UniGear Digital Engineering Guide

UniGear Digital Engineering Guide
Medium Voltage product
UniGear Digital
Engineering Guide
Document ID: 1VLG500007
Issued: 2017-01-02
Revision: D
© Copyright 2017 ABB. All rights reserved.
Copyright
This document and parts thereof must not be reproduced or copied without written permission from ABB, and the contents thereof must not
be imparted to a third party, nor used for any unauthorized purpose. The software or hardware described in this document is furnished under
a license and may be used, copied, or disclosed only in accordance with the terms of such license.
Table of contents
1
Introduction................................................................................................................................................................................. 5
This manual.......................................................................................................................................................................... 5
Intended users ..................................................................................................................................................................... 5
2
UniGear Digital ............................................................................................................................................................................ 6
Sensors ............................................................................................................................................................................... 7
2.1.1
Current sensors............................................................................................................................................................. 8
2.1.2
Voltage sensors........................................................................................................................................................... 10
Protection relays................................................................................................................................................................. 13
IEC 61850.......................................................................................................................................................................... 22
Switchgear type overview.................................................................................................................................................... 24
3
Engineering ............................................................................................................................................................................... 27
Sensors ............................................................................................................................................................................. 27
3.1.1
Current sensors........................................................................................................................................................... 27
3.1.2
Voltage sensors........................................................................................................................................................... 31
Documentation................................................................................................................................................................... 33
Station bus (GOOSE) .......................................................................................................................................................... 35
Process bus (SMV) ............................................................................................................................................................. 41
Ethernet ............................................................................................................................................................................. 48
3.5.1
Requirements.............................................................................................................................................................. 48
3.5.2
Technology ................................................................................................................................................................. 49
3.5.3
Topologies .................................................................................................................................................................. 55
3.5.4
Ethernet traffic estimation............................................................................................................................................. 59
3.5.5
Naming convention to identify protection relays ............................................................................................................. 59
3.5.6
IP Address Allocation ................................................................................................................................................... 60
3.5.7
Time synchronization ................................................................................................................................................... 61
3.5.8
Traffic segregation ....................................................................................................................................................... 63
3.5.9
Protection relays.......................................................................................................................................................... 65
3.5.10
Managed Ethernet switches ......................................................................................................................................... 68
3.5.10.1
Basic Settings <Mandatory> ................................................................................................................................ 69
3.5.10.2
Time Settings <Mandatory> ................................................................................................................................. 71
3.5.10.3
Switching Settings (VLAN) <Mandatory> ............................................................................................................... 73
3.5.10.4
Redundancy Settings RSTP <Conditional> ........................................................................................................... 75
3.5.10.5
Redundancy Settings E-MRP <Conditional> ......................................................................................................... 76
3.5.10.6
Redundancy Settings PRP and HSR <Conditional> ............................................................................................... 77
3.5.10.7
Advanced Settings <Optional> ............................................................................................................................. 78
3.5.11
Satellite controlled clock............................................................................................................................................... 79
3.5.11.1
Tekron ............................................................................................................................................................... 79
3.5.11.2
Meinberg ............................................................................................................................................................ 81
UniGear Digital
Engineering Guide
4
1 Introduction
This manual
The engineering guide provides information for the UniGear Digital solution by providing details about its main components. This guide focuses
especially on the IEC 61850 digital communication and it can be used as a technical reference during the engineering phase.
Intended users
This manual is intended for to be used by design, protection relay, test and service engineers. The protection relay engineer needs to have a
thorough knowledge of protection systems, protection equipment, protection functions, configured functional logic in the Protection relays
and their IEC 61850 engineering. The test and service engineers are expected to be familiar with handling of the electronic equipment.
UniGear Digital
Engineering Guide
5
2 UniGear Digital
UniGear Digital is a new solution implemented to the traditional UniGear switchgear. It is accomplished by using state-of-the-art, well-proven
components: current and voltage sensors, Relion® protection relays and IEC 61850 digital communication.
The design of the current sensors is very compact and it is optimized for the use in UniGear. Each panel can accommodate two sets of
current sensors. The voltage sensors are very compact as well. They are integrated as part of support insulators housed in the cable
compartment or directly in the busbar compartment.
The current and voltage sensors are very accurate (accuracy class 0.5), however revenue metering might require higher accuracy classes or
separate instrument current and voltage transformer. Such transformers can optionally be added to sensor-equipped panels.
Capacitive voltage detection is enabled by capacitive dividers that are either integrated into the support insulators or into the conventional
current transformers, which is used case by case.
Fast horizontal GOOSE communication for inter-panel (bay-to-bay) signals exchange is a mandatory part of this solution, while the Process
bus is optional.
Figure 1: UniGear Digital and its key components
UniGear Digital
Engineering Guide
6
Sensors
Sensors, for current and voltage measurement, are important part of UniGear Digital. Each switchgear type offering UniGear Digital solution
uses particular type of sensors as shown in the table in below.
Table 1: Sensor product portfolio for UniGear Digital
Measurement
type
Current
Sensor type
Maximum
application
parameter
Panel
width [mm]
UniGear ZS1 UniGear ZS1
Digital
Digital
up to 17.5 kV up to 24 kV
KECA 80 C104
Up to 1 250 A
650
x
KECA 80 C165
Up to 4 000 A
800 / 1000
x
KECA 80 C184
Up to 1 250 A
800
x
KECA 80 C216
Up to 3 150 A
1000
x
KECA 250 B1
Up to 2 000 A
KEVA 17.5 B20
Up to 17.5 kV
KEVA 24 B20
Up to 24 kV
x
UniGear 550
Digital
UniGear 500R UniGear MCC
Digital
Digital
x
x
x
x
x
x
Voltage
UniGear Digital
Engineering Guide
x
7
2.1.1
Current sensors
Current measurement in KECA sensors is based on the Rogowski coil principle.
KECA 80 C104 / KECA 80 C165
For dynamic current measurement (protection purposes) the ABB sensors KECA 80 C104, and KECA 80 C165, fulfil requirements of
protection class 5P up to an impressive value reaching the rated short-time thermal current Ith (31.5 kA or 50 kA). With KECA 80 C104 and
KECA 80 C165 sensors, measuring class 0.5 is reached for continuous current measurement in the extended accuracy range from 5 % of
the rated primary current Ipr not only up to 120 % of Ipr (as being common for conventional current transformers), but even up to the rated
continuous thermal current Icth (1 250 A or 4 000 A). That provides the possibility to designate the corresponding accuracy class as 5P400
and 5P630, proving excellent linearity and accuracy measurements.
Figure 2: Current sensor KECA 80 C104 / KECA 80 C165
Technical parameters
·
·
·
Continuous thermal current
Rated primary current
Accuracy class
1 250 / 4 000 A
80 A / 150 mV at 50 Hz or 80 A / 180 mV at 60 Hz
0.5 / 5P400; 5P630
KECA 80 C184 / KECA 80 C216
For dynamic current measurement (protection purposes) the ABB sensors KECA 80 C184, and KECA 80 C216, fulfil requirements of
protection class 5P up to an impressive value reaching the rated short-time thermal current Ith (31.5 kA). With KECA 80 C184 and KECA 80
C216 sensors, measuring class 0.5 is reached for continuous current measurement in the extended accuracy range from 5 % of the rated
primary current Ipr not only up to 120 % of Ipr (as being common for conventional current transformers), but even up to the rated continuous
thermal current Icth (1 250 A or 3 150 A). That provides the possibility to designate the corresponding accuracy class as 5P400, proving
excellent linearity and accuracy measurements.
Figure 3: Current sensor KECA 80 C184 / KECA 80 C216
Technical parameters
·
Continuous thermal current
·
Rated primary current
· Accuracy class
UniGear Digital
Engineering Guide
1 250 / 3 150 A
80 A / 150 mV at 50 Hz or 80 A / 180 mV at 60 Hz
0.5 / 5P400
8
KECA 250 B1
For dynamic current measurement (protection purposes) the ABB sensors KECA 250 B1, fulfil requirements of protection class 5P up to an
impressive value reaching the rated short-time thermal current Ith (31.5 kA). With KECA 250 B1 sensors, measuring class 0.5 is reached for
continuous current measurement in the extended accuracy range from 5 % of the rated primary current I pr not only up to 120 % of Ipr (as
being common for conventional current transformers), but even up to the rated continuous thermal current I cth (2 000 A). That provides the
possibility to designate the corresponding accuracy class as 5P125, proving excellent linearity and accuracy measurements.
Figure 4: Current sensor KECA 250 B1
Technical parameters
·
Continuous thermal current
·
Rated primary current
· Accuracy class
UniGear Digital
Engineering Guide
2 000 A
250 A / 150 mV at 50 Hz or 250 A / 180 mV at 60 Hz
0.5 / 5P125
9
2.1.2
Voltage sensors
Voltage measurement in the KEVA sensor is based on the resistive divider principle. Voltage sensors are designed to be compact and shaped
as support insulators. They can be installed in the switchgear´s cable compartment or directly in the busbar compartment.
KEVA 17.5 B20
KEVA B sensor can be used in all applications up to the voltage level 17.5 kV. The sensor fulfils requirements of accuracy class 0.5 for
measurement purposes and accuracy class 3P for protection purposes.
Figure 5: Voltage sensor KEVA 17.5 B20
Technical parameters
·
Rated primary voltage
·
Rated power frequency withstand voltage
·
Rated lightning impulse withstand voltage
·
Transformation ratio
·
Accuracy class
15 / Ö3 kV
38 (42) kV
95 kV
10 000:1
0.5 / 3P
KEVA 24 B20
KEVA B sensor can be used in all applications up to the voltage level 24 kV. The sensor fulfils requirements of accuracy class 0.5 for
measurement purposes and accuracy class 3P for protection purposes.
Figure 6: Voltage sensor KEVA 24 B20
Technical parameters
·
Rated primary voltage
·
Rated power frequency withstand voltage
·
Rated lightning impulse withstand voltage
·
Transformation ratio
·
Accuracy class
UniGear Digital
Engineering Guide
22 / Ö3 kV
50 kV
125 kV
10 000:1
0.5 / 3P
10
Sensor accessories
Sensors are connected to protection relay via cable with RJ-45 connector. In case both current and voltage sensors are connected to a
protection relay, a coupler adapter AR4 or AR5 is used. The coupler adapter AR4 is one phase adapter, it means three coupler adapters
AR4 are required for all phases. The coupler adapter AR5 is three phases adapter. Protection relays used in UniGear Digital have combined
sensor inputs. Each current and voltage sensor has separate cable with one RJ-45 connector. The cable is a separable part of each sensor
and it can be replaced by cable of the same length because of the guaranteed accuracy and performance of the sensor. The cable is to be
connected directly (or via the coupler adapter AR4 or AR5 if needed) to the protection relay. The coupler adapter AR4 or AR5 is used to
combine two RJ-45 connectors from current and voltage sensors into a combined sensor input for each phase on a protection relay.
Figure 7: Coupler adapter AR4 utilized with Relion® 615 and 620 series protection relay
Figure 8: Coupler adapter AR5 utilized with Relion® 615 and 620 series protection relay
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Current sensor wires are connected according to the following assignment: PIN 4 – S1, PIN 5 – S2, other PINs remain unused.
Figure 9: Connector pins assignment of a current sensor plug
Voltage sensor wires are connected according to the following assignment: PIN 7 – a, PIN 8 -
, other PINs remain unused.
Figure 10: Connector pins assignment of a voltage sensor plug
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Protection relays
UniGear Digital is supported by the following types of protection relays, shown in table below.
Table 2: Protection relay key functionality overview for UniGear Digital
Relion®
Product type
Current and
voltage sensor
input
Standard
configuration
IEC 61850-92LE
Arc protection
Synchrocheck *
G
x
x
x
x
L
x
x
x
x
REM615
D
x
x
x
RED615
E
x
REF620
B
x
REM620
B
x
REF615
615 series
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
620 series
* Only available with IEC 61850-9-2LE
The above mentioned protection relays support IEC 61850 Ed.1 and Ed.2 communication with GOOSE messaging (performance class P1 /
1A) and 9-2LE stream (sample rate 4 kHz in case of 50 Hz, 80 samples per cycle, 1 ASDU per frame). The IEC 61850-9-2LE interface is
supported by the Relion® 615 and 620 series protection relays, including the PRP1 / HSR redundancy (RED615 only via fiber optic interfaces).
The 615 and 620 series work as a redundancy box (redbox) between the HSR / PRP1 networks and single attached devices or networks
not aware of PRP1 / HSR.
The 615 and 620 series support the IEEE 1588 (PTPv2) and Power profile as defined in IEEE C37.238 standard to reach the required timing
accuracy over an Ethernet network. The 615 and 620 series work as an ordinary clock (capable of acting as either a Master or a Slave clock).
There is no need to design a substation with two Grandmaster clocks to reach redundancy because the 615 and 620 series can work as
Master clock. For more details see 615 and 620 series manuals.
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Feeder protection and control REF615
The REF615 is a dedicated feeder protection relay perfectly aligned for protection, control, measurement and supervision of utilities and
industrial power distribution systems including radial, looped and meshed networks, and also involving a potential distributed power
generation. The REF615 is able to send (1 instance) and / or receive (1 instance) voltage over the IEC 61850-9-2LE and to synchrocheck
with IEC 61850-9-2 LE.
Figure 11: Functionality overview of REF615 standard configuration G
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Engineering Guide
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Figure 12: Functionality overview of REF615 standard configuration L
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Motor protection and control REM615
The REM615 is a dedicated motor protection relay perfectly aligned for protection, control, measurement and supervision of asynchronous
motors in manufacturing and process industry. The REM615 offers all the functionality needed to manage motor starts and normal operation,
including also protection and fault clearance in drive and network disturbance situations. The REM615 is able to send (1 instance) and / or
receive (1 instance) voltage over the IEC 61850-9-2LE.
Figure 13: Functionality overview of REM615 standard configuration D
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Line differential protection and control RED615
RED615 is a phase-segregated, two-end, line differential protection and control relay. With in-zone transformer support, perfectly harmonized
for utility and industrial power distribution networks. The RED615 relays communicate between substations over a fiber-optic link or a galvanic
pilot wire connection. Protection of ring-type and meshed distribution networks generally requires unit protection solutions, also applied in
radial networks containing distributed power generation. With relation to UniGear Digital this protection relay is used for more dedicated
applications only. The RED615 is able to send (1 instance) and / or receive (1 instance) voltage over the IEC 61850-9-2LE and to synchrocheck
with IEC 61850-9-2 LE.
Figure 14: Functionality overview of RED615 standard configuration E
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Feeder protection and control REF620
The REF620 is a dedicated feeder management relay perfectly aligned for the protection, control, measurement and supervision of utility and
industrial power distribution systems, including radial, looped and meshed networks, with or without distributed power generation. REF620
can also be used to protect feeders including motors or capacitor banks. Additionally REF620 offers functionality for interconnection
protection used with distributed generation like wind or solar power connection to utility grid. The REF620 is able to send (1 instance) and /
or receive (1 instance) voltage over the IEC 61850-9-2LE and to synchrocheck with IEC 61850-9-2 LE.
Figure 15: Functionality overview of REF620 standard configuration B
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Motor protection and control REM620
The REM620 is a dedicated motor management relay perfectly aligned for the protection, control, measurement and supervision of mediumsized and large asynchronous and synchronous motors requiring also differential protection in the manufacturing and process industry.The
REF620 is able to send (1 instance) and / or receive (1 instance) voltage over the IEC 61850-9-2LE and to synchrocheck with IEC 61850-92 LE.
Figure 16: Functionality overview of REM620 standard configuration B
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Remote IO unit RIO600
The remote inputs/outputs unit RIO600 is designed to expand the digital and analog inputs/outputs of ABB’s Relion ® protection relays and
to provide inputs/outputs for the substation automation device COM600S using the IEC 61850 Ed.2 communication. The RIO600
communicates with the protection relays over the Ethernet cable via fast horizontal GOOSE communication.
Figure 17: Overview of RIO600 connection
ESSAILEC ® RJ45 test block
ESSAILEC® RJ45 test block is used for efficient testing of protection and control relay with sensor inputs during regular maintenance. The
test block is flush mounting type on the low voltage compartment door and its vertical layout is recommended. The testing of protection and
control relay’s sensor inputs is possible without opening the low voltage compartment door. One test block is intended for one phase and it
consists of a socket, a lid and a plug.
Figure 18: ESSAILEC® RJ45 test block
®
Figure 19: Low Voltage Compartment door of UniGear panel with ESSAILEC RJ45 test blocks
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The socket is covered during Normal operation by the lid. For testing, the lid is removed and replaced by the test plug.
Figure 20: The testing (only one phase is shown)
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IEC 61850
The IEC 61850 standard was released in 2004 as a global international standard representing the architecture for communication networks
and systems for power utility automation.
The IEC 61850 standard defines the Ethernet technology for substation automation communication. It also includes the related system
requirements and the data model of the protection and control functions. The standardized data modelling of substation functions including
the communication interfaces pave the way to openness and interoperability of devices.
The IEC 61850 standard distinguishes Station bus IEC 61850-8-1 with vertical and horizontal GOOSE communication (real time
communication between protection relays) and Process bus IEC 61850-9-2 for transmission of Sampled Measured Values (SMV) gathered
by measurements. The UCA International Users Group created a guideline (commonly referred to as IEC 61850-9-2LE where “LE” stays for
“Lite Edition”) that defines an application profile of IEC 61850-9-2 to facilitate implementation and enable interoperability .
The Station and Process busses can be physically separated or they can coexist on the same Ethernet network. The GOOSE and SMV
profiles enable designing substation communication for MV switchgear in a novel and flexible way to make the protection relay process data
available to all other protection relays in the local network in a real-time manner.
Protection relays publish signals for interlocking, blocking, tripping between panels via horizontal GOOSE communication in UniGear Digital.
Nowadays, GOOSE communication is used increasingly in substations and it offers new additional values like simplicity, functional flexibility,
easy scalability and improved diagnostic, faster performance compare to conventional hard wired interpanel wires.
Figure 21: Switchgear with sensor measurement
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Process interfaces to MV apparatus (for example voltage sensors) are on the process level. Besides the conventional signal wiring between
the process interface and protection relays, IEC 61850 introduces a concept where process signals can be exchanged in process bus, under
IEC 61850-9-2. In MV switchgear application the station and the process bus can be combined together to one common bus. When using
conventional voltage instrument transformers (VTs) in MV switchgear they are usually located in the incoming feeders on the cable side and
the busbar voltage is measured in any of the outgoing feeders or in dedicated metering panel. The sharing of the busbar voltage is done by
interconnection wires between busbar VTs and protection relays in all outgoing feeders. Usage of sensors and IEC 61850-9-2 has significant
effect on the design of the switchgear. The signal from the voltage sensor measuring the busbar voltage in one of the protection relay is
digitized into sampled values stream shared over Ethernet network. The interconnection wiring in switchgear becomes simplified as less
regular galvanic signal wires are needed. Transmitting voltage signal over process bus enable also higher error detection because the signal
transmission is supervised.
Figure 22: Switchgear with sensor measurement and process bus application of voltage sharing and synchrocheck
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Switchgear type overview
UniGear Digital is available for for the following switchgear types:
·
·
·
·
UniGear ZS1
UniGear 550
UniGear 500R
UniGear MCC
Table 3: Overview of UniGear Digital in UniGear switchgear family
Switchgear type
UniGear ZS1
Busbar arrangement
UniGear Digital
Voltage level
Rated feeder current
Rated short-circuit
current
Single busbar
x
Up to 24 kV
Up to 4 000 A
Up to 50 kA / 3 s
Double busbar
Up to 24 kV
Up to 4 000 A
Up to 31.5 kA / 3 s
Back to back
Up to 24 kV
Up to 4 000 A
Up to 50 kA / 3 s
UniGear 550
Single busbar
x
Up to 12 kV
Up to 1 250 A
Up to 31.5 kA / 3 s
UniGear 500R (IEC)
Single busbar
x
Up to 12 kV
Up to 2 000 A
Up to 31.5 kA / 3 s
UniGear MCC
Single busbar
x
Up to 12 kV
Up to 400 A
Up to 50 kA / 3 s
Figure 23: UniGear ZS1 Digital (17.5 kV, 4 000 A, 50 kA)
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Figure 24: UniGear ZS1 Digital (24 kV, 3 150 A, 31.5 kA)
Figure 25: UniGear 550 Digital (12 kV, 1 250 A, 31.5 kA)
Figure 26: UniGear 500R Digital (12 kV, 2 000 A, 31.5 kA)
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Figure 27: UniGear MCC Digital (12 kV, 400 A, 50 kA)
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3 Engineering
Sensors
3.1.1
Current sensors
Correction factors
The amplitude and phase error of a current sensor is, in practice, constant and independent on the primary current. This means it is an
inherent and constant property of each sensor and it is not considered to be unpredictable and bound to influences. Hence, it can be easily
rectified in the protection relay by using appropriate correction factors, specified separately for every sensor. Values of correction factors for
the amplitude and phase error of a current sensor are entered on the sensor label and as well as in the sensor´s routine test report. To achieve
the required accuracy classes it is recommended to use both correction factors (Cfs), that is, the amplitude correction factor (aI) and the
phase error correction factor (pI) of the current sensor.
Figure 28: Example of a current sensor label
Due to linear characteristics of the sensor measurement error caused by manufacturing tolerances can be compensated for by using
correction factors entered in the protection relay. The correction factors are entered via parameter setting in PCM600 (IED Configuration /
Configuration / Analog inputs / Current (3I, CT))
Figure 29: Example of setting the correction factors for current sensor in PCM600
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Primary current
Setting example
In this example, an 80 A / 0.150 V at 50 Hz sensor is used and the application has a 1 000 A nominal current (In).
Figure 30: Single line diagram
When defining another primary value for the sensor, also the nominal voltage has to be redefined to maintain the same transformation ratio.
However, the setting in the protection relay (Rated Secondary Value) is not in V but in mV / Hz, which makes the same setting value valid
for both 50 Hz and 60 Hz nominal frequency.
In
RSV =
Ipr
× Kr
fn
RSV
Rated secondary value in mV / Hz
In
Application nominal current
Ipr
Sensor-rated nominal current
Kr
Sensor-rated voltage at the rated current in mV
fn
Network nominal frequency
In this example, the value is as calculated using the equation.
1000A
RSV=
80A
× 150mV
50Hz
=37.5
mV
Hz
Primary, Nominal current and Rated secondary values are entered via parameter setting in PCM600 (IED Configuration / Configuration /
Analog inputs/Current (3I, CT))
Figure 31: Example of setting values for current sensor in PCM600 for application nominal current 1 000 A
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Unless otherwise specified, the Nominal Current setting should always be the same as the Primary Current setting.
Each setting parameter of current protection functions is divided by application nominal current I n.
Threshold for PHIPTOC1 Start value tripping at 2 000 A is:
InTRIP 2000A
=
= 2
In
1000A
Maximum current Start and protection setting values
If the ratio of the application nominal current In and sensor-rated primary current Ipr becomes higher, and the rated secondary value needs to
be set higher than 46.875 mV / Hz, the highest value that the relay is able to measure before the current sensor input is saturated is smaller
than the maximum setting value of the current protection.
Table 4: Maximum current Start and protection setting values
Application Nominal current (In)
Rated Secondary Value with
80 A / 0.150 V at 50 Hz
Maximum current Start and protection
setting values
... 1250 A
1.000 … 46.875 mV / Hz
40 x In
1250 … 2500 A
46.875 … 93.750 mV / Hz
20 x In
2500 … 4000 A
93.750 … 150.000 mV / Hz
12.5 x In
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Polarity
Each current sensor has unique physical polarity.
Figure 32: Current sensor with polarity marking
Figure 33: Polarity setting for current sensors in incoming feeder
Sensor polarity is changed via parameter setting in PCM600 (IED Configuration / Configuration / Analog inputs / Current (3I, CT))
Figure 34: Example of polarity setting for current sensor in PCM600
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3.1.2
Voltage sensors
Correction factors
The amplitude and phase error of a voltage sensor is, in practice, constant and independent on the primary voltage. This means it is an
inherent and constant property of each sensor and it is not considered to be unpredictable and bound to influences. Hence, it can be easily
rectified in the protection relay by using appropriate correction factors, specified separately for every sensor. Values of correction factors for
the amplitude and phase error of a voltage sensor are entered on the sensor label and as well as in the sensor´s routine test report. To achieve
the required accuracy classes it is recommended to use both correction factors (Cfs), that is, the amplitude correction factor (aU) and the
phase error correction factor (pU) of the voltage sensor.
Figure 35: Example of a voltage sensor label
Due to linear characteristics of the sensor measurement error caused by manufacturing tolerances can be compensated for by using
correction factors entered in the protection relay. The correction factors are entered via parameter setting in PCM600 (IED Configuration /
Configuration / Analog inputs / Voltage (3U, VT))
Figure 36: Example of setting the correction factors for voltage sensor in PCM600
Amplitude correction factors of sensors also affect the scaling of SMV frames. Thus, it is sufficient to configure these correction factors in the
sender only. On the other hand, phase error correction factors affect only the phasor of fundamental frequency and need to be set both in
the SMV senders and the receivers.
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Other parameters
The voltage sensor is based on the resistive divider principle. Therefore, the voltage is linear throughout the whole measuring range. The
output signal is a voltage, directly proportional to the primary voltage. For the voltage sensor all parameters are readable directly from its
rating plate and conversions are not needed.
In this example the system phase-to-phase voltage rating is 10 kV.
Figure 37: Single line diagram
Primary voltage parameter is set to 10 kV. For protection relays with sensor measurement support the Voltage input type is always set to
“CVD sensor” and it cannot be changed. The same applies for the VT connection parameter which is always set to“WYE” type. The
division ratio is 10 000:1. Thus, the Division ratio parameter is set to“10 000”. The primary voltage is proportionally divided by this division
ratio.
Figure 38: Example of setting values for Voltage sensor in PCM600
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Documentation
Network overview diagram
The diagram provides an overview of the substation network (interconnections between the protection relay and Ethernet switch, network
architectures, and device location – Panel No. …)
Figure 39: Example of a Network Overview Diagram
Logic diagrams for interconnection between panels
The GOOSE Logic diagrams show the principle of the application used, and are project oriented.
Figure 40: Example of a logic diagram for interconnection between panels
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Sampled measured value diagram
The diagram gives overview about measurement sharing when using the IEC 61850-9-2LE (Process Bus).
Figure 41: Example of a Sampled measured value diagram
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Station bus (GOOSE)
Protection and control relay manager (PCM600)
The protection relay configuration process is carried out via a protection relay configuration tool. The PCM600 provides versatile functionalities
for the entire lifecycle of all Relion® protection and control relay applications, on all voltage levels. The IEC 61850 configuration tool of PCM600
makes it possible to view or engineer a data set and dataflow configuration for a vertical, GOOSE and SMV IEC 61850 communication. The
IEC 61850 configuration tool is recommended to be used for simple applications.
·
PCM600 v.2.5 or later / IEC 61850 Configuration / GOOSE Communication
Always use the latest version of PCM600 and the latest relevant connectivity package for protection relays.
Integrated Engineering Tool (IET600)
The IET600 is a System configuration Tool which contains various modules to complete the system engineering of an IEC 61850 based
substation, including:
·
·
·
·
·
·
Configuration of the substation topology
Configuration of the communication network
Configuration of the IEC 61850 dataflow (Data sets, Control blocks)
Engineering of typical bays for efficient engineering
Import and export of IEC-61850-SCL data for exchange with other tools
Export of project data for documentation
The IET600 tool is recommended for use in advanced applications. Always use the latest version of IET600 and the latest relevant connectivity
package for protection relays.
Detailed information on the specific protection relay and its network configuration can be found in the Technical Manual of dedicated
protection relay or in the IEC 61850 Engineering Guide, ABB Oy, Distribution Automation.
Configuration procedure in PCM600
Only three simple steps are needed to get GOOSE engineered in PCM600.
Step 1 / 3
Creating a GOOSE data set and its entries with the IEC 61850 Configuration tool
Figure 42: Creating a new GOOSE data set and its entries
A maximum of 20 data attributes can be added to a single GOOSE data set. If a data set has quality attributes, the attributes must be located
after the status value of the same data object.
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Step 2 / 3
Configuring a GOOSE control block with the IEC 61850 Configuration tool
Figure 43: GOOSE control block properties
The data set defines what protection relay data is used in GOOSE service and sent to local Ethernet subnetwork in a GOOSE message. The
GOOSE control block links the data set and its attributes to actual data.
GOOSE Control Block Attributes
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
APPID – unique GoID in network
·
Reserved value is ranging from 0x0000 to 0x3FFF (Ed.1)
MAC address
·
Unique Multicast address per GoCB is recommended
·
The allowed multicast address ranges from 01-0C-CD-01-00-00 to 01-0C-CD-01-01-FF
GOOSE Control block name
Data set definition
VLAN ID
·
The default value is 0x000; it should be configured to > 0
·
Recommended values (as per IEC 61850-90-4) are ranging from 0x3E8 (1 000) to 0x5E7 (1 511)
VLAN priority
·
The default value is 4 as per IEC 61850-8-1 (value range 0 …7)
Tmin (ms)
·
Maximum response time to data change
Tmax (ms)
·
Heartbeat cycle time in (the default value is 10 000 ms)
ConfRev
·
Its value increases when referenced data set becomes modified
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Step 3 / 3
Configuring a GOOSE receivers with the IEC 61850 Configuration tool
Figure 44: GOOSE control block editor showing the senders and receivers (1- receiver #1, 2- receiver #2, 3 – sender)
Configuration procedure in IET600
Step 1 / 6
After the common configuration items have been completed, the SCD file has been exported from PCM600 and the SCD file has been
imported to IET600.
Step 2 / 6
In the Options dialog box in IET600, click Show IED Capabilities Tab.
Figure 45: Selecting Show IED Capabilities Tab
In the IED Capabilities tab, check the Override for Client Service for Client Service Conf Dataset Modify box to adjust the IED615 / IED620
option to support GOOSE dataset modification.
Figure 46: Editing 615 series capabilities
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Step 3 / 6
Creating a GOOSE data set and its entries with the IET600
Figure 47: Creating a new GOOSE data set and its entries
Step 4 / 6
Configuring a GOOSE control block with the IET600
Figure 48: Naming a GOOSE control block
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Step 5 / 6
Configuring a GOOSE receivers with the IET600
Figure 49: GCB client
Step 6 / 6
Save and export the SCD file and import it to PCM600
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Connecting GOOSE sender data to a protection relay application in PCM600
Step 1 / 3
Adding GOOSERCV function block with Application Configuration Tool. Give the GOOSERCV block application-specific user-defined names
to distinguish between different blocks when making GOOSE connections in the Signal Matrix tool.
Figure 50: Adding a GOOSERCV function block in the Application Configuration Tool
Step 2 / 3
Creating GOOSERCV block connection into the application
Figure 51: Creating GOOSERCV block connection to a new variable
Step 3 / 3
Mapping of GOOSE sender data into the corresponding GOOSERCV function block in Signal Matrix
Figure 52: Signal Matrix
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Process bus (SMV)
Supported applications
Power measurement, directional protections, voltage based protections and synchrocheck work when voltage is shared over the Process
bus.
Figure 53: Example of Process bus application of voltage sharing and synchrocheck
Not supported applications
Voltage switching is not supported when voltage is shared over the Process bus
SMV Engineering tools
·
·
PCM600 v.2.6 or later / IEC 61850 Configuration / Process bus Communication
IET600 v.5.2 or later
Always use the latest version of tools and the latest relevant connectivity package for protection relays.
Detailed information on the specific protection relay and its network configuration can be found in Technical Manual of dedicated protection
relay or in the IEC 61850 Engineering Guide, ABB Oy, Distribution Automation.
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41
Configuration procedure in PCM600
Only four simple steps are needed to get Process Bus engineered in PCM600.
Step 1 / 4
Activation of transmission of Sampled Measured Value needs to have the SMVSENDER function block added to the Application Configuration
Tool (ACT) in a voltage sender protection relays. By adding the SMVSENDER function block new data set is automatically added to the
protection relay configuration and also a control block for SMV is created.
Figure 54: Adding a SMSENDER block in the Application Configuration Tool
Supervision of Sampled Measured Value receiving status needs to have the ULTVTR1 function block added to the ACT in all voltage receiver
protection relays.
Figure 55: Adding a ULTVTR1 block in the Application Configuration Tool
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Step 2 / 4
Since the SMV needs to obtain accurate time synchronization the synchronization method is to correspond to IEEE 1588, with the PTP
priority to be set to correct values. Lower value means highest priority. Identical time synchronization method is to be used in all SMV sending
and receiving protection relays.
Figure 56: Time parameter setting dialog in PCM600
IED Configuration / Configuration / Time / Parameter Setting / Synchronization
·
·
·
·
·
Synch source = IEEE 1588
PTP domain ID = 0, only clocks with the same domain are synchronized
PTP priority 1 = 127...128, the clock with the lowest priority 1 becomes reference clock (Grandmaster)
PTP priority 2 = 128...255, if all the relevant values for selecting the reference clock for multiple devices are the same, the clock with
the lowest priority 2 is selected as the reference clock
PTP announce mode: Power Profile
It is recommended to set Priority 1 and Priority 2 to be equal to 128 for all protection relays, except the voltage sender protection relays
(Priority 1 = 127, Priority 2 = 128...255 to be different for each protection relay). Voltage sender protection relay provides the synchronization
of network time in case Grandmaster clock is not available.
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Step 3 / 4
The connection between SMV sender and receiver is handled using the IEC 61850 Configuration tool. Protection relay can receive voltage
only from one another relay via IEC 61850-9-2LE.
Figure 57: Configuring the SMV senders and receivers
Step 4 / 4
Setting the Sampled Measured Value Control Block attributes
Figure 58: Changing the Sampled Measured Value Control Block attributes
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Sampled Measured Value Control Block Attributes
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
App ID – unique SvID in network
·
It shall always be 0x4000 based on 9-2LE
·
Reserved value range is from 0x4000 to 0x7FFF (if no APPID is configured, the default value shall be 0x4000 based on
IEC 61850-9-2)
MAC address
·
Unique Multicast address per Control Block is recommended
·
The allowed multicast address range is from 01-0C-CD-04-00-00 to 01-0C-CD-04-01-FF
VLAN ID
·
The default value is 0x000, should be configured > 0
·
Recommended value range (as per IEC 61850-90-4) is from 0xBB8 (3 000) to 0xDB7 (3 511)
VLAN priority
·
The default value is 4 as per IEC 61850-9-2 (value range 0 …7)
Config Revision
·
It increases in case of modification of attributes
·
Recommended value is 1
Data Set Definition
Control block name (Sampled value ID)
If configuration is updated in a manner that affects the Config Revision value of Sampled Measured Value Control Block, update all SMV
sender and receiver protection relays using the PCM600 tool.
Configuration procedure in IET600
Step 1 / 5
After the common configuration items have been completed, the SCD file has been exported from PCM600 and the SCD file has been
imported to IET600, the SMV sender and receiver connections can be handled using the IET600 tool.
Step 2 / 5
In the Options dialog box in IET600, click Show IED Capabilities Tab.
Figure 59: Selecting Show IED Capabilities Tab
In the IED Capabilities tab, check the Override for Client Service SampledValues box to adjust the IED615 / IED620 option to support sampled
values services.
Figure 60: Editing 615 series capabilities
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Step 3 / 5
Configuring sampled value control block in the IET600
Figure 61: Sampled value control block
Step 4 / 5
Connecting the SMV senders and receivers in the IET600
Figure 62: Connecting the SMV senders and receivers
Step 5 / 5
Save and export the SCD file and import it to PCM600
Application configuration of the SMV receiver
TVTR function blocks are used in receiver application to perform the supervision for the sampled values and to connect the received analog
voltage inputs to the application. When SMVRCV is connected to the TVTR inputs, the connected TVTR does not physically measure its
analog inputs if they are available in the protection relay. SMVRCV function block outputs need to be connected according to the SMV
application requirements, typically all three analog phase voltages connected either to ULTVTR1 or alternatively only a single analog phase
voltage UL1 connected to the ULTVTR2 input. RESTVTR1 input is typically connected only in case there is measured neutral voltage needed
and then available from the sender.
Figure 63: Receiving all phase voltages and residual voltage using SMV
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Synchrocheck function requires and uses only single analog phase voltage (UL1) connected to ULTVTR2.
Figure 64: Receiving line voltage for synchrocheck functionality using SMV
The ALARM output of UL1TVTR1 function block should be connected to ensure failsafe operation in all circumstances. The WARNING output
is always internally active whenever the ALARM output is active. The WARNING in the receiver is activated if the synchronization accuracy of
the sender or the receiver is less than 4 μs. The output is held on for 10 s after the synchronization accuracy returns within limits. The ALARM
in the receiver is activated if the synchronization accuracy of the sender or the receiver is unknown, less than 100 ms or more than one
consecutive frame is lost. The output is held on for 10 s after the synchronization accuracy returns within limits.
Figure 65: Application Configuration tool logic examples for the SMV fail save operation
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Ethernet
3.5.1
Requirements
Electro Magnetic Immunity (EMI)
The IEC 61850-3 standard outlines the EMI immunity requirements for communication equipment installed in substations. EMI phenomena
include inductive load switching, lightning strikes, electrostatic discharges from human contact, radio frequency interference due to personnel
using portable radio handsets, ground potential rise resulting from high current fault conditions within the substation and a variety of other
events commonly encountered in the substation.
Environmental Robustness
Both the IEC 61850-3 standard and the IEEE P1613 standard define the atmospheric environmental requirements for network communication
devices such as the Ethernet switches in substations. Devices connected to the substation network have to be specifically toughened for the
substation environment.
Real-Time Operation
Modern managed Ethernet switches offer advanced Layer 2 and Layer 3 features that are critical for real-time control and substation
automation. These include:
·
IEEE 802.3x Full-Duplex operation on all ports, which ensures that no collisions occur and thereby makes Ethernet much more
deterministic. There are absolutely zero collisions in connections that both support IEEE 802.3x Full-Duplex operation.
·
IEEE 802.1p Priority Queuing, which allows frames to be tagged with different priority levels in order to ensure that real-time critical
traffic always makes it through the network even during periods of high congestion.
·
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN which allows the segregation and grouping of protection relays into virtual LANs in order to isolate real-time
protection relays from data collection or less critical protection relays.
·
IEEE 802.1w Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol, which allows the creation of fault tolerant ring network architectures that will
reconfigure in milliseconds as opposed to tens of seconds, as was the case for the original Spanning Tree Protocol 802.1D.
It is important to note that the above features are based on standards, thereby ensuring interoperability amongst different vendors.
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3.5.2
Technology
Metal cabling
Metal cabling consists of four twisted pairs terminated with RJ-45 (not ruggedized) connectors. The cabling should be shielded CAT6 S /
FTP or better. In general, metal cabling is susceptible to electromagnetic interference, therefore should be only used inside the
panels/switchgear.
Figure 66: FTP patch cable terminated with RJ-45 connectors
Fiber Optic
The ABB standard for fiber optic in substations is the multi-mode fiber cable 50 / 125 µm, 1 300 nm. Multi-mode communication links are
generally the most common due to the low cost of fiber cabling and transceivers. When forming a multi-mode link, multi-mode transceivers
must be used as well as multi-mode cabling. Multi-mode fiber cable 50 / 125 µm embodies a core size of 50 µm in diameter and a cladding
size of 125 µm. 62.5 / 125 µm cabling is generally the most popular one. The name “Multi-mode” comes from the fact that the light used to
transmit the data actually travels multiple paths within the core.
Patch cords
A patch cord or patch cable is an electrical or optical cable used to connect (“patch-in”) one device to another one for signal routing. The
patch cord is terminated by connectors on both ends. Interconnections between protection relays and the Ethernet switch and between
Ethernet switches inside the substation are made with the help of patch cables. Patch cables should be duplex; they have two fiber optics,
one used for data transmission and the other for data reception.
Figure 67: Fiber optic patch cable terminated with LC connectors
Fiber Optics Connector
Relion® protection relays are equipped with Small Form Factor connectors, type LC. The innovative LC design offers a form factor one-half
the size of current industry standards.
Figure 68: LC connectors
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Ethernet rear connections of protection relays
The Ethernet communication module is provided with either galvanic RJ-45 connection or optical multimode LC type connection, depending
on the product variant and the selected communication interface option.
Figure 69: Communication module with single Ethernet connector
Communication modules with multiple Ethernet connectors enable the forwarding of Ethernet traffic. These variants include an internal
Ethernet switch that handles the Ethernet traffic. All Ethernet ports share this one common MAC table Ethernet ports marked with LAN A and
LAN B are used with redundant Ethernet protocols HSR and PRP. The third port without the LAN A or LAN B label is an interlink port which
is used as a redundancy box connector with redundant Ethernet protocols.
Figure 70: Communication modules with multiple Ethernet connectors
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Managed Ethernet switches
A switch is an Ethernet device that filters and forwards data packets between the LAN segments. The switches operate on the data link layer
and occasionally the network layer. Packets that arrive on a port are analysed for errors and only forwarded onto the port that has a connection
to the destination device.
The AFS family offers many features which are required in the utility environments, including fast protection schemes, redundant power supply
and alarm contacts, and enables the stepwise introduction of Smart grid applications. Recommended types of managed Ethernet switches
are shown in table below.
Table 5: Recommended Managed Ethernet switches overview for UniGear Digital
Managed
Ethernet
switch type
Manufacturer
RSG2100
Siemens
19' switch
RSG2300
Siemens
up to 32x
19' switch (24xRJ-45, 8x
option)
RS900
Siemens
DIN Rail
switch
RS900G
Siemens
RS950G
Number of ports
HSR
PRP
Process
Station bus
redbox
redbox
RSTP SNTP PTPv2
bus
applications
functionality functionality
applications
x
x
x
x
x
x
up to 9x
(6xRJ-45, 3x option)
x
x
x
DIN Rail
switch
8xRJ-45, 2x option
x
x
x
Siemens
DIN Rail
switch
3x option,
2of3 HSR /PRP
x
x
AFS670
ABB
19' switch
up to 24x option
x
x
x
AFS675
ABB
19' switch
up to 28x option
x
x
x
AFS677
ABB
19' switch
16x option
x
x
AFS660 Basic
ABB
DIN Rail
switch
6xRJ-45, 2x option
x
x
x
AFS665 Basic
ABB
DIN Rail
switch
6xRJ-45, 4x option
x
x
x
AFS660
Compact
ABB
DIN Rail
switch
2xRJ-45, 4x option,
2of6 HSR /PRP
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
AFS660
Standard
ABB
DIN Rail
switch
4xRJ-45, 7x option,
2of11 HSR /PRP
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
AFS665
Standard
ABB
DIN Rail
switch
8xRJ-45, 3x option,
2of11 HSR /PRP
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
UniGear Digital
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up to19x option
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
51
Figure 71: Example of Managed Ethernet Switches from AFS family
Small form-factor pluggable (SFP) module / port
SFP modules allow users to select appropriate transceiver for each SFP port embedded in Ethernet switch to provide the required connection
over the available optical fiber type (for example multi-mode fiber or single-mode fiber) or over metal twisted pair type. SFP modules are
commonly available in several different categories: multi-mode fiber, single-mode fiber and twisted pair cabling. Fast Ethernet SFP modules
are not applicable for the slots (ports) that support only Gigabit Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet SFP modules are not applicable for the slots
(ports) that support Fast Ethernet. Only use ABB SFP modules for AFS family.
Figure 72: 1 - Fast Ethernet fiber optic SFP module, 2 - Gigabit Ethernet fiber optic SFP module
Figure 73: Installed SFP module in managed Ethernet switch AFS677
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Satellite controlled clock
A network time server with satellites reference clock for industrial applications. It synchronizes all connected devices using its reference time
source. Optional accessories usually are: antenna, antenna cable, antenna mount and lightning protection kit.
Recommended type of a compact substation clock, TTM 01-G manufactured by TEKRON, supports accurate GPS (USA) / GLONASS
(Russian) clock with sub-microsecond timing that is used to synchronize protection relays. Key features are:
·
·
·
Synchronization of IEEE 1588-2008 (PTPv2) compatible clients via IEEE C37.238-2011 Power Profile
Synchronization of NTP and SNTP compatible clients
1x RJ-45 or 1x multi-mode fiber optic interface
Refer to www.tekron.com for additional information.
Figure 74: Example of satellite controlled clock from Tekron with optional accessories
Other recommended type of substation clock is LANTIME M400 manufactured by Meinberg. It supports GPS / GLONASS clock and
synchronization of IEEE 1588-2008 (PTPv2) compatible clients via IEEE C37.238-2011 Power Profile, two step clock. Refer to
www.meinberg.de for additional information.
Figure 75: Example of satellite controlled clock from Meinberg
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Layout
The communication devices are usually mounted inside the low voltage compartment of the panel. Therefore the panels are ready for
connection. The main benefits of this solution are:
·
·
·
·
Cubicles are ready for connection
Saving space in substation building
Shorter communication links
Cheaper solution
Protection relays are connected to the Ethernet network in compliance with the Network Overview Diagrams. It is recommended to wire
communication link from Ethernet switch to protection relays and keep minimal allowed bend radius especially for fiber optic patch cords.
Figure 76: Low Voltage Compartment of UniGear panel
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3.5.3
Topologies
SINGLE network using Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) / Enhanced Media Redundancy Protocol (E-MRP)
The single network topology is the most common one, protection relays are connected to managed Ethernet switch via single connection.
The managed Ethernet switches form a physical loop (ring).
RSTP ring offer redundancy mechanism against link between switches failures, but not against protection relay link or switch failure. Rapid
Spanning Tree protocol always blocks one path to avoid duplicates. Moreover the RSTP ring cannot guarantee a zero or near-zero frame
loss upon network failure occurrence. It is supported by AFS and RUGGEDCOM family.
Figure 77: RSTP ring redundant structure
Media Redundancy Protocol (MRP) is a ring redundancy protocol defined in IEC 62439-2 standard. One of the Ethernet switches in the ring
acts as a Ring Manager. There is exactly one ring manger in the ring. With the help of the ring manager function, the two ends of a backbone
in a line structure can be closed to a redundant ring. The Ring Manager keeps the redundant line open as long as the line structure is intact.
If a segment fails, the ring manager immediately closes the redundant line, and line structure is intact again . E-MRP is a non standardized
enhanced version of MRP with decreased recovery time (Ring < 10 switches: < 10ms recovery time, Ring < 100 switches: < 40ms). It is
supported by AFS family.
MRP provides shorter switching times than RSTP, it is limited to ring topology and it covers much bigger networks in comparison to RSTP.
Coupling RSTP, MRP and E-MRP networks is possible.
Figure 78: MRP / E-MRP ring redundant structure
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Figure 79: Single network using RSTP / E-MRP
Network Redundancy
IEC 61850 standard specifies network redundancy that improves the system availability for substation communication. It is based on two
complementary protocols defined in the IEC 62439-3 standard: Parallel Redundancy Protocol and High Availability Seamless
Redundancy protocol. Both protocols are able to overcome failure of a link or switch with zero-switchover time. In both protocols, each
node has two identical Ethernet ports for one network connection. They rely on the duplication of all transmitted information and provide
zero-switchover time if links or switches fail, thus fulfilling all the stringent real-time requirements of substation automation. The choice between
these two protocols depends on the particular application and the required functionality.
Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP) networks using Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) / Enhanced Media Redundancy Protocol
(E-MRP)
In PRP, each node is attached to two independent networks operated in parallel. The networks are completely separated to ensure failure
independence and can have different topologies. Both networks operate in parallel, thus providing zero-time recovery and continuous
checking of redundancy to avoid failures. The PRP1 redundancy is supported by Relion ® 615 Series (RED615 only via fiber optic interfaces)
and 620 Series. SCADA system can be connected to PRP networks via redbox or directly if PRP redundancy is supported by SCADA.
Figure 80: PRP networks using RSTP / E-MRP
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High Availability Seamless Redundancy (HSR) network
The HSR ring applies the PRP principle of parallel operation to a single ring. For each message sent, a node sends two frames, one over
each port. Both frames circulate in opposite directions over the ring and every node forwards the frames it receives from one port to the
other. When the originating node receives a frame it sent, it discards the frame to avoid loops.
HSR redundancy is supported by Relion® 615 Series (RED615 only via fiber optic interfaces) and 620 Series.
Figure 81: HSR network
HSR network with redboxes
Figure 82: HSR network with redboxes
The maximum number of IEDs in a HSR ring is 30. It is not recommended to configure more than four SMV senders due to all information is
sent into both directions in parallel.
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Combined Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP) and High Availability Seamless Redundancy (HSR) networks
Combining PRP and HSR networks can be overcome some drawback of pure PRP or HSR network. PRP and HSR protocols have been
developed to work interoperable, because HSR ring applies the PRP principle of parallel operation to a single ring. PRP networks and HSR
rings are coupled through PRP / HSR redboxes. Two redboxes should be used per one ring to be redundant and have access to both PRP
networks. If one redbox fails the seamless redundancy is still available through the other. The redboxes divide HSR ring in two parts of equal
size minimizing the maximum number of hops.
Figure 83: Combined PRP and HSR networks
Comparison of network topologies
Comparison of network topologies is shown in table below.
Table 6: Comparison of network topologies
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3.5.4
Ethernet traffic estimation
MMS
0.01 Mbps
per a single protection relay
GOOSE
0.1 Mbps
in burst conditions per a single protection relay (two data sets)
SMV
5 Mbps
per a source protection relay
Fast Ethernet = 100 Mbps
The bandwidth of the HSR ring is half of the Fast Ethernet, because each message is sent in parallel into either direction.
For instance, estimated Ethernet traffic volume for a substation consisting of two sections (20x GOOSE sender, 2x SMV sender) is:
20 x 0.01 + 20 x 0.1 + 2 x 5 = 12.2 Mbps
Knowledge of data flows and traffic patterns allows for detecting bottlenecks and planning the network segmentation and segregation of
traffic.
3.5.5
Naming convention to identify protection relays
The protection relay name must be unique within the planned network. A default name is applied if it is not specified by the client and it is
based on the reference designation system of IEC 61346
·
·
·
Substation
3 characters
Voltage Level
1 character
·
B > 420kV
·
C < 380, 420> kV
·
D < 220, 380) kV
·
E < 110, 220) kV
·
F < 60, 110) kV
·
G < 45, 60) kV
·
H < 30, 45) kV
·
J < 20, 30) kV
·
K < 10, 20) kV
·
L < 6, 10) kV
·
M < 1, 6) kV
·
N < 1 kV
Voltage Level Index
1 character
·
·
Bay
Protection Relay
st
nd
rd
3 characters, 1 char. = letter, 2 -3 char. = digits
2 characters
For example, SubstationVoltagelevelVoltagelevelindexBayProtectionRelay
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SUBJ1J01A1
59
3.5.6
IP Address Allocation
The IP address is a number that identifies a network device. Each device connected to a network must have a unique address. The default
IP address range for a substation is: 172.16.X.X - 172.30.X.X. The IP addresses and IP masks are a specific feature of each device. In case
of device failure, the replacement device receives the same IP address. The IP address should be structured in a way to reflect the physical
plant layout according to IEC 61850-90-4.
·
172.NET.BAY.DEVICE
·
Subnet mask 255.255.0.0 (Class B)
·
16 - 30
· NET
16 = the highest voltage level,
17 = the second highest voltage level …
· BAY
·
·
·
·
0
1-169
170 - 179
201 - 250
Station level (PC, COM600S, Satellites reference clock ...)
Bays
Virtual bays (substitution of actual devices by simulation or calculation)
Station Level Ethernet Switches
· DEVICE
·
·
0
1- …
Bay Level Ethernet Switch
Protection relays
Note: PRP redundancy +100
Figure 84: Example of an allocation of device IP addresses
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3.5.7
Time synchronization
Accurate time synchronization with precision requirements of sub one microsecond is essential for a proper functionality of process bus.
Sampled measured values need to be synchronized between the sending and the receiving protection relays that perform protection or
control functions. The 615 and 620 series support the IEEE 1588 (PTPv2) protocol and Power Profile as defined in IEEE C37.238 to reach
required timing accuracy over an Ethernet network. Using the Ethernet network to propagate the timing signals eliminates extra cabling
requirements.
Figure 85: Example of IEEE 1588 time synchronization via the Ethernet network
Using the Best Master Clock (BMC) algorithm devices in the network with the most accurate time are determined, which are to be used as
a reference time source (Grandmaster). Subsequently the participating devices synchronize themselves with this reference time source. The
BMC algorithm run continuously to quickly adjust for changes in network configuration. IEEE 1588 networked protocol supports multiple
master clock, which improves redundancy and reliability of substation time synchronization system.
PTP clock types
·
·
Grandmaster clock
Ordinary clock
·
Transparent clock
is synchronized with an external source as a satellites (satellites reference clocks).
capable of acting as either a Master or a Slave clock (protection relay). In most network implementations
the clocks remain in the Slave state and only become Master when the Grandmaster fails.
corrects the time information before forwarding it without synchronizing itself (Managed Ethernet switch)
The PTP Clocks can be either one-step or two-step ones; their mixing should be avoided. Two step clock sends Sync message (contains
the approximate time) and follow-up message (contains more precise value of when Sync message left the clock). One step clock does not
send Follow-up message, instead the Sync message carries a precise time stamp. The One-step mode reduces network traffic and is
preferable.
System settings for the 3 rd party devices
·
To be capable of supporting the IEEE 1588-2008 (PTPv2) version of the standard
·
Preferably of 1588 type according to the Power profile, either via power profile parameters or by individually setting the parameters
according to the Power Profile, with implementation in line with the one-step mode.
Table 7: C37.238 Power Profile key parameters
Parameter
Value
Path delay
Peer to peer
VLAN
1 recommended
Ethertype
0x88f7
Announce period
1s
Sync period
1s
Pdelay period
1s
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Time synchronization schemes
Preferred schemes for HSR-PRP and PRP networks
The PRP redundancy protocol foresees that the grandmaster clock is doubly attached to both LANs. An ordinary clock therefore receives
the Sync (Follow-Up) and Announce messages from each LAN independently. The ordinary clock treats each side as a different clock, but
does not apply the Best Master Clock algorithm since both have the same identity. Locating two grandmaster clocks, one in each LAN also
possible, in that case the doubly-attached ordinary clocks execute the Best Master Clock algorithm to select the clock they are synchronized
to. However, singly attached nodes do not benefit from redundancy.
Figure 86: IEEE 1588 Time synchronization scheme for HSR-PRP networks
Figure 87: IEEE 1588 Time synchronization scheme for PRP networks
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3.5.8
Traffic segregation
SMV messages causing high traffic should be filtered out so that they do not reach network devices which do not subscribe to SMV
messages. This is done in managed Ethernet switch configuration which has to be configured to perform the filtering operation. Traffic over
Ethernet network is grouped into several virtual LANs.
·
·
·
VLAN ID = 1
(MMS, IEEE 1588, SNMP, …). It exists as default and its usage throughout LAN yields the same
behavior as if there were no VLANs (VLAN ID = 0)
VLAN ID = 1 000
(GOOSE messages)
VLAN ID = 3 000 – 3 511 (SMV stream). It is grouped based on sender and associated receivers.
Figure 88: Example of traffic segregation via building virtual LANs
Figure 89: Virtual LANs allocation in PRP-RSTP networks
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Figure 90: Virtual LANs allocation in HSR-PRP networks
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3.5.9
Protection relays
Ethernet rear ports and redundancy settings
IED configuration / Configuration / Communication / Ethernet / Communication: 0
·
·
·
IP address = IP number
Subnet mask = Subnet mask
Switch mode = HSR / PRP / Normal
Figure 91: Communication parameter setting dialog
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Ethernet rear ports supervision
RCHLCCH or / and SCHLCCH are used for supervision. RCHLCCH block supervises redundant channels and SCHLCCH block supervises
status of Ethernet ports.
RCHLCCH outputs signals
·
CHLIV
·
REDCHLIV
·
·
LNKLIV
REDLNKLIV
Status of redundant Ethernet channel LAN A. When redundant mode is set to HSR or PRP mode, value is True
if the protection relay is receiving redundancy supervision frames. Otherwise value is False.
Status of redundant Ethernet channel LAN B. When redundant mode is set to HSR or PRP mode, value is True
if the protection relay is receiving redundancy supervision frames. Otherwise value is False.
Link status of redundant port LAN A
Link status of redundant port LAN B
SCHLCCH outputs signals
·
CH1LIV
·
·
LNK1LIV
CH2LIV
·
·
LNK2LIV
CH3LIV
·
LNK3LIV
Status of Ethernet channel X1 / LAN1. Value is True if the port is receiving Ethernet frames. Valid only when
redundant mode is set to None or port is not one of the redundant ports (LAN A or LAN B)
Link status of Ethernet port X1 / LAN1
Status of Ethernet channel X2 / LAN2. Value is True if the port is receiving Ethernet frames. Valid only when
redundant mode is set to None or port is not one of the redundant ports (LAN A or LAN B)
Link status of Ethernet port X2 / LAN2
Status of Ethernet channel X3 / LAN3. Value is True if the port is receiving Ethernet frames. Valid only when
redundant mode is set to None or port is not one of the redundant ports (LAN A or LAN B)
Link status of Ethernet port X3 / LAN3
Figure 92: Adding RCHLCCH and SCHLCCH blocks in the Application Configuration Tool
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Figure 93: Status of Ethernet rear port displayed via ITT SA Explorer (on top and on bottom)
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3.5.10
Managed Ethernet switches
AFS Family
After connecting a notebook with the AFS Finder SW tool to any Switch Port, the following dialogue screen appears. AFS Finder automatically
searches the network for those devices, which support the AFS finder protocol. The next dialogue, opened by double clicking on the
respective switch in AFS finder, defines the IP address and netmask.
Figure 94: AFS switch screen
The user-friendly Web-based interface offers the possibility of operating the device from any location in the network via a standard browser
such as Mozilla Firefox or Microsoft Internet Explorer. Being a universal access tool, the Web browser uses an applet which communicates
with the device via the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). The Web-based interface allows the device to be graphically
configured and it uses Java. Java has to be enabled in the security settings of the Web browser.
Login
Default User name to configure the AFS67x family is admin and the password is admin.
Default User name to configure the AFS66x family is admin and password is abbadmin.
Figure 95: Login window
Notes on saving the Configuration profile
·
·
·
To copy changed settings to the volatile memory (RAM), click the Set button
To refresh the display in the dialogs, click the Reload button
To keep the changed settings even after restarting the device, click the Save button in Basic Settings / Load / Save dialog
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3.5.10.1 Basic Settings <Mandatory>
Basic Setting / Network
Mode/Local = enabled
VLAN / ID = 1
Local
·
·
IP address = IP number
Netmask = Netmask
AFS Finder Protocol / Operation = ON
Figure 96: Network parameters dialog
Basic Setting / Port configuration
Port on = enabled
Automatic Configuration
·
·
Enabled, Gigabits ports and TX (RJ-45) ports to protection relay supporting autonegotiation function
Disabled, fiber optic ports
Manual Configuration = Fixed speed to protection relay should be set
Manual cable crossing = enabled on one ring port, when automatic configuration is disabled
Flow control = disabled
Figure 97: Port Configuration dialog
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Basic Settings / Load / Save
The changes have to be stored to Device in a permanent way. If a yellow triangle with the exclamation mark is seen, the configuration does
not contain data entered permanently. After saving the configuration to the switch (Device) the yellow triangle symbol disappears.
Figure 98: Load/Save dialog
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3.5.10.2 Time Settings <Mandatory>
Time / PTP / Global
PTPv2 has to be configured in case SMV (IEC 61850-9-2LE) is used.
Operation IEEE 1588 / PTP = ON
Configuration IEEE 1588 / PTP / PTP Version-Mode
·
V2-transparent-clock; used only to correct and forward PTP messages. The device cannot become a PTPv2 master.
Figure 99: PTP Global dialog
Time / PTP / Version 2(TC) / Global
Profile Presets / Profile = Power - Defaults
Operation IEEE 1588 / PTPv2 TC
·
·
·
·
·
·
Delay mechanism = P2P (Peer to Peer)
Primary Domain = 0
Network protocol = IEEE 802.3
Syntonize = enabled to synchronize also local time
Power TLV Check = enabled
VLAN = 1
Figure 100: PTP Version 2 (Transparent Clock) Global dialog
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Time / PTP / Version 2(TC) / Port
PTP Enable = enabled on all ports
Figure 101: PTP Version 2 (Transparent Clock) Port dialog
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3.5.10.3 Switching Settings (VLAN) <Mandatory>
The traffic segregation is essential especially for process bus to reduce data traffic and to let it go only where needed (for example GOOSE,
SMV shared between protection relays should be not sent to the control system, SMV should be sent only where required). Traffic filtering in
managed Ethernet switches can be done via logical separation of the data traffic to several VLANs or via multicast MAC address filtering for
ports.
Switching / Global
Global setting should be kept as default.
Configuration
·
·
·
Activate Flow Control = disabled
Address Learning = enabled; it is disabled only to observe data at all ports (disable direct packet distribution)
Frame size = 1 522, 1 552 is intended for double VLAN tagging
Figure 102: Switching Global dialog in AFS67x (on top) and AFS66x (on bottom)
Switching / VLAN / Global
Configuration
·
·
VLAN 0 Transparent Mode / VLAN Unaware Mode = disabled
GVRP active = disabled (enabled to synchronize VLAN information between Ethernet switches)
Learning/Mode/Independent VLAN = enabled
Figure 103: VLAN Global dialog in AFS67x
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Switching / VLAN / Static
This item is used to configure outgoing packets from the switch. New VLAN ID Entries as per the protection relays engineering have to be
created.
VLAN ID
·
·
GOOSE ranging from
SMV ranging from
1 000 to 1 511
3 000 to 3 511
Name = for information purpose on the switch only
Untagged ports = U, All ports in VLAN ID 1 except ring, PRP, HSR ports. It is possible to connect engineering tools, Internet Explorer or other
features via this untagged VLAN
Tagged ports = T, All ports in the other VLAN IDs (ring, PRP, HSR, GOOSE and SMV receiver)
= -, Port is not member of VLAN and does not transmit data packets of VLAN
Figure 104: VLAN Static dialog
Switching / VLAN / Port
Ingress Filtering = enabled on all ports. The port evaluates the received VLAN tags and transmits messages relevant to VLANs configured
for this port; other messages are discarded.
GVRP = disabled on all ports
Figure 105: VLAN Port dialog
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3.5.10.4 Redundancy Settings RSTP <Conditional>
Redundancy / Spanning Tree / Global
Operation = ON
Protocol version = RSTP
Protocol Configuration / Information
·
·
·
·
·
Priority
·
4 096 for Root (Master) Switch
·
8 192 for Backup Root Switch
·
32 768 for all Bay (Slave) Switches
Hello Time = 2 s
Forward Delay = 15 s
Max Age = 20 s
MRP Compatibility = disabled; enabled if MRP ring ID is used together with RSTP
Figure 106: Spanning Tree Global dialog
Redundancy / Spanning Tree / Port
STP active = enabled for all ports
AdminEdge Port = enabled for all ports except the ring ones
AutoEdge Port = enabled for all ports
Figure 107: Spanning Tree Ports dialog
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3.5.10.5 Redundancy Settings E-MRP <Conditional>
E-MRP ring is supported only by AFS family. Spanning Tree Operation is off (Redundancy / Spanning Tree / Global / Operation) or STP
protocol is disabled on all ports used for E-MRP (Redundancy / Spanning Tree / Port) before configuring the E-MRP.
Redundancy / Ring Redundancy
Version = E-MRP (not all switches support E-MRP; use same version for all switches)
Ring Port 1 & 2 = Ring Ports used for E-MRP
Ring Manager / Mode = enabled in one switch (Ring Manager)
Ring Manager / Mode = disabled in in all ring switches except of switch (Ring Manager)
Operation = ON
VLAN/VLAN ID = 1
Switches / Number = the number of switches in the ring
Figure 108: E-MRP Ring Redundancy dialog
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3.5.10.6 Redundancy Settings PRP and HSR <Conditional>
Supported by AFS66x. The PRP and HSR networks are always connected to AFS66x via ports 1/1 and 1/2, marked as port 1A and port 2B.
Both ports support fiber optic connection (SFP slot) or twisted-pair connection (RJ-45 socket). PRP function replaces interfaces 1/1 and 1/2
with interface prp/1 and HSR function replaces interfaces 1/1 and 1/2 with interface hsr/1, that is why it is recommended to initialize
configuration process of the Ethernet switch with redundancy settings if it is applicable.
Figure 109: Example of AFS660 Front view
Switching / Global
Configuration / VLAN Unaware mode = disabled (another name for the VLAN 0 transparent mode). When VLAN Unaware mode is enabled,
the device transmits data packets to all learned ports without evaluating or changing the VLAN tagging in the data packet. The priority
information remains unchanged.
Figure 110: Switching Global dialog
L2-Redundancy / PRP / Configuration
MRP and STP protocol cannot operate on the same ports as PRP
·
·
STP protocol is disabled on ports used for PRP (Redundancy / Spanning Tree / Port (both tabs))
PRP ports are different from MRP or MRP operation is completely disabled
Operation = ON
Ports A, B = ON, other devices not providing support to PRP are connected to other ports.
Figure 111: PRP Configuration dialog
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L2-Redundancy / HSR / Configuration
MRP and STP protocol cannot operate on the same ports as HSR
·
STP protocol is disabled on ports used for HSR (Redundancy / Spanning Tree / Port (both tabs))
·
HSR ports are different from MRP or E-MRP operation is completely disabled
Operation = ON
Ports A, B = ON, other devices not providing support to HSR are connected to other ports.
HSR parameter
·
·
·
HSR mode = modeu (host operates as a proxy for destination device, it forwards unicast traffic around the ring and forwards it to
destination address, when the frames return to the source node it discards the unicast message) / modeh (host operates as a proxy
for destination device, it removes unicast traffic from the ring and forwards it to destination address)
Switching node Type = hsrredboxsan (to connect non HSR device to HSR ring) / hsrredboxprpa (to connect HSR ring to PRP
LAN A) / hsredboxprpb (to connect HSR ring to PRP LAN B)
RedBox Identity = Id1a / Id1b, specifies the tags for PRP LAN traffic
Figure 112: HSR Configuration dialog
3.5.10.7 Advanced Settings <Optional>
Advanced / Industrial Protocols / IEC61850-MMS
Operation = ON to make information related to the Ethernet switch available on the IEC 61850 network.
Figure 113: IEC61850-MMS Configuration dialog
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3.5.11
Satellite controlled clock
3.5.11.1 Tekron
After connecting a notebook with the Tekron clock configuration tool software (available from www.tekron.com) to Ethernet port of Tekron
device, the following dialogue screen appears. Tekron clock configuration tool automatically discover connected unit supposing (Discover
button).
Figure 114: Tekron clock configuration Tool
Configuration procedure is initiated by Configure button after selecting of unit from the list. Default login is: User Name - admin, Password Password. The procedure can be blocked by Windows firewall settings.
Network / Basic Settings
Advanced Options = enabled
IPv4
·
·
·
·
Method / Static = enabled
IP address = IP number
Netmask = Netmask
Gateway = IP number
VLAN
·
·
·
·
Enable = enabled
ID = 1
Priority = 4
Tagged traffic / PTP = enabled
Ethernet
·
Link Settings = 100Mbps + Full duplex
Figure 115: Basic setting dialog
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Network / PTP Settings
Enable = enabled
Profiles = C37.238
Grandmaster Priority #1 = 120 (128 default setting)
Figure 116: PTP setting dialog
Ethernet switch - Basic settings / Port configuration
Ethernet switch port, where TEKRON clock is connected, has to have Automatic Configuration disabled and 100 Mbit/s FDX mode.
Figure 117: Port Configuration dialog
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3.5.11.2 Meinberg
The LANTIME M400 timeserver can be configured via several user interfaces (for example local display, web interface).
Web interface
For first time installation enter IP address, netmask for Ethernet connection LAN0 of LANTIME via local HMI and then connect to the web
interface by entering IP address of the LANTIME into the address field of a web browser. Default User name to configure device is root and
password is timeserver.
PTP Settings
Figure 118: PTP setting dialog
PTP Setting / Interface 01 / Global
Select Profile = Power
Priority1 = 120 (128 default setting)
Other setting is default
Figure 119: PTP Global settings dialog
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PTP Setting / Interface 01 / Network
Enable DHCP-Client = Static
TCP/IP Address = IP number
Netmask = Netmask
Gateway = IP number
Other setting is default
Figure 120: PTP Network settings dialog
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Glossary
615 series
Relion® 615 series protection and control relays
620 series
Relion® 620 series protection and control relays
ACT
Application Configuration Tool
AFS Family
ABB FOX Switch family for utility applications
APPID
Application Identifier in GOOSE and SMV messages
ASDU
Application Service Data Unit
BC
Boundary clock
BMC
Best Master Clock algorithm
Control Block
It defines HOW and WHEN data is sent to WHOM
CT
Current Transformer
Data set
It defines WHAT data is sent
EMI
Electro Magnetic Immunity
Ethernet
A standard for connecting a family of frame-based computer networking technologies into a
LAN
E-MRP
Enhanced Media Redundancy Protocol with decreased recovery time
FDX
Full Duplex
FTP
Foiled Twisted pairs
GOOSE
Generic Object-Oriented Substation Event
GLONASS
Global Navigation Satellite System
GoID
GOOSE message identifier
GPS
Global Positioning System
GVRP
Generic VLAN Registration Protocol
HMI
Human Machine Interface
HSR
High Availability Seamless Redundancy
HW
Hardware
ID
Identifier
IGMP
Internet Group Management Protocol
IEC
International Electrotechnical Commission
IEC 61850
International standard for communication networks and systems for power utility automation
IEC 61850-8-1
Station bus (MMS + GOOSE)
IEC 61850-9-2
Process bus
IEC 61439
International standard for High availability automation networks
IED
Intelligent electronic Device
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The IEEE standard groups defined the PTP
and Power profile
IEEE 1588
Standard for Precision clock Synchronization Protocol for Networked Measurement and
Control Systems
IET600
Integrated Engineering Toolbox
IP
Internet Protocol
ITT
Integrated Testing Toolbox for efficient testing and commissioning of IEC 61850 based
Substation Automation Systems
I/O
Input / Output
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KECA
Indoor Current Sensor
KEVA
Indoor Voltage Sensor
LAN
Local Area Network
LC
Type of connector for glass fiber cable
LE
Light Edition (Lite Edition)
MAC
Media Access Control
Mbps
Megabit per second
MMS
Manufacturing Message Specification
MRP
Media Redundancy Protocol (according IEC 62439)
E-MRP
Enhanced Media Redundancy Protocol
MV
Medium voltage
NTP
Network Time Protocol
PC
Personal computer
PCM600
Protection and control relay Manager
PPS
Pulses per second
PRP
Parallel Redundancy Protocol
PTPv2
Precision Time Protocol Version 2
REF615
Feeder protection and control relay
REF620
Feeder protection and control relay
Redbox
Redundancy box connects non-PRP / non-HSR devices to high availability IEC 62439
networks
RED615
Line differential protection and control relay
REM615
Motor protection and control relay
REM620
Motor protection and control relay
RJ-45
Galvanic connector type
RSTP
Rapid spanning tree protocol
SA
Substation Automation
SCADA
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition
SCD
SCL file type (Substation Configuration Description)
SCL
XML-based substation description configuration language defined by IEC 61850
SFP
Small form-factor pluggable
SMV
Sampled Measured Value
SNMP
Simple Network Management
SNTP
Simple Network Time Protocol
SvID
Sampled value message identifier
TC
Transparent clock
TLV
Type Length Value
VLAN
Virtual LAN
VT
Voltage Transformer
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Document revision history
Technical revision / Date
Main changes
A / 2014
First release
B / 2015-01-16
New switchgear types for UniGear Digital (UniGear ZS1 24kV, UniGear 550, UniGear 500R, UniGear MCC)
3D models of switchgear panels
Extended sensor product portfolio for UniGear Digital
Engineering of sensors including setting examples
Updated recommended network topologies (HSR networks with redboxes, HSR-PRP networks)
Updated recommended time synchronization schemes (HSR-PRP networks)
HSR and IEEE1588 v2 support in AFS 66x
Examples of test setups for current and voltage sensors
Ethernet testing
C / 2015-12-01
615 series 5.0 FP1 (new functionality: for example IEC 61850 Edition 2 support, synchrocheck function with
IEC 61850-9-2LE, RED615 supports HSR, PRP and IEC61850-9-2LE)
Connecting GOOSE sender data to a protection relay application in PCM600
Application configuration of the SMV receiver
Protection relay Ethernet rear ports setting and supervision
Updated engineering of current sensors (RSV up to 150 mV/Hz)
Small form-factor pluggable module / port
Recommended Satellite controlled clocks and their engineering
Updated recommended network topologies (Enhanced Media redundancy protocol)
Recommended primary testing device for sensors
Detailed test setup for Omicron
D / 2017-01-02
Ethernet technology extended about Ethernet rear connections of protection relays
620 series 2.0 FP1 (new functionality: for example IEC 61850 Edition 2 support, synchrocheck function with
IEC 61850-9-2LE, REM620 supports sensor inputs)
Testing section has moved to UniGear Digital Commissioning and testing Guide
Updated pictures with UniGear ZS1 Digital (17.5 kV, 4 000 A, 50 kA) – a new post insulator support
Automatic port configuration in Ethernet switch for connected protection relays via metal cabling
Ethernet channel supervision function blocks (RCHLCCH and SCHLCCH)
Coupler adapter AR5 – three phases adapter
ESSAILEC® RJ45 test block
Removal of SNTP-> IEEE1588 Time synchronization scheme (It is not optimal solution for UniGear Digital)
ABB s.r.o.
EPMV Brno
Videnska 117
619 00 Brno, Czech Republic
Phone: +420 547 152 413
Fax:
+420 547 152 190
e-mail:[email protected]
http://www.abb.com/mediumvoltage
UniGear Digital
Engineering Guide
1VLG500007 D © Copyright 2017 ABB.
All rights reserved.
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