Band 5

Band 5
Battleships
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Draw two grids like these (or print off copies from the school website on the maths
resources page)
The aim of the game is to find and sink
each other’s ships by naming co-ordinates
on your partner’s grid.
‘ships’ can be of various lengths (i.e. 2, 3 or
4 coloured squares in a line—horizontal or
vertical)
Agree what number of sizes of ‘ships’ each player should have on
their board, e.g. 2 x 4 squares; 3 x 3 squares; 4 x 2 squares.
Secretly draw your ships on you own grid. Make sure your partner
doesn’t see it!
Take it in turns to guess the co-ordinates of your opponents ‘ships’.
Respond with ‘hit or ‘miss’
The winner is the person to sink all their opponent’s ‘ships’ first.
How much?
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While shopping, point out an item costing less than £1.
Ask your child to work out in their head the cost of 3 of
that item.
Encourage them to round up and down to the nearest 10 to make it
easier, then subtract or add the difference accordingly, e.g. it is
much easier to round 99p up to £1, multiply by 3 and then subtract
3p)
Ask them to estimate the cost first. See how close they come.
If you see any items labelled, e.g. ‘2 for £3.50’ ask them to work out
the cost of one item for you, and to explain how they got the answer.
Band 5
At this stage your child is learning to:
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Guess my number
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Choose a number between 0 and 1 with one decimal place, 0.6.
Challenge your child to ask you questions to guess your number.
E.g. a question such as ‘Is it less than a half?
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You may only answer ‘Yes’ or ‘No’.
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See if he or she can guess your number in fewer than 5 questions.
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Now let your child choose a mystery number for you to guess.
Add challenge by choosing a number with one decimal place between 1
and 10, e.g. 3.6. You may need more questions!
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Read, write, order and compare numbers up to at least
1,000,000 and determine the value of each digit.
Interpret negative numbers in context, count forwards and backwards with positive and
negative whole numbers, including through zero.
Add and subtract whole numbers with more than 4 digits, using formal written methods
(columnar addition and subtraction).
Add and subtract numbers mentally with increasingly large numbers.
Solve addition and subtraction multi-step problems in contexts, deciding which operations
and methods to use and why.
Identify multiples and factors, including finding all factor pairs of a number, and common
factors of two numbers.
Solve problems involving multiplication and division, including using his/her knowledge of
factors and multiples, squares and cubes.
Solve problems involving multiplication and division, including scaling by simple fractions
and problems involving simple rates.
Compare and order fractions whose denominators are multiples of the same number.
Read and write decimal numbers as fractions e.g. 0.71 = 71/100.
Read, write, order and compare numbers with up to three decimal places.
Solve problems which require knowing percentage and decimal equivalents of 1/2, 1/4, 1/5,
2/5, 4/5 and those fractions with a denominator of a multiple of 10 or 25.
Convert between different units of metric measure (for example, kilometre and metre; centimetre and metre; centimetre and millimetre; gram and kilogram; litre and millilitre).
Measure and calculate the perimeter of composite rectilinear shapes in centimetres and
metres.
Calculate and compare the area of rectangles (including squares), and including using
standard units, square centimetres (cm²) and square metres (m²), and estimate the area of
irregular shapes.
Draw given angles and measure them in degrees (°).
Distinguish between regular and irregular polygons based on reasoning about equal sides
and angles.
Solve comparison, sum and difference problems using information presented in a line
graph.
Don’t forget you can also finds lots of games and some maths resources on our website
www.fairfieldinfant.co.uk or www.colneisjunior.co.uk — just go to your child’s year group page!
Decimal number plates
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FD56 UPN
Each player is given a car registration
plate.
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Choose 2 digits from it and make the smallest and largest numbers
possible, each with one decimal place, e.g. 5.6 and 6.5.
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Now find the difference between the two decimal numbers,
e.g. 6.5-5.6 = 0.9
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The player with the biggest difference scores a point.
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The first player to 5 points wins
Play the game again, but this time score a point for the smallest difference
or the biggest total when you add the two numbers.
Times tables
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Make a times-table grid like this (or print off
a copy from the school website on the maths
resources page)
Shade in all the tables facts that your child
knows, probably the 1s, 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s, 10s
and most of the 11s.
Some facts appear twice, e.g. 7x3 and 3x7,
so cross out one of each.
Are you surprised how few facts are left?
Just take them one a day and, if it helps, make up a silly rhyme together to help your child learn it, e.g.
‘Nine sevens are sixty-three, lets have lots of chips for tea!’
Target 1000
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Roll a dice 6 times.
Use the six digits to make two three-digit numbers.
Add the two numbers together.
How close to 1000 can you get.
For an extra challenge, roll three dice to make a three-digit number each
time. What is the smallest number of throws you need to make exactly
1000?
Line it up
You need a ruler marked in centimetres and millimetres.
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Use the ruler to draw 10 different straight lines on a piece of paper.
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Ask your child to estimate the length of each and write it alongside.
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Now ask them to measure to the nearest millimetre, write it down
and work out the difference from their estimate.
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A difference of 5mm or less scores 10 points. A difference of 1cm or
less scores 5 points. How close to 100 points can he or she get?
Finding areas and perimeters
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Collect 5 or 6 new or used envelopes of different sizes.
Ask your child to estimate the perimeter of each one to
the nearest centimetre. Write the estimate on the back.
Now measure. Write the measurement next to the estimate.
How close did your child get?
Now choose 5 or 6 boxed adverts from newspapers or magazines
and ask your child to estimate and measure the perimeter of each
one.
Once you have worked on the perimeter, estimate and calculate the area
Telephone challenges
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Challenge your child to find numbers in the telephone directory
where the digits add up to 42.
Find as many as possible in 10 minutes and write them down.
On another day, see if they can beat their previous total or choose a
different number to make.
Telephone: 01394 ………….?
Dicey subtractions
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Write the subtraction 400[ ] - 399[ ] = on a piece of paper
Take turns to roll one dice twice or two dice once.
Fill in the missing numbers in the boxes, e.g. 4002-3994
Count on from the smaller to the larger number (find the difference
between), i.e. = 8 so you score 8 points
Keep a running total of your score.
The first to get to 50 wins.
Dicey division
For this game you need a 1-100 square (print off a copy from the maths
resources page on the website or ask your child’s teacher for a
photocopy), a dice and 20 coins or counters.
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Take turns.
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Choose a two-digit number. Roll a dice. If you roll 1, roll again.
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If your two-digit number divides exactly by the dice number, put a
coin or counter on your chosen two-digit number. Otherwise miss
that turn.
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The first to get 10 coins or counters on the board wins.
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