identify yourself as a Dance Major, and they will walk you through the
setup process. During the fall/spring semester, regular hours are Monday thru Friday, 11am5pm.
PERFORMANCE OPPORTUNITIES AND POLICIES
Performance Attendance Policy: (created 8/26/13)
All Dance majors are required to attend all UWM Dance performances during the academic
year, and encouraged to attend all UWM Dance showings and other UWM Performing Arts
shows.
Performance Participation Criteria
The faculty has determined the following criteria for Dance major participation in UWM
Department of Dance choreography:
GENERAL GUIDELINES (updated 9/2/16)
v All eligible dance majors are required to audition for every dance performance
opportunity. No dance major will be cast who has not attended the audition or
supplementary audition activities. Any Dance major on probation is excluded from
auditioning and casting by faculty, guest artist and student choreographers. The faculty
reserves the right to review opportunities for all dancers on a case-by-case basis.
v All Dance major performers must be students in good standing (3.0 minimum in the
major) to participate in any concert.
v All rehearsals, production showings and technical rehearsals are mandatory and are
announced as soon as the schedule is determined. You must be available for the full
production week(s) and additional scheduled rehearsals.
v Any dancer cast in faculty or guest artist choreography must be enrolled in at least 3
UWM Department of Dance technique classes per week during the rehearsal semester.
(i.e. enrollment and participation in MWF Modern, M-F Ballet, TR Tap plus 1 day of
Ballet, MW African plus 1 day of Modern, etc)
v Dance BFA students are encouraged to complete production requirements (Dance 209,
309) before being cast in their first faculty/guest artist concert.
v Choreographers may modify their casting choices at any time.
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v To protect your education investment, dance-related activities (teaching, performing,
choreographing, etc) outside of UWM Dance must be requested prior to agreeing to
pursue the activity via the Outside Activity Request Form. These forms are located on
the Mitchell 254/256 bulletin board, and should be submitted to Darci Wutz’s mailbox in
the Faculty & Staff Services Office, Art 203, for approval by the Dance Faculty.
Approval/denial will be sent via email. Penalties for late or non- notification could
include impact participation in current faculty, guest artist and/or student casting;
result in grade reduction; and/or permission to audition in a future semester.
v All General Guidelines are subject to faculty review.
FACULTY/GUEST CHOREOGRAPHY (updated 9/2/16)
v Dance majors may be in up to three pieces during each semester of rehearsal, with no
more than 2 student works in a semester.
v Students are not permitted to audition until 2nd semester of their first year. For
example: Fall 2016 admits would be eligible to participate in the April 2017 audition for
the Winterdances 2018 concert.
v Guest artist auditions may be limited to selected students only.
v Rehearsals for faculty choreography are part of Repertoire and Ensemble courses (490).
If enrolled for under 18 credits, students must register under the choreographer’s lab
number for a minimum of 1 credit and be available for all scheduled rehearsals.
v No grades will be assigned in PAWS until after the performances have been completed.
Exceptions may be considered for graduating seniors.
v No dancer may participate in more than two dances in the faculty concerts. Exceptions
to this will be determined by faculty agreement.
v Students are not permitted to upload any faculty or guest choreography online without
explicit permission from the choreographer or the department.
v The Monday after Winterdances closes, performers are excused from any Dance
technique class prior to 1pm, but not dance academic classes.
STUDENT CHOREOGRAPHY (updated 10/13/14, also New Dancemakers policies below)
v No dancer may be involved as a choreographer or performer in more than two dances
for New Dancemakers concerts. In addition, choreographers are encouraged not to
dance in their own choreography.
v Anyone cast in student choreography must be enrolled in a minimum of 2 Department
of Dance technique classes per week during the rehearsal semester.
v Dancers participating in New Dancemakers showings and performances should register
for Repertory/Student Choreographer (491) for a minimum of 1 credit (if enrolled for
less than 18 credits). As with faculty choreography, dancers are required to attend all
scheduled rehearsals, and absences must be excused ahead of time.
NEW DANCEMAKERS (updated 5/16/11)
v Eligible choreographers must have completed or be currently enrolled in Composition 2
(including BA students). Senior Project students are given priority in program
determination, but an adjudication process will determine final program inclusion and
order.
v All choreographers must be enrolled in at least 3 UWM Department of Dance technique
classes per week during the rehearsal semester (minimum of 1 credit).
v All choreographers and their dancers and collaborators must adhere to the New
Dancemakers showing and production guidelines as outlined by the New Dancemakers
Artistic Director.
INTERNSHIPS (9/2/16)
Dance majors are eligible and encouraged to apply for internships with area dance companies
and organizations during their senior year in performance, choreography/research,
administration, marketing, teaching or production. If a performance aspect is part of an
internship, that will be included in the Winterdances or Springdances auditions in November or
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April. Students will receive notice of application for internships electronically. Concert casting
determination will take precedence over internship applications if a student wants to be
considered for both. Internship placement by area dance companies is approved via faculty
vote, and an effort is made to place as many interns as possible.
STUDY ABROAD IN DANCE
The Dance Department traveled with its first study abroad trip in June of 2008 to Brazil to
study the Bumba-Meu-Boi festival with faculty member Simone Ferro and another contingent
went in summer 2010 and 2015. Future trips to Brazil are in the planning process. Faculty can
also assist (making introductions, translating, etc) if students are interested in traveling abroad
independently for varying lengths of time – previous student destinations have included
Australia, Austria, Germany, Portugal, and Spain. For further information on all UWM Study
Abroad opportunities, visit the Center for International Education website at
http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CIE/studyabroad/.
While not considered study abroad, the Disney College Program is also a possibility for distance
study in the Dance Department. http://cp.disneycareers.com/en/default/
AMERICAN COLLEGE DANCE ASSOCIATION
The American College Dance Association exists to support and affirm the role of dance in
higher education primarily through the sponsorship of regional college/university dance
festivals. UWM Dance is an active member in the association and we have been recognized
very positively in our appearances at regional and national festivals. Each year, we commit
some portion of our budget toward faculty and student participation in the North-Central
regional conference. Students also have the option of self-funding their attendance at the
conference.
COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION
Milwaukee dance community members and UWM Dance alumni are permitted to participate in
dance technique classes when space is available. In order to attend, the instructor must grant
permission (in advance as some classes or specific days may not be available), and a voucher
must be purchased for each day (for insurance/liability purposes). Class schedule can be found
at schedule.uwm.edu. Local professionals pay $11, and alumni and current dance majors pay
$6 per class voucher. (Current dance majors must pay during summer only if not enrolled or
cast in Dancemakers). Please mention your status at the PSOA Box Office prior to purchasing
your voucher. The Box Office is located off the parking lot of the Zelazo Center, 2419 E.
Kenwood Blvd (or at arts.uwm.edu/tickets).
LAPTOP GUIDELINES (for Undergraduate Dance Majors only)
Policy per the Undergraduate Catalog: Dance BA and BFA students are required to have a
laptop computer (or comparable tablet) in their sophomore year. The hardware and software
must meet or exceed the current departmental requirements. Students are strongly
encouraged to have laptops when they enter the program.
Base Machine Recommendations as of September 2016
o Apple: 13” MacBookPro or 11” MacBookAir
o Strongly recommend extended warranty protection (AppleCare)
Required External Items
o USB2 flash drive (i.e. thumb drive) minimum 8 GB capacity
o external hard drive minimum 320 Gigs for video storage and backup (larger capacity
highly recommended)
o Power adaptor (as included with laptop purchase)
Software (subject to change with software upgrades)
o Required Free Software – download from appropriate websites if not included with
laptop upon purchase
o Microsoft Office (SA-365, http://uwm.edu/software/office-365-faqs/)
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o Apple Video Editing: iMovie
Optional Free Software
o Cross-Platform Audio Editing: Audacity version 2.1.0
(audacity.sourceforge.net/download/)
o Paid Software – purchase from Wisconsin Integrated Software Catalog (WISC)
o Recommended video editing (only for Dance 415 and composition/Senior Project
creations as needed): Apple recommendation Final Cut Express; PC
recommendation Adobe Premier Elements
o Recommended still image editing as needed: Photoshop Elements
General Specifications if creating your own laptop
SCREEN SIZE at least 11-13” screen
RAM at least 4 GB, 8+ GB preferred
HARD DRIVE SPACE at least 250 GB (more if possible)
PROCESSOR POWER at least 1.6 Gigahertz
OPERATING SYSTEM most current operating system available
PORTS/CONNECTIVITY require USB and audio out
OTHER FEATURES
o integrated laptop camera (or purchase usb digital video camera or share files from
phone)
o wireless internet access (Wi-Fi) to connect to UWM network
o warranty program for computer maintenance (i.e. AppleCare for Apple) strongly
recommended
Sites for assistance/laptop purchase:
o arts.uwm.edu/laptop – includes information on increasing financial aid loan packages
for computer purchases, and links to the UWM TechStore and HelpDesk
o apple.com – Apple Education Store
o newegg.com
o http://www.wiscsoftware.wisc.edu/wisc/ - Wisconsin Integrated Software Catalog
o
STUDENT VIDEO PORTFOLIO REQUEST PROCEDURES
In order for students to get copies of any work they created or danced in as part of their time
in UWM Dance Department, the following procedure must be followed.
1. Create list of desired works, including titles, choreographers, and performance or
showing details. For instance, “Though the World…” choreographed by Ed Burgess on
Winterdances in February 2009 OR “mypiecetitle” choreographed by Jane Doe on
Composition 1 Showing in December 2013. That list, as well as intended editing
software, should be submitted via email to [email protected]
2. Choreographer Approval: Office staff will cross-check student request list with the
database of choreographer permissions. Not all footage is permitted for student use,
and some choreographers limit what students may do with the footage if it is available.
Any limitations will be communicated to the students.
3. Office staff collects the appropriate footage, and converts it if necessary. This is a firstcome, first-served process.
4. Scheduled Distribution: Student schedules a time to stop into the Dance Media Archives
to retrieve the footage. At scheduled time, student brings flash drive, external hard
drive or computer (must be Apple-compatible) and files are transferred. Alternate
transfer methods used as necessary.
ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY
The Board of Regents, Administrators, Faculty, Academic Staff and Students of the University
of Wisconsin System believe that academic honesty and integrity are fundamental to the
mission of higher education and of the UW System. The university has a responsibility to
promote academic honesty and integrity and to develop procedures to deal effectively with the
instance of academic dishonesty. Students who violate these standards will be confronted and
must accept the consequences of their actions.
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GRIEVANCES: Department Mediator and Student Mediators
The training of dance is highly disciplined and requires commitment on physical, intellectual
and emotional levels for both students and faculty. As the UWM student population continues
to become more culturally diverse, the Department of Dance has expanded its curriculum to
include increasing diversity, different cultural genres, base training and pedagogy. This will
itself require a deeper sensitivity and openness to various approaches to movement and the
creative process from both our students and our faculty. There might be times when it will be
necessary for a student to communicate outside of their instructor and/or assigned advisor
regarding any multiplicity of issues within their stay in the department. It is hoped that many
of these issues may not need to go as far as the Chairperson and can be resolved.
The Department Mediator will work with students, faculty and the Department Chair in creating
a dialogue to address concerns, and create an atmosphere where communication can be fluid.
Most importantly, the role of this position will be to reach resolution within the Department. If
an internal resolution cannot be reached, then the Peck School of the Arts grievance policy will
be followed.
Additionally, student mediators will be elected each year to serve as another method for
resolving any issues that may occur.
RESOLUTION PROCEDURE
Step 1: Student and/or Faculty must have first tried to meet to discuss issue at hand
and seek resolution with the instructor.
Step 2: If Step 1 does not resolve the issue then an appointment must be made with
the Department Mediator. For this step, the party must set an appointment with the
mediator, and provide a written document detailing the conflict and needed result.
After which a form will be completed by the Mediator and placed into a confidential
file by the Mediator. This file will be kept in the Mediator’s office and will not be
placed into the individual’s personal files.
Step 3: The Mediator will meet with the other party to gain insight of the other side of
the issue.
Step 4: If deemed necessary the Mediator will then meet with both parties to gain and
understanding of the issues at hand and attempt clear resolution.
Step 5: If resolution cannot be reached the Mediator will inform the Department Chair
for resolution.
Step 6: If a resolution cannot be reached within the Department between the student,
Instructor, Mediator and Chair, the student will be advised to take their concern to
the Dean of the Peck School of the Arts for review outside the Department.
GRADE APPEALS
The Department Mediator does not handle grade appeals for Dance Department classes.
A copy of the Peck School of the Arts grade appeals procedure may be downloaded from the
site below, or picked up at the PSOA Student Services Office in the Theatre Building room 120.
http://www4.uwm.edu/psoa/facultystaff/downloads.cfm
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University Policies
(from http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/SyllabusLinks.pdf)
1. Students with disabilities. Notice to these students should appear prominently in the
syllabus so that special accommodations are provided in a timely manner:
http://www4.uwm.edu/sac/SACltr.pdf
2. Religious observances. Accommodations for absences due to religious observance should be
noted. http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S1.5.htm
3. Students called to active military duty. Accommodations for absences due to call-up of
reserves to active military duty should be noted.
http://www4.uwm.edu/current_students/military_call_up.cfm
4. Incompletes. A notation of "incomplete" may be given in lieu of a final grade to a student
who has carried a subject successfully until the end of a semester but who, because of illness
or other unusual and substantiated cause beyond the student's control, has been unable to
take or complete the final examination or to complete some limited amount of term work.
http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S31.pdf
5. Discriminatory conduct (such as sexual harassment). Discriminatory conduct will not be
tolerated by the University. It poisons the work and learning environment of the University and
threatens the careers, educational experience, and well-being of students, faculty, and staff.
http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S47.pdf
6. Academic misconduct. Cheating on exams or plagiarism are violations of the academic honor
code and carry severe sanctions, including failing a course or even suspension or dismissal
from the University. http://www4.uwm.edu/acad_aff/policy/academicmisconduct.cfm
7. Complaint procedures. Students may direct complaints to the head of the academic unit or
department in which the complaint occurs. If the complaint allegedly violates a specific
university policy, it may be directed to the head of the department or academic unit in which
the complaint occurred or to the appropriate university office responsible for enforcing the
policy. http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S49.7.htm
8. Grade appeal procedures. A student may appeal a grade on the grounds that it is based on
a capricious or arbitrary decision of the course instructor. Such an appeal shall follow the
established procedures adopted by the department, college, or school in which the course
resides or in the case of graduate students, the Graduate School. These procedures are
available in writing from the respective department chairperson or the Academic Dean of the
College/School. http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S28.htm
9. Other The final exam requirement, the final exam date requirement, etc.
http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S22.htm
10. FERPA policy. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 as amended
requires that you be advised of your rights concerning your education records and of certain
categories of public information which the University has designated "directory information."
More information at the following: http://www4.uwm.edu/academics/ferpa.cfm
11. S.A.F.E. Campaign. The Safety Awareness for Everyone campaign is a focused effort to
increase campus-wide awareness of how to stay safe. One of UWM’s safe campus goals is to
create a culture of awareness among students, faculty, staff, even parents. The S.A.F.E. Web
site at www.campussafety.uwm.edu (red link at the bottom of the UWM home page)
centralizes emergency and routine safety information and communications. All faculty,
students, and staff are encouraged to enroll in the S.A.F.E. Alert system to receive emergencyPage 34
information text message alerts. Sign up at the above site.
Health and Accident Insurance
The UW System does not automatically provide a health and accident insurance to students.
Individual students are responsibly for providing their own coverage and providing proof of
coverage for the Department of Dance if requested.
Safety
In some class settings (e.g., classes that are production oriented), the instructor will present
safety guidelines and procedures. These procedures must be followed carefully to insure your
safety and the safety of your fellow classmates. Failure to follow safety procedures may result
in disciplinary action.
Financial Obligation
All UWM students are required to sign the Educational Services Credit Agreement prior to
registering for classes (available from your PAWS home page). Please not that some classes in
the Department have special course fees, all have differential tuition fees, and every student is
required to pay these fees. A complete description of UWM fee policies may be found in the
Schedule of Classes.
MORE CAMPUS INFORMATION
(in semi-alphabetical order)
Accessibility Resource Center
Mitchell Hall Room 116, (414) 229-6287, (414) 229-4549 TTY
The Accessibility Resource Center, part of the Division of Academic Affairs, strives to create an accessible
university community that allows students with disabilities to realize their full potential. ARC works with
students, faculty, and staff to promote an increased awareness of the abilities of all students, and to
ensure they are regarded on the basis of ability, not disability.
Any UWM student with a disability restricting one or more of life's major activities who desires an
accommodation for a course, workshop, program, or activity should contact ARC. Students with mobility,
sensory, communication, mental, or learning differences - as well as basic health impairments including
temporary injuries - use the Center's services. Students are eligible for ARC services if they are enrolled
in the university and can provide documentation of their disability.
Reasonable accommodations may include registration assistance, referrals and general advising, notetaking, sign language and oral interpreting, auditory listening devices, taped textbooks, mobility
assistance, and exam accommodations. If you believe that the University has not adequately
accommodated your disability, you can contact the Office of Equity/Diversity Services in Mitchell 359 or
at (414) 229-5923 for more information or to file a grievance.
Accounts Receivable/Bursar’s Office
Mitchell Hall, Room 285/295, (414) 229-4914
The Accounts Receivable office administers loan funds and provides collection services. You can get
information about library fines, bill-to authorizations, special course fees, Perkins loans, current semester
tuition fees and fee-related charges, prior-year tuition, credit agreements, and non-sufficient funds
information.
UWM Virtual Bookstore
Student Union First Floor
uwm.booksbyecampus.com
Career Planning and Resource Center
Mellencamp Hall, Room 128, (414) 229-4486
The Center provides comprehensive counseling and information services to undergraduate and graduate
students. Group workshops and seminars are offered for students with specific concerns related to the
job search.
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Children's Center
(414) 229-5384
The UWM Children's Center, operated through the Division of Student Affairs, provides high quality childcare for the children of UWM students, faculty, and staff. Children from six weeks to 10 years old may
attend the Center. An after-school and full-time summer program is available for school-age children.
Computer and Copy Center Information and UWM Mobile app (iOS or Android)
University Information and Technology Services (UITS), (414) 229-4040
www4.uwm.edu/uits/
UITS offers a variety of computer facilities and services to assist you in coursework and research. Please
contact them directly with any computer or technology questions you may have.
The campus computer labs offer a wide variety of popular software as well printers and scanners. The
Bolton 225 lab also houses the UITS Walk-In Help Desk and the UWM TechStore.
Additional services available from UITS include:
*Non-credit short courses on various topics (free or at a nominal charge)
*Consulting assistance on computer problems by phone, email, or in person
*Discounts on computer and software purchases.
Email/Internet/Software Access
Every new UWM student is assigned an account in the UWM technology system, called an ePanther
account. The ePanther account provides you with a UWM email address and disk space to manage your
email and calendar via Office365 (plus access to the Microsoft Office Suite online and as a free download,
http://uwm.edu/software/office-365-faqs/). This account also allows you to set up a personal Web page,
access the UWM Library catalog, and use other services such as D2L and PAWS. All departmental
communication will be via the UWM email address.
UW Credit Union
Union 1st Floor, West Atrium, 1-800-533-6773
Financial services at the UW Credit Union include checking and savings accounts, ATM cards, direct
deposit of paychecks, money market accounts, CDs, student and personal loans, credit cards, traveler’s
checks, money orders, and more. Faculty, staff, students, alumni, and families of members can join.
Cultures & Communities Certificate
uwm.edu/cultures-communities/
Learning to work across differences of cultural background and experience is a process essential to
intellectual growth and lifelong learning, and ultimately to building a better world.
This is the philosophy at the heart of the Cultures & Communities Program, which promotes diversity and
civic engagement through an undergraduate certificate, community-university partnership grants and
collaboration with UWM’s Center for Community-Based Learning, Leadership and Research.
On-Campus Entertainment/Enrichment
Peck School of the Arts Box Office (414) 229-4308 and arts.uwm.edu/tickets
UWM Inova Gallery (414) 229-5070
Union Art Gallery (414) 229-6310
Union Theatre (414) 229-4070
The Office of Equity/Diversity Services (EDS)
Contact: [email protected]
EDS provides the essential services of promoting “Unity In Diversity” among students, staff and faculty
members at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). Our mission is to effectively integrate equal
opportunity and diversity into UWM’s institutional climate. UWM’s policies provide equal opportunity in its
admissions, employment, educational programs, and activities without regard to race, color, religion,
sexual orientation, sex, national origin, age, disability, or veteran status. EDS is dedicated to preventing
discrimination and guiding institutional compliance with applicable federal and state laws. Through
educational programs, the investigation and resolution of complaints, and oversight activities, EDS fosters
an environment and culture that appreciate all members of the UWM community
Page 36
Golda Meir Library
(414) 229-4785
Named for alumna and former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir, the library contains over 4.6 million
cataloged items and serves the informational and research needs of the University. There are over 1.1
million visitors each year and annual circulation approaches 500,000 transactions. Most items are shelved
on open stacks for maximum user access. The Golda Meir Library on-line catalog provides access to
library holdings at UWM and other universities and institutions. The library also offers cameras, audio
recorders and laptops for borrowing. Users can search the bibliographic databases from any station in the
library, campus labs, via modem, or the Internet (http://www.uwm.edu/Library/).
The online catalog workstations and library web page also offer access to electronic indexes and
publications, at no charge to the user. Fee-based reference assistance for databases not available
through the library's online connections is available. A growing number of course reserve materials can
be located through the online catalog, both in the library and with a Web connection.
Outstanding research collections in the library are the Fromkin Memorial Collection on human rights and
social justice, the Shakespeare Research Collection, the Seventeenth Century Research Collection, the
Camus Bibliography Research Collection, and the Holweck and Slichter Civil War collections.
The library is a member of the Library Council of Metropolitan Milwaukee (LCOMM) and is a charter
member of the Wisconsin Interlibrary Lending Service (WILS). Graduate students and faculty may
arrange to borrow items not held in the Golda Meir Library through the Interlibrary Loan (ILL) office. ILL
requests may be made electronically from the library Web site. Information on specific library
departments and services may be found at the Reference Desk and through the library Web site.
Health Insurance
Student Association, Union E351, (414) 229-4366
The Student Association makes available, by contract with an insurance company, group health insurance
for students who are attending UWM either part or full-time.
Norris Student Health Center
(414) 229-4716
The Norris Student Health Center has a multidisciplinary staff providing ambulatory medical and mental
health services to UWM students. Medical services are offered for most general medical problems
common to a student population. A Sports Medicine program evaluates and treats minor orthopedic
injuries. Basic gynecological services are available and include contraceptives. Mental Health provides
individual and group sessions for students with counseling needs.
Nursing appointments are available for a variety of conditions. Nurses perform allergy injections,
immunizations, and blood pressure checks. Health education and AIDS counseling and testing also are
available. For a minimal charge, the clinic pharmacy fills prescriptions written by health center staff.
Appointments are required for all services except urgent care mental health and medical services. The
hours of operation are Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m.; and Friday, 9 a.m.-4:45 p.m.
UWM Housing Options
On-Campus Housing Office contact:
University Housing: 3400 N. Maryland Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53211-2953
(800) 622-0286, (414) 229-4065 , Fax: (414) 229-4127
Housing is available at Sandburg Halls (including East Tower), Cambridge Commons, RiverView Residence
Hall, Purin Hall and Kenilworth Square Apartments. Please contact the housing office directly with any
contract or amenities questions.
Dance Foundations Living Learning Community (LLC.uwm.edu):
Be part of a "community within a community" by living in the residence halls among students with similar
interests. The Dance Foundations LLC builds a learning and social support system for dance majors as
they get acquainted with UWM and the Milwaukee-area arts community.
Picture yourself attending dance performances and other artistic events on campus and off, visiting
theatres and galleries from UWM’s Inova to neighborhood and downtown venues, and creating friendships
that support developing artists like yourself!
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Off-Campus Housing: Neighborhood Housing Office
(414) 229-6999, http://www.aux.uwm.edu/nho/
The Neighborhood Housing Office provides direct outreach and advising to help students find quality offcampus housing and roommates through education, referral, and support. They promote healthy living
and social responsibility to connect students with UWM and the surrounding neighborhoods.
ID Cards
Union 143, http://uwm.edu/onestop/my-info
The UWM student ID card, referred to as the Panther Card, is necessary to use many campus facilities,
including the library.
Legal Services
University Legal Clinic, Union E343, (414) 229-4140
The University Legal Clinic offers free information and consultation to enrolled UWM students. Services
provided by paralegals and consulting attorneys include information to protect and enforce your rights in
matters relating to divorce, child custody, personal injury, criminal and traffic offenses, landlord-tenant
disputes, and more. On-staff attorneys can be retained at a student discount rate through the LAWS
(Lawyers Assisting Wisconsin Students) Program. The ULC offers free Notary Public service to all UWM
students. The clinic cannot provide counseling over the phone.
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center
Union WG89, (414) 229-4116
The mission of the UWM Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center is to connect with
various student populations and the community at large by embracing the diversity of the UWM student
community; increasing awareness, education, and presence of LGBT issues on campus; providing a
resource for students and community members wanting to learn about and advocate for LGBT issues;
providing a safe space for all LGBT students and their allies at UWM to give and receive social and
emotional support; and fostering student leadership and personal, academic, and professional growth
through collaborations on and off campus. The LGBT Resource Center, a student-led and -funded
initiative, also has a library and as well as mentoring and support programs.
Klotsche Center
(414) 229-5287, http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/klotsche/
The J. Martin Klotsche Center for Physical Education and Recreation provides modern facilities at no cost
to students for organized and open athletic activities. Areas for aquatic activities, running, basketball,
volleyball, handball/racquetball, weight lifting, and combative sports are available from early morning
through the evening. Your ID card is required for entry into the Klotsche center.
Parking and Transit Office
Union Ground Floor, (414) 229-4000
On-campus parking at UWM is very limited and very expensive. Most commuting students find one of
several alternative methods offered by UWM to be a hassle-free, money-saving answer to their
transportation needs. The MCARD, together with a UWM student ID, allows students registered for at
least 1 credit on the main campus to ride any bus in the Milwaukee County Transit System (MCTS) for
free. You can use your MCARD for unlimited travel anywhere (not just to UWM). Many MCTS bus routes
provide frequent, fast, and direct bus service to UWM. In addition to the MCARD, the Parking and Transit
Office also sells bus tickets and passes for MCTS and Wisconsin Coach Lines
U-Park features large satellite parking lots for commuting students. Frequent, non-stop shuttle bus
service runs to and from the campus from early morning until late evening, as well as to Kenilworth
Square East.
A campus organization NOT affiliated with Parking and Transit called Be On the Safe Side (BOSS) offers
free shuttle and walking escort services for UWM students on weekday evenings when classes are in
session. Call 229-6503 for more information.
Student Success Center
Bolton 120, (414) 229-5385, http://www4.uwm.edu/ssc/
The one stop where you can find all the information about a variety of valuable resources on campus. The
mission of the SSC is to provide quality comprehensive services to all students enrolled at UWM.
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The Student Success Center is also home for the Campus Ambassadors and Faculty/Staff/Student
Mentors who, during the academic year, will reconvene their orientation groups, meet one-on-one and
maintain communication with their first-year students, and assist in the development of targeted firstyear programming.
Dean of Students Office
http://www4.uwm.edu/dos/
Through its programs and services, the Dean of Students Office provides a holistic approach to student
development that includes social, intellectual, emotional, physical, and cultural growth. They provides
activities related to student leadership development, self-awareness and personal growth, cultural
diversity, campus civility, and student safety, experiential learning and community involvement, social
and cultural activities, providing students with university information, and student support and
mentoring.
Center for Student Involvement
www.studentorgs.uwm.edu
The Center for Student Involvement oversees registered student organizations through administering
campus policies and procedures, supervising university segregated fee expenditures, and providing
organizations with guidance, support and training resources. They provide individuals and student groups
with meaningful opportunities for participation in social, cultural, intellectual, recreational, and
governance programs that enhances involvement with the campus community and society. The CSI also
fosters student learning and development through involvement that enhances individual character and
citizenship, institutional spirit and sense of community, and a respect for diversity.
Women's Resource Center
The Union Terrace, Southwest Corner, (414) 229-2852
The WRC is a center where students can meet, network, organize, explore issues, read, and relax. It is
also a clearinghouse for woman-focused services, events, and opportunities on and off campus. The WRC
provides information and referral, as well as individual and group services, to support women students in
identifying and eliminating barriers to academic, professional, and personal goals. The WRC features free
pamphlets, a lending library, discussion and support groups, and many opportunities for female and male
student involvement.
DEPARTMENT of DANCE PARTNERS
~Danceworks~
danceworksmke.org
Dani Kuepper, Artistic Director email: [email protected]
Amy Brinkman-Sustache, Studio Director email: [email protected]
Deborah Wenzler-Farris, Executive Director email: [email protected]
1661 N. Water Street, Milwaukee, WI 53202
(414) 277-8480
Danceworks is a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization that has provided quality dance performance and a
wide array of educational and community based creative arts programs to children and adults throughout
Southeastern Wisconsin since 1992. About a third of our resources are devoted to producing the concerts
of the Danceworks Performance Company, Milwaukee’s newest contemporary dance ensemble, and the
rest support educational programming in our studio and in the community. Much of our community based
programming is produced through Dreamtime Studio, our internal creative arts component.
~Daniel Burkholder/The PlayGround~
danielburkholdertheplayground.org
Daniel Burkholder, Artistic Director
email: [email protected]
Daniel Burkholder/The PlayGround is a movement-based performance group engaging audiences on
multiple levels through dynamic work combining the formalism of choreography with the spontaneity of
improvisation. By layering movement ranging from highly athletic to subtle gestures with text, live music,
and video, the company considers multiple perspectives as it presents accessible, yet layered
performance works.
~Ko-Thi Dance Company~
ko-thi.org
Ferne Caulker-Bronson, Artistic Director
email: [email protected]
Founded in 1969 by Ferne Yangyeitie Caulker, a native of Sierra Leone, West Africa, this unique ensemble
is committed to preserving and performing the dance and music rooted in African, African-American and
Caribbean cultures. Comprised of artists trained in the history, mythology and techniques of art forms
within the African Diaspora, the Ko-Thi Dance Company uses a myriad of traditional instruments,
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authentic costumes, infectious music and extraordinary dance to educate and bridge the gap between
cultures.
~Milwaukee Ballet and Milwaukee Ballet II Company~
milwaukeeballet.org
Michael Pink, Artistic Director
email: [email protected]
504 W. National Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53204
(414) 643-7677 Fax: (414) 649-4066
Milwaukee Ballet strives to inspire its audiences to think within and beyond traditional ballet through the
presentation of quality performances and the implementation of educational opportunities. Milwaukee
Ballet and Milwaukee Ballet School are recognized among the top companies in the nation. With an
annual operating budget of more than $5 million, Milwaukee Ballet presents more than 40 performances
to more than 50,000 people each year. Its resident company includes 25 professional dancers along with
18 trainees in its Nancy Einhorn Milwaukee Ballet II program and is one of the few dance companies in
the country to maintain its own symphony orchestra. Milwaukee Ballet School, the official school of the
Ballet, is a nationally accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Dance (NASD) with an
enrollment of nearly 900 students at three locations throughout Southeastern Wisconsin.
~Milwaukee Yoga Center~
mycmke.com
Susan Goulet
email: [email protected]
3514 N. Oakland Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53211
(414) 332-3551
Milwaukee Yoga Center is dedicated to the Iyengar style of yoga, which emphasizes correct alignment
and the use of props so that every person, regardless of age or physical condition can benefit from the
poses.
~Oni Dance~
onidance.org
Maria Gillespie, Artistic Director
email: [email protected]
Oni Dance is an organization of artists that provides creative collaboration, performance, and movement
education as the formula for furthering the growth and cultural impact of contemporary dance theater.
The artistic director and its members determine to engage and educate the public in the integration of
dance, theater, music, film, and movement-based practices. The mission of Oni Dance is to ensure that
dance retains a vital position in the social rituals of daily life of though classes, workshops, collaborations
and public performances.
~Wild Space Dance Company~
wildspacedance.org
Debra Loewen, Artistic Director
email: [email protected]
Wild Space Dance Company’s mission is to expand the audience for contemporary dance through
performance and outreach programs in the greater Milwaukee area and throughout southeastern
Wisconsin, reaching diverse communities. Known for site-specific dance events and artistic collaborations,
the company merges dance with visual art, architecture and music to create inventive choreography and
emotionally-charged performances.
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DEPARTMENT of DANCE FACULTY
The Department of Dance is proud of its distinguished faculty. This is an eclectic, experienced, and
versatile group of artists who are deeply committed to the academic experience (for contact information,
please see second page of this document). Their credentials range from impressive, professional
experiences in major dance companies to teaching assignments and choreographic commissions in the
international arena to accomplished work in regional theatre. See the Dance Faculty/Staff page for fulllength biographies and photos: arts.uwm.edu/dance
Daniel Burkholder is an Assistant Professor of Dance and the Interim Program Director for the M.F.A.
in Dance program at UW-Milwuakee. His choreographer and performance work has been shown at the
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (WDC), 92nd Street Y (NYC), Tribeca Performing Arts
Center (NYC), 848 Community Space (SF), Mascher Space Co-Op (Philadelphia), and Dance Place (WDC),
along with numerous indoor and outdoor spaces. Daniel has taught at the West Coast Contact
Improvisation Festival, University of Maryland College Park, George Washington University, CityDance
Center at Strathmore, and as guest teacher for Cirque du Soleil. Currently he co-creates and curates,
with Andrea Burkholder, Real Time, a monthly First-Friday movement-based performance series. Daniel is
also a Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioner.
A native of São Paulo, Brazil, Simone Ferro joined the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2001. She
served as Chair for four years, and just finished a year’s sabbatical in Brazil. She is currently the Director
of the Master of Fine Arts program in Dance (again). After a professional career as soloist with dance
companies in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Geneva, Switzerland, she completed graduate work in dance
at the University of Iowa. Simone has collaborated extensively with local dance, theater and opera
companies, including the Milwaukee Ballet, the Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, the Florentine Opera, the
Milwaukee Chamber Orchestra, the Milwaukee Opera Theater, Danceworks Performance Company, Wild
Space Dance Company and Theatre Gigante.
Maria Gillespie is the artistic director of Oni Dance and was named one of Dance Magazine’s “25 to
Watch.” Gillespie’s choreography has been presented at venues including The Ford Amphitheatre, The
Getty Museum, the Roy and Edna Disney/Cal Arts Theater, The A.W.A.R.D Show!, UCLA, CalArts,
numerous universities as well as in New York City and San Francisco. She has performed and taught
internationally in Mexico, Japan, and China. She has taught at UCLA, CalArts, Loyola Marymount,
CalState University Long Beach, & University of Iowa. Gillespie received an MFA from UCLA’s Department
of World Arts & Cultures. She joined the faculty at UWM as Assistant Professor in 2012, and was a 201415 Global Studies Fellow. www.onidance.org
Dani Kuepper received both her BFA and MFA from UW-Milwaukee, where she has been a faculty
member of the UWM Dance Department since 1999. She is Artistic Director of Danceworks Performance
Company. She joined the company in 1999 and has been grateful for the opportunity to collaborate
extensively in the Milwaukee community with established organizations as well as independent artists. As
an undergraduate at UWM, Dani performed the solo, Mrs. Schultz, at the national American College
Dance Festival at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. She was honored in 2009 as a “Forty Under
40” recipient by the Business Journal of Milwaukee and also received the UWM Alumni Association
Teaching Excellence Award for non-tenure track in instructors in 2010.
Marcia Parsons learned to improvise and choreograph from Hanya Holm, Steve Paxton, Anna Halprin,
Beverly Blossom, Nancy Stark Smith, and Bob Dunn. Marcia has ventured into performance and
storytelling with Laura Simms and Ruth Zaporah. Marcia is a program visionary who has led in
formulating the BA, BFA., MFA., and K-12 certification programs in UWM Dance. Marcia's creative
research has been supported by grants from the UWM Graduate School and the Bader Foundation.
Marcia's current research engages teachers in movement phrases that activate and integrate the learner's
brain to take in new information from the full academic spectrum, and to express/reflect what has been
learned through movement.
Tim Russell lives in a world of sound. His career as a musician started in the Chicago suburbs playing
drums in rock bands. He graduated UW-Madison with a BM in percussion performance, and also began
creating music for Dance. Tim now resides in Milwaukee; he is the Music Director for the UW-Milwaukee
Dance Department. He has been called “the premier composer for Modern Dance in Milwaukee”
(Shepherd Express), and his “compelling original music” (Madison Isthmus) has shared the stage
with a vast array of choreographic artists, bringing Tim and his music all across the country.
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Darci Brown Wutz holds a BFA in Theatre/Dance Emphasis from the University of MN, Duluth, and an
MFA in Dance Performance and Choreography from Smith College. After teaching at UMD, Smith, Mount
Holyoke and Alverno College, Darci served as Director of Dance in the Dept. of Performing Arts at
Marquette University before joining the Dance faculty at UWM (Musical Theatre Program Coordinator,
Associate Professor). Choreographer of over 48 musical theatre and non-musical theatre productions, as
well as an equal number of concert works, Darci has worked in regional and national theatre, including
the Minnesota Repertory Theater, Milwaukee Repertory Theater, Stackner Cabaret, First Stage, The
Skylight Opera Theatre, Milwaukee Chamber Theatre, Theatre X, Renaissance Theaterworks, Waukesha
Civic Theatre and the Sunset Playhouse.
DEPARTMENT of DANCE LECTURER INFORMATION
Melissa Anderson: Milwaukee Ballet, Icelandic National Ballet ([email protected])
Sara Arends Haggith: BA Math/Philosophy, Alverno College ([email protected])
Amy Brinkman-Sustache: Studio Director, Danceworks Inc ([email protected])
Andrea Burkholder: BA Dance/Spanish, University of Maryland College Park ([email protected])
Angela Frederick: BFA Dance, UWM ([email protected])
Susan Goulet: BS English, UWM ([email protected])
Alex Hansen: BFA Sculpture, UWM ([email protected])
Joey Hernandez: BA Theatre Arts (Dance)/Health & Society, Beloit College ([email protected])
Kim Johnson: BFA Dance, UWM ([email protected])
Gina Laurenzi: BFA Dance, UWM ([email protected])
Debra Loewen: MFA Dance, UWM ([email protected])
Annie Melchior: BA Comparative Literature, UWM ([email protected])
Lisa Moberly: BA Dance, UW-Stevens Point ([email protected])
Phaleshia Pinder-Fearen: MA Education, Corcordia University ([email protected])
Tracey Radloff: BA Education, UWM ([email protected])
Thomas Ryan: BS Economics, St Norbert College ([email protected])
Dan Schuchart: MFA Experimental Choreo., Univ of California-Riverside ([email protected])
Susan Sperl: Instructor, East Towne Ballroom ([email protected])
Valencia Turner: former Assoc Artistic Director, Ko-Thi Dance Company ([email protected])
Matthew Ventura: MFA Acting, University of Tennessee; M.AMSAT ([email protected])
DeMar Walker: BA Mass Communications/Theatre, University of Central Arkansas ([email protected])
Krislyn World: MFA Dance, UWM ([email protected])
Megan Zintek: BFA Dance UWM ([email protected])
DEPARTMENT of DANCE ACCOMPANIST INFORMATION
The Department of Dance is dedicated to providing a well-rounded experience in all technique classes.
Essential to the training of any dancer is the ability of dancers to 'hear' and 'feel' musical variances,
subtlety and aesthetic context – adding a valued dimension to the study of dance. To this goal, each
ballet, modern and African technique class is provided with a live musician and/or musicians, who, in
addition to being professional artists in their own rights, accompany and provide musical and percussive
support for instructors.
Alan Borkenhagen: Classical Piano
Anna Brinck: Classical & Jazz Piano
Cory Coleman: African-Caribbean & Contemporary Percussion
David Collins: Saxophone, Electronics
Neil Davis: Contemporary & Jazz Guitar
Anthony Deutsch: Contemporary & Jazz Piano
Nick Lang: Contemporary Percussion
Josh Robinson: Classical & Musical Theatre Piano
Will Rose: Contemporary & African-Caribbean Percussion
Tim Russell: Electronics, Voice, Piano, Contemporary Percussion
Tarence Spencer: African-Caribbean Percussion
Kate Stocks: Classical Piano
Ryan Washington: African-Caribbean Percussion
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DEPARTMENT OF DANCE SUMMARY by Professor Ed Burgess
(1952-2011)
Dance is a calling that one hears throughout life. It takes a lifetime, then, to attend to all of
the ways one can express oneself through this art form.
Our program seeks to bring forward the specific ways in which dance speaks to each of our
students. We respect the individuality of each of our students while informing them of the
standards of craftsmanship pertinent to their areas of study and interest.
Collectively, the interest of our Faculty is wide-ranging, and profoundly knowledgeable in a
variety of skills. The example the Faculty sets for themselves, each other, and the students is
one of self-discipline, diversity, versatility and continued personal development. This results in
a hard working environment that speaks to the varied dance interests of each student while
providing positive role modeling at the same time.
The Faculty is committed to our students seeking and finding their personal voice as
interpreters, choreographers, and teachers.
Opportunity favors the prepared mind. That is what we do. We prepare our students to meet
the demands of the opportunities that exist in the vast landscape that is the professional dance
world.
INFORMATION IN THIS HANDBOOK IS
SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE.
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