eArLY cHiLdHood LeArninG ActiVities

eArLY cHiLdHood LeArninG ActiVities
EARLY CHILDHOOD
LEARNING ACTIVITIES
Here are some of the concepts and words children will be learning during the early years in
school. You can help at home or in school—and have fun at the same time. Pick one of the
topics, spend a little time on it as often as possible, and then do the same with the others.
Remember that children in this age group have a short attention span so do not expect
them to be able to concentrate for too long. Learning is hard work. You must be patient.
Try to make these activities an enjoyable time, a sharing time.
TOPICS
KEY CONCEPTS
GAMES TO PLAY
red
blue
yellow
‘Simon Says’ or ‘I Spy’
COLORS
FAMILY
parents’ names
address
telephone number
child’s birthday
Let your child draw his or her
family. Help child write a story
about your family.
HOME
names of different rooms
in the house
names of different furniture
Draw your house and label
the rooms. Use a catalog
to furnish the drawing.
Label the furniture.
PARTS OF THE
BODY AND HOW
THEY HELP US
eyes
teeth
tongue
chin
cheek
Play ‘Simon Says.’
Get a large sheet of paper
and draw an outline of your
child. Let your child label
different parts of the body.
CLOTHING
names of different articles of
clothing
Use a catalog to cut out a
wardrobe
SEASONS
summer
fall
Use a calendar to discuss
seasons. Relate seasons
to child’s birthday. Talk about
what kind of clothing
you wear for each season.
green
orange
black
ears
mouth
nose
elbow
fingers
white
purple
brown
feet
lips
wrist
ankle
winter
spring
WEATHER
cloudy sunny
snowy rainy
windy
DOING THINGS
Tie shoelaces
dress himself/herself
zip zippers
button buttons
use scissors (blunt ones)
use paste to paste pictures
Let your child be a weather
reporter. Relate weather to
seasons, clothing, and
geography! Plan an imaginary
trip to a place with a
different climate.
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TOPICS
KEY CONCEPTS
GAMES TO PLAY
OPPOSITES
up and down
in and out
on and off
near and far
over and under
narrow and wide
high and low
top and bottom
front and back
first and last
same and different
right and left
here and there
Have an ‘Opposite Day’
or an ‘Opposite Time,’
in which everything said is
opposite. Be clear about
the beginning and ending
of this exercise.
SPATIAL
RELATIONSHIPS
middle
in front of
behind
over
alongside
Play hide-and-go-seek
with an object. Give hints
according to location.
MOTION
slow and fast
slower and faster
Have toy car races.
Then talk about how they
win or lose.
TIME
beginning and end
morning afternoon
night
night and day
late
early on time
Make a clock out of a
paper plate. Talk about
activities that occur at
different times of the day.
TEMPERATURE
hot and cold
warm and cool
AMOUNTS
COUNTING
next to
between
below
above
beneath
some and none
few and many
whole and part
each
all and some
empty and full
none
pair
teaspoon
tablespoon
cup
from 1 to 10
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INTRODUCTION to LITERACY
PERFORMANCE:
STANDARDS
What should your child be able to understand? Literacy, for purposes of this guide, is
about language­—spoken, read, written. Schools and school systems set standards
for your child’s achievement as he or she progresses through elementary school. Our
children can and do want to achieve. Surveys of students indicate that children want
higher standards, and research shows that students learn more when expectations
are higher. Readings standards, for example, now indicate that a child should read 25
quality books every year, including fiction, nonfiction, poetry and other types of reading.
The level of difficulty requires increases with each grade level.
Some students will meet the standards earlier, others later. Identifying the exact time
the student should demonstrate a particular skill is less important than making sure he
or she learns it. What matters most is that your child has a high but attainable goal, the
confidence and encouragement to try, and the teaching and other support he or she
needs to succeed.
LANGUAGE ARTS
The reading performance standard at the elementary school level has four parts including
reading and understanding a broad range of literature.
The writing performance standard requires that students at the elementary school level
produce reports, responses to literature, narrative accounts and narrative procedures.
Components of LITERACY
Speaking
Listening
Reading
Writing
ORAL LANGUAGE
RICH LANGUAGE
practical uses
poetry
family based
folk tales
story telling
riddles & jokes
giving/understanding
instructions
songs
vocabulary
all kinds of books & magazines
LITERACY SKILLS
THINKING
decoding
comprehension
sequencing
memory
retelling
analysis
sight words
opinions
spelling
note taking
computers
13
LITERACY SKILL BUILDING
Key Decoding Skills
Beginning Sounds
You can help your reader make the connection between different letters and the sounds
at the beginning of words.
Practice making the “B” sound, then slowly say a list of words. Have your child raise
her hand when she hears a “B” word. Later, point out written “B” words: ball, bug, bike
or bed.
Do the same thing with other beginning letters and sounds.
Have your child point to sight words or words on a page that start with the letter, and
together “read” the whole word.
All the “B” words can be written down and used in a Bingo or Concentration game.
Provide fun practice and as much help as needed to remember and distinguish sounds and letters.
Word Families
Practice saying “Bat.” Say “Bat” several times. Review the beginning sounds of several
words, making the connection between the first letter and the first sound: cat, mat,
sat, fat...
Say “Bat” and concentrate on the “–at” sound. Say it several times. Say “Cat”, “Mat” etc.
“Cat” begins with C. “Mat” begins with M. “Sat” begins with S. They are in the same
family. See how many new words you can make!
“— at”
c at
m at
s at
f at
“— et”
m et
p et
s et
l et
“— ot”
p ot
l ot n ot
d ot
“— ook”
b ook
t ook
c ook
l ook
Here are some other words to use in the same way: cake, top, pen, ring, rug.
Write down the basic part of each word family, such as “— at”, “— et”, etc. on separate
squares. Then give your child individual letters to put at the beginning. Make up Word
Family games.
14
Blends
Word Endings
Comprehension
Word Families also help you practice beginning blends like “br”, “tr”, “st”, “sp”, sh”, “pl”, etc.
“— ot”
“— ook”
“— ay”
sp ot
sh ook
pl ay
Calling attention to and practicing common words helps with new word recognition.
play ing
eat ing
hard er
fath er
wish es
dish es
sleep ing
Check for understanding even when your child can sound out the words without difficulty.
Recalling details: “Tell me something you remember from the story.”
Making inferences: “What part of the story let you know Kim was scared?”
Relating to personal experience: “Were you ever afraid? Tell me about it.”
Long and
Short Vowels
Long Vowel
Short Vowel
apronapple
eagle
egg
ice
igloo
overalls
octopus
unicorn
umbrella
15
Using the Silent “e”
Short Vowel Sounds Become Long Vowel Sounds
An “e” at the end of a one-syllable word changes the vowel sound from a short sound
to a long sound: it makes the vowel say its name.
For practice, have your child read the word in the short vowel column and then the
corresponding word in the long vowel column. Ask what the difference is.
The goal is for your child to recognize that by adding “e” to the end of these words, he
or she is changing the sound of the vowel.
Short Vowel Sounds
a
Long Vowel Sounds
at
ate
cap
cape
mad
made
pal
pale
tap
tape
e
pet
Pete
i
dim
dime
win
wine
bit
bite
kit
kite
spit
spite
o
hop
hope
dot
dote
u
rob
robe
tub
tube
cut
cute
• Take an index card, cut off a strip about an inch high.
• Write an “e” on the left side.
• Hold it next to the words in the above Short Vowel list.
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Sight Words
These are good words to use for spelling and word games since children must know them
on sight, but don’t use them for testing.
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
grades 1 & 2
grades 2 & 3
grades 3 & 4
grades 4 & 5
grades 5 & up
a, A
are
do
from
goes
her
I
is
of
out
pull
push
put
said
the
they
to
very
was
were
why
you
your
come
cost
done
don’t
four
friend
full
off
one
none
shoe
ski
some
someone
Saturday
talk
there
walk
want
what
where
who
won’t
again
against
answer
because
been
could
couldn’t
does
doesn’t
only
orange
lose
parent
pretty
says
should
shouldn’t
sure
two
whole
would
wouldn’t
among
any
beauty
both
bought
build
built
during
know
knowledge
laugh
length
many
minute
move
once
ought
owe
people
poor
promise
radio
tongue
toward
woman
women
although
altogether
aunt
beautiful
busy
buy
door
enough
eye
father
floor
island
ninth
ocean
pint
rough
sugar
taxi
though
through
together
tough
Tuesday
usual
usually
Wednesday
17
READING for MEANING
Sample Reading Session
I
II
Review work from previous session(s). (About 5 minutes.)
Choose the book.
Select about three books based on your child’s interests and ability. Let your child make
the choice from among these. If possible, ask your child’s teacher for recommendations.
III
Read the book. (This may take several sessions.)
Begin with discussion of the cover picture and title to give some clues about the story
and to spark interest. Name the author and illustrator.
Read aloud.
1. Pre-teach difficult words in the passage. (Optional)
2. Have your child read aloud. If he/she has difficulty with a word, tell it to him/her.
3. Write down three or four of these words on the “Word Computer” for later review.
4. Alternate reading a few passages with your child.
Note:
Not everything
should be done in
one session!
Read silently.
1. Select a short passage to be read silently by your child.
2. Remind him/her to ask for help with unfamiliar words.
3. When finished reading, ask a question or ask for an opinion on something in the
passage. Your child’s answer will show whether or not he/she has understood
what was read.
IV
Review the skills, using one of the activities. (About 10 minutes.)
A.Have your child read the “Word Computer.” Help him/her use the words
in sentences to show they are understood.
B. Play Concentration (each word on two small cards). Give student the game to take home.
C. Play Word Bingo. Write problem words on Bingo board, some on one, some on the
other, and on “call” cards.
V
VI
VII
Read aloud to the student “for fun.”
Let student select a book to borrow, if possible in your program.
Make a record of activities on the Daily Journal sheet.
Use the last column to plan your next session.
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Building Self-Correction Skills
EXPLANATION
Child reads through errors and never self corrects
1. Y
our child may have self-corrected the meaning but doesn’t feel it is necessary to
go back and correct out loud.
2. Your child doesn’t realize an error has been made.
ACTION TO TAKE
1. Ask your child to tell you about the story or even just that part.
2. Ask your child to go back and check the page on which the error was made.
WHAT TO SAY
“You misread something on this page. Can you find it?”
“I like the way you did that, but can you find what part of the story was hard for you?”
CHECKING/
CONFIRMING
Be sure to check to see if your child has a sense of the part of the story that was
read incorrectly.
Child pauses
EXPLANATION
Your child has noticed that something is not right, has lost the sense of the passage,
or has met a challenge he or she cannot solve.
ACTION TO TAKE
Draw the attention to the fact that your child has become aware of something.
Model a new strategy or guide your child to use a strategy he or she already knows.
WHAT TO SAY
“My, aren’t you looking and checking!”, “Why did you stop? What did you notice?”
or “You noticed something, didn’t you?”
CHECKING/
CONFIRMING
Support/encourage independence by drawing attention to & praising your child’s
awareness that something was wrong. Children need to learn to recognize & trust
these signals.
EXPLANATION
ACTION TO TAKE
Child stops and cannot continue
Your child cannot use any clues to solve a reading challenge.
Occasionally you may need to give your child a choice of words. Have your child
decide which one would fit best. Check with your child to be sure this word makes
sense. The more you provide children with the one correct word, the further they will
be from reading independently.
WHAT TO SAY
CHECKING/
CONFIRMING
“How could you check? Would
“Do you think it looks like
make sense?” “Could
fit there?”
?”
This action will help develop a child’s thinking, draw attention to his or her abilities and
build independence.
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Strengthening Reading Abilities
Word and Sentence Meaning
POINTING OUT ERROR
ACTION TO TAKE
WHAT TO SAY NEXT
REINFORCING
“You said ‘______’...Does that sound right?”
Parent: Reread the sentence. Stop at the problem word.
“Let’s read that again.”
“Were you right? How did you figure it out?”
Word Recognition
POINTING OUT ERROR
ACTION TO TAKE
WHAT TO SAY NEXT
REINFORCING
“Does that look right?”
Parent: Reread the sentence and just say the first sound of the word. Cover the word.
Ask, “What letter do you think comes at the beginning?” Uncover the word and check.
“Does that look right?”
“What would you expect to see if that word were ______?”
“What letter does it start with? What sound does it make?”
“Read the sentence again, say the sound of the first letter of the word, and see if you
can think of what the word might be.”
“Were you right? How did you figure it out?”
What to Do When your Child Doesn’t Know a Word in a Text
Give plenty of time for your child to use his/her own strategies to figure out the word.
Try using a picture from the story to help.
Remind the student what the story is about.
Ask, “Does what you just read make sense? Try telling it back to me.”
Look for a part of the word inside the word that the student knows.
Leave the word out, skip it, read on to the end of the sentence. Then come back to it.
Tell the word, if it interferes with the meaning or the flow of the reading.
*
If there are five words on a page a child doesn’t know, try an easier book.
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Suggested Questions to Ask
After Reading a Story
appropriate for K–3 grades
Here are some suggested questions that you can ask your child. Not all will fit each
story; not all should be asked. Try to choose one or two that are most appropriate for
your child and for the particular story.
Asking questions of this type will encourage your child to start thinking about what
he/she has read and will help him or her to understand some of the concepts in the
story. However, do not turn discussions into quizzes.
It is a good idea to tell the title of the book, the author and the illustrator. These terms
may have to be explained.
1.
Can you tell me something you remember from the story?
2.
Did you like the story? Why? Why not?
3.
Which part did you like (not like)? Why?
4.
What was the story about?
5.
Who was the most important character? Would you like to have a friend like that?
Why? Why not?
6.
Are there any parts you would like to hear again?
7.
Can you pick out an exciting (or scary or funny or sad) part? Why was it 8.
Do you think any of your friends would like this story?
What would you tell them about it?
9.
Where does the story take place? (city/country, indoors/outdoors)
10.
?
When does the story take place? (day/night, summer/winter, now/long ago)
Always have the attitude that
your child chose the answer, and is
working the way he or she is working,
for a reason. It might be a “wrong”
reason, but it does exist.
21
Where are Answers to Questions Found?
RIGHT THERE
THINK & SEARCH
ON MY OWN
The answer is in the text. The words used in the question and the words used for the
answer can usually be found in the same sentence.
The answer is in the text, but the words used in the question and those used for the
answer would not be in the same sentence. You need to think a lot before you can
answer the question.
The text got you thinking, but the answer is inside your head. So think and use what
you already know to answer the question.
Questions for More Advanced Readers
REALITY
(BELIEVABILITY)
1. Did you like the story? Why?
2. Does the story make sense to you?
3. Is this illusion or reality?
4. What passages make the story seem real or unrealistic?
CHARACTER
DEVELOPMENT
1. Which character had the most power?
2. Who was your favorite character in the story? Why?
3. Have you ever met someone like this in real life?
MOOD AND TONE
1. What is the basic mood of the story?
2. What key passages set the mood?
3. Why do you think the author placed the story in the specific time/space?
CONFLICT OR MORAL
OF STORY
1. What do you think the messages of the story are?
2. What specific passage in the story helped you understand the author’s message?
3. Do you agree or disagree with this message? Why?
EXPERIENCE
RELATED QUESTION
1. Have you ever had an experience like this in your life? When? Explain.
2. Can you apply the basic message to your life experience?
3. Would you like to share this story with other children and adults?
22
GETTING STARTED with WRITING
From the earliest grades, written language is considered important. Children use writing
for many tasks, including creating instructions, descriptions, stories, and for note taking.
Children’s writing is expected to show a clear communication purpose. Begin by asking,
“What is it you are trying to do today?” Then ask the child to answer the 5 “W’s” to
organize the writing: Who, What, When, Where, and Why?
Helping Children Think About Writing
There are important steps that can be followed when helping your child with writing.
They include having a “writing conference” with your child, asking good questions about
his or her writing and using different ideas to encourage him or her to write more. It is
important to focus on the content of the writing first, and at the end work on grammar,
spelling and punctuation.
The Writing Process
1st Step:
Brainstorm
2nd Step:
Rough Draft
3rd Step:
Revise
4th Step:
Edit
5th Step:
Final Draft
What is your essay or story about? What do you want to convey to the reader?
What are some of the details? Make a list or outline of every thing you want to say.
Write a rough draft focusing on the content of the essay and how it will be
organized. At this point, don’t worry too much about grammar and spelling.
Begin the conferencing process.
After conferencing, go back to the essay. Does it say everything you need to say?
Are there any details that needed to be added? Do you like your word choice?
Does it sound the way you want it to sound?
Have another writing conference. Read over the essay carefully. Are there any spelling
or grammar errors to be fixed at this point? Is it organized in an effective way?
This is the point to write up or type the essay neatly. Are there any final changes you
need to make?
23
How to Have a Writing Conference
1.
The writer shares with the listener where he or she is in the writing process and where
help is needed. For example, “I’ve written a rough draft and gone over it a couple of
times but it’s missing something and I can’t put my finger on it.”
2.
The writer reads the piece aloud. The listener does not interrupt.
3.
The listener retells what he or she has heard. For example, “So last Friday you went to
the dentist to have a cavity filled. And you were really nervous because you’re afraid of
dentists, but this one was really nice and made you laugh the whole time. It didn’t even
hurt to have the cavity filled, so now you like going to the dentist.”
Questions to Ask
Use the questions below to elicit more information and to move the writer along in the
writing process. Use appropriate questions (not all of them) as to what is needed with
the particular essay. Writer and listener discuss questions and comments. Older writers
can take notes.
Opening Questions
How is your writing going?
What are you writing now?
Where are you now in your draft?
Process Questions
Read the part you like best.
What is going to happen next?
Please tell me more about . . .
One thing I like about your story is . . .
What do you mean when you said this?
What are you trying to do with this part?
I did not understand what you meant in this part . . .
What are you trying to tell your reader?
What do you want to do in the next draft?
What is your next step?
Questions
that Reveal
Development
.
I noticed that you changed . How did you do that?
If you were going to put more here, how would you do that?
How can you solve this writing problem?
How did you go about choosing this . . . (word, name, description)?
What do you think about this piece of writing?
What was hard for you when writing this piece?
What will you do with this piece of writing when it is completed?
24
General Suggestions for Writing
Create a safe environment for writing. Balance feedback between what is good about
the writing and what needs improvement. Always highlight whatever is positive in your
child’s writing.
Encourage a variety of writing activities. Keeping a daily journal can be motivating and
can provide needed practice. Consider other fun assignments such as writing to a pen
pal, composing songs, or recording a family activity.
Use free writing. Set a time each day and have children write about anything that
nterests them. Stress that no one else has to read what they write, nor will the writing
be evaluated.
Provide time for provision and proofreading. Emphasize that writing is a process.
Explain to older children that it might be easier to proofread what they have written a
day or after writing it rather than immediately.
Use cooperative writing projects. Provide opportunities for several children to work in
groups as they work on writing assignments. Designate a different role for each person,
such as brainstormer, researcher, proofreader, and illustrator.
25
The Read and Do Game
Directions: Cut the sentences into strips. Fold them.
Take turns picking one and doing what is written.
Name five articles of clothing.
What color are your parent’s eyes?
Learning Leaders Reading Games & Activities
Recite the days of the week starting with Wednesday.
Tell your parent to clap his or her hands three times.
What is today’s date?
Name three odd numbers.
What is a synonym for “curious”?
Name five types of transportation.
Name five vegetables.
Put your pencil on the floor and then pick it up.
Put your right hand on your left ear.
Describe what your parent is wearing.
How many people in this room are wearing eye glasses?
Ask your parent the name of his or her favorite TV program.
Who is the President of the United States of America?
What is the opposite of “under”?
Name five things you could drink from if you didn’t have a glass.
© 2009 Learning Leaders, Inc. All rignts Reserved.
26
the
Bookworm
My Name
TITLE
AUTHOR
Learning Leaders Reading Games & Activities
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. © 2009 Learning Leaders, Inc. All rignts Reserved.
27
THE
Book Reviewer
1. Tell about your book by filling in the “newspaper” (below).
2. Write a sentence answering each question.
3. Draw pictures for fun!
Title
Author
Tell about the main character.
WHAT?
Tell what happens in your book.
Learning Leaders Reading Games & Activities
WHO? picture
WHERE?
Draw a picture of where the story takes place.
WHEN?
Tell when the story takes place.
WHY?
Did you like the book? Why or why not?
© 2009 Learning Leaders, Inc. All rignts Reserved.
28
Word Bingo
Word Bingo can be used for several purposes: to reinforce new sight words, practice
short vowel words and aid pre-readers in letter recognition and initial consonant sounds.
Materials
Learning Leaders Reading Games & Activities
Directions
1.
2.
3.
4.
One piece of paper with two Bingo boards on it; 18 small squares of paper; list of words
to use in game. (Photocopy the game board below.) Write a word/letter in each space.
Use blank squares to cover the spaces.
Write the words you want to work with in the spaces on one Bingo board, one
word/letter to a space. Have your child write the same words on the other bingo board.
Since two people play, put the words in different places on the two boards.
Tutor should call out a word/letter from list.
Each player should take blank square of paper and cover the word on the board.
Person who covers all the words in a row, diagonally or the whole board, wins!
FREE
© 2009 Learning Leaders, Inc. All rignts Reserved.
29
Concentration
Concentration is a popular game involving memory and concentration skills.
Directions
1.
Learning Leaders Reading Games & Activities
2.
Cut paper into squares.
Select a list of five to ten sight words from the reading which the student needs to work on.
3.
Each word should be written on two of the squares. The tutor should write on one
square and the student should copy it onto a second square.
4.
When all the words are written, the cards should be mixed up and placed facedown
on the table.
5.
6.
7.
The adult goes first and turns over two cards; the student reads the words.
If there is no match, the cards are turned over again, and it is the student’s turn.
The student turns up two cards and reads each word aloud.
If a match is made, the person who made the match collects those cards and goes again.
8.
This process continues until all the words have been picked up. The person with the
most pairs wins.
9.
Subtly allow children to win most games and also encourage them to keep the cards
and play the game with someone at home.
Note for Pre-readers:
Instead of using words, letters or pictures can be written on the squares of paper.
Vocabulary Concentration:
Instead of using sets of matching words, you can write the word on one card and the
definition on the other.
CAT
CAKE
A Small
Furry Pet
© 2009 Learning Leaders, Inc. All rignts Reserved.
A Sweet
Treat
30
Bicycle Race
Bicycle Race is a board game which helps increase comprehension. The student is
making inferences, recalling information and evaluating while thinking of answers to the
questions. These are all important aspects of comprehension.
The game should be played after completing a story or a book.
Learning Leaders Reading Games & Activities
Materials
Directions
1.
Bicycle Race board
6 cards numbered 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 4
1 marker for each player. (Two to four players; the tutor is always one of the players.)
Place the cards in a pile facedown.
2.
The first player selects a card and, starting at “Start,” moves his or her marker the number
of spaces indicated. The player then answers the question or follows the directions that
are in the box. (The tutor may have to discuss the question if the student has difficulty
answering it. If the tutor feels that a question does not pertain to the book or story, the
player may move his or her marker forward one box and answer that question.)
3.
The second player selects a card and the game continues in this way, with the players
alternating turns.
4.
The first player to reach the end is the winner.
© 2009 Learning Leaders, Inc. All rignts Reserved.
31
Bicycle Race
Which part
was the most
exciting?
e up
Mak er title
.
th
ano e story
h
t
for
Did
you enjoy
the ending?
Why or
why not?
START
P
JUM
A HEA D
2 SPACES!
s
wa
t
r
pa
t?
ich nnies
h
W e fu
th
Tell
something
in the story you
did not like.
You le
ft you
r
snea
ker a
t
STAR
Go b
T.
ack
and g
et it.
ere
t
ry w e wha
o
t
s
b
i
is
cr
e
If th , des
V
k lik
ng.
T
on uld loo eginni
b
o
it w
very
e
h
at t
YOU
WIN!
!
LUCKY YOU ut!
cret shortc
Take the se
clovers!
Follow the
m
fro he
t
in y in hey .
h
t or t t d
ll 3 e st tha ene
e
T th er pp
d ha
or
gs
d
Did the goo
character(s)
triumph?
or
ad ing
s
.
ed
yth
l1
Tel happ ppen
a
1
th
tha
OOPS!
You dropped your
sunglasses. Go back
1 space and
get them.
© 2009 Learning Leaders, Inc. All rignts Reserved.
JUMP
A HEA D
2 SPACES!
Would you
like to be
friends with
any of the
characters?
Why?
Lose 1
turn while
you take a
drink of water.
Who was
the most
important
character?
ter
rac r
a
o
ch
in lder
a
m
o
?
the story you so?
Is
n
the r tha think
in
ge
u
un o yo
o
y
d
y
Wh
32
Neighborhood
Treasure Hunt
Use this game to help your child find different things in your neighborhood.
Don’t try to complete the hunt in one walk. It should take several.
This is one way to build your child’s awareness of things around and to
increase his/her vocabulary. Have fun! (By the way: you do the writing.)
FIND
SHOW ME
FIND
DO YOU SEE
COUNT THE STEPS
FIND SOMETHING
WHAT OTHER COLORS
DO YOU SEE?
FIND
FIND THE SIGN
SHOW ME
CAN YOU
DO YOU SEE
SHOW ME SOMETHING
2 buildings made of brick a tree a branch
its trunk
a twig
2 made of stone
its roots
a leaf
3 windows of different shapes. What shapes are they?
1. 2. a flagpole?
a bench?
its bark
3. a gate?
a fence?
in front of a building. There are red green yellow steps.
blue white orange 5 different kinds of stores 1. 2. 4. 5. that tells the name or number of your street. What does it say?
3 different ways to travel
1. 2. think of any others? a traffic sign?
hydrant?
traffic light?
sewer?
high low down far away in something hard 3. lamp post?
utility pole?
soft © 2009 Learning Leaders, Inc. All rignts Reserved.
curb?
a bush?
up near under something big over something 3. heavy small light 33
home Treasure Hunt
Use this game to help your child find different things at home.
Don’t try to complete the hunt the first time. It should take several.
This is one way to build your child’s awareness of things around and to
increase his/her vocabulary. Have fun! (By the way: you do the writing.)
FIND
SHOW ME
FIND
DO YOU SEE
COUNT THE DOORS
FIND SOMETHING
There are WHAT SHAPES
DO YOU SEE?
SHOW ME SOMETHING
SHOW ME
its top
its legs
doors.
red green yellow HOW MANY
a table
2 doors
3 rooms Are there numbers or words in these rooms? What are they?
1. 2. 3. a clock?
a sink?
a stairway?
WHAT OTHER COLORS
DO YOU SEE?
FIND
2 windows blue white orange 5 different kinds of food 1. 2. 4. 5. rooms are there? high low in something under something big small soft heavy the kitchen
a bedroom
© 2009 Learning Leaders, Inc. All rignts Reserved.
3. hard light the front door
34
WORD COMPUTER
35
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