W600 Series
W A L C H E M
IWAKI America Inc.
W600 Series Controllers
W600 Series
Water Treatment Controller
Instruction Manual
Five Boynton Road Hopping Brook Park Holliston, MA 01746 USA
TEL: 508-429-1110 FAX: 508-429-7433 WEB: www.walchem.com
Notice
© 2014 WALCHEM, Iwaki America Incorporated (hereinafter “Walchem”)
5 Boynton Road, Holliston, MA 01746 USA
(508) 429-1110
All Rights Reserved
Printed in USA
Proprietary Material
The information and descriptions contained herein are the property of WALCHEM. Such information and
descriptions may not be copied or reproduced by any means, or disseminated or distributed without the
express prior written permission of WALCHEM, 5 Boynton Road, Holliston, MA 01746.
This document is for information purposes only and is subject to change without notice.
Statement of Limited Warranty
WALCHEM warrants equipment of its manufacture, and bearing its identification to be free from defects in
workmanship and material for a period of 24 months for electronics and 12 months for mechanical parts and
electrodes from date of delivery from the factory or authorized distributor under normal use and service and
otherwise when such equipment is used in accordance with instructions furnished by WALCHEM and for the
purposes disclosed in writing at the time of purchase, if any. WALCHEM's liability under this warranty shall
be limited to replacement or repair, F.O.B. Holliston, MA U.S.A. of any defective equipment or part which,
having been returned to WALCHEM, transportation charges prepaid, has been inspected and determined by
WALCHEM to be defective. Replaceable elastomeric parts and glass components are expendable and are
not covered by any warranty.
THIS WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ANY OTHER WARRANTY, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO
DESCRIPTION, QUALITY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE,
OR ANY OTHER MATTER.
180600 Rev. B
December 2014
TableofContents
1.0 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 2 2.0 SPECIFICATIONS ................................................................................................................... 3 2.1 .......... Measurement Performance ............................................................................................................ 3 2.2 .......... Electrical: Input/Output ................................................................................................................... 4 2.3 .......... Mechanical ...................................................................................................................................... 5 2.4 .......... Variables and their Limits ............................................................................................................... 5 3.0 UNPACKING & INSTALLATION ............................................................................................. 7 3.1 .......... Unpacking the unit .......................................................................................................................... 7 3.2 .......... Mounting the electronic enclosure .................................................................................................. 7 3.3 .......... Sensor Installation .......................................................................................................................... 7 3.4 .......... Icon Definitions ............................................................................................................................. 11 3.5 .......... Electrical installation ..................................................................................................................... 11 4.0 FUNCTION OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................ 29 4.1 .......... Front Panel ................................................................................................................................... 29 4.2 .......... Touchscreen ................................................................................................................................. 29 4.3 .......... Icons ......................................................................................................................................... 30 4.4 .......... Startup ......................................................................................................................................... 32 4.5 .......... Shut Down .................................................................................................................................... 36 5.0 OPERATION USING THE TOUCHSCREEN ........................................................................ 37 5.1 .......... Alarms Menu ................................................................................................................................. 37 5.2 .......... Inputs Menu ................................................................................................................................. 37 5.2.1 Contacting Conductivity .............................................................................................................................. 40 5.2.2 Electrodeless Conductivity .......................................................................................................................... 40 5.2.3 Temperature ................................................................................................................................................ 41 5.2.4 pH ................................................................................................................................................................ 41 5.2.5 ORP ............................................................................................................................................................. 41 5.2.6 Disinfection.................................................................................................................................................. 42 5.2.7 Analog Input ................................................................................................................................................ 42 5.2.8 DI State ........................................................................................................................................................ 42 5.2.9 Flow Meter, Contactor Type........................................................................................................................ 43 5.2.10 Flow Meter, Paddlewheel Type ................................................................................................................... 43 5.3 .......... Outputs Menu ............................................................................................................................. 44 5.3.1 Relay, Any Control Mode ............................................................................................................................ 44 5.3.2 Relay, On/Off Control Mode........................................................................................................................ 44 5.3.3 Relay, Flow Timer Control Mode ................................................................................................................ 45 5.3.4 Relay, Bleed and Feed Control Mode.......................................................................................................... 45 5.3.5 Relay, Bleed then Feed Control Mode ......................................................................................................... 46 5.3.6 Relay, Percent Timer Control Mode ............................................................................................................ 46 5.3.7 Relay, Biocide Timer Control Mode ............................................................................................................ 46 5.3.8 Relay, Alarm Output Mode .......................................................................................................................... 48 5.3.9 Relay, Time Proportional Control Mode ..................................................................................................... 49 5.3.10 Relay, Intermittent Sampling Control Mode ................................................................................................ 49 5.3.11 Relay or Analog Output, Manual Mode....................................................................................................... 50 5.3.12 Relay, Pulse Proportional Control Mode .................................................................................................... 50 5.3.13 Relay, Dual Set Point Mode......................................................................................................................... 51 5.3.14 Relay, Timer Control Mode ......................................................................................................................... 51 5.3.15 Analog Output, Retransmit Mode ................................................................................................................ 53 5.3.16 Analog Output, Proportional Control Mode ............................................................................................... 53 5.4 .......... Configuration Menu .................................................................................................................... 54 5.4.1 Global Settings ............................................................................................................................................ 54 5.4.2 Security Settings .......................................................................................................................................... 54 5.4.3 Network Settings .......................................................................................................................................... 55 5.4.4 Network Details ........................................................................................................................................... 55 5.4.5 Display Settings ........................................................................................................................................... 55 5.4.6 File Utilities ................................................................................................................................................. 56 5.4.7 Controller Details ........................................................................................................................................ 57 5.5 .......... HOA Menu .................................................................................................................................... 58 5.6 .......... Graph Menu ................................................................................................................................ 58 6.0 OPERATION USING ETHERNET ......................................................................................... 59 6.1 .......... Connecting to a LAN..................................................................................................................... 59 6.2 .......... Connecting Directly to a Computer ............................................................................................... 60 6.3 .......... Navigating the web pages ............................................................................................................ 60 7.0 MAINTENANCE..................................................................................................................... 61 7.1 .......... Electrode Cleaning ....................................................................................................................... 61 7.2 .......... Replacing the Fuse Protecting Powered Relays .......................................................................... 62 8.0 TROUBLESHOOTING........................................................................................................... 62 8.1 .......... Calibration Failure ......................................................................................................................... 62 8.1.1 Contacting Conductivity Sensors ................................................................................................................. 62 8.1.2 Electrodeless Conductivity Sensors .............................................................................................................. 63 8.1.3 pH Sensors.................................................................................................................................................... 63 8.1.4 ORP Sensors ................................................................................................................................................. 63 8.1.5 Disinfection Sensors ..................................................................................................................................... 64 8.1.6 Analog Inputs ............................................................................................................................................... 64 8.1.7 Temperature Sensors .................................................................................................................................... 64 8.2 .......... Alarm Messages ........................................................................................................................... 65 8.3 .......... Procedure for Evaluation of Conductivity Electrode ..................................................................... 68 8.4 ........ Procedure for evaluation of the pH/ORP electrode ...................................................................... 68 8.5 ........ Diagnostic Lights .......................................................................................................................... 69 9.0 SPARE PARTS IDENTIFICATION ........................................................................................ 70 10.0 SERVICE POLICY ................................................................................................................. 84 1.0
INTRODUCTION
The Walchem W600 Series controllers offer a high level of flexibility in controlling water treatment
applications.
One or two sensor inputs are available that are compatible with a variety of sensors:
Contacting conductivity
Electrodeless conductivity
pH
ORP
Any Walchem disinfection sensor
An analog (4-20 mA) sensor input card with two input circuits is also available for use with 2, 3 or 4wire transmitters.
Six relay outputs may be set to a variety of control modes:
On/Off set point control
Time Proportional control
Pulse Proportional Control (requires pulse output relay option)
Dual set point
Timer
Bleed or Feed based on a Water Contactor or Paddlewheel flow meter input
Cycles of Concentration
Feed and Bleed
Feed and Bleed with Lockout
Feed as a percent of Bleed
Feed as a percent of elapsed time
Daily, Weekly, 2-week or 4-week Biocide timers with pre-bleed and post-add lockout of
bleed
Intermittent sampling for boilers with proportional blowdown, controlling on a trapped
sample
Always on unless interlocked
Diagnostic Alarm triggered by:
High or Low sensor reading
No Flow
Relay output timeout
Sensor error
An option card with two isolated analog outputs may be installed to retransmit sensor input signals to
a chart recorder, datalogger, PLC or other device. They may also be connected to valves, actuators or
metering pumps for linear proportional control.
An Ethernet option provides remote access to the controller’s programming via a PC connected
directly, via a local area network, or via Walchem’s VTouch account management server.
Our USB features provide the ability to upgrade the software in the controller to the latest version.
The Config file feature allows you to save all the set points from a controller onto a USB flash disk,
and then import them into another controller, making the programming of multiple controllers fast
and easy. The data logging feature allows you to save the sensor readings and relay activation events
to a USB flash disk.
2
2.0
SPECIFICATIONS
2.1
Measurement Performance
0.01 Cell Contacting Conductivity
Range
0-300 µS/cm
Resolution
0.01 µS/cm, 0.0001 mS/cm, 0.001 mS/m, 0.0001 S/m, 0.01 ppm
Accuracy
± 1% of reading
0.1 Cell Contacting Conductivity
Range
0-3,000 µS/cm
Resolution
0.1 µS/cm, 0.0001 mS/cm, 0.01 mS/m, 0.0001 S/m, 0.1 ppm
Accuracy
± 1% of reading
1.0 Cell Contacting Conductivity
Range
0-30,000 µS/cm
Resolution
1 µS/cm, 0.001 mS/cm, 0.1 mS/m, 0.0001 S/m, 1 ppm
Accuracy
± 1% of reading
10.0 Cell Contacting Conductivity
Range
0-300,000 µS/cm
Resolution
10 µS/cm, 0.01 mS/cm, 1 mS/m, 0.001 S/m, 10 ppm
Accuracy
± 1% of reading
pH
Range
Resolution
Accuracy
ORP
Range
Resolution
Accuracy
-2 to 16 pH units
0.01 pH units
± 0.01% of reading
-1500 to 1500 mV
0.1 mV
± 1 mV
Disinfection Sensors
Range (mV)
-2000 to 1500 mV
Resolution (mV) 0.1 mV
Accuracy (mV) ± 1 mV
Range (ppm)
0-2 ppm to 0-20,000 ppm
Resolution (ppm) Varies with range and slope
Accuracy (ppm) Varies with range and slope
Temperature
Range
Resolution
Accuracy
Analog (4-20 mA)
Range
0 to 22 mA
Resolution
0.01 mA
Accuracy
± 0.5% of reading
23 to 500°F (-5 to 260°C)
0.1°F (0.1°C)
± 1% of reading
Electrodeless Conductivity
Ranges
Resolution
Accuracy
1
µS/cm,
0.01
mS/cm,
0.1
mS/m,
0.001
S/m,
1
ppm
±
1% of reading
500-12,000 µS/cm
3,000-40,000 µS/cm
1 µS/cm, 0.01 mS/cm, 0.1 mS/m, 0.001 S/m, 1 ppm
± 1% of reading
10,000-150,000 µS/cm
10 µS/cm, 0.1 mS/cm, 1 mS/m, 0.01 S/m, 10 ppm
± 1% of reading
50,000-500,000 µS/cm
10 µS/cm, 0.1 mS/cm, 1 mS/m, 0.01 S/m, 10 ppm
± 1% of reading
200,000-2,000,000 µS/cm
100 µS/cm, 0.1 mS/cm, 1 mS/m, 0.1 S/m, 100 ppm
± 1% of reading
Temperature °C
Range Multiplier
Temperature °C
Range Multiplier
0
181.3
80
43.5
10
139.9
90
39.2
15
124.2
100
35.7
20
111.1
110
32.8
25
100.0
120
30.4
30
90.6
130
28.5
35
82.5
140
26.9
40
75.5
150
25.5
50
64.3
160
24.4
60
55.6
170
23.6
70
48.9
180
22.9
Note: Conductivity ranges above apply at 25°C. At higher temperatures, the range is reduced per the range multiplier chart.
3
2.2
Electrical: Input/Output
Input Power
100 to 240 VAC, 50 or 60 Hz, 7 A maximum
Fuse: 6.3 A
Inputs
Sensor Input Signals (0, 1 or 2 depending on model code)
Contacting Conductivity 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, or 10.0 cell constant OR
Electrodeless Conductivity OR
Disinfection OR
Requires a preamplified signal. Walchem WEL or WDS series
Amplified pH or ORP
recommended.
±5VDC power available for external preamps.
Each sensor input card contains a temperature input
Temperature
100 or 1000 ohm RTD, 10K or 100K Thermistor
Analog (4-20 mA) Sensor Input (0, 2 or 4 depending on model code)
2-wire loop powered or self-powered transmitters supported
3 or 4 –wire transmitters supported
Each sensor input board has two channels
Channel 1, 130 ohm input resistance
Channel 2, 280 ohm input resistance
Available Power
Two independent isolated 24 VDC ± 15% supplies per board
1.5 W maximum for each channel
2W (83 mA at 24 VDC) total power consumption for all channels
(four total channels if two boards are installed; 2W is equivalent to
2 Little Dipper sensors)
Digital Input Signals (6):
State-Type Digital Inputs
Electrical: Optically isolated and providing an electrically isolated
9V power with a nominal 2.3mA current when the digital input
switch is closed
Typical response time: < 2 seconds
Devices supported: Any isolated dry contact (i.e. relay, reed
switch)
Types: Interlock
Low Speed Counter-Type
Electrical: Optically isolated and providing an electrically isolated
Digital Inputs
9V power with a nominal 2.3mA current when the digital input
switch is closed 0-10 Hz, 50 msec minimum width
Devices supported: Any device with isolated open drain, open
collector, transistor or reed switch
Types: Contacting Flowmeter
High Speed Counter-Type
Electrical: Optically isolated and providing an electrically isolated
Digital Inputs
9V power with a nominal 2.3mA current when the digital input
switch is closed, 0-250 Hz, 1.25 msec minimum width
Devices supported: Any device with isolated open drain, open
collector, transistor or reed switch
Types: Paddlewheel Flowmeter
Outputs
Powered mechanical relays (0 or 6 depending on model code):
Pre-powered on circuit board switching line voltage
6 A (resistive), 1/8 HP (93 W)
All six relays are fused together as one group, total current for this
group must not exceed 6A
Dry contact mechanical relays (0, 2 or4 depending on model code):
6 A (resistive), 1/8 HP (93 W)
Dry contact relays are not fuse protected
Pulse Outputs (0, 2 or4 depending on model code):
Opto-isolated, Solid State Relay
200mA, 40 VDC Max.
VLOWMAX = 0.05V @ 18 mA
4 - 20 mA (0 or 2) Internally powered
Fully isolated
600 Ohm max resistive load
Resolution 0.0015% of span
Accuracy ± 0.5% of reading
4
Ethernet
10/100 802.3-2005
Auto MDIX support
Auto Negotiation
Agency Approvals
Safety
UL 61010-1:2012 3rd Ed.
CSA C22.2 No. 61010-1:2012 3rd Ed.
IEC 61010-1:2010 3rd Ed.
EN 61010-1:2010 3rd Ed.
EMC IEC 61326-1:2005
EN 61326-1:2006
Note: For EN61000-4-6, EN61000-4-3 the controller met performance criteria B.
*Class A equipment: Equipment suitable for use in establishments other than domestic, and those directly
connected to a low voltage (100-240 VAC) power supply network which supplies buildings used for
domestic purposes.
2.3
Mechanical
Enclosure Material
Enclosure Rating
Dimensions
Display
Operating Ambient Temp
Storage Temperature
2.4
Polycarbonate
NEMA 4X (IP65)
9.5” x 8” x 4” (241 mm x 203 mm x 102 mm)
320 x 240 pixel monochrome backlit display with touchscreen
-4 to 131 °F (-20 to 55 °C)
-4 – 176°F (-20 – 80°C)
Variables and their Limits
Low Limit
High Limit
Low end of sensor range
Low end of sensor range
0.01
0.5
0.1
0.001
-5
Low end of sensor range
0
0
High end of sensor range
High end of sensor range
10
1.5
3,000
10.000
500
High end of sensor range
100
100
0
0
0
100,000,000
100,000
1,000
Sensor input settings
Alarm limits
Conductivity alarm dead band
Cell constant
Installation Factor (Electrodeless conductivity only)
Cable length
PPM conversion factor (only if units = PPM)
Default temperature
Deadband
4 mA value (analog input only)
20 mA value (analog input only)
Flow meter input settings
Totalizer alarm
Volume/contact
K Factor
5
Relay output settings
0 seconds
Low end of sensor range
Low end of sensor range
0 seconds
0
0%
86,400 seconds (0 =
unlimited)
86,400 seconds (0 =
unlimited)
300 seconds
High end of sensor range
High end of sensor range
86,400 seconds
1,000,000
100%
0 seconds
86,400 seconds
1 (0 = no prebleed)
0 seconds
0 seconds
0 seconds
0
10 seconds
0 seconds
0 seconds
0 seconds
0 seconds
10 pulses/minute
0%
0%
30,000
86,400 seconds
86,400 seconds
86,400 seconds
30,000
3600 seconds
3600 seconds
3600 seconds
3600 seconds
86,400 seconds
480 pulses/minute
100%
100%
Low end of sensor range
Low end of sensor range
0%
Low end of sensor range
Low end of sensor range
0%
0%
0%
0 mA
High end of sensor range
High end of sensor range
100%
High end of sensor range
High end of sensor range
100%
100%
100%
21 mA
0000
1 minute
10 seconds
9999
1440 minutes
60 seconds
Low end of sensor range
Low end of sensor range
High end of sensor range
High end of sensor range
Output Limit Time
1 second
Hand Time Limit
1 second
Min Relay Cycle
Set Point
Dead Band
Feed duration (Flow Timer mode)
Accumulator volume (Flow Timer mode)
Feed Percentage (Bleed then Feed mode)
Feed Lockout Time Limit (Bleed & Feed, Bleed then
Feed modes)
Prebleed Conductivity (Biocide mode)
Prebleed Time (Biocide mode)
Bleed Lockout(Biocide mode)
Event duration (Biocide, Timer modes)
Proportional band (Time or Pulse Proportional mode)
Sample period (Time Proportional mode)
Sample Time (Intermittent Sampling mode)
Hold Time (Intermittent Sampling mode)
Maximum Blowdown (Intermittent Sampling mode)
Wait Time (Intermittent Sampling mode)
Max Rate (Pulse Proportional mode)
Minimum Output (Pulse Proportional mode)
Maximum Output (Pulse Proportional mode)
Analog (4-20 mA) output settings
4 mA Value
20 mA Value
Hand Output
Set Point
Proportional Band
Minimum Output
Maximum Output
Off Mode Output
Error Output
Configuration settings
Local Password
VTouch update period
VTouch reply timeout
Graph settings
Low axis limit
High axis limit
6
3.0
UNPACKING & INSTALLATION
3.1
Unpacking the unit
Inspect the contents of the carton. Please notify the carrier immediately if there are any signs of
damage to the controller or its parts. Contact your distributor if any of the parts are missing. The
carton should contain a W600 series controller and an instruction manual. Any options or
accessories will be incorporated as ordered.
3.2
Mounting the electronic enclosure
The controller is supplied with mounting holes on the enclosure. It should be wall mounted with the
display at eye level, on a vibration-free surface, utilizing all four mounting holes for maximum
stability. Use M6 (1/4" diameter) fasteners that are appropriate for the substrate material of the wall.
The enclosure is NEMA 4X (IP65) rated. The maximum operating ambient temperature is 131°F
(55°C); this should be considered if installation is in a high temperature location. The enclosure
requires the following clearances:
Top:
2" (50 mm)
Left:
8" (203 mm) (not applicable for prewired models)
Right:
4" (102 mm)
Bottom:
7" (178 mm)
3.3
Sensor Installation
Refer to the specific instructions supplied with the sensor being used, for detailed installation
instructions.
General Guidelines
Locate the sensors where an active sample of water is available and where the sensors can easily be
removed for cleaning. Position the sensor such that air bubbles will not be trapped within the sensing
area. Position the sensor where sediment or oil will not accumulate within the sensing area.
In-Line Sensor Mounting
In-line mounted sensors must be situated so that the tee is always full and the sensors are never
subjected to a drop in water level resulting in dryness. Refer to Figure 2 for typical installation.
Tap off the discharge side of the recirculation pump to provide a minimum flow of 1 gallon per
minute through the flow switch manifold. The sample must flow into the bottom of the manifold in
order to close the flow switch, and return to a point of lower pressure in order to ensure flow. Install
an isolation valve on both sides of the manifold to stop flow for sensor maintenance.
IMPORTANT: To avoid cracking the female pipe threads on the supplied plumbing parts, use no
more than 3 wraps of Teflon tape and thread in the pipe FINGER tight plus 1/2 turn! Do not use
pipe dope to seal the threads of the flow switch because the clear plastic will crack!
Submersion Sensor Mounting
If the sensors are to be submersed in the process, mount them firmly to the tank, and protect the cable
with plastic pipe, sealed at the top with a cable gland, to prevent premature failure. Place the sensors
in an area of good solution movement.
7
Sensors should be located such that they respond rapidly to a well-mixed sample of the process water
and the treatment chemicals. If they are too close to the chemical injection point, they will see spikes
in concentration and cycle on and off too frequently. If they are too far away from the chemical
injection point, they will respond too slowly to the concentration changes, and you will overshoot the
set point.
The contacting conductivity sensor should be placed as close to the controller as possible, to a
maximum distance of 250 ft. (76 m). Less than 25 ft. (8 m) is recommended. The cable must be
shielded from background electrical noise. Always route low voltage (sensor) signals with at least a
6” (15 cm) separation from AC voltage wiring.
The electrodeless conductivity sensor should be placed as close to the controller as possible, to a
maximum distance of 250 ft. (76 m). Less than 25 ft. (8 m) is recommended. The cable must be
shielded from background electrical noise. Always route low voltage (sensor) signals with at least a
6” (15 cm) separation from AC voltage wiring. These sensors are affected by the geometry and
conductivity of their surroundings, so either maintain 6 inches (15 cm) of sample around the sensor
or ensure that any nearby conductive or non-conductive items are consistently positioned. Do not
install the sensor in the path of any electrical current that may be flowing in the solution, as this will
shift the conductivity reading.
The pH/ORP electrode should be placed as close to the controller as possible, to a maximum
distance of 1000 feet (300 m) from the controller. A junction box and shielded cable are available to
extend the standard 20 foot (6 m) length. pH and ORP electrodes must be installed such that the
measuring surfaces will always remain wet. A U-trap provided in the manifold design should achieve
this, even if the sample flow stops. These electrodes also must be installed with the measuring
surfaces pointing down; that is 5 degrees above the horizontal, at a minimum.
The disinfection sensor should be placed as close to the controller as possible, to a maximum
distance of 1000 feet (300 m) from the controller. A junction box and shielded cable are available to
extend the standard 20 foot (6 m) length. The sensor should be mounted such that the measuring
surfaces will always stay wet. If the membrane dries out, it will respond slowly to changing
disinfectant values for 24 hours, and if dried out repeatedly, will fail prematurely. The flow cell
should be placed on the discharge side of a circulation pump or downhill from a gravity feed. Flow
into the cell must come from the bottom side that has the ¾” x ¼” NPT reducing bushing installed.
The reducing bushing provides the flow velocity required for accurate readings and must not be
removed! A “U” trap should be installed so that if the flow stops, the sensor is still immersed in the
water. The outlet of the flow cell must be plumbed to open atmosphere unless the system pressure is
at or below 1 atmosphere. If the flow through the line cannot be stopped to allow for cleaning and
calibration of the sensor, then it should be placed in a by-pass line with isolation valves to allow for
sensor removal. Install the sensor vertically, with the measuring surface pointing down, at least 5
degrees above horizontal. Flow rate regulation must be done upstream from the sensor, because any
flow restriction downstream can increase the pressure above atmospheric and damage the membrane
cap!
Important Boiler Sensor Installation Notes: (refer to typical installation drawing)
1. Make sure the minimum water level in the boiler is at least 4-6 inches above the skimmer
blowdown line. If the skimmer line is closer to the surface, it is likely that steam will be drawn
into the line instead of boiler water. The skimmer line must also be installed above the highest
tube.
2. Maintain a 3/4 inch minimum pipe ID with no flow restrictions from the tap for the boiler
skimmer blowdown line to the electrode. If the ID is reduced below 3/4 inch, then flashing will
8
occur beyond that point and the conductivity reading will be low and erratic. Minimize the
usage of tees, valves, elbows or unions between the boiler and the electrode.
3. A manual shut off valve should be installed so that the electrode can be removed and
cleaned. This valve must be a full port valve in order to avoid a flow restriction.
4. Keep the distance between the tap for the boiler skimmer line to the electrode as short as
possible, to a maximum of 10 feet.
5. Mount the electrode in the side branch of a cross in a horizontal run of pipe. This will minimize
entrapment of steam around the electrode and will allow any solids to pass through.
6. There MUST be a flow restriction after the electrode and/or control valve in order to provide
back pressure. This flow restriction will be either a flow control valve or an orifice union. The
amount of the flow restriction will affect the blowdown rate as well, and should be sized
accordingly.
7. Install the motorized ball valve or solenoid valve per the manufacturer’s instructions.
8. For best results, align the hole in the conductivity electrode such that the direction of water flow
is through the hole.
Guide to Sizing Blowdown Valves and Orifice Plates
1. Determine the Rate of Steam Production in Pounds per Hour:
Either read off the boiler name plate (water-tube boilers) or
Calculate from horsepower rating (fire-tube boilers): HP x 34.5 = lbs/hr.
Example: 100 HP = 3450 lbs/hr.
2. Determine the Concentration Ratio (BASED ON FEEDWATER)
A water treatment chemical specialist should determine the desired number of cycles of
concentration. This is the ratio of TDS in the boiler water to TDS in the feedwater. Note that
feedwater means the water that is fed to the boiler from the deaerator and includes makeup water
plus condensate return. Example: 10 cycles of concentration has been recommended
3. Determine the Required Blowdown Rate in Pounds Per Hour
Blowdown Rate = Steam Production / (Concentration Ratio –1)
Example: 3450/(10-1) = 383.33 lbs./hr
4. Determine if Continuous or Intermittent Sampling is Required
Use intermittent sampling when the boiler operation or loading is intermittent, or on boilers where
the required blowdown rate is less than 25% of the smallest available flow control valve or less
than the flow through the smallest orifice. See the graphs on the next page.
Use continuous sampling when the boiler is operating 24 hours per day and the required
blowdown rate is more than 25% of the smallest applicable flow control valve or orifice. See the
graphs on the next page.
Use of a flow control valve will give you the best control of the process, since the flow rate can be
easily adjusted. The dial on the valve also gives you a visual indication if the flow rate has been
changed. If the valve clogs, it can be opened to clear the obstruction, and closed to the previous
position.
9
If an orifice plate is used, you must install a valve downstream from the orifice in order to fine
tune the flow rate and provide additional back pressure in many applications.
Example: An 80 psi boiler has a Required Blowdown Rate of 383.33 lbs./hr. The maximum flow
rate of the smallest flow control valve is 3250 lbs./hr. 3250 x 0.25 = 812.5 which is too high for
continuous sampling. Using an orifice, the flow rate through the smallest diameter plate is 1275
lbs./hr. This is too high for continuous sampling.
5. Determine the Orifice or Flow Control Valve Size for this Blowdown Rate
Use the following graphs to select a flow control device:
10
3.4
Icon Definitions
Symbol
O
3.5
Publication
Description
IEC 417, No.5019
Protective Conductor Terminal
IEC 417, No. 5007
On (Supply)
IEC 417, No. 5008
Off (Supply)
ISO 3864, No. B.3.6
Caution, risk of electric shock
ISO 3864, No. B.3.1
Caution
Electrical installation
The various standard wiring options are shown in figure 1, below. Your controller will arrive from
the factory prewired or ready for hardwiring. Depending on your configuration of controller options,
you may be required to hardwire some or all of the input/output devices. Refer to figures 6 through
17 for circuit board layout and wiring.
Note: when wiring the optional flow meter contactor input, the 4-20 mA outputs or a remote flow
switch, it is advisable to use stranded, twisted, shielded pair wire between 22-26 AWG. Shield
should be terminated at the controller at the most convenient shield terminal.
CAUTION
1.
There are live circuits inside the controller even when the power switch on the front panel
is in the OFF position! The front panel must never be opened before power to the controller
is REMOVED!
If your controller is prewired, it is supplied with an 8 foot, 18 AWG power cord with USA
style plug. A tool (#1 Phillips driver) is required to open the front panel.
2.
When mounting the controller, make sure there is clear access to the disconnecting device!
3.
The electrical installation of the controller must be done by trained personnel only and
conform to all applicable National, State and Local codes!
4.
Proper grounding of this product is required. Any attempt to bypass the grounding will
compromise the safety of persons and property.
5.
Operating this product in a manner not specified by Walchem may impair the protection
provided by the equipment.
11
Figure 1 Conduit Wiring
12
COOLING TOWER
METERING
PUMPS
HEAT
EXCHANGER
19.5"
¾“ NPTF
FLOW
FLOW
SWITCH
WEL pH/ORP
ELECTRODE
¾“ NPTF
FLOW
11.75"
CONDUCTIVITY
ELECTRODE
SAMPLE
VALVE
1/4" POLYPRO
PANEL 19.5" x 11.75"
Figure 2 Typical Installation – Cooling Tower
13
1
2
3
4
5
6
AC POWER
FLOW IN
FLOW OUT
SUBMERSION
ELECTRODE
ACID
BASE
pH
PROBE
Figure 3 Typical Installation – Cooling Tower Submersion
14
RECOMMENDED INSTALLATION
INTERMITTENT SAMPLING
Skimmer Blowdown Line
3/4" Min. up to Electrode
10 ft. max.
with minimal valves, elbows & unions
CONDUCTIVITY
ELECTRODE
Full Port Block
Valve
¾" TEE
2 ft.
minimum
Motorized
Ball
or Solenoid
Valve
Flow
Control
Valve or
Orifice Union
1 to 3 ft.
maximum
Manual Blowdown
(Normally Closed)
To Drain
TO
DRAIN
Install accessories
either vertically or
horizontally, per
manufacturer's
instructions.
Skimmer Blowdown Line
3/4" Min. up to Electrode
Motorized
Ball
or
Solenoid
Valve
Full Port Block
Valve
Flow
Control
Valve
or Orifice
Union
CONDUCTIVITY
ELECTRODE
¾" TEE
Flow
Control
Valve or
Orifice Union
Manual Blowdown
(Normally Closed)
To Drain
To Drain
RECOMMENDED INSTALLATION
CONTINUOUS SAMPLING
Figure 4 Typical Installation – Boiler
15
To Drain
1
2
3
4
5
6
SAMPLE RETURN
1 ATMOSPHERE MAXIMUM
ROTAMETER
30-100 LPH
SENSOR
FLOW CELL
ISOLATION
VALVE
(NORMALLY
OPEN)
FLOW
SWITCH
FLOW
CONTROL
VALVE
SAMPLE
VALVE
RECIRCULATION
PUMP
PROCESS WATER
Figure 5 Typical Installation – Disinfection Sensor
16
Figure 6 Parts Identification
17
DUAL
ANALOG
OUTPUT
OPTION
USB PORT
ETHERNET
OPTION
I/O SLOT 1
BOARD
I/O SLOT 2
OPTION BOARD
MAIN CONTROLLER BOARD
POWER
RELAY
BOARD
RIBBON CABLE
EARTH GROUND
TERMINAL BLOCK
SENSOR, DIGITAL INPUT
AND ANALOG OUTPUT
TERMINAL BLOCKS
POWER SUPPLY
FUSE
AC POWER
TERMINAL
BLOCK
NEUTRAL
TERMINAL
BLOCK
RELAY OUTPUT
TERMINAL BLOCK
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
SENSOR LABEL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB3
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R3
R4
R5
TB5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB6
TB2
TEMP– WHT
TEMP+ GRN
RCV
BLACK
SHIELD
XMT
RED
TB1 or 2
Conductivity
Electrode
Figure 7 Contacting Conductivity Sensor Input Wiring
18
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
SENSOR LABEL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB3
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R4
R5
TB5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB2
TEMP –
TEMP +
RCV –
RCV +
SHIELD
XMT +
XMT –
TB1 or 2
Conductivity
Electrode
Figure 8 Electrodeless Conductivity Sensor Input Wiring
19
R3
TB6
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB3
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R3
R4
R5
TB5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB6
TB2
Optional Temperature
Compensation
SENSOR LABEL
TEMP– WHT/GRN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TEMP+ GRN/WHT
IN–
WHT/ORN
IN+
ORN/WHT
SHIELD
+5V
BLU/WHT
-5V WHT/BLU
TB1 or 2
pH/ORP electrode
Figure 9 pH/ORP Sensor Input Wiring
20
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
SENSOR LABEL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
IN–
WHT
IN+
GRN
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB3
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R5
R6
TB4
TB2
RED
-5V BLK
TB1 or 2
Figure 10 Disinfection Sensor Input Wiring
21
R4
TB5
SHIELD
+5V
R3
TB7
TB6
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
Type of Transmitter
TB 2 Wire
2 Wire
3 Wire
Pin# Loop Powered
+24V
1 +24V
2
XMTR–
3
4 XMTR– XMTR+
XMTR+
5
COM(-)
6 SHIELD SHIELD
SHIELD
+24V
7 +24V
8
XMTR–
9
10 XMTR– XMTR+ XMTR+
COM(-)
11
12 SHIELD SHIELD
SHIELD
4 Wire AI#
+24V
24V(–)
XMTR–
XMTR+ 1
SHIELD
+24V
24V(–)
XMTR–
XMTR+
SHIELD
2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB3
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R3
R4
R5
TB5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB6
TB2
RED
Power
LK
d
n B
Grou
RN
– B
RN
O
+
Little
Dipper
POWERED
4-20mA SOURCE
–
•SIMULATOR
+
•POWERED 4-20mA
OUTPUT
ld
Shie
(i.e. W100)
TB1 or 2
TB
Pin#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
2 Wire
Loop
+24V
XMTR–
SHIELD
+24V
XMTR–
Type of Transmitter
2 Wire
3 Wire
Powered
+24V
XMTR–
XMTR+
SHIELD
XMTR–
XMTR+
SHIELD SHIELD
XMTR+
COM(-)
SHIELD
+24V
XMTR+
COM(-)
SHIELD
4 Wire AI#
+24V
24V(–)
XMTR–
XMTR+ 1
SHIELD
+24V
24V(–)
XMTR–
XMTR+
SHIELD
2
UNPOWERED
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
+
–
ld
Shie
24V Po
wer
UNPOWERED
Jumper
wire
+ Signal
– Ground
Shield
TB1 or 2
Figure 11 4-20mA Sensor Input Wiring
22
2 WIRE
TRANSMITTER
Jumper
wire
3 WIRE
TRANSMITTER
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB3
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R3
R4
R5
TB5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB6
TB2
SIGNAL
IN –
POWER +9V
Hall Effect
FLOW METER
Reed Switch
FLOW METER
Polarity not Critical
TB1, 2 OR 3
SAFETY COVER LABEL
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
(TB 3 SHOWN)
Figure 12 Digital Input Wiring
23
FLOW SWITCH
Contact Closure:
Polarity not critical
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
TO
TB4
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
TB3
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R3
R4
R5
TB5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB6
TB2
IF MOTORIZED
BALL VALVE
NO
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
SOLENOID/
MOTORIZED
BALL VALVE
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
NC
NO
NC
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
NO
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
TO
TB4
NC
NO
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
NC
NO
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
TB5
PUMP
NC
NO
NC
TO
TB4
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
TO
TB4
R4
R5
R6
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
ALARM
Power Supply
(115 VAC or 230 VAC)
24
R3
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
TO
TB4
Figure 13 W600 AC Power & Relay Output Wiring
R2
TB6
PUMP
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
R1
TB7
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R3
R4
TB5
R5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB2
TB6
If motorized
ball valve
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
R1
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
R2
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
TB5
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
R3
PLC
Fused
External
Power
Source
Fused
External
Power
Source
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
TB4
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
R4
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
R5
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
ALARM
R6
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
TB6
TB7
Power Supply
(115 VAC or 230 VAC)
Figure 14 W610 AC Power & Relay Output Wiring
25
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R3
R4
TB5
R5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB2
TB6
External
AC
Power
R1
External
AC
Power
R2
R3
PLC
Fused
External
Power
Source
Fused
External
Power
Source
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
TB4
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
R4
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
R5
ALARM
R6
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
TB6
TB7
Power Supply
(115 VAC or 230 VAC)
Figure 15 W620 AC Power & Relay Output Wiring
26
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB3
TB1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
R3
R4
TB5
R5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB2
TB6
External
AC
Power
R1
External
AC
Power
R2
External
AC
Power
R3
External
AC
Power
R4
R5
PLC
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
TB4
Fused
External
Power
Source
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
GRN 120V
GRN/YEL 240V
WHT 120V
BLU 240V
BLK 120V
BRN 240V
R6
ALARM
TB6
TB7
Power Supply
(115 VAC or 230 VAC)
Figure 16 W640 AC Power & Relay Output Wiring
27
POWER
SWITCH
FUSE
R1
R2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
TB3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
+
–
SHIELD
Chart
Recorder
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
TB1
N
N
N
N
N
N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
Figure 17 Analog Output Wiring
28
R4
R5
TB5
R6
TB4
TB7
TB6
TB2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
SAFETY LABEL
R3
+
–
SHIELD
TB2
Chart
Recorder
4.0
FUNCTION OVERVIEW
4.1
Front Panel
Figure 18
4.2
Front Panel
Touchscreen
A Home screen is displayed while the controller is on. This display shows a user-defined list of input
readings and the status of any outputs that are tied to that input. Touching any of the input readings
will bring up that input’s Details screen, where you can access calibration and setting menus. Arrow
icons page up or down to additional inputs if more than three are configured to be viewed. Touching
the Menu icon brings up the Main Menu screen.
Easy to understand Icons on the bottom of the screens, and areas within the screen that are outlined
in black, bring up new screens. These reverse the black and white when touched to give visual
feedback.
29
4.3
Icons
The following icons appear on the Home screen.
The Main Menu icon brings you to the list of menu options
listed below.
The following icons appear on the Main Menu screen. Touch the icon to get to the menu selections.
Alarm Menu
Inputs Menu
Outputs Menu
Configuration Menu
HOA Menu
Graph Menu
Home Page
Other icons may appear in the menu screens.
Calibration icon appears in sensor input menus and brings
up the calibration menu
Cancel icon aborts a calibration or setting change
The Page Down icon scrolls down to a new page in a list of
options.
The Page Up icon scrolls up to a new page in a list of
options.
The Back/Return icon returns the display to the previous
screen
The Make Character Higher icon is used when making an
alphanumeric entry
The Make Character Lower icon is used when making an
alphanumeric entry
The Move Cursor icon is used to scroll left to right within an
alphanumeric entry
The Confirm icon accepts a choice, finishes entering data, or
advances to the next calibration step
Settings Menu
30
The Character Delete icon deletes part of an alphanumeric
entry
The Shift icon switches between upper and lower case alpha
entry screens
The Next Screen icon moves to the next step in a calibration
sequence. In a Graph it shifts the graph forward in time.
The Previous Screen icon moves back a step in a calibration
sequence. In a Graph it shifts the graph backwards in time.
Overview of the use of icons
Changing Numeric Values
To change a number, use the Character Delete icon to the digit to be changed. If the new number will
be negative, start with touching the minus sign, then use the numeric touchpad and decimal point to
type the number (some entries must be integers and the decimal will be ignored and the setting
rounded to the nearest integer). Once the value of the number is correct touch the Confirm icon to
store the new value into memory, or touch the Cancel icon to leave the number at its previous value
and go back.
Changing Names
To change the name used to identify an input or output, use the Move Cursor icon to the character to
be changed and change it using either the Make Character Higher or Lower icons. Upper case and
lower case letter, numbers, a blank space, period, plus and minus symbols are available. Move the
cursor to the right and modify each character. Once the word is correct, use the Enter icon to store
the new value into memory, or use the Cancel icon to leave the word at its previous value and go
back.
Choosing from a List
Selecting the type of sensor, the units of measure of an input, or the control mode used for an output,
the selection is picked from a list of available options. Touch the Page Up or Down icons if
necessary to find the desired option, and then touch the option to highlight it. Touch the Confirm
icon to store the new option into memory, or touch the Cancel icon to leave the selection at its
previous value and go back.
Hand-Off-Auto Relay Mode
Touch the desired relay mode. In Hand mode the relay is forced on for a specified amount of time
and when that time is up the relay returns to its previous mode, in Off mode the relay is always off
until taken out of Off mode, and in Auto mode the relay is responding to control set points. Touch
the Return icon to go back to the relay settings.
31
Interlock and Activate with Channels Menus
To select which digital inputs or relays will interlock this relay (Interlock Channels), or which digital
inputs or relays will force this relay on (Activate with Channels), touch the input or relay number(s).
The background of the selected item will turn dark. When finished selecting as many as needed,
touch the Confirm icon to accept the changes or the Cancel icon to leave the selections at the
previous settings and go back.
4.4
Startup
Initial Startup
After having mounted the enclosure and wired the unit, the controller is ready to be started. Plug in
the controller and turn on the power switch to supply power to the unit. The display will briefly show
the model number and then revert to the normal summary (Home) display. Refer to section 5 below
for more details on each of the settings.
To return to the summary display, touch the Main Menu icon
and then touch the Home icon.
Settings Menu (see section 5.4)
Choose language
Touch the Configuration Settings icon. Touch Global Settings. Touch the Scroll Down icon until the
English word “Language” is displayed and then touch it. Touch the Scroll Down icon until your
language is displayed and touch it. Touch the Confirm icon to change all menus to your language.
Set date (if necessary)
Touch the Scroll Up or Down icon until Date is displayed, and then touch it. Touch the Move Cursor
icon to highlight the Day, and then use the numeric touchpad to change the date. Touch the Confirm
icon to accept the change.
Set time (if necessary)
Touch the Scroll Up or Down icon until Time is displayed and then touch it. Touch the Move Cursor
icon to highlight the digit to change, then use the numeric touchpad to change the time. Touch the
Confirm icon to accept the change.
Set global units of measure
Touch the Scroll Up or Down icon until Global Units is displayed and then touch it. Touch the
desired units. Touch the Confirm icon to accept the change.
Set temperature units of measure
Touch the Scroll Up or Down icon until Temp Units is displayed and then touch it. Touch the desired
units. Touch the Confirm icon to accept the change.
Touch the Main Menu icon. Touch the Inputs icon.
32
Overview of the menu structure
33
34
Inputs (see section 5.2)
Program the settings for each input
The S11 sensor input will be displayed. Touch it to get to the Details screen. Touch the Settings icon.
If the name of the sensor does not describe the type of sensor connected, touch the Scroll Down icon
until Type is displayed. Touch the Type field. Touch the Scroll Down icon until the correct type of
sensor is displayed, then touch it to highlight it. Touch the Confirm icon to accept the change. This
will bring you back to the Settings screen. Finish the rest of the S1 settings. For disinfections sensors,
choose the exact sensor in the Sensor menu. For contacting conductivity sensors, enter the cell
constant. Select the units of measure. Enter the alarm set points and alarm deadband. Set the default
temperature that will be used for automatic temperature compensation if the temperature signal
becomes invalid.
When finished with S11, touch the Return icon until the list of inputs is displayed. Touch the Scroll
Down icon and repeat the process for each input.
The S12 temperature input Element should be set correctly once the S11 sensor type has been set. If
not, select the correct temperature element and set the alarm set points and alarm deadband. ORP and
disinfection sensors do not have temperature signals and are preset to Unassigned.
To calibrate the temperature, return to the S2 Details screen, touch the Calibrate icon, and touch the
Enter icon to perform a calibration.
If a flow switch or liquid level switch is connected, D1 through D6 (whichever one has the device
connected to it) should be set to DI State type (if no switch is connected, select No Sensor). Set the
state that will possibly interlock control outputs (refer to the Outputs settings to program which
outputs, if any, will be interlocked by the switch). Set the state, if any, that will result in an alarm.
If a contacting head or paddlewheel flow meter is connected, D1 through D6 (whichever one has the
device connected to it) should be set to that type (if no flow meter is connected, select No Sensor).
Set the units of measure, volume/contact or K factor, etc.
Calibrate the sensor
To calibrate the sensor, return to the list of inputs, touch the sensor to calibrate, touch the Calibrate
icon, and select one of the calibration routines. For disinfection sensors, start with the Zero
Calibration. For electrodeless conductivity, start with the Air Calibration. Refer to section 5.2.
Touch the Main Menu icon. Touch the Outputs icon.
Outputs (see section 5.3)
Program the settings for each output
The R1 relay output will be displayed. Touch the relay field to get to the Details screen. Touch the
Settings icon. If the name of the relay does not describe the control mode desired, touch the Scroll
Down icon until Mode field is displayed. Touch the Mode field. Touch the Scroll Down icon until
the correct control mode is displayed, then touch the Confirm icon to accept the change. This will
bring you back to the Settings screen. Finish the rest of the R1 settings.
If you want the output to be interlocked by a flow switch or by another output being active, enter the
Interlock Channels menu and select the input or output channel that will interlock this output.
The default is for the output to be in Off mode, where the output does not react to the settings. Once
all settings for that output are complete, enter the HOA Setting menu and change it to Auto.
Repeat for each output.
35
Normal Startup
Startup is a simple process once your set points are in memory. Simply check your supply of
chemicals, turn on the controller, calibrate it if necessary and it will start controlling.
4.5
Shut Down
To shut the controller down, simply turn off the power. Programming remains in memory. It is
important that the pH/ORP electrode remains wet. If the shutdown is expected for any longer than a
day, and it is possible for the electrode to dry out, remove the electrode from the tee and store it in
pH 4 buffer or cooling tower water. Take care to avoid freezing temperatures when storing the
pH/ORP electrodes to avoid breakage of the glass.
36
5.0
OPERATION using the touchscreen
These units control continuously while power is applied. Programming is accomplished either via the
touchscreen or the optional Ethernet connection. See section 6.0 for Ethernet instructions.
To view the readings of each sensor, or whatever user-defined list of parameters that has been set,
touch the Home icon if not already there. The menus for each of these parameters may be accessed
directly by touching the parameter.
Keep in mind that even while browsing through menus, the unit is still controlling.
Touch the Main Menu icon
from the home page to access all settings. The menu structure is
grouped by alarms, inputs and outputs. Under the Configuration menu will be general settings such
as the clock, the language, etc. that do not have an input or output associated with it. Each input has
its own menu for calibration and unit selection as needed. Each output has its own setup menu
including set points, timer values and operating modes as needed.
5.1
Alarms Menu
Touch the Alarms icon to view a list of active alarms. If there are more than six active alarms, the
Page Down icon will be shown; touch this icon to bring up the next page of alarms.
Touch the Main Menu icon to go back to the previous screen.
5.2
Inputs Menu
Touch the Inputs icon to view a list of all sensor and digital inputs. The Page Down icon pages down
the list of inputs, the Page Up icon pages up the list of inputs, the Main Menu icon brings back the
previous screen.
Touch the input to access that input’s details, calibration (if applicable) and settings.
Sensor Input Details
The details for any type of sensor input include the current value read, alarms, the raw (uncalibrated)
signal, the sensor type, and the calibration gain and offset. If the sensor has automatic temperature
compensation, then the sensor’s temperature value and alarms, the temperature resistance value read,
and the type of temperature element required are also displayed under a separate sensor input menu.
Calibration
Touch the Calibration icon to calibrate the sensor. Select the calibration to perform: One Point
Process, One Point Buffer or Two Point Buffer Calibration. Not all calibration options are available
for all types of sensor.
One Point Process Calibration
New Value
Enter the actual value of the process as determined by another meter or laboratory analysis
and touch Confirm.
37
Cal Successful or Failed
If successful, touch Confirm to put the new calibration in memory.
If failed, you may retry the calibration or cancel. Refer to Section 8 to troubleshoot a
calibration failure.
One Point Buffer Calibration, Disinfection Sensor Zero Cal, Electrodeless Conductivity Air Cal
Cal Disables Control
Touch Confirm to continue or Cancel to abort
Buffer Temperature (only appears if no temperature sensor is detected for sensor types that
use automatic temperature compensation)
Enter the temperature of the buffer and touch Confirm.
Buffer Value (only appears for One Point Calibration)
Enter the value of the buffer being used
Rinse Sensor
Remove the sensor from the process, rinse it off, and place it in the buffer solution (or
oxidizer-free water for Zero Cal, or air for the electrodeless conductivity open air cal). Touch
Confirm when ready.
Stabilization
When the temperature (if applicable) and signal from the sensor is stable, the controller will
automatically move to the next step. If they don’t stabilize you may manually go to the next
step by pressing Confirm.
Cal Successful or Failed
If successful, touch Confirm to put the new calibration in memory.
If failed, you may retry the calibration or cancel. Refer to Section 8 to troubleshoot a
calibration failure.
Resume Control
Replace the sensor in the process and touch Confirm when ready to resume control.
Two Point Buffer Calibration
Cal Disables Control
Touch Confirm to continue or Cancel to abort
Buffer Temperature (only appears if no temperature sensor is detected for sensor types that
use automatic temperature compensation)
Enter the temperature of the buffer and touch Confirm.
Buffer Value
Enter the value of the buffer being used
Rinse Sensor
Remove the sensor from the process, rinse it off, and place it in the buffer solution. Touch
Confirm when ready.
Stabilization
When the temperature (if applicable) and signal from the sensor is stable, the controller will
automatically move to the next step. If they don’t stabilize you may manually go to the next
step by touching Confirm.
Second Buffer Value
Enter the value of the buffer being used
Rinse Electrode
Remove the sensor from the process, rinse it off, and place it in the buffer solution. Touch
Confirm when ready.
Stabilization
When the temperature (if applicable) and signal from the sensor is stable, the controller will
automatically move to the next step. If they don’t stabilize you may manually go to the next
step by touching Confirm.
38
Cal Successful or Failed
If successful, touch Confirm to put the new calibration in memory. The calibration adjusts
the offset and the gain (slope) and displays the new values. If failed, you may retry the
calibration or cancel. Refer to Section 8 to troubleshoot a calibration failure.
Resume Control
Replace the sensor in the process and touch Confirm when ready to resume control.
One Point Analog Calibration
OK to disable control?
Touch Confirm to continue or Cancel to abort.
Input Value
Enter the mA value that the transmitter will be sending. Touch Confirm to continue or
Cancel to abort.
Please set input signal to specified value
Make sure that the transmitter is sending the desired mA signal. Touch Confirm to continue
or Cancel to abort.
Automatic circuit calibration in progress
Cal Successful or Failed
If successful, touch Confirm to save calibration results. The calculated offset will be
displayed.
If failed, you may retry the calibration or cancel. You may also restore calibration to the
factory defaults. The calibration will fail if the measured mA is more than 2 mA away from
the Input Value entered.
Please restore input signal to process value
Put the transmitter back into normal measurement mode if necessary and touch Confirm
when ready to resume control.
Two Point Analog Calibration
OK to disable control?
Touch Confirm to continue or Cancel to abort.
Input Value
Enter the mA value that the transmitter will be sending. Touch Confirm to continue or
Cancel to abort.
Please set input signal to specified value
Make sure that the transmitter is sending the desired mA signal. Touch Confirm to continue
or Cancel to abort.
Automatic circuit calibration in progress
Second Input Value
Enter the mA value that the transmitter will be sending. Touch Confirm to continue or
Cancel to abort.
Please set input signal to specified value
Make sure that the transmitter is sending the desired mA signal. Touch Confirm to continue
or Cancel to abort.
Automatic circuit calibration in progress
Cal Successful or Failed
If successful, touch Confirm to save calibration results. The calculated offset and gain will
be displayed.
If failed, you may retry the calibration or cancel. You may also restore calibration to the
factory defaults. The calibration will fail if the offset is more than 2 mA or the gain is not
between 0.5 and 2.0.
Please restore input signal to process value
Put the transmitter back into normal measurement mode if necessary and touch Confirm
when ready to resume control.
39
5.2.1
Contacting Conductivity
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Alarms
Deadband
Default Temp
Cable Length
Gauge
Cell Constant
Units
Name
Type
5.2.2
Low-Low, Low, High and High-High Alarms limits may be set.
This is the Alarm Deadband. For example, if the High Alarm is 3000, and
the deadband is 10, the alarm will activate at 3001 and deactivate at 2990.
If the temperature signal is lost at any time, then the controller will use the
Default Temp setting for temperature compensation.
The controller automatically compensates for errors in the reading caused
by varying the length of the cable.
The cable length compensation depends upon the gauge of wire used to
extend the cable
Do not change unless instructed by the factory.
Select the units of measure for the conductivity.
The name used to identify the sensor may be changed.
Select the type of sensor to be connected.
Electrodeless Conductivity
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Alarms
Deadband
Default Temp
Installation Factor
Cable Length
Gauge
Cell Constant
Range
Units
Name
Type
Low-Low, Low, High and High-High Alarms limits may be set.
This is the Alarm Deadband. For example, if the High Alarm is 3000, and
the deadband is 10, the alarm will activate at 3000 and deactivate at 2990.
If the temperature signal is lost at any time, then the controller will use the
Default Temp setting for temperature compensation.
Do not change unless instructed by the factory.
The controller automatically compensates for errors in the reading caused
by varying the length of the cable.
The cable length compensation depends upon the gauge of wire used to
extend the cable
Do not change unless instructed by the factory.
Select the range of conductivity that best matches the conditions the sensor
will see.
Select the units of measure for the conductivity.
The name used to identify the sensor may be changed.
Select the type of sensor to be connected.
40
5.2.3
Temperature
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Alarms
Deadband
Name
Element
5.2.4
Low-Low, Low, High and High-High Alarms limits may be set.
This is the Alarm Deadband. For example, if the High Alarm is 100, and
the deadband is 1, the alarm will activate at 100 and deactivate at 99.
The name used to identify the sensor may be changed.
Select the specific type of temperature sensor to be connected.
pH
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Alarms
Deadband
Default Temp
Cable Length
Gauge
Name
Type
5.2.5
Low-Low, Low, High and High-High Alarms limits may be set.
This is the Alarm Deadband. For example, if the High Alarm is 9.50, and
the deadband is 0.05, the alarm will activate at 9.51 and deactivate at 9.45.
If the temperature signal is lost at any time, then the controller will use the
Default Temp setting for temperature compensation.
The controller automatically compensates for errors in the reading caused
by varying the length of the cable.
The cable length compensation depends upon the gauge of wire used to
extend the cable
The name used to identify the sensor may be changed.
Select the type of sensor to be connected.
ORP
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Alarms
Deadband
Cable Length
Gauge
Name
Type
Low-Low, Low, High and High-High Alarms limits may be set.
This is the Alarm Deadband. For example, if the High Alarm is 800, and
the deadband is 10, the alarm will activate at 801 and deactivate at 790.
The controller automatically compensates for errors in the reading caused
by varying the length of the cable.
The cable length compensation depends upon the gauge of wire used to
extend the cable
The name used to identify the sensor may be changed.
Select the type of sensor to be connected.
41
5.2.6
Disinfection
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Alarms
Deadband
Cable Length
Gauge
Name
Sensor
Type
5.2.7
Low-Low, Low, High and High-High Alarms limits may be set.
This is the Alarm Deadband. For example, if the High Alarm is 7.00, and
the deadband is 0.1, the alarm will activate at 7.01 and deactivate at 6.90.
The controller automatically compensates for errors in the reading caused
by varying the length of the cable.
The cable length compensation depends upon the gauge of wire used to
extend the cable
The name used to identify the sensor may be changed.
Select the specific type and range of disinfection sensor to be connected.
Select the type of sensor to be connected.
Analog Input
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Alarms
Deadband
4 mA Value
20 mA Value
Units
Name
Type
5.2.8
Low-Low, Low, High and High-High Alarms limits may be set.
This is the Alarm Deadband. For example, if the High Alarm is 7.00, and
the deadband is 0.1, the alarm will activate at 7.01 and deactivate at 6.90.
Enter the value that corresponds to a 4 mA output signal from the
transmitter.
Enter the value that corresponds to a 20 mA output signal from the
transmitter.
Select the units of measure for the transmitter.
The name used to identify the transmitter may be changed.
Select the type of sensor to be connected. The choice of Analog Input is
only available if that type of sensor card is installed.
DI State
Input Details
The details for this type of input include the current state with a custom message for open versus
closed, alarms, the status of the interlock, and the current type of input setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Open Message
Closed Message
Interlock
Alarm
Name
Type
The words used to describe the switch state may be customized.
The words used to describe the switch state may be customized.
Choose whether the input should be in the interlocked state when the
switch is either open or closed.
Choose if an alarm should be generated when the switch is open, or closed,
or if no alarm should ever be generated.
The name used to identify the switch may be changed.
Select the type of sensor to be connected to the digital input channel.
42
5.2.9
Flow Meter, Contactor Type
Input Details
The details for this type of input include the total volume accumulated through the flow meter,
alarms, and the current type of input setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Totalizer Alarm
Reset Flow Total
Volume/Contact
Flow Units
Name
Type
A high limit on the total volume of water accumulated may be set.
Enter this menu to reset the accumulated flow total to 0. Touch Confirm to
accept, Cancel to leave the total at the previous value and go back.
Enter the volume of water that needs to go through the flow meter in order
to generate a contact closure.
Select the units of measure for the water volume.
The name used to identify the sensor may be changed.
Select the type of sensor to be connected to the digital input channel.
5.2.10 Flow Meter, Paddlewheel Type
Input Details
The details for this type of input include the current flow rate, total volume accumulated through the
flow meter, alarms, and the current type of input setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the sensor.
Totalizer Alarm
Reset Flow Total
K Factor
Flow Units
Rate Units
Name
Type
A high limit on the total volume of water accumulated may be set.
Enter this menu to reset the accumulated flow total to 0. Touch Confirm to
accept, Cancel to leave the total at the previous value and go back.
Enter the pulses generated by the paddlewheel per unit volume of water.
Select the units of measure for the water volume.
Select the units of measure for the flow rate time base.
The name used to identify the sensor may be changed.
Select the type of sensor to be connected to the digital input channel.
43
5.3
Outputs Menu
Touch the Outputs icon from the Main Menu to view a list of all relay and analog outputs. The Page
Down icon pages down the list of outputs, the Page Up icon pages up the list of outputs, the Main
Menu icon brings back the previous screen.
Touch an output to access that output’s details and settings.
NOTE: When the output control mode or the input assigned to that output is changed, the
output reverts to OFF mode. Once you have changed all settings to match the new mode or
sensor, you must put the output into AUTO mode to start control.
5.3.1
Relay, Any Control Mode
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay. Settings that are available
for any control mode include:
HOA Setting
Select Hand, Off or Auto mode by touching the desired mode.
Output Time Limit
Enter the maximum amount of time that the relay can be continuously
activated. Once the time limit is reached, the relay will deactivate until the
Reset Output Timeout menu is entered.
Reset Output
Timeout
Enter this menu to clear an Output Timeout alarm and allow the relay to
control the process again.
Interlock Channels
Select the relays and digital inputs that will interlock this relay.
Activate With
Channels
Select the relays and digital inputs that will activate this relay.
Minimum Relay Cycle Enter the number of seconds that will be minimum amount of time that the
relay will be in the active or inactive state. Normally this will be set to 0,
but if using a motorized ball valve that takes time to open and close, set this
high enough that the valve has time to complete its movement.
5.3.2
Hand Time Limit
Enter the amount of time that the relay will activate for when it is in Hand
mode.
Name
The name used to identify the relay may be changed.
Mode
Select the desired control mode for the output.
Relay, On/Off Control Mode
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status,
accumulated on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
44
5.3.3
Set point
Enter the sensor process value at which the relay will activate.
Deadband
Input
Enter the sensor process value away from the set point at which the relay
will deactivate.
Select the sensor to be used by this relay.
Direction
Select the control direction.
Relay, Flow Timer Control Mode
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status,
accumulated on-time, remaining feed time, accumulated flow total, alarms related to this output, and
the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
Enter the amount of time for the relay to activate for once the accumulated
Feed Duration
volume through the water meter has been reached.
Accumulated Volume Enter the volume of water to pass through the water meter required to
trigger the chemical feed.
Input
5.3.4
Select the input to be used to control this output.
Relay, Bleed and Feed Control Mode
ONLY AVAILABLE IF HVAC MODES ARE ENABLED IN CONFIG MENU – GLOBAL
SETTINGS
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status,
accumulated on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
Feed Time Limit
Enter the maximum amount of feed time per bleed event
Bleed
Select the relay to be used for Bleed/Blowdown
45
5.3.5
Relay, Bleed then Feed Control Mode
ONLY AVAILABLE IF HVAC MODES ARE ENABLED IN CONFIG MENU – GLOBAL
SETTINGS
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status,
accumulated on-time, remaining feed time, the accumulated bleed time, alarms related to this output,
and the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
5.3.6
Feed Percentage
Enter the % of bleed relay activation time to use for the feed relay
activation time
Feed Time Limit
Enter the maximum amount of feed time per bleed event
Bleed
Select the relay to be used for Bleed/Blowdown
Relay, Percent Timer Control Mode
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status, cycle
time, accumulated on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
5.3.7
Sample Period
Enter the duration of the sample period.
Feed Percentage
Enter the % of the sample period time to use for the feed relay activation
time
Relay, Biocide Timer Control Mode
ONLY AVAILABLE IF HVAC MODES ARE ENABLED IN CONFIG MENU – GLOBAL
SETTINGS
Basic Biocide Operation
When a biocide event triggers, the algorithm will first prebleed (if a prebleed is programmed) for the
set amount of prebleed time or down to the set prebleed conductivity. Then the biocide relay is
turned on for the set duration. This is followed by a post-bio add lockout that blocks the bleed relay
from turning on for a set amount of bleed lockout time.
Special Condition Handling
Prebleed
If both a time limit and a conductivity limit are set, the time limit takes precedence. The bleed relay
will turn off once the time limit is reached or when the prebleed conductivity limit is reached
(whichever occurs first).
Overlapping biocide events
If a second biocide event occurs while the first one is still active (in prebleed, biocide add or
lockout), the second event will be ignored. An Event Skipped alarm will be set.
46
Interlock Conditions
Interlocks override the relay control, but do not change the operation of the timers or related bleed
control.
A no-flow (or other interlock) condition does not delay a biocide add. The biocide add duration timer
will continue even if the relay is locked out due to a no-flow or other interlock condition. This will
prevent delayed biocide adds which can potentially cause higher than expected biocide
concentrations in the system when two biocides adds occur close to the same time. Not allowing
delayed biocide adds will also prevent incompatible biocides getting added at close to the same time.
“Activate With” Conditions
“Activate with channels” settings override the relay control, but do not change the operation of the
timers or related bleed control. The biocide timer continues counting biocide add time when the
biocide relay is forced on, and ends at the expected time (biocide event start time plus duration). If
the “activate with” condition continues after the end of the biocide feed time, the relay remains
activated.
Alarms
An Event Skipped alarm is set when a second biocide event occurs while one event is still running
(either in prebleed, biocide add or post-biocide add lockout).
An Event Skipped alarm is also set when the biocide add relay never turns on during a biocide add
because of an interlock condition.
The alarm is cleared when the relay is next activated for any reason (the next timer event or HAND
mode or “activate with” force on condition).
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status,
accumulated on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting. The current
week number is displayed (even if there is no multi-week repetition event programmed). Cycle Time
shows the time counting down of the currently active part of the biocide cycle (pre-bleed, biocide
feed, or post biocide feed lockout of the bleed).
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
47
Bleed
Select the relay to be used for Bleed/Blowdown
Prebleed Time
If lowering the conductivity prior to feeding biocide is desired using a fixed
time instead of a specific conductivity setting, enter the amount of time for
the prebleed. Also may be used to apply a time limit on a conductivity
based prebleed.
If lowering the conductivity prior to feeding biocide is desired, enter the
conductivity value. If no prebleed is required, or if a time-based prebleed is
preferred, set the conductivity value to 0.
Prebleed To
Cond Input
Select the sensor to be used to control the prebleed relay selected above.
Bleed Lockout
Enter the amount of time to lockout bleed after the biocide feed is
complete.
Event 1 Repetition
Select the time cycle to repeat the biocide feed event: Daily, 1 Week, 2
Week, 4 Week, or None.
An event means that the output is turned on at the same time of day, for the
same amount of time, and except for the Daily cycle, on the same day of
the week.
Event 1 Week
If the Event Repetition is Daily or 1 Week, select N/A. For longer cycles,
select the week during which the event will occur.
Event 1 Day
If the Event Repetition is Daily, select N/A. For longer cycles, select the
day of the week during which the event will occur.
Event 1 Start Time
Enter the time of day to start the biocide feed event. The event begins with
the Prebleed if applicable, then the chemical feed, and then the Bleed
Lockout.
Event 1 Duration
Enter the amount of time that the biocide chemical feed pump will be on.
Repeat for up to 10 events…
5.3.8
Relay, Alarm Output Mode
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status,
accumulated on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting.
Settings
An alarm relay will activate if any alarm is active. There are no additional programmable parameters.
48
5.3.9
Relay, Time Proportional Control Mode
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status, the
current % on time calculated for the cycle, the current point in the cycle time, accumulated on-time,
alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
Set point
Proportional Band
Enter the sensor process value at which the relay will be off for the entire
Sample Period.
Enter the distance that the sensor process value is away from the set point
at which the relay will be on for the entire Sample Period.
Sample Period
Enter the duration of the sample period.
Input
Select the sensor to be used by this relay.
Direction
Select the control direction.
5.3.10 Relay, Intermittent Sampling Control Mode
ONLY AVAILABLE IF HVAC MODES ARE ENABLED IN CONFIG MENU – GLOBAL
SETTINGS
In an Intermittent Sampling with Proportional Blowdown control mode, the controller reads an
analog input on a timed schedule, and the relay responds to maintain the conductivity value at the set
point by activating for a programmable amount of time that varies with the deviation from the set
point.
The relay goes through a sequence of activation/deactivation as described below. The intended
purpose of this algorithm is boiler blowdown. A sample cannot be supplied to the sensor
continuously in many boilers because a recirculating loop is not possible, and it would be a waste of
hot water to constantly run a sample to a drain. A valve is opened intermittently to supply a sample
to the sensor.
Where a non-ideal installation of the sensor can cause the sample to flash to steam, and give a false
low reading, this can be corrected by taking the reading with the sample held in the pipe with the
sampling valve closed, so the sample is at boiler pressure and therefore back in the liquid state.
Because the conductivity reading cannot be trusted while the valve is open, the blowdown is timed
rather than in direct response to a sensor reading. Rather than relying upon a fixed time, where the
blowdown could be much longer than necessary if the reading is just barely off the set point value,
proportional blowdown adjusts the time appropriately.
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, relay status (HOA mode, Interlock
status, Intermittent Sampling cycle step, etc.), time remaining for the active Intermittent Sampling
cycle step, alarms related to this output, the live reading of the conductivity, and the current control
mode setting.
49
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
Set point
Proportional Band
Sample Time
Hold Time
Maximum Blowdown
Wait Time
Cond Input
Enter the conductivity value below which the controller will not start a
blowdown cycle.
Enter the conductivity value above the set point at which the maximum
blowdown time will occur.
Enter the length of time the blowdown valve will be open in order to
capture a fresh sample of boiler water.
Enter the length of time the blowdown valve will be closed in order to
ensure that the captured sample is at boiler pressure.
Enter the maximum length of time that the blowdown valve will be open,
when the conductivity of the captured sample is above the set point plus the
proportional band.
Enter the time to wait to sample the water again once the captured sample
is below set point.
Select the sensor to be used by this relay.
5.3.11 Relay or Analog Output, Manual Mode
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state or analog output %, HOA mode or
Interlock status, accumulated on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode
setting.
Settings
A Manual relay will activate if the HOA mode is Hand, or if it is Activated With another channel.
There are no additional programmable parameters.
5.3.12 Relay, Pulse Proportional Control Mode
ONLY AVAILABLE IF CONTROLLER INCLUDES PULSE OUTPUT HARDWARE
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay pulse rate, HOA mode or Interlock status,
accumulated on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
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Set point
Input
Enter the sensor process value at which the output will pulse at the
Minimum Output % set below.
Enter the distance that the sensor process value is away from the set point
beyond which the output will be pulsing at the Maximum Output % set
below.
Enter the lowest possible pulse rate as a percentage of the Maximum Stroke
Rate set below (normally 0%).
Enter the highest possible pulse rate as a percentage of the Maximum
Stroke Rate set below.
Enter the maximum pulse rate that the metering pump is designed to accept
(10 - 360 pulse/minute range).
Select the sensor to be used by this relay.
Direction
Set the control direction.
Proportional Band
Minimum Output
Maximum Output
Maximum Rate
5.3.13 Relay, Dual Set Point Mode
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status,
accumulated on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
Set point
Enter the first sensor process value at which the relay will activate.
Set point 2
Enter the second sensor process value at which the relay will activate.
Deadband
Enter the sensor process value away from the set point at which the relay
will deactivate.
Select the sensor to be used by this relay.
Input
Direction
Select the control direction. In Range will activate the relay when the input
reading is between the two set points. Out of Range will activate the relay
when the input reading is outside the two set points.
5.3.14 Relay, Timer Control Mode
ONLY AVAILABLE IF HVAC MODES ARE DISABLED IN CONFIG MENU – GLOBAL
SETTINGS
Basic Timer Operation
When a timer event triggers the algorithm will activate the relay for the programmed time.
Special Condition Handling
Overlapping timer events
If a second timer event occurs while the first one is still active, the second event will be ignored. An
Event Skipped alarm will be set.
Interlock Conditions
Interlocks override the relay control, but do not change the operation of the timer control.
A digital input or output interlock condition does not delay the relay activation. The relay activation
duration timer will continue even if the relay is deactivated due to an interlock condition. This will
prevent delayed events which can potentially cause problems in they do not occur at the correct time.
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“Activate With” Conditions
“Activate with channels” settings override the relay control, but do not change the operation of the
timer control. The relay activation duration timer continues counting when the timer relay is forced
on, and ends at the expected time (event start time plus duration). If the “activate with” condition
continues after the end of the event time, the relay remains activated.
Alarms
An Event Skipped alarm is set when a second timer event occurs while one event is still running.
An Event Skipped alarm is also set when the timer relay never turns on during an event because of an
interlock condition.
The alarm is cleared when the relay is next activated for any reason (the next timer event or HAND
mode or “activate with” force on condition).
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the relay on/off state, HOA mode or Interlock status,
accumulated on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting. The current
week number is displayed (even if there is no multi-week repetition event programmed). Cycle Time
shows the time counting down of the currently active part of the timer cycle.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
Select the time cycle to repeat the timer activation event: Daily, 1 Week, 2
Event 1 Repetition
Week, 4 Week, or None.
An event means that the output is turned on at the same time of day, for the
same amount of time, and except for the Daily cycle, on the same day of
the week.
Event 1 Week
If the Event Repetition is Daily or 1 Week, select N/A. For longer cycles,
select the week during which the event will occur.
Event 1 Day
If the Event Repetition is Daily, select N/A. For longer cycles, select the
day of the week during which the event will occur.
Event 1 Start Time
Enter the time of day to start the timer activation event.
Event 1 Duration
Enter the amount of time that the relay will be active.
Repeat for up to 10 events…
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5.3.15 Analog Output, Retransmit Mode
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the output %, HOA mode or Interlock status, accumulated
on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
4 mA Value
Enter the process value to correspond to a 4 mA output signal.
20 mA Value
Enter the process value to correspond to a 20 mA output signal.
Hand Output
Enter the output % desired when the output is in Hand mode.
Error Output
Enter the output % desired when the input signal is invalid (Error mode).
Input
Select the sensor input to retransmit.
5.3.16 Analog Output, Proportional Control Mode
Output Details
The details for this type of output include the output %, HOA mode or Interlock status, accumulated
on-time, alarms related to this output, and the current control mode setting.
Settings
Touch the Settings icon to view or change the settings related to the relay.
Set point
Proportional Band
Minimum Output
Enter the sensor process value at which the output % will be the
programmed minimum %.
Enter the sensor process value away from the set point at which the output
% will be the programmed maximum %.
Enter the lowest output %. If the output should be off at the set point, this
will be 0%.
Maximum Output
Enter the highest output %.
Hand Output
Enter the output % desired when the output is in Hand mode.
Off Mode Output
Enter the output mA value desired when the output is in Off mode, or being
Interlocked, or during a calibration of the sensor being used as an input.
The acceptable range is 0 to 21 mA.
Enter the output mA desired when the sensor is not giving the controller a
valid signal. The acceptable range is 0 to 21 mA.
Error Output
Input
Select the sensor input to use for proportional control.
Direction
Select the control direction.
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5.4
Configuration Menu
The configuration Settings Menu is used for settings and activities that are not tied to Inputs or
Outputs.
5.4.1
Global Settings
Date
Enter the current year, month and day.
Time
Enter the current hour (military time), minute, and second.
Name
Enter the name to help identify the controller when it connects to VTouch.
Location
Enter the location to help identify the controller when it connects to VTouch.
Global Units
Select the units to be used for cable length and wire gauge settings, metric or
Imperial.
Temperature Units
Select between Fahrenheit and Celsius.
HVAC Modes
Enable HVAC Modes for cooling tower and boiler applications where the relay
control modes for Biocide timer, Bleed and Feed, Bleed then Feed, and
Intermittent Sampling are required. Disable HVAC Modes if these control
modes are not necessary and a more generic timer control mode will replace the
Biocide timer.
Language
Select the language the software will use.
5.4.2
Security Settings
Controller Log Out
Security
Local Password
Key Beep
When Security is Enabled, and after the password has been entered, the
controller requires immediate use of a password to calibrate or change settings.
Once finished making changes, log out to prevent unauthorized changes by
someone else. If not manually logged out, the controller will automatically log
out after 10 minutes of inactivity.
Select Enable to require a password in order to calibrate or change settings, or
Disable to allow calibration and set point changes without a password. In order
to enable security, the default password must be entered first, then touch
Enabled, then touch the Confirm icon.
Used to change the touchscreen password needed for full configuration
capability if security has been enabled. The default local password is 5555. This
can and should be changed using this menu if Security is enabled.
Select enable to hear a beep when an icon is pressed, or disable for silence
54
5.4.3
Network Settings
DHCP Setting
Select Enabled to get an IP address from the LAN or Disabled to use a fixed IP
address.
Controller IP
Address
Enter the default IP address to use if a network is not available or if DHCP is
disabled.
Network Netmask
Enter the default netmask to use if a network is not available or if DHCP is
disabled.
Network Gateway
Enter the default gateway address to use if a network is not available or if DHCP
is disabled.
DNS Server
Enter the default DNS server IP address to use if DHCP is disabled.
VTouch Status
Select Enabled to activate a connection to VTouch, or Disabled to stop sending
data and alarms to VTouch.
Update Period
Enter the time between data updates being sent to VTouch.
Reply Timeout
Enter the maximum time allowed for VTouch to respond.
5.4.4
Network Details
The Network Details are for information only and display the network settings currently in use, and the
recent history of the VTouch connection.
Displays any active Network-related alarms
Alarms
DHCP Status
Displays if the connection to the LAN using DHCP was successful or not.
Controller IP
Address
Displays the IP address that the controller is currently using.
Network Netmask
Displays the netmask address that the controller is currently using.
Network Gateway
Displays the gateway address that the controller is currently using.
DNS Server
Displays the DNS server address that the controller is currently using.
MAC Address
Displays the MAC address of the Ethernet card.
Last VTouch
Config
Displays the date and time of the last attempt to send configuration data to the
VTouch server.
Last VTouch Data
Displays the date and time of the last attempt to send a data to the VTouch
server.
5.4.5
Display Settings
Home 1
Select the input or output to display on the 1st line of the display Home screen.
Home 2
Select the input or output to display on the 2nd line of the display Home screen.
Home 3
Select the input or output to display on the 3rd line of the display Home screen.
Key Beep
Select enable to hear a beep when an icon is pressed, or disable for silence
55
5.4.6
File Utilities
File Transfer Status
Displays the status of the last attempt to export a file
Export Daily Data
Log
Save the Daily Data Log file to a USB stick. This records all inputs’ data from
the last 24 hours in 10 second intervals.
Export Weekly
Data Log
Save the Weekly Data Log file to a USB stick. This records all inputs’ data
from the last week in two minute intervals.
Export Monthly
Data Log
Save the Monthly Data Log file to a USB stick. This records all inputs’ data
from the last 96 days in 15 minute intervals.
Export Event Log
Save the Event Log file to a USB stick. This records set point changes, user
calibrations, alarms, relay state changes, file exports, etc.
Export System Log
Save the System Log file to a USB stick. This records hardware changes,
software upgrades, automatic calibrations, power loss, system-level issues, etc.
Export User Config
File
The User Configuration file contains all settings for the controller. Enter this
menu to save the controller’s settings to an USB stick for using later to restore
settings to this controller, or to program additional controllers with the same
settings as this one. It takes several minutes to create the file and transfer it to
the stick.
Import User Config
File
The User Configuration file contains all settings for the controller. Insert an
USB stick containing the desired Configuration file. Enter this menu to import
the file from the stick onto the controller.
Software
Upgrade
Insert a USB stick that has the upgrade file stored in the root directory into the
USB connector under the watertight cap on the outside of the front panel (see
figure 18). Touch the Confirm icon, and then touch the Confirm icon to start the
upgrade.
NOTE: To maintain the IP65 rating, always remove the stick and replace the cap securely over the USB
connector when not in use.
56
5.4.7
Controller Details
Controller
Displays the name for the group of default settings used as built
Product Name
Displays the model of the controller as built
Serial Number
Displays the serial number of the controller
Controller Board
Displays the revision number of the front panel circuit board
Software Version
Displays the software version on the controller board
Power Board
Displays the revision number of the power/relay board
Sensor Board #1
Displays the revision number of the sensor board in the Sensor 1 slot
Software Version
Displays the software version on the sensor board in the Sensor 1 slot
Sensor Board #2
Displays the revision number of the sensor board in the Sensor 2 slot
Software Version
Displays the software version on the sensor board in the Sensor 2 slot
Network Board
Displays the revision number of the network board
Software Version
Displays the software version on the network board
Display Board
Displays the revision number of the display board
AO Board
Displays the revision number of the analog output board
Battery Power
Displays the VDC output of the battery that is used to hold the date and time.
The acceptable range is 2.4-3.2 VDC.
Internal Temp 1
Displays the temperature of the main processor. The acceptable range is -10 to
65 C.
Internal Temp 2
Displays the temperature of the sensor input processor installed in I/O slot 1.
The acceptable range is -10 to 65 C.
Internal Temp 3
Displays the temperature of the sensor input processor installed in I/O slot 2.
The acceptable range is -10 to 65 C.
Internal Temp 4
Displays the temperature of the network card processor. The acceptable range is
-10 to 65 C.
+5 Volt Supply
The normal range is 4.75 to 5.25 VDC. The 5 V supply is used for powering all
the I/O.
+3.3 Volt Supply
The normal range is 3.135 to 3.465 VDC. The 3V supply is used to run the
system.
LCD Bias Voltage
The normal range is -25 to -20 VDC. This is the touchscreen voltage after
contrast adjustment.
LCD Supply
The normal range is -25 to -20 VDC. This is the touchscreen voltage before
contrast adjustment.
57
5.5
HOA Menu
The HOA (Hand-Off-Automatic) Menu is used to quickly and easily test all relay outputs, and to
stop or enable automatic control.
Touch the relay number in order to change the HOA state of that relay. The relay number will be
shaded dark, and its current HOA state will be shaded dark. Then touch the desired state. The change
happens immediately unless that relay has a Minimum Relay Cycle programmed that is above 0
seconds.
5.6
Graph Menu
The Graph Menu is used to display a graph containing one sensor or analog input value plus one
digital input or relay state. Touch the Graph icon and the controller will display “Generating Graph
Please Stand By” for a few seconds then show the graph. The default is to show the value of sensor
input S11 and the state of relay output R1 over the past 10 minutes.
Touching any point on either line on the graphs displays a vertical line plus the details for that data
point: date and time, value of the sensor, and an arrow showing if the state or the digital input/relay
was high or low at that time.
Touching the
or the
icons will redraw the graph forward or backwards in time, in
increments of one time range. It can only go back in time to the point where the data log file used to
generate the graph starts. Changing the time frame while in the graph view, after moving back in
time, shows data from that past time. Exiting the graph menu and returning to the graph menu moves
back to the current time.
5.6.1
Settings
Sensor
Enter this menu to select the sensor, analog input, flowmeter type digital input
(total flow and/or flow rate if applicable), or analog output value to show on the
graph
DI/Relay
Enter this menu to select digital input, or analog output value to show on the
graph
Low Axis Limit
The graph auto-scales based on the sensor value if both Low and High Axis
Limit are set to 0. To manually adjust the Y axis scale, enter the low limit here.
High Axis Limit
The graph auto-scales based on the sensor value if both Low and High Axis
Limit are set to 0. To manually adjust the Y axis scale, enter the high limit here.
Time Range
Select the time range for the X axis of the graph.
The time range may also be accessed from the graph view by touching the time
range icon in the lower right corner.
58
The resolution of the screen only allows for 84 data points per graph, so not all data points in each
time range can be shown. For finer resolution, download the data log CSV file from the Config – File
Utilities menu and graph the data in Excel or equivalent spreadsheet application.
6.0
Time Range
Time between data points
10 minutes
10 seconds
30 minutes
30 seconds
1 hour
1 minute
2½ hours
2 minutes
8 hours
6 minutes
½ day
10 minutes
1 day
20 minutes
½ week
1 hour
1 week
2 hours
2 weeks
4 hours
4 week
8 hours
Datalog file used
Daily
Daily
Daily
Weekly
Weekly
Weekly
Weekly
Monthly
Monthly
Monthly
Monthly
OPERATION using Ethernet
All of the same settings that are available using the touchscreen are also available using a browser
that is connected to the controller’s Ethernet IP address. The controller may be connected to a Local
Area Network (LAN), directly to the Ethernet port of a computer, or to the VTouch account
management system server.
6.1
Connecting to a LAN
Connect the controller’s network card to the LAN using a CAT5 cable with RJ45 connector.
6.1.1 Using DHCP
Using the touchscreen, from the Main menu, touch Config, then touch Network Settings, then touch
DHCP Setting. Touch Enabled, then the Confirm icon.
After a power cycle of the controller, return to Config, then Network Details to view the Controller
IP Address that has been assigned to the controller by the network.
6.1.1
Using a fixed IP Address
Using the touchscreen, from the Main menu, touch Config, then touch Network Settings, then touch
DHCP Setting. Touch Disabled, then the Confirm icon. Cycle power to the controller. If DHCP is
already Disabled then you can skip this step.
Using the touchscreen, from the Main menu, touch Config, then touch Network Settings, then touch
Controller IP Address. Enter the IP address provided by the administrator of the LAN then touch the
Confirm icon. Repeat for the Network Netmask and Network Gateway settings. Cycle power to the
controller.
59
6.2
Connecting Directly to a Computer
Connect the controller’s network card to the computer using a CAT5 cable with RJ45 connector.
Follow the instructions above to give the controller a fixed IP address that is compatible with the
network settings of the computer.
Open a browser and type the numeric Controller IP address in the web page address field. The login
screen should quickly appear. The default user name is admin and the default password is 5555. The
default View-Only user name is user and default password is 1111. These can and should be
changed in the Config menu, under Security Settings.
6.3
Navigating the web pages
From any computer that is directly connected to the controller, or is on the same network as the
controller, open a browser and type the numeric Controller IP address in the web page address field.
The login screen should quickly appear. The default user name is admin and the default password is
5555. The default View-Only user name is user and default password is 1111. These can and should
be changed in the Config menu, under Security Settings.
The Home page will appear. This will display the date and time, any active alarms, and the current
readings or status of all of the Inputs and Outputs. On the left side of the page you will see links to
the Main Menu selections: Alarms, Inputs, Outputs and Config. Hover the mouse pointer over each
menu to see the submenus, and click on the submenu to access all of the details and settings
associated with it.
60
7.0
MAINTENANCE
The controller itself requires very little maintenance. Wipe with a damp cloth. Do not spray down the
controller unless the enclosure door is closed and latched.
7.1
Electrode Cleaning
NOTE: The controller must be recalibrated after cleaning the electrode.
Frequency
The electrode should be cleaned periodically. The frequency required will vary by installation. In a
new installation, it is recommended that the electrode be cleaned after two weeks of service. To
determine how often the electrode must be cleaned, follow the procedure below.
1. Read and record the conductivity.
2. Remove, clean and replace the conductivity electrode.
3. Read conductivity and compare with the reading in step 1 above.
If the variance in readings is greater than 5%, increase the frequency of electrode cleaning. If there is
less than 5% change in the reading, the electrode was not dirty and can be cleaned less often.
Cleaning Procedure
The electrode can normally be cleaned using a cloth or paper towel and a mild detergent. If coated
with scale, clean with a dilute (5%) solution of hydrochloric acid solution. Occasionally an electrode
may become coated with various substances that require a more vigorous cleaning procedure.
Usually the coating will be visible, but not always. To clean a coated electrode, use fine grit abrasive,
such as emery paper. Lay the paper on a flat surface and move the electrode in a back and forth
motion. The electrode should be cleaned parallel to the carbon electrodes, not perpendicular.
CLEAN IN
THIS DIRECTION
Figure 19 Cleaning the Electrode
61
7.2
Replacing the Fuse Protecting Powered Relays
CAUTION: Disconnect power to the controller before opening front panel!
Locate the fuse on the circuit board at the back of the controller enclosure under the plastic safety
cover. Gently remove the old fuse from its retaining clip and discard. Press the new fuse into the clip,
secure the front panel of the controller and return power to the unit.
Warning: Use of non-approved fuses can affect product safety approvals. Specifications are shown
below. To insure product safety certifications are maintained, it is recommended that a Walchem
fuse be used.
8.0
Fuse
Walchem P/N
5 x 20 mm, 6A, 250V
102834
TROUBLESHOOTING
CAUTION: Disconnect power to the controller before opening front panel!
Troubleshooting and repair of a malfunctioning controller should only be attempted by qualified
personnel using caution to ensure safety and limit unnecessary further damage. Contact the factory.
8.1
Calibration Failure
Calibrations will fail if the adjustments to the reading are outside of the normal range for a properly
functioning system. Refer to the instruction manual for the specific sensor being used for further
information.
8.1.1
Contacting Conductivity Sensors
The calibration will fail if the adjustment to the gain is outside of 0.5 to 2.0.
Possible Cause
Dirty electrode
Improper wiring of sensor to controller
Corrective Action
Clean electrode
Correct wiring
Program the controller cell constant setting at the
value that matches the electrode being used
Ensure that the temperature is accurate
Set to the correct values
Replace electrode
Wrong cell constant entered
Incorrect temperature reading or setting
Incorrect cable length or wire gauge setting
Faulty electrode
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8.1.2
Electrodeless Conductivity Sensors
The calibration will fail if the adjustment to the gain is outside of 0.2 to 10, or the offset is outside of
-10,000 to 10,000.
Possible Cause
Dirty sensor
Improper wiring of sensor to controller
Sensor placed too close to container walls
Sensor placed in the direct path of electrical current
flow
Incorrect temperature reading or setting
Incorrect cable length or wire gauge setting
Faulty sensor
Corrective Action
Clean sensor
Correct wiring
Relocate sensor
Relocate sensor
Ensure that the temperature is accurate
Set to the correct values
Replace sensor
8.1.3 pH Sensors
The calibration will fail if the adjustment to the gain is outside of 0.2 to 1.2, or if the calculated offset
is outside of -60 to 60.
Possible Cause
Dirty electrode
Improper wiring of sensor to controller
Incorrect temperature reading or setting
Incorrect cable length or wire gauge setting
Faulty electrode
Faulty preamplifier
8.1.4
Corrective Action
Clean electrode
Correct wiring
Ensure that the temperature is accurate
Set to the correct values
Replace electrode
Replace preamplifier
ORP Sensors
The calibration will fail if the adjustment to the gain is outside of 0.5 to 1.5, or if the calculated offset
is outside of -300 to 300.
Possible Cause
Dirty electrode
Improper wiring of sensor to controller
Faulty electrode
Faulty preamplifier
Corrective Action
Clean electrode
Correct wiring
Replace electrode
Replace preamplifier
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8.1.5
Disinfection Sensors
The calibration will fail if the adjustment to the gain is outside of 0.2 to 10.0, or if the calculated
offset is outside of -40 to 40.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Insufficient conditioning
Wait for the appropriate amount of time before
attempting a calibration.
Insufficient sample flow
Increase flow rate to between 30 and 100 liter per
hour.
Air bubbles on membrane
Dislodge bubbles. Adjust flow rate higher if
necessary.
Air bubbles in electrolyte
Refill membrane cap with electrolyte.
Dirty membrane
Clean membrane
Loose membrane cap
Tighten membrane cap.
Faulty membrane
Replace membrane cap.
High Pressure
Reduce pressure to below 1 atmosphere and refill
cap with electrolyte
No electrolyte fill solution in membrane cap
Fill membrane cap with electrolyte. Replace
membrane cap if it will not hold solution.
Improper wiring of sensor to controller
Correct wiring
Faulty sensor
Replace sensor
Faulty analysis equipment or reagents
Consult test equipment instructions
Sample contaminated with interfering molecule
Remove source of contamination
(refer to Sensitivity specification in sensor
instructions)
8.1.6
Analog Inputs
The calibration will fail if the adjustment to the gain is outside of 0.5 to 2.0, or if the calculated offset
is outside of -2 to 2 mA.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Improper wiring of sensor to controller
Correct wiring
Faulty sensor
Replace sensor
8.1.7
Temperature Sensors
The calibration will fail if the calculated offset is outside of -10 to 10.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Improper wiring of sensor to controller
Correct wiring
Reprogram to match the connected temperature
Temperature input is set to the incorrect element
element
Faulty sensor
Replace sensor
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8.2
Alarm Messages
HIGH or HIGH-HIGH ALARM
Occurs if the sensor reading rises above the high alarm set points. If your unit is programmed for an alarm
relay output, the alarm relay will activate. The controller will continue to check the sensor reading, and any
outputs using the sensor will remain active.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
The process went further out of control than normal.
May have to increase chemical flow rate.
The chemical supply has run out.
Replenish the chemical supply.
The pump or valve or supply line is faulty.
Repair or replace the control device.
Wrong chemical is being controlled.
Replace with correct chemical.
The sensor is not responding to changes.
Repair or replace sensor. Evaluate mixing or
recirculation.
The pump is siphoning, valve leaking.
Repair or replace the control device or re-route
tubing.
Control output has been left in "HAND" mode.
Switch back to "AUTO".
It may be a normal part of the process.
None required.
LOW or LOW-LOW ALARM
Occurs if the sensor reading drops below the low alarm set points. If your unit is programmed for an alarm
relay output, the alarm relay will activate. The controller will continue to check the sensor reading, and any
outputs using the sensor will remain active.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
The process went further out of control than normal.
May have to increase chemical flow rate.
The chemical supply has run out.
Replenish the chemical supply.
The pump or valve or supply line is faulty.
Repair or replace the control device.
Wrong chemical is being controlled.
Replace with correct chemical.
The sensor is not responding to changes.
Repair or replace sensor. Evaluate mixing or
recirculation.
The pump is siphoning, valve leaking.
Repair or replace the control device or re-route
tubing.
Control output has been left in "HAND" mode.
Switch back to "AUTO".
It may be a normal part of the process.
None required.
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DI STATE CUSTOM MESSAGE
A digital input that is a DI State type can be set such that either the open or closed state generates an alarm.
The alarm message may be customized. The most common use for this will be a Flow Switch.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Check piping for closed valves, blockage, etc.
No flow
Check recirculation pump.
Faulty flow switch/cable
Check with ohmmeter.
Faulty controller
Check by shorting digital input in controller.
TOTAL ALARM
Occurs if the flow meter totalizer alarm limit is exceeded.
Possible Cause
Normal operation
Corrective Action
Reset the total to clear alarm
Route cable at least 6 inches (150 mm) away from
any AC voltage
Shield cable
AC coupled onto flow meter cable
Noise coupled onto flow meter cable
TOTAL RANGE LIMIT
Occurs if the flow meter totalizer range limit is exceeded. The maximum flow total is 1 trillion times the
increment of the flow meter. For example, if 1 gallon/contact or if K Factor = 1 pulse/liter, the maximum
total is 1 trillion gallons.
Normal operation
Reset the total to clear alarm
OUTPUT TIMEOUT
This error condition will stop control. It is caused by the output (either relay or analog) being activated for
longer than the programmed Time Limit.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
The process went further out of control than normal. Increase time limit or reset timer.
The chemical supply has run out.
Replenish the chemical supply.
The pump or valve or supply line is faulty.
Repair or replace the control device.
Wrong chemical is being controlled.
Replace with correct chemical.
The sensor is not responding to changes.
Replace sensor. Evaluate mixing or recirculation.
RANGE ALARM
It indicates that the signal from the sensor is out of the normal range. This error condition will stop control
of any output using the sensor. This prevents controlling based upon a false sensor reading. If the
temperature sensor goes into range alarm, then the controller will go into manual temperature compensation
using the Default Temperature setting.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Sensor wires shorted
Disconnect short
Faulty sensor
Replace sensor
Faulty controller
Replace or repair controller
66
EVENT SKIPPED ALARM
An event skipped alarm is set when a second biocide or timer event occurs while one event is still running
(either in prebleed, biocide-add or post-biocide add lockout in the case of the biocide timer mode). An
event skipped alarm is also set when the timer relay never turns on during an event because of an interlock
condition.
The alarm is cleared when the relay is next activated for any reason (the next timer event or HAND mode
or “activate with” force on condition).
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
Incorrect programming
Reprogram to eliminate overlapping events
Long duration interlock condition
Normal operation
Decrease prebleed time
Long duration prebleed
Increase bleed flow rate
Reprogram to eliminate overlapping events
SENSOR FAULT
This error indicates that the signal from the sensor is no longer valid at all. This error condition will stop
control of any output using the sensor.
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Sensor wires shorted
Disconnect short
Faulty sensor
Replace sensor
Faulty controller
Replace or repair controller
INPUT FAILURE
This alarm indicates that the sensor input circuit is no longer working. This error condition will stop control
of any output using the sensor.
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Faulty controller
Replace or repair controller
BATTERY POWER LOW
This alarm indicates that the battery which holds the date and time in memory is below 2.4 VDC.
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Faulty battery
Replace battery
SYSTEM TEMP LOW
This alarm indicates that the temperature inside the controller is below -10 °C.
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Low ambient temperatures
Provide heat for the controller
SYSTEM TEMP HIGH
This alarm indicates that the temperature inside the controller is above 65 °C.
Possible Cause
Correction Action
High ambient temperatures
Provide cooling for the controller
DISPLAY ERROR
This alarm occurs if the user interface gets lost
Possible Cause
Pressing icons very quickly
Correction Action
Exit out of the screen and continue programming
NETWORK CARD FAILURE
This alarm occurs if the Ethernet circuit board fails
67
Possible Cause
Ethernet card locked up
Ethernet card not seated correctly
Faulty Ethernet card
Correction Action
Try a power cycle to reset it
Unplug the network card and plug it back in
Replace Ethernet card
WEB SERVER FAILURE
This alarm occurs if the web server on the Ethernet circuit board fails
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Web server locked up
Try a power cycle to reset it
Faulty Ethernet card
Replace Ethernet card
VTouch DATA COMM ERROR
This alarm occurs if the controller attempts to send data to VTouch and VTouch fails to acknowledge
receipt of the data
Possible Cause
Correction Action
No connection to LAN
Connect Ethernet cable to LAN
Program valid settings for LAN in the controller or
Wrong IP, subnet and/or gateway address
use DHCP if supported by the LAN
LAN is blocking outside access
Program LAN’s router to open access
Network card failure
See above
VTouch LiveConnect ERROR
Future feature
Possible Cause
8.3
Correction Action
Procedure for Evaluation of Conductivity Electrode
Try cleaning the electrode first (refer to Sect. 7.1).
To check the electrode, check the electrode connections to the terminal strip (refer to Figure 7).
Make sure that the correct colors go to the correct terminals, and that the connections are tight.
Restore power and see if the conductivity is back to normal. If not, replace the electrode.
8.4
Procedure for evaluation of the pH/ORP electrode
The most common cause of a calibration failure is an electrode problem. First try cleaning the
electrode, then retry the calibration. If this fails again, replace the electrode and retry the calibration.
The next most common problem is wet or poor connections. Check the connection of the electrode
to the cable for moisture. Check the connections between the cable and the terminal strip. Make
sure that they are tight, that the terminal is not clamped to the plastic jacket, and that the wires are
routed to the correct terminal. If there is a junction box installed between the electrode and the
controller, check the wiring there as well.
You should be able to measure the +5VDC ±5% and -5VDC ±5% vs IN- at the terminal strip. If not,
the controller is faulty. You should be able to measure the IN+ vs IN- (DC scale) and get the
appropriate values for the buffer solutions used. If not, the preamplifier or its wiring is faulty.
68
The last possibility is to try replacing the preamplifier.
8.5
Diagnostic Lights
Some of the circuit boards inside the controller have diagnostic lights.
POWER/RELAY BOARD AMBER NEON (ONLY FOR MODELS WITH POWERED RELAYS)
Indicates status of the fuse protecting the relays. Normal operation is ON. If not on:
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Fuse has blown or is missing
Replace fuse
Controller model has only dry contact or pulse
Normal
proportional relays
CONTROLLER BOARD D7 LED
Indicates status of the software application. Normal operation is that 5 seconds after power-up, it does one
long blink on, two short blinks, on long blink off. If it is not doing this:
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Controller software is not running
Try a power cycle to reset it
Faulty controller board
Replace controller board
CONTROLLER BOARD D8 LED
Indicates the status of the 5 VDC power supply. Normal operation is ON. If not on:
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Faulty ribbon cable
Replace ribbon cable
Faulty power supply
Replace power/relay board
CONTROLLER BOARD D9 LED
Indicates the status of the 3.3 VDC power supply. Normal operation is ON. If not on:
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Faulty ribbon cable
Replace ribbon cable
Faulty power supply
Replace power/relay board
SENSOR BOARD LED
Indicates the status of the sensor board. Blinks slowly for several seconds during power-up. Normal
operation is OFF. If not behaving this way:
Possible Cause
Correction Action
Sensor card locked up
Try a power cycle to reset it
Sensor card not seated correctly
Unplug the card and plug it back in
Faulty sensor card
Replace sensor card
69
9.0
Spare Parts Identification
191733 Ethernet board
191732
Analog
output
board
191730 Sensor board
or 191731 Analog input board
191739
Ribbon cable
191729
Front panel
assembly
191738 Safety cover
191578 Power switch cable
102834 Fuse (W600 & 610 only)
103864 (6x)
191734 W600 Power relay board
or 191735 W610 Power relay board
or 191736 W620 Power relay board
or 191737 W640 Power relay board
103808
Strain relief
insert
191576
191743
Strain relief/insert
191677
Strain relief/
insert & locknut
191742
Strain relief/
insert
102903 (3x) Locknut
103803 Power switch
103859 Power cord
103805 Strain relief/insert
103809
Strain relief/insert
Controller Parts
103860 Pigtails
Controller Parts
70
WCT600 Sensor option BD and FD
71
WCT600 Sensor option BN or FN
72
WCT600 Sensor option BA, BB, BC, FA, FB, FC
73
WCT600 Sensor option DE, DF
74
WCT600 Sensor option DN
75
WCT600 Sensor option HA, HB and HC
76
WCT600 Sensor option HD
77
WCT600 Sensor option HN
78
WDS600 Sensor option FF or FN
79
WDS600 Sensor option PN
80
WDS600 Sensor option PX
81
WPH600 Sensor option PN
82
WPH600 Sensor option PX
83
10.0 SERVICE POLICY
The W600 series controller has a 2-year warranty on electronic components and a 1-year warranty on
mechanical parts (terminal strip and relays).
We stock circuit boards for immediate exchange after we have isolated the cause of the problem.
Factory authorized repairs that are received by next-day-air will be returned within 24 hours. Normal
priority for returns is two weeks.
Out of warranty repairs or circuit board exchanges are done on a flat fee basis after the warranty is
expired.
84
FIVE BOYNTON ROAD
TEL: 508-429-1110
HOPPING BROOK PARK
FAX: 508-429-7433
HOLLISTON, MA 01746 USA
Web: www.walchem.com
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