Awareness - Mount Lehman Credit Union

Awareness - Mount Lehman Credit Union
MEMBER
Awareness
Defend Yourself
from Fraud
Table of Contents
Awareness is Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
FRAUD: Recognize it. Report it. Stop it.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
The Face of Fraud: It’s not who you think.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
You wouldn’t fall for it?.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
The Pitch versus the Facts.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
You can protect yourself!.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Identity Theft and Protection.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Imagine this . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Identity theft – a fast-growing crime... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
How identity thieves get your personal information.. . . . . . . . . . 9
How identity thieves use your personal information. . . . . . . . . . 9
Your credit union takes steps to protect you.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Take steps to protect your personal identity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Take action immediately if you suspect identity theft.. . . . . . 12
Online fraud: Phishing.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Internet Transactions Protection.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Are you secure?... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
You are the key to your financial transactions security... . . . . . 15
Don’t be the weak link.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Invest in peace of mind.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Firewall.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Anti-virus program.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Anti-spyware program.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Other security suggestions.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Protect Your Money.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Be PIN smart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Protecting your PIN is up to you.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Awareness is Security
The confidentiality and security of your personal information
is one of your top priorities. Whether you are concerned
about Identity Theft – one of the fastest growing crimes in
North America – or about Fraud by telephone, Internet and
mail, which continues to be a serious international problem,
it is important to protect yourself by always being aware and
learning how to recognize these dangers.
Gather as much information as possible and learn how
to protect yourself from various types of crimes that
are prevalent today. Awareness is security, so familiarize
yourself with the valuable tips and information included
within this booklet.
Talk to your credit union if you have any concerns about the
safety and privacy of your personal information. They will be
happy to answer your questions.
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Fraud: Recognize It. Report It. Stop It.
The Face of Fraud: It’s not who you think
Believe it or not, there is no typical fraud victim in Canada.
It can happen to anyone.
The risk of becoming a fraud victim is not linked to your
age, race, income or geographic location. Scammers don’t
care about any of that – they just want your money.
These are professional criminals. They know what they’re
doing and, unfortunately for their victims, they do it well.
You wouldn’t fall for it?
Thousands of Canadians are defrauded each year. Scam artists
are up to date and well organized. They use the latest trends
and sophisticated techniques:
• Professional marketing materials.
• Well-crafted and researched telephone scripts,
which are traded among criminals.
•Putting you at ease with their friendly tone
and “generous” offers.
•Having believable answers ready for your tough questions.
• Impersonating legitimate businesses, charities and causes.
• Expertly using your own emotions to persuade you.
•Pricing of a product is much less than the price for the
same product on the open market.
•Offering you a large payment or reward in exchange for
allowing the use of your financial account – often to deposit
cheques or transfer money.
•Overpaying for your goods or services with instructions to
wire excess funds back to fraudster…the original cheque gets
returned as counterfeit leaving you out the whole amount.
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The Pitch versus the Facts
Is your credit really protected?
The Pitch: They say, “We’ll protect you from scammers
who could run up huge debts on your credit cards without
you knowing. Just send us your card numbers and we’ll
protect you for a nominal fee.”
The Facts: Offers of credit protection or “insurance”
against fraud are just attempts to get your credit card
numbers and your money. Call your credit card companies
or your credit union first. If someone fraudulently uses
your cards, most companies hold you responsible only for
the first $50, and many waive all losses.
Do you absolutely need that money?
The Pitch: A call, a letter or an email from a “highly-placed”
official of a foreign government requests your assistance
to transfer a large amount of money. If you can help, you’ll
earn a huge fee!
The Facts: Beware of anyone asking you to deposit a
cheque and to return some of the money or send some
of the money to someone else. Such cheques are usually
counterfeit. The deposit will look legitimate until the cheque
bounces. The return of the cheque could take weeks or
months. Your financial institution will then ask you how you
intend to cover the money you transferred to the scammers.
It’s essential that you ask your financial institution whether
the cheque has cleared – not just whether the money is
available – because even then some cheques can still be
returned. Businesses or anyone selling goods on the Internet
or through newspapers should be especially suspicious of
cheques received for payment of goods that exceed the
agreed upon amount of purchase and then request return
of the overpayment to the purchaser. Always wait for the
cheque to clear prior to returning any overpayment as it is
likely the cheque is either stolen or counterfeit.
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West African Scam
The Pitch: A person will receive a call, letter or email
stating that someone has money stuck in a foreign country
and they are looking for outside assistance to get their
money out. The person will be offered a large portion of
the money if they help. Sometimes the proposed reward
will be in the millions of dollars. This person will then be
told that they just need to provide their financial account
information so that the money can be transferred to it.
They will be given an address to send a cheque or wire
the money to cover the costs of getting through the red
tape for the release of funds. If the person provides the
requested funds they will eventually be asked for more and
more money to assist in getting the funds released. They
could also find their account has been attacked and their
money has been transferred out. Sometimes a cheque is
sent to a person and they are requested to cash it, keep
their portion and wire the rest back to the sender or a
third party. In all cases the cheque they receive will be a
counterfeit cheque and they will lose the funds they wired
to the criminal sender. Letters or email messages for these
types of scams can be badly written and have many spelling
mistakes. However, they may also be very sophisticated.
The Facts: Be skeptical of individuals representing themselves
as foreign business people or foreign government officials
asking for your help in placing large sums of money in overseas
bank accounts. Do not believe the promise of large sums
of money for your co-operation. Guard your account and
personal information carefully.
You pay to play, but you can’t win
The Pitch: A caller says you were automatically entered into
a foreign lottery and you won a big prize! But you must act
now and send fees to cover taxes and handling.
The Facts: Most legitimate lotteries do not call winners.
If a caller requires you to pay an up-front fee to claim a prize,
it’s a scam. The only winner is the crook.
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Pre-qualified never means pre-pay
The Pitch: You’re told you’ve been “pre-qualified” for a
low-interest loan or credit card, or to repair your bad credit
even though financial institutions turn you down. They ask
for your social insurance, driver’s licence and financial account
numbers – and a processing fee of several hundred dollars.
The Facts: Beware of advertisements or phone calls
offering credit, especially if you have been turned down by
financial institutions. Legitimate lenders never “guarantee”
a card or loan before you apply. A legitimate pre-qualified
offer means you’ve been selected to apply – you must still
complete an application and you can still be turned down.
Verify the business you are dealing with.
Not so special delivery
The Pitch: Your business receives a “last chance” invoice for
a listing in a “business directory”. An invoice says an urgent
delivery of photocopier or fax supplies is awaiting confirmation
of your address. It appears that someone in your office
ordered services or supplies but the bill hasn’t been paid.
The Facts: Scam operators trick many businesses into paying
for goods and services they haven’t ordered. They bet that
many small business owners and their staff are just too busy
to check that every invoice is legitimate. Carefully examine all
invoices, even those under $50.
Con job
The Pitch: An employment advertisement offers a workat-home opportunity, a multi-level marketing plan or other
means to “be your own boss” and earn significantly higher
income. Beware also of Internet job sites. Some of the
job postings are made by organized crime and are meant
only to set up phone interviews with individuals to gather
personal information.
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The Facts: Sending fees for job information or to be
listed for jobs in Canada or abroad is risky. In many cases,
scammers advertise all kinds of job opportunities from
envelope stuffing to filling out forms, but all too often these
ads make promises they don’t keep. You lose more money
instead of making more money. For a phone interview,
if the interviewer asks too many personal questions you
should be suspicious. A prospective employer does not
need to know your social insurance number (SIN) or your
driver’s licence number. Beware of odd questions that
reveal too much personal information that could later be
used to assume your identity. Full addresses should not be
provided on an online posting, city and province should be
sufficient. Never include your SIN on the resume.
Don’t fall for a winning prize scam
A call says you won a big lottery prize but you must send
money or make a purchase before you can collect. It is
a fraud and you will lose your money! Hang up and call
The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre (formerly known as
PhoneBusters™ ), at 1-888-495-8501.
Legitimate lottery and sweepstakes administrators never
charge fees to deliver your prize. This is one of the most common scams – if you send money you will never get it back.
It’s a rip-off! Here’s the tip-off:
• The caller is more excited than you are.
•The caller demands an immediate answer but refuses
to send you anything in writing.
•You must pay fees or buy a product before you can
collect your prize or obtain credit.
•You are asked for credit card or financial account
numbers, or copies of personal documents – but you
get nothing in writing.
• You can only send payment by wire service or by courier.
• You receive an unexpectedly large cheque.
•Your business is invoiced for supplies or directory
listings you did not order.
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Fraud: Recognize It. Report It. Stop It.
You can protect yourself!
Crooks can do bad things with your good name. Protect your
precious personal information. Ask all marketing, research or
charity callers for:
• Detailed, written information that you can check yourself.
•Time to think about the offer. Scam artists pressure you
for an answer, saying the offer will expire or go to the next
person if you don’t act now.
• Valid references and the means to contact them.
•A call-back number. But beware – a crook can give
you a number where a colleague is standing by to finish
taking your money.
You should also remember to shred unwanted personal
documents such as transaction records, credit applications,
insurance forms, cheques, financial statements and tax returns.
If a scam artist contacts you or if you’ve been defrauded,
call The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-888-495-8501
The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre will gather evidence and
alert law enforcement in Canada and abroad. By reporting,
you can prevent others from becoming victims and help put
an end to fraud.
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Identity Theft and Protection
Imagine this…
Unexpectedly, you get turned down for a loan, you get a call
from a collection agency about an account you never opened,
or worse yet, a call from the police about a crime you didn’t
commit. Suddenly, you’re a victim of identity theft.
Identity theft – a fast-growing crime
Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in North
America. It happens when someone steals your personal
information, information such as your SIN, driver’s licence
number, date of birth, health card number, credit card or debit
card number, or your Personal Identification Number (PIN).
Criminals get this information by stealing your cards, posing
as an employer, credit union or utility company employee,
grabbing information from websites that are not secure, social
chatrooms, sorting through garbage, or using devious ways to
find out your PIN. It can happen to anyone. In the course of a
busy day people use an Automated Teller Machine (ATM) to
get money for groceries; charge tickets to a hockey game by
phone; mail their tax returns; call home on their cell phones;
or apply for a new credit card online. We don’t give these
everyday transactions a second thought. But someone else
does – someone who is interested in using these everyday
transactions to steal your personal information and use it to
commit fraud or theft.
Once they have a few pieces of your information, criminals
can open a new credit card account or financial account in
your name. And the worst thing is, you won’t know about
it until it’s too late.
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How identity thieves get your personal information
•T hey steal wallets and purses containing your
identification, credit and debit cards.
•T hey steal your mail, including your debit and
credit card statements, pre-approved credit offers,
telephone calling cards and tax information.
•T hey complete a ‘change of address’ form to divert
your mail to another location.
•T hey rummage through your garbage or the garbage
of businesses for personal data.
•T hey fraudulently obtain your credit report by posing
as a landlord, employer or someone else who may have
a legitimate or legal right to the information.
• They get your business or personnel records at work.
• They find personal information in your home.
• They use personal information you share on the Internet.
•They buy your personal information from ‘inside’ sources –
e.g. a dishonest store employee.
How identity thieves use your personal information
•T hey call your credit card issuer and, pretending to be you,
ask to increase your credit limit and to change the mailing
address on your credit card account. The thief then runs
up charges on your account and because the bills are being
sent to another address, it may take some time before you
know there’s a problem.
•T hey open a new credit card account using your name,
date of birth and SIN. When they use the credit card and
don’t pay the bills, the delinquent account is reported on
your credit report.
• They establish phone or Internet service in your name.
• They buy cars by taking out car loans in your name.
• They mortgage your home.
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Your credit union takes steps to protect you
Credit unions actively work to detect and investigate
any irregular activity in your accounts. Your credit union
debit and credit cards contain only the minimum amount
of information necessary to make a transaction. As soon
as you enter your PIN at an ATM or point-of-sale machine,
it is automatically scrambled before it’s sent on the
network and the transaction begins.
If you lose your debit card or credit card, or you suspect
someone has fraudulently created a duplicate card and is
using it to take money from your account or run up your
credit card, let your credit union know immediately.
Refer to your cardholder agreement for further details
on liability.
There are important steps you can and should take to
protect your identity and secure your personal information.
Steps like managing your personal information wisely and
cautiously, and taking steps to minimize your own risk.
Take steps to protect your personal identity
•If you have several debit and credit cards, carry only those
that you need. Leave the others at home in a safe place.
• Sign your new cards immediately.
•Don’t carry your social insurance card or birth
certificate with you. Keep them in a secure, safe place.
•D on’t attach or write your PIN or social insurance
number on anything you are going to discard, such as
transaction records or scraps of paper.
•Check your receipts to make sure they belong to you
and not someone else.
•Don’t give personal information or account numbers to
anyone until you have confirmed the identity of the person
asking for it. You should also ask how the information will
be used and whether it will be shared with anyone else.
Ask if you have a choice about providing personal identifying
information and, if you can, choose to keep it confidential.
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•Frequently check your credit report so you’re aware
of any changes or unusual activity. Basic credit information
can be obtained once a year at no charge from Equifax
Canada at www.equifax.ca or 1-800-465-7166, and
TransUnion at www.transunion.ca or 1-800-663-9980.
•For additional security, or in the event that your house
or cabin is broken into and you have reason to believe
that confidential financial information may have been
compromised, consider putting a fraud alert on your credit
file with the two major credit bureaus listed above.
•Pay attention to your billing cycles. Follow up with creditors if your bills don’t arrive on time. A missing credit
card bill could mean an identity thief has taken over your
credit card account and changed your billing address to
cover their tracks.
•Guard your mail from theft. Promptly remove your mail
from the mail box. Notify Canada Post to hold your mail if
you’re going to be away for some time and ensure that your
mail is forwarded or re-routed if you move or change your
mailing address.
•Protect your computer with a good firewall and anti-virus
software. Take advantage of technologies that enhance
security and privacy when using the Internet, such as using
digital signatures, data encryption, and different ways of
making the information anonymous.
•Avoid posting personal information on publicly accessible
websites and online bulletin boards.
•G ive your SIN only when it’s absolutely necessary.
Don’t include your SIN and other sensitive personal
information in online resumes.
• When you register for websites, use strong passwords
and avoid words that are easy to guess. Don’t use the same
password for different sites and don’t store your password
in your computer.
•B e wary of online offers from websites you don’t know
and trust.
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•An identity thief will pick through your garbage or recycling
bins. Be sure to shred any document that contains your
debit card or credit card number, receipts, outdated bills,
tax documents, copies of credit applications, insurance
forms, physician statements, credit offers you get in the mail,
or any other sensitive information.
Take action immediately if you suspect identity theft
•C all your credit union immediately if you suspect you
have been a victim of identity theft or if there is unusual
activity in any of your accounts. We can provide advice
on what to do with your credit card accounts, financial
accounts and investments with your credit union.
•C all the police and file a report. Ask for a copy of the
police report.
•Contact each credit grantor who has opened a fraudulent
account and tell them you did not open that account. Have
them close these accounts right away.
•Change your PIN immediately. If you open new accounts,
make sure you put new passwords on the accounts.
•Contact Canada Post if someone is diverting your mail.
•Document all the contacts you make along with dates,
phone numbers, names of persons you spoke with, and
exactly what they said.
Your security is important!
At your credit union, we’re working with you to protect your
identity. By taking steps to carefully guard your PIN, safeguard
your debit and credit cards, and by being aware of any unusual
signs, you can minimize your risks.
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Online Fraud: Phishing
Phishing – What is phishing?
Phishing, or ‘brand spoofing’ attacks use ‘spoofed’ (look alike)
email messages and fraudulent websites. These are designed
to fool recipients into divulging personal and financial data such
as credit card numbers, account usernames and passwords,
SIN, etc. By hijacking the trusted brands of well-known financial
institutions, government agencies, online retailers and credit
card companies, phishers are able to convince some of the
recipients to respond to them.
What should Internet users do about phishing schemes?
Internet users should follow three simple rules when they
see email messages or websites that may be part of a phishing scheme: Stop, Look and Call.
1.Stop. Phishers typically include upsetting or exciting (but
false) statements in their email messages with one purpose
in mind. They want people to react immediately to that
false information, by clicking on the link and inputting the
requested data before they take time to think through
what they are doing. Internet users however, need to resist
that impulse to click immediately. No matter how upsetting
or exciting the statements in the email may be, there is
always enough time to check out the information more
closely.
2.Look. Internet users should look more closely at the claims
made in the email. Think about whether those claims make
sense, and be highly suspicious if the email asks for any
items of personal information such as account numbers,
usernames or passwords.
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For example:
• If the email indicates that it comes from a financial institution
where you have a debit or credit card account, but tells you
that you have to enter your account information again, that
makes no sense. Legitimate financial institutions already have
their customer’s account numbers in their records. Even if
the email says a customer’s account is being terminated, the
real financial institution will still have that customer’s account
number and identifying information.
• If the email says that you have won a prize or are entitled to
receive some special “deal”, but asks for financial or personal
data, there is good reason to be highly suspicious. Legitimate
companies that want to give you a real prize don’t ask you
for extensive amounts of personal and financial information
before you’re entitled to receive the prize.
3.C all. If the email or website purports to be from a
legitimate company or financial institution, Internet users
should call or email that company directly. Ask whether
the email or website is really from that company. To
be sure that they are contacting the real company or
institution where they have accounts, credit card account
holders can call the toll-free customer numbers on the
backs of their cards. Financial institution customers can
call the telephone numbers on their financial statements.
Never call the number given in the email to confirm the
contents validity as it will lead to the criminals who sent
the email and they will verify whatever was said.
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Internet Transactions Protection
Are you secure?
To protect your financial and personal information while
online, your credit union’s Internet transaction application
uses a variety of security measures to maintain your privacy
and security. For example, while you are performing online
financial transactions, your data is encrypted to ensure that
your information cannot be read or modified while it is
being downloaded to your computer.
You are the key to your financial transactions security
Even with your credit union’s online security measures in
place, it’s important to remember that YOU need to take
steps to keep your computer secure. There are ways to
control access to the valuable information that you maintain
on your computer or input to access a secure site.
Don’t be the weak link
Internet fraud continues to be on the rise. Not only your
home computer but any computer can become infected
with malware (malicious software), such as “spyware” and
viruses that attempt to collect your Internet transactions
location and login information prior to entering the secure
environment that your credit union provides. With today’s
powerful online transaction systems, someone pretending
to be you may be able to:
•transfer funds to another location
• apply for loans that you are not aware of
•set up automatic credit card payments
for cards that are not yours
Regardless of the operating system you have on your
computer, you need to be concerned about computer
security. Some things to keep in mind:
•Do not use software components (especially operating
systems) for which the vendor has ceased to provide
security updates. An example would be Windows 95®*.
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•Make sure you apply all recommended security updates
in a timely manner to critical software components on every
computer that you use. In a Windows®* environment, this
would include, but not be limited to, Microsoft®* (Windows,
Office and others), Apple®* (QuickTime®* etc.), Sun™*
(Java™*), and Adobe®* (Acrobat®*, Flash®*).
•S ubscribe to security newsletters from software
vendors like Microsoft which will keep you informed
about updates and issues.
Invest in peace of mind
Reputable retailers sell a variety of software and hardware
solutions to make your computer more secure. Here are a few
recommendations to enhance the security of any computer
that is connected to the Internet:
Firewall
Considered the first line of defense for protecting private
information, a firewall helps prevent unauthorized access
to or from your home or office network. Although some
computers come with a standard operating system firewall,
it should not be considered sufficient to keep out intruders.
An additional firewall, that will detect new forms of attacks
or attempted intrusions, should be installed and upgraded
regularly. Firewalls can be implemented in both hardware
and software, or a combination of both.
Anti-virus program
Computer viruses are pieces of destructive computer codes
that are easily spread from computer to computer without
the user’s knowledge. In some cases they are used to collect
and transmit personal information, such as passwords and
online transaction locations, to a third party. Other viruses
are intended to harm the computer they infect and make it
unusable. Virus protection programs or anti-virus software
is now a must for computer users because the number and
the destructiveness of new computer viruses is increasing
exponentially. To ensure you are protected from new viruses,
ensure your anti-virus is enabled and configured to run daily
updates and regular virus scans to detect if your computer has
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become infected with a virus. With a good quality program,
updates are available online through the software provider’s
website and in many cases can be set to automatically update
as new releases become available.
Anti-spyware program
Spyware will not harm your computer as a virus might. It is
programming that is usually picked up through accessing Internet sites, or phishing or spam attachments, and downloaded
on to your computer without your knowledge or consent.
Spyware secretly gathers information about you and relays it
to advertisers or others who want to know more about you
and your online habits. Criminals are using this technology to
install keyloggers or screen capture programs that allow them
to collect personal information and passwords to secure sites
and the sites’ URL locations which is a breach of your personal
privacy. Because spyware is becoming increasingly powerful
and difficult to remove, specialized anti-spyware programs
should now be considered as important as anti-virus technology. To ensure you are protected from new spyware, make
sure your anti-spyware program is enabled and configured to
run daily updates and regular spyware scans to detect if your
computer has become infected. Good quality products have
an automatic or requested update feature where updates are
available online through the software provider’s website.
Other security suggestions
Here are some additional things you can do to protect
your personal and financial information while online:
•Use a multi-character, alphanumeric password –
one that is difficult to guess.
• Change your password frequently and regularly.
•Do not use software that ‘memorizes’ passwords unless
the product keeps them in an encrypted form and displays
them only in a masked form on the screen.
•Keep your passwords and PIN safe and never share them.
• Do not use the same password for different secure sites.
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•Install new security patches as soon as your operating system
and Internet browser manufacturers make them available.
•Pay attention to the look of the website you’re using for
online transactions. If it changes, check the URL carefully
to ensure that you have not been hijacked to a bogus site.
•Never leave your computer while it is logged on to a
password protected site that can perform online transactions.
Follow the instructions provided to properly exit online
secure sites and then clear your cache.
•Always exit Internet banking using the “log out” button,
and close your browser if you step away from your computer.
Your browser may retain information you entered in the
login screen and elsewhere until you exit the browser.
•If you do have to send personal or confidential information
via email, send it in an attachment (Word or Excel file,
for example) that is secured via a strong password and
an industrial-strength encryption technique. The password
should not be provided to the recipient via email but
instead via a more secure medium like the phone.
•All attachments or website links that are sent in an unsolicited
email message should be considered suspect and not opened.
•D o not conduct online financial transactions where you
can be observed or at Internet cafés or libraries where
a previous user may have accessed a site that downloaded
a keylogger.
•Always confirm that you are accessing online transactions
through the correct credit union website address.
• Disable file sharing in Windows®* products.
•Do not follow links provided in an email form, that appears
to be from your credit union or any other financial institution, that request you to provide personal information. If you
are unsure, call your financial institution through a known
number, other than one that may appear in the content of
the email, to verify if the message was sent from them.
•The easiest way to tell if an email is fraudulent is to bear in
mind that your credit union or another financial institution
will never ask you for your personal information, passwords,
PIN, or login information in an email.
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Protect Your Money
Be PIN Smart…
Canadians use their debit cards millions of times each day
for purchases and cash withdrawals from Automated Teller
Machines (ATMs). In fact, Canadians are one of the biggest
users of debit cards and ATMs in the world. With the
INTERAC † shared services, cardholders have convenient
access to their cash 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
While INTERAC shared services are among the most secure
in the world, debit card fraud can occur. Interac Association
and its members continue to work together to protect cardholders from debit card fraud.
Protecting your PIN is up to you
Think of it like a key. Instead of unlocking the door to your
house or car, your PIN unlocks the gateway to your financial
and personal information. We regularly lock our houses and
cars, but too often, we’re careless about the “keys” to our
financial accounts and information.
Cardholders can help keep their money safe by protecting their
debit cards and PIN and by following these 10 important steps:
1.Use your hand, body or other blocking method such
as a piece of paper or envelope to shield your PIN when
you are conducting transactions at an ATM or at the
point-of-sale.
2.Never let your debit card out of your sight when
conducting a transaction at the point-of-sale. Only allow
your card to be swiped once and always remember to take
your debit card and transaction record with you once your
transaction is completed.
3.Regularly check your statements and balances to verify all
transactions have been properly documented. If entries
do not accurately reflect your transactions activities, for
example, if there are missing transactions or additional
unknown transactions, you should contact your credit
union immediately.
4.If your debit card is lost, stolen or retained by an ATM,
notify your credit union as soon as you become aware of
the problem.
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5.Your debit card and PIN are the keys to your
account(s). Never disclose your PIN to anyone or you
could be liable for any losses. You are the only person who
should know it. Keep your card in a safe place and never
lend it to anyone.
6.Memorize your PIN – it’s your electronic signature. If you
suspect that someone knows your PIN, change it immediately or contact your credit union to cancel the card and
obtain a new card.
7. When selecting your PIN, never use obvious information.
You could be liable for losses if you create your PIN by using
your telephone number, date of birth, address or SIN.
8.Be aware of any changes regarding the look of the device
you are using. Has it changed in any manner that might
indicate a skimming device is attached? Report any changes
to your credit union or owner of the device.
9.Only conduct transactions when and where you feel
secure. If anyone tries to distract you, complete what you
are doing and retrieve your card before doing anything
else. If you cannot retrieve your card, call your credit
union immediately.
10. In a proven case of fraud, victims are protected by the
Canadian Code of Practice for Consumer Debit Card
Services and will not suffer any financial losses. The Code is
available on Credit Union Central of Canada’s website at:
www.cucentral.ca/Debit_Card_Code
Each case is reviewed on an individual basis by your
credit union.
For more information about the INTERAC † shared services
or PIN security tips, visit www.interac.ca.
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Important Contacts
The Canadian Anti-Fraud Call Centre (formerly PhoneBusters)
Tel: 1-888-495-8501; Fax: 1-888-654-9426;
[email protected]; www.antifraudcentre.ca
The Competition Bureau of Canada
1-800-348-5358, www.competitionbureau.gc.ca
RCMP – Reporting Economic Crime On-line
www.recol.ca
Government of Canada (Public Safety Canada)
Resources on Identity Theft
www.publicsafety.gc.ca/prg/le/bs/consumers-eng.aspx
Canadian Council of Better Business Bureaus
www.ccbbb.ca
Major Credit Bureaus
Equifax Canada: www.equifax.ca
To report lost or stolen identification or identity theft:
1-866-828-5961
To order your credit report: 1-800-465-7166
TransUnion: www.transunion.ca
1-800-663-9980; Quebec residents: 1-877-713-3393
This publication is provided for informational purposes only. The information
in this publication is summary in nature and does not constitute legal or business advice. Credit Union Central of Canada hereby disclaims all warranties
as to the accuracy of any of the information in this publication and disclaims
all liability for any actions taken in reliance on this information. You may
display on your computer, download, print or photocopy this publication for
non-commercial, personal or educational purposes only, provided that the
content is not modified and that each copy identifies the source and bears
our copyright notice “© Credit Union Central of Canada” and the terms of
this limited license. Any copying, redistribution or republication of this publication, or its content, for any other purpose is strictly prohibited.
This booklet is provided to you courtesy of your credit union.
®HANDS & GLOBE Design is a registered certification mark of the
World Council of Credit Unions, used under license.
† Trade-mark of Interac Inc. Used under license.
*Credit Union Central of Canada’s use of the third party marks is not intended to indicate sponsorship or affiliation with the owner of the marks.
©
2010 Credit Union Central of Canada. All rights reserved.
MEMA6BXA
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