Feb - American Radio History
i
FEBRUARY
iqh .fide
THE
MAGAZINE
FOR MUSIC LISTENERS'
50 CENTS
THE
PHILADELPHIANS
by ROLAND GELATT
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
High 3idelity
T H E
M A G A Z
I
The Cover. Keen -eyed citizens of the City
of Brotherly Love will note with interest
{
and amusement the third film -strip from
the top in the cover design, which illustrates one of the hardships of magazinepublishing. It depicts William Kincaid,
and
flute, and Marcel Tabuteau, oboe
between the taking of the photographs
and their appearance in print, M. Tabuteau
left Philadelphia Orchestra. All the pictures,
incidentally, were taken at Columbia recording sessions in the Academy of Music.
-
F O
M U S I C
R
Volume 4
Number
L I S
T
E
N
E R S
February 1955
12
AUTHORitatively Speaking
4
Noted With Interest
9
Letters
22
As The Editors See It
35
The Philadelphians, by Roland Gelatt
36
This Issue. The austerely angular ultramodern living room, perhaps featuring
picture-windows or glass bricks, presents
its audiophile -dweller a tough acoustic
problem but not a decorative one.
He has plenty of austerely angular blonde
Korina cabinets to choose among. Its
the others of us, who may happen to live
in a Colonial or Federal décor, who are
faced with a dearth of phono- furniture.
All of which gives a particularly welcome
flavor to Edward Maged's how- to -do -it
piece on housing audio-equipment in
It starts on
period American furniture.
page 46.
Next Issue. From the most sumptuous in
symphonic fare, the Philadelphia Orchestra,
our next lead article takes us to some of
the subtlest and supplest of today's avantthat of the Modern Jazz
garde jazz
Quartet. Portraitist of the Quartet will
be Nat Hentoff.
-
-
CHARLES FOWLER,
Editor
JR., Managing Editor
ROY F. ALLISON, Associate Editor
H.
HOOPES,
Art Director
Editorial Assistants
Miriam D. Manning, Cora R. Hoopes
ROLAND GELAIT, New York Editor
ROY LINDSTROM,
Contributing Editors
C. G. BURKE
JAMES G. DEANE
JAMES HINTON, JR.
MANSFIELD E. PICKETT,
Director of
Advertising Sales
Manager
R. WRIGHT, Circulation Manager
WARREN B. SYER, Business
FRANK
(Advertising only): New York:
Telephone:
East 39th Street.
Murray Hill 5 -6332. Fred C. Michalove, Eastern
Manager.- Chicago: John R. Rutherford and Associates. 230 East Ohio St., Chicago, Ill. Telephone:
Whitehall 4 -6715. - Los Angeles: 1052 West 6th
Street. Telephone: Madison 6 -1371. Edward Brand.
Branch Offices
Room 600, 6
West Coast Manager.
FEBRUARY. 1955
portrait in print of one of our times' greatest musical organizations.
Living With Music, by Louis Untermeyer
First in a series of essays on personal reactions to music.
39
Is There an Edison in the House'
Can you think of an audio device you wish someone would invent?
41
Conductors in Caricature, by Frederic Grunfeld
43
An Old Look For Your New Sound, by Edward Maged
A welcome disquisition on the use of antiques
or reproductions
to house home -music
equipment.
-
-
Music Makers, by Roland Gelatt
Record Section
Disks-
-
Building Your Record Library
Toscanini on Records, Part III.
Records In Review
46
51
-
53-92
Dialing Your
An Audio Lexicon, by Roy F. Allison
95
Tested In the Home
97
Publisher
JOHN M. CONLY,
ROY
A
J
The National Line; R Wharfedale; Fisher Mixer-Fader; Fisher 50PRC Preamp Equalizer; Wall Trig -R-Heat Solder Gun; Brociner
Mark ra; Ampex 620 Amplifier-Speaker; Audax Arm & HiQ7 Cartridge; Ingalls Acousti -Pads; Craftsmen Croon Tuner; Ampro Hi-Impedance Adaptor; Staticmaster Record Brush; Sargent-Rayment SR -8o8
Tuner and 98B Amplifier.
Books In Review
129
Audio Forum
134
Professional Directory
136
Traders' Marketplace
139
Advertising Index
143
High Fidelity Magazine is published monthly by Audiocom, Inc., at Great Barrington, Maas. Telephone:
Great Barrington 1300. Editorial publication, and circulation offices at: The Publishing House, Great
Barrington, Mass. Subscriptions: $6.00 per year in the United States and Canada. Single copies: 50 cents
each. Editorial contributions will be welcomed by the editor. Payment for articles accepted will be arranged
prior to publication. Unsolicited manuscripts should be accompanied by return postage. Entered as
second -class matter April 27, 1951 at the post office at Great Barrington, Maes., under the act of March 3,
1879. Additional entries at the poet office, Pittsfield, Mass., and Albany, N. Y. Member Audit Bureau of
Circulation. Printed in the U. S. A. by the Ben Franklin Preen, Pittsfield, Maee. Copyright 1956 by Audiocorn, Inc. The cover design and contents of High Fidelity magazine are fully protected by copyrights and
must not be reproduced in any manner.
AUTHORitatively Speaking
Roland Gelatt, while officially outraged
4t--
.".-u
li
(0 :3
..
at
the impropriety of the New York editor's
being selected as the man to profile the
Philadelphia Orchestra, admits having been
secretly pleased. Indeed, it comes out,
the first orchestral record he ever bought
was the famous Stokowski -Philadelphia
version of the Bach Toccata and Fugue in
And throughout his underD Minor.
graduate years at Swarthmore he conscientiously commuted to Philadelphia
for the Friday afternoon concerts by the
PO.
S
Louis Untermeyer, who initiates our new
series, "Living With Music," on page
39, is certainly one of the most literarily
learned men in the nation today, yet he
At 17 he
never finished high school.
entered his father's jewelry manufacturing
business; loyally he stayed with it for
zo years, then quit to make his living at
literature. The number of books he has
written and /or edited and /or collaborated
in almost defies counting, and their diversity
is enormous, ranging from a scholarly
biography of Heinrich Heine through a
pair of American Humor anthologies
to some fine serious poems. He is probably
best known for his poetry anthologies
which may be
British and American
the best- selling of any such collections.
He has spent much of the last few years
writing a sort of analytical cultural history
of the last hundred years, in which he
picks out the men who have contributed
most strongly to the shaping of our civilization.
high C's
-
to heartbeats
With the lowest distortion,
widest useful dynamic and frequency ranges,
flattest response and finest balance
available today for critical listeners,
Edward Maged, who prescribes "An Old
Look for Your New Sound" on page 46,
says he was formally exposed at a tender
age to electrical engineering and architecture, but soon discovered that the slide rule
is not the quickest of money- making
instruments. Now he is sales manager of
Bozak Loudspeakers and Speaker Systems
recreate every audible sound
with its most subtle qualities that
contribute the last whisper of realism.
Chosen as the standard
by leading acoustical laboratories
an industrial loudspeaker manufacturer.
His favorite avocational activities are (quote)
finding out what makes a nine - year -old
daughter tick; unquote: advancing with the
high -fidelity phenomenon (since the days
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the Bozaks remain unchallenged for
Unsung collaborator on Fred Grunfeld's
"Conductors in Caricature" was Dr. Otto
Bettmann, proprietor of the Bettmann
Archive (prints and pictures) and author
of a picture- history of medicine.
The Very Best in Sound
nn
t
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the
R. T.
BOZAK
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Darien
Box 966
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Connecticut
Componi,
-
Hicksville,
New York
Two new names you will be seeing in the
Records section are Nathan Broder and
Howard LaFay. Broder, who'll cover Bach
and pre -Bach music, is associated editor
of Musical Quarterly, author of a new
book on Samuel Barber (Schirmer, $3.5o), a
sometime lecturer in music at Columbia
University and an alumnus (15 years) of
He
G. Schirmer, the publishing firm.
lives in Brooklyn. La Fay lives in Washington, is associate editor of Town Journal
and will cover folk music, which he has
collected (strictly amateur) in "all the
hemispheres." He served with the Marine
Corps in World War II and Korea, and
holds a Sorbonne degree.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
`
HIGH- FIDELITY
MUSIC-APPRECIATION RECORDS
TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND MUSIC BETTER AND ENJOY IT MORE
4
is
ON ONE SIDE
ON THE OTHER SIDE
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great musical pwork, featuring
orchestras and soloists of recognized distinction in this
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MUM
A NEW IDEA OF
FREQUENTLY, most Of US arc
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APPRECIATION RECORD
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all the great masterpieces of music will be
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Deems Taylor. After reading this descriptive essay (presented in a form that can be
kept for long use) you may take the record
or not, as you decide at the time. You are
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TWO TYPES OF RECORDS AT A RELATIVELY LOW COST
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(A small charge will he added to the prices
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A ONE -MONTH SUBSCRIPTION
OBLIGATION TO CONTINUE . . .
\\'hy not make a simple trial, to sec if
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record, BEErltovnr' s FIFTN SYMPHONY,
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RETURN ONLY IF
MUSIC- APPRECIATION RECORDS
c/o Book -of- the -Month Club, Inc.
345 Hudson Street, New York 14, N. Y.
Please send me at once the first Mustc-
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A
Symphony
LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Norman Del Mar, Conductor
Analyst. by Thomas Scherman
AVE HEARD this great work countless times -what
HAVE
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to hear? This demonstration will show you what you
may have been missing in listening to great music.
NPR' HIGHFIDELITT RECORDING RT THE
Yon
FEBRUARY, 1955
MUSIC-APPRECIATION RECORDS, under the conch
tions stated above. It is understood that, as a subscriber, I am not
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first record, or any time thereafter at my pleasure, but the introductory record is free in any case.
1fr.
Mrs.
22
:hiss S
(Please Print)
Address
City
lone
State
MAR
1
5
Full electronic remote controlled
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The separate remote tuning unit may be
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Fleetwood professional performance is
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Write for complete information and name
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101
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ARIZONA
ELECTRICAL COMMUNICATION
202 East Fillmore, Pheonix
Phone: Alpine 2 -8248
1
650 Sixth Avenue, New York
Phone: Oregon 5 -8600
-6646
5
SUTTON AUDIO SYSTEMS
155 Ninth St., San Francisco
Phone: Underhill 3 -5860
970 First Avenue, New York 22
3
Phone: PI.
Santa Monica
117 Santa Monica Blvd.,
Phone: Exbrook 3.8231
85
17647 Sherman
Way, Van Nuys
Phone: Dickens
-5143
WESTLAB
WHITTIER HI
TALK -O COMMUNICATION
1342 Cornell St., Whittier
Phone: Oxford 6-4682
Crestview
I
2475 Central Ave., Yonkers
Phone: Spencer
Phone: Douglas 7.4092
9-6400
OHIO
FI
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13421 Euclid Ave., East
Phone: GL. -4868
CONNECTICUT
-4548
7
4-3311
307 Audubon Avenue, New York 33
Phone: Tompkins 7.2971
VALLEY ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CO.
Commercial Center St., Beverly Hills
Worth
JULIUS WEIKERS & CO.
0-6321
2
-7224
Cortlandt St., New York
Phone:
Victory Blvd., Van Nuys
State
3
TERMINAL RADIO CORPORATION
SANTA MONICA RADIO PARTS
Phone:
7-0315
SUN RADIO & ELECTRONICS CORP.
HOUSE OF SOUND
14513
MITCHELL'S EL RANCHO TELEVISION
1119B W. Huntington Dr., Arcadia
Phone:
Phone: Co.
BREIER SOUND CENTER
3781 Fifth Ave., San Diego
HOUSE OF SIGHT & SOUND
CO.
CALIFORNIA
407 -J
I
-8171
Phone: Cypress
-
Cont.
LEONARD RADIO, INC. "AUDIO MART"
69 Cortlandt St., New York 7
NEW YORK
HIGH -FIDELITY HOUSE
Cleveland
12
1
DAVID DEAN SMITH
PIONEER ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CO.
1302 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank
Phone: Thornwall 4 -1521
262 Elm St., New Haven
Phone: University 5 -1101
2115 Prospect Ave., Cleveland 15
FI COMPANY
17616 Ventura Blvd., Encino
METTLER PIANO SHOWROOM
Westfair Center, Post Rd., Westport
VALLEY ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CO.
ENCINO HI
State 4 -2147
Phone:
Phone: Su.
1
-9410
OREGON
SIGHT & SOUND
4325 S.W. 96th Ave., Beaverton
Phone: MI. 4 -6416 (Portland)
ILLINOIS
TURNTABLE HI -FI
AUDIO WORKSHOP, INC.
116 West Wilshire, Fullerton
Phone: Lambert 5-0811
2734 West Touhy Avenue, Chicago 45
HAWTHORNE ELECTRONICS
Phone: Sheldrake
CALIFORNIA SOUND PRODUCTS, INC.
7264 Melrose Ave., Hollywood 46
VOICE & VISION, INC.
700 S.E. Hawthorne Blvd., Portland
Phone: Filmore 9375
Webster
Phone:
1
-1557
PACIFIC RADIO EXCHANGE
1407
3
-3264
53 E. Walton Place, Chicago
Phone: Whitehall 3 -1166
1
OTT'S RADIO, TV & HI FI
I
3760 S.E. Hawthorne Blvd., Portland
LAFAYETTE RADIO
Cahuenga Blvd., Hollywood 28
Phone: Hollywood 2.1393
110
ACORN RADIO & ELECTRONICS
STEDMAN RADIO LABORATORIES
4736 W. Century Blvd., Inglewood
Phone: Oregon 8.5344
360 Boylston St., Brookline
Longwood 6 -5882
CUSTOM SOUND
3687
Federal St., Boston
10
103 South Vermont, Los
Phone: Dunkirk 8 -0634
Angeles
19 S.
1932 Peck Street,
Phone: 2 -5910
ARCO ELECTRONICS, INC.
4
JOHN J. CASEY CO.
CRENSHAW HI -FI CENTER
104 Somerset St., New Brunswick
Phone:
Charter
24
Phone: Dexter
9 -1900
Central Ave., Newark
LAFAYETTE RADIO CORP.
11240 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles 64
Phone: Bradshaw
2
-1440,
Arirona
3 -0518
Phone:
Richmond
7 -0271
MIDWAY ELECTRONIC SUPPLY
2608 Ross Avenue, Dallas
Phone: Sterling 5361
TOWN NORTH MUSIC CORP.
BROOKLYN HI -FI CENTER
5328 W. Lovers Lane, Dallas 9
2128 Caton Avenue, Brooklyn
CLIFFORD HERRING SOUND EQUIPT. CO.
W. Lancaster at Burnet St., Fort Worth 3
Buckminster 2 -5300
Phone: Ivanhoe
I
UNIVERSAL RADIO SUPPLY CO.
Angeles
CRABTREE'S
139 West 2nd St., Plainfield
Phone: Plainfield 6 -4718
Phone:
15
1
Phone: Fa. 4877
GULF COAST ELECTRONICS
-8160
ELECTRONIC SUPPLY CORP.
41 -08
4
6 -2730
WEINGARTEN ELECTRONICS
CUSTOM TELEVISION COMPANY
7556 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles 46
Phone: Webster 5 -5405
1947 Broadway, New York 23
Phone: Trafalgar 7 -9047
29th St., Newport Beoch
Phone: Harbor 1506
124 E. 44th at Lexington Ave.,
Phone: Murray Hill 2- 3869 -3870
NO. HOLLYWOOD RADIO & TV SUPPLY
4333 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood
Phone: Stanley 7 -3063
HARVEY RADIO COMPANY, INC.
DOW RADIO
LAFAYETTE RADIO CORP.
1759 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena 4
Phone: Ryan -6683
100 Sixth Ave., New
Phone: Rector 2 -8600
1
FEBRUARY, 1955
103 West 43rd St.,
Phone: Judson 2 -1500
New York
New York 36
York
STERLING RADIO PRODUCTS CO.
1616 McKinney Ave., Houston
UNIVERSITY HI -FI SHOP
GRAND CENTRAL RADIO, INC.
-
Houston 4
WASHINGTON
CUSTOM AUDIO SALES
413
110 Winbern Sf.,
Phone: Justin 1551
1
Greenpoint Ave., Long Island City
Phone: Stillwell
-4242
TEXAS
ISLAND RADIO DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
412 Fulton Ave., Hempstead, L. I.
2817 South Crenshaw, Los Angeles 16
Phone: Republic -2451
1729 S. Los Angeles St., Los
Phone: Prospect 5241
-1661
NEW YORK
KIERULFF SOUND CORPORATION
820 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles
I
Phone: 36 -4501
Phone: Market
Phone YO. 6218
HENRY RADIO
3
6 -5686
BLUFF CITY DISTRIBUTING CO.
234 East Street, Memphis 12
2
6320 Commodore Sloat Dr., Los Angeles 48
2
21st St., Philadelphia
TENNESSEE
LAFAYETTE RADIO CORP.
FIGART'S SOUND UN -LTD.
-6767
LEO MILLER HI -FI STUDIO
790 N. Main St., Providence
6 -7761
THE JABBERWOCK
8
3
RHODE ISLAND
856 Lincoln Place, Teaneck
Phone: TE
Angeles
Gr.
RADIO ELECTRIC SERVICE CO.
HIGH FIDELITY SOUND STUDIO
709 Arch Street, Philadelphia 6
Phone: Lombard 3 -7390
Muskegon
12026 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles 25
Phone: Bradshaw 2 -7536
38571/2 Santo Rosalia, Los
Phone: Axminister 4-1110
4 -3404,
Phone: Rittenhouse
NEW JERSEY
BUSHNELL ELECTRONICS
We.
Phone:
WEST MICHIGAN SOUND CO.
7
5341
PENNSYLVANIA
HI FIDELITY ELECTRONIC SOUND CORP.
368 Montgomery Ave., Merlon
DANBY RADIO CORP.
MICHIGAN
Atlantic Ave., Long Beach
Phone: Long Beach 404813
Filmore
Phone:
MASSACHUSETTS
41
17
I I
University Way, Seattle
5
Phone: Me. 6000
WISCONSIN
VALLEY RADIO DISTRIBUTORS
Appleton St., Appleton
518 N.
Phone:
THE
3
-6012
AUDIO SHACK
1208 Milwaukee
Phone: 7657
Ave., Janesville
7
"Why
I bought a Stan White
peaker"
"Stan White
Speakers are
the most
!
We use them
exclusively in all
Duke Ellington
was crowned "Mr.
our reproduction
work."
>
(-
Hi -Fi" at both the
Chicago and New
York Audio Fairs,
1954
R
(MR. HI-FI)
Stan White, of
Stan White, ln,.,
with Mr. Ellington.
Photo taken at
Chicago
Audio
Fair.
Featuring curled, not folded,
ex-
ponential horn (1% of formula)
Multiple flare formula (patent
applied for)
Passive phasing
chambers
24db /octave acoustical crossover
Distributed throat
characteristic (not found
where)
else-
.
Complete Line of Cabinet Speakers
Esquire (Illustrated)-28
x
22 x 18 ",
Frequency Response: 30 to 16,000 cycles.. ..194.00
See your high fidelity dealer or write
Le Sabre -24 x 15 x 12 ",
Frequency Response: 40 to 16,000 cycles..
79.50
Le Petitte -19 x 12 x 9 ",
Frequency Response: 60 to 16,000 cycles....
49.50
4 -D -5' x 3' x 2',
Frequency Response: 15 to 16,000 cycles
994.00
Famous Powrtron Amplifiers
Dept. H -1, 727 South LaSalle Street, Chicago 5, Illinois
A DIVISION OF EDDIE BRACKEN ENTERPRISES
Model W10, 10 watt amplifier
Model W20, 20 watt amplifier
Model W2010, Crossover Amplifier
System
_.
119.50
174.50
299.50
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
send for
ALLIED'S
SPECIAL NEW 64 -PAGE
HI -FI CATALOG
This Month's Mystery
Mr. Edward Hill of New York wrote
us a frantic little note recently to
ask if we had changed our editorial
policy. Seems he spotted the familiar
HIGH FIDELITY wrapper in his mailbox.
When he sat down to read his latest
copy, the magazine he pulled out
was a well -known children's publication!
Be calm, Mr. Hill; HF is as ever ..
and if you think you were upset by
the shock, just turn your thoughts
to the poor child who got HIGH
FIDELITY!
Cooperative Spirit
It was nice of NBC and its New
England affiliate, Station WBZ in
Boston, to work out an arrangement
with non -commercial Boston station
When NBC had TosWGBH
canini, WGBH had the Boston SymThen the great maestro
phony.
retired, NBC picked up the Boston
orchestra, and WGBH was half out
in the cold: they were silent during
the first half of the Boston concerts,
came on at intermission when NBC
left off. This was confusing, to say
the least, particularly when WBZ's
FM side was put off the air by a
hurricane; about 40% of New England's radio families have FM. So -o -o,
to wind up this complicated story,
both WGBH and WBZ now carry
the Boston Symphony programs, in
a fine spirit of cooperation.
....
Multiple Speakers
Every now and then we hear about
someone who's gone berserk and
installed a panel of i4 or 79 speakers
We're not saying
or something.
(far be it!) whether or not the idea
has merit in itself; it's just that we
foresee a numbers race, so that the
only way to hold your head up in
Continued on page ro
FEBRUARY, 1955
A Typical ALLIED System Value
Your guide to a complete
understanding of Hi -Fi-
plus the world's largest
selection of Hi -Fi systems
1
and components
64 -page book shows you
how to select a High Fidelity
music system at lowest cost.
Tells you simply and clearly
what to look for in each unit.
Shows many handsome, practical
do-it-yourself installation ideas.
Offers you the world's largest
selection of complete systems
and individual units (amplifiers,
This
"Space Saver
II"
Hi-Fi Phono System
Here's authentic Hi -Fi performance that fits in the
smallest available space. No cabinets required.
Carefully matched components just plug in. System includes: Knight 12 -Watt Amplifier (featuring
3- position record compensation, bass and treble
controls, loudness- volume control, response ±
0.75 db, 20- 20,000 cps at 12 watts) in handsome
metal case only 3% x 13 x 10 %'; Webcor 1127 -270
3 -Speed Changer (9 x 14 x 14' in Russet and Beige
or Burgundy and Beige) with G.E. RPX -050 magnetic cartridge and dual-tip sapphire stylus;
Electro -Voice "Baronet" folded horn enclosure
with SP8 -B speaker in mahogany or blonde finish
(22% x 143. x 13 %'). Complete, ready to plug in.
Hi -Fi record included. Specify colors.
$167.25
94 PA 159. Net only
93 SX 312. Knight 12 -Watt "Space Saver" Ampli$59.50
fier only. Shpg. wt., 14 lbs. Net only
tuners, speakers, enclosures,
changers, recorders and accessories) from which to make your
money -saving choice. To understand Hi -Fi, to own the best for
less, you'll want this FREE book.
Write for it today.
EXPERT HI -FI HELP
Our Hi -Fi consultants are always
available to help you select components and systems to satisfy your
listening desires at the lowest possi
ble cost to you.
EASY TERMS
New Knight 728 FM -AM Tuner -Our Top Value
Designed to ALLIED'S highest specifications
equals the best at incomparably low cost. Maximum AM reception, thrilling on FM. Features:
AFC on FM- 'locks in" the station; two simple
controls; sensitivity -FM, 5 mv for 20 db quieting.
AM, 5 mv for 1 volt output; response, 50- 15,000
cps, ± 1 db; tunes FM, 88 -108 mc, AM, 530 -1650
kc; output level -FM, 4 volts high imp., AM, 1
volt high imp.; hum, 60 db below output; outputs
for amplifier and tape recorder; 300
-
ohm FM antenna input, AM, high imp .
loop or antenna. Only 5 x13 %x7%'
deep. Complete with FM -AM antenna.
94 SX 728. Net only
$89.50
94 5X 729. Tuner as above in handsome black and gold finished metal
cabinet. 6 x 13% x 8%'. Net $95.50
is available from ALLIED or
easy payments: only 10% down, 12
full months to pay. Write for details
Hi -Fi
ALLIED RADIO
America's
Hi-Fi Center
1
r
ALLIED RADIO CORP., Dept. 49 -8 -5
100 N. Western Ave., Chicago 80, III.
Send FREE 64 -Page Hi -Fi Catalog
Ship the following:
enclosed
5
Nome
Address
LCity
Zone
State
J
URRRIR.
a new experience in
INTEGRATED
SOUND
THE 111AIRCHI LI)
24O
Balanced -Bar PREAMPLIFIER
This amazing preamplifier lets you
custom -tailor sound to fit the exact
acoustical characteristics of your own
listening room!
Just recently perfected by Fairchild,
this brand -new Balanced -Bar 240
brings professional quality, and outstanding adaptability to home systems. Balance -Bar control integrates
the tonal quality of your high fidelity
systems with the particular requireHIGHEST LEVEL
-
ments of your home. You can be sure
that your records will receive the
most accurate, most satisfying equalization possible.
Also, the Fairchild 240 features an
extraordinary Listening Level Control. Operating independently of volume control, the LLC provides pleasant low-level listening and correctly
balanced normal listening levels -all
easily, without complex adjustments.
sg8e
LOOK
at these
additional
features
hi -fi -dom is to have more speakers
than anyone else.
We are going to stop this right
now by telling you about a speaker
system which we are planning. It
will be located in a doorway between
two rooms; outside dimensions of
the speaker panel will be 2'8" by
Thanks to Telex, who has
6'8 ".
recently developed the special speakers we shall use, it will contain
2,56o loudspeakers.
We are asking the M.I.T. acoustics
lab to cooperate with us in two aspects of this undertaking:
t) the
computation of the nominal impedance of the system, should we
decide to connect the 2,56o speakers
in parallel, and 2) in the design of
an amplifier without output transformer, should we decide to connect
in series. We shall keep you advised
of our progress, much of which
depends on how soon Telex decides
to send us all these speakers (without
charge, of course!).
And in case you have any disparaging remarks to make, be careful.
These tiny speakers can, by a flip of
a switch, be changed to microphones,
with which to record what you say.
we shall have not only the
So
world's biggest speaker system, but
also the world's largest microphone
or something.
-
...
Graceful and fashion wise, this exciting cabinet
matches any decor, any interior styling.
Nertz Dept., Cont'd.
ION: The Fairchild 240 performs every function
of the high quality preamplifier-equalizer, using only two control knobs
in normal operation. Yet, it features a complete range of controls with
flexibility to satisfy the most avid audio fan.
Quite
Performance guaranteed!
FAIRCH LU
50 watt AUDIO AMPLIFIER
1
Fairchild's new 260 Power Amplifier is so stable that it is
unconditionally guaranteed not to ring at any loading
condition!
Full 50 watts of undistorted power is continuously availto accommodate crescendos and peaks which overload
ordinary amplifiers. Yet, this compact Fairchild 260 is a
single unit easy to install almost anywhere. eL
.
Continued from page 9
ATTRACTIVE DESIGN:
.
SIMPLICITY OF O
.able
D
Fairchild 240 is capable of higher
gain than any other preamplifier designed for home use. Voltage gain
of 68 db drives your power amplifier to full output with one millivolt
input signali The famous Cascade design, in use in radar and television.
offers an inherently quieter circuit.
LOWEST NOISE:
NOTED WITH INTEREST
j4q
ß Ti11
Na ringing at any level
Output unaffected by load power factor
Exceptional stability
Exclusive distortionmncelling adjustment
a number of readers have
sent in clippings of an advertisement
which apparently appeared all over
the country and which had to do
with a high fidelity (sic) portable
radio -phono which "reproduces all
instruments faithfully from 5o to
15,000 C.P.S.," had twin speakers,
base (sic) reflex hi -fi, and a lifetime
osmium needle, all for "half-price"
or $49.95.
Nertz, naturally; particularly to that lifetime osmium
needle.
Reader Walker of Danville, N. Y.,
said the ad appeared in the comic
section of his local paper, "which I
thought was quite appropriate." Shake
on that, brother!
International Spirit
Remember the item a few issues ago
about the music lover in Hungary
10th AVENUE AND 154th STREET, WHITESTONE,
NEW YORK
Continued on page 12
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Z
W
D
W
U
Love at first sight is something that happens between men and women and
PRECEDENT. One glimpse of this frankly glamorous radio tuner, and you'll visualize
the way its luxurious simplicity of styling can distinguish your own living room.
PRECEDENT beauty is not veneer -deep, but instead is evident throughout
its superb components and matchless hand craftsmanship.
As the only truly professional FM tuner, PRECEDENT provides perfection of
reception that no imitation can ever approach. Prices begin at $325 in a
handsome metal cover. Visit a dealer
RADIO ENGINEERING
LABORATORIES
INC
PRECEDENT
MINNESOTA
Duluth: Northwest Radio, 123 E. First St.
Minneapolis: Lew Bonn Co., 1211 LaSalle Ave.
CONNECTICUT
Montclair: Perdue Radio Co., 8
C.
Washington: Shrader Manufacturing Co., 2803 M Street, N.W.
NEW JERSEY
Buffalo: Genesee Radio 8 Parts Co., 2550 Delaware Ave.
New York City: Harvey Radio Co., 103 W. 43 St.
Sonocraft Corp., 115 W. 45 St.
Terminal Radio Corp., 85 Cortlandt St.
OHIO
FLORIDA
Miami: East Coast Radio & TV, 1932 N. W. Miami Ct.
Pensacola: Grice Radio & Electric Supplies, 300 E. Wright St.
ILLINOIS
Chicago: Newark Electric Co., 223 W. Madison St.
Voice & Vision, Inc., 53 E. Walton
Oak Park: Brewer Engineering Co., 229 N. Ridgeland Ave.
Canton: Custom Classics, 13421 Euclid Ave.
Cleveland: Audio Craft Co., 2915 Prospect Ave.
Columbus: Electronic Supply Corp., 134 E. Long
Hubbard: Siefert Sound Service, 548 S. Beechwood
lima: Li na Radio Parts Co., 600 N. Main St.
Massillon: M. H. Martin Co., 1118 Lincoln Way, E.
PENNSYLVANIA
MASSACHUSETTS
Boston: DeMambro Radio Supply Co., 1111 Commonwealth Ave.
Radio Shack Corp., 167 Washington St.
The Listening Post, Inc., 161 Newberry St.
MICHIGAN
Bethlehem: The Audio Laboratory, 729 Delaware Ave.
Philadelphia: Radio Electric Service Co., 701 Arch St.
ten Cate Associates, 6128 Morton St.
Reading: George
D.
Barbey Co., Inc., Second & Penn Sts.
WISCONSIN
Ann Arbor Music Center, Inc., 300 S. Thayer
Detroit: Radio Electronic Supply Co., 1112 Warren Street,
Raleigh: Allied Electronics, Inc., 413 Hillsboro St
NEW 'YORK
DELAWARE
Wilmington: Radio Electric Service Co., Third 8 Tatnall Sts.
Mn Arbor:
NORTH CAROLINA
S. Park St.
Paramus: Music Age, Inc., 171 Route Four
Kelsey 8 Assoc., White Birch Dr.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
FEBRUARY, 1955
at these high fidelity specialists:
Beverly Hills: Crawford's, 456 N. Rodeo Dr.
Hollywood: Hollywood Electronics, 7460 Melrose Ave.
Pacific Radio Exchange, 1407 Cahuenga Blvd.
Los Angeles: Henry Radio, 11240 W. Olympic Blvd.
Menlo Park: High Fidelity Unlimited, 935 El Camino Real
Pasadena: High -Fidelity House 536 S. Fair Oaks
San Francisco: Audio Engineering Assoc., 3525 California St.
Milford: Milford Tool Co., 108 Gulf St.
OL
Long Island City 1, N.Y.
CALIFORNIA
Guilford: Philip
CC
today, and make PRECEDENT yours.
36 -40 Thirty - seventh Street
Hear the superlative new
W
(below)
W.
LaCrosse: Terry's Music Store, Inc., 307 Main St.
NOTED WITH INTEREST
io
Continued from page
who wanted to swap stamps for
copies of HIGH FIDELITY? He couldn't,
of course, get the necessary U.S.
dollars to pay for a regular subscription.
Within three days of mailing that
issue to subscribers, we had received
from a reader in Tennessee a check
covering a three-year subscription for
our Hungarian friend!
Think we ought to pass this item
it
along to the Voice of America
certainly makes you stop and realize
that the spirit of friendly understanding and the love of music are
not aware of political boundaries.
e
...
Hi -Fi Continues to Grow
From time to time we list openings
of new high fidelity show rooms, but
three such items deserve special attention. Two have to do with long established dealers expanding (always
a wonderful sign). Lowe Associates
of Brookline, Mass., has moved to
larger quarters at 65 Kent Street .
and Boston's Radio Shack has opened
a new branch in New Haven, at 230
Crown St.
And from Victoria, British Columbia, comes word from Henry Stubbings that he and his wife have taken
the big step and opened a store and
show room at 823 Broughton St. He
writes, "We have both poured our
hearts into this venture and, after
six weeks of hammering and painting,
I have lost (without dieting) fourteen
His description of the
pounds!"
listening facilities sound very interesting; lines carried are excellent.
Best of success to you, Mr. (and
Mrs.) Stubbings!
.
NOW
-
Lled
hm
cc'
'«le
at a reasonable P rice
FM tuner
quality
has been
hi- fidelity
Now, for the first time, a
designed that is priced to fit your pocketbook. By utilizing new circuit
techniques and the latest miniature tubes, Browning Laboratories
have been able to maintain their traditional standards of highest
quality at a greatly reduced cost. The "Brownie" is extremely compact, yet has all the features of larger models. It gives you undistorted, noise -free reception, can be used with the most expensive
amplifiers and speakers, and opens the door to many new, exciting
installation ideas.
Buy the "Brownie"
- superb, high-prked performance for only $8750
c11tc-1'.
BROWNING
150 Main
THE
WORLD'S
Street
Winchester, Mass.
OLDEST AND LARGEST EXCLUSIVE
MANUFACTURER OF HI -FI TUNERS
tlic'-t
-
cic-vi
ri
ft'.iturt-S
-
+22.5
3.5 microvolts for 20 db quieting
High sensitivity
KC at 400 cps in accordance with I.R.E. standards Overall
Smooth Autofrequency response 20 to 20,000 cycles
High gain 6BQ7A cascode RF
matic Frequency Control
amplifier Cathode follower output Full vision, illuminated
Velvet
Armstrong circuit
easy- to-read slide rule dial
tuning control Low interstation noise Front panel volume
Tape recorder output
Compact size: 9" wide
control
x 4%/e" high x 8" deep.
-
For more information see your local hi -0 dealer, or write the
Browning Laboratories, Inc.
.
Apologia
If this issue is late, or contains inexplicable peculiarities here and there,
please address your complaints to
HIGH FIDELITY'S art director, Roy
Lindstrom. He completely disrupted
work around the office for several
days by appearing one morning in a
. cutest
brand new Volkswagon .
item you ever saw. Everyone had to
have a ride, and of course, one at a
time. Figure half an hour apiece for
about 36 people, plus plenty of time
to discuss the whole situation, and
you can see what has happened to
Continued on page z6
.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
I.-
Did you know you
can reduce speaker
distortion by 76%
with an amplifier?
2 DAMPING
FACT'
PATENT
PENDING
000
Meet Bogen's new amplifiers
with `ultimate damping'
Now you can enjoy more hours of perfect listening without fatigue. The famous Bogen DB20 and D030 amplifiers are now available with the exclusive BOGEN
VARIABLE DAMPING FACTOR CONTROL (VDFC)
which permits you to minimize speaker distortion and
eliminate system resonances.
The Bogen control is the first to offer a range from +2
through infinity to -1 ... which is that magical point,
we call it "Ultimate Damping", at which the speaker
resistance is negated and distortion reduced to an imperceptible value.
Yes, now you can get true bass with any speaker!
It is easy to set your Bogen VDFC for Ultimate Damping ... no instruments are needed. As you can see from
the enlarged control shown above, you merely turn the
slotted shaft with a screwdriver to the desired setting
when you install your system. No later adjustment is
required.
*Acoustical measurements by an independent laboratory
using a quality hi -fi speaker system operating at 5 watts
and 25 cycles showed 96% distortion with damping
factor of 10 (typical amplifier), and only 20% with
Bogen Ultimate Damping. (Amplifier distortion itself
was well under 0.5 %.)
BOGEN DO3OA POWER AMPLIFIER
This brilliant unit now features the exclusive Bogen
THE DB2ODF AMPLIFIER
This is our famous Bogen
DB20 amplifier, rated as having "Best Overall Quality"
by a leading consumer
testing organization, with
the added feature of the
Variable Damping Factor
Control. This amplifier gives
you 20 watts of power at
o.3% distortion with a 5- position Loudness Contour
Selector, a 10- position input selector -phono equalizer,
output jack for tape recorder and non -resonant, separate
bass & treble tone controls. With Variable Damping
Factor: $108.00 (DB20 without VDFC: $99.00.)
variable damping factor
control as standard equipment ... which adds to its
stature as the perfect companion to the all- control
tuners -such as the Bogen
R750 FM -AM Tuner where
tuning, volume, bass tone, treble tone and selector controls are all on the tuner panel. The D030A amplifies all
frequencies uniformly from 10 to 20,000 cycles within
0.2 db at rated output of 30 watts. Variable Damping
Factor Control is the same as that on DB2ODF. $99.00
SECOND PRINTING:
David Bogen Co.. Inc. Dept. WB
29 Ninth Ave.. New York 14. N. Y.
"Understanding High Fidelity" is fast becoming a
standard manual of hi -fi theory and application. Clearly
and concisely. this new enlarged 56 page edition presents invaluable practical information to help you get
more out of any sound system. "For the Audiophile first
seeking his way... a surprising introductory work."
says the Saturday Review. Send 250 for your copy.
Send "Understanding High Fidelity" (250 enclosed).
Name
Address
IBIGHBogen
BECAUSE IT SOUNDS BETTER
FEBRUARY, 1955
City
Zone
State
Send only free catalog and where -to- buy -it guide.
L.
TUNERS
TURNTABLES
Professional -quality Audio Components, by one of the world's leading
makers of laboratory instruments for sound measurement.
310 FM BROADCAST MONITOR TUNER
Most important new development in tuner design
2- megacycle wide -band circuitry for outstanding reception quality even on weak signals. Convenient
single -sweep tuning. DYNAURAL interstation noise
suppressor. Automatic gain control. Tuning and signal strength meter. Three IF's, three limiters. Sensitivity:
A true 2 microvolts on 300 -ohm input for 20 db
quieting. Your comparison will prove the 310 outperforms any tuner at any price. Capture ratio better
than 2.5 db. $149.50 net *.
-
710 -A STROBOSCOPIC TURNTABLE
Radically new torsional and dual -stage
mechanical filtering reduces rumble by more
than 60 db, "wow" to less than 0.1 %. Built -in
optical stroboscope visible with record in place.
Push- button selection of 3311, 45, aed 78 rpm
speeds, each vernier-adjustable ±5 %for pitch control. Acoustic feed -back eliminated by a basic new
pickup -arm mounting system. $102.00 net *.
Optional hase $14.95 net *.
265 -A 70 -waft POWER AMPLIFIER
A distinguished amplifier for the perfectionist. Exclusive adjustable "Dynamic Power Monitor" control
allows full output on music, with maximum speaker protection. Damping factor continuously adjustable from
30/1 to 0.5/1. Class A circuitry throughout. Flat from
12 to 80,000 cps. Intermodulation distortion less than
0.1 %; harmonic distortion less than 03% at full output.
$200.00 net *.
121 -A
DYNAURAL EQUALIZER -PREAMPLIFIER
The most versatile control and compensation unit ever offered, the 121 -A affords the
music connoisseur adjustment for any recording
curve and record quality. Patented DYNAURAL
dynamic noise suppressor and unique record distortion filter. Roll -off equalization as well as
turnover frequency and maximum "boost" are
continuously variable. The 121 -A incorporates
all refinements known at this stage of the art.
$162.75 net *.
AMAZING DYNAURAL Dynamic Noise Suppressor
The DYNAURAL Noise Suppressor is an exclusive, patented H. H. SCOTT feature. It
virtually eliminates record surface noise
rumble, but without losing audible
and
music, as contrasted to non-dynamic filters
which impair wide-range fidelity. The
DYNAURAL protects record library invest.
14
ments by extending the useful life of
precious records, both new and old. For
example, music lover Roger Dokin, Editor
of COLLIER'S, says: Your Noise Suppressor
is simply a wonder
it does all the work
asked of it, without ever obtruding itself
upon the listener's notice."
...
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
AMPLIFIERS
Engineering Awards and Leadership
EQUALIZERS
A product and its performance are but reflections of the maker's competence and
integrity
advertising superlatives cannot make it otherwise. HERMON HOSMER
SCOTT, Inc., a leading manufacturer of laboratory instruments for sound measurement and analysis, has consistently been accorded preeminent engineering recognition for technical leadership. This recognition includes:
-
"Electrical Manufacturing" Award for outstanding laboratory instrument design.
The Audio Engineering Society's award of the John H. Potts Memorial Medal
to H. H. Scott for outstanding contributions to audio science.
Two A.I.M. Merit Awards for outstanding instruments and audio components.
The Medal of Merit at the International Sight and Sound Exposition.
"first choice" by C. G. Burke in the "Saturday
Review Home Book of Recorded Music and Sound Reproduction."
H. H. Scott amplifiers were rated
H. H. Scott amplifiers are rated "finest on the market" by expert Harold Weiler,
author of "High Fidelity Simplified."
210 -C 23 -watt COMPLETE AMPLIFIER
Incorporating the best features developed by
H. H. Scott, the 210-C offers an outstanding combination of styling, performance, and price. Patented
DYNAURAL noise suppressor, record- distortion filter,
8- position equalizer, 3- channel tone controls, loudness control, and provision for convenient tape recording. Flat from 19 to 35.000 cps. Intermodulation
distortion less than 0.1% at full output. $172.50 net *.
232-A 32 -watt POWER AMPLIFIER
Outstanding listenability makes the 232 -A a
most practical choice and "best -buy" among power
amplifiers. 1tS. specifications include: 12 to 80,000 cps
flat frequency response, noise and hum down by more
than 85 db, distortion less than 0.1% at full output.
Circuitry is Class A throughout for clean distortionless
reproduction at all listening levels. Low output impeddb regulation and optimum
ance provides less than
speaker damping. $102.00 net *.
1
99 -A 12 -watt COMPLETE AMPLIFIER
The 99 -A offers control and compensation versatility matched by few amplifiers at any price. Nine
equalization curves. Input selector. Wide-range tone
controls and loudness control. Twelve -watt output
with clean, symmetrical clipping gives output audibly
equal to much higher ratings. Provision for easy attachment of accessory 114 -A DYNAURAL noise suppressor. The 99 is the "best -buy" and outstanding performer in its price field, by actual "A-H" listening
comparisons. $99.95 net *.
H. H. SCOTT inc.
3 8 5
P U
T
CAMBRIDGE,
FEBRUARY, r955
N A M
A V
E
N U
Prices slightly higher west of Rockies.
Prices and specifications subject to
change without notice.
E
MASSACHUSETTS
FREE BOOKLET HF
-552
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page 12
Crestwood models
Hear all
Angeles Audio
Los
the
Room 584
at
-
office routine.
The car has bright
red leatherette upholstery . . . even
a radio.
Roy is delighted with it,
except for the radio, which he says
talks German.
Fair,
FM Here and There
Crestwood goes to the heart of sound
At the great Hi -Fi Shows in Chicago, Boston and New York... in homes
and offices across the country
in critical tests made by experts .. .
CRESTWOOD 303 rates as a truly exceptional tape recorder.
...
Used with Hi -Fi Systems, CRESTWOOD 303 offers smooth, wide -range
frequency response ... separate bass and treble controls ... professional
type recorder "red heads
an all- important monitor jack ahead of
power output and speaker for easy connection into Hi -Fi Systems.
"...
For all-round tape recorder use, CRESTWOOD 303 isa self -contained
package
ready to record and play back with breathtaking realism.
Simple connections permit professional quality recording from microphone, TV, radio or phonograph. Tone touch controls allow nine response
characteristics. But the heart of CRESTWOOD 303 popularity is performance. Sounds come through with lifelike fidelity- so crystal -clear
that only hearing is believing. Ask for, and insist upon, a CRESTWOOD
demonstration at your dealer's store
write for the address of your
nearest CRESTWOOD dealer.
...
-or
For copies of "High Fidelity Magazine" reports on CRESTWOOD, plus
complete specifications on all CRESTWOOD models, clip and send
coupon.
B
T
O A
T
f
T
R
Hi -Fi Crestwood 400's
Model 401 (Recorder) $199.50
(Frequency response: 30 to
13,000 cycles + or
tdb at
71" per second tape- speed)
Model 402 (Power Amplifier
and Speaker)
$100.00
-
Crestwood Model 303
Tape Recorder
$199.50
(Slightly higher in Denver and West.)
Iii
...
Red Face Dept.
o B
837 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, New York
I am interested in:
High Fidelity Magazine Report
Dealer's Address
Name
Street
Town-
...
O M
Daystrom Electric Corp.
Dept..
Reader Metalitz of College Park,
Md., says to put this in a black box:
Washington's WCFM, one of the
two good music stations there, gave
up and went off the air not long ago.
And Dr. John Stern of Utica says
that, annent the Rural Radio Network,
WRUN has dropped the WQXR
programs but is doing a "reasonably
good job transmitting semi -classical
and classical music from RRN headquarters in Ithaca."
Duane Pemberton of Evansville,
Indiana, writes: "Since Evansville College's policy does not permit commercial advertising, I'm writing you
to pass on some information which
your readers might be interested in.
EC owns and operates educational
radio station WEVC -FM
operates
on 91.5 mc
with a power of 1,900
watts, giving it a range of about
roo miles . . . thus covering the
entire Ohio River Valley."
Mr.
Pemberton, who is the college's music
director, listed the station's classical
music programs.
Abbreviated (by
us) they run Mondays through Fridays
from 3 to 3:30 and from 6:3o to
7:3o plus Tuesdays and Wednesdays
to 8; Sundays 3 to 5:30.
Finally, Malcolm Hall of Raeford,
N. C., calls our attention to station
WEWO -FM at Laurinburg on 96.5
mc, which airs a whole lot of good
music programs.
Thanks to all of you for passing
along this information.
Reports
from readers provide the only practical
way of keeping track of what's going
on with FM.
State
One of our subscription renewal
letters, which we use from time to
time, mentions Cadillac cars in a
couple of places, prattling on about
how we think HF, even without a
Cadillac, is sufficiently exciting to
warrant an immediate renewal, etc.
One of these letters came back to
us a while ago, with every mention
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
/
NOTED WITH INTEREST
YOU CAN OWN THE HIGHEST QUALITY
Continued from page z6
IMPORTED
of Cadillac circled in red and the
comment, "Well, we'll renew, but
would prefer a Lincoln."
And in whose name do you think
Of
the subscription was listed?
course
the Ford Motor Co. Scientific Lab., at Dearborn!
Having read that Lincoln again
swept the Mexican road race deal,
we think maybe we'd prefer a Lincoln.
And if anyone offers us one, instead
of those 2,56o Telex speakers, we're
going to be in a tough spot.
Thanks, by the way, to Lorraine
Phillips, of the Ford Motor Co., for
a sense of humor. If we use this
letter again, we'll switch to Lincolns.
FOR THE
HOME AUDIO SYSTEM
BARGAIN
OF ONLY
$I739O
-
Still Blushing
In the Records -In- Review section of
the December issue we proudly
presented a review of the Obernkitchen Children's Choir singing on
a recent Angel release. Being in the
Christmas spirit and needing a picture
just so big, we dropped in what we
thought was a photo of the Obernkitchen children in action. Ahem.
The picture turned out to be that of
the St. Paul Choirboys of London,
also Angel artists. No particular harm
done, I suppose, unless there is a
bit of intramural competition between
Nonetheless, our
the two groups.
inapologies to all concerned
cluding Angel.
-
Edison Cylinder Repairs
It's been brought to our attention
that James Riley, 44 Church St.,
Norwich, Conn., makes a speciality
of repairing old phonograph equipment, such as Edison cylinder
machines. Handy to know about, if
this is one of your problems.
o
LAP 2
©
AUdVMPLIFIER
a>
it-tone EAPIOIDIo
cs
0
fié.
AMPLIFIER
.en
-
!
-
AND, FOR THOSE WISHING TO SPEND
UNDER $100, WE OFFER:
l:
Motek Tepe Transport Mechanism (described above) $59.50
The new Fen-Tone TPR -1 tape preamplifier.
$39.75
TPR -1 Specifications: Power Supply on separate chassis.
Erase and Bias Frequency 50 kc /s.
'Tubes: 6X5GTA
5879 Shock -mounted
Special hum balancing control.
6AQ5
6E5 Magic Eye
One low level and one high level input
12AT7 Shock -mounted
Signal to noise ratio 55 db
2:
VORTEX /ON
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY
...
stuffy and all
That's what we are
the rest. But once we write an obituary, we're going to stay obited.
Back a few issues ago, we wrote an
obituary to "Tested in the Home" reports on microphones, since the home
is no place in which to test, with any
degree of accuracy, a microphone.
While that issue was on the presses,
Frank Capps Co. sent us one of their
fine units for a TITH report, and we
FEBRUARY, 1955
MOTEK TRANSPORT MECHANISM
a Auoial
-tone PE REX CHANGERS
Output 6 watts, 3 - 5 ohms
Separate power pack for remote installation
The only truly automatic and foolproof
to avoid HUM.
changer ( patented ), playing ten interRecord frequency range 50 - 10 000 C.P.S.
mixed records, without pre -setting, in
Erase and Bias frequency 45 kc /s.
any odd size between 6" and 12 ".
record, play -back and amplifier
Controls
Precision built: free from rumble and
selector switch, tone volume, phono, master
acoustic feedback.
volume, magic eye record indicator.
Automatic muting switch. Automatic shutInput
for microphone, phono, radio and
off. Built in 3 -stage tone filter. Spring
telephone pick -up with provision for mix.
mounted chassis.
ing, special Hi Fi preamp output socket to
feed into
Hi Fi audio amplifier (same
Price includes famous PE8 dual cartridge
socket may serve also as input for a 2,000
with sapphire stylus. (45 spindle + $3.50)
uhms monitor headphone).
Total price will be $154.15 by substituting Model TPR -1 for Model EAP -2.
(TAPE
Hidebound
Continued on page
ttoae
Driven by three individual AC motors.
Speed 71 I.P.S., dual tracks.
All electrical push button switching and
braking.
Hi -Fi record /playback and erase heads.
Frequency response better than 50 - 10,000
C.P.S.
WOW and FLUTTER less than .3%
Accommodates 7" reels (1200').
i8
TAPE RECORDER
Featuring:
*
Three individual motors.
* Speed:
Audiophile Net
$37950
72/z and 33/4 I.P.S., dual
tracks.
* WOW and FLUTTER less than
.2 %. Frequency 50- 12,000 C.P.S.
* Accommodates 1750' reels (8 ").
At Your Nearest Hi -Fi Center.
FENTONCOMPANY
15 MOORE STREET
See us in Room 540 al the Audio Fair in Los Angeles, Feb. 10.13
NEW YORK 4, N. Y.
HEATHKIT
NOTED WITH INTEREST
Continued from page t7
"BUILD IT YOURSELF"
arnpIifier
kits
eutuil
WILLIAMSON TYPE
(ACROSOUND
TRANSFORMER)
This dual -chassis high
fidelity amplifier kit pro-
bility. It features the
Aerosound "ultra-linear"
output transformer, and
has a frequency response
within 1 db from 10 cps to 100,000 cps. Harmonic distortion
and intermmlulation distortion are less than .5% at 5 watts,
and maximum power output is well over 20 watts. A truly outstanding performer. %V-3M consista of main amplifier and
power supply. Shpg. Wt. 29 lbs., Express
Model W-3 consists of W'-3M plus WA -P2 PreampLfier listed1lon this page. Shpg. Wt. 37 lbs., Express
fi
$69.50
PREAMPLIFIER
Here is the complets
preamplifier. Designed
specifically for use with
the Williamson Type cir-
euit, it provides equalisation for LP, ¡IAA, AES,
and early 78 records, 5
switch -selected inputs
with individually preset
level controls, separate
lass and treble tone controls, special hum control,
etc. Outstanding in per 1 mu:mee and most
attractive ill appearance. Fulfills every
reptirement for true high fidelity performance. $1
Shpg. Wt. 7 the
9.75
(CHICAGO TRANSFORMER)
This hi -fi amplifier is cons
t ructed
on
a
single
chassis, thereby affecting
a reduction in cost. Uses
new Chicago high fidelity
output transformer and
provides the same high performance as Model W-3 listed above.
An unbeatable dollar value. The lowest price ever quoted for a
complete Williamson Type Amplifier circuit.
Model W -4M consists of main amplifier and Power among un
chassis. Shpg. Wt. 28 Ilse, Expreu
onlyY
gle
O
Model W -4 consists of W -451 plus WA -P2 Preamplifier. Shpg. Wt. 3511x., Express only
$59.50
7'JgeGG
WILLIAMSON TYPE
(PEERLESS TRANSFORMER)
This latest and most advanced Heathkit hi -fi
amplifier has all the extras so important to the
COMBINATION
W -5M and WA -P2
super-critical listener. Featuring ET -66 tubes.
special Peerless output transformer, and new circuit design, it offers brilliant performance by any
standard.
Bass response is extended more than a full
octave below other Heathkit Williamson circuits,
along with higher power output, reduced inter modulation and harmonic distortion, better phase
shift characteristics and extended high frequency
response. A new type balancing circuit makes
balancing easier, and at the same time permits a
closer "dynamic" balance between tubes.
Aside from these outstanding engineering features, the W -5 manifests new physical design as well. A protective cover fits over
all above-chassis components, forming a most attractive assembly- suitable for mounting in or out of a cabinet. All connectors are
brought out to the front chassis apron for convenience of connection.
Model W-5M consists of main amplifier and power supply on single chassis with protective cover. Shpg . Wt. 31 1ba.
Express only
Model W -5 consists of W-5M, plus WA-P2 Preamplifier shown on this gage. Shpg. Wt. 381bs.
Express only
59.75
$79.50
Wearlrkit
HIGH FIDELITY
H
20 WATT AMPLIFIER
This particular 20 watt Amplifier combines high fidelity with economy. Single
chassis construction provides preamplifier,
main amplifier and power supply function. MODEL A- 911
True hi -fi performance ± 1 db, 20 cps to
20,000 cps. Preamplifier affords 4 switch- selected compensated inputs. Push pull 61.6 tubes used for surprisingly clean output signal with excellent response characteristics and adequate power reserve. Full tone control action.
Extremely low cost for real high fidelity performance. Shpg $9J
Wt. 18 ll n
.
ZUaute
18
5.50
New wrinkle in the hi -fi field is Shryock's (of Ardmore, Pa.) come- in -anddo-it- yourself evenings. Nice idea;
see ad in this issue for complete details.
Back Copies
J, Miletiz, 1010 W. Madison St.,
Ottawa, Illinois, wants a complete
set of HIGH FIDELITY Magazine .
and Gerald Winn, 62oo N. Kenmore Ave., Chicago 40, Illinois, has
extra copies of Nos. 6 through ro
inclusive.
. George Wentz, box 26, San Marcos, Texas. wants a copy of No. 4, but
has extra copies of Nos. i, 2, 3, & 5.
F.
.
...
WILLIAMSON TYPE
HIGH FIDELITY
...
Do -It-Yourself
vides installation flexi-
YTea
had to say "Sorry, too late." But we
do want to point out that the absence
of a TITH report on the Capps microphone (or on any other, for that matter) has nothing to do with the qualifications of the unit as high or low
fidelity; Capps manufactures a very
fine microphone
but we're stubborn!
EATH
COMPANY
BENTON HARBOR 8,
MICHIGAN
FOR FREE CATALOG AND SCHEMATICS
.
Cabinet Makers' List
Fred I. Sutton. Jr., of Kinston, N. C.,
writes that the "John Tyndall Fixture
Co. of this city paneled my library in
walnut and built the enclosures for
my high fidelity equipment. Their
craftsmanship couldn't be improved
upon; they have since made installations for others which are beautiful
also."
Hold It!
This, as far as we know, has nothing
to do with high fidelity, unless you
stretch things a bit and include
Anyway, every
guying antennas.
once in a while something crosses
our desk which we think is of such
general interest that we drop it in
this column.
seems to us you'd all be
So
glad to know about a doodad called
a "Keep-Stake," manufactured by
the A. B. Chance Co., 210 North
Allen St., Centrali, Mo. It's a rod
3o in. long 7/16 in. in diameter,
eye on one end, and a sort of single,
corkscrew plate on the other. Poke
it in the ground, twist, and you've
got a firm anchoring device.
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
The Greatest Reward
is BUYER APPROVAL
12-INCH TURNTABLE S
...
were received by you with the kind of enthusiasm that
is
every manufacturer's dream. Your acceptance and approval of
these products have confirmed our confidence in their quality
and lustifled the years of work devoted to their development.
We are both gratified and encouraged. We shall continue to
give our best talents and efforts to the cause of high quality
sound reproduction
- moving always nearer the ultimate. And
one day, we shall be able to give you 'the perfect turntable'
.
Until then, we offer you the Rondine Turntables, representing
the closest approach to such perfection.
If you are not yet familiar with the Rondine Turntables,
write for a complete description to Dept. YB -2
R E K - O - K U T
Sold by Leading
Sound Declers
The
RONDINE... 06995
FEBRUARY, 1955
C O M P A N Y
Makers of Fine Recording and Playback Equipment
Engineered for the Studio
Designed for the Home
38 -01 Queens Blvd., Long Island City 1, N. Y.
The
RONDINE Deluxe... $11995
19
FOR DISCRIMINATING LISTENERS
SIR:
THE AUTHENTIC KLIPSCHORN, created for those who
demand authentic sound reproduction, is the culmination
of fourteen years intensive research.
Its three horn -loaded speakers give you over nine
octaves of faithful music re- production, true to the tone
quality of the original instruments. They have been selected only after exhaustive laboratory and listening tests of
every important foreign and domestic model.
The bass driver is mounted in an exclusive Klipschdeveloped horn with an air column adequate to reproduce
the largest organ pipes. Yet the entire speaker system
fits unobtrusively into any average size room.
Write for our newest brochure on the Klipschorn and
the name of your Klipsch dealer.
While browsing through The New
Yorker, I find that Abercrombie &
Fitch is selling pocket radios, both
AM and FM. So now it is possible
to walk down the street with the
correct plug in each ear, and listen
to binaural!
The units are $30 FM, and $5o AM.
Robert Fabric
Hagerstown, Md.
SIR:
Peter Bartók's fine article (November
1954) not only gives a learned explanation why records sound like
records
it also shows why Bartók
records sound less like records than
some others! A fellow who combines
Bartók's technical knowledge with
his musical background ought to be
able to do a superlative job.
There is one statement, however,
which I don't feel quite happy about:
P. B. says that, for all we know,
supersonic frequencies up to too,000
cps might set up some distortions
in the auditory organ which influence the perception of audible
frequencies. This is an interesting
speculation, but I cannot admit that
it is based on physiological facts.
The anatomical structure of the sound transmitting units in the middle ear
has, to my knowledge, never been
shown to allow response to frequencies above the upper limit of
hearing, nor has the sound receptive
system
the cochlea in the inner
receptive resonance above it.
ear
Even if supersonic frequencies would
create a certain state of tension in
either of the structures involved,
they would be of negligible importance as the energy of those
frequencies is incomparably smaller
than that of the audible ones.
I have a very strong feeling that
the musical instruments of mankind
ate empirically or, to use a biological
term, phylogenetically, made so that
they cover, but hardly spread outside,
the spectrum of the human ear. If
Continued on page 22
-
-
-a
TELEPHONES:
KLIPSCH & ASSOCIATES
HOPE, ARKANSAS
PRospect
13395
PRospect
PRospect
14538
15575
PRospect
7
5514
RIVER EDGE CABINETS
designed expressly for
REGENCY HIGH FIDELITY COMPONENTS
Day by day more and more people are making High Fidelity
a part of their everyday life. These handsome River Edge cabinets
have been designed to make it effortless to assimilate
High Fidelity equipment into any home decor.
Model TM Table model cabinet
for HF -80 or HF -150
amplifiers or any Regency tuner.
Model CTC Console cabinet
for combination of changer,
AF -220 tuner and HF-80
or HF-150 amplifiers.
Model TMC Table model or a
chairside consolette for
changer and HF-80 or HF-150
amplifiers or AF -220 tuner.
River Edge cabinets are priced from $17.50
to $85.55. Pre -cut, pre- drilled panels are available
to specifications at nominal charge.
Regency Division, I.D.E.A., Inc.
7900 Pendleton Piks
Indianapolis 26, Indiana
LETTERS
Exciting High Fidelity Firsts!
Continued from page 20
we could detect in any way frequencies above, say, zo,000 cps, there
INTERELECTRONICS
would be musical instruments producing them, exactly as organ builders
would build 32 - foot pipes going
below 32 or even 16 cps if those
"infra- bass" notes could be heard
Now .
.
in these superb matched
instruments
.
enjoy the foremost
advances in High Fidelity
startling
realism, greater power, lowest distortion, precision craftsmanship.
.
...
-
-
INTERELECTRONICS
"Coronation 100"
40 WATT Amplifier$995°
Greatest amplifier buy today and here's
why. RESERVE POWER
80 watt peak.
EXCLUSIVE NOVALOOP CIRCUITRY
completely new, non-ringing multiple
path feedback design, over 50 DB feedback. 40 WATT HIGH EFFICIENCY, WIDE
RANGE OUTPUT TRANSFORMER sealed
multiple- section winding, thin strip core.
FOOLPROOF DAMPING CONTROL
continuously variable, exactly matches loudspeaker for startling performance. 5 to
200,000 cycle response. DISTORTION FREE
-less than 0.05 °o at 30 watt level, ex-
-
-
-
POWER RESPONSE -at 30
watts
casting.
'
0.1 DB from 16 to 30,000 cycles. HUM
AND NOISE LEVEL -virtually non-measurable. DESIGNED FOR THE FUTURE
finest sealed components
unted on
Bakelite terminal board for m decades of
trouble -free listening pleasure. Plug -in
filter capacitor. Critical networks of precision components, lifetime encapsulated.
BUILT -IN PREAMPLIFIER POWER SUPPLY.
PUILT -IN POWER FOR NEWEST ELECTROSTATIC TWEETERS. Other firsts.
-
INTERELECTRONICS
"Coronation"
CON SOLETTE
PREAMPLIFIER- EQUALIZER
Worthy companion to the incomparable
"Coronation 100" 40 watt amplifier. AD-
-
VANCED EXCLUSIVE CIRCUITRY
the
only preamplifier -equalizer operating entirely thru negative feedback. REVOLUTIONARY
NEW INPUT TUBE, Z -729,
phenomenal low noise followed by premium 12AY7 tube. HUM INAUDIBLE with
all controls on full. DISTORTION FREE
virtually n
eable, exceeds FCC
requirements tor a FM broadcasting. 5 to
200,000 cycle response. HIGHEST GAIN
no transformers required with all present
phono cartridges. LOUDNESS CONTROL
continuously variable to your exact pref-
-
For the hi-fi thrill of your life,
hear the Coronation Twins today!
available.
i
.
We would like to refer Dr. Stern
to page 582 of the July, 1954 issue
of the "Journal of the Acoustical
Society of America."
In a brief
note, it is reported that high intensity
under water sounds at a frequency
40
AN
Some dealerships still
reeds FCC requirements for FM broad -
...._r.--r
e
$7qso
musical sounds.
I don't think a comparison of music
and painting is out of place here.
There must be pigments in many
paintings which reflect "color" beyond
the visible spectrum
ultraviolet and
infrared. Yet, nobody will suggest
that frequencies of those wavelengths
influence the visible colors of the
painting, and no painter will intentionally mix pigments with these
reflecting powers into his colors.
Finally, another thought occurs:
we know that the upper limit of our
hearing becomes more and more
drastically curtailed as we grow older.
At 45, nobody is able to discern
frequencies above 14 or 15,000 cps.
This means that, by the time the
average music lover is economically
in a position to afford an expensive
zo to zo,000 cps -type high- fidelity
system, he is too old to appreciate
it. This is a sad reflection on a biological injustice not limited to high
fidelity.
John J. Stern, M. D.
Utica, N. Y.
as
erence. MAXIMUM BASS AND TREBLE
COMPENSATION
over 20 DB distortion -free boost and attenuation. FIVE
INPUT SELECTIONS. 16 PRECISION PLAYBACK CURVES
lifetime
capsulated
precision plug -in networks, instantly replaceable if equalization curves change.
ULTRA COMPACT,
EASY MOUNTING.
-
of
50,000 cycles have been heard
by research workers at the Bureau
of Ships. The authors point out
that "hearing" was apparently by
bone conduction.
Moral: for real
hi -fi, keep your head under water!
-
power for Weathers cartridge,
film projector photocells, condenser microphones. Distinguished satin -gold LUCITE
table
front panel. Custom finished
cabinets available. Many extras.
Built-in
INTERELECTRONICS
2432 Grand Concourse
New York 58, New York
SIR:
the November issue of HIGH
FIDELITY, D. A. Koss, of Chicago,
stated in the letter section, "The
In
Chicago Symphony is the most phonogenic orchestra in the world." He
is completely wrong.
For my money, and from my
knowledge of orchestras, I'll take
the Philadelphia Orchestra and the
Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amster Continued on page 26
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
The Ampex 600 monitor ale
ing comparison between what .
to you. (Ask your local Ampex distributor
.
e
.
'antoneous listen
ne tape plays back
for this demonstration')
and you will hear how perfect a tape recorder can be
On the Ampex 600 it takes the most perceptive listening to hear even the slightest difference between what
goes into the recorder and what the tape plays back.
...
after an Ampex has run for thousands of hours. The comparison will still be equally
favorable. This sustained performance is something
that specifications do not show. But this is the
reason why Ampex has become a magic name.
Listen again
For recording from
F
-M radio, copying of valuable
records, playing of pre- recorded tapes or the
making of personal or professional recordings, the
Ampex 600 is a permanent investment in satisfaction.
ARTHUR FIEDLER
listens...
"A studio Ampex is a cherished part of my home high
fidelity system. But hearing this new Ampex 600 was a real
surprise. It's such a convenient size, yet like my big Ampex
it is a superb recording and reproducing instrument."
(NOTED CONDUCTOR OF THE BOSTON POPS ORCHESTRA)
40 to 15,000 cycles response at 7T/2 in /sec. (± 2 db from 40
to 10,000 cycles; down no more than 4 db at 15,000 cycles).
Over 55 db signal -to-noise ratio.
Flutter and wow under 0.25% rms.
Prices
$498 unmounted, $545 in portable case.
-
Matches the Ampex 600 in appearance and quality.
Price
$149.50 in portable case.
-
For
full specifications, write today to Dept.
F
-1887
AMPEX
CORPORATION
FEBRUARY, 1955
934 CHARTER STREET
REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA
Distributors in principal cities (see your local telephone directory under
"Recording Equipment "). Canadian distribution by Canadian General
Electric Company.
>>
a
the lllclnto&li filwie&tionai
AUDIO COMPENSATOR
AND
PRE
-AMPLIFIER
McINTOSH alone provides the complete flexibility of tone control
required to bring out the finest, or even the hidden qualities in an audio
system. It's now so easy to bring laboratory standard performance to your
home. You can quickly connect the McIntosh self -powered C -8P to your present
system.
The C -8P brings to your fingertips the most advanced in high fidelity compensation techniques, yet operation, as well as installation, is surprisingly easy.
Abundant control is made possible by five Bass (turnover) and five Treble
(roll -off) switches, an Aural Compensator, a Rumble Filter, separate wide -range
Bass and Treble controls, and a five program- source selector control for Tuner,
Tape Recorder, Microphone, and two phonograph cartridges.
The C -8P makes any record or system sound better. Enjoy the supreme
satisfaction of complete and uncompromising audio control, with the marvelous
McIntosh. There's nothing else like it. Hear it at your dealer's.
$9950
Model C -8P
(without wooden cabinet)
With Mahogany cabinet
(illustrated)
Model C -8PM $107.50
Model C -8, powered
by McIntosh ampli-
fiers, without cabinet
$88.50.
Model C -8M. with Ma.
hogany cabinet $96.50.
The McIntosh provides stability, adequate
frequency resopnse, and lowest distortion features
os important in the pre -amplifier as in the power
amplifier. Distortion less than .3% at full 4 volts,
110 db.
20- 20,000 cycles. Hum level (inaudible)
All controls silently operated.
-
24
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
A TYPICAL HOOK -UP OF THE McINTOSH
C -8 P
iN PUTS
y)
Flat channels 1, 2 and 3, each
with pre -set level control, for
Tuner, Tape Recorder, and
Microphone.
tNTER.UNR CABLE
O
ó
Au
OUTPUTS
MAIN()
Au
A
A1r
sto
NEOSH LAB., NC.
AUDIO
COMPENSATOR
MODEL C-131,
AL NO
0000
Channel 4 terminated for Pick-
Cartridge, but readily
modified for any other magnetic
cartridge.
ering
60
Auxiliary output for
recorder in addition
to main output to
power amplifier.
Switch allows Channel 5 to be used
(Not needed for McIntosh power amplifiers.)
as
Three auxiliary 117 v. outlets so
that rccord player, tuner, power
amplifier and compensator can be
turned on or off simultaneously.
(Three extra 117 v. outlets are
provided on separate power supply
with Weathers,
Phansteil, ceramic,
well as any
magnetic cartridge.
All- purpose channel
5, for G.E.,
Audak, Fairchild,
Weathers,
Phansteil or ceramic cartridges.
Variable load resistor, calibrated from 0 to 100,000
ohms, easily set for best
performance of any cartridge on channel 5.
unit.)
The McINTOSH C -8P Professional Audio
Compensator is a complete control center for your
entire system. Its extreme versatility simplifies your
audio installation, yet expands its usefulness.
Inadequate compensation may cause changed or clouded reproduced
sound, which cannot be overcome through even the most expensive audio installation. With
the McIntosh compensation switches, exact tone balancing is obtained for any possible recording curve. The true, transparent qualities of the original sound are therefore faithfully
re- created. Annoying high frequency record hiss, surface static, and noisy radio reception, are
also filtered out with a welcome effectiveness. Precise audio control is at your command to
match the natural sensitivity of high fidelity reproduction, exactly as your keenest listening
taste may dictate.
-
You'll be proud to own a McIntosh, world-honored for outstanding performance, built
with superb craftsmanship
truly a masterpiece in high fidelity sound.
Send for FREE McIntosh Record Compensation Guide
for finest playback results.
Ilisintosh
LABORATORY, INC.
322 Water Street
Separate power supply, 51/2" x 43/4" x 2% ", allows
main control unit for maximum convenience of installation
prevents any possible induced hum problem from
associated equipment.
smaller
-
FEBRUARY, 1955
Binghamton, N. Y.
Export Division: 25 Warren St., New York 7, N.
Y.
CABLE SIMONTRICE NEW YORK All Codes
25
LETTERS
Continued from page 22
dam.
These two are the musical
giants of today . . .
I have heard Mercury's version of
Tchaikovsky's Sixth
and Kubelik's
tempi do not have the assurance
that Ormandy has. Ormandy's performance shines with brilliance, and
the first and third movements are
unsurpassable . .
Mr. Koss has the presumption to
call Ormandy a sloppy conductor.
If this term "sloppy" is what I've
been hearing at the weekly Saturday
night concerts or on Columbia records,
I'd better see an ear specialist ...
I'm positive that J. F. Indcox of
HIGH FIDELITY, Irving Kolodin of
Saturday Review, and Olin Downes
of the New York Times can't all be
wrong in saying that Philadelphia has
the greatest sounding orchestra in
the world.
Harry Roth
Philadelphia, Pa.
...
.
Now!
MicroTuning!
TH E,
FISHER_
FM TUNER
SIR:
FM-80
World's Best by Z R. E Standards
before in the history of Frequency Modulation has there
been a tuner to match the remarkable, new FISHER FM -80.
Equipped with TWO meters, it will outperform any existing
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companions, the FISHER FM -AM Tuners, Models 50 -R and
70-RT, we predict the FM -80 will be widely imitated, but never
equalled. Be sure; buy THE FISHER.
Only $139.50
NEVER
Outstanding Features of
SIR:
Price Slightly Higher West of the Rockte.
21
III
Ralph E. Whitney
Washington, D. C.
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
11111It1Inllrurnl1111111111111
best...
THE FISHER FM -80
TWO meters; one to indicate sensitivity, one to indicate center-of-channel
for micro. accurate tuning.
Armstrong system. with two IF stages, dual
limiters and a cascode RF stage.
Full limiting even on signals as weak
as one microvolt.
Dual antenna inputs: 72 ohms and 300 ohms balanced (exclusive!)
Sensitivity: 11 microvolts for 20 db of quieting on
-2 -ohm input; 3 microvolts for 20 db of quieting on 300 -ohm input.
Chassis completely shielded and shock-mounted, including tuning condenser, to eliminate microphonics, and noise from otherwise accumulated
dust.
Three controls- Variable AFC /Line- Switch, Sensitivity, and
Station Selector PLUS an exclusive Output Level Control.
Two bridged
outputs. Low-impedance, cathode-follower type, permitting output leads
up to 200 feet.
11 tubes.
Dipole antenna supplied. Beautiful,
Self-powered.
brushed-brass front panel.
WEIGHT: 15 pounds.
SIZE: 1234" wide, 4" high. 81/2" deep including control knobs.
FISHER RADIO CORP.
.
.
A moderately adequate record
library represents a sizable investment,
and even a masterpiece too often
repeated can pall, while many agreeable
trifles just don't seem to be worth
the price of a top -notch modern LP.
For the impatient collector whose
appetite is bigger than his pocketbook Camden records offer a very
welcome solution, I feel. Though
they are remakes of old 78s, most
of them were originally highly esteemed interpretations in excellent
recording for their not - too -far -past
period. For the most part, they have
been transformed into LPs skillfully,
and their surfaces are among the
.
-25 44th DRIVE
L. I. CITY 1,
N. Y.
Mr. Kramer, in his article on record
reviewers and reviews (December)
1954), has said enough to goad me,
and I imagine many others, into
expressing a few divergent opinions
on the subject.
Since the earliest days of record
reviews, I have been following what
the critics have to say with considerable interest and sometimes amusement at the diversity of opinions
expressed about one and the same
recording.
I have learned by experience to trust most of them to
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
tell me the quality of the recording
though even here they do disagree
but I never expect them to be unanimous. These record critics are just
well,
as human as you and I
almost
and are entitled to their
likes and dislikes the same as we are.
Mr. Kramer is expecting too much.
No one can be as objective in his
-
-
World's
Finest
"duty to the public" as he would
have him: I, for one, enjoy a literary
flair in reviews and if a given reviewer
is dictating raste, I for one can take
it or leave it.
If he doesn't agree
with what I believe, I dismiss him.
I have learned by a process of trial
and error, perhaps, just which publications and critics generally agree
with me or I with them. For me,
these writers then are the most
I suggest that
Mr.
dependable.
Kramer try my system and with
little difficulty he can find which
critic will usually be "en rapport"
(pardon me, Mr. Kramer) with his
He will soon discover the
tastes.
Toscaniniophiles, the Modernists, the
Purists, the Anti -Stokowskites and
But
the Baroques, among others.
they are all sincere, honest and
skillful, as they see it. I suggest a
more trusting attitude but no expectation of consistency of opinion,
except in a very few cases.
Mr. Kramer is singularly inconsistent in his language for one who
doesn't enjoy a literary flavor, with
such expressions as "guide the impressionable," "outrage the intractable,"
and "disillusion the discerning." That
sounds like a "whiplashed asseveration" if I ever heard one. Find your
reviewer who likes the kind of music
and performance you do and his
opinions will reinsure you again and
again.
I shall look forward to your proposed article on the reviewer and
his functions.
Arthur]. Sherburne
Coshocton, Ohio
BY
I. R. E.
STANDARDS
ISHER
efr
FM -AM TUNERS
THE truest index to the quality of FISHER Tuners is the roster
of its exacting users. An Eastern FM station chose the FISHER
to pick up selected New York and Washington programs direct,
for rebroadcast to its own community. Reception of FM stations
over 150 miles distant, terrain permitting, is a regular occurrence,
if you own a FISHER Professional FM -AM Tuner, 70 -RT or 50 -R.
MODEL 70 -RT
III Features extreme sensitivity (1.5 mv for
20 db of quieting); works where others fail.
Armstrong system, adjustable AFC on switch.
adjustable AM selectivity, separate FM and
AM front ends. Complete shielding and
shock -mounting on main mod subchassis. Distortion below 0.04% for I volt output. Hum
level: better than 90 db below 2 volts output on radio, better than 62 db below output
with 10 mv input on phono. Two inputs.
Two cathode follower outputs. Self- powered.
Exceptional phono preamplifier with enough
gain for even lowest -level magnetic pickup.
Full, phono equalization facilities. 15 tubes.
Six controls, including Bass, Treble, Volume,
Channel /Phono- Equalization, Tuning and
Loudness Balance. Beautiful Control Panel.
I -i'í" wide, 852" high, 91/4" deep.
MODEL 50 -R
use
MASTERPIECE OF TUNER DESIGN
Identical to the 70 -RT but designed for
with an external preamplifier -equalizer.
such as the FISHER Series 50 -C.
MODEL 50
R
SIR:
(Re Mr. Kramer's article), why should
a critic hesitate to try to improve
his reader's taste? This seems to me
to be the difference between a critic
and an ordinary reviewer.
The
former will try to bring out the fine
points of good music and performances
and thus encourage his readers to
expect more than just another good
Scheherazade or Eroica.
Unless the
record is being bought purely as a
Continued on page 28
FEBRUARY, 1955
MODEL 70 -RT
$1845°
MODEL 50 -R
$1645°
PRICES SLIGHTLY HIGHER
WEST OF THE ROCKIES
Write for Full Details
FISHER RADIO CORP.
21 -25 44th DRIVE
LONG ISLAND CITY 1, N.Y.
It It Lt Lttltutluntuutufuunt
LETTERS
Continued from page 27
ßl'1ì #e eYi ffllfl<)14
hi -fi show -off, the music itself will be
the most important consideration to
the reader of the review, who is due
some discussion of the work for its
own sake.
TO COMPLETE YOUR
P. L. Forstall
Evanston, Ill.
HOME MUSIC SYSTEM
SIR:
I agree
FISHER
ACCESSORIES
MIXER -FADER
Model 50-M
NEW! Electronic mixing or fading of any two signal
sources (such as microphone, phono, radio, etc.) No
insertion loss. Extremely low hum and noise level. High
impedance input; cathode follower output. 12AX7 tube.
Self -powered. Beautiful plastic cabinet. Only $1 9.95
50 -PR
PREAMPLIFIER-EQUALIZER
Professional phono equalization. Separate switches for
HF roll-off and LF turn -over; 16 combinations. Handles
any magnetic cartridge. Extremely low hum. Uniform
response, 20 to 20,000 cycles. Two triode stages. Fully
shielded. Beautiful cabinet. Self- powered.
$22.95
PREAMPLIFIER- EQUALIZER
50 -PR -C
WITH VOLUME CONTROL
50 -PR -C. This unit is identical to the 50 -PR but is
equipped with a volume control to eliminate the need
for a separate audio control chassis. It can be connected
directly to a basic power amplifier and is perfect for a
high quality phonograph at the lowest possible cost.
$23.95
HI -LO FILTER SYSTEM
Model 50 -F
Electronic, sharp cut -off filter system for suppression of
turntable rumble, record scratch and high frequency
distortion
with absolute minimum loss of tonal range.
Independent switches for high and low frequency cut -off.
Use with any tuner, amplifier, etc.
$29.95
-
PREAMPLIFIER
Model
PR -5
A self- powered unit of excellent quality, yet moderate
cost. Can be used with any low -level magnetic cartridge,
or as a microphone preamplifier. Two triode stages.
High gain. Exclusive feedback circuit permits long output leads. Fully shielded. Uniform response, 20 to 20,000
$12.57
cycles.
At the historic High Fidelity Concert given
by the National Symphony Orchestra in
Constitution Hall, November 13, 1954,
FISHER 50-AZ Amplifiers and a FISHER Master Audio Control were
used to play back the tape recordings made on the spot for the
thrilled audience. "Listeners could hardly tell the difference between
real and electronic."- TIME MAGAZINE.
FLASH
See next page for FISHER amplifiers.
21
-25 44th DRIVE
L. I. CITY
to reviews, then let them be lucid,
concise, and consequently greater in
number. Diffuse, long -winded writing
has no place here.
Joe T. Herron
Evansville, Ind.
SIR:
I have
located a party who has a
huge collection of old player-piano
rolls.
The old player piano has
passed in oblivion, now an item for
collectors. Player -piano rolls are no
longer made
there may be one or
two parties still making a few
but
the one party responsible for the
great share of them is very old and
hardly active today.
I understand that this collection
is going to be broken up and dispersed to the four winds
As one
who is interested in the preservation
of the old music of America I wonder
if some way might be found to
preserve this music on tape?
It is questionable whether these
have any great commercial value,
but the nostalgic value is great. If
some means can be found for preserving these by the collective interest
of those interested, I believe the
service to the future would be sig-
-
-
....
nificant.
The time is short and action must
be prompt. The party has several
player pianos and I am sure would
cooperate to the fullest in having
them recorded.
Michael L. Byrd
1107 Myrtle Street
Inglewood, Calif.
jor.
SIR:
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP.
thoroughly with Mr. Henry
T. Kramer (December 1954, "Help
Wanted ").
I read record reviews
for assistance in selecting records,
not for a lesson in literary style or to
be impressed by erudite musicology.
If only so many pages can be devoted
1, N. Y.
Since I have spent a number of years
in the string sections of various
symphony orchestras,
28
I
naturally have
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
been concerned with quality treble
reproduction.
To aid any of your readers that
are not satisfied with their system's
treble characteristics, I am including
a brief description of my solution
to this problem.
I first observed that my husband
seemed to be contributing very little
to my installation. In fact, upon
analysis, his contribution proved to
be negative. I therefore decided to
eliminate simultaneously this negative
contribution and solve my treble
This was
reproduction problem.
done quite simply by hollowing out
my husband's head so that it was an
acoustic chamber of quite high resonant frequency and by installing
a compression -type super tweeter in
his nose.
Specifications: My husband is 5
feet to inches, weighs 18o pounds
(without wiring), and since his agreement to this installation underwent
differing degrees of refusal, I would
describe the system as one of variable
reluctance.
In closing, I should add that the
hollowing out process is a simple
procedure involving surprisingly minute quantities, and that in the typical
husband mechanism it probably is
not necessary.
SWEEPING THE COUNTRY!
The Greatest Advance
IN AMPLIFIER DESIGN
IN TWENTY YEARS!
FISHER
Z MAT
C
I
both are a regular and traditional
product of our engineering laboratories. But never before
have we offered a technological advance so obviously needed, so
long overdue, as the exclusive FISHER Z- Matic. Regardless of
the speaker system, be it a modest 8" unit or a giant assembly,
the vast acoustic improvement contributed by FISHER Z-Matic
is instantly apparent and truly astonishing. For Z -Matic has at
one stroke eliminated the energy -wasting, distortion- producing
mismatch that has prevented the complete union of speaker and
amplifier ever since the advent of electronic sound reproduction.
Z -Matic is now standard equipment on all FISHER amplifiers.
What Z -Matic Does
Ruth A. Faye
Multiplies the efficiency and effective audible
range of any speaker system, regardless of size.
The continuously variable Z -Matic control
permits any setting, according to personal taste
or the requirements of the speaker system.
Eliminates need for oversize speaker enclo.
sures and automatically corrects inherent deficiencies in speaker or speaker housing.
Z -Marie must not be confused with tone,
SIR:
-
-
END
HE unusual, the choice
Edgewood, Md.
I read with appalled fascination the
descriptions offered by your readers
of the elaborate machines they assemble; and I shudder to think of the kind
of sound the sensitive systems
must provide: the highs, the lows,
and the middles all bright, sharply
and
defined, gratifyingly "present"
all, if my experience is any criterion,
inundated by a Niagara of clicks, pops
and hisses that make record -listening
something of an ordeal at best. Or
do these fidelity fiends have some
secret source of records that are free
of blemishes? Living in New York,
I have my choice of hundreds of record sellers, and I have yet to discover
one who provides records worthy of
even my modest equipment. It is
true that these dealers all guarantee
the quality of their merchandise, but
after the second or third return trip for
exchange and no noticeable improvement in record quality, I, for one, get
with the result that my
discouraged
collection contains a saddening proportion of sub -standard disks. As the
,At.
kab
equalization. loudness balance or damping factor controls. It is an entirely new development.
Only FISHER amplifiers have Z- Matic.
A Word
50 -Watt Amplifier
Model 50 -AZ
100 watts pe.sk: World's finest .ill.triote
amplifier. Uniform within I db. 5 to
100,000 cycles. Less than 1% distortion
at 50 watts. Hum and noise 96 db below
full output. Oversize, quality components
and finest workmanship.
to Our Patrons
Your FISHER 50 -A or 70 -A amplifier can be
readily equipped with Z- Matic. A complete kit
of parts and easy -to- follow instructions are
available at a cost of only $2.50 to cover
handling. Give serial number and model.
5159.50
-
Series
Master Audio Control
Sac
Radio and
"Finest unit yet offered."
TV News. 25 choices of record equalization, separate bass and treble tone controls, loudness balance control. 5 inputs
and 5 independent input level controls,
two cathode follower outputs.
Chassis, 589.50
With cabinet, $97.50
25 -Watt Amplifier
Model 10 -AZ
50 -watts peak! More clean watts per dollar.
Less than 1/2% distortion at 25 watts 10.05%
at 10 watts.) Response within 0.1 db, 2020,000 cycles; I db, 10 to 50,000 cycles. Hum
and noise virtually non- measurable!
599.50
Prices Slightly Higher West of the Rock.es
WRITE TODAY FOR COMPLETE SPECIFICATIONS
FISHER RADIO CORP.
21
-25 44th DRIVE
L. I. CITY
1, N. Y.
Continued on page 3o
29
FEBRUARY, 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
LETTERS
Continued from page 29
enjoy
professional
turntable
performance...
plus fully
automatic
operation...
THORENS
I
I
I
r
I
-
SIR:
I
t
quality of my equipment improves,
the surface noise from the records increases; my new Weathers pick -up
works marvels for the music
when
you can hear it behind the static... .
If manufacturers cling to material as
soft and as vulnerable to New York's
sooty atmosphere as vinylite, could
they not be persuaded to record at
higher volume levels so as to blanket
some of the surface noise? The cornpiece Tristan is admirably hi -fi, but
I have yet to hear the opening notes
of the prelude, obliterated from my
copy (before I bought it) by an army
of well -fanged dust particles. Where
is the fidelity in this?
I, for one, await the advent of mass produced pre- recorded tapes with impatience.
Harold L. Geisse, Jr.
New York, N. Y.
CBA-83
kft
"The Hand Never
Touches The Tone-Arm"
With a THORENS AUDIOMATIC,
there is no possibility of record damage
caused by an unsteady hand on the tone -arm.
You simply press a button for 7", 10" or 12"
records ... and the tone-arm automatically
lowers into the lead -in groove. After play,
the arm returns ... the motor shuts off
Because of the direct -gear drive, AUDIOMATIC
has absolute speed regularity... and a noise
level -48 db below recording level Thus,
you enjoy the advantages of automatic operation
and performance comparable to transcription
turntables costing twice as much. sun,
!
!
Delians among your readers may be
interested to know of the chartering
here at Tampa recently of the Delius
Society of Florida, Incorporated.
As listed in its Charter, the aims
of the Society are: t) To promote
a wider and more frequent hearing
of music by Delius; 2) to acquaint
the public with the influence of
his stay in Florida on Delius' life
and subsequent development as a
composer; 3) To work for the restoration and preservation as a public
monument of Solano Grove, Delius'
home while in this state.
For the present the Society is
confining its efforts to a certain
amount of modest proselytizing in
the state of Florida only. In time,
however, it is hoped that the organization will grow strong enough to
seek members throughout the country
and sponsor a proposed annual music
festival at St. Augustine, of which
the works of Delius would be a
feature.
J.
R. Goodman, Secretary
The Delius Society of Florida, Inc.
Tampa 3, Florida
SIR:
4*
THOR
NEW HYDE PARK
SEE
30
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Music Boxes
SWISS Hi-fi Components
o MADE Spring-Powered Shavers
Lighters
NEW YORK
YOUR DEALER
Also a complete
line of hi -fi
record changers
and transcription
turntables.
Brochure
upon request.
Is there a means or service for the
exchange of unwanted records in
excellent condition?
Since I buy
most of my records by mail, I'm
occasionally disappointed
in
my
choices and would appreciate an
Continued on page 32
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
strikes a
note in Hi Fi
Speaker
Enclosures
Enhances enjoyment
of superlative Tru -Sonic
speaker system
ti
Model 610 cabinet alone
$129.00 net
Shipping Weight
74
lbs.
Speaker System III, Stephens
#105LX 15" woofer, =814H
multicellular horn with #216
high frequency driver and attenuator, # 800 X -2 dividing
network. $168.75 net
Shipping Weight 31 lbs.
Californian with No. III system $297.75 net
Shipping Weight 105 lbs.
Strong, uncluttered lines lend freshness to this classic cabinet.
Scaled low to fit with modern furnishings, the Californian
comes in lustrous hand rubbed blonde or mahogany finish.
Random gold grille cloth highlights a masterpiece for music. A
burnished lattice and beige or bronze grille cloth also available.
The Californian is specially engineered to let Stephens famous
Tru -Sonic speaker systems realize the ultimate performance.
The recommended Tru -Sonic system (No. III) gives rich bass
response from 15" woofer. Even wide angle dispersement of
tingling highs is achieved through the use of a multicellular
horn and low 800 cycle crossover point. Californian is 36"
wide, 20" deep, only 30" high.
For name of dealer nearest you, write to
sTPH ENS
Stephens Manufacturing Corporation
8538 Warner Drive Culver City, California
Cable Address "Morhanex" Export Address, 458 Broadway
New York 13, New York
www.americanradiohistory.com
LETTERS
Continued from page 3o
BUY DIRECT...
SAVE MONEY!
HI -FI and
Binaural units ..
opportunity to make trades or get
credit (even at a significant loss to
me) so that I could salvage some of
my initial cost toward new disks.
Nelson L. Walker
Findlay, Ohio
wired or kits!
SIR:
V-
I am interested in buying the machine
described below, or something very
like it:
Tape player (with play head only
no erase or record heads), one
speed: 71/2 ips, response flat to my
ears from bottom to top, no audible
flutter, wow, noise, or distortion.
Double trace with instantaneous, synchronized, inaudible reversal of tape
and lift (or drop) of play head, so
that when tape has finished playing
it is rewound on its original reel.
(Auxiliary reel, accordingly, might
be fixed.) Fast "wind," both forward
and reverse (during operation of
which audio circuit is broken). Automatic shutoff. Should take reel of
tape to play two hours. (7 -in. with
r -mil tape?)
Then, of course, I want to buy
records to play on this machine.
Mahler's 8th, for instance, on one
reel.
Beethoven's 9th
one reel,
and only the 9th. A 16- minute Mozart
piano sonata on its own small reel.
Seriously, I don't see why these
desiderata should be in the category
of idle wishes any longer. Who is
waiting for what to happen?
Harold Holden
Lansing, Mich.
12 -tube AM -FM
NeImperial
it
T
-
Band width
200 kc
Tuned
RF stage
Tun ing Range 88 -108
me
Sensitivity
5-10 u /v, 20 -30 db
Iron core tuned I.F.
disc. trans.
6CB6 RF
amplifier
6AB4 mixer
6AB4
oscillator
6AU6 1st I.F. amplifier
6AU6 2nd I.F. amplifier
6AU6 1st
limiter
6AU6 2nd limiter
6AL5 detector
6C4 cathode follower output
AM tuning
range 530 -1650 kc
6BA6 RF amplifier
6BE6 converter
6BA6 1st I.F. amplifier
1N34 or 1N60 crystal diode detector
Tuned
RF
Chassis dimensions:
stage
5" high, 8"
9414" long.
W.
kit of parts including tubes, $
pictorial and schematic diagrams.... a
Complete
-
Frequency Response (FM) 20
20,000 CPS
Frequency Response (AM) 20
7,500 CPS
-
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±
5p
.5 DB
-.
3 DB
NeVjV -5 FM
Receiver Kit
Self-contained
AC Power Supply
3 section variable
condenser
Tuning
-
range 88.108 me
Band
width 200 Inc
Sensitivity
10 microvolts 20 db
Tuned RF
stage
Iron core tuned I.F. -disc. trans.
6C86 R.F. amplifier
6A84 mixer
6A84
oscillator (temp. compensated)
6AU6 1st
-
I.F. amplifier
6AU6 2nd I.F. amplifier
6AU6 1st limiter
6AU6 2nd limiter
6AL5
detector
604 cathode follower output
Dimensions 93/4" s
465 selenium rectifier
s
Complete kit of parts Including AC
power supply, tubes, pictorial and g2950
"s5r/"
1,
29
schematic diagrams
Frequency response 20- 20,000 CPS 3- .5 DB
Wired A Tested extra
$5.00
Ne
-5 AM
RecV eiver
Kit
SIR:
Self -con-
I'm in favor of bigger and better
crusades. A very important one: A
handle on every phonograph tone -arm
since the first impulse imparted to
a plain arm when one seeks to grasp
it, is inevitably a downward or sidewise
thrust, which is damaging. The only
way to seize a tone -arm is with an upward motion. Why on earth don't
manufacturers get wise?
Harry L. Wynn
Pittsburgh, Pa.
tained
power
AC
supply
T u n i n g
range 5301650 kc
-
6BA6
Amplifier 6BE6
converter
6BA6 1st
I. F. amplifier
6AL5 detector
6C4 cathode follower
output
#65 selenium rectifier
"-
RF
section variable cond.
Tuned RF stage
Sensitivity 5 microvolts
Iron core tuned
coils throughout
Dimensions 93/4" x 5"
3
x
i
57/a"
Complete kit of parts, including AC
power supply, tubes, pictorial and $2450
schematic diagrams
Frequency Response 20 -7,500 CPS ± 3 db
Wired & Tested extra
$4.25
SIR:
FREE CATALOG OFFER!
A short -cut (cheap) way for binaural
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radio reception: My large living -room
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portable across the room. It's cheap
but effective.
-
John
W.
YOTA
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OBSOL J 8 J
No matter how respected nor how recent your phonograph pickup may be,
you're missing plenty if you don't
have the sensational new ESL electrodynamic cartridge! ESL is the only
cartridge with all these and many more
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Rugged; safely handled
Adaptable to all arms & changers
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34
BUCHANAN, MICHIGAN
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
AS THE
a
EDITORS
THIS PUBLICATION is a rather unusual one, and in
a way that makes its editor's life easier than it might be
otherwise: Its staff is a reasonably exact replica, in miniature, of its readership.
The publisher is an accomplished audio -experimenter
who, when he has two hours to kill between trains in
Chicago, spends them at a Myra Hess recital. The managing editor is pretty crisp jazz drummer (a little rusty,
maybe) and so ardent a Haydn- devotee that he needs two
speaker-systems in his home. One of the speaker- systems
was developed by the associate editor. The New York
editor tortures guests by playing records of Lotte Lehmann
singing Italian opera arias and making them guess who it is.
The business manager and the advertising director recently
completed a hazardous traversal of ice -bound Massreturning to report that the Boston Symphony
achusetts
Orchestra's Verdi Requiem was really terrific. The art
director plays the violin, though modestly claiming that
he prefers Oistrakh. The circulation manager collects
on records and via a
folk music particularly Asian
shortwave radio and tape-recorder. One of the editorial
assistants hides from her social-register acquaintances
the fact that she is wiring her third Williamson- circuit
audio amplifier. The chief bookkeeper, not long ago,
added a wing to her house to do better justice to her three
Wharfedale speakers and Paul Badura -Skoda.
And so on, through the echelons. The point being
made here is merely that this vastly simplifies the task
of editorial selection. An article or an idea can be pre- tested,
pretty reliably, right on the premises. If the heart- warming
saga of how Glotzville's own good -music station, WGOGFM, won its budget -battle against awful odds (unquote)
generates an expression of courteous apathy on one
staff- physiognomy after another, it is very sound editorial
practice to send the story back to Glotzville without
undue delay.
On the other hand, if the receipt of a manuscript in
the editorial office produces a prompt, convivial stream
of interdepartmental visitors who would like to read it
before it goes to the printer, the prognosis for its success
is, as the doctors say, positive.
And this permits us to predict high viability for a series
of articles we are beginning this issue, called "Living
With Music." Three manuscripts in the series have come
in, and their typescript popularity has been such that
they had to be withdrawn from circulation and locked
up until copies could be made.
The idea of the series is simple. The articles are to be
short reports by interesting people on their own adventures
like their
in home -music listening. The writers will be
-
-
-
-
SEE IT
-
readers
music -lovers but not professional musicians.
The first contributor is Louis Untermeyer, poet, essayist,
editor and anthologist, who describes his effort as a sort
of chat, covering the evolution of his own musical tastes
and some remarks on the maltreated word "escape." The
next probably will be James Reid Parker, known to readers
of The New Yorker not only as a short -story writer but
as (or did you know ?) the caption- writer for the clubwoman
cartoons of the late Helen E. Hokinson. Among others
who have furnished or promised to furnish articles are
Dana Andrews, actor; Prof. Jacques Barzun, historian
and Berlioz-enthusiast; Dr. Ralph J. Bunche, Director
of the United Nations' Trusteeship Department, perhaps
best known simply as the man who brought peace to the
Holy Land; Ralph Ellison, whose first novel, "The Invisible Man," won the fiction prize at the 1952 National
Book Awards, and who used to work with David Sarser,
violinist and audio- expert, making "Musician's" amplifiers; Jose Ferrer, actor, director and producer; Dr. Alfred
C. Kinsey, who relaxes from the study of sexual behavior
among men, women and wasps by holding high -fidelity
concerts for his friends, and William Saroyan, who adorned
last month's cover and who accompanies his manuscript corrections with queries on audio components.
The obvious hazard to be faced in committing a publication to any such series as this is, of course, the possibility that all the contributors will write the same article
in different words. We felt a little apprehension about
this to begin with, and indeed this was one reason for
waiting till we had three manuscripts in hand before announcing the series. The apprehension has now abated.
Untermeyer's charming and witty offering has been described above. James Reid Parker probably shares many
of Untermeyer's musical tastes, but he has also an extraordinarily intriguing special use for certain kinds of
music, which gives him occasion for some very funny
writing. Saroyan's report it would be fruitless to attempt
to describe, except to say that it is very Saroyan, which
we enjoy. About the others to come we will venture no
prediction, except that each seems likely to differ refreshingly
from all the others.
If there seems to be a heavy proportion of professional
writers in the listing, it is for a very obvious reason. Writers
write. In so doing, they disclose some of their interests
for instance, music. There may be equally articulate
surgeons, sea -captains and real -estate tycoons addicted
equally to living -room listening, but it is harder to find
them. Possible women contributors also have been hard
to locate and persuade. We are wide open to suggestions.
J. M. C.
FEBRUARY, 1955
-
35
www.americanradiohistory.com
A modern symphony orchestra is probably the greatest instrument of expression that
any civilization has conceived, and to run and maintain one is an extremely complex
business operation. Here is a look at the inner workings of a very famous one.
WITH INEXORABLE regularity the 54- year -old
Philadelphia Orchestra is being described these days as
"the greatest orchestra in the world." This may be flattering to its collective ego, but like most such adumbrations
it is open to dispute. If superlatives must be used, it would
be better to describe the Philadelphia as the most familiar
orchestra in the world. In miles traveled and disks recorded
it surpasses all other ensembles. The mileage to date
stands at well over 1,2oo,000
a figure which may be
augmented substantially in May if an anticipated five -week
tour of the Continent materializes and its recordings
for Victor and Columbia have been staple items of phonographic merchandise since 1917, some $4o,000,000 worth
of Philadelphia Orchestra records having been sold by
both companies. Local circumstances stimulated the
orchestra's wanderlust and its employment before the microphone, but its continuing success on tour and on record
must be credited to the particular musical endowments
for which the Philadelphia Orchestra is celebrated: its
professional dependability, its amply stocked repertory,
its talent for rendering everything
it plays in sumptuous, cushioned
sound.
Behind these esthetic attributes
lies a strong buttressing of hard
practical preparation. For the 12
staff members who work in Suite
19ío of the Girard Trust Building,
-
-
just opposite William Penn's City Hall, the Philadelphia
Orchestra connotes more than an agglomeration of caressing tone; to them it is a never -ending job compounded
of such mundane details as payrolls, timetables, baggage
cars, and printers' deadlines. Although they can occasionally attend a Philadelphia Orchestra concert for sheer
musical satisfaction, more often than not they are preoccupied wich the myriad details of management which
seem to grow in complexity from one season to the next.
Now, midway through the present season, they are already
grappling with situations that will develop next October,
negotiating with soloists, booking tours, planning a program of recordings, while coping at the same time with
that ever -present problem of keeping the current deficit
within manageable proportions. A deficit? Alas, yes;
despite its world -wide fame, the Philadelphia Orchestra
cannot operate in the black. Thirty years ago it could,
and did. Today, like most other musical institutions, it is
confronted with rising costs and stabilized receipts
predicament in which the resort to red ink is as swift as
it is inevitable.
A set -to with the musicians'
union at the beginning of this
season put Philadelphia's money
troubles in the headlines. All last
summer the Philadelphia Orchestra
Association had been negotiating
with the American Federation of
-a
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
36
www.americanradiohistory.com
.
"a
Musicians over a new contract. As usual in such negotiations, a dispute arose over money; the AFM demanded
a $10 raise in minimum salaries, the Association said no.
On October 8, the day of the opening concert, they were
still at loggerheads, and word went out that for the first
time in its history the Philadelphia Orchestra would not
begin its season on schedule. This disruption was enough
to promote a compromise. The two parties agreed on a
weekly raise of $2.50 and the season began, with less than
two hours of rehearsal, three days late. Neither musicians
nor management relished this altercation, but they took
some consolation from the fact that it focused national
attention on the increasingly uncomfortable plight of the
symphony orchestra in an expanding economy.
Nothing, of course, has expanded more in the past
20 years than salaries. At present the Philadelphia Orchestra lays out $17,750 a week in musicians' pay checks,
compared to $10,135 in 1935. Under its present contract
the minimum salary is $142.50 a week. About half the
personnel are paid at this scale; others receive more according to merit. How much more is a well -guarded secret,
but there is good reason to believe that certain Philadelphia Orchestra instrumentalists are paid between $250
and $3oo a week, most of this bonus money going to the
woodwind and brass players, who are most in demand.
In return for their weekly stipend, members of the orchestra are expected to work a maximum of 22 hours
exclusive of travel time. This breaks down during an average week to four rehearsals and four concerts. Recording
sessions do not figure in the contractual 22 hours; for these
the men are paid extra, and that "extra" during the course
of one season can amount to $goo or more. Actually, the
22 -hour work week seems shorter on paper than it is in
practice. Time spent in travel to out -of-town concerts
often adds up to five or six hours a week, and for most
programs some advance preparation at home is desirable.
Nothing in the contract stipulates that a player need practice on his own time, but if he wants to stay clear of Eugene Ormandy's famous temper he will know his part well.
Thirty -two weeks at a $142.50 minimum, plus six
weeks during the summer season at Philadelphia's Robin
Hood Dell, plus recording fees and other extras bring the
yearly income of an average Philadelphia Orchestra musician to about $6,200. For Leonard Frantz, a 39- year-old
violist in the orchestra, this has been enough to support
a wife and two children, to buy a car and a house in the
suburbs
even with an unpaid three month vacation every
summer. To one tied to an office desk from nine to five,
with two weeks off a year, the flexible schedule and long
vacation that is the lot of a Philadelphia instrumentalist
might well be matter for envy. Compared to other proeven the well -paid Philafessionals, however, musicians
delphians are at a financial disadvantage. Mr. Frantz devoted
10 years to his musical education,
first at the Peabody Conservatory
in Baltimore and later at the Curtis
Institute in Philadelphia, and then
spent a six -year apprenticeship in a
studio orchestra at Station KYW
-
--
before joining the Philadelphia Orchestra eleven years ago. Doctors
and lawyers may spend a similar
amount of time in preparation for a
career, but when they achieve the
competence in their professions
that a Philadelphia Orchestra musician has reached in his, they are
usually paid far better. Whether orchestra men are properly
compensated for their special talents is a question on
which much argument can be consumed, and it is
resolved only by weighing intangibles: do the satisfaction of making music and the advantages of a relatively
leisured schedule offset a salary that is adequate but by
no means munificent? However this is answered, there
can be no doubt that among the opportunities open to
musicians today a job with the Philadelphia Orchestra is
extremely desirable. Once you're in, you rarely leave.
Only three or four vacancies occur a year. Required retirements on pension at the age of 65 create a few of them,
and occasionally another orchestra will raid the Philadelphia ranks in search of a particular instrumentalist. Dismissals are rare. So many applicants line up for the few
openings each year that Eugene Ormandy can always find
new players of proven ability.
Philadelphia has been able to find and keep first -rate
players by dint of its 32 -week season. Musicians like to
receive those weekly pay checks as often as possible,
and in this respect Philadelphia can match all but the
Boston Symphony, with its mammoth season of 48 weeks.
But in order to keep its musicians busy for that length of
time the Philadelphia Orchestra has to cultivate audiences
far afield. Experience has shown that the citizens of Philadelphia can absorb a maximum of 8o concerts in 29 weeks;
beyond that, musical indigestion sets in. So for three
weeks of each season the orchestra takes to the road and
gives home listeners a rest. One week each is spent at the
Worcester and Ann Arbor Festivals, in mid- October and
late April respectively, and there is an additional week of
one -night stands, this year in the South, where the Philadelphians will play six concerts in as many days between
Atlanta and Charleston, West Virginia. However, this only
begins to account for the 5o or more out -of-town dates
they keep each year. During 29 weeks of Philadelphia
concerts the orchestra is constantly traveling to nearby
cities. It has been paying regular visits to New York,
Baltimore and Washington since 1902. In addition the
orchestra makes once-a- season forays to accessible cities
in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and en route to Ann
Arbor it stops off at Youngstown, Pittsburgh and Detroit.
Four times in 20 years it has taken a transcontinental
junket, and in 1949 the Philadelphians went overseas for a
27 -day concert marathon through
the British Isles. All this traveling (12,500 miles in a normal
season) adds to the Philadelphia
Orchestra's reputation; even more,
it adds to its bank account. Long
ago Philadelphia recognized that its
orchestra had to tour in order to
FEBRUARY, 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
survive. The musicians, after all, are paid by the week,
not by the concert, and it is incumbent on the management
to obtain as much box -office revenue as possible while
they are on salary.
The job of transporting 104 musicians and their instruments so that all arrive simultaneously at an out -of-town
auditorium is in the practiced hands of Theodore Hauptle,
the orchestra's stage manager. For a quartet century he
has been assisted in this endeavor by a 7o -foot baggage
car named "Patti," which nominally belongs to the Pennsylvania Railroad but is now accepted as a revered and
indispensable member of the orchestra. Patti is both
capacious and cold; the railroad has issued standing orders
never to turn on the heat in No. 6055 for fear that an excess of steam may warp precious string instruments. Ten
times a season she goes to New York for the regular Tuesday series of Carnegie Hall concerts. Normally the orchestra plays in Philadelphia the night before performing
in New York, and it is not until midnight on Monday
that three large trucks will pull up to Patti's permanently
assigned siding in the Philadelphia freight yard and begin to disgorge their cargo of instruments, wardrobe
trunks and musical scores. In about an hour Patti is
loaded to Teddy Hauptlé s satisfaction, sealed with the
orchestra's own padlocks, and secured for the northward
journey on a milk train in the small hours of the morning.
She is invariably waiting at Pennsylvania Station on Tuesday afternoon when Hauptle and another crew of truckers
arrive to unload the instruments and bring them uptown
to Carnegie Hall's stage entrance.
That same evening the operation is reversed, and by
next morning every instrument is in its appointed place
at Philadelphia's Academy of Music ready for the regular
Wednesday rehearsal. In over half a century of musical
peregrination, no Philadelphia Orchestra baggage has
ever been lost en route. The same cannot be said for
Philadelphia Orchestra musicians. A facility for reading
a score does not necessarily betoken a facility for reading
a map, and there have been sad instances of Philadelphia
personnel taking a wrong turn and missing a concert. An
edict is now in force forbidding auto travel on long tours;
the management prefers to keep its orchestra together in
chartered railroad cars, where a count of noses can be
periodically carried out.
DESPITE those 12,500 miles of travel per year, it is still
the Philadelphia Orchestra, dependent on the City of
Brotherly Love for the hard core of its income. And Philadelphia, needless to say, supports its celebrated orchestra
with appropriate enthusiasm. It patronizes a minimum of
two concerts a week, on Friday afternoons and Saturday
evenings, and often three or four when the orchestra plays
a Pension Fund, Student, or Monday evening concert.
Four times a year the Philadelphians give free concerts
in Convention Hall, an immense barn with dismal acoustics, as partial recompense for an annual grant of $5o,000
from the city exchequer. During the days of Leopold
Stokowski's magnetic reign, Philadelphia concerts were
almost entirely sold out through season subscriptions.
That is so no longer. People are more wary of committing
themselves in advance to 28 concerts, and today subscription sales have fallen to about 7o per cent of capacity.
Fortunately, box -office sales take up the slack so that
over -all attendance is as good as ever, but this dependence
on box -office receipts entails a constant appeal to the
taste of average music- lovers. Stokowski could cleave the
general ear with first performances of Schönberg, Stravinsky and Varèse, secure in the knowledge that the money
was in the till even if the patrons were not always in
their seats. Eugene Ormandy is not so favored. He
frankly tries to concoct programs that will attract audiences and is admittedly cautious in introducing new music.
Whatever esthetic criticisms may be leveled at this attitude, Ormandy's policy of programming manages to fill
the Academy of Music's three thousand seats with almost
mathematical certainty; and every time he does so, the
orchestra collects about $7,500 in ticket revenue.
In
capacity and acoustics the Academy is about as efficient
a concert hall as any in the world. Its grimy, pigeon -infested facade betrays its age (the cornerstone was laid just
a century ago), but the interior glows with Victorian serenity, the stage equipment has been modernized, and the
audibility is beyond compare. Majority stock in the
Academy is held by the orchestra
just in case someone
should be possessed of the notion to demolish it and put
up a nice, new office building.
-
EVEN with full houses at the Academy and on tour,
the Philadelphia Orchestra loses money. Indeed, if it had
to rely wholly on income from concerts, there would be
no Philadelphia Orchestra
at least not as presently
constituted. At this point the phonograph enters with a
flourish, as befits an invention that has brought the orchestra about $4,000,000 in record royalties. To anyone
(with the possible exception of Secretary George Humphrey)
that figure connotes a goodly sum of money, and though
comparative figures are not available it is probable that
the Philadelphia Orchestra surpasses all others in the
amount of income it has derived from records.
The Philadelphians have been in the business of making
phonograph records since 1917. It was a geographical
accident that got them started, the fact that Victor's headquarters in Camden lay within easy distance of the Academy
of Music, but it was their adaptability to the exigencies
of a microphone that gave them world -wide preeminence.
For three decades, ever since the Danse Macabre of 1925,
the Philadelphia Orchestra has been making high fidelity
news, though that was not always the accepted expression.
Stokowski's interpretative ideas might have been open to
question, but there was wide agreement in the 1920$
and 193os that the best sound of all came from Philadelphia;
indeed, many Philadelphia Orchestra classics of this era
are doing duty yet in Victor's low- priced Camden series,
under the pseudonym Warwick Symphony. With the
switch to Columbia and LP in the 1940s this standard did
not abate, though today the competition for hi -fi honors is
more potent than it was a quarter century ago. But if
Philadelphia no longer corners
Continued on page to
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
38
www.americanradiohistory.com
LOUIS UNTERMEYER
inLyzji UVIÑO
wing Music
Here a new series of essays begins with one by Louis Untermeyer, poet, editor, critic
and anthologist. In a forthcoming book, Makers of the Modern World, to be published
by Simon & Schuster, Mr. Untermeyer bas chosen as the four trend-shaping composers of
the past hundred years Wagner, Debussy, Stravinsky and Gershwin. What he really likes
best to listen to, however, is a very different matter
THERE WAS A TIME when the music I cared most
deeply about was the music which not only wore its
heart on its sleeve but spilled its blood luxuriously out
of every ascending phrase and dying cadence. Devoted
to the literature of poetic romance, I wallowed in the
Romantics, in the inexhaustibly overflowing spring of
Schubert, the half-intellectual, half-sentimental Weltschmerz
of Schumann, the alternately plaintive and passionate
nostalgias of Chopin. It was inevitable that, like Cynara's
lover, I should cry for madder music and for stronger
wine, and so I gorged on the bacchanalian banquets of
Wagner, from Tannhäuser to Tristan, feasts that were
I thought
sensually exciting and violently satiating.
that my youthful appetite was unlimited; but, although
I tried, sipped, and savored all kinds of musical fare, my
real craving was for the highly spiced and the thickly
sweetened. I fancied I was a musical gourmet when I
was merely a somewhat specialized glutton.
With the repetitive years my taste has undergone an
almost complete change. I can still feel the poignance
of Schuberi s "Death and the Maiden" quartet, but his
Unfinished Symphony is so worn by familiarity that,
for me at least, it is finished. Schumann's Carnaval,
which I used to play with a flourish of false notes, has
lost its fantasy since I anticipate every phrase before it
is announced. Chopin lives for me not so much in the
Nocturnes that dripped through my youth as in the
caricature suggested by Eliot's lines in "Portrait of a
Lady ":
We have been, let us say, to hear the latest Pole
.
Transmit the Preludes through his hair and fingertips
On the other hand, the music which I once thought
antiquated and "thin" now seems the richest and rarest,
the most satisfying as well as the most sustaining. Today
I turn with the greatest anticipation and delight to the
to such Italians
music of more than two centuries ago
as Vivaldi (who gets merely one sidelong mention in
Brockway and Weinstock's voluminous Men of Music),
..
-
-and may
come as a surprise.
to Corelli and Cambini, Albinoni and Scarlatti, Marcello
and Monteverdi, Pergolesi and Tartini; to such Teutons
as Telemann and Gluck and Handel; and to such Britishers
as Boyce and Byrd and Purcell. Perhaps it is their serenity
which, in these tension -crammed times, seems to carry
a kind of healing; perhaps, after an era of overorchestrated
polyphony, purposeful atonality, and distorted dissonance,
the ear is grateful for the clean line, the clear -cut statements, and the unashamed melodies which are both
supple and straightforward.
What I listen for at home on records is what I listen
for in the concert hall: the essence of the music rather than
the minute subtleties of sound. I am, of course, grateful
for the latest advances in mechanical techniques and the
engineering skills which allow me to enjoy a wider range
and a richer palette than was possible before the advent
of high-fidelity equipment. But, not being overfastidious
about flaws, I do not demand perfection. I am not deeply
disturbed by an occasional scratch, a "p" pop, or the gutty
"sting" of an overintense violin. I am no more distressed
by a little surface noise than I am by the chance rustle
of a program page, Toscanini's hardly suppressed cough,
or an admiring gasp in the concert hall. I have never
heard an absolutely perfect performance in this imperfect
world and I see no reason why I should expect one on a
piece of plastic.
As long as I am being unorthodox about the last record
refinements, let me continue the heresy by adding that
the performer is what interests me least. I prefer Kempff
and Backhaus' Beethoven to the Beethoven of, say,
Casadesus and Novaes, Curzon's Mozart to Kraus', just
as I derive more pleasure from Landowska's harpsichord
renditions of Bach than from Rosalyn Tureck's excellent
piano version of the Well- Tempered Clavier. But it is the
music rather than the interpretive musician which attracts,
holds, persuades, and finally possesses me. What I seek
is the communication of the composer, the creatively
imaginative spirit which has shaped order out of chaos
FEBRUARY, 1955
39
www.americanradiohistory.com
and has brought solace into a world of confusion.
Usually the personality of the composer declares itself
as sharply as the welcome accents of a friend
there is
no mistaking the widely differing but immediately recognizable idioms of the two Strausses; the savage inflections
of Stravinsky; the tart sweetness of Grieg (who was it that
compared Grieg's music to a chocolate bonbon filled with
snow ?); the rhetorical bombast of Liszt; the almost innocent happiness of Mendelssohn; the metaphysical brooding
of Mahler; the theatricalized storm and stress of Tchaikovsky; the heavy-going, fog- shrouded terrain of Sibelius; or, to leap into another world, the dynamically
syncopated America of Gershwin. There are times, however,
when the identity of the composer vanishes entirely and
the music emerges as a pure and disembodied thing, an
essence complete in itself. I am thinking, for example,
of some of the most magical melodies ever conceived
the expressions of unknown composers all over the world
from pre -Elizabethan England to Czarist Russia and
slave -holding America.
The protests of downhearted
lovers and depressed laborers have never been more poignantly immortalized than in the anonymous strains of the
simple but moving "Greensleeves," the slow -pulsing
"Song of the Volga Boatman," the heart- rending "Deep
River," and the extraordinary chanty known both as
"Shenandoah" and "Across the Wide Missouri."
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IF I TURN more and more often to the music of an older
day it is not because I have a longing for an impossibly
untroubled time. I know that, except for a few desperate
dreamers, there never has been a Golden Age. "The
troubles of our proud and angry dust," wrote the stoical
A. E. Housman, "are from eternity and shall not fail."
Yet, when "the world has still much good, but much
less good than ill," there is graciousness as well as gladness
in a music which is not an outlet for neurotic repressions
and which does not reflect the malaises, the fears, insecurities and compulsions of what Auden characterized
as "The Age of Anxiety." In a world where I am too
often depressed by rationalized unreason, I find myself
comforted by unmeaning melody. Reversing the proverbial formula, I sometimes believe in caring for the
sound and letting the sense take care of itself.
That, I suppose, is why I have a new and deeper appreciation for the forthright declarations of William
Boyce, particularly the trumpet clarities of his First and
Fifth Symphonies, the lovely and lively spirit of Antonio
Vivaldi
I never tire of such concertos as "La Pastorello,"
"La Cetra," "La Stravaganza," the concertos for viola
d'amore, as well as the lavish Concerti Grossi
to say
nothing 'of Handel's Great Concertos, a dazzling dozen,
the uplifting high spirits of his Water Music, the primal
sanities in his sonatas and the nobility of his oratorios.
Not that I repudiate the music of the present. I am
continually charmed by this century's three D's: Debussy,
D'Indy, and Delius. After the orchestral debauches of
the imperial Wagner (Richard the First) and his successor,
Strauss (Richard the Second), a purification was imperative. As every music student knows, this was accom-
-
-
plished by the restrained lyricism of Debussy and his
industrious followers, whom I once libelled the Debussy bodies. I confess that I still find Pelléas and Mélisande a
long and lugubrious bore, but there is a strangely fluctuating play of colors which never fails to excite me in the
Afternoon of a Faun, and there is nothing less than
enchantment in the shimmering transparence of Debussy's
smaller orchestral and piano works. I am captivated every
time I put on D'Indy's Symphony on a French Mountain Air,
with its pensive opening and its mounting climax of
variations; when winter comes and spring seems too remote
to be real, my heart leaps up with Delius' On Hearing the
First Cuckoo in Spring.
There are, of course, times when one asks for fun rather
than finesse, for wit instead of wistfulness, for the ridiculous after the sublime. It is then that I turn to the
satires of Gilbert and Sullivan
any or all of them
beginning with that great alliterative trio: Pinafore, Patience, and Pirates of Penzance. I suppose my prime favorite
is lolanthe, a triumphant parade of paradoxes, contrasting
Mendelssohnian fairy music with a mockery of noble
birth, blue blood, and a somnolent House of Peers who
"throughout the war did nothing in particular, and did
it very well." I take almost equal delight in Patience, in
which Gilbert exposes the pretensions of every precious
cult and Sullivan again proves that he is Handel's legitimate
London (not Londonderry) heir.
Like everyone else, I have a few musical allergies.
I loathe, detest and abhor hillbilly music of every region
-
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no matter how "native"; the rumble of rhumbas, sambas,
and mambos affects me with a malady of monotony; I
find Hawaiian tunes invariably sickening, and I cannot
listen to anything played on an electric guitar. I am,
however, responsive to our own abrupt and buoyant
beat. Although by no means a hot jazz aficionado
am not fanatic about the Dixieland boom and can scarcely
tell the difference between New Orleans, Chicago, Kansas
City, and Harlem styles
nevertheless I am fascinated
by the guttural (or, as it is sometimes mis- spelled, "gutteral," with no attempt at a low -down pun) voice and trumpet of Louis ( "Satchmo ") Armstrong, Charlie Ventura's
saxophone, Jack Teagarden's trombone, Benny Good man's clarinet, 'Jelly Roll" Morton's piano, Ella Fitz gerald's blues singing, and other "movers and shakers"
who have fashioned a people's music.
But other times, other rhymes and other rhythms.
As already indicated, when this world is too much with
us, I am not ashamed to escape for a few calm hours to
a less exacerbated and more tuneful era. I can always
renew my faith in music and even my hope for man by
listening to one of Vivaldi's pieces for strings
especially if it is in my favorite key of B Flat Major.
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40
www.americanradiohistory.com
Is there an EDISON in 4)e house?
EVERY YEAR, the Inventors' Council publishes, for the
benefit of the Incurable American Gadgeteer, a list of
items that need to be invented. Not surprisingly, a substantial number of the desirable inventions they have
called for have been made, not too long after their need
was made public. Most have been simple in principle,
as important inventions usually are. Many of the inventors,
it is safe to assume, have made money from their responsive
ingenuity.
Without any desire to swipe thunder from the Council,
we have felt the need to emulate their technique. There
are, we shudder to reveal, a few highly desirable items
in the field loosely described as high fidelity which have
not yet been marketed, whether or not they may have
been devised in private. We will herewith designate a
few, taking care to point out that this writing is being
done in mid -December, 1954, and that we will not be
surprised to find that several of the items we crave are
at this moment being prepared for unveiling. If so, we
won't even be red -faced about it. This is a fast -breaking
game we're in.
.
why doesn't someone offer
So
A high -fidelity AM- shortwave tuner. Many fi -folk,
particularly those living in lively urban areas, showed
their confidence in FM several years ago by buying FMonly tuners as the radio- components in their rigs. Most
good local AM broadcasting was duplicated on FM, and
in some cases the very best local programs were available
on FM only. Now, for one thing, binaural AM -FM
broadcasting has sprung up and flourished. Furthermore,
European radio has come to life again. The great Continental music festivals are shortwaved our way, and
there is a Health of folk -material on the airwaves. It
would be pleasant to hear it. Finally, some of the most
devoted American listeners are in places like Alaska and
Puerto Rico, where the Boston Symphony and the New
York Philharmonic are purveyed only by short wave.
They'd pay (that magic word!) for tuners that would
let them use their high -fidelity amplifiers and speakers
to reproduce these concerts. Such a tuner probably should
cover all the AM broadcast bands but
not the non -broadcast services; the dial
space would then be entirely usable,
permitting easy and accurate tuning.
An inexpensive turntable. There are several manufacturers who make, at prices
ranging from $8 to $13, turntables that
If they
almost qualify as high -fidelity.
went just a little further, using slightly
-
...
h
heavier turntables, and perhaps belt- transmission to
minimize the effects of the low -cost motor's vibration,
they could eliminate the grind and shudder which keeps
them in the low -fi description, make life easier for the
A
minimal - price -rig assemblers and make money.
turntable -kit to fill this need should offer motor, turntable mounting, belt and mounting -board template, all for
about $18. It wouldn't cut into the markets for either
changers or precision turntables. It would bring into the
fold people who now can't afford to get in at all.
A precise but inexpensive pick-up arm. This should
he reasonably non -resonant, compliant in traversal, usable
with at least two of the three most popular magnetic
cartridges, and priced at well under $1o. Like the turntable
described above, it would be a temporary property of the
incipient home -music enthusiast. It should have a screw adjustable counterweight, to make possible the proper
stylus pressure, and probably pivot- height adjustment.
Pin -tip connectors with crossbar grips. Most amplifiers, preamplifiers, and tuners now are made with receptacles for pin -tip plugs. And pin -tip plugs, as curYou have
rently constructed, are diabolical devices.
(let us say) copied a rare recording on your tape machine.
You want to play it back at once, to determine how well
you have captured the performance, before your guest,
the owner of the rarity, yawns and shows signs of yearning
for beddy -bye. You grab at your high -level (radio, TV
or tape) input, and find yourself with a handful of straggling wire. The soldered connection yielded, while the
pin -tip plug stuck. In a glum, dumb rage, you now fish
out your nail file and pry the pin -tip from its socket, but
the joy has fled your heart, and you no longer care if
Schnabel's piano does sound like a Hawaiian guitar in
This is so unnecessary. A pin -tip plug
your copy.
with a solid crossbar -grip would have slid readily from
its lodging, without damage, without prying. Why doesn't
someone make one?
A pilot-light kit. The lovely new recording of La Boutique Fantasque, twice- played, ended 15 minutes ago,
whereupon you lifted the stylus out of the runoff groove
and returned to your crossword puzzle (you
might feel like a bit of Bach before bed, why
The crossword
cool off the amplifier?)
leaves you baffled, so you decide to desert
it, although still preoccupied with the four letter word, ending in "u," meaning "alas."
Grumpily, you turn off the lights and retire,
while your amplifier and turntable continue
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surreptitiously to function through the
41
FEBRUARY, 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
night. This
is wasteful, and if their activity had been indicated by a small gleaming light across the room, you'd
have gone over and deactivated them, saving yourself
a small sum on the power- company bill and sparing your
equipment some wear- and -tear. Of course, you could
easily go to a wholesale radio -supply shop and get the
makings of a pilot-light circuit, together with whatever
instructions you might need. The trouble is, it isn't a
very exciting project, and you don't do it. If someone
offered you a kit
you might.
The kit might include a connector like those three-way
electrical sockets you get at a hardware store. You plug
it into an AC wall outlet. One of the three female sockets
would supply power to the hi -fi system, and another
would take a plug from the pilot -light wire. The third
female outlet would accept only a non-standard or polarized
male plug, which would be attached to the wire leading
to the switch. Turn on the switch and both pilot light and
equipment would go on. The light and switch could
be at any convenient distance from the wall outlet and
from each other.
An LP file cabinet. In 78 -rpm days, even an inexpensive
record -cabinet had an air about it, once it was facaded
with the black -and -gold spines of record albums. Since
the arrival of LP, this is no longer the case. A few fairly
new LP records have respectable- looking lettered edges,
but most, when cabineted edge -out, still look about
as glamorous as items in a druggist's files. Furthermore,
they are not suited to quick searching. The obvious way
to store LPs is in a file -cabinet. However, most available
commercial file- cabinets will not accomodate i21/4-in.
by 121/2-in. jackets. Some, made to hold hospital -case
files, will do so, but they do not look like living -room
furniture. Could not someone gifted at this sort of thing
devise a file- cabinet expressly for records, which would
not deface a living -room decor and yet make it easy to
locate LPs?
Adaptable shock -mount springs. Any record- player,
be it a changer or a turntable, should be shock mounted
to minimize acoustic feedback. It would do no harm if
some amplifiers and tuners were protected likewise; there
are such things as microphonic tubes. To be sure, some
makers of turntables and changers do supply shocksprings,
but in most cases they ignore an important factor - levelling. A turntable must be level to work as it should.
To make it so and keep it so, the obvious means are
supporting springs which can be adjusted, from above,
with a screwdriver. The only trouble is, nobody seems
to make any such spring -assemblies. Is it all that difficult,
or hasn't anyone tried?
Loudspeaker fuses. There's no reason why a loudspeaker
couldn't be protected from overload by a fuse or fuses
or, for that matter, a complete
in series with the voice coil
loudspeaker system might be protected by a common fuse.
Ideally, the fuse holder would be mounted on the speaker
and wired in by the manufacturer, but a simple box could
be offered for universal use that would have input and
output terminals and an accessible fuse holder.
There are two common ways in which a speaker can he
damaged by overload. First, an instantaneous surge can
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42
cause movement of the voice coil so violent that it is
permanently displaced, either because of suspension
breakdown or because the coil leaves the gap. Second,
the average level of power fed to the voice coil may be
so high that overheating and burnout occurs. In order
to utilize to their fullest capacity some speakers, then,
one of the slow -blow type,
two fuses might be required
to protect against burnout, and one of larger capacity
but of the fast -blow type to protect the speaker from
excessive peak loads.
In every case, unless the exact
power- handling characteristics of the speaker were already
known, the recommendation of the manufacturer would
have to be obtained as to the type or types of fuse needed.
Auxiliary speaker switchboxes. A gadget that would
undoubtedly have a large market is a small good -looking
box with three or four sets of screw terminals: one pair
for connection to an amplifier and two or three pairs that
would feed separate loudspeakers or speaker systems.
An on -off switch would be furnished for each set of
speaker terminals, so that speakers in various parts of the
house could be turned on and off individually. Instructions
covering amplifier connections for various combinations
of speaker impedances would be supplied; possibly,
level controls for use at the speaker locations would be
part of the package too.
Multi-jack adaptors. How many of us have a turntable
for LPs and a changer for 78s, each with a magnetic cartridge? Or two turntables, or a turntable and a separate
Quite a few, we'd guess and for us a
45 changer?
preamplifier with one input for magnetic cartridges is
inconvenient at best. People with a tuner, tape recorder
and TV find preamplifiers with one or two high -level
inputs similarly lacking in adequacy. This situation could
he resolved at little expense by the manufacturers of
preamplifiers and control units, simply by furnishing
a reasonable number of input jacks and switch positions
on their products. But not many do and it seems
ridiculous to replace an otherwise satisfactory piece of
equipment only to gain another input channel or two.
Why not another little box, then, with two or three
input jacks feeding through a switch to a common output?
Careful construction would be necessary to avoid hum
pickup when the unit was used with low -level circuits,
but even with this consideration the box shouldn't cost
more than three dollars. It would be worth that to be able
to plug the leads from both cartridges into two input
jacks, connect the output of the box to the single magnetic
cartridge input jack on a preamplifier, and simply turn a
switch to use either cartridge.
An FM tuning meter. Here's another gadget that could
be classed as a non -essential, but the number of inquiries
we've received about it would surprise some enterprising
manufacturer. A simple, $7.50 tuning meter that could
be attached easily to an FM tuner would likely be sold
by the carload. Not all present tuners have "tuningeyes," and not all such "eyes" work well in fringe-areas.
Unfortunately, there are problems.
A vacuum -tube
voltmeter device would be best, but these run into money
and require periodic adjustment. If a simple direct-deflection voltmeter circuit were
Continued on page izo
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
4
CONDUCTORS IN CARICATURE
17r father of orchestral conducting,
Jean Baptiste Lully, was also the
first casualty of the baton. He died
at 54 from an infection which he
started by pounding himself on the
little toe with a heavy staff he used
His successors,
for beating time.
/
.t more cautious lot, are noted for
i
their longevity, among other things.
Customs change with the times, of course: Lully smashed
his fiddlers' instruments across their backs to maintain
discipline; fragile batons have proved just as effective
and more expendable. But ever since the conductor left
the protection of his place at the cembalo and exposed
himself in a central, elevated position in front of the
ensemble, he has presented an inviting target for the
barbed shafts of caricature.
lip
.
Berlioz, seen by Gustav Doré lording it over (sue of
his mammoth choruses (above), launched the modern
art of conducting by demonstrating that the function of
the man in command was to make the whole sound
greater than the sum of its parts. A drillmaster and perfectionist who rehearsed his instruments in separate
choirs, he was the first in France to insist on using a full
score instead of a single part (the violon conducteur) and
abolished the fashion of noisily tapping out each beat.
A contemporary of his, the celebrated Louis Antoine
Jullien of France, England and America (left), was the
first orchestral showman, a Barnumesque character whose
spotless white gloves and jeweled baton directed the
audience as much as the orchestra. Nearly every king of
the podium has taken something from both models.
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FRED GRUNFELD
43
FEBRUARY, 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
(Top) Berlioz cuing in the percussion battery, in a prophesy
of what Tchaikovsky was to bring. Artur Nikisch, the master
of "iron calm" who directed with almost no gestures. Arturo
Toscanini, as seen in a pianissimo during the early 193os.
(Second row) Johannes Brahms, a gentle Meister: "It's all
the same
I'd rather listen." Gustav Mahler, of the phenomenal ear: "Tradition is nothing but slovenliness." A
table of orchestral mannerisms
14 poses for the podium
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poseur.
44
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
(Top) Bruno Walter presiding over the pit at the turn of the
century. Daumier's broadside at "modern" music, 1890
vintage: The conductor holds a roll of paper, a custom of
pre -baton days. (Second row) Hogarth's comment on a
performance of Handel's Judith in the 173o's: Handel threatened to toss one singer out of the window if she didn't keep
in line. Gabriel Fauré, who conducted with needlepoint
meticulousness. Max Reger, corpulent contrapuntist and
devotee of "inner voices."
PICTURES:
BETTMANN ARCHIVE
FEBRUARY, 1955
45
www.americanradiohistory.com
by
fost
EDWARD MAGED
gout
Naau
eouxd
The bulk of the music that passes through high-fidelity sets
probably dates from the 170os and early Moos. Some lovely
furniture designs also originated then, but manufacturers of
home-music cabinetry don't seem to be very well aware of it.
TO SAVE VALUABLE editorial space, it might be
desirable to state firmly that the writer's attitudes are
solely his own, completely biased and obviously do
not necessarily reflect this publication's opinions. They
are certainly diametrically opposed to the furniture -design
concepts of most present-day high fidelity manufacturers.
Wallace Nutting, one of America's outstanding authorities on furniture, once stated that a civilization is reflected
in its furniture, and its forms in turn reflected the skills,
imagination and character of an era. A country mirrors
with precision in her furniture craft the aspirations, sentiments and intellectual ability of her people. If we accept
this premise, we here today are completely bereft of high
ambition, intellectual emotion and perception.
How
else could we submit to what in essence are soap boxes
(polished, of course), used horizontally or vertically,
Figure
46
I
with or without legs, as housings for our music?
This high -fidelity age might rightfully be called "operation rubber stamp," for cabinet designs are all stereotyped,
as if stamped out by almost identical dies and differ only
in terms of the extravagant phraseology their makers use
to describe them.
Is there any real technical justification for existing
shapes, particularly as far as housings for loudspeakers
are concerned? We doubt it. Machine -run curves will
graphically show that response, usually the lay person's
sole criterion of speaker performance, often more closely
resembles the temperature chart of an acute malarial
patient than published specifications. The latter invariably
imply a straight line whose only concession to a French
curve is a beneficent, graceful droop of 3 -4 db at each
end of a 68.5- 14,75o cycle spectrum. (The preceding
figures have been altered a bit
to protect the guilty.)
One of our chief complaints is
the failure of most manufacturers
to realize that high fidelity can
and should be integrated with the
rest of our furniture. Its a relatively easy job, and one which
requires but a little imagination.
The expression "bad taste" almost crept in, but the realization
that taste is as ephemeral as a
Dior dictate and cannot be dealt
with in terms of absolutes, eliminated this pitfall. Even Tolstoy
in his long essay "Art," gave up
trying to define taste as a bad job.
It's apparent enough that manufacturers operate on only one
premise, which seems to be based
on the advertising dictum, "whatever sells is good taste and what
does not sell is bad taste." PerFigure II
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
.r
sonally, I won't buy this definition as the carefully thought out motivation for current designs. Rather, their genesis
seems to be in a rectangular enclosure conjured up 15
years ago, which manufacturers have copied ever since,
without even wondering whether the public might prefer
something else. How many of these otherwise astute
merchants have bothered with surveys and samplings to
ascertain what really will and will not be bought? How
many of them even have paid attention to High Fidelity's
readership survey, available to any sales manager for the
asking? It may come as a surprise to them that 57.5%
of High Fidelity's subscribers have their homes furnished
in traditional styles, and may well regard anything smacking
of Grand Rapids modern as anathema. So far as concerns
such people's ability to afford slightly higher ( ?) costs
for better designs, bear in mind that those subscribers
who own their own homes, (and there are plenty of them,
too) value them at an average of $26,000 based on today's
resale prices.
I would like to digress for a moment or two and put
myself on record with regard to "contemporary" furnituredesigns. The good ones are superlatively good and for an
excellent reason
they are almost carbon copies of proven
designs of over a century ago, and I here refer specifically
to the Shaker influence. We would recommend to the
"form follows function" adherents a visit to Fenimore
House, Cooperstown, N. Y. where outstanding examples
from the comprehensive private collection of Dr. E. D.
Andrews, world's foremost authority on the Shakers,
may be seen and examined at leisure. Dr. Andrews and
his wife, Faith Andrews, are also authors of Shaker Furniture
(Dover Publications, Inc., N. Y.), a definitive work on
the subject; copies may be obtained at most public libraries and better book shops.
These forms were evolved from an almost fanatical
asceticism, which reflected itself in an original and distinctive native-American furniture style. Utility was its
prime objective, with the achievement of beauty a by- product. All
their pieces were characterized by an
austere charm, coupled with usefulness, strength, honesty and simplicity and were outstanding for
their lack of overornamentation and
archaic adornment. Celibate and
communistic (now, now, Senator),
this almost extinct sect has left an
indelible imprint on the American
furniture scene.
Through the kindness and cooperation of the Andrews', we are
illustrating a few typical pieces, all
of which are discussed in detail in
their book. The contents encompass
writing desks, clocks, sewing stands
cupboards, counters, benches and
washstands, all with a dignity and
perfection of line unsurpassed during any other period of furniture
design in America.
Figure III
-
Inquiries regarding hand -made reproductions of authentic pieces from the Andrews' Shaker collection may he
addressed to Dr. Edward Deming Andrews, The Stuyvesant, Glenwood Gardens, Yonkers, N. Y.
Let's tackle the question of the loudspeaker enclosure
first and try to break through this aesthetic ambush.
How do we disguise it so that it won't be unsightly, and
will blend harmoniously with the rest of our living room
furniture?
A possible answer may be seen in Figures I and II. Pick
out a housewrecker in town and inspect his array of shutters. They are usually available in widths from 8 to t8
inches, in varying heights to 7 feet. Most of them are
rectangular, but occasionally arched types can be found.
Cost: three dollars a pair (based on Westchester County,
and things don't come cheaply here).
N. Y. prices
Choose a mechanically sound pair and with two coats
of paint and two pairs of hinges, you're ready to screen
your sound -source. If you would rather start from scratch,
a new pair may be obtained at a lumber yard or mill at
from $9.00 to $12.00 per pair. The carriage trade may
prefer something more elaborate. For them, I should
suggest combined panel- and -louvre screens, which must
be purchased new
from $16 to $22 a pair. If you buy
second -hand ones, reconcile yourself to a painted finish,
for it's a tough (but not impossible) job to remove the
old paint with varnish remover. The new ones are usually
made of pine and lend themselves to a stained or painted
finish.
These shutters or panelled screens may be used in two's
or three's, depending on the size of the enclosure, wall
space or corner to be covered. They add an extremely
decorative note to any environment and result in an
overall economy, since many loudspeaker housings may
be obtained in raw wood, eliminating costly veneers and
finishes. In systems using two or three speakers, the
low- frequency enclosure may be fastened directly to the
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FEBRUARY, 1955
Figure IV
47
www.americanradiohistory.com
backs of the screens by means of simple steel "L" brackets.
is a copy of a doctor's chest (often labeled an apothecary
A word of caution. Most of the older shutters incorporate
chest), period 1800, environment of (the original) Bedford,
a half-inch rear vertical dowel coupled to the louvres to
N. Y. Back in the 18th and early 19th centuries many
vary the angle of opening. Adjust the position of the
doctors were their own apothecaries, stocked pharmadowel so that the louvre angle is approximately 45° in
ceuticals and filled their own prescriptions. Chests of
the downward plane. If you use a modern -day shutter
this type that we have examined still retained distinct
or screen, this problem won't arise, since the position of
chemical odors in some of the drawers, even after a century
the louvres is usually fixed permanently at about 45°.
or more of disuse. If you like this piece, it's an easy one
One suggestion based on the writer's own experience
to duplicate, for all the drawers can be dummies. Take your
when the system is completed, add a few inconspicuous
choice of two methods of construction. The easiest is
casters to permit ready access for dusting or sweeping
to hinge the top and install the record playing equipment
the covered area. As silly as it seems, most manufacturers
in one side of a built-in well and the remainder of the
operate on the patently absurd premise that just being
equipment in the other side. (For convenience, the top
a high fidelity addict endows a husband with all those
may be split and consist of two similar hinged pieces.)
roost- ruling prerogatives usually reserved to the wife.
All dummy drawer fronts should be cut to the same size
So much for loudspeaker enclosures.
(6 inches square) and fastened with screws from the back
We doubt very much if manufacturers will pay any
The framework to hold the drawer fronts can be of builtattention to the following suggestions for cabinetry to
up solid stock or if you wish to use scrap lumber, it may
enclose the remainder of a high fidelity system, because
consist of a series of small windows made from 3A-inch
of the mistaken notion that a relatively small potential
lumber. Each opening should be approximately one inch
is involved. But since three and a half billion dollars are
smaller in both dimensions than the size of the drawer
spent yearly on furniture (including antiques and antique
front. Although the original piece was in cherry, the
reproductions), we offer the following to the music encopy was made in pine, a most satisfactory (and more
thusiast interested in the last two categories.
Incidentally, the only power
economical) substitute.
Why antiques? The reasons are legion and almost as
tool used in its construction was a circular saw. The
varied as the number of things one can collect. The
scalloped skirt was cut out with a key hole saw and then
hobby, craze (or what have you) had its initial impetus
cleaned up with a spoke -shave and file. The decorative
as the result of the Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia
moulding on three sides of the top was achieved by a
in 1876 and has gained tremendous popularity in the
De Walt two lip moulding -cutter (cost $2.50) which
interim three quarters of a century.
fitted the arbor of the circular saw. If you have no power
Attribute this interest to character, beauty of simple
saw, the moulding may be an applied one, since there
line, sentimental appeal, hand craftsmanship, a link with
is a great variety of satisfactory ones available in pine,
the past which is actually a reflection of our social history,
and may be attached with glue, brads, or both. Don't
or the mellowness of age
all are valid reasons. And
be frightened by the moulding at the top of the skirt
latterly, antiques provide a means of exercising the acor above the drawers
they're applied ones, also.
quisitive instinct which is an essential part of all of us.
The other method of construction will depend on the
Good representative antiques are expensive. Modifying
size of your components. If the tuner is small and all
them for music reproduction not
the useful controls on the
only involves additional cost, but
preamplifier occupy relatively
reduces their resale value tremenlittle panel space, it shouldn't
dously.
Since we are interested
be too difficult to make a
hinged drop -lid out of four
primarily in their outer forms and
finishes, there is no good reason why
or six of the drawer fronts
(joined as a unit) and install
a satisfactory reproduction will not
serve. Again, let's go on record.
the preamp and tuner directly
behind this area. In selecting
We needn't worship blindly at the
drawer fronts, bear in mind
shrine of authenticity. We can still
the space necessary for the
maintain the essential original
record player.
spirit and form, but create minor
The original cabinet is 33
modifications in light of our present inches high, 36 wide and 16
day needs, materials and techniques.
deep.
Changing these diThe following is directed to those
mensions slightly, if necessary,
who are handy with tools and, in
is quite in order, provided
view of the do -it- yourself trend,
original proportions are mainshould prove of some interest.
tained.
Incidentally, the saving over origI enjoyed making the hunt
none of
inal prices is enormous
board shown in Figure IV.
the pieces illustrated cost the writer
The original was seen in an anover $15.00 in material.
tique
Continued on page 118
The illustration in Figure III
Figure V
-
-
-
-
48
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A
NEW EXPERIENCE
in record listening,
from the southern coast of Africa. Conductors who
have tried it in their own reproduction equipment,
say that it creates an illusion of attendance at their
own live performances. You'll agree, quite readily,
when you use the Duotone African Diamond Needle
in your equipment.
Mined in Africa, this Diamond is famed for its
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millionth. Set, with jewelers care, to produce a lifetime of artistic listening. Quite correct, there's a
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model player and cartridge. Welcome companion to
such perfection, is the Duotone Electro -Wipe Cloth.
Used by record companies to wipe out static.
A quick dust of your records before playing,
will decharge them for months as this Duotone
Electro -Wipe Cloth is impregnated with a liquid that
absorbs ionization. Never pop or click again.
Reduced, now, 1 /3 in price to $1.00. At better record
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
music makers
by
THE
78 -RPM disk approached its
demise on January 31, when 5,117
records at the erstwhile "standard
speed" were withdrawn from the
British HMV catalogue. England was
the last outpost of 78 rpm, and with
this wholesale deletion of shellacs
by HMV the time has come to prepare
an obituary. But anyone who thinks
that 78 rpm went out with a whimper
is sorely mistaken. In the past three
months Addison Foster, leading HMV
dealer in the United States, has received orders from about 11,000
customers for more than 200,000
78 -rpm disks. This lingering demand
for shellacs so impressed Mr. Foster
that he has determined to continue
indefinitely his policy of issuing,
on his own label, HMV-manufacAn
tured 78s of historic value.
album of John McCormack records
is due on the tenth anniversary of the
tenor's death, September 16; it includes
a duet with Maggie Teyte recorded
during World War II but never
issued. Foster also plans to publish
this year the complete set of off-thestage recordings made in Covent
Garden at Nellie Melba's farewell
performance, June 8, 1926. Eleven
sides were cut at that time, of which
only three were ever released. And
if it is at all feasible, he hopes to
issue again on 78 -rpm shellacs
a complete Fidelio starring Lotte LehThe Gramophone Shop Enmann.
cyclopedia, 1936 edition, listed this
as "In Preparation "; Lehmann's admirers have been waiting for it ever
-
-
since.
TO MANY collectors of vocal records
the 78 -rpm shellac remains the medium
par excellence for great singing. They
contend that microgroove transfers
cannot ever compare, in quality of
sound, to 78 -rpm originals. Charles
Gerhardt, a young RCA Victor engineer who specializes in making
LPs from 78s, holds a different view.
As a collector of old vocal records
himself, Gerhardt sympathizes with
the 78 -is -best attitude, but he doesn't
fall under its sway. "I've come to
FEBRUARY, 1955
ROLAND GELATI
recognize," he says, "that a person's
critical judgment is influenced more
than he thinks by the sight of a disk
on the turntable.
Unconsciously
he may endow a record whirling
away at 78 rpm with qualities it
does not possess, and conversely
he may underrate the very same
recording if he sees it lumbering
along at 33 /3." Some of the early
LP transfers were sonically inferior
to the 78s from which they derived,
Gerhardt admits, but with the techniques of rehabilitation now in use
he feels there is no perceptible deIn fact, he suggests
terioration.
that the blast -free and noise- reduced
i3s may actually give a truer idea of a
singer's art than the original 78s.
The latest evidence of Gerhardt's
engineering prowess will be issued
1
in April by RCA Victor:
a five-LP
album entitled "Fifty Years of Great
Operatic Singing," one LP to a
decade, beginning with Francesco
Tamagno's "Di quella pira" of 19o3
and ending with Risë Stevens' "Non
so pin" of 1951.
It is the brainchild
of an astute director of artists and
repertoire, RCA Victor's George Marek, and a discerning critic, Saturday
Review's Irving Kolodin. The latter
was charged with one of the pleasantest duties I can imagine: to choose
from among the entire archives of
Victor and HMV a substantial selection of operatic recordings worthy
of perpetuation on LP. The only
records exempted from his purview
were those already reissued in RCA's
hardly a serious
Treasury series
limitation. By studying old catalogues
and drawing on his own recollections,
Kolodin was able to compile a
tentative list of about 150 items.
To RCA Victor then went the job
of finding file pressings of these
records so that they could be heard
and evaluated. It took time, for many
had to be ordered from England and
Italy, but at length they were all
assembled in an auditioning room
at RCA's 24th Street Studio in New
York.
There during the course of several
-
afternoons Kolodin, Marek, and RCA
Victor's quality control manager, Don
Richter, listened to the tentative
choices and compared notes. Richter
had occasionally to recommend rejection of a recording by reason of
egregious surface noise or other mechanical defects. One such was a duet
by Eames and Sembrich from Le
Nozze di Figaro, which Kolodin much
regretted giving up, as it seemed
to him the only recording made
by Emma Eames that accorded with
her reputation. Otherwise, nothing
irreplaceable was rejected because of
sound quality, and after many long
hours in the auditioning room Kolodin was able to whittle down his
list to the 68 selections that would fit
on five LPs.
"Fifty Years of Great Operatic
Singing" then passed to the aforementioned Charles Gerhardt, whose
task it has been to extract every
decibel of sound from the grooves
of Kolodin's choices. Last November,
I watched Gerhardt at work as he
transferred a recording of "Casta
Diva," made by Marcella Sembrich
on October r 1, 1907, from 78 rpm
to tape (and thence to microgroove).
His raw material was a plastic mold
taken from the Victor archives in
Camden. First order of business was
a speed check
not much of a
problem for Gerhardt, since he is a
musician with absolute pitch and
need only use his ears to ascertain
whether a record is turning at the
correct speed. In this case "Casta
Diva" began squarely in the indicated
F major at 78 rpm; if it had not,
Gerhardt would have employed a
device varying the cycles of current
feeding into his turntable motor
until the record played at proper
pitch. Victor's data sheets, which
date back to the early years of the
century, almost invariably indicate
the key in which a recording was
made; but the relationship between
key and pitch has varied according
to time and place, and it is of the
utmost importance to reproduce a
record exactly at its original pitch.
-
51
Even an infinitesimal variation in chis
regard will dangerously alter musical
quality. Next came the job of finding
a stylus (diamond, of course) to fit
the groove as snugly as possible;
78 rpms were cut at various angles,
widths and depths, and there are
styli at 24th Street to fit them all.
Speed and stylus being in good
order, the time had come to listen
to Sembrich's "Carta Diva" with a
critical ear. Gerhardt played it flat
and at high volume. Through a
loudspeaker suspended from the ceiling came some enchanting vocalism
and some disenchanting pops, ticks,
blasts, and hiss. They did not seem
to dismay RCA's rehabilitation expert, who walked over to a panel of
meters and dials and switches, and
began fiddling with them.
"What
are you doing now ?" I inquired.
"Analyzing the record electronically,"
he replied, which left me none the
wiser. While Gerhardt twiddled with
his switches and knobs, the record
played on as before, riddled with
spluttering noises. Then he flicked
one last switch, the hissing suddenly
vanished, and Sembrich was heard
clear and relatively unencumbered.
"That's it," he said and jotted down
the settings of his knobs and switches.
More dial -twirling ensued at another
panel, this time to achieve the best
possible musical compensation by
obviating peaks, boosting bass, and
so forth.
Still Sembrich's "Carta Diva' had
some disturbing blemishes.
There
were, for example, occasional blasts,
a term descriptive of the fuzzy sound
caused by a singer's fortissimo cutting
too deeply into the groove wall.
Gerhardt has a method of playing
these spots so that they won't blast,
but it is a secret technique and not
for publication.
"Casta Diva" was
sullied as well with intermittent ticks
and pops, these caused by air bubbles
in the original wax. The process by
which ticks are removed is no secret.
They are merely cut out by hand
when the recording has been transferred to 3o -ips tape.
"Merely,"
did I say? It often takes the better
part of an hour to de -tick one four minute side, snipping off the offending
quarter-inch segments and splicing
the tape. Gerhardt assured me that
these excisions in no wise affect the
tempo of a recording. Ticks last
only one -hundredth of a second,
and they never will be missed.
Whether the LP transfers in "Fifty
52
Years" equal or improve on the
original 78s is a question each opera
aficionado will have to answer for
himself.
This listener, who heard
"Casta Diva" at the start and finish
of Gerhardt's ministrations, was much
impressed with the end product.
ANYONE WITH a taste for opera
will be sorely puzzled during 1955
in deciding how best to disburse
a budget for records.
RCA's five decade recapitulation of great singing
is only one of many delectable items
about to appear. Angel will be issuing
Karajan- conducted performances of
Mozart's Così fan tutte and Strauss'
Ariadne auf Naxos, La Scala performances of I Pagliacci (Callas, Di
Stefano), La Forza del Destino (Callas,
Tucker) and L'Italiana in Algeri (Simionato, Valletti). From London we
can expect La Traviata (Tebaldi,
Poggi), Rigaletto (Gueden, Del Monaco, Protti) and Manon Lescaut (Tebaldi, Del Monaco).
RCA Victor
has just recorded highlights from the
Metropolitan Opera production of Un
Ballo in Maschera (following severance of the Metropolitan -Columbia
entente) with Marian Anderson, Zinka
Milanov, Jan Peerce and Leonard
Warren; Mitropoulos conducting. Victor also has in the works a Viennamade recording of Die Walküre conducted by the late Wilhelm Furtwangler, Madama Butterfly (De los
Angeles, Di Stefano),
Don Carlo
(Maria Antonietta Stella, Elena Nicolai, Mario Filippeschi, Tito Gobbi)
and Manon Lescaut (Albanese, Bjoerling, Merrill), to say nothing of the
Toscanini versions of Aida and Un
Ballo reposing in the vaults. Coming
up from Cetra -Capitol are Il Segreto
di Susanna and Un Ballo. On the
Epic label will be found Bizet's
Pêcheurs de Perles and Debussy's Pelléas.
Hold on to your librettos,
gentlemen, the deluge approaches.
CAPITOL RECORDS, the youngest
of the Big Four among American
record companies, is about to pass
into the control of Electric & Musical
Industries Ltd., a giant British -owned
enterprise which controls the HMV,
Columbia, Pathé, Parlophone, and
Odeon companies in Europe. Perhaps
by the time this appears in print
the deal will have been consummated.
Over $4,000,000 worth of controlling
stock will have changed hands
most of it from the hands of Glenn
-
E. Wallichs, John Mercer, and the
estate of George ( "Buddy") De Sylva,
the trio who launched Capitol Records
in 1942 with an investment of less
than $5o,000.
When news of the E.M.I. negotiations leaked out, on January
12, everyone in New York even
vaguely connected with affairs phonographic was concocting theories
about the new alignments in international record diplomacy that were
almost certain to ensue. It seems
eminently plausible that Capitol will
take over rights to the HMV catalogue in America once the present
HMV -Victor contract has run its
Relations between HMV
course.
and Victor are not what they used
to be.
Time was when the two
companies had the world neatly divided between them:
North and
South American (plus Japan) for
Victor; Europe, Africa, Australia, and
the rest of Asia for HMV.
Since World War II this modes
vivendi has broken down. RCA has
set up its own plants on the Continent and is now in active competition with HMV. And since the
European branches of RCA have
exclusive rights to the new recordings
of Toscanini, Horowitz, Landowska,
Heifetz, et al, to say nothing of
Eddie Fisher and Eartha Kitt, that
competition isn't doing HMV's business any good at all. To date the
HMV -Victor alliance has been maintained so far as the English and
American markets are concerned; but
it doesn't seem beyond the bounds
of reason that the policy- makers at
E.M.I. have decided to take matters
in their own hands and break off the
deteriorating agreement with RCA
Victor altogether. If so, acquisition
of Capitol would provide a ready made and extremely efficient system
of distribution in the U.S.A. for
HMV recordings.
Angel Records will continue to
distribute here the products made in
Europe by E.M.I.'s Columbia and
Pathé subsidiaries. In the domestic
market Angel and Capitol will still
operate as separate and competitive
companies, even though both hereafter will be owned by E.M.I. Actually,
it was Angel's soft-spoken president,
Dario Soria, who suggested to the
head office in England that Capitol
Records would be a useful addition
The plan
to the E.M.I. empire.
was broached last June and remained
a secret for over six months.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Reviewed by
PAUL AFFELDER
JOHN M. CONLY
NATHAN BRODER
RAY ERICSON
JAMES HINTON, JR.
ROBERT KOTLOWITZ
C. G. BURKE
ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN
J. F. INDCOX
ROY H. HOOPES, JR.
DAVID RANDOLPH
HOWARD LAFAY
JOHN S. WILSON
Classical Music, Listed by Composer
Dialing Your Disks
Collections and Miscellany
Folk Music
CLASSICAL
BACH, C. P. E.
Sonata in D Major, for Flute and Continuo; Trio in B Minor, for Flute,
Violin and Continuo; Duo in E Minor,
for Flute and Violin; Solfeggietto for
Harpsichord; Quartet in G Major for
Harpsichord, Flute, Viola and Violoncello.
Kurt Redel, flute; Irmgard Lechner, harpsichord; Ulrich Grehling, violin; Martin
Bochmann, cello.
12 -in.
40:55
L'OISEAU -LYRE OL 50017.
min. $5.95.
Besides the famous "Solfeggietto" (known
to so many piano students) this disk contains a group of works that makes one
anxious to delve further into the output
of this composer.
The prevalence of works involving the
flute may stem from the fact that Philipp
Emanuel was employed as harpsichordist
to Frederick the Great, King of Prussia.
Frederick was an enthusiastic amateur
flutist, and it was one of Bach's duties to
compose music for his royal patron to play.
The performances leave nothing to be
desired, and they have been recorded in a
manner that makes for a most pleasing
D. R.
effect upon the ear.
BACH, J. CHRISTIAN
Andante from Sinfonia Concertante in E
flat See Mozart.
-
BACH, J. S.
Aria Variata alla maniera
Italian
Italian Concerto
Overture in the French Manner (Partita
in B Minor)
Eva Wollman, piano.
WL 5298.
WESTMINSTER
28 min. $5.95.
12 -in.
15, 12.
53
7o
7o
74
The Spoken Word
Best of Jazz
Toscanini on Records, Part III
Building Your Record Library
The Italian Concerto and the B Minor
Partita, both from the Clavierribung, are
major works well known and often enough
recorded to require no comment. But
Miss Wollman's recording of the Aria
Variata is only the second I know of
(the other being by Rosalyn Tureck for
Dating from Bach's second
Allegro).
Weimar stay (1708 -1717), it is an early
work, uncomplicated, and, to quote Parry,
the
"singularly plaintive in expression
evident product of a poetic youth." Of
particular interest is the last of the ten
variations, in which by simple changes
Bach greatly heightens the expressive
Miss Wollman
content of the theme.
plays cleanly, with sensible tempos, and
Perhaps it
in
touch.
variations
judicious
is negative pianism, but it does not interfere with one's enjoyment of the music.
R. E.
The recording is just as tidy.
...
BACH, J. S.
-
Arioso from Cantata No. 156; Adagio
from Concerto for Oboe and Violin
See Mozart.
ABOUT PRICES LISTED HERE
On January 3, RCA Victor suddenly
announced drastic changes in its
schedule of prices, lowering those
of LPs and 455 and raising those of
78s. The move took the rest of the
industry by surprise. For a fortnight
thereafter there were sudden announcements of price- adjustments
from various companies. Since we
went to press during this period,
not all the prices in this section
will be correct when it appears in
print. Changes are still going on.
FEBRUARY, 1955
77
79
83
92
BACH, J. S.
Brandenburg Concertos, Nos. 1-6, Complete
Anonymous orchestra, Jascha Horenstein,
cond.
Vox DL 122. Two 12 -in. $11.90.
a little more complicated
for Bach enthusiasts, here comes another
complete recording of the Brandenburg
Concertos in their original instrumentation,
hard on the heels of the Prohaska set
issued by Bach Guild two months ago.
They are nicely performed and resonantly
recorded in the Vox edition, but in some
movements the balance could have been
improved. In No. 2 the trumpet is too far
back and the oboe sometimes too loud;
the solo violin in the first movement of
No. 4 occasionally overwhelms the recorders; and in No. 5 the right -hand part
of the harpsichord does not always come
through as clearly as it should. Everything
considered, this reviewer is inclined to
rate as follows the four available sets that
attempt to reproduce the original instrumentation: 1) Prohaska -Bach Guild; 2)
Münchinger- London; 3) Horenstein -Vox;
However, Vox
4) Haas -Westminster.
offers a blandishment in the form of a
pamphlet containing detailed notes by
Emanuel Winternitz and the scores of all
N. B.
six concertos.
Just to make life
BACH, J. S.
Cantata No. 51, "Jame/net Gott in allen
Landen;" Cantata No. 2o2, "Weichet
nur, betrubte Schaffen"
Suzanne Danco, soprano; Stuttgart Chamber
Orchestra, Karl Miinchinger, cond.
LONDON LL 993. 12 -in. 19, 25 min. $3.98.
Bach's Cantata No. 51 in the DancoMünchinger version invites comparison
with the one made for Columbia by Elisa-
53
www.americanradiohistory.com
hl,tRi>
beth Schwarzkopf.
In slow sustained
passages Schwarzkopf's voice is more
opulent, Danco's more pointed. To the
credit of both artists. neither one exaggerates her particular quality beyond the
bounds of good taste. It is in the faster
arias that differences become more marked.
Schwarzkopf seems to stress virtuosity,
pushing the tempo to the limit. Danco
takes a more leisurely pace, losing thereby
a little of the exuberance that the faster
tempo imparts, but avoiding by the same
token the almost frantic quality which
accompanies Schwarzkopfs attempts to
articulate the notes in running passages.
I find Danco's more poised approach preferable. Also the smaller Stuttgart forces
allow for greater clarity of detail in the
orchestral parts.
Technically, both recordings are excellent, but my review copy
of the London record contained many
defective grooves.
D. R.
and
No. 2, in C major
cond.
PERIOD SPI. 700.
I2 -in.
The Concerto No.
14, 18 min.
85.95.
will be recognized
by many listeners as a work in which the
two solo instruments were originally a
violin and an oboe. Bach himself recast
it into its two- clavier form.
Everything
about this record can be recommended
I
wholeheartedly. There is no purposeless
seeking after effects; the sole aim seems to
be to allow the music to emerge with the
greatest naturalness. Open and spacious
recording (but not to the extent where
any details are lost) with the balance
between pianos and orchestra.
D. R.
BACH, J. S.
Concertos
for Violin and Orchestra in
and E major
A minor
BACH, J. S.
Cantata No. 78: "Jess, Der
Dee
Meine
Seele"
Cantata No. 206: "Gottes Zeit
Allerbest Zeit"
1st
Die
Teresa Stich Randall,
soprano; Dagmar
Hermann, alto; Anton Dermota, tenor;
Hans Braun, bass. Choir and Orchestra
of the Bach Guild, Felix Prohaska, cond.
BACH GUILD BG 537.
12 -in.
26, 22:40
min. $5.95
This listener can hardly imagine a more
felicitous coupling than the two cantatas
which the Bach Guild has chosen to pair
on this disk.
Both cantatas are gems,
whether viewed from the standpoint of
purely musical interest alone, or as dramatic
settings of the texts. (The Cantata No. 78
contains the appealing duet for soprano
and alto, "Wir eilen mit schwachen doch
emsigen Schritten.")
Moreover, the fine
jacket notes call attention to many of the
subtleties of the music. (But who wrote
them ?)
I shall
permit myself a momentary
excursion into the personal.
Having
conducted both these works on several
occasions, I might be expected to have
certain notions as to how they should be
performed. Yet, despite that orientation,
I can find nothing in the performances at
which to cavil. What more enthusiastic
recommendation can a critic give? The
recording, likewise, is excellent.
D. R.
BACH, J. S.
Concertos for Two Claviers
No. r, C minor,
Vera Appleton and Michael Field, pianos;
Castle Hill Festival Orchestra, Frank Brief,
and Orchestra,
Jascha Heifetz; Los Angeles Philharmonic
Orchestra, Alfred Wallenstein, cond
RCA VICTOR
LM
1803. 12 -in. $3.98.
The two surviving violin concertos by Bach
are here presented by that old master of
the fiddle, Heifetz, in clear, restrained
and thoroughly musical performances.
Everything is in good taste; there are no
smears or slides, no excessive vibrato, nor
anything else that smacks of the romantic
nineteenth -century style of violin playing.
Wallenstein's contribution is discreet and
seldom too heavy. There might be some
question about the soloist's interpretation
of the ornaments, but none is going to
be raised here. I found this a richly satisfying representation of two well -recorded
N. B.
masterworks.
BACH, J. S.
Motets: "Jesu Meine Preside"; "Komm
Jesu Komm "; "Singet Dem Herrn Ein
Neues Lied"
Vienna Akademie Kammerchor, Ferdinand
Grossmann, cond.
WESTMINSTER WL 5289. 12 -in. 26, 11:25,
16:22 min. $5.95.
Although it was not until relatively late
in his life that Bach turned to the writing
of motets, the examples that we have
of his essays in this genre are among his
most rewarding, if demanding, works.
The three motets contained on this disk
are not the sort of music whose full contents can be revealed on a single hearing.
Fortunately, the choir and its conductor
perform in such a manner as to make
repeated hearings a pleasure, to those who
are willing to devote the time to such
pursuits. They are more than equal to
the extraordinary technical demands of the
music, but never lose sight of its expressive
qualities
and to all this they bring
beautiful tone as well.
The recording is well balanced, so that
Bach's lines are never obscured.
There
seems to be, however, a shade of tape
-
hiss.
D. R.
Heifetz plays Bach: "... clear, restrained
and thoroughly musical performances ..."
54
Prelude:
''Jesus Christus, Unser lleiland"
(BWV 626); Chorale- Prelude: "Nun Komm'
Der Heiden Heiland" (BWV 599); Prelude
in G major (BWV 577); Prelude and Fugue
in A minor (BWV 543).
Jeanne Demessieux; played on the organ
of Victoria Hall, Geneva.
LONDON
LI.
946.
12 -in.
42 min.
$3.98.
These are all straightforward, musicianly
performances on an organ of the large,
modern variety, no attempt having been
made to re- create the smaller, clearer
sound of the Baroque organ. The acoustics
are spacious, the recording excellent.
D. R.
BARTOK
Contrasts
tMilhaud: Suite for Violin, Clarinet and
Piano
Melvin Ritter, violin; Reginald Kell,
clarinet; Joel Rosen, piano.
DECCA DL 9740. 12 -in. 15, 18 min. $4.98.
Trios for violin, clarinet and piano are
rare; this disk, in fact, contains practically
the whole literature for that combination,
or at least that part of it which is worth
playing. The Milhaud is light, gracious,
and fluent, with more than an occasional
gesture toward French chamber music of
the 17th century. The Bartok is stark,
rhapsodic and dramatic. It was written for
Benny Goodman, whose clarinet reminded
Bartok of the Hungarian instrument known
as the tarogato, but Goodman was really
no match for this music; the clarinetist
Bartok really was working for, although
he did not know it, was Reginald Kell.
Kell's interpretation brings out all the
shaggy, rough -hewn virtuoso qualities the
score demands and also provides it with
unequalled elegance and subtlety.
His
collaborators are musicians of similar
insight and capacity, and the recording
is flawless.
A. F.
BARTOK
Divertimento for String Orchestra
Two Portraits
RIAS Symphony Orchestra, Ferenc Frícsay,
tond.
BACH
Recital Organ Music
Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in
Kell plays Bartok: "shaggy, rough -hewn
virtuosity . . . elegance and subtlety."
DECCA
(BWV
Wir in
C major
564); Chorale-Prelude:
"Wenn
Ilochsten Noten Sein" (BWV 641); Chorale-
DL
9748.
12
-in.
25, 16 mins.
$4.98.
The Divertimento, written in 1939 for Paul
Sachet and his Chamber Orchestra of
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
OEM
Basel, is one of the richest and most popular
of Bartok's symphonic works; it has something of the sweep and energy of a baroque
concerto grosso, a great deal of the typical
Bartokian lyricism, and several touches
of the mad, surrealistic satire of which
this composer was past master. The Two
Portraits, which date from 1908, are among
Bartok's earliest surviving compositions,
but, unlike some other examples of his
juvenilia, they have not been recorded
merely out of piety or a determination to
make a disk of everything he produced
regardless of its value; on the contrary,
they form a suite of the greatest interest.
The first portrait, salvaged from an uncompleted violin concerto, is called The
'deathtic; it is a somewhat Straussian slow
movement in which a solo violin retains
The second portrait,
its eloquent role.
The Distorted, is a brief, brisk scherzo
employing the same thematic material
Fricsay's performances are
as the first.
exceptionally sensitive, and so is Decca's
A. F.
recording.
BEETHOVEN
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No.
r, in C Op. r5
Rudolf Serkin; Philadelphia Orchestra,
Eugene Ormandy, cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4914. 12 -in. 36 min. $3.98.
People who demand
a
special
nicety of
articulation in the First Concerto, or just
the right mixture of fun and philosophy
in the first movement, will cleave to the
Gieseking- Philharmonia version on ColumOthers may well choose
bia ML 4307.
the newest version over all. Fine, rollicking
pianism from Serkin, altogether beautiful
playing from the orchestra, a little more
fun than philosophy from the conductor,
and a sonic re- creation equal to that of
any recorded piano concerto. The Philadelphia Orchestra has a quality like that
of heated and blended spices, but it is a
rare record that can give the essence of any
orchestra truly. This one does. The piano
is real in all its registers, and the record
is amenable to any good phonograph.
Best of all, the triumph is not of sensationalism. but of warm exactitude. RecommenC. G. B.
ded without qualification.
Fantasy in the Modern Manner Bartok's Theater Works
BELA
BARTOK composed three works
for the stage: a one-act opera, Bluebeards
Castle, and two ballets, The Wooden Prince
Together
and The Miraculous Mandarin.
they reveal a composer who was strongly
susceptible to dramatic and literary quality
once for the better, twice for the worse.
Bluebeards Castle, written in 1911, is the
-
earliest and by far the best of the three
Its performances have
compositions.
been comparatively few, but it reveals
itself on these records as one of the masterpieces of modern opera, worthy to be
set alongside a Pelllas or a Wozzeck. The
libretto, by Béla Balasz, is an extraordinarily beautiful poem, and the text must
be accorded full credit in accounting for the
effect of the whole.
Duke Bluebeard introduces Judith, his
He
fourth wife, to his gloomy castle.
willingly gives her the keys to the mysterious
doors that lead from his great hall. Behind
the first door she finds instruments of
torture, behind the second weapons, and
behind the third jewels covered with blood.
The fourth door yields a bloody garden,
the fifth a crimson panorama of Bluebeard's
domain, and the sixth a lake of tears.
Bluebeard tries to prevent her opening
the seventh door but at length gives in.
From it come his three previous wives.
The first, he explains, was his dawn bride,
the second his bride of midday, and the
third his bride of evening. Judith is to be
He gives her the
his bride of darkness.
appropriate mantle, crown and jewels, and
sadly closes the seventh door behind her.
"Now it is night forever," says Bluebeard,
as the curtain falls.
This is the plot in brief synopsis, but
what counts is the delicacy and subtlety
of its literary treatment. In its repetition
of phrases and of parallel actions it is rather
like a folk ballad, but a ballad seen with
the modern insight that uncovers important
pyschological meaning in mythology and
folklore. Balasi s libretto emphasizes the
tragedy of Bluebeard, and this is underlined
with marvelous effectiveness in Bartok's
the individual episode for the sake of the
cumulative whole. The score moves along
as a single marvelously intricate organism.
One excellent reason for its unity is the
fact that it calls for only two singers, bass
and soprano, who, remain on the stage
It would make an extrathroughout.
ordinarily fine concert piece, especially
since ones imagination can create a much
more evocative setting for it than any
that could be materialized with paints
and light.
Understatement is scarcely the word
Though Bartok
for The Wooden Prince.
was seldom guilty of prolixity, he certainly
flagged in this case. Every musical point
is made six times over. In a way one regrets
that the whole ballet score has been recorded rather than the suite which Bartok
later extracted from it. Béla Balasz also
wrote the scenario for The Wooden Prince,
but it does not measure up to his libretto
for Bluebeard. It tells of a prince who sees
a princess spinning at the window of
A
her castle and falls in love with her.
fairy prevents his reaching her by calling
forth spirits of forest and stream to hold
him back. At length he attracts the princess's attention by constructing an effigy
of himself around his staff. The wooden
prince then comes to life, and the princess
dances off with him in a frenetic, bewitched
obsession. At this point the fairy relents,
and the real prince, bereft, is crowned as
hero by the pastoral spirits. The princess
and the wooden prince return, the spell
is broken, and all ends happily.
This childish fairytale demanded a much
simpler idiom than the psychological
involvements of Bluebeard, with the result
t hat
The Wooden Prince, though completed
as
years
later than the opera, sounds
if it might
have
been
written long
before. Its best parts are the nature music
of its introduction and finale and the
grotesque dance of the princess with the
The recorded edition features
puppet.
a printed synopsis of the story with many
quotations from the score, so that one may
follow the sequence of events without
difficulty.
The Miraculous Mandarin was composed
in 1919 to a scenario by Menyhért Lengyel.
The new record presents a suite derived
from the entire score; it is the same suite
as the one recently recorded by Antal
Dorati for Mercury. In this ballet a gang
of thugs employs a prostitute to lure men
into her room so that they can be maimed
and robbed. Two victims are disposed of
according to plan, but the third is a mandarin who refuses to succumb to beating
and stabbing until the girl, moved by the
intensity of his desire, takes him into her
Then his wounds open and he
arms.
expires. The music for this ballet is brutal,
barbaric, violent, fiendishly difficult for
the orchestra. To my ears it is also excessively literal in its suggestion of the
action, altogether unmoving, and more
than a little tedious.
As this reviewer has often reiterated,
records issued under the Bartok label
have been consistently praiseworthy in
quality of sound and highly authoritative
These are no different
in interpretation.
from their predecessors.
ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN
BARTOK
Bluebeard's Castle
Endre Koreh, bass; Judith Hellwigh, sop.
New Symphony Orchestra, Walter Susskind,
cond.
BARTOK 3Io and 311. Two 1z -in. 55 min.
$12.90.
The Wooden Prince
New symphony Orchestra, Walter Susskind,
cond.
Two xz -in. (Fourth side
BARTOK 308.
blank.) 55 mins. $9.67.
score.
The music is strongly beholden to Hungarian folk song and to Mussorgsky's
operatic declamation; there is also a trace
here and there of the Richard Strauss who
wrote Elektra. Each incident is magnificently characterized in the music, but
with a great master's genius at understating
five
Set for The \ uuden Prince: Nature -music, faire-tale plot and Bartok high-fidelity,.
FEBRUARY, 1955
The Miraculous Mandarin (Suite)
New Symphony Orchestra, Tibor
Serly,
cond.
BARTOK 301.
I2-in.
20 mins.
$6.45.
55
www.americanradiohistory.com
BEETHOVEN
Concerto for Piano, No.
3,
in C Minor,
Op. 37
Emil Gilets; Paris Conservatory Orchestra,
André Cluytens, cond.
ANGEL 35131.
12 -in.
34 min.
$5.95
Mr. Gilets' début as an Angel is impressive
in its muscles, but showy, and coarse in
its contrasts. Mr. Cluytens, who has done
much better, leads as if wanting faith,
except in the rondo. We have heard the
acoustics of the Théatre des Champs
Elysées to superior advantage: the forceful
piano sound is hard, and the orchestra is
short of lilt and expansiveness in this
recording.
C. G. B.
BEETHOVEN
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No.
4, in G, Op. 58
Sonata No. 14, in C Sharp Minor, "Moonlight," Op. 27, No. 2
BEETHOVEN
Egmont: Eight Excerpts
Württemberg State Orchestra (Stuttgart).
with Lore Wissmann, soprano, and Paul
Hartmann, speaker; Ferdinand Leitner,
cond.
DECCA DL 7540.
to -in. 31 min. $2.98.
This vigorous performance, with good
singing by Miss Wissmann, is something
of a bargain for those who will not mind
Egmont with the first and fourth entr'actes
missing.
Bold and effective recording, a
little coarse, with brilliant trumpets and
good horns. As a whole, a stimulating
disk that could be more enthusiastically
recommended if there were not two complete versions already, including a phone graphic masterpiece on Westminster WL
5281.
C. G. B.
BEETHOVEN
Sonatas for Piano:
No. r, in F minor,
Op. 2, No. 1; No. 2, in A, Op. 2, No. 2
Guiomar Novaes; with Pro Musica Orchestra, Vienna, Hans Swarowsky, cond., in
the Concerto.
Vox PL 853o. 12 -in. 32, 13 min. $5.95.
A firm insistence on a gentler lyricism than
usual makes this performance memorable
and makes it lovely. No one else plays the
Concerto quite like this, leisurely, with a
reduction of emphasis in the first and
last movements and a quickened asperity
in the second. The pianism is a kind of
continued and determined caress, a statement of belief without excitement, and
Mme. Novaes and the conductor are in
agreement on this.
Captivating at once,
in one of those recent Vox recordings of
the piano which give all the resonance,
all the crispness of the instrument directly
to the near ear, the proximity underlined
by the sound of felts and pedals.
The
orchestra is clear and thorough, but discophiles will note that its sound seems to
parallel that of the piano in another plane,
interesting but slightly artificial.
This is the first Fourth Concerto to
share its vinyl with other music, and while
the demand for the "Moonlight" Sonata
may not justify a fifteenth version, no
edition carries more justification than this
one carrying Guiomar Novaes's soft finesse.
C. G. B.
seems easily the most successful of four
on microgroove.
C. G. B.
Friedrich Gulda.
LONDON LL 996. I2 -in. 16, 22 min. $3.98.
Flouting
tradition, London puts Nos.
on the same disk. It is not improbable that Mr. Guida, now having
recorded seven of the 32, will eventually
do them all. He is a good choice, as the
present record testifies.
This contains
expert and intelligent pianism, both robust
and refined.
The piano sound is good
standard.
Unfortunately the Schnabel
performance of No. 2 (RCA Victor LCT
1155) persistently recalls itself to ears and
mind; Mr. Guida, good as he is, cannot
dispel that aural imprint yet.
C. G. B.
r
and
2
56
Yves Nat.
HAYDN SOCIETY HSL -109.
14, 20 min. $5.95.
12 -in.
16,
Yves Nat, using a judicious rubatq and an
articulation dedicated to slurring not one
note, gives some fresh interest to Nos. 8
and 14 and makes an "Appassionata" of
dramatic repression, its greatest explosions
always suggesting more epic revelations
yet to come.
Splendid vibrancy in the
bass of this piano. and a crisp, exact treble.
At high volume there is some mid -treble
clatter.
Good as a whole, and nearly
outstanding.
C. G. B.
BEETHOVEN
Sonatas for Piano: No. 3o, in E, Op.
109; No. 31, in A flat, Op. Ito; No. 32,
in C minor, Op. tut
Yves Nat.
HAYDN SOCIETY
20 min. $5.95.
HSL- I W.
12 -in.
16,
Having the three last sonatas united on
one disk is a strong cumulative argument
in its favor. Mr. Nat is a pianist of im-
BEETHOVEN
Sonatas for Piano: No. 1, in F Minor,
Op. 2, No. 1; No. 3, in
Op. 2, No. 3
Cutner Solomon.
RCA VICTOR LM -1821.
12 -in.
21. 24 min.
$3.98.
Sonatas for Piano: No. 3, in C, Op. 2, No.
3; No. 19, in G Minor, Op. 49, No. 1;
No. 20, in G, Op. 49, No. 2
Friedrich Guida.
LONDON
$3.98.
LL -999.
12 -in.
24, 8, 7 min.
These are considered together, not to compare the common item, Sonata No. 3, but
lLan J u aro u'sky: in the Beethoven Fourth
Concerto, adept p.trtite*ship with Noraes.
BEETHOVEN
Sonatas for Piano: No. 8 ( "Patbétiq, e" ),
in C minor, Op. 13; No. 14 ( "Moonlight "),
in C sharp minor, Op. 27, No. 2; No.
23 ( "Appassionata "), Op. 57
to call double attention to the high quality
of the newer vintage of the Beethoven
sonatas in general. The records are not
faultless since there are not yet any faultless
records, but to find grave faults in the
brilliant pianism and realistic recording
here would be to insist on standards outside
experience. The surety of Mr. Solomon's
playing of the Third Sonata may captivate
by its suggestion of finality, or it may
repel by its suggestion of complacency,
and indeed this critic prefers Mr. Gulda's
more insinuating manner in that Sonata,
but there is no room for dogmatism between
virtues crowded so close. Victor's sound is
more vibrant than London's, but the
pianist is responsible for part at least of
that vibrancy. The softer, more yielding
London piano is very seductive in the
caressing Guida performances of the little
Sonatinas of Op. 49. The Solomon No. i
Solomon
Guido
perturbable individuality, and his use of
mutable tempo evokes approval and dissent
in equal measure. This show of independence is not tasteless or even disconcerting,
but neither is it invariably illuminating.
Nevertheless, this collection stands high
in the list of recorded editions, with the
C minor, curiously, pleasing most.
The
recording has preserved the deep bite
and resonance of the bass and the surety
of the entire treble when volume is low
or moderate, but mid -treble is over plangent
when loud.
C. G. B
BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 3 ("Eroica")
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Paul van
Kempen, cond.
EPIC LC 3o16. 12 -in. 48 min. $3.98.
The record is more than a year old but
arrives late. It has enough merit to justify
a late review.
The conductor's concept
is sturdy, his beat determined.
These
qualities produce their best results in the
first two movements, the staccato of the
scherzo being too literal and the andante
variation of the finale slowed to the detriment of lyricism. The dynamic scope is
imposing, largely because of some very
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
artful pianos, and the string tone is conEngulfing sound
sistently admirable.
pleasant to the ears, since there are no
excesses save of echo, which smothers
articulation.
A middling product as a
whole.
C. G. B.
BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 4. in B flat, Op. 6o
Symphony No. 8, in F, Op. 93
"Vienna State Philharmonia," Jonel Perlea,
cond.
Vox
PL
8740.
12 -in.
3i,
27
min.
$5.95.
A disappointment to everyone who knew
something of Mr. Perlea's abilities in the
opera house. No Elan, little poetry, tired
dynamics, uncertain control of the orchestra.
We have a half-dozen better performances
Disappointment is limited to
of each.
interpretation: these sonics are imposing,
with their crisp piano strings, enveloping
bass and bright distinctness.
Mr. Perlea
has the stuff to do better, and this pair of
mediocre performances may be attributed
to mike -fright.
C. G. B.
-
BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 5, in C minor, Op. 67
¡Mozart: Symphony No. 39, in E flat,
KV 543
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Herbert
von Karajan, cond.
I2-in.
32,
COLUMBIA -ENTRE RL 3o68.
25 min. $2.98.
With perplexing diffidence this comes
idling in nearly a year late. It contains
two stunning performances needing no
excuses, both worth consideration near
the top of their towering stacks of comThe masculine vigor of this
petitors.
Fifth vitalizes without altering the granite
of its structure, and Mozart's KV 543 has
of those very rare interpretations
exalting the demons as well as the elves
in it. The trouble is that the sonics are
less than compelling; a great deal of the
bite is swallowed in the Fifth, and distinction of timbres is far from complete in
both. Fair sound, we can say, but performances that must be heard, at a cost
that will bankrupt no one. The piston
strokes of the C minor Symphony will
complicate anyone's notion of Viennese
one
"sentimentality."
C. G. B.
BELLINI
Norma
Maria Callas (s), Norma; Ebe Stignani
(ms), Adalgisa; Mario Filippeschi (t),
Pollione; Nicola Rossi -Lemeni (bs), Oro veso; and others; Orchestra and Chorus
of the Teatro alla Scala, Milan, Tullio
Serafin, cond.
ANGEL 3517 C.
Three 12 -in. $17.85.
Virtually ever since it moved its first audience, at La Scala in 1831, from an initial
apathy to rapturous enthusiasm, Bellini's
Von Karajan conducts Beethoven's Fifth and
Mozart's 39th. "stunning performances."
BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 4, iu B flat, Op. 6o
Belgian National Broadcasting Orchestra,
Franz André, cond.
t2 -in. 29 min.
TELEFUNKEN LGX 66oto.
$3.98.
M
As American distributor for Telefunken
records, London here asserts a redundancy
of merit in the Fourth Symphony.
To
these ears the best performance on records
has been Solti's (London LL 316), while
the best engineering has been Krips's
(London LL 915). Franz André's stiff and
hasty performance will not effect the
striking of the Solti colors, but the sonics
with which he has been blessed are as
imposing as the Krips and a good deal
more spectacular.
An immaculate and
well -proportioned
pervasive but withal
bass gives the smoothest substance to the
orchestral fabric. A fairly long echo seems
to do no harm except at rests. The higher
instruments are gracious enough, but
detail is not king here: totality is. Where
the conductor permits, we have a grand
If he had relaxed his grip
experience.
on occasion, and .permitted some real
pianos, the experience might have been
Recommended to enthucontinuous.
C. G. B.
siasts of sound per se.
FEBRUARY, 1955
Norma has been held in awe as a great
masterwork, at once a summing up of
the finest qualities of a whole style of
opera composition and possessed of unique
qualities that set it aside from all others.
Down the years it has remained secure
in its place, honored and respected by
almost everyone, including musicians as
diverse as Chopin and Wagner. For composers there is almost no barrier to admiration of Bellini; he was both in the main
stream of a great tradition and a law to
himself. As Verdi said of him, he perhaps
lacked a fully rounded conservatory technique, but he had gifts that no conservatory
on earth could have given him. There is
about Bellini's melodies a length and sweep
of line, a strange, serious, almost sad
beauty that is beyond analysis or imitation,
a dignified, noble sweetness that is like no
other music ever composed.
It would be wrong, though, to indicare
that Norma is or ever has been a popular
opera in the same sense that La Traviata
Its casting
and La Bohème are popular.
demands are too extreme for it to be given
without expense and careful planning.
Seldom, even in the golden days of the art
of singing, has there been any surplus of
Lilli
Normas, Adalgisas, or Polliones.
Lehmann was not far from literal truth
when she remarked that the role of Norma
was more difficult than all the Brünnhildes
comparison she could make with
first -hand authority. As matters now stand,
Maria Callas, without having an absolute
corner on the market, is the established
-a
and Callas recording Norma
in Milan last summer: "majestic justness."
Rossi-Lemeni
world Norma, and for that reason the
Angel recording is worthy of respect.
It is not a perfect performance by any
means, nor even the best imaginably
obtainable, but it has things about it that
are incontestably fine.
Even in the opera house, the most striking
thing about Miss Callas' Norma is not
the way her voice sounds; here, much of
her singing is veiled, even muffled, some
of it imprecise in intonation, a little of it
actually unsteady. However, there is also
about her delivery a kind of absolute dramatic conviction and stylistic assurance that
overcome, rather than compensate for,
the flaws; an emotional sweep that is
Unlike some vocally
exciting always.
imperfect performances, this is one that
comes to seem better and better the more
it is listened to, for the shortcomings are
excrescences on the surface of a fundamentally magnificent performance, not
surface manifestations of deep -seated inIt is quite possible
terpretative faults.
co imagine a Norma sung more purely,
but I can think of no other singer in the
world active today who could achieve
the same majestic justness of phrasing
that Miss Callas does. In the competitive
Cetra set, much less modern in engineering,
Gina Cigna is also a powerful and exciting
singer, but her performance is marred by
serious vocal instability, a great deal of
really shattered tone, and much coloratura
that is not even approximately accurate.
Ebe Stignani is the Adalgisa in both
sets, and the tremendous authority of
style that is a constant wonder of her singing
is seldom prejudiced in either. The Angel
version, however, finds her past vocal
peak, and there are times when her voice
shows the long, distinguished use to which
it has been put, this even with the duets
taken down a tone. As Pollione, Mario
Filippeschi avoids the embarrassing tumbles
of Giovanni Breviario, his Cetra opposite
number, and by dint of a hard -pressed
palatal placement of tone manages to get
through most of the passage -work respectably. The one clear point of Cetra
superiority is Tancredi Pasero's fine Oroveso.
for Nicola Rossi -Lemeni achieves the doubtful distinction of sounding here as shockingly bad as any major singer I can think
of on records. Both sets are extremely
57
RECORDS
well conducted. Tullio Serafin and Vittorio
Gui sometimes choose different tempos,
but both achieve a satisfyingly broad and
singing line. On the technical level, there
is little contest, for though the Cetra set
is still acceptable, the Angel is a fine
contemporary recording with characteristics similar to those of other Angel -La
(t), Nadir; Jean Borthayre (b), Zurga.
L'Orchestre de la Société des Concerts du
Conservatoire de Paris; Alberto Erede, cond.
Mireille (opera in four acts, libretto in
French by J. Barbier and A. Carré after
the poem by Frederic Mistral). Excerpts:
Act I: 0 légère hirondelle (Mireille). Act II:
La brise est douce (Mireille and Vincent);
Trahir Vincent! and Mon coeur ne peut
(hanger (Mireille). Act IV: Heureux petit
berger; Voici la vaste plaine (Mireille).
Scala sets.
J. H., JR.
BIZET
Les Pécheurs de Perles (excerpts
tGounod: Mireille (excerpts)
Janine
)
Micheau
(s),
Mireille;
Pierre
Gianotti (t), Vincent.
L'Orchestre de la
Société des Concerts du Conservatoire de
Paris and L'Orchestre du Théatre National
de l'Opéra, Paris; Alberto Erede, cond.
LONDON LI. 939. rz -in. $5.95.
Lei Pécheurs de Perles (Opera in three acts,
libretto in French by A. Carré and E.
Cromon. Excerpts: Act I: C'est toi! and
Au fond du temple saint (Nadir and Zurga).
Act II: Me voilà seule and Comme autrefois
( Léila);
Léila! and Dieu puissant, le voilà
( Léila and Nadir).
In quick succession now, London has made
available two 12-inch sides of excerpts from
Gounod's Provencal opera Mireille, which
is loyally cherished in France but not much
Janine Micheau (s), Léila; Libero de Luca
known to audiences in other countries.
One has as its main protagonist the Mado
Robin and is backed by the same singer in
excerpts from Donizetti's Lucia di Lamthe other, and present, disk
features Janine Micheau and is backed by
her in excerpts from Bizet's Les Pécheurs de
Perles.
Since the Mireille excerpts are
parallel, the basis for choice for listeners
who are not connoisseurs of interpretations
of it must necessarily be based on preferences as to vocal quality and as to the
coupling. Miss Robin is best known for
her stratospheric coloratura, and she keeps
a prettier surface than Miss Micheau does,
of which
especially in florid passages
while singing expresthere are plenty
sively within her natural coloristic limitations; the Lucia excerpts are strange,
sometimes wonderful, sometimes stylismermoor;
-
-
--
tically brightful. Miss Micheau, closer to
or to whatever soprano
lyric soprano
has more variety o f
leggiero is in French
a
Two Giant Choral Works of Hector Berlioz
EVEN THOUGH the Berlioz sesquicentennial year is over,
heartening quantities of this composer's music continue to arrive
on disks. Recently, two of the master's largest and most important
have been issued in well works
the Requiem and the Te Deum
engineered recordings.
or Grande Messe des Morts
Berlioz composed his Requiem
in 1837. It was intended to be performed in July of that year at
a commemorative service for heroes of the :83o Revolution, but
the powers -that -be decided against it at the last moment for political
reasons. Instead it was presented in December at a service of public
mourning for General Damrémont and the soldiers who fell in the
Algerian Campaign of October 1837. At this first performance
in the Invalides (where Napoleon is now buried) the Requiem
enlisted the services of a huge chorus and orchestra, plus four
over 400 performers
brass choirs and a host of military drummers
in all. It was very well received.
"If I were threatened with the burning of all my works except
one," Berlioz wrote in later years, "it is for the Requiem that I would
ask for mercy." One can well understand the composer's attachment
co such an immense and deeply moving work. Always fond of
using vast throngs of singers and instrumentalists, he was nevertheless very careful here not to create an overwhelming volume
of sound merely for its own sake. There is much writing of a
quiet, relatively intimate nature; the big effects are reserved for the
Dies irae and the Lacrymosa, tremendous evocations of the Day of
Judgment.
Columbia has performed a real service to present and potential
Berlioz lovers by issuing this up -to -date recording of the Requiem.
What is surprising is that it appears on the inexpensive Entré label.
But don't let this fool you; it is a performance of great power and
-
-
-
-
-
conviction.
The conductor, Theodore Hollenbach, obviously
loves and understands Berlioz; he also knows how to bring the
best out of his large amateur chorus, which sings with cohesion.
balance and wealth of tone. The orchestra must surely be composed
of members of the Rochester Philharmonic, for it has a thoroughly
homogeneous, professional sound. Ray de Voll sings the lovely
tenor solo in the Sanctus with devotion and beauty of tone. The
and it is a minor one
only flaw in this convincing performance
results from the slightly offbeat attacks by the four auxiliary
brass choirs stationed at four corners of the hall. Quality of recorded sound is generally excellent throughout, though the orchestra overbalances the chorus at times.
Like Verdi's Requiem, the one by Berlioz is as much theatrical
as ecclesiastical in concept. And so, for that matter, is the Te Deum,
which followed the Grande Messe des Morn by 12 years. Again, it is
devotional music on an enormous scale, calling for triple chorus,
tenor soloist and orchestra. It had to wait until x855 for its first
performance, which took place in the church of Saint -Eustache
in Paris. At that performance Berlioz used some goo singers and
instrumentalists. Inasmuch as all but the children's choir required
payment for services rendered, the occasion almost sent the composer
into bankruptcy. Later, he prudently revised the work so that it
could be presented by a choral force totaling 130.
It is the revised version that Beecham uses in this first representation of the Te Deum on disks. Sir Thomas is a Berlioz expert
who knows how to achieve both impressiveness and clarity from the
Berlioz himself described the
composer's huge tonal masses.
Te Deum as "colossal," but nothing is big merely for bigness'
sake. It is, as its name implies, a devoted hymn to God, and it is
offered here with becoming devotion.
AlexanThe choruses have been admirably trained, the soloists
are, excellent,
der Young, tenor, and Denis Vaughan, organist
and the Royal Philharmonic is its usual virtuosic self. The immense
spaciousness of sound on this disk suggests the atmosphere of a
great cathedral, with voices and instruments answering one another
from different parts of the building, as Berlioz intended. It is a
PAUL AFFELDER
notable achievement in every respect.
-
-
- -
BERLIOZ
Requiem, Op. 5
Ray de Vol!, tenor; Chorus and Orchestra of the Rochester Oratorio,
Society; Theodore Hollenbach, cond.
COLUMBIA -ENTRE EL 53.
Te Deum, Op.
FRED FLAUC
Beecham's Te Deum: "Nothing is big for bigness' sake alone."
58
Two 12-in. $5.96.
22
Alexander Young, tenor; Denis Vaughan, organ; London Phil.
harmonic Choir; Dulwich College Boys' Choir; Royal Philharmonic
Orchestra; Sir Thomas Beecham, cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4897.
12-in. $3.98.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
The names listed above are those of the
singers; they are not, in general, vocally
as gifted as the original cast, who can be
heard on Decca 8014. Engineering: modern
J. H., JR.
sound -track quality.
BRAHMS
BORODIN
Prince Igor (Act H)
Concerto
D, Op.
Opera in three acts, libretto in Russian by
Act
the composer and Vladimir Stassov.
Il (Polovtsian
scene).
Anna Ivanova (s), A Polovtsian Maiden;
Valentina Borisenko (ms), Konchakova;
Sergei Lemeshev (t), Vladimir; Alexander
Andrei Ivanov (b),
Serov (t), Ovlur;
Prince Igor; Mark Reizen (bs), Khan
Konchak. Orchestra and Chorus of the
Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow; Alexander MclikPashaieff, cond.
12 -in.
CRLP 10220.
$5.95
COLOSSEUM
Fritz Reiner shares the honors with Artur
Rubinstein in a new Brahms First Concerto.
color in her voice, which is not as glittery
and which shows signs of honorable wear
but which she uses with more positive
artistry in both the Gounod and Bizet
excerpts; neither Mireille tenor is more than
bearable, However, Mr. De Luca, for all
his Italian name, knows far more about
Bizet than he does about Donizetti, and
although neither he nor Jean Borthayre
sound to be improving vocally, their
AN fond du temple saint has an authentic
shape. There is little to choose between the
engineering qualities; both disks are typical
medium -grade Paris -style London jobs.
All told, Mireille is very definitely worth
sampling, so a vote for Miss Micheau.
J. H., JR.
BIZET -HAMMERSTEIN
Carmen Jones (excerpts)
Marilynn Home (s), LeVerne Hutcherson,
(t), Marvin Hayes (b), and others; orchestra
and chorus of the Cinemascope film production, Herschel Burke Gilbert, cond.
RCA
VICTOR LM
1881.
12 -in.
$4.98.
When Carmen Jones was first presented on
Broadway, it was praised in some quarters
as a great theatrical innovation, potentially
fruitful of a whole crop of adaptations
that would, by providing vernacular locales
and texts, make famous operas "accessible."
Others damned it as wanton tampering
with a masterpiece.
An innovation it
certainly was, but whether what it made
accessible had much to do with Bizet's
opera, and whether it had anything of
independent value to say, are other and
quite different questions. It is no doubt
a matter of taste whether you prefer to
hear a performance of Carmen, in which
Spanish gypsies sing in French, or one of
Carmen Jones, in which American Negroes
sing a peculiar stage dialect concocted
by Mr. Hammerstein, but it may be well
to listen again before going off on a Carmen
/ones kick and claiming for it a superior
degree of relevance to life as it is lived
here and now. You just possibly may end
by deciding that it is simply a showman's
trick, and not a very good one.
The recent movie version, genesis of this
recording, dispenses with more of the
music than the stage show did, and dubs
in voices for its non -singing acting cast.
FEBRUARY, 1955
is
reproduced with realistic
breadth, evocative of a big piano in a big
hall, and the proportion of keyboard to
C. G. B.
orchestra seems right.
Rubinstein
This disk carries with it an assurance,
possibly comforting, possibly just super.
fluous, that not one penny of the buyer's
$5.95 will "enure to the benefit of" the
It also bears a very imSoviet Union.
portant- looking copyright notice. Otherwise, it does not differ significantly from the
Act II to be heard in the semi -complete
Neither version is
Period recording.
notably better engineered than the other,
although characteristics are not identical.
The quality of sound is above Soviet
average, the quality of vinylite below United
States optimum, with total results that are
likely to neither delight the perfectionist
nor seriously deter anyone primarily concerned with finding out what the opera
is like. If not an undebatably great work,
Prince Igor is an extraordinarily fine one,
as well as a landmark of sorts in the history
of trans -European opera. It is certainly
worth hearing all of; but if all cannot be
managed, the Polovtsian episode presented
here stands alone well enough and does
hold some of the most impressive and
individual music in the score. The performance is weak in some elements but
is strong in ensemble feeling and very
strong indeed in the characterizations of
Andrei Ivanov, as Igor, and Mark Reizen,
as Konchak. Text in English on the jacket.
For those who think they might like it:
J. H., JR.
Recommended.
BRAHMS
for Violin and Orchestra, in
77
Johanna Martzy; Philharmonia Orchestra,
Paul Kletzki, cond.
ANGEL 35137. 12-in. 42 min. $5.95.
In four months four commanding records
of this violin concerto
have emphasized its
modern status as a hurdle every violinist must
clear to win critical recognition. The collaboration between Miss Martzy and Mr.
Kletzki is in the new direction of relative
serenity and introspection, smooth and temperate, with a reserve left in the muscles.
This may have been arranged in deference
to the violinist's sex, but the results are not
feeble, merely restrained. Probably because
of the comparative intimacy of utterance.
but perhaps because of sympathetic acoustics, Miss Martzy draws a tone as suave as
any in this music. A similar ingratiation of
confident reserve marks the orchestra and
the sound in a disk whose unexcited vitality
is not likely soon to wear itself or us out.
C. G. B.
BRAHMS
Six Songs and Folksongs
-
See Wolf.
BRAHMS
Vier ernste Gesänge, Op. s21
Two Songs for Contralto with Viola Obbligato, Op. 91
In stiller Nacht (Deutsche Volkslieder
No. 8)
Sandmännchen (Volkskinderlieder No.
4
Nell Rankin, contralto; Coenraad V. Bos.
piano. Carlton Cooley, viola, in the Two
Songs with Obbligato.
CAPITOL
P
8289.
12-in. $4.98.
KIPNIS SINGS BRAHMS
In stiller Nacht; Mein Mädel hat rinn
Rosenmund; Sandmännchen; Vor dem Fenster; Ruhe, Süssliebchen, im Schatten; Der
Gang zum Liebsten; O kühler Wald; Dein
blaues Auge; Meine Liebe ist grün; Geheimnis:
Am Sonntag Morgen; In Waldeseinsamkelt:
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No,
I, in D minor, Op. 15
Artur Rubinstein; Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Fritz Reiner, cond.
RCA VICTOR LM 1831. 12-in.
$3.98.
47 min.
This brilliant playing flows naturally from
the musical thought. The performance is
weighed but not weighty. Even the massive
snarling of the opening theme, which is
capable of making anti -climax of everything
that follows, has been judiciously tempered
to obviate that catastrophe and to fit instead
into a regulated development. From end
to end the concerto is smoother and more
refined than in the usual performance, a
refinement emanating partly from the polished quality of the recording, taken through
There is an envelopa single microphone.
ing orchestral surge admirable in the tuttis,
albeit a little shallow in woodwind detail.
The assured but not complacent playing of
Nell Rankin leads a Brahms triple -bill:
"all- around excellence of performance."
59
Rf((IZI)
Wir wandelten; Wie Melodien zieht es mir;
Wiegenlied,- Auf dem Kirchhofe; Der Uber-
laufer; Ein Wanderer.
Alexander Kipnis,
Wolff, piano.
RCA VICTOR
A
basso;
LCT 1157.
Ernst
12 -in.
Victor
$3.98.
SCHUBERT-BRAHMS RECITAL
yet represented by no less than four re-
corded versions. Knappertsbusch treats the
music sensibly and with expansiveness, and
the reproduction is clear and resonant. To
my taste, however, this very melodic and
not too verbose work is heard to best advantage in the more animated reading, just
as well recorded, by Goehr and the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra on Concert
Brahms: Der Tod, das ist die bible Nacht;
O wisst ich doch den Weg ziruck; Meine
Hall 1195.
Liebe ist grin; Ach, wende diesen Blick;
Es träumte mir; Wiegenlied; Liebestreu; Immer
leiser wird mein Schlummer; Der Schmied.
Schubert: Ständchen; Im Frihling; Gretchen
am Spinnrade; Auf dem Wasser zu singen;
Im Abendroth; Nacht und Träume; Rastlose
Liebe.
BUXTEHUDE
Four Cantatas: "Herr, auf Dich Traue
Ich "; " Singet dem Herrn"; " Lauda
Sion Salvatorem "; "Jesu, meine Freude"
Helen Boatwright, soprano; Choir of Sr.
Carol Smith, contralto;
piano.
RCA VICTOR LBC 1071.
Renato Cellini,
12 -in.
$2.98.
sampling of Brahms' Lieder is to be
found on these three disks, with a little
Schubert thrown in for good measure.
The singing, too, is of a high order, but
the same cannot always be said of the
interpretations. For all- around excellence
of performance, Nell Rankin takes top
honors here; her singing is intelligent,
and she obviously understands the meaning
of what she is interpreting. An additional
feature is the exquisite viola playing of
Carlton Cooley, reproduced with stunning
sound quality.
Kipnis' disk is an LP
reissue of an old 78 -rpm set, and as such,
sets a remarkably high standard for such
dubbings; the sound is almost as good
as on present -day recordings. The basso's
tone is full and rich, but he does not
always vary his expression from one song
to the next. This is also the chief failing
of Carol Smith, who possesses a sumptuous, sometimes ravishing voice but
delivers all the music in a monochromatic
fashion. So does her accompanist. MonotP. A.
onous.
A fine
BRUCKNER
Symphony No. 3 in D minor
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Hans Knappertsbusch, cond.
LONDON LL I044. I2 -in. $3.98.
One of Brucknei s less familiar symphonies,
P. A.
Thomas' Church, New Haven, Connecticut, Howard Boatwright, cond.
OVERTONE 6.
12
-in. 48 min. $5.95.
Dietrich Buxtehude, born in 1637, antedated
Bach by about half a century. In 1705, two
years before the older master's death, the
then 20 -year-old Bach made his famous
journey on foot to hear Buxtehudé s organ
playing and to study his works
perhaps
these very cantatas. They are not only of
historic interest, but of gratifying musical
substance on their own, and we can experience them here in sensitive and idiomatic
performances. Miss Boarwrighi s voice has
just the right texture for this music, and in
matters of style she leaves nothing to be
desired. Fine recording too.
In keeping with the conscientiousness that
seems to typify the approach of most of the
smaller record companies, Overtone has
supplied complete texts and translations of
all the works, together with informative
notes by David Kraehenbuehl.
D. R.
-
BYRD
Four-
and Fivepart Masses
Pro Musica Antiqua, Safford Cape, cond.
EMS 234. 12 -in. 24, 25, min. $5.95
William Byrd was a staunch Catholic who
consistently refused to attend the services
of the newly founded Church of England.
He and his family were on many occasions
called upon to answer the charge of recusancy, and it is believed that only Queen
Elizabeth's high personal regard for his musical abilities saved him from more serious
inconveniences. Since it was a crime for a
priest to celebrate Mass, Mr. Cape assumes
that "the Masses can only have been sung
at the time in private gatherings, by a very
small choir, or more probably, simply by a
trio, quartet or quintet of singers." In
putting these conclusions into practice in
the present recording, the conductor imposes great responsibility upon each of
his five singers. These responsibilities they
discharge in most admirable fashion. It is
no easy task for a group of single voices to
of the sort
sustain long lines of music,
and to do so
ordinarily given to a chorus
with such purity of tone and stylistic insight
as they demonstrate here.
One regrets
only the high level of tape hiss in an otherwise good recording. Latin texts and English
D. R.
translations are supplied.
--
CHOPIN
Helen Boatwright sings in four Buxtehude
cantatas: "gratifying musical substance."
60
Twelve Etudes, Op. so
Twelve Etudes, Op. 25
Alexander Uninsky, piano.
Eric LC 3065. 12 -in. 28, 3o min. $5.95
Alexander Uninsky shows ample virtuosity
in two cleanly-played Chopin piano disks.
Sonata No. 2, in B flat, minor, Op.
Sonata No. 3, in B minor, Op. 58
Alexander Uninsky, piano.
EPIC LC
3o56.
12 -in.
19, 23
35
min. $5.95
An effective, mature pianist, Mr. Uninsky
treats music traditionally, in the best sense
of the word. There is not much poetry, it is
true, nor are there many of the personal
touches that might add freshness to this
much -played Chopin music, but the virtuosity is present in full force, as it should
be, without any of the distortions this sometimes leads to. Strong and clean, the play.
ing seems better the more that is demanded
of it, and the three last tremendous études
in Op. 25 have exceptional power. The piano
tone comes through well, brighter and shallower in the études, cooler and fuller in the
sonatas.
The étude disk seems to be the only one
carrying both the Op. to and Op. 25 sets
complete. In order to get everything on,
Epic has foregone banding; since the works
are played in order, they are not too hard
to pick out. The étude performances wear
extremely well, so the disk strikes me as a
R. E
bargain.
COUPERIN
Three Tenebrae Services for Holy Week:
Motet, Audite omnes; Motet pour le
jour de Paques.
Nadine Sautereau (s), Janine Collard (c).
Noëlie Pierront, organ; Huguette Fernandez,
Marie- Claire Misson, violins; Marie -Anne
Mocquot, viola da gamba; Laurence Boulay, cond.
HAYDN SOCIETY
11SL -105.
12 -in.
$5.95.
To those who know Francois Couperin
only as the composer of some charming
harpsichord pieces this disk should come
as a magnificent surprise. The three Lecons
de Tfnèbres, settings of texts (in Latin)
from the Lamentations of Jeremiah, are
among the great sacred works of the
Baroque period in France. Their dramatic
power, conveyed through supple melodic
lines, poignant harmony and elegant construction, is as affecting today as it must
have been when these pieces were first
published in 1714. And this is achieved
with a minimum of performing forces
one singer, organ, and a viola da gamba
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
S
in the first two Lessons, joined by another
singer and two violins in the third, which
is the finest of the three. The ladies of the
ensemble perform very well, Mlle. Collard
being particularly outstanding, and there
is an impression of spaciousness around
The Audite omnes did not
the voices.
seem especially interesting to this listener,
but the triumphant Motet for Easter
Day is almost alone worth the price of the
disk. The original texts and an English
N. B.
translation are supplied.
DONIZETTI
L'Elisir d'Amore
Margherita Carosio (s), Adina; Loretta di
Lelio (s), Giannetta; Nicola Monti (t),
Nemorino; Tito Gobbi (b), Sergeant
Belcore; Melchiorre Luise (bs), Doctor
Dulcamara; Orchestra and Chorus of the
Teatro dell Opera, Rome, Gabriele Santini,
cond.
RCA VICTOR LM -6024. Two c2 -in. $7.96.
When it comes to dispensing judgments
about works in the opera bula form, two
Rossinï s Il Barbiere di Siviglia and
have attained
Donizettï s Don Pasquale
what you might call habitual first-class
status. The rest, heard and unheard, are
often just as habitually lumped together
as "typical," and there the matter is left
to rest. There may be some justice in this,
at least in a positive way, for both Il Bar biere and Pasquale deserve to be set above
the countless works that more or less
resemble them in plot and music; it may
also, however, do some injustice to a work
like L'Elisir d'Amore, which wanders off
the beaten bola track into some thoroughly
delightful territory of its own. Aside from
the fact that the score is one unending
succession of bubbling, ingratiating melodies, the libretto is genuinely funny in a
way that by no means all comic -opera
librettos are (William Fense Weaver's
translation supplied with this set is exMoreover, the characterization,
cellent).
both verbal and musical, of the principals
I have a very
is unfailingly delightful.
Too
real personal devotion to L'Elisir.
many people have been led to believe
that the tenor romanza Una furtiva lagrima
is all there is to it.
Both available recordings are worth
while, and though the older Cetra set
seems to me to be, in the final analysis,
the better performance, the newer RCA
and it is on two
Victor set has its points
Margherita
records instead of three.
Carosio has been for some time a kind of
reference point for the ranking of Adinaweight lyric sopranos; she is still a fine
artist, but time has worn her voice, and
though the machinery still works well
enough, the gears are not noiseless. Cetra's
Adina, Alda Noni, is also very good;
her voice may not perhaps be basically
as pretty, but it is much fresher. As Nemorino, Nicola Monti (for RCA) and Cesare
Valletti (for Cetra) are both more than
satisfactory. My preference is slightly for
Valletti, on grounds of characterization,
but Monti has a voice of somewhat sweeter
timbre. Tito Gobbi and his Cetra counterpart, Afro Poli, are old pros as Belcore;
however, the Victor set was made at a time
when Mr. Gobbi was in pretty rocky voice.
Dulcamaras are a matter of taste, to an
-
-
extent, but it seems to me that there is
almost no contest at all between the expert,
straight -faced buffo singing of Sesto Bruscantini in the Cetra set and the hard,
almost petulant singing and characterization of Melchiorre Luise in this one
quite aside from the fact that Luisé s voice
is not really a bass at all, but a kind of low
tenor suitable only for character work.
Orchestrally, both sets are at least accepGabriel Santini's conducting for
table.
Victor has more bounce and sparkle than
Gianandrea Gavazzeni's for Cetra, but
some of his tempos, especially in choral
passages, are brisk to the point of rushing
past the musical point, while Gavazzeni's
are both firm and singable and more relaxed.
The engineering of both sets is
satisfactory, the Victor sound perhaps
J. H., Ja.
more brilliant.
-
DONIZETTI
Lucia di Lammermoor
Lily Pons (s), Lucia; Thelma Votipka (s),
Alisa; Richard Tucker (t), Edgardo; Thomas
Hayward (t), Arturo; and others; Orchestra
and Chorus of the Metropolitan Opera
Association, Fausto Cleva, cond.
COLUMBIA SL -127. Two 12 -in. $7.96.
All told, this
is a good representative
Metropolitan Lucia. For more years than
it would be quite gallant to count up,
Lily Pons has been the resident coloratura
of the Metropolitan. Although she does
not sing there as frequently as she did
20 years ago, she still has admirers and has
outlasted with apparent ease a whole
generation of young singers touted to
replace her. Any way you look at it, her
career has been a remarkable one. Leaving
voice and personal charm out, the real
key to her success has been concentration
of purpose and completely professional
command of the techniques of her craft.
She may or may not be that rare creature
deserving to be called a great artist, but
there is about everything she does a kind
of thoroughgoing professionalism. This
quality may not arouse the emotions,
but it commands the utmost respect.
Lucia is a part she has sung as often,
at least, as any other, and the main legitimate criticism of her performance here is
that it does not present her at the peak of
her career., Artistically speaking, everything
-
This, then, is a recording that deserves
consideration, especially in this country.
But there is a great deal to be said in favor
of the Angel recording for those who
think they might like a bigger, more
communicative voice in the title role and
And
a smoother all -round performance.
for those who would like to hear the
score without its conventional cuts, there
is value in the generally good performance
of the Urania set, which has Dolores
J. H., JR.
Wilson as its Lucia.
DVORAK
Biblical Songs,
Op. 99, Vols. 2 and 2
Gypsy Songs, Op. 55; Love Songs, Op. 83
Hildegard Rössl- Majdan, contralto; Franz
Holletschek, piano.
I2 -in. /5.95.
WESTMINSTER WL 5324.
We hear far too little of Dvorak's fine songs.
The three cycles presented here help make
up for this neglect. The to Biblical Songs.
with texts taken from the Psalms, are works
of nobility and depth of feeling, and among
the most beautiful of Dvorak's vocal offerespecially
ings. The seven Gypsy Song
the familiar Songs My Mother Taught Me
are heard rather more frequently, though
none too often. Their more fiery spirit contrasts with the lyrical tenderness of the eight
Love Songs which round out this recorded
-
-
FEBRUARY, 1955
in place, every detail attended to; she
sings, for the most part, squarely on pitch;
her phrasing is, similarly, unexceptionable.
Used to the full, the voice no longer
But the passage -work is
sounds fresh.
still brilliant and the Mad Scene has a
great deal of the elan that won so many
ovations from so many audiences. Listened
to in its full context, there is much to
praise and very little that I, for one, would
want to disparage.
As Edgardo. Richard Tucker sounds
splendid, though he and Donizetti might
disagree on details of style and diction.
As Ashton, Frank Guarrera is variable
sometimes extremely good, sometimes
trying to sing bigger than his vocal cords,
sometimes (and this is the fault of somebody for releasing the set as it is) obviously
puzzled by the phrasing of his colleagues,
and hence not as emphatic as he might
be.
Norman Scott is basically a dull.
undramatic Raimondo, and neither Thomas
Hayward nor James McCracken sound
as well in the secondary tenor roles as they
But Thelma
have in the opera house.
Votipka achieves the distinction of being
out and away the best Alisa on records.
Fausto Cleva, characteristically a fine Lucia
conductor, leads a performance that is
fiery and crisp at best, if somewhat marred
by near- disagreements among the singers.
is
-
collection.
Hildegard Rössl- Majdan, most often
heard in recordings of Bach cantatas and
the like, strikes me here as one of the finest
contraltos I have heard on disks. The dignity, musicality and mellowness with which
she presents these songs provides a delightful hour of distinguished vocalism. If I
could find any fault with her presentation,
it is that she sings in German instead of in
the original Czech. but this is a minor matter.
Donizetti: well served in a new Columbia
Lucia and RCA Victor L'Elisir d'Amore.
Holletschek's piano accompaniments are all
they should be, and the album is supplemented by complete German and English
texts.
P. A.
61
Rf( ()RD,
FOSS,
LUKAS
A Parable of Death
Marvin Hayes, narrator; Richard Robinson,
tenor; chamber ensemble, Pomona College
Glee Clubs, Lukas Foss, cond.
EDUCO ECM 4002. 12 -in. $5.95.
A Parable of Death was commissioned by
the Louisville Philharmonic Society for
Vera Zorina, who appeared as the narrator
at its premiere. Later, she recorded it with
the Louisville Orchestra for Columbia.
Still later, the young pianist- composer -conductor revised its instrumentation so that,
instead of a full orchestra, it could employ a
string quintet, organ, piano and percussion.
It is this latter version which he conducts
on the present disk.
Using as his text excerpts from Geschichten
vom leiben Gott by Rainer Maria Rilke (1875.
1926) in an English version by Anthony
Hecht, Foss was faced with the problem of
creating a work for narrator, tenor, chorus
and orchestra that would not resolve itself
into a melodrama. By handling his forces
with skill and economy, he has managed to
turn out a most interesting and often deeply
moving work, dramatic yet intimate. Personally, I prefer the original version because
of the greater variety of instrumental sound.
I also prefer the earlier performance, mostly
but never
because of the more forceful
narration by Miss Zorina, as opforced
posed to the rather casual one by Marvin
Hayes, and because of the more cohesive
singing of the Choir of the Southern Baptist
P. A.
Theological Seminary.
GOUNOD
Mireille (excerpts)
-
in D minor;
Sonata for Cello and Harpsichord
Bach: Trio Sonata No. r
The Harpsichord Quartet.
ESOTERIC ES -538.
I2 -in. 45 min.
$5.95.
Lovely music, expertly performed and
well recorded, with fine jacket notes by
James Lyons.
D. R.
HANDEL
Passacaglia (arr. Halvorsen)
zart.
-
See
Mo-
HANDEL
WESTMINSTER WL 5322.
12 -in
49 min.
$5.95.
One of the six pieces that make up Goyescas
has attained considerable popularity, The
The other
Maiden and the Nightingale.
five deserve to be as well known, for they
are equally evocative. When heard in sequence as they are here, they acquire
additional flavor, for some of the musical
ideas turn up in more than one piece.
The extensive fifth section, Love and Death,
is particularly gorgeous and suggestive,
with its references to The Maiden and the
El Pelele (The Straw Man)
Nightingale.
makes a natural companion piece to
Goyescas, because like them it is inspired
by Goya drawings. Although there have
been more silken performances than those
of Echaniz, the Cuban pianist has a natural
feeling for Granados' irregular phrase
shapes, and he knows how to keep the
melodies distinct from the filigree surrounding them. Clean, natural piano sound.
R. E.
GRIEG
Sigurd forsalfar
-
56
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, ThorJohnson, cond.
LONDON LD 9138.
Io -in. $2.98.
a reissue of the same recording contained on one side of London LL 406
pesters have been putting onto disks the
greatest masterpieces of quartet literature
played on those Stradivaris in that hall, and
not one of those disks has sound to compare with what Columbia can produce in
less Olympian quarters.
What good the
Stradivaris if their blood is chilled by four
wrong walls? What matter the Budapest
sentience and knowledge if their strings
chirp when they should sing, if viola and
cello sound exhausted and desiccated?
A detailed examination seems unnecessary.
The Schneider version for the Haydn Society (HSQ -L), whose recording was entrusted to Columbia engineers, is immeasurably better in sonics, and the Schneiders have
acquired an assurance in Haydn that no
Water Music (complete)
The
Hewitt Orchestra,
Hewitt, cond.
Paris,
Maurice
HAYDN SOCIETY HSL -107.
$5.95
12 -in.
39 min.
timbre, makes this the most desirable of the
three recorded editions (not counting the
six recordings of excerpts arranged by the
late Sir Hamilton Harty to form an orchestral suite). The pomposo playing of the pompom sections in the competing versions
show a heartier inflation than Hewitt permits, but the latter gives a sparkling liveliness to the other dance movements and a
litheness to the slow sections not expressed
with such ingratiation elsewhere. The vivid
oboe quality lightens the color, but as usual
the horns are not strong enough. C. G. B.
HAYDN
See
for Flute and Strings, in D
Telemann.
-
HAYDN
ten"), in D minor; No. 3 ( "Emperor"),
in C; No. 4 ( "Sunrise"), in B flat; No.
5 ( "Largo"), in D; No. 6 in E flat
Budapest Quartet.
COLUMBIA SL 203. Three 12 -in. 18, 19, 23,
19, 19, 20 min. SI 1.94. Available in separate
consecutive pairs on ML 4922-4, $3.98 per
disk.
Western Symphony- See Thomson.
Liebesträume; Légendes; Ballades
Edith Farnadi, piano.
WESTMINSTER WL 5321.
12 -in.
51
min.
$5.95.
Bright and exhilarating sound, kind to
Concerto
KAY, HERSHY
LISZT
Quartets, Op. 76: No. r, in G; No. 2 ("Quin -
Orchestral Suite, Op.
In the Library of Congress repose a set of
Stradivari instruments whose value is so
exalted that they are in effect chained within
those halls fecund in learning for Congressmen who can read. For their recent Columbia records the Budapest Quartet have been
in effect chained to the instruments, and
thus imprisoned in the Library. The Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Auditorium bears a
name honored in music, but Columbia's
experience with its acoustics for recording
purposes offers no proof that a boxcar or a
bathysphere might not be better. The Buda -
group in the world should challenge without
the help of superb acoustics. Attention is
called to Columbia ML 4216, Op. 76, No. 4,
the "Sunrise," in the Budapest version issued
six years ago, warm, bright, round and
healthy: a delight. It was not made in the
Library of Congress.
Perhaps the clatter
of demagoguery seeps into that building.
It has not been tractable to Columbia's
engineers, and these records cannot be
recommended.
C. G. B.
Lukas Foss with Vera Zorina, for whom his
first version of the Parable was written.
El Pelele
José Echaniz, piano.
62
r
See Bizet.
GRANADOS
This is
HANDEL, G. F.
Concerti A Quatre: No.
No. 2 in D major.
-
-
Goyescas;
(where its diskmate was Alfven's Midsummer
Vigil). The performance is sane and straightforward, the reproduction a trifle edgy. P. A.
Miss Farnadi continues her tour on records
through the Liszt piano literature, and I
know of no one who makes a better case
for it. Unafraid of the music's sentiment
(or sentimentality, if you will), she lets
the melodies rise and fade in lingering.
pathetic curves, and she plays up the
melodramatics with boldness and imagination. In other words, she brings these
period pieces to life by her complete
identification with the style. If she occasionally scrambles around the keyboard in the
bravura passages, she is otherwise technically secure, and her command of Liszt's
delicate, ornamental tracery is perfect.
The disk offers a good sampling of Liszt's
from the relatively early
piano works
Ballades, in which he appropriated and
expanded a Chopin form, through the
Liebesträume, which are transcriptions of
his own songs (including the overplayed
No. 3), to the completely pictorial Légendes.
lists the Liebesträume
The label on Side
before the Légendes, but the latter are played
first. No complaints about the engineering.
-
1
R. E.
LISZT
-
Mephisto Waltz No. r
Prometheus
Symphonic Poem No.
5
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
career would be bound up with opera or
to what extent his success would give
Edith l am ed,: in a tour through Liszt's
piano works, a firm display of sentiment.
Paris Conservatory Orchestra, Karl Mün
chinger, cond.
LONDON LD 9153. to-in. 32.98.
After hearing so much from Karl Münchinger in the way of eighteenth- century
music, it comes as a surprise to find how well
he fares with these two works of Liszt.
Both these readings are marked by great
dramatic fire, yet never at the expense of
extreme clarity, even in the inner voices.
The popular Mephisto Waltz has more head-
long excitement and forward motion than
in most other recorded versions. Prometheus,
here presented on disks for the first time,
is revealed as among the more interesting
and well knit of Liszt's symphonic poems
musical and not too bombastic. Vibrant reP. A.
corded sound throughout.
-
MAHLER
Three Rücken Songs
Kathleen Ferrier, contralto; Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Bruno Walter, cond.
LONDON LD 9137. to -in. $2.98.
-
As originally issued, these three songs
Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen, Ich
atmet' einen linden Duft and Um Mitternacht
-
occupied the fourth side of London's magnificent recording by the late Kathleen
Ferrier, Julius Patzak and Bruno Walter of
Mahleis Das Lied von der Erde (LL 625/626).
Why any devotee of Mahler or of these supreme artists should want the one without
the other it is difficult to say. Be that as it
may, the present performance and recording
P. A.
are beautiful in every respect.
impetus to the operatic movement among
Thus Amelia
contemporary composers.
al Ballo is already, in a way, a historic work,
and as such it is interesting to have it
available on records in its original form,
with the text in Italian, as it was still when
the Curtis Institute of Music gave the
premiere, with Fritz Reiner conducting,
on April Fools' Day 1937. Since then,
it has become well known in this country
in English, as Amelia Goes to the Ball,
but quite naturally reverted to Italian for
its La Scala premiere last spring, on which
occasion the Angel set was made.
Called an opera buffa, it differs from such
later Menotti works as The Medium and
The Consul, which are in style a sort of
eclectic twentieth -century verismo, and even
from the later comedies, being bigger in
scale than The Telephone and more formal
in structure than The Old Maid and the
Thief. In it the composer is indebted to
past works in the form, from Pergolesi
onwards; it could hardly be otherwise.
But the libretto, for all its affinities with
buffa conventions, Parisian bedroom farce,
and the general plot family of WolfFerarri's The Secret of Suzanne, has a sort
of amoral twentieth- century charm of its
own. The score has good but not memorable
tunes, treated with unflagging grace, wit
and velocity, in an individual blend of
Italian opera usages and instrumental
writing that has something in common
with French composers of the FrancaixAmelia is scarcely
Poulenc persuasion.
a great work, but it is never a dull one.
The Angel performance is very stylish
and to the point, if not invariably lovely
to listen to. Margherita Carosio, one of the
most accomplished of coquette sopranos,
sings with some unattractive edge to the
tone but with practically limitless skill.
Both Giacinto Prandelli and Rolando
Panerai are good foils for her. and Nino
Sanzogno conducts with abundant spirit.
The engineering is somewhat untypical
of Angel's La Scala series, in that the
voices are not heard in as consistently
close perspective as usual; this results in
a better performance -sense but also in
some odd balances. However, the sound
is characteristically clean and the surfaces
J. H., JR.
excellent. Recommended.
MILHAUD
Suite for Violin, Clarinet and Piano
See Bartok.
MOZART
broader and less nimble than we would wish.
The orchestral parts are in general meaty,
and the conductor brings out their juices
effectively. Hearty sound of good quality
C. G. B.
not unpleasantly echoic.
MOZART
for Clarinet and Orchestra,
in A, KV 622
Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, in A,
Concerto
KV 581
F. Etienne, clarinet; Hewitt Orchestra, Paris,
Maurice Hewitt, cond.; Vegh Quartet.
HAYDN SOCIETY
HSL -96.
12 -in.
29, 29 min.
35.95.
Longer playing time admits the two summits of music for the clarinet to one disk.
In these good performances and excellent
recordings the appeal may be irresistible.
Etienne blows the juicy, protean tone we
expect from a French clarinetist, and everyone here plays with that sense of order the
French almost invariably maintain in music
of this period. In both works the close sound
has rendered a clarinet pungent, vital, imperative; and in the quintet the instrument is
played as one of the ensemble rather than
with the
in concerto-style, thus effecting
mingled
extreme nicety of the recording
color of strong appeal, particularly lovely in
the larghetto.
This seems to be the best record in which
the Veghs have participated. It is interesting to compare it with the perfumed refinement of the wonderful version by the Italian
Quartet (London LL 573), which it resembles
not at all. The concerto has not such a preeminence. It is a good performance distinguished by the headiness of the Etienne
tone, and it has been pleasantly recorded,
but its credentials are no better than those of
C. G. B.
several other versions.
-
-a
MOZART
Concerto for Oboe and Orchestra,
KV 314
in G
tJ. Christian Bach: Andante from Sinfonia Concertante in E flat
tJ Seb. Bach: Arioso from Cantata No.
156; Adagio from Concerto for Oboe
and Violin
Mitchell Miller, oboe; Saidenberg Little
Symphony Orchestra, Daniel Saidenberg,
cond.
-
"Va, dal furor portata,"
"Si mostra la sorte," KV 209:
Concert Arias:
KV 21;
MENOTTI
Amelia al Ballo
"Con ossequio," KV 210; "Se
Margherita Carosio (s), Amelia; Maris
Amadini (c), The Friend; Giacinto Prandelli (t), The Lover; Rolando Panerai (b),
The Husband; Enrico Campi (bs), The
Chief of Police; and others; Orchestra
and Chorus of the Teatro alla Scala, Milan.
Nino Sanzogno, cond.
ANGEL 3514o. t2 -in. (in album). 35.95.
-
In 1935, when he was only 23, Gian -Carlo
Menotti began working on his first opera
according to him, almost without intending
to become an opera composer at all.
Certainly, neither he nor anyone else could
have foretold then to what extent his
FEBRUARY, 1955
al labbro
mio," KV 295; "Per pietà, non ricercate," KV 42n; "Misero! O sogno," KV
43
Waldemar Kmentt, tenor; Vienna Symphony
Orchestra, Bernhard Paumgartner, cond.
EPtc LC 3076. 12 -in. 45 min. 33.98.
Most of these arias are new to records. The
first four were composed for inclusion in
operas by other men; the last two are rondos
for concert performance. Several are impressive Mozart, all are worth hearing.
Waldemar Kmentt is an amiable tenor. We
can acknowledge pleasant singing here without failing to recognize that his style is
Gian -Carlo Menotti: In the Scala version,
Amelia goes to the ball speaking Italian.
ii( URI),
COLUMBIA ML 4916.
S3.98-
12
-in. 22, 6,
3, 7
Divertimento (String Trio) in E flat.
The record abounds with so much good
nature and competence, and reproduces
so richly, that it is a pity to say that there
is no great need for it. LP is not the place
for isolated pieces like those of the Bach
items here, and all the benignity in the
world will not compensate for an indifference to style in the Oboe Concerto
of Mozart. This is the same music as the
Second Concerto for Flute, for which
it apparently served as prototype. What
is meant by style is superbly illustrated
in the flute version, on Epic 3033; and the
Saillet -Paumgartner playing of the oboe
setting on Renaissance 29 has a much
subtler fragrance than the new Columbia
and so nearly
so rich in efficiency
C. G. B
faultless in sound.
-
MOZART
for Piano and Orchestra: No.
in A, KV 414; No. t8, in Bflat, KV 456
Concertos
12,
MOZART
min.
Lily Kraus; Boston Symphony Orchestra,
Pierre Monteux, cond.
RCA VICTOR LM 1783. 12 -in. 25, 29 min.
KV 563
Pasquier Trio.
HAYDN SOCIETY HSL -114.
a
guiding conscience her style suggests
tinsel. Thus her rondos skip along in a
blessed way and her opening allegros
all too frequently have the same peremptory
bounce, less blessed there. The conductor
could not stop this in No. 18: one can
hear the orchestra pick up their manner
from the pianist immediately after her
entrance. Still, No. 12 is good; the orchestra sings with the enticement peculiar
to them; the strings are sweetly recorded
and the piano has some of that Victor
big-hall concert breadth. There is some
engulfment of the woods, but the turns
Five-sixths good, and one
are solid.
C. G B.
half very good.
MOZART
Jean Fournier infuses a latter-day warmth
into the Mozart Concertos No. 3 and No. 5.
carefully weighed, interjections forceful.
They are not tricky performances, since
the transitions are orderly and the line
does not alternate distensions and contractions.
But they have no determinable
style; they seek to transcend style by the
infusion of later warmths.
Interesting
beyond doubt, and with those horns and
those oboes rich beyond other editions.
C. G. B.
Divertimentos for Two Oboes, Two Bassoons and Two Horns: in E flat, KV
252; in F, KV 253; in B flat, KV z7o;
in E flat, KV 289
Sextet from the Vienna Symphony Orchestra.
ERIC LC 3081. 12 -in. 11, 15, 12, 16 min.
$3.98.
In the whole list of divertimentos, regardless
of instrumentation, these four are Nos.
12, 13, 14 and 16. No. 16 is not found in
any other recording.
The others, with
No. 8, are better presented on Westminster
WL 5103
better because played with
more life and imagination.
A curiosity
of the Epic record is that it claims Bernhard
Paumgartner, no tyro Mozartean, as "conductor." For six men? If Mr. P really
prepared these players, determined their
tempos and dictated their phrasing, he
has a greater tolerance of mediocrity than
his previous disks indicate.
C. G. B.
-
MOZART
Divertimento (String Trio)
in E flat,
KV 563
Duo No
Fournier; Vienna National
Orchestra, Milan Horvath, cond.
12 -in.
WESTMINSTER WL 5187.
min. $5.95.
Opera
Jascha Heifetz, violin, and William Primrose, viola, in all; with Emanuel Feuer -
26, 3,
mann, cello, in the Divertimento.
RCA VICTOR LcT 115o. 12 -in. 33, 17.
7 min. $3.98.
Invisible until now since its announcement many months ago, this record has
features uncommon in the presentation of
Mozart concertos. One of them, and the
salient virtue, is the true, unstifled sonance
of the oboes and horns. These must be
heard forthright, to baffle the monochrome
of the strings, and here they are, as they
rarely are. The string body is larger than
usual, with an augmentation of suavity as
Mr. Fournier, recorded close to
result.
the microphone, makes a wide variety
of tones in a deliberate romanticization of
music customarily played austerely. The
slow movements are very slow, the phrases
64
the brothers Pasquier have steadfastly
adhered to the Gallic ideals of clarity
and poise.
They are skeptical of sentimentality and hostile to languor.
Their
work in KV 563 is unfanciful and masculine.
In contrast with the smiling graces of the
historic Victor edition (Heifetz, Primrose,
Feuermann) and the tender sympathy of
the Westminster (Pougnet, Riddle, Pini)
it can sound rude. This austerity of attack
has its justification in an unmistakable
revelation of pattern and detail, contrapuntal detail in particular, entirely evident
in the balance of the playing and the
bold clarity of the sound. Perfectly adapted
to the playing, the reproduction is very
clear and outright, forceful without excesses,
resonant enough but not notably altered
by an environment which seems to give
back just what it received.
Excellent.
C. G. B
MOZART
Concertos for Violin and Orchestra: No.
3, in G, KV 216; No. 5, in A, KV 219
Jean
36 min
Throughout their long career devoted to
music written for violin, viola and cello,
$3.98.
Belated in arrival, this record is interesting
enough for a notice. For five of the six
movements in the two concertos the
playing is a delight of scintillation opposed
by reflection. The curt and flip brilliance
of Miss Kraus in the first movement of
This lady's
No. 18 is not endearing.
dazzling proficiency in Mozart frequently
needs corrective knuckle -rapping: without
I2 -in.
2, in B flat, KV 424
Mandel-Halvorsen: Passacaglia
This is the second transfer of the Divertimento in the rosy, elegant performance
originally recorded in 1941 and a dozen
years later put upon an LP without the Duo
and the Passacaglia, now to be regarded as
belated gratuities. Alliance with a stature
like Messrs. Primrose's and Feuermann's
usually induces Mr. Heifetz to behave at
his best, and the two shorter pieces are
equal in technical mastery and musical
understanding to the Divertimento. There
is also more bite to their reproduction,
the cello in 1941 being woody when low.
C. G. B.
MOZART
Sonata for Piano, No. 16, in B flat,
570
tSaint- Saëns:
Concerto
KV
for Piano and
Orchestra, No. 2, in G minor, Op. 22
Emil Gilds; with Paris Conservatory Orchestra, André Cluytens, cond., in the
Concerto.
ANGEL 35132. I2 -in. 18, 23 min. $5.95.
The sonata is one that is always perplexing,
no two pianists playing it the same way.
Gilds, whose forte is not piano but rather
assertion and brilliance, surprises agreeably
by a supple mutability and restrained
attack. Reproduction: pleasant and cushioned, not crisp, but probably an accurate
restatement of the original.
The Saint -Saëns Concerto, the one that
has earned the immortal description of
proceeding from Bach to Offenbach, is
a lively piece which everyone likes a little
and no one dares admire. It has received
the big, bluff treatment it needs from the
pianist. He is vigorously supported by the
conductor and skillfully by the orchestra,
in a strong, clear and satisfying sound
whose short echo ought to be imitated
C. G. B.
MOZART
Symphony No. 39, in E flat, KV 543
See Beethoven.
-
MUSSORGSKY
Boris Godounoff (excerpts)
(Opera, libretto by the composer, afte,
Pushkin and Karamzin; score revised by
Excerpts:
Nikolai Rimsky- Korsakoff).
Introduction and opening chorus (Novodievitch scene); Coronation scene; The Town
of Kazan (Varlaam's song); I bave attained
the highest power; Boris -Shuiski scene and
clock scene; farewell and death of Boris.
Alexander Kipnis (bs), Boris and Varlaam:
Ilya Tamarin (t), Shuiski.
RCA Victor
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Orchestra and Robert Shaw Chorale;
Nicolai Berezowsky, cond.
RCA VICTOR (Bluebird) LBC -1082. 12 -in.
$ 2.98.
In its original form this was one of the
most distinguished of operatic recordings,
and its reappearance in the catalog as a
popular -priced Bluebird LP is a piece of
except, perhaps, for
great good luck
certain people who have been hoarding
their 78 -rpm sets and refusing to part with
them even to the needy. Alexander Kipnis'
Boris was a tremendously impressive
characterization, and in making parts of
it audible on records the Victor engineers
established a standard of fidelity that
seemed amazing at the time and that still
seems very good, especially with regard
to the perspective of solo voices. There
can never be too many fine performances
as Boris on records, and this is certainly
if not, as far as it goes,
one of the best
Mr. Kipnis' Varlaam is
the very best.
pure lagniappe; Ilya Tamarin is finely
slithery and insinuating as Shuiski; and
chorus and orchestra both do well under
Nicolai Berezowsky. Highly recommended.
J. H., JR.
-
-
MUSSORGSKY
Trepak and Serenade, from Songs and
Dances of Death; The Revel; The
Goat; Kalistrat; Song of the Flea
The Soldier's Bride,
tRachmaninoff:
Op. 8 No. 4; Thou, my beloved harvest
field, Op. 4, No. 5; Like a vision the
vanished; Spring
have
daydreams
Waters, Op. 14, No. I r; I was at her
house, Op. 14, No. 4; The Pied Piper,
Op. 38, No. 4; 0, cease thy singing,
maiden fair, Op. 4, No. 4; Dear one,
do not leave, Op. 4, No. r
mezzo- soprano;
Nadezhda Oboukhova,
Serge Lemeshev, tenor; Boris Gmirya and
Alexander Pirogov, baritones; Mark Reizen,
bass.
VANGUARD VES 6023.
12 -in. 48
min. $4.98.
The five Soviet artists heard on this disk
give idiomatic, full -flavored performances
that are highly recommended. My favorites
among the singers are the two oldest
Mme. Oboukhova, who is 68 according
to the record liner, and Mr. Gmirya, who
is 51; both sing with great sensitivity and
taste. Lemeshev's brilliant, intense tones
have a characteristic Slavic color not to
everyone's liking; Pirogov's powerful voice
wobbles and goes a little wild; Reizen's
dark bass is capable of wide coloration.
But whatever the vocal quality, the performances have an authentic, persuasive
sound. The songs themselves, particularly
those by Mussorgsky. should need no
Rachmaninoffs Like
recommendation.
a vision is an unpublished, recently displease his devotees.
that
should
covered item
The piano accompaniments (the artist
or artists are not listed) are on the whole
excellent. The sound is variable, mostly
on the good side, and certainly never
R. E.
poor enough to be disturbing.
-
Pasquale,
Sanroma, piano; Joseph de
viola; Samuel Mayes, cello.
BOSTON 8-208. 12 -in. 23, 20 mins. $5.95.
Prokofieff s Opus 94 is well known in its
violin version, in which form it has been
It does not reveal
recorded three times.
its true wit, elegance and cool coloristic
ingenuity, however, until it is heard on the
flute, for which it was conceived. Mrs.
Dwyer's performance is superb and the
recording is very good, but Sanroma shows
the lady so much deference that the piano
The balance
is often nearly inaudible.
is excellent throughout the Roussel trio,
which is as gracious, fluent and exquisitely well mannered a piece as only a
A. F.
Parisian can produce.
PROKOFIEFF
Symphony No.
Neither of these big works has hitherto
appeared on records. The Prodigal Son is
one of Prokofieff s most brilliantly orchestrated, tuneful and pungent ballet scores,
and Sebastian's interpretation of it is
extremely vivid. The Fourth Symphony,
one of the eight or nine works commissioned by the Boston Symphony Orchestra
for its fiftieth anniversary celebration in
1930, has had few performances in the
quarter -century of its existence, perhaps
justifiably. Ac all events, Sebastian makes
no very eloquent case for it. Recordings
are somewhat overbrilliant, not to say
A. F.
harsh.
RACHMANINOFF
See
Mussorgsky.
RACHMANINOFF
Symphony No. I, in D minor,
Philharmonic
Bongartz, cond.
Dresden
URANIA URLP 7131.
Op. 13
Orchestra,
12 -in.
41
Heinz
min.
After the initial performance, in St. Petersburg in 1897, of his Symphony No.
In
Rachmaninoff withdrew the work.
1
parts were discovered
After
Leningrad Conservatory.
correlation with the composer's piano -duet
version of the symphony, the score was
1945 the orchestral
in
the
FEBRUARY, 1955
Scheherazade
Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy,
cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4888. 12 -in. 41 min. $3.98
Columbia labels this "a magnificent adventure in hi- fidelity sound," to which I can
only add "Amen." It is certainly a sonic
dazzler of the first order, and for those
interested in sound qua sound this is definitely the version to buy. Musically, some
people may find Ormandy's reading on the
rather unimaginative side, lacking poetry
and fire, though it follows pretty closely
the ideas conveyed in his earlier recording
(Columbia ML 4089) issued some five
A comparison
years and 800 LPs ago.
between the two versions, as to sound,
immediately discloses the great advances
made by Columbia's engineers in capturing
the orchestral tone of this aggregation.
The old recording now seems like a weak,
anemic, undernourished weakling against
the full- bodied splendor of the new version,
where the strings have a ravishing velvety
quality, the woodwinds caress sweetly,
and the brass is a solid and sumptuous
J. F. I.
phalanx of sound.
ROUSSEL
-
Trio for Flute, Viola and Cello,
40
See Prokofieff.
SAINT -SAENS
Concerto
2,
for
-
135,
173,
Op.
Piano and Orchestra, No.
in G minor,
Sonatas
Op. 22
See
Mozart.
.
for Harpsichord, Vol. VI (Longo
in A major; 163, in D minor;
in F minor; 274, in C major; 281,
in F minor; 282, in C major; 286, in
G major; 324, in C major; i79, in A
minor; 452, in C minor; 466, in E major;
497, in B flat major)
Fernando Valenti, harpsichord.
12 -in.
WESTMINSTER WL 5325.
$5.95.
Sonata for Flute and Piano, Op. 94
tRoussel: Trio for Flute, Viola and Cello.
Opus 40
Mercury's has
for Mercury.
more spaciousness and resonance in sound,
Urania's more brilliance and immediacy.
SCARLATTI, DOMENICO
PROKOFIEFF
Doriot Anthony Dwyer, flute; Jesus Maria
milovich
RIMSKY -KORSAKOFF
-Suite
Orchestre des Concerts Colonne, George
Sebastian, cond.
28, 18 min.
URANIA URLP 7139. 12 -in.
-
-a
R. E.
4
The Prodigal Son
Songs
reconstructed and given its second performance, in Moscow in 1945. Written
in 1895, when Rachmaninoff was only 22,
it represents quite an achievement for such
a
young man and has as much validity
as many otherlate- nineteenth -century works.
All four movements are for the most part
built around a theme shaped like the
theme that turns up again
Dies Irae
in later Rachmaninoff works. There are
many suggestions of the composer's more
mature style; it also seems more cohesive
In interand less sweet harmonically.
pretation and engineering this disk stacks
up about equally with that by the Stockholm
Radio Orchestra under Jacques Rach-
Boston's
-
Doriot Anthony Dwyer plays the
Prokofieff flute
sonata
on
the
flute!
51
min.
Having reached his sixth dozen of Scarlatti
sonatas, Valenti seems to be playing better
His performances here seem
than ever.
more thoughtful and relaxed, without
losing any of their previous liveliness; the
registrations are just as colorful but more
transparent and delicate. Finally, it seems
as if Westminster has removed its recording
microphone to a more discreet distance
65
RECORDS
from the harpsichord; there is less mechanical clatter, less emphasis on the bass tones.
Nothing new can be said about the music;
there is just no end to the subtlety, sophistication and originality of Scarlatti's
ideas. For those who have not yet tried
the Scarlatti-Valenti combination, I would
suggest this disk
as a
starter.
cuts deeply. More like these, and Lichtegg
will be prominent in the list of lied singers.
No printed texts, but the clarity of the
diction makes texts unnecessary for those
who understand German. The public may
think that a seven -minute side is not
long -playing.
C. G. B.
R. E.
SCHUBERT
SCHUBERT
Quintet for Piano, Violin, Viola, Violoncello and String Bass, in A ( "Trout "),
Op. 114
Menahem Pressler, three from the Guilet
Quartet and Philip Sklar.
MGM E 3128. 12 -in. 37 min. $3.98.
At moderate or low volume, one will
experience here the best sound accorded
to any edition of the most companionable
work in chamber music. The close recording is not notably affected by restartverberation, and the instruments
lingly vibrant and real seem to be in
the room where they are reproduced.
The top of the piano and the double bass
over its entire scope speak with a vital
Performance?
actuality seldom heard.
Well, it has been noted here before that
the "Trout" Quintet steers its performers
competent musicians cannot
to virtue:
spoil it no matter how hard they try. The
present group do not bend at all to sentimentality; they are frowning proficiency
itself, and they let Schubert's unembellished notes turn the frowns into smiles.
In this disarming music the composer
C. G. B.
foresaw everything.
SCHUBERT
Sonatas for Piano: in D, Op.
$3.98.
It was inevitable that the ingratiating
little First Symphony of Schubert, so
anxious to be big, would find a recorded
version appropriate to its cheerful lyricism.
$3;
PL 882o.
31, 24 min.
The seventh and eighth sonatas in the
complete edition projected for Wührer
by Vox are very good examples of Schubert
playing and recording. The pianist has a
shameless sensibility to romanticism that
persuades him to flourish the composer's
splendid naiveties with assertive gusto,
making loud unmistakably loud and soft
a whisper, sentimentalizing slow and stiffening fast, disdaining nothing which
might help the expressiveness of what he
Good pianism withal, and
is playing.
first -class piano sound, throbbing in the
bass and crystal above the bass, easy to
The rather crazy D major
reproduce.
Sonata, Op. 53, is one that glows warmer
with familiarity, while the rather messy
Op. 122 (composed six years earlier)
exasperates by the incomplete promise
C. G. B.
of its undisciplined charm.
half-way romanticism marks Friedrich
IViihrer's performance of Schubert sonatas.
Sir Thomas was the right man to mix
finesse with joviality as the music requires,
and few listeners will fail to admire the
organization of the orchestra, the gracious sound of its strings and the transparency of the Beecham pianos. The Second Symphony is also well presented, but
the more imposing work has less spon-
taneity in performance than that granted
its predecessor.
No doubt remembrance
of the vivid dash of the Steinberg interpretation (Capitol S 8162) furthers this
impression. It is hard to choose between
the two versions, since the intra- aJjustments of the Royal Philharmonic are
superb and the newer Columbia sound
has an all -round authority not matched by
the good but less polished Capitol recording.
C. G. B.
SHOSTAKOVICH
SCHUBERT
Songs from "Schwanengesang ": Das
Fischermädchen; Die Stadt; Am Meer;
Der Doppelgänger, Die Taubenpost
Max Lichtegg (tenor), Hans Willi Haeuss-
Symphony No.
lein (piano).
$5.95.
LONDON LD 9093.
10 -in.
15
min.
$2.98.
Considered in the light of these five songs
the tenor is to be noted. The control and
direction of the voice, the nicety of enunciation and the musical responsiveness are
of high order. Der Doppelgänger especially
66
SMETANA
The Bartered Bride
Milada Musilova (s), Jarmila Pechova (s),
No Zidek (t), Oldrich Kovar (t), Karel
Kalas (bs) and others; Chorus and Orchestra
of the National Theatre, Prague, Jaroslav
Vogel, cond.
COLOSSEUM 16o -161.
Two 12 -in.
2 hr.
8 min. $11.90.
-
The superb performance
better than we
may ever expect to have of this melodious,
rhythmic comedy in America except via
records
is identical with that of two other
recorded editions, Urania 231 and Supraphon 91 -3.
Only in the case of David
Oistrakh can homage from so many directions be found. By squeezing the music
into four sides Colosseum has reduced the
cost to discophiles. Laudable; but a sonic
dimension and the bass have been reduced
more, making a curious projection all in
one plane
smooth, easy, lifeless and
depthless.
C. G. B.
-
Bedrich Smetana: Dalibor (opera in three
acts; libretto by Josef Wenzig and Ervin
Spindler).
in E
55.95.
sen-
SMETANA
Dalibor
No
12 -in.
a
sitive musician to boot. The symphony
scarcely needs discussion, and the suite
from The Golden Age scarcely merits it. A. F.
-
Op. 122
Friedrich Wührer.
Vox
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Thomas
Beecham, cond.
COLUMBIA ML 4903.
12 -in.
27, 26 min.
-
-
fiat,
Symphony No. 1, in D
Symphony No. 2 in B flat
an orchestra, and one conducted by
The Golden
z
Age- Suite
National Symphony Orchestra, Howard
Mitchell, cond.
WESTMINSTER WL 53,9. 24, 16 min. 12 -in.
What particularly distinguishes this release
is the mellow, well -balanced, beautifully
realistic quality of its sound. Many of the
recent orchestral recordings that have crossed
my turntable have screamed or boomed, or
both; this one does neither but sounds like
Marie Podvalova (s), Milada; Stefa Petrova
(s), Zdenek Beno Blachut (t), Dalibor;
Antonin Votava (t), Vitek; Vaclav Bednar
(b), King Vladislav; Theodor Srubar (bs),
Budivoj; Karel Kalas (bs), Benes. Orchestra
and Chorus of the National Theatre,
Prague; Jaroslav Krombholc, cond.
SUPRAPHON SLPV 98.
Three 12 -in.
has never had much, if any,
currency outside of its home country,
Smetana's Dalibor is regarded as a great
Although it
national Czechoslovak artistic inheritance.
So, too, are Smetana's The Bartered Bride,
which also has had substantial success
outside of Bohemia, and Dvorak's Rusalka,
which never has; but Dalibor is a different
case, for it is neither a comic work making
use of familiar folk materials and usages
nor a poetic fantasy, but a full-scale national
opera of heroic scope, a forceful. highly
dramatic work of war and passion and
intrigue, calling for the all out efforts of a big
opera house.
Smetana was
a
thoroughly
competent composer, at his best one whose
expressive abilities matched his intellectual
and emotional grasp, and in the libretto
of Dalibor he found a text that inspired
him to the full. There is in it a certain
mixture of influences, for when he composed it Smetana was a sophisticated,
educated musician of 1865, not unaffected
by the currents that were in the air. But
it is also an individual work and one of
really remarkable impact, not as peculiarly
national as the great Russian nationalistic
operas of the nineteenth century but in
It is certainly
many ways better made.
worth hearing, and more times than once
or twice.
The Supraphon performance,
which uses singers from the national opera
house in Prague, most of them good and
at least two really outstanding, was made in
the company's Prague studios. Technically
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
is innocent of any
precise specification of content; so the
average listener must either ignore the
plot, and the jacket
story or take it largely on faith.
J. H., JR.
STRAUSS, RICHARD
Arabella (excerpts)
Elisabeth Schwarzkopf heads the superb
cast of the new Angel Wiener Blut set.
is not in the same class as the best contemporary Western recordings, but it is
generally acceptable in clarity, especially
when solo voices only are concerned, and
although big climaxes seem to level off or
distort at a relatively low ceiling there is,
most of the time, sufficient sense of space.
With some reservations, recommended to
those interested in the better grade of
J. H., JR.
operatic curiosa.
it
STRAUSS, JOHANN
Wiener Blut
Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (s), Emmy Loose
(s), Nicolai Gedda (t), Erich Kunz (b).
and
others;
Alois Pernerstorfer (bs),
Philharmonia Orchestra and chorus, Otro
Ackermann, cond.
ANGEL 35156. Two 12 -in. (three sides).
$11.90.
The last of Johann Strauss' operettas,
Wiener Blut, is actually made up of preexistent music fitted, with Strauss' auth.
orization, to the libretto in 1899. The fact
that he did not live to compose new music
and supervise the fitting -to -words of the
old makes very little difference in the final
quality of the piece, which in plot and
general atmosphere is of the same family
All of which is to say
as Die Fledermaus.
that lovers of the Angel recording of The
Merry Widow and the London recording
of Die Fledermaus will very likely want
to add this Wiener Blut to their list. The
entire cast, both vocally and in point of
which is, after all, the enduring
style
is
appeal of recordings of this sort
superb, and so is the conducting of Otto
Ackermann and the E. M. I. engineering.
J. H., JR.
Highly recommended.
-
-
STRAUSS, JOHANN
Der Ziguenerbaron (excerpts)
Hilde Zadek (s), Rosette Anday (ms),
Julius Patzak (t), Kurt Preger (bs); Vienna
Philharmonic Orchestra and chorus of
the Vienna Staatsoper, Clemens Krauss,
cond.
LONDON LL 648. 12 -in. $4.98.
There would not be much point now in
asserting the high place of Der Zigeunerbaron
A product of his best
in Strauss' output.
years, it is firmly established as the prototype of Viennese operettas of the HunTaken from the
garian -gypsy variety.
excellent complete London recording, these
excerpts are masterfully conducted and
Unhappily, no text is provided,
sung.
there is only a general recounting of the
Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (s), Arabella; Anny
Felbermayer (s), Zdenka; Nicolai Gedda
(t), Matteo; Murray Dickie (t), Waiter
and Count Elemer; Josef Metternich (b),
Mandryka; Harald Pröglhöf (bs), Count
Dominik; Walter Berry (bs), Count Lamoral; Theodor Schlott (bs), Count Waldner;
Philharmonia Orchestra, Lovro von Matacic, cond.
ANGEL 35194. 12 -in. $5.95.
which has waited more than
20 years since its premiere to reach the
United States, is being done this season
at the Metropolitan in an English translaArabella,
tion by John Gutman. We owe Angel a
debt of gratitude for having given us the
first extensive advance sampling of its
music in recorded form. As early as 1916.
during the give-and -take of revisions of
Ariadne auf Naxos, Strauss approached
Hugo von Hoffmansthal, the librettist of
Der Rosenkavalier and Ariadne and a playwright of established excellence, on the
subject of a libretto that would be "a
realistic comedy with true and interesting
He was fishing for a
human beings."
successor to Der Rosenkavalier, but he was
willing to settle for a libretto that would
give him words for a comedy "full of
satire, like Offenbach." In the end he
got what he had wanted at first, but with a
difference. It was not until ¡927 that the
subject that was to be Arabella came up
again; not until Hofmannsthal's death,
in 1927, that the problems were all solved;
and not until just before the premiere
in 1932, that the score was completed.
In a sense, Arabella ended by actually
in the
being a second Rosenkavalier
sense that anyone who finds in himself
an affinity for the Mozartean, yet sentimental, side of Strauss should have a
difficult time deciding which score he
loves more. But it is also Arabella, lighter
-
and even less Wagnerian, and no one
need love it less for that. The story, which
too complex to
is extremely complex
has to do with a family,
recount in detail
aristocratic but no longer well-to -do, in
which there are two daughters, Arabella
and Zdenka. The one is brilliantly lovely,
much sought after, and highly romantic;
the other is sweet and gentle. Arabella
has many suitors, but she waits for "Der
which can be translated as
Richtiger"
"the right one." He comes, in the person
of the young Mandryka, who has fallen
in love with her picture. There are complications, numerous complications, the
last of which arises out of a false assignation
engineered by Zdenka, out of the best
possible motives. But all ends, not happily
merely, but in a maturer kind of the same
ecstasy captured in the final Rosenkavalier
duet between Sophie and Octavian.
that is to say, the portion
The music
of it to be heard here is lovely, not
merely in its tunes and the treatment of
them, but in the total effect of musical and
dramatic rightness and cultivation. Here
are not only the lyrical climaxes, which
in themselves would be enough to win the
- -
susceptible, but the wonderfully fitting
treatment of conversational episodes into
the musical fabric, the familiar perfection
of Strauss' control of ensemble writing.
Without any background of stage performance, it would be rash to attempt to
say very much about that of the recording.
Elisabeth Schwarzkopf has been in better
form from the purely vocal standpoint,
but she sings with a purity and beauty
of phrase that are hard to resist, and Josef
Metternich, without always seeming to give
sufficient attention to the text, sings with
great tonal beauty as Mandryka.
Anny
Felbermayer is sensitive and musical as
Zdenka, and all of the other members of the
cast are adequate or better. Under Lovro
von Matacic the Philharmonia men play
Engineering:
Close -to on the
cleanly.
voices, without flattering them; orchestral
sound is not as sharply defined as might
J. H., JR.
be wanted.
STRAUSS, RICHARD
Operatic Excerpts
Nocturne and Finale: "Wo ist
Capriccio
-
mein Bruder?;" Ariadne
gibt ein Reich;" Arabella
auf Naxos
-Act II,
Mandryka duet: "Der Richtiger,
still zu mir gesagt."
so
-
"Es
Arabella-
hab' ich
Lisa della Casa (s), Paul Schoeffler (b),
Franz Bierbach (bs); Vienna Philharmonic
Orchestra, Heinrich Hollreiser, cond.
LONDON LL 1047. 12 -in. $4.98.
Lisa della Casa is known in this country
-
primarily as a singer of Mozart and Wagner,
which only
but her career in Europe
has been intimately
began in 1943
bound up with the luminous later operas of
Richard Strauss.
Hearing her in this
music
which, unhappily, is known little
or not at all in this country
gives an
interesting and flattering perspective on her
as an artist. As William Mann points out
in his excellent notes (no texts at all are
fact that is almost disqualifyprovided
ing, particularly where Capriccio is concerned),
Strauss felt free with Ariadne auf Naxos
to declare that he had "cast off the whole
armor of Wagner for ever." Whether or not
he could completely forget all he had
learned from Wagner or not may be
questioned, but the key to his last operas
is their lyricism and melodic flow rather
than any piling up of instrumental effects.
The near- classic line of the Ariadne
aria, with its ecstatic plea for death, is so
-
-
-
-a
-
-
-
Lisa della Casa: singing so lovely as to
make "highlights" a sin against Strauss.
67
FEBRUARY, 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
RECORDS
moving and so beautifully sung as to make
it a matter for real regret that the recorded
performance stops short instead of continuing on through the marvelous final
duet between Ariadne and Bacchus. The
Act II duet from Arabella makes possible
an interesting comparison with the same
duet as it is sung in the Angel release of
excerpts by Elisabeth Schwarzkopf and
Josef Metternich; for beauty of tone, the
Angel artists have an edge, but so far as
possession of the materials is concerned,
I am not sure that Miss Della Casa and
Paul Schoeffler do not surpass them. As
for the final monologue from Capriccio,
the composer's last opera of all, it is surely
one of the greatest things in operatic music,
and Miss Della Casa sings it with complete
artistry and a wonderful inwardness that
leaves a glow behind. The engineering is
perhaps not London's best, but it is still
J. H., JR.
very good.
TCHAIKOVSKY
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. t,
flat minor, Op. 23; Concerto for
Piano and Orchestra, No. 2, in G
major, Op. 44
in B
Edith Farnadi; Orchestra of the Vienna
State Opera, Hermann Scherchen, cond.
WESTMINSTER WL 5309.
I2 -in. 32, 33 min.
55.95.
Aggressive, overwrought readings by Scherchen of the two piano concertos, which
substantiate the impression gained from
his previous skirmishes with the music
of Tchaikovsky that he has little feeling,
except perhaps ill feeling, for this composer.
Miss Farnadi struggles manfully
with her task, but seems to be the innocent
capricious
victim of the conductor's
ideas. The G major is a trifle more disr.,
but
Scherchen
than
No.
creetly handled
drives the finale overstrenuously and can
be heard urging his players to even greater
heights towards the end of the movement.
No laurels can be awarded either to Westminster's engineers, who have provided
an unbearably piercing sound, which no
amount of knob turning can properly
equate; the piano tone emerges inflexible
J. F. I.
and wiry.
TCHAIKOVSKY
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in
D, Op. 35
David Oistrakh, violin; Saxon State Orchestra, Dresden, Franz Konwitschny, cond.
DECCA DL 9755.
12-in.
35 min.
$4.98.
We have had such a glut of inferior sounding
Oistrakh recordings, mostly processed from
Russian tapes of assorted vintages, that
any recording presenting the Russian
artist in a setting of reasonably modern
sound is particularly welcome. Although
the fi in Decca's sound is not very hi, it
does capture quite well the violinist's
suave tone in a performance that is rich,
Oclyrical, intense and finely grained.
casionally the soloist is carried away by
his own virtuosity, but these excesses are
minor flaws in a most arresting performance,
that may safely be called one of the best
currently available.
The orchestral support is solid, but on
the discreet side, and not as well defined
J. F. I.
as it might be.
68
tHaydn:
in D
Concerto
for Flute and Strings,
Hubert Barwahser; Vienna Symphony Orchestra, Bernhard Paumgartner, cond.
EPIC LC
3075.
12
-in. 26, 24 min. $3.98.
The engineers have made the flute sound
overblown and the violins cutting in both.
The very captivating Telemann Suite has received much better treatment from the
Zimbler Sinfonietta on Decca (8522), and the
Concerto attributed to Haydn, modernized
in this version, exists on a Urania disk (7031)
so differently conceived that the two records
seem to contain antagonistic music This
is not one of Epic's successes.
C. G. B.
TEMPLETON, ALEC
Oistrakh's Tchaikovsky Concerto, abetted
by adequate sound, is a front -rank entry.
TCHAIKOVSKY
-
The Nutcracker, Op. 71
Complete Ballet
Symphony Orchestra of Radio Berlin, Otto
Dobrindt, cond.
URANIA URLP 237. Two 12 -in.
hr. 28 min.
1
57.96.
ago Mercury issued a splashy
version of the complete Nutcracker, which
I confess I found cold, a trifle too calculated
and lacking in humor, but undeniably impressive for its graphic and spectacular
sound (who could forget that musket
shot?). I am sure this was a minority report
and that most people interested in the work
snapped up the album, particularly since the
outlook for a competitive version seemed
rather dim. Now from Urania comes a rival
version, and a very good one too, to reward those with a little more patience. The
vivid clarity of the Mercury sound is not
seriously challenged by Urania's warmer,
more mellifluous recording, but the latter
is considerably more appropriate to the
proper consummation of a ballet score on
records. Dobrindt has a lighter, more flexible manner of handling the score than
Dorati, and under his direction the work
flows with more smoothness and sustained
continuity. The inherent joviality is very
nicely conveyed, without becoming too
riotous and out of hand. The orchestral
playing is always first class, but lacks the
precision of the Minneapolis players. J. F. I.
A year or so
TCHAIKOVSKY
Beauty- Ballet Suite
Symphony Orchestra of Radio Berlin, Adolf
Fritz Guhl, cond.
URANIA URLP 7127. 12 -in. 55 min. $3.98.
The Sleeping
Twenty excerpts, the core of Tchaikovsky's
brilliant ballet score are endisked here, in a
recording more correctly labeled, on the
record itself, as "Ballet Suite" (with no
opus number) than on the record sleeve as
"Ballet Opus 66." In any case, this is more
of the score than has been issued previously
on any one 12 -inch LP, an advantage somewhat negated by a performance that is too
sober and lacking in the magic necessary to
illuminate this fanciful fairy tale. Urania's
sound, often overbright and heavily weighted
in favor of the drums, is troublesome to
J. F. L
equalize properly.
TELEMANN
Suite for Flute and Strings, in A minor
Trio; Quartet Pastorale
Julius Baker, flute; Albert Goltzer, oboe; and
Alec Templeton, piano (in Trio). Phoenix
Quartet.
ESOTERIC
ES
533. 12 -in. 15, 23 min. $5.95.
Alec Templeton wrote his Trio at the age of
18, when he was a freshman at the Royal
College of Music in London, and with it
won first prize in composition in a contest
whose judges included Ralph Vaughan
Williams. Scored for the attractive combination of flute, oboe and piano, it rolls along
tidily in a style that might be called Ravel and-water. Of far greater interest is the
Quartet, composed in 1948. Without being
particularly original, the style now is less
patently derivative; the workmanship is
more closely knit, more finished. Yet both
works have in common an ingratiating
melodiousness, a quick appeal and an easy
good nature that should win them friends
among some listeners. Good performances;
clear, close -to sound.
R. E.
THOMSON, VIRGIL
Filling Station
'Kay: Western Symphony
New York City Ballet Orchestra, Leon
Barzin, cond.
Vox PL 9050. 12 -in. 27, 20 mins. $5.95.
Two Americanistic ballet scores. Hershy
Kay's Western Symphony is a clever, fast moving skein of folk tunes, always obvious
and sometimes cheap. Virgil Thomson's
Filling Station, on the other hand, is a genuinely creative work. It is full of shrewd
satiric insights, both musical and dramatic;
the piece is beautifully organized and illuminated by Thomson's characteristic mastery of transparent textures. The recording
of the Kay is better than that of the Thomson.
A. F.
TORELLI, GIUSEPPE
Twelve Concerti, Op. 8
Reinhold Barchet, Will Beh, violins; Helma
Elsner, harpsichord; Pro Musica String
Orchestra, Stuttgart, Rolf Reinhardt, cond.
VOX DL 113. Three 12-in. $17.85.
Torelli was one of the first in the great line
of Italian violinist- composers that is usually
considered to begin with his contemporary,
Corelli, in the seventeenth century and that
ended with Paganini in the nineteenth.
Opus 8, his last and most important work,
consists of six concerti grossi, in which two
violins form the concertino, and six concertos for a solo violin and strings. The
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
latter are probably the first true violin concertos but there is nothing primitive about
them. This is clean, healthy music, not very
profound. perhaps, but enjoyable in reasonable doses. Any one of the concerti grossi
could make an excellent opening number
for a program of recorded music at home.
Of the violin concertos, I found those in
E minor (No. 9) and F major (No. 11) especially attractive, and only the one in A
(No. to) uninteresting. The performances
are spirited; the fast movements have plenty
of verve and in the slow movements Reinhardt keeps things going nicely. The only
criticism I have of the recording is the faintness of the harpsichord in the concerti
N. B.
grossi.
VERDI
Rigoletto (excerpts)
Giuseppe Verdi: Rigoletto (opera in three
acts; libretto in Italian by F. M. Piave, after
Hugo's Le Roi S'Amuse). Excerpts: Act I:
quella (Duke); Pari AIM through
duet to O veglia donna (Rigoletto, Gilda,
Giovanna); Gualtier Malde! and Caro nome
Questa
o
Act II: Parmi veder (Duke); from
through Cortigiani! (courtiers and Rigoletto). Act III: La donna e
mobile (Duke): Bella figlia dell' amore (Gilda,
Maddalena, Duke, Rigoletto).
(Gilda).
Povero
Rigoletto
Lina Pagliughi (s), Gilda; Irma Colsanti
(ms), Maddalena; Ines Marietti (s), Page;
Tilde Fiorio (ms), Giovanna; Ferruccio
Tagliavini (t), Duke; Giuseppe Taddei (b).
Rigoletto; Alberto Albertini (b), Marullo;
Mario Zorgniotti (bs), Ceprano. Orchestra
of Radiotelevisione Italiana. Turin, and Cetra
Chorus; Angelo Questa, cond.
CETRA A- 50166. I2 -in. $4.98.
work peculiarly resistant to being cut
into highlights -length chunks and disposed
of on a twelve -inch record, Rigoletto has a
number of such treatments in the catalog
five in all. Of them, the newest, by Cetra,
is one of the best, although the real strength
of the set from which it is drawn lies not so
much in the brightness of its highlights as in
the consistency of its quality, and arias tend
to bring out the worst rather than the best
in Ferruccio Tagliavini. Why anyone would
be content with any highlights- from -Rigoletto record when the whole opera can be
had is hard to understand, but those who
would be might find the RCA Victor exception more to their taste, while those
interested in fewer chunks but more good
meat might profitably look into the older
Cetra release that has duets between Gilda
and Rigoletto superbly sung by a younger
Miss Pagliughi and Alexander Sved at the
J. H.. Jr.
top of his career
For
a
-
VICTORIA
Missa pro Dejunctis; Magnificat
-
VIVES, AMADEO
Doña Francisquita
Maria de los Angeles Morales (s), Ana
Maria Iriarte (ms), Maria Dolores Garcia
(s), Angelita Calvo, (ms), Maria Carmen
Perez Parral. (ms), Carlos Munguia (t),
Julio Uribe (t), José Maria Maiza (b), Juan
Andia (b). Juan del Campo (t), Chorus of the
Orfeon Donostiarra de San Sebastian and
symphony orchestra, Ataulfo Argenta, cond.
Synopsis but no libretto.
LONDON TW 91005 -06. Two 12 -in. $9.96.
Born in 1871, Amadeo Vives turned out to
be one of the most prolific of Spanish stage
composers, the author of numerous operas
and something like 6o zarzuela[. Of these,
it is said
the most
Dopa Francisquita is
popular. It is not difficult to understand why,
for the score is melodious and well made,
and there is some reason to suspect that for
a Spanish -speaking audience the words
would also hold rewards. Vives' music is
seldom what most non -Spaniards would call
Spanish, except in a few dance rhythms, a
few cadences; and though its date is 1923,
there is little to place it definitely in this
Some of it sounds like Italian
century.
opera buffa, some of it like French operetta,
but not very much.
some like Viennese
-
-
-
Lecco
The six -voiced Missa is one of the great
works of Victoria, and indeed of the late
Renaissance. It is full of the intensity typical of that master at his best. This intensity
is sometimes expressed by understatement.
as at the Latin words meaning "I am made
to tremble and I fear the judgment and wrath
which are yet to come, when the heavens
and earth shall be moved," where an unex-
FEBRUARY, 1955
...
IV Toni
of the Choral Academy,
(Italy), Guido Camillucci, cond.
Vox PI. 893o. 12 -in. $5.95.
Choir
petted effect is produced by the reduction
of the texture to three voices. The work is
full of beauty of line, powerful harmonies
and masterful counterpoint. Unfortunately,
The
the performance is not very good.
women's voices are unsteady in spots, some
of the attacks are tentative, and there is some
overaccentuation of strong beats. The review disk crackled a bit, and the lower
voices in tutti sounded blurred. The title of
the Missa and the notes on the sleeve are
rather misleading. We read: "A great proportion of (Victoria's) work is devoted to
and Offices for the Dead "
Requiems
Actually, Victoria, as far as is known, wrote
Requiem
Mass so labelled and one
only one
the present work,
Office for the Dead
which comprises not only a Missa pro Defunctis but also a motet (Versa est), a responsory (Libera me), and a Lesson (Taedet
animam meam). The Magnificat is one of two
that Victoria wrote on the Fourth Tone (not
"in IV Tones," as the sleeve has it). In this
one, the odd -numbered verses are chanted
and the even -numbered ones are set polyphonically. The Latin texts and an English
N. B.
translation are given.
Thomson: his ballet -suite Filling
Station shows "shrewd satiric insight."
Virgil
It ends by sounding like itself, which is to
say bright, full of good humor, and often
quite pretty. Libretto or no libretto, it is
nevera bore. The principal singers, especially
Maria de los Angeles Morales and Ana
Maria Iriarte and one of the tenors, whom I
take to be Carlos Munguia, are fresh- sounding and competent or better, and the whole
performance moves with good pace under
Ataulfo Argenta. Engineering: listenably
modern, but not of a quality to make it
suitable for equipment demonstrations. Off
the beaten path, but attractive enough to
J. H., JR.
try.
WOLF
Italienisches Liederbuch (22 songs)
[Brahms: Six Songs and Folksongs
Hugo Wolf:
Auch kleine Dinge;
Mir ward
gesagt; Wer reif dich denn? Du denkst mit
einem Fadchen mich zu fangen; Wie lange
schon war immer mein Verlangen; Nun,
junger Herr; Mein Liebster ist so klein; Ihr
jungen Leute; Wir haben beide lange Zeit
Mein Liebster singt;
Man
geschwitgen;
tagt mir; Mein Liebster hat zu Tische mich
geladen; Du sagst mir; Wohl kann ich euren
Stand; Was soll der Zorn; Wenn du, mein
Liebster, steigst zum Himmel auf; Gesegnet
sei das Grin; O wär dein Haut durchsichtig
wie ein Glas; Heut Nacht erhobt ich mich;
Schweig' einmal still; Verschlin der Abgrund
meines Liebsten Hitte; Ich hab in Penna einen
Liebsten wohnen.
Johannes
Die Trauernde; Die
Brahms:
Schwälble ziehet fort. from Deutsches Volkslieder: Feinliebchen; Schwesterlein; In stiller
Nacht. Vergebliches Ständchen.
soprano;
Irmgard Seefried,
Erik Werba,
piano.
DECCA DL 9743.
12
-in. $4.98.
In the seventh year of LP, there are still
only ,o recordings of songs by Hugo
Wolf listed in the catalog. Since he is
commonly regarded as one of the greatest
of all composers in this form, the inequity
or at least it is shockis a little shocking
ing to realize how limited an opportunity
many record listeners have had to find out
at first hand why he is ranked so high.
This new Decca release, along with recordings last year by Hans Hotter (Angel)
and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (RCA Victor),
should help stimulate interest, for the Wolf
literature is vast and extremely rich. Much
of Wolf is deeply serious, but the songs
that make up his Italienisches Liederbuch
They fit their texts, which are
are not.
drawn from the stylized, at least half mocking love poetry of late -Renaissance
The music is not in the least
Venice.
Italianate in any conventional sense, but
in its glossy surfaces, its tongue -in -cheek
elaboration of sentiments that are more
manners of speaking than properly sentiments at all, it colors each syllable. They
are delightful songs, and there is about
Irmgard Seefried's singing of them a kind
of spontaneous personal communication
that allows her to project everything in
them. Hers is a voice with rather more
color and individuality than most German Austrian lyric sopranos have, and she uses
it musically and with fine control. The
six Brahms songs that fill out the odd
side are well chosen to contrast with the
mercurial, sophisticated Wolf songs, and
-
69
KI(
(
ltl
Dialing Your Disks
reduced and bass increased to restore the
original balance.
Control positions on
equalizers are identified in different ways,
but equivalent markings are listed at the
top of each column in the table below. This
table covers most of the records sold in
America during the past few years, with the
emphasis on LP. Some older LPs and 78s
Records are made with the treble range
boosted to mask surface noise, and the bass
range reduced in volume to conserve groove
pace and reduce distortion. When the
records are played, therefore, treble must be
TURNOVER
400
500
Soo (MoD.)
RIAA
RECORD LABEL
AES
(old)
ABS
(new)
ROLLOFF AT toKC
16 db
NARTB
LP
RCA
NAB(Old)
COL
ORIG. LP
ORTHO
RIAA
LON
COL
LON
LP
ORIG. LP
Allied
Angel
Atlantic *1
Amer. Rec. Soc.*
Bartok
Blue Note Jazz*
Boston*
Caedmon
Canyon*
Capitol*
Capitol -Cetra
Cetra -Soria
Colosseum*
Columbia*
Concert Hall*
Contemporary*
Cook (SOOT)1
Decca*
EMS*
Elektra
Epic*
Esoteric
Folkways (most)
Good -Time Jazz*
Haydn Soc.*
L'Oiseau -Lyre*
London*
Lyrichord, new *2
Mercury*
MGM
Oceanic*
Pacific Jazz
Philharmonia*
Polymusic*1
RCA Victor
Remington*
Riverside
Romany
Savoy
Tempo
Urania, most*
Urania, some
Vanguard*
Bach Guild*
Vox*
Walden
Westminster
*Beginning sometime in 1954, records made from new masters require RIAA equalization for both
bass and treble.
Binaural records produced on this label are recorded to NARTB standards on the outside band.
On the inside band, NARTB is used for low frequencies but the treble is recorded flat, without pre emphasis.
Some older releases used the old Columbia curve, others old AES.
70
Continued from page 69
10.5 -13.5 db
AES
RCA
ORTHO
NAB
NARTB
required Boo -cycle turnover; some foreign
78s are recorded with Soo -cycle turnover
and zero or 5 -db treble boost. One -knob
equalizers should be set for proper turnover,
and the treble tone control used for further
correction if required. In all cases, the proper settings of controls are those that
sound best.
-
Miss Seefried sings them exceedingly
well
especially In Miller Nacht, where
the simplicity of line and beauty of phrasing
are extraordinary.
Erik Werba's accompaniments are very good.
Engineering:
by Deutsche Grammophon; the sound
is clean, natural and consistently balanced
for the most part, but the piano may be a
little recessive for some tastes; not much
sense of space, but none of crowding, either;
good surfaces. Recommended J. H., JR.
COLLECTIONS AND
MISCELLANY
HOMAGE TO DIAGHILEFF
Parade; Weber -Berlioz: Le Spectre
de la rose; Debussy: L'Après-midi d'un
faune; Ravel: Daphnis and Chloe
Suite
No. z; Tchaikovsky: Les Sylphides
Mazurka; Scarlatti -Tommasini: Les Femmes
de Bonne Humeur; De Falla: The Three
Cornered Hat
Miller's dance; Prokofieff:
Le Pas d'acier; Liadoff: Kikimora; Stravinsky:
Satie:
--
Petrouchka
-
-
Three Dances.
Philharmonia Orchestra, Igor Markevitch,
tond.
ANGEL
35í8C. Three 12-in.
t
hr 14 min.
$17.85.
Angel's "Homage to Diaghilev," an anthology of music from ballets associated
with the great Russian impresario, will
provoke the same sort of questions that
follow the publication of any anthology.
Why is this in? Why is that out? Such
questions, in this case, will seem perfectly
justified, for far too little imagination
seems to have been used in the selection
of the works (or parts of works) included
here. There are two novelties, neither of
which are available on LP; Prokofieff's
Le pas d'acier and Liadoff's Kikimora (the
latter a short section from the ballet "Contes
Russes "). The excellent Parade of Satie
is welcome, but the remainder are rather
stale crumbs. Surely from the vast repertoire of Diaghileff productions we might
have been offered such nonrecorded items
as Lambert's Romeo and Juliet, Sauguet's
La Chatte or Milhaud's Le Train Bleu
in place of another Spectre de la rose, L'Aprismidi d'un faune or the Mazurka from
Les Sylphides.
Considering the long, successful Stravinsky -Diaghileff partnership,
why not a complete Stravinsky ballet
score, instead of the three excerpts from
Petrouchka which we are offered? In all
fairness it must be added that the album
does give us a reasonable picture of classical
and modern ballet to 1929.
Shortly before Diaghileff died in 1929,
he had discovered a "genius" of 17, Igor
Markevitch, to whom the direction of these
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
The
performances has been entrusted.
results are not particularly stimulating;
despite his background, they have little
ballet style; and though agreeably played
and well reproduced, there are some strong
personal ideas about tempos that are hard
to understand. On the other hand, Angel has
really outdone itself in the accompanying
booklet, which is quite the best I have ever
seen issued with any LP album. The art
work throughout is superb. The numerous
and, in some cases, rare photographs of
Diaghileff and his associates are interspersed with excellent articles by Markevitch (on Diaghileff), Vuillermoz (on
Diaghileff and music) and Michel Georges Michel (on Diaghileff and the painters).
Cyril
Beaumont
contributes informative
program notes on the ballets, and special
notice should be drawn to a letter in the
incredible handwriting of Boris Kochno,
addressed to Diaghileff, 25 years after
the latter's death.
Since none of these records can be
purchased singly in Angel's Factory Sealed
package, couplings are listed for those
interested in obtaining individual items
No booklet with
in the Thrift package.
characterization brought to its height.
Whether it cackles, whimpers, cajoles,
derides, laughs or leers this voice never
fails to illuminate the song and bring to
life the characters in it. Of course, she
was fortunate in having writers like Xanrof,
Bruant and Jouy, who could supply her
with material that fitted her like the long
black gloves that were her trade mark.
Some of these songs had a certain vulgarity
it is true, but Guilbert handled such things
with a naiveté of delivery that, while
heightening the effect, never made them
obnoxious.
The collection here is of some of her
early and most successful songs. To hear
her sing "Le Fiacre," with its cabbie cry,
is like hearing the song for the first time,
no matter how often you may have been
Listen
subjected to it by other singers.
to the malicious innuendo of her "Madame
HINDEMITH
Kleine Kammermusik, Opus 24, No. 2.
Wind Ensemble of the Orchestre National
-
de la Radiodiffusion Francaise.
12 -in.
12, 7, 6, ro min.
ANGEL 35079.
$5.95.
-
A genuine high fidelity nut would do well
to stock his library richly with recordings
of wind instruments, for the flute, all the
GREGORIAN CHANT
Easter Liturgy; Christmas Cycle.
reeds, and the horn record exceptionally
du Saint -Esprit du
La Schola
Grand Scholasticat de Chevilly, Lucien
Deiss, cond.
ANGEL 35116. 12 -in. $5.95.
des
Pères
The complete Mass for Easter Sunday
and various chants from the music for the
Christmas season, beautifully sung by a
group of French monks and well recorded
These
on practically noiseless surfaces.
glorious chants are among the most elaborate in the Gregorian repertory, and it is
saddening to think how infrequently they
Catholic
in American
performed
Students who have the imchurches.
pression that all notes except final ones are
of equal value in the Solesmes method
should listen to this record to hear how
flexible and full of nuance that method
Angel supplies the Latin texts
can be.
N. B.
and English translations.
are
YVETTE GUILBERT
Song Recital
Yvette
Guilbert
by
Toulouse- Lautrec
Arthur," or the deliciously ironical statement of her preference for old gentlemen
over younger
rivals, the pathetic
drama
of "D'elle ii lui," or the quite irresistible
delivery of " Partie carée," and you will find
ample evidence of a unique artist, worthy
of the legend that surrounds her name.
These are transfers from French HMV
78s recorded in the late 1920s.
The voice
comes through with great vibrancy, and
the piano tone is adequate. The jacket
notes comprise a touching tribute to
Guilbert, who died in 1944, are by
Angel also supplies
Carl Van Vechten.
J. F. I.
texts of the songs.
Yvette Guilbert, diseuse; Irène Aitoff, piano.
ANGEL 64011. 10 -in. 25 min. $3.95.
BRAHMS
Hungarian Dances Nos.
TCHAI KO V SKY
Waltz- Scherzo, Op. 34
This isn't exactly a pretty voice, but then
Yvette Guilbert wasn't exactly a pretty
not as ugly, she once said, as
woman
Toulouse -Lautrec made her appear in his
Hers
posters, but certainly very plain.
was the art of vocal manipulation and
-
FEBRUARY, 1955
5,
9
-
ORGAN RECITALS
The King of Instruments, Vol. II
MI ASKO V SKY
Violin Concerto, Op. 44
GLIERE
Romance for Violin and Orchestra, Op.
i
well. On this particular disk there is some
excellent music too.
se chauffer
The French have a proverb
d la cheminée du Roi René (to warm one's
which means
self at King René's hearth)
to bask in the sun. Milhaud's title refers
not only to the proverb but to the King
René of history, who ruled peacefully at
Aix -en- Provence, Milhaud's birthplace, in
the fifteenth century. The piece is a suite
in seven movements delightfully suggesting medieval ceremonies and entertainments, the songs, of trouvères, jousts,
the hunt, and the quiet well -being of
The Deux Esquisses, which
René's realm.
follow on the same side, are movements
of much greater intensity and power; they
are, in fact, compositions of considerable
symphonic eloquence, despite their relatively short duration. Ibert's Trois Pila
Brèves are in a tuneful, slapstick style;
the Hindemith is in that composer's best
A. F.
Gothic, Eulenspiegelish vein.
-
L'H,5tel de numero 3. Madame
Arthur. La complainte des quatre étudiants.
D'elle d lui L'éloge des Vieux. Verligodin.
Partie tarée. Les vieux Messieurs.
Le Fiacre.
So
decidedly of the nineteenth century.
far as can be determined, Oistrakh gives
virtuosic
and
another of his fabulously
But the resilken -toned performances.
production is as bad as anything yet turned
out either by the Soviet engineers or
Colosseum. It is hard, rough and outSurely,
rageously distorted in sound.
everyone concerned could have done much
better by this phenomenal fiddler, and it is
devoutly to be hoped that a more felicitous
transfer to disks will be forthcoming from
some quarter. The encore pieces by Glière,
Brahms and Tchaikovsky, all previously
recorded by Oistrakh, are presented with
P. A.
spirit.
IBERT
Trois Pièces Brèves
Record No. 35151: Parade. Le spectre
de la rose. Prelude a l'après -midi d'un faune.
Suite No. 2,
Daphnis and Chloe
Suite.
Record No. 35152. Swan Lake
Les femmes de
Les Sylphides- Mazurka.
bonne humeur. The Three Cornered Hat
Miller's dance.
Record No. 35153. Le pas d'acier. Kiki.
Three dances.
mora. Petrouchka
J. F. I.
-
Nicolai Miaskovsky (1881.195o), one of
the leading Soviet composers, wrote 27
symphonies but only one violin concerto,
which receives its first recording here. It
is a lyrical work, with many grateful passages for the solo instrument, but it is
MILHAUD
La Cheminée du Roi René; Deux Esquisses
these.
-
piano, in the Brahms and Tchaikovsky.
COLOSSEUM CRLP 149. 12 -in. $5.95.
3
and 8
National PhilDavid Oistrakh, violin.
harmonic Orchestra; Alexander Gauk, cond.,
in the Miaskovsky; Kiril Kondrashin,
cond., in the Glabre. Vladimir Yampolsky,
Bach: Three Schrïbier Chorales (Kommst du
nun, Jesu, vom Himmel herunter; Meine
Seele erhebet den Herrn; Wo soll ich fliehen
hin); Trio Sonata No. r, in E flat major.
Vivaldi-Bach: Allegro from Conterto in A
Minor. Davies, Sir Henry Walford: A
Litanies.
Alain, Jehan:
Solemn Melody.
Langlais, Jean: hymn ¿Actions de Graces;
Te Deum from Trois Paraphrases Grégoriennes. Sowerby, Leo: Carillon.
Roy Perry, George Faxon, and staff members
71
of the Aeolian- Skinner Organ Company,
organists.
AEOLIAN -SKINNER ORGAN COMPANY. I2in. 41 min. $5.00 postpaid from factory,
Boston 25, Mass.
The King of Instruments, Vol. III
Walther, Johann Gottfried: Chorale variations on Meinen Jesum lass ich nicht. Bach:
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland; Nun freut
euch, lieben Christen, g' mein. Handel: Concerto No. 2, in B flat major. Daquin: Noel,
Grand Jeu et Duo. Vierne: Carillon de
L'AtcenWestminster. Messiaen, Olivier:
Lion, Méditation Symphonique No. 4.
Robert Owen, organ.
AEOLIAN -SKINNER ORGAN COMPANY, 12in. 44 min. $5.00 postpaid from factory,
Boston 25, Mass.
Musicfor the Organ, Vol. II
Vierne:
Scherzo from Symphony No. 2.
Reger: Weihnachten 1914. Widor: Andante from the Gothic Symphony. Dandrieu:
Dialogue and Musette. Karg- Elert: 0 Gott,
Pachelbel:
Ach, was
du frommer Gott.
soll ich Sander machen? Schroeder, Hermann:
Bach:
Prelude and
Schönster Herr Jesu.
Fugue in C Major.
Edward Linzel, Ernest White, organists.
M. P. MOLLER, INC. (Hagerstown, Md.)
12 -in. 36 min. $5.95.
Having had so much success with their
initial demonstration records, Aeolian Skinner and Möller have issued additional
Aeolian- Skinner has moved on
ones.
from Vol. I, a demonstration of organ
stops and combinations, to Vol. II, devoted
to organ music in a variety of styles played
those in Symon three different organs
phony Hall, Boston; the First Presbyterian
Church, Kilgore, Tex.; and the Cathedral
Church of St. Paul, Boston. More than
In Vol. III,
one organist is involved.
a single organist plays a similar range of
music on one instrument, the organ at
Christ Church, Bronxville, N. Y. Möller's
Vol. I demonstrated the versatility of a
Vol.
single medium -sized instrument.
-
II demonstrates: (I) a larger instrument,
the one at the George Washington Memorial
Shrine in Alexandria, Va., played by Linzel;
(2) a very small instrument, a two- manual
organ called "The Double Artiste," played
by White.
All the instruments involved succeed
in showing what the manufacturers claim,
that their organs are designed to have
the utmost clarity at all times and to be
adaptable to all kinds of music
baroque,
romantic and modern. Miller's Alexandria
organ produces a more massive tone than
any of the others, but is nonetheless brilliant for that. The performances in every
case have an efficiency, care and knowledgeableness that makes them practically
unexceptionable.
The Sowerby Carillon
could stand a more romantic treatment
in the manner of Farnam, perhaps
and some of the Bach performances lean
towards the pedantically dry; but this
is surely a question of individual taste.
Specifications for the organs are given in
the case of Aeolian- Skinner Vol. Ill and
Möller Vol. II; Aeolian- Skinner gives
registration details for many works on
both Vols. H and III. Most organists will
be interested its all three disks. The non-
-
--
72
organist should find the Aeolian- Skinner
Vol. III most rewarding. The repertoire
is not novel, but it is almost all substantial
(I, personally, dislike the Messiaen) and
is quite beautifully played by Robert
Owen.
R. E.
PIANO ENCORES
Paul Badura -Skoda, piano.
Schubert: Moment Musical in F Minor,
Op. 94, No. 3.
Brahms: Rhapsody in G
Minor, Op. 79, No. 2. Liszt: Liebestraum
No. 3 in A Flat Major; Hungarian Rhapsody
No. 2, in C Sharp Minor. Chopin: Etude
in C Sharp Minor, Op. 25, No. 7; Etude
in E Major, Op. so, No. 3. Ravel: Toccata.
Beethoven: Polonaise in C Major, Op. 89.
Strauss- Schulhof: Pizzicato Polka.
WESTMINSTER
$5.95.
WL 5277.
12 -in.
42 min.
Mr. Badura -Skoda never seems to play
anything badly and many things better
than most pianists his age. The excellence
of his Schubert, Brahms, and Chopin
performances here was to be expected;
that he plays Ravel and Liszt with so much
insight and conviction is reassuring as to
the pianist's encompassing musicianship.
The Beethoven and Strauss are delightful,
charmingly played novelties in a rather
hackneyed list.
The Strauss is not the
Pizzicato Polka as the jacket implies
not that it matters much. Beautiful sound.
R. E.
-
The publication of the Tom Lehrer Songbook (Crown Publishers, New York, $2.00)
furnishes an excuse to talk about a very
funny record which was released almost
secretly, over a year ago, but which rapidly
acquired a remarkable word -of -mouth popularity and has ever since been selling,
if I may use the expression, like hotcakes.
In fact, to date 5o,000 copies have been
sold and it is continuing to move at the
rate of 5,000 per month.
The record,
entitled The Songs of Tom Lehrer is obtainable in some record stores or from
Tom Lehrer, Box 121, Cambridge 38,
Mass. Price: $4.25.
Thomas A. Lehrer, the young man who
behind all the excitement,
PORTER
String Quartet No.
ROLDAN
Ritmica No. s
CATURLA
Suite No.
6
1
Members of the Orchestre National
la Radiodiffusion Francaise,
de
Georges Tzi-
pine, cond.
ANGEL
35105.
12
-in.
22,
12,
5
min.
$5.95.
TOM LEHRER
is
herself scratched. Then there is his stirring
tribute to the South:
Where pellagra makes you scrawny
And the honeysuckle c/utters up the vine
And the Wild West:
Where the scenery is attractive
And the air is radioactive . . .
and a "Hunting Song," in which he boasts
proudly of his bag:
Two game wardens, seven hunters
And a pure -bred Guernsey Cow.
The engaging thing about Mr. Lehrer is
his ability to make everything he sings
about, from Dan the corner druggist,
who ground up his mother -in-law and
Sprinkledjust a bit
Over each banana split
to the Irish maiden who
Weighted her brother down with stones
And tent him of to Davy Jones
sound ever so neighborly.
I always come away from a session with
Mr. Lehrer's record with the uplifting
feeling that, after all, what's a little dope
peddling among friends?
R. H. H., Ja.
is a
Harvard
Phi Beta Kappa who graduated (in
1947)
magna cum laude and is by profession a
research mathematician and teacher.
He
also plays the piano and possesses an
unusual gift for satiric lyrics. He began
by composing and singing a few of his
songs around Harvard, first with a quartet,
and later by himself with piano (his own)
accompaniment; the next thing he knew
he was singing them in the Blue Angel
in New York.
His glamor -career was
abruptly interrupted last month, however,
when the United States Army booked him
for a prolonged engagement.
To describe Mr. Lehrer's songs is about
like trying to describe a Charles Addams
cartoon. The best I can do is to say that
he sings very humorously and matter -offactly of things most people don't care to
talk about. For instance, there is his moving
love song, "When You Are Old and Gray,"
wherein he admits that when decrepitude
does overtake his beloved she can consider
This disk, made under the auspices of
UNESCO's International Music Council,
combines a major work by a living American
composer with two rather minor ones by
Cubans, now dead, who at one time seemed
to promise much. Quincy Porter's sixth
quartet is typical of that musician's many
contributions to the chamber literature.
It is elegant, aristocratic, very interesting
rhythmically, and wonderfully idiomatic
in its writing for the strings. It is difficult
to tell if it is the performance or the recording that is to blame for the somewhat
excessive weight here given the first violin.
The pieces by Roldan and Caturla are
for wind instruments and piano.
Both
are derived from Cuban folk sources.
Roldan
is
a
The
mere trifle, but the Caturla
is a work of some length, in three movements; it is extremely dissonant in harmonic
texture, is stark, serious and dramatic in
its general tone, and is well worth the
price of admission.
Good recording.
A. F.
PROKOFIEFF
Peter and the Wolf
DUKAS
The Sorcerer's Apprentice
GERMAN
Henry VIII Dances
SAINT -SAENS
Henry VIII Dance.
Boston "Pops" Orchestra, Arthur Fiedler,
cond. Richard Hale, narrator.
RCA VICTOR LM 1803.
12 -in.
51 min.
$5.95.
The narration of ProkofiefFs whimsical
fairy tale is not quite the simple task it
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
NEW LOW
the dawn of a new era
in operatic recording
pRICES
Mario del Monaco
Hilde Gueden
Mario del Monaco
Hilde Gueden
Aldo Protti
of Mantua
The Duke
Gilda
.
Rigoletto
Speraf%ci1e
Maddalena
Giovonna
Monterone
CHORUS
'
-
HE STRA
AND ORC
OF
L'ACCADEMIA
Cesare Siepi
Giulietta Simionato
Luisa Ribocchi
Corena
Fernando
ROME
CECILIA,
DI SANTA
Bonoventura Som
(Chorus Master:
Conductor:
ma)
ALBER14.94
to reach
í1A-25
ever
ev
boasted
operatic recordings
its kind ev er
the merl ^ly, ^ode er set of
of
and
one
be
Certainly, celebrities.
restudied
This will
public. Certoi
completely
comp
world- accloimed
her been scruputhe
scoring
r
array
the
han
usuel cuts
Verdi mostetoieas
re that
the
mode to musical omissions-e lotion of thdia9nrt o
This
in
hos been
no
co -oiler
effort
ore
recording
very
ocious
There
to cost this
observed. included. With thebeen
afford.
ore
ore
hos been
could Ppossibly
opera housecon mpora FFRR ro house cou
ope
patine singers,
contemporary
no
manner
Tebaldi
VERDI
OTELLCO
Mario del Monaco
$14.94
are the
and Renato Tebaldi today. It
world
and soprano in the
Mario del Monaco
catalogue
Londonadded their
tenor
the
in
greatest
presence
p
their
ers hove
fine sing
is because
these riches,
all
of the other
with
es,
most
and
that
roster
our
to
complete opera
own names
issuing
be
London shalldifficult to surpass.
be
will
that
f
FEBRUARY, 1955
73
RECORDS
may seem to be, at first glance, as the less
than fortunate readings by Eleanor Roosevelt, Alec Guinness and Arthur Godfrey
proved. It is now back in the safe hands of
Richard Hale, who, as the original narrator,
gave such an ingratiating performance in
the old Koussevitzky- Boston recording
many years ago. In this new version, he
is even more successful, the tendency to
occasionally sound pompous has been
eradicated, and all the humorous, as well
as the tragic events of the little fable are
convincingly re -told. Fiedler and his men
give it a rollicking performance, which,
with the excellence of Victor's sound,
make it the best "Peter" on records.
The Dukas scherzo might benefit from
a little more orchestral bite, even though
this is a better than average performance.
The Henry VIII dances, one by Saint Saëns, three by Edward German, conclude
a
most pleasantly diversified program.
J. F. I.
RECORDER AND
RECITAL NO. 3
HARPSICHORD
Partita No.
2 in G; Senallié:
in G minor, Op. t: Anon.:
Sonata
Greensleeves to a Ground: Pepusch:
No. 4 in F; Matteis: Prelude in D; Anon.:
Allemande and Corrente in G minor: Caix
d'Hervelois:
Two Movements from Suite
in G; Handel: Sonata No. 7 in C: Lawes:
Pour Pieces (arr. Dolmetsch).
Telemann:
Sonata No.
5
Dolmetsch,
harpsichord.
Carl
LONDON LL 1026.
CRESTON
Invocation and Dance
Louisville Orchestra, Robert Whitney, cond.
SERIES
$5.95
-
Tricke/ion is the first work by Halsey Stevens
professor of composition at the University of Southern California and biographer of Bartok
to appear on disks.
The title signifies an interrelated three part form; the composition is actually a
symphony in three movements, and an
extremely fine one, a work of dignity,
integrity, and deep resonance, with a first
movement suggesting the concerto grosso
texture, the second based on long melodic
lines, the third a blazing dance. Creston's
Invocation and Dance is primarily a study in
rhythms. It is quite a big piece, and very
complex in its metric structure, but somewhat less effective than it should be because
of a certain commonplace quality in its
themes. Villa Lobos' Dawn in a Tropical
Forest sounds exactly like a piece by Villa
Lobos called Dawn in a Tropical Forest.
The performances are splendid, and the
recordings are good, though somewhat
top heavy.
A. F.
-
FOLK MUSIC
British Folk
ELISABETH SCHWARZKOPF
Song Recital
This
Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, soprano;
Moore, piano.
ANGEL 35023. 12 -in. $5.95
Gerald
This miscellany provides a fair reflection
of several facets of Schwarzkopfs non operatic personality. However, it does not
wholly indicate her range of emotional
projection, nor does it present her invariably at her vocal best. Generally, the
performances are well calculated and executed
especially where the lines are
long and flowing, such as in Brahms'
Da unten im Tale and Wolfs Wiegenlied
im Sommer.
Gerald Mooré s accompaniments are exemplary. Engineering: intimate
without crowding, good balance, and
-
superb surfaces.
STEVENS, HALSEY
Triskeliort
VILLA LOBOS
Dawn in a Tropical Forest
74
J. H., JR.
FOOTLIGHT FAVORITES FROM
RUSSIA
COLOSSEUM CRLP 167
12 -in.
6o min. $5.45
RUSSIAN TANGOS
COLOSSEUM CRLP 169
12 -in.
59
min. $5.45.
GEORGE BOULANGER
COLOSSEUM CRLP 156 12 -in.
6i min. $5.45.
FOLK DANCES AND SONGS FROM
RUSSIA
COLOSSEUM CRLPX 013
1z -in.
64 min.
$5.45.
After five years in the conservatory, music
students in the Soviet Union are classified
into one of four categories: opera, concert,
radio or teaching. Once classified, they're
stuck, from then on they receive work
orders that enable them to operate only
within their group.
Two of these new
--
BRITTEN (arr.)
Songs
Peter Pears, tenor; Benjamin Britten, piano.
LONDON LD 9136. to -in. 19 min. $2.98.
is
one
of the cosiest of
records,
a
delightfully intimate little concert of British
folk songs, sung with artistry and communication by Pears, to the perfect accompaniments of the composer.
The
arrangements are by Britten, who has
interested himself in this field for some
years. They may offend those who consider
the traditional settings to be sacrosanct;
others, less hidebound, cannot fail to be
charmed by their ingenuity and good
taste. London provides sound that has a
nice comfortable quality about it, heightening the effect of genial informality which
pervades this recital without obscuring
its artistic worth.
J. F. I.
EVERY INCH A SAILOR
Foc'sle Song and Shanties sung by Milt
Okun
STINSON
SLP 65
to-in.
28
min.
Footlight Favorites and
were made by artists
in the second or concert category, who
within their own organization are further
separated from symphonic and film musicians. This group works in the musical
comedy, operetta, jazz and circus areas,
though circus artists, to compound the
confusions, belong to the same union as
Oistrakh! In any case, the results of their
work, as recorded here, indicate a relentless
turn -of-the- century point of view as far
as
operetta and musical comedy are
concerned. Footlight Favorites includes more
than a dozen waltzes and polkas almost startling in their lack of character; one band, however, lists a foxtrot
called Tahiti Trot, arranged by Dmitri
Shostakovich, which turns out to be
Tea for Two turned inside out and rather
hesitantly parodied at moments by the
arranger. Russian Tangos is adequate enough;
the tangos are generally well played and
Russian
$3.98.
Dolmetsch plays with a nice sense of the
differences in style required by so miscellaneous a group; the recording is bright
and clear.
N. B.
J. S. Bach: Bist du bei mir. Gluck: Einem
Bach der fliesst (from The Pilgrims to Mecca).
Mozart: Abendempfindung; Der Zauberer.
Beethoven: Wohne der Wehmut. Schubert:
Litanei; Ungeduld.
Schumann: Aufträge.
Brahms:
Da unten im Tale; Och, Modr,
ich well en Ding han!; Vergebliches Stündchen.
Wolf: Wiegenlied im Sommer; MausfallenSpriehlein. Richard Strauss: Hat gesagt bleibt's nicht dabei: Schlechtes Wetter.
Hile." All in all, a superior example of
folk -music singing and recording.
R. K.
Russian recordings
recorder; Joseph Saxby
12-in.
ORCHESTRA COMMISSIONING
LOU-545.
12 -in. 22, 10, 12 min.
LOUISVILLE.
range, but he knows how to enunciate
every last word so that you don't miss a
lyric. The songs derive mostly from the
19th -century and their mood and subject
matter vary from the ribaldry of "Can't
You Dance the Polka ?" to the really
baleful lamenting on "Tommy's Gone to
$3.00.
Jack Was Every Inch a Sailor; Fire Down
Below; Greenland Fisheries: Round the Corner
Sally; Mainsail Haul; Gloucester Girls; Bold
McCarty Sailors Grave; The Mermaid: Bonet';
Ship Rambolee; Can't You Dance the Polka,
Hanging Johnny; Jack Tar; Tommy's Gone
to Hile.
Most of these sea songs and shanties
were unfamiliar, to me at least, and it was
a
useful idea for Stinson to get them
together on a record.
Milt Okun, who
sings them, has a fairly big, clear voice
that could stand a little wider emotional
Tangos
the frequent exaggerations of tempo given
them by the Leshtchenko and Utiosov
orchestras spruce them up with mild
humor. The sound on both records is
barely acceptable in contemporary terms.
The late George Boulanger, described
as "King of the Gypsy Violin," offers
strong evidence that the title is not arbitrary. His gypsy music, as well as that
of the other orchestras represented here
(including the Rumanian Folklore Institute
Orchestra, Bucharest Radio
Orchestra,
Film Symphony Orchestra, and the Gypsy
Orchestra of Bucharest), is as uninhibited
as it comes, but none of it is helped by the
reedy sound.
Folk Dances and Songs is the work of three
of Russia's most famous musical groups,
the Piatnitsky Song and Dance Ensemble,
the Voronezh Russian Folk Song Chorus,
aad the Rudneva Russian Folk Song
Chorus. There is a great deal of joy in
everything they do, as well as a minimum
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
STEI N BERG
OUR TIME
ARTISTSIN OF
GREAT
FULL DIMENSIONAL SOUND
ON CAPITOL RECORDS
Los Angeles Daily News "In addition to the equipment basic to
any fine conductor, Steinberg possesses that rarest of gifts, a natively musical,
natively ardent temperament that illuminates both the score and the listener's
own perception. He achieves the kind of radiant lucidity that makes music
endlessly new and miraculous, and with a flair and buoyancy that could well
serve as a model for other conductors."
MILDRED NORTON
WILLIAM STEINBERG conducting
T
E
PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
B. H. DOROFF
Syracuse Post -Standard
"It contains the sumptuous playing of the Pittsburgh Symphony
Orchestra under the musicianly
leadership of William Steinberg,
one of the truly outstanding conductors of this era. The reproduction is one of the most stunning Full Dimensional Sound
accomplishments."
TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No.
P
B'Minor (Pathétique)
FEBRUARY, 1955
Capitol announces an exciting "first" in recording history...the simultaneous release
of four brilliant albums by Mr. Steinberg and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra:
Minor
RACHMANINOFF:
Symphony No. 2 in
STRAUSS, RICHARD
Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks
Death and Transfiguration
P 8291
TCHAIKOVSKY:
PROKOFIEV:
Serenade for Strings
Classical Symphony
P 8290
BEETHOVEN:
Symphony No.
Symphony No.
5
8
E
P 8293
in C Minor
in F Major
P 8292
INCOMPARABLE HIGH FIDELITY IN FULL DIMENSIONAL SOUND
in
8272
6
75
"I do
I
not know of anybody by whom
feel myself so understood as by you
and I believe, too, to !me penetrated
to the depth of your soul."
(Gustav Mahler
in a
letter to Bruno Walter)
of restraint; but, again, it is difficult to
select and describe any musical virtues
possessed by the groups from the rudimentary sound they have been given.
R. K.
MUSIC OF AFRICA SERIES
to inch $2.98 each.
No. t: Tanganyika Territory
LONDON
LB
567
No.
LB
2: Kenya
826
No. 3: Drums Of East Africa
LB
827
No. 4: Congo Drums
LB
828
No. 5: The Guitars Of Africa
LB
829
No. 6: The African Music Society's Best
Recordings Of 1952
LB
83o
No. 7: Congo Songs And Dances
LB
831
No. 8: Music Of The Uganda Protectorate
LB
832
by their composers.
Foreign influences
permeate much of the material. One of the
most charming songs, Chemirocha, is an
adulation of its namesake, cowboy star
Jimmy Rogers, sung by a contingent
of his female admirers from the Kipsigis
tribe.
The Guitars of Africa, LB 829, is an
unmitigated delight and provides the
most readily accessible music of the series.
Introduced centuries ago by the Portuguese, the guitar has been avidly embraced
in all parts of the continent. The Africans
have a languorous, winsome way with the
instrument and the soft, limpid tones
of their dialects adapt superbly to strummed
accompaniments. Tracey believes that the
guitar is destined to become Africa's
principal musical instrument.
High spot of the series to this reviewer
is LB 828, Congo Drums, featuring Rev.
W. H. Ford's learned, easy dissertation
with running illustrations by drummers
on the message
of the Lokele tribe
drums of the Congo Basin. This is a clear,
utterly fascinating account of the integration
of the two-toned languages of Africa
into two-toned drum talk, the world's
first system of wireless telegraphy.
The reverse side presents the infectious,
complex, overpowering rhythms of the
Royal Tutsi Drums. These drum patterns
eloquently point up the African origins
of jazz; occasionally one can close his
not the Hutu drummers
eyes and hear
of Ruanda but echoes of a younger
Gene Krupa's ecstatic rendition of Drum min' Man.
LB 83o, The Best Recordings of 1152,
offers a cross -section of the series and is
an obvious jump -off point for anyone
interested in exploring the African folk
idiom. However, almost half the selections
are excerpted from other records in the
series.
An outstanding feature of this
disk is Nimuze Tugwera Gwere, a hauntingly
beautiful Tutsi chant lamenting the departure of a chief.
While Music of Africa is commendable
in motivation and execution, the organization of the material is another matter.
Six of the records provide explanatory
narration by Tracey; two do not. Album
notes range from adequate to useless,
with most in the latter category. A particular Tutsi drum rhythm contained on
LB 827 is repeated in toto on LB 828.
And, of course, the value of The Best Recordings of 1952 is somewhat nullified by
duplications.
Mr. Tracey records on high fidelity
equipment and the results are admirable.
Save for a few lapses, the sound throughout
the series is exemplary for field recording.
There is a complete absence of extraneous
noise; all the recording is close -to and
dear.
In an artistic sense, Africa's folk music
Its primary
is not of great significance.
to summon the gods,
value is utilitarian
to communicate news, to commemorate
an event. Here in this set is a generous,
sympathetic sampling of it.
H. L.
-
-
--
Aqd
Samplings of the Dark Continent's rhythms
include these by Kumasi College students.
Available now -the Symphony No.
For a long time African folk music was
r
in D Major of
gtor4
, /
`W0C/ V
in a performance conducted by
&L t «%J U./a-
A,
Dr. Walter, foremost exponent of
Mahler's music, leads the Philharmonic- Symphony Orchestra of New
York in a brilliant reading of this
great romantic work. The specially
packaged Columbia "Lp" album includes an illustrated brochure with
Dr. Walter's own notes on the com-
poser and his music. Ask your
dealer today!
Co.»pná Eeeetde.
Play safe with Columbia Needles!
"Columbia" and
76
4,
Trade -Mark. Reg. U.
Marc.. Registrada..
S. Pat.
Off.
sketchily known as the continent's
dark interior. But some few years ago a
handful of folklorists armed with recording
equipment began to circulate among the
tribes in an attempt to preserve and analyze
the varied body of native music.
Among the foremost of these pioneers
is Hugh Tracey of the African Music
This London series of eight
Society.
to-inch records contains the cream of
his work in British East Africa and parts
of the Belgian Congo.
Tracey's recordings were made at a
particularly fortunate time, for African
traditions are crumbling.
In another
generation the drums and the dancing,
the chants and the gossip songs will have
all but disappeared. Tribal Africa has been
in gradual retreat for centuries. The hard eyed Boers of the South, the avaricious
Europeans of the coasts
all have been
closing in. But in recent years the retreat
has become precipitous and the old ways,
the old skills, the old songs are dying fast.
Virtually all modes of African musical
expression are mirrored in this London
series. There is instrumental music featuring
a variety of drums, flutes and lyres, a
wealth of the topical songs that comprise
the chief body of African vocal music,
and choral singing that is a marvel to
the ear.
The main emphasis of the set is on the
living, changing nature of native folk
music. The majority of the songs are
contemporaneous; indeed, most are sung
as
-
-
MUSIC OF
ESOTERIC
OCCIDENTAL AFRICA
ES -529
12
-in.
S5.95.
Grand Prix du Disque 1954
Grands Prix du Disque seem to droppeth
as the gentle rain from heaven, spattering
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RECORDS
an inordinate number of mediocre recordings
on the earth beneath. But in the case of
Esoteric's Music of Occidental Africa, which
captured a 1954 Grand Prix, the honor
is richly merited.
Sponsored by l'Institut Francais ¿Afrique
Noire and the Musée de l'Homme in conjunction with UNESCO, the disk presents
music of the Malinké and Baoulé peoples
of French West Africa in lustrous high
Everything is authentic, unfidelity.
adulterated African, carefully chosen for
Two
freedom from foreign influences.
items of exceptional interest are a quasi religious ceremony starring a village's
protective spirit (in the flesh) and a Witch
STRANGE TO YOUR EARS!
Doctor's dance.
There is little of immediate popular
appeal in this scholarly record, but for the
initiate it offers a vivid glimpse into traThe notes, by
ditional native music.
Gilbert Rouget of the Musée de !'Homme,
are excellent. Surfaces are silent and the
engineering is outstanding.
brilliant achievement.
All told,
H.
a
f
THE SPOKEN WORD
THE INVESTIGATOR
DISCURIOSITIES LP 6834.
12
-in. $5.95.
The Investigator, a play which centers around
the Chairman of a United State Senate
Investigating
Committee,
who
bears
a
remarkable resemblance to our own censured ex- Chairman of the Senate Permanent Sub -committee on Investigations,
has a most unusual history. It was written
by one Reuben Ship of Montreal who.
according to the New York Times, was
deported from the U.S. in 1953 because
of membership in the Communist Party.
It was first performed by the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation and not long
thereafter gained considerable popularity
in this country, and especially in Washington, in the form of a much circulated
It turned up next as a
written script.
"private" bootleg record which seemed
to get around with all the ease and facility
traditionally associated with such "under the- counter" commodities. In the middle
of January it was made available to the
public by B & C distributors and when
Jack Gould in the New York Times devoted
a column to it, it became an overnight
bestseller- 12,000 copies in its first week,
to be exact.
Briefly, it is the story of an "investigator"
who is removed from his mundane investigations by a plane crash. When he
arrives at The Great Beyond he is subjected
to what for him is the supreme humiliation:
he is forced to appear before the Permanent
Investigating Committee on Permanent
Entry. During the course of the investigation, he, of course, wrests control from the
Committee's Chairman by the simple
technique of questioning the qualifications
particularly the Chairman's.
of his peers
To unfold any more of the tale would
he to spoil it for those who have yet to
hear it.
However, it is easy to imagine
what happens when the Investigator digs
into "a thousand years of treason," turning
up such vile subversives as Socrates. Thomas
Jefferson, Voltaire and Chopin, to mention
a few!
-
FEBRUARY, 1955
JIM.FIISS
Jim Fassett explores the
fabulous world of sound
Canaries singing in nine -part harmony, "Fassett's patented pin drop," a piano
recorded backwards -you'll hear them all on one of the craziest records that
ever dropped onto your turntable.
When Jim Fassett starts playing around with familiar sounds you can't believe
your ears. With the aid of three tape recorders he can make baby chicks sound
like sea lions or turn a dripping faucet into a pile driver.
It's entertaining! It's enlightening! You're in for an
aural awakening when you hear "Strange to Your
Ears." Get it at your dealer's today!
Exclusive
hi-fi
Columbia "inner shield" safeguards
release, keeps
it
this new
dust free, assures better sound.
"STRANGE TO YOUR EARS" CONTEST!
Guess
the mystery sounds and win one of the 50 Rio Palzrs-
including a Columbia "360K" Phonograph and
Columbia -Bell & Howell Tape Recorder. Details
a
of
contest on every album.
EXCLUSIVELY ON COLUMBIA '" RECORDS
Play safe
"Columbin."
"'
M,wters,,rta."
with your sound- switch to
"arm "
"Rall
&
Howell.
a Columbia
needle
T. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Of f. Marcus
liegi.trgd,,.. rt'
T. M.
77
RECORDS
The role of the investigator himself
played by an actor named John Drainie
in delightfully accurate mimicry of that
The
all -too- familiar Senatorial voice.
supporting cast is excellent.
There is no use saying about this record
something nonsensical to the effect that:
"whatever your politics you will be amused,
etc., etc." If you are among those who
cannot abide the personality or tactics of
Senator Joseph R. McCarthy of Wisconsin,
you will enjoy this record; if you are among
those who approve or support him, you
R. H. H., JR.
will not. It's that simple.
is
BOB AND RAY
UNICORN RECORDS UN
toot. Io -in. $3.95.
or later Bob (Elliott) and Ray
(Goulding) were bound to make a record.
They have, and a very funny one it is,
providing, of course, you like Bob and
Sooner
Here are eight typical B &R productions:
"Mary McGoon," telling us
how to make frozen Gingerale salad;
"Grub
The Story of Food;" "Mr. Treat
(the surly old investigator) Chaser of
Lost Persons "; "Epic"
story of the
Civil War; "Tahiti "; "O Sweaters"
for
lucky kiddies whose names begin with
"O "; ( "Our legal department will gladly
make the change free with no extra charge");
"The Crying Garter Man;" and "Fonsicle
Cigarettes" ( "speaking of Fonsicle Cigarettes, four out of five doctors say yes ").
High spot of the performance, however,
is an
intermittent "Bulletin From the
Office of Fluctuation Control and Ceiling
Repairs, Bureau of Edible Condiments,
Soluble, Insoluble and Indigestible Fats
and Derivatives, Washington, D. C." read
in a voice that will be startlingly familiar to
anyone who suffered through last year's
Army- McCarthy hearings.
R. H. H., JR.
Ray.
-
-a
-
MICKEY SPILLANE'S MIKE
HAMMER
Written and told by Mickey Spillane
Music by Stan Purdy and His Orchestra
COLUMBIA VI. 35or. Io-in.
At the risk of being clubbed over the head
some night with a blackjack, I can only
say about this record that I rate it up
among the finalists for the title: "Worst
Record of r954.It capitalizes on two very valuable pieces
of property in the mass -publishing market
Mickey Spillane and Mike Hammer.
-
One side of the record consists of some
grade -B movie music composed by Stan
Purdy
four songs, Veleta, said on the
dust jacket to describe "the beauty that is
seen by Mike Hammer in his now equally
famous Secretary "; The Woman, "the
combination of beauty, passion and violence
displayed in the women that move in Mike
-
Kicks For The Kiddies --- And "Others"
The Story
ofJazz is ostensibly intended
for children and is catalogued as part
But
of Folkways' Children's Series.
at some point in the final stages of
preparing it for distribution, Folkways
appears to have realized that this disk
might have a wider appeal Than had
been intended.. That, at least, is the
inference that can he drawn from the
fact that the title used on the accompanying booklet of notes, The Story
of Jazz for Children, has been amended
on the liner cover to read The Story
of Jazz for Children "Young People and
Others." The exact significance of the
quotation marks is not clear but the
reason for the added words is perfectly
This is as good a half -hour
clear:
summation of the highlights of jazz
children or
as one could wish for
"young people" or particularly
"others."
It is, so far as I know, a pioneering
effort to summarize jazz briefly on an
LP disk. Unlike most ground -breaking
projects, it has been able to avoid the
usual pitfalls of forerunners because
(t)
of two special circumstances:
Langston Hughes, who wrote and reads
the commentary for the disk, had
already set up the framework for his
narration when he wrote a book called
The First Book of Jazz, and (2) the
recorded illustrations are drawn mostly
from the monumental r 1-disk survey of jazz prepared for Folkways by
Frederick Ramsey, Jr.
With the basic framework already
prepared and the recordings to be
used pre -winnowed, the next hurdle
might have been the reading of the
text for, as experience has shown,
there is nothing like the realization
that one has to sit through spoken
explanations for the Nth time to kill
off any interest in hearing whatever
music may go with the explanations.
Fortunately, in this case, Mr. Hughes
is a poet. He writes in the direct yet
imaginative shorthand of the poet
and he reads in a lyric style that suggests
-
78
-
a musical beat without becoming singsong. In his reading, the commentary
itself has musical qualities which make
it both unobstrusive and susceptible
to repeated hearings.
What Mr. Hughes manages to pack
into 3r minutes is nothing short
of amazing. Setting his scene with
some passages by Louis Armstrong,
Baby Dodds, Jelly
Roll Morton
and Johnny Dodds, he goes back to
origins
drums on the West Coast
of Africa moves on to work songs,
the musical melting pot that was New
Orleans, the quadrilles and marches
which contributed to jazz, piano rags,
and back to Louis Armstrong, the
blues and blues singers. He pauses ro
explain the meaning of breaks, riffs
and improvising.
Then he picks up
his story again in Kansas City, touches
on boogie woogie, Chicago, swing,
Duke Ellington, the spread of jazz
around the world, bop, modern jazz
and, putting a neatly tied bow on the
completed package, returns to a form
of primitive drumming this time
present-day New York teenagers beating
on homemade instruments as recorded
by Tony Schwartz.
In the course of this swiftly moving
odyssey, a glittering array of great
jazz names are encountered. In addition
to Armstrong, Morton, the Dodds
brothers and Ellington, there are Lead
Belly, the New Orleans Rhythm Kings,
--
-
Bunk Johnson, Scott Joplin, Ma Rainey,
Count Basie, Mary Lou Williams,
Meade Lux Lewis, Biz Beiderbecke,
Bunny Berigan, Earl Hines, Dizzy
Gillespie and Lennie Tristano.
For the most part, the illustrative
music has been aptly chosen although,
inevitably, there are opportunities to
quibble. Is Duke Ellington adequately
represented by an excerpt devoted
largely to Baby Cox and Lonnie Johnson
who made only a single recorded
Is bop
appearance with Ellington?
properly illustrated by one of Gillespie s
When the spread of
comic vocals?
jazz to foreign parts is under discussion,
why not some music by a foreign
jazzman instead of the admirable but
thoroughly American Earl Hines?
These, however, are trivial complaints
and amount to little when it is considered that all of the New Orleans
Wanderers' wonderful Perdido Street
Blues and much of Louis Armstrong's
I'm Not Rougb and Jelly Roll Morton's
trio version of Wolverine Blues are included as part of a perceptively edited
kaleidescope of great jazz performances.
Hughes has seen the dangers of trying
to tell too much, of trying to be too
explicit. He aims for clarity and simplicity, to keep the developments in
jazz connected ro the world around it,
and, above all, to be interesting. He
has succeeded on all counts.
One word of caution: The recordings
duplicated on this disk were made in
the pre -high fidelity era. many of them
in the Twenties, and they have the
characteristics of the recordings of that
period. So, fortunately, does the music.
JOHN
S.
WILSON
THE STORY OF JAZZ FOR
CHILDREN "YOUNG PEOPLE
AND OTHERS"
FOLKWAYS
Langston Hughes, poet-editor-producer of
the Jazz Story, with youthful admirers.
FP
712
Io -in.
3r min.
$4.75.
Written
and narrated by Langston
Hughes, with documentary recordings,
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RF(.OR1)S
Hammer's world "; Oh Mike! which "brings
forth the passion that Spillane has so well
expressed in the seven Mike Hammer
books "; and The Mike Ilammer Theme,
describing "simply the violence that surrounds Mike Hammer." The reverse side
contains a ridiculous original story read
by Mickey himself.
There is one thing that can be said
for the record and that is that it is "documentary." If that is so, I recommend that
we put every last copy of it, and the master,
in a time -capsule and let future archaelogists
and historians worry about them.
R. H. H., JR.
THE BEST OF JAZZ
By John S.
Wilson
One of the truly phenomenal ensembles of our day, the beloved Trapp Family Singers, has just waxed a new high
fidelity album that should be on every
checklist. It's Sad Am I Without Thee,
a "Collection of Austrian, German, American and English Songs of Ardent Affection, Wails and Plaints, as well as Joyful
Songs and Dances, Sung and Performed
on Recorders, Pipes and Suitably Stringed
Instruments ..... conducted by the singing family's gifted priest, Father Franz
Wasner ( DL 9759 ).
Enthusiasm for the
performances of An-
JAZZ FOR GI'S, ,VOL.
$3.00.
Tony Scott Quartet: Tony Scott, clarinet;
Dick Katz, piano; Milt Hinton, bass;
Sid Bulkin, drums.
Milt to the Hilt; Homecoming.
Mat Mathews,
Mat Mathews Quartet:
accordion; Claude Noel, Dick Katz, piano;
Bolden, drums.
bass;
Walter
Max Waybe,
Pennies from Heaven; Bag's Groove.
Tony Scott has the great good fortune
to have Milt Hinton on bass in his group
and he leans on him heavily as both soloist
and swinging support throughout both
Scott himself plays his
his numbers.
customary lithe, probing clarinet and on
Homecoming takes the time to construct
Mathews is
a carefully developed solo.
a Dutch accordionist with plenty of will
and vigor but little to say in extemporaneous
The recording, assertedly
a soldier audience at Fort
Monmouth, is exceptional for such a
location job for it has a studio sound and
jazz terms.
made before
balance.
4
JIMMY GUIFFRE
CAPITOL
H 549.
to -in
24 min.
$2.98.
Guiffre, tenor and baritone sax ophones, clarinet; Bud Shank, alto saxophone; Jack Sheldon, trumpet; Shorty
Rogers, fluegel horn; Bob Enevoldsen,
valve trombone, bass; Ralph Pena, bass;
Jimmy
Shelly Manne, drums.
Sultana;
Four Brothers;
Wrought of Iron.
Nutty
Pine;
Guiffre; Sheldon; Manne; Russ Freeman,
piano; Curtis Counce, bass.
Do
for
It!; All far You; I Only Have
Eyes
You.
Jimmy Guiffre, who has been responsible
for a lot of the writing for small modern
West Coast jazz groups, steps out on his
own on this disk at the head of a pair
of swinging ensembles. in general, the
side devoted to the quintet is more successful
than the side devoted to the septet, for the
quintet is more cohesive and its readings
tend to have a brighter, more vivid tone.
FEBRUARY, 1955
drés Segovia has been
growing by leaps and
bounds and it stands
r
Tony Scott Quartet, Mat Mathews Quartet
BL 58057.
to -in. 25 min.
BRUNSWICK
not only as tribute to
his great artistry, but
also to Segovia's solid
conviction through the
years that the guitar
will one day be recognized as one of the integral solo instruments in the orchestra. In his latest album
Menu an, Donald O'Connor, Dan Dailey,
Johnnie Ray, Mitzi Gaynor and Dolores
Cray and the hits from what is being
hailed as the greatest, grandest showbiz
picture ever made.
There's a stunning performance of
Slaughter on Tenth Avenue in the Decca
On Your Toes album from the recent
Broadway revival ( DL 9015 - ED 904 ).
That would be reason enough for you to
hear it, but On Your Toes contains such
all -time Rodgers and I lart hits as It's
Gotta Be Love and There's a Small Hotel,
too. Keep in mind that this official Broadway Cast album is in high fidelity, too!
With the current interest in Oscar
Hatnnierstein's immortal Carmen Jones
we'll just remind you that Decca has the
Original Cast Recording from the Broad way production ( DL 8014 - ED 904 ).
We think it's one of the best performances
in the Decca catalogue.
Perhaps you've been fortunate enough
by this writing to have heard one or the
other of the new David
Oistrakh
for Decca, Segovia plays works of
Franck, Couperin, Haydn, Grieg. and
some enchanting works from Spain and
Latin America ( DL 9734 ). If you haven't
as yet heard Segovia's other recent albums, the Bach Chucorute (DL 9751)
and An Evening With Andrés Segovia
( DL 9733) by all means make it a point
to do so.
Arturo Toscanini has called the Virtuosi di Roma, directed by Renato Fasano,
"the great instrumental ensemble of this
age." The precision and musicality you
will discover in their new Deceit album
Music of Vivaldi Vol. 3 ( DL 9684 ) will,
we think, testify to the Maestro's impeccable perspicacity.
On the domestic scene, there's a lilting
new album featuring some of Hollywood's fresh new voices, So This Is Paris
(DL 5553 - ED 700 ). This thoroughly
enjoyable group of selections from the
Universal -International picture brings the
voices of Gloria DeHaven, Tony Curtis,
and a host of other up- and -coming entertainers.
You'd have to be slightly un- American
not to have a place for Irving Berlin's
and
music in your record library
when it comes wrapped up in an unabashedly heart -filled tunefest like the
sound track of There's No Business Like
Show Business (DL 8091 - ED 828 DAU 957 ) you'd have to be slightly
crazy, too. there are the fabulous Ethel
...
recordings,
Brahms' Concerto in D
Major Op. 77 (DI.
9754) or Tchaikowsky's Concerto in D
Major Op. 35 (DL
9755). If you haven't, make it a point,
because while it goes without saying
that Oistrakh is one of the world's foremost violinists, at last he's presented in
the type and kind of high fidelity that
does justice to his artistry. And don't pass
over Conductor Ferenc Fricsay's Showpieces For Orchestra Vol. 3 ( DL 9738).
It's a heady assortment of compositions,
that really lets a full-scale symphonic
orchestra cut loose and show its stuff.
Incidentally, next time you're in a record store, check the Decca "4000" Series.
It's a veritable gold mine of some of the
world's best shorter selections at a price
you can easily afford. Just to mention a
few of the newest in this series, Eric
Coates conducts his own compositions,
London Suite and London Again (DL
4039). You'll recognize many of these
familiar melodies wedded into a very
listenable recording. Also, the London
Baroque Ensemble, which has won a
great. and we think, we'll- deserved popularity on this side of the Atlantic, per fonns Six Minuets of Beethoven and
Dvorak's Gavotte under the baton of
Karl I lags (DL 4096 ). A "Iii -fi" note:
you'll find the sound on these "4000"
Series Long Play records as technically
superb as it is musically exciting.
Look to DECCA for ..
a New World of Sound
79
RECORDS
There are
decided echoes
of
the Gerry
Mulligan quartet about this group, especially when Giuffre turns to the baritone
saxophone and plays around Jack Sheldon's
breathy, Chet Baker.styled trumpet. Sheldon
is an erratic performer but Russ Freeman
and Curtis Counce give the group a riding
impetus.
Some of Giuffres best work
is done on clarinet which he plays with a
wonderfully appealing husky tone. The
septet has less warmth, less vitality and,
except for Nutty Pine which is bolstered
by attractive playing by Giuffre and Bud
even on Giuffré s most
Shank, its work
celebrated composition, Four Brothers- is
of only routine interest. The recording is
adequate, falling occasionally into an
unseemly fuzziness.
-
SVEND ASMUSSEN AND HIS UNMELANCHOLY DANES
ANGEL ANG 60000
10 -in.
23
min.
$3.95.
Svend Asmussen, violin; Max Leth, piano
and vibes; Jorgen Ingmann, guitar; Svend
Hauberg, guitar and clarinet; Borge Ring,
Poul Gregersen, Leif Sjoberg. bass; Erik
Frederiksen, drums.
My Boy; Bebup - Woogie; Yes, Sir,
That's My Baby; Doctor, Lawyer, Indian
Chief, The Woody Woodpecker Song; Civilization; St. Louis Blues, Lonesome Road.
Alone Together; Gone with the Wind; All
God's Children Got Rhythm; The Nearness
of You; The Gypsy in My Soul; Dancing on
the Ceiling; Summertime; These Foolish Things.
Riverside Shake; Dawn Club Joys; Back Side
o'Town; Doin' the Plymouth Rock; How'm
At a time when jazz guitarists are being
delivered by the bushel basket load, Bill
de Arango can easily be distinguished
from the frantically plucking mob by his
crisp, discriminating style and the infectiously swinging beat on which he
serves it.
His approach to the standard
tunes on this disk is direct, often couched
in understatement and distinguished by
that type of dryness which marks a good
Bob Helm is usually heard on records
as part of Turk Murphy's ensemble but on
this disk he steps out at the head of his
own group playing eight of his compositions. In recent years Helm's clarinet
playing, which runs a gamut from Johnny
Dodds to Boyd Senter, has been veering
so much toward the Senter side that the
suspicion has been growing in the mind
of one listener that he had either stopped
buying reeds or had abandoned all principle.
That listener now stands corrected.
Removed from Murphy's lee, Helm plays
with spirit, logic and a fine round tone.
There are momentary suggestions of Senter
but the bulk of his work on this cleanly
recorded disk is disciplined, inventive and
full-bodied, with that undercurrent of
excitement which characterizes his playing
even in his Senter sallies.
The group around him is on hand
essentially for support although Everett
Farey, another Murphy sideman, gets a
few opportunities to display his clean,
even -toned cornet style. The tunes that
they tackle have an air of familiarity
as well they might, since Helm is writing
within a familiar tradition
and they are
played with obvious fondness by the
composer -clarinetist and his colleagues.
I
Gonna Do It; I Don't Want Any More;
Seagull Strut; Daybreak Blues.
martini.
He is tender on These Foolish
Things but he is not sentimental. When
he evokes a mood, as in Summertime, he
does it with firm, strong statements.
His
qualities would be most welcome in any
jazz musician but they are particularly
welcome amid the clangor of guitarists.
He is served admirably on these numbers
by his bassist, Teddy Kotick, and drummer
Art Mardigan. He is served, complemented
and challenged by pianist Johnny Williams
who keeps prodding the rhythm along
and appears several times in solo passages
that are warm and lyrical.
Charley,
This group of Danish musicians may be
one of the healthiest things to appear on
the American jazz scene in recent years.
Not simply because they are an invigorating
and exciting jazz group, which they are,
but more importantly because they play
with such zest and vitality, such a spirit
of fun that one is reminded with a shock
how lacking current jazz is in this feeling.
Jazz is essentially a music of fun and
high spirits but it has been taking itself
terribly, terribly seriously lately.
Svend
Asmussen's Danes are just the right antidote
for this.
They are a polished, integrated jazz
team, as they demonstrate from stem to
stern on Bebup- Woogie and St. Louis Blues
but their usual technique is to create a
sort of jazz vaudeville by interlarding
their playing with group vocals (loaded
with provocative breaks and interpolations,
be it quickly said) and with interpretive
noises, vocal and instrumental. Although
Asmussen has two strikes on him when he
attempts jazz on the violin, he is one of
the most successful of this odd breed. His
playing is light and lilting and the cat
rarely screeches. Borge Ring, one of three
men who share the bass chores on these
numbers, has tremendous authority and
provides an amazing driving force on the
three selections on which he appears.
This is, numerically, the first of Angel's
offerings in the jazz field and it gets the
series off to a bright and hopeful start.
The surfaces were a little noisy on the
pressings I heard and the bass sometimes
echoed a bit more than seemed desireable,
but otherwise the recording is good.
DE ARANGO
EMARCY MG 26020
10 -in.
23
BOB HELM'S RIVERSIDE ROUSTABOUTS
RIVERSIDE RIP 2510
Io -in.
25
-
-
min. $3.85.
Bob Helm, clarinet; Everett Farey, cornet;
Hank Ross. piano; Bill Stanley, bass and
tuba; Bob Thompson, washboard.
ITALIAN JAZZ STARS
I
ANGEL ANG 60001
Io -in.
25
min. $3.95.
Gianni Basso and His Quintet; Oscar
Valdambrini and His Quintet; Flavio
Ambrosetti Quartet; Roberto Nicolosi and
His Orchestra; Giancarlo Barigozzi and
His Quintet; Nunzio Rotondo and the
Sextet of the Hot Club of Rome.
'reco ded
h;gh
delity
WHAT IS HI -FI?
A journey behind the
with Kurt List, Westminster's musical director, describe;
high fidelity and the making of
high fidelity records. Informative, interesting, of permanent
scenes
value to every record buyer. For
your free copy, send a card to:
WESTMINSTER RECORDS
DEPT. HF
275 Seventh Ave., New York 1, N. Y.
Invenzione; Gim Blues; Tenderly; Cool- laboration; Fascinating Rhythm; La Barca del
Sogni; Nancy with the Laughing Face; Stelle
Filanti.
On the evidence of these recordings,
Italian jazz (modern branch) is well into
its derivative period and is even showing
an occasional sign of striking out on its
own. Most of the musicians heard on this
disk have patterned themselves after one
of the leading American cool stars and have
gotten far enough inside the American's
style to handle it with ease. There is,
consequently, a pleasantly relaxed feeling
about much of this Italian jazz and if
none of it is strikingly original still it
maintains a level of competence which is
not often found in American recording
groups.
The pianists on most of the numbers
are consistently interesting (Shearing and
Garner and a little Tristano are reflected
in their work) while Flavio Ambrosetti's
alto swings nicely through Fascinating
Rhythm and trumpeter Oscar Valdambrini
makes several appealing entrances. Some
passages have been muddied in recording
but the general sound level is good.
min. $2.98.
Bill de Arango, guitar; Johnny Williams,
piano; Teddy Kotick, bass; Art Mardigan,
THE OSCAR PETERSON QUARTET,
Album No. 2
drums.
CLEF
8o
MG C -168
Io-in.
24 min.
$3.95.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
.+
s
Oscar Peterson, piano; Barney Kessel,
guitar; Ray Brown, bass; Alvin Stoller,
drums.
Oh, Lady Be Good; Body and Soul.
The version of Oh, Lady Be Good which
Oscar Peterson creates at a furious pace
on one side of this disk is one of the great
virtuoso performances of recorded jazz.
It is a masterful demonstration of creative
Although 23
and physical endurance.
choruses of the tune are played, 16
by Peterson and the other seven by
guitarist Barney Kessel, and even though
Peterson comes out punching and swinging right from the start, the pianist manages to hold to the classic construction
of such jazz performances, building an
impression of increasing tension as he
goes along. He pours out one idea on
top of another, developing new line after
new line with no dependence on clichés,
"quotation" or repetition. Not until the
fifteenth chorus does he briefly make use
of a riff and it is only the final two choruses
that are based on riffs. One can only
conjecture in what condition this whirlwind
performance left Peterson but for a listener
it is exhausting and exhilarating.
Body and Soul, also a complete LP side,
is a calm oasis, showing the opposite
side of Peterson's talent and some delicate
and reflective guitar work by Kessel.
credit to Angel's editorial judgment.
The sound processing, a primary stumbling block on some other Reinhardt
collections, gives evidence of intelligent
care. Since the original recordings come
from many periods and circumstances,
the basic sound values vary from selection
to selection but the music in general
is heard on this disk with depth, vitality
and a relatively low level of surface noise.
Django Reinhardt's death two years ago
stirred up a succession of LP collections
of his recordings which were amiable in
intent but decidedly varied in quality.
Of the nine Reinhardt disks now available,
this offering by Angel strikes me as the
most satisfactory. It is, for one thing,
widely representative in that it covers a
decade of Reinhardt's recording, ranging
from a performance by the original Quintet
of the Hot Club of France (My .Serenade)
to works recorded in the late Forties (DiIt includes two
minushing, Festival 48).
pieces which are nothing less than superb
Dinette, one of Reinhardt's most engaging efforts both as composer and
performer, and Diminushing, a provocative
and the reventure in a minor mood
maining selections maintain a level that
is a
MEET THE NEW JACK TEAGARDEN
URANIA UJLP toot to -in. 23 min. $4.00.
Jack Teagarden, trombone and vocals;
Ruby Braff, trumpet; Lucky Thompson,
tenor saxophone; Sol Yaged, clarinet;
Kenny Kersey, piano; Sidney Gross, guitar;
Milt Hinton, bass; Denzil Best, drums.
-
-
an
invitation
to dance
Never
before has
the contagious
thrill of "live"
JIMMY RANEY ENSEMBLF.
NEW JAZZ
LP 1103
to -in.
20
min. $3.95.
Phil Woods, alto saxophone; John Wilson,
trumpet; Jimmy Raney, guitar; Bill Crow,
bass; Joe Morello, bass.
Stella by Starlight: Joanne; Bark and Blow;
dance music been
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Fire.
This disk serves to introduce alto saxophonist Phil Woods and its a very promising introduction. Woods has a lift and
urgency in his playing that is reminiscent
of Charlie Parker. His attack is strong,
eager and self -confident, so eager at times
that he occasionally falls into stridency.
This, however, is a minor shortcoming
in view of the indubitable strength that
he brings to an instrument which has
lately been played more for negative
values than positive ones.
Woods provides the excitement on this
disk, Raney the firm, steady hand, and
Crow and Morello a propulsive beat.
Much of their playing is cerebral jazz
which manages to swing even while cerebrating. They avoid the introversion that
often characterizes this type of playing
by using it largely as a backdrop against
which Raney's rational guitar and Woods'
extroverted alto gain added effectiveness.
They achieve depth without being obscure.
The group is well recorded with the rhythm
section properly related to the solo instruments and a good instrumental definition on ensembles.
ID -in.
23 min. 83.95.
Festival 48; Nuages; Oiseaux des Iles; OP
Man River; Dinette; My Serenade; Diminushing; Rhythme Futur.
FEBRUARY, 1955
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1955
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Lover; too Years from Today; St. James
Infirmary Blues.
JACK TEAGARDEN PLAYS
AND
SINGS
URANIA UJLP 1002
to -in.
23
min.
$4.00
Same personnel as above.
Aster You've Gone; Blue and Esoteric; Stars
Feil on Alabama; Christmas Song.
Jack Teagarden has been inexplicably
absent from recording studios since he left
Louis Armstrong's group several years ago
so Urania is to be particularly commended
for focusing on him in its first jazz releases.
But having acquired as valuable a property
as Teagarden, Urania might have used
him with more discrimination.
Lover,
for instance, is an old Teagarden specialty
and when the entire side of a ten -inch LP
is devoted to it one anticipates a generous
Yet in its 12V
serving of Teagarden.
minutes' running time there are only two
and a half fast choruses of his masterful
trombone work.
The main feature of
After You've Gone, another fine base of
operations for Big T, is a much too lengthy
bass solo.
On the ballads, Teagarden is
encumbered by a dreary tempo that all
but stymies his vocal efforts.
Whenever
he picks up his trombone, however, Tea garden reveals himself as the exceptional
jazz player that he is and when he is given
an opportunity to sing such appropriate
songs as St. James Infirmary and After
You've Gone, he is in his proper element.
He gets admirable assistance from Ruby
Braff and an occasional pleasant passage
is contributed by Kenny Kersey.
But
there is too little Teagarden and too much
routine padding on these disks to suit
His group has
this Teagarden fancier.
been recorded with a big, sometimes
echoing sound which frequently results
in muffled ensembles.
"A TRIUMPH
RANDY WESTON
ART!
OF
Cole Porter in
a
Modern Mood.
RIVERSIDE RLP 2508
Olin Downes, music critic for the New York Times,
labeled the Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orchestra's
Carnegie Hall debut "a triumph of art!"
Ñ'SAfAK R ITV's.7%
CONCERTGEBOU W
ORCHESTRA OF
In commemoration of the orchestra's recent American tour, Epic Records is proud to release a splendid "Radial Sound" recording of Brahms' Symphony
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Beethoven: Symphony No.
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Randy Weston, piano; Sam Gill, bass.
What It This Thing Called Love; I Love You;
Night and Day; I Get a Kick Out of You; In
the Still of the Night; Get Out of Town; Just
One of Those Things; I've Got You Under My
Skin.
Riverside, which has been completely
devoted to traditional jazz heretofore,
takes its first step into a more modern
vein with this group of piano and bass
performances. Randy Weston is an excellent
choice for this initial venture for his playing
is tinged with the ideas of the modern
jazz pianist without being idiosyncratically
esoteric or fashionably rutted.
He has
much of Basié s swinging sparseness,
expressed with a light and lively touch,
but his methods of working out his ideas
are quite personal and delightfully imaginative. No small part of the success of
is the exceptional
these performances
rapport between Weston and his bassist,
Sam Gill, who moves in and out of the
line of thematic development with intriguing effectiveness and provides a thoroughly swinging foundation over which
Weston can work. They are recorded in a
properly close and intimate manner.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
l:l( I)l:l),
HIGH FIDELITY DISCOGRAPHY
No.
14
TOSCANINI ON RECORDS
by Robert Charles Marsh
Part III: 1949/54
EARLY in the summer of 1948 Columbia introduced
the modern long -play disk and, as it soon became clear,
revolutionized the recording industry. During this tumultuous change -over to LP Toscanini was inactive,
phonographically speaking; he led no regular recording
sessions between December 1947 and November 1949.
When he started again his output was up slightly. At
the close of the 1949-5o season of radio concerts he made
his celebrated tour of the United States with the NBC
Symphony, and on his return capped the triumph by
finally making a recording of La Mer that suited him.
The following year was dismal in contrast. He injured
his hip and reduced his commitments to a minimum:
there were four radio concerts and three recordings that
season, two of them from the broadcast line. Some of us
feared that it was the end: that he vrould retire to Italy
for good. (As I write this, the "retired" Maestro Toscanini
has just announced that he will conduct Falstaff at La
Scala this spring.)
mere 84- year -old
In the autumn of 1951, Toscanini
was back and setting a pace that had everybody else
panting. Then began the great series of Toscanini on
high fidelity. Between September 195r and mid -August
1952 he recorded 42 works in a form he approved for
release, and during the 1952 -53 season he completed recordings of 18 additional items. In his final season with
the NBC Symphony he canceled all scheduled recordings
except a final session to correct the tapes of two opera
broadcasts. However, the broadcasts from the 1953-54
season yielded many tapes, some of which make their
appearance on LP this month.
-a
-
WITH NBC SYMPHONY
-
1949
-
Symphony No. 2, recorded
LMin Carnegie Hall, November 7
1723 & in LM -69oo.
BEETHOVEN:
On the whole the technical side of these later records
of the highest quality. To avoid needless repetition,
I shall comment upon the sound of a specific recording
only if it is notably different from the general high level
of the series. Most of these were made in short takes to
fit the regular, and later the extended -play, 45 surface,
though eventually Victor gave in to Toscanini and allowed
him to have his way and play works straight through.
(Dividing music up into "takes" and stopping and starting
during performance had always been a source of annoyance
to him, as one can understand when one senses the importance of perfect continuity in his performances.)
Since all of these recordings have received full reviews
in HIGH FIDELITY within the recent past, I have held my
Fuller discussion will
remarks down to the minimum.
be found in my forthcoming book, Toscanini and the
Art of Orchestral Performance.
is
on LM -1o43; there is neither adequate
fidelity nor volume, and as a result the
clarity and brilliance of the concert-hall
original are gone. If this had only been
recorded in 1953!
proportions. Toscanini holds its somewhat
loose structure together with a strong
hand and makes a judicious cut in the
final movement. Recommended.
RESPIGH!:
No other conductor reveals the stature
of this score in the manner Toscanini
does. He makes it a work of great force,
a logical phase in the development from
the young genius who wrote the First
Symphony to the mature one who composed
the Eroica. The recording is disappointing
but responds to fussing with compensation;
worth having for the performance.
Daphnis and Chloe: Suite No. 2,
recorded in Carnegie Hall, November
21
*DM -1374 & LM -1o43.
RAVEL:
-
Symphony
1955
No.
3
(Eroica),
-
recorded in Carnegie Hall, November
*DM-1375 &
28 & December 5
LM -Io42 & in LM -699o.
The inflections of the 1939 performance
have here given way to a singing line that
is hair- raising in its intensity and cumulative
power. The recording originally was not
too pleasant, but a refurbished master
now gives improved sound that is often
quite fine.
Manfred Symphony (usually
called a "symphonic poem "), recorded
*DMin Carnegie Hall, December 5
TCHAIKOVSKY:
Toscanini's approach to this music is
that everything should be heard; thus,
his balance and general effect often differ
from that of the great Koussevitzky performance, which many of us will hear in
our minds as long as we live. The sad
thing is that one can't hear everything
FEBRUARY,
BEETHOVEN:
1372 &
LM1o37.
-
Another masterful demonstration of how
to play Tchaikovsky, this time involving
a fine and unjustly neglected score of major
Roman
-
Festivals, recorded in
12
LM -55.
Carnegie Hall, December
High fidelity is really with us here; the
bell notes in the last half inch of Side
are as good as those on any disk. When
told that the final section of the work
might overload the recording equipment,
Toscanini shouted: "I don't care! Break
everything, but get it on!" What we have,
then, is a thrilling performance of a score
that is good picture music but not much
else, recorded as an all -time decibel champion.
1
WAGNER: Götterdämmerung: Siegfried't Rhine
Journey [concert version by Toscaninil.
recorded in Carnegie Hall, December
in LM -6029.
22
-
The dawn music
is
here played about
six percent faster than in 1936, and it makes
83
RECORDS
difference! Nonetheless, this is a brilliant (and sonically the definitive) statement
of a score that Toscanini has practically
made his own.
WITH NBC SYMPHONY- 1950
WAGNER: Parsifal: Prelude and Good Friday
Spell, recorded in Carnegie Hall, December 22
*DM -1376 & LM-i5 & in
The combination of completely modern
sound and a deeply felt and impelling
(but not overly tense or demoniac) performance gives us this work with blood
a
-
LM -602o.
first movement
sound
MOZART:
fully achieved.
The
12
-LM -1789.
-
DUKAS: The Sorcerer's Apprentice, recorded
in Studio 8 -H, March 19
LM -1118.
One of the most enjoyable of the lighter
works in the supposedly serious repertory,
given a delicious performance. But why
inflate costs by giving a 12 -inch surface to
a
io-minute piece?
Symphony No. 8 (Unfinished),
SCHUBERT:
-
recorded in Studio 8 -H, March 13 &
June 2
*DM -1456 & LM -9o22 &
*LM -54
is
slightly dry.
Symphony No. 40, recorded in
Carnegie Hall, March
in it.
The LM -6o2o version of this offers
better sound than the other two; fidelity
even embraces the noise of passing subway
trains beneath the hall. The qualities of
this playing, the tensile strength of the
sound, the incisiveness of the attack, the
expressive force of the inflection and
accent make for a statement of the music
with an impact that others almost never
achieve. (I find what appears to be an
equal performance in the ancient recording
by Karl Muck.)
is
The last Toscanini set to be released
on 78 -rpm disks. This is as far as one
can get from the "Blossom Time' approach
to Schubert. The music is played with
the same qualities of cohesion and strength
found in the Parsifal and the force of the
-
SMETANA: The Moldau, recorded in
8 -H, March 19
LM -1118.
Studio
Does this river flow into the Elbe or the
Adriatic? The performance has a clarity
and drive that one rarely hears, and the
inner voices are beautifully revealed, but
the spirit could not be less Bohemian and
the scanning of the excerpt of folk music
is completely Italian in manner.
-
Falstaf, recorded in Studio 8-H
during broadcasts, April
& 8
LM6111. Principals: Herva Nelli, soprano;
Teresa Stitch- Randall, soprano; Nan
Merriman, mezzo -soprano; Cloe Elmo,
mezzo -soprano; Giuseppe Valdengo, baritone; Frank Guarrera, baritone; Norman
Scott, bass, and others; with the Robert
Shaw Chorale.
VERDI:
1
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If you enjoy the finest reproduction
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want the finest reproduction of music
you can demand a perfect, unplayed,
guaranteed record.
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Catalog 3
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Y.
Toscanini is to give this work at La
Scala this spring, and RCA would do well
to be there with plenty of tape and engineers. The Maestro's part of the recorded
broadcasts is wonderful, but on the whole
the singers rather let him down; they
seemingly do not know the parts well
enough to give them adequate characterization. There is a lot of juice in the title
role that Valdengo fails to squeeze out:
he is neither un gran seduttore nor a convincing Re de pantie.
Still, there is an
abundance of delightful music on these
records.
DEBUSSY:
La
8-H, June 1
-
Mer, recorded
LM -1221.
in Studio
In the 29 seasons from 1925 to 1954
Toscanini gave this work over 5o times.
The successful 195o recording came after
several had been rejected. Toscanini has
edited the score with great care (and
Debussy's permission). His performance
is slower than that of most conductors,
and the clarity and brilliance, the perfection with which each detail of the
instrumentation is achieved, make it the
nearest thing one is ever likely to hear
to the sounds in the mind of the composer.
One of the great recordings of the century.
SAINT -SAENS:
Danse
in Studio 8 -H, June
1
-
Macabre, recorded
LM -1118.
This is like finding a chromolithograph
of the Albert Memorial framed in gold
at the Louvre.
DEBUSSY:
June
2
-
Ibiria, recorded in Studio
8 -H,
LM -1833.
The last Toscanini recording to be
made in Studio 8 -H (R.I.P.), which was
converted to TV purposes during the
summer of 195o. For years the Maestro
refused to approve this Ibiria. Recently,
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
ft f<
however, RCA Victor reprocessed the
tapes in such a way as to give this five year -old recording an "enhanced sound"
(RCA's terminology), and in its new
guise Toscanini was satisfied. Hence its
belated issue this month, coupled with
the previously released La Mer.
The
latter has also been sonically updated
with "enhanced sound."
[Editor's Note:
A pressing of this recording could not
be sent in time to Mr. Marsh, who is now
in England.]
WITH NBC SYMPHONY
-
Hall, January 10
:
-
&
Two more modern duplications of
older recordings which have the life and
strength of the originals. There is a noticeable (but inoffensive) tape splice near the
beginning of the Prelude to Act 1; both
preludes could use a little more solidity
and base.
-
Siegfried: Forest Murmurs, recorded in Carnegie Hall, October 29
LRM -7029.
WAGNER:
1951
-
Don Juan, recorded in Carnegie
LM -1157.
STRAUSS:
Lohengrin: Preludes to Acts
3, recorded in Carnegie Hall, October
LRM
-7o29
& LM -6o2o.
22
WAGNER:
An impassioned statement of one of
Strauss' most effective pieces of portraiture, quite sufficient to rebut the charge
that Toscanini's performances of his music
are overrefined and lack vigor.
Of all the raw and bleeding fragments
of Wagner which reach the concert room,
this one reaches the level of "grovelling
imbecility" according to Tovey, whom
I second with bravo!
The 45 set matches
the level of the music: after 24 seconds
of Forest Murmurs there is a break to the
side following! Those who can stand the
piece with its lack of form and silly climax
(how can Toscanini tolerate it ?) will find
it beautifully played here.
-
Symphony No. r, recorded in
LM -17o2
Carnegie Hall, November 6
& in LM -6,o8.
BRAHMS:
For me this is the Brahms First. No other
conductor refines away the pretension and
the mechanical formulae of the string
parts the way Toscanini does, and in his
hands it becomes powerful, majestic, and
eloquent; but not even he can get me to
listen to the second movement! The best
part of the symphony, the Introduction
to the final movement and the choral
that follows. is here recorded with true
splendor.
?cod 711494eGpeeIt
-
BEETHOVEN:
Symphony No. 4, recorded
during a broadcast, February 3
LM1723 & in LM -69oo.
7tCed
have listened to a copy of the original
tape and can report that the disk reproduces
the sound of the source recording well,
though it is not less cramped and dry for
that. Toscanini was driving the orchestra
very hard and obviously wanted clarity
and dramatic force, which are here preserved at the cost of tonal splendor. The
more relaxed 1939 performance is the one
to have. It is not available, alas!
I
RESPIGHI:
Brazilian Impressions
GRANADOS: Two Spanish Dances
L'Orchestre des Concerts Colonne
conducted by George Sebastian
CHAVEZ
-
VERDI: Requiem Mass, recorded in Carnegie
Hall during a broadcast, February 27
LM -6oí8.
[Editor's Note:
Toccata for Percussion
1
Pressings of this recording
- 12"
could not be sent in time to Mr. Marsh.
However, it was reviewed by James Hinton.
Jr., in HIGH FIDELITY for January 1955.]
-
7054.
4
(orch. Berlioz):
levitation to the
Dance, recorded in Carnegie Hall, SeptemERA -125.
ber 28
Don Pasquale: Overture, reDONIZETTI:
corded in Carnegie Hall, October
-
-
recorded
Symphony No.
15
in
Carnegie
r
Hall,
(Classical),
October
LM -9oso.
Has this symphony a slow movement?
Toscanini has decided in recent years that
it does, and his tempo for the Larghetto
is quite a bit slower than that of other
It is convincing, but the
conductors.
great Koussevitzky performance (which
never got onto modern records) was
convincing too, though quite different.
An unusual and effective reading of a fine
score, then, well worth some thought.
FEBRUARY, T955
- 12"
7144
B.Flat Major
1
in C
Major
Leipzig Philharmonic Orchestra
conducted by Gerhard Pfleger
URLP 239
$11.90
SHOSTAKOVITCH:
Lallet Suite No.
Recordings
These are all agreeable works and all
are second recordings. The 1936 Semiramidt
was so fine that no other version will
ever quite take its place, but this one is
excellent, and the other two disks are
equally polished and propulsive.
5 in
Symphony No.
2
io-
URLP
WEBER:
Magnificent
New Hyper-Linear
High Fidelity
LRM-7o28.
PROKOFIEFF:
Symphony No.
TODAY ...TO
TOMORROW'S
STANDARDS
WEBER
55.95
BRUCKNER.
CAPTURED
recorded
in Carnegie Hall, September 28
LRM Semiramide: Overture,
ROSSINI:
The Gotham Percussion Players
1,
Opus 84
KABALEVSKY:
The Comedians, Opus 26
PROKOFIEFF:
Love for Three Oranges (Suite), Opus 33 A
BORODIN:
Girl's Dance and Polovtsian Dances
OUTSTANDING RECENT RELEASES
KODALY Concerto for Orchestra
PROKOFIEFF Scythian Suite, Opus 20
LALO Symphony in G Minor
Rhapsodie Norvégienne
MEYERBEER
Selections
URLP
7138
URLP
7142
;Berlin Symphony Choir:.
1
-
12"
Berlin Symphony Orchestra
URLP 7146
53.98
501-- 15,0001.
Overtures and Orchestral
URLP 7141
PROKOFIEFF Symphony No. 4 in
The Prodigal Son, Ballet Suite
C
URLP
Major
7139
SCHUBERT Symphony No. 3 in D Major
URLP 7137
Symphony No. 6 in C Major
85
O11)
RECORDS
BEETHOVEN: "Symphony No. 7,
Carnegie Hall, November 9
& in LM -69oo.
-
recorded in
LM -1756
There is no use pretending that at 84
the Old Man could duplicate what may
have been the Beethoven performance
of his life 15 years earlier, but this is very
good indeed, and the ways in which it
falls below the 1936 version are not too
conspicuous and probably not terribly
important, so take this for its superior
sound.
The Nutcracker Suite, re-
TCHAIKOVSKY:
-
corded in Carnegie Hall,
19
LRY -9aoo.
November
It may come as a surprise to some to
learn that this work was on the program
of Toscanini's first symphony concert
It is here played with attention
to balance, texture, and coloring such as
it is rarely given.
in 1896.
BEETHOVEN:
WAGNER:
Die Meistersinger:
-
Preludes
to
& 3, recorded in Carnegie Hall,
November 26
LM -6o2o (Art 3 only
in LRM- 7o29).
Arts
1
In terms of performance alone the
slower and more relaxed 1946 version of
the Act Prelude is better than this. None-
-
1
gi
fidelity
tapes
LP
LM -1745
Toscanini plays this work with a larger
group than that for which it was intended
but achieves a quality that is not alien to
chamber music. This is a young Beethoven,
not the thunderer, but fresh, melodic,
and romantic.
high
at
-
Septet (Op. 20), recorded in
Carnegie Hall, November 26
prices !
Omegatapes conform to the Ampex Recording
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First Releases:
tchaikovsky: The Tempest and Elegie
for Strings
vienna state opera orchestra, zoltan fekete, conductor
omegatape 6008... five inch reel, dual track $6.45
mozart: Three Salzburg Symphonies K.136, 137, 138
london mozart ensemble, mervyn vicars, conductor
a mozart bicentennial celebration edition 1956
omegatape 6001 ... five inch reel, dual track $6.45
tchaikovsky: Serenade for Strings
concert artist symphony of london, mervyn vicars, conductor
omegatape 5002... five inch reel, dual track $5.95
beethoven: Piano Concerto Number 3, Op. 37
concert artist symphony of london, mervyn vicars, conductor
vitebsky, pianist
omegatape 6002... fire inch reel, dual track $6.45
mozart: Piano Concerto Number 21 in C Major, k. 467
london mozart ensemble, mervyn vicars, conductor
Sergio fiorentino, pianist
a mozart bicentennial celebration edition 1956
five inch reel, dual track $5.95
omegatape 5007
Send demonstration tape
(Omegatape D) enclosed $1.00
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omegatape 5005... five inch reel, dual track $5.95
P) Send free complete Omega.
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name_
address
city
tone
86
state
Carnegie Hall, December
& in LM -61o8.
-
recorded in
Symphony No. 4.
BRAHMS:
3
LM -1713
One of the supreme masterpieces of the
nineteenth century and my candidate for
the most perfectly conceived work of
Brahms. From the siren song of the opening
bars to the towering heights of the closing
passacaglia it is filled with traps for the
unwary conductor of dubious musicianship
or taste. Toscanini is equal to every one
of them. In the final movement, by holding
the tempo steady, as it must be, he achieves
the great climactic passage at the close
of the variations in a manner fit to be a
paradigm for all who play the score. There
is another, less intense, approach to the
slow movement, but Toscanini's does
not lack in effectiveness. A great recording.
Variations on an Original Theme
(Enigma), recorded in Carnegie Hall,
December 10
LM -1725.
ELGAR:
-
The British tend to overrate Elgar and
the Americans to ignore him. Both positions
are unsatisfactory. He is not of the rank
of Brahms (say), but he is worth our
attention, particularly in such a lovely
score as this, played here with obvious
affection.
-
The Fountains of Rome, recorded
in Carnegie Hall, December 17
LM1768.
RESPIGHI:
More Roman pictures with the colors
splashing wet out of the tubes.
BEETHOVEN:
-
Symphony No. z, recorded in
Carnegie Hall, December 21
& in LM -69oo.
LM -6009
Within the style imposed (a severe,
unyielding classicism) this is a consistent
and cogent reading of the score. Some
may prefer a warmer and broader performance, such as that of 1937.
WITH NBC SYMPHONY
-
1952
WAGNER: Götterdämmerung: Siegfrieds Death
and Funeral Music (concert version by
-
Toscanini], recorded in Carnegie Hall,
January 3
LM -6o2o.
...
Great Wurlitzer Pipe Organ, gordon kibbee, organist
omegatape 5009 ... five inch reel, dual track $5.95
n
theless, both performances are longer
than a "standard" German one, such as
Muck's. The 1951 version, with its brilliant
sound (but boost the bass a little), is
highly effective and enjoyable. The Act
3 Prelude is magnificently achieved and
gives us some of the best pages Wagner
wrote. Increase bass here too.
This powerful statement of the hero's
death is slower and more dramatically
paced than the echt German version by Muck.
It is one of the basic Toscanini repertory
items, most welcome in its return to the
catalog. Increase the bass a little and this
Omegatape
becomes
INTERNATIONAL PACIFIC RECORDING CORPORATION
7511 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles 46, California
520 Fifth Avenue, New York 36, New York
One of the great works of German
romanticism. Here its lyric and dramatic
qualities are fully revealed.
WEBER:
a
real thriller!
-
Der Freischutz: Overture, recorded
LRM -7o28.
in Carnegie Hall, January 3
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Kf( ()RI),
Psyché and Eros, recorded in
LM -1838.
Carnegie Hall, January
FRANCK:
7-
Toscanini's only recording of Franck's
music offers an agreeably melodic excerpt
from the symphonic poem Psyché.
Tristan and Isolde: Prelude and
Lore- Death, recorded in Carnegie Hall,
WAGNER:
January
7
-
LM -6o2o.
Alma Mahler's biography of her
husband, we learn of Mahler's misgivings
about Toscanini's performances of Tristan
in the 19o9 -lo season at the Metropolitan
Opera, when they both conducted there.
The perI share Mahler's reservations.
formance (there is no reason to believe it
has changed greatly in the intervening
years) is overrefined, the antiseptic souvenir
of passion rather than its full -blooded
In Tristan this will not do.
actuality.
There is a noticeable break in continuity
in bar 55 of the Liebestod, right after the
strings have played a wonderful phrase
as if it were something by Verdi.
In
I
BEETHOVEN:
Symphony No. 5, recorded in
BEETHOVEN:
-
Carnegie Hall during
22
a
broadcast, March
director.
LM -1757 & in LM -6900.
Between 1939 and 1952 Toscanini speeded
this work up two minutes and a second.
There is no question but that the faster
tempi make the work more thrilling, but
does a symphony of these dimensions
need to break all speed records to be
effective? What I really want is the 1939
performance with the 1952 recording.
What I'll settle for is the 1952 version.
BEETHOvEN:
Symphony No. 9 ( Choral>,
final movement recorded in Carnegie
Hall, March 31; first three movements
recorded
there April
Nan
-
I
LM -6009 &
Eileen Farrell, soprano;
Merriman. mezzo -soprano; Jan
in LM -69oo.
Peerce, tenor; Norman Scott, bass: the
Robert Shaw Chorale, Robert Shaw
"I'm almost satisfied" was Toscanini's
comment on this recorded performance.
Undoubtedly he knows how he could
do it better, with angelic choirs that never
sing off key or need to breathe, but in
terms of human resources this seems about
as good a Ninth as one is likely to hear.
It is the only one on records that avoids
all the pitfalls (and no score has more of
them) and achieves a sense of unity of
form and continuing progression from one
climax to the next, up to the very end.
(Most conductors enter the final movement
in the position of the general who has
fired off his entire stock of heavy ammuDefinitive.
nition early in the battle.)
"anyone
(Pastoral),
Hall, January
Symphony No. 6
-
recorded in Carnegie
f.M -1755.
14
This is a dazzling classical landscape,
brilliantly illuminated by the Mediterranean
sun. The performance is full of marvels,
not the least of them the slow movement.
Beethoven's village band never appears
in the scherzo; the refined sounds one
Indeed, the entire
hears are no rustics.
effect is of a countryside more perfect
than any one is ever likely to see.
for
HI -FI
a Theme of Haydn,
BRAHMS: Variations
recorded in Carnegie Hall, February
on
4
-
Do you know that a violin, a viola, a flute and a clarinet will
sound the same when their frequency response is cut off at
3,000 cycles? Do you know what inter -modulation is? Do
you know how to check for it? Do you know your Hi-Fi?
LM -1725.
A basic item in Toscanini's repertory
given a second recording that duplicates
the fine 1936 version and offers the excellence of modern sound.
BRAHMS:
Symphony No. 2,
Carnegie Hall, February
& in LM -61o8.
t
11
-
CHERUBINI:
Carnegie
(A Guide To Sound Listening)
DL 130
A VOX DE LUXE ALBUM, written and produced by Tyler Turner. Hear
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See Hi-Fi illustrated and diagrammed read a detailed analysis
in a comprehensive booklet. Check the speed of your turntable with
the stroboscope on the specially designed label. THE SOUND SEN-
LM -1731
Symphony in D, recorded in
-1745.
Hall, March 10
-LM
Don't expect this to be a forgotten
masterpiece, but take it as an enjoyable
work by a composer who was once ranked
with the great and has been reduced, as
others shall, to a lesser rank.
FEBRUARY, ):955
"THIS IS HIGH FIDELITY"
recorded in
Toscanini's Brahms is usually best when
he forgets himself and allows the line
to slacken or the tempo to loosen up for
the purpose of expression. The performance
of this symphony in London that Toscanini
gave with the Philharmonia Orchestra in
the September following this recording
was of the "loosened" type, and it had a
warmth and communicative power that
this verson lacks. Here the Maestro is
disciplined: intensity is the predominant
feeling of the work, the tempi are fast,
and the propulsive force of the dramatic
line carries all before it. This approach
has its merits, but I wish we had the other
(There
Toscanini performance as well.
is a tape of it in Walter Toscanini's collection of broadcast material.)
?
-
-
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-A
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CORELLI:
TORELLI:
COMPLETE OPUS 3 d 4
(12 Church and 12 Chamber Sonatas)
Musicorum Arcadia 8 Egida Giordani
Sartori, continuo
3 -12"
DL 163
VIVALDI:
LA STRAVAGANZA, OPUS 4 (12 Concerti
for Solo Violin, Strings and Continuo)
Berchet, violin
Elsner, harpsichord
Pro
Musica String Orchestra, Stuttgart
Rein hardt, conductor
3-12" DL 103
-
QL
/,....0
1a1.,.x1
-
-
VO 1
-
CONCERTI, OPUS 8 (For Violin and
String Orchestra)
Berchet, Beh, violins
Pro Musica String
Orchestra, Stuttgart
Reinhardt, conductor
3 -12"
DL 113
12
-
-
BACH:
BRANDENBURG CONCERTOS NOS.
1
-6
(Complete)
Soloists under the musical direction of
Jascha Horenstein
2-12" DL 122
Ultra High Fidelity
236 West 55th Street, New York 19, N. Y.
87
RECORDS
i,cnrenr
-
Siegfried Idyll, recorded
Carnegie Hall, July 29
LM -602o.
WAGNER:
in
Students of concert life in New York
should note that this ends with a fanfare
of automobile horns; in fact, the constant
penetration of noise into the hall caused
the engineers to use a "close -in" technique
which lost much of the natural resonance
of the auditorium. The performance is
not my favorite of the three, a little chilly
and lacking intimacy. The 1946 version
is best.
Note the midsummer recording
date of this and the following; unusual
for Toscanini.
l3l RLE.SQUE
UNCENSORED
Music for countless lovely muscles
44/100°ío pure.
COOK #1071 12 -in.
-
LIADOFF: Kikimora- LRM -7or4.
PONCHIELLI:
La Gioconda: Dance
99
55.95.
-
Jacket notes brazenly identify this as a recording from the orchestra pit during a live
burlesque show. "Recorded in the flesh" i,
the exact wording! And later, "a BAREFACED DOCUMENTARY ..." -and
"Music for a strip tease ".
My own reactions as to the kind of imagination which thought up such a record in the
first place had best be left unprinted. I will
confine myself purely to a rigid, impartial,
unbiased, open -minded, fair and factual
examination of this frightening release. Unfortunately the record has little to offer in
comparison say to the lovely sonatas for lute
and flute review in this column last month.
The orchestra on BURLESQUE UNCENSORED plays with more decolletc than
dignity. The brass section, especially the
trumpet, takes unwarranted liberties with
the score, interpolating shocking slides and
ad libidum figures which are positively
raucous and licentious. The percussion not
only completely obliterates the rest of the
orchestra but also is given to charmless and
indelicate outbursts. The bump figures are
heavy handed, (if I may be permitted to
speak figuratively) while the grind motif
lacks real integrity.
The fidelity of the recording is perhaps too
revealing, the low ends embarrassing, and
as for the recording curve, I suspect there
are several, all well pre -emphasized Surface
noise is most objectionable, with frequent
whistles, hoots and howls,
or was this
the audience? Personally I prefer the pristine
measured sound of simple strings calmly
recorded in a deadened and unemotional
studio. The 1932 version of Air on a G.
string recorded by Machiabelli is one modest example.
Get It Now While Still Available
(before it goes under the counter)
-
-
COOK LABS
88
-
of
Esoteric
tudio
ound
"PANEGYRIS"
th_
the royal greek festival company
& LM -1834.
Mignon: Overture
LRM -7013.
All recorded in Carnegie Hall, July 29.
THOMAS:
Lobby talker, Candy Butcher; Music for
Strip Tease, Patti Waggin; Sketch
Aunt
,lfartha's New Maid: chorus line; Sketche;
W'omen Haters' Club and Old Judge
Mortlfort Rides Again; strip tease -Marie
Voe; catcalls courtesy midnight audience.
-
flours- LRM -7oo5
New
These were recorded close-in and then
given artificial resonance, the effect of which
was to coarsen the sound, particularly
in the loud passages.
All are "Pops"
items with some lovely playing but no
great musical content.
BIZET:
Carmen: Orchestral Suite No.
LRM-7o 13.
t
-
h. m.
under the high patronage of
the queen of the hellenes, frederika
vol. I -greek folk songs and dances -es -527
2 -greek island and mountain songs -es -531
vol.
CATALAN!:
Lorelei: Dance of the Water
Nymphs; La Wally: Prelude to Act 4
ERA -tor.
-
ESOTERIC RECORDS
HEROLD:
Zampa: Overture
LRM -7014
& LM -1834.
HUMPERDINCK: Hansel and Gretel: Prelude
238 East 26th Street
New York City 10
-
LRM -7o14. All recorded in Carnegie
Hall, August 5.
LIVING PRESENCE
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MG 50046
ANTAL DORATI
conducting the
Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra
101
SECOND ST.
STAMFORD, CONN.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
KL
Further spectacular performances of lighter works with the recording coarsened by
the addition of resonance.
is sensational.
SIBELIUS:
The Carmen
-
Finlandia, recorded in Carnegie
LRM -7oo5 & LM -1834.
5
Hall, August
Toscanini's only commercial recording
of music by a composer he has played
The performance is simple,
sparingly.
forceful, and direct.
Oberon:
WEBER:
recorded in
LRM -7o28.
Overture;
Carnegie Hall, August
5-
The 45 set has this tagging Don Pasquale
without a separating band. Toscanini does
things with the early romantics that others
just can't manage; this is no exception.
BRAHMS:
-
No. 3. recorded in
LM -r93ä
Symphony
Carnegie Hall, November 4
& in LM -6108.
Toscanini put off recording this symphony until the end of the Brahms series
because he was uncertain how he wanted
it to go. After several days of listening
to tapes of his broadcasts, he put together
an ideal performance (first and fourth
movements of October 15, 1938, second
movement of March 31, 1946, third movement of November 20, 1948). He listened
to this until he thought he had it well in
mind and then attempted to duplicate
it in the recording session. He was unsuccessful. The "ideal version" is consistently taut, hard driving, and intense.
This performance is slower and suffers,
of all things, from both a lack of continuity
and changes in the rhythmic pulse and
scanning of phrases. The conclusion to
be drawn is that the Old Man is still unable
66 amazing for their clarity,
to get this to go as he would like.
/
44 so far as recorded sound is
Symphony' No. 8,
recorded in
Carnegie Hall, November io
-LM-175"
BEETHOVEN:
The traditional manner of playing this
score turns it into a merry quadrille. full
of jolly little tunes and by no means a
serious business. Commentators can then
remark how odd it was that Beethoven
should write such a work during a period
of crisis in his life. In the Toscanini performance it is restored to its proper stature,
as a work equal in power and intensity
to the Seventh which precedes it. A definitive recording. Note the big difference
made by repeating the exposition of the
In seeing the necessity
first movement.
for this Toscanini reveals his superb sense
of form.
La Forza del Destino: Overture,
recorded in Carnegie Hall, November
10- ERA -125.
VERDI:
For those who enjoy the piece this
brilliant version.
GLUCK:
-
Hall
22
naturalness."
concerned this disc is the
finest available today."
& in LM -69oo.
a
their realism, and overall
44 goes several steps beyond
the competition."
/
46 unhesitatingly
These are critics speaking of
the brilliant new WESTMINSTER
LABORATORY SERIES. Public
response has been, if anything,
even more enthusiastic. For
W-LAB records are made expressly for professional equipment:
is
Orfeo: Art 2, recorded in Carnegie
during a broadcast, November
LM -185o.
[Editor's Note: Pressings of this recording
could not be sent in time to Mr. Marsh.]
Vie Aeolian *Milner
=
they are free of distortion,
either harmonic or intermodulatory; they have no echo,
either pre- or post-; there is no
sound seepage between grooves,
no reduction of high frequency
response, no stylus- bridging on
inside grooves. Each record is
packed in a dust -protective
cover and comes with an engineering analysis by C. G.
McProud, editor and publisher
of Audio.
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FEBRUARY, 1955
tiy
OKL)!,
RECORDS
WITH NBC SYMPHONY
THESE ARE THE
REASONS
why so many people
-
1953
- - LRY
BEETHOVEN: Egmont Overture
LM -1834.
BERLIOZ: Roman Carnival Overture
LM-
1834.
9000.
William Tell: Overture
All recorded in Carnegie Hall,
January
19.
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Symphony No.
in Carnegie
-
recorded
26
LM -1789.
94
Every record guaranteed to be
brand new, factory fresh and unplayed.
Every record carefully inspected
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mailing.
Every record dusted, cleaned and
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warm and radiant performance of
symphony in which the most celebrated
of the various surprises is not the most
amusing. (The best of Haydn's surprises
is in fact the Great Bassoon Joke in the
final movement of No. 102.) The theme
of the minuet is unhappy at the pace
Toscanini takes it; otherwise all is relaxed
and beautiful.
(orch. Ravel):
Pictures at
an Exhibition, recorded in Carnegie Hall,
January 26
LM -1838.
Ravel orchestration was commissioned
by Koussevitzky, but Toscanini plays
it with a dramatic flair and growing excitement that I have not heard from any
other conductor. The quality of the sound
makes this a real showpiece
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Symphony No.
5
-
Hall,
The traditional performance of this
work contains a good deal of unrefined
corn which Toscanini removes.
If you
like the corn, if you think it is inherent
in the thematic material and the way it
is developed, then you won't find this a
sympathetic reading of the score.
Not
being a corn lover, I call it definitive.
Symphony No. 9 [sometimes
called No. 71, recorded in Carnegie Hall,
February 9
LM -1835.
SCHUBERT:
-
Those who say that Toscanini's pace
is too fast in the slow movement fail to
grasp the fact that by means of this he
achieves a climax which is clearly what
When ordering simply list records
wanted (to avoid delay, list substitutes also) with your check or
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orders.
New record prices are in operation
as quickly as they are announced
by the Record companies.
.11)JSfAc
fox
MAIN STREET
GREAT BARRINGTON, MASS.
Brahms is sometimes thought of as the
of these dances. They are, in fact,
folk music which he collected and arranged
for piano.
Toscanini plays them with
great bravura, but the way he places the
accents in No. t ought to have all the
gypsy fiddlers in arms. It is wonderful.
It is thrilling. But it is completely Latin!
RESPIGHI:
The Pines
of
Carnegie Hall, March
recorded in
LM -1768.
Rome,
t
7
"It sounds better here than the orchestra
in the hall," was the Maestro's comment
on this disk, and that is sufficient, I think.
Mista Sokmnis, recorded in
Carnegie Hall, March 3o, 3i, & April
2
LM -6013. Lois Marshall, soprano;
Nan Merriman, mezzo soprano; Eugene
Conley, tenor; Jerome Hines, bass;
the Robert Shaw Chorale, Robert Shaw
BEETHOVEN:
-
conductor.
I have heard an air -check recording of
Toscanini's first performance of this work
during his 1933.34 New York Philharmonic
season, with Rethberg, Onegin, Althouse,
and Pinza in the solo parts. The pace is
slower, the inflection of the melodic line
more pronounced, and the power even
greater, and it is tragic that we have no
recording of that period.
(Victor made
the work in Boston with Koussevitzky.l
This is a faster performance with lighter weight soloists and a single- microphone
technique which puts them at a disadvantage.
It is full of remarkable things, for example
the perfect handling of the solo violin
(which in less than expert 'hands can
sound disturbingly like a concerto). As
great a statement of the score as one is
likely to hear.
QUIET prevents static.
QUIET lubricates and protects the
grooves.
QUIET retards needle wear.
-
FOR
PHONOGRAPH
RECORDS
hc
Hungarian
composer
(From the Neu
recorded in Carnegie
February 2
LM -1778.
Dvorak):
-
MUSSORGSKY
-
(orch.
Dances Nos. 1, 17, 20 & 21, recorded
in Carnegie Hal!, February 17
LM1834.
Hall, January
A
World),
U. S. A.
BRAHMS:
(Surprise).
a
.ervice:
Schubert intended, and which cannot he
realized at a slower tempo. It is interesting
to contrast reviews of this record with those
of the 1947 version. Many critics have
written approvingly of the modified tempi
in the 1953 recording. Actually, Toscanini
has slightly quickened his pace, but the
brilliance of the modern sound makes
his effects more apparent and hence more
acceptable.
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RECORDS
t: Record Market
Symphony No. 5 (Reformation), recorded in Carnegie Hall during
LM -1851.
13
a broadcast, December
MENDELSSOHN:
-
(Editor's Note: A pressing of this recording
could not be sent in time to Mr. Marsh -]
WITH NBC SYMPHONY- 1954
Symphony No. 4 (Italian),
recorded in Carnegie Hall during a
LM -1851broadcast, February 28
MENDELSSOHN:
-
A pressing of this record(Editor's Note:
ing could not he sent in time to Mr. Marsh.]
VERDI:
-
Te Deum, recorded in Carnegie
Hall during a broadcast, March 14
LM- 1849. With Robert Shaw Chorale,
Robert Shaw conductor.
Borro:
Mefistofele: Prologue, tecorded
in Carnegie Hall during a broadcast,
Nicola MosLM -1849.
March 14
Columbus Boys Choir,
cona, bass;
Herbert Huffman conductor.
-
Pressings of these re(Editor's Note:
cordings could not be sent in time to
Mr. Marsh.]
A Masked Ball, recorded in Carnegie Hall during broadcasts, January
February 24, with additional
17 and
material from June 3 & 5. To be re-
THIS IS IT!
A device for cleaning both record and
stylus without risk of damage to either.
FREE your records of dust and grit by
using this unique NO bristle brush.
chemically treated for static, that
operates with a "duster" action.
a cloth to rub with. Not a liquid
to spray.
A spring -like motion of the brush, fans
the dust from the grooves. A jet blast
of air cleans the lint from the stylus.
Begin now to enjoy better sound from
your system by using this new HI -FI
Not
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only 51.00 Postpaid
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PLASTICOVERS are transparent, durable.
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Twelve 120 she OR E Ighlan 10" size
ONLY $1.00. 10% discount with $5 orders.
Dealer Inquiries Invited
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Inspected Guaranteed
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-
CA L EX
Plastic Jacketed
4110 Caroline, Houston 4, Texas
This is the only unreleased item included in the present discography. I enter
it because everyone knows that the Masked
Ball is pending and because it is pertinent
to conclude Part 3 on a note of anticipation.
Thanks to magnetic tape, RCA Victor
still has a sizable store of Toscanini issues
both from regularly
"to he released"
scheduled recording sessions and from
broadcasts. And it is altogether possible
that the Old Man will consent to conduct
again before the recording microphone.
Part 4, to appear at a later date, will comment
on the intervening Toscanini records.
Meanwhile
good health, Maestro!
saves your records
-
-
-VOL,
II
Fabulous Dynamic and Frequency Range
the
Incomparable Moller
Organ
Preludes, Fugues and Chorales
Dandrieu, Karg- Elert, Pachelbel,
Schroeder, Bach and Kirnberger
Ernest White, Edward Lintel; Organists
Famous Duotone Electrowipe
with $10 order.
Herva Neill, soprano, Claramae Turner,
mezzo -soprano, Jan Peerce, tenor, Robert
Merrill, baritone, Nicolai Moscona, bass, and
others, with Robert Shaw Chorale, Robert
Shaw, conductor.
No.
Demonstration Record illustrating the
A
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tara -d
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Catalog 25c or Free with Order
leased.
Troost Ave., Dept. F1,
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CO
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HI -FI Test Record
STATICLOTH
Prevent slow ruin of precious Hi -Fi
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Play the clean groove, hear music at
its best. STATICLOTH cleans, lubricates
and destroys static. Ask for it, ONLY
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STATICLOTH
Record Cleaning Cloth
Intorelectronics Corporation
2432 Grand Concourse, N. Y.
(an R.C.A. Victor custom pressing)
Check your equipment for
frequency response, distortion
First side (78 RPM): 15.6- 22,500 cps; sine waves
Second side (3340 RPM): frequency test run; square
waves; three variations of music to check
equipment characteristics
Recordings by Peter Bartok
Oscilloscope Illustrations
Notes
i
Sounds of Frequency...FPX 100
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Write for complete Folkways catalog;
more than 100 HiFi longplay records.
THE MUSIC
129 West 41 Street
lUdson
ROOM
New York 19, N.Y.
2 -4290
AUDIO FIDELITY RECORDS
This concludes the Toscanini Discography. Part II of The Chamber Music of
Brahms, by Paul Affelder, will appear in
the March Issue.
presents
STUDIES IN HIGH FIDELITY SOUND
MERRY GO ROUND MUSIC
High. medium and low frequency on
AUDIO FIDELITY LP
Watch For
Nat Hentoff's portrait of
The Modern Jazz Quartet
in the
March Issue
FEBRUARY, 1955
901
a
crazy carousel
10"
54.00
DRUMS OF THE CARIBBEAN
WROUGHT IRON RECORD RACK
Mambos. Rhumbas. Voodoo. Vibrant presence.
Holds 200 LP's. Black finish with rubber tips- Size I9 1/2"
high, 25" long, 9s/a " deep. Sturdy construction. Ten
separate sections allow for ideal storage of music by
style, composer, artist. Several racks may be placed side
by side to form
complete library of records. Please ^remit
with order. Satisfaction Guaranteed
7J
Money Refunded. Shipped Express Collect.
LESLIE CREATIONS 211i Robbins St. Dept. 209 Pha 49 Pa
AUDIO FIDELITY LP 902
10"
54.00
distributed by
DAUNTLESS INTERNATIONAL
!}i Lafayette
SI
New York 12,
N. Y.
sk9r75
7
qr
RH
()kI)
building your record library
number seventeen
JOHN
S.
WILSON SUGGESTS
TEN BASIC CHAMBER
SINCE the terminology of jazz, including the word "jazz" itself,
still in an area of lexicographical fluidity in which almost everything is open to personal interpretation, it might be well to precede
a selection of basic chamber jazz LPs by some indication of what
"chamber jazz" is going to mean on this occasion.
The term stems largely from the time of the emergence of the
Benny Goodman small groups and they can very fittingly be taken
as the prototype of the chamber jazz ensemble. This means that
we'll be dealing with trios, quartets, quintets
in the proper
circumstances, it might even be an octet
in which there is an
intimacy of voicing, ensemble interplay among the instruments
and at least a surface sophistication in approach.
This definition rules out some pretty basic small jazz groups
Louis Armstrong's Hot Five and Hot Seven, Jelly Roll Morton's
Red Hot Peppers, Red Nichols' Five Pennies and Dixieland ensembles in general. It also eliminates from consideration those
trios, quartets, etc., which are less ensembles than showcases for
a single soloist.
Having set up these ground rules, it almost inevitably follows
that the jumping off point for a library of chamber jazz is Benny
Goodman. The historically minded might like to start with Benny
Goodman Trio (Victor LPr 17) which contains the first recordings
(1935) made by the first Goodman small group (Goodman, clarinet;
Teddy Wilson, piano; Gene Krupa, drums) but there's more meat
and more variety to be found in a collection of later recordings
(1939-1945), Benny Goodman Combos (Columbia GL 500).
No small merit of the Columbia disk is that it permits Wilson and
another early Goodman small group star, Lionel Hampton, to be
heard without the burden of Krupa's rather heavy- handed drumming.
It also includes work by two of the most adept hands at chamber
jazz, Charlie Christian and Red Norvo. If it's a question of choosing
between the two disks, the clue to which is more suitable to your
taste will be found on the first band of the A side of each record.
In both cases, the tune is "After You've Gone." recorded nine
is
- -
-
years apart.
Contemporary with the early Goodman groups and powerful
influences in helping to establish the concept of chamber jazz
were two quite dissimilar groups: John Kirby's orchestra and the
Quintet of the Hot Club of France. Kirby's orchestra was actually
a sextet
thoroughly all -star sextet which played precise,
compact conceptions with a delightfully light, lilting beat. The
only available LP of its work, John Kirby and His Orchestra
(Columbia Mt. 4801), leans a little heavily on Kirby's invasions of
the classics but is, nonetheless, a fine expression of the charm of
this group.
Kirby's six men were equally responsible for the ensemble's
success but the Quintet of the Hot Club of France leaned heavily
on one man in particular: Django Reinhardt, an amazing three fingered guitarist.
The make-up of the Quintet was unique
three guitars, string bass and violin
and the swinging, compelling rhythm that they could churn up in ensemble was equally
unique. Reinhardt, of course, was one of the great virtuosi of jazz
and the Quintet's performances are studded with his brilliant
solos. Swing from Paris (London LS 81o) is a representative
selection of the Quintet's work during the five years that it recorded.
Chamber jazz groups were relatively few until the end of the
war. But with the fading of big bands from the jazz scene at that
time, small groups became the commonplace of jazz and, coming
into the Fifties, more and more of them were playing chamber
jazz. In a direct line from Goodman among the postwar groups
are the Buddy De Franco Trio and Quartet. De Franco plays the
clarinet with the swinging fluidity of Goodman but he develops
his ideas within the harmonic framework favored by the more
recent generation of jazzmen. Some of the best instances of his
chamber work are found on Buddy De Franco, King of the
-
-a
-
92
-
JAZZ WORKS
Clarinet
(MGM E 1771 on which he has the very helpful ensemble
and solo assistance of Kenny Drew on piano and guitarist Jimmy
Raney.
One of the most ubiquitous of jazz musicians
and particularly
so in the area of chamber jazz
is Red Norvo. He has already
been included in this listing as a Goodman sideman but no selection
of chamber jazz LPs would be properly basic if it did not include
one disk devoted completely to the work of this unusually creative
and tasteful musician. Of three excellent LPs featuring Norvo's
trio of recent years, possibly the most appealing is Red Norvo
Trio, Vol. 2 (Discovery 3018).
Norvo, De Franco, the Quintet of the Hot Club, Kirby and
Goodman represent what might be considered the old, established
element in chamber jazz (Artie Shaw's Gramercy Five
the old
Gramercy Five of the early Forties
deserves to be included in
this group and also deserves a better LP representation than the
single one available, Victor [PT 3017). In the past couple of years.
the experimentalists of jazz have been finding the chamber form
a fertile field and some of the most provocative work in it has
been done by groups which, at least at the outset, were breaking
sume kind of new ground.
One of the first to work out a formula that was both somewhat
experimental and somewhat commercial was Gerry Mulligan
whose pianoless quartet (baritone saxophone, trumpet, bass, drums)
produced some warm and intricately interwoven sounds in its earlier
days. A Mulligan collection from that period, Gerry Mulligan
Quartet (Fantasy 3 -6) gives an effective display of the inventiveness and appealing tonal colors which first aroused interest in his
work.
Dave Brubeck builds his chamber jazz on solos and duets by
his alto saxophonist, Paul Desmond, and himself. Like many
contemporary jazzmen, their improvisations are intellectually,
rather than emotionally, motivated but what they play is given an
emotional base by its superimposition on a very realistically swinging rhythm section (bass and drums). Brubeck's Quartet has received its best recording, both technically and musically, on Jazz
Goes to College (Columbia CL 566).
A very different type of quartet is the Modern Jazz Quartet.
This combination of piano, vibraphone, bass and drums starts,
as does any proper chamber jazz group, with a warm, moving beat
but instead of finding its inspiration for the development of its
ideas in the modern serious composers (Brubeck, for instance,
has studied with Darius Milhaud), the Modern Jazz Quartet is
more likely to go back to the classical composers, spicing them with
a touch of recent harmonics. The quiet charm of this group is
aptly caught on The Modern Jazz Quartet (Prestige PRLP 160).
New prospects for chamber jazz are being opened up by a pair
of West Coast jazzmen, Bob Cooper and Bud Shank. Although
both are primarily saxophonists, they have recently been working out
duets on instruments which have not previously been drawn closely
into the jazz sphere
Cooper on oboe and English horn, Shank
on flute and alto flute. With the accompaniment of piano, bass
and drums, they have recorded an intriguing set of selections on
a disk bearing the somewhat misleading title, Howard Rumsey's
Lighthouse All- Stars, Vol. 4 (Contemporary 251o). Despite this,
it's a solid helping of Cooper and Shank.
The urge to fool around with the techniques of the more avantgarde serious composers leads, inevitably, out of the jazz world
and into the avant -garde composer's camp. A group that is balanced
precariously between these two magnets is the Teddy Charles
Quartet (vibraphone, guitar, bass and drums). Both in and out
of the jazz world, Charles and his men play with dedicated skill.
The Quartet's New Directions (Prestige PRLP 140) contains well turned examples of both the ultimate extension of chamber jazz
and the step beyond this ultimate extension.
-
-
-
-
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
"Praise ... owes its value only
to its scarcity - Samuel Johnson
R. D. DARRELL
One of the Nation's Foremost Record Critics
"It flabbergasted me recently to be asked what kind of pick -up stylii
it's been unconceivable to me to play any record
(of any type, old or new) with anything but a diamond stylus
... a diamond stylus is not only essential, but actually cheaper .. .
Here for once, the maximum in quality and safety is also
the most convenient and economical!"
I used: for years
r',,
_,.
'\s.
PLAY SAFE
PLAY DIAMOND
TETRAD
WORLD'S LARGEST
MANUFACTURERS
OF
DIAMOND STYLI
Ask your dealer or serviceman for a BRAND NAME DIAMOND
Record -Needle Care Folders: Dept. F-2, 62 St. Mary Street, Yonkers, N. Y.
FEBRUARY. 1955
9;
Photograph is by Irvin Kershner of 17th or 111th century Colascione
in the Erich Lachmann Collection of Historical Stringed Musical
Instruments reproduced through the courtesy of the Allan Hancock
Foundation and the University of Southern California. Printed
reproductions of four of the photographs used In this series are
available for one dollar. Send remittance to James B. Lansing
Sound, Inc. Be sure to print your name and address clearly.
labor of love
The skilled 7talian bands which fashioned
this seventeenth century colascione were
alive with delight. The elegance with
which they inlaid the engraved mother-of-
ers and Enclosures. 7-le works to please,
pearl in the straight -grained spruce table
through bis meticulous labors, the finely
suggests a vision of courtly singers and
attuned ear which
noble ladies. The dim Lansing craftsman
appreciate today's closest approach to
carries in bis mind another vision while
perfection
be form.; and assembles Signature Speak-
loudspeakers by dim Lansing.
is
able to perceive and
- the verbatim reproduction of
Only Jim Lansing 15" and 12" General Purpose Speakers are made with four -inch voice coils... for
crisp, clean bass. .. for smooth, extended highs.
JAMES
B.
LANSING SOUND, INC.
2439 Pletcher Drive, Los Angeles 39, California
41
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Ztubío ILexícon: part t
flrnrg a 3Capman'g OuiDe tu tije
>f61eaning5 anb ZEISe of
barious 12)orDs, trrnt5
anl Abbrebiation5 tommonlp entountereb in tlje Colloqup5 and â-ZIrltmgs of
anb Ibiglj jfibelitp 3lnitiate5, tolnpileb bp 3top if. Alllson
uòio engineer5
-
AC
(See
Acoustic feedback -The physical transfer
of mechanical vibrations from the output
of a sound system back to an input device.
Vibrations from a loudspeaker system
which are coupled back to a pickup arm,
for instance, are acoustic feedback.
A
PA system that howls or whistles is caused
by sound emitted from the loudspeaker
reaching the microphone with enough
strength to result in oscillation.
-
Audio frequency.
A vibration that
the ear.
Vibrations
falling within the range from 16 to 20,000
cycles per second are commonly considered to be in the human audio -frequency
range. The term is applied both to pressure
vibrations in the air, that can be heard
directly, and to electrical impulses in a
sound system that correspond to them.
AF
can be detected by
-
-A
device that reduces the
This
reduction may be fixed, variable in steps,
or continuously variable. A volume control
is an attenuator; so is a loudspeaker level
Attenuator
Alternating current.
control.
-
Back -loading
Baffle
-
(See
Loading.)
-A
Bass -reflex
type of speaker enclosure
in very wide use, consisting of a completely
closed box except for two openings: one
for the speaker and another, usually comparable in size, that permits sound from
the back of the loudspeaker cone to escape
in such a manner as to reinforce bass tones
over a chosen frequency range.
Beam -power tube
Binaural
-
-
(See Tubes.)
Pertaining to two -eared hearing, or the process of hearing with two
ears.
Unfortunately, it is often (erroneously) used as a synonym for "stereo-
AM
phonic."
-
Amplitude modulation. This
is the
old or standard system of radio broadcasting, in which the sound is impressed on
the radio wave by varying its amplitude.
Amperes
-
Amplifier
of relatively
(See
-A
Amplifier stage
-
One or more tubes and
the associated components and wiring
(circuitry) necessary to produce one step
of amplification. A voltage amplifier stage
increases the amplitude of an impulse
without necessarily increasing its power
level; a power amplifier stage raises the
power level of electrical impulses so that
they are strong enough to drive a loudspeaker. Usually preamplifiers, tuners and
control units consist entirely of voltage
amplifier stages. Power amplifiers have a
series of voltage amplifier stages terminated
in a power amplifier stage, which uses
two or four tubes in a push-pull output
circuit.
Amplitude distortion
-
-
(See
Distortion.)
The long horizontal part of a record
playing assembly, pivoted at one end and
free to swing over the record, that holds
the cartridge and needle or stylus.
-
Attenuate
To reduce in loudness, amplitude, or intensity. (See Attenuator.)
FEBRUARY, 1955
large area situated in close
proximity but separated by an insulating
Current.)
device that increases the
amplitude of electrical impulses. When
the word is used alone, it is ordinarily
understood to mean a power amplifier;
that is, the final amplifier that drives a
loudspeaker systetti. As such there may or
may not be preamplifier, equalizer and
control sections in the same unit.
Arm
-a
circuit element usually conCapacitor
sisting of two or more thin metallic plates
material; the plates are of foil strips in
most fixed -value capacitors, and the strips
are rolled into cylindrical shape in order
In variable
to achieve compactness.
capacitors (such as common radio tuning
condensers) the plates are rigid, the insulating material is air, and the capacity
is varied by adjusting the degree to which
the plates are meshed (thereby changing
the effective plate areas).
When a voltage is impressed across
such plates they become charged according
to the polarity of the voltage; that is,
electrons are withdrawn from one plate
and an excess of electrons is forced into
the other. The number of electrons affected
is determined by the amount of the voltage,
the area of the plates and the distance
between them and the insulating material.
Considering a given voltage the capacity
(measured in farads) of the capacitor is
determined by plate area and spacing
If the
and by the insulating material.
voltage applied does nor change, the
plates assume a fixed charge and no further
current flows; capacitors, therefore, "block"
DC: they represent a very high impedance
to DC. But if the applied voltage is reversed, electrons flow out of the second
plate and into the first, charging them in
the opposite sense; if the applied voltage
is reversed again and again, each time
before the new charging cycle has been
completed, there is continuous current
Capacitors "pass"
flow in the circuit.
the higher the frequency of
AC, then
-
-
The element in a record playing assembly that changes the mechanical motion of the needle or stylus into
electrical impulses that can be amplified.
Some common cartridge types are the
crystal and ceramic, magnetic (moving -coil
and variable reluctance), and capacitance.
Cartridge
(See Enclosure.)
Electrical current that reverses its direction repeatedly.
Alternating current, AC
the AC, the better the "passing" action.
amplitude of electrical impulses.
-
The negative element of any
electrical device, as opposed to the positive
(anode) element. In a vacuum tube, the
element from which electrons are "emitted," or issued.
Cathode
-A
tube circuit that is
Cathode follower
often used as the last stage in tuners,
preamplifiers and control units because
of its low output impedance. This characteristic permits the use of long connecting
lines between such units and others (power
amplifiers, for instance) without danger
of hum pickup or loss of high frequencies.
-
(See Record player.)
Changer
The metal base, usually formed
Chassis
as a rectangular box, that supports and
shields the circuit components and wiring
of an amplifier or similar equipment.
Choke
-
(See
Inductor.)
-A
woofer and tweeter
(See
combined "in-line" or coaxially
Loudspeaker.)
Coaxial Speaker
Coil
-
(See
Inductor.)
Compensation
-
-
(See
Equalization.)
Lack of mechanical resistance to movement: the easier it is to bend,
flex, compress, expand or otherwise cause
physical movement of some sort in an
Compliance
object, the more compliant that object is.
High compliance is desirable in many
ways for loudspeaker suspensions and
cartridge-stylus combinations, but may
result in mechanical fragility.
Condenser
Conductor
Cone
-
-
(See Capacitor.)
(See
Electricity.)
(See Loudspeaker.)
Connector
the ends
-A coupling
device used on
cables, by
of interconnecting
of which temporary or semipermanent connections can be made between
the various units of a hi -fi system.
means
Controls
-
The knobs on an equalizer,
control unit, tuner or amplifier for selecting
Continued on page 124
95
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ALBERT PULLEY, Chief Recording
Engineer, RCA Victor Record Division
l'hoto by 44....4( IN.I?..auste",
"SCOTCH' Brand High Output Tape meets
all our demands for RCA Stereophonic recordings!"
ALBERT PULLEY, Chief Recording Enginccr,
RCA Victor Record Division, holds an enviable
position in the field of audio engineering. His
contributions to the development of high fidelity
sound over a period of years have helped establish
the United States as a leader in recorded sound.
In addition, his brilliant and sensitive supervision
of recordings by such masters as Toscanini,
Stokowski and Koussevitsky have won him the
warm praise of critics and technicians alike.
To meet the exacting standards demanded for
RCA Victor "Red Seal" Stereophonic recordings
requires the finest recording material available.
That is why RCA uses new "SCOTCH' Brand No.
12oA High Output Tape for their original recordings. With no increase in noise or harmonic
distortion
133% more output, new "SCOTCH"
Brand No. I2oA High Output Tape assures audio
engineers clearer, greater dynamic range recordings. Have you tried it?
...
SRep. U.S. Pet. Off.
COTCH Magnetic Tapes
BRAND
The term "SCOTCH" and Inc plaid design are registered trademarks for Magnetic Tape made in U.S.A. by MINNESOTA MINING
AND MFG. CO., St. Paul G, Minn. Export Sales Office: 99 Park Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. In Canada: Minnesota Mining and %
Manufacturing of Canada, Ltd., P.O. Box 757, London, Ontario.
96
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
These reports may not be quoted or reproduced, in part or in whole, in any form whatsoever, without written permission from the publisher.
Because of space limitations we normally attempt to report only on products of wide general interest. Thus, omission does not, per se, sigEach report is sent
nify condemnation, although reports are seldom made on equipment that is obviously not reasonably high in fidelity.
to request that
to the manufacturer before publication; he is free to correct the specifications paragraph, to add a comment at the end, or
the report be deferred (pending changes in his product) or not published at all. He is not permitted, however, to amend or alter the report.
-
The National Line
(furnished by manufacturer): Criterion FM -AM
binaural tuner; Horizon 5 preamp -equalizer-control unit; Horizon
20 amplifier. Preamplifier can be plugged into either tuner or
amplifier, and receives power from either, or can be used sepaInputs: high -level
rately with external power source. TUNER
inputs for TV and tape recorder, and low -level input for magnetic phono cartridge, connected to preamp plug connector and
used only if Horizon 5 preamp -equalizer- control unit is plugged
into the tuner. Controls: AM tuning, FM tuning, combined AC
on -off and AM volume control, FM volume control, selector
switch (FM Mutamatic; FM normal; AM; Binaural). Hum
balance and Mutamatic adjustments on chassis. Outputs: high impedance output to tape recorder, unaffected by volume controls; low- impedance tuner output, for use when tuner is operated
monaurally without Horizon 5; preamp output, live only when
Horizon 5 is used with tuner; binaural individual FM and AM
outputs. Output to multiplex unit for future binaural broadcasts using only an FM channel. Two switched AC outlets.
Sensitivity: FM, 0.5 microvolts for 20 db quieting; AM, sufficient
for optimum quieting on any signal strong enough for good
quality. Selectivity: FM, 60 db down 200 kc. each side of carrier,
with 180 kc. bandwidth at 6 db points; AM, 52 db down 20 kc.
each side of carrier, with 17 kc. bandwidth at 6 db points. Hum:
at least 60 db below rated output of 3 volts. Drift: negligible;
no AFC required. Distortion: essentially zero. FM capture ratio:
.8. Dimensions: 161/2' in. wide by 74 high by 113. deep. Tubes:
6BQ7, 6X8, 3 -6BA6, 6ßE6, 6AU6, 6AV6, 2 -6BN6, 6AL5,
Inputs: three high -level, for
2- 12AX7, 5Y3GT. PREAMPLIFIER
tuner, tape recorder, and TV; one low -level equalized input for
magnetic phono cartridge. These are connected to multi -contact
plug on back; when unit is plugged into Criterion tuner or Horizon 20 amplifier, connections to input jacks are made automatically. Controls: combined selector and equalization control
(TV, Tape, Tuner, phono positions with NARTB, RIAA, LP,
Bass
AES, 78 Noisy, FFRR, and Foreign equalization);
( +25 to -15 db, 20 cycles); loudness compensation on -off switch;
SPECIFICATIONS
-
-
R
4
Criterion tuner has separate FM, AM sections. Preamp is in slot.
FEBRUARY, 1955
Treble (+12 to -25 db, 10,000 cycles); combined AC on -off switch
and loudness or volume control. Tape and TV input level controls,
and phono input level switch, under chassis. Outputs: single
medium -impedance output; when used with Criterion tuner, this
is connected to Preamp output jack; when used with Horizon
20 amplifier, it is connected automatically to the amplifier input
jack. Distortion: less than .2% harmonic at normal output (1.5
volts); .6% at 10 volts, and 1.5% at 15 volts; less than .31% IM
at normal output. Response: within .25 db, 20 to 30,000 cycles;
within 1 db to 100,000 cycles. Hum and Noise: at least 70 db down
from normal output on high level inputs; at least 50 db down from
signal at 10 millivolt phono position. Mounting: fits into Criterion
tuner or Horizon 20 amplifier, or can be operated remotely by
means of 3 or 15 -ft. interconnecting cable (available). Dimensions: 2% in. high by 10 1/8 wide by 6 deep. Tubes: 2- 12AX7.
20 -watt power amplifier with input level control,
AMPLIFIER
1 db,
:
.15 db, 20 to 20,000 cycles;
single AC outlet. R
Distortion: less than .3% harmonic at 20
10 to 60,000 cycles.
watts, .6% at 25 watts; 1% IM at 20 watts. Hum and Noise: 80 db
below 20 watts. Output impedance: 8 or 16 ohms. Rumble filter:
operative below 30 cycles. Dimensions: 4 in. high by 143/2 wide by
12AX7, 2 -6L6G, 5U4G. Prices: Criterion
11 deep. Tubes:
tuner, $169.50; Horizon 5 preamplifier- control unit, $49.95;
Horizon 20 amplifier, $84.95. Manufacturer: National Company,
Inc., 61 Sherman Street, Malden 48, Mass.
-
t
t
Whatever else may be said about National hi -fi equipment,
there can be no argument about its dissimilarity to any
other line! Here is equipment designed with a completely
fresh approach, made by a company new to the high fidelity field. It even looks different.
Further, there should be no doubt about National's
qualifications, particularly when it comes to tuners. They've
been making top -grade communications equipment since
the beginning days of radio; their products have earned a
reputation for performance and dependability, in a highly
competitive field, for which many manufacturers would
swap their best tax men. So we might expect their high
fidelity line to be good, as well as different, and it is.
The main items are the Criterion FM -AM binaural tuner,
the Horizon 5 preamp- equalizer -control unit, and the
Horizon zo power amplifier. (There's also a to -watt amplifier with integral preamp- control section, which we didn't
have for test). They are planned so that the control unit
can be inserted into either the tuner or the amplifier, and
so become effectively part of either; connections are made
automatically by a multi -terminal connector on the back
of the control unit that mates with a receptacle on whichever unit is used with it. Input and output jacks, connected
to terminals on the receptacles, are furnished on both the
97
tuner and the amplifier. The control unit can be used by
itself too; 3 and r 5 -ft. interconnecting cables can be obtained for that purpose. Aluminum places are furnished
with the tuner and amplifier to cover the holes when the
control unit is not used.
FM and AM sections of the tuner are individually tuned
and controlled, so that it can be used to pick up present
binaural broadcasts without another tuner. In addition,
there is a high- impedance output from the FM detector
that can be connected to a binaural detector in the event
that binaural FM multiplex transmission is authorized
a unique feature. There are three input jacks on the back
panel: two high -level inputs, for tape playback and TV,
and one for a magnetic phono cartridge. These are led to
the control unit connector receptacle, of course, and are
used only when the control unit is plugged into the tuner.
Two output jacks are labeled FM and AM; these are simultaneous outputs when the tuner's function selector switch
is in the binaural position.
In the AM position of the
function selector switch only the AM jack is energized,
and in either of the two FM positions only the FM jack is
"live." If the tuner is to be used in a conventional monaural
setup these jacks would not be used; instead, the jack
marked Tuner Out (or the one marked Preamp Out, if the
control unit is included in the tuner) would be connected
to the amplifier. These, and the Recorder Out jack operate normally as in standard FM -AM tuners, with the
function selector switch determining the type of signal fed
to them. (As a matter of interest
if the switch is turned
to the binaural position these jacks are fed from the FM
section of the tuner.) A constant output level of volt is
obtained at the Recorder Out jack; it is not affected by
the volume controls.
There are two FM -only positions on the function selector
switch, as has been mentioned. One is marked FM Muta matic, the other FM. In the Mutamatic position a squelch
circuit
another singular feature kills all noise between
stations. This is a real blessing if the station you're looking
for is of medium or high signal strength, but it may
eliminate very weak stations as well as the noise. Accordingly, the other FM position is furnished so that you can
get the weak ones. Sensitivity and limiting are both very
good on FM, as is sensitivity and selectivity on AM.
No AFC is included; none is required, says National, because drift is negligible, and the discriminator is not critical
as to tuning. Our only complaint about the tuner concerns
-
its dial, which is short and not marked very clearly.
When the Horizon 5 is inserted into the tuner it takes
over the functions of AC on -off switching and volume
control, so the volume controls on the tuner can be turned
up to maximum and left there. There are three adjustments
on the bottom of the control unit chassis: tape and TV
input level controls and a sensitivity and impedance switch
for the phono input channel. In one position of this
switch the input is matched for low -level cartridges such as
GE; in the other position Pickering, Audak and similar
cartridges are matched. In both the tuner and the amplifier
cases are holes directly under these controls, so they can be
reached when the Horizon 5 is in either unit.
Front -panel controls are conventional in most respects.
The input selector switch has seven phono positions, with
various equalization curves (see specifications paragraph).
and three positions for high -level inputs (TV, Tape,
Tuner). Old standard curves as well as RIAA are furnished
for LP, and there are three special curves for 78s. Bass
and treble tone controls seem to have truly flat center
positions, and there are exceptional amounts of bass
boost and treble cut available. We suspect that the loud-
-
-
-
Horizon 20 power amplifier, with prea,np- control unit installed.
98
The Horizon
5
preamp- control fits in either tuner or amplifier.
ness compensation on -off switch will be left in the off
position by most users, because many will find the amounts
of bass and treble boost added (even at high settings of
the loudness control) to be excessive. Rough checks on
our test unit showed the maximum compensation boost
(at low settings of the loudness control) to be 31 db and
17 db at 5o and to,000 cycles, respectively.
This control unit has flexibility and performance comparable to that found in units costing substantially more;
at the price it seems a very good buy. Because of its
unusual connection setup, however, it should probably
be used with the National tuner or amplifier. Adapting
it for other systems would be possible, but not easy, for
the technically inexperienced.
Our test showed that the Horizon 20 amplifier met its
specifications easily, and is an excellent amplifier adaptable
to any system. It has an AC on -off switch and jacks on
the back panel for magnetic phono, TV, tape and tuner
whose use (as with the tuner) depends on whether or not
the control unit is incorporated. There are also amplifier
input level and hum controls, which are effective with or
without the control unit, and a switched AC outlet. Attractive styling, scrupulously clean sound, and relatively
high power for the price make the Horizon zo an attractive
buy in any comparison. The first time at bat, National
has hit a home run.
R. A.
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
4
R-J Wharfedale
Fisher Mixer -Fader
(furnished by manufacturer): an R -J enclosure fitted complete with an 8-in. Wharfedale speaker.
Size: 11 -in. high, 10 -in. deep, 23h -in. long. Frequency response:
50 to 16,000 cycles. Impedance: 10 ohms. Finishes: mahogany
and blonde. Price: $54.50 in mahogany, $57.50 in blonde. Ad.
dress: R-J Audio Products, Inc., 164 Duane St., New York
13, N. Y.
SPECIFICATIONS
SPECIFICATIONS
R-J enclosures were introduced some time ago (couple
of years, anyway) and of late have been widely sold because
of their compact size and, considering this size, their
good response. As readers know, R J's are sold through
British Industries Corp. in New York, which also imports
noble line of English products, including Wharfedale
speakers, Garrards, Leak amplifiers, and several others.
In this enclosure, we find R -J and Wharfedale combining
their efforts to produce excellent sound.
Well, here we go again trying to describe what a speaker
system sounds like. There's enough difference between
the big ones; the little ones (into which class this R-J
Wharfedale combo falls) show even greater differences.
a
R-J and Wharfedale, combining efforts, produce excellent sound.
(furnished by manufacturer): An electronic
mixer for use in blending together and controlling level of two
signal sources. Two high impedance inputs; cathode follower
output. One 12AX7 tube. Master volume control. Size: 41/2
by 5% by 5 in. deep. Price: $19.95. Address: Fisher Radio
Corp., 12 -25 44th Drive, Long Island City 1, N. Y.
Here's another useful accessory from the Fisher electronic labs; tape recording
enthusiasts are going to love
In essence, it
this one.
permits you to blend or mix
two signals, control the level
of each and of both combined. The two levers control the volume of the two
input channels and the center knob regulates the level
of the single, mixed output channel. For example, if
you're recording a commentary to go with home movie
films, you could let your voice ride through at a steady
level and bring background music up or down in loudness,
in relation to your voice, as you wished.
Cute trick: the two levers work in opposite directions,
the left-hand one being off at the top whereas the right
hand one, at the top of its throw, is full on. Thus, by
moving both up (or down) together, you completely
switch channels.
Another trick: although this mixer
provides no gain (it inserts no loss, either) you can secure
the effect of relative gain, in the amount of to db, by
shorting a resistor.
and only $ 19.95. Pretty
Compact, effective, useful
nice.
C. F.
-
-
So, put this down for well -balanced, with a surprising
amount of whump in the low end. The advertisements
show a frequency response chart; it's got enough bumps
in it to make us believe its probably pretty true to life,
and the speaker system sounds as if the lows started to slip
slowly below 70 or 8o cycles, just the way the chart shows
them.
This system makes the hiss between FM stations sound
like "hess "; it puts a veil over the sound, which is quite
pleasant to listen to, in a gently muted, dignified sort of
way. We wouldn't look for the drama and excitement
and, thank goodness,
in the music with this system
neither will the brasses and the violins make us cringe.
You're sitting in the back section of the orchestra, here;
relaxing, enjoying a quiet bit of nice music. Oh, you can
but,
step up the volume, all right; this baby can roar
dear me, it's so ungentlemanly!
And just to prove the point we've made at various times
we heard the same speaker, not long
in these pages
ago, in a rock -solid, tuned -port bass reflex of only slightly
larger size than this unit. Relatively speaking, you'd never
know it was the same speaker (as a matter of fact, maybe
it wasn't but it was an 8 -in. Wharfedale). Almost too
brilliant and snappy for our taste. Just goes to show!
-
-
...
- C.
The pained looking gentleman above is Mr. John B. Minton, a
salesman for the Custom Music Howse in San Francisco. The
only reason we can offer for publishing this picture is that Mr.
Minton sent it to us with the comment that if we had no use for
it (a plausible comment) we drop it in the Charles River. In
that we are some 13o miles from the Charles, we decided it
would be easier to use it. However, we would like to give
fair warning that if we receive any more pictures like this
they will promptly be dropped in the Housatonic, which is only
a picture's throw from our window.
F.
99
FEBRUARY, 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
Fisher 50PR -C PreampEqualizer
We'll skip the manufacturer's
specifications on this and,
instead, refer you back to
page 94 of the JanuaryFebruary 1954 issue, in which
the 50 -PR was reviewed in
detail.
This is the same thing,
except that a volume control has been added.
There were plenty of applications for the simple, effective
preamp -equalizer; there are as many more for this. An
inexpensive power amplifier plus this unit makes a fine
phono combination for a second installation. Or plug
a pair of earphones into the output of the 5oPR -c and the
lead from the cartridge into the input, and you have a
completely private listening system with fine quality;
you'll be surprised at how much you enjoy it. Or, if
you have a double -headed arm for binaural, use two
50PR -c's and binaural earphones; that's all you need. This
makes the simplest and most economical binaural system
known to man, just about; it'll be "true" binaural and a
startlingly different experience if you've never heard
binaural over phones.
And so on
let your imagination wander; Fisher has
again added to the flexibility of his line.
C. F.
...
We were particularly pleased with the spotlight. The
ten -watt bulb is recessed in the handle so that it can't
be broken easily, yet it throws enough light to be really
useful, and it covers a reasonable area. This is more than
can be said for many soldering -gun lights. Further
and
here is a touch of simple genius!
the light has a separate
switch to itself. You don't have to keep the heating
trigger depressed to inspect your soldering job, so there
is no danger of overheating.
The Wall guns appear to be very well built, and with
their other advantages this puts them into the top bargain
category. Our five -year -old boy, incidentally, shares our
enthusiasm for the 214LTN, since it's the very epitome
of deadly-looking space guns.
R. A.
-
-
-
Brociner Mark 12
-
Wall TribR -Heat Solder Gun
The Mark sz: complete control, small size, and good performance.
(furnished by manufacturer): a line of instantheating lightweight soldering guns with automatic temperature
regulation. Model 214T has -in. tip; input wattage (determined
by thermostat) ranges from 150 to 400 watts; weight is 11 oz.;
AC or DC operation. Model 212LT has % -in. tip; input is 300 to
650 watts; weight is 24 oz.; has built -in 10 -watt spotlight to
illuminate work. Model 214LTN has 34-in. tip; input is 150 to
400 watts; weight is 14 oz.; has built -in 10 -watt spotlight.
Tips and element assemblies are interchangeable between 212LT
and 214LTN models. Prices: model 214T, $9.95; model 214LTN,
$14.95; model 212LT, $16.95. Distributor; Garden City Industries, Inc., 900 -910 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 7, Illinois.
(furnished by manufacturer):
a complete
preamplifier, control unit, and amplifier in a single, small case.
Fr
1 db, 20 to 20,000 cycles.
Power output.
12 watts; 24 watts peak. Distortion: 1% harmonic at 12 watts;
1% intermodulation at 5 watts. Inputs: 3 high level, 1 low level.
Outputs: tape take -off ahead of volume control; speaker (4,
8, and 16 ohms). Tone control range: bass
16 db at 50 cycles;
treble +12 to -15 db at 10,000 cycles. Equalization: separate
bass (AES, NARTB -RIAA, 800, and LP) and treble (LP,
NARTB -RIAA, AES, LON, FFRR, and 78 or flat). Sise:
4 % -in. high, 10 7 /8 -in. wide, 8 -in. deep. Prise: $98.25. Address:
Brociner Electronics Laboratory, 344 East 32nd. St., New
York 16, N. Y.
SPECIFICATIONS
y
Of the gun type soldering
devices we've
worked with
so far, these
appear to have
the most impressive
advantages for
the
average
A new lightweight solder gun.
home
user.
They are fast -heating but are not of the typical transformer type, so that they are quite light in weight. We had the
model 214LrN for our tests; this has a built-in spotlight
but the smaller heating element and tip assembly. Even
so, there was plenty of heat for any electrical soldering
job
and the smaller tip simplifies close work.
-
SPECIFICATIONS
t
t
Here is a fine example of what can be achieved in the way
of "compacting" an amplifier without losing flexibility
or running into too much of a distortion problem at
reasonable listening levels.
This unit has separate equalization controls (turnover
control is combined with input selection), separate tone
controls and a loudness control (loudness compensation
can be defeated by plugging in a shorting plug at the back
of the chassis). It provides three high -level input channels,
which can be selected by a knob on the front, and a low level channel for magnetic cartridges.
Another input
jack on the back is tied to the mag phono jack and handles
crystal and other cartridges (such as the Weathers). The
gain on the phono channel will be enough, on some
systems (with high -efficiency speakers) to operate low
Continued on page 102
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
IOo
www.americanradiohistory.com
-4
QUALITY SPEAKS...
TEL
HIGH FIDELITY RADIOS
With great pride, the manufacturers of the world famous
Telefunken Microphones present their latest engineering
triumphs. Never before have you heard such unbelievably perfect
sound from table model radios. Actually, these fine sets are
more than just radios, they are complete high fidelity audio
systems incorporating superb FM -AM -Short Wave tuners.
There are inputs for your turntable or record changer, and your
tape recorder as well as outputs for additional speakers or the
recorder. All American markings and dials. Good news for
your neighbors: there is no need for playing these sets at their full
power output .. extreme highs and lows come through in all
.
a very low volume! Wonderful news for the
lady of the house: the hand finished solid French Nalnut cabinets
their beauty, even at
are truly masterpieces of design and craftsmanship.
"OPUS 55 HI-FI"
...
THE ULTIMATE IN HIGH FIDELITY
SPEAKERS
6
specifications:
SPEAKERS. Two 8 1;2" woofers. Ivor 4" permanent-dynamic medium
treble speakers. Iwo elects o -static tweeter sswifh non duetted radiation.
WAVE
ANTENNAE:
RANGES: FM:
88.108
Mr.; Short Ware: 5.9 -18 Mc; Std.:
5151620 Ice.; Special: 150.330 ke.
dipole antenna and rotating ferrite antenna
for standard bond (operated horn front of cabinet).
Built-in
FM
"RONDO"
MODERATELY PRICED
...
3 SPEAKERS
specifications:
SPEAKERS: Oval shaped woofer, 101.4" e 714"; two permanentdynamic tweeters.
WAVE RANGES: FM: 88 -108 Me.; Short Wave: 5.9 -18.5 Mc.; Std.;
515.1620 6n.; Special: 150 -330 6e.
CIRCUITS: 17 circuits including 9 for FM (Armstrong circuitry).
ANTENNAE: Builtin FM dipole antenna and rotating ferrite antenna for standard
band (operated from front of cabinet).
AUTOMATIC VOLUME CONTROL: On two stages backwards.
CABINET DIMENSIONS: 2374" e 1514" e IO',-c".
FREQUENCY RESPONSE: 30 to 18,000 cycles.
POWER OUTPUT: Approx. 8 watts.
CIRCUITS:
circuits,
19
AUTOMATIC VOLUME
DIMENSIONS:
CABINET
for
11
25'('
16' ¡,"
e
(Armstrong
FM
circuitry'.
stages backwards.
.
11
".
RESPONSE: 20 to 20,000 cycles.
FREQUENCY
POWER
including
CONTROL: On two
Approx.
OUTPUT:
10
watts.
"GAVOTTE"
LOW PRICED
specifications:
... 2
SPEAKERS
shaped woofer, 1074" a 1 1/4"; permanent- dynamic
WAVE RANGES: FM: 88 -108 Mc.; Short Wave: 5.5 -18 Me.; Std.:
515 -1620 Mc.; Special: 150 -330 6e.
SPEAKERS: Oval
CIRCUITS:
IS circuits,
including
9
tw
for FM (Armstrong circuitry).
ANTENNA: Built -in FM dipole antenna.
AUTOMATIC VOLUME CONTROL: On two stages backwards.
CABINET DIMENSIONS:
FREQUENCY
1814"
RESPONSE: 50 to
x
13'4"
s
7s/ ".
15,000 eyries.
those who seek QUALITY find TELEFUNKEN
At leading music stores everywhere
Write for free literature and technical data.
Also ask for details about
TELEFUNKEN TUBES
Telefunken tubes are interchangeable
in fact,
with American types
Telefunken "long life cathode"
tubes will improve the
performance of any radio
or television set.
...
MAGNETOPHON TAPE RECORDERS
Telefunken products imported and distributed exclusively by
by Telefunken
and
AMERICAN
TELEFUNKEN MICROPHONES
ELITE. INC.
DEPT.
11
1775 BROADWAY
NEW YORK
Dealer inquiries invited.
19, N. Y.
www.americanradiohistory.com
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page too
connection is taken ahead of the volume /loudness control
but after equalization and tone controls. A hum balance
control is provided.
And
the important thing
the sound output is
very good. A critical ear may be able to detect distortion
at high levels on loud passages over wide range speaker
systems, but somehow we cannot visualize Mr. Brociner
advising a customer to drive his Transcendent with a
Mark 12! More likely, he would recommend the twice
as bulky, and twice as costly 3oA and C combination
whose specifications call for % of i% IM distortion at
20 watts. We checked distortion and found it to be about
as specified for the Mark 12; it rises sharply above that
5 -watt point.
So, if you want fine sound at moderate listening levels,
plenty of flexibility, an attractive but relatively palm -sized
unit, at a happy- medium cost, then look carefully at
the features of the Mark I2. - - C. F.
-
-
-
Back of Mark r2 cage carries clear
indications for wiring.
output cartridges (such as Fairchild) without a transformer.
The loudness compensation is gentle, the tone control
range more than adequate. As a matter of fact, it appears
to be slightly greater than stated in the specifications.
The instructions are right up to date; even tell you
how to connect Electro -Sonic cartridges. The tape output
Ampex 620 Amplifier- Speaker
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT: It is certainly true that the performance of our
Merk 30 amplifier is more in keeping with the quality of an elaborate speaker
system such as the Transcendent. It may be of interest. however, that at the
recent Audio Fairs we did use the Mark 12 to drive the Transcendent some
of the time and astonished a good many people at the quality of reproduction
afforded by this little package, even at the high volume levels customary
at the Fairs. Incidentally we are now supplying the Mark 12 with an improved front panel having a frosted finish in the section bearing the designations,
with the top and bottom strips in brushed brass. The new plate is easier to
read and its styling is more attractive than the panel shown in your illustration.
(furnished by manufacturer): a compact power
amplifier and loudspeaker assembly in portable carrying case.
AMPLIFIER ONLY
rated power: 10 watts. Inputs: single high level input, 20,000 ohms; 0.6 volts produces full rated output.
Controls: input level control; equalization (flat response at center setting, up to 6 db treble boost in maximum clockwise position and up to 6 db bass boost in maximum counter clockwise
rotation); AC on -off switch. Outputs: amplifier normally connected to built -in speaker through bass and treble -boost network; flat output of amplifier available at phone jack on front
panel which, when used, disconnects built -in speaker. Unswitched AC power outlet on side of case. Distortion: less than
I% harmonic at 10 watts. Noise: better than 70 db below rated
output. Response: 20 to 20,000 cycles, t0.5 db. Impedance:
12 ohms.
OVERALL
speaker: 8 -in. PM in totally-enclosed
baffle; will take full amplifier power. Response: 65 to 10,000
cycles, essentially flat, with usable response below and above.
Dimensions: 13 in. by 16 by 8, including case. Weight: 25 lb.
Price: $149.50, including case.
Manufacturer: Ampex Electric
Corporation, 934 Charter Street, Redwood City, California.
lined with a heavy pitch -like substance and is cross braced; there is also a fiber-glass mat to kill high- frequency
reflections. This combination has an acoustic response
characteristic, when fed from a "flat" amplifier, that is
not flat -- it droops at both ends of the range, particularly
the low end. In order to compensate for the speaker enclosure characteristic, the amplifier was designed with
a boost network that produces a rising response at the
ends of the range. Neither amplifier nor speaker- enclosure
combination would sound good if used separately, but
together they furnish a flat acoustic output that is, to
say the least, exceptional for something of this size.
The amplifier can be used to drive other speaker systems
if the compensation network is removed; this is done
automatically, and the built -in speaker is silenced, when
a phone plug is inserted in the SPEAKER jack. With or
without an external speaker, however, the EQUALIZATION
The Ampex 600 portable tape recorder came as quite a
shock to many, accustomed as we were to the massiveness
that characterized previous Ampex machines. As fine
a miniaturization job as the 600 is, we believe that the 620
is still more remarkable: it's a high fidelity power amplifier
and speaker system in a suitcase, with a total weight of
25 lb.! And it sounds good
from an 8 -inch speaker in
an enclosure of just about half a cubic foot, such sound
is likely to make you doubt your ears.
According to the instruction book, these results were
achieved by designing the speaker, enclosure and amplifier
as a unit, each part with characteristics that exactly complement the other parts. The speaker has a big magnet
assembly with a long gap, so that large cone movements
can be made without distortion, and the cone suspension
is designed to permit such movements. The enclosure
The 620 hi-fi speaker -amplifier combination is truly portable.
SPECIFICATIONS
-
-
is
-
I
02
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
and LEVEL controls are effective. The equalization control
gives a flat response when in the center position of its
rotation. Turned to the right it boosts the high frequencies
(to a maximum of 6 db at io,000 cycles) without materially
affecting the bass; turned to the left, it boosts the bass
in the same way. The amplifier itself, then, is a good basic
ten -watter with somewhat more flexibility than usual.
We don't want to convey the impression that the 62o
can be mistaken for a good two or three -way speaker
system in a large enclosure. It comes remarkably close
to a reasonably good single-cone speaker in a 4 or 411 -cubic
foot enclosure, though, and
particularly at the bass
end
is noticeably better than most i and 2 -cubic foot
systems driven by standard amplifiers. For portable hi -fi
R. A.
it's outstanding.
-
-
-
Audax Arm & Hi -Q7 Cartridge
(furnished by manufacturer): No. 12 arm, for
playing records up to 12 in. diameter, and Hi -Q7 turnover
cartridge. Separate stylus assemblies for 78s (sapphire) and
microgroove (diamond). ARM
length: 11 1/8 in. including
cartridge. Adjustments: one, for cartridge setdown height.
re pp
.
20 to 20,000 cycles. Output: 40 milliCARTRIDGE
volts. Recommended load resistor: 100,000 ohms. Prices: 12 -in.
arm, $13.52; 16 -in. arm, $19.40; adaptor (for using other cartridges with Audax arms), $4.70; Hi -Q7 cartridge, $40.88.
Manufacturer: Audak Company, 500 Fifth Avenue, New York
SPECIFICATIONS
-
36. N. Y.
In addition to fine performance,
Audax car-
s
tridges have two advantages for the home user:
ruggedness (which makes
them particularly suitable
for use in record changers,
by the way) and the fact
that the styli are easily
replaceable individually by
Other popthe user.
ular magnetic cartridges
may have one but not
both of these important characteristics.
Output voltage of these cartridges has always been
relatively high, which helps keep preamplifier noise down
below audibility. Now the output voltage has been increased substantially in the Hi -Q7 in an attempt to get
a still more favorable ratio of signal to noise; the output
is now as high or higher than that of any other magnetic
cartridge. It is just as important as ever to observe the
usual precautions regarding hum pickup, of course. According to Audak the increased output level is the only
change made in the cartridge, and listening tests confirmed
this
the Hi -Q7, properly loaded, sounds very good
indeed.
The matter of loading is important, since a value less
than the recommended roo,000 ohms will result in some
Most fixed input resistors
high- frequency reduction.
on preamplifiers range from 22,000 to 47,000 ohms, so
that it will be necessary to replace them.
-
Audax arm and cartridge: a standard high-fidelity combination.
Audax cartridges do not fit standard arms, although
adaptors are available for Webcor and Garrard changers.
For that reason, if for no other, an Audax arm should be
used with the Hi -Q7 in a manual -play setup. We had the
shorter arm for testing, and it seemed ideally suited to
the cartridge. In order to get the stylus pressure down
to the 8%4 grams specified as a compromise for both types
of records, we had to remove the weight at the back and
turn it around so that it projected beyond what would
normally be the end of the arm. And with our turntable
(which is not inordinately high) we had to mount the
arm on a block above the mounting board so that it would
clear the record. There is a universal adaptor available
this may be of interest, since the
for other cartridges
arm is less expensive than most. -- R. A.
-
For all practical purposes. the Hi -Q7 will
although instrument
perform superbly with either 47,000 or 100,000 ohms
tests will indicate a slight difference at 10.000 cycles. By "standard arms'
R. A. undoubtedly means the arms originally designed for crystal cartridges.
still used on commercial machines. Because such arms conceal the cartridge
from view, the Hi-Q7 was designed to be in full view, thus making possible
the highly important cartridge- groove alignment.
The standard height from panel to top of turntable is % inch. However.
each Audax arm comes with several 1/8 -inch lift pads of which one, two or
even three may be used under the arm base, depending on the turntable height.
Apparently, R. A. overlooked these lift pads.
From now on all Audax arms will be micro- balanced for six grams, also
permitting a heavier pressure for the once-in -a -while 78 record.
EDITOR'S COMMENT: By "standard" arms, we meant arms of other manufacture that are designed to take most hi -fi cartridges. The two lift pads
supplied with the arm received for testing didn't raise the arm off the base
enough for our turntable.
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT:
Ingalls Acousti-Pads
(furnished by manufacturer): a supplemental
pad for the turntable of record players, changers, and transcription tables. Made of American Felt Company's Feltan, resembling
felted rubber. Sizes: 8, 10, 12, and 17 in. diameter. Prices: $2.00,
$2.25, $2.50, $5.00. Address: Ingalls Electronics Co., 30 West
Putnam Avenue, Greenwich, Conn.
SPECIFICATIONS
Time was when turntables were covered with some green
felt or maybe a slab of cork. Changers followed the same
unless they got out the
pattern and record collectors
vacuum cleaner at regular intervals -- often found that
they were dropping their records onto a miniature bed
of gravel.
Then someone saw a market for turntable pads that were
easy to keep clean, and many companies made them available. The latest comes from American Felt via Ingalls.
Instead of being felt, cork, or foam rubber, it is a mixture
of felt and rubber, which gives it considerably more body
than the ones made of foam rubber alone. It is about
/i6th of an inch thick.
The thinness (in comparison to other types) is an advantage with turntables, whereon the center post is often
quite short. Further, it may not be necessary to readjust
the height of the pickup arm if this mat is added.
The firmness will be an advantage particularly to those
who have the habit of not turning off the turntable when
removing a record. The mats with less body tend to rumple
-
r
Io3
FEBRUARY, 1955
www.americanradiohistory.com
up; this one stays flat. On the other hand, it seems likely
that a firm mat will not help reduce rumble as much as
the softer variety. That's a hard question to decide, since
it depends on the type of rumble or vibration: damping
a vibration depends, obviously, on the frequency and
nature of the vibration and the susceptibility of the damping material to sympathetic resonance at this frequency.
-
C. F.
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT: Acousti -Pads are made of Feltan, a patented
microporous rubber material resembling a 'felted" rubber. The tenacious
nature of the Acousti -Pad positively eliminates slippage, fault apparent on
any record player employing just loose pad (usually a moulded rubber pad)
as covering on the metal turntable. Slippage is an important matter on transcription turntables. Feltan's surface characteristic also helps keep the record
clean; foreign matter on a record transfers to and remains on the pad. There
N noticeable reduction of the fuzz that usually accumulates on the stylus.
Craftsmen C1000 Tuner
(furnished by manufacturer):
an FM -AM
with built -in preamp -equalizer and control sections.
Inputs: one for magnetic phono cartridge; two high -level inputs
marked for tape recorder and TV. Controls: Volume; Bass
( +17 to -15 db, 50 cycles); combined selector and equalization
switch (FM without AFC, FM with AFC, AM sharp, AM
broad, four phono positions with LP, RIAA, EUR, or LLP
equalization, Tape, TV); combined AC on -off and Treble (+17
SPECIFICATIONS
tuner
to -15 db, 10,000 cycles); Tuning.
panel.
Hum adjustment on back
Outputs: one low- impedance main output to amplifier;
The FM section is really hot: a booster helped very
little or not at all. We could detect no distortion whatever, limiting was excellent, there was no trace of instability, and we liked the idea of being able to switch off
the AFC when we had to. We weren't able to take advantage of the "broad" AM position on the selector
switch
no local stations
but there are many who
will. Although restricted in frequency range, sound in
the sharp position was clean and relatively noise -free,
altogether bearable. A good whistle filter was partly
responsible for this.
Of top -notch quality, the audio section was not meant
to duplicate an elaborate front end; still, it has plenty of
flexibility for the average hi -fier. There are two high level input channels, which are certainly adequate since
FM and AM are already provided for. Only one phono
channel, but there are four equalization settings available:
LP, RIAA, EUR and LLP. The first is for the old Columbia
LP curve; the third has about 5 db rolloff, and is meant as
a universal curve for 78s; the last is for older London
records. With the bass and treble tone controls any curve
could be matched pretty much on the nose.
Both the recorder and main outputs are low- impedance,
which is unusual even for the most elaborate control
units and is a nice feature. No loudness compensation
on the volume control some might miss it, but others
(including us) won't. Miscellaneous comments: lots of
gain in the phono channel for just about any cartridge
without transformer
sound is very good, particularly
in regard to transient definition
styling is pleasant,
construction seems to be first -rate. All considered, worth
every penny of its cost and more.
R. A.
-
-
-
-
-
-
Ampro Hi-Impedance Adaptor
(furnished by manufacturer):
This is a kit
which provides a high impedance output, taken ahead of the
power amplifier stage, for Ampro models 756 and 757 tape
recorders, to facilitate their use with high fidelity systems. Price:
$9.75. Address: Ampro Corp., 2835 N. Western Ave., Chicago
SPECIFICATIONS
18,
Cr000 FM -AM tuner and preamp-control is "best Craftsman yet."
one low- impedance output, unaffected by volume or tone controls, for tape recorder. Two switched AC power outlets on
back panel. Sensitivity: FM, 2 microvolts for 30 db quieting;
AM, 1 microvolt for 10 db signal to noise ratio (AM sharp
position). Response: FM, *0.5 db, 20 to 20,000 cycles; AM,
*0.5 db, 20 to 5,000 cycles (AM broad). Audio Distortion:
0.05% IM at 1% volts output. Noise: in Phono positions,
60 db below 1% volts output; other positions, 65 db down.
Dimensions: 14% in. wide by 134 deep by 6% high; % in.
required for knob clearance. Tubes: 2 -6ßJ6, 6BE6, 6CB6,
6ßN6, 6AU6, 2 -6AL5, 2 -6BK7A or 2- 6BQ7A, 6U8, 6AV6,
3- 12AX7, 5Y3GT. Price: $179.50 Manufacturer: Radio Craftsmen, Inc., 4401 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago 40, Illinois.
This is the best Craftsmen tuner yet, and that's saying a
lot. In addition to superb FM, with and without automatic frequency control, you now have a choice of wide band AM (for hi -fi reception of local stations) or narrow band (for long- distance AM). As we have pointed out
before, a compromise AM bandwidth can be fairly satisfactory but still has the disadvantages of a compromise.
104
Illinois.
In our May, 1954 TITH section we reported on the Ampro
model 756 tape recorder and concluded with the statement,
"To summarize, this is a good package unit. The quality
-
-
up to the power amplifier stage
is sufficiently high
so that, from the point of view of the man who wants
to use his recorder in conjunction with a hi -fi system, we
wish Ampro had included a jack wired in ahead of that
final output stage."
Smart people, Ampro. They read that TITH report and
set about providing the answer. This kit, costing all of
$9.75, is it. It includes a new jack and a condenser;
there is also a new escutcheon. You remove the old jack
(for external speaker) and put in the new one; resolder
the wires from the old jack, connect a wire already soldered
to the new jack to a tube socket, snip out a condensor
and replace it with a new one. A microphone -type (3 -wire)
plug is provided, ready to connect to your hi -fi control unit.
The new jack is so wired that it provides either a high
Continued on page rob
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
litinfesit
99
brings you
LABORATORY
160
00%*
30
AMPLIFICATION
PERFECT
WATT
AMPLIFIER
MC-30
$143.50
featuring the
patented McIntosh circuit
* All but 0.000016 of
power output is a perfect
reproduction of input signals
at 30 watts. (20-20,000 cycles)
The magnificent new McIntosh delivers the power you need with exceedingly
low distortion (less than 1/3% at full power output-20-20,000 cycles). The unique
McIntosh bifilar circuit insures that you hear all the instruments in clean,
smooth, living sound, without listening fatigue. Designed expressly for those
who demand professional performance in the home.
Make the McIntosh listening test. Step up your listening pleasure.
Step up to the McIntosh 30 watt amplifier, masterfully engineered by
specialists in high fidelity amplification.
eoze OA,
send descriptive literature and "Lost
Instruments,- explaining true high fidelity sound.
Please
LABORATORY, INC.
Binghamton,
N. Y.
Export Division: 2S Warren St., New York 7, N. Y.
CARLE- SIMONTRICE
FEBRUARY,
1955
32 pg. booklet "Lost Instruments."
McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.
322 Water St., Binghamton, N. Y.
mesh
322 Water Street
FREE
Name
Address
City
Zone
_State_
NEW YORK
05
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page 104
impedance output, to be connected to a high level input
(e.g., radio or TV) on a hi -fi control unit, or, with different
plug wiring, it connects an external speaker after the
recorder's power amplifier stage and disconnects the
built -in speaker.
The new jack takes off after the volume control but
ahead of the tone control (which is operative on playback
only); seems like a good system to us.
Wiring is simple for anyone not completely inexperienced. This change will make the Ampro recorder much
more valuable to hi -fiers.
C. F.
-
nally, so that there is no danger in using enough polonium
to neutralize the static quickly. The polonium is made
into foil by sealing it between a silver base and a gold
covering; this strip is protected by a shield and grid that
makes it impossible to touch directly. In use the grid (visible in the photograph reproduced here) is held about Ih in.
from the record surface while "sweeping" the grooves with
the brush.
The active life of the polonium is such that the foil is
effective in static neutralization for one to two years; after
that, the brush should be returned to the manufacturer for
foil replacement.
We found that records remained clean and dust -free
if they were brushed with the Staticmaster directly after
MANUFACTURER'S COMMENT:
Overall frequency response at EXT. AMP.
output jack with tape speed of 74 ips and constant voltage input is 40 to
12,000 cycles,
db. Output is high -impedance, minimum 100.000 ohms;
output voltage is variable from 0 to 0.5 volt. Tube complement is one 5879
and one -half 12AX7. Signal to noise ratio is 42 db, and distortion is less than
0.2%. For further specifications on Ampro tape recorders, see the Tested
in the Home report in HIGH FIDELITY for May. 1954 or write to us for
a detailed specification sheet.
t3
Staticmaster Record Brush
(furnished by manufacturer): A record -cleaning
brush with fine hair adjusted to the proper stiffness for LP
record grooves, and a strip of polonium foil in the brush ferrule
for neutralizing accumulated static charge on the record. Dimensions: brush is 3 in. wide and about :,i in. thick at end.
Prier: $17.85; polonium element guaranteed for one year or more,
and will be replaced for $9.75. Manufacturer: Nuclear Products
Company, 10173 East Rush Street, El Monte, Calif.
SPECIFICATIONS
This is the most powerful and fastest-acting record static
neutralizer we've worked with so far; a few circular sweeps
on each side of the record cleans it of visible dirt. On the
other hand, it is more expensive than most such devices,
and its effectiveness is not as long-lasting.
According to the manufacturer, the reason for its fast
action is the high- intensity alpha radiation emitted by a
strip of polonium foil in the brush ferrule. The literature
states that alpha particles are absolutely harmless exter-
Sargent -Rayment SR -808
Tuner and 98B Amplifier
SPECIFICATIONS (furnished by manufacturer):
an FM -AM
tuner with integral preamp -equalizer- control section, and
separate power amplifier. SR -808 TUNER
tunes FM band
with or without AFC, and AM. Inputs: one high -level, for TV
sound or tape recorder; one phono, choice of magnetic or constant amplitude type (Weathers, ceramic or cyrstal.) Controls:
combined selector and equalization switch (AC power off, FM
without AFC, FM with AFC, AM, TV, three phono positions
with RIAA, AES, or LP equalization); Gain or volume, with
concentric loudness compensator on -off switch; Bass, with
concentric four- position switch having two positions (250 or
350 -cycle turnover) with rumble filter and two without; Treble,
with concentric five -position scratch filter (Out, 15, 10, 7, or
5 -kc. cutoff frequency); Tuning. Outputs: one from FM detector, to feed binaural multiplex separator; one affected by volume
control but not tone controls or filters, to feed tape recorder;
one standard low- impedance output to amplifier. Sensitivity:
FM, 3 microvolts for 30 db quieting; AM, 5 microvolts. Selectivity: FM, 190 kc. bandwidth; AM, 13 kc. bandwidth.
Response: FM,
I db, 20 to 20,000 cycles; AM,
1 db, 20 to
5,500 cycles. Distortion: FM, less than 0.5% at 100% modula-
-
t
r o6
t
Polonium destaticizer is behind
grid in Staticmaster's handle.
being played and then were put away in their jackets immediately. Brushing can be accomplished while the record
is still rotating on the turntable.
If you consider it worth a $17.85 initial investment and
a $9.75 yearly maintenance expense to have virtually
noise -free (and longer- lasting) records, then this is a
good buy for you. It's the most satisfactory record -cleaner
we've seen
also the most expensive.
R. A.
-
tion; AM, less than 0.36% at 100% modulation; other channels'
less than 0.17% at 1 volt output. Hum: on phono channel'
65 db below 1 volt output; other channels, 75 db below 1 volt.
Dimensions: 13!,j in. wide by 7 high by 10 2 deep. Tubes: 6BQ7A'
3-6CB6, 6X8, 2 -6AU6, 3 -6BA6, 6BE6, 2- 12AU7, 12AX7, 6U5.
5Y3GT.
SR -98B AMPLIFIER
Inputs:
one high -impedance,
250,000 ohms. Controls: input level control. Outputs: 4, 8 or
16 ohms to loudspeaker; one AC power outlet; power plug for
preamplifier. Re pp
:
0.2 db, 10 to 75,000 cycles. Distortion:
0.1% harmonic at 18 watts; less than 1% at 25 watts. Dimensions: 134 in. wide by 131. deep by 8 high. Tubes: 6J5, 6SN7,
2 -KT66, 5U4G.
Prices:
tuner, $236.00; amplifier, $91.60.
Manufacturer: The Sargent -Rayment Company, 1401 Middle
Harbor Road, Oakland 20, Calif.
-
It is difficult to decide whether the SR -8o8 is a topnotch
tuner to which an elaborate preamplifier has been added,
or vice versa; the two sections have received equal emphasis
to an unusual degree, and each by itself would be a fine
piece of equipment. Together on one chassis, the total
cost to the consumer is somewhat less than separate units of
equivalent performance would be and, with the SR -98B
Continued on page zo8
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
THE
1
AND ONLY
8" TRIAXIAL SPEAKERMODEL 308
BY
ITS
2ND
TO NONE
THE MODEL 312
No other speaker like it! An 8'' 3 -way speaker -ideal for
hi -fi installations where space is at a premium and quality is
not to be compromised. Response down to better than 50
cycles, provided by voice coil and diaphragm operated with
the exclusive University Alnico -5 "W" magnet. Rich, full-bodied
mid -range is achieved through the use of the patented "Diffusicone" section of the unit, crossing over at 1,000 cycles. The high
frequency reproducer, a compression driver unit wide angle
tweeter which extends to 15,000 cycles, crosses over electrically
at 5,000 cycles. Impedance 8 ohms, power capacity 25 watts.
-
TRIAXIAL
3
BY
L/C network and "balance" control permit you to adjust
tonal quality to your own listening tastes. All -Alnico -5
exclusive University "W" magnet and duraluminum
voice coil suspension in woofer section results in deep
and highly efficient bass response. 8 ohms impedance,
25 watts power capacity.
-WAY WONDER
-
MODEL 315 TRIAXIAL
12
field. Full range
A new advance by University in the
response from 40 cycles to inaudibility. Employs the
fullmid
-range and the
bodied
"Diffusicone" principle for
HF -206 Super Tweeter for clean, brilliant highs. Built-in
IT'S A
BY
Reproduces the entire range, from 30 cycles to inaudibility with such amazing clarity and presence that the
superiority of this unit is readily obvious. Built around the
sensational CISW woofer assembly, mid-range is provided by the patented "Diffusicone" device, while the
clean and brilliant highs are reproduced by a compression
driver unit with wide angle horn through an L/C electrical
network crossing over at 5,000 cycles. Impe-
dance 8 ohms, power capacity 50 watts.
Custom Design For
Airaltrierty
Speaker Systems
Enclosures Engineered To Acoustically Enhance
The Performance Of University Speakers ... Tastefully Styled To
Complement The Decor Of Your Home Rather Than Dominate It
Fine Speaker
Engineering Superiority
...
Proven by Years of Acceptance
EN -15
The best features of rear horn loading,
phase inversion, and direct radiation are
integrated to result in a highly efficient,
extended range enclosure capable of
unusual power handling capacity and
Model 6200 Extended Range Speaker
Full bodied response to beyond 10,000 cycles
makes it ideal for rodio, TV and phono oppli.
cations. Excellent basic unit. Eight
impedance, 25 watts power capacity.
excellent transient response. Ideally
suited for the Model 312 or Model 315
Triaxial speakers, or any of the other fine
12'' or 15'' University speakers. Available in cherry or blond mahogany at no
extra cost, or unfinished.
The EN-15 comes equipped with adapter
boards for mounting 2 or 3 -way combinations of University woofers and tweeters.
-8"
Diffusicone
and 12' Coaxial Speakers
Exclusive patented "Diffusicone" design with
1000 -cycle mechanical crossover results in full
fidelity anywhere in the room ... full undistorted response without loss of highs at listening points progressively off speaker axis. Eight
ohms impedance, 25 watts power capacity.
EN -8
Utilizes a combination of rear horn loading for
unexcelled power handling and distortion control, and tuned horn mouth for phase inverter
action for increased bass efficiency. The perfect
enclosure for the Model 308 Triaxial speaker
or Diffusicone-8. Available in cherry or blond
mahogany at no extra cost, or in unfinished
mahogany.
Model 6201 Dual Range System
Acknowledged as the industry's finest value in
a high quality 12" loudspeaker. Complete with
coaxial tweeter driver and wide angle horn, it
is one of the few true dual range systems in its
price class. Built -in 1/C network and balance
control. Eight ohms impedance, 25 watts power
capacity.
The EN -8 has cut -out for University tweeters
woofer or other cones.
use with
for
8
For complete information on the entire University high
80 SOUTH KENSICO
FEBRUARY, 1955
AVENUE,
ohms
fidelity line, write
TE
Desk 53
INC.
PLAINS, NEW YORK
TESTED IN THE HOME
Continued from page zo6
amplifier, are the nucleus of a compact sound system of
highest caliber.
The selector switch is combined with the record equalization control and the power on -off switch. It has three
positions of phono equalization, corresponding to RIAA,
old AES, and old Columbia LP; good choices, certainly,
if only three choices are to be made available. But why
limit it to three? In our opinion, the somewhat limited
equalization isn't quite compatible with the other more
elaborate control facilities of this unit. There are two
phono input jacks, incidentally, only one of which can
The SR -8o8 FM -AM tuner has elaborate preamp- control section.
be used at a time: the standard magnetic cartridge input
and one for constant- amplitude cartridges such as the
Weathers. Variable equalization is effective on both.
Other positions of the selector switch are for FM with
or without AFC, AM, and the unequalized high -level
input. This can be used for TV sound or tape recorder
playback.
The gain or volume control has a concentric switch
by means of which loudness compensation circuits can
be switched in or out. Maximum boost for loudness
compensation, obtained at very low volume control
settings, was about 15 db in the bass and 41/2 db at ro,000
cycles on the tuner we received. This seemed adequate
to us, and not excessive.
Bass and treble controls are both unusual. The bass
control operates normally, furnishing boost or droop,
but it has a concentric switch with four positions that
make it unique. In the maximum clockwise position
of the switch the bass turnover frequency (the frequency
at which the tone control begins to have an effect) is
25o cycles, and the rumble filter is not effective. One
position to the left inserts the rumble filter, which cuts
in at about 5o cycles. In the third position to the left the
rumble filter is retained but the turnover frequency is
changed to 35o cycles; in the last position the turnover
frequency is 35o cycles and the rumble filter is not effective. The reason for two turnover frequencies is to
permit effective use of the tone control on any type of
program material
with the lower turnover, more bass
boost can be used without making voices sound boomy,
-
toll
and the higher turnover is generally more satisfactory
for music.
The treble control has the normal amount of boost,
but only about 8 db (on our test unit) cut at ro,000 cycles.
This is because a sharp -cutoff filter is furnished also,
by a concentric switch whose five positions are labeled
Out, 15, ro, 7 and 5, corresponding to frequencies in
thousands of cycles at which highs are chopped off.
Cutoff is very sharp indeed; our rough measurements
showed it to be greater than 25 db per octave. It should
be noted that the labeled frequencies are those at which
response is 33 db down
the actual cutoff process begins
slightly more than an octave below the labeled frequency.
Altogether, a reasonable argument could be made that the
bass and treble tone controls are versatile enough by far
to take over where the record equalizer leaves off.
Last knob on the right is, of course, the tuning knob
for both FM and AM. Both tuning sections are extremely
sensitive; the SR -8o8 will win honors in any competition
on that score. Selectivity on AM is such that the audio
response extends to 5,5oo cycles, and only in a few localities would a wider bandwidth be usable. The low -distortion Sargent -Rayment AM detector shows itself to
good advantage in a comparison with conventional AM
tuners. Selectivity and limiting on FM are excellent and,
as noted, sensitivity is top -rank. Unfortunately, we experienced some oscillator radiation that interfered with
a television set nearby. This could be a serious problem
in many installations, as is obvious.
The main output to the amplifier is of low impedance;
there's a high- impedance output too, not affected by the
tone controls, loudness compensation or cutoff filters,
that is intended to feed a tape recorder. But it is affected
by the volume control. An output jack labeled Multiplex
Binaural is connected directly to the FM detector; this
-
Sargent-Rayment 98B power amplifier. Knob is input level control.
for tentative future binaural broadcasts on a single
FM channel.
Not much space need be devoted to the amplifier,
beyond noting that listening tests were completely satisfactory. Further, the price is below that of most competing amplifiers with similar power ratings and less
imposing performance specs. It seems to be a remarkably
good buy.
R. A.
is
-
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
don't play with
T- N -T*
You're not really getting Hi -Fi reproduction when your turntable
furnishes a sound track of its own. And, most distracting noises do
come from turntables -the heart of your hi -fi system.
For clear, true, brilliantly accurate performance -free from throbs,
flutters and wows -you need the new PRESTO T-15 Turntable. Here
is a truly professional mechanism-12" heavy aluminum table, 3
speeds, precision "deep- well" bearing, single control lever. Dynamically balanced and precision engineered like the most expensive
PRESTO units. And PRESTO is standard equipment in broadcasting
studios all over the world!
The New
PRESTO
T -15
TURNTABLE
One Control Lever Does Everything!
and disengages idler wheel
Automatically switches motor off and on
3. Selects 3 speeds -331/3, 45, 78 rpm
1. Engages
All you have to do is listen -to be convinced that the PRESTO T-15
is the answer to your turntable problems. It's only 553.50 -your
best buy in hi -fi.
2.
Mail this coupon today!
*Throbbing, Noisy Turntables
PRESTO RECORDING CORPORATION, SALES DIV. MN
PARAMUS, NEW JERSEY
Please send me illustrative data and specifications on the new,
improved PRESTO T -15 turntable.
RECORDING
CORPORATION
PARAMUS, NEW JERSEY
Export Division:
Canadian Division:
WORLD'S
LARGEST
25 Warren Street, New York 7, N. Y.
Instantaneous Recording Service, 42 Lombard St., Toronto
MANUFACTURER
OF
PRECISION
RECORDING
EQUIPMENT
AND
DISCS
NAME
_.
ADDRESS
-
___
CITY
ZONE.
STATE
EDISON IN THE HOUSE
Continued from page 42
RINN 410
o
NII
IDII
1111
Im
Dual concentric volume
control with optional 2 -po-
to be used, the meter's sensitivity
would probably have to be high.
Even with a 50- microampere movement and a 20 -volt scale, the
voltmeter circuit impedance would
be just 400,000 ohms.
Only trial
on various tuners would determine
what effect such a low value would
have on the tuners' operation. Then
too, explicit directions would have
to be prepared for each popular
tuner, which would be no mean
task. The company that finds the
answers, nevertheless, stands to make
a nice bit of change.
A volume compressor /expander.
This would be a luxury item, no
doubt, but we'll bet it would find
its way into many a fine sound
system. A small, relatively inexpensive ($25 or so) box
something
like Fisher's Hi -Lo filter, for instance
could be made to provide volume
expansion or compression at the
flick of a switch, when put between
a control unit and a power amplifier.
The amount of compression or expansion could be controlled by another
knob.
Expansion of the dynamic range
(making loud sounds louder and
quiet passages quieter) is beneficial
on many occasions, if done moderately. This is particularly true of
music received from radio broadcasts,
which is nearly always compressed.
On the other hand, some like music
as a background to work or conversation, and then some extra compression makes it less intrusive.
3- position record com-
THE PHILADELPHIANS
Two types of phono input:
Continued from page 38
10H
IMI
43-111,
Now! You Can Have
Professional Tone Control
with the new
BETTER BECAUSE
SARGENTRAYMENT
Tuner Model aoa
SR
A professional - quality tuner,
preamplifier and tone control in one compact unit. Advanced design and simplified construction give the new Sargent Rayment 808 instrument audibly truer
performance on AM, FM, TV, phono.
Most flexibility, too, with precise accuracy of control over the full range from
highest practical treble to lowest bass.
LEAST EXPENSIVE professional combination of
preamp, tuner and pro-
HERE IS
fessional tone control,
the SR-808 is priced at
`236
FOB
-
OAKLAND
Compare the audibly better performance of the
Dual concentric treble
control with 5 position filter
independent of treble control
eliminates heterodyne
whistles, record scratch,
close proximity TV whistles,
high frequency audio hash,
but enables treble boost up to
actual point of interference.
Dual concentric bass con-
trol
with 1- position cut - off
filter independent of bass
control
eliminates turntable rumble, amplifier overload, low frequency hum.
Plus 2- position bass boost
turnover: 250 cycle for voiced
selection programs; 350 cycle
for concerts or where bass
reinforcement is desired.
...
sition volume control. Flat
volume response or Fletcher Munson curve.
pensation.
constant velocity and constant amplitude.
Low - distortion SR AM
detector, universally recognized by professionals.
SR -808
The SARGENT-RAYMENT Co
Oakland 20, California
electronics since 1926
1401 Middle Harbor Road
Artisans
in
-
at your local dealer
-
the market in magnificent recorded
sound, it is still one of the top contenders. Its best seller to date on LPs
is Srheherazade, about ioo,000 copies;
next comes the Paganini Concerto,
with Francescatti.
Best sellers in
the making are the newer Gaitt
Parisienne and the 12-inch "Wagner
Concert."
Some Philadelphia Orchestra recordings for Victor, by reason of their
Continued on page I I 2
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
HARVEY
the House of Audio
rift' BELL
The NEW
REK -O -KUT
el'011/l'(' /I'
3- Speed,
2-inch
1
PRECISION TURNTABLES
Represented to be the result of more than S years study, these new record
playback units are offend as the closest approach to perfection in turntable
performance. Like all Rek -O -Kul units, the turntable is cost Aluminum and
exerts no pull on magnetic cartridges.
The following new features have been included:
single selector knob for
setting speed: 331/, 45 and 78 rpm.
built -in retractable hub for 45 rpm
records- requires no external adopter permanently affixed 3 -speed strobe
neon pilot light os'on /off' indicator
disc for instant
s speed checking
recspecial cork- neoprene mat maleriol to eliminate record slippage
tangular deck to fit conventional record changer beards.
Two identical Rondine models are available which differ only in the type
of motor employed.
Rondine Model 11-12 with 4-pole induction motor
with hysteresis synchronous motor 119.95
Rendine Deluxe Medel I -I
$69.95
2
McINTOSH
Model
COMPENSATOR and PREAMP
flexible front end unit with
5- position selector switch for AM,
Microphor, TV, Tape or other program sources. Has a built -in
variable rumble filter. Five sliding-switch, turnover controls used individually or in combination permit up to 11 turnover settings from 280 to
1340 cycles. Another series of five sliding switches allow up to 11 treble
rolloff curves. There is a volume control plus a 5- position compensator
which maintains bass and treble balance at low levels. A variable input
resistor, calibrated from 1K to 100K ohms, terminates any magnetic cartridge. with correct load for optimum performance. A switch provides
equolizat on for FM or ceramic cartridges. Power is obtained from the
main amplifier or from separate power supply os listed below.
A complete,
FM, Phono,
C
C
59650
-8M with tubes in attractively styled cabinet
As above, with auxiliary power supply
-BPM
--
-
107.50
88.50
99.50
with tubes, less cabinet
-8
As above, with auxiliary power supply
C -8P
C
Perfectly matched in performance and appearance. Designed for the critical eye os well as the discriminating ear.
AM -FM Radio Tuner
Model 2255
compact, high quality AM -FM tuner.
Fully enclosed in metal cabinet richly
finished in satin gold and brown, with
edge -lighted, slide -rule dial. Designed for
open -shelf or table -top use as well as
panel mounting. Groundedgrid input
stage, double -tuned limiter, true Arm
strong FM, AFC and low- distortion cathode follower output, all contribute
to unusual sensitivity and stability. Has built -in ceramic ferrite AM antenna.
Momentary AFC defeat switch on tuning knob permits accurate center
of frequency tuning. FM Section provides 4 AV sensitivity for 20 db
than 33 db image rejection. Frequency response is
quieting
. better
20- 20,000 cps ±1/s db. Drift ±3 kc with AFC. AM Section. Frequency
response is 20 -5000 cps
db. Maximum output is 3 volts with less than
1% distortion. Hum level 65 db below 100% modulation. Power supply is
self -contained. Dimensions: 4" high, 91/2" wide, 83/." deep. Weight: 9 lbs
A
3
Complete with tubes
ELECTRO-VOICE
Series
REPRODUCER SYSTEM
Employs the principle of the mov
ing coil, on inherently linear
transducer, to provide uniform
frequency response from 20 to
17,000 cycles ±2 db. Low dynamic mass and high compliance
have been combined to produce
12 TRXB 12 -in.
An
1
Specify Model
ARISTOCRAT
-
-
$3750
FAIRCHILD 280 TRANSCRIPTION ARM
studio quality transcription arm for home music systems. Completely
eliminates the undesirable effects of arm resonoce. Continuous perfect
midgroove tracking is assured. There is no side thrust, skidding or groove
jumping. Concealed thumbscrew sets stylus pressure. Once correctly set
for microgroove cartridges, standard cartridge pressure is automatically
adjusted by inserting compensating slug. Accepts all variable reluctance
or dynamo cartridges including dual stylus types. Plug-in mount fingers
automatically contact cartridge lugs of differing widths. Shorting switch
eliminates hum when changing cartridges. Provides adjustments for height
and levelling. Requires no arm rest; self -locking stop holds arm securely,
yet permits easy swing to playing position. Available in two models:
Model 281 for 16" transcriptions and Model 280 for more compact installotions with no sacrifice in results.
A
Mahogany
r
HARVEY RADIO CO., Dept. HF -2, 103
......
W.43rd
RADIO COMPANY, INC.
$6600
72.00
St., New York 36, N.Y
_.
money order for
I enclose
check
shipping charges. Unused surplus will be refunded.
New FREE High Fidelity Catalog
Send:
Details of your TIME PAYMENT PLAN
ESTABLISHED 1927
FEBRUARY, 1955
Blond
Please ship the follow, -.rg
Subject to change without notice
43rd Street, New York 36
d Folded Horn Enclosure
Klipsch -Lin
Designed for corner operation, the Aristocrat permits bass response
down to 35 cycles, when used with appropriate speaker. Ideal for the
new Electro -Voice 12TRXB. Utilizes the Klipsch principle which employs
the corner of the room as an acoustical eirload extension of the rear
exponential horn. This extends bass response to lower frequencies than
is obtainable from conventional cabinets of similar size. Simple lines and
styling of the Aristocrat ore in keeping with modern tastes in decor.
Dimensions: 291/2" high, 19" wide, 161/2" deep.
52950
Either Model
superb
low cost. Combines the famous E -V
Super Sdnax, Rados Propagator, and large
boss cone in one compact concentric assembly. Provides clean boss response, fullbodied mid -range and smooth upper octaves
with good balance and presence and without masking effect. Adjustable
'brilliance control' allows matching to room acoustics. Frequency response
is 35 to 15,000 cycles in the suitable enclosure. Edgewise wound voice
coil design increases overall efficiency. Will handle 20 watts of program
material, 30 watts on peaks. Impedance: 16 ohms. Diameter: 121/4".
Complete with HighFrequency Level Control, and
_55970
.__.. _.
Electrical and Mechanical Crossovers
cartridge with exceptional tracking ability, low needle talk and record
and virtually distortion -free performance. The 170 ohm output
impedance is almost purely resistive with no effect on response by reason
of grid load. Low impedance eliminates hum pickup and high frequency
loss. Mounts in standard record changer and transcription arms, and
operates into magnetic cartridge inputs of conventional preamplifiers.
Output is .005 v.
Available with any one of three sizes of diamond point:
Model 220A
1.0 mil. for microgrooves, Model 2208
2.5 mil, for
transcriptions, and Model 220C
3.0 mil. for 78 rpm's.
wear,
'103 W.
Triaxial
integrated, 3-way reproducer offering
performance
a
HARVEY
1
,1]
LOUDSPEAKER
T3511
NOTE. Prices Net, F.O.B., N.Y.C.
$9995
Model 2256
A New
DIAMOND CARTRIDGE
..
.
Fully enclosed in metal cabinet finished
in soft gold and brawn, intended for
open -shelf or tablelop use as well as
panel mounting. A perfect twin in both
appearance and performance to the Model
2255 Tuner, yet functions perfectly with
other high fidelity components. Has built in pre-amplifier and full set of controls.
Power Output is 12 watts with .5% distortion, 20 watts peak. Frequency
response is 20.20,000 cps *1 /z db with controls set for flat response. Six
inputs ore provided for radio, crystal, pickup, two magnetic pickups, FM
and ceramic pickups, tape or disc recorder or TV. Five front panel controls
include: 7- position Selector Switch with provision for equalization to match
all existing record curves, continuously variable loudness control, bass
control: -18 to +15 db at 40 cps, treble control: -18 to +14 db at
15 kc, and rodio level -set control on rear panel. Four outputs: 4, 8, 16
ohms plus high impedance jock for tope or disc recorder. Employs two
6V6 output tubes in pushpull. Dimensions: 4" high, 91/," wide, 81/4"
deep. Weight: 14 lbs.
58995
Complete with tubes
The New
FAIRCHILD
220
-
__-
Audio Amplifier
12 -Watt
C -8
PROFESSIONAL AUDIO
Qolden -Z"w«r l(níts
For High Fidelity Home Systems
including estimated
NAME........
JU 2 -1500
ADDRESS
L
.......................................
.
...
J
THE PHILADELPHIANS
The Sensation of Two Audio Fairs
PERMOFLUX
Largo and Diminuette
2 -WAY
SPEAKER SYSTEMS
Now Available Under
Acclaimed at the Sight and Sound
Exposition in Chicago and the
Audiorama in New York, these amazing high fidelity speaker systems are now available under HTPan exclusive Permoflux insured plan that enables you to
try a Largo or Diminuette in the quiet and comfort of
your own home for 15 days. See your hi -fi dealer today!
'EXCLUSIVE PERMOFLUX 15 -DAY INSURED HOME TRIAL PLAN, INTRODUCED AT THE CHICAGO AND NEW YORK AUDIO FAIRS, OCT., 1954
THE LARGO
Outstanding wide -range
speaker system at moderate
cost. Uses the "Super Royal
Eight" speaker and Super
Tweeter. Unique new -type
back - loading horn enclosure
matched, octave by octave,
assuring undistorted reproduction from
35-16,000 cps. In selected 1/4"
Mahogany or Korina veneers.
Exclusive: Special connection
for headset extension cord.
Size: 24" W, 23" H, 14" D.
Impedance, 8 ohms.
is
to speakers
..
Suggested Audiophile Net
...$99.75
THE DIMINUETTE
marvel of compactness featuring "big- system" reproA
duction over the full audio
range and low cost. Ideal for
use in a bookcase or as extension speaker. With 2 "Royal
6" speakers and Super Tweeter. In Mahogany or Blonde
finish 54" veneers. Size: 23 W
W, 11Sí" H, 12" D. Impedance, 4 -8 ohms.
Suggested Audiophile Net
...$49.50
As abuse, but with selected
%" Mahogany or Korina ve-
neers.
Suggested Audiophile Net
... $64.50
Try either system at home under HTP!
Read what High -Fidelity Magazine says:
"It's best to try a speaker at home before buying."
-Audio Forum Dept., Oct. 1954 issue
HEARING IS BELIEVING!
MIMEEvery HTP participant will receive, absolutely FREE, the new Permoflux "Maestro" Speaker -Headset Control
Box. See your Permoflux-authorized HTP dealer, or write for full
details, to:
.
,
,
Continued from page
rro
longevity, have sold in even greater
quantities; for example, the Rachmaninoff Second Piano Concerto
(Rachmaninoff-Stokowski), which in
25 years has found more than zoo,000
purchasers.
All these figures, incidentally, pertain to domestic sales only.
Six or seven times a season Columbia
dispatches its full complement of recording personnel for an all -day session
at the Academy of Music. Sunday is
invariably chosen for the business of
making records, thereby avoiding conflicts in schedule and extraneous noises
from Locust Street.
(Philadelphia
observes the Sabbath with sober decorum.) The sessions last from six to
seven hours each and yield tape
sufficient for one, two or even three
LPs. So that the orchestra will work at
top efficiency, the music to be recorded
is always performed in concert just
prior to a session. Sometimes this
gives Academy audiences a chance to
hear scores they might otherwise miss.
Walter Piston's Fourth Symphony is a
Columbia had decase in point.
cided to record this work, thanks to a
subsidy from the Naumburg Foundation, and suggested it as a project for
the Philadelphians. Accordingly it
was played at the Academy last April,
taped immediately thereafter, and will
be issued in June. More usually, however, Columbia prefers to record music
in the orchestra's normal repertory.
David Oppenheim, the young clarinetist- turned -executive in charge of
Columbia's classical program, shares
the general view that the Philadelphia
Orchestra excels in nineteenth-century refulgence, and he leans heavily to
music of this persuasion in assigning
the yearly complement of Philadelphia
recordings.
Although record royalties help appreciably to approach a balance in the
Philadelphia Orchestra's budget, there
Continued on page 115
FOR A UMITED TIME ONLY
CORPORATION
4916 West Grand Avenue
West Coast Plant
Canadian Licensee
112
Chicago 39, Illinois
Glendale 4, California
Campbell Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Tcronto, Canada
4101 San
F
do Rood
For more information
about advertisements
in HIGH FIDELITY use
the Readers' Service
Cards facing page 128.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
NEW...GE
3 -WAY RECORD FILTER
Filters all noise ... restores balance
to every record...Only $19.95°
is a brand new concept in filter systems.
Every accessory control for fine music reproduction is wrapped up in this one instrument.
There's a Lo cut -off to suppress turntable rumble
and vibration... a Hi cut -off for total reduction of
HERE
record scratch and high frequency distortion...
plus a complete compensator selection.
Now- compare the cost. General Electric's Record Filter is priced at little more than half what
you'd pay for less flexible instruments! It belongs
in every type of home record equipment. Hear it
soon and treat yourself to the custom- tailored brilliance this filter reveals ... with even the oldest
recording in your collection.
*Subject to change without notice. Slightly higher N'est and South.
FOR
Lo
CUSTOM
INSTALLATIONS..
OR
cut- off -Four positions 0, 40, 60 and 80 cps.
Hi cut- off -Four
positions
3, 5, 9kc and
EVEN
CONSOLE PHONOGRAPHS
flat.
Six Selective Compensator settings.
WITH INEXPENSIVE
RECORD PLAYERS
FIRST TO OWN ONE!
MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY!
BE THE
Completely independent controls.
Developed exclusively for use with G -E variable
reluctance cartridges or similar types.
Use
with or without compact cabinet.
Progress /s Our Most /mportant Product
General Electric Company
Radio & TV Department, Section R5425
Electronics Park, Syracuse, N.Y.
Please send me information regarding your
new 3-Way Record Filter.
NAME
ADDRESS
GENERAL
FEBRUARY, 1955
ELECTRIC
CITY
STATE
113
Immortalizing the instrument...
/
For the "Instrument
of the Immortals"
. all great instru-
ments and voices, there
are now magnetic recording
tapes of matching quality. They are Soundcraft Tapes, created by engineers with the
maximum of recording experience.
We believe them to be the world's finest
tapes, because Soundcraft Tapes alone
combine:
Pre -Coated adhesive applied directly to
base anchors oxide, no flaking, cracking.
--
Surface -lubrication on both sides! No friction, no chatter, no squeal.
Chemical balance throughout to prevent
cupping, curling, peeling, chipping.
Uniform output of
Micro- Polished°
coating,
a
patented
Soundcraft process that eliminates unnecessary head wear and gives uniform high frequency response right from the start.
T
H E
WORLD'S
F
I
N E S
dh. within
a
reel,
±Y2 db. reel -to-reel.
REEVES
SOUNDCRAFT TAPES FOR
EVERY PURPOSE
Constant depth oxide for uniform middleand low- frequency response.
1,4
Soundcraft LIFETIME. Tape for priceless recordings. For rigorous use. For perfect program timing. DuPont "Mylar" Polyester
Plastic base. A third as strong as steel. Store
it anywhere. Guaranteed for a lifetime!
Get the Soundcraft Recording Tape you
need today. Your dealer has it.
Soundcraft Red Diamond Tape for all high fidelity recording.
Soundcraft Professional Tape for radio. TV
and recording studios. Splice -free up to 2400
feet. Standard or professional hubs.
T
TAPES
.
.
Y
E
T
SOUNDCRAFT
CORP.
DFPT
F9
10 East 52nd St., N. Y. 22, N. Y.
FOR EVERY SOUND REASON
T H E Y
C O S T
N O
MORE
4
THE PHILADELPHIANS
From NEWCOMB'S
Big, NEW HI -FI LINE
Continued from page 112
disheartening deficit every
year. Last season the disparity between
intake and outgo reached $175,302.
A regularly sponsored radio or television program would bring about a
dramatic reduction of this yearly loss,
and perhaps such will come to pass
Meanwhile, until this
some day.
millennial event, the Philadelphia Orchestra Association must continue to
find ready cash. Some of it, about
$7o,000 a year, derives from the income of an endowment fund given
to the orchestra in 1919, when income
tax was low and philanthropy flourished. The original gift was a million
dollars; its value has roughly doubled
by now. The rest comes from an
annual drive for contributions, which
range in amount from $1.00 to $ro,000.
Business firms in Philadelphia are
now contributing importantly to the
orchestra's support in token of the
enormous prestige it bestows upon the
city, and by way of thanks the Philadelphia Orchestra gives a free Concert
for Industrial Contributors to the
Orchestra Fund each season.
Nobody is happy either about the
deficit or about the annual bout of
hat passing, but both are certain to
continue indefinitely. Except for the
ro percent increment applied to admission revenue when symphony concerts were exempted from Federal tax
three years ago, the prices of tickets
to the Philadelphia Orchestra are the
same today as they were in 1935. This
being the case, no one can fairly chide
the orchestra for operating at a loss.
Philadelphians now look upon the
annual Orchestra Fund drive as a
proper and necessary philanthropic
campaign analogous to Red Cross or
the March of Dimes. They are proud
of the orchestra's reputation and concerned over its welfare. In its turn,
the orchestra tries its best to please the
Philadelphia public, and that public
has a seemingly illimitable appetite
for chunky servings of standard reperwhat Myra Hess calls "the
tory
roast beef of music." Those few
novelties that do appear during a
Philadelphia Orchestra season are well
camouflaged behind large quantities
is still a
-
Continued on page 116
FEBRUARY, 1955
The two new Compacts, with amplifier,preamplifier and control unit all
in one... the new Classic 200 FM -AM Tuner, the answer to years of demand...just three of the twelve all new components in the Newcomb
line -a line which offers an amplifier for every hi -fi need. All twelve
reflect the engineering leadership for which Newcomb has been famous
since 1937. Visit your dealer...see and hear the full Newcomb line and
you'll understand why Newcomb is your best buy in hi-fi!
HI -FI COMPLICATED? EXPENSIVE?
NOT WITH NEWCOMB'S COMPACT 12!
Newcomb offers every music lover authentic high fidelity with a minimum of
expense and trouble in the new Compact 12. Provides unequalled flexibility
and range of sound control. Needs no cabinet. Just plug it in, connect it to a record changer and speaker. But if you prefer to use cabinetry, it includes Newcomb's
exclusive "Adjusta -Panel" feature for easy installation. Simple to move -ideal
for apartments! U/L approved.
Compact 12 Specifications
10- Asimpli- 12-watt high fidelity amplifier- preamplifier control unit
of
exceptional . less than 1% distortion at 12 watts response ±1 db 20
fieá ill -oiitt version
-
Compact
performance.
to 20,000 cycles.separate crossover and rolloff controls give
input selector and rumble
36 different recording curves
filter 7 inputs mike input tape Input output to tape
wide range separate bass and treble tone controls, bass range
hum
db to 4-16 db
db to +18 db, treble range
balance control . new level control . advanced design loudness control . size only 41/e" high x 121/2" x 9 ".
-18
-15
FOR SUPERIOR RADIO RECEPTION
NEW Classic 200 -2 knob FM -AM Tuner
For years now, satisfied Newcomb amplifier
owners have asked for a tuner by Newcomb. Here
it is -the Classic 200 high fidelity tuner to deliver
the utmost to a fine amplifier! It, too, is compact
in size.
Designed for use with any amplifier having its own control,
Fully enclosed, beautifully finished to use as is, or the ex
clusive "AdjustaPanel" makes cabinet installation simple.
U/L approved. Output is 10 volts at less than 1/4 %. 1 volt at
less than 4/100 %. Effective to 200 feet from amplifier. Many
new circuit advances in both FM and AM sections. Results:
30 db of quieting with only 14 microvolts input on FM. 1
microvolt AM sensitivity for 1 volt output. Only Via" high x
111/2" x 111/2".
(1
"Hi -Fi Is For Everybody" Explains the how and why of authentic
high fidelity How to buy and install economically InformaNot a catalog
tive and thoroughly illustrated
[email protected]
M
O
C
E
W
N
r
1937
High Fidelity Amplifiers and Tuners
I
Here's 25c for new book,
"Hi -Fi Is For Everybody."
Please send free catalog
of Newcomb's complete
line of 12 new hi -fi products, plus name of my
nearest Newcomb dealer.
L
NEWCOMB,
Dept. W2
6824 Lexington Ave., Hollywood 38, California
Name
Address
City
7one_State
J
IIj
for those who want the best
THE PHILADELPHIANS
Continued from page 115
of Beethoven
want the best components that money can buy, we recommend
the Craftsmen basic units shown below. Each of these components is built with
only one purpose in mind -to make the most perfect unit that engineering skill
and quality parts can produce. They are engineered without any of the shortcuts normally used to hold prices down. They are designed to include every
feature the most hard -shelled audiophile could desire. They are built to give
continuous service, year after year, at the same peak of audio quality. Each
component is specialized-designed to do a specific job without any sort of
compromise.
And all of these features pay off in pleasure the day you play your first
concert in your own living room.
For those who
this
-
C810 Basic
FM -AM Tuner
Designed for sensitive FM and
high fidelity AM reception. Separate tuned RF amplifiers and triode converters on
both FM and AM. Net 1345O
or this
C900 Basic FM Tuner -De-
signed for operation in extreme
fringe areas and broadcast
monitoring. With virtually unmeasurable distortion
Net
119°
plus this
C350
Equalizer- Preampli-
fier -The
amplifier
highest quality prebuilt, with exclusive
hinged action tone
controls.
Net
129 50
C375 Filter System -De-
signed to remove distortion, such
as hiss and scratch on old 78
RPM records.
Net
3950
and this
-
C550 Basic Power Amplifier
Superb audio amplifier with
exclusive thermal
50
time delay.
Net
109
For complete information,
see your high fidelity
dealer or write
give you the finest
system money
can buy!
Prices slightly higher on west coast
craftsmen
The Radio Craftsmen, Inc., Dept. F2
4403 N. Ravenswood Ave., Chicago 40, Illinois
I I 6
and Brahms, Schumann
and Berlioz, Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky, Wagner and Strauss, familiar
Debussy and early Stravinsky. Special
cycles devoted to one composer have
been popular in Philadelphia ever since
the orchestra's first conductor, Fritz
Scheel, played nine Beethoven symphonies in five days during the 1902 -03
season. There was another Beethoven
cycle last year (nine symphonies, five
concertos, five overtures); and this
season Ormandy is giving five all Bach concerts, concluding with the
St. Matthew Passion in early April.
Philadelphia Orchestra programs,
whatever their virtues or shortcomings,
are the responsibility of Mr. Ormandy
and the management. Ormandy formulates them in large part during the
summer months at Chexbres, high
over the Lake of Geneva. where he
has been renting Professor Piccard's
villa for several years. They start arriving at the Philadelphia office in
July and are routed to the desk of
Donald L. Engle, assistant manager,
who checks them for timing and possible duplications. While Engle gets
an advance start on program notes,
which he writes tout seul, the librarian
Jesse Taynton checks the missives
from Chexbres against his own files so
that music for the forthcoming season
can be collated and, if necessary,
mended. In view of Ormandy's conservative programs, the orchestra's
library of 2,000 scores is usually self sufficient; when it is not, the problem
goes to the office of Harl McDonald,
manager of the orchestra, who decides
whether to rent or purchase the missing
scores. Next season Mr. Taynton will
be drawing heavily on the Sibelius
and Mozart shelves of his library, for
cycles dedicated to both composers
are scheduled - - in honor of their
9oth and tooth birthdays.
And this brings us back to music,
which is where any story about the
Philadelphia Orchestra should end.
Sam Goldwyn once complained after
a conversation with Bernard Shaw that
the playwright talked only about
money and never about art.
Any
reader who has persevered thus far
Continued on rage r IS
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
In reproduced music, all the flowery specifications and sales talk in the world can not change
the fact that you, and ONLY You can tell what
sounds the best to you. The following letter puts
More
it eloquently;
breath- taking performance
. . three times I heard your
at the Audio Fair. I would like a CHROMATIC Hi-Q7 such
as you used there, but equipped with a diamond and a sapphire, both microgroove. I will use the diamond for playing
and the other stylus I will occasionally switch into play for a
few seconds, to compare the two. This will guard my records
against loss of musical quality. I now have three different
cartridges that are sharp with high frequencies, but they just
haven't got that musical quality. What model arm did you
about
use?
..
.
hear the CHROMATIC Iii -Q7, compare it
...
LISTENING
then YOU be the
against any other cartridge
judge. Yet with all its fine qualities, the Audax
CHROMATIC Hi -Q7 (magnetic) costs no more
than ordinary cartridges.
Stylus- Balam111,
t
NOTA SCALE)
Like a stroboscope, Stylus- Balance shows
instantly if stylus is too heavy, too light, or
correct. See pages 85 and 86. January 1955.
QUALITY
Compass -Pivoted tone arm
The arms used at the fair were the Audax
#12 and 16, universally acknowledged as the
finest and most efficient arms available . . .
Yet these Audax arms cost less.
For home and studio. only THREE parts, NO
SPRINGS.
Announcer's Audio Fair Script*
.. Some time ago R.C.A. called to tell us of a new recording technique they developed, that finally caught up
with the Audax CHROMATIC. The merchandise manager
stated that the new records were the equal of and in som'
eases better than the original master -tape and invited us t.0
play these new type records at the New York Audio Fair.
'art ridge Ada pier
Permits other cartridges to utilize the now
famous Audax Compass-Pivoted arms. All
metal construction.
We have here, from R.C.A. the master- magnetic -tape as
well as the soft master -disc. Now - for the first time
we will take you behind the Vinylite curtain and play for
you first, the magnetic -master-tape as originally recorded
by the orchestra, then the master -record and finally the
...
commercial record
... etc."
Write for particulars concerning Audax products and for FREE copy of "Electronic Phono Facts"
AU DAK COMPANY
Dept. HF
500 Fifth Avenue
New York 36, N. Y.
Creators of Fine Audio -Electronic Apparatus for over 25 years
"54e Standard
FEBRUARY, 1955
bty
Which Ogee, are
9uareJ and Valued"
I17
THE PHILADELPHIANS
Continued from page 116
may be tempted to aim the same corn -
C2 -100
plaint at this writer. But money and
art can hardly remain independent of
each other in the case of so expensive
an institution as the modern symphony
orchestra. Testimonials to the sonority and precision and virtuosity of the
Philadelphia Orchestra have been written in abundance; its efforts to maintain a precarious financial stability have
gone largely unreported. In its budgetary difficulties Philadelphia is not
alone; every orchestra in America is
afflicted similarly. And the problem is
getting worse, not better.
Music
listeners should be aware, at least, that
Net price, $4.50
The highest
overtones of
the piccolo
The deepest tones
it exists.
of the bass tuba
Senior Compentrol -with special
Printed Electronic Circuit*
is no ordinary compensated
control. There's nothing else
like it, for improving the tone
performance of hi -fi amplifiers or
pre-amplifiers! Level-set lets
you control compensation to
suit yourself. Ask your Centralab
distributor
or service man.
Write Centralab, Dept. 939B,
Milwaukee 1, Wisconsin for
Compentrol booklet.
K,....w.
-
-
ab
LONG -PLAYING 133
-
R.P.M.) HI- FIDELITY
MASTERPIECES
COMPLETE TO THE LAST NOTE!
SCHUBERT
"Unfinished" Symphony (No. 8)
BEETHOVEN
Ruins of Athens (March and Choir)
MOZART
!long
Piano Concerto in
E
Flat
BACH
Toccata and Fugue in D Minor
WAGNER
Die Meistersinger Prelude,
At
1
MOUSSORGSKY
Night on Bald Mountain
No Strings
Attached!
BRAHMS
Academic Festival Overture
No Need to Buy Any
DUKAS
Other Records Ever! Full Advantages of Trial Membership
Sorcerer's Apprentice
ALL 8 masterpieces for only $1. Performed by
world- famous artists. Custom- recorded on purvinyl. Reproduced with a tonal fidelity encompassing the entire range of human hearing (50 to 1 The Musical Mosterprece Society, Inc., Dept. 112
43 West 61st Street, New York 23, N. Y.
15,000 cycles.) This amazing offer is made only
Enclosed is $I In hat payment for the recordings
to demonstrate superb quality of our recordings;
of 8 masterpieces listed. Enroll me as trial member.
and to show you advantages of trial membership.
Privileges: No purchase obligation ever! Advance
est
HOW CLUB OPERATES-We advise you mon
of new releases. Those you want are sent you
FREE trial. After 5 days' listening -only the re,..
you decide to keep are billed you ar the low men,:
ship price of $1.50 per disc (average playing tin.
min.). You save r the usual retail price! This "u;.
away" offer can obviously not be kept open in,!
nitely. MAIL COUPON NOW while supply last.
Full money -back guarantee.
I18
notice of releases. 5 day free trial on any discs.
I may reject records before or after receipt: may
cancel membership at any time. For future l.p.
discs I keep. I'll pay only $1.50 each plus shipping
Name
Address
City
Canada. address: 686
State
Bathurst St.. Toronto
4.
Ont
OLD LOOK
Continued from page 48
-
the outskirts of Columbia, S. C. price
$450. Cost of reproduction: $14.70,
but in walnut instead of yellow pine
as in the prototype.
These hunt
boards or serving tables were popular
in the South during the period
175o -I800 and were aptly named,
since food was placed on them for
the hungry landed gentry after a fox
hunt. Note this one's appealingly
simple lines, its utter lack of sophistication (unmistakable evidence of
its back plantation origin) and its
ease of duplication.
Here again we can take some
justifiable liberties, particularly since
these pieces were made in a great
variety of drawer configurations. Many
of them incorporated a large drawer
or hinged door at the center or at
each end to accommodate bottles
or demijohns of whiskey. We can
do exactly the same thing and our
choice of location and door or drawer
size will depend entirely upon the
sizes of record player, tuner and
amplifier.
If you would like to
maintain drawer symmetry, why not
combine two similar drawer fronts
to simulate a single one by incising
two shallow narrow lines to imitate
the thickness of the supporting shelf?
The apparent drawer -front(s) can then
be hinged unobstrusively either at
the side or the bottom, whichever is
Continued on page 121
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
V-M
Authentic
High Fidelity
(0feeveit
Fidelis
WITH TONE -O-MATIC
brings music vibrantly alive
r,,,40/7
When you first realize that you control the perfect- precisebalance of reproduction in your favorite records . . . that with
tone -o -matic you decide how strong the high or low tones will be
played -then, you understand the perfect gift V -\1's "Fidelis" offers
in authentic high fidelity pleasure.
Il within the acoustically correct cabinet, -.I/ has provided an audible
range of -10 to 15,000 cps. Silently, gently, records of all three sines and
speeds are automatically changed to bring you their full tonal beauty.
And, after the last record plays. Siesta Switch' shuts off even the amplifier, automatically.
Choose either African Mahogany or Champagne blonde in lustrous
hand- rubbed finish at the same price. S1Ú19.50 "(Legs, black or brass
finish, are ontional.)
1
24
MODELS
TO CHOOSE FROM
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glut s- high
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NAME___
ADDRESS_
CITY
i
C
Michigan
trirhin Your R'ull.."
_ZONE_
WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PHONOGRAPHS AND RECORD CHANGERS
FEBRUARY, 1955
A
I,,.,.
CORPORATION, Benton Harbor
Please send
l
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.9dvertisenteut
SPECIAL TELEVISION REPORT
TV chassis of the future..
.
WALSCO PC -9 COMBINES
FIRST COMPLETELY PRINTED
CIRCUIT CHASSIS WITH
AUTOMATIC OPERATION
-
-
The introduction of the first and only entirely
"printed circuit" television chassis marks a dramatic
departure from all present day receivers. The supersensitive Walsco PC -9 automatically produces the exact, crystal -clear performance found only in precision
TV control room monitors.
The new custom PC -9 chassis offers keyed automatic
gain control, automatic brightness and contrast, automatic elimination of vertical retrace, magnetic centering, direct current restoration, inverse audio feedback
for greater sound fidelity, two video amplification
stages, advanced cascode turret tuner, plus twelve
other future features.
Either 21, 24, or 27 inch tube (90° deflection) can
be used without modifying the chassis. The PC-9 is
available now at user's net of $299, including remote
control with 20 feet of cable and tube mounting kits.
Completely portable, hand -size remote control. Exclusive "open circuit" control automatically finds the
channel...instantly locks in perfect picture and sound.
Since all fine video adjusting is automatic, this remarkable, motor driven unit has only the volume
(on -off) knob and the channel dial.
For information write to Walsco Electronics Corporation,
Dept. H -rj 3602 Crenshaw Blvd., Los Angeles 16, Calif.
-
No more "jungle" of wires. Chief Engineer Fred Miller (right)
makes a side -by -side comparison of a Walsco PC-9 (right) with
a conventional, complicated chassis. Bob Mueller, Walsco Sales
Manager, observes simplicity of vertically mounted, printed
circuit design.
Printed circuits prevent faulty connections and production
errors. Special machines and dip-soldering reduce the usual
2900 hand soldered connections to only 56 in the new PC -9
chassis. This advance circuitry provides ultra-clear reception
on all channels. Each circuit strip plugs into PC -9, making
servicing simple and quick.
OLD LOOK
Continued from page
i i8
least conspicuous. Glide type rollers
can be used to provide access to the
record player and may be easily
installed on the sides of the drawer
opening.
Caution put the back
( Masonite) on after the rollers are
installed.
Offhand, we can't think of any
construction difficulties, with the possible exception of the legs which
are tapered on two adjacent sides
for a distance of 24 inches from the
bottom. If you know the sources,
the walnut legs may be obtained in
dimensional lumber, surfaced four
sides.
Stock r 5 /8 by r 5/8 inches
square will do very nicely and tapering
on the circular saw may be accomplished either free hand or by means
of a tapering jig ($2.95 at your
nearest hardware store). The bottom
of the taper should be approximately
square. Talking about jigs,
3/4 -inch
you might also invest in a doweling
jig, which provides accurately drilled
and aligned holes for doweling the
aprons of the hunt board to the
legs. One more thought. The board
should be made in two separate
sections, the upper one containing
the drawers and the lower one consisting of the aprons and legs. The
former should then be set on the
latter and fastened with wood screws
through a one -by -one strip mounted
flush with the top of the aprons.
As in the case of the apothecary's
chest, mouldings may be separate
and fastened to both sections with
The original hunt-board is
brads.
6o inches wide, 441/4 high and 15
deep. The drawers on mine were all
5 inches high, with four of them
14 wide and the balance 11.
The blanket chest illustrated in
Figure V is typical of those popular
during the early 18th century. Made
of pine throughout, its construction
is relatively simple and no major
changes are required for the accommodation of a complete music reproduction system (less the speaker,
of course). The top is hinged and
the only modification required involves the installation of a well
for the record player and remaining
Continued from page 122
-
FEBRUARY, 1955
Franz is a little child in western Europe -already old for his
five years. Cut off from the joys of normal childhood, he knows
too well the bitter taste of privation and neglect. The only
clothes he has are the shabby ones he is wearing. He has no
toys. His parents are scarcely able to provide the barest
essentials. His present is bleak, his future uncertain.
What hope is there for Franz? A little friendly interest warm clothing, shoes, a toy to play with
will help him to
take his place in the world, a happier and healthier child, with
the knowledge that he has a friend who loves him and wants
to help.
In the countries aided by Save the Children Federation,
there are so many children like Franz, innocent victims of
war and destruction, who need your help to guide them through
their difficult early years.
-
HOW YOU CAN HELP
You can help a needy child like Franz through the Federation's CHILD SPONSORSHIP plan. For just $120 a year,
$10 a month, SCF will send "your" child warm clothing,
sturdy shoes, blankets and other necessities- delivered in
your name in Austria, Finland, France, Western Germany,
Greece, Italy, Korea and Yugoslavia.
You will receive a case history and photograph of the
child you sponsor. You may correspond with "your" child
and his family, so that your generous material aid becomes
part of a larger gift of understanding and friendship.
A contribution in any an
nt will help
SCF NATIONAL SPONSORS (a partial list)
Faith Baldwin, Mrs. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lynn Fontanne, Herbert
Hoover. Henry R. Luce. Dr. Ralph W. Sockman, Thomas J. Watson.
SCF
THE
-C
ILDREN
IT)
FEDERATION
Established
1932
International Center.
Carnegie Endowment
CHSAVE
United Nations Plaza, New York 17, N. Y.
would like to sponsor a child in
country) for one year.
I will pay $120.00 for one year (or $10.00 a month
Enclosed is payment
for the full year
first month ...
Please send me the
child's name, story and address, and picture.
I cannot sponsor a child, but I want to help by giving $
I
.
Name
Address
City
Zone
State
Contributions to the Save the Children Federation are deductible from
income tax.
You may help a needy child in Austria, Finland,
France, Western Germany, Greece, Italy, Korea, or Yugoslavia.
HF -I
121
HI -FI FANS and CRITICS AGREE:
1955
OLD LOOK
franchised
Continued from page 121
WALCO
CLEAN
Praised like this in
High Fidelity, Audio,
Sat. Review of Recordings and American Record Guide:
.
deserves its fine
reputation ..."
Your Best Defense
...of considerable
Against Dustr. Enemy of Rec"...nullifies static very
ords and Needles
effectively ..
Absolutely Safe
"Best product!"
Non-Residual
Contains No Soaps or Detergents
Adds Years to Record Life -With No
Loss of Presence or Brilliance
Laboratory Tested. Unconditionally
1
--
.
Guaranteed
Nothing stops dust as safely and effecNo other
tively as STATI- CLEAN.
cleaner has the permanence of STATICLEAN one quick spray stops dust for
months! Chemical -impregnated cloth
cleaners are temporary and become useless after dirtying, washing, or short exposure to air... but with STATI- CLEAN,
you use the free applicator cloth indefinitely. It may be washed repeatedly, is
continually restored by use! Further, unlike clip -on devices that reduce static but
do not clean the record (and are dangerously radioactive), and brushes that
just generate more dust attracting static
in use STATI-CLEAN does the whole
job, sensibly and safely.
Ask for STATI -CLEAN the original
anti -static spray cleaner next time you
visit your record dealer.
-
-
-
-
BY THE MAKERS OF THESE OTHER
FAMOUS RECORD PRODUCTS:
WALCO
Contoured Bottom
WALCO
Sapphire and Diamond
equipment. Although many of the
original chests incorporated one or
two lower drawers, an almost equal
number included a simulated one as
the illustrated example. A source
of supply for the two ball feet and
other special turnings will be mentioned later. The chest is 36 inches
wide, 31 high and 15112 deep.
For the softer solid woods, such as
pine, try your local lumber dealer.
The slightly more pretentious cabinet
woods such as birch, maple, cherry
or butternut are virtually unobtainable
at local yards, but sources of supply
can be located from any handicraft
magazine. I list three below; there
are many more.
THE
MAINSBURG
LUMBER
CO.,
COVINGTON, PA.
The following woods are obtainable, in
rough and surfaced dimensioned form in
thicknesses of % -in- to 3 in. and in lengths
and widths sufficiently varied for most
cabinet projects. Catalog available for 250:
Ash, basswood, beech, birch, cherry,
elm, hickory, hard and soft maple.
for Records
NEEDLES
for all
cartridges ka
and players
ALBERT CONSTANTINE & SON,
INC., 797 E. 135 St., N. Y. 54
Dimensioned lumber in birch, cherry,
Honduras mahogany, white maple, white wood and walnut. Also veneers by the
square foot and a fairly representative
line of period hardware.
Catalog Sot,
refundable, I believe, on the first $5.00
purchase.
RICHARDSON & DUTT, 70o Third Avenue, New York City.
Soft woods, primarily, but an excellent
choice of different moldings in pine,
oak, mahogany, walnut and birch. An
infinite number of turnings such as finials,
balls and table legs.
(We obtained the
two balls for the front legs of the blanket
chest here.) Not a mail order house, but
we feel sure that they will fill your order
if your wants are specific.
(The author will be glad to answer queries
addressed to him at 784 Davis Ave., White
Plains, N. Y.)
Cabinetry finishing will be discussed by
Mr. Maged in the March issue of HIGH
-`i,40
Write for free sample DISCOVER,
plus free $1 book on record care,
indexing, etc. Enclose 25c to cover
postage and handling.
FREE
alhiM
PRODUCTS, INC.
60 -F Franklin St., East Orange, N. J.
AT LEADING RECORD SHOPS
122
Inc., 2020 Euclid Ave.
Pioneer Electronic Supply
Co., 2115 Prospect Ave.
Radio 8 Electronic Parts
Corp. 3235 Prospect
COLUMBUS, O.: Schaffer Music Co., 849 North
High Street
CONCORD, N. H.: Evans Radio, P. 0. Box 312
DAYTON, O.: Dayton Sound Associates, 1357 Phil.
adelphia Drive
DETROIT, Mich.: Haco Distributing Co., 9730 Ournette Ave., at Grand River
KLA Laboratories,
Inc. 7412 Woodward
EAST ORANGE, N. 1.: Custom Music Systems, 426
Main Street
GLENDALE, Calif.: Glendale Recorders, 319 N. Central
HEMPSTEAD, L. I., N. Y.: Island Radio Distributors,
412 Fulton Ave.
HOLLYWOOD, Calif.: Pacific Radio Exchange, 1407
Cahuenga Blvd.
HOUSTON, Tex.: Audio Center, 1633 W. Wertheimer
Wyre Company, 2045 Welch
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.: Graham Electronic Supply Co.,
102 S. Pennsylvania Street
JAMAICA, N.Y.: Audio Exchange, 159-19 Hillside Av.
LAS VEGAS, Nev.: Metcalf Radio Sound & Supply,
Second and California
LOS ANGELES, Calif.: L. A. Portable Recording Ent.,
521 N. La Cienega Blvd.
Magnetic Recorders Co.,
7120 Melrose Ave.
Weingarten Electronics, 755
Melrose Ave.
REPLACEMENT
Protective Polyethylene Sleeves
distributors
ALBANY, N.Y.: Taylored Sound, Inc., 465 Central Av.
ALBUQUERQUE, N. M.: Sound Engineering 8 Equip
ont Co., 8011/2 Yale
ATLANTA, Ga.: Baker Fidelity Corp., 1429 Peachtree
N.E.
High Fidelity SSS, 606 Peachtree N.E.
BATON ROUGE, La.: Louisiana RadloTelevision Dists'
Inc., 1645 Plank Road
BELLINGHAM, Wash.: Waitkus Supply, 110 Grand Av.
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif.: Crawford's, Ins., 456 North
Rodeo Drive
BOSTON, Mass.: The Listening Post, Inc. 161 New
bury Street
Radio Wire 1V, Inc., 110 federal St.
BUFFALO, N. Y.: Frontier Electronics 1503 Main
Street
Radio Equipment Corp., 147 East Genesee
CAMBRIDGE, Mass.: HIFI Labs., 1077 Mass. Ave.
CANTON, O.: Groshan Camera Center, 331 Cleve.
land Ave., N.W.
CHICAGO, Ill.: Chicago Electronic Distributors, 420
East 87th Street
Electronic Expediters, 2909
West Devon Ave.
R. P. D. Arthur Nagel, 925 E.
55th St.
Voice and Vision Inc., 53 E. Walton
CINCINNATI, O.: Customcralters, Inc., 2259 Gil.
vert Ave.
Steinberg's, Inc., 633 Walnut Street
CLEVELAND, O.: Audio Craft Company, 2915 Pros.
pect Ave.
Olson Radio Warehouse of Cleveland,
FIDELITY.
Available NOW
Complete index of HIGH FIDELITY's record reviews, from
the first issue through December 1953
5o cents.
-
LOUISVILLE, Ky.: P. I. Burks A Co., 911 West
Broadway
MELBOURNE, Fla.: McHose Electronics, 640 New
Haven Ave.
MILWAUKEE Wis.: The HI -FI Center 2630 N. Downer
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.: Paul A. Schmitt, 88 S. Tenth
NEWARK, N. 1.: Hudson Radio and Television Corp.,
35
Williams Street
NEW YORK CITY: Davega Stores, 76 Ninth Ave.
Goody Audio Center, 235 West 49th Street
Grand
Central Radio, Inc., 124 East 44th Street
Heins
8 Bolet, 68 Cortlandt Street Hudson Radio A Tele
vision Corp, 48 West 48th Street
Hudson Radio
8 Television Corp, 212 Fulton Street
Leonard
Radio, Inc., 69 Cortlandt Street
Peerless Camera
Stores, Inc., 415 Lexington Ave.
Sonocraft Cor
poratlon, 115 -17 West 45th St.
Sun Radio and
Electronics Co., Inc., 650 6th Ave.
OMAHA, Neb.: Omaha Appliance Co., 557 S. 18th St.
PARAMUS, N. 1.: Music Age, Route w4
PASADENA, Calif.: High Fidelity House, 536 S. Fair
Oaks
Weldon Associates, 1572 East Walnut
PATERSON, N. 1.: Magnetic Recording Co., 344
Main Street
PHILADELPHIA, Pa.: Radio Electric Service of
Pennsylvania, Inc., 701 Arch Street
PITTSBURGH, Pa.: Cameradio Company, Inc., 1121
Penn
Radio Parts Company, 929 Liberty Ave.
Walk's Kamera Exchange, 308 Diamond St.
PHOENIX, ArIO., Elco Electrical Communications,
Inc. 202 East Fillmore
PORTLAND, Ore.: L. D. Heater Music Co., 1001
S.W. Morrison
Hawthorne Electronics, 700 S.E.
Hawthorne Blvd.
ROCHESTER, N.Y.: Jerry Fink Co., 614 Clinton Ave.
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah: Poll and Austin, 1651 S.
Eleventh East
SAN DIEGO, Calif.: Breier Sound Center, 3781 Fifth
Ave.
SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.: San Francisco Radio, 1284
Market Street
SAN PEDRO,
Calif.: Bower's Music Store, 810 Gaffey
SANTA BARBARA, Calif.: Bennett Music Company,
Westen's, 800 State Street
B27 State Street
SEATTLE, Wash.: Electricraft, Inc., 622 Union St.
Olympic Ene veering Co., 1008 Westlake
SPARTANBURG, S. Car.: Merit Distributing Co., 491
Union Street
SPOKANE, Wash.: Twentieth Century Sales, West
1021 1st Ave.
SYRACUSE, N.Y.: Varsity Camera, Inc., 804 South
Crouse Ave.
TACOMA, Wash.: C. 8 G. Radio Supply Co., Inc.,
2502.6 Jefferson Ave.
TEANECK, N. l.: 1. 1. Casey. 856 Lincoln PI.
TOLEDO, O.: Warren Radio Co., 1320 Madison
TORONTO, CANADA: Custom Sound A Vision, Ltd.,
390 Eglinton Ave, W.
TUCKANOE, N.Y.: Boynton Studio, 10 Penn. Ave.
VANCOUVER, British Columbia CANADA: Hygrade
Radio, Ltd. 971 Richards Street
D.C.: Electronic Wholesalers, Inc.,
Kitt's Music Co., Inc.,
2345 Sherman Ave., N.W.
1330 G. Street, N.W.
WASHINGTON, Pa.: Bradford Martin 8 Son, 122 W.
Strawberry Ave.
WHEELING, W. Va.: lames M. Black & Sons, 952
WASHINGTON,
Market Street
WORCESTER, Mass.: Radio
Electronic Sale Co., 52
Chandler Street
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Music lovers and sound enthusiasts who demand the ultimate in
sound reproduction can now have
high quality professional performance at home with the NEW Con certone 20 20 recorder. The result
of three years of research, design
and testing, this bri'liant performer will complete your home
at a price you
audio system
...
can afford to pay!
S445 is the user's
net (air traded price.
The NEW CONCERTONE
20 2r)
has all these foremost
design advances:
Provision for five heads (three
are standard). For example, an
additional amplifier makes both
monaural and binaural recordings possible.
Three motors for minimum wow
and flutter. Two -speed capaci-
tor induction motor for direct
drive. Shaded pole motors for
take -up and supply.
Unified Control. One simple convenient error -proof lever system.
...
monitors
Test Fader
between incoming signal and
playback without traisients or
clicks.
A -B
...
-
Built -in Two -Channel Mixer
line signal can be mixed with
mike input to put both on tape
simultaneously.
professional performance
at home with the
NEV,Ì
20 / 20
-
-
v recorder
Tastefully styled to complement
the decor of your home.
4917 West Jefferson Blvd.
Los Angeles 16, Calif.
Manufacturers of Berlant
Studio recorders and accessories
See and hear the New Concertone
20 20 at any of the franchised
Concertone distributors listed on
(20 to 20,000 cycles useable frequency response)
"JUST LIKE BEING THERE"
FEBRUARY, 1955
the opposite page.
LEXICON
Continued from page 95
-
The
Record
Changer
With
$
CieCUCINOV
RC -54
the sound source, adjusting tonal balance
and sound intensity, etc.
Some of the
controls found in virtually all high -fidelity
systems:
Selector switch.
This switches in the
desired sound source
the tuner, TV,
record player, or tape recorder
and
feeds it through the system.
Bass control. This adjusts the bass tones
as desired, from less than normal intensity
in its counterclockwise rotation to greater
than normal intensity in its clockwise
rotation, without affecting the middle or
high frequencies.
Treble control.
This adjusts the treble
tones or high frequencies in the same
manner as described for the bass control.
Volume, gain, or level control. This adjusts
the sound intensity, and affects all frequencies alike. Often, in addition to the
main control, there are level controls on
all the individual sound inputs, in order
to make the sound sources equal in intensity as the selector switch is operated.
Such level controls are not usually on the
front control panel because, once set,
they would not ordinarily be changed.
Loudness control.
Similar to a volume
control except that, as the overall intensity
is turned down, the bass (and sometimes
the treble) tones are not turned down
as much as the middle range. This is done
to compensate for the tendency of the
ear to lose the bass and, to a lesser extent,
the treble as intensity is decreased. These
controls are usually accompanied by input
level controls, by a standard front -panel
volume control, or by a front -panel switch
that can cut out the boosting circuits.
Equalization controls. Necessary to adjust
the phonograph preamplifier circuits for
the various recording characteristics used
on records of different manufacture. Often
there are individual equalization controls
for turnover (low- frequency boost) and
rolloff (high -frequency reduction), although
one-knob equalizers are common. When
a one -knob equalizer is furnished it is
likely to be combined with the selector
there being then two or more
switch
switch positions for the phono input,
with various equalization curves in the
multiple phono positions of the switch.
3 Speeds
Fully Automatic
-
9e
r --
Get the whole story
ROCKBAR CORPORATION, Dept. RB -2
215 East 37th Street, New York 16, N.Y.
Tell me about JPF and the Collaro RC -54
Control unit
-
Corner horn
-A baffle for
124
a
low- frequen-
opening into the room (the mouth.) The
corner horn utilizes the junction of two
walls and the floor as an extension of the
mouth, thereby increasing the effective
size of the horn and bettering its extreme
low-frequency performance.
-
Zone
star.
/7/
model
1811
full
12
watt
high fidelity amplifier
NOW, at moderate cost, you
can own and enjoy a quality
of musical re-creation virtually
indistinguishable from the original
performance. Here is the ideal
"heart" for your home music
system, capable of reproducing the
full musical range from vibrant
bass through thrilling treble with
the full emotional depth and
meaning of the original music.
Here is the finest audio achievement,
designed to bring you the
ultimate in enduring listening pleasure.
with every desirable feature for
superb musical reproduction ...
-
Full 12 watts output
Response,
0.5
db, 20-20,000 cps. 3 Response Curves
to bring out the full fidelity in all types
and makes of records Microphone input
for entertainment and recording Separate
Bass and Treble tone controls
Choice of
regular or "equal loudness" control
Inputs for GE or Pickering cartridge,
tape, tuner, and microphone Removable
panel for easy mounting...
PLUS
every other desirable feature
to create a new dimension
in sound for your home.
Abbreviation for cycles per second
(See Frequency.)
Crossover network -A combination of
ADDRESS
C;ty
(See Preamplifier.
cy loudspeaker.
The baffle takes the
shape of an exponential horn; that is, a
horn with a slow rate of size increase near
the loudspeaker or driver end (the throat)
and a high rate of size increase at the
Cps
Nome_.._........_ ..................... ............._._.........._....
musical
magic'
-
capacitors and inductors which separates
and feeds the low frequencies to a bass
Continued on page 126
Hear the
RAULAND 1811
Amplifier at your
Hi -Fi dealer, or write
for full details.
RAULAND-BORG CORPORATION
3515 W. Addison St., Dept. F, Chicago 18, III.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
The
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Morantz Audio Consolette is unmatched by any unit on the market:
Continuously Variable Bass
These are the features:
and Treble Controls Independent Turnover and Rolloff Controls Loudness ComFrequency
High Frequency Cutoff Selector
pensator (does not affect volume)
Negligible IM Distortion (less than .037.
Response: 17 to 40,000 cycles ±Idb
at 2-volt output).
7- position Selector Switch
NEW!
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Model 956GE
3 -Speed AUTOMATIC
RECORD CHANGER
.1-1I-Ft al]ARKY{IÁS A
Model 1201A
12" GENERAL ELECTRIC
NOSE FOR MUSIC-.
This was fine during the '78' era.
hut with the birth of 'L.P.'s'
Harry found the nosing a little
rough and the music not up to
snuff. Then his best friend told
him about Transcriber's custom
re- tipping service and he mailed us
his nose I First Class, of course I.
We retie any needle with diamond
.
make it like new again.
So if your needle has had its day,
remove it from the cartridge.
Scotch -tape it to a piece of
cardboard and mail to Transcriber.
Our experts will straighten
and strengthen the shank . . .
custom re-tip it with a new
guaranteed diamond. You'll boost
your Fi and save your records.
Total cost? Only 10.50 postpaid.
48 hour service.
q
you
send r entire
retool, needle
reruid,e.
HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKER
READY TO PLUG TOGETHER AND PLAY!
This amazing 3 -Star System is loaded with high price
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that cost up to twice as much. features: Fully Guaranteed Famous Termatone ...Sensitive and Stable FM...
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The
Pickup
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VM Voice of Music Record Changer with heavy duty
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You get all these fine Full Size Components for only a
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Yours for
fo(e,i,/
COMPANY
Diamond Stylus Manufacturers
70 Pi. Steel - Dept. hF -2
AttI.b.r.. M.
6Zataade
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store
MAIL ORDERS FILLED WITHIN 48 HOURS
If you cannot come to our store for This sensational
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Every item FULLY
TRANSCRIBER
f.o.b.
our
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GUARANTEED.
Yours for the askin
Brochure feag Hi -Fi Systems
at Sweet-and Low prices from
for Bulletin HF -2
FEETerminal's
luring fine
85 CORTLANDT STREET, NEW
FEBRUARY. 1955
YORK 7, N. Y.
125
LEXICON
Only Tape Recorder
Continued from page 124
with Simple Single -Knob Control
$1295°..
speaker (woofer) and the high frequencies
to a treble speaker (tweeter), and sometimes
the middle range of frequencies to another
speaker. The combination of these speakers,
their enclosure(s), and the crossover network makes up a complete loudspeaker
system.
-
The rate of flow of electrical
charges (electrons) in a circuit; measured
in amperes or milliamperes (a milliampere
is one thousandth of an ampere).
An
ampere is 6.3 billion billion electrons per
second. In the hydraulic analogy, current
is comparable to fluid flow rate (gallons per
Current
Model
CT -1
minute, etc.).
Current feedback
Cutter head
-
-
(See Feedback.)
The vibrating mechanism
and stylus assembly that cuts the groove
in the original master record blank.
-
Cycle
One complete occurrence of a repetitive phenomenon.
For instance, a
complete revolution of the minute hand
on a clock constitutes a cycle; one cycle
of an alternating current occurs each
time it goes through maximum in one
direction, reverses and reaches maximum
in the other direction, reverses again and
returns to maximum in the original direction.
P ENTRON
Damping
TAPE RECORDER
mONOmAfic
with exclusive
True
ance
2 -hour
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and
playback
Straight line slot loading
fidelity
DC
perform-
it -hear it -to believe it! Ask your Pentron
dealer to demonstrate Monomatic Control.
i
PENTRON CORPORATION
A
1
O
O
TApE
R E C
ORD EßS
Canada: Allas Rodio, Ltd., Toronto
126
l
EXCLUSI'E
rrn
Dept. HF2, 777 5. Tripp Ave., Chicago 24, Illinois
Please send detailed literature on Pentron with Monomatic.
Please send nome of my nearest Pentron source.
Name
I
Address
City
_Zone.
State
(See
Direct current.)
-A
See
ST
-
Decibel, db
logarithmic measurement
of relative power levels (i.e., a measurement
Horizontal or vertical
operation
Instantaneous braking no tape spilling
Send for complete details today
-
plifier's apparent source impedance. High
damping factor (low source impedance),
obtained with large amounts of negative
voltage feedback and /or positive current
feedback, is said to be effective in reducing
or "damping" spurious loudspeaker cone
movements at low frequencies caused by
undesirable resonances.
control
With Monomatic Control, a flick of the finger instantly gives you
selection of Record or Play, in either 7% " or 3U " tape speeds, or Fast
Forward and Fast Rewind.
Simplest control ever devised for recording. MONOMATIC
Control is your error -proof assurance of getting what you want,
when you want it, every time.
31/4"
(See Resonance.)
Damping factor In a power amplifier,
the ratio of load impedance to the am-
This sensational new Pentron gives you the recording -playback quality
and all the features of recorders selling for up to twice this price .. .
plus fool -proof Monomatic Control, featured in no other recorder at
any price!
2tape speeds -7W and
-
-
based on a mathematical relationship
concerning the ratio of two power levels).
Used universally because it reduces to
smaller numbers the astronomical arithmetic
relationships between power levels encountered in electronics and, in high fidelity
techniques particularly, because it corresponds to human hearing characteristics
fairly well. A power ratio of 2 to I corresponds to a decibel difference of about 3,
is to decibels (db),
a power ratio of to to
is 20 db,
and a power ratio of too to
no matter what the absolute power levels
involved. Furthermore, within the normal
range of hearing, the amount of change
in sound level apparent to the ear corresponds to the decibel relationship regardless
of the absolute powers in watts. A change
of db is just noticeable at middle frequencies to most listeners.
There is a common "standard" base,
or zero level from which decibel power
levels are figured. The dbm is calculated
from a base of t milliwatt, or one thou Continued on page 128
u
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
MODEL FM 607A
$129.50*
MODEL AF 825
Complete AM -FM tuner -preamplifier and
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$69.50*
Famous basic FM Pilotuner with unusual
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oiOviré,
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cision engineered- featuring Pilot's famed
Renowned basic AM -FM Pilotuner with improved sensitivity and selectivity -popular
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priced
Write for complete information on any or all of the above PILOTUNERS.
PILOT RADIO CORPORATION
'Prices slightly higher West of the Rockies
LONG ISLAND CITY 1, NEW YORK
Send for Free Booklet H -2
FEBRUARY, 1955
I27
LEXICON
Continued from page 126
sandth
of
"dbm"
is used does a
watt; only when the term
decibel figure correspond to a specific power level unless another
base is specified.
Twenty dbm would be
one tenth of a watt; 3o dbm, i watt; 40
dbm, io watts.
a
-A
De- emphasis
reduction in high frequency intensity to compensate for previously- introduced
deliberate
emphasis
(pre -emphasis) of the high tones.
The
purpose is to reduce the scratch level,
in the case of records, and the noise level
in the case of FM broadcasting. Standard
pre-emphasis is used at FM transmitters,
so that all FM tuners and receivers have
fixed de- emphasis networks built in. Pre emphasis on records has not been standard,
however, so that variable de- emphasis or
rolloff controls (equalizers) are needed.
-A
Detector
circuit in a tuner that separates the electrical sound impulses from the
IF frequency.
Diaphragm
Diode
-
-
(See Loudspeaker.)
(See Tubes.)
Direct current, DC
-
Current that
does
not change its direction.
Distortion
way
impulse corresponding to that sound in
the process of its pickup, recording,
transmission, detection, amplification or
reproduction.
The types of distortion
that are commonly acknowledged to be
important in high fidelity are these:
Non -linear or amplitude distortion.
This
occurs in any element of the system in
which the output amplitude is not strictly
and uniformly proportional to the input
amplitude. It has two effects
the generation of spurious harmonic frequencies
of an original tone (harmonic distortion),
and the production of non -harmonic tones
resulting from the interaction of two or
more simultaneous tones (intermodulation,
or IM distortion.)
-.-.-..El
ICtRONICS
¡
Cri-o/Ulp
¡
,
-
i:,,
wt
Yf/
MINA. COMP POWWOW
20-watt Trl-amp by
'I"
Frequency distortion.
Discrimination, according to frequency, in the amount of
amplification or suppression.
In other
words, some frequencies are favored by
the system and therefore emerge with
Pdesen
P.O. BOX 572
L
A
F
A
-
Mutilation or change in any
of the original sound or the electrical
Y
E
T
T
E
CALIFORNIA
undue prominence. Loudspeaker systems
are usually the worst offenders in this
regard.
Phase distortion.
The reproduction of
some tones later in time than other tones
which originally occurred simultaneously.
Doppler distortion. This effect is serious
only when tones of widely different frequency are fed to a single loudspeaker.
As the cone makes a single low- frequency
vibration it will also be vibrating several
times when a high -frequency tone is
present. The high tone will be increased
in frequency as the cone moves outward
under the influence of the low tone, and
the high tone will be decreased in frequency
as the cone moves inward.
The effect is
one of intermittent false vibrato.
(To be continued)
I28
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Nun
SATCHMO:
My Life in New
Orleans by Louis Armstrong. 240
pages. Prentice -Hall, Inc. New
York. $3.5o.
This first section of Louis Armstrong's
autobiography (the book ends as he
reaches Chicago in 1922) may be
somewhat of a disappointment to
those who anticipated a story dripping
with jazz anecdotes and associations.
There are some anecdotes and associations, almost inevitably, since
Armstrong's life has revolved around
his cornet ever since he learned to
play it during his stay at the Colored
Waifs Home for Boys in New
Orleans in his early teens. But he is
only on the threshold of his musical
career when this book stops. The
great days are still ahead. What he
has given us this time is the formative
period, a time when music dominated
his interests but when the necessities of scrambling for a living and
trying to grow up in an almost
jungle -like atmosphere took precedence over even his musical interests.
But if the book is lacking as jazz
history, it is nonetheless a fascinating
sociological document. The influence
of jazz on adolescents has rarely,
if ever, been cited as noble or uplifting by any of the self-appointed
guardians of our morals but there
can be little doubt that jazz was the
saving grace in Louis Armstrong's
life. The neighborhood around Perdido and Liberty Streets where he
grew up was as tough, as unmitigatedly
evil as could be imagined. It was an
area of cheap honky tonks which
spawned gun fights and knivings so
steadily that they were a casual part
of everyday life. Every man was a
pimp and all women were whores.
(Louis admits to a brief fling at
pimping which ended disastrously
when his "chick" stuck a knife in
him for resisting her attempts to
seduce him.)
To Louis, this was home and yet
he moved in it as a stranger. He
walked the streets warily with a
watchful eye on the neighborhood
toughs.
Peaceful coexistence was
FEBRUARY, r955
Ikve
his aim.
When trouble boiled up
him, Louis paints himself
as a faint -hearted adventurer
he
is constantly taking to his heels
whether from guns, knives, the possibility of an attack by white boys
resenting Jack Johnson's knockout
of Jim Jeffries, or the unexpected
arrival of someone claiming prior
rights to a girl whose bed he was
sharing.
His narrative approach to much of
this is disarmingly matter -of-fact. If
a rather unlikely roseate tinge creeps
into his recollections of these adventures as well as his efforts to
support his mother and assorted
other relatives by working days on a
coal cart and blowing his cornet at
night in the tonks, or his brief,
brick- throwing marriage to his first
wife who had been engaged in the
local profession when he met her,
well, the mellowing effects of time
on what would seem to have been an
utterly bleak picture in actuality must
be considered.
But the glow with which Armstrong
remembers his admiration for the
great jazzmen he heard as a child
Kid Ory, Joe Oliver ( "Papa Joe"
to Louis), Freddie Keppard, Papa
and his pride in his youthCelestin
ful achievements and recognition as
a cornetist is unaffectedly warm and
His love of the music
genuine.
he heard and made was the one
true, unqualified emotion which could
flourish in so twisted an atmosphere
and it was this which enabled Armstrong to emerge from his sordid
background as whole and full a man
as he is. This book, in essence, is
the story of how he managed to survive
and emerge.
Armstrong's prose style, in its
original form, is a unique and often
exhilarating blend of interjections,
exclamations and side excursions. It
undoubtedly needs some editorial
But
clarifying for the lay reader.
the editorial hand which has been
laid on this manuscript is heavy,
stiffening his grammer into unbe-
-
around
Yea
Neand
Sui
-
F
-
-
1
1
1
ROCKBAR CORPORATION, DEPT.BB2
215 East 37th Street, New York 16, N. Y.
1
1
Please send complete description of the
Axiom 80 and other Goodmans loud-
speakers.
Name
Address
1
city
Zone
state_
My Dealer Is
Continued on page 13o
129
1
BOOKS
tuned
to
tomo
r)J
Jú`Jló
sJ!1
20 WATT
Continued from page 129
AMPLIFIER
UNITY -COUPLING:
Exclusive circuit eliminates impulse distortion characteristic in conventional
amplifiers. Transformer's only function
is to provide impedance match to
speaker.
lievable formality, reducing him to an
elementary textbook style which makes
the opening pages almost forbiddingly
pat. Once he gets into his story,
however, once he starts setting his
scene, the dull-minded grammarian
on his shoulder is forgotten. His
picture of life in this drably colorful
section of New Orleans is explicit
and vivid, told from the unusual
point of view of one who accepted
it as normal without fully accepting
its values. If he succeeds as well in
telling his post -1922 story, the jazz
book that many of us have been
looking forward to may be in the
making. But please, Messrs. Prentice Hall, send that boy with the grammatical sliderule out for an Orange
JOHN S. WILSON
Crush.
HARMONIC DISTORTION:
Less than .3% at rated output of 20 watts,
at 25 watts the distortion is .6% or less.
INTERMODULATION DISTORTION:
Not more than 1% at 20 watts output
measured with 400 cps and 7 kc mixed
4, 1.
FREQUENCY RESPONSE:
±.l
20 cps -20 kc
I db.
±
db;
10
cps
-100 kc
POWER RESPONSE AT 20 WATTS:
-20 kc ±.15
±1db.
db;
20 cps
10
cps
-60 kc
HUM AND NOISE:
80 db below 20 watts output.
SENSITIVITY:
1.6 volts for 20 watts
output
OUTPUT IMPEDANCE:'
8
and 16.
INPUT IMPEDANCE:
500 k.
OTHER FEATURES:
Input level control, rumble filter (effective below 30 cps
may be easily disconnected if preferred), plugs and wiring
Horizon
5 pre -amplifier,
for use with the
-
117 V accessory plug.
TUBES:
12AX7, 6L6G
2), 5Ú4G.
$8495
WRITE FOR COMPLETE
SPECIFICATIONS TO DEPT.
830
NATIONAL COMPANY, INC.
61
SHERMAN
ST.,
MALDEN 48, MASS.
Early Medieval Music, edited by
Dom Anselm Hughes. The New
Oxford History of Music. 434
pages. Illustrated. Oxford University Press. London and New
York. $7.50.
The Oxford History of Music published
fifty years ago still holds a place of
honor on scholarly shelves, but musicology has grown apace and the fine
old set is now superannuated. The
new 11- volume History will take its
place. The editorial board charged
with carrying out this substantial
undertaking is headed by J. A.
Westrup. His co- workers are Gerald
Abraham, Dom Anselm Hughes, Edward J. Dent and Egon Wellesz,
all eminent figures in British musicology.
Other brain -trusters from Europe
and America contribute individual
chapters on their various specialties.
In the heavy volume on medieval
music (the first to appear, but second
in the series), Wellesz discusses early
Christian music, especially Byzantine
hymnography; Alfred J. Swan, Russian
chant; Higini Anglés, Ambrosian and
Gregorian chant; Jacques Handschin,
trope, sequence and conductus; W.
L. Smoldon, liturgical drama; Westrup.
medieval song; and Hughes, the
beginnings of polyphony up to about
The sections are dovetailed
1300.
neatly: the over-all picture is clear,
consistent and above all authoritative.
It goes without saying that the
subject is fraught with question-
TUNER
000001
NEIG 3 -n.1
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HI-FI
cost
At last -the answer to the
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Also matching cabinets for
speakers. Ask wherever high
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write direct for catalog.
JCOMPANY
G
MO, illIMCIf
G/L
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
marks.
Few of the original marl
uscripts survive, their interpretation
is open to dispute, even the mediev.i:
theorists themselves are often un
reliable about the practice of music
in their time. Modern scholars have
made the Middle Ages a veritable
battleground, an area blanketed by
weighty barrages of tomes, monographs and theses. Fortunately the
authors have dispensed with hairsplitting and concentrate on negotiating the smoothest possible course
over the tricky terrain of chant and
11ULU
you/can hear
and feel
organum.
Summing up the intensive research
of several fruitful decades, they offer
concise, though necessarily technical
\planations of notation and forms,
illustrated by a wealth of examples,
expertly chosen.
For students of
composition and theory as well as of
history, the book will be worth its
weight in parchment as a guide
and reference on the materials of
early music. Lovers of the musical
mystery should be intrigued by the
clues here furnished to the exciting
puzzles and fantastic difficulties that
still confront the scholars.
A jacket note asserts that the
TAPE RECORDER
twospeed,
dualtrack
Continued on page 132
tuned ,\\
to
tomo \a"?
0 -WATT AMPLIFIER, PREAMP
UNITY COUPLING:
Exclusive circuit eliminates impulse distortion characteristic of conventional
amplifiers. Transformer's only function
is to provide impedance match to
speaker.
DISTORTION:
Less than .5% harmonic distortion at
rated output of 10 W. Not more than 2%
intermodulation at 10 W output measured
with 400 cps and 7 kc mixed 4:1.
FREQUENCY RESPONSE:
20 cps -20 kc ±1. db on the high level
inputs.
POWER RESPONSE:
20 cps -20 kc ±2. db on the high level
inputs.
HUM AND NOISE LEVEL:
High level input : Better than 70 db below
full output. Phono input: Better than
50 db below full output.
fcFX/B/L/Ty
When buying any recording
t
equipment you, as a high fidelity enthusiast, are interested in its many
technical aspects. Frequency response,
signal-to -noise ratio, flutter and wow
are, certainly, all important. And in
these aspects the FME Tape Recorder
is incomparable in its price class.
Yet, in the truest sense only your ear
can really distinguish the quality of fine
recorded sound. Only your trained touch
can really judge the simple, smooth operation of a tape recorder. It is for this
reason that Federal, without bold reference to technical specifications, invites
you, the real jury, to listen to the FME.
Hear for yourself Federal's triumph
in sound. Feel for yourself its quality
construction, its smooth, simple operation. Playback any tape-either 3% or
71/2 IPS. Test its single knob control,
its fast forward and rewind, its separate
volume and tone controls and many
other wanted features.
Then look at the price -we're sure
you'll be delightfully surprised.
azine designed 78 networks! See
page 74 of their Sep-Oct 1952
issue.
Depending on speaker voice
coil impedances, the 5 sizes now
available permit crossover frequencies of 85, 175, 275, 350,
550, 700, 1100, 2200, 4400, and
8800 cps.
Flexibility is the
word
and also:
reliability,
because for more than three
years I have devoted all my
efforts to manufacturing and
selling crossover networks and
air -couplers.'
Send 250 (refundable on first purchase) for
booklet giving complete network
5139.95. Slightly higher on West
Coast. Supplied complete with ceramic
microphone, reel of magnetic tape, take up reel, power cord and plug.
L.39
EXPORT
DIVISION:
Cables
2S
Warren St.,
SINIONTRICE NEW
FEBRUARY, 1955
N.
Y. 1,
YORK all codes
Volume control with built -in loudness
compensation.
TREBLE CONTROL:
1
db boost and 10 db cut at 10 kc.
BASS CONTROL:
(includes Power ON -OFF switch). Provides 15 db boost at 30 cps.
SENSITIVITY:
Inputs Tape and TV
-.5
watts.
High level phono input
Low level phono input
-
TUBES:
12AX7, 6V6G (2), 5Y3GT.
Walter M. Jones
*Licensed by Stromberg-Carbon, patent- holder on this unique bass reproducer.
WRITE
w
ALTER
/ /M
Y.
N
N. Y.
P.
0.
BOY. 277
O
R
30
mvt
10 my
P
O
R
A
SHEFFIELD,
T
E
D
MASS.
For 10
watts
$7995
COMPLETE
TO DEPT.
830
ationa
a,t2414 a
C
FOR
volts for 10
SPECIFICATIONS
JONES
AND ENGINEERING CORP.
215 Steuben Street, Brooklyn 5, N.
LOUDNESS CONTROL:
-
Only
FEDERAL MANUFACTURING
CONTROLS:
Five
position input
selector -record
equalizer switch.
Input
Position
High level -Tape
1.
2.
High level -Tuner
3. Phono R.I.A.A.
4. Phono A.E.S.
5. Phono Foreign
Flexibility -- that's the key
my crossover networks. I now
make 5 coil sizes: 10.2, 5.1,
1.6, 0.8, and 0.4 mh.
Using
just 4 of these sizes (the 0.4
is new) "High Fidelity" Mag
data.
OUTPUT IMPEDANCE:
8 and 16 ohms.
NATIONAL COMPANY, INC.
61
SHERMAN ST., MALDEN
48, MASS.
BOOKS
tuned ,\\
to
tomo
Continued from page 131
BJJJTJ PJèfi
AM-FM TUN
FM
R
"MUTAMATIC" TUNING
Exclusive circuit eliminates inter -station
hiss and noise present in other FM
TUNERS. Desired station locks -in automatically. Fine tuning is unnecessary.
FM
SECTION
Sensitivity:
.5 uy for 20 db quieting. Capture
ratio:
rejects interfering signals up to 80% as
strong as desired signal. No distortion
from reflected ghosts.
Image rejection:
Better than 60 db, I.F. pass band is flat
within ±1 db over band of 200 kc. Audio
distortion: less than 0.5% for all levels
of modulation.
Output:
Cathode follower output. Hum & Noise
level 60 db below audio signal. Full
A.G.C. maintains I.F. band pass regardless of input signal level. Instantaneous
limiters provide lowest impulse noise of
any tuner.
Selectivity provides complete adjacent
channel rejection.
AM SECTION
Sensitivity:
Sensitivity: 10 uy at antenna terminals
for signal -to -noise ratio of 10 db.
Image ratio: better than 60 db.
I.F. Pass band flat within ±1 db over
a 14.5 kc
range.
BINAURAL OPERATION
Individual tuning condensers, volume
controls and output jacks for simultaneous operation. FM free of AM signal
up to 100 times the FM signal Input. AM
free of FM signal up to 100 times AM
signal input.
$16995
WRITE
FOR
COMPLETE
SPECIFICATIONS TO
DEPT.
830
NATIONAL COMPANY, INC.
61
I3 2
SHERMAN ST., MALDEN
with the "informed
music-lover" also in mind. Perhaps
this hypothetical individual will be
better served in forthcoming volumes.
It's my impression that a layman
would have to be awfully well informed to keep up with the elaborate
arguments that occur in this one.
As a rule the authors are careful to
define their basic terms, but from
there it's just a hop and a jump to
more advanced and complex matters
where the uninitiated will find the
going rather heavy. A lot is certainly
taken for granted: can it be true,
for example, that the words and music
of the sequence Victimae paschali
are "too well known to need reproduction" for "informed" music
lovers who may seek enlightenment
in this book? I'd call that colleague conscious writing.
RCA Victor's History of Music in
Sound is intended as a phonographic
supplement to this work, but nor
much could be gained from both
without a comfortable reading knowA smattering of
ledge of music.
Latin would also be helpful, since
the authors aren't all equally gracious
about translations. All of this is by
way of saying that Oxford has produced an extremely scholarly survey.
What I can't understand is the lack
of any real effort to relate music
to the medieval life of thought and
action. Only the introduction conin the remaining
tains a hint or two
40o pages it's as though music were
created in a vacuum. No explanations
are offered for the incredible vitality
of the medieval artist, for the creative
spirit that constantly found new outlets in spite of efforts to keep it
within the bounds of "propriety."
There were more than musical reasons
for the impulse that led a generation
of music-makers to add a second
melody above the single line that
this is a
had sufficed for millenia:
turning point in Western thought, the
first dividing cell in our musical
The learned anatomists
evolution.
have put early music on the dissecting
table. Now we need an André Mal raux to breathe some life into this
corpus of knowledge. FRED GRUNFELIT
series is designed
48, MASS.
I
1
MIRACORD
XA -100
has the
"M ayic WaiG;;
The only spindle that
treats your precious
records with the care
they deserve. No more
"out -of- round" center
holes. No rumble;
no wow.
THE MIRACORD XA -100
for sale at all leading distributors
throughout the United States. If you
are interested in High Fidelity you
owe it to yourself to see and hear
this remarkable instrument.
is
-
John Philip Sousa, by Ann M.
Lingg. Henry Holt and Company.
New York. 25o pp. $3.00.
Only the
Plus
PUSH BUTTON CONTROL
operation of this remarkable
changer is simply controlled by four
push buttons
Every
Plue. PAUSAMATIC
Now you can automatically preset the
time lapse between
from
5
record
changes,
seconds to 5 minutes
Plus. ALL
THESE FEATURES
No Wow.
No rumble.
Intermixes 10" and 12" records.
Interchangeable plug -in heads.
Ball- bearing- suspended turntable
and tone arm.
Adjustments without tools.
Rubber matted turntable.
All 3 speed settings controlled
by single knob.
Shipped complete with leads and
plugs, ready to play.
AUDIOGERSH
CORPORATION
`
23 Park Place
N. Y. 7, N. Y.
HIGH FIDELF1 y MAGAZINE
YOU
ARE
THERE
with the
razier--may
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THIS IS IT -an exponential
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you sparkling mid range and truly
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Everyone who hears it ... cheers
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I
Choose a beautiful setting for your
FM Twin Seventy fine bench
crafted cabinets in either contemporary or traditional styling.
Limed oak, silver fox, or hand rubbed African mahogany.
-
Write for literature and price list.
,
International
Electronics
Corporation
The life of John Philip Sousa, whose
centennial occurs this year, mirrors
certain facets of American history
of the last third of the nineteenth
century and first third of this one
which are not encountered in most
studies.
From his enlistment as
"apprentice" in the Marine band at
the age of thirteen to the end of his
long and honored career he was a part
of the American scene. His interest
in Gilbert and Sullivan and, later.
Victor Herbert, spurred a talent which
has not endured as has his reputation
for composing marches, but in his
heyday his operas, too, were popular
and great favorites.
His participation in the great expositions at Philadelphia and Chicago.
his leadership of the Marine Band
and then of his own band with
which he toured this country and all
the English-speaking countries of the
world brought him unprecedented
renown. Miss Lingg brings into focus
his place as march -king in America
beside that of the Strausses of Vienna
as waltz -kings.
The advent of the
two -step as the popular dance of the
day won him esteem as a composer
and recognition in his field beyond
that ever before accorded an American
And, incidentally, he
composer.
was thoroughly American in spite
of the apparent desire of many to
lend him a more glamorous foreign
ancestry.
Sousa's music has survived because
of its innate verve and zest but the
change of fashion in ballroom dancing
has settled him on a side road in that
sphere and the accompanying diminution of interest in concert bands
has affected his memory in another.
Sousa decried the advent of the new
dance steps and prophesied dire consequences from what he called "canned music."
His dignified appearance, his exemplary life, his pioneering spirit
and courage in music, all are brought
into proper perspective by Miss Lingg.
No one equalled him during his
life; no one has taken his place since.
It was an epoch of progress in which
he played a major role.
Sousa's
friendships and contacts with his
contemporary musicians and other
eminent men of his day make particularly absorbing reading.
Several inconsequential errors of
details are not important but are of
a piece, however, with the shallow
literary style of the book.
tuned \\
to
tomo.'
NM037,5
PLUG -IN PREAMP /CONTROL
CONTROLS:
Input Selector Record equalizer switch.
Permits selection of any one of 3 high
level input sources such as TV, tape and
phonograph. The remaining 7 positions
of this control compensate for all recording characteristics.
BASS TONE CONTROL:
Control range is from +25 db to -15 db
at 30 cps. Flat position is accurate to 1°
(one degree).
TREBLE TONE CONTROL:
Control range is from +15 db to -25 db
at 10 kc. Flat position is accurate to
within 1 °.
LOUDNESS VOLUME CONTROL
LOUDNESS -ON -OFF SWITCH:
Loudness compensation to volume control may be switched off by pushing
switch in toward panel.
Three source adjustment controls
accessible are:
1. TV level set
2. Tape level set
3. Phonograph sensitivity switch.
FREQUENCY RESPONSE:
In flat position, frequency response
measured from TV input is 20 cps -20 kc
±.25 db and 20 cps -100 kc ±1 db.
HARMONIC DISTORTION:
Less than .2% at 1.5 volts out, less than
.6% at 10 volts out.
INTERMODULATION DISTORTION:
Less than .3% at 1.5 volts out, less than
1.5% at 10 volts out (at 400 cps and 7 kc
mixed 4/1).
HUM AND NOISE:
70 db below 1.5 volts on high level inputs,
50 db below 1.5 volts on the 10 my phonograph input.
OUTPUT IMPEDANCE:
Approximately 3000 ohms accommodates
up to 50 ft. of cable between preamplifier
and amplifier.
TUBES:
Two 12AX7's.
$4995
WRITE FOR COMPLETE
SPECIFICATIONS TO DEPT.
HOWELL ST..
FEBRUARY, 1955
DALLAS. TEXAS
830
ationa
NATIONAL COMPANY, INC.
61
159
\1
SHERMAN
ST.,
MALDEN 48,
MASS.
JAY C. ROSENFELD
Ijj
Now, try
AUDIO FORUM
FAIRCHILD'S
new Serles 220,
and...
SIR:
In my hi -fi system there is unequal
distribution of the bass; it is more
pronounced close to the walls and in
the corners than in the center of the
room.
There is a bathroom behind one
wall of the living room
about 220
cubic feet. Would an infinite baffle,
obtained by mounting the speaker
in that wall, give me better repro-
-
Hear what you've
been missing:
Only Fairchild's newly -improved moving
coil design as featured in this brand new
cartridge Series 220, can offer such outstanding performance. Only this amazingly accurate, high -compliance cartridge can bring
your records to such full, dramatic life!
LOOK AT THIS
FREQUENCY RESPONSE CURVET
$37.SU
FREQUENCY IN CYCLES PER SECOND
o
duction? And where would I mount
the tweeters? Most of the seats in
the room have their backs to the
wall in question.
My wife objects to experimentation
since it would mean cutting a hole
in the wall.
lohn J. Stern, M. D.
3 Hopper Street
There isn't much doubt about an air coupler being able to extend the bass
range of your system.
However, you
should consider two matters:
r) The efficiency of the air coupler
will be somewhat less than that of your
present combination, so you'll have to
add a level control at the input of your
present system to balance it with the
coupler.
2) You should pretty much discount
the idea that air-coupler bass holds up
at low volume levels better than bass
from a standard system. Bass is bass
no matter where it comes from, and an
air -coupler won't change the characThe ear,
teristic of the human ear.
not the speaker system, is responsible
for the apparent loss in bass as the over-all
sound level is reduced.
Utica 3, N. Y.
10000
30000
Virtually no distortion -uniform response up
to 17,000 cydes, with slow roll-off beyond.
No peaks or jagged response curves mean
no rough sound or unnatural harshness.
And, a
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280 Ssriss
Transcription
Arm
Match your cartridge ro the finest arm! Low mass and resonance-free, Fairchild's 280
Transcription Arm allows the cartridge
alone to lift all the tone color from your
recordings. Superb precision balance and
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plugs in easily- performs better -with this
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$245p
%
I
1011,
3 -}
AVENUE & 15411, STREET, WHITESTONE, N. Y.
It isn't unusual to find that bass is more
pronounced close to a corner, to a wall,
or even to the floor (noticed when the
listener sits down in a deep armchair).
This is because the room dimensions
approximate the wavelengths of bass
sounds,
and
-
room
reflections
set
up
standing waves
areas of maximized
or minimized bass, particularly noticeable
at certain low frequencies.
The effect cannot be eliminated easily,
but a more favorable distribution can
often be obtained by putting the speaker
Wouldn't it be possible
somewhere else.
for you to move your present speaker
system around to various parts of the
room, and find out where the best location
is? You could certainly move it to the
location proposed for the infinite baffle
mounting, and discover approximately
what the results would be before cutting
a hole in the wall.
SIR:
-
At present I am using a two -way
.
I
speaker system consisting of
am wondering if adding the Junior
Air Coupler to this system with a
cross -over at 175 cycles would maBass
terially improve the sound.
response now is very good but, of
course, tends to drop out at low
levels.
W. N. Powell
1219 North 9th Street
Temple, Texas
SIR:
Since several of the owners of
Scott 800B sets with whom I have
corresponded lately have asked for
information concerning modernization possibilities, I am herewith sending a digest of several letters, without
comment.
All the correspondents seem to
agree on two points: r) the Scott
800B tuner is an excellent unit, and
2) something should be done to
improve the speaker compartment.
Probably the most surprising bit
of news came from E. H. M. of
Virginia (and confirmed by J. W. W.,
a neighbor of mine, and also by the
Service Department of Scott Laboratories): the high -frequency tweeter
of the Jensen speaker is connected
so that it is inoperative in phono position.
The Scott people explain that "due
to high scratch level and distorted
high- frequency response of phono
records" of pre -195o vintage, the
tweeter would have served no good
purpose.
The remedy is simple: connect
slots No. 7 and No. 8 of the speaker
receptacle with a thin narrow strip
of copper, or install a jump wire
across the base of the corresponding
plug points No. 7 and No. 8.
I
used a copper strip bent in a U shape
and immediately afterward cleared
Continued on page 137
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
Hi...
Mr.
This is It
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THE DR -12A
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HI-FI dealers,
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DR-12A
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Attainable only with the
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box
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at Brooklyn Iii -Fi Center
the recorder
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1
tape transport
Isimetric Drive is the first significant departure from "traditional" tape handling
mechanism design since the establishment of the magnetic tape recording
industry' It is a self -balancing magnetic
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i
Provision
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write for FREE
literature
c
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4 db
Frequency Response: 30- 15,000
at 71/2" sec.
Signal to noise ratio: Over 55 db
Flutter and soou'. Below 0.2% at 71/2"
Radically new idea in loudspeaker en. Not a bass reflex or folded horn.
The sole purpose of a loudspeake- enclosure
is to prevent destructive sound cancellation that
takes place at low frequencies, when the front
and rear waves, emanating from both sides of
the speaker cone, merge.
It is obvious that no rear waves con escape
through o totally enclosed cabinet, and it would
be the perfect baffle, except for one reason.
The oir pressure within the cabinet acts os o
cushion upon, and therefore restricts, cone movement. This causes loss of life and color
The BRADFORD Perfect BAFFLE is totally
enclosed, yet it relieves cone pressure by
in unian ingenious device that op
son with cone movement.
Since this action conforms to on ultimate
scientific principle, the BRADFORD Perfect
BAFFLE is the only enclosure that can give you
the utmost in sound reproduction.
And that, specifically, is .. .
ALL THE BASS. Full, rich, clean bass, clearly
distinguishing each contributing instrument, down
to the lowest speaker frequency.
NO BOOM. Absolutely no boom. Boom, or
"one- note" boss, is not high fidelity.
NO FALSE PEAKS. Does not "augment" bass
by false peaks that are really distortions.
NO CUTOFFS. No cutoffs, dips or hangover.
ANY SPEAKER. Accommodates any speaker ..
any size, weight, shape or make.
NO TUNING. No port tuning or speaker matching.
ANY POSITION. Operates in any room position.
NO RESONANCES. No false oabinet or air
resonances.
COMPACT. 20" h x 20" w x IS" d.
REAL HARDWOODS. Genuine mahogany and
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INCOMPARABLE CONSTRUCTION. Hand made.
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GUARANTEED. Unconditionally guaranteed to
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...
If you want the very best speaker
, and will not be misled as to
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A demonstration will convince you.
encl
Or write for litera
potent pending
sec.
BRADFORD
2128 Caton Ave., Brooklyn 26, N.Y., BU 2 -5300
(at corner of Flutbunh Avenue
FEBRUARY,
1955
,,,, Set
1
FÌoorf)
Pegérece
BAFFLE
BRADFORD 8 COMPANY
315 East 6th Street
NEW YORK, N.
Y
1
3 5
PROFESSIONAL
CALIFORNIA
In Southern California
For the Ultimate in
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it's
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NEW YORK
THE HI -Fl CENTER
complete demonstration facilities
components
custom installation
Listen
Leisurely
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6320 Commodore
DIRECTORY
ILLINOIS
Les
DISTRIBUTORS OF EVERYTHING IN ELECTRONICS
PreRecorded Tape and Records
IN THE NEW YORK CITY AREA.
ROgers Park 4 -8640
2909 WEST DEVON AVE.
BOHN MUSIC SYSTEMS CO.
PL 7 -8569
550 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 36
"WE HAVE IT"
1
1
1
7460 MELROSE AVENUE
LOS ANGELES 46, CALIFORNIA
WEbster
3
arthur nagel, inc.
Complete Selection
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918
E.
CONSULTATIONS
INDIANA
OHIO
It's VAN SICKLE
For Hi Fidelity
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ZEnith 0271
SUPPLY CO.
7556
LECTRONI
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INC.
MIroa
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YOrk 3872
WAlnut 5405
The ultimate in High Fidelity
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Offering the World's Finest lloow
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High Fidelity is our only business
not a sideline. Complete stock of every
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536 South Fair Oaks, Pasadena
SY 5 -4118
RY
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CINCINNATI AND THE.
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COMPE'FENT ENGINEERING
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p. System"
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PENNSYLVANIA
CUSTOM INSTALLATIONS
High Fidelity Center
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Acoustic Consultants
Cabinet Design
LOWE ASSOCIATES
our new studios
65 Kent St., Brookline 46. Mass.
ne
NOW AVAILABLE
Working drawings and complete instructions for constructing and wiring the PORTRAITIST and MURALIST
speaker systems. State which model you prefer. PRICE $500 (per model).
Completely assembled JUNIOR AIR
COUPLER. Selected plywood. Shipped expo'....' collect. No COD's, please.
PRICE $29.50.
Mail Order Dep't.
RAM COMPANY
P. O. Box 221
IN
Y.
-
1320 Calhoun St. Ft. Wayne, Ind.
MASSACHUSETTS
EINCARTEN
Yonkers, N.
Spencer 9 -6400
or write to
-\W
COMPONENTS
CUSTOM INSTALLATIONS
Write for freu catalog
In FT. WAYNE
From Primary Components
to Completed Custom Installations
"AUDIO -PHILE HAVEN"
SERVICE
2475 Central Avenue
BUtterfield 8-5050
-8208
rows
for high fidelity
CHICAGO
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VISIT OUR NEW
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its
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CHICAGO 45
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HOLLYWOOD
ELECTRONICS
CONSULT A SPECIALIST IN
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rlrrlh.ry Circle Theater)
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WHY EXPERIMENT?
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HIFI
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Use our
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Assemble and compare leading
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Records
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SHRYOCK
CO.
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311 W LANCASTER AVE, AROMORE. PA_ Midway
1926
2
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PHILADELPHIAS' only
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LECTRONICS
City Line Center
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NEW JERSEY
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2598 Lombard
San Francisco 23,
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-3134
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YOUR COMPLETE SUPPLIER is
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HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
AUDIO FORUM
DISTINCTIVE ACCESSORIES
Continued from page 134
up a minor mystery. Before, I couldn't
understand why certain high fidelity
recordings sounded better over FM
than when played on my own turntable. Now, thanks to E. H. M., I
know what was lacking in my own
phonograph and have corrected the
fault.
Writes J. W. L. Austin, Texas, ".. .
the speaker is a 15 -in. Jensen JAP -6o
coaxial, with 6 lb. bass magnet, and
special high- frequency speaker with
integral crossover.
this is a fine
speaker and cannot be duplicated
under $150.00. Incidentally, speakers
All open back
improve with age.
cabinets have air resonance, usually
about too to zoo cycles, due to their
shape." He suggests that I get a
roll of z -in. non -reflective Kimsul
insulation ($7.00) and, with tack
hammer or stapler, line the speaker
enclosure. "Block off the amplifier
so that it gets free air supply. Now,
drape as much Kimsul as you can
across the back (except at amplifier.)
You might try placing cabinet across
corner of room, after applying acoustical celotex or Kimsul to wall behind
use only
cabinet.
check all tubes
matched output tubes. Happy Lis-
-
Big, hold earrings based on
Beautifully hand wrought
In handsome sterling sil-
cal theme.
gift!
Earrings
Pin
$475
$300
the pair
from Great Britain
In blue or white
enamel with black musical
notes. Imported from Paris.
measure a dramatic
they
1" in diameter
have gold
finished screw hacks. (Shown
actual size).
...
spells elegance. A smart
addition to almost any
costume... a noteworthy
$
j00
pair
tat and postrege included
Federal lox and
postage included
STAINLESS STEEL
An exact replica of a famous old
English sterling pattern, exquisitely perfect in form and
a
delightful variation of a musi-
these pieces have
the simplicity of line that
craftsmanship. with
graceful
pistol- handled knives. three lined forks and rat -tailed spoons.
Handsomely executed in stainless
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Made in
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Sheffield, England, with the finest
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$(195
fi -piece place setting i7ppd
MUSIC MASTER PLAQUES
These handsome wall plaques conceal Swiss music
hoses! Pull the knob to hear a selection by the composer pictured in has relief. Mahogany finished frame.
5-1/2 in. square, with gold toned medallion on recessed black background. Choose Chopin. Strauss.
Schubert. Haydn, Wagner. Beethoven. Rach. Brahms
or Mozart ... superb singly or in groups!
1595 pair
$850 each. ppd.
-
AlAt
,
-
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FOR A MUSICAL EAR
WoPIIJEWELRY
ver
...raC
pa.
Write for new 50 -page catalogue
t \co Ilnrlboro litage
li
GREAT BARRINGTON. MASS.
tening."
I am first going to line the speaker
If
enclosure with acoustical felt.
that doesn't get the sound I want
I may remove
the amplifier and
convert the speaker enclosure to a
size and style of the current R -J
Continued on page 138
CANADA
CANADA'S FIRST
HIGH-FIDELITY
RADIO. PHONOGRAPH, RECORD AND
TELEVISION CENTRE
Stromberg- Carlson "Custom 400"
Hallicrafters Hi -Fi, Short Wave & T -V
Fisher Radio
- Concertone Tape Recorders
All Makes of Hi- Fidelity Records
C 4shoot Sodu$daad Vale."
390 EGIINTON WEST
1
-td.
TORONTO, ONT.
Phone Hodson 1 -1119
IN CANADA-
-
-
and
There's one place where you can find
all your high-fidelity equipment needs.
hear
We carry a complete stock ... come in, or write
in, for a chat, a look, and a listen.
6LECTRO-UO10E
SOUND SYSTEMS
ca:6fffrzlic,.,Lfkrd),
.
will always be the final criterion by which the merits
of any loudspeaker system must be judged. Believing this
to be the key to the complete enjoyment of music in your
home, we developed the Portraitist and Muralist. Your
response has more than confirmed our belief By employing
this principle as a basis for our research, and applying it
to the entire practical size and price range for loudspeaker
systems, we have expanded our quality line 4 -fold.
Further details on the new additions, which include two
economical lines of enclosures for 8- and 12-inch speakers
.
and a neu' multiple -speaker system employing an extension
of the junior air-coupler principle, will be published in
our March issue advertisement. Literature on the complete
line will be available soon. If you would like to receive
one of these "catalogs". write to Catalog Dep't..
THE
GREAT
RAM
BARRINGTON.
COMPANY
MASSACHUSETTS
141 Dandas St., West. TORONTO
FEBRUARY, 1955
137
AUDIO FORUM
7414
you kecocu , ,
Continued from page
.
YOUR HI -FI
RECORDING SYSTEM
IS ONLY AS GOOD
AS YOUR MICROPHONE!
74ae toc,tioztaat deatuzee
aze de -zeaao.ca cul y tle
GRADIENT'
"300"
HIGHER FIDELITY MICROPHONE
is used by leading recording artists
and Hi -Fi enthusiasts for consistently
superlative reproduction:
REDUCES REVERBERATION and pickup of unwanted noises by 66%1
SMOOTH FREQUENCY RESPONSE
-40- 15,000
c.p.s.
/BI- DIRECTIONAL
PICKUP PATTERN
-enables you to arrange the artists
around microphone to obtain the best
balance between the different
V4musical components.
-
VOICE -MUSIC SWITCH
for utmost flexibility in
achieving highest quality
recordings.
-
problems
by allowing recorder
to be operated at normal gain settings.
/MULTI- IMPEDANCE
SWITCH for LOW,
MEDIUM or HIGH
IMPEDANCE -pro.
vides
added
flexibility.
enclosure.
Unfortunately, this enclosure is just a couple of inches
roo high to fit into the Scott cabinet;
otherwise, I would buy the unfinished
model for 15 -in. speakers, tuck it
in the Scott cabinet, and Mrs. R..
who isn't exactly a hi -fi enthusiast.
would never know the difference.
John IV. Ripley
240o Crestview
Topeka, Kansas
SIR:
Further to my Audio Forum communication on the distributed -port
corner bass -reflex cabinet in the November issue, may I make the following additions?
i) The actual internal volume of
the cabinet is about 111/2 cubic feet
after deducting panels, braces etc.
2) The number of I -in. diameter
holes in the distributed port is 35,
not 27. (The area of the port is 27
sq. ins.)
3) The bass -reflex design is a cornposition of data based chiefly on the
principles of G. A. Briggs of England.1.2
I do not know
why I
said Fred Briggs; he is our local TV
announcer.
4) The distributed port is used by
General Electric.,
5) I consider a corner design to
AMPLI WÑ
20
Model
Broadcast
Push - Button Phono Equalizer
For LP. RIAA, LON and EUR curves
Z729 Preamplifier Tube
Phono hum and noise below 1.5
Model
533
$135.00
Range includes
and
2
New contours extend useful ranges
Tape Recording Jack
Cathode follower: switched for playback
"Pivoting" Tone Controls
Calibrated: accurate flat selling
Rumble Filter Switch
Phono Scratch Filter Switch
Five Inputs and many other
professional features
i
Send for detailed descriptive
literature or see your local high
STATION
fidelity distributor.
DIRECTORY
$15.00
1
"Center -Set" Loudness Control
and determination of the numbers
of port holes. They lie in a block
of five wide and seven down in the
port baffle, which is the lower two thirds of the front of the cabinet.
(The speaker baffle is the upper third.
F.M.
V.
Speaker Damping Factor Selector
LIST PRICE
Desk Stand
List Price
Watts Ultra- Linear
6L6 push-pull output, 40 walls peak
be essential.
I have received numerous letters
asking for specifications; I regret to
say there are none. The cabinet was
constructed from a sketch and notes.
Every letter asks about the location
HIGH OUTPUT -eliminates hum
t 37
Model S1000B
S
99.50 net
Black and Gold finish
SHURE BROTHERS, Inc.
/v
I
"
Microphones and Acoustic Deices
225 West Huron St., Chicago 10,
Illinois
Coble Address: SHUREMICRO
Model S1000C
In NEW YORK CITY
FOR QUALITY MUSIC
Please send me FREE Microphone Catalog
77A and list of Shure Distributors in my
locality.
NIGHTLY
P.M. to
Nome
12
Midnight
Jh4grwflhd
dial
ECTRONIC LABORATORIES
Address
City
_State
H FG-2
138
$104.50 net
Gold-tooled Cordovan Leatherette
WWRL-FM ---105.1 Mc
I
Dept. 2H, 2802 W. Cullom Ave., Chicago M,
Ill.
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
PHa}D.:RPiH
DY
RICHARD R[TTTiE
What
are the facts
about cancer
of the lung -?
20 YEARS AGO, in 1933, cancer of
the lung killed 2,252 American men.
Last year, it killed some 18,500.
JUST
WHY THIS STARTLING INCREASE?
Our re-
and is a separate panel.) The number
of holes was determined by finding
the port area on the graph on page
27 of the University Technilog.'
The holes are drilled on four -inch
centers both vertically and horizontally.
All panels except the speaker baffle
are glued and screwed in place. They
must be accurately fitted. The top
overlaps the sides and the sides
overlap the bottom. The speaker is
installed on its baffle which is then
screwed to the cabinet, which in
turn must be air -tight and quite rigid.
Top, bottom, and four sides are
lined with 2 -in. Kimsul.
The Stephens 206 -AX was selected
for the following reasons.
I) It is non -wiry. (There are sweet
and sharp speakers.)
2) It has a free -air cone resonance
of 35 cycles.
3) It has a high flux density and a
heavy magnet.
4) It has a supple surround.
5) The tweeter horn is exponential
and non-metallic.
6) It has a low crossover (1200
cycles).
DOCTORS ESTIMATE
...
-?
Many reasons. But one of the
most important is not enough money
. for mobile X -ray units, for diagnosis and treatment facilities, for training technicians and physicians.
WHY
THESE ARE JUST A
FEwof the reasons why
you should contribute generously to
the American Cancer Society. Won't
you please do it now? Your donation is
needed -and urgently needed -for the
fight against cancer is everybody's fight.
Cancer
MAN'S CRUELEST ENEMY
Strike back -Give
MIRACORD
XA -100
orkut
The superb craftsmanship of the
Miracord XA -100 permits only
the recording, not the surface
noise of the record, to reach
your ear!
Terminal Radio
Continued on page 140
searchers are finding the answers as
rapidly as funds and facilities permit
-but there isn't enough money.
that 50% of all men
who develop lung cancer could be
cured if treated in time. But we are
just oneactually saving only 5%
tenth as many as we should.
the
TRADERS' MARKETPLACE
Here's the place to buy, swap,
or sell
audio equipment. Rates are only 30C a
word (including address), and your advertisement will reach 50,000 to 100,000
music listeners. Remittance must accompany copy and insertion instructions.
Stock favorite LPs on your Changer! "NON TUTCH RECORDISKS" separate, save irons abrasive
Now
scratches.
E.
$1
at Record Dealers.
SSG Products, 205
Liberty, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Accessories, unusual
TAPE
RECORDERS,
values. Dressner, Box 66K, Peter Stuyvesant Station,
Topes,
The Miracord XA -100 comes
equipped with the "Magic
Wand" spindle that preserves the
life of your precious records.
Pir44.
All brands. Send your inquiries
Hi -Fi al low cost.
on specific makes and models to Louis Leopold, Box
1262, Church Street Station, New York 7, N. Y.
FAIR TRADE IN ALLOWANCES on your old equipment
for new quolity components. Cambridge Electronics,
1014 East Fayette, Syracuse, N. Y.
Amplifiers
Save 50';
BARGAINS!
Accordions, Pianos, Organs,
Tremendous savings
Typewriters, Movie Equipment, Binoculars, Recorders,
Hi -Fi Systems. ABELMART, 466 Belmont, Paterson,
New Jersey.
AMAZING
ALL THESE FEATURES
No Wow.
No rumble.
Intermixes 10" and 12" records.
Interchangeable plug -in heads.
Ball- bearing- suspended turntable and
tone arm.
Adjustments without tools.
-
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
GENTLEMEN:
Please
end me free information
on cancer
Enclosed
S
is
my contribution of
to the cancer crusade.
Name
Address
State
City
Simply address the envelope: CANCER
Postmaster, Name of Your Town
c/
FEBRUARY, 1955
Ideal gifts, perfect money -makers! Hi -Fi reproduction,
all speeds, any quantity. Musical groups, weddings,
speeches, etc. Write for free folder and prices, Recorded Publications Labs. 1560 Pierce Ave., Camden
5, New Jersey.
FM Antennas
Standard and Special types. Installa.
lion Accessories. Wholesale Supply Co., lunenburg,
Mass.
Push
button operation.
-
the user's choice of time
Pausamatic
lapse between records from 5 seconds
to 5 minutes.
Shipped complete with
plugs, ready to play.
leads
and
TERMINAL RADIO CORP.
85 Cortlandt Street
New York 7, N. Y.
I
ìy
AUDIO FORUM
Continued from page 139
"New
B -1
A speaker with a higher free -air
cone resonance would require more
holes, for which there is not room,
arm makes
or
all others
obsolete
a
smaller cabinet, which should
be avoided.
I think far too many audiophiles
'
lose themselves in a maze of over elaborateness. They lose sight of the
simplicity of the bass -reflex; because
it is "old- fashioned" they have a
prejudice against it. There has been
far too much emphasis placed on
bass reproduction, and not enough
on that of the middle range. All the
money goes into the low end, but
most of the music lies elsewhere.
The big bass -reflex gives clean low
bass and perfect loading with truly
remarkable transients and full mid-
Only the B -J arm holds the
stylus parallel to the groove from the
beginning to the end of the record.
range.
The co -ax was chosen over a 3 -way
set -up because possible problems of
balance and phase difficulties are
thereby avoided. It would be interest-
Precision made by British craftsmen.
It's the perfect pickup arm for the most
discriminating Hi fidelity enthusiast.
SOLVES TRACKING ERROR because stylus is held
parallel accurately within 1 degree in all grooves
of a 12 inch. NO DISTORTION DUE TO TRACK-
ING ERROR!
STYLUS WEAR because, from beginning to
end, the stylus is properly seated in the groove.
LESS
LESS
RECORD
WEAR because stylus is held in
constant parallel position.
LESS
less
SURFACE NOISE because stylus tracks with
friction from start to finish.
LESS RUMBLE because
at all radii of the sound
stylus
track.
is
accurately seated
PICKUP ARM DISTORTION because natural
tone -arm resonances are eliminated . . . the DA
twin arms cancel out each other.
LESS
YOU take full advantage of the longer
frequency response of modern records and pickups.
B -J LETS
WILL ACCOMMODATE most standard pickup
cartridges.
B -J
B
-J IS EASY TO INSTALL. Do it yourself! Full in-
structions.
Will
work nn any turntable except automatic.
$16.50
Postpaid anywhere
Cin
(PICKUP SHELL SHOWN
ORDER DIRECT.
U.S.A. or
anada
- NOT INCLUDED)
Dept.
"F"
HI- FIDELITY DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
420 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y.
*GRAMOPHONE. LONDON
40
ing, however, to play around with
this cabinet and a Wharfedale 2 or
3 -way system, although I think we
would run into a difficult problem
of obtaining a large enough distributed port.
Regarding my final statement that
this system will give as good music
as a three -way corner horn system,
I still stand behind that.
The performance is natural on both music
and speech.
If you do not have
excellent transient response over the
entire frequency range, you do not
have good high fidelity. This cabinet
was designed for full frequency range,
not for bass alone.
The loading
of the speaker is such that at high
volume and low frequencies (e. g.,
drums) there is no visible movement
of the cone. The cabinet is large,
but when it is built into a corner
surrounded by bookshelves it is not
too conspicuous.
As Charles Fowler says, "There is
nothing to equal a big enclosure,
regardless of speaker size."
Albert Sadler
1609 Los Altos Road
San Diego 9, Calif.
Continued on page 142
i
UNEXCELLED
PERFORMANCE
Residual rumble more than 65 db down.
Less than 0.1% flutter and wow.
Better than 0.25% speed accuracy (less
than 5 seconds in 30 minutes).
Trouble -free performance
ask
any
proud owner.
Three speed belt- drive.
Constant speed, precision Bodine Motor.
Overall shock mounts eliminate undesirable acoustical feedback.
Twenty -Five pound turntable -cork pad.
Choice of blonde or mahogany finish.
User's net price of turntable $84.50
Matching chairside cabinet available.
-
COMPONENTS CORP.
Denville, New Jersey
9_,L,ecettxri... the
letters start. Then from all
over the free world come such com.
ments as these from readers of THE
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR.
an international daily newspaper:
"The Monitor ,is must reading for straight -thinking
people...:"
"I returned to school
alter a
lapseof 18 years. I will get
my degree from the college,
but my education comes
from the Monitor... .
"The Monitor gives me ideas
for my work... .
"I truly enjoy its
corn-
You, too, will find the Monitor
informative, with complete world
news. You will discover a constructive viewpoint in every news story.
Use the coupon below.
The Christian Science Monitor
One, Norway Street
Boston 15, Mass., U. S. A.
Please send me The Christian
Science Monitor for one year. I
enclose $15
(3 mos. $3.75)
Briggs, G. A.. "Enclosures for Loudspeakers,"
HIGH FIDELITY Vol. 3, Nos. 4, 5, 6; Vol. 4,
No. 1.
Wharfedale cabinet construction sheet, available from British Industries Corp., 164 Duane St.,
t
(name)
P
New York 13, New York.
GE installation data sheet Er -A-A1 -400;
General Electric, High Fidelity Section, Electronics
Park. Syracuse, New York.
s University Loudspeakers, Inc., 80 So. Kensico
Ave., White Plains. N. Y.
(address)
(city)
(zone)
(state)
PB-12
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
RZCOTON
magnetic
turnover
cartridge
gives you
unsurpassed
audio
emoted
lobe
Enjoyed
Name your own standards! There is no
cartridge made that excels the new
performance!
RECOTON -GOLDRING.
You can enjoy all the advantages of low out-
Recoton features:
Replaceable diamond or sapphire
I
styli.
I
Frequency response of 20 to
16,000 cps.
Added shielding
High compliance and low mass
Independent safety stylus assembly
Minimum vertical motion
Simple installation
RECOTON
put while eliminating hum pickup from
changer motor, transformer, etc. The answer
is in Recoton's newly developed push pull
coil assembly. So thrill to a new experience
in listening pleasure with this amazing turnover cartridge. It gives a performance that
will satisfy even the most critical hi -fi enthusiast! And its modest price of $9.90 (including 2 sapphire styli) comes as a pleasant
surprise!
Is
CORPORATION
Sold by all leading hi-fi distributors. For more
detailed literature and name and address of
f distributor nearest you, write to Dept. H.
147 W. 22nd Street
New York 11,N.Y.
Manufacturers of World Famous Diamond, Sapphire, Osmium Phono Styli
'D() IT
YOURSELF"
CABINET
KIT
Mid -Nineteenth
Century Bohemian
Pokal
Courtesy
Cleveland Museum
of Art
-
The glass makers of last century Bohernia who created such breathtaking
pieces as this 100 -year -old Pokal were
recognized as masters of their art . . .
just as today the men who conceive and
make the fine line of Bell High Fidelity
Amplifiers are among the leaders in
their field.
Just as Bohemian glass was created
to he a thing of pure beauty, so the design and workmanship entering into the
Bell line is aimed at giving you a precision instrument unsurpassed in reproducing all the glories and rapturous
beauties of orchestral and vocal sound.
Visit your high fidelity dealer soon.
Ask to hear a demonstration of a superb
Bell amplifier. There's a Bell instrument for every need ... for every purse,
but all are the ultimate in their range.
Hear and see for yourself.
for
$49.95
High Fidelity Amplifiers
Model 300 B
Assemble and finish your men Ili Fi Cabinet and Sane.
Designed to hold record changer, amplifier, pre amplifier,
AM or FM tuner, and has a speaker enclosure for a 12" horn.
*
All Mahogany Cabinet
x 18" x 33".
-
Check these Features
*
Takes any record changer -well
size 15.4" x 163t;" x 6%" above
*
Takes horn up to 12"
motor board.
*
-
enclosure
-
12" x 15" x 28"
back loads the
speaker with folded horn up to 5'.
size 32%"
*
-
Easily assembled with screw driver
and hammer
all materials and
CATALOG 542 -A
Model
No. 2256
hardware furnished. Complete instructions in each kit.
Priced $49.95* F.O.B. Huntington, Indiana. Shipping weight 60 lb.
Send check, money order or write today to:
OAK ELECTRIC MOTORS, Inc.
K D Cabinet Division, 700 Toledo Trust Building, Toledo 4, Ohio
*Plus 3% Sales Tax on Ohio deliveries.
FEBRUARY, 1955
WRITE FOR
Sound Systems, Inc.
555 -57 Marion Rd., Columbus 7, Ohio
Export Office: 401 Broadway, New York 13,
N. Y.
A Subsidiary of Thompson Products, Inc.
141
AUDIO FORUM
elotftafte
-
Continued from page 140
Mc GOHAN
SIR:
AMPLIFIERS
WITH OTHER
LEADING
BRANDS
The new WA -410, for example...
here is an amplifier -preamp combination with all of the features of
more expensive units, at a price
that is little more than you would
expect to pay for the preamp alone.
Correlated dual concentric controls, printed circuits and McGohan's production efficiency corn bine to provide a unit of complete
flexibility and unequalled value.
While paging thru several back
copies, I was struck by the change in
the "Dialing your Disks" section
April versus October. In April there
is no mention of NARTB but NAB
is used to describe binaural characteristics.
In October, these same
records are linked with NARTB which
is distinguished from NAB (OLD).
And here we have a new AES and an
old AES.
So you see, your well meaning
efforts have only increased my confusion.
I would be most grateful
if you would compare the following
for me with respect to turnover
point and to kc. rolloff: AES Old,
AES New, RIAA, NARTB, New
Orthophonic, NAB.
Are any of
these identical with any other?
-
Daniel F. Fromm
4881 North Anita Ave.
Milwaukee 17, Wis.
a compromise curve that would approximate all the existing curves at the time
the Columbia, RCA (new Orthophonic),
London, NAB, etc. The NAB curve had
a Soo -cycle turnover, very little shelving
below
zoo
and tG db rollo!
cycles,
Columbia's curve was the same as NAB
except for a shelf below too cycles (boost
stopped at coo cycles).
The London
curve was the same as Columbia's except
that the rollo! was only about 11 db.
RCA's New Orthophonic curve had a
turnover of Soo cycles, decreased boost
but not actually a shelf below zoo
cycles, and rolloff of 13.5 db at ro,000
cycles.
Many other record manufacturers
used these same curves; Westminster,
instance, used NAB, and Capitol
for
and
Mercury used AES.
The Record Industry Associatio:: of
America, or RIAA, decided to remedy
this lack of standardization
possible.
Early in 1954 they came up with a neu'
standard which was identical to the New
Orthophonic, calling it the RIAA curve.
The Audio Engineering Society decided
to go along, and changed its standard
if
So did the NARTB. Result:
the New Orthophonic, RIAA, AES, and
NARTB curves are now identical, and
to conform.
Before 1954,
the AES playback curve
had a 400 -cycle turnover and
too
at ro,000
below
COMPARE THESE SPECIFICATIONS:
Power Output: 14 watts
Frequency Response:
20 to 20,000 cps,
I db.
Intennodulotion Distortion: Less than 1%
at
12
cycles.
It
no
rolloff was
shelf
12 db
was intended to be
to differentiate between the new
AES curves they are
so
and old
labeled.
TAMMOY
watts.
Harmonic Distortion:
12
cycles; the
watts.
Seven Inputs:
-Less than 0.5% at
Magnetic, ceramic and FM
capacitance pickups, radio, tape, TV
and microphone, plus switch for high
frequency compensation of GE pickups.
All- Channel 4- Position Rumble Filler Control
Salads 36 Different Recording Curves
Flexible Bass and Treble Controls
TANNOY DUAL CONCENTRIC HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKERS
with
variable inflection points to eliminate
distortion that usually accompanies
bass and treble boost.
Voice Mixer Control that permits blending
of microphone with all other inputs.
Tubes: 1 -Z729, I -5Y3, 2 -6V6, 3- 12AX7.
Dimensions: 14 in. x 10 in. x 434 in.
Audiophile Nat: $39.50.
The Z729 pentode used in the
WA -410 is a high -gain, low -noise
tube that is internally shielded to
almost completely eliminate hum.
Sold by loading
high fidelity
distributors from
coast to coast
DON McGOHAN Inc.
3700 West Roosevelt Road
Chicago 24, Illinois
142
TANNOY "AUTOGRAPH"
PRE
-AMPLIFIER
TANNOY HIGH- FIDELITY POWER AMPLIFIER
TANNOY VARILUCTANCE TURN -OVER
CARTRIDGE
with diamond/sapphire styli
This. the Tannoy Organisation's latest
contribution to the realistic transcription
of recorded music, represents a technical
advance of some magnitude. Several conventions have been ignored, among them
the idea that if resonant peaks are kept well
outside the audio spectrum they may safely be neglected.
This cartridge has no uncontrolled resonances whatsoever. In addition,
the lateral to vertical compliance ratio has had particular attention -and we
have not scorned empiricism in arriving at the damping arrangements
finally adopted. These factors, combined with very low effective dynamic mass
permit a completely safe tracking weight of six grammes at all speeds.
The turnover mechanism is simple and positive, and the styli
assemblies are independent
55000
TANNOY
TANNOY
(AMERICA) LTD.
Carnegie Hall, New York 19. N.
Y.
36
(CANADA) LTD.
Wellington St. East, Toronto I, Canada
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
ADVERTISING INDEX
Aeolian Skinner Organ Co., Inc.
Allied Radio Corp.
Altec Lansing Corp.
American Cancer Society
American Elite Co.
Ampex Corp.
Approved Electronics
Argos Products...
Audak Company..
Audio Devices, Inc.
Audio Exchange, Inc.
Audiogersh Corp.
A -V Tape Libraries
B
8
C
89
9
94
139
101
23
32
130
117
Inside Front Cover
132,
139,
143
144
81
Recordings
91
Beam Instruments Corp.
Bell Sound Systems, Inc.
Beyland Engineering Co.
Bogen, David, Co., Inc...
Bohn Music Systems.......
Book -of- the -Month Club, Inc.
Boxak, R. T., Co.
33
141
90
13
136
4
135
144
135
10
91
Calez Co.
Back Cover 75
Capitol Records
121
Carnegie Endowment Internat. Center
Centralab
Christian Science Monitor..
Collaro
Columbia Records, Inc....
Components Corp.
Concertone Recorders, Berlant
Associates
Conrac
Cook Laboratories, Inc...
Cox, Hal, Custom Music.
Creative Audio Associates
Crestwood Recorder Division.
Custom Sound & Vision Ltd.....
Customcrafters
118
140
124
76, 77
140
122,
123
6,
7
88
136
136
16
137
136
135
Ltd.
Dauntless International
Daystrom Electric Corp.
Decca Record Corp.
Duotone Co., Inc.
16
79
50
136
32
34
137
82
88
Epic Records
Esoteric Records, Inc.
Fairchild Recording & Eqpt. Corp.
Federal Mfg & Engineering Co
Fenton Company
Fisher Radio Corp.
12,
134
131
17
26, 27, 28, 29
Fleetwood Television (Conroe, Inc.)
FM Station Directory
General Electric Co
Goodmans Loudspeakers
6, 7
138
113
.. 129
Hartley, H. A. Co., Inc.......
Harvey Radio Co., Inc...
144
111
18
.
Heath Co.
Hi -Fi Record Center
Hi- Fidelity Distributors, Ine..
High-Fidelity House
91
140
136
High Fidelity Sales
91
Hollywood Electronics....
1955
1
131
Kierulff Sound Corp.
136
20
Klipsch Associates
Lansing, James B., Sound, Inc.
Lec tron ics
Leslie Creations
London Records
Lowe Associates
49
136
Maronts, S. B.
McGohon, Don, Inc.
McIntosh Laboratory, Inc.
Mercury Records Corp.
..
Minnesota Mining & Mfg. Co.
Music Box
...
125
142
TRADE IN
YOUR PRESENT
CARTRIDGE FOR
THE NEWEST
91
llRMllLID
73
136
24, 25, 105
88
96
90
Music Room, The
Musical Masterpiece Society, Inc.
91
118
Nagel, Arthur, Inc.
National Company
Newcomb Audio Products
136
130, 131, 132, 133
115
Oak Electric Motors, Inc.
Omega Electronics
141
84, 86
Pedersen Electronics
128
126
112
Pentron Corp.
Permoflux Corp.
Pickering & Co., Inc.
Pilot Radio Corp.
Presto Recording Corp.
Professional Directory
2
127
109
136, 137
RAM Co.
Radio Craftsmen, IncRadio Electric Service Co.
Radio Engineering Labs., Inc..
Rauland -Borg Corp.
...
Record Market
136, 137
116
136
..
4
124
91
Recoton Corp.
Regency
Reeves Soundcraft Corp.
141
21
114
Rek -O -Kut Co.
19
Rockbar Corp.
still higher compliance!
response to 20,000 cps!
124, 131
136
22,
91
133
Sargent- Rayment Co. The
Save The Children Federation,
Scott, Herman Hosmer, Inc
Sherwood Electronics Laboratories
Shryock Radio and TV Co.
Shure Brothers
even less
110
121
14, 15
138
136
138
136
Sound Unlimited
Stephens Mfg. Corp.
Sun Radio & Electronics Co., Inc..
to 6 db
higher output!
11
....
91
Electronic Expediters....
Electra -Sonic Laboratories
Electro- Voice, Inc.
ElectroVoice Sound Systems
Interelectronics Corp....
International Electronics.
Jensen Mfg. Co.
Jones, Walter, Apparatus Co.
5
Bradford & Company
Brociner Electronic Lab
Brooklyn High Fidelity Sound Center
Browning Laboratories, Inc.
D & R,
137
Jenifer House
record wear!
the
31
144
.
Tannoy, Ltd.
Terminal Radio Corp.
Tetrad
Thorens Co.
Trader's Marketplace
Transcriber Co.
125,
142
139
93
30
139
125
United Transformer Co... Inside Back Cover
University Loudspeakers, Inc.....
... 107
85
Urania Records
V
-M Corp.
Van Sickle Radio Supply Co.
Vox Productions, Inc.
119
136
87
WWRL
138
122
Walco (Electrovox Co., Inc.)
Walsco Electronics Corp.
Weingarten Electronic Laboratories
Westlab
Westminster Recording Co.
White, Stan, Inc.
120
136
136
80, 89
8
audio
exchange
TRADING
THE
O F
T H
E
H
ORGANIZATION
I
F
I
FIELD
159-19 Hillside Avenue
Jamaica 32, N.Y
Phone: Olympia 8 -0445
OPEN TUES. TILL 9 P.M
CLOSED MONDAYS
FREE
PARKING
NEAR SUBWAY
the audio exchange exchanges audio
143
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SPECIFICATIONS:
HEADS: Record- playback, monitor,
3
are better than 2. The
monitor head enables you to listen
while recording. You are the con
with control over variaductor
tion in tone and volume, achieving
results that you want. This
3
and erase. MOTORS: One Hysteresis
synchronous motor for record and
playback (speed regulation: 0.5°ó).
Two 4 -pole induction motors for
rewind and fast forward. All
60 cycle AC. FREQUENCY RESPONSE: 50 to 12,000 cycles
'at
i.p.s.). WOW AND
FLUTTER: Less than 0.2 %.ó.
SPEEDS: 37t and 71/2
i.p.s. REEL CAPAC71/2
ITY: Up to 81/2".
DUAL TRACK.
P7
heads
...
superior topedeck defies
comparison, even with
machines costing a
great deal more
than its modest
price. $195
Special components for constructing bias
erase oscillator for Wearite Tapedeck
Distributed in
or
$30.
the U. 5. by the
makers of the famous
Hartley Speaker Systems.
w.,
Decor
Western Audio Ltd., 2497 Telegraph Ave.
Berkeley 4, Cal.
Mark 30A
Power
le,
.
lethnttal
521 East 162nd Street, New York 51, N. Y.
In Western Stales:
MARK 30
AMPLIFIER
a
tree hreroNre
and . mplere
H. A. HARTLEY CO., INC.
Power Amplifier
Mark 30A $98.25
military -proved "printed circuit"
technique.
Phenomenally LOW intermodulation
distortion insuring purest sound reproduction: at to watts-1/10%; at
20 watts-V.1%; at 30 watts -less than
Uses
1
%D.
Beautiful styling, low in cost.
Ultra- linear circuit.
Compact. Only 31/2" x 12" x 9"
over all.
Amplifier
Audio Control Center
Mark 30C
$88.50
Mark 30C
Audio Control
Center
Available at better
high -fidelity distributors.
(Prices slightly higher west et Rockies).
Literature on request.
BROCINER
ELECTRONICS
Dept. HF
144
1,
LABORATORY
344 E. 32nd
St,
Self-powered preamplifier of military proved "printed circuit" design.
2 phonograph plus radio, TV, tape
inputs.
Turnover and Roll -Off separately adjustable for all record curves including new RIAA Standard.
Loudness or volume control with selector switch.
Multiple -loop negative feedback. I.M.
distortion virtually unmeasurable.
Only 31/2" x 101" x 6". Attractive
maroon and gold cabinet. For table
top or cabinet installation.
New York 16
HIGH FIDELITY MAGAZINE
r
MINIATURIZED
TRANSFORMER
COMPONENTS s=K
LEADERS IN
MINIATURIZATION
OVER
FOR
YEARS...
TWENTY
Items below and 650 others in our catalog A.
HERMETIC SUB -MINIATURE
AUDIO UNITS
COMPACT
HERMETIC
AUDIO FILTERS
These are the smallest hermetic audios made.
Dimensions ...1/2 x 11/16 x 29/32... Weight.8 oz.
TYPICAL ITEMS
Application
Input to grid
Single plate to single
grid, 3:1
Single plate to line
110
1130
N31
N -32
Single plate to low
impedance
Single plate to low
Impedance
Reactor
N -33
11-34
H -35
H
J6
Transistor Interstage
Can be used
See. Imp.
Ohms
Pri. Imp.
Ohms
MIL
Type
50
DC
In
Fri MA
UTC
Max. level
±2
+13
+13
pass application in both inter-
+13
+15
signs. Thirty four stock values,
+
62,500
90,000
0
3
30,000
200
50
1
300 -10,000
300-10,000
TF1A13YY
100,000
60
.5
300- 10,000
TF1A20YY
TF1A15YY
25,000
TF1A1OYY
TF1A15YY
10,000
TF1A13YY
TF1A13YY
10,000
0
stage and line impedance de-
.5
1-11/16 x
..
+10
300-10,000
Weight 6-9 oz.
SUB- SUBOUNCER
AUDIO UNITS
HERMETIC MINIATURE
HI -q TOROIDS
UTC Subouncer and sub subouncer units provide ex-
ceptional efficiency and frequency range in miniature
size. Constructional details assure maximum reliaWeight
bility. SSO units are 7/16 x 3/4 x 43/64
units provide high O. excellent stability and
minimum hum pickup in a case only. 1/2 x
1-1 '16 x 17/32
weight 1.5 oz
MOE
...
...
1/50 lb.
TYPICAL ITEMS
Inductance
1
7
MOE -3
20
M12E -5
50
MOE
MOE.)
MOE -10
MOE -12
MOE
15
mhy
mhy.
mhy.
mhy.
100
.9
by.
by.
2.8
hy.
.4
DC
MA D.C.
Max.
Type
40
SSO -1
135
80
50
35
00
12
SO
7.2
ro
KC
o r
s
o
e m
is
n a
40
Interstage /3:1
Plate to Line
a
TYPICAL ITEMS
Application
Mike, pickup or line to
1 grid
Single plate to 1 grid
Single plate to 2 grids,
D.C. In Pri.
Single plate to line, D.C.
In Pri.
0.1
0.4
0.7
00
010
o-u
0-13
PrL Imp
50, 200/250,
500 /600
Sec. Imp
15,000
15,000
60,000
95,000
15,000
50, 200/250, 500/600
50,000
30,030 ohms
50, 200/250, 500 /600
plate to plate
50, 200/250, 500: 600
Mixing and matching
50, 200/250
Reactor, 300 Hys. -no D.C.; 50 Hys.-3 MA. D.C., 6000 ohms
Push pull plates to line
Pri. Imp.
200
Level
4 V.U.
Pri. Res.
Sec. Imp.
in Pri.
250,000
0
62,500
90,000
200
500
50
50
4 V.U.
V.U.
+20
3700
750
2600
3250
35
2875
4.6
4700
60
800
1,200
Sec. Res.
13.5
3.3
850
125
HERMETIC
VARIABLE
INDUCTORS
Standard for the industry for 15 yrs., these
units provide 30-20,000 cycle response in
case 7i8 dia. x 1-3/16 high. Weight 1 oz.
+
+
0-.25
10,000
10,000
3
1.5
25,000
1.0
30,000
Output
SSO-4
+20 V.U.
550-5
Reactor 50 HY at 1 mil. D.C. 4400 ohms D.C. Res.
100,000
.5
SS04
Output
+20 V.U.
.5
SSO-7
Transistor
+10 V.U.
20,000
Interstage
.5
30,000
Impedance ratio is fixed, 1250:1 for SSO- 1,1:50 for SS0.3.
Any impedance between the values shown may be employed.
SSO-2
SSO-3
17
Application
Input
OUNCER (WIDE RANGE)
AUDIO UNITS
Type
1
with higher source impedances, with corresponding reduction in frequency range and current
'
Type No.
1 -3/16 x
-5/8 -2.1/2 high
others to order. Case
6
100 Henries-0 DC, 50 Henries -1 Ma. DC, 4,400 ohms.
1,000
standardized filters are for
low pass, high pass,- and band
dime
db (Cye.)
150.10,000
300-10,000
These inductors provide high O from 50.10,000
cycles with exceptional stability. Wide inductance range (10.1) in an extremely
compact case 25/32 x 1-1/8 x 1-3/16
w
...
Weight
2 oz.
.002
.011
.07
.2
HVC4
NVC-10
1111C -12
7.0
50
ï
uc
4/ WAVES
0r
IS
TYPE No. Min. Hys. Mean Nys. Max. Nys. DC
!WC-3
10/C-S
SOO
iamc+
ze
TYPICAL ITEMS
NYC -1
oe
.006
.040
.25
.6
25
150
Ma
"
100
40
20
15
.02
.11
.7
2
3.5
70
500
00
1.5
4440m
401.411411 AT
e0004113
UNITED TRANSFORMER CO.
LET US MINIATURIZE YOUR GEAR.
SEND DETAILS OF YOUR NEEDS
for
SIZES
and PRICES
ISO Varick Street, New York 13, N. Y.
EXPORT
CABLES.
DIVISION, 13
' ARLAB"
E.
40th St., New York 16, N. Y,
Where Would You Sit?
Ever spend 2I hours searching for the best seat at
a concert? In a recent recording session, our producer and engineer spent 2!1 hours working with
the artists before a single note was taped. This time
was spent to accomplish just one thing: to make
sure that as you listen to the recording at home you
will enjoy not only the most nearly perfect performance possible, but also the best sound possible. This
time was spent, in short, to find "the best seat in the
house" for your listening pleasure.
The particular selection being recorded was
Brahms' Quintet in F Minor, performed by Victor
Aller with the Hollywood String Quartet. As any
musician will agree, this composition places almost
unreasonable demands upon performers. The third
movement of the Quintet calls for the utmost in
virtuosity and endurance, surpassed only by the
All Full
Dimensional
Sound
records come to
you in Inner
Protective
Envelope.
skill and effort which must immediately be brought
forward during the playing of the fourth movement.
It is for this reason, and other similar ones, that
Full Dimensional Sound recordings seldom result
from one-session performances. Actual recording
time for the Quintet was it hours and 25 minutes,
spread over the course of 3 days. Painstaking? Yes
-especially when you realize that all this effort on
the part of gifted artists, an outstanding producer
and a skilled engineer went into a recording which
runs for 35 minutes
Small wonder that we suggest with pride that
you listen to a Full Dimensional Sound recording.
Listen -and realize that your own home may always
provide the best seat in the house- thanks to
!
Capitol's determination that Full Dimensional
Sound must always offer you the ultimate in high
fidelity... the ultimate in listening pleasure.
Incomparable High Fidelity
in Full Dimensional Sound
I
C
0
111
!
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