2010 lcisd athletic staff handbook

2010 lcisd athletic staff handbook

2010

L.C.I.S. D. ATHLETIC

STAFF

HANDBOOK

This handbook has been prepared to assist staff members in answering some of the most common problems and questions on athletics in this district. Any questions not answered in this handbook should be directed to your Campus Coordinator and then the District Athletic Director.

Each coach is responsible for a thorough knowledge of this handbook which includes:

A thorough knowledge of this Athletic Handbook

The current University Interscholastic League rules as set forth in the Constitution and Contest Rules

The TEA/UIL Side By Side

The Rules and Regulations of the District Executive Committee.

The Lamar CISD local policies and procedures

__________________________

Mike Rice

Athletic Director

Lamar Consolidated Independent School District

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LEGAL GUIDELINES

Page 1

Page 2-3

Page 4

Page 5-6

Objectives of Athletics and Standards for Participants

Behavioral Expectations of Coaches

Teacher-coach's Role

Coaching Relationships

Staff

Parents

Page 7

Page 8

Community

Faculty

Players

Media

Coaching Responsibilities

U.I.L. COACHING RESPONSIBILITIES

Page 6 COACHING APPRAISAL AND ACCOUNTABILITY

Page 9 PROFESSIONAL IMPROVEMENT & ADVANCEMENT

Page 10

Page 11

Page 13

Page 14-15

MEDICAL PROGRAM

General

Physical Examinations

Insurance

Weather Policies

FITTING & MAINTENANCE OF EQUIPMENT

Fitting the Helmet

SCHEDULING POLICIES & PROCEDURES

Page 16-18

Page 19

General

Responsibility & Approval

Factors to be considered in Scheduling

ATHLETIC BOOSTER CLUB ORGANIZATION & PROJECTS

Function & Purpose

Guidelines

Role of Booster Clubs

Expenditure of Funds

ADMINISTRATION OF INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETICS

Philosophy

Objectives of the Lamar Consolidated Athletic Department

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION OF ATHLETIC

DEPARTMENT

Athletic Director

Campus Coordinator - High School

Head Coach for Each Sport

Junior High Coordinator

Assistant Coach - High School

Assistant Coach - Junior High School

Athletic Trainer

Assistant Athletic Trainer

Procedure for Handling Athletic Requests & Problems

Page 20-21

Page 22

Page 23-24

Page 25

Page 26

Page 27

ATHLETIC STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES

Director of Athletics – General

Campus Coordinator – General

Head Coach (Junior High School) – General

Head Coach of Each (High School)

Athletic Trainer - General

Page 33

Page 28-30

PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

High School

Basketball (Boys/Girls)

Baseball

Cross Country (Boys/Girls)

Football

Golf (Boys/Girls)

Swimming

Tennis (Boys/Girls)

Track (Boys/Girls)

Volleyball

Soccer (Boys/Girls)

Junior High School

Page 31 Basketball (Boys/Girls)

Football

Tennis (Boys/Girls)

Track (Boys/Girls)

Volleyball

GENERAL POLICIES & PROCEDURES

Lamar CISD Athletic Lettering Policy

Baseball

Basketball - Boys/Girls

Cross Country - Boys/Girls

Football

Golf - Boys/Girls

Manager or Trainer

Soccer - Boys/Girls

Softball

Swimming & Diving - Boys/Girls

Tennis - Boys/Girls

Track - Boys/Girls

Volleyball

Wrestling – Boys/Girls

Lamar CISD Athletic Awards Policy

High School Varsity Awards

Page 41

Teams Other than Varsity

BUSINESS PRACTICES PURSUANT TO ATHLETICS

Budget Preparation

Bids

Camps

Coaching Schools and Clinics

Credit Cards ( Purchase Card)

Equipment

Maintenance

Meals

Officials

Receipts

Scouting

Summer Baseball/Softball

Page 45

GENERAL INFORMATION

Contract

Evaluations

News Releases

Participation in Various Sports

Practice (U.I.L.)

Public Address Announcers

Publicity & Promotion

Recruiting by Colleges & Universities

L.C.I.S.D. Victory Bell

LEGAL GUIDELINES

The legal profession in the last few years has closely examined the liability of schools, coaches, trainers, and physical education instructors in discharging their duties.

No liability and no monetary damages may be awarded unless the coach or trainer has been negligent.

Negligence can be defined as the failure to do what a reasonable prudent person would do under like or similar circumstances. If the athletic instructor has a duty to act and breaches the duty, by failing to act reasonably, if the breach causes an injury and negligence is shown, there may be liability. The instructor is entrusted with the duty of maintaining a reasonable standard of care in supervising the athletic training and development of the participants. It is when this duty is breached that the question of negligence arises.

The most general duty to be exercised by athletic instructors is the duty to supervise. "If, under all circumstances, (the instructor's) absence from the classroom is negligence, the fact that (the plaintiff's) conduct or that of other participants in the game was also a substantial factor, does not excuse (the instructor)."

In addition to the duty to supervise, the athletic instructor's duty to give adequate training and instruction has been widely recognized by the courts. The instructor is responsible for teaching the proper techniques for safe participation in the athletic endeavor and to inform the participants of the inherent dangers involved therein.

Athletic instructors and coaches are also under a duty to supply proper equipment and to instruct the participants as to its proper use. Where an athletic endeavor calls for certain safety equipment, the instructor must provide safety equipment, instruct as to its proper use, and make a reasonable effort to compel the use thereof.

The above duty applies to all athletic equipment, as well as safety in athletic activities such as weight lifting, handball, and pole vaulting, where a novice participant should be adequately instructed as to the proper use of the equipment involved prior to beginning the activity. The instruction should, of course, warn as to the dangers of misusing or abusing such equipment.

The duties previously discussed are generally those, which the athletic instructor must perform prior to the initiation of the planned athletic activity. The remaining duties are those performed during the course of the athletic activity.

These duties are: (1) a duty to supervise closely the activity itself, and

(2) A duty to provide medical treatment or proper aid and assistance should the situation arise.

An athletic instructor's duty to supervise the athletic event or competition is possibly the most imperative. The instructor must assume the responsibility of supervising the action

and react prudently to whatever turn of events compel reasonable action to be taken to assure the safety of the participants.

The second duty, which arises in the course of the athletic activity, is the duty to provide medical treatment or render proper first aid and assistance should the need ever arise,

(most often in football injury cases).

T

HINK

ABOUT THIS:

Do you use these skills with your assistant coaches as well as your athletes?

1. Be a coach, not a judge.

2. Don’t tell, ask.

3. Listen more than talk.

4. Praise in public, share failures and for such counsel in private.

5. Remember it is OK to fail; it’s how we learn.

6. Be flexible – things can get done without having "your way” all the time.

7. Support your coworkers and assistant coaches.

8. Be developmental, not punitive.

9. Set priorities daily and ask yourself, “What is most important to the big picture?”

10.MOST OF ALL Ask yourself, “What did I do today to help my

athletes get better?”

OBJECTIVES AND STANDARDS

School athletics has potential for meeting many needs of American youth, because of the value that has been placed on competition and cooperation. These characteristics have been identified by the American culture for their value in our society in developing in developing the next generation of citizens. Each area of athletics is fostered by competently directed athletic games. We believe a well-balanced program of interscholastic sports should be offered to all students. Interscholastic athletics for the physically gifted student represents an area for them to practice the pursuit of excellence.

The goal of the athletic program is to offer this opportunity of participation to each student that is enrolled in LCISD. However, a student is not obligated to take part in athletics, nor is this required for graduation. Therefore, it is stressed that this is a privilege, not a right.

Since it is a privilege, the athletic director has the authority to revoke the privilege when the rules are not followed. Standards for athletes will provide the security of authority that youth need. The athletes will know what they can and cannot do. They will realize that the school wishes them to attain their very best achievement level, both in their own lives and interscholastic athletics.

The following standards are important in the establishment of an athletic program

necessary to achieve the stated objectives:

Behavior:

Proper dress and appearance

Good grooming and personal cleanliness

Abstinence from alcohol, tobacco, and drugs

Pursuing physical fitness through training

Adequate rest, proper nutrition.

Citizenship:

Exemplary conduct, on and off the campus

Adherence to school and community rules

Respect for individuals and property

Appreciation for scholarship and academic achievement

Team Responsibility:

Common goals and group loyalty

Subordination of self-interest to team goal

Self-discipline and personal sacrifice for team goals

BEHAVIOR EXPECTATIONS OF THE COACH

Exemplify the highest moral character by:

Exemplary behavior and positive leadership

Respect the integrity and personality of the

individual athlete.

Refrain from arguments in front of

players and spectators

Practicing strong ethical integrity standards

Abide by and teach the rules of the game in

letter and in spirit.

Abstain from any practice that solicits

teachers to modify a student athlete’s grade for eligibility purposes.

Promoting good citizenship and showing good sportsmanship!

Set a good example for players and spectators

to follow. Instruct participants and spectators in proper sportsmanship responsibilities and demand that they make sportsmanship the number one priority.

Display no gestures which indicate an official

or opposing coach does not know what he or she is doing or talking about; no throwing of any object in disgust.

Shake hands with the officials and opposing coaches before

and after the contest in full view of the public.

Respect the integrity and judgment of game officials. Treating

them with respect, even if you disagree with their judgment, will only make a positive impression of you and your team in the eyes of all people at the event

.

Display modesty in victory and graciousness in defeat in public

and in meeting/talking with the media. Please confine remarks to game statistics and to the performance of your team.

Develop a program that rewards participants and spectators

for displaying proper sportsmanship and enforces penalties on those who do not abide by sportsmanship standards.

Be no party to the use of profanity, obscene language, or

improper actions.

THE TEACHER-COACH'S ROLE

The coach, who is willing to take a personal interest in the young people with whom they come in contact, can influence their lives. In this work the coach can influence and affect the lives and character of young people, by stressing the proper mental attitude and the vital role it plays.

This knowledge may be demonstrated on the basketball court, baseball field, or track. Courage, honesty, self-confidence, determination, the will to win, and the respect for others are some of the attributes that may be inspired through leadership. These attributes mentioned comprise the role of the coach.

The coach is a leader and a leader's job is to reach predetermined goals through other people. The key to successful leadership is the relationships that exist between the coaches, the coaches and parents, the community in general, the school faculty and finally, and most importantly, between the coaches and players.

Leadership involves genuine, solid relationships with people but success in coaching lies first in the coaches' relationship to the players. It is essential to establish and maintain a consistent philosophy toward the players and how they will be treated. Successful leaders must develop a system of values with which they can live in openness and with the assurance that they are maintaining private personal integrity and good public relations.

Specific ways that the coach can aid in the attainment of these objectives are:

1. Take a personal interest in the total development of the students.

2. Communicate concern for all aspects of their lives.

3. Develop an awareness of the vital importance that a positive mental attitude plays toward success in any endeavor

4. Encourage the student/athlete to achieve academic success

5. Create a climate for developing a strong, wholesome self-concept

6. Teach and develop ethical values. Help players form a value system that will enable them to consistently make valid decisions of their own.

7. Teach the pursuit and practice of excellence in competition by giving guidance and encouragement in the process of goal setting.

COACHING RELATIONSHIPS

STAFF

1. The athletic director or head coach should help each coach achieve his/her program goals. This does not mean they will always please the coach. It does mean that a consistent effort is being made to establish a program where the coach has an opportunity to work toward athletic program goals.

.

2. The attitudes of the coaches are the major determinants of the team's success. They set the pace for the athletes who are looking to the coach for leadership; therefore, a positive, winning attitude is a must. For a coach, a winning attitude is exemplified by: a. Thorough preparation for each practice b. Preparation of video or any teaching or motivational aids c. Constant probing of one's thinking to assure that all phases of the game are being covered d. Willingness to devote time tirelessly to all phases of coaching e. Exemplifying an attitude on the field, which indicates real enjoyment of coaching, also displaying patience and persistence.

3. Be loyal and complimentary to fellow coaches.

4. Disputes between coaches should never occur in front of the team. Disagreements are to be voiced during coaches' meetings. This indicates a professional attitude and consideration for others involved.

5. Be prompt for all department coaches, or team meetings. This indicates a professional attitude and consideration for others involved.

6. Assistant coaches should be thoroughly knowledgeable of the head coach’s system. It is important that there be continuity and a progression in the skills that are taught.

7. Coaches should support all sports provided by the district.

PARENTS

1. Do not comment on the ability of a player in front of a parent and avoid comparisons.

2. If a parent or any adult has a complaint, try to discuss the problem in person, rather than on the phone. Don't make the person an enemy, but try to turn them into a friend of the program.

3. Don't hesitate to refer parents to the head coach or athletic director, but first inform the head coach and /or the athletic director of the situation, before the parent's call.

COMMUNITY

1. Remember that many people in the community are acquainted with the athletic staff.

Coaches' actions should be a positive influence on the lives of those who observe them.

2. Constantly strive to gain good community support. A successful program cannot be maintained without it.

FACULTY

1. Develop good relationships with the faculty and administration. The coaching staff needs their support. Try to "win over" anyone who might be against the program, maybe by asking advice. The coach must strive to set an example in the classroom.

2. Occasionally a coach may encounter a person in another department who will attempt to hurt the program with comments. Avoid being critical - always have favorable comments about them.

PLAYERS

1. The push, the drive, and the enthusiasm of a team come from the coach. Remember that players reflect the coach's attitude and goals.

2. Players must respect the coaches. This respect must be earned. In the long run, respect comes to the coach who consistently places the welfare of the player first. This concern will pay dividends in respect and effort on the part of the athlete.

3. Expressed approval by a respected coach is a powerful motivating force. Even though praise is more important than criticism, if a player needs to be reprimanded, don't hesitate or wait for another coach to do it. All coaches must share the small things in discipline.

4. Avoid degrading the squad. No one likes anyone else being critical of his/her team. A coach cannot afford to "get down" on them, as he/she is a part of that team.

5. A coach may dismiss a player from the squad. This should be an "overnight" decision. It should not be made in a time of anger, but only after careful thought and deliberation. It should first be discussed with the head coach or athletic director.

6. Varsity team members shall not participate on a non-school sponsored team during the time their sport is in season.

MEDIA

1. Develop good relationships with the media.

2. Encourage media to be positive when writing stories about our athletes and teams.

3. A coach should furnish all game results to the media immediately following the game.

COACHING RESPONSIBILITIES

Each coach is expected to coach at least two sports and is responsible for:

1. Implementing the stated objectives and standards;

2. The coach should be professional at all times and continue to improve professional growth

3. Preparing the athletes to meet the demands of competitive sports with safety for each participant

4. Preparing each athlete by teaching individual and team skills, games and rules strategy, and by developing the athlete's ability to cope with the psychological aspects of competition

5. Emphasizing training as a prerequisite for achieving top performance and that athletes are leaders, representing their school and community

6. The image they personally project and the relationship they establish with a. The athlete b. The faculty & administration c. The parents in the community.

7. Encouraging good relationships between their team and the opponent.

COACHING APPRAISAL AND ACCOUNTABILITY

In many cases total evaluation of a sports program is based primarily on the win/loss record established by the head coach. Few schools actually take the time and effort to totally assess their coaches and/or athletic program.

Although a coach may feel uncomfortable with the word "evaluation", he/she should expect to be accountable for the program for which his/her leadership has been entrusted by a school district. Every effort will be made by the athletic director to assist staff members in every way possible. One of the most important ways the athletic director can help the coach is by pointing out areas of strength and areas of concern.

The underlying purpose of a coach's appraisal is improving the instruction the athletes receive. Other purposes of this appraisal system include:

1. Creating a climate to achieve individual improvement and advancement

2. Affording opportunity to identify and give recognition to quality coaching and instruction

3. Identifying the need for means of improving the quality of performance of a total staff

4. Providing the information required to support a coach against accusations which question their ability to coach

5. Providing for exchange of ideas and creating an avenue of communication between the coach and athletic director

6. Providing the school administration with assurance that quality coaching is a responsibility shared by the entire coaching staff and athletic director and the willingness to be accountable for the quality of performance.

a. Professionalism

b. Rapport with athletes, parents, and the community

c. Discipline of athletes.

d. Coaching/Directing techniques and performance.

e. Equipment/organization

U.I.L. GUIDELINES FOR COACHES GAME RESPONSIBILITY

The attitude of the coach is the key to the conduct of their players. Many times he/she is also responsible for the conduct of spectators. Because so much depends upon the coach, attention should be given to the following matters:

1. The coach's conduct should be an example for both the players and the fans

2. The coach should not reach the point of becoming angry

3. The coach should avoid appearances on the playing area, as this tends to create tension among spectators

4. The coach should teach respect for officials by accepting their decision.

Remember that officials are selected and approved by the coaches of the two schools involved before the game is played.

5. A coach should be sure that the team leaves the field of play in a group immediately after the final whistle has blown.

6. The coach should show respect for the opposing coach by being courteous at all times.

7. The coach should furnish itinerary/maps for all away games.

PROFESSIONAL IMPROVEMENT AND ADVANCEMENT

It will be the policy of the athletic department to consider current members of the staff for positions, which open within the department. Application from outside the system will be considered when applicants on the current coaching staff are not qualified. Tenure will be considered if the applicant meets other qualifications equally.

The qualifications will vary with the specific duties of the job available. The following characteristics, however, are considered highly valuable to a coach, regardless of specific job qualifications. Any prospective applicant will be evaluated in these areas:

1. INDUSTRIOUSNESS - In coaching as in most worthwhile endeavors, there are few short cuts. The industrious coach is one who realizes that a lot of extra time and effort is required to gain the small bit of excellence that is the margin of difference between the champion and the contender.

2. PREPARATION - A planned system for personal and professional improvement will lead to improved knowledge of the game and better methods of teaching and motivation. Without this kind of preparation, opportunity will only make a person look foolish.

3. POSITIVE ATTITUDE - Believe the job can be done and look for ways that it can be accomplished rather than reasons it cannot be. This attitude reflects cheerfulness and patient persistence toward correction of honest mistakes.

4. CREATIVE THINKING - Ideas result from man's attempt to solve a problem or to improve an old method of doing something. The creative coach will be continually checking, evaluating, and trying to modify or improve the system of coaching with new ideas. The willingness to personally assume responsibility for thinking out an assignment and creatively attacking problems in all phases of the program is the difference between the average coach and the outstanding coach. The average coach acts only on direct assignment while the creative thinker recognizes problem areas and works toward their solution.

5. LOYALTY - To staff, school and athletic department. The loyal coach supports all decisions and keeps all staff problems and materials confidential. In doing so, benefits will be derived by the coach, his/her family as well as the school system. His/her own fortunes will be influenced by the success or failure of his/her present program. The best way to tell what a person will do in the future is to see what he/she is doing at present. In other words, the person who will make the best high school track or basketball coach is probably doing the best job in lower grade levels now. The best head coach is probably the best assistant coach at the present time.

6. Professional Growth – L.C.I.S.D. encourages all coaching staff members to professionally grow. This can be done by attending clinics, working camps, workshops or going to playoff games. Other things that can help coaches grow would be attending college practices in the spring, get involved in summer programs, read articles that apply to your coaching area. Books, videos, and DVD are also good sources. You are also encourages to join athletic associations and education associations of your choice.

MEDICAL PROGRAM

General

1. The school designates a local physician as a team doctor to administer medical treatment to the injured student athlete. This doctor is to be used when the athlete does not have a family doctor, when the family doctor is not available, when the parents indicate that the team physician be used, or in emergency treatment. Coaches should inquire if parents have a preference in the attending physician and honor that request.

2. The trainer is the coaches' medical link in the world of athletics. The trainer should be consulted concerning the rehabilitation of injured players and should work with the coach and attending physician in determining the fitness and ability of the athlete to participate.

3. The athletic trainer will set specific hours for the training room to be available to students.

Physical Examinations

Participating students are required to have a current LCISD Medical packet, which includes physical exam and emergency medical form before participation in practice or a game. Each coach is responsible for having a copy, signed by both the examining physician and the parent on the official (U.I.L.) physical form on file at HOME games and

AWAY games.

The coach is responsible for not allowing students participating without a physical.

Insurance

Lamar C.I.S.D. has insurance covering all athletes participating in a U.I.L. sponsored sport.

The insurance policy is a secondary carrier policy.

What this means is that if parents have an athlete listed on another health insurance

policy, they will file any claims first on the other insurance policy.

If they do not have the athlete listed on any other health plan, then the school policy will act as a primary carrier policy.

It is important that they realize that this does not mean the insurance will completely cover the entire claim. The policy will pay what is termed "usual and customary" which does not always mean paid in full.

The parent or guardian is responsible for filing of the claim.

Injury Reports and Medical Bills:

1. The coach is responsible for seeing that injury reports get to the athletic office promptly after they are filled out.

2. Serious injuries should be reported to the athletic director or principal's office by phone on the day of the injury.

3. When an athlete is sent to the doctor he should not resume practice until the doctor releases him.

4. When an athlete is injured and the coach thinks a doctor's care is needed, take or send them immediately to seek medical assistance. DO NOT WAIT UNTIL AFTER

PRACTICE.

5. Report all injuries, not just those that are sent or taken to the doctor.

6. If the athlete is covered by school insurance, an insurance form should be taken with the injured athlete at the time of the accident to be filled out by the attending physician of hospital.

Head, Neck, and Back Injuries

The following procedure is to be followed in the handling of head, neck and back injuries during the course of athletic practice or competition.

1.

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO MOVE THE INJURED PLAYER - even if you have to stop the game until help arrives.

2.

DO NOT REMOVE THE HELMET OR ANY PART OF THE EQUIPMENT.

3.

CHECK VITAL SIGNS (Breathing and heartbeat). ALSO CHECK FOR OTHER INJURIES.

4.

GET MEDICAL HELP AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE. (Doctor ambulance).

5.

A HEAD INJURY SHOULD BE EXPECTED IF THE FOLLOWING SIGN OR SIGNS ARE

PRESENT:

a. Player is dazed or unconscious

b. Headache or dizziness, nausea

c. Bleeding from ears, nose or mouth

d. Unequal or dilated pupils

e. Paralysis in extremities

6.

A NECK OR BACK INJURY SHOULD BE EXPECTED IF THE FOLLOWING SIGN OR SIGNS

ARE PRESENT.

a. Numbness or paralysis in extremities

b. Player is unconscious

c. Inability of player to coherently talk with you.

d. Tingling or burning sensation in neck, back or extremities

7.

All suspected head; a physician should carefully examine neck and back injuries before returning athlete to participation.

8.

NEVER let an athlete return to competition if he/she has sustained a head injury, no matter how slight, no matter how the athlete says he/she feels.

9.

If the player has to be moved, lift the body as one unit and place on a stretcher in a reclining position.

10. If a player is face down (conscious or unconscious) check neck vertebrae and spine or ask if neck or back hurts before turning over. Turn body as a unit, if needed to be turned.

11. Tag all equipment (especially helmet) that athlete was wearing at the time of injury and bring to the athletic director's office.

12. Tag should have athlete's name, date of injury, and nature of injury on it.

13. Send the original helmet checklist with the athlete's signature to the athletic director.

Retain a copy for your files.

14. Send a written report on the procedure(s) that the coach used in handling the injury to the athletic director.

15. Send the athlete's physical and parent permission form to the athletic director.

Weather Policies

L.C.I.S.D. ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT

HOT WEATHER POLICY

Practice or competition in hot and humid environmental conditions poses special problems for student-athletes. Heat stress and resulting heat illness is a primary concern in these conditions. Although deaths from heat illness are rare, constant surveillance and education are necessary to prevent heat-related problems. The following practices should be observed.

General Considerations for Risk Reductions

1. Encourage proper education regarding heat illnesses (for athletes, coaches, parents, medical staff, etc.) Education about risk factors should focus on hydration needs; acclimatization, work/rest ratio, signs and symptoms of exert ional heat illnesses, treatment, dietary supplements, nutritional issues, and fitness status.

2. Assure that onsite medical staff has authority to alter work/rest ratios, practice schedules, amount of equipment, and withdrawal of individuals form participation based on environment and/or athlete’s medical condition.

General Guidelines:

1. An initial complete medical history and physical exam.

2. Gradual acclimatization of the athlete to hot/humid conditions is a must. We advise that student-athletes should gradually increase exposure to hot and/or humid environmental conditions over a period of seven to 10 days to achieve acclimatization.

3. Clothing and protective gear can increase heat stress. Dark colors absorb solar radiation, clothing and protective gear interfere with the evaporation of sweat and other avenues of heat loss. During acclimatization process, student athlete should practice in T-shirts, shorts, socks and shoes. Rubberized suits should never be worn.

4. To identify heat stress conditions, regular measurements of environmental conditions will be taken daily. Lamar C ISD will use the Telvent DTN weather station at the high school level.

5. Junior High Coordinators will get a heat index reading from an approved source at 1:30 P.M. and follow the guidelines appropriate for that heat index reading.

Specific Guidelines

Heat index of less than 100:

• No Restrictions

Heat index of 100-105

• Outdoor workouts limited to 2 hours, 10 minute break every 45 minutes.

• Junior High workouts limited to 1 1/2 hours, 10 minute break every 30 minutes.

• Cross country must stay on campus, limit runs to 1/2 normal length

• Conditioning for football should take place without helmets/shoulder pads.

• Athletes allowed to remove helmets if not actively participating

Heat index of 105-110

• High School workout limited to 1 1/2 hours, 10 minute break every 45 minutes

• Jr. High workouts limited to 1 1/2 hours, 10 minute break every 30 minutes

• Unrestricted access to water at all times

• A 10 minute break should proceed all conditioning for high school

• Conditioning should take place without helmets/shoulder pads and not exceed

10 minutes

• Jr. High Conditioning should be moved indoors

• Extra conditioning /running cancelled

• Decrease repetitions and practice for overweight individuals

• Asthmatic athletes may remove themselves from workout without penalties or repercussions

Heat Index of 110-115

• Junior High workouts should be moved indoors

• Shorts and T-shirts, helmets for high school workouts

• Practice shortened to 1 ½ hours for high school

• Unrestricted access to water at all times

• 15 minute break every hour

• Conditioning should take place indoors

• Decrease repetitions and practice for overweight individuals

• Asthmatic athletes may remove themselves from workout without penalties or

Heat index of greater than 115

� No outdoor workout

L.C.I.S.D. Athletic Department

LIGHTNING POLICY

While the probability of being struck by lightning is extremely low, the odds are significantly greater when a storm is in the area and proper safety precautions are not followed. Prevention and education are the keys to lightning safety. The athletic trainer, head coach and/or administrator using one of the three following methods will monitor conditions.

Telvent DTN – This is a portable weather station which utilizes GPS and updates the location of a thunderstorm each minute.

1. When a suspicious cloud/storm approaches, the athletic trainer/ head coach, assistant coach or administrator will activate and monitor Telvent DTN.

2. Once the cloud/storm reaches the 10 mile range, the field should be evacuated

Televent DTN – This is a detection device that estimates the distance of lightning.

1. When a suspicious cloud/storm approaches, the athletic trainer/ head coach, assistant coach or administrator will activate and monitor Televent DTN.

2. Monitor lightning by checking the read out periodically. Lightning detected in the 20-40 mile range moving into the 8-20 mile range indicates the cloud is moving closer to your location.

3. Once the cloud/storm reaches the 3-8 mile range, the field should be evacuated.

● "Flash to Bang" method - This method estimates the distance of lightning. Upon seeing the flash of lightning, start counting the seconds until thunder is heard. Divide the time in seconds by five to measure distance.

1. When suspicious cloud/storm approaches, the athletic trainer/ head coach, assistant coach or administrator shall monitor the approaching storm using the flash bang method.

2. Once the cloud/storm reaches the 6 mile range, the field should be evacuated.

Evacuation Procedures

The students should be evacuated to a safe shelter. Staying away from tall or individual trees, lone objects (light or flag poles), metal objects, and open fields. Examples of safe shelter are a bus, dressing room, or other building. A dug out or awning are not considered safe shelter. Administrators should evacuate spectators from the stadium.

Resume Practice and Competition

Once a game or practice has been suspended the storm should continue to be monitored.

No contest or practice should be resumed until

1. No lightning strike has been detected within 6 miles for 30 consecutive minutes using the Flash Bang method.

2. No lightning strike has been detected within 3-8 mile range for 30 consecutive minutes using the Televent DTN.

3. The lightning has moved out of the ten mile radius on the Televent DTN.

Although the home team is responsible for each game or match, it should be noted that the athletic trainer, head coach and/or administrator is wholly responsible for the safety and well being of adults and students in his/her charge. If no policy is in effect at the out of town site, it is recommended that the Lamar C.I.S.D. policy be adhered to in these situations.

OZONE ALERTS

Campus/District Procedures

PURPOSE

To have an action plan in place, addressing the health and well being of all students when ozone levels are reported to be unhealthy, allowing for site based and district-wide interventions as appropriate.

CAMPUS PLANNING

• Identify a minimum of three (3) computers in close proximity of the administrative offices, and bookmark the ozone web page that reports daily ozone levels and general air quality (i.e. administrator, secretary, nurse). One (1) computer should also be identified in P.E./Athletics.

• If the campus computers are “down”, an alternative campus should be identified in advance and called to get the ozone report for the day.

• Staff members assigned to the computers monitoring the ozone levels are responsible for checking the ozone site daily upon arriving for work.

Ozone conditions posted as unhealthy (Ozone Watch or color codes other than green or yellow) should be reported immediately to the designated campus administrator, who in turn will initiate the appropriate action plan

(Elem. – notify all staff) (Secondary – notify P.E./Athletic staff and others as appropriate).

ACCESSING WEB SITE

1. Log on to www.hcoem.org

2. Select Ozone Alerts (left column)

3. Select following sites: C26; C554; C559; C410

4. Bookmark this page

INTERPRETING THE WEB SITE INFORMATION

There will be a color code and the name of the primary pollutant being monitored (i.e. ozone, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, etc.) the color code is an interpretation of the numbers being reported and are as follows: AQI=Air Quality Index

AQI of 0-50 Green good air quality

51-100 Yellow moderate

101-150 Orange unhealthy for sensitive groups

151-200 Red unhealthy

201-300 Purple very unhealthy

301+ Dk. Purple hazardous

Lamar C.I.S.D. Weather Guidelines

Cold weather is defines as any temperature that can negatively affect the body’s regulatory system. These do not have to be freezing temperatures. The following temperature guidelines have been established for Lamar CISD Athletic Department practices and games.

Cold Weather Caution: When temperature or wind chill (which is lover than actual temperature) is from 40° F - 30° F

No modification of practice, but a warning will be given to coaches and athletes

Coaches and Athletic Trainers emphasizing the importance of following UIL Cold

Weather Illness Recommendations.

Watching those “high risk” athletes

Cold Weather Warning: When temperature or wind chill is from 30° F – 20° F, there may be a modified outside participation of 45 minutes. warm up to be started indoors (stretching, etc.) to not take away from 45 min.

A practice that keeps individuals moving, try to avoid working up a big sweat in the first 20 minutes, having them be wet, and then sit around watching.

Wear a hat that covers the ears, and some sort of gloves to cover the hands are required.

Keeping a very close eye on those “high risk” athletes

If available, a cool down indoors.

Cold Weather Termination: When temperature or wind chill reaches 19° F and below, there may be a termination of outside practices and games.

UIL Cold Weather Illness Information

Hypothermia: Hypothermia is a decrease in core body temperature.

1. Mild Hypothermia – shivering, cold sensation, goose bumps, numb hands.

2. Moderate Hypothermia-intense shivering, muscle incoordination, slow and labored movements, mild confusion, difficulty speaking, signs of depression, withdrawn.

3. Severe Hypothermia-shivering stops, exposed skin is bluish and puffy, inability to walk, poor muscle coordination, muscle rigidity, decrease in pulse and respiration rate, unconsciousness.

Managements:

Remove athlete from cold environment.

Remove wet clothing and replace with dry clothes and/or blankets.

Refer all moderate cases to the emergency! Wrap the athlete in an insulated blanket and see emergency medical care immediately.

Frostbite – thermal injury to the skin caused by cold exposure.

1. Frostnip – skin appears white and waxy or gray and mottled; possible numbness and pain.

2. Superficial Frostbite – skin appears white, mottled or gray; feels hard or rubbery but deeper tissue is soft, insensitive to touch.

3. Deep Frostbite – skin is white and has a wooden feel, numbness and anesthesia.

Management:

Do not rub the area.

Gently rewarm the area by blowing warm air into the area, placing the area against a warm body part, or placing the affected area into warm (101° – 108° degrees F) water for several minutes.

If not absolutely certain that the tissue will stay warm after rewarming, do not rewarm it. Refreezing newly thawed frostbitten tissue can cause extensive tissue damage!

If a person is also suffering from hypothermia, the first concern is core rewarming.

Prevention: The best method of management is prevention.

Dress in layers.

Cover the head to prevent excessive heat loss from the head and neck.

Stay dry by wearing a wicking fabric next to the body and a breathable, water repellant outer layer.

Stay adequately hydrated.

Eat regular meals.

Avoid alcohol, caffeine and nicotine.

Educate participants, coaches, officials and administrators in recognition of coldrelated illness.

Consider cancellation of athletic events if weather conditions warrant.

If unsure whether an athlete is hypothermic, err on the side of caution and treat accordingly.

Figure 1. Wind Chill Index

Recognition, Management and Prevention of Cold Exposure

Significance: Although excessive and prolonged exposure to cold may be an infrequent problem in high school athletics, the prevention, recognition and management of cold related conditions are still an important consideration for coaches, administrators and athletic trainers.

The human body’s mechanisms of heat retention are significantly less efficient than our ability to dissipate heat. Epidemiological research suggests that even in otherwise innocuous environmental conditions, hypothermia can occur. During the day, the temperature may be moderate and the sun shining, but as the sun sets and the temperature begins to fall, when coupled with conditions of exhaustion, dehydration and wet clothing associated with physical activity, the risk if cold-related pathology can increase.

Understanding the mechanisms of heat retention and production are essential to the prevention and management of cold-related illness and injuries:

Vasoconstriction – Decreases blood flow to the periphery to prevent loss of body heat.

Shivering – While involuntary shivering generates heat through increased muscle activity, it may also hinder an athlete’s sport performance and ability to perform behavioral tasks to aid in heat retention.

Activity increase – Increase heat production through a general increase in metabolic activity. Quick bouts of intense activity can generate incredible amounts of heat.

Behavioral responses – Adjusting the number and type of clothing layers will result in heat regulation by controlling the amount of heat lost by the body.

There are two cold-related pathologies that coaches, administrators and athletes should be aware of: hypothermia and frostbite.

Hypothermia is defined as a decrease in the core body temperature to at least 95° degrees F. It occurs when the heat loss is greater than the metabolic and heat production. Hypothermia can be categorized in three stages: mild, moderate and severe, based on core body temperature.

Frostbite is a thermal injury to the skin, which can result from prolonged exposure to moderate cold or brief exposure to extreme cold. The body areas most prone to frostbite are the hands, feet, nose, ears and cheeks. Frostbite can be classified into three basic categories: frostnip, superficial frostbite and deep frostbite.

Recognition of Cold-Related Issues

There are several factors influencing one’s susceptibility or risk of cold related injury or illness. These factors can be addictive. This, it is essential to appreciate each of these factors, along with the associated signs and symptoms of hypothermia and frostbite. For example, exposure to 30° degrees - 50° degrees temperature under wet and windy conditions can be equivalent to sub zero temperatures with no wind and moisture.

Risk Factors

Low air temperature – When cold exposure exceeds or overwhelms the body’s ability to compensate for heat loss due to the external environment.

Wind chill – Figure 1 provides a wind chill index chart that identifies the risk associated with the interaction of the wind speed and air temperatures.

Moisture – Wet skin freezes at a higher temperature than dry skin.

Exposed skin – Heat occurs primarily through convection and radiation to the external environment, but may also include evaporation if the skin is moist. This is a concern for those exercising and sweating in cold environments.

Insulation – The amount of insulation from cold and moisture significantly affects thermoregulation.

Dehydration – Negatively influences metabolism and thermoregulation.

Alcohol – Increases peripheral blood flow and heat loss; can also disrupt the shivering mechanism.

Caffeine – Acts as a diuretic, causing water loss and dehydration

Tobacco – Acts as a vasoconstrictor: increasing the risk of frostbite.

Recognition

Coaches, athletes, officials and administrators should also be aware of the continuum of signs and symptoms associated with various classifications of cold-related pathologies:

(Curtis, R. Outdoor Action Guide to Hypothermia and Cold Weather Injuries. Outdoor

Action Program, Princeton University. www.princeton.edu/˜oa/safety/hypocold.hmtl, last updated 1995.)

Signs and Symptoms of Frostbite

Management

Hypothermia – The basic principles of rewarming victims or hypothermia are to conserve the heat they have, and replace the heat that they have already lost. The best method to determine the extent of core temperature loss is measurement of rectal temperature.

Unfortunately, obtaining a rectal temperature reading on a moderately or severely hypothermic patient can be difficult, and may expose the athlete to further cooling. The following describes the management regimes for hypothermia relative to severity:

Mild Hypothermia – Seek dry shelter; replace wet clothing, insulate whole body and head, avoid sweating, use external warmth (bath, fire) only if core above 95° degrees F, give warm sweet drinks and food.

Moderate Hypothermia – Avoid exercise and external warmth, gently rest, give warm sweet drinks and calories, internal warming via warm moist air, monitor pulse and breathing.

Severe Hypothermia – Medical emergency, give nothing by mouth, wrap in an insulated blanket. Avoid rapid rewarming, transfer to hospital immediately

Frostbite – It is very important to note that refreezing newly thawed frostbitten tissue can cause extensive tissue damage. If it is not absolutely certain that the tissue will stay warm after rewarming, do not rewarm it. Once the tissue is frozen, the major harm has been done. Keeping it frozen for a longer period of time will not cause significant additional damage. The following describes the management of frostbite relative to severity:

Frostnip – Rewarm the area gently by blowing warm air onto the area or placing it against a warm body part or place in a warm (101° degrees - 108° degrees F) water bath for several minutes. Never rub the area. This can damage the affected tissue by increasing the friction on the ice crystals in the cell, causing tearing of the tissue.

Superficial Frostbite – If a small area is involved, it can betreated the same as indicated for frostnip; if it is a larger area, follow the management for deep frostbite.

Deep Frostbite – Rewarm by removing restrictive clothing and immersing the affected body part in a water bath of 105° degrees - 110° degrees F for 25-40 minutes. Refer deeply frostbitten athletes athletes to the emergency room. Do not rewarm the tissue unless absolutely absolutely certain that it will stay warm after rewarming.

FITTING & MAINTENANCE OF EQUIPMENT

Only a properly fitting helmet can provide appropriate protection. Helmets are made of a hard plastic shell and suspension or padding system to absorb impact.

FITTING THE HELMET

Procedure:

1. Make sure the ears are in line with the ear holes of the helmet. Next, make sure the front rim of the helmet is not more than two finger widths above the eyebrow.

2. Make sure the helmet covers the base of the skull. Be sure that the back rim of the helmet does not cut into the back of the athlete's neck.

3. Proper cheek pads are important in preventing side motion, holding the facemask and trying to turn the helmet side to side can check this. Proper size cheek pads will not allow the helmet to rotate laterally. Also, while holding the face mask, move the helmet forward and backward to see if the helmet slides high on the forehead or down over the eyes. This would indicate and oversized helmet.

Maintenance:

E

VERY

W

EDNESDAY AFTER PRACTICE

,

WE WILL CHECK EVERY ATHLETE

'

S EQUIPMENT IN THE PROGRAM

.

WHAT TO CHECK

:

1. Air in helmet

2. Chin straps

3. Buttons on helmet

4. Warning labels on helmet

5. Mouthpieces

6. Straps and clips on shoulder pads

SHOULDER PADS

The distance from shoulder to shoulder should be measured, and the correct pad size selected from the manufacturer's chart. The pads should meet but not overlap. Loose pad straps can chafe, so they should be secured. There should be 1 to 2 finger widths between the neck and pad. The pad should reach down in front to the nipple, and out to just beyond the shoulder. There should be minimal movement when shifted, and the arms should be free to raise overhead.

SCHEDULING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

General

In constructing a schedule, the primary aim is to arrange schedules for each sport, which will provide the most equitable competition possible within the framework of respective sports budgets and consistent with the objectives of the overall sports program and applicable U.I.L. regulations

Responsibility and Approval

It is the responsibility of the head coach of each sport, working with the Campus Coordinator to prepare a tentative schedule for the approval of each building principal and Athletic Director. Schedules should be submitted according to the schedule provided by the

Athletic Department In cases of conflicts in scheduling, the building principal, campus coordinator, and athletic director will make the final decision.

Public Release of Schedules

We will expect the head coach of all sports to work with the athletic office staff to secure all information concerning their sports schedules and scores to be entered onto the district athletic home page and the campus page of the Lamar CISD web-site. This will include team information, roosters, game results and messages or information concerning a particular program.

Factors to be considered in Scheduling

1. Balance between the number of games at home and away.

2. Proper spacing between games at home and away.

3. Income and expense involved for each contest as well as the total schedule.

4. Class absences required for each contest.

5. Balance between outstanding, average, and weak opponents.

6. Dates for playoffs.

7. Numbers of games, matches, or tournaments allowed by UIL matches in all sports are limited to a maximum of two school days per week unless approved beforehand by the athletic director and building principal.

8. Matches or games should be scheduled as close to home as possible and still achieve the preceding scheduling objectives. Our policy for non-district activities is that we travel no farther than sixty miles outside the school district without a special permission of the principal and athletic director.

9. The coach is responsible for notifying the athletic office when a game is cancelled or there is a time change.

10. No games will be scheduled at home during the Christmas holidays according to UIL rules, except district play. Games will not be played during the TAKS test.

11. Head coach is responsible for sending the Athletic Director and campus coordinator all updated schedules plus tournament brackets.

12. The Athletic Director must approve all schedules after they have been checked and approved by the campus coordinator.

13. Playoff game sites in volleyball, basketball, softball, baseball, football, or soccer have to be approves by the Athletic Director. The head coach and the Athletic Director will meet before hand to discuss game sites.

Travel arrangements should be coordinated and approved with the

Athletic Director and the campus coordinator.

ATHLETIC BOOSTER CLUB ORGANIZATION AND PROJECTS

Function and Purpose

It shall be the function of the All Sports Booster Club at the High Schools to encourage and support the athletes in that school. Its purpose is to aid the program with those projects deemed beneficial by the Athletic Director and

Campus Coordinator. No projects will be undertaken without prior approval

of the Athletic Director and the Campus Coordinator.

Guidelines

Booster clubs are to be solely school-oriented groups. Outside groups that are involved in the same or similar activities such as professional, college or inner-community groups, are not allowed by the U.I.L. to receive any awards or gifts beyond that allowed in the athletic award policy of the district. A banquet or dinner is permitted to recognize the sports participants. Booster clubs shall direct and concentrate their efforts toward the high school program. They are not to provide or otherwise support on a club basis; any form of scholarship based athletic participation. Businesses are not to be contacted for donations or contributions of any kind without prior approval of the building principal. Printing, sale and distribution of team programs must be approved by the athletic director.

Role of Booster Clubs

School patrons to help enrich the school’s participation in extracurricular activities form booster clubs. The fund-raising role of booster clubs is particularly crucial in today's economic climate.

The majority of activities supported by booster clubs are related to UIL activities. Since UIL rules regulate what UIL participants, sponsors and coaches may and may not accept, it is important that booster clubs are aware of these rules.

Expenditure of Funds

1. Booster groups or individuals may donate money or merchandise to the school with prior approval of the administration. These kinds of donations are often made to cover the cost of commercial transportation and to cover costs for out of

town meals. It would be a violation for booster groups or individuals to pay for such costs directly.

2. To avoid violation of the UIL athletic amateur rule, money given to a school cannot be earmarked for any particular expense. Booster clubs may make recommendations, but cash or other valuable consideration must be given to the school to use at its discretion.

3. Coaches and directors of UIL academics, athletics and fine arts may not accept a petty cash fund or a miscellaneous discretionary fund. All funds must be given to the school administrator and spent at the discretion of the school, with the approval of the school board.

4. Coaches and director of UIL academics, athletics and fine arts may not accept more than $500 in money, product, or service from any source in recognition of or appreciation for coaching, directing or sponsoring UIL activities. The $500 limit is cumulative for a calendar year and is not specific to any one particular gift. The district may pay a stipend (fixed at the beginning of the year) as part of the annual employment contract.

5. Booster clubs cannot give anything to students, including awards. Check with school administrators before giving anything to a student, school sponsor or coach.

Schools must give prior approval for any banquet or get-together given for students.

6. Individuals should be informed of the seriousness of violating the athletic amateur rule. The penalty to a student athlete is forfeiture of all varsity athletic eligibility for one calendar year from the date of the violation. Student athletes are prohibited from accepting valuable consideration (anything that is not given or offered to the entire student body on the same basis that it is given or offered to an athlete.) Valuable consideration is defined as tangible or intangible property or service, including anything that is wearable, useable or sellable. Sellable food items or trinkets given to students because they participate on the school athletic squad by senior girls, cheerleaders, drill team members, little/big sisters, school boosters, parents of other students, teachers, or others violate this rule.

7. Homemade "spirit signs" made from paper and normal supplies a student purchases for school use may be placed on students' lockers or in their yards.

Trinkets and food items may not be attached. Yard signs made of commercial quality wood, plastic; etc. must be purchased or made by the individual player's parents.

8. For purposes of competing in an athletic contest the school may provide meals for out of town trips only. If the school does not pay for meals, then individual parents need to purchase their own child's food. Boosters and/or parents may purchase anything they wish for their own child, but may not provide food or other items of valuable consideration for their child's teammates.

9. Parties for athletes are governed by the following State Executive Committee interpretation of Section 441:

VALUABLE CONSIDERATION SCHOOL TEAMS AND ATHLETES MAY ACCEPT:

1. Pre-Season. Athletic teams may be given no more than one pre-season meal, per sport, per school year, such as a fish fry, ice cream supper, etc., provided it is approved by the school and given by a non-profit organization (usually the booster club) before the team plays in its first contest. It may be given after a scrimmage.

2. Post-Season. Athletic teams are limited to no more than one post-season meal or banquet per sport, per school year, and it must be given by a non-profit organization and approved by the school. Banquet favors or gifts are considered valuable consideration and are a violation if they are given to a student athlete at any time.

3. Other. At any time athletic teams and athletes may be invited to and may attend functions where free admission is offered, or where refreshments and/or meals are served, provided all students from that high school are invited to attend for the same fee and on the same basis as the athletes or the athletic team. Athletes or athletic teams may be recognized at these functions, but may not accept anything that is not given to all other students.

VALUABLE CONSIDERATION SCHOOL TEAMS AND ATHLETES MAY NOT ACCEPT.

Examples of items deemed to be valuable consideration, and thus a violation of this rule, include, but are not limited to: 1) cookies, candy, and other gifts from other students, often referred to as goodie bags; 2) meals, snacks, or snack foods during or after practices; 3) parties given by parents or other students that are strictly for an athletic team: 4) anything that is not given, or offered, to the entire student body on the same basis that it is given to or offered to an athlete.

Funds should be used to support school activities. To provide such funding for nonschool activities would violate the public trust through which funds are earned.

THE ADMINISTRATION OF INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETICS

Philosophy

The philosophy of the Lamar Consolidated Independent School District competitive sports is to maintain a broad based program that will provide students with athletic interests and opportunity for participation in sport/sports of their choice.

Objectives of the Lamar Consolidated Athletic Department

1. Provide as many students as possible a favorable environment.

2. Instill good habits, sound morals, exemplary citizenship and a high standard of sportsmanship in the students of the Lamar Consolidated

Independent School District.

3. Encourage students to grow spiritually, physically, mentally, and socially.

4. Instill in young people an appreciation for optimum health, and physical fitness. The importance of proper rest, good eating habits, and cleanliness should be stressed.

5. Develop a program in such a manner that the end results will be one of unity, harmony and success. Mass participation is to be emphasized and encouraged at sub-varsity levels.

6. Instill in the athletes the desire to represent their school and community in a manner that will make school administrators, teachers, parents, and other citizens proud of them.

7. Emphasize to athletes that athletic competition is a privilege.

8. Create in students a greater interest in the value of education.

9. Maintain and conduct a successful interscholastic athletic program.

ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION OF ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT

Athletic Director

1. The athletic director is responsible for the athletic program, athletic coaches in the system and their assignments in regards to promotion of the overall program, such as in-service clinics, track meets, basketball tournaments, scouting, or any other duties deemed necessary.

(Specific duties are outlined in the job description).

2. Responsible to the Superintendent of Schools.

Campus Coordinator - High School

1. Responsible for coordinating athletic programs and supervision of coaching personnel in high school.

2. Authorized to assign coaches under his/her supervision to scouting responsibilities, in-service meetings and other duties relating to the successful operation of the program.

3. Responsible to athletic director and building principal.

4. Assist junior high coordinator in evaluating and assigning coaches.

Head Coach for Each Sport

1. Responsible for his/her particular sport and assistant coaches under his/her direction, including evaluation.

2. Responsible to campus coordinator, principal and athletic director.

Junior High Coordinator

1. Responsible for coordinating athletic programs and supervision of coaching personnel in assigned school.

2. Responsible to principal, high school campus coordinator and athletic director.

Assistant Coach - High School

1. Responsible to head coach of their particular sport.

2. Responsible to building principal, campus coordinator and the athletic director.

Assistant Coach - Junior High School

1. Responsible to head coach of their particular sport.

2. Responsible to building principal, junior high coordinator, and the athletic director.

Athletic Trainer

Works with head coach, campus coordinator, and building principal and athletic director.

Assistant Athletic Trainer

Works with head athletic trainer, building principal, and junior high campus coordinator, and athletic director.

Procedure for Handling Athletic Requests and Problems

1. Coaches shall initiate each request or discussion of a problem pertaining to athletics with the campus coordinator of his/her school.

2. The request or problem may then be referred to the athletic director by the head coach if the subject requires additional attention.

ATHLETIC STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES

Director of Athletics – General

The Director of Athletics shall have the responsibility of general supervision and coordination of the competitive sports program of the Junior High and

High Schools and of the Lamar Consolidated Independent School District. It is to this director that the coaches shall look for direction, guidance, and assistance in the improvement and effective operation of the athletic program. The Athletic Director shall support the policies of Lamar

Consolidated Independent School District, particularly, as they relate to the three-fold platform of:

Specific Duties and Responsibilities

1. Organize and administer, in cooperation with the school principal, the over-all program of athletics.

2. Recommend with the advice and counsel of the school principal, the professional personnel required to implement the program.

3. Supervise the programs of athletics.

4. Administer the budget for the athletic program.

5. Requisition, in cooperation with appropriate staff members, supplies and equipment for the athletic program.

6. Be responsible, jointly with the school principals, for administering inter-school athletic events and contest.

7. Execute Board of Education and administrative policies in the area of assignment.

8. With the assistance of appropriate staff members, the athletic director develops and places into operation rules and regulations consistent with the general policies of the district.

9. Assist in the evaluation of policies within the area of assignment and make recommendations for changes in policies.

10. Perform other duties as assigned.

11. Work with principals and other staff members in developing interest in and appreciation for competitive sports. This interest should be developed in pupils, school employees and public.

12. Make periodic reports as requested on the operation of athletics.

13. Work with other administrators of the school toward the development of strong physical bodies, superior moral standards, and sound ethical character for the boys and girls of the LCISD schools.

Campus Coordinator - Genera

l

The campus coordinator shall coordinate the total athletic program in the school and in the principle feeder school or schools. The coordinator shall be directly responsible to the building principal and to the athletic director in the performance of duties.

Specific Duties and Responsibilities

1. Is responsible for the supervision of assistant coaches to a coaching schedule. High

School is responsible for the supervision of trainers. Is responsible for supervising and coordinating the work of Junior High assistant coaches.

2. Assists the athletic director in developing and directing a comprehensive program of athletics in the high school and the principal feeder intermediate school or schools. Consults with the principal and the athletic director in the organization and operation of programs. Plans meetings, conferences, and to coordinate the activities of all coaches for all sports in the program.

3. Assists and advises the athletic director in the recruitment, appointment,

management, and evaluation of program personnel of the high school and the feeder schools. Make recommendations to the athletic director for the appointment of all personnel. Is responsible for developing and clearly defining in writing the job of each coach. Gives general supervision to all sports in the high school and the feeder junior high school.

4. Is responsible for submitting an evaluation form for all coaches in the high school and junior high schools.

5. Assists the athletic director in preparing and maintaining an up-to-date handbook of athletic policies, plans, regulations, and procedures for coaches. In general, the handbook will contain job descriptions for the athletic director and head coach, as well as staff policies and information on eligibility awards.

6. Works with the athletic director in the preparation and administration of an annual budget for athletics. Manages campus athletic budget with all athletic purchases routed to the Athletic Financial Secretary and approved by the Director of

Athletics.

7. Is responsible for assigning coaches to:

a. Prepare and keep current an inventory of all equipment, fixtures, and properties of the athletic program in the school assigned and to maintain and care for all equipment.

b. Supervising use of indoor and outdoor equipment.

8. Directly responsible for the in-service training of the coaches involved in the high schools and the junior high schools. This responsibility includes formations, terminology, drills, scouting, and organization for practice.

a. Plans on an annual basis, an in-service training program for coaches to attend such as the following: coaching schools, clinics, local workshops, etc. all plans must include anticipated expenses.

b. Secures approval of the principal, superintendent, and director of athletics to attend conferences when the coach or any assistant is to be out of school.

9. Assists the athletic director in developing a public relations program designed to keep patrons informed as to the accomplishments of the athletic program.

a. Cooperates with community agencies and the press.

b. Plans consistently and continuously to maintain good home/school relationship with students,, staff, faculty and community at all times..

c. Open door of understanding and effectively communicating the process and procedures of Lamar Athletics.

10. Assumes the responsibility for the school's participation in all matters; complies with these regulations:

a. Keeps abreast on all rules and regulations of the University Interscholastic

League, and sees that the school, in all matters, complies with these regulations.

b. Make all necessary reports to the league in cooperation with the principals and to the athletic director in UIL compliance issues.

11. Secures competent game officials.

12. Assumes responsibility for the general management (use, care, and maintenance) of athletic fields and facilities under his/her supervision.

13. Is responsible to the principal for an eligibility list of athletes at the beginning of the season, weekly reports, and end-of-season reports.

14. Is responsible to the principal with regard to travel, list of players, means of travel, departure time, when athletes are involved.

15. Submits a list of names of athletes to be scheduled in the athletic period, and is responsible for recommending the transfer of athletes out of the athletic program.

16. Directly responsible to the principal and athletic director for his/her behavior and the behavior of assistant carrying out any duties connected with his/her sport.

17. Works with the athletic director in developing varsity, junior varsity, sophomore, and freshman football schedules.

18. Makes every effort to attend other sport contests in his/her district high schools and junior high schools.

19. Encourages the athletes to participate in other sports.

20. Is responsible for administering policies for athletic awards.

HEAD COACH (JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL)

The junior high coach shall be responsible for developing and coordinating the athletic program under the leadership of the principal, the athletic director, and the head coach from the high school.

Specific Duties and Responsibilities

1. Teaches the type of offense, defense, and drills suggested by the high school head coach.

2. Implements, under the athletic director and head coach, an off-season training program.

3. Compiles in January, a statement of needs (equipment, supplies, and maintenance) along with a complete inventory to insure the securing of essential supplies and equipment for program operation during the subsequent year.

4. Requisitions for program essentials through the athletic director, the principal, and the campus coordinator.

5. Secures team transportation and travel expenses for all athletic trips through the athletic director.

6. Schedules games for junior high athletics with the approval of the athletic director.

7. Is to be a participating, cooperative member of the coaching staff, and be interested in providing leadership to every part of the athletic program, as well as the total school program.

8. Cooperates with community agencies and the press.

9. Makes consistent and continuous effort to maintain a good home/school relationship.

10. Works with school related activities to boost the school district's athletic program.

11. Helps develop pride and the desire to excel in those who participate in the athletic program.

12. Encourages continuing participation in the athletic program.

13. Helps to develop good physical and mental attitudes.

14. Sets a good example for all athletes in manner, attitude, dress, conduct and character.

15. Responsible for care of injured players. If necessary, referrals are made to the trainer assigned to the school or the physician. In case of emergency transports them to the hospital.

16. Attends all in-service training programs held by the athletic director and the high school head coach.

17. Gives proper care and maintenance to all athletic equipment.

18. Assumes responsibility for the general management (use, care, and maintenance) of athletic fields and facilities under the coach’s supervision.

19. Attends all meetings necessary to implement league rules.

20. Works with the athletic director in securing game officials.

21. Meet visiting teams and supplies their needs.

22. Performs others duties that may be assigned by athletic director or high school campus coordinator.

HEAD COACH (HIGH SCHOOL)

Specific Duties and Responsibilities

1. Submits to the principal an eligibility list or participants for the sport they are coaching. This list should be complete and in the mail to the designated personnel before the team competes against another school.

2. Obtains a three (3) week report from the principal on the eligibility of each player.

3. Submits to the principal a list of players who will be traveling. Must receive approval of the principal as to means of travel, departure times, etc.

4. Must submit recommendations to the campus coordinator of the names of athletes who have earned athletic awards.

5. Must submit to the head coach a written list of items for repair or replacement for the particular sport(s) for which he/she is responsible.

Will not hesitate to call the athletic director when a hazard exists where facilities are concerned. An emergency merits an immediate phone call to the athletic director.

6. Will stay with the participants until they have dressed and gone home.

Will see that all facilities are securely locked before leaving.

7. Confers with the campus coordinator and athletic director if a player is to be dismissed from the program.

8. Will work closely with the team physician, athletic trainer, and parents on illness and injury problems. The team physician, family physician and the parents will make the final decision as to whether an athlete will practice or participate.

9. Secures game officials, meets visiting teams, supplies visiting team needs and takes care of any other requirements for the orderly performance of all games.

10. Must be responsible for all equipment used in the coaches' sport. Keep an inventory of all equipment up to date - and submit to athletic director no later than two (2) weeks following the close of the season.

11. Provide direction and assistance to junior high coaches to assure coordination and success in each sport.

12. Is responsible for making sure their athletes live in the correct attendance zone.

Athletic Trainer –

The athletic trainer is responsible for the care and treatment, or referring to physician for treatment, of all athletic injuries sustained by boys and girls participating in the athletic program in the schools to which he is assigned. He reports to the campus coordinator and is responsible for the assistant trainer.

Specific duties and Responsibilities

1. Treats all minor injuries.

2. Works under the direction of the team physician in the treatment of major injuries.

3. Keeps a record of all injuries.

4. Keeps a written record of all treatment administered.

5. Keeps on file physical examination reports signed by physician.

6. Obtains all information about family insurance.

7. Keeps athletic office informed about surgeries and is certain that family insurance claims have been filed when applicable.

8. Approves all medical and hospital bills (no recommendation for payment should

be made until it is absolutely certain that family insurance has been paid in full).

9. Is responsible for working with and developing the proper relationship with team physicians, coaches, athletes, and family of injured athlete.

10. Is responsible for working with and developing the proper relationship with the participating athletes.

Is called "coach" or "Mister/Mrs." by students.

Inform students of what is expected of them.

Develops training room rules.

Develops rules for student trainers and managers.

11. Develops as many student trainers as possible. Develops a daily, weekly, or monthly work schedule for all student trainers.

12. Conducts open house for parents in order to provide a good public relations program.

13. Contacts parents to give extent of injuries. Keeps them informed.

14. Checks with the physician when in doubt about an injury.

15. Recognizes that the team physician has the final say concerning an athlete's physical ability to participate.

16. Will be present at all high school football practice sessions, varsity football games, varsity basketball game, and other athletic contests as assigned by the head coach and the athletic director.

17. Will treat injuries of students in all sports with equal enthusiasm. Strives at all times to maintain a close harmonious working relationship with coaches and athletes of all sports.

PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

HIGH SCHOOL

Scheduled events will not be further than sixty miles from the school without approval of the athletic director. All schedules will conform to the rules and regulations of the U.I.L., the district to which the school is assigned and any special regulation of the LCISD.

BASKETBALL PROGRAM (BOYS/GIRLS)

Each high school may field five teams: varsity, junior varsity, sophomore, and two freshmen with the approval of the athletic director. The junior varsity will be limited to two tournaments - one of which should be in the LCISD.

Sophomore and freshman teams will be limited to no more than eighteen games and two tournaments - one of which should be in the LCISD.

BASEBALL PROGRAM

Each high school may field a maximum of three baseball teams with the approval of the athletic director. These shall be a varsity, junior varsity, and a sophomore team. Freshmen shall be allowed to play on the sophomore team. There shall be no more than two games in one week excluding tournaments. Sub varsity team will be limited to no more than four nondistrict games and one tournament.

CROSS COUNTRY (BOYS & GIRLS)

Each school may field three teams: varsity, junior varsity and freshman. A team or student shall participate in no more than eight invitational meets exclusive of the district meet. Two meets with three or less schools may be held provided there is no loss of school time.

FOOTBALL PROGRAM

Each high school may field five teams: varsity, junior varsity, sophomore and two freshman teams. Each team may schedule a maximum of ten games.

GOLF PROGRAM (BOYS & GIRLS)

Each high school shall be allowed to field two teams. The golf program shall start in September. Competitive meets shall be scheduled during the spring semester with the fall semester being limited to six practice matches. The spring will consist of two matches and eight tournaments plus a district tournament. Any combination of this total amount of matches and tournaments is acceptable if approved by the athletic director.

SOCCER (BOYS & GIRLS)

Each high school shall be allowed to field two teams: varsity and junior varsity teams. There shall be no more than two games in one week excluding tournaments. U.I.L. guidelines will be followed as to the number of games - tournaments.

SOFTBALL PROGRAM

Each high school may field a maximum of three softball teams with the approval of the athletic director. These shall be a varsity, junior varsity, and a sophomore team. Freshmen shall be allowed to play on the sophomore team. There shall be no more than two games in one week excluding tournaments. Sub-varsity teams will be limited to no more than four nondistrict games and one tournament.

SWIMMING (BOYS & GIRLS)

Each high school will compete in swimming. Meets shall conform to school and U.I.L. guidelines.

TENNIS PROGRAM (BOYS & GIRLS)

The tennis program for both boys and girls shall begin in August. Each high school shall be allowed to participate in eight matches during the fall semester. The spring tennis schedule shall consist of six matches and eight tournaments plus a district tournament. Any combination of this total amount of matches and tournaments will be acceptable with the approval of the athletic director. Matches are to be scheduled with no loss of school time.

TRACK PROGRAM (BOYS & GIRLS)

High Schools may field a maximum of three teams: a varsity, junior varsity, and a freshman team. Neither student nor team representing the school shall participate in more than eight meets (excluding cross-country and district meets) during a season. They may participate in two tri or dual matches.

Sub-varsity teams will be limited to six meets and two trio or dual matches.

When a school has an athlete or athletes who will participate in a state track meet, the team will travel to the state meet the day of the meet, unless the team has an athlete who will compete in a field event, in the morning. A team can stay overnight after the team participates during the day or the evening.

VOLLEYBALL PROGRAM

Each high school shall be allowed to field three girls' volleyball teams: varsity, junior varsity, and freshman team. Each team shall be allowed to schedule a maximum of two matches a week plus three tournaments. Sub-varsity teams may enter no more than two tournaments - one of which should be in the

LCISD.

WRESTLING (BOYS & GIRLS)

Each high school shall be allowed to field two teams: varsity and junior varsity teams. U.I.L. guidelines will be followed as to the number of meets - tournaments.

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

Scheduled events should not be greater than sixty miles from the schools without approval of the athletic director. All schedules will conform to the rules and regulations of the U.I.L., the district to which the school is assigned and special regulation of the board policy. All practices in junior high will be a maximum of two hours.

BASKETBALL (BOYS & GIRLS)

Each junior high school will be allowed a maximum of three (3) eighth grade teams and three (3) seventh grade teams. Each team may schedule a maximum of twelve games plus two tournaments, one of which should be in the L.C.I.S. D. Games will be played in the afternoon after school is dismissed.

FOOTBALL

Each school will have a maximum of three teams at each grade level if justified by participation. There will be a maximum of nine games scheduled. Practice will not begin until school starts.

TENNIS (BOYS & GIRLS)

Tennis for both boys/girls shall consist of inter-school competition limited to the spring semester. The schedules shall include no more than four tournaments and ten matches.

Tennis will begin following basketball season.

TRACK (BOYS & GIRLS)

Each junior high shall field one team at each grade level (seventh and eighth). Each team will be allowed to participate in seven meets or matches.

VOLLEYBALL

Each school will have a maximum of three teams at each grade level if justified by participation. There will be a maximum of nine games scheduled. Practice will not begin until school starts. The season shall conclude with the corresponding date for the conclusion of the high schools season. There will be no more than one match a week.

Each team may enter two tournaments, one of which should be in LCISD.

Discipline of Athletes

1. A student is not required to take part in athletics nor is it required for graduation. Athletics is a privilege, and consequently, when high ideals and standards are violated, this privilege can be revoked.

2. The general philosophy of the LCISD Athletic Department is that we will attempt to help an individual who makes a "mistake"; however, if a

"mistake" is repeated, the welfare of the team must take priority. (A

"mistake" may mean violation of training rules, missing practice, poor attitude.)

3. Coaches have the right to discipline athletes on their individual teams, but should exercise sound judgment in evaluating specific penalties, keeping in mind the welfare of the team, as well as the individual.

Above all, coaches must be consistent with their discipline.

4. No coach should dismiss a boy or girl from a team until discussing it with the head coach and allowing a twenty-four-evaluation period, except with extenuating circumstances.

5. If an athlete quits before a current season is finished the athlete may not practice or participate in another sport until the sport in which he or she quit is finished. This would include playoffs; this will mean forfeiture of any awards acquired in the sport the student quit.

Participation in Various Sports

Students should be encouraged to participate in as many sports as their interests and abilities will allow. If an athlete wants to drop a sport he/she should first be directed to the head coach in that sport who will discuss the matter with him/her. What is best for the student must always be of primary importance. An athlete who quits one sport cannot participate in another sport while the sport he/she quit is still in season. This applies only to the year he/she has quit.

A coach should not attempt to influence an athlete to give up participation in one sport in order to devote greater concentration in another sport. (In other words, "recruiting" will not be tolerated).

GENERAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Lamar CISD Athletic Lettering Policy

FOOTBALL

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including play-offs) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. An athlete must participate in a minimum of twelve quarters of play in order to be eligible to receive a letter award. (4 Games)

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the football program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD football letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

Lamar CISD Athletic Lettering Policy

SWIMMING & DIVING

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including regional and state meets) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. An athlete may letter in swimming and diving if they obtain 25% of all points possible in meets the swim team competes in or finishes in the top three at the

District Meet.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the swimming and diving program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD swimming and diving letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

Lamar CISD Athletic Lettering Policy

BOYS AND GIRLS BASKETBALL

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including play-offs) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. Players must participate in 30% of varsity quarters in order to letter as underclassmen in a regular season.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the boys or girls basketball program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD boys or girls basketball letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

Lamar CISD Athletic Lettering Policy

VOLLEYBALL

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including play-offs) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. An athlete must participate in a minimum of 30% of all games in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the volleyball program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD volleyball letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

Lamar CISD Athletic Lettering Policy

BOYS AND GIRLS TRACK

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including regional and state meets) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. An athlete must accumulate a total of 12 points or get a point in district meet in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the track program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD track letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

Lamar CISD Athletic Lettering Policy

SOFTBALL

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including play-offs) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. An athlete must participate a total of 30% of all games in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the softball program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD softball letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

Lamar CISD Athletic Lettering Policy

BASEBALL

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including play-offs) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. An athlete must participate a total of 30% of all games, or if a pitcher, 20% of all games in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the baseball program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD baseball letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

LAMAR CONSOLIDATED INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

LETTERING POLICY

BOYS AND GIRLS GOLF

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including regional and state tournaments) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. A student must play in at least four varsity golf tournaments and participate in the district tournament.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the golf program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD golf letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

LAMAR CONSOLIDATED INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

LETTERING POLICY

MANAGER OR TRAINER

I. A manager or trainer must complete the season in good standing in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. A student must be a manager or trainer for two (2) consecutive years in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD manager or trainer letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

LAMAR CONSOLIDATED INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

LETTERING POLICY

BOYS AND GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including regional and state meets) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. A student must accumulate 12 points or finish in top 20 in District meet. (Point system at regular meets, Top 1/3 - 3 Points; Middle 1/3 - 2 Points; Bottom 1/3 - 1

Point.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the cross-country program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD cross country letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

LAMAR CONSOLIDATED INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

LETTERING POLICY

BOYS & GIRLS SOCCER

I. An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including play-offs, regional, and state) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II. Players must participate in 30% of varsity quarters in order to letter as underclassmen in a regular season.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the soccer program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III. Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD soccer letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

AMAR CONSOLIDATED INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT

LETTERING POLICY

BOYS AND GIRLS TENNIS

I.

An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including regional and state tournaments) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II.

A student must play in at least 50% of the varsity team tennis district schedule and

50% of tournaments scheduled for the fall season. a. Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the tennis program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III.

Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

BOYS AND GIRLS WRESTLING

I.

An athlete must complete the season in good standing (including regional, and state) in order to be eligible to receive a letter award.

II.

Players must Earn 50 varsity team points (forfeits do not count) or Earn 35-49.5 varsity team points and have weighed in for 50% of possible varsity weigh-ins.

Exception: A senior athlete who has continuously participated in the wrestling program for two or more years and has met all other requirements of the lettering policy will be eligible to receive a letter award.

III.

Exceptions to the previously stated requirements may be granted to an athlete due to extenuating circumstances only if the head coach, the athletic director, and the building principal unanimously agree upon the need for such exception.

In order to receive a Lamar CISD wrestling letter award, each athlete must have fulfilled the requirements of both item I and item II or have been granted an exception as described in item III.

Lamar CISD Athletic Awards Policy

High School Varsity Awards

Students lettering on varsity teams included in the athletic program at the high school level shall be eligible to receive the following awards:

1. A custom tailored jacket or blanket.

2. No participant may receive more than one jacket during the years of enrollment in high school in the LCISD.

3. The jacket shall be custom tailored and made up in the colors of the school with a six-inch school letter on the front. Service bars, captain’s stars, and symbolic emblems indicating the sport, in which the award was earned, shall be included in the letter. The blanket shall be in the colors of the school with a six-inch school letter. The student's name, the proper symbol of the sport, service bars and captain's stars shall be included in the letter.

No nicknames will be permitted

.

4. If an athlete quits before a current season is finished the athlete may not practice or participate in another sport until the sport in which he or she quit is finished.

This would include playoffs; this will mean forfeiture of any awards acquired in the sport the student quit.

Teams Other Than Varsity

1. Participants lettering on a ninth grade team shall receive an award symbolic of the sport in which they lettered.

2. Participants lettering on a sophomore or junior varsity team shall receive an award symbolic of the sport in which they lettered.

3. In order to earn a letter on a sub-varsity team, a representative schedule must be played. The head coaches of all sports must file a policy for the awarding of letters in their sport with the athletic director. This policy must first have the approval of the athletic director.

4. Varsity students not receiving a letter or blanket shall receive an award symbolic of the sport in which they lettered.

A roster of all athletes being recommended for letters must be submitted to the

athletic director's office within three days after the close of each sport season. Forms will be supplied for this information. Each coach must check his records very carefully to be sure they do not recommend a major award for a student whom may have previously received one.

BUSINESS PRACTICES PURSUANT TO ATHLETICS

Budget Preparation

The athletic budget shall be prepared and administered by the athletic director with the cooperation of the coaches in each secondary school. Equipment requests for the ensuing year must be submitted by January 31. Requests include manufacturer's name, phone number, and a complete description including color, size, and number.

Coaches who are responsible for scheduling must take into consideration the amount set aside for travel and game expenses. Additional information such as capital equipment needs, suggestions for repair to equipment and approximate number of lettermen in a sport, must be submitted on "Budget Request" forms. Coaches should study budget appropriations for his/her sport and exercise good judgment in all requests. A coach will not be allowed expenditures exceeding the specific amount budgeted. Equipment or supplies may not be purchased without prior approval of the athletic director. Requisition forms must be submitted to the athletic director's office for approval and processing.

Bids

The head coach with the approval of the athletic director will select equipment. All athletic equipment will be placed on bids, (3 bids, when possible). The coach must have the manufacturer's name and stock number, a complete description including color, size, & number needed. There will be no confirmation buying. The school will not pay for any items that are charged without an approved purchase

Camps

All camps must be pre-approved (budget included) by the athletic director.

COACHING SCHOOLS AND CLINICS

High school coaches and the head coach of each junior high whose sport is featured are eligible to attend the Texas High School Coaches Association or the women's coaching association meetings. Transportation mileage will be allotted on the basis of four per car.

The district will not reimburse membership fees or dues to professional organizations.

Registration for schools or clinic will be reimbursed. Other expenses will be reimbursed on a per diem basis.

Head coaches and varsity assistants of each sport may attend one other clinic or spring training with the approval of the athletic director. The athletic director for state play-off contests such as football, basketball, etc will approve no expenses. The athletic director may approve registration and transportation mileage for all other coaches at a coaching school or appropriate clinic.

Trip authorization requests must be presented to the athletic director seven (7) days prior to departure date.

Credit Cards

All credit cards are to be checked in and out of the purchasing department. Please contact the athletic department for allowed amounts for meals and drinks. All hospitality must be approved 48 hrs. in advance to allow for competitive pricing and availability. If you are leaving the district you must contact the purchasing department regarding your school district credit card prior to leaving and if you are a new coach entering the district please contact the purchasing department for a new card to be issued

.

Equipment

It is the responsibility of the head coach or an assistant designated by the head coach to keep an inventory of equipment. This record must indicate the equipment on hand at the beginning of the season, the amount purchased, and the ending inventory. This report is to be furnished to the athletic director within two (2) weeks after the season ends.

Coaches must prevent loss of equipment by checking on managers and players to see that the proper care is being given the equipment. This responsibility is not left to student managers alone. Student managers are not giving athletic equipment to players. The coach must remind players that the stealing of equipment is a serious offense.

It is the responsibility of coaches to keep equipment clean and in good repair. Dressing rooms and storage rooms should be orderly and clean. At the close of each season, clothing, shoes, etc. should be thoroughly cleaned and properly stored. Equipment is very expensive, and it will last longer by continually taking the proper care of it.

Maintenance

Requests for maintenance of fields and repair to fields and gyms must be submitted to the athletic director. The athletic director will issue work order requests.

Meals

When in the course of performing duties away from home or school for an extended period of time, employees will be reimbursed for meals according to district policy.

Although every effort should be taken to limit the possibility of having to feed groups away from home, it is sometimes necessary due to distances or time elements. Therefore, the coach should anticipate this and draw advances through the athletic office based on district policy. An itemized expense report must be turned in immediately upon return.

Travel checks and advances should be submitted at least five (5) working days before a check is required.

Guidelines for the Feeding of Athletes

Teams leaving after 12:00 p.m. (noon) will not be fed a noon meal. Teams that are able to return to their respective school before 7:00 p.m. will not be fed an evening meal. Teams leaving as late as 5:30 p.m. will not be fed an evening meal unless they are returning after

10:00 p.m. No team will be fed prior to leaving or after returning from an activity. The meal allowances are the maximum that may be spent. The use of meals for the rewarding of athletic participation will not be tolerated.

Officials

The most competent game officials available shall be employed to officiate at athletic contests. Coaches and other school officials will take measures to insure courteous treatment of game officials.

Football

Head coaches and the athletic director select varsity football officials. The athletic director assigns sub-varsity and junior high officials from the area officials' association.

Basketball

The head coach and the athletic director select boys and girls varsity officials. Sub-varsity and junior high officials are assigned from the area officials association through the athletic director.

Baseball and Softball

Coaches responsible for securing officials (must be with mutual agreement by opponent) and the athletic director.

Games Canceled or Postponed

If a contest is postponed or canceled, notify the athletic office immediately in order that officials may be notified. (We are obligated to pay officials who are not informed and who report for the contest.)

Receipts

The business office must have a receipt for monies that are spent on athletes. All lost

receipts cost you $5.00. After receiving your credit card statement , the coach should sign the receipts, fill out the expense reports, and return them to the athletic office.

Scouting

Funds budgeted in the account for athletic scouting are to be expended to reimburse school personnel for approved athletic scouting trips. Reimbursement will be made upon the recommendation of the athletic director and the head coach. Mileage and meals will be paid in accordance with the LCISD policy.

Summer Baseball/Softball

Summer League School based baseball and softball teams must pay for the lights. An electrical reading will be taken before the season starts and upon completion of the season.

ALL facilities request must be filled out with proof of liability insurance

GENERAL INFORMATION

CONTRACT

All coaching positions are directly tied to a teaching contract. If a coaches chooses not to coach he or she will not be under a teaching contract. This is so the coaching replacement will have a teaching slot.

Evaluations

The evaluation chain works this way.

1. The Director of Secondary Education evaluates Athletic Director.

2. The Athletic Director evaluates campus Coordinator.

3. The Campus Coordinator evaluates Head Coaches.

4. Assistant Coaches are evaluated by Head Coaches.

5. The Campus Coordinator of the connecting High School evaluates Jr.

High Campus Coordinator.

6. The Jr. High Campus Coordinator evaluates Jr. High Coaches.

 These evaluations are subject to be discussed with the High

School or Jr. High School Principal.

News Releases

The head coach of a sport is to release information regarding his/her respective team and its opponents. Every effort should be made to cooperate with the news media. (Some sub-varsity football, basketball, track, baseball, golf, tennis, and volleyball coaches may have to call the media and report detailed information about the game or meet.) Many times the news media is unable to have a reporter working each of these activities.

Reports to the media should be made as early as possible after the event.

Information regarding the school districts policies and programs concerning the athletic program and personnel shall be released through the office of the athletic director.

Participation in Various Sports

Students should be encouraged to participate in as many sports as their interests and abilities will allow. If an athlete wants to drop a sport he/she should first be directed to the head coach in that sport who will discuss the matter with him/her. What is best for the student must always be of primary importance. An athlete who quits one sport cannot participate in another sport while the sport he/she quit is still in season. This applies only to the year he/she has quit.

A coach should not attempt to influence an athlete to give up participation in one sport in order to devote greater concentration in another sport. (In other words, "recruiting" will not be tolerated).

Practice (U.I.L.)

1. In high school, a coach may not be on field with the athlete until the date of the

U.I.L. lists as the official date of starting practice. The coach may write letters but he must not hold any squad meetings before the official starting time.

2. No practice sessions shall be conducted on Wednesday night, Sunday, Thanksgiving

Day, New Year's Day, Easter, or five consecutive days to include December 24-25.

Public Address Announcers

The Campus Coordinator and the Athletic Director must approve all announcers. All U.I.L. guidelines will be adhered to.

Publicity and Promotion

Coaches are representatives of the LCISD athletic department. It is the personal responsibility of a coach to maintain good relations with the faculty, parents, and the general public, as well as create a favorable image of the athletic program. The coach maintains a close relationship with parents and never hesitates to confer with them on subjects involving their child. The use of abusive language or unsportsman like conduct in practice, in games or elsewhere in dealing with athletes is never acceptable. Coaches are expected to dress appropriately for the occasion, whether it is in the classroom or on the athletic field.

Recruiting by Colleges and Universities

Employees in the athletic department should not attempt to direct a LCISD athlete to a particular college or university. Upon request for assistance by the athlete's parents or by the athlete, the coach may attempt to aid the athlete in entering the college or university of his/her choice.

Head coaches of a sport should strive to anticipate routing matters, which would easily be handled by mail. Contact the athletic director for assistance in securing reservations or other needs; don't wait until it is necessary to call.

Victory Bell

The victory bell is an L.C.I.S.D. bell in the district stadium (Traylor Stadium).

The home team that wins the game has the option to ring the bell.

There will be no interference from opposing team that would keep the home team from ringing the bell.

After the game is over and the stadium is cleared, anyone can ring the bell.

L.C.

I.S.

D.

A

THLETIC

C

HAIN OF

C

OMMAND

Board of Education

Foster High School

Lamar High School

Terry High School

George Ranch High School

Trainers

Superintendent

Secondary Education

Athletic Director

Campus Coordinator

High School

Coaches

Assistant

Coaches

High School

Principal

Jr. High

Coaches

Jr. High

Coaches

C: My Documents/Venine/Athletic Handbook 2010

Briscoe Jr. High

George Jr. High

Lamar Jr. High

Reading Jr. High

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