Mechanical Workshops Health and Safety file W105, W106, W108

Mechanical Workshops Health and Safety file W105, W106, W108
School of Engineering
Dept of Mechanical & Electronic
Engineering
Health and Safety File
Mechanical Workshops
W105/ W106 /W108
File 1
Rev: April 2016
School of Engineering
Dundalk Institute of Technology
Ancillary Safety Statement
April 2016
This Ancillary Safety Statement is to be read in conjunction with the
Parent Safety Statement of Dundalk Institute of Technology
Table of Contents
1.
Introduction
2.
General Statement of Policy within the School of Engineering
3.
School of Engineering Functional Safety Area: Description
4.
Overview of Risk Assessment Process
5.
Functional Area Safety Records
Appendix I:
Functional Area Safety Committee 2015/2016
Appendix II:
List of Responsible Persons & Safety Organisational Chart
Appendix III:
Safe Work Practice Sheets and Risk Assessment
(Refer to specific laboratory and workshop specific safety files and Safe Work
Practice Sheets)
Appendix IV: Accident, Incident, Near Miss & Dangerous Occurrence Reporting Procedures
Accident ,Incident Report Forms
Near Miss Report Forms
List of First Aiders
1.
Introduction
Under the provisions of The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005, Dundalk Institute of
Technology is required to ensure so far as is reasonably practicable the health, safety and
welfare of all its employees and students engaged in work or study, and all visitors to the
Institute premises.
In view of the recent extensive expansion that has taken place on the campus and in order to
comply with the requirements of the 2005 Act, the Institute has decided to review and update its
Safety Statement. Dundalk Institute of Technology’s safety management programme consists of
a Parent Safety Statement supplemented by seven ancillary Safety Statements, which apply to
different functional areas of the Institute. These ancillary Safety Statements take account of the
diverse range of activities, which apply across the Institute.
The Institute’s overall Safety Statement is comprised of the following documents:

Parent Safety Statement

Ancillary Safety Statement – School of Business & Humanities

Ancillary Safety Statement – School of Health & Science

Ancillary Safety Statement – School of Engineering

Ancillary Safety Statement – School of Informatics & Creative Arts

Ancillary Safety Statement – Secretary/Financial Controller’s Functional Area

Ancillary Safety Statement – Registrar’s Functional Area

Ancillary Safety Statement – Regional Development Centre Functional Area

Emergency Evacuations Procedures Manual
The purpose of the Ancillary Safety Statements is to provide details of the specific hazards and
control measures which apply in these areas. Each Ancillary Safety Statement should be read
in conjunction with the Parent Safety Statement.
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2.
General Statement of Policy within the School of Engineering
The School of Engineering Functional Area is committed to ensuring that high standards of health and
safety are achieved and maintained throughout all areas under our control. The key mechanism for
achieving and maintaining safety is Risk Assessment, by which we identify hazards, which have the
potential for harming health or causing accidents, evaluate the risks arising and select and implement
appropriate precautions.
Throughout the School of Engineering Functional Area, Risk Assessments are carried out in all areas
under our control periodically. Risk Assessments must take account of any changes with regard to the
structure of the organization, Academic Staff, work practices; use of machinery, design techniques or
equipment all may necessitate periodic changes to this document as well as any periodical amendments
or updates to legislation.
It is essential that all staff and students contribute and cooperate to this process, thus ensuring that
the School of Engineering Functional Area’s stated objective of providing in so far as is reasonably
practicable a safe place of work is achieved. Employees are encouraged to contribute to the
improvement of health and safety by making suggestions to their departmental manager. The success
of this policy depends on the co-operation of all staff and students, and it is therefore extremely important
that staff:
Read and understand the safety information provided
Know their role and responsibilities.
Always abide by the arrangements the Institute has put in place to ensure their health, safety welfare,
and that of their colleagues and others.
The process of Risk Assessment in the School of Engineering Functional Area enables us to take all
relevant precautions to ensure that Dundalk Institute of Technology’s legal standard as an employer is
fulfilled particularly in relation to:

Exercising all due care

Putting in place necessary protective and preventative measures

Identifying hazards and assessing risks likely to result in accidents or ill-health

Not being required to take further measures where these would be grossly
disproportionate having regard to the unusual, unforeseeable and exceptional nature
of the circumstances.
Health and Safety is overseen in the School by the Functional Area Safety Committee which
contains representatives from all of the areas within the School (See Appendix I for membership
details)
Signed on behalf of School of Engineering, Dundalk Institute of Technology,
___________________
Mr. Eugene Roe
Head of School of Engineering
3.0
School of Engineering Functional Safety Area: Description
The School of Engineering is divided into Four Departments, one Research Centre.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Department of Electronic & Mechanical Engineering
Department of the Built Environment
Department of Engineering Trades
Centre for Renewable Energy at DkIT(CREDIT)
The School of Engineering is predominantly located in the following areas of the Institute:
Location
North Block
Description
Dept. Electronic & Mechanical
Engineering
North Block
South Block
Dept. of the Built Environment
North Block
South Block
The Carroll’s Building
Dept of Engineering Trades
Primary Activity
o Lecture rooms
o Computer Labs
o Office based activities
o Work Placements
o Laboratories
o Workshops
o Lecture rooms
o Computer Labs
o Office based activities
o Laboratories
o Fieldwork
o Lecture Rooms
o Computer Labs
o Office based activities
o Drawing Offices
o Motor Engineering Workshop
o Plumbing Workshops
o Carpentry Workshops
o Electrical Workshops
o Motor Engineering Lab
o Electrical Lab
o Plumbing Lab
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Risk Assessment is carried out at least once per year in each location in the School of
Engineering functional area under the direction of the Head of School, Mr. Eugene Roe who is
the responsible person.
The wide range of workplace activities and the associated risks to health, safety and welfare
within the School of Engineering can be broadly categorized as follows:
Offices, (Administration and Lecturing Staff) – low to medium risk.

Lecture Rooms, Drawing Offices, Computer Labs. – low to medium risk

Workshops – low to high risk
Refer to Appendix lI for School of Engineering safety management organizational layout.
Hard copies of this Functional Area Ancillary Safety Statement are available at the following locations:
1. Administration Office, School of Engineering
2. Workshop locations
3. Laboratories
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4.0 School of Engineering – Overview of Risk Assessment Process.
This Ancillary Safety Statement covers all activities carried out by the School of Engineering,
and should be read in conjunction with the Institute Parent Safety Statement.
Dundalk Institute of Technology will adapt the “General principles of prevention” as outlined in
the 2005 Act Schedule 3
When a hazard is identified and the risk assessed, the necessary arrangements are put in place
to protect safety and health.
Dundalk Institute of Technology will utilize the hierarchy of controls A series of common sense
steps for hazard control (often called hierarchy of control) where elimination of the risk is not
reasonably practical,.
These steps are:
1. Substitute the hazard (e.g. use a less harmful substance).
2. Isolate the hazard.
3. Use engineering controls (e.g. Physical controls).
4. Put in safe work practices (e.g. Instruction, training, supervision).
5. Use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as gloves / overalls.
If a hazard cannot reasonably be eliminated it is the policy to work through this list to minimise
exposure to risks. For example, the Institute will try to substitute the hazard first. If this is not
possible, will go to the next step and so on. In some cases it may be appropriate to implement a
combination of the steps e.g. Steps 3, 4 and 5.
The list above indicates an "order of priority" for remedial measures for any hazard situation
which Dundalk Institute of Technology will adapt.
The process of Risk Analysis is by numerical format.
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
The above risk analysis is incorporated into the School’s Safe Work Practice Sheets
The Analysis takes into account who is exposed
The initial Risk Rating before controls are implemented
The Reduction Risk Rating after controls is in place
A risk is the probability or likelihood of a hazard actually causing a degree of injury or
damage.
A hazard is anything that can potentially cause harm.
After a hazard has been identified, it is evaluated in order to assess what its impact would be if
steps to control it were not taken. In practical terms, one determines the likelihood of an
accident happening and the consequences of it happening.
There are inevitable difficulties in assessing risks. Some risks such as exposure to e.g.Chemicals / Manual Handling / Lone Workers / Trainees may require physical or organisational
measurements to be taken. Risk depends on many (often related) circumstances:Is anyone exposed to the hazard? Is the hazard likely to cause injury?
Is the hazard well controlled? Is the level of supervision adequate?
How long people are exposed and what are are the levels of exposure that should not be
exceeded (e.g. Equipment, chemicals, poor lifting techniques)
Risk Assessment will be carried out at least once a year in all of the different sites in the
School. The Risk Assessment process adopted by the School of Engineering identifies hazards
posed by activities within the School and quantifies the risk posed by same.
In most cases these hazards can be controlled by adhering to procedures detailed in the
School’s Safe Work Practice Sheets (Appendix III) which are developed on an as-needed
basis and identified through regular area-by-area risk assessment / Inspection. As part of the
annual Risk Assessment process, all Safe Work Practice Procedure Sheets will be reviewed
and updated to ensure that they take account of any changing circumstances that have arisen
during the course of the year, any changes to work practices, introduction of equipment,
changes in legislation will also require updating as is necessary.
Safe Work Practice Sheets are available in the School of Engineering Administrative office,
Heads of Departments, Workshop Locations, Laboratories and on the Institute’s website
The list of these SWPS is also included in Appendix III of this document. More generic college
wide SWPS are also to be adhered to and are available at:
The primary objective of the Safe Work Practice procedures is to eliminate, reduce or control
any risks posed as a result of the hazards that exist throughout the School. These Safe Work
Practice Procedures are also made available to all staff and students operating in any lab,
workshop or classroom environment that is the subject of a risk assessment and safe work
practice procedures.
Adherence to the Safe Work Practice Procedures is the primary means of risk control in the
School of Engineering. However, hazards may arise from time to time, which are not covered by
these procedures. Under Section 13 (h)(i - iii) of the 2005 Safety, Health & Welfare at Work Act,
all staff are required to report any hazards that they notice or observe to their employer. Within
the School of Engineering, any hazard noted or observed by any member of staff must be
reported to their immediate superior.
Incidents and Dangerous Occurrences must be notified to the relevant supervisor using the
forms included in Appendix IV.
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5.0
Functional Area Safety Records
Functional Area safety records include but are not limited to the following documents:
1. Ancillary Safety Statement, including Safe Work Practice Sheets
2. Health and Safety Training Records
3. Accident, Incident and Near Miss Dangerous Occurrence Reports
4. Functional Area Safety Committee Meeting Records
5. Inspection Certificates (where applicable)
(1-5 ) can be located as follows for:
(a) The School of Engineering
Record Type
Ancillary Safety Statement,
including Safe Work
Practice Sheets
Building
North Block
Room No.
School of Engineering Office, NC121
Training Records
North Block
Offices
Mr. Eugene Roe (HOS)
NC126
Mr. Simon O’Neill (HOD)
NC124
Mr. Noel McKenna (HOD)
NC127
Mr. Pat McCormick (HOD)
NC128
Mr. Padraig McGuigan
NW207
(Section Head)
Mr James Mulvany
NW216
(Section Head)
Mr. John Doherty
S120
(Section Head)
School of Engineering Office, NC121
Incident & Accident Reports
North Block
School of Engineering Office, NC121
FASC Meeting Records
North Block
School of Engineering Office, NC121
Inspection Certificates
North Block
School of Engineering Office, NC121
North Block
South Block
Contact
Orlagh Devine
[email protected], ext. 2894
[email protected] ext. 2893
[email protected] ext. 2847
[email protected] ext. 2891
[email protected] 2551
[email protected]
ext. 2698
[email protected]
ext 2520
[email protected] ext. 2692
Orlagh Devine
[email protected], ext. 2894
Orlagh Devine
[email protected], ext. 2894
Orlagh Devine
[email protected], ext. 2894
Orlagh Devine
[email protected], ext. 2894
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Rev: April 2016
APPENDICES
Appendix I
Functional Area Safety Committee
2015/2016
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Eugene Roe, Head of School of Engineering (Chairperson)
Simon O’Neill, Head of Department of Engineering Trades
Pat McCormick, Head of Department of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering
Padraig McGuigan, Head of Section: Mechanical Engineering
James Mulvany, Head of Section: Electronic Engineering
Noel McKenna, Head of Department of the Built Environment
John Doherty, Head of Section Carpentry/ Joinery / Plumbing
Orlagh Devine, Senior Administration
Jim Connolly, Senior Technical Officer
Paul Egan, Lecturer
William Lyons, Lecturer
Brendan Walsh, Lecturer
Dermot Clarke, Lecturer
Paul Durcan, Lecturer
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Rev: April 2016
Appendix II
List of Responsible Persons within the
School of Engineering
Head of School
Mr. Eugene Roe
Head of Dept of Mechanical & Electronic
Engineering
Mr. Pat McCormick
Head of Section: Mechanical Engineering
Mr. Padraig McGuigan
Head of Section: Electronic Engineering
Mr. James Mulvany
Head of Dept of the Built Environment
Mr. Noel McKenna
Head of Dept of Engineering Trades
Mr. Simon O’Neill
Head of Section: C&J and Plumbing
Mr. John Doherty
Centre for Renewable Energy
at Dundalk Institute of Technology
(CREDIT)
Dr. Tom Dooley
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Governing Body
President, DkIT
Mr. Denis Cummins
Head of School of
Engineering
Mr. Eugene Roe
Head of Dept. of
Electronic and
Mechanical Engineering
Head of Dept. of
Building and
Surveying
Head of Dept. of
Engineering Trades
Head of Dept. of
Civil &
Environmental Engineering
Centre for Renewable
Energy
Dr. William Lyons
Mr. Noel McKenna
Mr. John Carolan
Mr. Pat McCormick
Dr. Paul MacArtain
Lecturers/Technicians/
Administration
Lecturers/Technicians/
Administration
Research Centre
Staff
Lecturers/Technicians
/Administration
Undergraduate &
Postgraduate
students
Lecturers/Technicians/
Administration
Undergraduate
students
Apprentice
Students
Undergraduate
students
School of Engineering
Safety Management Organisation Chart
Appendix III
Safe Work Practice Sheets
SWPS ID
Mechanical Engineering Machinery Workshops W105 / W106 / W108
General Routine Safe Work Practice Sheets Used in this Area:
GEN 001
GEN 002
GEN 003
GEN 08
SWPS 05
GEN 009
GEN 010
GEN 09
GEN 019
GEN 025
GEN 026
SWPS 007
GEN 027
SWPS 013
SWPS 015
SWPS 016
SWPS 017
General Rules
Access and Egress
Fire Safety
Electrical Safety
Chemical Agents Risk Assessments
Slips, Trips and Falls
Lone Person Working
Manual Handling
Storage Areas
General Workshop Safety
Use of Hand Tools
Safe Use of Ladders / Stepladders
Cutters, Scalpels and Stanley Knives
Noise
General Health and Welfare Provisions
Emergency Response
Emergency Contact Numbers
Engineering Specific Safe Work Practice Sheets Used in this Area:
MEC 003
MEC 004
MOT 049
MEC 007
MEC 009
MEC 010
MEC 011
MEC 012
MEC 013
MEC 014
MEC 015
MEC 020
MEC 022
MEC 024
MEC 026
MEC 027
MEC 028
MEC 032
MEC 033
MEC 036
MEC 037
MEC 038
MEC 039
Arc Welding (MMA, MIG, TIG)
Sheet Metal Bending and Folding Machine
Degreasing Bath
Bench and Pillar Drilling Machines
Flame-Fast Furnace
Gas Welding and Cutting
Grinding Machines (Pedestal)
Grinding (Surface Grinder)
Guillotine (Pedal Operated)
Steelworker Powered Guillotine
Hot Wire Strip Heater
Lathes (Harrison 300/400)
Milling Machines
Unimolder Plastics Molding Machine
Portable Electric Angle Grinder
Portable Electric Shears
Portable Spot Welder
Thermo Forming Centre - Portable
Vacuum Form Plastic Cutter
Air Compressor & Hoses
Portable Hand Guillotine
Fixed Guillotine
Fly Press
MEC 040
MEC 041
MEC 042
MEC 043
MEC 044
MEC 066
MEC 069
MEC 070
MEC 071
MEC 079
MEC 080
MEC 081
MEC 082
PLU 019
Transportation & Storage of Metal Stock
Carif 260, Semi-Automatic Band Saw
Portable Optimum Bit Grinder
Hurco TM 6
Hurco VM 10
Edwards Bench Mounted Bending Machine
Mitutoyu Optical Comparator
Scrolling Apparatus
Colchester Universal Workbenches
Hand Tools
Soldering
Corded and Cordless Hand Held Drills
Workshop Floor Cleaning
Gas Safety
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Appendix III
General Routine Safe Work Practice Sheets
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Safe Work Practice Sheet
General Rules
Ref: SWPS 001
Date: July 09
Assessed by: E.Roe
Hazards
There is always an ever-present risk of accidents occurring due to lack of vigilance
and awareness of staff and students
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Everyday working environment
Controls


Smoking, eating and drinking is prohibited in all areas other than designated
areas. Smoking is prohibited in all areas.

Exercise care when opening or closing doors on entering or leaving rooms. Never run.

Conduct yourself in a responsible manner and do not act in a way that could be dangerous to yourself or
others. Refrain from indulging inappropriate behavior
as it could have serious consequences.

No student or member of staff should ever work alone in a Laboratory, Workshop, Service Duct or Plant
Room, without prior notification to Line Manager.

All bags and coats are to be left in designated areas. All work and teaching areas should be kept tidy when in
use and left tidy when finished.

All accidents however minor must be reported to immediate superior.


No member of staff or student is to interfere with any workplace equipment.
Report any malfunctioning or dangerous or defective equipment to immediate supervisor without delay.
Never attempt to effect repairs, no matter how trivial.

Become familiar with position and use of safety equipment for each area in which you work.

Study carefully and obey the Safe Work Practice Sheets for any area in which you are required to work.

Co-operate with Employer in fulfilling duties imposed under Section 13(1)(a- h) of the Safety, Health &
Welfare Act 2005
Checks & Inspections
Constant vigilance and awareness
Information, Instruction & Training
Not applicable
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Not applicable
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
x
2
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
6 high risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
Possible
2
Unlikely
1
RISK FACTOR
3
1-3 Low Risk
Serious
2
4
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
= Risk Factor
3 low / medium risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
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Ref: SWPS 002
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Access and Egress
Date: July 09
Assessed by: E.Roe
Hazards
Inadequate access and egress in the workplace can result in slips, trips and falls.
Obstructed access roads and paths can also pose a risk of injury to pedestrians and to
vehicle operators and can also delay emergency escape and emergency vehicle access.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Everyday working environment on campus
Controls
1. All doorways and access points in the workplace must be kept clear of obstructions.
2. All passageways and pedestrian routes must be kept clear from obstructions.
3. Materials must be stored in designated areas away from pedestrian and vehicular routes.
4. All stairways with more than 3 steps should be provided with handrails and maintained in good
condition.
5. Adequate lighting must be provided throughout the Institute at all entry points, exit points and a long
corridors and passageways.
6. Workplaces must be kept clean and tidy at all times.
7. All spillages must be cleaned up immediately.
8. All cabling and hosing must be neatly tied off or ramped in order to prevent tripping.
9. Workplace floors must be kept in a level and even condition where possible in so far as is
practicable. All holes and trip hazards should be removed, filled in or covered.
10. Trip hazards which cannot be removed must be clearly visible or signed as such.
11. Chairs, desks or drawers should never be used to access shelving or any other elevated area.
12. Stepladders or kick stools must always be used.
13. Vehicle drivers must exercise extreme caution when driving on Institute site.
All defects in flooring, lighting, stairwells, etc must be reported to the Estates Office via the Maintenance
Request online system.
Checks & Inspections
Constant vigilance and awareness.
Information, Instruction & Training
Not applicable
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Not applicable
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
6
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
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Safe Work Practice Sheet
Fire Safety
Ref: SWPS 003
Date: July 09
Assessed by: E.Roe
Hazards
The outbreak of fire can lead to:

Serious bodily injury or fatality

Damaged property or plant

Disruption of premises causing loss of facilities Person
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
There is always an ever-present risk of fire occurring in all workplaces. Common fire hazards include
improperly stored combustible or flammable materials, the use of naked flames, faulty electrical equipment, the
use of flammable fuels, the use of inappropriate equipment, the build up of flammable materials or wastes in the
workplace and smoking in undesignated areas. The accidental release of chemical material may also lead to the
outbreak of fire, especially if the material is pyrophoric, extremely flammable or is a strong oxidiser.
Controls
The Institute is committed to providing a fire safety programme that guards against the outbreak of fire in all
areas and also makes provisions for the safety of all persons in the event of a fire. The Institute would like to
reiterate to all staff at this point that every employee has a responsibility to guard against the outbreak of fire in
the workplace through the implementation of good fire safety practices and where applicable the adherence to
the control measures outlined below.
Employees should also refer to specific fire risk assessments that apply to their specified places / type of
work.
Fire Detection, Equipment & Emergency Lighting
Layout drawings, detailing the location of the fire detection and alarm systems, throughout the campus
have been prepared by the Estates Office. Copies of these drawings are held by members of the
Caretaking Staff, to assist in the identification of the location of any alarm signal.
Fire detection and alarm systems are installed and maintained in accordance with current standards.
Emergency lighting systems are in operation in all parts of the Campus. These are installed to and regularly
maintained in accordance with current standards.
Fire mains and Hydrants and Fire Hose Reels are inspected and maintained in accordance with current
standards The date of the most recent inspection is noted on each hose reel. Test reports on ring mains and
hydrants are held in the Estates Office and Fire Registers.Portable fire extinguishers are inspected and
maintained in accordance with current standards. The date of testing is noted on each extinguisher.
Copies of all testing and certificates are held in Estates Office in the Fire Register.
Emergency Response
1. Each building has in place an emergency plan detailing the response to be taken in the event of the
sounding of a fire alarm or the discovery of a fire. Refer to
http://ww2.dkit.ie/about_dkit/health_safety/emergency_evacuations_procedures_manual for further
details.
2. Fire response procedures are displayed in prominent locations within the area covered by their
provisions.
3. Emergency response procedures are tested at least annually by use of a fire drill.
Procedural Controls
1. It is prohibited to use a naked flame (outside of a laboratory area) or to engage in ‘hot’ work (outside of
designated workshops) anywhere within the Institute without first obtaining a ‘Hot Work Permit’ from the
Institute Estates Office. Hot work is defined as grinding, welding (all types), hot cutting, and any other
work with the potential to generate a spark or an ignition source.
2. It is prohibited to disengage a fire detection device, remove a fire extinguisher from its designated
location or to isolate a component of a fire safety system without the express permission of the Institute
Estates Office.
Training
1. It is the responsibly of individuals within the Institute to ensure that they are familiar with the
provisions of any relevant emergency procedures.
2. Fire safety training is available through the Staff Training & Development Officer for all interested
parties.
Means Of Escape
1. All Institute premises will be provided with clearly signed suitable means of escape and emergency
exits for use in the event of a fire.
2. All escape routes and emergency exits throughout a building / premises must be kept clear at all times.
3. It is the responsibility of all Institute employees to ensure that escape routes and emergency
exits in their working area are kept free from obstruction.
4. No individual may obstruct or remove from service an escape route or emergency exit without prior
arrangement with the Institute Estates Office.
5. In the event that employees have a concern regarding means of escape then they must contact their
manager immediately. Urgent concerns can be conveyed directly to the Institute Estates Office.
Hazardous Agents
1. As part of a hazardous agent risk assessment fire safety provisions for handling the agent(s) in
question must be detailed.
2. Flammable materials may only be handled and stored in accordance with the requirements
of their Material Safety Data Sheets, with due regard being paid to their fire risks.
3. Flammable materials must be stored in a suitable storage area. The requirement for low
voltage or flame proof wiring should be considered.
4. The large scale storage of flammable materials (>200l / kg) in a single location requires completion of
a specific risk assessment prior to storage taking place.
1. Where new buildings are constructed by the Institute or existing buildings are substantially modified
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
the requirements of Part B of the Building Regulations (1997) Technical Guidance Documents will
be adhered to.
Smoking is prohibited in all indoor workplaces within the Institute.
Employees are encouraged to make themselves familiar with the location of alarm activation
points and escape routes in their working areas.
Employees must not attempt to repair any electrical equipment unless they are competent
to do so. All electrical repairs and installations within the University must only be completed
by a competent person, following the rules laid down in the National Rules for the Electrical
Installations, as prepared by the Electro-Technical Council of Ireland.
The amount of combustible materials stored within the workplace should be kept to a minimum.
In the event of an evacuation all persons must leave the workplace without exception and assembly
at their designated assembly point.
Employees must adhere to any instructions given by Institute Fire Wardens or emergency services
personnel in the event of an emergency.
Persons must not fight workplace fires unless they have been trained to do so and it is safe to do so.
All employees are reminded of their statuary obligation to protect their own and their co-workers
safety by guarding against the outbreak of fire in the workplace through the use of safe systems of
work
Checks & Inspections
Information, Instruction & Training
 Fire Drills
 Fire Warden Training
 Use of fire fighting equipment
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Not applicable
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
6 high risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Electrical Safety
Hazards




Ref: SWPS 08
Date: March 2009
Assessed by: E. Bell
Electrocution
Electric shock
Burns
Inadvertent starting of machines
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
A range of electrical appliances are used in the Institute. This Safe Work Practice Sheet covers Portable
Appliance Testing and general electrical safety
Controls
-
-
General
Installation or repair work may only be carried out by qualified electricians.
New installations will comply with the requirements of the General Application
Regulations and the Electro-Technical Council of Ireland publication ‘National Rules for
Electrical Installations.
Flexible cables will be adequately protected against external mechanical and heat damage.
Flexible cables should not be run across floors or walkways. Where electrical cables have to be run
across open floor areas ramps will be placed over them to prevent the tripping and damage to
cables.
Adequate fusing or excess protection, e.g. circuit breakers, must be provided for all fixed and
portable equipment.
RCDs should be tested at the beginning of each term.
Areas around fuse boards will be kept clear of flammable materials and the fuse board cabinets will
be kept closed at all times.
Work on electrical appliances by contractors or work requiring isolation of electrical supplies
requires an Electrical Work Permit. Buildings and Estates must be contacted.
Staff must report defective equipment and take out of service Portable AC electrical appliances that
may be subject to deterioration as a result of their use such as power supplies and oscilloscopes
must be visually inspected and tested at regular intervals. The schedule of testing should be
determined by following the Electrical Technical Councils guidelines available at
www.etci.ie/docs/ET215(2008).pdf. A record of testing and inspection must be kept by the relevant
departments.
Live working is prohibited except in circumstances where it is not possible to carry out
the work in any other manner.
The following precautions must include as appropriate;
o the use of people who are properly trained and competent to work safely on live
equipment
o the provision of adequate information to the person carrying out the work, about the
live parts involved, the associated electrical installation and the likely risks, the use of
suitable tools including insulated tools, equipment and protective clothing
o For example, insulating gloves, insulating boots and insulating rubber matting, the use
of suitable insulated barriers or screens,
o the use of suitable instruments and test probes,
o accompaniment by a second person who is trained and able to act in an
o emergency, e.g. switch off power and give first aid treatment for electric shock,
o effective control of any area where there is danger from live parts.
o A safe system of work must be drawn up.
Checks & Inspections
• Portable appliance testing must be carried out on certain portable AC electrical equipment
• RCDs tested once per term
• Electrical circuits tested every 3 years
Information, Instruction & Training

Trained First Aider/CPR (available when live working is carried out)
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Safety boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
4 Medium Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Chemical Agents
Ref: SWPS 05
Date: 29/10/2008
Assessed by: E. Bell
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Exposure to certain chemical agents can cause a range of injuries from minor to serious long term
damage. Exposure may be through ingestion, inhalation, skin absorption, absorption through the
mucous membranes.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Staff and students may be exposed to a range of chemicals in the School including but not limited to;
- Petrol
- Cutting/cooling fluids
- Ferric chloride
- Solder
- Glues
- Cement/ Bitumen
- Hardwood dust
- Welding fume
Exposure frequency and duration is variable depending on the activity.
Controls
- Material safety data sheets are obtained for all potentially hazardous chemicals or chemical agents and
hard copies are kept with the School Safety Statement.
- A chemical agents risk assessment form (attached to this Safe Work Practice Sheet) is completed for
each activity involving the use of chemicals as required by the Chemical Agents Regulations.
- Where a number of chemicals are associated with an activity they must be assessed together.
- The hazards associated with each chemical substance and the precautions that must be taken are
brought to the attention of the users through the chemical agents risk assessment form.
- Where necessary local exhaust ventilation is installed and maintained.
- Appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is provided for staff. Students are alerted to the
requirement for PPE.
- Hazardous chemicals are stored in accordance with the requirements set out in the Material Safety Data
Sheet. Chemicals re not decanted into unmarked containers. Where chemicals are placed in other
containers an appropriate hazard warning label is attached.
- Gas lines are marked with the gas name at intervals along their length.
Checks & Inspections
 Local exhaust ventilation should be checked annually to ensure it is extracting efficiently.
Information, Instruction & Training
The hazards associated with each chemical substance are brought to the attention of the users (Senior technical
staff are responsible for informing other technical staff, lecturers are responsible for informing students)
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Care must be taken in the selection of personal protective equipment, e.g. select the correct glove to ensure that
the chemical does not readily break through
Personal protective Equipment should be CE marked.
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2-3
x
Severity
2-3
= Risk Factor
4-9
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
variable
x
Severity
variable
= Risk Factor
variable
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Form 2: DKIT School of Engineering Chemical Agents Risk Assessment.
Rocol Multisol
___________________________________________________________________
1. Location : Mechanical Workshop
2. Assessment carried out by: E. Bell, Integrated Risk Solutions
3. Date 29/10/08
4. Short description of the process involving the use of the chemical(s) – indicate the frequency and
duration of the process and who will be carrying it out - if necessary attach a written procedure for the process.
Coolant used in lathe. Sump with coolant is cleaned out annually and new coolant added. Coolant is
made up by adding 1 part Rocol Multisol to 20 parts water.
5. Hazardous Chemical Agents to be used
Amount
Physical Form
Rocol Multisol – contains mineral oil, fatty acids, tall 500 ml/3 times per Liquid
year approx.
oil & reaction products of immuodiethanol and boric
acid
6. Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public  Contractors
 Visitors
7. Indicate Hazard Classification (for all chemicals used)
□
Highly Flammable: □
Flammable: □
Harmful: □
Irritant: 
Corrosive: □
Teratogen: □
Explosive:
□
Oxidising:
8. Potential routes of exposure
Inhalation:
Skin Contact: 
Extremely Flammable:
□
Sensitiser: □
Very Toxic:
□
Toxic:
□
Hazardous to the environment: 
Ingestion:
9. Control Measures to ensure safe use of chemicals
9.1. PPE Required: Lab Coat:
handling concentrated product.
Face Shield:
__________
Safety Glasses:
Safety Goggles: Only if there is a risk of splashing when
Gloves: (indicate type) Rubber gloves for concentrated product
9.2. Engineering Controls: Fume Hood: Local exhaust ventilation
Special storage arrangements : (give details) _________
9.3. Emergency Response
(a)Fire (consult relevant MSDS for further information)
Other: (give details)
Use foam, dry chemical or carbon dioxide, not water.
(b)First Aid (consult relevant MSDS for further information)
An MSDS must accompany all victims of exposure when seeking medical advice. Always consult an MSDS following an exposure to a
hazardous agent.
-
Flood eye with water for 15 minutes
Wash skin with soap and water
Wash mouth out with water. Do not induce vomiting. Seek medical attention.
(c)Spill Response (consult relevant MSDS for further information)
Use absorbent material. Wear gloves for clean up of concentrated product. No special precautions
required.
9.4. Further Risk Control Measures required
e.g. isolation of ignition sources; use of warning signage; the use of additional safety equipment;
implementation of safe handling , transport and storage arrangements; availability of appropriate first aid
equipment / antidotes, exclusion zones
No additional requirements
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
x
2
Severity
2
= Risk Factor
2 Low risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
1
= Risk Factor
1 Low risk
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Slips, Trips & Falls
Ref: SWPS 009
Date: July 09
Assessed by: E.Roe
Hazards
Slips are caused by the presence of substances such as water, grease, oil, fats, soaps, granules, plastic sheets,
packaging, leaves, ice etc deposited on the floor arising from the working conditions or in some cases the
weather. Slip hazards can be found on both wet and dry surfaces.
Trips can be caused by such features as electric cables or compressed-air lines across walkways, curled-up or
worn carpets, uneven floor surfaces and steps, or discarded work items.
Falls may be caused by slips or trips or when adjacent surfaces are at different levels leading to persons losing
their balance because they had not anticipated the change in level. Slips or trips on stairs are particularly
dangerous.
The hazards listed above are so ordinary and commonplace that people often accept them as part of normal
living until they or someone close to them has an accident and is seriously hurt.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students  Employees Public  Contractors  Visitors
Work Description
Everyday activity on campus
Controls
Observe & Adhere to Health & Safety Authority Guidelines as below
- The starting point lies with everybody becoming aware of these hazards and taking appropriate action.
- Management must take responsibility for controlling these hazards and must assign appropriate
responsibilities to staff. Clear policies should address what people need to do to identify and monitor
slip, trip and fall hazards and the action to take once they identify a hazard.
- Slips, trips and falls must be considered in the workplace hazard assessment that is required by law.
This assessment should take account of:
- The type of hazard including how likely it is to occur
- Characteristics of the workplace such as the nature and condition of floor surfaces, quality
- of lighting
- Influence of the weather (e.g. rain, frost or leaves)
- Maintenance and cleaning procedures
- Workplace users
- Where workplaces are being modified or constructed there is an excellent opportunity to prevent slips
and trips by selecting appropriate floor materials that are slip resistant and
- installed so as to minimise trip hazards.
Nature of the hazard
In some work areas such as certain food processing activities slip hazards may not always
be completely avoidable and the control measures will need to assume the hazard is
always present.
-
In other situations the floor surface may be non-slippery for most of the time but leaks from
plant or bad weather may lead to the creation of a slip hazard. It only takes a small amount
of liquid on a smooth floor to create a hazard. In these situations the immediate control
measures will focus upon detection of liquids and the actions to be taken to remove the hazard or
reduce it by the provision of warnings and cordoning off areas.
Permanent trip hazards should be removed as far as possible by such measures as the rerouting of
-
pipes or cables, provision of more sockets to reduce long cable lengths, use of battery powered
tools and the repair of uneven floor and stair surfaces.
A good housekeeping regime will go a long way to reduce intermittent hazards from badly stored or
discarded items. Materials should never be left or stored on stairs.
Where changes in floor level cannot be avoided they should be clearly marked and the provision of
handrails to control the movement of persons may be appropriate.
Changes in level should not take people by surprise.
Characteristics of your workplace
-
-
-
-
-
-
It is better to eliminate slip hazards by choosing a suitable surface rather than depending on
cleaning regimes to keep a floor safe. Building designers should ensure that the intended
appearance of a building does not compromise the choice of inherently safer floor options.
Macro-rough surfaces (i.e. those that contain an aggregate) are recommended for areas that are
expected to experience high levels of contamination. Floors that have hard particles throughout
their thickness can maintain their slip resistance throughout their life but floors with a superficial
layer of grit or slip resistant paint can become slippery as the layer is worn away.
Profiled floors (ridges or blisters) are sometimes used in areas subject to slip hazards but these can
become slippery over time as the profile becomes worn and contaminants can be left trapped within
the profiles.
Carpets or mats placed on smooth floors can pose both slip and trip hazards and, if used, should
be securely fixed to the floor at their edges and at any joints.
The slip resistance of steps is improved by the fitting of nosing’s which protect the edge of the step
from wear and help users to the place their feet more accurately on it. Care has to be taken that the
nosing itself does not constitute a hazard.
The design of stairways in buildings will need to take account of Technical Guidance Documents B
(Fire Safety), K (Stairways, etc) and M (Access for People with Disabilities) produced by the
Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government.
Adequate lighting, including the avoidance of glare and shadows, is necessary to expose slip /trip
hazards. Higher lighting levels are needed where older people are present.
Poorly sited or excessive signage can distract people who are then less likely to notice slip or trip
hazards.
The weather
- Building entrances can become slippery due to the ingress of moisture, mud and debris in bad
weather. Measures such as having a slightly higher internal air pressure in the vestibule or the
provision of a suitably designed shelter or canopy above the entrance can reduce the ingress of
rain. Another simple measure is the installation of doors that do not blow open in the wind.
- Where matting is provided it should be aligned with the way pedestrians use the entrance. It should
be laid immediately inside the door entrance and extend across the full width of the door. The
existence of wet footprints beyond the entrance or matting is usually a sign that existing controls
are not sufficient.
- Where mats in mat-wells are prone to becoming waterlogged the provision of drainage holes
should be considered.
Maintenance and cleaning procedures
-
Floor cleaning procedures should be incorporated in the operation and maintenance procedures for
a company. The procedure should specify the methods and materials to be used as the use of the
wrong cleaning method can increase the area of hazard and level of risk. The cleaning agent used
should be suitable for the floor surface and the type of contamination encountered. A build -up of
polish or detergent residues should be avoided. The drying of floors after cleaning is most important
for the control of slip hazards. Staff should be informed, trained and supervised with regard to:
-
Cleaning and drying floors
Importance of dealing with spillages/leaks
"Cleaning as you go"
- Reporting hazards as they arise and any equipment defects contributing to slip hazards or problems
with the cleaning equipment itself
- Prompt incident reporting
- Use of suitable footwear
- Cleaning should, where practical, be carried out when there are less people around.
- Cleaning activity should be organised so as to provide dry paths through areas being cleaned. It is
better to restrict access to areas that are being cleaned by the use of barriers rather than depending on
the use of cones or signs alone.
- Research has shown that forewarning people of a hazard can lead them to modifying their gait so as to
anticipate the situation but attention must be paid to removing signs when the hazard has been dealt
with; otherwise people will tend to ignore them if their experience tells them that the signs are always
displayed irrespective of the conditions underfoot.
- Where existing unsuitable floor surfaces are identified, the hazard can be reduced by controlling
contamination, using mats, treating the surface or in some cases replacing it altogether with a safer
material.
Workspace users
- Where there is control over access to the workspace, the risk of falls can be reduced by the
introduction of a "sensible shoe" policy i.e. no high heels or loose fitting shoes. In addition: Shoe
soles should have deep cleating and a well defined tread pattern.
- Safety footwear may not always be slip-resistant and purchasers should check that it is suitable for
the conditions under which it is going to be used.
- Slip resistant shoes will not remain so if they become worn or contaminated underfoot.
- The risk of slipping while barefoot is often greater than when wearing shoes, so this factor needs to
be taken into account in shower areas and in other tiled areas associated with swimming pools, etc
- Disposable plastic overshoes can have poor resistance on smooth floors
- In other workspaces where there is general public access there will greater dependence on the
selection of floor material in combination with maintenance regimes to control slip, trip and fall
hazards.
Checks & Inspections
- Visual checks and Risk Assessments as required in each Functional Area
Information, Instruction & Training
Not applicable
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Not applicable
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
RISK FACTOR
3
1-3 Low Risk
6 High RISK
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Medium Risk
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Lone Person Working
Ref: SWPS 010
Date: March 09
Assessed by: E. Bell
Hazards
- Persons working alone using hazardous chemicals or equipment may not be able to summons
- help in the event of an accident or spillage.
- Certain exit routes may not be available during out of hours working.
- Entrapment in areas or spaces due to negligence or accident
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Definition of lone working
Lone working/out of hours working is defined as follows:
Any Laboratory / Experimental work carried outside of 9 am - 5 pm Monday – Friday when
there are no persons aware of your work within calling distance.
Any other work undertaken outside of 7 am-10 pm Monday – Friday and during the hours of 9am 6pm on Saturday, Sunday & Bank Holidays.
All buildings must be vacated by 6pm on Saturdays, Sundays and Bank holidays to allow
for full lock up. At Christmas & Easter the campus will close down for a specified number of
days and access will only be granted under exceptional circumstances .
Lone working includes carrying out field work in hazardous terrain or in areas where there
is a risk to personal safety.
Lone working may also include carrying out routine maintenance work in isolated areas
such as roofs or plant-rooms.
Controls
General
-
-
-
Lone working in laboratories is not permitted unless a risk assessment has been carried out in
conjunction with an academic supervisor and the risk is deemed to be low. Typical work that
may be allowed includes work on PCs, microscope work, viewing plates, taking items in and
out of incubator.
The supervisor may allow working on high risk activities if the person is competent (typically an
experienced member of staff) and a buddy is in attendance.
The supervisor may allow work on medium risk activities for competent researchers (with or
without a buddy present).
Where a person is working alone without other persons within shouting distance then a phone
or mobile phone must be readily available. They must also notify a colleague of their intention,
how long they intend to be working in the isolated area, and check back with the colleague at
an agreed, pre-determined time, when the work in the isolated area is complete.
Field work in hazardous terrain or where there is a risk of personal injury as a result of
confrontation must not be carried out alone (see SWPS Fieldwork).
Hazardous experiments must not be left unattended overnight.
Out of hours access
-
If out of hours work is required permission must be sought from the Head of Department.
-
-
-
All persons requiring ‘Out of Hours’ access must be aware of what to do in the event of an
emergency, i.e. what emergency exit doors are available, how to raise the alarm, where to go etc.
The Head of School must provide Security with the names and locations of persons working out of
hours. The person must contact Security on leaving the building.
Persons authorised to work out of hours must not admit any other person to the building out of
hours. Persons claiming to be authorised but without a swipe access card or key should be referred
to Security for access.
Where the fire alarm is activated in the building after hours, those evacuating the building must
assemble at the building fire assembly point. Otherwise emergency services will assume that they
are still in the building.
Researchers or Staff members who in exceptional circumstances, due to the nature of their
research work, require access during ‘Lock-Up’ must seek authorisation for such access from
Buildings and Estates.
Checks & Inspections
Visual checks and Risk Assessments as required in each Functional Area
Information, Instruction & Training
Not applicable
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Not applicable
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
2-3
=
Risk Factor
4-6
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
2-3
=
Risk Factor
2-3
Lone working/Out of Hours working
Name
Position
Date
Prepared by
Reviewed by:
Approved by
Revision
1
Date
By
Description
2
3
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Manual Handling
Ref: SWPS 09
Date: 30/03/2011
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Incorrect method of lifting
Attempting to lift something which is to heavy
Lifting sharp/awkward shapes
The main injuries associated with manual handling and lifting are:
Back strain, slipped disc, hernia,
Lacerations, crushing of hands or fingers.
Repetitive Strain Injury.
Bruised or broken toes or feet.
Various sprains, strains, etc.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public  Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Staff and students may be required to lift or move heavy items from time to time including large pieces of wood,
bags of aggregate, metal piping, moving rotating electrical boards, pushing/pulling trolleys and lifting engines and
transmissions and various motor parts
Controls

Risk assessments must carried out on manual handling tasks normally performed by staff As a
rule of thumb an assessment is required where weights are above the guideline weights set out by
the Health and Safety Authority and reproduced overleaf in figure 1. The assessment should be in
writing and set out on form 1 Manual handling assessment attached to this procedure.

Manual handling will be avoided where possible. Mechanical or other means of moving or lifting will be
used such as trolleys and winches.
 Staff will be provided with manual handling training where manual handling is a regular part of their job.
 Seek assistance where possible when lifting heavy items.
Consideration must be given to the arrangement of stored items so that heavier items are not stored near floor or
above shoulder height.
Risks
The injuries associated with objects involving, lifting, lowering, maneuvering and handling objects are:



Back injury, including slipped disks. The effect of the injury may be cumulative over a period of years
(as with chronic backache).
Pulled muscles and strained ligaments.
Note: once the back or any other part of the body “goes”, then it is easier to go again.
Primary controls
 Trained in the correct manual handling techniques and requirements
 Whenever and wherever possible and practicable use the correct mechanical means to lift, lower or
manoeuvre heavy or awkwardly shaped loads.
 Split large loads into several smaller loads if possible.
Basic controls
1 Assessment
Carry out the following assessment process before you begin:
 Is it too heavy, too large, unwieldy or unstable?
 Will it require an unstable body posture position?
 Is the ground, floor or surface uneven or slippery?
 Are you able to maintain good posture while lifting?
 Will it require excessive lifting, lowering or carrying distances?
 Are you physically suited to carry out the task (e.g. physique, fitness, body strength)?
 Are you wearing suitable PPE (e.g. gloves, safety footwear)?
2 Safe to Manual Handle
When your assessment indicates that you can safely undertake the manual handling task, then proceed
as detailed in section 3
Even when considered safe you should still use the correct mechanical means whenever and wherever
possible and practicable.
3 If there is no alternative way then:
Protect your back
 If you must lift, carry and move an object yourself or with others, then you
must do so in accordance with the correct techniques that you have learned
in training. These correct techniques are summarised as follows:
 Lifting: Stand close to the load, bend the knees, not the back. Get a firm grip
of the load and rise up straight.
 Carrying: Keep the load close to the body, with back straight, and turn by
pivoting your feet.
 Lowering: Lower the entire body bending the knees, with back straight.
Special Controls
Loading, transporting
& off-loading materials



Use mechanical means to load heavy and awkward loads
Wear gloves and boots to protect body from getting trapped between the
load and any other surface.
Secure and store safely on the transport vehicle
Checks & Inspections
 Senior technician to monitor that correct manual handling technique is being used.
 Trolleys should be visually checked before use. Trolleys with damaged wheels should be taken out of
service.
Information, Instruction & Training
 Manual Handling Training provided to relevant staff. Manual Handling activities are monitored and refresher
training and /or reinstruction is an integral part of the safety management programme.
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
Severity
3
= Risk Factor
High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
1-2
= Risk Factor
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Figure 1. Guideline weights issued by the Health and Safety Authority.
2-4 Low-medium risk
Form 1 Manual handling risk assessment
Section A – Preliminary
* Circle as appropriate
Job Description
Is an assessment needed?
(i.e. Is there a potential risk for injury, and are the factors beyond the
limits of the guidelines?)
Factors beyond the limits of the guideline weights? (See
SWPS Manual handling)
If ‘yes’ continue. If ‘no’ the assessment need go no further.
Yes / No*
Operations covered by this assessment (detailed description):
Diagrams or other information:
Locations:
Personnel involved:
Date of assessment:
Section B – See over for detailed analysis
Section C – Overall assessment of the risk of injury?
Low/Med/High*
Section D – Remedial action to be taken:
Remedial steps that should be taken, in order of priority:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Date by which action should be taken:
Date for reassessment:
Assessor’s name:
Signature:
Section B – More detailed assessment, where necessary:
Questions to consider:
If yes, tick
appropriate level of
risk
Low
The tasks – do they involve:

holding loads away from trunk?

twisting?

stooping?

reaching upwards?

large vertical movements?

long carrying distances?

strenuous pushing or pulling?

unpredictable movement of
loads?

repetitive handling?

insufficient rest or recovery?

a work rate imposed by a
process?
The loads – are they:

heavy?

bulky / unwieldy?

difficult to grasp?

unstable / unpredictable?

intrinsically harmful (e.g. sharp
/ hot)?
The working environment – are
there:

constraints on posture?

poor floors?

variations in levels?

hot/cold humid conditions?

strong air movements?

poor lighting conditions?
Individual capability – does the job:

require unusual capability?

hazard those with a health
problem?

hazard those who are
pregnant?

call for special information /
training?
Other factors:
Is movement or posture hindered by
clothing or personal protective
equipment?
Med
Problems occurring
from the task (Make
rough notes in this
column in preparation
for the possible
remedial action to be
taken).
Possible remedial action
(Possible changes to be
made to system/task, load,
workplace/space,
environment.
Communication that is
needed.
High
YES / NO
Back to content page
43
Ref: SWPS 019
Date: July 09
Assessed by: E.Roe
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Storage Areas
Hazards
Slips, trips, falls
Cut
Back Injury
Sprains
Falling object
Fire
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Storage of hazardous and non-hazardous substances and materials
Checks & Inspections
-
Keep all pathways clear
Do not climb on shelves or storage racks
Do not climb on shelves to reach heights – use stepladders only
Keep aisleways clear
Do not keep any hazardous materials and substances in general storage areas – they must be
kept in designated protected store located in Maintenance Building.
Store heavy items at low level.
Store medium weight items on middle shelves.
Store light items on high shelves.
Store items on shelves in such a way that they can not fall off.
Keep all hazardous materials and substances, papers, boxes, etc. away from electric heaters.
Store material lengths or racking parallel to the aisle.
Storage areas to be kept locked at all times.
Only authorized personnel are allowed access to Storage Areas.
Do not attempt to lift any loads unless you have received appropriate training in safe manual
handling techniques.
Smoking, eating and drinking is prohibited in all storage areas.
Information, Instruction & Training
Not applicable
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Not applicable
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
4
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Ref: SWPS 025
Date: Aug 09
Assessed by: E.Roe
Safe Work Practice Sheet
General Workshop Safety
Hazards
Improper storage of items can lead to items falling on staff,
- obstruction of exit routes,
- manual handling injuries,
- fire,
- failure of shelving.
- Operation of diesel or petrol engines in unventilated space may lead to asphyxiation
- Use of cutting equipment without extraction can lead to respiratory problems
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
General activities in workshop
Controls
- The Workshop is fitted with fire detection and alarm system and emergency lighting which is serviced
regularly.
- Exit routes must be kept clear of obstruction at all times.
- Adequate shelving is provided to allow safe storage of equipment.
- Heavier items should be stored on middle shelves with lighter items above shoulder height & floor
height.
- Where heavy items are stored the condition of shelving should be checked every 6 months by the
Supervisor.
- Diesel and petrol is stored in appropriate marked containers in small quantities (<20 litres).
- Diesel or petrol engines must not be operated indoors unless ventilation is operational.
- Extraction ventilation must be serviced annually.
- Cutting equipment should be used in conjunction with extraction.
Checks & Inspections
Extraction equipment must be serviced annually
Information, Instruction & Training
Staff must be shown the correct use of extraction equipment
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Safety boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
4 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Use of hand tools
Ref: SWPS 026
Date: Aug 09
Assessed by: E.Roe
Hazards
Cuts
Ejection of material
Eye damage
Stab injuries
Head injuries
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public  Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Using hand tools such as chisels, Stanley knives, hammers, drills etc.
Controls
- Only staff with appropriate training or experience may use hand tools.
-
The tools should be checked before use for signs of wear and tear. Damaged items should be taken out of
service for repair or replacement.
No power tools or electrical equipment of greater voltage than 110 volts shall be used in external locations.
Where power tools have to be used off the main supply the source of supply must be fitted with residual
current devices (ELCB) rated at 30 mAmps at 30 msecs.
All cable connections must be properly made; under no circumstances is insulation tape to be used for any
repair or joint in extension.
Power tools must be maintained in good condition with casing intact and label fitted showing voltage and
other information. An annual formal documented inspection should be carried out by a competent person.
Mains operated equipment must be electrically tested.
Where there is a risk of particles hitting the eye, eye protection must be worn.
Ear defenders will not normally be required as the duration of exposure is expected to be low and
infrequent.
Tools should not be left unattended in public areas when going for breaks.
Staff should not repair tools unless they are trained to do so.
Only use tools in the manner in which they were designed to be used.
Return tools to the workshop at the end of each day.
Checks & Inspections
- Check all tools before each use.
- Annual electrical test for mains operated equipment.
Information, Instruction & Training
- Only trained staff may operate equipment. Training may be provided in house by another
- competent member of staff.
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Personal protective equipment varies with tool being used. Where there is a risk of flying
particles then eye protection should be worn.
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
6 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Use of Ladders / Stepladders
Ref: SWPS 007
Date: 10/05/2011
Assessed by: P. Killeen
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards


Physical injury due to fall of persons from ladder
Objects dropped by ladder / stepladder user
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
NOTE:
The use of Ladders / stepladders is restricted to activities where the risk is deemed to be low (that it would be unlikely
to cause injury), the work is of short duration (30mins max) or brief periods at a time, and where the risk assessment
shows the use of other work equipment ( e.g. working platforms ) is not justified.
Low Risk is considered when: where the operator can maintain a handhold / grip on stile whilst placing a box on
a shelf and where the user’s both feet are fully supported on the same step / rung.
Ladders/ stepladders are not suitable for strenuous or heavy work or where the work involves carrying awkward
objects, tools or equipment.
Work Description
The use of Ladders / Stepladders by staff is infrequent. As part of their work technicians on occasions access
shelving and storage areas to gain access to materials or parts.
Controls









Ladder work is restricted to work which can be carried out using one hand only and of short duration.
The base of the ladder must be on firm and level ground.
For extension ladders they must be at the correct angle of rest 75 degrees or a base to height ratio of 1:4 ( 1
out to every 4 units up ) and made secured ( tying at the top or bottom )
Stepladders must be fully opened out.
There must be no sideways loading.
Maintain 3 points of contact ( both feet on the same rung, firm grip on the stile or handrail )
Over reaching from ladders / stepladders will be avoided.
Do not work on the top 3 rungs of a ladder, or top 2 steps for stepladders (regardless of length)
Do not straddle ( or sit at the top ) of an A frame ladder.
Checks & Inspections



Ladders will be checked for the correct type of equipment for the job at hand.
Ladders / Stepladders must be visually inspected before use.
Inspection of ladders must be recorded on form GA3 for every 7 day of use or used for the first time.
Information, Instruction & Training




Operatives will be instructed to the safe use of ladders and the hazards which are to be avoided.
Operatives to follow the controls
Operatives to report any defects
A further risk assessment will be necessary where the work activity is deemed to be medium or a high risk.
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)

PPE may be a requirement dependant on the Risk Assessment
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
PROBABILITY
Probable 3
Possible 2
KEY
SEVERITY
Critical
3
Serious
2
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
4 Medium Risk
Unlikely
Minor
6-9 High Risk
1
1
4
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2
Risk Assessment Review
Risk Assessment will be reviewed periodically
Back to content page
Ref: SWPS 027
Date: March 09
Assessed by: E. Bell
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Use of cutters, scalpel and stanley knives
Hazards
- Cuts when taking blades in and out of handle
- Cuts while using equipment
- Cleaning staff receiving cuts if blades disposed of to general waste
- Eye injury if blade breaks while used with force for tasks other than cutting
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
A range of cutting equipment is used in some areas by staff and students
Controls
- Where possible retractable blades or safety knives will be used.
- Blades must be disposed of to a designated sharps bin with a closable lid. Blades must never be
disposed of to general waste.
- Users should use only sharp blades – blunt blades require more force and their use may result in injury
- Users should cut away from the body keeping the restraining hand well away from the blade.
- Unsheathed blades must never be carried in pockets or bags.
- Unsheathed blades must not be left in drawers or toolboxes.
Checks & Inspections
- Knives cutters used in classroom situations should be visually checked annually and damaged
equipment removed from circulation.
Information, Instruction & Training
Students receive specific instruction on safe use of blades
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
x
2
Severity
3
= Risk Factor
6 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2-3
=
Risk Factor
2-3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Noise
Hazard:
Ref: SWPS/ CJ 013
Date 26/01/2011
Assessed by: Paula Killeen
Approved by: E. Roe
Noise
Noise exposure can lead to hearing damage or poor concentration which can lead to incidents. Potential
hearing damage due to a given sound depends on the sound level and duration of exposure. “Daily noise
exposure level” is expressed as Lex 8h(db)(A) (time weighted average). Continuous noise levels can have
the same energy content as varying sound levels. Peak sound pressure or instantaneous noise levels
reached under the regulations will require particular measures as below
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Noise associated with Workshop Machinery
Controls
As a rule of thumb you may be at risk if:




you have to shout to be clearly heard by someone 1- 2 metres away
your ears are still ringing after leaving the workplace
the noise is intrusive – like a vacuum cleaner – for most of the day
you work in a noisy environment, e.g. workshop
When noise exposure exceeds the exposure action value (80 dB(A)), information, training and hearing
protection must be provided.
If the upper exposure action value (85 dB(A)) is exceeded,
 establish and implement technical and/ or organizational measures to reduce exposure to noise
 restrict access
 hearing protection
 hearing protection must be worn
 provide hearing checks
 Provide adequate information and training
When using tools such as grinders, air operated pumps etc. Hearing protection must be worn.
Checks & Inspections



Instructions given when machine is shut down
Technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction and Training
Supplies of ear defenders or other hearing protection will be made available for any Staff Member where it is not
practicable to reduce the noise levels to a safe limit. These where issued must be worn at all times by both Staff and
Student when operative is exposed to noise above the Above Upper Action level (85Db) or Exposure Limit(87Db).
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
hearing protection
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
6 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
Noise assessments and Health Surveillance will be part of the safety management programme
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
General Health and Welfare Provisions
Ref: SWPS C/J 015
Date: 2/02/2011
Assessed by: P. Killeen
Approved by: E. Roe
The workplace regulations ( general application ) regulations 2007 S.I. No. 299 in particular regulation 18 and 19
gives specific standards to be maintained in the place of work.
These regulations refer to adequate facilities for “taking meals / consumption of food” “cleanliness,” also that rest
areas are “large enough”. These facilities must be kept in a state that is free from accumulations of any dirt, dust etc..
Regulation 18 states:
(f) “the taking of meals by employees is prohibited at any location in the place of work
where there is likely to be a risk to safety, health or welfare.”
The workshop and store would not be deemed suitable as a place for taking meals ( which includes beverages ) for a
number of reasons including the space limitations, the location of items stored at height, the lack of hygiene facilities
and the fact that it is deemed a work area for a member of staff. The fact that it is a store within a workroom.
Regulation 19 states:
An employer shall ensure that—
“(a) where, because of—
(i) the type of activity carried out, or
(ii) the presence of more than a certain number of employees, and
(iii) the safety, health and welfare of employees so requires,
employees are provided with an easily accessible rest room or appropriate rest area,”
providing relaxation during breaks,
(b) rest rooms are large enough and equipped with tables with easily cleaned surfaces
and seats with backs, adequate for the number of employees,
The workshop and store would not meet the criteria set out in section 19 above, because of the work
activity carried out (where there is a presence of dirt and dust ) and ( it is deemed a work area ) and (
Insufficient space ). Therefore under both sections of the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work ( general
application) regulations 2007 DkIT would be breaching the requirements.
Washing, food preparation and eating areas are made available at various locations on the campus:
The Well, The Coffee Dock, The Main Canteen, The Staff Room.
Information, Instruction
To meet the requirements of Health and Safety Legislation and to ensure that good hygiene practices are
employed at all times, it is prohibited to consume or bring into laboratories or workshops any drinks or
beverages.
Signed:
___________________________
Head of School of Engineering
Back to content page
EMERGENCY RESPONSE
Ref: SWPS C/J 016
Date: 26/01/2011
Assessed by: P. Killeen
Approved by: E. Roe
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Emergency protocol for everyday working environment.
Emergency Contacts











Dial 9 for an outside line, then 999 or 112 and you will be connected directly to the emergency
services.
Be prepared to give the following information:
Information on the condition of the victim, if there is a casualty.
Details of any hazards, i.e. fire/chemical/gas/radiation/structural collapse etc.
Exact location of the accident (room number and building).
Call the Estates Office (2671/2670) and give the above details.
If deemed necessary, contact the Nurse (2777) and trained Department first aiders.
Call Reception (500), ask them to alert the caretaker on duty and give them the above details.
Report to the Head of Department, Head of School, and your Supervisor (where relevant).
As soon as practically possible, report the accident on an accident/incident report form and submit
to the Head of Department/ Head of School of Engineering.
Emergency contact numbers are strategically located throughout the School of Engineering.
Fire Fighting Equipment
The majority of fire-fighting equipment points are located in workshops, laboratories and on each floor in
the School of Engineering building. There are a number of trained fire wardens in the School. Fire warden
courses are run on a regular basis and are available through the
Estates Office. The School abides by the Institute Policy and Procedures on fire safety.
Information, Instruction & Training
All training in First Aid, Emergency Response, and Fire Safety/Wardens is available through
consultation with your Head of Dept and HR Office. The School abides by the Institute Policy on first aid
safety.
Back to content page
EMERGENCY CONTACT
NUMBERS
Ref: SWPS CJ 017
Date: 26/01/2011
Assessed by: P. Killeen
Approved by: Eugene Roe
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Important contact details which are available throughout all Departments in case of emergency
General

Ambulance/Fire Brigade:

Health Centre/Campus Nurse:

Doctor: Dr. Shane Gleeson:

Hospital: Louth Hospital:
112 or 999
2777
2702/ 042 9320038
(042) 933 4701
A List of First Aiders is prominently displayed in all workshops and Lab Locations
Back to content page
Appendix III
Specific Safe Work Practice Sheets
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Arc Welding (MMA, MIG, TIG)
Ref: SWPS MEC 003
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly connected, damaged or poorly maintained electrical wiring on welders can result in
Electrocution-Death. First second and or third degree burns
Slips Trips & Falls
Untidy workspace, trailing electrical cables can cause tripping and result in breaking of limbs, cuts and
bruises.
Fumes
Inhalation of fumes from welding can cause respiratory disease and illness. Contact with skin can result
in skin irritation.
Manual Handling
Lifting of heavy metal loads or machinery for welding can cause acute or chronic musculoskeletal lower
back disc injury.
Fire
Sparks from welding can ignite fuel sources resulting in asphyxiation from smoke. First second and or
third degree burns.
Hot Surfaces
Contact with welded metal surfaces can result in first, second or third degree burns.
Radiation
Exposure to ultra violet light from welding can result in acute severe burning to the eyes and skin, long
term exposure may result in skin cancer and cataracts of the eyes.
Sharps
Metal for welding may contain sharp edges or corners and result in major or minor lacerations to the
hands and fingers.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Welding of metal components or artefacts using Manual Metal Arc (MMA), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) or Tungsten
Inert Gas (TIG) method.
Controls























The consumption of food and drink is not permitted in the work shop.
Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or
technician’s supervision.
Loose or nylon clothing is not permitted when welding.
Long hair should be neatly tied back or wear a well fitted cap.
Hand jewellery must not be worn.
Wear proper welding visor with approved filter glass.
Do not look at welding arc with unprotected eyes.
Protect the forearms and all exposed skin from exposure to arc rays, do not roll up sleeves.
Protect the front of the body with suitable leather cape/apron.
Wear suitable leather gloves to protect the wrists and hands.
Wear suitable protective footwear.
Follow the manual handling training when lifting heavy loads.
Keep working area tidy and free from flammable materials and personal belongings.
Ensure suitable fire extinguishing equipment is readily available and maintained in good
condition.
Ensure all electric cables, plugs and sockets are in good condition prior to use.
Stand on a dry floor or duck-board and/or wear rubber-soled shoes/boots.
Welding area must be properly ventilated. Use extract system at all times.
Never drape or rap electrical cables around any body part.
Screen off the area so that persons in the vicinity are protected from directly viewing the welding
arc.
Beware of the danger from hot metal when arc welding. N.B. cuffs on overalls, turn-ups on
trousers, exposed long hair and low cut shoes are likely lodging places for sparks or globules of
hot metal and slag.
Allow sufficient cooling time before handling hot metal, use tongs or gloves where necessary
Exercise caution and use gloves when handling metal sharps
Use a descaling hammer or brush to remove welding slag.
MIG or TIG Welding
 Do not touch the electrode while H.F. set is switched on
 Switch off the mains-power supply when not in use
 Switch off the contactor before changing the electrode or the nozzle.
Checks & Inspections






Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Ensure emergency shutdown devices are checked each term
RCDs tested once per term
Electrical circuits tested every 3 years
Electric cables are inspected annually
Information, Instruction & Training
 Students receive instruction before using equipment
 Students are supervised when using the equipment.
 PPE Training
 Manual handling training
 Chemical Handling training
 MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)





Welding Gloves to be worn
Suitable eye protection must be worn
Apron/overalls to be worn
Glass Filters Shade 14GW, Arc-welding, TIG and MIG
Equipment for eye and face protection BS1592:1949
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Sheet Metal Bending and Folding Machines
Ref: SWPS MEC 004
20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Slips Trips & Falls
Untidy workspace or scrap metal on the ground can result in unsecure footing and slips & falling & breaking of limbs,
cuts and bruises. Metal sheets stored against machine can cause trips & result in broken limbs cuts and bruises.
Manual Handling
Carrying large heavy sheets of metal can overload the body and result in acute or chronic lower back disc injury or
musculoskeletal injuries to the arms and neck.
Mechanical
Crushing of hands and fingers if inserted into the machine when bending. Struck by moving parts of the machine
resulting in concussion, bruising.
Sharps
Sharp edges or corners on sheet metal can cause deep lacerations to the hands & other body parts.
Flying Debris
Bending pieces of metal can result in metal breaking and flying thus resulting in loss of sight from metal flying
fragments.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Bending sheet metal and other small cross-sectioned metal articles to particular shapes and angles
Controls














Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
The consumption of food and drink is not permitted in the work shop.
Loose clothing or items of jewellery must not be worn.
Long hair must be neatly tied back.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Never sit or stand on the machine.
Do not store metal sheets or materials on or leaning against the machine
Measure and mark materials for bending on a work bench prior to bending
Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times
Wear safety glasses.
Wear leather work gloves when handling sheet metal stock.
Ensure that hands and fingers are clear of the bending area at all times.
Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Observe bending machine surroundings when in use.
S


Group gathering is not permitted when the machine is in operation.
Wear safety glasses when operating the machine.
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School.
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures.
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE.
Information, Instruction & Training
 All students are given training before being allowed to use the bending machine.
 All students must be supervised by the leacturer when operating the bending machine.
 Manual handling training
 PPE training.
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety glasses
Leather work gloves
Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
2
Severity
=
Risk Factor
4 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Degreasing Bath
Ref: SWPS MOT 049
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly connected, poorly maintained or damaged electrical cable or plugs of the degreasing machine can cause
electrocution-death or first second and or third degree burns to the hands and body parts.
Manual Handling
Topping up or emptying the degreaser of detergent requires lifting or carrying, lifting engine or gear parts in and out
of the degreasing basin can result in acute or chronic lower back and or musculoskeletal injuries.
Chemical
Immersing parts for degreasing with detergent, removing degreased parts for washing, brush cleaning parts, topping
up or emptying the degreaser can result in splashing of detergent causing temporary or permanent loss of sight,
burns to the hands and fingers or other body parts by contamination of clothing.
Slips, Trips and Falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings, parts for cleaning lying on the ground, trailing power cable, spilled
detergent lying on the ground can result in slipping and tripping causing fall impact head injuries and cuts and
bruises.
Fumes
Topping up the machine with detergent, removing cleaned parts, brushing parts down with detergent can result in the
inhalation of detergent fumes causing acute or chronic respiratory illness.
Fire
Detergent or engine components for degreasing can catch fire when in contact with an ignition source and result in
first, second and or third degree burns.
Falling Engine Parts
Lifting or removing engine or metal parts to or from the degreaser can slip and fall causing lower leg and feet crush
injuries.
Mechanical
Hands or fingers are inadvertently crushed when closing the lid of the degreaser.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The machine is used for degreasing engine and gear box parts of grease, oil, wax, dirt etc.
Controls



All degreasing operations must be carried out in the degreasing bath in the Motor Shop.
Students are not permitted to carry out this task.
The Lecturer or technician must only carry out this task.












Inspect the electrical cable and plug of the degreasing machine prior to use.
Do not use the test unit if electrical cable or plugs are damaged in any way and remove from use for repair.
Electrical repairs must be carried out by a competent person.
Follow the manual handling training guide lines at all times when operating the degreaser.
Always seek assistance when emptying the degreasing barrel or heavy engine parts.
Safety glasses must be worn at all stages of the use and maintenance of the degreaser.
Protective clothing i.e. overalls non-absorbent gloves must be worn (See PPE Required).
Contaminated clothing must be removed immediately when in contact with degreaser.
Ensure that the machine is plugged into the socket on the wall at the back of the machine.
Spilled degreaser must be cleaned up immediately.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Parts for cleaning must never be stored on the ground around the machine, use the surrounding work
benches.
 Ensure that there is adequate ventilation when operating the degreaser and that the area ventilation system
is switched on.
 When possible close the lid of the machine for degreasing or draining parts from detergent.
 Never place hands or fingers between the lid and frame of the degreaser when closing the lid.
 Do not inhale fumes. Wear a mask.
 Do not use in the vicinity of welding operations.
 Do not use in the presence of naked flame or other source of ignition.
 Eating, drinking, smoking and using mobile phones are prohibited from all workshop and laboratory areas.
 Allow parts that are cleaned by detergent to drip dry in the detergent bath before removing.
 Rinse/wash component by immersing, washing or spraying with water.
 Wash both hands thoroughly when finished.
 Adhere to instruction in manufacturers Material Safety Data Sheets.
 All waste solvents must be disposed of according to Material Data Sheets.
 Appropriate fire extinguisher to be close at hand.
 Observe great care when using this process.
Checks & Inspections



Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School.
Lecturer and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures.
Operator to check extraction is operational before starting process.
Information, Instruction & Training




MSDS
Manual Handling training
PPE Training
Chemical Handling Training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)





Safety glasses
Industrial safety gloves (Black Gauntlet Gloves CE 0321, extended length 450mm)
Protective apron/overalls
Safety shoes/boots
Safety Mask
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Bench and Pillar Drilling Machines
Ref: SWPS MEC 007
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Poorly connected, maintained or damaged electrical wiring can result in Electrocution-Death. First, second
and or third degree burns.
Mechanical
Wearing of loose clothing can cause entanglement with rotating drill resulting in cuts and bruises to the body.
Crush or puncture injury by hand becoming trapped with descending drill. Blunt force injury from impact of
unsecure machine or ejected objects from the machine. Eye/s injury from ejected drilled waste material or
unsecured work materials.
Hot Surfaces
Drilling metal objects generates heat and may result in first or second degree burns to the skin when in
contact with.
Slips, Trips and Falls
Untidy work area and trailing cables can cause falls that result in broken limbs, minor cuts and bruises.
Ergonomics
Work tables that are too low or high can result in musculoskeletal injuries and cause lower back, neck, arm
and hand injuries.
Manual Handling
Lifting heavy objects for drilling can cause musculoskeletal injuries and result in lower back injuries.
Sharps
Drilled material can create sharp surfaces and result in minor cuts to the hands.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Drilling holes in metallic and non-metallic materials, normally clamped in a vice.
Controls









Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
The consumption of food and drink is not permitted in the work shop.
Safety glasses must be worn at all times.
Loose clothing such as open jackets, loose jumpers, ties etc. must not be worn when operating this machine.
Wearing jewellery such as rings, necklaces etc. are not permitted.
Long hair must be covered by cap or net or neatly tied back.
Personal belongings must not be stored at or near the machine.
Clutter must not be allowed to build up around the machine.
Inspect the electrical cable and plug for any damage or defects prior to use. Do not use if damaged or
defected in any way and remove from use for repair by a competent person.
Adjust the work table to the required working height.
Inspect the cutting tool prior to use, do not use if damaged, all damaged cutting tools must be handed to the
lecturer or technician. Students must not repair any damaged cutting tools, the Lecturer or the technician are
only permitted to repair damaged cutting tools. New cutting tools must be obtained from the lecturer or
technician.
 Ensure cutting tool is properly secured in machine chuck.
 Ensure work piece is properly secure in machine vice.
 Ensure vice is properly secured to machine table.
 When required, only use a copper or plastic mallet to tap down work piece or to tighten machine vice.
 Machine is never to be left unattended when running.
 Wear gloves or allow drill bit and drilled material to adequately cool down before handling
 Use a brush to clean down drilled material or machine, never use air to clean down.
 Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Checks & Inspections






Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by the
School
Ensure emergency shutdown devices are checked each term
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 All students are given training before being allowed to use drilling machines
 Manual Handling
 PPE Training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety glasses
Gloves
Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
x
2
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
3 Low Risk
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Flame-Fast Furnace
Ref: SWPS MEC 009
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Poorly connected or maintained electrical wiring can result electrocution-death First, second and or third
degree burns.
Chemicals
Inhalation of propane, molten metal vapours or carbon monoxide may cause Asphyxiation-death or
unconsciousness due to the lack of oxygen.
Slips Trips and Falls
Untidy work area and trailing cables can cause trips and falls that result in broken limbs, minor cuts and
bruises.
Fire
Sparks or hot surfaces may ignite fuel sources and result in asphyxiation from smoke.
Temperature
Hot surfaces can cause first, second and or third degree burns to the hands and fingers.
Manual Handling
Lifting heavy objects can cause lower back strain, neck and arm injuries.
Explosions
Explosions may occur from flammable gas and result in ejected missiles causing serious to minor injuries to
eyes, face and other body parts.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The Flame-Fast furnace is used for melting aluminium for the purposes of producing metal castings.
Controls






Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
The consumption of food and drink is not permitted in the work shop.
Inspect the electrical cable for damage or defects prior to use, do not use if damaged or defected in any way
and remove from use for repair.
Loose or nylon clothing must not be worn.
Long hair must be neatly tied back or a well fitted cap worn.
Work space must be maintained free from clutter.









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
Personal belongings are permitted beside or around the furnace.
Jewellery must not be worn when operating the furnace.
Fuel sources must not be stored at or near the furnace.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times
Propane tank, pipework and fittings must be maintained in good condition.
Ensure that correct type of fire extinguisher is located nearby.
Use protective apron.
Use safety glasses/goggles.
Use appropriate tongs when handling hot surfaces.
Use heat resistant gloves.
Ensure that ventilation systems are switched on and operating properly.
Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Checks & Inspections



All pipework, fittings, electrical cables are checked annually
Flashback arrestors are replaced as soon as a replacement is indicated
Ventilation system to be checked annually
Information, Instruction & Training



Student are only permitted to use this facility under close supervision of lecturer and/or technician
PPE training
Chemical Training
Manual Handling Training
MSDS



Heat resistant apron
Heat resistant gloves
Safety glasses/goggles


Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Gas Welding and Cutting
Ref: SWPS MEC 010
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrect installation, damaged or poorly maintained electrical wiring can result in electrocution-death or major or
minor burns.
Chemicals
Inhalation of Acetylene may cause Asphyxiation-death or unconsciousness. Exposure to oxygen may cause eye and
respiratory irritation.
Fumes
Inhalation of smut when igniting acetylene can result in acute or respiratory discomfort and illness.
Explosions
Explosions may occur from flammable gas resulting in ejected missiles causing serious to minor injuries to eyes, face
and other body parts.
Fire
Sparks or hot surfaces may ignite fuel sources and result in asphyxiation from smoke, first, second or third degree
burns to the skin.
Hot surfaces
Contact with hot surfaces can result in burns to the hands and fingers.
Slips Trips and Falls
Untidy work area and trailing cables or hoses can cause falls that result in broken limbs, minor cuts and bruises.
Manual Handling
Lifting or pulling heavy loads can result in acute or chronic lower back injury and or neck and arm injuries.
Ergonomics
Welding pieces of metal that are too high or low can result in lower back and neck injuries.
Bright Light
Burns to the back of the eyes can occur from looking into burning flame and cause permanent eye damage and
discomfort
Person Exposed to Risk
Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Using oxygen and acetylene for welding
Controls

Students are permitted to carry out this task, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s




























supervision.
The consumption of food and drink is not permitted at the workspace.
Loose or nylon clothing must not be worn.
Long hair must be neatly tied back or a well fitted cap worn.
Personal belongings are not permitted beside or around the workspace.
Jewellery must not be worn when operating gas welder.
Wear proper welding visor with approved filter glass
Protect the front of the body with suitable leather cape/apron.
Wear suitable leather gloves to protect the wrists and hands.
Wear suitable protective footwear.
Beware of the danger from hot metal when gas welding and cutting. N.B. cuffs on overalls, turn-ups on
trousers, exposed long hair and low cut shoes are likely lodging places for sparks or globules of hot metal
and slag.
Ensure the gas pressure is set correctly.
Ensure gases and regulator valves are turned off when no longer required.
Purge used lines into extract hood.
Ensure extract fan is switched on when gas welding.
Ensure damper on the extract hood is fully open. Close damper on all hoods not in use.
Ensure the ignition of the acetylene is conducted directly under the extract hood in use.
Ensure were possible no trailing gas torch hoses.
Tidy all gas torch hoses up when no longer required.
Wear gloves or use tongs when handling metal sharps or hot surfaces.
Where possible hand file smooth sharp edges.
Ensure work piece is at an adequate body height when welding.
Never place gases at or near the mouth, nose or eyes.
Keep working area tidy and free from flammable material.
Welding and cutting must be performed in areas free from fire risk.
Ensure suitable fire extinguishing equipment is readily available and maintained in good condition.
Welding area must be properly ventilated
Spark lighters are recommended.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times.
Checks & Inspections



All pipework, fittings are checked annually
Flashback arrestors are replaced as soon as a replacement is indicated
Ventilation system to be checked annually.
Information, Instruction & Training


PPE training
Chemical Training
Manual Handling Training
Instruction is given on the safe use of the equipment
Workshop and laboratory exercises are supervised by college staff
The MSDS for each gas must be available in the work shop.

Welding Gloves to be worn




Personal protective equipment required (last resort)


Approved filter safety glasses / visor must be worn
Apron/overalls to be worn
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Grinding Machines (Pedestal)
Ref: SWPS MEC 011
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly installed, badly maintained or damaged electrical cables can result in electrocution-death and or first,
second or third degree burns.
Manual Handling
Lifting and holding heavy objects for grinding can cause acute or chronic lower back or musculoskeletal injuries.
Mechanical
Moving parts can cause entanglement resulting in major or minor deep wounds to the face hands and arms. Contact
with rotating wheel may result in hand/s becoming entrapped, cut and bruised.
Slip Trips And Falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings, water on the floor and trailing cables can cause trips and slips causing falls
that result in broken limbs, major and minor cuts and bruises.
Vibration
Grinding pieces of metal for long periods of time can result in hand arm vibration – white finger causing damage to the
nerves on the fingers and hands.
Hot Surfaces
Grinding pieces of metal generates heat and can result in minor burns to the hands or fingers.
Fire
The generation of sparks may result in a fire when in contact with flammable sources causing first, second and or third
degree burns.
Flying Debris
Damaged or defected grinding stone can shatter resulting in debris causing loss of sight and or bodily puncture
wounds.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Hand held grinding and shaping of metallic components
Controls








Operators that have received formal abrasive wheel training may only operate this machine.
Competent persons must only carry out mounting of an abrasive wheel.
Group gatherings are not permitted at or around the machine when in use.
Inspect the wheel for defects or damage prior to use, do not use if damaged in any way and remove from use.
The consumption of food and drink is not permitted at the workspace.
Loose or nylon clothing must not be worn.
Long hair must be neatly tied back or a well fitted cap worn.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.



Jewellery must not be worn when operating grinder machine.
Group gathering around the machine is not permitted.
Inspect the machine electrical cables and plug for damage or defects prior to use, do not use if damaged or
defected in any way and remove from use for repair by a competent person.
 Eye protection must be used at all times.
 Wheel guard/visor to be in position when grinding is being carried out.
 Machine is never to be left unattended when running.
 Never touch the rotating stone with hands or fingers
 Wheel dressing must only be carried out by trained person.
 Water coolant is permitted when using this machine, Water on the floor must be dried immediately.
 Use a tongs or metal grips to hold pieces of metal.
 Avoid using the machine for extended periods of time, tend to other duties for periods of rest.
 Only trained technicians and apprentices in training are permitted to operate this machine.

Flammable materials must never be stored at or near the machine.
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by the
School
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training



Only trained technicians and apprentices in training are allowed to operate this machine.
Only trained technicians are allowed to replace a grinding wheel.
Abrasive wheel training in accordance with S.I. No. 30/1982 - Safety in Industry (Abrasive Wheels)
Regulations, 1982.
PPE Training
Manual Handling


Personal protective equipment required (last resort)

Safety glasses
Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)

Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Grinder (Surface Grinder)
Ref: SWPS MEC 012
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly installed, damaged or badly maintained electrical cables can result in electrocution-death and or first,
second or third degree burns.
Manual Handling
Lifting and carrying heavy metal objects can cause acute or chronic lower back and or musculoskeletal injuries.
Mechanical
Rotating parts of the machine can cause entanglement resulting in major or minor deep wounds to the face hands
and arms. Contact with rotating wheel may result in hand/s becoming entrapped.
Slip Trips And Falls
Untidy work, oil on ground can cause slips, trips that result falls, broken limbs, major, minor cuts and bruises.
Flying Debris
Shattered grind stone may result in high speed flying debris resulting in loss of sight, major or minor puncture wounds
Chemicals
Contact with machine cooling oil can result in minor skin and eye irritation.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Fine surface grinding of metallic components and artefacts
Controls
















Operators that have received formal abrasive wheel training may only operate this machine.
Students are not permitted to use this machine.
The consumption of food and drink is not permitted at the workspace
Loose or nylon clothing must not be worn.
Long hair must be neatly tied back or a well fitted cap worn.
Personal belongings are not permitted beside or around workspace.
Maintain clear and clean workspace all times
Jewellery must not be worn when operating grinder machine.
Group gathering around the machine is not permitted.
Machine must not be left unattended when running
Do not run the speed of the machine above the manufacturer’s recommendations.
Do not reach above or around the moving wheel.
Follow the manufacturer’s instruction for mounting grinding wheel.
Inspect the machine electrical cables and plug for damage or defects prior to use, do not use if damaged or
defected in any way and remove from use for repair by a competent person.
Safety glasses must be worn at all times
Work piece must be clamped securely to magnetic table. Ensure magnetic chuck is turned on by trying to
remove work from it. Ensure machine guards are in place prior to operating the machine and that the guard













covers at least half the grinding wheel.
Keep face of the wheel evenly dressed.
Take heed of hazard warning notices
Only trained technicians may change and set up a grinding wheel.
Clean the magnetic chuck with a cloth.
Check that the magnetic chuck has been turned on by trying to remove work from the chuck.
Check that the wheel clears the work before starting the grinder.
Run a new grinding wheel for about one minute before engaging the wheel into the work.
Stand to one side of the wheel before starting the grinder.
Turn off coolant before stopping the wheel to avoid creating an out-of-balance condition.
Keep the working surface clear of scraps, tools and materials.
Keep the floor around the grinder clean and free of oil and grease.
Wash hands thoroughly when in contact with coolant oil.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times.
Checks & Inspections




Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School
Ensure interlocks and emergency shutdown devices are checked each term
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training


Only trained technicians are permitted to change and set up a grinding wheel.
Abrasive wheel training in accordance with S.I. No. 30/1982 - Safety in Industry (Abrasive Wheels)
Regulations, 1982.
PPE Training
Manual Handling
MSDS



Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Safety glasses
 Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Guillotine (Pedal Operated)
Ref: SWPS MEC 013
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Manual Handling
Lifting, carrying and pushing sheet metal for cutting can result in acute or chronic lower back injury and neck and arm
injuries.
Sharps
Thin pieces of metal sheets, corners of metal sheets and damaged pieces of metal can cause deep lacerations to the
hands, arms, face and other body parts.
Slips, Trips & Falls
Untidy work space, poorhouse keeping can cause individuals to trip or slip resulting in broken limbs, concussion,
major and minor cuts and bruises.
Mechanical
Moving parts of machinery can result in crushing or breaking fingers, severing of fingers from shearing action of
cutting blades.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Cutting sheet and strip metal into particular shapes and lengths
Controls
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Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
Food or drink must not be consumed in workshop.
Loose clothing is not permitted.
Long hair must be tied back neatly.
Personal belongings are not permitted beside or around workspace.
Maintain clear and clean workspace all times
Jewellery must not be worn when operating machine.
Group gathering around machine is not permitted.
Wear safety glasses at all times.
Do not touch cutting blade with bare hands
Measure and mark metal sheets for cutting prior to using the machine.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times. When required, seek assistance in lifting and
holding large cut offs of metal sheets.
Wear leather work gloves when handling sheet metal stock.
Always ensure secure footing when operating the machine.
Ensure that hands and fingers are clear of the cutting area at all times.
Hands and fingers must remain at the front stop of the machine when cutting.
On completion of cutting, tidy the machine workspace and floor from all metal sheet cut offs.
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Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by
the School
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 All students are given training before being allowed to use the guillotine
 All students must be supervised when operating the guillotine
 Manual Handling Training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
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Safety glasses
Leather work gloves
Safety boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
2
Severity
=
Risk Factor
4 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Steelworker Powered Guillotine
Ref: SWPS MEC 014
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly wired or damaged cables can result in electrocution-death, first, second or third degree burns.
Mechanical
Contact with machine cutting tool can result shearing of fingers, contact with machine puncher may cause crushing
injuries to hands and fingers, contact with notching tool can result in entrapment and loss of fingers.
Sharps
Cutting, notching and punching pieces of metal can result in sharp edges, corners and surfaces on machined and
scrap pieces of metal and cause lacerations to the hands, face, eyes.
Slips, trips and falls
Trailing power cable and untidy work area can impede secure footing and result in falls that cause concussion, major
or minor cuts and bruises and musculoskeletal injuries.
Chemicals
Filling up the machine oil reserves can cause skin and eye irritation from splashing.
Hydraulics
Contact with hydraulic hot fluid may result in first, second or third degree burns, damage to the skin from injection or
cuts and bruises from flying hydraulic lines.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Cutting medium sized cross-sectioned metal bar-stock to length, punching and notching sheet metal.
Controls
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Students are not permitted to use the machine. Lecturers and technicians are only permitted to use this
machine.
Food or drink must not be consumed in workshop.
Loose clothing is not permitted.
Long hair must be tied back neatly.
Personal belongings are not permitted beside or around workspace.
Maintain clear and clean workspace all times
Jewellery must not be worn when operating machine.
Group gathering around machine is not permitted.
Machine isolator must be locked (tag out / lock out) when machine is not in use.
Emergency stop button must be pressed stop and power switch must be in off position when machine is not
in use.
Isolator power switch lock and key is under the control of the technician.
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Ensure electrical power cable of on/off foot pedal and machine sre free from defects prior to use. Do not use
if damaged. Competent persons must only carry out repairs to damaged power cables.
 Ensure all machine guards (Notching, Puncher, and Guillotine X 2) are in place prior to use.
 Ensure all machine panels are in place prior to use
 When required seek assistance when cutting large sections of material.
 Place foot pedal to the required (Notching, Punching or Guillotine) part of machine in use.
 Wear safety glasses.
 Wear gloves when topping up with hydraulic oil.
 Never touch leaking hydraulic fluid and ensure machine is turned off
 Wear leather work gloves when handling sheet metal stock.
 Ensure that hands and fingers are clear of the cutting area at all times.
 Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by
the School
Information, Instruction & Training
 Only trained technicians are allowed to operate this machine
 Manual Handling Training
 PPE Training
 Chemical Training
 MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
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Safety glasses
Leather work gloves
Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Hot Wire Strip Heater
Ref: SWPS MEC 015
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Mechanical
Contact with the bending arm crushing of fingers resulting in bruising. Contact with the bending arm can cause
entrapment resulting in broken fingers.
Electricity
Incorrectly wired or damaged cables can result in electrocution-death, first, second and or third degree burns.
Temperature
Machine hot wire, over heated material surfaces can cause first, second and or third degree burns.
Manual Handling
Lifting, carrying of the machine can result in lower back acute and chronic injury.
Slips trip and falls
Machine trailing cables, untidy work area can cause trips and result in falling injuries such as concussion, broken
limbs, major and minor cuts and bruises.
Fumes
Inhalation of fumes from overheated materials can result in acute of chronic respiratory illness.
Fire
Combustible material in contact with heated wire, resulting first, second and or third degree burns, acute or chronic
respiratory illness from inhalation of smoke.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
This machine clamps and holds Perspex and plastic sheeting. A heated wire element softens the material along a
narrow straight line. The material can then be bent / folded along that line. On cooling, the material re-hardens
thereby retaining its new folded shape.
Controls
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Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
Food or drink must not be consumed in workshop.
Loose or nylon clothing is not permitted.
Long hair must be tied back neatly.
Personal belongings are not permitted beside or around workspace.
Maintain clear and clean workspace all times
Jewellery must not be worn when operating the machine.
Group gathering around machine is not permitted.
Ensure materials are not stored on the machine.
Ensure electric cable and plug are free from defects (do not use if damaged) prior to use. Only competent
person/s can carry out repairs to damaged plug and cables. Follow manual handling guidelines when
transporting machine.
Ensure the machine is used in a well-ventilated place.
Flammable liquids or materials must not be stored on or near the machine.
Do not place fingers underneath the machine bending arm.
Never leave the machine unattended when in use.
Only use materials suitable for heat bending (Perspex and acrylic sheets).
Mark and measure working material using a china-graph pencil prior to using the machine.
Prior to switching the machine on, insert the measured working material into the machine and adjust heating
wire into the required position.
 Avoid over heating of work materials. Read and follow the manufacturer’s heating guidelines on the face
plate of the machine. When required temperature is achieved bend the material to the desired angle by
using the lever arm on the machine.
 Do not place bare hands, or clothing on or near the heating wire or hot working materials.
 Place the bending arm over the heating wire when work is completed.
 Turn off and unplug the machine when no longer required.
 Wear heat resistant gloves
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Safety glasses must be worn
Checks & Inspections
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Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by
the School
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
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All students are given training before being allowed to use the hot wire bending machine
PPE training
Manual Handling training
MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Heat resistant gloves
 Safety glasses
 Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low RISK
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Lathes (Harrison 300/400)
Ref: SWPS MEC 020
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly wired or damaged cables can result in electrocution-death, first, second and or third degree burns.
Manual Handling
Lifting and carrying chuck heads, pushing and pulling tail stock can result in acute lower back acute injuries.
Mechanical
Loose clothing or long hair can become entangled with rotating shaft or chuck head and result in asphyxiation.
Entrapment, fingers in contact with rotating parts, resulting in loss of fingers, broken bones, major and minor injuries.
Hot Surfaces
Contact with machined surfaces or hot cutting tools can cause minor burns to the hands and fingers.
Sharps
Contact with machine cutting tool and generated swarf machined material can result in major or minors lacerations to
hands.
Noise
Poorly maintained machinery, incorrect cutting of materials can cause noise resulting in acute temporary hearing loss,
discomfort or chronic hearing problems.
Slips trips and fall
Untidy work area, poorly placed floor mats can cause slipping & tripping that results in falling injuries, concussion,
broken limbs, major and minor cuts and bruises.
Chemicals
Contact with machine cooling or cutting oil may cause skin acne, slight irritation to the skin.
Flying Debris / Missiles
Ejected cutting material or oil can come into contact with eyes and result in loss of sight or temporary eye discomfort.
Ejected chuck key and work piece can cause impact injuries, loss of sight concussion cuts and bruises.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Machining cylindrical part, components and artefacts mainly from metallic stock
Controls
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Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision. .
Inspect the machine electrical cable and plugs for damage or defects prior to use, do not use if damaged or
defected in any way and remove from use for repair.
Food or drink must not be consumed in workshop.
Personal belongings are not permitted beside or around workspace.
Maintain clear and clean workspace all times.
Group gathering around machine is not permitted (only under the lecturer’s instruction).
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Non work materials must not be stored on the machine.
Ensure machine parts and working materials are firmly stored on the head stock. Do not stand materials or
parts top heavy.
Ensure all machine guards are in place prior to operating the machine.
Safety glasses must be worn at all times.
Lecturers and technicians are only permitted to change chuck heads.
Rotating Chuck head must come to a complete stop prior to loading or changing work pieces or chuck head.
Chuck guard must be used where practical.
Ensure work piece is properly secured in machine chuck.
Remove chuck key immediately after tightening or releasing workpiece.
Loose clothing such as open jackets, loose jumpers, ties etc must not be worn when operating this machine.
Long hair must be covered by cap or hair net or tied back neatly.
Jewellery such as rings, chains and necklaces must not be worn when operating this machine.
Machine is never to be left unattended when running.
Use proper manual handling practice when loading or unloading heavy or awkward work pieces or chucks.
Ensure secure firm footing at all times, do not over reach when operating the machine.
Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Only use a brush to brush down machine, do not use air or bare hands.
All swarf must be brushed down off the top of machine surfaces into the machine sump.
Empty the sump when required.
Exercise caution when handling cutting tools or machined materials (swarf etc.).
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by
the School
 Ensure interlocks and emergency shutdown devices are checked each term
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
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Only trained operators are allowed to operate the lathe unsupervised.
All students are given training before being allowed to use the lathe.
All students must be supervised when operating the lathe.
Manual Handling Training.
PPE Training
Chemical Handling Training
MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)


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Safety glasses
Cap / hair net
Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
Severity
3
= Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible 2
Serious
2
Unlikely 1
Minor
1
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
4 Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
= Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Ref: SWPS MEC 022
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision no. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Milling Machines
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly wired or damaged electrical cables may cause electrocution-death, first, second and third degree
burns.
Chemicals
Contact with cooling and cutting fluid can result in minor eye and skin irritation
Mechanical
Contact with rotating cutting tool can result in entanglement and major or minor injuries, cuts and bruises
Sharps
Contact with machine tools and machined material can result in major and minor lacerations to the hands
and fingers.
Ejected materials
Unsecured vice or work materials may be ejected and cause blunt force body injuries. Machined material or
disintegrated broken cutting tools can generate flying parts and cause loss of sight, major and minor
lacerations and puncture wounds to the body.
Pneumatics
Incorrectly fitted or damaged air lines can result in whipping hose and cause loss of sight, major or minor
lacerations and bruising to the body.
Slips, trips and falls
Poor housekeeping, untidy work area, folded mats lead can cause falls from slipping, tripping that result in
broken limbs, major and minor cuts and bruises.
Hot surfaces
Used machine tools and machined material can cause minor burns when touched by hands and fingers.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Cutting and shaping metal parts, components and artefacts
Controls
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Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
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Safety glasses must be worn at all times
Loose clothing such as open jackets, loose jumpers, ties etc must not be worn when operating this machine
Long hair must be covered by cap or hair net or tied back neatly.
Food or drink must not be consumed in workshop.
Personal belongings are not permitted beside or around workspace.
Maintain clear and clean workspace all times and ensure mats are flat on the ground.
Jewellery such as rings, chains and necklaces must not be worn.
Group gathering around machine is not permitted (only under the lecturer’s instruction).
Inspect the machine power cable for damage or defects, do not use the machine if power cable is damaged
or defected in any way. Competent person/s must only carry out electrical repairs.
Cutting tools and clamping devices must only be replaced or adjusted when machine is not running.
Do not place hands or body parts near rotating parts of machinery.
Prior to use, ensure cutting tool is not damaged and is properly secured in machine chuck. Damaged cutting
tools must be reported to the lecturer / technician for a replacement one.
Lecturer and technicians must only repair and replace cutting heads and tools.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times. Seek assistance when lifting and carrying heavy
machine parts and material to be machined.
Where applicable ensure all machine guards are in place prior to and when operating the machine.Work
piece/s must be properly secured in the machine vice.
Ensure that the vice is properly secured to the machine table.
Wash hands and body parts when in contact with cutting and coolant fluid.
Allow hot cutting tool and materials to cool sufficiently (or wear heat resistant gloves) prior to handling.
Exercise caution when handling sharp cutting tools and cut materials.
Only use copper or plastic mallet to tap down work piece or to tighten machine vice.
Machine is never to be left unattended when running.
Machine must be brushed (using a brush only) down when work is complete and machine has come to a
stop.
Empty the swarf tray as required.
Store all non-used machine tools (cutting tools etc.) in their storage location.
Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Checks & Inspections




Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by
the School
Ensure interlocks and emergency shutdown devices are checked each term
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 Only trained operators are allowed to operate the milling machine unsupervised
 All students are given training before being allowed to use the milling machine
 All students must be supervised when operating the milling machine
 Manual handling training.
 Chemical training
 PPE training
 MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)

Safety glasses


Overalls/shop coat
Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk.
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Unimolder Plastics Molding Machine
Ref: SWPS MEC 024
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Damaged or incorrectly wired electrical cables can result in electrocution-death, first, second and or third degree
burns.
Mechanical
Sliding guard door, moving injection piston can result in crushing of hand and fingers.
Hot Surfaces
Contact with hot moulds, heaters and hot materials can result in first, second or third degree burns to hands and
fingers.
Hydraulics
Contact with hydraulic fluid may cause minor irritation to the skin. Hydraulic injection fluid injuries, piercing the skin on
the hands and fingers. Acute or chronic respiratory illness from inhalation of hydraulic fluid aerosol.
Manual Handling
Lifting and pulling of machine guard can result in work related upper limb disorder, carrying of plastic materials and
moulds can cause lower back acute or chronic injuries.
Slips trips and falls
Poor housekeeping, leaking oil fluid, spilled plastic beads can cause slipping or tripping that results in falls and
concussion, major or minor cuts to the head.
Fumes
Acute or chronic respiratory illness from inhalation of fumes from overheated plastics
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Universal plastics moulding machine for injection, compression and blow moulding operations
Controls
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Lecturers and Technicians are only permitted to operate the machine.
Food or drink must not be consumed in workshop.
Personal belongings are not permitted beside or around workspace.
Maintain clear and clean workspace and floors all times.
Group gathering around machine is not permitted.
Materials must not be stored on top of the machine.
Loose or nylon clothing must not be worn when operating the machine.
Long hair must be tied back neatly.
Ensure all electrical cables are in good working order prior to use. Do not use if electrical cables are
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damaged.
Ensure floor is free from hydraulic oil prior to use. Do not use machine if leaking hydraulic fluid.
Avoid over filling of machine hopper when loading plastic pellets. Clean up any spilled plastic pellets
immediately.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times, exercise caution when lifting and placing moulds
into and out of the machine
Wear safety glasses at all times
Ensure safety guards and machine panels are in place and closed when machine is in operating mode
Use heat resistant gloves where required
Take heed of hazard warning notices
Ensure that there is adequate ventilation when operating the machine.
Checks & Inspections


Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by
the School
Ensure safety interlocks on guards and emergency shutdown devices are checked each term
Information, Instruction & Training





Only trained technicians are allowed to operate this machine
Manual Handling training
PPE training
Chemical Training.
MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Heat resistant gloves
 Safety glasses
 Safety boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Portable Electric Angle Grinder
Ref: SWPS 026
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Poorly maintained, damaged or cut cable and plugs can result in electrocution-death, first, second and third degree
burns.
Manual Handling
Incorrect lifting, holding or carrying pieces of machinery can result in acute or chronic lower back injuries and work
related upper limb disorder.
Mechanical
Contact with rotating cutting blade can result major skin lacerations, severing of fingers. Entanglement of loose
clothing, long hair may cause major cuts to body parts.
Flying debris
Shattered cutting disc, grinded material may result in loss of sight, body puncture would, minor cuts and bruises.
Ergonomics
Unfavourable working space, cramped position, can result in lower back injuries.
Fire
Flammable fuel sources may ignite from sparks and result in major burns to the body, asphyxiation form smoke
inhalation, and acute respiratory illness.
Slips trips & falls
Trailing cables and untidy work area can result in slipping or tripping that results in falls and concussion, major or
minor cuts to the head.
Persons Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Rough grinding of metal items using hand-held power tool
Controls
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Students are not permitted to use this machine.
Operators that have received formal abrasive wheel training may only operate this machine.
Competent persons must only carry out mounting of an abrasive wheel.
Group gatherings are not permitted at or around the machine when in use.
Food or drink must not be consumed at or near work area.
The wearing of loose or nylon clothing is not permitted.
Long hair must be neatly tied back.
Group gatherings are not permitted when machine in operation.
Work area must be maintained free from flammable materials, clutter and personal belongings.
Never carry or move the machine by the power cable.
The operator must carry out the required pre-operational (cable, plugs etc.) checks on the machine. Do not
use the machine if damaged in any way.
Eye protection to be worn at all times. When required wear a face guard.
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Adequate personal protective equipment (gloves, apron, boots) must be worn.
Only trained competent persons to mount wheels in accordance with the Abrasive Wheels Regulations
1982.
It is the duty of the employee to advise the Senior Technician of any repairs necessary to the machine where
they become aware.
Grinding should be performed in a controlled area (welding cubicle), certain circumstances may require
grinding to be performed in an open area.
Power cables must follow the rotating disc. No person, even the operator, is permitted to approach the
dangerous moving parts of the machine while it is in operation.
Do not touch a rotating grinding disc and allow coming to a stop.
In exceptional circumstances, when a competent person is present to operate the machine, a maintenance
person may observe the operation of the machine provided there is no risk of entanglement or coming in
contact with moving parts of the machine.
The operator should stop the machine if anyone has to move close to the grinding area for any reason,
taking account of draw down time unless brakes are fitted. Adequate warning signs should be placed at the
grinding area while in operation.
When the machine is not in use, precautions must be taken to ensure that it is fully immobilised.
Grinder must be returned to the stores after use & locked away under the lecturer, technician’s control.
Checks & Inspections




Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by
the School
Grinding/cutting disc to be changed and checked by technician
Technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training




Only trained persons are allowed to operate this machine or to replace a grinding wheel
Abrasive wheel training in accordance with S.I. No. 30/1982 - Safety in Industry (Abrasive Wheels)
Regulations, 1982.
PPE
Manual Handling
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety glasses/goggles, face guard
Boots
Apron
 Gloves
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Portable Electric Shears
Ref: SWPS MEC 027
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Damaged or defected electrical cables or plugs can result in electrocution-death or first, second or third
degree burns.
Manual Handling
Incorrect lifting, carrying and holding of shears and metal sheets can result in lower back injuries, work
related upper limb disorders.
Mechanical
Contact with moving blade can result in minor cuts to hands and fingers.
Slips trips & falls
Trailing cables and untidy work area can result in slipping or tripping that results in falls and concussion,
major or minor cuts to the head.
Sharps
Contact with machine blade, metal sheets can result in lacerations to the hands.
Ergonomics
Unfavorable working space and height can result in lower back discomfort, work related upper limb
disorder.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
A powered hand-held shears for cutting sheet metal
Controls









Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
Food or drink must not be consumed at or near work area.
The wearing of loose or nylon clothing is not permitted.
Long hair must be neatly tied back.
Group gatherings are not permitted when the machine is in operation.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times.
Maintain workspace free from clutter and personal belongings.
Measure and mark sheet metal for cutting prior to obtaining the machine. Ensure sheet metal is on a work
bench when marking for cutting.
Students must request the machine from the lecturer or technician when required.


Do not carry or move the machine by the power cable.
Ensure the machine and power cable is free from defects prior to use. Do not use the machine if damaged
in any way
 Plug in the machine at the sockets above the chosen workbench.
 Ensure adequate workspace is available and maintained when cutting materials
 Ensure the power cable follows the cutting blade when machine in is use
 Do not touch cutting blade or cut sheet metal edges with bare hands
 Machine must be returned to the lecturer or technician when no longer required.
 Tidy workspace from all sheet metal and cut offs when work is complete.
 Safety glasses must be worn.
 Safety gloves must be worn when handling sheet metal material.
 Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Checks & Inspections



Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by
the School
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training




All students are given training before being allowed to use the bending machine
All students must be supervised when operating the bending machine
Manual Handling Training
PPE Training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety glasses
Safety gloves
Safety boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Portable Spot Welder
Ref: SWPS MEC 028
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electrical
Contact with damaged plugs or cables can result in electrocution-death or first, second or third degree burns.
Manual Handling
Incorrect lifting, carrying and holding of welder can result acute or chronic lower back injuries, work related upper limb
disorders.
Mechanical
Contact with machine tong tips and linkages can crush hand parts and fingers.
Slips trips & falls
Trailing cables and untidy work area can result in slipping or tripping causing falls and concussion, major or minor
cuts to the head.
Ergonomics
Unfavorable working space and bench height can result in acute or chronic lower back discomfort and or work related
upper limb disorder.
Fire
Flying sparks can ignite combustible materials resulting in burns, and respiratory illness from inhalation of smoke.
Explosion
Flammable liquids exposed to heat or sparks can ignite and explode
Hot surfaces
Contact with heated metal surfaces can result in first or second and third degree burns to the hands and fingers.
Falling machinery / materials
Loose machine in vice or unsecure work material can result in falling item causing lower leg and feet impact injuries
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Spot welding is a process used to join thin metal sheets or plates. The sheets are placed in contact with one another
and are joined by the heat obtained from resistance to electric current flow. Work-pieces are held together under
pressure exerted by two electrodes. Welding current is concentrated into a small "spot”. Forcing a large current
through the spot will melt the metal and form the weld.
Controls
 Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
 Food or drink must not be consumed at or near work area.
 The wearing of loose or nylon clothing is not permitted.
 Long hair must be neatly tied back.
 Group gatherings are not permitted when the machine is in operation.
 Maintain workspace free from clutter and personal belongings.














Students must request the machine from the lecturer or technician when required.
Do not carry or move the machine by the power cable, use the machine handles.
Ensure the machine and electrical cable are free from damage or defects prior to use. Do not use if
damaged in any way.
Lecturers / technicians must set up machine at the required work bench, use vice if required.
Plug in the machine at the sockets above the chosen workbench.
Ensure adequate workspace is available and maintained when welding.
Ensure the power cable and hands do not come between machine tong tips.
Use hand held tongs when welding small components.
Do not touch hot welded surfaces with bare hands.
Ensure there is adequate ventilation prior to operating the machine.
Flammable and combustible materials must not be stored at or near welding working area.
Return the welder back to storage when no longer required.
Ensure to maintain a firm hold of the machine when in use.
Ensure work pieces are securely clamped or held
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 All students are given training before being allowed to use the spot welder
 All students must be supervised when operating the spot welder
 Only the designated area in the workshop is to be used for spot welding
 Manual handling training
 PPE training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety glasses/goggles must be worn at all times
Heat resistant gloves
Safety boots must be worn
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Thermo Forming Centre - Portable
Ref: SWPS MEC 032
Date: 20/07/2014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electrical
Poorly maintained, connected or damaged cables or plugs can result in electrocution-death or first, second or third degree
burns.
Manual Handling
Pulling and pushing machine into position can result in acute or chronic lower back injury and or work related upper limb
disorder. Incorrect lifting and closing of the machine heating hood can result in muscular skeletal injuries. Damaged wheels
can impede the movement of the machine resulting acute lower back injuries.
Pneumatics
Incorrectly fitted or damaged airlines can result in whipping airline, resulting in loss of sight, minor cuts and bruises
Trips and falls
Poor housekeeping or incorrect placement of machine can result in trips and falls that result in broken limbs minor cuts and
bruising.
Mechanical
Placing of hands in injection molding piston can result in crushing injuries to fingers and hands. Fingers or hands may get
crushed or trapped from closing manually operated heating hood, oven door. Loose clothing long hair may get trapped in
oven heating hood
Hot Surfaces
Inserting and removing metal components from the machine oven can result in first or second degree burns.
Chemicals
Overheated plastic materials can generate fumes resulting in respiratory illness.
Fire
Flammable sources in contact with hot surfaces may ignite and cause minor burns to the body.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The thermo forming centre is a machine used to soften plastic and polymer materials so that they can be pressed and
moulded into shapes, using basic dies and moulds. Also used for preheating metals for plastic dip coating.
Controls
 Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction & the lecturer or technician’s supervision.
 Food or drink must not be consumed at or near work area.
 The wearing of loose or nylon clothing is not permitted when operating the machine.
 Jewellery must not be worn when operating the machine.
 Long hair must be neatly tied back.
 Group gatherings are not permitted when the machine is in operation.
 Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times.
 Maintain workspace free from clutter and personal belongings.


Follow manual handling training when moving the machine and seek assistance if required.
Ensure wheels on machine are in good working order. Move the machine to the designated work area and lock both
caster wheels. Do not transport by pulling on cables and hoses.
 Inspect the electrical cable, plugs and airlines for damage or defects prior to operating the machine.
 Avoid the trailing of electrical cables.
 Ensure the required machine guards are in place prior to operating the machine.
 Use the handle on the oven when required to operate.
 Use both hands to operate the handle of the heating hood.
 Do not touch injection molding piston when in operation,
 Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on the machine face plate.
 Do not store flammable sources beside, on or near the machine.
 Ensure there is adequate ventilation when the machine is in use
 Use purpose-made tongs and handles for manipulating moulded components and materials
 Use heat resistant gloves when handling hot materials
 Use safety glasses at all times
 Take heed of hazard warning notices
 Do not use the machine if defective in any way.
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance inspections to be carried out and records kept by the School
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 All students are given training before being allowed to use this machine
 Students are only permitted to operate the machine while supervised
 Manual handling training
 PPE training
 Chemical training
 MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Heat resistant gloves
 Safety glasses
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Vacuum Form Plastic Cutter
Ref: SWPS MEC 033
Date: 20/072014
Revision No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Manual Handling
Moving the machine to and from storage location can result in lower back injuries.
Electricity
Incorrectly wired, damaged or poorly maintained cables can result in electrocution-death or first second and third
degree burns.
Slips trips and falls
Trailing cable, poor housekeeping can cause slips and trips resulting in falls and broken hands and fingers, minor
cuts and bruises. Folded floor mat may result in trips and fall impact head injuries causing concussion and minor
bruising.
Mechanical
Loose clothing, long hair in contact with rotating shaft can result in entanglement and cause minor cuts and
bruising. Contact with rotating blade can result in deep lacerations to the fingers and hands.
Flying material
Trimming plastic material creates flying waste material and can result in loss of sight or temporary eye discomfort.
Hot surfaces
Trimming plastic materials on the cutting tool can result in generating heat and cause minor burns to the hands
and fingers.
Falling machine
Poorly mounted and unsecured machine can fall and cause impact injuries resulting in broken toes and major
bruises.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The vacuum form plastic cutter is a portable bench mounted cutting device use to trim moulding flash and excess material
from vacuum formed components.
Controls



Lecturer or technicians must set up the machine.
Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
Follow manual handling training guidelines when lifting and transporting the machine.















Inspect the electrical cable and plug prior to use, do not use if damaged or defected in any way.
Electrical repairs must be carried out by a competent person.
Never pull or drag the machine by the electrical cable.
Ensure no trailing cables, plug into socket above workbench.
Maintain work area free from clutter and personal belongings.
Floor mats must lay firm and flat on the ground.
Loose clothing is not permitted when operating the machine.
Long hair must be neatly tied back.
Ensure machine guard is in place prior to using the machine.
Never touch the rotating cutting tool.
Chosen workbench must be free from materials so as to ensure secure mounting of machine.
Ensure that the machine is paced in from the workbench edge.
Group gatherings are not permitted around the machine unless under the lecturers supervision.
Safety glasses/goggles must be worn at all times.
Use heat resistant gloves when required.
Checks & Inspections



Regular maintenance inspections to be carried out and records kept by the School
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 All students are given training before being allowed to use the cutter
 All students must be supervised when operating the cutter
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)




Safety glasses/goggles
Heat resistant gloves
Manual Handling training
PPE Training
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
High Risk 9
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
Low Risk 1
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Air Compressor & Hoses
Ref: SWPS MEC 036
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Explosions
Over pressuring of compressor, not being maintained can result in explosions and ejected flying metal missiles causing
death, lacerations, deep puncture wounds, major and minor cuts and bruises.
Electricity
Loose, damaged or poorly maintained electrical cables, plugs can result in electrocution or first, second or third degree
burns.
Slips, Trips & Falls
Leaking water, untidy workspace, poor housekeeping, can cause personnel to slip trip and fall breaking limbs, cuts and
bruises and or concussion.
Noise
Poorly marinated compressors, missing guards can increase noise levels and cause acute or chronic permanent or
temporary hearing loss and discomfort.
Fire
Overheating of compressors can result in fire when in contact with fuel sources and cause first second or third degree
burns.
Whipping air lines
Damaged air lines, partly left open valves, poorly fitted connections can cause uncontrolled whipping lines striking
individuals and causing loss of sight minor cuts and bruises.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public  Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Compressing air to open and close demonstration valves, operate machinery, and particular hand held tools.
Controls









Students are not permitted to turn on Air Compressor or use airline hoses.
Only trained lecturers and technicians must operate the compressor.
Maintain good housekeeping and clutter free surrounding of the compressor at all times.
Inspect electrical cable and plugs for damage or defects prior to use, do not use if damaged or defected in any
way.
Dry up any leaking water immediately.
Ensure all machine guards and housing is in place at all times of use of the compressor.
Ensure all airline valves are closed prior to turning on compressor.
Switch on the compressor when required. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
Ensure all hose attachments and connectors are free from defects (do not use if damaged) prior to use. Leaking or







damaged airlines must only be repaired by a competent person.
All non-machine hose airlines must be stored in storage lab. Lecturer and technicians are only permitted to use
hose airlines. Return hose air lines to storage when no longer required.
Only trained persons may use the compressor.
All pipes, hoses, and fittings must have a rating of the maximum pressure of the compressor. Compressed air
pipelines should be identified (psi) as to maximum working pressure.
Air supply shutoff valves should be located (as near as possible) at the point-of-operation.
Air hoses should be kept free of grease and oil to minimise the possibility of deterioration.
Hoses must not be strung across floors or aisles where they are liable to cause personnel to trip and fall. When
possible, air supply hoses should be suspended overhead, or otherwise located to afford efficient access and
protection against damage.
Compressed air must not be used to blow down clothing etc. and disciplinary action will be taken against anybody
seen directing a live compressed air hose at any other person, as compressed air can enter the body via the skin
causing serious illness/fatality.
Checks & Inspections
 Annual test and inspection of the compressor must be completed by the insurer. A record of the test should be
kept by the School.
 Inspect hose and fittings prior to use.
Information, Instruction & Training

PPE
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)


Safety boots.
Glasses
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Portable Hand Guillotine
Ref: SWPS MEC 037
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Manual Handling
Lifting, carrying, pulling and pushing the machine to and from storage can result in acute or chronic lower
back injury and neck and arm injuries.
Sharps
Cutting blades, corners of sheet metal and damaged pieces of metal can cause deep lacerations to the
hands, arms, face and other body parts.
Slips, Trips & Falls
Untidy work space, poor housekeeping, personal belongings, supporting base legs of guillotine can cause
individuals to trip or slip resulting in broken limbs, concussion, major and minor cuts and bruises.
Mechanical
Operating hand lever of the machine can result in blunt blows to the head and body parts causing
concussion minor wounds and bruising, fingers in between shearing action of cutting blades can result in
severing of fingers.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Portable machine for cutting thin pieces of sheet metal into various sizes and shapes.
Controls
















Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
Food or drink must not be consumed in workshop.
Loose clothing is not permitted.
Long hair must be tied back neatly.
Personal belongings are not permitted beside or around workspace.
Maintain clear and clean workspace all times
Jewellery must not be worn when operating machine.
Group gathering around machine is not permitted.
Wear safety glasses at all times.
When required, place the machine (workshop or outside) into the required position and on firm level ground.
Seek assistance when moving the machine and follow manual handling training guidance.
Observe the placement of the supporting base of the machine when operating it.
Measure and mark metal sheets for cutting prior to using the machine.
Never touch machine cutting blades with bare hands.
When required, seek assistance in lifting and supporting large cut offs of metal sheets.
Wear leather work gloves when handling sheet metal stock.
Place metal sheet into the guillotine where cut is to be achieved.


Ensure that hands and fingers are clear of the cutting area at all times.
Ensure that both hands are on the end of the guillotine lever when operating it.
 Ensure secure firm footing at all times.
 Return the lever into the upright position when cutting is complete.
 Ensure spatial surroundings are free from persons and obstructions when operating the machine lever.
 Tidy the machine workspace and floor from all metal sheet cut offs.
 Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturers recommendations and records kept by
the School
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 All students are given training before being allowed to use the guillotine
 All students must be supervised when operating the guillotine
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)


Safety glasses
Leather work gloves
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
6 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
3
RISK FACTOR
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Fixed Guillotine
Ref: SWPS MEC 038
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Manual Handling
Lifting, carrying and holding heavy loads for cutting can result in acute or chronic lower back injury and
neck and arm injuries.
Sharps
Cutting blades, corners of sheet metal and damaged pieces of metal can cause deep lacerations to the
hands, arms, face and other body parts.
Slips, Trips & Falls
Untidy work space, poor housekeeping can cause individuals to trip or slip resulting in broken limbs,
concussion, major and minor cuts and bruises.
Mechanical
Moving parts of machinery can result in blunt blows to the head and body parts causing concussion minor
wounds and bruising, fingers in between shearing action of cutting blades can result in severing of fingers.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Portable machine for cutting thin pieces of sheet metal in various sizes and shapes.
Controls














Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or
technician’s supervision.
Food or drink must not be consumed in workshop.
Loose clothing is not permitted.
Long hair must be tied back neatly.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Jewellery must not be worn when operating machine.
Group gathering around machine is not permitted.
Wear safety glasses at all times.
Measure and mark metal sheets for cutting prior to using the machine.
When required, seek assistance in lifting and supporting large cut offs of metal sheets.
Wear leather work gloves when handling sheet metal stock.
Ensure that hands and fingers are clear of the cutting area at all times. Do not touch cutting blade
with bare hands.
Ensure spatial surroundings are free from persons and obstructions when operating the machine
lever.
Both hands should be used to operate the machine lever.
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Return the lever into the upright position when cutting is complete, tidy the machine workspace and
floor from all metal sheet cut offs.
Take heed of hazard warning notices.
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 All students are given training before being allowed to use the guillotine
 All students must be supervised when operating the guillotine
 Manual handling training
 PPE training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)


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Safety glasses
Leather work gloves
Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
6 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
Possible
2
Unlikely
1
RISK FACTOR
3
1-3 Low Risk
Serious
2
4
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Fly Press
Ref: SWPS MEC 039
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Mechanical
Contact with rotating fly wheel can result in blunt blows to the head, eyes and upper body parts resulting in
concussion or minor bruising. Crushing of fingers can occur when pressing bearings. Loose clothing, long
hair can become entangled with fly wheel and result in neck injuries and minor bruising to body parts.
Chemicals
Hands in contact with machine lubricating oil can result in contact dermatitis and minor skin irritations.
Sips trips and falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings, folded matting can generate slip and trip hazards resulting in falls
and head injuries, broken arms, minor cuts and bruises.
Falling machine
Unsecured machine can fall and cause impact injury resulting in broken bones in the feet and lower legs,
major and minor cuts and bruises.
Manual Handling
Incorrect pulling of the fly wheel can result in acute lower back or upper arm injuries.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The machine is used to press bearings and bushings
Controls
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Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or
technician’s supervision.
Food or drink is not permitted at or near the workstation.
Do not touch lubricated parts of the machine with bare hands, wash hands or skin if in contact with
oil.
Use the machine as instructed and always keep head and body parts clear of the fly wheel.
Ensure the fly wheel arm is properly configured prior to use.
Do not place hands and fingers between moving parts, use both hands when turning the fly wheel.
Maintain work area free from clutter and personal belongings at all times.
Floor matting must be secure and flat on the ground at all times.
Ensure that the machine is securely bolted to the work bench.
Follow the manual handling safety guidelines when operating the fly wheel.
Do not wear loose clothing.
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Long hair must be neatly tied back or cap worn when operating the machine.
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance inspections to be carried out and records kept by the School
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Information, Instruction & Training
 Operators must be trained in how to use the machine.
 Manual handling training.
 Chemical training.
 MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
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Safety glasses/goggles
Safety boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
4 medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
Probable 3
Critical
Possible
2
Unlikely
1
RISK FACTOR
3
1-3 Low Risk
Serious
2
4
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Transportation & Storage of Metal Stock
Ref: SWPS MEC 040
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Manual handling
Lifting and carrying long pieces of metal can result in acute or chronic lower back injuries and work related
upper limb disorder.
Slips trips and falls
Metal materials lying on the ground can cause slipping and tripping that results in falls to the ground or
against stored materials resulting in possible concussion, major and minor cuts to the head, broken hand or
arm, major and minor cuts and bruises to hands.
Metal Sharps
Lifting and carrying metal sheets and rods etc. can result in loss of sight from metal sharps, major and
minor cuts or puncture wounds to the hands, arms and other body parts.
Falling materials
Heavy loads can slip and fall when carrying causing impact injuries to the feet and lower legs resulting in
broken bones, major and, minor cuts and bruising.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Flat metal sheeting, long metal rods etc. are taken in from a supplier and stored in the metal storage area for when
required.
Controls
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Technicians are only permitted to receive stock from suppliers and place in storage.
Students are permitted to take stock from the stores as required, under correct instruction and the
lecturer or technician’s supervision.
Seek assistance when transporting metal stock into the storage area.
Heavy metal bars must be stored on bottom shelving & light material rods etc. on top shelving.
Sheet metal must be stored on its side against the wall in the stores.
Pre-cut long pieces of metal to the required length prior to moving to storage. Inspect cut material
for metal sharps and file smooth if required.
Ensure the walkway of the stores is maintained free from metals & maintain good housekeeping at
all times. Personal belongings must not be stored in with metal materials.
Ensure manual handling training guidelines are followed at all times.
Safety glasses must be worn at all times.
Use leather apron and gloves at all times.
Safety boots must be worn at all times.
Checks & Inspections


Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training


Manual handling training
PPE training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety glasses
Leather apron
Safety boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
2
Severity
=
Risk Factor
4 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Carif 260, Semi-Automatic Band Saw
Ref: SWPS MEC 041
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly wired, damaged power cables can result in electrocution-death or first second and third degree burns.
Manual Handling
Lifting and carrying heavy loads for cutting can result in acute or chronic lower back and or musculoskeletal injuries.
Ergonomics
Operating the cutting handle of the machine for extended periods of time can result in work related upper limb
disorder.
Noise
Poorly maintained machinery can generate unnecessary noise when cutting various metal materials and cause acute
hearing discomfort.
Chemicals
Filling the machine with cutting fluid can cause spilling and splashing and result in minor eye and skin irritation.
Handling of lubricated cut metal or saw blade can result skin minor irritation to the hands and fingers.
Slips, trips and falls
Oil on floor may result in slips and cause impact head injuries from falling, minor and major cuts and bruises. Cutting
Long pieces of cutting materials, poor housekeeping & incorrect storing of metal can cause trips resulting in impact
head injuries from falls.
Sharps
Contact with machine cut metal can cause lacerations to the hands, fingers and other body parts. Contact with saw
blade teeth can result in cuts to the hands and fingers.
Mechanical
Contact with rotating saw blade can result in severing of fingers & hands. Loose clothing, long hair can become
entangled with machine causing death.
Flying debris
Cutting of various metals can generate flying materials and cause loss of sight or eye irritation. Unsecured work piece
can fly and cause blunt force injuries resulting in concussion and bruising. Damaged or poorly fitted saw blade can
result in ejected materials causing loss of sight and cuts.
Hydraulics
Damaged hydraulic hoses, ejecting hydraulic fluid can result in piercing of the skin, loss of sight and minor skin
irritation.
Person Exposed to Risk
Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Long and short pieces of square, cylindrical, flat, metal tubing and rods of varying diameters are loaded into the
machine and cut to a required length using a rotating machine saw.
Controls
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Trained operators (lecturers /technicians) must only use the machine.
Students are not permitted to use the machine.
Stand back from the machine when cutting is in progress.
Group gatherings are not permitted with this machine, unless under the lecturers / technicians supervision.
Materials must not be stored on top of or beside the machine.
Prior to use, inspect the machine power cables and plug for any damage or defects. Do not use if damaged
or defected in any way and remove form use for repair by a competent person.
Ensure emergency stop button is in good working order.
Follow manual handling training guidelines at all times, seek assistance where loads are too heavy or
awkward to handle and lift.
Ensure the machine is adequately filled with cutting oil and that it is turned on. Wear gloves and glasses
when filling with cutting oil, pour carefully, and avoid spilling and splashing.
Clean all cutting oil up that comes into contact with the floor as soon as possible.
Collect all metal cut offs in an empty bucket.
Remove and replace clothing contaminated with cutting oil. Wash any contaminated skin immediately.
Wear gloves if handling metals or saw blade in contact with cutting fluid.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Ensure the machine rollers are free rolling.
Hand file or grind any metal burrs & sharps if required.
Ensure all machine and blade guards are in place prior to operating the machine.
Stand clear and allow the machine to stop if the blade breaks when running.
Never touch the rotating saw blade.
Hands and body parts must remain clear from the rotating saw blade at all times.
Loose clothing must not be worn and long hair must be neatly tied back or a cap worn.
Wear safety glasses at all times when operating the machine.
Ensure material for cutting is properly clamped and secure.
Never cut more than one metal tubing or piping at a time.
Ensure saw blade is correctly tensioned prior to use, replace any damaged saw blades.
Wear gloves when handling cut materials, piping or removing and replacing saw blade.
Ensure hydraulic machine hoses are in good order prior to use, do not use if damaged or leaking.
Switch off the machine when it is no longer required and tidy up work area.
Unused metal stock must be returned to storage.
Checks & Inspections



Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School.
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 Machine operation
 Manual handling training
 PPE training
 Chemical training
 MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety Glasses
Safety Boots
Gloves
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Portable Optimum Bit Grinder
Ref: SWPS MEC 042
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly wired, damaged or poorly maintained electrical power cables can result in electrocution-death or first
second and third degree burns.
Manual Handling
Lifting and carrying the machine into the required location can result in acute or chronic lower back or
musculoskeletal injuries.
Ergonomics
Setting the machine up at a height that is too low or high can result in acute or chronic lower back or musculoskeletal
injuries.
Falling Machine
Unsecure machine on work bench edge can fall resulting in lower leg and feet impact injuries and bruising.
Slips, trips and falls
Folded mats, trailing cables, poor housekeeping can result in slipping and tripping causing head impact injury and
cuts and bruises. Wet floor when transporting machine resulting in splashing from trough causing slips and fall head
impact injuries.
Sharps
Contact with drill bits for sharping can result in lacerations to the hands and fingers.
Ejected metal / debris
Operating hand vise can result in hands in contact with metal debris & inadvertently being rubbed into and causing
eye damage.
Hot Surfaces
Contact with machined drilled bits can result in minor burns to the hands and fingers.
Mechanical
Loose clothing, long hair can become entangled with the machine causing minor cuts and bruising. Abrasions to
hands and fingers from touching rotating stone.
Person Exposed to Risk
Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Damaged, blunt machine drill bits are inserted into the machine vise for manually operated reshaping on a rotating
sharping stone.
Controls
 Students are not permitted to use this machine.
 Operators that have received formal abrasive wheel training may only operate this machine.
 Competent persons must only carry out mounting of an abrasive wheel.
 Group gatherings are not permitted at or around the machine when in use.
 Materials must not be stored on top of or beside the machine.
 Inspect the machine power cable and plug for defects or damage prior to use. Do not use the machine
where cables are damaged or defected in any way, remove from use for repair by a competent person.
Ensure emergency stop button is in good working order.
Follow manual handling training guidelines at all times, seek assistance if required.
Ensure the machine is set up at the required height when in use.
Ensure the machine is placed in from the work bench edge, level and flat.
Ensure all floor matting is lying firm and flat along the ground.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Machine electrical cable should be plugged into sockets above workbenches or tables.
Do not touch the drill bit or cutting tool head, handle by the shank.
Use water in machine water trough to cool machined hot metals.
Ensure all machine guards are in place prior to operating the machine.
Never touch the rotating stone on the machine. Use machine clamping device at all times and ensure piece
is securely clamped.
 Do not fill machine water trough prior to moving, do not over fill water trough when in position. Empty water
trough when no longer required.
 Never touch hands to eyes during or after grinding, wash hands thoroughly after grinding is complete.
 Loose clothing must not be worn and long hair must be neatly tied back or a cap worn.
 Wear safety glasses at all times when operating the machine.
 Switch off the machine when it is no longer required for use and tidy up work area.
Checks & Inspections
 Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School.
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE

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Information, Instruction & Training
 Abrasive wheel training in accordance with S.I. No. 30/1982 - Safety in Industry (Abrasive Wheels)
Regulations, 1982.
 Manual handling training
 PPE training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Safety Glasses
 Safety Boots
 Gloves
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Hurco TM 6
Ref: SWPS MEC 043
Date: 28/01/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly wired, loose or damaged power cables can result in electrocution-death or first second and third degree
burns.
Manual Handling
Lifting and carrying drums of machine cutting fluid, swarf waste bin, reservoir oil tray, & removing and lifting machine
panels and parts for maintenance can result in acute or chronic lower back injuries.
Slips, trips and falls
Folded mats, transformer power cables, poor housekeeping, personal belongings, machine control pedals can result
in tripping causing head impact injuries and cuts and bruises. Spilled, leaking, splashed hydraulic or cutting fluid &
waste material can result in slipping causing falls & head impact injuries.
Chemicals
Filling the machine with cutting fluid can result in spilling & splashing of fluid & cause minor eye and skin irritation and
clothing contamination. Cutting oil in contact with hands and body parts can result in minor skin irritation.
Pneumatics
Incorrectly installed, damaged or inadvertent banging of airline can result in uncontrolled whipping airline causing
loss of sight & minor eye injuries.
Sharps
Contact with cutting tool, chuck head, tail stock, machined material, swarf can result in cuts to the hands / fingers
Mechanical
Crush injuries and entrapment from tail stock and chuck head. Crushed fingers from closing machine door & part
capture. Pinch points from replacing panels. Entanglement of loose clothing and long hair resulting in neck and head
injuries. Entrapment with chuck head and or tail stock when loading or adjusting work piece.
Flying Missile & Debris
Machining material, brushing or blowing of swarf can generate flying debris and result in loss of sight. Unsecure work
piece in chuck head can result in flying missile & cause major blunt force head injuries.
Falling objects
Machine cutting tools and miscellaneous materials stored on top of the machine can fall and cause impact injuries to
the head and other body parts.
Fire
Machine not maintained can lead to overheating of machine oil, burnt cables etc. and result first second or third
degree burns.
Hot Surfaces
Insufficient cutting oil on machined cutting tool/work pieces can result in minor burns to the hands and fingers.
Person Exposed to Risk
Students
 Employees  Public
Work Description
 Contractors
 Visitors
Using Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) MTurning Centre to machine (cut) metal, polymers to a desired part or
component shape
Controls
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Only trained operators can use the machine, students must be supervised by the lecturer or technician
when using the machine.
All machine guards must be in place prior to operating the machine.
Group gatherings are not permitted with the machine unless under the supervision of the lecturer.
Ensure that all electrical power cables are free from defects or damage prior to using the machine, do not
use if damaged in any way and remove from use for repair by a competent person.
Loose clothing or jewellery must not be worn when operating the machine.
Long hair must be neatly tied back or a cap worn.
Never touch a machine rotating or moving part.
Marked pedestrian walkway must be used at all times by passers-by.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines when lifting, pulling, pushing or carrying heavy loads.
Ensure that the machine surrounding floor space is free from oil leaks at all times.
Cutting fluid or waste material on the floor must be cleaned as soon as noticed.
Avoid the spilling and splashing of cutting fluid when topping up the machine.
Remove and replace any clothing contaminated with cutting fluid or oil immediately.
Wash skin contaminated by cutting fluid or oil immediately.
Avoid trailing power cables with the machine control pedals and transformer.
Ensure all floor mats are lying flat on the ground.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Safety glasses must be worn when operating or maintaining the machine.
Safety gloves must be worn when handling cutting fluid, machined materials or parts in contact with cutting
fluid.
Ensure airlines are securely fitted, free from damage or leaks prior to using the machine. Do not use if
damaged or defected in any way and remove from use for repair by a competent person.
Always brush swarf away from yourself & machine parts & machined materials. Never use air to remove
swarf.
Never handle swarf with bare hands.
Wear gloves when handling the cutting tool, tail stock, raw materials or machined materials.
Do not place fingers or hands in-between moving chuck clamp or tail stock.
Keep fingers and hands clear when closing machine doors and machines parts capture.
Ensure material in chuck head is securely clamped prior to operating the machine.
Never store machine parts or miscellaneous items on top of the machine.
Turn off the machine when it is no longer required.
Student part programmes from “of line” programme should only be imported into the Hurco master file.
Checking of interlocks as per recommendations in Hurco safety manual
CE locks, interlocks or hardware, limit switches or other guarding must never be interfered with.
Front door can never be open during machining.
The chuck foot pedal must be operated by the same operator loading and unloading the work piece.
Machine door must be closed before tail stock foot pedal is operated. The machine operator must only
advance the tail stock.
Side door must only be opened for service proposes; door must be bolted closed during any machining

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
operations, or machine movements.
Emergency Stop button must be unobstructed and tested each term.
No person is permitted inside the enclosure without correct equipment lock out procedures in place.
Always wash your hands when finished using the machine.
Checks & Inspections
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Maintenance to be carried out according to manufactures recommendations (Ch. 4)
Maintenance log to be maintained by the School
Ensure safety interlocks are checked each term
Technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lectures and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training





Machine operation
Manual handling training
PPE training
Chemical training
MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety Glasses
Safety Boots
Gloves
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Hurco VM 10
Ref: SWPS MEC 044
Date: 28/01/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Incorrectly wired, loose or damaged power cables can result in electrocution-death or first second and third degree
burns.
Manual Handling
Lifting and carrying drums of machine cutting fluid, swarf waste bin, reservoir oil tray, machine panels and parts (vise
dividing head etc.), for use or maintenance can result in acute or chronic lower back injuries.
Slips, trips and falls
Folded mats, poor housekeeping, personal belongings, air and cooling fluid hose lines can result in tripping causing
head impact injuries. Spilled, leaking, splashed hydraulic or cutting fluid & waste material can result in slipping
causing falls & head impact injuries.
Chemicals
Filling the machine with cutting fluid can result in spilling and splashing of cutting fluid & cause minor eye and skin
irritation and contamination of clothing.
Pneumatics
Incorrectly installed, damaged or inadvertent banging of airline can result in uncontrolled whipping airline causing loss
of sight & minor eye injuries.
Sharps
Contact with cutting tool, chuck head, machined material and swarf can result in lacerations to the hands and fingers.
Mechanical
Crush injuries and entrapment with tail stock and chuck head. Crushed fingers from closing machine door & part
capture. Pinch points from replacing panels. Entanglement of loose clothing, long hair with rotating cutting tool
resulting in neck and head injuries. Pinch points when manually inserting cutting tool resulting in loss of finger.
Flying missile / debris
Unsecure work piece or vise can result in flying missile & cause major blunt force head & body injuries. Machining
material, brushing or blowing of swarf can generate flying debris & oil and result in permanent eye damage.
Falling objects
Machine cutting tools and miscellaneous materials stored on top of the machine fall and cause impact injuries to the
head and other body parts.
Fire
Machine not maintained leading to overheating of machine oil, burnt cables etc. resulting burns to the body
Hot Surfaces
Insufficient cutting oil on machined cutting tool and work pieces can result in minor burns to the hands and fingers.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public  Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Using Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) MTurning Centre to machine (cut) metal, polymers to a desired part or
component shape.
Controls
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Only trained operators can use the machine, students must be supervised by the lecturer or technician when
using the machine.
All machine guards must be in place prior to operating the machine.
Group gatherings are not permitted with the machine unless under the supervision of the lecturer/technician.
Marked pedestrian walkway must be used at all times by passers-by.
Ensure that all electrical power cables are free from defects or damage prior to using the machine, do not
use if damaged in any way and remove from use for repair by a competent person.
Lose clothing or jewellery must not be worn when operating the machine.
Long hair must be neatly tied back or a cap worn.
Never touch a machine rotating or moving part.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines when lifting, pulling, pushing or carrying heavy loads.
Ensure that the machine surrounding floor space is free from oil leaks at all times.
Ensure there is adequate cutting fluid prior to operating the machine.
Cutting fluid or waste material on the floor must be cleaned as soon as noticed.
Avoid the spilling and splashing of cutting fluid when topping up the machine.
Remove and replace any clothing contaminated with cutting fluid or oil immediately.
Wash skin contaminated by cutting fluid or oil immediately.
Ensure all floor mats are lying flat on the ground.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Safety glasses must be worn when operating or maintaining the machine.
Safety gloves must be worn when handling cutting fluid or machined materials or parts in contact with cutting
fluid or jot surfaces.
Ensure airlines are securely fitted, free from damage or leaks prior to using the machine. Do not use if
damaged or defected in any way and remove from use for repair by a competent person..
Always brush swarf away from yourself & machine parts & machined materials.
Only trained operators can use air and coolant guns on the machine.
Students must never use air or oil coolant guns.
Never test air or coolant guns against body parts.
Do not handle swarf with bare hands.
Wear gloves when handling the cutting tool, tail stock, raw materials or machined materials.
Keep fingers and hands clear when closing machine doors.
Never store machine parts or miscellaneous items on top of the machine.
Turn off the machine when it is no longer required.
Student part programmes from “of line” programme should only be imported into the Hurco master file.
Checking of interlocks as per recommendations in Hurco safety manual.
CE locks, interlocks or hardware, limit switches or other guarding must never be interfered with.
Work area must be cordoned off when side doors of machine are open for machining of large components

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

and under the lecturers supervision at all times of the operation.
Front door can never be open during machining
Side door must only be opened for service proposes; door must be bolted closed during any machining
operations, or machine movements.
Emergency Stop button must be unobstructed and tested each term.
No person is permitted inside the enclosure without correct equipment lock out procedures in place.
Always wash your hands when finished using the machine.
Checks & Inspections
 Maintenance to be carried out according to manufactures recommendations (Ch. 4)
 Maintenance log to be maintained by the School
 Ensure safety interlocks are checked each term
 Technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
 Lectures and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training
 Machine operation
 Manual handling training
 PPE training
 Chemical training
 MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Safety Glasses
 Safety Boots
 Gloves
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Edwards Bench Mounted Bending Machine
Ref: SWPS MEC 066
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Falling Machine
The machine is placed on the edge of the workbench and falls causing lower leg and feet impact and crushing
injuries.
Manual Handling
Lifting and lowering of the bending lever of the machine for extended periods of time can result in work related upper
limb disorder.
Mechanical
Crushing and entrapment of hands and fingers when in between manual descending clamping metal plate. Crushing
of fingers when in between hinge limit and bending bolt or compressing springs.
Slips Trips and Falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings, metal artefacts lying on the ground can result in slips and trips causing fall
impact head and body injuries.
Sharps
Handling flat pieces of metal for bending can contain sharp edges or corners that can result in deep lacerations to the
hands and fingers.
Flying Debris
Bending pieces of metal can result in metal breaking and flying thus resulting in loss of sight from metal flying
fragments.
Person Exposed to Risk
Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The Machine is used for bending and folding various flat metal sheets or bars.
Controls
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Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
Ensure that the machine is fixed bolted to the work bench.
If required, tend to other duties for periods of rest from repeatedly operating the bending lever of the
machine.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines at all times.
Never place hands and fingers in between the manual descending clamping plate.
Always keep fingers and hands on the outside of the machine when holding metal for bending.
Do not place fingers tips in between the hinge limit and bending bolt.
Never touch the springs of the machine when it is in use.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Always use the work bench at the machine to store metal parts for or after bending.
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Where possible file smooth any sharp metal edges or corners on material for bending.
If required wear leather gloves for handling metal sharps.
Be aware of other people in the vicinity of the machine and ensure the work area is clear before using
equipment.
 Wear eye protection when operating the machine.
Checks & Inspections
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

Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School.
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training


Manual handling training
PPE training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety Boots
Safety Gloves
Safety Glasses
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
2
Severity
=
Risk Factor
4 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Mitutoyu Optical Comparator
Ref: SWPS MEC 069
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Falling Machine
The machine is placed at the workbench edge and falls resulting in lower leg and feet impact injuries.
Electricity
Poorly maintained, damaged or defected electrical power cable or plug can result in electrocution-death or first,
second and or third degree burns.
Slips Trips and Falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings, trailing electrical cables lying on the ground can result in slips and trips
causing fall impact head and body injuries.
Manual Handling
Moving the machine to or from storage can result in acute or chronic lower back or musculoskeletal injuries.
Person Exposed to Risk
Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The Machine is used for bending and folding various flat metal sheets or bars.
Controls
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Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision.
Ensure that the machine is placed in from the work top edge, flat and level.
Inspect the machine electrical cable and plug for damage or defects prior to use, do not use if damaged or
defected in any way. Competent person/s must carry out all electrical repairs.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Avoid the trailing of the electrical cable by plugging the machine in the socket mounted on the wall behind
the machine.
Follow the manual handling training guide lines if required to move the machine and seek assistance.
Ensure that all electrical covers are in place and closed prior to operating the machine.
Checks & Inspections



Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School.
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training

Manual handling training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)

Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Scrolling Apparatus
Ref: SWPS MEC 070
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Falling Apparatus
Mounting the apparatus on the edge of the workbench can fall and result in lower leg and feet impact and injuries.
Manual Handling
Repeated lifting and lowering of the bending lever of the machine can result in work related upper limb disorder.
Mechanical
Crushing of fingers with manual descending clamping roller. Crushing of fingers tips if in between ascending clamp
and limit bolt. Shearing or crushing of finger tips if in between lever and bolt pivot points.
Slips Trips and Falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings, metal artefacts lying on the ground can result in slips and trips causing fall
impact head and body injuries.
Sharps
Handling round or flat pieces of metal for scrolling can contain sharp edges or corners that can result in deep
lacerations to the hands and fingers.
Flying Debris
Scrolling pieces of metal can result in metal breaking and flying thus resulting in loss of sight from metal flying
fragments.
Person Exposed to Risk
Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The Machine is used for scrolling flat and round pieces of metal.
Controls
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Students are permitted to operate the machine, under correct instruction and the lecturer or technician’s
supervision. .
Ensure that the apparatus is fixed bolted to the work bench prior to operating it.
Tend to other duties for periods of rest from repeatedly operating the bending lever of the machine.
Never place hands and fingers in between the manual descending clamping roller clamp & limit bolt.
Never place finger tips in between lever and bolt pivot points.
Never rest free hand on the machine when scrolling metal pieces.
Where possible always use both hands to scroll metal pieces.
Do not place fingers tips in between the hinge limit and bending bolt.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Always use the work bench at the machine to store metal parts for or after bending.
Where possible file smooth any sharp metal edges or corners prior to scrolling.
If required wear leather gloves for handling metal sharps.
Ensure work area is free from bystanders when operating the machine.
 Wear eye protection when operating the machine.
Checks & Inspections



Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School.
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training


Manual handling training
PPE training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)



Safety Boots
Safety Gloves
Safety Glasses
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
2
Severity
=
Risk Factor
4 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Colchester Universal Workbenches
Ref: SWPS MEC 071
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Manual Handling
Moving the workbench to and from location, adjusting the height of the bench can result in acute or chronic lower
back and or musculoskeletal injury.
Slips trips and Falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings, rubber mats and metal materials lying on the ground can result in slipping
and tripping causing falls and head and body impact injuries cuts and bruises.
Falling Bench
Moving the bench to and from required location can result in the bench toppling over and falling causing feet crushing
injuries, lower leg impact injuries.
Mechanical
Adjusting the height of the table can result in crushing of fingers if holding on to the shaft when the table is being
lowered to the required height. Crushing of fingers when clamping in materials on the vice.
Ergonomics
Carrying out work on the work bench that is too low or high can result in acute or chronic lower back and or
musculoskeletal injuries.
Person Exposed to Risk
Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The workbenches are mobile and can be used as supplementary workbenches.
Controls


Students are permitted to use the benches, under the lecturer or technicians supervision.
Follow the manual handling training guidelines and seek assistance if required to move the table or use a
trolley if required to transport the workbench several metres away.
 Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
 Never leave metal artefacts lying on the ground.
 Ensure rubber mats are lying flat on the ground.
 Where possible leave the bench in the same location.
 Never hold on to the shaft of the workbench when adjusting the bench height.
 Never place hands or fingers in between the closing jaws of the vice when clamping materials.
 Always seek assistance when adjusting the table height.
 Ensure that the table is adjusted to the required height prior to carrying out work on it.
 Wear safety boots when working oat the bench.
Checks & Inspections

Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records kept by
the School.


Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training


Manual handling training
PPE training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)

Safety Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
2
Severity
=
Risk Factor
4 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Hand Tools
Ref: SWPS MEC 079
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Sharps
Holding tools by the cutting edge or blade, placing fingers between the cutting blades of snips, damaged
tool handles with sharp metal parts can result in lacerations to the hands and fingers. Puncture wounds to
body parts pointed sharps (scribes etc.)
Flying Debris
Inappropriate use of the tool can result in the metal tool breaking and causing flying metal parts, hack saw
blade breaks, striking metal objects with hammers etc. can result in loss of sight or puncture wounds to the
body.
Ergonomics
Holding and using hand tools for extended periods of time can result in work related upper limb disorder.
Falling hand Tools
Tool rolls from the workbench, tools placed at the edge of the work bench edge, over loading of the body
with hand tools when transporting resulting in lower leg and feet crush and or puncture injuries from falling
tools.
Slips Trips and Falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings, hand tools lying of the ground can result in slipping and tripping
causing falls and head and body impact injuries.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The hand tools are manually operated and are used to cut, punch, file, extract, bend, measure etc. and can
consist of metal and or wooden handles. The types of tools used can include hammers, files, dividers,
callipers, scribes, spot punch, squares, hacksaws, stock dyes, tin men snips and clamps etc.
Controls
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Students are permitted to use the hand tools under correct instruction and the lecture or
technicians supervision.
Inspect the hand tool for damage or defects prior to use, do not use if damaged or defected in any
way and remove from use for repair or replacement.
Always hold the tool by its handle.
Never place fingers in between closing parts of a hand tool.
Never press pointed sharps against any part of the body, always carry out work on a work bench or
away from the body.
 Always use the tool as intended by the manufacturer.
 Safety glasses must be worn at all times of hand tool use.
 Avoid the use of hand tools for extended periods of time, tend to other duties for periods of rest.
 Ensure tools are placed in from the work bench edge when not in use.
 Ensure tools cannot roll off the workbench when placed upon it.
 Never over load the body with hand tools when transporting.
 Safety boots must be worn at all times.
 Never throw or drop tools to the ground or workbench.
 Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
 Hand tools must never be stored or left lying on the ground.
Checks & Inspections


Lecturer and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures.
Lecturer and technician to monitor the wearing of PPE.
Information, Instruction & Training

PPE Training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Safety Boots
 Safety glasses
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
2
x
2
Severity
=
Risk Factor
4 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
2
=
Risk Factor
2 High Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Soldering
Ref: SWPS MEC 080
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Poorly fitted, loose or damaged electrical wiring or plug on the soldering Iron can result in electrocutiondeath or first, second and or third degree burns.
Hot surfaces / Liquids
Contact with heated soldering iron or liquid metals can result in first second and or third degree burns to the
hands and fingers.
Fire
Flammable materials in contact with hot soldering iron can result in fire, minor and or major burns and or
respiratory illness from smoke inhalation.
Fumes
Soldering metal parts together can result in the inhalation of fumes and cause acute or chronic respiratory
illness.
Chemicals
Applying flux when soldering can result in acute or chronic irritation to the hands and finger, inadvertent
ingestion of solder can result in acute or chronic illness.
Slips Trips and Falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings, trailing cables can cause tripping and result in head and body fall
impact injuries.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Soldering is carried out so as to join two join two pieces of metal together.
Controls
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Students are not permitted to carry out soldering.
Soldering must be carried out by a lecturer or technician.
Inspect the electrical power cable & plug of the soldering iron for damage or defects prior to use.
Do not use the soldering iron if the power cable or plug is damaged or defected in any way and
remove from use for repair.
All electrical repairs must be carried out by a competent person.
Always hold the soldering iron by the handle.
 Allow heated metals to adequately cool prior to handling.
 Wear heat resistant gloves if required to handle hot materials.
 Flammable materials must not be stored at or near the soldering iron when in use.
 Ensure soldering is performed in the welding shop and that the extract system is turned on.
 Use a brush when applying flux and wear safety gloves.
 Always wash your hands after soldering is complete.
 Food or drink must not be consumed in the work shop.
 Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
 Avoid trailing cables and use the socket mounted on the wall.
Checks & Inspections



Regular maintenance carried out on in accordance with the manufacturers recommendations and
records maintained by the school
Lecturer and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures.
Lecturer and technician to monitor the wearing of PPE.
Information, Instruction & Training



PPE Training
Chemical Training
MSDS for Flux and Solder.
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Safety Boots
 Safety glasses
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 Medium Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 High Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Corded and Cordless Hand Held Drills
Ref: SWPS MEC 081
Date: 23/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Poorly or incorrectly connected, fitted, damaged or defected electrical cables and plugs can result in
electrocution-death or first, second and or third degree burns.
Slips Trips and Falls
Poor housekeeping, personal belongings or a trailing electrical cable, hand tool lying on the ground can
result in slipping and tripping causing fall impact head and body injuries.
Mechanical
Entanglement of long hair or loose clothing with rotating tool or chuck head can result in minor cuts and
bruises. Cuts to hands and fingers when in contact with rotating cutting tools.
Ergonomics
Operating the tool in crunched awkward positions and for extended periods of time can result in acute or
chronic lower back and or upper body musculoskeletal injuries.
Vibration / Torque
Drilling various materials can result in vibration and cause hand and vibration injuries (white finger). Drilling
various materials can result in sprains to the wrist and elbow when the drill comes to a sudden stop.
Flying Debris
Drilling various materials can generate flying debris (swarf) and result in loss of sight, drill bits can shatter
when in use and fly resulting in loss of sight or minor cuts.
Noise
Drilling various materials can result in the generation of noise and cause temporary hearing discomfort.
Sharps
Drill bits can contain sharps and result in minor lacerations to the hands and fingers when handled.
Falling Machine
Unsecure hold of hand tool when operating it, hand tool placed on the edge of a work bench can result in a
falling tool and cause lower leg and feet impact injuries.
Person Exposed to Risk
Students
 Employees  Public  Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
The hand tools are used for drillings holes or screws into or cleaning down various materials.
Controls

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
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
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


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Students are not permitted use of the equipment.
Where possible always use a battery operated or 110v drill. If required to use a 240v drill ensure
that it is plugged in to a socket with a Residual Control Device (RCD).
240v power tools are not permitted to be used for external work.
Inspect the electrical cable, plugs and drill for damage or defects prior to use.
Do not use if cable or drill is defected or damaged in any way and remove from use for repair by a
competent person or safe disposal of.
Maintain good housekeeping and work area free from personal belongings at all times.
Avoid the trailing of electrical cables where possible.
Never leave a hand tool lying on the ground, use a nearby work bench to rest it on.
Loose clothing must not be worn when operating the machine.
Long hair must be neatly tied back or a well fitted cap worn.
Never touch a rotating cutting tool.
Never assist in stopping or slowing down a rotating tool or chuck head.
Do not use the hand tool for extended periods of time and tend to other duties for periods of rest or
split the work load with another work colleague if possible.
Maintain a firm and secure hold of the hand tool when drilling materials.
Always place the hand tool in from the edge of a work bench when not in use.
Wear safety glasses when drilling materials.
Never touch swarf with bare hands.
Wear safety hearing protection when required.
Always use the drill as intended by the manufacturer.
Never hold or handle a drill bit by its cutting tool head, wear gloves if required.
Never leave a drill unattended and return to storage when no longer required.
Always hold the tool with both hands when drilling materials.
Checks & Inspections



Regular maintenance to be carried out according to manufacturer’s recommendations and records
kept by the School.
Lecturers and technicians to monitor compliance with control measures
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the wearing of PPE
Information, Instruction & Training


PPE training.
Safe use of operating the tool.
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Safety Glasses
 Safety Boots
 Safety Gloves
 Hearing protection
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Workshop Floor Cleaning
Ref: SWPS MEC 082
Date: 20/07/2014
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Hazards
Electricity
Contact with damaged, loose or poorly maintained electrical cables can result in electrocution-death or
minor injuries, first, second and or third degree burns.
Manual Handling
Pushing and pulling hoover/buffer, cleaner, moving furniture, machinery etc. can result in acute or chronic
lower back and or musculoskeletal injuries.
Chemicals
Applying cleaning chemicals and emptying machinery can result in chemical burns to the eyes, hands, face
and other body parts and contamination of clothing. Damage to the lungs by acute wheezing or chronic
asthma from the inhalation of fumes.
Slips Trips and Falls
Poor Housekeeping, wet floors, oil and dirt on the floors, trailing cables can cause slips trips and falls
resulting in broken limbs, musculoskeletal injuries, broken fingers, cuts and bruises.
Mechanical
Contact with rotating buffer can result in entanglement of long hair, loose clothing causing asphyxiation,
cuts and bruises.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public
 Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Class aid is required to clean the floors of the mechanical work shop by means of electrical hoover, buffer,
Taski vacuum liquid sucker and liquid chemicals etc.
Controls
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Floor Cleaning must be carried out when students, contractors, visitors or other staff are not present.
Food and drink are not permitted in the work shop/ lab at any time.
Safety signage must be used when cleaning in progress.
Inspect the electrical cable and plug of the cleaning equipment for damage or defects prior to use. Do not
use if damaged or defected in any way and remove from use for repair or replacement.
Class Assistant must not carry out repairs on cables, plugs or damaged cleaning equipment.
All electrical repairs must be carried out by a competent person.
Never transport cleaning equipment by pulling on the electrical cables.
Chemicals must be stored (under lock and key controlled by class assistant) away in a designated area.
Chemicals must remain in original containers with original Identification label description.
Ensure that there is adequate ventilation prior to commencing cleaning and turn on the extract system where
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available.
Liquid waste (Taski liquid vac hoover, bucket etc.) must be disposed of to external drains.
Care must be taken when moving or lifting class furniture (seek assistance if required). Follow manual
handling training at all time and seek assistance when required.
Use a pallet truck for moving work benches or other items of furniture and repeat the process when returning
to their original position.
When cleaning machinery is in use, trailing electrical cables must be draped over shoulder of class
assistance.
Remove and replace any clothing contaminated by chemicals.
When using a mop bucket do not over fill with water.
When chemicals are required for cleaning ensure to apply them sparingly.
On completion of cleaning, all cleaning machinery must be returned to storage.
Observe where cleaning machinery cables are at all times, avoid walking over cables where possible.
Always use cleaning equipment and chemicals as intended by their manufacturer.
Never touch the rotating parts of cleaning machinery with any body part.
Never wear loose clothing when operating cleaning machinery.
Long hair must be neatly tied back or a well fitted cap worn.

Checks & Inspections

Cables and Plugs on electrical machines must be checked before use.
Information, Instruction & Training




Manual handling training.
Chemical Handling training.
PPE training.
MSDS
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Wear safety glasses, boots and gloves when cleaning in operation
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
3
Severity
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
Possible
2
Serious
2
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
1-3 Low Risk
4
Medium Risk
6-9 High Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low Risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Ref: SWPS PLU 019
Date: 18/07/2014
Revision. No. 001
Assessed by: G. Caffrey
Approved by: E. Roe
Safe Work Practice Sheet
Gas Safety
Hazards
Chemicals
Working with oxygen and ethylene gases can result in asphyxiation.
Temperature
Quick releasing gas from cylinder can result in frostbite to exposed skin parts.
Explosion
Gas exposed to an ignition source can result in an explosion and or fire and result in death or first second and third
degree burns. Cylinders left lying on their side when full or empty can explode and cause death.
Manual Handling
Moving cylinders to and from storage can result in acute or chronic lower back injury.
Escaping Gas
Gas escaping from a cylinder under pressure can result in loss of sight.
Falling Cylinders
Unsecure hold of cylinder when transporting to and from storage, not secure on trolley, cylinder left free standing, can
result in a falling cylinder and crush injuries to the lower legs and feet.
Person Exposed to Risk
 Students
 Employees  Public  Contractors
 Visitors
Work Description
Use of oxygen and acetylene for welding.
Controls
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Persons required to connect and disconnect cylinders must have gas safety training.
Material Safety Data Sheets must be available for any gas in use in the School
Cylinders must be properly marked so that all users are aware of the contents.
Always ensure that the regulator in use is suitable for the pressure contained within the cylinder. Check the
pressure rating of the regulator and the indicated pressure within the cylinder.
Ensure that gas tubing is in good condition and is suitable for the gas e.g. never use natural rubber tubing
with O2.
Never lay cylinders on their side unless they are empty and are being stored prior to removal off site. Never
lay acetylene cylinders on their side, even when empty.
When using flammable gases remove potential sources of ignition from the area wherever possible.
Cylinders must always be securely fastened. Cylinders must never be left freestanding for any length of
time.
Wear safety gloves, glasses and boots as required.
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The use of PTFE tape to seal joints is prohibited
The use of oil or greases on cylinder threads is prohibited
Never attempt to catch a falling cylinder
The regulator should be closed / turned to zero before opening the cylinder valve at the spindle.
Repairs to damaged regulators may only be undertaken by a competent service provider.
Regulators must be serviced on a regular basis, as per the manufacturers instructions. As a general rule an
annual inspection with a five year replacement or reconditioning is recommended.
 Regulators must be removed before transporting cylinders, even for short distances
 Correctly sized tools should be used when fitting regulators to ensure no damage to the fittings and a secure
fit
 A purpose designed detector fluid should be used to check for leaks around a regulator during initial set up
and at regular intervals thereafter
 Naked flames must not be used in areas where flammable gases are stored or used and signage to this
effect must be erected close by.
 Areas in which compressed gases are in use must be adequately and continuously ventilated
 When a cylinder is not in use the cylinder valve should be closed
 Cylinders must be handled carefully at all times. All persons handling cylinders must be trained in manual
handling techniques.
 Cylinders must be transported using a suitably sized cylinder trolley. Cylinders should be properly secured
in the trolley and trolleys should be pushed and not pulled.
 Safety shoes and gloves must be worn when handling large compressed gas cylinders
 Cylinders must not be carried in passenger areas of vehicles. Cylinders should be carried in an open
vehicle.
 Cylinders should be stored in well ventilated areas protected from the effects of weather and out of direct
sunlight.
 Full cylinders should be stored separately to empty cylinders
 Empty cylinders should be returned to the supplier as soon as possible. Regular supplier delivery and
collections should be made to ensure rapid turnover of used stock
 The minimum number of cylinders possible should be kept in storage
 Cylinders must be secured in an upright position
Checks & Inspections
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Piping is checked annually and records maintained by the school.
Slam shut valves are checked annually and records maintained by the school.
Lecturers and technicians to monitor the compliance with control measures and the wearing of PPE.
Information, Instruction & Training
 The MSDS for each gas must be available
 Manual Handling Training
 Chemical Handling Training
 PPE Training
Personal protective equipment required (last resort)
 Safety gloves
 Glasses
 Boots
Initial Risk Rating (without any control measures)
Probability :
3
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
9 High Risk
KEY
PROBABILITY
SEVERITY
RISK FACTOR
Probable 3
Critical
3
1-3 Low Risk
Possible
2
Serious
2
4
Unlikely
1
Minor
1
6-9 High Risk
Medium Risk
Risk Factor = Probability x Severity
Risk Reduction Rating (after controls introduced)
Probability :
1
x
Severity
3
=
Risk Factor
3 Low risk
Risk Assessment Review
As and when process changes or yearly
Back to content page
Appendix IV
Accident / Incident, Near Miss and Dangerous
Occurrence Reporting Procedures
ACCIDENT, INCIDENT, NEAR MISS AND DANGEROUS OCCURRENCE
REPORTING PROCEDURES
Dundalk Institute of Technology is committed to reducing accidents and ill-health to staff and
students of the Institute. Procedures are in place in the Institute to ensure that all Accidents, Near
Misses and Dangerous Occurrences are recorded. These procedures not only ensure compliance
with the law, but are also used as a basis for analysing trends throughout the Institute, in an effort
to reduce accidents and ill-health to staff and students. All reports are reviewed at each meeting
of the Institute Safety Monitoring Committee.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish all the facts relating to the incident, to draw
conclusions from the facts and to make recommendations to prevent reoccurrence. Each incident
will be looked at from the point of view of place, plant, procedures and people, to see where the
safety system has failed and to tighten controls. It is important to note the definitions of all
incidents (Accidents, Near Misses & Dangerous Occurrences) in order to take the correct action.
DEFINITIONS
An Accident is defined as an unplanned event resulting in personal injury or property damage.
This could include, but is not limited to:
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Sprain
Laceration
Broken bone
Concussion
Unconsciousness
Ill-health

Sickness due to
exposure to a
dangerous
substance, fumes
or gases, fire or
explosion



Sickness due to a
chemical spill or
environmental
pollution
Damage to building
Damage to property
A Near Miss is defined as an incident in which there was no injury or property damage but
where the potential for serious consequences existed.
A Dangerous Occurrence is one of a number of specific, reportable adverse events, which are
defined within the Twelfth Schedule of the General Application Regulations 2007. Dangerous
Occurrences are reportable to the Health & Safety Authority (HSA) using Form lR3 or via the
HSA online notification process. Any Dangerous Occurrences which are notifiable to the HSA
will be forwarded by the Health & Safety Co-ordinator.
These are incidents with a high potential to cause death or serious injury, but which happen
relatively infrequently. Dangerous occurrences usually include incidents involving:

Lifting equipment

Explosions,

Collapse of

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Pressure systems
Overhead electric
lines
Electrical incidents
causing explosion
or fire
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biological agents
Radiation
generators and
radiography
Breathing
apparatus
Diving operations
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scaffolding
Train collisions
Wells
Pipelines or
pipeline works
All Accidents are ‘Incidents’. However, the definition of an Incident is wider in that it
includes Dangerous Occurrences and Near Misses.
REPORTING PROCEDURES
All incidents must be reported immediately using the DkIT relevant incident report forms. These
are located in the Parent Safety Statement and also on the DkIT website at
https://www.dkit.ie/safety/incidents-accidents-reporting-procedures. All sections of the form
must be completed with as much accurate information as possible.
The immediate supervisor must investigate the cause of the incident, and complete the Institute
Accident/Incident Report Form or Near Miss Form. A copy of this form must then be made
available to the Head of Department/School/Function for review and final sign off. Copies of
the completed form should be forwarded to the Health & Safety Co-ordinator,
Secretary/Financial Controller and the Estate’s Office. Copies of these forms are contained
within this document.
Accidents involving visitors and contractors must be investigated by the staff member to whom
the injury was reported, in conjunction with the staff member they are visiting or working with.
Accidents, which involve serious or fatal injuries to an employee, student or any third party must
be notified to the Health and Safety Co-ordinator and the HSA without delay.
Any accidents at work that involve an employee being unable to carry out his/her duties for three
or more consecutive days, or that involve a third party being injured and requiring treatment
from a medical practitioner, are reportable to the HSA and must be notified using Form lR1 or
via the HSA online process, as soon as practicable. Dangerous Occurrences are reportable to the
HSA using Form lR3 or via the HSA online notification process. Any incidents, which are
notifiable to the HSA, will be forwarded to the HSA by the Health & Safety Co-ordinator.
Internal Reporting Procedure
It is the responsibility of each Head of Department/School/Function to ensure that the
appropriate investigation procedures take place in the event of an Accident, Near Miss or
Dangerous occurrence arising in their area. Heads of Department/School/Function must also
ensure that the appropriate forms are completed and forwarded to each of the relevant parties
(i.e. Estates Office, Secretary/Financial Controller, Health & Safety Co-ordinator).
It is the responsibility of the Health & Safety Co-ordinator to ensure that all reported incidents
are tabled and discussed at each ISMC meeting.
External Reporting Procedure
Arising from the internal reporting procedure, any incidents, which are notifiable to the HSA,
will be forwarded to that body by the Health & Safety Co-ordinator.
ACCIDENT / INCIDENT REPORT FORM
Note:
This form should be completed whenever an accident or incident occurs which results in injury
or damage to personnel or property.
If personnel or property WERE NOT injured or damaged during the Accident/ Incident, do not
use this form. Use the NEAR MISS REPORT FORM.
Accident / Incident Report Form
i
ii
Name of person involved in
Accident/Incident:
Address:
iii
Phone:
Who was involved in the Accident/Incident:
 Student
 Employee
 Public
 Contractor
Visitor
iv
Occupation:
v
If an employee of the Institute please state Department:
vi
If no, please elaborate:
vii
Particulars of Accident/Incident & circumstances under which the Accident/Incident occurred:
Use additional pages and/or photos if necessary.
viii
ix
x
Place:
Time:
Witness Phone No & Address:
Date:
Witness Phone No & Address:
xi
When and to whom was the Accident/Incident initially reported?
xii
Details of injury/damage:
Indicate type of injury (put an ‘x’ in one box only)

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

xiii
xiv
Bruising, contusion
Concussion
Internal injuries
Open wound
Abrasion, graze
Amputation
Open fracture (i.e. bone exposed)
Closed fracture
Dislocation
Sprain, torn ligaments
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



Suffocation, asphyxiation
Gassing
Drowning
Poisoning
Infection
Burns, scalds and frostbite
Effects of radiation
Electrical injury
Property damage,
Specify____________________
 Other, Specify_____________________
Indicate part of body most seriously injured (put an ‘x’ in one box only):
 Head, except eyes
 Fingers, one or more
 Eyes
 Hip joint, thigh, knee cap
 Neck
 Knee joint, lower leg, ankle
 Back, spine
 Foot
 Chest
 Toes, one or more
 Abdomen
 Extensive parts of the body
 Shoulder, upper arm, elbow
 Multiple injuries
Lower
arm,
wrist,
hand

 Other, Specify_____________________
Consequences of the Accident/Incident:
Anticipated absence if not
Date of resumption of work
back
Fatal

if
back
4-7 days

Non Fatal

Year
Month
Day
8-14 days

____
_____
___
More than 14 days

xv
Treatment:
xvi
Doctor’s report and recommendation:
xvii
Steps taken to prevent reoccurrence of this type of Accident/Incident:
Signature of person completing report:
Date:
Print Name & Job Title:
Signature of Head of Department/School/Function:
Date:
Print name:
(Copies of the completed Institute Accident Report are to be sent separately to the Institute
Health & Safety Co-ordinator, the Secretary/Financial Controller and the Estates Office)
NEAR MISS REPORT FORM
Note:
This form should be completed whenever a Near Miss occurs - that is an incident WITHOUT
injury to person or damage to property.
If personnel or property were injured or damaged during the incident, do no use this form. Use
the ‘ACCIDENT / INCIDENT REPORT FORM’.
NEAR MISS REPORT FORM
Time of Near Miss:
i
Date of Near Miss:
ii
Location of Near Miss:
iii
Who was involved in the Near Miss:
 Student
 Employee
 Public
 Contractor
Visitors
iv
Name of person(s) involved in Near Miss:
v
Name, Address & Contact details of any witnesses to Near Miss:
vi
Description of Near Miss:
vii
Steps taken to prevent a reoccurrence of this type of Near Miss incident:
Signature of person completing report:
Date:
Print Name & Job Title:
Signature of Head of Department/School/Function:
Date:
Print name:
(Copies
of the completed Near Miss Report Form are to be sent to the Health & Safety Coordinator, the Secretary/Financial Controller and the Estates Office)
First Aid and Emergency Contacts
Location
Jim Connolly
Mechanical Engineering Workshop
Ext 2966
Phil Dillon
Engineering Administration
Ext 2754
Simon O’ Neill
Plumbing Workshop
Ext. 2847
Larry Quigley
Plumbing Workshop
Ext. 2594
Nick O'Rourke
Plumbing Workshop
Ext. 2593
Alan Gorham
Plumbing Workshop
042 9396510

Ambulance/Fire Brigade:

Health Centre/Campus Nurse:

Doctor: Dr. Shane Gleeson:

Hospital: Louth Hospital:
112 or 999
2777
2702/ 042 9320038
(042) 933 4701
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