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WAR OF THE SUNS
WAR OF RESISTANCE, 1937-1945
RULEBOOK
Table Of Contents
1.0 – Introduction.......................................................................... 2
1.1 – Game Components...............................................................2
1.2 – Sides And Players.................................................................2
1.3 – Game Scale...........................................................................2
1.4 – The Map & Player Aids..........................................................2
Abbreviations.................................................................................3
1.5 – Glossary And General Concepts...........................................3
2.0 – Victory Conditions............................................................... 3
2.1 – Campaign Game...................................................................3
2.2 – Scenario Games....................................................................4
2.3 – Immediate Defeat..................................................................4
3.0 – The Playing Pieces.............................................................. 4
3.1 – Unit Counters........................................................................4
3.2 – Marker Counters....................................................................6
4.0 – General Game Concepts..................................................... 6
15.0 – Unit Breakdown............................................................... 19
15.1 – Breakdown Procedure.......................................................20
15.2 – Reassembly Procedure.....................................................20
16.0 – Guerrilla Warfare.............................................................. 20
16.1 – Guerrilla Bases..................................................................20
16.2 – Guerrilla Recruitment.........................................................20
16.3 – Converting Regular Units To Guerrillas.............................21
16.4 – Converting Guerrillas To Regular Units.............................21
16.5 – Non-Chinese Guerrilla Units..............................................21
16.6 – Anti-Guerrilla Warfare........................................................21
17.0 – Air And Naval Operations................................................ 23
17.1 – Bases And Ports................................................................23
17.2 – Zones And Deployment.....................................................23
17.3 – Status................................................................................23
17.4 – Reequipping Air Units........................................................23
17.5 – Missions............................................................................24
17.6 – Air/Naval Combat Sequence.............................................27
4.1 – Zones Of Control...................................................................6
4.2 – Stacking.................................................................................6
4.3 – Limited Operation Areas........................................................7
4.4 – Rounding And Cumulative Modifiers.....................................7
4.5 – Unused Capacities................................................................7
18.0 – Political Negotiations...................................................... 27
5.1 – Pre-Operation Segment........................................................7
5.2 – Operation Segment...............................................................7
5.3 – Post-Operation Segment......................................................7
19.0 – Threatened Cliques......................................................... 29
20.0 – Inflation............................................................................. 29
7.1 – Events Phase.........................................................................8
7.2 – Weather Events ....................................................................8
7.3 – Yellow River Dike Destruction..............................................10
7.4 – “Green Veil”.........................................................................10
7.5 – Drought/Locusts..................................................................10
7.6 – Disease................................................................................10
21.0 – Ground Unit Improvement.............................................. 30
5.0 – Sequence Of Play................................................................ 7
6.0 – Turn 0 Special Rules............................................................ 8
7.0 – Events................................................................................... 8
8.0 – Transport Routes............................................................... 10
8.1 – Off-Map Trails, Roads And Railroads..................................10
8.2 – River Routes........................................................................10
8.3 – Transport Route Construction.............................................10
8.4 – Transport Route Sabotage..................................................11
9.0 – Headquarters And Activation........................................... 11
9.1 – HQ Counters........................................................................11
9.2 – HQ Deployment And Movement.........................................11
9.3 – HQ Removal........................................................................11
9.4 – Activation.............................................................................11
9.5 – Command............................................................................12
10.0 – Supply............................................................................... 13
10.1 – Supply Centers..................................................................13
10.2 – Maintaining Supply............................................................13
11.0 – Movement......................................................................... 14
11.1 – Regular Movement............................................................14
11.2 – Special Movement Types..................................................15
11.3 – Transport...........................................................................15
12.0 – Combat............................................................................. 16
12.1 – Effects Of Terrain On Combat...........................................16
12.2 – Effects Of ZOCs On Combat.............................................16
12.3 – Determining Combat Results............................................16
12.4 – Post-Combat Movement...................................................16
12.5 – Surrender...........................................................................17
13.0 – Replacements.................................................................. 17
13.1 – Replacement Abilities........................................................17
13.2 – Replacement Points..........................................................17
13.3 – Chinese Replacements.....................................................17
13.4 – Oilfields..............................................................................18
13.5 – Replacement Restrictions.................................................18
13.6 – Converting CP To RP.........................................................18
14.0 – Unit Deployment.............................................................. 19
14.1 – Deployment Order.............................................................19
14.2 – Reinforcement & Replacement Deployment.....................19
18.1 – Peace Talks.......................................................................27
18.2 – Relations With Major Powers............................................28
18.3 – KMT Clique And Minor Country Political Affiliation...........28
20.1 – Isolating China...................................................................29
20.2 – Inflation Effects..................................................................29
20.3 – Controlling Inflation...........................................................30
21.1 – Sources Of Improvement..................................................30
21.2 – Improvement Procedure....................................................31
21.3 – Training..............................................................................31
22.0 – Factories........................................................................... 31
22.1 – Movement..........................................................................31
22.2 – Productivity........................................................................31
22.3 – Stacking Limit....................................................................31
23.0 – KMT Advisors And Japanese Collaborators................. 31
23.1 – KMT Military Advisors........................................................31
23.2 – Japanese Collaborators....................................................32
24.0 – Special Units.................................................................... 32
24.1 – Chindit Units......................................................................32
24.2 – British 3rd Commando Brigade.........................................32
24.3 – Artillery Units.....................................................................32
24.4 – Armor And Mechanized Infantry Units..............................32
24.5 – Japanese Navy Ground Forces.........................................32
24.6 – Japanese Puppet Forces..................................................33
24.7 – Chinese Army In India.......................................................33
24.8 – 20th Air Force B-29s.........................................................33
24.9 – Bandit Units.......................................................................33
24.10 – Engineer Units.................................................................33
25.0 – Alternate Histories (Optional)......................................... 33
25.1 – Further Concessions.........................................................33
25.2 – Stalin’s Choice...................................................................34
25.3 – Sian Forgiven.....................................................................34
25.4 – Wang Ming Ousts Mao......................................................34
25.5 – Peace Mission Of Wang Ching-Wei..................................34
25.6 – Japan’s China First Policy.................................................34
25.7 – Indian Uprising..................................................................34
25.8 – Stilwell’s Dream.................................................................35
25.9 – US Amphibious Landings..................................................35
25.10 – No Atomic Bombs...........................................................35
26.0 – Variant Rules (Optional).................................................. 35
26.1 – Simplified Rules.................................................................35
26.2 – Limited Intelligence...........................................................35
26.3 – Historical Game.................................................................35
Credits......................................................................................... 36
War of the Suns
2
1.0 – INTRODUCTION
天無二日 — There can never be two suns under one sky.
This Chinese saying never became more true than when the Red Sun of the
Imperial Japanese Empire launched its aggression against the White Sun
of the newly unified China. Defending against this onslaught was a fragile
coalition of the National Revolutionary Army of the Kuomintang (KMT)
and the armed forces of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), but each with
their own agenda to also pursue. It is truly a miracle that such a divided China
could sustain a large-scale war against an industrialized country like Japan for
more than eight years.
Five years after the end of the War of Resistance, however, both suns had set
on the theater where millions had died. The final winner was not a sun but the
red star of the Communists.
1.1 – GAME COMPONENTS
1.3 – GAME SCALE
Each turn represents one season: Winter (December to February), Spring
(March to May), Summer ( June to August), and Fall (September to
November). The map scale is about 1:3,000,000, each hex being approximately
33 miles (55 km) across. One Stacking Point represents approximately 5,000
combatants.
1.4 – THE MAP & PLAYER AIDS
The 3 included maps represents the vast geographical area over which the War
of Resistance was fought, divided into the China-Indochina (CIC) and IndiaBurma-Siam (IBS) theaters.
DESIGN NOTE: Siam was historically part of the Chinese theater, but the
British had in reality a much stronger influence over it than China did.
The map has been superimposed with a hexagonal grid to help adjudicate
military activities like movement and combat.
•
1760 counters printed on 10 separate countersheets
•
This Rulebook
•
•
A Playbook, detailing the various campaigns and scenarios, order of
battle information and various game aids and tables
Mini-Map: A copy of the Territories Table map, with boxes to place
markers designating territories and rivers affected by events.
•
•
Eight Player Aids
•
Three 22" by 34" mapsheets
•
One 8.5" by 11" map overlay
•
4 dice
Task Force Boxes: To avoid unwieldy stacks on the map,
the players may use the Task Force (TF) markers of the
various sides to represent the air units and fleets in a
given hex. Place the TF marker on the map, and place
the counters in the corresponding Task Force Box on
your display. Task forces including units from several sides should be
represented by WA TF markers when in the IBS theater, or KMT TF
markers when in the CIC theater.
•
War of the Suns is a 2 to 4 player strategic simulation of the eight year war in
the China-Burma-India (CBI) theater of World War II. There are four different sides in the game:
Activation Track: The HQ Chits of all the HQs in play are placed on
this track to manage their activations during the Operation Segment
[5.2].
•
Japan. Controls the units of the Imperial Japanese Army, Imperial
Japanese Navy, Manchukuo, Mengkiang, Chinese collaborationists,
Burma Defense Army, and Indian National Army, as well as pro-Japan
Siamese and (Vichy) French units.
Record Track: This track is used to place markers recording important
game values, like victory points levels, remaining Transport Points or
Command Points, Replacement Points, etc.
•
Kuomintang (KMT). Controls the units of the KMT cliques, as well
as the Allied air units and fleets operating in the China-Indochina
theater and the West Pacific Holding Box.
Political Display: This display is used to record the political affiliation
of the various KMT cliques [18.3] and of minor countries, as well as
the attitudes of the three major powers toward Japan and the KMT
[18.2].
•
Holding Boxes: The two holding boxes represent off-map areas where
units may enter play, operate in, or retreat to. Units in a friendly holding box are always in command and in supply.
note: Numbers in [brackets] are rule references.
1.2 – SIDES AND PLAYERS
•
•
•
Chinese Communist Party (CCP). Controls the units of the CCP
and Vietminh.
•
Western Allies (WA). Controls the units of the British
Commonwealth, the ground units of the USA and Chinese Army in
India, all the Allied air units and fleets operating in the India-BurmaSiam theater and the Indian Ocean Holding Box, as well as pro-WA
Siamese and (Free) French units.
Some tracks, tables, and boxes are printed on the map and the player aids:
1.
2. Indian Ocean Holding Box (represents off-map India and Ceylon)
— Controlled by the WA. Ground units may move between the
box and the IBS theater via air or sea transport, or the transport
routes in India leading off map. This holding box also represents
the Indian Ocean air and sea zones. Air units and fleets must
perform one mission to redeploy to the IBS theater.
NOTE: The CCP will be less active in the game than Japan and the KMT.
Also, the WA enter play on Turn 18 only.
Depending on the number of players, each player will control one or more
sides. When a player controls several sides, rules specifically relating to one of
his sides apply only to those forces controlled by that side.
1.2.1 – Four-Player Game: Each player controls one side.
If more than four players are available, the players on a given side should
allocate all the territories of the map among themselves; they are then
responsible for handling the activations of all HQs of their side activated
while within their respective territories.
West Pacific Holding Box (represents mainly Japan, Korea, and
Taiwan) — Controlled by Japan, unless otherwise specified.
Ground units may only move between the box and the CIC
theater via air or sea transport. This holding box also represents
the West Pacific air and sea zones. Air units and fleets herein must
perform one mission to redeploy to the CIC theater.
•
Unit Pools: These four boxes on the player displays are used to hold the
following units:
1.
Reinforcement Pool — Units becoming available on the current
turn before they are deployed on the map, and units whose entry
has been delayed for any reason to the current turn.
1.2.2 – Three-Player Game: One player controls Japan, another one
controls the KMT, and the third controls both the CCP and the WA.
2.
Replacement Pool — Replaceable units that have been eliminated.
Only units in this Pool can be replaced.
1.2.3 – Two-Player Game: One player controls Japan and the other
controls the KMT, the CCP, and the WA. See Garrison Requirements
Table for a special garrison requirement.
3.
Non-Replaceable (NR) Pool — NR units that have been eliminated, or units that have been relocated off map or demobilized
as required by an OB. These units are sometimes referred to as
“removed from play.”
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
4.
Exchange Pool. Units that have been broken down into their
component units.
Abbreviations
AS: Attack Strength.
BC: British Commonwealth.
BDA: Burma Defense Army.
CA: Central Army.
3
FEP (Foreign Equipment Point) source: All on-map and off-map supply
centers located outside of China. A FEP source is ‘open’ unless it is controlled
by Japan or has been force to close by a game mechanic. A closed FEP source
generates no FEP, and may lead to inflation if China is isolated [20.0].
Japanese: Controlled by Japan, no matter what service or nationality it
belongs to.
Ledo Road: The Ledo Road is considered built when all the trail hexes between Ledo (6041) and Mogaung (6437) have been improved to road hexes.
CCP: Chinese Communist Party.
Open hex: An open hex is a hex containing clear terrain and no other natural
feature (i.e., desert, forest, or swamp). A hex with clear terrain and a city (for
instance) is an open hex.
CIC: China-Indochina (theater).
Regular unit: Non-guerrilla ground combat unit.
CnC: Chinese collaborators.
River Route: A hex is bordering a River Route if the River Route runs along at
least one of its hexsides.
CAI: Chinese Army in India.
CP: Command Points.
DEP: Domestic Equipment Point.
DS: Defense Strength.
FEP: Foreign Equipment Point.
IBS: India-Burma-Siam (theater).
Transport route hex: A hex with a road or railroad, or a hex with a river route
hexside.
UST (United States Trained) units: “UST units” refer both to units with a
“UST” annotation on their counter and units with “UST Improved” markers.
2.0 – VICTORY CONDITIONS
IJA: Imperial Japanese Army.
2.1 – CAMPAIGN GAME
IJN: Imperial Japanese Navy.
Each side earns victory points (VPs) during the campaign game. The player
with the highest VP total at the end of a game is the winner. Should there be a
tie, the game is considered a draw.
INA: Indian National Army.
KMT: Kuomintang.
MA: Movement Allowance.
NR: Non-Replaceable.
OR: Operational Radius.
PC: Payload Capacity.
RP: Replacement Point.
SP: Stacking Points.
SPD: Speed.
UST: United States Trained.
In a three-player game, the CCP-WA player’s VP total equals the average of
the CCP and WA VP totals.
In a two-player game, the KMT, CCP, and WA VP totals must each be higher
than the Japanese VP total in order for the KMT-CCP-WA player to win.
2.1.1 – Japanese Victory Points: During each End of Turn Phase, Japan
earns or loses VPs as follows, by comparing the Objectives (any city,
oilfield, port, naval base, or airbase) it controls with those it controlled in
the End of Turn Phase of the previous turn:
+6 Japan gained control of any number of Objectives (including a
city under Japanese partial control at the start of Turn 0) during
the turn, and lost none.
VP: Victory Points.
–3 No change in Objective control from previous turn (but see
[18.1]).
WA: Western Allies.
–6 Japan lost control of any number of Objectives.
1.5 – GLOSSARY AND GENERAL CONCEPTS
Allied, enemy, friendly: A unit, counter, hex, ZOC, etc. is friendly if it is controlled, exerted, etc. by the same side. It is allied if it is controlled, exerted, etc.
by an allied side. It is enemy if it is controlled, exerted, etc. by an enemy side.
Japan is always enemy to the KMT, CCP, and WA (and vice versa). The KMT
and WA are always allied, as are the CCP and the WA. The KMT and CCP
are normally allied, but one of them may announce at any time (even in the
middle of another player’s phase) that they are now enemy to each other. They
may later revert to being allied, at any time they both agree upon it.
Bridge: A road or railroad crossing a river hexside. (Note that roads and
railroads do not always cross river hexsides.)
Burma Road: The Burma Road is considered built when all the trail hexes between Myitkyina (6336) and Kunming (5627) have been improved to road hexes.
Control: “Control” is an important concept in the game. A hex is controlled
by the last side to exert an undisputed ZOC into it. A transport route is
controlled by the side controlling all the hexes comprising the route (this also
applies to the Ledo and Burma Roads). To control a river route, a side must
control all the hexes bordering it (see River Route, below). A river route is
considered uncontrolled if no side controls all bordering hexes.
Effective Combat Strength: The modified combat strength of a unit; possibly
modified by any “reduced” or “improved” marker on it.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
+6 Japan controls all cities in the provinces of Chahar, Suiyuan,
Shansi, Shantung, and Hopeh, without having lost more than 6
Stacking Points (SP) of IJA units since the game start. To earn
these VPs, Japan must also control at this time all the cities that it
controlled at game start. This VP gain can happen only once per
game.
Example: During the turn, Japan gained control of one city, but lost
control of one city, one oilfield, and one airbase: it scores -6 VPs.
Example: During the turn, Japan gained control of one naval base but lost
control of it in a KMT counterattack, thus scoring -3 VPs.
2.1.2 – KMT Victory Points: The VPs accumulated by the KMT are
calculated at game end, as follows:
KMT VP total = (total AS of all on-map CA units) divided by 5
(see [4.4.1] for rounding rules)
2.1.3 – CCP Victory Points: The VPs accumulated by the CCP are
calculated at game end, as follows:
CCP VP total = (total AS of all on-map CCP units and units of
pro-CCP cliques + number of CCP guerrilla bases) multiplied by
2.
War of the Suns
4
2.1.4 – WA Victory Points: The WA enter play on Turn 18. From then
on, they earn VPs as follows during the End of Turn Phase of each turn:
+5 No Japanese units within India
+2 No Japanese units within Burma
+1 Less than 3 Replacement Points (RP) were used to replace
eliminated BC units during the turn
2.2 – SCENARIO GAMES
War of the Suns includes several individual scenarios:
•
Three Operational Scenarios, each covering an important period of the
eight-year war. Players should expect a playing time of about one hour
per turn.
•
Four Mini-Scenarios, each covering just a few turns and using simplified rules. They should be completed in about 2 hours, and make good
learning tools for the basic rules.
The Playbook contains the descriptions, victory conditions, and orders of
battle for all these scenarios; as well as the campaign game.
2.2.1 – Victory Conditions (Operational Scenarios): The Playbook lists
a specific set of victory conditions for each Operational Scenario. At the
end of a game, each side calculates the percentage of objectives it achieved;
victory percentages higher than 100% (e.g., your victory conditions state
that you must capture five cities by the end of the scenario but you capture
six) are considered as 100%. The player with the highest percentage is the
winner; if several players are tied for the highest percentage, the game ends
in a draw.
In a three-player game, the CCP/WA player’s victory percentage equals
the average of the CCP and WA percentages.
In a two-player game, the KMT, CCP, and WA victory percentages must
each be higher than the Japanese victory percentage in order for the
KMT/CCP/WA player to win. Ignore all Critical Victory Conditions (see
below) for the KMT and CCP under this player configuration.
To determine the level of success of the winning player, compare his victory percentage to the victory percentage of his opponent(s):
• Percentage is 1-9 higher than that of his opponent:
Marginal Victory
• Percentage is 10-19 higher than that of his opponent:
Major Victory
• Percentage is 20+ higher than that of his opponent:
Total Victory
Example: In a two player game, the KMT player achieves 40% of his objectives, the CCP 60% and the WA gets 20%. The Japanese player gets 50%. The Japanese player wins a Major Victory.
In three- and four-player games, the winner will be able to determine his
level of success over each of the other players; thus, a Japanese player might
win a Total Victory over the KMT, a Major Victory over the CCP, and a
Marginal Victory over the WA.
Two types of special victory conditions may also appear in some
Operational Scenarios:
•
Immediate Victory Conditions: When a particular side achieves its
Immediate Victory Conditions, the game ends in a Total Victory
for this player.” All the other players lose.
•
Critical Victory Conditions: If a side has not achieved its Critical
Victory Conditions by the end of the game, it scores either half
its achieved victory percentage or no victory percentage at all, as
specified by the scenario.
2.2.2 Victory Conditions (Mini Scenarios): All Mini Scenarios are short,
two-player games, including a single objective that must be achieved by
one side. Whether that side achieves its objective or not determines the
winner of the game.
2.3 – IMMEDIATE DEFEAT
In both campaign and scenario games, a side can suffer an immediate defeat
under the following circumstances:
2.3.1 – Japan: Loss of the Central China Area Army – If the Japanese
CChina AA HQ is permanently removed from play, Japan strikes an
armistice with China and retreats its army to Manchukuo.
The game ends with the defeat of the Japanese player. The remaining player
with the highest VP total (for campaign games) or victory percentage (for
scenario games) is the winner.
2.3.2 – KMT: The KMT suffers an immediate defeat in any of the following situations:
•
Loss of Chungking to the Japanese before Turn 16 – According to
Russian archives, Stalin had decided to invade and divide China
up with Japan if Chungking (4127) fell. A puppet state is set up
under Mao in western China. Chungking must be held by the
Japanese at the end of any turn prior to turn 16 for this to trigger.
Taking it but then losing it in a game turn will not trigger a loss.
If this happens, the game ends with the Japanese player as the winner.
•
Chiang surrenders – If the KMT Chiang Kai-Shek GHQ is
permanently removed from play, many of the KMT factions and
cliques are most likely to negotiate an armistice with Japan or become collaborators, while the rest continue a futile underground
resistance.
The game ends with the defeat of the KMT player. The remaining player
with the highest VP total (for campaign games) or victory percentage (for
scenario games) is the winner. Please follow the intention of this rule and
attempt to preserve the GHQ.
2.3.3 – CCP: Mao surrenders – If the CCP Mao Tse-Tung GHQ is permanently removed from play, Wang Ming succeeds him, and under orders
from the Comintern, the CCP becomes subordinated to KMT command.
The game ends with the defeat of the CCP player. The remaining player
with the highest VP total (for campaign games) or victory percentage (for
scenario games) is the winner. Please follow the intention of this rule and
attempt to preserve the GHQ.
Optionally, in the case of Mao surrendering, the players may decide to
continue the game; in a three-player game, the CCP-WA player controls
only the WA from then on. The CCP and all pro-CCP cliques become
pro-KMT cliques. Treat the Rectification Movement random event as No
Event from now on.
2.3.4 – WA: Loss of Chittagong and Imphal before Turn 30 – Revolution
breaks out in India after the fall of Chittagong and Imphal. Britain turns
all its efforts toward quelling the uprisings in the most valuable of its
colonies in Asia.
The game ends with the defeat of the WA player. The remaining player
with the highest VP total (for campaign games) or victory percentage (for
scenario games) is the winner.
Optionally, the players may decide to continue the game; in a three-player
game, the CCP-WA player controls only the CCP from then on. All
BC units, all CAI units, all US ground units in the IBS theater, and all
Allied air units in the IBS theater are removed from play (withdrawn to
off-map India); all future reinforcements of these kinds are forfeited. Siam
and French Indochina automatically become pro-Japan on the following
Negotiation Phase, but the Siamese and French units cannot be activated
until a Japanese unit enters their respective countries.
3.0 – THE PLAYING PIECES
3.1 – UNIT COUNTERS
Unit counters include ground and air units, and fleets. They represent the
military units that fought in the war. The numbers and symbols on the counters represent the strength, movement capability and types of unit represented
by each counter.
In the playbook is a more extensive list of units for all the sides.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
5
War of the Suns
6
3.2 – MARKER COUNTERS
Marker counters are used to record various game values and status. They
include:
•
Turn Marker: To record the current turn on the Record Track.
•
Record Track Markers: To record values like victory,
command, or transport points on the Record Track as
they are received or spent. They may be combined with
value markers to record higher values, or negative value
markers for negative values.
•
Control and Clique Markers: To record control of hexes on the map.
•
Status Markers: To record various statuses (out of supply, out of command, improved, reduced, movement mode, etc.) applying to units on
the map. The markers show the adjustments that apply to unit ratings.
•
Events Markers: To mark areas affected by events (snow, flood, famine,
typhoon, etc.) on the mini-map.
•
Construction Markers: To mark construction (and destruction) of
transport routes, airbases, naval bases, etc. on the map.
War of the Suns also includes HQ chits, each one corresponding to one HQ,
used on the Activation Track to record the number of remaining activations of
each HQ.
The players may use control markers as a reminder of which side controls
a given hex (major cities and supply centers for instance), or KMT clique
control markers as a reminder of which independent KMT clique controls
a given hex.
Allied transport routes hexes do not affect replacement or supply if the controlling side decides to leave the route open (e.g., a CCP unit might or might
not allow KMT supply, or link to a Foreign Equipment Point (FEP) source,
through a transport route it controls).
4.1.3 – Effects of ZOCs: ZOCs affect movement and combat: enemy
units moving out of a ZOC are slowed down [11.1.4], enemy units can
only be attacked by units exerting a ZOC in their hex, and ZOCs can cut
off enemy units [12.2].
4.2 – STACKING
Non-ground units (HQs, air units, fleets) do not have a SP value and may
stack freely.
4.2.1 – Stacking Limits: Stacking is counted in terms of SP. Units with a
0-SP value count as 0.5 SP for stacking; units without a printed SP value
do not count towards stacking. There are two stacking limits in War of the
Suns, which are enforced AT ALL TIMES (even during movement):
•
Absolute Stacking Limit (ASL): The ASL is the absolute maximum number of SP that is allowed in a hex at any time. A unit
cannot enter a hex if this would violate the ASL in that hex. If as a
result of combat, a unit is forced to retreat into a hex in violation
of the ASL, it is eliminated. The ASL is 9 SP (including no more
than six ground combat units) PER SIDE in an open hex, and
6 SP (including no more than four ground combat units) PER
SIDE in a non-open hex, flooded hex, or single-hex island.
•
Effective Stacking Limit (ESL): The ESL is the maximum number
of SP that can stack together in a hex without affecting movement
and combat. The ESL is 6 SP PER SIDE in an open hex, and 4 SP
PER SIDE in a non-open hex, flooded hex, or single-hex island.
A marker counter should be placed over the playing piece(s), hex, or territory
that it affects. All the playing pieces under a marker are considered to experience the status depicted on the marker.
The uses of most markers are explained in the respective sections.
4.0 – GENERAL GAME CONCEPTS
4.1 – ZONES OF CONTROL
4.1.1 – Types of ZOC: A unit may exert a Standard ZOC, a Limited
ZOC, or no ZOC:
•
Standard ZOC: All ground units with 1 or more SP exert a
Standard ZOC. A Standard ZOC covers the hex the unit occupies plus the six hexes surrounding it (Exception: A Standard
ZOC only extends into hexes that the unit can enter and across
hexsides that it can cross).
•
Limited ZOC: Standard and Limited ZOC units that are in
movement mode, out of supply Standard and Limited ZOC
units, non-evading guerrilla units, bandit units, and 0-SP ground
units exert a Limited ZOC. A Limited ZOC covers the hex the
unit occupies (only). Units exerting Limited ZOC and markers
causing Limited ZOC have a light colored strip behind their
ratings as a reminder.
•
No ZOC: All units without a SP value printed on the counter
(HQs, military advisors, collaborators, air units, fleets, and evading guerrilla units) exert no ZOC. They never control any hex
[4.1.2].
4.1.2 – Control: A unit controls all the hexes in its ZOC, unless a hex is
also in an enemy ZOC. In this case, it is a disputed hex. No side controls a
disputed hex, unless only one of them has units in the hex (note ZOCs do
apply in-hex).
In the rare case where it becomes important to know which of two allied
sides control a given hex (for replacement calculations between the KMT
and CCP for instance), the two sides will have to agree upon which one
controls the “disputed” hex. If they cannot, treat the hex as disputed, and
none of the sides control it.
WA
Control
CCP
Control
KMT
Control
Japanese
Control
Sung Clique
Control
Effects on Movement: A unit leaving a hex in which its side has
more SP than the ESL must spend 1 extra MP. Note that an
individual unit or stack must have completed its move before
another unit or stack may move.
Effects on Combat: When a side has more SP in a hex than
the ESL, its units in the hex have their total combat strength
proportionally reduced so that only the SP within the ESL are
considered. Round down any fractions.
Example: Two Japanese divisions with DS of 13, and 5 SP and
4 SP respectively, are stacked in an open hex. If attacked, their
combined DS is reduced to (13 + 13) x 6 / 9 = 17.333…rounded
down to 17
4.2.2 – Multi-Force Stacking: Apart from US units, which may stack with
no ill effects with any friendly/allied units, penalties apply to combat in
hexes where the following stacking situations exist:
•
Allied units: Units from one side only (designated by the allied
players; if they cannot agree, their opponent decides) contribute
their AS to an attack, or their DS to a defense, but all units in the
hex suffer the combat results.
•
Friendly units with different unit type symbol colors: Units from
one service/faction/dominion only contribute their AS to an
attack, or their DS to a defense, but all units in a defending hex
suffer the combat results.
4.2.3 – HQ Stacking: Two HQs may never occupy the same hex, unless
one of them is a GHQ.
4.2.4 – Stacking Arrangement: When stacking counters in a hex, players
should arrange them as follows, from top to bottom:
1.
Control and clique markers
2.
Opium markers
3.
Ground units being air or sea transported
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War of the Suns
4.
Air units, fleets, and Task Force markers
5.
Airbase and naval base counters
6.
Factory counters
7.
GHQ, HQ, military advisor, and collaborationist counters
8.
Ground units in decreasing order of AS. If there are units from
more than one side, Japanese units are placed on top, then WA
units, then CCP units, then KMT units
9.
Guerrilla, guerrilla base, and bandit counters
10. Transport route markers
Any markers affecting a given counter/terrain feature (out of supply,
movement mode, damaged, etc.) should be placed immediately on top
of it. Alternatively, to avoid unwieldy stacks of counters, the players may
decide not to place “inoperative” markers on air units, instead rotating the
affected counters upside down to depict this status. Similarly, movement
mode may be depicted by rotating the affected ground units upside down.
Players are free to check all the counters on the map at any time, unless
they use the Limited Intelligence variant rule [26.2].
4.3 – LIMITED OPERATION AREAS
Some units are restricted to a limited operation area which they cannot leave
while they are on map. The specific areas are listed in the OBs next to the affected units. These are identified by a red MA (on ground units) or a red name
(on leaders) on their counter. More general limited operation areas applying to
a whole force are defined after the OB to which they apply.
Units forced out of their limited operation area are eliminated. HQs are
temporarily removed [9.3.1] in this case and may be redeployed during a
subsequent turn.
DESIGN NOTE: IJA armies of specific fronts and KMT warlords who stuck
to their home territories have their HQs restricted to limited operation areas.
PLAY NOTE: The General Events Chart lists some time-specific operational
restrictions, applicable to a certain side rather than certain units. For instance,
on Turns 16-17 the CCP isn’t allowed to attack the KMT, on Turn 30 Japan
must maintain a reserve against potential US landings on China’s coasts, etc.
4.4 – ROUNDING AND CUMULATIVE MODIFIERS
4.4.1 – Rounding Rules: Rounding occurs only after all calculations are
finished. Round down all decimals in favor of the defender when calculating combat ratios. In all other calculations, round all decimals from .00 to
0.49 down and from .50 to .99 up.
4.4.2 – Cumulative Modifiers: Unless otherwise specified, all effects are
cumulative whenever multiple modifiers apply.
4.5 – UNUSED CAPACITIES
Unused Replacement Points, Transport Points, and construction capacities
cannot be accumulated from turn to turn. If not used, they are lost.
5.0 – SEQUENCE OF PLAY
This section presents an overall view of the flow of a game turn. Players should
refer to the Expanded Sequence of Play player aid for a detailed examination
of a turn’s activities.
5.1 – PRE-OPERATION SEGMENT
5.1.1 – Events Phase: The players check whether fixed events, alternate
histories, random events, or conditional events occur on this turn and
apply their effects.
5.1.2 – Reinforcement Phase: All the sides deploy their reinforcements
and apply all the relocations, reorganizations, etc. required by their OB for
the current turn. HQs may be voluntarily removed from the map.
5.1.3 – Administration Phase: The sides collect for the turn their
Command Points (CP), Replacement Points (RP), Domestic Equipment
Points (DEP), Foreign Equipment Points (FEP), and Railroad Transport
Points. Reset the River Transport Points markers to their maximum values.
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Remove “damaged” and “movement mode” markers from the map and
update “disease” markers. Update the status of air units and fleets of all
sides. Reequip air units with new aircraft models.
5.1.4 – Negotiation Phase: Perform peace talks, handle relations with
major powers, and influence the political affiliation of KMT cliques and
minor countries. The KMT may receive extra RP from foreign loans.
5.1.5 – China Isolation Phase: Check China’s connection status and
determine its effects on inflation.
5.1.6 – Factory Phase: The KMT and CCP may move any of their factories, which are then inoperative for the turn. Inoperative factories staying
put in a transport route hex become operative again.
5.1.7 – Guerrilla Phase: New guerrilla units may be recruited. All guerrilla
units and WA Chindit units may be activated to move, attack, sabotage,
and set up guerrilla bases; WA and CCP units must complete their activations before KMT units start theirs. CCP and KMT guerrilla units may be
converted to regular units.
5.1.8 – Strategic Warfare Phase: Air units may perform strategic bombing
missions, while fleets may perform bombardment or sea blockade missions. Enemy air units may interdict strategic bombing or bombardment
missions.
5.2 – OPERATION SEGMENT
5.2.1 – HQ Chit Pool Setup: The HQ chits of all the on-map HQs
are placed on the Activation Track, on the row corresponding to their
Command Quality.
5.2.2 – HQ Activation Phase: Each side with enough CP remaining and
at least one activation-eligible HQ on map announces whether it wants to
participate in the activation roll; if all the sides choose not to take part in
the activation roll (or no player has enough command points remaining),
the Operation Segment ends immediately. Otherwise, the highest-rolling
side becomes the Phasing Side and spends 2 CP to activate one of its
eligible HQ, moving the chit of this HQ down one row on the Activation
Track.
5.2.3 – Redeployment Phase: The Phasing Side may redeploy any of its
friendly ready air units and fleets, as well as its currently activated HQ
(and any higher-hierarchy HQ which possibly activated it).
5.2.4 – Movement Phase: All the friendly/allied ground units (including
guerrilla) of the Phasing Side over which the activated HQ has command
and which are within its Command Radius become activated. Activated
CCP and KMT regular units may be converted to guerrilla units. The
activated units may move up to their full movement allowance, using
available railroad, river, air, or sea transport if allowed and desired. Armor
and mechanized infantry units may attempt to overrun enemy-occupied
hexes, while Japan may disband any of its non-IJA, non-IJN units. After all
activated ground units have completed their movement, the activated HQ
may move.
5.2.5 – Combat Phase: The Phasing Side may perform anti-guerrilla and
anti-bandit sweeps, and then declares all its attacks. Eligible enemy units
may perform Defensive Reserve Movement. Both sides have their air units
and fleets perform any desired ground support and interdiction missions,
then the Phasing Side may cancel or rearrange its attacks. Resolve combats
in the order of the Phasing Side’s choice.
5.2.6 – Repeat Steps 5.2.2 to 5.2.5: A new HQ chit is selected via another
activation roll, starting a repeat of the activation sequence. A side having
just completed three consecutive activations cannot take part in this new
roll.
The Operation Segment ends if all the sides choose not to perform an activation roll, if no side can activate a HQ, or if the only side that could or wants to
activate a HQ has just been the Phasing Side for the third time in a row.
5.3 – POST-OPERATION SEGMENT
5.3.1 – Supply Phase: Check supply for all units and accordingly place/
remove “Out of Supply” markers. Unsupported guerrilla units must be
revealed.
War of the Suns
8
5.3.2 – Replacement and Construction Phase: Each side may spend its
RP, DEP, and FEP to replace any of its eliminated units and deploy them.
Newly replaced Chinese elite units are marked with training markers. The
KMT may expand its eligible units. Each side may build transport routes,
airbases, naval bases, or other constructions.
5.3.3 – Training Phase: Remove training markers from all ground
units (except Chinese elite units replaced in the immediately preceding
Replacement and Construction Phase), changing them to their improved
status. Place training markers on ground units entering the improvement
process, and BC units receiving Chindit training.
5.3.4 – End of Turn Phase: Update the VP markers on the Record Track,
and check whether any side meets the requirement for an Immediate
Victory or Immediate Defeat. If this is not the case, advance the Turn
marker to the next box of the Record Track.
6.0 – TURN 0 SPECIAL RULES
Turn 0 is a special half-turn (mid-July-August, 1937) simulating the unique
situation when elements from both sides were trying to limit the war. The
following special rules apply only during Turn 0:
HISTORICAL NOTE: Although the Marco Polo Bridge Incident (the
opening salvoes of the war in Peiping) occurred before sunrise on July 8, 1937,
large scale combat did not begin until mid-July.
•
•
At the start of Turn 0, KMT, CCP, and Japanese units are stacked
together in certain hexes. These hexes are all considered to be under
KMT control.
HISTORICAL NOTE: After the Boxer Rebellion, Japan (among
other nations) was allowed to maintain garrisons around Peiping and
Tientsin, while its concession in Shanghai was garrisoned by units
of the IJN (including its 3rd Fleet). CCP units in Shensi were under
reorganization, following an agreement with the KMT. These units
were in close proximity to KMT units.
No random event is rolled for during the Events Phase.
•
During the Admin Phase, each side receives half its normal number of
Railroad Transport Points, and the River Transport Points markers are
set at half their normal levels (round down in both cases as needed).
•
During the Admin Phase, both the KMT and Japan receive 6 CP,
while the CCP receives 4 CP. The KMT receives 9 RP, 12 DEP, and 8
FEP. The CCP receives a single RP only on a successful Comintern roll
[13.3.4]
•
No factory movement is allowed during the Factory Phase.
•
At the start of each of its activations, a side with on-map fleets receives
half its normal number of Sea Transport Points.
•
As long as no combat has been declared since game start between
Japanese and KMT units, Japanese units may ignore all KMT ZOCs
when they move along the Chinwangtao-Tangku-Tientsin-Peiping
railroad.
•
•
The bridge between Hangchow (2106) and Shaohing (2105) is considered not to exist for any purpose on Turn 0.
HISTORICAL NOTE: This bridge was under construction when war
began and was completed in September 1937.
Because of restrictions imposed by the Japanese government, Japanese
units may move and attack within the five northern provinces of
Hopeh, Chahar, Shantung, Suiyuan, and Shansi only on turn 0. This
restriction is cancelled in territories (and only in those territories)
where a Japanese unit has previously been attacked during the turn. No
IJN ground units, air units, and fleets can be activated before Turn 1,
unless the KMT attacks any of them during Turn 0. Should any IJN
unit be attacked, all IJN units may immediately be activated on turn 0.
7.0 – EVENTS
7.1 – EVENTS PHASE
•
Fixed Events (listed on the General Events Chart): These include
weather conditions, global war advances, etc. Every fixed event listed
on the General Events Chart for the current turn automatically occurs.
•
Alternate Histories (Optional) (listed on the General Events Chart):
These represent important events that did not occur historically, but
might in the game. An alternate history occurs only if all the players
agree or if the die roll winner so decides [25.0].
•
Random Events (listed in the Random Events Table): These include
changes in government policies, natural catastrophes, local events, etc.
The table is divided into four different periods. Roll 2 dice and check
the column of the Random Events Table corresponding to the current
turn to determine which random event (if any) takes place.
•
Conditional Events (listed on the Conditional Events Chart): These
include political proceedings and force redeployments linked to the
course of military operations. If the requirements for a conditional
event on the Conditional Events Chart are met at this point and this
event has not yet occurred during the game, it takes place immediately.
Do not roll for random events during Mini Scenarios, or on the first turn of
any of the Operational Scenarios.
7.2 – WEATHER EVENTS
All weather events last for one turn.
7.2.1 – Snow: During all Winter turns, there is automatically snow in Manchukuo, Inner Mongolia, and Northern
China (see Territories Table). The Random Events Table can
also cause Severe Snow to occur in various territories. Mark
affected territories by placing “Snow” markers (on their
back for Severe Snow) in the corresponding boxes of the
mini-map.
See the Weather Effects Chart below for the effects of Snow and Severe
Snow weather.
7.2.2 – Typhoon: During all Summer turns, there are heavy
rain and typhoons in Central China, Southern China,
Indochina, and Siam (see Territories Table). The Random
Events Table can also cause Severe Typhoon to occur in
various territories. Mark affected territories by placing
“Typhoon” markers (on their back for Severe Typhoon) in
the corresponding boxes of the mini-map.
See the Weather Effects Chart below for the effects of Typhoon and Severe
Typhoon weather.
7.2.3 – Monsoon Rain: During all Summer and Fall turns,
there is monsoon rain in Burma, India, and all hexes of the
Yunnan province west of the Salween River. Mark affected
territories by placing “Monsoon” markers in the corresponding boxes of the mini-map. Monsoon rain has the following
effects:
•
In an affected territory, roads and railroads are treated as trails,
trails are considered not to exist, and river routes no longer allow
river transport (but they keep their supply function).
•
During the Movement Phase, ground units must stop moving as
soon as they enter a hex situated in an affected territory via a nonroad, non-railroad hexside, regardless of their remaining MPs.
Their movement is over.
•
Ground units in a non-city hex situated in an affected territory
during the Admin Phase suffer from disease [7.6].
•
A Command or Supply Radius is reduced by two hexes if it passes
through at least one affected territory.
•
Air units cannot carry out any mission in or through affected territories, except air freight to a city/airbase hex and redeployment.
•
Fleets have their Surface AS halved if the target hex is situated in
an affected territory.
Four types of events can occur during the Events Phase:
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War of the Suns
•
9
The KMT cannot receive Foreign Equipment Points (FEP)
through the Burma Road or Ledo Road during Summer turns. It
still receives them during Fall turns, though.
can also cause Severe Flood to occur along the Yellow or Yangtze Rivers.
Mark the affected rivers by placing “Flood” markers (on their back for
Severe Flood) in the corresponding boxes of the mini-map.
7.2.4 – Floods: The teal colored hexes on the banks of the
Yellow and Yangtze Rivers represent areas that experience
floods during all Summer turns. The Random Events Table
See the Weather Effects Chart below for the effects of Flood and Severe
Flood weather.
WEATHER EFFECTS CHART
Snow
Severe Snow
Air units have their Surface AS halved if their flight path passes through at
least one affected territory.
Air units have their Surface AS halved on a die roll of 1-3 (roll for each
unit) if their flight path passes through at least one affected territory.
Ground units attacking a hex situated in an affected territory have their
effective AS halved.
In an affected territory, roads and railroads are treated as trails, while trails
are considered not to exist.
In Inner Mongolia and Manchukuo, rivers are frozen: they are ignored for
movement purpose, but do affect combat normally.
All rivers in an affected territory are frozen: they are ignored for movement
purpose, but do affect combat normally.
In Northern China, rivers are half-frozen: movement and combat across
rivers is prohibited unless across bridges.
No hex situated in an affected territory generates any RP for any side.
A ground unit moving through at least one affected territory has its MA reduced by 1 if it is 4 or less, or 2 if it is 5 or more. Units passing through affected
territories exclusively by rail transport are unaffected.
A Command or Supply Radius is reduced by one hex if it passes through at least one affected territory.
Typhoon
Air units have their Surface AS halved on a die roll of 1-3 (roll for each
unit) if their flight path passes through at least one affected territory.
Fleets have their Surface AS halved on a die roll of 1-3 (roll for each unit) if
the target hex is situated in an affected territory.
Roll 1D6 for each stack of units using amphibious attack against a coastal
hex situated in an affected territory, or using sea transport to a hex situated
in an affected territory that is not a friendly/allied naval base or port. On
a 1-3 result, the sea Transport Points and MPs are spent but the transport
cannot be executed. The units can try again during the same phase if
they have MPs left and their side has Transport Points remaining. River
transport and sea transport to friendly/allied naval bases and ports are
unaffected.
Severe Typhoon
Air units have their Surface AS halved if their flight path passes through at
least one affected territory.
Fleets have their Surface AS halved if the target hex is situated in an affected territory.
Ground units attacking a hex situated in an affected territory have their
effective AS halved.
No hex situated in an affected territory generates any RP for any side.
No amphibious attack may be attempted against any hex situated in an
affected territory.
Roll 1D6 for each stack of units using sea transport to a hex situated in an
affected territory that is not a friendly/allied naval base or port. On a 1-3
result, the sea Transport Points and MPs are spent but the transport cannot
be executed. The units can try again during the same phase if they have MPs
remaining and their side has Transport Points left. River transport and sea
transport to friendly/allied naval bases and ports are unaffected.
A ground unit moving through at least one affected territory has its MA reduced by 1 if it is 4 or less, or 2 if it is 5 or more. Units passing through affected
territories exclusively by rail or river transport are unaffected.
During the Movement Phase, mechanized and artillery units must stop moving as soon as they enter a hex situated in an affected territory via a non-road
or non-railroad hexside, regardless of their remaining MPs. Their movement is over.
A Command or Supply Radius is reduced by one hex if it passes through at least one affected territory.
Flood
The supply centers of Hankow (2816) and Nanchang (3011) on the
Yangtze River generate reduced RP (see Replacement Aids).
Severe Flood
Affected hexes generate no RP for any side.
Ground units in a non-city hex situated in an affected hex during the
Admin Phase suffer from disease [7.6].
In flooded hexes, roads and railroads are treated as trails and trails are considered not to exist; river routes bordering flooded hexes are considered as
nonexistent for river transport and supply purposes.
Ignore all combat effects of river hexsides if the defender’s hex is a flooded hex.
A Command or Supply Radius can enter but not pass through a flooded hex.
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War of the Suns
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7.3 – YELLOW RIVER DIKE DESTRUCTION
The Yellow River’s course changes naturally every few hundred years, but
it may also be altered by destroying the Chengchow dike (2022). Any side
with at least one SP of units in the city may destroy the dike when the unit is
activated; this changes the course of the river for the rest of the game.
When this happens (and we’re sorry about this but after years of debate this
was honestly the best solution), grab a piece of paper and write down the locations of all the units that will now be covered by the overlay (a small 8.5 by 11
map included with the game), pick those units up and lay down the overlay on
the map. Then replace the units to their correct position. The overlay will be in
play for the rest of the game.
From then on, the Yellow River follows its altered course. The altered Yellow
River suffers severe flood [7.2.4] every turn (not just summer) (see Terrain
Effects Chart) for the remainder of the game. Transport routes in the flooded
hexes, including the bridges near Pengpu and Hwainan are destroyed beyond
repair until game end.
off-map FEP source of Alma-Ata. Units are considered eliminated if
forced to enter Mongolia.
•
•
DESIGN NOTE: Sinkiang and Outer Mongolia were under Soviet
control at the time.
Railroads to Calcutta (India). The two railroads leading off the left
edge of the map to Calcutta are connected. They also link to the offmap supply center in Calcutta.
Railroad to Saigon (Indochina). The railroad leading off the lower
right edge of the map to Saigon links to the off-map supply center in
Saigon.
A ground unit may travel via an off-map railroad by rail transport only if both
ends of the connected railroad at the map edge are friendly/allied. A unit
cannot otherwise exit the map.
Other trails (from Sining and Kangting in western China) and railroads (from
Letpadan in Burma, Bangkok in eastern Siam) leading off map cannot be used
for off-map transport or supply trace.
The dike has already been destroyed at the start of Operational Scenarios 2
and 3.
8.2 – RIVER ROUTES
7.4 – “GREEN VEIL”
River routes are shown on the map by a very dark blue line inside the river
hexsides they follow; they represent navigable river sections (which may not
coincide with the main section of a river). River routes exist on the three rivers
below:
Gaoliang (a type of broomcorn) is widely cultivated in all the
northern Chinese provinces, except Ningsia and Chinghai (see
Territories Table). The crops provided perfect cover for guerrillas
when they reached their full length between May and July. This
“Green Veil”, as the Chinese called it, made evading guerrilla
units harder to locate by anti-guerrilla sweeps [16.6.2].
During all Summer turns, mark affected territories by placing “Green Veil”
markers in the corresponding boxes of the mini-map.
•
The Yangtze River up to Luchow (4428);
•
The West River up to Wuchow (4711);
•
The Irrawaddy River up to Mandalay (7235) and a section of the
Chindwin River.
7.5 – DROUGHT/LOCUSTS
DESIGN NOTE: Despite being major rivers, the Yellow, Mekong, and
Salween Rivers were too shallow or hazardous to navigate.
The Random Events Table can cause Drought/Locusts to
occur in various territories. Mark affected territories by placing
“Drought/Locusts” markers in the corresponding boxes of the
mini-map. Drought/locusts has the following effects:
8.3 – TRANSPORT ROUTE CONSTRUCTION
•
Ground units in a non-city hex situated in the affected territory during
the Admin Phase suffer from disease [7.6].
•
No hex situated in an affected territory generates any RP for any side.
7.6 – DISEASE
During the Admin Phase, place a “Disease” marker on units in:
•
Any swamp hex; or
•
Any non-city hex affected by the Severe flood or
Drought/Locusts random events; or
•
Any non-city hex in a territory affected by monsoon.
Remove “Disease” markers from units in none of the hex types above. Units
affected by disease (mainly malaria) fight with half their AS and move at half
their MA.
The following types of construction may be carried out during the
Replacement and Construction Phase in a hex or on a hexside not affected by
flood or monsoon rain:
•
Constructing Road: In any friendly/allied trail hex.
•
Constructing Railroad: In any friendly/allied road hex (including a
road marker).
•
Extending River Route: On any potential river route hexside; the hexes
bordering the river route must be friendly/allied.
•
Repairing Bridge: Any sabotaged bridge hexside; the hexes on both
sides of the bridge must be friendly/allied.
DESIGN NOTE: Most of the lower Yangtze River was navigable to the
heavier vessels required by modern warfare. But to make some of the nonnavigable parts accessible to these troop transports and supply ships, proper
harbor facilities had to be built, surveying expeditions had to be launched to
chart the river bed and depth, and engineering works sometimes had to be
undertaken. This is what extending a river route represents. 8.0 – TRANSPORT ROUTES
Transport routes include roads, railroads, and river routes, or a combination
thereof. They are crucial to maintaining supply [10.2.1] and providing ground
units with increased mobility [11.1.1 and 11.3]. A side may mark the railroads
and river routes under its control by placing its own control markers at both
ends of these routes. Note that trails are not considered transport routes. Note
also that roads and railroads do not always cross river hexsides.
8.1 – OFF-MAP TRAILS, ROADS AND RAILROADS
Some railroads, roads, and trails extend off-map:
•
•
Railroads to Hsinking (Manchukuo). The three railroads leading off
the top edge of the map to Hsinking (today’s Changchun) are connected. They also link to the off-map supply center in Hsinking.
Road and trail to Alma-Ata (USSR). The road (to outer Mongolia)
and trail (to Sinkiang) leading off the left edge of the map link to the
A transport route marker represents links to all the transport routes, towns,
and cities in adjacent hexes. River route markers should be placed so that their
top points to the end of the river route hexside.
8.3.1 – Construction Cost: Construction requires an RP expenditure
(Exception: See [24.10]). In addition, the KMT and CCP must control
a road/railroad/port linking any supply center in China to an open FEP
source to be able to construct any railroad.
The construction costs are:
•
1 RP to construct one road or railroad in an open hex; 2 RP in a
non-open hex.
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War of the Suns
•
•
1 RP to construct a road/railroad bridge across a minor river
(bridges cannot be constructed across major rivers). A railroad
bridge can only be constructed on an existing road bridge.
1 RP to construct two river route hexsides, both bordered by at
least one open hex; 2 RP if at least one hexside is bordered by two
non-open hexes.
Friendly construction capacity cannot be transferred to an allied side. Each
side can construct a maximum of four road hexes, four railroad hexes, and
four river route hexsides during a given turn.
Repairing damaged bridges has variable construction costs:
•
1 RP for a road bridge across a minor river.
•
2 RP for a road bridge across a major river, or a railroad bridge
across a minor river.
•
4 RP for a railroad bridge across a major river.
The KMT and CCP cannot repair bridges across major rivers.
8.4 – TRANSPORT ROUTE SABOTAGE
Roads and railroads can be sabotaged. River routes and trails can never be
sabotaged. Mark the sabotaged transport route hexes with “Damaged” markers.
DESIGN NOTE: The KMT tried to blockade the Yangtze and West River
routes with naval mines and sunken ships during the war, but these attempts
were never very successful. They usually took place where the strongholds are
located on the map, so their effects have been factored into the effects of the
strongholds.
8.4.1 – Sabotaging Roads and Railroads: Any ground unit
may sabotage a road or railroad by spending +1 MP in the
hex. A sabotaged railroad hex still functions as a road hex.
A sabotaged road hex functions as a trail hex. The supply
function of sabotaged transport routes is unaffected.
Roads and railroads may also be sabotaged by successful strategic bombing, bombardment, or random event.
All damaged roads and railroads are repaired in the Admin Phase of the
following turn; the “Damaged” markers are removed, unless the hex is still
controlled by the sabotaging side (and it wants to keep it sabotaged).
8.4.2 – Sabotaging Bridges: A ground unit may sabotage a
bridge by spending +1 MP in a hex on one side of the bridge.
Sabotaging a bridge does NOT at the same time sabotage
the transport route on either side of the river (ground
units can still enter the hex through the transport route).
Place a “damaged bridge” marker in the hex, with its arrow
pointing to the sabotaged bridge hexside. Unlike sabotaged roads and
railroads, sabotaged bridges are NOT automatically repaired and must
be reconstructed. Remove the damaged bridge marker once the bridge is
repaired [8.3.1].
8.4.3 – Removing Railroads: A side may remove up to four
friendly railroad hexes (regardless of the presence of friendly
units) during the Replacement and Construction Phase..
Place “removed railroad” markers in hexes where railroads
were removed. Removed railroads cannot be repaired and
must be reconstructed.
9.0 – HEADQUARTERS AND ACTIVATION
9.1 – HQ COUNTERS
HQ counters represent the named formation and his staff. They have a DS of
zero, and are removed from the map as soon as they happen to be in an enemy
ZOC with no friendly/allied ground units stacked with them.
DESIGN NOTE: The KMT and CCP commander names were selected on
the basis of their real power rather than their theoretical hierarchical positions.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
11
9.2 – HQ DEPLOYMENT AND MOVEMENT
9.2.1 – Redeployment: During the Redeployment Phase, the Phasing
Side can redeploy his activated HQ to any friendly/allied city, or any
hex containing at least one unit over which the HQ has full command.
In addition, if the HQ was activated by a higher-hierarchy HQ with red
command quality, this higher-hierarchy HQ can also redeploy. A redeployment may be made via:
•
A path of connected ground hexes free of enemy ZOC that an
infantry unit could enter during a normal move.
•
Air transport or sea transport (for sides with air or sea transport
capacity) through an unlimited number of sea zones (sea
transport) or over unlimited range (air transport). No Transport
Points are spent.
9.2.2 – Movement: During the Movement Phase, the Phasing Side may
move his activated HQ up to 6 MPs as an infantry unit, after all the
activated ground units have completed their movement. The HQ may not
use railroad, river, sea, or air transport during this phase.
9.3 – HQ REMOVAL
If, during a turn, a HQ is removed from the map for any reason, immediately
remove its corresponding HQ chit from the Activation Track.
9.3.1 – Temporary Removal: A HQ or GHQ is temporarily removed from
play in any of the following situations:
•
The controlling side voluntarily removes it from the map during
his Reinforcement Phase (HQ only).
•
It is in an enemy ZOC, not cut off, with no friendly/allied
ground units (removal happens as soon as this situation occurs).
•
It is eliminated in combat while not cut off.
•
It is forced to retreat beyond its limited operation area [4.3] after
combat.
•
It is temporarily removed due to its clique being threatened.
A temporarily removed HQ is placed in the Replacement Pool. It may be
redeployed to the map at no cost by the controlling side during any future
Reinforcement Phase.
9.3.2 – Permanent Removal: A HQ or GHQ is permanently removed
from play in any of the following situations:
•
It is in an enemy ZOC, cut off, with no friendly/allied ground
units (removal happens as soon as this situation occurs).
•
It is eliminated in combat while cut off.
•
An OB or an event requires an off-map relocation, removal, or
death of the HQ commander on the current turn.
9.3.3 – Removing KMT HQs: The KMT can never voluntarily remove a
US HQ. It can voluntarily remove a KMT HQ only if this HQ is stacked
only with CA unit(s) not belonging to the clique of the HQ.
9.4 – ACTIVATION
During the Operation Segment, each side can activate friendly HQs, which
in turn activate friendly ground units. The number of HQs activated by a side
during an Operation Segment is limited by the CP available to this side, each
activation requiring the spending of 2 CP. Furthermore, each HQ is limited
to a maximum number of activations per Operation Segment, equal to its
Command Quality rating.
9.4.1 – Command Points: Each side receives the following number of CP
in each Admin Phase:
•
Japan and WA: Receive a number of CP equal to the number of
RP received for the turn (listed on the General Events Chart),
unless otherwise modified.
•
CCP: Receives 6 CP every turn. Exception: If there are fewer than
3 CCP HQs on map, receives a number of CP equal to twice the
number of CCP HQs on map.
War of the Suns
12
•
KMT: Other than on Turn 0, receives 13 CP every turn. This
amount might be reduced by inflation [20.0].
activated by the Hu Tsung-Nan HQ. The Hu Tsung-Nan HQ counter
sports a “-1” as a reminder.
9.5 – COMMAND
9.4.2 – HQ Activation: At the start of the Operation Segment, each
side places all the HQ Activation Markers of its on-map HQs on the
9.5.1 – Checking Command: Command is checked at the beginning of
Activation Track. The track is divided into 4 rows (‘3 Activations left’, ‘2
the Movement Phase, BEFORE any Phasing Side unit moves. A unit is in
Activations left’, ‘1 Activations left’, ‘Activations Complete’). The chit of
command if at the start of the Movement Phase it is within the Command
a HQ is placed on the row
Entry
Radius of the activated HQ (and this HQ is capable of commanding the
corresponding to its Command
Turn
unit [9.5.3]). Units may move out of command should they wish.
Quality (e.g., a 3-Command
Rival
KMT
Quality HQ would have its
Clique
Clique
Unless affected by weather, a Command Radius normally has a range of six
chit placed in the ‘3 Activations Hierarchy
hexes traced from a HQ or GHQ to the units.
Command
Quality
Value
left’ row).
A Command radius:
(Red if HQ is of
Name
Higher Command)
On each HQ Activation Phase,
• Cannot enter an enemy hex or a disputed hex (unless the disputed
all the sides with at least 2
hex is occupied by friendly/allied units).
remaining CP and one HQ chit on the ‘1’, ‘2’, or ‘3 Activations left’ rows
announce whether they want to participate in an activation roll. Japan
• Cannot enter a hex/cross a hexside that the unit whose command
first declares its intent, followed by the WA, CCP, and KMT. No die roll
status is being checked could not enter/cross during a normal
is needed if only one side has remaining CP or HQs with activations left.
move.
If all the sides choose not to roll the die, the Operation Segment ends
• Can enter but not pass through a desert, forest, or swamp hex,
immediately, even if any side has some CP left.
unless along a friendly/allied road or railroad.
Each participating side (each side that said in the above that they wish to
• Can enter but not pass through a flooded hex.
participate) rolls 1D6. If only one side wants to go, no die roll is made.
The side with the highest result (sides tied for the highest result roll
The Command Radius of Chinese HQs does not extend outside the CIC
again) spends 2 CP and activates one friendly HQ of its choice. This side
theater.
becomes the Phasing Side. Move the chit of the activated HQ down one
row on the Activation Track.
Regardless of these limitations, a unit is always in command if it is within
the Command Radius distance of a HQ and adjacent to another inOnce the Phasing Side has completed its activation, the activation secommand unit of the same side.
quence starts again as a new HQ chit is selected via another activation roll
and all may choose to participate once again. Apply a -1 DRM to the side
9.5.2 – Out of Command: Only ground combat units may
which just had one HQ activated, or a -2 DRM to the side which just had
be out of command. Unless mustered, out of command units
two HQs activated consecutively. A side having just completed its third
cannot move or attack during an Operation Segment, even
consecutive activation cannot take part in this new roll.
if the attacked hex is within the Command Radius of the
activated HQ. Players may use “out of command” markers
Activating a Lower Hierarchy HQ: If the activated HQ has a higher
to designate units outside the Command Radius of the
hierarchy value than another HQ within its Command Radius, the side
currently activated HQ.
may choose to activate that HQ instead. For all purposes, the HQ considered to be activated is the lower-hierarchy HQ, not the higher-hierarchy
Units in a friendly holding box and all IJN ground units within six hexes
one. Exception: Move the HQ chit of the higher-hierarchy HQ (not the
of a friendly naval base are considered in command. These units can be
actually activated, lower-hierarchy HQ) down one row on the Activation
activated when any HQ of the side is activated, whether they are within
Track.
the Command Radius of the HQ or not. They cannot attack however,
unless the hex they enter the map (for units in Holding Boxes) or the hex
PLAY NOTE: This allows the lower-hierarchy HQ to be activated more
they start their move in (for IJN units within six hexes of a naval base) is
times than it would normally be able to do on its own.
also within the Command Radius of the activated HQ.
9.4.3 – Unit Activation: At the start of the Movement Phase, all the
DESIGN NOTE: In reality, HQs outside the theater commanded offfriendly/allied ground units (including guerrilla, but not other HQs) of
map reinforcements, and the Imperial Japanese Navy HQ commanded the
the Phasing Side within the Command Radius of the activated HQ and
IJN ground units. These units usually move in accordance with the needs
over which it has command [9.5.3] become activated.
of the HQs in the theater.
Units may be activated (and thus move and attack) multiple times in a
9.5.3 – Full and Partial Command: A unique feature of War of the Suns is
given turn.
that a HQ may not always have full command over friendly ground units.
Some HQs may have partial command over allied units, though.
9.4.4 – Mustering Units: In addition to activating in-command units,
an activated HQ may also activate out-of-command units; the hierarchy
• Full Command: A unit under full command of the activated HQ
value of the HQ indicates the maximum number of SP of units that it can
may move its full MA.
muster. If mustered by a HQ, a unit must end its move in a hex closer to
the HQ than the hex it started in; there is no such restriction if mustered
• Partial Command: A unit under partial command of the activated
by a GHQ. A unit can be mustered multiple times by different HQs
HQ has its MA reduced by 1 if it is 4 or less, or by 2 if it is 5
during a given turn.
or more. In addition, it attacks with half its AS (defense is not
affected). A unit activated under partial command cannot be
9.4.5 – Administrative HQs: A HQ with its command quality printed in
voluntarily moved to a hex where it would cause the ESL to be
red on its counter and HQ Chit cannot directly activate units, though it
exceeded or where it would be judged out of supply during the
may still activate lower-hierarchy HQs [9.4.2] or muster units [9.4.4].
Supply Phase (unless it started its Movement Phase already out of
supply).
9.4.6 – Operation Segment End: The Operation Segment ends if all the
sides choose not to perform an activation roll, if no side can activate a HQ,
• No Command: A unit over which a HQ has no command cannot
or if the only side that could activate a HQ has just been the Phasing Side
be activated by this HQ.
for the third time in a row.
Refer to the following table for the command capabilities of the various
9.4.7 – Hu’s HQ Communist Moles: Because of the communist moles
HQs. A HQ has no command over units not specifically mentioned in the
in his HQ, all units (regardless of clique) activated by the Hu Tsung-Nan
table.
HQ that attack CCP units suffer a -1 DRM on the Ground Combat
Results Table. Units of the Hu clique are not affected if they were not
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
13
Command Capabilites Table
HQ
Full Command
US HQ
BC HQ
Partial Command
US units
BC units
UST Chinese units outside China
non-UST Chinese units outside China
KcR guerrilla units
Pro-WA Siamese units
FT guerrilla units
Pro-WA French units
BC units
Pro-WA Siamese units
FT guerrilla units
Pro-WA French units
IJA units
IJA HQ
IJN units
INA units
CnC units
Pro-Japan Siamese units
Mck unit
Pro-Japan French units
Mk units
INA HQ
Siamese HQ
Units of own country or organization
—
French HQ
CCP units
CCP HQ
Units of pro-CCP cliques
Vm guerrilla units
Units of non-rival Central Army cliques
Units of assimilated cliques
Central Army KMT HQ
All other KMT units
YoA units
Assimilated clique KMT HQ
CAI units
Units of pro-KMT cliques
Pro-KMT clique KMT HQ
YoA units
Pro-CCP clique KMT HQ
Units of own clique
Pro-Japan clique KMT HQ
YoA units
Unaffiliated clique KMT HQ
CAI units
CAI units
9.5.4 – Rival Cliques: The combat effectiveness of KMT ground combat
units (Exception: US-trained units and improved units) might be affected
in situations mixing rival cliques of the Central Army under the same
command. An activated HQ has only Partial Command [9.5.3] over units
from a rival clique that it activates, unless the HQ is stacked with the
GHQ (Chiang Kai-Shek).
Each of the following HQs has the name of its rival clique printed in the
top right corner of its counter:
•
•
Ho (Ho) and Chen (Ch): A unit of Ho clique under Chen’s command, or a unit of Chen’s clique under any commander of Ho’s
clique.
Wei (Wei) and Tang (Ta): A unit of Tang clique under Wei’s command, or vice versa.
HISTORICAL NOTE: Ho and Chen had a long history of rivalry within
the KMT. Tang was fiercely anti-communist while Wei was very close to
the CCP.
DESIGN NOTE: The adverse effects of multi-clique stacking [4.2.2] are
caused by the difficulty to coordinate (due to different weapons, communication systems, etc.), while the adverse effects of rivalry are due to the
unwillingness to do so.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
10.0 – SUPPLY
10.1 – SUPPLY CENTERS
Supply centers are identified on the map by their large squares (see terrain
effects chart). A unit can obtain supply from a friendly supply center only (allied supply centers cannot be used). Off-map supply centers (Mukden, Saigon,
Calcutta) function like on-map ones.
A supply center may be damaged and may not be used as a supply center
(mark the hex with a damaged marker) until the next Admin Phase by:
•
An enemy air unit/fleet successfully bombing/bombarding it; or
•
A ground unit spending 2 extra MPs in the hex; or
•
The Scorched Earth Policy random event happening in the hex.
10.2 – MAINTAINING SUPPLY
10.2.1 Checking Supply: Each side must maintain supply to its units.
Supply is checked during the Supply Phase of each turn. HQs, air units,
fleets, CCP units, guerrilla units, and bandit units never need to check
supply and never are out of supply.
A unit is in supply if it can trace a path no longer than the side’s Supply
Radius to one of the following supply sources:
War of the Suns
14
•
a transport route hex leading, via a friendly/allied continuous
transport route (or combination of routes), to an undamaged
friendly on-map supply center, or to a map-edge transport route
hex linked to a friendly off-map supply center (to trace supply
along a river route, all hexes bordering its traced length must be
free of enemy units); or
•
an undamaged friendly supply center; or
•
a friendly port or naval base ( Japan and WA only).
10.2.2 Out of Supply: Place “Out of Supply” markers on
out of supply units. Out of supply units have their AS, DS,
and MA halved. Standard-ZOC out of supply units exert
Narrow ZOC (out of supply Narrow ZOC units keep their
Narrow ZOC).
Remove the “Out of Supply” marker from an out of supply unit when:
IJN units can draw supply from Japanese naval bases only.
It receives air supply; or
•
It is converted to a guerrilla unit during the Movement Phase.
Units judged to be out of supply while in a Desert hex are eliminated.
Unless affected by weather and/or terrain, a Supply Radius is generally
six hexes. KMT units unable to trace command per 9.5.1 to a KMT HQ
stacked with US military advisor Wedemeyer [23.1.3] have a supply radius
of four hexes only.
11.0 – MOVEMENT
A Supply Radius:
During the Movement Phase, all the friendly/allied activated [9.4.3] or
mustered [9.4.4] ground units of the Phasing Side can move.
•
cannot enter an enemy hex or a disputed hex (unless the disputed
hex is occupied by friendly/allied units), or any hex adjacent
to a bandit unit [24.9] (unless the disputed hex is occupied by
friendly/allied units).
•
Cannot enter a hex/cross a hexside that the unit whose supply
status is being checked could not enter/cross during a normal
move.
•
Can enter but not pass through a desert hex, forest hex, or swamp
hex unless along a friendly/allied road, railroad or river route.
•
Can enter but not pass through a flooded hex.
•
Cannot extend more than one hex across a major river regardless
of the length traced, unless across an undamaged bridge or
friendly/allied river route.
11.1 – REGULAR MOVEMENT
When moving, a unit moves from hex to hex, following a path of adjacent
hexes on the map (jumping over hexes is not allowed), and spending a certain
number of Movement Points (MP) from its Movement Allowance (MA) to
enter each hex or cross certain hexsides. See the Terrain Effects Chart for the
movement costs of the various terrain types.
A unit can move only once during the Movement Phase, and cannot spend
more MP than its MA (Exception: See [11.1.2]). Unused MP cannot be
accumulated for later use or transferred to other units. Units are never forced
to move.
11.1.1 – Road and Rail Movement: Entering a road or railroad hex via a
road or railroad hexside costs 1/2 MP, regardless of other terrain features
in the hex. Any fraction of MP not used is lost.
DESIGN NOTE: Railroad embankments facilitate ground unit movement along them.
Regardless of these limitations, a unit is always in supply if it is within
Supply Radius distance of a supply source and adjacent to an in supply unit
of the same side.
PLAY NOTE: Be sure to note the difference between “railroad movement” and “railroad transport” [11.3.2].
Supply Example 1
Supply Example 2
C
Dimapur (on the left map
edge) is the only supply
center shown here. Assume
all hexes in the picture are
friendly.
•
A unit in Hex A is out
of supply, unless the
Ledo Road has been
constructed along at
least three hexes starting from Ledo (6041)
(inclusive).
•
A unit in Hex B is out
of supply because a
Supply Radius cannot
pass through the
forest or swamp hexes.
•
•
A
Hankow and Nanchang are the only two supply centers in the picture. The Yangtze
River is experiencing a flood during this turn.
•
Assume all hexes in the picture are friendly. A unit in Hex A is in supply: it
traces three hexes to Sinyang, then along the railroad to Hankow.
•
Assume Japan controls Hankow and all the railroad hexes north of it. A
KMT unit in Hex B is out of supply: its supply path cannot reach Nanchang
over the Yangtze River (the flood effectively cancels the existence of the river
route and railroad on the right bank). While the supply path could cross the
top-bound Yangtze River and reach the river route right of Madang running
around the two lake hexes, the river route itself stops one hexside short
of Nanchang because of the flood negating the river route bordering the
Nanchang hex.
A
A unit in Hex C is
out of supply, but can
easily be air supplied
[17.5.2] if the side has
at least one transport
air unit within range.
B
B
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
11.1.2 – Minimum Move: A ground unit eligible to move can move at
least one hex during a phase, regardless of MP costs, but this rule cannot be
used to move through prohibited terrain or leave an enemy ZOC.
11.1.3 – Enemy-Occupied Hexes: A unit may not enter a hex occupied by
an enemy unit, unless:
•
an OB requires it; or
•
it is a commando unit; or
•
it is an evading guerrilla unit; or
•
all enemy units in the hex exert a Narrow ZOC or no ZOC; or
•
there is already a friendly/allied unit in the hex.
11.1.4 – Effects of ZOCs on Movement: When leaving a hex in an enemy
ZOC, a unit must spend 2 extra MPs (Exception: It spends only 1 extra
MP if it directly enters a friendly holding box or a hex containing friendly/
allied units only). Multiple ZOCs exerted in the hex have no additional
effects.
PLAY NOTE: A unit “leaves a hex in an enemy ZOC” when it enters
a hex occupied by a Standard-ZOC enemy unit, or when it exits a hex
occupied by a Standard- or Narrow-ZOC enemy unit.
11.2 – SPECIAL MOVEMENT TYPES
Apart from regular movement, a unit may use the following special movement
types during the Operation Segment.
11.2.1 – Administrative Movement: A ground unit moving by rail,
sea, river, or air transport [11.3] is using administrative movement.
Administrative movement spends the unit’s MP as well as Transport
Points (either its side’s for railroad and sea transport, or the shared amount
for river transport). A unit may use regular movement before and after
administrative movement, and/or take part in multiple administrative
moves if it has enough MP.
11.2.2 – Movement Mode: A ground unit can be put in
movement mode for one turn by placing a “movement
mode” marker on it at the start of its move. This unit:
•
Must be able to trace supply from every hex it
enters during its entire movement.
•
Cannot move into or out of any hex in enemy ZOC.
•
Exerts a Narrow ZOC, if it normally exerts a Narrow or Standard
ZOC.
•
Has its printed MA doubled, before taking weather, command,
and supply effects into account.
•
Defends with half its normal DS if attacked. A unit with a DS of
1 becomes a 0-DS unit, and is eliminated as soon as it is alone in
an enemy ZOC.
Movement mode can be combined with administrative movement.
DESIGN NOTE: Units in movement mode are moving at full speed,
without preparation for combat.
11.2.3 – Overrun: During the Movement Phase, a stack including at
least one armor or mechanized infantry unit may attempt to overrun an
adjacent enemy-occupied hex. The Phasing Side announces the attempt,
and then has every unit in the stack spend one extra MP and attack the
enemy-occupied hex [12.0]. Both offensive and defensive ground support
may be used in overrun attacks. If enemy units remain in the defending
hex after the overrun attack, the overrunning stack’s move is over; if the
hex is empty, the stack may continue moving as long as it has MP left. A
given stack may perform multiple overrun attacks in a Movement Phase
as long as every unit in it has adequate MP remaining to do so. Units that
attempted overrun attacks during the Movement Phase may take part in
regular combat in the following Combat Phase, regardless of the result of
these overruns.
11.2.4 – Defensive Reserve Movement: During the Combat Phase, after
the Phasing Side has declared all its attacks, enemy ground units in a hold©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
15
ing box or stacked on-map with a HQ and under full command of it may
perform defensive reserve movement if:
•
They can reach an attacked hex within their MA; and
•
(For on-map units) The HQ chit of the HQ is not in the
‘Activations Complete’ row of the Activation Track.
The Phasing Side may then cancel any of its attacks or rearrange them,
either by adding activated units adjacent to the attacked hex or having the
declared attacking units target another adjacent hex. Combats are resolved
only after all defensive reserve movements are completed.
11.2.5 – Post-Combat Movement: Units involved in a combat might
have to perform a combat retreat [12.4.1] and/or advance after combat
[12.4.2].
11.3 – TRANSPORT
Ground unit mobility can be greatly increased by using the following transport modes.
11.3.1 – Transport Capacities: Most of the sides have a
certain railroad and sea transport capacity, expressed in
corresponding Transport Points, at their disposal. These
are summarized on the Transport Capacity Table: in each
Admin Phase, the Railroad Transport Point markers of the
various sides are reset to the listed values, while each side
with at least one fleet on map has its Sea Transport Points
marker reset to ‘15’ at the beginning of each of its activations.
The transport air units of the WA also provide them an air
transport capacity. Ground units may use allied Transport
Points if consent is given.
Each river route has a maximum transport capacity per
turn, which is shared by all sides on a “first come, first serve”
basis. The Yangtze river route has a transport capacity of 20
Transport Points per turn, while the Irrawaddy/Chindwin
and West River each have a capacity of 6 Transport Points.
The corresponding markers are reset to these values in each
Admin Phase.
Example: Japan is carrying out the first activation of the Operation
Segment. Some of the activated Japanese units perform a river transport
up the Yangtze River route, using 12 river Transport Points. Only 8 river
Transport Points are left to use (for the four sides) along the Yangtze river
route until the end of the turn.
The Transport Point Requirement Table indicates how many Transport
Points are needed to transport a given unit. A unit uses up the same number of Transport Points in all forms of transport. The players should adjust
the various Transport Point markers on the tracks as they are used.
11.3.2 – Railroad Transport: At any time during its move, a ground unit
may initiate rail transport while in a railroad hex by spending 2 MPs and
the required number of Rail Transport Points. It can then move freely
along this railroad line, entering only connected, friendly/allied railroad
hexes; the railroad section travelled must be linked to a friendly city. The
unit may continue moving after exiting rail transport if it has any MPs left.
WA units cannot use railroad transport along railroad hexes not linked
to a railroad hex in India or Burma, while KMT units cannot use railroad
transport along railroad hexes not linked to a railroad hex in China.
11.3.3 – River Transport: At any time during its move, a ground unit may
initiate river transport while in a hex bordering a river route hexside by
spending 2 MPs and the required number of River Transport Points. The
unit can then move as far as it wants along this river route, travelling the
hexsides. Every hex bordering the travelled river route hexsides must be
friendly (but see below) and the travelled river route must link to a friendly
city or port via a friendly river route. To exit river transport, the unit must
pay the MP cost of its destination hex. When exiting river transport, the
unit is placed in any hex bordering the river route. The unit may continue
moving after exiting river transport if it has any MPs left.
As an exception to the above rule, Japanese escorted river transport allows
ground units to travel along an uncontrolled river route, as long as no
hex bordering the travelled section contains an enemy-controlled KMT
War of the Suns
16
stronghold. This requires a Japanese fleet to perform a river transport
escort mission [17.5.3].
Example: A ground unit exerting a Narrow ZOC cannot attack an adjacent
hex, unless it is stacked with a unit exerting a Standard ZOC.
River transport may be combined with sea transport [11.3.4] to transport
ground units from a port to a hex bordering a friendly river route, or from
a hex bordering a friendly river route to a coastal hex. Both sea and river
Transport Points are used in this case.
A stack of units is cut off if all the adjacent hexes (excluding those which no
unit in the stack can enter) are in enemy ZOC and not occupied by friendly/
allied units which are themselves not cut off. Units attacking cut off units
benefit from a 1-column shift in their favor.
11.3.4 – Sea Transport: At any time during its move, a ground unit in
a naval base or port may initiate sea transport and be transported to any
friendly/allied naval base or port; coastal open hex; or coastal open hex
occupied by enemy units (i.e., an amphibious attack) by spending the
required MPs (see Actions Using MP or Affecting Combat chart under
Terrain Effects Chart) and number of Sea Transport Points. To exit sea
transport, the unit must pay the MP cost of its destination hex; it may
continue moving after exiting sea transport if it has any MPs left.
12.3 – DETERMINING COMBAT RESULTS
Sea transport requires at least one friendly fleet to perform a sea transport
escort mission [17.5.3]. Both the initial and destination sea zones [17.2] of
the sea-transported units must be either the sea zone in which the escorting fleet(s) is located, or sea zone(s) adjacent to the sea zone in which the
escorting fleet(s) is located.
11.3.5 – Air Transport: At any time during its move and within its MA
restrictions (see below), a ground unit in an airbase or city may initiate air
transport and be transported to another hex by spending the required MPs
(see Actions Using MP or Affecting Combat chart under Terrain Effects
Chart).
Air transport requires at least one friendly air unit with enough Payload
remaining to perform an air freight mission [17.5.2]. The destination hex
of the transported unit must be within operational radius of the air unit.
There are three types of air transport:
•
•
•
Airlift: The ground unit uses up half its MA to be transported to a
friendly/allied airbase or city not in enemy ZOC. The other half
of its MA may be used to reach the airbase or city from which it
will be air-transported and/or leave the destination hex to which
it has been airlifted.
Air Drop: Only parachute units may perform air drops. The
ground unit must start the Movement Phase in the same airbase
or city as the transporting air unit, and uses up all its MA. An
air-dropping unit may land in any hex it could enter using normal
movement, even if it is in enemy ZOC.
Glider Landing: Only glider units may perform glider landings.
Glider landing is similar to air drop in all respects, except that the
landing hex must not be a Mountain hex. Some BC units may
receive training to gain glider-landing capability [24.1].
12.0 – COMBAT
Activated and mustered units may attack enemy units during the Guerrilla,
Movement, and Combat Phases. A unit may attack several times during a
given turn, but only once in a given phase (Exception: Overruns [11.2.3]).
Combat is never mandatory; a unit in an enemy ZOC is not forced to attack.
Combat may occur between enemy units in adjacent hexes or in the same hex.
Units stacked in the same hex may attack different hexes separately. An attacking unit may not divide its strength. If an enemy unit is attacked, all enemy
units in the same hex must be attacked in a single combat. A given hex or unit
can be attacked only once in a given phase (Exception: A unit that retreated
during a phase can be attacked later in the same phase if it ended its retreat in a
hex that is itself attacked [12.4.1]).
Non-activated units can never attack.
12.1 – EFFECTS OF TERRAIN ON COMBAT
A ground unit cannot attack a hex it is prohibited from entering. Also, see the
Terrain Effects Chart for the combat effects of the various terrain types.
12.2 – EFFECTS OF ZOCS ON COMBAT
A stack of units may attack a hex only if at least one unit in the stack exerts a
ZOC in that hex. A unit can always defend, even if it doesn’t exert a ZOC in
the hex containing the attacking unit(s).
Add up the total AS of the attacking units and the total DS of the defending
units. Compare these two totals to work out the combat ratio, and apply all
column shifts required by the Ground Combat Results Table to arrive at the
final combat ratio. Each side then rolls 1D6 (representing the performance
variability of the units involved in the battle) and applies all required die roll
modifiers (DRMs) to its respective result. Subtract the defender’s modified
result from the attacker’s modified result to obtain the die roll difference (DR
Diff.). Determine the combat result by cross-referencing the DR Diff. with the
combat ratio on the Ground Combat Results Table. Note that:
•
Units in the same hex as enemy units must take losses (up to their
elimination) before units that are only adjacent to enemy units.
•
Artillery units can take losses only if all friendly/allied units stacked
with them have been eliminated.
12.4 – POST-COMBAT MOVEMENT
12.4.1 – Combat Retreat: When the Ground Combat Results Table requires a retreat, the retreating player must retreat his units by moving them
2 hexes (but without exceeding the printed MA of each unit, and taking
into account the 2 MPs required to leave an enemy ZOC. A unit may only
retreat one hex if there isn’t enough MA to retreat the second hex. Units
from a single stack may retreat to different hexes.
A unit is eliminated if:
•
There is no hex it can retreat to; or
•
It does not have enough MPs to retreat to any hex; or
•
It is forced to retreat off map (Exception: A ground unit may
retreat to a friendly Holding Box and may return from there as
reinforcements in a subsequent Reinforcement Phase); or
•
Its only retreat path leads it to a hex beyond its limited operation
area; or
•
Its only retreat path enters an enemy controlled hex.
Provided it has valid retreat options, a side may always choose to eliminate
at least half the combat strength (AS if attacker, DS if defender) of its
ground units instead of retreating.
A unit retreating to a friendly hex which is attacked later in the same phase
does not take part in the defense but suffers any adverse combat results
inflicted on its side.
Ground units may retreat after combat via sea transport without spending
Transport Points (they still have to spend the 2 MPs required to exit an
enemy ZOC, though, and are eliminated if they cannot) in the following
situations:
•
Units defending in a port or naval base where a fleet (whatever its
status) is based may retreat to a friendly/allied port or naval base
within the same sea zone.
•
Units attacking from a hex that they entered in the immediately
preceding Movement Phase via sea transport may retreat to the
ports or cities they were transported from.
•
Units attacking from a hex that they entered in the immediately
preceding Movement Phase via river transport may retreat to any
friendly port or city linked to this hex via a friendly river route.
•
Units performing an amphibious attack (their landing hex is
occupied by enemy units) must retreat after combat to the ports
they were transported from if the combat result is “Inc” or
“Retreat”.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
12.4.2 – Advance After Combat: After each combat is resolved, any of the
attacking ground units may enter the hex the enemy units were defending
in, if no enemy units remain in the attacked hex. Advance after combat can
be done regardless of the attacking units’ MA or enemy ZOCs.
12.5 – SURRENDER
Ground units may surrender as a result of combat. Surrendering units are
eliminated and placed as normal in the Replacement or NR Pools (Exception:
The BDA unit, see below). Surrenders may have additional repercussions:
•
•
•
•
For each surrendering KMT or CCP unit (including guerrilla
units), place a generic CnC unit [24.6.1] of equivalent SP value
in the Reinforcement Pool. This unit may enter play during the
Reinforcement Phase of the following turn in any Japanese railroad hex
in China.
The total SP value of surrendering CnC units is converted to an
equivalent number of RP of the attacking side (KMT or CCP) and
immediately recorded on the Record Track, for use in the Replacement
and Construction Phase at the end of the turn. As for all RP, they are
lost if not used by the end of the turn they become available.
The total SP value of surrendering BC Indian units is converted to an
equivalent number of RP that Japan must immediately use to replace
INA units in the Replacement Pool at the time the combat is resolved
(any RP not spent are lost). These replaced units will be placed on the
map within 1 hex of any friendly Indian or Burmese city during the
Replacement and Construction Phase at the end of the turn.
PLAY NOTE: As this somewhat differs from the regular replacement procedure, be sure to remember these INA units when the
Replacement and Construction Phase comes.
When it surrenders, the BDA unit is flipped over to its PBF (Patriotic
Burmese Force) WA side and placed in the Reinforcement Pool. It may
enter play during the Reinforcement Phase of the following turn in any
WA railroad hex in Burma.
In addition to a surrender combat result, the following circumstances force a
non-IJA, non-IJN Japanese unit to surrender:
•
It suffers a Retreat combat result when it was not stacked with an IJA
or IJN unit at the beginning of the combat. (Exception: This does not
apply during Anti-Guerrilla Sweeps.)
•
During an enemy activation after Turn 30 (when Japan’s doom became
only a matter of time), it finds itself within an enemy ZOC while
not stacked with an IJA or IJN unit. Causing this surrender does not
prevent enemy units from continuing to move if they have remaining
MP or from attacking in this activation.
13.0 – REPLACEMENTS
Eliminated units in the Replacement Pool can be returned to play via
the replacement process. A unit is replaced during the Replacement and
Construction Phase by spending a number of RP available to the side equal to
the SP value of the unit; additionally, some Chinese units require spending a
number of DEP or FEP equal to their SP value [13.3].
13.1 – REPLACEMENT ABILITIES
The different sides have various abilities to replace units that were eliminated:
•
The WA may replace all WA air and ground units, all CAI units
operating in the IBS theater, and any friendly minor country units.
•
Japan may replace all IJA, IJN, and collaborationist units, and any
friendly minor country units.
•
The CCP may replace all CCP and Vietminh units.
•
The KMT may replace units of all KMT cliques that have not been
dissolved, plus all ROCAF, SVG, and US air units.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
17
13.2 – REPLACEMENT POINTS
In each Admin Phase (and possibly Negotiation Phase and
Replacement and Construction Phase), the KMT and CCP receive a varying number of RP, DEP, and FEP. These amounts are
calculated, based on the current on-map situation, according to
the Replacement Aids instructions; their availability and use are
recorded on the Record Track with the corresponding markers.
The KMT can also receive RP from foreign loans [18.2], while
the CCP can receive RP from the Comintern or from KMT/
Japanese sources [13.3.4].
The General Events Chart lists the number of RP available each
turn to Japan and the WA.
DESIGN NOTE: The WA and Japan receive a fixed number of RP because
their war capacities were largely based on conditions and events beyond the
theater.
13.3 – CHINESE REPLACEMENTS
13.3.1 – Replacement Types: The vast variety of weapons used among the
Chinese units means that different kinds of human and financial resources
— represented by RP — and equipment — represented by Domestic
Equipment Points (DEP) and Foreign Equipment Points (FEP) — are
needed to replace the various Chinese units. The KMT and CCP should
separate all their replaceable non-mechanized and non-artillery ground
units into three types:
•
Elite Units: A unit whose entry turn is printed in WHITE can be
replaced by using a number of RP and FEP each equal to its SP
value.
HISTORICAL NOTE: These units used weapons imported
from Germany, the Soviet Union, or later in the war, the USA.
•
Standard Units: A unit whose entry turn is in a YELLOW box
can be replaced by using a number of RP and DEP each equal to
its SP value.
HISTORICAL NOTE: These units were issued standard weapons assembled in Chinese factories, including the Chinese version
of the Mauser 98k rifle, mortars, and some light artillery.
•
Local Units: A unit whose entry turn is in a GREEN box can be
replaced by using a number of RP equal to its SP value.
HISTORICAL NOTE: These units equipped themselves with
whatever weapons were at hand. Their soldiers never knew
whether their rifles would fire or malfunction when next used —
when they had rifles at all. Some used swords, spears, or antique
firearms from the Manchu Dynasty era.
Elite and standard units can be replaced at reduced strength,
by using only RP. Reduced-strength units have their AS and
DS both reduced by 1 if their printed AS is 4 or less, or by
2 if their printed AS is 5 or more. Place “Reduced” markers
of the correct value on these units. A reduced-strength unit
remains so until:
•
it is eliminated; or
•
the side spends the required EPs in a subsequent Replacement
and Construction Phase to reequip it; or
•
it is improved [21.0].
Elite units replaced by spending full RP and FEP must remain in training
for one complete turn. Mark these units with a “Training” marker [21.3].
13.3.2 – Replacement Process: The KMT and CCP follow the steps
below (the KMT completes all steps, then the CCP completes all the
steps):
1.
Spend FEP and RP to replace elite units; spend FEP to replace air
units.
2.
Spend DEP and RP to replace standard units.
War of the Suns
18
3.
Spend RP to replace local units; spend RP to construct roads,
railroads, or airbases [17.1.2], and to extend river routes [8.3].
4.
Spend DEP or FEP to improve ground units [21.1].
In steps 2-4 above, FEP can be spent as DEP or RP, and DEP can be spent
as RP, but not vice versa.
13.3.3 – KMT Unit Expansion: Many KMT Army unit counters have
two sides: the front, or initial side, is used when these units first become
available. The back, or expanded side, shows the combat strengths and SP
of these units according to the standard TOE established at the Nanyue
Military Conference, at the end of 1938.
•
Yumen Oilfield (western Kansu, off map): Discovered only as a random
event. The side controlling the whole road section leading off map west
through Kansu province from Lanchow (3038) controls this oilfield.
•
Daching Oilfield (Manchukuo): Discovered only as a random event.
Japan controls this oilfield until the end of the game.
13.5 – REPLACEMENT RESTRICTIONS
Replacing a unit always requires spending at least 1 RP, even for a 0-SP unit.
Some specific unit types also have replacement restrictions, as explained
below:
13.5.1 – Non-Replaceable Units: Non-replaceable regular ground units
are designated as “NR” on their counters. When eliminated, these units
are placed into the NR Pool. Eliminated “NR” generic units are simply
removed from the map and available for later use.
From Turn 6 on, during the Replacement and Construction Phase, the
KMT may expand Army units from their initial side to their expanded
side by:
•
replacing an eliminated unit directly on its expanded side; or
•
spending a number of RP (and the same number of DEP or FEP
if necessary [13.3.1]) equal to the difference between the SP
values on the initial and expanded sides. The on-map Army unit
must be in supply and not in an enemy ZOC.
•
combining it with other units of the same clique at the end of a
KMT Movement Phase, if the units are stacked in the same hex.
The total AS, DS, and SP value from the combining units must
all be equal to or greater than the corresponding ratings of the
expanded unit. Remove the units merging with the expanded unit
from the map as if they had been eliminated.
DESIGN NOTE: Non-Replaceable status is due to different reasons.
KMT independent divisions and the British colonial units that faced the
initial Japanese attack were usually absorbed by existing units or disbanded
after they were destroyed. The Army Group level of the KMT military was
abandoned soon after war broke out. Collaborationist and guerrilla units
are dealt with through distinct game systems.
13.5.2 – Air Units: Each side may replace one eliminated or inoperative
air unit per turn, at the following cost:
KMT Replacement Example: It is the Replacement and Construction
Phase of Turn 6, and the KMT has 18 RP, 7 DEP, and 8 FEP.
The KMT uses 6 RP and 6 FEP to replace two 3-SP elite Armies. Then, it
spends 2 RP and 2 FEP to expand one on-map 2-SP elite Army to its 4-SP
side. The KMT is left with 10 (18-8) RP and 7 DEP.
•
KMT or Japanese Sources: At the start of the Replacement and
Construction Phase, the KMT and Japan may transfer any of
their RP to the CCP, as a help or a negotiation tool, for instance.
HISTORICAL NOTE: The CCP received funding from the
KMT until the New 4th Army incident, where the communist
Army was eliminated and disbanded by the KMT.
13.4 – OILFIELDS
Each friendly oilfield generates 1 extra CP and 1 extra FEP (for KMT and
CCP) or RP (for WA and Japan) every turn. There are three oilfields in the
game:
•
Yenangyaung Oilfield (Burma): The WA control this oilfield as long as
Japan does not.
•
KMT: 4 FEP to replace each ROCAF, SVG, or USAAF air unit.
•
KMT: Twice the normal number of RP and FEP.
•
Japan and WA: A number of RP equal to twice the unit’s SP
value.
Mechanized and artillery units cannot be replaced at reduced strength.
13.5.5 – Cavalry Units: Each side may replace one cavalry unit per turn.
The KMT can only replace a cavalry unit if:
Additional RP may also be available from the following sources:
HISTORICAL NOTE: The CCP received some funding from
the Comintern until its dissolution in 1943, and from the Soviet
Union thereafter.
WA: 4 RP to replace each RAF, USAAF, USN, or friendly RTAF
air unit.
13.5.4 – Mechanized and Artillery Units: Each side may replace one
mechanized unit AND one artillery unit per turn, at the following cost:
13.3.4 – Special CCP Replacement Capacity: Once it has replaced its
eliminated units, the CCP can use any remaining RP to build new 1-1-5 or
3-3-5 generic infantry units. These are built by spending a number of RP
equal to their SP value and deploying them within 1 hex of any CCP HQ
on map.
•
13.5.3 – Fleets: All fleets are Non-Replaceable units.
Now, the KMT spends 3 RP to replace a 3-SP local unit. With 3 RP left,
it replaces a 2-SP elite unit at reduced strength by spending 2 RP, and then
spends its last RP on constructing one road in a trail hex.
Comintern: The CCP rolls one die on every Admin Phase. On a
6, it receives 1 RP.
Japan: 4 RP to replace each IJAAF, IJNAF, or friendly RTAF air
unit.
See [17.4.1] for special considerations on Soviet aircraft replacements for
the KMT.
The KMT spends 4 RP and 4 DEP to replace one 4-SP standard unit, then
3 DEP to remove the “Reduced” marker from a 3-SP standard unit that
was previously replaced at reduced strength. The KMT has 6 (10-4) RP
left.
•
•
•
There is at least one KMT regular unit in the home territory of
the clique this cavalry unit belongs to; or
•
The Fu, Yen, Ma, or Sung clique has been assimilated by the
KMT, and there is at least one KMT regular unit in the home
territory of this clique; or
•
There is at least one KMT regular unit in the Jehol or Liaoning
province.
13.6 – CONVERTING CP TO RP
At the start of the Replacement and Construction Phase, Japan and the KMT
may convert any remaining CP to RP usable for replacements. The conversion
rate is the following:
•
Japan: 1 CP = 1 RP
•
KMT: 1 CP = 3 RP
DESIGN NOTE: Japan and China never reached the enlistment percentages
of WWII Germany or the Soviet Union and they could always have brought
more men to war. But such extensive recruitment would have had various
political costs. The CCP and WA cannot benefit from this rule, because
extensive recruitment was the norm for the CCP, and a more systematic
recruitment procedure was in place for the WA.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
14.0 – UNIT DEPLOYMENT
14.1 – DEPLOYMENT ORDER
Follow the order below when sides are deploying their units at the same time:
1.
All KMT non-guerrilla ground units and factory counters.
2.
All CCP and WA non-guerrilla ground units.
3.
All Japanese non-guerrilla ground units.
4.
All CCP and WA guerrilla units and guerrilla bases.
5.
All KMT guerrilla units and guerrilla bases.
6.
Each side secretly writes down on a piece of paper where its HQs, air
units, and fleets are to be deployed. Once this is done, all the sides
simultaneously reveal their deployments.
A unit can set up in enemy ZOC only if its setup instructions specifically
indicate it.
19
Reinforcement Deployment Table
Deployment
Instructions
•
a hex in enemy ZOC; or
•
a hex where they would be judged out of supply during the Supply
Phase; or
•
a hex outside their limited operation area.
14.2.1 – Reinforcement Deployment: Reinforcements are deployed
during the Reinforcement Phase. If no entry hex is available to deploy
reinforcement units, their arrival is delayed until the next Reinforcement
Phase when an entry hex is available. Any reinforcement unit(s) may also
have its arrival voluntarily delayed until a later turn. Alternatively, KMT
and CCP reinforcements may be converted to guerrilla units if the conditions are met [16.3].
Specific Hex
14.2.2 – Replacement Deployment: Replaced units are deployed during
the Replacement and Construction Phase, and cannot be deployed outside
their limited operation area. If on a given turn a unit cannot be deployed
for any reason, it cannot be replaced on this turn.
Refer to the following table to deploy replaced units:
Japanese Ground Units
•
IJA: Any railroad hex in Jehol or Liaoning, or West Pacific
Holding Box.
•
IJN: West Pacific Holding Box.
•
Manchukuo: Any railroad hex in Jehol or Liaoning.
•
Mengkiang and Chinese Collaborators: Initial deployment hex
listed in the Japanese OB for the unit.
•
INA: Within 1 hex of any friendly Indian or Burmese city (also
see [12.5]).
Other Ground Units
•
Unassimilated KMT Cliques: Any hex, within the home territory
of the clique, linked to a friendly supply center of the clique via
friendly/allied railroad or road hexes. No more than three units
can be replaced per turn in each territory.
•
Central Army and assimilated KMT Cliques: Any hex, outside the
home territories of any unassimilated cliques, linked to a supply
center controlled by the Central Government (i.e., marked with
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
OR if this would cause the ASL to be
exceeded, in the closest possible hex
(player’s choice if multiple hexes are
eligible)
Air Unit and
Fleet
In the listed
deployment hex
In a hex of the
listed territory
containing a unit
over which the
HQ has full
command (for
KMT HQ, a hex
containing at least
one unit of the
clique of the HQ)
—
Indian Ocean
Holding Box
May enter the
map via air or
sea transport, or
transport route in
India leading off
map [1.4]
—
Indian Ocean Air
Zone or Sea Zone
West Pacific
Holding Box
May enter the
map via air or sea
transport [1.4]
—
West Pacific Air
Zone or Sea Zone
Any friendly road
or railroad hex in
the listed territory
Specific
Territory
Specific Air
or Sea Zone
OR if no road or
railroad hex is
available, within
1 hex of a friendly
unit in the listed
territory
—
—
Airbase or city in
the listed air zone
(for air units)
Naval base or port
in the listed sea
zone (for fleets)
a “white sun” control marker) via friendly/allied railroad or road
hexes. No more than three units can be replaced per turn in each
territory.
There is no Reinforcement Phase on the first turn of Campaign and
Scenario Games.
Refer to the Reinforcement Deployment Table for reinforcement placement.
HQ
In the listed deployment hex,
14.2 – REINFORCEMENT & REPLACEMENT
DEPLOYMENT
Except for guerrilla units, all reinforcements and replacements must be
deployed in a friendly hex or holding box. Unless otherwise stated, reinforcements (including reorganizing, relocating, demobilizing, and returning units)
and replacements may never be deployed in:
Ground Unit
•
CCP: Within 1 hex of any CCP HQ.
•
BC: Any railroad hex in India, or the Indian Ocean Holding Box.
•
US: Any railroad hex from Ledo (6041) to Dimapur (8644), or
any friendly Holding Box.
•
CAI units in IBS theater: Any railroad hex from Ledo (6041) to
Dimapur (8644).
•
Siam: Within 1 hex of Bangkok (8416).
Air Units
•
IJAAF, ROCAF, SVG, RAF, and USAAF: Friendly airbase or city.
•
IJNAF and USN: West Pacific Holding Box, if it is friendly.
•
RTAF: Bangkok (8416)
15.0 – UNIT BREAKDOWN
Units listed on the Breakdown Chart may break down into their component
units. They may also be identified by their SP value printed on a white background and their counter backs showing their cadre unit. Component units
may later reassemble into the original units. Except for a few of them, most of
the detached component units are generic and can be used interchangeably
if they belong to the same service/clique/dominion. Breaking down or reassembling costs no MP.
War of the Suns
20
15.1 – BREAKDOWN PROCEDURE
A unit may be broken down in the following situations:
•
At the start of a Movement Phase, if it is activated.
•
Just before applying losses suffered in combat.
•
At the start of the Replacement and Construction Phase, if it is in the
Replacement Pool.
B
A
D
Substitute the original unit with the counters of its component units (flip the
original unit over to its cadre side if it is part of its component units, remove
it to the Exchange Pool if not). Note that the total combat strengths and SP
value of the component units may sometimes be less than those of the original
unit.
15.2 – REASSEMBLY PROCEDURE
C
Eligible component units may be reassembled back into their original unit in
the following situations:
•
At the end of a Movement Phase of their side, if they occupy the same
hex.
•
At the start of the Replacement and Construction Phase, if they are in
the Replacement Pool.
F
If a cadre unit is part of the component units, flip it over to its original side
and place the other component units aside for later use. If not, substitute the
component units with the original unit from the Exchange Pool and place
them aside.
E
16.0 – GUERRILLA WARFARE
The CCP, KMT, and WA may use guerrilla warfare. Guerrilla
units:
•
may establish guerrilla bases, from which new guerrilla
units can be recruited.
•
may sabotage transport routes and enemy airbases and
naval bases.
•
may convert to regular units under specific conditions
(KMT and CCP only).
•
may move during the Guerrilla Phase (whether in command or not)
and the Movement Phase (only if in command).
•
cannot use rail, river, sea, or air transport.
16.1 – GUERRILLA BASES
A guerrilla base marker defines a region where villagers equipped with crude
weapons pledge allegiance to a side. This region includes the hex containing
the guerrilla marker and the surrounding area delimited by the nearest roads,
railroads, major river hexsides, and territory borders (exclusive). Any hex
within this area containing a city, port, airbase, naval base, or terrain impassable to an infantry unit is NOT part of the guerrilla base area.
A guerrilla unit may spend 3 MPs in a hex to establish a guerrilla base in a
potential guerrilla base area if:
•
There is currently no friendly guerrilla base in the area; and
•
The hex does not contain any road, railroad, city, port, airbase, or naval
base; and
•
The hex is located in a territory that Japanese units have entered at any
previous point in the game (CCP guerrilla bases on the map on Turn 0
are not affected by this rule).
Each side has its own guerrilla base markers to denote control. KMT and
CCP guerrilla base markers may coexist in the same potential guerrilla base
area, but not in the same hex. A guerrilla base marker itself has no ZOC and
does not block movement.
If there is no guerrilla unit of a given side in a guerrilla base area, this side’s
guerrilla base marker may be removed by:
Guerrilla Base Example
A given side may have up to six Guerrilla Bases (A to F) in Shansi (composed of the Northern and Southern Shansi territories).
•
Any enemy unit that spends an extra 3 MPs in the guerrilla base hex.
•
The 3-Alls Policy random event occurring in the guerrilla base area.
16.2 – GUERRILLA RECRUITMENT
One new guerrilla unit may be recruited at the start of the Guerrilla Phase
from each guerrilla base that meets all the following conditions:
•
There is at least one Japanese unit in the TERRITORY where the
guerrilla base is.
•
The guerrilla base marker hex can be linked to any hex outside the
guerrilla base area through a series of connected hexes that are not
within enemy ZOC.
•
The player who owns the guerrilla base rolls 1D6. Recruitment succeeds on a 1-3 result. Apply a -1 DRM if there is any guerrilla unit of
the side within the guerrilla base area. Apply a DRM of +1 during Fall
turns (harvesting season).
The new guerrilla unit appears in the guerrilla base hex.
If more than one side satisfies the recruitment requirements in the same area,
the CCP always attempts recruitment first. The KMT may only attempt to
recruit guerrillas if the CCP fails.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
16.3 – CONVERTING REGULAR UNITS TO
GUERRILLAS
Some KMT and all CCP regular units may be converted to
guerrilla units. They can be identified by their SP value printed
in white on a black background on their counter and a “G” entry
turn code on their guerrilla unit side. This conversion may occur
at two points in the Sequence of Play:
•
•
During the Reinforcement Phase, if the received regular unit cannot be
deployed within the listed area because it would then be within enemy
ZOC or judged out of supply during the Supply Phase. Flip the unit to
its guerrilla unit side and deploy it within the listed area. (Exception: If
a listed deployment hex contains a road, railroad, city, port, airbase, or
naval base, place the guerrilla unit in any eligible adjacent hex).
At the start of the Movement Phase, when the regular unit is activated
by an HQ with full command over it. Flip the unit to its guerrilla unit
side.
Once converted to a guerrilla unit, a unit can be converted back to a regular
unit through rule 16.4, Point 3.
16.4 – CONVERTING GUERRILLAS TO REGULAR
UNITS
Guerrilla units may be converted to regular units in three ways:
1.
At any time during the Guerrilla Phase, the KMT and CCP may convert guerrilla units occupying the same hex into regular infantry units
from the Replacement Pool and/or regular units that are printed on
the back of the involved guerrilla units, if all the following conditions
are met:
•
The conversion does not result in any increase in total SP.
•
The sum of the AS, DS, and MA of the regular unit(s) cannot
exceed the sum of the AS, DS, and MA of the converting guerrilla
unit(s) (each unit has combined ratings of 8).
•
2.
3.
The conversion takes place in a hex in China (including foreign
colonies in China), and not within enemy ZOC.
Once on map, the regular unit is not activated for the remainder of the
Guerrilla Phase.
During the Guerrilla Phase, the CCP may create, at no cost, any
number of generic CCP 3-3-5 infantry divisions, 2-2-5 infantry
brigades, and 1-1-5 infantry regiments from guerrilla units in hexes
not within enemy ZOC, provided there is no CCP regular unit in the
Replacement Pool and all the involved guerrilla units have no regular
unit printed on their back. A division is created from three CCP guerrilla units stacked together, a brigade is created from two units, and a
regiment is created from one unit. Remove the guerilla unit(s) from the
map and place the new regular unit in the same hex.
When a named guerrilla unit with a regular unit side on its back is
eliminated, its owner may either:
•
Place it in the NR Pool. It may be subsequently used as a newly
recruited guerrilla unit.
•
Flip it to its regular unit side and place it in the Replacement
Pool. It may be subsequently replaced like other regular units.
16.5 – NON-CHINESE GUERRILLA UNITS
21
•
Free Thai (Seri Thai) Guerrilla Units: Under WA control, they are
limited to operations within Siam.
16.6 – ANTI-GUERRILLA WARFARE
16.6.1 – Evading Guerrilla Units: A guerrilla unit may enter evasion mode
at any time while it is activated to move and is within a friendly guerrilla
base area in a hex containing no enemy unit (it can do so even if it does
not move, or several times during the same activation). A generic unit has
its counter flipped to its evading side, while a named unit is marked with
an “evading” marker. Evading guerrilla units have no ZOC and cannot
participate in any combat or sabotage action, but they ignore enemy ZOCs.
An evading guerrilla unit is revealed (its counter is flipped back to its
revealed side or its “evading” marker is removed) if:
•
It participates in any combat or sabotage; or
•
It enters a road or railroad hex; or
•
It becomes unsupported during the Supply Phase (see below); or
•
Its owner decides to do so at the moment an enemy unit enters its
hex, or at any time while the unit is activated.
Example 1: An evading guerrilla unit is revealed to attack an enemy unit in
its hex. The guerrilla unit will not be able to revert to evasion mode until
its next activation, and even so only if the enemy unit has retreated or been
eliminated.
Example 2: A moving evading guerrilla unit enters a railroad hex, thus
causing it to be revealed. It spends an MP to sabotage the railroad and then
leaves the hex, at which point it reverts back to evasion mode.
Example 3: During the Movement Phase, a ground unit enters a hex
occupied by an evading enemy guerrilla unit. The guerrilla unit’s owner
decides to reveal it, thus now exerting a ZOC in the hex. The moving unit
will have to spend extra MPs to be able to exit the hex.
Guerrilla Support: Each guerrilla base area can support a total of two evading guerrilla units. If a guerrilla base area contains more than two of them
during the Supply Phase, the evading units in excess must be revealed. If
all evading units are from the same side, this side is free to choose which
unit(s) to reveal. If the evading units are from different sides, they must
agree upon which unit(s) to reveal; if they cannot, combat occurs. Each
side rolls a number of dice equal to the number of its guerrilla units
(evading or not) in the area. Compare the highest roll of both sides: on a
difference of 3 or more, the side with the lower roll must eliminate one of
its guerrilla units; on a difference of 1 or 2, it must reveal one of its guerrilla units. Repeat this procedure until only two evading guerrilla units are
left in the area, or until guerrilla units from only one side remains.
Example: Two evading CCP guerrilla units, and one evading and one
revealed KMT guerrilla units are in the same guerrilla base area during the
Supply Phase. The area cannot support three evading guerrilla units, and
the sides fail to negotiate. The CCP rolls a ‘2’ and ‘6’, while the KMT rolls
a ‘3’ and ‘4’. The difference is 2 (6 – 4), and the KMT had the lower roll
(‘4’ to ‘6’): it is thus forced to reveal its evading unit.
16.6.2 – Anti-Guerrilla Sweeps: Revealed guerrilla units can be attacked
like regular units during the Combat Phase. Evading guerrilla units can be
attacked during the Combat Phase, but only through anti-guerrilla sweeps.
Follow the procedure below:
1.
Setting up the Sweep: The sweeping units must have started their
activation within, or in a hex adjacent to, the guerrilla base area
they intend to sweep. Units in an anti-guerrilla sweep cannot
move or perform regular combat during their activation. The
guerrilla units targeted by the sweep need not be in the ZOC of
any sweeping units. Mechanized units, artillery units, units in
enemy ZOC, and ground support missions cannot be used in
anti-guerrilla sweeps.
2.
Locating the Guerrillas: The Phasing Side splits its force so that
each sweeping unit targets a specific guerrilla unit in the area. Not
all guerrilla units in the area have to be targeted, and each guerrilla unit can only be targeted once during each Combat Phase
(but it can be targeted by several sweeping units).
Non-Chinese guerrilla units can never be converted to regular units. Each of
the following guerrilla movements can have a maximum of two guerrilla units
on the map:
•
Vietminh Guerrilla Units: Under CCP control, they are limited to
operations within Indochina.
•
Kachin Guerrilla Units: Under WA control, they are limited to operations within the Kachin state in Northern Burma and the Yunnan
Province west of the Salween River.
HISTORICAL NOTE: The Kachin Rangers were under US command, as part of OSS Detachment 101.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
22
3.
The Phasing Side rolls 1D6 for each targeted guerrilla unit in
the area to determine whether it locates it. A result less than the
total SP value of all units targeting the guerrilla unit is a success;
flip the located guerrilla unit to its revealed side. Apply a -1
DRM if the Japanese NCSDF unit (red unit designation on its
counter) is involved. Apply a +1 DRM for “Green Veil” effects
during Summer turns in affected territories (see Territories Table).
Regardless of DRMs, a ‘1’ roll is always a success, and a ‘6’ roll is
always a failure.
After the Phasing Side has completed all its location rolls in a
given area, the guerrilla side may designate any non-targeted units
(which remain in their hexes) in the area to assist in the defense of
any of the located units.
Fighting the Guerrillas: If the location roll is a success, compare
the total AS of the sweeping units targeting the guerrilla unit with
the total DS of the located guerrilla unit and the guerrilla units
assisting in its defense. The guerrilla unit is considered to defend
in the hex offering the best defensive combat effects within
the area (defensive combat effects from hexside features – e.g.,
rivers – are ignored). Hill or Mountain hexes always provide a
2-column shift in favor of the guerrilla units. Apply any DRM
and consult the Ground Combat Results Table as usual.
Ignore all AR results. For DR results, the located guerrilla unit
reverts back to evasion mode, then moves to any hex within an
adjacent existing or potential guerrilla base area (as defined in
16.1). This does not cost any MP. A guerrilla unit cannot retreat
through a road or railroad hex in enemy ZOC, since it would
have to reveal itself. A guerrilla unit is eliminated if there is no
area it can retreat to. Whatever its results, an anti-guerrilla sweep
never triggers advance after combat.
A retreated guerrilla unit cannot participate in the defense of
the area to which it retreats if that area is attacked in the SAME
Combat Phase; any such further combat has no effects on it.
DESIGN NOTE: Although represented by a 1-SP counter, guerrilla
units were normally split into much smaller groups that operated within
a broad area instead of staying in one particular spot. This rule represents
the sweeping units spending time searching for and attacking the many
guerrilla groups constituting the guerrilla unit.
Anti-Guerrilla Sweep Example
Three CCP guerrilla bases are taken into consideration: the base in western Hopeh (0925) with one guerrilla unit, the base in northeastern Shansi (1027) with
one unit, and the one in Pinghsing Pass (1227) with two units. (The guerrilla unit west of the Tatung-Taiyuan railroad belongs to another guerrilla base not
shown here.)
Japan activates the 10th Army HQ in Shihkiachwang, which in turn activates the 21 (Division) in Paoting and the 5-5-5 Brigade in Shihkiachwang to attempt
to locate the guerrilla unit in Hopeh. The other Japanese units are not bordering the western Hopeh guerrilla base area and so cannot be used in this antiguerrilla sweep.
The 33 (Division) in Taiyuan is also activated to attempt to locate one of the guerrilla units south of the Pingshing Pass. The CnC unit in Tatung is out of
command, but if mustered, it could contribute its 1-SP value to
locate the evading guerrilla unit in northeastern Shansi or the
one near Ningwu. Its AS of ‘0’ would prevent it from participating in an attack though, and since there is no Japanese unit
with an AS of 1 or more adjacent to these two guerrilla base
areas, there would be no combat even if a guerrilla unit were
located.
Western Hopeh Guerrilla Base: The IJA has 5 SP performing
the anti-guerrilla sweep. Japan rolls a 2. Despite the +1 “Green
Veil” DRM, the sweep is still successful (3 is less than the 5-SP
total value) and the guerrilla unit is flipped to its revealed side.
The 13–1 combat ratio is reduced to 11–1 due to Hill terrain
in the area, and resolved on the 9–1 column of the Ground
Combat Results Table. The Japanese roll is a 1 and the CCP
roll is a 2, yielding a DR Diff. of 1. The CCP guerrilla unit is
eliminated. Note that the guerrilla base marker is not removed
by combat.
Pinghsing Pass Guerrilla Base: Japan has 3 SP performing the
anti-guerrilla sweep. The Japanese roll is a 2, +1 for “Green
Veil”. The guerrilla unit is not located (3 is not less than the
3-SP total value). On a Fall turn, the sweep would have located
the guerrillas.
Let’s say the Japanese rolled a 1 instead: the guerrilla unit is located. The CCP decides to add the non-targeted guerrilla unit
to the defense. An ‘8’ AS against a ‘2’ DS results in a 4–1 ratio,
reduced to 2–1 due to Level-2 terrain in the area. Both sides
roll one die, resulting in a 2 DR Diff. An “Inc” result means
that the CCP must lose half its total combat strength; one
guerrilla unit (‘1’ DS) is eliminated. Japan must lose at least 1
AS point; the 33D is broken down into its 4-5-5 cadre side and
one 3-3-5 regiment, which is eliminated. The Japanese suffered
heavy losses, but the remaining guerrilla unit is now revealed:
it would be easy to deal with in regular combat, if the Japanese
could activate again before it reverts to evasion mode...
HISTORICAL NOTE: This example is a reenactment of
the Imperial Japanese Army “security operation” in Northern
China during the Summer of 1941.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
17.0 – AIR AND NAVAL OPERATIONS
17.1 – BASES AND PORTS
Airbases and naval bases are the two types of bases found in War
of the Suns.
Bases existing at the start of Turn 0 are printed on the map (they
are also listed in the Playbook). Bases built during the game
should be denoted with airbase or naval base markers.
17.1.1 – Base/Port Capacity: Airbases in a city have an
unlimited air unit capacity. Airbases not in a city and cities
without airbases have a capacity of one air unit. Carrier
groups have a capacity of two ( Japanese) or four (American)
carrier-based air units. Naval bases have an unlimited fleet capacity. Ports
have a capacity of one fleet.
17.1.2 – Base Construction: A new airbase may be built in any friendly/
allied city, road, or railroad hex, for the same cost as the construction of
a road in the hex [8.3.1]. Japan or the WA may convert a friendly commercial port to a naval base by spending 2 RP. Naval bases cannot be built
in non-port hexes.
Bases may also be built by engineer units [24.10].
17.1.3 – Base Damage: A base can be damaged (mark it
with a “damaged airbase” or “damaged naval base” marker)
until the following Admin Phase by:
•
Enemy air units or fleets successfully bombing/
bombarding it.
•
Any ground unit spending 2 extra MPs in the hex.
•
The Scorched Earth Policy random event happening in the hex.
17.1.4 – Base/Port Capture: When the enemy captures a base, city, or
port of a given side, this side must immediately relocate all the operative
air units and fleets in it. Air units must relocate to other airbases or cities
within the same air zone, while fleets must relocate to other naval bases or
ports within the same sea zone. Ready (only) air units/fleets may spend
one mission to redeploy to an adjacent air/sea zone instead. All inoperative
air units/fleets, and any air units/fleets that cannot relocate or redeploy to
a friendly/allied base/city/port are eliminated.
PLAY NOTE: Remember that as soon as a ground unit exerting a
Standard ZOC enters a hex adjacent to an enemy base, city, or port where
there is no enemy ground unit, the base/city/port is captured!
17.1.5 – Carrier Groups: Carrier groups are fleets serving as airbases
for carrier-based air units. Carrier groups include the Japanese Carrier
Division — starting the campaign game in naval bases of the off-map West
Pacific sea zone — and the US 3rd and 7th Fleets — made available by the
US Amphibious Landings alternate history [25.9].
23
17.2 – ZONES AND DEPLOYMENT
The War of the Suns map includes various air and sea zones, whose adjacency
relationships are depicted below:
Indian Ocean
Air Zone
(off map)
Indian Ocean
Sea Zone
(off map)
When launching its air units on an offensive mission (fighter escort,
strategic bombing, or offensive ground support), a carrier group may
move within its sea zone or to an adjacent sea zone before launch. Air
units on a defensive mission (interdiction or defensive ground support)
can be launched only from a hex of the sea zone where the carrier group is
currently situated.
DESIGN NOTE: Carrier groups effectively extend the range of their air
units. A carrier group in the South Sea zone could indeed launch offensive
ground support missions against any coastal areas of the map.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
Bay of Bengal
Sea Zone
China-Indochina
Air Zone
South Sea
Sea Zone
West Pacific
Air Zone
(off map)
Yellow Sea
Sea Zone
West Pacific
Sea Zone
(off map)
NOTE: For game purpose, the Gulf of Thailand (the sea hexes around
Bangkok) is considered to be part of the Bay of Bengal.
During the Redeployment Phase, the Phasing Side may decide to redeploy its
air units and fleets in ready status. Air units can only be deployed to friendly/
allied airbases or cities, and fleets can only be deployed to friendly/allied naval
bases or ports. Redeployment within the same air/sea zone is free; redeployment from an air/sea zone to an adjacent zone requires air units/fleets to
spend one mission.
The KMT controls all non-Japanese air units in the CIC theater, while the
WA controls all non-Japanese air units in the IBS theater. No units other than
US air units may be redeployed between the CIC and IBS theaters. The units
are controlled by the player that controls that theater.
17.3 – STATUS
At any given time, an air unit or fleet always has one of the following statuses:
•
Ready: The unit/fleet is available to perform a mission during the turn.
Once its mission is over, whether successful or not, the unit changes to
unready status. During the Redeployment Phase, only ready air units/
fleets may be redeployed by the Phasing Side.
•
Unready: The unit/fleet has completed a mission during this turn. Its
counter is flipped to its unready side. Unready air units/fleets revert to
ready status during the Admin Phase of the following turn.
Ready and unready air units/fleets are operative units.
•
Inoperative: The unit/fleet suffered damage in combat
and is unavailable to perform any mission until repairs
have been completed. Place “inoperative” markers above
affected units/fleets. Inoperative units/fleets change to
unready status during the Admin Phase of the following
turn. A side may choose to replace inoperative air units
during the Replacement and Construction Phase so that they will be
ready on the following turn. This is performed exactly the same way as
replacing units from the replacement pool.
•
Eliminated: The unit/fleet (including its pilots, for air units) has been
wiped out in combat. It is removed from play and placed into the
Replacement Pool (for air units) or NR Pool (for fleets).
Land-based air units can never land on carrier groups, and carrier-based air
units can never land on land airbases.
When a carrier group is in an on-map sea zone [17.2], the owning side
must specify any one hex of the zone as being the hex in which the carrier
group is located when it launches its air units. When a carrier group is in
an off-map sea zone, its air units are considered to be launching from the
corresponding off-map air zone (West Pacific or Indian Ocean).
India-BurmaSiam Air Zone
During the Admin Phase, unready air units/fleets of all sides become ready,
then inoperative air units/fleets of all sides become unready.
17.4 – REEQUIPPING AIR UNITS
On the turn when an OB lists the availability of a new aircraft model and
afterwards, this side may decide to re-equip any of its air unit counters of the
eligible air force with the new aircraft model. Air units can be reequipped
whether they are on map (in ready or unready status) or in the Replacement
Pool. This takes place during the Admin Phase, after the Air Unit and Fleet
Status Update. Replace all reequipping air unit counters with counters of the
new model, in unready status for on-map units.
War of the Suns
24
Note that an air unit equipped with a given aircraft type may be changed to a
different type (e.g., a unit equipped with heavy bombers may reequip to light
bombers, or fighters).
17.4.1 – Soviet Leftovers: On Turn 11, the two SVG air units in the game
(equipped with I-16 fighters and SB light bombers) are relocated to the
Soviet Union. Move their counters to the NR Pool if they are on map, or
remove them from the game if they are in the Replacement Pool.
From then on, Soviet planes are no longer available to the ROCAF, except
for the leftover SVG counters in the NR Pool. Soviet-equipped ROCAF
air units in the Replacement Pool can only be replaced if a leftover counter
of the same aircraft model is in the NR Pool. Such a replacement costs no
FEP. Also, any ROCAF air unit can reequip with the aircraft model of a
leftover counter in the NR Pool. Both of these actions cause the permanent
removal of the leftover counter from the NR Pool.
Once no leftover counter is in the NR Pool, any eliminated Sovietequipped ROCAF air unit cannot be replaced; it must first be reequipped
in the Replacement Pool with another aircraft model.
Example 1: An I-15-equipped ROCAF air unit is eliminated during Turn
12 and is placed in the Replacement Pool, while the SB-equipped SVG
counter is in the NR Pool. During the Admin Phase of Turn 13, the KMT
player decides to reequip its I-15 ROCAF unit with the SBs of the leftover
counter in the NR Pool and replaces the I-15 ROCAF counter with a SB
ROCAF counter. On a subsequent Replacement Phase, he places the SBequipped ROCAF air unit back on the map, at no FEP cost, and removes
the SB SVG counter from the NR Pool. A unit in the Replacement Pool
can be re-equipped and replaced to the map using a single leftover counter
from the NR Pool.
Example 2: A ROCAF air unit equipped with Hawk IIIs (a US aircraft
model) is on the map. During the Admin Phase, the KMT player decides
to reequip it with the I-16s of the leftover counter is the NR Pool: he
replaces the Hawk III ROCAF counter with a I-16 ROCAF counter (in
unready status) and removes the I-16 SVG counter from the NR Pool.
HISTORICAL NOTE: When the SVG left China in the Spring of 1940,
all its aircraft were left behind to serve as ROCAF replacements.
17.5 – MISSIONS
Each air unit/fleet may perform only ONE mission per turn (Exception: An
air unit can perform multiple air freight missions [17.5.2]).
•
•
Air Missions: An air unit must be of the right aircraft
type for the mission if one type is specified. The range
an air unit can fly over the course of a mission is double
its operational range. The operational range of any air
unit may be doubled on any mission by adding extra fuel
tanks, but the Air AS, Surface AS, and payload capacity
of the unit are halved for the duration of the mission. Place a “Drop
tank” marker on affected units as a reminder. After its mission, an air
unit does not have to return to the airbase from which it took off; it
may land on any friendly/allied airbase or city.
Air Mission Range Example: An I-16 fighter unit with a ‘7’ operational
range may fly six hexes to its target, then eight more hexes to another
airbase or city where it lands (6 + 8 = 14, which is not more than its
range of 14 — double its operational range).
Increased Air Mission Range Example: A Japanese Ki-21 heavy
bomber unit may double its operational range, increasing its range to
46 but decreasing its Air AS to 3, its Surface AS to 5 and its payload
capacity to 1.
Naval Missions: A fleet may perform missions in the sea zone in which
it is located or in an adjacent sea zone. After completing its mission,
the fleet must return to a friendly/allied naval base or port in either its
original sea zone or the sea zone in which it just operated.
Air units/fleets may operate directly from off-map zones. When in the West
Pacific zone, they are considered to take off/operate from any hex along the
right map edge; when in the Indian Ocean zone, air units may take off from
any India or Bay of Bengal hex along the left map edge, while fleets may operate from any Bay of Bengal hex along the left map edge.
Enemy missions during a friendly activation are announced by the enemy
AFTER all air and sea missions of the Phasing Side are confirmed, and before
any mission is resolved. Exception: During the Movement Phase, the Phasing
Side announces each of its air freight [17.5.2] and transport escort [17.5.3]
missions as it resolves it. Any air or sea interdiction missions [17.5.7] targeting
such a mission must be declared right after the Phasing Side announces its
mission.
Each of the following mission descriptions indicates whether it can be
performed by air units (“AIR”) and/or fleets (“NAVAL”).
17.5.1 – Redeployment (AIR / NAVAL): During the Redeployment
Phase, the Phasing Side may freely redeploy its ready air units between
friendly/allied airbases or cities, or its ready fleets between naval bases or
ports, within the same air or sea zone; this does NOT constitute a mission.
It may also redeploy them between adjacent zones, but this constitutes a
mission.
Only US air units may be redeployed between the CIC and IBS theaters.
No units other than US air units may be redeployed between the CIC and
IBS theaters.
When a carrier group redeploys, the air units it carries do not lose their
ability to perform their air mission for the turn.
17.5.2 – Air Freight (AIR): Air freight missions may be
carried out by transport (T) or heavy bomber (HB) air units
of the Phasing Side during the Movement Phase; they are
necessary to allow ground units to use air transport [11.3.5].
Air units on an air freight mission use their Payload Capacity
to either transport or supply ground units (Exception: Heavy bomber
units can only supply ground units, NOT transport them). Payload capacity is the yellow circled number on transports or “2” on all heavy bombers.
As a unit uses its Payload Capacity, track it with “Payload remaining”
markers. A unit performing air freight missions becomes unready after
it has spent its last Payload. However, even though it is not technically
unready yet, a unit with a “Payload remaining” marker cannot perform
missions other than air freight. (It can redeploy within the same air zone,
though, as this does not constitute a mission.)
AIR TRANSPORT — 1 Payload allows an air unit to transport 1 SP of
friendly/allied ground foot units from a friendly/allied airbase or city it
is in to a destination hex within operational radius of this airbase or city
[11.3.5]. Ground units transported by the same air unit do not need to
have the same destination hex, as long as each destination hex is within
operational radius of the airbase or city of origin. A side’s air units may be
used to transport allied ground units if both sides agree.
AIR SUPPLY — 1 Payload allows an air unit to supply out of supply
ground units totaling an air supply value of 1. Ground units in different
hexes can be supplied by a single air unit if each hex is within operational
radius of its airbase or city of origin.
A ground unit has an air supply value equal to its SP value (Exception: A
0-SP unit has a value of 1), modified by the following, cumulative conditions:
•
Double the value if the unit is a mechanized or artillery unit.
•
Halve the value if the unit is in an airbase or city hex.
•
Double the value if the unit is in a Hill or Mountain hex with no
airbase and city.
•
Double the value if the unit is in an enemy ZOC.
Example: A C-47 air unit can use 5 of its 6 Payload Capacity to supply a
3-SP BC infantry division in an open hex (air supply value of 3) and two
1-SP tank brigades in an airbase hex (air supply value of 2 x (1 x 2 x 1/2) =
2) if all are within its range.
If the infantry division had been in a Hill hex, it would have required the
whole Payload of the C-47 unit to supply it (air supply value of 3 x 2 = 6).
If it had also been in an enemy ZOC, it would have required the whole
Payload of two C-47 units to supply it (air supply value of 3 x 2 x 2 = 12).
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
25
17.5.3 – Transport Escort (NAVAL): Sea and river transport escort missions are necessary to allow ground units to use sea transport [11.3.4] and
escorted river transport [11.3.3], respectively; they can be freely performed
and do not count as a fleet’s one allowed mission per turn. The escorting
fleet counters move to the landing hex where enemy air units on sea
interdiction mission [17.5.7] may attack them. The escorting fleets must
return to their original ports or naval bases after their mission.
SEA TRANSPORT ESCORT — For a ground unit in a naval base or port
to initiate sea transport [11.3.4], at least one friendly fleet must perform
a sea transport escort mission. The side must specify which of its fleets are
escorting the transport. Both the initial and destination sea zones of the
sea-transported units must be either the sea zone in which the escorting
fleet(s) is located, or sea zone(s) adjacent to the sea zone in which the
escorting fleet(s) is located.
and can only fire at bomber air units targeting it when attacked in
air-to-sea combat. On an “R” result, redeploy the defending fleet
to another naval base in the same sea zone (or to an adjacent sea
zone, if the fleet was ready and decides to become unready to do
so). On an “I” result, the fleet becomes inoperative in the targeted
base. Fleets in the attacked base can only redeploy if allowed by an
“R” result. Once the air-to-sea/naval combat is over, surviving air
units/fleets of the strategic bombing/bombardment mission may
bomb the naval base. A naval base that gets hit is marked with a
“damaged naval base” marker; its capacity is reduced to one fleet
and all inoperative fleets at the naval base are eliminated. Then,
fleets that did not redeploy and now exceed the reduced capacity
are eliminated.
•
Road/Railroad/Bridge: The road/railroad in the target hex and all
bridge hexsides of the target hex are considered as two separate
targets. If hit, mark the hex with appropriate “damaged road”,
“damaged railroad”, and/or “damaged bridge” markers. Strategic
bombing/bombardment missions cannot target roads/railroads
in city hexes nor bridge hexsides of such hexes. See [8.4.1] and
[8.4.2] for damage effects on road, railroad, and bridges.
•
Factories: Factories on their inoperative side cannot be targeted
by strategic bombing/bombardment missions. Each DEP of the
operative factories (whatever the combination of counters) in the
targeted hex is a single target. A DEP that gets hit is destroyed
and removed from play. Immediately record any DEP loss on the
Record Track.
Example: A Japanese fleet located in Canton (South Sea) would allow sea
transport from the West Pacific zone to the Bay of Bengal zone.
RIVER TRANSPORT ESCORT — Japanese ground units may use river
transport along an uncontrolled river route [11.3.3] if at least one of the
Japanese 3rd, 4th and 5th fleets performs a river transport escort mission.
The fleet must start the Movement Phase in the sea zone the river route
flows into.
17.5.4 – Fighter Escort (AIR): Fighter escort missions may be carried
out by fighter air units. Their role is to protect from enemy interdiction
friendly air units carrying out their missions, and to engage escaping enemy
air units when enemy airbases are bombed.
17.5.5 – Strategic Bombing (AIR) / Bombardment (NAVAL): Strategic
bombing and bombardment aim to undermine another side’s ability to
wage war. These missions may be carried out during the Strategic Warfare
Phase by air units with a Surface AS higher than 0 and by fleets. A strategic
bombing/bombardment mission attacks a specified hex, which must be
a coastal hex for bombardment missions. For each attacking unit/fleet,
designate a strategic target in the hex, roll 1D6, apply any appropriate
DRMs, and cross-reference on the Strategic Bombing/Bombardment
Table the modified roll with the Surface AS of the unit/fleet to get the
result. If a Hit is scored, the unit/fleet may attack another target in the
hex; it may continue to attack in this way until it fails to get a hit or there
are no targets left. A -1 DRM applies when the target type is different from
the type of the previous target in the same mission.
The five types of strategic targets, as well as the effects of hits against them,
are as follows:
•
City/Oilfield/Supply Center: These are considered as a single
target. A city/oilfield/supply center that gets hit is marked with a
“damaged” marker and generates no CP, FEP, or RP for the side
controlling it in the following Admin Phase. Also, a “damaged”
supply center ceases to be a valid supply source [10.2.1].
•
Airbase: Ready and unready enemy air units on the attacked
base may redeploy. Redeployment is not automatic if the base
is attacked by a strategic bombing mission with a fighter escort
mission. In this case, resolve air-to-air combat [17.6] between the
escorting fighter units and the defending (redeploying) air units;
unready units cannot fire back. On a “–” result, the defending air
unit may redeploy to another airbase or city in the same air zone
(or to an adjacent air zone, if the unit was ready and decides to become unready to do so). On an “R” result, the unit must redeploy.
On an “I” result, the unit becomes inoperative on the targeted
base. Once the air-to-air combat is over, any surviving eligible air
units of the strategic bombing mission may bomb the airbase. An
airbase that gets hit is marked with an “airbase damaged” marker;
its capacity is reduced to one air unit and all inoperative air units
at the airbase are eliminated. Then, air units that did not redeploy
and now exceed the reduced capacity are eliminated.
•
Naval Base: The air units/fleets of the strategic bombing/
bombardment mission may attack ready and unready enemy
fleets in the targeted base. Use the Air and Sea Attack Table to
resolve the air-to-sea/naval combat [17.6]; unready fleets cannot
fire back. A defending fleet is considered to have a Speed of zero
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
Example: A Japanese G4M heavy bomber air unit performs a strategic
bombing mission against the city of Chungking (4127). It has a Surface
AS of 10, unmodified by weather, and ground anti-aircraft fire is ineffective. The Strategic Bombing/Bombardment Table “9–12” column
shows that a die roll of 4-6 will hit. Japan decides to target the factories
in the hex, represented by a single 2-DEP factory counter. He rolls a
6, scoring an automatic hit and eliminating 1 DEP, then targets the
remaining DEP and rolls a 4, eliminating it as well. He now targets the
city/supply center and again rolls a 4, but the -1 DRM results in a miss.
The strategic bombing mission is over.
17.5.6 – Ground Support (AIR / NAVAL): Ground support missions
may be carried out during the Combat Phase by air units with a Surface AS
greater than 0 and fleets. Before a combat is resolved, a side may announce
a ground support mission comprising any number of air units within
range of a ground combat involving its units, and/or any number of fleets
if any enemy unit involved in the combat occupies a coastal hex. If a side’s
ground units are attacking, its fleets performing ground support may come
from the sea zone containing the coastal hex or from an adjacent sea zone;
if they are defending, its fleets must be located in the same sea zone as the
coastal hex. Offensive ground support assists the Phasing Side’s ground
attack, while defensive ground support assists the side targeted by the
ground attack.
After any potential air and sea combat has been resolved [17.6], compare
the total Surface AS of all remaining air units and fleets that both sides
have in ground support. Subtract the smaller total from the larger total to
get the net ground support value; for every 5 full points of this value (do
not apply the rounding rules), the side with the higher total Surface AS
gets to add a +1 DRM to its roll on the Ground Combat Results Table.
Example: A side assigns two air units and a fleet to offensive ground
support; all three each have a Surface AS of 6. The opposing side assigns
one 4-Surface AS air unit to defensive ground support. If no weather or
random event effects apply and all survive air and sea combat, the net
ground support value is (6x3)-4 = 14, which results in a +2 DRM on the
Ground Combat Results Table for the attacking side.
Units belonging to different air forces on the same side (e.g., IJAAF and
IJNAF) cannot participate in the same ground support mission. This
restriction does not apply to other air missions.
A fleet on a ground support mission is considered to be in any coastal hex
containing an enemy unit involved in the ground combat; enemy air units
on sea interdiction missions [17.5.7] may attack the fleet in this hex.
26
War of the Suns
Comprehensive Air-Sea-Ground Combat Example
The KMT has just activated the Chen C. HQ in Nanking (not pictured), and decides to gather units from around the Kiangsu province to attack Shanghai.
Japan responds by moving the SNLF unit from the West Pacific Holding Box to Shanghai as a defensive reserve movement.
The KMT declares his air missions and sends the entire ROCAF into the combat, the Gamma 2E bomber air unit performing an offensive ground support
mission while the Hawk II and III fighter air units escort it. Japan decides to engage its air units in the West Pacific Holding Box, launching them from the east
map edge and having them fly 5 hexes to Shanghai. The A5M fighter air unit and the A2N fighter air unit from the Carrier Division will perform an air interdiction mission, while the D1A, B4Y, and G3M bomber air units are on a defensive ground support mission. Finally, the IJN 3rd Fleet deployed in Shanghai will
perform a defensive ground support mission.
In Fighters vs. Fighters combat, the A5M air unit fires first (due to its higher Speed of 8) and targets the Hawk III air unit. On the ‘+2’ (6 - 4) strength difference
column of the Air and Sea Attack Table, a dice roll of ‘8’ (‘4’ and ‘4’) gives an ‘E’ result. The Hawk III air unit is eliminated and placed in the Replacement Pool,
without a chance to fire back. Next to fire is the Hawk II air unit (Speed of 7); it can only target the slower A2N. The dice roll results in a ‘6’ (‘5’ and ‘1’), modified to ‘5’ for firing ROCAF units. The ‘0’ (3 - 3) column shows ‘–’, no effect. The A2N air unit may now fire at the Hawk II air unit (only possible because the
Hawk unit targeted it first). The strength difference is ‘0’, while the dice roll is a ‘7’ (‘5’ and ‘2’), giving an ‘I’ result: the Hawk II air unit becomes inoperative and
must return to base.
The surviving fighter air units may now attack the bomber air unit. The A5M air unit fires at the Gamma 2E air unit. This is a +3 strength difference (6 - 3) shot,
with a dice roll of ‘3’ (‘1’ and ‘2’), for no effect. The lucky Gamma air unit gets through on its ground support mission, but as this is a Summer turn, the possible
effects of Typhoon have to be checked: a roll of ‘2’ halves the Surface AS of the Gamma air unit, which can only provide 2 points of ground support. (Note that
if the Gamma air unit had been on a sea interdiction mission instead of a ground support mission, it would have attacked the IJN 3rd Fleet in Shanghai.)
Japan now computes its total Surface AS on defensive ground support. Japan rolls a ‘6’, ‘3’, and ‘2’ to determine the effects of Typhoon on its B4Y, D1A, and
G3M air units respectively. The B4Y air unit is unaffected, but the D1A air unit has its Surface AS halved to 4 and the G3M air unit has its own halved to 0.5,
rounded up to 1. The 3rd Fleet also has its Surface AS halved to 2 due to a ‘3’ Typhoon roll. Japan thus has a ground support strength of 15 (8 + 4 + 1 + 2) in
Shanghai. The ground support difference is 13 (15 - 2), or a +2 DRM for Japan in the upcoming ground combat.
The total AS of the KMT ground units is 12 (4 + 4 + 2 + 1 + 1; the 10 (Artillery) unit uses its Special Attack AS because it is attacking a city hex and the AmR
tank unit provides its antipersonnel strength of ‘1’ because the defenders include no tank or mechanized infantry units). Note that, had the Chen C. HQ not
been stacked with the Chiang K.S. GHQ, the Ho clique units would have had their AS halved due to the Chen-Ho rivalry [9.5.4]. The two IJN units have a
total DS of 3 (2 + 1). The initial combat ratio is 12:3, or 4–1. However, the Japanese units are defending in Major City terrain, and thus benefit from a 2-column
shift (see Terrain Effects Chart) on the Ground Combat Results Table: the final ratio is 2–1.
The KMT rolls a ‘4’, modified to a ‘5’ because the German military advisor Falkenhausen is stacked with the Chen C. HQ in Nanking. Japan rolls a ‘5’, modified
to a ‘7’ by ground support. The DR Diff. is ‘-2’ (5 – 7), giving an “Inc” result on the 2–1 column. Japan must eliminate ground units whose cumulated DS equals
at least half its total DS for the combat, or 2 (3 / 2, rounded up); it removes the ShSNLF unit from the map and places it in the Replacement Pool. The KMT
also has to eliminate ground units whose cumulated AS equals at least 2. The 20i brigade unit must be eliminated first, since it is in the same hex as the enemy
units; in addition, the KMT decides to eliminate the AM tank regiment unit (artillery units can only take losses if all friendly/allied units stacked with them
have been eliminated).
The surviving bomber air units return to their respective airbases or cities, while the 3rd Fleet remains in its naval base in Shanghai. The factory in Shanghai is
now alone in a Japanese ZOC and is thus eliminated.
HISTORICAL NOTE: This example is a
reenactment of the KMT attack on Shanghai in
August 1937.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
River Naval Ground Support: The Japanese 3rd, 4th and 5th Fleets can
also perform ground support against enemy units in a hex bordering a
river route, provided that there is an uninterrupted river route between
their deployment hex and the enemy unit, even an uncontrolled one, not
bordered by any hex containing an enemy-controlled KMT stronghold.
If the Japanese ground units are attacking, the fleets may come from the
sea zone the river route flows into or from an adjacent sea zone; if they are
defending, the fleets must be located in the sea zone the river route flows
into. When performing ground support along a river route, these Japanese
fleets use their Surface AS on river routes.
17.5.7 – Interdiction (AIR):Interdiction missions are announced after
an opposing side has announced its missions. There are two kinds of
interdiction:
•
•
Air Interdiction: Air interdiction missions may be carried out
during any phase by ready fighter air units whose ranges allow
them to reach the hex targeted by an enemy air mission. Airtransported ground units are eliminated if the air units transporting them are eliminated; they are returned to their airbases or
cities of origin, with at least half their total DS eliminated, if the
transporting air units suffer a “I” result; and they are returned to
their airbases or cities of origin if the transporting air units suffer
a “R” combat result. Redeploying air units cannot be the target of
air interdiction missions.
Sea Interdiction: Sea interdiction missions may be carried out during any phase by ready bomber air units whose ranges allow them
to reach the hex targeted by an enemy naval mission (or the hex
in which the fleet is deployed, for sea blockade missions). Sea- or
river-transported ground units are eliminated if the fleets escorting them are eliminated; they are returned to their naval bases or
ports of origin, with at least half their total DS eliminated, if the
escorting fleets suffer a “I” combat result; and they are returned
to their naval bases or ports of origin if the escorting fleets suffer a
“R” combat result. Redeploying fleets cannot be the target of sea
interdiction missions.
PLAY NOTE: Ground units on unescorted river transport cannot be
interdicted; it is assumed that without an escorting fleet, the small civilian
vessels doing most of the transport are less conspicuous.
17.5.8 – Sea Blockade (NAVAL): During the Strategic
Warfare Phase, each Japanese fleet may blockade all ports
in China within 6 hexes of the hex where it is deployed to
reduce the RP and FEP contributed to the KMT. Place
a “sea blockade” marker on every affected port. See the
Replacement Aids for details.
17.6 – AIR/NAVAL COMBAT SEQUENCE
A combat involving air units and/or fleets is resolved by following step-by-step
the sequence below. Only perform the steps relevant to the mix of involved
units.
Each air unit or fleet can only fire once in each step. When units are allowed
to target enemy units during a step, all attacks must be declared before the first
is resolved. Several units can target the same enemy unit, but a unit targeting
an enemy unit which is destroyed before it attacks cannot change its target.
Disengaging from Air-to-Air Combat: An air unit may attempt to disengage
from air-to-air combat at any time if it has a higher speed than all the enemy
air units targeting it. Each unit may attempt this only once per air-to-air
combat.
The disengaging air unit rolls 1D6. On a result lower than or equal to the
speed difference between the disengaging air unit and the fastest enemy air
unit targeting it, disengagement is successful. Enemy air units cannot fire
at the disengaged unit, which must return to base at once. A unit failing to
disengage remains in the air-to-air combat.
DESIGN NOTE: This rule allows faster aircraft to use “hit and run” tactics,
like the Flying Tigers which were initially outnumbered but still had great
success against the Japanese.
17.6.1 – Fighters vs. Fighters: Fighter air units target and fire at each
other. They fire in order of decreasing speed; in case of ties, the unit with
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
27
the higher Air AS fires first (roll a die for ties). An air unit may only target
an enemy fighter air unit whose speed is not higher than its own, or a unit
that fired at it during this combat. Consult the Air and Sea Attack Table to
determine the results of each shot. Eliminated fighter air units are removed
immediately and cannot fire back. Fighter air units suffering “Inoperative”
and “Retreat” results cannot fire back and return to their airbases or cities
once Fighters vs. Fighters combat is over.
Fighter air units on bombing missions are considered as bombers and do
not participate in this step, unless they abort their bombing mission; in this
case, they engage in air-to-air combat with their normal Air AS.
17.6.2 – Fighters vs. Non-Fighters: Surviving fighter air units from the
previous step now target any enemy non-fighter air units whose speed is
not higher than their own (fighters on bombing missions are considered
non-fighter units). The fighter air units of one side are all lined up against the
non-fighter air units of the other side. Conduct air combat as in the previous
step.
Transport air units have no combat strength and are automatically eliminated if targeted.
All surviving fighter air units, except those on bombing missions, are
returned to their airbases or cities at the end of this step.
17.6.3 – Bombers vs. Fleets: Surviving bomber air units on sea interdiction
missions now target enemy fleets. Bomber air units targeting a naval base
may also engage enemy fleets in the base at this point. A fleet is considered
to have a Speed of zero and can only fire at bomber air units targeting it.
Consult the Air and Sea Attack Table to determine the results.
17.6.4 – Air Freight and Strategic Bombing Missions: Air transport, air
supply, and strategic bombing missions are now executed. Return air units
to their respective airbases or cities once they have completed their missions.
17.6.5 – Fleets vs. Fleets: All surviving fleets can now target and fire at
each other. Sea-to-sea combat is resolved like air-to-air combat, except that
disengagement is not allowed. Fleets fire in order of decreasing Surface AS.
Carrier-based air units are eliminated if their carrier group is eliminated at
the end of the combat sequence.
17.6.6 – Bombardment Missions: All surviving fleets on bombardment
missions now execute them. Return the fleets to their naval bases or ports
once they have completed their mission.
17.6.7 – Ground Support Missions: All surviving air units and fleets on
ground support missions remain in their hex until the resolution of the
ground combat they are supporting. Each side will contribute the Surface
AS of all its surviving air units and fleets on offensive or defensive ground
support missions when ground combat is resolved. Artillery units can also
contribute to ground support [24.3].
18.0 – POLITICAL NEGOTIATIONS
Three kinds of political negotiation are possible during the Negotiation Phase:
peace talks, handling relations with major powers, and influencing the political
affiliation of KMT cliques and minor countries. Political negotiations allow
the various sides to pursue their objectives via political means in addition to
military operations. The Negotiation Matrix (see Political Display) summarizes
the negotiation options available to the various sides.
There is no Negotiation Phase during Mini Scenarios.
DESIGN NOTE: Any Command Points (CP) used or lost during the
Negotiation Phase represent the repercussions of political dealings on military
affairs.
18.1 – PEACE TALKS
Peace talks can occur between Japan and the KMT, or Japan and the CCP.
A side may initiate peace talks with an enemy side during the Negotiation Phase
of any turn. If the enemy side refuses to negotiate, the game proceeds as usual. If
the enemy side agrees to negotiate, the side initiating the peace talks rolls 2D6.
Apply a +1 DRM if peace talks were in progress between the two sides during
the previous turn, and a -1 DRM for every peace talk attempt between the two
sides that previously failed (either on the die roll or because the enemy side
refused to negotiate) in the game. These modifiers are cumulative.
War of the Suns
28
Use the “KMT-Japan failed peace talks” or “CCP-Japan failed
peace talks” markers on the Record Track to record the number
of previously failed peace talk attempts.
•
On a result of 6 or more, peace talks are in progress
between the two sides. For the current turn, they cannot
attack each other or perform any sabotage action against each other.
Japan does not lose any VPs for capturing no Objective and losing none
if peace talks are in progress with the KMT and it is not at war with
the WA [2.1.1].
•
On a result of 4 or 5, the enemy side has used the peace talks as a deception. The side initiating the peace talks loses half its CP remaining at
the end of the Negotiation Phase.
•
On a result of 3 or less, the secret dealings with the enemy are leaked to
the public, demoralizing the country. Besides losing CP for the turn as
for a result of 4 or 5 (above), the side initiating the peace talks suffers
a -1 DRM on all its attack and defense rolls on the Ground Combat
Results Table for the turn.
18.2 – RELATIONS WITH MAJOR POWERS
The attitudes of three major powers — Germany, the Soviet Union, and the
Western Allies — toward the KMT and Japan are recorded on the Foreign
Relations Status Track, using their respective control markers (Neutral attitude is shown by the absence of any marker). At any given time, each major
power has one of the following attitudes:
•
Supporting KMT
•
Sympathetic to KMT
•
Neutral
•
Appeasing Japan
•
Supporting Japan
PLAY NOTE: If the Stalin’s Choice alternate history [25.2] is in effect, the
Soviet Union might be Supporting or Sympathetic to the CCP instead of the
KMT.
During the Negotiation Phase, both the KMT and Japan may give up 3 CP
for each attempt to influence their relations with a specific major power. First,
each side must secretly select how many attempts it will make on each power
(either by writing on a piece of paper or through a third player). Each side
then rolls 1D6 for each attempt; on a ‘5’ or ‘6’ result, the major power’s attitude is shifted one step in favor of that side. In a given Phase, a side can benefit
from only one shift per specific major power; if a side successfully influences a
particular major power on its first attempt, any CP spent on extra attempts to
influence that power are wasted.
At the end of the Negotiation Phase, the KMT receives loans, represented as
a number of RP, from each major power that supports it. The amount of each
supporting power’s loan is determined by rolling 2D6.
•
Japan receives 1 extra RP and 1 extra CP if it has not invaded
Indochina.
•
The Border Closure random event may cause Japan to force
Britain to close its FEP source to China.
18.3 – KMT CLIQUE AND MINOR COUNTRY
POLITICAL AFFILIATION
18.3.1 – Home Territories: The territories over which a KMT clique or
a minor country has influence are called its home territories. The Political
Inclination Table details such territories. An unassimilated clique with a
home territory is called an independent clique. Only independent cliques
and minor countries may see their political affiliation change.
18.3.2 – Factions and Cliques: War of the Suns uses factions and cliques
to depict the political divisions plaguing the KMT. Factions affect combat
[4.2.2] and are subdivided into cliques. The game includes 10 independent
KMT cliques (and two more, when some optional rules are used). Only
the KMT, the CCP, and Japan are allowed to negotiate with a KMT
clique, and such negotiations are only allowed when a clique is threatened
[19.0].
HISTORICAL NOTE: Divisions between factions and cliques were
never clear-cut in reality. The loyalties of many commanders followed only
their personal interests. Refer to the KMT Faction and Clique Card for a
brief history of all the factions and cliques.
18.3.3 – Minor Countries: The game includes two minor countries: Siam
and French Indochina. No side may negotiate with (or invade) French
Indochina before Turn 12, or Siam before Turn 18. Only the WA and
Japan are allowed to negotiate with minor countries.
18.3.4 – Political Inclination: Each independent clique / minor country
has a leader and a political inclination value (see Political Inclination
Table). Political inclination reflects the beliefs and leanings of that leader
towards the KMT, CCP, and Japan; the higher the value, the closer the
leader shares the values of the side. Political inclination never changes
and is unaffected by the current political affiliation of the clique or minor
country.
18.3.5 – Political Affiliation Effects: A KMT clique may be unaffiliated,
favoring a side (e.g., “pro-Japan”), or assimilated by a side. A minor country
may only be unaffiliated or favoring a side — never assimilated. Political
affiliation changes may occur as follows (note the directions):
Unaffiliated ↔ Pro-side A → Assimilated by side A
Political affiliation affects KMT cliques as described below:
•
Pro-KMT: The clique’s units and units activated by its HQ cannot attack CCP units.
•
Assimilated by KMT: See Note 2., below.
•
Pro-Japan: The clique’s units may only attack CCP units. If
during a Japanese activation, a Japanese unit spends an extra MP,
all the units of the clique currently in its ZOC must perform a
combat retreat until they are no longer in an enemy ZOC (no
combat occurs) (Exception: If there is no eligible retreat hex, no
retreat happens). Japan may still attack the clique’s units.
•
Assimilated by Japan: The clique is dissolved. Permanently remove
its HQ and replace all its regular units within its home territory
and not stacked with units of other KMT cliques by CnC units of
the same total SP value (any combination of the player’s choice).
The replaced units are removed from the map as if they had been
eliminated.
•
Pro-CCP: The clique’s units may only attack Japanese units and
their ZOC have no effect on movement or supply of CCP units.
CCP HQ have partial command over the clique’s units. The CCP
may still attack the clique’s units.
•
Assimilated by CCP: The clique is dissolved. Permanently remove
its HQ and replace all its regular units within its home territory
and not stacked with units of other KMT cliques by CCP regular
units of the same total SP value (any combination of the player’s
18.2.1 – Germany: Germany starts Turn 0 as Neutral. Remove any marker
from the German section of the Foreign Relations Status Track at the
start of Turn 9, as war breaks out in Europe; German loans are no longer
available from then on.
18.2.2 – Soviet Union: The Soviet Union starts Turn 0 as Sympathetic
to KMT. Remove any marker from the Soviet section of the Foreign
Relations Status Track at the start of Turn 16, as Germany invades the
USSR; Soviet loans are no longer available from then on. If the Soviet
Union is Appeasing or Supporting Japan:
•
The CCP and Japan cannot attack each other during the turn.
•
The Border Closure random event may cause Japan to force the
Soviet Union to close its FEP source to China.
18.2.3 – Western Allies: The Western Allies start Turn 0 as Neutral. They
can no longer be Appeasing Japan or Supporting Japan from Turn 18 on,
as Japan attacks Pearl Harbor (Exception: If the Japan’s China First Policy
alternate history [25.6] is in effect) — if they were, they immediately
become Neutral. From Turn 12 on, on each turn that the Western Allies
are Appeasing or Supporting Japan:
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
choice). The replaced units are removed from the map as if they
had been eliminated.
•
29
•
Potential Threat: A clique is under potential threat if any Japanese unit
has invaded a neighboring territory of its home territory. A clique
with multiple territories is threatened as soon as one of its territories is
threatened. Example: The Yan, Fu, and Han cliques are under potential
threat at the start of Turn 0.
•
Imminent Threat: A clique is under imminent threat if any Japanese
unit has invaded any of its home territories. Example: The Sung clique
is under imminent threat at the start of Turn 0.
Unaffiliated: The clique’s units can be activated ONLY if the
territory in which they are located becomes threatened.
Political affiliation affects minor countries as described below:
•
Pro-WA: The WA control all the country’s HQ and units.
•
Pro-Japan : Japan controls all the country’s HQ and units. The
Hanoi FEP source is closed for as long as French Indochina is
pro-Japan.
•
Unaffiliated: Units available to an unaffiliated country are
deployed according to its OB, but are controlled by no side and
cannot be activated.
Notes:
To quickly assess whether and how much a clique is threatened, clique markers
may be placed in the corresponding boxes of the mini-map on the home
territories of independent cliques, and Japanese control markers on each of the
neighboring territories containing Japanese units.
A threatened clique is affected as follows:
•
If its HQ is not in its home territory, it must be redeployed to it during
the Redeployment Phase of the next friendly activation [9.2.1]; this
redeployment is in addition to the redeployment of the activated
HQ. If it is impossible for the HQ to redeploy to its home territory,
it is temporarily removed from the map until the soonest subsequent
Redeployment Phase where it can be deployed there. If its home
territory ceases to be threatened while it is off map, the HQ can be
redeployed anywhere during the next Redeployment Phase.
1.
Even if a unit belongs to a KMT clique that is unaffiliated, or
favoring a side other than the KMT, it is still under KMT control
and thus controls hexes for the KMT.
2.
The various affiliations affect which HQ may command which
units, and whether it has full or partial control over them [9.5.3].
3.
When the leader of a clique is permanently removed (for
whatever reason), the clique is immediately assimilated by the side
it was currently favoring, or it is assimilated by the KMT if it was
unaffiliated.
•
Units of other cliques controlled by the KMT or CCP may enter an
independent clique’s home territory only while it is threatened.
•
4.
Unaffiliated independent cliques may undergo affiliation change
under certain circumstances (see Conditional Events Chart).
A supply center controlled by a threatened pro-KMT clique contributes 1 more RP than if it is not threatened (see Replacement Aids).
•
A factory counter inside a clique’s home territory may only be moved if
this clique is under imminent threat and Pro-KMT.
Record the political affiliation of each clique and minor country with
the appropriate control markers on the Political Affiliation Track of the
Political Display. Leave a box empty to show unaffiliated status.
18.3.6 – Negotiation Process: During a Negotiation Phase, each eligible
side may give up a number of CP to attempt to influence its relations
with a selected minor country or threatened KMT clique. The number of
CP required for each attempt depends on the Political Inclination of the
clique or country toward the side:
•
1 CP for a Political Inclination of 2;
•
2 CP for a Political Inclination of 1;
•
3 CP for a Political Inclination of 0.
The process is identical to attempts on major powers [18.2]. The sides first
secretly select how many attempts they will make on each clique or country, then they each roll 1D6 per attempt. On a ‘5’ or ‘6’ result, the clique’s
or country’s relations are shifted one step in favor of that side.
Apply the following DRMs to negotiation attempts on minor countries
only:
•
On Turns 18 and 19, +1 for Japanese attempts
•
From Turn 30 on, +1 for WA attempts
A side may benefit from only one shift per clique or country in a given
Negotiation Phase; if it successfully influences a particular clique or minor
country on an attempt, any CP spent on extra attempts to influence that
power are wasted.
Relation shifts with KMT cliques take place in the following order:
Japanese, KMT, CCP.
Example: The Yen clique is pro-CCP on Turn 0. During the Negotiation
Phase, both the KMT and Japan successfully attempt to influence this
clique. The Japanese success first causes the Yen clique to become unaffiliated, then the KMT success causes it to become pro-KMT.
19.0 – THREATENED CLIQUES
An independent clique not pro-Japan may find itself under one of two different threat levels:
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
As soon as no Japanese units are in its home territory or any neighboring territory, a clique is no longer threatened. Units of other cliques inside its home
territory do not have to leave, but if they do, they can only return if the clique
is threatened again.
Example: Japan has invaded Burma, a neighboring territory of the Yunnan
province. The HQ of the Yunnan clique must return to Yunnan during the
Redeployment Phase of the next KMT activation. All KMT and CCP units
may now enter the province until there are no Japanese units in any neighboring territories of Yunnan.
20.0 – INFLATION
China’s connection status affects inflation, and thus the number
of CP and RP available to the KMT on a given turn.
HISTORICAL NOTE: The economy of the KMT government
depended very much on foreign trade. By 1944, even paper had
to be imported through the Hump, and this cost more than the
value of money subsequently printed on it. The foreign trade cut-offs caused
inflation in the KMT-controlled areas. Commanders were soon unable simply
to feed their men; many of them resorted to illegal dealings (opium trafficking, arms smuggling, extortion, etc.). Desertion became very common.
20.1 – ISOLATING CHINA
China is isolated when the KMT controls no transport route
from a friendly/allied, unblockaded supply center to an open
FEP source during the China Isolation Phase. Conversely, China
is connected when the KMT controls at least one such transport
route.
China’s connection is checked during the China Isolation Phase of each
turn, and remains set for the whole turn duration (even if on-map conditions
change). Move the “China isolated” marker along the Record Track to
record the number of consecutive turns that China has been isolated until
Hyperinflation, or the proper “Inflation” marker to record the number of
consecutive turns that China has been connected under a given inflation
condition.
20.2 – INFLATION EFFECTS
There are three levels of inflation: mild, rampant, and hyperinflation.
War of the Suns
30
If due to inflation, the KMT ends up with a negative number of CP, it loses 3
RP per negative CP, then sets its CP marker to zero.
20.2.1 – Mild Inflation: Mild inflation starts on the second consecutive
China Isolation Phase that China is isolated. Inflation is over on the
second consecutive China Isolation Phase that China is connected under
mild inflation. When mild inflation is in effect:
•
•
Eligible Training Hexes: Any friendly/allied supply center not
in enemy ZOC that can be linked via a friendly/allied transport
route to a friendly/allied operative factory.
•
Improvement Limits: The maximum number of SP of units
that can start training in a given supply center on a given turn
is limited to the combined DEP values of all the friendly/allied
operative factories that are linked to the center via friendly/allied
transport routes.
The KMT loses 3 CP during the China Isolation Phase.
20.2.2 – Rampant Inflation: Rampant inflation starts on the fifth
consecutive China Isolation Phase that China is isolated. Inflation falls
back to mild on the third consecutive China Isolation Phase that China is
connected under rampant inflation. When rampant inflation is in effect:
•
The KMT loses 6 CP during the China Isolation Phase.
•
The KMT loses 30% of its total RP during the China Isolation
Phase, due to desertions and corruption.
20.2.3 – Hyperinflation: Hyperinflation starts on the eighth consecutive
China Isolation Phase that China is isolated. Once it has reached hyperinflation, inflation never falls back. When hyperinflation is in effect:
21.1.2 – Open FEP Sources: Unused FEP may be used to have eligible
units start training during the Training Phase, at the rate of one FEP per
Stacking Point.
•
Eligible Units: All unimproved units of Local or Standard
Replacement Types [13.3.1].
•
Eligible Training Hexes: Any friendly/allied supply center not
in enemy ZOC that can be linked via a friendly/allied transport
route to an open FEP source or an unblockaded friendly/allied
port.
21.1.3 – US Training: Unless otherwise specified, eligible units may
be improved with US equipment and instructors flown in above the
Himalayas (the “Hump”) from Turn 22 to Turn 30. The WA must keep
one US fighter air unit in Ledo (6041) during the whole turn (to protect
the air bridge) to be able to use this improvement source. This air unit can
only perform interdiction missions, and only in Ledo.
•
The KMT loses 9 CP during the China Isolation Phase.
•
The KMT loses 60% of its total RP during the China Isolation
Phase, due to desertions and corruption.
•
KMT units pay 1 MP instead of 1/2 MP when using road or
railroad movement due to gasoline shortages.
•
•
Roll 1D6 for each non-US trained KMT unit attacked by a
Japanese unit. On a ‘1’ result, the unit deserts and is eliminated.
On a ‘2-3’ result, the unit retreats before combat is resolved. A
‘4-6’ result has no effect.
Eligible Units: All unimproved units which do not have ‘UST’ on
their counter.
•
Hyperinflation never happens (inflation remains rampant even if China
is isolated for eight or more consecutive China Isolation Phases) if the
Stilwell’s Dream alternate history is in effect [25.8].
Eligible Training Hexes: Training must take place in the supply
center of Kunming (5627). CCP units may similarly be trained
in Yenan (2230) if the CCP controls the city and the CCP, KMT
and WA all agree.
•
Improvement Limits:
20.3 – CONTROLLING INFLATION
The KMT has two ways of preventing inflation from deteriorating during
the China Isolation Phase (i.e., preventing the “China isolated” marker from
advancing on the track):
•
Monetary Policy: The KMT may spend 5 RP to prevent inflation from
deteriorating on this turn.
•
Peace Talks: If peace talks are in progress between the KMT and Japan,
inflation does not deteriorate due to trade with Japanese-occupied
areas.
Example: Historically, China was isolated from Turns 19 to 30 and was connected from Turn 31 on. Thus, China entered mild inflation at the beginning
of Turn 20 (Summer 1942), rampant inflation on Turn 23 (Spring 1943), and
hyperinflation on Turn 26 (Winter 1943-44).
If the KMT had spent 5 RP to control the economy on Turn 20, or if peace
talks had been in progress with Japan on that turn, mild inflation would have
been postponed to Turn 21.
21.0 – GROUND UNIT IMPROVEMENT
During the Training Phase, the KMT and CCP may have their ground units
in eligible hexes enter the training process to improve their AS and DS.
21.1 – SOURCES OF IMPROVEMENT
KMT and CCP ground units may be improved in three ways:
21.1.1 – Factories: Unused DEP may be used to have eligible units start
training during the Training Phase, at the rate of one DEP per Stacking
Point of unit.
•
1. Deployment: The KMT must maintain a portion of its
US-trained improved units in Yunnan (see Garrison
Requirements Table for details).
HISTORICAL NOTE: These units helped defend Yunnan
against the Japanese and cooperated with Stilwell’s counterattacks in northern Burma.
2. Factions: Of every four US-trained improved units, at least
one must belong to a non-CA clique (including CCP units).
3. Combat: US-trained units and air units equipped with US
planes can only be used against Japanese units. They can never
be involved in any hostile action against another side.
4. Stacking Points: A maximum of 30 SP of ground units can
receive UST improvement markers over the course of the
game. Record the SP trained with the “Alpha
force” marker on the Record Track.
5. KMT-CCP Conflict: If any unit is eliminated
as a result of KMT-CCP combat on a given
turn, the Hump improvement source cannot
be used during the Training Phase of this turn.
Moreover, any unit with ongoing US training that should
have been completed on this phase instead suffers mandatory
training interruption [21.3].
HISTORICAL NOTE: These units, part of a planned
36-division Chinese Army, were known as the Alpha Force.
Victories in the Pacific and the Soviet guarantee to invade
Japan after defeating Germany made it no longer necessary to
equip and train KMT units to defeat Japan on the mainland
after Winter 1944-45.
Eligible Units: All unimproved units of Local Replacement Type
[13.3.1].
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War of the Suns
21.2 – IMPROVEMENT PROCEDURE
Mark units entering the training process with an improved “AS,
DS +1” (for units with a printed AS of 4 or less) or “+2” (for
units with a printed AS of 5 or more) marker, with a training
marker on top of it. Use UST (“US-trained”) improvement
markers for units improving with US training. Note that:
31
tory interruption, DEP/FEP are NOT credited back, and the SP value of the
units DOES count (do NOT adjust the “Alpha force” marker).
22.0 – FACTORIES
China had a limited military industry, with factories located
mostly along the coast; their subsequent relocation to western
China was vital to sustaining the Chinese war effort. Factory
locations on Turn 0 are shown in the KMT OB. During the
game, factories generate DEP for the side controlling them. A
factory is always controlled by the KMT, unless it is in a hex
controlled by the CCP.
•
An improved unit cannot be further improved.
•
An improved unit loses its improved marker if it is subsequently
eliminated or expanded (it may later go through the improvement
procedure again).
Example: A unit with 3-4-4 original ratings is improved to 4-5-4 ratings. If eliminated, its “improved AS, DS +1” marker is removed before
the unit is placed in the Replacement Pool.
Each factory counter has two ratings: DEP value (left) and MA
(right).
•
A reduced-strength unit that undergoes improvement does not
improve; instead, it loses its reduced marker once training is complete.
It may then undergo another improvement process to gain improved
status.
•
An improved marker cannot be removed by itself to satisfy combat
losses (i.e., a defending unit with 3-4-4 original ratings and an “improved AS, DS +1” marker could be eliminated to satisfy a combat loss
of up to 5 combat strength points, but could not choose to only lose its
marker to satisfy a 1-combat strength point loss).
Except on Turn 0 when they cannot move, factories may move during the
Factory Phase only; to do so, they can use either regular movement, or railroad
or river transport (each DEP of a transported factory spends 2 Transport
Points). Factories cannot use movement mode and do not require command
or supply.
•
When an improved unit is broken down, its improved strength should
be shared as much as possible among the component units, odd points
going to the ones with the highest AS+DS totals.
Example: A unit with an “improved AS, DS +1” marker is broken
down into its cadre unit and component unit; the cadre unit gets the
marker. If this unit was marked with an “improved AS, DS +2” marker,
the cadre unit and component unit would both receive an “improved
AS, DS +1” marker. A unit with an “improved AS, DS +2” marker is
broken down into three component units; the two of them with the
highest AS+DS totals each receive an “improved AS, DS +1” marker.
21.3 – TRAINING
During the Replacement and Construction Phase, training
markers must be placed on newly-replaced Chinese elite units
[13.3.1]. During the Training Phase, remove training markers
from all ground units (except Chinese elite units replaced in the
immediately preceding Replacement and Construction Phase),
which then change to their improved statuses. Then place training markers on ground units entering the improvement process [21.0] and BC
units receiving Chindit training [24.1].
A unit with a training marker cannot move or attack. Other than during the
Training Phase, training markers can be removed (thus interrupting training)
under two circumstances:
•
At any time, to allow a training unit to move or attack; this is voluntary
interruption.
•
When a training unit is attacked (it may then defend and retreat
normally); this is mandatory interruption.
When training is interrupted:
•
An elite unit with only a training marker has it replaced with a reduced
marker of the correct value [13.3.1].
•
Any unit with a training marker on top of an improved marker has
both markers removed.
•
Any unit with a training marker on top of a reduced marker has its
training marker removed.
•
A Chindit unit has its training marker removed and is flipped back to
its non-Chindit side.
On a voluntary interruption, any DEP and/or FEP spent to replace/improve
these units are credited back to their side, and the SP value of units improved
through US training [21.1.3] does not count toward the total allowed over the
course of the game (adjust the “Alpha force” marker accordingly); on a manda©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
22.1 – MOVEMENT
Factory movement within a clique’s home territory is limited [19.0].
As soon as a factory counter finds itself in the ZOC of an enemy unit, it is
destroyed, unless a friendly/allied unit is stacked with it. Destroyed factories
cannot be replaced.
22.2 – PRODUCTIVITY
Factory counters moving during the Factory Phase are placed inoperative side
up on the map. Inoperative factory counters are flipped back to their operative
side during the Factory Phase when they are in a transport route hex and do
not move. Only operative factories generate DEP.
22.3 – STACKING LIMIT
Each hex may hold up to 5 DEP of operating factories, regardless of other
units. Inoperative factories do not count towards stacking.
The controlling side may break a factory counter down into several factory
counters whose total DEP value is equal to the DEP value of the initial counter; conversely, it can combine several factory counters into a single counter
whose DEP value is equal to the total DEP value of the initial counters.
23.0 – KMT ADVISORS AND JAPANESE
COLLABORATORS
KMT military advisors must always stack and move with a CA HQ. Japanese
collaborators must always stack and move with an IJA HQ. Military advisors
and collaborators are removed from the map when the HQ they are stacked
with is removed, and they share the permanent or temporary nature of the
HQ’s removal [9.3]. They may be reassigned to another HQ if they return to
play.
Each military advisor and collaborator contributes his unique abilities to his
side.
23.1 – KMT MILITARY ADVISORS
A military advisor increases the Command Quality of the HQ with which it
is stacked by one: when placing the HQ chit on the Activation Track, place
it one row higher than normal (e.g., a 1-Command Quality HQ has its chit
placed in the ‘2 Activations Left’ row). 3-Command Quality HQs do not
benefit from this increase.
HISTORICAL NOTE: Foreign military advisors played a significant role in
almost every war of the KMT. Soviet advisors were active since the Northern
Expedition in the 20s. They were later replaced by German advisors when the
initial cooperation between the KMT and CCP broke up. Late in the war,
American advisors stepped in. Ironically, ex-IJA officers were also to serve as
KMT advisors during the Chinese Civil War and afterward.
23.1.1 – Alexander von Falkenhausen: Nazi military advisor von Falkenhausen is in China from Turn 0 to the end of
Turn 4.
War of the Suns
32
KMT units benefit from a +1 DRM when attacking in ground combat if
they have been activated by the HQ Falkenhausen is stacked with.
DESIGN NOTE: This simulates Falkenhausen’s expertise in blitzkrieg
attack and modern warfare.
23.1.2 – Vasily Chuikov: Soviet military advisor Chuikov is
in China from Turn 14 to the end of Turn 18.
The KMT benefits from a +1 DRM against any Japanese
attack in ground combat if the defender’s hex is a city within
the Command Radius [9.5.1] of the HQ Chuikov is stacked
with. Also, no hostile action between the KMT and CCP is allowed while
the HQ Chuikov is stacked with is activated.
DESIGN NOTE: This simulates Chuikov’s expertise in urban defense, as
shown later in Stalingrad where he led the legendary 62nd Army, as well as
the fact that he oversaw cooperation between the KMT and CCP.
23.1.3 – Albert Wedemeyer: American military advisor
Wedemeyer is in China from Turn 29 on.
The supply radius of all KMT units within the Command
Radius [9.5.1] of the HQ Wedemeyer is stacked with is
increased to 6 hexes.
DESIGN NOTE: This simulates the revolution Wedemeyer brought to
the KMT supply system, whose effects can still be seen in Taiwan today.
HISTORICAL NOTE: Albert Wedemeyer was appointed as Chief of
Staff to Chiang after Stilwell was recalled. He also served as commander of
US forces in China. For game purpose, Wedemeyer is considered a KMT
military advisor.
24.0 – SPECIAL UNITS
24.1 – CHINDIT UNITS
The In 77B unit directly enters play as a Chindit glider unit. The
Br 14B, Br 16B, Br 23B, In 111B, and WAf 3B units enter play
as normal infantry units (most of them become available only
through the breakdown of their parent division, see Breakdown
Chart). They may be converted to Chindit glider units by
undergoing training in any WA supply center or in the Indian Ocean Holding
Box; flip the units over to their glider side and mark them with a training
marker [21.3].
Chindit units:
•
may perform glider landings [11.3.5].
•
may be activated during the Guerrilla Phase (whether they are in
command or not), in addition to operating as regular units during the
Operation Segment.
•
do not suffer the column shift for attacking enemy units in forest terrain.
After any of its component units has become a Chindit unit, a parent division
can never be reassembled.
24.2 – BRITISH 3RD COMMANDO BRIGADE
The 3CdoB unit may move into an enemy-occupied hex during
the Movement Phase. If it enters a hex containing enemy units
and attacks these units during the same Operation Segment, use
its red-boxed AS.
23.2 – JAPANESE COLLABORATORS
24.3 – ARTILLERY UNITS
HISTORICAL NOTE: To promote the “Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity
Sphere,” Japan established and supported various puppet regimes ruled by
collaborators. These would help maintain order in China, and assist Japan’s
swift advance in Burma.
Artillery units can only attack in conjunction with at least one
non-artillery friendly unit (which may or may not be in the same
hex). Artillery units use their special AS when attacking a city
hex, or a hex across a river, lake, or strait hexside if the defending
units receive a defense bonus.
23.2.1 – Wang Ching-Wei: All Chinese collaborationist
(CnC) units within the Command Radius of the HQ
Wang is stacked with do not surrender on contact or during
retreat [12.5]; instead, they apply the results called for by the
Ground Combat Results Table.
DESIGN NOTE: This simulates the charismatic nature of Wang, even in
the eyes of his opponents, which allowed him to boost the morale of the
forces in his presence.
HISTORICAL NOTE: Wang Ching-Wei changed from revolutionary
to opportunist after losing the power struggle with Chiang. Then, seeing
the carnage of war turned him into a defeatist. In late 1938, Wang fled
Chungking to collaborate with Japan, becoming the head of the Reformed
Government in Japan-controlled Nanking.
23.2.2 – Aung San: All Japanese ground units activated by
the HQ Aung San is stacked with are always considered in
supply and may ignore the movement effects of forest terrain
when operating in Burma outside the Kachin state.
DESIGN NOTE: This simulates the valuable guidance that
the BIA provided to Japanese units through the difficult Burmese terrain.
Artillery units may also be used in ground support. In this case, they contribute their special AS to their side’s total ground support value, but their AS is
not added to their side’s total AS during the subsequent combat.
Artillery units can take combat losses only if all friendly/allied units stacked
with them have been eliminated.
24.4 – ARMOR AND MECHANIZED INFANTRY UNITS
These units do not have AS and DS like other ground units:
instead, the leftmost rating on their counter is the antipersonnel
strength, while the middle rating is the antitank strength. In
combat, use the antitank strength in attack and defense if the
enemy units include armor or mechanized infantry units; use
the antipersonnel strength otherwise.
PLAY NOTE: The game includes alternate counters for these
units, showing the silhouette of their main fighting vehicle type.
Armor and mechanized infantry units may perform overruns
[11.2.3].
24.5 – JAPANESE NAVY GROUND FORCES
Aung San is removed from play in the Events Phase when Japan controls all
the cities in Burma, or in the Events Phase of Turn 20, whichever is earlier.
The IJN ShSNLF (Shanghai Special Navy Landing Force) has a
limited operation area: the Shanghai hex.
HISTORICAL NOTE: Aung San (father of human rights activist and
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi) organized the small Burma
Independence Army (BIA) before Japan invaded Burma. The BIA grew
quickly as Burma was overrun, and was later reorganized as the Burma
Defense Army (BDA) for garrison duties in the country. Later in the war
and still under Aung San, it turned against Japan as the Burma National
Army.
The generic IJN SNLF counter represents the many SNLF units
(each one a few hundred men strong) formed at different times
of the war.
The IJN BF (Naval Base Force) units represent various units
(each comprising a few hundred men) garrisoning the occupied
naval bases. They have a limited operation area: all the Japanese
naval bases.
Sea-transported IJN ground units do not use up Japanese sea Transport
Points.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
24.6 – JAPANESE PUPPET FORCES
To prevent them from defecting to the Allies [12.5], Japan may disband any
Mck, Mk, CnC, BDA, INA, pro-Japan Siamese, or pro-Japan French units
by having an IJA or IJN ground unit spend one extra MP while in their hex at
any point of the Movement Phase.
24.6.1 – Chinese Collaborationist Units: In addition to the
CnC units listed in the Japanese OB, the following sources
can provide generic Chinese Collaborationist (CnC) units
as conditional reinforcements:
•
Bandit Units: Successfully recruited bandit units
[24.9] are converted to 0-1-0-1 or 1-0-4-1 CnC units.
•
Surrendering KMT and CCP Units: Each KMT and CCP
ground unit (including guerrillas) that surrenders causes a CnC
unit of equivalent SP value to be placed in the Reinforcement
Pool [12.5].
0-1-0-1 CnC units can be freely converted to 1-0-4-1 CnC units, or vice
versa, during the Reinforcement Phase. A stack of generic CnC units
can combine into a generic CnC unit with an SP value equal to their
combined SP values, as per [15.2]. A CnC unit cannot be broken down
into smaller SP-value units.
24.6.2 – Indian National Army: The Indian National Army
(INA) was organized from Indian prisoners taken during the
Malaya campaign. Japanese HQs only have partial command
over INA units. INA units use their red-boxed AS when
attacking enemy units located in a hex within India.
The Subhas Chandra Bose HQ becomes available only if the Indian
Uprising alternate history is in effect [25.7)
24.7 – CHINESE ARMY IN INDIA
The Chinese Army in India (CAI) units appear in the WA OB.
Initially, they are controlled by the WA and can be activated
only by US HQs.
CAI units (and all US ground units) cannot leave the IBS
theater, except when mandated by the Conditional Events Chart. When a
CAI unit forced to leave the IBS theater first enters a hex, or lands in a hex,
in China, it immediately ends its Movement Phase there. From then on, it is
controlled by the KMT for all purposes, including replacements.
Once they have entered China, CAI units can no longer enter the IBS theater.
24.8 – 20TH AIR FORCE B-29S
The B-29 heavy bomber air unit arriving as KMT reinforcements in Chengtu on Turn 28 was used for Operation
Matterhorn (the strategic bombing of targets outside China)
and was not part of Chennault’s 14th Air Force. Its name is
printed in red to distinguish it from other air units.
This unit places two obligations on the KMT:
•
The KMT is required to expand the existing airbase at Chengtu on
Turn 27 or before, to accommodate the B-29s, at a cost of 4 RP.
•
At least one US-equipped fighter air unit must remain at Chengtu
airbase on every turn that the B-29 air unit is in China. This fighter
unit can only perform interdiction missions in Chengtu. Should the
fighter not be present, the B-29 is instantly removed from play and may
reenter when a fighter returns to Chengtu as a reinforcement.
The KMT might choose to not expand the airbase, refusing the deployment of
the B-29s; or Japan might control Chengtu on Turn 28. In these cases:
33
Normally, no side controls this unit. But if a Japanese unit is in Szechwan or
Kweichow province during the Admin Phase while the B-29 unit is in China,
the B-29 unit becomes controlled by the KMT.
DESIGN NOTE: From Turn 30, the B-29s were based on Pacific islands,
thus making the base in China unnecessary
24.9 – BANDIT UNITS
Bandit units appear on the map due to the Peasant uprising
random event.
Supply cannot be traced through any hex adjacent to a bandit
unit.
During the Operation Segment, the Phasing Side may attack or attempt to
recruit each bandit unit (but not both against a given unit):
•
Regular units may attack bandit units only by using the anti-guerrilla
sweep rules [16.6.2].
•
If a bandit unit is within the Command Radius of the activated HQ,
the Phasing Side (not the WA) may roll 1D6 to attempt to recruit it
at the start of the Movement Phase. On a ‘1-3’ result, the recruitment
fails and the bandit unit remains in the hex. On a ‘4-6’ result, replace
the bandit unit with a 1-0-4 or 0-1-0 CnC unit ( Japan); either replace
the bandit unit with a generic guerrilla unit, or remove the bandit unit
and add an extra RP to the side (KMT or CCP).
24.10 – ENGINEER UNITS
Instead of spending RP, a side may use a friendly engineer unit to construct
transport routes, airbases, and naval bases. During a Movement Phase when it
is activated, an engineer unit may spend extra MPs in a hex to:
•
Construct a road in a trail hex; or
•
Construct a railroad in a road hex; or
•
Construct a bridge across a regular river hexside of a hex; or
•
Repair a bridge across a river hexside of a hex; or
•
Construct an airbase in a city, road, or railroad hex; or
•
Construct a naval base in a port hex.
The number of extra MPs needed is equal to the number of RP normally
required for the construction. The number of MP of an engineer unit is the
only limit to the number of constructions it can perform on a given turn.
25.0 – ALTERNATE HISTORIES (OPTIONAL)
The alternate histories attempt to provide answers to “what if ?” questions in
the campaign game. Note that some of them may greatly affect game balance.
During the Events Phase of a turn with an alternate history listed on the
General Events Chart, the players decide whether this event occurs or not. If
they cannot all agree, each side rolls 1D6 and applies any specified DRM. The
side with the highest result determines whether the alternate history occurs
or not. Alternate history units are listed at the end of the OBs and have their
entry turn preceded by an ‘A’ on their counters.
25.1 – FURTHER CONCESSIONS (TURN 0, KMT DRM
+1)
Chiang’s response to the Japanese aggression greatly affected the outcome of
the war. He could have made further concessions to Japan after the Marco
Polo Bridge Incident to strengthen his army before the final confrontation.
Under this alternate history, Chiang concludes that delaying the war is in his
best interests.
•
From Turn 28 on, the KMT can no longer improve KMT units with
US equipment;
•
The game starts on Turn 4.
•
Perform all OB instructions for Turns 1-3.
•
On Turn 28, the KMT cannot receive a loan from a US source;
•
•
On Turns 28 and 29, Japan receives +1 RP and +1 CP.
The Stalin’s Choice [25.2], Sian Forgiven [25.3], and Wang Ming
Ousts Mao [25.4] alternate histories may happen.
•
The CCP deploys four additional 1-1-5 generic regiments within the
SKN Border Area.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
34
•
The KMT may improve seven standard units [13.3.1] with German
training and equipment. Mark them with the appropriate “improved”
marker [21.2].
•
Change the political affiliation of the Sung, Han, Yen, and Fu cliques
to pro-Japan.
•
KMT CA units defending in the Kiangyin stronghold (1808) benefit
from a 2-column shift on the Ground Combat Results Table until the
Japanese capture the stronghold.
•
The players perform the following redeployments in the listed sequence. These must not violate any operational or faction limits (e.g., a
unit cannot be repositioned to the home territory of a non-threatened
clique) or pass through non-friendly hexes.
(1) All Chinese units in Hopeh, Chahar, Shantung, Suiyuan, and
Shansi (except units in the home territory of their clique) must be
removed and redeployed to other friendly hexes.
(2) Two new demilitarized zones are established: (1) All hexes north
of the Yungting River (running along the Peiping (0724) and
Tientsin (0722) hexes) in Hopeh; (2) All hexes within 2 hexes
of Shanghai (1806). Chinese units originally deployed in these
zones must be relocated elsewhere within the same province, and
further units cannot be deployed within these areas.
(3) The KMT and CCP may redeploy all their on-map units and
factories originally deployed in non-home territories of Pro-Japan
or unaffiliated cliques to other friendly hexes.
(4) Japan may redeploy one of its on-map 0- or 1-SP units to each
of the cities of Nanking (1910), Hankow (2816), and Canton
(4507) for the protection of Japanese civilians.
25.2 – STALIN’S CHOICE (TURN 0, CCP DRM +1)
During the War of Resistance, Stalin chose to support the KMT instead of
his comrades of the CCP. For some, this decision was one of the reasons for
the feud between the two communist nations in the 50s. Under this alternate
history, Stalin places his bet on Mao.
•
•
The Soviet Union starts Turn 0 as Sympathetic to CCP. Negotiations
attempts on the Soviet Union can be made only by the CCP and Japan.
The CCP, not the KMT, can benefit from Soviet loans (use normal
rules).
The Soviet SVG air units and military advisor Chuikov are received
and controlled by the CCP instead of the KMT. All the rules pertaining to them apply normally.
25.3 – SIAN FORGIVEN (TURNS 1 AND 3, KMT DRM +1)
After staging the Sian Incident, Chang Hsueh-Liang (the Young
Marshal) of the Northeastern Army was imprisoned and Yang
Hu-Cheng of the Shensi Army was sent abroad. Under this
alternate history, Chiang Kai-Shek forgives them their involvement in the coup and restores them to their former power.
•
The Chang Hsueh-Liang HQ arrives as a reinforcement
on Turn 1. The Yang Hu-Cheng HQ is received as a
reinforcement on Turn 3 (on Yang’s return to China)
only if all sides agree or, if they don’t, if the side with the
highest event roll [25.0] decides so.
•
The Northeastern Army becomes a pro-KMT clique with its home
territory in either Honan or Anhwei (KMT choice).
•
If the Yang Hu-Cheng HQ is received as a reinforcement, the Shensi
Army becomes a pro-KMT clique with its home territory in Shensi.
•
Units of the Northeastern Army and Shensi Army cliques have their
AS and DS increased by one when they are within the Command
Radius of their respective HQ.
•
The Chiang Kai-Shek GHQ must be stacked with at least one CA unit
at all times.
•
When/if they become cliques, the Northeastern Army and Shensi
Army may see their political affiliation change like the other KMT
cliques.
25.4 – WANG MING OUSTS MAO (TURN 3, CCP DRM
+1)
After returning from Moscow, the Soviet-groomed Wang Ming
gained unanimous support of the Politburo. He could have
taken the chance to oust Mao but didn’t. Under this alternate
history, Wang Ming replaces Mao as head of the Chinese
Communist Party.
•
Replace the Mao Tse-Tung GHQ with the Wang Ming GHQ.
•
The CCP and all pro-CCP KMT cliques become pro-KMT cliques.
•
Treat the Rectification Movement random event as No event from now
on.
•
The CCP and KMT victory conditions remain unchanged. In a threeor four-player game, the CCP player stays in the game as a partner
of the KMT player: he still controls the CCP units and tries to meet
the CCP victory conditions. The CCP and KMT can no longer take
hostile actions against each other.
25.5 – PEACE MISSION OF WANG CHING-WEI (TURN
6, KMT DRM +1)
Close confidant of Sun Yat-Sen, and one of the most important members of
the early Kuomintang, Wang Ching-Wei could have won over more support
when he defected to the Japanese, had he used his influence wisely. Under this
alternate history, Wang is more successful in neutralizing the Chinese warlords
during his collaboration with Japan.
•
Japan may immediately make a free negotiation attempt (no CP are
spent) on any three KMT cliques whose home territories have not
experienced the Massacre random event up to this point in the game.
In addition, if any of these free attempts succeeds, Japan enjoys a
+1 DRM on all negotiation attempts with KMT cliques during the
Negotiation Phase of Turn 6.
25.6 – JAPAN’S CHINA FIRST POLICY (TURN 17)
This alternate history will preclude the Indian Uprising alternate history
[25.7] from occurring.
Under this alternate history, the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy agree to
finish off China before taking on the Western Allies or the Soviet Union.
Japan has to finish the war quickly, before its oil reserves are depleted and its
economy risks collapsing.
•
Japan does not go to war against the Western Allies and does not attack
in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. Japan may not invade Siam or any
British colonies. French colonies can still be invaded.
•
The campaign game ends on completion of Turn 24. The KMT and
CCP calculate their Victory Points per the normal procedure [2.1.2,
2.1.3]. Japan cannot win if it does not control Chungking (4127) at
game end.
•
From Turn 18 to Turn 24 inclusive, Japan receives 12 RP and 12 CP
per turn.
•
All ground units, air units, and fleets that should per OB instructions
be relocated to the Pacific or IBS theater from Turn 17 on remain in
the CIC theater instead.
•
All US units listed in the KMT OB and all units in the WA OB will
never enter play. Exception: The Flying Tigers P-40 air unit arrives as
reinforcements to China on Turn 19.
•
The Western Allies may be Appeasing Japan or Supporting Japan after
Turn 17 [18.2.3].
25.7 – INDIAN UPRISING (TURN 24, WA DRM +1)
This alternate history will not occur if the Japan’s China First Policy alternate
history [25.6] took place, or if the Massacre random event happened in Burma
or India since game start.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
Subhas Chandra Bose (aka Nataji), leader of the Indian National Army, is still
a folk legend among many Indians. He and his forces might have changed the
history of Southeast Asia. Under this alternate history, the “Quit India” movement ignites armed revolution in India and leads to Gandhi’s arrest. Japan
jumps at the chance and provides full support to Bose and his INA.
35
•
For the remainder of the game:
The KMT receives 10 extra RPs and CPs per turn. These points must
be kept distinct from the others available to the KMT per the normal
rules (use the “KMT RPs” and “KMT CP” markers with an “A” in the
upper left to track them) and may only be used to replace conditional
units provided by this alternate history. In addition to its one-air-unitper-turn limit [13.5.2], the KMT may replace one of this alternate
history’s conditional air units per turn.
•
Defending BC Indian units not stacked with a British unit surrender
on a Retreat combat result suffered in an attack including any INA
unit [12.5].
•
INA units no longer surrender when suffering a Retreat combat result
as per [12.5].
•
The Br 2D originally available as a conditional reinforcement remains
in India to suppress the revolution and does not appear in the game.
25.10 – NO ATOMIC BOMBS (TURN 32, OCCURS ONLY
IF AGREED BY ALL PLAYERS)
•
As long as any INA unit is within the Indian borders during the Supply
Phase, all supply centers in India cease to be valid supply sources for the
non-Japanese sides.
Under this alternate history, no atomic bombs are dropped on Japan. The
Soviet Union does not attack the Kwantung Army in Manchukuo until
Operation Coronet — the invasion of the Kanto plain near Tokyo — takes
place in Spring 1946.
25.8 – STILWELL’S DREAM (TURN 28, WA AND KMT
DRM +1)
The USA repeatedly tried to get a tighter control on KMT units in order
to make them a more effective fighting force. But the Generalissimo and his
loyalists would have none of it. Under this alternate history, Chiang Kai-Shek
is removed in a coup organized by the OSS in Summer 1944, and his successor
agrees to Roosevelt’s suggestion of appointing Stilwell as supreme commander
of the Chinese forces. However, Stilwell would quickly experience difficulties
in controlling units still loyal to Chiang (just as Li Tsung-Jen found out in
1949 when he became acting president of China).
•
•
•
Remove the Chiang Kai-Shek GHQ from play, as well as the HQs
of the Chen, Tang, and Hu cliques of the Central Army. The Joseph
Stilwell HQ is now controlled by the KMT and will serve as KMT
GHQ for the remainder of the game (it is not removed from play on
Turn 29). The Daniel Sultan HQ enters the game on Turn 29 with no
limited operation area.
US HQs may now activate Chinese units in China, with full command
over UST units and partial command over non-UST units.
If on map, the 20th Air Force B-29 heavy bomber air unit [24.8] is released for combat as part of the 14th Air Force during its stay in China
(Turns 28 to 30). It is now controlled by the KMT and can perform
missions as per the normal rules.
•
US financial help stabilizes the Chinese economy. Hyperinflation never
sets in (or, if it already is in effect, it falls back to rampant inflation in
the next China Isolation Phase).
•
CCP units in Yenan (2230) can be improved with US training if the
CCP decides so. A maximum of one in four US-trained improved
units [21.1.3] can belong to the CCP. In circumstances where it matters (e.g., the 30-SP limit is almost reached), CCP units must be given
priority over KMT units for US training.
•
The KMT cannot attack CCP units from then on. This restriction
is lifted if the CCP attacks the KMT; in this case, the CCP cannot
receive US training for the remainder of the game.
25.9 – US AMPHIBIOUS LANDINGS (TURN 30, WA
DRM +1 IF STILWELL’S DREAM ALTERNATE
HISTORY OCCURRED)
The USA had made plans to conduct amphibious landings
in China. They might have concretized, had the KMT not
crumbled during the Japanese Ichi-Go Offensive. Under this
alternate history, the KMT holds its own under the Japanese
attacks, and the US plans are implemented.
DESIGN NOTE: These US units are not controlled by the WA because their
objectives (and thus, their impact on victory conditions) are more closely related to those of the KMT than those of the WA in Burma and India. Placing
them under KMT control also avoids violating the unit command rules in the
CIC and IBS theaters.
•
The game continues until the end of Turn 34 (Winter 1945-46).
•
The final Victory Points of Japan and the WA are calculated at the end
of Turn 32.
26.0 – VARIANT RULES (OPTIONAL)
26.1 – SIMPLIFIED RULES
The players may agree to use any of the following before game start.
26.1.1 – Simplified Limited Operation Areas: Units with limited operation areas simply cannot leave the region (see Territories Table) where they
are initially deployed, unless subsequently required by an OB.
26.1.2 – Simplified Deployment: Units with a specific entry hex listed
in the OBs can be deployed freely in friendly hexes of the territory (see
Territories Table) in which they are originally destined to be deployed.
26.2 – LIMITED INTELLIGENCE
Players can check the counters in any stack of another side at any time, except
ground units.
Due to better intelligence, Japan may always examine ground units of the
KMT and WA (but not CCP) sides. Also, ground units in a hex where a unit
of another side exerts a ZOC must be revealed to this other side. Otherwise,
a side cannot check the units under the top unit in a ground unit stack of another side (even an allied side), but can enquire about the SP, sizes, and types
of ground units in the hex, which the player must honestly answer, saying for
instance “There are 5 SP of units, one cavalry brigade, one armored battalion,
and one infantry division”.
DESIGN NOTE: The Allied sides cannot check each other’s units, because
historically, there was some level of mistrust among them. Even the British
never let the Chinese know of their battle plans and deployments. Guerrilla,
guerrilla bases, and bandit counters do not represent the precise location of
the groups they represent, but rather an indication of their existence in the
surrounding area. As such, it is logical to let all the players know where they
are.
26.3 – HISTORICAL GAME
Players preferring a more historical game might want to use the following
variants.
26.3.1 – No Political Negotiations: Political negotiations rules [18.0] are
not used, but foreign loans are still received. The consequences of historical political activities are implemented during the Negotiation Phase.
•
•
Eliminate any Japanese units in the West Pacific Holding Box. From
now on, the holding box is controlled by the KMT.
Turn 0: Sung clique pro-KMT.
•
Turn 2: Soviet Union supporting KMT — Sung clique assimilated by KMT — Han clique pro-Japan.
•
On Turn 30, the conditional US units listed in the KMT OB enter
play in the West Pacific Holding Box under KMT control. These may
only operate in the CIC theater and the West Pacific Holding Box.
•
Turn 3: Germany appeasing Japan — Han clique assimilated by
KMT — Szechwan (Sc) clique assimilated by KMT — Yen clique
unaffiliated.
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
War of the Suns
36
•
Turn 5: Germany supporting Japan.
•
Turn 22: Famine [in Honan province].
•
Turn 6: Western Allies sympathetic to KMT — Yen clique proJapan.
•
Turn 23: Improved KMT Recruitment — Peasant Uprising [Hex
3720, Hunan province].
•
Turn 7: Western Allies neutral.
•
•
Turn 12: Peace talks between KMT and Japan — Western Allies
appeasing Japan (Burma Road closure).
Turn 24: Famine [in Northeastern India] — Peasant Uprising
[Hex 3237, Kansu province].
•
Turn 25: Rectification Movement.
•
Turn 13: Western Allies neutral — French Indochina pro-Japan.
•
Turn 27: Peasant Uprising [Hex 2519, Honan province].
•
Turn 14: Western Allies sympathetic to KMT.
•
Turn 30: Famine [in Indochina].
•
Turn 15: Western Allies supporting KMT (Lend-lease agreement
with China, trade embargo against Japan).
•
Turn 31: Mutiny [in Shantung province].
•
Turn 18: Siam pro-Japan.
•
Turn 24: Western Allies sympathetic to KMT (Start of Dixie
Mission).
•
Turn 27: Yu clique unaffiliated.
•
Turn 29: Western Allies neutral (Stilwell recalled from China).
26.3.2 – No Random Events: Do not roll for random events. Instead,
events occur following the historical schedule below. Information [in
brackets] is given for historical interest only; players should follow the
events’ instructions to determine their effects in the game.
•
Turn 2: Massacre [in Nanking (1911)].
•
Turn 3: KMT Death (Liu Hsiang).
•
Turn 4: Opium [ Japan, in Inner Mongolia].
•
Turn 5: Bio-Chemical Attack [in Hankow (2816)].
•
Turn 6: Scorched Earth Policy [in Changsha (3515)] — Peasant
Uprising [Hex 1318, Shantung province].
•
Turn 9: Oilfield (Yumen).
•
Turn 11: KMT Death (Sung Che-Yuan).
•
Turn 12: Border Closure [Western Allies].
•
Turn 14: Opium [CCP, in Shensi province].
•
Turn 19: Peasant Uprising [Hex 4723, Kweichow province].
•
Turn 20: Three-Alls Policy [in Hopeh province].
•
Turn 21: Natural Catastrophe [Drought/Locusts, in Honan
province].
HISTORICAL NOTE: Often significantly due to human causes, the great
famines of the war—like the Bengal famine of 1943 which took more than
three million lives or the 1945 famine that caused over one million deaths in
northern Indochina—are an ignored part in a conflict ignored by much of the
Western world.
CREDITS
Research and Design: Leonard To
Development: Adam Starkweather
Map and Box Art: Mark Mahaffey
Counter Art: Bruce Yearian
Rules Editing: Vincent Lefavrais
Rules Formatting: Nick Richardson
VASSAL Support: Kevin Graves
Special Thanks: Akira Takizawa, for his help with research on Japanese units.
Alpha Playtest: Leonard To, Lawrence Hung, Edwin Siu, Laikay, Anthony
Lee, Wong Yat Fung.
Proofreading: Aaron Silverman, John Clifford
Original Design:<聖戰千秋> Long Live the Sacred War — Summer
1983 (winner of the First Hong Kong Wargame Design Competition)
First Redesign: <八年抗戰> Eight Years’ War of Resistance — Summer
1991
Second Redesign: <天無二日> War of the Suns — September 2004- Spring
2013
©2013 Multi–Man Publishing, Inc.
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