null  User manual
THE MAGAZINE FOR MUSIC LISTENERS
African Torture Test
proves
L Ft cfaudiatapa
°
immune to extreme heat and humidity
"The Iturf Forest provides the
worst possible conditions for
recording work. Our camera
lenses grew mushrooms, even
on the inner surfaces. All
leather molded in four days.
Our acetate -base tapes became
unuseable. But the I.R Audio tape always unwound without
sticking and showed no tendency to stretch or curl."
COLIN M. TURNBULL, noted explorer, made the above comments on his recent return front a year -long
recording expedition through the arid deserts and steaming jungles of Africa, where Audiotape on
"Mylar-- polyester film was subjected to the -'worst recording conditions in the world." Its performance
speaks for itself.
Here's positive proof that all hot -weather recording problems can be entirely eliminated by using the new LR Audiotape
on Mylar* polyester film.
During his trip from Morocco to East Africa, through the
Gold Coast and the Congo, Mr. Turnbull recorded 45,000 ft.
of Audiotape on 1 and 2 mil "Mylar". Not an inch of it gave
any trouble, either in desert sun (125° temperature, 25%
humidity) or in the Congo forests (85° temperature, 90;í
humidity).
That's a real torture test for tape and proof of the superiority of the new, longer recording Type LR Audiotape.
Made on tough but thin 1 -mil "Mylar ", it gives you 50¡f
more recording time per reel, yet is actually far stronger than
Table
TESTS AT 75 F,
I
Yield Strengt4
mil Acetate
1
0.9 mil
Mylar
145 mil Acetate
Table
II
mil Acetate
11/2-mil acetate -base tape under humid conditions. For better
0.9 mil Mylor
recording in any season, ask your dealer for "Mylar"
Audiotape -now available in 1, 11/2 and 2 mil base thickness.
1.45 mil Acetate
Write or ask for a copy of Bulletin No. 211 containing complete specifications.
AUDIO DEVICES, Inc.
444 Madison Avenue, New York 22, New York
Chicago
Offices in Hollywood
Export Dept., 13 E. 40th St., N.Y. 16, N.Y., Cables "ARAB"
-
breaking Strength
37Ib
3.9 lb
4 2
7:
16
50Ib
TESTS AT 75 F,
Yield Strength
1
50% RELATIVE HUMIDITY
El
lb
5 5 lb
90% RELATIVE HUMIDITY
Breaking Strength
-
4I
lb
The above test data. taken under conditions of both
.sinter and summer humidity, show the marked
superiority of 1- mil "Mylar," not only over the thin
cellulo -e acetate base, but over the standard 1.45.
tail acetate as well.
*DuPont Trade Mark
You're looking at excitement in your life!
your reaction
Excitement is the word for it ..
music re- created
when you first hear music
through a Jensen authentic high fidelity loudspeaker.
And you'll feel this excitement again and again
with every added hour of musical revelation,
with each new disc or tape you try.
You probably won't try to analyze the exhilaration, the sense of complete satisfaction that grows
with time; you don't really need to, for the sound
speaks for itself.
But naturally there are good reasons why Jensen
is not only a hobbyist's choice in high fidelity, but
also is winning instant acceptance in the homes of
music lovers everywhere.
Listening is easy, smooth, comfortable. There is
realism without trace of nerve -tensing shrillness or
...
.
...
vaguely disturbing mechanical effects. You're
free, ready to hear what the artist wants to say.
This is due to fine balance, smoothness, wide
frequency range, absence of appreciable distortion,
false coloration and overemphasis -all in notable
degree
with a finesse culminating over a quarter century's specialization in fine loudspeakers.
You can set your own standard of high -fidelity
with Jensen. Make it as high as you like. You're in
for excitement in your life!
...
(top left) PR -100 Imperial, 3 -way system $525.00 in Mahogany;
$535.00 in Blonde. (top center) TP -200 Tri -plex, 3 -way system
$312.70 in Mahogany; $316.80 in Blonde. (top right) CT -100
Concerto, 2 -way system $164.50 in Mahogany; $168.00 in Blonde.
(lower left) DU -500 TV- Duette, 2 -way system $85.50 Blonde Oak,
brass hairpin legs. $82.50 in Mahogany, wood legs. (not illustrated)
DU -400 TV- Duette $49.50 Blonde or Mahogany finish, wood
legs. (lower center) DU -300 Duette "Treasure Chest" 2 -way
system $76.50; wrought iron legs $4.25. (lower right) DU -201
" Duette' Reproducer, 2 -way system $62.50 in Burgundy pigskingrained Fabrikoid.
Jensen MANUFACTURING COMPANY
6601 SOUTH LARAMIE, CHICAGO 38
DIVISION OP THE MUTER CO., IN CANADA, COPPER WIRE PRODUCTS, LTD. LICENSEE
WORLD'S QUALITY STANDARD FOR MORE THAN A QUARTER CENTURY
... and leaders today!
Ask those who know -the experienced professionals and the
veteran hi -fi owners -and you'll get answers like these:
"Pickering was first to introduce many high fidelity
features that bave become accepted standards today."
"Pickering bas always been the pace-setter
in the race for perfection...
"Pickering still sets the goals to which others aspire."
There are good reasons for such praise. Every product bearing the
Pickering name is precision engineered to give optimum performance.
Each individual component is rigidly tested before it reaches the dealer
...subjected to the severest quality control procedures to make sure
component comes up to the high standards expected of
that every
®
Pickering equipment.
If you want the best that high fidelity can offer ... if you are willing to
invest just a little more to get a lot more listening pleasure, now is the time
to ask your dealer for a demonstration with Pickering components. See
if you, too, don't bear the difference!
PICKERING and company incorporated
Oceanside, L.I.. Sew fork
t
PICKERING PROFESSIONAL AUDIO COMPONENTS
`o¿de
w
ENcer#
the
...Demonstrated and sold by Leading Rodio Ports Distributors everywhere. For
2
one nearest you and
4p;
for detailed literature; write Dept.
H -8
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
MAGAZINE
This Issue. In the many months since last
carried an article by G. A. Briggs,
Yorkshire's contribution to the art of loudspeaker making and mounting, we have
had many, many letters from readers asking
for more. This we cannot give them, just
now. However, we can offer the next best
thing, which is an article about Mr. Briggs
-and one which will serve to explain,
too, why he has no time currently for literary endeavors. He is too busy preparing
and presenting lecture-demonstrations, in
which high quality sound reproducing
equipment is pitted against live performers
in concert halls.
The latest of these
covered by Robert Marsh on page 31, took
place in May at London's new Festival Hall.
The Briggs show sold it out (or very
nearly) twice in rapid succession. Come to
think of it, we can offer, or at least suggest,
to Briggs -admirers, something as good or
better than a Briggs article-i.e., Briggs,
in person. He has arranged to hire Town
Hall, in New York City, twice in October,
during Audio Fair time, for demonstrations
like those in Festival Hall. Enough said?
vve
MUSIC
FOR
Volume
5
Number
LISTENERS
August 1955
6
Noted with Interest
4
AUTHORitatively Speaking
IO
Swap-a- Record
14
Letters
20
As the Editors See It
27
Music's Great Dane, by Kurt Stone
28
.
Ah, to be in Bayreuth, now that Wagner's
there, to hear Siegfried's horn sound in
the world's only horn -loaded auditorium.
However, the town couldn't hold us all, so
perhaps it is well that some of us are constrained by circumstances to haunts nearer
home. And you can acquire some topnotch
Wainer lore here, too. In fact, all you
need do is page through the record section
till you come to -Tames Hinton, Jr.'s fascinating discography of Wagner's later works.
An appreciation of Carl Nielsen, with discographic overtones.
Yorkshireman in Festival Hall, by R. C. Marsh
An on -the -spot account of
demonstration.
a G. A. Briggs concert-scaled
;1
audio
The Science of Music in Ancient China, by F. A. Kuttner
Creeping Distortion and What To Do About It,
by Irving M. Fried
First aid for shrieks, hums, whistles
-and
ROY F.
Associate Editors
ALLISON
FRANK R. WRIGHT
Rol, LINDSTROM, Art Director
Editorial Assistants
ì
riam D. Manning,
Cora R. Hoopes
ROLAND GELATT, Neu' York Editor
Contributing Editors
C. G. BURKE
JAMES HINTON, JR.
ROBERT CHARLES MARSH
MANSFIELD E. PICKETT, Director of
Advertising Sales
WARREN B. SYER. Business Manager
CHRISTINE KORTE, Circulation Manager
New York:
Room 600. 6 East 39th Street.
Telephone:
Murray Bill 5 -6332. Fred C. Michalnve, Eastern
Manager: Chicago: John R. Rutherford and Associates, 230 East Ohio St., Chicago, Ill. Telephone:
Whitehall 4- 6715: Los Angeles: 1052 West 6th
Street. Telephone: Madison 6 -1371. Edward Brand,
West Coast Manager.
Branch Offices
(Advertising only):
AUGUST 1955
35
sudden silences.
No One's Going To Emancipate Me, by Christopher Faye
Sage suggestions by an unreconstructed audiophile.
Music Makers, by Roland Gelatt
Record Section
Publisher
JOHN M. CONEY, Editor
ROY H. HOOPES, JR., Managing Editor
CHARLES FOWLER,
32
When an acoustical engineering experiment might easily last
five centuries!
Records in Review; Dialing your Disks; Building your Record
Library; Wagner on Microgroove, Part II, by James Hinton, Jr.
Tested in the Home
37
4r
43-69
7t
Webster 97 -o Preamp and 97 -to Amplifier; CBC Voltage Regulators; Wilcox -Gay 41: lo Recorder; EdiTall Jr. Tape Splicer; GE
Record Compensator /Filter; Rauland Golden Gate Tuner;
Snyder 5-D Indoor Antenna; Argos AD Speaker Enclosures;
Fairchild 220 Cartridge; Mohawk Midgetape.
The Listener's Bookshelf, by R. D. Darrell
90
Professional Directory
92
Traders' Marketplace
93
Advertising Index
95
High Fidelity Magazine is published monthly by Audiocom. Inc., at Great Barrington, Masa. Telephone:
Great Barrington 1300. Editorial publication and circulation offices at: The Publishing House, Great
Barrington, Mass. Subscriptions: $6.00 per year in the United States and Canada. Single copies: 50 cents
each. Editorial contributions will be welcomed by the editor. l'ayment for articles accepted will he arranged
prior to publication. Unsolicited manuscripts should he accompanied by return postage. Entered as
second -class matter April 27, 1951, at the post office at Great Barrington, Mass., under the act of March 3,
1579. Additional entry at the post office, Pittsfield, Mass. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation. I'rinted
in the U. S. A. by the Ben Franklin Press, Pittsfield, Mass. Copyright. 1955 by Audinrom, Inc. The cover
design and contents of High Fidelity magazine are fully protected by copyrights and must not be reproduced in any manner.
3
Antenna Testimony
We have harped in this column and
elsewhere, again and again, on the
advantages of a good FM antenna installation. Not long ago, we harped
once more, at Philadelphian C. J.
Elliott. Here's his story, from a letter
wrote us recently:
recommendation to use the
best available outside FM antenna was
the difference between no reception
and amazing reception.
The first
week -end I had the equipment in the
Harrisburg apartment, the only antenna was the standard Soo -ohm built -in
affair that comes with the
tuner
that we had selected. I had purchased
from Danby an eight -element broadband Yagi but had not had the opportunity to put it up. With the built -in
antenna we got nothing but a few
local and near -by FM stations and then
only by using considerable power and
accepting considerable noise along
with the reception. Since Harrisburg
is a notoriously difficult area for all
types of radio and TV reception, because of the surrounding mountainous
terrain, I was not at all surprised. The
following week -end I was able to get
the FM Yagi up by simply adding it
to our existing TV mast but using a
separate lead -in which consisted of
standard, fiat Soo-ohm wire of approximately 90 feet from mast to set.
(TV mast is on the roof of an eight story apartment house and our apartment is on the fourth floor.) We do
not have a rotator and I pointed the
Yagi toward Allentown, approximately
8o air miles away, in the hope of receiving their 'good music' station
which rebroadcasts the New York
WQXR afternoon and evening programs. To my amazement, we received
this station perfectly with just a touch
of the volume turned on; no fading,
no drifting, no noise of any kind. To
my further amazement we also dishe
"... The
3 -way
Multi -flare Horn
which outperforms
speakers selling at
twice the price
only $19400
New Deluxe
...
-
THE
6
An exponential multi -flare horn system of unusual quality. The base
horn (30-150 cycles) has an equivalent axial length of 15 feet. Two
eight inch speakers placed on each side of cabinet with phase shift network for simulated three dimensional effect produce 150- to 2000 cycles.
High frequencies (2000 - 16,000 cycles) have axial horn length of 32
inches. The feeling of a large sound source is created by the nonresonant bass horn and electrical phase shift network. The clarity and
smoothness are the result of unique phasing chambers and heavy air
loading of the diaphragms. Capacity: 25 watts. Impedance: 16 ohms.
Available in Blonde Korina, Walnut, Red Mahogany and Ebony. Three
coats of lacquer hand rubbed to a lustrous finish. Satin finished brass
legs. 36 x 24 x 16 inches.
Weight:
60 lbs.
Other Stan White Cabinet Speakers
LePetitte -19 "x12 "x9"
LeSabre- 24 "xl5 "x12"
Hi -Fi -4H "x30 "x20"
4 -D -60 "x36 "24"
49.50
79.00
645.00
994.00
See your Hi -Fi
distributor
or
write...
Dept.
F
-8, 725 South LaSalle Street
Chicago 5, minois
A Division of Eddie Bracken Enterprises
4
covered that we could receive the same
kind of perfect reception from good
Continued on page 9
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
THE 310 FM TUNER
...seems as close to perfection
as is practical at this time."
HJuly.1955TY
Here's why fop audio experts agree
that the 310 FM Tuner gives you
performance found in no other tuner.
Very high sensitivity. combined with excellent rejection of noise and interference, makes distant stations sound
as good as the locals. HIGH FIDELITY (July. 1955) says:
.. sensitivity is extremely high; we haven't worked with
any tuner that was better in this respect."
Now you can hear stations you never knew were there.
For the first time. you can easily separate stations that are
so close to each other on the dial they can't even he found
with conventional tuners. Exceptional I.F. selectivity is the
key to this unusual performance.
Radically New Wide -band Design
-
New (ride -hand circuit, - the latest development in
FM tuner design
make weak or strong stations tune alike.
The wide -hand design gives drift -free performance that removes all need for A.F.C. There is never the danger of weak
signals being pulled out of tune by a strong nearby signal.
which often happens when A.F.C. is used. And the wide hand design, combined with the use of silver -plated chassis,
assures that strong local signals do not appear at more than
one point on the dial.
The automatic gain control continuously and automatically adjusts for best p. rformance, no matter how much
the signal strength may vary. The A.G.C. also prevents distortion from overloading by strong local signals.
Fast Single -sweep Tuning
-
Single -sweep timing lets you select any station in an
instant
no more tedious knob twisting. A vernier control.
together with a combined signal strength and tuning meter,
permits critical tuning for very weak signals.
An interstation noise suppressor removes the annoying
FM "roar" between stations. This suppressor is adjustable
from the front panel to meet different signal conditions.
Other convenient features include: a tape jack for
"off -the -air" recording: a LEVEL control on the front panel;
and a compact metal cabinet that enables you to use the
tuner "as -is" on a shelf or table.
Once you have seen and operated the H. H. Scott 310
FM Tuner. you'll agree with HIGH FIDELITY'S comment:
.. the 310 has everything. We can't think of any change
that would make it better."
Ask your dealer to let you try the 310, so you can see
for yourself the outstanding operating characteristics and
features of this radically new tuner.
Write today for free Technical Bulletin.
-2
-
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
microvolts with 20 db of quieting.
Sensitivity
Circuit Features
3 stages of full limiting; 2- megacycle limiters and detector.
Capture Ratio of 21/2 db
This assures noise -free reception of stations only
21/2 db stronger than interference on the same channel
- -East
-
300 -ohm input.
Audio Output
maximum output voltage 4 volts for 75kc dev'ation.
Custom Installation
accessory escutcheon available for cabinet mounting.
Prices
West Coast: $156.98 net.
Coast: $149.50 net.
Antenna
H. H. SCOTT Inc. 385 Putnam Ave.
Cambridge 39, Massachusetts
AUGUST 1955
5
lIHntcsh
C -8
PROFESSIONAL AUDIO COMPENSATOR and PRE -AMPLIFIER
The beautiful new McIntosh C -8 puts at your fingertips complete
and precise audio control. The ultimate in playback performance is
achieved with five Bass (turnover) and five Treble (de-emphasis) switches
wihch operate independently and cumulatively. Innumerable compensation
settings create fine degrees of sound shading. (Bass switches provide
progressive turnover from 1200 to 280 cycles per second. Treble switches
provide progressive roll -off from 0 to -25 db in 1 or 2 db steps!)
Additional features: separate wide -range bass and treble FINE controls,
a five -program-source selector, a rumble filter, an aural compensator to
preserve correct tone balance at low listening levels. Hear the flawless
reproduction possible with McIntosh uncompromising audio control at
your dealer's.
$$"
-
for C -8 less cabinet; C -6M in cabinet illus.
Crated, $96.50 (for use with McIntosh amplifiers); self- powered model C -8P (less cabinet)
599.50; C -8PM (with cabinet) $107.50.
unbelievable realism and clarity without
Here's a miracle in music
listening fatigue. The incomparable McIntosh MC -30 main power
GUARANTEES full
amplifier sets a new standard of performance
30 watts (60 watts peak) at all frequencies 20 to 20,000 cycles. Full
reproduction of the highest and lowest frequencies is assured with
unparalleled low distortion. Harmonic distortion guaranteed below
f/3 % at 30 watts, 1/10% at 15 watts; IM distortion below %z %
even at full 60 watts! Inaudible hum level, highest efficiency,
more plus values from the exclusive patented McIntosh
longest life
Circuit with Unity Coupling". At your dealer's. $143.50. * Patented 1949.
-
-
6
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Why
1114111Ø9h QUALITY
LISTENING
GREATER
The McIntosh C -8 is the most flexible audio compensotor ever devised. It is fundamental to High Fidelity sound reproduction principles, which are reviewed below,
K/4 is compensation,
or equalization, for the recording process necessary?
The recording process requires thot the loudness of the music over
portions of the sound spectrum be artificially raised or lowered to
get the most on the record. To obtain realism in playback results we
must exactly reverse this curve, thus equalizing its effect.
7e4 is
so
much flexibility necessary?
There are over 1000 recording companies using various and changing recording
curves. The McIntosh con reproduce any recording curve, present or future. More
important even, is its ability to adjust precisely to varying room conditions, ear
preferences and speaker characteristics. The vast tonal possibilities of the McIntosh
let you be your own conductor. Weathers, or constant amplitude cartridges con be
switched into the equalizer, if desired, for full compensation control.
%Q
the McIntosh easy to operate?
Your ear will quickly get you acquainted with the tonal effects of this flexible instrument.
The switches are large and easily seen. Operation is surprisingly easy and satisfying.
ni
do
s
I
know how to set the controls for
a
particular record?
Recommended playback characteristics ore often given on the record jacket.
McIntosh supplies o convenient Record Compensation Chart covering 55 record
manufacturers, and giving 32 progressive boss turnover and treble roll -off settings.
eeut
control settings be relocated accurately?
The finest degree can be re- located quickly and exactly. Your own
preference, once selected, can be permanently indicated on a McIntosh
label and applied to the record or jacket for ready reference.
eaef
I
connect the McIntosh to my present equipment?
Any system con now be easily altered to professional
standards with the self -powered C -8P. Separate power
supply, 51/2" x 43/4" x 23/8 ", allows smaller main control
unit and prevents any possible induced hum problem.
MORE
EASE
IN
INSTALLATION
Versatile hack panel features five inputs (can include two
phonograph cartridges). three outputs, equalization
switch for magnetic or amplitude cartridges. Variable load
resistor ( 1,000 to 100,000 ohms) adjusts for optimum
magnetic cartridge performance. Three AC outlets for
master system on -off feature. Great stability, adequate frequency response and typical McIntosh lowest
distortion
less than .3% at full 4 volts,
20- 20,000 cycles. All controls silently operated.
-
Send today for details and McIntosh Master
Compensation Chart for finest playback results.
Pioneer Specialists in High Fidelity Amplification
III4ntosIt
LABORATORY, INC.
322 Water Street
Binghamton, N. Y.
Export Division: 25 Warren St., New York 7, N. Y.
Cable: SIMONTRICE N. Y.
AUGUST 1955
High Fidelity
tape- o -matic
Recorder!
Treasure ALL the sounds
you want to save!
YOUR versatile V -M tape o-matic can bring you a universe of sound enjoyment
with push button ease
-
to possess and treasure forever!
Preserve your records at
their "newest" with a high
fidelity tape- o- matic. Save
every fleeting sound you
want, from FM's musical
moments. Make a professional quality recording library of the best of the orchestras, and singers, family
and friendly gatherings. They
are at your pleasure, to hear
again at any time through
the magnificent V-M tape -omatic dual-speaker system.
Ask for
a
demonstration.
Among the V -M tape- omatic's TEN Top Features
(many not Mind on expensive models) are dual
input and output jacks! Use your tape -o -matit as
a
PA system
...
playba:k through external speakis only $179.95!'
ers, if you wish! And,
V
-M Model
Portable
25
Deluxe
Speaker. Heavy-
duty 12" speaker in bass
reflex case. St.led to match
tape -o- matit. 546.50
See yourVoice of Music Dealer!
'Slightly higher in the went. If I. Approve.I.
V -M CORPORATION
BENTON HARBOR 1, MICHIGAN
World's Largest Manufacturer of Phonographs and Record Changers
8
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page 4
music stations in Lancaster, Pa.; Philadelphia (95 air miles); Bridgeton.
N. J. (105 air miles), and Baltimore
(75 very mountainous air miles at
more than a 90 degree angle from the
direction in which the Yagi had been
pointed). In addition, many Philadelphia and New York FM 'non- good -music' stations are received well. From directly across a mountain range to the
North, again at right angles to the
direction of the antenna, we pick up
a very clear, strong signal from Sunbury, Pa. If this is not a strong argument or demonstration of what a
difference an antenna installation
makes in FM reception, then I shall
bow out to those not willing to give it
ALWAYS IN
STOCK AT
ALLIED
AUGUST
'955
',4- 4íi
iIily prirod. this system provides exceptional
audio fidelity and smooth, dependable performance. System includes: 1. Bogen DB110 10-Watt
Amplifier I i. 1 db, 15 to 50,000 cps; calibrated
bass and treble controls: record compensation;
shock- mounted preaniplitier; attractive gold and
urquoise chassis). 2. Garrard RC -80 3-Speed Record
Changer wit h jewel -mounted arm; 4 -pole, shadedpole motor less 45 rpm spindle i. 3. G.E. Cartridges, RPX -040 with sapphire stylus for 78 rpm
records. and RPX -061 with diamond stylus for
microgroove records. 4. Electro -Voice SP12 -B 12"
Speaker for remarkably clean bass and treble response. System comes complete, ready for easy
installation. For 110 -120 volt, 60 cycle AC operation. Shpg. wt., 60 lbs.
94 PA 132. (' omplete Phono System. Only $156.50
SYSTEM WITH FM -AM TUNER. System as above, with
addition of the Bogen R640 FM -AM Tuner, noted
for high sensitivity (includes drift compensation
and automatic frequency control
PA 133. F \I -AM -Phono Syst ein. Only..$261.25
I
(
Star Record Products
tion.
The ingenious catalogue which Dr.
Lowen also devised is a bit too involved to describe here. We can say,
however, that there's nothing to be
said about a record for which there
isn't a specified space to say it in the
catalogue. You index a record by composer as well as by title of piece, assign
a removable, adhesive tab number to
the record and record the tab number
on the "Title" page of the book. So if
you're looking for your recording of
Respighi's Pines of Rome, turn to the
Yellow page marked "Classical," find
"Respighi" which will tell you on
which composer -composition page you
Continued on next page
au
Famous "Saturday Review" Custom Phono System
I I ere is the extremely popular comonly
binal ion of high fidelity components
based on recommendations made
Review"
5I56so by the noted "Saturday
hi -fi book. While it is very moder-
atry....
We received recently a record cabinet,
adhesive tabs, and catalogue, designed
by a layman, Dr. Alexander Lowen, of
New York City, who simply had a record file- and -find problem and solved it.
He had run up against the constant,
frustrating problem of wanting to play
a particular record, say, for a guest,
and being unable to locate it, giving
up in disgust.
The cabinet he designed is quite
simple: small, wooden, compartmented
box which will hold fifty long- playing
records with ease, each of the five
compartments holding ten records. It
comes nicely finished in mahogany,
walnut, natural, or ebony, for $9.95
(or unfinished for $7.95). Its outside
dimensions are 125/8 in. deep by 133/4
high by 11 wide, all smooth, straight
sides which allows for group placement or record library -shelf installa-
BOGEN
EAST TERMS:
Hi -Fi is available from
A1.1 "1Ell) on easy payments: only 10r; down. 12
full months to pay. Write
for the attractive details.
New Bogen Deluxe FM -AM Tuner With " Autolook"
Latest model R765 Tuner- Preamp. Tunes "on
station" in any area by means of delayed AFC
with "Autolock" feature. AFC is off when tuning
between stations; comes on automatically when
signal is present; locks -in for perfect tuning. No
interslation noise on FM. Exclusive "red dot"
controls for simplified operation. Tuner response:
+ .5 db, 20- 20,000 cps. Sensitivity: FM, 2 ms
for 30 db quieting; AM, 5 my for 30 db signal -tonoise ratio. Preamp response: + 1 db, 10- 200,001)
cps. Controls: Tuning; Record Equalization; Bass;
Treble; Volume -On -Off; Loudness Contour Selector: Input Selector. 3 inputs: 2 outputs; 16 tubes.
6,2 x 14 t4 x 9' deep. For 110 -120 v., 60 cycle AC.
Shpg. wt., 17 lbs.
93 SX 887. Bogen R765 FM -AM Tuner. Net $199.50
Bogen B50 -41( Variable -Speed Turntable
A quality manual record player is it speed variable
front 29 to 86 rpm. Speed control notched for quick
selection of 33':a, 45 or 78 rpm. 12' weighted (33,i
lbs.) turntable has rubber padded surface for record protection. Less than 1'; fluctuation in speed
on line voltage variations from 95 to 125 volts.
heavy -duty motor. Ball- bearing mounted
pickup arm has adjustment for stylus pressure.
Takes any standard cartridge. Supplied with one
plug -in head. 45 rpm record adapter. 3 -foot phono
cable, and 6 -foot AC line cord. Mounting space:
above mounting board; 2'Ç'
15 x 12' and 3
below. For operation from 110 -120 volts. 50 -60
cycle A('. Less cartridge. Shpg. wt.. 15 lbs.
96 RX 696. Bogen B50 -4LC Turntable. Net $40.40
4 -pole,
t
ALLIED4 RADIO
ALLIED'S
68 -PAGE
HI -FI CATALOG
Your guide to a complete understanding of Hi -Fi, including tips on how to
select systems at lowest cost, as well
as installation ideas -plus the world's
largest selection of complete systems
and individual components from which
to make your money- saving choice. To
own the best in Hi -Fi for less, you'll
want this FREE book. Write for it today.
America's
Hi -Fi Center
r ALLIED
RADIO CORP., Dept. 49 -G -5
100 N. Western Ave., Chicago 80, III.
Send FREE 68 -Page Hi -Fi Catalog No. 144.
Ship me the following-
enclosed
$
Name
Address
City
Zone.
.State
9
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from preceding page
CORNER HORN
LOUDSPEAKER SYSTEM
... the finest creation of Paul W. Klipsch,
fabricated individually under
his personal supervision.
will find his works listed, and then
behind this composer -composition page
will be White Title pages where you
will find Pines of Route listed and the
Tab number of the record. Confused
Well, fear not; if you have enough
records to feel the need of a catalogue
to keep track of them, and you want to
give this one a try, there are lucid directions in the front of the book for
using it.
The deluxe edition of the catalogue
which will keep track of 500 records
under as many as 120 composers'
names, sells for 83.95. The standard
catalogue for 300 records and up to 8o
composers costs $2.45. The tabs come
in sheets of too and sell for 39e a
sheet.
We were a little disappointed in the
Star Tabs. They are self -adhesive and
removable, but there is no way to
attach them so that they will protrude
from the record album for easy finding. A better method might be to have
the tab numbers on a stiff piece of
cardboard, say, with double strips of
Continued on page 72
AUTHORitatively Speaking
Born in Germany, Kurt Stone studied at
Hamburg University until the Nazis came
into power. Thereupon he crossed into
Denmark and entered the Royal Conservatory, where he studied musical theory, history, piano and old keyboard instruments
and first heard of Carl Nielsen, as he
relates on page 28. Now Editor -in -Chief
at Associated Music Publishers, Inc., his
tastes run to the very old (editing ancient
choral and keyboard works) and the very
new (writing about Hindemith and arranging for modern dance groups).
-
If a South African incunabulist, paleographer, linguist and missionary had not come
Write for the name of your
Klipschorn distributor and our
latest literature on the Klipschorn
and Shorthorn speaker systems.
KLIPSCH AND ASSOCIATES
IIOYE, ARKANSAS
TELEPHONES
PRospoct 7-3395
ospecl 7-4535
PROSpect 7-5575
PROSpecl 7-5514
to this country in 1920 and married the
first woman to graduate in accountancy from
the University of Minnesota, Christopher
Faye wouldn't have been born in 1926, and
we wouldn't be able to offer you his deadpan industrial advice on page 3'. (Ex.
hale.) Faye is an officer of a midwestern
tire and fuel company, and was very nearly
an officer in the armed forces, having
accepted commissions in both Army and
Air Force before being drafted as a private.
in 1953. His wife plays the piano, pipe
organ, violin, viola and saxophone. Fayes
own instrument is the tane recorder.
Next issue's Discography: The Vocal
.Music of Bach by Nathan Broder.
QUALITY SPEAKS..
TE LE FU NK
t
Moderately Priced High Fidelity. Radios ..
.
With great pride, the manufacturers of the world famous TELEFUNKEN Microphones present their
latest engineering triumphs. Never before have you heard such unbelievably perfect sound from table
model radios. Actually, these fine sets are more than just radios, they are complete high fidelity audio
systems incorporating superb FM -AM -Short Wave tuners. There are inputs for your turntable or record
changer, and your tape recorder ai well as outputs for additional speakers or the recorder. The hand finished
solid French walnut cabinets are truly masterpieces of design and craftsmanship.
2
50
SPEAKERS
TO 15,000 CYCLES
FREQUENCY
RESPONSE
An amazing value priced unit. Built-in FM
dipole antenna. Arm-
strong FM circuitry.
Cabinet dimensions:
18% "x 13% " x7% ".
3
30
SPEAKERS
TO 18,000 CYCLES
FREQUENCY
RESPONSE
Approximately 5 watts
----output. Armstrong FM
circuitry. Both a built in FM dipole antenna
and a rotating ferrite
antenna for standard
band. Cabinet dimensions 231/4" x 151/2" x
10A ".
those who seek QUALITY find TELEFUNKEN
sill
et IeelieE stores-ererywrere!
Write for free literature and technical data on this and other TELEFUNKEN products.
Products of
TE LE
FUN
KEN
Free Western Germany
Imported and distributed
exclusively by
AMERICAN
ELITE, INC.
DEPT. H
7
PARK AVENUE
NEW YORK 16, N.
Y
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page so
the self-adhesive tape at one end to
straddle the record album. For this
you would have to pay, though, certainly more than
per hundred.
These Star Record Products may be
ordered separately by mail from Korman Bros., 572 Westchester Ave.,
Bronx, N. Y. They will be sent postpaid upon receipt of check or money
order.
i0
Music Festival
America's TOP Tuner!
THE,
FISHER_
FM TUNER
MODEL
FM -80
many
World's Best by LAB Standards
two decades we have been producing audio equipment
Fthealmost
outstanding quality for the connoisseur and professional user.
FISHER products, some have proven
cavalcade
oa
of
of
In
years ahead of the industry.
to be
THE FISHER FM -80
just such a
product. Equipped with TWO meters, it will outperform any existing FM Tuner regardless of price! The FM -80 combines extreme
sensitivity, flexibility and micro- accurate tuning. Despite its full
complement of tubes and components, the FM -80 features an unusually compact chassis of fine design. Chassis nnly,$139.50
THE FISHER FM -80
Two
meters; one to indicate sensitivity- one to indicate center-of- channel
Armstrong system, with two IF stages. dual
for micro -accurate tuning.
Full limiting even on signals as weak
limiters and a cascode RF stage.
Dual antenna inputs: 72 ohms and 300 ohms balas one microvolt.
Sensitivity: 11/2 microvolts for 20 db of quieting on
anced (exclusive:)
72 -ohm input; 3 microvolts for 20 db of quieting on 300 -ohm input.
Chassis completely shielded and shock-mounted, including tuning condenser, to eliminate microphonics, and noise from otherwise accumulated
Three controls
Variable AFC /Line- Switch, Sensitivity, and
dust.
Station Selector PLUS an exclusive Output Level Control.
Two bridged
outputs. Low- impedance, cathode-follower type, permitting output leads
Dipole antenna supplied. Beautiful,
up to 200 feet.
tubes.
Self-powered.
brushed -brass front panel.
EIGsi: 15 pounds.
CHASSIS SIZE: 123/4" wide, 4" high, 81/4" deep including control knobs.
-
Il
Price Slightly Higher West of the Rockte,
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP.
I2
21
-25 44th DRIVE
Series subscription is $10.00; single
admission: $2.40. Address inquiries to
them at Box 31, Stockbridge, Mass.
Pre -Recorded Tapes
is
Mahogany or Blonde Cabinet, $1 4.95
Outstanding Features of
We are very happy to note that The
Pro Musica Antiqua will be at Stockbridge, Mass., again this year to present
musical masterpieces of the Medieval,
Renaissance, and Early Baroque periods,
employing authentic reproductions of
musical instruments used by musicians
of those periods. Musical Director
Noah Greenberg has announced the
following schedule of performances
for this summer's festival:
Aug. 13: French Chansons and English Madrigals
Aug. 2o: Italian Baroque Music
Aug. 27: William Byrd: Sacred and
Secular Works
Sept. 3: The Virgin in Medieval and
Renaissance Music
Sept. 4: Music of Spain and Ger-
L. I. CITY 1, N. Y.
Neu Tape Center, 2233 W. Roosevelt
Dr., Milwaukee 9, Wis., is a new enterprise operating exclusively in the
field of pre- recorded monaural and
binaural tapes. They handle seventeen
brands including all we have heard of
and some we didn't know existed, and
plan to handle European and British
ripes when they are available. They
specialize in mail orders, so write to
them if you can't fill your tape desires
locally.
Back Copies
Wanted: The following are looking
for a copy of Vol. r, No. 4:
James R. Casteel, Ravenswood, Mo.
E. M. Finbury, Apt. r -C, 1975 Delaware Ave., Buffalo 16, N. Y.
Howard B. Levine, 2905 Oakland
St., Ames, Iowa.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Maj. Stanford Roberts, o- 1647908,
Signal Section, HQ 7th Army, APO
46, New York, N. Y. In addition Maj.
Roberts wants Nos. I, 5, and 14.
For sale to the highest bidder, the
following offer complete sets of HIGH
FIDELITY:
Daniel Klitnick, 254 Hewes St.,
Brooklyn II, N. Y.
Dr. T. D. Ullmann, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.
Jack H. Bines, 34 Keats Rd., Short
Hills, N. J. ($25, plus parcel post).
Arthur H. Rosenbaum, 33 Bennett
Village Ter., Buffalo 14, N. Y. ( with
exception of No. 7 ) .
Paul M. Somers, 410 W. Clark St.,
Champaign, Ill., has available Vol. 1,
No. r through Vol. 4, No. 5. Vols. 1
and 2 are in binders.
T. M. Olsen, Custom -Audio, 745
E. 242nd St., Bronx 7o, N. Y., has
Nos. 3, 5, ro, 12, 16 -20, 22, and 23 for
It's New! Ii's Terrific! y
sale.
THE,
Confusion Compounded
J
Subscriber Karl C. Thomas of State
College, Pa., wrote us some time ago
that he agreed with our TITH conclusion on the Concertone 20 /zo: it's a
lot of tape recorder for the money.
However, he said, it would be only
fair to point out that half -track heads
are supplied as standard equipment on
the 20/2o, not the full -track heads as
on the higher priced BR-i model,
which we implied. We checked with
Berlant Associates about this and received a reply from Harlan Thompson
which is quoted in part below:
"Our BR-1 machine is ordinarily
supplied with full -track erase and record heads, and a half -track playback
head. This is to permit playing
.
both single and dual -track tapes
.
There is no appreciable difference [in
results) between this and the full -track
playback.
"For those who are skeptical about
this fact, we do supply, on special
order, a single -track playback head for
$to additional. We also put out the
BR -2 recorder with three half-track
heads at the same price as the BR -i.
"The standard Concertone 20/2o,
known as the TWR -2, comes with
three dual-track heads. The TWR -t
has single -track erase and record heads
and a dual -track playback head. It sells
for $25 more
With a single -track
playback head [also, it sells for) $40
more than the standard TWR -2
Everything straight now?
..
...
...
...."
AUGUST 1955
FISHER.
e/` <IJIC'Í PV//II/fI
SERIES
(r`,
<///lI(r
80 -C
IT Toole FISHER to improve on FISHER. When we introduced
our Model 50 -C Master Audio Control three years ago it was
immediately acclaimed the finest instrument of its type. Like its
renowned counterpart, the new FISHER Master Audio Control,
Model 80 -C, represents another milestone in engineering excellence,
ease and flexibility of use, and workmanship of a quality normally
encountered only in broadcast station equipment
these are its
outstanding characteristics. It took FISHER to improve on FISHER.
Chassis Only, $99.50
Mahogany or Blonde Cabinet, $9.95
...
Remarkable Features of
THE FISHER
80 -C
Professional, lever -type equalization for all current recording character.
Two cathode.
Seven inputs, including two l'hono, Mic and Tape.
istica.
Complete mixing and Jading on two, three, tour or five
follower outputs.
Bass and Treble Time Controls of the variable -crossover feedchannels.
Self- powered.
back type.
Accurately calibrated Loudness Balance Control.
DC on all filaments;
Magnetically shielded and potted transformer.
Inherent hum:
achieves hum level that is inaudible under any conditions.
measurable. (On Phono, 72 db below output on 10 my input signal;
IM and
better than MS db below 2v output on high -level channels.)
harmonic distortion: non- rneasurable.
Frequency response: uniform, IO to
o-
Separate equalization and amplification directly from tape
Four dual -purpose tubes, all shielded and shock -mounted.
PushButton Channel Separate, high -gain microphone preamplifier.
Selectors with individual indicator lights and simultaneous AC On-Off
switching on two channels (for tuner. TV, etc.I
Master Volume Control
plus 5 independent Level Controls on front panel.
11 Controls plus 5
push - buttons.
Three auxiliary AC receptacles. SIZE: Chassis, 12 +, ¡" x 73"
x 41/4" high. In cabinet, 13-11/16" x 8" x 5ye" high. Shipping weight, 10 pounds.
100,000 cycles.
playback head.
!'rives Slightly Higher Kent of the !rockier
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP.
21 -25
44th
DRIVE
L. I. CITY 1, N. Y.
13
The following are lists of records for trade:
if any records listed here interest you, write
directly to the person offering them and
give him your trade list. The records
listed below are stated to he in good con-
Z
W
D
W
U
W
dition.
Judith E. Grosse, 18zo Potomac Dr..
Toledo 7, Ohio, offers:
Gounod: Faust I complete.
Soloists.
Beecham, Royal Philh. VICTOR LCT 61oo.
3/I2-in.
cAmcrécas VOIC
I
2-in.
0 Persuasive information on freed,';i an./
democracy is now being spread throa5out the
world with the help of the PRECEDENT,
Harrison: Suite for Violin, Piano, and
Small Orchestra. M. & A. Ajamian, Stokowski. Weber: Symphony on Poems of
William Blake. W. Galjour, Stokowski.
world standard among FM tuners.
Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E
minor. Bruch: Scottish Fantasy. 1- :eifetz,
0 Eight PRECEDENTS have been purch.uc...5
the U. S. Information Agency fir the new
broadcasting and recording studios of the
of America, in Washington. Each operates
continuously, is permanently tuned to a differc.
radio station, and may be selected instantly
in any of seventy-two locations throughout the
studio plant. News broadcasts received by a
PRECEDENT, firr example, aid in the prcja :
offoreign- language Voice of America pro, ra
Beecham and Steinberg. VICTOR LM 9016.
I 2-in.
0 The same pace- setting tuner is available
in limited numbers to those who can apf1e(i.
and afford this superlative achievement
in radio reception. Detailed info rmalio :l m.
he obtained upon request.
RADIO ENGINEERING LABORATORIES INC.
cc
Beethoven: The Ruins of Athens. Hollestelle, Goehr, Netherlands Philh. Choir
& Orch. CONCERT HALL CIIS It 58.
36 -40 Thirty- seventh Street
Long Island City 1, N.Y.
VICTOR LM 1785. 12 -in.
Chávez: Toccata for Percussion. Farber man: Evolution. Boston Percussion Group.
BOSTON 207.
12.ín.
Rachmaninoff: Isle of the Dead. Prokofiev: Classical Symphony. Kossevitzky.
Boston Sym. VICTOR I.M 1215. 12 -in.
Strauss: An Alpine Symphony. Konwitschny, Munich State Opera Orch.
URANIA 7064. 12 -in.
Kismet. Original cast. COLUMBIA ML
485o. 12 -in.
Borodin: Polovtsian Dances; Falla: El
Amor Brujo. Van Beinum, Collins, London Philh. LONDON LL 203. 12 -in.
Shosta'.:ovich: 24 Preludes for Piano.
Pressier. M -G -M E 3070. 1z -in.
Bothie. 4119 N. Pittsburgh Ave..
Chcago 3 a, lll., wants to trade the following for Ba let or Opera E .erpt records:
Russ
American Concert
Band Masterpieces.
Fennell, Eastman Concert Band. MERCURY
MG 40006. I t -in.
Paganini: Ca -ric_s Nos. 13 -24. Ricci.
LONDON LL 252. 12 -in.
French Organ Music. Biggs. COLUMBIA
ML 4195. 12 -in.
La Fiesta Mexicana. Fennell, Eastman
MERCURY
MG
Symphonic Wind Ens.
40011. 12 -in.
Beethoven: Concerto for Violin in D
major. Heifetz, Toscanini, NBC Sym.
Orch. VICTOR LCT 1010.
12 -in.
Brahms: Symphony No. 4. Krips, Lon
o-
don Sym. Orch. LONDON LL 208. 12 -in.
City of Glass Suite. Stan Kenton & Orch.
CAPITOL H 353. lo-in.
Dr. Martin L. Borish, Box 432, Freehold,
N. J., offers this list and would like to see
yours:
Mahler: Kindertotenlieder. Ferrier, Wal-
Continued on page r6
r4
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Here's the turntable professionals want
in their own
,,;
Hi -Fi setups
the all-new
PRESTO T-18
streamlined inside and out
...delivers top professional performance
with incredible ease of operation
12" diameter ...only $53.50
with hysteresis motor, $108
...and here's
the
16"
version
Nobody knows better than the hi-fi expert how good the
T -18 turntable really is. T-18 fills your every requirement
for performance and value...is a natural choice for your
home, as well as your studio and control room.
for home or professional use!
PRESTO T- 68 TURNTABLE
The first completely professional 16" turntable
that's moderately priced thanks to PRESTO's
streamlined shift design. Like all PRESTO units,
T-68 offers the reliable performance that is vital
in 24- hour-a -day transcription work. It's ideal
for disc programs, sound effects, client auditions,
dozens of jobs...and it's wonderful for the home
with a fine hi -fi collection.
-
The most exciting feature of PRESTO's T -18 is a revolutionary 3 -way shift the flick shift. A simple sideway
motion of the single control lever selects any speed
331A, 45, 78 rpm. Complicated up- and -down motions are
eliminated because the 3 idlers are mounted on a single
movable plate. Just a flick automatically engages the
proper idler for the desired speed! There are no trouble making arms or shift cams. The mechanism is streamlined
down to essentials -without sacrificing a decibel of quality.
-
-
T -68 specifications: turntable speeds 33V3,
45, 78 rpm weight -7 lbs. panel
size 8" x 11" speed accuracy
clarity
max. variation 0.25%
50 clb below 7 cm /sec. signal
$79.50 with hysteresis motor, $134.
-
-
-
-
Other advantages extra heavy weight wide-beveled
table. precision deep -\\ ell bearing, built-in 45 rpm adapter,
and smart modern sty ling in brushed chrome and telephone black. A remarkable hi-fi instrument!
O
RECORDING CORPORATION
PARAMUS, NEW JERSEY
Export Division:
Canadian Division:
25 Warren Street, New York 7, N. Y.
Instantaneous Recording Service, 42 Lombard Street, Toronto
WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PRECISION RECORDING EQUIPMENT AND DISCS
SWAP -A- RECORD
Continued from page 14
ANNOUNCING
!
new
the
ter, Vienna Philh. COLUMBIA ML 2187.
r o -in.
Wagner: Meistersinger, Act IL Gueden,
Schoeffler, Knappertsbusch, Vienna Philh.
LONDON LL 284/5. 2 /r2 -in.
Verdi: La Traviata. Peerce, Albanese,
Merrill, Toscanini, NBC Sym. VICTOR LM
6003.
2
/12 -in.
Madama
Butterfly. Steher,
Tucker, Valdengo, Rudolf, Metropolitan
Opera Orch. COLUMBIA SL 104. 3 /12 -in.
Schumann: Concerto in A minor for
Piano and Orchestra. Serkin, Ormandy,
Philadelphia Orch. COLUMBIA ML 4041.
Puccini:
I
2-in.
Charles Lipschitz, 2112 Dorchester
Brooklyn 26, N. Y., offers:
Rd.,
Debussy: Nocturnes ( 3) ; Berlioz: Roman Carnival Overture; Ravel: Alberado
del Gracioso; Pavanne for a Dead Princess. Dorati, Minneapolis Sym. Orch.
MERCURY MG 50005. 12 -in.
Chausson: Symphony in B -flat. Stock.
Franck: Psyche; Le Chausseur Maudit.
Defauw, Chicago Sym. Orch. VICTOR LBC
1056. 12 -in.
Gershwin: Concerto in F. Pennario,
Steinberg, Pittsburgh Sym. Orch. CAPTIOL
P 8219. r 2-in.
78 rpm
Milhaud: Suite Française. Milhaud, N. Y.
Philh.-Sym. Orch. COLUMBIA MX 268.
2/x2-in.
Hindemith: Mathis der Maler. Ormandy,
Philadelphia
HIGH QUALITY
L O W
C O S
FAIRCHILD
25 watt
POWER
T:
255: AMPLIFIER
Here's a mighty twin to Fairchild's big -power 260 Professional Amplifier.
The new 255 delivers a full 25 watts of undistorted power for the finest
sound, best reproduction!
This is the ideal power amplifier
for the average home or apartment.
The Fairchild 255 gives you full
power from deepest bass to highest
treble, and an instrument especially
designed for minimum transient distortion as well as lowest IM and
harmonic distortion, resulting in
exceptionally true natural sound.
Superbly engineered, the 255 has
a controlled frequency response of
+0 to /2 db, from 20 to 20,000
cps. The sound is always right!
-t
You can
always restore "new
amplifier" performance to the
Fairchild 255, even if tubes age
unequally, by Fairchild's simple,
exclusive distortion -cancelling
balance control.
COMPACT: Only 6" x 91/2" base
POWER GAIN: 42db
HIGH SENSITIVITY: Less than one volt
lI pt
re ,luied for full output
i
and it's only $$q 50
When you need full 50 watts of power, get the Fairchild 2601
only
14q,S0
/No/
I
(t
VICTOR
DM
854.
304.
3/I2-in.
Stravinsky: Le Sacre du Printemps. Stravinsky, N. Y. Philh. -Sym. Orch.
Wanted
Gershwin: Concerto in F, etc. Levant,
Kostelanetz, N. Y. Philh.-Sym. Orch.
Mme. Anni Frind -Sperling, 3509 Chestnut
St., New Orleans, La., who used to sing in
Germany with the Berlin Civic, Munich
State, and Dresden State Operas, is trying
to complete her library of recordings she
made under her maiden name, Anni Frind.
She needs the following records which were
pressed in Europe during the 193os for
HMV and Telefunken:
Durch Oper und Operette, with Frind,
Perras, Kloss, Korfus, Jungkurth, Husch,
Wittrisch, Strienz, Ludwig. ELECTROLA
(HMV) EH 945.
Heimatlied and War's auch nur ein
Traum from "Monika." ELECTROLA
(HMV) EH 6293.
"Die Tänzerin Fanny Elssler": Draussen
in Sievering; "Der Arme Jonathan ":
Ach, wir armen Primadonnen. ELECTROLA (HMV) EG 3377.
"Ball im Savoy" selections, with Frind and
Hartung. TELEFUNKEN E 1309.
"Die Kaiserin" selections, with Frind, Ludwig. ELECTROLA (HMV) EH 859.
Was die Heimat Singt Volkslieder potpourri. TELEFUNKEN A 1092.
"Das Dreimaderlhaus" potpourri. TELEFUNKEN A I198.
-
7/RC1I1/L/ßEQUIPMENT
/1
and
INPUT IMPEDANCE: 100K
Orch.
3/12-in.
Gounod: Faust Ballet Music. Weldon,
City of Birmington Orch. COLUMBIA Mx
10th AVENUE AND
154th STREET, WHITESTONE, NEW YORK
"Die Geisha" selections.
A I209.
TELEFUNKEN
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
is scaled for smaller rooms
and limited budgets
Choice of modern blonde
or rich deep mahogany
hand - rubbed finish. 21"
wide, 29'/2" high, 14" deep.
Cabinet 620 alone, Net
$78.00. Shipping Weight:
43 lbs.
Speaker is Stephens 12"
full range speaker, Model
112FR. Speaker alone, Net
$31.50. Shipping Weight
11
If yours is a cozy room where you'd like to pull
the sound in around you, choose the Stephens
"Coronado ". Sides and back of cabinet are completely enclosed: sound radiation comes from
within the enclosures, permitting the Coronado to
function independently of its location in the room.
Makes any good speaker sound better
or with
...
the recommended Stephens Speaker 112FR, you
get quality that can't be beat for the modest price.
lbs.
Enclosure (Model 620)
with Model 112FR speaker
installed, Net $109.50.
Stephens Manufacturing Corporation
STEPHENS
CSira
8538 Warner Drive
Culver City, California
Coble Address: "Morhanex ", Export Address: 458 Broadway, New York 13, New York
Ask Your
Authorized
Fleetwood Dealer
for Free Booklet of
Installation Ideas
or write
CONRAC, INC., Glendora, California
ARIZONA
AUDIO SPECIALISTS
333 E. Camelback Rd., Phocnis
Phone: AMherst 5 -0447
HIGH FIDELITY SIGHT & SOUND SYSTEMS
606 Peachtree St., N.E., Atlanta 3
Phone: VErnon 6534
AUDIO SHOP
2497 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley 4
Phone: THornwall 5-7224
BERKELEY CUSTOM ELECTRONICS
Roosevelt at Bancroft, Berkeley
Phone: THornwall 3-4180
-
HIGH FIDELITY MART
120 Broadway, Chico
Phone: Flreside 2 -8675
THE HI -FI CENTER
2909 W. Devon Ave., Chicago 30
Phone: LAmbert 5 -0811
AUDIO VIDEO SERVICE
7518 Melrose, Hollywood 46
Phone: WE. 3 -7349
HOLLYWOOD ELECTRONICS
7460 Melrose Ave., Hollywood 46
Phone: WEbster 3 -8208
PACIFIC HI FI HOUSE
1320 Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood 28
Phone: H011ywood 2 -6767
DACKNEY ELECTRONICS
343 E. Market St., Long Beach
Phone: 206 -491
5
ELECTRONIC SERVICES
6941 -I 2 La Ti Jera Blvd., Los Angeles 56
Phone: ORchard 4 -4774
FIGART'S SOUND UN -LTD.
6320 Commodore Sloat Dr., Los Angeles 48
Phone: YO. 6218
HENRY RADIO
11240 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles 64
Phone: BRadshaw 2 -1440 ARizona 3 -0518
MIDWAY ELECTRONIC SUPPLY
2817 Crenshaw Blvd., Los Angeles 16
Phone: REpublic 1 -2451
COAST ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CO.
"STAIRWAY TO SOUND"
4166 Broadway, Oakland 11
Phone: OLympic 3 -7138
DOW RADIO
1759 E. Colorado St., Pasadena 4
Phone: RYan 1 -6683 SY. 3 -1196
HIGH -FIDELITY HOUSE
536 S. Fair Oaks Ave., Pasadena 1
Phone: RYan 1 -8171
SOUND SHOPPE
1910 - 16th St., Sacramento 14
Phone: Gllbert 3-6660
HOLLYWOOD HI -FI SHOP
1839 E Street, San Bernardino
Phone: 83 -6101
MONTCLAIR ELECTRONICS
12005 W. Pico Blvd., W. Los Angeles 64
Phone: GR. 7 -0731
WHITTIER HI FI
1342 Carnell St., Whittier
Phone: OXford 6-4682
Phone: RO. 4-8640
VOICE & VISION, INC.
53 E. Walton Place, Chicago
Phone: WHitehall 3-1166
CONNECTICUT
DAVID DEAN SMITH
262 Elm St., New Haven
Phone: UNiversity 5 -1101
AUDIO WORKSHOP, INC.
South Main St., West Hartford
1
Phone: ADams 3 -5041
METTLER PIANO SHOWROOM
Westfair Center, Post Rd., Westport
Phone: Fairfield CLearwater 9 -8391
FLORIDA
GRICE RADIO & ELECTRONIC SUPPL., INC.
300 E. Wright St., Pensacola
Phone: HEmlock 3 -4616
PHIL WOODBURY SOUND
1103 Com'l, Emporia
Phone: 20
J. M. HISLE AND ASSOCIATES
405 -7 S. Upper St., Lexington
2
-7884
MASSACHUSETTS
BLUFF CITY DISTRIBUTING CO.
East Street, Memphis
Phone: 36 -4501
234
MICHIGAN
MODERN SOUND
5151 Adams, Birmingham
Phone: MIdwest 4 -8494
AUDIO HOUSE, INCORPORATED
19771 Conant at State Fair E., Detroit 34
Phone: TWinbrook 3 -3358
K.L.A. LABORATORIES, INC.
7422 Woodward Ave., Detroit 2
Phone: TRinity 4 -1100
WEST MICHIGAN SOUND CO.
1932 Peck Street, Muskegon
Phone: 2 -5910
MISSOURI
DAVID BEATTY HIGH FIDELITY SOUND & TV
11
NEW JERSEY
THE JABBERWOCK
104 Somerset St., New Brunswick
Phone: CHarter 9 -1900
JOHN J. CASEY CO.
856 Lincoln Place, Teaneck
Phone: TE 6 -7761
NEW MEXICO
THE HI FI HOUSE,
SOUND ENGINEERING & EQUIPMENT CO.
3011 Monte Vista, NE, Albuquerque
Phone: 5 -1695
SANDERS & ASSOCIATES
70 W. Marcy St., Santa Fe
Phone: SAnta Fe 3 -3437
NEW YORK
COMMERCIAL SOUND SYSTEMS, INC.
7
ADIRONDACK RADIO SUPPLY
185 -191 W. Main Street, Amsterdam
Phone: VI 2 -8350
MILAU ELECTRONICS
7854
-
79th St., Glendale 27
Phone: EVergreen 6 -1690
ISLAND RADIO DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
412 Fulton Ave., Hempstead, L. I.
Phone: IVanhoe 1 -8160
ARROW AUDIO CENTER
65 Cortlandt Street, New York
Phone: Dlgby 9 -4714
SUTTON AUDIO SYSTEMS
970 First Avenue, New York 22
Phone: PL. 3 -7224
JERRY FINK CO.
644 Clinton Ave., S., Rochester 20
Phone: BRowning 3503
SEGEN ELECTRONICS
118 Glen Cove Rd., Roslyn Heights, L. I.
Phone: ROslyn 3-4950
CONCERT -CRAFT, INC.
HIGH FIDELITY SOUND STUDIO
TENNESSEE
CRAMER ELECTRONICS, INC.
811 Boylston St., Boston
Phone: CO. 7 -4700
N. Pearl St., Albany
DANBY RADIO CORP.
19 S. 21st Street, Philadelphia 3
Phone: Rlttenhouse 6 -5686
RADIO ELECTRIC SERVICE CO.
709 Arch St., Philadelphia 6
Phone: LOmbard 3-7390
TEN CATE ASSOCIATES
6128 Morton St., Philadelphia 44
Phone: GErmantown 8 -5448
CUSTOM ELECTRONICS, INC.
813 Chartres St., New Orleans 16
Phone: CAnal 4120
1616 Westport Road, Kansas City
Phone: JEfferson 3110
1000 S. Main Street, Dayton 9
Phone: ADams 3158
CUSTOM CLASSICS
13421 Euclid Ave., E. Cleveland 12
Phone: GL. 1 -4868
R. S. T. LABS
14511 Granger Rd., Maple Heights
Phone: MOntrose 2 -3213
PENNSYLVANIA
KENTUCKY
Phone:
15
CUSTOM ELECTRONICS, INC.
11
WOODBURN SOUND SERVICE
8 E. College St., Iowa City
Phone: 8 -0151
11
2
Phone: CHerry 1-5560
RICHARD J. SAUER
LOUISIANA
WHITE ENTERPRISES
6039 W. Washington Blvd., Culver City
Phone: DU. 9-1719
TURNTABLE HI-FI
116 W. Wilshire, Fullerton
349 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse
Phone: 2 -8979
AUDIO CRAFT CO.
2915 Prospect Ave., Cleveland
ELECTRONIC EXPEDITERS
KANSAS
CALIFORNIA
YORK (Continued)
W. G. BROWN SOUND EQUIPMENT CORP.
OHIO
ILLINOIS
IOWA
ELECTRICAL COMMUNICATION CO.
202 E. Fillmore, Phoenix
Phone: ALpine 2 -8248
GENE TAPIE
NEW
GEORGIA
P. O. 66, Brandywine Sta., Schenectady 4
Phone: 4 -0720
2
TEXAS
CRABTREE'S
2608 Ross Avenue, Dallas
Phone: STerling 5361
TOWN NORTH MUSIC CORP.
5328 W. Lovers Lane, Dallas 9
Phone: ELmhurst 6477
CLIFFORD HERRING SOUND EQUIP'T CO.
W. Lancaster at Burnet Sts.,
Phone: FO. 4877
Fort Worth
3
TRUETT KIMSEY COMPANY, INC.
3515 W. Vickery St., Forth Worth 4
GULF COAST ELECTRONICS
1110 Winbern St., Houston 4
Phone: Justin 1551
WRYE CO., LTD.
2045 Welch at Shepherd, Houston
Phone: JA. 3 -7874
VANDERGRIFT AUDIO COMPANY
4106 San Pedro, San Antonio
Phone: PErshing 5 -2091
UTAH
SOUND BY CRAFTSMEN
91 Orpheum Ave., Salt Lake City
Phone: 5 -2817 5 -2818
1
VIRGINIA
AUDIO CONSULTANTS, INC.
76 N. Glebe Road, Arlington .3
Phone: JAckson 5 -3355
WASHINGTON
OLYMPIC ENGINEERING CO.
2008 Westlake Ave., Seattle 1
Phone: ELiot 4650
UNIVERSITY HI -FI SHOP
4111 University Way, Seattle 5
Phone: ME. 6000
WISCONSIN
THE HI -FI CENTER, INC.
2630 No. Downer Ave., Milwaukee
Phone: WOodruff 4 -3344
11
HAWAII
JOHN J. HARDING CO., LTD.
1471 Kapiolani Blvd., Honolulu 12
Phone: 991481 - 991593
CANADA
rAVENUE RADIO & TELEVISION, INC.
4114 St. Catherine St., W., Montreal
Phone: GLenview 6578
PAYETTE RADIO LIMITED
730 St. James St., W., Montreal
3
Phone: UN. 6-6681
PECK'S
Sherbrooke East of Guy, Montreal
Phone: F 1 -4685
JEAN PAUL GAGNON RADIO &,TELEVISION
960 1st. Avenue, Quebec City
Phone: 2 -1735
Full electronic remote controlled
custom television
Fleetwood's two- chassis television system is
quality matched to your Hi Fi equipment
and, like it, is designed for custom installation. It supplies power for your speaker
and has high fidelity output to connect
to your sound system. The picture is the
same professional quality as that on TV
station monitors-also made by Fleetwood.
The separate remote tuning unit may be
operated 40 feet or more from the picture
chassis. It's readily adaptable to U.H.F.
Both remote (2 chassis) and non -remote
Fleetwood systems are available for 21 ",
24" and 27" rectangular picture tubes.
Fleetwood professional performance is
available in models starting at $199.50.
Write for complete information and name
of dealer nearest you.
Ibigi au,dwuko,
I
tzwA4
9fEEfooJ
CUSTOM TELEVISION
manufactured by CONRAC, Inc.
Dept. A
A few dealer franchises
Conrac is the
Canadian name
for Fleetwood Television.
Export Division
AUGUST 1955
Glendora, California
-
Fr
still available
& Hansen, Ltd., 301 Clay Street, San Francisco 11,
California,
U. S. A.
19
Exciting High Fidelity Firsts!
In these superb matched instruments -enjoy
the foremost advances in High- Fidelity -start-
Especially
Coronation 400
SIR:
space
is
limited
the
GOODMANS
8 inch
FIDELITY
HIGH
LOUDSPEAKER
MADE IN ENGLAND
ROCKBAR CORPORATION, Dept
LH -2
215 East 37th 5t., New York 16, N. Y.
Please send complete description of the
Goodmans Axiette.
Name
Address
My Dealer is
Zone
-
chassis.
where
City.
-
lowest distortion
precision
craftsmanship- gleaming polished chromium
ling realism
State._.
It seems that the most often recurring
gripes in your "Letters" column are the
complaints over the poor condition of
genuine vinyl hi -fi disks as received
from that maniac at the record shop
who lets the general public, as well as
those few who are conscious of all the
dangers of careless handling, sample
records freely on the usually poor
equipment available in such places.
Records are the largest single investment in any home music system, and
the customer is entitled to physically
perfect merchandise.
While in Marseilles, France, recently, we had the opportunity to browse
in a fairly new record shop where the
precautions for the protection of the
delicate surfaces were simple and almost foolproof. There the customer
never, never handled the surfaces of
any record until the proprietor had a
quite respectable bunch of francs safely ensconced in his cash box.
Instead, one of the sales clerks took
the record, placed it on one of six
turntables in back of the counter and
directed us toward one of a like
number of listening booths at the rear
of the store. These booths were equipped with only the tone and volume
controls, a couple of chairs, and a small
speaker mounted on the wall. There
we were able to relax and listen to the
selections we had made, and decide, as
the different sides were sampled for us,
whether the records were in guild
enough condition to warrant buying.
Installing an entire six -channel extended range sound system like that
would run into enough money to prevent its happening in most establishments, but certainly quite a few of the
larger record shops could afford one
really excellent outfit with the turntable available only to its sales personnel, who would present a much simpler
educational problem than the public
at large does.
Having records demonstrated in this
fashion, rather than trusting them to
the not -so- tender mercies of the un-
40
WATT
AMPLIFIER
$9950
buy today! COMPLETELY
NEW, NON -RINGING NEGATIVE FEEDBACK
over 50 DB feedback. CUSTOM
CIRCUITRY
IGreatest amplifier
-
CRAFTED- sealed transformers, encapsulated
networks, finest molded components on Bakeless
lite terminal board. DISTORTION -FREE
than O.05°ó at 30 watts. POWER RESPONSE
Surat
30
watts.
cycles
0.1 DB 16 to 35,000
passes FCC requirements for FM broadcasting.
5 to 200,000 cycle r response. 40 WATT WIDE RANGE OUTPUT TRANSFORMER, sealed multiple section windings, thin strip core. FOOLPROOF
DAMPING CONTROL for startling
speaker performance. BUILT -IN POWER for
preamplifiers and newest electrostatic tweeters.
-
INIE
ICS
ELECIR
Coronation 85
CONSOLETTE PREAMPLIFIER EQUALIZER
$7950
Incomparable companion to the "CORONATION 400 ". EXCLUSIVE NEGATIVE FEEDBACK
CIRCUITRY. Over 50 D8- virtually eliminates
distortion. Surpasses FCC requirements for FM
Broadcasting. 5 to 200,000 cycle response.
CUSTOM CRAFTED -polished chromium chassis,
satin gold front panel. Encapsulated precision
networks, molded components on Bakelite
panel. LOUDNESS CONTROL, continuously variable. FIVE INPUT SELECTIONS, 16 PRECISION
PLAYBACK CURVES. FULL 20 DB DISTORTION FREE Bass and Treble compensation. Phenomenal lowest noise Z -729 input tube HUM INAUDIBLE with all controls on full. Highest
gain. Built -in power for motion picture photocells, FM phono cartridges, condenser microphones. Ultra compact, easy front mounting.
Now at your local dealer!
INTERELECTRONICS
2432 Grand Concourse
New York 58, New York
Continued on page 22
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Since 1935
the Garrard has been
sold and serviced
throughout the United States.
Incomparable...
It is recognized every-
where for superior
performance, ruggedness
and reliability.
*0
FEATURES.
CRAFTSMANSHIP,
.
SERVICE
PRICE AND
this Is
clearly why
understand
record changer.
and you will
No .1 high-fidelity
CHECK
the worlds
"RIGHTS" and -'WRONGS"
of record changer design
(important in protecting your records).
RIGHT:
...
Garrard Precision Pusher Platform
the only record changing device that insures
positive, gentle handling of records with standard
center holes.
WRONG:
"Overhead Bridges" (as on ordinary changers)
.. which may damage or dislodge records
accidentally.
RIGHT:
Garrard removable and interchangeable
spindles ... Easily inserted; accommodate all
records, all sizes, as they were made to be
played; pull out instantly to facilitate removal of
records from turntable.
WRONG:
Fixed Spindles (as on ordinary changers) ..
.
which require ripping records upwards over
metallic spindle projections after playing.
Other Garrard features include:
4 pole motor
rumble, no induced hum
heavy drive shaft
wows, no waves
weighted turntable
flywheel action, constant speed
muting switch
-silence between records
silent automatic
stop -shuts off after last record; no disturbing
"plop ".
easy stylus weight adjustment -protects long- playing records
balanced-mounted
tone arm -true tangent tracking
universal shell
-fits all popular high fidelity cartridges
-no
-no
MODEL RC80
-
World's Finest Record Changer
...
and this is
the LEAK TL /10 HIGH FIDELITY AMPLIFIER
COMPLETE WITH "POINT ONE" REMOTE CONTROL PREAMPLIFIER
Most economical amplifier ever built by
Leak. Despite amazingly low price, Leak
standards have been maintained, with all
the engineering skill and fastidious assembly and wiring that have won world -wide
admiration. Incorporates an ultra -linear 10watt circuit, with 2 of the new KT -61 beam
power output tetrodes in push-pull. Harmonic distortion only one -tenth of one
percent at 1000 cycles, for a power output
of 8 watts
a noteworthy achievement
Insuring flawless reproduction.
...
High damping factor of 23, and low hum level of
-76 db below full output, are ordinarily found
only in far more expensive units.
4 MASTER
CONTROLS
Control t
Tuner, Tape, AES,
NARTB, FFRR,
COL.LP
Control 2
Treble, 23 db
range of control
Control 3
Bass, 23 db
range of control
Control 4
On -Off and
Volume
EXCLUSIVE FEATURE: Tape recorder jacks (input and output) on front panels for instantaneous use
WRITE FOR A COPY OF
"SOUND CRAFTSMANSHIP"
Mail coupon today for a complimentary
copy of "Sound Craftsmanship" 16
pages illustrating and describing all
products of the British Industries Group.
BRITISH INDUSTRIES CORP., Dept. HF -85
164 Duane Street
New York 13, N. Y.
Please send "Sound Craftsmanship" to:
Name
Address
City
_
H
EAT
HKIT
LETTERS
-6121,11
"BUILD IT YOURSELF"
amplifier
kits
...
I went to the Toronto Audio Show
and enjoyed it very much with the exception of the following which appeared right in the middle of the
official catalogue under the heading
"How to Choose the Components for
WILLIAMSON TYPE
(ACROSOUND
TRANSFORMER)
This dual -chassis high
fidelity amplifier kit provides installation flexi-
bility. It feat urea the
Acrminmul "ultra- linear"
output transformer, and
has a frequency response
within 1 db from 111 cps to 100,000 cps. Harmonic distortion
and intermalulation distortion are less than .5';ó at 5 watts,
and maximum power output is well over 2(1 watts. A truly outstanding performer. W -3M consists of ruait, amplifier and
er supply. Shpg. W t. 29 lbs., Ex press
only
Model R' -3 consists of IV-3M plus N'A -l'_' l'n n.;InI r Lslthis page. Sittig. Wt. 37 lbs..
$49.75
:q
YOURSELF
'r eat`i tit
$69.50
M1011
reati.it
WILLIAMSON TYPE
Here is the
templet
preamplifier. Designed
HIGH FIDELITY
specifically for use with
the Williamson Type circuit, it provides equalisetion for 1.P, R IAA, AES,
PREAMPLIFIER
and early 78 records, 5
switch -selected inputs
with individually preset
level
controls, separate
bas and treble tone
con -
lroL,. special hum control,
etc. thustanlmg in performance and most attractive in appearance. Fulfills every
requirement for truc high fidelity performance.
7
Shpg. Wt. 7 lbs.
$19.75
(CHICAGO TRANSFORMER)
This hi -fi amplifier is nmst rutted on a single
chassis, thereby affecting
it reduction in emit. Uses
new Chicago high fidelity
output transformer and
provides the same high performance as
Mold R -3 listed atuve.
An unbeatable dollar value. 'l'he lowest price ever quoted for a
complete II'illiamson Type Amplifier circuit.
Mabel IC -{M consists of main amplifier and pawar supply "n
single chassis. Shpg. Wt.. 28 lbs., ExiTc,
only
Model W-4 consists of W-1M plus VA -P2 I'reamplifier. Slips. Vt. 35 lIn., Express only
$39,75
$ 59.50
'sl'eat44íe
WILLIAMSON TYPE
25 WATT AMPLIFIER
(PEERLESS TRANSFORMER)
This latest and most advanced Ileathkit hi -fi
amplifier has all the extras so important to the
super-critical listener. Featuring KT-titi tubes,
special Peerless output transformer, and new circuit design, it offers brilliant performance by any
COMBINATION
Bass response is extended more than a full
octave below other Ileathkit Williamson circuits,
along with higher power output, reduced inter modulation and harmonic distortion, letter phase
shift characteristicsmid extended high frequency
response. A new type ',showing circuit makes
balancing easier, and at the same time permits a
closer "dynamic" balance between tunes.
Aside from these outstanding engineering features, the W -5 manifests new physical design as well. A protective cover fits over
all above-chassis components, forming a most attractive assembly-suitable for mounting in or out of a cabinet. All connectors are
brought out to the front chassis apron for convenience of connection.
Model W-5M cotmists of main amplifier and power supply on single chassis with protective cover. Shpg. Wt. 31 Ile.
Express only
Model W -5 consists of W -5 \t, plus WA-P2 Preamplifier shown on this page. Shpg. Wt. 38 Ile.
$
Express only
$59.75
79.50
qieeteldie
HIGH FIDELITY
20 WATT AMPLIFIER
This particular 20 watt Amplifier combines high fidelity with economy. Single
chassis construction provides preamplifier,
main amplifier and power supply function. MODEL A- 98
True hi -fi performance ± I dh, 20 cps to
20,000 cps. Preamplifier affords 4 switch-selected compensated inputs. Push pull 61.6 tubes used for surprisingly clean output signal with excellent response characteristics and adequate power reserve. Full tone rant rid act ion.
Extremely low cost for real high fidelity performance. Shpg.
18
Ile
F-White FOR
2_'
Your Home High -Fidelity Music System."
"The Recording Companies are constantly refining their product; certain
selected recordings leave little to be
desired in technical and artistic perfection. On the other hand, the serious
listener must learn to discount defects
in Swot pressings occasioned by deformed stompers used in processing
the recoral, scratches, and ticks and
pop.' incident to impurities in the record bare" [Mr. Shiner's italics).
Here is one serious listener who
refuses to do any such thing, and regards it as slightly ridiculous that he
should be advised to put up with a
pressing from a deformed stamper for
which he is expected to pay $5.95
S. Shiner
Toronto, Ont.
SIR:
W -5M and WA -P2
standard.
Wt.
knowing public would certainly be
effective in reducing complaints as
well as being an almost irresistible selling point to the discerning buyer.
Lloyd V. Laurence
FPO, New York, N. Y.
SIR:
eatlsdiit
Eadd
Cotinued from page 20
$35.50
FREE CATALOG AND SCHEMATICS
Having completed reading the June
issue in detail and the Posner -Fink
article, "Baha, Betofen, and Bramsu" in
particular, I am now compelled to
write. The article tends to mislead
and, worse, omit, and needs be clarified by an astute, traveler -audiophile:
myself. Let me first qualify by stating
that I am recently returned from a
seven -year residence in Japan as an
electronics engineer who, hobby -wise,
rigorously pursued the art and science
of high fidelity.
Now Messrs. Posner and Fink imply
that hi -fi is sweeping the country or
has swept the country recently like
"seasonal typhoons" and cite as an example the emporium known as Confectionery West. In mid -195o I sat
contentedly in Confectionery West
sipping coffee, eating an hors d'oeuvre
sized strawberry shortcake, and listening to Brahms's Fourth, which casr.tded majestically from a modified
Continued on page 25
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
One of a series on
what makes one magnetic recording tape
better than another
to
11'
,
I_xtra Playing Time
Extra Strength
Mylar' Base
i
o
Full Depth Oxide Coating
50.
Micro- Polishedg
EXTRA PLAYING TIME)
magnetic recording t pe
.
REEVES SOUNDCRAFT
.
Lubricated Both Sides ..
.._
i]c
CORPORATION
SI
.
VET
COSTS
NO
MORE
PLUS 50
Magnetic Recording Tape newest in the
famous Soundcraft line
brings you a combination of
superior qualities that no other
tape possesses. Qualities that
let you capture and hear the
true sense of violin strings, all
the brilliance of brass, the color of wood winds ... that faithfully record the human voice
-
-
in all of its varied subtleties.
Plus 50's uniform output,
inherently low signal -to -noise
ratio, its 50% extra playing
time, added strength and flexibility ... its dimensional stability in any climate. These are
the special qualities that make
it the choice of professionals
and amateurs, alike, wherever
tape perfection is required.
And Soundcraft Plus 50 adds
this special bonus Its "Mylar"
base assures virtually a lifetime
of smooth, trouble -free service
at no more cost per foot than
other quality tapes. Like all
Soundcraft products, Plus 50
is engineered and made by
tape recording specialists. Get
some Soundcraft Plus 50 Tape
at your dealer's today.
:
FOR EVERY SOUND REASON
REEVES
Trade -Mark Tor DuPont Polyester Film
AUGUST 1955
SOUNDCRAFT CORP
Dept. F -8, 10 East 52nd Street, New York 22, N. Y.
i
laab,
The Ampex 600 Tape Recorder
-
superlative performance in a 28 -pound
package, a professional quality recorder in a
portable case.
The Ampex 620
Amplifier- Speaker
-
magnificent tonal quality in a 25 -pound
package
an exceptional system for
sound reproduction from tape recorder,
turntable. record changer, AM -FM
tuner or pre -amplified microphone.
-
in two hands, is the finest Hi -Fi
system for its size available today. It
Here
revolutionary Ampex recorder reproducer combination that
can be carried anywhere -yet it
is equally at home as part of a
custom installation.
is
a
i
t=/ i wm
t
G
SUPERB PERFORMANCE
ANYWHERE
When you own an Ampex 600 -620
combination, recording perfection and
truly exceptional sound reproduction
are at your command ... PLUS
portability that lets you enjoy true
Hi -Fi wherever you go.
At home, listen to its matchless
performance in any room. If you prefer
concealed components, it's ideally
suited for wall or cabinet installation,
can be easily integrated with existing
Hi -Fi systems.
Take it on trips or when you visit friends,
lifts out of custom installations in just
seconds, as ready to travel as a packed
suitcase.
No matter how or where you use it, this great
Ampex 600 -620 combination offers fidelity
in sound recording and reproduction
superb
performance anywhere you want it.
-
PRICES: Model 600 Tape Recorder -$545.00
Model 620 Amplifier-Speaker -$149.50.
HEAR IT ... the real test is listening, so ask for a
demonstration from your local dealer ... or write to
Dept. F -2262 for full description and specifications.
f
cf;gttartire of C.:Z ctiott
i,t
Clot,td
AmPIEX
CORPORATION
934 CHARTER STREET REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA
see your local telephone
Distributors in principal cities
directory under "Recording Equipment."
Canadian distribution by Canadian General Electric Company
-
LETTERS
Continuedfrom page 22
grand piano. Said piano, a Steinway appearing "Yamaha," had been ingeniously altered, the inards having been
replaced by a turntable, preamp and
amplifier, and creditable speaker system. Five years ago Confectionery
West was a going concern, and I
cannot say how long before. Thus the
"sweeping" action goes back a bit further than implied by the article.
Phonetically, Messrs. Posner and
Fink goofed on " Betofen." The "f"
sound is equally as difficult for the
Japanese as "v," and both re- emerge in
speech as "b." "Baha" and "Bramsu'
come through without distortion, and
it may be interesting to note the Japanese transliteration of Bach to "Baha."
Since in almost all cases word endings
must have vowel sounds, Bach from
Western pronounciation would become "Baka." "Baka" means stupid,
foolish, or fool -ergo: "Baha."
Five years ago I discovered that
Japan was hi -fi conscious; per capita wise as much or more so than in the
States. The hard core or tight little
band did something about it via the
only medium available to them at the
time: AM radio broadcasting. Today
they have TV, too, with exceptional
audio quality, but not FM radio broadcasting which they don't need. The
dynamic and frequency range of their
AM broadcasting equals the best of
the locally received "Good Music"
FM stations in Baltimore, Philadelhave at
phia, and Washington
least 20,000 feet of recorded tape to
prove my point. All of which leads to
my little sneaker: open house or tape respondence with anyone interested.
Kenneth O. Weir
III Catalpa St.
Middletown, Pa.
-I
Let's Get EFFICIENCY Straight
THE experienced engineer understands that
high efficiency in any piece of audio equipment
implies high sensitivity over a limited working range.
But many laymen have come to believe that
high efficiency indicates greater audio quality
in a music system. Speaker A sounds louder than
Speaker B at the same amplifier-gain setting:
therefore, Speaker A is thought to be the better.
-
High efficiency, in this sense of greater loudness,
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In a quality music system, where the response from
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-
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Palmer I louse
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September 30 to October 2
SIR:
A Selective
Discography of Ballet
Music, in the May issue, contains an
error. Actually Petrouchka, as recorded
by L. Stokowski and company is catalogued Victor LM 1175 and has no
coupling. Victor LM 9029 contains a
pairing of Stravinsky's Firebird Suite
and Iberi s Escales, both performed by
Monsieur Stokowski and friends.
Bob A. Gelman
Brooklyn, N. Y.
THE R. T. BOZAK COMPANY
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AUGUST 1955
DARIEN, CONN.
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AS
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EDITORS
WHEN HIGH FIDELITY Magazine was started, five
years ago, it bore the subtitle, "Devoted to the Interests of
Audiophiles." It could be, at that time, nearly all things to
all audiophiles. The breed was much less numerous then
than now, and much more homogeneous. The audio enthusiast of the day was a do- it- yourself man, for a very
simple reason. He had to be. He was also, almost invariably, something of a music fancier. Otherwise he would not
have gone exploring for professional components to better
his sound reproduction. No one had solicited his interest.
Few audio equipment makers made budget- provision for
consumer advertising, in those days, and no major record
company yet had thought of putting the words "hi -fi" on its
jackets. The initiative lay with the individual devotee, who
exercised it well. His existence and energy were a great
boon to HIGH FIDELITY in its early years, and to the home
sound industry in general.
Nevertheless, both the magazine and the industry began
thereafter to neglect him a little, not out of ingratitude, but
out of necessity. Interest in high fidelity soon infected new
people in large numbers. A few of these knew something
about music, but almost none knew anything about the
technicalities of sound reproduction. Manufacturers became
aware of this. More and more they tailored their products
and their advertising to the untutored living room listener.
And more and more it fell to HIGH FIDELITY to tutor him.
It has been the privilege of this magazine to introduce
some forty thousand beginners* to the possibility of reproducing lifelike music in their own homes, to the delights of
perceptive listening and to the fascination of helping Ormandy and Brubeck sound their best. But it has not been
easy, as perhaps nothing worth while ever is. To have
several thousand new readers each issue is hard on an editor.
The newcomers want the old, broad, basic high fidelity story
told again. The old guard, in contrast, wants discussion on
something new and special
should electrolytic condensers
be used in crossover networks? What both groups get, after
the editors have cudgeled their wits to pulp, is a piece suitable for the new, not obnoxious to the old, on speaker systems for small living rooms, in which perhaps there may
be some obiter dicta on crossover networks.
But even while numerous new recruits have joined us,
certain of the old guard have fallen away, while others have
written in piteously, saying that they still valued the record
reviews but were at a loss where to seek articles on the how to-do-it aspects of audio. This pains us, so Audiocom, the
parent company of HIGH FIDELITY, has undertaken to start
publishing, in October, a monthly magazine for these folk,
-
called AUDIOCRAFT.
AUDIOCRAFT will cost 35 cents for a single copy,
$i.50 for a year's subscription, $6.5o for two years, $9 for
three. A one -year charter subscription at $3 is available for
people who subscribe before November r. AUDIOCRAFTS
*A rough guess. We have approximately sixty thousand paying readers now.
AUGUST 1955
SEE IT
editor will be Roy F. Allison, former editor of Communication Engineering and TV & Radio Engineering and for the
past two years technical editor of HIGH FIDELITY. He will
have his own staff, as well as the facilities of HIGH FIDELITY, to produce the new magazine.
AUDIOCRAFT, as it is currently planned, will contain
monthly departments devoted to tape recording and reviews
of prerecorded tape; cabinetry and woodworking in general;
the maintenance and servicing of high fidelity equipment;
audio news, including new developments and trends; pictures and descriptions of new components, parts, instruments, and tools; a continuing discussion of fundamental
audio theory, and practical guidance on sound- system instal lations.
There will also be voluminous feature articles. Among
those already scheduled are, for instance, pieces dealing with
how to get better TV sound without adding anything unsightly and external to the cabinet; how to install FM in an
automobile; how to use test instruments, and how to give
your homemade front ends that factory-crafted-escutcheon
look. An evaluation of electrostatic loudspeakers also is in
the works. There will be ample reportage, schematically
and photographically illustrated, on the experiments, labors,
and discoveries of the proud and diligent amateur guild of
tin -choppers and solder -steam sniffers, in large part contributed by these stalwarts themselves.
Editor Allison is very frankly in the market for both suggestions and articles. Physically, AUDIOCRAFT will resemble HIGH FIDELITY in its dimensions and stock; it will
be a big, handsome magazine. And its content will be of
quality to match. Which is not to say that it will be written
all by engineers, and certainly not for engineers(in their
capacity as engineers, anyway). But neither will it be condescending in tone or atmosphere. The subscriber to
AUDIOCRAFT is visualized as a man with brains, curiosity,
and energy, absorbed with a desire to tinker with sound
apparatus, and not to be frightened off by a diagram or two.
Mr. Allison will continue to serve as technical associate
editor of HIGH FIDELITY, which in turn will continue to
purvey its own audio features
"Tested in the Home,"
"Audio Forum," and the like
it is expected that there
will be very little overlap in content between the two publications. A word about advertising may not be amiss. A recent questionnaire survey of HIGH FIDELITY readership
disclosed a very intriguing fact: most readers read most of
the magazine regularly, but what all read all the tinte is the
advertising. They enjoy it. Shopping (even beyond one's
means) is fun. It is certain that AUDIOCRAFT will attract some advertising tools, kits, measurement instruments, cabinet materials, parts -that HIGH FIDELITY never
has. So ... a new dimension to a fascinating pursuit.
AUDIOCRAFT normally will be issued on the twentieth
of each month, but the first (November) issue will be available October to, 1955. Now turn to page 73.
J. M. C.
-
-but
-
27
Tardily the world discovers ..
.
Music's Great Dane
by KURT STONE
WHEN I went to Denmark in the early 193os to study
at the Royal Conservatory in Copenhagen, the Danes considered me shockingly deficient in musical background: I
knew nothing about Carl Nielsen!
Although ever since my arrival I had heard this composer's name pop up wherever I had heard Danish musicians talk shop, and I had seen his name in practically
every Danish musical publication, I had to confess that I
had not paid much attention to it. After all, Nielsen is
about the most common and undistinguished name imaginable in Denmark. Almost every other person on the streets
is a Nielsen, a Hansen, or a Pedersen. It takes a while for
an outsider to tell one Nielsen from another.
And just as the name, Carl Nielsen, would not readily
conjure up in my mind a clearly focused image of a personality, neither did his music, which belatedly I began to examine with great, if somewhat unenthusiastic, diligence. In
fact, I found it quite impossible at first to find recognizable
stylistic features recurring
in
consistently enough
Nielsen's music to make it
fit into any established
category or tradition.
Nielsen obviously was
no Schoenberg man and
neither was he a Hindemith disciple, nor an emulator of Stravinsky or Bar tók. It was equally obvious
that the characteristics of
Impressionism and Post Impressionism were far too
vague to apply to Nielsen's
robust and earthy musical
personality. Could one call
his music "modern" at all
Carl Nielsen: "almost humble."
in the accepted sense? But
if he was not a "modern" composer, what was he? His
music certainly was not old- fashioned or traditional either
least I had never come across any music quite like it.
As for the Danes, they saw no problem; they considered
Carl Nielsen a full-fledged modern composer and the
greatest musical Dane since Dietrich Buxtehude to boot.
They shuddered when foreigners occasionally dared to
characterize his music as belonging somewhere between
Reger and Sibelius. And by "the Danes" I do not mean little
village music teachers or Chamber of Commerce patriots,
nor was this opinion restricted to the older generation. It
was ( and still is) the consensus of the foremost musicians
of the country -and to me it was all very puzzling. It is
frustrating not to be able to see something others can.
-at
28
The solution came when I realized that in order to find
out what the music of Carl Nielsen is all about, to understand its internal organization and its underlying plans, one
must not choose pieces for examination at random. It is
best to begin, chronologically speaking, near the end. Anyone who approaches Nielsen's music through, say, his first
three symphonies or the first violin sonata (as I, unfortunately, had done) will find him seemingly little different
from the late Romanticists or the Brahms school. But if
one starts with his unique and immensely powerful Fifth
Symphony, or the Clarinet Concerto, and then works one's
way backward, it will not only become increasingly clear
that Carl Nielsen was a very highly individual composer, but
also that the earlier works actually do contain the same, consistent, strong, and quite unusual features of his musical
personality. It is merely a little harder to detect them there.
The reason why it is at first so difficult to recognize the
man behind the music is that, in spite of the unique
strength of his personality, Nielsen was a rather modest,
almost humble man. It was not for him to blare out and
exaggerate every little bit of originality; he did not adverrather rare feature in the music of
tise his personality
our century. Small wonder that to us his musical character
may seem elusive.
My ears were first really opened to Nielsen's music and
its stylistic raison d'être through the study of his Chaconne
for piano, and then his Theme and Variations for piano.
Since these works are similar in structure, and since this
particularly well
series of variations
structure
suited to demonstrate a composer's musical philosophy, they
were ideal introductions to Nielsen's art, although for the
non -pianist and /or record listener the Fourth and probably
even more so the Fifth Symphonies are a good deal more
impressive and, particularly in the case of the Fifth, spectacular.
In the two piano works just mentioned I was fascinated
first of all by the range and variety of the harmonic language. The Chaconne opens in a modal, somewhat archaic
vein and moves on through comparatively traditional harmonic phases to a climax of hypertense, clashing, dissonant,
almost insane outcries, after which the music, exhausted, relaxes to a state of ethereal, flowing calm which, in its
peculiar aimlessness, is quite close to the harmonic vagueness of the modal opening, and which seems beyond any
particular school or style and chiefly conveys a sense of
-a
-a
-is
blissful ease.
The Theme and Variations follow a similar plan, except
that here the music begins and ends in a richly harmonized,
rather Brahmsian texture.
These brief descriptions may suffice to suggest Nielsen's
musical Weltanschauung which, very roughly, amounts to
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
this: music has outgrown its old confines of traditional harmony and chord structure, but the fundamental element of
tonality as a prerequisite for all music remains unchallenged.
This is conservatism, of a kind. The new harmonic and
chordal possibilities at first so fascinated this century's cornposers that most of them avoided and even abandoned as
many features and characteristics of everything that had
gone before as possible. They took to floating around
happily in uncharted oceans of new sounds, rhythms, and
melodic shapes, with a great deal of splashing but usually
without much aim, purpose, or organization.
Carl Nielsen enjoyed the splashing too, but he could not
go along with the attitude of discarding everything old in
favor of everything new, an attitude which, to him, seemed
unnecessarily wasteful. He is said to have remarked repeatedly that although it is interesting to think up new,
strange harmonies, the real proof of true, musicianly imagination and craftsmanship still lies in the ability to write
down a perfectly ordinary melodic skip of a third or fifth in
such a way that it sounds as if one had never heard it before.
In his book Levende Musik (Living Music) he wrote:
"We must show the surfeited that a melodic skip of a third
ought to be looked at as a divine gift, a fourth as a revelation, and a fifth as the greatest joy. Thoughtless gluttony
undermines one's health."
As a result of this attitude, Carl Nielsen's music shows a
wider range of expressive resources than that of almost any
other composer. His melodies range from naïvely simple
tunes, through solidly built, concise themes and extended,
sophisticated melodic passages to the most exotic turns and
contortions. (One of the characteristic stylistic features in
his melodic work is a hovering around a central tone from
which the melody probes into all kinds of intervals, with
particular prominence given to the lowered seventh.)
Equally, his rhythm ranges from the most natural 3/q
waltzes and 4/4 marches to the wildest outbursts of rhythmic complexity
for example, to the point of having two
tympanists fire freely improvised drum salvos from opposite
corners of the stage into a full orchestra (Fourth Symphony). Texturally, too, the variety is unusual: Nielsen
produced volumes of beautiful, simple chorale harmonizations, but at the same time he has hardly an equal in the
overwhelming complexity of contrapuntal pile -ups in some
of his symphonic climaxes, particularly in the first movements of his Fourth and Fifth Symphonies.
It is perhaps not surprising that his music can (and often
does) mislead the casual listener into thinking that Nielsen
never did more than assemble all sorts of musical gimmicks
and mix them indiscriminately into a sort of stylistic hodgepodge. But it is not the number and variety of devices
which counts, it is the way and the spirit in which they are
applied. Nielsen's craftsmanship, spontaneity, and sincerity
of expression, and the warmth of the personality which
underlies his music, mark him as far more than a mere
manipulator of tricks and techniques.
the son of a house painter who played the violin at occasional village gatherings. From him he picked up the rudiments of fiddling but the thought of pursuing music as a
career apparently did not occur to him. He became an apprentice in a grocery store. Soon, however, the store went
bankrupt and he lost his job, which caused him no grief at
all. He bought a trumpet, practiced it diligently, and applied for a position in a military band in the town of
Odense. Although he was only fourteen years old, he was
accepted and stayed with the band for three years. Then he
went to Copenhagen to study violin and piano at the Royal
Conservatory.
At the time, the Conservatory seems to have been soporifically provincial. When Nielsen graduated, in 1886, he
had reached the age of 21 without ever having been made
seriously aware of the great musical battles of the period.
The Wagner- Bruckner -Brahms controversy never had really
reached Denmark, and neither had the controversial French
trend toward Impressionism. Instead, Denmark's music
lovers lived on a post -Mendelssohnian diet, bland and lukewarm; the Danes were definitely behind the times. Niel sen's divergence from the paths followed by his musical
contemporaries, therefore, must be attributed in part to the
fact that he didn't even know that these paths existed. To
him, everything was new and exciting. And when sophistication came, it had been preceded by a very keen, self evolved taste. When finally he encountered new musical
-
ABRIEF GLANCE at Carl Nielsen's youth may shed
some light on the reasons for his exemplary open- mindedness in matters musical, and his apparent immunity to fads
and fashions. He was born June 9, 1865, in a little village,
AUGUST 1955
.1
Odense, where a composer's career began in a military band.
fashions, he was able to choose and reject among them with
high independence. His guiding principle was, more than
anything else, an appreciation of true craftsmanship and
sincerity in music. Knud Jeppesen, his renowned compatriot, once observed ( in the German musical magazine
Melos, June 1927) that while the average person generally
takes music for granted, as something which has always
been with us, Carl Nielsen never lost the ability of the child
to wonder.
Jeppesen could have added that Nielsen also was childlike in his lack of inhibitions about speaking his mind. He
failed thus to endear himself to some of his contemporaries
and elders. In an obituary note (Nielsen died October 3,
1931) J¢rgen Bentzon wrote "A young musician who in
29
the early 189os ... openly criticized the Beethoven-Wagner
era and then expounded the spiritual purity and artistic superiority of the music of a Palestrina, a Bach, a Mozart, was
bound thereby to isolate himself."
In looking over Carl Nielsen's total output, we find that
The Music of Nielsen
on long playing records
Note: The most impressive works here listed are, in this order,
the Symphonies 5, 4, 3, Cornmotio, and the Clarinet Concerto.
This does not mean, however, that "impressiveness" equals
"higher quality" than the rest. Thus the Chaconne is a fine
introductory work; the Wind Quintet has an outstanding first
movement; the Sixth Symphony is a work imbued with a peculiar mixture of serenity and sarcasm; the Motets are of particular interest to those who already know their Carl Nielsen
well; the Flute Concerto is a characteristic work although perhaps not quite as consistent, stylistically, as the Clarinet Concerto; the Violin Concerto and the First Symphony, finally, are
both altogether charming and vibrant pieces, but the Symphony,
of course, is not yet particularly representative of the stylistic
uniqueness of the later works.
1892- Symphony
No. r, G Minor, Op. 7. Danish State
Radio Symphony Orchestra, Thomas Jensen, cond.
LONDON LI. 635. 12 -in.
1903
Helios Overture, Op. 17. Danish State Radio Symphony Orchestra, Erik Tuxen, cond. LONDON LS 653.
to-in.
1906- Maskarade, Overture to the Comic Opera. Danish
State Radio Symphony Orchestra, Thomas Jensen,
cond. LONDON LL 1143. 12 -in.
Maskarade, excerpts. Danish State Radio Symphony
Orchestra, Thomas Jensen, cond. LONDON LD 9156.
I o -in.
191t- Symphony No. 3: Sinfonia espousing, Op. 27.
Danish State Radio Symphony Orchestra, Erik Tuxen,
cond. LONDON LL coo. 12 -in.
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 33 *. Yehudi
Menuhin; Danish State Radio Symphony Orchestra,
Mogens Wöldike, cond. RCA VICTOR LHMV 22.
-
I
2-in.
1916- Symphony
No. 4: Det Uudslukkelige (The Inextinguishable), Op. 29. Danish State Radio Symphony
Orchestra, Launy Grpndahl, cond. RCA VICTOR LHMV
1 006.
12 -in.
Chaconne for Piano, Op. 32. Ellegaard, piano. LONDON LD 9065. 10 -in.
1922-Symphony No. 5, Op. 50 *. Danish State Radio Symphony Orchestra, Thomas Jensen, cond. LONDON LL
1143. 12 -in.
Quintet for Wind Instruments, Op. 54 (three recordings). Copenhagen Chamber Wind Quintet, MER12 -in.
CURY 15046.
Copenhagen Wind Quintet,
LONDON LL 734. 12 -in. New Art Wind Quintet,
CLASSIC ED. 2001. 12 -in.
925
Symphony No. 6: Sinfonia semplice. Danish State
Radio Symphony Orchestra, Thomas Jensen, cond.
MERCURY 10137. 12 -in.
926 -Concerto for Flute and Orchestra. Jespersen; Danish
State Radio Symphony Orchestra, Thomas Jensen,
cond. LONDON LL 1124. I2 -in.
1928-Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra, in F, Op. 37*
(two recordings) . Cahuzac; Copenhagen Royal Opera
Orchestra, J. Frandsen, cond. COLUMBIA ML 2219.
to-in. Erikson; Danish State Radio Symphony Orchestra, Mogens Wöldike, cond. LONDON LL 1124. 12 -in.
1929 -Three Motets for Mixed Chorus a cappella, Op. 55.
Danish State Radio Madrigal Choir, Mogens Wöldike,
cond. LONDON LL 1030. 12 -in.
1931
Commotio, for Organ, Op. 58. Georg Fjelrad, organ.
LONDON LL 1030. 12 -in.
'The opus numbers do not always follow the chronological
order of composition.
-
t
-
1
-
30
while his strong personal style is unmistakably apparent in
many of his works, some are almost devoid of it, and seem
tame and ordinary. This is partly due to the fact that Nielsen composed a great deal of music for specific occasions.
Although he wrote always with the greatest sincerity and
integrity, there were projects such as compiling, harmonizing, and, in part, composing the music for a new series of
song books and hymnals for school use ( which Nielsen carried out in collaboration with the Danish musicologist
Thomas Laub), or the composition of a new national anthem ("Der er et yndigt Land"). In such projects the emphasis was on doing a practical, serviceable, professional
job; they did not afford an opportunity for being an avantgardiste.
It is only rather recently that Nielsen's music has been
recorded in any quantity, but no sooner did the records
reach the public than his popularity began to grow steadily.
Nielsen wrote two operas and over a dozen pieces of incidental music to various plays, six symphonies and many
other orchestral works, three concertos ( violin, flute, and
clarinet ), a great many chamber and solo works for different
instruments, and an impressive number of songs and other
vocal works, both solo and ensemble, but his complete LP
discography, is still very small, although it is growing.
THERE ARE many latter -day composers whose urge toward
stylistic originality causes them to become utterly cerebral
their music loses all true spontaneity and elemental drive.
There are others who in their anxiety to please forsake
artistic integrity and mix into their works of approved
and "audience tested" musical devices to achieve success.
Lasting art generally lies between extremes. It is less
spectacular and obvious than the originality -at- any -price
school and not as smooth and bland as the music with built in audience appeal. Carl Nielsen chose the middle road: he
did not need to strain toward originality. It developed
naturally because he was a great, sensitive, sincere musician
with a sound creative imagination, and he retained a
humble and unpretentious attitude toward his art throughout his life.
-
s
.
ENCORES
lit 'r THE SrouY of Lriens Dlusitian, passes all,
who had given forth that by his Musick he could
drive men into what affections he listed, being
required by llwuus King of Uenmarke to put his
skill in practice. lee with his harp or l'olyeord
L!lra expressed such elfectuall melody and harmony in t he variety of changes in severall Keyes,
and in such excellent Fugg'n and sprightly :lyres,
that his Auditors began first to ht- moved with
some strange passions; hut ending his excellent
voluntary with some choice Fancy upon this
Phrygian Moot. the Kings passions were altred
and excited to that height, that he fell upon his
most trusty friends which were scare him, and
slew some of theta with his fist for lackt- of another
wclgxm, which our Jlttsitian perceiving ended with
the sober 1)orick: the King came to himselfe and
nu ch lamented what he had done.
From John Hayford: _-i Ilreefe Introduction to the
,Skill of 3luxiek for Song and 1-ioll, London, 1654.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Report from Britain
Yorkshiremau in Festival Hall
by ROBERT CHARLES MARSH
A. BRIGGS, the flying Yorkshireman of the speaker
trade, is planning to bring to New York his "Sound Reproduction, A Non -Technical Demonstration," which twice this
season has packed a capacity audience of three thousand
into London's Royal Festival Hall and has been well attended in smaller auditoriums elsewhere in Britain. If this
interest holds up, Britain, with a catalogue of high quality
long -playing records finally available, is about ready for a
high fidelity boom, purchase tax or no purchase tax.
Mr. Briggs's own report on the first session ( last November ) has appeared in his distinctive style in the
Gramophone, so I shall limit my remarks to the second
performance which was held in May. Speaker equipment in
use was ( naturally! ) five of Mr. Briggs's Wharfedale systems, one of them consisting of only two eight -inch drivers,
and the others of three to four units mounted in the familiar Briggs corner reflex enclosure. Because of problems
encountered in the Festival Hall, but not in living rooms,
these were all specially reinforced, and two departed from
the usual sand -filled panel construction and were lined with
tiles one inch thick. Early in the session Mr. Briggs demonstrated the effect of this on the resonance, pounding
emphatically on the enclosures with a large wooden mallet.
"I hope my name will go down in history," he added, as
the first man to test loudspeakers with a hammer." Feeding
the speakers were four Acoustical Quad II amplifiers connected in parallel, driven by two Ferranti pickups mounted
on Garrard transcription turntables.
In the old days, when no one expected a recording to be
anything but a miniature of the real thing, playing a tape of
a chorus and orchestra in
the same concert hall
where the original performance took place and
at the identical levels
would have seemed pure
lunacy. The fact that Mr.
Briggs was able to do this
and have everyone accept
it calmly, as if direct comparison were, in fact, the
going standard of judging
recorded sound, shows
how far we have come in
this specialty since the
close of the war.
Thus the main course
in Mr. Briggs's sound feast was Vaughan WilG.
AUGUST 1955
hams' This Day as played by the BBC Symphony and sung
by a double chorus, all under Sir Malcolm Sargent, on January 19 and recorded on thirty -inch tape by EMI engineers,
who noted the levels in the score so that they could be
reproduced exactly in the playback. I think it must be regarded as a success. Certainly the effect was different from
that of a chorus and orchestra on the stage, but the large
masses of sound were full, spacious, and (the hardest thing
of all) produced without apparent distortion or strain.
What loss of presence could be felt was due to the fact that
the speakers were arranged in a line, rather close together,
and taking up perhaps a third of the arc of the stage. Therefore the chorus, which one expected to come from the
entire width of the back of the hall, just as one expected the
orchestra to come from all over the stage, became, in fact, a
narrow sound source. Further, the low resonances of the
chorus seemed somehow diminished, and there was less
solidity and ring than the original must have had.
Very good but not verisimilitude is, in fact, the over -all
judgment for the session as a whole. Mr. Briggs had live
harpsichord, piano, organ, and chorus on hand for test
matching. The harpsichord in reproduction was excellent,
just a bit short of perfect. The Wharfedale version of a
piano was beautiful sound, but lacked the brightness and
full sonority of a real Steinway heard a moment later, even
in works calling for no great weight of piano tone. The
organ matched well, when lighter registration was used, but
no effort was made to match the speakers against a real
thirty foot pipe. (I wondered what a large folded horn
would have been able to do.) The chorus was quite lovely
over the speakers, but
again lacked the fullness
and bass of the living
voices.
A part of the session
was given to playing
commercial recordings at
volume levels appropriate
to the hall. Mr. Briggs's
contention, that this is
the test of a disk (reviewers please note! ) although open to debate,
certainly is justifiable in
that anything which can
take the amplification
necessary to fill a hall of
three thousand seats has
Continued on page 84
31
The
science of music in ancient China
by F. A
.
KUTTNER
Finding in antiquity something for modern acoustical experts to marvel
at is what Dr. Kuttner loves best. Currently he is at work on a record
embodying most of what is known about music of the ancient Greeks.
-
particularly pure
TODAY'S great interest in sounds
and beautiful sounds
for their own sake may strike
some people as a thing completely new. Of course, it is
not. Indeed, it furnishes us a rare link with an incredibly
remote portion of the civilized human past. It is a technical
link and a musical one as well, however incomplete and
fragmentary. As our century dawned, there were left only
a few men who were skilled in playing the instruments of
ancient China and who retained a clear conception of the
nation's great musical tradition. So far as I know, they died
in recent years, before their performances could be preserved in good recordings. Now we are facing the difficult
task of reconstructing, on a theoretical basis, the instrumental techniques, the sound phenomena and musical traditions involved.
Reconstruction of the technical link is making progress.
The instruments themselves we have been able to study and
test and marvel at. They are worth marveling at. The
people of China's pre- historic and early historical periods
achieved a precision in the acoustics of tone -production and
in instrumental standards which compares very favorably
with what our contemporary sound -engineers, with all their
equipment, have been able to do. Their mastery was all
but incredible.
In order to understand this development, and the compelling urge of the ancient scientists towards such perfection, we must remember a few basic facts pertaining
to most of the ancient Asian cultures:
First, music is one of the oldest pure sciences of these
cultures, correlated to, and simultaneously developed
with, their astronomy, astrology, and mathematics.
Second, all the high civilizations of Asian antiquity
had very elaborate cosmological philosophies which tried
to explain all phenomena in the universe as correlated appearances of one and the same cosmic unity. In these
systems music and musical sound were seen as being
governed by the same laws which guide the heavenly
bodies, the seasons, human destinies and the like.
Third, consequently, there could be only one kind of
true music and musical tones: the one that was in perfect
harmony and agreement with the laws of cosmic order.
With such philosophical concepts guiding the social
and spiritual life of a people, the permanent search for
the ideal tone -system and musical instrument became a
matter of supreme importance. If the musical system was
not in harmony with cosmic order, all kinds of disasters
and natural catastrophes may befall the nation. Earthquakes, floods, droughts, attacks by barbarian neighbors,
political corruption, and tyrannic government, were attributed in legendary tradition and in realistic chronicles
to a music that was corrupted and out of tune with the
universe. In the annals of many early rulers we find that
at the beginning of their reign they "ordered the prime
minister to bring the music in order." Other semi- legendary reports state that kings or dynasties fell victims to
revolutions caused by a corrupted musical system.
It is obvious that such beliefs and traditions were
formed by a queer admixture of superstitions, near- primitive mysticism, and erroneous principles of causality. Less
obvious are the truth and fundamental wisdom hidden in
Resonator and tuningflange cast into bell's mouth. After casting. additional filing was done along the edges to the right.
Early bell (perhaps from Middle Chow period, 946-771 B.C.)
with tuning -nocks (left) foreshadowing today's tuning-fork design.
-
32
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
those cosmological systems, but they may be found and
tested by any number of experiments. Ten years ago, when
I still enjoyed malicious psychological tricks, I used to
present to gatherings of friends and small lecture audiences
a thesis which is a modification of the famous Macchia vellian statement and a true interpretation of ancient
Chinese thought on the subject: "Tell me what kind of
music your nation is producing, and I'll tell you what
kind of government it has." I always scored a good
laugh, at first, because everybody immediately thought of
some questionable music in some Western nation other
than his own. But when I called the attention of the
French, English, Americans, etc., in the group to some of
their own national composers of the highly controversial
contemporary type, most of them usually got distinctly
annoyed.
What was this ideal cosmological music system of the
Chinese and how did they try to drive it ever closer to
perfection? It was, from all the evidence collected so far,
an allocation of 12 semitones within the compass of the
octave, derived from a circle of 12 consecutive pure fifths,
the same way our Western system of the 12 major or
minor keys is built up (C, G, D, A, E, B, F-sharp, etc., until
C is reached again after the 12th step). As mentioned, the
fifths were acoustically pure, measuring 702 cents each.'
Mathematically, the interval of the fifth is represented by
the simple numerical ratio 2:3. (Two tones of 200 and
3O0 cycles respectively will produce this interval; stop a
violin string at two thirds of its full length, and the stopped
tone will be a fifth higher than the unstopped string.)
The first Chinese tone -system was developed by a series
of 12 bamboo pitch pipes, fashioned after the principle
of 2:3 division: each of two "neighboring" pitch pipes
was two thirds the length of the previous one, occasionally
doubling the size of a pipe in order to transpose its pitch
one octave lower. (The mathematical ratio for the interval of the octave is 1:2.) It is not known when this first
system actually became part of China's musical tradition.
The definition of intervals in cents is a logarithmic method introduced by the
English physicist A. J. Ellis in the 1880s, for high -precision measuring' of
micro -intervals. 100 cents represent one semitone, 200 cents a major second,
300 cents the minor third, 700 cents the fifth, accordingly 12 semitones, i. e.
the octave, measure 1200 cents, all of them in the modern Western intonation of equal temperament (which is a slightly corrupted compromise
between various methods of pure mathematical intonation). As shown above,
the pure acoustical fifth measures 702 cents, the fifth in equal temperament
only 700 cents.
It may, or may not, reach far back into the nation's prehistory, because in West Asia this system was known and
used around, or before, 3500 B. C. in Sumer. My findings
would suggest that the Chinese acquired this knowledge
from West Asia some time between 2000 and 1600 B. C.
Unfortunately, the principle of 2:3 division, though it
works with a high degree of acoustical precision for
strings, cannot easily be applied to pitch pipes. Two pipes
of the same inner diameter do not produce a pure fifth,
even if one measures two thirds of the length of the second.
There is a slight difference in pitch which keeps accumulating with every consecutive step. The last and twelfth
tube, then, will be very severely off pitch. In order to
overcome these differences, the diameter of the tubes
must be reduced as the pipes get shorter. Now, even
in a primitive or beginning civilization, the length
of bamboo pipes can be easily manipulated, but not
the diameter, which is determined by natural growth.
Furthermore, the proportional decrease of tube diameters
is a tricky mathematical problem which was still incompletely solved in the middle of the nineteenth century in
European organ building.
In addition to this difficulty, the ancient Chinese realized
that the method of embouchure and lip -pressure influences the pitch of every pipe and pipe player individually;
and finally they found that bamboo is a very perishable
material, subject to breakage, humidity, and decay, all of
which made it a poor medium for the preservation of
standard pitches.
Sometime between 1700 and 1400 B.C. the art of bronze
casting became known in China, probably introduced by
craftsmen coming from Persia or some other territory in
West Asia. Soon the Chinese artisans and music
scientists turned to casting bronze bells in complete scale
sets, up to seven in a series, and in a great variety of shapes,
sizes and ornamental decors. The earliest of these specimens
found in excavations can be assigned to the fourteenth or
thirteenth centuries B.C.
Casting bronze bells to a preconceived musical pitch is a
task of terrifying difficulties. Think of some of the problems involved
composition of the alloys; size and
weight of the bells; form and width; location of the bell's
sound opening; thickness of the metallic walls; form and
Some of the oldest known bronze bells, dating from Shang dynasty,
14th -i3th Centuries B. C. Holes were punched to flatten the pitch.
The dating of this beautifully ornamented cast bronze bell is
in debate. It may come from the Middle Chou period, 946-771 B. C.
-
1
2
3
5
AUGUST 1955
33
A perfect ,-.%ample of a Pi Disk, probably dating Jro,,, i/- sixth
.v unrous jade.
century B. C., beautifully carted from a piece
f
fixing of the handle or other provision for suspension.
Small wonder that the proper pitch was rarely hit in the
casting process itself. A separate tuning procedure had to
follow, and it is here that we find the first evidence of
the amazing scientific skills and techniques of ancient
China. Wings and tongue -shaped protrusions are added
to the shape of the original casting mould, and then these
protrusions are ground or filed down to raise too -low
pitches until the desired intonation is reached. A much
more complex problem is the flattening of too -high
pitches, because any decrease of sonorous matter tends to
raise the pitch. The Chinese solved this problem by
grinding away matter from the bells' large surfaces at certain critical points where the acoustical vibration nodes
are located, or by punching holes into the bell body at
these points. As a consequence, the bell's elasticity was
raised, thus yielding a lower pitch (provided the loss of matter in this process did not outweigh the flattening effect!).
If the hole were just a tiny bit too big, the pitch would
get too low and the bell would he spoiled for good.
It did not take the Chinese scientists and sound -engineers very long to find out that though bronze bells
were a lot better than the unreliable bamboo pipes, they
were still very far from being ideal standards for invariable
pitch. All bronze bells produce a number of harmonic
overtones and non- harmonic partials which add certain
"impurities" to the ideally "pure" tone. Also, bronze
bells develop patination and finally corrosion as time goes
by, affecting the surfaces and interior molecular structure
of the bells, thus gradually destroying their true pitches
and sonorous qualities. In their search for the ideal sonorous material they finally found the last and definite answer
-which is still good in 1955 A.D.- stone.
Probably as early as the sixteenth century B.C. the
ancient physicists and mathematicians experimented with
various substances, mainly limestone, marble, nephrite,
and jade. The earliest specimens of sonorous stones known
so far may go hack as far as 1600 B.C. They already show
an approximation to a pentagonal form which was to hecome tradition in later centuries, and an incised ornamentation of cultic symbolism. The next find, chronologically, is from the Shang dynasty period and may be dated
as early as the fourteenth century B.C. Here the traditional pentagon is fully developed and the stylized tiger furnishes proof of a major acoustical and artistic achievement:
the scientist -lapidaries knew already how to calculate in advance the effect of the carved ornamentation on the pitch.
And now comes the great surprise for our research.
The Royal Ontario Museum of Archæology in Toronto
possesses 18 sonorous stones which were found in
the Princes of Han tombs near Lo -Yang in North
Honan Province. The circumstances of the find make it
clear that the 18 stones belonged to probably six different
sets of 16 stones each; accordingly, 78 stones were missing
lost or left behind undiscovered. I tested the 14 best
specimens, which were in perfect or near -perfect condition,
with high- precision frequency measuring equipment that
permits accuracy within one cent (r /too of a semitone).
The results were sensational: all stones were in perfect
Pythagorean intonation, i. e., derived from a circle of pure
fifths of 702 cents each, and the intonation of all
of them was precise within 2 -4 cents of mathematically
correct pitch. (The best -trained professional musicians of
our century cannot distinguish pitch differences below 3
or 4 cents in the frequency range represented by these
stones. And until about ten years ago we did not possess
electronic instruments precise enough to measure pitch
differences smaller than 4 -5 cents).
As the stones are odd pieces from various (up to six
or more) sets and still true to the same Pythagorean intonation, it follows that they were all intoned to the
same sacred standard pitches and hence at will interchangeable within various sets. This is a condition not
frequently met by the instruments of our modern symphony orchestras, where most of the units have to be
re -tuned before and during every performance. Some of
the Toronto stones show circular marks from a grinding
process which was applied for precise and definite tuning.
The tombs of the Princes of Han were closed between
45o and 230 B.C. according to the latest archeological
opinions. This gives us a dating for the stones of 230 B.C.
or earlier. My own investigations have convinced me that
these lithophones were made between Continued on page 8i
-
Earliest perfect sonorous stone known. It was tuned and decorated
(with a tiger) during the Shang dynasty, at least 3000 years ago.
With the exception of the picture opposite this box, all photographs for this article were taken by the author. The photographs on pages 32 and 33 are used by courtesy of the Royal
Ontario Museum of Archaeology in Toronto; the photograph
at the top of this page is used by courtesy of the Metropolitan
Museum of Art, New York; the photograph across the page is
from China Reconstructs, No. 4 Peking, 1952.
34
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
by IRVING M. FRIED
iAAM.i.N
1211:1:1111111
Zti14I
%%
hat
Oil Call
HOW LOW should amplifier distortion be? Most
manufacturers today, faced with competition, are feverishly
working, either in their laboratories or in their advertising
departments (sad to say, the ratio is about 5o -5o) to reduce
distortion. Everyone, at least in the quality field, is now talking about "unmeasurable" distortion. After routine checks of
most of today's amplifiers and preamplifiers, before recommending them to his customers, the writer has found that
very, very few units have no distortion. But when this is
pointed out, the selfsame manufacturer who claimed "unmeasurable" distortion, will say, and in many cases actually
believe it:
1. The ear can't hear the kind of distortion you are
measuring," or
2. "You ought to recalibrate your test equipment," or
3. "Since records, pickups, microphones, and loudspeakers
are so bad, anyway, it really doesn't matter whether distortion is .1 %, or ro %, or even 5Orß in certain cases," or
4. "Look at the discount we're giving you ...."
In all justice to mortal manufacturers, extreme low
distortion levels exist in very few of today's products,
it is
for very long
everything is just too variable. And
possible to become adjusted to and to prefer certain kinds
of distortion. For instance, we all know the people who
prefer a juke-box bass to clean fundamental bass, or those
who prefer a screaming treble (which can be shown to
consist of enormous amounts of intermodulation products)
to actual string- sound.
Be that as it may, the writer has been running his own
private tests of people's reactions to varying degrees of
amplifier distortion over the last several years. Whenever a
customer entered who said he knew nothing about high
fidelity, "just wanted to listen to music," he was carefully
guided into listening to two amplifiers in the same price record, cartrange, using identical associated equipment
ridge, speaker ( all of which had substantially higher
distortion than either of the two amplifiers). He was then
asked to voice a preference between the two systems, and to
tell why. In virtually every case, the customer would prefer
the one with lower measured amplifier distortion, because it
was "sweeter sounding," "clearer," "not so tinny," etc.
Quite similar reports have come from some of the top
amplifier laboratories, such as McIntosh, Bro ciner, Acro, and
-
-
-
AUGUST 1955
w
.AA
111N 1111'111m
iIi ulOut
it
.
. .
others. In effect, these reports all say that the ear is, when
unprejudiced, a remarkable test instrument, able to pick a
condition of lesser distortion from greater when it and
its associated mind are given a real chance to evaluate the
differences.
There are today two commonly accepted methods of
measuring distortion as it affects hearing
SMPE
intermodulation method, and the CCIF first -order difference-tone intermodulation method. Both have their proponents. The two should, when fairly used and interpreted,
correlate, since both test the essential "linearity" of an
amplifier. The methods used experimentally by the writer
were the SMPE intermodulation tests.
Certain experimental evidence seems to indicate that the
ear is particularly irritated by the kind of distortion that
can originate in the earlier stages of amplification
i.e., in
the preamplifier. Today, one school of thinking insists
that .5eí of intermodulation distortion in a phono -preamplifier is much worse than 1.5!'f in the output stage.
Everyone is familiar with the theory of feedback in power amplifiers, how it helps in reducing distortion; no high
quality amplifier is made commercially today without it.
Until recently, most authorities considered the beneficial
work of feedback to be unnecessary in preamplifiers-dis tortion there isn't great enough to worry about, they said.
There is now a state of rethinking about preamplifiers
the literature is profuse with articles on the subject -and
the searcher after the very minimum of distortion is advised
that he can find several manufacturers offering complete
feedback preamplifiers which actually may bring distortion
down to "unmeasurable." The all- feedback preamplifier is,
then, the preamplifier for the man who detests distortion.
What about amplifier stability? This, too, is a subject
currently controversial, though everyone is a little further
along than just a few years back, when a famous transformer manufacturer told a gentleman who had used the
manufacturer's circuit and got a beautiful low frequency
mess, that "a little instability might be a good thing." Now
one manufacturer insists that his amplifier "won't ring
under any circuit condition." Other manufacturers attack
each other, saying, in effect, "Mine is just perfect; yours
just oscillates." And certain circuitry, particularly where the
manufacturer seems to be giving you a big bargain, has to
-
-the
-
-
35
have either good stability or good distortion characteristics,
not both.
If choice there must be, the writer agrees that absolute
stability is even more important than lower distortion, for:
z. An unstable amplifier in the bass region may "motorboat" (put -put at certain settings of bass control). At best,
it will tend to muddy any sudden bass pulses, and put an
unhealthy and continuous pulsation on woofers.
2. An amplifier having treble oscillations may blow out
certain super tweeters. In any case, treble transients will be
clouded over, and your lovely tweeter may reproduce nothing but an unpleasant overlay of screech.
3. When an amplifier oscillates in any fashion, part of its
total power is devoted to the oscillation, severely limiting
the power available for musical reproduction.
On this whole matter of stability, the writer would like
to relate an incident that he wouldn't believe, frankly, if he
hadn't been present. On a listening test of two preamplifiers, both complete- feedback units, with identical intermodulation measurements, and equalization within 1/2 db
of each other, it was noticed by the four critical listeners
present that one preamplifier made records sound a bit
more harsh than the other, and definitely "broke up" more.
It was then decided to investigate with instruments to see
whether there could be any other difference between the
two preamplifiers. Using the square wave (a laboratory device to measure performance on things that affect an amplifier in the same manner as music), the testers noticed that
both preamplifiers were the same except that the offending one had a slight oscillation on top of the oscilloscope trace of the square wave. From the placement of the oscillation, it was determined that it was occurring at about
6o,000 cycles. After correcting the circuit malfunction, and
thus the oscillation, the testers listened further, to find that
any oscillathe preamps now sounded identical! Moral
tion will adversely affect listening pleasure!
The various methods of measuring stability are too involved for the scope of this article. However, you are advised
to steer clear of amplifiers which in their literature sometimes
-
-
JACKETS BY RODRIGUES
irte StIeine Tacbtmu5ix
hint that they might be unstable under certain conditions.
Particularly if you are not looking for a bargain, but have
come to realize that good amplifiers must be in the upper
price brackets, you should insist on detailed information on
stability.
Aside from elementary circuit mistakes, the stability of a
particular amplifier is almost entirely dependent on the
quality of the output transformer. A good output transformer is expensive, so the writer has always cautioned
people to steer away from the amplifiers that seem to give
you just as much for one half the cost
such amplifiers
almost invariably have either high distortion or very poor
stability. No one is sadder to behold than the phonophile
-
who has just spent all sorts of money on an expensive
speaker, to get rid of the boom and screech of his former
speaker only to be told by a testing laboratory that it was
his oscillating amplifier that had been at fault all the time.
More amplifiers suffer from problems of stability than any
other problem so, take care!
"This is fine," you may say, "But what if I have already
bought my dream amplifier, that has in theory an ample
power reserve, good frequency response, exceedingly low
distortion, and admirable stability? How can I try to keep
it in good condition, in my home? Are there any tell -tale
signs of deterioration that I might be able to correct ?"
The following suggestions are not intended to be a repair
guide. Actual amplifier repair is a job for competent service
personnel, with proper equipment and know -how. Nor are
the suggestions an adequate substitute for periodic tests on
distortion-analyzing equipment. For instance, the intermodulation analyzer is the most potent diagnostic guide
your local audio specialist (let us hope you have one) can
employ. It is the one sure way you have of knowing
whether your amplifier is meeting its original specifications
of performance. Use it, even if it means shipping your
amplifier back to the factory every year. Unfortunately, the
human ear, if it is buffeted enough, can come to accept distorted sound as "right." The "ear" mentioned below is,
necessarily, one that hasn't been worn down by a steadily
deteriorating amplifier.
One of your most potent diagnostic tools at home, then
can be your own ears. The ear can establish by direct comparison the lesser of two degrees of distortion. It can also
hear bass or treble instability, spurious noises, and general
sonic hash. Let us begin with symptoms and cures in the
preamplifier.
Every reputable amplifier has an instruction manual.
Read it the manufacturer knows his own product's idiosyncracies, weak points, and cures better than you do. For
instance, he will tell you where the "hum-balance control"
is. He may even mention juggling tubes from one socket
position to another (make sure the same tube type was in
each before you interchange) . Generally, a noisy (hummy,
hissy, or microphonic) tube is better in a later stage, i. e.,
farther away from the input sections. One precaution
your preamplifier has DC on the filaments, turn off the set
before you move tubes around.
If you have noisy volume- or tone -controls, you can
often quiet them with radio servicemen's preparations, or,
Continued on page 86
in a pinch, with an
-
-
-
-if
36
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
No one's going
to emancipate ME
by CHRISTOPHER FAYE
The hardy pioneers of high fidelity lived dangerously, and gloried
in the hazards that beset them. Audiophiles were he -men, in those
days. Now, however, a sinister threat imperils a Great Tradition.
THERE is a theory that high fidelity is simply technology's latest and most picturesque attempt to achieve
mankind's subjugation. Which may be true, but remember
that technology is not a self -willed metal monster, newspaper cartoons to the contrary. Technology is something we
do to ourselves, and this explains why it is sometimes a
little zany. Eventually, of course, any aspect of technology
is taken over by business. After that it is governed by
round commercial principles, applied hard-headedly and
embodying good, horse or common sense.
Now if there is anything I abominate .
no, I had
better put th'.t some other way. Common sense is very
helpful inder_d in reading detergent advertisements. I favor
it, too, in labor- management disputes. And I think it is a
great thing for the governors of the New York Stock Exchange. But I don't want it in high fidelity, and I don't
think you do either. Nobody does, except a crew of oafish
parvenus or come-lately's, who have nothing on their side
but numbers. It is time to draw the line, and it is to this
end that I have compiled the following list of do's and
dons s for manufacturers, dealers, and aficionadi, or should
that be aficionados? In either case, it means you. Let us
.
begin with
...
Manufacturers
.
....
r. Put a few more knobs on your equipment.
Iis getting
so that it is possible to compensate everything correctly
before the selection is half over.
This indicates very poor planning.
With just a little more attention
to detail, correct compensation
could be rendered impossible until
the logical moment the closing
measure.
2. Whenever possible, publish
manuals bearing the title "High Fidelity for the Layman" or "What
Every Grade School Child Knows
About High Fidelity" or some other
such enticing title. Needless to say.
manual writers are to be informed
that their remuneration will be directly proportional to the number
of technical obscurities therein con-
-
AUGUST 1955
0
DISTORTION
DISTORTION
OISTORTION
METER
rained. Of course, this booklet is to be distributed to people
who think an ohm is what there is no place like.
3. On the other hand, insure that all technical literature
on your equipment is phrased in hi -glo advertising idiom,
not colorless engireering terminology. This will brighten
the lives of people who write asking what your equipment's
technical specifications are.
4. Great strides in varying record speeds were made after
the war. What has happened in recent years? The manufacturers have lethargically rested on their mere four speed
laurels. Certainly American ingenuity and inventiveness
a.e not to be confounded by crass, practical limitations!
Now that sundry turntables and changers have been developed to handle four speeds, now that record libraries
have again been built up, what about revolutionizing the
record industry once again by declaring all of the old speeds
obsolete? Is the time not ripe for the .0000r -inch groove,
on the counterclockwise record, to be played from the inside
out? Get with it, diskeries!
5. It appeared until lately that tape recording was to become the main standard -bearer of high fidelity's Great
Tradition. There was truly great promise in the early introduction of four recording speeds, coupled with each company's prompt acceptance of its duty to invent a highly
individual system of equalization. Unfortunately these
initial gains have been squandered. Soulless radicals have
seized control of the industry, and
through a series of sinister machinations have standardized the prerecorded tape playback speed. Even
now they are viciously striking at
what is generally considered the
conservatives' last stronghold the
equitable principle that it should be
impossible for tape recorded on one
make of machine to be played back
on any other make. It is indeed
difficult not to view developments
such as these with extreme consternation.
The paramount issue now is
clear. Will the conservative element, now sadly reduced to the
0000
OUTPUT
WATTS
OUTPUT
oíWIER
-
37
status of an underground movement, prove able to regain
its rightful control? Recent peripheral skirmishes such as
the conservatives' attempt to improve binaural techniques
by providing different manufacturers with inspiringly
varied systems of head placement, although reminiscent of
past glories, demonstrated a lamentable lack of knowledge
of the devious strategems necessary to success in today's
Machiavellian atmosphere. Indeed, the only positive success
recently achieved, aside from the trifling development of
unco -ordinated rewind and forward speeds, to assure "tape
stretch," has been the rather whimsical appelative triumph
which resulted in one- hundred -pound recording machines
being equipped with handles for midgets and designated as
"portable." At least this demonstrates that our forces, even
though temporarily in retreat, have not lost their spirit.
will have to do better than that, or
But we
I mean you
the old tape-salad days will be only a memory.
6. However, you will be pleased to learn that a method
finally has been discovered to bypass the need for uniform
speed in tape reels. This is accomplished by a new machine
which stretches the tape out to its complete length of
twelve or eighteen hundred feet, and a transport mechanism
which carries the various heads along the tape's entire path.
Since these units were first tested in vacant elevator shafts
in the Empire State Building, unfortunate publicity was
attracted when several people, mistaking the transport
mechanism for an elevator, plunged to their deaths.* However, no logical criticism of these units now remains with the
introduction of a marking system which positively identifies them as not being elevators.
-
Dealers
-
2. Govern the length of your pre -customer approach
duties so that your customer is either forced into a state of
upright exhaustion or on to one of your enclosures.
3. In either event your customer is putty. If he is not in
a state of zero sales resistance from physical exhaustion, he
is sitting on one of your easily scratched mahogany enclosures. If the latter be the case, your immediate examination
of the enclosure can be accompanied with sufficient obvious
consternation to foredoom any possible sales resistance.
4. Demonstrate all equipment with popular records for
the classical enthusiast and with classical records for the
popular enthusiast. For the dedicated jazzman, always play
Guy Lombardo.
5. If your customer is able to trouble you with
questions, the volume is obviously too low. Remember, it
isn't high fidelity unless the soles of their feet tingle.
6. If there seems to be any danger of a customer's actually
deciding upon a particular component, it is because you
have failed to demonstrate the products of a sufficient number of manufacturers. However if, even after multiple
demonstrations, your customer perversely continues in his
eccentric decision to purchase a certain component, subtler
tactics should be employed. The technique certainly both
most advanced and likely of success is (or soon will be)
known to the trade as the "Faye Principle of Customer Indecision When Confronted with a Constant Variable." To
illustrate: assume your customer has decided upon a certain loudspeaker. All you need do is prepare an array
consisting of one dozen units of the model selected, in
essentially similar cabinets which look different. Then
simply conduct a demonstration, asking your customer to
compare unit one with unit two, unit two with unit three,
unit three with unit four, etc. Soon he will get into the
spirit of the thing, and indeed may well extend his newly
acquired critical techniques to include a searching analysis
of his own sanity.
t
....
Arrange the demonstration room so that any potential
customer is unable to find any place to sit except on a few
strategically placed, highly polished, mahogany enclosures.
T.
*An interesting sidelight on this tragedy was provided when it was found that
the recording mechanism had been in operation during the fatal fall. The
screams recorded produced some of the best and most realistic high frequency
tapes of the human voice yet created. Due to the difficulty of arranging an
encore, it is expected that these tapes will prove standard for some time.
By way of summary: the demonstration's purpose is to
impress upon the customer the futility of relying upon his
own miserable judgment and the necessity of placing com-
DRAWINGS BY CHARLES RODRIGUES
38
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
plete and slavish reliance upon your repeatedly demonstrated superior wisdom.
7. As a consequence of the correct execution of the preceding step, it is now a simple matter to obtain a certified
check for one thousand dollars. You should tell the customer that you will call him later if you need any more. It is
also recommended that the customer be notified at this time
(even though this announcement may be delayed) that the
proposed system will be of such technical perfection that
its aesthetic value would be ruined by introducing it into
the poor acoustical surroundings that would undoubtedly
be found in his home. However, make it clear that he is to
feel free to come and listen to his system at your store anytime that he feels like it. During business hours, of course.
Consumers
....
A. Consumer -Dealer Relations)
i. Make it a point to appropriate the magazines and
other publications that your dealer has for sale. This is
(
good advertising for the dealer.
2. Take an active part in developing your dealer's techni-
cal ability by insisting upon unusual combinations of com-
ponents being demonstrated.
3. After you have furthered your dealer's education by
having him shift all his speakers into different enclosures,
and by having him completely rewire his demonstration
room, explain that, since you can get a better price through
your brother-in -law who works for a large distributor, you
will be back when you are interested in seeing some more
parts demonstrated.
(B. Consumer -Other Consumer Relations)
i. Since flaws exist in all equipment, approval of a system constitutes a reflection upon your degree of knowledge.
It therefore follows that enjoyment should be equated to
weakness in any discussion of high fidelity.
2. Individuals found enjoying their own systems should
nevertheless be regarded with compassion, as the art is too
new to expect everyone to have acquired the correct degree
of misery.
3. It therefore behooves all true high fidelity advocates
to engage in the missionary work of explaining in detail
AUGUST 1955
the defects in all systems with which they come in contact.
4. Occasionally a system's defects cannot be fully appreciated by the owner, because of his personal lack of critical
discrimination, musical knowledge, character, or intelligence.
It is particularly in these cases that the true high fidelity
enthusiast can be recognized. Regardless of the likelihood
of arousing permanent animosities, he unselfishly and frankly discusses the owner's defects and their probable environmental and geneological causes.
(C. Consumer -Self Relations, or How To Operate Your
Own System)
r. Since current equipment possesses specifications superior to those of the human ear, aural surgery should be
prerequisite to any sensible installation.
2. Construction of a room as near to acoustical perfection
as possible is likewise essential. The bank and the FHA
may be churlish about this. If so, check your neighborhood
for pawnshops. Above one of these you are almost bound
to find a firm that will accommodate you. Be bold -you
expect your income to grow with the years, don't you?
Eventually you will regain custody of your annuity policy.
3. As the human body is not composed of sonically
acceptable materials, its introduction into your "acoustically
superior room" is not to be countenanced.
4. Therefore your only evidence of the system's operation
is to be in terms of the readings obtained from the various
meters, gauges, oscillographs, and other measuring devices
which you have mounted outside your "acoustically superior
room."
5. Since your measuring devices produce the most significant results when the system is utilizing test records, the
reproduction of music is not permissible.
6. All of your measuring devices are to be designed to
register degree of distortion, non -compliance, and other
forms of imperfection. Whether or not these imperfections
are audible to the normal ear or even to your surgically improved ear is irrelevant. The point is that you will be able
to demonstrate conclusively your system's shortcomings.
The most advanced practitioneers, of course, are able to
point out defects which even instruments are too imperfect
to detect. While this is a tremendously gratifying and impressive accomplishment, involving as it does a sort of
intuitive omniscience, those not so gifted can at least install
instrumentation designed to register the degree of distorti n inherent in the meters measuring the system itself.
While the foregoing carries no pretension of all- encompassing thoroughness, it is hoped that it will be found
useful both as an expression of the subject's basic philosophy and as a practical set of field working rules.
39
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40
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
music malzers
ROLAND GELATI
by
THIS BEING the Age of Automation, it was only a matter of time until
someone got around to devising a
machine that would create music automatically and show up the fallible
human instrumentalist for the butterfingered duffer that he is. That machine has now been built and the day
has dawned when we can hear music
untouched by human hands. Down at
the David Sarnoff Research Center, in
Princeton, New Jersey, the celebrated
Dr. Harry F. Olson and a group of
associated engineers have been engaged for several years constructing
the RCA Electronic Music Synthesizer.
It was formally introduced to the
American Institute of Electrical Engineers on January 31, and its accomplishments can now be sampled on
RCA VICTOR LM 1922, a twelve-inch
LP entitled The Sounds and Music of
ties, which he describes as frequency,
intensity, growth, duration, decay,
portamento, timbre, vibrato, and de-
viations. Having isolated these properties, his next job was to design and
have built a set of electronic circuits
that would produce them artificially
and mix them together in any way
desired. Thus far he was not breaking any spectacular new ground.
Electronic instruments have been created in abundance (the electrical organ
is a common example of one), but
all
prior to Dr. Olson's
have
had to be played. RCA's Synthesizer
differs from other electronic instruments in being independent of performers. It produces music accord-
-
-
the RCA Electronic Music Synthesizer.
The record is both impressive and
rather laughable.
Dr. Johnson described this kind of endeavor for all
time when he said: "Sir, a woman
preaching is like a dog's walking on
his hind legs. It is not done well;
but you are surprised to find it done
at all." No one with an ounce of
musical discrimination could say that
these trial runs of RCA's Synthesizer
are particularly well done; but just
to hear music artificially produced by
circuits of vacuum tubes working at
the behest of a coded paper tape is
enough to give you pause. To expect a pause that refreshes would be
asking too much. The dance band,
the piano, the hillbilly ensemble on
this record are all too palpably electronic for genuine musical contentment. They sound like nothing else
than bad imitations of the real thing.
But before laughing LM 1922 off the
turntable, it might be instructive to
play a Berliner Gramophone Record
of 1895. It is always difficult to keep
a straight face when confronted with
first flights like these. Later on, the
early laughs sometimes begin to sound
just a little hollow.
Dr. Olson began his work on the
Synthesizer by analyzing musical tones
and determining their basic properAUGUST 1955
Keyboard of Dr. Olson's Synthesizer.
ing to the signals it receives from a prerecorded paper tape, and
like a
phonograph
it can repeat the same
performance again and again. That
tape is analogous to musical notation;
it embodies tempo, pitch, rhythm,
quality, and phrasing. The code is
different from the one promulgated
by Guido d'Arezzo in the eleventh
century, but it is no less a system of
notation for that.
Why did Dr. Olson spend five years
of his time and $15o,000 of RCA's
money on the Synthesizer? He assured
me, when I visited him earlier this
summer in Princeton, that it was built
for strictly practical purposes. RCA
believes it to be a potentially valuable
source of musical material for records
especially for short pop records,
where its ability to create exotic scales
and sonorities can provide some new,
off-beat enticements in a strongly
competitive market. A new and im-
-
-
-
proved Synthesizer is now being constructed for the Victor Record Division and is due to be installed in Victor's Twenty- fourth Street Studio within a few months. After that, great
things are expected of it. Dr. Olson
and his associates in Princeton realize
that the music synthesized so far has
been something less than awe- inspiring in artistic impact, for the sole
creator of music on RCA's instrument
to date has been an acoustical engineer
(Herbert Belar) and not a musician.
Mr. Belar has had to content himself
with making reasonably accurate copies
of familiar music. When composers
and performers begin to work with the
Synthesizer, creating new combinations of sounds and rhythms, the
people at RCA feel that its scope and
capabilities will become far more evident.
Since building the Synthesizer,
Messrs. Olson and Belar have been
experimenting with a device which
chops off a sliver of recorded music,
one -sixteenth of a second long, and
plays this sliver continuously so that
its tonal properties can be studied at
leisure. With this new sound analyzer,
RCA's engineers expect to find the
key to more successful operation of
the Synthesizer. They maintain that
the Synthesizer can re- create perfectly
any musical sound if only the operator
knows precisely what he wants and
how to code it properly on the paper
tape.
"It won't be long," Dr. Olson
volunteered, "before we shall be able
to achieve a perfect synthesis of
Caruso's voice as it sounds on the old
records. Once this is done, we can
surround the synthesized Caruso rendition of an aria with a synthesized
full orchestra instead of the tinny
studio ensembles of his day. In this
way we can bring an old recording up
to date. But that isn't all. Having
c. orked out the correct code for Caruso's voice, we can then go on to synthesize his singing in music he never
recorded. Why, we could even put
out a synthesized record of Caruso
singing Davy Crockett." At this point
I asked for my hat and fled.
41
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42
For a Good Time,
Anytime-
Play
COLUMBIA'/ RECORDS
"The Sound of Genius"
s "Columbia", ;i,,
t
T.
M.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
Records in I
Reviewed
by
NATHAN BRODER
PAUL AFFELDER
ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN
RAY ERICSON
JAMES HINTON, JR.
J.
F.
INDCOX
Classical Music, listed by composer
Dialing Your Disks
Recitals and Miscellany
Building Your Record Library
CLASSICAL
BACH
E major
Reinhold Barchet, Willi Beh, violins; Pro
Musica String Orchestra (Stuttgart), Walther Davisson, cond.
Vox PL 9150. 12 -in. 55.95.
The special feature of this recording is the
inclusion, for the first time, of all three of
Bach's surviving violin concertos on one
disk. The soloists play pleasantly and tastefully in the fast movements, and rather poetically in the searching slow movements.
But there is an easygoing air about these
performances, and as a result the Vivace of
the Double Concerto, for example. seems
not vivacious enough and the Largo a bit
In the solo concertos, I prefer
draggy.
Heifetz's more vigorous and livelier playing.
N. B.
BACIl
Sonatas for Viola da Gamba and Harpsichord, Nos. , -3
Janos Scholz, viola da gamba; Egida Giordani Sartori, harpsichord.
Vox PL 9010. 12 -in. 55.95.
The first and third of these sonatas are
highly regarded by Spitta, and all three
are
admired by Schweitzer and other writers.
The present reviewer humbly reports that he
does not find the knee -viol the most ravishing of solo instruments, and that to him
for all the good tunes that
these works
can be found in them and their impeccable
workmanship - seem rather humdrum.
They are nicely played by both artists and
well recorded. The balance could have been
improved in those passages where the gam ba, leading for the moment, is covered up
by the harpsichord. There were some faulty
-
AUGUST 1955
S. WILSON
43
5o
The Music Between
The Best of Jazz
53
Folk Music
Wagner on Microgroove, Part II
55
grooves near the end of the first movement
of the G minor on the review disk. N. B.
Concerto for Two Violins in D minor;
Concerto for Violin in A minor; Concerto
for Violin in
ROBERT KOTLOWITZ
JOHN
HOWARD LAFAY
BARTOK
Concerto
for
Piano and Orchestra, No.
3
Monique Haas, piano; RIAS Symphony
Orchestra, Ferenc Fricsay, cond.
tMartint Petite symphonie concertante
Irmgard Helmis, harp; Gerty Herzog. piano;
Silvia Kind, harpsichord; RIAS Symphony
Orchestra, Ferenc Fricsay, cond.
DECCA DL 9774. 12 -in. 53.98.
Frank Martin's Petite symphonie concertante
is
product of a subtle mind coming admirably to grips with the subtle and exacting
problem of composing a symphony for
strings and a solo group of harp, piano, and
harpsichord.
To manage these close -lying
timbres in such a way as to exploit both
their differences and their similarities and
keep the entire sound- picture crystal clear
is no mean feat, and it was no mean feat
for Deutsche Grammophon's engineers to
maintain that clarity throughout the recording. Martin's work is a delight to the ear
and the mind; but when one turns the disk
and experiences the urgency and incandescence of Bartók, one is significantly instructed in the difference between a minor
and a major composer. Mlle. Haas does
very well by the Bartók concerto, though
its solo part can be thrown into stronger
relief without damaging the composer's
A. F.
conception.
a
BARTOK
Concerto for Orchestra
Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy,
cond.
COLUMBIA ML 49'3. 12 -in. $4.98
An able
C. G. BURKE
ROLAND GELATT
performance and
an
extremely
brilliant recording of this celebrated symphony for orchestral virtuosos. It is the
fifth LP version in current catalogues, and
58
59
62
64
-
all of them are good, but the one by Fritz
Reiner
also issued by Columbia (and
probably stxm due for release on the Entre
label)
seems to me the best because it
stresses the line and structure of the work
more than do the others. Ormandy brings
out its color superbly, however, and color
is certainly a major value in a composition
of this kind.
A. F.
BEETHOVEN
Quartets: No. 12, in E flat, Op. 127; No. 13,
it) B flat, Op. 130; No. 14. in C -sharp
minor, Op. 131; No. 15, in A minor,
Op. 132; No. 16,
in
I
Op. 135;
Fugue, in B fiat. Op. ,33
Hungarian Quartet.
ANGEL 3514 -D. Four
513.92.
12 -in.
Great
519.92, or
The records may he bought separately for
$4.98 or 53.48 each, according to the
standard Angel formula. The higher price
in this instance commands a disk inspected
and sealed, plus notes by Maurice Hewitt
and a pocket score of the music recorded.
Quartets No. 12 and 16 are on one record.
35112; the Great !,Igoe follows Quartet
No. 13, for which it was the original finale.
on 35113; and Quartets No. 14 and 15
occupy each an entire disk, 35114 and 35115
respectively.
Thus Angel concludes the most thorough
and thoughtful physical presentation of the
seventeen works specifically composed by
Beethoven for the classic quartet of strings.
The two preceding volumes have been reviewed here [HIGH FIDELITY, January 1955.
May 19551 without enthusiasm for their
musical presentation. Volume III incites a
critical emotion altogether tepid, for what
we hear in it is very good quartet playing.
and a very disappointing statement of the
insides of this viscero-cerebral music. The
outcries are subdued; the pain and exaltation are reproved. The rhapsody of the
Great Fugue is iced. and the C -sharp minor
Quartet, which penetrates all the sensibili-
43
RI-(
ties of man, has been skillfully evirated to a
glossy and complacent equanimity. In the
others, too, Beethoven's passionate confessional has been metamorphosed with the
same address to a salon, serious indeed but
not very, and silken first.
This third volume lias an agreeable, unified and unobtrusive quality in the reproduction of the strings which is always acceptable although it lacks the bite of the
best.
C. G. B.
BEETHOVEN
Sonatas for Piano: No. 8, in C minor
( "Pathétique"), op. i 3; No. 3r, in A-flat,
Op.
iio
Grant Johannesen, piano.
MUSICAL MASTERPIECE. SOCIETY
MMS
52.
Io -in. $1.65.
Twenty -three other LPs contain one or the
other of these, not in such economy of
space and cost. That economy gives an
advantage to this mail -order disk confirmed
by performances of telling and reticent perception, but compromised in some measure
by a piano reproduced not inaccurately but
with a semblance of being elsewhere and
filtered to us in reduction of the power
these sonatas in places must assert. C. G. B.
BEETHOVEN
of the majestic exaltation of
a cosmic
triumph. Excellent sound, but not of the
flattening force that the C minor Symphony
must be able to command at its apices in
the first and last movements.
Whereas the Fourth Symphony, presumably recorded under the same general
conditions but much less unruly In the confinement of the phonograph, emerges with
that presentation of clear detail and clean hewed mass, separate and together, that
distinguishes so many Westminster records
of the orchestra. Sonically this version competes with the André version for Telefunken,
which is hardly in competition interpretatively. The finale and the first movement in
Dr. Scherchen's leadership are as convincing
as we have them anywhere, the first movement especially, in a fastidious discrimination of textures without preciousness or a
betrayal of contrivance. It is the Adagio,
the heart, which falters a bit. Its serene
flow is troubled by a trifle more of stress
on its underlying rhythm than is good for
the ordained other -worldly current:
we
can feel it being propelled. This is not obtrusive, but it is damaging to a version
which otherwise would be called the best.
The Krips and Sold editions, both on London, but each occupying an entire record,
still dispute the leadership.
C. G. B.
-
heard otherwise on LP but not so disposed. And in the case of La Damnation de
Faust, there is no really comparable representation of the score in less -than -complete
form, though there are disks that offer
various purely instrumental excerpts. London has managed to get quite a bit of the
music of Marguérite and Faust on a single
twelve -inch side, and a healthy
if that is
quite the word chunk of Werther on the
turnover. In both operas, Raoul Jobin uses
his strong, not terribly suave voice, with
good sense. As hi -fi Berlioz Fausts go, he
is by all odds the best stylistically: on the
basis of his singing here, a full -dress recording with him would be no displeasure
at all. As Werther, he is less open to compliment.
He lacks the elegance of the
Urania Werther, Charles Richard, though
he has a solider voice in the climaxes. Irma
Kolassi is no paragon either as Marguérite
or Charlotte. Greek by birth and French
by habitat, she sings both roles like a well trained, musicianly concert singer, but not
as if she had ever stepped on a stage, and
with curiously dead tone.
Anatole Fistoulari's conducting is of the
bread -earning variety, the playing of the
-
-
London Symphony suitably responsive. The
recording, quite clear so far as the voices
are concerned, does curiously slight justice
to the scoring of Massenet, leave alone of
Berlioz. No texts, so-so notes.
J. H., Jr.
Symphony No. r, in C, Op. 21
Symphony No. 7, in A, Op. 92
BERLIOZ
La Damnation de Faust (excerpts)
Bamberg Symphony Orchestra, Anon. cond.
(in No. I).
Vienna State Philharmonia,
Jonel Perlea, cond. (in No. 7).
Vox PL 912o. 12 -in. $5.95.
Act II: Sans regret j'ai quitté les riantes campagnes (Faust). Act III: Autrefois un roi de
Thulé (Marguérite); Grand dieu! que vois-je?
BIZET
Les Pécheurs de Perles
(Marguérite); Angeadoré (Marguérite, Faust)
Act IV: D'Amour, ¡ardente flamme (Marguérite); Nature immense (Faust).
Irma Kolassi (ms), Marguérite; Raoul
Jobin (t), Faust. London Symphony Orchestra, Anatole Fistoulari, cond.
Pierrette Alarie (s), Leila; Léopold Simoneau (t), Nadir; René Bianco (b), Zurga:
Xavier Depraz (bs), Nourabad. Elisabeth
Brasseur Choir, Orchestra des Concerts Lamoureux, Jean Fournet, cond.
EPIC SC 6002. Two I2 -in. $9.96.
In all other editions the Seventh Symphony
is alone on two sides. The generous measure
here is effected by having its finale on the
outer band of Side 2, preceding the First
Symphony. A less spirited Seventh has not
been heard. It thuds where it should spin,
and stumbles where it should jump. It is
unfluent and the orchestra is uneven. The
Rumanian conductor has shown decided
ability in public performance, but his records continue to disappoint.
Herr Anon is much more persuasive in
the First Symphony, which is a creditable
piece of playing and recording, although it
will not displace the Karajan and Scherchen
performances for Angel and Westminster,
nor the Pritchard for Epic. In sum, a disk
for those to whom duration is paramount.
C. G. B.
BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 4, in B-flat, Op. 6o
Symphony No. 5, in C minor, Op. 67
Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of London, Hermann Scherchen, cond.
WESTMINSTER WL 5406.
I2 -in. $5.95.
Abhorring rote, Dr. Scherchen makes the
sharp scrutiny of the Fifth Symphony expected of him. But what can remain concealed in music whose hundred thousand
performances have included the concepts.
conscientious or not, of all the prominent
conductors of the last hundred years? The
new interpretation is not an apocalypse,
and the music lovers who anticipated one
will be disappointed in a performance of
firm but familiar virtues in the first three
movements and a quickened finale that
gives the excitement of a cavalcade instead
44
tMassenet: Werther (excerpts)
Act I: Je ne sais si je veille ... 0 nature plein
(Werther). Act II: Qui! ce qu'elle
Lorsque ¡enfant revient (Werther). Act Ill: Letter Aria (Charlotte);
from Ah! mon courage m'abandonne through
N'achevez pas (Charlotte; Werther).
de grace
m'ordonne
...
Irma Kolassi (ms), Charlotte; Raoul Jobin
(t), Werther. London Symphony Orchestra,
Anatole Fistoulari, cond.
LONDON LL t 154.
12
-in. $4.98.
The performances here are fair to a shade
better than middling, the main interest of
this disk being its oddly assorted, if not
quite omnibus, contents. They are all to be
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63
42
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69
69
65
69
68
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69
6r
63
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Les Pécheur. de Perles was Bizets first full -
length opera. Not an immediate success
except with Berlioz, who wrote a favorable
review
it nevertheless stands, as Eugene
Bruck points out in his good background
notes to the new Epic set, as one of the
best "first" operas any composer has produced. Bizet was charged with imitating in
it almost any established opera composer
whose name happened to pop into the mind
of the unresponsive listener Gounod.
Wagner, or Félicien David. The more valid
point, though, is not that the score is in
some ways derivative, but that it is, in ways
that matter more. quite good, if not great.
Very different from Carmen (just in case
there is any advance doubt on that point),
it is a score in which the melodies are
longer and more pure, the declamation less
down -to -earth and more in line with longestablished French lyric usages; a romantic
score in which the sentiment is herbed
with the instrumental and harmonic devices
that were the common coin of nineteenth century French orientalisme.
The most valid complaint against Les
Pécheurs de Perles is its libretto. Set in an
-
-
extremely nonspecific Ceylon (any place East
of Suez would do as well) and an equally
nonspecific antiquity, it has to do with a
love triangle, complicated by much the
same kind of French -distilled Brahminism
that complicates the plot of Lakmé. The
work has variant endings, and the one
used in both current LP recordings leaves
considerable room for doubt. In this con-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
nection, it should be noted that the version
of the text supplied with the Epic set is so
at variance with what is actually sung as to
be of almost no practical use in following
the performance. The libretto furnished
with the Renaissance recording (sX 205),
on the other hand, is quite accurate, aside
from the usual fistful of spelling errors, and
usable. There are differences between the
two performances as recorded, but both
would seem to relate quite closely to the
work as it is done in Paris at the OpéraComique.
The main over-all advantage of the Epic
over the older Renaissance set lies in the
fact that it is on four sides instead of six.
As the heroine, Leila, Pierrette Alarie is,
as she was at the Metropolitan, a neat vocalist, and her delivery of music and words is
that of a thoroughly capable stylist. But her
singing is seldom as communicative, and
never as strikingly lovely as that of Mat tiwilda Dobbs in her best moments for
Renaissance.
Neither is either of the tenors quite ideal.
Léopold Simoneau, who has a small, attractive lyric voice, does not make all the
points he tries for, but he does sing
lyrically, with grace and authentic style. His
Renaissance opposite number, Enzo Seri,
has a basically fine voice, but his
singing, very variable in style, is white and
bleary too much of the time.
The baritones and basses balance each
other. And between the orchestral choral forces (Renaissance uses what is
called the Paris Philharmonic) there is not
much to choose. Jean Fournet's shaping of
the score is that of a soundly routine opera
conductor. René Leibowitz's, for Renaissance, is more vital and exploratory, fresher
in approach (though it may be that some of
his emphases would surprise Bizet), and
generally more provocative.
Both recordings are technically acceptable,
the Epic rather more responsive at the extremes. The perspective of both is that of a
modest but not cramped concert hall.
J. H., Jr.
BIZET
Roma
¡Chabrier: Bourrée fantasque
New York City Ballet Orchestra, Leon
Barzin, cond.
Vox FL 932o. 12 -in. $5.95.
Bizet's most elaborate purely orchestral
composition, Roma (call it a symphony, a
symphonic suite, or what you will), has for
some unexplainable reason had less currency than his charming but teen -age Symphony in C, although it absorbed a good
deal more creative energy and is, on the
whole, a meatier, more rewarding piece.
The associated ballet does not use the long,
developmental Andante section; the twentytwo recorded minutes take in the Introduction, Scherzo, Andante, and Finale (Carnaval).
Bourrée Fantasque is danced to a Balanchine- assembled suite of miscellaneous
Chabrier pieces
bit of the Joyeuse marche,
used as a prelude; the Bourrée fantasque,
originally a piano piece, orchestrated by
Felix Mottl; an interlude from the opera
Gwendoline, which shows Chabrier's Wag nerism in a Deliusish way; and the Fite
Polonaise from the opera Le Roi malgré lui.
-a
AUGUST 1955
-
Quite aside from the merits of the choreography and this is one of the most durable big -scale works in the New York City
Ballet repertoire
the score is worth hearing over and over again: as Balanchine's
notes on the record jacket point out, there
is a depth and bite and poignance to Chabrier's music that is no more than hinted
at by the glittery surface and the happily
lopsided grin of first acquaintance.
Playing and conducting are absolutely
first class, and the recording is clean and
true and never out of proportion. J. H., Jr.
-
sound; the Bamberg Symphony was evidently recorded in a spacious hall, and that
space has been carried over in the altogether
excellent reproduction. Hollreiser's readings are satisfactory but not memorable. P.A.
BRAHMS
Quartets: No. 2, in A minor, Op. 3I, No.
2; No. 3, in B -flat major, Op. 67
Vegh Quartet.
LONDON LL
I142. I2 -in. $3.98.
Aside from a rather slow -paced reading of
the finale of the Quartet in A minor and
occasional pitch deviations by the first violinist, the Vegh foursome giv
altogether
excellent accounts of these two chamber music masterpieces. The Hollywood String
Quartet may enjoy a slight edge, from a
sonic standpoint, in their Capitol recording
of the A minor, but that runs to two
twelve-inch sides. Certainly the present
version is far superior to the Curtis Quartet's for Westminster, while that group's
treatment of the B-flat Quartet
the best
until now
is about on a par with the
-
-
performance here. All of which indicates
that this new disk offers the best coupling
of these two works yet issued.
P. A.
(Editor's note: All three Brahms quartets
have been recorded by the Budapest Quartet for Columbia. Probably they will be
issued this autumn.)
BRAHMS
Bizet: Roma was well worth resurrecting.
BOCCHERINI
Sonata for Cello and Piano, No. 6, in A
tSchubert: Sonata for Arpeggione and
Piano, in A minor
tGio. B. Sammartini: Sonata in G
Leonard Rose, cello; Leonid Hambro, piano.
COLUMBIA ML 4984.
12 -in.
$3.98.
In this lofty, dispassionate cello playing,
impressive in a continuous pure linearity of
both projection and tone, and with the help
of sonics beautifully distinct and trouble free, Schubert s overworked but still pleasant
sonata for the dead arpeggione has its most
satisfactory recording. The Boccherini is a
little gem not recorded before, a harbinger,
it is to be hoped, of other recorded adornments by the most natural of composers for
the cello; and the (Giovanni) Sammartini
sonata, originally written for we know not
what stringed instrument, completes a disk
of tranquil but positive merit. The sonatas
are unusual for their time, in that the keyboard is not the leader, but even so a
trifle more prominence to Mr. Hambro
would have made a good record better.
C. G. B.
BRAHMS
Academic Festival Overture, Op. 8o
¡Liszt: Les Préludes
¡Wagner: Siegfried Idyll
tSibelius: Finlandia
Quartet No. 3, in BJlat major, Op. 67
Quartetto Italiano.
ANGEL 35184.
12 -in.
$4.98 (or $3.48).
The superb Hungarian Quartet would have
been a perfect choice to record all three of
the Brahms quartets, and it is a mystery to
me why Angel selected for this job the
Quartetto Italiano, a slick ensemble, but
one rather lacking in interpretative force or
conviction
certainly not the group to
play Brahms. More than its customary force
is present in this performance of the B -flat
Quartet, but the interpretation, however
aimed, lands far from the mark. The group's
entire approach is too genteel, too detached.
Some of the tempos are slow, and particularly in the first and third movements there
are some completely uncalled -for ritards or
whole passages played at a contrastingly
slower pace. Despite faithful, intimate reproduction, this disk doesn't come anywhere
close to competing with the recent one by
the Vegh Quartet on London.
P. A.
-
BRUCH
-
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, No. I
see Prokofiev: Concerto for Violin and
Orchestra, No. 1.
BRUCKNER
Symphony No. 4, in E -flat major ( "Romantic")
¡Sibelius: Symphony No. 7, in C major,
Heinrich
Op. 105
Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra,
Paul van Kempen, cond.
TELEFUNKEN LGX 66026/7. Two I2 -in.
$).96.
This mélange of orchestral warhorses is
notable mainly for the high quality of its
The Bruckner Fourth and Sibelius Seventh
are odd companions, the former broad and
Bamberg Symphony Orchestra,
Hollreiser, cond.
Vox PL 935o. 12 -in. $5.95.
45
RECORDS
expansive, the latter lean and compact.
Still, it is a waste of time to worry about
compatibility, since the records are not
satisfactory anyway. Van Kempen is heavy handed with the already heavy though
nonetheless beautiful Bruckner, and he zips
through the Sibelius in a perfunctory
fashion. The recording, dubbed from 78s,
is marred by audible breaks and by the
omission of the da capo of the Scherzo of
the Bruckner. The listener is left up in the
air at the end of the Trio, then plunged
right into the Finale.
No altogether satisfactory version of the
Bruckner Fourth is yet available. My
preference goes reluctantly to Abendroth's
on Urania, with Van Otter loo'ss on Epic as
runner -up. The Sibelius, however, is well
represented by Koussevitzky. Collins, EhrP. A.
ling, Beecham. and Barbirolli.
BRUCKNER
Te
Deumm
Frances Yeend ( s ) , Martha Lipton (ms) ,
David Lloyd ( t ) , Mack Harrell (bn) . New
York Philharmonic- Symphony and Westminster Choir, Bruno Walter, cond.
- Mahler: Kindertotenlieder
Kathleen Ferrier, contralto; Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Bruno Walter, cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4980. 12 -in. $4.98.
Bruckner symphonies were played in America as early as 1885, and Theodore Thomas
introduced the Te Deum to Cincinnati well
before the turn of the century, when
"seven thousand prosaic Americans were
transported by the music,' according to
one snobbish Austrian writer. Yet, as far
as I know, this is the first Bruckner recording made in prosaic America. Of course
Walter upholds the broad Viennese tradition, but he has refined and broadened
that tradition, and it has taken on strength
and vigor in the process of being transplanted to this country.
Walter's concern is clearly with the
human experience of Bruckner's great, soar-
even in these instances she remains reserved
and somewhat sexless in tone. It is because
Walter is on the podium that this performance bears the stamp of decisive authority.
FRED GRUNFELD
CHABRIER
España
from The
Autor Brujo.
-
see Falla: Dances
Three-Cornered Hat; El
Rapsodie
CHABRIER
Bourrée fantasque- see Bizet:
Roma.
CHABRIER
Une Education manquée
Born in the Auvergne and educated as a
lawyer, Emmanuel Chabrier went into government service as a young man and spent a
round twenty years as a working -day bureaucrat and an ayant -garde intellectual after
hours
composing a bit, cultivating friendships with Fauré, Duparc, and D'Indy
before finally, at forty, chucking his civil
career, to devote his full time to music. By
that time as Une Education manquée, his
he was
last amateur work, demonstrates
already an accomplished composer with an
engagingly off-center rhetorical logic of
his own. The scoring is skillful and precise,
with a kind of gourmet-like regard for the
juices of post -Wagner harmony, and fine
elegance of surface, and springiness of timing. The defining thing about the operetta,
in fact, is the polish and assurance of the
setting, for the plot is a little nothing that
could easily be spoiled by the least bumbling or lapse in taste.
Essentially, it is a wedding -night comedy
set in the time of Louis XVI. Gontran and
Hélène are just married but terribly ill -atease alone with each other. Neither knows
what to expect of the other; and, worse,
-
46
-
-
-
-
neither knows what is expected. Hélène
knows that she is no longer a little girl and
that she must obey her husband. But poor
Gontran only knows what his grandfather
that on his wedding night
has told him
nobody needed to tell him a thing. His old
tutor, Pausanias, is no help. In the first
place, he is drunk. In the second place,
he has no information on the crucial question; it isn't in the syllabus. Finally the
gap in education is made up by a storm
and by the fact that Hélène is terribly afraid
of thunder. So everything is solved just
as it should be, and very charmingly.
The Vanguard performance is musically
crisp and beguiling and generally quite
well sung, especially by Xavier Depraz, if
occasionally lacking the final polish in the
spoken sections. The recorded sound is
close but clean and mostly well balanced.
Good notes and translation by Harold
J. H., Jr.
Lawrence.
-
ing declaration of faith. Massive as it is,
the music flows unimpeded and with impressive clarity. The four soloists are dependable, and David Lloyd's contribution
in the Te Ergo is notable for its musicianly
warmth. The Westminster Choir and the
New York Philharmonic -Symphony sound
responsive and well balanced in their individual and collective sonorities.
The sound of the Kindertotenlieder in
their new format is substantially superior
to the existing ten -inch version of the same
performance. Ferrier was a curiously unemotional singer; here and in Das Lied von
der Erde she came closest to passion, but
-
Christiane Castelli (s), Gontran de Bois massif; Claudine Collart (s), Hélène de la
Cerisaie; Xavier Depraz (bs), Maitre Pausanias. Orchestre Symphonique de Paris,
Charles Bruck, cond.
VANGUARD vas 460. 12 -in. $4.98.
-
Bruno Walter: transport for the prosaic.
For both these early trios by master (César
Franck) and pupil (Ernest Chausson) , this
is an LP debut. Although the Franck is
historically important as the model for
music in
much subsequent cyclical music
which one or two basic themes keep reit
curring in more than one movement
is not very vital or interesting. The Chausson, on the other hand, is music of great
lyric beauty, though some of that beauty
stems directly from teacher Franck's Piano
Quintet in F minor, composed three years
earlier. Nevertheless, this is Chausson in
full blossom and at his most engaging.
The Trio di Bolzano does a solid, workmanlike job, though their interpretations
CHAUSSON
Trio in G minor, O. ;
1-Franck: Trio in F-sharp major, Op. r,
No.
r
Trio di Bolzano.
VOX PL 895o. 12 -in. $5.95.
Artsermel: Debussy's martyr is clarified.
and Vox's generally excellent reproduction
could both profit from a bit more warmth.
P. A.
CHOPIN
Concerto for Piano and
in E minor,
Orchestra, No. I.
Op. r r
Liszt: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra,
No. r, in E flat major
Samson François, piano; Orchestre de la
Société des Concerts du Conservatoire,
Georges Tzipine, cond.
ANGEL 35168. 12 -in. $4.98 (or $3.48).
Samson François, still in his twenties, gives
a thoroughly interesting account of the
Chopin concerto. He brings a fresh, unormodern yet
thodox attitude to the music
Occasionally the unorthosympathetic.
doxies sound labored, but they are never
there merely to flaunt convention; they are
too patently the ideas of an artist trying to
present the music clearly and as he sees it.
The playing is clean, forthright, considered,
never mechanical or cold. Listeners will
probably be most dissatisfied with the slow,
lyric passages, which M. François tends to
"throw away" in brisk tempos and rather
cavalier phrasing, as if to avoid sentimental.
ity.
Beautifully luminous orchestral support helps to make this recording worth
investigating, though it is not on a par with
the Rubinstein version for RCA Victor.
The Liszt concerto is handled in more
routinely brilliant fashion; the sound has a
fine concert -hall perspective, with a parR. E.
ticularly full piano tone.
-
CHOPIN
Concerto for Piano and
in F minor,
1Saint-Saëns:
Orchestra, No.
2,
Op. 21
Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra, No. 4, in C minor, Op. 44
Alexander Brailowsky, piano; Boston Symphony Orchestra, Charles Munch, cond.
RCA VICTOR LM 1871. 12-in. $3.98.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
kL(
The Brailowsky -Munch collaboration on the
F minor Concerto was most accurately characterized by Harold Schonberg in his Chopin
discography as routine, methodical, accurate, flavorless. The Saint-Saëns concerto
comes off better. A graceful, grandiloquent,
likable example of its species, the work
gains from the externalized, nervous brilliance of Brailowsky's playing and from the
rapport of Munch's conducting. Lively,
smooth, well -balanced reproduction. R. E.
DEBUSSY
Chansons de Bilitis; Le Promenoir des deux
amants; En sourdine; Fantoches
Irma Kolassi, mezzo-soprano; André Collard, piano.
LONDON LD 9176.
lo -in. 52.98.
The feast-or- famine policy of issuing records
has seemingly caught up with the vocal
music of Debussy. It was only yesterday
that the Haydn Society brought out a treasurable recital of Debussy songs by Flore
Wend. Now London counters with a considerably shorter collection but one almost
as good. They overlap only in the Chansons
de Bilitis, and here my allegiance still goes
to Miss Wend and her marvelously effective
projection midway between speech and song.
But Irma Kolassi has her allurements too.
She has a warm, sensuous voice (better
qua voice than Flore W end's) and her straightforward interpretations will appeal to those
who blanch at the disease approach. R. G.
DEBUSSY
Le Martyre de Saint Sébastien
Suzanne Danco (s); Nancy Wough (c);
Marie Lise de Montmollin (c); Union
Chorale de La Tour -de -Peitz and l'Orchestre
de la Suisse Romande, Ernest Ansermet,
cond.
LONDON LL 1o6í. 12 -in. 53.98.
If Debussy had died at seventy -six instead
of fifty -six, he would very probably have
written a film score. French composers
were turning out great quantities of movie
music during the 193os and this incidental
music to Le Martyre de Saint Sibastien gives
an inkling of what Debussy's writing for le
cinéma might have been like. It would not
sound at all amiss in conjunction with some
spectacular screen epic of Decadent Rome.
However, in 1911, when Le Martyre was
composed, the movies were silent. Mme.
Ida Rubinstein
dancer, actress, and gen-
-
eral theatrical factotum
-
was not.
She
commissioned Gabriele d'Annunzio to
write a miracle -play and had Claude Debussy compose the incidental music therefor. The play, a pretentious farrago of
mysticism, paganism, and volupté, has fallen
into the oblivion it deserves, carrying Debussy's music with it. From time to time,
to be sure, that music has been performed by
itself without reference to the play, but in
this form it is only moderately effective.
Although it has many moments of eerie
beauty, they do not hang together well and
the end effect is more episodic than a truly
satisfactory work of art should allow. As a
musical influence, it has its importance
(Honegger's Jeanne d'Arc is cut from the
same bolt); as an example of Debussy's
third manner, it has its undeniable interest;
as a piece of continuous music (which
Debussy never intended it to be), Le Mart) re
has its drawbacks.
AUGUST
'955
Several years ago, Allegro published a
recording of this music performed by the
Oklahoma City Symphony Orchestra and
Chorale under the direction of Victor Alessandro. It was by no means a contemptible
effort and spoke exceedingly well for the
state of music south of the Ozarks. The new
recording by Ansermet, however, quite
eclipses it, both technically and musically.
Passages that sounded muddy and stamped
in the older version are clearly articulated
here by Ansermet's superior instrumentalists
and singers; greater care has been paid to
the balance between orchestra, chorus, and
soloists; and the simulation of hall presence
is far more successful.
R. G.
FALLA
El Sombrero de Tres Picos (Suite of
Dances)
fTurina: Sinfonia Serillafia
Orquesta Nacional De España, Ataulfo
Argenta, cond.
LONDON INTERNATIONAL TW 91013. I2in. 34.98.
FALLA
Dances front The Three -Cornered Hat;
El Amor Brujo
fChabrier: Espana Rapsodie
Diana Eustrati, mezzo -soprano; Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra (Bamberg Symphony
for Chabrier), Fritz Lehmann, cond.
DECCA DL 9775. 12 -in. $4.98.
The jota and the polo gitano affect the
pulse rate of Fallá s works, but performers
need be neither Aragonese nor gypsy to
get to the heart of his music. In fact, few
really successful Falla recordings have come
out of his homeland; Argentás lack -lustre
version of the Three -Cornered Hat Dances
reveals the extent of the gap between the
real Spain and the musical country that
Falla glorified. Though recorded figuratively, within the shadow of the Escorial and
the Alhambra, it wants color and loses
profile because the rhythms are limp and
the playing is rarely incisive. Falla was a
meticulous craftsman in an era of fastidious musicians, and though precision is not
everything with him, certainly, it is at least
a first principle. Not suprisingly the finest
Sombrero on records comes from Geneva,
the watchmaking center and Suisse Romande town.
Turiná s Sinfonia Sevillaña is a three movement pictorial symphony of no great
subtlety or symmetry, culminating in a
Fiesta that runs true to splashy stereotype.
The playing is idiomatic, perhaps, but also
flaccid in contour and perfunctory in
rhythm. It is not given to Argenta to hear
Seville as others hear it
or rather heard
it, when the cante hondo was still in flower.
The orchestral sound is flat and dulled.
The Lehmann Falla performances are on
a higher level of sonic and instrumental
merit, but they have a stiff, mechanical air,
that suggests the conductor has never
thought of either work in a dancer's terms.
At least he achieves ample clarity of line,
and Eustrati, the mezzo -soprano in Amor
Brujo, has a fair understanding of the dramatic values involved. The Chabrier Rapsodie, being more synthetic to begin with,
fares better than the others in Lehmann's
-
literal interpretation. Technically the disk
is bright and clean -sounding.
FRED GRUNFF.LD
FAURE
jor Violin and Piano, No. t, in
major, Op. 1;
tFranck: Sonata for Violin and Piano, in
Somata
A
A major
Joseph Fuchs, violin; Artur Balsam, piano.
DECCA DI. 9716.
12 -in.
53.98.
Fuchs and Balsam are serious, thoughtful
musicians with virtuosic abilities, and the
tonal richness, sincerity of interpretation,
and balanced ensemble that they bring to
these two glorious works makes theirs one
of the most desirable presentations on disks.
This is chamber music as it should be played,
reproduced with appropriate fidelity and
opulence of sound.
P. A.
FIBICH
The Bride of Messina (excerpts)
Smetana: Dalibor.
-
see
-
FRANCK
Sonatafor Violin and Piano, in A major
see Fauré: Sonata for Violin and Piano,
No.
t,
FRANCK
Trio in F-sharp major, Op. s, No. t
see Chausson: Trio in G minor,
-
GLAN V ILLE -HICKS
The Transposed Heads
Audrey Nossaman (s), Monas Harlan (t),
William Pickett (bn), Dwight Anderson
and Robert Sutton, speakers; Kentucky
Opera Association Chorus, Louisville Orchestra, Moritz Bomhard, cond.
LOUISVILLE 545/6. Two I2 -in. (3 sides)
Sold by subscription only.
This is the first of the operas commissioned
by the Louisville Orchestra to make its appearance on records. The libretto is adapted
from a novel by Thomas Mann. Shridaman, a young Brahmin. marries Sita, wooing
her, according to Hindu custom, through
his friend, Nanda. Sita falls in love with
Nanda, whereupon both the tenor and the
baritone cut their own heads off before a
shrine of the goddess Kali. Kali orders Sita
to put the heads back on the bodies so
that she may restore Shridaman and Nanda
to life. Sita, in her agitation, switches the
heads, and the two men are revived in this
scrambled form. A sage proclaims that it
is the head which counts, so Sita goes off
with her husband's head attached to her
lover's body. Soon, however, "Sita begins
to pine for the parts she lacks." (That's
what it says on the leaflet.) The triangle is
resolved by general suicide.
How this absurdity can be staged is not
easy to imagine. The music is based very
largely on Hindu material; the composer
says she could handle such themes without
doing violence either to them or to her own
style because she has "shed the harmonic
dictatorship peculiar to modernists and . .
evolved a melody -rhythm structure that
comes very close to the musical patterns of
the antique world." This statement is
extremely difficult to accept. What Miss
Glanville -Hicks has actually done is adapt
47
()kl),
RECORDS
her Hindu tunes to a highly conservative
and rather obvious Western harmonic scheme
and in forcing them into the straitjacket of
Western intonation she has done them the
utmost, not to say the final violence. When
she abandons her Hindu idiom, Miss Glanville -Hicks sounds a good deal like Menotti;
Sita is, in fact, a sister under under the skin
to Madga Sorel of The Consul.
The performance is excellent and the
recording is quite adequate.
-
A. F.
-
GOUNOD
Mireille
Janette Vivalda (s), Mireille; Christine
Jacquin (s), Clemente; Madeleine Gayraud
(s), Vincinette; Christiane Gayraud (ms),
Taven; Nicolai Gedda (t), Vincent; Michel
Dens (b), Ourrias; André Vessieres (bs),
Ramón; Marcello Cortis (bs), Ambroise;
Robert Tropin (bs), Ferryman. Chorus of
the Aix -en- Provence Festival and l'Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, André Cluytens, cond.
ANGEL ANG 3533. Three 12 -in. $15.98
(or $10.44)
Gounod's Mireille is a singular opera,
which, I suspect, will appeal enormously to
a rather limited group whose literary
temper is of a certain sensitively romantic
sort, and whose taste in theater music does
in the way of
not require overmuch
pungent characterization or sharp dramatic
impacts. Others may find the whole affair
pretty pale and uncompelling.
The work has been popular in France
alone. Never, since its première in 1864,
has it been able to fight its way into the
repertoires of opera houses in other countries. It is a sort of local opera, a Provençal devoir adopted by the nation, in
somewhat the same way that Charpentier's
Louise is adopted because it is a view of
Paris.
The libretto of Mireille, by Michel
Carré, is based on the poem Miréio by the
great Provençal regional poet, Frédéric
Mistral. At the 1954 Aix -en- Provence
Festival, and consequently for this recording, the version used was that in five acts,
as reconstituted by Reynaldo Hahn for the
1939 revival at the Opéra-Comique, where
Mireille is well on its way towards its
9ooth presentation. This version differs
substantially in a number of regards from
that current since 1874 and described in
many operatic story- books. The plot poses
no great difficulties for the listener, except,
perhaps, when supernatural forces affect
the action. The heroine, Mireille, is a Provençal girl of good peasant family; she is
in love with a boy named Vincent, who is
honest but not very well off, and Vincent
loves her. But so does one Ourrias
and he
bull -tamer, or Provençal cowboy
has the backing of Mireilles father. Complications lead to a fight between Ourrias
and Vincent, and after having hit Vincent
with his ironshod bull -taming tool, Ourrias
is drowned by water deities, Rhone variety,
who are unfavorably impressed by his
-
-
-a
behavior.
But that is only the end of Act III. Sad
and distraught, Mireille hears about what
has happened to Vincent and wanders out
into the wild desert place called the Crau,
singing of her love, the cruelty of life, and
so on, in some of the most dramatic and
48
-
impressive emotional outpourings that
in this version
Gounod wrote. Finally
-she struggles out of the Crau towards
the Chapel of the Blessed Marys, where she
has a longstanding appointment with Vincent. He is there, only slightly battered,
having been patched up by old Taven, the
local white witch. But Mireille has cooked
in the desert sun too long and, quite out of
her head, dies in his arms while the rest of
the cast stand around and are sorry and a
voice calls her to Heaven.
The story may seem no great prize, but
in the Crau
Gounod's score is very pretty
scena rather more than that. And, without
overselling its Provençal character, it does
make very skillful use of local color,
though most of the music is essential
Gounod and has nothing in particular to
do with Mistral or with Provence at all.
And it has the same practical characteristics of all but the very best moments of
that is, it needs
Gounod's operatic music
singers of great personal force if it is not
to seem slightly insipid. The singers in the
Angel set
and it is likely to be the only
set for quite a while, so the interested
listener might as well bear with them
have everything but this personal force.
borrowed, if memory
Janette Vivalda
serves, on relatively short notice by the Aix
impresarios from the opera house at Monte
Carlo is a good, competent French -type
lyric soprano with a clear, cold, vitrified,
not very colorful voice, but she certainly
knows her way around the role. Nicolai
Gedda sings the set pieces with lovely tone
and control of line; Michel Dens is very
stylish and emphatic enough as Ourrias;
and the others sing with uniformly intelligent projection. The conducting of André
Cluytens is that of an experienced musician,
if not of a terribly imaginative spirit.
The set is beautifully gotten out, with a
fifty-page booklet that contains pages of
literary appreciation of Provence and many
beautiful pictures, but with no really adequate systematic notes on the work and
with a libretto translation that gives no
very good feel of the poetry. There is a
glossary of local terms, but no positive
indication that the translator knows the
difference between a bull and an ox; where
taming is concerned, I should imagine that
it does not matter. The French Columbia
pressing of the same performance won a
J. H. JR.
Grand Prix du Disque award.
-
-
-
-
-
HANDEL
Messiah
Adrienne Cole (s), Watty Krap (a), Leo
Larsen (t), Guus Hoekman (bs); Chorus
and Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra,
Walter Goehr, cond.
MUSICAL MASTERPIECE SOCIETY MMS 2019.
Two
12 -in.
$5.00.
Imposing elements and very low cost justify
a longer scrutiny of this album than its
many and hurtful cuts would seem to deserve.
The Musical Masterpiece Society has the
grace to call the edition a "concert version,"
by way of warning for those who wish their
Messiah complete, and in spite of the excisions the four sides last more than two
hours. The principal omissions are "And
he shall purify," "His yoke is easy," and
"How beautiful are the feet," besides a
number of items less prominent. But the
solo soprano is a delight, and the soprano
section of the choir sweeps the heavens.
The conductor alternates between projections of carefully prepared and fervid belief
and docile acceptations of a story told too
often in the same manner. The remaining
solo voices are not notable, but the English
enunciation is excellent by these Netherlanders, solo and in choir, without the distraction of a foreign semblance.
The wind parts added by Mozart are used,
and this writer has never been able to share
the horror professed by some that Mozart
dared this. The Scherchen and Boult editions are nearer "authenticity" than this
one, but that is not where their superiority
lies. London gave to Sir Adrian splendor of
sound and Dr. Scherchen gave to Westminster a boldness of examination and a
hypnotic leadership that sec those versions
well apart from this one. The sound here is
of steadily satisfactory quality, with one
exception which may have been inherent in
the distribution of the vocal forces: the
sopranos dominate unduly, thus obscuring
polyphony and weakening drama. C. G. B.
HAYDN
Quartet in F minor, Op. 20, No. s
1-Schubert: Quartet No. ro, in E -flat,
Op. 125, No. r
Vienna Philharmonic Quartet.
TELEFUNKEN LGX 66034.
12 -in.
$4.98.
Good professional playing on the literal
side, sober of fancy and shy of nuance, but
bathed in a balanced euphony a little
beyond the capability of the very clear but
somewhat dry sonics to reproduce perfectly.
A pittance more of resonance is needed.
Nevertheless it is a cool pleasure to have
violins sound with this easy smoothness
even when they seem too temperate. Presumably this kind of arbitrary coupling
a quartet plucked from Haydn and another
from Schubert, with nothing but the four
instruments in common -hurts no one
but the manufacturer when other editions
of both are available. The competition in
the present case is limited to one version
of each work, but the Schneider Quartet's
recording of Haydn 's Op. 20, No. 5 is
backed by No. 6; and the Konzerthaus
Quartet give both quartets in Schubert s
Op. 125 on one record. The opinion here
is that the earlier versions of both works
are decidedly more desirable in themselves,
with the rational couplings an attraction in
addition.
C. G. B.
-
KARLOWICZ
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in
major, Op. 8
A
tSzymanowski: Sonata for Violin and
Piano, in D minor, Op. 9
Halina Barinova, violin; National Philharmonic Orchestra, Kiril Kondrashin, cond.
(in the Karlowicz). David Oistrakh, violin; Vladimir Yampolsky, piano (in the
Szymanowski )
.
COLOSSEUM CRLP 190.
r2 -in. $3.98.
Except for Chopin, the music of Poland
has, on the whole, suffered neglect at the
hands of Western performers
undeservedly so, as this record indicates.
Mieczyslaw Karlowicz (1876 -1909) was a
more than ordinarily gifted composer, to
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RH OR
judge from his Violin Concerto, an exceptionally melodious work, somewhat in the
spirit of Glazunov, and well knit thematically. After hearing it, one wonders why
it isn't in the repertoire of some of our
own concert violinists; it would be a refreshing relief from the usual run of works
for violin and orchestra that we are compelled to listen to season after season. It
is a pity that its composer's life was cut so
short (by a mountain avalanche when he
was only thirty -three). The performance
by Halina Barinova is masterly, and Colosseum has obliged, for once, with a halfway
respectable recording, though there is some
hollowness in the orchestral tone.
The Szymanowski sonata is another example of first-rate Polish music, colored by
some derivations from Brahms and Franck;
it is well worth hearing and has been more
than adequately reproduced.
P. A.
LISZT
and
Concerto for Piano
in E flat major
to for
Piano
and Orchestra,
No. r,
see Chopin: ConcerOrchestra, No. r.
LISZT
Consolation No. z; La Lubugre Gondola
No. 2; Bénédiction de Dieu dans la
solitude
tSchumann: Humoreske, Op. 20
Jean -Michel Damase, piano.
LONDON INTERNATIONAL TW 91041. I2-
in. $4.98.
These performances have warmth, as they
should for obvious stylistic reasons, but
they are seriously deficient in rhythmic life.
La Lugubre Gondola, inspired by the
funeral processions by gondola in Venice
and written two months before Wagner
died, is properly mournful, Wagnerian in
its declamatory lines yet markedly original.
The Bénédiction is a full-blown, lengthy
study in serenity from Liszi s happy years
at Weimar. Some have found the work
tiresome and maudlin, others call it inspired and inspiring. Schumann's string
of caprices under the title Humoreske has
been given a more poised, flowing performance by Joerg Demus (Westminster)
than it receives here.
R. E.
no problems, but it is worth noting that
the harpsichord is less plangent than those
familiar on records.
C. G. B.
-
MARTIN
Petite symphonie concertante see Bartók: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra,
No. 3.
-
MASSENET
Werther (excerpts) see Berlioz:
Damnation de Faust.
La
MATCHAVARIANI
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra
tSibelius: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in D minor, Op. 47
Maurice Vayman, violin; National Philharmonic Orchestra, Alexei Matchavariani,
cond. (in the Matchavariani). David Oistrakh, violin; National Philharmonic Orchestra, Alexander Gauk, cond. (in the
Sibelius).
COLOSSEUM CRLP 172.
12 -in.
$3.98.
This concerto by the Armenian composer
Alexei Matchavariani makes its bow to
this country in this disk. On first acquaintance, it doesn't impress, seeming to be
little more than a less interesting by- product
of the more imaginative Khachaturian
Concerto. The performance may be good,
but it would be difficult to tell from the
extremely distorted sound in this recording.
Fortunately, the reproduction is much
improved for Oistrakh's polished and often
exciting performance of the Sibelius
Concerto. Not many violinists can master
this fiendishly difficult work, but Oistrakh
keeps it well in hand at all times. His is
certainly one of the preferred recorded versions, even if Gauk's accompaniment occasionally leaves something to be desired.
My favorite, though, remains the old but
still miraculous Heifetz performance on
RCA Victor.
Stern's interpretation on
Columbia is also quite acceptable, and it
would be well for the prospective purchaser
to compare all three before making a choice.
MAHLER
Kindertotenlieder
Deum.
-
Academic
see Bruckner:
Te
MARAIS
Suites for Viola da Gamba and Harpsichord: Book III, No. r, in D minor;
Book IV, No. 5, in G
Robert Boulay, viola; Laurence Boulay,
harpsichord.
ANTHOLOGIE SONORE AS 37. I2 -in. $5.95.
These fluent inventions by a pupil of Lully
and contemporary of François Couperin are
consistently diverting and nicely spiced,
the dark shadows of the viola notwithstanding. It is good to have light music, no
matter its antiquity, lightly presented; and
the MM. Boulay are in no degree portentous, recognizing dance music as such and
stating it cheerfully. Reproduction presents
AUGUST 1955
MOZART
Quartets: No. 20, in D, K. 499; No. 22,
in B -flat, K. 589
Netherlands Quartet.
EPIC LC 3100. I2 -in. $3.98.
see Schubert:
It is unjust to fault a performance when the
players are entirely loyal to the stipulations
of the score, especially when they bow a
sound of enviable mellow warmth sympathetically reproduced by the recording
supervisors. Nor do these late quartets of
Mozart require in their geniality insight or
fervor. Still, there are better versions of
both, by players a little more restless. The
less attractive music, K. 589, has the more
sensitive interpretation, but holders of a
previous version need not discard it for
an equality.
C. G. B.
Concertos for Piano and Orchestra: No. 17,
in G, K. 453; No. 27, in B flat, K. 595
MOZART
Sonatas for Piano: No. 5, in G K. 283;
No. Ir, in A, K. 33r; No. 15, in C, K. 545
Rondo for Piano, in A minor, K. 5rr
P. A.
MENDELSSOHN
Octet in Eflat, Op. 20
Symphony No. 5.
LISZT
Les Préludes -see Brahms:
Festival Overture.
There are seven versions of the Coronation
Concerto, none what we could hope; but
this opinion chooses this one as the best.
The music has been contemptuously classified for two generations as weak Mozart,
because it has none of the austerity of the
G minor Symphony; and pianists, having
been told that it is brilliantly empty, try
to make that apparent, conductors assenting. Most of the records convey a bravura
superficiality, several engagingly, but the
one at hand gives a slow presentation of a
handsome ceremonial of surprising and not
unwelcome dignity.
The avoidance of
flashy digitation is almost ostentatious, and
the conductor has weighted the background
by underlining the part of the darker instruments. It is possible and certainly not reprehensible, in view of tradition, to consider
the deliberate sedation vexatious, but the
writer can attest that it wears better than the
customary continuous sparkle. Both piano
and orchestra have a healthy, unspectacular
sound, with good balance and adequate
definition.
The variations -in- rondo, K. 382, is irresistible entertainment, perhaps the best
possible introduction to Mozart.
This
version is republished and improved from
DECCA 4079, where it is coupled with a
companion rondo, K. 386. Played with a
plump mock -solemnity alternating with
gliding grace, the little piece will beguile
all but the deaf.
C. G. B.
MOZART
Hans Henkemans, piano; Vienna Symphony Orchestra, John Pritchard, cond.
EPIC LC 3117. 12 -in. $3.98.
It is a pity that tubercular piano -sound
cannot be cured, for the orchestral parts
here are splendid, the English conductor
giving new proof of his spirited address in
Mozart concertos.
C. G. B.
MOZART
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 26,
in D ( "Coronation'), K. 537
Rondo for Piano and Orchestra, No. t,
in D, K. 382
Carl Seemann, piano; Berlin Philharmonic
Orchestra (in the Concerto), Bamberg Symphony Orchestra (in the Rondo), Fritz
Lehmann, cond.
DECCA DL 9631. 12 -in. $3.98.
Guiomar Novaes, piano.
Vox PL 9080. 12 -in. $5.95.
It is a pleasure to contemplate and to hear
Mme. Novaes, a pianist in no way preposterous. Her playing seems always to ascend
from a conviction and never a fancy. She is
incapable of damaging a principle, and thus
seldom damages a measure. Her facility of
fingers is at the command of music; and
when she plays, we hear the composer
directly, as if she were not there. This is not
denial but affirmation in the highest degree:
her piano is not an attachment but an integer.
Since her programs are chosen to accord
with her sympathy, her records are a precious exposition of piano music, but are hard
to praise individually since her virtues are
Continued on next page
49
RECORDS
reduced and bass increased to restore the
Control positions on
balance.
equalizers are identified in different ways,
but equivalent markings are listed at the
top of each column in the table below. This
table covers most of the records sold in
America during the past few years, with the
emphasis on LP. Some older LPs and 78s
Dialing Your Disks
original
Records are made with the treble range
boosted to mask surface noise, and the bass
range reduced in volume to conserve groove
When the
space and reduce distortion.
records are played, therefore, treble must be
TURNOVER
40o
500
500 (MoD.)
AES
RIAA
NARTB
RCA
ORTHO
NAB
NARTB
RECORD LABEL
AES
(old)
AES
(new)
ROLLOFF AT toKC.
16 db
10.5 -13.5 db
LP
RCA
NAB(Old)
COL
ORIG. LP
ORTHO
RIAA
LON
COL
LON
LP
ORIG. LP
Allied
Angel
Atlantic *1
Amer. Rec. Soc.*
Bartok
Blue Note Jazz*
Boston*
Caedmon
Canyon*
Capitol*
Capitol -Cetra
Cetra -Soria
Colosseum*
Columbia*
Concert Hall*
Contemporary*
Cook (SOOT) t
-
-
Rodzinski, cond.
COLUMBIA -ENTRE RL 3119.
12 -in.
$2.98.
Rodzinski may sound a trifle perfunctory
at times, but his reading is clear and forthright
an enticing bargain at the price.
Although this is a pre -tape recording, it is
remarkably wide-range, showing off the
Philharmonic at the peak of its powers. P. A.
-
ORFF
Antigonae, Scenes IV and
V
Christi Goltz (s), Hilde Rössl- Majdan (c),
Hermann Uhde (t) , Josef Greindl (bn) ;
Vienna State Opera Chorus, Vienna Symphony Orchestra, Heinrich Hollreiser, cond.
COLUMBIA ML 5038. I2 -in. $4.98.
London*
Lyrichord, new*2
Mercury*
MGM
Oceanic*
Pacific Jazz
Philharmonia
Polymusic *l
RCA Victor
Remington*
Riverside
Romany
Savoy
Tempo
Urania, most*
Urania, some
Vanguard*.
Guild
¡
*Beginning sometime in 1954, records made from new masters require RIAA equalization for both
bass and treble.
outside band.
'Binaural records produced on this label are recorded to NARTB standards on the
flat, without pre On the inside band, NARTB is used for low frequencies but the treble is recorded
curve, others old AES.
zSóme older releases used the old Columbia
50
Continued from preceding page
steadfast. A Chopin étude from her hands
does not sound like one of the Mozart
sonatas here, but the qualities brought to
bear on its re- creation are the same as those
used for the Mozart. Clarity, delicacy
but not too much
equilibrium and moderation convey the music here and in all her
disks. Even when another interpretation is
valued more highly, one is not dissatisfied
with that of Guiomar Novaes. The four
works here, none unfamiliar, accorded an
untainted if undramatic reproduction of the
piano, are Mozart pure, and no one may ask
more of a pianist.
C. G. B.
New York Philharmonic-Symphony, Artur
EMS*
Elektra
Epic*
Esoteric
Folkways (most)
Good -Time Jazz*
Haydn Soc.*
L'Oiseau -Lyre
Walden
Westminster
per settings of controls are those that
sound best.
MUSSORGSKY
Pictures at an Exhibition (orch. by Ravel)
Decca
Bach
Vox*
required Soo -cycle turnover; some foreign
78s are recorded with Soo -cycle turnover
and zero or 5 -db treble boost. One-knob
equalizers should be sec for proper turnover,
and the treble tone control used for further
correction if required. In all cases, the pro-
These are the last two scenes from a setting
of Sophocles' Antigone in the German
translation by Friedrich Hölderlin. Scene
IV is a long lament sung by Antigone and
the chorus as the heroine contemplates the
execution to which she has been condemned
by her uncle, Creon, for burying the body
of her brother, Polynices, in defiance of
Creon's orders. Scene V describes, through
the classic Greek device of the messenger,
how practically everybody in the Thebes
Social Register died because of Creon's
obstinate cruelty. The music is typically
Orffian in its reliance upon spectacular,
extravagant, and frequently electrifying
effects. The vocal orchestration uses everything from a barely audible whisper
through speech, Sprechstimme, and chants
to a wild, coloratura -like keening. The instrumental orchestration depends upon
trumpets, flutes, oboes, and an immense,
unprecedented battery. The subject does
not permit so great a variety of mood as in
Orffs Carmine Burana or Catulli Carmine;
there is less climax and sweep, and the final
scene trails off in a slightly monotonous
succession of ominous atmospheric devices.
Still and all, this is Orff, the master of all out dramatic expression who always bowls
you over the first time, whatever may
happen on the second or third hearing. ( In
my experience, Orffs appeal lies mainly on
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RC( OROS
the surface and does not sustain itself after
its initial shock has worn off.) The performance is obviously excellent in every
respect, and the recording is quite good,
although it has some echo, especially toward
the end of the first side. The record is
accompanied by the full German text and
a madly capricious English version; most
of Scene IV is translated but most of Scene
V is merely summarized, although the
leaflet allows ample space for a complete
translation.
A. F.
PROKOFIEV
for Violin and Orchestra,
Concerto
in D,
The Adagio and Rondo is a phonographic
première. Schubert's only concerted music
tor piano and orchestra, it is worth having
although small Schubert. Indeed the Rondo
is a careful paraphrase of Mozart without
Mozart's breezy mastery of varied reiteration in nursery -tune form. The Adagio is
a sweet and rather vapory piece of more
original substance. Tripping easily in
modest Mozartean style, the pianist does not
overestimate the seriousness of his work,
and the orchestra plays akin. The registration is appealing at low volume and ought
to be kept there, since some coarseness
becomes apparent with increased power.
The inventive and energetic Third Symphony, which owes so much to Haydn and
sounds so little like him, has received another of the good standard performances
now beginning to abound on records. With
more continuous drive in the last two
movements this would have challenged the
leadership of the Hoogstraten interpretation
for Period. The sound is both clear and fat,
a little echoic. The value imposingly transcends $1.65.
C. G. B.
No. r,
Op. 19
tBruch: Concerto for Violin and
tra, No.
1,
in G minor,
Orches-
Op. 26
David Oistrakh, violin; London Symphony
Orchestra, Lovro von Matacic, cond.
ANGEL 35243.
12 -in.
$4.98 or $3.48.
What a man is that David Oistrakh! What
a tone, what a bow arm, what a left hand,
what flaming style! He is particularly impressive here because of Angel's gorgeous
recording. On this disk you can really hear
what he does with the lyricism and grotesquerie of the Prokofiev concerto and with
the gentle romanticism of the concerto by
A. F.
Bruch, the poor man's Brahms.
PROKOFIEV
Symphony No. r, in D ( "Classical "),
Op. 25
Symphony No. 5, in B -flat, Op. too
Orchestre des Concerts Colonne, Jascha
Horenstein, cond.
Vox PL 917o. 12 -in. $5.95
Here on one disk are the two symphonies
of Prokofiev that have found their way into
the so- called standard repertoire. Both are
done by an outstandingly able conductor
and both have been well recorded. There
are sixteen other LP versions of the Classical in the current catalogues; this work has
probably been recorded more often than
any other piece of modern music, but
Horenstein's interpretation must stand high
on the list. His interpretation of the Fifth
is not as distinguished as that of the late
Serge Koussevitzky, but it is, of course, considerably superior from the sonic point of
view.
A. F.
Composer Orff with soprano Goltz (right)
side. The recording is generally good but
somewhat spotty, particularly in the matter
of balance between piano and orchestra.
A. F.
RAVEL
Mallarmé; Deux Mélodies Hébraïques
Suzanne Danco, soprano; Orchestre de la
Suisse Romande, Ernest Ansermet, cond.
LONDON LL 1196. 12 -in. $3.98.
Some of the subtlest songs in the modern
repertoire, marvelously interpreted and
beautifully recorded, but rendered completely meaningless for most listeners by
the omission of texts from the jacket. This
is not fair to Ravel, to Mme. Danco, or to
Ansermet, and it may not even be fair to
London's balance sheet. It would be interesting to know, at least, if such idiotic
issues as this sell as well as vocal recordings
with the poems supplied. Not that sales
alone would justify the idiocy.
A. F.
SAINT-SAENS
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 4,
in C minor, Op. 44
see Chopin:
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 2.
-
SAMMARTINI, GIOVANNI
BATTISTA
-see
Sonata in G
Boccherini: Sonata
for Cello and Piano, No. 6.
RAVEL
SCHUBERT
Concerto for Piano (for the Left Hand)
and Orchestra
Adagio and Rondo, for Piano and Orchestra, in F
Symphony No. 3, in D
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, in G
Jean Doyen, piano; Orchestre des Concerts
Lamoureux, Jean Fournet, cond.
EPIC LC 3123.
12 -in.
$3.98.
It is good to have both of Ravel's piano con-
certos on a single disk, especially since they
were written simultaneously and comment
on each other. It is typical of Ravel's nice
taste in paradox that the concerto for one
hand is the bigger, more densely sonorous
and monumental of the two and comes as
close to the epic style as Ravel was capable
of coming, while the concerto for two hands
is a light, witty contribution to the "neoclassical" trend of its time. Doyen has a very
large, fine tone and plays both works with
great sensitivity and penetration, though
his delivery of the Bach -like slow movement
in the two -hand concerto is on the tubby
AUGUST 1955
SCHUBERT
Shéhérazade; Trois Poèmes de Stéphane
Frank Pelleg, piano; Winterthur Symphony
Orchestra, Clemens Dahinden, cond. (in
the Adagio and Rondo); Utrecht Symphony Orchestra, Paul Hupperts, cond. (in
the Symphony).
MUSICAL MASTERPIECE SOCIETY MMS 6
to -in. S1.65.
NOW AVAILABLE
RECORD SECTION
INDEXES
1951.1953 and 1954
(see page 59)
.
Quartet No. Io, in E-fiat, Op. 125, No.
r -see Haydn: Quartet frt F minor,
Op. so, No. 5
SCHUBERT
-
for Arpeggione and Piano, in A
minor
see Boccherini:
Sonata for
Cello and Piatra, No. 6.
Sonata
SCHUBERT
Symphony No. 5,
in B-flat
tMendelssohn: Octet in Eflat,
Op. 20
NBC Symphony, Arturo Toscanini, cond.
RCA VICTOR LM 1869. 12 -in. $398
The little symphony with its small forces is
delivered in trim and shapely style and it
sparkles with movement, but the sound is
hard. Improvement but not cure can be
effected through the controls. It is the
octet which excites admiration. Richer and
more virile by the multiplication of the
prescribed double string quartet, this music
is transfigured by the Toscanini fire into a
braver, fighting, and furious new image of
itself. We shall never hear it more exciting
and probably never with more homogeneity
of stroke. The famous Italian conductor
at his best generally means Mendelssohn
at his best. Large, hearty, and sweeping
reproduction in a nice fit with the performance.
C. G. B.
SCHUBERT
Symphony No. 9, iu C
Hallé Orchestra (Manchester), Sir John
Barbirolli, cond.
RCA VICTOR LBC 1085. 12 -in. $2.98.
The sonics will be admired more than the
performance. Admirable brass, clear wood,
and fair strings, the latter a bit distant and
the whole a little echoic but in good likeness of a public performance, carry an interpretation in which the conductor has not
helped much. The last two movements are
deficient in the strong energy and contrasts
found in most other editions, and the second
movement, the ethereal and plaintive An-
51
RECORDS
dante, is actually jaunty in the quickened
trot to which Sir John spurs it. An odd
production which leaves the Furtwängler,
Walter, and Mengelberg editions, all with
less effective sound, still well out in front.
C. G. B.
-
SCHUMANN
Humoreske, op. 20 see Liszt: Consolation No. I; La Lugubre Gondole No.
2; Bénédiction de Dieu dans la solitude.
tional forms in distinctive, untraditional
style. The Fifth Quartet is somewhat
showier and strains a little in the direction
of orchestral sonority, but it has one of
those gorgeously lyrical slow movements,
like those of the Fifth and Sixth Symphonies, which are among the most distinguished specialties of the house.
The
performances are very good, the recordings
mediocre.
A. F.
SIBELIUS
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D
minor, Op. 47 see Matchavariani:
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra.
-
SHOSTAKOVICH
Quartets: No. 4, Op. 83; No. 5, Op. 92
Tchaikovsky Quartet (in No. 4); Beethoven
Quartet (in No. 5).
VANGUARD VAS 602I. 12 -in. $4.98.
The Fourth Quartet may be Shostakovich's
finest work in this form; it employs the
medium in a beautifully plastic and subtle
fashion, is full of delectable tunes and
coloristic devices, and handles the tradi-
-
SIBELIUS
Finlandia see Brahms: Academic Festival Overture.
SIBELIUS
-
7, in C major, Op. ros
Bruckner: Symphony No. 4.
Symphony No.
see
Giant Scarlatti Sampler
release, from every point of
Kirkpatrick, probably the greatest
living authority on Scarlatti's lite and
view.
-
-
a Spanish band.
The Columbia engineers turn in a practically perfect job of reproduction, and
there is very little surface noise. The annotations, by the performer, which is a
guarantee of their quality, are spread over
seven sides of the four sleeves.
52
National Theater, Jaroslav Kromholc, cond.
COLOSSEUM CRLP 181/3. Three 12 -in. $12.94.
This is the same performance as the Dalibor
issued by Supraphon and already reviewed
(HIGH FIDELITY, February 1955). The distinction between the two sets is that in the
Colosseum, Dalibor has been squeezed onto
five sides, with the sixth given over to a
highlights -type excerption from Fibich's
The Bride of Messina. The previous comment
on Dalibor as a work, and as a performance,
stands; the technical variation between the
two sets is not enough to be defining.
Zdenek Fibich was born in 185o and composed a tremendous quantity of music before his death in 1900. Regarded as a less
significant figure in the Bohemian revival
than either Smetana or Dvofák, he was
nevertheless a gifted man and the music recorded here, if not timeless, is not by any
means negligible. Fibich had a special interest in the setting of words, and in this
text
based on Schiller's tragedy of fate
he had words that called for a kind of
formal melodic setting that has at once an
almost classic purity of shape and the power
and lowering darkness of free high- tragic
declamation. The performance is one of
real drive and urgency; the singers, unnamed,
are thoroughly competent, especially the
tenor (he may be Beno Blachut, who sings
the title role in Dalibor.) The engineering,
as with the run of East- European recordings,
suffers from distortion at both ends of the
scale, but the solo voices come through
decently and the orchestra can be heard
well enough to give a good idea of the score.
There is a libretto booklet, with translation,
for Dalibor: only a synopsis, and not a
very good one, for the Fibich work. J. H., Jr.
-
.A. MAJOR
works, here presents sixty representative
sonatas of the more than 500 that Scarlatti
wrote. To those listeners who know only
the handful of sonatas that are played for
warming -up purposes at piano recitals
usually in a mutilated or prettified arrangethese remarkment by Tausig or Bülow
able pieces should come as a revelation.
For they display, within a fairly stereotyped
two- section pattern, an astonishing variety
of moods and textures. Here are wild
Spanish dances, rhapsodic improvisations,
romantic serenades, passionate outbursts,
solemn processions, joyous hunting scenes,
lyric poems, all sublimated in a pure and
disciplined style. Here are toccata -like constructions demanding the utmost in virtuosity from the player, as well as simple
two- and three -part "inventions." In the
works from the middle and late periods, a
single "affection" does not govern a whole
piece, as in most baroque music. Instead,
there are often sudden changes of mood
within a piece. The most open diatonicism
may suddenly shift to a tight chromaticism.
As was to be expected, Kirkpatrick plays
these masterpieces with profound understanding and impeccable technique. His
instrument, a modern one, has a lovely
tone and is capable of much more color
than those of Scarlatti's time. Sometimes,
writes Kirkpatrick, "I have followed what
seemed to me the spirit rather than the
letter, especially in those sonatas in which
it seemed that no contrast could be too
violently exaggerated, in which no poetic
suggestion seemed capable of over -realization." The harshness and noisiness of some
left -hand forte chords are therefore probably deliberate: in such passages Kirkpatrick sees an imitation of the drums of
SMETANA
Dalibor
tFibich: The Bride of Messina (excerpts)
Soloists, orchestra, and chorus of the Prague
NORMAN DRISCOLL
Ralph Kirkpatrick
-
STEIN, LEON
Three Hassidic Dances
phony No. 3.
-
see Ward: Sym-
SZYMANOWSKI
Many of these works (something like
one -third of them) may be found also on
the seven disks of Scarlatti sonatas recorded
by Fernando Valenti for Westminster.
Valenti, too, plays them with understanding, sensitive musicality, and excellent
technique. I prefer the Kirkpatrick, howthe Valenti style
ever, for several reasons
is somewhat heavier, probably because of
his fondness for octave couplings, while
Sonata for Violin and Piano, in D minor,
Op. 9
see Karlowitz: Concerto for
Violin and Orchestra.
Kirkpatrick's
Il Cimento dell' Armonia
-
lines are cleaner, sharper,
closer to the genius of the harpsichord; the
pairwise arrangement discovered by Kirkpatrick is not observed by Valenti, who
almost always separates a sonata from its
partner; in two or three of the sonatas
Valenti's text differs somewhat from Kirk patrick's authoritative edition; and finally
I like the tone of Kirkpatrick's instrument
better than Valenti's wirier -sounding one.
This is a set you can dip into, and derive
pleasure from, for a long time to come.
NATHAN BRODER
SCARLATTI, DOMENICO
Sixty Sonatas
Ralph Kirkpatrick, harpsichord.
COLUMBIA SL 22I. Four I2 -in. $15.92.
-
TURINA
Sinfonia Serillaña
-
see Falla:
El Som-
brero de Tres Picos(Suite of Dances)
V I V ALDI
zione, Op. 8
e
dell' Inven-
Reinhold Barchet, violin; Pro Musica String
Orchestra (Stuttgart), Rolf Reinhardt, cond.
Vox DL 173. Three 12 -in. $17.85.
The stately procession of collective works
by important baroque composers recorded
by Vox continues. The twelve violin concertos of Opus 8, published by Vivaldi
under the fanciful title The Trial of Harmony
and Invention, are, like the other sets in the
series, handsomely housed and provided
with comprehensive notes by Joseph Braunstein. The first four of these concertos comprise the group called The Seasons, discussed
in these pages (HIGH FIDELITY, June 1955)
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
in connection with a Boston recording.
No. 5 is entitled The Sea Storm, No. to
The Hunt, and the others have no special
names. The Seasons is particularly delightful,
but most of the other concertos are near the
top of Vivaldi's numerous output (the slow
movement of No. 11, for example, is extraordinarily lovely), and only No. 5 is com-
paratively routine.
Bucher negotiates his sometimes rather
elaborate solo passages with little effort,
and his double -stopping is clean, pleasant,
and free from scratching. The orchestra
plays lustily, with precision and attractive
tone. A little more nuance would have been
welcome in the tone -painting of The Seasons
the first movement of Summer, for
example, could have been more languid and
the Stuttgarters are just as loath as the
Bostonians were to let us hear the dog barking in the second movement of Spring
but on the whole the performance is satisfactory and the recording is clear and live.
N. B.
-
-
WAGNER
Siegfried Idyll -see Brahms: Academic
Festival Overture.
WARD
Symphony No.
3
tStein, Leon: Three Hassidic Dances
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, ThorJohnson, cond.
REMINGTON 1(199 -185. 12 -In. $1.95.
Robert Ward's Third Symphony is a work
of large, full- bodied sonorities and a generally philosophic cast; it is ingenious in form
and highly typical of the contemporary
American symphonic style. Leon Stein's
Hassidic Dances may be roughly characterized
as somewhat labored studies in the higher
Ippolitov- Ivanov steppes. Excellent recording and presumably authoritative interA. F.
pretations.
-
casts light on Wagner as both an original
not to
creator and the heir of a tradition
mention the fact that the Weber chorus is,
along with the Guerra! outburst in the last
act of Norma, one of the most applaudable
of all opera choruses. The performances
are firm and in the vein; the sound from the
grooves is resonant and adequately spacious.
No texts, but very good notes in English;
boxed and swaddled so elaborately as to
take up more space than is reasonable.
J. H., Jr.
RICHARD CROOKS
Favorites
Romberg: I Bring a Love Song; You Will Remember Vienna (from the film Viennese
Nights); One Alone (from The Desert Song).
Isabelle Firestone: In My Garden. Tierney:
Rio Rita.
Herbert: Neapolitan Love Song
(from The Princess Pat). Friml: Only a Rose
(from The Vagabond King). Geehl: For
You Alone. Liddle: How Lovely Are Thy
Dwellings (Psalm LXXXIV). Penn: Smilin'
Through. Tosti: Goodbye.
Richard Crooks, tenor; orchestra.
CAMDEN CAL 217. 12 -in. $1.98.
Camden releases of this type do a real public service by giving something like aural
reality to singers now retired who deserve
to be remembered but who would otherwise
very likely be known (if at all) only as names
after a few more years.
Most certainly
Richard Crooks deserves to be remembered,
for he was a fine singer and, in certain conmost
texts, an artist of real distinction
particularly in French opera. However, none
of the three Crooks LPs issued so far really
shows why he was so admired as a Des
Grieux, and this third one dips too deep in
the musical barrel to be very interesting at
all, even though it does give a good sense of
the quality of the voice and of the perfectly
articulated, if mannered and now somewhat
affected -sounding, delivery of words. Until
a Crooks -in -opera disk is gotten together,
CAL 170
on which half a dozen oratorio
is his best current reprearias are reissued
sentation.
J. H., Jr.
-
-
RECITALS AND
MISCELLANY
CHORUSES FROM GERMAN OPERA
Das Nachtlager in
Conradin Kreutzer:
Granada: Schön die Abendglocken klangen.
Wagner: Tannhäuser: Freudig begrüssen (entrance of the guests); Beglückt darf nun
(Act III pilgrims' chorus). Weber: Der
Freischütz:
Was gleich wohl
auf Erden.
Chorus and Orchestra of the Berlin Städtische
Oper, Hansgeorg Otto, cond.
TELEFUNKEN TM 68031.
IO -in.
$2.98.
This disk provides a sort of choral sectioning of German Romantic opera as it was in
the first half of the nineteenth century. It
may not really explain anything, but it does
show, in one plane, at least, the relationship between the pre-Ring Wagner of 1845
and the kind of theater music he grew up
with and admired. The Tannhätuerchoruses
are, of course, very familiar, but they take
on freshened interest when heard in close
juxtaposition with the great marksmanship
contest chorus from Der Freischütz, composed in 1821 and the shepherds' prayer
from the almost-forgotten Das Nachtlager in
Granada, composed in 1834. The hearing
AUGUST 1955
-
CHRISTEL GOLTZ
Opera Excerpts
Strauss: Salome: from Ah! Du wolltest
nicht deinen Mund küssen lassen to end
[with Hetty Plümacher (ms), Herodias;
Wolfgang Windgassen (t), Herod; Württemberg State Orchestra, Ferdinand Leitner,
cond.]. Beethoven: Fidelio: Abscheulicher!
Wo eilst du hin? [with Bavarian State Orchestra, Robert Heger, cond.]. Weber:
Oberon: Ozean, du Ungeheuer! Goetz: The
Taming of the Shrew: Die Kraft versagt
[with Bavarian State Orchestra, Robert
Heger, cond.]. Gluck: Alceste: Oit suitce n'est point d'un sacrifice;
je?
. Non,
Divinités du Styx! [with RIAS Symphony
Orchestra, Arthur Rother, cond.).
Christel Goltz, soprano; orchestras as noted
above.
DECCA DL 9778. I2 -in. $3.98.
With Ljuba Welitch fading into less and
less activity, Christel Goltz was imported to
sing the name role in Strauss's Salome at
the Metropolitan last season, and she now
has a two-out -of -three lead over such corn petition as there is in full -length LP versions of the opera. If not the greatest of all
time, she is certainly the most available of
present -day Salomes. However, in Germany
and Austria she works full time in all the
nonlyric repertoire, and the principal interest of this disk is that it gives a fair enough
sectional representation of her singing. The
rarity of the collect:on is "Die Kraft versagt"
Kate's taming -down monologue
from Goetz's The Taming of the Shrew.
It is a fresh, freely emotional outpouring,
effective, and (sung as well as it is here)
really touching. The two excerpts from
Gluck's Alceste are done with very proper,
careful artistry, and the singing is mostly
steady and secure, the tone frequently
much more positively attractive than hearing
the singer only in a Salome -type context
would allow one to imagine.
All told, these are the performances of a
good, competent, serious, well-routined
German soprano with a good voice that is
here still not spread and worn from toohard use. As such, recommended. Engineering: general), clean and consistently balanced. No text translations, but originals,
and sensible notes.
J. H., JR.
-
HILDE GUEDEN
Memories of the Vienna Theatre
Excerpts from operettas by Ascher; Ziehrer;
Lehár; Straus; Schönherr; Johann Strauss,
Jr.; Kreisler; Kálmán; and Fall.
Hilde Gueden (s); Vienna State Opera Orchestra, Max Schönherr, cond.
LONDON LL 1116. I2 -in. $3.98.
Readers concerned with details of works
and excerptions in this attractive potpourri
may refer back to recent reviews [HIGH FIDELITY, June 1955] of LONDON LD 9157
and LD 9158. The materials are identical,
and since the technical quality of the
twelve-inch version is if anything superior,
and the total cost considerably less, there is
no problem of choice.
J. H., JR.
MAGDA LASZLO
Italian Airs
Vivaldi: Un certo non so che. Caldara:
Come raggio di sol. Pergolesi: Ogni pena
più spietata. Pergolesi: La Passione, Nos.
VII, IV, II. Martini il Tedesco: Piacer
d'amore. A. Scarlatti: Gid il sole dal
Gange. Gasparini: Caro loaccio, dolce
nodo. Sarri: Sen corre l'agneletta. Bononcini: Deb, più a me non v'ascondete. Carissimi: Piangete, ohimè piangete. Durante:
Danza danza.
Magda Laszlo, soprano; Franz Holetschek,
piano.
WESTMINSTER WL 5375. 12-in. $5.95
Although she has never appeared in this
country, Magda Laszlo has become familiar
through the fairly wide variety of musical
contexts in which she has been heard as
Westminster's house soprano. This is her
second LP recital disk of seventeenth- and
eighteenth- century Italian songs. As in the
earlier WL 5119, she is unfailingly an artist,
and usually an interesting one, a musician
worth careful attention even when her
singing is not perfect, even when her interpretations are open to question. The repertoire
apart from the three excerpts from
Pergolesi's La Passione
not unusual.
These are the songs that are the backbone
of arie antiche literature
the best known,
the most often sung. But they are not
-
-is
-
53
RECORDS
songs best suited to Miss
and this might have been a
a bit more imagination had
in the choice of material.
Holetschek's accompaniments are
necessarily the
Laszlo's voice,
finer record if
been exercised
Franz
competent and unobtrusive; the sound is
clean, full, and sensibly balanced. J. H., JR.
MARJORIE LAWRENCE
Opera and Song
Strauss: Salome, Final Scene. Lied an
Meinen Sohn, Op. 39, No. 5; Des Dichters
Abendgang, Op. 47, No. 2. Wolf: Gesang
Weylas. Hans Pfitzner: Stimme der Sehnsucht, Op. 19, No. I; Michaelskirchplatz,
Op. 19, No. 2; Die Einsame, Op. 9, No. 2.
Weatherly: Danny Boy. Lemon: My Ain
Folk. Hook: Doun the Burn.
Marjorie Lawrence, soprano; orchestra;
Felix Wolfes, piano.
CAMDEN CAL 216. 12 -in. $1.98.
As those who have given attention to a
movie called Interrupted Melody will have
gathered (even though they may never have
heard its heroine other than in the soundtrack person of Eileen Farrell), Marjorie
Lawrence was a very considerable singer,
well on her way to what might have been
a really great career when she was taken
with poliomyelitis in 1941; and though she
has won a sort of moral victory over her
disability, it is impossible to hear the performances re-released here without feeling
pangs of regret for what she could have
become. Born in Australia in 1908, she
made her debut in France in 1932, and had
not been singing ten years in public, was
scarcely into her thirties, when her operatic
career was squeezed off. This recording is
the work of a young and relatively inexperienced singer who should be right at
the peak of her career now, twenty years
later.
This is singing that is most definitely
worth hearing. The item of greatest general
interest is, no doubt, the final scene from
Salome, an opera that Miss Lawrence sang
here for the first time in 1937, after having
made her debut at the Metropolitan two
seasons earlier. This recording, however,
dates back to her earlier Paris success in
the opera and is sung in French, with Piero
Coppola conducting the Pasdeloup Orchestra (a bit of data that might be given on
the label, but it is not). Originally cut by
HMV, it was for a time in the 193os the
completest version of the scene to be had
on records and was released here when
Miss Lawrence became a salable commodity.
It is a fine, supple, gleamingly sung performance, not as taut and vital dramatically
as later performances at the Metropolitan,
but very fine in its way. The studio recording was notably good twenty-odd years ago,
and it is still better than merely tolerable.
From the first, there was a tendency to snub
this version because of the French text. This
seems somewhat sophistical, for the play
was originally written in French, and the
text as sung scans very acceptably with
Strauss's setting; if Strauss didn't complain,
why should anyone else?
In terms of unusuality, the most interesting conclusions of all are the Pfitzner songs,
so far as a cursory checkwhich are not
otherwise to be heard on LP at
up shows
idioall. Too conservatively romantic
to please all of
syncratically conservative
his contemporaries, Pfitzner was a contro-
--
54
-
versial figure during the better part of his
long life (he was born in 1869 and lived
on until 1949). And he still is. To some
people, his Palestrina is one of the greatest
of all operas; to others it is a bore. The
songs here are not exactly Palestrina, but
they are quite characteristically Pfitzner,
and to those who are responsive to his
individual melos they are very lovely,
breathing as they do somewhat (but only
somewhat) the same romantic air as the
songs of Mahler.
J. H., JR.
reverberation not only renders the words
indistinguishable but, what is more important, blurs the melodic lines. Only the
voices of the (boy) sopranos come through
clearly. Latin texts and English translations
are provided.
N. B.
MERE COURAGE
Germaine Montero, with orchestra conducted by Raymond Chevreux.
VANGUARD VRS 7027. ro -in. $3.95.
Full-blown, proficient, yet rather slick orchestral arrangements of these two popular
Richard Rodgers scores, resulting in a form
of musical inflation that I find unattractive
as well as inappropriate to the original
material. The vernal freshness of Oklahoma!, one of its principal charms, is
almost completely lost in this welter of
orchestral sound; and if Carousel emerges
from the onslaught slightly less scathed,
this is due more to its inherent dramatic
content than to any slackening of Gould's
attentions. If you are not averse to this
sort of manipulation, the record is recommended for the excellence of RCA Victor's
bristling sound and for an extremely lively
and well -balanced performance from Gould
and his men.
J. F. I.
The play Mère Courage is by Berthold
Brecht, who supplied the libretto for The
Three Penny Opera; the score is by Paul
Dessau, a composer completely unknown
to me, whose music has a sharp, ironic bite
in the tradition of Kurt Weill. The songs
themselves deal with hunger, struggle of a
kind, and courage. Montero sings them
most persuasively, her dark, vibrant, earthy toned voice suiting their contents well. No
French texts, but adequate English translaJ. F. I.
tions, and very good sound.
THE
VENETIAN
MOTETS
OF
SCHOOL
A. Gabrieli: In dechacordo psa/terio;
Sacerdos et pontifex; Filix Jerusalem;
Maria Magdalene; Cor meum; Annuntiate
inter gentes: Asola: Lapidaverunt Stephanum: Te gloriosus; Ave Rex poster; Cum
auteur venisset: Surge propera; O altitudo
divitisrum; Tu es Petras; Nasco: Facti sont
hostes; Ave Maria; Porta: Prwparate corda
rests; Viadana: O sacrum convivium
Choir of the Cappella di Treviso, Giovanni
d'Alessi, cond.
Vox PL 879o. 12 -in. 55.95.
None of these interesting sixteenth -century
pieces, for three to five voices and sung a
cappella, seems to have been recorded on
LP before. It is therefore regrettable that
the valiant efforts of Monsignor d'Alessi
were defeated by the engineers. The chorus
sounds like a fairly large one recorded in
a very large enclosure, and the resulting
RODGERS -GOULD
Suites from Oklahoma! and Carousel
Morton Gould and his orchestra.
RCA VICTOR LM 1884. 12 -in. $3.98.
CESARE SIEPI
Operatic Recital
Gomes: Salvator Rosa: Di sposo, di padre,
le gioie serene. Verdi: Simon Boccanegra:
Il lacerato spirito. Meyerbeer: Les Huguenots. Seigneur, Rampert et Seul Soutien;
Pill, pail! Robert le Diable: Nonnes, qui
reposez. Halévy: La Juive: Si la rigueur.
Cesare Siepi, bass; Orchestra di l'Accademia
di Santa Cecilia (Rome), Alberto Erede,
cond.
LONDON LD 9169. Io -in. $2.98.
The repertoire to be heard from this
little disk is far, far more stimulating than
the general run of such things
much
more stimulating, in fact, that all one
can say of the results is that they are worth
being unhappy about. The summarizing
effect is of musics recorded without suitable
thought or preparation, simply-or at
least mainly
because someone looked
through a book of bass arias and thought it
might be nice to give these a whirl, on the
comforting assurance that Cesare Siepi has
a record -buying public.
The Meyerbeer excerpts, for instance,
have a most distinguished past on records
and deserve much better than they get here.
Recording: Very clear and resonant, if
somewhat close to the ear. No texts, notes
that are fair, but that have a questionable
current of taste in the instance of La Juive.
J. H., JR.
-so
-
PAUL ULANOWSKY ACCOMPANIES
YOU
Schumann: Widmung; Du bist nie eine
Blume: Mondnacht; Ich grolle nicht. Schubert: Die Forelle; Ungeduld; Die Post;
Heiden Röslein; Horch, horch, die Lerch.
Brahms: Die Melodien; Feldeinsamkeit;
Meine Liebe ist grün.
Paul Ulanowsky, piano.
-or
BOSTON
Paul
Ulanousky,
ghost accompanist.
B
502. 10-in. $3.72.
Continued on page 57
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
TO
l
building your record library
number twenty -three
PHILIP MILLER SUGGESTS A BASIC
COLLECTION OF ART SONGS
THE CONNOISSEUR of the art song long playing records
are by no means an unmixed blessing. There is nothing so merciless in showing a singer's limitations as a song recital, and when
this recital is made permanent for indefinite repetition it can be
positively cruel. A completely representative anthology of recorded
songs is therefore a manifest impossibility; any choice of ten disks
must be a compromise. For if we would include the songs that
should figure on any basic list, and these in outstanding interpretations (for nothing less will do) we must carry along with them
more than a little unwanted repertoire.
Such a basic list should include songs by Schubert, Schumann,
Brahms, Wolf, and Strauss (possibly Mozart, Beethoven, Franz, and
Loewe); Faure, Debussy, Duparc and Poulenc; Dowland, Purcell,
and Vaughan Williams (perhaps Warlock, and Britton; MacDowell,
Griffes, and Ives); Grieg and Kilpinen; Mussorgsky (possibly
Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninoff). There would be a place for some
of the classic Italian masters, something old and something new
from Spain. Along with operatic arias, songs with orchestra must
be excluded. Now, how many of the right songs can you find on
current lists sung by the right singers? Such great interpreters as
Elena Gerhardt, Julia Culp, and Gerhard Hüsch have not yet been
discovered by the makers of long playing records; Clément and
Gilibert, whose famous song interpretations were never too well
represented, are known only to older collectors; even Povla Frijsh
and Eva Gauthier are conspicuous by their absence, while available
recordings of Lotte Lehmann and Elisabeth Schumann are spotty
at best. If our list is to include no songs of which we are ashamed,
and no performances below a great singer's standard, the choice is
very considerably narrowed.
It seems appropriate to begin with one of the great song cycles
of Schubert. This should not be too difficult, since we have a
choice of seven singers in Die schöne Müllerin and four in Die
Winterreise, yet in nearly every case the record leaves something to
be desired. The two best performances of Winterreise, by Victor
Carne and Hans Hotter, both lack tonal appeal, though the singers
are musicianly, and both know how to convey the meaning of the
texts. Carne, the less dramatic of the two, has the advantage of
singing the songs in the original keys. In Die schöne Müllerin
this last consideration would count for more than it does were it
not that the best of the tenors, Aksel Schi¢tz, is hampered by aging
recording and a not too happy job of transfer to LP. Dietrich
Fischer-Dieskau, assisted like Schi¢tz by the invaluable Gerald
Moore, has the benefit of modern reproduction (RCA Victor
LHMV 6). Young as this singer is, he has already proven on more
than one occasion that his is an outstanding intellect, and that he
is a musician whose quite ample and impressive voice serves only
as a vehicle for the songs he sings, which, after all, is the essence
of fine lieder- singing. I am tempted to add at least a couple more
of his recordings, but these must make way for others.
It would be pleasant to follow this recording with one of the
seven versions we have of Schumann's Dichterliebe, but incomparably the best two of these, by Schiritz and Moore and by Panzéra
and Cortot, are now issued on the same disk in Victors "Treasury"
series. Aside from their somewhat faded reproduction, we could
hardly afford space for two performances of the same cycle! Let us
pass on, then, to the fine Hugo Wolf Recital, including the
Michelangelo Lieder, by Hotter and Moore (Angel 35057). The
singer's treatment of certain lines of the texts might well be
studied by any aspiring young artist. My third choice must again
be Wolf, but such is the variety of his musical treatment of the
various poets, such the divergence of styles between the Goethe
and Michelangelo songs we have from Hotter and those from his
Italienisches Liederbuch, of which Irmgard Seefried gives us
twenty-three (Decca DL 9743) that the balance of our list is not
thrown so tar as we might expect. The soprano's fine voice and her
appealing vocal style are at their best in these miniature dramas. I
am not con happy about the inclusion at the end of this recital of
six folk and folklike songs of Brahms, because the program would
have been better rounded with more of Wolf, yet in this way we
can represent another important lieder composer, and surely the
AUGUST 1955
singing is lovely enough. Erik Werba is the accompanist.
The French repertoire offers a greater problem, not that we do
not have distinguished performances to choose from, but few of
these recitals seem to belong on our ratified list. Singher, Souzay,
and Tourel have given us programs that are too miscellaneous;
Danco s admirable Debussy does not quite match the effect of the
now old recording by Maggie Teyte; a whole disk of Poulenc sung
by Bernac would seem extravagant. I would settle, rather, on one
of the most unusual recordings in the field, in which the admirable
mezzo-soprano Irma Kolassi offers us an all but unique opportunity
to hear Fauré's late cycle, La Chanson d'Eve, and Milhaud's
affecting Poèmes Juifs, with André Collard at the piano (London
Lt. 919). As a distinguished performance admirably reproduced,
this is not matched by any of the available recordings of more
familiar Fauré. Nor do any of the recent Debussy recitals rank
with it; as for Duparc, he has yet to receive even adequate treatment in the age of LP.
Various singers have tried their voices in programs of Italian
Arie autiche, but the results have been, to say the least, variable.
The most recent of these seems to me the most successful: indeed it
provides some of the finest singing we have had in many months.
This is the second Italian recital of Magda Laszlo, (Italien Airs),
assisted by Franz Holetschek, including arias by Vivaldi, Caldara,
Martini, Bononcini, and others (Westminster WL 5375). Three
thirteenth -century Laude from the Liuzzi collection, here attributed
to Pergolesi, are beautifully sung by the clear -voiced soprano. Perhaps this is the place to mention the classic Spanish songs sung to
the harpsichord by Victoria de los Angeles, and the modern ones
with piano, though the program is disqualified by its coupling with
Folio's opera La Vida breve.
I should like to represent the Russians with Mussorgsky, but I
am not sufficiently impressed with the various recordings of Songs
and Dances of Death, or with available miscellaneous recitals.
Maria Kurenko has sung The Nursery along with a side of Rachmaninoff songs, but somehow I find myself preferring her second
collection of Rachmaninoff Songs for the Rachmaninoff Society,
with Laurence Rosenthal at the piano (RS 5). Some of the songs
are well- known, though not necessarily under the titles as listed
"The Fountain," "It is pleasant here," "Yesterday we met." etc. One
feels that her interpretations are absolutely authoritative. Beside
this disk I would place the first selection of Hungarian Folk
Songs by Bartók and Kodály sung by Leslie Chabay with Tibor
Kozma assisting ( Bartók BRS 904). To be sure these are arrangements of folk melodies, but they are touched with great art, and
after all they are the foundations of the musical styles of Hungary's
two great modern masters. One need not understand Hungarian to
enjoy the spirited performances.
Coming now to our own language, I must include a set of
Elizabethan Love Songs, sung in admirably clear English by the
Swiss tenor Hugues Cuenod (Lyrichord LL 37). The most affecting number in a fine program including Dowland, Pilkington,
Jones, and Bull is the anonymous "Drink to me only with thine
eyes," done for once with the text as Ben Jonson wrote it, and to a
newly arranged harpsichord accompaniment by Claude Chiasson.
To represent our own country we have a very recent set of Charles
Ives Songs so superbly performed by Helen Boatwright and John
Kirkpatrick that the exclusion of all other Americans seems unimportant. The songs themselves, set to poems of widely varying
merit, range from the naïve to the musically daring, yet they all
become little masterpieces in this unaffected and tonally lovely
performance (Overtone 7).
Finally, in tribute to one of our greatest vocal artists, I offer
The Art of Roland Hayes, a program ranging historically from
Guillaume de Machaut to arrangements of spirituals by Mr. Hayes
himself (Vanguard VRS 448 -9: as this is a two -disk set I will leave
the choice of one open). No need to apologize for the voice of the
sixty- eight- year -old singer; he has enough left, and he remains one
of our outstanding interpreters. The recording is unusually fine,
the singing especially well balanced with the expert piano playing
of Reginald Boardman.
-
"
55
RECORDS
The Golden Age Through Mapleson's Magic Horn
AMONG THE MOST celebrated inheritances of the common past of opera and
the phonograph are the amateur recordings
made by Lionel Mapleson at the Metropolitan at the turn of the century. Now they
have become available, for the first time, on
microgroove. Some present day opera
lovers will greet them with rapture. Others
will be disappointed, or simply baffled.
As to why this may be, there is a clue in
the jocular legend on the envelope of the
recording. "THIS IS NOT A HIGH
FIDELITY RECORD,' it says, and there is
cause for the undertone of asperity, for
with the coming of LP and the development of more and more modern recording
techniques there has grown up a whole
new breed of vocal- record enthusiast, a
breed that not only questions the timehonored assay of the Golden Age but refuses the currency. And they write letters.
To one who grew up on a mixed but predominantly acoustical record library, added
to it as time went by, and made the transition to LP gradually, it is quite amazing
how many post -1948 devotees of opera -onrecords regard the Golden Age as pretty
much a dead loss; they have tried to listen
to those old records, they say, but all they
can hear is rumble and distortion.
The discouraging thing is that so many
seem entirely unable to distinguish between
the quality of the singing and the quality
of the recording. Granted, the worse a
recording is technically the harder it is to
get any very complete idea of what a singer
was like, and there is always the unevaluatable (except by second -hand authority)
the voice whose quality somefactor X
how did not lend itself well to recording.
But there is in even the least successful
acoustical recording a residue of very positive evidence that can be heard with a little
intelligent trying. After all, no one with
any sense refuses to look at Brady's Civil
War photographs because they are not in
Kodachrome or to see Garbo in Camille
because it was not filmed in Cinemascope.
Or perhaps they do. And perhaps they are
the same people as the opera enthusiasts
who will have nothing to do with recordings such as these.
Even as Golden Age acousticals go, these
fragments are very special. Perhaps the
most fascinating single thing about them is
the fact that they were made during
actual opera -house performances. In 1900,
Thomas A. Edison gave a cylinder- recording machine to Lionel Mapleson, the
Metropolitan Opera orchestra librarian. He
kept it in the opera house and during 19or,
19oz, and 1903 cut cylinders during performances, a couple of minutes at a time,
from a point high in the wings. Considering the distance from the stage to the
acoustical horn, it is amazing that he got
anything at all; but though the original
cylinders did not give back a very loud
signal, he got an amazing lot. Subsequently, the cylinders were played and replayed,
and apparently not always handled with
the greatest care. Some of them developed
grindings and thumpings over and above
-
56
the normal complement for hill- and -dale
recordings. But, as reproduced by the International Record Collectors' Club, first
on 78s, and now
with the music brought
forward into somewhat surer audibility
on LP, the results are sometimes badly
flawed, but always worth hearing.
The general effect is of listening from
backstage, through a door that keeps suddenly opening and closing, to bits of pieces
of performances. The vantage point is at a
little distance from the singers, and they
-
-
Mapleson with the acoustical gramophone
seem to be heard through a certain amount of
backstage clatter; sometimes they move out
of the line of hearing, and sometimes the
noise obscures the voices. But, mostly, they
can be heard quite well enough for the
listener to get a very definite sense of personalities and occasionally of the full
impact of virtuosity that, in terms of the
opera house today, is quite literally beyond
the wildest imaginings. In a sense even
more striking, from the technical point of
view, is the full orchestral sound that somehow managed to make its way through the
little neck of the recording horn when all
was going well with the machine -suggesting that the old -time engineers were
quite wrong in thinking that even 1900
acoustical equipment could not carry the
weight of instrumental sonorities.
In fact, all of these factors combine to
make one of the most impressive bands on
this record
the opening of Pagliacci, Act
II. The opening bass drum sounds like
just a resonant thump, but then the orchestra and chorus play and sing so superbly
well under Philippe Flon (who ever heard
of him ?) and Antonio Scotti's Tonio has
such immense vigor and brio that the
whole thing takes fire as few Pagliacci performances ever do, or ever could have.
Another wonderful ensemble (again with
Flon conducting) is the Act II Rataplan
from La Pille du Régiment, with Charles
Gilibert doing a really fabulous job in the
buffo part, Thomas Salignac (one, with
Jean de Reszke, Albert Saléza, and Georg
Anthes of the otherwise unrecorded pre Caruso tenors represented here) as Tonio,
and Marcella Sembrich rattling off the
-
coloratura with a style and attack that make
memories of Lily Pons seem terribly pale
including
by comparison. The Wagner
Jean de Reszke's Siegfried (his only recording apart from the L'Africaine fragment
that is, similarly, Lucienne Bréval's only
one, in spite of her thirty-year reign at the
Paris Opéra) -comes out less well.
The real stunners of the whole record
are the four excerpts from the Act III
Valentin -Marcel duet from Les Huguenots,
Reszke, low E -fiat and all, and even more
the fabulous bit from the
Queen's part, in which,
out of an awful thumping and grinding noise,
Nellie Melba's voice suddenly gleams through,
free and full and sure as
she hurls it up an impossible arpeggiated scale,
with full resonance, ending on a B that rings in
the ear for seconds after
she has taken the cadence. Mapleson left the
needle in the groove, and
just as the cylinder ends
the house roars into
applause. And it damn
well should have. No
Golden Age, with Melba,
Sembrich,
Calve',
Edison gave him. Gadski, Nordica, and
Bréval, to name only
sopranos, and with Schumann -Heink and
Louise Homer and Mathilde Bauermeister singing Valkyries?
Who doubts,
let him listen.
To those who care
about singing, not just about singers, this
disk is essential.
JAMES HINTON, JR.
-
ECHOES OF THE GOLDEN AGE OF
OPERA
Fragments of performances recorded in the
Metropolitan Opera House, New York, in
1901 and 1903. Donizetti: La Fille du
Régiment. Verdi: La Traviata. Leoncavallo: Pagliacci. Meyerbeer: L'Africaine:
Les Huguenots.
Wagner: Tristan und
Isolde: Lohengrin: Die Walküre; Siegfried.
Gounod: Faust.
Marcella Sembrich (s), Nellie Melba (s),
Johanna Gadski (s), Lillian Nordica (s),
Emma Calve (s), Lucienne Bréval (s);
Ernestine Schumann -Heink (c), Mathilde
Bauermeister (ms), Louise Homer (c),
Marie van Cauteren (ms), Thomas Salignac (t), Carlo Dani (t), Georg Anthes
(t), Jean de Reszke (t), Albert Alvarez
(t), Albert Saléza (t), Andreas Dippel
(t), Antonio Scotti (b), Giuseppe Cam panari (b) , David Bispham (b) , Charles
Gilibert (b), Edouard de Reszke (bs), and
numerous others. Metropolitan Opera
Chorus and Orchestra, Philippe Flon, Luigi
Mancinelli, Alfred Hertz, Walter Damrosch,
Armando Seppilli, tonds.
INTERNATIONAL RECORD COLLECTORS'
CLUB IRCC L -7006. to -in. $4.00. (Avail-
able from the club, 3 t8 Reservoir Avenue,
Bridgeport 6, Conn. Inquiry as to shipping
details should be made in advance.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
Continued from page 54
Paul Ulanowsky is probably the finest of
the accompanists heard regularly with
singers in New York's Town Hall during
the season, and for fourteen years he
toured with Lotte Lehmann. His accompaniments here should prove of inestimable
value to students of singing, since his own
superlative phrasing and timing can force
them when they sing with this record into
some musicianly phrasing on their part.
The budding accompanist should profit
from hearing the unencumbered piano
from trying to sing the songs
parts and
with Mr. Ulanowsky
should learn where
and how singers are dependent on what the
accompanist does. The songs are played in
which is almost always
the original keys
in the soprano register. Fair sound, with
the piano tone not the roundest. It will do
R. E.
under the circumstances.
-
-
-
AV
by C. G. Burke
6oto.
5
-in.
71
ips.
r029 -E.
7 -in.
71/2
(with
ips.
Sandra
2
tracks.
$10.95.
BEETHOVEN
Sonatas for Piano: No. 8, in C Minor,
"Pathétique," Op. 13; No. 14, in Csharp minor, "Moonlight," Op. 27,
No. 2
OMEGATAPE
HAYDN
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, in C;
Poco Adagio Cantabile from the "Emperor" Quartet, Op. 76, No. 3
}Bach: Suite No. 3, in D
[Corelli: Suite for Strings
Hamburg Philharmonia Orchestra, Hans
Juergen -Walther, cond.
Bianca in the Concerto).
MUSIC ON TAPE
Bernard Vitebsky.
An estimable product from all points of
view, especially vivid in the playing and
sound of the piano. The pianist transmits
a spirit of good- humored entertainment in
his display passages, which are brilliant
enough but not serious. Since this is an
imaginative and valuable concerto although
it needs a rest, novelty of a tasteful sort is
welcome. The long lyricism of the adagio
is treated with respect, and the ca- ordination
of piano and orchestra is notable in both
shape and balance. Registration of the
piano treble has been accomplished with a
clean clarity still very rare in recordings.
2
tracks.
$6.45 -
The very early Haydn, winsome but frail,
is a first recording, and we shall all regret
that it was not entrusted to hands less dutifully devoted to tidiness. This virtue seems
to take exclusive precedence in the work of
the conductor here, and the pianist has
been infected by his promotion of it. The
other extensive work, the lively suite by
Bach, is equally deficient in variety, élan
and a sense of sport. The Corelli, best
It is not possible for a critic to feel enthusiasm for new manifestations of this music,
of which there is already an aggregate of
thirty recordings. These are standard performances, and the piano issues a sound of
good realism a little light in the bass,
probably a faithful reflection of the performing left hand.
BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 5, in C minor, Op. 67
Tonhalle Orchestra, Zurich, Otto Acker mann, cond.
MUSIKON 604. 7 -in. 71/2 ips. r track. $to.
The confidence which promoted an issuance
of the Fifth Symphony on tape, braving
comparison with nineteen discal editions
including one binaural and several orchestrally imposing, a confidence not without
an upstart's effrontery, proclaims its justification in the opening minutes of reproduction. In downright sonic effectiveness this
tape is excelled only by the Cook binaural
record of a performance less convincing
than most. Fundamentally what impresses
on the tape is its strong, pervasive, clean
and natural bass, which carries life with it.
The rest is good but not remarkable. There
is a little too much length of reverberation,
and the interpretation, although not to be
despised, is on the stocky side and not
illuminating. A brave and successful demonstration of 7.5 -ips effectiveness in standard music.
GRIEG
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, in A
minor, Op. r6
Grant Johannesen; Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra, Walter Goehr, cond.
MUSIKON 6o1. 7 -in. 71/2 ips. t track. $to.
AUGUST 1955
7005.
OMEGATAPE
5
-in.
ips.
71/2
2
tracks. $6.95.
The placement of the orchestra and a
slighted reverberation give a chamber music quality to these timely evocations of
mood in season. Both pieces -which comprise an unusually appropriate coupling, for
tape or disk
are played with unforced
sympathy contained by a restraint in accordance with the benignity of a holiday
summer. With interpretations so conceived, the sound, allowing crispness and
scope to the woodwinds and keeping the
smooth strings in subordination, cannot be
faulted.
The Prokofiev Suite, composed
for piano, has its first orchestral recording
here.
-
-
MENDELSSOHN
A Midsummer Night's Dream: 4 excerpts
tTchaikovsky: Nutcracker Suite No. r;
Sleeping Beauty: Waltz
Hamburg Philharmonia Orchestra, Hans
Juergen -Walther, cond.
AV ro32 -E. 7 -in. 71 ips. 2 tracks.
$10.95.
AV 1032 -F.
5 -in. 33/4
ips. 2 tracks. $8.95.
The Overture, Scherzo, Nocturne, and Wedding March from the MSND, gentlemanly
to surfeit. The favorite composer of Victoria RI needs a conductor to dishevel him.
The Tchaikovsky too is content in a tranquillity which may not content us. The
regularity of balanced play, commendable
in itself, could be welcomed in other music.
-The sound is excellent in the cool way
which is really the way of the conductor,
with the brass precise but subdued, the
strings smooth and the wood lively, all in
balance.
With some diminution of treble brightness and bass articulation, the 33/4 version
is nevertheless surprisingly good. It is
above all easy and euphonious, the faster
tape heard at a greater distance, and the
difference not to be exposed except by first class apparatus.
SCHUBERT
Quartet No. ro, in E -fiat, Op. 125, No. r
tHaydn: Quartet No. r8, in F, Op. 3,
No. 5
tMendelssohn: Octet in E -flat, Op. 2o;
Quintet in B -fiat, Op.
Andante
Scherzando only
Fine Arts Quartet (augmented for the
Octet and Quintet).
87-
WEBCOR 2923 -5. 7-in.
Otto Ackermann: best Beethoven on tape?
played of the music on this crowded tape,
is a synthetic collection occasionally heard
in public concert, and a pleasant amalgam
of dignity and spoofing. Facile reproduction
and agreeable, although not notable in
articulation.
KODALY
Summer Evening
[Prokofiev: A Summer Day, Op. 656
Concert Artist Orchestra of London, Mervyn Vicars, cond.
71/2 ips.
2
tracks.
String quartets on tape are easier in reproduction than on disks. The violins are
orderly, and there is no sense of strain. The
acoustics of the place used for recording
generally determine the quality of registration on tape, when small groups of players
are used. The environment here is sonically
close to neutrality and the results are excellent. So is the playing of the Schubert,
to which the musicians have devoted delineative care not apparent in their bare treatment of the Haydn. The Octet, not deficient
in energy or skill, nevertheless disappoints
vaguely in a delivery that never seems
pointed to a culmination. (Here it is admitted that the Toscanini performance, still
vivid in mind, has been prejudicial to this
new tape or any other performance.)
57
RI:CORD5
THE MUSIC BETWEEN
by Robert Kotlowitz
THE BEST OF FRED ASTAIRE
Day; They All Laughed; Cheek to
Cheek; I Can't Be Bothered Now; They
Can't Take That Away from Me; A Fine
Romance; Let's Call the Whole Thing OfJ;
Slap That Bass; Change Partners; Things
Are Looking Up; Nice Work If You Can
Get It; Dig It.
A Foggy
-
-
More echoes
joining Paris, Italy, Latin
America, and Broadway, among others
from George Feyer, probably the ablest
cocktail -lounge pianist to be heard on records. Mr. Feyer's secret is revealed as soon
as he starts to fool around with the keyboard: he has intelligence and musical
imagination, and neither quality is allowed
to patronize his material. Naturally, both
the music and the listener benefit, and to
complete the bargain Vox has added close up but not smothering sound.
Fred Astaire.
EPIC LN 3137. 12-in. $3.95.
The title of this delightful album is a
misnomer. The best of Fred Astaire is
visual; it comes from his feet, not his
larynx, and it's absurd to pretend otherwise.
Nevertheless, the voice, thin and reedy as
it is, has value and style, if only because it
brings to mind again those wonderful,
wisecracking movies in which Astaire and
Ginger Rogers charmed us all in the
Thirties. The album will take you happily
on a return trip through many of them,
and every now and then it even offers a
sudden outburst of tapping feet while
Astaire rests his voice. The songs were all
recorded in the Thirties. No hi -fi, but you
do get the feeling of being "back there,"
and it's fun.
ing; Estrellita; Tango Bolero; Frou -Frou.
Casanova and his Orchestra.
VOX vx 780. to -in. $4.75.
Several old stand -bys played by a fairly big
orchestra that serves up thick juicy sounds.
Vox recognizes this fact by recording them
almost as hi as fi will go today, but the
results are never more than standardly
pleasant.
DEE- LIGHTFUL
Plantation Boogie; Laura; Yes Sir, That's
My Bab,; Siboney; Sweet Georgia Brown;
Little Brown Jug; September S g: Ballin'
the Jack; Exactly Like You; The World Is
Waiting for the Sunrise; The Donkey
Serenade; The Birth of the Blues
Lenny Dee, organ.
DECCA DI. 81 14.
12 -in. $ 3.98.
Conventional and competent organ solos of
the kind that accompanies- or used to
show breaks at big movie
accompany
houses. A drummer helps Mr. Dee along,
and together they stir up quite a bit of
sound. Recommended only to organ
enthusiasts who can stomach pop music on
that instrument.
-
ECHOES OF HOLLYWOOD
Easter Parade; Lili; Cheek to Cheek; Our
Love is Here to Stay; Lovely to Look At;
An American in Paris; The Carioca; Isn't
It Romantic ?; Third Man Theme; Alexander's Rag Time Band; The Continental;
Terry's Theme; Cocktails for Two; Donkey
Serenade.
George Feyer, pianist.
Vox vx Soo. ro -in. $4.75.
58
paradoxically
MOOD FOR LOVE
I'm in The Mood for Love; What A Difference a Day Made; Stars Fell on Alabama:
There Goes My Heart; Melody of Love;
Pennies from Heaven; Let's Fall in Love;
Don't Take Your Love from Me; It's the
Talk of the Town; Three Coins in the
Fountain; Stranger in Paradise; I'm Sitting
the World.
The Four Aces, featuring Al Alberts.
DECCA DL 8122. 12 -in. $3.98.
o.. Top of
The Four Aces are one of the most popular
male quartets in the country; there was a
time, not too long ago, when it was almost
impossible to turn on the radio without
interrupting their performance of Three
Coins in the Fountain. This also holds
true, more or less, for several other songs
included in Mood for Love, and if you're
not wearied of such pop successes as
Stranger in Paradise and Melody of Love,
as well as Three Coins, The Four Aces will
certainly brighten them to a fine gleam for
you. But it should be pointed out that the
gleam on one song is pretty much identical
with the gleam on another.
From George Feyer, a Hollywood cocktail.
CARESSES
Easy to Love; I Believe; La Cumparsita;
Love for Sale; Three O'Clock in the Morn-
-
with
play on the word
vigorous, forthright sound.
ITALIAN POPULAR FAVORITES
'E cummarelle; Firenze sogna; Bella si to
vuo' sape'; Pasquale militare; Sciummo;
Maria Rosa; Torna dimane; 'A Luciana
Aurelio Fierro, tenor.
DURIUM DLU 96003. 10 -in. $2.98.
MUSIC FOR A LAZY AFTERNOON
Willow Weep for Me; Tall Trees; Flashing
Pearls; Serenade D'Amour; Little Jumping
Jack; Evening Mist; Waltz Theme from
Blithe Spirit; The Singing Zither; Lotus
Land; The Grasshopper.
Orchestra conducted by Camarata.
DECCA DL 81 r 2. 12-in. $3.98.
This is a combination of both sentimental
and spirited pops, and they are sung with
unaffected grace by a light tenor named
Aurelio Fierro, whose voice and crooning
delivery seem almost typically Italian. One
complaint only: since the jacket copy
claims that the lyrics to these songs are far
superior to their American counterparts, it
would have been a nice idea to have included their English translations.
Most of the tunes on this record are so
languorous that they are practically guaranteed to keep you from getting anything
done. This may be a strictly negative accomplishment but it has its utility on a hot
afternoon. The melodies are all silken in
performance by the Camarata orchestra and
include several of the conductor's own
misty compositions. Decca, incidentally, has
dressed up the jacket with a reproduction
of Seurat's Sunday Afternoon on the
Grande -Jatte, and it turns out to be a
shrewd choice, indeed, to match the album's
mood.
MELODIES OF LOVE
Melody of Love; Yamscthik; Carefree;
Lydia; My Chrysanthemum Flower; My
Buddy; Blue Hours; Occhi -Turchini; My
Wonderful One; Waltz Huguette; That
Naughty Waltz; The Waltz You Saved for
PIANO RHYTHMS FROM ITALY
The Peanut Vendor; Viale d'autunno; Giochi proibiti; Wonderful Copenhagen; Mogliettina; Aveva un bavero; Tutte le
Me.
Wayne King and his Orchestra.
DECCA DL 8124. 12 -in. $3.98.
The young son of a friend of mine once
threw a temper tantrum when his parents
insisted on listening to the Wayne King
orchestra on radio; the conclusion reached
was that the well -known King blandness
simply unnerved the child. Millions who
have reached their majority, however, find
this quality exactly to their raste; it was
Wayne King, after all, who played at the
President's Inaugural Ball. Still, he remains
to many listeners the symbol of musical
atrophy; sometimes it is possible to wonder
just where the beat went to. Decca has
and I mean a
bolstered the undertaking
-
mamme; Canzone da due soldi
Luciano Sangiorgi, piano; with rhythm
accompaniment.
DURIUM DLU 96005. Io -in. $2.98.
Luciano Sangiorgi's piano rhythms from
Italy turn out to be quiet and fairly
thoughtful exercises in a style completely
indigenous to every cocktail lounge in
Europe and the United States. It is all extremely pleasant and inoffensive, and you'll
find familiar echoes in almost all the selections, ranging from Chopin to George
Feyer (another expert at this sort of stuff).
The recorded sound is excellent.
STRAUSS WALTZES
Blue Danube; Southern Roses; Tales from
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
the Vienna Woods; Waltz from The Gypsy
Baron; Waltzes from Die Fledermaus; Artist's life; Voices of Spring: Emperor
Waltz; Vienna Life; A Thousand and One
Nights
Andre Kostelanetz and his Orchestra.
COLUMBIA ML 4993. 12 -in. $4.98.
"Special" arrangements of Strauss waltzes,
with the cutting apparently so heavy on
some of them that they seem to be over
almost before they've begun. What's left
gets a rather hefty shove rhythmically from
the Kostelanetz band, which never manages
to achieve the superlative level of at least
several Strauss recordings issued by Vanguard and London, among others, in the
recent past.
THE BEST OF JAZZ
by John S. Wilson
COUNT BASIE AND HIS ORCHESTRA
Seventh Avenue Express; My Buddy; Mister
Roberts' Roost; Wonderful Thing; If You
See My Baby; Katy; South; Sweets; Rat
Race; Just an Old Manuscript; Basie's
Basement; Lopin'.
This, again, is a mixture of new issues and
reissues. In this case, the reissues predominate -Ain't Gonna Give Nobody None
of This Jelly Roll, Skeleton Jangle, and
Trombone Preaching Blues are the items
which have never before been available
(the rest have been on the Circle label) .
The disk is notable for bringing together
three masters of the rough -toned attack
Davison, Archey, and Hall. Davison has
managed, like a musical Peter Pan, to
maintain the rough and ready sound of the
Chicago jazz of the Twenties, while Archey
is a glorious exponent of New Orleans tailgate, and Hall, another New Orleans man,
has added a caustic touch to the usually
creamy New Orleans clarinet style.
Archey is a particular delight on these
numbers, huffing enthusiastically in both
background and foreground and giving an
all-around demonstration of his slower
style on Trombone Preaching Blues. And
Danny Barker, a guitarist of subtlety and
taste, adds to almost every number with
both chortled and single -string solos. One
of the highlights of the set is Can't We Be
Friends on which the ensemble shows what
a merry clobbering an astute group of jazzmen can give a pop tune. The recordings
were taken from several broadcasts in 1947
and, accordingly, the balances vary. The
range is somewhat limited.
-
RCA VICTOR LPM 1112. 12 -in. $3.98.
DON ELLIOTT DOUBLES IN BRASS
The last days of the old Basie band (194750) are represented on this disk which is
made up of a mixture of previously unreleased and reissued sides. South, My
Buddy, Basiés Basement (with Basie on
organ) , and Seventh Avenue Express are
the reissues. Six of the numbers are by the
full band, six by small groups. Basie has
never lacked for talented sidemen and even
in its twilight days this band could still
boast of Emmett Berry, Harry Edison, Clark
Terry, Dicky Wells, Paul Gonsalves and
the original Basie rhythm section.
It was, inevitably, a swinging group, still
swinging in the driving manner of the
early Basie success but varying it with such
an atypical performance as Katy, a lovely
melodic, slow conception with some unusual trumpet- over-saxes work. Wonderful
Thing is also in this relaxed vein. The
small group selections are in the usual
Basie manner except for Lopin' in which
Basie shares the spotlight with baritone
saxophonist Ronald Washington. This is a
varied collection, most of it well above
average. The only outright failure is South,
a peculiarly gutless version of a tune for
which Basie might be expected to have
some affection. The recording is good for
its time.
Wally's Theme; Blues for Brother Herb;
My Heart Stood Still; Do Nothing Till
You Hear from Me; Out of This World;
WILD BILL DAVISON
Eccentric; Tishomingo Blues; Clarinet
Marmalade; Trombone Preaching Blues;
Can't We Be Friends: Skeleton Jangle;
Ain't Gonna Give Nobody None of This
Jelly Roll; It's Right Here for You.
Wild Bill Davison, trumpet; Jimmy Archey,
trombone; Albert Nicholas or Edmund
Hall, clarinet; Ralph Sutton or James P.
Johnson, piano; Danny Barker, guitar;
Pops Foster, bass; Baby Dodds, drums.
RIVERSIDE RLP
2514. ro -in. $3.98.
AUGUST 1955
RECORD
INDEXES
of
High fidelity
RECORD REVIEWS
1951 -1953
1954
1lailable
NOW
Charmaine.
Don Elliott, mellophone, trumpet, vibes;
Ellis Larkins, piano; Aaron Bell, bass;
Bobby Donaldson, drums.
8016. ro -in. $3.95.
Elliott, an all- around type, shows off a few
of his talents on this disk (he plays guitar
and bongos in addition to the instruments
listed above and he also sings). But he is
more than simply versatile
is an intelligent, creative jazz musician whose playing shows increasing signs of maturing
taste. On these selections his work on
mellophone is most consistently rewarding,
particularly on My Heart Stood Still and
Do Nothing Till You Hear from Me, an
especially apt piece for the mellophoné s
haunting tones. On this latter number, he
has dubbed in a trumpet accompaniment
but this is the only occasion when he has
succumbed to the temptation to do tricks
with his talents. He runs something of a
gamut and a good gamut
on Blues
for Brother Herb, an engagingly swinging
thing in which Elliott plays all three of his
instruments.
Throughout the disk he gets exceptional
assistance from Ellis Larkins, a sensitive
and tasteful pianist whose fine jazz sense is
just beginning to be used to advantage in
instrumental sessions such as this. Recording is good.
VANGUARD VRS
-he
-
-
DON ELLIOTT RUSTY DEDRICK
all
A complete index, alphabetical
by composer or collection -title,
of all the classical and semiclassical, jazz and spoken word
record reviews contained in
HIGH
FIDELITY Magazine
from 1951 through 1953 and
1954. Discographies included.
A
"must' reference.
ONLY
500
EACH
Send for your copies NOW'
HIGH FIDELITY Magazine
Publishing House
Great Barrington, Mass.
Enclosed find
send me a copy of:
1951 -1953 Index
1954 Index
]'Ir;ne
.
o
NAME
ADDRESS
Six Valves
Vampire Till Ready; When Your Lover
Has Gone; Gargantuan Chant; Your Own
Iron; Easy to Remember; Dominick
Seventh.
No C.O.D.'s, please
59
RECORDS
Don Elliott, Rusty Dedrick, trumpets; Dick
Hyman, piano; Mundell Lowe, guitar; Eddie Safranski, bass; Don Lamond, drums.
RIVERSIDE RLP 2517. IO -in. $3.98.
Limiting himself to trumpet, Elliott joins
Dedrick, another fine trumpet man who is
just emerging as a solo star, in duets on
compositions by Dick Hyman, pianist in
this group. The material is bright and
moving and Elliott and Dedrick attack it
with cleanliness, clarity, and taste both in
their duets and in their alternating solos.
Although the natural open horn styles of
both men are very similar, there is no
monotony of sound. They vary open and
muted horns and wisely refrain from clinging to any individual solo spot for long.
Hyman makes a few appearances playing
some of the live, thoughtful piano of which
he is capable (as opposed to the frightening trash which he has produced for a few
recent recordings). The rhythm section is
one of the best that could currently be
assembled and, as a consequence, this disk
swings from first to last. When Your Lover
Has Gone and Easy to Remember are ballad
solos (for Elliott on Lover and Dedrick on
the other), both exceptionally warm and
moving performances. This is an excellent
produced, performed, and recorded
disk
with intelligence and taste.
-
I LIKE
JAZZ
Wally Rose: Maple Leaf Rag; Bessie
Smith: Put It Right There; Louis Armstrong: Jazz Lips; Eddie Condon: Home
Cooking; Big Beiderbecke: Sentimental
Baby; Phil Napoleon: Sensation Rag; Duke
Ellington: Merry -Go- Round; Teddy Wilson
and Billie Holiday: I'll Never Be the Same;
Benny Goodman: Jam Session; Pete Rugolo: 4 :20 A.M.; Turk Murphy: Got Dem
Blues; Dave Brubeck: Makin' Time.
COLUMBIA JZ
t. 12 -in. 980.
Columbia has been advertising this as "a
fabulous record" and I will not quibble one
little bit with that description. In fact,
when the price is considered, Columbia's
advertising department might be accused of
understatement. The purpose of this disk
is to get samples from Columbia's jazz
catalogue into as many hands as possible.
It is done in the form of a hop- skip -andjump history of jazz using, as examples,
recordings which have either not previously been transferred to LP or not issued
at all.
-
The line -up assembled by George
who continues to be the most
Avakian
exciting (and excitable) jazz A & R man
is an almost unqualified
now practicing
series of gems. Armstrong's Jazz Lips is
one of his more inspired Hot Five performances, Home Cooking is an unusually
provocative product of the Chicagoans
scuffling days, and Merry -Go -Round can
count on at least one vote as the most
solidly swinging recording in the Ellington
repertoire.
Of the new material, the standout item
is Benny Goodman's Jain Session, an exciting 1937 aircheck with an exuberant reminder of Harry James's great days with a
horn. Brubeck, Murphy, and Rose are excellently represented while Phil Napoleon's
Sensation Rag is a surprisingly bright and
driving performance. The only entry which
6o
-
not gemlike to some degree is Beiderbecke's Sentimental Baby and even Avakian,
in his notes, passes this off as an illustration of the horrible surroundings in which
Beiderbecke played. This, however, in no
way detracts from the overall fabulousness
of this disk. It is the finest single- record
summation of jazz that has ever been
issued.
The recording, of course, varies widely
from excellent (the new studio recorded
material) to tolerable (the mid -Twenties
BARBARA LEA
A Woman in Love
recordings).
RIVERSIDE RLP
JAZZ WEST COAST
An Anthology of California Music
We won't start talking about Barbara Lea
in terms of the great jazz singers yet, or
possibly for some time to come, but note
that with this disk she makes her recorded
appearance: she is here in a rough sort of
way and from where she stands great things
could be possible. What she is now is a
girl with a huskily liquid voice who is
strongly influenced by Lee Wiley and who
occasionally produces that beautifully lyric
lift which was such an important element
in Mildred Bailey's art. When she is good
and she is very good on I Didn't Knott'
About You and A Woman Alone with the
Blues, one of Willard Robison's neglected
masterpieces -she sings with a sensitivity,
intonation, and phrasing which are wonderfully refreshing in this day of tortured
tempos throw
stylists. She misses, too
her off, she pushes into stridency, she loses
but the good parts are
the sense of a lyric
so right that you have to ride with them.
She is fortunate in having absolutely
superb accompaniment by Johnny Wind hurst and Billy Taylor's trio, accompaniment that supports and frames her singing
with thoughtful care. If Miss Lea is still
an uncertain talent, these musicians are not,
and the disk can be highly recommended
on the basis of their work alone. The recording is live and full although there are
times when the microphone seems to be a
mite too far down Miss Leas throat.
is
Chet Baker Ensemble: Bockhanal; Gerry
Mulligan Quartet: Soft Shoe; Darn That
Dream; Clifford Brown Ensemble: Tiny
Caper; Zoot Sims Quartet: I'll Remember
April; Bud Shank and Three Trombones:
Wailing Vessel; Chet Baker Quartet: Happy
Little Sunbeam; Bill Perkins and Bud
Shank: It Had to Be You; Bud Shank and
Bob Brookmeyer: Low Life; Chet Baker
Quintet: There Will Never Be Another
You; Bud Shank and Shorty Rogers: Lotus
Bud; Laurindo Almeida Quartet: Speak
Lou; Bob Gordon and Jack Montrose: Tuo
Can Play; Lee Konitz and the Gerry Mulligan Quartet: Oh, Lady Be Good.
PACIFIC JAZZ JWC 500. I2 -in. $3.98.
Another mélange of sides from the files of
one record company, this time Pacific Jazz.
In this case, the company is small, its history brief and the point of the disk is to
offer examples of jazz played by the modern
school around Los Angeles. Most of the
selections are alternate masters of sides already available. There are three previously
unreleased performances (Soft Shoe, I'll
Remember April, and There Will Never Be
Another You) and one reissue (Lotus Bud).
The theory of the alternate master is a
dubious one at best. Either the best take
is issued the first time out or else the recording company is deliberately shortchanging its talent and its customers. There
are times when the choice between masters
is difficult to make but probably not as
many times as there are alternate masters
on this disk. Be that as it may, the showing in this collection is good although a
little repetitious, particularly in the work
of the pianists. The dominant figures are
Gerry Mulligan (whose previously unreleased Soft Shoe is a rich specimen of his
meaty style) and Bud Shank who plays a
darkly moving flute on Lotus Bud and
brightens both Loin Life and Speak Lou,
with his alto. On the other newly released
numbers, Zoot Sims's I'll Remember April
develops into a smoothly flowing tenor solo
after a fiat, lifeless statement of melody
common to this school of saxophonists,
while There Will Never Be Another You
displays Chet Baker with a bigger tone
than usual and Jimmy Giuffre with a
hollower clarinet sound. The disk provides
a valid introduction to the newcomer to
West Coast jazz, but, except for Soft Shoe,
it contributes little that will be new to
those who have been there before, even
with its alternate masters. Recording, for
the most part, is extremely good.
Next issue: The vocal music
of Bach by Nathan Broder
Come Rain or Come Shine; As Long As I
Live; Love Is Here to Stay; Thinking of
You; I Didn't Know About You; Love Me;
The Best Thing for You; A Woman Alone
with the Blues.
Barbara Lea, vocals; Johnny Windhurst,
trumpet; Billy Taylor, piano; Jimmy Shirley, guitar; Earl May, bass; Percy Brice,
drums.
2518. to -in. $3.98.
-
-
-
JOE MOONEY QUARTET
You Go to My Head: What More Can a
Woman Do ?; Prelude to a Kiss; Shaky
Breaks the Ice; Nancy; From Monday On;
A Man with a Million Dollars; Have Another One. Not Me.
Joe Mooney, accordion, piano, vocals; Andy
Fitzgerald, clarinet; Jack Hotop, guitar;
Gate Frega, bass.
DECCA DL 5555. I'D-in. $2.98.
-
This is only somewhat a jazz record
there are novelties and vocal ballads on it
which are a bit far afield from this departbut everything that
ment's usual concern
Mooney does is so infused with a jazz feeling that it deserves consideration here. The
Mooney Quartet existed briefly in the late
Forties and fired up a small but fervent
following until the bass player, Gate Frega,
abandoned the group to study for the
priesthood. Mooney is an accordionist,
pianist and singer of an inventive turn of
mind and an impeccable manner of phrasing. His quartet was a tightly knit organization which followed his inventions and
phrasings with unusual group feeling. As
a jazz group, they get their best opportunity
on this disk in From Monday On, a
splendid sample of their special charm, and
Continued on page 62
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Encore For a
magnificent performance
12 NEW
Encore
Trellsve lapes
long playing,
ONLY 59c EACH
from the actual
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Recordings
exclusively reproduced to introduce
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IDE
brilliant new innovation in recording perfection that insures flawless, professional tape reproductions with most recorders, regardless of the experience
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A
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Top performance regardless of level set
Performs well on any recorder
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Unaffected by storage conditions
Consistent mechanical endurance
New self- threading reel
SPECIAL MAIL OFFER.
-
You pay only 59e for this Exclusive Encore Treasure Tape, "Excerpts
from Dubbings Test Tape No. D -110"
THE MEASURE OF YOUR
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tape speed, wow and flutter, signal -to -noise ratio. NOT for sale
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anywhere. Obtainable only by mailing this coupon.
llo, r
of the un r input ed drnnt nd. r his offer is necessarily au 6jeet to
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LONG -PLAYING MYLAR
PROFESSIONAL ACETATE
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Please send me Treasure Tape "Excerpts from Dubbings
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NAME
-
ADDRESS
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STATE:
TECHNICAL TAPE CORP., Morris Heights, New York 53, N. Y.
AUGUST 1955
61
RE(ORI)',
My Solitude; Don't Get Around Much
Anymore; Mood Indigo; I Let a Song Go
Out of My Heart.
Stewart, trumpet; Lawrence Brown,
trombone; Hilton Jefferson, alto saxophone;
Danny Bank, baritone saxophone; Hank
Jones, piano; Milt Hinton, bass; Osie Johnson, drums.
Rex
ILLINOIS JACQUET AND HIS ALL
The dancing of Pilar Calvo and Alejandro Vega is superb; the sharp staccato of
their heels against the floor is incredibly
real. This record has shattered my longheld conviction that recorded sound alone
could never convey the excitement of a
flamenco dance.
Angel's sound is bright and clean. If you
are at all interested in Spanish music, don't
miss Andalusian Dances.
STARS
Ghost of a Chance; Jumpin' at the Woodside; Robbins Nest; Memories of You;
Diggin' the Count; She's Funny That Way.
GRAND AWARD 33-315.
All- around Elliott
can play bongos, too.
Continued from page 6o
Shaky Breaks the Ice. Most of the other
numbers are largely devoted to Mooney's
appealing singing with occasional snatches
of his wittily swinging accordion playing.
This collection is not too representative of
the capabilities of the Mooney quartet but
it provides at least a suggestion of the
work of one of the more brilliant small
jazz groups. Some of the recording is
fuzzy and there is a bit of surface noise.
RUSTY DEDRICK
Rusty
Rusty Dedrick, trumpet; Joe Palmer, bass
clarinet, bassoon, tenor saxophone; Carl
Prager, clarinet, alto saxophone; Al Richman, French horn; Romeo Penque, oboe;
Dick Hyman, piano; Eddie Safranski, bass;
Don Lamond, drums.
Cry of the Bat; Rusty in Orchestraville:
Fools Rush In; I Wished On the Moon;
Navarac; Charlesville; Nobody Else
Me; Gloomy Sunday; Zing Went
Strings of My Heart
ESOTERIC ESJ 9.
counterrevolution must be setting in
against the thin -toned trumpet. Last year
Ruby Braff drew attention with a big,
warm sound. Now comes Rusty Dedrick
with another rough and hearty tone. Like
Braff, Dedrick is well -grounded in earlier
jazz forms and has kept abreast of recent
developments. He plays in a variety of
broad and broodmanners on this disk
ing approach in Fools Rush In: a nervous,
modern attack on Rusty in Orchestraville
and Charlesville. The wind group which
accompanies him is confined almost entirely
to ensemble work, but pianist Dick Hyman
is given a number of solo choruses in which
-a
he does very well. Except for Cry of the
Bat and Navarac, these are relaxed performances which hang together well, and the
recording is exemplary.
REX STEWART PLAYS DUKE EL-
LINGTON
62
FOLK MUSIC
the
A
Boy Meets Horn; Take the
After Rex Stewart gets past his rather dated
specialty, Boy Meets Horn, the group he
leads in this disk goes on to play some of
the most compelling subdued jazz recorded
in a long time. In point of fact, you have
to go back to the Ellington works of the late
Forties to find something comparable for
these are, of course, Ellington tunes played
with an Ellington feeling but they are not
direct copies. Lending an Ellington tone,
besides Stewart, are two other Ellington
alumni, Lawrence Brown and Hilton Jefferson. Jefferson, usually buried in section
work, emerges on this disk as an inventive
and graceful alto soloist, while Brown is in
his best free floating form. Danny Bank,
another fine musician who works too often
in section obscurity, provides a Carney -like
bottom for the group. The recording is
excellent in both range and balance.
The Jacquet side is made up of reissues
from the Apollo label, originally made in
the middle Forties, most of them in his
rich ballad style. On only one number,
Diggin' the Count, does he resort to the
squealing which disfigures so much of his
playing. On the only other uptempo number, Jumpin' at the Woodside, he gives an
honest demonstration of his really great
ability on a fast -moving solo. The recording ranges from good to fuzzy.
but
to-in. $4.00.
"A" Train; In
12-in. $2.98.
by Howard LaFay
ANDALUSIAN DANCES
BYELORUSSIAN FOLK SONGS AND
DANCES
National Byelorussian Folk Orchestra and
Chorus of Minsk
COLOSSEUM CRLP 180.
12 -in. $3.98.
LEMESHEV SINGS POPULAR RUSSIAN FOLK SONGS
Osipov Russian Balalaika Symphony Orchestra
Piatnitsky Song and Dance Ensemble
COLOSSEUM CRLP 187. 12 -in. $3.98.
It is only fair to preface this review with
the warning that the sound in these releases
is so poor that only avid lovers of Russian
song will derive any sustained enjoyment
from them. This is especially regrettable
because the two disks contain a wealth of
otherwise unavailable music performed by
gifted artists in the land of its origin.
Sergei Lemeshev, one of the great names
of the Bolshoi Theatre, has a formidable,
soaring tenor voice which he neatly adapts
to the limited demands of the material at
although he cannot resist pulling
hand
out all the stops for an occasional fortissimo. Lydia Ruslanova, equally famous,
comes off less well. Her efforts here are a
bit on the shrill side and smack strongly
of ham.
Colosseum gives generous measure: the
Ruslanova release contains twenty-one selections; the Lemeshev twenty-two.
-
CAUCASIAN FOLK SONGS AND
DANCES
VOLUME II: GEORGIAN AND ARMENIAN
Soloists, National Georgian Song and
Dance Ensemble of Tbilisi, Tbilisi National
Bolero Flamenco; Cadiz, Sevillanas; Soleares
y Fandango; Seguiriyas Para Bailar; Fandango de Huelva Para Bailar; Zambra del
Sacromonte; Malagueñas Para Bailar; Serenata
Luis Maravilla, guitarist, and others.
ANGEL ANG 64020.
to -in. $2.98.
-
ever since the
record companies discovered the Iberian
we have been all but inunPeninsula
dated by a flood of Spanish disks. However,
Angel proves that there is
from
this gem
particularly when
always room for more
it is as dazzlingly executed as this.
Embodied in Andalusian Dances are the
brilliant rhythms and somber fire that spell
Spain to the outside world. The best
known of the artists is the guitarist -cornposer Luis Maravilla, whose notable Joys
and Sorrows of Andalusia (WESTMINSTER
WL 5135) won a well-merited Grand Prix
du Disque some years back.
For the past year or so
-
-
Shinichi Yuize: the koto
is accessible.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
Symphony Orchestra; National Armenian
Folk Orchestra, Soloists and Ensembles of
Erevan Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra conducted
by Aram Khachaturian.
COLOSSEUM CRLP 175.
$3.98.
12 -in.
potpourri of Georgian and Armenian
music that covers a very broad spectrum
indeed. In addition to a generous measure
of folk songs and dances, Armenia's
favorite musical son, Aram Khachaturian,
conducts three spirited examples of his
work, including
inevitably
the Saber
A
-
-
Dance from Gayne.
While the music is vivid, the sound is
not. Colosseum's engineers have failed to
ameliorate the woeful reproduction of the
original Soviet tapes.
THE JAPANESE KOTO
Shinichi Yuize
COOK /SOOT 1132. 12-in. $5.95.
The koto, a classical stringed instrument of
great purity and remarkable tone, is high
in the Japanese musical hierarchy. Identified from antiquity with the nobility, its
mastery even today generally denotes exalted
social status; Japanese children of good
family are invariably taught the koto.
Shinichi Yuize is a virtuoso on the instrument. For this record he has chosen a
program of Imperial Court Music
some
of it more than goo years old
and several
compositions of his own. The music is
exotic, but accessible. In fact, it falls
pleasantly upon Western ears. Emory
Cook's superlative engineering makes this
a worthy addition to Sounds of our Times.
- -
SANDHOG
A Folk Opera by Earl Robinson and
Waldo Salt
Earl Robinson, singer and pianist; Waldo
Salt, narrator.
VANGUARD VRS 9001. 12 -in. $4.98.
Vanguard is to be congratulated for preserving Earl Robinson's excellent score
from Sandhog, a "folk opera" composed in
collaboration with Waldo Salt. Sandhog
was produced off -Broadway in New York's
Phoenix Theatre.
In this off -beat recording, Salt furnishes
narration and dialogue while Robinson,
accompanying himself on the piano, sings
all the parts, even
thanks to the miracle
of tape
duets and choruses. There is
-the
-
nobody else, even though the cast numbered
forty. And, astonishingly, the co- authors
achieve an extraordinary dramatic projection.
Set in late nineteenth -century New York,
the story deals with the men who dug the
first tunnel beneath the Hudson River.
Salt's book is credible and warm: Robin son's music is outstanding. His song
Johnny-0 is a lovely thing that can hold its
own in any company.
One comes away from this recorded synthesis with the feeling that the American
theater is seriously sick when a musical of
such obvious quality is left to languish in
a downtown alley while every theatrical
and promotional opulence is lavished upon
the burglarized melodies of Borodin who,
being dead, is unable either to collect
royalties or protect his good name.
THE WILD SIDE OF LIFE
Wild Side of Life; The Little Green Valley;
Diesel Smoke, Dangerous Curves; Left My
Gal in the Mountains; The Craudad Song:
Lonesome So Lonesome; One Hour Ahead
of the Posse; Great White Bird; Hound
Dog; There's a Mule Up in Tombstone,
Arizona; It's So -Long and Good-Bye to
You; Close the Door, Richard
Burl Ives, with various accompaniments
DECCA DL 8107. r2 -in. $3.98.
Burl Ives recorded these songs in the heart
of the Grand 01' Opry belt, and the jacket
notes duly record his judgment that "Nashville, Tennessee, today has achieved the
nearest thing to a contemporary folksong."
Burl's voice hasn't improved any, but the
infectious delivery is still there. And Decca
has blessed him with brilliant reproduction.
His songs are a typical cross- section of
the Nashville "country music" genre, and
as such are enjoyable enough. However, to
equate them with folksongs is to clothe
them with a dignity that they do not
possess. Quite aside from the fact that
"country music" is composed down to the
last cliché, it is completely lacking in the
simple, lucid, yet profound emotion that
characterizes folk ballads. Rather the
Nashville songs
sung customarily in a
stylized nasal twang
a whiney, superficial gamut from banal joy to beery bathos.
By any imaginable musical criteria, the
overwhelming bulk of the Nashville product is shallow and meretricious. And it is
not folk music.
- -run
how to rate music
for hi -fi possibilities
Certain musical works and performances, more than others, are
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CHABRIER :
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Ballet Orch. -Leon Barzin, conductor
KAY- BALANCHINE:
WESTERN SYMPHONY
THOMSON -CHRISTENSEN
FILLING STATION
PL
9050
N. Y. C. Ballet Orch. -Leon Borzin, conductor
R. STRAUSS:
TILL EULENSPIEGEL'S MERRY PRANKS,OP. 28
DON JUAN, OP. 20
DEATH AND TRANSFIGURATION, OP. 24
Bamberg Symphony Jascha Horenstein,
PL 9060
conductor
-
LISZT:
PIANO CONCERTO No. 1 IN E FLAT MAJOR
PIANO CONCERTO No. 2 IN A MAJOR
Orazio Frugoni, piano Pro Musica Symphony, Vienna -Hans Swarowsky, conductor
-
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YALESVILLE
See
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its techniques and technicalities
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2r:
-4
THIS IS
HIGH FIDELITY
(A Guide To Sound Listening)
Written and produced by
Tyler Turner. Narrated by
Art Honnes. In a special
De Luse Album
DL
130
Ó°L ,eaattditia.oxdo
CONNECTICUT
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236 West 55th Street
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63
RECORDS
HIGH FIDELITY DISCOGRAPHY
No.
Part
15
11:
1867 -1 882
Wagner on Microgroove
by JAMES HINTON, JR.
1867
DIE MEISTERSINGER (3 Editions)
When he first conceived the idea of a work
to be called Die Meistersinger, in 1845,
Wagner referred to it as "a comic opera."
Later, he began adding the prefix "grand."
By the time he had done, he left it without
any designation at all. It is simply Die
Meistersinger von Nurnberg, the best-loved
of all Wagner opera among less- than -perfect Wagnerites -and, like its composer,
unique thing, without direct precedent,
without parallel, without true descendants,
itself a mass of contradictions. It could be
no more specifically German than it is, yet
its Germanism is not, for once, imposed; it
is inherent, unavoidable. In that the knight
is set against the burgher, it is social drama.
In that the artist is set above the rules, it is
a
-
and autobiography. In
aesthetic polemic
that it has set pieces and concerted finales
in the old style, it is a regression from
music-drama to opera buffo. And in that
there is in it no high -Romantic redemption
through love, but only a very human resolution of emotions, it is not "Wagnerian"
at all. Yet is quintessentially Wagnerian.
All the apparent conflicts are subsumed in
the humor and wisdom and humaneness of
Hans Sachs, at once the most complex of
Wagnerian symbols and one of the most
marvellously individual of operatic people.
With its huge cast, Die Meistersinger is
a frightfully demanding work to do, and
the most surprising thing about its LP versions is that all are worth serious consideration.
In some measure, choice depends on individual feeling about the work itself, in
some measure on prejudices pro or con
certain recording characteristics. The Co.
lumbia set, taped during the 1951 Bayreuth
Festival, is conducted with great efficiency
by Herbert von Karajan, who takes quite
brisk tempos and is firmly against any pausing to pick flowers by the wayside. Notably
free from the errors of happenstance that
mar some live -performance recordings, it
has the tension and immediacy so hard to
find in a studio, and the occasional scuffing
on stage and snuffling from the audience is
small price to pay for this continuing excitement. The Festspielhaus, not large and
all of wood, is a space of fine natural resonance, and there is no problem here of
dimness or distance; in fact, the voices
sometimes override the under -the -stage orchestra. The London set is a Viennese recording- studio job; the voices are taken
closer -to with less surrounding resonance,
and the ensemble lines are always lean and
distinguishable. Under Hans Knappertsbusch, the pace is slower to slowest, but
never slack. It is as if he were quite unable
64
to bear the thought of letting any loveliness
be passed by in uncontemplative haste. But
there is always a pulse; even when a tempo
slows to almost a dead stop, the playing
and singing is never merely sluggish. The
Urania sound is contemporary, but the engineering not very carefully worked out; so
that although there is plenty of brightness
and color, the balances are not even logically inconsistent. Rudolf Kempe's reading
is characteristic of him
not a planned,
scholarly exposition of the score nor an
essay in virtuosity, but a theatrically and
vocally responsive performance of unflagging energy, with those intuitive flashes that
make him so interesting a conductor in the
opera house even when the listener cannot
agree with what he is doing.
The most ponderable artist of the three
Sachses is Paul Schoeffler (London) , but
his drying voice is not flattered by the
broad phrasings asked by his conductor and
needs to be listened through, almost, if the
listener is to find all the values that are in
his treatment of the text. Not of the same
level of distinction, but a well -routined
craftsman with a solid voice, Ferdinand
Frantz (Urania) has less to say, but gets it
said with more immediate impact, at least
partly because Mr. Kempe is helpful. In
1951 Otto Edelmann was a relativey unformed artist as Sachs, though patently
very well coached; the most positive excellence of his performance is the full, round,
darkish tone, for his reading is somewhat
lacking in eloquence of detail.
His companion as Eva in the Bayreuth
Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
gives the
set
most exquisite performance of all, and for
many listeners the grace and delicacy of her
phrasing will outweigh any other values.
Her authority is greater than that of Hilde
Gueden (London), and her voice has just
the body that Miss Gueden's lacks, just the
purity of tone that Tiana Lemnitz (Urania)
could not summon up to set off her womanly feeling for the role. None of the Stolz ings is ideal, but Hans Hopf (Columbia)
comes closer to the manly lyricism needed
than does Günther Treptow (London),
with his more heroic but less malleable
voice, or than Bernd Aldenhoff (Urania),
with his tendency to pinch the ton, so that
he sounds like an aspiring Mime. Kurt
Böhme (Urania) has the best Pogner voice
by all odds and, in spite of some perfunctory intonation, the ripest, most commanding vocal personality, though both Friedrich
Dalberg (Columbia) and Mr. Edelmann
(not a true bass, but the London Pogner
anyway) are satisfactory. Of the Davids,
Anton Dermota has much the finer voice,
but Gerhard Unger
especially with Mr.
Kempe -gives a surer, completer char-
-
-
-
-
acterization. My own preference among
the Beckmessers is for Karl Dönch (London), though Erich Kunz (Columbia) is
unexceptionally good and Heinrich Pflanzl
(Urania) is more in his element than he is
as the Bayreuth Kothner (the one really
weird bit of casting in the set, for he can
only shake his voice at the turns that Alfred
Poell- for London ticks off in fine
style). Both Columbia and London have
generally excellent miscellaneous master singers; the Urania group is a reminder
that even a city like Dresden has trouble
with seventeen- character operas.
It adds up to this: For those who do not
hate live -performance opera recordings on
some mysterious private principle, the Columbia- Bayreuth set is at least on a par
with the London, and has the great advantage of Miss Schwarzkopf. But the London
is very good- better in almost all respects
than the Urania-and some may, as I do,
find Mr. Knappertsbusch's reading the
warmest and most loveable of all, year in
and year out.
-Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (s), Eva; Ira
Malaniuk (ms), Magdalena; Hans Hopf
(t), Stolzing; Gerhard Unger (t), David;
Erich Majkut (t), Vogelgesang; Gerhard
Stolze (t), Moser; Josef Janko (t), Zorn;
Karl Mikorey (t), Eisslinger; Otto Edelmann (b), Sachs; Friedrich Dalberg (bs),
Pogner; Erich Kunz (bs), Beckmesser;
Heinrich Pflanzt (bs), Kothner; Heinz
Borst (bs), Schwartz; Arnold van Mill
(bs), Foltz; Heinz Tandler (bs), Ortel;
Hans Berg (bs), Nachtigall; Werner Faulhaber (bs) , Nightwatchman. Orchestra
and Chorus of the Bayreuth Festival, 1951,
Herbert von Karajan, cond. COLUMBIA SL
117. Five rz -in. $24.90.
-Hilde Gueden (s), Eva; Else Schurhoff
(ms), Magdalena; Günther Treptow (t),
Stolzing; Anton Dermota (t), David; Hugo
Meyer- Welfing (t), Vogelgesang; Hermann
Gallos (t), Moser; Erich Majkut (t),
Zorn; William Wernigk (t), Eisslinger;
Paul Schoefier (b), Sachs; Alfred Poell
(b), Kothner; Otto Edelmann (b), Pogner;
Karl Dönch (bs) , Beckmesser; Franz Bierbach (bs), Schwartz; Ljubomir Pantscheff
(bs), Foltz; Harald Pröglhof (bs), Ortel; Wilhelm Felden (bs), Nachtigall;
-
Harald Pröglhof (bs), Nightwatchman.
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus
of the Vienna State Opera, Hans Knappertsbusch, cond. LONDON LIA 9. Six 1zin. $29.83.
-Tiana Lemnitz (s), Eva; Emilie WaltherSachs (ms), Magdalena; Bernd Aldenhoff
(t), Stolzing; Gerhard Unger (t), David;
Johannes Kemter (t), Vogelgesang; Gerhard Stolze (t), Moser; Karl-Heinz Thomann (t), Zorn; Heinrich Tessmer (t),
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RE( Oi(U.',
Eisslinger; Ferdinand Frantz (b), Sachs;
Karl Paul (b), Kothner; Kurt Böhme (bs),
Pogner; Heinrich Pflanzl (bs), Beckmesser;
Erich Händel (bs), Schwartz; Werner
Faulhaber (bs), Foltz; Theo Adam (bs),
Ortet; Kurt Legner (bs), Nachtigall; Werner Faulhaber
(bs), Nightwatchman.
Saxon State Orchestra and Chorus of the
Dresden State Opera, Rudolf Kempe, cond.
URANIA URLP 206. Six 12 -in. $29.88.
DIE MEISTERSINGER (vocal excerpts)
Formally not so hard to excerpt as other
late-Wagner works, Die Meistersinger has
always been well represented on records,
and though far too many fine performances
that were available on 78s have been
allowed to drop from availability, it is not
badly represented already on LP. By far the
most extensive excerpts to be had are those
of the act -by-act disjointing of the complete
London set, reviewed above; but this is
purely an advantage of installment- collect-
ing convenience. Stolzing's two songs are
best sung, but anciently recorded, on the
Eterna Leo Slezak disk, leaving Hans Hopf
seeming very small artistic potatoes in his
well -recorded Epic miscellany, and Set
Svanholm a strong, rather stiff and unlyrical singer in the medium -fi RCA reissue.
In his Epic self, Otto Edelmann sings
Sach's big scenes with tone as fine as in the
Columbia set and, in general, with riper
character if not with the utmost in meaningfulness. The Frantz counterparts are
from the Urania set and are reliably sung.
Much more impressive artistically, if not
always lovely in sound, are Hans Hotter's
two monologues as issued by Decca
the
distinction being that between a great artist
and two good singers. An artist too, if not
so imposing a one, Paul Schoeffler is represented on a London disk that is also worth
while. As in so many cases, this tabulation
leaves the finest until last, because it dates
from pre -hi -fi days
the supremely rich,
warm, humane performances of the late
Friedrich Schorr, reissued in the RCA
Treasury series. These are among the truly
great things preserved on records and should
be heard by everyone who cares more for
art than for electronics.
In contexts other than the complete London set, Paul Schoeffler's Sachs tends to gain
even more distinction. His Remington
"Fliedermonolog" is quite fine; and, with
Maria Reining as a very touching and expressive Eva, he does some of his very best
singing in the duet recorded, Zurich -style,
by London. The sound of the old RCA Act
Ill is no longer to be marvelled at, but it is
a superbly well -integrated ensemble performance that Karl Böhm obtains, and in
the sum of his qualities Hans Hermann
Nissen is a Sachs of greater capability than
any of the three in the full-length sets;
similarly, Torsten Ralf has more to give as
Stolzing, and Martin Kremer is a delightful
David. All told, the recording (Dresden,
1938) is still good enough to make one
wish that all three acts had been done.
The great Schumann -Melchior- Schorr
quintet reissued by RCA is in the same
lofty class as the Schorr monologues. The
Eterna excerpt is principally of historical
value, as a proof of the solid qualities that
gave Michael Bohnen a right to be erratic
and flamboyant on occasion. The Allegro
excerpts are from a good performanceso far as can be heard for sure from what
-
is apparently a radio taping, done not at all
well and engraved on plastic that has qualities in common with both sandpaper and
second -rate Swiss cheese. It remains to note
a good "Prize Song" by Richard Crooks, to
be heard in the fascinating Critic's Choice
miscellany chosen for RCA by Irving
Kolodin.
-Act
I: Complete.
Cast as in LLA 9.
478/9. Two I2 -in. $9.96.
I: Am stillen Herd; Fanget an! Act
III: Prize Song. Hans Hopf (t); Vienna
Symphony Orchestra, Rudolf Morals, cond.
EPIC LC 3103. I2 -in. $3.98 (with excerpts
from Rienzi; Der Fliegende Holländer;
Lohengrin; Die Walküre).
-Act I: Am stillen Herd. Act III: Prize
Song. Set Svanholm (t); RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra, Frieder Weissmann, cond.
RCA VICTOR LM I I 55. 12 -in. $3.98
(with excerpts from Tannhäuser; LohenLONDON LLA
-Act
grin; Die Walküre).
-(same).
Leo Slezak (t);
ETERNA ELP 499. 12 -in. $5.95
orchestra.
(with ex-
cerpts from Tannhäuser; Lohengrin).
-Act II: Complete. Cast as in LLA 9.
LONDON LL 284/5. Two 12 -in. $9.96.
-Act II: Was duftet doch der Flieder;
Jerum! Jerum! Act III: Wahn! Wahn.'
Euch macht ihr's leicht; Verachtet mir die
Meister nicht. Otto Edelmann (b); Vienna
Symphony Orchestra, Wilhelm Loibner.
cond. EPIC LC 3052. 12 -in. $3.98 (with
excerpts from Der Fliegende Holländer;
Tannhäuser; Parsi /al).
-Act II: Was duftet doch der Flieder. Act
Ill: Wahn! Wahn: Mein Kind. von Tristan und Isolde: Euch macht ihr's leicht;
Verachtet mir die Meister nicht. Ferdinand
Frantz (b); Saxon State Orchestra, Rudolf
Kempe, cond. URANIA URLP 7067. 12 -in.
S3.98 (with orchestral excerpts).
-Act II: Was duftet doch der Flieder.
Act III: Wahn! Wahn.' Hans Hotter (b);
orchestra. DECCA DL 9514. 12 -in. $3.98
(with excerpts from Der Fliegende Holländer; Die Walküre).
-(same). Paul Schoeffler (b); Vienna
Philharmonic Orchestra, Hans Knappertsbusch, cond. LONDON LD 9078. 10 -in.
S2.98.
same) . Friedrich Schorr (b) ; orchestra. RCA VICTOR LCT loot. 12 -in. S3.98
(in "A Wagner Treasury").
-Act II: Was duftet doch der Flieder.
Paul Schoeffler (b) ; Austrian Symphony
Orchestra, Wilhelm Loibner, cond. REMINGTON R 199 -137. I2 -in. S1.95 (with
excerpts from Der Fliegende Holländer: Die
-(
Walküre).
-Act
II: Gut'n Abend. Meister; Act Ill:
Sieh. Er'chen. Cast as in LLA 9. LONDON
LD 9079. 10 -in. S2.98.
-Act II: Gut',, Abend. Meisters Maria
Reining (s); Paul Schoeffler (b). Zurich
Tonhalle Orchestra, Hans Knappertsbusch,
cond. LONDON LS 109. Io -in. $2.98
(with excerpts from Trntnhuscr; Strauss:
Der Rosenkaralier).
-Act III: Complete. Cast as in LLA 9.
480/82. Three lain. $14.94.
Margarete Teschemacher (s),
Eva; Lene Jung (ms), Magdalena; Torsten
Ralf (t), Stolzing; Martin Kremer (t),
David; Rudolf Dittrich (t), Vogelgesang;
Hans Lange ( t) Moser; Ludwig Eybisch
(t), Zorn; Claus Hermanns (t), Eisslinger;
Hans Hermann Nissen (b), Sachs; Arnold
Schellenberg (b), Kothner; Sven Nilsson
(bs) , Pogner; Eugen Fuchs (bs) , BeckLONDON LLA
-(same).
,
-
AUGUST 1955
:ñ'
mantovani
gershwin
-
PLAYS
-
rbapsady in blue
concerto in
LL
f
-1262
Julius katchen, piano
65
RECORDS
messer; Hermann Greiner (bs) , Schwartz;
Serge Smirnoff
(bs), Foltz; Rudolph
Schmalnauer (bs), Ortel; Robert Bussell
(bs) , Nachtigall. Saxon State Orchestra
and Chorus of the Dresden State Opera,
Karl Böhm, cond. RCA VICTOR LCT 6002.
Two 12 -in. $7.96.
-Act 111: Quintet. Elisabeth Schumann
(s) , Gladys Parr (ms) , Lauritz Melchior
(t) , Ben Williams (t) , Friedrich Schorr
(b); orchestra, Lawrence Collingwood, cond.
RCA VICTOR LCT 1003. 12 -in. $3.98 (in
"Golden Age Ensembles ").
-Act III: Verachtet mir die Meister nicht.
Michael Bohnen (b); orchestra. ETERNA
ELP 0 -474. 12 -in. $595 (in "Wagnerian
Baritones ") .
-"Prague Opernhaus, F. Wentzel, cond."
ALLEGRO 3061/2. Two 12 -in. $11.9o.
DIE MEISTERSINGER (orchestral excerpts)
As in the earlier installment, disks that contain excerpts from a work are listed, first,
in order of first entry from the score; second, in order of quantity of music excepted;
third, in order of preference. Since Die
Meistersinger is relatively classic in structure, it is not so often snipped and reglued
as some later Wagner scores, and the excerptions are, so to speak, less vulnerable
to imagination. The Urania disk, taken
from the full -length recording, includes the
standard, legitimate, purely orchestral parts
of the score, conducted with a good deal of
snap and decently played, recorded full, flat,
and sonorously. But there is greater distinction further down the list. For clarity, propulsiveness, and crispness of attack, the
Toscanini preludes could hardly be bettered,
though some listeners of less thyroid temperament may prefer the breadth and expansiveness of the Knappertsbusch or the
magisterial rubato of the Furtwängler. All
are good in sound. The Leitner reading is
musical and less orotund in its declamation,
very good in its way, and a good value for
those who can get along without the Act
introduction.
Of the Prelude -alone performances, that
111
-
by George Szell is the surest and the best
better than the Paray or the
played
Horenstein by the difference between New
York and Detroit or Bamberg. In baton
control the Reiner rivals it, but is a touch
chilly and is not made a better value by
the Pittsburgh string tone of the time or by
aging reproductive quality. The ten -inch
Toscanini offers a marvelously well- modelled Act III introduction. The new Beecham
is also fine, with a plumper kind of classicism to the phrasing, and it is followed by
a pleasant -tempered playing of the apprentices' dance music and a wonderfully pomp and-circumstance entrance of the master singers. The Ormandy record benefits from
good, ripe Philadelphia Orchestra sound but
has little positive character otherwise.
-Prelude; Prelude to Act III; Dance of
Apprentices; Entrance of Mastersingers.
Saxon State Orchestra, Rudolf Kempe, cond.
URANIA URLP 7067. 12 -in. S3.98 (with
vocal excerpts) .
-Prelude; Prelude to Act Ill. NBC Symphony Orchestra, Arturo Toscanini, cond.
RCA VICTOR LM 6020. Two 12 -in. $7.96
(in "A Wagner Concert").
-(same).
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Hans Knappertsbusch, cond. LONDON
LD 9026. to -in. $2.98.
-Prelude; Dance of Apprentices. Vienna
66
Philharmonic Orchestra, Wilhelm Furtwängler, cond. RCA VICTOR LHMV 1049.
I 2-in. $4.98 (with Siegfried Idyll; excerpts
from Die Walküre; Götterdämmerung).
-Prelude; Dance of Apprentices; Entrance
of Mastersingers. Württemberg State Orchestra, Ferdinand Leitner, cond. DECCA
DL 4037. Io -in. $2.98.
-Prelude. New York Philharmonic-Sym phony Orchestra, George Szell, cond. CO12 -in. $3.98 (with
LUMBIA ML 4918.
excerpts from Rienzi; Der Fliegende Hollander; Tannhäuser).
-(same). Detroit
Symphony Orchestra,
Paul Paray, cond. MERCURY MG 50021.
12 -in. $3.98 (with excerpts from Tannhäuser; Lohengrin; Die Walküre).
-(same). Bamberg Symphony Orchestra,
Jascha Horenstein, cond. VOX PL 911o.
12-in. $5.95 (in "A Wagner Concert").
-(same). Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Fritz Reiner, cond. COLUMBIA ML
4054. 12 -in. $3.98 (with excerpts from
Lohengrin; Die Walküre; Siegfried).
-(same). Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra,
Wilhelm Furtwängler, cond. PERIOD 716.
12 -in. 84.98 ( with Schubert: Symphony
No. 8; Strauss: Till Eulenspiegel).
-Prelude to Act Ill; Dance of Apprentices;
Entrance of Mastersingers. Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Thomas Beecham,
-Stuttgart
Orchestra, Karl
Chamber
Münchinger, cond. LONDON LL 525. 12in. $3.98 (with Haydn: Symphony No.
45)
-NBC
Symphony Orchestra, Arturo Toscanini, cond. RCA VICTOR LCT 1116. 12in. $3.98 (with excerpt from Götterdämmerung) .
-Same. LM 6020. Two 12-in. $7.96 (in
"A Wagner Concert").
-London Philharmonic Orchestra, Felix
Weingartner, cond. COLUMBIA ML 4680.
12 -in. $3.98 (with excerpts from Tannhäuser; Tristan und Isolde; Götterdämmerung).
-Munich Philharmonic Orchestra, Herbert
12 -in.
Albert, cond. MERCURY 10015.
$3.98 (with Mozart: Eine kleine Nachtmusik) .
-Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Wilhelm
Furtwängler, cond. RCA VICTOR LHMV
1049. 12 -in. $4.98 (in "A Wagner Con-
cert').
-New
York Philharmonic- Symphony Or-
chestra, Artur Rodzinski, cond. COLUMBIA ML 4086. 12 -in. $3.98 (with Sibelius:
Symphony No. 7) .
-Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge
Koussevitzky, cond. RCA VICTOR LM
1177. 12 -1n. (with Strauss: Don Juan).
cond. COLUMBIA ML 4962. 12 -in. $3.98
(with excerpts from Der Fliegende Hol-
länder; Götterdämmerung).
-(same). Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene
Ormandy, cond. COLUMBIA ML 4865. 12in. $3.98 (with excerpts from Tannhäuser:
Lohengrin; Die Walküre).
-Prelude to Act Ill. NBC Symphony Orchestra, Arturo Toscanini, cond. RCA VICTOR LRM 7029. 10 -in. $2.98 (with excerpts from Lohengrin: Siegfried).
1870
(8 Editions)
The single maturely creative symphonic
piece by Wagner, the Siegfried Idyll, was
written to be played privately as a combination birthday -Christmas gift to his wife
Cosima and as a sort of thank -you for the
birth of their son Siegfried a year before.
SIEGFRIED IDYLL
1871
SIEGFRIED
(
I
Edition)
If of the four Ring works Die Walküre
is
the most affectionately regarded by the
average operagoer, Siegfried is the most engaging in its animal high spirits and is
probably the most fully realized of all as a
music -drama
at least for the first six sevenths of its length. Having completed
the text for what was called, first, Siegfrieds
Tod in 1848
only the year after Rienzi,
it should be noted
Wagner forthwith
got himself run out of Germany for revo-
- -
lutionary activity. Safe, if not prosperous,
in Paris, he decided to expend the drama
backwards, and in 1851 finished the text
that, after revision, was to become Siegfried. However, five years passed before he
began the music; twenty before he completed it; and still five more before the first
Bayreuth Festival, in 1876, brought the
première of this scherzo-as it has been
of the Ring.
called
On 78s, it was possible to put a quite
nearly complete Siegfried together out of
the Victor and HMV catalogues, but
unless RCA can be persuaded to do yet another good Camden turn
the LP generation is still waiting for a decent recording.
The Allegro, if it can be found in shops at
all, is one of those things made, apparently,
from tapings by a one -reel amateur of
broadcasts from Bayreuth
more than
nothing, but only questionably better.
-"Soloists, choir, and orchestra of the
Dresden State Opera, Fritz Schreiber, cond."
ALLEGRO 3133/7. Five 12 -in. $29.75.
-
The musicians, including many very famous
ones, assembled in secret on Christmas
morning í87o and began to play on the
staircase leading to her room, awakening
her with one of the loveliest musical gifts
ever devised. Wagner subsequently sent
the gift away to make its own living, so to
speak, and so it reached the world. Lightly
scored and graceful, it sings its loveliest in
a performance such as that by the Stuttgart
players under Karl Münchinger, but there
are other less staircase-like performances
notably the
that are good in their ways
pure, clear reading of Toscanini, even more
notably the marvelously plastic, evocative
Weingartner, now aging in sound. The
Furtwängler reading tends to too much
and so on. But
rhetoric, for my taste
this is a very personal piece, and others
may differ about this, and about the Koussevitzky as well.
-
-
-
-
-
SIEGFRIED
(vocal excerpts)
Although this survey is supposed to be
limited to LPs buyable in this country, the
representation of Siegfried on post-1948
recordings is so measly that the best advice
to be given to a seriously Niblung struck
listener is to tell him to choke back any
anti -vinylite prejudices he may have and
start digging about in the shops of those
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
dealers who still tolerate 78s. Even if he is
not able to find the old HMV set GM 172
(practically the whole work, with Lauritz
Melchior in the title role, Frida Leider and
Florence Easton as Brünnhilde, and Friedrich Schorr, Emil Schipper, and Rudolf
Bockelmann as the Wanderer
and, one
of the great things of its kind on records,
Albert Reiss as Mime), which is in automatic sequence, or Victor set vM 83, twenty
sides, with some of the same people, he
may find a good many miscellaneous disks
that, while not golden-ear in sound, are
fair enough technically and so splendid in
art that they never will lose their value,
even if a good complete recording comes
out on LP. If the upcoming, LP- weaned
generation knows of Frida Leider at all, it
is as the singer whose unavailability led to
the coming to the Metropolitan of Kirsten
Flagstad. But she was a fine singer herself
and in most ways a more interesting artist
certainly a warmer one. Her singing in
the HMV -recorded final duet
in which
Siegfried stops being gesanrtkunst and becomes opera
magnificent, the recording early- '3oish. Leider's partner here,
-
-
scene is satisfactory.
-Act II:
Forest Murmurs. NBC Symphony
Orchestra, Arturo Toscanini, cond. RCA
VICTOR LRM 7029. 10 -in. $2.98 (with excerpts from Lohengrin; Die Meistersinger).
-(same). Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Fritz Reiner, cond. COLUMBIA ML
4054. 12 -In. S3.9$ (with excerpts from
Lohengrin; Die Walküre; Die Meister-
singer).
-Act Ill:
Vorspiel, Scene 3. Orchestra of
the Munich State Opera, Franz Konwitschny, cond. URANIA URLP 7065. 12 -in.
53.98 (with excerpts from Götterdämmerung; Parsifal).
-
-is
Rudolf Laubenthal, was far from being the
Heldentenor of the ages; even so this thrillingly communicative recording cries for reissue on Camden.
Meanwhile, the curious can sample,
courtesy of Eterna, an even earlier Leider
recording of the duet (dubbed from acoustic Deutsche Grammophons) with the
tenor Fritz Soot. The Flagstad -Svanholm
version is postwar; she is in fine voice, he
in stiff, dry voice, but neither they nor the
music takes fire. The Farrell- Svanholm, she
making fine sounds but saying nothing at
all, he artistic but making armor -piercing
sounds, seems to be withdrawing almost of
its own accord; small loss. The "Forest
Murmurs" as sung -and quite pleasantly
so by Franz Lechleitner
takes in, as customary, Siegfried's musings on his parentder
age ( "Dass
mein Vater nicht ist ") and
abortive attempts to talk with the woodwind birds, up to just before the dragon
awakens
but don't read the jacket notes
if you want to believe so.
-Act II, Scene 2: Forest Murmurs. Franz
Lechleitner (t); Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Hans Knappertsbusch, cond. LONDON LS 290. to -in. $2.98 (with Overture
to Rienzi) .
-Act III, Scene 2: Awakening Scene. Kirsten Flagstad (s), Set Svanholm (t); Phil harmonia Orchestra, George Sebastian,
cond. RCA VICTOR LHMV 1024. 12 -in.
$4.98 (with excerpts from Götterdärnmerung) .
-(same). Eileen Farrell (s), Set Svanholm (t); Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, Erich Leinsdorf, cond. RCA VICTOR
LM moo. 12 -in. 53.98 (in "Wagner Pro-
-
-
gram")
.
-Act Ill:
Finale. Frida Leider (s), Fritz
orchestra. ETERNA ELP 0 -4'7.
12 -in. 55.95 (in "Operatic Recital ").
Soot
sioning includes a little stretto ending that
may very well outrage some hearers, who
may like the Reiner better. As a matter of
choice, I prefer the music in the theatrical
context for which Wagner wrote it. The
Urania introduction to the Erda-Wanderer
(t);
SIEGFRIEII (orchestral excerpts)
Since Siegfried does not offer too much
matter that tempts concert -versioners, its
orchestral representation on LP is even
slighter than its vocal, but the lack is not
so hurtful, if hurtful at all. The Toscanini
"Forest Murmurs "
made up, as is usual
practice, from various Act I1 materials
is very beautifully played, but his own ver-
-
AUGUST 1955
-
1874
GOETTERDAEMMERUNG (t Edition)
Over the years, much abuse has been heaped
on George Bernard Shaw for having re-
marked that whatever the first three Ring
works might be, Götterdämmerung is old fashioned grand opera. Yet it is
to an
extent. Since the Ring dramas were written
in reverse order and composed the other
way round, it has a text that Wagner
might have altered but for the fact that,
when he sat down to compose it, it was
already not only published but yellowing;
and even he, even in his old age, could not
escape the fact that it falls naturally into
something very like closed forms, with the
big Hagen -and- the-vassals number a standard bass -with- chorus affair not too far from
similar scenes in the first and last acts of
Norma -and with Brünnhilde ending the
greatest composite artwork of the ages in
something very suspiciously like a scena
for dramatic soprano.
The Allegro set
which must serve
until the promised Bayreuth recording
comes from London Records
technically as frightful as its companions.
-"Soloists, choir, and orchestra of the
Dresden State Opera, Fritz Schreiber, cond."
ALLEGRO 3138/43. Six t2 -in. $35.70.
-
-
-is
GOETTERDAEMMERUNG (vocal excerpts)
Rather better off than Siegfried, Götterdämmerung still wants a lot of modern recording done, as is shown by the fact that
its best -filled LP is an historic-interest lot
of varying values, at best
as in Frida
Leider's Brünnhilde -very fine, and all
worth hearing despite the old sound. Josef
Greindl does quite well with the vassal calling scene, and Kirsten Flagstad's postwar "Immolation" lacks nothing in superb
power and lift, if a little something in tone
no longer that of a girl. The Traubel -Toscanini masters were apparently buffed before transfer to LP, with some loss of
gleam; but when this recording was made
(February 1941) Traubel had the vocal re.
sources and the tremendous vigor in urging her to use them. The Harshaw- Ormandy (which starts with the funeral music,
makes some odd jointings, and then goes
into the scena) is fine technically but more
than average dull musically.
II: Hagens It "acht: Hagens Ruf. Act
]II: Rhinemaidens' song; Siegfried's narra.
-
-Act
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tive; Siegfried's death; Brünnhilde's Immolation. Frida Leider (s), Brünnhilde;
Richard Schubert (t), Erik Schmedes (t),
Siegfried; Ludwig Hoffmann (bs), Hagen.
Various accompaniments. ETERNA ELP
480. 12 -in. $5.95.
-Act II: Scene 3. Josef Greindl (bs);
Munich Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorus
of the Bavarian State Opera, Fritz Rieger,
cond. DECCA DX t2r. Two 12 -in. $7.96
(with Die Walküre, Act 1).
-Act III: Brünnhilde s Immolation. Kir sten Flagstad (s); Philharmonia Orchestra,
Wilhelm Furtwängler, cond. RCA VICTOR
LFIMV 1072. 12 -in. $4.98 (with excerpts
from Tristan said !solde).
-(same; same performing elements).
RCA VICTOR LHMV 1024. I2 -in. $4.98
(with excerpts from Sieg fried).
-(same). Helen Traubet (s); NBC Symphony Orchestra, Arturo Toscanini, cond.
RCA VICTOR LCT iI16. 12 -in. $3.98
(with Siegfried Idyll).
-(same). Margaret Harshaw (s); Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4742. 12 -in. $3.98 (with
Funeral Music; excerpt from Tristan und
!solde).
GOEITERDAEMMERUNG
(orchestral excerpts)
Ordered primarily by content and chronology within the work, then by opinion of
merit, the recordings below cover the usual
concert excerptions quite well. The Urania
is not at all bad, but is not notable. The
new Capitol is very well conducted by William Steinberg, and is quite splendidly
engineered, taking an edge over the interpretive polarities offered by Victor. Of
these, personal preference alone puts the
Furtwängler rubato and majesty before the
brilliant, electric Toscanini. The new Lon-
WHAT IS HI -FI?
A journey behind the
Kurt List, Westminster's musical director, describes
high fidelity and the making of
high fidelity records. Informative, interesting, of permanent
value to every record buyer. For
your free copy, send a card to:
scenes with
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68
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Y.
don is an example of musicianship that is
sure but less important than these or than
the aging Weingartner, which as a reading
is superlatively fine and belongs, interpretatively, at the very top of the list. The
Beecham, new in sound and very well
executed, is not very exciting or, actually,
anything more than a good, routine shaping
of the music. The Leitner is honorable,
the Stokowski as lurid a rape case as there
is on vinylite. "F. Wentzel ?" Who he?
-Rhine Journey; Funeral Music; Finale.
Orchestra of the Munich State Opera, Franz
Konwitschny, cond. URANIA URLP 7065.
52-in. $3.98 (with excerpts from Siegfried;
Parsi/al).
-Rhine Journey; Funeral Music. Pittsburgh Symphony, William Steinberg, cond.
CAPITOL P 8185. 12-in. $4.98 (with excerpts from Tristan rind Isolde).
-(same). Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra,
Wilhelm Furtwängler, cond. RCA VICTOR
LHMV 1049. 12 -in. $4.98 (with Siegfried
Idyll; excerpts from Die Walküre; Die
Meistersinger) .
-(same). NBC Symphony Orchestra, Arturo Toscanini, cond. RCA VICTOR LM
602o. Two 12 -in. $7.96 (in "A Wagner
Concert").
-Dawn and Rhine Journey; Funeral MuL'Orchestre de la Société des Concerts
du Conservatoire de Paris, Carl Schuricht,
cond. LONDON LL 1074. 12 -in. $3.98
(with excerpts from Tristan und Isolde).
-(same). L'Orchestre de la Société des
Concerts du Conservatoire, Paris, Felix
Weingartner, cond. COLUMBIA ML 4680.
I2 -in. $3.98 (with Siegfried Idyll; excerpts
sic.
from Tannhäuser; Tristan und Isolde).
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra,
-(same).
Sir Thomas Beecham, cond. COLUMBIA
ML 4962. 12 -in. $3.98 (with excerpts
from Der Fliegende Holländer; Die Meistersinger: Parsilal).
-(same). Württemberg State Orchestra,
Ferdinand Leitner, cond. DECCA DL 4072.
co -in. $2.98.
-(same). New York Philharmonic-Sym phony Orchestra, Leopold Stokowski, cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4273. t2 -in. $3.98 (with
Tchaikovsky: Romeo and Juliet).
-Funeral Music. Philadelphia Orchestra,
Eugene Ormandy, cond. COLUMBIA ML
4742. 12 -in. S3.98 (with vocal excerpt,
Act III; excerpts from Tristan und Isolde).
Prague Opernhaus Orchestra, F. Went zel, cond. ALLEGRO 3065. 12 -in. $5.95.)
(-
1882
PARSIFAL ( I Edition)
Called by Alfred Einstein "Wagner's sermon to his flock," Parsi /al is the final
triumph of refinement in his art at the
same time that it is a grandly developed
recital of his personal religious faith. It is
for
to experience
an amazing work
-
simply "hearing" or "seeing" it cannot be
work that
imagined by anyone who has
long before the end of the first act can obviously become no more elevated in tone,
but that keeps on becoming so all the long
way to its close. Whether the profession
of faith is in God, and if so which; whether
it is in Wagner himself; whether it is in
the ultimate power of sheer theatrical synthesis, cohesive and in staggering mass
that is for the individual to decide for him-
-a
-
self. He may be transfigured, or repelled,
or merely bored, but he can hardly deny
that Parsi /al is one of the most impressive
of musical- theatrical creations.
The London recording was made at the
1951 Bayreuth Festival and the performance is one of those rare recorded ones that
the listener can actually feel come to life
and pulse. The sound has its quota of
audience noises and the singing is not always perfection, but the encompassing
and most
sweep of the occasion is all
imposing it is, especially under the broad,
devoted beat of Hans Knappertsbusch.
Martha Miidl is a marvelously dramatic
Kundry, in all her multiple personalities;
and if her singing is not always tidy, it tells
unfailingly. Wolfgang Windgassen's Par sifal, especially in the later scenes, is several
cuts above average. George London is a
very moving Amfortas, Ludwig Weber
strong and knightly as Gurnemanz, Hermann Uhde (who is to come to the Metropolitan next season) superbly evil as
Klingsor
and so on. Big, bulky, not for
every taste, and expensive, but one of the
opera
recordings ever made.
truly great
-Martha Mödl (s), Kundry; Hanna Ludwig (s), Elfriede Wild (ms), Esquires;
Lore Wissmann (s), Erika Zimmermann
(s), Paula Brivkalne (s), Maria Lacorne
(s), Hanna Ludwig (s), Elfriede Wild
(ms), Flower Maidens; Ruth Siewert (ms),
A Voice; Wolfgang Windgassen (t), Par sifal; Walter Fritz (t), A Knight of the
Grail; Gunther Baldauf (t), Gerhard
Stolze (t), Esquires; George London (b),
Amfortas; Hermann Uhde (b), Klingsor;
Ludwig Weber (bs), Gurnemanz; Werner
Faulhaber (bs), A Knight of the Grail;
-
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
Orchestra and Chorus of the Bayreuth
Festival, 1951, Hans Knappertsbusch, cond.
LONDON LLA ro. Six 12 -in. $29.88.
PARSIFAL (vocal excerpts)
As before, the ordering; but the excerpts
are made far less significant by the fact of
the excellent full recording. The Bohnen
performance of Gurnemanz story to the
esquires is good, but not a must; the Edelmann of Amfortas' agonized outburst as he
anticipates the pain of another communion,
very fine in tone but not very long on drama;
the Treptow -and- Blumenmädchea not much
use when you reflect that the solo girls used
to be great singers, not choristers. But the
Flagstad- Melchior account of the great Act
Il duet is so beautiful vocally as to make
up for sapless conducting. And even here,
the Leider singing of a part of the duet is
not bettered, although the Traubel is, and
light -years.
I: Titurel, der fromme Held. Michael Bohnen (bs); orchestra. ETERNA ELP
0-474. 12 -in. $5.95 (in "Wagnerian Baritones ")
-Act I: Nein! Lasst ihn unenthüllt! Otto
Edelmann (b); Vienna Symphony Orchestra, Rudolf Morals, cond. EPIC LC 3052.
12 -in. $3.98 (with excerpts from Der
Fliegende Holländer; Tannhäuser; Die
Meistersinger) .
-Act II: Flower Maiden Scene. Günther
Treptow (t); Chorus of the Vienna State
Opera and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra,
Hans Knappertsbusch, cond. LONDON LS
287. Io -in. $2.98 (with Prelude; Transformation Scene).
-Act II: Parsifal -Kundry Scene. Kirsten
Flagstad (s), Lauritz Melchior (t), Gordon
Dilworth (b); RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra, Edwin McArthur, cond. RCA VICTOR LCT 1105. 12 -in. $3.98 (with excerpt
from Lohengrin).
-Act II: (part of scene above) Ich sah das
Kind. Frida Leider (s); orchestra, John
Barbirolli, cond. RCA VICTOR LCT 1001.
12 -in. $3.98 (in "A Wagner Treasury").
-(same). Helen Traubel (s); RCA Vicby
-Act
.
tor Symphony Orchestra, Frieder Weissmann, cond. RCA VICTOR LM 1123.
12 -in. $3.98 (in "A Wagner Recital ").
"Dresden State Opera Orchestra, etc.,
Fritz Schreiber, cond." ALLEGRO 3095.
-Prelude; Good Friday Spell. NBC
Sym-
phony Orchestra, Arturo Toscanini, tond.
RCA VICTOR LM 6020. Two 12 -in. $7.96
(in "A Wagner Concert ").
-Prelude; Good Friday Spell. Orchestra
of the Munich State Opera, Franz Konwitschny, cond. URANIA URLP 7065. I2in. $3.98 (with excerpts from Siegfried:
Götterdämmerung) .
-Prelude; "music from Act Ill." Symphony Orchestra, Leopold Stokowski, cond.
RCA VICTOR LM 1730. 12 -in. $3.98
(with Schubert: Rosamunde, excerpts).
-Good Friday Spell. Royal Philharmonic
Orchestra, Sir Thomas Beecham, cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4962. 12 -in. $3.98 (with
excerpts from Der Fliegende Holländer;
Die Meistersinger; Götterdämmerung).
-Good Friday Music. London Philharmonic Orchestra, Clemens Krauss, cond.
LONDON LL 14. 12 -in. $3.98 (with excerpts from Tristan und Isolde).
(-Good Friday Spell. "Warwick Symphony
Orchestra" (Philadelphia Orchestra, Leopold Stokowski, cond.). CAMDEN C 163.
12 -in.
$1.98 (with Rimsky- Korsakov:
Russian Easter Overture. Glinka: Overture
to Ryden and Ludmilla.)
$5.95)
PARSIFAL (orchestral excerpts)
The standard cuttings for concert purpose,
are represented here quite well
the
Prelude and the "Transformation Scene"
most feelingly in the Knappertsbusch readings, of which the twelve -inch has better
sound. The "Good Friday Spell" ( i.e., orchestral arrangement of Gurnemanz' long
speech on that subject in Act Ill) is very
luminously played in the Toscanini version.
The Stokowski Act III music is a mess
the very word
materials from Act Ill
cut up and stuck together with the blood
of the score. Of the disks that deal only
with Act III, the Krauss
no longer as
brilliant sounding as once
is more in the
vein than the lush new Beecham.
-Prelude; Transformation Scene (Act I) .
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Hans
Knappertsbusch, cond. LONDON LL 451.
12 -in. $3.98 (with excerpt from Rienzi).
-(same; same performing elements.)
LONDON LS 287. to-in. $2.98 (with vocal
excerpt, Act II) .
-
-
-of
--
AUGUST 1955
why so many people
are switching to
THE MUSIC BOX'S
unique Long Playing
l'ecOI'd mail order
service:
Every record guaranteed to be
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Every record carefully inspected
for visible imperfections, before
mailing.
Every record dusted, cleaned and
enclosed in a polyethelene envelope
to lessen possible damage from
dust, while in transit.
This concludes Wagner on Microgroove. Next issue's Discography
will be Vocal Music of Bach by
Nathan Broder.
...
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0.5 db, 20 to 22,000 cycles. Narnienk distortion:
3 watts, 50 cycles, 0.3 %; 10 watts, 50 cycles, 0.75%;
10 watts, 30 cycles, 1.5%. Noise: 80 db below 10
watts. Dimensions: 12 in. long by 7 1/8 wide by
6 1/8 high, overall. Tubes: 2 -655, 6S37, 2.6V6GT,
5Y3GT. Price: ,$89.50. Manufacturer: Webster
Electric Company, Racine, Wis.
SPECIFICATIONS
-
(t
(t
t
-
trol has a flat position. By changing a
terminating resistor you can have two
microphone channels or two magnetic
phono channels, as you prefer. Easier yet,
use external load resistors of the recommended values to get two phono channels.
Preamplifier noise level was very low and
gain extremely high.
On the front panel are six small holes,
and behind them are screwdriver -adjusted
input level -set controls, one for each channel. Incidentally, the instructions contain
some good advice concerning these adjustments. Keep them turned down as far as
possible, and the main preamplifier volume
control as far up as possible, in order to
achieve minimum distortion. This applies
equally to any similar equipment.
The selector switch is the first main control on the front panel. Next are individual turnover and rolloff equalization
trots. Response in their center positions
was almost perfectly flat, and the maximum
boost and droop of each met specifications
well within the error tolerance of our test
equipment. Further -and most important
they caused absolutely no discernible
ringing on transients. Then, to the right,
are concentric volume and loudness controls. We have commented before that this
seems, to us, most sensible of the many possible arrangements for loudness compensation. Acording to our checks, maximum
compensation at 5o cycles was 12.5 db; at
10,000 cycles, 3 db. Less compensation
than most loudness controls furnish but, in
our opinion, entirely adequate.
In the upper right-hand corner is the AC
power switch and, in the lower right-hand
corner, a pilot light. Between them is the
filter switch, with a flat position and two
others labeled 5 kc and 7 kc, corresponding
-
This amplifying system from Webster
Electric was obviously designed and built
to the highest commercial standards; all
control facilities of real value have been
included, and provision made for a multiplicity of input sources. There is even
that rarity, two distinct input channels
suitable for magnetic cartridges. Electrical
performance and mechanical construction
are exceptionally good. Curiously, though,
the preamplifier in particular has much
more ear- than eye- appeal, and the input
and output screw -terminal connections are
anything but easy to work with. These
deficiencies are only so annoying because of
the equipment's superiority in other respects.
The preamplifier has three standard
high -level input channels, labeled Tuner,
Tape, and TV. Another high -level channel,
for crystal, ceramic, and other constantamplitude cartridges, is affected by the varias it should
able equalization controls
be. There are two low -level input channels
labeled Mag and Mic. They are identical
except for input loading resistors; the termination for the Mag channel is loo,000
ohms and that for the Mic channel is s
-
megohm. Both channels are affected by the
equalizer controls; consequently, each con-
AuUsT,.1955__
The Webster 97 -o preamp- control gets blue ribbons for flexibility and overall quality.
controls. Turnovers available are flat, old
AES, Soo (RIAA), old LP, and Soo (old
RCA).
Rolloff control positions are
marked according to decibels attenuation
at to,000
cycles: o, 4, 8, 12, and 16.
Curves for both controls are well-chosen
and our workbench checks showed them to
be right on the nose.
Next along are treble and bass tone con-
to the points at which sharp high- frequency
cutoffs begin. We found that the actual
frequencies at which cutoff began in our
test unit were 3,900 and 6,8oc cycles. Although cutoff was very sharp
18 db per
octave
ringing caused by the control teas
-
-
insignificant.
There are two outputs and both are at
low impedance. One is for connection to
71
the amplifier, the other to a tape recorder.
The latter is not affected by any controls
other than the selector and equalization
switches. Output as well as input connections are made by means of screw terminals.
The 96 -10 amplifier is rated with a
greater degree of conservatism than any
we've worked with; most manufacturers
would have called it a 13-water. At full
rated output we measured roughly the same
IM distortion as at half -power. Both figures
were low. Waveform was clean and the
sound, as with the preamplifier, excellent.
Our only complaint concerns- againconnections! To get into this amplifier you
have to wire up an Amphenol connector (the
connector is supplied, but not the cable).
Furthermore, you have to find an AC power
CBC Voltage Regulators
(furnished by manufacturer);
Regomatic automatic voltage regulators produce
constant output AC voltage with varying power line input voltages. Capacity: model 200, loads
from 130 to 200 volt -amperes; model 300, 180 to
300 volt -amperes. Regulation: output voltage is
constant at 115 volts 3 % with line voltages from
95 to 130. Prices: model 200, $29.95 list; model
300, $34.50 list. Manufacturer: CBC Electronics
Company, Inc.. 2601 North Howard St., Philadelphia 33, Pa.
SPECIFICATIONS
f
If you live in suburban or rural surroundings-or even in many cities- your
power -line voltage may vary ove: a surprisingly wide range during the day. We have
found that ours may be anything from tog
to I IS volts. Television sets generally do
not take kindly to such wide variations;
they react by burning out tubes or making
narrow, poor- quality pictures. These regulators were designed to keep the voltage
supply constant for TV sets. You plug the
regulator into the wall outlet and the set
into the outlet on the regulator; turning on
the set activates the regulator, which cuts
down the wide swings to harmless size.
Well, high fidelity equipment is affected
by incorrect line voltages too. Low voltages
may cause speed changes and overheating
in turntable motors, degraded tuner per-
formance, and reduced power output as
well as increased distortion in amplifiers.
The CBC regulators work just as well with
hi -fi systems as they do with TV sets, which
is very well indeed.
There are two models available, and
you'll have to use the correct size or sizes
to obtain proper results. Model 200 should
be used for loads totaling 130 to 200 watts;
model 30o for loads from iSo to 300
to complete the power circuit. That receptacle is for a remote on -off switch; we
believe that it would have better been
Webster's 97 -ro amplifier: very good also.
omitted.
It is probably obvious that we are enthusiastic about both Webster units. We
think that with a few minor changes, making them more convenient to work with
and dressing up the preamplifier's appearance a bit, they would be highly competitive with the best on the market. In
quality, performance, and control flexibility
they deserve to be best- sellers, and it will
be regrettable if they do not become so.
-
R. A.
A shorted plug for
plug, connect a wire across its terminals,
and plug it into a receptacle on the chassis
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT,
watts. More than one item of equipment
can be plugged into a regulator, of course,
so long as the total load on each regulator
falls within its rated range. Most complete
systems can be handled by a single regulator. Power required by tuners, amplifiers,
and the like is usually indicated somewhere
on the equipment or in literature that accompanied it; if not, that information can
be obtained from the manufacturer. Cost
of the regulators is nominal, and there
should be very little maintenance required.
good, simply could not be expected to
measure up to other components in better
hi -fi systems.
The 4Fro is better for use with high
fidelity systems than the A model in several
important respects, however. First, there is
a push -pull amplifier output; this has little
apparent effect on the overall frequency
response (determined by the heads, head
alignment, and the record and playback
preamplifiers), but it does reduce playback
-R.
A.
We have no corrections to make to the article and the only addition
we ran think of is that the unit would have applicaMANUFACTURER'S COMMENT:
tion even in localities where power regulation is
good hut where appliances in the home are on an
over -loaded circuit. This is especially true o. ap-
pliances that have an automatic "on" and "off"
action like air conditioners and refrigerators
Wilcox -Gay 4F10
Recorder
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished by manufacturer): substantially the same as for the 4A10 recorder, dis-
cussed in Tested in the Home for
September 1954.
except as noted in section below. Manufacturer:
Wilcox -Gay Corporation, Charlotte, Mich.
The model 4F to, latest tape recorder from
Wilcox -Gay, is basically much like the
model 4A
which we reported on more
fully in the September '34 issue. For those
who do not recall, we may say here that
this is a "package" type portable recorder,
having a built -in low -power amplifier and
speaker. Performance at the very modest
price of the 4A o, although subjectively
the amplifier's A(' switch terminals will be furnished with all future production.
distortion substantially when the power
amplifier is used. Better yet, the TV -phono
input jack is connected to the top of the
playback volume control when the machine
it serves as a
is in the PLAY position
constant -level output before the power
amplifier section, and is perfectly suitable
for feeding a hi -fi system on playback. The
jack is connected just after the low-noise
12ÁY7 playback preamp tube; you'll have
to use the volume control on your hi -fi
control unit, and will probably get better
results with some bass boost too.
It will be remembered that the 4Aro
had an external speaker jack which, when
used, disconnected the speaker in the recorder. The same arrangement is made for
one external speaker jack in the 4Fro;
there are two extra speaker jacks, however,
that do not disconnect the built-in speaker.
You can use the internal speaker alone,
then, or with one or two external speakers,
or you can have one, two, or three external
speakers going without the internal speaker.
There's a resemble record and playback
time indicator on the 4Fro, with index
-so
Continued on page 74
Right: Wilcox -Gay model 4F to recorder is better than 4Aro.
Below: CBC voltage regulator helps to maintain performance.
72
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
A NEW MAGAZINE
High fldelitl]
last is the perfect complement to High Fidelity ... a new monthly
BY THE PUBLISHERS OF
Here at
magazine written for those who want more technical and do- it- yourself material
about hi fi, for those who want basic, practical and reliable information on sound
in the
recording and reproduction. Here is the magazine which will tell you
first issue
how to place and orient your speaker system for best results ... how
to have FM in your automobile
the characteristics and prices of all popular
microphones
how to build a compact quality amplifier for your TV set . .
how to build an especially fine
how to dress up your equipment with decals
three -speaker system, complete with detailed woodworking plans. Every issue
will include the following regular departments:
-
-
...
...
.
...
The Grounded Ear
Audionews
Tips for the Woodcrafter
How They Did It
The Sound Board
Tape News and Reviews
Basic Electronics
Sound Servicing
Hi -Fi Demonstration and Test Records
-
The first issue (November) will be on sale October 25th
your first copy early by taking advantage of
A SPECIAL OFFER TO
... but you can get
CHARTER SUBSCRIBERS:
The regular subscription rates will be $3.50 for one year, $6.50 for two, and
$9.00 for three. If you get your subscription order in now, you will pay only
$3.00 for a full one year subscription AND your copy of the big first issue
It's certain
( November) will be mailed to you immediately after October loth.
to be a sell -out, so make sure of getting your copy. Enter a subscription today!
AUDIOCRAFT Magazine, 4500 Publishing House, Great Barrington, Mass.
Please enroll me as a Charter Subscriber to AUDIOCRAFT at the special
rate of $3.00 for one year. I enclose cash, check, or money order.
Name
(Please print)
Street 8 N
C
ty
Zone
Stata
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page 72
numbers to facilitate locating any section of
a recording for which the original number
was noted. Finally, the case is embellished
with a handsome clear plastic protective
covering, with minor changes in control
placement. These changes bring the cost
of the 4Flo up to $209.95, as against
$149.95 for the 4Á1o. Most users, we
believe, will find the changes worth the
R. A.
difference.
-
EdiTall Jr. Tape Splicer
SPECIFICATIONS
(furnished by manufacturer):
a
cutting and splicing b ock for magnetic recording
tape, made of polished aluminum. Has tape holding channel and diagonal cutting slot. Attached
to recorder or tape editing desk with two -faced
masking tape supplied. Dimensions: 4 in. long by
in. wide byi{ in. thick. Price: $2.80. Manufacturer: Tech Laboratories, Inc., Bergen & Edsall
Boulevards, Palisades Park, N. J.
The EdiTall Jr. is a simplified version of
the professional tape-splicing block developed by CBS tape editor Joel Tall. It is
EdiTall tape block
promotes fast and
accurate splicing.
somewhat shorter, does not have the perpendicular cutting slot of the professional
model (not needed for hi -fi work) , nor the
screw mounting holes, and sells for less
than half the price of the larger version.
One of the important differences among
splicing blocks is in the tape holding channel. This in the EdiTall models has a
curved bottom and precisely machined
sides. Result is that the tape can be pressed
into place easily, yet is held securely while
it is being spliced, and pops out of the
channel with a gentle but sharp pull at
both ends simultaneously. The cutting
guide slot is deep, so the razor won't climb
out; the material is Duralumin, so the slot
should be tough enough to resist the razor
cuts. Finally, the entire block is well
finished. It appears to be an efficient, dur-
able product.
A sample piece of splicing tape is furnished with the block. This is the 7/16
width-slightly narrower than the magnetic tape and, as with all splicing tape, has
a non -oozing adhesive; it should always be
used for splicing to avoid gummed -up tape
R. A.
and tape heads.
-
Even though This
splicer looks extremely simple it is nevertheless a
precision instrument machined to a tolerance of
unbelievable accuracy. This is true both of the
professional and the Jr. models. Such accuracy
is required for the purpose of holding the tape
securely under all conditions and at the same time
permitting quick removal, without nicking. of the
tape from the slot.
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT:
model TV55. There is a multi -contact
receptacle on the back panel of the HFt55
that takes a cable from the TV55, carrying
operating voltages to the TV55 and the
audio IF back to the HF155. Smart idea, in
view of the poor audio quality you get
from most standard TV sets. You can't use
it for standard inputs, though.
There are two standard output jacks on
the HF155, both of low impedance. According to specifications you can use zoo fr.
of cable to an amplifier or tape recorder, if
you want to. One output has a level control, the other does not. Miscellany: top
of the cabinet gets quite warm after a
while; don't pile books or the like on
glass dial plate on our tuner was out of
spring clips on arrival; easy to replace
pilot lights show through dial backup
panel what position selector switch is in.
Generally, the HFt55 represents solid
it-
Rauland-Borg's FM -AM tuner features good looks and performance, control simplicity
Rauland Golden Gate
Tuner
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished
by manufacturer): an
FM -AM tuner, model HF155. Inputs: one, for TV
sound. Same receptacle furnishes operating voltages for Rauland TV55 television sound tuner.
Controls: combined AC power and selector switch
(OR, AM, FM -AFC, FM, TV); tuning. Volume
control for main output on back panel. Outputs:
low- impedance outputs to tape recorder and amplifier; amplifier output has level control. Sens
nivity: FM, 5 microvolts for 30 db quieting; AM,
5 microvolts for L5 volts output. Response: FM.
db. 20 to
0.5 db, 20 to 20,000 cycles; AM,
5,000 cycles. Distortion: less than 2% at 1.5 volts
output. Dimensions: 1354 in. wide by 10 deep by
2
-6AU6,
6AB4,
Tubes: 4 -6CB6, 6ßE6,
4 high.
12AT7, 6AL5, 6AV6, 6X4. Price: $119.50. ManuRauland -Borg Corporation, 3515 W.
facturer:
Addison St., Chicago 18, Ill.
t3
The HF155 is unconventional in appearance, as can be judged from the picture. A
black -and -white photo, however, cannot
convey the striking effect of the brushedbrass panel end- pieces, nor the gold -traced
black cabinet.
When you consider the price for this
FM -AM combination, its performance is
just as outstanding as its looks. It is very
sensitive on both FM and AM, in the front
74
rank. Noise suppression on FM is just as
good. Noise isn't troublesome on AM,
probably because response cuts off above
5,000 cycles (all you can use on long-distance pickup). In some cases we thought
an AM whistle filter would have been helpThere are separate FM and
ful, even so.
AM "front ends," each with an RF amplifier stage. A double limiter and Foster Seeley discriminator are used on FM; these
indicate that no short cuts were taken in
the tuner's design, and account in part for
its excellent performance.
The selector switch has five positions;
turned maximum counterclockwise the
tuner is shut off. Next is the AM position,
and then two for FM (one with and one
without automatic frequency control). AFC
in the HF155 is quite powerful, and you
can skip over a weak station next to a
strong one. But if you tune in the weak
station with the selector in the FM position,
then switch to FM -AFC, you'll stay locked
on the station. Last position of the selector
switch is labeled TV. This is designed for
use with Rauland's television sound tuner,
-
-
value.- R.
A.
The HF -155 you
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT:
received was one of the first pilot run of 10O pieces.
Subsequent production has been changed to correct the possibility of the glass dial
slipping during shipment.
escutcheon
Snyder 5-D Indoor
Antenna
(furnished by manufacturer): portable indoor antenna, with push- button tuning, for
TV and or FM reception. Consists of two telescoping dipole elements that can be individually raised
or lowered in angle, a central phasing bar variable
in length, and a group of three tuning push -buttons.
Heavy cast -iron hase to prevent toppling. Price:
Manufacturer:
Snyder Manufacturing
$12.95.
Company. 22nd and Ontario Streets. Philadelphia
SPECIFICATIONS
40, Pa.
It can be stated virtually without qualification that an outside antenna is always desirable for FM reception. In low-signal areas
a good antenna installation at a reasonable
Continued on page 76
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
k HARVEY
the House of Audio
The NEW
The NEW
Mc INTOSH
BOGEN
ee
Model MC -60
AUDIO
60 WATT
AMPLIFIER
CONTROL
Model PR100
Designed to meet the most exacting demands of advanced high fidelity
systems, the PR100 preamp- control offers the ultimate control flexibility
and reproduction quality. Frequency coverage is from 5 to 150,000 cycles
±0.5db.
Six Input channels with individual level adjustments are fed through a
pushbutton selector and permit its use with tuner, phono, monaural tape,
binaural tape, TV, etc. Three outputs are provided for main amplifier, tape
recorder and for binaural reproduction. Separate Tur
and Wolf controls, each with 6 positions, permit any record equalization characteristics
to beset. In addition, there are separate bau and treble controls for 15 db
cut and boost at 50 and 15,000 cycles, respectively.
Sharp cut -off Biters provide 5 positions or frequencies at which abrupt
attenuation can be introduced to cut -off any low frequency noise or high
frequency distortion originating in the signal source. There is a normal
volume or level control, as will as Loudness Contour Selector. All control
knobs are of the dual -purpose, coaxial type.
Complete with tubes and mounting front panel.__.._._.. ..__ .................._...39950
In Cabinet (specify mahogany or blonde)
_.._._..... 119.50
Employing the famous McIntosh -exclusive circuit with unity coupling, the
new Model MC -60 provides performance within .4% of theoretical perfection. The tremendous reserve power mode available by its 60 watt
output, gives the MC -60 a distinct advantage in handling transients and
other sudden surges without overloading or distortion and contributes
imm
bly to the realism of reproduction.
There is less than .5e1 of harmonic distortion from 20 to 20,000 cycles
even at full 60 -watt output. Frequency response extends from 10 to 100,000
cycles ±1.0db; 16 to 60,000 cycles ±.Sdb; and 20 to 30,000 cycles
±.1db. Intermodulation distortion, under 120 watts peak, is less than 5 %.
Socket terminals ore provided for powering McIntosh and other ',memos,
and there are two inputs for .5 volts and 2.5 volts, respectively. Output
terminals have the following impedances: 4, 8, 16 and 32 ohms. The
McIntosh MC -60 employs the new Tungsol 6550 output tubes in pushpull.
The New
3 -Speed
BELL
The NEW
GARRARD
TAPE RECORDER
and PLAYBACK Unit
TRANSCRIPTION
10
TURNTABLE
Professional Model
301
unit designed specifically for discriminating listeners and owners of
home sound systems. The turntable itself it o 7r/t lb. disc, precisely
machined, accurately centered and balanced. A 4 -pole induction motor was
specially developed by Garrard for use in this unit. Armature is dynomi
sally balanced and the rotor set in self -centering phosphor bronze
bushings. A newly designed motor mounting technique, employing counterbalanced springs, absorbs virtually oll vibration.
Intended for all 3 speeds: 331/4, 45 and 78 rpm, the 301 features on eddy
current speed control for making fine adjustments. Speeds cannot be changed
unless the unit is shut off, thus preventing any possible jamming of the
idlers. Other features include: built -in lubricating system, R/C switch network to eliminate 'on /off' clicks, shutoff broke, and a rubber mot to
prevent slippage of records.
A
Model 301
$8900
...... ...............................
Model
-
-
Complete
with
microphone, reel of tope, take -up reel,
tubes, and instructions
The New
LOUDSPEAKER
With a depth of only 3%" the DI23 is the most compact 12 -inch speaker
in the field. It can actually be wallmounted flush with the surface and
between studding. In a properly designed reflex or hornloaded enclosure,
the usable frequency response extends from 30 to 15,000 cycles.
Power handling capacity is 20 watts; impedance: 16 ohms; and fundamental resonance: 35 cycles. The diameter of the voice coil is 3 inches.
Model D123
GRAY
Model 108C
fluid suspension provides automatic regulation of both the vertical
and lateral movements of the arm. Improves tracking and minimizes groove
jumping and skidding. Protects records because arm will not
suddenly.
Mechanical resonance is virtually eliminated. Simple slidein feature permits instant interchange of cartridges. Handles records up lo 16" diameter.
Hos adjustments for viscosity and stylus pressure.
Model 1O8C
..
$3995
37
HARVEY SHIPS EVERYWHERE. Use
this handy coupon
HARVEY RADIO CO., Dept.HF -8, 103 W.43rd St., New York 36, N.T.
Please ship the following
_..
..
$5450
..
$14995
Viscous- Damped
High Fidelity ARM
Viscous
Model D123 12 -inch
-
Pushbutten controls are provided for both fastforward and font- rewind.
There are two microphone inputs, one for crystal and one for dynamic or
ceramic
plus inputs for radio, phono and other high level program
material- Microphone and high level channels can be recorded simultaneously. Playback is provided by means of a built -in amplifier and 6 s 9"
oval, widerange speaker. There ore two outputs: 3.2 ohms for external
speaker and 500 ohms for line. A high impedance output is also provided
for feeding o high fidelity system- The entire unit is contained in a portable
case measuring only 16% z 15 x 91/4" and weighing 35 lbs.
JIM LANSING
EXTENDED RANGE
RT -75
A single control lever permits operation of this unit at either 1.875 ips for
lectures, meetings, etc., with a frequency response from 50 to 4000 cycles
±6db at 3.75 ips for general recording purposes with a frequency
response from 50 to 6500 cycles ±3db
or at 7.5 ips for high fidelity
with a frequency response from 50 to 12,000 cycles ±3db. Correct equal.
;cation is automatically introduced with each speed change. Dual track
recording permits 4 hours of sound on a 7" reel at 1.875 ips.
NEW
Signature
5198so
Complete with tubes
_..
NOTE: Prices Net, F.O.B. N.Y.0
HARVEY
money order for I
check
shipping charges. Unused surplus will be refunded.
New FREE High Fidelity Catalog
Send:
Details of your TIME PAYMENT PLAN
I
Subject to chongo without notice
ESTABLISHED 1927
RADIO COMPANY, INC.
103 W. 43rd Street, New York 36
.
including estimated
JU 2 -1500
1_
AUGUST 1955
enclose
City-._..__......_......__...__.. ._.._...__......._............. Zeno _...._..._.. state__...._....._.
....
.._..._
75
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page 74
height can pick up the maximum signal
available: in strong-signal areas antenna
height is desirable to minimize noise pickup. Furthermore, even though signal
strength may be high outside urban buildings, their steel frame construction is likely
to reduce the effectiveness of any indoor
antenna. These facts are mentioned to lend
weight to a warning: if it is impossible or
undesirable to use an outdoor antenna,
make sure that your indoor antenna is a
good one.
The Snyder 5 -D antenna, pictured here,
is an excellent one. It is not as directional
as a simple dipole, but it isn't completely
non -directional either. The lengths of its
dipole arms and their vertical angle, and
the length of the phasing bar, are adjust-
GE
passive
filter
/compensator has
variable equalizer
and range controls.
GE Record
Compensator
Filter
manufacturer):
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished by
model AL -901 is a passive control device to be used
between a GE pickup cartridge and a preamplifier
Lo
Controls:
or combined amplifier -preamp.
or
Cut -Off, with 12 db per octave cut at 0, 40, 60,LP,
80 cycles; Compensator, with Flat, Eur 78. Lon
AES, RIAA -Std, and Col LP positions; Hi Cut -Off,
with 12 db per octave cut at 3,000. 5,000 or 9,000
cycles, and a flat position. Insertion loss: zero when
all controls are in the flat positions. Price: $19.95.
General Electric, High Fidelity
Manufacturer:
Section, Radio and Television Dept., Electronics
Park, Syracuse, N. Y.
This Snyder antenna
is quite big but it
works well indoors.
able; you set them for best average results
and then don't need to bother with them.
Best results on FM are usually obtained
with the arms and the bar slightly shorter
than maximum. Tuning for individual
stations, if required, is accomplished with
the three push- buttons. They can be depressed individually or in combination, giving eight possible tuning arrangements
(including that with none depressed).
A stacked conical antenna in our third story attic gets us six FM stations in the
morning with solid reception, and two
more Blighty noisy stations. With the Synder 5 -D in our first-floor listening room we
were able to pick up four solid stations and
four slightly noisy ones; in other words,
two of the formerly quiet stations slipped
into the slightly -noisy group. During this
comparative test only the push- buttons were
adjusted on the Snyder -arm length and
orientation were not disturbed. In many
cases it was not necessary to readjust the
push- buttons for good reception when the
station was changed
that depended on
the strength of the signal from the station
and how close on the dial it was to the
previous one.
We'd say that this was exceptional performance. The 5 -D has one disadvantage:
its size. With the arms extended as they
should be the antenna is quite long. However, the dipole length is closely associated
with efficiency; a shorter antenna simply
wouldn't pick up as strong a signal. R. A.
-
-
76
General Electric should be congratulated
many times over for this record filter. It
provides a simple way for anyone using GE
cartridges to have precise and flexible record equalization as well as high and low all for less than
frequency cutoff filters
$20. If you don't have all these facilities in
your record -playing system now (and not
many systems are that complete) we can't
think how $20 could be better spent.
There are three controls: two are sharp cutoff range filters, the other a six-position
record equalizer. The equalization curves,
described in the specifications paragraph,
are well chosen to cover present and past
characteristics in wide use. There is a flat
position in which the compensator has no
effect, so that if a variable equalizer is
furnished on your amplifier or preamp-control unit you can use that instead. The low-
-
-
Flat,
frequency filter has four positions
40, 6o, and 8o, corresponding to frequencies at which the cutoff begins. We don't
recall any other rumble filter having such
closely- spaced cutoffs, which we consider
desirable. The remaining control is a four position treble filter, with a flat position
and cutoffs beginning at 3,000, 5,000, and
9,000 cycles.
This is a passive filter; it contains no
tubes and furnishes no amplification. You
plug the lead from your pickup cartridge
directly into the unit, and plug its output
into a normal magnetic cartridge input on
your amplifier or preamplifier. Operation
will be correct for any GE cartridge except
broadcast models, but incorrect in varying
degree for other makes of cartridge. The
preamplifier used with the fi.ter should
have standard RIAA bass equalization and
flat high -frequency response; if it has a
variable equalizer, and you want to use the
filter's compensator control, set the preamp's
equalizer to Flat. Otherwise, set the filter's
compensator to Flat and use your preamp's
variable equalizer. Ideally, the preamp's
input resistor should be 1oo,000 ohms or
more. If it is less than 5o,000 ohms it
should be replaced. Most non-variable
equalizers have standard RIAA bass boost
and a low -value input resistor for high frequency rolloff; replace that resistor with
R. A.
r 00,000 ohms and you're all set.
-
Argos AD Speaker
Enclosures
SPECIFICATIONS
(furnished
by
manufacturer):
models AD -1 and AD -2 are wall and corner versions
of small enclosures utilizing, by license agreement,
the Jensen Duette baffling principle. For 8 or 12 -in.
speakers with or without separate tweeters. Covered
with pyroxylin-coated 6!4lb. fabric, light or dark.
in. wide by 23 3 /8 high by
Dimensions: AD -1, 19
1354 deep; AD -2, 1934 in. wide by 23 3 /8 high by
14 [4 deep. Prices: AD-1, $21.50; AD -2, $24.50.
Manufacturer: Argos Products Company, 310 Main
Street, Genoa, III.
These Argos cabinets are slightly less than
cubic feet in volume; accordingly, the
lensen Duette type of mounting is used.
The speaker is not mounted directly on the
front panel but on a smaller panel spaced
about 3/ in. back of it; shims are used on
three sides to make an air -tight seal
between the two panels, but there is no
shim on the fourth side. This provides an
opening of controlled shape and size that
permits radiation from the back of the
speaker to reinforce front radiation at bass
frequencies.
The aural result is quite good for cabinets of this size. It doesn't quite come up
to the performance of a well -built cabinet
of appreciably greater dimensions, but there
are many applications in which it is impos-
Argos cabinets are good values.
Bible or inconvenient to use a larger, more
expensive enclosure. In such cases the
Argos cabinets do very well; and they will
outperform larger cabinets that are not
sturdily built.
We have emphasized many times in
these columns the need for rigid and airtight construction of loudspeaker enclosures.
Regardless of operating principle, this is an
extremely important point; panels vibrating
excessively can reduce the effectiveness of
Continued on page 78
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Even the walls have ears... for Bogen
An un-
NEW BOGEN DB11O(G) 13 WATT AMPLIFIER.
NEW BSO SERIES RECORD PLAYER.
An exclusive Bogen circuit makes
possible "luxury" performance in this
economy amplifier. 0.65:47 distortion
at full output; ± 0.5 db response from
15 to 50,000 cps; infinite damping.
Four separate controls for gain, bass,
usual value. Operates manually. to
play any disc up to 16 ", at any speed
from 29 to 86 rpm. (This includes,
of course, 78, 45, and 33% rpm.)
"Wow", "Hum" and "Rumble" are
minimal. Stylus pressure is adjustable
for minimum record wear. Arm is
equipped with plug-in head for simple
interchange. B50 -4LC (with one head,
you- pick -your- cartridge) : $40.40. Attractive wooden base; $4.60.
treble and
4
inputs and
3
record
equalization positions. DB110
(chassis) $59.95. In gold- finished
cage; $61.50. (See "Tested in the
;
Home ", April High. Fidelity.)
Bogen
IDELITY
HIGH
BECAUSE
rr
SOUNDS BETTER
1re
Send 25c for 56-pa.ge book, "Understunding High Fidelity ", to Dept. WH
David Bogen Co., Inc., 29 Ninth A renne, Nena York City 11, New York
TESTED IN THE HOME
Fairchild 220 Cartridge
Continued from page 76
We can make this the shortest TITH report
in history: Fairchild's 215 series was excellent indeed; the 22o is better all around.
even the best- designed enclosure, and add
unattractive coloration to the sound as well.
The Argos enclosures are good in this
Frequency response has been extended to
somewhere around 15 to 17 kc and a slight
peak in response, which used to occur in
the 12 to 14 kc zone, has been moved out
respect.
Each enclosure will accommodate an 8 or
a 12 -inch speaker; there are mounting bolts
tor both sizes. Each has also a cutout for a
small compression tweeter. There are terminal connections for speaker wires on
each cabinet, and rubber feet are supplied.
The fabric finishes may not be strong features, but the prices certainly are, and the
cabinets can be painted. We believe that
R. A.
they are excellent buys.
Fairchild 220
cartridge: it's
even
better
than the 215.
-
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT: One additional punt
the
on the side of versatility should be noted:
size of the tweeter opening is such as to make a
properly dimensioned bass-reflex port if the tweeter
panel is left off completely, giving excellent results
with
a 12 -in.
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished by manufacturer):
very small tape recorder-playback unit, battery
powered. Recording time: 1 hour (1 7/8 ips, both
sides of 3 -in. tape cartridge). Inpet: high impedance.
1
millivolt minimum. Output: 3 milliwatts at
2,000 ohms. Response: 200 to 4,000 cycles. Wow
and flutter: less than 0.7 %. Noise: 35 db below
maximum recording level. Batteries: motor and
filament battery, 8 volts and 1.3 volts. lasts 45
hours; 30 -volt B battery lasts 100 hours. Tubes:
in. by
CK542DX. Dimensions: 8
7/8 by 1 7/8 overall. Weight: 49 ox. including
batteries. Accessories Included: loaded tape cartridge, set of batteries, clip -on lapel mike, playback
earphone. Prim: $229.50. Manufacturer: Mohawk
Business Machines Corporation, 944 Halsey Street,
Brooklyn 33, N. Y.
2- CKS49DX,
3
can appreciate the beautiful precision
tine watch, or a faithful reproduction
in miniature of a sailing ship, the Midgetape will fascinate you. This battery -operated recorder will tit inconspicuously in a
topcoat pocket and you can make perfectly
good recordings, with the microphone nowhere in sight, anywhere you can ride or
walk. Even the motor is battery -operated,
so you don't have to wind up a spring
every few minutes. You can record continuously for a half hour on one side of the
tape in a small cartridge, turn the cartridge
over (or pop in a new one) in about ten
seconds, and you're in business for another
half hour. The machine will play back to
you through a miniature earphone or you
can use an accessory AC- powered amplifier
and speaker ($35.00) that matches the
recorder in size.
Before we go much further, we should
point out that this isn't a hi -fi tape recorder.
Its response range encompasses about that
perof the usual table model AM radio
fectly suitable for intelligible speech and
music reproduction, but not much more
than that. Outside business and professional
applications (of which there are a great
many) its only appeal to hi -fiers is in its
novelty and its potentialities as a gadget to
have a lot of fun with. We've had the
Midgetape for several weeks, and in that
time have: 1) created a minor case of mass
hysteria at a cocktail party, by playing back
a half hour of conversations with guests
who didn't know they were being recorded
(we don't recommend this as a regular
practice); 2) proved to a doubting friend
that our parakeet does. too, talk when no
one is around; 3) demonstrated to our
If you
of
a
-
78
was sometimes
necessary to use a
trans-
former to boost the output so that the
cartridge could be used satisfactorily with
preamplifiers which did not boast extreme
gain. And the transformer led to hum
pickup problems, unless due care was used.
The extra output of the 220 eliminates
these headaches. It should work perfectly,
without a transformer, with any modern
Note, incidentally, that the
preamplifier.
Fairchild is a low-impedance unit; therefore it can be used at a considerable distance from the preamplifier. As an experiment, we ran 5o ft. of shielded cable
between cartridge and preamp input; there
was no noticeable deterioration of quality.
All of which adds up to: a tine product
made still better.
C. F.
-
-
coaxial speaker.
Mohawk Midgetape
17 kc. The sound has the same
clarity which characterized the 215s.
Perhaps of primary importance from
most points of view is the fact that the
output of the Fairchild has been substantially increased. With the old series, it
to about
young son, with an emphasis no word
description could convey, how much noise
he made while eating and how strident was
his conversational voice; 4) obtained a recording of an intermittent engine noise in
our car for the benefit of the garage mechanic. This is only a partial list.
There are only three controls on the
Midgetape, all on one end. The master off on lever starts the drive motor and supplies
power to the tubes, which are of the instant- heating type; the recorder is in full
operation less than a second after this lever
is thrown. Another lever has only two
positions: Record and Play. Due care will
have to be taken not to start the recorder
with this in the Record position if it isn't
desired to record; you'll get tape erasure if
you do. Finally, there is the volume control, effective on both record and playback.
It has painted marks for close -to and conference pickup positions. The microphone
has high output and the amplifier is very
you can overload the tape if
sensitive
you aren't careful but, by the same token,
you can record sounds at a great distance,
or very weak sounds.
The microphone input and the playback
output sockets are at the same end of the
unit. Available in addition to the lapel
mike supplied are a telephone pickup coil
($10.00), a throat mike ($19.75), and a
wrist mike that looks like a watch ($33.5o).
By pushing a slide latch you can open the
tape compartment for access to the tape
cartridge, capstan, and heads. The cartridge
has takeup and supply reels one over the
other, both fully enclosed. Only a loop of
-
tape is outside the cartridge. It is marked
"First half hour" on one side, "Second half
hour" on the other; on each side there is a
slot showing the amount of tape left to
record, with marks showing the time in
five -minute intervals. There is a corresponding slot in the recorder case, and the
time marks are also printed on the outside,
so you can tell how much time you have
left without opening the case. During recording or playback the cartridge reels are
driven by the motor, as is the capstan; rewinding is done by hand, however, to conserve the battery. There is a crank on the
outside of the case for this purpose
folds flush with the case when not used.
One turn of the crank rewinds about three
seconds of the recording, and the entire reel
can be rewound in less than a minute. Extra tape cartridges cost Si .5o.
At the end opposite the controls is another hinged section that opens to replace
the batteries. The larger battery supplies
power for the motor and tube heaters; this
lasts for 45 hours of operation and costs
$9.50. It is made by Mohawk especially
for this application and is obtainable only
-it
through Mohawk distributors. There is a
pilot light on the side of the case that indicates when power is on and also the motor
battery condition; when it goes out entirely
the battery is good for five hours more.
Tube plate voltage is supplied by a smaller
battery good for zoo hours, and which
costs $2.00.
Altogether, this is a unique, well -made
gadget that has many practical uses as well
as a lot of amusement potential.
R. A.
-
Mohawk Midgetape
is completely selfdoesn't
contained,
require winding up.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
SOUND
the "missing link"
in your
sound system!
PRODUCED
HEARD
IS NOT SOUND
Today you can buy amplifiers, tuners, record players, tape recorders
etc. with specifications that exceed reasonable demands of sound reproduction. In other words, the equipment is capable of reproducing
a finer range of sound than the ear can -detect. And yet, how many
times have you heard an audiophile say that he was dissatisfied with
the sound of his system in his home? Islit possible that although fine
equipment can reproduce almost all of the sound, we cannot hear
that same sound in our home?
FROM THE
RECORD TO THE EAR
SOUND SYSTEM,
IS
BOTH
THE LARGEST PART OF YOUR
IN SIZE AND IN
IMPORTANCE,
THE LISTENING ROOM.
The acoustics of your listening room, as much as the performance of
any one of the essential components of a sound system. determine how
the sound is heard. Now some manufacturers have devised an ingenious
type of variable damping control that permits the amplifier to compensate for certain deficiencies in speaker response. When used with
relatively inefficient speakers, this is a decided help. But with the
finer speaker systems, the net gain is very slight. The reason for this
is that the closer the speaker comes to an ideal response, the more
does the listener react to the acoustic distortions present in his room.
The designers of Concert Halls and Opera Houses realize that the audience must have good acoustics for true listening satisfaction. But few
housewives will permit their husbands to decorate home with attention to acoustics only. There is the "missing link" in your sound system!
MEANS OF CONTROLLING THE
THERE MUST BE
A
ACOUSTICS OF A
LISTENING ROOM
Some time ago, the engineering staff of Brainard Laboratories recognized the need for a means of controlling the acoustics in a home.
After years of developmental work these engineers perfected ABC
(ACOUSTIC BALANCE CONTROL) and subsequently incorporated
their invention into all new Brainard Amplifiers. This invention actually permits you to electronically correct for the acoustic distortion
in your listening room ... with the turn of a knob.
cOlogr A B
ABC UNVEILED
AT ELECTRONICS
C
PARTS SHOW,
CHICAGO, MAY 1955
The response of the electronics industry to the introduction of ABC
was immediate and impressive. The entire production of Brainard
Amplifiers was sold out for three months in advance. Audio engineers
throughout the country hailed ABC as the decade's outstanding im-
provement in the high fidelity field.
HEAR THE AMAZING BRAINARD DEMONSTRATION AT YOUR
HIGH FIDELITY DEALER
You can actually "hear" the effect of ABC on the acoustics of a room!
Your high fidelity dealer will be happy to demonstrate the Brainard
equipment. although it is possible he might not be able to fill your
order immediately. Brainard Electronics is not a mass manufacturing enterprise but predominately specialist in audio and electronic
fields, manufacturing only those components utilizing distinctive
Brainard developments. Consequently, the tremendous reception
accorded the new Brainard Amplifiers with ABC has created a temporary short supply. Please leave your name and address with your
dealer and your order will be filled as quickly as possible.
BR -25
Acoustic Balance Control
Power Output: 25
Watts (Ultra Linear) Frequency Response: Flat
1 db., 20 to 50.000 c.p.s.
Power Response:
1 db., 30 to 20,000 c.p.s.
Efficiency: In excess of
58 % at full output compared to 25 -30 % of usual
Class A circuits
Feedback: Three feedback
loops for maximum stability and purest reproduction Hum Noise Level: 70 db below rated
output Distortion: Less than .5 % at 20 watts
Printed Circuit Construction Loudness Control: Au-
Write today for illustrated Brainard Catalog 11-8, complete with technical
specifications on all equipment and a full explanation of the revolutionary
Acoustic Balance Control.
i
BR-25
25
Wall Amplifier
BR 14
14
Walt Ampliliet
tomatic correction for Fletcher Munson Curve
Boss Control: 19 db of boost at 30 cycles
Treble
Control: 20 db. of cut and 18 db of boost at
10 k.c.
Record Compensator: 36 combinations of
corrective curves including scratch filter for
worn records Phono -Pre- Amplifier: Input sen sivity, 10 millivolts. Three inputs for all types of
modern phono -cartridges
Pilot Light: Detachable for cabinet mounting
Two Auxiliary Inputs: For radio, T.V., Tape, etc.; sensitivity. .7
volts r.m.s. Tope Output: High impedance connection unaffected by loudness control Speaker
ramar
ELECTRONICS
8586 -90 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles 46, California
Output Impedances:
8 and 16 ohms
Two A.C.
Convenience Outlets: 150 watts maximum controlled by amplifier power switch
Unique
"Thickness Adapter ": Eliminates shaft extensions
Tube Complement:
12AX7,
6L6GB, 1 --
5U4GB
12" wide
AUGUST 1955
2-
2-
Overall Size: 75¡" high. 9y§" deep,
Shipping Weight:
17
lbs.
ft)
^^^r
BRS -28
28
Watt
Stereo Amp.
BP -14
14
Watt
BP -25
25
Watt
Power Amp. Power Amp.
BR -36
36 Comb.
Rec. Comp.
AM-FM
Tuner -Amp
14 Watts
25 Watts
79
HI -FI COMPONENTS IN THIS
FAMOUS NAMES
READY -TO -PLAY
NEW! McIntosh MC60
60 WATT AMPLIFIER
4 -STAR PHONO SYSTEM
*ELECTRO -VOICE
SP12B RADAX 12" SPEAKER
Clean, sparkling wide-range
reproduction! Built -in mechanical crossover for optimum response: 30 to 13,000
cps.!
16 ohms impedance.
*PILOT
1
AA -902 PILOTONE
AMPLIFIER
Nationally famous 10 Watt Amplifier!
Amazingly low distortion (I% at 10
Watts). Hum and noise level 90db below
rated output. Overall dimensions 141/e"
wide x 444" deep x 51/4 "high. Net $39.75
Net $29.10
99,ÓO%
PERFECT AMPLIFICATION!
The new McIntosh Amplifier sets a new standard
of excellence -99-60/100%perfect amplification
is the theoretical limit of quality and efficiency
and is the only power amplifier which will
produce 60 Watts of power at less than 0.5%
harmonic distortion, from 20 to 20,000 cycles
per second! DESIGNED A
BUILT FOR THE DIS-
-
CRIMINATING LISTENER.ND
Net
MC60
MC30 like above, with 30 Watts output.
Net $143.50
$198.50
*PILOT
-912 PREAMPLIFIER
SeIfpowered matchmate to the Pilot AA902.
Great hi -fi features: Frequency Response: at
20 to 100,000
1 db.
radio, auxiliary inputs,
cps. Dual Tone Control Range: 18 db. boost or
cut at 20 cps. and at 20,000 cps. Phono
PA
':
Equalizers for all LP records. Overall dimensions 115/e" long x 51/e" high x 544" deep.
Beautiful Hammertone Bronze Finish. Net $49.50
DOZENS OF EXCLUSIVE FEATURES
*MIRAPHON XM110
3
-SPEED MANUAL RECORD PLAYER
Mc Intosh
riptionquality performance, complete
frequency ra ge. Precision arm with convenient
weight adjustment has GE tripleplay pickup already
mounted. Dim nsions 10r/2" x 12I4".
Net $43.60
Amazing trans
MATCHLESS PERFORMANCE
Listening Pleasure Usually Found in Systems Costing
The 4 -STAR SYSTEM SHOWN HERE
READY TO
Many, Many Times This LOW, LOW PRICE!
This outstanding, low -cost 4 -Star System is loaded with high-price
features: PILOT AMPLIFIER is easily mounted, takes only minimum
space. Frequency response 15 cps. to 40,000 cps. PILOT PREAMPLIFIER has separate microphone input control for radio, television,
phono and tape recorder effects. MIRAPHON RECORD PLAYER is
completely assembled to plug in ELECTRO-VOICE SPEAKER incorporates revolutionary E -V Radas Principle for ootimum response.
C -8
PROFESSIONAL
AUDIO
COMPENSATOR
ONLY
PLUG
IN AND
PLAY
s1
complete control center for professional and
home entertainment systems. Features laboratory- standard performance in your home: 10
switch phono compensator for unlimited equal-
A
-
3265PLETE
TOTAL REGULAR NET 5162.15
You Save $29.50
izing
never before achieved; precision tonal
balance for any type program .
AM or FM
radio, TV, tape or records, attuned to your most
.
critical listening judgement.
Net
less cabinet
C -6
CBP Same as above,
less
$ 88.50
with cabinet Net $96.50
self -powered
cabinet.
Net
$99.50
with cabinet Net $107.50
gleC741.CL
NEW!
MATCHED SPEAKER
GARRARD
301
Professional TRANSCRIPTION
AND
TURNTABLE
EQUIPMENT CABINETS
Electro -Voice Enclosures are made
by fine furniture craftsman in beautiful woods to complement the decor
of your home.
ARISTOCRAT CORNER ENCLOSURES
Utilize famous KLIPSCH sound principles, for 12"
full -range
and separate 2 and 3 -way loudspeaker
systems. Efficiency is many times that obtained
with conventional type bass -reflex or vented -type
cabinets. Extended bass range, no boominess,
greater speaker power -handling capacity. Dimensions: 291/2" high x 19" wide x 161/2" deep.
Mahogany Net
$64.68
THE
UNIPIVOT
Blonde Net
$70.56
Mahogany Net
$94.08
$99.96
Blonde Net
Note: PEERAGE CABINETS will be shipped with
Wank panels, or cut out for standard hi -f, components, of suitable size. Specify items to be
mounted, or send templates.
$89.50
GUARANTEE:
You are fully protected against
loss if any part arrives In damaged
condition or becomes defective within 90 days.
item
Every shipment is insured in transit and every and
is FULLY GUARANTEED by the manufacturer
Terminal
8o
Radio.
...
$87.22
ELECTRO-VOICE
TRANSCRIPTION PICKUP Model 17A
12" TRIAXIAL SPEAKER
Arm
any financial
Garrard's "incomparable" quality features: 4 -pole
heavy -duty motor, dynamically balanced; 12" Turn.
table with permanently "true" center; Variable
Speed Control for exact playback pitch on all three
speeds; Noiseless Main Spindle eliminates rumble;
built -in pressure lubricating system insures continuous, proper lubrication at all times
one of the
world's finest transcription turntables!
Model 301
Net
W8301 Base for turntable
Net $24,00
ANGEL
With
The Heavenly Touch".
Made by the Manufacturers of Angel Records.
A new experience in crisp, clean sound! A precision instrument with pickup and arm completely integrated for
the finest reproduction of Microgroove and Standard
records, up to 17" transcriptions. Complete with LP
cartridge, diamond stylus and high impedance transformer.
Net
Model 78 Standard 78 RPM Pickup, with Sapphire Stylus.
Net $12.50
The
PEERAGE SOUND EQUIPMENT CONSOLES
Pivoted, tilting top mounts most conventional
tuners. Amplifier is mounted on back shelf.
Changer drawer is directly below tuner panel, and
is mounted on roller slides for smooth operation.
Dimensions: 29?á" high x 20r/2" wide x 181/4" deep.
Prices Include
Transportation and
Insurance Costs
for Stateside USA
when full remittance accom-
panies order. Or send 25% deposit, balance COD, transportation and insurance collect.
MODEL 12TRXB
20 WATTS, 3 -IN -1 INTEGRATED SYSTEM?
Discover the distortion -free, wider range 35 to
15,000 cps. reproduction of this compact Triaxial
Speaker! Phenomenal bass response, full- bodied
mid -range, silky-smooth upper octaves. ADJUSTABLE
CONTROL TO MATCH INDIVIDUAL ROOM ACOUSTICS!
Net
12TRX like above, but has giant -size magnet strucNet $111.72
ture for greater efficiency and power.
$58.51
urinal Radio
85 CORTLANDT STREET, NEW YORK 7, N. Y.
o
CORP.
WOrth 4 -3311
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BACK COPIES
-
The following back copies are in stock:
Winter -1951 (No. 3), May -June -1953
(No. ro), July-August -r953 (No. rr),
May -1954 (No. 17), June-1954 (No.
18), August-1954 (No. 20), September '954 (No. 21), October -1954 (No. 22 ),
November-i954 (No. 23 ) , December'954 (No. 24), January-r955 (No. 25),
June-1955 (No. 3o). Just encircle, on
the card to the left, the identification
number of each issue you would like and
enclose your check or money order. Sorry,
we cannot bill single copies.
a new
ANCIENT CHINA
Continued from page 34
moo and 70o B. C. Thus, the object of
the Chinese musicologists and sound
technicians had been triumphantly
achieved: they had preserved the nation's sacred pitch standards and scale
systems in stone for 3000 years! It also
shows that the "Pythagorean" system
of intervals was known and used in
China 300 or 40o years before the
Greek philosopher, after whom our
own Western system was to be named,
was ever born.
In the subsequent centuries, when
the scientists and lapidaries became
more and more assured in their growing technical skill,'theyset out for ever
increasing ornamentation and began
to incorporate the nation's music cosmology into the sonorous material.
They also turned to a precious material
found to have superior sonorous qualities: jade. For probably more than 700
years the Chinese acoustical laboratories studied the possibilities of flat
circular jade disks with a central perforation, measuring between 5 and 18
Hundreds cf
inches in diameter.
them, originating from the ninth w
the third century B.C., were studied by
this writer and found to show unmistakable traces of a tuning process. The
techniques were similar to those found
in bronze bells, and aimed at sharping
as well as flatting tones. I also
identified five different methods of
drilling the central perforation to improve the tone qualities, and silk thread suspension techniques. The
objective was to curb the sidewise sway of the suspended disks when
they were played in scale sets. Their
Chinese name, incidentally, is Pi.
Some of the most perfect specimens were created between the sixth
and fourth centuries B.C. They are
completely covered with beautiful ornamentations carved or incised into
the large surfaces, and show no more
traces of a tuning process. The artists,
consequently, calculated and knew in
advance all dimensions of the disks,
all physical properties of the jade material and all pitch- changing influences of the ornamental carving. A
few of the finest specimens will produce, on one gentle stroke, a tone of
crystal -clear beauty, gently undulating
around a tonal pitch center, swelling
and fading slightly in volume and intensity and lasting up to one minute
Continued on next page
AUGUST 1955
HIGH FOR HI -FI !
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Now
enjoy Hi -Fi
the
outdoors with
...
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RANGE WEATHERPROOF
COAXIAL
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The BIC is the only speaker for extending o hi -fi music
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requires no enclosure -full 2 -way speaker
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CARMEN
Carmer ..Cora Canne Meyer
Don Jose
Leo Larsen
Escamillo ..Gerard Holthaus
Micaela ..Corry van Beckum
and other outstanding artists
A breathtaking performance
by one of Europe's outstanding mezzo- sopranos.
W.
A. Nfozart
THE MARRIAGE OF
FIIiARO
..Siemer' Jongsma
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Susanna Anneke van der Graaf
II Conte ....Henk Driessen
La Contessa.Margit Opawsky
and other outstanding artists
A superb new rendition of
most f amour opera
An amazing Demon- L Mozart's
pupa!
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home, and if you decide to keep it pay ONLY
sl. no strings attached.
You'll hear every famous aria. duet, chorus and
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music from the opera of your choice. We make
this special offer to introduce you to the superb
high -fidelity recordings available to members of
The Opera Society at tremendous savings.
With your selection you also obtain Trial
Membership with full privileges. These include:
advance description of all future releases; right to
audition any of these free, with no obligation to
buy. For those you keep pay the Member's low
price of only $2.95 per 12" long-playing record;
a saving of almost 40 %1 Mail the coupon NOW!
Select
Cuiusch!tc A'etili
LA TRAVIATA
Violetta
Alfred
Margit 3pawsky
Leo Larsen
Henk Driessen
Germont
and other outstanding artists
Brimming with
immortal
music and high drama. here
is a production which is
pure gold!
FE OPERA SOCIETY, Dept. 111.14F
Columbus A
, New York 23, N. Y.
Send me for FREE audition the recording checked
below and enroll me as a Trial Member.
CARMEN
Cl FIGARO
TRAVIATA
After 5 days I will return it or send only SI (plus
shipping). Prieileees: No purchase obligation ever!
Monthly advance notice of releases. 5 day free trial on
any discs. I may reject any records before or after I
receipt; may cancel membership at any time. For
future 12' l.p. discs I keep. I'll pay only 22.85 each
plus shipping.
LIMIT: Only one sample package to a customer '
Name
Address
City
In Canada address
105
...
Zone
State
Bond St., Toronto 2, Ont.
1
óI
ANCIENT CHINA
"TRULY
PROFESSIONAL!"
SAY
AUDIO
ENGINEERS...
Model 70
STUDIO
CONSOLE
AND
ARMCHAIR
ENGINEERS!
Model
PET
a
COMPONENTS
TURNTABLE
for BOTH!
. and only the "Professional" claims and
proves truly professional performance, exceeding the best figures in record manufacture and
FM transmission. Rumble -70db or better,
wow and flutter O.OS% or less, speed accuracy, at least 0.25 %. No other turntable
approaches this performance
yet both the
studio and home models of the Components
"Professional" are providing it year in and
year out for thousands of critical users. Why
should you settle for anything less? User's
net, Model PBT, $99.50 (skirt optional at extra
Model 70, 5295 f.o.b.
cost)
...
WRITE FOR FREE LITERATURE.
COMPONENTS
DENVILLE
before vanishing into final silence.
Here was indeed a high- precision
science and craftsmanship justly corn parable to the most refined modern
techniques in optics or electronics.
Many of the large pentagonal stones
Discussed above had arched hases for
improving tone duration and sonority. It was found that the diameter of
the curvatures was the same for several
stones in the same set, suggesting that
they were parts of, and cut from, one
ring -shaped original unit. A study
extending over three years finally
showed that the ancient acoustical engineers and mathematicians had devised a system of cutting two very
large circular stone disks (of the Pi
type ) into six segments each, forming
six tones each of the twelve semitones
contained in the octave. According to
Chinese cosmological tradition, there
are six male and six female tones in the
twelve -tone system. They follow each
other alternatingly in the construction
of the circle of the fifths.2 The six
male tones came from one large ring,
for HI -FI
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Continued from preceding page
NEW JERSEY
sheer
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f
model
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watt
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the six females from a second slightly
smaller unit, and they were cut up
according to a secret mathematical
division, without leaving scrap or
fragments from the ring's total circumference. Thus, the cosmological unity
of the tone system and its derivation
from two co -equal male and female
elements were actually built into the
stones. This mathematical secret has
been lost, and so far nobody has been
able to reconstruct it, in spite of all
our advanced mathematical knowledge
and computing equipment. It reminds
one of the case of the Cremona violin
makers; no amount of modern research can produce anything even
remotely comparable to the masterpieces of a Stradivarius or Guarneri.
These are some of the focal points of
ancient Chinese achievement that justify -- to me, anyway - the contention that we have something to learn
from them. The Chinese did things
the hard way. Our easier ways may
have hazards. The senses of modern
researchers and engineers have become
blunt and unresponsive, because they
rely completely on testing and measuring instruments. The Chinese had
to train themselves throughout many
centuries to develop an incredible
NOW, at moderate cost, you oge
can own and enjoy a quality
of musical re- creation virtually
indistinguishable from the original
performance. Here is the ideal
"heart" for your home music
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full musical range from vibrant
bass through thrilling treble with
the full emotional depth and
meaning of the original music.
Here is the finest audio achievement,
designed to bring you the
ultimate in enduring listening pleasure.
!C was male. G female, D was male, A was female, etc.
RAULAND-BORG CORPORATION
Continued on page 84
with every desirable feature for
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db, 20- 20,000 cps. 3 Response Curves
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and makes of records Microphone input
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
The sensitive fingers of Gennaro Tabricatore molded a lyre guitar in Naples (1806)
in a shape which seems to be an abstract visualization of sonority. 7n the language
of acoustics such beautiful lines are called "exponential curves ", and scientists
produce an infinite variety of them by mathematical formula. Engineers in the
Jim Lansing atelier use the formulae of science when designing speakers and
enclosures, but to them they add the intuitive imagination which leads to basic
design advancements. They add, too, the traditions of craftsmanship devotion
takes
which
perfection
to detail, infinite care in production, meticulous assembly
as its
only goal.
YOUR BASIC SPEAKER-
The Jim Lansing Signature extended range Model DI30 is your basic speaker. Never a compromise, the D130 by itself, in a suitable enclosure such as the Signature C34 folded exponential
horn, will reproduce a perfect quote of every recorded note. if you wish to convert to a divided
network system later, your D130 will serve as an excellent low frequency speaker, perfectly
balanced with other Jim Lansing Signature units.
JAMES B. LANSING SOUND, INC.
2119 Fletcher Drive, Los Angeles 39, California
craftsmanship
carried to
the point
of artistry
Photograph is by Irvin Kershner of a Lyre Guitar in the
Erich Lachmann Collection of Historical Stringed Musical
Instruments reproduced through the courtesy of the
Allan Hancock Foundation and the University of Southern
California. Printed reproductions suitable for framing of
4 of the photographs used in this series are available for
one dollar. Send remittance to James B. Lansing Sound,
Inc. Be sure to print your name and address clearly.
First
ANCIENT CHINA
Continuedfrom page 82
QUAS
with BEAM
AMPLIFIERS *
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The outstanding audio achievement of
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high efficiency., harmonic filtering, pushbutton equalization and channel selection,
exact pick -up matching, balanced feedback throughout, precision made 13 -section output transformer, low distortion,
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RESPONSE:
QC lI Control Unit:
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QUAD II Amplifier: 20- 20,000 cps, flat
Total Distortion, QC Il: 0.02°0
Less than
Total Distortion, QUAD Il:
1
/10%
Full complement of controls, including filter slope, bass, treble, 3 channel selection
and record compensation.
QC II Control Unit
Quad II Amplifier
$120.00
$130.00
$237.50
System Complete
For detailed specifications on the Beam
QUAD AMPLIFIER, and literature on Beam
Stentorian Speakers from 8" to 12" sizes,
5 and 15 watt super tweeters, woofers,
matching crossovers, 10" and 12" Duplex
(Twin Concentrics), and Beam enclosures,
write:
BEAM
INSTRUMENTS CORPORATION
Empire State Building
350 FIFTH AVENUE
NEW YORK, N. Y.
Charter Member:
Institute of High Fidelity Manufacturers, Inc.
84
acuteness and refinement of sense -perception; they had no test equipment.
They also had to develop a degree of
patience and perseverance unknown
in contemporary Western research,
where the pressing demands of warfare and commerce always urge toward
the fastest shortcut, toward incomplete,
compromise solutions. The Chinese
always strove for perfection, nothing
less. Too much modern research aims
at immediate ends, oblivious of ultiThe ancient scholars
mate values.
and craftsmen, with a single mind,
set out for basic truth and perfect
beauty.
To move from the general to the
particular, music is one of the few
modern activities (I mean of course
serious music) still conceived as timeless, still largely uncorrupted by the
urge toward quick success on a low
level. So is its pleasant offspring, high
fidelity
but both now are threatened
by popularity, the latter more than the
former. One hears the word "perfectionist" used almost as an insult, which
is unfortunate. For one, I think that
if high fidelity is to become and remain an important cultural factor, it
must embody some of the "fidelity"
of spirit of the ancient Chinese. Otherdroughts,
wise
who knows?
earthquakes, floods, barbarians, political corruption, and tyranny!
-
-
things
last!
We freely confess that when we began
planning the Tannoy high- fidelity
Domestic Sound System, we did not
contemplate designing and manufacturing
our own phono- cartridge. After all,
there were several excellent cartridges
already on the market.
We changed our minds when the first
power amplifiers and 'Autograph'
pre -amplifiers began to emerge from the
assembly lines. It was evident that
the almost uncanny faithfulness of the
amplifying chain, ending with the now
world- famous Dual Concentric Speaker,
justified the use of a cartridge of more
than ordinary freedom'.
Our engineers therefore set about the task
of designing a cartridge which was free
to extract and pass on, everything from
the recorded groove without any spurious
effects or blanketing resonances. The
result is the Tannoy Variluctance
Cartridge ... a precision transducer which
would be completely wasted on any but
the very finest of high -fidelity
reproducing equipment.
-
LONDON REPORT
Continued from page 31
to be technically excellent. Unfortunately, because of time limitations only
a few records could be played, and
none of them for very long. A row of
neon lights allowed one to see how
many watts were going into the
speakers at each moment, a most
interesting and valuable addition.
A dance band number [Audiophile,
78 -rpm microgroove] played only on
the two eight-inch units, was bright
with lots of presence and took twenty
watts at one or two loud bits to fill the
hall. The same wattage, over the
larger speakers, gave one a fine passage
for the full orchestra in the KleiberConcertgebouw recording of the Beethoven Pastoral [LONDON LL 916],
played (because of uneven British
pressings) from a metal part. A Bach
aria by Kathleen Ferrier had a remarkable quality [LL 6881, partly due to
the effect of hearing the voice of a
T
E C
H N I C A L
S P E C I F I C A T I O N
Every cartridge hand -made and laboratory tested.
Upper frequency limit > 16,000 cps.
No resonant peaks.
No undamped resonances in sub-supersonic range.
Simple turn -over mechanism.
Stylus assemblies completely independent.
Instantaneous replacement of .soli without use
of
tools.
Optimum lateral to vertical compliance ratio.
Very low egectire dynamic mass.
Output: 20 mV at I2 cm per .second.
Termination load: 50,000 ohms.
Tracking weight: 6 grams Jhr nU discs.
T,aNNOY,
VARILUCTANCE
Phono. Cartridge
For service in the Foiled States
call New York WIIitehall 3-7000
TANNOY (CANADA) LTD
36 Wellington St. East,
Toronto
1,
Ontario, Canada
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
invisible hands
guide your
HI -FI AUTOMATIC
RECORD CHANGER
The industrious -invisible hands of Dekamix
-creatures of ingenious design -are busily
engaged in the many automatic functions
so essential to
superior record perform-
ance and listening pleasure. The Dekamix
intermixing record changer is the result of
outstanding craftsmanship that is devoted
to producing an instrument extremely
simple and functional, yet fully automatic.
12",
automatic changing of
10" and 7" records in one
stack
3
speeds -331/2, 45, 78
weighted top plate that obtains full advantage of air
cushion effect
preserve
record surface
accoustically balanced tone
arm; non -magnetic turntable
stops automatically
after
last record is played
MIXED STACK
7 ", ID ". I2"
-to
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dollars more you
By spending a few
hi -fi amplifier
can have the finest
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pre -amplifier
7
and
-listen and comRogers of England
buy!
pare before you
AT LEADING HI -FI MUSIC CENTERS
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE LITERATURE
ERCONA CORPORATION
Electronic Dinsiu,
dead singer, full and resonant, in a hall
in which one has heard the living
voice, partly due to the fine quality of
the reproduction. Most of the aria was
under the one watt level, a climax hit
ten watts for a moment. Three piano
recordings which probably are very
satisfactory at home did not have the
quality I felt was needed for the hall.
Piano solo (around mf) required only
about two watts, and a Mozart concerto
called for ten watts in the fuller passages and stayed around four warts most
of the time the orchestra was playing.
Some excellent sound effect, percussion, and solo instrumental sounds
were also low wattage items on the
whole.
Two ideas stick in my head as a
result of the afternoon. The most
power Mr. Briggs needed was a couple
instants of eighty watts in the loudest
parts of the EMI tape. Therefore if
this is all it takes to produce a solid fJ
in the Festival Hall, one would assume
that with reasonably sensitive speakers
an amplifier with a peak output of
around forty watts is plenty for any
normal home application, and smaller
rooms can be filled with all the sound
their air space can take by the medium
class amplifiers (rated output around
r o- r5 watts) which are most popular
in England. I wonder if enthusiasts do
not use high levels (and thus, high
wattage) in an attempt to get a sense
of "the whole room playing" ( to steal
a phrase from Columbia) ? The most
effective of Mr. Briggs's recorded
items was the Vaughan Williams Sea
Cpmphony [British Decca LXT 2907]
with recorded choir and orchestra playing with live organ, for the sound of
the speakers was then just a part of a
larger mass of sound radiating out
from the organ pipes across the back
of the stage, and the special effects
which had been missing in the EMI
rape were suddenly restored. If I may
intrude into the final words of this report a conclusion from my own researches this year, in music, the ear
wants to hear sound coming from
more than one source, and no one
speaker system, however high its
volume level, will ever satisfy it. In
other words, the spatial effects one
may desire often are to be secured, not
by getting a more powerful amplifier,
but by acquiring a second speaker
system.
Ili
.
.
.
Mr. Ili Fi
Titis is It
.
.
.
The BRADFORD
Perfect BAFFLE*
Radically new idea In loudspeaker enclosures.
Not a bass reflex or folded horn.
The primary purpose of a loudspeaker enclosure is to prevent destructive sound cancellation
that takes place at low frequencies. when the
front and rear waves. emanating from both sides
of the speaker cone. merge.
It is obvious that no rear waves can escape
through a totally enclosed cabinet, and it would
be the perfect baffle. except for one reason. The
air pressure within the cabinet acts as a cushion
upon, and therefore restricts, cone movement.
This causes loss of life and color.
The BRADFORD Perfect BAFFLE is totally enclosed, yet it relieves cone pressure by an ingenious device that operates in unison with cone
movement.
this action ronforms lo an ultimate
the BRADFORD Perfect
is the only enclosure that ran gire you
the istmos! in .sound reproduction.
.Since
srienlifir
BAFFLE
principle,
And that, specifically, Is ...
THE BASS, full, rich, clean bass, clearly
distinguishing each contributing instrument,
down to the lowest speaker frequency.
NO BOOM.
Absolutely no boom. Boom, or
"one note" bass, is not high fidelity.
NO FALSE PEAKS. Does not "augment' bass by
false peaks that are really distortions.
ANY SPEAKER. Accommodates any speaker .. .
any size. weight, shape or make.
NO TUNING. No part turning or speaker matching.
ANY POSITION. Operates in any room position.
NO RESONANCES. No false cabinet or air resoALL
nances.
COMPACT. 20" w x 20" h x 15" d for 12s as 15s
@ $69.50. Unfinished birch [email protected] $43.50. 12"
x 12" h x 10" d for 88.91,s ee lOs
@ $39.50.
Unfinished birch
@ $34.50.
...
...
In all popular finishes
mahogany. blond, ebony, walnut, red.
REAL HARDWOODS.
.
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Hand made,
INCOMPARABLE CONSTRUCTION.
hand finished
by master craftsmen. All walls
?
;"
thick.
...
Unconditionally guaranteed to
out -perform any other enclosure now available
regardless of size. weight or price.
GUARANTEED.
If you want the very best speaker enclosure and will not be misled as to real
performance by deceptive sire or price, see
your audio dealer at once. A demonstration
will convince you. Or write for literature.
Prices slightly higher West of Rockies.
*Patent pending.
BRADFORD
PeVece
BRADFORD
315 East 6th Street
&
BAFFLE
COMPANY
NEW YORK, N. Y.
551 Fifth Ave., Dept. H9, New York, N. Y.
AUGUST 1955
s
CREEPING DISTORTION
Continued from page 36
"T HE PLAY'S
HE THING"
G
some carbon tetrachloride, shooting in a few drops
where the shaft enters the control, then
rotating it to work the liquid around.
Unfortunately, noisy controls are often
caused by leaky coupling capacitors
which can also cause considerable
audio distortion. If cleaning has no
effect, better get your preamplifier in
competent hands quickly.
eye -dropper and
Hamlet
-
AV AILABLE at all leading
di tributors throughout the
Un iced States.
If you are interested in high fidelity
Y u one it to yourself to see and
ha or this remarkable instrument.
MIRACORD
XA -100
The superb craftsmanship of the
Miracord XA -100 permits only
the recording, not the surface
noise of the record, to reach
your ear!
(
J
Noisy switches can often be cleared
just by rapid flipping. Sometimes mysterious noises will disappear if you
take the tubes out of their sockets,
clean the tube prongs, and reinsert them
Beyond these measures, there isn't
much you can do to your preamplifier,
except deduce that the trouble may
really be in your power -amplifier.
Power amplifiers, as the name implies, furnish th:: high -level energy
that makes the sound. A good rule to
follow: look first for spurious noises in
your preamplifier section; look first in
the power amplifier if your amplifier
J ate
aid
XM-110
This outstanding manual
player has a specially
is
completely free from wow
and rumble. The tone arm and
turntable are suspended in
ball bearings.
E
VE L L E I
lr' F
Always at the head of it
class, with honors in profes
AUDIOGERSH
CORPORATION
23 Park Place, N. Y. 7, N. Y.
CHECKUP
.1
sional studio service, thi s
Stephens condenser microphone is the natural choice
of the home user who knows
the difference
designed
for the single microphone
system, because it is engi
neered to pick up not onl
all the lows and highs you've
come to expect in fine hig
a check
.
to help others...
a
fidelity recording, but th
If you are interested in High
Fidelity you owe it to yourself
to see and hear these remarkable instruments.
and a
One -Third
Actual Site
.(tjetr
MIRAPHON
86
with a CHECK
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Record changer
designed 4 pole motor, and
fight cancer
full dynamic range of soum
as well, from a low throat:
whisper to full Wagneriat
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Sensitive, of course, bu t
rugged enough to withstant 1
shock. This is an expensiv e
microphone, but the prover
results indicate its value.
checkup
to help yourself.
Speakers
ST
S
Stephens Manufacturing Cor P.
8538 Warner Drive
Culver City, California
Microphones
AMERICAN
CANCER SOCIETY
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
just doesn't have the sock it once did,
or spills over, or sounds muddy.
Since every power amplifier worthy
of the name is a push -pull unit, and
since balance between the two sides is
the requisite for proper operation, you
can make the following deductions. If
distortion is very high, one side may
dead. If the
be completely "out"
main fault is lack of impact, aging may
have impaired the condition of both
tubes. An amplifier can go unbalanced
because tubes, resistors, or condensers
deteriorate. Total power output can go
down because the rectifier or output
tubes wear down. The most common
causative factor is tubes -and these
are your great weapon in your home
fight against deterioration.
Since the "Williamson" revolution,
many power amplifiers use the same
tube types through the early stages
(up to the output tubes, which are
bigger and near one end of the amplifier, generally). Working on our
theories, try the following; you are
cautioned in all cases to look before
you plug in, to protect your hands
from heat before you grab, and to use
your head:
I. Listening to music at moderate
room volume, pull out one output
tube. If no change in sound
-
2.
3.
4.
either that tube or one of those
before it in the circuit is dead.
If the sound goes out completely,
then the other output tube or one
before it on the other side of the
circuit is dead. On general principles, buy a new set of matched
output tubes, and put them in.
If no improvement from (1 ),
and your circuit is a Williamson
or similar type, move the driver
tube ( little tube nearest the output tubes ) into the first tube
position ( make sure it is the
same tube type). If circuit goes
dead, replace the rube you just
moved up front. If sound goes
worse, replace the tube you just
moved in the driver position.
If the tubes just before the output stage are in separate envelopes
(cf. the Fisher goA ), reverse
them and listen for improvement
or degradation in quality.
Reverse output tubes and listen
critically to the bass region. Use
program material such as organ,
played at moderate or soft levels.
Where the organ is deeper and
smoother, you have the best-balanced condition. Or try the same,
turning the output balance-conContinued on next have
THE ORIGINAL
KT66
The name
GENALEX on the
tube and carton is
your guarantee
that you are buying
the original
KT66 ... world famous power
tetrode, often
referred to as the
finest audio tube
ever made! The
GENALEX KT66 is
Genalev
^--rr°'-Y
the hallmark of the
finest amplifiers.
It is supplied as
original equipment
in amplifiers
of the highest
quality. Identical
pins and
connections as
6L6 tubes.
Only $3.50 net
1lll
Quality endorsed
product of the
Butish industries Group
AUGUST 1955
For complimentary
fact sheet, write Dept. Ill- 8
BRITISH INDUSTRIES CORPORATION
164 Duane Street
New York 13, N.
Y.
For the first time...
etc t.
Model 1012
Ampli6er/Preomp
Everybody can own
HI -FI with
NEWCOM
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AMPLIFIERS
and
FM -AM TUNERS
EXPENSIVE BUILT-INS
UNNECESSARY
Here is an entirely new concept
in high fidelity enjoyment created by Newcomb, the originator
of the "compact" design. Amplifier /preamp units and AM -FM
tuners in beautiful new satin
gold finish, so small they fit your
convenient chairside table top.
Makes expensive built -ins unnecessary. No technical knowledge necessary to connect. Performance to please the most
ardent hi -fi fan. Combination
amplifier /preamp units available
in 10, 12, or 20 watt output, with
all the exclusive recognized Newcomb features. Not only technically superb but audibly better.
Economical high -efficiency AMFM timer, or deluxe model with
marry advanced features available
in matching design.
THE YEAR'S GREATEST
HI -FI SENSATION
N
EWCOM
B
THE SOUND OF QUALITY SINCE 1937
SEE YOUR NEAREST
DEALER OR WRITE
FOR DETAILS NOW!
NEWCOMB, Dept. W -8
6824 Lexington Ave., Hollywood 38, Calif.
Enclosed
Is 25c.
Please
send me
new
booklet "HI -Fl is for Everybody."
Send name of nearest Newcomb dealer
and complete details about the Newcomb
Compact.
NAME
ADDRESS
L_
CITY
STATE
J
CREEPING DISTORTION
Continued from preceding page
trol. The correct setting in every
case is where the sound becomes
smoothest and best defined.
The following are a list of common
amplifier symptoms, with suggested
cures under each.
Symptom: fuse blown, keeps blowing.
Cure: replace fuse, take out all tubes
but rectifier and outputs.
If fuse still blows, replace both output
tubes.
If fuse still blows, replace rectifier tube.
If fuse still blows, take to competent
service shop for replacement transformer, choke, or condensers.
Symptom: low hum in set with
volume control turned down.
Cure: new output tube for defective
one, or new input tube for leaky one,
or take in for replacement of filter sections in power supply.
Symptom: muddy bass notes, speaker
cone is seen visibly to "breathe" even
when no input signal.
in some
Cure: subsonic oscillations
cases, you can minimize by adjusting
output balance control, or jiggling
tubes for better overall balance. If
not, take in immediately for repair.
-
Perfectly matched electronically and
in styling, the "Golden Twins," Model
2255 AM-FM Tuner and Model 2256 12watt amplifier, are ideal operating in
Symptom: highs gone suddenly wiry
and screechy.
it
Cure: try to replace output tubes
may be that one has "gone wild," is
oscillating violently. If not, get immediate and competent service, to avoid
damage to voice coils.
Symptom: when volume and, or bass
controls turned up during playing,
"motorboat" effect.
Cure: same as for subsonic oscillations
above.
Symptoms: treble control turned up,
produces loud "rushing" noise in
speaker.
Cure: may be noisy tube or component parts in preamp before the volume
control, in which case, start by replacing tubes; or it may indicate that the
amplifier -preamplifier combination is
basically unstable on the high -frequency end. Sometimes, by changing
tubes, you will get one with lower gain,
therefore subduing the noise ( and the
problem, too, actually).
Symptom: amplifier seems to "mush
up" when more volume called for,
normal otherwise.
Cure: replace rectifier tube first. Replace output tubes with new matched
-
set.
Obviously, most of the suggested
the same system, but also provide the
same high standards of high fidelity reception and reproduction long associated with the Bell name, when used as
individual components.
The 2256 amplifier has 5 controls: record compensation, treble and bass boost
and cut, master gain control and loudness control, and 6 inputs. The 2255
AM-FM tuner covers the entire AM range
(530 to 1650 kc) and the FM band from
88 to 105 mc; and is complete with built in ceramic antenna and momentary AFC
defeat switch. See and hear these golden hued self -cabineted components at your
high fidelity dealer
and write for
catalog 542 -A.
Those who demand
the Finest
always choose Bell
...
CANADAS' FIRST HIGH- FIDELITY RADIO,
PHONOGRAPH, RECORD AND TELEVISION CENTRE
Complete stock of Stromberg- Carlson, Fisher, BerlantConcertone, Brociner, Scott, Weathers, Sonotone, Electro-Voice.
RCA Victor and General Electric Hi -Fi equipment.
We ship from coast -to -coast
Prompt attention to mail orders
in Canada, aircargo, express or freight.
-
Custom Sound and Vision Ltd.
Sound Systems, Inc.
A
390
Eglinton West
Telephone HUdson 9 -2117
Toronto, Ontario
Subsidiary of Thompson Products, Inc.
555 -57 Marion Rd., Columbus 7, Ohio
EXPORT
88
OFFICE: 401
BROADWAY,
NEW
YORK
CITY
13
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
"cures" are only matters of intelligent
tube changing. Quite often you may
be able to make a remarkable improvement in your amplifier.
If you can't, and if you either know
or think you may be in trouble, you
need the best professional service you
can find. Home diagnosis and cures
must be sketchy and incomplete. The
nYodern feedback amplifier and preamplifier are carefully balanced, precise mechanisms. Their stability, low
distortion, power capacity, and useful
life are dependent on the condition of
the tubes and associated parts inside.
A change in any one of the hundreds
of components may lead to serious
changes in the essential characteristics
for which you may have paid many
hard -earned dollars.
If you are seriously using your high
fidelity amplifier for good music reproduction, you are urged to have it
thoroughly checked by competent service personnel, with the proper distortion measuring devices, at least once a
year. By competent service personnel
is not meant the average corner serviceman, though no disrespect is
intended to thousands of good and
conscientious radio - servicemen. By
TAPE RECORDER
tirospeed,
dualtrack
When buying any recording
equipment you, as a high fidelity enthusiast, are interested in its many
technical aspects. Frequency response,
signal -to -noise ratio, flutter and wow
are, certainly, all important. And in
these aspects the FME Tape Recorder
is incomparable in its price class.
Yet, in the truest sense only your ear
can really distinguish the quality of fine
recorded sound. Only your trained touch
can really judge the simple, smooth operation of a tape recorder. It is for this
reason that Federal, without bold reference to technical specifications, invites
you, the real jury, to listen to the FME.
Hear for yourself Federal's triumph
in sound. Feel for yourself its quality
construction, its smooth, simple operation. Playback any tape-either 3% or
7% IPS. Test its single knob control,
its fast forward and rewind, its separate
volume and tone controls and many
other wanted features.
Then look at the price -we're sure
you'll be delightfully surprised.
Only $139.95. Supplied complete with
ceramic microphone, reel of magnetic
tape, take -up reel, power cord and plug.
L-39
"competent" is meant someone who
has enough respect for and understanding of amplifier design, to want to, and
to know how to, restore the original
functioning of your amplifier.
If you have no local audio service
laboratory, this means that
if you
want good quality out of your amplifier
you should expect to send it
back to the manufacturer once a year.
Don't be fooled by the man who tells
you his is perfect -never changed a
tube. He is probably the same man
who never spent a dime on his car
until it stopped dead on him on a
lonely road one cold night. Amplifiers
are like automobiles; they must be
serviced. The dream unit you thought
was still putting out 5o watts may be
now somewhat inferior to a new iowatter straight from the test rack. If
so, you have paid the price for high
power, without enjoying the superbly
clean performance which is its raison
-
-
-
UNIQUE
SPEAKER
ENCLOSURE
DEMONSTRATED
TO
MUSICIANS
Stan Kenton,
Tommy Dorsey, Les Brown,
Billy May, Mel Torme,
Pete Rugolo,
Freddy Martin,
June Christy,
Ray Anthony
AND ENGINEERING CORP.
215 Steuben Street, Brooklyn 5, N. Y.
EXPORT
DIVISION:
25 Warren
(able, SIMONTRI(E
AUGUST 1955
NEW
SI.,
YORK
N.
Y. 1,
N.
Y.
.
.
Y
Just a partial list of famous
musicians attending the amazing
MUSIKONE demonstration . .
and an impressed they have given
MUSIKONE permission to use their names in
public announcements. Several months ago audio
engineer Hugh Morgan designed a radically new
cone -type speaker enclosure for use with 8"
speakers. Not satisfied with exhaustive laboratory
tests he insisted on submitting his design to the
ultimate test
the musicians' ear. The results
of these musician demonstrations were so effective
that without one line of odrertiating, orders have
flooded into the MUSIKONE factory.
.
...
NOW FOR THE FIRST TIME. MUSIKONE ENCLOSURES
AVAILABLE TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC AT HIGH FIDELITY
SHOWROOMS
WHAT IS IT?
MUSIKONE
is an entirely new type of speaker en.
closure and consisting of a cone 7 feet long, made of
a s
ial EASTMAN plastic.
The MUSIKONE
enclosure is not attached to the speaker directly.
but speaker and enclosure are separated by a decoupling pad. The speaker actuates the body of the
MUSIKONE, which then propagates waves which
are never one -quarter out of phase with the waves
propagated by the front or top side of speaker cone.
The result is sound reproduction by a huge plastic
vibrating surface, in effect the MUSIKONE acts as
a gigantic speaker, with excellent, well damped bass
produced right up to the power capacity of the unit.
GUARANTEED SUPERIOR IN PERFORMANCE TO ANY
1" SPEAKER ENCLOSURE
Audio engineers and musicians who have heard the
MUSIKONE demonstration are unanimous in stating that the sound reproduction is superior to that
of any 8" speaker enclosure, and is, in fact superior
to the response of many I 2" enclosures.
SOLVES PROBLEM OF HIGH FIDELITY LISTENING
IN SMALL APARTMENTS
Due to the unique cone shape of the MUSIKONE
enclosure, it can be easily placed in a small room, is
capable of reproducing all the lows, unlike many
bass reflex and folded horn enclosures in small rooms
MUSIKONE'S ATTRACTIVE SHAPE AND NEUTRAL COLOR
BLEND INTO ANY INTERIOR
Unlike many huge period enclosures, MUSIKONE
is modem and yet not fantastic . . . in design.
PRICE:
d'être.
50
$16 NET
Due to the efficient design, the MUSIKONE enclosure can be purchased in kit
form for a fraction of the cost of other
speaker enclosures of comparable or lesser
quality. Kits can be assembled by anyone in a few minutes. A deluxe model
with wrought iron stand and fully assembled.
FEDERAL MANUFACTURING
.
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.
B6950
O
MUSIKONE available at your High
Fidelity dealer or if your dealer cannot
supply you. write to
MUSIKONE COMPANY LoAg..
t°osIe
California
oll roder
89
LISTE ER'S
Now...easier
more versatile
operation for...
5
THOR
1, lí.
.11
THE ONLY HI -FI CHANGER
history surely is an apt
example of what the ancient
Preacher had in mind when he
answered his own rhetorical question,
is there any thing whereof it may b:
said, Sec, this is new ? ", with the disillusioning assertion, "It hath been already of old time, which was before
rs0RAC
SPEED CONTROL
Dial- selection of
any of three speeds
plus
a
fine- tuning
knob to permit exact
pitch adjustments
above and below all
standard speeds.
us.'
Yet while of course all recorded history is no more than an extension and
coagulation of the legends of events
and personalities with which men have
entertained and instructed themselves
ever since they first learned the magical powers of speech, the present -day
return to preserving history in the
quick- frozen colloquial narrations of
its makers and their contemporaries
has for us the freshness and verve of
shows
CONTROL FOR
MANUAL OPERATION
Allows you to disengage the automatic
trip mechanism
to enjoy flexible
operation.
Plus an improved direct -drive motor
with separate gear for each speed
for absolute speed constancy
and silence.
...
See Your Dealer or
...
for more about new
improved Thorens Record Changers,
Players and Turntables writer
that
You h
e1° y high
t0
at great fi rieht
savingsY
Home
Music
Systems
HOW TO BUILD
AND ENJOY THEM
By EDWARD TATNALL CANBY
- -
This popular, standard guide to
the only book of
high fidelity
has now
its kind in the field
been completely revised to include the big "hi -fi" developments of the past two years. It
shows you how you can enjoy
finer musical reproduction, as
well as better radio and TV reception. Easy -to- follow, practical, HOME Music SYSTEMS gives
you everything you need to know
about building "hi -fi" music systems for greater enjoyment of
your records and radio music, at
a low cost that will surprise you.
With diagrams and photographs.
HARPER & BROTHERS
49 East 33rd Street, N. Y. 16
90
llut-r+ll
BOOKSH E LF
CD -43
SIMPLIFIED
U.
apparent novelty. And although the
great modern pioneer in this field, Joe
Gould, Greenwich Village's peripatetic
scholar, never did make his monumental ( if perhaps largely mythical )
work available even in snatches to a
wider audience than his barroom
cronies, his basic notion of an "oral"
history of our times now is being seriously developed by a corps of Columbia professors under Pulitzer-Prizewinner Allan Nevins. A fabulous
amount of material is being accumulated, for the most part on magnetic
tapes, and the bits which have been
transcribed for publication in issues of
The American Heritage have attracted
wide interest and enthusiastic acclamation.
The method obviously is particularly
suitable for use in specialized fields
where activities have been or are in a
state of violent flux and where the
available source materials, however
profuse, are so fragmentary and widely
scattered as to make comprehensive
to say nothing of system collection
well -nigh humanly
.[tic organization
impossible. Perhaps one day soon some
one will begin to exploit the oral -history potentialities of recorded music
and high fidelity sound reproduction.
If and when they do, they are likely to
profit no more from the scholarly, institutional methodology of Nevins and
his associates than from the brilliant,
unsponsored improvisations of two
jazz fans, Nat Shapiro and Nat Hentoff, who have just published what
amounts to an oral history of their
favorite art (or is it a Way of Life? )
Hear Me Talkin' to Ya; the Story of
Jazz by the Men Who Made It ( Rinehart & Co., $4.00)
Now, whatever you may think of
jazz, either as an art form or as a social
phenomenon, there can be no denying
that it possesses incalculable significance
of some sort ... that it exerts a powerfully magnetic attraction on many
listeners . . that its history, nature,
and pantheon of gods and heroes all
have been the subjects of extraordinary
- -
:
.
.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
confusion and controversy. There's a
wealth of pertinent literature, but most
of the books so far have been so
specialized, propagandistic, or prejudiced ( or all three), that they lack
both solid authority and broad appeal.
And the great bulk of authentic source
materials is lost to the general reader
in the files of periodicals, many of
which are obscure or highly inaccessible. Hence the uncommon value of
Shapiro & Hentoff's inspiration
which is simply to go back through
these enormous files for articles and
interviews ( augmented by published
and unpublished reminiscences and
correspondence) where the leading
jazz personalities may be heard talking
frankly about themselves, their colleagues, and their music.
In any form such incomparable Urtexts, couched as they are in the most
informal and colloquial ( if by no
means exclusively "jive" ) terms, would
be a delight to read. But in the ingenious selection and painstaking organization of Shapiro and Hentoff they are
woven into a closely knit story
at
once a kaleidoscopic portrait gallery
and a richly illuminating evocation of
the heroic days in New Orleans, Chicago, Kansas City, and the "Big
Apple." All the stars are here in relaxed off -stage volubility Armstrong.
Beiderbecke, Brubeck, Ellington, Gillespie, Goodman, Handy, Henderson,
Holiday, Morton, Oliver, Wagers, and
various Johnsons, Smiths, and Williamses ), but they graciously share
honors here with an inexhaustible company Of less celebrated leaders, sidemen, recorders, producers, and critics,
each of whom has a paragraph or a
page to add to the saga of the singular
world of jazz
both on the bandstand
and ( since there is no dodging of economic, racial, or narcotic problems) off.
No serious jazz student will need
the spur of my recommendation to
rank this volume beside his cherished
copies of Smith & Ramsey's Jazzmen,
Sargeanr s Jazz: Hot and Hybrid,
Panassié's Hot Jazz, Ramsey's Guide to
Longpla)ing Jazz Records and the
earlier discographies by Smith and
Delaunay ), and the handful of outstanding jazz biographies and memoirs.
But to the jazz novice, or to any even
mildly interested non -specialist reader,
I can't possibly suggest a more informative or enlivening introduction both to
the general subject of jazz music and
the fabulous personalities who created
and are still uninhibitedly developing it
PERSPECTIVES
FOR
E LECTRONIC
E NGINEERS
-
Check these
D
&
R
features:
Outside Idler Drive.
Floating Idler -Assuring utmost
freedom of mechanical vibration.
Signal -to -Noise Ratio 60 DB.
Non -Magnetic Turntable.
Mercury Switch.
Dynamically Balanced Motor.
Constant Speeds- 33.33, 45,
78.26 with high starting torque.
THE DR -12A
Turntable only, with
standard panel
mounting
See your dealer
or write to...
$87.00*
*Mahogany
box mount-
ing extra
AUDIO EQUIPMENT
DIVISION D &R LTD.
402 E. Gutierrez Street
Santa Barbara, Calif.
-
Westinghouse
AIR ARM
.a.
LISTEN!
Spend just
10
minutes listen-
ing to the great Daystrom
Crestwood tape recorder and
learn for yourself the wonders
of its exclusive "LiuingSound. "
Your dealer will be glad to
give you this convincing test.
It's a real thrill!
DAYSTROM
TAPE RECORDERS
DAYSTROM ELECTRIC CORP.
N
20 POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y.
AUGUST 1955
FUTURE
t
Lontinacd on next p.i
c
*
I
INCOME
PROFESSIONAL
\\
RECOGNITION/
/i,
4/
OPENINGS EXIST
-
(
ELECTRONICS DIVISION
FOR
(
IN
*
THE FIELDS
OF:
COMMUNICATIONS
* FIRE CONTROL
* RADAR
* TECHNICAL WRITING
* COMPUTERS
* BOMBER DEFENSE
* MISSILE GUIDANCE
*
FIELD
ENGINEERING
TO APPLY
send letter outlining education
and experience to:
Employment Supervisor
Dept. 206
Westinghouse Electric Corp.
2519 Wilkens Avenue
Baltimore 3, Maryland
PROFESSIONAL
DIRECTORY
no
...
finer choice than
For ti
gICC9(7/6CC i,
high -fidelity components
IN
L
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VW/LW
KIY-
48, CALIF.
B U I L
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HI-FI
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desire the finest
S TEDM AN
STEDMAN RADIO LABORATORIES
360 Boylston St., Brookline, Mass.
Pioneer Custom Builders Serving N.
E.
1.0 6 -5882
Since 1916
OHIO
-Vizt INCARTEN
_
LECTRONIC
`ABORATORIES
IMC.
7556 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles 46, California
WEbster 5 -5405
WEbster 6 -3872
The Ultimate in High Fidelity
at net prices.
IN
*
*
*
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CINCINNATI AND THE
TRI -STATE AREA
COMPETENT ENGINEERING
COMPONENTS AT NET PRICES
FINE CABINETRY
SERVICE ON ALL III -FI COMPONENTS
er4rst0~44,iva,
90te.
2259 Gilbert Ave., Capitol 3153- Cincinnati 2, Ohio
"A Component or m Complete System"
/
PENNSYLVANIA
HI
HIGH -FIDELITY HOUSE
Most complete stock of Audio
components in the West
Phone: RYan 1.8171
536
S.
Fair Oaks, Pasadena
1,
Calif.
FI
DO
ITYOURSELF
In spare time, Mon., Wed., and Fri.
eves. Ample parking. Use our
workshop, tools, expert supervision.
Assemble and compare leading
makes; tuners, amplifiers, changers,
Tape Recorders, speakers, Cabinets, kits, etc. at low net prices.
Records
Tapes
Trade-ins
SHRYOCK
Fßs
p
TEL
TELEVISION
317 W. LANCASTER AVE.. ARDMORE, PA.,
HI -FI
EQUIPMENT SERVICED
and tested to meet laboratory
standards. We specialize in solving
individual problems.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
U/tronics
7023 CANBY AVE.
Co.
RESEDA, CALIF.
ALLIED RADIO
America's Hi-Fi Center
WORLD'S LARGEST STOCKS OF
HI -FI SYSTEMS AND COMPONENTS
VISIT OUR SOUND STUDIOS
100 N. WESTERN AVE., CHICAGO 80
141 -F1
CATALOG
1955 EDITION
Almo
HANDBOOK & CATALOGUE
7160to RADIO CO.
ARCH ST., PHILA., PENNA.
PHILADELPHIANS:
-
Preview the advanced products
exclusive
speakers,
electrostatic
British and European components.
Consult nationally recognized
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LECTRONICS
HAymorket 1-6800
SEND FOR FREE
1926
Suggests various ways of buying 8 installing components.
Lists hundreds of makes, models 6 prices along with
technical specifications. Write, wire or call
509
ILLINOIS
VM
Midway 2-1920
RADIO CO'S
"HIGHFIDELITY"
Dickens 4-6156
Continued from preceding page
"Serious" Musicians' Guises
&
Dis-
guises
RADSODn PHONOations
DESIGNED AND BUILT TO ORDER
Offering fabulous performance and artistic
custom cabinetry.
Heme installation and maintenance.
sW
Phone WE 6-6218
.' whit
CUSTOM
ANGELES
6320 COMMODORE SWAT DRIVE
(opposite earthy circle theatre)
LOS ANGELES
BOOKSHELF
MASSACHUSETTS
CALIFORNIA
City Line Center
GReenwood
Practitioners of "serious" or "classical"
music too often seem unduly conscious
of these inept terms' formal connotations. The future "oral" historian in
this field will have a hard time digging
up raw materials as outspoken and
vivacious as those unearthed for Hear
,%le Talkin' to Ya. The materials exist,
all right, but generally they are disdained as improper for conventional
books by or about musicians. Yet of
course even these formalized and sometimes painstakingly re- touched "studio
portraits" may satisfy to some extent
music lovers' craving for what Jim
Huneker used to describe as "psychical
insight" ( as distinguished from merely
vulgar curiosity ) .
At any rate, it's the general assumption that reminiscences, autobiographies are the mainstay of the music
book business, and that it should be
relatively easy to predict the popular
appeal of individual titles. According
to your degree of interest in the personality concerned, you should be reasonably sure whether or not you want
to know all, or all that's fit to print,
about him. Unfortunately, however,
promise seldom can be safely accepted
as performance: some of the most fascinating personalities make a scurvy
off -stage appearance, while others,
more inconsequential or less appealing
in themselves, prove to be delightful or
admirably informative book- acquaintances.
WEST VIRGINIA
J
ELECRONICS
in WEST VIRGINIA and the
TRI -STATE AREA
Lending Components of net prices
Special Demonstration Facilities
Cabinets to your Specifications
Service an till Eleclroniee
Singer Electronics. 1555 3rd Ave.,
7 -9535
W. VA. HI -FI CENTER
HUNTINGTON, W. VA.
Phone 37439
CANADA
THE HI -FI CENTER
complete demonstration facilities
components custom installations
DISTRIBUTORS OF EVERYTHING IN ELECTRONICS
PreRecorded Tape and Records
ROgers Park 4 -8640
2909 WEST DEVON AVE.
CHICAGO 45
Ned/ionic exiaeclite44
92
In
PITTSBURGH and the
TRI -STATE AREA
L64eAfatiOf tLÍt dfL-
}
WOLK'S HIGH FIDELITY CENTER
right next to Wolk's Kamera Exchange
306 Diamond Street
Express
Pittsburgh (22), Pa.
1
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
There are apt examples in each
category right at hand: Charles
Munch's I Am a Conductor (Oxford,
$2.75), Alfredo Casella's Music in My
Times (Univ. of Oklahoma, $4.00), and
T. R. Ybarra's Verdi
Miracle Man
of Opera (Harcourt Brace, $4.75)
-each of which should be far more
satisfactory than it turns out to be.
The trouble with Munch ( and
Casella too) is that whatever his skill,
reputation, and "in-person" charms,
he's a mighty dull companion to meet
in the pages of a book. I've always felt
that he was something of a cold fish
musically, as well, except perhaps in
his Berlioz and other French repertories, so I was partly prepared for the
mock- modest pretentiousness that irks
me here. The role of conductor is for
him a priestly function, no less, for
which only the pure in heart are properly called
although this sanctity
apparently is unimpaired by the practice, which he endorses, of cutting and
revising the masters' scores! Maybe
you'll feel differently if you're a devout
Boston Symphony subscriber or enjoy
what strikes me as a condescending
celebrity's greenroom chitchat, but to
anyone who seriously wants to learn
something about baton technique, I
suggest Rudolph's Grammar of Conducting (G. Schirmer, 195o) ; and to
anyone who wants definitive larger
appraisals of the orchestral leader's art,
I recommend Berlioz's Orchestral Conductor (Carl Fischer reprint), Weingartner's On Conducting ( Kalmus
reprint), and
a larger scale
Scherchen's Handbook of Conducting
(Oxford, 1933).
Does the dust jacket tint and the
palish appearance of openly leaded
type pages prompt or reinforce my impression of Casella as a grayishly pallid
personality? He shouldn't be: during
his earlier life (he died in 1947, but
long before had faded into comparative obscurity) he played a not inconspicuous part in the midst of a marvellous musical period. He should have
been able to relate utterly fascinating
stories about Ravel, Fauré, Debussy,
Stravinsky, Diaghilev, and the many
other "greats" with whom he studied
or worked, but the few he does tell are
only enough to whet one's appetite,
and nothing he writes about his own
music stimulates any desire to know it
better. At best
worst -what he
does do is to tantalize us by half glimpses of the personal problems of
his relations with Italy's fascist regime:
apparently he tried to straddle, but he
must have had an even tougher time
-
-
-on
-or
AUGUST 1955
-
than he indicates in maintaining the
"non -subversive" nature of his pronounced international and modernistic
tendencies, for which his apologia, in
the last chapter, marks the one time he
and his book really come to life. (Incidentally, both Munch and Casella,
for all their own frequent participation
in recording sessions, fail to contribute
any noteworthy addition to our knowledge of recording from the point of
view of the music maker.)
Yet even the deadpan aspect of
these two personalities is easier for me
to face than the ghastly mortician's
blush with which Ybarra defaces poor
Verdi's death mask. Ybarra's idea of
biographical style is a blend of Benzedrine, vodka, and historical romancing (in equal proportions) He starts
off fortissimo with frantic action,
F.M.
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music listeners. Remittance must accompany copy and insertion instructions.
SALES
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ON ALL TYPES OF NEW AND USED AUDIO
EQUIPMENT.
ARGUS SERVICE COMPANY
235 LYONS AVENUE
NEWARK, N. J.
WAVERLY 3 -3025
TAPE RECORDER SPECIALISTS!
Ask for quotations
on Hi -Fi Components also. Bottom Prices! Get details.
Boynton Studio, 10H Pennsylvania, Tuckahoe, N. Y.
6 ELEMENT broad band FM ant
aluminum, $10.95 ppd.
Lunenburg, Mass.
Wholesale
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5 hours of poetry.
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CAMBRIDGE ELECTRONICS, 1014 E. Fayette Street, Syra-
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93
BOOKSHELF
Continued from preceding page
C2 -100
Net price, $4.50
The highest
overtones of
murky atmosphere, dastardly intrigues,
and Vista- Vision into the future. Get
this ( or perhaps I should say more
appropriately, List! )
"The craving to create music,
the light of his life, his dream,
his spur, the food and drink of
his inner self, had vanished.
Never again would he put notes
on paper! ( Within a few years he
was to turn out in quick succession three operas which, today.
more than a century later. are
cornerstones of operatic repertories ererywhere.)
Fin not kidding: Boy -Scout's oath,
that's what it says here ( on page 6,
if you insist on checking)!
Needless to add, before this Verdian
soap opera staggers to a fade -out some
300 pages later, Ybarra has long since
exhausted even his own copious supply of superlatives and exclamation
points, and has to resort to wholesale
borrowings. If you can stomach such
bilge, I suppose it's one way of absorbing the few, plain facts of Verdi's life
and work ( but watch out for heartburn! ). If you want those facts without sugar coating and with infinitely
more genuine insight into the incomparable music itself, run, don't walk,
to the nearest bookstore ( dropping
this volume in the handiest trashbasket
on your way ) to get Toyés Verdi
1946 ) or Hussey's shorter
( Knopf,
biography in the "Master Musiciansseries (Dent, 1948; via Pellegrini &
-
the piccolo
The deepest tones
of the bass tuba
Senior Compentrol -with special
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Cudahy).
Grace Notes
Bibliography of Jazz. The first really
scholarly and comprehensive work of
Ouahty I1esIQRe,l by
maraniz
Owners of the Marantz Audio Consolette invariably
comment on the immediate improvement in sound
quality of their systems. Such a fine instrument cannot
he produced by the thousands, but only through careful assembly and thorough testing of each unit.
Naturally, its components are uncompromisingly
chosen for superior quality. This and the character of
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suitable for installation $142.50, with cabinet $155.00.
n
94
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s. b. matras ?z
44-IS Vernon Blvd.,
L.I.C., New York
its kind, this compilation by Alan P.
Merriam, assisted by Robert J. Ben ford, comprises 3,324 book and article
entries, a list of 113 jazz magazines,
and 17 pages of subject and periodical
indices (as compared with some 1,15o
entries and 82 magazines in Robert G.
Reisner's Literature of Jazz, issued in
paperback form last year by the New
York Public Library ). Nothing later
than 195o is catalogued here and there
are no annotations, either critical or
descriptive. Nevertheless, this is the
most impressive and useful approach
made so far to the ultimate, definitive
bibliography of jazz historians' dreams.
( American Folklore Society, S6.00 ).
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
ADVERTISING
INDEX
WHY NOT
TRADE IN
YOUR PRESENT TUNER
FOR THE NEWEST
FISHER
Allied Radio Corp.
9, 92
Almo Radio Co.
Altec Lansing Corp.
American Elite, Inc.
Ampex Corp.
Audak Company
A udiocraft
Audio Devices
Audio Exchange
Audiogersh Corp.
92
FM80 ... $139.50
IT'S NEW!
IT'S TERRIFIC!
Quality
96
11
24
95
is everything!
73
Inside Front Cover
95
86
Beam Instrument Corp.
84
Bell Sound Systems, Inc.
88
Beyland Engineering Co.
Bogen, David, Co., Inc.
Book -of -the -Month Club, Inc.
Professional FM Tuner
Listening
Indexed on 44
77
Back Cover
Bosok, R. T., Co.
25
Bradford & Company
Brainard Electronics
British Industries Corp.
85
86
Centralab
Columbia Records, Inc.
94
Components Corp.
82
70
Conrac, Inc.
ONE FOR
SENSITIVITY
THE OTHER INDICATES
CENTER -OF- CHANNEL FOR
MICRO- ACCURATE
TUNING
WRITE FOR TRADING INFORMATION
the
audio
exchange
TRADING
THE
OF
THE HI
ORGANIZATION
-FI FIELD
159.19 Hillside Avenue
Jamaica 32, N.Y.
Phone: OLympia 8 -0445
WRITE DEPT. H 8 FOR
FREE CATALOG OF
18, 19
Indexed on 44
Cook Laboratories, Inc.
Crestwood Recorder Division
Cus tomcrafte rs
Custom Sound
D &
R
&
PARKING
NEAR SUBWAY
AUGUST 1955
-(l
JcG
EN IN(iQUALITY
other pickup. .
But all t he flow -
ap,ritiratiuns
ery
the world can-
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ot change the fart
hat (IN LY you can
,ell
what
hest tu you.
may other
sounds
Hear and compare the II I-Q7 with
and
you be the
pickup known
judge.
Playa all sileels.
Equipped with Chromatic
!HA MON I1 and a sapphire stylus Loth replareable AT II(I5I E.
NEW COMPASS -PIVOTED
ARM
Universally acknowledged as the most efficient
barring none.
arm
No restraint
No
No springs
No
f
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Highest truing efficiency. Eq ipprd
fatigue
for xlynea -presx n re nd ;rod men,. This superb
AU DA X arm is now also available for use
with other cartridges.
88, 92
Ltd.
91
91
Dublin's
Indexed on 44
Electro- Voice, Inc.
26
Electronic Expediters
92
Ercona Corp.
85
FM Directory
93
Fairchild Recording 8 Eqpt. Corp.
Federal Mfg. & Engineering Corp.
16
89
Fisher Radio Corp.
12, 13
Fleetwood Television (Conroe, Inc.)
18, 19
Goodman's Loudspeakers
20
Bothers
&
90
Harvey Radio Co., Inc.
75
Heath Co.
22
High -Fidelity House
92
Interelectronics Corp.
20
STYLI'S- BALANCE
"1, 's easy Ti. WO. :ual without doubt is potentially
hr nowt are male gauge avaiIabl. for home use.
...
i
Minh Fidelity Abort:inc.
of the r+artridg,s in use, work with
This nuans stylus and ref,
ord destruction. With the scabs and gauges
ailahle heretofore, it has hoer imprmsible to
, heck stylus -pressure closer than 2 or 3 grams
one way or the other.
That is 50%, MTrrt. This means deformation of groovewalls, which explains much of the et. hoes, ghosts
and of her distortion. Strnbnsrnpe.like, STY LI ISBA LANCE accurately indir:nes correctness or
incorrect mss of stylus -pr, sauce.
7-
reel stylus pressure.
Works with any cartridge and arm.
Net $4.80
...
Add 25e if shipp,d from N. Y.
crf "ELECTRONIC
F.a('TS"nl Yufudrvflr'r..,
FREE r'nliv
Jensen Mfg. Co.
I) 11ON O
KCMS
..
KISW -FM
Kinodom Products Ltd.
the audio exchange exchanges audio
92
Vision Ltd.
USED EQUIPMENT
FREE
91
Daystrom Electric Corp.
Harper
,
42
Associates
WITH TWO METERS
lui
not ,. iu:dled by any
Concertone Recorders, Berlant
EQUIPPED
i.
n u:,
S\Mn1TIINESS. LIST-
r
Cancer Society
llll.
1d, frequency rang,,, yet one will perform Sn ont hly, while the others
are harsh, shrill, etc.
The NEW high output
111 -Q7 It,s II \I.A \(H:,
79
21, 87
IIR(1\1.1'fl(' III
(
e
..
..
...
Continued on (text page
(1l'
93
93
96
.%
171/A
.Tnu hil'IL .\
t(Y'ilP rf..
h
Ilcpl. II
Fine Au,l;,._ l:`, rrrnnir
n
New York :f(i
Noma ,c+nrrr:to yea,
95
ADVERTISING
INDEX
Keep 1 -0uI
liieroids 1- iiuug:
Continued from preceding page
No more brushing, spraying
or wiping records
Associates.
lo
Lansing, James B. Sound, Inc.
83
Lectronics
92
Klipsch
Leslie Creations
London Records.
Use the new
Indexed on 44
Indexed on 44
Maico, The, Co., Inc.
Newcomb Audio Products Co.
Nuclear Products Co.
Opera Society
NOW ...PLAY the NEW
PRE -RECORDED TAPES
WITH FULL FREQUENCY RANGE
&
Co., Inc.
Now t 00% better
than ever!
Imitated but not
duplicated.
96
94
Marantz, S. B.
6, 7
McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.
96
Mercury Scientific Products Corp..
40
Minnesota Mining & Mfg. Co.
Indexed on 44
Music Box
81
Musical Masterpiece Society
89
Musikone Co.
Pickering
111SC-
1'llAliI:Eli
87
Indexed on 44
This tiny plastic device contains
a radioactive material which constantly ionizes the air in its vicinity,
drawing off the static electricity
generated by your records.
Static electricity causes records to
attract and hold dust. Use of the
Disc-Charger* eliminates the static
electricity and allows the stylus to pick
up the dust and clean the record in a
few plays. Records now no longer attract (lust and stay clean and noise free.
I ; gram -- clips
to any pickup arm.
See your local distributor.
or shipped postpaid. only .
81
$ SO
2
Presto Recording Corp.
15
Professional Directory
92
MERCURY SCIENTIFIC
PRODUCTS CORP.
1725 W. 7th ST.
LOS ANGELES 17, CALIF.
'Vat. App. For
14
Radio Engineering Labs., Inc.
82
Rauland -Borg Corp.
Indexed on 44
..
Record Index
Indexed on 44
Record Market
23
Reeves Soundcraft Corp.
Inside Back Cover
Rek -o -Kut Co.
20
Rockbar Corp.
20- 15,000
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Ask your Hi Fi Dealer or write:
DYNAMO MAGNETRONICS CORPORATION
A Division of The
Mateo Bldg., Ni.
y
*iv
Co., Inc.
lis, Minn.
Scott, Herman Hosmer, Inc.
5
Shryock Radio and TV Co.
92
Singer Electronics
92
Sound Unlimited
Radio Labs.
92
Stephens Mfg. Corp.
17, 86
Tannoy, Ltd.
Technical Tape Corp
Indexed on 44
92
84
Telefunken
Terminal Radio Corp.
11
Thorens Co..
90
Trader's Marketplace
93
Ultronics Co.
University Loudspeakers, Inc.
92
V -M Corp.
Vox Productions, Inc.
80
fl5"
81
8
Indexed on 44
WRR -FM
93
WWRL
93
92
Weingarten Electronic Labs
91
Westinghouse Electric Corp.
Westminster Recording Co.... Indexed on 44
...
White, Stan, Inc.
Wolk's Kamera Exchange....
(1
4
92
%
`L14
.
WORLD FAMOUS QUALITY.
Hi -Fi AUDIO Tubes
At All Leading Hi -Fi Dealers
Write for Complete Information
KINGDOM PRODUCTS, Ltd.
23 Park Place, New York 7, N. Y.
WOrth
4 -8585
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
NOW
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The Model L -34 was originally
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The response was overwhelming.
In no time at all, a new clamour
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or write for details to Dept. M II -2
REK -O -KUT COMPANY
Makers of Fine Recording and Playback Equipment
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Alfred Wallenstein, rondnctisa The Music Appreciation
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Rrcowns meet this need -for a fuller un-
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an illuminating analON THE OTHER SIDE Is
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MINOR
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The Stadium Concerts
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TWO TYPES OF RECORDS AVAILABLE
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-a
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and Smetana's The Moldau
Pitiulles's Ssmeheny
and Britten's Guide
Bath's Suite loi Orchestra
Wagner's Overtures
Schumann's Concerto
Mendelssohn's Concerto
Strauss Till fulenspletel
Mr.
:iii..
Ì
ADDRESS
CITY
7ONF......STATt'
MAR 33
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