Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition

Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition
These materials are © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.
Content Marketing
Kudani® Limited Edition
by Paul Clifford
These materials are © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.
Content Marketing For Dummies®, Kudani® Limited Edition
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Introduction
C
ontent marketing is a hot topic. Unlike many marketing
fads that catch fire and die quickly, content marketing is
here to stay. It is a proven way to interest customers and convert them into buyers.
The magnitude of information thrown at customers every day
causes them to guard their attention closely. If you want to
grab your customers’ attention, you need to produce content
that solves real problems and is of higher quality than that of
your competitors. That’s a tall order.
That’s why Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited
Edition was written. It helps you cut through the endless
supply of content marketing advice and provides a proven
system that works.
About This Book
In this book, you take a look at the PICASSO content marketing framework created for use with KudaniCloud software.
The good news is that you can use this powerful framework
for all your content marketing efforts without the software
itself. However, if you use the software, you will be more
­effective.
The chapters cover each step in the PICASSO framework,
from creating a plan to measuring the outcome. They show
you how to handle common problems that content marketers
face, but also how to avoid mistakes. You see how the right
combination of planning and content creation leads to engaging content that can increase your bottom line.
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2
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition Icons Used in This Book
This book provides basic yet key information about content
marketing, with the following icons used to draw your attention to special points:
This icon signifies content that makes something easier or
quicker for you.
This icon represents information you need to remember.
Hopefully, when you’re reaching into your memory bank, this
information floats to the top.
This is information that you may find interesting if you like to
know more about the technical details.
Beyond The Book
To learn about KudaniCloud, go to
http://www.kudani.com/book
We also offer a detailed training program to complement the
book. That program is available here:
http://www.kudani.com/course
These materials are © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.
Chapter 1
Understanding Content
Marketing
In This Chapter
▶▶Looking at how modern marketing has changed
▶▶Working with the PICASSO Framework
▶▶Starting your plan
C
ompanies recognize that if customers can’t find the
­content easy to use and enjoy, they are off to seek out
something else. The opportunity to impress or even get on
their radar screen is missed. Marketing expert Seth Godin
has said, “Content marketing is the only marketing left.” In
this chapter, you learn how to develop an effective content
­marketing strategy using the Kudani PICASSO Framework.
Understanding Why Content
Marketing Is Needed
Do you know what all marketers desperately want? It’s their
prospects’ attention — to what they have to say and sell.
Since the advent of our “always on” culture, the competition
for people’s attention has been fierce. So fierce that most of
the content created by companies is never even seen by their
prospects.
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4
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition It wasn’t always hard to get people’s attention. We used to
send marketing material and then call. Prospects were usually receptive because the salesperson was the keeper of all
­product information.
Those days are over. You may or may not have the opportunity to meet your customers face to face. Conversations do
help develop relationships, and relationships help you get
and keep your customers’ attention, so how can you engage
a customer in an online conversation? You can (and must!)
use quality content that addresses their needs and provides
valuable information. You can do that using the PICASSO
Framework.
Using the PICASSO Framework
The PICASSO Framework was developed by Kudani for
use with its KudaniCloud content marketing software. It is
a proven content marketing blueprint that gives you the
­confidence to create a profitable content marketing program.
You don’t need to use the KudaniCloud software to execute
the PICASSO Framework. However, if you do use it, you will be
more effective.
P‐I‐C‐A‐S‐S‐O is an acronym for Plan, Infrastructure, Create,
Amplify with Syndication plus Sharing, and Outcome.
Here’s an overview of the items that make up the PICASSO
Framework:
✓✓Plan: You must start with a solid plan or you risk going
off course without even realizing it. Within the planning
section, you follow the M‐A‐S‐F‐C method. That is, you:
••Define your Mission
••Develop your Avatar
••Create your Style sheet
••Construct your buyer Funnel
••Lay out your Calendar
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Chapter 1: Understanding Content Marketing
5
This chapter covers each of these in the “Starting with a
plan” section (except for the Calendar, which is covered
in Chapter 3).
✓✓Infrastructure: Your infrastructure is the engine that
drives all your content marketing. If you get this right,
you create a solid foundation that reliably converts your
prospects. Your infrastructure includes your websites,
landing pages, and any other sites that act as a “shop
window” to entice customers.
✓✓Create: Creation of content is the most difficult for content marketers because it requires an ongoing commitment to publishing quality content on a consistent basis.
✓✓Amplify with Syndication and Sharing: To promote your
content and get your message heard, you need to use
both organic and paid tactics.
✓✓Outcome: Metrics you choose will help you determine
how much traction you are getting.
The book covers all these pieces of the framework, and you
begin by creating your plan.
Starting with a Plan
You may have started publishing content without a plan. It
might have seemed easier to write an article or blog post and
see whether it resonated with your audience. The bad news
was that your content probably went unnoticed. All your hard
work and effort may have been wasted.
You’re not alone. A variety of factors, including Google filters
and poorly constructed content, mean that the majority of
content you created will never be seen by the people targeted
unless you are strategic about how to reach those ­targets.
Defining your mission
To reach your audience, you need to begin with a clear
mission statement. You may think that mission statements
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Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition are outdated, but they truly help you focus on your most
­important goals and define your website content.
According to the “2015 Benchmarks, Budgets and Trends —
North America” report by the Content Marketing Institute/
Marketing Profs, the top organizational goals for B2B content
marketing are the following:
✓✓Brand awareness: 84 percent
✓✓Lead generation: 83 percent
✓✓Engagement: 81 percent
✓✓Sales: 75 percent
✓✓Lead nurturing: 74 percent
✓✓Customer Retention/Loyalty: 69 percent
✓✓Customer Evangelism: 57 percent
✓✓Upsell/Cross‐sell: 52 percent
Developing your avatars
Nothing is more important for you as a content marketer than
understanding your customers. Without this understanding,
you can’t develop content or make your product or service
indispensable. Enter buyer avatars. Avatars are representations of your targeted customers. Marketers have a love‐hate
relationship with them. They know that they need to create
and use them, but they find avatars difficult to develop.
Creating avatars can be tricky. You can’t treat them like lifeless customer profiles that are created once and pulled out
only for quarterly meetings. You have to understand who your
avatars stand for and what they care about. Avatars change as
your company and products change.
Art and science combine in the work of developing avatars.
You need hard data to justify your conclusions. You also need
a sense of how that data translates into customer emotions
and actions. If you have a poorly constructed set of avatars,
you may do more harm than good.
The first question you may have as a content marketer is
whether your content benefits from using buyer avatars. Does
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Chapter 1: Understanding Content Marketing
7
it really matter if you haven’t developed avatars on which to
focus your team’s content creation efforts? The good news
is that developing avatars greatly improves the content you
create. Read on to see how.
When you use avatars, you can:
✓✓Tap into feelings and emotions in your copy. After you
understand how your buyers want to feel when they use
your product, you can evoke those feelings with your
content.
✓✓Use buying triggers in emails and real‐time messaging.
If you know your avatars’ buying triggers, you send your
emails and messages at the right time to interest buyers.
You can also make sure that the same content is on your
website and anywhere else your buyers find you.
✓✓Directly address problems they are experiencing.
Solving problems for your customers is key to generating
revenue. Your content, in all appropriate formats, should
focus on problem solving.
✓✓Use influencers to persuade them. Knowing whom your
customers listen to and respect is an important piece
of the content puzzle. You want to include influencer
endorsements in your content when possible.
✓✓Set the tone, style, and delivery of your content. You can
determine whether you need a formal voice or something
more conversational.
Using avatars also helps you determine what content you
need. If you break your existing content down by avatar, you
can easily see which avatars have plenty of content and which
avatars need more content.
To effectively use the avatar concept, you should create an
avatar document that details your customer wants/needs.
Here are some suggestions about what to include:
✓✓Name and gender
✓✓Demographics: Age, education, income level, location
✓✓Job role
✓✓Goals
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Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition ✓✓Challenges
✓✓Story
✓✓Language spoken
✓✓Where your customers consume content, such as via
email, on Pinterest, and so on
It can be helpful to pick a photo to include on your avatar document that depicts the age, gender, and look of your avatar. A
photo helps you think of the avatar as a real person.
Creating Brand Awareness
Using Style Mastery
Your brand is created in the mind of your customer. It is
the feeling they get when they use your product, including
whether they perceive that your brand is authentic. You can
declare what your brand means to your customers, but you
can’t make them believe it.
Because prospects can’t make a face‐to‐face determination
about your company’s truthfulness and ethics, they rely on
your content. An authentic brand is one that seems truthful,
transparent, and cares about its customers’ satisfaction.
Your customers define your brand by several characteristics,
including your style. Here are some facets to consider when
developing your style:
✓✓Writing style: Should your content be formal or do you
want to use a more casual style? You need to define your
tone so that all the writers who contribute content can
match it.
✓✓Tone: Your tone is conveyed by the words you choose as
well as sentence style. Decide whether you want matter‐
of‐fact content, a style that evokes emotions, or something in between.
✓✓Punctuation: Create a style sheet that details any specific
punctuation or word usage requirements.
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Chapter 1: Understanding Content Marketing
9
✓✓Blog post and website layout: Make sure to provide documentation that tells staff what the layout of all owned
sites should be. Without consistency, your brand communicates an unprofessional attitude.
✓✓Image style: Your images impact how your brand is interpreted. Make sure to create a style guide that details the
size and requirements for all visuals.
Looking at the Buyer Funnel
The shift in control from marketers to prospects has created
a strong need for content marketers to figure out what a prospect needs at every stage of the buyer’s journey. In today’s
marketplace, buyers want to be able to explore information
on all their devices from any location. They explore retail
stores, the web, print and broadcast outlets, customer events,
and so on, and all in a nonlinear process. You therefore need
to anticipate the potential contact points and provide content
for each one.
Even more important than a focus solely on touchpoints (that
is, a place at which your prospect comes in contact with
your brand) is an understanding of the journey your customers take. You need to walk in their shoes to understand their
behavior and what they need. This is where your avatars
come into play. Of course, mapping the journey using a host
of procedures, systems, avatars, and touchpoints can be complex. But the payoff is worth it. As the buyer’s journey has
evolved, marketers have realized that creating generic content for prospects in each stage is a waste of time and money.
You need to speak to your specific buyer. Customers expect
more personalized communication that’s geared to their
tastes and sensibilities.
To create all the content needed for each part of the buyer’s
journey, you set up a buyer funnel. Funnel is a term used to
describe the process of collecting visitors and sending them
through a defined set of steps, from the beginning where they
“meet” your brand to the end when they become a buyer.
So what are the steps in a typical funnel? The typical buying
process is divided into four steps, as depicted in Table 1‐1.
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Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition Table 1-1
A Typical Funnel Journey
Buyer
Stages
Step in the
Funnel
Suggested Content
Types
Objective
Visitors
Top of the
­funnel content
(TOFC)
Curated piece, original
article, promoted blog
post, social curation,
educational sequence
Signups, get
traffic to your
blog, likes
and shares
Leads
Middle of the
funnel content
(MOFC)
Weekly Roundup,
reviews, case studies,
webinars
Sales, get
traffic to your
blog, trust
Customers
Advocates
Bottom of the
funnel content
(BOFC)
Emails, customer
news, tips, webinars
Trust, shares,
word of
mouth
Here’s how a prospect might go through the funnel:
✓✓Top of the funnel content (TOFC): When people initially
discover your business, the content they see first should
be educational. They want to determine whether you’re
presenting a solution to a problem they have.
✓✓Middle of the funnel content (MOFC): If customers
believe that your product may provide a solution, they
begin to think about how they might implement the solution you offer. They consider costs and comparisons with
other competitors, and frequently read reviews and case
studies.
✓✓Bottom of the funnel content (BOFC): After people
become customers, you need to strengthen your bond
with them to ensure that they continue to be delighted
with their purchase. The final phase in the funnel
involves encouraging buyers to be advocates for your
business and arming them with the content that helps
them socially sell your solution to their network.
In Chapter 5, you find out how to set up a buyer funnel.
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Chapter 2
Preparing the Infrastructure
In This Chapter
▶▶Optimizing performance for conversion
▶▶Looking at trust signals
▶▶Deploying lead magnets
Y
our infrastructure is critical to the success of your content marketing efforts. If your web pages load slowly or
your mobile website looks bad, you will drive visitors away
before they even consider your content.
This chapter focuses on preparing your sites to receive
­visitors. You also find out the key ingredients that go into
helping you get leads from your targeted audience using a
lead magnet.
A lead magnet is a piece of content you use to entice your
customers to give you their email address or other identifying information in exchange for something of value to them
(a report, e‐book, webinar, or something else.) You obtain this
information so that you can attempt to convert them from a
prospect into a customer because you now have their permission to send them emails and offers.
Preparing Your Sites for Visitors
As you think about all the tasks involved in working on your
content marketing, you’re probably not thinking about your
sites’ performance. Instead, you focus on the content itself
and worry about creating enough to satisfy your customers.
But without the proper attention to site optimization, you
can’t succeed.
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Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition Tuning your engine
Your audience is impacted by your site’s performance. Look
at these statistics.
✓✓Forty percent of people leave a website if it takes more
than four seconds to load.
✓✓Seventy‐three percent of mobile users say that they’ve
left a website that took too long to load.
Your prospects don’t have the time or inclination to wait for
your sites to display. You need to pay attention to your site
performance so that your prospects don’t have to. If you have
not fine‐tuned your sites, you’re not paying attention to the
heart of your content marketing operation.
Setting optimization goals and
looking at some key metrics
The easiest way to maintain your sites is to set some specific
performance goals. Here are two optimization goals that make
a big difference:
✓✓Desktop performance goal: A site should not take more
than four seconds to load from a visitor’s desktop.
✓✓Mobile performance goal: A mobile site should not take
more than two seconds to load on your visitor’s mobile
device.
Want to test how fast your sites load? Go to http://tools.
pingdom.com/fpt/, type in your URL, and see what you
find out.
If you routinely check these measurements, you’ll be alert to
problems you need to address.
You also need to track other metrics, and you use Google
Analytics for this type of tracking. (See Chapter 5 for more
about Google Analytics.)
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Chapter 2: Preparing the Infrastructure
13
These other metrics include:
✓✓Opt‐in rate for leads: It’s important for you to know the
rate at which your lead magnets are getting people to
convert to prospects. Keep your eye on this measure so
that if you see a low rate, you know what you need to do.
Lead magnets require an opt‐in from your audience, which
means that prospects volunteer to give you their personal information. Using an opt‐in with your lead magnet
increases the likelihood that you are connecting with a
person who is truly interested in what you have to say.
✓✓Time on site: This measurement tells you how much
time your visitor spends on a specific page on your site.
Obviously, you would like your visitor to spend some
time on your pages.
✓✓Bounce rate: The bounce rate tells you how often visitors leave your site after looking at the one page they
landed on. It’s calculated as a percentage. So a 50 percent
bounce rate means that 50 percent of the time a visitor
lands on your site, he or she doesn’t look at any other
page but instead leaves your site completely.
Developing Site Content
That Gets Leads
Your owned sites are the closest thing you have to a real shop
window. As with any good shop window, your site should
demonstrate authority and encourage prospects to explore
further.
On the web, you want to signal your customers that you’re a
legitimate business. You do that by displaying trust signals.
The next section reveals what some of these trust signals are.
Using trust factors that
build authority
Everyone wants to do business with people they trust. For
this reason, it is imperative that you provide as many trust
signals as you can. So what exactly is a trust signal?
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Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition Trust signals are logos or other identifying symbols that you
put on your site to assure the visitor that your site is trustworthy. These include a logo from a security company or a
100‐percent‐guarantee icon that mitigates risk in the mind of
your customer when he or she buys your product.
Here are some examples of trust signals you should consider
using on your sites:
✓✓A professional‐looking logo that indicates that you are
serious about your business and your brand
✓✓A phone number that the visitor can call for further
­information
✓✓Several benefit‐driven testimonials from satisfied
­customers
✓✓A guarantee icon that tells the visitor that you stand
behind your products
✓✓A live‐chat function that allows a visitor to speak to a
customer service representative
✓✓The address of your business location
✓✓Terms of Service (TOS) and Privacy links that spell out
the responsibilities of both you and your visitors when
they visit your site
✓✓A demo video or tour that demonstrates your product or
tells visitors about your services
Creating a powerful lead magnet
As you know, what most content marketers want in this
­information‐overload era is to focus people’s attention
on their brand. Unsurprisingly, technology has negatively
impacted our attention span. The Statistic Brain Institute
defines attention span as “the amount of concentrated time
on a task without becoming distracted” and reports that our
attention span in 2000 was 12 seconds but by 2015 had gone
down to 8.25 seconds (http://www.statisticbrain.
com/attention‐span‐statistics).
The Statistic Brain Institute also reports that office workers
check their email Inbox approximately thirty times per hour.
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Chapter 2: Preparing the Infrastructure
15
That’s a shocking ­statistic if you multiply that by an eight‐
hour day. Two hundred and forty times a day! So what can
a content marketer do to stand out from the crowd? He can
grab attention by creating a powerful lead magnet. Lead
magnets are not easy to get right, however. There are several
ways you can slip up. The major offenses include:
✓✓No follow‐up: You need to send a follow‐up within one
day of receiving a person’s name. If you don’t, you run
the risk that the person will not remember opting in and
will consider your email to be spam. Don’t be shy. If this
person is interested in your content, send more of it.
✓✓No next step (call to action): Sending a quality lead
magnet is great, but what about telling visitors what to do
next to be more effective? A wonderful lead magnet can
be a dead end if you don’t also give your prospects clear
actions to take next to solve their problem. They are
interested in your advice. This next step is called a call to
action (CTA).
✓✓Providing too much content: Too much content? Is that
even possible? Actually, it is. You may be thinking that
your prospect wants to know everything you know about
the topic. But what your prospect really wants to know
is exactly what she needs to know based on where she
is in the buyer’s journey. That’s why it’s very important
to provide your information in manageable doses that
speak to the needs of your prospect at that moment. You
provide these manageable doses by creating content
for every part of the Buyer’s Funnel, as described in
Chapter 1.
So what goes into creating an effective lead magnet? A lead
magnet must provide content that
✓✓Solves one problem your avatar is struggling with:
Remember that you have a customer who is looking for a
solution to a problem. Your title should indicate that you
have a solution.
✓✓Looks professional and includes your qualifications
so that visitors trust you: No one needs to tell you that
unprofessional sites will actually scare people off. No one
wants to do business with amateurs.
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Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition ✓✓Contains high‐quality images: Visuals carry a great deal
of weight in the mind of the customer. For high‐quality
images, consider using Unsplash (http://unsplash.
com) or Pixabay (http://pixabay.com). Each has
­royalty-free images that you can use to enhance your
sites.
✓✓Includes a strong CTA: Make sure you have a strong
directive that tells people what action they should take
next. Kudani recommends that you use a method called
Congruent Lead Capture (CLC) when developing your
call to action. CLC is a call to action that is specific to the
post your customer is reading.
For example, if your visitor is reading a post about the
five best types of content marketing templates to use,
offer that visitor a lead magnet that has a PDF download
of five free templates. This ensures that the lead magnet
matches the reader’s interest.
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Chapter 3
Creating Your Content
In This Chapter
▶▶Researching content that converts prospects into buyers
▶▶Understanding why keywords still matter
▶▶Creating different content types
T
he biggest challenge that content marketers face is not
related to systems or governance. It is figuring out how
to create content that engages their audience. Why is this
so difficult? Because it requires you to really know who your
audience is and what they want. That’s a critical part of any
marketing strategy, but it’s especially important when you
are deciding what content to create for all the steps in your
buyer’s journey.
In this chapter, you look at how to research content topics
for your audience and provide ways to create quality content
fast. You learn about out the different types of content available for you to create.
Researching the Topics
That Get Traffic
Before you begin to write any of your content, you want to
review what you’re already sharing to get a sense of what
your audience finds important. Your goal is to get attention;
to do this effectively, you need to write about topics your
audience cares about.
You should focus on two key areas: keywords and virality.
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Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition When your customers perform searches, they are looking
for solutions to their problems. Make sure that you know
what their problems are and demonstrate that you have the
answers.
Using the best keywords
The good news about keywords is that you don’t have to
be a search engine optimization (SEO) expert to use them
effectively. In fact, many of the rules about SEO that used to
be considered imperative have become obsolete. Google has
changed the way it ranks content so that old methods don’t
apply. Now you need to focus on providing rich, informative
content that your readers will love, and the rest will take care
of itself.
This doesn’t mean that you should ignore keywords. They
are still very important. But you need to find the specific keywords that attract buyers, not just those searching for information. The keywords that people use tell you their intent,
that is, what they are trying to accomplish.
When you create your keyword list, consider your buyers’
commercial intent. That is, focus on keywords that people use
when they intend to buy things. People basically undertake
three types of searches:
✓✓Informational searches: This is the type of search that
users perform when they are primarily looking for information. Their searches contain such words as how do I,
or where can I.
✓✓Navigational searches: Users conduct this kind of search
when they know exactly what they are looking for. For
example, if they want to read articles on a specific blog,
they simply type in the name of the blog.
✓✓Transactional searches: User intent here is to buy something. This is the type of keyword that you want to focus
on. You want to ensure that the people who want to buy
can find you.
Along with words such as buy, the category of product
appears. For example, if you were selling organic baby
food online, you’d want to use keyword phrases like “buy
organic baby food online” or “ship organic baby food.”
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Chapter 3: Creating Your Content
19
To find the right buyer keywords, you want to focus on the
long-tail keyword. Long‐tail keywords are keywords that are
very specific and generally have three‐ and four‐word phrases,
perhaps even longer. They are the phrases that searchers put
into Google to find something.
For example, if your customer were looking for tennis shoes,
she would probably type something more specific than just
“tennis shoes.” She might want to narrow the search by color
and size, so her long‐tail phrase might be “buy ladies white
tennis shoes size 6.” If you were selling that type of tennis
shoe, you would want to make sure to use those keywords.
Add your long‐tail keywords to both your content title and in
the body of your content.
Understanding virality
What about viral content? Everybody wants to create it, but
does anyone really know how? Some research done by Jonah
Berger and Katherine L. Milkman suggests that we at least
know some of the components that make up viral content.
Berger and Milkman published an article in the Journal of
Marketing Research called, “What Makes Online Content
Viral?” (To download the PDF, use this link: https://
marketing.wharton.upenn.edu/files/?whdmsaction=
public:main.file&fileID=3461). They analyzed New
York Times articles and determined that emotion played a
large part in creating sharing behavior.
Specifically, they found that
✓✓Positive content is more likely to go viral than negative
content.
✓✓High psychological arousal fuels viral content. Content
that evoked such strong emotions as awe, anger, anxiety,
and sadness was more likely to go viral than content that
evoked weaker emotions.
This research can help you when you’re creating content with
an eye toward going viral, but it can’t ensure your success.
To increase the chances that your content will go viral, you
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20
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition need to do some research to find out what content people are
already responding to before you create your own.
Here are some online tools to help you find answers:
✓✓BuzzSumo (http://buzzsumo.com): Tells you what’s
being shared right now by article title and provides a
breakdown of social shares by social platform.
✓✓Quora (http://quora.com): Here you find the answers
to questions about a variety of topics asked by real
people who need answers.
✓✓Amazon (http://amazon.com): Search for the top
titles in your niche and read testimonials to see what
buyers want and what they want to avoid.
Develop a list of your ideas that match the research and your
avatars, and keep it on hand so that you never run out of
ideas to write about.
Diversifying with Content Types
Several content types are available for you to consider when
creating content. These types include original content,
curated content, curated social content, and repurposed
­content. Look at each in turn to see how you can make the
most of each type.
Creating original content
Original content is the foundation of any content strategy.
It helps businesses and thought leaders gain authority and
brand recognition. But creating this kind of content takes a
great deal of time and effort. You have to be sure that you are
targeting your avatar (persona) and creating content that is
powerful and actionable.
So how can you create this type of content? Kudani recommends a method called Repurposing and Segmenting a
Masterpiece (RSM), which helps you quickly create great
­content. It involves a three‐step process:
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Chapter 3: Creating Your Content
21
✓✓Create masterpiece content on a regular schedule,
­perhaps once or twice a month depending on how
in‐depth your research needs to be. Masterpiece ­content
is original content that is selected from three types of
content discussed in the next section. You create this
content in one sitting so your time is not fragmented.
✓✓Segment the content into a variety of types. These could
be blog posts, podcasts, videos, infographics, and a host
of other types.
✓✓Repurpose this quality content. You repurpose the
content by distributing it on all your channels — blogs,
social media, paid media, and any other channel you
have established.
In a short time, you have an abundance of content that you
can use to engage your audience.
You will get a significant return on the time you invest in this
method. It’s much quicker than creating original content from
scratch any time you need a blog post or article.
Here are the kinds of content you can use to create your masterpiece content. Most content marketers struggle because
they don’t know where to start. These types of content work
especially well because they focus on your avatars’ needs:
✓✓Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ): These are the
questions that your audience wants to know about, so
you can be assured that they will be interested in the
answers. You can develop answers to these questions
and go into as much depth as you like.
✓✓“Should ask” questions: This type of content can help
you stand out from your competitors. Why? Because
you’re telling your audience what to think about before
they spend money on a solution. To do this correctly,
you should construct the answers to the questions in a
way that makes you the obvious choice. Your services or
your products meet all the needs that you designate as
must haves.
✓✓Vision, opinion, and data: This type of content can
give you or your brand the capability to demonstrate
leadership. It involves picking a topic that you think is
important to your industry. The content you write should
include your vision for the topic, your opinion on how it
will change things, and data to back up your claims.
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22
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition As you can see, these content types lend themselves to
­quality content. You don’t have to go searching for what to
write about.
Curating content
Content curation can seem complicated, but it is really very
straightforward. What can be complicated is the delivery of a
curated article that adds value. A good way to think of this is
the Oprah chat show. Oprah (the curator) hosts guests on her
show who appeal to her audience. She doesn’t provide the
content, her guest does. She simply provides the audience,
and by selecting the best people to be on the show (the content providers), she is perceived as the authority.
According to a 2014 survey by Trap.it (http://trap.it), 74
percent of marketers say that curation is important to their
content marketing strategy.
You and your audience benefit when you curate content,
because it allows you to
✓✓Demonstrate your ability to analyze and add value to
content topics
✓✓Organize the information to make it easier to understand
✓✓Provide a new viewpoint on an old idea to make it usable
✓✓Inspire trust in you as a thought leader
✓✓Put the information in a different format, such as an infographic, to make it more digestible
✓✓Create content that can supplement your original content, thus providing quantity and quality
The key to curating articles is to be able to quickly find the
content that will be most valuable to your audience.
Some content marketing platforms like KudaniCloud have
built‐in feed sources and article curation tools. Look for that
function when you consider content marketing software.
So how do you curate an article? You must include the
­following:
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Chapter 3: Creating Your Content
23
✓✓Introduction: Write your own original introduction that
tells readers why you have chosen the article.
✓✓Curated content: Copy a piece of the content from the
source and add it to your article. You don’t want to
include too much. Some guidelines suggest 50 percent,
but the key is to give the reader a feel for the article’s
points and to strengthen your message.
✓✓Attribution: Attribute or cite the source of the article
and provide a link to it so that the original author is given
credit. This can be done in a formal and informal way:
••Informal: You can include the backlink in the context of the curated content. For example: “James
said in his article here that houses made of straw
will get blown over.”
••Formal: You show the source using the word via to
illustrate to the reader that it’s curated. For example: “Houses made of straw will get blown over. Via
James’ nursery rhyme blog.”
✓✓Summary: Write an original summary of the article that
gives your point of view and adds value for the reader.
✓✓Image: Create a new image to support the article.
✓✓Title: Create a new title for the article that differentiates
it from the one you’re curating.
If you do these things, you will have curated content that your
audience will find valuable.
A word on duplicate content: It was perceived for many years
that using this approach is duplicating others’ content and
can damage your SEO. In fact, as long as you attribute the
source (citation or attribution), such content’s use is fully
endorsed by the search engines who recognize that curation
is in effect.
Utilizing social curation
One popular way to create content is to share links from other
relevant sources of news on social platforms. This type of
content is popular because your audience cannot spend all
its time searching such sites as Twitter and Facebook. People
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24
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition could miss content that would interest them. If you share
those links from your feed, you can become a welcome source
of curated social content.
To accomplish this task, you can use tools like Feedly
(http://feedly.com), Buffer (http://buffer.com), or
Kudani (http://www.kudani.com/book) to find interesting
social ­content to curate.
Repurposing other
people’s content
When you repurpose other people’s content, you can change
the format, update the material, or both.
Many reasons exist for repurposing content. Repurposing
helps you
✓✓Spread ideas: It extends the reach of your ideas by giving
new audiences the chance to see it.
✓✓Provide a variety of formats: You can increase the reach
of the content.
✓✓Make content more cost effective: By repurposing
other people’s content, you save the cost of the original
research.
In all cases when repurposing someone else’s content, you
should cite the original source. So what are some ideas for
repurposing other people’s ­content?
You can repurpose
✓✓Someone’s post to an infographic
✓✓An infographic to a post, with a unique link back to the
­original infographic
✓✓An infographic image, and turn it into an authority article
✓✓A YouTube video into a post with step‐by‐step images
from screen grabs of the video
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Chapter 3: Creating Your Content
25
Recognizing the Power
of the Headline
Why do headlines matter? Some people never get past them.
Research shows that only two in ten people will go past the
headline to read the article. You need all the help you can get
to create compelling headlines so that you entice people to
read further.
When you create headlines, you want to
✓✓Evoke emotion: As you’ve seen, emotions trigger attention and persuasion. If your headline is bland, the reader
will pass it by on the way to something juicier.
✓✓Attract the right reader: Your headline should make
it clear whom the article is targeted at — CEOs, small
­business owners, or others.
✓✓Assist with search engine optimization (SEO): This
means using a keyword in your headline to help your
­customers find you.
✓✓Make a meaningful promise: Readers always want to
know what they will get from reading your article. Make
it clear.
✓✓Do the work of the entire article: As you know, some
readers will never get past the headline, so create a headline that has impact.
You can find a variety of free online tools to help you construct
and evaluate your headlines. They include Headlinr (http://
Headlinr.com) and the Emotional Marketing Value Headline
Analyzer (http://www.aminstitute.com/headline/).
Filling in Your Editorial Calendar
Would you schedule a trip without looking at a calendar?
Probably not. So why not use an editorial calendar when
scheduling your content? If you wonder whether a calendar
is necessary, you’re not alone. Some content marketers don’t
want to be bothered with establishing one and keeping it
­current.
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26
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition If you’re a solo business operator or have a very small team,
you might think that a calendar is overkill. Think again.
Keeping a schedule is a proven tool used to accomplish goals.
Why take the chance of missing ­deadlines?
If you work in a large corporation, you probably already see
the need for a robust organizational tool and may be looking
for a good editorial calendar. You have several good options
to choose from, and I describe them shortly. But first, take a
look at the tasks that a calendar helps you perform. When you
have a calendar, you can
✓✓See the big picture of how your content is distributed throughout the months. A calendar gives you an
at‐a‐glance view of the content that is in the pipeline
and that has already been published, helping you avoid
­duplication.
✓✓Ensure that you will have the people and resources
that you need when you need them. To avoid long
gaps in the schedule, you want to get writers lined up
in advance. If someone drops out or you want to add
something special, you can prepare ahead of time. Also,
Google loves consistency, and you don’t want to disappoint Google!
✓✓Develop content for specific promotions and campaigns. Product managers, marketers, and sales managers want to get their campaigns put at the head of the
line. A calendar can help to control the potential chaos of
conflicting demands.
✓✓Assign people to specific content tasks and then follow
up with them. A documented schedule allows you to
follow up with the people to whom you assign tasks. You
can see whether a deadline is fast approaching with no
word from your contributor.
✓✓Prevent the problem of not knowing what to write
about with a deadline looming. A calendar allows you to
schedule topics in advance so that you’re never wondering what your people should be writing about.
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Chapter 4
Amplifying Your Content
with Sharing and
Syndication
In This Chapter
▶▶Looking at content promotion
▶▶Sharing organic content to get attention
▶▶Using paid syndication
I
t’s great when your content is discovered by a new audience. Your ticket to recognition is to distribute your content to as many eyeballs as you can. But how do you make
that happen? You can’t count on getting all your traffic from
your owned media, such as a blog or website. To get the word
out, you need to use other venues, such as social media and
other people’s blogs.
Two great strategies you can use to find new audiences are
syndication and guest posting. Some people get confused and
think they are the same thing because they involve posting
content on someone else’s site. But the two actually have very
different characteristics and benefits.
The main difference between syndicated content and guest
posting is that with syndicated content, you are sharing content that was already posted on your site. When you guestpost, you are creating original content that is first seen on an
influencer blog with a link back to your site.
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28
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition In this chapter, you find out about syndication and guest posting, as well as the need to promote your content to as wide an
audience as possible.
Understanding Content
Promotion Types
You have several types of content promotion available to you:
✓✓Paid media: This type of media refers to the advertising promotions that you pay for. When choosing these
options, you need a budget and a conviction that you will
get a return on the money you spend.
Examples: Facebook ads, promoted tweets, traditional
and native advertising, print ads, paid search, mobile
ads, app ads, and Amazon ads.
✓✓Earned media: This is the media that you get when other
sources recognize and promote your content for you.
Your brand or your content is deemed valuable and is
showcased in some way or reshared.
Examples: Influencer reviews, traditional PR, and media
relations.
✓✓Shared media: This media consists of the shares you get
from others on the various social media platforms.
Examples: Shares on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr,
and others.
✓✓Owned Media: This type of media is controlled by you
and is becoming more and more important as time goes
on. I explain why later in this chapter.
Examples: Website, blogs, emails, microsites, apps,
­collateral, and user‐generated content.
With shared media, you are part of the conversation without
having to specifically buy your way in. That’s a great place
to be. But you also want to consider paid traffic, which you
can read about in the “Promoting your posts with Facebook”
­section, later in this chapter.
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Chapter 4: Amplifying Your Content with Sharing and Syndication
29
Utilizing Organic Promotion
Everyone loves to use organic promotion. Organic promotion is made up of free shares and links that others give you
because they like your content. So what can you do to amplify
your content so that it gets the most shares possible? Here
are some ideas on what to display for specific purposes:
✓✓To get traffic, promote your posts proactively to your
social audience using an eye‐catching text snippet and
relevant backlink. That way, the reader has to come
back to your site to see the original post.
✓✓To build awareness and thought leadership, use the full
article. You want the reader to see your full post on the
authority site.
✓✓To expose your products, use headlines, paragraphs,
and images of the product. You want to tap into potential customers’ interest.
Remembering to prepare your
content to get shares
Okay, you’ve written a blog post you’re proud of. But your
work is not done. When you’re preparing to publish your
blog posts to encourage sharing, here are four best practices
from the Facebook developer’s site (https://developers.
facebook.com/docs/sharing/best‐practices) to keep
in mind:
✓✓Image size: Make sure that your images are a minimum
size of 600 x 315 pixels. Facebook’s recommended size is
1200 x 628 pixels.
✓✓Text on images: Text should cover only 20 percent of the
image. This is important because if you want to create
an ad on Facebook using an image, it must meet the
20 ­percent criteria.
✓✓Tags: Make sure to use the open graph (OG) tag to
­facilitate distribution among your followers.
✓✓Headlines: Work at developing an eyeball‐grabbing
­headline. You need to get your audience to read beyond
the title.
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Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition Even if you do all these things in the list, you have to post
consistently to build your audience; otherwise, your audience
won’t know when to expect new content and will spend their
time on sites that post regularly.
Embracing hashtags
Many people use hashtags on social platforms as an afterthought (or not at all). Don’t be one of them. Hashtags really
do give your content more visibility and increase the likelihood that you’ll be reshared on places like Twitter, Pinterest,
and Instagram. People set content alerts for brand names,
products, and specific keywords. By using hashtags, you
immediately get on people’s radar screen and encourage them
to check you out.
Although they may seem unfamiliar, hashtags are simply a
way to categorize keywords. By adding the # symbol in front
of the keyword, you tell the search engine to pull out and display content designated that way every time someone uses
that term. So, if someone on Twitter or other social platform
types the # before a term, that person will be able to see all
the tweets that contain it. People can get right to the content
that interests them most.
We recommend no more than three hashtags per tweet. The
concept of “less is more” applies here.
It’s helpful to look at the usefulness of hashtags from two
angles. The first is that a hashtag helps you find something;
second, it helps you to be found. Sound simple? It really is.
For example, if you want people from a specific area — like
New York City — to find your content, you can add a hashtag
like #nyc that makes it easy to spread your message locally.
How about borrowing a hashtag that has a devoted group of
followers? If you’re a writer, you can use #amwriting or
#writing to speak to that community. Use a tool like RiteTag
(www.ritetag.com) to ensure that you use hashtags that
have traffic.
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Chapter 4: Amplifying Your Content with Sharing and Syndication
31
Understanding Paid Syndication
Some marketers focus the majority of their attention on free
shared media. You could be making a rookie mistake if you do.
Why? Isn’t social media sharing the best way to reach new
customers? Yes; however, you need a balanced mix of promotion types. You want to consider paid media to round out
your plan.
Choosing parameters for paid
syndication
When you consider syndicating your content, you have some
choices to make. None of your choices are irrevocable. You
can choose to try something and see how it works. With that
in mind, here are some decisions to make:
✓✓Type of content: You have no real limit on the kind of
content that you can syndicate. As long as it’s digital, a
place to syndicate it on the web probably exists. Types
can include:
••Blogs
••Articles
••Video
••Audio
••Landing pages
••Microsites
••E‐books
••Slideshows
✓✓Amount of content: When you syndicate your content,
you don’t necessarily have to show the entire post. You
can choose to show snippets, thumbnails, or just the
links to video and audio. What you show very much
depends on what’s right for you and what the syndicator
requires.
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Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition Promoting your posts
with Facebook
One place that you want to consider when choosing paid
media is Facebook. As the largest social network, Facebook
provides you with a huge audience that is available to see
your message twenty‐four hours a day. It also has a very easy‐
to‐use platform that helps you target your audience in a deep
and rich way. By targeting and paying for Facebook traffic,
you can amplify your message well beyond what you would
get by simple organic sharing.
However, that doesn’t mean that you should pick all your
posts as suitable for paid sharing. You need to be strategic
and look at the posts you’ve already shared on Facebook
that are getting the most engagement. This gives you a
­definite advantage. It allows you to target your specific
­audience and reach people who have never heard of your
brand.
Facebook allows you to choose different aspects of your
audience, including
✓✓Demographics: Choose location, age, and gender.
✓✓Interests: You can choose to target the people who use
services or tools that relate to your industry; additionally, you can choose others who target the topic as
well. On Facebook, you do this targeting by choosing
interests.
When you think about interests on Facebook, you should
­consider what other products or services your prospects
might also be using. For example, if I sell kitchen design, I
might want to find people who are in the process of buying a
house. I would therefore target people who are interested in
Realtors or mortgages.
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Chapter 4: Amplifying Your Content with Sharing and Syndication
33
How about free paid traffic?
Yes, you read that headline right,
even though it sounds contradictory.
Kudani has a tip for you on how to get
your paid traffic for free.
The tactic involves using what is
commonly known as a trip wire,
which is an offer that gets people to
buy something inexpensive with the
notion that when they’re in a buying mode, they may opt for a more
expensive product offered at the
same time.
The way to get your traffic paid for is
to offer a low‐cost item to the people
who have opted into your funnel.
(These are the clicks you paid for.).
If enough people buy the lost‐cost
offer, you have offset the cost of
your paid traffic. If some portion of
the audience paying for the low‐cost
offer chooses to buy the higher‐
priced option that you present them
with next, you may actually make a
profit. The key to making this tactic
work is to carefully plan your funnel
before you consider paid traffic. (See
Chapter 1 for more about funnels.)
Working with Influencers
In today’s marketplace, many types of people comprise the
constellation of customer influencers. Sometimes a family
friend can supersede any referral made by your hand‐picked
celebrity.
It’s important to know your potential buyers and understand
what really matters to them.
The key to using influence is to put the customer at the center
of your content‐marketing efforts. To have influence, we must
do the following:
✓✓Impact the person’s feelings. Although most people
believe otherwise, logic is not the way to influence
­someone. You must touch people to get their attention
and allow them to focus on primitive emotions. Most
information goes right by us unless it taps into our lizard
brain (the part of the brain that controls such things as
addiction, happiness, and the fear response.)
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34
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition ✓✓Cause a change in mindset. Influence must cause movement that impacts your mindset. You may start out as
neutral or even negative. Persuasion causes you to move
in the direction of the influencer.
✓✓Rest on a trust relationship. Influencers have “emotional
capital” with their audience. They are trusted, which
keeps the lizard brain from invoking the “fight or flight”
response and instead evokes positive emotions.
Benefitting from influencer
relationships
If you haven’t connected with your audience’s influencers,
you are missing out on a highly effective tactic. Influencers
have the power to
✓✓Send you qualified traffic: You know that the people
who come to your blog as the result of a link from an
influencer are exactly the audience you want to attract.
✓✓Connect you with other influential people: When you
talk to influencers, remember to ask them, “Who else
would be interested in this message?”
Following a few rules
So what should you remember to do when you are connecting with influencers? Here are three rules to follow when you
decide to engage specific influencers:
✓✓Give before receiving: Follow them on Twitter and
Facebook and help them promote their content by sharing it. You have to be sincerely interested in what they
are doing.
✓✓Follow up and comment: Comment on their posts and
demonstrate that you are knowledgeable about the topic.
✓✓Ask to start a conversation: Begin a conversation with
them via email or Twitter. Developing a relationship with
an influencer takes time.
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Chapter 4: Amplifying Your Content with Sharing and Syndication
35
For example, these are the influencers Kudani follows in
­content marketing and social media:
✓✓Ann Handley: www.MarketingProfs.com
✓✓Brian Clark: www.CopyBlogger.com
✓✓Chris Brogan: www.chrisbrogan.com
✓✓Dan Norris: www.contentmachine.com
✓✓Darren Rowse: www.problogger.net
✓✓Heidi Cohen: www.HeidiCohen.com
✓✓Jay Baer: www.JayBaer.com
✓✓Joe Pulizzi: www.ContentMarketingInstitute.com
✓✓Kristina Halvorson: www.BrainTraffic.com
✓✓Mari Smith: www.marismith.com
✓✓Melissa Breker: www.ContentStrategyInc.com
✓✓Mike Stelzner: www.socialmediaexaminer.com
✓✓Neil Patel: www.neilpatel.com
✓✓Robert Rose: www.RobertRose.me
✓✓Scott Abel: www.TheContentWrangler.com
✓✓Seth Godin: www.sethgodin.com/sg
Deploying Guest Posts
Guest posting has become very popular with bloggers and
brand representatives because it helps them cut through the
noise to reach a new audience. A guest post is a post that has
been written and accepted for publication to a popular blog. It
exposes that writer to people who might not be aware of the
writer’s (or company’s) brand.
You can derive many great benefits from guest posting. It can
help you in several areas:
✓✓Company brand awareness: It can help new audiences
find your brand.
✓✓Personal thought‐leader status: It can demonstrate your
knowledge and expertise as well as serve as a sample of
your writing skills.
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36
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition ✓✓Product and service exposure: It may potentially drive
the sales of a product or service that is discovered when
readers go to your site after reading your post.
✓✓Link building: You are building links to other popular
sites.
✓✓Social proof: It demonstrates that a major blogger deems
your content worthy of a posting on his or her site.
✓✓Traffic: New readers may visit your site and spend time
on it.
✓✓Shareability: It offers great potential for having your
­content shared on social platforms.
Guest posting is not necessarily a quick way to promote your
work. It takes some solid investigation and effort. However,
the benefits can be significant.
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Chapter 5
Measuring Your Outcome
In This Chapter
▶▶Looking at key performance indicators
▶▶Using an omni‐channel approach to the buyer funnel
▶▶Tracking metrics using the buyer funnel
▶▶Continuing to monitor your data
W
hen some content marketers complain that their content is not attracting customers, they likely haven’t
selected the right metrics (or in some cases, any metrics) that
tell them how they are doing. For content marketers, every
piece of content must be an experiment that yields a data
point. Is it successful or not?
In this chapter, you find out about the kinds of metrics you
should be using to determine your progress. They should be
based on your overall business goals (see Chapter 1 for more
about those goals) and the immediate measures you track in
places like your Google Analytics account.
Knowing Your Numbers
Simply put, the content marketers who succeed are those who
know their numbers. This means that they test everything and
look at the resultant data to make decisions about improving
their content.
Much discussion goes on among content marketers about
how to calculate return on investment (ROI) with content marketing. You need to understand that the effect of the content
you publish is cumulative. You won’t see results overnight.
Your blog posts and articles build over time, and the positive
results you see in such data as your Google Analytics account
will increase as your content reaches new audiences.
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38
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition Choosing Key Performance
Indicators (KPIs)
One set of measures that can tell you how well your strategy
is succeeding are Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). KPIs
are the measures you choose to help you determine whether
you’re reaching your overall business goals. If you don’t measure yourself against your business goals, you won’t know
whether your content marketing strategy is working and
­supporting your larger business objectives.
To help you think about how to craft your KPIs in relation to
your business goals, check out Table 5‐1. You can compare
the goals to your plan as discussed in Chapter 1. List your
goals and choose some metrics. Refer back to your list when
you check your progress.
Table 5‐1 provides the goals listed by the CMI/Marketing Profs
B2B survey mentioned in Chapter 1 in the section about defining your mission.
Table 5-1
Choosing KPIs
CMI/Marketing Profs
B2B Top Goals
Suggested Metrics
Increase brand
awareness
Social media shares, social media likes,
email forwards, referral links
Lead generation
Blog signups, blog comments, conversion
rate, form completions
Lead nurturing
Increase engagement Comments, page depth (how many pages
consumed), downloads, page views, back
links, time on site, click‐through rate
Grow sales revenue
by X percent
Revenue influenced by content (which content was consumed before sale), offline sales
Improve customer
retention/loyalty
Bounce rate, followers, retention rate
Encourage customer
evangelism
Social media shares, comments, follower
count, word of mouth
Increase upsells/
cross sells
Measure conversions in shopping cart and
on landing pages; number of conversions
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Chapter 5: Measuring Your Outcome
39
Benefitting from an omni‐channel
approach to your buyer funnel
One key benefit of mapping out your buyer’s journey is that
it helps you understand where to put your greatest effort. So
how do you go about putting your funnel together? Start with
an omni‐channel mindset. Think of all the different customer
touchpoints as one integrated journey. No more multi‐channel
approach; instead, all the channels are connected.
A multi‐channel experience is not the same as an omni‐­
channel experience. You likely already have a presence on
several channels. But if the customer experience on all these
channels is not consistent and integrated, you are not an
omni‐channel marketer.
Here’s an example of an omni‐channel purchasing experience:
Imagine that your customers look at your website and see
something they consider purchasing. They want to look at it
in your store to make sure that it is exactly what they want.
When they walk into your store, you can trigger a discount
coupon on their smartphone. They can then purchase using
that coupon. When they return home, they can check your
­website to look at the shipping arrangements. If you don’t
have a bricks‐and‐mortar store, your customers will still want
to shop where and when it’s convenient for them, so you have
to create a buyer’s journey that supports their path.
As you look at the buyer funnel in Figure 5‐1 in the upcoming
section, notice that all the measures come from a variety of
devices and locations.
Using the Buyer Funnel
The guidelines for the best customer experience continually
change. The only aspect that remains constant is that buyers
are empowered and define their own journeys, and you need
to accommodate them.
As discussed in Chapter 1, businesses need to use a buyer
funnel to help them determine the content they need to
create for each step in the buyer’s journey. For small business
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40
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition owners, Kudani recommends that you use the tools, such as
your autoresponder, listed in Figure 5‐1 to collect your key
metrics as a quick way to assess your results.
Figure 5-1: Using the buyer funnel to select metrics to monitor.
Here’s how to determine metrics for each stage of the funnel:
✓✓Top of the funnel content (TOFC): At the TOF, you are
looking for traffic. To monitor your traffic, you can look
at your Google Analytics data and Facebook Insights (if
appropriate) data. (You find out how in the next section,
“Using Urchin Tracking Module codes.”)
✓✓Middle of the funnel content (MOFC): At the MOF, you
want to track leads, which you can find by looking at
your autoresponder data to see how your mailing list
responds to your email communications. (Your autoresponder is used by any email program you are using to
send a response when the user clicks to receive your
lead magnet or other offer.)
✓✓Bottom of the funnel content (BOFC): At the BOF, you
evaluate your sales data, which you can see in your
merchant account, such as your PayPal account or a
shopping cart. Also at the BOF, you evaluate how your
advocate programs are performing. You do that by
­looking at your data in the formal referral or affiliate
­programs you have set up.
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Chapter 5: Measuring Your Outcome
41
Using tracking codes
When you set up your content to be tracked, you need to
create Urchin Tracking Module (UTM) codes. UTM codes are
URLs that you set up to monitor your specific marketing campaigns and pages in Google Analytics or Facebook Insights.
The UTM code is composed of a custom URL that tells you
where your click came from. It can track activities such as
keywords, ads, and split tests (tests that let you know which
version of something is better than another version.)
For example, if you set up a landing page, you should create
a UTM code to identify your Google Analytics data that is
coming from that landing page. You can then see how well
that page is doing.
Want to know what the four components of a UTM code are?
To create one, you have to choose the following:
✓✓A URL: This could be your campaign landing page or
website URL. You look at the URL for the content you
want to track and use that as part of the code.
✓✓A source: The source where the original traffic came
from. The content could come from someone’s website,
a social platform, or a search engine (Google, Twitter, a
blog, and so on).
✓✓A medium: This is the generator of the traffic, such as
a particular ad, image, or piece of content. It could be
an email, social platform, banner ad, or cost‐per‐click
­campaign.
✓✓A name: This name is for your own internal tracking purposes, and each campaign has a unique identifier. Some
examples are promo code, product launch, or sale.
Setting up goals in
Google Analytics
You probably use Google Analytics as part of your data
­collection scheme. One of the most important items to track
in Google Analytics is how well your content is doing, and to
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42
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition determine that, you need to set up goals. Here is a ­tutorial on
setting up goals: http://www.kudani.com/goal‐setup.
After you have your goals set up, you can determine which
content is the most popular, and you’ll have the evidence you
need to confidently promote the content that will give you the
best results.
Considering the return
on investment (ROI)
You want to understand where the traffic is coming from
and which type of marketing is generating the highest return
(ROI). Combining goal tracking with UTM codes allows you to
examine the reverse path for your conversions and see which
item of content generated the most leads or sales. You can
find out more detail in the PICASSO course. Go to http://
www.kudani.com/course.
Following up to achieve success
A characteristic that sets successful content marketers apart
from unsuccessful ones is their continual monitoring of their
data. They regularly refine their work until they meet their
goals.
You owe it to yourself to do this. Don’t give up too soon. If
you use the proven PICASSO framework, you will see results.
The folks at Kudani want to hear from you so that they can
share your success story. Contact Paul at [email protected]
and let him know how you’re doing.
For more training on the PICASSO framework, go here:
http://www.kudani.com/course
These materials are © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.
Chapter 6
Ten Features to Look for
in a Content Marketing
Platform
In This Chapter
▶▶Identifying the features you need
▶▶Knowing why those features matter
A
s you know, content marketing presents many challenges
to online businesses. When you select content marketing
software to assist you, you want to ensure that you choose a
platform that makes doing all facets of the job as easy as possible. You can find a variety of tools in the marketplace. Some
focus on only one or two functions; others integrate a host of
functions.
To get the most for your money, here are ten features to
look for when you’re choosing a content marketing software
­platform:
Keyword Research Tools
As you saw in Chapter 1, understanding the needs of your
avatar is crucial. Using built‐in keyword tools allows you to
seamlessly research and select the keywords and phrases
that your ideal customers use to find you. Look for software
that includes this function.
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44
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition Viral Content Discovery Tool
Viral content refers to popular content that is already being
shared by your target audience. A built‐in viral content
­discovery tool allows you to look at what is already being
shared to see what content and headlines resonate with your
audience. Your software platform of choice needs to be able
to mine those articles so that you create content that hits
the mark.
Headline Generator
If you want to create high‐converting headlines that get clicks,
you can use a headline generator. A headline generator shows
you examples of proven headlines that you can modify to fit
your content. Having one built into the content marketing
software platform helps you generate content ideas and saves
untold hours of creation time.
Editorial Calendar
It is almost impossible to run an effective content marketing
program without an editorial calendar to schedule all your
tasks in advance. For example, you need to schedule writers
to create content and you need to schedule posts in advance
of their publication date. Without a built‐in calendar function,
you waste a great deal of time and effort having to do things
manually at the last minute.
Multiuser Workgroups
Your content marketing efforts have lots of moving parts. Not
the least of these is the team (in‐house or outsourced) that
is tasked with creating content and images and getting them
ready for publication. Look for software that allows you to
effortlessly monitor and track your team’s efforts to ensure
timely delivery.
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Chapter 6: Ten Features to Look for in a Content Marketing Platform
45
Workflow Approval
The hallmarks of first‐class content are that it is easy to read,
free of errors, and solves problems. To produce content of
this quality requires a workflow process that ensures that the
editorial team has approved all content. Publishing slipshod
content signals that you are not serious about providing your
audience with the best content possible. Make sure that your
software has a way to efficiently monitor workflow to approve
content.
Built‐In Analytics
It’s critical that you monitor your metrics to alert you to
­content that is not performing. A built‐in analytics function
keeps you apprised of what’s happening without requiring
you to leave the application to investigate. Analytics programs like Google are hard enough to interpret without having
to leave your software platform to find the metrics you need.
Look for this feature so that you get the best information right
at your fingertips.
Original Content Automatically
Published to Your Owned
Media Sites
You need to constantly feed your owned media sites (such as
your website) great content on a consistent basis. That’s why
having the ability to write and automatically publish to these
sites is so important. Typically, without a software platform,
you would have to manually publish each piece of content
to your sites. Look for software that lets you set up your site
URLs once and then continually publish to them with no
extra effort.
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46
Content Marketing For Dummies, Kudani Limited Edition Blog Posts Automatically
Promoted to Your Social
Platforms
Your blog is a key component of your content marketing
efforts. Ensuring that content gets published to it in a timely
manner is key to keeping your audience engaged. Software
that lets you set up your blog feed to automatically schedule
posts is a huge time-saver. Look for this feature in any software you are considering.
Curated Content Automatically
Published to Your Social Feeds
Curating content is a great way to engage and solve problems
for your customers. Having a tool that allows you to read and
curate from other websites is incredibly useful. If it can automatically ­publish the curated content to your social feeds,
you will save both time and money.
These materials are © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.
These materials are © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Any dissemination, distribution, or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.
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