Robbie O`Leary, Sacred Heart SNS

Robbie O`Leary, Sacred Heart SNS
Technology in the Curriculum...
Robbie O’Leary, Principal Sacred Heart SNS, Killinarden, Tallaght
What’s your school like?
Aims, principles and features,
Primary School Curriculum Introduction
 the child’s sense of wonder and natural curiosity is a primary motivating
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factor in learning
the child is an active agent in his or her learning
learning is developmental in nature
the child’s existing knowledge and experience form the base for learning
the child’s immediate environment provides the context for learning
learning should involve guided activity and discovery methods
language is central in the learning process
the child should perceive the aesthetic dimension in learning
social and emotional dimensions are important factors in learning
learning is most effective when it is integrated
skills that facilitate the transfer of learning should be fostered
higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills should be developed
collaborative learning should feature in the learning process
the range of individual difference should be taken into account in the
learning process
assessment is an integral part of teaching and learning
Since @ 2003...
INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARDS
SMART PHONES
WEB.2: BLOGGING, TWITTER, YOUTUBE, WIKIS
SOCIAL NETWORKING
TABLET COMPUTERS
CLOUD COMPUTING
ONLINE CPD
The Pace of Technological Change
Years to reach 50 Million users
Radio
Telephone
Television
Mobile
phones
Cable TV
Worldwide
Web
iPods
MySpace
Facebook
YouTube
0
10
20
30
40
50
 The main aim of education should be to send
children out into the world with a reasonably sized
anthology in their heads so that, while seated on
the lavatory, waiting in doctor's surgeries, on
stationary trains or watching interviews with
politicians, they have something interesting to
think about. (John Mortimer)
...alternatively...
 “If we hire a youngster who doesn’t know all the
mathematics or physics that is needed to work here
(i.e. in Nokia), we have colleagues here who can
easily teach those things. But if we get somebody
who doesn’t know how to work with other people,
how to think differently or how to create original
ideas and somebody who is afraid of making a
mistake, there is nothing we can do here. Do what
you have to do to keep our education system up-todate but don’t take away creativity and openmindedness that we now have in our schools.”
(Sahlberg, 2011)
Generation after generation, parents raised their children to
use the tools with which they were familiar. Later on, some
of the more ingenious children tweaked their ancestors’
tools and invented new ones. But never before the advent of
electronic computers and, more recently, of Internet-based
services, did such a large fraction of humanity change their
everyday habits and tools in such a short time. Within a
couple of decades, the tools used in most trades and for such
basic acts as communicating, gathering information, keeping
records of the past or drawing plans about the future were
replaced by digital ones. For the first time, today’s parents
and teachers have little, if any, experience with the tools that
children are going to use every day in their adult lives.
OECD, September 2015, Students, Computers and Learning: making the
connection
Giving our students the opportunity to develop 21st century
skills is a priority. Technology is embedded in all aspects of
our lives, and is bringing our society new advantages and
solutions every day. I want to encourage all teachers to use
technology in the classroom to bring learning to life for
students; to give learners the tools to collaborate and to
examine engaging problems; to research and analyse
information; and to use digital resources to communicate
their ideas and to share what they create with others beyond
the walls of their classroom or school.
Minister for Education and Skills, Jan O’Sullivan, October
2015
We have committed ourselves to embedding 21st
century skills strongly in the teaching and learning
of subjects. We want to provide and reward learning
experiences that promote not only critical thinking,
but also collaboration, creativity, innovation and
inventiveness – attributes that will be absolutely
necessary if we are to equip young people to tackle
the challenges of changing economies and the moral,
societal and environmental challenges that arise in a
globalised world.
Dr. Harold Hislop, Chief Inspector, September 2015
The need to integrate technology into
teaching and learning right across the
curriculum is a major national challenge
that must be met in the interests of
Ireland’s future economic wellbeing.
Schools IT 2000 strategy document, 1997
Modern societies are increasingly based on information and
knowledge. So they need to:
• build workforces which have ICT skills to handle
information and are reflective, creative and adept at
problem-solving in order to generate knowledge
• enable citizens to be knowledgeable and resourceful so they
are able to manage their own lives effectively, and are able
to lead full and satisfying lives
• encourage all citizens to participate fully in society and
influence the decisions which affect their lives
• foster cross-cultural understanding and the peaceful
resolution of conflict.
OECD, September 2015, Students, Computers and Learning:
making the connection
UNESCO’s ICT Competency Framework for Teachers emphasizes that it
is not enough for teachers to have ICT competencies and be able to teach
them to their students. Teachers need to be able to help the students
become collaborative, problem-solving, creative learners through using
ICT so they will be effective citizens and members of the workforce.
“Technology is the only way to dramatically expand access to knowledge.
To deliver on the promises technology holds, countries need to invest
more effectively and ensure that teachers are at the forefront of designing
and implementing this change.”
Andreas Schleicher, OECD Director for Education and Skills
Executive Summary: In the end, technology can amplify great teaching,
but great technology cannot replace poor teaching.
Rosen (ReWired)
…it is not only the range and
sophistication of hardware that is
changing – but so too is the way that
today’s “iGeneration” learns.
Surrounded by technology from birth,
traditional (i.e. teacher-centred,
paper-based) approaches fail to
engage or even interest modern
children.
Consequently, schools that fail to create
authentic digital contexts that reflect
the lives of children will fail to
connect with them, resulting in
boredom, disaffection and decreased
learning.
TECHNOLOGY HAS PRESENTED
OPPORTUNITIES TO CHANGE THE
LOCATION OF EDUCATION FROM THE
CLASSROOM TO . . . ANYWHERE. THIS
GENERATION, WITH ITS PERVASIVE
USE OF CELL PHONES AND OTHER
PORTABLE COMMUNICATION
TECHNOLOGIES, IS READY TO HAVE
THEIR EDUCATION EXTENDED FROM
THE CLASSROOM TO ANY ROOM.
(LARRY D ROSEN, REWIRED, P.58)
Marc Prensky (Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants)
When our leaders think that the job of educators is to
re-create the old education better and more
effectively for today’s students, they deny our
students the means to cope and thrive in the 21st
century. When they think success at education is
moving our kids up in the international PISA
[Program for International Assessment] rankings,
they send the message that they want our students to
compete in the past.
Prensky
Despite all the focus that reformers place on
testing, our hardest and most pressing educational
problem is not raising test scores, but rather
connecting our kids’ education to real life and to
the fast-evolving world of the future. It is our
inability to make the material we are currently
required to teach in school real and interesting for
today’s students – call it relevance, or
engagement, or something else – that makes so
many current efforts unsuccessful.
Prensky
Our students have changed radically.
Today’s students are no longer the people
our educational system was designed to
teach.
What is the primary function of schools...?
Are we teaching our children what to think...
or
how to think?
Gilbert (Why do I need a teacher when I’ve got Google?)
 The role of the twenty-first century teacher...is to help
young people know where to find the knowledge, to know
what to do with it, to know “good” knowledge from “bad”
knowledge, to know how to use it, to apply it, to
synthesise it, to be creative with it, to add to it even, to
know which bits to use and when and how to use them
and to know how to remember key parts to it...
 ...and to develop their communication skills, their
creativity, their ability to work well as a team, their
confidence and self-esteem, their sense of what is wrong
and what is right, their ability to deal with adversity, their
understanding of their role as a citizen of the world...
Jean Piaget
 Intelligence is what you use when you don’t know
what to do.
Instead of asking...
• What Interactive Whiteboard should I buy?
• Which tablet is the best?
• Should we have a computer room?
• Which platform is the best?
Where do we go from here – and how do we get there?
• What are the needs of the pupils….in terms of
methodologies and learning outcomes?
(Do we subscribe to Mortimer’s definition of
intelligence, or Piaget’s....? Is Prensky correct?)
• To what extent can ICTs enhance the attainment of
these objectives?
• In what ways will pupils and teachers be using such
technology?
• What are the most appropriate applications to this
end?
• What hardware do we need?
Classroom Activity Profile
Teacher-based
instruction
Independent
work
Group work
Programme for Government 2011
This Government’s ambition is to build a knowledge society. Education ...
will be the engine of sustainable economic growth. Ireland has
experienced a decline in educational outcomes in recent years. We will
draw from top performing education models like Finland to reverse this
trend ... Education will be a priority for this Government....
21st Century Schools
This Government will end the treatment of ICT in education as a standalone issue, but will integrate it across education policy ... A new plan to
develop ICT in teaching, learning and assessment will be developed ...
The primary priority for investment in ICT in the immediate term will be
the integration of ICT in teaching and learning across the curriculum and
investing in broadband development to ensure schools have access to
fibre-powered broadband.
Obstacles
•Absence of a clearly articulated vision
•Lack of funding / investment
•Impossible to plan
•Unreliable broadband
•Technical support
•Dismantling of middle-management structures
Guiding Principles
•C L A R I T Y O F P U R P O S E
•A C R O S S - C U R R I C U L A R R E S O U R C E
•I N F O R M A L S K I L L S
•C L E A R L I N K A G E W I T H C U R R I C U L U M O B J E C T I V E S
•B R O A D S P E C T R U M O F U S E : C O N T E N T - R I C H /
CONTENT FREE
•T U T O R , T O O L , T U T E E
•H O M E U S E
•T R I E D A N D T R U S T E D S O F T W A R E
Optimum Conditions
The level of access to the technology
The more devices there are, the more
likely it is they will be used
Optimum Conditions
The level of access to the technology
The more devices there are, the more
likely is they will be used
The specification levels of the
infrastructure
…in terms of storage, processing power
and connectivity
Optimum Conditions
The level of access to the technology
The more devices there are, the more
likely is they will be used
The specification levels of the
infrastructure
…in terms of storage, processing power
and connectivity
The availability of high quality
applications
…appropriate to the needs and abilities
of the learners
Optimum Conditions
The level of access to the technology
The more devices there are, the more
likely is they will be used
The specification levels of the
infrastructure
…in terms of storage, processing power
and connectivity
The availability of high quality
applications
…appropriate to the needs and abilities
of the learners
The social context of the learning
activities
How the teacher can orchestrate the
environment with regard to grouping
and opportunities for interaction
Optimum Conditions
The level of access to the technology
The more devices there are, the more
likely is they will be used
The specification levels of the
infrastructure
…in terms of storage, processing power
and connectivity
The availability of high quality
applications
…appropriate to the needs and abilities
of the learners
The social context of the learning
activities
How the teacher can orchestrate the
environment with regard to grouping
and opportunities for interaction
The role of the teacher
The clarity of the learning objectives,
and of how the technology enhances the
learning
Optimum Conditions
The level of access to the technology
The more devices there are, the more likely
it is they will be used
The specification levels of the
infrastructure
…in terms of storage, processing power and
connectivity
The availability of high quality
applications
…appropriate to the needs and abilities of
the learners
The social context of the learning
activities
How the teacher can orchestrate the
environment with regard to grouping and
opportunities for interaction
The role of the teacher
The clarity of the learning objectives, and of
how the technology enhances the learning
Training and support
exemplary teaching with computers is more
likely to occur when there is a full-time ICT
coordinator employed in the school, when
training and development opportunities are
plentiful and ongoing, and when a
principal-led climate for productive
technology use is present.
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