06. Edit Menu 2.fm - e

06. Edit Menu 2.fm - e
Edit Menu
Assign Group
Synth (low): Same as Synth (last) but with low note priority. When you
release the currently sounding solo key while holding other keys down, the
lowest held solo key sounds in a Legato fashion (MiniMoog).
Synth (high): Same as Synth (last) but with high note priority. When you
release the currently sounding solo key while holding other keys down, the
highest held solo key sounds in a Legato fashion.
Fingered Glide: Same as Synth (last), except that Glide is disabled when
playing Staccato, enabled when playing Legato.
Assign Group
Use the Assign Group parameter to assign a certain number of channels to
each layer. By assigning all voices in the preset to assign groups, important
parts are protected from being “stolen” by more recently played keys. Or
you can assign a voice, such as an open high hat, to a mono channel so it is
cancelled by a closed high hat on the same mono channel. Layers rotate
within their assigned “bin” of channels, not interfering with other bins.
L1
ASSIGN GROUP
poly all
The modes are:
Poly All: Notes are played polyphonically with dynamic channel
assignment using all 32 channels.
Poly 16 A-B: Two bins of 16 channels each. Notes are played polyphonically with dynamic channel assignment using no more than 16 channels.
Poly 8 A-D: Four bins of 8 channels each. Notes are played polyphonically
with dynamic channel assignment using no more than 8 channels each.
Poly 4 A-D: Four bins of 4 channels each. Notes are played polyphonically
with dynamic channel assignment using no more than 4 channels each.
Poly 2 A-D: Four bins of 2 channels each. Notes are played polyphonically
with dynamic channel assignment using no more than 2 channels each.
Mono A-I: Nine monophonic channels, Any layers assigned to the same
letter interrupt each other without affecting other layers.
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 101
Edit Menu
Glide
Glide
Glide creates a smooth transition from one note to the next instead of the
normal instantaneous change in pitch when a new key is pressed. This
effect is commonly heard on slide guitars, synthesizers and violins.
L1
GLIDE RATE
0.000 sec/oct
CURVE
linear
The Glide Rate parameter defines the time it takes to glide to the new pitch
(the larger the value, the slower the glide rate) The glide rate value range is
from 0 through 32.738 seconds (zero means off).
Last
Note
New
Note
Last
Note
Exp1
Glide Speed
Linear
Glide Speed
Glide Speed
The Glide Curve describes how the glide accelerates as it slides between
notes. Because of the ear’s non-linear response to pitch, a linear glide
sounds slow at the beginning and speeds up toward the end. Exponential
curves actually sound smoother and more linear. Eight exponential curves
are provided. Choose one that suits your style.
New
Note
Last
Note
Exp8
New
Note
Glide can be either polyphonic or monophonic depending of the state of
Solo Mode.
Z-Plane Filters
A filter is a device which changes the output of a signal (sound) by
removing certain elements of the signal based on the frequency and
amplitude. The “Order” of a filter defines the number of filter elements it
contains. The more elements, the more complex the filter.
Proteus 2000 contains 17 different types of E-mu’s celebrated Z-plane filters.
In addition to the standard Low pass, High pass and Band pass filters,
Proteus 2000 contains Swept Octave Equalizers, Phasers, Flangers, Vocal
Formant Filters, and digital models of classic synthesizer filters.
102 E-mu Systems
Edit Menu
Z-Plane Filters
Filter Types
This screen allows you to choose the type of filter for the current layer.
L1
FILTER
Phazer 2 E4
Low-pass filter
Type
PHA
Filter Name
Order
Type
Description
Smooth
02
LPF
Typical OB type low-pass filter with a shallow
12 dB/octave slope.
Classic
04
LPF
4-pole low-pass filter, the standard filter on
classic analog synths. 24 dB/octave rolloff.
Steeper
06
LPF
6-pole low-pass filter which has a steeper
slope than a 4-pole low-pass filter.
36 dB/octave rolloff!
Shallow
02
HPF
2-pole high-pass filter. 12 dB/octave slope.
04
HPF
Classic 4-pole high-pass filter. Cutoff sweep
progressively cuts 4th Order High-pass.
Filter Types
LPF
Ord
6
PHA
Phaser
Deeper
HPF
High-pass filter
Band-pass1
02
BPF
FLG
Flanger
Band-pass filter with 6 dB/octave rolloff on
either side of the passband and Q control.
Band-pass2
04
BPF
BPF
Band-pass filter
Band-pass filter with 12 dB/octave rolloff on
either side of the passband and Q control.
ContraBand
06
BPF
A novel band-pass filter where the frequency
peaks and dips cross each other midway in
the frequency range.
Swept1>1oct
06
EQ+
Parametric filter with 24 dB of boost or cut
and a one octave bandwidth.
Swept2>1oct
06
EQ+
Parametric filter with 24 dB of boost or cut.
The bandwidth of the filter is two octaves
wide at the low end of the audio spectrum,
gradually changing to one octave wide at the
upper end of the spectrum.
Swept3>1oct
06
EQ+
Parametric filter with 24 dB of boost or cut.
The bandwidth of the filter is three octaves
wide at the low end of the audio spectrum,
gradually changing to one octave wide at the
upper end of the spectrum.
AahAyEeh
06
VOW
Vowel formant filter which sweeps from
“Ah” sound, through “Ay” sound to “Ee”
sound at maximum frequency setting. Q
varies the apparent size of the mouth cavity.
Ooh-To-Aah
06
VOW
Vowel formant filter which sweeps from
“Oo” sound, through “Oh” sound to “Ah”
sound at maximum frequency setting.
Q varies the apparent size of mouth cavity.
VOW Vowel/ formant
EQ+
EQ boost
EQ-
EQ cut
SFX
Special Effect
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 103
Edit Menu
Proteus 2000 Filter Types
Proteus 2000 Filter
Types
Filter Name
Order
Type
Description
PhazeShift1
06
PHA
Recreates a comb filter effect typical of phase
shifters. Frequency moves position of
notches. Q varies the depth of the notches.
PhazeShift2
06
PHA
Comb filter with slightly different notch
frequency moving the frequency of notches.
Q varies the depth of the notches.
FlangerLite
06
FLG
Contains three notches. Frequency moves
frequency and spacing of notches. Q
increases flanging depth.
BlissBatz
06
SFX
Bat phaser from the Emulator 4.
Filter Parameters
The Freq and Q parameters control various elements of the filter depending
on the type of filter used. See the table in the Filter Types section for details
about what the Freq and Q fields control in each filter.
L1
FILTER
Freq:
255
Filter Envelope
Q:
019
The Filter Envelope is normally used to control the filter frequency and has
six stages. Unlike the Volume Envelope, the Filter Envelope must be
patched to the Filter Frequency using a PatchCord. In this respect, it can be
thought of as a general purpose envelope generator which is normally
patched to control the filter. The Filter Envelope Levels can be negative as
well as positive.
There are three mode options:
• Time-based: Defines the Filter Envelope rates from 0 to 127 (approximately 1 ms to 160 seconds). The Master clock has no affect on timebased rates.
L1
FILT ENV
Attack 1
104 E-mu Systems
RATE
84
LEVEL
100%
Edit Menu
Filter Envelope
• Tempo-based: The Filter Envelope times vary based on the master tempo
setting and are displayed in values such as 1, 2, 3, etc. Note values are
displayed instead of a number when the time corresponds to an exact
note value. Tempo-based envelopes are useful when using arpeggiators
and sequencers because the envelope rates compress and expand according to the Master Tempo setting, keeping the envelopes in sync with the
music. See the illustration on page 97.
L1
FILT ENV
Attack 1
RATE
1/4
LEVEL
100%
Envelope Repeat
The Envelope Generators can also be made to repeat. When the envelope
repeat function is On, the Attack (1&2) and Decay (1&2) stages will
continue to repeat as long as the key is held. As soon as the key is released,
the envelope continues through its normal Release stages (1 & 2). For more
information, see “Envelope Repeat” on page 60.
þ
1.
To Turn on Envelope Repeat:
Move the cursor until it is underneath the Mode field as shown below.
L1
FILTER ENVELOPE
Mode: time-based
2.
Turn the data entry control clockwise. The lower line changes to:
L1
FILTER ENVELOPE
Repeat: off
3.
Move the cursor underneath the on/off field, then turn the data entry
control clockwise so that Repeat is On.
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 105
Edit Menu
Auxiliary Envelope

See the Programming
Basics section of this manual for
detailed information about how
the Envelopes work.
Defining the Filter Envelope
The Filter Envelope controls the filter frequency of the layer over time. The
Envelope has six stages to the contour: Attack 1, Attack 2, Decay 1, Decay 2,
Release 1 and Release 2. When a key is pressed, the Envelope goes through
the first four stages. If the key continues to be held, the envelope holds at
the Decay 2 level. When the key is released, the envelope immediately
jumps to the Release 1 stage, then the Release 2 stage finally ending at the
Release 2 level.

+100
Rls
1
k1
At
0
Sustain
k2
At
y1
Dc
The default PatchCord
settings connect the Filter
Envelope to Filter Frequency but
the envelope can be routed to
any real-time control destination
using a PatchCord.
time
Rl
s2
Dcy
2
-100
Key Down
Key Released
Auxiliary Envelope
The Auxiliary Envelope is a supplementary general purpose envelope that
can be routed to any real-time control destination in the PatchCords. It is
identical to the filter envelope generator. See “Filter Envelope” on page 104
for full details.
Low Frequency
Oscillators (LFOs)
A Low Frequency Oscillator or LFO, is simply a wave that repeats at a slow
speed. Proteus 2000 has two LFOs per layer identified on the display as
LFO1 and LFO2.
An LFO can be routed to any real-time control destination using a
PatchCord. LFOs have a myriad of uses, some of which probably haven’t
been thought of yet. The following examples show a few common uses.
• Control the pitch of the sound (LFO -> Pitch). This effect is called
“vibrato” and is an important performance tool. Many presets use this
routing with the modulation wheel controlling “how much” modulation is applied.
• Create a “tremolo” effect by routing the LFO to control the volume
(LFO -> AmpVolume).
• Add a bit of animation to the sound by routing the LFO to control the
filter. Set the PatchCord amount low for a subtle effect.
The LFOs have five parameters: Shape, Sync, Rate, Delay and Variation.
106 E-mu Systems
Edit Menu
Low Frequency Oscillators (LFOs)
Shape
LFO waveforms have different shapes. The shape of the waveform determines the effect of the LFO. LFOs have traditionally been used to add
vibrato or repeating movement to a sound. These new shapes offer a lot of
new programming possibilities.
If you modulate the pitch of an instrument, it’s easy to visualize the shape
of the waveform. For example, the sine wave has a smooth, rolling shape
that changes the pitch smoothly. The square waveform changes between
two pitches abruptly. A sawtooth waveform increases the pitch smoothly,
then abruptly changes back down. The available waveforms are shown
below.
R an dom
LFO Tricks & Tips:
Tri an gl e
S awtooth
Sine
S qu are
33% Pulse
25% Pu l s e
16% Pu l s e
12% Pulse
• The Random LFO wave is truly
random and is different for
each voice and layer.
• The Pattern (Pat) waveforms
will sound the same on
different layers and voices.
• Sine + Noise is very useful for
simulating trumpet and flute
vibrato.
★ When routing Hemi-quaver
to Pitch:
Pat: O c taves
+38 = major scale
-38 = phrygian scale
+76 = whole tone scale
(+38) + (+76) = diminished
Pat: F i f th +O c tave
+ Octave
Pat: S us4 tr ip
G
C
F
G
- Octave
C
C
(two cords)
odd amount = S+H sound
Pat : N een er
S i n e 1,2
S i n e 1, 3,5
C
A#
G
Note: References to musical
intervals in the pattern LFO
shapes are with the LFO
routed to pitch and a
PatchCord amount of +38.
S ine + N oi s e
H emi - qu aver
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 107
Edit Menu
Low Frequency Oscillators (LFOs)
L1
LFO1
SHAPE
sawtooth
SYNC
key sync
Sync
The Sync field specifies whether the LFO is synchronized to a key stroke or
is Free Running. Key Sync starts the LFO wave at the beginning of its cycle
each time you press a key on the controller. In Free Run mode, the LFO
wave begins at a random point in its cycle each time you press a key on the
controller.
Rate
The Rate field determines the LFO speed in absolute frequency rate values
or tempo-based note values. All values equal to or greater than zero specify
absolute frequency values from 0.08 Hz to 18.14 Hz.
Values less than zero specify tempo-based rates. If you modulate the rate of
a tempo-based LFO, the rates will jump between the tempo-based note
values with each PatchCord increment of “1”. As an example: if the LFO
rate was set to 8/1 and you patched the Mod Wheel to control rate with a
PatchCord amount of +1, turning the Mod Wheel to maximum would
change the LFO rate to 4/1d. Refer to the chart below.
L1
108 E-mu Systems
LFO1
RATE
0.08Hz
DELAY
60
Tempo-based Rates
(based on Master Tempo)
Display
octal whole note
8/1
dotted quad whole note
4/1d
octal whole note triplet
8/1t
quad whole note
4/1
dotted double whole note
2/1d
quad whole note triplet
4/1t
double whole note
2/1
dotted whole note
1/1d
VAR
020
Edit Menu
Low Frequency Oscillators (LFOs)
LFO Synced to 1/4 Note Clock
Tempo-based Rates
(based on Master Tempo)
Display
double note triplet
2/1t
whole note
1/1
dotted half note
1/2d
whole note triplet
1/1t
half note
1/2
dotted quarter note
1/4d
half note triplet
1/2t
quarter note
1/4
dotted 8th note
1/8d
quarter note triplet
1/4t
8th note
1/8
dotted 16th note
1/16d
8th note triplet
1/8t
16th note
1/16
dotted 32nd note
1/32d
16th note triplet
1/16t
32nd Note
1/32
Delay
The Delay parameter defines the amount of time between hitting a key on
the controller and the onset of the LFO modulation. Delay can be used to
simulate an effect often used by acoustic instrument players where the
vibrato is brought in only after the initial note pitch is established. The
following illustration demonstrates how delay works.
time
Delay
key
down
All Delay values equal to or greater than zero specify absolute time rates
from 0 to 127. Values less than zero specify Tempo-based mode. Refer to the
previous table for times and tempo-based rates.
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 109
Edit Menu
Low Frequency Oscillators (LFOs)
Variation
LFO Variation sets the amount of random variation of the LFO each time
you press a key on the controller. This creates a chorus or ensemble effect
since each note played has a slightly different modulation rate. The higher
the value entered, the greater the note to note variation in the LFO.
_
The Variation value range is from 0 through 100.
Variation is disabled
when a Tempo-Based LFO is
selected.
LFO variation changes the rate of each note to create an “ensemble” effect.
110 E-mu Systems
Edit Menu
PatchCords
PatchCords
PatchCords tie everything together by connecting modulation sources to
destinations. Each PatchCord has its own Amount control which can be
positive or negative (negative amounts invert the signal). In addition, the
PatchCord amounts themselves can be controlled by any modulation
source. Proteus 2000 provides 24 patches for each layer.
There are three permanently connected control routings: volume envelope
to amplifier, pitch wheel to pitch and key to pitch. All other connections
must be made using the PatchCords.
Modulation
Source
Amount +/-
-
LFO 1
+
Destination
Amp
Volume
Modulation
Source
Destination
LFO 1
LFO 2
Amp Env
Filt Env
Aux Env
Wheel
Pressure
etc.
Amp Vol
Pitch
Pan
LFO Rate
Aux Env
Env Atk
Glide
etc.
Each patch has an amount field which determines how much modulation
is applied to the destination. The modulation amount can be positive or
negative. Negative values invert the input. The amount value range is from
-100 to +100.
L1
PATCHCORD
RlsVel
->
AmpVol
L1
#01
+100
PATCHCORD
Key+
->
FiltRes
#24
-27
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 111
Edit Menu
PatchCords
Modulator Polarity
You will notice that some of the modulation sources have symbols
following their names. For example, there are three Velocity modulation
sources, Vel +, Vel ±, and Vel <.
Control
Value
+
±
<
0
63
127
Control Value Applied
0
-63
-127
63
0
-63
127
+64
0
+ modulation ADDS to the
initial value. (Normal)
± centers around Zero.
(Use for LFOs, Filt. Freq.)
< modulation SUBTRACTS
from the initial value
“+” Modulation: Uses only the positive half of the range, adding to the
current value. For example, if the filter frequency were set to 100 and you
patched Vel+ to the filter, the filter frequency would increase from 100 as
velocity was applied.
“±” Modulation: Uses both sides (full) range and both adding and
subtracting from the current value. For example, if the filter frequency
were set to 100 and you patched Vel ± to the filter, the filter frequency
would decrease from 100 with key velocities of 63 or less and increase from
100 with key velocities of 64 and above. Therefore with medium velocity,
the Filter frequency is approximately where you set it at 100.
An LFO ± works the same way; on the positive half of the cycle it increases
the initial amount and on the negative half of the cycle it decreases the
initial amount. With a ± modulation source, a value of 64 equals 0.
“<” Modulation: Uses only the negative half of the range, subtracting
from the current value. For example, if the Amplifier Volume were set to
+3 dB and you patched Vel < to AmpVol, the volume would be at +3 dB
only when maximum key velocity were applied. Lower key velocities would
scale back the volume. In general, < modulation is the proper choice when
modulating Volume.
112 E-mu Systems
Edit Menu
PatchCords
Refer to the following table for a list of modulation sources and
destinations available in the Proteus 2000.
Modulation Sources:
Modulation Destinations
Off
Key (+, +)
Velocity (+, +, <)
RlsVel (Release Velocity)
Gate
Pressure
PitchWhl (Pitch Wheel)
ModWhl (Modulation Wheel)
Pedal
MIDI A-L
FootSw1 - 3 (Foot Switch 1-3)
FootnFF (Flip-Flop Foot Switch 1 -3)
MIDI Volume (Controller 7)
MIDI Pan (Controller 10)
KeyGlide
VolEnv +, +, < (Volume Envelope)
Off
KeySust (Key Sustain)
FinePtch (Fine Pitch)
Pitch
Glide
ChrsAmt (Chorus Amount)
‘SStart (Sample Start) -note-on)
SLoop (Sample Loop)
SRetrig (Sample Retrigger)
FiltFreq (Filter Frequency)
‘FiltRes (Filter Resonance -note-on)
AmpVol (Amplifier Volume)
AmpPan (Amplifier Pan)
RTXfade (Real-time Crossfade)
VEnvRts (Volume Envelope Rates -all)
FilEnv +, +, < (Filter Envelope)
AuxEnv +, +, < (Auxiliary Envelope)
LFO 1 & 2 (+, +)
White (White Noise)
Pink (Pink Noise)
XfdRand (Crossfade Random)
KeyRand 1 & 2 (Key Random)
Lag 0 sum (summing amp out)
Lag 1 sum (summing amp out)
Lag 0 & 1 (Lag Processor)
Clk Divisors (Octal, Quad, Double
Whole, Whole, Half, Qtr, 8th,16th)
DC (DC Offset)
Summing Amp
Sum
Switch
Absolute Value
Diode
Flip-Flop
Quantizer
4x Gain
VEnvAtk (Volume Envelope Attack)
VEnvDcy (Volume Envelope Decay)
VEnvRls (Volume Envelope Release)
FEnvRts (Filter Envelope Rates -all)
FEnvAtk (Filter Envelope Attack)
FEnvDcy (Filter Envelope Decay)
FEnvRls (Filter Envelope Release)
FEnvTrig (Filter Envelope Trigger)
AEnvRts (Auxiliary Envelope Rates -all)
AEnvAtk (Auxiliary Envelope Attack)
AEnvDcy (Auxiliary Envelope Decay)
AEnvRls (Auxiliary Envelope Release)
AEnvTrig (Auxiliary Envelope Trigger)
LFO 1 & 2 Rate
LFO 1 & 2 Trigger
Lag Processor In 0 & 1
Sum (Summing Amp)
Switch
Abs (Absolute Value)
Diode
Quantize
Flip-Flop
Gain 4x
Cord 1-24 Amount
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 113
Edit Menu
Pitch Bend Range
Pitch Bend Range
Specifies the Pitch Wheel range in semitones for the current layer. Pitch
Wheel is a standard synthesizer control which is transmitted as a MIDI
continuous controller message used (normally) to bend the pitch up and
down.
The PitchBend range is from 0 to +12 semitones or “Master.” A setting of
“0” turns the pitch wheel Off for the current layer. The Master setting uses
the Pitch Bend range defined in the Master menu.
L1
Mix Output
PITCHBEND RANGE
+/- 12 semitones
This feature allows you to program the Effect Send as a part of the preset.
Note that for this feature to work, the Mix Output setting in the Master
menu MUST be set to “Preset” on the selected MIDI channel. If you want to
define output routing by MIDI channel, set it up using the Mix Output page
in the Master menu. See “Mix Output” on page 38 for more information.
L1
MIX OUTPUT
Send2->main
FX Send
Routing

The entire Send is
disconnected from the Effects
Processors even if only one plug
is inserted into the Submix jack.
Output
Routing
The Sends function as effect processor inputs (effect sends). Send 2 and
Send 3 are also used to route sounds to the Sub 2 and 3 outputs on the back
panel. When a plug is inserted into the associated Submix jack on the back
panel, the Send is routed directly to the output jack, bypassing the effects
processor.
The Output Routing field shows the true routing of the Sends either to
Main (through the effects processor) or directly to a Submix output. If a
plug was inserted into a Sub 1 jack, the screen above would change to show,
“Send2 -> sub1”. This indicates that the preset is routed to the Sub 1 output
jacks.
114 E-mu Systems
Edit Menu
Common
Preset
Parameters
Preset Effects
This section of the Edit menu chapter describes parameters that affect all
layers in the preset.
Proteus 2000 has two stereo effects processors. When playing presets one at
a time, the two processors can be programmed as part of the preset. The
diagram below shows how the effects are integrated into the signal path
using a parallel effects send/return model, similar to a mixing console.
FX Send Amount
Reverb, Delay
Effect
A
Sum
Layers
Main
Outs
Dry Signal
Sum
Effect
B
Chorus, Flange
FX Send Amount
Refer to the Effects chapter for additional information and instructions for
setting up both the Preset Effects and the Master Effects.
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 115
Edit Menu
Preset Effects
OUTPUT SECTION
& EFFECTS PROCESSORS
FX Sends
PRESET
EDIT MENU
Send 2 10%
Send 3 0%
Send 4 0%
Mix
Output
Send 1
N
D
1
B➟A
FX Sends
Send 4 15%
Mix Output
Ch 2A
SEND 2
Ch 3A
SEND 3
S
E
S
U
B
1
Jack Detect
2
S
E
3
MASTER MENU
Effect
B
N
D
N
D
Ch 16B SEND 4
Chorus
M
A
I
N
Send 1 0%
Send 3 20%
PRESET
Effect
A
S
E
Send 2 0%
Ch 1A
Hall 1
Send 1 15%
Jack Detect
S
U
B
2
S
E
N
D
4
The Mix Output setting in the Master Menu determines if the Preset’s Mix
Output routing will be used. This allows the Sends to be programmed by
either MIDI Channel or by Preset, whichever you prefer.
116 E-mu Systems
Edit Menu
FXA Algorithm
FXA Algorithm
This screen selects the effect type for Effect Processor A. The “A” effects
consist of different reverb types and digital delays. Move the cursor to the
lower line of the display and select the effect you want.
FXA ALGORITHM
Lg Concert Pan
A Effect Types
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
Room 1
Room 2
Room 3
Hall 1
Hall 2
Plate
Delay
Panning Delay
Multitap 1
Multitap Pan
3 Tap
3 Tap Pan
Soft Room
Warm Room
Perfect Room
Tiled Room
Hard Plate
Warm Hall
Spacious Hall
Bright Hall
Bright Hall Pan
Bright Plate
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
BBall Court
Gymnasium
Cavern
Concert 9
Concert 10 Pan
Reverse Gate
Gate 2
Gate Pan
Concert 11
Medium Concert
Large Concert
Large Concert Pan
Canyon
DelayVerb 1
DelayVerb 2
DelayVerb 3
DelayVerb 4 Pan
DelayVerb 5 Pan
DelayVerb 6
DelayVerb 7
DelayVerb 8
DelayVerb 9
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 117
Edit Menu
FXA Parameters
FXA Parameters
The FXA parameters are Decay, High Frequency Damping, and the FxB to
FxA send. Decay sets the length of time it takes an effect to fade out. HF
Damping causes the high frequency energy to fade away more quickly
during the reverb decay. FxB to FxA controls the amount of the “B” effect
sent through effect “A”. This allows you to place the two effects in series
and create setups such as “distortion through reverb” among others. Please
refer to the Effects chapter for more information about the effects.
FXA DECAY
048
FXA Send Amounts
HFDAMP
064
These parameters set the effects amounts for each of the four stereo effects
busses.
FXA SEND AMOUNTS
2: 50%
3: 10%
FXB Algorithm
FxB>FxA
000
1:100%
4: 0%
This screen selects the effect type for Effect Processor A. Move the cursor to
the lower line of the display and select the effect you want.
FXB ALGORITHM
Panning Delay
B Effect Types
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
118 E-mu Systems
Chorus 1
Chorus 2
Chorus 3
Chorus 4
Chorus 5
Doubling
Slapback
Flange 1
Flange 2
Flange 3
Flange 4
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
Flange 5
Flange 6
Flange 7
Big Chorus
Symphonic
Ensemble
Delay
Delay Stereo
Delay Stereo 2
Panning Delay
Delay Chorus
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
PanDelay Chorus 1
PanDelay Chorus 2
Dual Tap 1/3
Dual Tap 1/4
Vibrato
Distortion 1
Distortion 2
Distorted Flange
Distorted Chorus
Distorted Double
Edit Menu
FXB Parameters
FXB Parameters
The FXB parameters are Feedback, LFO Rate and Delay. Feedback sends the
output of the effect back into the input. This creates multiple echoes on a
delay effect and intensifies a chorus or flange effect. LFO Rate allows you to
change the speed of the modulation oscillator for flange and chorus effects.
Delay sets the length of the delay line. This affects the time between
echoes, or the tone of flange effects.
FXB
FXB Send Amounts
FEEDBK
032
LFORATE
003
These parameters set the effects amounts for the four stereo effects busses.
FXB SEND AMOUNTS
2: 50%
3: 10%
Effects Patchcords
O
DELAY
200ms
1:100%
4: 0%
Effects PatchCords give you real-time control of the effects send amounts.
You can dynamically adjust the effects mix during a sequence or live performance. The effect processors are a powerful synthesis tool and this feature
lets you control and use them in exciting new ways. There are 12 effects
PatchCords per preset with a source, a destination and an amount control.
The amount can be set from -100 to +100. The effects PatchCord controls
are added to the FX Send Amounts set in the Master or Edit menus.
The FX Cords allow you
to crossfade between effects.
1) Set FXA Send 1 to 100%.
2) Set FXB Send 1 to 0%.
3) Set FX Cord #1 to FXA Send 1
at -100.
4) Set FX Cord #2 to FXB Send 1
at +100.
Increasing the controller amount
will crossfade from FXA to FXB.
FX CORDS
Pedal
-> FXBSend2
Modulation Sources:
Off
PitchWhl (Pitch Wheel)
ModWhl (Modulation Wheel)
Pedal
MIDI Volume (Controller 7)
MIDI Pan (Controller 10)
MIDI A-L
#01
+100
Modulation Destinations
Off
Effect A Send 1
Effect A Send 2
Effect A Send 3
Effect A Send 4
Effect B Send 1
Effect B Send 2
Effect B Send 3
Effect B Send 4
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 119
Edit Menu
Initial Controller Amount
This parameter sets the initial value of MIDI controllers A-L when the preset
is first selected. The front panel Control Knobs can be thought of as front
panel MIDI controllers because in the Proteus 2000, they are treated just as
if they originated from an external MIDI device. Refer to the following
diagram. There are three Initial Controller Amount screens (A-D, E-H, I-L).
Control
Knobs
Edit
Menu
A
31
MIDI
A/E/I
-
B/F/J
-
C/G/K
-
D/H/L
-
+
Controller
A
B
0
1
2
3
+
Controller
B
C
0
1
2
3
31
MIDI
+
Controller
C
Cord
MIDI
31
MIDI
L
0
1
2
3
31
Cord
0
1
2
3
Patchcord Destinations
Cord
Master
Menu
Cord
Initial Controller
Amount
MIDI
Controller
L
+
Amount
Key Sustain
Fine Pitch
Pitch
Glide
Chorus Amount
Sample Start
Sample Loop
Sample Retrigger
Filter Frequency
Filter Q
Amplifier Volume
Amplifier Pan
Amplifier Crossfade
Volume Envelope Rates
Volume Envelope Attack
Volume Envelope Decay
Volume Envelope Release
Filter Envelope Rates
Filter Envelope Attack
Filter Envelope Decay
Filter Envelope Release
Aux. Envelope Rates
Aux. Envelope Attack
Aux. Envelope Decay
Aux. Envelope Release
LFO 1 & 2 Rates
LFO 1 & 2 Trigger
Lag Processor
Summing Amp
Switch
Absolute Value
Diode
Quantizer
4x Gain
Cord 1-24 Amount
External MIDI controller numbers are assigned to the Letters A-L in the
Master menu. The Initial Controller Amount value is sent to the PatchCord
destination when the Preset is first selected. If you move the Control Knob,
then that value replaces the initial value. If MIDI controller data is received
it will similarly replace the knob or initial setting.
INITIAL CONTROLLER AMT
A:017
B:112
C:127
D: off
The Initial controller amounts can be set from 000-127 or they can be
turned Off. If set to Off, the current controller value is used when the preset
is first selected. Setting the Initial Amount to “off” uses the values from the
previously selected preset.
120 E-mu Systems
Edit Menu
Keyboard Tuning
Keyboard Tuning
In addition to the standard equally divided octave tuning, Proteus 2000
contains twelve factory programmed tunings and 12 user-definable
tunings. The Keyboard Tuning parameter selects which tuning is used by
the current preset. The User Tuning tables are defined in the Master menu.
The factory Keyboard Tuning tables are described in the following table.
Tuning Tables
Description
Equal Temperament
Standard Western tuning
(12 equally spaced notes per octave)
Just C
Just intonation. (Based on small interval ratios. Sweet
and pure, non-beating intervals.)
Vallotti
Valotti & Young non-equal temperament. (Similar to 12
tone equal temperament. Each key has a different
character for a given scale.)
19-Tone
19 tone equal temperament. (19 notes per octave.
Difficult to play, but works well with a sequencer.)
Gamelan
5 tone Slendro and 7 tone Pelog. (Javanese. Pelog are
white keys, Slendro are black keys. Exotic tunings of
Gamelan flavor.
Just C2
Allows you to play the following chords in the key of C:
C, E, F, G, A, B, C#m, D#m, Em, F#m, G#m, Am, Bm
Just C-minor
Allows you to play the following chords in the key of C:
C, E, F, G, A, B, Em, Am, Bm, C#m, D#m, G#m
Just C3
Allows you to play the following chords in the key of C:
C, D, F, Bb, C#m, Dm, Em, F#m, G#m, Am
Werkmeister III
A “well” temperament developed in the 17th century.
Although you can play in all keys, each key sounds
slightly different.
Kirnberger
Another well temperament developed by Johann
Philipp Kirnberger where no pitch is more than 12
cents off from equal temperament.
Scarlatti
A variant of Meantone tuning which was used from the
15th to 18th centuries.
Repeating Octave
Middle C octave is repeated up and down the keyboard.
Link with a preset in equal temperament to form
unusual inversion up and down the keyboard.
User 1-12
Define your own tuning tables (Master menu).
Refer to “User Key Tuning” on page 53 in the Master Menu chapter for
instructions on how to define your own Keyboard Tunings.
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 121
Edit Menu
Keyboard Tuning
The Just C Tuning Tables

Proteus 2000
implements the MIDI Tuning
Dump protocol which allows you
to create tuning tables on your
personal computer and
download them via MIDI. There
are several computer
applications available on the
internet which let you create
and download tuning tables via
MIDI.
Well Tempered and Just were standard keyboard tunings up until the 20thcentury when the current “equal tempered” scale became prevalent. In an
equal tempered scale, the octave is equally divided into 12 parts. In Just or
Well Tempered scales, the 12 notes are separately tuned to produce pure
chords. However, in Just tunings you are limited to playing certain chords
and if you play the wrong chord it may sound very BAD!
Proteus 2000 allows you to modulate between keys by providing you 12
user tuning tables. Tuning tables can be changed as you play using a
program change (create several presets with the same sound and different
tuning tables), by MIDI SysEx command (using a programmable MIDI
footswitch or other device), or using a continuous controller (link 2 presets
and crossfade between them using a controller). The Just C2, Just C min,
Just C3 Tuning Tables
These new tuning tables take the concept of just intonation a step beyond
previous E-mu products. Fully explaining the mysteries of just intonation is
beyond the scope of this manual, but the subject is covered exhaustively in
Hermann Helmholtz’s On the Sensations of Tone, available at most libraries
and bookstores.
The new tables are called Just C2, Just C3, and Just C Minor. Try playing in
the key of C/Cm using each table. You’ll quickly discover both the wonders
and the frustrations of just intonation! In Just C, for example, you’ll find
that the chords C, Em, F, G, and Am sound beautiful. If you hold one of
these chords, you’ll hear no “beating”. After playing for a few minutes,
switch back to Equal Temperament for a rude awakening!
At this point you might wonder why anyone would use Equal Temperament to begin with. For the answer to that question, play a D, Dmi, or Bb
chord!.The intervallic ratios that make the C & G chords sound so pure
make the D chord sound horribly out of tune. That's why we had to include
Just C3. In this tuning, D, Dmi and Bb sound in tune, but the G chord will
sound wrong.
Each of the 4 tables allows you to play a different group of common chords
in just intonation. Sadly, there is no single 12 note tuning that will allow all
of the common chords to be in tune, and of course that's why they
invented the equal temperament tuning system that we use today.
Just C
Play these chords: C,
E, F, G, A, Cm, C#m, Em, F#m, Gm, Am
Just C2
Play these chords: C,
Just C2 minor
Play these chords: C,
Just C3
Play these chords: C,
122 E-mu Systems
E, F, G, A, B, C#m, D#m, Em, G#m, Am, Bm
Db, D, Eb, G, Ab, Cm, Em, Fm, Gm
D, F, Bb, C#m, Dm, Em, F#m, G#m, Am
Edit Menu
Preset Links
Preset Links
You can link presets to other presets to create layering or keyboard splits.
The current preset can be linked with up to two other presets (Links 1 & 2).
Each linked preset can be assigned to a specific range in order to create
keyboard splits or can be assigned a velocity range to switch links according
to key velocity. In addition, you can specify Volume, Pan, Transpose and
Delay settings for each Link. The modulation parameters specified in each
preset remain in effect for each preset in the link.
LINK 1 Preset
0002 Preset Name
LINK 1
RANGE
C-2
LINK 1
LINK 1
CMPSR
KEY
G8
VEL
000-127
VOLUME
+0dB
TRANSPOSE
+00
PAN
00
DELAY
0
Links provide an easy way to create new sounds by combining the existing
presets. Or, you can create your own custom stacked presets with up to 12
layers! We’re talking LARGE sounds here. Of course Links can also be used
when you just want to stack up two sounds.
As an example, let’s stack two presets to create a big sound. Start with a
preset you like, then go into the Links screen and start scrolling through
the preset list while you play to hear both presets together. When you find
a winner, simply Save the preset and you’re finished!
• You can “Split” the keyboard up to 12 ways by using combinations of the
Layers and Links.
• By adjusting the Velocity for the link, you can bring in the link by
playing hard.
• Transposing the Link can radically change the sound.
• The delay parameter lets you create surprise effects, echoes or cascades of
sound as you continue to hold the keys.
Proteus 2000 Operation Manual 123
Edit Menu
Preset Tempo Offset
Preset Tempo Offset
This function allows you to double or halve the Master Tempo as it applies
to this preset. When playing or sequencing several presets in Multimode,
the Master Tempo may be too fast or slow for one preset. Using this feature,
you can adjust the tempo for the misbehaving preset. The Tempo Offset can
use the current tempo or be set to half or twice the current tempo.
TEMPO OFFSET
use current tempo x 2
Audition Riff
Selection
This function allows you to assign a Riff to a Preset to be played when the
front panel Audition button is pressed. A Riff is a short pre-recorded
musical phrase designed to demonstrate the presets. A Riff can also be a
single note. The Riffs themselves cannot be modified.
Listening to the Riffs is a quick way to learn the sounds in Proteus 2000.
Riffs allow the Sound Designers to demonstrate what they had in mind
when they designed the preset. If a preset has hidden tricks or controllers,
these will be shown off in the Riff.
AUDITION SELECTION
Plays:KEY-MiddleC
Play Solo Layers
When constructing multilayer sounds it is often useful to turn off one or
more of the layers so you can hear what you’re doing! This feature allows
you to temporarily solo individual layers or listen to them in any combination. This screen differs from the other Edit screens in that it is NOT
saved with the preset. The values reset each time you exit the Edit menu.
Solo is activated by setting any layer to On (On = the layer is being Soloed).
Any layers set to On will play and any layers set to Off will be muted. If all
layers are set to Off, then Solo mode ends and all layers play normally.
When you exit the Edit menu, all layers play normally.
PLAY SOLO LAYERS
1: off
2: off
3: off
124 E-mu Systems
4: off
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