2014-2015 SAM Manual - The City University of New York

2014-2015 SAM Manual - The City University of New York
THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
2014 – 2015
STUDENT AID
POLICIES & PROCEDURES
MANUAL
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
JUNE 2014
SAM 2014-2015
Organization of the SAM Manual
As a guide to this manual, the chapters are summarized below:
Chapter 1
INTRODUCTION
General information on the components of the financial aid system and the use of professional
judgment to address special circumstances.
Chapter 2
STUDENT ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS
Systematic discussion on how to resolve the federal edits – citizenship, immigration, social
security number, selective service and financial aid history.
Chapter 3
DATA BASE MATCHES
Outlines the major delivery system changes for 2014-15 and presents information needed to
identify and resolve SAR/ISIR rejects, matches and assumptions.
Chapter 4
VERIFICATION
Specifies the minimum requirements for the verification of information on federal student aid
applications.
Chapter 5
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
Details CUNY’s minimum satisfactory academic performance standards for federal and state
financial aid program eligibility.
Chapter 6
STUDENT BUDGETS
Contains budgets for the 2014-2015 academic year and an explanation of the student categories.
Chapter 7
DETERMINING EXPECTED FAMILY CONTRIBUTION
Presents an introduction to the EFC formulas and worksheets for calculating students’
family/student contribution.
Chapter 8
USING FEDERAL TAX RETURNS
NASFAA’s reference tool on how to use federal income tax returns, schedules, and forms in need
analysis; also includes sample tax forms keyed to FAFSA line items.
Chapter 9
PACKAGING
Explains CUNY’s packaging parameters for 2014-2015.
Chapter 10
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES
Details the criteria for establishing the student’s eligibility for special program assistance.
ORGANIZATION 1
OSFA
Chapter 11
PAYMENTS
Addresses disbursements, late disbursements, overawards, overpayments, and return of Title IV
requirements.
Chapter 12
RECORD RETENTION AND RELEASE
Outlines record retention requirements for Title IV and Special Programs and FERPA regulations.
Chapter 13
CUNY LEGACY FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
Provides detailed instruction in using 3 CUNY financial aid systems: FAP, PETS & CUDLS.
Chapter 14
SAMPLE FORMS
Presents suggested forms colleges can use to collect data to document various student/family
situations and keyed FAFSA and CUNY TAP form.
Chapter 15
NEW YORK STATE AWARD PROGRAMS
Gives information about the NYS grant programs, such as Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) and
Aid for Part-time Study (APTS), as they relate to CUNY processing.
Chapter 16
OTHER CUNY PROGRAMS
Information on various new CUNY programs that have developed over the last several years.
Chapter 17
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Gives information not provided elsewhere in the manual including a guide to internet sites and
electronic mailing lists of interest to the financial aid professional.
Appendix A
2014-15 ISIR GUIDE & COMMENT CODES AND TEXT
Federal ISIR Layout, Processing, Edits, Rejects & Comments.
2 ORGANIZATION
INTRODUCTION
The Student Aid Manual (SAM) is designed to assist CUNY financial aid personnel in
understanding how student financial assistance is awarded and disbursed at the colleges of City
University of New York. This manual details the regulatory and procedural environment
through which student financial assistance must be administered so that CUNY financial aid
personnel can perform their administrative roles more responsibly and effectively. The SAM is
not designed to replace regulatory documents and communications from funding agencies, but
instead serves as a supplement to these documents. Neither is the SAM intended to provide
detailed guidance for aid program management using CUNYfirst – the needed guidance and
training materials for working in CUNYfirst are published separately. The Federal Student Aid
Handbook and the U.S. Department of Education’s Information for Financial Aid Professionals
(IFAP) web site (http://www.ifap.ed.gov/ifap/) serve as the primary resources for administering
Title IV programs. HESC Programs, Policies and Procedures and the HESC website
(http://www.hesc.ny.gov/content.nsf/CA/Programs_Policies_and_Procedures_Guide_to_Grants_
and_Scholarships_Programs) serve as the primary resources for administering NYS programs.
The materials in the SAM attempts to integrate CUNY practices with federal, state and city
policies and procedures.
CUNY’s financial aid policy is based upon the premise that financial aid resources are to be
awarded to students in an equitable and consistent fashion throughout the University. All
available funds must be awarded and disbursed in accordance with federal, state, and city
regulatory and program guidelines.
CONTENTS
3 Components of the CUNY Financial Aid System .................................................................. 1-3
Student Cost of Attendance Budgets .................................................................................. 1-3
Determining Expected Family Contribution ...................................................................... 1-3
Packaging ........................................................................................................................... 1-4
CUNY Model Code of Conduct ................................................................................................ 1-5
INTRODUCTION 1-1
OSFA
New York State’s SLATE Act of 2007 ..................................................................................... 1-6
CUNY Conflict of Interest Policy ............................................................................................. 1-7
Professional Judgment ............................................................................................................... 1-7
Dependency Status Overrides ............................................................................................ 1-8
Adjustments for Special Circumstances ............................................................................. 1-10
Verification and Professional Judgment............................................................................. 1-12
Student Marital Status Changes ......................................................................................... 1-13
Unaccompanied Homeless Youth ...................................................................................... 1-14
Students Without Parental Support .................................................................................... 1-15
Guide to Addressing Special Circumstances Charts .......................................................... 1-16
INTRODUCTION 1-2
SAM 2014-2015
3 Components of the CUNY Financial Aid System



Establishing Student Cost of Attendance Budgets
Determining Expected Family Contribution
Packaging with Student Financial Assistance
Student Cost of Attendance Budgets (COA)
The student’s cost of attendance budget (COA) is the first fundamental component
required to determine a student’s need for financial assistance. The COA is defined as a
calculated dollar amount needed for a student to attend CUNY for a defined academic or
award period.
The COA has two components: educational expenses (that is, expenses directly related to
attending college, such as tuition, fees, books, supplies and carfare) and living expenses
(housing, food & personal expenses). CUNY has established two standard student
budgets: (1) students living with parents and (2) students living away from parents. The
student’s living arrangements will determine which budget category (living with or living
away) is used for packaging.
CUNY makes certain assumptions in determining the COA. For example, it is assumed
that students will use the New York City transit system to travel to and from school and
that those not living with parents are sharing housing costs with someone else.
Chapter 6 of this manual provides the individual components of the COA and explains
the rationale used to derive them. These budgets represent the maximum expenses for
the awarding of need-based aid to a student studying at City University of New York.
Determining Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
A federally mandated calculation is performed for each student through an approved
federal methodology which calculates the number of dollars students are expected to
have available to meet their college expenses. This sum is referred to as the expected
family contribution (EFC). The EFC calculation is an objective formula used to measure
the ability of students and/or their families to meet their educational costs. Further, use
of the EFC formula is mandated for meeting the requirements of most federal and some
state aid programs. The FAFSA is the instrument used to collect the data for the EFC
calculation.
There are several assumptions underlying the calculation of an EFC:

Parents of dependent students are assumed to have an obligation to
provide their children with as much financial assistance as family
circumstances permit.

The family’s size and any extraordinary expenses are considered in
evaluating the family contribution.

The formula recognizes the need to preserve some of the family assets for
the parents’ retirement and the education expenses of other children in the
family.
INTRODUCTION 1-3
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Step Three of the FAFSA is used to determine which analysis (independent/dependent) is
used to obtain the appropriate family contribution. Unlike the cost of attendance budget
which is determined by the student’s living arrangements (living with parents or living
away from parents), the EFC calculation is based on the student’s dependency status
(dependent or independent).
Chapter 7 of this manual provides information on the components of the EFC formula for
each category and furnishes worksheets to allow the administrator to hand calculate
EFCs.
Packaging
Packaging is the system by which individual students are awarded available financial aid
funds based on each student’s financial need. To learn the financial need of a student, the
family contribution (EFC) is subtracted from his or her cost of attendance budget. Unmet
need establishes the maximum aid $ that can be awarded from all sources.
Awards packaging occurs centrally either through the mass packaging equations built
into CUNYfirst or through the University’s packaging module in FAP. Both modes of
packaging are designed to allow financial aid administrators flexibility in the consistent
and equitable allocation of aid. Monies from all of the programs for which the student is
eligible are used to finance a student’s need. The most common sources of financial aid
for CUNY students include:
New York State Tuition Assistance Programs (TAP, PTAP, APTS)
Federal Pell Grant
Campus-based Federal Aid Programs

Federal Work-Study (FWS)

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

Federal Perkins Loan
Federal Direct Loan Program
Special Program Awards

SEEK

College Discovery

Bilingual

Honors College

Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP)
Other Awards

New York State Scholarship for Excellence

Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship
Chapter 9 of this manual sets forth the awards packaging parameters at CUNY for the
current award year. More detailed guidance for awards packaging in CUNYfirst is
published separately.
INTRODUCTION 1-4
SAM 2014-2015
CUNY Model Code of Conduct (revised March 10, 2010)
The Chancellor has requested that CUNY and its colleges, in order to comply with the
HEOA, display the following model code of conduct prominently on their websites.
CUNY’s Model Code of Conduct
 The provisions of this Model Code of Conduct apply to all employees of CUNY
or any of its constituent colleges or units.
 Conflicts of interest between the responsibilities of employees involved in student
financial aid and such employees’ relationships with lenders are strictly
prohibited.
 For purposes of this Model Code, a lender is defined as (i) any entity that itself or
through an affiliate engages in the business of making loans to students, parents,
or others in order to finance higher education expenses or to securitize such loans;
(ii) any entity, or association, that guarantees such loans; or (iii) any industry,
trade, or professional association that receives money from any such entity.
 No employee may accept a gift from a lender. A gift is defined as any gratuity,
favor, discount, entertainment, hospitality, loan or other item having a monetary
value of more than a nominal amount. It includes a gift of services, transportation,
lodging, or meals, whether provided in kind, by purchase of a ticket, payment in
advance, or reimbursement after the expense has been incurred.
 No employee may accept any compensation of any kind or reimbursement of
expenses for serving as a member of a lender’s advisory board.
 Neither CUNY nor any of its colleges may accept anything of value from a lender
in exchange for any advantage or consideration provided to the lender related to
its educational loan activity. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, a ban
on (i) revenue sharing by a lender with CUNY or a college; (ii) acceptance of
computer hardware for which below market value is paid; and (iii) acceptance of
printing costs or services. Revenue sharing means an arrangement whereby a
lender pays a higher education institution a percentage of the principal of each
loan directed toward the lender from a borrower at the institution.
 Neither CUNY nor any of its colleges may use preferred lenders. Preferred
lenders include either lenders with which CUNY or a CUNY college enters into a
formal agreement or lenders that CUNY or a CUNY college informally
recommends to students. Therefore, CUNY employees may neither adopt
preferred lender lists nor, more informally, recommend particular lenders to
students seeking advice on alternative loan providers.
 Neither CUNY nor any of its colleges shall link or otherwise direct potential
borrowers to any electronic Master Promissory Note or other loan agreement in
an electronic format that incorporates any preferred lender list or similar device
into the electronic medium, including any drop-down menus of possible lenders
for the student to select. Instead, students must be presented with the opportunity
to enter the lender code or name for any lender offering the relevant loan.
INTRODUCTION 1-5
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
If CUNY ever enters the “School as Lender” program as permitted under federal
law, it may not treat School as Lender loans any differently than if the loans
originated directly from another lender. The School as Lender program allows
higher education institutions to function directly as a lender to its students.
 Neither CUNY nor any of its colleges shall enter into agreements with lenders to
provide “opportunity loans.” Opportunity loans are loans provided up to a
specified amount to students with poor or no credit history, or international
students, whom the lender claims would otherwise not be eligible for the lender’s
alternative loan program. Opportunity loans may not be in the borrower's best
interest because of the high interest rate on the loans.
 No employee or agent of a lender may staff a CUNY or college financial aid
office. Neither CUNY nor any of its colleges may identify an employee or agent
of a lender as an employee or agent of CUNY or one of its colleges.
New York State’s SLATE Act of 2007
Passed unanimously by the NYS Legislature in May 2007, The Student Lending
Accountability, Transparency and Enforcement (SLATE) Act of 2007 includes the following
provisions:
 Prohibits lenders from making gifts – including the practice of revenue sharing to
colleges and universities or their employees in exchange for any advantage in
loan activities;
 Bans colleges and universities from soliciting, accepting or receiving any gifts
whatsoever – including those construed as part of a revenue sharing practice –
from lenders in exchange for advantageous loan consideration;
 Bars college and university employees from receiving any advantage,
reimbursement or benefit from serving as a member of a lender’s advisory board;
 Prohibits lender employees and agents from posing as college or university
employees, including staffing the school’s financial aid offices with lender
employees;
 Bans lenders and schools from agreeing to certain quid-pro-quo high-risk loans
that prejudice other borrowers or potential borrowers; and,
 Dictates strict criteria that schools must abide by if they continue to use
“preferred lender” practices.
INTRODUCTION 1-6
SAM 2014-2015
CUNY Conflict of Interest Policy
The CUNY Board of Trustees approved a new CUNY Conflict of Interest Policy on June
23, 2008. Under the Policy, which is effective as of July 1, 2008, all University activities
are to be conducted in accordance with the highest standards of integrity and ethics and
in a manner that will not reflect or appear to reflect adversely on the University's
credibility, objectivity, or fairness.
The Policy sets forth the general standards of conduct and the rules regarding hiring,
employment, and contracting decisions and supervisory responsibility involving certain
family members that apply to any individual who is, or at any time becomes, an officer,
full-time or part-time employee, or post-doctoral associate at the University, or a student
engaged in faculty directed research at the University other than as part of his or her
coursework, whether or not the student is paid for the engagement. The Policy also sets
forth specific obligations of covered individuals who are involved in research or similar
educational activities at the University and the University's procedures for managing
Conflicts of Interest that may arise in connection with those activities.
Access the complete policy on the CUNY portal at: http://web.cuny.edu/academics/infocentral/addresources/faculty-staff/conflict-of-interest.html.
Professional Judgment
Federal regulations give the discretionary authority to a Financial Aid Administrator
(FAA) to determine the independent status of individual students and to address the
economic needs of a student’s household experiencing “special circumstances.” This
exercise of discretionary authority is commonly referred to as professional judgment (PJ).
A FAA may, on a case-by-case basis, exercise PJ when a student who does not meet the
federal criteria for independent status presents compelling reasons to be considered
independent. PJ may also be used when the stated FAFSA income and household data
produces an EFC that overstates the economic strength of a student’s household or fails
to take into account unusual but legitimate economic burdens. In such cases, the FAA
may, but is not required to, “override” student’s dependency status, or “adjust” the
budget and/or the data elements used to calculate the EFC so as to more accurately reflect
the student’s household circumstances. The burden for documenting such circumstances
rests with the individual student and all PJ decisions must be supported by complete
documentation in the student’s file.
The statutory authority for PJ decisions applies to all Title IV programs (including the
Federal Pell Grant Program). FAAs are only permitted to modify only the data items
used in the COA and the EFC calculation. FAAs are under no obligation to approve any
dependency override or to adjust any income data element and FAA PJ decisions are not
subject to student appeal to the US Department of Education. Also note that the
Department of Education does not mandate that the FAA use the authority given to it to
make professional judgments; its use by financial aid administrators is optional.
While the Department of Education grants significant latitude in the exercise of
professional judgment, the FAA may not change the dependency status of a student who
already meets the federal definition of independent back to dependent, may not alter the
EFC formula or any of the table values used therein, may not adjust the EFC directly, or
INTRODUCTION 1-7
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create a new cost of attendance category. PJ must be applied on a case by case basis
only. It may not be applied to a group of students, even if every member of that group
appears to have the same characteristics. Its use may not be applied in an arbitrary
manner to circumvent regulations or the intent of the law, or to render an otherwise
ineligible student eligible.
Dependency Status Overrides
DCL GEN-03-07 published May 2003 gives more explicit guidance than was available
previously on overriding dependency status. DCL GEN-11-15 published July 2011
expands upon this guidance by reviewing the conditions and documentation that support
the use of dependency status overrides. The following reproduces the substance of the
guidance contained in these DCLs: In the course of conducting recent compliance
reviews of institutions participating in the Federal student aid programs, ED has found
that some institutions have not been properly following the statutory requirements for
making dependency overrides as well as not adequately supporting their dependency
override decisions with sufficient documentation. In working to improve compliance at
these institutions, ED has determined that issuing comprehensive guidance that reviews
the conditions for making dependency overrides and documenting these overrides would
help improve compliance with these requirements at all schools participating in the Title
IV, HEA programs.
Background
Section 480(d) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA), defines an
independent student as someone who fits into one or more of the following specific
categories: (1) 24 years of age or older by December 31 of the award year; (2) A married
individual; (3) Working on a master’s or doctorate degree or graduate certificate; (4)
Currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces; (4) A veteran of the U.S.
Armed Forces; (5) Having legal dependents other than a spouse; (6) From age 13, an
orphan, being in foster care, or a ward of the court; (7) An emancipated minor or in legal
guardianship as determined by a court in applicant’s state of legal residence; (8) An
unaccompanied youth who was homeless or at risk of being homeless as certified by a
school district homeless liaison, a director of an federally funded emergency shelter
program or a director of a runway or homeless youth shelter.
An individual who does not qualify as an independent student under one of
these…categories may be considered an ‘independent student’ under section 480(d)(7) of
the HEA. Under that provision, a student is considered to be an independent student if he
or she: “is a student for whom a financial aid administrator makes a documented
determination of independence by reason of other unusual circumstances”....
Making Dependency Status Overrides
The first [eight] categories of independent students in the statute describe those students
for whom it is not appropriate to expect a parental contribution toward the students'
postsecondary educational costs. The [final] category provides financial aid
administrators with the ability to make a documented determination of independence
based upon “other unusual circumstances.”
INTRODUCTION 1-8
SAM 2014-2015
Since its enactment, the Department has interpreted the phrase other unusual
circumstances in section 480(d)(7) to mean unusual circumstances that make it
inappropriate to expect a parental contribution for the student. Section 480(d)(7)
provides the financial aid administrator with great latitude in determining what
constitutes unusual circumstances. We recognize that, with few exceptions, financial aid
administrators have used this authority under the statute in a prudent and reasonable
manner. We applaud the practice of financial aid professionals in seeking the advice and
counsel of their colleagues on this and other professional judgment cases through the use
of the Internet, and the efforts by associations of financial aid administrators in
developing and conducting training workshops on the reasonable use of this authority.
These efforts have resulted in a body of practice within the financial aid profession for
making dependency overrides that focuses on truly exceptional circumstances and
consideration of individual cases, rather than contradicting the fundamental principles of
financial aid need analysis or making de facto changes to the statutory dependency
criteria as they are applied at individual schools. Situations that might warrant a
dependency override include the student’s voluntary or involuntary removal from the
parents’ home due to an abusive situation that threatened the student’s safety and/or
health, the student’s abandonment by the parents, or the inability of the student to locate
the parents.
The Department's Application and Verification Guide (AVG) emphasizes the need to
make dependency overrides only for students with unusual circumstances on a case-bycase basis and to document the unusual circumstances that the FAA relied upon in
making the override. In recent years, the AVG has identified four conditions that,
individually or in combination with one another, do not qualify as ‘unusual
circumstances’ or that do not merit a dependency override. Those circumstances are: 1.
Parents refusing to contribute to the student's education; 2. Parents unwilling to provide
information on the application or for verification; 3. Parents not claiming the students as
a dependent for income tax purposes; 4. Student demonstrating total self-sufficiency.
The law also requires that a determination of unusual circumstance(s) must be made each
award year. A determination of independence in one award year does not mean that the
student would automatically be an independent student in a subsequent award year. The
financial aid administrator must affirm in the subsequent year that the conditions for
determining the student to be independent continue to exist and continue to make
expecting a parental contribution inappropriate.
INTRODUCTION 1-9
OSFA
Collecting and Maintaining Acceptable Documentation Adequate documentation is a
critical aspect of the dependency override process. The documentation must include the
reason for the determination and must support the decision. In almost all cases, the
documentation should originate from a third party with knowledge of the unusual
circumstances of the student. The third party confirming the student’s unusual
circumstance could include: counselors or teachers, clergy, community groups,
government agencies, medical personnel, courts, or prison administrators. In rare
circumstances where third party confirmation cannot be obtained, the financial aid
administrator may - but is not required to - accept a signed statement from the student
alone, or the student and his or her relatives or friends; however, the use of this form of
documentation should occur only in extremely rare circumstances.
Financial Aid Administrator's Written Determination After reviewing all relevant
documentation related to a student's assertion that there are unusual circumstances that
support why he or she should be considered to be independent rather than dependent, the
financial aid administrator must make a specific determination for the student. Upon
making such a determination that a dependency override is warranted, the financial aid
administrator must prepare a written statement of that determination, including the
identification of the specific unusual circumstance upon which the financial aid
administrator based his or her determination. The institution must maintain this
documentation and the supporting documentation used to make each determination.”
Accepting Dependency Status Overrides Performed At Other Schools Schools may
accept a dependency override performed by another school within the same award year.
The school does not need to document the student’s special circumstances but need only
document it is accepting the dependency override already performed. The school that
originally performed the dependency override must maintain the documentation. Schools
have complete discretion on which, if any, dependency overrides they will accept from
another school. Also, dependency overrides do not carry over from year to year; the
FAA would have to reaffirm with documentation that the unusual circumstances still
exist and a subsequent year dependency status override is still justified.
Adjustments for Special Circumstances
An administrator may use professional judgment on a case by case basis and with
adequate documentation to alter the values of the data elements used to calculate the
expected parent or student contribution (or both) or to adjust the student’s cost of
attendance. The decision to adjust either a data element or the cost of attendance depends
on whether the special circumstance relates to the family’s ability to pay or reflects
higher than usual educational costs for the particular student. For example, when a
student already has a zero EFC, a cost of attendance adjustment might be the only way to
provide a student with additional assistance. [See Chapter 6 of this manual for more
information on cost of attendance adjustments.]
INTRODUCTION 1-10
SAM 2014-2015
Special circumstances are "conditions that differentiate an individual student from a class
of students rather than conditions that exist across a class of students." Section 479A(a)
of the Higher Education Act presents examples of special circumstances where a
financial aid administrator may wish to exercise his or her professional judgment. These
may include but are not limited to:
 Tuition expenses at an elementary or secondary school
 Medical, dental or nursing home expenses not covered by insurance
 Unusually high child-care or dependent-care costs
 Recent unemployment of a family member or an independent student
 A student or family member who is a dislocated worker as defined in section 101
of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998
 Enrollment of a dependent student’s parent in college
 A change in housing status that results in an individual being homeless as
defined in section 103 of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act.
 Other changes in a family’s income or assets.
The thoughtful use of professional judgment, especially to address a student’s financial
and family circumstances that may have changed from the base year information
originally reported on the student’s FAFSA, may be critical in determining whether the
student can enter or continue in postsecondary education. A changed circumstance
certainly includes the loss of a job or a reduction in work hours or wages, but it also
includes, for example, the income loss associated with a prospective student’s decision to
leave the workforce or to reduce work hours in order to return to school.
When adjustments are made that are related to the student’s or the student’s family’s
income, it is appropriate to use information that realistically reflects the individual’s
and/or family’s current and near-term economic situation. For example, for an individual
who has lost a job or has taken a significant salary cut beginning in November of 2013,
you may choose to project income for the next 12-month period (December 2013 through
November 2014) and use that figure instead of the base year income (calendar 2012) that
was initially used in the calculation of the student’s expected family contribution (EFC).
Of course, verifiable third-party documentation of the changed circumstances should be
obtained in order to support any decision to use professional judgment.
While not every student will become eligible for a Federal Pell Grant as a result of an
adjustment based on your exercising professional judgment, many may become eligible
for a subsidized Federal Stafford Loan or for assistance from one of the three campusbased programs. These federal student loans have much better interest rates, repayment
options, and other terms than those that are available with private educational loans,
credit cards, or most any other method of credit-based financing.
Remember that the examples provided in the law do not authorize across-the-board
adjustments. Even if students are found to meet the examples of special circumstances
listed above, the HEA still requires a case-by-case review by the financial aid
administrator. Each student must still demonstrate that a special circumstance exists that
can be documented and recorded by the financial aid office. As with dependency status
overrides, the aid office must also maintain documentation of the administrator’s written
INTRODUCTION 1-11
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determination made after review of the student's circumstances (i.e., whether to make any
adjustment, and the nature of any adjustment made). The prohibition against across-theboard adjustments does not prohibit an institution from identifying conditions that might
trigger a review by the financial aid administrator. Institutional policies and procedures
regarding the use of professional judgment can provide a basic framework for identifying
potential students for whom special circumstances consideration might be warranted, but
within that framework each student must be individually reviewed to determine whether,
in that student's particular case, the special treatment is indeed warranted.
When adjusting data items to account either for income loss or unusual expenses, the
administrator should look at the nature of the income that was reduced and the way that
family paid the unusual expenses, whether from current income or from asset reserves.
The majority of income or expense adjustments will involve the changing one of two data
items: (1) the family’s adjusted gross income (AGI); or (2) the family’s assets. For
example, in a situation where a family member is ill, one might adjust the AGI to reflect
lower earnings in the coming year or adjust the assets to reflect that family savings will
be spent on medical expenses.
In making adjustments for unusual expenses, the administrator must remember that the
income protection allowance (IPA) already factors modest allowances for basic living
expenses into the EFC calculation [30% for food, 22% for housing, 9% for
transportation, 16% for clothing and personal expenses, 11% medical expenses and 12%
miscellaneous]. Before making an adjustment for an unusual expense you must first
determine whether some or all of the expense under consideration may have already been
accounted for in the EFC calculation.
For example, a dependent student’s family of 4 (with 1 in college) has documented
$4000 in medical expenses. If the IPA for a family of 4 is $22,200, then 11% of $22,200
(that is, the % of the IPA covering a household’s medical expenses) = $2442. The final
adjustment would include just the incremental difference between the total documented
medical expenses ($4000) and the amount allotted to medical expenses for a family of 4
in the IPA ($2442). Therefore, $4000 - $2442 = $1558 which would be considered the
“unusual” amount of the expense.
Verification and Professional Judgment
If the applicant’s FAFSA information is selected for verification, the applicant must
complete verification before the school exercises any of its PJ authority under section
479(a) of the HEA to make changes to the applicant’s cost of attendance or to the values
of the data items required to calculate the EFC. If, as a result of verification, any of the
original FAFSA data are found to be in error, the school must submit these corrections to
the federal processor and wait for a new ISIR before making the adjustment.
Adjustments to data items must be made on correct data only. To ensure the PJ is made
on correct applicant data, PJ changes should not be submitted until after an ISIR has been
received confirming the processing of any verification corrections.
INTRODUCTION 1-12
SAM 2014-2015
If the FAFSA has not been selected for verification, the school may proceed with the PJ
adjustment without completing verification first. Transactions that reflect professional
judgment adjustments to an applicant’s FAFSA information will not be reevaluated under
the verification selection model and therefore, will not be selected for verification as long
as the FAA sets the professional judgment flag when the changes are submitted.
The school does not have to complete verification before submitting a dependency status
override because the authority to make an otherwise dependent student independent is
separate and apart from the authority to exercise professional judgment. If the
application is selected for verification by the CPS when processed, it would be necessary
to complete verification before awarding and disbursing aid.
Student Marital Status Changes
A change in a family’s economic situation after a FAFSA is filed due to the death,
separation or divorce of one of the parents of a dependent student, or the spouse of an
independent student, has long been recognized as a special circumstance that might
warrant the use of professional judgment because the information reported on the original
FAFSA may no longer accurately reflect a family’s ability to pay.
The verification regulations provide the FAA with the discretion to require an update to a
student’s marital status (and corresponding changes in household size, number in college
and dependency status) “to address an inequity or to more accurately reflect the
applicant’s ability to pay”. The FAA may change an applicant’s marital status without
regard to whether the applicant’s information was selected for verification. However, the
change in marital status can only be made if the change would result in a change in the
applicant’s dependency status for the award year.
There are now two reasons why a student might change the answer to the FAFSA
question concerning the student's marital status:
 Correction: If the answer on the FAFSA was incorrect as of the FAFSA
application date, the applicant may change the answer to correct the error.
 Update: If the answer on the FAFSA was correct as of the FAFSA application
date, but has subsequently changed, the college financial aid administrator may
choose to allow or disallow a change to the answer on the FAFSA.
In both cases the change in status should be reviewed by the college financial aid
administrator. Financial aid administrators should look for comment code 75 to identify
students who have changed the student's marital status.
If the student says that the marital status was in error, the FAA should ask for a copy of
the marriage certificate and compare the date of the certificate with the FAFSA's
application date. If the marital status was not in error, but has subsequently changed, the
FAA will need to decide whether to allow or disallow the change.
The FAA may update an applicant’s marital status on a case by case basis and must
document the reason for the decision. An institution that decides to update applicants’
marital status may have as part of its policy a cut-off date after which it will not consider
any updates to a student’s marital status.
INTRODUCTION 1-13
OSFA
When an applicant updates marital status, the CPS will apply Reject 21 to the resulting
transaction. If the FAA agrees to accept the applicant’s marital status change, he or she
will enter an appropriate administrator-only override that will result in a new transaction
with a corrected EFC.
When an allowable change in an applicant’s marital status is made, all other FAFSA
information that relates to the new marital status and new dependency status must be
updated, regardless of whether the student is being verified. This includes income (either
adding the spouse’s income/asset information or deducting a former spouse’s
income/asset information) as well as household size and number in college.
It is reasonable to expect that if a school chooses to update an applicant’s marital status,
it will be in situations where the marital status changes from single to married and the
dependency status changes from dependent to independent. However, under the
regulations, it is possible for an applicant who was independent only because he or she
was married when the FAFSA was first completed to go from independent to dependent.
If the institution changes the applicant’s marital status to unmarried, making the student
dependent, the FAFSA must be updated with parental information.
Note that the regulations do not allow for updating when an otherwise independent
student marries or divorces, i.e., there is no change in dependency status and the student
is not selected for verification.
Unaccompanied Homeless Youth
As a result of the CCRAA, a student is independent if at any time on or after July 1,
2008, he or she is determined to be an unaccompanied homeless youth by a school
district homeless liaison or the director (or designee) of an emergency shelter program
funded by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). A director (or
designee) of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program can
also determine a student to be an unaccompanied homeless youth or an unaccompanied
youth who is self-supporting and at risk of being homeless. These authorities make this
determination if the student is receiving their programs’ services or if, in the case of a
school district homeless liaison, the student is in high school. An FAA may also
determine if a student is either an unaccompanied youth who is either homeless or is selfsupporting and at risk of being homeless. In a case where it is the FAA making the
determination, it is important that students’ living situations and claims be examined on a
case-by case basis.
A student is considered homeless if he or she lacks fixed, regular, and adequate housing.
This is broader than just living “on the street.” It includes temporarily living with other
people because he or she had nowhere else to go; living in substandard housing (if it
doesn’t meet local building codes or the utilities are turned off, it is generally not
adequate); living in emergency or transitional shelters, for example, trailers provided by
the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) after disasters; or living in motels,
camping grounds, cars, parks, abandoned buildings, bus or train stations, or any public or
private place not designed for humans to live in. It also includes living in the school
dormitory if the student would otherwise be homeless. A student living in any of these
INTRODUCTION 1-14
SAM 2014-2015
situations and fleeing an abusive parent may be considered homeless even if the parent
would provide support and a place to live. There is no prescribed documentation for an
FAA’s evaluation of the living arrangements of a student, but it must demonstrate that
she meets the definition of this category of independent student. The determination may
be based on a documented interview with the student if there is no other written
documentation available. Students who are older than 21 but not yet 24 and who, if not
for their age, would be considered unaccompanied homeless youths or unaccompanied,
self-supporting youths at risk of being homeless, would have to be treated as a
dependency override.
Students Without Parental Support
Although students whose parents refuse support are not eligible for a dependency
override, the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 (HEOA) granted that such
students may receive unsubsidized Stafford loans only. For a student to be eligible for
this provision, the FAA must collect a signed and dated statement from the parents
indicating that (1) the parents refuse to provide information on the FAFSA (2) they do
not and will not provide any financial support to the student and (3) the student does not
reside with them. The date the support ended must be included as part of the statement.
If the parents refuse to provide such a statement, a third party statement from a teacher,
counselor, cleric, or court may suffice.
As noted above, this situation does not justify a dependency override. But as with
overrides, making this determination is up to the discretion of the FAA. If you decide
that a student falls into this category, you must document your decision and ensure that
the student submits a FAFSA and passes all the eligibility matches.
The result will be a rejected application with no EFC. You can then award the student
unsubsidized Stafford loans up to the maximum the student would normally be eligible
for depending on his grade level (but not the amount a student can get when his parent is
unable to get a PLUS loan). See DCL GEN-08-12 for more information.
INTRODUCTION 1-15
OSFA
Guide to Addressing Special Circumstances Chart
The following Guide to Addressing Special Circumstances suggests how one may
evaluate situations that would seem to warrant a professional judgment adjustment.
Apart from those conditions already mentioned in the previous discussion, such
circumstances might include 1) support of “extended” family members, i.e., persons
receiving support who do not qualify as family members according to FAFSA criteria; 2)
non-recurring or “windfall” income (or assets) that do not accurately reflect award year
resources; or (3) situations where families face unusually high debt burden not accounted
for in the federal methodology formulae. This chart has been adapted from NASFAA
Monograph #21 entitled: Professional Judgment in Eligibility Determination and
Resource Analysis, a useful document available in its entirety from
http://www.nasfaa.org. Another useful reference is Guide to Best Practices for
Professional Judgment prepared by Mark Kantrowitz which is available at:
http://www.finaid.org/educators/pj/.
Circumstance
Unusual medical,
dental or nursing
home expenses
Reason for
Response
Can be a hardship
affecting a family’s
ability to pay.
How to Gather
Information
See Table 1,
Attachment A.
Possible Data
Verification
1. Base year federal
income tax form,
Schedule A- Itemized
Deductions
2. Receipts of actual
medical, dental or
nursing home
payments.
Suggestions for
Implementing the
Adjustment
1. Reduce adjusted gross
income (AGI) by medical,
dental or nursing home
expenses that exceed a
certain percentage of total
income.
2. Reduce AGI by annual
installment payments
made for long-range
medical, dental or nursing
home care (e.g., cancer
therapy or orthodontic
work).
3. Consider such long
range indebtedness as
allowance against assets
(may be a more accurate
reflection of cash flow,
since expenses may be
paid for over a period of
years).
4. Other.
See Table 2,
Support of extended To address on a caseAttachment A.
family
by-case basis families
who provide financial
support to relatives who
are unable to support
themselves adequately
but don’t qualify as
family members using
INTRODUCTION 1-16
1. Receipts
2. Billing statements
1. Reduce AGI by amount
of support; or
2. Adjust household size;
or
3. Adjust assets; or
SAM 2014-2015
usual FAFSA criteria.
4. Other.
Circumstance
Reason for Response How to
Gather
Information
Elementary and
secondary school
costs; child care
and dependent
care costs.
Identified added
expenses related to
attendance at tuitioncharging schools, child
care, care of an elderly
family member.
Unusual debts
See Table 3,
Attachment A.
To address on a case-by- See Table 4,
Attachment A.
case basis families with
high debt payments for
unusual situations, such
as mortgages or credit
card debts to cover
unemployment expenses
or failed businesses;
legal fees for divorce,
adoption, etc.; education
loans of
parents/spouses; or
personal debts for nondiscretionary expenses.
Income reduction or To address on a case-by- See Table 5,
Attachment A.
case basis instances
non-recurring
when base year income
income
does not accurately
reflect a family or
student’s ability to pay for
education, such as
divorce or death , change
or loss of employment ,
disability, or receipt of
non-recurring (or
“windfall”) income.
Possible Data
Verification
Suggestions for
Implementing the
Adjustment
Base year federal
income tax return (# of
exemptions claimed,
credits taken for care
of dependent children,
elderly or disabled
family members);
receipts for tuition
payments; signed
itemized statement of
expenses.
1. Reduce AGI by tuition
expense amount; or
1. Contracts,
mortgages, or liens
2. Billing or payment
summaries from
persons, companies,
or agencies to which
money is owed.
1. Reduce AGI by amount
of total annual installment
payments on these debts;
or
2. Add amount of
dependent care expenses
to student’s cost of
attendance; or
3. Adjust assets; or
4. Other
2. Adjust assets, if this
treatment may be a more
accurate reflection of the
family’s cash flow, since
the debt(s) will be paid for
over a period of years; or
3. Other.
1. For estimated
income: signed
statements
documenting estimated
earnings; alimony or
child support
designated in divorce
agreements;
unemployment
compensation & JTPA
benefits; actual
disability & social
security benefits
received.
2. For non-recurring
income: base year
federal income tax
return, Schedule AItemized Deductions;
Form 3903 (moving
expenses); Schedule
D- Capital Gains &
Losses, etc.
1. Use expected year
income. Consider using
either anticipated current
year income or academic
year income.
2. If non-recurring income
was spent in the base
year, reduce AGI by that
amount.
3. Replace the “windfall”
amount with an average of
incomes over the past
several years.
4. If source of nonrecurring income is an IRA
or pension distribution that
has been rolled over, it
should not be counted as
either income or as an
asset because such
retirement funds are not
currently part of the need
analysis calculation.
5. Other.
INTRODUCTION 1-17
OSFA
Circumstance
Reason for Response How to
Gather
Information
Dependency Status To address on a case-by See Table 6,
case basis a student who Attachment A
does not meet the federal
criteria for independent
status but who may still
be considered to be
independent due to
unusual circumstances
(i.e. physical/ emotional
abuse by a parent,
abandonment, or
estrangement).
INTRODUCTION 1-18
Possible Data
Verification
Suggestions for
Implementing the
Adjustment
1. Student personal
statement
2. Base year federal
income tax return for
student
3. Court documents
4. Third party
statements
5. Rental agreement;
utility bills, etc.
1. Evaluate information
submitted to determine if
student should be
considered independent
based on “other unusual
circumstances” category
included in the statute.
2. Other
SAM 2014-2015
Attachment A
Table 1
Unusual Medical, Dental or Nursing Home Expenses (for independent
students/spouses and parents of dependent students)
1.
How much did you pay for your medical/dental insurance in 2013? (Do not include employer’s
contribution.)
$________________
2.
What were your 2013 medical/dental/nursing home expenses not paid by insurance? $_______
3.
Please explain if your unreimbursed medical/dental/nursing home expenses will be lower, the
same, or higher in 2014 or 2015, and why? _________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
4.
From what sources will you finance these expenses?
________________________________
$___________________
________________________________
$___________________
Table 2
1.
Extended Family Support (for independent students/spouses and parents
of dependent students)
Do you contribute financial support to a relative (or relatives) not counted as members of your
household?
_____Yes
_____No
If yes, complete the grid below for each relative indicated.
2.
Please explain if these expenses will be lower, the same, or higher in 2014 or 2015, and why.
_________________________________________________________________________________
3.
From what sources will you finance this support? ____________________________________
Name of
Supported
Relative
Age
Relationship
Support
Began
(Month/Year)
Support
Ends
(Month/Year)
Amt. Paid by
Other
Sources
Reason
for
Support
INTRODUCTION 1-19
OSFA
Table 3
Elementary and Secondary Education and Dependent Care Expenses
(for independent students/spouses and parents of dependent students)
1.
Do you pay for elementary or secondary education expenses or dependent care expenses?
_____Yes
_____No
2.
List family members and the amount of relevant support given for each by completing the
grid below.
3.
Please explain if these expenses will be lower, the same, or higher in 2013 or 2014, and why.
_________________________________________________________________________________
4.
From what sources will you finance these expenses? _________________________________
Name of
Supported
Relative
Table 4
Age
Relationship
Child Care Elementary
Expenses Education
Expenses
Secondary
Education
Expense
Adult
Dependent
Care
Expense
Total 2013
Annual
Expense
Unusual Debts
(for independent students/spouses and parents of dependent students)
1. Do you or your parents have unusual debts or loans for which you or they are currently making
monthly payments? (Include mortgages or credit card debts to cover unemployment expenses or
failed businesses; legal fees for divorce, adoption, etc.; education loans of parents or spouses; or
personal debts for nondiscretionary expenses.)
_____Yes
_____No
2. If yes, list type and purpose of debt, total amount owed and amount of monthly payment on
the grid below.
3. Please explain if these expenses will be lower, the same, or higher in 2014 or 2015, and why.
_________________________________________________________________________________
4. From what sources will you finance this support? ____________________________________
Type or
Cause of
Debt
INTRODUCTION 1-20
Who Owes
Amt. of
Original Debt
and Date
Incurred
(Month/Year)
Balance
Owed on
Debt
Date
Payments
Began
Monthly
Payment
Holder of
Debt
SAM 2014-2015
Table 5
1.
Income Reduction
(for independent students/spouse and parents of dependent students)
Will your income and/or your spouse’s or parents’ income be less in 2014 or 2015 than in 2013
for any of the reasons listed in question 2?
_____Yes
_____No
2. If “yes”, please check the appropriate reason and explain, giving the date of the change in your
situation.
Date:____________________________
a. ___ Unemployment or change in employment
c. ___ Death of student’s spouse or parent
b. ___ Divorce/separation
d. ___ Disability of student, or student’s spouse,
or parent
e. ____ One-time income (examples: inheritance, moving expense allowance, back year social
security payments, or IRA or pension distribution)
3. If 2e is checked, identify source of income and how funds were spent or invested.
_______________________________________________________________________
4. If 2a, 2b, 2c, or 2d is checked, please complete the following income information for the
period
_______________________(month/year) to _____________________(month/year).
5. If you or your parent are divorced or separated, give only your information or the
information of the custodial parent.
6. If the loss of income was due to the death of your spouse or parent, give only your
information or the information of your surviving parent.
_________________________________________________________________________________
Anticipated income
Wages, salaries, tips (including severance pay, disability payments and any income from work)
Other taxable income
Untaxed social security benefits
Public Assistance
Child support received
Other untaxed income
Total anticipated income
INTRODUCTION 1-21
OSFA
Table 6
Dependency Status
There are federal requirements that a student must meet to qualify for financial aid as an independent
student. If you do not meet one of the criteria for independence, you will be evaluated as a dependent
student, meaning that your parents must provide income and asset information. There may be special
circumstances that warrant re-evaluation of your status by a financial aid counselor. Please provide the
information requested below so that a final determination of you status can be made.
1. Please explain the circumstances in your family that have led to your being unable to obtain your
parents’ financial information or signatures on your FAFSA. Describe your past and current
relationship with each of your parents and provide a timeline with approximate dates of the events
leading to the break in the relationship with them.
___________________________________________________________________________
2. Please indicate the amount and the source (examples: your wages/benefits, support from parents,
monetary gifts from persons other than your parents, interest income) of your annual income for
2012 and 2013.
___________________________________________________________________________
3. Please complete the following information about your annual calendar year expenses:
(If any amounts are zero, please explain who pays for these expenses.)
_____________________________________________________________________________
Housing
_____________________________________________________________________________
Food
_____________________________________________________________________________
Transportation (car payments, insurance, gas, maintenance)
_____________________________________________________________________________
Utilities
_____________________________________________________________________________
Child care and/or dependent care
_____________________________________________________________________________
Personal (clothing, entertainment)
_____________________________________________________________________________
TOTAL
INTRODUCTION 1-22
STUDENT ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS
This chapter describes program eligibility requirements related to the applications process for
Title IV student financial aid. Treated separately in this manual are additional eligibility
requirements of verification (Chapter 4), good academic standing and satisfactory progress
(Chapter 5). The program eligibility issues covered in Chapter 2 include:
Citizenship Status
Registration with Selective Service
Overpayment of Title IV Grants
Default on Title IV Loans
CONTENTS
Overview of the Title IV Student Eligibility Requirements ................................................. 2-3
Documentation of Citizenship or Immigration Status ........................................................ 2-5
Eligible Categories ......................................................................................................... 2-5
Ineligible Categories ...................................................................................................... 2-5
Citizenship Match with Social Security Administration .............................................. 2-6
Children Born Abroad to U.S. Citizen Parents ................................................. 2-8
Lawful Permanent Residents and Other Eligible Non-citizens .................................... 2-8
Match with DHS Records – Primary Verification ............................................. 2-9
Automated Secondary Confirmation Match ...................................................... 2-9
Paper Secondary Confirmation Process ........................................................... 2-10
Acceptable Documents for Paper Secondary Confirmation ............................ 2-11
U.S. Permanent Resident ..................................................................... 2-11
Other Classifications of Non-citizen.................................................... 2-12
Documents Showing Non-eligible Statuses ..................................................... 2-14
Using the G-845 for Secondary Confirmation ............................................................ . 2-15
Sample G-845 Document Verification Request ............................................. . 2-17
Interpreting the DHS Response ...................................................................... . 2-19
Student Rights ................................................................................................. . 2-20
Native Americans Born in Canada ............................................................................. . 2-21
Citizens of the Freely Associated States ..................................................................... . 2-22
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-1
OSFA
Immigration Status Determined in Previous Award Year .......................................... .
Change of Status within the Award Year ................................................................... .
Replacing Lost Immigration Documents .................................................................... .
Financial Aid Eligibility for Non-Citizens Chart ....................................................... .
Summary Chart of Acceptable Documentation .......................................................... .
Sample Citizenship/Immigration Documents ............................................................. .
Ineligible Immigration Status Documents .................................................................. .
Common Non-Immigrant Categories and Visa Classifications .................................. .
Social Security Number Match .............................................................................................
Successful Match ........................................................................................................ .
No Match on SSN ....................................................................................................... .
No Match on Name or Birth Date .................................................................................
Missing Information .....................................................................................................
Date of Death ................................................................................................................
Applicants Using Same SSN ........................................................................................
When Does a Student Who Does Not Have a Valid SSN Establish Eligibility?..........
Selective Service Registration Compliance...........................................................................
Selective Service Match................................................................................................
Failure to Register .........................................................................................................
Selective Service Status Information Letters .............................................................
Registration Acknowledgment or Verification Postcards
.....................................
On-line Verification of Selective Service Registration ...............................................
When Does a Student Who Failed to Register Establish Eligibility? ...........................
Selective Service System -- Who Must Register ..........................................................
Summary of Selective Service Status Information Letters ...........................................
NSLDS Financial Aid History ...............................................................................................
NSLDS Match ..............................................................................................................
Match Successful ..........................................................................................................
Partial Match .................................................................................................................
Using the Customer Care Center To Resolve Data Conflicts .......................................
Student Not in Database or No Relevant History .........................................................
Processing Problem.......................................................................................................
Changes After Initial Match – Post-Screening .............................................................
Checking Financial Aid History for Transfer Students ................................................
Data Provider Information ............................................................................................
Resolving Default Status ..............................................................................................
Loan Status Codes and Eligibility Chart.......................................................................
When Does a Student Regain Eligibility After Resolving a Defaulted Loan? .............
When Does a Student Regain Eligibility After Resolving an Overpayment? ..............
Default on a Loan Made at a Closed School ................................................................
Effect of Bankruptcy or Disability Cancellation ..........................................................
Regaining Title IV Eligibility After Inadvertent Overborrowing.................................
Unusual Enrollment History Flag .................................................................................
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-2
2-22
2-23
2-24
2-25
2-26
2-27
2-31
2-32
2-33
2-33
2-33
2-34
2-34
2-35
2-35
2-35
2-36
2-37
2-37
2-38
2-39
2-39
2-39
2-40
2-42
2-43
2-43
2-43
2-44
2-44
2-45
2-45
2-45
2-45
2-46
2-46
2-47
2-50
2-50
2-51
2-51
2-51
2-52
SAM 2014-2015
Overview of the Title IV Student Eligibility Requirements
To be considered for assistance under the Title IV federal student aid programs, a student
must certify certain general eligibility requirements. The school is responsible for
ensuring that a student has met all of the relevant eligibility requirements before
awarding Title IV funds to that student.
A student must:
 Be a regular student enrolled or accepted for enrollment in an eligible program
at an eligible institution;
 Have a high school diploma or its recognized equivalent, [e.g., a GED
certificate] or complete his or her state’s requirements applicable to home
schooling;
 Not be simultaneously enrolled in elementary or secondary school;
 Be a U.S. citizen or national, or an eligible noncitizen;
 Have a valid, correct Social Security Number (SSN);
 Be registered with Selective Service, if required;
 Certify, by signing a Statement of Educational Purpose, that federal student aid
will be used only to pay for educational costs;
 Not be in default of a Title IV loan or owe an overpayment on a Title IV grant
or Federal Perkins Loan;
 Not have received grants or loans in excess of the annual or aggregate limits;
 Not have property subject to a lien for a debt owed to the U.S.;
 Be maintaining satisfactory progress (SAP);
 Not have disqualifying drug convictions; and
 Have financial need, if applicable.
In addition, a student’s eligibility for Title IV funds may be affected by such factors as:
 Prior degrees earned;
 Enrollment status;
 Remedial course work;
 Correspondence study;
 Study by telecommunications;
 Incarceration; and
 Conviction for drug offenses.
Finally, a student who is subject to an involuntary civil commitment after completing a
period of incarceration for a forcible or non-forcible sexual offense is ineligible to
receive a Federal Pell Grant.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-3
OSFA
Criteria Collected on the FAFSA
or through the Application
Process






Citizenship/Immigration
Status
Social Security Number
Selective Service
Registration
Default/Overpayment
Certain drug
offenses/convictions
Statement of Educational
Purpose
Criteria Collected or Monitored by
the School






Criteria That Must Be Resolved
If Conflicting Information
Exists
Enrollment as a regular student 
in an eligible program
High school diploma or
recognized equivalent, or home 
schooling
Borrowing in excess of annual
and aggregate loan limits
Satisfactory academic progress
Financial need
Individual program
requirements
Simultaneous enrollment in
elementary or secondary
school
Property subject to lien for
debts owed to the U.S.
The rest of this chapter discusses eligibility issues arising from the application process
[the first column of the above table]. Some of the school-based requirements from the
second column such as satisfactory progress and determining financial need are discussed
in later chapters of this manual (see Chapters 5 & 8). For requirements not discussed in
this manual, see the FSA Handbook, Vol. I, Student Eligibility.
Certain data provided by the student on the FAFSA is compared to information stored in
various federal databases. The following chart lists the federal agencies with which the
matches are conducted and a general description of the match.
Federal Agency
Social Security Administration (SSA)
Database Match
 Verifies an applicant’s (and the parents’ of a dependent
applicant) SSN as valid and corresponding to the name
& date of birth records at SSA
 Checks if the SSN belongs to a deceased person
 Verifies applicant’s claim of U.S. citizenship
Department of Homeland Security (DHS)  Verifies applicant’s eligible non-citizen status
Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration
Services
Selective Service
 Verifies registration of eligible males with Selective
Service
National Student Loan Data System
(NSLDS)
 Verifies applicant’s default and overpayment status
 Ensures that aggregate and annual award limits are not
exceeded
 Confirms that a student is eligible for Title IV funds
Department of Justice
 Detects the ineligible status of an applicant due to a
court’s sentencing in a drug possession or distribution
conviction
Veterans Administration (VA)
 Verifies applicant’s veteran status
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-4
SAM 2014-2015
When applicant data does not match in one or more of the federal databases, the
applicant’s application record is flagged by the CPS. When an application is flagged,
both the applicant and the financial aid administrator may have to take certain actions to
resolve the match flag before FSA funds may be awarded and disbursed. The following
pages describe how to resolve federal edits resulting from failed data matches in the
following categories:
 Citizenship and Immigration Status
 Social Security Number Issues
 Selective Service Registration Compliance
 Financial Aid History – Loan Defaults and Grant Overpayments
Documentation of Citizenship or Immigration Status
Eligible Categories
Students must meet one of 2 classifications to receive any Title IV grant, loan or work
assistance:
1. U.S. citizen or national
Persons are U.S. citizens by birth or naturalization. A U.S. citizen is a person born in the
50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and the
Northern Mariana Islands, as well as most persons born abroad to parents who are
citizens. All U.S. citizens are considered to be U.S. nationals, but not all nationals are
U.S. citizens. Natives of American Samoa, Swain’s Island or the U.S. Minor Outlying
Islands are non-citizen nationals and are eligible for federal student aid. Citizens of the
Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of
Palau are eligible for Federal Pell Grant, but may not receive federal educational loans.
2. U.S. lawful permanent resident who has an I-151, I-551, or I-551C (Alien
Registration Receipt Card).
If not a permanent resident, an eligible non-citizen must have an Arrival-Departure
Record (I-94) from DHS showing one of the following designations:
 “Refugee”
 “Asylum Granted”
 “Paroled into the United States pursuant to Section 212 of the I&N Act”
 “Cuban-Haitian Entrant, Status Pending”
 “Conditional Entrant” (valid only if issued before April 1, 1980).
Persons who have been designated as “victims of human trafficking” or “battered
immigrants-qualified aliens” are new categories of eligible non-citizen.
Ineligible Categories
 Students who have only a Notice of Approval to Apply for Permanent Residence
(I-171 or I-464) are not eligible for federal student aid.
 Students granted relief from deportation under the Family Unity Program
[“family unity status”] and students living and working in the U.S. as “temporary
residents” under the Legalization or Special Agricultural Worker program are not
eligible for federal student aid. (These categories became non-eligible categories
with welfare reform legislation [P.L. 104-193] and immigration reform legislation
[P.L. 104-208] enacted in 1996.)
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-5
OSFA
 Persons who are in the U.S. on non-immigrant visas such as an F1 or F2 student
visa , or a J1 or J2 exchange visitors visa, are not eligible for federal student aid
unless they also have an I-94 with one of the eligible endorsements.
See p. 2-14 of this chapter for more extended discussion of ineligible statuses.
Citizenship Match with Social Security Administration (SSA)
All applications are automatically matched with social security records to verify U.S.
citizenship status. A successful match occurs when all four social security match
elements (SSN, name, citizenship, and date of birth) are confirmed. There is no comment
on the SAR/ISIR when the match is successful but the match flag value will either be
blank or show an “A” meaning that the student’s status as a U.S. citizen was confirmed.
Once confirmed, the SSA Citizenship Flag is carried forward to next year’s application
and the match is not performed again.
If a student leaves the citizenship question on the FAFSA blank, CPS still attempts the
citizenship match with SSA. If there is a complete match with the student’s Social
Security Number, name, date of birth, and U.S. citizenship, the CPS will assume the
student to be a citizen. The CPS will reject the application for insufficient information if
one of the required items is not provided.
NOTE: the citizenship field on the student’s application record will remain blank even if
U.S. citizenship status is confirmed. In order to make other corrections, you must also
fill in this field with “U.S. citizen”.
U.S. citizens born abroad and naturalized U.S. citizens may fail the Social Security
citizenship match unless they have updated their citizenship information with the Social
Security Administration.
If one or more of the data items don’t match SSA records, a comment that applicant’s
citizenship status could not be confirmed will appear on the SAR/ISIR. If incorrect, the
student should make necessary corrections to SSN, name, or date of birth which will also
cause the citizenship match to be rerun.
If the Social Security match doesn’t confirm that the student is a U.S. citizen, a comment
will appear on the SAR/ISIR asking the student to provide documents proving citizenship
or, if the claim of U.S. citizenship is in error, to make a correction showing that he or she
is an eligible non-citizen. If the student is an eligible non-citizen, he or she must submit
a correction that includes the A-number so that a DHS match might be attempted.
Students whose status was not confirmed by SSA but who are in fact citizens must
provide documentation of citizenship status to the school. This documentation does not
have to be submitted to any federal agency for verification, but must be kept in the
student’s file. The student should be advised to contact SSA to update its database,
although this is not required for the student to receive aid.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-6
SAM 2014-2015
The school determines what documentation is acceptable to demonstrate U.S. citizenship;
ED doesn’t specify the documentation the student must provide. Acceptable citizenship
documentation for students born in the U.S. might include but is not restricted to:
 a copy of a birth certificate showing that he or she was born in the U.S.,
including Puerto Rico (on or after Jan. 13, 1941), Guam, the U.S. Virgin
Islands, American Samoa, Swain’s Island, or the Northern Mariana Islands,
unless the person was born to foreign diplomats residing in the U.S.;
 a statement attesting to U.S. birth signed by a person other than a family
member such as a priest, clergyman, or doctor;
 a U.S. passport book (current or expired). In the case of nationals who are not
citizens, the passport will be stamped “Noncitizen National.” Note: if the
passport shown is a “limited” passport, it is not acceptable documentation of
U.S. citizenship. Limited passports are often issued on an emergency basis to
U.S. travelers abroad who have had their passports lost or stolen and can be
issued without proof that the recipient is actually a U.S. citizen.
 a U.S. passport card which is accepted at U.S. land and sea ports of entry but
cannot be used for air travel.
Note: a social security card, driver’s license, voter registration card or baptismal record
does not document U.S. citizenship.
Acceptable citizenship documentation for persons not born in the U.S. might be:
 a Certificate of Citizenship (N–560 or N–561), issued by USCIS to
persons who derive U.S. citizenship through a parent;
 a copy of Form FS-240 (Consular Report of Birth Abroad), FS-545
(Certificate of birth issued by a foreign service post), or DS-1350
(Certification of Report of Birth) – these are State Department documents;
 a Certificate of Naturalization (N–550 or N–570), issued by USCIS
through a federal or state court, or through administrative naturalization
after December 1990 to those who are individually naturalized;
 a valid U.S. passport book or passport card (described above).
A Certificate of Citizenship must include: the certificate number (in the upper right
corner); the student’s name; and the date of issuance of the certificate. If issued to a
minor child, a Certificate of Citizenship may bear the signature of the parent instead of
the child, but this does not affect the legitimacy of the document. A Certificate of
Naturalization must include: the certificate number (in the upper right corner); the DHS
Alien Registration Number; the student’s name; the name of the court where the
naturalization occurred, and the date of naturalization. DHS has advised ED that these
documents may be photocopied to document eligibility for federal student aid funds).
Documents that are presented to the school to confirm U.S. citizenship must be the
original documents, not copies. These documents are not submitted to an outside
agency like DHS for confirmation, but must be kept in the student’s file.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-7
OSFA
Children Born Abroad to U.S. Citizen Parents
Foreign-born children of U.S. citizens are also U.S. citizens and their status is usually
indicated on the SSA database when they receive a SSN. If the SSA database is not
correct, such a student will fail the citizenship match. Such students should contact SSA
to correct their status. These students may also document their citizenship status by a
State Department-issued Form FS-240 (Consular Report of Birth Abroad) or Form DS1350 (Certification of Report of Birth). If the birth was registered with the American
Consulate/Embassy in a foreign country before the student turned 18, he/she can receive
a copy of the certificate by contacting: Passport Services, Vital Records Section, 1111
19th Street, NW, Suite 510, Washington, D.C. 20522-1705 [Tel: 202-955-0307].
The student should provide his or her name at birth, date and place of birth, parents’
names, dates and places of parents’ birth, a daytime telephone number and return address.
The request must be signed and, for Form FS-240, the student will need to include the
original form (to exchange it) or a signed affidavit that the original has been lost or
destroyed.
If the student’s birth was not registered and the student is now 18 years of age or older,
he or she can file a self-petition for a “Certification of Citizenship” to any local DHS
office (Form N–600). Proof of the parents’ U.S. citizenship at the time of the child’s
birth must be provided.
Lawful Permanent Residents and Other Eligible Non-Citizens
A lawful permanent resident is a non-citizen legally permitted to live and work in the
U.S. permanently. Persons who are not lawful permanent residents may be eligible for
federal student aid if they are in the U.S. for other than a temporary purpose and with the
intention of becoming citizens or permanent residents as in the following eligible
categories:
 Refugees are given indefinite employment authorization. Their refugee status
continues indefinitely unless revoked by DHS or until lawful permanent residence
is granted, which refugees may apply for after one year.
 Persons granted asylum are given indefinite employment authorization and may
apply for permanent residence after one year. Asylum status continues unless
revoked by DHS or until permanent residence is granted.
 Conditional entrants are refugees who entered the U.S. under the seventh
preference category of P.L. 89-236 or whose status was adjusted to lawful
permanent resident under that category. Not used after March 31, 1980.
 Cuban-Haitian entrants.
 Persons paroled into the U.S. for at least one year must provide evidence from
the DHS that they are in the U.S. for other than a temporary purpose and intend to
become either a citizen or permanent resident.
 Victims of human trafficking have the same eligibility for federal benefits as
refugees, but are certified for this status by HHS and not DHS (see p. 2-13 for
more information on this category).
 Battered immigrants-qualified aliens may be eligible for federal public
benefits, including federal student aid, under the Violence Against Women Act
(see p .2-13 for more information on this category).
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-8
SAM 2014-2015
Match With DHS Records – Primary Verification
If an applicant indicates on the FAFSA that he or she is an eligible non-citizen and
provides an A-number, the identifying information is sent to be matched electronically
with the DHS database for “primary verification” of the student’s eligible non-citizen
status. The results of the match are shown by a match flag in the FAA section of the
SAR/ISIR and by a written comment about the results in the comments section.
An application answering “U.S. citizen” to the citizenship question and providing an A
number will be matched with both the SSA and DHS database. If the DHS match
identifies the student as an “eligible non-citizen,” the results from the DHS data match
will take precedence over any results from the SSA match and the SSA citizenship match
flags won’t appear on the SAR/ISIR. However, the usual procedures for resolving any
DHS match discrepancies should be followed.
If a student leaves the citizenship question blank but provides an A-number, the CPS
assumes the student is an eligible non-citizen and will attempt to match the A-number
with DHS.
If the student leaves both the citizenship question and the A-number blank, the CPS
won’t attempt a match with DHS records and will reject the application. The student
must submit a correction that includes citizenship status and, if a non-citizen, an A
number.
If the student indicates eligible non-citizen but leaves the A-number blank or misreports
it, the match won’t be conducted. In such cases, the student receives ISIR Comment 142
and must submit a correction of the A-number so that the match can be conducted. In
these situations, the FAA may not initiate paper secondary confirmation to confirm the
student’s status because a DHS Verification Number will not appear on the ISIR record.
The DHS will not process G-845 forms without the DHS Verification Number (see p. 215 of this manual for more information).
After the student or school submits the A-number as an ISIR correction, the CPS will
once again attempt to conduct a match with DHS records. If the match is successful, an
ISIR comment will confirm the student’s claim of eligible non-citizen status and the
student may receive aid. If the match is conducted but the student’s status is not
confirmed, the student will be required to undergo Secondary Confirmation.
Automated DHS Secondary Confirmation
If the database match with immigration records fails to confirm a student’s eligible noncitizen status, DHS records are automatically re-checked to see if documentation that
confirms the student’s immigration status exists. If after 3 days the DHS has been unable
to confirm the student’s status, the CPS will generate a SAR/ISIR with a secondary
confirmation match flag of “P”, meaning that automated secondary confirmation is still in
progress.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-9
OSFA
When DHS finishes the confirmation, the results are sent to the CPS which, in turn,
generates another ISIR that replaces the “P” one of the following codes:
Automated Secondary Confirmation Comment Codes
Y
Citizenship status confirmed. The student is eligible for aid.
C
In continuance. DHS has not been able to confirm that the student is an eligible non-citizen.
The school should wait 10 business days for another ISIR with an updated match result. If
there is no update, school must begin paper secondary confirmation.
N
Citizenship status not confirmed. The DHS did not confirm the student’s citizenship status
as eligible. School must begin paper secondary confirmation.
X
DHS needs more information. Paper secondary confirmation is required.
Note: Schools should wait 5-15 business days for the results of automated secondary
confirmation before initiating the paper process.
Corrections When DHS Automated Secondary Confirmation Is Still In Progress
It is possible that the school or the student will make corrections to a transaction while
the DHS is still in the process of conducting automated secondary confirmation on that
transaction. If corrections for a transaction are received before secondary confirmation
has been completed on that transaction, the CPS will send the correction transaction to
the DHS once again for primary verification and, if necessary, automated secondary
confirmation. If the first transaction passes automated secondary confirmation, or if the
corrected transaction passes either primary verification or automated secondary
confirmation, the school can award and disburse aid to the student.
Corrections When DHS Automated Secondary Confirmation Has Been Completed
If a correction is made to a transaction after the automated secondary confirmation
process has been completed and a resulting systems-generated transaction has been sent
to the school, the DHS data match process will depend on the prior results. If the results
of the secondary match confirm the student is an eligible non-citizen, the CPS will not
send the record through the match again. Likewise, if primary verification results show a
match value of “Y”, the record will not be resent. If the student did not pass either the
primary verification or automated secondary confirmation on an earlier transaction, the
record will be resent to DHS.
Paper Secondary Confirmation
If the applicant fails primary verification or automated secondary confirmation, the
accuracy of the student identifiers should be confirmed, especially the DHS alien
registration number and DOB, before initiating paper secondary confirmation. If any of
the student’s information is incorrect, the corrections must be submitted to the CPS
before initiating paper secondary confirmation because the student might pass primary
verification with corrected information.
If the student’s information appears correct, or appears to conflict with other information
in the student’s file, then paper secondary confirmation must be conducted to confirm the
student’s status. In the paper secondary confirmation process, a student who is not a U.S.
national or a citizen of the Freely Associated States must furnish documentation that
shows an eligible non-citizen status. If the documentation provided shows reasonable
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-10
SAM 2014-2015
evidence of eligible non-citizen status, this evidence should be submitted to DHS to
confirm that the documentation is valid. If the documentation doesn’t provide reasonable
evidence of a student’s eligible non-citizen status, it should not be submitted to DHS; the
student is not eligible for federal student aid.
A copy of the immigration documentation the student submits, along with the secondary
confirmation results received from DHS must be retained in the student’s file.
Documents that are examined and photocopied for submission to DHS must be the
original documents, not copies. Care must be taken that the endorsement stamp (often
appearing in a rust-colored ink that is hard to copy) is legible on the photocopy.
Acceptable Documents for Paper Secondary Confirmation
U. S. Permanent Resident
The standard document for a lawful permanent resident is either the Permanent
Resident Card (Form I-551, since 1997) or the Resident Alien Card (Form I-551,
before 1997), referred to as “green cards” though they are not green. DHS has been
replacing the older Alien Registration Receipt Card (Form I-151) with these new cards
but the Alien Registration Receipt Card remains acceptable as evidence of permanent
residence for the purpose of receiving federal student aid.
Permanent residents may also present an Arrival/Departure Record (CBP Form I-94)
or the new Departure Record (Form I94A) with the endorsement “Processed for I-551.
Temporary Evidence of Lawful Admission for Permanent Residence. Valid until
_____________. Employment Authorized.” The form will have an A-number annotated
on it and is an acceptable document as long as the expiration date has not passed at the
time it is submitted for secondary confirmation.
The U.S. Customs Border Protection (CBP) now issues a machine readable visa (MRIV)
in the holder’s passport. The MRIV will have an admission stamp, and the statement
“UPON ENDORSEMENT SERVES AS TEMPORARY I-551 EVIDENCING
PERMANENT RESIDENCE FOR 1 YEAR”. An MRIV with this statement, contained
in an unexpired foreign passport and endorsed with the admissions stamp constitutes a
temporary I-551, valid for 1 year from the date of the endorsement on the stamp.
DHS now issues the U.S. Travel Document which replaces the Reentry Permit (Form I327) and the Refugee Travel Document (Form I-571). It is used by lawful permanent
residents (as well as refugees and asylees) and is annotated with “Permit to Reenter Form
I-327 (Rev. 9-2-03).”
A student who has an approved application for permanent residence on file with DHS
and is awaiting the receipt of the Permanent Resident Card may not have proof of his or
her status. In the absence of a “green card” or one of the forms of I-94 listed above, a
passport stamped “Processed for I-551. Temporary Evidence of Lawful Admission for
Permanent Residence. Valid until _____________. Employment Authorized.” would be
acceptable documentation of U.S. permanent residence. However, the expiration date
stamped in the passport must be valid for all semesters of the award period for which the
student is receiving aid.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-11
OSFA
The Marriage Fraud Amendments established a two-year conditional permanent
resident status for certain alien spouses and their children. The alien spouse of a U.S.
citizen or legal immigrant is given conditional permanent-residence status if the marriage
took place less than two years before the spouse applied for permanent residence status or
citizenship. On being granted conditional permanent resident status, aliens will be issued
a Form I-551 with a 2 year expiration date (rather than the usual ten). It can be
recognized because 1) the admission code on he front of the card begins with a “C”
(referring to the term conditional); and 2) there is an expiration date on the back of the
card. A conditional permanent resident alien must file a petition for removal of this
restriction in the 90 days preceding the expiration of the two-year period of conditional
status. After satisfactory review of the alien’s petition, the restriction will be dropped
and new documents issued. Conditional permanent residents holding an I-551 are
eligible to receive aid under the federal student aid programs until the expiration date.
If the student has an I-551 or I-151 with a baby picture, he or she should update it with
DHS. Permanent residents are expected to get a new picture and be fingerprinted at age
14. An I-551 or I-151 with a baby picture may be submitted to DHS and a student
ultimately paid as long as it can be confirmed that the “green card” in fact belongs to the
student. This is done by comparing the card to a current photo ID that has the student’s
name, date of birth, and signature. The information on the current photo ID must be
consistent with any other identifying information that you keep in the student’s file.
If a person is applying to suspend deportation, he or she must request a hearing before an
Immigration Law judge who will render a decision. If the decision is favorable, DHS
will give the applicant a Form I-551 which will certify his or her lawful permanent
resident status. Therefore, there is no special category for persons who have been
granted suspensions of deportation.
Other Classifications of Non-citizen
The most commonly presented evidence of status will be an Arrival/Departure Record
(Form I-94) stamped with one of the following:
Refugees may have Form I-94 or I-94A annotated with a stamp showing admission under
Section 207 of the Immigration Nationality Act (INA). They may have the old Refugee
Travel Document (Form I-571) or the new U.S. Travel Document mentioned above.
Persons granted asylum (asylees) will have an I-94 or I-94A with a stamp showing
admission under Section 208 of the INA. They may also have some of the same travel
documents mentioned above.
NOTE: A student in either of the above two categories who is applying for permanent
residence must return his or her original I-94 to DHS. While the application is being
processed, DHS will give the student a copy of the original I-94 which will include
endorsement “209a (or 209b) pending. Employment Authorized.” These students are
eligible for federal student aid as long as the I-94 has not expired.
Conditional entrants will have a stamp on the Form I-94 indicates the student has been
admitted to the United States as a conditional entrant. Although this status remains valid,
DHS stopped admitting individuals into the U.S. in this status after March 31, 1980. If a
student presents an I-94 with a conditional-entrant status granted after March 30, l980,
you shouldn’t disburse funds.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-12
SAM 2014-2015
Paroled persons (parolees) must have a stamp indicating that the student has been
paroled into the United States for at least one year with a date that has not expired.
(Federal student aid may not be disbursed after the document has expired.)
Cuban-Haitian entrants will have a Form I-94 with the following stamp: “CubanHaitian Entrant (Status Pending). Reviewable January 15, 1981. Employment Authorized
until January 15, 1981.” These documents are valid no matter what expiration date
appears.
Victims of human trafficking are entitled to the same federal benefits as refugees under
Section 107(b)(1)(A) of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act
(VTVPA). However, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has
responsibility for certifying an individual as a victim of human trafficking and not DHS.
HHS issues a Certification Letter to a victim age 18 or older and an Eligibility Letter to a
victim under the age of 18. Certain relatives of a victim in possession of a valid T-visa as
explained below may also be eligible.
When these applicants file a FAFSA, they will fail the DHS data match because DHS
does not have the eligibility status of victims of human trafficking from HHS in its
systems. Therefore, before Title IV program assistance can be disbursed, the FAA at the
school must confirm the applicant's status under the VTVPA.
The applicant must present to the FAA a copy of the Certification Letter or Eligibility
Letter that was issued by HHS. The FAA must call the HHS Office of Refugee
Resettlement at 1-866-401-5510, as noted on the letter, to verify its validity and to
confirm that HHS certification or eligibility has not expired. The FAA must document
the time and date of the call to the HHS Office of Refugee Resettlement, as well as
record the results of the call and retain a copy of the Certification Letter or Eligibility
Letter for the school records. Once the student’s status is confirmed through this process,
an otherwise eligible applicant may receive Title IV program assistance for the award
year. If the student applies for Title IV program assistance at the same institution in a
subsequent year, the FAA must re-verify that the student's Certification Letter or
Eligibility Letter remains in force by again calling the HHS Office of Refugee
Resettlement.
The spouse, child, or parent of a victim of human trafficking may also be eligible for
Title IV program assistance. These individuals will not have an HHS provided
Certification Letter or Eligibility Letter, but will have a T-visa (T-2, T-3, or T-4, etc.).
Such applicants will also fail the DHS data match. The FAA must follow the procedure
outlined above to verify the validity of the T-visa and Certification Letter.
See Dear Colleague Letter GEN-06-09 (May 2006) for more information and sample
certification and eligibility letters [http://www.ifap.ed.gov/dpcletters/GEN0609.html].
Battered immigrants-qualified aliens are immigrants who are victims of domestic
violence by their U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouses and who may, with their
designated children, be eligible under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) for
federal public benefits, including federal student aid. These students will fail the
“eligible non-citizen” match because information on these immigrants are not maintained
in the DHS system used to make the data match, so a separate procedure has been
established to establish eligibility for these students.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-13
OSFA
The student will need to provide documentation of their status to the FAA and the
specific documentation required is based on their case type: self-petition, suspension of
deportation, or cancellation of removal.
In self-petitioning cases, the immigrant applies to the USCIS who may approve or deny
the petition or indicate a “prima facie” case has been established. With an approval of a
petition, the USCIS will issue a Form I-797, Notice of Action Form that will indicate that
it is an approval notice. Separate approval notices would be issued to any dependent
children listed on the original petition. The approval notice documents an eligible
citizenship status for federal student aid for those persons listed on the notice(s).
A Form I-797 can be issued by USCIS indicating the establishment of a “prima facie”
case which will exist usually for a period of up to 180 days (with possible extensions)
until USCIS ultimately approves or denies the petition. Separate notices would be issued
to any dependent children listed on the original petition. As long as the deadline has not
passed, this notice documents an eligible citizenship status for federal student aid for
those persons listed on the notice(s).
An immigration judge may issue either a “suspension of deportation” or a “cancellation
of removal” of the abused person under VAWA. A copy of the court order documents
the citizenship eligible status for federal student aid for the persons listed on the
document as long as the order has not expired.
The FAA must examine the USCIS or court documents and retain a copy in the student’s
files. The original document can serve in subsequent award years as long as it has not
expired as long as the student also submits a dated, written statement that his or her
immigration status under VAWA remains in effect without change. If the documentation
has expired, it must be renewed.
If any document is unclear, the FAA may submit a completed G-845 form [with “Box
8—Other” checked and “VAWA Verification” specified] and a copy of the document to:
DHS-USCIS, 186 Exchange St, Buffalo, NY 14204. The student’s eligibility for aid will
be based on the result of the submission. For more information, see DCL GEN-10-07.
Documents Showing Non-eligible Statuses
If a document a student provides is for a non-eligible status, it should not be submitted to
DHS for secondary confirmation. DHS only confirms whether or not the document is
genuine, not if the student is eligible for federal student aid. Unless a student can submit
documentation for an eligible status, the student cannot receive aid.
An approved Form I-817, “Application for Family Unity Benefits,” indicates that a
student has been granted relief from deportation under the Family Unity Program. These
students are not eligible for federal student aid.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA) established a legalization
program (also called the amnesty program) for certain undocumented aliens. Though
allowed to work while their application or permanent residence was being processed,
they are not eligible for federal student aid. Students in this category might present
several kinds of documents to document their status: the Employment Authorization Card
(Form I-688A), Employment Authorization Documents (Form I-688B or Form I-766) or
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-14
SAM 2014-2015
the Temporary Resident Card (Form I-688). None of these documents qualifies the
student for federal aid.
[Note: Employment authorization does not, in and of itself, constitute proof of eligible
non-citizen status. Documentation showing only employment authorization is
inconclusive; the student needs to produce some form of acceptable documentation to
prove eligible non-citizen status.]
Students with non-immigrant visas are not eligible for federal student aid funds unless
they also have an I-94 with one of the eligible endorsements listed earlier. Nonimmigrant visas include the F-1, F-2 or M-1 Student Visa, B-1 or B-2 Visitor Visa, J-1 or
J-2 Exchange Visitors Visa, H series or L series Visa (which allow temporary
employment in the U.S.), or a G series Visa (pertaining to international organizations).
Students who have a “Notice of Approval to Apply for Permanent Residence (I-171 or I464)” (and who had not been in a previously eligible category) cannot receive federal
student aid. Therefore, a holder of an I-94 with one of the following endorsements is not
eligible for federal aid: “adjustment applicant,” “245,” “245 applicant,” or “applicant for
permanent residence.”
Some students are issued a Form I-94 stamped “Temporary Protected Status.” This is a
status used for persons who are from countries in upheaval, but is a temporary status in
that it does not provide for eventual conversion to permanent resident status. These
students are not eligible for federal student aid.
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) provides for a two-year grant of
deferred action to certain individuals who are not in lawful immigration status and
entered the United States as minors. Sometimes confused with the proposed, but not as
yet enacted DREAM Act provisions, DACA does not confer lawful immigration status
upon recipients, nor does it provide a pathway to citizenship. DACA recipients are
eligible for work authorization and to apply for social security numbers, but are not
eligible for federal or state financial aid assistance.
Using the G-845 for Secondary Confirmation
To initiate Secondary Confirmation, the FAA must complete a Form G-845 “Document
Verification Request.” This is a standard form that is used to ask the DHS File Control
Office to confirm that an alien’s documentation is valid.
Note: On January 8, 2012, USCIS issued a revised Form G-845 which carries an
expiration date 01/31/2015. Schools should begin using this new G-845 form as soon as
possible and discontinue using prior versions.
To complete the G-845, fill in fields #1-15 of Section A. Take care that under field #7,
“Case Verification Number” (the 15 digit number that is printed in the “FAA
Information” section with the match flags in Part 1 of the SAR) is correctly copied. This
number can also be found on the PETS Calculation Pull Down Panel under #6 “Matches”
(Match Flags Panel). Confirmation requests without this number cannot be processed.
DHS may cross out the DHS Verification Number the FAA provided on the G-845 form,
enter a new number and process the form. The FAA may ignore the change.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-15
OSFA
Always leave the following fields blank: #6, "Student and Exchange Visitor Information
System (SEVIS) Number" and #8, "Registered Agency Case Number".
If the G-1120 form (Status Verification Return Checklist) from DHS indicates that the
DHS Verification number is missing, but the number was clearly provided on the form,
check the number for accuracy. If the number is incorrect, make the necessary
corrections and resubmit the form. If the number is complete and correct, contact Marya
Dennis at 202-377-3385 or [email protected]
Attach a photocopy of the front and back sides of the student’s immigration document
and send this information to the File Control Office no later than 10 business days after
receiving this documentation from the student. If a response from DHS is not received
within 15 working days (10 working days plus 5 days mail time) from the time the G-845
was mailed, the FAA should document the file that DHS exceeded the time allotted and
that a determination of the student’s non-citizen eligibility had to be made without
benefit of DHS verification. Then after reviewing the student’s file, the FAA may use his
or her best judgment to determine whether the student meets the eligible non-citizen
requirements based on the documentation the student provided and proceed to award and
disburse any aid for which the student is otherwise eligible. The student’s file must duly
reflect that the DHS exceeded its time allotment and that the student’s non-citizen
eligibility status was made without DHS verification.
When secondary confirmation results in an eligible status, the G-845 must be retained in
the student’s file. If the confirmation process results in a discrepancy with DHS, no aid
can be disbursed or loans originated until the discrepancy is resolved. If the discrepancy
cannot be resolved, and aid was disbursed, it must be repaid (except for any FWS wages
earned). If the student is able to provide new information, it must be submitted to DHS
on a new G-845.
As long as these procedures have been followed, including notifying the student of the
discrepancy and withholding further disbursements and loan certifications, the institution
is not liable for any aid disbursed prior to secondary confirmation (assuming there was no
other conflicting information prior to the disbursement and available documentation had
been found acceptable as proof of the student’s eligible non-citizen status.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-16
SAM 2014-2015
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-17
OSFA
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-18
SAM 2014-2015
Interpreting the DHS Response
The status verifier at DHS will mark one or more of the check boxes on the G-845. The
following table shows students’ eligibility status based on the box or boxes checked.
USCIS Response on G845
Lawful Permanent Resident alien of the United
States
Conditional Resident alien of the United States
Alien who is employment authorized in the
United States
Alien not authorized employment in the United
States
Alien who has an application pending for…
Alien granted asylum or refugee status in the
United States
Alien paroled into the United States
Alien who is a Cuban/Haitian entrant
Eligibility Status
Eligible for FSA funds
Eligible for FSA funds
Eligibility status inconclusive. Student must also
have another eligible status checked on the form
or provide other documentation that can be
confirmed by USCIS.
Not eligible for FSA funds
Eligibility status inconclusive. Student must also
have another eligible status checked on the form
or provide other documentation that can be
confirmed by USCIS.
Eligible for FSA funds
Eligible for FSA funds if paroled into the U.S. for
one year or more and there’s DHS evidence that
he is in the U.S. for other than a temporary
purpose and intends to become a citizen or
permanent resident.
Eligible for FSA funds
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-19
OSFA
Alien who is a conditional entrant
Alien who is a nonimmigrant
Eligible for FSA funds
Not eligible for FSA funds
American Indian born in Canada
Likely eligible for FSA funds if adequate Jay
Treaty documentation provided
U.S. citizen
Eligible for FSA funds. Note: G845 should not
be used to verify U.S. citizenship
USCIS is searching indices for further
This block is checked if the USCIS is withholding
information
judgment, pending further investigation on the
status or validity of documentation. The
student’s documentation should be accepted at
face value until the USCIS sends final
notification regarding immigration status. If the
student appears to be an eligible noncitizen
based upon your review of the documents, you
may award and pay the student any FSA funds
for which she is eligible. If the USCIS later
notifies you that the student’s documentation
isn’t valid, you must cancel further
disbursements, but your school isn’t liable for the
payments already made—the student is.
The document is not valid because it appears to Not eligible for FSA funds. This with the
appropriate subsidiary box are checked when
be: A. Expired, B. Altered, or C. Counterfeit
the document has expired, been revoked, or
when it appears to be counterfeit or altered.
Until this is resolved, no further aid may be
disbursed, awarded, or certified. If the student
does not take corrective action in a timely
manner, you must report the case to the Office
of the Inspector General. Notify the student that
unless corrective action is taken with the USCIS,
the case will be submitted to the OIG.
Unable to process request without an original
Ignore this comment; it does not apply to FSA
consent of disclosure statement signed by the
applicants
applicant
No determination can be made from the
Eligibility status inconclusive. Resubmit the Ginformation submitted
845 after obtaining a copy of the original alien
registration documentation.
No determination can be made without seeing a Eligibility status inconclusive. Resubmit the Gcopy of both sides of the document submitted
845 with copies of both sides of each document.
Cannot read document copy
Eligibility status inconclusive. Resubmit the G845 with higher quality copies of the original
documentation.
Student Rights
The student who doesn’t pass the DHS data match must be notified at the time the results
are received by the school and given at least 30 days to provide documentation of
immigration status. This 30 day period may extend past the end of the award year or
period of enrollment. During this period and until the secondary confirmation results are
received, students may not have their aid denied, reduced, or terminated. Disbursements
can be made to an otherwise eligible student pending an DHS response if at least 15
working days have passed since the date any documentation was submitted to DHS.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-20
SAM 2014-2015
If a student was erroneously determined to be an eligible non-citizen, the school would
not be held liable if it possessed no other conflicting data and relied on one of the
following for the determination:
 an output document indicating the student meets the requirements for federal aid;
 DHS determination of an eligible immigration status in response to a request for
secondary confirmation;
 immigration status documents submitted by the student, if DHS did not respond in
a timely fashion.
The student (or parent for PLUS borrowers) would be liable to repay any federal student
aid received if he or she is ineligible. On the other hand, the school would be liable it
had awarded and disbursed aid without one of the above types of evidence. In any
determination of ineligibility, the student must be notified and given the opportunity to
appeal and submit additional documentation in support of eligible non-citizen status.
Every student required to undergo secondary confirmation must be furnished the
following in writing:
 an explanation of the documentation the student must submit as evidence of
eligible non-citizen status such as the Summary Chart of Acceptable
Documentation on p. 2-26;
 the school’s deadlines for submitting documentation (must be at least 30 days
after the results of primary verification/automated secondary confirmation
have been received);
 notification that if the student misses the deadline, he or she may not receive
federal student aid funds for the award period (or period of enrollment); and
 acknowledgment that a final decision will not be made about the student’s
eligibility until the student has a chance to submit immigration status
documents.
Native Americans Born in Canada
Individuals born in Canada with at least 50% Native American blood have certain unique
rights under the Jay Treaty of 1794, subsequent treaties, and U.S. Immigration Law. The
Jay Treaty provides that persons born in Canada with at least 50% Native American
blood have the legal right to enter freely into the United States. They are automatically
deemed “lawfully admitted for permanent residence” and, thus, eligible for federal
student aid.
Because there are very few federal aid applicants eligible under the Jay Treaty, the
citizenship question on the FAFSA does not have a separate response for such students.
A Native American who is eligible for federal student aid because of the Jay Treaty
should report on the FAFSA that he or she is an “eligible non-citizen” and should fill in
the Alien Registration Number with “A999999999.” When the application is matched by
the central processor (CPS) with DHS, this response will not be confirmed. It is then the
responsibility of the financial aid administrator to obtain proof that the student has 50%
Native American blood and was born in Canada.
The following is acceptable documentation of the applicability of Jay Treaty status:
 A “band card” issued by the Band Council of a Canadian Reserve, or by the
Department of Indian Affairs in Ottawa;
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-21
OSFA
 A birth or baptismal record;
 An affidavit from a tribal official or other person knowledgeable about the
applicant’s or recipient’s family history;
 Identification from a recognized Native American provincial or territorial
organization.
If a Canadian-born Native American with at least 50% Native American blood can
provide one of the above forms of documentation, and meets other Title IV eligibility
criteria, the institution, after documenting the student’s file, may award the student
federal student aid.
Citizens of the Freely Associated States
Students who are citizens of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia,
and the Republic of Palau are eligible for Federal Pell Grants, but are not eligible for any
federal loans. These students should answer “eligible non-citizen” on the FAFSA but
leave the A-number item blank. (If they do not have a Social Security number, they are
to leave that item blank as well.) They should take care to provide the correct state
abbreviation for the “State of legal residence” item on the FAFSA. Because the student
isn’t providing the A-number, the application will not go through the DHS match. As
long as the student’s file contains consistent information about his or her citizenship,
citizenship documentation does not need to be collected.
Immigration Status Determined in Previous Award Year
Unless the school has conflicting information or reason to believe that a student’s claim
of citizenship status is incorrect, it may not require the student to produce DHS
documentation required of permanent residents or the other categories of eligible noncitizen if the student demonstrated in a previous award that he or she is:
 a born or naturalized U.S. citizen;
 a U.S. non-citizen national (a native of American Samoa or Swain’s Island); or
 a permanent resident of the Freely Associated States (e.g. Trust Territory of the
Pacific Islands or Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia and Palau)
or the Northern Mariana Islands.
A school may not request secondary confirmation if the student demonstrated eligibility
through secondary confirmation in the previous award year, provided that:
 the DHS documents used for secondary confirmation have not expired; and
 the institution has no conflicting information about that student’s status.
A school is not prohibited from requesting secondary confirmation for any student who
changes a response on an application from “not eligible” or “eligible non-citizen” to
“U.S. citizen.” If the school has conflicting documentation, reason to believe the claim
of U.S. citizenship is incorrect, or believes the submitted documentation is fraudulent, it
may also request secondary confirmation. To invoke the secondary confirmation
exclusion, the school must have actually confirmed the student’s status using secondary
confirmation. If DHS did not respond to the request in the previous year, the exclusion
has not been met.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-22
SAM 2014-2015
If the following categories are flagged with the citizenship edit, they must undergo
secondary confirmation each year:
 Temporary Form I-551. Students presenting this form in a prior year should
have received the permanent I-551 by the next year and should obtain from DHS
either a permanent I-551 or an updated endorsement on the temporary card.
 Refugee. The student may have been adjusted to permanent resident status or
may have had his or her status revoked
 Person Granted Asylum. The student may have been adjusted to permanent
resident status or may have had his or her status revoked.
 Cuban Haitian Entrant. The student may have been adjusted to permanent
resident status or may have had his or her status revoked.
 Person Paroled. The student may have been adjusted to permanent resident
status or may have had his or her status revoked.
 Conditional Entrant. This individual is still eligible as long as he or she holds a
departure record showing admission into this status through March 31, 1980.
However, you should refer the student to DHS. DHS is working on adjusting the
status of this category of persons to permanent resident status. If DHS continues
to designate the student to be a conditional entrant, you should note in the
student’s file that the student’s conditional entrant status was confirmed.
 Victims of Human Trafficking. The school must contact HHS each year to
confirm that student’s status is still valid.
Change of Status Within Award Year
If a student becomes a citizen or eligible noncitizen at any time during the award year,
the student may be paid Pell Grant or campus-based funds as if he or she had been
eligible the entire award year. For example, if a student attending school during the
2013-14 award year (July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014) is granted permanent-resident status
in May 2014 and is still enrolled in school at that time, that student may receive Pell
Grant and campus-based funds for every term they attended that the school considers part
of the 2013-14 award year.
Similarly, if a Direct Loan borrower becomes a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen
during a period of enrollment, his or her loan limit is equal to the limit that he or she
would have been allowed had he or she been a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen from
the beginning of the enrollment period.
In some cases, the expiration date on a student’s DHS documentation passes during the
award year. Provided the date on the documentation is valid when the school first
determines the student’s status for that award year, the student does not need to submit
new proof. However, if flagged for the next award year, the student would need to
provide valid documentation.
A school is required to check a student's citizenship status only once during the award
year. If a student loses citizenship or eligible non-citizenship status during an award year
or during a period of enrollment, the school does not need to take any action to prevent
the student from receiving aid.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-23
OSFA
Replacing Lost DHS Documents
If a student cannot locate his or her official DHS documentation, he or she must request
that they be replaced. Non-citizens who are 18 years and older must have immigration
documentation in their possession at all times while in the U.S. Requests for replacement
documents should be made to the DHS District Office that issued the originals.
The student will be asked to complete a Form I-90, “Application to Replace Alien
Registration Card” or a Form I-102, “Application for Replacement/Initial Nonimmigrant
Arrival-Departure Document.” PDF versions of these forms can be downloaded from the
DHS website at: http://ucis.gov/. A temporary I-94 might be issued while he replacement
documents are pending.
In cases of undue hardship, where the student urgently needs documentation of his or her
status, the Freedom of Information Act (FOI) allows the student to obtain photocopies of
the original documents from the DHS District Office that originally issued them. The
student can submit Form G-639 to make this request or simply send a letter to the district
office.
If unsure which district office issued the original documents, the student may send their
request to the FOI office in Washington, D.C. at:
Bureau of Citizenship & Immigration Services
Freedom of Information Act Office
ULLICO Bldg., 2nd fl.
425 I Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20536
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-24
SAM 2014-2015
Financial Aid Eligibility for Non-Citizens
Federal Pell
TAP
Title IV Aid (FWS,
Federal Perkins,
Federal SEOG),
Federal Direct Loan
Permanent U.S. Resident
Form I-151, I-551, or I-551C
X
X
X
X
Asylum Status Granted
Must be stamped on Form I-94
X
X
X
X
Refugee/Parolee Status Granted
Must be stamped on Form I-94
X
X
X
X
Victims of Human Trafficking
(and their spouses and children)
X
X
X
X
Battered Immigrants
X
X
X
X
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
N/E
N/E
N/E
X
Permanent Residency Pending
N/E
N/E
N/E
X
Asylum Pending
N/E
N/E
N/E
X
Refugee/Parolee Pending
N/E
N/E
N/E
X
Conditional Entrant* Temporary Refugee
Status
Must be stamped on Form I-94
X
X
X
X
Cuban/Haitian Entrant
Must be stamped on Form I-94
X
X
X
X
N/E
N/E
N/E
X
I-766 Holders
N/E
N/E
N/E
X
Undocumented Alien
N/E
N/E
N/E
N/E
Student Status
I-688 Holders
I-688A Holders
I-688B
No longer issued
Special Program
Funding
N/E - Not Eligible
* Dated prior to March 31, 1980
Note:
1. New York State residency is required for TAP and SEEK program.
2. New York City residency is required for College Discovery and Bi-Lingual program.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-25
OSFA
Summary Chart of Acceptable Documentation
As an alternative for a student who is having trouble obtaining replacement DHS documents,
the student may use a G-639 to request photocopies of the original documentation.
Citizen Not Born in the United
States
Certificate of Citizenship
Certificate of Naturalization
“Certification of Birth Abroad” Form FS-545,
DS 1350, or FS-240, “Report of Birth
Abroad”
U.S. Passport book or card
Must have student’s name, certificate
number and the date the certificate was
issued
Must have student’s name, certificate
number, Alien Registration Number, name
of the court (and date) where naturalization
occurred
Must have embossed seal “United States of
America” and “State Department”
Current or expired OK; limited passport not
OK
Non-Citizen National
U.S. Passport book or card
Must be stamped “Noncitizen National”
Permanent Resident
“Permanent Resident Card” Form I-551, or
the “Alien Registration Receipt Card” Form
I-151
Unexpired Foreign Passport
“Arrival Departure Record” Form I-94
U.S. Travel Document
OK if not expired at the time of
confirmation
Must be stamped “Processed for I-551" with
expiration date
May have Machine Readable Immigrant Visa
(MRIV) with admission stamp and following
statement “Upon endorsement serves as
temporary I-551 evidencing permanent
residence for 1 year”
Must be stamped “Processed for I-551" with
expiration date, or “Temporary Form I551,” with appropriate information filled in
Must be annotated with “Permit to Reenter
Form I-327 (Rev. 9-2-03).”
Other Eligible Non-Citizen
“Arrival Departure Record” Form I-94
Must be stamped Refugee, Asylum Status,
Conditional Entrant (before April 1, 1980),
Parolee, Cuban-Haitian Entrant
Victims of Human Trafficking
HHS Certification or Eligibility Letter or
T-Visa (if spouse or child of HTV)
Battered immigrants-qualified
aliens
Form I-797 Notice of Action approval or
prima facie letter or immigration judge’s
court order
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-26
Status must be verified each year by
confirmation phone call to HHS
SAM 2014-2015
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-27
OSFA
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-28
SAM 2014-2015
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-29
OSFA
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-30
SAM 2014-2015
Ineligible Immigration Status Documents
The following documents do not establish or support a student’s claim to be an
eligible noncitizen for federal student aid purposes.
Document
Reason
Temporary Resident Card (Form I-688)
The Immigration Reform and Control Act
of 1986 (IRCA) established a legalization
program (also known as the amnesty
program) for certain illegal aliens.
Eligible amnesty applicants were issued
an I-688 and were allowed to work in the
U.S. while their permanent resident
application was being processed.
Employment Authorization Card (I-688A) Allows a student to work in the U.S.
while his or her permanent resident
application is being processed.
Employment authorization does not, in
and of itself, constitute proof of a
student’s eligible noncitizen status.
Employment Authorization Documents
(I-688B or I-766)
Allows a student to work in the U.S.
while his or her permanent resident
application is being processed.
Employment authorization does not, in
and of itself, constitute proof of a
student’s eligible noncitizen status.
Form I-171 or I-464, Notice of Approval
to apply for Permanent Residence
Indicates that the student is eligible to
apply for permanent resident status.
Application for permanent resident status
does not constitute proof of a student’s
non-eligible status.
Form I-181, I-18111A or I-181B
Indicates that the applicant has applied
for permanent resident status, but does
not prove that permanent resident status
has been granted.
Form I-817, Application for Family Unity
Benefits
Indicates that the student was granted
status and relief from deportation under
the Family Unity Program. However,
status under the Family Unity Program
no longer qualifies as an eligible
noncitizen status.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-31
OSFA
Common Non-Immigrant Categories and Visa Classifications
A student holding a visa with any of the following visa categories or classifications is
a non-immigrant and not eligible for federal student aid.
Visa Category or Classification
A
B-1
B-2
C
D
E
F-1
F-2
G
H, L, and O
J-1
J-2
J, H-1B
K
M-1
M-2
P
Q
R
TPS
U
V
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-32
Description
Diplomatic and other foreign government officials,
and their families and employees
Temporary visitors for business
Tourist
Aliens in transit
Crewmen
International traders and investors
Students pursuing full-time academic studies or
language training programs at colleges, universities,
seminaries, conservatories, academic high schools,
and other academic institutions
Spouses and children of aliens with F-1s
Representatives to international organizations and
their families and employees
Temporary workers and their spouses and children
Aliens in educational and cultural exchange
programs
Spouse and children of aliens with J-1s
Physician, professor, scholar, teacher
Alien fiancées, spouses, and children of U.S.
citizens
Students enrolled in vocational or other nonacademic programs, other than language training
Spouses and children of aliens with M-1s
Performing athletes, artists, entertainers
Aliens in international exchange programs and their
families
Religious workers
Aliens with temporary protected status
Crime victims cooperating with federal investigations
Alien spouses and children of U.S. permanent
residents
SAM 2014-2015
Social Security Number Match
To receive FSA funds, a student must have a valid Social Security number. The CPS
conducts a match with SSA records to determine that a student’s SSN is valid and that
the name and date of birth associated with that number corresponds with the information
provided on the FAFSA. The Department also uses this match to confirm whether or not
the student is a U.S. citizen [see previous section]. Except for citizens of the Freely
Associated States, the CPS won’t process an application without a valid SSN.
The results of the match with SSA records appears on the SAR/ISIR in the “FAA
Information” section as the SSN Match Flag. If the match is unsuccessful, a comment
will appear on the SAR/ISIR giving the student instructions on how to resolve the
problem.
If the match is successful, there is no printed comment to the student and the CPS will
not rematch the student’s data with the SSA database on subsequent transactions, unless
the student makes corrections to name, birth date or SSN. Once the match elements have
been confirmed, the SSN flag for a successful match will be carried forward to next
year’s Renewal FAFSA and the match will not have to be performed again.
Successful Match
If the match with the SSA database confirms the student’s SSN, name and date of birth
on the FAFSA matches SSA records, the student may receive FSA payments. Once this
information is confirmed, the student may not change the SSN on his or her aid record. If
a student tries to change a previously confirmed SSN, the CPS won’t accept the change
and will refer the student to the FAA for help. In the unlikely event that the confirmed
SSN is wrong, the student must correct it by filing a new FAFSA.
No Match on the Social Security Number
If the SSN the student reported is not found in the SSA database, the student’s
application will be rejected and the student will receive a comment to correct the SSN or
to contact SSA if he or she believes the SSN to be correct.
If the student reports the wrong SSN on the original FAFSA, there are two ways to
correct it. The student may file a completely new FAFSA with the corrected SSN. The
student may also correct the SSN by changing the original application information.
When a student record is first created, the SSN and the first 2 letters of the applicant’s
last name comprise the CPS record identifier for the processing year. When a SSN
correction is submitted, the CPS updates the current SSN but leaves the record identifier
unchanged.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-33
OSFA
The Common Origination and Disbursement (COD) System uses the current [and
presumably correct] SSN to process records so it isn’t always necessary to change the
original “identifying” SSN even if incorrect. Caution: A student may use both the above
alternatives to correct an incorrect SSN, that is, he or she may submit a SSN correction
to the original application record and file a completely new FAFSA. In an instance like
this, PETS will show 2 separate student records – one with a student identifier that does
not match the current SSN and another where the identifying SSN and the current SSN do
match. Both records may be valid payable records and have their own series of separate
transactions. Though both records reside in PETS, FAP cannot distinguish between the 2
and will not allow the FAA to select the record they wish to pay on. This may cause the
COD origination record to be rejected. To get the student properly originated may
require OSFA intervention so that a payable record with consistent information can be
created on FAP and submitted to COD.
If a student becomes aware that he or she has used someone else’s SSN and a CPS
identifier has been created incorrectly, the student with the incorrect SSN must refile a
new FAFSA to create a CPS identifier with the correct SSN and should not submit a
SAR/ISIR correction. The student whose SSN was used incorrectly will need to submit a
correction FAFSA. [See below “Applicants Using Same Social Security Number” for
more information.]
If the number reported on the FAFSA is correct, but isn’t in the SSA database, the
student must contact directly a local or regional SSA office to update its database. Once
this is done, the student may resubmit the original SSN as a correction and the match
should be successful. NOTE: the student can’t simply resubmit the SSN as an ISIR
correction because the CPS will continue to reject the application until the SSA database
is updated.
If the SSN provided on the FAFSA was correct but is incorrect on the SAR/ISIR record
due to a CPS keypunch error, the student may contact the Federal Student Aid
Information Center at 1-800-433-3243 to get it resolved.
No Match on Name or Birth Date
If the student’s (or a parent’s) SSN is in the SSA database, but the name or date of birth
doesn’t match SSA records, the application will be rejected. If the student’s (or parent’s)
name or date of birth is incorrect on the SAR/ISIR, the student should submit corrections
to the CPS. If the student’s (or parent’s) name or date of birth on the SAR/ISIR is
correct, the student must re-enter the information and submit it to the CPS. The CPS will
then override the reject. The student is not required to correct this information with SSA
before aid is awarded and disbursed, but should correct this information with SSA to
prevent matching problems in future years. NOTE: If the student reports the current (or
later) year as his or her birth date, the application will be rejected and the student must
submit a correction.
Missing Information
No match is performed if the student doesn’t sign the FAFSA or provide a last name or
birth date. The FAFSA will be rejected and the student must submit a correction with the
missing data.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-34
SAM 2014-2015
Date of Death
If the SSA database shows a date of death with the SSN the student reported, the
application will be rejected. The student will either have to correct the SSN reported on
the FAFSA or contact SSA if the number he or she reported is correct. Note: in addition
to the above date of death match, the CPS will verify that the student’s SSN does not
appear on a Master Death File supplied to the CPS by SSA.
Applicants Using Same Social Security Number
When applicants with similar names report the same SSN by mistake, they may end up
with a shared record identifier. The record identifier is the SSN and the first two letters
of the applicant’s last name as reported on the initial FAFSA. This record identifier
remains the same on all subsequent transactions even if corrections are made to either the
SSN or the student’s last name.
If another student submits an application with the same SSN and the first two letters of
the last name, the CPS assumes the application is a duplicate application being submitted
by the first applicant. The only information that would be accepted from the second
application would be either an address or school name change. The student using the
wrong SSN must correct the error by filing a new FAFSA.
If the student using the correct SSN filed after the other student, he or she must submit a
special type of application called a “correction application.” The correction application
will allow the CPS to accept the student’s data instead of treating it as a duplicate and
continuing to provide the other student’s data on the SAR/ISIR.
If the student using the correct SSN applied first, his or her data should already be on the
SAR/ISIR record and a correction application should not be necessary. However, he or
she should make sure that the address and school choices have not been changed, and if
so, should make the appropriate corrections.
Both students should keep all copies of all output documents including those from the
first FAFSAs filed. This could be important in establishing whether or not an applicant
made an application filing deadline. If you believe a correction application is warranted,
obtain one by calling 1-785-838-2141.
When Does a Student Who Doesn’t Have a Valid SS Number Establish Eligibility?
If a student who was not able to provide confirmation of his or her SSN at the beginning
of an academic year provides confirmation of that number at some point during the
academic year, the student establishes eligibility for all Title IV programs (Federal Pell
Grant, campus-based funds, Federal Direct Loan, and FFELP), for the entire period of
enrollment (generally the entire academic year).
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-35
OSFA
Selective Service Registration Compliance
Men between the ages of 18 through 25 are required to register with the Selective Service
System. This requirement covers both U.S. citizens, permanent residents, and most other
men residing in the U.S. Students required to register with Selective Service must do so
to be eligible for FSA funds. Students may register with Selective Service by answering
a question on the FAFSA or register on-line at the Selective Service web site at:
http://www.sss.gov. Students who have questions about the Selective Service
registration requirement may contact the Selective Service at 1-847-688-6888.
In addition to females, major exceptions to the registration requirement are:
 men born before 1960;
 males currently in the armed services and on active duty (does not apply to
members of the Reserve and National Guard not on active duty);
 males who are not yet 18 at the time they complete their FAFSA (an update is
not required during the year, even if a student turns 18 after completing the
application);
 citizens of the Freely Associated States;
 non-citizens who first entered the U.S. after they turned 26 (If a male
immigrant can show proof of his date of birth from a driver’s license, state
ID, birth certificate or passport and his immigration entry date into the U.S.
from a) a date stamp on their I- 94 form, b) a dated passport immigration
stamp entry, or c) a letter from USCIS indicating his entry date, this is
sufficient documentation that he is clearly not required to register and no
Selective Service Status Information Letter is needed);
 non-citizens who entered the U.S. as lawful non-immigrants on a valid visa
and remained in the U.S. on the terms of that visa until after they turned 26 (If
a male immigrant can show proof of his date of birth from a driver’s license,
state ID, birth certificate or passport and his immigration entry date into the
U.S. prior to age 26 from a) a date stamp on their I- 94 form, b) a dated
passport immigration stamp, c) a letter from the USCIS indicating entry into
the U.S., or d) a student visa form (I-20) or other valid U.S. passport visa
stamp with expiration date (dates must be from entry date until age 26.).
There are other less common situations where registration isn’t necessary. If a student
wasn’t required to register prior to meeting one of the following criteria and continues to
meet one of these for the entire time through age 25, they are exempted from the
registration requirement. These are:
1. Students who are unable to register due to being hospitalized, incarcerated, or
institutionalized.
2. Students who are enrolled in an officer procurement program at the Citadel,
North Georgia College, Norwich University, or Virginia Military Institute.
3. Students who are commissioned officers of the Public Health Service on
active duty and members of the Reserve of the Public Health Service.
4. Students who are commissioned officers of the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-36
SAM 2014-2015
If one of these exceptional criteria applies, the school must document the student’s status.
If the student is not clearly exempt from the requirement to register, the student must
document the exemption by providing a Selective Service Status Information Letter.
Selective Service Match
The CPS matches student aid applications with registration records from the Selective
Service System. If the match shows that the student is registered, a comment to that
effect appears on the student’s SAR/ISIR. The student is considered eligible if the match
shows he is still too young to register and if the CPS successfully forwarded the student’s
name to Selective Service for registration.
If the Selective Service could not confirm the applicant’s registration, the SAR/ISIR will
have a “C” flag printed next to the EFC and one of the following three comments:
1. Comment 30: The Selective Service reports that the student has not registered
with them.
2. Comment 33: The student did not provide enough information for his name to be
sent to Selective Service, he is outside the age range for registration, or he did not
sign the form.
3. Comment 57: The student did not answer “yes” to both items 27 & 28 on the
FAFSA.
Until the registration problem is appropriately resolved, the school must withhold all
federal student aid funds and must not certify a loan application. Unless the financial aid
administrator has documentation proving that a student who receives one of these
comments is exempt from registration, the student must present appropriate confirmation
(that is, his Selective Service Registration Acknowledgment or his letter of Registration)
to the financial aid administrator. Otherwise, if the student does not have any of these
documents, he must reconcile the conflict with the Selective Service documenting that he
is registered or that he is exempt from registering. Selective Service does not provide
letters for females because females are not required to register.
Failure to Register
In recent years, a number of students have been denied aid because they failed to register
with the Selective Service before their 26th birthday. The Selective Service will only
register males age 18 through 25 leaving older students with no way to remedy their
earlier failure to register. However, these students may still be eligible to receive aid if
they can demonstrate that they did not knowingly and willfully fail to register.
A student who served on active duty in the armed forces but did not register before
turning 26 is still eligible to receive federal aid because it is presumed that a person who
has actually served in the armed forces was not trying to avoid registering for the draft.
The administrator should obtain the student’s DD- 214, “Certificate of Release or
Discharge from Active Duty,” which shows military service in the armed forces – other
than the reserve forces, the Delayed Entry pool, and the National Guard – and a release
under a condition other than dishonorable.
The financial aid administrator must determine whether a student who has not served in
active duty knowingly and willfully failed to register; that is, whether the student knew of
the registration requirement but, nevertheless, chose not to register. The financial aid
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-37
OSFA
administrator’s decision is final and cannot be appealed to the Department of Education.
However, the Department will hear appeals from students who have provided their
schools with proof of compliance with the registration requirement (i.e., that they are
registered or exempt from registration) but who are still being denied federal student aid
based on the registration requirement.
When deciding whether the student knowingly and willfully failed to register, the
financial aid administrator should consider the following factors:
1. Where the student lived when he was age 18 to 25. For example, if a student was
living abroad, it is more plausible that he would not come into contact with the
requirement for registration.
2. Whether the student claims that he thought he was registered. Mistakes in record
keeping can occur. Correspondence indicating an attempt to register could form a
basis for determining that the student did not knowingly and willfully fail to
register. On the other hand, a letter from Selective Service stating that it received
no response to correspondence sent to the student at a correct address would be a
negative factor.
3. Why the student was not aware of the widely publicized requirement to register
when he was age 18 through 25.
Selective Service Status Information Letters
A student who cannot prove that s/he meets one of the allowable exemptions regarding
registration or document that he has served in active duty in the armed forces must write
to Selective Service to obtain a Status Information Letter addressing the failure to
register. The student should provide as complete a description about his situation as
possible: where he was living during the period when he should have registered, whether
he was incarcerated or institutionalized, his citizenship status during the period, if
applicable, and so on. In reply, the student will receive a coded Status Information Letter
which he should submit to the FAA. The letter codes are listed here:
E1-E8 – student was not required to register or was exempt the entire time he could
have registered (ages 18 through 25).
NM – student did not register although he was on active duty in the armed forces
only for a portion of the time when he could have registered (between ages 18
through 25) and was, therefore, required to register.
NR – student was born before 1960 and not required to register.
RD – student provided a reason or documentation of an exemption from registering
but Selective Service determined the reason or documentation to be invalid.
RH – student was sent one or more letters requesting that he register during the
required period, but all letters were returned by post office.
RL – student was required to register but Selective Service has no record of his
registration; records show one or more letters were sent requesting his compliance
with the requirement during the period he was required to be registered.
RR – student said he tried to register but Selective Service has no proof that he did.
If the student receives a “general exemption letter” (codes E1-E8) or a “1960” letter, the
student is exempt from registration and may receive FSA funds. If the student receives
any other type of letter, the school must determine (based on all relevant evidence)
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-38
SAM 2014-2015
whether the student knowingly and willfully failed to register. Most of these letters state
that the final decision regarding the student eligibility rests with the agency awarding
funds. For the purposes of the FSA programs, the decision is made by the financial aid
administrator who represents the Department.
Decisions about FSA eligibility for a man who failed to register with Selective Service
should not be based solely on the letter codes, but should be considered part of the
evidence that shows the failure to register was neither willful nor knowing. For example,
if the student received a code RL letter (indicating a compliance letter had been sent), this
would be a negative factor when the financial aid administrator makes the determination.
If the student received a “Military Service: Non-continuous” letter (code NM), the
financial aid administrator may reasonably determine that the student did not knowingly
and willfully avoid registration. If the school’s financial aid administrator determines that
the student’s failure to register was knowingly and willful, the student loses FSA
eligibility.
If the Selective Service System response time is longer than 30 days and if you have no
evidence that a student intentionally failed to register, you may award and disburse aid
without having received the SSS response. If the SSS response or other subsequent
information causes you to conclude the student did knowingly and willfully fail to
register, then he becomes ineligible for Federal Student Aid and he, not your school, is
responsible for returning the aid he received.
Registration Acknowledgment or Verification Postcard
If a student claims to have registered, he may provide a Registration Acknowledgment or
Verification postcard or letter of registration confirmation as valid proof of registration.
According to ED, a “returned postal receipt from the Selective Service” is the actual
receipt that results from the “Returned Receipt Requested” form mailed to registrants by
Selective Service and proves that the registration was received by Selective Service. A
signed receipt or statement from the postmaster who collected the student’s registration
form is not acceptable documentation, because it “does not prove that the registration was
actually received by Selective Service.”
Online Verification of Selective Service Registration
Colleges may verify a student’s Selective Service registration online by accessing the
Selective Service website at: http://www.sss.gov/.
When Does a Student Who Failed to Register Establish Eligibility?
If a student fails to establish that he meets the Selective Service registration requirements
at the beginning of an academic year, but meets them at some point during the academic
year while still enrolled, the student establishes eligibility for all federal aid programs
(Federal Pell Grant, campus-based federal aid programs, Federal Direct, and FFELP), for
the entire period of enrollment (generally the entire academic year) in which proper
registration status was determined.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-39
OSFA
SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM - WHO MUST REGISTER
Category
Must Register *
All male citizens born after
December 31, 1959, who
are 18 but not yet 26 years
old, except as noted below:
X
Members of the Armed
Forces on Active Duty
Cadets and Midshipmen at
the Service Academies or
Coast Guard Academy
Cadets at the Merchant
Marine Academy
X**
ROTC Students
X
X**
Males Rejected for
Enlistment
X
Civil Air Patrol Members
X
Lawful Non-immigrants on
visas (e.g. Diplomatic and
consular personnel and
families, foreign students,
tourists)
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-40
Copy of DD-214
X**
X
Aliens ****
X**
X
Delayed Entry Program
Enlistees
Separatees from Active
Military Service
Documentation
X
Students on Officer
Procurement Program ***
National Guardsmen and
Reservists not on Active
Duty (active duty for
training does not constitute
“active duty” for registration
purposes)
Not Required to
Register
X
Should provide a copy of
unexpired Forms I-94, I95A or Border Crossing
Document I-85, I-186, I586, I-444. If forms are
expired or the legal status
of the alien has changed,
the alien must register.
SAM 2014-2015
Category
Must Register*
Nationals or Citizens of
the Republic of the
Marshall Islands or the
Federated States of
Micronesia
Permanent Resident
Aliens
X
Refugee, Parolee and
Asylees Aliens
X
Undocumented Illegal
Aliens
X
Dual National U.S.
Citizens
X
CONFINED MALES
Incarcerated,
hospitalized or
institutionalized for
medical reasons
HANDICAPPED
Able to function in
public with assistance
Not able to function
in public
Females
Not Required to
Register
Documentation
X
Documentation of
citizenship. Exception: If the
individual has lived in the U.
S. for more than a year for a
purpose other than being a
student or employee of his
homeland, he must register.
X**
If incarcerated, must have
letter from head of
incarceration facility. If
hospitalized or
institutionalized, must have
physician’s statement or
letter from head of hospital
or institution.
X
Physician’s statement or
sworn statement of the
person who is responsible
for applicant’s well being.
X
X
* Men age 26 years or older and have not registered must submit a written request to the Selective Service System, General
Counsel’s Office, Washington, D.C. 20435, for an advisory opinion stating why he failed to register.
** MUST register within 30 days of release unless already 26 or already registered when released or unless exempt during
entire period 18 to 25
*** Students enrolled at: The Citadel, North Georgia College, Norwich University, and Virginia Military Institute.
**** Residents of Puerto Rico, Guam, Virgin Islands, and Northern Mariana Islands are U.S. Citizens, Citizens of American
Samoa are U.S. Nationals and must register upon establishing residence in the United States.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION WRITE: SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM, REGISTRATION INFORMATION OFFICE, P.O.
Box 4638, NORTH SUBURBAN, ILLINOIS 60197-4638 OR CALL THE TOLL FREE NUMBER: 1-800-621-3308.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-41
OSFA
Summary of Selective Service Status Information Letters
Letter Type
Reason
Action
E4
Military Service Age 18-26
Collect evidence that the student is on
active duty in the Armed Forces of the
United States (not the Reserves or the
National Guard) or collect a DD 214
“Certificate of Release or Discharge
from Active Duty.”
NM
Prior Military Service
Collect a DD-214 “Certificate of
Release or Discharge from Active
Duty.”
E2
E3
E5
Incarceration Age 18-26
Collect evidence issued by the federal
or state prison system that the student
was incarcerated continuously between
the periods of time stated in letter type
AK (from the student’s 18th birthday
through the student’s 26th birthday).
E1
E6
E7
Alien over age 26 or Alien who entered
the United States after age 26 or lawful
Non-immigrant or alien without notice
Collect a copy of the student’s DHS
documentation to show his legal date of
entry into the United States. Collect a
thoroughly detailed statement from the
student including the actual date of
entry into the United States, an account
of why the student failed to register and
an explanation of why that failure was
not knowing and willful.
NR
Born before 1960
No additional evidence required.
RD
Registration not found
Collect a thoroughly detailed statement
from the student including an account
of why the student failed to register and
an explanation of why that failure was
not knowing and willful. If the student is
not a citizen of the United States,
collect a copy of the student’s DHS
documentation to show his legal date of
entry into the United States. The
student’s statement should also include
the actual date of entry into the United
States.
Registration sent, returned not
deliverable
Registration sent, but not received
No further action required.
Student not eligible.**
RL
RH
RR
** Final determination of ineligibility is left with the FAA. If documentary evidence contrary to Selective
Service’s findings is presented, the student may be found to be eligible.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-42
SAM 2014-2015
NSLDS Financial Aid History
Students who have previously attended other colleges may have a financial aid history
that adversely affects their eligibility for FSA funds at their present college. A student’s
financial aid history is maintained and can be reviewed using the National Student Loan
Data System (NSLDS). NSLDS can also help track changes to the student’s financial aid
history through the Post-Screening and Transfer Monitoring processes. In general, a
student is not eligible for federal student aid funds if he or she is in default or owes a
repayment on a federal student aid grant or loan or is subject to a judgment lien for a
federal debt. Similarly, a parent may not borrow a PLUS Loan on the student’s behalf if
either the student or the parent is in default or owes a repayment on a federal student aid
grant or loan. Students are also ineligible if they have exceeded annual or aggregate loan
limits or have already been paid 100% of a scheduled Pell grant.
NSLDS Match
When the FAFSA is processed, the CPS matches the student against the National Student
Loan Data System (NSLDS) to see if the student is in default, owes an overpayment or
has exceed loan maximums. The FAA must resolve any conflicts between the NSLDS
information and any other information known about the student before awarding and
disbursing federal student aid funds.
Note: the CPS doesn’t perform any matches to determine whether or not the student is
subject to a judgment lien for a federal debt, and the administrator isn’t required to
check for such liens. However, if it is discovered that the student is subject to such a lien,
then he or she is not eligible for FSA funds.
The results of the NSLDS match are provided on the SAR/ISIR on the NSLDS Financial
Aid History page and in the FAA Information Section. As is the case for other matches,
a “C” next to the student’s EFC indicates a problem that must be resolved.
Match Successful
The SAR/ISIR will contain NSLDS financial aid history information if the student
identifying information matches the database and there is relevant information in the
database. Financial aid history will not be supplied on a rejected application. If the
student has no defaults or overpayments, or is in satisfactory repayment status, the
NSLDS match flag will be 1 and no C code will appear on the output document. A
match flag of 2, 3, or 4 with a C code indicates that the student has defaulted loans, owes
an overpayment or both. Documentation must be provided that shows the problem to be
resolved before disbursing aid. This means accounting for each defaulted loan or
overpayment and affirming its current status by individually or collectively matching
them to the documentation submitted from the loan holder or overpayment data provider.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-43
OSFA
Partial Match
If the student’s SSN is in the NSLDS database, but the first name and date of birth don’t
match what was reported on the FAFSA, then no financial aid history will be reported.
The SAR/ISIR will have the C code and a comment explaining that financial aid history
was not provided for this SSN because of the name/birth date discrepancy. The comment
will direct the student to work with the school to resolve any discrepancies. If the student
originally reported incorrect information on the FAFSA, the student should make the
appropriate corrections so that the correct data can be matched with the NSLDS database.
The FAA may access NSLDS directly using the student’s reported SSN to see if the
NSLDS record belongs to the student. A decision can be made by considering whether
the information on NSLDS is consistent with other information known about or provided
by the student (for example, the student may show evidence of a legal name change). If
the discrepancy is the result of the student misreporting the name or date of birth on the
FAFSA, the student should submit corrections to the ISIR record. However, the
information on NSLDS can be used to determine the student’s eligibility before the
corrected data is reported.
If it is found that the financial aid history associated with the student’s SSN doesn’t
belong to the student, it may be assumed that the student has no relevant financial aid
information. Although it isn’t required, the school or the student should contact the
agency that misreported someone else’s data using the student’s SSN. [See Dear
Colleague Letter GEN-96-13 for further information.]
Using the NSLDS Customer Care Center To Resolve Data Conflicts
The NSLDS Customer Care Center (CCC) is authorized to assist in the resolution of data
conflicts that affect the student’s Title IV eligibility, such as an incorrect student
identifier (i.e., the student’s first name, date of birth or SSN), an incorrect default or
overpayment status, an incorrect award amount, or a duplicate record. Schools may
report data conflicts directly to the NSLDS CCC by phoning 1-800-999-8219 and
selecting option 3 or sending an e-mail to: [email protected]
The definition of a data conflict does not include a current year Pell Grant issue, a loan
status that has recently changed, incorrect information in the history portion of a
student’s record, loan status that does not affect the student’s eligibility, the aggregate
loan determination for Consolidation Loans, or an incorrect middle or last name of a
student.
When a school reports a data conflict to CCC, a tracking number is assigned to the
reported conflict. The school must also provide documentation that substantiates the
requested data change along with the assigned tracking number before the CCC will
begin working with the school to resolve the conflict. When the conflict is resolved, the
data will be changed and the student notified. Note: the CCC cannot help students
directly. Students who contact the CCC will be referred back to the school, the FSA
Information Center, or to the Loan Ombudsman.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-44
SAM 2014-2015
Student Not in Database or No Relevant History
If a match with NSLDS is completed but there’s no information on the student in the
database, or if the student’s SSN matches a record in the database but there’s no relevant
financial aid history to report, it can be assumed that the student has no financial aid
history that would affect his or her eligibility for federal student aid funds (unless the
FAA is in possession of conflicting information).
Processing Problem
If a match with the NSLDS database cannot be conducted due to a processing problem, it
may be necessary to request a duplicate SAR/ISIR in order for the record to be sent
through the NSLDS match again. If corrections need to be made to the FAFSA data, the
NSLDS match will be conducted again when the corrections are processed.
Changes After Initial Match – Post-Screening
A school is only responsible for the financial aid history information it obtained from
NSLDS at the time it made a disbursement of Title IV aid. NSLDS informs schools
whenever significant changes to a student’s financial aid history that might affect
eligibility occur by means of post-screening. When these history changes are identified,
new output documents are generated and the schools listed for the receipt of the student’s
FAFSA information are notified. Schools are responsible to review such changes to the
student’s financial aid history to be sure there have been no changes that affect the
student’s eligibility.
A school isn’t held liable for any funds it disbursed to the student even if subsequent
information from the NSLDS database (or any other reliable source) indicates that the
student was not eligible for all or a portion of that aid, unless the school had access to
conflicting information that showed a lack of, or reduced eligibility for the student.
However, once a school becomes aware through NSLDS or any other means that a
student is no longer eligible and/or was not eligible for aid previously disbursed, it must:
1) Not disburse or deliver additional funds; and
2) Help make sure the student arranges to repay the aid for which he or she
wasn’t eligible.
Checking Financial Aid History for Transfer Students
The financial aid history of any student transferring to your school must be reviewed on
the ISIR or on-line at the NSLDS website to determine:
 whether the student is in default or owes an overpayment on a federal student
loan or grant;
 the student’s scheduled Pell Grant and the amount(s) already disbursed for the
award year;
 the student’s balance on all federal student aid loans;
 data pertaining to TEACH grants, including those converted to loans;
 the amount of and period of enrollment for all federal student loans for the
award year.
Through the transfer monitoring process, NSLDS checks a transfer student’s financial aid
history and alerts the school to any history changes at other schools affecting the
student’s current awards. In most cases, with transfer monitoring initiated, the financial
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-45
OSFA
aid history on the ISIR will be enough, though there may be instances where NSLDS
may have more information, if for example, a student has more than 6 loans.
There are three steps involved in initiating the transfer monitoring process: Inform,
Monitor and Alert. Students transferring into a school must be identified and reported to
NSLDS as “Inform” files. Schools may not disburse any FSA funds to a student for 7
days after the transfer monitoring request is made to NSLDS, unless the response is
received earlier than 7 days or unless the FAA checks the student’s history directly by
accessing the NSLDS web site.
NSLDS monitors these students for a change in financial aid history that may affect their
current awards and alerts the school when:
 a new loan, Pell Grant, is being awarded,
 a new disbursement is made on a loan, Pell Grant, or
 a loan or Pell Grant (or a single disbursement thereof) is cancelled.
Note: defaulted loan and overpayment information is not monitored in the transfer
monitoring process as it is already covered by post-screening.
Finally, when NSLDS creates an alert for one or more students at the inform school, it
sends an e-mail notice to the school’s designated contact person. That person accesses
the alert list on the NSLDS FAP website or from an electronic batch file, reviews the
revised financial aid history and makes appropriate adjustments to any awards either
disbursed or scheduled to be disbursed.
If the school has followed these procedures for obtaining financial aid history
information from NSLDS for its transfer students, it is not liable for any overpayments if
the student’s situation subsequently changes. However, the student will be liable for any
overpayments in this situation and would lose eligibility for further disbursements until
the overpayment is resolved.
Data Provider Information
If a school believes that NSLDS information about a transfer student is incorrect, it may
obtain official documentation from the appropriate data provider and can rely on that
documentation. For example, if NSLDS shows that a student received $3000 in Pell
Grant from a prior school, but the student claims to have received only $1500, the school
could contact the prior school and obtain documentation of the correct amount. It could
then rely on that documentation in making eligibility and award determination.
Resolving Default Status
A student who is in default on a federal student loan cannot receive further federal
student aid until the default status is resolved. This can be done in a number of ways.
Repayment in Full. A student can resolve a default by repaying the loan in full. If a
compromised amount for settling the debt is agreed to, or if the loan is successfully
consolidated, it counts as full repayment. Once the debt is satisfied, whether through
voluntary payments or from some involuntary means such as an IRS offset or wage
garnishment, the default status is removed and the student regains FSA eligibility.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-46
SAM 2014-2015
If a student has repaid a defaulted loan in full, but the financial aid history on the
SAR/ISIR or NSLDS still shows default status, the student must submit documentation
from the holder proving that the loan has been repaid in full. If the loan holder simply
writes off the loan, the loan is not paid in full and the student remains in an ineligible
status.
Satisfactory Repayment Arrangements. A student in default on a federal student loan
can regain eligibility for federal student aid funds if he or she has made repayment
arrangements that are satisfactory to the loan holder. After the student has made 6
consecutive, full, voluntary, timely payments of a mutually agreed upon amount to the
loan holder, the satisfactory repayment arrangement is established and the student regains
eligibility for federal student aid funds. A student may regain eligibility by making
satisfactory repayment arrangements only once. Once the loan holder has updated
NSLDS to reflect satisfactory repayment status on the defaulted loan, the student regains
eligibility for FSA funds. In the absence of updated NSLDS information, a written
statement from the loan holder indicating the student has made satisfactory repayment
arrangements is sufficient documentation of the arrangement.
Loan Rehabilitation. Although a student may regain federal student aid eligibility by
making satisfactory repayment arrangements, the loan is still in default. It is possible to
rehabilitate the loan, thereby removing the loan from default and restoring eligibility for
all the normal loan benefits, such as in-school deferments. A loan may be rehabilitated
by the borrower making 12 consecutive, full, voluntary, timely payments of a mutually
agreed upon amount to the loan holder.
Loan Status Codes and Title IV Eligibility Chart
CODE
STATUS
TITLE IV ELIGIBILITY
AL
Abandoned Loan
Yes
BC
No Prior Default, Bankruptcy Claim,
Discharged
Yes – loan was not in default and was
discharged
BK
No Prior Default, Bankruptcy Claim,
Active
Yes – loan was not in default
CA
Cancelled (Perkins: Loan Reversal)
Yes
CS
Closed School Discharge
Yes
DA
Deferred
Yes
DB
Defaulted, then Bankrupt, Active
(Perkins: all bankruptcies; FFELP or
Direct Loans: Chapter 13)
No, unless debtor can show that loan is
dischargeable. See Dear Colleague Letter
GEN-95-40, dated Sept. 1995
DC
Defaulted, Compromise
Yes -- compromise is the same as paid in full
DD
Defaulted, Then Died
No, if borrower is reapplying, loan status is in
error
DE
Death
No, if borrower is reapplying, loan status is in
error
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-47
OSFA
CODE
STATUS
TITLE IV ELIGIBILITY
DF
Defaulted, Unresolved
No
DI
Disability
Yes
DK
Yes – defaulted loan has been totally
Defaulted, Then Bankrupt,
Discharged (Perkins: all bankruptcies; discharged
FFELP or Direct Loans: Chapter 13)
DL
Defaulted, In Litigation
No
DN
Defaulted, Then Paid In Full Through
Consolidation Loan
Yes
DO
Defaulted, Then Bankrupt, Active,
other (for FFELP and Direct Loans in
Chapters 7, 11, and 12)
No, unless debtor can show that the loan is
dischargeable. See Dear Colleague Letter
GEN-95-40, dated Sept. 1995
DP
Defaulted, Then Paid In Full
Yes – loan was paid in full
DR
Defaulted Loan Included in Roll-Up
Loan
Yes – loan was combined with other loans and
subrogated to ED which reported the same
information to NSLDS in one loan – the status
of that loan determines eligibility
DS
Default, Then Disabled
Yes – loan debt is cancelled
DT
Defaulted, Collection Terminated
No
DU
Defaulted, Unresolved
No
DW
Defaulted, Write-Off
No [Note that there is no status code for
Perkins write-offs, which are for amounts less
than $50; see 34 CFR 674.47(h).]
DX
Defaulted, Satisfactory Arrangements, Yes, Yes, assuming student complies with
and 6 Consecutive Payments Made
repayment plan or forbearance granted by GA
DZ
Defaulted, 6 Consecutive Payments,
Then Missed Payment
No, the loan has returned to active default
status
FB
Forbearance
Yes
FC
False Certification Discharge
Yes
FR
No
Loans obtained by borrowers
convicted of fraud in obtaining Title IV
aid
FX
Loan once considered fraudulent but
now resolved
Yes
IA
Loan Originated
Yes
ID
In School or Grace Period
Yes
IG
In Grace Period
Yes
IM
In Military Grace
Yes
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-48
SAM 2014-2015
CODE
STATUS
TITLE IV ELIGIBILITY
IP
In Post-Deferment Grace (Perkins
only)
Yes
OD
Defaulted, Then Bankrupt,
Discharged, (for FFELP and Direct
Loans in Chapters 7, 11 or 12)
Yes, the defaulted loan has been totally
discharged
PC
Paid In Full Through Consolidation
Loan
Yes – consolidation loan can be through
FFELP or Direct Loan; underlying loans can be
in default
PD
Permanently Disabled
Yes
PF
Paid In Full
Yes
PM
Presumed Paid In Full
Yes
PN
Non-defaulted, Paid In Full Through
Consolidation Loan
Yes
PX
Identity Theft Discharged
Yes
PZ
PLUS Loan for student who has died
No for student
Yes for parent
RF
Refinanced
Yes, defaulted loans can’t be refinanced
RP
In Repayment
Yes
UA
Temporarily Uninsured – No Default
Claim Requested
Yes
UB
Temporarily Uninsured – Default
Claim Denied
Yes, because the loan is not a federal loan
while temporarily uninsured
UC
FFEL: Permanently
Uninsured/Unreinsured – Nondefaulted Loan
Perkins: Non-defaulted Loan
Purchased By School
Yes
UD
FFEL: Permanently
Uninsured/Unreinsured – Defaulted
Loan
Perkins: Defaulted Loan Purchased
By School
Yes, the loan is no longer a federal loan
UI
Uninsured/Unreinsured
Yes, does not matter if loan was in default
VA
Veterans Administration Discharge
Yes
XD
Defaulted, Satisfactory Arrangements, Yes, assuming student complies with
and 6 Consecutive Payments Made
repayment plan or forbearance granted by GA
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-49
OSFA
When Does a Student Regain FSA Eligibility After Resolving a Defaulted Loan?
Federal Pell Grant/Campus-Based Funds
For awarding and disbursing Pell Grant and campus-based program funds, a student who
resolves a default on a federal student loan within the award year regains eligibility for
these programs retroactively only to the beginning of the most recent payment period
during which the default was resolved (usually the semester).
For example, if a student was enrolled in a Fall/Spring semester-based academic year and
was in default on a federal loan at the beginning of that academic year, and if this same
student resolved the default sometime after the end of the Fall semester, but before the
end of the Spring semester, he or she would be eligible to receive Pell Grant or campusbased funds only for the Spring semester. This student would not be eligible to receive
these funds for the Fall semester.
Federal Direct Loans
For Direct Loan program funds, the student who is in default on a federal educational
loan regains eligibility for Direct Loan funds for the entire period of enrollment during
which the default was resolved. Since the Direct Loan program does not use payment
periods, for most students this would be for the entire academic year.
When Does a Student Regain FSA Eligibility After Resolving an FSA Grant or Loan
Overpayment?
If a student owes an overpayment on a federal student aid grant or loan at the beginning
of an academic year, but resolves the overpayment at some point during the academic
year, the student regains eligibility as follows:
Federal Pell Grant/Campus-Based Funds
For the Federal Pell Grant and campus-based programs, the student regains eligibility
retroactively to the beginning of the most recent payment period during which the
overpayment was resolved.
As in the example for the student who had defaulted on a federal student loan, if a student
was enrolled in a Fall/Spring semester-based academic year and owed an overpayment at
the beginning of that academic year, and if this same student resolved the overpayment
sometime after the end of the Fall semester, but before the end of the Spring semester, he
or she would be eligible to receive these funds only for the Spring semester. This student
would not be eligible to receive Pell Grant or campus-based funds for the Fall semester.
Direct Loan and FFEL Programs
For Direct Loan and FFEL program funds, the student regains eligibility for the entire
period of enrollment during which the overpayment was resolved. For most students, this
would be for the entire academic year since these programs do not use payment periods.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-50
SAM 2014-2015
Default on a Student Loan Made at a Closed School
If the school closed while the student was still enrolled, the student may be able to have
the student loan discharged if all of the following conditions are met:
1.
The loan was received on or after January 1, 1986.
2.
The student was enrolled at the school or on an approved leave of absence on the
day the school closed, or the school closed within 90 days after the student
withdrew from the school.
3.
The student has not completed, and is not in the process of completing, his/her
program of study, either by transferring academic credits or hours earned at the
closed school to another school, or by any other means.
If the student believes he/she is eligible to have the loan discharged based on the criteria
given above, the student should contact the holder of the loan to apply for the discharge.
If the student is not eligible for this loan discharge, he/she should contact the holder of
the loan to find out the best way to resolve the default status, including loan rehabilitation
and loan consolidation.
NOTE: If the loan was discharged because the school closed while the student was
enrolled, but he/she later completed the program of study at another school by
transferring one or more credit hours from the closed school, the closed school loan
discharge may be canceled and the loan may have to be repaid.
Effect of Bankruptcy or Disability Cancellation
A student who has filed bankruptcy or had a loan discharged for disability may need to
provide some additional documentation before receiving aid.
Bankruptcy
A student with a federal student aid loan or a grant overpayment that has been discharged
in bankruptcy remains eligible for federal student loans, grants and work-study. A
borrower does not have to reaffirm a loan discharged in bankruptcy in order to be
eligible. The Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1994 prohibits denial of aid based solely on a
bankruptcy discharge.
A borrower who has listed a defaulted federal student loan or a grant overpayment in an
active bankruptcy claim may be eligible for further federal student aid funds if the
borrower submits documentation from the holder of the loan that the debt is
dischargeable.
A borrower who includes a non-defaulted federal student loan in an active bankruptcy
claim, so that collection on the loan is stayed, is eligible for federal student aid funds as
long as he or she has no loans in default (including the loan included on the bankruptcy
petition).
In most cases, the NSLDS Loan Status Code (see the Chart on pp. 2-47 – 2-49 of this
chapter) will provide sufficient information on the default or repayment status of any
Title IV loan included on a bankruptcy claim.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-51
OSFA
Total and Permanent Disability Cancellation
Perkins, Stafford, and PLUS loan borrowers can have their loans canceled for a total and
permanent disability. Except for veterans who qualify for a total and permanent
disability discharge (TPD) by the Dept of Veterans Affairs, ED monitors the status of
borrowers who have applied for and received a TPD discharge. The monitoring period
begins on the day the discharge was granted and lasts for up to three years. If the
borrower fails to meet the eligibility requirements throughout the monitoring period, the
loan will be reinstated by ED. This same procedure holds for discharging and reinstating
the service obligation for TEACH grant recipients who become totally and permanently
disabled.
If a borrower whose loan has been discharged wishes to take out a new federal student
loan, or wishes to receive a TEACH grant, he or she must obtain certification from a
legally licensed physician stating that the student 1) has the ability to engage in
substantial gainful activity or 2) can attend school. Then the student must sign a
statement indicating that he or she is aware that the new loan or TEACH grant can’t later
be discharged on the basis of any present impairment unless that condition substantially
deteriorates to the extent that the definition of total and permanent disability is again met.
The borrower isn’t required to obtain a physician’s certification or to sign the statement if
he or she is applying for federal grants or work-study only.
If the borrower is in the post-discharge monitoring period, he or she must resume
payment on the discharged loan before receiving the new loan or TEACH grant. A
borrower who received a VA-determined discharge would not be required to resume
payment on the discharged loan.
If a defaulted loan was conditionally discharged, then reinstated, the student would have
to make satisfactory repayment arrangements on the reinstated loan before receiving the
new loan.
Regaining Title IV Eligibility After Inadvertent Overborrowing
Under the Department’s regulations at 34 CFR 668.35(d), a student who has
inadvertently exceeded annual or aggregate loan limits, and who is not in default on a
Title IV loan, may regain Title IV eligibility if the student: (1) repays the excess loan
amount in full; or (2) makes satisfactory arrangements to repay the excess amount.
Generally, an institution becomes aware that a student has exceeded an aggregate loan
limit from flags (and comments) included in the student’s ISIR that are generated from
information contained in NSLDS.
If a student who has inadvertently received loan funds in excess of an annual or
aggregate loan limit wishes to receive additional Title IV aid, the institution where the
student wishes to receive the aid must identify the loan(s) that resulted in the
overborrowing, make a determination that the overborrowing was indeed inadvertent,
discuss the overborrowing with the student, and resolve any discrepancies in the
information that is obtained.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-52
SAM 2014-2015
Examples of circumstances that may have resulted in a student inadvertently exceeding
an annual or aggregate loan limit include, but are not limited to: institutional processing
errors, missing or incorrect NSLDS information (e.g., capitalized interest incorrectly
included in a borrower’s aggregate outstanding loan balance), or unintentional student
error or omission.
(1) Repayment of the Excess Loan Amount
If a student who has inadvertently overborrowed wishes to regain Title IV eligibility by
repaying the excess loan amount, the student must contact the applicable servicer and
comply with the servicer’s repayment instructions.
Once the student has repaid the excess loan amount in full, the servicer will send the
student confirmation that the excess loan amount has been repaid. The student or
servicer must provide a copy of the repayment confirmation to the institution. The
inadvertent overborrowing is considered to have been resolved as of the date the servicer
received the borrower’s full payment of the excess loan amount.
(2) Making Satisfactory Repayment Arrangements for the Excess Loan Amount
(Reaffirmation)
A student who has inadvertently overborrowed may regain Title IV eligibility by making
satisfactory repayment arrangements acceptable to the servicer of the loan. The
satisfactory repayment arrangement requirement can be met if the student reaffirms the
debt by agreeing, in writing, to repay the excess amount according to the terms and
conditions of the promissory note supporting the loan.
Note: If NSLDS shows that a student consolidated the loan(s) that resulted in the
inadvertent overborrowing into a Direct Consolidation Loan (or, prior to July 1, 2010,
into a FFEL Consolidation Loan), no further action on the part of the borrower is
needed, since by signing the consolidation loan promissory note the borrower has agreed
to repay any excess loan amount.
The reaffirmation process includes the following steps:
1. Either the institution or the student contacts the servicer and explains that the
student has inadvertently overborrowed and wishes to reaffirm the debt.
2. The servicer sends the student a reaffirmation agreement.
3. The student reads, signs, and returns to the servicer the reaffirmation agreement.
4. The servicer sends the student confirmation that the reaffirmation agreement has
been accepted. The student or servicer must provide a copy of the reaffirmation
confirmation to the institution.
5. The inadvertent overborrowing is considered to have been resolved as of the date
the servicer receives the student’s signed reaffirmation agreement.
Effective Date for Regaining Title IV Eligibility
When an otherwise eligible student resolves an inadvertent overborrowing issue by one
of the methods discussed above, the student regains eligibility for the Pell Grant, campusbased, TEACH Grant, and Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant programs beginning with
the payment period in which the issue was resolved, and regains Direct Loan Program
eligibility retroactive to the beginning of the academic year in which the issue was
resolved.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-53
OSFA
Unusual Enrollment History Flag
The Unusual Enrollment History Flag indicates whether a student has a pattern of
enrollment involving the receipt of Federal Pell Grant (Pell Grant) funds at multiple
institutions within a three year time frame and is intended to address possible fraud and
abuse in the Title IV student aid programs. The specific enrollment pattern causing
concern is one where the student attends an institution long enough to receive Title IV
credit balance funds, leaves without completing the enrollment period, enrolls at another
institution, and repeats the pattern of remaining just long enough to collect another Title
IV credit balance without having earned any academic credit. Some students who have
an unusual enrollment history have legitimate reasons for their enrollment at multiple
institutions. However, such an enrollment history requires a review to determine whether
there are valid reasons for the unusual enrollment history.
A UEH Flag value of ‘N’ indicates that there is no unusual enrollment history issue and,
thus, no ‘C’ Code, no comments, and no action required by the institution.
A UEH Flag with a value of ‘2’ indicates an unusual enrollment history that requires
review by the institution of the student’s enrollment records to determine if the institution
must collect additional information about the student’s prior enrollment. An example of
an enrollment pattern that would generate a UEH Flag value of ‘2’ would be when the
student received Pell Grant funds at three institutions over two award years.
A UEH Flag with a value of ‘3’ indicates that the institution must review academic
records for the student and, in some instances, must collect additional documentation
from the student, as explained below. An example of an enrollment pattern that would
generate a UEH Flag value of ‘3’ would be when the student received Pell Grant funds at
three or more institutions in one award year.
Resolving Unusual Enrollment History Flags
An institution must take the following steps to resolve an ISIR-reported UEH Flag.
UEH Flag value is ‘N’: No action is necessary as the student’s enrollment pattern does
not appear to be unusual.
UEH Flag value is ‘2’: The institution must review the student’s enrollment and
financial aid records to determine if, during the specified three award year review period,
the student received a Pell Grant at the institution that is performing the review.


If the student received Pell at the school performing the review, no additional
action is required unless there is reason to believe that the student remained
enrolled just long enough to collect student aid funds.
If the student did not receive Pell at the school performing the review, or there is
reason to believe that the student remained enrolled just long enough to collect
student aid funds, the guidance provided below for a UEH Flag of ‘3’ must be
followed.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-54
SAM 2014-2015
UEH Flag value is ‘3’: The student’s academic records must be reviewed to determine if
the student received academic credit at the institutions the student attended during the
specified three award year period. Using information from the National Student Loan
Data System (NSLDS), the institution must first identify the institutions where the
student received Pell Grant funding during the three award year period. Based upon
academic transcripts it may already possess, or by asking the student to provide academic
transcripts or grade reports, the institution must determine, for each of the previously
attended institutions, whether academic credit was earned during the award year in which
the student received Pell Grant funds. Academic credit is considered to have been earned
if the academic records show that the student completed any credit hours or clock hours.


Academic Credit Earned: If the institution determines that the student earned any
academic credit at each of the previously attended institutions during the relevant
award years, no further action is required unless the institution has other reasons
to believe that the student is one who enrolls just to receive the credit balance. In
such instances, the institution must require the student to provide additional
information as discussed below under “Academic Credit Not Earned.” If it is
determined that academic credit was not earned at one or more of the previously
attended institutions, the institution must follow the “Academic Credit Not
Earned” guidance below.
Academic Credit Not Earned: If the student did not earn academic credit at a
previously attended institution and, if applicable, at the institution performing the
review, the institution must obtain documentation from the student explaining
why the student failed to earn academic credit. The institution must determine
whether the documentation supports (1) the reasons given by the student for the
student’s failure to earn academic credit; and (2) that the student did not enroll
only to receive credit balance funds.
In some cases, the student may present personal reasons to explain the failure to earn
academic credit. These reasons could include illness, a family emergency, a change in
where the student is living, and military obligations. The institution should, to the extent
possible, obtain third party documentation to support the student’s claim.
In other instances, the student may present academic reasons to explain the failure to earn
academic credit. For example, a school’s academic program presented unexpected
academic challenges, or did not meet the student’s needs. Again, the institution should,
to the extent possible, obtain third party documentation to support the student’s claim.
Much like the exercise of professional judgment, as provided by section 479A of the
Higher Education Act (HEA), the financial aid administrator determines whether the
circumstances of the failure of the student to receive academic credit, as evidenced by the
student’s academic records and other documentation, support the continuation of title IV,
HEA program assistance eligibility. Also, like professional judgment, these institutional
determinations are final and not appealable to the Department, and the reasons for the
decision must be documented and maintained for possible review.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-55
OSFA
Approval of Continued Eligibility
If the institution approves the student’s continued eligibility, the financial aid
administrator may choose to require the student to establish an academic plan, similar to
the type of plan used to resolve satisfactory academic progress (SAP) appeals as provided
in the regulations at 34 CFR 668.34(c) and (d). The financial aid administrator may also
wish to counsel the student about the Pell Grant duration of eligibility provisions
[Lifetime Eligibility Used (LEU)] and the impact of the student’s attendance pattern on
future Pell Grant eligibility.
Denial of Continued Eligibility
If a student did not earn academic credit at one or more of the relevant institutions and
does not provide, to the financial aid administrator’s satisfaction, an acceptable
explanation and documentation for each of those failures, the institution must deny the
student any additional Title IV/HEA program assistance. The student must be provided
with an opportunity to question and appeal the decision, consistent with the opportunities
to question and appeal similar financial aid determinations at the institution such as SAP
determinations and professional judgment decisions.
Regaining Aid Eligibility
If the institution denies a student continued Title IV/HEA program assistance under the
circumstances described above, it must provide the student with information as to how
the student may subsequently regain eligibility. Since the basis for the denial is the
student’s academic performance, it is expected that successful completion of academic
credit would form the basis for the student’s subsequent request for renewal of program
eligibility. This could include meeting the requirements of an academic plan that the
institution established with the student.
If the student meets the institution’s standards to regain eligibility for Title IV/HEA
program assistance, that eligibility would be effective under the same provisions that
apply when a student gains or regains eligibility under other student eligibility
requirements. For the Pell Grant and campus-based aid programs, eligibility begins with
the payment period in which the student begins to meet the eligibility requirements
(following the payment period of ineligibility); for Direct Loans, regained eligibility is
retroactive to the beginning of the enrollment period.
Authority
The authority for an institution to deny Title IV/HEA program assistance under the
circumstances described in this letter is section 484(a)(4)(A) of the Higher Education Act
of 1965, as amended, which requires the student to sign a Statement of Educational
Purpose. By signing the Statement of Educational Purpose as part of the student’s
submission of the FAFSA, the student certified that he or she would use the Title
IV/HEA program assistance received only to meet educational costs.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-56
SAM 2014-2015
CUNY Policy and Systems Support
Students who have UEH values equal to ‘2’ or ‘3’ will have a B segment error on FAP
and will be NOT OK TO PAY. [UEH flag ‘N’ will also display but requires no action as
these students have no history of unusual enrollment.] If upon review, the school
determines that the unusual enrollment pattern was justified, the “CS1OVDCC” field
should be updated to “Y” on the ‘S’ Page. Students identified with UEH flag ‘2’ should
be overridden if Pell was disbursed at the CUNY college performing the review at any
point during the three year review period.
A FAP Report querying Edit ‘BOG079’should be ordered from ProdUAPC in order to
receive a listing of affected cases. The list will include SS#, Name and UEH flag. This
list should be requested with some frequency (weekly).
CUNY has modified the Financial Aid Edit Letters to include students flagged with these
values and the Edit Letter will inform the student that “Your institution must collect
additional information about your previous enrollment history, please contact your
Financial Aid Office for further information”.
Colleges in Delivered CUNYfirst Financial Aid will have a checklist assigned that will
prevent disbursements. The Checklist code will be ‘FUEH’ and the message that will
display on the Student Service Center is “Your institution must collect additional
information about your previous enrollment history, please contact your Financial Aid
Office for further information”.
If the college performing the review is one of the colleges the student has received Pell
funds in the 3-year period, there is no action be taken for students flagged with UEH ‘2’
unless there is reason to believe fraud or abuse of funds is involved. If there are reasons
to believe of abuse of funds or fraud, then transcripts should be requested and reviewed
as thought the student was flagged as ‘3’.
Students identified with UEH ‘3’ flag should have the transcripts reviewed, and based on
the review of grades completed and earned credits, the student may need to be placed on
an academic plan, similar to those used for meeting Federal Satisfactory Academic
Progress. The student may need to submit statements and proof of reasons for failure to
meet academic standards. A committee review is recommended for these sets of students
as professional judgment will be necessary, but it is up to each institution on how the
review, denials of aid and appeals are performed.
The Office of Financial Aid is encouraged not to request duplicative documentation from
the students, and as a result, the collaboration of the Admissions and Registrar’s Offices
in this process is essential to expedite the review of the enrollment history and determine
potential financial aid eligibility.
PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-57
OSFA
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PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 2-58
DATABASE MATCHES
This chapter is excerpted from the 2014-15 EDE Technical Reference, 2014-15 ISIR Guide,
the 2014-15 SAR Comment Codes and Text, and other Department of Education bulletins.
This material is designed to assist the administrator by bringing together conveniently in one
place useful information about the 2014-15 delivery system. However, it is not intended to
replace the original source publications. Familiarity with the 2014-15 ISIR Guide in its entirety
is an essential prerequisite to effectively using the material contained in the following pages. All
the publications mentioned above can be accessed at the U.S. Department of Education’s IFAP
website: http://www.ifap.ed.gov/ifap/
The first part of the chapter outlines the major system changes for the new award year. You will
also find the Reject Codes and Reject Reasons with the Department’s instructions on how the
applicant is to resolve the reject.
The remainder of the chapter consists of the following items:
SAR Comment Texts with C Flags
Assumption Overrides
CUNY Edits
DATABASE MATCHES 3-1
OSFA
CONTENTS
Changes to FAFSA Data Elements .............................................................................................. 3-3
Changes to CPS Edits .................................................................................................................. 3-4
IRS Data Retrieval Tool............................................................................................................... 3-5
Changes to Verification ............................................................................................................... 3-7
Reject Codes and Reject Reasons ................................................................................................ 3-8
SAR/ISIR Database Match Flags and Comment Codes and Text ............................................. 3-12
CUNY Edits ............................................................................................................................... 3-12
Assumption Overrides ............................................................................................................... 3-13
DATABASE MATCHES 3-2
SAM2014-2015
Changes to FAFSA Data Elements
Revised Parents’ Marital Status Responses– The “Single” response for parents’ marital
status has been changed to“Never married” and a new response has been added labeled
“Unmarried and both parents living together”. The FAFSA instructs a dependent student to
provide information about both of his or her legal parents, regardless of the parents’ marital
status or gender, if the parents live together. The updated the instructions now define a legal
parent as the student’s biological and/or adoptive parent.
Revised Labels for Parent Questions– Adding the new “Unmarried and both parents living
together” response for the parents’ marital status question resulted in FAFSA field label
revisions for several of the parents’ demographic and financial fields. Gender-neutral labels are
now used when referencing a specific parent and are reflected on the paper FAFSA and
throughout our application processing systems, including the CPS, FAFSA on the Web, FAA
Access, and applicant communications (SAR, SAR Acknowledgement, eSAR, and ISIR).
New Tax Return Filing Status Questions– New questions to collect tax return filing statuses
for students and parents have been added. The new questions help to identify instances when the
reported tax filing status is inconsistent with the reported FAFSA marital status. Although the
reported tax filing status may accurately reflect the student or parent tax filing status for the
2013 tax return, if the student’s or parent’s marital status has changed, the financial information
from the IRS will not match what is expected based on the marital status as of the day the
FAFSA is completed. Identifying these instances enables the student or parent to be asked to
verify that the responses are correct and to restrict the use of the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (IRS
DRT) when the tax filing status for the 2013 tax return does not match the marital status at the
time the FAFSA is completed.
Examples of edits include:
•
If a student or parent with a marital status other than “Unmarried and both parents living
together” indicates he or she has “Already Completed” or “Will File” a tax return and
selects a 2013 tax return filing status that does not match the current marital status, then
we display a message to inform the student or parent the IRS tax information may not
reflect the current marital status. The student or parent is not eligible to use the IRS DRT
if his or her 2013 tax return filing status does not match the current marital status.
•
If a student or parent who was initially eligible to use the IRS DRT transfers data from
the IRS and the IRS tax return filing status is inconsistent with the reported FAFSA
marital status, then we no longer consider the data “Transferred from the IRS.” When
the student or parent returns to FAFSA on the Web, we inform the student or parent that
we do not identify questions pre-filled with IRS tax information as “Transferred from
the IRS,” because the tax return filing status transferred from the IRS does not match the
tax return filing status that he or she selected on the FAFSA.
In addition to adding the edits described above, we are adding the following edits to minimize
further the transfer of financial information from the IRS DRT that no longer reflects the student
or parent’s current marital status:
•
If a student or parent responds with a tax return filing status of “Don’t know” and is
otherwise eligible to use the IRS DRT, then he or she must provide an actual tax return
filing status before he or she can use the IRS DRT.
DATABASE MATCHES 3-3
OSFA
•
If a parent indicates a marital status of “Widowed” and provides a tax return filing status
of “Qualifying Widow(er),” then we instruct him or her to use the IRS DRT only if his
or her spouse’s income was excluded from the tax return.
Application processing edits generate a comment code that is included on the SAR, SAR
Acknowledgement, eSAR, ISIR, and in Student Inquiry whenever the tax return filing status and
marital status do not match.
Changes to CPS Edits
Student Date of Birth Edits – We revised our date of birth edits to enable applicants who
are under the age of 13 years and have completed their high school course work to apply for
Federal Student Aid for the cycle. The applicant must file using a “modified” paper FAFSA
that can be obtained by calling Federal Student Aid at (202) 377-3889. The applicant cannot
file using FAFSA on the Web.
Parents’ Marital Status Edits – We revised the current edits and added new edits for the
new response option for the Parents’ Marital Status question. Because of these changes, we
revised edits for Rejects E, F, J, K, S, T, 6, 7, and 9 and added new comment codes.
Tax Return Filing Status Edits – We added edits to the system for the two new Tax
Return Filing Status questions on the FAFSA. Because of these new edits, we added
comment codes 361 through 368.
Subsidized Usage Limit Applies Flag Edit – We added edits for the new regulations to
eliminate subsidies for Direct Subsidized Loans when a first-time borrower’s enrollment
exceeds 150% of the program length. Because of these changes, we added new edits that are
used to generate comment code 267. When an applicant’s status has changed, we generate a
new transaction and the NSLDS Post-Screening Reason code is set to 25.
Verification Edits – As we continue to analyze data and refine our verification selection
criteria, we determined a need for new edits. Due to the sensitive nature of verification edits,
we do not publish the details and conditions that cause an applicant to be selected for
verification.
New Reject 23, Eligibility Hold Edits – The new Reject 23 edits are part of our
verification data analysis. Applicants who meet the conditions for our new Reject 23 are in
an eligibility “hold,” and are not eligible for aid until they resolve the eligibility issue. To
resolve a Reject 23, the FAA or applicant must contact Federal Student Aid as described in
comment code 281. If the hold is removed, comment code 283 is set on the applicant’s
record.
New Reject 24, NSLDS Fraud Loan Flag Edits – We revised our edits for applicants who
have their NSLDS Fraud Loan Flag set to Y. Currently, we set comment code 272, warning
the applicant that he or she is not eligible for aid. Effective January 1, 2014, we revised our
edits for the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 cycles, and applicants who have the NSLDS Fraud
Loan Flag set to Y now receive the new Reject 24. Comment code 272 continues to be set.
DATABASE MATCHES 3-4
SAM2014-2015
IRS Data Retrieval Tool
IRS Request Flags on SAR/ISIR
IRS Request Flags for the student and parentsdisplay on the ISIR/SAR to help identify use
and non-use of the IRS DRT option. Values for the IRS Request Flag fields can be
translated into the following:
 Blank = IRS Data Retrieval Tool not available in the application method used by the
applicant (i.e., paper FAFSA, EDE, or FAA Access to CPS Online)
 00 = Student/Parent was ineligible to use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool and was not
presented with the option to use it.
 01 = Student/Parent was presented with the option to use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool
in FAFSA on the Web and elected to use it, but did not transfer IRS data into the
FAFSA
 02 = IRS data for the student/parent was transferred from the IRS and was not changed
by the user prior to submission of an application or correction
 03 = IRS data for the student/parent was transferred from the IRS and changed by the
user prior to submission of an application or correction
 04 = IRS data for the student/parent was transferred from the IRS and changed by the
user prior to submission of an application or correction
 05 = Student/Parent was presented with the option to use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool
in FAFSA on the Web, but did not elect to use it
 06 = IRS data for the student/parent was transferred from the IRS, but a subsequent
change made the student/parent ineligible to use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool
DATABASE MATCHES 3-5
OSFA
IRS Display Flags on SAR/ISIR
TheIRS Display Flags have been added to inform schools whether the IRS DRT was
displayed to the student or parent, and if not, the reason the DRT was not displayed.
Value Student IRS Display Flag
Parent IRS Display Flag
A
Student skipped the income and asset
Dependent student has special
questions – IRS DRT was not displayed circumstances or independent student
skipped the parent questions – IRS DRT
was not displayed
B
IRS DRT was displayed to student
IRS DRT was displayed to parent
C
Tax return filing status not equal to
Tax return filing status not equal to
“Already completed” – IRS DRT was
“Already completed” – IRS DRT was not
not displayed
displayed
D
Marital status date greater than or equal Marital status date greater than or equal to
to January 2014 – IRS DRT was not
January 2014 – IRS DRT was not
displayed
displayed
E
First three digits of SSN are 666 – IRS
First three digits of SSN are 666 – IRS
DRT was not displayed
DRT was not displayed
F
Not Applicable
Non-married parent or both married
parents entered all zeroes in SSN – IRS
DRT was not displayed
G
Not Applicable
Neither married parent entered a valid
SSN – IRS DRT was not displayed
H
Student amended his/her tax return –
Parent amended his/her tax return – IRS
IRS DRT was not displayed
DRT was not displayed
J
Student filed a Puerto Rican or foreign
Parent filed a Puerto Rican or foreign tax
tax return – IRS DRT was not displayed return – IRS DRT was not displayed
K
Student is married and tax return filing
Parents are married and tax return filing
status is married filed separate return –
status is married filed separate return –
IRS DRT was not displayed
IRS DRT was not displayed
L
Student is married and tax return filing
Parents are married and tax return filing
status is head of household – IRS DRT
status is head of household – IRS DRT
was not displayed
was not displayed
M
Conflict between the student’s marital
Conflict between the parents’ marital
status and tax return filing status – IRS
status and tax return filing status – IRS
DRT was not displayed
DRT was not displayed
Note: Used only when the student’s tax
Note: Used only when the parent’s tax
return filing status is NOT head of
return filing status is NOT head of
household or married – filed separate
household or married – filed separate
return. In cases where the student’s
return. In cases where the parent’s
marital status is married and the tax
marital status is married or remarried and
return filing status IS head of household the tax return filing status IS head of
or married filed separate return, IRS
household or married filed separate
Display Flag of K or L displayed.
return, IRS Display Flag of K or L is
displayed.
N
Not Applicable
Parents’ marital status is unmarried and
both parents living together – IRS DRT
was not displayed
Blank IRS DRT not available (for example,
IRS DRT not available (for example,
paper, EDE, or FAA Access)
paper, EDE, or FAA Access)
DATABASE MATCHES 3-6
SAM2014-2015
Changes to Verification
Other Untaxed Income to be Verified
For 2014-2015, certain applicants are required to verify the untaxed income information
they provided on the FAFSA in question 45 (Student’s 2013 Untaxed Income) for the
student and question 94 (Parents’ 2013 Untaxed Income) for the dependent student’s
parents. We place those records in the new V6 Verification Tracking Group for Household
Resources verification.
Verification Tracking Groups
Records selected for verification in 2014-2015 will be identified in the usual way. The
Verification Flag will be set, there will be an asterisk next to the EFC on the SAR and a
generic verification text message will be generated as part of the SAR cover letter. In
addition, applicants selected for verification will be placed into one of five groups indicated
by a separate Verification Tracking Flag indicator. The FAFSA information that must be
verified is based on the assigned Verification Tracking Group.
We made the following adjustments to the Verification Tracking Groups:
•
Records are no longer assigned to Verification Tracking Group V2 (SNAP-Food
Stamps) for2014-2015. Although the V2 group is no longer used, applicants in
Verification Tracking Groups V1, V4, V5, and V6 must still verify SNAP-Food
Stamps benefits if reported on the FAFSA.
•
New for 2014-2015, a Verification Tracking Group V6 (Household Resources) has
been added .For records placed in Verification Tracking Group V6, the applicant
must verify any Other Untaxed Income reported in FAFSA questions 45 or 94.
The new Verification Tracking Flag values and corresponding Verification Tracking Groups
are:
V1 = Standard Verification Group (Record selected because conditions based on
statistical analysis error-prone risk model were met)
V3 = Child Support Paid Verification Group (Record selected for Child Support Paid
criteria only)
V4 = Custom Verification Group (Record selected for Identity/Statement of
Educational Purpose criteria only)
V5 = Aggregate Verification Group (Record selected for Identity criteria/Statement of
Educational Purpose and Standard Verification criteria)
V6 = Household Resources Verification Group (Record selected for other untaxed
income)
Reporting V4 and V5 Verification Tracking Group Results
We added an Identity Verification Results feature to FAA Access, enabling FAAs to
provide the required verification results for students selected for identity and high school
completion status.
DATABASE MATCHES 3-7
OSFA
Reject Codes and Reject Reasons
Reject codes and reasons, and their associated SAR comment codes, are listed here. If a
student is rejected for more than one reason, the reject codes will appear in the FAA
Information Box in priority order. The resolution for a rejected SAR is always the
responsibility of the student, not the institution, and the SAR comment generated by the
reject explains what action the student must take.
*These Alpha reject codes are the same as the Reject Override Codes.
Reject
Code
*A
*B
*C
D
E
F
Reject Reason
Action
Date of birth year equals 1900
through 1939
Independent student and date of
birth equals 09-01-98 or greater,
and date of birth is not equal to or
greater than current year
Taxes paid is greater than 0 and
greater than or equal to a fixed % of
the AGI, but not equal to or greater
than the AGI [Parent or
Independent Student]
Student’s SSN match, but no name
match
Parent 1 SSN match, but no name
match
Parent 2 SSN match, but no name
match
Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value)
or correct date of birth.
Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value)
or correct date of birth.
Comment
Code
069
072
Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value)
or correct taxes paidand AGI.
154, 155
Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value)
student’s first and last name.
Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value)
Parent 1 last name and first initial.
Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value)
Parent 2 last name and first initial.
061
040, 377
051, 379
Taxes paid is greater than 0 and
Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value) 153
greater than or equal to a fixed % of or correct taxes paidandAGI.
the AGI, but not equal to or greater
than the AGI [Dependent Student]
Parent 1 SSN contains all zeros and Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value) **083, 388
*J
reported as a tax filer
for the Parent 1 SSN.
Parent 2 SSN contains all zeros and Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value) **084, 389
*K
reported as a tax filer
for the Parent 2 SSN.
**If both rejects J and K are on the ISIR, comment codes 083 and 084 are replaced with comment code
164 and comment codes 388 and 389 are replaced with comment code 391.
Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value) 080
*N
Missing first or last name
or correct student’s first or last name or
verify a blank first or last name field if the
student actually has only one name.
Student’s Social Security match, but Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value) 060
R
no date of birth match
or correct student’s date of birth.
Parent 1 Social Security match, but Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value) 016, 373
S
no date of birth match
or correct Parent 1 date of birth.
*G
DATABASE MATCHES 3-8
SAM2014-2015
Reject
Code
T
*W
1
2
Reject Reason
Comment
Code
017, 375
Action
Parent 2 Social Security match, but
no date of birth match
Unusually high number of family
members
Confirm (that is, re-enter the same value)
or correct Parent 2 date of birth.
If the student is dependent, confirm (that is, 178, 179
re-enter the same value) or correct parents’
number of family members.
If student is independent, confirm (that is,
re-enter the same value) or correct
student’s number of family members.
Simplified needs test is not met, and If student is dependent, and student’s asset 150, 151
auto zero EFC flag is not set, asset threshold exceed field = “yes” or blank,
threshold exceeded = “Yes”, and
provide student’s cash, savings or
checking; real estate/investment net worth,
anyasset data is blank
and business/investment farm net worth.
Provide same for student’s parents if
parents’ asset threshold field = “yes”.
If student is independent, provide student’s
cash, savings and checking; student’s real
estate/investment net worth and student’s
business/investment farm net worth.
Incomplete FAFSA
If the student is dependent, provide parent
taxed and untaxed income.
129, 130
If the student is independent, provide
student and spouse (if married) taxed and
untaxed income.
5
6
Student’s taxes paid is greater than
zero and equal to or greater than
AGI
Student’s marital status date on
initial application is greater than the
date the application was signed
OR
Student’s marital status date on a
correction transaction is greater that
the transaction receipt date
Missing or invalid date of birth
Parent 1 SSN not on SSA database
7
Parent 2 SSN not on SSA database
8
SSN match with date of death
*3
4
Correct student’s taxes paid or AGI.
114, 152
If student’s marital status date is after the
date the application was signed, correct
marital status [cannot be overridden by
FAA]
062
Correct date of birth
Correct identifying information for Parent
1 and/or Parent 2 to achieve full match.
Correct identifying information for Parent
1and/or Parent 2 to achieve full match.
Contact SSA to fix the error at SSA; then
re-enter name and/or DOB and submit as a
correction for an updated SSA match.
018
011, 369
012, 370
076, 140,
145
DATABASE MATCHES 3-9
OSFA
Reject
Code
9
10
11
*12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Comment
Code
Dependent student and some or all Correct SSN, name, and/or DOB for Parent 049, 387
of identifying information for both 2 and/or Parent 1 to achieve a full match
parents missing
for at least one parent.
Missing marital status or household If the student is dependent, review and
168, 169
correct parents’ marital status and parents’
size
number of family members.
If the student is independent, review and
correct student’s marital status and
student’s number of family members.
Marital status inconsistent with
If the student is dependent, review and
089, 099
correct at least one of the following:
reported incomes
parents’ marital status
orfather’s/stepfather’s income from work
and mother’s/stepmother’s income from
work.
If the student is independent, review and
correct student’s marital status and/or
student’s income from work and spouse’s
income from work.
Parents’ taxes paid is greater than
Correct taxes paid or AGI.
111
zero and equal to or greater than
AGI
Provide the following: Student’s last name 082
Missing name
and/or first name; or confirm (that is, reenter the same value) a blank first or last
name field if student actually has only one
name.
Reject Reason
Missing student signature on paper
FAFSA or SAR
Action
Signature may be corrected electronically
or submitted on a printed SAR certification
page.
Missing parent signature on paper
Signature may be corrected electronically
or submitted on a printed SAR certification
FAFSA or SAR
page.
Missing student signature on Web Signature may be corrected electronically
or submitted on a printed SAR certification
application
page.
Citizenship status is blank and SSA Provide citizenship/immigration status and
did not verify citizenship status; or alien registration number, if appropriate.
student reported not a U.S. citizen
or eligible non-citizen
SSN not on Social Security
Correct the SSN, or if SSN is correct,
contact SSA to fix the error in their
Administration’s database
records. Then re-enter SSN and submit as
a correction for an updated SSA Match.
DATABASE MATCHES 3-10
160
108
110, 285
068
024
SAM2014-2015
Reject
Code
19
*20
Reject Reason
Action
An EFC cannot be calculated
because the Dept. of Education has
placed a ‘hold’ on the student.
A non-filer is reporting an income
that is above the IRS filing
requirement
Student needs to call 202/377-3889 to
resolve comment 009.
Comment
Code
009
If the student is dependent, review and
126,131
correct the appropriate set of data from the
student’s tax return status/student’s income
or parent’s tax return
status/father’s/mother’s income.
If the student is independent, review and
correct the student’s tax return
status/income for student and spouse.
If the student’s marital status date is after 119
the date the application was received,
correct the marital status date and/or
marital status.
*21
Student’s corrected marital status
date is greater than application
receipt date and less than
transaction receipt date.
23
An EFC cannot be calculated
because the Department of
Education has placed an eligibility
“hold” on the student
Student needs to call 202-377-3889 to
resolve comment 281.
281
24
NSLDS Fraud Loan Flag is set
indicating loan was obtained
fraudulently
Student needs to contact the lender and
resolve issue to have the Fraud Loan Flag
reset in NSLDS.
272
DATABASE MATCHES 3-11
OSFA
SAR/ISIR Database Match Flags and Comment Codes and Text
Check the appendix to this manual to download a copy of the 2014-15ISIR Guide and Comment
Codes and Text document. This document contains detailed information on how to resolve
rejects, C flags, and other issues on the FAFSA that may require resolution.
2014-15 CUNY Edits
UAPC Edit
Code
MESSAGE
RCD063
Undergraduate Student Reports Graduate Student Status but enrolled in UG Program
RCD064
Undergraduate Student Reports Graduate Student Status but no Bachelors Degree
RCD075
Student answered “Yes” to Emancipated Minor Question
DATABASE MATCHES 3-12
SAM2014-2015
Assumption Overrides
Assumption
Override
Assumption
Made When
Override Flag
Is Not Present
1
Parents’ # in
college assumed
= 1 when # in
college > 6.
Parents’ AGI
assumed = sum
of father’s &
mother’s
income from
work.
Student’s # in
college assumed
= 1 when # in
college = # in
household &
both are greater
than 2.
Student’s AGI
assumed = the
sum of student/
spouse’s income
from work.
Amount of
parents’
Additional
Income from
FAFSA
assumed = 0.
2
3
4
5
6
Amount of
student’s
Additional
Income from
FAFSA
assumed = 0.
Results Of Setting
Override Before
Sending Data
Triggering
Assumption
Allow # in college to
be > 6.
Situation
Allow parents’ AGI to
be 0 if blank, or if 0 is
entered.
Parents’ AGI is blank or 0. Tax return
status is filed, will file, or blank. Father’s
or mother’s income from work is
positive or negative.
Allow # of family
members to be = # in
college when they are
= or > 2.
Independent student’s # in family = 3 or
more, or # in college is the same value.
Allow student’s AGI to
be 0 if blank.
Student’s AGI is blank or 0. Tax return
status is filed, will file, or blank.
Student/spouse’s income from work is +
or -.
Allow parents’
Additional Income
total to be > 0, and = or
> a fixed % of parents’
total income.
Parents’ calculated 2013 tax status =
filed. Additional Income total is > a
fixed % of parents’ AGI + parents’ total
from untaxed income.
Parents’ calculated 2013 tax status =
non-tax filer. Additional Income total is
> a fixed % of father/mother’s income
from work + parents’ total from untaxed
income.
Student’s calculated 2013 tax status =
filed. Additional Income total is = or > a
fixed % of student’s AGI + student’s
total from untaxed income.
Student’s calculated 2013 tax status =
non-tax filer. Additional Income total is
= or > a fixed % of student/spouse’s
income from work + student’s total from
untaxed income.
Allow student’s
Additional Income
total to be > 0, and = or
> a fixed % of
student’s total income.
Parents’ # of family members does not =
the # in college. Parents’ # in college = 7
or more.
DATABASE MATCHES 3-13
OSFA
THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY.
DATABASE MATCHES 3-14
VERIFICATION
Verification is the process by which the college reviews and documents the accuracy of the
information provided by selected student applicants and their families on the federal aid
application. In order to verify the information, the FAA collects tax records, signed statements,
and other documents and compares this information with the data submitted on the FAFSA. The
Department of Education designed verification as a way to reduce error rates in the data reported
by the student on his or her FAFSA so that eligible students receive the correct amount of
financial assistance.
This chapter outlines the minimum federal requirements for the verification of information on
student applications for Title IV funds as contained in 34 CFR 668, Subpart E (Verification and
Updating of Student Aid Application Information) and has been updated to reflect the revised
regulations published October 29, 2010 that took effect July 1, 2012. Further updates to these
regulations reflecting ED guidance subsequent to July 1, 2012 and the specific requirements for
“customized” verification in the 2014-15 academic year are also incorporated into this chapter.
CONTENTS
Selection for Verification...........................................................................................................
Discretionary Verification .........................................................................................................
Exclusions from Verification .....................................................................................................
Unsubsidized Student Financial Assistance Programs ........................................................
Death of the Student ............................................................................................................
Spouse Unavailable..............................................................................................................
Parents Unavailable .............................................................................................................
No Funds Disbursed.............................................................................................................
Verification Completed At Another School ........................................................................
Records Lost or Destroyed ..................................................................................................
Post-Enrollment ...................................................................................................................
Data Items to be Verified ...........................................................................................................
Verification Tracking Groups ..............................................................................................
Household Size ....................................................................................................................
Number Enrolled in College ................................................................................................
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-4
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-8
4-9
VERIFICATION 4-1
OSFA
Household Receipt of Food Stamps (SNAP) Benefits ......................................................
Child Support Paid By Applicant, Spouse, Parents or Both ..............................................
High School Completion....................................................................................................
Identity/Statement of Educational Purpose........................................................................
Reporting Results for Verification tracking Groups V4 and V5 .......................................
Tax Filers ...........................................................................................................................
Filers of Joint Tax Returns Who Are No Longer Married ................................................
Tax Filing Extensions ........................................................................................................
When a Tax Return Transcript Is Not Available ...............................................................
Victims of Identity Theft ...................................................................................................
Non-filers ...........................................................................................................................
IRS “Who Must File” Chart...............................................................................................
“Zero” Income ...................................................................................................................
Other Untaxed Income .......................................................................................................
Tax Filing Requirements for Non-Citizens Without SSNs ...............................................
Signature Requirements .....................................................................................................
Completing the Verification Process .......................................................................................
Verification Status Codes ..................................................................................................
Reconciliation of Conflicting Information ........................................................................
Subsequent ISIRs ...............................................................................................................
Internal Controls and Quality Assurance ...........................................................................
Changes in Applicant Data ......................................................................................................
Corrections .........................................................................................................................
Updates ..............................................................................................................................
Valid ISIR Required ..........................................................................................................
Adjustments .......................................................................................................................
Tolerance Option ...............................................................................................................
Selected for Verification After Disbursement ...................................................................
Verification Extension Deadline ..............................................................................................
Failure to Submit Documentation ............................................................................................
VERIFICATION 4-2
4-10
4-10
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-12
4-14
4-14
4-14
4-15
4-15
4-16
4-16
4-17
4-17
4-18
4-19
4-19
4-19
4-20
4-20
4-21
4-21
4-21
4-22
4-22
4-23
4-23
4-23
4-24
SAM 2014-2015
Selection for Verification
Applications are selected for verification either by the federal edit system or the college. If a
student’s application is selected for review by the federal edit system, the school is required
to verify selected items on the student’s application and collect certain required information
and documents before awarding and disbursing federal student aid funds. Every FAFSA
selected for verification by the CPS must be verified. The option for a school to verify only a
certain percentage of the applicants selected for verification by the CPS has been eliminated.
Each award year, the FAFSA items that are subject to verification, along with the required
documentation, are published in the Federal Register. The specific data items that are to be
verified will change from year to year. ED’s long-term goal is for a customized approach to
verification whereby the items to verify for a given application will be selected from a menu
and indicated on the student’s ISIR. For the 2014-15 award year, students selected for
verification will be placed in one of five verification tracking groups. The items to be
verified and the required documentation to be collected are determined by the particular
tracking group in which the student has been placed. These are described in detail beginning
on p. 4-6 of this chapter.
If a school has reason to believe that any student’s FAFSA information is inaccurate [34 CFR
668.54(a)(2)] or if any information has been found to be discrepant [34 CFR 668.16(f)], the
school must verify the accuracy of that information whether or not it is one of the required
verification items, and whether or not the CPS selected that application for verification.
All FAFSA information selected for verification whether by the CPS or the school must be
verified (and any corrections reprocessed through the CPS) before the school may exercise
professional judgment to adjust the cost of attendance (COA) or any data items required to
calculate the EFC.
Note: Schools participating in the U.S. Department of Education’s Quality Assurance (QA)
Program are not required to use the Department’s verification criteria, but instead may use
their own criteria for the verification of applicant information. Under the revised regulations,
schools participating in the QA program will continue to be exempt from certain verification
requirements. Note that CUNY does not currently participate in the federal QA program.
Discretionary Verification
Individual campuses have the regulatory authority to verify any student’s information and
ask for any additional documentation needed to insure the integrity of the federal programs
and to aid them in the smooth operation of their offices.
If the school selects a previously unselected application for verification, it can choose which
items it wants to verify, omitting some or all of the items required by ED, and including
items other than those ordinarily required. All other verification requirements, including
deadlines and interim disbursement rules, apply equally to all students being verified,
whether they have been selected by the CPS or by the school.
VERIFICATION 4-3
OSFA
Exclusions From Verification
Sometimes a selected application may be exempt from some or all of the verification
requirements if certain unusual circumstances exist. The basis for an exclusion must be
documented. Other information not excluded must still be verified according to all other
requirements.
Except in the case of the student’s death, none of the following verification exclusions
excuses the school from the requirement to resolve conflicting information. As stated
previously, if there is reason to believe the application information is inaccurate or if the
institution has conflicting information, the application must be verified in order to determine
the correct information and resolve any discrepancies.
Unsubsidized Student Financial Assistance Programs
A student who has been selected for verification but is eligible only for unsubsidized Title IV
assistance (that is, an unsubsidized Stafford Loan, a PLUS Loan or TEACH Grant) may be
excused from completing verification. The school should note in the student’s record if
excused from completing verification because of this exclusion.
A student who might be eligible for any subsidized aid program (that is, any federal aid
program where financial need is one of the eligibility criteria) may not use this exclusion to
avoid verification by borrowing only an unsubsidized loan. In such cases, the school must
require the student to complete the verification process.
Although the interest subsidy on Federal Direct Loans was eliminated for graduate students,
they should still be required to complete verification if it is determined they have eligibility
for any need-based programs such as Federal Perkins Loan or Federal Work-Study.
Death of the Student
If a student dies during the award year, or before the deadline date for completing
verification, the school does not need to complete verification, even if an interim or initial
disbursement has been made. However, the college may not disburse further Title IV aid to
the student’s account at the institution or to the student’s beneficiaries, except for any already
earned Federal Work-Study funds. Funds disbursed prior to death are not considered
overpayments. After a student’s death, a Stafford Loan cannot be originated or certified, nor
the proceeds delivered to the student’s beneficiaries.
Spouse Unavailable
Unless it has reason to believe that the reported FAFSA information is incorrect, a school is
not required to verify the information of the spouse of an independent student if any of the
following conditions apply:

the spouse is deceased or mentally incapacitated. [Note: physical
incapacitation is not considered a valid exclusion condition.]

the spouse is residing in a country other than the United States and can’t
be contacted by normal means.

the spouse cannot be located because his or her contact information is
unknown, and the student cannot obtain it.
This exclusion applies only to spouse’s data and does not affect any other part of the required
verification. The basis for this exclusion should be documented in the student’s file.
VERIFICATION 4-4
SAM 2014-2015
Parents Unavailable
Unless it has reason to believe that the reported FAFSA information is incorrect, a school is
not required to verify the FAFSA information of a dependent student’s parents (or obtain
appropriate signature(s) for verification purposes) if any of the following conditions apply:

student’s parents are mentally incapacitated. [Notes: physical incapacitation
and death of the parents are not considered valid exclusion conditions. If the
parents die after the FAFSA is filed, the student’s dependency status changes
from dependent to independent and the application information must be updated
and verified under the new status.]

parents are residing in a country other than the United States and cannot be
contacted by normal means.

parents cannot be located because their contact information is unknown, and the
student cannot obtain it.
The basis for this exclusion should be documented in the student’s file. If only one of the
dependent student’s parents meets one of these conditions, the student and the remaining
responsible parent are still subject to all verification requirements.
No Funds Disbursed
If the student won’t be receiving FSA funds (for reasons other than the student’s failure to
complete verification), then verification is not required. This category includes students
ineligible for aid from the FSA programs and those who withdraw without receiving aid.
Verification Completed At Another School
A student who has completed verification at another school for the current award year, and
has transferred to your school, may be excluded from verification. For the student to qualify
for this exclusion, the FAFSA data must be the same as it was at the previous school and the
FAA must obtain the following items from the school that completed the verification:

a statement that the student’s application data were verified, and

the transaction number of the verified ISIR.
Records Lost or Destroyed
Periodically, ED waives certain requirements, including verification requirements, for
victims of natural disasters (such as floods or hurricanes) and notifies the financial aid
community via The Federal Register and/or a Dear Colleague Letter. In such cases, the
FAA must document in the student’s file that the records were not available due to damage
caused by a natural disaster and use the verification status code of “S” when reporting the
disbursement on COD.
Post-Enrollment
If the student is first selected for verification after ceasing to be enrolled at the school for the
award year and all disbursements (including any late disbursements) have already been
made, he or she may be excluded from verification.
VERIFICATION 4-5
OSFA
Data Items To Be Verified
For 2014-15 applicants selected for verification will be placed into one of five verification
tracking groups. The minimum number of items that must be verified for a selected applicant
will vary depending upon which tracking group he or she has been assigned to. The school
may choose to verify application items other than those required on a student’s ISIR, and
may choose which students must provide additional documentation and what that
documentation might be, in accordance with consistently applied institutional policies. The
school is also required to verify any information it has reason to believe is incorrect on any
application, whether or not the application was selected for verification and regardless of
which tracking group the applicant has been assigned to.
Verification Tracking Groups
The following are the five verification tracking groups into which a selected applicant may
be placed and the minimum number of data items that must be verified for each tracking
group.
Tracking Flag V1: Standard Verification Group
 Household size
 Number enrolled in college
 Household receipt of SNAP (food stamp) benefits
 Child support paid by applicant, spouse, parents or both
 For tax filers:
 Adjusted Gross Income (AGI)
 Income tax paid
 Untaxed IRA distributions
 Untaxed pensions
 Education credits
 IRA deductions
 Tax-exempt interest
 For non-filers, income earned from work
Tracking Flag V2: [Not in use for 2014-15]
Tracking Flag V3: Child Support Paid Verification Group
 Child support paid by applicant, spouse, parents or both
Tracking Flag V4: Custom Verification Group
 Household receipt of SNAP (food stamp) benefits
 Child support paid by applicant, spouse, parents or both
 High school completion status
 Identity/Statement of Educational Purpose
VERIFICATION 4-6
SAM 2014-2015
Tracking Flag V5: Aggregate Verification Group
 Household size
 Number enrolled in college
 Household receipt of SNAP (food stamp) benefits
 Child support paid by applicant, spouse, parents or both
 High school completion status
 Identity/Statement of Educational Purpose
 For tax filers:
 Adjusted Gross Income (AGI)
 Income tax paid
 Untaxed IRA distributions
 Untaxed pensions
 Education credits
 IRA deductions
 Tax-exempt interest
 For non-filers, income earned from work.
Tracking Flag V6: Household Resources Verification Group
 Household size
 Number enrolled in college
 Household receipt of SNAP (food stamp) benefits
 Child support paid by applicant, spouse, parents or both
 For tax filers:
 Adjusted Gross Income (AGI)
 Income tax paid
 Untaxed IRA distributions
 Untaxed pensions
 Education credits
 IRA deductions
 Tax-exempt interest
 For non-filers, income earned from work
 Other Untaxed Income:
 Payments to tax deferred pension and retirement savings plans (FAFSA
questions 45a and 94a)
 Child support received (FAFSA questions 45c and 94c)
 Housing, food and other living allowances paid to members of the
military, clergy, and others (FAFSA questions 45g and 94g)
 Veterans’ noneducation benefits (FAFSA questions 45h and 94h)
 Other untaxed income (FAFSA questions 45i and 94i)
 Money received or paid on the applicant’s behalf (FAFSA question 45j)
 Resources or benefits not appearing on the FAFSA, such as in-kind
support from a relative or benefits from a government agency.
VERIFICATION 4-7
OSFA
Household Size (V1, V5 or V6 Tracking Groups)
A statement signed by the student (and at least one of the student’s parents, for dependent
students), listing the names of the household members, their relationship to the student and
their age fulfills the documentation requirement to verify this data item. A verification
worksheet can be used to collect the statement and required signature(s).
Household size need not be verified if:

for a dependent student, the household size reported for parents who are married,
or who are unmarried and living together as 3, or for divorced, separated or
widowed parents as 2.

the household size for a married independent student is 2 or for a separated,
divorced or widowed student is 1.

the household size information was verified on an earlier transaction and hasn’t
changed.
The following persons may be included in the household size of a dependent student:

The student and his/her legal parents, even if the student is not living with them.
Both legal parents (either biological or adoptive) must be included in the
household if they are living together, even if their status is unmarried. This is true
for divorced parents who may still be living together and legal parents in
common-law or same-sex relationships. A parent who has died or is not living in
the household because of separation or divorce should be excluded from the
household size. An individual in a partnership with a legal parent who is not the
student’s legal (biological or adoptive) parent should also be excluded from the
student’s household.

The student’s children and siblings, regardless of where they live, if they will
receive more than half support from the student’s parent(s) from July 1, 2014
through June 30, 2015. This includes siblings of the student and unborn children
of either the student or parent who will receive more than 50% support from the
student’s parent(s) from birth to the end of the award year. It also includes
siblings who would be considered dependent based on the FAFSA dependency
questions (even if they are not living at home or students who have applied for
aid). To include children in the household size, the “support” test is used (rather
than residency) because a parent may support a child who does not live with him
or her, especially in cases of divorce or separation.

Other persons who lived with and received more than half support from the
student’s parent(s) at the time of application and will continue to do so for the
entire award year.1 Note: foster children are not included in the household size
and the money the family receives for their care is not included as income on the
FAFSA. The IRS defines a foster child as any child placed with a family by an
authorized placement agency or by judgment, decree, or other order of any court
of competent jurisdiction. Therefore, a foster child, under the IRS definition,
would not qualify for nor should appear as an income tax exemption.
1
The parents’ dependent children need not be living in the parents’ residence, whereas other persons
receiving more than 50% of their support from the parents must reside in the household during the
course of the academic year to be included in the parents’ household size.
VERIFICATION 4-8
SAM 2014-2015
If the parents are divorced and the parent whose income is included has remarried, or if the
parent was a widow or widower who has remarried, family members would include the
parent whose information is reported on the FAFSA, the stepparent, the dependents of the
parent and the stepparent who are living with the parent and the student.
The following persons are included in the household size of an independent student:

The student and his/her spouse, unless the spouse has died or is not living in the
household because of separation or divorce.

The student’s children, regardless of where they live, if they will receive more
than half of their support from the student July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015.
This includes the student’s yet unborn child(ren) who will receive more than half
support from the student from birth to the end of the award year.

Other persons who lived with and received more than half support from the
student at the time of application and will continue to do so for the entire award
year. Note: foster children are not included in the household size and the money
the family receives for their care is not included as income on the FAFSA. The
IRS defines a foster child as any child placed with a family by an authorized
placement agency or by judgment, decree, or other order of any court of
competent jurisdiction. Therefore, a foster child, under the IRS definition, would
not qualify nor should appear as an income tax exemption.
Number Enrolled In College (V1, V5 or V6 Tracking Groups)
A statement signed by the student (and, for dependent students, at least one of the student’s
parents) giving the enrollment information for each family member attending a
postsecondary institution fulfills the documentation requirement to verify this data item. A
verification worksheet can be used to collect the statement and required signature(s). If there
is reason to doubt the college enrollment information reported, the student can be asked to
obtain documentation from the other students and schools listed.
The number in college need not be verified if either of the following conditions apply:

the number of family members enrolled in college is only 1.

the enrollment information was verified on an earlier transaction and hasn’t
changed.
The student should always be included in the # in college, but parents are not included.
Other members of the household are counted if they are or will be enrolled at least half time
in a degree or certificate program at a Title IV eligible institution during the 2014-2015
award year. Parents may only be included if the school, using professional judgment,
documents a situation on a case by case basis where a parent attending college should be
counted. Household members who are students at a U.S. military academy should not be
included in the # in college because most of their primary educational expenses are paid for.
If the school has reason to believe that the information provided on the verification
worksheet about the number of family members enrolled in college may be inaccurate, the
school must obtain a statement from each school listed confirming the enrollment of the
household member in question (unless such a statement is not available because the family
member has not yet registered, or that the family member plans to register at the same
institution as the applicant).
VERIFICATION 4-9
OSFA
Receipt of Food Stamp (SNAP) Benefits (V1, V4, V5 or V6 Tracking Groups)
If the ISIR shows that someone in the parents’ or student’s household received SNAP
benefits in 2012 or 2013, the student must provide a signed statement indicating receipt of
the benefit. A verification worksheet can be used to collect the statement and required
signature(s). Remember that the person (or persons) who received the food stamps must
qualify as a member of the FAFSA household and be listed in the household grid on the
verification worksheet.
Alternately, the institution may require documentation from the agency that issued the SNAP
benefits such as an account summary or a website printout that clearly verifies SNAP
benefits received and that the document was obtained through official means from the
agency.
In cases where it is found that receipt of SNAP benefits were not originally reported on the
FAFSA because the question was not presented to the student on FAFSA on the Web, it is
not necessary to reprocess a correction to the SNAP field unless changing the answer to this
question to “Yes” now makes the student eligible for the auto zero EFC calculation or the
simplified needs test.
Child Support Paid (V1, V3, V4, V5 or V6 Tracking Groups)
A statement signed by the student, spouse or parent who paid the child support certifying (a)
the amount of child support paid; (b) the name of the person to whom the child support was
paid; and (c) the name of the children for whom the child support was paid will be sufficient,
in most cases, documents this data item. A verification worksheet can be used to collect the
statement and required signature(s).
If the school believes any information provided in the signed statement is inaccurate, the
student must submit additional documentation such as (a) a copy of a court document
(separation agreement or divorce decree) showing the amount of child support to be
provided; (b) a statement from the person receiving the child support showing the amount
provided; or (c) copies of the child support checks or money order receipts.
Note that the child support statement submitted for verification should not name as payees
anyone who is listed in the household grid of the verification worksheet or included in the
FAFSA household size.
If the student reports on verification documents that he, his spouse, or his parent paid child
support but did not report that on his FAFSA, you must resolve the conflict. However, if he
was eligible for an automatic zero EFC, the child support paid question would not have been
presented on FAFSA on the Web; as long as he is still eligible for an auto zero EFC, there is
no need to correct the child support field on the application.
High School Completion (V4 or V5 Tracking Groups)
Students selected for this item must provide one of the following documents to demonstrate
their high school completion status at the beginning of the 2013-14 academic year:

A copy of the high school diploma

A copy of a final, official high school transcript that shows the date when the
diploma was awarded

A copy of a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or GED
transcript
VERIFICATION 4-10
SAM 2014-2015



An academic transcript that indicates the student successfully completed at least a
two-year program that is acceptable for full credit toward a bachelor’s degree
A copy of a secondary school completion credential for homeschool (other than a
high school diploma or its recognized equivalent) if state law requires
homeschooled students to obtain that credential
A transcript or the equivalent, signed by the parent or guardian of a homeschooled student, listing the secondary school courses the student completed and
documents the successful completion of a secondary school education in a homeschool setting.
If a school has already obtained during the admission process one of the documents that is
acceptable for verifying high school completion, no further document is needed for this
requirement. Since the high school completion documentation requirements match the high
school credentials students must submit to be admitted to City University, colleges should
verify the student’s high school completion status through their Admissions Offices and not
require the student to re-submit this documentation to the Financial Aid Office.
Identity/Statement of Educational Purpose (V4 or V5 Tracking Groups)
Students must appear in person at the school and present a piece of valid, government-issued
photo identification (ID) such as a passport or a driver’s license or other state-issued ID. An
annotated copy of that ID that includes the date it was received and the name of the FAA
who was authorized to receive it must be maintained in the student’s file.
Students must also sign in person a statement of educational purpose that certifies who they
are and that the federal student aid they may receive will only be used for educational
purposes and for the cost of attending the school for the 2013–2014 year. ED has issued the
following required language for this statement:
Statement of Educational Purpose
I certify that I ____________________________________ am the individual signing this
(Print Student’s Name)
Statement of Educational Purpose and that the federal student financial assistance I may
receive will only be used for educational purposes and to pay the cost of attending
___________________________________ for 2013–2014.
Name of Postsecondary Institution
A student who is unable to appear at the school must submit a copy of the government-issued
ID and a signed original [wet signature] statement of educational purpose signed by a notary
public confirming that the student appeared before her and presented the ID confirming his
identity.
VERIFICATION 4-11
OSFA
Reporting results for Verification Tracking Flags V4 and V5
Beginning with 2014–2015, results for any student for whom an ISIR with tracking flag V4
or V5—as selected by the CPS, not your school—is received and for whom you request
verification documentation must be reported to ED. This information is reported on the FAA
Access to CPS Online website by selecting the Identity Verification Results option from the
main menu, and entering your school identifiers, the year, the student identifiers and one of
the following numeric codes that most applies to the student:
1—verification completed in person, no issues found
2—verification completed using notary, no issues found
3—verification attempted, issues found with identity*
4—verification attempted, issues found with HS completion
5—no response from applicant or unable to locate.
*If issues are found with both identity and high school completion status, use code 3
Because the FAA Access website does not store a list of these verification results for you to
retrieve, it is recommended that you print and keep the confirmation page for your records. If
there is a change in a result you have already submitted, you can submit the new code using
the above process. In April 2014 you will be able to submit verification results by uploading
a flat file instead of using this individual method.
Tax Filers (V1, V5 or V6 Tracking Groups)
Students selected for verification who retrieved and transferred their income tax return
information (and that of their legal parent(s) or spouse, as applicable) using the IRS Data
Retrieval Process – either when initially completing the FAFSA or through the corrections
process – are considered to have met the documentation requirements for verifying the
FAFSA IRS information (type of tax return filed. Filing status, AGI, taxes paid, income
earned from work, exemptions and the applicable untaxed income items listed in tracking
groups V1. V5 or V6) as long as the flag on the student's ISIR shows that the information
was retrieved from the IRS and was not changed.
It is important to remember that successful use of the IRS Retrieval Process does not relieve
a selected applicant from having to complete verification, but merely excuses them from
having to submit an IRS tax transcript to the school. These students would still have to
submit a signed verification worksheet and any additional documentation required to
complete verification (proof of food stamps received, child support statements, etc.).
Under certain conditions, some applicants selected for verification will need to submit an
IRS Tax Return Transcript for the student, his or her spouse, and his or her parents, as
applicable. IRS tax transcripts submitted to the school for verification do not have to be
signed by the filer, although ED encourages collecting the signature.
These are the conditions under which IRS tax transcripts may be required:
 When the student (or parent) did not or could not use the IRS Data Retrieval Process
– either at the initial filing of the FAFSA or through a subsequent correction
 When the information included on the FAFSA using the IRS Data Retrieval Process
was subsequently changed
 When the person did not indicate on the FAFSA that a tax return has been completed
 When a marriage date is January 2014 or later
VERIFICATION 4-12
SAM 2014-2015




When the first three digits of an SSN is 666
When the tax return was amended
When the person filed a Puerto Rican or foreign tax return
When the tax filing status of a married independent student and spouse is either
“married filing separately” or “head of household”
 When the tax filing status of the married parents of a dependent student is either
“married filing separately” or “head of household”
 When neither married parent entered a valid SSN
 When a non-married parent or both married parents entered all zeroes for the SSN.
An institution may accept as documentation any IRS tax transcript that includes all of the
income and tax information required to be verified: adjusted gross income (AGI), U.S.
income tax paid, untaxed IRA distributions, untaxed pensions, education credits, IRA
deductions and tax exempt interest. Therefore, because the Record of Account Transcript
and the Return Transcript for Taxpayer (RTFTP) includes all of the above noted information,
either document may be used to meet the verification requirements. However, because the
Information Returns Processing Transcript Request - Wages (IRPTR-W) only provides wage
information it does not satisfy the verification requirements.
For a student not selected for verification by the CPS, a school may use a signed copy of the
federal income tax return to perform institutional verification or make corrections. However,
should the student be selected for verification by the CPS on a subsequent transaction, the
student would have to provide tax data directly from the IRS either through submitting an
IRS tax transcript to the school or by using the IRS Data Retrieval Tool through the FOTW
correction process.
For some filers the tax return transcript may show a “per computer” amount for some tax
data that is different from what the filer reported to the IRS. The “per computer” amount
should be used because it corrects mathematical errors and is more accurate than what
appears on the return or was transferred via the DRT. Beginning in 2014-15 changes to the
DRT process will reduce the number of discrepancies between tax transcript data and DRT
data because the DRT will begin to report “per computer” values for AGI, income tax paid,
and education tax credits where they differ from the tax return data originally reported.
WARNING: When tax documents are collected from a student or his or her family, the FAA
must examine the tax return items used to calculate the EFC to make sure no conflicting
information exists. This means looking beyond the mandatory verification items to account
for missing asset information, incomplete wage information, whether or not the filer was
eligible to file an IRS EZ or short form, incorrect tax filing statuses, parents and student both
claiming the student as a tax exemption, etc. The school has the obligation to resolve
conflicting information between application data and the tax documents it has collected, even
if the application was not selected for verification, and even if the FAA never asked the
student to submit the tax documents.
VERIFICATION 4-13
OSFA
Filers of Joint Tax Returns Who Are No Longer Married
When an independent student or the parents of a dependent student filed a joint return but are
now separated, divorced, widowed, or remarried to someone else, the school must collect
copies of the W-2 forms along with the IRS tax transcript in order to meet the regulatory
documentation requirement for verification. (If the individuals are self-employed, or if no
W-2 forms are available, a signed statement may be accepted instead of the W-2 form.) The
portion of income and taxes paid from the joint return that can be attributed to the student or
parent (and the new spouse, if applicable) will be computed and verified by the school.
Interest, dividends and business income received by the student or parent are added to the
earned income to arrive at the computed AGI. Generally, income from jointly held
businesses, accounts or investments are divided equally.
There are two ways of computing taxes paid by a separated, divorced or widowed student or
parent who filed a joint return with the former spouse. In the first method, known as
proportional distribution, the FAA determines what proportion of the AGI the person in
question was responsible for, and applies that percentage to the tax paid. The second method
has the FAA use the IRS tax table to figure the amount of tax the parent or student would
have had to pay if a separate return had been filed.
Tax Filing Extensions
If a required tax return for a student, spouse or parent has not been filed by the time of
verification and a filing extension has been granted by the IRS, the school must accept as
alternative documentation a copy of IRS Form 4868 filed (or a copy of the IRS’s approval of
an extension beyond that provided by Form 4868) and copies of the W-2 forms for each
source of employment. (A self-employed individual may submit a signed statement of his or
her AGI and taxes paid in place of the required W-2s.) The school must then use this
documentation to compute the AGI and taxes paid amounts that should appear on the ISIR.
Once this documentation is furnished and the application review completed, the student may
be awarded and disbursed federal aid on the basis of this alternative documentation. If
documentation of the filing extension has been provided, the school may not delay verifying
a student’s FAFSA information until the tax return is actually filed.
The school is given the option, when the final tax returns are filed, to require an IRS tax
transcript from each individual who was granted a filing extension. If the school does collect
the IRS tax transcript, it must re-verify the IRS tax data. If corrections to the previous data
are necessary, the student’s eligibility must be reviewed and award amounts recalculated on
the basis of any change in EFC.
When a Tax Return Transcript is Not Available
In limited circumstances, the school may accept a signed copy of a 2013 income tax return if
it determines that obtaining an IRS tax transcript is not possible. The school must document
the reason for allowing a student to do so. Currently, the Department of Education only
permits three instances where a preparer copy of a tax return is acceptable:

Tax returns from foreign countries and other specific locations

Amended tax returns
If the student, parent or spouse, as applicable, filed a foreign or Puerto Rican tax return, a
preparer copy of the tax return may be accepted in lieu of an IRS tax transcript. The income
information on a non-IRS form should be taken from the lines of the form that corresponds
most closely to the AGI and taxes paid lines on a U.S. income tax return and converted to
VERIFICATION 4-14
SAM 2014-2015
U.S. dollars.
Students or parents who filed an amended tax return cannot use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool,
and, if they filed an amended tax return after initially using the IRS Data Retrieval Tool, they
must submit the following documents to complete verification: 1) a signed copy of the
original preparer’s tax return, or an IRS tax transcript (or other IRS-produced tax return
record such as an RTFTP that contains the line item information required for verification)
and 2) a preparer copy of the IRS Form 1040X that was filed.
Victims of Identity Theft
Victims of identity theft who cannot get a return transcript or use the DRT must call the
IRS’s Identity Protection Specialized Unit (IPSU) toll-free number at 800-908-4490. After
the IPSU authenticates the tax filer’s identify, she can ask the IRS to mail her an alternate
paper tax return transcript known as the TRDBV (Transcript DataBase View) that will look
different from regular transcript but that is official and can be used for verification. Unless
you doubt the TRDBV’s authenticity, you don’t need to get an IRS signature or stamp or any
other validation. In Dear Colleague Letter GEN-14-05 issued 3-25-14, ED rescinded the
guidance previously in effect for 2012-13 and 2013-14 on what constitutes acceptable
income documentation for identity theft cases.
Non-Filers (V1, V5 or V6 Tracking Groups)
A student, spouse or parent who had income earned from work, but did not file and was not
required under IRS rules to file a federal income tax return, must submit a copy of Form W-2
or 1099 for each source of employment income received for tax year 2013. In addition, each
person reporting income earned from work must sign a statement certifying that he or she has
not filed, and is not required to file, an income tax return for tax year 2013. Finally, each
person must list the sources of income earned from work and the amounts of income for tax
year 2013 that is not reported on a Form W-2. The signed statement and the list of earned
income not reported on a W-2 can be part of a verification worksheet.
It may be desirable in some cases to confirm a claim of non-filer status by collecting an IRS
Verification of Nonfiling letter. Note that IRS letters dated earlier than June 15 of the year
following the tax year requested will not accurately reflect the taxpayer’s nonfiling status.
Therefore, to help ensure accuracy in the 2014-15 verification process, ED advises schools
not to accept a Verification of Nonfiling letter for the 2013 tax year that is dated prior to June
15, 2014.
An AGI figure is not available for persons not required to file a tax return. A non-filer
reports all income earned from work (whether or not it appears on a W-2 form) on the
appropriate “income earned from work” lines of the FAFSA. Income earned from work
should never be reported as “untaxed income” on the FAFSA, even if taxes are neither owed
nor paid on this earned income. If someone whose income data was required on the FAFSA
indicates non-filer status on a Verification Worksheet, but the administrator has reason to
believe that this person would have been required to file a U.S. tax return, this constitutes
conflicting information and must be resolved before aid can be disbursed. One frequently
encountered situation occurs when the parents of a dependent student who are neither
citizens or permanent residents of the U.S. report foreign income on the FAFSA.
VERIFICATION 4-15
OSFA
When a non-filer reports income from work on the FAFSA that is above the IRS filing
requirements, the FAFSA is rejected with reason code 20. The applicant can only resolve the
reject by furnishing an appropriate tax-filing status or amending the amount of income
reported. On the other hand, a FAA can override the reject without changing the responses
to the data items, but should do so only after documenting both the correctness of the nonfiler status and the dollar amounts of the income earned from work.
2013 “Who Must File” Chart (for most taxpayers)
AND at the end of 2013 you
THEN file a return if your
If your filing status is...
were*...
gross income** was at least...
Single
under 65
65 or older
$10,000
$11,500
Married filing jointly***
under 65 (both spouses)
65 or older (one spouse)
65 or older (both spouses)
$20,000
$21,200
$22,400
Married filing separately
any age
Head of household
under 65
65 or older
$12,850
$14,350
Qualifying widow(er) with under 65
dependent child
65 or older
$16,100
$17,300
$3,900
*If born on January 1, 1949, you are considered to be age 65 at the end of 2013.
**Gross income means all income received in the form of money, goods, property, and
services that is not exempt from tax, including any income from sources outside the U.S. or
from the sale of your main home (even if you may exclude part or all of it). Do not include
social security benefits unless (a) you are married, filing a separate return and you lived with
your spouse at any time in 2013 or (b) ½ of your social security benefits plus your other
gross income is more than $25,000 ($32,000 if married filing jointly).
***If you did not live with your spouse at the end of 2013 (or on the date your spouse
died) and your gross income was at least $3,900, you must file a return regardless of age.
NOTE: If a parent (or someone else) can claim you as a dependent, you must file a tax return
if you are under age 65, either single or married, and had earned income over $6,100 or
unearned income over $1,000. If an individual has earnings from self-employment
exceeding $400, he or she would also be required to file a tax return.
“Zero” Income
Occasionally, a student or the student’s family may report zero income for the base year. If a
student’s sole source of family income was from public assistance or social security, the
reported income on the FAFSA would be ‘zero’ because these income sources are not
required to be reported on the application. There may be tax write-offs that produce a
negative AGI or the student may have failed to report untaxed income.
If the individual had no income earned from work, and did not (and was not required to) file
a tax return, he or she would complete the signed statements on the verification worksheet
(or the equivalent) to verify non-filer status and zero earned income.
VERIFICATION 4-16
SAM 2014-2015
Applications with ‘zero’ income are noted in the CPS edits and may be one of the factors that
lead the CPS to select that application for verification. Even if not selected for verification, it
may be appropriate to ask for further information regarding support. Such inquiries should
focus on unreported untaxed income, in-kind support or money paid by someone else on the
student’s behalf. Any cash support for the student, other than support from a parent for a
dependent student, counts as untaxed income and should be reported on the application. Inkind help from a friend or relative – such as using a room at an aunt’s house or eating meals
with her family – would not be considered untaxed income or reported on the FAFSA.
Professional judgment may be used to adjust income line items to reflect unreported sources
of income when the tax return(s) have a zero or negative AGI or to account for the value of
in-kind support (e.g., excluding the housing allowance from the COA budget).
Other Untaxed Income
For students selected for verification under the Household Resources Group (tracking flag
V6) you can verify these items by obtaining a statement giving the sources and amounts of
income and signed by the student and, if appropriate, one parent. This information can be
collected using a verification worksheet. Also get a copy of any W-2 form for these sources.
If you determine that the total of the other untaxed income and all other sources of income
does not appear to be sufficient to support the number of household members reported, the
student and, if appropriate, his parents or spouse must explain how the family was financially
supported during the 2013 calendar year. Your financial aid office decides what is sufficient
financial support and what is evidence of that, and your office must document its decision in
each case.
Tax Filing Requirements for Non-Citizens Without SSNs
Noncitizens must file a U.S. federal income tax return for wages earned while working in the
U.S. regardless of whether that income comes from U.S. or non-U.S. sources, unless the only
income received from a U.S. source is less than the personal exemption amount. Not having
a Social Security Number (SSN) does not prevent an individual from filing a federal tax
return when otherwise required by the IRS to do so. If a resident or non-resident alien is
required to file a federal tax return but does not have and is not eligible for a SSN, the IRS
will instead issue an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) so he or she may file
the necessary tax return. Individuals with ITINs enter it on their tax returns wherever a SSN
is required.
If any individual (with an ITIN or SSN) was required to file a federal tax return (e.g., his or
her wages meet the IRS threshold for filing), but did not file one, this constitutes conflicting
information which must be fully resolved before you may continue processing the student's
federal aid application.
A tax filer without an SSN whose information is reported on a FAFSA will not pass the IRS
Data Retrieval Process because the ID number for the individual is reported as all zeroes on
the FAFSA. IRS tax transcripts would have to be obtained for these individuals.
VERIFICATION 4-17
OSFA
Signature Requirements Chart
Document
Student’s IRS Tax Transcript
Parent’s IRS Tax Transcript
Student’s IRS tax account summary
Parent’s IRS tax account summary
Student’s U.S. Tax Return (if
collected)
Parent’s U.S. Tax Return (if
collected)
Dependent Student Verification
Worksheet
Independent Student Verification
Worksheet
Child Support Statement
Required Signature
Filer’s signature suggested but not required
Filer’s signature suggested but not required
Filer’s signature suggested but not required
Filer’s signature suggested but not required
Any one of the following:
Student
Student’s spouse (if married)*
Tax preparer, including Social Security
Number (SSN) or Employer
Identification Number (EIN) or Preparer
Tax ID Number (PTIN);
Tax preparer’s stamp, including SSN, EIN
or PTIN;
Tax preparer’s name, plus the SSN, EIN
or PTIN printed or typed
Any one of the following:
Parent whose income is on the form
Tax preparer, including SSN, EIN or
PTIN;
Tax preparer’s stamp, including SSN, EIN
or PTIN;
Tax preparer’s name, plus the SSN, EIN
or PTIN printed or typed
For joint returns, only one parent’s signature is
required.
Student and at least one parent
Student
Student, Spouse or Parent who pays the child
support
At the discretion of the school
Third Party Documentation – e.g.,
court documents, letters from
postsecondary institutions
Note: Faxed or photocopied signatures on verification documents are acceptable assuming
that they are legible. Any required signatures must be collected at the time of verification and
cannot be collected after the verification deadline for that award year.
VERIFICATION 4-18
SAM 2014-2015
Completing the Verification Process
When all necessary verification documents have been obtained from a student, they should
be compared with the information reported on the SAR/ISIR. If verification shows that all
the information provided on the SAR/SIR is correct, and there is no conflicting information,
aid for which the student is eligible may be awarded and disbursed.
Verification Status Codes
For 2014-15, the valid code values are V, W, S and blank. When a Federal Pell Grant is
disbursed, the student’s verification status must be reported to COD, even if he or she was
not selected for verification.
Use “V” when a student record has been verified (includes students who were not selected by
the CPS but chosen for verification by the school).
Report a “blank” if the student was not verified due to not being selected by the CPS or the
school, or if the student was selected for verification after he or she was no longer enrolled.
A “W” is reported ONLY if an interim disbursement was made on a record selected for
verification and for whom verification has not been completed. A “W” automatically limits
the scheduled Pell award to 50% and, if not changed to “V” or blank by the end of the year,
the percentage is reset to zero and the school is required to return any funds drawn for that
student. [See Chapter 11 of this manual for more information on interim disbursements.]
The “S” code is used for students selected for but excused from verification due to lost or
damaged financial records resulting from a natural disaster or if the school participates in the
Quality Assurance Program and the application did not meet the school’s verification
criteria.
VERIFICATION STATUS CODES
V
Verified
W
Without Documentation
S
Selected by CPS but Not Verified
blank
Not Verified
Reconciliation of Conflicting Information
If, after collecting the information and documentation required for verification, it is
discovered that the information submitted conflicts with the information reported on the aid
application, the school must reconcile all information received and submit the corrections to
the CPS for reprocessing. There is one exception to this requirement: if the student dies
during the award year.
During the process of reviewing the submitted documents, it may become apparent that some
FAFSA data items – both required data items and others that that were not required (or
weren’t selected) for verification – are questionable or erroneous. For example, the IRS tax
transcript can reveal assets that were not reported on the FAFSA, income earned from work
that was not correctly reported, or unusual differences between tax exemptions and the
FAFSA household size. Schools may develop their own criteria for uncovering which
additional data items seem to be most error prone.
VERIFICATION 4-19
OSFA
If the school has any reason to believe a FAFSA data item is in error, even if it is not a
required verification item, the discrepancy must be verified as correct prior to awarding or
disbursing any Pell or campus-based funds, employing a student in the FWS program,
originating a Federal Direct Loan or disbursing a previously certified Direct Loan.
The requirement to resolve inaccurate and conflicting information is separate and distinct
from the verification requirements and supersedes all verification rules. Federal student aid
cannot be disbursed to a student for whom conflicting information has not been resolved.
Further, if you discover discrepancies after disbursing federal student aid, you must reconcile
the conflicting information and require the student to repay aid received in excess of his or
her eligibility.
Subsequent ISIRs
Whenever a change to FAFSA information is submitted to the Department, the applicant’s
FAFSA record is reevaluated under the verification selection model. While the change may
not, in itself, result in the applicant being selected, in some instances the review of the entire
record could result in the applicant being selected for verification. All subsequent
transactions for a student must be reviewed, even if verification was completed on an earlier
transaction. Any changes to the EFC, “C” flags, comments or NSLDS information should be
reviewed and evaluated along with any updates or corrections that may have been made to
the application data.
If the EFC has not changed and there are no changes in the “C” flags or NSLDS information,
or if the data elements that changed were previously verified, then no action is required
beyond a notation in the file.
If on a subsequent transaction a previously unverified student is selected for verification or
new data elements are flagged that were not previously verified, the school must require the
student to verify the information, except that the student does not have to resubmit
documentation for the FAFSA information previously verified, if the verified information
remains unchanged.
If the EFC has changed, or if there are changes in the “C” flags or NSLDS information, then
these matters must be investigated and any conflicts resolved. A conflict is considered
resolved when the administrator has determined which data are correct, has collected any
required additional documentation, submitted any necessary changes to the CPS for
reprocessing, and made the appropriate notation in the student’s file.
If the resolution involves confirming that a determination for a previous transaction was the
correct one, it is possible that no further action need be taken, except to document the finding
in the student’s file.
Internal Controls and Quality Assurance
The FSA Participation Agreement signed by each college president requires that a school
demonstrate the capacity to properly and efficiently administer the Title IV and HEA
programs. Part of a school’s demonstration of administrative capability is the presence of an
adequate system of internal checks and balances. Furthermore, New York State’s Internal
Control Act of 1987 requires that all state agencies, including City University of New York,
have a formal internal control program that involves assessing the risks associated with its
critical administrative functions. Each agency must conduct periodic reviews of its internal
VERIFICATION 4-20
SAM 2014-2015
control mechanisms to determine whether adequate and effective control measures have been
implemented. It should be noted that over the past several years ED has conducted numerous
program reviews focused on verification compliance. Verification violations make up a
significant percentage of federal audit and program review findings.
To better assure compliance with these regulations, each CUNY financial aid office must
review its internal controls to ensure the accuracy of its verification process. Each college
should provide their personnel with extensive training on verification and file review along
with periodic refresher training as needed. When a counselor or staff member first begins
doing verification, his/her work should be reviewed by a more experienced professional or
senior staff member until proficiency is assured. Subsequently, the work of each counselor
or staff member doing verification should be periodically spot checked for accuracy and
completeness. Finally, each college must establish and maintain a formal process to check
its verification files on an ongoing basis to make sure that federal requirements are being
met.
Changes in Application Data
Corrections For students not selected for verification, any processing errors that would
affect the student’s eligibility for federal student aid or would change the EFC must be
submitted to the CPS for reprocessing. If the school has reason to believe that any of a
student’s FAFSA information is inaccurate, the information in question must be verified and
the necessary corrections submitted for reprocessing before awarding and disbursing from
the subsidized (that is, need-based) federal student assistance programs.
For students selected for verification and receiving subsidized student aid, changes that result
to any non-dollar item and to any dollar item of $25 or more must be submitted to the CPS
for re-processing. If a disbursement has been made to a student based on information that is
later found to be incorrect, the corrected/updated information must be used to determine the
correct award, and either prior or future disbursements adjusted so that the student receives
the correct amount.
Updates Although students and schools can correct items that were incorrectly reported on
the original FAFSA, only a few answers from the FAFSA can be updated to reflect changes
after the FAFSA was signed. In general, information that is correct as of the date the FAFSA
was filed cannot be changed; but there are 3 items – dependency status, household size, and
number enrolled in postsecondary education – that under certain circumstances must be
updated. If a student’s dependency status changes at any time during the award year, the
application data must be updated, whether or not the application was selected for
verification, except when the update was due to a change in the student’s marital status. The
updated information has to be reprocessed through the CPS, even if there is no change in
eligibility. The school, at its own discretion, may update dependency status due to a change
in the student’s marital status if the school determines that the update is necessary to address
an inequity or more accurately reflect the student’s ability to pay. If the school chooses to
update the student’s marital status, all updated information must be consistent with the status
change, including household size, number enrolled in college and spousal income.
For students selected for verification, household size and number enrolled in college must be
updated to be correct at the time of verification unless the change is the result of a change in
the student’s marital status. This information also has to be reprocessed through the CPS
VERIFICATION 4-21
OSFA
before awarding and disbursing aid even if there is no change in eligibility. The school, at its
own discretion, may update household size and number in college due to a change in the
student’s marital status if the school determines that the update is necessary to address an
inequity or more accurately reflect the student’s ability to pay. [See Chapter 1 of this manual
for more information on updating student marital status.]
If the parent of a dependent student remarries after completing the FAFSA but before
completing verification, the household size must be updated to include the new stepparent.
However, the income and assets of the new stepparent would not be counted in the
calculation, though the administrator may use professional judgment to do so.
Valid ISIR Required A valid ISIR is defined as an output document with an official EFC
that is based on application information that is correct and complete on the date the
application or correction was signed. If a student’s FAFSA information changes as a result
of verification, all corrections or updates to any non-financial item or to any single dollar
item of $25 or more must be submitted to the CPS for reprocessing. The valid ISIR
reflecting these corrections and containing a final and correct EFC must be received by the
school and used as the basis for determining the student’s eligibility for all need-based
federal assistance programs. The school must also recalculate the student’s eligibility for
Federal Pell Grant and adjust his or her awards package on the basis of the corrected EFC on
the valid ISIR.
Note: In prior award years, schools were not always required to obtain a “valid” ISIR in
order to make disbursements of federal student aid funds. If the school determined through
its own calculations that a student’s award amounts or EFC did not change, it did not have
to submit the changes through the CPS. However, the revised verification regulations
stipulate that the school must receive a valid ISIR and use it as the basis for awarding and
disbursing federal student aid. By definition, a valid ISIR can only be created after the
corrected information has been processed through the CPS.
To make changes to a student’s record, the school must have signed documentation from the
student and parent (if dependent). This could include a signed corrections statement on a
SAR (or equivalent statement on a corrections worksheet), tax transcript (or other tax
documents) from student or parent, or other signed documentation as appropriate to the
nature of the corrections being submitted.
Adjustments These occur when a financial aid administrator changes application data in the
exercise of his or her professional judgment. If an application has been selected for
verification, the school must perform verification on all the required FAFSA data items,
collect the necessary worksheets and documentation, submit any changes to the CPS and
wait for the corrected ISIR before using PJ to perform an income or expense adjustment.
The school must then submit the PJ adjustments to the CPS on a new transaction. Changes
to a student’s information as a result of verification, and PJ adjustments to that information,
may not be submitted on the same transaction. The school may not submit PJ changes to the
CPS until it has received an ISIR confirming the processing of any corrections resulting from
verification.
All adjustments made from an administrator’s exercise of professional judgment must be
submitted to the federal processor using the appropriate processing flag designating the
change as a PJ adjustment, and not as a simple data correction.
VERIFICATION 4-22
SAM 2014-2015
Note: if a student applicant has not been selected for verification, the school is not required
to complete verification before performing a PJ adjustment, unless the school has a policy to
select for institutional verification all students who request PJ adjustments. If a PJ causes a
previously unselected record to be selected for verification, the verification would be
performed from the ISIR transaction on which the PJ was based.
Tolerance Option
Any changes to an individual dollar item on an applicant’s FAFSA that is $25 or more must
be submitted for reprocessing. For example, if the difference reported for the AGI = $24 and
taxes paid = $5, the institution would not be required to submit changes for reprocessing.
However, if the difference for the AGI = $25 and taxes paid = $5, the institution would be
required to update all changes, not just the change that exceeded the tolerance. Note that all
corrections to non-dollar items must be submitted to the CPS for reprocessing.
Selected For Verification After Disbursement
If as a result of a correction or update, an application which was not originally selected for
verification becomes selected, and the student has already been awarded and disbursed aid
based on the previous unselected output document, the student must complete verification
before any additional disbursements are made.
If the student does not complete verification, no further aid may be disbursed and the student
must repay any Pell, FSEOG, or Perkins disbursed under the unverified application. The
student would not be required to repay any FWS wages earned or any Stafford loan funds
disbursed. If the completion of verification reveals a change of information, the data must be
reprocessed through the CPS and, if there is a change in eligibility, prior and future
disbursements adjusted so that the student receives the correct amount.
If the student is selected for verification after ceasing to be enrolled for the award period
(with no plans to re-enroll) and all aid for the enrollment period has been disbursed
(including any late disbursements), the student may be excused from completing verification
and would owe no repayment on any federal aid disbursed on the unselected ISIR.
Verification Extension Deadline
If a SAR or ISIR with an official EFC has been processed while the student is enrolled and
eligible for payment, and that student aid record has been selected for verification, the
student is given a 120 day grace period after his or her last day of enrollment (but no later
than September 28, 2015) to complete the verification process.
Note: an ISIR with an “official” EFC is not necessarily the same as a “valid” ISIR. An
official EFC is an EFC that has been calculated by the CPS based on the FAFSA information
submitted (whether that information is correct or not) and appears on the output document
produced by the CPS. A “valid” ISIR is an output document with an official EFC that is
based on application information that is correct and complete on the date the application or
correction was signed.
The revised regulations allow schools to submit all corrections or updates resulting from a
student completing verification after they are no longer enrolled, but within the 120 day
grace period, and then use the valid ISIR with the corrected EFC to award and disburse
Federal Pell Grant (subject to the late disbursement rules and R2T4 requirements, if
applicable).
VERIFICATION 4-23
OSFA
Note: in prior years, students could not be awarded a late disbursement of Pell based on the
corrected ISIR if the corrections resulted in an EFC that was lower than the EFC the student
had on the last day of enrollment. In these cases, they would have had to have been paid on
the higher of the two EFCs even if incorrect. The revised regulations now require that Pell
eligibility for these students be determined from the corrected EFC on the final valid ISIR.
See Chapter 11 of this manual for information on the R2T4 and late disbursement
requirements.
Failure to Submit Documentation
A student must provide all information or documents requested by either the Department of
Education or the school to satisfy verification requirements or to resolve instances of
conflicting or discrepant information. If a student fails to provide the required
documentation by the established deadline, or the school fails to obtain a final valid ISIR, he
or she:
 Forfeits Federal Pell Grant for the award year;
 May not receive disbursements of additional Federal Pell, FSEOG or Federal
Perkins Loan funds;
 May not continue in an FWS job;
 May not have a Federal Direct Loan originated or receive further
disbursements of loan funds; and
 Must repay any disbursements of Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG or Federal
Perkins Loan already received.
If the school has received any proceeds for a Direct Subsidized Loan on behalf of the
student, the school must return all or a portion of the funds to the program under the excess
cash tolerance regulation [34 CFR 668.166(b)]. If the student received any interim
disbursement of FSA funds before the student completed verification, the school is
responsible for returning the money to the programs.
VERIFICATION 4-24
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
Recipients of state and federal financial aid are required to be making Satisfactory Academic
Progress in accordance with appropriate guidelines. Students who fail to meet the progress
requirements due to unusual circumstances that can be documented may apply for a waiver. The
minimum satisfactory academic progress and waiver requirements for both federal and state
programs are outlined in this chapter. Individual colleges may apply stricter standards to their
student body and these standards must be published and available to students. Auditors will hold
Colleges responsible for consistently applying the progress standards that appear in campus
publications.
CONTENTS
Federal Satisfactory Academic Progress Standard ................................................................ 5-3
Regulatory Overview ....................................................................................................... 5-3
Qualitative Measure ......................................................................................................... 5-4
Quantitative Measure ....................................................................................................... 5-4
CUNY’s Title IV Satisfactory Academic Progress Standard .......................................... 5-5
Undergraduate Students ................................................................................................... 5-5
Graduate Students ............................................................................................................ 5-6
Determination of Attempted Credits and Accumulated Credits ...................................... 5-6
Financial Aid Suspension ................................................................................................ 5-7
Right to Appeal ................................................................................................................ 5-7
Financial Aid Probation ................................................................................................... 5-8
Required Notifications and Monitoring ........................................................................... 5-9
Re-establishing Eligibility ............................................................................................... 5-9
Treatment of Non-Standard Situations .......................................................................... 5-10
CUNYfirst Title IV SAP Setup Tables and Status Codes ............................................. 5-11
New York State Good Academic Standing Standard ........................................................... 5-14
Program Pursuit ............................................................................................................. 5-14
Academic Progress......................................................................................................... 5-15
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-1
OSFA
Treatment of Remedial Students .................................................................................... 5-17
Transfer Students ........................................................................................................... 5-17
Re-admitted Students ..................................................................................................... 5-18
Accelerated Study .......................................................................................................... 5-18
Regaining Award Eligibility .......................................................................................... 5-19
Waiver of Good Academic Standing Requirements ...................................................... 5-20
Placement on the Progress Chart ................................................................................... 5-21
Eligibility Related Issues ............................................................................................... 5-24
C Average Requirement ................................................................................................. 5-24
NYS Progress Charts ..................................................................................................... 5-23
5-2 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015
Federal Satisfactory Progress Standard
Regulations for satisfactory progress for FSA recipients were initially published by the
U.S. Department of Education in October of 1983 and were republished in December of
1987 with some minor changes. On July 1, 1994, revised regulations went into effect
changing the quantitative component of institutional standards for determining satisfactory
academic progress for FSA recipients. ED published further revisions to its satisfactory
academic progress regulations in October 2010 that regrouped all SAP requirements into
34 CFR 668.34, mandated the use of standardized terminology, and made more explicit the
conditions under which students could appeal loss of Title IV eligibility due to failure to
meet an institution’s Title IV SAP standard.
Regulatory Overview
As part of its demonstration of administrative capability under Section 668.16(e) of the
Student Assistance General Provisions, an institution must establish, publish and apply
reasonable standards for measuring whether an otherwise eligible student is maintaining
satisfactory progress in his or her educational program. In turn, every student applicant
must meet the institution’s Title IV SAP standards in order to be considered eligible under
the Student Eligibility provisions (Section 668.32(f)) to receive (or continue to receive)
Title IV funding.
The institution’s Title IV SAP policy is considered reasonable if it meets the following
provisions as specified in Section 668.34:
 The policy must be at least as strict as the standard of academic performance the
institution applies to a student who is not receiving Title IV program assistance;
 The policy must provide for consistent application of the standard to all students
within defined categories (such as full-time, part-time, undergraduate and
graduate students) and educational programs;
 The policy must require students be measured under the institution’s Title IV SAP
standard either at the end of each payment period or at least once annually to
correspond with the end of a payment period. [Note: although the revised
regulations give institutions the option of measuring SAP at the end of each
payment period (semester), CUNY has opted to continue measuring SAP on an
annual basis.]
 The review must include all semesters with attendance at the institution including
any summer and inter-sessions whether or not Title IV assistance was received in
those semesters/sessions.
 The policy must include both a qualitative and quantitative measure of progress
and establish a maximum time-frame in which a student is expected to complete
the program.
 The policy must describe how course incompletes, withdrawals, repetitions, noncredit remediation, and transfers of credit affect satisfactory progress; and finally,
 The policy must describe how a student who has lost eligibility due to not making
SAP may re-establish eligibility for Title IV assistance.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-3
OSFA
Qualitative Measure
The regulations require that the institution specify the minimum grade point average (GPA)
a student must achieve at each SAP evaluation. The most widely used acceptable norm is
the academic standard set by the college’s accrediting agency to measure good academic
standing.
The CUNY Manual of General Policy sets forth the minimal academic standards for
retention of full-time and part-time undergraduate students. Under this standard,
undergraduates are expected to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA based on the number
of credits attempted as in the following table:
Credits Attempted
Minimum GPA
.5 – 12
1.50
13-24
1.75
25 - upward
2.00
Only those credits used for calculating the cumulative GPA required to meet the college’s
minimum retention standard are used to assess whether a student meets the qualitative
component of the Title IV SAP standard. The phrase “credits attempted” is defined
differently when referring to the quantitative measure of progress (see p.5-5 for more
information).
The regulations also stipulate that, if enrolled in an educational program of more than two
academic years, a student must have a GPA of at least “C” or the equivalent at the end of
the second academic year. This means that a student must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA
after being at the school for four semesters or six quarters without regard to enrollment
status and superseding the above table.
Graduate students are expected to maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 or higher.
Quantitative Measure
To quantify academic progress, an institution must set a maximum time-frame of no more
than 150% of an academic program's published length as the maximum time-frame in
which the student is expected to finish the program. The college must also specify the pace
at which a student must progress through his or her educational program to ensure that the
student will complete the program within the maximum time-frame by establishing a
minimum percentage of credits a student must successfully complete each academic year.
Remedial course-work is not considered in the calculation of the progress toward
completion for Title IV purposes.
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CUNY’s Title IV Satisfactory Academic Progress Standard
The guidelines that follow were first published by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for
Student Affairs on May 19, 1995 and have been subsequently revised to satisfy the
requirements of the revised SAP regulations set forth in 34 CFR 668.34 which took effect
July 1, 2011.
Undergraduate Students
In order to be making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree, for purposes of
receipt of Title IV student financial assistance, an undergraduate student must meet the
minimum standards specified below.
A. Minimum GPA – achieve at least the GPA required to meet the college’s
minimum retention standard; if enrolled in a program of more than two years,
achieve at least a “C” average, or its equivalent, at the end of the second
academic year, or have an academic standing consistent with the requirements for
graduation.
B. Maximum Time-frame – may not attempt more than 150% of the credits
normally required for completion of the degree.
C. Pace of Progression
 for baccalaureate programs, accumulated (or earned) credits must be equal
to or greater than a certain percentage of the total credits attempted
according to the following (also see CUNYfirst setup tables on p. 5-11):
Attempted
Credits
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135
150
165
180
Earned
Credits
0
5
16
27
42
50
63
72
84
95
108
117
 for associate degree programs, accumulated credits must be equal to or
greater than a certain percentage of the total credits attempted according to
the following (also see CUNYfirst setup tables on p. 5-12):
Attempted 6
Credits
12
18
24
30
36
42
48
54
60
66
72
78
84
90
Credits
Earned
0
2
4
6
13
19
23
27
33
39
44
49
55
61
0
All undergraduate students (whether aid recipients or not) will be measured against each of
the three SAP components at the end of the spring term to determine eligibility for receipt
of Title IV student financial assistance in the upcoming year.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-5
OSFA
Graduate Students
In order to be making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree, for purposes of
receipt of Title IV Federal Student Assistance, a graduate student must meet the minimum
standards specified below.
A. Minimum GPA – maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 or better, or have an
academic standing consistent with the requirements for graduation.
B. Maximum Time-frame – may not attempt more than 150% of the credits
normally required for completion of the degree.
C. Pace of Progression – must accumulate credits toward the degree greater than or
equal to two-thirds the cumulative credits attempted at the institution.
All graduate students will be measured against each of the three SAP components at the
end of the spring term to determine eligibility for receipt of Title IV student financial
assistance in the upcoming year.
Determining Attempted Credits and Accumulated Credits
Attempted credits, as defined in this section, pertain to the courses and credits that must be
included in the quantitative measure of progress to calculate pace of progression and
maximum time-frame. The accumulation of attempted credits usually reflects the semester
course enrollment maintained in a student’s permanent record at the college and will
usually reflect a student’s enrollment as of the Form A date. Accumulated credits should
reflect credits that the student has earned towards the completion of the degree program in
which the student is enrolled.
In applying the Title IV SAP standard, the college must address how the following types of
courses, situations, and procedures may affect a student’s GPA and pace of progression:
1. Remedial Courses
Since remedial courses and the remedial component of developmental and compensatory
courses do not carry degree credit, the non-credit component of these courses is not
included in the total cumulative attempted credits or accumulated credits for determining
pace of progression. However, the credit-bearing portion of compensatory or
developmental courses would be included in the cumulative earned and/or attempted credit
totals for determining pace.
2. Withdrawals
Since the Form A date usually reflects a student’s course load for the term, net of program
adjustments, withdrawals as part of the program adjustment period (i.e., “drops”) will not
be included as cumulative attempted credits. Withdrawals which are recorded on a
student’s permanent record will be included as cumulative attempted credits and will have
an adverse effect on a student’s ability to meet the pace of progression standard.
NOTE: Retroactive “non-punitive” administrative withdrawal activity may result in the
requirement for the student to repay any assistance received as a result of the student’s
enrollment at the time of receipt of the student assistance funds.
3. Incomplete Grades
Courses with incomplete grades are included as cumulative attempted credits. However,
these courses cannot be used as credits accumulated toward the degree since successful
completion is the criterion for positive credit accumulation. If the student fails to meet the
pace of progression standard due to the lack of successful completion grades for
5-6 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015
incomplete courses, the recording of successful completion grades within a term which
brings the accumulated credit level to the appropriate standard will restore eligibility for
the term and subsequent terms within the academic year.
4. Repeated Courses
Successfully completed courses can generally be accepted toward degree requirements
once. However, each time a student attempts a course, even if that course is part of a
forgiveness or amnesty policy whereby credits attempted and grades earned in prior
semesters are excluded from the GPA, it must be included as part of the cumulative
attempted credit record for the measuring of pace of progression. Therefore, repeated
courses, regardless of the prior grade, reduce a student’s capacity to meet the pace of
progression standard.
NOTE: the revised regulations allow students to receive Title IV aid for one-time repeat of
a previously passed course as long as the student is again receiving credit for the course.
Should the student subsequently fail the course, any additional attempt of that course
cannot be included in the student’s enrollment status for Title IV assistance. There is no
regulatory limit on the number of times a student may be paid to retake a failed course,
unless the student has also previously passed that course.
5. Transfer of Credit
Transfer students from colleges inside and outside of CUNY shall have their pace of
progression status initialized for purposes of satisfactory academic progress measurement
by using the number of credits determined to be acceptable toward the degree as both
cumulative attempted credits and cumulative earned credits earned.
Financial Aid Suspension
Undergraduate students who do not meet the minimum undergraduate standard and
graduate students who do not meet the minimum graduate standard are placed on financial
aid suspension and lose their eligibility to participate in federal student aid programs.
Students on financial aid suspension will remain ineligible for Title IV federal student
assistance until they take actions that once again bring them into compliance with the
appropriate progress standard.
Right To Appeal
All students who have been placed on financial aid suspension may appeal through the
normal institutional academic appeals process to retain eligibility for Title IV assistance.
Students may appeal any component of the SAP standard they have not been able to meet
including not meeting the minimum GPA and exceeding the maximum time-frame for
program completion.
An appeal must be based upon mitigating circumstances resulting from events such as
personal illness or injury, illness or death of a family member, loss of employment, or
changes in the academic program. The student’s appeal must include: a) the reasons why
the student failed to make SAP and b) what has changed in his or her situation that will
allow the student to demonstrate SAP at the next evaluation.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-7
OSFA
The appeal may be granted if the school:

Determines that the student will be able to meet the appropriate SAP standard by
the end of the next payment period (semester); OR

Develops an academic plan for the student that, if followed, will ensure that the
student will either be able to meet the appropriate SAP standard by a specific
point in time or achieve completion of his or her academic program.
Title IV appeals should be reviewed by a college committee who can make an accurate
academic assessment of the student’s capability to meet the appropriate SAP standard by
the next payment period/semester. If the committee determines that the student should be
able to meet the SAP standards by the end of the next semester, the student may be placed
on financial aid probation without an academic plan.
If the committee determines that the student will require more than one payment period to
meet SAP, it may develop an individual academic plan that outlines a detailed strategy for
the student to regain SAP eligibility or attain program completion within a certain
probationary time-frame. The plan can be for one payment period/semester or longer. The
academic plan should specify conditions that must be met for the period covered by the
appeal such as: the specific coursework that must be taken, the minimum GPA that must be
attained, and the number of credits that must be successfully completed. An academic plan
may take the student to program completion, rather than meeting the institution’s SAP
standards at a specific point in time. Program completion, or graduation, should be always
regarded as the ultimate attainment of SAP, and the possibility of a student finishing their
program of study is a strong argument for a favorable appeal.
Although financial aid personnel may participate in the appeal process, the Financial Aid
Office should not be the determining office responsible for considering, reviewing, or
granting an appeal. Financial aid personnel also may not put together academic plans.
These must be designed, maintained and tracked by an academic office (e.g., academic
counseling, advisement, etc.).
Financial Aid Probation
A student who has been granted an appeal will be placed on financial aid probation.
Students in this status have their eligibility for Title IV program assistance reinstated for
one payment period (semester). At the end of the probationary semester, the institution
must review the student’s academic progress to determine whether the student has met the
appropriate SAP standard or has fulfilled the requirements specified in the student’s
academic plan. A student who once again meets the appropriate progress standard after the
probationary semester will continue to receive Title IV assistance until the next scheduled
progress evaluation. Students who meet all the conditions of their academic plan at the end
of the probationary semester will continue to receive Title IV assistance on a monitored,
semester by semester basis until the next scheduled progress evaluation.
5-8 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015
There is no limit on the number of times a student who is placed on financial aid
suspension may follow the financial aid appeals procedure. Although a student may file
only one appeal per payment period (semester), additional appeals to extend financial aid
probation to subsequent semesters are allowed. As in the original appeal, the student
would indicate the mitigating circumstances, the reasons why SAP was not achieved, and
what has changed that will ensure the student will be able to meet SAP at the next
evaluation. If a student fails to meet the conditions of an approved academic plan, he or
she may submit an additional appeal to modify or adjust the plan for the subsequent
payment period(s) documenting any unusual circumstances that prevented them from
meeting the goals established by the original plan. The college may approve or decline the
subsequent appeal and may create an updated plan based on the information submitted.
Required Notifications and Monitoring
Colleges must notify students when they are not achieving SAP, explain what steps they
must take to regain eligibility, what the appeals process is, whether or not they are required
to meet with an academic advisor, what forms need to be completed, etc. Additionally, all
elements of the college’s Title IV SAP policy should be published on the college’s website
and in the college bulletin.
The college is required to track and monitor:

All students who do not meet SAP standards.

All students who file an appeal and are either granted or denied that appeal.

All students who are granted an individual specific academic plan.

All students who are granted “probation” status.
It is recommended that an academic office such as Registrar, Academic Advisement or
Counseling be responsible for monitoring the students’ progress during a probationary
semester or if they are meeting the conditions of an approved academic plan(s).
Documentation of the appeal, the probation and the academic plan must be retained and
available for review by internal and external auditors.
Re-establishing Eligibility
Other than having eligibility restored through filing a successful appeal, a student on
financial aid suspension may regain eligibility only by taking action that brings him or her
into compliance with the appropriate progress standard. The mere passage of time is
insufficient to restore Title IV eligibility to a student who has lost eligibility due to not
meeting the SAP standard. Therefore, students may not re-establish eligibility solely by
leaving the institution for at least one year because this action, by itself, would not bring
the student into compliance for Title IV SAP.
Students who choose to remain enrolled without receiving Title IV aid may request a
review of their academic record after any term in which they were on financial aid
suspension to determine if they were able to re-attain the appropriate standard.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-9
OSFA
If a student is on financial aid suspension at the beginning of the academic year for not
meeting one or more components of the school’s SAP standard, but meets them at some
point later in the academic year, the student may regain Title IV eligibility as follows:
Federal Pell Grant/Campus-based Funds
For Pell Grant and campus-based programs, the student regains eligibility
retroactively to the beginning of the most recent payment period during which the
student once again met the school’s satisfactory academic progress standards, unless
the school’s satisfactory progress policy provides for reinstatement of eligibility at
some later point.
Federal Direct Loan and FFEL Programs
For Federal Direct and FFEL program funds, the student regains eligibility for the
entire period of enrollment. Again, this period generally coincides with the entire
academic year, unless the school’s satisfactory academic progress policy provides for
reinstatement of eligibility at some later point.
Treatment of Non-Standard Situations
1. Readmitted Students
A student not making SAP cannot re-establish eligibility for Title IV program assistance by
re-enrolling after a one year or longer period of non-reenrollment. Upon readmission after
any period of non-reenrollment, the student’s Title IV progress standing must be reevaluated for SAP under the standard as the record stood at the end of their last term of
attendance. If the student has taken any action during the period of non-reenrollment that
would bring him or her into compliance with the progress standard (e.g., successfully
completing transferable courses at another institution during the period of absence), this
should also be factored into the reassessment. If the readmitted student has not taken any
such action, or if the action taken is not sufficient to bring the student back into compliance
with the progress standard, the student remains on financial aid suspension and must file a
successful appeal to re-establish eligibility.
2. Second Degree Students
Students enrolling for a second baccalaureate, graduate or associate degree shall have their
pace of progression status initialized for purposes of satisfactory academic progress
measurement by using the number of credits determined to be acceptable toward the degree
as both the students’ cumulative attempted credits and cumulative earned credits.
3. Change of Major
Students who change majors within the same degree or certificate program must complete
the degree within the maximum time-frame, unless the institution has allowed for such
changes by establishing various time-frames for different programs leading to the degree or
by individually re-evaluating the time-frame for these students.
4. Change of Degree
If a student changes his or her objective and begins pursuing a different degree or
certificate, the institution may make the student subject to the maximum time-frame it
establishes for the new objective without regard to time spent pursuing the previous degree
or certificate. The institution also has the flexibility to develop a policy that is more
restrictive and limits the student to an overall time-frame for the completion of his or her
studies.
5-10 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015
CUNYfirst Title IV SAP Setup Tables
Four year programs
A. Minimum GPA
Cumulative Attempted Units From Cumulative Attempted Units To 0.001 Minimum Cumulative GPA From Minimum Cumulative GPA To SAP Status 12.999 0 1.499 FAIL 13 24.999 0 1.749 FAIL 25 999.999 0 1.999 FAIL B. Maximum Time-frame
Attempted Maximum Units From Attempted Maximum Units To 120.001 SAP Status 180 WARN 180.001 999.999 FAIL C. Pace of Progression
Cumulative Attempted Units From Cumulative Attempted Units To Cumulative Earned Cumulative Earned Units Percentage Units Percentage From To 25 30.999 0 14.99 FAIL 31 36.999 0 24.99 FAIL 37 45.999 0 34.99 FAIL 46 48.999 0 39.99 FAIL 49 60.999 0 44.99 FAIL 61 72.999 0 49.99 FAIL 73 94.999 0 54.99 FAIL 95 120.999 0 59.99 FAIL 121 129.999 0 60.99 FAIL 130 138.999 0 61.99 FAIL 139 150.999 0 62.99 FAIL 151 151.999 0 63.99 FAIL 152 156.999 0 64.99 FAIL 157 164.999 0 63.99 FAIL 165 180.999 0 64.99 FAIL 181 999.999 0 99.99 FAIL SAP Status SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-11
OSFA
Two year programs
A. Minimum GPA
Cumulative Attempted Units From Cumulative Attempted Units To 0.001 Minimum Cumulative GPA From Minimum Cumulative GPA To SAP Status 12.999 0 1.499 FAIL 13 24.999 0 1.749 FAIL 25 999.999 0 1.999 FAIL B. Maximum Time-frame
Attempted Maximum Units From Attempted Maximum Units To 60.001 SAP Status 89.999 WARN 90 9999 FAIL C. Pace of Progression
Cumulative Attempted Units From Cumulative Attempted Units To 16 20.999 0 9.99 FAIL 21 25.999 0 14.99 FAIL 26 30.999 0 19.99 FAIL 31 35.999 0 24.99 FAIL 36 40.999 0 33.99 FAIL 41 45.999 0 42.99 FAIL 46 50.999 0 45.99 FAIL 51 55.999 0 49.99 FAIL 56 60.999 0 53.99 FAIL 61 65.999 0 55.99 FAIL 66 70.999 0 57.99 FAIL 71 75.999 0 59.99 FAIL 76 80.999 0 61.99 FAIL 81 84.999 0 64.99 FAIL 85 90.001 0 66.69 FAIL 90.002 999.99 0 99.99 FAIL 5-12 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
Cumulative Earned Cumulative Earned Units Percentage Units Percentage From To SAP Status SAM 2014-2015
CUNYfirst Title IV SAP Status Codes
Calc Status Severity Short Description Description SAP Status FAIL 80 FAIL Failed SAP Not Meet OVER 10 OVERRIDE Override for single term Meets SAP PASS 40 PASS Meets SAP Meets SAP PRB1 60 PROB‐1 PRB2 61 PROB‐2 Initial Probationary SAP Probation Continuing Probationary SAP Probation PRB3 62 PROB‐3 Third Probationary SAP Probation UDET 30 UNDETERMIN Undetermined Undetermined WAIV 20 WAIVER Waiver for one aid‐year Meets SAP WARN 35 WARNING Beyond 100% Credits Meets SAP KEY to the SAP Status Codes
SAP status codes are used on the CUNYfirst Student SAP page either in the “Calc SAP
Status” field or in the “Override SAP Status” field.
FAIL: indicates that student has not met SAP. Its effect is to inhibit awarding/disbursement
of federal student aid. Some colleges use FAIL as an override status to indicate that a
student who failed SAP, filed a Title IV Appeal, and had that appeal denied. Such a student
would have FAIL in both the “Calc SAP Status” field and in the “Override SAP Status” field.
OVER: used in the “Override SAP Status” field for students who have failed SAP but who
have been granted a Title IV appeal. Students with this status are said to be meeting SAP.
PASS: may be used in the “Override SAP Status” field to override a FAIL status when the
student has re-attained progress in a subsequent term within the school year.
UDET: used only in the “Calc SAP Status” field to indicate that the student’s SAP status is
undetermined. It is a default status in CF delivered aid to indicate that SAP has not yet been
run for that student. UDET is not assigned in the interface environment. Students who are
in UDET status are assumed, for the moment, to be meeting SAP.
WAIV: used in the “Override SAP Status” field to waive a student who was incorrectly
calculated for SAP by the software. Examples are students who have remedial units being
counted in the GPA attainment calculation or for students enrolled for a second degree who
are being incorrectly assessed for time-frame or pace of progression.
PRB1, 2, or 3: Used in the “Override SAP Status” field to indicate students who in a
probationary semester as the result of a Title IV appeal. These statuses have not been
made available for use by interface schools.
WARN: is used in the “Calc SAP Status” field to signal that a student has attempted more
than 100% [but fewer than 150%] of the credits required for the degree. This is an eligible
status for SAP.
The Severity Codes exist so that the proper outcome of the SAP evaluation is reached for
each student. The software measures each component of SAP separately and then arranges
them in a hierarchal relationship so that the final result of combining the individual
components and the various override conditions yields an appropriate overall SAP status
determination.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-13
OSFA
New York State Good Academic Standing Standard
Students receiving NYS awards must show evidence of good academic standing by
meeting program pursuit standards and reaching specific benchmarks of academic
progress. For financial aid purposes, good academic standing consists of two elements:
Program Pursuit and Satisfactory Academic Progress. Program pursuit is defined as
completing a certain percentage of degree-specific course work each term. Satisfactory
Academic Progress has two components: students must accumulate credits toward the
degree at a certain rate and maintain a minimum grade point average in each term a state
award payment is received.
An award recipient who fails to maintain good academic standing by not meeting the
program pursuit or the academic progress requirement loses eligibility for further NYS
awards until he or she is reinstated in good standing. A NYS scholarship may be revoked
if the recipient is not reinstated in good academic standing within a reasonable time.
A waiver from these requirements exists to provide qualified students experiencing
temporary difficulty in maintaining eligibility with an opportunity to have uninterrupted
participation in the state programs. Good academic standing requirements may be waived
once.
Program Pursuit
Program pursuit is determined each time a NYS award is received whether the award is for
full-time or part-time study. Half-time TAP awards for accelerated summer study are not
considered part-time awards and are factored into the program pursuit calculation
differently.
During each semester a NYS award is received, a student must complete a certain
percentage of a minimum required course load. The percentage of course work that must
be completed each semester becomes greater as a student receives additional payments
until the point where a student is required complete the equivalent of 100% of the
minimum required course load for any remaining payments.
Students receiving full-time TAP payments are evaluated for program pursuit using 12
semester hours as 100% of a minimum full-time course load. Students receiving APTS are
evaluated using 3 semester hours as 100% of a minimum part-time course load. [Note: the
State defines the minimum enrollment requirement for APTS eligibility as 3 semester
hours. This definition holds at CUNY even though CUNY customarily makes no APTS
awards for enrollment fewer than 6 semester hours of credit.]
More specifically, during the first and second semesters of State-supported study a student
must complete 50% of the minimum credits or equated credits required for that payment.
If receiving a full-time TAP payment, a student must complete at least 6 semester hours of
credit to meet the 50% program pursuit requirement. For APTS purposes, 50% of the
minimum part-time course load is defined as 1.5 semester hours of credit.
During the third and fourth semesters of State-supported study a student must complete
75% of the minimum credits or equated credits required for that payment. If receiving a
full-time TAP payment, a student must complete at least 9 semester hours of credit to meet
the 75% program pursuit requirement. For APTS purposes, 75% of the minimum part-time
course load is defined as 2.25 semester hours of credit.
5-14 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015
After the fifth semester of State-supported study, and for every semester thereafter, a
student must complete 100% of the minimum credits or equated credits required for that
payment.
Both degree credits and credit equivalents awarded for remedial work count toward
fulfilling the pursuit requirement. In addition, all grades that indicate a student persisted
throughout the semester are counted, including second and subsequent “R” grades received
for the same course (which are taken to be the equivalent of an “F” grade when
determining pursuit or progress). The grades at CUNY that do not count toward meeting
the pursuit requirement are “W”, “WU”, “WA”, “WF” and “WN”.
Students receiving Part-Time TAP (P-TAP) are considered to be receiving a strict proration of a full-time TAP award. Therefore, these students are evaluated for program
pursuit using the total enrolled semester hours of credit for the term in question and
applying to that number the appropriate completion percentage. For example, a student
receiving P-TAP for 9 semester hours of credit would have to complete 4.5 (rounded down
to 4) semester hours of credit to meet the 50% program pursuit requirement and 6.75
(rounded down to 6) semester hours of credit to meet the 75% program pursuit
requirement. A student receiving P-TAP for 11 semester hours of credit would have to
complete 5.5 (rounded down to 5) semester hours of credit to meet the 50% program
pursuit requirement and 8.25 (rounded down to 8) semester hours of credit to meet the 75%
program pursuit requirement.
Once a student receives his or her first State-aid award, he or she is “placed” on the first
step of the undergraduate level progress chart. For each full-time or part-time award
received, the student moves up one step on the pursuit chart. A student who fails to meet
the required percentage of completed course work may not continue to receive State
program funds without first re-establishing award eligibility.
The program pursuit requirements are outlined in chart form at the end of this chapter.
Academic Progress
To maintain award eligibility, students must meet the academic progress standard for each
full-time award semester (that is, each time the student accumulates 6 payment points).
This standard has two components:
1. Students must accrue a specified number of credits;
2. Students must achieve a minimum grade point average (GPA).
Old Progress Standard – 1st NYS award received before July 1, 2006
All students new to the program are automatically eligible for their first payment. In
addition, there are no minimum credit-accumulation or GPA criteria for the second
payment. In order to be eligible for the third payment, a student must have earned at least
6 degree credits with a minimum 1.00 GPA. By the fourth payment, a student must have
accumulated 18 degree credits with a 1.2 GPA. A student must maintain a 2.00 GPA (“C”
average) from the fifth state payment to the completion of the undergraduate degree. In
addition, the student must have accumulated 31 degree credits by the fifth payment, 45
degree credits for the 6th payment, 60 credits by the 7th payment, 75 degree credits by the
8th payment, 90 credits by the 9th payment and 105 credits by the 10th payment.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-15
OSFA
2006 Progress Standard
The 2006 progress standard applies to students first receiving state aid in 2007-08 through
and including 2009-10 and remedial students first receiving state aid in 2007-08 and
thereafter. There are separate credit-accumulation and minimum GPA criteria for state aid
recipients enrolled in two year associate degree/certificate programs or four year
baccalaureate degree programs.
Two-Year Standard: All students new to the program are automatically eligible for their
first payment. To be eligible for the second payment, a student must have earned 3 degree
credits with a minimum .5 GPA. By the third payment, a student must have earned at least
9 degree credits with a minimum .75 GPA. By the fourth payment, a student must have
accumulated 18 degree credits with a 1.3 GPA. A student must maintain a 2.00 GPA (“C”
average) from the fifth state payment to the completion of the degree. In addition, the
student must have accumulated 30 degree credits by the fifth payment, and 45 degree
credits for the 6th payment.
Four-Year Standard: All students new to the program are automatically eligible for their
first payment. To be eligible for the second payment, a student must have earned 3 degree
credits with a minimum 1.1 GPA. By the third payment, a student must have earned at
least 9 degree credits with a minimum 1.2 GPA. By the fourth payment, a student must
have accumulated 21 degree credits with a 1.3 GPA. A student must maintain a 2.00 GPA
(“C” average) from the fifth state payment to the completion of the undergraduate degree.
In addition, the student must have accumulated 33 degree credits by the fifth payment, 45
degree credits for the 6th payment, 60 credits by the 7th payment, 75 degree credits by the
8th payment, 90 credits by the 9th payment and 105 credits by the 10th payment.
2011 Progress Standard
The 2011 progress standard applies to nonremedial students first receiving state aid in
2010-11 and thereafter. There are separate credit-accumulation and minimum GPA criteria
for state aid recipients enrolled in two year associate degree/certificate programs or four
year baccalaureate degree programs.
Two-Year Standard: Non-remedial students new to the program are automatically eligible
for their first payment. To be eligible for the second payment, a student must have earned
6 degree credits with a minimum 1.3 GPA. By the third payment, a student must have
earned at least 15 degree credits with a minimum 1.5 GPA. By the fourth payment, a
student must have accumulated 27 degree credits with a 1.8 GPA. A student must maintain
a 2.00 GPA (“C” average) from the fifth payment to the completion of the degree. In
addition, the student must have accumulated 39 degree credits by the fifth payment, and 51
degree credits for the 6th payment.
Four-Year Standard: Non-remedial students new to the program are automatically
eligible for their first payment. To be eligible for the second payment, a student must have
earned 6 degree credits with a minimum 1.5 GPA. By the third payment, a student must
have earned at least 15 degree credits with a minimum 1.8 GPA. By the fourth payment, a
student must have accumulated 27 degree credits with a 1.8 GPA. A student must maintain
a 2.00 GPA (“C” average) from the fifth state payment to the completion of the
undergraduate degree. In addition, the student must have accumulated 39 degree credits by
the fifth payment, 51 degree credits for the 6th payment, 66 credits by the 7th payment, 81
5-16 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015
degree credits by the 8th payment, 96 credits by the 9th payment and 111 credits by the
10th payment.
Students who first received an award prior to the 2007-08 academic year will have to
continue to meet the 2006-07 academic progress requirements. The new progress
requirement described above does not affect these students.
Because academic progress is based on cumulative performance, grade changes and the
resolution of incomplete grades affect a student’s GPA once they are part of a student’s
record. These changes do not retroactively change past payments but may affect the next
payment. Also note that APTS and PTAP recipients are evaluated for academic progress
only when they have accrued payments equal to a full-time award semester, that is, each
time 6 payment points have been accumulated.
The undergraduate good academic standing requirements are outlined in chart form at the
end of this chapter.
Treatment of Remedial Students
A student shall be deemed to be in a program approved by the Commissioner for remedial
study if he/she:
 Indicates the need for remediation for at least two semesters through scores on a
recognized college placement exam or a nationally recognized standardized exam,
as certified by the college and approved by the State Education Department;
 Is enrolled in the Search for Education, Elevation and Knowledge (SEEK) program
or the College Discovery (CD) program; or
 Is or was enrolled in at least six credit hours of noncredit remedial instruction the
first semester they received a TAP award.
Students meeting the definition of remedial student will not be subject to the new academic
standards but rather will stay on the 2006 chart.
Transfer Students
Number of Previous Payments
In assessing the financial aid record of a transfer student, a receiving college must
determine the number of payments a student has previously received, and whether or not a
student has used a waiver. The Higher Education Services Corporation provides payment
and waiver information on the payment roster.
Program Pursuit
The payment points which are shown on the certification roster determine the student’s
placement on the pursuit chart.
Academic Progress – Determining Grade Point Average
Colleges may choose one of two ways to consistently develop students’ transfer grade
point averages. Whichever of the two options it elects, a college must uniformly apply it to
each and every transfer student.
The first option is to have a student start from scratch, and use, for the purpose of GPA
development, only those courses a student actually takes at the new college.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-17
OSFA
The second option is to calculate an incoming “transfer GPA.” This and the GPA a student
develops at the new college become the student’s cumulative GPA, to be used in assessing
the student’s academic progress as he or she continues in the program.
Academic Progress – Beneficial Placement
A college must make the determination as to where to place a transfer student on the
progress chart. It can either place the student at the level of credit (defined here as the
number of credits assigned by the new college) or at the level corresponding to the number
of payments that the student has already received. The choice is determined according to
which of the two options would most benefit an individual student.
The point where a student is placed on the Good Academic Standing chart and the actual
number of payments a student has received may not line up. For a transfer student, as for a
student who has received a waiver, the headings in the top row of the progress chart might
more appropriately be read as next payment instead of first, second, third, etc. Once placed
on the chart, either by virtue of starting at step one or higher, a student must meet the
appropriate program pursuit and academic progress standards to maintain eligibility each
semester.
Re-admitted Students
A re-admitted student is one who begins a course of study, leaves, and subsequently returns
to that same college. For State aid purposes, a re-admitted student may fall into one of
three categories. In each of these, a student is subject to the college’s normal re-admission
procedures.
If a student left the college in good academic standing and is then re-admitted, the student
is eligible for NYS aid upon returning to the college. If a student left the college after
having lost good academic standing and returns to the college after an absence of at least
one year, the student is eligible for NYS aid upon returning to the college.
If a student left the college after having lost good academic standing and returns to the
college after an absence of less than one year, there are two ways this student can regain
eligibility for the first semester of the student’s return:
 the student is granted the use of a waiver, provided that he or she has not
already used the waiver; or
 the student has made up the deficiency by attending without the benefit of
State support another college during the semester of absence from the college
of initial enrollment.
Placement on the Chart for Re-admits
Re-admitted students are placed on the Good Academic Standing Chart according to the
rules which govern the placement of transfer students.
Accelerated Study
Students can receive an additional term award for attending an additional study term
beyond the regular program of study for the academic year. Students can also receive an
additional award for half-time summer attendance. At CUNY, the summer term is always
the accelerated term and the term evaluation process includes both full-time and part-time
summer term enrollment.
5-18 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015
Accelerated half-time study requires being enrolled for at least six but fewer than 12 credit
hours (with a minimum of three real credits). Additionally, to receive an award for halftime accelerated study, the student must have been enrolled as a full-time student in an
approved program of study in New York State during the preceding spring term or the next
fall term.
In order to be eligible for either a full-time or a half-time award for an accelerated term
beginning after January 1, 2007, the student must complete 24 credits at the college of
summer attendance in the prior two semesters. These credits may be earned in any
combination (i.e., 12 + 12, 6 + 18, etc.). Up to three (3) credits in each of the prior two
semesters can be non-credit remedial hours.
Progress criteria for an accelerated award are based upon the same criteria as eligibility for
any academic year semester. This means that for an accelerated payment, a student must
have achieved in the prior semester both the academic progress and program pursuit
standards stipulated on the good academic standing chart for receipt of a “next award.”
Eligibility for an award for accelerated study does not increase a student’s maximum award
entitlement under TAP. TAP is still limited to 4 years at the undergraduate level and/or 4
years at the graduate level.
Half Awards
Any accelerated course work becomes part of a student’s cumulative GPA. Work
performed in the accelerated term affects a student’s academic progress standing and
therefore his/her eligibility for a next payment.
A student who has a whole number (0, 1, 2, etc.) of previous payments, and who receives a
half award in the accelerated term, has his/her payment number “rounded down” for the
next award. This means, for example, that a student whose total number of payments at the
end of the accelerated term is 3½ will be considered as having received 3 payments for
placement purposes only.
If a student has received 4 ½ payments for 4 full terms plus a half accelerated award and
then received a second accelerated half payment, the payments cumulate to 5 and the
student would be at the 100% pursuit level for the summer semester.
Full Awards
Students who receive full awards in the accelerated term are governed by the standards
indicated on the Good Academic Standing chart for that payment number.
Regaining Award Eligibility
When a student does not meet the requirements outlined on the good academic standing
chart either by failing to reach program pursuit and/or academic progress standards in any
given semester, further NYS awards to the student are suspended. For State aid purposes
the student can be said to have lost good academic standing and is therefore ineligible for
his or her next award.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-19
OSFA
There are a number of ways a student may regain eligibility:

A student can combine two or more semesters’ work to regain good
academic standing, provided that only one of those semesters is paid for
through State support.

A student may be eligible for a waiver. If the college approves a waiver, the
student may continue in the State aid program without interruption.

A student who transfers is automatically eligible for State aid in the first
semester at the new college even if the student has not met the good
academic standards at the college from which he or she transferred.

A student who is readmitted into his or her college after an absence of at
least one calendar year can become eligible providing he or she meets the
college’s readmission requirements.
There is no provision in the State regulations that limits the number of times a student can
lose good academic standing and seek reinstatement except that a student may use the
waiver provision to regain eligibility only once.
A student who has been granted a waiver for failure to meet program pursuit is not stalled
on the good academic standing chart while the waiver is in effect. The student is expected
to meet the pursuit standard stipulated for continued participation in the program.
Waiver of Good Academic Standing Requirements
In order to provide some allowance for cases where otherwise academically proficient
students experience a “bad” semester, a waiver of the good academic standing
requirements can be granted. The waiver permits a student to receive a State award the
semester immediately following the one in which the student failed to meet the program
pursuit and/or academic progress standard. The college must have a written policy
statement about the granting of waivers. Failure of the college to adhere to its published
policies concerning the waiver or to maintain the necessary documentation may result in an
audit disallowance. Because a waiver is to be granted only when unusual or extraordinary
circumstances are present, it is not expected that the waiver provision will be used with
great frequency. Therefore the following principles are to be kept in mind when
establishing policies:
 The waiver should be granted only when there is reasonable expectation that a
student will meet future requirements. [A college’s published waiver policy must
address student eligibility requirements.]
 A student may receive a waiver of the good academic standing requirements only
once. A student may receive this one-time waiver after failing to meet program
pursuit guidelines, academic progress standards or a combination of both
requirements during one semester. A student who uses a waiver after failing to
meet, for example, program pursuit in one semester cannot receive an additional
waiver for failure to make academic progress during another semester.
 The granting of a waiver must be approached in terms of the best long-range
interests of he student. Use of the waiver is an important option and should only be
considered with the concurrence of the student. For example, a student who is one
or two credits short of the required number of credits for the next payment might be
better served by taking a summer course at their own expense to regain eligibility
instead of using a waiver.
5-20 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015


A waiver does not increase the total number of payments a student may receive.
Waiver information is reported to HESC and becomes part of the student’s history
of state-aid usage. HESC reports prior use of the waiver for all students, including
transfer students, as part of the payment roster information.
A waiver is not automatic. A student must apply for a waiver according to the
procedures clearly established by his or her college. A college must make an
assessment of the reasons for the student’s failure to meet requirements. The
college must also maintain a written record of the findings and determination of
each case. In issuing waivers, the college should not use a “check-off” type form
with only basic information about the student. There should be a written narrative
detailing the effects of the extraordinary circumstances on the student’s academic
achievement and the waiver officer’s findings and determinations for granting a
waiver.
Placement on the Progress Chart
A student who has been granted a waiver for failure to make academic progress is stalled
on the academic progress portion of the chart for the semester during which the waiver is
being used. The student is expected to use the term to advance to the level the student
could not achieve without the waiver.
A student who has been granted a waiver for failure to meet program pursuit requirements
is not stalled on the good academic standing chart for the semester during which the waiver
is in effect. By the end of the semester covered by the waiver, the student is expected to
meet both the pursuit and progress standard stipulated for continued participation in the
program.
Eligibility-Related Issues
Students who apply for State awards for the first time after having already attended college
are placed on the good academic standing chart in step number one, as being certified for
their first payment. Because of this, a student’s academic performance prior to applying
for State aid does not enter into consideration in certifying a student for the first payment.
This principle also applies to college credit earned by high school students.
Change of Curriculum
Academic Progress is assessed based on accumulated credits and GPA earned toward the
program of study that student is enrolled in for that term. Therefore, a change of program
would exclude credits and grades for courses that no longer count towards the new
program and could throw the student out of progress. In moving from one program to
another, the basis for calculating both accumulated credits and cumulative GPA is changed
and may differ from the cum credits and GPA showing on the transcript. State guidance
does specifically prohibit using change of program as a way of circumventing the C
average requirement.
A student who changes his or her major while receiving State aid may experience some
difficulty in making the adjustment during the transition semester. Although a student’s
continuation in the program will be governed by the same guidelines which pertain to all
students in that program, the student who has been succeeding academically prior to
switching majors, but loses good academic standing for State awards because of a “bad”
transition semester is a likely candidate for a waiver. (Always keep in mind that there
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-21
OSFA
should never be an automatic reason for a waiver to be granted; each student’s situation
should be reviewed and documented individually.) Also note that all work attempted at the
institution becomes part of a student’s cumulative GPA.
Unresolved (Incomplete) Grades at Time of Certification
In the case where a student has met program pursuit and academic progress standards, but
has received an incomplete grade, the student can be certified as eligible for the following
semester. If the incomplete grade is subsequently changed to a failure and the student’s
GPA falls below the minimum level required for eligibility, the student retains the current
award but would be ineligible for continued payments unless work completed during the
State-supported semester is sufficient to raise the student’s GPA to at least the required
minimum.
C Average Requirement
A student who has received the equivalent of two or more full years of NYS student
financial aid payments [24 or more payment points] must have a cumulative C (2.0) GPA
to be eligible for continued State-supported assistance. This requirement applies to all
State-funded general and academic performance awards available at CUNY. If a student
fails to achieve a 2.0 GPA after receiving the equivalent of 4 full-time semester TAP
payments, he or she may not receive further state aid payments until a 2.0 GPA is once
again achieved.
Transfer students with 24 or more payment points are assumed to have met the C average
requirement in their first term of study at the new college since only courses for which the
student has earned a C or better are normally accepted in transfer. [The school can also
consider the actual grades of the courses accepted in transfer, but if this approach is
adopted, it must be consistently applied to all transfer students.] If a student with 24 or
more payment points of assistance is a readmitted or returning student, with or without
transfer credits earned elsewhere, and the GPA is still less than 2.0, the student is ineligible
for State-support in the initial term upon return and must attain a 2.0 GPA to regain
eligibility unless the student applies for and is granted a waiver (see below)..
C Average Requirement Waiver
Students may apply for a waiver of the “C” average requirement based on undue hardship
resulting from circumstances that have affected their ability to achieve the required C
average. If granted, this waiver and does not count as a use of the one-time only waiver of
the NYS Good Academic Standing requirements [see above]. Records of the use of the
waiver of the “C” average requirement are separately maintained by the college and not
reported to HESC. This waiver of the “C” average requirement may be granted more than
once if circumstances warrant.
Note: there can be no waiver of the C average requirement for P-TAP students because
having a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 is in the legislation as one of defining eligibility
requirements of the P-TAP program.
5-22 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015
NYS Progress Charts
PROGRAM PURSUIT
Demonstrating Program Pursuit means students must receive completion grades in a minimum percentage of
course work each semester State aid is received.
To be certified for payment #:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
student must have completed
this percentage of a minimum
full-time/part-time course load in
the last semester TAP, PTAP or
APTS was received:
0
50%
50%
75%
75%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
NOTE: A student receiving PTAP and APTS must meet the appropriate Program Pursuit standard every semester an
award is received. For instructions on calculating program pursuit for PTAP & APTS recipients, see pp. 5-9 – 5-10 of
this chapter.
MINIMUM GPA REQUIREMENT [for all students]
Students who have received the equivalent of 2 years of full-time NYS financial assistance [that is, accrued 24
payment points] must maintain at least a 2.00 GPA in order to receive TAP, PTAP or APTS.
OLD ACADEMIC PROGRESS [for students who received their first NYS award before July 1, 2006]
Meeting the Academic Progress standard requires that students (a) accumulate at least 6 degree credits by the end
of the second TAP-supported semester and between 12-15 credits each semester thereafter; and (b) attain the
minimum Grade Point Average as specified in the chart for each State aid payment requested.
To be certified for payment #:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
[payment points to be accrued]
6
12
18
24
30
36
42
48
54
60
(a) have earned this # of credits:
0
0
6
18
31
45
60
75
90
105
(b) with at least this GPA:
0
0
1.00
1.20
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
at the end of the prior semester,
student must
NOTE: A student receiving APTS or PTAP will be evaluated for the credit accrual and GPA requirements after each
accrual of 6 payment points.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-23
OSFA
2006 ACADEMIC PROGRESS [for associate degree students who received their first NYS award in the 200708 through 2009-10 academic years or meet the NYS definition of “remedial student”]
Meeting the Academic Progress standard requires that associate degree students (a) accumulate at least 9 degree
credits by the end of the second TAP-supported semester and between 9-15 credits each semester thereafter; and
(b) attain the minimum Grade Point Average as specified in the chart for each State aid payment requested.
To be certified for payment #:
1
2
3
4
5
6
[payment points to be accrued]
6
12
18
24
30
36
(a) have earned this # of credits:
0
3
9
18
30
45
(b) with at least this GPA:
0
.5
.75
1.30
2.00
2.00
at the end of the prior semester,
student must
NOTE: A student receiving APTS or PTAP will be evaluated for the credit accrual and GPA requirements after each
accrual of 6 payment points.
2006 ACADEMIC PROGRESS [for baccalaureate degree students who received their first NYS award in the
2007-08 through 2009-10 academic years or meet the NYS definition of “remedial student”]
Meeting the Academic Progress standard requires that baccalaureate degree students (a) accumulate at least 9
degree credits by the end of the second TAP-supported semester and between 12-15 credits each semester
thereafter; and (b) attain the minimum Grade Point Average as specified in the chart for each State aid payment
requested.
To be certified for payment #:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
[payment points to be accrued]
6
12
18
24
30
36
42
48
54
60
(a) have earned this # of credits:
0
3
9
21
33
45
60
75
90
105
(b) with at least this GPA:
0
1.10
1.20
1.30
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
at the end of the prior semester,
student must
NOTE: A student receiving APTS or PTAP will be evaluated for the credit accrual and GPA requirements after each
accrual of 6 payment points.
5-24 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
SAM 2014-2015
2011 ACADEMIC PROGRESS [for associate degree students who received their first NYS award in the 201011 academic year or thereafter and do not meet the NYS definition of “remedial student”]
Meeting the Academic Progress standard requires that associate degree students (a) accumulate at least 15
degree credits by the end of the second TAP-supported semester and at least 12 credits each semester thereafter;
and (b) attain the minimum Grade Point Average as specified in the chart for each State aid payment requested.
To be certified for payment #:
1
2
3
4
5
6
[payment points to be accrued]
6
12
18
24
30
36
(a) have earned this # of credits:
0
6
15
27
39
51
(b) with at least this GPA:
0
1.3
1.5
1.8
2.00
2.00
at the end of the prior semester,
student must
NOTE: A student receiving APTS or PTAP will be evaluated for the credit accrual and GPA requirements after each
accrual of 6 payment points.
2011 ACADEMIC PROGRESS [for baccalaureate degree students who received their first NYS award in the
2010-11 academic year or thereafter and do not meet the NYS definition of “remedial student”]
Meeting the Academic Progress standard requires that baccalaureate degree students (a) accumulate at least 15
degree credits by the end of the second TAP-supported semester and between 12-15 credits each semester
thereafter; and (b) attain the minimum Grade Point Average as specified in the chart for each State aid payment
requested.
To be certified for payment #:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
[payment points to be accrued]
6
12
18
24
30
36
42
48
54
60
(a) have earned this # of credits:
0
6
15
27
39
51
66
81
96
111
(b) with at least this GPA:
0
1.5
1.8
1.8
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
at the end of the prior semester,
student must
NOTE: A student receiving APTS or PTAP will be evaluated for the credit accrual and GPA requirements after each
accrual of 6 payment points.
SATISFACTORY PROGRESS 5-25
OSFA
THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY.
5-26 SATISFACTORY PROGRESS
6
STUDENT BUDGETS
CONTENTS
2014-15 CUNY Student Budget Calculations ............................................................................. 6-3
Budget Adjustments for Students with Special Circumstances ................................................... 6-5
Child Care/Elder Care ...................................................................................................... 6-5
Disabled/Handicapped ..................................................................................................... 6-5
Out-of-State Tuition ......................................................................................................... 6-5
Students Enrolled in ASAP.............................................................................................. 6-5
Accelerated Study Fee...................................................................................................... 6-5
Professional Judgment ..................................................................................................... 6-5
Less than ½ time Budget for Self-Help and Campus-Based Aid ................................................. 6-6
Summer Budget ........................................................................................................................... 6-6
Cooperative Education Budget Adjustment ................................................................................. 6-6
Living Away from Parents – AY 2014-2015 ............................................................................... 6-7
Living With Parents – AY 2014-2015 ......................................................................................... 6-8
Student Fees ................................................................................................................................. 6-9
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-1
OSFA
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-2
SAM 2014-2015
2014-2015 Budget Calculations
CUNY’s student expense budgets represent an estimate of the maximum expenses allowed for
awarding need-based financial aid to a student pursuing his or her education at CUNY. The
types of costs that may be included in the cost of attendance budget are prescribed by Section 472
of the Higher Education Act. While the cost categories are the same for all federal student aid
programs, the appropriate amounts to include for each category are determined for CUNY
students each academic year by the Office of Student Financial Assistance. Budgets are adjusted
every year based on the changes in selected budget elements in the Bureau of Labor Statistics
Consumer Price Index for all Urban Consumers available at: http://www.bls.gov. The CPI shows
the yearly changes in the elements that are used to create CUNY’s student expense budget.
The following charts explain the data used to create the 2014-2015 CUNY Student Expense
budgets. These budgets were derived using the 2013-14 budget components and adding the
percentage increase from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) CPI data to that component.
Rather than using the national CPI data, the NY/NE NJ data was used. In addition, we used our
own figures for housing and lunch.
2013 expenditures
Source: http://www.bls.gov 12/17/13
Base year 2012
12months
housing*
Base year 2013
9 months
yearly
change
12 months
9 months
13,454
9,902
3.3%
13,898
10,424
1,093
832
1.6%
1,110
832
336
252
1.1%
340
256
entertainment
1,446
1,064
0.6%
1,455
1,092
medical
2,220
1,588
2.6%
2,277
1,708
food
3,840
2,802
0.2%
3,847
2,886
at home
1,861
1,358
-0.2%
1,857
1,394
lunch**
2,050
1,498
0.8%
2,066
1,550
1,248
None
apparel
personal
books
1,304
*Use CUNY Housing Budget Calculation: Review of 1 bedroom apartments on Craigslist from 12/26/12
Average cost = $1,098/month for individual share of apartment
Use $1,098/mo rent plus $56 utilities = $1,154/mo for housing ($10,386 for 9 months)
**Use CUNY Lunch Calculation: $6.75/day x 5 days x 17 weeks/term x 2 terms
NYC
adjustment
Regional adjustment
apparel
personal
entertainment (LAP)
food
Personal Totals
LWP
LAP
832
10%
916
916
916
256
10%
282
282
282
1,092
10%
1200
600
1,200
2,886
10%
3174
1,798
2,398
*LWP gets ½ of an LAP
entertainment budget
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-3
OSFA
CUNY has created separate block budgets for students based on whether they live with or away
from their parents as reported on the FAFSA. The following charts show how the separate dollar
amounts for each budget category are derived. Not included in the charts on this page are the
appropriate tuition and fee charges which are, of course, essential components of every student’s
budget but are student, school and program specific. Also note that, at best, these budget
calculations are the average costs of attendance estimated for students attending CUNY in each
category used for the purposes of packaging aid awards and are not meant to represent exact
dollar for dollar costs.
Living with Parents
books & supplies
use 2012 figure + 4.5% from CPI-U
1,304
transportation
use weekly metrocard ($30) x 17 weeks/term x 2
terms
1,020
apparel
use NYC adjusted figure
916
other
use NYC adjusted figure
282
entertainment
use NYC adjusted figure / 2
600
1,798
personal (total)
room & board
use $3,066 (1/2 income protection allowance)
minus $1,148 lunch
1,918
lunch at school
use $6.75/day x 17 weeks/term x 2 terms
1,148
total
7,188
Living Away from Parents*
books & supplies
use 2012 figure + 4.5% from CPI-U
1,304
transportation
use weekly metrocard ($30) x 17 weeks/term x 2
terms
1,020
medical
use 2012 figure adjusted to 9 months
1,708
apparel
use NYC adjusted figure
916
other
use NYC adjusted figure
282
entertainment
use NYC adjusted figure
1,200
4,106
personal (total)
housing
use CUNY housing calculation
10,386
lunch at school
use $6.75/day x 17 weeks/term x 2 terms
1,148
food at home
use NYC adjusted figure minus calculated lunch
2,020
total
19,984
“*Budgets for The CUNY Law School and the CUNY Graduate Center for doctoral students differ from these
calculations based on higher living expenses, books, and additional medical expenses. Contact those colleges for
their specific numbers.”
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-4
SAM 2014-2015
Budget Adjustments for Students with Special Circumstances
Certain special circumstances may call for adjustments either to raise or lower $ amounts in
students’ block budgets as appropriate:
Child Care/Elder Care – Students with dependent care expenses for children under 13 years of
age (that is, 12 years + 12 months – 1 day) or for an elderly family member (or members) are
eligible for a dependent care allowance. This allowance should not be given to families who
receive day care services or funds from the HRA or free daycare services from the college.
Assume 6 hours/week per course with travel time
Use $7.75/hour x 6 hours per course x 2 courses
Multiply 17 weeks/term for 2 terms
Adjust result to make it divisible by 9 months
$99
$3366
$3,366.00
Disabled/Handicapped – Students who can document additional expenses as a result of a
disability and who are not sponsored by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and/or
the Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped may receive a budget adjustment for
these expenses. Students not presently supported by these agencies, and not previously rejected
by these agencies, must be referred to them prior to making such an adjustment.
If the student indicates they need additional supplies/equipment, the FAA should inquire from
the student’s counselor at the appropriate agency whether the requested items will be provided by
the organization. If not, the student’s budget may be increased to reflect the reasonable cost of
the items needed.
Out-of-State Tuition – Students attending CUNY charged out-of-state tuition have their budget
adjusted by that amount.
Students Enrolled in ASAP – The Accelerated Study for Associate Programs (ASAP) program
provides its students with textbooks and Metrocards. Since ASAP students incur no costs for
books and transportation, these two budget components are adjusted to 0 for ASAP students.
Professional Judgment – The FAA may, on a case by case basis, use professional judgment to
adjust elements of the cost of attendance based upon individual student requests for such
consideration. Such adjustments must be for a compelling unusual circumstance that can be fully
supported by documentation in the student’s file. Adjustments should be limited to expenses that
relate directly to the student and his or her academic program. (Costs related to the student’s
family are addressed by the EFC formula.) Documented costs for book or supplies related to the
student’s curriculum in excess of the budget maximums, reasonable costs for the rental or
purchase of a personal computer, unusual medical or transportation expenses exceeding the
allowances in CUNY’s block budgets might justify the use of a PJ cost of attendance adjustment.
Remember that 1) the law prohibits the use of professional judgment to create a new cost of
attendance category or categories; 2) the FAA is under no obligation to use professional
judgments to make COA adjustments; its use by financial aid administrators is optional; and 3)
the school must complete the verification process for any applicant selected by the CPS before
making a COA adjustment. Note that CUNY has a standard dependent care allowance that is
included in the budgets of students with dependents. This situation would not be an exercise of
professional judgment. On the other hand, if a student is requesting dependent care expenses in
an amount which exceeds a standard allowance, increasing the allowance on an applicant
selected for verification would be a use of PJ authority that should be exercised only after
verification was completed.
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-5
OSFA
Less than ½ Time Budget for Self-Help and Campus-based Aid
Only the costs for tuition & fees and allowances for books & supplies, transportation and
dependent care expenses (where applicable) may be included as part of the COA for students
who are enrolled less than half-time. Use the following budget for packaging campus-based aid:
Transportation
425.00 ((5 trips @ $2.50) per week) x 34 weeks)
Books & Supplies 326.00 ($1,304/4)
+ $751.00
+ Tuition /fees
+ Dependent care expenses [where applicable]
[Note: The types of costs in the Pell Grant budget for students enrolled for less than half time are
the same as for the other Title IV programs but the Pell budget does not pro-rate the budget
components and always uses the costs for a full academic year.]
Summer Budgets
Use the appropriate block budget (see pp. 7-8) that reflects either living with parents or living
away from parents status and the period of attendance. When students who are not enrolled in a
summer session use FWS in the summer, 62.5% of the actual earnings will be treated as a
resource and subtracted from the student’s academic year financial need. Students who attend
the summer session are packaged with 10.5 month budget and FWS, whether earned in the
summer or not, is part of the total award year package.
Cooperative Education Budget Adjustment
Students with a “living with parents” budget enrolled in cooperative education programs for at
least 4.5 months duration may have their academic year budgets increased to reflect the
additional costs incurred by going to work. The maximum allowable costs are:
$ 390.00
($32.50 per week x 12 weeks)
Lunch
Transportation
0
(weekly Metrocard included in standard budget)
Personal
780.00
($65 x 12 weeks)
Total $1170.00
Students who have 2 Co-op assignments during the award year will have the following budget:
1st Co-op budget
Personal
Total
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-6
$1170.00
520.00
$1690.00
SAM 2014-2015
LIVING AWAY FROM PARENTS - AY 2014-2015
>= Half Time
Books and Supplies *
Transportation
Personal
Housing **
Food (At Home)
Lunch
Total Block Budget ***
Child/Elder Care
Housing Exclusion
Medicaid
Budget w/Child Care
Budget w/Housing Exclusion
Budget w/Medicaid Exclusion
1.5
MONTHS
3
4.5
6
7.5
9
10.5
12
MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS
$217
$435
$652
$869
$1,087
$1,304
$1,521
$1,521
$170
$340
$510
$680
$850
$1,020
$1,190
$1,360
684
1,369
2,053
2,737
3,422
4,106
4,790
5,475
1,731
3,462
5,193
6,924
8,655
10,386
12,117
13,848
337
673
1,010
1,347
1,683
2,020
2,357
2,693
191
383
574
765
956
1,148
1,339
1,530
$3,330
$6,662
$9,992
$13,322
$16,653
$19,984
$23,314
$26,427
$561
$1,122
$1,683
$2,244
$2,805
$3,366
$3,927
$4,488
($1,731)
($3,462)
($5,193)
($6,924)
($8,655) ($10,386) ($12,117) ($13,848)
($285)
($569)
($854)
($1,139)
($1,423)
($1,708)
($1,993)
($2,277)
$3,891
$7,784
$11,675
$15,566
$19,458
$23,350
$27,241
$30,915
$1,599
$3,200
$4,799
$6,398
$7,998
$9,598
$11,197
$12,579
$3,045
+ Tuition
+ Fees
$6,093
$9,138 $12,183 $15,230 $18,276 $21,321 $24,150
+ Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
< Half Time
Total
Child Care
Total w/Child Care
$125
$250
$376
$501
$626
$751
$876
$1,001
$281
$561
$842
$1,122
$1,403
$1,683
$1,964
$2,244
$406
+ Tuition
+ Fees
$811
$1,217
$1,623
$2,028
$2,434
$2,840
$3,245
+ Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
*If a student's curriculum requires books and supply costs in excess of this standard maximum, such costs must
be documented.
**The amount allocated for housing expects that students share housing costs.
***Students’ college costs, excluding tuition and fees, are expected to be the total block budget. The category
breakouts are a general guide and the amounts can be reallocated between categories.
For LaGuardia students, see text for appropriate co-op adjustments.
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-7
OSFA
LIVING WITH PARENTS - AY 2014-2015
>= Half Time
Books and Supplies *
Transportation
Lunch
Personal
Housing
Total Block Budget **
Child Care
Housing Exclusion
Budget w/Child Care
Budget w/Housing Exclusion
Budget w/Child Care &
Housing Exclusion
1.5
3
4.5
6
7.5
9
10.5
12
MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS MONTHS
$217
$435
$652
$869
$1,087
$1,304
$1,521
$1,521
$170
$340
$510
$680
$850
$1,020
$1,190
$1,360
$191
$383
$574
$765
$956
$1,148
$1,339
$1,530
$300
$599
$899
$1,199
$1,498
$1,798
$2,098
$2,397
$320
$639
$959
$1,279
$1,598
$1,918
$1,918
$1,918
$1,198
$2,396
$3,594
$4,792
$5,989
$7,188
$8,065
$8,726
$561
$1,122
$1,683
$2,244
$2,805
$3,366
$3,927
$4,488
($320)
($639)
($959)
($1,279)
($1,598)
($1,918)
($1,918)
($1,918)
$1,759
$3,518
$5,277
$7,036
$8,794
$10,554
$11,992
$13,214
$878
$1,757
$2,635
$3,513
$4,391
$5,270
$6,147
$6,808
$1,439
+ Tuition
+ Fees
$2,879
$4,318
$5,757
$7,196
$8,636 $10,074 $11,296
+ Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
< Half Time
Total
Child Care
Total w/Child Care
$125
$250
$376
$501
$626
$751
$876
$1,001
$281
$561
$842
$1,122
$1,403
$1,683
$1,964
$2,244
$406
+ Tuition
+ Fees
$811
$1,217
$1,623
$2,028
$2,434
$2,840
$3,245
+ Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition + Tuition
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
+ Fees
*If a student's curriculum requires books and supply costs in excess of this standard maximum, such costs must
be documented.
**The amount allocated for housing expects that students share housing costs.
***Students’ college costs, excluding tuition and fees, are expected to be the total block budget. The category
breakouts are a general guide and the amounts can be reallocated between categories.
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-8
SAM 2014-2015
Student Fees 2013-2014
The fees shown on this chart represent the average fees students are typically charged. The fee amounts an
individual student actually pays may differ on occasion from the calculated fees posted to FAP.
This chart includes the U.S.S. student government fee ($.85 per semester), the Consolidated Services Fee
($15.00 per semester), the appropriate student activities fee and the Technology Fee (see note below). This fee
chart is current as of 01/23/13.
Full-Time
Summer
2013
College
UG
Grad
Part-Time
Academic Year
2013-2014
One Semester
2013-2014
Academic Year
2013-2014
One Semester
2013-2014
UG
UG
UG
UG
Grad
Grad
Grad
Grad
Community Colleges
BMCC
86.85
–
317.70
–
158.85
–
173.70
–
86.85
–
Bronx
102.00
–
354.00
–
177.00
–
204.00
–
102.00
–
Hostos
94.10
–
355.20
–
177.60
–
188.20
–
94.10
–
Kingsboro
50.00
–
350.00
–
175.00
–
184.00
–
92.00
–
LaGuardia
50.00
–
365.70
–
182.85
–
183.70
–
91.85
–
--
--
341.70
--
170.85
--
--
--
--
--
79.85
–
339.70
–
169.85
–
177.70
–
88.85
–
144.85
78.85
480.00
308.00
240.00
154.00
300.00
208.00
150.00
104.00
143.35 D
126.85 E
123.85 F
69.85 P
125.35
380.20
160.70
177.05 D
126.35 E
105.85
140.10
130.35
354.10 D
252.70 E
211.70
280.20
260.70
227.05 D
176.35 E
179.35
190.10
130.35 F
80.35 P
454.10 D
352.20 E
358.70
77.85
NCC
Queensboro
Senior Colleges
Baruch
Brooklyn
City
Hunter
80.35
91.55
50.00
399.00
255.70
199.50
127.85
238.90
155.70
119.45
John Jay
104.85
95.35
329.20
290.70
164.60
145.35
209.70
190.70
104.85
95.35
Lehman
102.50
102.50
378.00
378.00
189.00
189.00
238.00
238.00
119.00
119.00
Medgar Evers
75.85
–
301.70
–
150.85
–
201.70
–
100.85
–
NYC Tech
65.00
–
339.10
–
169.55
–
170.40
–
85.20
–
Queens [Day]
129.00
121.25
476.50
390.50
238.25
195.25
311.50
290.50
155.75
145.25
Queens [Evening]
129.00
121.25
466.50
390.50
233.25
195.25
307.50
290.50
153.75
145.25
Queens Summer II
143.25
135.25
CSI
128.00
128.00
428.00
428.00
214.00
214.00
256.00
256.00
128.00
128.00
York
75.85
–
366.00
–
183.00
–
226.00
–
113.00
–
Law
–
115.00
–
1711.70
–
855.85
–
1611.70
–
805.85
Graduate
–
50.00
–
313.20
–
156.60
–
213.20
–
106.60
Professional Studies
Journalism
–
–
1130.00 F
1331.00 S
–
565.00 F
665.00 S
–
1030.00 F
1231.00 S
–
515.00 F
615.00 S
Graduate Schools
Note: The Technology Fee of $100.00 per semester for full-time students and $50.00 per semester for part-time
students has been included in the fee totals in the above chart.
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-9
OSFA
Student Fees 2013-2014
The fees shown on this chart represent the average fees students are typically charged. The fee amounts an
individual student actually pays may differ on occasion from the calculated fees posted to FAP.
This chart includes the U.S.S. student government fee ($.85 per semester), the Consolidated Services Fee
($15.00 per semester), and the appropriate student activities fee, but DOES NOT include the technology fee (see
note below). This fee chart is current as of 01/23/13.
Full-Time
Summer
2013
College
UG
Grad
Part-Time
Academic Year
2013-2014
One Semester
2013-2014
Academic Year
2013-2014
One Semester
2013-2014
UG
UG
UG
UG
Grad
Grad
Grad
Grad
Community Colleges
BMCC
36.85
–
117.70
–
58.85
–
73.70
–
36.85
–
Bronx
52.00
–
154.00
–
77.00
–
104.00
–
52.00
–
Hostos
44.10
–
155.20
–
77.60
–
88.20
–
44.10
–
Kingsboro
0.00
–
150.00
–
75.00
–
84.00
–
42.00
–
LaGuardia
0.00
–
165.70
–
82.85
–
83.70
–
41.85
–
NCC
--
--
141.70
--
70.85
--
--
--
--
--
29.85
–
139.70
–
69.85
–
77.70
–
38.85
–
94.85
28.85
280.00
108.00
140.00
54.00
200.00
108.00
100.00
54.00
93.35 D
76.85 E
23.85 F
19.85 P
41.55
75.85
180.20
60.70
127.05 D
76.35 E
55.85
90.10
30.35
254.10 D
152.70 E
111.70
180.20
60.70
127.05 D
76.35 E
79.35
90.10
30.35 F
30.35 P
0.00
254.10 D
152.70 E
158.70
199.00
55.70
99.50
27.85
138.90
55.70
69.45
27.85
John Jay
54.85
45.35
129.20
90.70
64.60
45.35
109.70
90.70
54.85
45.35
Lehman
52.50
52.50
178.00
178.00
89.00
89.00
138.00
138.00
69.00
69.00
Medgar Evers
25.85
–
101.70
–
50.85
–
101.70
–
50.85
–
NYC Tech
15.00
–
139.10
–
69.55
–
70.40
–
35.20
–
Queens [Day]
79.00
71.25
276.50
190.50
138.25
95.25
211.50
190.50
105.75
95.25
Queens [Evening]
79.00
71.25
266.50
190.50
133.25
95.25
207.50
190.50
103.75
95.25
Queens Summer II
93.25
85.25
CSI
78.00
78.00
228.00
228.00
114.00
114.00
156.00
156.00
78.00
78.00
York
25.85
–
166.00
–
83.00
–
126.00
–
63.00
–
–
65.00
–
1511.70
–
755.85
–
1511.70
–
45.00
--
0.00
15.00
–
180.00
--
113.20
30.00
930.00 F
1131.00 S
–
90.00
--
56.60
15.00
465.00 F
565.00 S
–
180.00
--
113.20
30.00
930.00 F
1131.00 S
Queensboro
Senior Colleges
Baruch
Brooklyn
City
Hunter
30.35
Graduate Schools
Law
Graduate
Professional Studies
Journalism
755.85
90.00
--
56.60
15.00
465.00 F
565.00 S
Note: The Technology Fee of $100.00 per semester for full-time students and $50.00 per semester for part-time
students must be added into the above fee chart.
STUDENT BUDGETS 6-10
DETERMINING EXPECTED FAMILY CONTRIBUTION
The completed FAFSA furnishes all the information needed to calculate the Estimated Family
Contribution (EFC) for dependent and independent students. EFCs are calculated using a
uniform formula approved by Congress for each student category and are used to determine a
student’s need for federal student aid. This chapter outlines the three basic EFC formulae:
Dependent Student, Independent Student without Dependents (other than spouse), and
Independent Student with Dependents (other than spouse) and gives the worksheets and tables
needed to hand-calculate an EFC for each category. Also discussed are additional special
calculations that may be applied in certain circumstances: the Simplified EFC Formula, the
Automatic Zero EFC and EFCs for enrollment periods other than 9 months.
CONTENTS
EFC Formula for Dependent Students (Regular and Simplified) ................................................ 7-3
Regular Worksheet: Dependent Students .................................................................................... 7-5
Parents’ Analysis ............................................................................................................. 7-5
Student’s Analysis ........................................................................................................... 7-6
Final EFC Calculation ..................................................................................................... 7-7
EFC Calculation for Enrollment Periods Other Than 9 Months ..................................... 7-8
Simplified Worksheet: Dependent Students ................................................................................ 7-9
Parents’ Analysis ............................................................................................................. 7-9
Student’s Analysis ......................................................................................................... 7-10
Final EFC Calculation ................................................................................................... 7-11
EFC Calculation for Enrollment Periods Other Than 9 Months ................................... 7-12
Dependent Student Analysis Tables .......................................................................................... 7-13
EFC Formula for Independent Students Without Dependents Other Than Spouse
(Regular and Simplified) ............................................................................................... 7-17
Regular Worksheet: Independent Students Without Dependents Other Than Spouse .............. 7-18
Student’s Analysis ......................................................................................................... 7-18
EFC Calculation for Enrollment Periods Other Than 9 Months ................................... 7-19
Simplified Worksheet: Independent Students Without Dependents Other Than Spouse .......... 7-20
Student’s Analysis ......................................................................................................... 7-20
NEED ANALYSIS COMPUTATION 7-1
OSFA
EFC Calculation for Enrollment Periods Other Than 9 Months ................................... 7-21
Independent Student Analysis Tables ........................................................................................ 7-22
EFC Formula for Independent Students With Dependents Other Than Spouse
(Regular and Simplified) ............................................................................................... 7-25
Regular Worksheet: Independent Students With Dependents Other Than Spouse ................... 7-27
Student’s Analysis ......................................................................................................... 7-27
EFC Calculation for Enrollment Periods Other Than 9 Months ................................... 7-28
Simplified Worksheet: Independent Students With Dependents Other Than Spouse ............... 7-29
Student’s Analysis ......................................................................................................... 7-29
EFC Calculation for Enrollment Periods Other Than 9 Months ................................... 7-30
Independent Student Analysis Tables ........................................................................................ 7-31
NEED ANALYSIS COMPUTATION 7-2
SAM 2014-2015
EFC Formula for Dependent Students (Regular and Simplified)
The Regular Dependent Student Formula calculates the EFC from three elements: the
parents’ contribution (including a contribution from both income and assets), the
student’s contribution from income and the student’s contribution from assets. The EFC
is the sum of the three.
The Simplified Dependent Student Formula is basically the same as the regular
formula except that the asset information isn’t included in the calculation. A dependent
student qualifies for the simplified formula if:
 the student’s parents either filed or were eligible to file a 2013 IRS Form 1040A
or 1040EZ, or were not required to file any tax return, OR anyone included in the
household size received benefits during 2012 or 2013 from a “means-tested
Federal benefit program” such as Supplemental Security Income, Food Stamp
Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), etc. OR either
parent is a dislocated worker, AND
 the parents’ combined AGI (or income earned from work for non-filers) was less
than $50,000.
Parents’ Contribution
The three basic steps in calculating the parents’ contribution involve 1) determining the
parents’ available income, 2) calculating the parents’ contribution from assets and 3)
calculating the parental contribution using the available income, contribution from assets
and the number in college.
Parents’ available income is calculated by first adding all taxed and untaxed parental
income and then subtracting from the total income allowances that account for certain
non-discretionary expenses such as taxes paid, basic living expenses and an employment
expense allowance. The amount of income remaining is assumed by the formula to be
available at least in part to help pay for a post-secondary education. This amount can be
a negative number. [Note: the school may assume the IPA includes 30% for food, 22%
for housing, 9% for transportation, 16% for clothing and personal expenses, 11% medical
expenses and 12% miscellaneous.]
In the full formula, a portion of the parents’ net worth is calculated by adding together
the assets reported on the FAFSA and applying certain offsets and allowances to come up
with a number that is called the parents’ discretionary net worth. The parents’
contribution from assets is calculated by multiplying the discretionary net worth by a
conversion rate of 12%. If the contribution from assets is a negative number, it is set as
zero. In the simplified formula the parents’ assets are not counted in the calculation.
Finally, the parents’ available income and the contributions from assets are added
together to obtain the parents’ adjusted available income. This amount can be a negative
number. The parents’ total contribution is a percentage of the adjusted available income
and represents the total amount parents are expected to contribute toward all of the family
members’ postsecondary costs. This amount is divided by the number in college to get
the parents’ contribution for the individual student. Parents are not included in the
number attending college.
NEED ANALYSIS COMPUTATION 7-3
OSFA
Student’s Contribution from Income
The student’s contribution from income is determined by first calculating the student’s
available income. Like the parents’ contribution, this figure is the total taxed and
untaxed student income minus the total allowances. The allowances to the student’s
income include taxes paid, an income protection allowance of $6,260 and parent’s
Adjusted Available Income (if it is a negative number). The student’s available income
is assessed at 50% for student’s contribution from income. If this amount is a negative
number, it is set to zero.
Student’s Contribution from Assets
The student’s assets are treated similarly to the parents’ assets but with a 20% conversion
rate and differences in the offsets. In the simplified formula the student’s assets are not
counted in the calculation.
Final EFC Calculation
The Parents’ Contribution, the Student’s Contribution from Income and the Student’s
Contribution from Assets are added together to get the EFC.
Alternate EFCs
The law specifies that the EFC of a dependent student must be modified for enrollment
periods greater or lesser than 9-months. For periods of less than 9 months, the parents’
contribution is pro-rated according to the number of months of enrollment. Likewise, the
student’s contribution from income is pro-rated and then added to the contribution from
assets, which is not pro-rated. For periods greater than 9 months, the parents’
contribution is adjusted according to p. 3 of Worksheet A of the EFC Worksheets while
the student’s contribution remains the same. A table of alternate EFCs, used when
students are attending for periods of from 1 to 12 months, can be found in the “FAA
Information” section of the SAR/ISIR.
Automatic Zero EFC
A zero EFC is automatically assigned to a dependent student if:
 the parents of the student was not required to file a 2013 IRS Form 1040 (long
form); OR if anyone included in the household size received benefits during 2012
or 2013 from a “means-tested Federal benefit program” such as Supplemental
Security Income, Food Stamp Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy
Families (TANF), etc., OR if either parent is a dislocated worker, AND
 the combined parental AGI (for tax-filers) or income earned from work (for nonfilers) was $24,000 or less.
Using the Dependent Student Worksheets
The following 12 pages contain Worksheets for the Regular Dependent Student EFC
Formula, & the Simplified Dependent Student Formula, and Tables A-1 through A-7
needed to determine the necessary offsets and allowances. The worksheets allow hand
calculations of both the 9 month EFC and the EFC for periods of enrollment other than 9
months for both categories of independent student. The simplified worksheet greys out
the asset information not used in the calculation and alerts you if the student is eligible
for the automatic zero EFC.
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EFC Formula for Independent Students Without Dependents Other Than a
Spouse (Regular and Simplified)
The Regular Independent Student Without Dependents Formula calculates the EFC
from two elements: the student’s contribution from available income and the student’s
contribution from assets. These two numbers are added together and the sum is divided
by the number in college.
The Simplified Independent Student Without Dependents Formula is the same as the
regular formula except that the asset information isn’t included in the calculation. An
independent student qualifies for the simplified formula if:
 the student or spouse either filed or were eligible to file a 2013 IRS Form 1040A
or 1040EZ, or were not required to file any tax return, OR if anyone included in
the household size received benefits during 2012 or 2013 from a “means-tested
Federal benefit program” such as Supplemental Security Income, Food Stamp
Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), etc., OR either
student or spouse is a dislocated worker, AND
 the combined AGI (or income earned from work for non-filers) of student and
spouse was less than $50,000.
Student’s Contribution from Available Income
The student’s available income is the total taxed and untaxed income for the student (and
spouse, if married) minus the total allowances for non-discretionary expenses. These
allowances include taxes paid, an income protection allowance (for basic living
expenses) and an employment expense allowance. The IPA is $9,730 for unmarried
students (or for married students with a spouse attending college at least half-time), and
$15,600 for married students with a spouse who is not attending college. The student’s
available income can be a negative number. The available income is assessed at a rate of
50% to come up with the student’s contribution from available income.
Student’s Contribution from Assets
In the full formula, a portion of the student’s (and spouse’s) net worth is calculated by
adding together the assets reported on the FAFSA and applying certain offsets and
allowances to come up with a number that is called the student’s discretionary net worth.
The contribution from assets is derived from the student’s discretionary net worth by
multiplying it by a 20% conversion rate. If the contribution from assets is less than zero,
it is set to zero. In the simplified formula the student’s assets are not counted in the
calculation.
Alternate EFCs
The law specifies that the EFC of an independent student must be modified for
enrollment periods greater or lesser than 9-months. For periods of less than 9 months,
the EFC is simply pro-rated by dividing it by 9 and then multiplying the result by the
number of months the student will be enrolled. For periods greater than 9 months, the
EFC remains the same as for 9 months.
Automatic Zero EFC
Independent students with no dependents do not qualify for the automatic zero EFC.
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EFC Formula for Independent Students W/ Dependents Other Than a
Spouse (Regular and Simplified)
The Regular Independent Student With Dependents Formula calculates the EFC
from two elements: the student’s contribution from available income and the student’s
contribution from assets.
The Simplified Independent Student With Dependents Formula is the same as the
regular formula except that the asset information isn’t included in the calculation. An
independent student with dependents qualifies for the simplified formula if:
 the student or his or her spouse either filed or was eligible to file a 2013 IRS
Form 1040A or 1040EZ, or was not required to file any tax return, OR if anyone
included in the household size received benefits during 2012 or 2013 from a
“means-tested Federal benefit program” such as Supplemental Security Income,
Food Stamp Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), etc.,
OR either the student or spouse was a dislocated worker, AND
 the combined AGI (or income earned from work for non-filers) for student and
spouse was less than $50,000.
Student’s Contribution from Available Income
The student’s available income is the total taxed and untaxed income for the student (and
spouse, if married) minus the total allowances for non-discretionary expenses. These
allowances include taxes paid, the income protection allowance (for basic living
expenses), and an employment expense allowance. The student’s available income can be
a negative number. [Note: the school may assume the IPA includes 30% for food, 22%
for housing, 9% for transportation, 16% for clothing and personal expenses, 11% medical
expenses and 12% miscellaneous.]
Student’s Contribution from Assets
In the full formula, a portion of the student’s (and spouse’s) net worth is calculated by
adding together the assets reported on the FAFSA and applying certain offsets to come
up with the student’s discretionary net worth. The contribution from assets is derived
from the student’s discretionary net worth by applying a 7% conversion rate. If the
contribution from assets is less than zero, it is set to zero. In the simplified formula the
student’s assets are not counted in the calculation.
Final EFC Calculation
The student’s (and spouse’s) available income and the contributions from assets are
added together to obtain the student’s adjusted available income. This amount can be a
negative number. The student’s total contribution is a percentage of the adjusted
available income and represents the total amount the student’s family is expected to
contribute toward all of the family members’ postsecondary costs. This amount is
divided by the number in college to get the EFC.
Alternate EFCs
The EFC of an independent student must be modified for enrollment periods greater or
lesser than 9-months. For periods of less than 9 months, the EFC is simply pro-rated by
dividing it by 9 and then multiplying the result by the number of months the student will
be enrolled. For periods greater than 9 months, the 9 month EFC is used.
NEED ANALYSIS COMPUTATION 7-25
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Automatic Zero EFC
A zero EFC is automatically assigned to a independent student with dependents if:
 the student or spouse was not required to file a 2013 IRS Form 1040 (long form),
OR if anyone included in the household size received benefits during 2012 or
2013 from a “means-tested Federal benefit program” such as Supplemental
Security Income, Food Stamp Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy
Families (TANF), etc., OR either student or spouse was a dislocated worker,
AND
 the combined AGI (for tax-filers) or income earned from work (for non-filers) for
student and spouse was $24,000 or less.
Using the Independent Students With Dependents Worksheets
The remaining pages of this chapter contain Worksheets for the Regular Independent
Student with Dependents Formula, the Simplified Independent Student With Dependents
Formula and Tables C-1 through C-6 which are needed to determine the necessary offsets
and allowances. The worksheets allow you to hand calculate both the 9 month EFC and
the EFC for periods of enrollment other than 9 months for both categories. The
simplified worksheet greys out the asset information (which is not used in the
calculation) and alerts you if the student is eligible for the automatic zero EFC.
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USING FEDERAL TAX RETURNS
The following chapter is a reference tool on how to use federal income tax returns, schedules,
and forms in need analysis. This document is published annually by the National Association of
Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) for use by their members.
CONTENTS
Using Federal Tax Returns in Need Analysis ............................................................................. 8-3
IRS Tax Return Transcripts ........................................................................................................ 8-4
Common Federal Tax Forms .................................................................................................... 8-18
Common Federal Tax Schedules ............................................................................................... 8-24
Guide to Implied Income & Assets .......................................................................................... 8-25
Forms Comparison Chart ........................................................................................................... 8-27
Highlights of the Form W-2 ..................................................................................................... 8-28
USING FEDERAL TAX RETURNS 8-1
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USING FEDERAL TAX RETURNS 8-2
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USING FEDERAL TAX RETURNS 8-30
9
PACKAGING
This chapter explains the method used by CUNY to package students with available campusbased financial aid funds. All college scholarship funds are added to the package by the colleges
themselves (usually after centralized packaging is done). Packaging of students begins in the
Spring prior to the award year and continues until funds are exhausted. Students have an equal
opportunity to receive campus-based funds whether they are packaged early or late in the
packaging phases. All data and logical edits must be resolved and the student’s record must be
flagged OK TO PAY on FAP or READY FOR PACKAGING on CUNYfirst before any
campus-based funds are offered. Once a student has been packaged, the packaging program no
longer considers him/her for additional campus-based assistance. Student records continue to be
run through the packaging module until they receive campus-based aid or all funds are
exhausted.
CONTENTS
CUNY Packaging Philosophy ................................................................................................... 9-3
Timing of Packaging ................................................................................................................. 9-3
Effect of processed loans on packaging .......................................................................... 9-3
Usage of Federal Work Study Awards............................................................................ 9-3
How Does Packaging Work? ..................................................................................................... 9-4
Packaging Parameters ................................................................................................................. 9-5
Packaging Guidelines .................................................................................................................. 9-7
Packaging Worksheet ................................................................................................................ 9-8
Packaging Refusal Codes ......................................................................................................... 9-10
Award & Denial Letter Files .................................................................................................... 9-11
Discretionary Funds .................................................................................................................. 9-11
9-1 PACKAGING
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9-2 PACKAGING
SAM 2014-2015
CUNY Packaging Philosophy
Packaging at CUNY for the remaining legacy schools not yet live on native CUNYfirst
financial aid is done through the Central Packaging System. Students packaged centrally
will carry their packaged aid from one CUNY school to another without reapplying.
Note: inter-CUNY transfer students must submit new requests for Direct Loans and
submit a TAP college code change. Occasionally inter-CUNY transfer students must add
the new CUNY college to their FAFSA school code choices or provide their DRN# to the
new college if that college needs to process FAFSA corrections or adjustments.
The packaging program attempts to meet the base need of each student using federal,
state, city and CUNY funds. Base need is defined as the tuition and fees, books and
supplies, and a portion of the living expenses of the student. Due to the large number of
students applying for aid and their high aggregate need, CUNY generally has not been
able to meet 100% of this base need figure. In practice, CUNY uses a percentage of the
calculated base need as the “target need” in the packaging process with the neediest
students having the highest percentage of their need met.
In CUNYfirst, students are initially packaged in the same manner as they are in the legacy
system student using federal, state, city and CUNY funds. The difference is that each
college has their own funds that can only be allocated to their own students and the funds
are not transportable between colleges. Students will receive a separate award from each
college that they are accepted to so they will have multiple financial aid awards and
should only accept one college’s awards. Once the financial aid census date is reached
the financial aid certification date, the awards from the colleges not being attended will be
automatically cancelled.
Timing of Packaging
CUNY central legacy batch packaging (Phase 00) is run in mid April/early May of each
year with all eligible students being packaged at their first choice college or the higher
college choice where they have been admitted. This run excludes all colleges who have
become live on the CUNYfirst financial aid module. Honors College and Graduate
Center students are excluded also from all legacy packaging runs. Additional packaging
phases are run over several weeks to pick up additional students who have filed later or
are selected for verification according to a set schedule until all funds have been
expended.
CUNYfirst packaging for those colleges who are live on the financial aid module are
usually initially packaged in early May once the new set of colleges go live. This date
depends on when the new year is activated and the ISIRs are loaded. As mentioned
earlier, students in CUNYfirst will get multiple financial aid awards from any CUNY
college where they have been admitted soon after the admission is loaded to the college
instance of CUNYfirst.
Effect of processed loans on packaging
Colleges should try to delay processing Direct Loans for students until after they have
been packaged with campus-based aid because the loan will be looked at as a student
resource and the student’s target need will be reduced accordingly.
9-3 PACKAGING
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Several colleges who are live in the CUNYfirst financial aid module have chosen to
automatically package their graduate students with loans along with their other needbased aid. For the 2014-15 year, Hunter College, Lehman College and CUNY Law are
packaging graduate loans in their packaging plans.
Usage of Federal Work Study Awards
Once a student is packaged with Federal Work-Study, the student may secure a job and
begin working even if it is during the summer prior to the 9 month academic year.
Summer FWS is not a separate program but is instead part of the full year FWS award.
How Does Packaging Work
When Central Office begins running the packaging program each year, every student on
the financial aid file (FAP) is evaluated by the packaging program. This is done whether
the student is OK TO PAY or not. If a student has a problem, s/he is not packaged and is
assigned a Packaging Refusal Code. A student will be prevented from continuing though
packaging based on the first Refusal Code encountered even if the student record has
more than one problem. The order of the Refusal Codes in the packaging program is
listed below. All those students who are OK TO PAY and have an appropriate target
need will receive an award based on the packaging parameters. Each time packaging is
run, every student who has not yet received an award is evaluated by the program again to
see if they are ready to be packaged.
Once a student has received an award, s/he will not normally be processed by the
packaging program again even if a financial aid counselor changes information on the
student’s record that increases the student’s need. In order to send any student who has
been packaged through the packaging program again, the current package must be
deleted. Repackaging can be problematic if certain funds that a student received the first
time through packaging are no longer available. Colleges should delete packages very
carefully since reinstatement of awards after the end of batch packaging does require the
use of a college’s discretionary funds.
Categories to Filter Out Ineligibles - Order of Refusal Codes
01
96
15
06
02
04
SEGERR
NONEED
NOTNEED
NONCIT
GRADCNTR
OWESPELL
11
05
26
09
08
DEGREE
LOANDFT0
LOANDFLT
NOFALL
NOSELF
03
18
17
25
07
SUPPRESS
UAWARDS
USEDUP
TOORICH
USP
9-4 PACKAGING
Error in common or need segment
No raw need
No target need
Not citizen or eligible non-citizen
Grad Center excluded
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student owes Federal Pell/FSEOG
repayment
Special Program undergraduate student in 2nd BA program
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student in default of loan
Non Special Program student with SAR messages indicating loan default
Not enrolled in Fall semester
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student with either no self help
requested OR self help requested but EFC above cutoffs
Packaging suppressed by Financial Aid Office
User awards - excluded from Central Cycle
Special Program student with maximum term usage
Family contribution > 1200, not eligible for FWS
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student not making satisfactory
progress
SAM 2014-2015
95
16
99
19
BATCHOUT
SPCLSPI
NOPKNS
SPCLCAS
12
13
14
27
20
21
24
22
23
10
00
BADSEEK
BADCD
BADBIL
BADLVL
NOFWS
NOLOAN
NSHND
NOPK
NTP
Student group excluded from packaging per college request
Not eligible for Special Programs
Missing GPA and/or cumulative credits and YC = 2,3,4,5 and requested Perkins
Special Programs student identified as Special Programs by Admissions system
(CAS) but haven’t been income verified
SEEK at college without SEEK
CD at college without CD
BILINGUAL at college without BILINGUAL
UG student with grad division or Grad student with UG division
Target need below FWS minimum
Target need below loan minimum or freshman not eligible for Perkins loan
Requested FWS and loan, target need below minimum for both
No SAR and not verified and not OK to Package
Special Program student without a TAP or Pell segment
No funds available
Other error - call OSFA
Packaging in CUNYfirst depends on a student having satisfied/completed any checklist
that was assigned based on data compiled from the admission application or the ISIR
submitted. Students only run through the initial packaging program once but will be
considered for repackaging based on changing enrollment, NYS Tuition Assistance award
changes, and request for Perkins loan funding. Initial packaging runs daily to pick up
new students whose ISIRs have just been received or students who have completed any
outstanding checklists. Repackaging is also run daily and students received notification
any time a change is made in their financial aid package.
Packaging Parameters
Packaging parameters change each year based on the number of students in the packaging
pool, the level of funding in the campus-based programs, and Federal Pell and NYS TAP
award amounts. The following are reminders of several changes made in recent years.
1. Ineligible for TAP:
a. Legacy: The fields CFITAP, CSITAP, and CUITAP are set by default to “N”
which assumes the student to be TAP eligible. Once it becomes known that a
student is not TAP eligible, the fields may be set to “Y” and TAP will not be
assumed for the designated semester. Turning this flag on will have no effect
on a posted Albany award which cannot be changed until the student is
decertified by the college.
b. CUNYfirst: Students remain with TAP eligible awards until certification is
done and the student is decertified.
2. TAP Estimates:
a. Legacy: The packaging program performs a TAP estimate based on the TAP
guidelines even if the student has not filed a TAP application with HESC.
This estimate is only done for packaging purposes; no TAP award amount will
appear on the M page until application information is processed by HESC.
b. CUNYfirst: The packaging program performs a TAP estimate based on the
TAP guidelines even if the student has not filed a TAP application with
HESC. This estimate is only done for packaging purposes; no TAP award
9-5 PACKAGING
OSFA
amount will appear on the student’s bill as anticipated aid until application
information is processed by HESC and the student’s award shows up on the
TAP roster which is received weekly from HESC.
3. Perkins Awarding: In order to allow continuing students to be considered for Perkins
awards before Spring cumulative credits and GPA are posted on FAP/CUNYfirst, the
cum GPA and cum credits (+ the Spring credits being currently taken) are used. They
are replaced with the actual numbers once the Cumulative Credit/GPA files are
received at the end of the Spring term. Since students with fewer than 28 credits are
not considered for Perkins, only those students who meet the minimum credit
accumulation will be loaded. Since CUNY requires that a student have a minimum
2.0 GPA in order to receive a Perkins Loan, and the Spring 13 grades are not yet
available, the following sliding scale of the minimum GPA required based on the
number of credits already completed through the Fall 13 term is used:
Cumulative Credits
Minimum GPA
< 28 cr
no Perkins
28-40
2.5
41-65
2.4
66-90
2.3
90+
2.2
Actual cumulative GPA and cumulative credits will be loaded as soon as the semester
is over and the actual numbers are available. Reports can be run at that point to
identify anyone who has dropped below the minimum required GPA and colleges can
decide whether or not to cancel Perkins for that student.
3. FAFSA Loan Request Flag:
a. Legacy: Since the FAFSA no longer asks whether a student wants a loan and
this field was always used to award Perkins, the loan request flag has only
been turned on for students who previously received Perkins. Most of the
Perkins funds available will be provided to the colleges in the form of
discretionary funding.
b. CUNYfirst: In order to request a Perkins loan, students must fill out the
Supplement Form that is accessed through Campus Community on
CUNYfirst. Once the student requests a Perkins Loan, the student will be
repackaged with Perkins funds if funds are available.
4. Perkins Maximums Reduced: Over the last several years, we have been spending
down our Perkins funds since we were carrying a large balance. We are now in a position
where our collections are not keeping up with our expenditures. Due to that, the Perkins
maximums for most categories of students have been reduced. The award ranges on the
next page show the changes.
9-6 PACKAGING
SAM 2014-2015
Award rules
FSEOG
FWS
Perkins
awarded only if EFC is 0
awarded only if EFC is 1000 or less
awarded if EFC is 1000 or less AND YC > 1 AND accumulated
credits >= 28
Need matrix is set at between 84% and 96% of base need plus 50% of next $1000 over
base need. Lower EFCs have a higher percentage of their base need met.
Award Ranges
FSEOG
FWS
Perkins
Special Programs
CUSTA
All undergrads
Dependent
Independent
Graduate
Dependent
Independent
Graduate
Law School
SEEK Books
CD Books
SEEK Fees
CD Fees
Eligible students
$ 200 – 350
$ 900 – 1800
$ 900 – 1800
$ 1000 – 2200
$ 900 – 1800
$ 900 – 1800
$ 1000 – 2000
$ 1000 – 4000
$ 0 – 1000
$ 0 – 700
Set by college
Set by college
$ 100
Packaging Scenarios
a)
UG LAP (not Special) - CUSTA, FPERK, FWS, FSEOG
b)
UG LWP (not Special) - CUSTA, FPERK, FWS, FSEOG
c)
Special LAP (CD and Bilingual) - CUSTA, Fees, Books, FPERK, FWS,
FSEOG
d)
Special LAP (SEEK) - CUSTA, Fees, Books, FPERK, FWS, FSEOG
e)
Special LWP (CD) - CUSTA, Fees, Books, FPERK, FWS, FSEOG
f)
Special LWP (SEEK) - CUSTA, Fees, Books, FPERK, FWS, FSEOG
g)
Grads - FPERK, FWS
h)
CUSTA only
9-7 PACKAGING
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2014-2015 Packaging Guidelines for Legacy Colleges
The computer performs the following steps to calculate a student’s packaging eligibility and
make the financial aid awards.
The need matrix is calculated using the following formula:
Target need = Needscale + 70% of next $1000 over base need
Needscale = {0.95 - [.16 x MIN(1,EFC/800)]}
1) Calculate NB$ (calculated budget which eliminates live away and child care)
Take base living expenses for 9 months
Add if summer
Add if 12 month
Add in tuition and fees for appropriate college
Resulting budget = NB$
$7,188
1,198
1,538
OR
2) Set WA (work amount) = need from N Segment
3) Calculate TN$ (target need)
a) If WA  NB$
Set TN$ to [(WA - X) x Needscale] minus Z
b) If NB$ < WA  NB$+$1000
Set TN$ to [(NB$ - X) x Needscale] + [(WA - NB$) x .70] minus Z
c) If NB$+$1000 < WA
Set TN$ to [(NB$ - X) x Needscale] + 700 minus Z
X = College awards + veterans benefits
Z = Estimated TAP + Pell
4) Packaging Order
Set maximums and minimums:
FSEOG All undergrads
FWS
Dependent
Independent
Graduate
$ 900 - 1800
$ 900 - 1800
$1000 - 2200
Perkins Dependent
Independent
Graduate
Law School
$ 900 - 1800
$ 900 - 1800
$ 1000 - 2000
$ 1000 - 4000
Special Programs
SEEK Books
CD Books
SEEK Fees
CD Fees
CUSTA Eligible students
9-8 PACKAGING
$ 200 - 350
$ 0 - 1000
$ 0 - 700
Set by college
Set by college
$ 100
SAM 2014-2015
2014-2015 Packaging Worksheet
STUDENT NAME____________________________
SSN_____________________________
1) Calculate NB$, that is, the calculated budget which eliminates live away and child care. All students
are packaged based on this standard budget whether they are dependent or independent and are
living with or living away.
Base living expenses for 9 months
$7,188
$7,188
Add to budget if student is enrolled for the summer term
1,198
+
OR Add to budget if student is enrolled for 12 months
1,538
+
Add appropriate
amount for your
college
+
Check fee chart
+
Add Tuition
Add Fees
=
Total budget for packaging purposes : NB$
2) Then set the work amount (WA) which is equal to the need from N Segment:
Need from N Segment: :
3) Now calculate x
=
WA
(estimated TAP + Pell at time package is calculated):
Estimated TAP
Estimated Pell
x
=
4) Finally, calculate the target need (TN$) using one of the following formulas:
 NB$
If WA
Set TN$ to [(WA - X) x Needscale] minus Z
1

(
If NB$ < WA  NB$+$1000
x %%)
-
=
Set TN$ to [(NB$ - X) x Needscale] + [(WA - NB$) x .70] minus Z
2
<

If NB$+$1000 < WA
+1000
(
x %%) + [(
-
) x .70] - _____
=
Set TN$ to [(NB$ - X) x Needscale] + 700 minus Z
3
+ 1000 <
(
x %%) + 700 -
=
CONTINUED ON OTHER SIDE
9-9 PACKAGING
OSFA
5) Make awards of additional campus based aid based on the award rules, packaging order and
packaging scenario that follows:
CUSTA
$
FEES (SEEK/CD only)
BOOKS (SEEK/CD only)
FPERK
FWS
FSEOG
TOTAL
9-10 PACKAGING
=
SAM 2014-2015
LEGACY PACKAGING REFUSAL CODES 2014-2015
01
Error in common or need segment
02
Grad Center excluded
03
Packaging suppressed by Financial Aid Office
04
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student owes Federal Pell/FSEOG
repayment
05
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student in default of loan
06
Not citizen or eligible non-citizen
07
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student not making satisfactory progress
08
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student with either no self help requested
OR self help requested but EFC above cutoffs
09
Not enrolled in Fall semester
10
No funds available
11
Special Program undergraduate student in 2nd BA program
12
SEEK at college without SEEK
13
CD at college without CD
14
BILINGUAL at college without BILINGUAL
15
No target need
16
Not eligible for Special Programs
17
Special Program student with maximum term usage
18
User awards - excluded from Central Cycle
19
Special Programs student identified as Special Programs by Admissions system (CAS)
and not income verified
20
Target need below FWS minimum
21
Target need below loan minimum or freshman not eligible for Perkins loan
22
No SAR and not verified and not OK to Package
23
Special Program student without a TAP or Pell segment
24
Requested FWS and loan, target need below minimum for both
25
Family contribution > 1300, not eligible for FWS
26
Non Special Program student with SAR messages indicating loan default
27
UG student with grad division or Grad student with UG division
95
Student group excluded from packaging per college request
96
No raw need
99
Missing GPA and/or cumulative credits and YC = 2,3,4,5 and requested Perkins
00
None of the above - miscellaneous - call OSFA
9-11 PACKAGING
OSFA
Award & Denial Letter Files
Legacy: CIS provides each college with a file of students who have been packaged with
campus-based aid. The file will be sent to each college’s reader at the request of the college.
The college uses this file to create their own award letters.
CUNYfirst: All students who are packaged in CUNYfirst receive an email that refers them to
the awards page on CUNYfirst that shows them their awards. The same award letter is used
for all colleges live in the CUNYfirst module.
Award files for Entering Freshmen and transfers are also produced by phase for the colleges
to use in sending award notices through Hobson’s for both legacy colleges and CUNYfirst
colleges.
CIS can also provide a file of students who have not been packaged with campus-based aid.
This file can be used by the colleges to create denial letters. Students who appear on this file
may not have been actually denied campus-based aid as, for example, in the case of students
not packaged due to incomplete ISIR records. Remember that students whose files are
complete but who couldn’t be packaged with campus-based aid may still be eligible for TAP
and Pell awards.
Legacy: When a student is put through the packaging module and is not awarded any
campus-based aid, the refusal code selected is the first refusal code encountered [see p. 9-4 of
this chapter for the order of refusal codes]. Once the packaging program encounters any
refusal code, it does not look for any additional errors/problems in the student’s record. Only
one refusal code is ever noted for the student and reflected on the file.
Discretionary Funds
From time to time during the award year, OSFA may make allocations of campus-based
program funds (FSEOG, FWS and Perkins) to the campuses. These monies are intended to
allow financial aid officers the flexibility to make awards in the campus-based programs at
their discretion.
Discretionary funds are commonly used to:

Package students with campus-based funds who were not packaged in the regular
batch packaging cycles;

Adjust campus-based award amounts based on individual student appeals;

Increase FWS budgets so that students may continue to perform FWS
assignments;

Award monies in situations where the financial aid officer using professional
judgment determines that the making of such awards is warranted.
When making awards using discretionary funds, the financial aid officer is not constrained by
CUNY’s batch packaging parameters and is free to award up to the limits set for each
program by the U.S. Department of Education. However, in awarding discretionary funds,
the financial aid officer must make sure that the discretionary awards, when combined with
all other sources of assistance, do not exceed the student’s cost of attendance.
9-12 PACKAGING
SAM 2014-2015
THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY.
9-13 PACKAGING
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES
The local campus is responsible for reviewing the economic eligibility of all entering Special
Programs (SEEK/CD/Bilingual) students. A first-time freshman can be permitted to register as a
Special Programs student prior to the documentation of his/her economic eligibility, but cannot
receive Special Programs funds until eligibility is confirmed. Special Programs economic
eligibility criteria apply only at the time of admission as a first-time freshman to a Special
Program. Once admitted to a Special Program, a student may continue to receive special
programs supportive services in subsequent years as needed, regardless of changes in the
family’s income. However, to receive and continue to receive special program funding, students
must submit a FAFSA and a NYS TAP application to the appropriate processors each year. A
student’s economic status will be reviewed by need analysis each year and appropriate
adjustments made in the financial aid package. Information about special programs management
in CUNYfirst is not contained in this chapter but is available separately.
CONTENTS
Economic Eligibility Criteria for Entering Freshman ................................................................ 10-3
Economic Guidelines Chart ....................................................................................................... 10-4
Exceptions .................................................................................................................................. 10-4
Fifteen Percent Variation ........................................................................................................... 10-5
Economic Eligibility Documentation for Entering Freshman ................................................... 10-7
Eligibility for Receiving Special Programs Financial Assistance.............................................. 10-9
Request for Additional Part-Time Enrollment for SEEK/CD Students ................................... 10-10
Special Programs on the FAP System ...................................................................................... 10-12
Special Programs Packaging Request Form ............................................................................ 10-14
Books, Fee/Stipend Payment System ...................................................................................... 10-15
Period of Student Funding Eligibility ...................................................................................... 10-15
TAP/STAP Eligibility ............................................................................................................... 10-15
Calculation of Semesters of Eligibility ................................................................................... .10-16
Eligibility for Non-Citizens ..................................................................................................... 10-16
Continued Eligibility ................................................................................................................ 10-16
Transfer Students ..................................................................................................................... 10-16
Pre-Freshman Summer Experience.......................................................................................... 10-17
CUNY Special Programs Transfer Request Form ................................................................... 10-18
Letter from Associate Dean of Special Programs .................................................................... 10-19
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-1
OSFA
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-2
SAM 2014-2015
Economic Eligibility Criteria for Entering Freshmen
For purposes of determining eligibility for Special Programs funding, a student’s
dependency status must be determined according to the federal definition. The term
independent, when used with respect to a student, means any individual who:

was born before January 1, 1991

is married as of the current date (separated, but not divorced)

is a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces or currently serving on active duty

is working on a master’s/doctorate program or graduate certificate

has children who will receive more than half of their support from them between
July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015

has dependents (other than children or spouse) who will live with and receive
more than half of their support from them now and through June 30, 2015

at any time since turning age 13, had parents who were both deceased, was in
foster care or was a dependent or ward of the court

is an emancipated minor or in legal guardianship as determined by a court in the
student’s state of legal residence

at any time on or after July 1, 2013, the student’s high school or school district
homeless liaison determined that the student was an unaccompanied youth who
homeless

at any time on or after July 1, 2013, the director of an emergency shelter or
transitional housing program funded by the U. S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development determined that the student was an unaccompanied youth
who was homeless

at any time on or after July 1, 2013, the director of a runaway or homeless youth
basic center or transitional living program determined that the student was an
unaccompanied youth who was homeless or self-supporting and at risk of being
homeless.
A student is considered economically disadvantaged if he or she is a member of a
household whose total annual income falls within the limits indicated on the economic
guidelines chart on the next page. All economic eligibility criteria apply to the calendar
year prior to the academic year of first entry to college. For 2014-15, it is the 2013
calendar year.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-3
OSFA
Economic Guidelines Chart
The economic eligibility criteria for Equal Opportunity Programs in New York State,
including SEEK and College Discovery, are 185% of the poverty level. For students first
entering college between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015:
Calendar Year 2013 (Base Year for AY 2014-2015)
Number of members in Household
(including head of household)
Total Annual Income1
1
$21,590
2
$29,901
3
$36,612
4
$44,123
5
$51,634
6
$59,145
7
$66,656
For each additional household member in excess of 7, add $7,511.
Exceptions
Reference to the household income scale need not be made if the student falls into one of
the following categories and documentation is available:

The student’s family is the recipient of (1) Family Assistance Program
Aid; or (2) Safety Net Assistance through the NYS Office of Temporary &
Disability Assistance, or a county department of social services; or (3)
family day-care payments through the NYS Office of Children & Family
Services or a county department of social services; or

The student is living with foster parents who do not provide support for
college, and no monies are provided from the natural parents; or

The student is a ward of the state or a county.
1
Total Annual Income means all taxable and nontaxable funds that are received by the household for
general use. Such funds may be derived from sources such as wages, dividends, interest, Social
Security, disability pensions, veterans benefits, and unemployment benefits. For purposes of
determining Special Programs eligibility, total annual income is the total received, e.g., the line for
“Total Income” on Federal tax returns (IRS forms 1040EZ, 1040A, and 1040) plus any other untaxed
sources of income the family may have.
The following shall not constitute income: (1) Monies received specifically for educational purposes
from sources such as veteran’s cost of education benefits, and education grants from the Office of
Vocational Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID); (2) Social services or
public assistance payments received through the Family Assistance Program, or Safety Net
Assistance Program and Family Day-Care Payments.
The family income figures apply to the applicant’s income only when he/she meets the federal
definition of independent. The income of any independent student (and spouse) during the base year
must meet the family income scale.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-4
SAM 2014-2015
Fifteen Percent Variation
A maximum of 15 percent of the students admitted to Special Programs may come from a
household whose income exceeds the scale listed in the economic guidelines chart when
warranted by unusual and extenuating circumstances. Presence of these special
circumstances could make a student economically disadvantaged in the professional
judgment of the financial aid office. Documentation of these circumstances must be
obtained and kept on file by the school at which such students are enrolled. In all cases,
this documentation must include a statement from a disinterested, reliable third party,
such as a member of the clergy, a legal representative or a social worker, who has direct
knowledge of the student’s situation. Students enrolled into a special program under the
15 percent rule must be designated at the time initial eligibility for all Special Program
students is determined.
Categories into which these variations may fall are limited to the following:

Serious mismanagement of the household income with little of the funds accruing
to the interest of the student. Serious mismanagement might be defined as use of
a controlled substance by head of household, bankruptcy, or a history of
gambling. For this category, the statement from the disinterested third party and
financial aid counselor notes would be acceptable documentation.

A one-time fluctuation in household income where there is a history of low
income. Satisfactory evidence that a household’s income in the calendar year
prior to the calendar year used for determining the student’s economic eligibility
fell within the limits of the applicable household income scale shall be sufficient
to establish the existence of a one-time fluctuation in household income, provided
that there is satisfactory proof of a history of low income.

Households with substantial long term, non-reimbursed medical obligations (such
as maintenance of physically or mentally handicapped children). This may be
documented by the appropriate medical bills or a statement from the facility if the
family member is institutionalized.

Families which must maintain two households, one for the wage earner and one
for dependents, in order to maintain employment. Documentation required would
be leases, utility bills for both residences and a statement from the employer
attesting to the job location. In the above cases, all parental and student income
must be reported on the FAFSA.

Families where the EFC as computed from base year financial data by a United
States Education Department approved need analysis system indicates no
contribution other than the minimum expectation from student income for
independent students or a zero parental contribution for dependent students.
If a college wishes to use the 15 percent rule to enroll a student in a special program, they
should collect the required documentation, complete a 15 Percent Variation Request form
[see p. 10-6 for sample] and submit it to the Director of CUNY’s Office of Special
Programs.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-5
OSFA
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-6
SAM 2014-2015
Economic Eligibility Documentation for Entering Freshmen
“The rules which establish what documentation is necessary to verify the economic
eligibility for all State-funded opportunity program students are Section 27.1 and 27-2.1
of the Rules of the Board of Regents. These requirements must also be approved by the
Director of the State Budget and all State-funded opportunity programs must follow
them.” (Letter of February 12, 1997 from Douglas Mercado, Chief, Bureau of Higher
Education Opportunity Programs/VATEA Scholarships, State Education Dept.)
The following shall be acceptable documentation of economic eligibility. It is required
only to document the economic eligibility of the dependent student’s parents or the
independent student/spouse:
All Income, Earned Dividends, Interest, Pensions & Annuities
A signed copy of the appropriate year’s Federal income tax return (IRS Form 1040,
1040A, or 1040EZ) with all schedules. When the original tax returns are unavailable,
applicants may use IRS Form 4506T (Request for Transcript of Tax Return) to obtain a
transcript of the tax return(s).
Treatment of Federal Earned Income Credit
“In determining the economic eligibility of new first-time students, the Federal earned
income credit is not to be used for opportunity program students. It may be used in
determining the economic need of opportunity students as long as it is done for all
students.” (Letter of February 12, 1997 from Douglas Mercado, Chief, Bureau of Higher
Education Opportunity Programs/VATEA Scholarships, State Education Dept.)
No Income
A copy of IRS Form 4506 which has been filed by the student or family with the Internal
Revenue Service or an IRS Verification of Nonfiling Letter..
Pension/Annuity/ Unemployment Benefits
Letter from the applicable agency showing appropriate year’s total award (if not reported
on IRS Forms 1040, 1040A, 1040EZ or 1099).
Social Security, Supplemental Security Income or Veterans Administration
Non-Educational Benefits
Letter from the applicable agency showing appropriate year’s total award for each
member of the household (including Medicare premiums) or IRS Form 1099 for each
member of the household.
Social Services Payments
Verification from a branch of the State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance,
Office of Children and Family Services Assistance, or a county department of social
services showing the year that benefits were received and the names of recipients.
Child Support and/or Alimony
A court order, affidavit or amounts reported on student’s Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA).
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-7
OSFA
Additional Members in Household
Birth certificates, marriage certificates, third-party verification, or similar documentation
(e.g., Medicaid card) along with proof of income or lack of income for each member.
Zero Household Contribution
The student’s need analysis output document, either the SAR or ISIR.
Eligibility for Receiving Special Programs Financial Assistance
To receive Special Programs financial Assistance, a student must do the following each
academic year such assistance is requested:

File a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and a NYS TAP
application by the deadline established by the student’s financial aid office.

Be enrolled full-time.
Note: Special Programs students must begin attendance in each of the courses used to
determine full-time enrollment each semester. If a student receives a WN grade in a
course, that course must be excluded from the semester enrollment status calculation
used to determine eligibility for special program funding. If, after receiving a
disbursement of special programs funds, a student is found not to have met the semester
enrollment status requirement due to WN grades, he or she loses eligibility for those
funds and the ineligible payment(s) must be returned to the program.
Exceptions

The Special Programs director may give written approval for a student to carry
only those courses needed for graduation in the student’s last semester of
enrollment, even if it is less than full-time.

The Special Programs director may give prior written approval for a student to
carry less than a full-time load due to extenuating circumstances that are
documented in the Special Programs office.

The Special Programs director may give written approval allowing a student to
drop from full-time to 9 credit/contact hours provided the Special Programs
counselor has deemed the action advisable and proper authorization is maintained
in the Special Programs office under the student file.
Special Program guidelines specify “part-time status is granted for only one semester
and extended only through a waiver . . .” Thus, students who are enrolled part-time for
two or more semesters must receive a waiver if they are to maintain their SEEK/CD
eligibility and remain in the Program. The waiver cannot be granted at the college level
and must be given by the Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs or his/her
designee.
The majority of part-time Special Program students fall into the following five categories:
1.) certified differently-abled students whose mandated accommodation(s) include a
reduced course load;
2.) graduating seniors requiring fewer than 12 credits to complete their degrees;
3.) students on probation who are required to attend part-time;
4.) students who have not met the basic skills requirements and are consequently
required to take a reduced course load; and
5.) students pursuing a major that has restrictions on the course load.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-8
SAM 2014-2015
As a means of facilitating the waiver request process for these five groups of students,
the Office of Special Programs has developed a Student Part-Time Enrollment Report
which must be submitted to OSP electronically each semester. The Report requires that
each campus list the students who are in attendance part-time for a second semester or
more, complete all of the requested information for each student, and check the
appropriate column indicating the reason for the part-time enrollment.
After reviewing the Report, OSP will approve the waivers and return them to the
respective campuses for inclusion in the students’ files. A decision to give the student
Special Programs funds for the semester, if economically eligible, will rest with the
SEEK or College Discovery Director.
For students seeking a waiver for a second (or more) part-time semester for reasons
other than the five listed above, Directors must complete the following Request for
Additional Part-Time Semester Enrollment for SEEK/CD Student form. The nature of
the reasons should be stated in general terms thereby protecting the students’ privacy.
The request will be reviewed by the Office of Special Programs and a decision made to
either grant or deny the waiver. No waiver will be denied without consultation with the
Director. Once a decision is made, a written response will be sent to the Director.
Note that the part-time waiver policy and procedure applies to students who enroll parttime at the beginning of the semester; it does not apply to students who enroll full-time
and later drop classes thereby becoming part-time.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-9
OSFA
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-10
SAM 2014-2015
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-11
OSFA
Special Programs on the FAP System
Special Programs Coordinators have several options on how they want their students
handled on FAP. In order to deal with the differing needs of the colleges, several fields
exist on FAP to identify the status of Special Programs students with regards to their
eligibility, both academic and economic.
Incoming Freshmen
There are three fields/flags on FAP that can indicate the status of a prospective Special
Programs student:
CXSPCL
This field will be initially set to Special Programs (C/S/B) for students
allocated as Special Programs on the CAS (entering student admissions)
file. (X = CUNY Fall or Spring)
CSPCLCAS This flag will be set by reading the CAS file and will indicate that student
was allocated to Special Programs on CAS file. This flag can’t be
changed by college.
CSPCLIV
This flag will indicate whether a student’s income was verified for Special
Programs. It will initially default to ‘N’ and must be changed to ‘Y’ when
the college verifies the family/student income. Change to ‘I’ if student is
ineligible for Special Programs.
Packaging Guidelines: Colleges have three possibilities for packaging their prospective
Special Programs students:
1 - Package all students who show CXSPCL as SEEK/CD/Bilingual students for
Summer, Fall or Spring;
2 - Package all students as regular whether CXSPCL is set to Special Programs or
not;
3 - Package only those students whose income verification flag has been set to ‘Y’.
Even if a college selects option #1 or #2, all students whose CSPCLIV flag is set to ‘Y’
will be packaged with Special Programs funds. Field must be set to ‘I’ if student is
ineligible.
NOTE: If student is income verified and found to be income ineligible for Special
Programs, the college should remove CXSPCL so the student can be packaged as a
regular student.
Continuing Students
When the FAP file is rolled over at the beginning of the processing year, all students
coded CXSPCL are rolled over as Special Programs students. If a student remains
eligible for Special Programs, the college does not have to do anything to have that
student packaged with Special Programs funds. If student is ineligible for any semester,
the college should remove the Special Programs code for that term.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-12
SAM 2014-2015
In the case that a Special Programs student is no longer eligible to receive Special
Programs funding:
CSPCLNE
This flag allows the college to indicate that the student is no longer
eligible for Special Programs funds. Setting it to ‘N’ will override
CXSPCL field.
Part-time Students
If a part-time student is eligible to receive Special Programs funds FAP must be updated.
CXSPOVR will be set to ‘N’ and the field must be changed to ‘Y’ for the semester(s) the
student is eligible.
Remedial or Enrichment Program Students
Students attending a college’s Remedial or Enrichment Program are eligible to receive
book funds and a weekly stipend. Students must have been economically certified
SEEK, CD or Bilingual eligible and have the above status flags properly coded.
Other FAP fields must be updated:




NSUMSP set to Y
NUSP#WK set to number of week student is in program
CUCOL set to college code
Student is packaged with Special Programs $
A form has been developed by OSFA for colleges to use to indicate which option they
prefer to use for their students. This form must be filed by the Financial Aid Director any
time a change in the handling of their students is desired. Otherwise, the computer
system continues to handle Special Programs students in the same manner each year.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-13
OSFA
Special Programs Packaging Request Form
2014-2015
Incoming Freshmen
Packaging Guidelines:
SELECT ONE OF THE FOLLOWING OPTIONS:
1 - Package all students who show CXSPCL as SEEK/CD/Bilingual students;
2 - Package all students as regular whether CXSPCL is set to Special Programs or
not;
3 - Package only those students whose income verification flag has been set to ‘Y’.
Note: Even if a college selects option #1 or #2, all students whose CSPCLIV flag is set to ‘Y’
will get packaged.
Letter Production:
UAPC will run Special Programs students’ letters separately and colleges can decide when to
send them to students.
Please discuss this with your Special Programs Coordinator, then sign and date this form
and FAX it to Alice Murphey at (646) 664-2952.
_________________________________
Director of Financial Aid
_________________________________
College
_________________________________
Date
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-14
SAM 2014-2015
Books, Fee/Stipend Payment System
To be eligible for summer stipends, books, and fees, a student must file a FAFSA and a
NYS TAP application by the deadline date established by the University/College.
For 2014-2015, the maximum amount given to students for books and supplies shall be
separately determined for the regular academic year and for summer session attendance.
Based on available funding, these amounts may be less than the amount built into the
student budget in Chapter 6. The book allowance is reviewed yearly for adjustment
contingent on availability of funds. Book funds and fee credits are usually generated by the
first stipend payment of the term. Back payments will be allowed throughout the term.
However, for the summer session, only back payments for books and fees will be
permitted. All books, fees, and stipend payments must be processed and accounted for
through the CUNY Student Financial Aid System (SFA).
Period of Student Funding Eligibility

Two/Four-year degree program: A SEEK student is allowed ten (10) semesters and
CD/Bilingual students six (6) semesters, or the equivalent, of opportunity program
eligibility. In addition, all special program students are allowed one Immersion and
two regular summer semesters.

Five-year baccalaureate program: A student is allowed twelve (12) semesters, or
equivalent, of opportunity program eligibility if enrolled in a registered five-year
baccalaureate program.

When a Special Programs student has not been a STAP recipient but will be
graduating upon the completion of the 11th semester (for SEEK) or the 7th semester
(for CD/Bilingual), that student would be eligible for an additional semester of
Special Programs financial aid support (SEEK the 11th semester – CD/Bilingual the
7th semester). See TAP/STAP eligibility below.

Requests for exemptions for individuals who do not fall into the first 3 categories
should be submitted to the University Office of Special Programs for consideration.
Special Program directors are required to maintain records for all exemptions given
to students.
The maximum length of time for a leave of absence shall not exceed three (3) consecutive
semesters. Where special circumstances warrant, requests for exceptions along with
appropriate justification shall be transmitted by the College Special Programs Director to
the University Office of Special Programs for appropriate approval.
TAP Eligibility
Special Programs students admitted Fall 1995 and later are eligible for up to 10 semesters
TAP but must have a 2.0 GPA after receiving 4 semesters of TAP in order to receive
subsequent TAP payments.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-15
OSFA
Calculation of Semester of Eligibility
A student will use one semester of Special Programs eligibility every time he or she
registers as a full-time student. To calculate the number of semesters used by students who
were required to register part-time (e.g. those on academic probation or for whom part-time
status was approved for exceptional reasons), add up the total number of credits or equated
credits taken while enrolled on a part-time basis and divide it by fifteen.
Eligibility for Non-Citizens
There are no citizenship requirements for Special Programs eligibility and therefore
citizenship or immigration status does not have to be documented for Special Programs
eligibility determination. However, students must demonstrate one year’s residency in
New York State for SEEK and one year’s residency in New York City for the College
Discovery and Bilingual programs. Residency in New York State follows the guidelines
for the TAP program (see Chapter 15). Students must have an immigration status that
indicates that they will remain in the U.S. Students in diplomatic visa categories or student
visa categories (J-1, F-1) are not eligible for Special Programs.
Undocumented students are not be eligible for Special Programs financial aid funding (see
copy of letter from University Associate Dean of Special Programs on p. 10-18).
Continued Eligibility
Special Programs students are not required to submit financial aid applications for
continued Special Programs eligibility. However, a student must file a FAFSA each year
they desire special program funding.
Transfer Students
All students transferring colleges either within CUNY or from outside CUNY must have a
completed Special Programs transfer request form (see page 10-14) included with their
CUNY transfer application.
The college Financial Aid Office is responsible for:

Collecting a completed and signed Special Programs transfer form from the student’s
original college to determine a transfer student’s eligibility for Special Programs.

Verifying loan default or grant repayment status on NSLDS for non-CUNY transfers.
Students in default of Title IV funds or who owe a repayment of a Title IV grant are
not eligible to receive any Title IV aid and are not eligible to transfer within Special
Programs until all delinquent accounts are cleared. Reliance will be placed on
NSLDS data to determine overpayment and default status.
The Program Director and Counselor are to assist the student to ensure timely verification
of student eligibility and certification of transfer. They are to make certain that the
student’s transfer application (ASTA) includes the “Special Programs (SEEK, College
Discovery and BiLingual) Transfer Request Form.”
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-16
SAM 2014-2015
Pre-Freshman Summer Experience
Students provisionally admitted as freshmen into the SEEK, College Discovery (CD) or
Bilingual Program who fail one or more of the University Skills Assessment Tests in
Reading, Writing, and Mathematics are required to attend the college’s Remedial Program
[previously University Skills Immersion Program (USIP)] in the summer session prior to
their fall semester enrollment. Students who are required to, but do not, attend the summer
session are not eligible for SEEK/CD/Bilingual admission in the fall semester.
The SEEK/CD/Bilingual component of the Remedial Program includes basic skills courses
in reading, writing, mathematics, or English-as-a-Second Language, along with tutoring
and counseling services. There is no tuition charge for these summer remedial courses. All
economically certified SEEK, CD, or Bilingual freshmen who attend the summer Remedial
Program receive student financial aid in the form a weekly stipend. Book money will be
paid directly to the program. Stipends are provided to support student participation in this
summer pre-college program prior to the student’s first semester of attendance and as such
should not count toward meeting the academic year COA.
Upon arrival, students allocated to SEEK/CD/Bilingual who cannot attend the remedial
program at their home campus, may attend one of the following programs as an alternative:

another campus Remedial Program;

one of the University Language Immersion Programs;

the University COPE Orientation Program (for students on public assistance); or

their high school summer school, if the student must complete a high school
requirement in order to graduate.
Students who are not required to attend the summer remedial program may be offered a
Summer Enrichment Program. These students will also be eligible for the stipend and book
monies.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-17
OSFA
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-18
SAM 2014-2015
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-19
OSFA
THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY.
SPECIAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES 10-20
PAYMENTS
CONTENTS
Disbursements ........................................................................................................................ 11-3
Determining If a Student is a Title IV Recipient .......................................................... 11-3
Allowable Charges (Deductions) ................................................................................. 11-3
Required Student Authorizations ................................................................................. 11-4
Specific Program Disbursement Requirements ........................................................... 11-4
Timely Book Allowance ............................................................................................... 11-6
Interim Disbursements .................................................................................................. 11-6
Late Disbursements....................................................................................................... 11-7
Required Disclosures Regarding College Refund Policies and Procedures ............... 11-8
Retaking Previously Passed Coursework ................................................................... 11-8
Financial Aid Checks .................................................................................................. 11-9
Declination or Return of Federal Pell Grant Fund by a Student ................................ 11-10
Disbursement Notification Requirements .................................................................. 11-11
Overawards and Overpayments .......................................................................................... 11-13
Correcting Overawards ............................................................................................... 11-13
Institutional Responsibility ............................................................................. 11-13
Estimated Financial Assistance or Not ........................................................... 11-13
Overaward Tolerance ...................................................................................... 11-14
Pell Grant ........................................................................................................ 11-14
Federal Direct Loan ........................................................................................ 11-14
Campus-Based Aid ......................................................................................... 11-14
FSEOG and Perkins Loan ................................................................... 11-15
Federal Work-Study ............................................................................ 11-15
Treatment of Overpayments ....................................................................................... 11-15
Pell Grant ........................................................................................................ 11-15
FSEOG or Perkins Loan ................................................................................. 11-16
Student Fails To Begin Attendance ................................................................ 11-16
PAYMENTS 11-1
OSFA
Student Begins Attendance on Less Than Half-time Basis ............................
Overpayments Due to Interim Disbursement .................................................
Overpayments Due to Student Error ...............................................................
Overpayments – Minimum Thresholds ..........................................................
Reporting Overpayments to NSLDS ..............................................................
Referring Overpayment Cases to ED’s Borrower Services ............................
Examples of Institutional & Student Liability ................................................
Return of Title IV Funds ....................................................................................................
Eligible Student .........................................................................................................
Determining Student’s Withdrawal Date ...................................................................
Official Withdrawals ......................................................................................
Unofficial Withdrawals ..................................................................................
Administrative Withdrawals ..........................................................................
Rescinding Withdrawal..................................................................................
Approved Leaves of Absence ...................................................................................
Determining the Amount of Aid the Student Earned ................................................
Aid That Could Have Been Disbursed ......................................................................
Crediting the Student’s Account ...............................................................................
College Return of Unearned Aid ..............................................................................
Student Return of Unearned Aid ..............................................................................
Order of Return of Title IV Funds .............................................................................
Post-Withdrawal Disbursement ..................................................................................
Verification Not Completed Before Withdrawal ........................................................
R2T4 Treatment for Students Called to Active Duty ................................................
Consumer Information ...............................................................................................
For Further Guidance .................................................................................................
Charts - Return of Title IV Funds
Requirements and Deadlines ........................................................................
Notification Requirements .............................................................................
Determining Trigger Dates ...........................................................................
PAYMENTS 11-2
11-17
11-17
11-18
11-18
11-18
11-19
11-20
11-21
11-21
11-21
11-22
11-22
11-22
11-22
11-23
11-23
11-23
11-24
11-24
11-25
11-25
11-26
11-26
11-27
11-28
11-28
11-29
11-30
11-31
SAM 2014-2015
Disbursements
Federal student aid funds are considered to have been disbursed when the school credits a
student’s account or pays a student or parent directly with:
 FSA program funds received from the Department, or
 School funds labeled as FSA program funds and used in advance of receiving
actual FSA program funds.
At the point FSA funds are actually disbursed, a student becomes a Title IV recipient
with all of the rights and responsibilities of a recipient. When a loan borrower becomes a
recipient, he or she assumes responsibility for the loan and any accrued interest, and has
the right to cancel the loan. The date of disbursement determines when the college (and
the university) must comply with regulatory requirements for the timely delivery of credit
balances to students and other cash management issues.
Federal funds are not considered disbursed if the college simply makes a memo entry for
billing purposes or credits the student’s account but does not identify it as an FSA credit
(for example, “estimated” or “anticipated” Pell”). Disbursement occurs only when an
actual dated check (or EFT) is issued by the Office of the University Controller (OUC) or
when the posting on the student’s account is converted from an estimated or unlabeled
credit to an actual FSA credit. The earliest that a school may disburse FSA funds by
crediting the student’s account or by paying directly to the student or parentis 10 days
before the first day of classes for that payment period.
Determining If a Student Is a Title IV Recipient
A Title IV recipient is a student or parent who has either already received FSA program
funds or has met the conditions that allow for a late disbursement of FSA funds. No
disbursement may be made to a student until he or she is enrolled for classes for the
payment period. A student is considered enrolled upon completing the college’s
registration requirements (except for the payment of tuition and fees).
If a disbursement of FSA funds occurs on or after the first day of classes, except for
Direct Loans, the school must confirm that students have begun attendance in each class
on which eligibility is based. If a student withdraws (officially or unofficially), is
expelled before the first day of classes or does not begin attending classes, or if the
college cannot document that the student ever attended the classes for which payment is
being made, the student would be considered not to have completed the registration
requirements and would not be considered an enrolled student. The school would be
required to return any FSA funds paid to this student for the payment period. See the
section later in this chapter entitled “Treatment of Overpayments” for more information.
Allowable Charges
A college may debit a student’s account only for allowable charges. These are:

Current year tuition, fees, room and board (if contracted with the college);

Other current year charges incurred by the student for educationally-related
activities other than tuition, fees and institutionally contracted room and board if
the college has obtained the student’s (or parent’s) written authorization. Note:
Current charges are those assessed to the student for the current award year or
for the Direct Loan period as certified by the college. A Direct Loan certified for
Fall semester only may not be automatically used for Spring semester charges.

Prior year charges that are less than $200. A student/parent's permission is not
PAYMENTS 11-3
OSFA
required to apply the $200 unless educational charges other than tuition, fees,
room and board are included in the prior year charges. According to regulation
34 CFR 668.164(d)(2) schools may not apply current year Title IV funds to settle
a prior year liability in excess of $200 even with student authorization. Note:
students who owe more than $200 in prior year charges may use their current
year Title IV funds to settle the debt, but the college may not cash or split the
check or use any other means which involves the college interceding in the
disbursement process. The student must settle the debt by writing the college a
separate check or presenting a money order or cash.
University policy states that students who have prior year tuition and fee liability
(receivables) cannot register if they have not settled their liability with the college.
However, colleges do allow students that fall into this category to complete their
registration when they have reason to believe the receivable will be settled.
Required Student Authorizations
The college must obtain authorization from the student (or parent borrower) before:

Disbursing FSA funds by EFT to a student or parent designated bank account;

Using FSA funds to pay for allowable charges other than tuition, fees, and room
and board (if the student contracts with the college);

Holding an FSA credit balance.
The college may not require or coerce the student’s (or parents’) authorization and must
explain how the authorization may be modified or canceled. A student’s or parent’s
authorization may be modified or cancelled at any time. Once the authorization is
canceled or modified, the college may not perform the function, or must perform the
function as modified from that date forward. Two or more items may be included on one
authorization statement; however, the student must be informed that s/he may refuse to
authorize any item on the statement. Any authorization must clearly explain how the
college will carry out the activity. Even though the college does not need to detail every
aspect pertaining to the activity, a blanket authorization that only identifies the activities
to be performed is not acceptable. An authorization may be effective for the entire period
a student is enrolled at a college unless a shorter period of time is specified. A
cancellation or modification of an authorization is not retroactive. A cancellation or
modification of an authorization to pay for charges other than tuition and fees is effective
from the date the college receives it.
Specific Program Disbursement Requirements
Pell Grant
The college can use its discretion in disbursing Pell Grants within a payment period (or
semester) to best meet a student’s needs. In all cases, the full amount of the award due
the student must be disbursed by the end of the payment period (or semester). The
college may choose to pay a student at the beginning of the semester or after a financial
aid census date or in several installments throughout the semester. The college must
notify the student of the amount s/he will be paid and the method of payment. If the
college is paying the student by check, the college must tell the student when the check
will be available and where the student must go to pick it up.
A student may be paid retroactively for any completed semester within the current award
year as long as the student remains eligible for payment for those semesters. For
PAYMENTS 11-4
SAM 2014-2015
example, if the student’s ISIR is processed with an official EFC while he or she is still
enrolled in the spring semester, and the student was also in attendance and eligible for
payment in the fall semester, the college may pay the student funds for both the fall and
spring semesters. However, the amounts of the fall payment must be calculated based
only upon the credits completed.
Perkins Loan
A Perkins Loan is made when the borrower has signed the promissory note and the
college has disbursed the first payment under that promissory note. The student must
also complete entrance counseling before payment may be made. If the loan proceeds are
credited to a student’s account, the school must notify the student either in written or
electronic form within 30 days of his/her right to cancel all or a portion of the loan. The
college must return the funds within 14 days of receiving the student’s request.
Direct Loan
Before any Direct Loan funds can be disbursed, the student must have returned a legally
enforceable promissory note; and this note must have been accepted by the Direct Loan
Servicer. In general, Direct Loans must be paid in two or more installments – no
disbursement may exceed half of the loan amount and half of the loan period must have
elapsed before the second disbursement may be made. A loan may be paid in one
disbursement if half of the loan period has elapsed before the first payment has been
made.
If a student is in the first year of undergraduate study and is a first-time Direct Stafford
borrower, or if the school’s cohort default rate has been 15% or greater for the three most
recent years for which data is available the schools may not disburse the first installment
of the loan until 30 calendar days after the student’s program of study begins. Schools
whose cohort default rate is less than 15% for the three most recent years are not required
to delay the first disbursements for such students.
The borrower must have been provided with a disclosure statement at, or prior to, the
first disbursement. The disclosure statement must include specific information about the
loan, such as loan type, anticipated amounts and dates of disbursement, and loan
cancellation instructions. The school must check the student’s eligibility at the time of
disbursement (for example, checking enrollment status to see that the student has not
dropped below half-time). The school must notify the student, or in the case of PLUS,
the student’s parents, of the amount s/he will be paid, the method of payment and
whether the loan is subsidized or unsubsidized.
When Stafford or PLUS loans are being credited to a student’s account, a written notice on
paper or in electronic form must be sent no earlier than 30 days before and no later than 30
days after crediting the student’s account indicating:
 the date and amount of the disbursement;
 the borrower’s right to cancel all or part of the loan;
 the procedures and time by which the borrower must notify the school of their desire
to cancel the loan.
PAYMENTS 11-5
OSFA
Timely Book Allowance
The October 2010 Program Integrity Regulations require schools to ensure that certain
students can obtain books and supplies by the seventh day of a payment period. Schools
must comply with this provision if the following conditions are met:
 the student is eligible for a Federal Pell Grant;
 the school could disburse the student’s Title IV funds 10 days before the
beginning of the payment period; and
 if all Title IV funds were disbursed, the student would have a remaining Title IV
credit balance.
The student must have met all eligibility requirements for the funds and all conditions
related to disbursement must have been met 10 days prior to the beginning of the
payment period for this provision to apply. Therefore, schools would not have to comply
with this provision for students who have not completed verification, or have an
unresolved “C” code or unresolved conflicting information by this date. Likewise, if the
student is subject to the 30 day disbursement rule for Stafford Loans, the school would
not consider the amount of the Stafford Loan in determining the available Title IV credit
balance.
The amount to be provided for books and supplies is the lesser of the anticipated Title IV
credit balance or the amount the school determines the student needs as reflected in the
books and supplies allowance used in the student’s cost of attendance budget for the
payment period. The manner in which the books and supplies funds are provided is
flexible and up to the institution. Examples given in the preamble to the final rule
include bookstore vouchers, cash disbursements, store-valued cards, or extensions of
credit. If a student uses the way provided by the school to obtain or purchase books and
supplies under this rule, the student is considered to have authorized the use of Title IV
funds and the institution does not need to obtain a separate written authorization for this
purpose. However, the new regulations require schools to allow a student to opt out of
the way the school provides for the student to obtain or purchase books or supplies.
ED considers that a school should be able to confirm whether or not a student has
actually begun attending classes within seven days of the start of the payment period and
must ensure that eligible students be able to obtain or purchase books and supplies by the
seventh day of the payment period. However, if a student never begins attendance in the
payment period, the school would be liable for returning any Title IV funds except Direct
Loan funds disbursed directly to the student. If a student withdraws from a payment
period for which the institution provided a bookstore voucher, those expenses for the
required course materials are considered institutional charges for R2T4 purposes.
Interim Disbursements
The school, prior to receiving the valid ISIR record, may make one disbursement from
Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG and Federal Perkins Loan funds, may begin student
participation in the FWS program for 60 days, and originate and disburse a subsidized
Federal Direct Loan. However, if the school makes such a disbursement but does not
receive the valid ISIR reflecting the corrections, it must reimburse the appropriate
program account by making restitution from its own funds. The FWS student would
have to be paid for all work performed but not from FWS program funds. Schools are
not required to make interim disbursements and, given the potential for a high degree of
PAYMENTS 11-6
SAM 2014-2015
institutional liability, it is not advisable for this option to be exercised.
Late Disbursements
A student who is no longer enrolled has lost Title IV eligibility and, generally, may not
be paid further FSA program funds for the enrollment period (semester). However, there
are some cases where a late disbursement of FSA program funds may be made to an
ineligible student if the student became ineligible solely because s/he is no longer
enrolled at the college for the award year, or, in the case of Direct Loans, is no longer
enrolled as at least a half-time student for the loan period.
A student who is no longer enrolled because he or she has completed the award year,
period of enrollment, or program prior to all aid being disbursed must receive a late
disbursement of these funds. A student who withdrew before completing the payment
period (semester) and did not receive all awarded Title IV funds must be offered any
post-withdrawal disbursement to which he or she may be entitled following the rules for
post-withdrawal disbursements contained in the R2T4 regulations (see the discussion on
“Return of Title IV Funds” later in this chapter). Though not the same as a late
disbursement, a post-withdrawal disbursement must meet the same conditions as a late
disbursement.
In all late disbursement situations, a SAR/ISIR must have been processed with an
“official” EFC while the student was still eligible (that is, before he or she withdrew or
ceased to be enrolled). The official EFC on this initial ISIR needn’t be the final correct
and payable EFC, but merely an EFC determined by CPS from the information on a
processed ISIR. However, before making a late disbursement of FSA program funds, the
school must receive a “valid” ISIR within 120 days of the student’s last day of
enrollment (or by the September 2014 processing deadline, whichever is earlier). A valid
ISIR is one that has been reviewed for correctness, has had all questions of incorrect,
inconsistent or possibly conflicting information resolved, all Federal and CUNY edits
appropriately addressed, all verification requirements (if selected) completed, and has
been reprocessed (if necessary) with the final correct and payable EFC. Pell eligibility
for a student whose ISIR requires reprocessing after they have ceased to be enrolled must
be determined from the correct EFC on this final valid ISIR.
For purposes of determining eligibility for a late disbursement, use the processing date on
the SAR/ISIR. For an ISIR, use the field labeled “Processed Date.” For a SAR, use the
date above the EFC on the first page. For a SAR Acknowledgment, use the date labeled
“transaction process date” in the School Use box.
An ISIR with issues that were not resolved before the student’s last day of enrollment
should be selected for verification [if not already selected by the CPS] so that the 120 day
grace period for completing verification and making corrections may be utilized to
resolve the remaining issues.
When a SAR/ISIR has been processed for a student but the school is not listed, and then
that student ceases to be enrolled, the school must be added as one of the school choices
so that payment may occur. When the school receives the ISIR, it will have a processing
date that postdates the student’s last day of attendance. In this circumstance, the school
must obtain a copy of the SAR/ISIR processed while the student was still enrolled in
order to document his/her eligibility (e.g., was the record processed with an official EFC
prior to student’s last day of attendance?).
PAYMENTS 11-7
OSFA
For Direct Loan recipients, an electronic loan origination record must have been created
while the student was still enrolled and eligible. Unless the school meets the conditions
under the HERA to be excused from this requirement, a first-year, first-term Direct Loan
recipient must have completed at least the first 30 days of the loan period for which the
loan was made. If a student does not withdraw, but ceases to be enrolled as at least a
half-time student, a late first disbursement of a Direct Loan may be made to pay for
educational costs the student incurred for the period the student was eligible. A late first
disbursement of a Direct Loan must occur within 180 days after the student withdrew or
otherwise became ineligible. The college may not make a second or subsequent
disbursement of a Direct Loan unless the student successfully completed the period of
enrollment for which the loan was intended. If a student receiving a first disbursement of
a Direct Loan withdraws in the Fall semester but re-enrolls for the Spring semester, he or
she may not receive the 2nd disbursement of the loan. In this case, a new loan for the
Spring term would have to be originated.
The college may pay a student Federal Work-Study funds after the last day of attendance
for work performed while the student was still in school; however, FWS funds may not
be used to pay a student for work performed after the student ceased to be enrolled.
Federal Pell, Federal Perkins and FSEOG funds must be disbursed no later than 180 days
after the student withdrew or otherwise became ineligible. Students who haven’t
completely withdrawn may only be paid for courses completed. For Perkins and FSEOG
funds, the college must also have awarded the aid before the student ceased to be
enrolled. In the case of Perkins Loan funds, the student must sign the promissory note
and complete entrance and exit counseling before receiving the disbursement.
A school may no longer request approval from the Department to make a late
disbursement beyond the 180 day late disbursement period.
NOTE: Although 180 days is the maximum time allowed by ED to make a late
disbursement, both CUNY pay calendar limitations and CUNYfirst processing schedules
may further limit the processing window for late disbursements.
Required Disclosures Regarding College Refund Policies and Procedures
The college must provide written information to prospective and current students
explaining the college’s refund and repayment policies and procedures, including the
requirements for the return of FSA program funds when a student withdraws from school,
information on any refund policy with which the school must comply, details on how
refunds will be calculated and distributed, and other factors that determine the amount of
the student’s refund. Students must be given a description of the procedures they must
follow to officially withdraw from school and request a refund.
Retaking Previously Passed Coursework
Students may receive FSA funds for one repeat of a previously passed course. The
credits for the retaken course may be included in the total number of credits when
determining enrollment status.
PAYMENTS 11-8
SAM 2014-2015
Federal Financial Aid Checks
There are three regulations pertaining to Title IV financial aid funds disbursed by check.
1. 21 day rule A school cannot hold a federal financial aid check longer than 21
days from the issue date. For checks that are not mailed centrally and are picked up
by the college for in-person distribution to the student, the college may either mail
the check to the student within 21 days of the check issue date [if the student fails to
pick up the check at the college] or return the funds by using the "void" check option
of SFA system to return the student’s net payment. Deductions are not subject to the
21 day rule. The college does not avoid the 21 day time frame by depositing the
student's federal financial aid check, applying funds to the student receivable and
issuing a college check for the balance due to the student. NOTE: where the college
chooses to mail checks to students, the college must ensure that the checks are
mailed within 3 business days of the check date.
2. 45 day rule When a student 's check is returned by the U.S. Post Office as
undeliverable, the college must either distribute the check to the student or return the
funds within 45 days from the date the college received the check as "undeliverable
mail." This rule applies to both the centrally mailed checks that OUC is returning to
the college for another distribution attempt and checks that the colleges are mailing
directly to students. Thus, the 45 day rule requires that checks that are mailed and
could not be delivered to the addressee must be returned within 45 days if another
attempt to deliver the check is not made.
3. 240 day rule ED has established that where a Title IV check is not cashed, the
funds must be returned within 240 days of the issue date. To comply with this
regulation, all uncashed checks issued from the SFA disbursement system that are
approaching the 240 day limit are selected for voiding. Federal funds are returned
according to the requirements of the Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG, Direct and Perkins
loan programs. Refund checks that colleges may issue to Title IV recipients are also
subject to the 240 day rule. For example, if Pell funds are applied to the student
tuition account and then reversed because TAP funds are received, the refund to the
student contains Federal funds. The college will need to monitor refund checks
made to Title IV recipients if they are not cashed within 240 days. The college can
return the federal portion of the uncashed checks by using the “split” check option of
the SFA disbursement system. In order to ensure that funds are returned to the
federal programs by 240 days, it is recommended that colleges select refund checks
approaching 210 days. Where a student is a recipient of multiple federal financial
programs, use the return to Title IV hierarchy to return funds. The order should be:
Unsubsidized Direct loan (SFA program code 916)
Subsidized Direct loan (SFA program code 915)
Federal Perkins loan (SFA program code 396)
Direct Plus loan (SFA program code 917 & 918)
Pell (SFA program code 107)
FSEOG (SFA program code 312)
PAYMENTS 11-9
OSFA
Declining or Returning Federal Pell Grant Funds by a Student
Declining a Federal Pell Grant
A student may decline all or part of a disbursement of Pell Grant funds that the student is
otherwise eligible to receive. A student may wish to take this action as a strategy to
conserve Pell eligibility for future semesters in light of the new 12 semester LEU limits.
To decline Pell Grant funds, a student must deliver to the school a signed, written
statement clearly indicating that the student is declining Pell Grant funds for which he or
she is otherwise eligible and that the student understands that those funds may not be
available once the award year is over. The school must, if necessary, submit any
adjustment records for the student to the Common Origination and Disbursement (COD)
System.
Returning a Federal Pell Grant
A student may return all or a portion of Pell Grant funds that the student was otherwise
eligible to receive, as long as this action is taken during the same award year. A student
may not return any Pell Grant funds from a prior award year that the student was
otherwise eligible to receive.
To return all or a portion of Pell Grant funds, the student must deliver to the school a
signed, written statement clearly indicating that the student is returning Pell Grant funds
for which he or she is otherwise eligible and that the student understands that those funds
may not be available once the award year is over. The student must return the funds
directly to the school, and the school must return those funds to its Pell Grant account.
The school must then submit the required adjustment records for the student to the COD
System.
PAYMENTS 11-10
SAM 2014-2015
Disbursement Notification Requirements
This chart details the various disbursement notification requirements. Note that all parent
references below apply only to PLUS funds borrowed by the parent on the student’s
behalf.
Notification
Title IV
Eligibility &
Payment
Information
Information To Be
Conveyed
For each Title IV
program:
 Amount to be
received,
including PLUS
 Expected
disbursement
date; and
 Method of
disbursement.
For FWS, notice must
include amount
authorized to be
earned in the award
period.
Who Must
When
How
Be Notified
Electronic or
Institution For all Title IV
must notify programs other written notice
than FWS, notice sent directly to
student.
student.
must be sent
each award year
before Title IV
funds are
disbursed.
For FWS, notice
must be sent
each award
period before
initial
disbursement of
FWS wages.
For Stafford Loans
both subsidized and
unsubsidized
amounts must be
indicated.
Institution School must
Electronic or
Crediting Title If school credits
must notify make notification written notice
student’s school
IV Loan
account with Direct student.
Proceeds to
between 30 days sent directly to
Loan or Federal
Student’s
prior to and 30 student.
Perkins Loan
School
days after
proceeds:
Account
crediting
student’s school
 Anticipated
account, if
disbursement
affirmative
date and amount
confirmation
of disbursement;
received;
 Borrower’s right
otherwise, no
to cancel all or
earlier than 30
portion of loan;
days prior to and
and
no later than 7
 Procedures and
days after
deadline by
crediting the
which borrower
student’s school
must inform
account.
school of his or
her decision to
cancel all or
portion of loan.
Comments
For each Direct Loan,
amount may be either
full amount of loan
originated or estimated
net disbursement.
For FWS, award period is
period of time covered
by student’s FWS award
(e.g., academic year if
awarded for fall and
spring semesters).
FWS award period may
consist of parts of 2
award years (i.e.,
summer FWS award
crosses over July 1).
School is considered to
have disbursed student’s
Title IV loan proceeds by
crediting student’s school
account, if it:
 Disburses proceeds
by means of EFT to
bank account
designated by
student or parent;
and then
 Withdraws all or a
portion of those
funds to credit
student’s school
account to pay
tuition, fees, room,
board, or other
authorized charges.
If borrower wants to
cancel all or a portion of
the loan, he or she must
respond:
 By the later of the
first day of payment
period or 14 days
after date of the
school’s notification,
if school uses an
active confirmation
process; or
 Within 30 days after
date school sent the
notification, if school
does not use an
active confirmation
process.
PAYMENTS 11-11
OSFA
Notification
Crediting
TEACH Grant
Proceeds to
Student’s
School
Account
Information To Be
Conveyed
Who Must
Be Notified
When
How
Comments
If school credits
Electronic or
Institution must return
Institution School must
student’s school
must notify make notification written notice TEACH Grant proceeds,
account with TEACH student.
each award year sent directly to cancel TEACH Grant, or
Grant funds:
before funds are student/parent. do both, if:
disbursed.
 Amount of
 By the later of the
TEACH Grant
first day of payment
funds to be
period or 14 days
received;
after date of the
school’s notification,
 How and when
if school uses an
those funds will
active confirmation
be disbursed;
process; or
and
 Within 30 days after
 Student’s right
date the school sent
to cancel all or a
the notification, if
portion of TEACH
school does not use
Grant.
an active
confirmation
process.
Institution may return
TEACH Grant proceeds,
cancel TEACH Grant, or
both, if student requests
cancellation of a TEACH
Grant after the applicable
time period above, but
within 120 days of
TEACH Grant
disbursement date.
If institution does not
return TEACH Grant
proceeds, or cancel
TEACH Grant, the
institution must notify
the student that he or
she may contact ED to
request TEACH Grant be
converted to a Federal
Direct Unsubsidized
Loan.
PAYMENTS 11-12
SAM 2014-2015
Overawards and Overpayments
Correcting Overawards
An overaward of Federal Student Aid funds is created when a student’s aid package
combined with all other resources exceeds a student’s financial need. While care must be
taken not to overaward a student in creating the initial awards package, changed
circumstances after a student is packaged may cause an overaward. For example, a
student may be awarded an academic scholarship late in the term; or a student’s
eligibility may decrease because of updates made to the application record, or the student
may wish to extend his or her work-study employment. When circumstances such as
these create an overaward, the FAA must adjust the federal student aid in the package or
take other actions to eliminate the overaward.
Before making any such adjustments, the student’s financial need should first be reevaluated to determine whether he or she has increased need that was not anticipated
when the school initially awarded aid to the student. If the student’s need has increased
and the total packaged aid does not exceed the revised need, no further action beyond
documenting the change is required. However, if the school determines that total
assistance still exceeds his or her need after a re-evaluation, the school must reduce or
cancel any future Title IV or institutional disbursements. Beginning with any
unsubsidized loans the student is scheduled to receive, the school must first reduce a
student’s level of borrowing.
Institutional Responsibility
As a condition for participation in the FSA programs, each college president signs a
program participation agreement that, as one of its provisions, requires that the school
demonstrate administrative capability. Part of this provision requires the designation of
an official who is responsible for coordinating all financial aid information at the college.
This is intended to insure that awards are made appropriately and overawards of certain
forms of FSA program funds are prevented. Colleges are responsible for insuring that
students who receive campus-based FWS, FSEOG and Perkins funding have all other
financial resources considered so that total funding from FSA programs does not exceed
the allowable costs of attendance. Similarly, colleges are responsible for knowing and
considering all other financial resources when certifying a student’s eligibility for Federal
Direct Loans to prevent students from borrowing unnecessarily. Colleges have the
further responsibility to continually monitor the receipt of other scholarships and awards
during the year to insure that excess federal funds are not disbursed to students. The flow
of information about these additional sources of funding must be maintained during the
year to facilitate timely adjustment of the aid package to prevent overawarding students.
Estimated Financial Assistance or Not
Colleges should take into account the nature and purpose of an institutional or outside
award or scholarship before including it as estimated financial assistance. If a student
receives the award because of their postsecondary enrollment, it should count as
estimated financial assistance unless the award is considered wages for employment
according to state or federal rules, or wages for employment based on need. Awards that
take the form of wages for employment or would otherwise be reportable as taxable
income on a tax return (and thus the FAFSA) would not be counted as estimated financial
assistance.
PAYMENTS 11-13
OSFA
Overaward Tolerance
A $300 overaward threshold exists for all campus-based programs. This threshold
applies only if the overaward occurs after campus-based aid has been packaged. The
threshold does not allow a school to knowingly or intentionally overaward campus-based
funds.
Pell Grant/Iraq & Afghanistan Service Grants
These grants are never adjusted to take into account other forms of aid, except in the case
when an IASG recipient subsequently becomes Pell eligible.
Federal Direct Loan
If the loan has not been originated or the loan proceeds have not been already completely
disbursed, the overaward must be eliminated by canceling or reducing the requested loan
amount and/or canceling or reducing other aid in the student’s package, as necessary. In
general, there is no $300 overaward tolerance for Direct Loans; but if a student’s
financial aid package also contains FWS, the $300 overaward tolerance can be extended
to include and be applied to the loan overaward.
If the overaward is discovered after the school has received the funds, and a reassessment
of the student’s financial need shows no increased need for assistance, the school may:
 Use some or all of the amounts of packaged unsubsidized, PLUS, or non-federal
loans to replace the EFC rather than using these funds as a resource (if this was
not already done), thereby reducing or eliminating the overaward. [Remember
that if the sum of the loan amounts exceeds the EFC, the excess must be treated
as a resource.]
 Cancel or reduce the second or subsequent loan disbursements.
 If the overaward still exists after these adjustments have been made, withhold
and return any loan monies that the student has not yet received to ED. [Note:
Federal Direct Loan funds must be returned before campus-based aid is canceled
or adjusted.]
 If the student is ineligible for only part of the disbursement, either return the
amount of the loan for which the student has become ineligible or cancel the
entire loan and originate a new loan for the lower amount.
If the overaward situation occurs after the entire loan has been fully disbursed, there is no
loan overaward (unless the student was ineligible for the entire loan). The borrower is
responsible for repayment of the loan according to the terms of the promissory note.
However, the school may have to adjust the aid package to prevent an overaward of
campus-based funds. The school may elect to return loan funds applied directly to the
student’s account, though this is not required. Note: if a student received more than the
annual or aggregate loan maximum due to inaccurate information provided
inadvertently, he or she may continue to receive federal student aid if the excess amount
is repaid or satisfactory arrangements to repay the excess are made.
Campus-Based Aid
If the aid package does not contain a Federal Direct Loan, or if the school has eliminated
the loan overaward, and if the student’s total resources still exceed the student’s need by
more than $300, the school must resolve the overaward by reducing or eliminating
campus-based awards. If it is found after reevaluating the student’s need that his or her
need has increased and the total resources do not exceed the need by more than $300,
then no further action is necessary.
PAYMENTS 11-14
SAM 2014-2015
FSEOG and Perkins Loan
If the school recalculates the student’s need and determines that the total resources still
exceed need by more than an applicable overaward tolerance, the school must try to
eliminate the overaward by reducing or canceling future disbursements. If the overaward
cannot be eliminated in this manner, the amount of the loan or grant that exceeded the
student’s need is an overpayment and must be repaid (see below).
Federal Work-Study
A student can’t be required to repay FWS wages legitimately earned; a FWS overaward
can only be remedied by adjusting future payments. The student may be paid FWS funds
up to $300 over his or her need. Students who continue to be employed after that point
cannot be paid from FWS funds. If the student has earned more than $300 over need
when the school learns of the additional resources, and the required steps for resolving an
overaward cannot eliminate the entire amount earned in excess of $300, the excess
amount is not considered an overaward because the student cannot be required to repay
wages earned. However, the school must reimburse the FWS program from its own
funds.
Treatment of Overpayments
An overpayment is created whenever a student has received federal grant or loan
disbursements in excess of his or her eligibility. Overpayments may occur when a
student receives additional assistance that was not considered when he or she was first
packaged. Overpayments may also be caused by misreported information on the ISIR that
is later corrected, miscalculated EFCs or costs of attendance, payments to an ineligible
student, or payments made in excess of grant or loan maximums. An overpayment may
result when a student withdraws or drops out before the end of the payment period and
has received a disbursement in excess of the amount s/he was entitled to for the time
period he or she was actually enrolled. (See “Return of Title IV Funds” below for more
complete discussion of this last topic.)
A student who owes an overpayment is ineligible for additional federal student aid
payments until the overpayment is satisfied. In some cases, however, it may be the
school which is required to repay the overpayment.
Federal Pell Grant/IASG
If a student receives an overpayment of these funds that is not the result of an
institutional error, he or she may continue to receive SFA funds if the overpayment can
be eliminated by reducing later disbursements of these funds in the same award year.
NOTE: the school cannot reduce awards from the current award year to eliminate
overpayments from a previous year.
If the overpayment cannot be eliminated by adjusting later disbursements in the award
year, and the overpayment was not the result of the school’s error, the student may not
receive additional federal student aid funds until the overpayment is repaid in full or
satisfactory repayment arrangements with the school are made.
A student may not be held accountable for an overpayment of these funds due solely to
an institutional error or the school’s failure to follow regulatory requirements. The
institution must immediately restore the overpayment to the appropriate program account.
PAYMENTS 11-15
OSFA
An overpayment of Pell/IASG funds for which the institution alone is liable may not be
considered a Title IV debt of the student, though the institution may pursue collection of
the overpayment with the student as an institutional debt. The student’s eligibility for
receipt of additional Pell Grant disbursements or other federal student aid funds remains
unaffected.
If returning the funds causes the student to have an open balance of institutional charges
for the current award year, any subsequent disbursements for that award year may be
applied to that balance, if it is for an allowable charge, or if the institution has the
student’s written permission to apply aid to other charges.
A student may not receive Pell/IASG funds from more than one school for the same
period of enrollment. The COD system identifies students who have been reported as
recipients at multiple schools for the same enrollment period. The schools involved must
coordinate their response so that the student receives these funds for attendance at only
one of the schools for the period. If after 30 days the schools haven’t resolved the matter,
the payments at both schools are disallowed and the matter may require ED involvement
to be resolved.
FSEOG or Perkins Loan
If a student receives a Federal SEOG or Perkins Loan overpayment that is not the result
of an institutional error, he or she may continue to receive federal student aid funds if the
overpayment can be eliminated by adjusting subsequent disbursements, other than
Federal Pell Grant, within the same award period. If the overpayment cannot be
eliminated by adjusting later disbursements in the award year, and the overpayment was
not the result of the school’s error, the student may not receive additional federal student
aid funds until the overpayment is repaid in full or satisfactory repayment arrangements
are made.
A student may not be held accountable for a Perkins or FESOG overpayment which is
due solely to an institutional error or the school’s failure to follow program requirements.
The institution must immediately restore both the amount of the overpayment along with
any administrative cost allowance claimed on that amount to the appropriate program
account. The school may not correct the overpayment by reducing subsequent
disbursements within the award year.
A Perkins or FSEOG overpayment for which the institution alone is liable may not be
considered a Title IV debt of the student. The institution may pursue collection of the
overpayment with the student as an institutional debt. The student’s eligibility for receipt
of additional federal student aid funds would remain unaffected.
If returning the funds causes the student to have an open balance of institutional charges
for the current award year, subsequent disbursements for that award year may be applied
to that balance if the open balance is for an allowable charge, or if the institution has the
student’s written permission to apply aid to other charges.
Student Fails To Begin Attendance
If a student never attends any classes, officially withdraws, drops out or is expelled
before the first day of classes, all Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG or Perkins Loan funds must
be returned by the school to the respective programs within 30 days of learning the
student did not begin attendance. At a school that has a census date on which it reports its
PAYMENTS 11-16
SAM 2014-2015
enrollment levels to a state, local jurisdiction or outside agency, it would be reasonable to
expect the school to return funds no later than 30 days following the census date. The
student would not be considered a Title IV overpayment. The institution may pursue
collection of the overpayment with the student as an institutional debt. The student’s
eligibility for receipt of additional federal student aid funds would remain unaffected.
If a student begins attending some but not all of his or her classes, the student’s Pell
Grant or IASG must be recalculated based on the student’s actual enrollment status. Any
amount disbursed for a class or classes the student never attended must be returned to the
program. Though the student is liable for the overpayment, the school may return the
funds to ED on the student’s behalf and pursue the collection of the overpayment as an
institutional debt.
If a Federal Direct Loan recipient withdraws or is expelled before the term begins, or
doesn’t begin attendance, or if the school cannot document any attendance, the school
must return within 30 days of learning the student did not begin attendance any Direct
Loan funds that were credited to the student’s account at the institution for the payment
period or period of enrollment. In addition, the school must return the amount of any
tuition/fee payments made directly by or on behalf of the student to the school for the
payment period or period of enrollment, up to the total amount of the loan funds
disbursed. For any remaining loan funds disbursed directly to a student, the school must
notify the applicable loan servicer that the student did not begin attendance, so that the
lender or Department can issue a final demand letter to the student for immediate return
of any loan funds that were disbursed directly to the student.
Student Begins Attendance on a Less Than Half-Time Basis
If a student who received a Direct Loan disbursement begins attendance for the loan
period, but does so on a less than half-time basis despite having originally enrolled
(registered for classes) on at least a half-time basis, neither the institution nor the student
is required to return any loan proceeds. However, the institution must not make any
subsequent disbursements of the loan, unless the student resumes enrollment on at least a
half-time basis.
Overpayments Due to Interim Disbursement
When an overpayment results from interim disbursements made before verification was
complete, and the verification ultimately showed the student to be ineligible, the school
shares liability with the student for the repayment of the overpayment.
If an overpayment is the result of an interim disbursement, the student may continue to
receive federal student aid funds if the overpayment can be eliminated by adjusting
subsequent financial aid payments, or if the student repays the overpayment in full, or
makes satisfactory repayment arrangements with the school.
If the student doesn’t repay the overpayment, the school must repay the overpayment
from its own funds within 60 days of the student’s last day of enrollment, or by the last
day of the award year, whichever comes first. Once the school satisfies the overpayment,
the student regains eligibility for FSA funds. However, nothing in the regulations
prohibits the college continuing to treat the amount owed by the student as an
institutional debt and continuing its collection efforts.
PAYMENTS 11-17
OSFA
Overpayments Due to Student Error
If a student’s error or failure to report information on a FAFSA caused the overpayment,
the student is responsible for repayment. If the overpayment cannot be eliminated by
adjusting later disbursements in the award year, the student cannot receive additional
federal student aid payments until he or she repays the overpayment in full or makes
satisfactory repayment arrangements with the school. If the student doesn’t repay the
overpayment, the school is not liable for the overpayment, but must make a reasonable
attempt to contact the student and collect the overpayment.
For an FSEOG or Perkins Loan overpayment, the school must promptly try to recover the
overpayment by sending the student a written notice requesting payment in full and must
consider and respond to any claims by the student that the overpayment is a mistake.
If the student is found to be responsible for repaying the overpayment, the school may
elect to make the repayment for the student from its own funds. When the school makes
the repayment on the student’s behalf, the student is no longer considered an
overpayment and may once again receive federal student aid funds. Instead of being an
overpayment, the amount owed becomes an institutional debt that is repaid according to
the school’s normal collection procedures.
Overpayments – Minimum Thresholds
A student does not owe an overpayment if the amount is less than $25. The $25
threshold does not apply to amounts that are remaining balances of an initial larger
amount, nor does it apply to amounts remaining after applying the $300 tolerance. If an
overpayment results from an R2T4 calculation, the student will not owe the overpayment
if the amount is less than $50. These minimum amounts are considered program specific.
Reporting Overpayments to NSLDS
Overpayments resulting from student error must be reported to NSLDS within 30 days of
the date the school learned of the overpayment using the on-line NSLDS screens. Only
unresolved overpayments that are the result of student error are reported to NSLDS.
Overpayments that are the result of an institutional error must be repaid by the school
using school funds.
Once an overpayment is reported to NSLDS, the student’s future application output
documents will be flagged with an overpayment indicator. The Financial Aid History
section of the SAR/ISIR record will contain information about the overpayment including
whether or not the student has made satisfactory repayment arrangements.
Note: in the case of a grant overpayment resulting from an R2T4 calculation, the school
will report the overpayment to NSLDS if the student fails to establish a repayment
arrangement with either the school or the Department within 45 days after the student
was first notified of the overpayment. If the student repays in full by the 45th day of the
period of extended eligibility, there is no NSLDS reporting requirement. (See the next
section of this chapter, “Return of Title IV Funds,” for more information.)
PAYMENTS 11-18
SAM 2014-2015
Referring Overpayment Cases to ED’s Borrower Services
The school must notify ED’s Borrower Services in addition to NSLDS if a reasonable but
unsuccessful effort to collect a grant overpayment not due to the school’s error. Once an
overpayment is referred to ED for collection, the school is not required to make any
further attempts to collect the overpayment. Though it may continue accept payments
from the student for amounts that have been referred to ED for collection, these payments
may not be returned to the appropriate program account via OUC’s SFA system. Instead,
the school must prepare a check and send it to the National Payment Center with
appropriate student account information. (For more complete information on procedures
for the referral of overpayments including contact information, required reporting
formats, and collections procedures, see the most recent FSA Handbook, Volume 5
“Overawards, Overpayments and Withdrawal Calculations”.)
PAYMENTS 11-19
OSFA
Examples of Institutional & Student Liability
Overpayment Scenario
Liability
Student reports incorrect information on FAFSA.
Student liability only – student erred in reporting
incorrect data.
School fails to resolve conflicting information on
original or subsequent transaction before making
a disbursement based on that transaction.
Institutional liability only – school must resolve all
conflicting information before disbursing Title IV
aid.
Student receives outside scholarship and is
awarded FSEOG. Bursar fails to notify financial
aid office of the outside scholarship and student
receives overpayment of FSEOG funds.
Institutional liability only – school had information
about the outside scholarship when FSEOG was
disbursed.
School properly makes interim disbursement to
student selected for verification but final verified
EFC results in reduced award amount.
Joint institutional and student liability – student
erred in reporting incorrect data and school chose
to make the interim disbursement. School must
try to recover overpayment from student and if
unsuccessful after 60 days, must repay from its
own funds.
School makes disbursement based on unselected
ISIR for which it had no conflicting information.
Student fails to complete verification.
Student liability only; as long as no further
disbursements were made, school would not have
violated any disbursement rules.
School makes disbursement based on unselected
ISIR for which it had no conflicting information.
Verification of subsequent transaction results in
reduced award amount.
Student liability only – student erred in reporting
incorrect information; school did not violate any
disbursement rules. Note: overpayment may be
recovered by adjusting later disbursements
School's cost of attendance is miscalculated.
Institutional liability only – school erred in
determining the student's Scheduled Award.
School disburses Pell Grant based on incorrect
Scheduled Award.
Institutional liability only – school erred in
determining the student's Scheduled Award.
School disburses Pell Grant to transfer student
without checking the student's remaining eligibility
within the required time frames.
Institutional liability only – school is required to
check a transfer student's remaining eligibility for
the award year before disbursing a Pell Grant.
Student fails to begin attendance in all classes for
which s/he was enrolled; school recalculates Pell
award as required by regulations.
Student liability only – student's change in
enrollment affected the enrollment status on which
the amount of the Pell award was based.
Student drops classes for which s/he registered;
school recalculates Pell award as required by
school's policy.
Student liability only – student's change in
enrollment affected the enrollment status on which
the amount of the Pell award was based.
School disburses Title IV funds but cannot
document that student attended any class.
Institutional liability only – school must be able to
document student attended each class at least
once.
Student withdraws; R2T4 calculations result in
student owing a Title IV overpayment.
Student liability only – student received unearned
Title IV funds.
PAYMENTS 11-20
SAM 2014-2015
Return of Title IV Funds (R2T4)
Title IV funds are awarded to a student under the assumption that the student will attend
school for the entire period for which assistance was awarded. Under the Return of Title
IV (R2T4) regulations, a student is considered to have withdrawn from a payment period
or period of enrollment if he or she does not complete all of the days in the payment
period he or she was scheduled to complete. Students “earn” the assistance they have
been awarded in direct proportion to the number of days of the payment period
(semester) they remain enrolled, through the 60% point in the semester. A student who
withdraws after the 60% point earns 100% of the aid for that term.
If a recipient of FSA grant or loan funds withdraws from school after beginning
attendance during a semester, the college must calculate the amount of assistance the
student earned. If the amount disbursed to the student is greater than the amount the
student earned, the unearned funds must be returned. If the amount disbursed to the
student is less than the amount earned, then the student is eligible to receive a postwithdrawal disbursement.
If the student has received excess funds that must be returned to ED, the college shares
the responsibility of returning those excess funds with the student. The college’s portion
of the excess funds to be returned is equal to the lesser of the entire amount of the excess
funds, or the student’s total tuition and fee charges multiplied by the percentage of
unearned funds. If the college is not required to return all of the excess funds, the student
may be required to return a portion of the remaining amount. The college must return its
share of unearned funds to the Department of Education through the Office of University
Controller (OUC). The student may repay his or her share to the college or, if the
overpayment has been referred to DCS, make arrangements to repay the Department of
Education directly.
Eligible Student
The student must be fully eligible to receive federal funds prior to the date of withdrawal,
that is, the conditions that make a student eligible for a “late disbursement” of Title IV
funds must be met in order for Title IV aid to be considered “aid that could have been
disbursed” and included in the R2T4 calculation.
Determining Student’s Withdrawal Date
Some aspects of the R2T4 process cannot occur until the college learns that the student
has withdrawn. The date the college determines the student withdrew captures the point
in time when the college could reasonably have been expected to know that a student
withdrew.
 For official withdrawals, this date is either date the student began the withdrawal
process or the date of his or her withdrawal notification, whichever is later.
 For unofficial withdrawals, this date is the date the college becomes aware that
the student is no longer in attendance (usually after the end of the semester).
[Note: For a student who withdraws without providing notification to the school,
the school must determine the withdrawal date no later than 30 days after the
end of the earlier of (1) the payment period or the period of enrollment (as
applicable), (2) the academic year, or (3) the student’s educational program.]
 For approved leaves of absence, this date is the date the leave began.
PAYMENTS 11-21
OSFA
 In the case of a student who stops attending after rescinding a withdrawal, this
date is the date the college becomes aware that the student did not or will not be
able to complete the semester (usually reverts to the original withdrawal date).
The date the college determines that the student withdrew is used in the following
circumstances:
 A post-withdrawal disbursement of loan funds not credited to the student’s
account must be offered within 30 days of the date of determination;
 The college must disburse grant funds within 45 days of the date of determination
(written acceptance by the student is no longer required for post-withdrawal
disbursements of grant funds);
 The college must disburse loan funds within 180 days of the date of determination
if the student or parent accepts the offer of all or a portion of a post-withdrawal
disbursement of loan funds;
 The college must document a student’s withdrawal date and maintain the
documentation as of the date of determination;
 The college must notify a student if a grant overpayment is due within 30 days of
the date of determination;
 If the college is collecting the overpayment, it must require repayment of the full
amount of the overpayment within two years of the date of determination;
 The college must return the amount of Title IV funds for which it is responsible
no later than 45 days after the date of determination; and
 The amount of aid disbursed as of the date of determination is used to determine
the amount of unearned aid that must be returned.
The types of withdrawal and the corresponding withdrawal trigger date are summarized
in the chart on p. 11-21.
Official Withdrawals
When a student officially withdraws, the college may use any one of the following dates
that best represents the student’s last date of attendance:
 Date student began the withdrawal process prescribed by the college;
 Date student provided official notification;
 Last date of attendance at an academically related activity as documented by the
college.
Unofficial Withdrawals
When a student leaves without notice, the college may use any one of the following dates
that best represents the last documentable date of attendance:
 Last date of an academically related activity;
 Date provided by an instructor;
 Date college determines illness, accident, or grievous personal loss occurred;
 Mid-point of the semester.
Administrative Withdrawals
If a school administratively withdraws a student (e.g., expels, suspends, or cancels the
student’s registration) who has not notified the school of his or her intent to withdraw, the
last possible date of withdrawal for the student is the date the school terminates the
student’s enrollment.
PAYMENTS 11-22
SAM 2014-2015
Rescinding Withdrawal
A college may allow a student to rescind a notification of withdrawal. The student must
give written notice that s/he is continuing in academic activities and that s/he intends to
complete the semester. This rescission would be negated if the student subsequently
ceases attendance prior to the end of the semester. In this instance, the student’s
withdrawal date would revert to the original date of notification (unless the college can
document student’s later attendance at an academically-related activity). The college
must have a formal published policy on rescinding withdrawals.
Approved Leaves of Absence
A college may grant a student multiple leaves of absence; but the total of all leaves of
absence may not exceed 180 days within a 12 month period. The college must have a
reasonable expectation that the student will be able to return and complete the course
work within the semester. The student must return by the end of the leave of absence or
s/he must be treated as a withdrawal. In the case of a student who fails to return from an
approved leave of absence, the withdrawal date reverts to the date the leave of absence
commenced. If the student has received a loan, s/he must be told that failure to return
will affect the grace period of the loan. The college must have a formal published policy
on leaves of absence. The school’s written policy must require that a student submit a
written, signed and dated request that includes the reason for the request.
Determining the Amount of Aid the Student Earned
The semester begins on the first day of class and ends on the last day of final exams.
Any scheduled breaks of five consecutive days or more should be excluded from the
count of days. This includes Spring Break and the breaks between the modules in each
semester at LaGuardia and Kingsborough Community Colleges. The amount of aid a
student has earned is determined by dividing the number of days that the student attended
by the number of days in the semester, then multiplying the result by the amount of
federal aid the student “could have been disbursed”. This amount is compared to the
amount of aid the student actually was disbursed to determine whether FSA funds must
be returned or whether the student will receive a post-withdrawal disbursement.
Aid That Could Have Been Disbursed
The calculation of earned Title IV program assistance includes all Pell Grant, TEACH
Grant, FSEOG, and FFEL/Direct/Perkins Loan funds that were disbursed or could have
been disbursed to a student. Federal Work-Study (FWS) funds are not included in the
calculation.
For purposes of determining earned Title IV aid, the college includes as “aid that could
have been disbursed” any undisbursed Title IV aid for the period for which the return
calculation is performed so long as the conditions for late disbursements in 34 CFR
668.164(g)(2) were met prior to the date the student became ineligible. This is true
regardless of whether the college was prohibited from actually making the disbursement
on or before the day the student withdrew so long as the conditions for late disbursements
listed below are met prior to withdrawal.
PAYMENTS 11-23
OSFA
The conditions for a late disbursement that must be met before the date the student
became ineligible are:

the Department processed a Student Aid Report (SAR) or Institutional Student
Information Record (ISIR) with an official Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
for the student (except in the case of a PLUS loan);

for a Direct Loan, the college originated the loan; and

for a Federal Perkins Loan or FSEOG, the college made the award to the student.
Note: A promissory note must be signed for a loan to be included as aid that could have
been disbursed in an R2T4 calculation. The signature may be obtained after the student
withdraws but the note must have been completed before the school performs the
calculation (see DCL GEN-05-16 published October 27, 2005 for more information).
Some funds included in “aid that could have been disbursed” are funds that the student
may not actually be eligible to receive. Specific examples of “aid that could have been
disbursed” that would not be offered as a post-withdrawal disbursement are:

Second or subsequent disbursements of Direct Loan funds;

Disbursements of a Direct Loan or Perkins Loan for which the borrower has not
signed a promissory note;

Disbursement of a Pell Grant for whom the school did not have a valid SAR/ISIR
by the established ED deadline.
Note: if a student was disbursed excess Pell Grant based on enrollment in classes for
which non-attendance dates were subsequently reported, the school must recalculate the
Pell enrollment status, return the amount the student was overpaid, and then perform the
R2T4 calculation excluding this amount from either aid disbursed or aid that could have
been disbursed. The school must regard the entire amount it had to return as a student
liability to the college separate and beyond any additional liability that might result from
the R2T4 calculation. The same holds true for any other disbursed grant or loan aid
based on enrollment for which non-attendance dates have been subsequently reported;
that is, the overpayment must first be repaid and the R2T4 calculation is then performed
on what remains.
Crediting the Student’s Account
The college may credit the student’s account with Title IV grant funds from a postwithdrawal disbursement without his or her authorization to satisfy current year tuition
and fee or contracted room and board charges (incurred prior to withdrawal). Before
crediting a student’s account with Title IV loan funds from a post-withdrawal
disbursement to cover allowable charges, the college must obtain authorization from the
student (or the parent in case of a PLUS loan). The college must also have written
authorization from the student (or parent in case of PLUS) to credit the student’s account
with Title IV loan funds from a post-withdrawal disbursement for other than the
allowable current charges.
The school no longer has to obtain confirmation from a student before making a postwithdrawal disbursement of Title IV grant funds. These may be either credited to a
student’s account to pay allowable charges or disbursed directly to a student without the
student’s or parent’s authorization.
PAYMENTS 11-24
SAM 2014-2015
College Return of Unearned Aid
The university must return unearned aid for which it is responsible to the Department of
Education within 45 days after the college determines the date of withdrawal. The
college’s portion of the excess funds to be returned is equal to either the entire amount of
the excess funds disbursed, or the total tuition and fee charges multiplied by the
percentage of unearned funds, whichever is less.
Student Return of Unearned Aid
The student is assumed to have possession of Title IV funds only if the amount of
disbursed Title IV funds exceeds institutional charges. The student’s share of unearned
aid that must be returned is derived by subtracting the college’s share from the total
unearned amount. Any loan funds that the student must return are repaid according to the
terms of the promissory note. Grant funds in excess of $50 that the student must return
are regarded as an overpayment. Under the HERA, the amount of a grant overpayment
due from a student is limited to the amount by which the original grant overpayment
amount exceeds half the total Title IV grant funds received (or that could have been
received) by the student.
The student who owes a grant overpayment due to a withdrawal retains Title IV
eligibility for a maximum of 45 days from the earlier of the date the college sends the
student notice of the overpayment, or the date the school was required to notify the
student. If the student repays in full, or enters into a repayment agreement with either the
school or ED within 45 days, the student retains eligibility. If the student fails to take
action to resolve the overpayment within the 45 days, the school must report the
overpayment to NSLDS immediately after the 45 days has elapsed and must refer the
overpayment to ED’s Debt Collection Service (DCS) in accordance with instructions in
the most recent FSA Handbook, Volume 5 “Overawards, Overpayments and Withdrawal
Calculations”. Unresolved overpayments not referred to DCS ultimately become the
school’s responsibility to repay.
Order of Return of Title IV Funds
Amounts returned to the Department of Education must be credited to the FSA programs
in the following order:
1)
Federal Unsubsidized Loan
2)
Federal Subsidized Loan
3)
Federal Perkins Loan
4)
Federal PLUS
5)
Federal Pell Grant
6)
FSEOG
7)
Other Title IV Grants
PAYMENTS 11-25
OSFA
Post-Withdrawal Disbursement
If a student has received less Title IV funds than s/he has earned, the student (or parent)
must receive a post-withdrawal disbursement of any grant funds within 45 days from the
date of determination. The school no longer must obtain written confirmation from the
student or parent of their acceptance of a post-withdrawal disbursement of grant funds.
The college must notify in writing to the student within 30 days of the college’s
determination of withdrawal prior to making a post-withdrawal disbursement of loan
funds. The notification must:
 Identify the type and amount of the loan funds
 Ask whether those loan funds are to be credited to the student’s account or
disbursed directly to the student (or parent)
 Include the information necessary for the student, or parent for a parent PLUS
loan, to make an informed decision as to whether the student or parent would
like to accept any disbursement of loan funds
 Request confirmation of any post-withdrawal disbursement that the student or
parent, as applicable, wishes the school to make
The school must document the result of the notification process and the final
determination made concerning the disbursement, and maintain that documentation in the
student’s file. Once a school has received confirmation from a student, or parent in case
of a PLUS loan, that he or she wants to receive the post-withdrawal disbursement of loan
funds, a school must make the post-withdrawal disbursement of Title IV loan proceeds as
soon as possible, but no later than 180 days after the date of the school’s determination
that the student withdrew.
Verification Not Completed Before Withdrawal
A school must offer any post-withdrawal disbursement of loan funds within 30 days of
the date of the school’s determination that the student withdrew, and return any unearned
funds and make a post-withdrawal of grant funds within 45 days of that date.
Schools must disburse any Title IV grant funds within 45 days of making a withdrawal
determination and disburse any loan funds the student accepted within 180 days. If
verification is not completed in time for the school to meet the 45 day R2T4 deadline, the
school should include in the R2T4 calculation only that Title IV aid that was not subject
to verification (PLUS and unsubsidized loans).
If the student completes verification after the initial R2T4 calculation but within the 120
day verification extension deadline, the school must perform a new calculation and make
the appropriate return or post-withdrawal disbursement. The post-withdrawal
disbursement must be made within 180 days after the student’s last date of attendance in
the semester the withdrawal occurred.
If the student fails to provide all required verification documents in time for the school to
meet the 45-day return deadline, the school must return any funds disbursed on an interim
basis (PELL, ACG, FSEOG, and Perkins).
PAYMENTS 11-26
SAM 2014-2015
R2T4 Treatment for Students Called to Active Duty
Provisions of the Higher Education Relief Opportunities for Students (HEROES) Act of
2003 now codify treatment of Title IV eligible students who must withdraw from school
because of active duty service during a war or other military operation or national
emergency; or, qualifying National Guard duty during a war or other military operation
or national emergency; or who reside or are employed in an area that is declared a
disaster area by any Federal, State or local official in connection with a national
emergency; or who suffered direct economic hardship as a direct result of war or other
military operation or national emergency, as determined by the Secretary. Under the
HEROES Act, effective December 12, 2003, the school must perform an R2T4
calculation for students who withdraw due to their status as an affected individual. If
these calculations result in the school being required to return funds to one or more of the
Title IV programs, it must do so as it would for any student who completely withdraws.
However, for these students, the school is to exclude from the student’s total institutional
charges those amounts covered with non-Title IV sources of aid, such as tuition covered
by a NYS TAP grant.
If these calculations result in an overpayment that is the student’s responsibility to repay,
s/he is not required to return or repay the overpayment. Consequently, the school should
not contact the student for repayment, report the student as an overpayment to NSLDS or
refer the overpayment to DCS. However, the school must document in the student’s file
the amount of any overpayment as part of the school’s documentation of the applicability
of this waiver.
If an affected student is entitled to a post-withdrawal disbursement, he or she has up to 45
calendar days to respond to a school’s notification of their eligibility for the disbursement
(the usual deadline is 14 days).
The HEROES Act encourages schools to provide a full refund of tuition, fees, and other
charges for the portion of the instruction period an affected student could not complete,
or for which s/he did not receive academic credit. The CUNY Tuition & Fee Manual,
p. 46 prescribes that “in instances where students who are...recalled to active duty do not
attend for a sufficient time to qualify for a grade, there shall be a 100% refund of tuition
and all other fees except application fees.” Any refund request for military service must
be documented in order for it to be processed. (No refund can be made to a student so
called who has been assigned an earned grade, regardless of whether the grade is passing
or failing.)
Before making a refund to these students, the school should perform the required R2T4
calculations based upon the originally assessed charges. Any reduction of institutional
charges may take into account the funds the school is required to return. Therefore, the
school would not return funds to the federal programs and at the same time provide a
refund of those same funds to the student.
NASFAA has created a Reserve/Guard Financial Aid Resources Page at:
http://www.nasfaa.org/linklists/reservistguidance.asp to provide guidance related to the
call to active duty of students who are members of the Reserves and National Guard.
PAYMENTS 11-27
OSFA
Consumer Information
The college must provide information about R2T4 when a student withdraws. This
information must include the requirements for withdrawing from the college as well as a
summary of the requirements of 668.22 of the federal regulations.
For Further Guidance
For a more comprehensive treatment of the R2T4 regulations, readers should turn to the
most recent FSA Handbook, Volume 5 “Overawards, Overpayments and Withdrawal
Calculations”. Here you will find extended discussion of each element of the R2T4
calculation with definitions, examples, worksheets, case studies and regulatory citations
to assist in a better understanding of this process. Additional guidance can be found in
Dear Colleague Letters GEN-04-03 (February 2004); GEN-00-24 (December 2000);
GEN-98-28 (November 1998). This guidance is easily referenced from
http://www.ifap.ed.gov/ifap/
The CUNY Office of the University Controller publishes its “R2T4 Through SFA
Manual,” a comprehensive user’s guide to the University’s centralized R2T4 process
which can be found in an Appendix to the SAM.
Detailed information about managing R2T4 in CUNYfirst is published and available
separately.
PAYMENTS 11-28
SAM 2014-2015
Return of Title IV Funds – Requirements and Deadlines
The University has centralized much of the R2T4 process with OUC sharing with the colleges
the responsibility of meeting the R2T4 requirements and deadlines.
Party Responsible
College
Requirement
Determining withdrawal date for a
student who withdraws without
providing notification
College/OUC
Return of unearned Title IV Funds
College/OUC
Post-withdrawal disbursement to the
student’s account for:
tuition and fees and other allowable
charges for the current year;
prior year charges for less than $200
with written authorization from the
student
Written notification providing the student
(or parent) the opportunity to accept all
or part of a loan (Perkins, Direct, or
Plus) for post-withdrawal disbursement
to pay institutional charges
College/OUC
College/OUC
College/OUC
College
College/OUC
College
College
Written notification of student ‘s
eligibility for post withdrawal
disbursement of loan funds in excess of
outstanding current charges
Post withdrawal disbursement to student
of earned Title IV funds in excess of
outstanding current charges
Notification to the student (parent) of
the outcome of a late request for a post
withdrawal disbursement
Notice to the student of a grant
overpayment
Report to NSLDS if the student does not
pay the overpayment in full or does not
enter into a repayment agreement
within 45 day grace period after
notification of grant overpayment or fails
to meet the terms of the repayment
agreement
Referral of the student to ED Borrower
Services if the student does not pay the
overpayment in full or does not enter
into a repayment agreement within 45
day grace period after notification of
grant overpayment or fails to meet the
terms of the repayment agreement
Deadline
30 days after the end of the
earlier of either the
semester, academic year,
educational program (as
appropriate)
45 days from the date the
college determined that the
student withdrew
180 days from the date that
the college determined that
the student withdrew in
accordance with
requirements for disbursing
Title IV funds (34 CFR
668.164)
Within 30 days of the
disbursement of loan funds
in accordance with
requirements for
authorizations and
notifications (34 CFR
668.22(a)(4)(i)(B))
Within 30 days from the
date the college determined
the student withdrew
Grants: no later than 45
days from the date of
determination; Loans: no
later than 180 days from
the date of determination
Not specified (but should be
ASAP)
30 days from the date the
college determined that the
student withdrew
No later than 45 days after
student is notified of
overpayment
ASAP after the expiration of
the 45 day grace period
PAYMENTS 11-29
OSFA
Return of Title IV Funds – Notification Requirements
Party Responsible
College
Notification
Consumer Information
1.
2.
3.
4.
College/OUC
Written notification of the
student’s eligibility for postwithdrawal disbursement of
Title IV loan funds in excess
of outstanding current
charges.
5.
6.
7.
8.
College
College
PAYMENTS 11-30
Response (may be electronic)
to a late request for a postwithdrawal disbursement
(that the college chooses not
to make).
Repayment Agreement
9.
Requirements
College’s withdrawal policy
College’s refund policy
Office(s) where students
should file withdrawal forms
Requirements for the return
of Title IV funds
Identify the type and the
amount of Title IV loan
funds that make up a postwithdrawal disbursement to
the student.
Explain that the student (or
parent) may accept all or
part of the disbursement
Advise the student or
parent that no postwithdrawal disbursement of
loan funds will be made
unless the college receives
a response within time
frame set by the college.
Explain that the student (or
parent) may cancel all or a
portion of loans that may be
credited to institutional
charges.
Negative outcome of
request. (If it was positive,
the college would be
sending payment.)
10. Terms permitting the
student to repay the
overpayment while
maintaining eligibility for
Title IV funds.
11. Repayment in full must be
made within 2 years of the
date the college determined
that the student withdrew.
SAM 2014-2015
Return of Title IV Funds – Determining Trigger Dates
Withdrawal Type
Circumstance
Student’s
Withdrawal
Date1
Official Notification
(Official
Withdrawal)
Student began the
school’s withdrawal
process
Student provides
official notification
to school of intent
to withdraw
Official notification
not provided by
student because of
circumstances
beyond student’s
control
All other instances
where student
withdraws without
providing official
notification
Student does not
return from an
approved leave of
absence or takes
an unapproved
leave of absence
Date the student
began the school’s
withdrawal process
Date the student
otherwise provides
notification
Student withdraws
after rescinding
previous official
notification of
withdrawal
Student’s original
withdrawal date
from previous
official notification
Official Notification
Not Provided
(Unofficial
Withdrawal)
Leave of Absence
Related
Withdrawal After
Rescission of
Official Notification
Date the school
determines is
related to the
circumstance
beyond the
student’s control
Midpoint of the
payment period, or
period of
enrollment, as
applicable
Date the student
began the leave of
absence
Date of School’s
Determination
that Student has
Withdrawn
Date student began
withdrawal process
or date of
withdrawal
notification,
whichever is later
Date the school
becomes aware
student has ceased
attendance2
The earliest of the
dates of the end of
the leave of
absence or the date
student notifies
school that s/he will
not be returning to
school (for
unapproved leaves
of absence, the
date the leave of
absence began)
Date the school
becomes aware the
student did or will
not complete the
period of
enrollment
1
In place of the dates listed, school may always use as a student’s withdrawal date
the student’s last day of attendance at an academically related activity, if this can be
documented.
2
For a student who withdraws without notification, the school must determine the
withdrawal date no later than 30 days after the end of the earlier of the (1) payment
period or period of enrollment (as appropriate), (2) academic year, or (3) the
student’s educational program.
PAYMENTS 11-31
OSFA
THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY.
PAYMENTS 11-32
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE
Colleges are required to retain financial aid applications and supporting awarding and payment
documentation for a specified period of time after the student receives the aid. The record
retention requirements differ from program to program; there are also differences between rules
established by CUNY and various state and federal rules. Apart from records storage, colleges
must also follow federal, state and University regulations regarding the release and
dissemination of student information. In addition, the state and federal governments have
implemented stringent requirements concerning the use and dissemination of personally
identifying information about students. This chapter outlines the various records retention and
release requirements the financial aid administrator must be aware of and follow in order to be in
compliance with federal and state law and University policy.
CONTENTS
Federal Records Retention Requirements for Title IV Programs ............................................ 12-3
Minimum Records Retention Periods ........................................................................... 12-4
Records Retention Period Chart .................................................................................. 12-4
Special Retention Rules for FISAP and Federal Perkins Loan Program ...................... 12-5
Special Retention Rules for Direct Loan and FFEL Programs .................................... 12-5
Formats for Record Retention....................................................................................... 12-5
Records Retention Requirements for Special Programs ........................................................... 12-6
Records Retention Requirements for Aid for Part-time Study Program ................................. 12-6
CUNY Records Retention and Disposition Regulations ......................................................... 12-6
Disclosing Student Information Under FERPA ........................................................................ 12-7
CUNY Policy on Withholding Student Records .................................................................... 12-10
Use of Social Security Numbers as Student ID Numbers Prohibited .................................... 12-11
Financial Services Modernization Act .................................................................................... 12-11
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-1
OSFA
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-2
SAM 2014-2015
Federal Records Retention Requirements for Title IV Programs
Under federal law, a school must keep comprehensive and accurate records
demonstrating the proper administration of FSA program funds and must show a clear
audit trail for FSA program expenditures. Records must clearly show that each recipient
was eligible for the funds and that the funds were received, managed, disbursed, and
returned in accordance with program regulations.
Program Records
A school must maintain records in the appropriate offices that document its eligibility to
participate in the FSA programs, as well as the FSA eligibility of its educational
programs, the school’s financial responsibility and standards of administrative capability.
The FSA program records that must be maintained include, but are not limited to:
 Program Participation Agreement
 Application portion of the FISAP
 Accrediting and licensing agency reviews and reports
 State agency reports
 Audit and program review reports
 Self-evaluation reports
Fiscal Records
Schools must account for the receipt and expenditure of all FSA program funds in
accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A school must keep fiscal
records that reflect each FSA program transaction along with general ledger control
accounts and related subsidiary accounts that identify each FSA program transaction and
separate those transactions from all other school financial activity.
FSA Recipient Records
A school is required to maintain, in the appropriate office, the following records
pertaining to each FSA recipient, including but not limited to:
 Documentation pertaining to students’ admission, program of study and specific
courses in which they were enrolled along with the data used to establish enrollment
status and period of enrollment, and maintenance of satisfactory academic progress.
 Documentation directly related to each student’s (or parent’s) eligibility for Title IV
funds (such as proof of high school diploma, GED or ability to benefit).
 Documentation relating to the awarding and disbursing of Title IV funds (COA
information, required student certifications, SARs/ISIRs, documents used for
verification of applicant data, counselor’s notes, financial aid history information for
transfer students, FWS placement records, FWS job description records, FWS time
sheets, loan entrance & exit counseling, professional judgment decisions, resolutions
of conflicting information).
 The amounts of all FSA program grants, loans or FWS awarded; their payment
period; the loan period, if appropriate; the calculations used to determine the amounts
of these awards; the date and amount of each disbursement, the date and amount of
each payment of FWS wages, and the repayment history for Perkins Loan borrowers.
 Information on the date, amount and basis for the calculation of any refunds/ returns
or overpayments due to or on behalf of the student and the payment of any return or
overpayment to the FSA program fund, a lender or the Department, as appropriate.
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-3
OSFA
Minimum Record Retention Periods
Student records must be organized and readily available for review by auditors. All the
student records required by regulation do not have to be maintained in the financial aid
office, only those directly pertaining to the awarding of financial aid.
A school is required to keep records relating to the school’s administration of a campusbased program or the Federal Pell Grant Program for three years after the end of an
award year for which the program funds were awarded and disbursed. This retention
period covers program records maintained by the financial aid office, as well as other
records relating to the administration of FSA programs maintained by the Offices of the
Registrar, Bursar and Admission. A school may be required to retain records for longer
than three years if the records are involved in any loan, claim, or expenditure questioned
in any FSA program review, audit, or investigation. If the three-year retention period
expires before the issue in question is resolved, the school must continue to retain all
records until resolution is reached.
Note: CUNY Board of Trustees Records Retention and Disposition Regulations call
for a longer minimum student records retention period than stated here (see p. 12-6
of this chapter).
Records Retention Chart
FSA Program
From the
end of the
award year
in which
report was
submitted
Campus-Based, Pell,
ACG/SMART
From the
end of the
award year
for which
the aid was
awarded
From the
end of the
award year
in which
the student
last
attended
Loan is
satisfied or
as long as
documents
are needed
to satisfy the
obligation
From the
date on
which a loan
is assigned to
ED,
canceled, or
repaid
3 Years
Except:
Fiscal Operations Report (FISAP)
and supporting records
3 Years
Perkins repayment records (after 12/87,
includes original repayment schedule, though
manner of retention remains same as the
promissory note)
3 Years
Perkins original promissory notes
UNTIL
(before 12/87, included original repayment
schedule)
FFEL& Direct Loans:
Records related to borrower’s
eligibility and participation
All other records, including any
other reports or forms
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-4
3 Years
3 Years
SAM 2014-2015
Special Retention Rules for FISAP and Federal Perkins Loan Program
Schools must retain all required records for a minimum of three years. However, the
starting point for the three-year period is not the same for all records. For example, a
school must keep the Fiscal Operations Report and Application to Participate (FISAP)
and records necessary to support its data for three years from the end of the award year in
which the FISAP is submitted. The most current FISAP, which will contain 2013-2014
data, must be submitted during the 2014-2015 award year, to request 2015-2016 funds,
and has a submission date of October 2014. Because this FISAP will be submitted
during 2014-2015 award year, records must be kept until at least June 30, 2018.
There is an additional exception to the general record retention period for repayment
records (including any cancellation and deferment request) for Perkins Loans. These
records must be kept for 3 years from the date on which loan is repaid, canceled, or
assigned to the Department of Education. Perkins original promissory notes and original
repayment schedules must be kept until the loan is paid in full, discharged or canceled in
full, or assigned to the Department of Education. The original promissory notes and
repayment schedules must be kept in a locked, fireproof container.
Special Retention Rules for Direct Loan and FFEL Programs
Records relating to a borrower’s eligibility and participation in Direct Loan and FFEL
programs must be kept for three years after end of the award year in which the student
last attended the school. All other records and reports related to a school’s participation
in the loan programs must be kept for 3 years after end of award year in which records
are submitted to the Department of Education, to a lender, or to a guaranty agency.
Formats for Record Retention
A school must maintain all required records in a systematically organized and retrievable
manner. Unless a specific format is required, a school may keep required records in hard
copy, microform, computer file, optical disk, CD-ROM, or other media formats.
Regardless of the format used to keep a record, all records (except ISIRs) must be
retrievable in a coherent hard copy format. A coherent hard copy format includes, for
example, an easily understandable print out of a computer file.
Any document that contains a signature, seal, certification, or any other image or mark
required to validate the authenticity of its information must be maintained in its original
hard copy or in an imaged media format. This includes tax returns, verification
statements, certifications, and SARs used to determine eligibility. A school may
maintain a record in an imaged media format only if the format is capable of reproducing
an accurate, legible, and complete copy of the original document. When printed, the
copy must be approximately the same size as the original document.
The SAR or ISIR must be kept in the format in which it was received by the school,
except that a paper SAR may be maintained in either a hard copy or imaged media
format. CUNY has the ability to preserve the ISIR data that it has maintained during the
award year by archiving the data to a disk or other computer format.
Schools that participate in FSA programs must cooperate with the agencies and
individuals involved in conducting any audit, program review, or investigation authorized
by law by providing timely access to the requested records for examination and/or
copying.
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-5
OSFA
Records Retention Requirements for Special Programs
The provisions regarding records retention for Title IV programs also apply to the
awarding and payment of Special Program funds. In addition, records documenting
student eligibility to enter the program and student eligibility to receive aid (full-time
study) must also be maintained.
Records documenting compliance both with the economic and academic criteria for
program admission must be kept for three years after the student receives a degree. If the
student stops-out or drop-out, these records must be kept for a minimum of six years so
that the college can maintain information on program eligibility for that student in case
he/she returns. After six years, it is the student’s responsibility to re-establish eligibility.
Records Retention Requirements - Aid for Part-time Study Program
Institutions participating in New York State’s Aid for Part-time Study Program are
required to maintain the following records for a period of 5 years, following the end of
the academic year for which an award was made:
 A copy of all applications submitted to the institution, whether an award was
made or not, together with any ancillary documents which may have been
required to be submitted with the application.
 A record of the institution’s evaluation of financial need for eligible applicants.
 A fiscal record for each term for each student for whom an award was made
which shall include total tuition charges, all financial aid, the amount of the
award under this program and the amount of tuition waived (or refunded).
 An academic record for each term for which a recipient received an award that
shall include a list of all courses registered for in that term, grades received and
the cumulative average for the term.
CUNY Records Retention and Disposition Regulations
The CUNY Records Retention and Disposition Schedule issued in May 2007 indicates
the minimum length of time that college and University officials must retain their records
before the records may be disposed of legally. All CUNY records must be retained in
accordance with the retention periods and guidelines specified in this Schedule and in
any related policies, procedures, guidelines, or directives that CUNY has issued or may
issue in the future.
1[84] Student financial aid records, including but not limited to Free Application for
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) reports, applications for assistance and related eligibility
determination records, financial aid disbursement records, copies of income tax forms,
financial aid transcripts from other schools, award and declination notices, verifications
for non-taxable income and other tax-related records, instructor requests for work-study
students, student work-study job descriptions, copies of work-study time records to verify
hours with student schedule, and veteran's service information
RETENTION: 6 years after graduation, date of last attendance, or financial accounting,
whichever is longer
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-6
SAM 2014-2015
2[887] Financial aid reports (state, federal, and other) covering multiple students,
including but not limited to Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) reports
RETENTION: 6 years
NOTE: Appraise these records for continuing administrative or historical value prior to
disposition. Records with historical value should be retained permanently. Reports
containing information showing trends in student financial aid over time may be valuable
for planning and other decision-making as well as research purposes.
3[CU2] Student bankruptcy records, including but not limited to pleadings and
correspondence with court, receiver, student, or creditors' committee
RETENTION: 6 years after case closed
4[CU3] Student loan repayment records
RETENTION: 6 academic years after loan is repaid, fully canceled, or assigned to U.S.
Department of Education
Disclosing Student Information Under FERPA
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA sets limits on the
disclosure of students’ personal information from records kept by institutions. FERPA
requires that institutions establish policies that permit students to inspect and review their
educational records, request the amendment of records believed to be inaccurate or
misleading, and give consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information in
educational records, with some exceptions. Revised regulations, issued in 1997 by the
Department of Education to implement the 1994 statutory amendments, eliminated a
requirement that educational institutions maintain written policies regarding access,
disclosure, and challenges of educational records. Instead, colleges are required to
include this information in their annual notification of rights to students.
The Student Records Access Policy of the Board of Trustees of The City University of
New York (January 26, 1998 Minutes) provides that the University and its colleges shall
be in full compliance with FERPA and its implementing regulations. The CUNY Office
of the General Counsel and Vice-Chancellor for Legal Affairs published “Guidelines for
the Implementation of the Student Records Access Policy and the Federal Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)” dated October 19, 2000. Subsequently,
amended guidance was released in the form of a memorandum dated April 5, 2005 and
titled “Student Records Access and the Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act
(“FERPA”) and the USA Patriot Act.” These documents may be accessed on the
“Student Advisory Memos” page of the CUNYSAM website.
FERPA prohibits funding of an educational agency or institution that has a policy or
practice of disclosing students’ education records (or personally identifiable information
contained therein) without the consent of the parent. When a student turns 18 or attends
a postsecondary institution at any age, the rights under FERPA transfer from the parent to
the student.
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-7
OSFA
FERPA defines “education records” as “those records, files, documents and other
materials which –
(i) contain information directly related to a student; and
(ii) are maintained by an educational agency or institution or by a person acting
for such agency or institution.”
FERPA excludes from the definition of “education records” (and from the restrictions
and rights of access under FERPA) records that are maintained by a law enforcement unit
of an education agency or institution that were created by that unit for the purpose of law
enforcement.
Under FERPA, students have the right to inspect and review their education records. The
school must provide students with the opportunity to inspect their records within 45 days
of receiving such a request. The school may require the student to review the
information with an institutional official present and may set a policy regarding making
copies of information for the student. Schools may not charge a “records retrieval fee”
but may charge for the copying as long as the charges do not prevent the student from
access to the records. Students do not have the right to inspect and review financial
information submitted by their parents unless the parent has given written permission.
Institutions must safeguard disclosure of personally identifiable information about
students and provide an opportunity for students to challenge the contents of the record.
The Registrar’s Office shall maintain a record of each request for and disclosure of a
student education record, other than directory information. Each campus is to have an
official or employee designated by the college president to hear student appeals from
denial of access to records, requests to correct records, or other rights under FERPA.
Appeals concerning alleged failures by a CUNY College to comply with the
requirements of FERPA may be made to the University’s General Counsel and Vice
Chancellor of Legal Affairs within 30 days of the alleged failure to comply, and appeal
decisions shall be submitted to the Board Committee on Student Affairs and Special
Programs for its approval, with the student having the opportunity to submit a response.
FERPA generally requires prior written consent from the parent or eligible student before
the institution may disclose personally identifiable information from education records to
a third party. However, the law contains a number of exceptions to this general rule.
Institutions may disclose education records or their components without written consent
of the student to:
 persons or organizations determining financial aid eligibility or award amounts, or
concerning enforcement of terms of the student’s financial aid. Since terms of a
Title IV loan require that it be repaid, a collection agency may have access to those
records necessary to enforce the terms of the promissory note.
 a college, Central Office or Board of Trustees official, employee, or agent, such as
an attorney representing the college, whom the college has determined to have a
legitimate educational interest in the particular student’s records.
 an official or employee of another college, or other institution of postsecondary
education, who indicates the student seeks enrollment or intends to enroll, provided
that the college also gives the student written notice of such disclosure, and upon
request, a copy of the record that was disclosed.
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-8
SAM 2014-2015
 authorized representatives of the Comptroller General of the United States; the
Secretary of Education of the United States; or State and local educational
authorities where access to the education records is in connection with an audit or
evaluation of the Federal or State supported education programs or for the
enforcement of or compliance with Federal legal requirements which relate to those
programs.
Although the protections under FERPA transfer to the student after he or she turns 18
years old, or enters a postsecondary institution at any age, FERPA provides ways in
which a school may, but is not required to, share information from an eligible student's
education records with parents, without the student's consent. For example:
 Schools may disclose education records to parents if the student is claimed as a
dependent for tax purposes.
 Schools may disclose education records to parents if a health or safety emergency
involves their son or daughter.
 Schools may inform parents if the student, if he or she is under age 21, has violated
any law or policy concerning the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled
substance.
 A school official may generally share with a parent information that is based on that
official's personal knowledge or observation of the student.
Institutions may disclose, without consent, information from education records in
compliance with a judicial order or a lawfully issued subpoena. However, the institution
must first make a reasonable attempt to notify the student, except in the case of Federal
grand jury subpoenas or law enforcement subpoenas where the court has ordered the
institution not to disclose to anyone the existence or contents of the subpoena or the
institution’s response.
FERPA also permits the disclosure of educational records or personally identifiable, nondirectory information from education records in connection with a health or safety
emergency “if knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health and safety
of the student or other individuals.” However, any release must be narrowly tailored
considering the immediacy, magnitude, and specificity of information concerning the
emergency. This exception is temporally limited to the period of the emergency and
generally will not allow for a blanket release of personally identifiable information from
a student’s education records.
FERPA permits educational agencies and institutions to disclose, without the consent or
knowledge of the student or parent, personally identifiable information from the student’s
education records to the Attorney General of the United States or to his designee in
response to an ex parte order in connection with the investigation or prosecution of
terrorism crimes. An ex parte order is an order issued by a court of competent
jurisdiction without notice to an adverse party. FERPA does not require a school official
to record a disclosure of information from a student’s education record when the school
makes that disclosure pursuant to an ex parte order and “shall not be liable to any person
for that production.”
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-9
OSFA
When the institution releases personally identifiable information, such as loan records,
such information must be accompanied by a statement informing the recipient that the
information may not be disclosed to others without the written consent of the student.
The release of a financial aid transcript to another institution and the providing of
information to the Inspector General of the Department of Education does not require
notification/permission of the student.
A record must be kept of each request for access and each instance of disclosure of a
student’s personally identifiable information. The record must identify who requested
the information and their legitimate interest in the information. The record must be
added to the student’s permanent file and kept for as long as the educational records are
kept. There are exceptions to this requirement. The school does not have to record
instances when the request is made by:
 The parent or eligible student
 A school official who has a legitimate educational interest
 A party with written consent from the parent or eligible student
 A party seeking directory information
 Certain court orders or subpoenaes.
CUNY Policy on Withholding Student Records
CUNY policy regarding students who have not satisfied their financial obligations with
the colleges was originally promulgated on April 20, 1964 and last amended on
November 18, 2002:
“Students who are delinquent and\or default in any of their financial accounts with the
college, the University or an appropriate State or Federal agency for which the University
acts as either a disbursing or certifying agent, and students who have not completed exit
interviews as required by the Federal Perkins Loan Program, the Federal Family
Education Loan Program, the William D. Ford Direct Loan Program, and the Nursing
Student Loan Program, are not to be permitted to complete a registration, or issued a
copy of their grades, a transcript of academic record, certificate or degree, nor are they to
receive funds under the Federal campus-based student assistance programs or the Federal
Pell Grant Program unless the designated officer, in exceptional hardship cases and
consistent with Federal and State regulations waives in writing the application of this
regulation.”
The designated officer referred to above is the President of the college. In the case of the
Law School, the designated officer is the Dean of the Law School.
A college may refuse to perform an administrative service such as certifying registration
status or signing loan deferment documents for any student who has failed to meet his/her
financial obligation to the college. This sanction is less severe than the ultimate sanction
of canceling a student’s registration which is permitted based upon the Board’s policy
indicated above.
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-10
SAM 2014-2015
Note: The following discussion on a college’s right to withhold academic transcripts was
posted to the NASFAA website on 2/2/09:
Many financial aid administrators wonder if a school can withhold an academic
transcript when a student has defaulted on a Title IV loan, owes an overpayment on a
Title IV grant, or has failed to complete a Perkins or Stafford Exit Interview. While the
school has the discretion to make its own policy on this matter, it must be sure that its
policy does not violate the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
Prior to July 1, 1995, a school could have included a provision in the Perkins promissory
note that it would not release academic transcripts of students in default. In July 1995,
however, the Department of Education (ED) reassessed this practice in light of FERPA
and concluded that a school would be in violation of this law if it denied a student access
to inspect and review his or her education records. Under the FERPA regulations, the
institution must give a student a copy of the records if failure to do so would effectively
prevent him or her from exercising the right to inspect and review the records.
Subsequently, ED clarified that a school could withhold official transcripts, but could not
deny an individual access to, or unofficial copies of, his or her education records.
Therefore, if a school chooses to withhold the official transcript, a copy of the transcript
should be furnished to the student stamped with the word "unofficial" (or a similar
indication).
Many schools find withholding official academic transcripts to be an effective tool in
encouraging student loan repayment. Although the official academic transcript may be
withheld, it is important to remember that an institution may not deny an individual
access to his or her education records, and may be required to provide the individual
with unofficial copies of records.
Use of Social Security Numbers as Student ID Numbers Prohibited
On July 1, 2001, an amendment to New York State education law took effect that
restricts the use of students’ social security numbers by educational institutions. The law
reads: “No public or private elementary or secondary school or college...shall display any
student’s social security number to identify such student for posting or public listing of
grades, on class rosters, or other lists provided to teachers, on student identification cards,
in student directories or similar listings, or, unless specifically authorized or required by
law, for any public identification purpose.”
Financial Services Modernization Act
Colleges and universities must have implemented an information security program by
May 23, 2003, to be in compliance with provisions of the Financial Services
Modernization Act (Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, or GLB Act), a Federal Trade
Commission (FTC) rule which mandates extensive new privacy protections for
consumers. The GLB Act requires financial institutions to take steps to ensure the
security and confidentiality of customer records, such as names, addresses, phone
numbers, bank and credit card account numbers, income and credit histories, and Social
Security numbers. Higher education institutions which participate in financial activities,
such as making Federal Perkins Loans, are considered financial institutions for GLB Act
purposes.
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-11
OSFA
Colleges and universities are deemed to be in compliance with the privacy provisions of
the GLB Act if they are in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act (FERPA). However, higher education institutions are subject to the provisions of the
GLB Act related to the administrative, technical, and physical safeguarding of customer
information.
Financial institutions, including colleges and universities, need to “develop, implement,
and maintain a comprehensive written information security program that contains
administrative, technical and physical safeguards” appropriate to the size and complexity
of the institution and the sensitivity of any customer information at issue.
Colleges and universities must:
 Designate an employee or employees to coordinate their information security
program;
 Identify reasonable, foreseeable internal and external risks to the security,
confidentiality, and integrity of customer information that could result in the
unauthorized disclosure, misuse, alteration, destruction, or other compromise of
such information, and assess the sufficiency of any safeguards in place to control
these risks.

Design and implement information safeguards to control the risks identified
through risk assessment and regularly test or monitor the effectiveness of the
safeguards’ key controls, systems and procedures.
 Require service providers by contract to implement and maintain adequate
safeguards.
 Periodically evaluate and adjust information security program based on the results
of testing and monitoring, any material changes to operations, or any other
circumstances that are known to have or that may have a material impact on the
institution’s information security program.
The FTC regulations on safeguarding customer information are available at:
http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr314_03.html
Here is an additional resource provided by the Catholic University of America
Office of General Counsel that relates to the Financial Services Modernization Act
(Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act):
http://counsel.cua.edu/FEDLAW/glb.cfm
RECORDS RETENTION AND RELEASE 12-12
CITY UNIVERSITY LEGACY FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
City University's legacy Financial Aid Management and Delivery System consists of four parts:
 Pell Electronic Transfer System, PETS,
 Financial Aid Packaging System, FAP (also called FAPINQ),
 City University Direct Loan System, CUDLS, and
 Student Financial Assistance Disbursement System, IDMS-SFA.
The Pell Electronic Transfer System, PETS, stores student’s financial data from the processed
FAFSA and calculates the family contribution. The Financial Aid Packaging System, FAP (also
called FAPINQ), calculates aid awards and tracks Pell and TAP eligibility. The City University
Direct Loan System, CUDLS, calculates loan eligibility and tracks the status of a student’s
loans. These three systems are administered by OSFA.
The Student Financial Assistance Disbursement System (IDMS-SFA) is an automated
centralized system that produces SFA payments (checks or direct deposit to a student’s bank
account or prepaid card) for the colleges within the City University of New York (CUNY)
including the CUNY Law School. Administered by the Office of the University Controller
(OUC), the SFA system pays Federal (Title IV) financial assistance programs and SFA programs
that are offered by New York State and City. These programs include Federal Pell Grant, the
“campus-based programs” (FWS, Federal Perkins Loan and FSEOG, SEEK, College Discovery,
CUSTA) and Federal Direct Loans. The SFA disbursement system also pays some individual
college scholarships and grants. Various SFA related reports are generated from the SFA system
including a number of management reports and various reports for government agencies. The
main source of data and updates to SFA come from the Financial Aid Packaging (FAP System)
managed by OSFA.
This section of the SAM details the functions of PETS, FAPINQ, and CUDLS. New users of
IDMS-SFA should contact OUC for access instructions, reference materials and training. Please
note that as CUNY schools migrate to CUNYfirst, these systems will be replaced by the
financial aid module within CUNYfirst Campus Solutions.
13-1 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
OSFA
CONTENTS
How to Access the Financial Aid Systems .............................................................................. 13-5
Financial Aid Packaging Inquiry System (FAPINQ) ........................................................ 13-6
What Does FAPINQ Do? ............................................................................................. 13-6
FAPINQ Systems ......................................................................................................... 13-6
Inquiries ......................................................................................................................... 13-7
Recalling the Previous Student’s Record ...................................................................... 13-7
The Record Header, “SEGS” (Segments) List ............................................................. 13-7
The Initial Page ............................................................................................................ 13-7
“Set Page” Command ................................................................................................... 13-7
Inquiry and Interactive Pages ....................................................................................... 13-8
Inquiry Pages
B Page ................................................................................................................... 13-9
B O Page ................................................................................................... 13-10
C Page ................................................................................................................. 13-10
E Page ................................................................................................................. 13-11
CUNY Edits ............................................................................................. 13-12
G Page ................................................................................................................. 13-12
M Page ................................................................................................................ 13-13
Precedence Codes ..................................................................................... 13-14
M Page Variations ................................................................................... 13-14
N Page ................................................................................................................. 13-14
N Page Variations ..................................................................................... 13-15
P Page .................................................................................................................. 13-16
Refusal Codes ........................................................................................... 13-17
T Page ................................................................................................................. 13-18
V Page ................................................................................................................. 13-19
W Page ................................................................................................................ 13-20
? Page .................................................................................................................. 13-20
2 Page .................................................................................................................. 13-21
F Page .................................................................................................................. 13-21
L Page ................................................................................................................. 13-21
Q Page ................................................................................................................. 13-21
4 Page .................................................................................................................. 13-21
Interactive Pages
S Page .................................................................................................................. 13-22
$ Page .................................................................................................................. 13-22
5 Page .................................................................................................................. 13-23
J Page .................................................................................................................. 13-25
0 “zero” Page ...................................................................................................... 13-25
Additional Pages
D Page ................................................................................................................. 13-25
O Page ................................................................................................................. 13-26
A Page, 1 Page .................................................................................................... 13-26
13-2 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
I Page ..................................................................................................................
R Page .................................................................................................................
K Page .................................................................................................................
Z Page .................................................................................................................
Signing Off FAPINQ ..................................................................................................
Using the TSO Systems ........................................................................................................
Pell Electronic Transfer System (PETS) ..........................................................................
What Does Pets Do? ....................................................................................................
How Does Pets Work? ...............................................................................................
Access to the System ..................................................................................................
Student Pull Down Panels ..........................................................................................
Using PETS ................................................................................................................
Pull Down Panels .......................................................................................................
Actions Pull Down ..............................................................................................
Sections Pull Down .............................................................................................
Calculations Pull Down ......................................................................................
NSLDS Pull Down ..............................................................................................
Summaries Pull Down ........................................................................................
Print Pull Down ..................................................................................................
Exit Pull Down ....................................................................................................
Update Log Panels
Update Log Search Panel ...........................................................................................
System Enhancements ..........................................................................................................
City University Direct Loan System (CUDLS) ................................................................
What Does CUDLS Do? ............................................................................................
How Does CUDLS Work? .........................................................................................
Pull Downs ..........................................................................................................
Command Line ....................................................................................................
Searching For A Student .....................................................................................
Student Biographical Information Panel ....................................................................
Changing Student Biographical Information ......................................................
Originating A Loan ....................................................................................................
Loan Origination Page ........................................................................................
Parent Biographical Information Sub-Panel ...............................................................
The Loan Page ............................................................................................................
Student Biographical Information Panel ....................................................................
Status Message ....................................................................................................
Disbursement Information Table ........................................................................
Updating Disbursement Information ..................................................................
Updating Loan Amount ......................................................................................
Canceling A Loan .......................................................................................................
Changing Information Related to the Loan Page .......................................................
Biographical Information ....................................................................................
Borrower Page ....................................................................................................
References Sub-panel ..........................................................................................
Loan Summary Sub-panel....................................................................................
13-26
13-26
13-26
13-26
13-26
13-27
13-28
13-28
13-28
13-28
13-29
13-31
13-32
13-32
13-32
13-34
13-34
13-34
13-35
13-35
13-35
13-37
13-38
13-38
13-38
13-38
13-38
13-39
13-40
13-40
13-40
13-42
13-43
13-43
13-43
13-44
13-44
13-44
13-45
13-45
13-45
13-46
13-46
13-46
13-46
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-3
OSFA
Origination Reject Messages ..............................................................................
Term Information ................................................................................................
Promissory Note Information Panel ...........................................................................
NSLDS ........................................................................................................................
Update Log .................................................................................................................
Update Log Search Panel ....................................................................................
Update Log Selection Panel ................................................................................
The Update Log Panel ................................................................................................
Disbursement Reports ................................................................................................
Reports Sub-Panel ......................................................................................................
Browse Panel ..............................................................................................................
The Flow of Data ..................................................................................................................
Appendix A – Miscellaneous CUNY Codes ........................................................................
13-4 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
13-46
13-46
13-47
13-48
13-48
13-48
13-49
13-49
13-49
13-49
13-50
13-50
13-51
SAM 2014-2015
How to Access the Financial Aid Systems
Access to the UAPC financial aid systems is done through an entry validation panel (not
pictured here) and requires an authorized User ID and valid Password. For information
about obtaining a User ID or creating/retrieving Passwords, you must contact your campus
accounts security administrator or the UAPC Helpdesk.
Once you gain access to the financial aid systems the following screen appears. This
allows the user to select which system to access.
Actions Options Commands Features Help
_________________________________________________________________
U A P C Network Session Selection
More:
Select sessions with a “/” or an action code.
Session ID
-------------TSO
FAPINQ
Command ===>
Enter F1=Help
Description
------------------------------------------------TSO ON 390A
Financial Aid Inquiry System
F3=Exit
F5=Refresh
F9=Retrieve
Status
----------------
390A/VTMT1042
F10=Action
If you wish to sign on to more than one system at a time, type “s” (for start) on the line in
front of each system and both systems will be activated. You will then be allowed to
switch back and forth between systems, although, since both PETS and CUDLS are
under the TSO option, you cannot get access to PETS and CUDLS at the same time.
When an option is selected, the status of that option will change to “Active”. To tab up
to the input lines before the system names, hold the SHIFT key down and press the TAB
key.
You may access FAPINQ directly or be given the TSO Application Selection Panel
screen to choose either PETS or CUDLS:
COMMAND ===>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Application Selection Panel
USER: $FAAEM
DATE: 06/06/09
TIME: 11:52:23
APPLICATION
-------------------1
CUDL11
2
CUDL12
3
CUDL13
4
PETS09
5
PETS10
6
PETS11
7
PETS12
8
PETS13
DESCRIPTION
----------------------------------------------DIRECT LENDING 2011 - 2012
DIRECT LENDING 2012 - 2013
DIRECT LENDING 2013 - 2014
PELL ELECTRONIC TRANSFER 09-10
PELL ELECTRONIC TRANSFER 10-11
PELL ELECTRONIC TRANSFER 11-12
PELL ELECTRONIC TRANSFER 12-13
PELL ELECTRONIC TRANSFER 13-14
STATUS
--------------ACTIVE
ACTIVE
ACTIVE
INACTIVE
INACTIVE
ACTIVE
ACTIVE
ACTIVE
Welcome to CIS.
CUNY CIS Help Desk – (212) 541-0981
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-5
OSFA
FINANCIAL AID PACKAGING INQUIRY SYSTEM (FAPINQ)
What Does FAPINQ Do?
The FAP system creates, maintains and reports information necessary to manage
financial aid for City University students at colleges who haven’t fully migrated to
CUNYfirst. The database is student-oriented with one record per student accessed by
student social security number. Each record includes a common or root segment and
from zero to six dependent segments. The common segment contains information
pertinent to the student while the dependent segments contain information pertaining to
TAP/APTS, PELL, Need Analysis, Packaging, and Direct Stafford Loans.
The FAP system accepts data from many different sources. The major source is the
Central Processing System (CPS) which electronically transmits data from students’
FAFSAs into the CUNY PETS system. Selected data then flows into FAP to create the
need analysis [“N”] page. In addition, users with update privileges may modify
previously entered data, add segments, delete segments, and update student biographical
data. Concurrent updating of the FAPFILE by batch and online processors is permitted.
In general, the individual colleges are responsible for the correction of errors.
Accordingly, FAP provides facilities for those responsible for error management to
interactively correct errors with either batched or single-entry input.
The FAP system is driven by externally set legislative requirements. Even though
college and central CUNY requirements are fully met, the system's algorithms and data
elements must be changed on a yearly basis. Accordingly, all system data sets are named
with a prefix FAPYY (when "YY" is the award year). Since data files for the prior year
are usually of interest to financial aid administrators, the files and programs are made
available one year after they are current. Similarly, there is a period of time when the
current file and the file for next year are required. In these cases, the new file is accessed
by the FAPINQ subsystem. It should be noted that there are often minor differences in
processing and data between different year systems, and some ingenuity on the part of the
user may be required to ferret out all the details.
FAPINQ Systems
Two award years are available for inquiries at any given time, and for several months at
the beginning of the current award year, both files accept updates. The current year (July
1, 2013 through June 30, 2014) file is maintained by the "FAPINQ13" subsystem. When
you sign onto FAP, the “FAPINQ13” subsystem automatically initializes and displays.
For the previous year, the subsystem to specify is "FAPINQ12". The record header
clearly identifies which award year is being researched; e.g. "12 SS#?" will appear on a
2012-13 record. If you are not sure which year you are working with type "FMT", and
this will reformat the screen to identify the subsystem you are using. To switch at the
“YY SS#?” prompt from FAP13 to FAP12 and vice-versa during the same session, type
"FAPINQ13" or "FAPINQ12" in response to the prompt “YY SS#".
13-6 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
Inquiries
Looking at data without changing it is called an inquiry. How to do an inquiry will
depend upon what particular bit of information you require and your familiarity with the
file "Pages". These computer pages, like their paper counterparts in the student's office
file, were created in response to data received from submitted aid applications. How
many pages there are in a student's record will depend upon the number of aid
applications filed and the particular requests for program assistance the student has made.
To look up a student, enter his/her SS# after the computer's prompt for "YY SS#?"
(Where YY=Academic Year). The system will then respond in one of two ways:
A.
"Academic Year, SS#, Name, Date of Birth and Header: SEGS=…". This
response means that the student is on file and information is available. Note:
Be sure to verify that the SS# and the name on the documents you are
working with agree with the record you are viewing on the PC screen.
B.
"Not on File" - Means that the student has not applied for financial aid of any
kind, or that he or she did not list any CUNY school on their aid application,
or that there is a SS# discrepancy.
To display different pages for the same student, type the letter or letters of the page you
want after system prompt, "Page?". To go on to a new student record, press carriage
return or ENTER after system prompt "Page?" appears. Then type in the next SS#.
Recalling the Previous Student’s Record
To recall the last student without keying in the SS# a second time, type "*" after the
prompt for "YY SS#?". You may do this only during an active session. Once you have
signed off and then signed back on to the system, the last record from the previous
session can be called in only by retyping the student's SS#.
The Record Header, "SEGS" (Segments) List
The "SEGS" list shows what pages are on record for that student (e.g. "CTB" means
Common, TAP, Pell [formerly known as BEOG] segments are in the record). Other
pages are available for every record even though they are not displayed as part of the
segments list. If the SEGS list contains a slash e.g. "CBT/N", the segments listed after
the slash exist in the record but are invalid because they contain one or more incorrect
field values. If the segments are listed in parentheses, those segments have non-fatal
errors between them which must be reconciled. You can see what the problems are by
accessing the E (Edit) page.
The Initial Page
The Initial Page is the FAP Page selected by UAPC to display first when a record is
queried. Usually the "M" page is the initial page. After sign-on, you can tell which page
has been selected as the initial page by a system message, i.e. "Page is Initialized to: M".
“Set Page” Command
You may on occasion have a need to review or update data for a number of students on a
page other than the initial “M” page. Use the “Set Page” command at the "YY SS#?"
prompt to display a page other than the initial “M” page when you query a record.
Restore the “M” page as the initial page by typing “INIT” at the “YYSS#?” prompt.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-7
OSFA
Inquiry and Interactive Pages
The Inquiry pages are:
B
(Pell)
C
(Common)
E
(Edit)
F
(Field)
G
(Direct Loan)
L
(List)
M
(Money)
N
(Needs)
P
(Package)
Q
(SS# Query)
T
(TAP)
V
(Verification)
W
(APTS)
?
(Aid Summary)
2
(Message)
4
(Multiple Admission/Optional Aid)
The Interactive pages are:
S
(SAR/ISIR Input)
U
(Update)
$
(Interactive packaging)
5
(Multiple Admission Resend/Optional Aid Create/Modify)
J
(APTS Questions from CUNY Supplement Input)
0
(“Zero” page –TAP Family Members Attending College Full-Time Input)
The format of each of these pages is standard, that is, for any given page, data elements
for any student are found in the same physical location on the screen. Each of these pages
is discussed on the following pages.
There are also other less frequently used pages but it is helpful to know what they are:
A
(Add)
D
(Dump)
I
(Interactive)
K
(Keep C Seg)
O
(TAP Supplement)
R
(Retrieve C Seg)
Z
(Zap)
1
(Add)
Limited discussion of these pages is found at the end of this section.
13-8 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
B Page ("Pell")
This page provides information regarding the calculation of the Pell award. The B
segment is created by FAFSA data received through PETS and edited through data input
through the S page at your campus. Data elements are arranged by payment term.
PELL SEGMENT CREATED 2013-04-03; LAST UPDATED 2013-05-15
CPS LATEST EFC: 0; LATEST TRANSACTION# 2 ; LATEST CPS UPDATE: 2013-05-01
SUMMER
FALL
SPRING
COL OF ENROLL
12
12
COL W/ISIR
12
12
EXPLICIT
PAYABLE TRAN#
002
002
OK TO PAY
NO
YES
YES
VERIFICATION
V1,COD=V
V1,COD=V
ENROLLMENT
FULL
FULL
DEPENDENCE
INDEP
INDEP
BUDGET FLGS
LAP
LAP
LAP
EFC
0
0
COST OF ED
$21420
$21420
TEACH GRANT
PELL AWARD
$2822.50
$2822.50
DISBURSED
NONCUNY PELL: 0.000%; PELL LIFETIME USAGE: 350.000%
PAGE?
Data elements on the B Page:
COL OF ENROLL The UAPC code for the college in which the student is enrolled
COL W/ISIR
The college that has updated the SAR and locked the transaction
for payment
EXPLICIT
Used for Pell payment - if explicit is turned on for summer, a
front-end Pell award is paid. Otherwise, back-end Pell is assumed.
This field may be used to suppress payment for a given semester.
PAYABLE TRAN# The ISIR transaction that has the payable EFC
OK TO PAY
Indicates whether all edits have been cleared and the award can be
paid
VERIFICATION
Indicates type of verification required (V1-V5) and if it has been
completed.
ENROLLMENT
FULL, 3/4, HALF, or < HALF
DEPENDENCE
INDEP or DEP
BUDGET FLGS
CHCR (child care) and/or LAP (living away from parents)
EFC
The EFC on the ISIR transaction that the student will be paid on
COST OF ED
Calculated budget for Pell payment
TEACH
Scheduled TEACH Grant (if eligible)
PELL AWARD
Scheduled Pell award based on Pell enrollment status
DISBURSED
Amount of Pell already disbursed through SFA
NONCUNY PELL Percentage of Pell disbursed at non-CUNY school
PELL LIFETIME USAGE: Cumulative usage of Pell in prior years given as %
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-9
OSFA
B O Page (“Pell Origination”)
Displays all the Pell Origination Records for a student within the award year. Pell Grants
cannot be paid without an accepted origination. A Pell origination must be sent each time
the EFC or the college changes. A college may request re-origination of the student’s
PELL record by updating “BREORIG” field. Since many students need to be originated
for more than one college, there can be more than one college listed on the “B O” page.
Students are always originated with a full-time cost of attendance since origination
frequently occurs before the student’s term enrollment has been finalized.
C Page ("Common")
Contains a student's basic demographic information. The "C" Segment is the basic
student record on FAP and is usually created through UAPC’s "COLLAD" (College
Admission Entering Freshmen) or "ASTA" (Transfer Admission) files. C Segments are
also rolled over from prior year's file or created from file uploads such as the HESC
award files or FAFSA ISIR files. This page also contains academic data needed to
calculate Perkins eligibility.
RECORD CREATED 2013-03-05; LAST UPDATED 2013-06-01
COMMON CREATED 2013-03-05; LAST UPDATED 2013-06-01
31-45 82ND STREET APT #1; EAST ELMHURST NY 11370
EMPLID:12345678;
ALB ID 2011TU; 24.0U/0.0G/0.0R/0.0V/0.0P POINTS THRU SPR 2013
CUNY HISTORY FLAG: NONE
HISTORY FLAG: ENROLL_LASTYR, FAFSA_FILED_LYR; CEYR=1109
AWARD HISTORY: NONE
USER FLAGS: NONE
TERM :
HOST COL:
HOME COL:
CRDS+HRS:
ATTEMPT:
NOT EARNED:
CUM CRDS:
GPA:
PELL EFC:
SUMMER
FALL
B 12-U
B 12-U
SPRING
B 12-U
B 12-U
WINTER CREDITS:
33.0
2.0
$0
$0
PAGE?
Data elements on the C Page:
RECORD CREATED: When the student’s FAP record was created
LAST UPDATED:
When any part of the record was updated
COMMON CREATED: When the C Page was created
LAST UPDATED:
When the C Page was last updated
STUDENT’S HOME ADDRESS
EMPLID:
Student’s assigned CUNYfirst ID
[No longer displayed: Student’s home phone number, Student’s sex, Student’s
H.S. Grad Year (CGYR)]
TAP HISTORY:
ALB ID = Initial Albany TAP Award Year; Award type;
# of accumulated Grad/Undergrad TAP points through
the previous award year
13-10 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
CUNY HISTORY:
Whether student was Special Programs last year,
independent, etc.
HISTORY FLAG:
Whether a student was enrolled, filed a FAFSA, etc.
CEYR:
College entry year
AWARD HISTORY: Lists awards by program (excluding FWS, Direct Stafford
and Special Programs) and number of years received at
CUNY
USER FLAGS:
CUNY Admissions/Financial Aid user-specified warning
and message code flags
HOME/HOST COL: UAPC College Codes displayed by term
CRDS + HRS:
Credit and hours enrolled for Summer, Fall, & Spring
WINTER CREDITS: # credits enrolled in Winter Session (also included in CRDS
+ HRS term totals)
ATTEMPT:
Total semester credits attempted
NOT EARNED:
Total semester credits not earned
CUM CRDS/GPA: Cumulative Credits and Cumulative GPA displayed by term
PELL EFC:
EFC displayed by term
E Page ("Edit/Error")
This page lists any errors or omissions occurring in any of the student's other segment
pages. These are displayed as COMEDIT, BOGEDIT, TAPEDIT, CNAEDIT, or
RCDEDIT message/explanations. The error message often requires correction or
clarification before payment and/or packaging can occur.
C SEG CORRECT
BOGEDIT: BOG054 STUDENT HAS UNRESOLVED OVERPAYMENT ISSUE PER SAR FOR COL 12
B SEG HAS ERRORS, RC=04
T SEG CORRECT
G SEG NOT IN RECORD
CNAEDIT: CMA005N PARENTS ASSUMED TO BE TAX FILER(S)
CNAEDIT: CMA006N STUDENT ASSUMED TO BE NON-TAX FILER(S)
N SEG CORRECT
P SEG NOT IN RECORD
RCDEDIT: RCD063 UNDERGRAD REPORTS GRAD STATUS, ENROLLED IN UNDERGRAD PROGRAM
PAGE?
Usually, the user should use E ALL to see all the errors found in a student’s record. It is
also possible to look at edits/errors for one particular segment. The format is as follows:
E
E
E
E
B - Edits/errors on the Pell segment
C - Edits/errors on the Common segment
G - Edits/errors on the Loan segment
N - Edits/errors on the Needs segment
E P - Edits/errors on the Package segment
E T - Edits/errors on the TAP segment
E W - Edits/errors for APTS
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-11
OSFA
BOGEDIT: Refers to any error in the Pell Segment
TAPEDIT: Refers to any edits pertaining to the TAP segment. When a student has not
returned a TAP Application, there can be many errors listed here.
CNAEDIT: Contains all the assumption messages from the ISIR
RCDEDIT: Refers to the specific CUNY Edits which keep a student from being paid
Pell Grant, campus-based and other Title IV assistance.
2013-14 CUNY EDITS
Edit Code
MESSAGE
RCD063
Undergraduate Student Reports Graduate Student Status but enrolled in UG Program
RCD064
Undergraduate Student Reports Graduate Student Status but no Bachelors Degree
RCD075
Student checked “Yes” to FAFSA question 56 (emancipated minor)
G Page ("Direct Loans")
This page will display any direct loan data which has been originated in CUDLS. Users
may not update this page since all changes must be made directly on the CUDLS system.
GSL SEGMENT CREATED 2013-06-20; LAST UPDATED 2013-08-05
LOAN # (CC):
TYPE:
PERIOD:
PROM NOTE:
LOAN STATUS:
LOAN AMT:
PGM COMP:
1 (01)
SUB
130827-140525
ACCEPTED/SERV
ORIG/ACCEPTED
$3500
2 (01)
UNSUB
130827-140525
ACCEPTED/SERV
ORIG/ACCEPTED
$4000
PAGE?
Additional information regarding a specific loan is held in sub-screens behind this screen.
For example, to get additional information about the subsidized loan (loan 1 above), you
should select page G 1. The page will give disbursement information along with the
credits which were used to calculate the loan eligibility.
Data elements on the G Page:
LOAN #
The order in which the loans were originated
TYPE:
SUB, UNSUB, or PLUS
PERIOD:
The loan period listed as YYMMDD
PROM NOTE:
Promissory note status - ACCEPTED by the SERVICER or
LINKED TO MPN
LOAN STATUS:
Indicates whether the origination has been accepted
LOAN AMT:
Amount of loan certified
13-12 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
M Page ("Money")
This page lists all the student's current academic year awards by Summer, Fall, and
Spring semesters. Awards are assumed to be for full-time attendance until enrollment
status files are loaded (Pell awards are flagged with certain letter codes which denote “F”
full, “T” 3/4 time, “H” ½ time, and “L” less-than ½ time enrollment).
13 SS# 123-45-6789; NAME: JOHN A SMITH; BORN 92-03-19; SEGS=CBTNP
TERM:
CURRENT SUMMER
FALL
SPRING
CREDITS:
FULL
FULL
FULL
HOME COL-DIV:
B 12-U
B 12-U
CRDS+HRS:
15.0
TAP AWARD:
AE2000.00
AD2000.00
PART-TIME:
P $0.00
P $0.00
PTAP PER CRED:
HESC SCHLRSHIP:
TUIT CRD:
TEACH
PELL AWARD:
(A/P) F $2822.50
(A/P) F $2822.50
(S)
SEOG:
$175.00
$175.00
FWS
$600.00
$600.00
LOAN=NONE
NSLDS TOTAL: SUB: $7000; UNSUB: $12000; CONSOLIDATED: NONE
NONCUNY PELL: 0.000%; PELL LIFETIME USAGE: 350.000%
HISTORY FLAG: ENROLL_LASTYR, FAFSA_FILED_LYR; CEYR=1109
*MESSAGE EXISTS*
WINTER:
PAGE?
Data elements on the M Page:
FIRST LINE:
FAP year - SSN - NAME - Birth date - segments that exist on FAP
TERM
Term in which awards may be made
CREDITS:
Credits for federal aid award calculation
COL-DIV:
Student’s college and level (undergrad/grad)
Preceded by Precedence (priority) Code*
CRDS+HRS:
# of credits/hours student has registered for that semester
TAP:
$$ amount of TAP award by term, whether the award is
estimated, actual or verified, and the TAP Schedule the
award is based on
PART-TIME:
$$ amount of APTS award (if available)
PTAP PER CREDIT:
PTAP per credit award amount
HESC SCHLRSHIP:
$$ amount of HESC Scholarship awards
TUIT CRD:
$$ amount of CUNY tuition credit (Senior Colleges)
PELL AWARD:
$$ amount of Pell award based on # of credits and whether
the award has been originated and accepted
CUSTA:
$$ amount of CUSTA (if any)
SEOG, FWS, ETC.:
$$ amounts of other campus-based awards in package
LOAN:
$$ amount of loans processed for this year; date the loan
was requested and from which college
NSLDS:
$$ Amounts on NSLDS up to this year (does not include
current loans)
CCPUU:
% of Pell eligibility left over from previous year
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-13
OSFA
TAP AWD:
HISTORY FLAG:
OPTIONAL PROGRAMS:
NONCUNY PELL:
PELL LIFETIME USAGE:
HONORS PROGRAM
MESSAGE EXISTS:
Last date information was received from Albany
Student history from C page
$$ amounts of other awards and scholarships
$$ Pell received for current year at non-CUNY schools
Cumulative Pell usage in prior years given as %
Awards displayed if student has honors college (CHCOL)
listed and fall/spring home college matches this
Flag for messages on 2 Page and prominent federal
warning edits
*The Precedence Code shows where the college information came from. Higher priority
numbers override lower priority numbers. The following chart shows the precedence codes
currently in use:
KEY
===
''
B
A
K
T
S
C
E
M
H
Priority
======
1
10
10
15
20
40
40
40
60
70
Status
=============================
PRE-LOADED WITH LOW PRIORITY
PELL WITHOUT SAR BIT TURNED ON
ALBANY AWARD RECORD
CAS SELECTED COLLEGE
TAP APPLICATION
PELL WITH SAR FROM FIN AID OFFICER
CHANGE FROM FAPINQ
ENROLLMENT STATUS TAPE
MANUAL UPDATE
HOME COLLEGE UPDATE
M Page Variations, Pageset Options
Several variations of the "M" page exist as:
M FF, SF
"M" Fall and spring full time programs displayed.
MC
"M" Conventional (Displays upper and lower division awards).
Variant displays of "M C" exist as "M C,UP"; "M C,FF"; "M
C,WF"; and "M C,SF". These pages will display awards for
summer part time; fall full time; winter full time; and spring full
time respectively.
M UP
"M" summer part time (only summer awards for TAP)
M FF
"M" fall full time (only fall full time programs)
M WF
"M" winter full time (only winter full time at LaGuardia)
M SF
"M" spring full time (only spring full time programs)
13-14 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
N page ("Need")
Displays all the major data elements needed to calculate the financial need of a student.
It also displays the CPS and N page updates to allow the user to compare whether the
information may be discrepant. In addition to need and family contribution values, the N
page lists summaries of key items from the need analysis algorithm. For dependent
students, parental information is displayed. For independent students, the data displayed
comes from the student’s income information.
NEEDS CREATED 2013-02-20; LAST UPDATED 2013-04-25
LATEST NEEDS TRANS#: 2 CPS NEED UPDATE DATE: 2013-05-01
LATEST CPS TRANS#:
2 CPS PELL UPDATE DATE: 2013-05-01
HISTORY FLAG: ENROLL_LASTYR, FAFSA_FIELD_LYR; CEYR=1109
SINGLE; 2ND YR; DEPENDENT; IRS REQUEST: 00 (S); 00 (P); TRACK FLAG: V1
BUDGET DUR=9.0 MO; AYR NEED:$24376=($24376)-$0
BUDG ADJ: NONE; NDC#= ; CALC: NOCHR; LAP
COL: FALL=12 (NOT SPCL); SPR=12 (NOT SPCL);
NYRES=Y,W4E=N, CCSPIO=N; NFWS=Y,NSUMFWS=-,NSTULOAN=Y
FAFSA SCHOOLS: 12, 13, 03
FC=$0(P); SIMP FC=; FULL FC=$0;
(9 MONTHS) FC=$0
PARENT:
TAXABLE$
|
NOTAX$
|
VALUE
RTYP
FIL 1040
| NTO (A)
|
SAV
|
FSTA
DID FILE
| NTO (B)
|
INV
|
TAEZ
N
|
|
BUS
|
#EX
3
|
|
AGI
$23443
|
|
#HS
4
|
WG0
$0
|
|
#COL 1
|
WG1
$0
|
MSTA SINGLE |
TAX
$138
|
|
|
|
PAGE?
Data elements on the N Page:
NEEDS CREATED
LAST UPDATED:
LATEST NEEDS TRANS#
CPS NEED UPDATE DATE
LATEST CPS TRANS#
CPS PELL UPDATE DATE
HISTORY FLAG
CEYR
Marital Status
Year in College
DEPENDENT
IRS REQUEST
TRACK FLAG
BUDGET DUR
AYR NEED
BUDG ADJ
NDC#
CALC
Date the need segment was created
Date the last update was made to the N page
Latest transaction from PETS that updated this page
Date of the PETS transaction that updated this page
Latest PETS transaction
Date of latest PETS transaction
History flags
First year student was accepted/enrolled at CUNY
Student’s marital status
Student’s year in college
Dependency status
IRS Data Retrieval Status Student (S) & Parent (P)
Verification tracking flag indicator
Budget duration
Academic year need = (Budget minus EFC)
Any budget adjustments done by the college
# of dependent children (from CUNY SUPP)
What the student reported on FAFSA regarding
childcare and where living
COL: SUM=__;FALL=__; SPR=__
College for summer, fall and spring
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-15
OSFA
Special Program Status:
Special Program status (SEEK, CD, Bilingual,
Honors, ASAP) for each term
NYS Resident (Y or N)
W4 form filed for FWS (Y or N)
Special Programs ineligibility override
FWS self-help requested
Loan self-help requested
Colleges listed on the FAFSA
Parent/student EFC (according to dep status)
Student/ parent (according to dependency status
Parent’s marital status (dependent student)
NYRES
W4E
CCSPIO
NFWS, NSUMFWS,
NPARLOAN, NSTULOAN
FAFSA Schools
FC
Income Information
MSTA
N A Page ("Needs – Applicant")
A subset of the "N" page which displays the student number of exemptions, household
size, number in college and flags. Other displayed information: student's resources,
assets and key budget calculation values.
N P Page (“Needs – Parent”)
A subset of the "N" page which displays the parent marital status, number of exemptions,
number in household, number in college and flags. Other displayed information: parents’
resources, assets and key budget calculation values.
N S Page (“Needs – Supplement”)
This page contains award history for Pell, SEOG and Perkins, any ineligibility flags, and
lists the student’s answers to the FAFSA Dependency Status questions.
P Page ("Packaging")
This page is created as the result of central or interactive packaging. Information about
the aid package includes: creation and update dates, phase number, student category,
current and assumed TAP and Pell, need, target need, campus-based awards and a
summary of all types of other aid. The final data element on the package page is the
remaining need.
HISTORY FLAG: ENROLL_LASTYR, FAFSA_FILED_LYR; CEYR=1109
CREATED 2013-04-19; LAST UPDATED 2013-04-19;
PHASES: --,01,01; CATEGORY: UGRIND
ASSUMED:
CURRENT:
TAP/WPT
$4000.00
$4000.00
ACG/SMART
SEOG:
$0.00
$350.00
TOT CAMPUS AID: ACA YR:
OTHER FINANCIAL AID:
LOAN:
UNS/PLUS AS AID:
VETERAN’S BENEFITS:
TOTAL AID:
REMAINING NEED:
PAGE:
13-16 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
PELL
$5645.00
$5645.00
FWS:
$1550.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$11195.00
13181.00
NEED
$24376.00
$24376.00
TGT NEED
$2800.00
N/A
$1200.00
SUMMER:
$0.00
UNS/PLUS REPLACE EFC
$0.00
SAM 2014-2015
In cases where a package was attempted but no campus based aid awarded, a P segment
may not appear in the SEG list, but if you call up page P, the system will display a refusal
code. Refer to the listing of packaging refusal codes on the next page. The codes can be
extremely useful in diagnosing errors in the N segment and helpful in student counseling.
Data elements on the P Page:
CREATED Date the package was created and when last updated
PHASES
Which phase the package was created in
CATEGORY Packaging scheme used to create awards package
The packaging program is run assuming that all students will enroll full-time. Therefore
all awards are assumed to be full-time awards. When packaging is run, the assumed
fields are used with the CURRENT fields being updated when actual awards are posted.
Packaging Refusal Codes: These are the error codes that will appear on a P Page for a
student who did not successfully run through the packaging program. These codes are
updated each year.
Packaging Refusal Codes for 2013-2014
01
02
03
04*
05*
06*
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15*
16
17
18
19
20*
21
22
23
24*
25*
26*
27
95
96*
99
00
Error in common or need segment
Grad Center excluded
Packaging suppressed by Financial Aid Office
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student owes Federal
Pell/FSEOG repayment
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student in default of loan
Not citizen or eligible non-citizen
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student not making satisfactory
progress
Non Special Program student or Non CUSTA student with either no self help
requested OR self help requested but EFC above cutoffs
Not enrolled in Fall semester
No funds available
Special Program undergraduate student in 2nd BA program
SEEK at college without SEEK
CD at college without CD
BILINGUAL at college without BILINGUAL
No target need
Not eligible for Special Programs
Special Program student with maximum term usage
User awards - excluded from Central Cycle
Special Programs student identified as Special Programs by Admissions
system (CAS) and not income verified
Target need below FWS minimum
Target need below loan minimum or freshman not eligible for Perkins loan
No SAR and not verified and not OK to Package
Special Program student without a TAP or Pell segment
Requested FWS and loan, target need below minimum for both
Family contribution > 1500, not eligible for FWS
Non Special Program student with SAR messages indicating loan default
UG student with Grad division or Grad student with UG division
Student group excluded from packaging per college request
No raw need
Missing GPA and/or cumulative credits and YC = 2,3,4,5 & requested Perkins
None of the above - miscellaneous - call OSFA
*A file can be created based on these codes for college’s to run their own denial letters.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-17
OSFA
T page (“TAP”)
Displays information contained on the current year HESC TAP Application and TAP
Certification data.
101 WEST 31ST STREET 7TH FLOOR; NEW YORK NY 10001
ALB ID 2011TU; 12.0U/0.0G/0.0R/0.0V/0.0P POINTS THRU SPR 2013
FACTS (CERT/CRD/APTS) : SUMMER: /
/ : FALL: /
/ ; SPRING: /
/ ;
CREATED 2013-04-03; LAST UPDATED 2013-08-01; DATA FROM TWEB(A);
ALB UPDT 2013-08-04; CIT=US; RES=YES;
FLAGS: MIN=N, REM=N, 5YR=N;*VET=-*;
SINGLE; A#HS=; P#HS=4; OSTUDS=1; OSUPP $0; NTB=($0,$10943); PETC=M; APST=Y; RECST=5;
WVR=NONE/000
TYPE
EXMP
INCOME
SS#
NAM
APPLCT:
NONE
0
$0
123-45-6789
CHI
SPOUSE:
FATHER:
LONG
2
$10943
EXCL A/C SEP/DIV 1998-08
MOTHER:
987-65-4321
CHI
UCOL
SUMMER:
FALL:
SPRING:
12
12
ACOL
SCOL
CERT
LVL
PS CLM#
1404
1413
1404
1404
NRSP
NRSP
2YR M
UGRD M
0
0
REM#
0
0
MSG# PTS
HESC-UPDATE
6.0
6.0
PAGE?
Data elements on the T Page:
TAP Address for student
TAP HISTORY
ALB ID = Initial Albany TAP Award Year; Award type;
Undergrad and grad TAP points usage through the previous
award year
“FACTS” DATA:
Shows term-based enrollment information needed to
determine State aid eligibility (see Chapter 15 of this
manual for an explanation of the TAP Certification Codes)
CREATED
Date TAP record created
LAST UPDATED
Date TAP record was last updated
DATA FROM:
HESC TAP application source (TWEB, EHESC, PAPER
APP, ISIR)
ALB UPDT
Date last update received from Albany
CIT
Citizenship
RES
NYS Residency
PETC
TAP Petition Code (P=pending financial independence
documents)
APST
Application Status Code
RECST
Record Status from HESC
UCOL
College on file at UAPC
ACOL
College according to Albany
SCOL
College reported by student
CERT
Status of certification
NRSP = not yet certified by college
NREG = not registered
ELIG = certified eligible for award
AWRD = TAP Award granted
WDTL = withdrawn with tuition liability
13-18 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
LVL
PS
CLM#
REM#
MSG#
PTS
HESC-UPDATE
NFTM = not full-time
NMAT = not matriculated
NAPP = not in approved program
NGSP = not in good standing
OTHR = other
PEND = pending
PTAP = receiving PTAP
Grade Level [UGRD = undergrad; GRAD = graduate]
Pay Status [D = Decertified; M = missing from roster; R =
on roster; C = certified; A = remittance advice; $ =
certified]
Roster number the student was reported on
Remittance Advice Number
Award Letter message code
Number of TAP points used in each semester
Date of last update from HESC
V page (“Verification”)
The verification page is an inquiry page designed to check the consistency of data when
comparing Pell (CPS) information and the information on the needs (N) page. Used
often when college is doing verification and looking for discrepancies or attempting to
resolve error messages.
LATEST DATE:
TRANS#:
DEPENDENCE
LATEST NEEDS TRANS
2013-05-01
02
EFC = $0
DEP
STUDENT
# IN HS
# IN COLL
WG0
WG1
AGI
TAX PAID
RETURN TYPE
ELIG 1040A/EZ
FILING STATUS
INCOME EXCLUS
SAVINGS
UNTAXED INC A
UNTAXED INC B
RESIDENCE
LATEST PELL TRANS
2013-05-01
02
EFC = $0
U-DEP, F-DEP, S-DEP
WON’T FILE
$0
$0
PARENT
04
01
$0
$23034
$23034
$138
FIL/1040
N
DID FILE
$0
$
WON’T FILE
$0
$0
PARENT
04
01
$0
$23034
$23034
$138
FIL/1040
N
DID FILE
$0
$0
NY
NY
NY
NY
$400
$0
$0
$0
STUDENT
$400
$0
$0
$0
PAGE?
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-19
OSFA
W Page (“APTS Display”)
Displays the information used for awarding Aid for Part-Time Study, a HESC program
administered by CUNY to give small grants from state funds to part-time students. Page
is constructed from the T Page data. At the bottom of the page is the information used to
award and certify APTS awards including the per credit dollar amount as set by OSFA
for each term. Colleges supply other required data such as enrolled credits, hours, tuition
charges and satisfactory progress indicator by established NYS deadlines in order for an
APTS award to appear on the M Page of FAP.
COMMON SEG DATA: 12.0 TAP PTS USED;
TAP SEG CREATED 2013-04-03; LAST UPDATED 2013-09-01
DATA FROM TWEB(AF); AND FROM NOWHERE
NYRES=Y, HBD=N
SINGLE; CIT=US; OSUPP $0
APPLCT:
SPOUSE:
FATHER:
MOTHER:
TYPE
NONE
EXMP
INCOME
$0
SS#
123-45-6789
NAM
CHI
LONG
2
$10943
321-54-9876
CHI #DEPEN#
#DEPEN# SEP/DIV 1998-08
AWARD STATUS: NTBS=$0
CC CRED CHRS TUITION
U:
F: 12
S: 03
GW5N
C-AWD
$0.00
$0.00
ST
RT RS ACOL NAME
PTS @CRED T-AWD
$65
$65
PAGE?
? Page (“Summary Display”)
Collects information from other pages on FAP and displays a summary record of the
student’s status. This page is most often used to identify whether a student has been
overawarded.
TERM:
CURRENT SUMMER
FALL
SPRING
COL-DIV:
C 12-U
C 12-U
CRDS+HRS:
WINTER:
OK TO PAY:
NO
YES
YES
DEPENDENCE:
DEP
DEP
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------BUDGET:
$20520.00
BUDGET DUR:
9.0 MO
CEYR: 0909
EFC:
$0.00
2ND YR
SINGLE
NEED:
$20520.00
TOT NYS AWARD
$3100.00
TAP:
$3100.00
APTS:
$0.00
PELL/TEACH:
$5550.00
PELL:
$5550.00
TEACH:
$0.00
TOT CAMPUS AID:
$1950.00
FWS:
$1500.00
FSEOG:
$450.00
FPERK:
$0.00
CUSTA:
$0.00
SPECIAL PGMS:
$0.00
STIPEND:
$0.00
BOOKS:
$0.00
FEES:
$0.00
OTHER FIN AID:
$0.00
SUB:
$0.00
UNS/PLUS AID:
$0.00 UNS/PLUS REPLACE EFC: $0.00
VET'S BENEFITS:
$0.00
TOTAL AID:
$10600.00
REMAINING NEED:
$9920.00
PAGE?
13-20 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
2 Page (“Message Display”)
The Message Page allows colleges to enter various messages about the student that will
help other financial aid personnel identify problems and solutions. Each message can be
only one line long but can be standardized by each college to meet their needs.
18
03
03
MSG# COL# MESSAGE
---- ---- ---------------------------------------UPDATED AND RETURNED NO CORRECTIONS
STD OVER AGGREGATE SUB. SEE NSLDS. QUEENS COLLEGE 1/23/04
STD IS A SOPHOMORE ACC. CREDITS REC'D $ OVER GRADE LEVEL TO DATE. CVT
PAGE?
To create or modify a message, access 2 Page by entering “2 U” at the “Page ?” prompt.
You will then be prompted for a “Function” (A=add, R=revise, D=delete, X=abort).
When you have completed the appropriate action, you will be prompted to “Update”.
F Page (“Field Display”)
The field page allows the user to see what values are in selected fields. The user selects
the F page and then enters the field name. The system then responds with the current
value in that field. This function allows the user to view the current values for many
fields in FAP that do not display on the screen.
L Page (“List Display”)
This page is used to see if there are duplicate records on file for any selected student.
Duplicate records usually result from a student filing under more than one social security
number. This page checks for duplicate students using the first 4 letters of the last name
and date of birth and then displays the results.
Q Page (“SS# Query Display”)
When a college asks that a social security number be changed, a record is kept in FAP of
both numbers. This page allows the user to identify whether a student has been on the
FAP file with a different social security number.
4 Page (“Optional Aid/Multiple Admissions Display”)
The top of the 4 Page lists information about an entering freshman’s college(s) of
assignment and his/her admission status at those colleges. The 4 Page is created by the
CUNY freshman database and edited with data input through the 5 Page at each college.
Data elements of the 4 Page (top):
CC
2 characters (##)
The college(s) to which the student is assigned.
Program Status
Provided by the freshman database. Programs listed will
be Regular, SEEK, College Discovery, Bilingual, and the CUNY Honors Program.
(Re)Send Date
Date that the multiple admission data is sent to financial aid
offices for estimated financial aid letters to be generated.
(Re)Send Reason
Always will be set to manual before data is sent.
Resend
Updateable field by the colleges if they need the data sent
to them again. Will appear as “Y” until the record is sent to the college and as “N” once
the estimated financial aid record is sent.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-21
OSFA
The bottom of the 4 Page is used for all entry of optional aid. The COPT field is no
longer in use. Any aid showing on this page will be available for transfer to SFA. The
following format will display any optional aid for the selected student.
#
1 character
The assigned number of that award. The first award input
will be “1", the next award will be “2", and so forth.
D
1 character (*)
This will always be blank on the $ Page since this field is
only used on the 5 Page to delete an award.
CC
2 characters (##)
The UAPC college code will display here.
OPT 3 characters (alpha) Optional aid program (OPT) is the three character acronym
for the college scholarship input by the financial aid office.
$$$$$ 5 characters (#####) This is the dollar amount of the optional aid.
# OPT AID 1 character (#) The number of optional awards input.
INTERACTIVE PAGES
FAP also includes interactive pages which allow the user to update specific information
on FAP. These pages are used by financial aid office personnel to update and change
student records when additional information is received by the school. Users should
reference the list of FAP Field Names that is published annually and available through
OSFA.
S page ("SAR Input")
This page allows the user to set the student to OK TO PAY. This flag automatically
overrides all CUNY edits and all non-fatal federal edits. Fatal federal errors must be
individually overridden on this page. Changes made to a student’s record can reset the
OK TO PAY flag to N and require the user to review and re-update the record. These
awards are loaded onto a university update file each week and made available to the
IDMS SFA system.
There are shorter variations of the S page that allow input for specialized functions.
These pages are used when the full power of the S Page is not needed.
S A page
("All Data Input").
S B page
(“Back-end Pell”).
S F page
("Basic and Financial Data").
$ Page ("Interactive packaging")
Interactive packaging is a process which allows the aid administrator to review a student
financial need and package with campus-based or special programs aid on a case by case
basis. Central packaging, on the other hand, considers an entire population of students
who are to be considered for these awards and packages globally according to a preset
schedule using University developed packaging formulae (see Chapter 9 of this manual).
Interactive packaging is available only at certain times during the semester, and, given
the availability of dollars, it will award for specific programs only. Check with OSFA for
further details by calling (212) 290-5698.
13-22 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
5 Page (“Multiple Admissions Resend/Optional Aid Create/Modify”)
The 5 Page allows the user to request that estimated aid data be resent to the entering
freshman student’s college(s) of assignment and to create, modify and delete all students’
optional aid and change dollar amounts for each award. Data elements are arranged in
order of the college assignment at the top of the page and the financial aid program and
the dollars entered on the bottom of the page.
Colleges can only enter and delete awards that have their own college code associated
with them. This will be verified based on the user ID of the person trying to make the
changes. If a college attempts to change or enter an award for another college, the error
message “INVALID DATA SPECIFICATION” will appear.
Any college can enter optional aid for a student even if their college is not listed as one of
the multiple admission colleges. To access this page, type 5 at the page prompt. To input
data, type the data you wish to input after the ? prompt.
Updates on this page require the user to:
1) modify the information and
2) update the information using FAPINQ’s prompts of U (update), R (resume), or
X (abort). U must be entered for the modified data to update student’s record.
Data Fields That Can’t Be Updated on the 5 Page:
CC
The college(s) to which the student is assigned.
Program Status
Regular, SEEK, College Discovery, Bilingual, and the CUNY
Honors Program
(Re)Send Date
Date that the multiple admission data is sent to financial aid offices
for estimated award letters to be generated.
(Re)Send Reason
Always will be set to manual before data is sent.
Fields That Can Be Updated on the 5 Page:
Resend
College updateable field for when you need the estimated
financial aid data sent to you again. This field is updated
using the U page (see below).
#
1 character (#)
Assigned number of scholarship award.
D
1 character (#)
Entered when the user wants to delete a scholarship, e.g.,
when an ‘*’ is typed on line 1 of the screen, the original
line 1 will be deleted and replaced with the new line 1
(which was previously line 2). Each time a line is deleted,
the line below the deleted line replaces the deleted line.
CC
2 characters (##)
The college from which the scholarship is being offered.
OPT 3 characters (AAA) Optional aid program (OPT) – the three character acronym
for the college scholarship being input. A complete list of
the SFA Program Codes including all OPT AID acronyms
is available from OSFA.
$$$$$ 5 characters (#####) Dollar value of the college scholarship. Value will be right
justified when displayed.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-23
OSFA
Multiple Admission Estimated Financial Aid Record RESEND:
A request to resend the multiple admissions estimated financial aid record to a college is
not done on the 5 Page. Instead, you must specifically update the field CMARSx (where
x stands for the numbers 1-4) on the U Page. First, check on the 4 Page to identify which
numeric position your college is listed in. Then go to the U Page and update the
appropriate CMARS field for your college from N [which is how this field is displayed
after the initial record is sent] to Y. The (RE)SEND REASON will change to USER
REQUEST. The record will then be resent in the next batch that is forwarded to your
college. Once the record is resent, the (RE)SEND DATE will be updated to the most
recent transaction date.
Optional Aid Input:
Input for the optional aid programs is done in the underlined area of the screen. The user
must be careful to enter the data directly under the fields in order for them to be
processed correctly. When initially inputting a scholarship, the user must enter the
scholarship # and then move 3 spaces before inputting the UAPC college code.
When this information has been entered, the message ‘MODIFIED’ will be displayed.
This does not mean the record has been updated yet. Any error messages will then be
displayed. At the end of the error display, the following message will appear:
U (UPDATE), R (RESUME) OR X (ABORT)? Select U to update record.
To Create A Scholarship Element:

Type the number of the scholarship in the column labeled # (1-9).

After creating the element, use the space bar to move the cursor to the
field under ‘CC’ and enter the 2 character UAPC college code in that
column.

After the 2 character college code is entered, type the 3 character program
code acronym in the column labeled OPT.

Type the award value for each program in the $$$$$ column (the dollar
amount will be automatically right justified and padded with zeros, e.g.,
entering 200 will display as 00200).

After entering this information, press the enter key and the message
‘MODIFIED’ will appear on the screen with a ? below it. You may then
select another award for this student.

If no more awards are to be entered, the user must press the enter key
again and will then be prompted with the message: U (UPDATE), R
(RESUME) OR X (ABORT)?

For the element to be added to the FAP record, the user must select U to
update record.
To verify that the scholarship element has been successfully added to the record, the user
should review the 4 Page.
To Delete A Scholarship Element:

At the ? Prompt, type the number of the element to be deleted (1-9).

Use the space bar to go one space and type an ‘*’ under the column
labeled D.

Press the enter key and the message ‘MODIFIED’ will display.
13-24 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015

When an ‘*’ is typed on line 1, the original line 1 will be deleted and
replaced by a new line 1 which was previously line 2. Each time a line is
deleted, it is replaced by the line below.

Press the enter key again to be prompted with the message: U (UPDATE),
R (RESUME) OR X (ABORT)? Press U in order for the element to be
deleted from the FAP record.
To verify that the scholarship element has been successfully deleted, the user should
review the 4 Page.
To Modify A Scholarship Element:
Type the number of the element to be modified under the column labeled #.

Use the space bar to go to the field (column) that needs to be modified.

Enter data only in this field, leaving the rest of the line blank.

Press the enter key and the message ‘MODIFIED’ with a ? below it will
display.

Press the enter key again to be prompted with the message: U (UPDATE),
R (RESUME) OR X (ABORT)? Press U in order for the element to be
modified.
To verify that the scholarship element has been successfully modified, the user should
review the 4 Page.
J Page (Unique APTS Questions Input)
This page allows the user to input the answers to the unique APTS questions found on the
CUNY Supplement. The user will be prompted with the data elements and will be able
to input appropriate responses as long as TAP segment information is present. [If TAP
data is not present, the J Page will not be able to be called up. Students will need to
complete TOTW and a CUNY Supplement in order to be considered for APTS.]
0 Page (“Zero” Page)
This page allows the user to enter or modify information about other family members
attending college full-time for TAP Award calculation purposes. This information
displays on the O page (see below).
ADDITIONAL PAGES
D Page (“Dump”)
The Dump page is a hexadecimal representation of each segment of the current record.
Unless you are a programmer or are at least schooled in reading this code, you will not be
able to make much use of this information. Originally the Dump page was developed as
a diagnostic debugging tool.
Type D followed by a space and then by a segment letter, i.e.
- D C = Dump of Common
- D B = Dump of Pell
- D N = Dump of Need
- D G = Dump of GSL
- D P = Dump of Package
- D T = Dump of TAP
- D W = Dump of Part-time TAP
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-25
OSFA
O Page (“TAP Supplement”)
Displays other full time college students in the applicant's household by name, SS#,
number of "other students" who are dependents of the applicant (indicated by a "A" in the
T column), and number of "other students" who are dependents of the applicant's parents
(indicated by a "P" in the T column).
A page, 1 page ("Addition")
Reference these pages to make a record addition – when a student is not already on file.
A feature of these pages is that they do an automatic search of all CUNY records before
accepting a record addition. This capability, assuming the user exercises some diligence,
will assure non-duplication of files. After the A or 1 page is selected, respond to the
prompts for name address, zip code, date of birth and history with appropriate replies. Be
sure not to extend the input beyond the specification outline of the data field.
I page ("Interactive")
To do a rolling update of the common segment, use this page after the common is in the
record. It will prompt you for the common segment fields (i.e. Name, date of birth,
address, and history). If you make a mistake, use "resume" to review and correct your
input. When the data has been corrected, select "update". As with pages "A" and "1",
"resume" restricts you to rolling update of the common; you do not have the ability to
update an unrelated field. If you are updating only one common field, you may prefer
requesting the field on the U page. NOTE: Subtle differences exist between pages A, 1
and I. "A" will only add a record to the file when no record exists. "1" will add a record
or update the common segment of an existing record. "I" will only update an existing
record. Pages "1" and "A" will do look-ups but page "I" will not.
R Page ("Retrieve")
Retrieves a common segment for a student whose record has been removed from
FAPINQ because the record has been inactive for at least one year. If FAPINQ indicates
that a student is "not on file", use the "R" page to search for the student in an archive file.
NOTE:
The "R" page only allows you to view the student's common segment, it
does not add it to the FAPINQ file; see "K" page below.
K Page ("Keep")
Adds a common segment to the FAPINQ file that has been retrieved from the archive file
using the "R" page. First use the "R" page to retrieve the common segment then use the
"K" page if you wish to reactivate the student on the FAPINQ file.
Z Page (“Zap”)
This page is used to complete the process of erasing a student record. This means the
record will not exist anymore (i.e., an inquiry for the record will result in a system
response, "Not on File"). The Z page is an interactive page, and like other interactive
pages, it requires an interactive account to effect a record deletion. All other segments on
file must be deleted one by one using the U page before the common segment can be
deleted.
Signing Off FAPINQ
To sign off FAPINQ, you should type “LOGOFF” at the “YY SS#?” prompt. This will
get you off the system and back to the system selection page.
13-26 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
Using the TSO Systems
The TSO systems are full screen edit programs. There are several concepts that you need to
understand in order to use either PETS or CUDLS.
Pull Downs: A group of pull down names are displayed at the top of most PETS/
CUDLS panels. Each pull down contains a set of items that allow you to perform
various actions. To select a pull down, position the cursor on or beside its name
and press <Enter>; the list of numbered items will be displayed below the name.
To select an item, type its number or position the cursor on its line, and press
<Enter>.
The Command Line: Some panels have a command line in their upper righthand corner (COMMAND ==>). To enter a command on this line simply position
the cursor on it, type the command and press <Enter>. When a selection menu is
displayed on a panel, you can usually use the command line to select an item from
the menu. Simply type the item's name or line number on the command line and
press <Enter>. However, you should consult the instructions for each panel as the
selection method varies.
Positioning the Cursor: You can use the cursor keys, Tab, Backtab, Return and
Home to move the cursor around on the panels. The Home key positions the
cursor in the top left and corner of the panel and allows you access to the pull
downs.
PF Keys: Several PF keys have been programmed to execute frequently
performed actions. Please become familiar with the following keys:
Key
<PF1>
<PF3>
<PF5>
Command
HELP
EXIT
RFIND
<PF7>
<PF8>
<PF9>
<PF17>
<PF18>
UP
DOWN
HOME
PREVIOUS SECTION
NEXT SECTION
Action
Displays a help panel.
Returns you to the previous panel.
Re-issues the previous Find command using the same search
criterion.
Scrolls up a list.
Scrolls down a list.
Positions the cursor in the upper left hand corner of the panel
Displays the previous Section Panel (may also use Shift PF5).
Displays the next Section Panel (may also use Shift PF6).
In order to leave any TSO system, you may just type <PF3> several times to bring
yourself back up through the panels you have accessed. Eventually, you will return to the
original screen which allows you to select your system.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-27
OSFA
PELL ELECTRONIC TRANSFER SYSTEM (PETS)
What Does PETS Do?
The Pell Electronic Transfer System (PETS) receives CUNY students’ FAFSA data from
the Central Processor and allows college’s to transmit corrections or changes to that data
electronically to the CPS. When a student files a FAFSA with the Central Processor, the
data from that FAFSA is input at the CPS and electronically transmitted to UAPC.
UAPC loads this information into PETS as student transactions which the college can
then access and edit.
Colleges may make any kind of change to application data in the PETS system and be
assured that the change will be loaded into FAP. These include all financial data, address
changes, enrollment plans, dependency status, etc. Any change to PETS is electronically
transmitted to the CPS at approximately 5 PM each day. It takes up to 3 days for the new
transaction to be processed and transmitted back to UAPC. At that point, the data is
loaded onto the N segment and sometimes the B segment [if the B segment hasn’t been
locked for payment]. Sometimes the systems can seem out of synch for a period of hours
because FAP is loaded with that day’s CPS data in the late morning while PETS is not
updated until around 5 p.m.
Colleges should note that the N segment will always display the results of the most recent
PETS/CPS transaction while the B segment may not, having been locked to an earlier
payable transaction. If a subsequent transaction is flagged for a new federal edit, or the
student has made changes to data that changed the EFC, these changes should be
reviewed and appropriate corrective actions taken as necessary, especially as Title IV
payment reconciliation issues may be involved.
How Does PETS Work?: Access to the System
When you select the TSO option and then select PETS12, the Title Panel appears. This
panel identifies the current version and release of PETS and allows you to access the
system's two main components: the ISIR Section Panels and the Update Log.
Functions
Print
Help
Exit
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Pell Electronic Transfer System 2013
PETS 2013-2014
Version 1
Release 1.0
============================
PPPP EEEE TTTTTT
SSSS
P
P E
T
S
S
P
P E
T
S
PPPP EEEE
T
SSS
P
E
T
S
P
E
T
S
S
P
EEEE
T
SSSS
==============================
13-28 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
11
11
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SAM 2014-2015
In order to access any information, select the Functions option. Use the HOME key to
get to the top line and press <enter> at the Functions option.
1.
Student
2.
Update Log
Then select either Student or Update Log from the pull-down menu. Selecting the
Student option will allow you to look at individual students and will move you to the
ISIR Student Search screen. The ISIR Student Search screen panel allows you to search
for a student, initiate the creation of a FAFSA, or initiate the creation of a Title IV
Institution Change request.
The Update Log will display the Update Log Search Panel which allows you to search for
updates so that you may track their progress. The Update Log will be discussed later in
this section.
Student Pull-Down Panels
When you select the Student option from the Functions pull-down, the ISIR Student
Search panel will appear:
Actions
Help
Quick Update
Exit
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ISIR Student Search
Id Num\Social Security Num
:
Student Last Name
Student First Name
Transaction Number
:
:
:
123456789
CPS Pushed ISIR Search
Begin Date:
End Date:
ISIR Transaction Generated Search
Date
:
2014-02-24
Select a student using the following criteria: Id Num\Social Security Number, Student
Last Name, Student First Name, or a Transaction Number. You don’t need to put in the
student’s name if you have the SSN. If you only have the name, you may search on the
last name only or you may enter both the last and first names. If the student has a
common name, you should probably also use the first name in order to narrow down the
search.
Initiate the search by just entering the SSN and pressing <enter>. Or you may select the
Actions pull-down for further options.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-29
OSFA
The Actions pull-down allows you to perform the following functions:
1.
Create - Searches for a student's Renewal Application Data (RAD), and then
displays a FAFSA Create Panel (with or without RAD), which allows you to
submit a FAFSA for the student by filling in a number of required fields.
2.
Search - Searches for students who match the specified criteria.
3.
Request - Displays the Request Sub-Panel, which allows you to submit a request
for a Title IV Institution Change to draw down a student's ISIR data. The Pell ID,
PIN, Last Name and First Name are required to perform a request for a student
ISIR. When the request is saved, a skeleton record is created for the student. It
allows you to search for the student and enter additional history corrections.
When you access the skeleton record it will be identified as GENERATED, and
the data you entered on the Request Sub-Panel will be listed in the Current
column.
If you enter a name that may identify more than one student, the Student Selection panel
will be displayed. The Student Selection Panel lists the students who meet the search
criteria you specified and allows you to select one. Each student's Last and First Names,
Pell ID, Current Social Security Number and Address are displayed. To select a student,
position the cursor on the student's line and press <Enter>, or type the line number on the
command line and press <Enter>.
COMMAND ==>
Row 1 to 10 of 23
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Student Search Results
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
LAST
NAME
------------BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
BROWN
FIRST
NAME
---------- -----MAKEETAH
MALIK
MARCEY
MARCIA
MARIA
MARLA
MARSHA
PELL
CURRENT
ID
SS NUM
ADDRESS
------------------------------------------------------------123456789BR02
123456789
170-34 130TH AVE
234567890BR01
234567890
2340 18TH ST
345678901BR01
345678901
10 STRATFORD RD
456789012BR01
456789012
3415 NEPTUNE AVE
567890123BR01
567890123
910 RUTLAND
111223333BR02
111223333 147-70 FERNDALE
444556667BR01
444556667
2155 MADISON AVE
If you are entering a social security number, only one student will be selected and the
Student Information (1 of 2) panel will be displayed. If only one student matches your
name search criteria, the system will display the Student Information (1 of 2) panel.
13-30 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
The Student Information (1 of 2) panel is the first of the fifteen section panels that make
up the complete student application information contained on the ISIR. Colleges can
access this information to verify or edit the data.
Actions Sections Calculations Nslds Summaries
Print
Exit
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------2013 Student Information (1 of 2)
DEPENDENT
Pell Id
:123456789CH01
EFC
: 000150
Last Name
:CHIN
First Name : George
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Last Name
First Name
Middle Initial
Street Address
City
State Code
Zip Code
Social Sec Num
Date of Birth
Home Phone Num:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
Current
CHIN
GEORGE
1114 SIXTH AVENUE
NEW YORK
NEW YORK
10036
123-45-6789
11-05-1992
(212) 337-4456
Corrections
_ ->
_ ->
_ ->
_ ->
_ ->
_ ->
_ ->
_ ->
_ ->
_ ->
You may perform all of the functions of this system for an individual student beginning
with this panel. The seven options listed across the top of the panel allow access to all
the information that was contained on this individual student’s ISIR. The following
section shows where the various information that you wish to access is held. Often, the
needed information is held on a sub-panel and familiarity with where each category of
information resides is necessary in order to become fluent in the use of the PETS system.
Using PETS
To make full use of the system, there are several actions you can take that will make
navigating the system quicker and easier:
 To enter a correction on any field, position the cursor in the Corrections column of the
field you want to modify and type the new data.
 To save the corrections that you have entered, select 1. Update from the Actions Pull
Down. If you do not save your changes, they will be lost when you exit the record.
 When you save changes for a student who did not specify your institution as a college
choice, you must enter the Student Data Release Number (DRN) in order to save and
transmit the changes.
 You may request help for a particular field, action, or a highlighted area in a help
window. To get help, position the cursor to the underscore portion of a particular field
and enter a question mark (?).
 When you are in a help panel, you may enter the number of the value that you wish to
change the field to at the COMMAND line. When you press <Enter> the selected value
will appear in the correct field.
 To list the values specified for a field in all of a student’s transactions, position the cursor
on the underscore between the Current and Corrections columns, type “+”, and press
<Enter>. The previous values that have existed for this field on previous transactions
will be displayed.
 To display a help panel for a field, position the cursor on the underscore, type “?”, and
press <Enter>. Either a Help sub-panel or a Help Selection sub-panel will appear.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-31
OSFA
To the left of the field names, the following indicators will explain the status of the current
value of the field:
>
required field when doing creates
#
to the left of a field indicates that it has been modified in this transaction
@
correction made to previous transaction
*
indicates that an assumption has been made about the field’s value.
+
indicates that the field has been modified and an assumption made about its value.
Pull Down Panels
Actions Pull Down allows you to save corrections to or perform an edit on a student's ISIR,
start a new search, select another student, list all the transactions on file for a student's ISIR,
or display a student's Update Log entry.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Update
Edit
Search
Multiple Students
Multiple Transactions
Update Log
1. Update - Performs an edit on the student's ISIR, and saves corrections, and records them
in the Update Log.
2. Edit - Integrates current and correction information, calculates the student's EFC and
displays assumptions, reject messages and general edit messages on the Edit Messages
Sub-Panel.
3. Search - Displays the ISIR Student Search\Create\Request Panel.
4. Multiple Students - Redisplays the Student Selection Panel.
5. Multiple Transactions - Panel displaying all the ISIR transactions on file for a student.
6. Update Log - Switches to the student's Update Log entry – lists all the changes to the
student's ISIR and tracks the progress of updates. If there is only one update on file for
this ISIR, the Update Log Panel is displayed. If there is more than one update, the
Update Log Selection Panel is displayed.
Sections Pull Down allows you to view each of the 20 section panels.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
13-32 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
Student Info (1 of 2)
Student Info (2 of 2)
Student Plans (1 of 2
Student Plans (2 of 2)
Student Income
Asset Information (Student)
Additional Financial Info (Student)
Untaxed Income (Student)
Student Status
Parent Information
Parent Household
Parent Income
Asset Information (Parent)
Additional Financial Info (Parent)
Untaxed Income (Parent)
Student Household
Information Release (1 of 3)
Information Release (2 of 3)
Information Release (3 of 3)
Office Information
SAM 2014-2015
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Student Information (1 of 2) - Displays the panel (1 of 2) that contains a
student’s biographical information from ISIR.
Student Information (2 of 2) - Displays the panel (2 of 2) that contains
additional student biographical information from ISIR.
Student Plans (1 of 2) - Displays the panel (1 of 2) that contains information that
pertains to a student's educational plans from ISIR.
Student Plans (2 of 2) - Displays the panel (2 of 2) that contains information that
pertains to a student's educational plans from ISIR.
Student Income - Displays the panel that contains information that pertains to a
student's income earnings and benefits for the previous year from ISIR.
Asset Information (Student) - Displays the panel that contains information that
pertains to a student's assets from ISIR.
Additional Financial Information (Student) - Displays the panel that contains
information that pertains to a student's income exclusion information from ISIR.
Untaxed Income (Student) - Displays the panel that contains information that
pertains to a student's reportable untaxed income from ISIR.
Student Status - Displays the panel that contains information that pertains to a
student's dependency status from ISIR.
Parent Information - Displays the panel that contains information that pertains
to the parents’ required identification information from ISIR.
Parent Household - Displays the panel that contains information that pertains to
the size and location of a parent’s household from ISIR.
Parent Income - Displays the panel that contains information that pertains to
parents’ income earnings and benefits from ISIR.
Asset Information (Parents) - Displays the panel that contains information that
pertains to a student's parents' assets from ISIR.
Additional Financial Information (Parents) - Displays the panel that contains
information that pertains to parents’ income exclusion information from ISIR.
Untaxed Income (Parents) - Displays the panel that contains information that
pertains to parents’ reportable untaxed income from ISIR.
Student Household - Displays the panel that contains information that pertains to
the size and location of a student’s household from ISIR.
Information Release (1 of 3) - Displays the panel (1 of 3), that contains a
student's college choices from ISIR Section H.
Information Release (2 of 3) - Displays the panel (2 of 3), that contains a
student's college choices from ISIR Section H.
Information Release (3 of 3) - Displays the panel (3 of 3), that contains a
student's release and signature information from ISIR Section H.
Office Information - Displays the panel that contains administrative information
for a student.
Use the PF6 key to scroll quickly through each panel display in succession.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-33
OSFA
Calculations Pull Down: This pull down allows you to display sub-panels that list assumed
values, ISIR comments, reject information, calculated data, and match flags.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Assumptions
Comments
Reject Information
EFC
Intermediate
Matches
FAA Information
1. Assumptions - Displays the panel that lists the values that have been assumed for the
fields on a panel. Fields for which a value has been assumed are marked with *. All
assumptions are made using federal specifications.
2. Comments - Displays the ISIR Comments Panel that lists the messages printed in the
first part of a student's ISIR.
3. Reject Information - Displays the panel that lists ISIR reject codes and messages that
explain why a student's EFC could not be calculated.
4. EFC - Displays the EFC Calculations panel presenting detailed information about a
student's EFC.
5. Intermediate - Displays the Intermediate Values Panel listing intermediate values used
in calculating EFC.
6. Matches - Displays the Match Flags Panel listing a student's match flags.
7. FAA Information - Displays the panel that lists information for the Financial Aid
Administrator.
NSLDS Pull Down: The pull down displays the information from the National Student Loan
Database System (NSLDS) that was contained in the ISIR.
1.
2.
3.
Pell Awards
Loans
Summary
1. Pell Awards - Displays current year Pell payment information for this student.
2. Loans - Displays each individual loan that a student has taken.
3. Summary - Displays the summary panel that includes both the default information and a
summary of all loans taken.
Summaries Pull Down: This pull down allows you to define and display the Summary
Panels.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Page 1
Page 2
Setup
Summary Updates
1. Page 1 - Displays the Summary Panel (1 of 2) – a set of fields that you define. The
Summary Pages allow you to view related data from different section panels quickly and
easily if you take the time to customize them.
2. Page 2 - Displays the Summary Panel (2 of 2) – a set of fields that you define.
3. Setup - Displays the Summary Setup Panel that allows you to specify what fields will be
displayed on the Summary Panels.
4. Summary Updates – Displays the selected fields that the user has chosen to display for
update purposes. May be changed at any time.
13-34 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
Print Pull Down: This pull down allows you to print ISIRs.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Immediate
Batch
Defaults
Release
1. Immediate - Prints an ISIR immediately. The report must be printed at your site.
2. Batch - Schedules an ISIR to be printed; the report is printed when it is released. Batch
printing allows you to schedule several ISIRs to be printed and release them together.
3. Defaults - Displays the Print Defaults Sub-Panel that allows you to specify where your
ISIRs will be printed and the printer parameters.
4. Release - Displays the Print Release Sub-Panel that allows you to release ISIRs that have
been scheduled to be printed at your site.
Exit Pull Down: This pull down takes you back to the PETS08 Title Panel.
1.
Quit
UPDATE LOG PANELS
Update Log Search Panel allows you to search for an update based on criteria you specify.
You get to this panel from the Title Panel when you first enter the system.
In order to access any information, you must select the Functions option. Use the HOME
key to get to the top line and press <enter> at the Functions option. When you select the
Update Log option, the Update Search Log panel appears. You may specify the following
criteria: Student Social Security, Name 2 (the first two characters of a student's last name),
Tran Number, Userid, Status, Update Date range, Send Date range, or Receive Date range.
An update's status can be:
C (canceled)
O (overridden)
R (received from the CPS)
S (sent to the CPS but not received)
U (updated but not sent to the CPS).
Actions Command
Help
Exit
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Update Log Search
Student Social Security:
Name 2:
Userid: $12FAX
Update Date Between:
Send Date Between:
Tran Number:
Status:
and
2013-10-01
Receive Date Between:
and
2013-10-05
and
Note, all dates are in YYYY-MM-DD format.
Press ENTER to begin search or PF3 to Exit.
The above search would give you back all the records that you sent for correction between
two selected dates.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-35
OSFA
When you access the Update Log Search Panel, the Userid defaults to your Userid. If you
want to look at just your changes, leave the Userid alone. If, however, you want to look at
ALL the students sent or received within a selected time frame, you need to blank out the
Userid.
The Update Log Selection screen is displayed in response to your search criteria. It reflects
all the records that meet the conditions that you indicated. An asterisk (*) in the Reject Ind.
column indicates that an update was rejected by the CPS. A plus sign (+) in the Reject Ind.
column indicates that a partial record was accepted. This happens when you update a field
that the CPS rejects when it has accepted the rest of the changes that you sent. To view the
update's reject reasons, position the cursor to the left of its line number, type I and press
<Enter>; the Reject Reasons Sub-Panel will be displayed.
Actions Scroll Print Command Help Exit
----------------------------------------------------------------Update Log Selection
Max rows exceeded
SCROLL ===> CSR
Message
Area
----------1
2
3
4
5
Pellid
-----------------------0001223345LU01
0045623345ST03
0001223345TR01
0001244445JO01
0035787845UR01
Update
Send
date
date
---------------- --------------2013-06-01 2013-06-01
2013-06-01 2013-06-01
2013-06-01 2013-06-01
2013-06-01 2013-06-01
2013-06-01 2013-06-01
Receive
Sta Rej
date
Ind Ind Userid
---------------- ------ ------ --------2013-06-06
R
$12FAX /\
2013-06-04
R
$12FAX {}
$12FAX
2013-06-05
R
$12FAX
2013-06-05
R
$12FAX
Once you have identified the student that you wish to review, you should place your cursor
to the left of the number of that student records and press ENTER. (You may not look at any
records that are “creates” that have a transaction number of 00.) The individual student
detail of that transaction will be displayed as follows:
Actions Scroll Print Command Help Exit
----------------------------------------------------------------Update Field Selection
Row 1 of 4
SCROLL ===> CSR
Pellid: 123456789CO02
Update date: 2013-06-01
1
2
3
4
Name: CHIN GEORGE N
Send date: 2013-06-01
Description
------------------------STUDENT_CHILD_SUPPORT_$
STUDENT_TAXES_PAID
SUDENT_EARNED_INCOME_CR
FAA_SIGNATURE
Status: R Reject:
Receive date: 2013-06-06
Field Data
----------------------00000
00000
02134
1
Userid
-----$01FA1
$01FA1
$01FA1
$01FA1
You can then review the changes that you made to the student record to see if the changes
were successful.
Select the Actions pull-down to get further information on that individual student.
13-36 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
If the record was rejected, once you have accessed the changes through the screen above, you
will want to know why the record was rejected. Select the Actions option from the pull
down menu and select option 4. Reject Reasons.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Search
Select
Biographical
Reject Reasons
Option 1 allows you to initiate another search for selected students. Option 2 will return
you to the Update Log Selection screen. Option 3 will take you to the actual record of
this student so that you can look at your changes. Select Option 4 to see the reject
reason.
You should check the Update Log at least once a week to make sure that the changes that
you have made to student’s ISIRs have been accepted by the CPS. The PETS
administrator can keep track of the updating being done by using this screen and
monitoring workload.
System Enhancements
PETS is updated yearly to comply with the changes in federal regulations and need
analysis. This system is relatively stable and major changes to the screens and panels are
rare. As updates become available, the general changes are incorporated into the updated
SAM Manual. UAPC also produces a new PETS Guide each year that will give you an
idea of what has changed.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-37
OSFA
City University Direct Loan System (CUDLS)
What Does CUDLS Do?
The City University Direct Loan System (CUDLS) is a software product developed to
allow colleges to originate (certify) Federal Direct Loans on-line. When a student
requests that a loan be processed, the college will access this system and originate either
a Subsidized Direct Student Loan, an Unsubsidized Direct Student Loan, or a PLUS
Loan. Once originated, the loan is updated via Electronic Data Exchange (EDE).
When you select the TSO option and then select CUDL12, the Title Panel appears. This
panel identifies the current version and release of the City University Direct Lending
System, and allows you to access individual students.
Functions
Reports
Print
Help
Exit
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------City University Direct Lending System
============================
CUDL 2013-2014
Version 1
Release 1.0
11
11
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11
11
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33
33
33
33
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CCC U
U
DDDD
L
C
U
U
D
D L
C
U
U
D
D L
C
U
U
D
D L
C
U
U
D
D L
C
U
U
D
D L
CCC
UUUU
DDDDD
LLLLL
=================================
How Does CUDLS Work?
Some brief instructions on working with CUDLS follow. These describe the functions of
several useful keys and outline the different procedures for entering commands.
Pull Downs: A group of pull down names is displayed at the top of most CUDLS panels.
Each pull down contains a set of items that allow you to perform various actions. To
select a pull down, position the cursor on or beside its name and press <Enter>; the list of
numbered items will be displayed below the name. To select an item, type its number or
position the cursor on its line, and press <Enter>.
The Command Line: Some panels have a command line in their upper left-hand corner
(COMMAND ==>). To enter a command on this line, simply position the cursor on it,
type the command and press <Enter>. When a selection menu is displayed on a panel,
you can usually use the command line to select an item from the menu. Simply type the
item's name or line number on the command line and press <Enter>. However, you
should consult the instructions for each panel as the selection method varies.
13-38 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
Searching For A Student
To begin working with student information, select Functions at the CUDLS Title Panel.
The pull down offers the following 3 options:
1 1.
2.
3.
Student
Update Log
Disbursement Dates
You will usually be selecting option 1. Student. When you select this option, the
Student Search Panel (see below) will be displayed. Specify a student's Social Security
Number, Last Name or Last and First Names. To begin a search, press <Enter>.
Actions
Command
Exit
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Student Search
Student Social Security Number:
Last Name:
First Name:
1234567890
Online Loan Application Search
Loan Request (Y or N): N
Request Date:
to 2013-07-05
REMINDER
Please remember that on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, if you are making changes
to a disbursement which will be disbursed at the next pay cycle, you need
to suspend payment on SFA to prevent any problem that may occur.
Please enter search criteria and press ENTER to begin search.
If you are searching using a social security number, the Student Biographical Information
Panel will display or a message will appear that the student is not on file. In addition, when
using the name options, if only one student matches your search criteria, the Student
Biographical Information Panel will be displayed. If the student has submitted an online loan
request through E-FAP, the online loan request indicator will be flagged “Y”.
However, if multiple students match your search criteria, the Student Selection Panel will be
displayed. The Student Selection Panel displays the Last and First Names, Current Social
Security Number and Address of each student who matches your search criteria. The
students are listed in alphabetical order. To scroll through the list, use the <PF7> (up) and
<PF8> (down) keys. The range of lines displayed and the total number of lines in the list are
indicated in the upper right-hand corner of the panel.
COMMAND ==>
Row 1 to 8 of 8
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Student Search Results
LAST
NAME
---------------1 MURPHY
2 MURPHY
3 MURPHY
4 MURPHY
FIRST
NAME
--------ABIGAIL
ALLAH
ALLISON
ANDREA
CURRENT
SS NUM
--------------000000000
000000000
000000000
000000000
ADDR
-----------------------------------------945 METROPOLITIAN AVE/2R
3600 PALMER AV PH
1833 EAST 51ST STREET
1107 EAST 80 STREET
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-39
OSFA
To select a student, position the cursor on the student's line and press <Enter>, or type the
line number on the command line and press <Enter>. The Student Biographical
Information Panel will be displayed.
Student Biographical Information Panel
This panel displays the biographical data required to originate a loan; most of the
information has been copied into CUDLS from the N Page on FAPINQ.
Actions Sections NSLDS Interview Command Exit
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Student Biographical
Social Security Number: 123456789
Last Name:
Address:
City:
Phone Number:
Citizenship:
License Num:
Email Addr:
CHIN
First Name: GEORGE
1114 SIXTH AVENUE
NEW YORK
State: NY
2125551212
Date of Birth (YYYY-MM-DD): 1992-11-01
1
Alien Reg Number:
C11122333444
ST: NY NSLDS MPN: A PLUS: N
[email protected]
Mailing Address
Address:
City:
Credits/OK to Pay:
State:
SUMMER
4.0/Y
FALL
8.0/Y
Entrance Interview
Date:
Select UPDATE to update or PF3 to cancel.
MI:
Zipcode: 10036
Zipcode:
SPRING
/Y
Site:
Type ? Or press PF1 for help.
Changing Student Biographical Information
You may update any of the data displayed on the Student Biographical Information Panel
except for the student’s name and date of birth (which must be updated through PETS);
any other corrections you make will be automatically transferred to FAPINQ.
Position the cursor in the field you want to change, and enter a valid value; if the field is
already filled, simply type over the old information. If you do not know what values a
field will accept, enter a ? in the field and press <Enter>. A help panel that either
describes or lists the valid values for the field will be displayed. If the panel displays a
description, type a valid value on the command line and press <Enter>. If the panel
displays a list, find the proper value and position the cursor on its line and press <Enter>,
or type the line number on the command line and press <Enter>. The new value will be
entered in the field for you.
When you have entered all your changes, you may update the student information by
selecting the Actions pull down and then selecting the update option. The Edit Messages
Sub-Panel will be displayed. Review the edit messages. If there are no problems, press
<Enter>. The message Update Complete will be issued.
Originating A Loan
Before you begin originating a loan for a student, check over the Student Biographical
Information Panel and modify any incorrect information. If the student has a mailing
address that is different from his or her permanent address, complete the mailing address
fields and update the record. Mailing address information is not transferred to FAPINQ.
If a mailing address is not specified, the prom note is sent to the permanent address.
13-40 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
To originate a loan, select the Actions pull down and select the Originate option.
3 1. Edit
2. Update
3. Originate
4. Student Search
5. Updatelog
This will bring you to the Credits sub-panel. Position the cursor under the term(s) that
the loan is for and enter the number of credits the student is registered for. Review the
information for all the fields displayed (Year In College, Dependency, Loan Default,
Loan Type); if anything is incorrect, change it. Enter P (PLUS) or S (Stafford) in the
Loan Type(P/S) field.
Please enter credits for the following terms:
SUMMER 1
--------___
SUMMER 2
---------
FALL
-----
Year In College: 02
Loan Default: N
SPRING
-------
Dependency:
I
Loan Type (P/S): S
College Code: 05
Dependent Eligible:
Press ENTER to originate or PF3 to cancel.
When all the questions have been answered correctly, press <Enter>. The Edit Messages
sub-panel will be displayed. Review the messages listed on it. If there are any problems,
press <PF3> to cancel the origination and return to the Student Biographical Information
Panel. If there are no problems, press <Enter>.
Edit Messages
Edit warning
COMMAND ===> Press ENTER or PF3 to return.
Message
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1 ED019
FAPINQ HAS DIFFERENT COLLEGE FOR TERM(S) PKGING LOAN
2 CMA005N
STUDENT ASSUMED TO BE TAX FILER(S)
**************************************** Bottom of data******************************************
The Calculation sub-panel will be brought up. This panel displays the amounts a student
is eligible for in subsidized and unsubsidized loans.
Amount calculated for
1) subsidized loan:
2) unsubsidized loan:
Total:
Year in College :
3500
2206
------5706
02
Budget : 9089
EFC :
0
Aid :
3383
Depend :
I
Press ENTER to continue or PF3 to cancel.
To select a loan, type 1 (subsidized) or 2 (unsubsidized) and press <Enter>. This will
bring you to the Loan Origination Page.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-41
OSFA
Loan Origination Page
The Loan Origination Page displays various information about the loan (for example:
Loan Period, Budget, Calculated EFC, Total Aid, Origination Amount, Disbursement
Dates, etc.) You may only modify the Amount to Pay, the Dependency Status and the
Disbursement Dates.
If you need to change any other fields on this screen, you should cancel the origination
and start over using the correct information.
When you change the Amount to Pay, the Disbursement Amount, Fee Amount, Net
Amount and Balance are all automatically adjusted. The Amount to Pay must be at least
$100 per term.
The first disbursement date should be at least fourteen days after the loan's Origination
Date, and the second disbursement date must be at least halfway through the Loan
Period. An example of a newly originated loan page follows:
Actions
Sections
Prom Note
Command
Exit
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Loan Origination Page
Loan ID: 123-45-6789 S 01 G02691 0 01
Student Last Name:
CHIN
Origination Date:
2013-07-26
Budget: 9089
EFC: 0
Year Max: 3500
Year in College: 04
CMD
------1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
Disbursement
Date
Term Amt
------------------- ------- ------2013-09-30
F
1750
2014-03-01
S
1750
SUBSIDIZED BMCC EDE: 01 NSLDS: 01
First Name:
GEORGE
MI:
Loan Period: F 2013-08-27 to S 2014-05-25
Total Aid: 3383
Need: 5706
Loan Max: 3500
Amount To Pay: 3500
Dependency Status: I
Addt’l Unsub:
Fee
Int
Net
Paid
Amt
Reb Amt
Amt
Bal
---------- ------ -------- ------- -----52
26 1724
0 1724
52
26 1724
0 1724
Status
-----------------
When the Origination Amount and Disbursement Dates are set, select Actions Pull Down
item 2. Update and press <Enter>.
2 1. Edit
2. Update
3. Originate
4. Student Search
5. Updatelog
If you are originating a PLUS Loan, the Parent Biographical Information Sub-Panel will
be displayed.
13-42 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
Parent Biographical Information Sub-Panel
Enter any parental information you have. Only the Loan Default field is required for
origination. Parent Address, City, State, Zip code and Phone Number are automatically
set to match the student's data, but you may change them. When you have entered all the
information you have, press <Enter>. The Loan Page will be displayed; if the origination
was successful, the message Update Complete will be issued in the upper right-hand
corner of the screen.
When you are originating a Stafford Loan and you update, the New Origination SubPanel will be displayed; the message Update Complete will be issued in the upper righthand corner if the origination was successful.
The Loan Page
To display a student's loan information, select Sections Pull Down item 1. Loan Page
from the Student Biographical Information Panel; the Loan Page following will be
displayed.
Actions
Sections
NSLDS
Prom Note
Command
Exit
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Loan Page
ORIGINATION ACCEPTED/MPN LINKED TO LOAN
Page 1 of 1
Loan ID: 123-45-6789 S 01 G02691 0 01 SUBSIDIZED BMCC EDE : 01 NSLDS : 01
Student Last Name: CHIN
First Name: GEORGE MI:
Origination Date: 2013-07-26
Loan Period: F 2013-08-27 to S 2014-05-25
Budget: 9089 EFC:
0
Total Aid: 3383
Need: 5706
Year Max: 3500
Loan Max: 3500
Amount to Pay: 3500
Year in College: 2 Dependency Status: I
Add’l Unsub:
CMD
-----1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
Disbursement
Date
Term
---------------- -------2013-09-30
F
2014-03-01
S
Amt
------1750
1750
Fee
Amt
---------52
52
Int
Net
Reb Amt
------ -----26 1724
26 1724
Paid
Amt
-----1724
0
Bal
-----0
1724
Status
-------------D-2013-09-30
Student Biographical Information Panel
The Loan Page displays various important loan information, such as Loan Period;
Budget; student's EFC; student's Total Aid; loan Origination Amount, Prom Note
Amount and Amount To Pay; and Disbursement Dates, Fees and Amounts. The Loan
Page also indicates the current status of a loan and allows you to modify a loan's amount
and disbursement data.
Each of the loans originated for a student is displayed on a separate Loan Page. The
loans are sorted in the order they were created. The number of the loan currently
displayed and the total number of loans on file for the student are displayed in the upper
right-hand corner of the screen (for example: Page 1 of 2). To scroll through the loans
use the <PF6> (next) and <PF5> (previous) keys.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-43
OSFA
Status Message
A Status Message is displayed in the upper left-hand corner of the Loan Page. It
summarizes the loan's progress. The first section indicates the status of the loan:
ORIGINATION ACCEPTED
ORIGINATION REJECTED
LOAN CANCELLED
CREDIT CHECK DENIED
CREDIT CHECK OVERRIDDEN
ORIGINATION ACCEPTED/CREDIT CHECK PENDING
CREDIT DENIED AFTER PENDING
The second section indicates the status of the loan's Promissory Note:
PRINT LOAN LETTER
PRINT PROMNOTE REQUESTED
MPN LINKED TO LOAN
PROMNOTE ACCEPTED BY FED
For PLUS loans a third section indicates the status of the Servicer's credit check:
CREDIT CHECK ACCEPTED
CREDIT CHECK REJECTED
Disbursement Information Table
The Disbursement Information Table is displayed at the bottom of the Loan Page. The
table contains the approximate date of each disbursement, the gross amount of each
disbursement, the fee percentage, the dollar amount of the fees, the net amount of each
disbursement, the amount that has been paid and the balance left to be paid. In addition,
the status of each disbursement is displayed in the Status column. The default status is
active. The following codes indicate status:
blank
D (disbursed)
A (adjusted)
an active status is indicated by a blank Status column
when a check is cut for a disbursement, a D and the date of the action
are displayed in the column
when a disbursement is adjusted (for example, a check is split and a
portion of the money is returned) or voided, an A and the date are
displayed in the column.
Updating Disbursement Information
HOLD: To place a hold on a disbursement, position the cursor on its line in the CMD
column, type H and press <Enter>. An H followed by the current date will be
displayed in the Status column. Select Actions Pull Down item 3. Update,
review the edit messages and press <Enter> to save the hold. A check will not
be printed for the disbursement until you reactivate it.
REACTIVATE: To reactivate a held disbursement, type A in the CMD column and
press <Enter>; the H in the Status column will disappear. Select Actions Pull
Down item 3. Update, review the edit messages & press <Enter> to save the
change.
13-44 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
CANCEL:To cancel a disbursement, change the Amount to Pay and zero out the
disbursement and press <Enter>. Update, review the edit messages and press
<Enter> to save the changed information.
REALLOCATE: To reallocate disbursements when a student looks like he or she has
gotten more money than was certified, first see if there is another
disbursement available to allocate the funds to. If not, create another
disbursement, then type Z in the CMD column and press <Enter>. The
system will reallocate the disbursements so that it looks like the student was
paid correctly.
The date of a disbursement may be changed at any time during the period of a loan prior
to its payment. Additional disbursements may be added any time before the entire loan
is paid.
To change a date, position the cursor on the appropriate line in the Disbursement Date
column, type the new date over the old one and press <Enter>. To add a disbursement,
position the cursor on an empty line in the Disbursement Date column, type the new
date and press <Enter>; the new disbursement will appear and the old ones will be
adjusted. Remember to update all changes.
Updating Loan Amount
You can also update the amount of a loan by changing the Amount to Pay. Since the
Promissory Note no longer includes a loan amount, this can be done at any time. When
the Amount To Pay is adjusted, the Disbursement Information Table is simultaneously
updated to reflect the new loan amount.
To change either amount, position the cursor in the field, type the new value over the old
one and press <Enter>. Then update and press <Enter> to save the changes.
Canceling A Loan
You should never completely cancel a loan. Instead, you should zero out the “Amount
to Pay”. This will be transmitted to the Federal Servicer and the loan will no longer pay
out. If you need to subsequently reactivate the loan, you can just increase the “Amount
to Pay” field and add any disbursements that you need.
Changing information related to the Loan Page
There are five options available for changing or adding to the information shown on the
Loan Page. These options give you more information about the loan and allow you to
add information that may be needed to complete the Promissory Note or review
information about the terms of the loan.
2 1. Biographical
2. Borrower Page
3. Loan Summary
4. Reject Reason
5. Term Information
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-45
OSFA
1. Biographical Information
Pull down item 1. Biographical just gives you the basic student biographical information
that was available when this loan was processed. This page looks just like the original
page if nothing has been subsequently changed. If any information has changed, this
page reflects information that was valid when the loan was processed.
2. Borrower Page
When the loan is a sub or unsub, this page will not display and you will get the message
“INVALID SELECTION”. When the loan page reflects PLUS information, you will see
the Parent Biographical Information Sub-Panel. To view or modify parent information
for PLUS loan, select Sections Pull Down item 2. Borrower Page from the Loan Page.
3. Loan Summary Sub-panel
For a concise summary of all loans for a student, select Sections Pull Down item 3. Loan
Summary from the Student Biographical Information Panel or the Loan Page. The Loan
Summary Sub-Panel will be displayed. The Loan Summary Sub-Panel displays the
student's total dollar amount for all loans and each loan's Amount To Pay, Budget,
Origination Date, Amount Paid To Date, EFC, Loan Status, Balance and Total Aid.
COMMAND ==>
Row 1 to 2 of 2
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Loan Summary
Total for all loans: 3500
111221122-S-02-G02687-0-01
Origination Date: 2013-07-17
Loan Status: HOLD CHECK
Amt to pay: 5500
Budget: 16650
Amt paid to date: 2709
EFC: 09009
Balance: 2791 Total Aid: 00500
111221122-U-02-G02687-0-01
Amt to pay: 5000
Budget: 16650
Origination Date: 2013-07-17
Amt paid to date: 2463
EFC: 09009
Loan Status: HOLD CHECK
Balance: 2537 Total Aid: 00500
___________________________________________________________
4. Origination Reject Messages
If a loan origination was rejected by the Servicer, you can determine the reasons from the
Loan Page. Select Sections Pull Down item 4. Reject Reason; the Origination Reject
Reasons Sub-Panel will be displayed.
5. Term Information
The Term Information Sub-Panel will display the term information that was used to
originate the loan that you are viewing.
13-46 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
Promissory Note Information Panel
There are several options available to deal with promissory notes. The system defaults
allow you to look at the status of the loan.
2
1. Print Request
2. Status
3. Accept Promnote
1. Print Request
This option allows the college to request that a duplicate promnote be printed. This
request is sent on to the Direct Loan Services for printing.
2. Status
For information about a loan's Promissory Note, select the Prom Note Pull Down and
then select Status. The Promissory Note Information Panel will be displayed. The
Promissory Note Information Panel details the history of a Promissory Note. The values
in the Type column indicate the Note's status.

PRINT LOAN LETTER indicates that UAPC has been set up to print the CUNY
loan letter showing how much the loan was originated for.

PRINT PROMNOTE indicates that UAPC has sent a request to the Federal
Servicer to print the promnote.

MPN LINKED TO LOAN indicates that the note was accepted and linked to the
loan application. Once this message is received, the loan will be sent to OUC for
payment on the next designated loan payroll.

PROMNOTE ACCEPTED BY FED indicates that the paper note has been
accepted by the Federal Servicer.
The Status column reveals whether UAPC and the Servicer ACCEPTED or REJECTED
the note. The Date and Time columns tell you exactly when the Promissory Note entered
each phase of its journey and the Userid column tells you who worked on the note.
Promissory Note Info Panel
Loan Id:
Last Name:
Address:
City:
Birth Date:
12333456789S02G072731001
CHIN
1114 SIXTH AVENUE
NEW YORK
1990-11-01
Row 1 to 2 of 2
Scroll ===> CSR
First Name: GEORGE
Type
Status
Date
---------------------------------------------------- ------------ ---------MPN Linked to loan
P
2013-07-18
State: NY ZIPCODE: 10036
Phone: 2125551212
Time
User
------------------ ------------12.35.55
CUDLOADR
3. Accept Promnote
This option was created to address situations when UAPC has not received data on notes
that have been signed, returned to the servicer and linked to the loan. When a college
verifies that the student signed the note and it shows on COD as being linked to the loan,
the college can access this option and enter that the promnote has been accepted.
You should NEVER use this option until all information has been verified on COD.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-47
OSFA
NSLDS
This new option allows you to see what loans a student has received according to the
information UAPC has received through the Transfer/Monitor/Alert process. UAPC
sends all students who have submitted a FAFSA through Transfer/Monitor/Alert and
receives back all the information that resides on NSLDS about a student’s borrowing.
The Update Log
The CUDLS Update Log allows you to track the progress of loan originations, changes to
student biographical information and changes to loan data. To begin working with the
Update Log select “1” Update Log from the Functions Pull Down on the Title Panel; the
Update Log Search Panel will be displayed.
2 1. Student
2. Update Log
3. Prom Track
4. Disbursement Dates
Update Log Search Panel
You can switch directly to the Update Log from the Student Biographical Information
Panel and the Loan Page. Select Actions Pull Down item Update Log. From the Student
Biographical Information Panel, all updates on file for a student will be displayed. From
the Loan Page, all the updates on file for one loan will be displayed.
The Update Log Search Panel allows you to search for updates, Loan Originations and
Corrections based on various criteria. You may search by Loan ID, Social Security
Number, UserID, Status, and Update, Send and Receive Dates.
To begin a search, enter one or more search criteria and press <Enter> or select 1. Search
from the Actions Pull Down. If only one update matches the criteria you specify, the
Update Log Panel will be displayed. If multiple updates match the criteria, they will be
listed on the Update Log Selection Panel.
Actions
Command
Help
Exit
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------CUDL Update Log Search
Student
Loan
Social Security:
Type:
Loan
Year:
ID:
Userid:
Update Date Between:
No:
and
and
2013-08-01
Note: all dates are in YYYY-MM-DD for amt.
Press ENTER to begin search or PF3 to exit.
13-48 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
Seq
Status:
Send Date Between:
Receive Date Between: 2013-08-01 and
Site
Prom
No:
SAM 2014-2015
Update Log Selection Panel
The Update Log Selection Panel displays the Loan ID, Update Date, Send Date, Receive
Date, and Status of each update that matches your search criteria. A maximum of 500
updates can be listed at one time; if your search returns more than 500 updates, the
message “Max rows exceeded” will be displayed in the upper right-hand corner of the
screen. When this occurs, return to the Update Log Search Panel and narrow the search
parameters (for example, reduce the range of dates). The updates are listed in the order
in which they were entered.
The Update Log Panel
The Update Log Panel details the data entered in an update. It lists the fields that were
changed, the new data, the old data and the Servicer's Status Code. The student's Loan
ID and Name, and the loan update's Status, Update Date, Send Date, Receive Date and
Reject Indicator are also displayed. Rather than list all the data that is sent when a loan is
originated, originations are identified by the words LOAN ID in the Description column
and Loan Originated in the New Field Data column.
An update's status can be: U (updated but not sent to the Servicer), C (canceled), O
(overridden), S (sent but not received from the Servicer), or R (received). An asterisk (*)
in the Reject Ind. column means the update was rejected. The Servicer's Status Code
provides more information on an update's status.
Disbursement Reports
CUDLS allows you to generate reports that identify students whose checks may be
distributed and students whose checks must be held or returned. At the Title Panel, select
Reports Pull Down item 1. Disbursement Report. The Reports Sub-Panel will be
displayed.
Reports Sub-Panel
The Reports Sub-Panel allows you to select the reports you want to run, and specify the
disbursement date for which you want them generated. Position the cursor next to the
report(s) you want to run, and type S. Three types of listings are available:
1. Checks to be held - Lists students whose checks should not be distributed because
the Servicer has not yet accepted their Promissory Notes or a user placed a hold on
their disbursement.
2. Originations Rejected -- Lists students who have had originations rejected by the
Federal Servicer.
3. Originations submitted but NO acknowledgement from the Federal Servicer -Lists students who we have expected to receive an origination acknowledgement and
need to research to figure out the problem.
Position the cursor in the Disbursement Date: field and enter the date for which you want
the report(s) generated. The format of the date must be YYYY-MM-DD. Press <Enter>
to run the report. When it is complete, the Browse Panel will be displayed.
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-49
OSFA
Browse Panel
The Browse Panel allows you to view the report without actually printing it. An entire
report cannot be displayed on one screen. Use the <PF7> (up), <PF8> (down), <PF10>
(left) and <PF11> (right) keys, or the Scroll Pull Down items (1. Bottom, 2. Down, etc.)
to view the whole report.
The Flow Of Data
Loan Originations are transmitted by UAPC to the Direct Loan Servicer at approximately
3:00 P.M. daily. Approximately two business days later (five for a PLUS Loan), the
Servicer transmits an acceptance or rejection to UAPC.
UAPC transmits loan data to SFA every day except for the Tuesday and Wednesday of
any week when checks are being run. When a loan is originated, it is sent to OUC with
an Activity Code of S (suspended); this allows the campus bursars to extend credit to the
students for their loans. When an MPN is accepted by the Servicer, the Status Code is
updated to a 9 and the loan's Activity Code is changed to A (active). Then, on the
indicated disbursement date or the next closest date according to your schedule at OUC, a
check is cut or a direct deposit authorized. Further information on the SFA system for
Direct loans is available from OUC.
13-50 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAM 2014-2015
APPENDIX A – Miscellaneous CUNY Codes
College Name
SFA
Code
Federal
Code
AFSA Code
DRAP
Baruch College
52
007273
04521
Brooklyn College
45
002687
City College
43
College of Staten
UAPC
CEEB
TAP
2752
Code
2
Code
2034
Codes
1409
04451
2755
5
2046
1410
002688
04431, 04432,
2758
1
2083
1411
48
002698
04481, 04482
2769
20
2778
1417
Hunter College
44
002689
04441, 04442,
2761
3
2301
1413
John Jay College
47
002693
04471
2762
16
2115
1414
Lehman College
51
007022
04511, 04512
2759
4
2312
1412
Medgar Evers
53
010097
04531, 04532,
8413
19
2460
1415
NYC College of
41
002696
04411, 04412
2765
13
2550
1405
Queens College
46
002690
04461
2766
6
2750
1416
York College
49
004759
04491
2770
15
2992
1418
CUNY Online BA
Code
004765
1420
BMCC
66
002691
04661, 04662
2753
12
2063
1404
Bronx CC
63
002692
04631, 04632,
2754
8
2051
1400
Hostos CC
68
008611
04681, 04682
2760
14
2303
1401
Kingsboro CC
65
002694
04651, 04652,
2763
10
2358
1402
LaGuardia CC
69
010051
04691
8414
18
2246
1403
Queensboro CC
64
002697
04641, 04642,
2767
9
2751
1407
Graduate Center
22
G04765
04221
2757
11
5620
CUNY Law School
50
21
5396
CUNY
99
04461
002686
FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS 13-51
OSFA
THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY.
13-52 FINANCIAL AID SYSTEMS
SAMPLE FORMS
A number of forms and worksheets have been provided on the CUNY Portal as examples of
documents the college can use to fulfill program requirements. These have been designed as
PDF fillables on City University of New York letterhead. Access these forms at this URL:
http://www.cuny.edu/admissions/financial-aid/FinancialAidForms/commonforms.html
SAMPLE FORMS14-1
OSFA
SAMPLE FORMS14-2
NEW YORK STATE AWARD PROGRAMS
The Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC) is the agency that administers New
York State's educational grant, loan and scholarship programs to undergraduate and
graduate students at institutions of post-secondary education.
CONTENTS
GENERAL ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA
(Applicable to all NYS Award Programs) .......................................................... 15-3
Citizenship ..................................................................................................................... 15-3
New York State Residency ............................................................................................ 15-3
Title IV Eligibility ......................................................................................................... 15-4
Approved Program of Study .......................................................................................... 15-4
Matriculated Status ........................................................................................................ 15-4
Full-time Status .............................................................................................................. 15-5
High School Graduation Requirement ........................................................................... 15-6
Good Academic Standing .............................................................................................. 15-7
C Average Requirement ................................................................................................. 15-8
Minimum Tuition ........................................................................................................... 15-8
Student Loan Default ..................................................................................................... 15-8
Out of State Study .......................................................................................................... 15-8
New HESC School Services Toll-Free Phone Number ................................................. 15-9
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................... 15-9
Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)................................................................................ 15-9
Part-Time TAP (PTAP) .............................................................................................. 15-16
Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS) ................................................................................ 15-17
New York State Scholarship for Academic Excellence ............................................. 15-19
Regent’s Professional Opportunity Scholarships ....................................................... 15-19
Math & Science Teaching Incentive Scholarships ..................................................... 15-20
Regent’s Awards for Children of Deceased or Disabled Veterans (CV) ................... 15-20
Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program ............................................................ 15-21
Memorial Scholarships ............................................................................................... 15-21
Veterans Tuition Awards ............................................................................................ 15-21
OSFA
World Trade Center Memorial Scholarships ..............................................................
Flight 3407 Memorial Scholarships ............................................................................
NYHELPs Alternative Loans .....................................................................................
Other Financial Aid ....................................................................................................
TAP Award Certificate Messages...............................................................................
TAP Award Schedules ................................................................................................
15-2 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
15-22
15-22
15-22
15-22
15-23
15-27
2014-2015 SAM
General Eligibility Criteria (Applicable to all NYS Award Programs)
Citizenship
To be eligible for any New York State award, a student must meet one of the
citizenship requirements for the Federal Student Aid programs. For more
information about FSA citizenship requirements, refer to Chapters 2 & 3 of this
manual.
New York State Residency
A student must meet New York State residency requirements to be eligible for
NYS-sponsored scholarships and awards.
Legal Residence
To satisfy the residency requirement, the student must be a legal resident of New
York State. This means that the student is currently living in New York State and
intends to make New York his or her permanent home. A person must have
established a domicile or permanent place of abode within NYS to be considered
a legal resident of the state. Living in NYS for the sole purpose of attending a
post-secondary institution does not, by itself, establish legal residence.
Duration of Residency
A student must be one of the following to be eligible for NYS awards:
 a legal resident of New York State for at least one year (12 months)
preceding the first day of classes of the term for which an award is
requested;
 an undergraduate student who is a legal resident at the time of application
and was a legal resident for the last two semesters of high school
regardless of any intervening time spent outside New York;
 a graduate student who is a legal resident at the time of application and
was a legal resident for the last two terms of undergraduate study,
regardless of any intervening time spent outside New York;
 a veteran or former National Service Volunteer who was a legal resident
upon entry into the service and who re-established legal residence within 6
months of release from active duty, regardless of the amount of time spent
outside New York.
Legal Residence of Dependent Students
The legal residence of a financially dependent student is presumed to be that of
the parents. If the parents are separated or divorced, the legal residence of the
custodial parent (or the parent who would have been awarded custody if the
student was still a minor) is presumed to be the legal residence of the student. If
the parents live out of state, the student is presumed to live out of state. A student
may petition HESC for recognition of residence separate from either or both
parents if circumstances warrant.
Loss of Residency
New York State residency is lost when the student (or the parents of a financially
dependent student) discontinues permanent legal residence in the state.
Assistance will be stopped for any term beginning after the residence changed.
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-3
OSFA
Disputed Residency
HESC provides a Residency Questionnaire to any student whose residency it is
questioning or to students who have been denied an award on the grounds of
residency without completing the questionnaire. HESC will review the completed
questionnaire before making a final determination.
Institutional Responsibility
The school should take into account any information it has that reflects on a
student's New York State residency. A diploma from a non-NYS high school, or
an out of state address for parents or for billing purposes, would reflect negatively
on a student’s claim of NYS residency. In these cases, the school must review
and document the eligibility for NYS awards for any student whose residency is
questionable. In cases that cannot be resolved by the college, the institution
should request that HESC send a Residency Questionnaire to the student and wait
for the student's residency to be resolved before proceeding with any certification
activity.
Title IV Eligibility
To be eligible for payment of TAP awards, students must attend an institution that
is Title IV eligible. Schools whose Title IV participation is revoked by the U.S.
Dept. of Education will lose TAP eligibility as well.
Approved Program of Study
To be eligible for a state award, a student must be enrolled in an approved
program of study. Approved programs of study are those leading to a degree, or
to a diploma or certificate fully creditable to a degree. An approved program is
one registered by the New York State Education Department, or where applicable,
the New York State Department of Health, as of the start of the term for which
assistance is sought. Each academic department sets specific course requirements
for each approved program and these are set forth in the college's catalog. The
institution must offer and the student must follow the program consistent with
how it was approved. Student petitions for exceptions to or waivers of program
requirements must be fully documented. Schools must also be aware of when a
particular program approval is due to expire and not certify students beginning
study in that program after the expiration date unless written arrangements have
been made with SED to have the program approval renewed or extended.
Matriculated Status
A student must have matriculated status to be eligible for a state sponsored grant
or scholarship. A student in a two-year program must also declare a major by the
beginning of the sophomore year; a student in a baccalaureate program must
declare a major by the beginning of the junior year. Any student enrolled in one
of the two special programs for the economically or educationally disadvantaged,
College Discovery or SEEK, are considered to be matriculated by virtue of their
acceptance into the program.
15-4 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
Full-time Status
With the exception of awards made for accelerated summer study, PTAP awards,
and awards made though the APTS or Vietnam/Persian Gulf Veteran Tuition
Assistance Programs, a student must be in full-time status to be eligible for a
state-sponsored grant or scholarship.
Definition of Full-time Status
Full-time status is defined as enrollment for at least 12 semester hours of
matriculated credit for a term of at least 15 weeks, including exam periods, or the
equivalent. Credit equivalent units may include independent study, practice
teaching, graduate assistantship, thesis or dissertation research, etc. These
equivalent activities must be required as an integral part of the students program
of study. "Matriculated credit" means that courses may be counted toward the
full-time status requirement only if they are creditable towards the student's
degree. Electives are acceptable when taken in accordance with published degree
requirements. A student may take courses not applicable to the degree in a given
semester as long as the course work is above the minimum full-time requirement
of 12 credits.
Remedial Courses
For payment purposes, remedial courses may be counted toward the full-time
enrollment requirement. However, the student must also be registered for at least
3 degree credits in the first term for which payment is sought and at least 6 degree
credits for every term thereafter.
Repeated Courses
Courses in which the student has already received a passing grade cannot be
included in meeting the minimum full-time study requirement for state-sponsored
financial aid. Repeated courses may be counted toward full-time study if a
student repeats a failed course, repeats a course for which additional credit is
allowed, or has received a passing grade that is unacceptable in a particular
curriculum. A student may repeat any previously passed course in a given
semester as long as the course work is above the minimum full-time requirement
of 12 credits. A transfer student may repeat a course taken at a prior college if the
grade received at the prior college is too low to permit the student to be admitted
to a particular major at the transfer college.
Time of Assessment
Students may achieve full-time status if they register for a sufficient number of
credits as of or between the first day of classes and the certification status date
(usually at the end of the add/drop period) and incur a tuition liability for each of
the courses constituting the full-time study requirement. A student who drops
below full-time after achieving "full-time status" for the current semester will not
lose their award for that term. However, the student may face losing eligibility in
a subsequent semester if he or she does not meet the program pursuit or academic
progress requirements.
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-5
OSFA
Students Who Fail to Attend
While schools are expected to make a good faith effort to ensure that students
who never actually attend are not certified for awards, HESC will allow the
certification of students who register for a sufficient number of credits and incur a
full tuition liability but fail to attend classes. However, the school should be able
to demonstrate that through its normal practices and procedures it was unaware
that the student never attended; there was no refund or forfeit of other financial
aid funds for non-attendance; and that it has made arrangements to collect full
tuition liability for that term.
CUNY collects Commencement of Attendance rosters to record for Title IV
purposes whether or not a student actually begins attendance in the classes in
which he or she has enrolled. Therefore, if a student receives a WN grade in a
course, that course cannot be used to determine enrollment for TAP and other
State awards.
Students Not Charged Full-Time Tuition
If an activity is considered integral to the student's program of study and
contributes to the student's full-time enrollment, but no tuition is charged for the
activity, the student is exempt from the requirement of having a tuition liability
for each of the full-time credits. However, such awards cannot exceed the actual
tuition liability.
Medical/Health Waiver
If satisfactory medical evidence can be provided that substantiates a health or
medical condition that absolutely prevents a student from engaging in full-time
study, the student may combine two or more terms at less than full-time into one
regular term of full-time study. Situations like these require the institution to
review and document the student's medical condition, monitor the terms in which
the student attended less than full-time, and then certify the student's eligibility
for an award in the semester during the term when the student has accumulated
enough credits for a full-time award.
Students With Disabilities
Students who are disabled, as defined by the 1990 Americans With Disabilities
Act (ADA), do not have to attend school full-time to be eligible for TAP awards.
These students are eligible for a partial TAP award if they are attending part-time
(at least three credits per semester or the equivalent). The student must meet all
other TAP eligibility requirements and the College must be able to document that
the student is disabled as defined by the ADA.
High School Graduation Requirement
All recipients of NYS awards must have graduated from high school, have a GED
or other equivalent of a high school certificate, or have received a passing score
on a federally approved ability-to-benefit (ATB) test.
15-6 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
Students must have a U.S. high school diploma or recognized equivalent (i.e.,
GED or home school documentation). Students who do not have these credentials
must attain a passing score on all three parts of the ACT COMPASS exam.
Students must take and pass the COMPASS exam within the institution’s
add/drop period or within 30 days of the first day of classes, whichever is earlier,
to be eligible for a NYS award. In some rare and exceptional circumstances, a
student may be allowed to take and pass the exam up to 30 days after the add/drop
period or 60 days after the first day of classes if the school has been unable to
identify the student until later in the term. Students must be notified in writing,
prior to the beginning of classes, of their potential liability if they fail to pass the
ATB exam and become ineligible for NYS awards.
On January 18, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education issued a Dear Colleague
Letter (GEN-12-01) that provided information on recent changes made to Title IV
student aid programs under the U.S. Department of Education Appropriations
Act, 2012 (Title III of Division F of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012 Public Law 112-74). Among other changes contained in the Act, students who
first enroll in a program of study on or after July 1, 2012 and who do not have a
high school diploma or a recognized equivalent, or who do not meet prescribed
home school requirements would no longer be eligible to receive Title IV student
aid. Students who do not possess a high school diploma or a recognized
equivalent but were enrolled in a Title IV eligible program prior to July 1, 2012
would continue to qualify for Title IV student aid under one of the ability-tobenefit (ATB) alternatives.
NYS Education Law (Section 661(4)(e)) allows students first receiving TAP in
2007-08 and thereafter to receive TAP if they have received a passing score on a
federally approved ATB test and which has been identified by the Regents to
satisfy certain requirements. The elimination of the ability-to-benefit (ATB)
alternatives to a high school diploma is for purposes of determining Federal
student aid (Title IV) eligibility only. The change does not withdraw the existing
federal approval of those tests nor does it eliminate federally approved ATB tests
for the purposes of admissions. Consequently, there is no current impact on
student eligibility for the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP).
Good Academic Standing
To receive payment under state grant or scholarship programs, a student must
maintain good academic standing. Good academic standing, as defined for
purposes of determining state aid eligibility, consists of two components which
are discussed fully in Chapter 5 of this manual:
 Program Pursuit – completing a certain percentage of course work each
term for which state aid is received; and
 Satisfactory Academic Progress – accumulating a specific number of
credits and achieving a specified cumulative GPA each term.
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-7
OSFA
C Average Requirement
Students who have received the equivalent of two or more full years of NYS
student financial aid payments [24 or more payment points] must have a
cumulative C (2.0) GPA to be eligible for continued State-supported assistance.
[See Chapter 5 of this manual for more information.]
Minimum Tuition
To qualify for a tuition-based NYS award, the student must incur a liability of at
least $200 per academic year pro-rated by term. There is no other minimum
tuition requirement for any other grant or scholarship program HESC administers.
Student Loan Default
A student who is in an unresolved default status on any state or federal
educational loan is not eligible for any state-sponsored grant or scholarship,
regardless of guarantor.
Determining Default Status
HESC tracks the repayment status of the loans it administers and determines
default status. HESC will also track the default status of federal educational loans
guaranteed by organizations other than HESC. A loan is considered to be in
default unless the student has cleared the default by paying the loan in full,
bringing the payment current, establishing satisfactory repayment status or having
the debt discharged.
Clearing Default Status
Students must clear a loan default by May 1st of the award year in order to
receive an award for any term of that award year. HESC will reprocess the
payment applications of any student denied an award previously because of a loan
default who clears the default by the May 1st deadline.
Renewed Eligibility for Financial Aid (REFA)
HESC will restore eligibility for state award programs to a student in default if he
or she meets the conditions for establishing satisfactory repayment by making six
consecutive monthly voluntary payments. Once state aid is restored, students
must continue to make regular scheduled monthly payments. Students approved
for an award through REFA who fail to continue making scheduled monthly
payments lose their eligibility for further state awards. Students with HESC loan
repayment issues may contact the HESC Loan Examining Unit at (518) 473-1688.
Out of State Study
A CUNY student may receive payment of a state-sponsored grant of scholarship
for out-of-state study only if the following conditions exist:

The student us required to pay all tuition and instructional fees for foreign
(or out-of-state) study to the approved unit of CUNY;

The off-campus study program must be an integral part of the CUNY
curriculum and tuition must be payable to and received by CUNY in the
same way tuition is charged for any other CUNY program; and

All credits taken at the foreign (or out-of-state) school must be accepted
towards the student’s degree at CUNY.
15-8 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
HESC School Services Toll-Free Phone Number
HESC’s college administrator access number: 1-866-431-HESC (1-866-4314372) brings administrators to a customer service portal with a voice response
system menu. This phone number is designed specifically for administrator use
and is not intended to be used by students. Students should use 1-888-NYSHESC (1-888-697-4372).
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
HESC administers both state and federally funded student financial aid programs
for undergraduate and graduate students. Some programs, like TAP, are
administered solely by HESC; others may be administered jointly with other state
agencies. Administrators are encouraged to examine the HESC fact sheets for
each program at: http://www.hesc.ny.gov/content.nsf
Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)
The Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) helps eligible New York residents
attending in-state postsecondary institutions pay tuition. Depending on the
academic year in which the student began study, and the specific CUNY college
the student attends, annual TAP awards at CUNY can be as much as 100%
tuition, barring other budgetary limitations imposed by NYS.
Eligibility Criteria
To be eligible for TAP at CUNY, a student must:
 meet one of the U.S. citizenship requirements;
 be a legal resident of New York State;
 be matriculated in an approved program of study;
 enroll as a full-time student;
 be in good academic standing;
 have at least a cumulative C average after two annual payments;
 be charged tuition of at least $200 per academic year;
 not have a statutory state or federal educational loan from any guarantor in an
unresolved default status;
 not exceed the income limitations set for the program;
 must have graduated from high school, have a GED or other equivalent of a
high school certificate or have attained a passing score on a federally
approved ability-to-benefit test (applies to first-time award recipients from
academic year 1996-97 to academic year 2006-07);
 must have a high school diploma or recognized equivalent from a recognized
school within the U.S. or attain a passing score on a federally approved &
Commissioner of Education administered ability-to-benefit test (applies to
1st-time recipients in the 2006-07 academic year and thereafter);
 must have a high school diploma or recognized equivalent from a recognized
school within the U.S. or attain a passing score on a federally approved,
Board of Regents chosen & Commissioner of Education administered abilityto-benefit test (applies to 1st-time recipients in the 2007-08 academic year
and thereafter).
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-9
OSFA
Duration of Awards
Payment Points and Eligibility
Undergraduate students enrolled in 4 year programs may receive up to the
equivalent of 8 semesters of TAP assistance for full-time study; up to 10
semesters in an approved program; no more than 6 semesters if enrolled in a 2year program. TAP awards are no longer available to graduate students.
HESC monitors the usage of NYS awards by assigning payment points for each
award a student receives: 6 points for a full-time semester payment; 3 points for a
half-time accelerated study summer payment; and 3 points for an APTS payment.
PTAP usage is measured as a proportional fraction of a full-time semester TAP
payment (e.g., a 7 semester credit PTAP award = 3.5 payment points; a 10
semester credit PTAP award = 5 payment points). A student is allowed a total of
48 undergraduate points in combined TAP/APTS and other state-sponsored
program assistance (60 for approved 5-year programs).
Award Calculation
Awards are calculated as an annual entitlement based on New York State taxable
income for the preceding tax year, and are pro-rated and paid on a term basis.
Award amounts cannot exceed the statutory maximum or 100% of tuition,
whichever is less. HESC calculates the actual amount of a student's award using
formulas from the TAP award schedules at the end of this chapter.
CUNY Undergraduate Students
A. Dependent Students or Independent Students Who Have Tax Dependents
First Year Award Received
Award Ranges
2000-2001 and thereafter
$500 - $5,000*
1994-1995 through 1999-2000
$500 - $4,125
All years prior to 1994-95
$500 - $3,575
*The maximum TAP award for students enrolled in 2-year degree programs is
capped at $4000.
B. Independent Students Who Are Single With No Tax Dependents
First Year Award Received
Award Ranges
All years since 1994-95
$500 - $3,025
1992-93, 1993-94
$500 - $2,575
All years prior to 1992-93
$500 - $2,450
15-10 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
C. Independent Students Who Are Married With No Tax Dependents
First Year Award Received
Award Ranges
All years
$500 - $3,025
CUNY Graduate Students
TAP for graduate students has been eliminated.
Income Limits
 Dependent Undergraduate Students or Students Who Are Married or Have
Tax Dependents - $80,000 NYS Net Taxable Income.
 Single Independent Undergraduate Students With No Dependents - $10,000
NYS Net Taxable Income
Income from New York State, Federal and local government pensions must be
included for the purposes of calculating the TAP award, consistent with the
requirement for reporting private pension income.
Other Factors Affecting Award Calculation
 other family members enrolled in post-secondary institutions;
 other educational benefits received;
 financial independence;
 level of study;
 whether the student attends a community or senior college;
 academic year in which 1st payment of state awards are received.
Changes in Award Amount During a TAP-Supported Semester
A student's award may change for any one of the following reasons:
 Total net taxable income verified by HESC is greater or lesser than that
originally reported on the application resulting in an award change, or the
attendance of other family members in post-secondary education as
reported on the application cannot be verified by HESC;
 Student loses state-aid eligibility during a TAP-supported semester
because of a failure to either make or maintain satisfactory repayment
arrangements on a defaulted student loan - at the point the default status
is reported to HESC, the award is withdrawn;
 TAP award is recalculated due to student withdrawals that result in
decreased tuition liability;
 Student changes information on TAP application record by submitting a
TAP Change Form to HESC, or by responding to request for information
from HESC.
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-11
OSFA
Changes in Economic Circumstances
Students may apply to HESC for an adjustment to income due to a change in the
family’s economic circumstances. State law recognizes death, permanent disability,
or divorce of a parent or spouse, “catastrophic illness” of the applicant and
circumstances where the applicant or spouse is called to active military duty.
How CUNY Students Apply for TAP
CUNY no longer produces a CUNY TAP application. CUNY FAFSA filers
apply for TAP directly with HESC using one of several methods of application:
1. Link from FAFSA on the Web (FOTW) to TAP on the Web (TOTW) –
When students successfully complete FOTW, they may link from the FOTW
Confirmation page to TOTW to apply for NYS awards. Applicants must first be
“authenticated” by creating a HESC UserID and PIN before actually accessing
the TOTW application. The TOTW application is pre-filled with some of the
applicant’s FAFSA data. The student’s and parent’s federal PIN serves as the
signature for the TOTW application. Students/parents who do not use a PIN may
satisfy the TOTW signature requirement by submitting the FOTW signature page
to the federal processor.
When students submit a TOTW application but use the FAFSA signature page for
the required signatures instead of a PIN, HESC waits 15 days for evidence from
the CPS that a signature page was received. If no signature page is received by
the CPS, an email postcard will be sent to the student with the link to TOTW (see
below).
2. Directly access the HESC TAP on the Web site – If a student uses a paper
FAFSA, misses the NYS link or abandons the TOTW session, he/she may still
use TOTW to apply for NYS awards online. To access TOTW, students must be
NYS residents, list a NYS college on the FAFSA, have a valid EFC, and undergo
HESC authentication by establishing a HESC UserID and PIN. When ISIR data
from the federal processor is received for these applicants, HESC will send them
an email or postcard with the following URL: https://www.tapweb.org/totw/
inviting them to apply for TAP.
3. Paper Express TAP Application (ETA) – If a student fails to sign-on to
TOTW within 3 weeks of notification by HESC, he/she will be sent a paper ETA
which he/she must return to HESC.
4. HESC Electronic Multi-Year TAP Application – Certain students whose
electronic or paper FAFSA data has not significantly changed from last year will
have their TAP application data generated automatically without actually having
to refile an application for the new award year.
15-12 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
TAP Information Changes
Once the TAP application has been processed, students may make changes or
corrections to the application data through the HESC web site. Using the HESC
UserID and PIN, students will be able to update, edit, correct and supply missing
data to their TOTW record.
Students must report changes or corrections to their application data directly to
HESC. Colleges may no longer use FAP to report TAP college code or other data
changes to HESC as UAPC no longer transmits these changes to HESC.
FAPINQ TAP Display
M Page: TAP Award Status Codes
These replace the “E” and “A” indicators to the left of the TAP award amount on
the M page:
 E – Estimated Tap award from application filed with HESC
 R – Estimated TAP award calculated based on annual reduction amount
subtracted from CUNY tuition and used before the NYS budget is
approved
 A – An actual TAP award amount has been sent from HESC on the
colaward file
 V – An income verified TAP award has been sent from HESC on the
colaward file
T Page: Application Data Source Codes
These can be found on the third line of the T page data display and indicate the
source of the TAP application data posted on the T page.
DATA FROM ISIR
DATA FROM TWEB
DATA FROM EHESC
DATA FROM PAPER APP
No TAP application data received from HESC;
all data (such as NTB, parents’ names and
SS#) are from the ISIR.
TAP application data received from HESC;
student filed using TOTW.
TAP application data received from HESC
from automatic renewal process.
TAP application data from HESC; student
filed a paper application
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-13
OSFA
T Page: HESC TAP Application Status Codes
This field is found on the sixth line of the T page data display and relate to TAP
application error messages that will still display on the E page. Remember that
these errors cannot be resolved by updating FAPINQ. The student will have to
make these corrections directly with HESC.
APST =
A – pending applicant data
B – pending education data
C – pending spouse’s, father’s and/or mother’s SSN
D – pending student income information
E – pending parent income information
F – pending financial independence documentation
M – pending additional information or multiple application errors
N – award denied
R – invalid SSN
S – special scholarship
Y – Award Certificate sent with positive dollar amount missing –
application has not yet been processed
T Page: HESC Record Status Codes
This field is also found on the sixth line of the T page data display.
RECST =
1 – skeleton record
2 – application skeleton record
3 – application processed; error condition exists
4 – adjustment processed; error condition exists
5 – hold for manual certification
6 – award determined/denied
7 – loan default denial
8 – on a roster for at least one term
9 – all awarded terms certified or decertified
10 – manual handling of prior year problems
20 – SSN in error
21 – no processing allowed (set by student refunds)
Filing Deadline
The final filing deadline for TAP is June 30 of the award year for which aid is
sought.
15-14 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
TAP Certification Codes
Code
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Explanation
Eligible. The student satisfies all of the eligibility criteria for the award. A
student who meets this criterion but then drops below full time is also
certified using Code 1 as long as the student incurs tuition liability for
each of the credits comprising full-time study.
TAP-No Scholarship. The student satisfies all eligibility criteria for a
TAP award but does not meet the eligibility criteria for a scholarship for
which he/she has also been approved. If an institution denies a
scholarship because the scholarship holder would have received a
concurrent benefit and the student is not eligible for TAP, use Code 9 to
decertify the student for the scholarship.
Withdrawn with Tuition Liability. The student has withdrawn from all
courses or has been terminated from school after the first day of classes
but has incurred a tuition liability for the term. (Schools should also report
reduced term tuition liability under tuition field.) NOTE: Schools should
carefully review good academic standing before certifying a student for
an award for a later term if the school used a Code 3 in the preceding
term.
Not Registered. The student was not registered for the term, has
withdrawn without incurring a tuition liability or chooses to refuse the
award.
Not Full-time. The student is not registered for sufficient credit hours (or
the equivalent) for the term to meet full-time study requirements; or for
accelerated summer study, the student was not registered for sufficient
credit hours for the term to meet the half-time study requirement or was
not in full-time attendance during an adjacent term; or for part-time
Veterans Tuition Award, the student was not registered for sufficient
credits (three credits minimum) for the term to meet part-time study
requirements.
Not Matriculated. The student is not a recognized candidate for a
degree or for a diploma or certificate creditable towards a degree.
Does not meet the Accelerated Study requirements.
Not in Good Academic Standing. The student does not meet the
Commissioner's Program Pursuit requirements or the institution's
approved standards of satisfactory academic progress or does not have
a C average (2.0 GPA) after having received two years of TAP. NOTE:
For students who are not in good academic standing but are granted the
one-time waiver, certify Code 1 and enter a "W" in the waiver column.
Miscellaneous. This code is used to decertify a student who is not
eligible for an award for reasons other than those in Codes 4 through 8.
Examples: Not an approved program, the student does not meet New
York State residency or U.S. citizenship requirements, the high school
graduation requirement, scholarship recipient accepts a concurrent
benefit, or a graduate student is matriculated for a second graduate
degree at the same level for which the student already received a
graduate level TAP award.
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-15
OSFA
Part-Time TAP (PTAP)
State Education Law was amended to create a Part-Time Tuition Assistance
Program (PTAP) for students attending SUNY, CUNY and not-for-profit
independent degree-granting colleges in New York State.
Eligibility Criteria
A student may receive PTAP if he or she has:

enrolled as a first-time Freshman in the 2006-07 academic year or
thereafter;

earned 12 or more credits toward graduation in each of two consecutive
semesters by the time the first PTAP award is sought;

at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average;

satisfied all program requirements for NYS TAP awards except for fulltime attendance (refer to the previous section on TAP eligibility criteria);

enrolled for at least 6 but fewer than 12 semester hours with at least 3 of
these being degree credits.
Note: The first P-TAP awards under this new program occurred in the 2007-08
academic year.
Award Amounts
A PTAP award is calculated as a proportional fraction of a normal full-time TAP
award based on the number of part-time credits a student is registered for.
Income Limits
Refer to the income limits for TAP above.
Selection for a PTAP Award
Code has been written into SIMS to select whether a PTAP award or APTS is
more beneficial for a student and that award should print on the student’s bill.
Colleges can override this choice if they have better information about a student’s
eligibility. FAP will only display a prospective PTAP award for a student who
meets all the eligibility criteria, though packaging will still assume full-time
attendance and will estimate a TAP award.
Students may be considered for P-TAP during the summer if they meet P-TAP
enrollment requirements. Colleges may have to determine whether students are to
receive either a summer P-TAP award or half a TAP award for accelerated study.
In addition to meeting the above P-TAP eligibility criteria, a student receiving a
summer P-TAP award who had been attending full-time prior to the summer term
would be expected to continue as a P-TAP student (that is, continue as a part-time
student) in the subsequent fall term.
15-16 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
Legacy System Modifications
FAP contains two fields onto the M page:
1)
PTAP PER CRED - how much the per credit amount of the PTAP award
is, if student is eligible (eligible students with zero eligibility will have
"0"; this field will be blank for ineligible students); and
2)
HESC SCHLRSHIP - the amount of any scholarship money other than
TAP the student will receive from HESC.
FAP assumes that a student will use the TAP award until APTS or PTAP is
flagged. The PTAP per credit award is either the Albany award (if available) or
the estimated TAP award divided by 12. This per credit amount of TAP will also
appear on the merge file.
SIMS has been programmed to accept the per-credit part-time TAP amount and
calculate whether it will be more beneficial for a student to receive PTAP or
APTS. Once a merge file is loaded onto SIMS, the calculation will be done and
the award that is more beneficial to the student will appear on SIMS. As stated
previously, colleges have the ability to override the award chosen by the system
and replace it with the other award.
A student's enrollment status will be set as of the end of the add/drop period or
Form A. If a student who is eligible for PTAP is part-time at this point, PTAP
will be used; otherwise, APTS will be credited. Colleges must report to UAPC on
the enrollment status file whether PTAP or APTS was used to cover tuition so
that it can be flagged on FAP for the overaward calculation.
Application Procedures
Refer to TAP application procedure in the previous section.
Aid For Part-Time Study
The Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS) program provides grant assistance to
eligible students enrolled part-time in an approved undergraduate program at
participating institutions. Unlike TAP, APTS is a campus-based discretionary
program funded by an annual appropriation. Colleges must apply each year to
participate in the APTS program by an established deadline. The allocation to
each college is based on prior year part-time enrollment in degree credit courses.
The annual CUNY appropriation may be reapportioned among the individual
colleges as needed.
The University is required to supply HESC with a roster of the names of those
selected for APTS awards within 45 days after the end of the add/drop period. At
the point of selection for APTS, each college must waive the tuition for each
student selected in the amount of the award. The colleges are reimbursed at the
end of the semester for amount of tuition waived for eligible students who
complete the term with a passing average and for up to 10% of all the term
awards made for those students who fail to achieve a passing average for the term.
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-17
OSFA
Eligibility Criteria
To be considered for an APTS award, students must:
1) meet one of the U.S. citizenship requirements;
2) be a legal resident of New York State;
3) enroll part-time (CUNY requires enrollment in at least 6 but fewer than 12
semester hours with at least 3 of these being degree credits)*;
4) maintain good academic standing;
5) have at least a cumulative C average after having received the equivalent of
two full years of payment of State-sponsored student financial aid;
6) be charged tuition of at least $100 per academic year;
7) not have a statutory state or federal educational loan from any guarantor in an
unresolved default status;
8) not exceed the income limitations set for the program;
9) not have used up undergraduate TAP eligibility;
10) must have graduated from high school, have a GED or other equivalent of a
high school certificate or received a passing score on an approved
ability-to-benefit test.
Note: a student who meets the TAP definition of “full-time” [see p. 15-5 of this
manual] may not be considered for an APTS award even if they have dropped
to part-time by the end of the add/drop period.
Duration of Awards
Awards are limited to the equivalent of eight full-time semesters (48 payment
points) of undergraduate study or ten semesters (60 payment points) for an
approved 5-year program. Students who participate in both the TAP and APTS
program cannot exceed the equivalent of 8 full-time semesters of undergraduate
study (10 semesters for an approved 5 year program). Students receiving APTS
who are enrolled in two-year programs are not subject to the 6 full-time semester
(36 payment point) limitation of eligibility.
Award Calculation
The annual APTS award cannot exceed $2000 or tuition, whichever is less. At
present, the limits on the State annual allocation of APTS funds to CUNY does not
permit maximum awards. In recent years, CUNY maximum APTS awards have
been limited to $45 credit. The per credit APTS award amounts are set by OSFA
each semester and revised as necessary based on the total annual allocation and the
amount of the allocation already expended.
Income Limits
APTS eligibility is based on NYS NTI from the preceding calendar year.
1) Students eligible to be claimed as tax dependents by their parents, can have a
family NYS NET taxable income as much as $50,550. Family income includes
student AND parents’ income.
2) Students not eligible to be claimed by parents as tax dependents, can have NYS
NET taxable income (including spouse’s income) as much as $34,250.
Spouse’s income must be included if marriage occurred on or before December
31 of the previous calendar year.
15-18 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
3)
Students not eligible to be claimed by parents but were eligible to claim tax
dependents can have NYS NET taxable income (including spouse’s income) as
much as $50,550. Spouse’s income must be included if the marriage occurred
on or before December 31 of the previous calendar year.
Selection for an APTS Award
HESC distributes APTS funds to CUNY OSFA and colleges decide who to award
APTS funds to, based on the funds they have available and students’ need. Within
the State-mandated timetable for selecting APTS recipients, each participating
CUNY college asks UAPC to create a potential APTS eligibility file and transmit it
to the college. Colleges on SIMS run the SIMB049 program against this file to
identify APTS eligible students. The edited file is then returned to UAPC. FAP
calculates and loads the APTS award for eligible students and the award transfers
on the nightly interface to SFA. Colleges on CUNYfirst interfaces use the 511
series of interfaces and the FACTS system to identify and report potentially eligible
APTS recipients to FAP. At the time of this writing, the APTS process was still
being defined and developed for the CUNYfirst delivered financial aid schools.
Application Procedures
Students who wish to apply for APTS first complete a FAFSA and a NYS TAP
application, then answers the 2 unique APTS questions on the CUNY
Supplement. Colleges still on legacy or CUNYfirst interfaces make the CUNY
Supplement available through the CUNY Portal. Schools of CUNYfirst delivered
financial aid have the CUNY Supplement as a “To Do” checklist item. Legacy
colleges may also collect the answers to the two APTS questions locally and enter
the necessary information directly onto FAP using the “J” page prompts.
New York State Scholarships for Academic Excellence
This program provides scholarship assistance to outstanding New York State high
school graduates based on grades in certain Regents exams.
New York State Regents Professional Opportunity Scholarships
This program was retired as of the end of the 2008-09 academic year. Previously
awarded students will continue to be paid, but no new scholarships will be
awarded.
THE ELIGIBLE PROGRAMS OF STUDY WERE:
Accounting (BA)
Architecture (BA, MA)
Chiropractic (DR)
Engineering (BA)
Landscape Architecture (BA, MA)
Massage Therapy (AS)
Nursing (BA)
Ophthalmic Dispensing (AS)
Pharmacy (BA)
Physical Therapy Assistant (AS)
Psychology (Ph.D.)
Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
Acupuncture (MA)
Athletic Trainer (BA)
Dental Hygiene (AS)
Interior Design (BA)
Law (JD)
Midwifery (MA)
Occupational Therapy (BA, MA)
Optometry (DR)
Physical Therapy (BA, MA)
Podiatry (DPM)
Speech Language Pathology/Audiology (MA)
Veterinary Technology (AS, BA)
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-19
OSFA
Awards ranged from $1,000 to $5,000 per year for up to 4 years of study or up to 5
years in certain programs. Scholarships were awarded by the SED to undergraduate
or graduate students, depending on the program based on the following priorities:
 Those who were economically disadvantaged and who were members of a
minority group that was historically under- represented in the chosen
profession.
 Those who were members of a minority group historically under represented
in the chosen profession.
 Those who were enrolled in or graduated from the following opportunity
programs: SEEK, College Discovery, EOP, or HEOP.
Upon completion of study, recipients must work as a licensed professional 1 year for
each annual payment received. Employment must be in the studied profession and
must be in New York State. If the recipient does not begin practice within 1 year of
program completion, s/he will be required to repay twice the amount of all
scholarship monies received plus interest.
Math & Science Teaching Incentive Scholarships
This scholarship program provides an annual award to students at either the bachelor
or master’s degree level who enter into a contract with HESC agreeing to teach full
time for five years in the field of math or science in a middle or secondary school in
New York. Awards will be made upon the successful completion of the academic
year.
Regent’s Awards For Children of Deceased or Disabled Veterans (CV)
Eligibility Criteria:
 Students whose parent(s) served in the U.S. Armed Forces during specified
periods of war or national emergency and, as a result of service, died or
suffered a 40% or more disability, are classified as missing in action, or were
prisoners of war. The veteran must currently be a New York State resident or
have been a New York State resident at the time of death, if death occurred
during or as a result of service. The periods of service are:
Vietnam/Indochina
12/22/61 - 05/07/75
Korean Conflict
06/27/50 - 01/31/55
World War II
12/07/41 - 12/31/46
World War I
04/06/17 - 11/11/18
Persian Gulf
08/02/90 - end of hostilities
Merchant Seamen
12/07/41 - 08/15/45
 Students whose parent(s) have been a recipient of the Armed Forces, Navy, or
the Marine Corps expeditionary medal for participation in operations in
Lebanon, Grenada, Panama. The periods of service are:
Lebanon
06/01/83 - 12/01/87
Grenada
10/23/83 - 11/21/83
Panama
12/20/89 - 01/31/90
 Students who were born with spina bifida whose parent(s) are Vietnam
Veterans who served in the U.S. Armed Forces in Indochina between
12/22/61-05/07/75.
15-20 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
The award is $450 per year. Eligible students must apply before May 1 of the
academic year for which they are requesting payment. Students must initially
establish eligibility by submitting a Child of Veteran Award Supplement form with
HESC BEFORE applying for payment.
Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship
This competitive federal honors program provides scholarships to academically
talented high school seniors who are New York State residents and plan to attend
any approved institution of higher education in the United States. The scholarship
provides for up to $1,500 per year, and is renewable for 4 years. Actual award
amounts depend on federal funding. Student may receive payment of this award
in addition to any other financial aid for which they qualify; however, total aid
cannot exceed the cost of attendance.
Memorial Scholarships
Memorial Scholarships for Families of Deceased Firefighters, Volunteer
Firefighters, Police Officers, Peace Officers and Emergency Medical Service
Workers provide financial aid to children, spouses and financial dependents of
deceased firefighters, volunteer firefighters, police officers, peace officers*, and
emergency medical service workers who have died as the result of injuries
sustained in the line of duty in service to the State of New York.
*Peace Officers are defined in the criminal procedures law and include many
categories including New York State Correction Officers.
Veterans Tuition Awards
Veterans Tuition Awards (VTA) provide up to the full cost of undergraduate
tuition at State University of NY for full-time study or actual tuition charge
whichever is less. Awards for part-time study are prorated by credit hour.
Awards are available for up to 8 semesters (4 years) of full-time undergraduate
study or 10 semesters (5 years) for students enrolled in an approved 5 year
program. Awards are also available for up to 6 semesters (3 years) of graduate
study or 4 semesters (2 years) of study in an approved vocational training
program. Programs are approved by the NYS Division of Veterans Affairs
Bureau of Veterans Education.
Eligible students are New York State residents discharged under honorable
conditions from the U.S. Armed Forces and who are:
 Vietnam Veterans who served in Indochina between 2/28/61 and
5/7/1975.
 Persian Gulf Veterans who served in the Persian Gulf on or after 8/2/1990.
 Afghanistan Veterans who served in Afghanistan during hostilities on or
after 9/11/2001.
 Veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces who served in hostilities that occurred
after 2/28/1961 as evidenced by receipt of an Armed Forces Expeditionary
Medal, Navy Expeditionary Medal or a Marine Corps Expeditionary
Medal.
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-21
OSFA
World Trade Center Memorial Scholarship
The World Trade Center Memorial Scholarship guarantees access to a college
education for the families and financial dependents of innocent victims who died
or were severely and permanently disabled as a result of the Sept. 11, 2001
terrorist attacks on the United States of America and rescue and recovery efforts.
Flight 3407 Memorial Scholarship
This program is intended to benefit the children, spouses and financial dependents
of those who perished in the crash of Continental Airlines Flight 3407 in
Clarence, NY on February 12, 2009.
NYHELPs Alternative Loans
A new alternative educational loan program for NYS students, families and
schools. Key features of the program are lower interest rates than other
alternative loans, the availability of fixed and variable rate loans, an up to $10,000
annual borrowing limit and required web-based financial literacy instruction for
borrowers. The first NYHELP loans were expected to be available in January
2010.
Other Financial Aid
For more information including about these and other state and federal student
financial aid programs (loans, grants, and scholarships) for full-time, part-time,
graduate, and undergraduate study, visit the HESC website at:
http://www.hesc.ny.gov/content.nsf.
15-22 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
TAP Award Certificate Messages
HESC prints the following messages on the student's copy of the TAP award certificate.
HESC prints the message number on the school copy of the award certificate. HESC
annually updates the year references in some messages.
Message
Number
Message
054
Award Denied. You cannot receive an award because you do not meet the statutory high school graduate
or alternate requirement.
401
Award Denied. Information reported in your application for payment indicated that you do not meet the
statutory New York State residency requirement. If you have established permanent (i.e., "Legal")
residence and wish to appeal this determination, contact HESC and request that an Affidavit of New York
State Residence be sent to you.
402
Award Denied. Our records show that you are on leave. While on leave you are not entitled to payment of
benefits. You may terminate your leave by notifying HESC on a Change Form.
403
Award Denied for One or More Terms. You're in default on a student loan or have failed to comply with a
service requirement made a condition of your award. Eligibility can be restored should you resolve your
loan default status.
404
Award Denied. You are not a Scholarship holder and you have not requested a Tuition Assistance
Program award.
405
Award Denied. You are neither a United States citizen, permanent resident alien, a paroled refugee, nor a
refugee.
406
Award Denied. Review of your Affidavit of New York State Residence indicates that you do not meet the
New York State residency requirement.
407
In response to the other educational aid question on your 1997-98 TAP application, you indicated that you
will be receiving other educational aid which duplicates the purpose of the TAP award.
408
Award Denied. You have failed to provide all of the Social Security numbers required by law. If you want an
award, you must submit the requested Social Security numbers.
409
Award Denied For One or More Terms. You have already been certified for an award under the Aid for
Part-Time Study program.
410
Award Denied. You were already certified as in attendance at another educational institution.
411
Award Denied. This educational institution does not offer the term for which you requested assistance.
412
Award Denied For One or More Terms. The term(s) for which you requested assistance is (are) not
approved for an award for part-time study.
413
Your award reflects your financially dependent status. You do not satisfy the legal criteria which would
enable you to exclude the income of your parents.
414
Financial Independence Denied. You have been processed for scholarship only. If you want to be
processed for TAP as a dependent student, report your parents' income on a Change Form.
415
Award Denied. This institution does not have a program approved for the Vietnam Veterans/Persian Gulf
Veterans Tuition Award requested.
416
The terms indicated below are the final terms for which you are eligible for a Vietnam Veterans/Persian
Gulf Veterans Tuition Award.
417
You cannot receive a Vietnam Veterans/ Persian Gulf Veterans Award for all terms. You have accumulated
the maximum number of payments under this program.
418
Your Vietnam Veterans/Persian Gulf Veterans Tuition Award was reduced because of a refund owed
HESC resulting from a previous award overpayment.
419
Your Vietnam Veterans/Persian Gulf Veterans Tuition Award for the term(s) below has not been processed
at your request.
420
Funding for the Regents College and Regents Nursing Scholarship Programs was not included in the
XXXXXX State Budget. Accordingly, no payments will be made for the XXXXXX academic year.
421
Award Denied. This institution does not offer a program approved for the Tuition Assistance Award
Program (TAP) award requested.
422
You reported other educational aid deemed by the New York State Commissioner of Education to
duplicate the purpose of your TAP award. If the total of that aid and your TAP award exceeded your tuition
charge, your TAP award has been reduced.
423
Tuition Assistance Denied For One or More Terms. The net taxable income you reported on your
application exceeded the statutory limit set for the TAP award.
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-23
OSFA
424
If you are receiving a Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) Award, the term(s) indicated below are the final
term(s) for which you are eligible.
425
You cannot receive a TAP award for all terms. You have accumulated the maximum number of payments
under this program or you are not eligible for other reasons.
426
Award Denied. The award which you requested is not approved for part-time study for the summer term.
427
Tuition Assistance Award Denied. The annual tuition charged at the institution you are attending is less
than $200.
428
Your TAP award was reduced because of a refund owed HESC resulting from a previous award
overpayment.
429
The term(s) indicated below are the final term(s) for which you are eligible for a Supplemental Tuition
Assistance Program (STAP) Award.
430
If you are educationally disadvantaged and will be enrolled in remedial courses, you may be eligible for a
Supplemental Tuition Assistance Program (STAP) Award. If so, contact your institution's Financial Aid
Office.
431
Scholarship Denied For One or More Terms. This institution does not offer a program approved for the
Scholarship Award requested.
432
You have been processed for Scholarship only. You do not meet the New York State residency
requirement for other awards requested.
434
The term(s) indicated below are the final term(s) for which you are eligible for a Scholarship Award.
435
You cannot receive a Scholarship Award for all terms. You have accumulated the maximum number of
payments under this program.
436
Award Denied. The award which you requested is not approved for part-time study for the summer term.
438
Your Scholarship award was reduced because of a refund owed HESC resulting from a previous award
overpayment.
439
You are on leave from your Nursing Scholarship. Therefore, you are not entitled to payment of your
Scholarship award.
441
Award Denied. This institution does not offer a program approved for the Child of Veteran and/or Child of
Police/ Firefighter/Correction Officer award requested.
444
The term(s) indicated below are the final term(s) for which you are eligible for a Child of Veteran and/or
Child of Police, Firefighter, Correction Officer Award.
445
You cannot receive a Child of Veteran and/or Child of Police, Firefighter, Correction Officer Award for all
terms. You have accumulated the maximum number of payments under this program.
446
Award Denied. The award which you requested is not approved for part-time study for the summer term.
448
Your Child of Veteran and/or Police/ Firefighter/Corrections Officer award was reduced because of a
refund owed HESC resulting from a previous award overpayment.
450
Financial Independence Denied. Your reported residence with your parents exceeds the maximum period
allowed by law. If you want an award as a dependent student, report your parents' income.
451
Financial Independence Denied because you stated you were claimed as a tax dependent by your parents.
If you want an award as a dependent student, report your parents' income.
452
Financial Independence Denied because you reported receipt of financial assistance in excess of $750. If
you want an award as a dependent student, report your parents' income.
453
Financial Independence Denied because you do not satisfy the legal criteria which enables you to exclude
the income of your parents. If you want an award as a dependent, report your parents' income.
454
Financial Independence Denied. The documentation submitted did not show unusual and exceptional
family circumstances that allow exclusion of parental income. If you want an award as a dependent, report
your parents' income.
455
Shown below are your XXXXXX awards. If during the year you wish to change any information upon which
your awards are based, submit those changes to HESC using a HESC Change Form.
456
Your summer award was calculated based on half-time study at the tuition charge shown. Your award may
be revised depending on your actual summer tuition charge as certified by the above institution.
499
The processing of your application has resulted in multiple messages regarding the status of your
application. A separate letter is being sent to you containing those messages.
500
Award Denied. This educational institution is not approved for the award(s) you requested.
501
You are not eligible for a XXXXXX TAP award because you are either not attending an approved institution
or have requested termination of the processing of your application.
15-24 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
502
Award Denied for One or More Terms. You have received the maximum number of payments for a student
enrolled in a two-year program. If enrolled in a program that requires more than two years, see the
Financial Aid Office for assistance.
510
You were not registered for that payment term, or had withdrawn with no tuition liability, or were not
registered at the correct level of study, or wished to refuse the award.
511
You were not in full-time attendance for that payment term; nor in part-time attendance where allowed by
law.
512
You were not matriculated in an approved program for that term.
513
You were not in good academic standing.
514
You were not in an approved five-year program and consequently not eligible for a fifth year of benefits; or
you were not a New York State resident for the required period of time; or you were not a United States
citizen; or, you received TAP for a prior degree at the same level as presently sought; or you were in
default on a Federal Stafford student loan.
601
602
603
604
Your award for the XXXXXX semester has been recalculated due to certification activity by the above
school. In the process of certification, the school indicated a change in either the tuition which you were
charged; the status of your attendance; or the amount of other benefits that you received which offset your
tuition charges. If you have any questions concerning this certification, you should contact the above
school.
605
606
607
608
Your award for the XXXXXX term has been recalculated after your placement on a payment roster but
before the processing of the above school's certification of your eligibility. The recalculation was a result of
either a change in information supplied by you or an internal adjustment generated by HESC. If you have
any questions concerning this award, contact HESC.
609
610
611
612
The above school has notified HESC that you are not eligible for payment of your Scholarship for the
XXXXXX semester. If you have any questions concerning this determination, contact the above school.
613
614
615
616
The above school has indicated that you withdrew from the XXXXXX semester with a tuition liability. Your
award has been recalculated based on the tuition liability which the school stated you had incurred. If you
have any questions concerning this determination, contact the above school.
617
618
619
620
The above school stated that you were not registered at their institution for the XXXXXX semester. If this is
incorrect, contact the above school.
621
622
623
624
The above school has indicated that for the XXXXXX semester you were not in attendance to the extent
required to receive a payment. If you have any questions concerning this determination, contact the above
school.
625
626
627
628
The above school has indicated that you were not matriculated in the program for which you registered for
the XXXXXX semester. If you have any questions concerning this determination, contact the above school.
629
630
631
632
The above school has indicated that for the XXXXXX semester the program in which you are registered is
not approved for payment of a TAP or Scholarship award or you are not in an approved five-year bachelor
degree or remedial program and are therefore ineligible for payment beyond four years in a bachelor
degree program or three years in an associate or other two-year program.
633
634
635
636
The above school has indicated that for the XXXXXX semester you were not in good academic standing. If
you have any questions concerning this determination, contact the above school.
637
638
639
640
The above school has indicated or HESC has determined that you are ineligible for the XXXXXX semester
for one of the following reasons: You were not a New York State resident; you were not a United States
citizen; you were in default on a Federal Stafford student loan; or you have not responded to a HESC
request for information.
641
642
643
644
Your award for the XXXXXX semester has been recalculated after your school was notified of your award.
As a result, your tuition account at the school may have changed.
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-25
OSFA
645
646
647
648
701
Your certified award for the XXXXXX semester is indicated above. If you have any questions concerning
the award for this term, contact HESC.
980
The above school indicated that you were not eligible for your scholarship. If incorrect, contact the
institution.
981
982
983
984
Your award has been revised due to information supplied by the above institution during the processing of
your payment for the XXXXXX term. Please refer any questions to that institution.
985
You have failed to respond in a timely fashion to our request for information or you have not submitted the
information needed to complete the processing of your XXXXXX application.
986
You have failed to submit your application for payment by May 1, XXXX. As a result, you will not be eligible
for an award.
988
The above institution indicated that you were not eligible for your Vietnam Veterans/Persian Gulf Veterans
Tuition Award. If incorrect, contact the institution.
989
HESC sent a request for additional information which was returned by the U.S. Postal Service due to an
incorrect address. That address must be corrected for application processing to continue.
ETA sent to student.
15-26 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
TAP Award Schedules
TAP awards are determined from family NYS net taxable income as reported on a NYS
Student Payment Application and verified with NYS Department of Taxation. The
student’s dependency status, academic level and year state aid was 1st received
determines which TAP award schedule is used. All annual awards are reduced by $100
after 4 payments.
Undergraduate Award Schedules (through 2013-14 Academic year)
A. For students who are dependent on their parents, or financially
independent and are married with tax dependents
Schedule A - For students who received awards in the 1993-94 school year or earlier
Maximum Award – $3575 or 100%
Tuition (whichever is less)
Minimum Award – $500
Net Taxable Income
Award Reduction
$7,000 or less
0
$7,001 – 11,000
7% of the excess over $7,000
$11,001 – 18,000
$280 + 10% of the excess over $11,000
$18,001 – 80,000
$980 + 12% of the excess over $18,000
$80,001 or more
NO AWARD
Schedule D – For first-time recipients in the 1994-95 through 1999-2000 school years
Maximum Award – $4125 or 100% Tuition
(whichever is less)
Minimum Award – $500
Net Taxable Income
Award Reduction
$7,000 or less
0
$7,001 – 11,000
7% of the excess over $7,000
$11,001 – 18,000
$280 + 10% of the excess over $11,000
$18,001 – 80,000
$980 + 12% of the excess over $18,000
$80,001 or more
NO AWARD
Schedule E – For first-time recipients in the 2000-01 school year or thereafter
Maximum Award – at 4 year schools: $5000
or 100% Tuition (whichever is less);
-- at 2 year schools: $4000 or 100% Tuition
(whichever is less)
Minimum Award – $500
Net Taxable Income
Award Reduction
$7,000 or less
0
$7,001 – 11,000
7% of the excess over $7,000
$11,001 – 18,000
$280 + 10% of the excess over $11,000
$18,001 – 80,000
$980 + 12% of the excess over $18,000
$80,001 or more
NO AWARD
STATE GRANT PROGRAMS 15-27
OSFA
B. For students who are independent and single without
dependents
Schedule K – For students who received awards in the 1991-92 school year or earlier
Maximum Award – $2450 or 100% Tuition
(whichever is less)
Minimum Award – $500
Net Taxable Income
Award Reduction
$3,000 or less
0
$3,001 – 10,000
31% of the excess over $3,000
$10,001 or more
NO AWARD
Schedule L – For first-time recipients in the 1992-93 and 1993-94 school years
Maximum Award – $2575 or 100% Tuition
(whichever is less)
Minimum Award – $500
Net Taxable Income
Award Reduction
$3,000 or less
0
$3,001 - 10,000
31% of the excess over $3,000
$10,001 or more
NO AWARD
Schedule M – For first-time recipients in the 1994-95 school year and thereafter
Maximum Award – $3025 or 100% Tuition
(whichever is less)
Minimum Award – $500
Net Taxable Income
Award Reduction
$3,000 or less
0
$3,001 - 10,000
31% of the excess over $3,000
$10,001 or more
NO AWARD
C. For students who are independent and are married without
tax dependents
Schedule C -- Applicable to students who receive awards in any school year
Maximum Award – $3025 or 100% Tuition
(whichever is less)
Minimum Award – $500
Net Taxable Income
Award Reduction
$7,000 or less
0
$7,001 – 11,000
7% of the excess over $7,000
$11,001 – 18,000
$280 + 10% of the excess over $11,000
$18,001 – 39,999
$980 + 12% of the excess over $18,000
$40,000 or more
NO AWARD
15-28 STATE GRANT PROGRAMS
OTHER CUNY GRANT PROGRAMS
CONTENTS
Macaulay Honors College .....................................................................................................
Eligibility Criteria .......................................................................................................
Financial Assistance Benefits .....................................................................................
What about other financial aid at CUNY? .................................................................
How is the award paid? ...............................................................................................
Application Procedures ...............................................................................................
City University Supplemental Tuition Assistance (CUSTA) .............................................
Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) .............................................................
Who is eligible for ASAP? .........................................................................................
ASAP Coding on FAP ...............................................................................................
16-3
16-3
16-3
16-3
16-4
16-4
16-4
16-5
16-5
16-6
OTHER CUNY GRANT PROGRAMS 16-1
OSFA
16-2 OTHER CUNY GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
Macaulay Honors College at CUNY
The Macaulay Honors College provides outstanding educational opportunities for
academically gifted students form the five boroughs of New York City and beyond. This
program is designed for students who have demonstrated scholastic strength and broad
intellectual curiosity through their high school academic records, test scores,
extracurricular involvements and other academic criteria.
The Macaulay Honors College is on 8 CUNY campuses: Baruch College, Brooklyn
College, City College, College of Staten Island, Hunter College, John Jay College,
Lehman College, and Queens College. In addition, the Macaulay Building on W 67th
Street includes state-of-the-art classrooms, student performance space, a fully-equipped
screening room, administrative offices, a cafe, and other common gathering spaces for
students. Additional information on the program can be found at:
http://www.macaulay.cuny.edu/.
Eligibility Criteria
Students must apply to CUNY by submitting the Macaulay Honors College online
application. The online application requires that applicants select one CUNY campus
(Baruch, Brooklyn, City, Hunter, Lehman, Queens, or Staten Island). Criteria for
selection include: the high school academic record, SAT/ACT scores, an essay, academic
and character references and an interview. The early decision deadline is November 1st
(with a December 15th acceptance notification) and the regular decision deadline is
December 15th (with a March 15th acceptance notification). Questions about the online
application may be directed to the CUNY Online Application Help Desk at 212-6522897 or [email protected]
Students are not required to be New York State residents. Out-of-state and foreign nonresidents are eligible. All University Scholars are required to file a FAFSA. All New
York State residents must also file the TAP application. The internal deadline to file both
applications is May 15 for the upcoming academic year.
Financial Assistance Benefits
1. Full tuition coverage (excludes fees) through a combination of TAP awards and a
tuition waiver equal to the difference between the tuition charged and the TAP
award.
2. Access to a Macaulay Opportunities Fund grant of up to $7,500 for the
undergraduate experience to be used for global research, internships and service.
3. A laptop computer (currently the MacBook®). Each University Scholar receives
the laptop computer upon enrollment.
4. A Cultural Passport that provides reduced admission at New York museums and
other arts and cultural venues.
What about other financial aid at CUNY?
Federal Pell Grants: University Scholars who are eligible for Federal Pell Grant awards
will receive the full amount of the award to assist them in paying for costs of attending
college such as school supplies, transportation, lunch and other supplemental educational
and personal costs.
OTHER CUNY GRANT PROGRAMS 16-3
OSFA
College Scholarships: Any CUNY College scholarships which have been offered to
University Scholars will be awarded in addition to the Macaulay Honors College
package.
Other Scholarships: University Scholars may also receive additional awards from other
organizations and government agencies which they may be allowed to retain depending
on the conditions of the award.
How is the award paid?
FAP has explicit fields for the awarding of Macaulay Honors College tuition waiver and
educational expense account funds.
TAP awards finalized by HESC after the initial loading of the waiver award require
adjusting the amount recorded in the FAP system.
Awards must be reviewed before tuition and fee deduction transactions are run. Because
these transactions are usually done during the middle of the term, there is time to adjust
the Macaulay Honors College awards. These awards vary for students depending on the
TAP award amounts and the actual fees incurred.
Application Procedures
Since the Macaulay Honors College tuition waiver is reduced by the amount of TAP that
a student may receive, University Scholars are required to file a FAFSA and to complete
the NYS TAP Application. The Macaulay Honors College Program Director at the
college will coordinate with the local Financial Aid Director to assure that this
requirement is met. When there are unusual extenuating circumstances which
categorically make the student ineligible for TAP or Federal Student Aid, the Financial
Aid Office may waive this requirement.
City University Supplemental Tuition Assistance (CUSTA)
CUSTA is a university administered program to assist students who experience a
reduction in their TAP awards beginning with their 5th semester of TAP eligibility.
Requirements
To be eligible for CUSTA, a student must:
 Be enrolled full-time in an undergraduate program at a CUNY senior or technical
college
 Have a TAP net taxable income of $7000 or less under Schedules A-E or $3000 or
less under Schedules K-m
 Be at least a 5th semester Tap recipient but not have exhausted TAP eligibility
Application Procedure
A student must have applied for TAP. No additional application is required.
Follow-Up
It is the College’s responsibility to rescind a CUSTA award if the student is found not to
meet the eligibility requirements or is not certified for TAP for the semester of the
CUSTA award.
16-4 OTHER CUNY GRANT PROGRAMS
2014-2015 SAM
Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP)
ASAP, or Accelerated Study in Associate Programs is designed to help motivated
community college students earn an associate degree as quickly as possible with the goal
of graduating 50% of program participants within three years.
ASAP offers students a combination of block programming, extra (and required) support
services and enrichment activities, small classes (25 or fewer students), career
development and job placement assistance, tuition waivers for financial aid eligible
students, free use of textbooks and monthly Metrocards for all students.
Near the completion of their degree, all ASAP students will receive personal guidance in
gaining employment in their selected career field or admission to an appropriate program
at a baccalaureate degree-granting college or university.
Who is eligible for ASAP?
 All prospective ASAP students must be New York City residents.
 Current CUNY or transfer students must have 15 or fewer college credits and
must have a GPA of 2.0 or above.
 All students must be fully skills proficient or have no more than two outstanding
developmental course needs based on their scores on the CUNY Assessment
Tests in reading, writing and math.
 All students must agree to enter into an Associate degree program (A.A., A.S., or
A.A.S.) on a full-time basis (minimum 12 credits or equated credits per semester)
in an ASAP approved major. Most programs other than nursing are available.
 Students must receive some need-based financial aid as determined through
completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form and a
New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) application.
 To be eligible for an ASAP tuition waiver, students must receive financial aid and
have a gap need between their financial aid award amount and the amount they
owe for tuition and fees.
 Students may not participate in both College Discovery and ASAP.
 Program slots are limited. All students who have applied to a CUNY community
college and meet ASAP residency, credit, and developmental course criteria will
be contacted by mail and invited to an ASAP information session.
 Borough of Manhattan, Kingsborough, and La Guardia Community Colleges will
be involved in a research study, and will use a lottery method to assign eligible
students to ASAP.
More information on the ASAP program, including additional eligibility criteria unique
to each participating college, can be found on the CUNY ASAP Website at:
http://www.cuny.edu/academics/programs/notable/asap/about.html
OTHER CUNY GRANT PROGRAMS 16-5
OSFA
ASAP Coding on FAP
ASAP students must be coded on FAP [CXSPCL = A] for each term of ASAP
participation so that their expense budgets will reflect a lower cost of attendance due to
their having books and transportation provided by the ASAP program. Each college
financial aid office should work with the ASAP program coordinators and OSFA to see
that the proper coding is entered for each student.
16-6 OTHER CUNY GRANT PROGRAMS
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
This chapter is intended to provide you with information you may need that is not contained
elsewhere in this manual. You may find the updated section on Internet resources especially
valuable in helping you keep abreast of new programs and policy changes and as a means of
improving and enlarging your services to students.
CONTENTS
Procedures for the Centralization of Waivers .......................................................................... 17-3
Tuition Waivers Program Table ............................................................................................... 17-5
Web Sites of Interest to the Financial Aid Professional ........................................................... 17-6
U.S. Government (other than the Dept. of Education) ............................................... . 17-6
U.S. Department of Education for Administrators ....................................................... 17-7
U.S. Department of Education for Students & Families............................................... 17-7
New York State Government ........................................................................................ 17-9
New York State Agencies ............................................................................................. 17-9
Professional Associations ........................................................................................... 17-10
Scholarship Search Sites ............................................................................................. 17-11
International Student Resources ................................................................................. 17-11
Other Useful Sites ....................................................................................................... 17-11
Lender Home Pages of Interest ................................................................................... 17-12
CUNY Home Pages and Financial Aid Pages ............................................................ 17-14
Electronic Mailing Lists for Financial Aid Administrators .................................................... 17-16
Veterans Educational Benefit Programs ................................................................................. 17-17
ACCES – Training at a College or University ....................................................................... 17-19
Configuration of Social Security Numbers ............................................................................. 17-20
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-1
OSFA
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-2
2014-2015 SAM
UNIVERSITY ACCOUNTING OFFICE
555 West 57 Street, New York, N.Y. 10019
(212) 397-5600
February 10, 1998
To:
Senior College Business Managers
From:
Joe Giordano
Subject:
Procedures for the Centralization of Waivers
Continuing with the University’s initiative to centralize the tuition and fee collection process, UAO
will begin to process tuition waivers centrally in the Spring ‘98 semester, through the Student
Financial Aid system. Senior colleges will be required to submit award information in the
University’s SFA system, for the Fall and Spring semesters, no later than the last business day of
October and March, respectively, and on or about the second Monday of May for final cleanup.
In order to streamline the tuition waiver process for the senior colleges, UAO will prepare and
submit vouchers for payment three times a year: in November, for the Fall semester; in April, for
the Spring semester; and a final cleanup voucher in early June. Subject to UBO’s approval of the
waiver budget, UAO will submit the waiver voucher to the State.
Attached is a table of available SFA program codes and program titles which the College should
utilize to process waiver information in the SFA system. UAO will utilize the SF700 report (award
column) as the basis to prepare State vouchers and to update the tuition/Fee ledger in FAS for cash
receipts. The SF700 report will be available through Wylbur. Further, UAO is in the process of
preparing another report which is voucher specific and user friendly. This report, which will also
be available through Wylbur, can be used by colleges to reconcile cash receipts posted by UAO.
This report should be available by early March. UAO will treat waivers as tuition deductions and
process waiver transactions in a similar fashion as Pell transactions. Accordingly, waiver receipts
will be identified in FAS by college code, voucher number, and the amount.
This information will be posted in FAS by UAO, within one business day of waiver receipt, as
follows:
Dr.
0-10001-113
Waivers Cash Account
Cr.
0-10001-216
Unassigned Waivers
To record cash receipt of Waivers.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-3
OSFA
UAO will generate the following transaction in FAS when we make a transfer to CUCF:
Dr.
0-10001-559
CUCF Waivers/Dep
Cr.
0-10001-113
Waivers Cash Account
To record transfer of funds to CUCF.
The only entry that the college should make is to assign dollars from the Unassigned Waivers
account to an appropriate receivable account as illustrated below:
Dr.
0-10001-216
Unassigned Waivers
Cr.
0-10001-XXX
College Waiver Receivable
To assign dollars received to the appropriate semester’s A/R.
The existing diagnostic report, FAM007, allows the colleges to view the entries UAO will make on
their behalf as well as information relating to voucher number per entry. This report also shows all
other entries which UAO makes for cash held centrally in the areas of TAP, tuition prepayment,
collection agency and tax offset activities, as well as Title IV tuition deductions. The report will
delineate transactions by each of the areas noted above.
Colleges need to review this report periodically to identify transactions being made to their
unassigned accounts and apply dollars to the appropriate accounts receivable.
If there are any questions, please call Larry Mah or Delferine Spooner at (212) 397-5696 or (212)
397-5698
respectively.
cc:
Vice Chancellor Richard F. Rothbard
Senior College Vice Presidents/Deans of Administration
Dean Angelo Proto
Mr. Anthony Hladek, Jr.
Mr. Ernesto Malave
Mr. Howard Galin
Mr. Fung Chin
Senior College Bursars
Senior College Financial Aid Directors
University Accounting Office Staff
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-4
2014-2015 SAM
Tuition Waivers Program Table
SFA Program
Code
839
850
851
852
853
854
855
856
857
858
859
861
870
SFA Program
Title
Tuition-Waiver-Last Semester
Undergrad-Empl-Waiver
City-Assistance Program
High School-Tuition-Waiver
Undergrad-Coop-Teach-Waiver
Inmates-Tuition-Waivers
Undergrad-Other-Tuit-Waiver
Grad-Empl-Tuition-Waiver
Grad-Coop-Teach-Waiver
Grad-Student-Tuit-Waiver
Grad-Other-Tuit-Waiver
Grad-Tuit-Waiver
United-Fed-Teach-Scholarship
UBO
Category
Last Semester
Employee Waivers
City Assistance
High School Students
Cooperating Teacher
Other Waivers
Other Waivers
Employee Waivers
Cooperating Teacher
Graduate Students
Graduate Students
Graduate Students
Other Waivers
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-5
OSFA
Web Sites of Interest to the Financial Aid Professional
The sites listed below have been verified as of June 2012. Some of the sites are actually
sub-sites of general interest pages.
U.S. Government (other than the Department of Education)
The White House
http://www.whitehouse.gov/
Information on the President and Vice President; guide to information about the
federal government. Search White House documents. Contact the President and
Vice President via the Internet.
The U.S. Senate
http://www.senate.gov/
Information on Committee memberships, recent legislative actions and scheduled
activities. Find out how to contact senators via the Internet.
The U.S. House of Representatives
http://www.house.gov/
Information on Committee memberships, recent legislative actions and scheduled
activities. Find out how to contact representatives via the Internet.
U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services
http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis
Immigration law and regulations, printable forms, employer information, etc.
U.S. Information Agency Fulbright Scholar Programs
http://www.cies.org
Internal Revenue Service
Downloadable IRS forms and instructions, etc.
http://www.irs.gov/
The Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Price index
Used to develop CUNY’s expense budget.
http://www.bls.gov/
General Accounting Office
http://www.gao.gov/
The investigative arm of Congress charged with examining matters relating to the
receipt and disbursement of public funds. See GAO reports and testimony here.
U.S. Government Printing Office
http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/
Access to government documents: the Budget of the U.S. Congressional Documents,
Congressional Reports, Federal Registers, Public Laws, etc.
Code of Federal Regulations
http://www.gpoaccess.gov/cfr/index.html
Browse or search the entire CFR and retrieve CFR sections by citation.
Selective Service
http://www.sss.gov/
Administrators may check students’ registration status, students may register on-line
or may request status letters.
Veterans Educational Benefits Web Site
http://www.gibill.va.gov/
Provides comprehensive information for veterans benefits and links to other benefits
available to Veterans.
U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
http://www.archives.gov/global-pages/subject-index.html
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-6
2014-2015 SAM
U.S. Department of Education Sites for Administrators
Home Page
http://www.ed.gov/
Dept Press Releases, Grants and Contracts, Research and Statistics, Financial Aid
Regulations, Policy and Program Information, Links to ED Offices, Publications and
Budget Information.
Office of Student Financial Aid Programs (OSFAP)
http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/fsa/index.html
Links to Information for Financial Aid Professionals, Financial Aid for Students,
Direct Loans, Project EASI, Customer Service Task Force.
NSLDS Administrator Log-On https://www.nsldsfap.ed.gov/nslds_FAP/default.jsp
Allows administrators to check student borrower history, loan default and
overpayment status and to update student overpayment and default records.
Information for Financial Aid Professionals
http://ifap.ed.gov/ifap/
Consolidates guidance, resources, and information related to the administration and
processing of Title IV federal student aid into one online site for use by the entire
financial aid community. Includes Dear Colleague and Action Letters, Federal
Registers, Online Technical References, Worksheets, Schedules and Tables, and
other links to sites of interest to Financial Aid Professionals.
Training for Financial Aid Professionals
http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/training/index.html
Schedules and Online Registration for training activities, conferences and events
offered to aid administrators by the U.S. Department of Education.
Federal Student Aid Data Center
http://federalstudentaid.ed.gov/datacenter/programmatic.html
Obtain reports by school on grant, loan, and campus-based aid program volume.
Dept. of Ed Publications
http://www.fsapubs.gov/
Search for and order documents and publications for teachers, administrators,
policymakers, researchers, parents, students and others with a stake in higher
education.
U.S. Department of Education Sites for Students and Families
Gateway to the Federal Government’s Services for Students
http://studentaid.ed.gov/redirects/students-gov
A comprehensive information portal for students and families planning for or
attending college.
Federal Student Aid Portal
http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/index.jsp
Information resource for students and families for federal student aid programs.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-7
OSFA
Funding Your Education
http://studentaid.ed.gov/students/publications/student_guide/index.html
Dept. of Education publication especially for high school students, providing general
information on student aid.
The Student Guide
http://studentaid.ed.gov/students/publications/student_guide/index.html
Complete text and graphics from the current year publication The Student Guide.
Completing the FAFSA
http://studentaid.ed.gov/students/publications/completing_fafsa/index.html
Useful reference page for aid professionals and students; provides more detailed
instructions to the individual FAFSA items than contained in the paper FAFSA
instructions.
FAFSA on the WEB
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/
Allows students to complete the FAFSA online. NYS residents are presented with
the opportunity to link to TAP on the Web from the FAFSA Confirmation page.
Personal Identification Number (PIN) Registration
http://www.pin.ed.gov/
Allows students and parents to request or change a Federal PIN.
Title-IV School Code Search
https://fafsa.ed.gov/FAFSA/app/schoolSearch?locale=en_EN
Find the six character Code for any school in the Title IV School Code List.
Direct Loan Program
https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/index.action
General information about the Direct Loan Program for students, parents and aid
professionals with links to interactive calculators, loan consolidation, etc.
Direct Loan Online Entrance/Exit Counseling
https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/index.action
Allows students to complete the entrance/exit counseling requirement and allows
administrators to check on a student’s entrance/exit counseling status.
Direct Loan Consolidation Information Center
http://www.loanconsolidation.ed.gov/
The online source of information about the Direct Loan Consolidation Loan Program
for borrowers, schools and loan holders.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-8
2014-2015 SAM
Direct Loan Repayment Interactive Calculators
http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/OtherFormsOfRepay.jsp
Site to help borrowers plan their borrowing, manage debt burden, and choose the
best repayment plan.
Guide to Defaulted Student Loans
http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/DCS/index.html
Information on FFEL, Direct and Perkins Loans, including loan repayment options,
loan consolidation, loan cancellation and discharge.
National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS)
https://www.nslds.ed.gov/nslds_SA/
ED’s student aid database providing student access to centralized, integrated tracking
of Title IV loans and Pell grants through their entire cycle from approval to closure.
FSA Ombudsman
http://www.ombudsman.ed.gov/
This Department of Education office helps students resolve disputes and solve other
problems with federal student loans.
New York State Government
Welcome to New York State
http://www.ny.gov
Office of the Governor
http://www.governor.ny.gov/
Strategic Programs, Key documents, Press Releases, Annual Information Statement
NY State Senate
http://www.nysenate.gov/
Contact your state senator. Find out about bills introduced, passed and signed into
law or vetoed. Committee membership. Public Hearings. Press Releases.
NY State Assembly
http://www.assembly.state.ny.us/
Find out about bills introduced, passed and signed into law or vetoed. Committee
membership. Public hearings. Press releases. Contact your assemblyman.
NY State Education Dept.
Current publications, Programs and Services.
http://www.nysed.gov/
NY State Dept. of Labor
http://www.labor.ny.gov/home
Services for Individuals - Job seekers, Students, unemployed.
New York State Agencies
Higher Education Services Corp.
http://www.hesc.com/content.nsf
This NYS agency administers the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP), guarantees
student loans, offers guidance to students, families and administrators and
administers a successful College Savings program for students and families.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-9
OSFA
HESC Online Programs, Policies & Procedures
http://www.hesc.com/content.nsf/CA/Programs_Policies_and_Procedures_Guide_to_Grants_and_Scholarships_Programs
HESC’s reference guide to administering NYS Grant and Scholarship programs.
TAP On The Web
https://www.tapweb.org/totw/
NYS students who have filed a FAFSA and have received an EFC may access a
TAP on the Web application for online completion and submission to HESC.
TAP Coach
http://www.hesc.com/content.nsf/CA/1/TAP_Coach
A comprehensive tool that assists college financial aid officers with TAP
administration and containing detailed information on a variety of TAP-related
topics.
Professional Associations
NASFAA
http://www.nasfaa.org
National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. A comprehensive
online resource for aid professionals.
EASFAA
http://www.easfaa.org/
Eastern Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.
NYSFAAA
http://www.nysfaaa.org/
New York State Financial Aid Administrators Association provides general financial
aid information for students and their families.
NACUBO
http://www.nacubo.org/
National Association of college and University Business Officers
NASSGAP
http://www.nassgap.org/
National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs.
NASPA
Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education
http://www.naspa.org
AACU
http://www.aacu.org/
Association of American Colleges and Universities
AACC
http://www.aacc.nche.edu/
American Association of Community Colleges
ACE
http://www.acenet.edu//AM/Template.cfm?Section=Home
American Council on Education
HEUG
http://heug.org
Higher Education User Group – organization for users of Oracle/People Soft
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-10
2014-2015 SAM
Free Scholarship Search Sites
CollegeXpress
http://www.collegexpress.com/reg/signup
College Answer
https://www.collegeanswer.com/
College Board Scholarship Page
http://apps.collegeboard.com/cbsearch_ss/welcome.jsp
College Net
http://www.collegenet.com/about/
fastWEB!
http://www.fastweb.com/
FindTuition.com
http://www.FindTuition.com/
International Scholarship Search
Petersons
http://www.internationalscholarships.com/
http://www.petersons.com/college-search/college-financial-aid.aspx
Scholarship Experts
SuperCollege.com
http://www.scholarshipexperts.com/
http://www.supercollege.com/
International Student Resources
International Education Financial Aid
http://www.iefa.org/
Smart Students’ Guide to Studying in the U.S.
http://www.edupass.org/
International Student Study Abroad Resource Ctr http://www.internationalstudent.com/
Other Useful Sites
Financial Aid Information Page
http://www.finaid.org/
A free, comprehensive, independent guide to student financial aid including links to
scholarship searches and financial aid calculators.
Chronicle of Higher Education
Allows registered users access to The Chronicle Online.
http://chronicle.com/
College Board
http://www.collegeboard.org/
This need analysis servicer markets PROFILE, an alternative, need analysis product
used by many private colleges and universities.
Corporation for National & Community Service
http://www.nationalservice.gov/
The Corporation for National Service provides information regarding federal
programs in national service such as America Reads and AmeriCorp.
Currency Converters:
The Universal Currency Converter
Current Exchange Rates Site
OANDA – the Currency Site
http://www.xe.com/ucc/
http://www.x-rates.com
http://www.oanda.com/currency/converter/
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-11
OSFA
Education Statistics At A Glance
http://nces.ed.gov/annuals/
Compendium of data from many sources about topics such as, average increase in
tuition costs, average # of high school students attending college by state, etc.
FAST WEB’s Quick Reference Guide to Student Financial Aid Statistics
http://www.fastweb.com/nfs/fastweb/static/QRG_Student_Aid_Statistics.pdf
Educational Testing Service Network
http://www.ets.org/
Mapping Your Future
http://www.mappingyourfuture.org/
This site helps students find information to plan careers, select schools and pay for
their education.
National Center for Education Statistics
http://nces.ed.gov/
The primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data relating to education in
the U.S. and other nations.
Project Vote Smart
http://www.votesmart.org/
Tracks the performance of over 13,000 political leaders including the President,
Congress, Governors and State Legislators.
US Dept of Health & Human Services Poverty Guidelines
http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/14poverty.cfm
Zillow.com
http://www.zillow.com
This site provides free real estate information and can be used to search for home
values, mortgage rates, etc.
ZIP Code Lookup
http://zip4.usps.com/zip4/welcome.jsp
This site allows you to supply ZIP plus four codes for any address and helps you
check the validity of any given address.
Lender Home Pages of Interest
Bank of America Student Banking
http://www.bankofamerica.com/studentbanking/
Campus Door
http://www.campusdoor.com/
Offers a well regarded alternative loan program that offers competitive interest rates
and flexible repayment options.
Citibank
https://www.studentloan.com/
Provides a link to CitiAssist – Citibank’s own alternative student loan program.
EduCap, Inc.
http://www.loantolearn.com/
Offers the Loan to Learn student loan program, the first nationwide privately-funded
education loan program created 25 years ago.
Key Education Resources
https://www.key.com/html/education-planning.html
A nationwide education funding provider for over 50 years offering a variety of
loans for full-time and part-time students.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-12
2014-2015 SAM
Nellie Mae
http://www.nelliemae.com/
Nellie Mae is a leader in student loan financing and offers both federal and private
loans to students. In addition, Nellie Mae partners with colleges to offer schoolspecific loan programs.
Nelnet (National Education Loan Network)
http://www.nelnet.net/
Student loan products and services including origination, funding, and servicing of
student loans including Stafford, PLUS, private, and student consolidation loans
SallieMae
https://www.salliemae.com/
A loan guarantor and servicer that provides borrowers self-service account access,
repayment calculators, etc.
Wells Fargo
https://www.wellsfargo.com/student/
Offers a variety of alternative educational loan programs tailored to individual
student situations, including loans for students studying less than ½ time.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-13
OSFA
CUNY Home Pages and Financial Aid Pages
City University of New York Portal
Financial Aid Page
http://cuny.edu
http://cuny.edu/admissions/financial-aid.html
CUNY Financial Aid Staff Information & Resources
http://www.cuny.edu/admissions/financial-aid/info-resources/faculty.html
Needs Username: finaid and Password: finaid1234
CUNY Online Center for Admissions & Financial Aid [EFAP]
https://portal.cuny.edu/cms/id/cuny/documents/informationpage/006373.htm
CUNYfirst Web Site
https://home.cunyfirst.cuny.edu
Baruch College
Financial Aid page
http://www.baruch.cuny.edu
http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/financialaid/index.htm
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Financial Aid page
http://www.bmcc.cuny.edu
http://www.bmcc.cuny.edu/finaid/
Brooklyn College
http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/web/home.php
FinAid page http://www.brooklyn.cuny.edu/web/about/administration/enrollment/financial.php
Bronx Community College
Financial Aid page
http://www.bcc.cuny.edu/
http://www.bcc.cuny.edu/Financial-Aid/
City College
Financial Aid page
http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/
http://www.ccny.cuny.edu/financialaid/index.cfm
CUNY Graduate Center
http://www.gc.cuny.edu
FinAid pagehttp://www.gc.cuny.edu/Prospective-Current-Students/Current-Students/Financial-Assistance
CUNY Graduate School of Journalism
http://www.journalism.cuny.edu/
Financial Aid
http://www.journalism.cuny.edu/admissions/financial-aid/
CUNY School of Law
Financial Aid
CUNY School of Professional Studies
Financial Aid
http://www.law.cuny.edu/index.html
http://www.law.cuny.edu/admissions/financial-aid.html
http://sps.cuny.edu/
http://sps.cuny.edu/financialaid/
Hostos Community College
Financial Aid page
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/ofa/
Hunter College
Financial Aid page
http://www.hunter.cuny.edu
http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/finaid
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Financial Aid page
http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/x.php
http://www.jjay.cuny.edu/189.php
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-14
2014-2015 SAM
Kingsborough Community College
http://www.kbcc.cuny.edu
Financial Aid page
http://www.kbcc.cuny.edu/sub-financial_aid/Pages/default.aspx
LaGuardia Community College
Financial Aid page
http://www.lagcc.cuny.edu/home/
http://www.lagcc.cuny.edu/Financial-Aid/Home/
Lehman College
Financial Aid page
Macaulay Honors College
Financial Aid pages
http://www.lehman.cuny.edu/
http://www.lehman.cuny.edu/financial-aid/
http://www.macaulay.cuny.edu/
http://www.macaulay.cuny.edu/prospective-students/tuition.php
http://www.macaulay.cuny.edu/current-students/tuition-aid.php
Medgar Evers College
Financial Aid page
http://www.mec.cuny.edu/
http://www.mec.cuny.edu/enrollment/financial-aid.aspx
New York City College of Technology
http://www.citytech.cuny.edu/
Financial Aid page
http://www.citytech.cuny.edu/admissions/financialaid/index.shtml
Queens College
Financial Aid page
Queensborough Community College
Financial Aid page
http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Pages/default.aspx
http://www.qc.cuny.edu/admissions/fa/Pages/default1.aspx
http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/
http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/FinancialAid/
Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education
http://www1.ccny.cuny.edu/prospective/med/
Financial Aid page
http://www1.ccny.cuny.edu/current/financial/index.cfm
College of Staten Island
Financial Aid page
http://www.csi.cuny.edu
http://www.csi.cuny.edu/finaid
York College
Financial Aid page
http://www.york.cuny.edu/
http://york.cuny.edu/administrative/finaid
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-15
OSFA
Electronic Mailing Lists for Financial Aid Administrators
FINAID-L
Discussion list for questions about financial aid administration, FAO job announcements,
and discussions of changes in federal aid regulations. To subscribe to the list, send email to:
[email protected] (no Subject: line or message body is necessary).
Submissions should be sent to [email protected] The list maintainers may be reached
by sending email to [email protected]
NYSFA-L
Mailing list for student financial aid administrators in New York State. It is owned and
administered by NYSHESC and is hosted by the computer facilities of SUNY. To subscribe
to the list, send email to [email protected] with the following in the message body:
sub NYSFA-L [your name here]. Submissions should be sent to: [email protected]
DIRECT LOAN LISTSERV
Used to transmit information about policy, system changes, technical issues, and other
critical information related to the Direct Loan program and other student financial assistance
programs. The listserv is read only. To subscribe, address an e-mail message to:
[email protected] Write the following (and nothing else) in the message block:
subscribe DLOANSINFO yourfirstname yourlastname (Leave the subject blank empty, and
if you have a signature block, please turn it off.)
SFA LISTSERV
A tool for disseminating information and addressing questions, concerns and issues related
to student financial aid for the CUNY community. Interested CUNY financial aid directors,
business managers, bursars, central office personnel and their staff may subscribe by
sending an email with their first and last name and email address to Tania Degen
[[email protected]] at OUC.
CUNYSIMS STUDENT INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM LISTSERV
The purpose of the CUNYSIMS listserv is to share topical information regarding SIMSrelated issues at CUNY’s SIMS campuses. Interested subscribers should contact James
Anastasio at [email protected]/
CF INTERFACE LISTSERVS
FAPES job summary listserv: [email protected]
505/509 Listserv: [email protected]
HIGHER EDUCATION USER GROUP (HEUG) FORUMS AND COMMUNITIES
As a benefit of CUNY using an Oracle application (PeopleSoft/CUNYfirst), any employee
of CUNY is eligible to sign up for an account on HEUG Online. On the community page
you can view the community blog from the Advisory Group managing that community,
have access to participate in the forum (listservs), download files, and more. If you want to
receive emails from a communities forum (to say in the loop without having to login), click
the name of the forum and on the window that opens click the ‘+Sub’ button on the right
side. Alternately you can always subscribe to topics from your ‘My Subscriptions’ page
(underneath the My Options drop down). Interested CUNY members should sign up for
HEUG at http://www.heug.org/
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-16
2014-2015 SAM
Veterans Educational Benefit Programs
For the most up to date comprehensive information on all the benefits programs listed on this page,
check the GI Bill website at: http://www.gibill.va.gov/.
The CUNY Office of Veterans Affairs website: http://www.cuny.edu/about/resources/veterans.html
is a virtual one-stop source of information for returning military veterans and their families. It is a
guide to educational benefits, entitlements, counseling, advocacy resources, and the latest news,
designed to assist veterans in attaining their academic, personal and professional goals.
Post 9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act (Chapter 33)
The Post 9/11 GI Bill takes effect August 1, 2009 and will provide up to 36 months of
educational benefits for individuals who served on active duty on or after September 11,
2001. Eligibility for benefits is extended to 15 years from the last period of active duty.
Benefit entitlement will be determined by length of active duty service after September 10,
2001. In addition to tuition and fees (not to exceed the most expensive in-state
undergraduate tuition at a public institution), there are provisions for a monthly housing
allowance equal to E-5 basic allowance for housing with dependents (in the same zip code
as the college), and a yearly stipend of $1,000 for books and equipment.
Montgomery GI Bill - Active Duty Educational Assistance (Chapter 30)
The MGIB program provides up to 36 months of educational benefits payable for up to 10
years following release from active duty. This benefit may be used for degree and
certificate programs, flight training, apprenticeship/on-the-job training and correspondence
courses. Remedial, deficiency, and refresher courses may be approved. To apply,
applicants use VA Form 22-1990 or they may apply online at:
https://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp_ssl/login.asp.
Montgomery GI Bill - Selected Reserve Educational Assistance (Chap. 1606)
The MGIB-SR program provides up to 36 months of educational benefits to members of the
Selected Reserve, including the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard
Reserves. This program does not require a person to serve on active duty to qualify. To
apply, applicants must obtain a Notice of Basic Eligibility (DD Form 2384 or 2384-1) from
their unit and complete VA Form 22-1990. To apply online:
https://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp_ssl/login.asp.
Reserve Educational Assistance Program (Ch. 1607)
REAP is a program that provides up to 36 months of educational benefits to members of the
Selected Reserves, Individual Ready Reserve (IRR), and National Guard who are called to
active service. The educational assistance allowance payable under REAP is a percentage
of the MGIB rate based on the number of continuous days served on active duty. To apply,
applicants complete VA Form 22-1990 and indicate they are applying for REAP. To apply
online: https://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp_ssl/login.asp.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-17
OSFA
Veterans Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 32)
VEAP is available for members of the armed forces who first entered active duty between
January 1, 1977 and June 30, 1985 and elected to make contributions from their military pay
to participate in this educational benefits program. Member contributions are matched on a
$2 for $1 basis by the government. To apply, applicants use VA Form 22-1990 or they may
apply online at: https://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp_ssl/login.asp.
Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance (Chapter 35)
This program provides educational and training opportunities to eligible dependents of
certain veterans who died or are totally and permanently disabled as the result of a serviceconnected disability. The program offers up to 45 months of benefits. Spouses of disabled
veterans have 10 years from the date the VA establishes eligibility to use the benefit.
Surviving spouses of veterans who died while on active duty have 20 years from the date of
the veterans’ death to use the benefit. Children may use the benefit while they are between
the ages of 18 and 26. Time limits can be extended under certain circumstances. Applicants
use VA Form 22-5490 to apply or they apply online at:
https://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp_ssl/login.asp.
Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program (Chapter 31)
The VR & E Program aids veterans with service-related disabilities to prepare for, find, and
keep suitable jobs. If any training is needed, the VA will pay training costs, such as tuition,
fees, books, supplies, equipment, and, if needed, special services. While in training, the VA
pays a monthly benefit, called a Subsistence Allowance, to help with living expenses. To
receive an evaluation for these services, a veteran must have received, or will receive, a
discharge other than dishonorable, and have a service-related disability rating of at least
10%. To apply, applicants use VA Form 28-1900 or they may apply online at:
https://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp_ssl/login.asp.
Veterans Work-Study Program
VA work-study program recipients must be receiving full-time GI Bill benefits to be
eligible. Up to 750 hours per year, payable at least at the federal minimum wage are
available to eligible veterans. For more information visit:
http://www.gibill.va.gov/pamphlets/wkstud.htm.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-18
2014-2015 SAM
ACCES – Training at a College or University
Adult Career & Continuing Education Services (ACCES) is a NYS government office that provides
a variety of educationally related services and some financial assistance for eligible students.
ACCES may support college training as part of a client’s Individualized Plan for Employment
(IPE).
College Components
ACCES Provisions
Full-Time Tuition, Fees,
Books & Materials
Room and Board
Length of Training
Part-Time
Summer, Mini, or
Intersession
Approved Vendors
Financial Aid
Refunds/Overpayment
Academic Standards
Out-of-State Training
Graduate Training
Foreign Training
ACCES's contribution for direct college expenses related to tuition, fees,
required texts and materials is calculated after all other available financial
aid and ACCES calculated student/family resources are applied.
ACCES may contribute a certain maximum amount per academic year. A
cost-effective analysis will be applied regarding commuting vs. living on
campus and ACCES will pay towards the lower of the two expenses.
Students may be allowed additional time to complete an Associate’s
Degree or a Bachelor’s Degree. If approved, the maximum allowances
include all part-time training and previously completed course work that can
be applied to the current degree program.
Part-time training is defined as taking fewer than 12 credits per semester or
the equivalent for schools operating on a trimester or other basis. It cannot
exceed two calendar years and, with agreement of the ACCES VRC, may
be allowed any time during the training. If courses are dropped during a
semester, resulting in fewer than 12 credits, the semester must be
considered as part-time. ACCES’s maximum contribution amount is
prorated based on the percentage of full-time credits taken.
ACCES may contribute when it is cost effective to ACCES; enables
completion of otherwise unavailable required or sequential courses; allows
repeat of failed course work required to meet the IPE employment goal
date; or individual is restricted from taking the required number of credits
per semester. This assistance is in addition to ACCES’s maximum
contribution for direct college expenses and is paid at the part-time rate.
Colleges must meet accreditation requirements and the institutions
selected must be most cost effective to ACCES.
Students must apply for all available Financial Aid and provide ACCES with
documentation, including award amounts by established deadlines.
If an overpayment exists, i.e. financial aid awarded and any ACCES
advance payment exceeds actual cost, the consumer is expected to repay
ACCES the overpayment amount.
Students must provide ACCES with the academic standards for their
degree program, as defined by the college. These standards, as well as the
standards to continue receiving TAP and Pell awards, must be met by the
student in order for ACCES to continue financial support for college
training.
May be allowed, but ACCES costs will equal the amount that would have
been contributed toward a college program available within NY State.
ACCES will contribute to graduate level training only when such training is
required for the individual’s Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE).
ACCES maximum contribution limits apply.
Allowed only if the home educational institution is providing instruction
outside the US and such training is required for the degree program.
ACCES maximum contribution limits apply.
The conditions under which students with disabilities can receive ACCES support for their
educational plans are described at: http://www.acces.nysed.gov/
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-19
OSFA
Configuration of Social Security Numbers
The Social Security number is divided into three parts: the area, group and serial numbers. Until
June 25, 2011, the first three (3) digits of a person's social security number indicated the person’s
state of residence from the mailing address shown on the SSN application. Since that date, SSA has
introduced a randomized process of assigning SSNs; therefore, in newly assigned SSNs, the area
number no longer has geographical significance. The process of random assignment has also
introduced area numbers not previously made available for assignment.
Within each area, the group number (middle two (2) digits) ranges from 01 to 99 but are not
assigned in consecutive order. The group number has no special geographical significance but is
used to break the numbers into blocks of convenient size for SSA processing operations.
Within each group, the serial numbers (last four (4) digits) run consecutively from 0001 through
9999.
The chart below shows the first 3 digits of the social security numbers assigned throughout the
United States and its possessions prior to the introduction of the random assignment process. It
should be used only for informational purposes.
001-003
004-007
008-009
010-034
035-039
040-049
050-134
135-158
159-211
212-220
221-222
223-231
691-699
232-236
232
237-246
681-690
247-251
654-658
252-260
667-675
261-267
589-595
766-772
268-302
303-317
318-361
362-386
387-399
400-407
408-415
756-763
416-424
425-428
587
588*
752-755*
429-432
676-679
433-439
659-665
440-448
New Hampshire
Maine
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Maryland
Delaware
Virginia
West Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Kentucky
Tennessee
Alabama
Mississippi
Arkansas
Louisiana
Oklahoma
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-20
449-467
627-645
468-477
478-485
486-500
501-502
503-504
505-508
509-515
516-517
518-519
520
521-524
650-653
525,585
648-649
526-527
600-601
764-765
528-529
646-647
530
680
531-539
540-544
545-573
602-626
574
575-576
750
751
577-579
580
580-584
596-599
586
586
586
700-728
729-733
Texas
Minnesota
Iowa
Missouri
North Dakota
South Dakota
Nebraska
Kansas
Montana
Idaho
Wyoming
Colorado
New Mexico
Arizona
Utah
Nevada
Washington
Oregon
California
Alaska
Hawaii
District of Columbia
Virgin Islands
Puerto Rico
Guam
American Samoa
Philippine Islands
Railroad Board**
Enumeration at
Entry
2014-2015 SAM
NOTE: The same area, when shown more than once, means that certain numbers have been
transferred from one State to another, or that an area has been divided for use among certain
geographic locations.
Any number beginning with 000 will NEVER be a valid SSN.
* = New areas allocated, but not yet issued
** 700-728 Issuance of these numbers to railroad employees was discontinued July 1,
1963.
Information about Social Security Numbers that have been assigned through July 1, 2008
is available on SSA's website at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/employer/highgroup.txt.
Identifying Invalid (or Impossible) Social Security Numbers
An invalid (or impossible) Social Security Number (SSN) is one which has not yet been assigned.
Prior to June 25, 2011, a valid SSN could not have an area number between 734 and 749, or
above 772. Effective June 25, 2011, the SSA began to assign SSNs randomly, thus allowing for
the assignment of area numbers between 734 and 749 and above 772 through the 800s. However,
the following still holds rue as of this writing:

No SSNs with an area number in the 900 series have been assigned. Numbers from 98765-4320 to 987-65-4329 are reserved for use in advertisements.
There are also special numbers which will never be allocated:

Numbers with all zeros in any digit group (000-##-####, ###-00-####, ###-##-0000).

Numbers of the form 666-##-####.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-21
OSFA
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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 17-22
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