Linux keyboard shortcuts you should know about

Linux keyboard shortcuts you should know about
Linux keyboard shortcuts you should know about
October 29, 2006 at 4:58 am · Filed under Linux
Linux has many keyboard shortcuts. Knowing them makes using Linux much easier.
Console/terminal
•
-
-
- shuts down computer
•
-
(
•
-
or
•
,
,
,…) - switch to n-th console
-
- switch to next/previous virtual terminal
- locks terminal input/output - allows to read console contents when output
is going too fast. To unlock, press Scroll Lock once again.
Alternatively, Scroll Lock can be enabled using
-
and disabled with
. Try last shortcut if your console hangs for unknown reason - it
happened to me many times that I’ve locked it accidentaly by pressing CTRL-S.
•
-
and
-
- scrolls console buffer up/down. Works also
is enabled. After changing the terminal (
when
contents is erased and it is impossible to scroll it.
•
-
- screen refresh
•
-
or
-
-
) buffer
- kills current task
•
- stands for EOF (End-of-file). If you type it on en empty command
line, it will quit bash. This is so much faster than typing exit
•
- pause process. Use commands: bg to run in background or fg to
run in foreground.
Bash & command-line
•
-
- moves cursor to beginning of command line.
•
-
- moves cursor to end of command line.
•
-
- clears command line from cursor position to end of line.
•
-
- clears command line from cursor position to beginning of line.
•
-
- clears word to the left
•
-
- will paste in anything that was deleted by
or
-
or
-
•
- command-line autocompletion. Automatically completes current
command line.
If autocompletion script is enabled, then also options and applications parameters
are autocompleted.
•
- followed by characters will do a incremental search of the
previous command history
Kernel shortcuts
Following shortcuts must be enabled in kernel, they also must be enabled using proc
interface (echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/sysrq).
•
written to disks.
•
-
-
- sync all mounted filesystem. Data in buffers is immediately
- remounts mounted filesystems read-only
-
•
- performs immediate reboot. Don’t do it without syncing
and unmounting as it can cause massive filesystem corruption
•
, then
, then
attempts to sync all mounted filesystems, remounts them read-only and
immediately reboots computer. Fastest way to reboot Linux.
•
-
-
-
- prints out list of other SysRQ functions.
X-Windows shortcuts
•
or
- changes screen resolution
(higher/lower). Only if X-Windows server is configured for multiple resolutions.
•
-
-
- kill X-server. Running applications will be terminated.
•
-
-
- xkill - click an application to kill it.
•
-
-
will turn the keypad on the keyboard into the mouse, so
you can control the mouse from keyboard. Keys
and
on the numpad
select left mouse click and right mouse click respectively. Mouse click is done by
on the numpad.
•
-
-
(
,
,
,…) - switches to n-th text console.
KDE shortcuts
•
-
-
-
- direct shutdown
•
-
-
-
- direct reboot
•
- Starts the run command box. Type a application executable to
launch it, folder name to open it, filename to use an appropriate program to launch
it, url to go to it in konqueror and any of the numerous web shortcuts(gg, wp)
defined by konqueror to activate them.
Do you know any other shortcuts that are worth to know?
Permalink
55 Comments
1. Nikhil said,
October 29, 2006 @ 5:30 am
FOR KDE
Ctrl+Alt+Shift+PageDN -> direct shutdown
Ctrl+Alt+Shift+PageUP -> direct reboot
Alt+F2 -> The god of KDE shortcuts. Starts the run command box. Type a
application executable to launch it, folder name to open it, filename to use an
appropriate program to launch it, url to go to it in konqueror and any of the
numerous web shortcuts(gg, wp) defined by konqueror to activate them. And u
can use most kde alias protocols to
2. michuk said,
October 29, 2006 @ 2:13 pm
CTRL+Bksp — kill X-server. Running applications will be terminated.
It shoud be CTRL+ALT+Bksp
3. pio said,
October 29, 2006 @ 4:39 pm
Michnuk: thanks for pointing out this mistake, fixed.
4. Vivek said,
October 29, 2006 @ 9:40 pm
Dont forget…
Ctrl-Z to pause and thereafter bg or fg to run the process in background or
foreground..
Ctrl-L clears the console screen ( actually a FORM FEED code )
Ctrl-\ kills apps
On bash…
Ctrl-R followed by characters will do a incremental search of the previous
command history
5. Harel Malka said,
October 29, 2006 @ 11:24 pm
Best key ever ;o):
CTRL + R and then start typing the beginning of a command you used last week:
It will cycle through history. Your very own flux capacitor.
6. lfs said,
October 30, 2006 @ 4:12 am
ctrl-shift-numLock will turn the keypad on the keyboard into the mouse. the 5 key
clicks, and the / and * and - keys at the top are the mouse buttons that 5 clicks for,
respectively.
so you can control the mouse from the keyboard.
7. Wooga said,
October 30, 2006 @ 5:51 am
What about CTRL + C to kill programs?
8. david said,
October 30, 2006 @ 5:58 am
Don’t forget:
ctrl-alt- to switch between virtual terminals.
alt-tab - switch between applications
9. chad said,
October 30, 2006 @ 6:01 am
I think that if you hit CTRL+ALT+F7 while running X window environment it
switches back to the virtual console, and CTRL+ALT+F8 switches back to X env
10. Paul said,
October 30, 2006 @ 6:53 am
Don’t want to be a total noob but what is the “Virtual Terminal”.
I access my servers using Putty and often have a few sessions open. Would be
great if there was a quick switch. Sort of like screen but with ctrl keys.
11. blog.teranetworks.de said,
October 30, 2006 @ 8:40 am
Linux Keyboard Shortcuts…
Pio’s blog features a nice write up of some useful linux shortcuts. Some of them
even I didn’t know about
Check it out. There is also some nice other stuff in his blog like a linux flash 9 vs
flash 7 benchmark. Definitely worth a look.
….
12. srikar said,
October 30, 2006 @ 9:14 am
You forgot xkill - ctrl+alt+esc
13. daniel said,
October 30, 2006 @ 9:47 am
it’ll be more correct to say that console shortcuts are actually readline key
bindings, for those who didn’t enable readline for their shell would be completely
confused.
14. AAM said,
October 30, 2006 @ 10:00 am
Great article, loved the keyboard letter graphics, where did you get them from?
15. Aidan Kehoe said,
October 30, 2006 @ 10:29 am
Ctrl + Y on a command line will ‘yank’ (paste) the last text you ‘killed’ with Ctrl
+ K or Ctrl + W.
16. Andrew said,
October 30, 2006 @ 10:55 am
Another addition to the history shortcut.
Hit CTRL+R and type in a few characters to match the last command that
matches your pattern, you can then hit CTRL+R again to match previous patterns.
CTRL+Y will paste in anything that was deleted by any of delete shortcuts
(CTRL+[Y, W, K]).
Type man bash and search for “Readline Command Names” - there are numerous
other nifty bash related shortcuts for your perusal.
17. chrak said,
October 30, 2006 @ 11:01 am
some of these are TTY stuff and some of themare for bash. BTW its alt+Fkey not
alt+Fn+Fkey..
18. Ogre said,
October 30, 2006 @ 12:07 pm
Under X-window: Ctrl-Alt-Esc brings up xkill, and you can kill runaway
windows with it. Usually the cursor looks like a black skull.
19. Doc. said,
October 30, 2006 @ 12:18 pm
Are there any keyboard shortcuts for
- switching workspaces
- switching keyboard layouts
20. Moving at darkbase.org said,
October 30, 2006 @ 12:41 pm
[…] Linux keyboard shortcuts you should know about […]
21. Dave said,
October 30, 2006 @ 1:03 pm
ctrl-shift-numLock will turn the keypad on the keyboard into the mouse.
Brilliant!!! We’ve got a server with a broken mouse port that’s always been
awkward to use, thanks.
22. Ecco said,
October 30, 2006 @ 1:28 pm
Hi,
By the way, the shortcut I keep using is Ctrl-D. This one is priceless. It stands for
“End-of-File” (aka EOF). If you type it on en empty command line, it will quit
bash. This is so much faster than typing ‘exit”.
23. amit said,
October 30, 2006 @ 1:28 pm
hi
this is a really nice blog…quiet helpful to the s/q industry
thanks
24. lugo said,
October 30, 2006 @ 1:34 pm
strg+shift+ -> switches workspaces
“->” means cursor right/left
25. meneame.net said,
October 30, 2006 @ 1:58 pm
Atajos de teclado en Linux…
Una recopilación de algunos atajos de teclado útiles en linux cuando no te
arrancan las X….
26. Jim said,
October 30, 2006 @ 2:51 pm
For me, Ctrl-U kills the *entire* line, whereas ctrl-W kills everything to the left.
I’ve tried this in konsole and on a virtual console.
27. Jim said,
October 30, 2006 @ 2:51 pm
(also, Ctrl-E moves the cursor to the end of the line).
28. Rory said,
October 30, 2006 @ 4:03 pm
On an Apple iBook, control and alt are beside each other, I keep accidentally
killing X while using Control-Backspace. You can disable Control-Alt-Backspace
by putting
Section “ServerFlags”
Option “DontZap” “yes”
EndSection
in your xorg.conf.
29. sloan said,
October 30, 2006 @ 5:37 pm
And Ctrl-A moves the cursor to the front of the line.
30. sloan said,
October 30, 2006 @ 5:43 pm
Also a very helpful command if you know that you recently used a command and
would like to run it again you can type ………….. ! and the first few letters of the
command and the shell will find the last command that you typed and complete
the command for you. Here is an example. For adding a default gateway ….
#route add default gw 192.168.0.1
to complete this command again all you would need to type would be
# ! rou
The shell will look in the .history file and find the last command that started with
rou and complete it for you.
A great! timesaver
31. Ebola said,
October 30, 2006 @ 6:10 pm
Cool reference, and extremely useful, but ctrl alt del reboots your computer rather
than shutting it down. Even though it does shut the operating system down it
causes the computer to reboot, so I wouldn’t say it’s a true shutdown.
32. vacore.monopolio.com.mx » Blog Archive » Atajos por teclado. said,
October 30, 2006 @ 6:17 pm
[…] Regresando a Linux, encontre una página en donde se recopilan varios atajos
de teclado, tanto para consola como para el ambiente gràfico. La verdad, habia
algunos que desconocia o ya no me acordaba, pero que en ciertas ocasiones me
hubieran facilitado parte del trabajo. […]
33. xore said,
October 30, 2006 @ 7:31 pm
“For me, Ctrl-U kills the *entire* line, whereas ctrl-W kills everything to the left.
I’ve tried this in konsole and on a virtual console.”
You’re wrong.
Ctrl-U Kills words, and Ctrl-W kills the entire line
34. usucapiao said,
October 30, 2006 @ 7:47 pm
Very usefull!
I´ll link up to this…
35. Steven Mocking said,
October 30, 2006 @ 11:15 pm
Another useful one you might want to add:
Ctrl+V - Add the next character to the command line literally. Examples include
newline and ^D character. Also works for everything you can run on a tty,
including cat, vim and echo.
36. gianni said,
October 30, 2006 @ 11:28 pm
as already said, CTRL+ALT+LEFT or CTRL+ALT+RIGHT to switch between
workspaces
37. its about time» Blog Archive » links for 2006-10-30 said,
October 31, 2006 @ 2:27 am
[…] Linux keyboard shortcuts you should know about » Pio’s Blog Extermely
useful! (tags: linux keyboard shortcuts tips tricks shell reference howto os bash)
[…]
38. Ram Sambamurthy said,
October 31, 2006 @ 6:16 am
Ctrl-Alt-Esc to kill an application does not work in Gnome! Someone said here
that the cursor changes to a skull, but nothing happened. Any ideas?
39. JP Loh said,
October 31, 2006 @ 7:22 am
ctrl+d - logs out the user (from the console, sudo, su, mysql console, psql console,
etc)
40. GB said,
November 2, 2006 @ 4:12 am
move mouse to start button -> click! -> point to “shut down computer” -> click
“turn off”… install linux!
41. Adam said,
November 3, 2006 @ 6:19 am
Ctrl+Shift+Alt+Left and Ctrl+Shift+Alt+Right
Drags focused window to other workspaces. A nice way to hide music or things
that you don’t need to see.
Tab+Tab (double tab) lists autocomplete options except in tcsh, this is Ctrl+D in
tcsh.
42. [email protected] » Blog Archive » Teclas de Atalho - Linux said,
November 3, 2006 @ 9:30 pm
[…] Lista de Combinações […]
43. Keyboard shortcuts revisited » Pio’s Blog said,
November 7, 2006 @ 12:14 am
[…] Few days ago I have posted summary of Linux shortcuts that are worth to
remember. This article got very large number of readers and great number of
comments. […]
44. TheJoe said,
November 11, 2006 @ 9:51 pm
Also in Fedora Core with GNOME, Alt-F2 runs the command box.. And it’s
extremely usefull!!
Joe
45. ‫ دال « ه
وه
ك‬said,
November 13, 2006 @ 7:31 pm
[…] ‫]…[ ارات ا م‬
46. Pitch said,
November 14, 2006 @ 12:39 am
Thanks for the great site. I’m using putty from windows to get to a unix network.
Once in I change to csh (from ksh). CTRL-U (and W and) do the same thing and
clear the whole line but CTRL-K works. Any knowledge on this? It would be nice
if someone had a quick fix. The program is literally an executable on my desktop
and is not a shortcut, but I did notice that WinSCP-3 has a putty key generator,
but WinSCP-3 was installed at a later time and is probably not the same as the one
on my desktop.
47. kate said,
November 14, 2006 @ 3:02 am
Hi, and thanks. I am trying to learn Linux on my own and this should make my
time a breeze.
48. Ray said,
November 17, 2006 @ 10:58 am
Thanks for your job. Hopefully you don’t mind that I translate this passage in to
Chinese and put it into my blog.
I leave a link for your blog and to this passage at the beginning of my translation:
http://www.lirui.name/post/22.html
And by the way I think it should be “X-Window” instead of “X-Windows”. The
“s” behind the X-Window does not exist in Linux.
周末愉快! (This means have a nice weekend!)
49. Melody said,
November 22, 2006 @ 3:11 am
Hi, I have red hat linux on a laptop… (I’m also a beginner at linux x_x)
I don’t know if it’s the difference of laptop keyboard settings, or if there’s
something I need to enable in linux, I can’t get any of these short-cut commands
to work… help? anyone?
50. Myglobalblog » Blog Archive » Life has shortcuts said,
November 25, 2006 @ 9:28 am
[…] Url.Site.Linux.Tutorials.linux shortcuts, what are they and what do they
mean […]
51. Tureba said,
November 27, 2006 @ 6:19 pm
On KDE (and possibly on other window managers):
Ctrl+Tab = switch to the next workspace
Ctrl+Shift+Tab = switch to the previous workspace
Also, on any window manager:
Alt+Tab = switch to the next program
Alt+Shift+Tab = switch to the previous program
Last one, on forms:
Tab = switch to the next field (as expected)
Shift+Tab = switch to the previous field (_very_ useful)
Tureba
52. 每点博刻 - Dedian’s Talking @ every day » links for 2006-11-28
said,
November 28, 2006 @ 3:17 am
[…] Linux keyboard shortcuts (tags: Linux shortcut keyborad shell) This entry is
filed under Del.icio.us. You can follow any responses to this entry through the
RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. Leave a
Reply […]
53. Joe R said,
December 2, 2006 @ 11:48 am
The suggested method for doing a kernel reboot using the SysRq key is to
remember “Raising Skinny Elephants Is Utterly Boring”. In order, that would be
SysRq + Alt + R, S, E, I, U, B
allowing pauses between each and holding down Alt and SysRq for each of them.
Thoroughly useful for a kernel panic, but it depends on whether the “Magic
SysRq Key” has been enabled in the kernel.
54. Rowan Rodrik van der Molen said,
December 25, 2006 @ 5:56 am
Thanks for the comprehensive list.
The shortcuts listed under “Bash & command line” are actually readline shortcuts
and as such available in many more programs (such as gdb, python, mysql, psql,
etc.).
Like many other people, I’ve compiled a list of a number of the default readline
shortcuts. Mine can be found at www.bigsmoke.us/readline/shortcuts.
55. Ian Stephen said,
December 30, 2006 @ 3:37 am
alt-esc gives command completion possibilities same as tab-tab. Done at a blank
command line one can learn many new commands!
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