Advanced Wave Table User`s Guide
Advanced
Wave Table
Upgrade
Plug and Play
USER’S GUIDE
User’s Guide
Information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a
commitment on the part of Creative Technology Ltd. The software described in this document
is furnished under a license agreement and may be used or copied only in accordance with the
terms of the license agreement. It is against the law to copy the software on any other medium
except as specifically allowed in the license agreement. The licensee may make one copy of the
software for backup purposes. No part of this manual may be reproduced or transmitted in any
form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, for any
purpose without the written permission of Creative Technology Ltd.
Copyright 1995 by Creative Technology Ltd. All rights reserved.
Version 1.0
January 1996
Sound Blaster is a registered trademark of Creative Technology Ltd.
Sound Blaster 16, Sound Blaster AWE32 and Wave Blaster are trademarks of Creative
Technology Ltd.
IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
MS-DOS is a registered trademark and Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
All other products are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.
The hardware on your card is covered by one or more of the following U.S. Patents:
4,404,529; 4,506,579; 4,699,038; 4,987,600; 5,013,105; 5,072,645; 5,111,727; 5,144,676;
Regulatory Information
The following sections provide regulatory information for this product.
Notice for the USA
FCC Part 15: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment
generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this
equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try one or more of the
following measures:
❑
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
❑
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
❑
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the
receiver is connected.
❑
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Caution
To comply with the limits for the Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules,
this device must be installed in computer equipment certified to comply with the Class B limits.
All cables used to connect the computer and peripherals must be shielded and grounded.
Operation with non-certified computers or non-shielded cables may result in interference to radio
or television reception.
Modifications
Any changes or modifications not expressly approved by the grantee of this device could void
the user’s authority to operate the device.
Notice for Canada
This apparatus complies with the Class “B” limits for radio interference as specified in the
Canadian Department of Communications Radio Interference Regulations.
Cet appareil est conforme aux normes de CLASSE “B” d’interference radio tel que spe’cifie’ par
le Ministère Canadien des Communications dans les règlements d’interfe’rence radio.
iii
Safety Information
CAUTION: This device is intended to be installed by the user in a CSA/TUV/UL certified/listed
IBM AT or compatible personal computers in the manufacturer’s defined operator access area.
Check the equipment operating/installation manual and/or with the equipment manufacturer to
verify/confirm if your equipment is suitable for user-installed application cards.
ATTENTION: Ce carte est destiné à être installé par l’utilisateur, dans un ordinateur compatible
certifié CSA/TUV/UL ou listé IBM AT, à l’intérieur de la zone définie par le fabricant.
Consulter le mode d’emploi ou le fabricant de l’appareil pour vérifier ou confirmer si l’utilisateur
peut y installer lui-même des cartes périphériques.
Compliance
This product is in conformity with the following Council Directive:
❑
iv
Directive 89/336/EEC, 92/31/EEC (EMC)
Contents
Introduction ...................................................................................................... ix
Before You Begin............................................................................................ ix
Checking System Requirements.......................................................... x
Getting Latest Information................................................................... x
Making a Copy of Your Diskettes...................................................... xi
Using the Documentation.................................................................... xi
Document Conventions...................................................................... xii
Text Conventions .................................................................. xiii
Icons....................................................................................... xiii
1
Knowing Your Synthesizer Card
Line-Out Jack.................................................................................................1-2
SPDIF Connector...........................................................................................1-2
Memory Module Expansion Slots ................................................................1-3
DRAM Expansion Jumpers ..........................................................................1-3
Motherboard Audio Connectors ...................................................................1-4
Knowing the Software-Configurable I/O Address Setting..........................1-4
2
Setting Up Your Synthesizer Card
Installing the Card..........................................................................................2-1
Connecting to Output Devices ......................................................................2-3
Connecting to Powered Speakers or External Amplifier ................2-4
Connecting to Audio Card ................................................................2-4
Connecting to External Digital Devices...........................................2-5
3
Installing Software in Windows 95
Setting Up Synthesizer Card Drivers............................................................3-1
Installing Your Synthesizer Card’s Applications.........................................3-2
Testing the Installation...................................................................................3-5
Uninstalling your Synthesizer Card Software............................................3-10
4
Installing Software in DOS/Windows 3.x
Installing From CD-ROM .............................................................................4-2
Installing From Diskettes...............................................................................4-2
Testing the Installation...................................................................................4-3
Understanding the Installation Program .......................................................4-4
Modifications to AUTOEXEC.BAT File ........................................4-5
Changing Resource Settings..........................................................................4-7
v
5
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for
Windows 95
Starting AWE32 Control ...............................................................................5-2
Setting Effects for Playback ..........................................................................5-3
Reverb ................................................................................................5-3
Chorus ................................................................................................5-4
Treble and Bass Level .......................................................................5-5
Changing Synthesizer Bank ..........................................................................5-5
Changing User Bank......................................................................................5-7
Uploading User Bank ........................................................................5-7
Clearing User Banks..........................................................................5-8
Changing WaveFx Samples ..........................................................................5-9
Uploading Instruments ......................................................................5-9
Clearing WaveFx Instruments ........................................................5-10
Auditioning Your Banks..............................................................................5-10
Viewing the Memory Status Display..........................................................5-12
Selecting AWE Devices ..............................................................................5-13
Using MPU-401 MIDI Emulation..................................................5-14
Browsing Sound Sample Files or SoundFont Banks .................................5-16
Using Context-Menu ...................................................................................5-17
6
Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects
Utilities
Using AWEUTIL...........................................................................................6-1
Initializing AWE Hardware ..............................................................6-2
Using MIDI Emulation to Support Computer Games.....................6-2
Using the AWE Control ................................................................................6-3
Starting AWE Control.......................................................................6-4
Setting Effects for Playback..............................................................6-5
Reverb ....................................................................................6-5
Chorus....................................................................................6-6
Changing Synthesizer Bank..............................................................6-7
Changing User Bank..........................................................................6-8
Using the Control Menu..................................................................6-10
Viewing the Memory Status Display..............................................6-10
Using the Break-Out-Box Button ...................................................6-11
Quitting AWE Control ....................................................................6-11
vi
Appendices
A
General Specifications
Plug and Play................................................................................................. A-1
Advanced WavEffects 32 Music Synthesizer ............................................. A-1
Upgrade Options........................................................................................... A-1
B
Changing DRAM Expansion Jumper Settings
C
Hardware Information
D
MIDI Specifications
MIDI Implementation Chart ........................................................................ D-2
Using MIDI Implementation Chart ................................................. D-3
GS Drum Preset Maps.................................................................................. D-4
Using GS Drum Preset Maps.........................................................D-10
Preset Organization.....................................................................................D-12
GM & GS Preset (Capitol tones)...................................................D-12
GS Preset (Variation Tones) ..........................................................D-15
Using GS Preset (Variation Tones)...................................D-17
MT-32 Preset ..................................................................................D-18
E
Troubleshooting
Problems Installing Synthesizer Card Software from CD-ROM............... E-1
Problems with Sound.................................................................................... E-2
Problems in DOS .......................................................................................... E-3
Problems in Windows 3.x ............................................................................ E-4
Resolving Conflicts....................................................................................... E-5
Resolving Conflicts in Windows 95................................................ E-5
Resolving Conflicts in DOS/Windows 3.x ..................................... E-6
vii
Introduction
Welcome to the next wave of multimedia computing. Your
synthesizer card allows you to obtain realistic acoustic reproduction
through digitized sound samples.
Your synthesizer card supports the following features:
❑ Plug and Play ISA Specification version 1.0a compliant
❑ Major MIDI standards such as General MIDI, GS, and MT-32
❑ SoundFont editing and playback
In addition, your synthesizer card can be used side-by-side with any
Sound Blaster compatible sound card.
Before You Begin
This section provides information you should know before using this
manual. It is organized as below:
❑ Checking System Requirements
❑ Getting Latest Information
❑ Making a Copy of Your Diskettes
❑ Using the Documentation
❑ Document Conventions
ix
Checking System Requirements
The system requirements are:
❑ A 386 computer (486 recommended)
❑ An EGA or VGA card installed (VGA recommended).
❑ 7.5 MB of hard disk space for your synthesizer card’s software.
❑ 4 MB RAM (8 MB recommended for Windows 95).
❑ Windows 95 or Windows 3.x.
Getting Latest Information
Your package may come with a CD-ROM or diskettes to install your
synthesizer card’s software. The README file, found in the
CD-ROM or installation diskette, contains the latest information and
changes not available at the time of printing. Please read the file
before you continue.
If you are about to follow the steps for reading the README
file on your card’s software installation CD-ROM, we assume
that you already have a CD-ROM drive installed.
To view the file in Windows 95:
1. Start Windows 95.
2. Insert the installation diskette or CD-ROM into a drive.
If you inserted the CD-ROM and it starts playing
automatically, choose Cancel at the first screen.
3. Double-click the My Computer icon on your Desktop.
Your system’s drive icons are displayed.
4. Double-click the icon representing the drive containing your
installation diskette or CD-ROM.
5. Double-click the README.TXT file.
The Notepad application starts and displays the
README.TXT file.
x
To view the file in DOS/Windows 3.x:
1. Start your computer.
2. Insert the installation diskette or CD-ROM into a drive
3. At the DOS prompt, change to the drive containing the diskette
or CD-ROM. Normally, this is drive A or B for a diskette and
drive D for a CD-ROM.
4. Type README and press <Enter>.
If you want to read the file in Windows 3.x, you can do so by
going to the Windows DOS box and following steps 3 and 4.
Making a Copy of Your Diskettes
If you have not made a copy of the original diskettes that come with
your package, you should do so before installing the software in your
system. Store your original diskettes in a safe place.
Using the Documentation
The documentation in this guide provides information on how to
install your synthesizer card. The guide is arranged as follows:
Chapter 1, “Knowing Your Synthesizer Card”
Contains information about the various hardware components on your
synthesizer card. If you are new to synthesizer cards, we recommend
that you read this chapter before you set up your card.
Chapter 2, “Setting Up Your Synthesizer Card”
Guides you through the process of installing the card in your system.
Chapter 3, “Installing Software in Windows 95”
If you are using Windows 95, this chapter helps you install the
software for the operating system.
Chapter 4, “Installing Software in DOS/Windows 3.x”
If you are using DOS or Windows 3.x, this chapter shows you how to
install the software in these operating systems.
Chapter 5, “Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows
95”
Details how to use the Windows 95 application that controls the
features of your synthesizer card.
xi
Chapter 6, “Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects
Utilities”
Describes how to use the Windows 3.x application and DOS program
to control your synthesizer card.
Appendix A, “General Specifications”
Describes the general specifications of your synthesizer card.
Appendix B, “Changing DRAM Expansion Jumper Settings”
Instructs you on how to change the DRAM Expansion jumper
configuration when you add more RAM to your synthesizer card.
Appendix C, “Hardware Information”
Provides information on the connectors used to direct sound from your
synthesizer card to your motherboard.
Appendix D, “MIDI Specifications”
Lists the MIDI specifications of your synthesizer card.
Appendix E, “Troubleshooting”
Provides tips and strategies for some of the problems you might
encounter with your synthesizer card either during installation or
normal use.
Document Conventions
This manual follows certain conventions to help you locate and
identify the information that you need. These conventions are
described in the following sections:
❑ Text Conventions
❑ Icons
xii
Text Conventions
The following text conventions are used to help you distinguish
elements of the text in this manual (see Table i).
Table i: Text Conventions.
Text Element
Use
bold
Command names, switches, and any text that
must be entered exactly as it appears.
italic
Title of a book. When presented at the DOS
command line, it is a placeholder that represents
information you must provide. This information
usually appears in the parameter listing after the
command is presented.
UPPERCASE
Directory name, file name, or acronym.
<>
Symbols, letters, and key names on the keyboard.
Icons
In this manual, icons are used to highlight areas of text that require
your attention (see Table ii).
Table ii: Icons.
Icon
Use
Information or instructions that must not be taken
lightly and should be noted.
Cautions or warnings that you must pay attention
to. Information highlighted by this icon tells you
how to avoid situations such as the risk of not
enough memory or even damages to your system.
xiii
1
Knowing Your Synthesizer Card
This chapter helps you locate and identify the components of your
synthesizer card. The components of the synthesizer card comprise
the following:
❑ Line-Out Jack
❑ SPDIF Connector
❑ Memory Module Expansion Slots
❑ DRAM Expansion Jumpers
❑ Motherboard Audio Connectors
❑ Knowing the Software-Configurable I/O Address Setting
These components are shown in Figure 1-1 below.
In addition, the section "Knowing the Software-Configurable I/O
Address Setting" is included in this chapter to get you acquainted with
the settings of your synthesizer card that can be changed through
software.
Knowing Your Synthesizer Card 1-1
Place the synthesizer card in front of you as you go through this
chapter. This will help you identify the various components
described.
Figure 1-1: The components of your synthesizer card.
Line-Out Jack
The Line-Out jack is a one-hole connecting interface on your
synthesizer card. It allows you to connect your card to powered
speakers or an external amplifier for audio output. The section
“Connecting to Powered Speakers or External Amplifier” in page 2-4
shows you how to make the connections.
This jack may not be available on your card.
SPDIF Connector
The SPDIF (Sony/Philips Digital Interface Format) connector allows
you to transfer digital audio signals from one digital device to another.
In this way, the fidelity of a transferred digital signal is preserved.
You can transfer digital signals from your synthesizer card to a digital
1-2 Knowing Your Synthesizer Card
device such as a DAT player through the SPDIF connector. The
section “Connecting to External Digital Devices” in page 2-5 provides
information on how to make the connections.
This connector may not be available on your card,
Memory Module Expansion Slots
The Memory Module Expansion slots allow you to install SIMMs
(Single In-line Memory Modules) on your synthesizer card so that you
can have more RAM for your MIDI instrument samples. You can add
up to a maximum of 28 MB of RAM using SIMMs. When you want
to use these SIMMs, you need to change the setting of the DRAM
jumper on your card. Refer to the section “DRAM Expansion
Jumpers” in this chapter.
We recommend that you use a pair of SIMMs with the same
capacity. The SIMM RAM access time must be 80
nanoseconds or faster.
DRAM Expansion Jumpers
If you have installed SIMMs in your synthesizer card’s Memory
Module Expansion slots, you can use the DRAM_EN jumper on your
synthesizer card to choose between the on-board 512KB or installed
SIMMs.
The factory default setting of jumper DRAM_EN is to use the
on-board 512KB. Refer to Appendix B, “Changing DRAM
Expansion Jumper Settings” for more information on setting the
jumper.
Some synthesizer cards may not come with the on-board
512KB. Such cards do not have the DRAM Expansion jumper.
Knowing Your Synthesizer Card 1-3
Motherboard Audio Connectors
These connectors are used to connect your synthesizer card to your
motherboard’s audio chips, if present. See Appendix C, “Hardware
Information” for detailed information on these connectors.
Knowing the Software-Configurable I/O
Address Setting
Your synthesizer card supports Plug and Play. This feature allows a
Plug and Play system to assign, using software, resources such as I/O
addresses required by your newly added synthesizer card.
I/O addresses are areas of memory used by your computer’s
microprocessor to distinguish among various peripheral devices
connected to your system when sending or receiving data. Your
synthesizer card is one such device. A possible combination of I/O
addresses that it uses is 620H to 623H, A20H to A23H, and E20H to
E23H.
You do not need to change the I/O addresses assigned by your Plug
and Play system. When the system boots up, it automatically searches
for free I/O addresses that are not used by other peripheral cards and
reserves them for your synthesizer card. If a previously assigned set
of addresses is taken up by another card, the system will search for
other free addresses to assign to your synthesizer card.
1-4 Knowing Your Synthesizer Card
2
Setting Up Your Synthesizer Card
This chapter guides you through the process of installing your
synthesizer card in your system. It is organized as follows:
❑ Installing the Card
❑ Connecting to Output Devices
IMPORTANT:
If you are installing your synthesizer card in a system that is
running Windows 3.x, you need to install a Plug and Play
Configuration Manager before you proceed with the
installation. The Plug and Play Configuration Manager allows
you to configure your Plug and Play synthesizer card in a non
Plug and Play system.
Installing the Card
Installing the synthesizer card in your system is a straightforward
process. Please follow the instructions below.
To install the synthesizer card:
1. Switch off your system and
all peripheral devices.
Unplug the power cord
from the wall outlet.
The power cord and
wall outlet shown may
be different in your
country.
Figure 2-1
Setting Up Your Synthesizer Card 2-1
2. Touch a metal plate on
your system to ground
yourself and discharge any
static electricity.
Figure 2-2
3. Remove the cover from
your system.
Figure 2-3
4. Find a free 16-bit
expansion slot in your
system.
Figure 2-4
5. Remove the metal plate
from the slot you have
chosen and put the screw
aside.
Figure 2-5
2-2 Setting Up Your Synthesizer Card
6. Align your card’s 16-bit
slot connector with the
expansion slot and gently
lower the card into the free
slot as shown.
Figure 2-6
7. Secure the card to the expansion slot with the screw you
removed from the metal plate.
8. Replace the cover of your system.
Connecting to Output Devices
Once the synthesizer card has been mounted in your system, you can
connect it to the following devices:
❑ Powered Speakers or External Audio Amplifier
❑ Audio Card
❑ External Digital Device
If your card does not have any connectors or jacks on its rear
metal plate (also known as rear bracket), skip all the sections
below.
Setting Up Your Synthesizer Card 2-3
Connecting to Powered Speakers or External Amplifier
To play audio directly from your synthesizer card, you can connect
your card to powered speakers or an external audio amplifier. Connect
the stereo phone jack from the speakers’ or amplifier’s input
connection to the Line-Out jack on the back panel of your synthesizer
card. See Figure 2-7 below.
Figure 2-7: Connecting powered speakers or external amplifier to synthesizer card.
Connecting to Audio Card
If you have an audio card in your system, you can connect the
synthesizer and audio cards together. You can then control audio from
your synthesizer card with the audio card’s software. To connect the
two cards together, use a stereo phono cable with a stereo phone plug
at each end to connect the synthesizer card’s Line-Out jack with the
audio card’s Line-In jack. Use Figure 2-8 below as a guide.
2-4 Setting Up Your Synthesizer Card
Some games do not work when the synthesizer and audio cards
are installed in your system. If your game software does not
appear to work in such a situation, contact the game’s
developer for help.
Figure 2-8: Connecting synthesizer and audio cards.
Connecting to External Digital Devices
You can send digital audio from your synthesizer card to a digital
device for high quality audio playback or recording. To connect your
synthesizer card to an external digital device, use a RCA cable with a
RCA plug at each end to connect the synthesizer card’s SPDIF jack
with the digital device’s input jack.
Figure 2-9: Connecting external digital devices to synthesizer card.
Setting Up Your Synthesizer Card 2-5
3
Installing Software in Windows 95
After you have installed your synthesizer card hardware, you can
begin to install the software. This chapter guides you through the
process of installing the synthesizer card’s software in Windows 95
and comprises the following sections:
❑ Setting Up Synthesizer Card Drivers
❑ Installing Your Synthesizer Card’s Applications
❑ Testing the Installation
❑ Uninstalling your Synthesizer Card Software
Setting Up Synthesizer Card Drivers
You need device drivers to control your synthesizer card. Installing
these drivers in Windows 95 is easy as the operating system detects the
existence of synthesizer card components, and either automatically
installs the drivers or prompts you for the drivers. To set up the drivers
for your synthesizer card, you need your Windows 95 installation
diskettes or CD-ROM. Your synthesizer card drivers are in them.
Installing Software in Windows 95 3-1
To set up the drivers:
Some of the dialog boxes shown below may not appear if you
have previously installed a synthesizer card or an audio card
with a wavetable synthesizer in your Windows 95 system.
1. Switch your system on.
The wavetable synthesizer on your card is detected. A dialog
box similar to the one in Figure 3-1 appears.
Figure 3-1: The New Hardware Found dialog box.
2. If you are prompted for a Windows 95 installation diskette or
CD-ROM, insert the indicated diskette or CD-ROM in a drive.
3. If you inserted a Windows 95 diskette, specify the drive
containing the diskette and choose OK.
The drivers for your synthesizer card are now set up. Go on to the next
section to install your card’s applications.
Installing Your Synthesizer Card’s Applications
Your synthesizer card applications can be installed from a CD-ROM
or a diskette depending on whether an installation CD-ROM or an
installation diskette is supplied in your package.
To install from CD-ROM:
1. Ensure that your CD-ROM drive is installed and working
properly. If not, refer to your drive’s documentation to
troubleshoot it.
3-2 Installing Software in Windows 95
2. Load your synthesizer card’s software installation CD-ROM
into your CD-ROM drive.
The CD-ROM supports Windows 95 AutoPlay mode and starts
running automatically. If it does not, refer to Appendix E,
“Troubleshooting”.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen to finish installing your
synthesizer card’s applications.
To install the applications from diskette:
1. Insert the applications’ installation diskette into the appropriate
drive in your system.
2. Click
in the task bar.
The Start popup menu appears
3. Select Settings from the Start popup menu as shown in
Figure 3-2.
Figure 3-2: Start popup menu.
Installing Software in Windows 95 3-3
4. Select Control Panel from the Settings sub-menu.
The Control Panel group box similar to Figure 3-3 appears.
Figure 3-3: The Control Panel group box.
3-4 Installing Software in Windows 95
5. Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
The Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box similar to
Figure 3-4 appears.
Figure 3-4: Add/Remove Programs properties dialog box.
6. Choose Install.
7. Follow the instructions on the screen to finish the installation.
Testing the Installation
When the applications have been installed, you can test your
synthesizer card to find out if it is working properly.
The testing procedure requires the Windows 95 Media Player. Follow
the Start button’s menus, as depicted in Figure 3-7, to see if the Media
Player icon is displayed. If it is not displayed, follow the instructions
below to install the Media Player. If it is displayed, jump to the
instructions to test the synthesizer card.
Installing Software in Windows 95 3-5
To install the Media Player:
1. Click the Start button.
2. Select Settings and then Control Panel.
The Control Panel group box is displayed.
3. Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
The Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box appears.
4. Click the Windows Setup tab.
The dialog box shown in Figure 3-5 appears.
Figure 3-5: The Windows Setup, Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box.
3-6 Installing Software in Windows 95
5. Select Multimedia and choose Details.
The Multimedia dialog box shown in Figure 3-6 appears.
Figure 3-6: The Multimedia dialog box.
6. Click the Media Player check box and choose OK.
7. Follow the instructions that appear on Media Player
installation.
The Media Player is now installed. Perform the following instructions
to test your synthesizer card.
Installing Software in Windows 95 3-7
To test the synthesizer card:
1. Click
in the task bar.
2. Select Programs, Accessories, Multimedia, and Media Player
as shown in Figure 3-7. The Media Player appears and is
shown in Figure 3-8.
Figure 3-7: Programs popup menu.
Figure 3-8: Media Player.
3-8 Installing Software in Windows 95
3. In the File menu, select the Open command.
The Open dialog box appears with a list of sound files
(see Figure 3-9).
Figure 3-9: The Open dialog.
4. Select CANYON.MID from the list of files.
You can also select any other file with the MID extension.
5. Choose Open.
6. Click
on the Media Player.
You should hear the file being played.
If there is no sound during the test, check the following:
❑ An output device is connected to the card’s Line-Out jack.
❑ Volume control of the output device (if any) is set at mid-range.
❑ If your synthesizer card is connected to an audio card, make
sure that an external amplifier or powered speakers is/are
connected to the audio card’s Line-Out jack if you decide not
to use the audio card’s internal power amplifier.
❑ No hardware conflicts between the synthesizer card and
another peripheral device.
You can also test the synthesizer card by running AWEDIAG
in Single-DOS mode or in a DOS box. See the section “Testing
the Installation” in page 4-3 for more details.
Installing Software in Windows 95 3-9
Uninstalling your Synthesizer Card Software
Many applications share resources and make modifications
throughout your system. The Windows 95 uninstall feature allows you
to remove applications cleanly or re-install them to correct problems,
change configurations, or make version upgrades. You can use the
uninstall feature on your synthesizer card’s software.
Please quit all your synthesizer card applications before
carrying out the uninstall procedure. If a card’s application is
running during the uninstall procedure, that application will not
be uninstalled.
To uninstall the software:
1. Click
in the task bar.
2. Select Settings from the Start popup menu as shown in
Figure 3-10.
Figure 3-10: Start popup menu.
3-10 Installing Software in Windows 95
3. Select Control Panel from the Settings sub-menu shown in
Figure 3-10.
The Control Panel group box like the one in Figure 3-11
appears.
Figure 3-11: The Control Panel group box.
Installing Software in Windows 95 3-11
4. Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
The Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box similar to
the one in Figure 3-12 appears.
Figure 3-12: The Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box.
5. Select Sound Blaster AWE32 Software from the list and
choose Remove.
The files pertaining to your synthesizer card applications are
deleted.
6. Follow the instructions on screen to complete the uninstall
process.
3-12 Installing Software in Windows 95
4
Installing Software in
DOS/Windows 3.x
This chapter provides instructions to install your synthesizer card’s
software in a DOS/Windows 3.x system. It also tells you how to test
the card and change the card’s resources. It consists of the following
sections:
❑ Installing From CD-ROM
❑ Installing From Diskettes
❑ Testing the Installation
❑ Understanding the Installation Program
❑ Changing Resource Settings
Your package may come with an installation CD-ROM or an
installation diskette to install your synthesizer card’s software. Please
use the appropriate section based on the installation media provided in
your package.
You need to have a Plug and Play Configuration Manager
installed in your system before you install your synthesizer
card’s software. Your system cannot detect the card without a
Plug and Play Configuration Manager.
Installing Software in DOS/Windows 3.x 4-1
Installing From CD-ROM
Before you can install the synthesizer card’s software from the
CD-ROM, a CD-ROM drive must be installed and working properly
in your system.
If you have not yet installed a CD-ROM drive and associated
drivers, refer to your CD-ROM drive’s documentation for
instructions.
To install the synthesizer card’s software from CD-ROM:
1. Quit to DOS if you are in Windows.
The installation will not work if you install from the
Windows DOS prompt.
2. Insert the installation CD-ROM into your CD-ROM drive.
3. At the DOS prompt, change to the drive containing your
CD-ROM. For example, type D:.
4. Change to the WIN31 directory (e.g. type CD WIN31).
5. Type INSTALL and press <Enter>.
6. Follow the instructions presented on the screen to complete the
installation.
When you have completed the installation and rebooted, proceed to
the section Testing the Installation in this chapter to find out if your
installation works.
Installing From Diskettes
If a diskette is provided, to install the synthesizer card’s software:
1. Quit to DOS if you are in Windows.
The installation will not work if you install from the
Windows DOS prompt.
2. Insert your synthesizer card’s installation diskette into a drive.
4-2 Installing Software in DOS/Windows 3.x
3. At the DOS prompt, change to the drive containing your
diskette. For example, if your diskette is in drive A, type A:.
4. Type INSTALL and press <Enter>.
5. Follow the instructions presented on the screen to complete the
installation.
When you have completed the installation and rebooted, proceed to
the section “Testing Your Installation” in this chapter to find out if
your installation works.
Testing the Installation
Once you have installed the card, run the test program AWEDIAG to
make sure the card has been installed properly. This program checks
the I/O addresses used by the synthesizer card. It then displays a menu
to let you test the card’s music output.
To run the test program:
1. At the DOS prompt, change to the directory containing your
synthesizer card’s software.
If your system contains a Sound Blaster audio card, the
software can be found in the same directory as your
audio card’s software (e.g. C:\SB16). Otherwise, it can
be found in the C:\CTSND directory or the directory
you specified during installation.
2. Type AWEDIAG and press <Enter>.
3. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the test.
If the test program stops or displays an error message when it is
checking the I/O addresses, it may be due to a conflict between the
synthesizer card and another peripheral device. To resolve the
conflict, you have to change the I/O addresses of your synthesizer
card. (See the section “Changing Resource Settings” in page 4-7 or
Appendix E, “Troubleshooting” on how to change the settings and
resolve the conflicts.)
Installing Software in DOS/Windows 3.x 4-3
If there is no sound output during the test, check the following:
❑ An output device is connected to the card’s Line-Out jack.
❑ Volume control of the output device (if any) is set at mid-range.
❑ If your synthesizer card is connected to an audio card and if you
decide not to use the audio card’s internal power amplifier,
make sure that an external amplifier or powered speakers is/are
connected to the audio card’s Line-Out jack.
❑ No hardware conflicts exist between the synthesizer card and
another peripheral device.
Understanding the Installation Program
The installation program creates a directory you specify, and copies
the software provided into that directory. It then allows you to set up
your Windows applications by adding a command to the WIN.INI file
to run WINSETUP.EXE. This command automatically creates the
synthesizer card program group and the application icons when you
next run Windows.
You can also choose to set up your Windows applications at a
later time by running INSTALL from the synthesizer card’s
directory in your hard disk. INSTALL also allows you to
selectively set up components that were not installed
previously.
The installation program also modifies your AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
Details are provided in the following section.
4-4 Installing Software in DOS/Windows 3.x
Modifications to AUTOEXEC.BAT File
Modifications made to the AUTOEXEC.BAT file vary depending on
whether you have a Sound Blaster audio card installed in your system.
❑ If you do not have a Sound Blaster audio card installed, the
installation program adds the following statements to the
AUTOEXEC.BAT file:
SET BLASTER=E620
SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E MODE:0
C:\CTSND\AWEDIAG /S /W=C:\WINDOWS
The first 2 statements set up the BLASTER and MIDI
environment variables for your synthesizer card. The last
statement runs the AWEDIAG utility. The CTSND directory
is the default directory that stores your synthesizer card’s
software. If you specified another directory to install to during
the installation process, that directory is reflected instead.
Similarly, the same statement assumes that C:\WINDOWS
contains your Windows program. If you installed it to another
directory, that directory is reflected instead.
❑ If you have a Sound Blaster audio card installed, three
modifications will be made to the AUTOEXEC.BAT file:
— An E parameter is added to the SET BLASTER statement.
— A MODE parameter is added to the SET MIDI statement.
— A statement to run AWEDIAG is added after the statement
to run DIAGNOSE for your Sound Blaster card.
The resultant statements for your Sound Blaster and
synthesizer cards may look like:
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 E620 T6
SET SOUND=C:\SB16
SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E MODE:0
C:\SB16\DIAGNOSE /S
C:\SB16\MIXERSET /P /Q
C:\SB16\AWEDIAG /S /W=C:\WINDOWS
The statement to run AWEDIAG should always be after
the statement to run DIAGNOSE.
Installing Software in DOS/Windows 3.x 4-5
The E parameter in the SET BLASTER statement specifies the I/O
address of your synthesizer card. Refer to your Sound Blaster audio
card’s Getting Started manual for more information on the additional
parameters. The SB16 directory is the default directory that stores
your Sound Blaster audio card’s software. If your audio card’s
software is stored in another directory, that directory is reflected
instead. Similarly, the last statement assumes that C:\WINDOWS
contains your Windows program. If you installed it to another
directory, that directory is reflected instead.
The SET BLASTER statement is added or modified by the
AWEDIAG utility. The values shown above may differ from those in
your system. Running AWEDIAG with the /S parameter updates the
E parameter of the BLASTER environment with the I/O address of
your synthesizer card (retrieved from the Plug and Play Configuration
Manager). Running AWEDIAG with the /W parameter updates the
SYSTEM.INI file with the same value.
The SET MIDI statement specifies the MIDI file format used. If you
have a Sound Blaster audio card in your system, it’s installation
program will have created the SET MIDI statement. In this case, the
MODE parameter is added to that existing statement by your
synthesizer card’s installation program.
The parameters in the SET MIDI statement are:
Parameter
Description
SYNTH:x
x can be 1 or 2.
1 (default setting) specifies the Advanced Wave
Table synthesizer.
2 specifies MIDI port on your audio card.
x can be G, E, or B.
G specifies General MIDI file format.
E (default setting) specifies Extended MIDI file
format.
B specifies Basic MIDI file format.
x can be 0, 1, or 2.
0 (factory default) specifies General MIDI mode.
1 specifies GS mode.
2 specifies MT-32 mode.
MAP:x
MODE:x
4-6 Installing Software in DOS/Windows 3.x
Changing Resource Settings
When your synthesizer card encounters a conflict with another
peripheral device, you need to change the resource settings of your
synthesizer card. This can be done by running the ISA Configuration
Utility that comes with your system’s Plug and Play Configuration
Manager. This utility shows you which resources are available for
your synthesizer card and allows you to choose them. You can refer
to the documentation for your Plug and Play Configuration Manager
for more information.
When you have changed the resource settings, you will be asked to
reboot. During reboot, your system’s environment will be updated
with the new settings. You can view the new resource settings in the
system’s environment by typing SET at the DOS prompt.
Installing Software in DOS/Windows 3.x 4-7
5
Using Advanced WavEffects
Control for Windows 95
You can use the Advanced WavEffects chip to control effects and
MPU-401 MIDI Emulation of your synthesizer card. This chapter
explores these capabilities using a Windows 95 application called
AWE32 Control. The AWE32 Control allows you to add and control
the effects of your MIDI playback in Windows. It also allows you to
specify the Synthesizer and User Banks.
This chapter is organized as follows:
❑ Starting AWE32 Control
❑ Setting Effects for Playback
❑ Changing Synthesizer Bank
❑ Changing User Bank
❑ Changing WaveFx Samples
❑ Auditioning Your Banks
❑ Viewing the Memory Status Display
❑ Selecting AWE Devices
❑ Browsing Sound Sample Files or SoundFont Banks
❑ Using Context-Menu
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95 5-1
Starting AWE32 Control
To start AWE32 Control:
1. Choose AWE32 Control from your synthesizer card’s program
group.
The AWE32 Control window similar to that shown in Figure
5-1 appears.
Figure 5-1: The AWE32 Control windows.
As AWE32 Control takes its settings directly from the
hardware, the appearance of the AWE32 Control window may
differ slightly.
5-2 Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95
Setting Effects for Playback
You can add effects like Reverb and Chorus to enhance your MIDI
playback.
To add effects:
1. Choose the Effect tab.
The tab panel similar to Figure 5-1 appears.
2. Select the desired effect.
3. Choose Apply to enable the effect.
The effect is used as the default setting immediately.
If the Reverb & Chorus effect is selected, you can further
specify the reverb and chorus variations.
Reverb
Reverb adds a spacious quality to the sound. Listening to a sound
containing Reverb is an experience similar to listening to music at an
indoor concert.
The Reverb consists of eight variations:
❑ Room 1
❑ Room 2
❑ Room 3
❑ Hall 1
❑ Hall 2
❑ Plate
❑ Delay
❑ Planning Delay
Each variation defines a different degree of reverberation.
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95 5-3
To select Reverb variations:
1. Choose the Reverb drop-down list box.
The dropped-down list similar to Figure 5-2 appears.
Figure 5-2: The Reverb drop-down list box.
2. Choose the desired reverb variation.
Chorus
Chorus adds depth and warmth to the sound. This function is designed
to give audio playback orchestral fullness and resonance.
The Chorus consists of eight variations:
❑ Chorus 1
❑ Chorus 2
❑ Chorus 3
❑ Chorus 4
❑ Feedback Delay
❑ Flanger
❑ Short Delay
❑ Short Delay Feed Back
Each variation defines a different degree of chorus effect.
5-4 Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95
To select Chorus variations:
1. Choose the Chorus drop-down list box.
The dropped-down list similar to Figure 5-3 appears.
Figure 5-3: The Chorus drop-down list box.
2. Choose the desired chorus variation.
Treble and Bass Level
Treble refers to the higher frequencies (or pitches) of sound while bass
refers to the lower frequencies of sound. Increasing the treble level
increases the volume of the higher pitches of sound. Increasing the
bass level increases the volume of the lower pitches of sound.
Changing Synthesizer Bank
You can specify the Synthesizer Bank required to support your MIDI
playback using the Available Synth drop-down list box on the Synth
tab panel.
Three predefined standards are available: General MIDI, GS, and
MT-32. These standards take their settings from the
SYNTHGM.SBK, SYNTHGS.SBK, and SYNTHMT.SBK bank files
respectively.
It is also possible to specify a customized Synthesizer Bank which
consists of a set of instruments you have pre-arranged.
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95 5-5
To choose the Synthesizer Bank:
1. Choose the Synth tab.
The tab panel similar to Figure 5-4 appears.
Figure 5-4: The Synthesizer Bank drop-down list box.
2. Choose the desired Synthesizer Emulation standard from the
Available Synth drop-down box.
Figure 5-5: Available Synth drop-down list.
3. Choose Apply to save your selection.
This synthesizer type is subsequently used as the default
synthesizer type the next time you start Wndows.
5-6 Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95
To change the Synthesizer bank to a user custom sythesizer bank:
1. Choose the User Synth option from the Available Synth
drop-down box.
2. Type the path for the user custom SoundFont bank in the
Configured path edit box.
Alternatively, choose Browse to search the path. You may also
choose the Configured Path drop-down list box to view the
most recently used file.
3. Choose Apply to set changes.
Changing User Bank
You can change a user bank by uploading a new user bank to the
pre-arranged bank files using the User tab panel (see Figure 5-6).
Uploading User Bank
To upload a User Bank:
1. Choose the User tab.
The tab panel similar to Figure 5-6 appears.
Figure 5-6: The User Bank section of Selection group box.
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95 5-7
2. Choose the Current State drop-down list.
3. Select a user bank from the drop-down list.
4. Type the path of the user bank in the Configured path edit box.
Alternatively, choose Browse to search for your SoundFont
bank. You may also choose the Configured Path drop-down
list box to view the most recently used sample.
5. Choose Apply to set changes.
Clearing User Banks
To clear the current user bank:
1. Choose the user bank to clear from the Current state drop-down
list.
2. Choose the Clear button.
The popup menu similar to Figure 5-7 appears.
Figure 5-7: Popup menu.
3. Select the Current User Bank option.
To Clear all user banks:
1. Choose the Clear button.
2. Select All User Banks option.
5-8 Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95
Changing WaveFx Samples
You can upload wave files as sound samples for your synthesizer card
hardware and use them as instruments during MIDI playback.
Uploading Instruments
To upload instruments
1. Choose the WaveFx tab.
The WaveFx tab panel similar to Figure 5-8 appears.
Figure 5-8: The WaveFax tab panel.
2. Choose the Instrument drop-down list.
3. Select a desired instrument from the drop-down list.
4. Type the path of the sound sample in the Sound sample path
edit box. Alternatively, choose Browse to search for your
Sound samples. You may also choose the Sound Sample Path
drop-down list box to view the most recently used file.
5. Choose Apply to set changes.
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95 5-9
Clearing WaveFx Instruments
To clear the current WaveFx Instrument
1. In AWE32 Control, click on the WaveFx tab.
2. Select a instrument from the Instrument drop-down list.
3. Choose the Clear button.
The popup menu similar to Figure 5-9 appears.
Figure 5-9: Popup menu.
4. Select the Current Instrument option.
To clear all WaveFx Instruments
1. Choose the Clear button and select the All Instruments option.
Auditioning Your Banks
The virtual keyboard allows you to test samples as you audition them.
By clicking different keys in this keyboard, you will hear the same
instrument at different pitches. This instrument is specified in the
Instrument list box. Also, clicking different regions of a key simulate
different velocity pressure exerted on that key.
5-10 Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95
To playback an existing instrument from a bank
1. Choose the Playback tab.
The Playback tab panel similar to Figure 5-10 appears.
Figure 5-10: The Playback tab panel.
2. Choose the Playback bank drop-down list.
3. Select a bank from the drop list.
4. Choose the Instrument drop-down list.
5. Select an instrument from the drop list.
6. Play the keys on the Virtual Keyboard to test the instrument.
To test instruments with MIDI Controllers:
1. Choose the Playback tab.
2. Select the desired instrument to test from the Instrument
drop-down list.
3. Choose the MIDI Controller from the MIDI controller
drop-down list.
4. Change the value of the MIDI controller using the Controller
value slider.
5. Play the keys on the virtual keyboard to test the instrument.
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95 5-11
To change the octave range:
1. Click the vertical slider next to the virtual keyboard.
2. Select the desired range by moving the slider up or down.
3. Play the virtual keyboard to test the instrument.
To reset the MIDI Controllers:
1. Choose the Reset Controllers button.
To silence all MIDI sustain sounds:
1. Choose the All Sound Off button.
Viewing the Memory Status Display
The Memory Status Display allows you to monitor the RAM memory
status on your synthesizer card. The memory space will decrease
when the file you assign to the bank number has embedded sound
samples. The memory space will decrease accordingly by sample file
size.
For the case of the display in Figure 5-11, 100% represents 512K.
Figure 5-11: 100% available memory space.
In Figure 5-12, the available memory space is 94.7% of 512K after
some sample files are loaded.
Figure 5-12: 94.7% available memory space.
5-12 Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95
Selecting AWE Devices
If you have multiple synthesizer cards or audio cards with synthesizer
hardware installed in your system, you can choose which synthesizer
to control using the Device Selection dialog.
To select other AWE devices:
1. Choose the Device button.
The Device Selection dialog similar to Figure 5-13 appears.
Figure 5-13: The Device Dialog.
2. Select your desired device from the device list.
The selected device's properties appear in the Properties
display box.
3. Choose the Select button to confirm selection.
The check box at the lower right, if available, allows you to enable
your selected device to have MPU-401 MIDI Emulation. The
following section describes how to use MPU-401 MIDI Emulation.
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95 5-13
Using MPU-401 MIDI Emulation
If you have games or other software that utilize the MPU-401 port and
that do not have native support for Advanced WavEffects synthesis,
you can use MPU-401 MIDI Emulation to allow them to use
Advanced WavEffects synthesis. With MPU-401 MIDI Emulation
enabled, music output to the MPU-401 port is redirected to the
Advanced WavEffects synthesizer.
For MPU-401 MIDI Emulation to work, ensure that you select
General MIDI or MPU-401 MIDI Out as the output music device for
the game or software. If the game or software installation prompts you
for the address of the music device, you need to select the value of the
P parameter in the BLASTER environment (e.g. P330). You can view
the BLASTER environment by typing SET at the DOS prompt and
reading the BLASTER= statement. In the case where the P parameter
is not shown or where its value does not match any of the choices
provided by the game or software installation, you should select
another option.
Or, you can change the value of the P parameter to match those
provided by the game or software installation.
5-14 Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95
To change the value of the P parameter:
1. Open the Control Panel folder.
2. Double-click the System icon.
The System Properties dialog appears.
3. Click the Device Manager tab.
4. Double-click “Sound, video and game controllers”.
5. Select the Creative SBAWE MPU-401 Emulation device and
choose Properties.
The properties dialog for the selected device appears.
6. Click the Resources tab.
The resource settings for the Creative SBAWE MPU-401
Emulation device are displayed.
7. Click the “Use automatic settings” check box to disable it.
8. Click the “Setting based on:” drop-down list and select a Basic
configuration other than the one originally shown.
The Input/Output Range setting in the table changes. This new
value will then be reflected by the P parameter in the
BLASTER environment.
9. Choose OK when done.
For DOS boxes only, MPU-401 MIDI Emulation is on the first
time you start Advanced WavEffects Control. To disable the
feature, you need to disable the check box shown in Figure
5-13. For Windows applications, MPU-401 MIDI Emulation
is not applicable.
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95 5-15
Browsing Sound Sample Files or SoundFont
Banks
To browse for sound sample or SoundFont banks:
1. Choose Browse button within the Synth, User or WaveFx tab
panel. Browse dialog similar to Figure 5-14 appears.
Figure 5-14: The Browse dialog.
2. Click on the drop list directly below List Files of Type and
select the desired file type from the list.
3. Choose the desired file listed in the file list box.
4. Choose OK to confirm selection.
Information of the selected file will appear at the bottom of the
Browse dialog. If there is no description displayed, the selected
file could be an unsupported format.
5-16 Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95
Using Context-Menu
The context-menu provides you with quick assess to controls on the
various tab panels.
To use context-menu:
1. Place your mouse cursor on any part of the tab panel.
2. Click your right mouse button.
The context-menu similar to Figure 5-15 appears.
Figure 5-15: Context-menu.
3. Select your desired option by clicking your left mouse button.
Using Advanced WavEffects Control for Windows 95 5-17
6
Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced
WavEffects Utilities
If you have a Windows 3.x/DOS system, you can use the synthesizer
card to perform MIDI Emulation (MPU-401 MIDI Emulation). This
chapter explores this capability and others using a DOS utility called
AWEUTIL and a Windows 3.x application called AWE Control.
This chapter is organized as follows:
❑ Using AWEUTIL
❑ Using AWE Control
Using AWEUTIL
AWEUTIL allows you to perform the following:
❑ Initialize AWE Hardware
❑ Use MIDI Emulation to support computer games
❑ Troubleshooting
For more information about your AWEUTIL options, do the
following:
1. Change to the directory containing your synthesizer card’s
software.
2. Type AWEUTIL /? and press <Enter>.
AWEUTIL options available for your synthesizer card appear:
/U
Unload.
/S
Initialize only.
/EM:GM
Enable MIDI Emulation using General
MIDI.
/EM:GS
Enable MIDI Emulation using GS
Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities 6-1
/EM:MT32
Emulation.
Enable MIDI Emulation using MT32
Emulation.
Initializing AWE Hardware
The command line for initializing the AWE hardware is:
AWEUTIL /S
This command initializes the AWE hardware only and does not
leave the program resident in memory.
Using MIDI Emulation to Support Computer Games
AWEUTIL allows you to enable the MIDI Emulation feature of your
synthesizer card. This feature allows games and other software that do
not support wave table synthesis to play wave table music from the
synthesizer card.
Protected mode software does not support MIDI Emulation.
You can still play music from this software using the
4-operator synthesizer chip on your audio card if you have one.
The command line for specifying the type of MIDI emulation is :
AWEUTIL [EM:xx] [/U]
The parameters for this command line are as follows:
/EM:xx
Specifies the type of MIDI emulation where xx
represents GM, MT32, or GS.
/U
Unloads the program from memory.
The /U command leaves the program resident in memory.
The Windows driver (SBAWE32.DRV) disables MIDI
emulation if you run Windows. Therefore, you will need to
enable MIDI emulation again after you exit Windows.
6-2 Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities
Using the AWE Control
The AWE Control allows you to add and control the effects of your
MIDI playback in Windows 3.x. It also allows you to specify the
Synthesizer and User Banks.
This section is organized as follows:
❑ Starting AWE Control
❑ Setting Effects for Your Playback
❑ Changing Synthesizer Bank
❑ Changing User Bank
❑ Using the Control Menu
❑ Viewing the Memory Status Display
❑ Using the Break-Out-Box Button
❑ Quitting AWE Control
Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities 6-3
Starting AWE Control
To start AWE Control:
1. Double-click the AWE Control icon in your synthesizer card’s
group window.
The AWE Control window similar to the Figure 6-1 appears.
Figure 6-1: The AWE Control window.
As AWE Control takes its settings directly from the hardware,
the appearance of the AWE Control window may differ
slightly.
6-4 Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities
Setting Effects for Your Playback
You can add effects like Reverb and Chorus to enhance your MIDI
playback.
To add Effect:
1. Choose the Effects Type drop-down list box.
The dropped-down list similar to Figure 6-2 appears.
Figure 6-2: The Effect Types drop-down list box.
2. Select the desired effect.
3. Choose Set to save the effect.
If the Reverb and Chorus effect is selected, you can further
specify the reverb and chorus variations within the Setup group
box.
Reverb
Reverb adds a spacious quality to the sound. Listening to a sound
containing Reverb is an experience similar to listening to music at an
indoor concert.
The Reverb consists of eight variations:
❑ Room 1
❑ Room 2
❑ Room 3
❑ Hall 1
❑ Hall 2
❑ Plate
❑ Delay
❑ Planning Delay
Each variation defines a different degree of reverberation.
Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities 6-5
To select Reverb variations:
1. Choose the Reverb drop-down list box.
The dropped-down list similar to Figure 6-3 appears.
Figure 6-3: The Reverb drop-down list box.
2. Choose the desired reverb variation.
Chorus
Chorus adds depth and warmth to the sound. This function is designed
to give audio playback orchestral fullness and resonance.
The Chorus consists of eight variations:
❑ Chorus 1
❑ Chorus 2
❑ Chorus 3
❑ Chorus 4
❑ Feedback Delay
❑ Flanger
❑ Short Delay
❑ Short Delay Feed Back
Each variation defines a different degree of chorus effect.
6-6 Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities
To select Chorus variations:
1. Choose the Chorus drop-down list box.
The dropped-down list similar to Figure 6-4 appears.
Figure 6-4: The Chorus drop-down list box.
2. Choose the desired chorus variation.
Changing Synthesizer Bank
You can specify the Synthesizer Bank required to support your MIDI
playback using the Synth Bank drop-down list box on the AWE
Control.
Three predefined standards are available: General MIDI, GS, and
MT-32. These standards take their settings from SYNTHGM.SBK,
SYNTHGS.SBK, and SYNTHMT.SBK bank files respectively.
It is also possible to specify a customized Synthesizer Bank which
consists of a set of instruments you have pre-arranged.
To choose the Synthesizer Bank:
1. Choose the Synth Bank drop-down list box.
The dropped-down list similar to Figure 6-5 appears.
Figure 6-5: The Synthesizer Bank drop-down list box.
Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities 6-7
2. Choose the desired Synthesizer Emulation standard.
3. Choose Set to save your selection.
This synthesizer type is subsequently used as the default
synthesizer type the next time you start Wndows.
Changing User Bank
You can assign bank numbers to the pre-arranged bank files using the
User Bank section (see Figure 6-6) of the Selection group box.
Figure 6-6: The User Bank section of Selection group box.
❑ The User Bank Descriptor Display shows the description of the
particular user bank selected.
❑ The User Bank Filename Display shows the name of the file
designated to the Bank Number displayed in the spinner box.
To change a User Bank:
1. Choose the number to assign the user bank using the spinner
buttons.
The Setup group box changes to the one shown in Figure 6-7.
Figure 6-7: To assign User Bank in Setup group box.
6-8 Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities
2. If you need to get a user bank from another path, choose Set
Dir. The Set Directory dialog box shown in Figure 6-8 appears.
Figure 6-8: The Set Directory dialog box.
3. Select the path of the user bank you want to use and choose
OK.
4. Choose the desired bank file (with SBK extension) from the
Setup group box.
Choose Clear to cancel the bank file assigned to the bank
number.
You can assign up to 127 user banks.
Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities 6-9
Using the Control Menu
To use the Control menu:
1. Choose the Control-menu box.
The menu similar to Figure 6-9 appears.
Figure 6-9: The Control Menu.
2. Select the option that you want to perform.
Viewing the Memory Status Display
The Memory Status Display allows you to monitor the RAM memory
status on your AWE 32 card. The memory space will decrease when
the file you assign to the bank number has embedded sound samples.
The memory space will decrease accordingly by the sample file size.
For the case of the display in Figure 6-10, 100% represents 512K.
Figure 6-10: 100% available memory space.
6-10 Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities
In Figure 6-11, the available memory space is 61% of 512K after some
sample files are loaded.
Figure 6-11: 61% available memory space.
Using the Break-Out-Box Button
When you choose BOB (Break-Out-Box button), the AWE Controller
Break-Out Box dialog box similar to Figure 6-12 appears. This dialog
box contains sliders that generate MIDI controller events as you move
them. You can use the sliders to generate controller events in playback
mode. The sliders automatically slide during playback to reflect the
values of controller events in the assigned slots.
Figure 6-12: The AWE Controller Break-Out-Box dialog box.
Quitting AWE Control
To quit AWE Control:
1. Choose Quit.
Alternatively, double-click the Control-menu box.
Using DOS/Windows 3.x Advanced WavEffects Utilities 6-11
A
General Specifications
This appendix lists the general specifications of your synthesizer card.
Plug and Play
❑ ISA specification version 1.0a compliant.
Advanced WavEffects 32 Music Synthesizer
❑ 32-voices polyphony.
❑ 16 parts multi-timbral.
❑ 1 MB ROM of General MIDI sample.
❑ 512 KB built-in DRAM (not available on some cards).
Upgrade Options
❑ SIMM RAM modules for more sound samples.
General Specifications A-1
B
Changing DRAM Expansion
Jumper Settings
Skip this appendix if your card does not have the on-board
512KB.
The jumper DRAM_EN configures your synthesizer card to use the
on-board 512 KB DRAM or the optional Single Inline Memory
Modules (SIMMs). The factory default setting specifies use of the
512 KB DRAM.
To change the DRAM usage, enable the jumper corresponding to the
setting shown in Figure B-1.
Figure B-1: The available DRAM expansion settings.
Changing DRAM Expansion Jumper Settings B-1
C
Hardware Information
You may want to internally connect your synthesizer card to the audio
chips on your system’s motherboard. This appendix defines the pins
of the motherboard audio connector on your synthesizer card.
Read this section only if you are an advanced user who knows
how to use the pin assignments. You should be familiar with
your system’s motherboard and know where to find your
system’s audio chip connectors. Obtain help from a qualified
technician if you are unsure.
Figure C-1 shows you the position of each of the four pins.
Figure C-1: The position of each pin of the motherboard audio connector.
Hardware Information C-1
Table C-1 shows you the pin descriptions.
Table C-1: Motherboard Audio Connector Pin Assignments.
Pin
Signal
1
Right Channel
2
Ground
3
Left Channel
4
Ground
5
Keyed
6
Ground
7
Ground
8
Ground
If you want to locate the motherboard audio connecters on your
synthesizer card, see Figure 1-1.
C-2 Hardware Information
D
MIDI Specifications
This appendix is organized as follows:
❑ MIDI Implementation Chart
❑ GS Drum Preset Maps
❑ Preset Organization
MIDI Specifications D-1
MIDI Implementation Chart
This section lists your synthesizer card’s MIDI implementation chart.
If you are not familiar with how to use the chart, read the following
section on “Using MIDI Implementation Chart”.
Table D-1: MIDI Implementation Chart.
Function
Transmitted
Received
Remarks
MIDI Channel
X
1 - 16
1 - 16
Mode
X
3
Note Number
X
0 - 127
Velocity
Note On
Note Off
X
X
Key Aftertouch
Channel Aftertouch
X
X
X
O
Pitch Bend *1
X
O
+/-2 Octave
PitchBend
Sensitivity
recognized
Control Change *1
0, 32
1
6, 38
7
10
11
64
91
93
98
99
100
101
120
121
123
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
Bank select
Modulation
Data entry
Main Volume
Pan
Expression
Damper Pedal
Reverb Depth
Chorus Depth
NRPN LSB
NRPN MSB
RPN LSB
RPN MSB
All Sounds Off
Reset All Controllers
All Notes Off
Program Change
X
O 0 - 127
9n, V = 0 - 127
8n, V = 0 - 127
Notes:
*1 : All channels respond to MIDI volume (including drums)
Default power up : Bend = 2 semitones, master volume = 100, Controllers normal.
Mode 1: OMNI ON, POLY
Mode 2: OMNI ON, MONO
D-2 MIDI Specifications
Mode 3: OMNI OFF, POLY
O: Yes
Mode 4: OMNI OFF, MONO X: No
Using MIDI Implementation Chart
A “MIDI Implementation Chart” is included with every MIDI device.
To check feature compatibility between two MIDI devices:
1. Fold the MIDI implementation sheets vertically along the line
between the Transmitted and Received columns.
2. Put the Transmitted column of the device you will use to send
MIDI messages next to the Received column of the receiving
devices.
3. Compare the sending and receiving features to see whether
features are compatible between the devices. See Figure D-1.
If the feature is followed by matching Os, then the devices can use that
feature together by means of MIDI. If either feature is marked with an
X, then the two devices cannot be used together. Features that show
ranges of numbers can be used together only in the values that overlap
within two ranges.
Figure D-1: Comparing your MIDI implementation charts.
MIDI Specifications D-3
GS Drum Preset Maps
You need to insert the SIMM RAM to have GS and MT-32
support. Otherwise, please skip this section.
The following tables list the drum preset maps used by your
synthesizer card. If you are not familiar with how to use the maps,
read the following section on “Using GS Drum Preset Maps”.
Table D-2: GS Drum Preset Maps.
D-4 MIDI Specifications
Table D-3: GS Drum Preset Maps.
MIDI Specifications D-5
Table D-4: GS Drum Preset Maps.
D-6 MIDI Specifications
Table D-5: GS Drum Preset Maps.
MIDI Specifications D-7
Table D-6: GS Drum Preset Maps.
D-8 MIDI Specifications
Table D-7: GS Drum Preset Maps.
MIDI Specifications D-9
Using GS Drum Preset Maps
This section helps you to understand what a drum kit is and how to use
the GS drum preset maps.
In the GS synthesizer mode, you can select any drum kit out of a
selection of 10 drum kits (which includes the Standard Drum Kit) to
play through MIDI channel 10. The choice of more drum kits offers
you the flexibility to listen to songs with a wider variety of percussive
instruments. These drum kits are shown in Table D-8.
Each drum kit is essentially an instrument that you can select in the
same way you select a melodic instrument. For example, to select the
TR-808 drum kit, all you need to do is change the program in MIDI
channel 10 to 26. All percussion sounds will then be played back
through the TR-808 drum kit.
D-10 MIDI Specifications
Table D-8: Drum kits for GS synthesizer mode.
Name
Prog#
Description
Standard/Jazz 1/33
Standard General MIDI drum kit. Jazz is
similar to the Standard drum kit.
Room
9
Similar to that of the Standard kit except that
it has more room ambiance.
Power
17
Similar to that of the Standard kit, but with
more powerful kick and snare drums.
Electronic
25
Electronic drum kit. Most of the percussion
instruments in this drum kit are reminiscent
of old analog and digital rhythm machines
(e.g., the Roland TR-707 and TR-909
rhythm machines).
TR-808
26
Electronic drum kit, reminiscent of the
Roland TR-808 rhythm machine.
Brush
41
Similar to the Standard kit except that
brushes have been added. This kit is mostly
used for Jazz MIDI pieces.
Orchestra
49
An immense collection of concert drums
and timpani.
SFX
57
A collection of sound effects.
CM-64/32L
128
Same as the MT-32 drum kit. This drum kit
contains standard percussion at the lower
range of the keyboard, and sound effects at
the higher range of the keyboard.
MIDI Specifications D-11
Preset Organization
This section lists the various preset organizations of your synthesizer
card.
GM & GS Preset (Capitol tones)
This section lists the Capitol tones for GM & GS preset.
Table D-9: GM & GS Preset (Capitol tones).
Prog#
Prog#
Instrument
1
Piano 1
2
Piano 2
3
Piano 3
4
Honky-tonk
5
E. Piano 1
6
E. Piano 2
7
Harpsichord
8
Clav.
9
Celesta
10
Glockenspiel
11
Music Box
12
Vibraphone
13
Marima
14
Xylophone
15
Tubular-bell
16
Santur
17
Organ 1
18
Organ 2
19
Organ 3
20
Church Org. 1
21
Reed Organ
22
Accordion Fr
23
Harmonica
24
Bandneon
25
Nylon-str. Gt
26
Steel-str. Gt
27
Jazz Gt.
28
Clean Gt.
29
Muted Gt.
30
Overdrive Gt.
31
Distortion Gt.
32
Gt. Harmonics
33
Acoustic Bs.
34
Fingered Bs.
35
Picked Bs.
36
Fretless Bs.
37
Slap Bass 1
38
Slap Bass 2
39
Synth Bass 1
40
Synth Bass 2
Piano
Chromatic
Percussion
Organ
Guitar
Bass
Instrument
D-12 MIDI Specifications
Table D-10: GM & GS Preset (Capitol tones).
Synth lead
Pipe
Reed
Brass
Ensemble
Strings /
orchestra
Prog#
Instrument
Prog#
Instrument
41
Violin
42
Viola
43
Cello
44
Contrabass
45
Tremolo Str
46
PizzicatoStr
47
Harp
48
Timpani
49
Strings
50
Slow Strings
51
Syn. Strings1
52
Syn. Strings2
53
Choir
54
Voice Oohs
55
SynVox
56
OrchestaHit
57
Trumpet
58
Trombone
59
Tuba
60
MutedTrumpet
61
French Horn
62
Brass 1
63
Synth Brass1
64
Synth Brass2
65
Soprano Sax
66
Alto Sax
67
Tenor Sax
68
Baritone Sax
69
Oboe
70
English Horn
71
Bassoon
72
Clarinet
73
Piccolo
74
Flute
75
Recorder
76
Pan Flute
77
Bottle Blow
78
Shakuhachi
79
Whistle
80
Ocarina
81
Square Wave
82
Saw Wave
83
Syn. Calliope
84
Chiffer Lead
85
Charang
86
Solo Vox
87
5th Saw Wave
88
Bass & Lead
MIDI Specifications D-13
Table D-11: GM & GS Preset (Capitol tones).
SFX
Percussive
Ethnic
Synth SFX
Synth pad etc.
Prog#
Instrument
Prog#
Instrument
89
Fantasia
90
Warm Pad
91
Polysynth
92
Space Voice
93
Bowed Glass
94
Metal Pad
95
Halo Pad
96
Sweeo Pad
97
Ice Rain
98
Soundtrack
99
Crystal
100
Atmosphere
101
Brightness
102
Goblin
103
Echo Drops
104
Star Theme
105
Sitar
106
Banjo
107
Shamisen
108
Koto
109
Kalima
110
Bag Pipe
111
Fiddle
112
Shannai
113
Tinkle Bell
114
Agogo
115
Steel Drums
116
Woodblock
117
Taiko
118
Melo Tom 1
119
Synth Drum
120
ReverseCym.
121
Gt. FretNoise
122
Breath Noise
123
Seashore
124
Bird
125
Telephone 1
126
Helicopter
127
Applause
128
Gun Shot
D-14 MIDI Specifications
GS Preset (Variation Tones)
Table D-12 and Table D-13 list the variation tones for GS preset. If
you are not familiar with how to use use the table, please read the
following section on “Using GS Preset (Variation Tones)”.
Table D-12: GS preset (Variation tones).
Prog#
Bank
Number
Instrument
Prog#
Bank
Number
Instrument
5
8
Detuned EP 1
32
8
Gt. Feedback
6
8
Detuned EP 2
39
8
Synth Bass 3
7
8
Coupled Hps.
40
8
Synth Bass 4
15
8
Church Bell
49
8
Orchestra
17
8
Detuned Or. 1
51
8
Syn. Strings3
18
8
Detuned Or. 2
62
8
Brass 2
20
8
Church Org. 2
63
8
Synth Brass3
22
8
Accordion It
64
8
Synth Brass4
25
8
Ukulele
81
8
Sine Wave
8
12-str. Gt
108
8
Taisho Koto
16
Mandolin
116
8
Castanets
27
8
Hawaiian Gt.
117
8
Concert BD
28
8
Chorus Gt.
118
8
Melo. Tom 2
29
8
Funk Gt.
119
8
808 Tom
31
8
Feedback Gt.
26
MIDI Specifications D-15
Table D-13: GS preset (Variation tones).
Prog#
Bank
Number
Instrument
0
Gt. FretNoise
0
Helicopter
1
Gt. Cut Noise
1
Car-Engine
2
String Slap
2
Car-Stop
0
Breath Noise
3
Car-Pass
1
Fl. Key Click
4
Car-Crash
121
Prog#
Bank
Number
Instrument
122
126
0
Seashore
5
Siren
1
Rain
6
Train
2
Thunder
7
Jetplane
3
Wind
8
Starship
4
Stream
9
Burst Noise
5
Bubble
0
Applause
0
Bird
1
Laughing
1
Dog
2
Screaming
123
124
127
2
Horse-Gallop
3
Punch
0
Telephone 1
4
Heart Beat
1
Telephone 2
5
Footsteps
2
DoorCreakin
0
Gun Shot
3
Door
1
Machine Gun
125
128
D-16 MIDI Specifications
4
Scratch
2
Lasergun
5
Windchime
3
Explosion
Using GS Preset (Variation Tones)
This section helps you understand what a user bank is and how it
relates to the GS preset maps shown in Table D-12 on page D-15 and
Table D-13 on page D-16.
Your synthesizer card offers GS compatibility by including the user
bank instruments found in GS. Instruments in a user bank are those
that are similar in class or variation. For example, GM instrument
number 25 is Nylon String Guitar (see Table D-9 on page D-12) and
its variation is Ukulele (see Table D-12 on page D-15).
An instrument from a user bank (called variation instrument) is just
like any GM instrument. Assume you are editing a MIDI file and one
of the tracks is using Nylon String Guitar. Upon the playback of that
track, you find that Nylon String Guitar does not produce the sound
that you want. You can then choose to use Ukulele, the variation for
Nylon String Guitar.
To do this, you need to insert a MIDI bank number of 8 (the bank
number of Ukulele) into that track, followed by a program change of
25 to select “Ukelele” as the instrument.
The user bank instruments are available only in the “GS” mode
of your synthesizer card. You can switch to “GS” mode via the
Control Panel.
MIDI Specifications D-17
MT-32 Preset
The following tables list the MT-32 preset.
Table D-14: MT-32 Preset.
Prog# Instrument
Prog# Instrument Prog# Instrument
1
Acou Piano 1
25
Syn Brass 1
49
Str Sect 1
2
Acou Piano 2
26
Syn Brass 2
50
Str Sect 2
3
Acou Piano 3
27
Syn Brass 3
51
Str Sect 3
4
Elec Piano 1
28
Syn Brass 4
52
Pizzicato
5
Elec Piano 2
29
Syn Bass 1
53
Violin 1
6
Elec Piano 3
30
Syn Bass 2
54
Violin 2
7
Elec Piano 4
31
Syn Bass 3
55
Cello 1
8
Honkytonk
32
Syn Bass 4
56
Cello 2
9
Elec Org 1
33
Fantasy
57
Contrabass
10
Elec Org 2
34
Harmo Pan
58
Harp 1
11
Elec Org 3
35
Chorale
59
Harp 2
12
Elec Org 4
36
Glasses
60
Guitar 1
13
Pipe Org 1
37
Soundtrack
61
Guitar 2
14
Pipe Org 2
38
Atmosphere
62
Elec Gtr 1
15
Pipe Org 3
39
Warm bell
63
Elec Gtr 2
16
Accordion
40
Funny Vox
64
Sitar
17
Harpsi 1
41
Echo Bell
65
Acou Bass 1
18
Harpsi 2
42
Ice Rain
66
Acou Bass 2
19
Harpsi 3
43
Oboe 2001
67
Elec Bass 1
20
Clavi 1
44
Echo Pan
68
Elec Bass 2
21
Clavi 2
45
Doctor Solo
69
Slap Bass 1
22
Clavi 3
46
School Daze
70
Slap Bass 2
23
Celesta 1
47
Bellsinger
71
Fretless 1
24
Celetra 2
48
Square Wave
72
Fretless 2
D-18 MIDI Specifications
Table D-15: MT-32 Preset.
Prog# Instrument Prog# Instrument Prog#
Instrument
73
Flute 1
92
Trombone 2
111
Bottleblow
74
Flute 2
93
Fr Horn 1
112
Breathpipe
75
Piccolo 1
94
Fr Horn 2
113
Timpani
76
Piccolo 2
95
Tuba
114
Melodic Tom
77
Recorder
96
Brs Sect 1
115
Deep Snare
78
Pan Pipes
97
Brs Sect 2
116
Elec Perc 1
79
Sax 1
98
Vibe 1
117
Elec Perc 2
80
Sax 2
99
Vibe 2
118
Taiko
81
Sax 3
100
Syn Mallet
119
Taiko Rim
82
Sax 4
101
Windbell
120
Cymbal
83
Clarinet 1
102
Glock
121
Castanets
84
Clarinet 2
103
Tube Bell
122
Triangle
85
Oboe
104
Xylophone
123
Orche Hit
86
Engl Horn
105
Marimba
124
Telephone
87
Bassoon
106
Koto
125
Bird Tweet
88
Harmonica
107
Sho
126
One Note Jam
89
Trumpet 1
108
Shakuhachi
127
Water Bell
90
Trumpet 2
109
Whistle 1
128
Jungle Tune
91
Trombone 1
110
Whistle 2
If you set your synthesizer card to the sound arrangement of MT-32,
you will be able to play in the same manner as if you were playing the
MT-32. However, since the sound module of MT-32 is organized
differently from your synthesizer card, you will not be able to
perfectly duplicate the operations of the MT-32.
MIDI Specifications D-19
The delicate changes in the sound will appear different to those of the
MT-32, when you change the sound of an instrument using such
features as velocity, modulation, and aftertouch.
Your synthesizer card cannot recognize MT-32 exclusive messages.
Therefore, if MT-32 exclusive messages are received by your
synthesizer card, the settings of your synthesizer card will not be
changed.
D-20 MIDI Specifications
E
Troubleshooting
This appendix provides some tips and strategies for some of the
problems you might encounter with your synthesizer card either
during installation or normal use.
Problems Installing Synthesizer Card Software
from CD-ROM
The following are problems that you may encounter when installing
your synthesizer card’s software from CD-ROM.
Problem
The CD-ROM does not automatically run after you
insert it in the drive.
Cause
The AutoPlay notification setting in your Windows 95
system may not be enabled.
Solution
1. Enable the “Auto Insert Notification” check box.
This check box can be found in your CD-ROM
drive’s properties page. To display this page:
1. Click the Start button.
2. Select Settings and then Control Panel.
3. Double-click the System icon.
4. Click the Device Manager tab and select your
CD-ROM drive.
5. Choose Properties.
The properties page for your drive appears.
Troubleshooting E-1
2. Alternatively, if you do not want to enable the “Auto
Insert Notification” check box, perform the
following steps:
1. Double-click the My Computer icon on your
Windows 95 desktop.
2. Using your right mouse button, click the icon
representing your CD-ROM drive.
A pop-up menu appears.
3. Select AutoPlay in the menu.
4. Follow the instructions that appear.
Problems with Sound
The following are general problems you might encounter when trying
to obtain sound.
Problem
No output when running the test program.
Causes
1. Volume knob of your powered speakers or gain of
your external amplifier is not set properly.
2. Your synthesizer card’s output is connected to the
wrong jack on the powered speakers, external
amplifier, external digital device, or audio card.
3. If you connected your synthesizer card to an audio
card, the audio card’s mixer may be mute or set to an
inaudible level.
Solutions
1. Check that the audio card’s volume knob or any
other volume control found on the speaker or
amplifier is not set to zero. You may also want to
check your audio card’s software mixer is set at an
audible level.
2. Make sure the synthesizer card is connected to the
correct input jack on your speaker, amplifier, digital
device, or the Line-In jack on your audio card.
3. Check that the audio card mixer’s master and
Line-In volume settings are set to audible levels.
E-2 Troubleshooting
Problems in DOS
The following are problems you might encounter in DOS.
Problem
BLASTER environment could not be found.
Cause
The command to set up the BLASTER environment
might not be included in the AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
The BLASTER environment specifies the I/O address
setting of your synthesizer card. It needs to be set up in
the DOS environment. When you install your
synthesizer card’s software, the commands to set up the
environment is automatically added to the
AUTOEXEC.BAT file so that the environment is set up
whenever your system is started. Whenever you make
changes to the environment, it is advisable that the
changes be reflected in the AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
Solution
To add the command to set up the BLASTER
environment in the respective system files, run
AWEDIAG (see the sections “Testing the Installation”
in page 4-3 and “Understanding the Installation
Program” in page 4-4). Remember to reboot for the
changes to take effect.
Problem
Error message “Out of environment space”.
Cause
The system environment space is used up.
Solution
Add the statement SHELL=C:\COMMAND.COM
/E:512 /P to the CONFIG.SYS file. /E defines a new
size for the system environment space. You can choose
a higher value if the environment size is already
512 bytes. (Normally, the next value is 1024 bytes.)
For more information on the above statement, refer to
your DOS manual.
Troubleshooting E-3
Problems in Windows 3.x
The following are problems you might encounter when in
Windows 3.x.
Problem
No sound when running your synthesizer card’s
Windows applications.
Cause
One or more of the synthesizer drivers might not be
included in the SYSTEM.INI file.
Solution
Check the SYSTEM.INI file by following the steps
below:
1. Choose Run from the File menu in Program
Manager.
2. Type SYSEDIT in the Command Line text box and
choose OK.
3. Make sure the following statements are present:
[drivers]
timer=timer.drv
midimapper=midimap.drv
MIDI=sbawe32.drv
[sndblst.drv]
AWEPort=640
The value shown in the [sndblst.drv] group may be different in
your system.
If one or more of the statements are missing, run INSTALL in DOS.
INSTALL rewrites SYSTEM.INI to set up the drivers. It also sets up
the Windows applications.
E-4 Troubleshooting
Resolving Conflicts
Conflicts occur when two or more peripheral devices contend for the
same resources. Conflicts between your synthesizer card and another
peripheral device may occur if your card and the other device are set
to use the same I/O addresses.
Resolving Conflicts in Windows 95
To resolve conflicts in Windows 95, run Device Manager to change
the resource settings of your synthesizer card or the peripheral card in
your system.
To run Device Manager:
1. Click
on the task bar of your Windows 95 screen.
2. Select Settings from the Start popup menu.
3. Select Control Panel from the Settings popup menu.
4. Double-click the System icon within the Control Panel group
box.
5. Click the Device Manager tab from the System Properties
dialog box.
6. Select Sound, Video and Game Controllers.
7. Select your synthesizer card’s name and choose Properties.
8. In your synthesizer card’s Properties dialog box, click the
Resources tab.
9. Click the Use automatic settings check box.
If this check box is already enabled, you need to go into the
Properties dialog box of the conflicting peripheral device and
click the same check box there.
10. Reboot your system to allow Windows 95 to reassign resources
to your synthesizer card and/or the conflicting peripheral card.
You can see which peripheral device is conflicting with your
synthesizer card in the Device Status box in the General tab of
your card’s Properties dialog box.
Troubleshooting E-5
Resolving Conflicts in DOS/Windows 3.x
To resolve conflicts in DOS/Windows 3.x:
1. Run the ISA Configuration Utility of your system’s Plug and
Play Configuration Manager. The peripheral devices that
conflict with your synthesizer card are noted.
2. Reselect the resource settings of your synthesizer card that are
in conflict with another card.
E-6 Troubleshooting
Printed in Ireland
P/N 0421920000-1
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