referee manual - Portland Youth Soccer Association

referee manual - Portland Youth Soccer Association
Portland Youth Soccer Association
REFEREE MANUAL
2016/2017
PYSA REFEREE MANUAL
2016/2017
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction Letter
Administrative Information
Game Field Location
Game Checklist
Officiating Points
Modified Soccer Laws for PYSA
PYSA Soccer Referees
Responsibilities of Referees
Recipe for Success
PYSA Soccer Primer
Yellow & Red Cards
Signals of the Referee
Referee Field Positions
Shoe Policy
PYSA Referee's Guide
Portland Youth Soccer Association
4840 SW Western Ave., #700
Beaverton, OR 97005
Ph. 503-646-6683
email: [email protected]
www.portlandyouthsoccer.com
Welcome to the 2016/2017 Portland Youth Soccer
Association (PYSA).
Your role as a PYSA soccer referee is a key factor in the
success of providing top quality recreational soccer to
Portland area children.
Enclosed you will find the following helpful materials:
PYSA Shoe Policy
PYSA Disciplinary Policy
PYSA Misconduct Report (Sample)
PYSA Referee Evaluation Form (Sample)
PYSA Assistant Referee’s Guide
Other helpful materials
Please take this Referee Packet to all of your games. As you
will see, it is a valuable source of information. Please use
your Referee Packet throughout the year to be
knowledgeable of PYSA laws and procedures. This packet,
your training sessions, and your actual refereeing game
experience are intended to provide you with the skills to
properly manage and conduct PYSA soccer matches at the
youth level.
If you have any questions about pay contact the PYSA office
503-646-6683. If you have a game conflict and cannot
referee your game, it is your responsibility to handle this as
far in advance through the www.oregonsoccercentral.com
web site.
The PYSA Referee Mentors will be conducting referee
evaluations each weekend. The purpose of the referee
evaluation is to assist you in becoming the best referee you
can be. Beginning referees will be evaluated at least once
during their first fall or spring season. You will receive a copy
of the written referee evaluation.
If you have any questions or concerns during the season,
please leave a message on the PYSA office phone at 503646-6683 or via email at
[email protected] We will respond to
all calls within 24 hours.
ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION
1. EMPLOYMENT FORMS:
Referees must complete payroll forms before any games can
be assigned! These forms include:
a. W-9 Independent Contractor
b. Calendar confirming available dates to work
2. GAME PAYMENT:
A. Payment chart
Game level
Pay Per Game
U9 – U10
$ 20.00
U11 – U12
$ 30.00
U13 – U14
$ 40.00
All beginning referees will be required to work U9, U10 and some
U11 games the first year.
B.
If you are sent to a field to referee and the game has been
cancelled, you will still be paid. If you have other games at
that field, do not assume they are cancelled. Pay periods
will begin after the second game of the season, and checks
will be mailed every two weeks. Checks will be mailed to
the address on the W-9 Form.
C.
Referees must be responsible for reporting their
scores in order to receive compensation. All scores
must be reported in the Game Report found on
www.oregonsoccercentral.com web site by 5:00 PM on the
Monday following the game.
3. ASSIGNMENTS:
A. PYSA will make all game assignments.
Assignments for games will be posted on the
www.oregonsoccercentral.com web site. PYSA will schedule
all initial games for new referees. PYSA will assume that all
referees are available every weekend, starting August 29th,
2015, to referee from 8:30AM to 5:00PM. Assignments will be
made directly off the calendar you completed. If you have a
conflict (PSAT or SAT testing, for example) it is your
responsibility to inform PYSA of the dates as far in advance as
possible. Your fellow referees and PYSA will appreciate this.
Any cancellations must be made online under
www.oregonsoccercentral.com before Thursday evening at 5pm.
PYSA has adopted a 3-Strike Policy:
First late cancellation or no-show to an assignment may be
excused with a written explanation and a phone call to
PYSA. Second late cancellation or no-show to an assignment
might be excused with a written explanation and a meeting with
a member of PYSA.
Third late cancellation will terminate a working relationship with
PYSA.
Expect a follow-up phone call to verify the reason for your
absence if you do not work your game and do not notify us.
Remember, there are approximately 30 players, several
coaches, and 40 to 50 parents depending on you for
each game.
GAME FIELD LOCATIONS
See the PYSA web site, www.portlandyouthsoccer.com or
www.oregonsoccercentral.com
GAME CHECKLIST FOR REFEREES
1.) Game Preparation and Equipment
Referees will wear proper uniform to all games (yellow shirt or
black when teams wear yellow, shorts, black 3- white-striped
socks and soccer shoes). Referees must have a hand whistle,
yellow/ red cards, timing device and flags), a pocket-sized pad to
record the scores and names of player(s) or given yellow/red
cards, or any incidents. Make sure you have the following
equipment before leaving for your games.
*Uniform (as described above)
*Assistant Referee flags
*Whistle (and back up)
*Coin
*Stop Watch
*Pad of paper & pencil
*Yellow and red cards
*Game assignments
*PYSA Referee Manual
*Code of Conduct Card
2.) Early Arrival
Set out your referee uniform (shirt, shorts, and socks) and
equipment the night before your game. Remember that all
sweatshirts must be worn under your referee shirt and the color
should not differ from the color of the referee shirt. Referees
should arrive at the field of play at least 20 minutes before their
first scheduled game. If you don’t know where the field is, find
out during the week. Don’t wait until Saturday morning to try to
locate the field. Most directions are available on the PYSA
web site, www.portland youthsoccer.com.
Make sure your shirt is tucked in and your socks are pulled
up.
3.) Field Inspection
The referee’s first task is to inspect the field of play. To ensure
the safety of the players, broken glass and other debris should
be removed before the play begins. Make sure corner cones or
flags are in place (if available). Use soccer balls, coats, or bags if
no cones are available. During this time, you may have to remind
coaches to start warming up, choosing captains, etc. You have
the right to abandon the game if unsafe field conditions (such as
unstable goal posts, lightning, and ice) will pose a danger to the
players.
4.) Player Inspection
Referees should conduct an orderly pre-game inspection of all
players and their equipment. At this time introduce yourself to the
coaches and ask for an assistant referee from each team.
PYSA team rosters are required for all players and coaches,
either a paper version or on their IPhone. No need to collect
them.
The Player’s Code of Conduct must be read to both teams
(including coaches) before the kickoff to start the game. You may
do this for each team after introducing yourself to the coaches
and checking the players equipment or for both teams at once by
assembling all the players (starters & substitutes) from both
teams at centerfield before kickoff (after coin flip) and read to
both teams at the same time.
ALL PLAYERS
Must wear shin guards, covered by socks.
Must wear approved soccer shoes. (See enclosed PYSA
Shoe Policy)
Must wear matching jerseys. All players on the field must be
attired in matching jerseys, except goalkeepers, who must wear
colors that distinguish them from all other players on the field. In
case of a color similarity between teams, the home team will
change or reverse jerseys.
May not wear articles that may injure themselves or another
player. Absolutely no jewelry may be worn during game
play. That includes all types of earrings (NO TAPING, NO
EXCEPTIONS), or body jewelry, watches, rings, necklaces,
bracelets, wristbands, do-rags, or casts, Hair bands, if used,
must be elastic. Any other articles, which in the opinion of
the referee may endanger the player or other players, are
also not allowed. Make no exceptions!! Medical Alert
bracelets: may be worn around the neck or around the wrist.
(Preferably taped to the player’s shirt.)
Late arriving players must be inspected.
Players who are late getting to the game must pass the above
equipment check before entering play. Watch for equipment
violations throughout the game.
5.) Lines Instruction
Have each coach select a volunteer Assistant Referee to identify
when the ball goes out-of-bounds only. Meet with both Assistant
Referees and coaches (together) prior to the start of the game,
introduce yourself and explain what you want them to do. Parent
Assistant Referees do not signal/call offside or fouls.
6.) Game Ball Selection and Coin Toss
Referees are to conduct a brief pre-game conference with the
team captains. Have the captains introduce themselves and
shake hands. Have both teams bring you a game ball for
inspections, and pick the best ball that is the right size for that
age group. (Note: U9-U12 uses a #4 ball; U13 & older use a #5
ball). The game ball should be properly inflated, round, with no
loose panels, no exposed air valve. Conduct the coin flip. The
team that wins the coin toss decides which goal it will attack in
the first half of the match. The other team must kick off to start
the match.
7.) Game Schedule
You are expected to keep all games on schedule. If one of the
teams arrives late, you may have to shorten the halves so
subsequent game(s) starting times stay on schedule. Both
halves must be equal. The PYSA allows 5 to 10 minutes
between halves. Use this flexibility to keep the game on
schedule. Call the teams back to the field a little early so they
have time to assemble. Do not stop your watch for player injury.
8.) Game Scores, Cards and Incident Reports
Referees are required to keep an accurate record of the games
and scores of all games worked. Write the goals down when they
occur – not at the end of the game. Make sure team NAMES are
accurate (not just uniform color). Write down the full name (first
and last) and team name of any person given a yellow or red
card, or the person(s) responsible for game abandonment. Use
the cards, if necessary! A red card can be given first if the
situation warrants it, but a caution usually precedes it. Note any
problems that may come up regarding the behavior of a team,
coach or any spectator. You must report all incidents in the
Referee Report found on www.oregonsoccercentral.com.
9) Game Reports
Referees will be held responsible for reporting the scores of the
games that they referee. This is to be done by 5pm the following
Monday online. You must file a game report in order to be paid
for the game. Report yellow/red cards and game incidents with
the scores, so that PYSA may follow up to avoid future problems.
Also, report any player, coach, spectator problems, and field
conditions.
OFFICIATING POINTS
Players and Officials:
1.) Any player bleeding from a wound must leave the field of play
and may not return unless and until the bleeding is stopped. If
there is blood in any garment they are wearing, it has to be
changed before reentering the field. Of course, such a player
must receive a signal from the referee in order to reenter the
game
2.) The term “linesman” has been replaced with Assistant
Referee.
Start of Play:
3.) The team that wins the coin toss decides which goal it will
attack in the first half of the match. The other team must kick off
to start the match.
Ball in Play:
4.) On the kick off and penalty kicks, the ball is in play when it is
kicked and moves forward.
5.) On ALL free kicks and corner kicks, the ball is in play when it
is kicked and moves.
On direct and indirect free kicks and corner kicks, the ball needs
only be kicked and move to be considered in play.
Goal Scoring:
6.) A goal may be scored directly from a kick off
7.) A goal may be scored directly from a goal kick
8.) On a penalty kick, the defending goalkeeper must remain on
the goal line, facing the kicker, until the ball has been kicked. The
goalkeeper is permitted to move his/her feet while remaining on
the goal line (i.e., moving sideways). The goalkeeper is not
permitted to come off the line by stepping or lunging forward until
the ball is in play.
9.) A goal may be scored directly from a corner kick, direct free
kick, penalty kick or drop ball.
Goalkeeper:
10.) If a goalkeeper holds the ball for longer than 6 seconds the
Referee must deem it as time wasting and award an indirect free
kick to the opposing team.
11.) The goalkeeper may take unlimited steps in any direction
(within the penalty area) prior to kicking or throwing the ball into
play. The goalkeeper cannot take more than six (6) seconds
while controlling the ball with his hands before releasing it from
his possession. The goalkeeper may not touch the ball with
his/her hands again (second touch rule) after it has been
released from his /her possession until another player outside
the penalty area touches the ball. If the goalkeeper violates the
six (6) second rule or second touch rule, an indirect free kick is
awarded to the opposing team where the goalkeeper was when
the violation occurred.
12.) An indirect free kick (IFK) is awarded if a goalkeeper
handles the ball after receiving it from a throw-in from his own
team. (This rule is intended to compliment and extend the “back
pass” rule). For example, a goalkeeper who controls the ball with
his feet directly from a throw-in by his own team and who then,
with no intervening play of the ball by anyone else, proceeds to
handle the ball has committed an offense and must be penalized
with an IFK for the opposing team. This restriction does not apply
if an opponent of the goalkeeper performs the throw-in, nor does
it apply if the goalkeeper does not handle the ball.
Corner Kick:
13.) On corner kicks, the ball is placed inside the corner arc at
the nearest corner flag post. The ball must always be inside or
touching the lines enclosing the corner arc area.
Player and Coach Conduct:
14.) Unsporting behavior has replaced “ungentlemanly conduct”
as a cautionable offense.
15.) Failing to respect the required distance when play is
restarted and delaying the restart of play have become
cautionable offenses.
16.) Using offensive, insulting or abusive language has replaced
“foul and abusive language”.
MODIFIED SOCCER LAWS FOR PYSA
The following list identifies the PYSA variations and refinements
of the Standard Laws of Soccer for full- sided soccer games.
They are numbered to correspond to the soccer law they modify
or enhance. PYSA follows the Seventeen FIFA Laws of the
Game with the following modifications.
Basic Soccer Facts Chart by Age
Age Game Ball Size Game Time Goal Size Field Size Goalie
U6 Kindergarten players play within their club or within a regional
micro program
U7 3v3
#3 40 minutes 4 x 5 pop-up goal 30 x 20 yards NO
U8 4v4
#4 40 minutes 4 x 5 pop-up goal 40 x 30 yards NO
U9 7v7
U10 7v7
U11 9v9
U12 9v9
#4 50 minutes 6 x 18 feet
#4 50 minutes 6 x 18 feet
#4 60 minutes 8 x 24 feet
#4 60 minutes 8 x 24 feet
U13 11v11 #5 70 minutes 8 x 24 feet
U14 11v11 #5 70 minutes 8 x 24 feet
HS 11 v 11 #5 80 minutes 8 x 24 feet
55 x 40 yards YES
55 x 40 yards YES
70 x 50 yards YES
70 x 50 yards YES
110 x 70 yards YES
110 x 70 yards YES
110 x 70 yards YES
Law 1 – The Field of Play- The chart above lists the maximum
recommended field size and the desired goal size for each age
group. The Portland area has a wide range of field sizes and the
PYSA attempts match the teams in an age group with the
appropriate size field based on availability. Ensuring the safety of
the field is a shared responsibility and should be done when first
arriving at the field. Any unsafe field conditions that are not
correctable before the game should be immediately reported to
the PYSA office and the scheduled game abandoned (not
played).
Law 2 – The Ball- See the above chart. U9-U12 teams play with
a #4 size ball. U13-U14 teams play with a #5 size ball. Normally
the home team is responsible for providing the game ball.
However, both teams’ captains may agree to choose the visiting
team’s ball if they determine it to be a better ball.
Law 3 – Number of Players and Substitution- The chart above
lists the number of players on the field and the maximum team
roster size by age group. At U11 and older the minimum number
of players for a game is seven (7) per team. The players must
have the referee’s permission to both enter and leave the field of
play. Violation of this law is a cautionable offense. Some
additional rules regarding players are:
Player Age- Players must play on a team proper for their grade
in school. Younger children may play on older teams but this is
not recommended. Children who have special requirements to
play on a team younger than their school age must apply for and
be granted a special waiver from the PYSA Board.
Playing Time- All players are entitled to play at least on half of
each game for which they suit up. The PYSA understands that
failure to practice; disciplinary action, sickness or injury might be
cause for an individual to play less.
Substitution Rules- Substitutions shall be unlimited as far as
the number of players and may be made, with the consent of the
referee, on any dead ball.
Any player receiving a yellow card (official caution) must leave
the game before play resumes. Another player may be
substituted for that player. The cautioned player may reenter
play at his/her team’s next substitution opportunity. Substitution
is not allowed for a player receiving a red card.
When a player is bleeding or has an open wound or excessive
blood on his/her uniform, he must leave the field immediately,
and can return only when the bleeding has stopped, the wound
is covered, and/or he has a clean uniform. The player may return
at the next legal substitution opportunity.
Law 4 – Player Equipment- All players on the field must wear
shin guards, covered by socks, and PYSA approved soccer
shoes (See PYSA Shoe Policy). All players on the field must be
attired in matching jerseys, except goalkeepers, who must wear
colors that distinguish them from all other players on the field. In
case of a color similarity the home team will change or reverse
jerseys. No type of earrings, watches, rings, necklaces,
bracelets, wristbands, or casts may be worn during the game
play and should not be worn during practice. Hair bands, if used,
must be elastic. No tape! No exceptions! Other articles, which in
the opinion of the referee may endanger the player or other
players, are also not allowed. Medical Alert Bracelets: may be
worn, preferably taped.
Law 5 – Referee- For U9 teams the referee will try to provide a
clear description and in some cases a demonstration of the
reason a player was called for an infraction of the rules. If a
player appears seriously injured, i.e.: head injury or kick to the
shins, stop the game immediately. Motion the coach onto the
field to get player. After stopping play for an injury, restart the
game with a drop ball if the ball was in play at the time you
stopped the game; if the ball was out of play, restart the game
with the appropriate action: throw-in, goal kick, or corner kick.
The PYSA referee has full authority to enforce the Laws of the
Game for the match to which he/she has been assigned.
Law 6 – Assistant Referee’s (AR’s) - The PYSA provides
referees, but not assistant referees. The referee will ask
each team to provide a volunteer assistant referee to help
make out of bound calls. Their primary duty will be to raise
the flag to let the referee know when the whole ball
completely crosses the outside edge of the touch line, and
to call out the color of the team that will take the throw in.
The referee has final say on who will throw the ball in.
Assistant Referees are not to signal/call offside or fouls. The
referee will provide assistant referee flags. The AR’s primary
responsibilities are to indicate (subject to the final decision
of the referee): When ball is out of play Which side is
entitled to a corner kick, goal kick, or throw in When a
substitution is desired
Law 7 – Length of Game – Refer to the chart. Game time is
equally divided into two halves with a 5-10 minute break in
between. The length of game may need to be shortened
because of a late start, etc. In such case, two equal periods will
attempt to be played. Conversely, additional time is normally not
added for time lost due to injury, penalties, substitution, time
wasting, etc.
Law 8 – The Start and Restart of Play- The visiting team
always calls the coin flip. The team that wins the coin toss
decides which goal it will attack in the first half of the match. The
other team must take the kickoff to start the match.
A drop ball will restart the play in the following circumstances:
(1) After an injury (when the ball was in play when play was
stopped).
(2) When play was stopped because of a dog interfering with
play
(3) Whistle blown by mistake by the referee (inadvertent whistle).
Law 9 – The Ball In and Out of Play- The ball is out of play
when:
It has totally crossed the goal line or touch line whether on the
ground or in the air Play has been stopped by the referee
Law 10 – The Method of Scoring- A goal is scored when the
whole of the ball passes over the goal line, between the goal
posts and under the crossbar, provided that the team scoring the
goal has committed no infringement of the Laws of the Game
previously.
Law 11 – Offside- Offside and offside position are different
terms. It is not a violation of the Law to be in an offside position.
An offside violation occurs only when a player in an offside
position becomes involved in active play. For any offside offense,
the referee will award an indirect free kick to the opposing team
from the place where the player was when he was declared
offside.
Law 12 – Fouls and Misconduct – The following infractions are
in addition to the standard soccer fouls and are intended to
promote player safety.
Slide tackling, and playing the ball while on the ground when
another player is within playing distance of the ball, is not
allowed. For infringement of this rule an indirect free kick is
awarded.
No player shall make physical contact with the goalkeeper, or
attempt to play the ball once the goalkeeper has control of the
ball (defined as contact between any part of the goalkeeper and
the ball) and to any degree whatsoever within the penalty area.
Infringement of this rule is defined, as “dangerous play” and an
indirect free kick shall be awarded.
Intentional charging of a goalkeeper is defined as violent
conduct. Infringements of this nature require the ejection of the
guilty party and a direct free kick shall be awarded. Penalize foul
play to protect the players’ safety. Trifling or incidental fouls
should be dealt with verbally without stopping play.
A direct free kick (DFK) is awarded to the opposing team if a
player commits any of ten (DFK) offenses. An indirect free kick
(IFK) is awarded to the opposing team if a player commits any of
the eleven (IFK) offenses.
Law 13 – Free Kicks- For both direct and indirect free kicks, the
ball must be stationary when the kick is taken and the kicker may
not touch the ball a second time unless it has touched another
player.
Law 14 – The Penalty Kick- All players other than the kicker
and goalkeeper must be behind the penalty arc when the kick is
taken.
Law 15 – The Throw In- When a throw-in is done incorrectly,
the throw-in is awarded to the opposing team. No re-throws are
given for throw-ins U9 and older.
Law 16 – The Goal Kick- The goal kick is taken from any point
within the goal area by a player of the defending team.
For U9 and U10 play only, goal kick, are taken at the top of
the penalty box (vs. the goal area) and is in play when it
leaves the penalty area. Defending team MUST be behind
the half way line until the ball clears the box. The kicker may
not play the ball a second time until another player touches
it.
Law 17 – The Corner Kick- Opponents must remain at least 10
yards from the ball until it is in play. The ball is in play when it is
kicked and moves.
PYSA SOCCER REFEREES
It’s the Referee’s Responsibility to Control and Manage the
Game
You control and manage a soccer game by:
1) Pre-game Preparation
a.
Your pre-game preparation begins when your last game
ends. Do a self-analysis of your performance.
b.
Have uniform and equipment ready and bag packed.
c.
Have referee pocket pad completed with team,
home/visiting, age level, start time, etc. Do this before
arriving at the field.
d.
If unfamiliar with field, get directions before Saturday
morning.
e.
Arrive at the field at least 30 minutes early.
f.
Inspect the field- make sure it is safe to play on.
g.
Introduce yourself to the coaches and shake hands. Make
sure both coaches clearly hear your name.
h.
Check rosters, either on paper or IPhone.
i.
Inspect the players- make sure uniform & equipment is
okay. Nothing dangerous.
j.
Ask coaches for assistant referees (AR) volunteers and
instruct the AR’s in what you want them to do.
k.
Select a game ball- both teams provide a ball.
l.
Read Player Code of Conduct to both teams.
m.
Coin flip ceremony with team captains...Ask captains to
shake hands & introduce them selves. Remember the
visiting team always calls the coin flip.
n.
Start the game on time.
2) Control methods during the game
a.
Fitness- Stay close to the ball at all times. (12 to 18 yards )
(You cannot make calls if you do not see them)
b. Voice- talk to the players, issue verbal warnings. Let the
players know what they are doing wrong.
b.
Listen- listen carefully for coaches requesting substitution
and manage the substitution process.
c.
Whistle- use short, lighter toots for less serious calls. Use
longer, louder toots for more serious calls.
d.
Hand signals- display crisp, straight arm signals to
communicate your calls to players, coaches and
spectators.
e.
Cards- issue a yellow card (caution) and/or red card
(send off) when appropriate.
f.
Temporarily suspend the game- for example, if weather
changes present a danger to participants.
g.
Abandon the game- if players, coaches, and/or spectators
become uncontrollable.
3) After the game
h.
Return the ball to the coach.
i.
Retrieve your flags from the Assistant Referee and thank
them for helping you.
j.
Monitor the end of game “handshake.” Watch for
unsporting behavior.
k.
Report your game scores, field problems, and
misconduct’s on line at
www.oregonsoccercentral.com
l.
Your pre-game preparation begins when your last game
ends. Do a self-analysis of your performance. What
could you improve in?
RESPONSIBILITIES OF REFEREES
1)
Referees do not make the law: Their duty is to act in the
capacity of a judge and administer the law.
2)
The referee’s job is not to instruct the players in how to play
the game; they have to insure that they conduct
themselves properly in relation to the laws.
3)
THE SAFETY OF THE PLAYERS IS THE #1
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE REFEREE. Secondly they see
that neither the players not the teams take unfair
advantage of the opposing players and team.
4)
The referees owe their duty to the game and that means
the game in the widest sense.
5)
The referee has discretionary powers; use them wisely.
6)
One duty is to see that the game moves well, and is not
subject to undue delay.
7)
The referees are not performers; the less obtrusive they
are, (given that the game is being played according to the
laws and the spirit of the game), the better
8)
The carrying out of these responsibilities places certain
personal responsibilities on referees: a. They should be
physically and mentally fit. Physically, they must be able to
keep up with the fastest game. Mentally, they must be alert
and on the spot to give their best decisions.
b.
Their temperaments must be good. They must be
fearless, fair, and firm. They must not be influenced
by demonstrations on the part of players, coaches or
spectators.
c.
They must be honest and seek to be completely impartial
at all times.
9)
They must accept these responsibilities. They can delegate
certain functions to the assistant referees, but the
responsibility is theirs alone.
10) Learn and understand the laws a. Know the 16 and17 FIFA
Laws of the Game as modified by PYSA b. Be absolutely
fair and impartial in every decision c. Keep physically and
mentally fit d. Remember, constant whistling for trifling, and
doubtful violations produces bad feelings and loss of
temper on the part of players, and spoils the pleasure of
spectators.
11) Practice good communication skills with the players and
coaches a. Verbalize your calls b. Give correct arm
signals c. Blow the whistle LOUDLY to instruct, command
and control
12) Control entry and exit from the field. Players, spectators, or
coaches are not allowed on the field of play without the
permission of the referee.
YOU BUILD YOUR OWN REPUTATION
A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS
1) Stay with play (12 to 18 yards from the play).
2) Discipline must be administered with care and affection.
Leave the players with their dignity.
3) Don’t stifle feedback. You will spend more time with players
than you will spend with referees. Listen to them and learn. They
may not be right but you will learn.
4) Do not lecture the teams before the game.
5) Get the person who did it. Many fouls are done in retaliation.
Find out why the player committed the foul.
6) Take the time you need to do your job properly. Don’t rush.
Time is on your side.
7) He who runs into trouble gets into trouble faster. Don’t react
too fast. Don’t get involved physically. Give them a chance to
disengage.
8) Know and enforce the Laws of the game and the PYSA
Modified Laws. I.e.The home team’s switch fields at half time at
the U9 level.
9) Know and enforce the PYSA rules.
10) Keep in shape.
11) Think like a player.
12) Be at the field 30 minutes before game time
13) Start games on time
14) Dress in a professional manner, and conduct yourself
accordingly.
15) Penalize foul play- protect the safety of players. A yellow/red
card will be too late if someone gets injured.
16) Use your whistle correctly to indicate seriousness It shows
confidence in yourself and your calls. Use light whistle for simple
incidents; use a hard whistle for more serious calls and foul play.
17) Always use arm signals; you help everyone know what’s
happening Indicate direction of throw or kick, place of throw-in
kick type or kick (corner, goal, indirect or direct, etc.
18) Verbalize every call; players and coaches may not see the
arm signals.
19) Be consistent in your calls throughout the game.
20) Take time to deal with players, coaches, and spectators
causing problems. If you don’t now, chances are they will cause
more problems in their next game for you or another referee.
Don’t pass problems on to other referees by not dealing with
them.
21) Enforce the Offside Rule.
PYSA SOCCER PRIMER
The Game
The game of soccer is played on a level field (the “pitch”) similar
to a football field with goals at each end. The size of the field and
goal varies depending on the age of the players. Two teams face
each other and try to put the ball in the opponent’s goal. The
team with the most goals at the end of the game wins.
The Team
U9 teams play 7v7. U9 Goal Kicks may be taken from any point
inside the penalty area (vs. the goal area) and is in play when it
leaves the penalty area. Opponents must be 10 yards from the
kicker. The kicker may not play the ball a second time until
another player touches it.
U10 teams play 7v7. U11-12teams play 9v9. Older teams field a
team of 11 players. Each team is comprised of a goalkeeper,
defenders, mid fielders and forwards. All positions are equally
important. All players must develop offensive and defensive skills
and every player has the potential to be a scorer. There is no
such thing as a fixed space or position in soccer. Players may
interchange positions during the game.
Goalkeeper (Goalie): is the team’s last line of defense, whose
primary responsibility is to prevent the opponent’s ball from
entering the goal for a score. The goalkeeper is the only player
allowed to touch or pickup the ball with their hands, and may
only do so when the ball is within their own penalty area. The
goalkeeper may take unlimited steps in any direction (within the
penalty area) prior to kicking or throwing the ball into play. The
goalkeeper cannot take more than six (6) seconds while
controlling the ball with his/her hands before releasing it from his
possession. The goalkeeper may not touch the ball with his/her
hands again (second touch rule) after it has been released from
his possession until another player outside the penalty area
touches the ball. If the goalkeeper violates the six (6) second rule
or second touch rule, an indirect free kick is awarded to the
opposing team where the goalkeeper was when the violation
occurred.
Defenders (Fullbacks): Players who function primarily in the
defensive third of the field and whose primary role is to repel
attacks on the goal by the opposing team.
Mid fielders (Halfbacks): Players who function primarily in the
central part of the field and whose main responsibility is to link
the defense and the attack.
Forwards (Strikers): Players who function primarily in the
attacking third of the field and whose main responsibility is to
score goals.
Officials
The Referee is in complete charge of the soccer game. The
safety of the players is the referee’s main concern. The referee is
responsible for keeping the time, enforcing the FIFA Laws of
Soccer and PYSA rules, stopping and restarting the game for
penalties or injuries, cautioning or banishing offenders (including
coaches) and ending the game if necessary. All decisions by the
referee are final!!
Assistant Referee
The referee is assisted by two Assistant Referees (a parent
volunteer from each recreational team in the PYSA) who are
primarily responsible for indicating when the ball is out of play
and which team has the right to put the ball in play again. When
you serve as an assistant referee, you are an impartial game
official, and must avoid coaching or directing the players on your
team.
Goal
A goal is scored when the whole of the ball crosses the whole of
the line between the vertical posts and under the horizontal
crossbar. A goal is not scored if another player did not touch the
ball after an indirect free kick, or throw in.
Drop Ball
The referee drops a ball between two players (one from each
team); to restart the game after play was stopped for a no
penalty situation. The ball is dropped where it was last in play or
at the nearest point on the goal line if play was stopped when the
ball was in the goal box area. The ball must touch the ground
before being kicked. Example of when to restart with a drop
ball:
1) After an injury (when ball was in play when play was stopped)
2) Dog interfering with play
3) Whistle blown by referee by mistake
Kick Off
The kick off officially begins the game at each half and restarts
play after a goal is scored. The ball the ball is in play when it is
kicked and clearly moves.
The player kicking off must not play the ball again until it is
touched or played by another player. Opponents must be at least
10 yards away in their half of the field. A goal can be scored
directly from a kickoff.
Goal Kick
A goal kick is taken by any defending player to restart the game
when the ball goes out of play across the goal line and was last
touched by an attacking player. May be taken anywhere in the
goal area. All opposing players must stand outside the penalty
area. To be in play, the ball must leave the penalty area before
being played by any other player, otherwise the kick is retaken. A
goal can be scored directly from a goal kick. There is no offside
on a goal kick. All goalkeepers for U9 may be taken from
anywhere in penalty area or must be taken at top of penalty area
(18 yard line).
Corner Kick
A corner kick is taken by any attacking player to restart the game
when the ball goes out of play past the goal line and was last
touched by a defending player. Kick is taken in the corner area
on the side of the field where the ball went out of play.
Opponents must be 10 or more yards away. A goal may be
scored directly from the corner kick. There is no offside on a
corner kick
Throw In
The throw in is taken to restart the game after the whole of the
ball crosses the outside edge of the touchline. Any member of
the team that did not touch the ball takes the throw in last, within
one yard of where the ball went out of play. The thrower must
face the field and throw the ball with equal strength by both
hands, in one continuous motion from the back of his/her head.
When the ball is released the thrower must have some part of
both feet on the ground on or behind the touchline. When done
incorrectly the throw-in is awarded to the opposing team. No rethrows are given for foul re-throws U-9 and older.
Player Substitution
In the PYSA player substitutions are unlimited, as far as the
number of players and may be made, with the consent of the
referee, on any dead ball. However, substitutions shall not be
permitted to be used as a game-delaying tactic. Referees need
to follow these substitution management steps:
a.) Acknowledge the call for substitution with a whistle and verbal
command to stop play.
b.) Use the “stop cop” signal to “freeze” the player with the ball.
c.) Players leave the pitch at midfield.
d.) Motion substitutes onto pitch at midfield.
e.) Restart play with a whistle, and verbal command.
Free Kicks
Free kicks are classified under two headings: “Direct” (from
which a goal can be scored directly and “Indirect” (from which a
goal cannot be scored unless the ball has been played or
touched by another player). The player taking a free kick is
entitled to have all opposing players stand 10 yards or more from
the ball (opposing players may stand on their own goal-line
between the goal posts), but may kick the ball without waiting if
he/she wishes. The ball is in play when it has been touched and
moved. When a player takes a free kick from within his/her
team’s - penalty area, all opposing players must also stand
outside the penalty area, until the ball has traveled outside the
penalty area. The ball must be stationary when kicked and the
kicker may not touch the ball a second time, until it has been
played or touched by another player. The goalkeeper shall not
receive the ball into his/her hands so that he or she may
thereafter kick it into play.
Any free kick awarded to the defending team within its own goal
area may be taken anywhere within the goal area. Any indirect
free kick awarded to the attacking team within its opponent’s
goal area must be taken from the top of the goal box at the point
nearest to where the offense was committed.
Fouls and Misconduct
A player who intentionally commits any of the following ten
penalty fouls shall be penalized by the award of a direct free
kick to be taken by the opposing team from the place where the
offense occurred, unless the offense is committed in the
opponent’s goal area, in which case, the free kick shall be taken
from a point anywhere within that half of the goal area in which
the offense occurred. Should a player of a defending team
commit a penalty foul within the penalty area, that team is
penalized by a penalty kick. A penal kick can be awarded
irrespective of the position of the ball, if in play, at the time any
offense within the penalty area is committed.
1.
Kicks or attempts to kick an opponent.
2.
Trips or attempts to trip an opponent.
3.
Jumps at an opponent.
4.
Charges an opponent in a violent or dangerous manner.
5.
Spits at an opponent.
6.
Strikes or attempts to strike an opponent.
7.
Holds an opponent.
8.
Pushes an opponent.
9.
Handles the ball, i.e. carries, strikes or propels the ball with
his/her hand or arm. The key judgment for this rule is
whether the contact was “hand to ball” (foul) or “ball to
hand” (no foul).
10.
For PYSA, intentional charging of the goalkeeper is defined
as “violent conduct”, and requires the ejection of the guilty
party.
The award of an indirect free kick to be taken by the opposing
team from the place where the infringement occurred shall
penalize a player committing any of the eleven non-penalty fouls.
1.
Playing in a manner considered dangerous to others
2.
Preventing the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from his
hands.
3.
Impeding the progress of an opponent.
4.
Charging the goalkeeper. The PYSA version of this rule is
that no player shall make contact with the goalkeeper, or
attempt to play the ball once the goalkeeper has control of
the ball (defined as contact between any part of the
goalkeeper and the ball) in any manner and to any degree
whatsoever within the penalty area.
5.
A goalkeeper taking more than six seconds after taking
control of the ball with their hands.
6.
Goalkeeper wasting time.
7.
A goalkeeper touching the ball with his/her hands after it
has been directly thrown in to them by their teammate.
8.
Offside infractions.
9.
Slide tackling or playing the ball while on the ground when
another player is in playing distance of the ball. (PYSA
Recreation team rule only)
10.
A goalkeeper touching the ball with his/her hands after it
has been deliberately kicked to him by a teammate.
11.
On a free kick (including Kick-off) the player taking the kick
touches the ball a second time before another player
touches the ball.
Advantage Rule: The referee may decide not to stop play if,
in their opinion, the fouled team would be better off if play
continues. The referee may still penalize if the advantage
does not immediately develop.
Off Side
The offside call is one of the most difficult calls to understand in
soccer and is not ordinarily called at the U7 and U8 age levels
unless the team is flagrantly violating the rule. Referees are
instructed to begin enforcing offside at the U-9 age level.
A player is in an offside position if they are nearer to the
opponent’s goal line than the ball, unless (a) the player is in
his/her own half of the field, or (b) there are at least two
opponents nearer the goal line than they are. This can include
the goalkeeper.
Attacking player shall only be declared off-side and penalized for
being in an off-side position, if, at the moment the ball touches,
or is played by, one of the player’s teammates, the player is, in
the opinion of the referee; (a) interfering with player with an
opponent (b) seeking to gain an advantage by being in that
position.
Attacking player shall not be declared off-side by the referee (a)
merely because the player is in an off- side position, or (b) if the
player receives the ball directly from a goal kick, a corner kick, a
throw in, or when it has been dropped by the referee. Offside
shall not be judged at the moment the player in question
receives the ball but at the moment when the ball is played
forward by one of his teammates. A player who is not in an offside position when one of his teammates plays the ball or takes
a free kick, does not become off-side if they go forward during
the flight of the ball.
If a player in his opponent’s goal area commits the offense, the
free kick shall be taken from a point anywhere within that half of
the goal area in which the offense occurred.
YELLOW AND RED CARDS
A player shall be cautioned (yellow card) if he or she:
1.) Enters or leaves the field of play during the game without the
referee’s permission.
2.) Persistently infringes upon the Laws of the Game.
3.) Shows by word or action, dissent from any decision by the
referee.
4.) Is guilty of unsporting behavior.
5.) Deliberately leaves the field without the referee permission.
6.) Delays the restart of play.
7.) Fails to respect the required distance when play is restarted
with a corner or free kick.
The player must leave the field. The player may be replaced by a
substitute.
A player shall be sent off the field of play (red card), if, in the
opinion of the referee, he or she:
1.) Is guilty of serious foul play.
2.) Is guilty of violent conduct.
3.) Uses offensive, insulting, or abusive language.
4.) Receives a second caution in the same match.
5.) Spits at an opponent or any other person.
6.) Intentionally handles in order to deny scoring. (This does
not apply to the goalkeeper in his own penalty area).
7.) Denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity to an opponent
moving towards the player’s goal by an offense punishable by a
free kick or penalty kick.
Referees shall caution (yellow card) or send off (red card)
players and coaches for the offenses listed on the following
pages.
After a player caution or dismissal, play is resumed by awarding
the opposing team an indirect free kick from the place where the
infringement occurred, unless the offense itself would normally
result in a direct free kick or a penalty kick, in which case the
appropriate kick is taken. The team must play short one player
for the remainder of the game.
For PYSA-sponsored events, the referee may caution a coach if
the coach does not control the spectators or players. A player or
coach receiving a red card is, at a minimum suspended from
appearing at the next game and may receive a longer
suspension depending on the offense or historical behavior. The
referee may abandon the game if the coach, spectator or player
does not comply with the order.
Our referees are asked to make their best judgment. They are
not expected to be perfect!
CAUTIONABLE OFFENSES (YELLOW CARD)
Guilty of unsporting behavior
Shows dissent by word or action
Persistently infringes the Laws of the Game
Delays the restart of play
Fails to respect the required distance when play is restarted with
a corner kick or free kick
Enters or re-enters the field of play without the referee’s
permission
Deliberately leaves the field of play without the referee’s
permission
Upon receiving a yellow card, the player must leave the field.
The player may be replaced by a substitute.
SENDING OFF OFFENSES (RED CARD)
Is guilty of serious foul play
Is guilty of violent conduct
Denies an opponent a goal or an obvious goal-scoring
opportunity by deliberately handling the ball (this does not apply
to a goalkeeper in his own penalty area
Spits at an opponent or any other person
Denies an obvious goal-scoring opportunity to an opponent
moving towards the player’s goal by an offense punishable by a
free kick or penalty kick
Uses offensive, insulting or abusive language
Receives a second caution
Upon receiving a red card the player must leave the field. No
player may be substituted for the offending player
SIGNALS OF THE REFEREE
Throw-in - stand facing the field of play and extend a
straight arm from your side in the direction of the team
awarded the throw-in. Also, say "red throw" to better
communicate to the players.
Corner kick - extend a straight arm at 45 degrees from the
side toward the corner from which the kick is to be taken.
Also, say, "corner kick" to better communicate to the players.
Goal kick - point to the top of the goal box. Also, say "goal
kick" to better communicate to the players.
Penalty kick - point to the penalty-mark. Also, say "penalty
kick" to better communicate to the players.
Indirect Free Kick (IFK) - arm straight up (hold until the ball
is touched a second time). Also, say "indirect kick."
Direct Free Kick (DFK) - straight-arm from the side in the
direction of the team awarded the DFK. Also, say "direct
kick."
Goal - straight-arm toward the center circle.
REFEREE FIELD POSITIONS
Throw-In
Be close enough to watch for hand and foot faults (usually
even with the thrower, but not so close that you are
interfering with play).
Corner Kick
Stand at top of penalty area, opposite corner of kick
Goal Kick
Stand at the top of the penalty box to one side for younger
players (this allows you to see if the ball clears the box
before being touched). For older players, you will need to
back up to where the ball may land, but not so close that you
are interfering with play.
Penalty Kick
Stand in the penalty box to the side of the kicker’s path
between the penalty mark and the goal line. This allows you
to judge if it is a goal and to watch for potential
encroachment by the players.
Direct Free Kick Indirect Free Kick
Position yourself close to where the ball may land, but not so
close that you are interfering with play.
Kick off
Stand outside the circle on the halfway line near one
touchline. This will allow you to see if the ball is played
forward, touched a second time by the same player, and
watch for encroachment.
Penalty Kicks
Penalty kicks shall be taken from the penalty mark (see
diagram) and when it is being taken all players, except the
player taking the kick and the opposing goalkeeper, shall
remain on the field of play outside the penalty area and
penalty arc and behind the ball. The opposing goalkeeper
may move side to side, but not forward on their goal line,
between the goal posts, until the ball is kicked.
The player taking the kick must kick the ball forward and
may not touch the ball a second time until touched or played
by another player. The ball is in play after it has been
touched and moved forward. A goal may be scored directly
from a penalty kick.
For any infringement of the penalty kick rules by: (a) The
defending team, the referee will allow the kick to proceed,
but if a goal does not result the kick will be re-taken. (b) The
attacking team, other than the player taking the kick, if a goal
is scored it will be disallowed and the kick re-taken. (c) By
the player taking the penalty kick, committed after the ball is
in play, an opposing player shall take an indirect free kick at
the point where the infringement occurred.
22
PYSA SHOE POLICY
To assure the safety of the children playing soccer, it is PYSA
policy that no child will be allowed to play without soccer shoes.
This proper shoe being plastic molded or standard length, rubber
studded soccer shoes, or soccer turf shoes (for hard, dry fields).
The following are BANNED from use:
ALL TENNIS SHOES BASEBALL SHOES -Tennis shoes have
no studs and these shoes can be dangerous and result in
serious injuries from falls.
ALL METAL STUDS DEEP-CLEATED - Even though these may
have molded cleats, baseball cleats are long, square, and
possibly sharp, and can be harmful if someone is stepped on or
kicked.
ALL METAL STUDS - Sharp metal studs can cause serious
injuries.
DEEP-CLEATED (Football shoes, or any shoes with long studs)
ALL METAL SPIKE SHOES (Baseball shoes, Track shoes, Golf
shoes, etc.)
This policy applies for all PYSA recreational practices and
games, including fall and spring seasons including those played
by classic teams (spring season).
The decision of all PYSA referees at the game field as to the
acceptability of a player’s shoes is final. Disagreements with a
referee’s decision may be appealed to the PYSA Administrator
through the club president, but such appeals shall be effective
only for games after the time when they are decided. All PYSA
referees are authorized to make decisions on the field as to the
acceptability of a player’s shoes.
PORTLAND YOUTH SOCCER ASSOCIATION
DISCIPLINARY POLICY
Standard Penalties for Players and Coaches:
1.
CAUTION: (yellow card)- any player receiving a yellow card
must leave the field immediately before play resumes and
may not re-enter until his/her team’s next substitution
opportunity. Another player may replace the cautioned
player. In PYSA games, the referee may caution coaches.
2.
EJECTION: (red card, send off) - any player sent off the
field shall be disqualified from further play during the game
AND shall receive a minimum subsequent one game
suspension. No substitution may be made for a player sent
off. In PYSA games, coaches may be sent off. They must
leave the field surroundings immediately AND are
prohibited from participation at the team’s subsequent
game.
Portland Youth Soccer Association will review ALL cards and
additional penalties may be imposed.
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