Internet Protocol version 6 in industrial automation 10

Internet Protocol version 6 in industrial automation 10
05.2013 Issue
76
ISSN 1470-5745
The Journal of Industrial Network Connectivity
Internet Protocol version 6
in industrial automation 10
Selecting between IP20
and IP67 protection 14
Industrial cyber security
24
& virtualization
Wireless photoelectric
sensor technology 28
Energy harvesting
wireless for IoT
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32
Ultra-Fast and Highly Intelligent –
The PFC200 Controller
t
t Programmable to IEC 61131-3
t Configuration and visualization via Web server
t Integrated security functions
t Robust and maintenance-free
www.wago.com
Contents
GET CONNECTED…
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Contents
Emergence of Industry 4.0
For the Industry 4.0 initiative to gain
momentum (see news on developments at the
Hanover Fair in the show report on page 4),
it’s apparent that improving the infrastructure
and security of industrial networks will be key
contributing technologies. There is certainly
agreement that unifying the functions of a
company’s enterprise and machine control
networks will produce even larger benefits in
the future, but the movement toward a Fourth
Industrial Revolution will require strengthening the performance and resilience of the
underlying networks as well.
This issue takes an in-depth look at these
topics beginning with the impact of Internet
Protocol version 6 (IPv6) on the world of
industrial automation. One of the biggest
issues moving forward is a higher level of
network management and the need for IT
and automation personnel to work more
effectively together. IPv6 provides a solution
for the underlying problem of not enough
IP addresses in the world, along with other
technology advances, but it also creates the
need for a seamless transition from IPv4
systems already in service.
A second critical issue moving ahead,
especially with the continuing shift toward
decentralized systems, is the growth of IP67
solutions. Mounting network switches and
routers, Ethernet-based controllers and I/O
systems on machines creates a need for a
higher level of protection from the environment and a question about how to achieve the
best results when designing new machinery.
Machine availability is such a critical issue for
manufacturers, that it demands solutions that
deliver an extremely high level of reliability.
And finally, security is a priority that will
require a continuing focus. At the Hanover
Fair, we met with numerous networking
companies and there is a consensus that end
user education is needed to better communicate both potential threats and available
technology solutions to address security.
For Industrial Ethernet to achieve its
promise in the future, all aspects of industrial
networking will need to become stronger
and more sophisticated. We are hoping to
be part of that process by reporting on new
technology and applications. We’re hoping
that you also find important information in
this issue on topics such as Internet Protocol
version 6 (page 10), IP20 vs. IP67 solutions
(page 14) and advanced security (page 24)
that will be both interesting and useful in
your work.
Industry news
4
Internet Protocol version 6 for automation technology
10
IP20 versus IP67: install a cabinet or not?
14
Monitoring and controlling VHF radios in the North Sea
17
Evaluate network plant floor coverage before using Ethernet
18
Fail-safe performance for optical fiber networks
20
Web-based plant operation using PC-based automation
22
Embedded virtualization and cyber security for automation
24
Single chip connection solution for PROFINET IO
26
Wireless photoelectric sensor for control & monitoring
28
Greenfield thinking at Nestlé using EtherNet/IP
30
Energy harvesting wireless paves way to Internet of Things
32
Open comms help Ford and Mazda stay flexible in China
35
New products
36
Product Directory
39
Global Sources Directory
44
Private Ethernet
50
Industrial Ethernet book
The next issue of The Industrial Ethernet Book will be published in June/July 2013
Deadline for editorial: June 4, 2013 Deadline for artwork: June 18, 2013
Product & Sources Listing
All Industrial Ethernet product manufacturers (not resellers) are entitled to free of charge entries
in the Product locator and Supplier directory sections of the Industrial Ethernet Book, both the
printed and online version. If you are not currently listed in the directory, please complete the
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Update your own products
If you wish to amend your existing information, login to the Editor section
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Editor: Al Presher, [email protected]
Contributing Editor: Leopold Ploner, [email protected]
Advertising: map Mediaagentur Ploner, [email protected]
Tel.: +49-(0)8192-933-7820 · Fax: +49-(0)8192-933-7829
Online Editor: Adela Ploner. [email protected]
Circulation: [email protected]
Published by
Al Presher
IEB Media, Bahnhofstrasse 12, 86938 Schondorf am Ammersee, Germany
ISSN 1470-5745
05.201 3
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
3
Industry 4.0 is a cornerstone of the German government’s high-tech strategy, and HANNOVER MESSE made it
a core focus of its Integrated Industry keynote theme for 2013. Along with intelligent manufacturing systems
that need to be smart and networked, the technology emphasis is on the complete lifecycle of products.
HANNOVER MESSE 2013 undoubtedly echoed
a strong and common theme with a focus on
the German initiative called “Industry 4.0”.
Among automation suppliers, there is a
uniform optimism that increasing digitization and networking will create the ability
for manufacturers to leverage productivity
advances. The idea is that a “fourth industrial
revolution” has the potential to completely
redesign and shape worldwide industrial
production but the change will take place
gradually with numerous projects of all sizes
being carried out over several years.
The Internet forms the basic communication
platform for Industry 4.0 as well as for the
smart factory where machines are connected
together to form an intelligent networked
production process, and where machines independently communicate with each other and
with the products that are to be produced.
With the “Self X Pro” joint project developed
in cooperation with the Fraunhofer Institute,
for example, Weidmüller is developing a
self-correcting punching-bending tool for its
production.
SOURCE: WEIDMÜLLER
Industry news
2013 Hannover Show Report
A basic goal of Industry 4.0 is that the factory of the future will organise itself based on a network of communicationcapable components and various key technologies.
1. Networked systems provide connectivity for local decentralised information processing.
2. Progressive miniaturisation allows for small, low-cost and high-performance sensors and actuators.
Cyber-physical systems emerge
At a press conference during the Fair, Siegfried
Russwurm, CEO of the Industry Sector and
Siemens AG board member, said that Industry
4.0 is already here in its infancy, and industry
is laying the essential foundations for its
implementation.
“Never before has the world of manufacturing and production technology been
changing as rapidly and fundamentally as
today,” Russwurm said. “The increasing penetration of IT and the growing integration of
all industrial technologies are taking place
in evolutionary steps from today’s perspective. However, looking back, the completely
IT-based interaction between human being,
product and machine could prove to be a real
industrial revolution.”
Russwurm said the heart of Industry 4.0
is the use of algorithms within cyber-physical systems which provide a way to select
the best path for optimizing production. The
product to be manufactured contains all of
the necessary information on its production
requirements, so that integrated production
installations can consider the requirements
of the entire value chain. Decentralized
cyber-physical systems (CPS) then interact
via embedded Internet-based technologies to
create flexible decisions within the production
4
3. Auto-ID for customised product manufacturing creates unique identification and links to the virtual world.
4. Intelligent field devices using software that allows for the global dynamic distribution of functionality is an
integral part of the system integration.
5. Mobile Device Management (MDM): man-machine interfaces for intuitive operation of complex systems without
special training.
process on the basis of this information.
During his presentation, Russwurm
referenced the advanced algorithms required
as enabling a “chess computer” which guides
the production process and will need to be
expanded to communicate more and more
complex parameters.
Humans will conceptualize and design
products, and determine the production rules
and parameters. The CPS then simulates and
compares production options on the basis of
instructions, and proposes compliant, optimal
production paths which results in the selection
of an optimal implementation process.
During the show, a visitor could barely move
from booth to booth without hearing more on
this topic, in part because Industry 4.0 has
a central place in the German government’s
high-tech strategy. But it is also part of a
larger global discussion about the Internet of
Things, and how innovative software systems
and the use of “Big Data” will lead to an optimization of the entire production process.
Clearly for Siemens some of the push is
toward use of simulation technology to
create a virtual optimization of the production
process and an ability to integrate product
and production lifecycles.
But it is also clear, in the overview, that
there will continue to be a strong push to use
intelligent networking to link digital product
planning with physical production and create
seamless data integration from field-level
devices all the way up to enterprise computing
systems.
The undeniable trend is that the IT and
industrial control worlds are becoming more
closely united behind the need for tighter
integration between factory data and machine
networks.
Our complete Hannover
Fair coverage is on our
website at:
www.iebmedia.com
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
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Industry news
ODVA & FDT Group announce
support for CIP networks
Networks supported in FDT2 will include EtherNet/IP, DeviceNet, CompoNet and ControlNet. A working group
has been formed to complete an annex in 2013 that creates compatibility between the two technologies.
ODVA AND THE FDT GROUP
announced at the Hannover Fair
that technical work is underway
in the FDT Group to develop an
annex to the FDT2 specification for
ODVA’s family of CIP Networks. The
new annex will ensure that support
for an FDT-compatible Device Type
Manager is possible for users of
EtherNet/IP, DeviceNet, CompoNet
and ControlNet who are also using
the updates and enhancements
to the FDT technology that are
included in FDT2.
FDT (Field Device Technology) is a standardized interface specification
The FDT Technology standardizes for open data exchange between field devices and automation
the configuration interface between systems. Two software components, a Device Type Manager or
field devices and host systems “device driver” and an FDT Frame Application, enable the exchange.
independent of the communication protocol used to transmit the
data between them, allowing access to device “The FDT Group fully supports this annex to
the FDT2 specification to ensure use of the
parameters for applications where extensive
technology with the family of CIP networks.”
device configuration may be needed. ODVA’s
A technical working group has been formed
CIP technology encompasses a comprehensive
suite of services for industrial automation within the FDT Group to prepare the annex
applications, including control, safety, for the FDT2 specification. The working group
energy, synchronization, motion, information includes companies who are members of both
and network management. When FDT is used ODVA and the FDT Group and individual particin combination with CIP and its network adap- ipants with subject matter expertise in CIP
tations, the resulting system provides users and FDT2. The FDT Group expects the work to
with a feature-rich interoperable environment be completed in 2013 and included with both
the FDT2 specification and in its IEC standard
for configuration, command and control.
“The membership of the FDT Group includes 62453. ODVA expects that there will be no
several automation suppliers who provide FDT impact on its specifications for the family of
capability for their products implementing CIP Networks.
ODVA’s family of CIP Networks,” noted Glenn
www.fdtgroup.org
Schulz, managing director of the FDT Group.
sercos III specification update available
The specification update V1.3.1 for the sercos
III real-time, Ethernet-based automation bus
has been released.
Several specification enhancements have
been executed since the last specification
release, including updates to the sercos
communication protocol and to the different
sercos profiles (drive, I/O, encoder and
energy). In addition, the mechanisms for the
blended infrastructure approach to transmit
sercos, TCP/IP and EtherNet/IP frames over a
single wire were included.
Specification V1.3.1 broadens the functionality and range of applications of the
6
standard, but also reflects trends in machine
and plant construction. Extensions are fully
compatible with the previous specification.
Future work includes functional profiles for
test and measurement, for power sections for
servo drives and for controller-to-controller
communication. A Condition Monitoring
profile for service and preventive maintenance is in process, along with a profile based
on the VDMA standard entitled ”Fieldbusneutral reference architecture for condition
monitoring systems in factory automation”.
EtherNet/IP Process
Management and
Machinery Standards
At the Hannover Fair, ODVA announced initiatives to create a new Industrial Ethernet
standard for process automation, plus the
formation of a working group to look at
exchanging information between machines
and optimizing machine integration.
ODVA members including Cisco Systems,
Endress+Hauser, Rockwell Automation and
Schneider are collaborating to evolve and
accelerate adoption of EtherNet/IP in process
systems. The immediate goal is to provide end
users with a solution starting with connectivity
down to field level devices. Longer range plans
include expanding the new standards into
what would result in a more complete portfolio
to address safety, explosion protection, long
distances and extensive diagnostic coverage.
A special interest group is also being formed
to look at new standards for the exchange of
information between machines, and between
machines and supervisory systems. The goal
is new data models and network services to
address areas such as production, energy,
condition monitoring, business intelligence,
batch and recipe management and multi-line
machine control.
One focus is models for logically grouping
machines attributes and the services required
for effective data exchange. This would allow
heterogeneous systems using EtherNet/IP
and CIP, servos III and/or OPC UA to use a
technology neutral approach to developing
reporting methods and tools.
ODVA Executive Director Katharine Voss
stated that the output of the working group
will further the vision of how optimization of
machinery standards (OMI) can define open
and interoperable standards for integration
of machinery assets into the production
domain. The first step is to study information and communication technology needs
for use cases related to machine-to-supervisory communication. Future work will address
the use cases related to machine-to-machine
communication.
www.odva.org
www.sercos.org
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
Industry news
Patching a broken model for
industrial cyber security
Research shows vulnerabilities existing in SCADA/ICS applications are high. But even when patches can be
installed, they are often problematic and protect for less than half of known problems.
RECENTLY PUBLISHED RESEARCH from Belden’s
Tofino Security brand shows that patching is
often ineffective in providing protection from
the multitude of vulnerability disclosures
and malware targeting critical infrastructure
systems today.
While patching is important as part of an
overall Defense in Depth strategy, the difficulties of patching for industrial systems mean
that compensating controls and special rule
sets that can be implemented to detect and
block attempts to exploit known vulnerabilities in a system may be appropriate.
Security after Stuxnet
Since the discovery of the Stuxnet malware
in 2010, industrial infrastructure has become
a key target for security researchers, hackers,
and government agents. Designed years ago
with a focus on reliability and safety, rather
than security, Supervisory Control and Data
Acquisition (SCADA) and Industrial Control
Systems (ICS) products are often easy to
exploit. As a result, there has been exponential growth in government security alerts
for these systems in the past two years. In
addition, they have attracted some of the
most sophisticated (Stuxnet, Night Dragon,
Flame) and damaging (Shamoon) cyberattacks
on record.
Eric Byres, CTO and vice president of engi-
neering at Tofino Security, investigated the
effectiveness of patching for protecting
control systems from vulnerability exploits
and malware. His work revealed that:
t The number of vulnerabilities existing in
SCADA/ICS applications is high, with as
many as 1,805 yet to be discovered vulnerabilities existing in control system computers.
t The frequency of patching needed to address
future SCADA/ICS vulnerabilities in both
controllers and computers likely exceeds
the tolerance of most SCADA/ICS operators
for system shutdowns. Unlike IT systems,
most industrial processes operate 24x7 and
demand high uptime. Weekly shutdowns for
patching are unacceptable.
t Even when patches can be installed, they can
be problematic. There is a 1 in 12 chance
that any patch will affect the safety or reliability of a control system; there is a 60%
failure rate in patches fixing the reported
vulnerability in control system products.
t Patches also often require staff with special
skills to be present. In many cases, such
experts are often not certified for access to
safety regulated industrial sites.
t Patches are available for less than 50% of
publically disclosed vulnerabilities.
t Many critical infrastructure operators are
reluctant to patch as it may degrade service
and increase downtime.
When patching is not possible, or while
waiting for a semi-annual or annual shutdown
to install patches, an alternative is to deploy
a workaround, also known as a ‘compensating
control’. Compensating controls do not correct
the underlying vulnerability; instead, they
help block known attack vectors. Examples of
compensating controls include product reconfigurations, applying suggested firewall rules,
or installing signatures that recognize and
block malware.
Tofino Security Profiles offer rule and
protocol definitions that are designed to
address newly disclosed vulnerabilities. They
provide a simple way for automation system
vendors to create and securely distribute
malware protection for systems. Operators
benefit from a single, easy-to-deploy package
of tailored rules that can be installed without
impacting operations. The result is that
critical industrial infrastructure facilities can
quickly and effectively defend themselves
against new potential threats.
“My research highlights the multiple
challenges with patching for SCADA and ICS
systems,” remarked Eric Byres. “To secure
facilities, critical infrastructure operators
should pursue a Defense in Depth strategy
that includes patching when possible, and use
compensating controls for protection when
patching is not possible.”
PLCopen Safety Part 4 application specific FBs for presses
A press or a machine press
is a tool used to work metal
(typically steel) by changing
its shape and internal structure.
For this it normally has a
moving section with a cyclic
behavior.
With the usage of presses on
the factory floor, the safety of
the operating personnel is very important.
For this reason PLCopen together with its
members worked on a safety specification,
specific for the application of presses. In this
way the implementation of the safety functionality is harmonized across the different
implementations, reducing system integration, certification and training efforts.
The document contains an overview of the
implementation of safety around presses,
8
coupled to twelve function
blocks. Due to the wide application area of presses, the
function blocks include the use
of electrical motors and valves
control for hydraulics. The set
of function blocks include capabilities such as Foot Switch,
Two Hand Multi Operator, Two
Hand Control TypeIIIC, Press Control and Cycle
Control, as well as Single Valve Monitoring,
Single Valve Cycle Monitoring, Double Valve
Monitoring, Directional Valve Monitoring,
Valve Group Control, Camshaft Monitor and
Cam Monitoring.
Updated motion user guidelines
The new User Guidelines contain application
examples and show how to create user-derived
function blocks to add to a company specific
library, improving the reusability of the application programs. These examples help the
user to better understand the PLCopen Motion
Control functionality and to get started with
their first application programs.
New Coding Guidelines Effort
Although there are coding guidelines for
many programming languages, they are
nearly non-existent for the important area of
industrial control, e.g. IEC 61131-3 and its
PLCopen extensions.
This initiative will focus on developing
a structured approach, and increasing the
efficiency in coding via re-use of pre-defined
functionalities.
wwwplcopen.org
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
Technology
Internet Protocol version 6
for automation technology
WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF IP VERSION 6
(IPv6) in automation engineering, the existing
32-bit IPv4 addresses have been extended
to an address four times as large with 128
bits. This allows a massive expansion of the
address space while, at the same time, allows
a complete shift away from existing address
translations with the limited IPv4 address
space. This means that direct communication
between end systems will again be possible in
the future without any difficulty.
Complicated and error-prone definition of
addresses via Network Address Translation
(NAT) will become obsolete. There will only
be pure “end-to-end” communication in the
future. Restrictive technologies such as NAT
and PAT (Port and Address Translation) will
no longer be required.
What benefits will the end user gain with
the introduction of the new IPv6 technology?
t Consistent diagnosis from the ERP level to
the management level all the way down to
the field level
t Hierarchical setup of network structures
t Optimized routing
New information technologies (IT) will be
based exclusively on IPv6. At the same time,
a long-term coexistence of IPv4 and IPv6 must
be taken into consideration. Today, it is no
longer a question of whether there will be a
transition from IPv4 to IPv6, but when.
In the future, IPv6 will be predominant at
the ERP level because new software functions
GRAPHIC: SIEMENS INDUSTRY
The shortage of IP addresses is leading inevitably to the transition from IPv4 to the IPv6 protocol. These
developments are also affecting automation systems, so adopting a possible twin-track approach can protect
investments in existing plants. The first automation products that offer IPv6 support permit making a
backbone connection without having to rely on the use of transition technologies.
The top graphic is an example of a global IPv6 address. Below is the size of IP address space with IPv4 versus IPv6.
will be based directly on IPv6 services.
Because of the increasingly close mesh
between automation and office IT communication, IPv6-based communication services with
integrated diagnostics capability will grow in
importance, this is a development which will
also affect automation devices.
The Switch to IPv6
By February 1, 2011, the time had come. The
Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA)
issued the last available address block to
10
TABLE: SIEMENS INDUSTRY
Overview of significant IPv4/IPv6 differences
Content
IPv4
IPv6
Released
1981 (RFC 791)
1998 (RFC 2460)
Available address space
32-bit, 4.29 x 109 addresses
128-bit, 3.4 x 1038 addresses
Address format
Decimal: 192.168.1.1
Hexadecimal: 2a00:ad80::0123
Loopback address
127.0.0.1
::1
IPsec header
Optional
Always available
Fragmentation
Host and router
Only the communication endpoint
Checksum in the header
yes
no
Options in the header
yes
no
Link-layer address resolution
ARP (broadcast)
Multicast neighbor discovery messages
Router discovery
Optional
Mandatory
IP configuration
Manual, DHCP
Automatic, DHCPv6, manual
the Asia-Pacific Network Information Center
(APNIC). With this move, there were no more
free IPv4 addresses to distribute to the five
Regional Internet Registries (RIR). The RIRs
can now only pass on the remaining IPv4
addresses that they already hold to their
customers.
For users of the Internet Protocol IPv4, this
meant the switch to the IPv6, defined 15 years
earlier, had begun. Operating systems such as
Windows and Linux had supported this for
years.
In the short term, users will still be assigned
IPv4 addresses from the Regional Internet
Registry pool, but in the mid-term, worldwide
availability via these numbers will not be
assured. The only way out of this misery is the
use of global, unique IPv6 addresses so that
end-to-end communication can once again be
ensured.
The standardization of IPv6 began as early
as 1998 with the publication of the Request
for Comments (RFC) 2460. This is considered
as the official successor to the IPv4 protocol.
The standardization process is in a stable
situation today. Many extensions such as the
coexistence of IPv4/IPv6, DHCPv6, Neighbor
Discovery, and many more have since been
described in the various RFC specifications and
documentation.
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
This is why the
automation industry
has become so
attached to us.
We’re the connect-convert-control-visualizeintegrate-and-adapt networking specialists.
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SOURCE: SIEMENS INDUSTRY
Technology
This graphic illustrates the breakdown of the new IPv6 addresses
stacks across all levels in the protocol stack,
from the application layer to the network
layer. The dual-stack approach ensures that
the further-developed components can always
interoperate via IPv4 with components that
have IPv4-capability only. In automation
technology, it ensures compatibility with
existing system components.
Additional IPv6 support for new devices
provides trouble-free global accessibility
without affecting the existing communication links. From the network perspective,
the main requirement for simultaneous
operation of IPv4 and IPv6 communication is
support in the Layer 3 devices (routing). In
principle, existing Layer 2 devices (switches)
allow both protocols, yet full support of
IPv6 requires adaptations at this level. This
twin-track approach means that investment in
existing systems is protected and retrofitting
or upgrading is only required in exceptional
cases.
Transition period made easy
IPv6 address structure
Investment securely protected
The term “dual stack” generally refers to a
complete duplication of the IPv4 and IPv6
TABLE: SIEMENS INDUSTRY
In contrast to IPv4, the IPv6 addresses are
written in 8 x 16-bit fields of four hexadecimal numbers each. These are separated from
each other with a colon. There is always a
64-bit subnet prefix and a 64-bit interface ID.
In purely numerical terms, a total of 340,28
2,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211
,456 addresses are possible – in the order of
3.4 x 1038.
The only way to grasp this unimaginably high
number is to make a slightly more comprehensible comparison. Every proton in the universe
could be given its own IP address, or the
seven billion people on earth could each be
given more than 1029 addresses.
Since sufficient addresses are now available
to allow unambiguous addressing, and thus
a direct connection between nodes, Network
Address Translation (NAT) and Port Address
Translation (PAT) are no longer necessary.
With IPv6 addressing, every network
interface is given at least one address; in most
cases, however, several addresses. Alongside
the link-local address (LLA) – always formed
automatically for each interface – which is
important for issuing addresses, this can also
include a unique local address (ULA) or even
a global address (GA).
One of the most important new features
of IPv6 is automatic address assignment.
Using the auto-configuration, any IP node
can create a unique link-local address itself
without requiring manual configuration or a
DHCP server. This means that all devices in the
local subnet can be accessed and diagnosed
from an IPv6 viewpoint.
For additional use in Router Discovery,
further IPv6 addresses, router addresses and
configuration parameters are provided for the
node. This should significantly reduce the
effort required for administration of networks.
The following examples show that the
connection of automation components via
IPv6 communication in the automation
sector is easily possible: It is already possible
to communicate via IPv6 today by using the
Simatic NET OPC server which takes on the role
of a proxy here, offering convenient access
to the automation data via IPv4 and IPv6.
This also allows OPC clients (HMI/SCADA) to
obtain the necessary information from the
automation system, regardless of whether
IPv4 or IPv6 is used. This makes it easy to
adapt to the different networks, especially
during a transitional period.
A system that is still IPv4-capable, or is
supported by other fieldbus systems such as
Profibus, is accessed via a backbone network.
The OPC client or a corresponding OPC browser
must be configured with the correct IPv6
address. Following access to the server, the
available variables are displayed. Users do
not notice any difference here, whether they
have connected via IPv4 or IPv6. This only
becomes clear when configuring the interface.
It becomes even easier if you only specify the
name of a PC station with the Simatic NET
OPC server.
The CP 1543-1 communications processor
is the first PLC product launched by Siemens
to have been developed for connection to the
IPv6 backbone network. The CP 1543-1 offers
the ability to access variables of the Simatic
S7-1500 station using the familiar Fetch/
Write services via the TCP port of the PC with
IPv6. It is thus possible that the existing
communication mechanisms can be retained
in a control system or even placed on a new
transport layer – in this case IPv6. Other ways
to connect to a new IPv6 infrastructure are by
FTP (client/server) and e-mail (client only).
In this system architecture example, a Simatic NET OPC assumes the role of a proxy-server.
12
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
SOURCE: SIEMENS INDUSTRY
To configure an IPv6 FTP server for the CP
1543-1, only a few settings are necessary
using the Step 7 configuration software,
V12.0. The user can define the IPv6 address
for the CP 1543-1 communications processor,
activate FTP or FTPS protocol, set up the user
with name and password and save the configuration data and transfer it to the station. The
configuration is completed and access to data
in the PLC program is possible.
Of course, the functions for IPv6 in the
overall security concept are also considered.
The user can specify how individual users or
nodes can access the station data. Access
to the data in a programmable controller is
possible with freely available tools under IPv6.
Technology
Case Study
CP1543-1 as FTP server
Transition Technologies
Switch to IPv6 will take longer
The need for introducing IPv6 is primarily due
to the fact that the address range of the global
IP network (Internet) has been exhausted.
An expanded address space with IPv6 was
defined many years ago to solve the problem
of this shortage. The implementation of the
new addressing therefore primarily affects the
backbone area of a company and will later
05.201 3
This diagram illustrates using the Simatic NET OPC server to communicate via IPv6 today .
SOURCE: SIEMENS INDUSTRY
The significance of IPv6 will increase, not
least due to the increasing shortage of IPv4
addresses. Global, unique IP addresses and the
associated opportunity to seamlessly network
systems and production facilities globally will
lead to IPv6 slowly but surely moving into IT
infrastructure in the next few years.
The decision to introduce IPv6 into a
network has far-reaching consequences.
Careful planning for conversion, time for
testing, and a strategy for how long the
existing IPv4 infrastructure can be run in
parallel are required. All findings gathered
under IPv4 must be configured and maintained
redundantly in parallel operation. A complete
switch to IPv6 is only possible if all nodes
can be addressed by IPv6 and the necessary
infrastructure has been created on the web.
Transitional technologies from the IT world
such as the use of IPv4-compatible addresses
or IPv4 mapped addresses, and the use of
tunneling technologies such as IPv6-over-IPv4
or Teredo generate additional overheads,
reduce security, and partially restrict functionality. The use of such technologies should
therefore be weighed up carefully.
In order to guarantee connectivity to the
Internet in future with IPv6, it is essential
to integrate the automation networks into
the IPv6 infrastructure. The first Siemens
automation products with IPv6 support permit
this backbone connection without having to
rely on the use of transition technologies.
In this way, they also guarantee the global
networking of production plants in future.
A system that is still IPv4-capable, or is supported by fieldbus systems such as Profibus, is accessed via a backbone
network. The OPC client or a corresponding OPC browser must be configured with the correct IPv6 address.
migrate gradually via the IT infrastructure to
the automation level. This transition will take
a long time and will also make it necessary for
the two procedures to exist in parallel with
one another.
To ensure connectivity to the Internet
in future with IPv6, the integration of
automation networks typically based on IPv4
in the IPv6 infrastructure is necessary. The
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
first automation products with IPv6 support
from Siemens allow this backbone connectivity without requiring the use of transition
technologies. In this way, they guarantee the
global networking of production plants in the
future.
Reiner Plonka works as a system manager for
Siemens AG Industrial Automation.
13
Applications
IP20 versus IP67:
install a cabinet or not?
Mechanical and system engineers are confronted with each new project about what type of protection should
be implemented for the automation. Decisions which previously ended mostly in the control cabinet due to
the vast superiority of IP20 systems, are no long so clear cut. The reason is that IP67 automation systems
have become consistently more powerful, and are therefore no longer limited to harsh environments.
SOURCE: WAGO
AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY is the heartbeat of
machines and systems, and has become an
indispensable contributor to the autonomous
execution of defined procedures. Without
advanced controls, it would hardly be possible
anymore to execute processes at the desired
quality, with the required speed, and within
the necessary economics.
More decentralized automation
In spite of the widely specialized fields, the
foundational demands that are placed on
automation technology remain quite similar.
In addition to the detailed design of individual
automation functions, mechanical and system
engineers are faced at some point with the
selection of a suitable automation system.
If nothing else, the answer to this question
determines whether the automation solution
will be tied to a control cabinet or not. In
many circumstances, this decision is easy.
Hardly anyone would, for example, equip an
overburdened conveyor system with an IP20
system, or automate a handling machine with
IP67 components. In between, however, there
is a great deal of room for various possibilities
which have not received enough investigation.
The fact that automation systems have
been developed in different protection
classes is not exclusively due to the more
or less harsh environmental conditions that
occur in the ultimate installation location.
Controls and the relevant modules at higher
protection classes are more often the result
of the automation technological revolution:
the selection of centralized and decentralized
control, with a trend to even more decentralized systems.
With regard to applications with strictly
centrally planned automation, the control
system is not generally located in direct
proximity to the actual process – and therefore
does not need to resist as much dust, spray
water, or vibrations as those of a decentralized
solution, in which the components are located
directly adjacent to machines or systems.
The hardware must be designed to be correspondingly sturdier, if it is not merely located
near, but rather directly at the location of
the process, and therefore can no longer be
protected by a control cabinet or housing.
14
While the choice of a centralized versus decentralized architecture is still important, controls are generally moving
increasingly closer to the process. IP67 compatibility is one of the enabling technologies that has made this possible.
Nevertheless, mechanical and system
engineers generally automate using IP20
products. The decision in favor of an
automation system based on control cabinets
is often made due to the power criteria
required, fast reaction times, general fieldbus
independence, available functionality such
as I/O module variance, user parameters
including data protection, update capabilities
or user-related programmability. Assuming no
functional criteria stand in opposition to IP67,
the reasons appear even more insignificant.
Whether the reasons are higher acquisition
costs or lack of experience, IP67 systems
without control cabinets are often treated as
a secondary option.
Technology strengths/weaknesses
With increasing demands on environmental
characteristics, the functional strengths
of IP20 technology begin to shift into the
background. If machines are used outside at
negative temperatures measured in double
digits, if presses and drilling machines must
endure constant vibrations and hard shocks or
if dirt, dust, and water dominate and a central
control cabinet does not provide an adequate
solution, almost inevitably an IP67 system will
be selected.
The view beyond the “control cabinet edge”
can, however, prove rewarding. The reason is
that IP20 automation has a few weaknesses
which can give designers reason for reconsideration during planning. Sensitivities to high
power and heat on the part of the components
used in the control cabinet or housing are
part of this. There is also a question as to
whether the maximum temperature range
will be achieved constantly and whether the
system will be stressed by this condition.
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
SOURCE: WAGO
Applications
Must additional cooling be a possible consideration? Is there a need for the ability to
exchange defective sensors, actuators, or
cables quickly and without problems? Any of
these can lead to higher costs of systems and
machines, on the manufacturer’s as well as on
the operator’s side.
If an automation design is placed into
testing and objectively compared, it must be
determined that modern IP67 systems have
attained an almost identical scope of power
and functions as IP20 solutions. There are
possible savings potentials at this point due
to smaller control cabinets, the elimination
of housings, as well as lower design and
cabling expenses. In addition, the proportion
of costs dedicated to service can be significantly reduced.
The modular design of new I/O systems enables connection of 64 I/O modules at distances of up to 50 meters
between modules, and a maximum total extension of up to 500 meters per station.
IP67 more capable than ever
Even in classic IP20 environments, IP67
systems like the SPEEDWAY 767 system from
WAGO can be the better alternative, depending
on the application. Reasons for this include,
for example, the scalability and expandability
associated with modular solutions, and
the possibility for extensions also offers an
advantage for lowering costs in machine and
system design. This means that systems can be
initially designed, tested, accepted and finally
dismantled at the factory, shipped and then
finally installed by the customer and placed
in operation. When using automation that is
already connected in control cabinets, this
becomes even more advantageous because
smaller connection technology, M8/M12, is
standard for use there.
The increased depth of automation in
machines and systems as well as the trend
toward fast fieldbus protocols is supported in
IP67 I/O system’s through shorter reaction
times, higher synchronicity, lower jitter/
skew and low latency calculation. Because
fieldbus-dependent, parameterization depth
of IP67 devices using GSD, GSDML, SDDML,
and EDS files or fieldbus-independent via FDT/
DTM technology is significantly greater than
in the past, multiple functionalities can be
covered by fewer base modules. This reduces
the number of modules and versions needed,
and minimizes supply and inventory costs.
Integrated “parameter handling” also ensures
that adjustments are not lost when a module
is replaced.
The use of new IP67 systems in traditional
IP20 environments is not merely sensible
theory; it has been a practical solution for
some time now. It is used in metal processing
centers, for example, in which IP20 systems
installed in cabinets are commonly used. In
fact, systems without cabinets can make sense
anywhere where there is insufficient space
because end products are now much smaller
and the processing systems need to be more
compactly designed.
05.201 3
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15
SOURCE: WAGO
Applications
Technology
In many applications, intelligent devices
are being mounted directly on site to take over
rotating, milling and drilling operations as a
supplement to, or operating independently of
another higher-level central controller.
Such cases lend themselves to decentralized IP67 systems which are programmable
according to IEC 61131-3 and function autonomously. The systems can be installed in direct
proximity to the process and simultaneously
increase system availability because partial
processes can be maintained during failures,
and system areas can be powered down in a
controlled manner.
Cost-effective, autonomous compact
controllers also enable cross-communication
which allows fast individual reactions in
exceptional circumstances. Signal processing
in the individual controllers also positively
influences runtime performance because
the signal volume to the control system is
reduced, and processing needs are offloaded
from the fieldbus and higher-level controller.
The fieldbus capacity can then be exploited
to achieve higher bus cycles, which increases
productivity in the system.
Programmability, signal processing, and
reduced installation space needs are three
reasons for using IP67 components. Another
is the flexibility use of IP67 brings to system
size. For example, when used in envelope
stuffing machines where different combinations of letters and enclosure materials are fed
into an envelope and made ready for dispatch,
they place a decisive role. The operator’s
ability to quickly and easily convert the
envelope stuffing system to settings tailored
to each customer places high demands on the
automation technology.
IP67-I/O systems are preferred because
they are designed to function decentrally
from the ground up, and are equipped with
standardized plug connections that support
simple “plug and play” functionality for the
operators. Changes of this type can lead to
changing variables in the IP67 I/O system,
which can in turn lead to delays in the process
mapping.
To avoid expensive engineering changes in
cases like this, systems like SPEEDWAY offer
options handling. This enables the determination of different configuration levels – within a
maximum configuration level – of the IP67-I/O
system by the higher-level controller within
the context of the machine design. An operational system change is then recognized by
the controller and a different program can be
initiated for production. Engineering changes
are unnecessary, so operating personnel can
quickly and easily carry out the work.
Generating user programs according to IEC 61131-3 (CODESYS 3) enables signal processing and direct cross
communication of IP67 control systems in the field. Because parameterization depth of IP67 modules is significantly
greater than for IP20 systems, multiple functionalities can be covered by fewer base modules.
is less important, and performance itself is
placed on center stage. These criteria also
provide a good argument for using IP67
technology in an IP20 environment. In
many distribution centers, pallets of customer-specific goods are assembled, and the
package sizes can vary widely. Robots have
often assumed primary responsibility for
these operations, providing fully automated,
precise, and space-saving packing on the
pallets. Control technology ensures secure
transportation at increasing weights and
continuous optimization of the transport path.
For this reason, speed and synchronization are
especially relevant for selecting the correct
automation system.
Fast Ethernet-based I/O systems which
support fieldbuses like sercos, for example,
are an ideal fit for this type of applicatino.
The systems offer a high internal data transmission rate such that achieving cycle times of
250 µs are not uncommon. Their use ensures
that data are not only transmitted quickly,
but can also be input and output with high
synchronization via the fieldbus and the higher-level I/O system. While an IP20 system
can also do this, the question becomes,
why? Decentralized structures in particular as
described in this scenario become an ideal
application for fast and powerful IP67 I/O.
IP67 a complementary technology
Dealing with logistics
The focal points for automation are set very
differently in the area of logistics. In these
applications, the flexibility of system variables
16
Experience shows that IP67 is not viewed
practically as competition with IP20, but
rather as complementary technology. There
is actually no serious competition between
the two technologies because the proportion
of automation not tied to housings versus
automation in control cabinets has remained
at around 15%, and the trend appears to be
to remain the same or only slightly increased.
While planners, engineers and end users should
look at implementing IP67 I/O systems when
assessing automation designs, the individual
application remains decisive for selecting the
correct system.
In addition to considerations of planning,
acquisition and operating costs, the answers
to the following questions can be helpful in
coming to a decision. Can the components be
installed in the existing control cabinet – or
must the cabinet be designed at extra cost?
Do the structure and sizes of the systems
argue for a centralized or decentralized use
of automation? Does the system need to be
dismantled, transported, and reassembled for
the end client after initial commissioning?
What are the expectations for start-up and
service – keyword: plug and play? Can all
functional changes be covered by the I/O
system under consideration?
The project-specific requirements alone
contribute to the evaluation of the planned
system or machine and decisively influence
this decision. In many cases, in which the
demands are not merely based on dust and
water protection, a system without a control
cabinet can absolutely present an attractive
alternative to IP20 solutions.
Ludwig Adelmann is a Product Manager at
WAGO Kontakttechnik GmbH & Co. KG
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
Serial data fed via Ethernet to a Multi-Axis Remote Control system using VHF radios mounted on gas and oil
rigs is used to collect, monitor and control operational and performance data in difficult environments.
tivity. Paul Ratcliffe, Engineering Manger at
Park Air Systems said, “The DeviceMaster RTS
16-port is ideal for our current setup, and its
2-port counterpart is starting to be used in
distributed systems.”
TO MAINTAIN CONTINUOUS MONITORING and
control of both new and existing VHF radio
systems around the North Sea, a Multi-Access
Remote Control (MARC) system is used to
collect operational and performance data from
the radios mounted on various gas and oil rigs
throughout the region.
Serial to Ethernet Device Servers
Serial Communications Feed
Each remote radio’s RS-232 data is fed through
an Inband Signalling Unit (IBSU), which
passes audio data and control signaling over
standard four-wire telecoms lines whether
they be land line, fiber, SAT or micro-wave
link to the DeviceMaster RTS 16-port at the
central control site.
All of this serial communications data is
then fed via Ethernet to the MARC system
which provides monitoring and remote control
of all VHF transmitters and receivers from the
central control site. Additional centers around
Serial to Ethernet communications enables monitoring.
the North Sea can also monitor the VHF radios
using the MARC system.
When Ethernet is available at future VHF
sites, the DeviceMaster RTS 2-port 1E will be
used to provide serial-to-Ethernet connec-
Serial to Ethernet device servers can connect
a wide variety of RS-232/422/485 serial
devices to a network using existing software
applications by offering support for native
COM, TTY, or TCP/IP socket communications.
Comtrol’s DeviceMaster products provide
security by offering SSL & SSH management
plus SSL serial data stream encryption.
The DeviceMaster has been ruggedized
to handle extreme temperatures, operating
voltage and humidity fluctuation, vibration
and shock of severe outdoor environments.
Application article by Comtrol.
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Applications
Monitoring and controlling
VHF radios in the North Sea
Applications
Evaluate network plant floor
coverage before using Ethernet
SOURCE: MOLEX
Just as the adoption of machine control over industrial networks has broadened, so too is the pool of
companies looking at leveraging the power of Ethernet to gain a competitive edge by linking manufacturing
and business operations. Here are some insights into factors to consider for your next project.
BUSINESS IMPERATIVES DRIVING the convergence of industrial and commercial networks
within the enterprise include uptime and
production optimization, product quality,
workflow speed and efficiency and customer
service demands. Global competition and
dwindling profit margins have precipitated
network integration for many manufacturers
striving to streamline operations, increase
productivity and reduce overall costs.
Just as the adoption of machine control
over industrial networks broadened over a
period of years, now companies are looking at
leveraging Ethernet to gain an edge by linking
their manufacturing and business networks.
Network convergence
This convergence necessitates the integration
of cabling, connectivity, controllers, switches
and other components, and software to
transmit and mine data between commercial
and industrial functions.
In device-level networks, a plant floor
controller communicates with devices on a
machine using one of several open or proprietary protocols. The trend today is toward
implementing Ethernet as the link-layer
protocol to one of the legacy protocol applications, and even Ethernet right down to the
device level on the machine.
With the right architecture and industrial
grade components, convergence can offer
significant advantages for enterprise-wide
access and increased business intelligence,
plus data transmission speed for faster
information flow. It can help with energy
efficiency and resource management, improve
equipment performance and be used to coordinated monitoring and control functions for
optimizing production.
Ethernet convergence offers the ability
to meet real-time data traffic requirements
with proven reliability, security and ease of
integration. That is why the trend toward
operating on an enterprise-wide technology
platform has steadily been growing, especially
among larger manufacturers.
Technology & industry in lockstep?
Formerly considered solely as plant-floor
functions, equipment performance and
production metrics are now widely recognized
as important strategic business tools that can
18
The convergence of industrial and business networks is leading to use of Ethernet as the link layer protocol for devices.
help to reduce expenses and optimize uptime.
Technology advancements have set the pace,
offering network tools to link machine
processes, control systems and plant-wide
information to the enterprise with unparalleled scalability, functionality and options.
However, technology and industry seldom
advance in lockstep. Despite often bullish
predictions of an industry-wide shift to
commercial-industrial network convergence,
the reality is that adoption has been moving
at a more measured and strategic pace.
Nevertheless, it is a fact that plant environments are gradually migrating away to the
most prevalent current standards: communication protocols that use Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and
standard Ethernet network structures.
Industrial Ethernet uses twisted pair cable,
fibre optics, wireless networks and in the
future, power-line carrier (Ethernet over the
power signal). Common industrial Ethernet
protocols including EtherNet/IP, Profinet and
other open systems are road tested to manage
myriad automation scenarios requiring
real-time performance and multiple communication channels on the same network.
TCP/IP, the set of protocols developed to
allow computers to share resources across
a network, has been widely adopted in
commercial offices. Multiple computers can
use TCP/IP and other protocols on a single
local area network with the IP providing
routing access to the Internet. TCP/IP facilitates rapid and accurate file transfer and user
communications in a commercial network.
Plant transmissions occurring via Ethernet
and TCP/IP enable integration into a common
commercial network and office applications.
Plant vs. enterprise information
In most cases, industrial network needs
diverge from those of the office suite. At the
plant level, process control and automation
often necessitate more stringent real-time
data transmission rates. In addition to speed,
Ethernet is able to span distances and accept
more devices without performance degradation seen in prior network technology.
Those deploying Ethernet today benefit from
critical lessons learned in the past. Network
architecture, security and data management
must be planned to work efficiently and allow
for expansion with minimal effort. Another
fallacy to be dispelled is that openness always
equates with seamless interoperability.
Despite the commonality of 100 Mbps
Ethernet chips, incompatibility of protocol
implementations is a reality. An Ethernet
I/O label does not mean all products are
compatible within the same protocol stack.
Interoperability is a factor that needs to
be carefully evaluated. Plant floor controllers such as PLCs, PACs and PCs control the
operation of and collect data from machines
and devices. The right network architecture
can link business management to the plant
floor PLCs and down to the device level.
However, ubiquitous data transparency
can be both empowering and overwhelming.
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
Faster information flow?
Unlike delays experienced in surfing the web
or printing a document, the immediacy of
machine-to-machine communication demands
more bandwidth. But the value of speed is
relative. With technology advancing swiftly,
ultimately, the industry can expect network
speeds in the Gigabits-per-second range,
which equates to transfer of more data faster.
Data speed alone will not necessarily
increase the speed of processes, although near
real-time data flow can contribute to greater
collaboration and more efficient workflow.
The full value of high speed information can
be fully realized only when commensurate
processes and network components keep pace.
Typically, only extremely rapid manufacturing operations involving motion control
and precision automation require bandwidth
for high vision, complex movement and
algorithms. Ethernet in its simplest form
(10-100 Mbps) is usually fast enough for most
manufacturing applications. The emphasis
should be on throughput and network
structures that operate properly at the desired
speed to achieve a desired throughput.
Consider these issues
Real-time raw data from the plant typically
doesn’t reach management level, nor does it
need to in most cases. Corporate culture in
the past often positioned manufacturing and
administration as separate entities with unique
environments and objectives. Enterprise-level
integration can offer significant benefits to
a manufacturer by providing real-time data
snapshots or dashboards providing intelligence for diagnostics, quality control,
customer service and efficient production
planning, scheduling and expediting.
The amount of data that can be transmitted
in one packet also makes Ethernet an ideal
tool for diagnostic monitoring and troubleshooting. The rising demand for advanced
monitoring and plant diagnostics will
accelerate data travelling per cycle, which
could push speed capacities.
Standard Ethernet is widely touted as
non-proprietary and cheaper. In theory,
that’s true. However, industrial Ethernet
components used in plant process areas are
designed to operate in harsh environments,
withstanding temperature extremes, humidity
and vibration well beyond conditions found in
controlled environment installations. Because
they are more ruggedly made, industrial-grade
components can cost more initially. However,
they are built to perform reliably for a significantly longer service life, so total cost of
ownership may actually be reduced.
Extended usage of Ethernet applications from office floors to the factory level
requires RJ-45 connectors with an enhanced
protection level and a minimum of Category
5e (100 Mbit/s Fast Ethernet) performance. Newer M12 circular connectors are
becoming more common in the market in a
D Code configuration specific to EtherNet/IP,
Profinet, and EtherCAT. Wireless can be used
to cover distances and can also be deployed
in industrial areas not easily wired. In petrochemical plants, wireless communication is
becoming more the norm. Some newer designs
are powered by small solar panels. Ethernet
will benefit from the advent of new wireless
technologies.
Many companies opt to deploy optical
fibre technology for harsh industrial applications. Fibre optic cables provide greater
speed, greater bandwidth, distance and noise
immunity than copper-based cables. Although
in most cases, fibre optic system costs are
higher and compatibility issues with legacy
systems can be problematic, industrial fibre
optic cabling solutions may offer the key to
data integrity on the plant floor in the future
as more companies migrate toward enterprise-wide convergence.
Ted Szarkowski is a Product Manager at Molex.
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Modbus
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Applications
Filtering and selecting data is key to
successful network convergence. Various
types of executive dashboards and other
business intelligence and analysis software
applications can focus on key metrics, key
performance indicators and other data needed
for high-level decision-making.
Technology
Fail-safe performance
for optical fiber networks
OPTICAL FIBERS ARE IMMUNE to electromagnetic interference and among the most reliable
transmission media for transmitting at high
data rates over long distances. On account of
their non-metallic structure, they cause no
potential equalization problems whatsoever.
Depending on the cable structure, they cope
better with smaller bending radii than cables
with metal conductors.
However, until now even they were not
immune to cable breaks or failure of the electronics at the network nodes, due to the cable
structure and the functionality of the network
protocol. An optical bypass now provides a
remedy.
Companies are accustomed to weighing
risks, and carefully weighing up costs against
benefits. Risk management supplies the
tools for making sound economic and technically sound decisions. For instance, risk
management considerations show that in many
cases failure of a network node is actually not
as critical as failure of downstream network
areas. Often one can cope with the failure of
the node and the devices or machines directly
connected. It is a different story if entire
subnetworks are cut off from communication.
One technology solution is to bridge the
failed areas, so that only the respective
network nodes fail while the rest of the
network including all adjacent networks
continue to remain functional.
Optical bypass technology
In the event of a power failure or failure
of a network node, an optical bypass can
automatically bridge the failed component
and maintain communication beyond the
failed node. One device that implements this
technology is a Fiber Protection Switch from
Microsens - with which the optical network is
fault-tolerant.
This solution offers the user higher availability of the network because, in the event
of failure of individual network nodes, all
other subnetworks and areas continue to be
accessible. The failure remains limited to the
respective network node, all other devices in
the network are unaffected by it, irrespective of the topology in which the network is
constructed.
The bypass can be triggered manually for
servicing work on machines, systems, network
20
SOURCE: MICROSENS
In both energy production and automation technology, the application of fiber optic rings is becoming
increasingly important to ensure the maximum availability of mission critical systems. New switch technology
is increasing the margin of error across fiber optic rings by eliminating the single point of failure.
Through optical bypasses, fiber switch technology increases the tolerance of fiber optic networks regarding both single
and multi-point failures and limits the effects of a brownout or complete system outage.
nodes or subnetworks. Where network nodes
previously had to be shut down, uninterrupted repair and servicing is now possible.
The bypass means that the network nodes to
be serviced are separated from the network
during ongoing operation. The time saved is
considerable and as a result of the correspondingly lower servicing costs the solution soon
pays off.
The replacement of one or more active
components at the same times is possible
during ongoing operation of the overall
network, as the other nodes and network areas
are not affected by the work. External alarms
can be controlled using an alarm relay. This is
simplified with an automatic alarm; administrative costs drop at the same time, which is
reflected in lower operating costs.
Practical examples
Bypasses have long since proven themselves
in practice, especially in fields which depend
upon reliability and top availability. Typical
areas of use include smart grid applications,
especially connected with renewable energy
sources. Wind turbines are usually erected in
remote rural areas, which means a time-consuming journey in case of servicing work and
faults. Solar parks extend over vast areas and
are usually also in rural areas or they are in
urban areas split into small and ultra-small
units. They still have to be monitored and
controlled, however. Deployment of personnel
pushes up the already comparatively high
costs of alternative energy generation. With
automation, costs can be reduced in the right
place.
Another extreme scenario is monitoring
of pipeline systems. The deployment of
surveillance personnel can hardly be justified
economically, but failures and leaks even
less so. In the wake of rising energy costs,
automated monitoring is indispensable. But
if one or more network nodes along a pipeline
fail, this can have major consequences for the
operating costs, as well as for the environment.
The expense of establishing fault-tolerant
monitoring with conventional means is not
only enormous, a potential source of error is
introduced with every additional device, which
further increases the expense. An automatic
bypass can simply bridge a failed network
node so that all other network areas continue
to be accessible and functional.
The same applies for industrial manufacture, deep-shaft and surface mining. Although
isolated failures are annoying, they can be
overcome. While the problem at the site
affected has to be rectified, all the other
areas have to continue working unhindered,
provided their communication is not cut off
by failure at a point.
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
SOURCE: MICROSENS
Are you still
sending people
for support ?
Protection switch technology bypasses the active industrial Ethernet switch optically, protecting the entire fiber optic ring
from breaking down even if multiple systems have been affected by the failure.
Failure of entire areas with safety-relevant systems, such as signalling equipment,
traffic information systems and tunnel installations, is more disastrous still. Planners,
installers and operators are faced with the
dilemma that monitoring and control has to
be constructed to be fault-tolerant, yet the
costs for installation and operation should be
kept within reasonable limits. Failures have to
be identified within the shortest possible time;
at the same time, the areas affected have to
be restricted to a bare minimum. And this not
only applies to unpredictable faults, but also
to necessary servicing work.
The same applies analogously to conveyor
equipment. If an area in the conveyor chain
breaks down, usually the entire system comes
to a standstill. A bypass can bridge the failed
network node. All neighbouring parts of the
system are still accessible in the network. And
the automatic alarm allows the failed node
to be identified quickly and reliably and the
fault rectified.
Simple structure, high reliability
An optical bypass must not itself be a point of
failure. It has to be constructed as simply as
possible to avoid creating an additional source
of error. For instance, no firmware is required,
for which updates have to be installed or
which could lead to a system crash.
Programming or configuration is also
unnecessary. Dispensing with complex semiconductor technology makes the bypass robust.
It works as an additional “normal” switch: If
the network node is in operation, the bypass
is necessarily in the “open” state and all data
flow via the network node. Should the network
node fail or the power supply break down, the
switch automatically closes and bridges the
failed node independent of the manufacturer
or protocol, and without additional configuration. Robust design and high temperature
resistance make the technology suitable for
the harshest environmental conditions.
05.201 3
By providing fail-safe performance using bus
and ring topology, Ethernet has established
itself as the dominant protocol in many areas.
It is based on a bus structure with which
all devices are arranged on a common line
section. With the development to Switched
Ethernet, the cabling developed into a star
structure, which is easier to handle. However,
bus and star have one thing in common: If the
bus is interrupted or the central point of a star
fails, then the neighbouring network areas are
cut off from communication.
To counteract this, a ring cabling structure
has prevailed in critical environments. If
the ring is interrupted at a point, all other
devices are still connected with each other.
The ring structure lulls the user into a false
sense of security, however. When it comes to
the failure of more than one network node,
for example due to hardware errors, software
problems or a simple power cut, then the ring
structure does not help much either.
In order to construct a fault-tolerant system,
everything would have to be configured at
least double: the cables, the routing, the
feeds to the network nodes and finally each
network node itself. These would then have
to be equipped with uninterruptible power
supplies and buffer batteries. Alongside the
acquisition costs, there would be the even
higher servicing costs and the expense of
administration for the additional devices.
With an optical bypass, technology is
available that allows the maximum fail-safe
performance and economical operation of
optical fiber networks, both in bus and ring
topologies. Since the technology is designed
to avoid use of software and complex electronics, the solution is both robust and
reliable. Applications are especially effective
when specified for use in remote and hard-toaccess areas.
The eWON
COSY 141
eliminates
the need
to travel
onsite to
troubleshoot
your
equipment,
by using a
secure VPN
connection.
‡ Easy setup using
customer’s LAN
‡ Firewall friendly
‡ Fully
secure
VPN
Thomas Kwaterski is president and founder of
Microsens
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
www.ewon.biz
Applications
Web-based plant operation
using PC-based automation
iPhone, iPads, PC-based machine controllers and high-speed EtherCAT networking have combined to create
web-based operations for a manufacturer of power control electronics. The operating concept is platformindependent, and produces a solution that extends to both discrete control and process engineering.
SOURCE: BECKHOFF AUTOMATION
AIXCON POWERSYSTEMS is a specialist in
control technology for power electronics
and manufactures complete systems used,
for example, to produce longitudinal seam
welding of composite pipes.
Using high-speed Ethernet networking
to integrate all automation components
including I/Os, PLCs and servo drives into a
system-wide fieldbus, the entire operation
of the plant is web-based. The result is an
operating concept that is totally platform
independent and can optionally be run via a
Windows PC, Linux, Apple, iPad or iPhone.
Heating of titanium sections
Overview of the system hardware architecture
Automation and control concept
a powerful current source. The dimensions
of this “power supply unit” are impressive.
Three control cabinet panels are capable of
delivering an impressive total of 30,000 A.
Each panel has 10 power units, each with its
own controller and rectifier for three power
transistors with 333 A each. The system uses
a 480 V/400 A 3-phase power supply.
SOURCE: BECKHOFF AUTOMATION
A recent project to develop and produce a
power supply system for a “hot stretcher”
highlights the challenges of developing these
systems. A hot stretcher is a type of plant
in which titanium sections are machined and
formed under the influence of heat without
impairing their material characteristics.
Sections are fixed in the hot stretcher,
heated based on an exactly defined temperature curve, formed (turned and drawn) and
then cooled. The specifications must be
followed precisely to prevent degrading the
properties of titanium such as its strength,
thickness and ductility.
Electricity is used for heating the material
in a hot stretcher based on defined temperature profiles. To heat a titanium section with
a length of around 4 m and a cross-section of
around 50 cm² to 620°C in 60 seconds requires
an electrical current of around 17,320 A.
Aixcon’s task was to develop and produce such
Three control cabinet panels are capable of delivering a total of 30,000 A for the hot stretcher.
22
The specifications required to efficiently
automate and operate this plant included
development, parameterization and archiving
of the recipes (current curves) in a database,
archiving of the actual process data (quality
verification) and set value generation for the
current source controllers.
Using an Ethernet-based machine network
as the basis for communications, the system
required real-time transfer of the set values
from the PLC to the controllers, and fast online
visualization of the process. One additional
goal was platform-independent visualization
of the process and production data using both
the iPad and iPhone.
These requirements were solved and implemented with an innovative automation and
operating concept, based on implementing a
database server, a TwinCAT PLC on a C6920
Industrial PC plus EtherCAT and EtherCAT I/O
terminals which are used to transfer the set
values and remaining process data. A Panel
PC with CP-Link 3 is utilized for visualizing
online process information at the machine,
ind us t r ial e t he r n et b o o k
05.2013
SOURCE: BECKHOFF AUTOMATION
Plant operations are completely web-based and can be run via a Windows PC, Linux, Apple, iPad or iPhone.
drawing information over the network from
both the database server and PLC server. All of
the web-based, platform-independent visualization was created using Java Script.
PC control and visualization
A PLC generates the set values for the process
based on the recipes stored on the database
server. The EtherCAT machine control network
is used for transferring the values to the
Aixcon controller boards and for logging the
signals, temperatures and states that are
relevant for system control and monitoring.
Each panel has an EtherCAT I/O station.
Online visualization of the whole process
takes place directly at the plant via a CP-Link
3 client. This technology replaces the previous
image transfer that used DVI with an interference-free, simple to install and cost-effective
Ethernet cable. The ability to use the Ethernet
interface offers several optional features
including, for example, connecting with up to
nine clients with different resolutions, display
sizes and content. At the hot stretcher end of
the process line, the CP-Link 3 technology is
used; at the other end of the large machine,
an additional panel can be positioned for
special diagnostic purposes.
The recipes for current and temperature
curves, section types, etc. are managed on
the database server. The database server
also deals with archiving and processing of
relevant process and production data. The
database and PLC form the centerpiece of
the process control system. Like the visualization, this communication is also based
on Java Script. The components required for
this purpose are the respective web servers
and the script DLLs. For the PLC, these are
Internet Information Server (IIS) integrated in
Windows and the ADS script DLLs for accessing
the PLC variables.
05.201 3
The main operator panel is a Windowsenabled Panel PC that is installed directly at
the plant. Since all modern browsers support
Java, that means that no further software is
required and the browser integrated in the
operating system can be used as a framework
for visualization. The operator terminal is
connected directly with the PLC via CP-Link
3, and Ethernet is mainly used for fast online
visualization of process data. In addition,
authorized operators have access to the
database and the recipes. Quality-relevant
data can be archived and the diagnostic data
can be accessed via the database server.
Mobile devices such as iPads, iPhones or
remote client PCs are routed via the Internet
through VPN. They can access the web server
of the database computer directly via Java
Script for displaying the required data. In the
same way as the system control can access the
database, the reverse route is also available.
For example, the production manager can not
only view the production data stored in the
database, it is also possible to visualize current
process values such as currents, temperatures
or diagnostic plant data on an iPad.
Increased efficiency results
“The current source we developed sets
new standards in terms of performance,
controllability and energy efficiency,” said
Aixcon’s managing director Karl Swiontek.
“For example, the single-phase AC power
source used in the past was only around 60%
efficient. We were able to increase efficiency
to an impressive 98%. This is not only better
for the environment, it also offers real savings
potential.”
Ralf Stachelhaus is Manager of Beckhoff
Automation’s Rhine-Ruhr branch in Germany.
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
Technology
Embedded virtualization &
cyber security for automation
THE NETWORKING OF MACHINERY is not only
resulting in new options for IT integration
of processes and remote services across wide
area connections, but also in new challenges
centered on the area of cyber security.
Solutions with dedicated security devices
are advantageous in that they physically
separate the actual functionality of a system
from its protective security measures, avoiding
mutual side-effects and allowing development of both by respective specialists. Yet
deployment often fails due to the additional
hardware needs and cost restrictions.
At the same time, the price-performance
ratio of processors, memory and peripherals
keeps constantly improving. This gives rise to
a shift from specialized hardware to software
functions on a common platform, limited by
the degree of modularization needed to cope
with technical risks and enabling the integration of subsystems from different suppliers.
Virtualization is key to combining the cost
savings of advanced hardware consolidation
with a modular design, and the virtual security
appliances for industrial automation and plant
environments.
Virtualization in IT & Automation
Virtualization of both client and server systems
is state-of-the-art technology in enterprise IT.
Typically, the virtual systems are operated on
a server farm in the network. The provision
and coordinated operation of multiple virtual
machines on a shared hardware are effected by
a layer of software called hypervisor or virtual
machine manager.
Two types of hypervisors and two
approaches to virtualization are usually being
distinguished.
tType 1 hypervisors run directly on the bare
hardware and only coordinate the available
hardware resources.
tType 2 hypervisors run as applications in a
host system. Performance is reduced by the
additional operating system layer.
The hardware virtualization approach
presents each original guest system with a
complete (simulated) computer of its own.
t The unmodified guest system is run with its
own time-slice scheduler not being aware of
the virtualized environment which typically
prevents real-time capability.
24
PHOTO: INNOMINATE SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES
Most industrial controllers and HMIs today lack protective functions for IT and network security. Upstream
security appliances with dedicated hardware could provide an add-on solution. But now the IT megatrend and
cost-cutting technology of virtualization is set to make inroads into the industrial automation market as well,
especially in embedded flavors.
A typical off-the-shelf industrial PC can be hypersecured using an embedded virtual machine manager.
t Depending on platform and implementation, the guest system may have direct
access to (parts of) the underlying hardware
components. Other components may be
completely simulated, requiring a fairly
complex hypervisor or a hardware platform
with virtualization support.
t Guest system performance can be equivalent
to a stand-alone system as long as no I/O
operations are using simulated components.
t Under the para-virtualization approach in
contrast, the guest systems need to be
modified for better cooperation with the
respective hypervisor.
t Time-slice and memory management can
be more tightly integrated and real-time
capability thus be achieved.
t The internal communication between guest
systems or guest system and hypervisor is
carried out through specialized interfaces.
In automation and control, the requirements are different from those in enterprise
IT. The systems deployed here run on
dedicated hardware with little or no operator
intervention. Controller components typically
have real-time requirements whereas
human-machine interfaces (HMIs) are mostly
applications on a Windows operating system.
In this environment, embedded virtualization taking a hybrid approach and combining
native Windows installations with additional
unmodified guest systems on a thoroughly
partitioned multi-core PC platform with virtualization support is of particular value.
HyperSecured Industrial PCs
Under the HyperSecured concept developed
by Innominate, automation components such
as an HMI or controller and a virtual mGuard
security appliance are integrated onto a
single hardware by means of an embedded
virtual machine manager. This provides the
automation components with all the benefits
of an upstream security appliance at reduced
hardware costs. The automation components
can thus be efficiently protected from unauthorized access and malware attacks.
With their exhibit of a HyperSecured IPC,
technology partners Innominate and TenAsys
showcase a joint solution to demonstrate
that embedded virtualization and cyber
security are ready for production use. The
exhibit uses TenAsys’ for Windows embedded
virtual machine manager (eVM) to integrate
an original Windows operating system with
a virtual mGuard security appliance on a
standard industrial PC.
Network communication between the
Windows system and the external environment has to pass through and is controlled by
the virtual security appliance which provides
firewall, virtual private network (VPN), and
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
PHOTO: INNOMINATE SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES
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Network communication between Windows and the external environment has to pass through and is controlled by the virtual
security appliance which provides firewall, virtual private network (VPN) , and integrity monitoring services to the PC system.
integrity monitoring services to the PC system.
The internal communication between the
Windows system and the security appliance
is done through a virtual Ethernet interface.
The hardware used is an off-the-shelf
Valueline IPC from Phoenix Contact, featuring
an Intel Core 2 Duo CPU with VT-x support, 2
GB RAM, and dual Gigabit Ethernet ports.
The TenAsys embedded virtual machine
manager is a compact package installed and
administered through Windows that partitions
the CPU into two cores and system domains for
Windows and the mGuard guest system. Both
Windows and the guest system boot natively,
exactly as if they were running stand-alone.
Peripheral components, in particular the
Ethernet interface, are exclusively assigned
to one of the systems.
Virtual Security Appliance
Using the embedded virtual manager, no
para-virtualization and modification of the
security appliance system is necessary on
Intel platforms with VT-d support because the
original Linux-based firmware image runs on a
dedicated core of the shared x86 CPU.
The appliance ensures protection of the
PC’s network communication as the Ethernet
interface to the external environment is exclusively assigned to it. DoS protection against
denial-of-service attacks will be effective as
well, due to this direct hardware control.
05.201 3
Even in an extreme case, only the virtual
security appliance could be overloaded and
external network packets would get delayed
or dropped. Due to the strict partitioning of
the CPU cores and system domains, this will
not affect the Windows partition or potential
other guest systems.
Access to the PC and its Windows system
will be blocked by the security appliance
firewall unless authorized by a general
static or user-specific dynamic firewall rule.
Integrated virtual private network (VPN)
functionality enables secure remote access
with authentication and encryption. VPN
tunnels are terminated by the virtual security
appliance; the Windows system gets to see
regular IP communication only.
Virtualization with an appropriate
embedded virtual machine manager enables
consolidation of industrial automation and
cyber security functions onto a cost-optimized
hardware, preserving the modular design and
benefits of dedicated devices.
The HyperSecured solution as presented is
not generally limited to just one protected
Windows system. It will be possible to use
additional CPU cores with their own native
guest systems including real-time operating
systems and controllers.
Application article by Innominate Security
Technologies AG.
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
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Technology
Single chip connection
solution for PROFINET IO
“Tiger” chip technology will potentially enable a wide range of new compact field devices to be coupled to
PROFINET IO down to the field bus level. The high level of integration using TPS-1 can create a significantly
smaller board area that is essential for these small applications. This article looks at the background of this
development and includes an interview with a user who explains its importance for his work.
INNOVATIONS IN AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY,
over the last two decades, have succeeded
each other at high speed. The driving force
behind this development was, and still is,
pressure on the manufacturing and process
industries to reduce costs and energy
consumption while increasing quality, operational safety, speed and data availability
throughout the production process.
Innovations have been particularly
remarkable in the communications technology
used in devices, machines and production lines.
These include the extension of the 4-20mA
standard with HART, the evolution of field bus
and wireless technology and especially the
utilisation of Ethernet technology driven by
the creation of “Industrial Ethernet”.
Scope of PROFINET IO compared to field bus technology
Industrial Ethernet
PROFINET IO
Fieldbus
PROFIBUS DP
Max. transmission speed
100 Mbit/sec
12 Mbit/s
Max. data volume per telegram
1,440 bytes
244 bytes
Max. participants per network
System Parameters
Practically unlimited
126
Combination I/O and IT on one cable
yes
no
Dynamic Frame Packing * (with PN IRT)
yes
no
Functional model
similar
Topology variants
similar
Secure data transmission (PROFIsafe)
identical
Time-stamping and redundancy
similar
Usable in explosive/hazardous areas
Not currently
yes
The Future of PROFINET IO
Auxiliary power supply via bus
Not currently
yes
Today, user companies and trade organisations, such as NAMUR for the process industry
and AIDA in the automotive sector, influence
technological developments much more than
in the past.
This is partly because they give detailed
information to manufacturers about the exact
way they will be using the products. But one
of the results of this is the wide range of
communication technologies they request,
spanning the still-popular 4-20mA standard,
field bus systems like INTERBUS, PROFIBUS
Connection cost for small devices up to now
Too high
Reasonable
Connection cost for small devices from now on
Reasonable (identical)
A key objective with PROFINET IO development is to reduce the connection cost for small devices.
and Foundation Fieldbus, and Ethernet-based
solutions. An example of the upper end of this
range is PROFINET IO, which is now used as
standard on the production lines of Germany’s
car makers in the typically complex systems
and devices they use.
By contrast, the use of PROFINET IO in
systems with small, simple devices has been
rejected up to now for a number of reasons,
and especially the high cost of connecting
the devices. Against this backdrop, it seems
logical that the market is still wondering
what the future holds for the development of
Ethernet in automation technology.
Development goal and technology
This diagram shows the internal architecture of the TPS-1.
26
The fact that connecting small devices to
PROFINET IO has always been too expensive
led to action on the part of Phoenix Contact,
Siemens and Renesas Electronics, along with
two institutes. The result was a special chip
called the Tiger PROFINET Single Chip or TPS-1
to connect I/O, compact field devices and
drives to PROFINET IO.
In terms of positioning, the TPS-1 feature
set ranks it below the ERTEC 200 among basic
technology components. As a result, there is
now an appropriate chip for every PROFINET
IO integration task with the ERTEC 400, ERTEC
200 and TPS-1 ranging from high-performance
and costly through to small, compact and
highly optimised chips.
Unlike the ERTECs, the TPS-1 is a single-chip
solution that includes the PROFINET protocol
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
and a 3-port RT/IRT switch on the chip,
among other features, and does not require
other components except a small serial Flash
for the firmware and configuration.
Costs and performance
In our opinion, it is considerably less
expensive to develop a PROFINET interface
with the TPS-1 compared to an ERTEC-based
solution because there are no costs for
external memory, an operating license and
software stack development tools. In addition,
the chip reduces development time due to the
fact that the PROFINET protocol is already
included in the chip, so the only wiring
needed is for the peripherals. As a result, the
overall interface costs are reduced to field bus
level – something users have been requesting.
On the PROFINET side, the TPS-1 supports
all Conformance Class C services including the
new functions in Version 2.3. Its compact
form factor means that a PROFINET interface
with the TPS-1 only requires about 260 mm2,
with a power dissipation of below 1 W when
copper is used as the transmission medium.
Turning to the application aspect, there is
a deliberate separation between the interface
and the application functionality. As many
device manufacturers will be using the product
for existing applications, this separation
enables them to keep the application as it is
rather than porting it to a different component
or operating system.
The TPS-1’s internal CPU ensures that the
device’s application CPU does not need to
provide extra computing power for PROFINET
and that the circuitry remains separate, also
with a view to preserving computing power.
This gives users a big advantage when they
upgrade their existing field bus devices to
PROFINET. However, the ERTEC 200 would be
a more suitable solution if the device application does run on the same CPU as PROFINET
communications, and/or if it has multiple
structures that need supporting, such as a
higher number of slots and subslots.
User benefits for machinery OEMs
The authors of this article interviewed Werner
Pollmann, who heads up the development of
special products for Phoenix Contact’s solution
business, about his experience with the Tiger
chip from a user’s point of view.
Your company played a role in the development of the Tiger, which has now been available
for a while. How important is this component to
the solution business you manage?
Werner Pollmann: TPS-1 will make a fundamental contribution to the wider adoption of
PROFINET IO because it opens up this modern
technology to manufacturers of smaller devices
and to new applications. And that is clearly
a win-win situation for machine and system
builders as well as for plant operators. It will
help our solution business take a step forward
05.201 3
because we work with a variety of different
field devices in different sizes that require a
communication interface that is as consistent
and cost-effective as possible. The Tiger gives
us a lot more flexibility in terms of the devices
we can work with, while providing us with a
consistent communications interface.
Wouldn’t it be possible to achieve this type
of solution with the ERTEC 200?
Not with the same level of efficiency.
When you need to integrate sensors and
actuators into your machine, the connection
costs are a key factor, even if they only vary
by a few Euros. The TPS-1 is the only chip
to achieve what machine builders always
wanted, PROFINET connection costs that are
comparable to field bus costs. Aside from the
cost aspect, we also listened carefully to what
users were saying about applications. The
Tiger is small and generates so little heat that
it can be used for very compact and sensitive
devices, such as certain types of motor.
Do you think the TPS-1 should only be used
for new machines or can it also be used to
upgrade existing field bus based devices?
Due to the attributes I mentioned just
now, the TPS-1 is particularly well suited to
upgrades of older devices because it replaces
existing field bus connections (such as to
INTERBUS or PROFIBUS) that take up about
the same amount of space. The chip’s highly-integrated functionality means that an
upgrade only takes a few weeks.
In what areas are you using the Tiger chip?
In machine building. To be precise, we’re
using it for the pushbutton module in the
assembly machines we make ourselves, which
are in widespread use. The TPS-1 gives us
something we’ve been wanting for a long
time, the migration from mixed INTERBUS and
Ethernet communications to an end-to-end
solution with PROFINET IO and a direct
connection to higher levels. The result is
faster production cycles, even better quality
levels, and significant time savings when we’re
engineering and building the machines.
Now that you’ve started using the TPS-1,
what “visions” does it open up for you, both
in the near and longer-term future? What
reactions have you been hearing when talking
to other new users?
With the current speed of innovation, our
visions could soon become reality. Like other
users, I believe that the family of PROFINETenabled devices, which is already impressively
large, will continue to show strong growth,
along with the adoption of PROFINET IO.
And my personal vision is that it will become
clear in the next two or three years that the
Tiger has made a significant contribution to
PROFINET IO consolidating its leading position
on the global market.
Article by Peter Fuchs, KW Software and
Christoph Hecker, Renesas Electronics.
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
Wireless technology
Wireless photoelectric sensor
for control & monitoring
Using wireless technology for photoelectric sensors created a need for a solution that offered low power
operation, deterministic data transfer and the ability to communicate over long distances in the factory.
Opting for a proprietary network protocol adapted for the specific needs of automation and control, new
systems provide line-of-sight communications up to one kilometer and battery life up to five years.
Networking Technology
The key to making the technology work in
a photoelectric sensor is that it only needs
to send a few bits of data over the air with
each update cycle. In most wireless implementations, the standard infrastructures are
designed to transmit and receive a lot more
data. Bluetooth, for example, is designed to
provide effective communications over a short
range, and typically opens a voice channel
which is far more data transfer-intensive.
So after investigating potential solutions,
Banner decided to build the technology
from the ground up, and only implement the
specific functions required to achieve an order
of magnitude better performance.
One key is that the wireless photoelectric
sensor requires 2,000 times less power than
a cell phone. Compared to a standard photoelectric sensor, the cost premium for wireless
is less than the cost to hard-wire the system.
To achieve the five-year battery life, the
design also needed to reduce the power
required to operate the sensor over a thousand
28
SOURCE: BANNER
WIRELESS PHOTOELECTRIC SENSOR technology
is targeting factory monitoring and control
applications, driven by the obvious advantages
that wireless brings to any application by
reducing infrastructure requirements such as
cabling, conduit complexities and installation.
New wireless technology from Banner
Engineering implements a self-contained
battery, radio and sensor in an all-in-one
package. Using its own proprietary network
protocol to optimize bandwidth and power
usage, the technology offers communication
capabilities of up to 3,000 ft/1 km line-ofsight, and a battery life of up to five years.
Communications is based on the 2.4 GHz
ISM band, which is used to create a frequency-hopping, spread spectrum solution. The
system doesn’t use Zigbee, WiFi or other
standard radio communication architectures
because those solutions can’t provide all the
characteristics that these types of automation
application requires. Specifically, more standardized solutions are not designed to
accommodate small amounts of data transfer,
exceptionally low power, deterministic data
transfer and very long range communications.
To create a notification system, each production area has a switch box and a tower light connected to the input on the wireless
photoelectric sensor with dry contact inputs. If a manager is needed on the production line, the operator flips the manager
switch, and a tower light installed near the managers is connected to the gateway’s outputs. The colors of each of the tower
lights are assigned to indicate the need for a technician (red) or manager (yellow) to provide assistance on the production line.
fold, on what was already a low power sensor.
The technique used to reduce power
consumption is to quickly turn the sensor on
and off. By making the sensors fast enough to
take a reading in a fraction of a millisecond,
the objective is to turn the sensor off for very
short periods (measured in microseconds).
The technology then is turned on and off
many times a second. The sensor is turned
on and operated for a very brief period, so
for the majority of cycle it is essentially off.
Sophisticated algorithms within the sensor
control when it is using power.
Application Advantages & Limits
If a customer is trying to implement a system
with millisecond or sub-millisecond operation
which could be categorized as high speed,
wireless is not an appropriate solution. Wired
systems are still faster for those types of applications with more brute force power available.
But if an application has long cable runs and
more real-time performance requirements,
versus high speed operation, the wireless
sensors can typically only respond in 125
milliseconds. Wireless is also suited for applications where there is motion between the PLC
and end device such as a transport mechanism
or conveyor. A wireless system design is much
less expensive than implementing slip rings
using cable trays and flexible cables.
An additional application advantage is if
the sensor is located a long distance from
the control. On a small machine where the
distance is only five feet, it may not make
sense but if the distance is 500 feet installing
the wireless sensor costs less than installing
the cable.
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
SOURCE: BANNER
Monitoring Door
Switches
Sensors can be used with
traditional magnetic reed
Applications
Another potential application class is
where there is a requirement for system-wide
monitoring such as a call-for-parts system, for
example, that delivers a tote of parts to a
location. Wireless is often used on forklifts,
so that the driver can have an indicator and
real-time feedback which identifies which
areas are out-of-parts. Since the forklift is
mobile, wireless offers a clear advantage.
Many manufacturing facilities are looking to
create flexible layouts where production can
be laid out for specific needs depending on
their product mix. To collect information from
a machine used in the process that might be
moved on a periodic basis, wireless works well
since you can move the machine without a
need to re-wire it.
switches to reliably monitor
doors and windows. Using the
wireless photoelectric sensors
with MultiHop Data Radios
easily transmits data even
within the largest plants.
Application article by Banner Engineering.
05.201 3
Call for Parts Systems
Production operators may
need a way to easily call
the forklift drivers to deliver
additional parts or to remove
completed assemblies from
the workstations. Because the
production area is frequently
reconfigured when production
requirements change, a wired
system would require timeconsuming rewiring with every
reconfiguration.
Red and green LEDs
(for radio function);
yellow LED (only for
alignment mode)
O-ring sealed
transparent Lexan
cover with stainless
steel hardware
Molded acrylic
lenses
Two lithium
AA cell batteries
Antenna
Slide-in PCBs
SOURCE: BANNER
One potential application concern is overall
communications reliability. But the signal
used provides 10 to 100X the range of a
WiFi-based system, and also has built-in all
of the characteristics of a PLC-based level
network. This includes time-out mechanisms,
CRC checks and a pre-defined state for the
output in case a link is lost.
For years, these techniques have been
used in automation and PLC level networks,
so they are also implemented and built into
the wireless photoelectric sensor protocol as
well. With its built-in site survey which reports
signal strength, if everything is setup properly
and within range to guarantee good signal
strength, Banner confirmed that the system
should be as reliable as a wired solution. It
also provides immediate indication if communications is lost to a part of the system, and
has been designed with the reliability and
determinism issues firmly in mind.
The system can also implement a system
heartbeat where wireless devices check on a
regular basis, every five seconds for example.
If the devices don’t check in, those devices
can be reset to a pre-defined state to fail in
a predictable manner. For setup, all the user
needs to do to establish communications
is bind it to a gateway. Since there can be
multiple gateways and devices in a single
area, communications only occur with devices
that they have been paired with.
One design consideration was operating
the sensors in noisy environments such as
variable frequency drives (VFDs) operating
in the area. Noise reduces the range of the
signal but not significantly because the
wireless system operates within a very narrow
band. Frequency-hopping, spread spectrum
technology creates very narrow, well-defined
frequencies, and these narrow frequencies are
noise immune because the system filters out
any frequencies above and below that level.
SOURCE: BANNER
PLC Network Features
The wireless photoelectric sensor technology implements a self-contained battery, radio and sensor in an all-in-one package.
Using a proprietary network protocol to optimize bandwidth and power usage, this customized approach was a necessity to
achieve long battery life and achievable because of the limited amount of data communicated over the network.
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
29
Applications
Greenfield thinking at
Nestlé using EtherNet/IP
The Nestlé factory in Biessenhofen, Germany is recognised as a competence centre for the company’s
production of hypoallergenic baby food. The goal with new plant upgrades at the facility has been to increase
manufacturing capacity, respond with more agility to consumer demands and use automation networking
technology to better facilitate planning and visualisation of the entire production process.
Plant upgrades at the new facility focused on producing a fully integrated environment that encompassed the filling and packaging sections, as well as the process areas.
FOOD INDUSTRY PRODUCTION METHODS must be heavily oriented
towards responding to the latest market demands. These requirements
include the ability to react fast to new situations, maintain transparency in increasingly complex production processes and monitor costs.
The result is that careful selection of raw materials, the highest
levels of precision and constant quality control at various stages in
the production process are all part of the daily work at the Nestlé
Biessenhofen factory. Employees comply with stringent hygiene regulations, especially in the section that manufactures powder-based
formulas for premature babies and infants. The quality control process
and internal controls go far beyond the standard legal requirements.
Manufacturing challenges
In Biessenhofen, Nestlé wanted to introduce a fully integrated solution
in a completely new facility, and automate it from start to finish.
The project involved the filling and packaging sections as well as the
process area. Manufacturing hypoallergenic baby food is such a complex
process that it would be hard to manage without computer-aided
process controls operating within very narrow tolerance levels. Every
stage of the process has to be managed, monitored and documented.
Nestlé set several strategic and technological goals for the automation
project at Biessenhofen. One of these was the optimisation of tolerance
levels and the ability to easily reproduce processes. Another was to
30
improve quality assurance, verification and batch traceability. The
company also wanted to increase the flexibility of machine and process
functions. On the operational level, Nestlé wanted to minimise losses
and night shifts while reducing labour costs and throughput times. The
Biessenhofen plant was also tasked with optimising the production
surface area, inventory and general monitoring costs.
Metering systems that capture and measure process and product characteristics are a central part of any automation concept that supports
safety in food manufacturing. The introduction of energy-saving and
preventive maintenance initiatives generates new measurement tasks
which need to be integrated into the system as cost-effectively as
possible. Examples of these tasks include measuring the amount and
source of power consumption as well as operating hours and machine
conditions. With all these requirements to consider, Nestlé selected
Rockwell Automation’s Integrated Architecture as it could be implemented throughout the plant and has proven strengths in the process
manufacturing area.
To support seamless production processes, Rockwell Automation
was asked to supply and install control cabinets including about 50
Allen-Bradley ControlLogix Programmable Automation Controllers
(PACs) with the appropriate switches, and about 150 PowerFlex AC
drives (0.75 KW - 315 KW). All the automation technology is based
on ControlLogix and includes FieldCare (the plant asset management
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
Applications
Focus
tool from Endress+Hauser), PowerFlex drives
with a safe torque-off feature, Flex/Point I/O,
Ethernet/IP, Stratix and integrated switching
technology.
EtherNet/IP technology
Nestlé believed the standardised Ethernet
approach was crucial for the installation, as
it facilitates the planning and visualisation
of the whole production process. Process
monitoring is made easier in the I/O network
by centralised switches which help to optimise
availability and detect any issues before they
cause machine failure. The performance and
flexibility of the field devices – and their integration – was another important goal.
“Nestlé has already implemented several
projects with Rockwell Automation and
Endress+Hauser,” said Florian Schreyer,
an automation engineer for Nestlé in
Biessenhofen. “Both companies have tailored
Using a standardised Ethernet approach facilitated the planning and visualisation of new production processes.
their products and systems to the specific
placed a lot of importance on transparency despite the complex
requirements of the food manufacturing
industry. Their worldwide availability helps to support systems and production processes, choosing open systems and structures. Using
industry-standard systems has made maintenance work much easier
applications throughout their lifecycle.”
The team at Nestlé in Biessenhofen is sure that it will continue to and the asset management facility helps to increase plant availability
implement EtherNet/IP when extensions are needed to the production and accelerate any changes needed to it.
“In addition, we’re expecting EtherNet/IP to be future-proof,” saidplant for hypoallergenic baby food. Schreyer added: “One reason is
clearly the widespread availability of automation components with an Schreyer. “The result was worth the effort. The network has delivered
the benefit of giving us centralised access to most of the information.”
EtherNet/IP interface.”
An advantage of EtherNet/IP is that it supports end-to-end processes
throughout the production plant and facilitates the integration of Stefanie Philipp is a technical journalist based in Munich, Germany.
network and field devices. “Almost as soon as the team at Nestlé
started talking about EtherNet/IP, Endress+Hauser became part of
the equation,” says Manfred Rothen, Sales Manager for Germany at
Rockwell Automation. Endress+Hauser had already installed EtherNet/
IP technology at the start of the Biessenhofen project when it implemented a Promass Coriolis flow measurement system, which integrated
seamlessly with the planned concept. The Level 3 add-on profile (AOP)
helped to make sure that the flow meters would integrate more easily
into the control system. Together, the two companies provide a holistic
system that is nearly as simple to configure as “plug and play”.
“As a result, the user can analyse real-time data from the production
plant in higher-level systems. This helps customers improve their plant
efficiency and transparency – and that translates into real savings,” says
Dion Bouwer, Product Manager Fieldbus Systems for Endress+Hauser.
The Biessenhofen project, which started in summer 2009 and has
production running since summer 2011, has been a success. Nestlé
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EtherNet/IP networking supports end-to-end processing and integration of field devices.
02.2013
05.201
3 i n di nudsutrsi tr
a li ael theethr ne er nt ebt obooko k
31
Wireless technology
Energy harvesting wireless
paves way to Internet of Things
WE ARE CURRENTLY SEEING communication
between equipment within an intelligent
network that can automatically manage
tasks in smart buildings, logistics and
monitoring. With the “Internet of Things”
(IoT), it is conceivable that each and every
end node, really every sensor and device, will
be connected to other devices and to the
Internet.
This includes devices which monitor the
environment and report information as well as
intelligent equipment which makes decisions
locally and can interact with control solutions
that communicate remotely, often over the
Internet. With the help of open software
platforms and secure data connections, every
device could be controlled via mobile devices
or the cloud.
Moving toward the IoT
With the help of open software, all types of devices within the home can be controlled via mobile devices or the cloud.
automation systems (BAS) or IP.
Deploying the millions of distributed devices
introduces the challenge of: how should they
be powered and how will they communicate.
One of these ways to the success of the IoT is
energy harvesting wireless technology.
Wireless sensors and relay receivers enable
simple deployment of intelligent nodes,
however, wireless devices require power;
historically this meant pulling a lot of wires
or installing and replacing batteries. Devices
powered by energy harvesters are maintenance-free and independent of batteries or
other external energy sources, paving the way
SOURCE: ENOCEAN
The realization of the IoT requires highly
flexible technologies and portable devices
that can be applied wherever needed. There
are already well-established protocols to
share information over the Internet, TCP/IP,
but this is primarily a computer-to-computer
based protocol with sophisticated provisions.
The requirements and capabilities for the
remote nodes are often different and cannot
support complex TCP/IP communication.
But there are straightforward ways to bridge
energy efficient wireless devices to TCP/IP,
typically performed by gateways to building
SOURCE: ENOCEAN
Wireless sensor solutions for use in buildings and industrial installations is smart, green, enabling
technology for the Internet of Things (IoT). These intelligent modules combine micro-energy converters with
ultra low power electronics and reliable communications to create self-powered wireless sensor solutions that
are fundamental for efficiently managing energy in buildings and industrial applications.
Industrial applications for the technology can interface with existing building automation control systems.
32
to a simpler installation of millions of devices
connected to each other and the Internet.
Wireless energy harvesting
Energy harvesting wireless technology stems
from a simple observation – where sensor
data resides, sufficient ambient energy exists
to power sensors and radio communications.
Harvestable energy sources include: motion,
indoor light and temperature differentials.
These ever-present sources provide sufficient
energy to transmit and receive radio signals
between wireless switches, sensors, actuators
and controllers, sustaining vital communications within an energy management system.
Instead of batteries, miniaturized energy
converters generate power for the wirelessly
communicating devices.
The devices are low energy, but not low
power. They have been optimized to operate
from small solar cells for example, with only
indoor light, while storing enough energy to
last over a weekend in darkness. For optimal
RF effectiveness, the radio protocol uses 315
MHz and 902 MHz frequency bands in the US.
The 902 MHz band in particular, offers the
ideal characteristics for M2M applications and
the future requirements of the IoT.
Due to its efficient use of energy, the
902 MHz band achieves double the range of
common 2.4 GHz devices for the same energy
budget, which is 90 feet in buildings, for
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
SOURCE: ENOCEAN
Wireless technology
Focus
The architecture of self-powered wireless sensor networks extends to all types of sensors and switches that can co-exist with wired lighting and HVAC systems.
automation sector, bridging the control
of light, HVAC and other fields of building
technology to smart home, smart metering
and energy management systems. This is the
starting point to actuate further applications
that lead to the IoT in the long term. The four
following steps show what this could look like.
Monitoring and Control
Wireless and batteryless technology significantly eases energy monitoring and control
in buildings with only little intervention into
the existing systems. The wireless devices are
highly flexible to install so that individual
components, wall switches, sensors and relay
receivers can be easily networked to form an
intelligent system without complex cabling. In
addition, dispensing with batteries eliminates
the burdensome need to maintain the devices’
energy supply in a regular time period, which
SOURCE: ENOCEAN
example. Simple and short wire antennas
enable the integration of energy harvesting
wireless into small product enclosures.
The result is an effective, robust wireless
platform for applications in the building
automation sector, for smart home solutions,
health care products as well as consumer
appliances or machine-to-machine communication. Standardized application profiles
inform networked devices of the nature of the
data, ensuring the interoperability of devices
from different vendors. These features make
energy harvesting wireless technology the
ideal communication standard to easily and
reliably interconnect thousands of individual
devices in a system, as well as network them
with other wireless protocols.
Today, energy harvesting wireless
technology is very well established providing
communication solutions in the building
The specifics of energy harvesting wireless technology.
05.201 3
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
can be up to each year.
An example for such a flexible automation
system is HVAC control. Here, a thermostat,
VAV (Variable Air Volume) or fan coil controller
receives information related to occupancy,
temperature, humidity, window position or
CO2 from the respective batteryless sensors
and controls the opening and closing of valve
actuators for radiators, or dampers for VAV
systems. At the same time, the controller
sends status information to a central building
automation system, and receives control
messages from the BAS system.
This enables the building to be monitored
from a central location, that can be remote
from the building itself, and to implement
building wide settings, such as holiday
shutdown, for example. Enormous progress
is also being made on the product side,
leveraging advancements in energy harvesting:
Revolutionary self-powered radiator valves,
from Kieback&Peter for instance, generate
energy from the difference in temperature
between the hot water and surrounding air.
This energy powers both the communication
with a controller or BAS system, and to turn
the valve itself. Without cables or batteries,
these wireless devices are especially easy to
install, and they require no maintenance.
In further optimized systems, central
equipment such as boilers or air handling
units are integrated into the wireless communication system enabling scalable HVAC
generation, visible and controllable over the
Internet on a PC, tablet or smart phone.
33
SOURCE: ENOCEAN
Wireless technology
Performing Tasks
Alarm systems are a field which batteryless
wireless technology is opening up, due to its
specific features. Reliability requirements are
more stringent than those required for lighting
controls. A failure not only means a malfunction but can cause many more consequences
for systems that depend on the equipment
being monitored. It’s a fact that more
malfunctions are caused by battery failures
than electronics, especially in large systems.
Energy harvesting overcomes this issue.
There are already various batteryless
wireless water detectors, for example, from
AFRISO using miniaturized solar cells or
motion energy converters to power wireless
signals that report water leaks in areas such
as washing machines, under the bathtub (also
in complete darkness), in the kitchen or in
the bathroom.
The wireless signal immediately sends the
leakage information to a gateway controller
or directly to a valve, causing that the main
water pipeline or the affected supply line to
be shut off. A notification is sent to the user’s
smart phone or smart pad at the same time to
inform them about the incident. In addition,
the water valve can be opened and closed,
independent of leakage notifications, by GSM
connection via smartphone or smartpad.
Embedded Processing
A major requirement of today’s and the future’s
energy supply is the smart grid. It’s intended
to network centralized and decentralized
energy suppliers to an intelligent system that
provides energy only when needed, updating
in real-time. This requires continuous data
flow and processing from all involved parties,
which means millions of information points.
34
One key to this are smart metering systems.
To work reliably and cost-efficiently, interoperability between the meters is supplied by
different manufacturers – this is why smart
metering calls for standardized technologies.
Consequently, the members of the EnOcean
Alliance have defined a device communication
protocol, the Automated Meter Reading (AMR)
profile for batteryless wireless devices.
Smart meter systems based on this open
protocol are already available from a number
of manufacturers, meters from Eltako and
the control system from BSC. The Eltako
components read and transmit the current electricity, water and gas consumption, including
accumulated meter figures, by means of energy
harvesting wireless technology located at a
variety of points inside a building. In addition,
the BSC software monitors and displays the
current meter readings, and compares them
against default values. This makes all relevant
data available for systems processing it for
intelligent energy management on demand.
Bridge to the Cloud
Via similar gateways, the standard-based
energy harvesting technology can also communicate with Ethernet, WiFi, GSM/UMTS/CDMA
and other networks for integration in cloud
services. Here, all data collected by batteryless
wireless sensors is encrypted and transmitted
to a cloud service over the Internet. The
gateways connected to a control and visualization software by TCP/IP can be used to control
all relay receivers and sensors bidirectional.
Magnum Energy Solutions (MES) and BSC
Software, for instance, have developed a cloud
solution which offers energy management
as-a-service. Facility managers and building
owners can monitor inventory, equipment,
assets and energy related information from
anywhere at any time, via the cloud. Critical
building related data is automatically pushed
to the cloud, freeing owners and managers
from the often-challenging coordination and
expense of hosting onsite servers.
One of the advantages of a cloud-based
solution is that the management system arrives
pre-commissioned from the manufacturer and
ongoing device commissioning is expertly
done on behalf of the client and pushed out
from the cloud. Users are granted unlimited
access to their remote, dedicated virtual server
with their own IP address, accessible from a
desktop or smart phone – the perfect precondition for a deeply connected world of an IoT.
As energy harvesting wireless technology
advances, possibilities are emerging for
using energy-autonomous, maintenance-free
wireless modules for early warning systems or
in domestic environments, adding extra functionality for more comfort and convenience,
security and safety to existing systems. In
agriculture, sensors could be placed over
large areas to provide early warnings of forest
fires, or to ensure that crops are receiving
an optimal supply of water and nutrients.
Batteryless technology is also suitable for
monitoring built fabric such as large bridges.
In all these scenarios, wired systems would
be too elaborate in their technology and by
no means cost-effective. Energy harvesting
wireless technology is consequently set to play
an increasingly important role in realizing the
IoT more reliably, more conveniently, more
economically and utilizing existing communication technologies.
Jim O’Callaghan is president of EnOcean Inc.
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
PHOTO: MOXA, INC.
The networking of EnOcean-based components iallows for interaction with other smart devices using communication standards such as EIB/KNX, BACnet, LON, TCP/IP and Modbus.
Applications
Open comms help Ford and
Mazda stay flexible in China
The Changan Ford Mazda Nanjing Company bases production on the Mazda “Triangle Control” concept. The
plant produces multiple models, and uses Open comms to achieve a high degree of flexibility and control.
THE TRIANGLE CONTROL CONCEPT is a hierarchical principle intended to address plant
control at all levels from the enterprise data
model at the top, to the actuators and sensors
at the bottom. The overall aim is to keep
things simple and standardized.
In a hierarchical system, open networks
play a key role. The plant was a significant
project for Mitsubishi Electric, whose factory
automation systems, often based on CC-Link
networking are used extensively throughout
the facility.
Architectural flexibility
A particular example of how the architecture
allows flexibility is in the body shop where the
line must be able to cope with the production
of various different models. The body framing
system currently allows the production of two
variants of three established models: Ford’s
Fiesta, the Mazda 2 and Mazda 3, as well as
reserving capacity for two additional future
models.
The entire shop is automated with the
system and divided into 24 stations. Each of
these has multiple controllers in charge of
three to four welding robots, making almost
100 robots total. A further 10 stations handle
the under body operations. Open comms helps
maintain operational flexibility by allowing
production engineers to conveniently reserve
future configurations. When actual production
machinery is added, it’s a simple matter to
enable the new parts of the network. This
leads to “plug and play” network configuration, significantly reducing project lead time.
The welding line creates adverse conditions
for communications; despite this the line has
run for approximately seven years without
experiencing any hardware failure or network
malfunction related downtime. Further
enhancing this exemplary record is the
easy system maintainability enabled by the
network’s diagnostics.
With CC-Link there is no need for complicated parameter settings, and the engineering
team found it easy to create clear diagnostic
displays to allow operators to see network
status at a glance. Further, if faults were to
occur, the network allows malfunctioning
stations to be removed, serviced and then
returned to operation without disrupting
operation for the rest of the line.
05.201 3
Chinese factory workers assemble Ford Focus cars on the assembly line at the auto plant of Changan Ford Mazda
Nanjing Company. The plant relies heavility on networked controls to maintain perfornance and flexible operations.
Network system benefits
The cost saving benefits of a flexible and robust
network protocol were also a key factor in its
selection. The use of standard cabling was
seen as a major benefit, and the lack of special
connectors or other additional hardware also
contributed to cost effectiveness. Moreover,
compact hardware footprints meant smaller
cabinets could be used for network stations,
allowing cost savings through smaller cabinets
and location flexibility.
Finally, performance was also an important
selection factor. Despite large station totals
and long distance requirements, millisecond
update times were achieved; well within the
plant’s requirements for data flow and machine
cycle times.
“This plant was close to a textbook example
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
of how Open comms offers benefits to large
scale manufacturing applications such as
those in the automotive industry, especially
when speed and intelligence are as important
as the network not being prescriptive in terms
of the hardware that will connect to it”,
commented John Browett, General Manager
of the CC-Link Partner Association.
“It’s clear to see that large end users such
as Ford and Mazda have a huge influence on
the OEM community, both directly with their
suppliers and indirectly in creating a culture
that understands and appreciates the benefits
of Open communications”.
Application article by CC-Link Partner
Association.
35
Product news
Managed Gigabit Ethernet Switch
Red Lion Controls: The modular N-Tron NT24k
managed Gigabit Ethernet industrial switch
series offers up to 24 Gigabit Ethernet ports
and a flexible modular format for different
configuration options. The switches are
designed to handle challenging industrial
environments with high reliability and
wire-speed performance.
Available in rackmount and DIN rail models,
the switches provide versatility through
Gigabit and 100Base connectivity options in
both copper and fiber. The new products are
targeting industrial networking requirements
across industries such as factory automation,
utilities, video surveillance, security, transportation and alternative energy.
The NT24k includes expanded shock
and vibration tolerances, and an extreme
operating temperature range. It offers
redundant power input options, configuration
backup and an onboard temperature sensor
to ensure maximum reliability. Its full set of
management features include Web browser
management, SNMP, Jumbo Frame support,
port trunking, port mirroring, DHCP client,
802.1Q VLAN, 802.1p QoS and other features.
N-Ring ring technology restores network
communication within ~30ms of fault
detection. Robust remote monitoring capabilities make management easy.
Wi-Fi Access Point for M2M
The router offers built-in Wi-Fi Hotspot,
Ethernet 10/100 and I/O ports, and connects
to the Internet via CDMA and HSPA+ cellular
telephone networks. SPECTRE3G-W can serve
as a Wi-Fi Access Point (AP) or “Hotspot,” as
well as scan for and tie into existing short-distance wireless networks. It eliminates the need
for multiple devices to achieve a Wi-Fi Hotspot.
Uses for the Wi-Fi Hotspot capabilities
include long-distance transportation where
bus and railway companies can provide en-route
Internet access to Wi-Fi-enabled device users
(laptops, tablets, cellphones). School buses
can provide en-route Internet access as well.
In industrial situations, where the router may
be located in either hazardous or hard-toreach places, technicians can connect to it via
Wi-Fi instead of physically connecting to the
Ethernet port. SPECTRE3G-W can connect to
Wi-Fi-enabled devices like sensors, and it can
provide long-range Ethernet connections to
any device that is within range of the cellular
network.
Embedded WirelessHART Adapter
Fint: A new WirelessHART adapter with Modbus
interface for embedded applications is based on
the Dust LTP 5902 WirelessHART Radio Module.
The T810 enables manufacturers of batterydriven measurement devices to operate on a
WirelessHART network in a straightforward way
with a bare minimum of investments.
The T810 adapter is characterized by its
small dimensions, 42mm x 42mm, and the
energy consumption is in the µW power range.
It is WirelessHART compliant with proven HART
technology and the first product in a series of
new WirelessHART communication modules,
tailored for manufacturers of battery operated
measurement devices as well as devices without
battery.
The router offers two Gigabit ports (LAN/
WAN) that harness the benefits of standard
Ethernet communication and industrial
automation technology. For security reasons
and in order to guarantee efficient management
of data traffic, machine networks are becoming
increasingly segmented and industrial routers
are used for gateways.
The routers are designed for this task and
offer high performance using the Gigabit
technology on both Ethernet ports. Using an
integrated “stateful inspection” firewall and
additional security functions (e.g. masquerading), the connected machine components are
reliably protected against unauthorised access.
They also incorporate additional features such
as the prioritisation and channeling of network
data traffic, IP address mapping to reduce IP
addresses and the adjustment of IP address
areas.
Integrated VPN remote maintenance
functions provide users with secure Internetbased remote access to components and
systems on the LAN network either through
wired access via the WAN port or wirelessly
via the UMTS interface. OpenVPN open source
technology and IPsec encryption can be used for
secure VPN connections, for both the client and
server function.
EtherCAT Power Monitoring
Gigabit Security Router
B&B Electronics: The addition of 802.11b/g/n
Wi-Fi connectivity technology to its rugged
SPECTRE 3G cellular router creates a single box
solution that provides local machine-to-machine (M2M) network connectivity.
36
Weidmüller: This new Gigabit security router
provides secure communication between
Ethernet networks with integrated VPN remote
warning functions for industrial networks. It
enables communication between Ethernetbased machines and systems as well as
higher-level networks.
Beckhoff Automation: A new EP9214 power
distributor box provides overload protection
and diagnostics for up to four NEC Class 2
power feeds circuits. This solution enables
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
Open comms chip synchronisation
HMS Industrial Networks: A new network
processor is targeted at real-time industrial
Ethernet applications to allow industrial devices
to communicate over any industrial network,
and forms the core of a CompactCom chip, brick
and module concept.
The NP40 supports several different Industrial
Ethernet and Fieldbus networks by simply downloading new firmware. This reduces systems
development time because there is no need for
re-development for each additional network,
and allowing device manufacturers to simply
install a communication interface into a product
and then simply download the firmware they
need before sending their products off to the
end customer.
This solution provides virtually zero delay (a
few microseconds) in passing signals between
the network and host API which makes it highly
suitable for applications that require high level
synchronisation or motion profiles. The Anybus
NP40 is a single chip network processor that
includes a high-performance ARM core and an
FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) fabric.
The ARM core runs the protocol and application
stacks while the FPGA fabric is used to implement
various real-time Ethernet interfaces.
A real-time-switch integrated into the FPGA
fabric supports synchronous cyclic messaging
using real-time networks such as PROFINET IRT,
Powerlink, EtherCAT and Sercos III.
05.2013
Ethernet over VDSL
Kyland: The Traffic Ethernet Switch Series
has been expanded by introducing an energy
efficient EoVDSL and Serial Device Server
integrated Traffic Ethernet Switch for ITS/Traffic
applications.
SICOM3172 is an ultra-low power consumption (less than 10 Watts) dual-slot managed
switch designed to slide into an open Detector
Chassis Slot of any signal cabinet. The device
features two EoVDSL ports with an RJ11
connector, four 10/100Base-TX Ethernet port
and two serial ports for selectable RS232, RS422
and RS485 serial connectivity.
The unit provides communications over
telephone grade cable with speeds up to
100Mbps over up to 2km distances using
existing phone lines. It can be easily installed
into any traffic cabinet with an open dual
slot in a detector input chassis. The industry
standard form factor fits the NEMA TS 1/TS 2
detector rack. Clean, filtered 24VDC power is
provided directly from the back-plane of the
detector chassis and eliminates adding to the
mess of additional power supplies and power
cables within the traffic cabinet. This 3-in-1
integration of EoVDSL, Serial Device Server
and Ethernet Switch resolves the problem of
limited room inside the Traffic Control Cabinets
for installing too many devices.
or vice versa. In this way, it is possible to
interconnect individual machine modules or
electrical cabinets over a single cable keeping
the sercos ring topology and its advantages.
The branch from ring topology to a single cable
can be enabled or disabled over a switch or
over a digital input. Via this digital input the
machine control can take in or out machine
modules or functions from the production
process depending on the produced product
or the operation state of the machine. As an
additional benefit, beside the gain of flexibility,
the energy consumption of the machine can be
reduced easily in this way.
Field devices are mounted more and more
often decentralized and as close as possible
to the production process. Due to the installation situation and the compact dimensions
those devices often cannot be equipped with
multiple connectors. Typical examples for such
devices are encoders or I/O devices with IP67
protection class. The TopoExtension offers
a simple solution by combining the requirements coming from the installation with the
advantages of the sercos ring topology.
Product news
the local distribution and switching off of the
power supply, providing an ability to supply up
to four NEC class-2 circuits via typical M8 plug
connectors. It provides an I/O solution that also
offers complete diagnostics and control functionality for up to eight 24 V DC branch circuits
(Us & Up power) per power box.
The EP9214 power box is equipped with
7/8-inch plug connectors, and maintains a total
current of 16 A for each control and peripheral
voltage with cable cross-sections of 1.5 and
2.5 mm2 (roughly #14AWG). Even considerably
higher starting currents are briefly permissible
at the outputs, so that trouble-free start-up of
the connected devices is guaranteed. Wiring
in the field using the power distributor box is
significantly simpler and less expensive than
equipping the system with additional terminal
boxes with fuses.
Open Ethernet Drive Networking
sercos III topology extension
CANNON-Automata: A TopoExtension opens up
new possibilities to simplify cabling of sercos III
networks on large and modular machines and
use features such as hot plug and redundancy
which make it possible to connect or disconnect
single devices or complete machine aggregates
while operation without loss of real-time data.
The device integrates the two cables
necessary for ring topology to a single cable
i n d u s tr i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
Control Techniques: The open Ethernet capabilities of Unidrive M, a new family of seven drives
dedicated to manufacturing automation, can
deliver a high level of synchronisation accuracy
using an open IEEE 1588 Ethernet network.
Unidrive M uses the CODESYS programming
platform with standard IEC 61131-3 programming languages and standard Ethernet for
communication across drives, I/O, HMIs,
PLCs and other industrial devices. Unidrive
M also supports connectivity with PROFINET
RT, EtherNet/IP, Modbus TCP/IP and EtherCAT
devices. For Unidrive M, Control Techniques
has developed a high bandwidth motor control
algorithm with up to 3,300 Hz current loop and
250 Hz speed loop bandwidth. Combined with
the latest microprocessor technology, the result
is extreme stability and high performance.
37
Product news
Profinet IRT solution
KW Software: Profinet communication stacks
have been successfully used in demanding
automation solutions for years, but this new
Profinet stack uses the special features of Intel’s
Ethernet Controller I210 for the isochronous
communication via Profinet.
According to Peter Fuchs, Head of Marketing
Communications at KW Software, “In the field
of Profinet controllers, complex hardware
like special ASICs, FPGAs or expensive plug-in
boards had to be used for synchronizing
Profinet communication. With the Intel Ethernet
Controller I210 family and our Profinet stacks,
very cost-efficient and space-saving IRT-capable
Profinet interfaces can be realized, particularly
for PC-based controls and automation devices.”
Like the Profinet RT stacks, this solution is
available for different CPU architectures and
real-time operating systems including Wind
River VxWorks, allowing step-by-step migration
from Profinet RT to IRT communication.
forward data to internal safety boards. Network
redundancy can benefit building automation
and facility management by supporting HVAC
control and lighting systems.
Dual LAN units implement two Ethernet
ports that permit operation over independent
networks and paths, which are accessible via
different IP addresses and MAC IDs. If Path 1
fails, Path 2 resumes communication. This is
critical and often mandatory for engine rooms
or building security. If redundancy is not
required, the 750-885 separates data between
different networks, such as between machines
and the office.
Dedicated Priority Ports
Media Redundancy Controller
Wind Tower Cables
Belden: Halogen-free optical wind Tower cables
can make a significant contribution to the
efficiency of individual wind turbines and the
quality of installation and maintenance of the
overall wind park as well as maximum safety and
security.
Installed vertically in the tower of a wind
turbine as the tower data communication cable,
the new Belden fiber-optic cable guides the data
communication between the bottom box at the
ground level to the top box within the nacelle
of the tower. On both sides, a fan-out is used to
connect the fibers to the equipment.
The cables are available in different versions
based on fiber types OM2, OM3, OM4 and SM,
and with fiber counts of 4, 8 or 12. Suited for
vertical installation, they offer high abrasion
and chemical resistance against oil, acids and
alkalies and are able to operate in a temperature range of -55°C to +85°C. They are fully
compatible with the Belden MIPP and with
all Hirschmann compact or modular Ethernet
switches.
Field I/O Devices
WAGO: Blending automation and IT protocols,
the new 750-885 Media Redundancy Controller
provides applications with network redundancy
and greater data processing. The ETHERNET 2.0
750-885 PLC features two redundant networks
backed by dual, independent Ethernet interfaces
and 1MB of data memory. SD Card provides up to
32GB of extra memory for back-up-and-restore,
file transfer and time-stamping/data-logging.
Using an SD Card, the controller can improve
manufacturing, process and traffic engineering
applications. For example, OEM efficiency can
be improved by transferring program, boot
files and device parameters from PLC to PLC.
SD Card allows bluewater vessel operators to
time-stamp navigation/propulsion changes and
38
Advantech: EKI-3000 series “Light Industrial”
unmanaged switches feature five and eight port
Ethernet switches in both 10/100 and Gigabit
versions. They offer dedicated priority ports,
up to 60% reduction in power consumption,
smart diagnostics, and support gigabit data
transmission making them suitable for a host
of industrial automation functions.
Priority ports prioritize the traffic coming
over those ports and delay the less immediately necessary data over the remaining ports.
This is especially useful for high bandwidth
applications such as video streaming where
latency would cause problems. Smart diagnostic
functions help identify a fault on the system
without extensive port analysis.
In energy sensitive applications where power
consumption is a factor, the switches come with
advanced power saving functions that save up
to 60% on power consumption by shutting down
ports that have no link and budgeting power
based on the length of the Ethernet cable.
This is part of the IEEE 802.3az Energy Efficient
Standard.
Gigabit Ethernet provides fast data transmission speeds for high definition video streaming
and the ability to sustain constantly high traffic
loads in our EKI-3725 and EKI-2728 models.
Phoenix Contact: New Axioline E product family
is a range of modular I/O products for field
installations. Plastic and metal housing variants
are available. The IP 67 compliant I/O family
works on Ethercat, Ethernet/IP, Modbus/TCP,
Profinet, Sercos, and Profibus networks. I/O
functionality includes digital functions and an
I/O link master for each network.
There are five different I/O link/analog
converters for analog functions - AI/I, AO/U,
AO/I, AO/U, and RTD - in two different housing
types, straight and angled. The product line
includes a total of 70 items that are being
introduced to market. The Axioline E series is
unique due to its rapid installation with the
Speedcon quick-locking system.
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
Model
Product Description
Adept Systems
GadetNode Net Plus
Advantech
ADAM-4570
ADAM-4570L
ADAM-4571
ADAM-4571L
ADAM-4572
ADAM-4577
ADAM-4579
EDG-4504
EDG-4508
EDG-4516
Agiligate Ethernet
AMA-ICCP-GW-TCP
AMA-ICCP-GW-TCP2R
AMA-OPC Double Client
AMA-SCAD-DS
CyberSerial
MB5302
MB5404
AS-i/Ethernet GW
AS-i/Ethernet TCP/IP Gateway
FC3300
FC3400
FC3402
FC-Opt20
FC-Opt30
FNL
SNL2-E
DeviceMaster 16
DeviceMaster 8
BACnet Interface for SmartServers
DL3000-DR1
DL4500-EDH+
UNIGATE
i.LON 100
EtherCAN
Ethernet Serial
FS-B2010
FS-B2011
FS-B4010
Anybus Communicator
Anybus X Gateways
NET232 Ethernet/IP
NET232 Modbus
netLINK MPI
netLINK PROXY
netTAP 100
netTAP 50
EAGLE
Rail Router EPL
canScan-CO
canScan-DN
Anybus EtherCAT
Anybus EtherNet/IP
Anybus Modbus-TCP
Anybus Profinet
Anybus X-gateways
is Pro SVCube
ECAT-1000 EtherCAT Gateway
ETH-1000 Multiprotocol Gateway
ETH-200 Multiprotocol Gateway
Innominate mGuard centerport
NetBiter Development
NetBiter M2M
NetBiter Modbus RTU
webSCADA Modbus
JBUs / Ethernet-IP
[email protected] II
CAN-Ethernet-Gateway
dOPC XGate
Serial/Parallel GW
IPn920
MDS gateNET
eWebServer
Multi-Protocol GW
PROFINET I/O Proxy
Simple Gateways
EDR-G903 Series
ioLogik E4200
MGate EIP3000 Series
SMG-1100 Series
SMG-6100 Series
VPort 704-T
iServer
IM4200
IMG-111
Embedded control module uses NetSilicon's NET+ARM processor with Adept's GadgetStack and GadgetNIC network interface chip to provide high a performance core for compact
SuperNodes.
2-port Ethernet to RS-232/422/485 Data Gateway.
2-port Ethernet to RS-232 Data Gateway.
1 Port Ethernet to RS-232/422/485 Data Gateway.
1-port Ethernet to RS-232 Data Gateway.
Ethernet to Modbus Data Gateway.
1-port Universal Serial Device Gateway.
2-port Universal Serial Device Gateway.
4-port Ethernet to RS-232/422/485 Data Gateway.
8-port Ethernet to RS-232 Data Gateway.
16-port Ethernet to RS-232 Data Gateway.
Gateway Orofinet IO to serial
The AMA-Gateway is a WIN-NT-application to link any SCADA-System with TCP / IP-interface with complete TASE.2 / IEC 870-6-conformity.
The AMA-Gateway is a WIN-NT-application to link any SCADA-System with TCP / IP-interface with complete TASE.2 / IEC 870-6-conformity.
The AMA-OPC Double Client Plug is a WIN_NT-application offering OPC 1.0- and OPC 2.0-client to link OPC-Serverfunctions.
The MA-SCAD-Dataserver offers a full flexible system to interchange data between different protocols and formats: for example ICCP, MMS, 101/104, OPC, Modbus RTU.
Internet Appliance server that directly accesses serial devices via the Internet. It provides a direct link to serial systems, devices, and equipment using a web interface.
2-port Modbus Gateway
4-port Modbus Gateway
This AS-i/Ethernet Gateway in Stainless Steel is available with 1 or 2 AS-i Masters. It recognises duplicate AS-i addresses.
Webserver for AS-Interface. The AS-i/Ethernet TCP/IP gateway connects Ethernet TCP/IP and AS-Interface.
Embedded gateway server, supporting 2 ports RS485. FieldCommander software, level advanced -with script language- included.
Embedded gateway server, supporting 4 ports RS485. FieldCommander software, level advanced -with script language- included.
Embedded gateway server, supporting SMS allerts and MMS-protocol (supporting the transfer of pictures). FieldCommander softwareincluded.
Gateway support for Galaxy (Ademco/Microtech) alarmsystems. This option allows the FieldCommander gateway's to communicate with alarmsystems and ARC.
Gateway support for KNX/EIB building systems. This option allows the FieldCommander gateway's to communicate with KNX/EIB building systems.
The Ethernet/PROFIBUS gateway allows the connection to all PROFIBUS DP networks based on RS485 (up to 12 MBit/s) and IEC-1158-2 for process automation (PA).
The Ethernet/RS232/RS485 gateway allows the connection of two serial end devices running completely independent from each other with one of the many available protocol drivers.
16 port RS-232 DB9 Ethernet to serial device server. Includes PortVision network management software.
8 port RS-232 DB9 Ethernet to serial device server. Includes PortVision network management software.
BACnet Interface for Echelon's iLon SmartServer
The DL3000-DR1 is a gateway between Allen-Bradley's DH+ and Ethernet TCP/IP.
The DL4500-EDH+ is a gateway that allows RSLINX/LOGIX on Ethernet to poll multiple nodes on AB's DH+ .
Features a switchable RS232/422/485 interface. All interface parameters can be programmed using the convenient WINGATE windows software.
The i.LON 100 features a built-in web server that allows web access to built-in scheduling, alarming, and data logging applications.
CAN-Ethernet gateway based on ARM-processor NET+50, 10/100BaseT ETHERNET, CAN interface, CANopen master, supporting Windows, Linux and others.
Gateway product providing IP gateway from standard serial port(s).
Feature rich protocol translator Bridge enables data transfer between serial and Ethernet protocols.
Feature rich protocol translator/gateway enables data transfer between Lonworks protocol and an extensive library of other serial and Ethernet protocols.
A 10 serial, 2-Ethernet port, protocol translator bridge enables data transfer between serial and Ethernet protocols. An ISA slot allows additional driver cards.
Serial to Fieldbus Gateway available for RS 232/485 to Profibus, Profinet-IO, DeviceNet, EtherNet/IP, Modbus-TCP, CANopen, CC-Link, EtherCAT, ControlNet, Modbus Plus, …
The Anybus X-gateway family is a product line consisting of over 150 different products aimed to connect almost every possible combination of two industrial networks.
Add 10/100 Ethernet/IP to your product. A serial port using Modbus RTU/ASCII can now become an Ethernet/IP port.
Add Modbus TCP Ethernet to your product. A serial port using Modbus RTU/ASCII can now become a Modbus TCP Ethernet port with no changes to your software.
SIMATIC S7 Ethernet programming plug
PROXY Plug between PROFINET/PROFIBUS
Flexible Gateway for Industrial Ethernet Protocols
Low-cost Gateway for Industrial Ethernet Protocols
EAGLE mGuard is an industrial firewall. It gives you the control over the information flow in your network.
RR EPL Gateways for Realtime Powerlink.
Intelligent Ethernet/IP to CAN bridge running CANOpen scanner on the module for optimum performance. Enables multiple CAN networks to connect to a factory-wide Ethernet.
Intelligent Ethernet/IP to CAN bridge running DeviceNet scanner on the module for optimum performance. Enables multiple CAN networks to connect to factory-wide Ethernet.
The Anybus Communicator Gateway connects industrial devices via a serial RS232/422/485 interface to EtherCAT without any programming.
The Anybus Communicator Gateway connects industrial devices via a serial RS232/422/485 interface to EtherNet/IP without any programming. Serial sub-network config is made
The Anybus Communicator Gateway connects industrial devices via a serial RS232/422/485 interface to EtherNet/IP without any programming. Serial sub-network config is made
The Anybus Communicator Gateway connects industrial devices via a serial RS232/422/485 interface to Profinet without any programming.
The Anybus X-gateways are designed to connect different PLC systems by connecting almost any TWO networks. There are over 180 X-gateway combinations available.
The gateway opens incoming Profibus data for the inclusion into an office-environment and OPC-capable SCADA systems.
Multiprotocol EtherCAT / RS-485 gateway
Multiprotocol Ethernet / RS-485 gateway
Multiprotocol Ethernet / RS-485 / RS-232 gateway
High-End Firewall & VPN Gateway
The NetBiter Ethernet development platform providess an interface between TCP/IP and automation products for custom protocols (Metasys, Modbus etc).
With the NetBiter M2M Remote Device Management solution you can network-enable your devices anywhere in the world and integrate them into the enterprise.
A pure transparent connection between serial Modbus RTU devices and Ethernet (Modbus TCP). Often used with SCADA systems in Industrial / Building automation.
The NetBiter webSCADA Modbus is a configurable web interface to Modbus RTU devices for easy monitoring and control.
This gateway based on a PLines, a µLines, or a IC-SER-PCIb board allows communication between 1 Ethernet network and 4 or 8 JBus networks.
The TCP/IP gateway [email protected] II allows to access CAN systems via Ethernet. The device can be operated in gateway mode.
CAN/CANopen-Ethernet-Gateway is a high performance computer system. It is a complete PC compatible computer for stand alone purposes.
dOPC XGate the easy solution for OPC XML Data Access. With the dOPC XGate Server it is possible to augment any OPC COM based servers with an OPC XML DA interface.
Communication gateways convert RS-232/RS485 serial or TTL-level parallel legacy equipment to 10/100 Base T Ethernet.
The Nano IP Series is a miniature 900 MHz Wireless Ethernet/Serial/USB Gateway.
The MDS gateNET serves as an Internet Protocol (IP) terminal server gateway between an MDS radio network and the enterprise network.
Embedded Web-Server (10BaseT), OEM-Modul, various interface to host-card: FIFO, RS232, BIT-I/O. Simple TCP/IP-Module (multi-chip-module).
Bridge dissimilar networks and allow the exchange of information between networks. Run 20 different protocols simultaneously to setup more than 20,000 different combinations.
The applicom PROFINET I/O Proxy provides real-time communication between a PROFINET I/O network and other devices connected to an Ethernet, PROFIBUS or Serial network.
BradCommunications Direct-Link gateways provide an easy and cost-effective solution for connecting AS-Interface, DeviceNet, Ethernet or Profibus to Ethernet.
Industrial Gigabit Firewall/VPN secure router
Modular Active Ethernet I/O adapter
1 and 2-port DF1 to EtherNet/IP gateways
Smart machine-to-machine Modbus gateway
Smart machine-to-machine gateway
4-slot Modular Industrial Multi-service Gateway
Newport iServer is an Ethernet to serial bridge with an embedded Web Server. The iServer enables serial devices to connect to an Ethernet network.
IM4200 gateways gives administrators a single point of secure access and control for managing all the servers, routers, switches and power devices.
Industrial intelligence machine-to-machine gateway
Agilicom
AMA-Systems
Appliance-Lab
Atop
Bihl + Wiedemann
CER
Comsoft
Comtrol
ConnectEx
DataLink
G ateways
Deutschmann
Echelon
ESD
Eurotech
FieldServer
gateweb
Grid Connect
Hilscher
Hirschmann
HM Computing
HMS
ifak system
ICC
Innominate
IntelliCom
Interface Concept
Ixxat
Janz
Kassl
LogiSync
Microhard
Microwave Data
MKC
Molex
Moxa
Newport
Opengear
Oring
Product directory
Company
The complete product listing can be found at http://www.iebmedia.com
05.20 13
i n d u str i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
39
Product directory
Company
Model
Product Description
Pepperl + Fuchs
Phoenix Contact
Phoenix Contact
Port
EtherNet
FL Ethernet/Interbus Gateway
FL COMSERVER UNI - Modbus Gateway
EPL Gateway
EtherCAN
4201-104S-103M
4201-104S-DH485
4201-DFNT-101S
4201-DFNT-103M
4201-DFNT-104S
Pepperl+Fuch's Ethernet gateway connects Ethernet TCP/IP with two AS-Interface networks, and transmits data from a single IP address.
The compact FL IBS SC/I-T Interbus Ethernet Gateway cost-effectively connects a complete INTERBUS system with up to 512 devices.
Modbus Gateway TCP - RTU/ASCII
EPL Interface or Router with access to EPL from legacy TCP/IP networks.
Gateway between CAN Layer-2 or CANopen and Ethernet with TCP/IP. Includes also Web Server, FTP, Telnet and SMTP client.
The 4201-104S-103M and 5201-104S-103M gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between IEC60870-5-104 and IEC60870-5-103 networks.
The 4201-104S-DH485 and 5201-104S-DH485 gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between IEC60870-5-104 and DH-485 networks.
The 4201-DFNT-101S and 5201-DFNT-101S gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and IEC60870-5-101 networks.
The 4201-DFNT-103M and 5201-DFNT-103M gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and IEC60870-5-103 networks.
The 4201-DFNT-104S and 5201-DFNT-104S gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and IEC60870-5-104 networks.
4201-DFNT-ASCII
4201-DFNT-DFCM
4201-DFNT-DNPM
4201-DFNT-DNPS
4201-DFNT-DNPSNET
4201-DFNT-MCM
4201-DFNT-MNET
4201-DNPSNET-103M
4201-DNPSNET-DFCM
4201-DNPSNET-DH485
4201-MNET-101S
4201-MNET-103M
4201-MNET-104S
4201-MNET-ASCII
4201-MNET-DNPM
4201-MNET-DNPS
4201-MNET-DNPSNET
4201-MNET-MCM
4204-DFNT-PDPM
4204-MNET-PDPM
4205-104S-PDPS
4205-DFNT-PDPS
4205-DNPSNET-PDPS
4206-DFNT-DEM
4206-MNET-DEM
4207-DFNT-HART
4303-104S-MBP
4303-DNPSNET-MBP
4303-MBP-DFNT
4303-MNET-MBP
ModbusTCP/ PROFIBUS
ProLinx Plus Wireles
Ethernet-DeviceNet GW
Ethernet-J1939 GW
ControlLogix-GENIUS
ASCII to E/IP
Barcode-EtherNet/IP GW
ControlLogix-Modbus
EtherNet/IP-DeviceNet
SC-RJ Transceiver
1761-NET-ENI
A-B 1788-EN2DN
A-B FF Linking Device
TSXETG100
SEL -2030
SEL-2032/2030
VPN Gateway Plus
IE/PB Link PN IO
Device Gateway
Echochange
FG-100 FF/HSE
OPC NetListener
Industrial Gateways
Ethernet-PROFIBUS
Field Marshal P510
Field Marshal P520
Field Marshal P530
Field Marshal P540
Webdyngate MODBUS
The 4201-DFNT-ASCII and 5201-DFNT-ASCII gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and ASCII networks.
The 4201-DFNT-DFCM and 5201-DFNT-DFCM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and DFI networks.
The 4201-DFNT-DNPM and 5201-DFNT-DNPM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and DNP networks. Supports one DNP Master port.
The 4201-DFNT-DNPS and 5201-DFNT-DNPS gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and DNP 3.0 networks. Supports one DNP Slave port.
The 4201-DFNT-DNPSNET and 5201-DFNT-DNPSNET gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and DNP networks.
The 4201-DFNT-MCM and 5201-DFNT-MCM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Ethernet/IP and Modbus networks.
Stand-alone DIN rail-mounted communication protocol gateways that provide a powerful connection between existing EtherNet/IP networks and the Modbus TCP/IP network.
The 4201-DNPSNET-103M and 5201-DNPSNET-103M gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between DNP over Ethernet to IEC60870-5-103 Master networks.
The 4201-DNPSNET-DFCM and 5201-DNPSNET-DFCM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between DNP over Ethernet to DF1 networks.
The 4201-DNPSNET-DH485 and 5201-DNPSNET-DH485 gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between DNP over Ethernet to DH-485 networks.
The 4201-MNET-101S and 5201-MNET-101S gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and IEC60780-5-101 networks.
The 4201-MNET-103M and 5201-MNET-103M gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and IEC60870-5-103.
The 4201-MNET-104S and 5201-MNET-104S gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and IEC60870-5-104 networks.
The 4201-MNET-ASCII and 5201-MNET-ASCII gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and ASCII networks.
The 4201-MNET-DNPM and 5201-MNET-DNPM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and DNP networks. Supports one DNP Master
port.
The 4201-MNET-DNPS and 5201-MNET-DNPS gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and DNP networks. Supports one DNP Slave port.
The 4201-MNET-DNPSNET and 5201-MNET-DNPSNET gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and DNP over Ethernet.
The 4201-MNET-MCM and 5201-MNET-MCM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and Modbus networks.
The 4204-DFNT-PDPM and 5204-DFNT-PDPM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and Profibus DP networks.
The 4204-MNET-PDPM and 5204-MNET-PDPM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and Profibus DP networks.
The 4205-104S-PDPS and 5205-104S-PDPS gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between IEC60870-5-104 and Profibus DP networks.
The 4205-DFNT-PDPS and 5205-DFNT-PDPS gateway provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and Profibus DP networks.
The 4205-DNPSNET-PDPS and 5205-DNPSNET-PDPS gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between DNP over Ethernet to Profibus DP Slave networks.
The 4206-DFNT-DEM and 5206-DFNT-DEM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and Honeywell DE networks.
The 4206-MNET-DEM and 5206-MNET-DEM gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and Honeywell DE networks.
The 4207-DFNT-HART and 5207-DFNT-HART gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between EtherNet/IP and HART multi-drop networks.
The 4303-104S-MBP and 5303-104S-MBP gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between IEC60870-5-104 and Modbus Plus networks.
The 4303-DNPSNET-MBP and 5303-DNPSNET-MBP gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between DNP over Ethernet to Modbus Plus networks.
The 4303-MBP-DFNT and 5303-MBP-DFNT gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus Plus and EtherNet/IP networks.
The 4303-MNET-MBP and 5303-MNET-MBP gateways provide stand-alone, DIN-rail mounted communication between Modbus TCP/IP and Modbus Plus networks.
The gateway automatically generates application-specific Derived Function Blocks containing all logic required by Schneider Electric M340 processors to manage communication.
Connect field devices using different networks or protocols and share data between these devices over the air with ProSoft Technology's new ProLinx Plus Wireless Gateways.
Pyramid Solutions' Ethernet to DeviceNet Gateway (p/n AB7603) provides connectivity from EtherNet/IP & Modbus/TCP networks to DeviceNet.
Pyramid Solutions' Ethernet to J1939 Gateway (AB7645) provides connectivity from EtherNet/IP & Modbus/TCP to a J1939 (CAN) network.
The AN-X-GENI product allows ControlLogix PLCs and other Ethernet/IP devices to connect to the GE GENIUS BUS network.
The ASCII to EtherNet/IP Gateway seamlessly transfers data between ASCII devices and Rockwell PLCs using EtherNet/IP.
The NO LADDER LOGIC EtherNet/IP Gateway is specially designed for Barcode Readers, Scales and other ASCII devices.
Now you can easily move up to 200 registers from up to 32 RTU devices with the Logix MB Gateway.
The EIP/Devicenet Gateway makes a network of DeviceNet devices look like a single EtherNet/IP adapter.
The connector components come in 650 nm for POF, and 850 nm and 1300 nm single or multimode for PCF and GOF. The transceiver is built in Small Form Factor Design.
1761-NET-ENI from Allen-Bradley provides EtherNet/IP connectivity for all MicroLogix controllers and any other DF1( full-duplex devices.
EtherNet/IP-to-DeviceNet Linking Device. bridge explicit messages from an EtherNet/IP network to a DeviceNet network or scan the DeviceNet network via EtherNet/IP.
The 1757-FFLD enables process control with any Logix processor while using the capabilities of Foundation Fieldbus process instrumentation.
The ETG100 ConneXium Gateway is a cost effective standalone hardware module that provides Ethernet connectivity to any Modbus serial device, master or slave.
SEL -2030 Communications Processor with installed SEL -2701 Ethernet Processor. Provides information via IEC 61850/UCA2, DNP3 LAN/WAN,Telent, and FTP access.
SEL-2032/2030 Communications Processors with installed SEL-2701 Ethernet Processor provide data with UCA2/IEC 61850, DNP3 LAN/WAN, Telnet, and FTP access.
Sequi VPN Gateway Plus provides IPSec VPN tunneling over Internet for Ethernet and Serial traffic. Web server configurable, 10/100Base-T LAN and WAN Interfaces.
Transition between Ethernet and PROFIBUS
DGW is a Device Gateway that transparently integrates devices like PLCs, robots, and other controls that use proprietary networks with Ethernet networks.
Ethernet Protocol Converter to bridge between Siemens, Rockwell Automation, and Schneider Electric PLCs.
FG-100 FF/HSE - Linking Device
This is a SNMP/ICMP to OPC Gateway. You can make a status monitoring from your network.
Ethernet to serial, CAN, USB Device Servers. IGW/800, IGW/900, IGW/920.
Gateway for 1...12 PROFIBUS strands. Ethernet PROFIBUS PA HART connection according to PNO profile. FDT/CommDTM integration.
A compact DIN-rail mounted gateway module providing connectivity between Ethernet TCP/IP and Profibus DP. Ideal for connecting fieldbus devices and I/O to PCs and HMls.
A compact DIN-rail mounted gateway module providing connectivity between Ethernet TCP/IP and DeviceNet. Ideal for connecting fieldbus devices and I/O to PCs and HMls.
A compact DIN-rail mounted gateway module providing connectivity between Ethernet TCP/IP and Modbus. Ideal for connecting fieldbus devices and I/O to PCs and HMls.
A compact DIN-rail mounted gateway module providing connectivity between Ethernet TCP/IP and CANopen. Ideal for connecting fieldbus devices and I/O to PCs and HMls.
The Webdyngate Modbus is a customisable Web enabled Modbus gateway providing local and remote monitoring services from Modbus connected devices
Industrial Router Firewall IF1100
Hirschmann EAGLE30-0402 Firewalls
Magnum 10RX Configurable Router
Magnum 10XTS Router Terminal Server
Fusion LTE Broadband Router
Vanguard 3000 Broadband Router
BR-1 BACNET
BR-2 BACnet
BTR BACnet Tunneling
µWEBox eRouter
EIPR-E
72001, 72002
BANDIT
BANDIT IP
BANDIT PLUS
24V Industrial Router + Managed Switch + OpenVPN
robust security and unprecedented flexibility
Configurable Router with Security Applications
10XTS provides configurability and reliability
High-performance multi-band LTE router
Multicarrier 3G cellular router
Routes BACnet packets between ARCNET and IEEE 802.3 Ethernet LANs. The Router may be connected to LANs containing a variety of network traffic, and dedicated BACnet networks.
BR-2 BACnet Router routes BACnet packets between BACnet Ethernet and BACnet/IP Ethernet LANs.
IP Router connects BACnet LANs using existing TCP/IP networks. BACnet packets are IP packaged for TCP/IP transmission, and IP packets are unpackaged for the BACnet LANs.
Enables Ethernet devices to communicate over the PSTN network. It permits you to create a standalone network with wide area access over the public dial-up PSTN network.
Industrial Ethernet IP Router
The i.LON TM1000 Internet Server brings LONWORKS networked devices to IP networks.
The Encore Networks BANDIT line of integrated IPsec VPN/Firewall/Router appliances provides SCADA to IP conversion for the utility and industrial marketplaces.
BANDIT IP is an IP only router ideal for IP based utility and industrial routing environments.
The Encore Networks BANDIT PLUS terminates 200 IPsec VPN connections, along with multiple SCADA serial interfaces.
G ateways
ProSoft
Pyramid
Quest
RTA
RdM
Rockwell
Schneider
SEL
Sequi
Siemens
SISCO
Softing
Somebytes
SSV
T&H
Tellima
Webdyn
ads-tec
Belden
R o ut e rs
CalAmp
Cimetrics
Comtech M2M
Contemporary Controls
Echelon
Encore Networks
The complete product listing can be found at http://www.iebmedia.com
40
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
eWON
Hirschmann
Innominate
Ro u ter s
Insys
Interface Concept
LyconSys
MESTECH
Moxa
Multenet
Phoenix Contact
RuggedCom
Smartronix
Supercom
Unicom
uSysCom
Weidmüller
Welotec
Acksys
S e r ia l I nter f ac e
Advantech
Atop
Busware Direct
CER
Comtrol
Comtrol Corporation
Connect Tech
Danpex
Digi
DigitaL SP
Entrix
Ethernet Direct
Grid Connect
HW group
Model
Product Description
EtherFRAD
eWON 2005CD/4005CD
eWON 2104/4104
Talk2M Go
MACH 4000P
PowerMICE
Innominate mGuard bladepack
Innominate mGuard industrial RS
mGuard smart2
MoRoS
JBus / Ethernet
LyconSys ERT100
EtherFRAD products can accommodate virtually any traffic type for transport over a single or multiple Frame Relay Permanent Virtual Circuits.
Industrial LAN Router
Industrial ADSL Router
Internet remote access platform for eWON routers
MACH 4000 backbone switches are designed for applications where high port densities and fast switching times are required.
PowerMICE backbone switches are designed for applications where flexibility and routing cababilities are required. PowerMICE switches are offerd from 8 to 28 ports.
Security solution for rack installation
Compact industrial firewall with VPN functionality
Portable hardware firewall
The MoRoS combines a modem (avialable with analogue Modem, ISDN-TA, GPRS Modem), a router and a 4-port switch.
This router based on a PLines, a µLines, or a IC-SER-PCIb board allows communication between JBus equipment via an Ethernet network.
Industrial VPN Router
Industrial ADSL
OnCell 5004/5104-HSDPA Series
Multenet Router
PSI-MODEM-3G/ROUTER
PSI-MODEM-GSM/ETH
RuggedRouter RX1000
Rollover Adapter
AP-02
AP-02-P
Micro-Router/4
3EMR
Minirouter IE-ARM-E
Minirouter IE-ARM-U
Router w. 56k modem
Router w. ISDN modem
TK700 - GPRS and UMTS Router
Industrial ADSL MTA400/402 , is based on the very latest ADSL2/2+ platform,supporting the fastest broadband speeds available.
GSM/GPRS/EDGE/UMTS/HSDPA high speed cellular
Connects remote devices to your local network. Includes support for a Dial-In PPP Service (RAS), Dial-Out On-Demand, Proxy ARP, Masquerading, IP and Port Fowarding.
GSM/UMTS Ethernet Router with VPN support
GPRS/EDGE GSM router with VPN support
Industrially hardened Ethernet network router with integrated router, firewall, and VPN. Multiple WAN and Ethernet ports, -40C to +85C, high immunity to EMI, high MTBF.
Converts any standard Ethernet cable into a Rollover cable.
Industrial 802.11b/g Wireless LAN Access Point with 2-port LAN- High Speed Air Connectivity: WLAN interface support up to 54Mbps link speed.
Industrial 802.11b/g Wireless LAN Access Point with 1-port LAN and 1-port P.O.E. PD- High Speed Air Connectivity: WLAN interface support up to 54Mbps link speed.
Micro-Router/4 provides four Auto 10/100 RJ-45 ports for LAN use and one for WAN. All port have Auto MDI-MDIX Crossover function and N-way automatic speed detection.
3-EMR is an industrial router that enables remote access to a network making use of the 3G and GPRS services the mobile network operators are offering.
Routing Ethernet to Ethernet. Temperature range 0C...60C. Configurable firewall/ DNS incl. reverse DNS/DynDNS/ Dial on Demand/ Telemaintenance/ Call back.
Routing Ethernet to serial. Temperature range 0C...60C. Configurable firewall/ DNS incl. reverse DNS/DynDNS/ Dial on Demand/ Telemaintenance/ Call back.
Routing Ethernet to serial or telephone line. Configurable firewall/ DNS incl. reverse DNS/DynDNS/ Dial on Demand/ Telemaintenance/ Call back/ SSH webserver.
Routing Ethernet to serial or ISDN. Configurable firewall/ DNS incl. reverse DNS/DynDNS/ Dial on Demand/ Telemaintenance/ Call back/ SSH webserver or console.
Industrial 2G GPRS and 3G UMTS Router with VPN
COMETH
COMETH-FIELD
PCI-1602
PCI-1603
PCI-1604UP
PCI-1610 Series
PCI-1610AUP
PCI-1611U
PCI-1612 Series
PCI-1620 Series
PCI-1622CU
PCI-1625U
PCL-740
PCL-741
PCL-743/745
PCL-746+
PCL-844+
PCL-846
PCL-858
PCM-3610
PCM-3612
PCM-3614
PCM-3618
PCM-3640
PCM-3641
PCM-3642I
PCM-3660
SE5416-N2
E103-1000
E103-1101
COM-Watch
DeviceMaster 1, 24V
DeviceMaster UP 4
DeviceMaster UP emb.
DeviceMaster UP VDC
RocketPort Universal PCI 8
RocketPort Octa
RocketPort Quad
Blue Heat/Net
CRM4859BTS2
CRM4859T
CRM4859TS2
CRM485BT
AccelePort Xp
AccelePort Xr 920
Digi Neo
Digi One IA
Digi One IAP
Digi One RealPort
Digi One SP
PortServer TS 1 MEI
LAN Modem
Etherlite
Serial to Ethernet
NET232-DCE
NET232-DTE
PortBox RS-232/485
Single port serial RS232 to Ethernet TCP/IP server, dongle format, external or remote power supply, remote COM, TCP server, Telnet Server and RFC2217 protocol support
Industrial Single Port serial RS232/RS422/RS485 to Ethernet TCP/IP server, DIN rail format, external power supply (+9VDC to +30VDC), remote COM, TCP server
2-port RS-422/485 PCI Communication Card with Isolation Protection
2-port RS-232 Current-loop PCI Communication Card with Isolation Protection
2-port RS-232 Low-Profile PCI Communication Card with EFT Surge Protection
4-port RS-232 PCI Communication Cards
4-port RS-232 Low-Profile Universal PCI Communication Card with EFT Surge Protection
4-port RS-422/485 Universal PCI Communication Card with Isolation & EFT Surge Protection
4-port RS-232/422/485 PCI Communication Cards
8-port RS-232 PCI Communication Cards
8-port RS-422/485 Universal PCI Communication Card with Isolation & EFT Surge Protection
8-port Intelligent RS-232 Universal PCI Communication Card
RS-232/422/485 Current-loop Communication Card
2-port RS-232 Current-loop Communication Card
2-port RS-422/485 Communication Cards
4-port RS-232/422/485 Communication Card
8-port Intelligent RS-232/422 ISA Communication Card
4-port High-speed RS-422/485 Communication Card
8-port High-speed RS-232 Communication Card
RS-232/422/485 Module with Isolation Protection
2-port RS-422/485 Module
4-port RS-422/485 High-speed Module
8-port RS-422/485 High-speed Module
4-port RS-232 High-speed Modules
4-port RS-232 High-speed Modules
8-port RS-232 Module
Jumperless Ethernet Module
16-port RS-232/422/485 (RJ45)
Industrial RS232/RS485 serial to Ethernet thin server. Supports UDP, TCP, SNMP and TFTP protocols.
Modbus serial (slave) to Modbus/TCP converter. 10 to 30Vdc powered. -30 to 70 degC operating. DIN rail or panel mount. Class 1 Div 2 rating pending.
Web-enables test and measurement server for logging and analysing fieldbuses like RS232, RS422, RS485, CAN, Modbus, EIB or ISDN.
Software selectable RS-232/422/485 Ethernet to serial intelligent/programable device server in 4-, 8-, 16-, and 32-port configurations. PortVision management software included.
Serial to Industrial Ethernet: PROFINET, EtherNet/IP and Modbus/TCP. Connect, communicate and control up to 4 serial devices on the platform of your choice.
Connect, communicate and control serial to industrial Ethernet: via PROFINET, EtherNet/IP or Modbus/TCP. Industrial power supply 5-30 Volt. Save protocol development time.
Serial to Industrial Ethernet: EtherNet/IP, PROFINET, or Modbus/TCP on a single platform.
Low profile or standard height universal PCI 5.0 volt ot PCI-X 3.3 volt compatible with RS-232 or RS-422 serial interface. Industry's longest MTBF.
Universal PCI 5.0 volt or PCI-X 3.3 volt compatible with RS-232 serial interface. Interface cables for RJ45, DB9, and DB25 available.
Universal PCI 5.0 volt or PCI-X 3.3 volt compatible with RS-232 serial interface. Interface cables for RJ45, DB9, and DB25 available.
Two, four or eight ports of RS-232 or RS-232/422/485 connectivity, auto-sensing 10Base-T, 100Base-TX LAN interface, with data speeds up to 460.8 Kbps per port.
NetStream Media Converter. All-in-One RS-485/422/232 in Terminal Block to Single-Mode ST fiber. Supports 2- or 4-wires in RS-485.
NetStream Media Converter, All-in-One RS-485/422/232 in DB9 serial interface to Multi-Mode ST Fiber. Extended operation temperature version available.
NetStream Media Converter. All-in-One RS-485/422/232 in DB9 serial interface to Single-Mode ST fiber. Extended operating temperature version available.
NetStream Media Converter. All-in-One RS-485/422/232 in Terminal Block to Multi-Mode ST fiber. Supports 2- or 4-wires for RS-485.
Highly integrated, powerful RISC processor based card provides the highest level of intelligence and the most advanced design available on the market.
Powerful RISC processor-based card delivers maximum performance up to 921.6 Kbps for two-, four-, or eight-EIA-232 serial port models on a PCI platform.
On-board surge suppression on each signal, low profile size as well as and Application Specific Integrated Circuit to provide throughput speeds
Efficient serial-to-Ethernet connectivity for industrial applications requiring simple and cost-effective connectivity.
Universal, high-performance serial-to-Ethernet device server. Designed for industrial applications requiring industry protocol support.
Standard serial-to-Ethernet connectivity. The Digi One RealPort is ideal for applications requiring seamless integration to existing application environments.
Efficient serial-to-Ethernet connectivity. The Digi One SP is ideal for applications requiring simple and cost effective data communications.
Universal, high-performance device server for RS-232/422/485 serial-to-Ethernet connectivity.
Serial to TCP/IP convertor connects serial devices to a TCP/IP LAN. Adds a serial port to any Windows computer using Redirector software (included).
Serial to Ethernet two-way connectivity achieved with this unit. RS232, RS422, RS485 signals seamlessly operate on any Ethernet network.
Boxer robus device server are designed to enable serial devices such as CNC and PLC to connect to Fast Ethernet network.
NET232 is an intelligent plug-and-play RS232-to-Ethernet cable adaptor that enables any device or machine with a serial port to become Ethernet enabled.
Net232 is an intelligent plug-and-play RS232-to-Ethernet cable adaptor that enables any device or machine with a serial port, to become Ethernet enabled.
Conversion of a serial line to Ethernet and vice versa (server or client/server) with RS-485 support and protocol enhancements.
Product directory
Company
The complete product listing can be found at http://www.iebmedia.com
05.2013
i n d u str i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
41
Product directory
Company
Model
Product Description
Insys
IntelliCom
Interface Concept
PortStore
INSYS Ethernet 5.0
NetBiter Serial
µLines
IC-SER-PCIb
IC-SER-PMCa
Plines
5M401
JetPort 5601
JetPort 5801
KPS2204/KPS1000
SICOM3171
LSC-1102
XPress-DR+
SC-232-X
STE02
MiiNePort E1 Series
NPort 5100A Series
NPort 5130
NPort 5150
NPort 5210
NPort 5410
NPort 5450
NPort 5600-8-DT Desktop Series
NPort 5610/5630 Rackmount Series
NPort 5650 Rackmount Series
EtherPAD Digital IO
EtherPAD Duo
EtherPAD Lite
PocketPAD 1
PocketPAD 2
PocketPAD 4
PocketPAD FX
PocketPAD Java
PocketPAD Multidrop
PocketPAD PoE
PocketPAD Router
PowerAgent
IDS-5000
Emb. Device Server
IOLAN DS/TS
IOLAN SDS
IOLAN STS
UltraPort Express
UltraPort SI
FL COMSERVER BASIC 232/422/485
FL COMSERVER PRO 232/422/485
FL COMSERVER UNI 232/422/485
FL COMSERVER WLAN 232/422/485
Ether232Duo
Ether232Plus
Generic IE Serial
DS-100R, DS100B
SEL-2890
4101 SeaLINK.232
4102 SeaLINK.485
4103 SeaLINK.ULTRA
4104 SeaLINK.Multi
4161 SeaLINK+16.232
4162 SeaLINK+16.422
4163 SeaLINK+16.ULTRA
4201 SeaLINK+2.232
4202 SeaLINK+2.485
4203 SeaLINK+2.Multi
4401 SeaLINK+4.232
4402 SeaLINK+4.422
4403 SeaLINK+4.ULTRA
4801 SeaLINK+8.232
4802 SeaLINK+8.422
4803 SeaLINK+8.ULTRA
TacServe
TCP/COM
TC2100
TC2800
ESERV-10
EDW-100
Com-Server
Com-Server 4 Ports
RS-232 serial line data buffer 2048kB. Stored data are accessible over the Ethernet network.
The INSYS Ethernet 5.0 integrates any application simply into a local area network. A virtual COM port driver is available.
The NetBiter Serial Server forwards data betwen a serial port and an Ethernet network. Together with a special software driver in a PC.
A high-performance LAN-WAN communications server. µLines4 provides 3 asynch/synch ports and 1 Ethernet link, µLines8 provides 7 asynch/synch ports and 1 or 2 Ethernet links.
The IC-SER-PCIb based on a PowerQUICC 860P provides 4 asynch/synch. High-performance serial multimode programmable ports, 1 10/100Mbps Ethernet port and 1 asynch. serial
port.
A PCI mezzanine module for cPCI, VME and proprietary designed mother boards. 4 asynch/synch.serial multimode programmable ports, 1 10/100Mbps Ethernet, 1 asynch. serial port.
A high-performance LAN-WAN communications server that attaches to your LAN network to provide wide-area connectivity.
The 5M401 offers 1 RS-232 and 3 ethernetports. The 5M401 comes standard with stateful inspection firewalls and AES encryption
Jetport 5601 is a RS-232/422/485 to Redundant Ethernet Serial Device Server. The serial interface is configurable in software and supports speed as high as 460.8kbps.
5801 is a one port RS-232/422/485 to Wireless Serial Device Server. The Wireless LAN solution is 802.11b/g with up to 54Mbps.
6 Port Managed Din-Rail Serial Device Server
5 Port Managed Traffic Serial Device Server
Ethernet to RS-232/ 422/ 485 Serial Device
Din rail mount. Wide -40° ? 70°C operational temperature, 15KV serial ESD protection and 2.5KV Ethernet isolation. Patent-pending SwitchPort+ technology.
RS232/RS485/RS422 Interface Converters
1 RS.232 port Serial to Ethernet industrial Converter. Server and Client mode, Web-based configuration, e-mail notification. Windows and Linux driver provided.
10/100 Mbps embedded serial device servers
1-port RS-232 serial device servers
1-port RS-422/485 serial device servers
1-port RS-232/422/485 serial device servers
2-port RS-232 serial device servers
4-port RS-232 serial device server
4-port RS-232/422/485 serial device server
8-port RS-232/422/485 serial device servers
8 and 16-port RS-232/422/485 serial device servers
8 and 16-port RS-232/422/485 serial device servers
The Digital I/O provides a interface for connecting digital signals to Ethernet. Remotely monitor and control digital signals using SANscript.
The EtherPAD Duo is a versatile device that can be used in stand-alone, DIN rail or 19" rack-mount applications.
The EtherPAD Lite is a entry-level connectivity device. It requires an external power supply and has a 10/100 Base-T Ethernet interface and a RS232/RS422/RS485.
The PocketPAD 1 is a low-cost, light-weight device server connecting an asynchronous serial device to Ethernet networks.
The PocketPAD 2 is a low-cost, light-weight device server connecting two asynchronous serial devices to Ethernet networks.
The PocketPAD 4 is a low-cost, light-weight device server connecting four asynchronous serial devices to Ethernet networks.
The PocketPAD FX is a low cost single port serial to Fiber Ethernet converter.
PocketPAD Java is a serial device server supporting an embedded Java Virtual Machine (JVM).
The PocketPAD Multidrop Ethernet is an innovative low cost serial to Ethernet converter supporting multi-drop Ethernet.
The PocketPAD Power over Ethernet features the ability for the device server to be powered over the Ethernet cable.
The PocketPAD connects remote devices to your local network over serial, PTSN, GSM or GPRS networks.
The Power Agent is a powerful SNMP Adapter for UPS systems that do not currently support Ethernet connectivity but do have a serial communications interface.
IDS-5000 series are innovative device server which offers many powerful features for HW & SW redundant features.
The IOLAN DS/SDS enables connectivity to serial-based COM port, UDP or TCP socket based applications. Perle's TruePort re-director provides fixed TTY or COM ports.
The IOLAN DS/TS device server is the best choice for simple serial to ethernet connectivity applications. Software selectable RS-232/422/485 interface.
IOLAN Device Servers Web or network enable existing equipment with RS-232, RS-422 or RS-485 serial interfaces, quickly and easily.
Delivering high performance in a compact or 1U form factor size, an IOLAN STS offers extensive security, flexibility and next generation IPv6 technology.
Perle UltraPort Express Serial Card is the ideal solution for applications where a fixed count of local serial ports is required.
Reliable, high speed PCI Serial Cards with software selectable RS232/422/485 interfaces for serial connectivity. The perfect solution for mixed device environments.
Serial Device Server
Free programmable Serial Device Server
Serial Device Server + Modbus Gateway
Serial Device Server for WLAN
Installing easily, the Ether232Duo simultaneously connects up to two asynchronous RS232 devices to a 10/100 Base-T Ethernet LAN/WAN.
A three-in-one IP access device which can connect any RS232/422/485 device to IP networks via Ethernet.
Single-slot, backplane compatible with A-B PLC/SLC/ControlLogix platforms. Provides communication between ASCII devices using the TCP/IP protocol and the processor.
Intelligent Serial device server. Connect any serial device, RS232/422/485 to the ethernet.
SEL-2890 Ethernet Transceiver connects to EIA-232 port and Ethernet network. Provides Telnet, serial communications tunneling, automatic email, and html interface.
Ethernet to 1-Port RS-232 Serial Server
Ethernet to 1-Port RS-422, RS-485
Ethernet to Isolated 1-Port RS-232, RS-422, RS-485
Ethernet to 1-Port RS-232, RS-422, RS-485
Ethernet to 16-Port RS-232 Serial Server
Ethernet to 16-Port RS-422, RS-485
Ethernet to 16-Port RS-232, RS-422, RS-485
Ethernet to 2-Port RS-232 Serial Server
Ethernet to 2-Port RS-422, RS-485
Ethernet to 2-Port RS-232, RS-422, RS-485
Ethernet to 4-Port RS-232 Serial Server
Ethernet to 4-Port RS-422, RS-485 Serial Server
Ethernet to 4-Port RS-232, RS-422, RS-485
Ethernet to 8-Port RS-232 Serial Server
Ethernet to 8-Port RS-422, RS-485
Ethernet to 8-Port RS-232, RS-422, RS-485
Modem server software for windows
TCP/Com allows any of the existing serial (RS232) ports on your PC to interface directly to a TCP/IP network.
Two-Channel Self-Healing Ring Fiber Optic Modem. RS-232 or RS-485.
Twelve channel Multi-Drop Self-Healing Ring Fiber Optic Multiplexer. RS-232 or RS-485.
Device server: connects serial devices (RS-232/RS-485) to IP network.
Industrial serial to Ethernet adaptor
RS32/RS422/RS485 to Ethernet TCP/IP (as TCP server, client or UDP peer). 1 port, 4 ports or special. FTP, Telnet, SNMP, DHCP/BOOTP, PING, RIP, SNMP, SLIP.
The Com-Server offers everything required for the direct connection of serial interfaces to the computer network. All protocols are included.
SE5001-S2
SE5002
SE5404-S5is
SE5408-N2
PES1A
PESV1A
VLinx ESP Series
1-port RS-232 (D-Sub) Serial Server
2-port RS-232/422/485 (D-Sub) Serial Server
4-port RS-422/485 photo-isolation Serial Server
8-port RS-232/422/485(RJ45) Serial Server
Compact Ethernet to RS-232 Serial Server powered by 803af compliant PoE. Ideal for retail, POS, Chip and PIN and security applications.
Compact Ethernet to RS-232 Serial Server powered by 803af compliant PoE. Supplies user-selectable 5-12V power to serial port, completely eliminates power supplies.
One, Two and Four port Ethernet Serial Servers. RS-232, RS-422 and RS-485. 10/100, Panel mountable with optional DIN mount.
Intermate
Korenix
Kyland
Lantech
Lantronix
L-com
MG
Moxa
Ser i al I n ter f ac e
Multenet
Oring
Perle Systems
Phoenix Contact
Precidia
ProSoft
ProxID
SEL
Sealevel
Tactical Software
TAL
TC Communications
Viola Systems
Westermo
W&T
S e r v e rs
Atop
B&B
The complete product listing can be found at http://www.iebmedia.com
42
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
Comtrol
Digi
Ipsil
Korenix
Lantronix
Ser ver s
Moxa
Omega
Oring
Perle Systems
RuggedCom
Sena
SSV
Supercom
Tibbo
Titan
Vision Systems
Volktek
W&T
Webdyn
Axis
Vi d e o S y s t e m s
Moxa
Moxa
Netdot3
Sensoray
Model
Product Description
Vlinx ESR Series
Vlinx Wireless
DeviceMaster 1
DeviceMaster 4 DB9
DeviceMaster 4 DB9/RJ45
DeviceMaster 8 DB9
DeviceMaster 8 DB9/RJ45
DeviceMaster PRO 16
DeviceMaster PRO 8
Port Server TS 8/16
PortServer TS 2/4
PortServer TS 2/4 MEI
AlarmBlock
SensorBlock
JetPort 5201
JetPort 5601
CoBox DR1
CoBox Thinserver
MSS100
MSSVIA
CN2500
CN2600 Series
MiiNePort E2 Series
NPort 5110
NPort 5200A
NPort 5230
NPort 5430
NPort 5450 Series
NPort 5600-8-DT Lite
NPort 6600 Series
NPort Express DE-211
NPort Express DE-311
NPort IA5150/5250 Series
VPM-7704
Omiga i-Server
TDS-5041-I-M12
IOLAN SCS
RuggedServer RS400
HelloDevice Multi-pot
Terminal Servers
IGW/800
IGW/900
IGW/920
DS-11F-S
DS-11-W
Serial Server for Industrial Applications. One, Two and Four port versions. 10/100, RS-232, RS-422 and RS-485 interfaces. Slim-footprint DIN rail mounting.
802.11g Industrial Wireless Serial Server. One, two and four port versions. RS-232, RS-422 and RS-485 support. Slim line DIN rail mounting. Wide range AC/DC power input.
Software selectable RS-232/422/485 Ethernet to serial intelligent/programable device server. Embedded option available. PortVision management software included.
Software selectable RS-232/422/485 Ethernet to serial intelligent/programable device server. PortVision management software included.
Software selectable RS-232/422/485 Ethernet to serial intelligent/programable device server. PortVision management software included.
Software selectable RS-232/422/485 Ethernet to serial intelligent/programable device server. PortVision management software included.
Software selectable RS-232/422/485 Ethernet to serial intelligent/programable device server. PortVision management software included.
16 port RJ45 software selectable RS-232/422/485 Ethernet to serial intelligent/programable device server. Includes PortVision management software.
8 port DB9 software selectable RS-232/422/485 Ethernet to serial intelligent/programable device server. Includes PortVision management software.
Features browser support configuration, SShv2, Radius with SSH for security, and port buffering for added diagnostic capability. Both rack and 48 VDC models available.
Standard multiport serial-to-Ethernet connectivity that are ideal for applications requiring low port count and seamless integration into existing application environments.
Universal, high performance serial-to-Ethernet connectivity with MEI(Multi-electrical interface).
Internet ready monitoring and alarming tool accepts 4-20mA, 0-5V signal or dry contact input signals. Generates digital output when predefined threshold is crossed.
Real-time monitor for 0-5v, 4-20mA or dry contact sensors. Built-in web server, RFC1122 compliant, full featured TCP/IP stack, supports Modbus.
Jetport 5201 is a smart one RS-232 to Ethernet device server. The serial speed can be as high as 460.8kbps.
Smart 1-port RS232/422/485 to redundant Ethernet serial device server, the first serial server with redundant dual Ethernet ports, Auto-Recovery in less than 200ms.
1 port device server with DIN rail mounting, RJ45 or screw block serial port for RS232/485, 10BaseT, 9-30VDC.
The Lantronix CoBox dual port thin-server will network enable any serial device via Ethernet.
The unit features a DB25 serial interface with full modem controls and a 10/100 RJ45 network interface. 4Mb Ram & 1 MB flash memory.
1 port Device Server, 1 DB25 RS-232 / RS-485 serial, 1 DB9 console port, 10/100 RJ45, Type I/II PC card interface. Supports 802.11 wireless PC Cards.
8 and 16-port RS-232 terminal servers
RS-232/422/485 terminal servers w. LAN redundancy
10/100 Mbps embedded serial device servers
1-port RS-232 serial device servers
2-port RS-232/422/485 serial device servers
2-port RS-422/485 serial device servers
4-port RS-422/485 serial device servers
4-port RS-232/422/485 serial device server
8-port RS-232/422/485 serial device servers
RS-232/422/485 rackmount terminal servers
DS-12
DS-42
DS-42-IP
DS-42-IW
DS-42-P
DS-42-W
DS100
DS202
Vscom
NetCom
IRF-601
IRF-611
IRF-633
IRF-634
IRF-655
IRF-656
Com-Server industry
Com-Sever plug-in
Micro Server
1-port RS232/422/485 Redundant Serial Device Server - Redundant Dual Ethernet Ports: Recovery time < 10ms-Switch Mode Supported.
Industrial 4-port RS232/422/485 to 2-port LAN Device Server- Redundant Dual Ethernet Ports: Recovery time < 10ms- Secured Management by HTTPS and SSH- Versatile Modes.
Industrial 4-port isolated RS422/485 to 2-port LAN with one port P.O.E. Serial Device Server, Redundant Dual Ethernet Ports: Recovery time < 10ms.
Industrial 4-port isolated RS422/485 to 802.11b/g and 2-port LAN Serial Device Server, Redundant Dual Ethernet Ports: Recovery time < 10ms- Highly Security Capability.
Industrial 4-port RS232/422/485 to 2-port LAN with 1 port P.O.E. Serial Device Server- Redundant Dual Ethernet Ports: Recovery time < 10ms.
Industrial 4-port RS232/422/485 to 802.11b/g and 2-port LAN Serial Device Server- Redundant Dual Ethernet Ports: Recovery time < 10ms- Highly Security Capability.
The DS100 is a first-generation Tibbo Serial Device Server that externally connects any existing serial device to an Ethernet (TCP/IP) network.
The DS203 offers full backward compatibility with the DS100. Notable enhancements include 100BaseT Ethernet port, large routing buffers, additional programming modes.
VScom Serial to Ethernet Server is an industrial-strength network-based serial device server for connecting RS232/422/485 devices directly to the 10/100Mbps Ethernet network.
Industrial-strength serial device server with 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 RS232/422/485 ports for DIN-Rail and 19" rackmount mounting.
RS-232 to 100Base-FX offers seamless integration of fiber to your factory floor. Being SNMP enabled, offers management and monitoring of the device over the ethernet remotely.
RS-422/485 to 100Base-FX offers seamless integration of fiber to your factory floor. Being SNMP enabled, offers management and monitoring of the device over the ethernet.
RS-232/422/485 to 10/100Base-TX offers 3-in-1 serial port to offer any kind of serial connection to your industrial ethernet. SNMP enabled, auto MDI/MDI-X support.
RS-232/422/485 to 10/100Base-FX offers 3-in-1 serial port to offer any kind of serial connection to your ethernet via fiber port.
IRF-655 Device Server offers 4-ports RS-232 and one 100Base-FX port. Now you can connect four serial devices to ethernet with single device server.
IRF-656 Device Server offers 4-ports RS-422/485 and one 100Base-FX port. Now you can connect four serial devices to ethernet with single device server.
Com-Server with its very compact rail-mount housing offers everything needed for directly connecting all kinds of serial interfaces to the 10/100 BaseT Ethernet.
Offers everything needed for the integration of 10/100 BaseT Ethernet capability in your serial device
Webdyn Intelligent Internet Gateways offer completely modular hardware and software solution designed to link remote devices to Internet
Axis 2120
Axis 2130
Axis 2401
MxNVR-IA8 Series
VPort 15-M12
VPort 25
VPort 251
VPort 254
VPort 351
VPort 351-T
VPort 354
VPort 364 Series
VPort 451
VPort 461
VPort D351
VPort D361
Videobackpack
Model 2416
Model 2444
Model 2446
Network camera with built-in web server and network connection. Ethernet 10/100. Up to 15 FPS. With manual vari-focal (zoom) iris lens for wide range of light conditions.
Integrated, all-in-one, P/T/Z video solution for monitoring of large areas over standard networks. Auto Focus for rapid focus and quick access to quality images,
Videoserver, communicates over Internet/Intranet, four channels PAL or NTSC, up to 30 FPS. Modem support, PHP3 and Linux.
8-channel industrial network video recorders
1.3-megapixel, compact fixed dome IP cameras
Fixed dome IP camera for outdoors
1-channel MJPEG/MPEG4 video encoder
4-channel MJPEG/MPEG4 industrial video encoders
1-channel MJPEG/MPEG4 industrial video encoder
1-channel MJPEG/MPEG4 industrial video encoder. -40 to 75 deg. C.
4-channel MJPEG/MPEG4 industrial video encoders
Excellent video quality
Full motion, 1-channel MJPEG/MPEG4 video encoder
1-channel H.264 Industrial Video Encoder
1-channel MJPEG/MPEG4 industrial video decoder
1-channel H.264/MJPEG industrial video decoder
The Videobackpak is a wireless remote video and audio diagnostic system. Allowing the centralised expert to see, hear and talk to a remote operator.
Ethernet Video Server with MPEG A/V
HD-SDI switcher - 4x4 3G-SDI Matrix
Streaming Video Server/HD image capture
Product directory
Company
1-port RS-232/422/485 serial device server
1 and 2-port serial device servers
4-port RS-232/422/485 Serial Device Server Module
Serial to Ethernet device server with embedded web pages. Connect almost any serial device to an Ethernet network and the Internet. DHCP and DNS compatible.
EN50155 Industrial device server
Delivering the highest level of reliability and performance in a 1U form factor, an IOLAN SCS offers robust security, flexibility and next generation IP (IPv6) technology.
Industrially hardened 4-Port serial device server with integrated 4-Port managed Ethernet switch. RS484/RS422/RS232 serial ports, -40C to +85C, high immunity to EMI.
Ethernet-to-Serial Communication Device (HelloDevice PS200/400, SS400/800).
Secure terminal server for remote management of netwrk & Telco equipments.
Industrial RS232/485 Linux device server for 10/100Mbps Ethernet. Embedded Linux OS preinstalled.
A compact sized industrial RS232/422/485/CAN device server for 10/100Mbps Ethernet and DIN-rail mounting. Embedded Linux OS preinstalled.
Compact DIN-rail datalogger with 10/100Mbps LAN, RS-232/422/485 serial interfaces and integrated USB-host controller. Free embedded Linux preinstalled.
Industrial 1-port RS232/422/485 to 1-port Single-Mode 100BaseFX Device Server, Redundant multiple host devices.
Industrial 1-port RS232/422/485 to 802.11b/g and 1-port LAN Seria Device Server, High Speed Air Connectivity: WLAN interface support up to 54Mbps link speed.
The complete product listing can be found at http://www.iebmediacom
05.2013
i n d u str i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
43
Global sources
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OnTime
Pepperl & Fuchs
Phoenix Contact
Rockwell
Schneider
Siemens
Smar
Transition Network
Wago
Westcon Automacao
Newton C. Fernandez
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Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Mr. Lehnert
Claudio Borges
Henrique Presch
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Paolo Capecchi
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+1 519 758 2700
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Gerhard Durauer
Sales Department
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Andreas Hinterschweiger
+43 7748 6586 0
+43 (0) 55 526 8813 0
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Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Ton van Oostende
Guy Volckaerts
Serge Bassem
Sales Manager
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Rene Michiels
Yannick Guenard
Sales Manager
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Sales Manager
Luc Raddoux
Stefan Hafner
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Sales Manager
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Sales Manager
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Sales Manager
+55 (11) 55925355
+55 11 3711 2651
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Australia
Advantech
Australian Utilities
BEC Engineering
Beckhoff
Belden
Control Logic
CrispTech
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DiMoto
Elpro
Ethernet Direct
Festo
Fieldbus Specialists
GarrettCom
Giraffe Production
Global Automation
Industrial Automation
Lumberg
Madison Technologies
Moore Industries
MPA Engineering
Opengear
Pepperl & Fuchs
Pepperstorm
Phoenix Contact
PowerCorp
Process and Factory Automation
RF Innovations
Rockwell
RuggedCom
Schneider
Sentor Monitoring
Siemens
TechEng
Ti2
Wago
Weidmüller
Deepak Kanogia
Tomkyns Kevin
Phil Owen
Sales Manager
Sales
Brad Whybird
Scott Hayes
Armin Fahnle
Graham Moss
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
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Brian Killin
Vince Levenda
Sales Manager
Henk De Graaf
Graham Trill
Manny Romero
Andrew Taylor
Ms. Ann Doughty
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Karl Haller
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
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Michael D'Souza
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Fuat Acar
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Sales Manager
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http://www.industrial-automation.com.au/
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Austria
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Sigmatek
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Westermo
Sales Manager
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Dietmar Buxbaum
Heinz Wolf
Sales Manager
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Sales Manager
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Sales Manager
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Belgium
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China
Advantech
Allen-Bradley
Asco Numatics
B&R
Beckhoff
Beijing Hecheng
Beijing Sixnet
Beijing Xiongyue
Contemporary Controls
Digi International
Echelon
Ethernet Direct
GarrettCom
Harting
Hi-optel
Hirschmann
HMS
Korenix
Kyland Technology
Lumberg
Maxdragon
MESTECH Electronic
Molex
Moxa
Nanjing Phoenix
N-Tron
RuggedCom
Sanko
Schneider
Shanghai Citic
Shanghai Huayuan
Siemens
Sixnet
Smar
SMT Electronic
Transcend
Transition Network
VimCross
Wago
Weidmüller
Witjoint
Yamaichi
A Plus
Acksys
Adeunis RF
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Weslin Fan
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Cindy Zhu
Michael Li
Sales Manager
Jason Peng
Jonathan Huang
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Yong Wang
Sales Manager
Bill Wu
Sales Manager
Jerry Zhao
Sales Manager
Kevin Gu
James Zhao
Candy Hong
Susie Wang
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Richard Chen
Hu Jun
David Hu
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Zhang Jinsong
Michael Li
Mike Wey
Andrei Chen
Cindy Zhu
Michael Chen
Ben Lin
Product Manager
Sales Manager
John Liu
Sales Manager
Sales Managers
Eric Cariou
+86 10 62984346
+86 10 6518 2535
+86 21 33950025
+86 (0)21 54644800
+86 21 66 31 26 66
+86 1062170088
+86 10 62316290
+86 10 5166 2266
+86 512 6809 5866
+86 10 6561 8310 Ext. 32
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+86 25 83111182
+86 21 6390 6935
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in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
Contact
Tel
eMail
France
Advantech
Amphenol Socapex
Antycip
Asco Joucomatic
Atemation
Ateva
ATIM
AURECOM
B&R
Beckhoff
Centralp
CITEL2CP
Cybersys
Digi International
Echelon
Enciris
Ethernet Direct
Festo France
Harting
Hirschmann
HMS
Inova Computers
Intelligent Instr.
Interface Concept
Itility
ITT Industries
Jay Electronique
Lantronix
Lextronic
Matsushita
Microsens
Moxa
MTS
Pantek Automation
Phoenix Contact
ProSoft
QL3D
RESoluCOM
Rockwell
Schneider
Siemens
Smar
Sphinx Connect
Sterkelec
Telegärtner
Transition Network
Volktek
Wago
Wavecom
Webdyn
Weidmüller
Westermo
Woodhead
Yamaichi
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Daniel Ait Akkouche
Yannick Guenard
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Francis RAIMBERT
Daniel Halbert
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Jean-Luc Logel
Frédéric Lemaire
Sales Manager
Doriane Faltot
Sales Manager
Cornelia Weissfloch
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Eric Begat
Marc Richard
Ton-Tona Khul
Sales Director
Brigitte Jousselin
Patrice Mousset
Rene Giammettei
Mr. Braun
Jerome Dellboulle
Geraud Danzel d´Aumont
Charles Gruffy
Fernando Prates
Michel Lefebvre
Sales Manager
Alain Chevalin
Ludovic Deboves
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Joseph Briant
Patrick Brassier
Antoine Miroux
Hervé Mathe
Sales Manager
Alain Lellouche
Dirk Steinkampf
Christian Amat
Bernard Piqueras
Hervé Bibollet
Sales Manager
Olivier Bughin
Sales Manager
Hugues Reymond
+33 4 7670 4700
+33 450892800
+33 1 3961 1414
+33 1 47 14 31 17
+33 1 34 65 72 00
+33 4 8615 4484
+33 (0)4 7695 5065
+33 2 97227972
+33 (0)4 72 79 38 50
+33 (0) 1 69 298370
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+33 4 76 623496
+33 (0) 155619898
+33 1 30 48 9700
+33 581 180 112
+33 149352323
+33 1 49383400
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+33 (1) 48 60 77 87
+33 01 39 54 80 99
+33 2 98 57 30 30
+33 0870 446 100
+33 1 60 24 51 40
+33 4 76 41 44 00
+33 139 30 41 74
+33 145 768388
+33 1 60135715
+33 130 80 21 73
+33 (0) 130 85 41 83
+33 1 58439028
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+33 534368720
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+33 1 30 67 72 00
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+49 (611) 974 84 60
+33 1 46520103
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+33 1 34245500
+33 169102100
+33 2 32960420
+33 (0)4.90.69.76.47
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Germany
ABB
Advantech
AMA-Systems
ARS Software
Astradis Elektronik
Axis Communications
B&R
Beck IPC
Beckhoff
Beijer Electronics
Belle electronic
Bihl + Wiedemann
B-S-K Industrievertretungen
Comsoft
connectBlue
Contemporary Controls
Dehn + Söhne
Deutschmann
Digi International
DMS
Dr. Neuhaus
Echelon
ED-V
EFB-Elektronik
egnite Software
eks
Elau
ESD
ESR Pollmeier
Ethernet Direct
Festo
FMN Communications
Fraba Posital
G.i.P.Engineering
GeNUA
GREATech
Harting
Helukabel
H-I Elektronik Vertrieb
Guntram Scheible
Customer Care Center
Sales Dept
Sales Team
Volker Lepa
Magnus Ekerot
Sales Manager
Product Manager
Sales Manager
Werner Belle
Fabricio Granados
Siegfried Renner
Joachim Kurpat
Leo Nieminen
Christian Blenz
Thomas J. Weiss
Michael Reiter
Beate Wrobel
Reiner Christophersen
Sales Manager
Wolfgang Zang
Sales Manager
Harald Kipp
Thorsten Ebach
Klaus Weyer
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Yvonne Grabowski
Reiner Baetjer
Wilfried Gentner
Peter Grundig
Sales Manager
Sales
Stephan Schmücker
05.2013
+49 6221 7011105
+49 0800 24 26 80 80
+49 7231786113
+49 89 8934130
+49 898 95050
+49 811 555080
+49 (0)6172 4019 0
+49 6404 6950
+49 (0) 5246 963 0
+49 711 327 599 0
+49 7062 674623
+49 621 33996 0
+49 (0)37609 58355
+49 (0)721 9497 290
+49 8441 786 4160
+49 341 5203590
+49 9181 9060
+49 6434 94 33 0
+49 (0)231 9747 0
+49 0 4623 1411
+49 (40) 55 304 0
+49 89 456 971 0
+49 6021 7971 42
+49 (0)521 40418 0
+49 232 3925375
+49 2762 9313 88
49 9391606111
+49 511 37 29 80
+49 6167 9306 0
+49 89613866 44
+49 (0) 711 34 70
+49 36 31 565000
+49 221 96213 0
+49 7152 357061
+49 (89) 991950 0
+49 21516525737
+49 571 8896 0
+49 (0)7150 92090
+49 203 761404
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[email protected]
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i n d u str i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
Company
Contact
Tel
eMail
Hilscher
Hima
Hirschmann
Hitex
HMS
ifak system
Innominate
Inova Computers
Insys
Intelligent Instr.
Ixxat
Janz Computer
Jetter
Kassl
Kerpen
Kontron
KUKA Controls
Lancom Systems
Lantech
Lantronix
LEAD
Lenze
Leoni
lesswire
Leuze
Lucom
Lütze
LyconSys
Meilhaus
MESCO Engineering
Mettler Toledo
Microsens
MKC
Molex
Moxa
MTS
Murrelektronik
NemaSystems
Netsilicon
Nexans
Numatics
Obermeier Software
Opto 22
Oring
Parker Hannifin
Paul Vahle
Phoenix Contact
Pilz
Port
Primation
Round Solutions
RuggedCom
S.Rothenbacher
Schildknecht
Schneider
Sick
Siemens
Smar
Softing
Software Manufaktur
Somebytes
Souriau
Sphinx Computer
SSV
Steinhoff
Stollmann
Systeme Helmholz
tci
Telegärtner
Transition Network
Trebing & Himstedt
TRL-Funksysteme
Turck
U. I. Lapp
U.T.E. Electronic
Vipa
Vipco
Vision Systems
Wago
Weidmüller
Welotec
Westermo
Wiesemann & Theis
Yamaichi
ZMD
Uwe Zeier
Dirk Eisenmann
Jürgen Bürkle
Thomas Ruf
Sales
Thorston Szczepanski
Christina Müller
Andrew Brown
+49 6190 9907 0
+49 6202 709 400
+49 (0)7127 14 1809
+49 721 9628 240
+49 721 989777-000
+49 39154456310
+49 30 921028 0
+49 8341 916 265
+49 941 560061
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+49 5250 15500
+49 71 412550440
+49 4743 911021
+49 2402 171
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+49(0)751 561220
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+49 9372 9451 121
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+49 4491 291 170
+49 335 5656 90
+49 7021 573 0
+49 9127 5946010
+49 7151 6053 0
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Sales Manager
Frank Pastors
Ulrich Luetke Entrup
Andreas Kraut
Sales
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Christian Schallenberg
Sales Manager
Timothy Rees
Alexander Schön
Christian Berghoff
Gerhard Galsterer
Sales Manager
Sven Kreiensen
Nikolaos Ernstberger
Peter Bernhardt
Ulrich Schutzeneder
Joern Randt
Lutz Kleberhoff
Sales Manager
Martin Jones
Sales Manager
Siegfried Gronbach
Andreas Maeser
Fjodor Lamm
Guenter Puetz
Klaus Obermeier
Sales Manager
Werner Kunze
Henry Claussnitzer
Sales
Oliver Puls
Hartmut Tietz
Benedikt Steinberger
Stefan Hafner
Dieter Lorenz
Vertribszentrale Deutschland
Sales Manager
Anton Hesbacher
Hubert Brunner
Edelhard Becker
Sven Ilius
Hartmut Rhoese
Sascha Klink
Product Manager
Jutta Steinhoff
Karsten Eichmüller
Dirk Steinkampf
Steffen Himstedt
Martin Nordlander
Sales
Sales Manager
Volker Pompetzki
Sales Manager
Product Manager
Sales Manager
Daniel Maurice
Anders Felling
Thomas Clever
Sales Manager
+49 8989 016643
+49 (0) 7621 89031 0
+49 (0) 641 507 0
+49 2381 9452 0
+49 202 273 170
+49 7252 9496 0
+49 37003990
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+49 7134 961 8814
+49 231 9747153
+49 (0)2166 27 2701
+49 22 4131600
+49 5246 70398 1
+49 62 511 0670
+49 211 938898
+49 781 5090
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+49 5235 300982
+49 711 3409 0
+49 345777550
+49 (0)89 46260 0
+49610327044
+49 (0)174 213 98 33
+49497348 20 12 08
+49 7042 841060
+49 6182812368
+49 7641469 0
+49 911 8953150
+49 671794680
+49 89 456 56 340
+49 7073500616
+49 08150816
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+49 (0) 7157 125 100
+49 611 974 8460
+49 385 39572 33
+49 6106 666 444
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India
Advantech
Allen-Bradley
Aricent
B&R
Beckhoff
Beijer
Conserve Tech
Dearborn Electronics
Ethernet Direct
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Vikas Ghandi
D A Satish
Sales Manager
+91 44 4230 3878
+91 575 771 112 14
+91 44 44225547
+91 (0)20 66011522
+ 91 20 4000 4800
+91 20 4011 1417
+ 91 (20) 46779307
+91 80 2634 0404
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45
Global sources
Company
Contact
Tel
eMail
France
Festo
N-Tron
Phoenix Contact
Protocol Solution
Pyrotech
Ramco Systems
RuggedCom
San Telequip
Saraswat
Schneider
Shresta
Siemens
Soliton
SPA Computers
Theta Controls
UL Group
Wago
Sales Manager
Leo Mascarenhas
Sanjay Arora
Baskaramoorthy D
Ankit Talesara
C. J. Jayaharan
CM Balaji
Hitendra Uppal
Sales Manager
Mehta Arvind
K.N. Tejasvi
Raja Mahbubani
Sangita Ingulkar
Ajay Pareek
+91 (0) 80 842 33 59
+91 9324268884
+91 11 41295700
+91 080 2528 7154
+9191 294 249 2123 25
+91 44 2354510
+91 99403 22881
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+91 22 26856805
+91 116257658
+91 (079) 27546497
+91 80 4120 8600
+91 80 2526 5348
+91 20 24222554 6 7
+91 20 2696 0040
+91 11 84 58 04 09
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Italy
Advantech
Alhof
ATTI
B&R
Beckhoff
Echelon
ECS
EFA
Ekau
Ethernet Direct
Fasternet
Fenway
Festo
Harting
HCE Engineering
Hirschmann
HMS
iCon
Intelligent Instr.
Inware
Luceat
MarCom
Matsushita
MG
MTS
Network Project
Numatics
Phoenix Contact
Piero Bersanini
Rockwell
S.P.E.
Schneider
Siemens
Softing
SSD Drives
Valtellina
Wago
Weidmüller
Yamaichi
Sales Manager
Marco Sirotti
Giuseppe Venceslai
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Andrea Longi
Gianfranco Abela
Andrea Barbolini
Sales Manager
Mauro Bontempi
Fabio Portaluppi
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
A. Genovese
Carlo Gementi
Paolo Sartori
Franz Ploner
Sales Manager
Antonio Cirella
Rita Varinacci
Luca Marani
Michele Frare
Marco Guzzetti
Ivano Celant
Davide Cristoni
Giuseppe Carotenuto
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Antonio Augelli
Alessandro Leonardis
Marketing
Daniele Nembrini
Alberto Poli
Sales Manager
Nicola Della Malva
+39 02 9544961
+39 22850081
+39 75395513
+39 02 93 20 58 1
+39 03 62 365164
+39 2 58215 235
+39 0437 33 101
+39 28 9517597
+39 (0) 51 78 18 70
+603 9282 5299
+39 302500954
+39 0297310120
+39 (0) 2 45 78 81
+39 02250801
+39 0586 219399
+39 039 5965250
+39 039 59662 27
+39 472 200970
+39 015 980096
+39 2 66504794
+39 030 9771 125
+39 45 8204747
+39 045 6752743
+39 0331 376568
+39 0309883819
+39 30 3731999
+39 2 660591
+39 02 26 85 31
+39 293 9721
+39 030 2427266
+39 396558442
+39 2 66762894
+39 02 45 05 171
+39 0362 557308
+39 035 42 05 111
+39 051 625 91 25
+39 02 660681
+39 039 688 1185
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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Japan
Advantech
Asahi Electronics
Echelon
Ethernet Direct
Festo
Gailogic
GarrettCom
Harting
Hirschmann
HMS
InterSolution
Lantronix
Lumberg
Matsushita
Netsilicon
Nihon Weidmüller
NPS
Phoenix Contact
Schneider
Shoshin
Siemens
Telegärtner
Transition Network
Wago
Woodhead
Yamaichi
YSOL Solutions
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Hideo Matsumoto
Sales Manager
Kenji Nogata
Keiichi Wakame
Tadashi Yoshimura
Minoru Yamazaki
Akihiko Yamamoto
Masahiko Kitamura
Makoto Umemura
Sales Manager
Ishikawa Toshiyuki
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Mitsunobu Suzuki
Sales Manager
Shin Iwamoto
Takao Uchiyama
Akira Takeuchi
Inside Sales Customer Service
Sales Manager
Yuji Sakuma
+81 3 5212 5789
+81 93 511 6471
+81 3 3440 7781
+81 (0) 45 593 56 10
+81 422 26 8211
+81 3 5817 3655
+81 454763456
+81 3 5404 3431
+81 45 478 5349
+81 3 5795 2685
+81 3 37807025
+81 45 664 3711
+81 6 908 1050
+81 3 5428 0261
+81 42 330 7891
+81 3 3464 8110
+81 45 4710030
+81 254744474
+81 (3) 3270 5926
+81 3 5423 6864
+81 357907621
+41 3 5403 6470
+81 3 3254 8881
+81 52 221 5950
+81 3 3778 6155
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
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[email protected]
Netherlands
Actemium Starren
Advantech
Asco Numatics
B&R
Belden
BESD
Cematic-Electric
CER International
46
H. van Wijk
Sales Manager
Albert Roggen
Sales Manager
Sales
Wim Berkers
Sales Manager
Collinda Luijkx
+31 413 349999
+31 (0) 165 55 05 05
+31 3327 77911
+31 (0)76 5715303
+31 77 3878455
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Ton van Oostende
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Sales Manager
+31 78 676 2999
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Sales Manager
Sales Manager
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Ben Schulte
Martin Moerman
Sales Manager
Harry Bakker
Sales Manager
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Rob Lems
R. Bus
Joop van der Sluis
Albert Righolt
Jos Beck
Sales Manager
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Stefan Hafner
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Herm Brunott
Jeroen Bloemendal
Peter Klestadt
Nick Snijder
Vincent Wagenaar
R. G. Stubbe
Sales Manager
Rene Van der Meer
Carlo Dykman
Product Manager
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Jonathan Arriola
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Poland
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Michal Wojtulewicz
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Sales Manager
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Piotr Mendera
Tomasz Niewolik
Sebastian Tryk
Peter Vukmirica
Sales Manager
Anna Kotaba-Kruk
Cezary Jedra
Sales Manager
Markus Poplawski
Boguslaw Wandzel
Sales Manager
+48 12 428 6300
+48 (77) 455 60 76
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+48 22 757 26 10
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Russia
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Teldor
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Timur Bogdanenko
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Alexey Molchanov
Oleg Izmailov
George Yurieff
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Dmitry Sakharov
Mario Ratancic
Product Manager
+7 095 105 5227
+7 495 6579501
+7 495 981 64 54
+7(812)331 09 64
+7 0 95 737 34 85
+7 8123276477
+7 911 1992948
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+7 0 95 956 04 64
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[email protected]
+966 38332339
+966 14779111
+966 3 8337110
+966 14981515
+966 26614444
+966 2 665 7323
+966 2 263 2959 ext, 313
+65 6442 1000
+65 6242 5108
+65 9827 5481
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Saudi Arabia
A.A. Turki
Abunayyan Electric
Naizak Global
Schneider
Siemens
Xceltra
Yusuf Ahmed Kanoo
Advantech
Avanca Technologies
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Beckhoff
DAC Systems
GarrettCom
Harting
Hirschmann
iWOW
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Link Vue Systems
Linkwise
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Sales Manager
Rami Abuzaid
Sales Manager
Abdulhafiz Vhora
Abbas Dehnuwala
Sales Manager
Zou Fen
Sales Manager
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S.K. Wong
Victor Tang
Sales Manager
Chua Teck Guan
Esther Lai
Sales
Vidyut Gandhi
Bernard Loh
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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05.2013
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Company
Lumberg
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Rockwell
Schneider
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Vector InfoTech
Wago
Weidmüller
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Yamaichi
Sales Manager
Michael Tan
William Ong
Sales Manager
Kocki Wong
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
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Vidyut Gandhi
Tiago Costa
Bryan Sim
Sales Manager
Wilson Tan
Sales Manager
Hock Lai Chan
Sales Manager
Earnest Phua
Justin Ng
+65 6776 8755
+65 2555473
+65 6562 9132
+65 6268 6868
+65 2129 839
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+65 356 9077
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+65 273 3679
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Sweden
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South Africa
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Throughput Techn.
Wago
Rudi Tuffek
Sales Manager
Mark Marusich
Sales Manager
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David Bean
Burg van der Westhuizen
Sales Manager
Kevin Barnfather
Mark Dilchert
Technical Support
Philip Allan
Sales Manager
John Mentz
Stefan Hafner
Claudio Agostinetto
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Hertzog Makete
Bob Petrie
Coenraad Kleinhans
+27 116588100
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[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
Sales Manager
T. Kikuchi
Sales Manager
Young Lee
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Seon Min Won
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Yujin Kim
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Andy Kim
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Kumar Nandi
Seoksoon Song
Thomas Sung
Sales Manager
Anderson Shin
Seok Yeul Yun
+82 2 3663 0405
+82 2 557 0522
+82 (0)31 4764766
+82 42 863 9400 1
+82 2 551 2783
+82 (0) 2 864 07 77
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[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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Spain
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Digi International
Elion
EncoSolution
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Omron
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QBM
Rockwell
RuggedCom
Schneider
S-Connect
Siemens
uSysCom
Wago
Weidmüller
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Emili Vendrell
Ronn Andreasen
Sales Manager
Guillermo Garcia Perez
German Fernandez
Sales Manager
Carlos Ruiz
Sales Manager
Javier Serrano
Jose Baena
Sales Manager
Edelmir Lleixa
Sales Manager
Germán Fernández
JJ Sanmartin Puy
Clément GUTIERRES
Ignacio Alvarez Vargas
Alfonso Amigo
Sales Manager
05.2013
+34 935 689 965
+34 93 5 84 49 97
+34 941 27 00 60
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Tel
Lars Lijegren
Tor Skjoldli
Per Bjorkdahl
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Anders Holm
Kristoffer Sygel
Rolf Nilsson
Lars Niska
Sales Manager
Roland Karlsson
Tor Ivar Skjoldli
Sales Manager
Patrik Thorstensson
Niclas Johansson
Roger Sundman
Henrik Ebeklint
Lars Djuvfeldt
Bo Stafsten
Malthe Winje
Erik Wilandh
Rickard Forsman
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Marten Lundell
Lars Jonsson
Martin Ohlsson
Patrick Thornqvist
Mattias Wide
Simon Nilsson
Sales Manager
Anders Felling
+46 21 325000
+46 8544 75104
+46 462722010
+46 (0)40 315980
+46 (0) 40 6 80 81 60
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+46 31 86 97 00
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+46 (0) 60 12 0489
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+46 54 52 10 00
+46 183 428-20
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+46 859476688
+46 155 77700
+46 8 608 6400
+46 771 219 219
+46 86238400
+46 8 7281272
+46 31 636200
+46 701 49 7607
+46 8 4101 2000
+46 7066 884 66
+46 771 43 00 44
+46 21 548 08 00
Jouko Korinen
Guy Yribarren
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Bruno Kern
Daniel Koch
Hans Ruegsegger
Nicolas Bovigny
Davide Cassucio
Sales Manager
Marketing Manager
Hans Lehner
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Markus Inhelder
Alexander Fischer
Dionys Giger
Stephen Wreford-Dorée
Johannes Mueller
Urs Meier
Peter Bernhardt
Jeff R Holcomb
Samuel Hess
Rico Colombo
Peter Vukmirica
Sales Manager
Rolf Zollinger
Sales Manager
Elger Gledhill
Sales Manager
Daniel Jehle
Angelo Casto
Daniel Herren
P. Weber
Sales Manager
Bruno Müller
Thomas Müller
+41 131 96222
+41 22 706 1830
+41 (0)52 72800 55
+41 (0) 52 633 40 40
+41 438449400
+41 41 766 1900
+41 344914040
+41 266760121
+41 44 821 78 18
+41 (0) 1 744 55 44
+41 21 6938671
+41 44 833 37 13
+41 1 9082060
+41 44 905 82 82
+41 44 421 44 66
+41 55 253 44 88
+41 (0) 44 887 69 89
+41 43 810 5007
+41 41 349 6161
+41 417997063
+41 (0)616412890
+41 1944 3034
+41 319852510
+41 44 908 36 66
+41 41 740 6636
+41 52 354 55 55
+41 44 933 84 76
+41 62 889 77 77
+41 7481777
+41 319173333
+41 1 585 584 823
+41 562009040
+41 26 676 75 00
+41 55 2412150
+41 52 6740707
+41 71 642 77 66
+41 (0) 52 267 75 25
Jessica Chu
Chris Sun
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Vicky Chou
+886 22912 1234
+886-3-5780275 x309
+886 227052678
+886 2 218 4567
+886 2 290 85626
+886 2 2656 2228
+886 2 8221 5088
+886 35508137
+886 2 2917 4550
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Switzerland
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[email protected]
South Korea
Advantech
Asia Yamaichi
B&R
BNF ENG
Echelon
Ethernet Direct
Festo
GarrettCom
Haisung Electric
Harting
Initium
Jeongil Intercom
Lantech
Lumberg
Phoenix Contact
Rockwell
Schneider
Sena Technologies
Siemens
Thomas Trading
Weidmüller
Witree
Zenithtek
ABB
ARX Innovation
Axis Communications
B&R
Beckhoff
Beijer Electronics
CACTUS Automation
Compwell
Connect Blue
DataSoft Systems
Electrona-Sievert
Festo
Flowmatic
Harting
Hirschmann
HMS
Imsys Technologies
IntelliCom
Intertechna
JOR
Malthe Winje
Matsushita
Miltronic
Phoenix Contact
Rockwell
Schneider
Siemens
Solar
Transition Network
Tritech Technology
Wago
Weidmüller
Westermo
Contact
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
i n d u str i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
ABB
Actis Computer
B&R
Beckhoff
EHAG
Emazy
Emmesys Ruegsegger
Engiby
EXSYS
Festo
FiveCo
Gateweb
Harting
Hirschmann
Inhelder
Innovis
Inova Computers
integrated.ch
Komserv
Matsushita
MESCO Engineering
Mettler Toledo
NetModule
Novitas Elektronik
N-Tron
Phoenix Contact
RDM
Rockwell
Satomec
Schneider
Siemens
Syslogic
Wago
Weber
Weidmüller
Westermo
Zurich University
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Taiwan
Aaeon Technology
Aboundi
Advanced Automation
Advantech
Amphenol LTW
ARinfotek
Asia Automation
Atop Technologies
Axiomtek
Ethernet Direct
EtherWAN
Festo
Harting
Hitech Electronics
Hung-Yu Automation
ICP DAS
John Yu
Kontron
Korenix
Landing Electric
Lantech
LCSI
Kevin Hsu
Lucy Lu
Candice Hsieh
Sales Manager
Maggie Chao
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Michael Wei
Mike Chao
Sylvia Lin
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
James Fuh
+886 (0) 22 601 92 81
+886 2 2346 3177
+886 2 2218 3600
+886 73833778
+886 2 8919 2220
+886 223314295
+886 2 2781 5791
+886 2 8911 1000
+886 2 2586 7304 6
+886 2 2799 5589
+886 2 2655 0169
Jess [email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
47
Global sources
Company
Contact
Tel
eMail
Company
Masstop
Moxa
Netstar Technology
Oring
Rockwell
Schneider
Starnet Technology
Sunix
Supercom
Telegärtner
Tibbo
Titan Electronics
TOPS CCC
Volktek
Wago
Westermo
Yamaichi
Ivy Young
Sales Manager
Sales
Sales
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
John Chang
Amjad Zafar
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
M. Ben Wong
+886 2 8692 6968
+886 2 89191230
+886 2 26592388
+886 2 2918 3036
+886 2 2550 5065
+886 27331464
+886 436008988
+886 2 89131987
+886 2 2918 3036
+886 222527620
+886 2 2692 5443
+886 3 4272431
+886 2 2799 9080
+886 2 8242 1000
+886 03 355 7085
+886-289 111 000
+886 2 2546 0507
Sales Manager
Erkan Cirit
Reyhan Asagikozan
Sales Manager
Cem Kamoy
Sales Manager
Kadir Kaya
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Mustafa Kemal Karaatli
Siskon Endüstriyel
Sales Manager
+90 216 428 78 78
+90 216 580 9830
+90 212 210 7646
+90 212 2526800 01
+90 216 420 83 47
+90 216 5891046
+90 (0) 216 411 44 66
+90 212 222 52 00
+90 216 376 10 95
+90 216 550 45 12 13
+90 212 293 3062
+90 216 469 06 00
+90 2163869570
+90 216 4593382
+90 232 2450076
+90 212 2730830
[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
+441273248977
+44 (0)1344 989500
+44 (0) 1276 803100
+44 1767 600777
+44 1695 713 687
+44 (0)115 925 8412
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+44 1491 41 05 39
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+44 (0) 8707 446 807
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Moeller Electric
Molex
Moore Industries
MTL
Multipix Imaging
NEC
Nematron
Netdot3
N-Tron
Omega Engineering
Omniflex
ORing
Panduit
Parker Hannifin
Pepperl & Fuchs
Perle Systems
Phoenix Contact
Prisym
Pro-face
Radio Dfata
RFDataTech
Rockwell
Routeco
RuggedCom
Schneider
S-Connect
SDUK
Siemens
Simon Reeves
Sinetica
Sixnet
Smar
Sundance
Szabo Software
TDK Semiconductor
Tellima Technology
Texim
TR Control
Transition Network
Tyco Electronics
Wago
Wavelength Digital
Weidmüller
Westermo
Wizcon Systems
Xceltra
Yamaichi
YR20
Eric Tsai
Jennifer Kuo
Calvin Ying
Jack Chang
Sales Manager
Frank Yeh
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Turkey
Areskom Iletisim
Beckhoff Otomasyon
DACEL
Elektro
Emikon Otomasyon
Entegre Kontrol
Festo
Klemsan Automation
Pacpro Otomasyon
Petek
Phoenix Contact
Rockwell
Schneider
Siemens
Siskon Endüstriyel
Weidmüller
[email protected]ns.com.tr
[email protected]
[email protected]
UK
Adaptive Modules
Advantech
AMD
AMG Systems
Asco Joucomatic
Audon Electronics
B&R
Baldor
Beckhoff
Biodata
Blackroc Technology
Bulgin Components
Canham Controls
Chrysalis
Cognex
Colter
Comtech
Comtrol
Concurrent Tech.
Contemporary Controls
Control Network Solutions
CTL Components
Datascan Systems
Datwyler
Dexdyne
Digi International
DigitaL SP
Echelon
Elpro
Embedded Results
Endress + Hauser
Entrix Computing
Ethernet Direct
Eurotech
Extronics
Festo
Fluke
GarrettCom
GE Security Fiber
Harting
Helping Hand
Hirschmann
Hitex
HM Computing
Huber + Suhner
IDC Technologies
Imtex Controls
Industrial Interface
IO Limited
IPC Systems
IT 4 Automation
Itility
Jade Communication
Lowe Engineering
M.A.C Solutions
Massa
Matsushita
Meikon
Memec Insight
Microbus
48
Sales Director
Sales Manager
Robert Stead
Roy Cummings
Chris Walsh
Gary Calland
Sales Manager
David Greensmith
Sales Manager
Anne McLaughlin
Paul Bennett
Geoff Canham
Chris Williams
Sales
Peter Fox
Steve Whitehead
Tony Elvidge
Jane Annear
Paul French
Mike Welch
John Puttock
Adam Sharp
Bharat Gupta
Sales Manager
Matthew Prime
Sales Manager
Paul Lambert
Jackie Owen
Tony Grassby
Kim Harris
Sales Manager
Tim Tabberner
Alison Newcombe
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
David Moss
Sales Manager
Kevin Edwards
Adam Pryke
Trevor Martin
Sales Manager
Jeff Futcher
Sales Manager
Andrew Sime
Adrian Nicol
Graham Spaull
John French
Patrice Mousset
Alison Blackledge
David Woodward
Tim Ricketts
Jerry Worsley
Robert Norfield
Michael Harrison
Ian Evans
David Bates
+44 (0) 1223 411200
+44 (0)1260 292651
+44 (0) 1252 775000
+44 0800 731 8764
+44 (0)870 3825 777
+44132 381 668
+44 (0)1604 766686
+44 (0)118 988 9907
+44 (0)121 3295000
+44 (0)2476 692 066
+44 (0)1684 581850
+44 (0) 1869 364101
+44 (0)20 8335 4014
+44 (0)1732 850360
+44 1242 251794
+44 (0)1638 742 390
+44 (0)1905338989
+44 (0) 8707 104060
+44 (0)1785 819 177
+44 (0)1925 295422
+44 (0)1323 735665
+44 1527 592999
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+44 (0)7762 324609
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+44 (0) 1628 537300
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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[email protected]
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[email protected]
Contact
Sales Manager
Rob Stockham
Philip Nunn
Julie Busby
Stephanie Parry
John French
Peter Vukmirica
Steve Hollis
Darren Barrett
Tony Mahony
Sales Manager
Richard Roebuck
Mark Timmins
Sales Manager
Jackie Smallwood
Glenn Bates
Dave Amps
Emiliano Marquesini
Sales
Chris Hardy
Darran Weissenborn
Mark McCormick
Simon Reeves
Christine Savickas
Tom Russell
Claudio Borges
Flemming Christensen
I. Szabo
Neil Harrison
Paul Wilson
John Taylor
Zak Admani
David Evans
Derek Lane
Keith Newton
Sales Manager
Arthur Heckels
Phil Bourne
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Doug Stevenson
Tel
eMail
+44 (0)1296 393322
+44 (0)1495 350436
+44 (0)1293 514488
+44 (0) 1582 407300
+44 (0)1730 233332
+44 1908 837213
+44 (0) 23 9226 8080
+44 08707 104050
+41 41 740 6636
+44 (0)161 777 2205
+44 (0)161 4914188
+44 1214680041
+44 (0)208 6017200
+44 (0) 1543 462644
+44 (0)161 6336431
+44 (0) 1932 268 591
+44 (0)1952 681700
+44 (0) 118 936 4400
+44 (0)2476 440088
+44 01376 501255
+44 (0)1322 614313
+44 0870 242 5004
+44 (0)1908 666777
+44 (0)1454 203 404
+44 (0)2476 416255
+44 (0) 1276 203 100
+44 (0)1928 571 977
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+44 (0) 794 931 4162
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+44 (0)1494 793298
+44 (0) 150 9854467
+44 (0) 208 4437061
+44 (0)1484 866806
+44(0)1522 789555
+44(0) 1737 355055
+44 (0)1204 658 098
+44 (0) 20 8420 8140
+44 (0)1788 568008
+44 (0)1908 265223
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+44 (0) 845 606 6120
+44 20 7858 1100
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+44 (0)1224 355290
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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USA
Aboundi
Accutech
Acromag
ACT Technico
Action Instruments
Actis Computer
Adalet Wireless
Adept Systems
ADI
Advantech
AESP/Signamax
Afar Communications
Alden
Altera
AMCI
AMD
Amphenol PCD
Antaira
Appliance-Lab
Aromat Corporation
Art & Logic
Automated Solutions
Automation Systems
AutomationDirect
AWC
Axis Communications
B & B Electronics
B&R
Banner Engineering
Beckhoff
Beijer Electronics
Belden
Binder
Busware Direct
C&M Corporation
Cables Plus
CalAmp
Capital Equipment
Capitol Automation
Carlson Wireless
Ceeyes Systems
Cimetrics
Cirronet
Cisco
Cognex
Cognio
Hong Yu
Jennifer Rogers
Sales Manager
Valerie Andrew
Rick Coleman
Mark Stephens
Matthew Piecuch
Samuel Smith
Sales Office
Sales Manager
Ron Thompson
Sharon Thomas
Robert Alesio
Sales Manager
Kristina Higgins
Sales Manager
Veronica Hendricks
Junji Ichiriyama
James Dueck
Ted Kirby
Joan Welty
Katie Woodhouse
Larry Newman
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Sales
Sales Manager
David Moss
Jack O'Brien
Tom Donovan
Sri Chaganty
John James
Simon Wakefield
Steve Lewis
+1 603 889 8188
+1 800 879 6576
+1 248 6241541
+1 215 957 9102
+1 858 279 5726
+1 480 838 1799
+1 216 267 6864
+1 801 2267607
+1 800 233 6261
+1800 800 6889
+1 800 446 2377
+1 805 681 1993
+1 717 877 5201
+1 (408) 544 7000
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+1 408 4920273
+1 617 3507550
+1 678 684 2000
+1 4085257406
+1 508 652 3722
+1 301 540 4900
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
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[email protected]
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
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05.2013
Contact
Tel
eMail
Company
Contact
Tel
eMail
CommScope
Computer Access
Comtrol
Concurrent Tech.
connectBlue
Conos
Contec
Contemporary Control Systems
Control By Light
Control Technology
ControlByWeb
Core Systems
Covaro Networks
Crossbow
Cyberlogic
Damaher Motion
Danpex
Data-Linc
DataLink
Delta Computer
Demarc Technology
Dust Networks
EBS
Echelon
Elau
Electro Motive
Electro-Matic
Electronic Systems
Electronics Development Corp.
Elpro
Elutions
Ember
Encore Networks
Endian
Ethernet Direct
Eurotherm
eWON
Exemys
Festo
FiberOptics4Sale
FieldServer
Fluke
Fraba
GarrettCom
GE Cisco
GE Digital Energy
GE IFS
Gillaspy Associates
Grid Connect
Hardy Instruments
Harting
Hirschmann
HMS
IC Links
ICC
ICS Electronics
ICT Global
Inductive Automation
Ingear
Innovasic
Innovative Integration
Inova Computers
INS
IntelliSensing
Interlogic
Ipsil
I-Tek
ITT-AET
Ixxat
Kalki
Kazio Networks
Kepware
KMS Systems
Kontron
Korenix
KTI Networks
Kurt Manufacturing
Lantech
Lantronix
L-com
Lexycom
Locus
LogiSync
Lumberg
Maxim Integrated Products
Metrobility
Metz Connect
Micrel
Microchip
Microscan Systems
Microwave Data
Millennial Net
MKS Instruments
Molex
Moore Industries
Mike Werner
Kimberly McKay
Dennis Christensen
Jane Annear
Bill Saltzstein
Sales Manager
Marie Kane
Joe Stasiek
John Thomas
Laura Minichiello
+1 828 459 5000
+1 408 727 6600
+1 763 494 4100
+1 734 971 6309
+1 425 442 5854
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+1 408 954 7014
+1 630 963 7070
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+1 508 435 9595
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+1 858 391 1006
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+1 604 632 4278
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+1 908 9967995
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1 410 312 6650
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+1 703 443 0000
+1 412 586 5901
+1 801 949 6476
+1 631 4350800
+1 408 890 6299
+1 408 2622299
+1 425 347 6100
[email protected]
sales @catc.com
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Moxa
MultiTrode
National Instruments
National Semicon.
Nebula Networks
NetAcquire
NetBurner
Neteon
Netsat
Netsilicon
Network Vision
Newport
N-Tron
Numatics
Obvius
OCC
OleumTech
Omnicor
Opengear
Opto 22
Orbit Micro
OTC Wireless
Paragon Robotics
Paralan
Parker Hannifin
Patton Electronics
Pepperl & Fuchs
Phoenix Contact
ProComSol
ProSoft
Proxicast
ProxID
Prysmian
Pyramid Solutions
Quabbin
Quest
Rabbit
Red Lion
RF Monolithics
Rockwell
RTA
RuggedCom
S.I. Tech
Schneider
Sealevel
SEL
Sena Technologies
Sensoray
Sensource
Sequi
Siemens
Siemon
Sisco
Sixnet
Smar
Smartronix
Softing
Software Toolbox
Sola/Hevi-Duty
Spinwave Systems
Starman Electric
Sylution
Synetcom Digital
Tactical Software
TAL Technologies
TC Communications
TeamF1
Teledesign Systems
Telegärtner
Timbercon
Transcend
Transition Network
TRT
TTI Wireless
Tuppas Software
Turck
Unicoi Systems
Unicom Electric
Verano
VoxTechnologies
Wago
Waterloo
Waters Network
Watlow
Weed Instrument
Westermo
Western Reserve
Wilkerson
Wipro
WPS
Yamaichi
YR20
Sales Manager
+1 714 528 6777
+1 561 994 8090
+1 800 776 8662
+1 631673 4097
+1 5127822669
+1 425 576 0822
+1 858 558 0293
+1 732 568 1988
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+1 978 499 7800
+1 714 540 4914
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+1 815 505 2643
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+1 510 490 8288
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+1 330 4253555
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+1 972 233 2903
+1 440 6463863
+1 414 4535100
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+1 412 8739481
+1 864 843 4343
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+1 518 877 5173
+1 713 8492021
+1 301 737 2800
+1 978 499 9650
+1 704 849 2773
+1 800 3774384
+1 978 392 9000, ext.225
+1 805 748 6492
+1 912 2663585
+1 310 379 2000
+1 603 606 6700
+1 215 763 7900
+1 949 852 1972
+1 510 505 9931
+1 408 941 1808
+1 6306167600
+1 503 827 8141
+1 630 378 5954
+1 952 941 7600
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+1 919 556 7100
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+1 763 694 2340
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+1 800 3466668
+1 508 337 0300
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+1 800 357 9246
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+1 763 509 7420
+1 314 878 4600
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[email protected]
Chris Schaffner
Fred Ellefson
Michael Dunbar
Daniel Muller
Ken Wyman
Nelson Kwan
James Steffey
Morgan Jack
Peter Nachtwey
Sales Manager
Sales
Michael Tennefoss
Patrik Hug
Nick Skope
Tom Kirchner
T J Manolatos
Frank Williams
John Bueno
Olivia Hecht
Bill Grant
Brandon Bain
Larry Winchester
Christopher King
Dominique Blanc
Adrian Chiaramonte
Sales Manager
Colin Yao
Steve Ferree
Julie Kuntz
Chintan Doshi
Jim Krachenfels
Marketing Manager
Steve Carrozzo
Rob Esau
Mike Justice
Customer Service
Jon DeSouza
Sales Manager
Sarah Hardman
Sales Manager
Darrin Hansen
Denise Romandia
Michael Ward
Dawnelle Shehan
Nora Henderson
Paul Gaudreau
Stephen Woram
Bert
Bruce Elsom
Todd Gallagher
Bill Seitz
Melvin Foo
Sales
George Mallard
Sales
Salvador Lara
Mr Williams
Jonathan T Baller
Sales Manager
Paul Wacker
Peter McNeil
Kelly Morgan
Ed Yenni
Karsten Loehken
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
Michael English
Primo Castro
Sales Manager
Shahin Sadri
Millennial Net Sales
Sales Manager
Steve Todd
05.2013
+1 510 5802767
+1 800 327 8262
+1 585 242 9600
+1 203 426 1180
+1 805 987 1959
+1 630 2451445
+1 858 278 2900
+1 847 7411500
+1 973 830 20 00
+1 312 829 0601
+1 530 888 1800
+1 (608) 831 1255
+1 925 4161000
+1 978 4999271
+1 800 266 7798
+1 610 9358282
+1 505 883 5263
+1 805 520 3300
+1 (602) 863 0726
+1 972 248 7466
+1 716 972 0075 Ext 217
+1 631 420 8111
+1 617 876 5454
+1 757 825 2555
+1 301 497 9900 x166
+1 603 4710800
+1 315 219 4198
+1 484 334 2757
+1 207 775 1660
+1 281 363 9154
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+1 425 2265700
+1 585 242 8445
+1 781 222 1030
+1 978 284 4000
+1 353 2500
+1 818 894 7111
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[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Fred Weber
Sales Manager
Tom Kenney
Leo Lee
david ohara
Charles Peterson
Mark Fondl
Applications Engineers
Gordon Stevens
Jeff Welker
Steve Herzogs
Michael Newman
Asif Sheriff
Todd Rychecky
Pre-sales Engineering
Sales Department
Khanh Trang
Sales Manager
John Walewander
Customer Service
Sales Manager
Jeffrey Dobos
Customer Service
Jim Sabol
Bob Leighton
Glenn Beal
Samantha Muto
Lorne Diebel
Sales
Sales Manager
Sales Manager
John Rinaldi
Jeffrey Lewin
Glen Corliss
Sales Representative
Gary Scheer
Marc Woo
Amy Jones
Darius Kosovan
Tien Van
Raj Rajani
Katherine Karter
Ralph Mackiewicz
Sales Manager
Joe Rondan
Eric Colvin
Ken Hoover
John Weber
Maureen White
Mark Edwards
Steve Resweber
Pat Wells
Nick Lee
Mukesh Lulla
Ralph Souders
Jeffery Sandy
Art Felgate
Rungtong Monthaniyachat
Thomas Albright
Karl Lehmann
Scott Simmons
Salvador Lara
Al Cooley
Tracy Lenz
Charles Murgiano
Gary Carlson
Rick Pennavaria
Mark Hendel
Jim Barlow
Vinay Chandra
Sales
Sales Manager
Mike Hinz
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Global sources
Company
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
i n d u str i a l e th e r n e t b o o k
49
Why does the IT world have to be full of uniform grey boxes? We admit that Apple has changed that
somewhat, adding uniform white boxes to the selection. But overall it would be good to see more stylish
hardware, adding a touch of beauty to our offices and IT departments. On the importance of beauty in our
lives, see Elaine Scarry’s essay On Beauty, from which we borrowed the title.
PHOTO: BELKIN INTERNATIONAL, INC.
Private Ethernet
On Beauty
Linksys Router
of the computer chassis in a whole new way.
A clever detail is the front cover, which can be
rotated to access the required connections”.
The compact aluminium housing accommodates certainly gives the computer a
distinctive, recognizable look.
It includes mainboard with AMD processor,
power supply unit, 4096 MB RAM, Radeon
HD7340G graphics, numerous connectivity
options, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. And the Akoya
X-PC can indeed be used as a pencil rack.
The E4200 is one example of how modern
technology can be packaged in an attractive
way. The shape is reminiscent of a floating
plane and the structured surface offers an
almost textile touch. Cables, connectors and
six antennas are neatly concealed, and even
the blinking LEDs can be disabled.
It looks more like an art object than the
450Mbps, dual-band wireless router that it is.
The E4200 even includes a built-in UPnP AV
media server so you can stream media files
across your network.
The embossed letters ‘Firewall’ separate the
outside LAN connectors from the internal
protected network, making the function immediately obvious and preventing false cabling.
www.ads-tec.de
R&M termination tool
www.medion.com
www.linksys.com
PHOTO: MEDION
50
PHOTO: ADS-TEC
Medion Akoya X-PC
Here is another example of design that doesn’t
limit itself to following function. What could
be a bookend or a pencil rack is actually a mini
desktop PC. The Medion Akoya X-PC won the
prestigious Red Dot Design Award. The jury
said: “The X-PC interprets conventional forms
PHOTO: REICHLE & DE MASSARI
ads-tec IF 1000 industrial firewall
Smart, unconventional design does not need to
be limited to the home and office world. Since
1953 the iF Industrie Forum Design awards
outstanding industrial design. One of the
winners is the ads-tec IF 1000, an industrial
firewall unit.
The bold red die-cast magnesium housing was
conceived by by Bohner-Design, Stuttgart,
Germany. It clearly states ‘Attention – safety
equipment’.
Another iF Award winner is the R&M termination tool for Ethernet jacks. In one operation
it reliably closes all four levers of an RJ45
connector and at the same time terminates
all 4 cable pairs. The prism shaped jaw allows
efficient connection of all eight wires simultaneously.
Frontal appliance and large handles enable
stress-free installation over long terms, even
in demanding space situations. Thanks to
a good balance of shape and material, no
additional mechanical fastening elements are
required. Cat.6A installations have never been
so much fun.
You can see the tool in action on Youtube:
http://youtu.be/Y-HYAQmvPBc
Leopold Ploner.
in d u s t r ial et h er ne t b o o k
05.2013
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IEB issue 76 - May 2013
I s s u e 2 / F e b r u a r y 2 0 13
SYSTEM COMPARISON
The 5 Major Technologies
nd E d i t i o n
2
PROFINET,
POWERLINK,
EtherNet/IP,
EtherCAT,
SERCOS III
How the Systems
Work
The User
Organizations
A Look behind
the Scenes
Investment
Viability and
Performance
Everything You
Need to Know!
Safety
protocols
Learn the basics!
Stéphane Potier
Huazhen Song
Bhagath Singh Karunakaran
Stefan Schönegger
Anton Meindl
Peter Wratil
Luca Lachello
Preface
Outsiders are not alone in finding the world of Industrial Ethernet somewhat confusing. Experts
who examine the matter are similarly puzzled by a broad and intransparent line-up of competing
systems. Most manufacturers provide very little information of that rare sort that captures technical characteristics and specific functionalities of a certain standard in a way that is both comprehensive and easy to comprehend. Users will find themselves even more out of luck if they are
seeking material that clearly compares major systems to facilitate an objective assessment.
We too have seen repeated inquiries asking for a general overview of the major systems and
wondering “where the differences actually lie”. We have therefore decided to dedicate an issue
of the Industrial Ethernet Facts to this very topic. In creating this, we have tried to remain as
objective as a player in this market can be. Our roundup focuses on technical and economic as
well as on strategic criteria, all of which are relevant for a consideration of the long-term viability
of investments in Industrial Ethernet equipment. The arguments made in this publication were
advanced and substantiated in numerous conversations and discussions with developers and
decision-makers in this field. We have made every attempt to verify claims whenever practically
possible.
This document must not be modified
without prior consent of its publisher.
Passing on the document in its entirety
is expressly encouraged.
The current version is available for download
from www.ethernet-powerlink.org.
Contact: EPSG Office,
phone: +49 30 850885-29
[email protected]
2
Despite all our efforts, though, we were unable to ascertain exact, verifiable information on
some aspects, which prompts us to ask for your help: if you would like to propose any
amendments or corrections, please send us an e-mail or simply give us a call. We look forward
to any and all support in supplementing this overview, and we welcome all discussions that
contribute to making the assessments of the various Industrial Ethernet standards as thorough
and objective as possible. This second, expanded edition includes feedback submit by the
Industrial Ethernet community after publication of the first issue in November, 2011.
Luca Lachello, Software Engineering Manager COMAU Robotics – Italy
Peter Wratil, Managing Director Innotec – Germany
Anton Meindl, President EPSG – Germany
Stefan Schönegger, Business Unit Manager B&R – Austria
Bhagath Singh Karunakaran, CEO Kalycito – India
Huazhen Song, Marketing Manager POWERLINK Association – China
Stéphane Potier, Technology Marketing Manager EPSG – France
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
INTRODUCTION
4
· Selection of Systems for Review
HOW THE SYSTEMS WORK
6
·
·
·
·
·
·
ORGANIZATIONS
12
· User Organizations and Licensing Regimes
CRITERIA FOR INVESTMENT VIABILITY
16
·
·
·
·
·
Compatibility / Downward Compatibility
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) · Electrical Contact Points
Cabling / Feasible Topologies · Hot Plugging Capability
High Availability · Gigabit Readiness
Availability of Safety Solutions · Market Penetration
PERFORMANCE
18
·
·
·
·
Theoretically Achievable Cycle Time · Communication Architecture
Direct Cross-Traffic · Heavy Data Traffic
Network Load for Safety Communication
Actual Cycle Time · Jitter · Performance Contest
IMPLEMENTATION
22
·
·
·
·
·
Master Implementation
Costs for Network Components
Slave Implementation
Node Connection Costs
Operating Costs
SAFETY FUNCTIONALITY
25
· Network Integrated rather than Hard Wired
THE BLACK CHANNEL PRINCIPLE
27
· Safety Field Networks
· Safety Data Transport via Bus or Network Lines
HOW THE SAFETY SYSTEMS WORK
28
· CIP Safety · PROFIsafe · openSAFETY · FSoE
· Certifications · Technology · Device Implementation
· Integration · Performance · CRC
Approaches to Real-Time
PROFINET Communication
POWERLINK Communication
EtherNet/IP Communication
EtherCAT Communication
SERCOS III Communication
3
Selection of Systems
for Review
|
This issue of Industrial Ethernet Facts compares PROFINET (RT, IRT),
POWERLINK, EtherNet/IP, EtherCAT, and SERCOS III, i.e. five out of
about 30 Industrial Ethernet systems currently in use around the
world.1 Why these five? The selection was based on technical aspects,
standardization status, and strategic market considerations. Relevant
issues include e.g. whether a user organization backs the ongoing
development of a protocol, whether a protocol is classified in the IEC
standard, and whether a system is suitable for hard real-time
requirements.
Real-time
A mechanism to resolve data collisions that is part of the IEEE 802.3
Ethernet standard causes irregular delays in data transfer. In order to
achieve real-time performance, Industrial Ethernet protocols employ
special preventive measures to avoid such collisions. For hard realtime, signal transmission times must stick exactly to a given time
frame, or else they will trigger a failure signal. For soft real-time, some
deviation within a limited span of time is tolerable. While cycle times
of up to several hundred milliseconds may be good enough for soft
real-time applications, e.g. for temperature monitoring, digital control
systems or Motion Control applications often require cycle times
below one millisecond.
1 For a more extensive overview of systems, consult the list on
www.pdv.reutlingen-university.de/rte/ compiled by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jürgen Schwager,
head of the Process Data Processing Lab at Reutlingen University.
4
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Market Penetration
Another key aspect in selecting Industrial Ethernet systems for comparison was market penetration: various IMS and ARC surveys indicate
that about three quarters of all Industrial Ethernet applications around
the world use EtherNet/IP, PROFINET, or Modbus TCP. Next in line are
POWERLINK and EtherCAT, two systems particularly suitable for hard
real-time requirements. The following roundup does not examine
Modbus TCP on its own, since its user organization ODVA has stated
that it has been integrated into EtherNet/IP. SERCOS III, however, was
included for comparison despite its marginal market share, because
this system plays a vital role for fast Motion Control solutions.
Building technology, control and
automation levels, trouble-free
processes, storage systems
Conveying systems,
simple controls,
majority of all automated systems
Machine tools,
fast processes,
robots
Real-time classes
and application areas
(IAONA classification)
Highly dynamic processes,
electronic drives
1 s
10 s
100 s
1 ms
10 ms
100 ms
1s
10 s
Response time / jitter
5
How the Systems Work
|
Diverse Approaches to Real-time Generation
method: in each cycle, data for all network nodes is sent in one
telegram that travels from one node to another along the ring
topology of the network, also collecting node responses on the way.
In contrast to that, the single telegram procedure used by the other
systems works by sending individual telegrams to the nodes, which
also respond individually in separate telegrams.
There are three different approaches to building a real-time Ethernet
solution:
1. Based on TCP/IP: Protocols are based on standard TCP/IP layers
with real-time mechanisms embedded in the top layer.
These solutions usually have a limited performance range.
2. Standard Ethernet: Protocols are implemented on top of standard
Ethernet layers. These solutions benefit from Ethernet evolution
without further investment.
3. Modified Ethernet: The standard Ethernet layer, the Ethernet
mechanism and infrastructure are modified. These solutions put
performance before standard compliance.
The systems use three different mechanisms for network access and
data synchronization:
– A master controls the timing on the network. In POWERLINK
environments, the master authorizes individual nodes to send data.
In EtherCAT and SERCOS III networks, the transfer of summation
frame telegrams follows the master‘s clock.
– PROFINET IRT uses synchronized switches to control communication.
– EtherNet/IP employs CIP Sync to distribute IEEE 1588 compliant
time information throughout the network.
One crucial difference of the various Industrial Ethernet systems
compared within this publication lies in how they organize data
transfer and how they manage to deliver real-time performance.
EtherCAT and SERCOS III communicate using a summation frame
Based on TCP/IP
PROFINET
EtherNet/IP
Standard Ethernet
IEEE 802.3
Modified Ethernet
Media Access
POWERLINK
PROFINET RT
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
PROFINET IRT
Ethernet
Modified Ethernet
TCP/UDP/IP
Ethernet
Ethernet Cabling
6
Methods for
real-time Ethernet
implementation
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
PROFINET Communication
|
PROFINET (“Process Field Network”) is differentiated into different
performance classes to address various timing requirements:
PROFINET RT for soft real-time, or no real-time requirements at all,
and PROFINET IRT for hard real-time performance. The technology was
developed by Siemens and the member companies of the PROFIBUS
user organization, PNO. The Ethernet-based successor to PROFIBUS DP,
PROFINET I/O specifies all data transfer between I/O controllers as well
as the parameterization, diagnostics, and layout of a network.
Application
Real-time cyclical
PROFINET
Real-time acyclical
PROFINET
Standard
PROFINET
Middleware
Engineering,
business
integration
Standard
application
(FTP, HTTP etc.)
DCOM
Standard UDP
Standard TCP
Standard IP
How It Works
In order to cover the different performance classes, PROFINET makes
free use of the producer/consumer principle and resorts to various
protocols and services. High-priority payload data sent directly via the
Ethernet protocol travels in Ethernet frames with VLAN prioritization,
whereas diagnostics and configuration data, for instance, is sent using
UDP/IP. That enables the system to achieve cycle times of around
10 ms for I/O applications.
Clock-synchronized cycle times below one millisecond, as required
for Motion Control applications, are provided by PROFINET IRT, which
implements a time multiplex mode based on specially managed,
hardware-synchronized switches. So-called Dynamic Frame Packing
(DFP) will in the future give users a new PROFINET variant designed to
optimize cycle times making use of the summation frame principle for a
certain set of devices in the network.
Standard Ethernet
Destination
address
Source
address
802.1q
Frame ID
Type =
0x8892
Process data
Data
CRC
Status info
7
Device Profiles
POWERLINK Communication
Protocol
Software
|
I/O
Encoders
Valves
Drives
Medical
Others
CANopen
Application Layer – Object Dictionary
Messaging (SDO and PDO)
POWERLINK Transport
CAN based
CANopen
Transport
Initially developed by B&R, POWERLINK was introduced in 2001.
The Ethernet POWERLINK Standardization Group (EPSG), an
independent user organization with a democratic charter, has taken
charge of the further development of the technology since 2003.
POWERLINK is a completely patent-free, vendor-independent and
purely software-based communication system that delivers hard
real-time performance. An open source version has also been made
available free of charge in 2008. POWERLINK integrates the entire
range of CANopen mechanisms and fully complies with the IEEE 802.3
Ethernet standard, i.e. the protocol provides all standard Ethernet
features including cross-traffic and hot plugging capability, and
allows for deploying any network topology of choice.
Hardware
Cycle Time
PReq
CN2
PRes
CN1
PReq
CN3
PRes
CN2
PReq
CNn
PRes
CN3
Isochronous
Phase
SoC = Start of Cycle
SoA = Start of Async
8
MN
SoA
PRes
CNn
Async Data
Asynchronous
Phase
PReq = Poll Request
PRes = Poll Response
MN = Managing Node
CN = Controlled Node
Ethernet Driver
CAN Controller
Ethernet Controller
A POWERLINK cycle consists of three periods. During the “Start
Period,” the MN sends a “Start of Cycle” (SoC) frame to all CNs to
synchronize the devices. Jitter amounts to about 20 nanoseconds.
Cyclic isochronous data exchange takes place during the second
period (“Cyclic Period”). Multiplexing allows for optimized bandwidth
use in this phase. The third period marks the start of the asynchronous phase, which enables the transfer of large, non-time-critical
data packets. Such data, e.g. user data or TCP/IP frames, is
scattered between the asynchronous phases of several cycles.
POWERLINK distinguishes between real-time and non-real-time
domains. Since data transfer in the asynchronous period supports
standard IP frames, routers separate data safely and transparently
from the real-time domains. POWERLINK is very well suited to all
sorts of automation applications including I/O, Motion Control,
robotics tasks, PLC-to-PLC communication and visualization.
POWERLINK uses a mixture of timeslot and polling procedures to
achieve isochronous data transfer. In order to ensure co-ordination,
a PLC or an Industrial PC is designated to be the so-called Managing
Node (MN). This manager enforces the cycle timing that serves to
synchronize all devices and controls cyclical data communication.
All other devices operate as Controlled Nodes (CN). In the course of
one clock cycle, the MN sends so-called “Poll Requests” to one CN
after another in a fixed sequence. Every CN replies immediately to this
request with a “Poll Response” on which all other nodes can listen in.
PReq
CN1
CAN Driver
Many shared characteristics: the CANopen and POWERLINK OSI model
How It Works
SoC
UDP/IP
POWERLINK Driver
CN
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
EtherNet/IP
Device Profiles
CIP Motion
Valves
EtherNet/IP Communication
|
I/O
Robots
Other
CIP Application Layer
Application Library
CIP
CIP Data Management Services
Explicit Messages, I/O Messages
Application
CIP Message Routing, Connection Management
Initially released in 2000, EtherNet/IP is an open industrial standard
developed by Allen-Bradley (Rockwell Automation) and the ODVA
(Open DeviceNet Vendors Association). The “Ethernet Industrial
Protocol” is essentially a port of the CIP application protocol
(Common Industrial Protocol), which was already used by ControlNet
and DeviceNet, to the Ethernet data transfer protocol. EtherNet/IP is
particularly well established on the American market and is often
used with Rockwell control systems.
ControlNet DeviceNet CompoNet
Transport Transport Transport
Network
Encapsulation
TCP
UDP
IP
Data Link
EtherNet
CSMA/CD
ControlNet
CAN
CompoNet
CTDMA CSMA/NBA Time Slot
Physical
EtherNet
Physical Layer
ControlNet DeviceNet CompoNet
Phys. Layer Phys. Layer Phys. Layer
Transport
EtherNet/IP layer model
How It Works
EtherNet/IP runs on standard Ethernet hardware and uses both
TCP/IP and UDP/IP for data transfer. Due to the producer/consumer
functionality supported by the CIP protocol, EtherNet/IP has various
communication mechanisms at its disposal, e.g. cyclic polling, time
or event triggers, multicast or simple point-to-point connections. The
CIP application protocol differentiates between “implicit” I/O messages and “explicit” query/reply telegrams for configuration and data
producer
consumer
consumer
accept
acquisition. While explicit messages are embedded into TCP frames,
real-time application data is sent via UDP due to the latter protocol‘s
more compact format and smaller overhead. Forming the center of a
star topology network, switches prevent collisions of data from devices
that are connected using point-to-point connections. EtherNet/IP
typically achieves soft real-time performance with cycle times around
10 milliseconds. CIP Sync and CIP Motion as well as precise node
synchronization via distributed clocks as specified in the IEEE 1588
standard are used to approach cycle times and jitter values low
enough to enable servo motor control.
consumer
accept
prepare
filter
filter
filter
send
receive
receive
receive
broadcast communication
9
Frame delay = (total byte count for header + data) x 10 ns
250 ns
EtherCAT Communication
115 ns
Master
PHY
|
IOS via LVDS
PHY
IOS via LVDS
PHY
EtherCAT (“Ethernet for Control Automation Technology”) was developed
by Beckhoff Automation. All users of this technology automatically
become members of the EtherCAT Technology Group (ETG).
How It Works
EtherCAT is based on the summation frame method: The EtherCAT
master transmits an Ethernet frame containing data for all nodes on
the network. That frame passes through all nodes in sequence. When
it arrives at the last node on a trunk, the frame is turned back again.
The nodes process the information in the frame as it passes through in
one direction. Each node reads out data addressed to it on the fly, and
inserts response data back into the frame. In order to support the
bandwidth of 100 Mbit/s, special hardware based on ASICs or FPGAs
is required for fast processing as data passes through. In effect, the
topology of an EtherCAT network always constitutes a logical ring.
Even trunks branching out, which can be hooked up to nodes
especially designed for such connections, actually only add a two-way
junction where the summation frame telegram travels up and back
down the branching line.
Structure of an EtherCAT frame
All EtherCAT telegrams with instructions for individual nodes are
contained within the payload data area of a frame. Each EtherCAT
frame consists of one header and several EtherCAT commands. Each
Ethernet HDR
FH
EH
Data
WC
of these comprises its own header, instruction data for a slave, and
a working counter. Up to 64 Kbytes configurable address space is
available for each slave. Addressing proceeds by auto-increment, i.e.
each slave counts up the 16-bit address field. Slaves can also be
addressed via distributed station addresses, which are assigned by
the master in the start-up phase.
EtherCAT Process Synchronization
Every slave connection provides a real-time clock that is synchronized
by the master using a technique similar to IEEE 1588. There are slave
devices with and without real-time mechanisms, since these are more
demanding on the hardware. Based on the real-time clocks, control
signals can be synchronized with high precision. In physical terms, the
EtherCAT protocol not only runs on Ethernet, but also on LVDS (Low
Voltage Differential Signaling). This standard is used by Beckhoff as
an internal bus on the terminals. A PC with a standard Ethernet interr
face is typically used to implement an EtherCAT master. In contrast
to other protocols such as POWERLINK or PROFINET, EtherCAT solely
extends to Layers 1 through 3 of the seven-layer OSI model. Hence,
in order to achieve application functionality comparable to the other
systems, an extra protocol layer (CoE, EoE) needs to be superimposed.
CRC
EtherCAT principle of operation
10
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Non-real-time channel
Real-time channel
…
I/O profile
Motion profile
SERCOS III Communication
|
Ethernet
application
Generic device profile
A freely available real-time communication standard for digital drive
interfaces, SERCOS III not only specifies the hardware architecture
of the physical connections but also a protocol structure and an
extensive range of profile definitions. For SERCOS III, effectively the
third generation of the Sercos Interface that was originally introduced
to the market in 1985, Standard Ethernet according to IEEE 802.3
serves as the data transfer protocol. This communication system is
predominantly used in Motion Control-based automation systems.
A registered association, sercos International e.V., supports the
technology‘s ongoing development and ensures compliance with
the standard.
How It Works
While specific hardware is categorically needed for the slave, a
software solution is also feasible for the master. The sercos user
organization provides a SERCOS III IP core to support FPGA-based
SERCOS III hardware development. SERCOS III uses a summation
frame method. Network nodes must be deployed in a daisy chain or a
closed ring. Data is processed while passing through a device, using
different types of telegrams for different communication types. Due
to the full-duplex capability of the Ethernet connection, a daisy chain
actually constitutes a single ring, whereas a proper ring topology will
in effect provide a double ring, allowing for redundant data transfer.
Direct cross-traffic is enabled by the two communication ports on
every node: in a daisy chain as well as a ring network, the real-time
telegrams pass through every node on their way back and forth,
i.e. they are processed twice per cycle. Hence, devices are capable
AT: Drive Telegram
MDT: Master Data Telegram
IP: IP Channel
C
RT channels Safety
(primary/secondary)
S III
protocol
SVC
channel
UDP/TCP
Cross-communication
M/S communication
IP
Synchr.
Ethernet
SERCON 100M/S (FPGA)
+
Ethernet Dual PHY
RT = Real Time
M/S = Master Slave
Synchr. = Synchronization
netX with
SERCOS III
or
SVC = Service Channel
S III = SERCOS III
UDP = User Datagram Protocol
TCP = Transmission Control Protocol
FPGA = Field Progr. Gate Array
PHY = Physical Layer
The specific master/slave communications controller for
SERCOS technology is known as SERCON.
of communicating with each other within one communication cycle,
with no need to route their data through the master.
Besides the real-time channel, which uses time slots with reserved
bandwidths to ensure collision-free data transfer, SERCOS III also provides for an optional non-real-time channel. Nodes are synchronized
on the hardware level, prompted by the first real-time telegram at the
beginning of a communication cycle. The master Synchronization
Telegram (MST) is embedded into the first telegram for that purpose.
Ensuring high precision by keeping synchronization offsets below
100 nanoseconds, a hardware-based procedure compensates
for runtime delays and variations in it resulting from the Ethernet
hardware. Various network segments may use different cycle clocks
and still achieve fully synchronized operation.
AT MDT IP
Master
Slave
Slave
Slave
Slave
Slave
Slave
11
The User Organizations
|
User independence is another key aspect in the overall assessment of
a system. Any unsettled issues regarding brand rights or patents that
may limit a user‘s own developments are crucial factors to consider
when making the decision for a system. Legal traps that may cause inconvenience later can be avoided by taking a close look at the creators
and the user organizations backing the various solutions.
Criteria
Organization
www.
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
PNO
EPSG
ODVA
ETG
SERCOS
International
profibus.com
ethernetpowerlink.org
odva.org
ethercat.org
sercos.org
PROFINET – PI
PROFIBUS & PROFINET International (PI) is the international umbrella
association for 25 regional PROFIBUS & PROFINET Associations
including the user organization PNO, which spells out as PROFIBUS
Nutzerorganisation e. V. It runs an office that manages joint projects
and disperses information to members and other interested parties.
A certification center for PROFIBUS and PROFINET product approvals
is affiliated with that office. Adopted on 24 April, 1996, the
organization‘s bylaws specify its duties and responsibilities.
Membership is open to all companies, associations, and institutions
that support the interests of PI as device vendors, users, systems
solution providers or operators of PROFIBUS or PROFINET networks.
www.profibus.com
12
POWERLINK – EPSG
The Ethernet POWERLINK Standardization Group (EPSG) was founded
in 2003 as an independent organization of companies in the drives
and automation sector. The group‘s goal is the standardization and
ongoing development of the POWERLINK protocol introduced by B&R
in 2001. The EPSG cooperates with standardization organizations
such as CAN in Automation (CiA) or the IEC. The EPSG is a registered
association established according to Swiss civil law.
www.ethernet-powerlink.org
EtherNet/IP – ODVA
ODVA is the union of all DeviceNet and EtherNet/IP users. The organization attends to the continual development and further distribution of
these field buses that are predominantly used in the USA and Asia,
but also in Europe. One key aspect of the organization‘s activities is the
development and propagation of the CIP protocol and of other protocols
based on it. Users may not only apply the technology but are also
invited to contribute to its ongoing development by joining Special
Interest Groups (SIG). The ODVA also actively participates in other
standardization bodies and industry consortia. The organization‘s
bylaws are relatively complex.
www.odva.org
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
EtherCAT – ETG
SERCOS III – sercos International e. V.
The EtherCAT Technology Group is a forum jointly established by users,
OEMs, machine vendors, and other automation suppliers. The group‘s
purpose is to provide support for and to propagate the benefits of
EtherCAT as an open technology. A certification lab is affiliated with the
organization‘s head office in Nuremberg. All contractual agreements for
use of the technology must be made directly with Beckhoff Automation.
Based in Nuremberg, Germany, the EtherCAT Technology Group is a
“nicht eingetragener Verein”, i.e. a non-registered club in the sense of
the German Civil Code.
www.ethercat.org
sercos International e.V. (SI) is an association entered into the court
registry in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. The association‘s members
are manufacturer and users of control systems, drives, and other automation components as well as machine vendors, research institutions,
and other associations. There are subsidiary organizations in North
America and Asia. A certification lab at the University of Stuttgart is
affiliated with the organization‘s head office.
www.sercos.org
13
Status, Rights and Licensing
Which is the legal status of the various user organizations? Who
owns the technology? Which legal ties, depending on the licensing
regime, are binding for developers who use a specific technology?
The following pages provide an overview.
Criteria
PROFINET
RT | IRT
Type of
organization
association
association
association
+
+
+
PNO
EPSG
+
+
Liability
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
non-registered
club
association
o
+
ODVA
members
SERCOS
+
o
+
EtherCAT Technology Group: the non-registered club is not a legal entity, but is
effectively a hybrid between an association and a private partnership, for which
legal liabilities remain unclear.
Criteria
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
Rights
owners
members
members
members
+
+
+
Brand
owners
PNO
EPSG
ODVA
+
+
+
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
Beckhoff
members
o
+
Beckhoff
SERCOS
o
+
In most cases, the rights to a technology rest with the organization responsible
for it. As co-owners, members are therefore entitled to make use of it. If other
persons or companies own the rights to a technology, the prospects for future
legal use of it remain unclear.
14
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Criteria
Funding
obligations
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
membership
fees
membership
fees
o
o
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
membership no membership membership
fees
fees
fees
o
+
o
Membership in the ETG is free of charge. A fee is due for memberships in
all other organizations. Annual contributions usually vary with the size of a
corporate member. POWERLINK‘s and sercos‘ user organizations also allow
non-members to develop products and put them on the market.
Criteria
Master and
slave
specification
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
PNO
EPSG
ODVA
Beckhoff
SERCOS
+
+
+
o
o
While communication mechanisms are specified for SERCOS III and EtherCAT,
the inner workings of a slave remain undisclosed. Users must resort to an ASIC
or an FPGA. FPGA IP code from Beckhoff is available for EtherCAT as object
code, the source code is not disclosed.
Criteria
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
Free source
code for
master
-
+
-
o
+
Free source
code for
slave
-
+
+
-
o
PROFINET: The PROFIBUS user organization (PNO) provides source code and
documentations for PROFINET implementations (PROFINET runtime software)
to its members. Clause 1.5 of the license agreement for this software gives
PNO members the right to use five patents.
POWERLINK: POWERLINK master and slave code is freely available under a
BSD open source license. The software stack is available on SourceForge.net.
EtherNet/IP: Stacks are available for purchase from various service providers.
An open source variant has been developed by a university.
EtherCAT: Slave implementations necessarily require an ASIC or an FPGA.
The VHDL or IP code for the FPGA must be purchased from Beckhoff; no source
code for it is available. The ETG provides sample source code for the master
side. Since the patent holder has not agreed to an open source licensing
regime, that source code does not qualify as open source.*
SERCOS III: Software master is provided free of charge under an LGPL
license. ASICs or FPGA code must be purchased for the slave.
* Source: Open Source Automation Development Lab (www.osadl.org)
15
Investment Viability
|
Openness as one issue with a bearing on the long-term viability of
investments in a system has already been mentioned. In addition,
a number of technical and strategic considerations also play crucial
roles in making a safe investment decision for the long term.
Compatibility to Existing Application Profiles
Criteria
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
EtherCAT and SERCOS III networks always constitute a logical ring.
That ring can be physically closed at the master, or, in the case of a
daisy chain, closed internally at the last node in the physical line.
EtherCAT does provide for trunks to branch out via special junctions,
but the entire frame travels up and back down such lateral network
lines, i.e. the network as a whole still represents a logical ring.
Criteria
PROFINET
RT | IRT
Tree
topology
+
+
Star
topology
+
EMC Susceptibility/Transmission Reliability
Ring
topology
Summation frame protocols are more susceptible to interference
than single frame protocols. If a frame is destroyed, summation frame
protocols always lose an entire cycle.
Daisy-chain
topology
Downward
compatibility
Criteria
EMC
susceptibility
PROFIBUS
CANopen
DeviceNet
CANopen
SERCOS II
+
+
+
+
+
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
o
o
+
+
SERCOS III
+
o
o
+
+
o
o
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
One special EtherCAT feature is the option to route all communication
through the internal I/O terminal bus as well. However, the superior performance often cited in connection with this feature is offset by the safety
risk due to increased susceptibility for interference (contacts and EMC).
PROFINET
RT | IRT
+
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
+
Only in the case of POWERLINK have master and cable redundancy been
included in the specifications, and have been implemented in actual
projects. For PROFINET and EtherNet/IP, application implementations
based on special switches are feasible.
Criteria
Electrical Contact Points
Electrical
contact
points
EtherCAT
High Availability
+
Since it uses two telegrams, in this comparison SERCOS III actually provides
50 % better performance than EtherCAT.
Criteria
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
+
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
o
+
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
Ring
redundancy
o
+
o
+
+
Master
and cable
redundancy
o
+
o
o
-
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Hot Plugging Capability
Support of International Standards
POWERLINK, EtherNet/IP, and PROFINET give users hot plugging
capability. Some restrictions apply for SERCOS III and EtherCAT due to
the compulsory ring topology. In a physical ring topology, SERCOS III
does allow for taking a single node off a network. In this event, the two
neighboring nodes close the TX and RX lines. Nodes can then be
reached from either side of the master. EtherCAT provides some hot
plugging capability: In the EtherCAT Slave Controller, open ports are
automatically closed if no link is detected. EtherCAT’s distributed
clocks, however, requires re-synchronization, which may affect certain
applications.
The IEC 61158 international standard standardizes protocols (called
“Types”) for use in industrial control systems. IEC 61784-2 standardizes
communication profile families (called “CPF”). GB standards are National
Chinese Standards written and issued by the Standardization Authority in
China (SAC). They are valid across all industries and nationwide. GB/Z
stands for national technical guidelines. These are primarily informative
in nature and in no way binding. The highest authorized standardization
level for communication technologies is GB/T. As a Chinese recommended
industrial standard, GB/T must meet several requirements: It must be
fully open technology, widely used and standard technology in the world.
It must not be subject to any country or company.
Criteria
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
o
o
PROFINET
+
Hot plugging
+
+
IEC 61158
For technologies based on a logical ring (EtherCAT and SERCOS III),
the limitations of the network topology also limit hot plugging capability.
Hot pluggable modules can only be connected to one end of a daisy chain
(SERCOS III) and distributed clocks require re-synchronization after node
failure, which may impose restrictions on applications.
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
Type 10
Type 13
Type 2
Type 12
Type 19
IEC 61784-2
CPF 3
CPF 13
CPF 2
CPF 12
CPF 16
GB National
Chinese
Standard
GB/Z
25105-2010
GB/T
27960-2011
GB/Z
26157-2010
Gigabit Readiness
As EtherNet/IP and POWERLINK are entirely software-based technologies, these protocols can also be used with Gigabit hardware.
EtherCAT can be scaled to Gigabit but requires an ASIC redesign.
PROFINET IRT also requires some redesign of the hardware, which concerns switches in particular. FPGA solutions can be ported to Gigabit.
Criteria
PROFINET
RT | IRT
Gigabit
readiness
+
-
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
+
+
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
-
o
Products on the Market
IRT products based on ERTEC technology are generally available on
the market. However, the introduction of the DFP feature and the new
generation of ASICs in conjunction with it (e.g. the Tiger Chip supplied
by Phoenix) has raised doubts concerning the future compatibility of
current IRT solutions.
Criteria
PROFINET
RT | IRT
Products on
the market
+
o
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
+
+
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
+
+
sercos International has stated that their IP core is basically Gigabit-ready.
17
Performance
|
Theoretically Achievable Cycle Time
The performance of the systems has been the subject of intense
debate, which has focused on the theoretical cycle times achievable
by Industrial Ethernet systems. The briefest possible cycle time in
theory is calculated as follows:
Number of bytes:
7
1
6
1010…0101..011 Destination
6
2
38 … 1500
Source
Preamble
Starting frame delimiter
Destination MAC address
Source MAC address
Length (if <1501*) / EtherType (if >1535*)
Payload data
Check sequence (cycling redundancy check)
*Decimal values
Number of bytes
Number of bits
Duration at 100 Mbit/s
Minimum length
26 + 38 = 64
512
5.1 µs
Maximum length
26 + 1500 = 1526
12208
122 s
Source: frame makeup as defined in IEEE 802.3
(The interframe gap of .96 µs must be added on top of the 5.1 µs cited above.)
18
4
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Hence, if a master sends out a frame addressed to itself that does
not pass through any other nodes, that frame will be available to the
master again after 122 microseconds have elapsed (in the case of a
single, maximum-length Ethernet frame).
In theory, it would be possible to process parts of a frame as soon as
they are received. However, the CRC bytes that confirm the validity of
the data received are last to arrive at the end of a frame. This scenario
does not factor in delays affected by PHYs, cables, and Ethernet ports,
times for internal data transfer in the master, etc. Moreover, once a
signal leaves the master, the time it takes to travel along network lines
(5 ns/m) and the processing time inside a slave have to be taken into
account as well.
Prospective extensions of a system and possible future requirements
need to be carefully considered for selecting either a centralized or
a decentralized architecture. One advantage of the decentralized
processing of various control loops is that it allows for adding
nodes without any noticeable effect on the basic cycle time, i.e.
no fundamental changes to the overall concept must be made.
Moreover, additional functionality such as condition monitoring or
integrated safety technology will have less impact on the control
concept than in central architectures, which depend significantly
on a low volume of data.
In order to select a solution that is viable for future use as well,
wherever possible preference should be given to a decentralized
handling of control loops for cycle times below 500 microseconds,
especially in drive applications.
Communication Architecture of the Systems
Criteria
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
Supports
central
control
+
+
+
+
+
Supports
decentral
control
+
+
+
-
o
Direct Cross-Traffic
Direct cross-traffic provides crucial benefits particularly in case of very
demanding real-time requirements: for fast drive controllers, axes can
be synchronized easily and with extreme precision, since all position
values can be distributed directly without having to go through a
master. That results in lower network load and also ensures that data
(e.g. actual angle positions of axes) is available to all relevant nodes
within the current cycle. If data needs to pass through a master first,
it is not only delayed by one cycle, but overall data traffic on the
network is increased as well.
Criteria
Direct
cross-traffic
PROFINET
RT | IRT
+
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
+
+
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
-
+
With POWERLINK and SERCOS III, direct cross-traffic is a feature even for
modules that only have slave functionality, while EtherNet/IP requires a module
with scanner functionality.
19
Heavy Data Traffic
Actual Cycle Time
In applications involving a large volume of process data, the time
required for passing through the nodes greatly impacts the overall
cycle time. Data prioritization, on the other hand, enables lower cycle
times. Systems that support prioritization mechanisms allow for
reading high-priority data once every cycle and polling for data with
a lower priority only every n-th cycle.
In solutions using the summation frame method, data must pass
twice through each controller. If a signal has to go through many
nodes, total transfer time will rise considerably as it makes its way.
Raw performance data cited by the organizations supporting such
solutions has to be adjusted to account for this effect. Another
aspect to consider is that performance depends on implementation
specifics, e.g. task classes, in the actual control systems used for
an application.
Criteria
Prioritization
PROFINET
RT | IRT
+
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
+
+
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
o
+
Criteria
Performance
For POWERLINK, EtherNet/IP, and PROFINET, variable cycle times have been
firmly established in the protocols‘ specifications. SERCOS III has only recently
added this feature. For EtherCAT, solutions for this requirement can be
implemented as part of a specific application.
Network Load for Safety Communication
Safety over Ethernet is based on a cyclic exchange of protected data
between safety nodes (emergency stop switches, drives with Safety
controllers). The safeguard procedures in this process involve data
duplication and wrapping data in safe “containers”. This increases
data rates on the network. Solutions using the summation frame
method will see the frame count go up, whereas the single frame
method will increase the volume of data in each of the frames that
are due to be sent anyway. All in all, the theoretically superior
performance of the summation frame method is neutralized.
PROFINET
RT | IRT
o
+
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
+
o
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
+
+
Jitter
It is crucial for control quality on a network to ensure minimal jitter
(clock deviation) and to determine signal delays very precisely.
To this end, network nodes must be synchronized as precisely as
possible. Competing Ethernet variants employ different mechanisms
to achieve that goal. While EtherCAT uses the principle of distributed
clocks solved by a proprietary algorithm within the ESC (EtherCAT
Slave Controller), synchronization is accomplished via a simple sync
signal (SoC) in POWERLINK networks.
Criteria
Jitter
PROFINET
RT | IRT
o
+
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
+
o
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
+
+
EtherCAT, POWERLINK, and SERCOS III give users a system with almost no jitter
(< 100 ns) at all times. On EtherNet/IP networks, jitter can be considerably
reduced with special IEEE 1588 extensions in all components. Reduced jitter
can also be achieved in PROFINET IRT applications.
20
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Performance Contest
In practice, POWERLINK is faster than EtherCAT in most applications.
EtherCAT is optimized for applications with only very low network traffic
volume. In systems with a heavier data load, there is a disproportionate
rise in cycle times in EtherCAT environments. Where decentralized
architectures (e.g. for decentralized Motion control) are implemented,
EtherCAT suffers greatly from the lack of direct cross-traffic (in both
directions), which sharply reduces the performance that can theoretically
be achieved. A direct I/O integration of EtherCAT also results in lower
sampling rates (I/O system), since the time the signal takes to pass
through the I/O has a direct impact on the cycle time within reach.
For POWERLINK and SERCOS III, there are no such effects.
The publication by Prytz (2008)1 was used as a reference for the calculations concerning EtherCAT. Delays for signals passing through the
EtherCAT ASIC were verified again by measurements. For POWERLINK,
applications with actual products were set up for practical measurements, leaving no room for doubt and reconfirming the cited figures.
In practice, comparing system performance proves to be a difficult
endeavor due to the specific characteristics of the various systems:
EtherNet/IP and PROFINET RT are excluded from the start because
these systems are only suitable for soft real-time requirements.
PROFINET IRT poses problems due to the indispensable switches,
which lead to a different application architecture that makes a direct
comparison of measurements complicated. The values below were
determined based on published calculation schemes.
Test scenarios were
1. a small machine comprising a master and 33 I/O modules
(64 analog and 136 digital channels);
2. an I/O system with a master and twelve Ethernet slaves with
33 modules each (in total, 2000 digital and 500 analog channels
were taken into account in this application);
3. a Motion Control network with 24 axes and one I/O station
with 110 digital and 30 analog I/Os.
No tests and calculations were conducted for SERCOS III. However,
SERCOS III can be expected to provide a performance level similar to
POWERLINK, making it faster than EtherCAT in many applications.
Better
542.88
Motion decentralized: EtherCAT
269.98
Motion decentralized: POWERLINK
363.48
I/O System: EtherCAT
325.25
I/O System: POWERLINK
Motion centralized: EtherCAT
271.44
Motion centralized: POWERLINK
269.98
1 G. Prytz, EFTA Conference 2008, A Performance
analysis of EtherCAT and PROFINET IRT. Referenced
on the EtherCAT Technology Group‘s website, www.
ethercat.org. Last accessed: 14 September, 2011.
53.4
Small I/O: EtherCAT
81.21
Small I/O: POWERLINK
0
100
200
300
Cycle time [µs]
400
500
21
Implementation
|
Implementation costs include development expenses, license costs,
and hardware costs. Code availability (program or VHDL in case of
a hardware implementation) must be taken into consideration here
as well.
Master Implementation
Master designs
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK
EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
Master access
–
+
–
o
+
no open source master available
openPOWERLINK
(open source)
no open source master available
patent-protected 1
common SERCOS III master API
(open source)
Implementation costs
o
–
+
o
+
o
pricey software
stack
requires special
hardware with
coprocessor
runs on standard hardware
pricey software stack
runs on standard hardware
typically with
coprocessor support
1 No open source master, only sample code that does not warrant applicability.
All protocols allow for a software implementation of the master
on a standard Ethernet chip.
22
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Costs for Potentially Required
Network Components
External devices = external switches or hubs
Internal multiports = ports that are directly integrated into the devices, primarily for daisy chain and ring topologies
Network components
costs
External devices
Internal multiports
PROFINET
RT | IRT
POWERLINK
EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
+
o
+
o
o
o
standard
switch
special switch,
IRT support
required
standard hubs or switches
managed switch with complex
functionality required (IGMP
snooping, port mirroring, etc.)
special network
components required 1
designated for future use of
external infrastructure devices,
but no such use at the time
of writing
o
o
+
o
+
+
integrated
switch
Siemens ASIC
required
standard hub
integrated switch,
very complex
Beckhoff ASIC required 2
FPGA-based technology
1 With EtherCAT, special network components are required for star or tree topologies.
2 Beckhoff ET1100.
23
Slave Implementation
For EtherCAT, SERCOS III, and PROFINET IRT, bus protocol implementations into a slave require hardware solutions (ASICs or FPGAs). For
POWERLINK, EtherNet/IP, and PROFINET RT, microcontroller-based
software solutions are also feasible. Expenses for software solutions
comprise license costs for the stack, possibly complemented by extra
costs for more powerful and therefore more expensive controllers.
For hardware solutions, users may opt for either FPGA- or ASIC-based
communication interfaces. In principle, FPGAs may also be used for
software solutions.
An FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) is an integrated circuit that
hardware developers can configure themselves. It consists of programmable logic components, so-called logic blocks, and a hierarchy
for the reconfigurable component circuitry. All logic functions ASICs
are able to execute can be implemented with FPGAs as well. Functionality
can be customized before commissioning. The one-off development
costs for FPGAs are lower than that of ASICs. FPGAs comprise an
attractive technology for Industrial Ethernet solutions primarily due
to these lower expenses, their high performance, and multi-protocol
capability, but also because they allow for using pre-assembled
components to integrate Layer 2 functionality (hubs, switches).
However, users need to be aware that the complexity of a protocol has
an impact on the volume of code and, by extension, the required
number of logic blocks. L2 functionality can also have a substantial
bearing on this number. Switches need more blocks than hubs, and
complex managed switches require an excessive number of logic
blocks. POWERLINK is the least complicated real-time Ethernet
solution. Moreover, since POWERLINK only resorts to hubs in its
network layout, this protocol requires only a small number of logic
blocks, and is suitable for small FPGAs.
EtherCAT and SERCOS III, on the other hand, are more demanding
and therefore need many more logic blocks.
Node Connection Costs in Different Real-time
Ethernet Environments
The connection costs per node below refer to the running expenses for
the hardware. Potentially owed license costs for software stacks etc.
have not been taken into account.
24
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Minimum Hardware Costs
25 $
20 $
Operating Costs
15 $
10 $
5$
22.2 $
9.2 $
15.2 $
11.0 $
PROFINET POWERLINK EtherNet/IP EtherCAT
RT | IRT
15.2 $
SERCOS III
The figures in this diagram have been derived from feedback from various
manufacturers with implementation experience covering different Industrial
Ethernet solutions. Several figures have also been quoted by manufacturers
in automation industry magazines. Costs for the PHY (2 × 1.1 $) have been
factored in equal measure for all protocols. Connectors are excluded.
Cost estimates per node are made for an annual volume of 1000 units.
PROFINET:
T The calculation reflects a solution with an ERTEC200 ASIC. Future
implementations may also use devices equipped with a TPS1 chip developed
by Phoenix Contact. In that case, costs are likely to drop to a level comparable
to EtherCAT. POWERLINK‘s price level will not be met.
POWERLINK:
K The calculation applies to an FPGA-based solution. RAM and flash
memory costs have been taken into account.
EtherNet/IP: The EtherNet/IP figure applies to a typical FPGA solution.
EtherCAT: The calculation is based on the least expensive EtherCAT ASIC
solution with two Ethernet ports (ET1100). EtherCAT solutions for FPGAs are
much more costly; the difference is most striking for synchronous solutions
with real-time clocks.
Operating costs largely consist of maintenance and network
administration expenses. Some technologies such as EtherNet/IP
with CIP Sync and PROFINET IRT are highly complex and may therefore
entail considerable network administration costs. Moreover, any use
of managed switches requires network expertise. In many cases,
a network engineer will be needed on location for commissioning
and maintenance.
The synchronization technology used by a solution plays a key role
for real-time communication. POWERLINK and SERCOS III ensure
synchronization via a master-managed mechanism that is very precise
and very rarely disturbed by faults. PROFINET IRT and EtherNet/IP
with CIP Sync depend on an IEEE 1588 compliant synchronization
mechanism. That results in significantly more complex network
administration, especially if devices must be isolated because they
trigger synchronization faults due to hardware or software failures.
Functions such as hot plugging – i.e. the option to swap devices on a
live network – can also help greatly to bring down maintenance costs:
replacement devices can be updated and configured without any
impairment to the real-time function of the system as a whole.
Costs
SERCOS III: The SERCOS III figure applies to a typical FPGA solution.
Purchase
costs
Operating
costs
PROFINET
RT | IRT
-
o
o
POWERLINK EtherNet/IP
EtherCAT
SERCOS III
+
o
+
o
+
o
+
+
25
Safety Functionality
|
Requirements toward safety in production environments have become
considerably more demanding over the past decade. Introduction of
the 2006/42/EC Machinery Directive by the European Union made
machine and plant manufacturers focus their attention on this issue.
They are required to design comprehensive solutions to ensure
protection of workers against injuries and the machinery itself against
damage while maintaining high levels of productivity.
The new standards led to the necessity for new machinery to undergo
strict certification procedures and to elevated performance requirements for the safety components used. Supported by a multitude of
new and innovative safety products, they also facilitated changes in
the approach toward the conceptual design of safety solutions. No
longer is an emergency stop immediately halting all parts of a machine
the only safe reaction to violations of the machine’s safe boundaries.
Smart safe reactions such as continued operation at a safe limited
speed can in many cases deliver the required level of protection while
providing better productivity by reducing the time to resuming full
speed. In many instances, it enables a more direct interaction
between worker and machine, particularly in teaching and adjustment
scenarios.
Network Integrated rather than Hard Wired
Traditionally, safety equipment used to be hard wired with dedicated
switching circuitry, often logic cast in pure hardware. Although with
some effort it is theoretically possible to cover many cases using
this method, more and more machine manufacturers have been
recognizing the benefits of integrated safety. It is based on safe
programmable control hardware and I/O modules using the existing
field bus to exchange safety-related data.
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Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
At first glance, the older methods may appear less costly. Due to the
lower purchasing costs of their hardware components, this may in
many cases be true, but not if safety solutions are viewed in their
entirety. Wherever the complexity of such systems goes beyond a
single emergency stop button, network-integrated safety systems have
become the preferred choice. They lower the number of components
as well as required cabling and provide more flexibility of safe logic
design by replacing hard wiring with configuration and parameter
setting. Also, error diagnostics are greatly simplified. Combined with
centralized data storage, this results in faster recovery. Maximum
availability of plants and machines is provided by network-integrated
safety technology through:
– Safety sensors directly attached to the network
– Direct read-out of component information
– Simplified maintenance due to automated component
parameter setting across the network
– Safer operating mode switching due to parameter setting
during runtime
– Decreased response time, as latency induced by relays is eliminated
– Modular design supported by network structure and safe software
– Increased availability as a result of comprehensive diagnosis
– Reduction of component count and wiring
– Greater variety of safety functions
(safe operating stop, safely limited speed…)
How It Works
Safety applications based on certified software are programmed
using function blocks such as counters, timers or speed monitors.
Running on dedicated safety controllers, this replaces the traditionally
hard-wired safety circuitry. Implementation of the safety application in
software reduces the number of both safety components and standard
I/O modules. Along with the replacement of discrete cabling by safety
data transfer via the existing network connections, this greatly
minimizes both costs and complexity of safety installations. Due to
the use of existing network connections, varying machine layouts
and options do not require dedicated safety connections. This also
improves flexibility and freedom of safety application design as well as
modifications of existing plants and machines during their lifecycle.
Also, diagnostic signals can be transferred without any additional
hardware. All in all, using integrated safety speeds up engineering and
substantially shortens time to market.
27
The Black Channel Principle
|
Safety Field Networks
Safety-oriented field buses simplify placement of components within
a plant or machine. In most cases, two cables, one for power and one
for communication, are all that is required. Sensors can be attached
directly to the safety network. They do not require separate cables for
the return of diagnostic signals. This results in a reduction of required
hardware components.
Using the Black Channel Principle, safety-relevant data as well as
diagnostic information is exchanged via the existing network
connections. This enables faster responses. Sensors receive their
parameter setting and configuration via the network. This allows the
download of optimized parameter settings to the sensors in case of
changes to the mode of operation and also eliminates the need to
adjust parameters at the device itself in case of component replacement after failure. All this adds to a maximized productivity and
reduced down time.
Safety
Application
Standard
Application
Safety layer
Communication Protocol
Safety Data Transport via Standard Bus
or Network Lines
The Black Channel Principle allows transmission of failsafe and
standard data via the same network or bus line. Independent of
the regular data transport mechanism used on that line, safety
components can transmit data using an isolated safe protocol
tunneling the underlying network channel. As safe fieldbuses are pure
application protocols without physical characteristics of their own,
available bandwidth and cycle times depend on the data transport
protocol used. Possible transmission errors are known and listed in
the relevant standards IEC 61784-3 and IEC 61508. Their prevention
needs to be implemented as a crucial part of the safety data transmission protocols. The required quality of transmission error
detection depends on the safety level that needs to be achieved.
Safety
Application
Standard
Application
Safety layer
Safety
layer
Communication Protocol
“Black Channel”
Industrial Ethernet, Fieldbus, Backplanes...
Black-Channel mechanism
28
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
How the Safety Systems Work
|
CIP Safety
The “CIP Safety” protocol was specified for safety data transmission
via EtherNet/IP or DeviceNet. Using the pre-existing CIP (Common
Industrial Protocol) Services as its foundation, the CIP Safety protocol
makes use of the producer-consumer mechanism for the exchange of
data between safe nodes. In this context, a consumer is designated
“originator” and a producer is called “target”. Safe time synchronization
between producers and consumers relies on chronological monitoring.
Synchronicity between all nodes throughout the network provided, the
time of origination of safe messages can be determined using a time
stamp. These methods guarantee that processed data is still up to
date. For the transfer of the safe data, “Safety Validator Objects” are
used. They organize and guarantee the integrity of messages in a CIP
Safety network. These objects also constitute the bridge between the
safety communication and the field bus or network used. For data
transmission, the protocol provides single transfer or multicast
connections. Their use depends on the capability of the channel used
to support either of these connections.
Pneumatic
Valves
AC Drives
Semi Devices
For CRC (cyclic redundancy check) calculation, the CIP Safety protocol
makes use of five different formats, ranging from 8 bit to 32 bit CRC.
These depend on whether data size is one or two Bytes or between
three and 254 bytes and of the data range to be covered by checksum
calculation. A “Unique Node Identifier” (UNID) is used for the unique
identification of the safe nodes. It is a combination of a network ID and
the node address, which is equivalent to the MAC address. It can be
set either manually using DIP switches or via software configuration.
During the ramp-up phase, the originator checks the presence of the
configured UNIDs in the network. Further parameters such as timeout
delays, ping intervals or the maximum number of nodes are configured
using a Safety Configuration Tool (SNCT).
Other Profiles
Safety
I/O Block
Other
Safety Profiles
Object Library
Safety-Specific
Object Library
Data Management Services
Explicit Messages, I/O Messages
Safety Layer
CIPSafety
Common
Industrial
Protocol
(CIP)
Connection Management, Routing
TCP
UDP
DeviceNet
Transport
ControlNet
Transport
Ethernet
CSMA/CD
CAN
CSMA/NBA
ControlNet
CTDMA
Ethernet
Physical Layer
DeviceNet
Physical Layer
ControlNet
Physical Layer
EtherNet/IP
DeviceNet
ControlNet
Internet Protocol (IP)
Network
Adaptions
of CIP
29
PROFIsafe
PROFIsafe uses the “Master-Slave” mechanism for transmission of
safety telegrams. The master, typically called the “F-Host”, cyclically
exchanges safety-relevant data with all its configured slaves called
“F-Devices”. Each F-Device has an F-Driver organizing the co-ordination
of safe messages called “Safety PDUs” (Protocol Data Unit) between
the F-Host and F-Slave. CRC calculation of the PDUs depends on the
message size to be transferred, the distinction being between “slim
PDU” up to 12 bytes and “long PDU” up to 123 bytes. CRC 24 is used
for slim PDU calculation, while for long PDUs, CRC 32 is used. As a
means for message recipients to determine whether telegrams arrive
in the right sequence, PROFIsafe uses consecutive numbers for the
safety telegrams. Additionally, monitoring of the tolerance time
(F-Watchdog Time) that is reset upon receipt of a telegram ensures
that always the currently valid telegrams are read. The so-called
F-Parameters (PROFIsafe parameters) supply a unique identifier
between F-Host and F-Device.
Although the addresses (Unique Codename) are automatically passed
on to the F-Devices, the target addresses need to be adjusted directly
at the device via DIP switches. The F-Devices receive their configuration
through transfer of the F-Parameter via “GSD” (General Station
Description) and of the I-Parameter (individual F-Device Parameter).
These parameters are managed within the iPar server, from where
they can be transferred to a PROFIsafe Device using standardized
interfaces. Usually, the iPar Server comes integrated in a “CPD-Tool”
(collaborative product design) engineering tool. For product designers,
this means that for the ability to completely configure an F-Device,
a GSD file needs to be created and an interface to the CPD-Tool must
be provided for each product.
User Program
(Logic Operations)
F-Device Technology
(e.g. Laser Scanner)
iParameter
Services
Services
F-Host Diver Instance
F-Device Driver
F-Parameter
State Machine
State Machine
PROFIsafe Message
CRC
Input Data
30
Control Byte Output Data
Status Byte
CRC
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
openSAFETY
openSAFETY was designed aiming at transmission of safety relevant
data over any field bus or network. It can be used on all field buses,
Ethernet-based or not.
For the transmission of safety data, the producer-consumer model
is used. The advantage of this model is that all consumers in an
openSAFETY network can receive and subsequently process the
messages sent by the producer. Each openSAFETY node has a unique
UDID (openSAFETY Unique Device Identification) number. This is a
combination of the MAC address and the manufacturer’s device
number. During the booting process, the Safety Network Management
(SNMT) checks the device type and the UDID, so that it automatically
detects replaced devices. In such a case, the required parameters are
automatically transferred to the Safety Nodes (SN). The SNMT can
optionally be integrated with the Safety Configuration Manager (SCM).
In analogy to other communication protocols, the SCM can be viewed
as an openSAFETY master using services to manage the network.
The openSAFETY Object Dictionary (SOD) manages all parameters,
which are then transferred to the safety nodes using Safety Service
Data Objects (SSDO). Upon completion of Node configuration and
the booting phase, the cyclic data transfer between producer and
Consumer commences. For the transfer of safety-critical process data,
this uses Safety Process Data Objects (SPDO). The openSAFETY frame
consists of two sub frames. It can transport a maximum of 254 bytes
of safety data, using CRC 8 for payloads from 1 to 8 bytes and CRC 16
for payloads from 9 to 254 bytes.
With openSAFETY, very large networks can be created. For each
openSAFETY Domain (SD), up to 1023 safe nodes can be connected.
As they are addressed by the SCM, no additional hardware switches
are required. The maximum total configuration of an openSAFETY
network has 1023 openSAFETY Domains with a total of more than a
Million safe nodes. Communication between the individual Domains
is performed by the openSAFETY Domain Gateway (SDG).
Safety Related Application
EtherNet/IP
Modbus/TCP
SERCOS III
...
LVDS
CAN
RS485
PROFINET
IO-Link
POWERLINK
USB
Industrial Ethernet
TCP/IP
openSAFETY
31
FSoE
Fail Safe over EtherCAT (FSoE) is a transmission scheme for safety
data over EtherCAT using an FSoE master and FSoE slaves. In each
FSoE cycle, the master sends its Safety PDU (Protocol Data Unit) to
the slave, concurrently starting a watchdog timer. The slave verifies
and calculates the data received prior to returning it to the master. In
this case, the slave also starts a watchdog timer. The master receives
and processes the data as described for the slave, stopping the
watchdog timer. Only when this cycle is completed, the master
generates a new Safety PDU. Due to this mechanism, safe communication always depends on the hardware and topology used.
The address relation between a master and a slave is called “FSoEConnection”. It is characterized by a unique Connection ID. The 16-bit
Connection-ID is transferred by the master to the individual slaves.
Users need to take measures to ensure providing each slave with a
unique ID. For correct identification of the ramp-up sequence, both
the master and the slave generate a “Sequence Number” ranging
from 0 to 65535 for every message. This ensures that only currently
valid messages are processed. Addressing of the individual devices
requires designation of unique Node numbers by hardware setting
using DIP switches. Each FSoE master includes an “FSoE master
Handler”, which communicates with a slave through an “FSoE slave
Handler”. Optionally, an additional “FSoE slave handler” that can be
implemented in the master allows communication between different
masters within a network. For safeguarding the PDUs to transfer, for
every 2 bytes of Safety Data, a CRC 16 is used. This implies that for a
10 Byte transfer, a CRC 16 is applied five times.
Parameter setting as such is not specified. The parameterization
process needs to be part of the user-programmed application
software. While the FSoE specification does detail the required
parameters, users need to ensure for the individual FSoE slaves
to receive their correct parameters.
Safety-over-EtherCAT Software Architecture
Safety Application
Application
Safety Objects
Safety Data
Safety Management
Application Layer (AL)
EtherCAT Data Link Layer (DL)
EtherCAT Physical Layer
32
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Integrated Safety System Comparison
|
Certifications
Technology
Criteria
CIP Safety
PROFIsafe
openSAFETY
FSoE
BlackChannel
based
+
+
+
+
IEC 61784-3
+
+
+
+
Certification
body
TÜV Rheinland
IFA
TÜV Süd
IFA
TÜV Süd
TÜV Rheinland
TÜV Süd
Generally speaking, all the various integrated safety technologies equally
fulfill safety requirements. They are all based on the “Black Channel” principle,
listed in the IEC 61784-3 standard and certified up to SIL 3. Hidden behind
the raw safety aspects, however, are relevant criteria that define whether a
technology will be adopted by component manufacturers or end customers.
The distinguishing differences are the ease of integration of the technologies
in the application serving the problem-solving purpose at hand.
Criteria
CIP Safety
PROFIsafe
openSAFETY
FSoE
SIL3 certified
(IEC 61508)
+
+
+
+
Ready
for SIL4
o
o
+
o
openSAFETY technology is certified up to SIL3. Though it has not been qualified
yet, the core principle of this technology, including probability of failure on
demand (PFD), is ready for SIL4.
Criteria
CIP Safety
PROFIsafe
openSAFETY
FSoE
Payload Data
duplication
support
+
–
+
–
Multicast
messaging
support
+
–
+
–
Safety device
configuration
+
o
+
o
Safe motion
control
o
+
+
+
In the design of safety devices, technology considerations have great significance. Depending on the complexity of Safety frames, their composition can
require undesired extra implementation efforts.
Support of multicast messaging helps achieve fast response times. These in
turn can be influential for the overall plant or machine design, for instance
reducing machine footprints and required floor space.
After maintenance or device replacement, safety slaves should automatically
be configured by the safety master. Configuration interfaces need to be specified and unique so that devices can be configured by different masters. For
PROFIsafe, the iPar-Server has been developed to cover this requirement. Its
interoperability status in the market is unclear, because in the past, configuration data came from the manufacturer of the master used rather than from
within the system.
In April 2012, the sercos International (SI) user organization announced the
development of a Safe Motion Profile for CIP Safety on SERCOS III. By the time
of publication of this brochure, however, a Safe Motion Profile based on CIP
Safety does not seem to be available.
FsOE offers a safe parameterization channel to transfer safe encapsulated
data to the safe application, but addressing scheme of the safe application
parameters does not exist.
33
Device Implementation
Criteria
Integration
CIP Safety
PROFIsafe
openSAFETY
FSoE
Stack
compatibility
o
o
+
–
o
Performance
o
o
+
o
+
o
Addressing
+
–
+
–
o
+
+
Safe Reaction
Time
o
o
+
o
o
+
o
–
+
+
+
–
CIP Safety
PROFIsafe
openSAFETY
FSoE
Legal
limitation
+
–
+
–
Investment
security
o
o
+
Time-ToMarket
+
+
Implementation
–
Current
market share
certified
stack available
Supported
Industrial
Ethernet
protocols
Open-Source
Implementation
available
CIP Safety
PROFIsafe
openSAFETY
FSoE
EhterNet/IP
SERCOSIII
PROFINET
PROFINET
EtherCAT
EtherNet/IP
Modbus
POWERLINK
PROFINET
SERCOSIII
EtherCAT
–
–
+
–
The openSAFETY stack is currently the only open source software for safety
communication. Technically as well as from a legal point of view, openSAFETY is
entirely technology-independent.
34
compatibility of all stacks on the market is essential.
Open source strategy of openSAFETY guarantees stack compatibility.
For device manufacturers, independence and implementation costs are the
most significant considerations. For implementation, all costs for license fees,
software stack, conformance test and certification were taken into account in
the comparison. So was the complexity of each technology and its impact on
the required resources and costs for implementation.
ProfiSAFE and FSoE are limited to the protocols of their user organizations.
This could lead to the requirement to implement several safety protocols if
equipment using different automation systems and fieldbuses is combined.
CIP Safety requires the implementation of a dedicated CIP Abstraction Layer
within the Black Channel, thus increasing engineering efforts. Acccording to
our researches a FSoE slave is under development, but currently there is no
certified FSoE slave stack available on the market. This may pose a potential
risk for safety technology implementations on the device level.
Criteria
Criteria
In a safety network, all nodes must have unique IDs. To avoid parameter setting
errors, addressing should be automated. The PROFIsafe and FSoE protocols,
however, require manual address setting for each safety device using DIP
switches. This makes installation of safety devices in the control cabinet more
complicated. Human error, particularly in maintenance scenarios, could result
in faulty parameter setting. It is also very difficult to create modular machine
concepts using hardware switches, as this form of addressing is always rigid
and components cannot be configured automatically.
Following the producer consumer principle, openSAFETY supports direct cross
communication, which results in singularly fast reactions. Routing all safety
messages via the master, as in PROFIsafe and FSoE, extends cycle times.
Consequently, valuable time for safe reactions is lost.
CIP Safety requires originator functions to support cross-traffic, thus a crosstraffic between slaves (targets) is not possible.
Systems Roundup:
The 5 Major Contenders
2nd Edition
Performance
Since Safety protocols are application protocols, a safety network‘s
performance depends on the underlying data transfer protocol. The
base protocol selection determines the available bandwidth and the
cycle times, but also functional features such as hot plugging
capability or data communication via cross-traffic.
Cross-traffic plays a crucial role in the performance of safety-oriented
systems. In networks supporting cross-traffic, safety nodes can
transmit signals directly to each other without routing them through
a master. This provides for optimized reaction times in hazardous
situations. On a network not supporting cross-traffic, safety nodes
send their signals to a fieldbus master node, which relays it to the
network‘s safety master for acknowledgement. It is then handed back
to the fieldbus master node which forwards it to the receiving safety
node. Compared to direct data transfer via cross-traffic, this process
causes four times the signal delay – valuable reaction time elapses.
Since the emergency stopping distance of an axis increases with
openSAFETY
the square of the fault response time and negative acceleration,
quadrupling the signal transfer time will result in a 16-fold extension
of the emergency stopping distance.
Criteria
CIP Safety
PROFIsafe
openSAFETY
FSoE
8-32 bits
24-32 bits
8-16 bits
16 bits
Required CRC
computations for
20 bytes net data
2
1
2
10
Number of
different CRC
5
2
2
1
CRC range
The required number of different checksums increases implementation
complexity, resulting in higher development costs. Additionally, computation of
multiple CRCs may result in significantly slower reaction to safety violations.
Failsafe over EtherCAT
POWERLINK
Master
EtherCAT
Master
Safe
PLC
Safe
PLC
3
2
4
Safe
Sensor
1
Safe
Motion
X
Safe
Sensor
1
Safe
Motion
X
Task:
(X) Safe Sensor has to send data to Safe Motion
Task:
(X) Safe Sensor has to send data to Safe Motion
Solution:
(1) Safe Sensor sends data to Safe Motion
Solution:
(1) Safe Sensor sends data to EtherCAT Master
(2) EtherCAT Master relays data to Safety Master
(3) Safety Master sends data to EtherCAT master
(4) EtherCAT master relays data to Safe Motion
Example for shorter signal transfer times
due to cross-traffic: Cross-traffic enables
safety nodes to directly communicate
with each other (left), whereas signal
paths are quadrupled in a system that
does not support cross-traffic (right).
35
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MM-E01306.009 INDUSTRIALETHERNETFACTS FEB. 2013 ENGLISH
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