UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017

UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
CONTENTS
How to Use This Book
Administration
Calendar
About UWM
Academic Opportunities
Campus Resources
Admission
Registration
Financial Information
Academic Information
Additional Information
Honors College
Schools and Colleges
Architecture and Urban Planning
The Arts
Business
Education
Engineering and Applied
Science
Health Sciences
Information Studies
Letters and Science
Nursing
Social Welfare
Inter-School/College Programs
Administrative Policies
Copyright 2016 by the University
of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
This undergraduate catalog is divided into two basic content
areas.
The front section (through the Academic Information section)
contains basic, noncurricular information pertinent to
undergraduate
education.
The school and college sections that follow include program
requirements, course descriptions, and faculty listings.
KEY TO COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM
100-299 Lower division courses
not open to graduate students for credit.
300-699 Upper division courses that may, if so designated, carry
graduate credit. Courses with level "U" are offered
for undergraduate
credit only; courses with level "U/G" may be offered for undergraduate
and/or graduate credit. Insofar
as a course approved for graduate
credit may not be offered for graduate credit in a given semester, the
current
Timetable should be consulted. Junior standing is
normally a minimum prerequisite for 300-699 courses that carry
graduate credit.
Abbreviations in Course Descriptions
cr:
Credit(s)
yr:
Year
sem:
Semester
P:
Prerequisite(s)
R:
Recommended Course
NP:
Non-repeatable Prerequisite
C:
Co-requisite
NC:
Non-repeatable Co-requisite
ER:
Enrollment Restriction
fr, soph, jr, sr, grad st: Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, Senior, Grad Standing
intro:
Introductory
equiv:
Equivalent
conc reg:
Concurrent Registration
conc enroll:
Concurrent Enrollment
cons instr:
Consent of Instructor
cons Dept Chair:
Consent of Department Chair
cons Prog Dir:
Consent of Program Director
lit-in-trans:
Literature in Translation
max:
Maximum
CHANGES IN PROGRAMS
This catalog includes academic policies, procedures, programs,
courses, and requirements in effect at the time of
publication. The
University faculty and administration reserve the right to make changes
in these regulations; some of
these changes may affect students'
programs. Efforts will be made to publicize all changes, but it is the
responsibility of
students to ascertain the requirements of their
programs at all times.
COURSE ABBREVIATIONS
The following abbreviations are used to identify UWM courses in this
catalog:
Ad Ldsp:
Administrative Leadership
AIS:
American Indian Studies
Africol:
Africology
Anthro:
Anthropology
Arabic:
Arabic
Arch:
Architecture
Art:
Art and Design
Art Ed:
Art Education
ArtHist:
Art History
Astron:
Astronomy
Atm Sci:
Atmospheric Science
Bio Sci:
Biological Sciences
BMS:
Biomedical Sciences
Bus Adm:
Business Administration
Celtic:
Celtic Studies
CES:
Conservation and Environmental Science
Chem:
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Chinese:
Chinese
Civ Eng:
Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Classic:
Classics
Commun:
Communication
CompLit:
Comparative Literature
CompSci:
Computer Science
ComSDis:
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Couns:
Counseling
Crm Jst:
Criminal Justice
CurrIns:
Curriculum and Instruction
Dance:
Dance
EAS:
Engineering and Applied Science
Econ:
Economics
Ed Pol:
Educational Policy and Community Studies
Ed Psy:
Educational Psychology
Educ:
Education
ElecEng:
Electrical Engineering
English:
English
ESL:
English as a Second Language
Ethnic:
Ethnic Studies
ExcEduc:
Exceptional Education
Film:
Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres
FilmStd:
Film Studies
FineArt:
Fine Arts – Interdepartmental
FLL:
Foreign Languages and Literature
FoodBev:
Food and Beverage Studies
French:
French
FrshWtr:
Freshwater Sciences
Geog:
Geography
Geo Sci:
Geological Sciences
German:
German
Global:
Global Studies
Greek:
Greek
HCA:
Hebr St:
HIA:
Hist:
Hmong:
Honors:
HS:
Ind Eng:
InfoSt:
IntlSt:
Italian:
JAMS:
Japanese:
Jewish:
Kin:
Korean:
Latin:
LACS:
LACUSL:
Latino:
L&S Hum:
L&S NS:
L&S SS:
LGBT:
Linguis:
Math:
MatlEng:
MechEng:
Mil Sci:
MthStat:
Music:
Mus Ed:
MusPerf:
MusThpy:
Nurs:
Nutr:
OccThpy:
PeaceSt:
PH:
Philos:
Physics:
Pol Sci:
Polish:
Portugs:
Psych:
ReligSt:
Russian:
ScndvSt:
Soc Wrk:
Sociol:
Spanish:
Spt&Rec:
Theatre:
TherRec:
Health Care Administration
Hebrew Studies
Health Information Adminstration
History
Hmong Studies
Honors
Health Sciences
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
Information Studies
International Studies
Italian
Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies
Japanese
Jewish Studies
Kinesiology
Korean
Latin
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. [email protected] Studies
Latino Studies
Letters and Science Humanities
Letters and Science Natural Science
Letters and Science Social Science
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
Linguistics
Mathematical Sciences
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Military Sciences
Mathematical Statistics
Music
Music Education
Music Performance
Music Therapy
Nursing
Nutritional Sciences
Occupational Therapy
Peace Studies
Public Health
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Polish
Portuguese
Psychology
Religious Studies
Russian
Scandinavian Studies
Social Work
Sociology
Spanish
Sport and Recreation
Theatre
Therapeutic Recreation
Trnsltn:
UWS Nsg:
UrbPlan:
Urb Std:
WGS:
Translation
UWS Collaborative Nursing Program
Urban Planning
Urban Studies
Women’s and Gender Studies
PREREQUISITE COURSE DEFINITIONS
R-Recommended Course: A course that the
instructor strongly recommends be taken prior to enrollment in a
subsequent course.
Ex.: ANTHRO 334 American Indians of the Southwest . . . Prereq:
ANTHRO 314 (R). ANTHRO 314 is recommended
for students enrolling in
ANTHRO 334.
P-Prerequisite: A course in which a student is required to earn
credit prior to being allowed to enroll in a subsequent
higher level
course. A prerequisite course may not be taken for credit subsequent to
the earning of credit in the higher
level course.
Ex.: PSYCH 205 Personality . . . Prereq: PSYCH 101 (P). Students must earn credit in PSYCH 101 before enrolling in
PSYCH 205, and may
not receive credit for PSYCH 101 after enrolling in PSYCH 205.
NP-Nonrepeatable Prerequisite: A prerequisite course for which
the student is not permitted to substitute the grade
earned when the
course is repeated subsequent to earning credit in the higher level
course.
Ex.: COMPSCI 252 Computer Programming II . . . Prereq: COMPSCI 152
(NP). Students may not repeat COMPSCI
152 for the purpose of receiving
a higher grade after enrolling in COMPSCI 252.
C-Corequisite: A course that may be taken as either a
prerequisite or as a concurrent registration with the higher level
course.
Ex.: BUS ADM 210 Introduction to Management Statistics . . . Prereq: MATH 211 (C) or MATH 231 (C). Students must
enroll in MATH 211 or 231
either prior to or at the same time as they enroll in BUS ADM 210.
NC-Nonrepeatable Corequisite: A corequisite course for which the
student is not permitted to substitute the grade
earned when the course
is repeated subsequent to earning credit in the higher level course.
Ex.: HLTHMNT 232 Nursing Practice for Health Promotion . . . Prereq: admission to enroll in clinical nursing major;
HLTHMNT 210 (NC), 211
(NC); FNDNURS 230 (NC); HLTHRST 320 (NC). Students must enroll in the
four listed
(NC) courses either prior to or at the same time as they
enroll in HLTHMNT 232. They may not repeat any of these four
courses
for the purpose of receiving a higher grade after enrolling in HLTHMNT
232.
ER-Enrollment Restriction: A course that is not open for
enrollment to students who have earned credits in a
specified course
(or courses) with similar or overlapping content.
Ex.: ECON 100-after cr is earned in ECON 103 or 104.
A course number followed by another number in parentheses means that the course was previously offered under
the number in parentheses. The two courses are the same course and the repeat policy applies.
Ex.: HUM KIN 270 (370) - HUM KIN 270 is the same course as HUM
KIN 370. A student with credit in HUM KIN 370
may enroll in 270 as a
repeat unless 370 was taken more than once.
This publication may be requested in accessible
format.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
[ Contents
| How to Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
General Education
Requirements
Degree Requirements
Class Standing/Level in School
Course Load
Grading System
F Grades – Additional Information
Grade Point Average
University-wide Academic Action Policy
Academic Drop
Incompletes
Overloads
Repeating Courses
Residence Credit Requirement
Graduation
Excess Credits Policy
Students Called to Military Service
Honors for Scholarship
Credit/No Credit Option
General Education Requirements
The General Education Requirements are intended to give structure to each student's education while providing the
student the greatest possible freedom to design an individual academic program. These requirements include two major
categories, competency and distribution.
The competency requirements are designed to assure basic proficiency in oral and written communication, quantitative
literacy, and foreign language. The GER Quantitative Literacy Part A and Oral and Written Communication Part A
requirements should be completed early in the academic career to ensure acquisition of critical skills for subsequent
coursework. Many UWM schools/colleges require completion of Part A of those competencies prior to advancing to the
professional portion of the major. Completion of the relevant Part A competency is also a prerequisite for some
intermediate and advanced courses. The distribution requirements are designed to provide students with a broad body
of knowledge in the areas of the arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences as a foundation for specialization.
Specific GER requirements are as follows:
COMPETENCY REQUIREMENTS
Oral and Written Communication (OWC) Competency
OWC Part A: Completion of OWC Part
A can be demonstrated by satisfying one of the following options:
earningat least three credits with a grade of C or higher in English 102;* or
transferring at least three credits with a grade of C or higher in a course equivalent to English 102 or higher level
expository writing course;* or
achieving an appropriate score on the English Placement Test (EPT).
OWC Part B: The OWC Part B is satisfied by completing
an approved advanced course (at least three credits) with a
significant
written or oral communication component by students who have completed
the Part A requirement.
Courses that count toward the
OWC-B requirement may be offered in a variety of disciplines and
students are
encouraged to choose the course that matches their
interests and helps them best meet the requirements of their degrees.
Quantitative Literacy (QL) Competency
QL
Part A: Completion of QL Part A can be demonstrated by satisfying one
of the following options:
earning at least three credits with a grade of C or higher in Math 102, 103 (formerly 106), 105, 108, 175, or
equivalent courses;* or
achieving a placement code of at least 30 on the mathematics placement test.
QL Part B: The QL Part B is satisfied by
completing at least one approved QL-B course (at least three credits)
as
decided by the major. QL-B courses make significant use
of quantitative tools in the context of other course material.
* These courses may not be taken credit/no credit if
they are to be used to satisfy the OWC-A requirement or
QL-A
requirement.
Foreign Language: Completion of the foreign language requirement
can be demonstrated by satisfying one of the
following options:
complete with passing grades, prior to enrollment at UWM, at
least two consecutive years of high school-level
instruction in a
single foreign language; or
complete with passing grades at least two consecutive
semesters (minimum of 6 credits) of college-level
instruction in a
single foreign language; or
demonstrate foreign language ability at least equivalent to
item B above by means of a satisfactory score on an
approved placement,
proficiency, departmental, or other appropriate examination.
Exceptions to GER
Students who entered UWM as
freshmen and/or earned transferable credit prior to September 2013 are
not responsible
for the Oral and Written Communication Part B or the
Quantitative Literacy Part B. Students who
entered UWM as freshmen and/or earned transferable credit prior to
September 1999 are not responsible
for the GER foreign language
competency. However, individual schools and colleges may require
completion of higherlevel foreign language courses; students are
strongly encouraged to check with their advisors and/or review their
Academic Requirements report on PAWS.
In general, second degree candidates from an accredited institution and
students whose first semester in a degree
program at an accredited
institution predates September 1986 are not subject to the General
Education Requirements.
All degree programs have
specific requirements beyond GER. Consult with an academic advisor to
design an
appropriate course of study.
DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS
Courses taken for distribution provide the general educational
background for each student. The distribution
requirements comprise
course choices from the following knowledge areas:
The Arts. Three credits in a course about the history,
philosophy, theory, or practice of the creative and
interpretive arts
(e.g., visual arts, dance, music, theatre, creative writing).
The Humanities. A total of 6 credits in at least two
courses.
The Natural Sciences. A total of 6 credits in at least
two courses. At least one course must include laboratory or
field
experience involving the generation and testing of data, and the
application of concepts and knowledge to
the solution of problems.
The Social Sciences. A total of 6 credits in at least
two courses.
Cultural Diversity. Three credits in a course relating to the study of life experiences of African Americans,
Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, or Asian Americans. Many, but not all, courses that satisfy
Cultural Diversity also satisfy one of the required distribution areas. (You will need to satisfy this requirement if
you started attending UWM in fall 1989 or thereafter.)
GER Course List
Courses that have been approved as satisfying the GER distribution requirements are listed on the Courses Approved for
GER Distribution pages. A course can be counted in only one of the main distribution areas (Arts, Humanities, Natural
Sciences or Social Sciences), but may also satisfy the Cultural Diversity requirement if it is on the approved list. Consult
with your academic advisor if you have questions about the General Education Requirements.
Consult the Schedule of Classes to determine specific courses being offered this semester. Courses that satisfy the GER
distribution requirements are annotated as follows directly below each course number:
(A) = satisfies Arts requirement
(CD,A) = satisfies Arts/Cultural Diversity requirement
(HU) = satisfies Humanities requirement
(CD,HU) = satisfies Humanities/Cultural Diversity requirement
(NS) = satisfies Natural Sciences requirement
(NS+) = satisfies Natural Sciences lab/fieldwork requirement
(SS) = satisfies Social Sciences requirement
(CD,SS) = satisfies Social Sciences/Cultural Diversity requirement
Cultures and Communities
Students may choose the Cultures and Communities (CC) option to
satisfy their GER distribution requirements. CC
courses emphasize
diversity and cross-cultural literacy, community-based learning,
multicultural arts, global studies,
and the cultural contexts of
science, health care, and technology. A Service Learning course also is
required. Students
who complete the CC program receive the Cultures and
Communities Certificate upon graduation.
A list of CC courses may be found online at uwm.edu/cultures-communities. Individual schools and
colleges may have
limitations on what GER courses from other schools
and colleges can be counted; students should check with their
advisor.
For more information, contact the Cultures and Communities Program,
Holton Hall G36, (414) 229-5960.
Required Areas of Study
The CC Certificate requires students to choose at least 15 of
their GER credit hours according to the following plan of
study. Area 1: Cultures and Communities Core Course (3 cr). Multicultural
America (satisfies Cultural Diversity and
Humanities, Social Science, or
Art GER requirements). May be taken as Anthropology 150, Art 150,
English 150, Film
150, History 150, Sociology 150, Urban Planning 350,
Urban Studies 150, or Women's Studies 150.
Area 2: Cultures and Communities of the United States
(3 cr). Issues and methods in the comparative study of
cultures and communities of the U.S. May be fulfilled by appropriate accredited GER or Cultural Diversity courses in
any discipline, school, or college.
Area 3: Global Perspectives on Culture and Community
(3 cr). Issues and methods in the comparative study of
cultures and communities outside North America and Europe. May be fulfilled by appropriate accredited GER courses
in any discipline, school, or college or through an appropriate study abroad experience.
Area 4: Art, Culture, and Community (3 cr). May be
fulfilled by courses that relate the theory and production of art
(dance, music, visual arts, film, and theater) to cultural and
community contexts. Restricted to courses in the Peck
School of the
Arts except through special petition.
Area 5: Science, Culture, and Society (3 cr).
Includes courses that examine how scientific knowledge may be
understood in relation to issues in culture and society. May be
fulfilled by enrollment in classes with a Natural Sciences
or Social
Sciences accreditation.
Community Engagement and Service Learning. Within their course distribution, students will take at least one class
with a Service Learning component. The core course (Multicultural America) satisfies this requirement when taken in
the fall or spring semesters.
(Please note: The number of credit hours and the distribution
across knowledge areas must still conform to the totals
listed under
the GER Standard Distribution described in Part A above.)
Degree Requirements
The minimum number of credits required for graduation is 120, but
many degree programs require 130 or more. Consult
the appropriate
school or college section in this catalog for specific degree
requirements associated with each program
or major.
Class Standing/Level in School
Prerequisites for certain courses are determined by class standing. The
chart below presents the number of credits for the
different class
standings.
Class
Business &
AOC/L&S
Nursing
All Others
Standing
Information
Studies
Sophomore 24-55
24-55
28-57
24-57
Junior
56-85
56-87
58-95
58-85
Senior
86 or more
88 or more
96 or more
86 or more
The prerequisite given in the course listing refers to the
qualifications and/or standing needed to enroll in a given course.
If no
prerequisite is listed, the course is generally open to all students. If
more than one prerequisite is listed, all are
necessary unless a choice
is clearly indicated. A student who enrolls in a course without the
required prerequisites may
be dropped.
Course Load
A full course load for undergraduates is considered to be a minimum of
12 credits, except for students enrolled in the
Academic Opportunity
Center, for whom it is 8. This definition may differ from that of the
Veterans Administration, the
Selective Service System, or other
agencies. UWM assumes no responsibilities in this connection.
Grading System
UWM uses a letter grade system that includes "plus" and
"minus" grades and is based on a 4.000 scale. For convenience
in computing averages, each letter grade carries a specified number of
points per credit. The scale of grades and points
follows:
Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF(0-16)
(Points per credit)
(4.000) Excellent
(3.670)
(3.330)
(3.000) Good
(2.670)
(2.330)
(2.000) Fair
(1.670)
(1.330)
(1.000) Poor
(0.670)
(0.000) Fail
In addition, students may be allowed to take a limited number of
courses on a "Credit/No Credit" basis, and may enroll
on an
"Audit" basis in courses for which they do not wish to obtain
college credit. The following symbols are used
where grade points are
not involved:
I
Incomplete
S
Satisfactory (Zero credit* and Audit courses
only)
U
Unsatisfactory (Zero credit* courses only)
Credit
C- or above (credit/no credit courses
only)
No Credit
Below C- (credit/no credit courses
only)
NC
Not completed (audit courses only)
Not Rptd
Grade was not submitted in time to be reported.
Course dropped by student after fourth week of
semester or first quarter of
W
shorter session
Administrative drop (enrollment in course
violates permitted number of
WR
repeats)
Administrative drop (enrollment in course
violates permitted number of
#W
repeats), effective March 2002
R
Repeat course (counts in GPA)
#
Repeat course (does not count in GPA)
* Except English 090/095, ESL 096, and Math 090/095. Letter grades
are assigned for these courses, although they
carry no degree or GPA
credit.
F Grades – Additional Information
Effective fall 2004, the University modified its system for
assigning grades of F in order to comply with federal
requirements
for students receiving financial aid. When reporting a grade of F,
instructors also will report a number
corresponding to the student's
"week of last participation" in the course. This is the last
week of the term for which there
is documented evidence of the
student's participation in the course. A student receiving the grade of
F0 would, therefore,
be one who never attended or participated,
whereas a student grade of F16 would signify completion of the entire
term.
The numeral for "week of last participation" will be
reflected on unofficial transcripts and grade reports. On official
transcripts, only the grade of F will be reflected.
Grade Point Average
The number of grade points earned in a course is computed by
multiplying the points for the grade by the number of
credits offered
for the course. (Example: A B earned in a three-credit course would
give you nine grade points.)
The general quality of a student's work is expressed in terms of
the grade point average (GPA). This is the total number
of grade points
earned divided by the total number of GPA credits. The highest possible
average is 4.000 or an A in
every subject.
The UWM grade point average recorded on your official transcript
is based solely upon credits earned or attempted at
UWM on a regular
graded basis. Even though you may receive credits for coursework taken
elsewhere, such transfer
credits are not counted as part of the GPA at
UWM. Some schools and colleges have different standards for GPA
calculation and may include transfer work for admission or graduation;
see degree requirements within each
school/college for specifics.
Credits granted by examination or UWM credits taken on an audit or
credit/no credit
grading basis also are excluded from the official UWM
grade point average.
If you are returning to UWM and have not previously earned your
bachelor's degree, your cumulative GPA will
continue from your last
point of enrollment. If you have previously earned your bachelor's
degree, you should apply as a
"Second Degree" student. Your credits and
GPA will start over with the courses you take upon your return, and
your
original record cannot be altered.
University-wide Academic Action Policy
The University-wide Academic Action Policy establishes minimum
standards for undergraduate students enrolled in
schools and colleges.
Individual schools and colleges may adopt stricter criteria;
students should consult the
school/college advising offices for
specific information.
A student whose GPA falls below minimum university-wide standards
for any grading period will be subject to the
following academic
actions.
Academic Probation: Imposed on students whose
cumulative GPA falls below 2.000. The student on academic
probation
whose semester GPA is 2.000 or better, but whose cumulative GPA
remains below 2.000, is permitted
to continue on academic probation.
Cleared Probation: Achieved when cumulative GPA
increases to 2.000 or above.
Dropped for One Semester: Imposed on any student on
academic probation who fails to earn a semester GPA of
2.000.
Final Probation: Applies to a student who is permitted
to enroll after any drop action. The student on final
probation whose
semester GPA is 2.000 or better, but whose cumulative GPA remains
below 2.000, is permitted
to continue on final academic probation.
Dropped for Two Years: Imposed on any student on final
probation who fails to achieve a semester and
cumulative GPA of 2.000
or better.
Re-instatement/Re-admission: A dropped student may be
re-instated immediately after a drop action or readmitted after the
drop period. A re-admitted or re-instated student is placed on final
probation.
Academic Drop
Academic drop is dismissal from the University for academic
ineligibility. Academic drop is initiated by administrative
offices. The student must apply for re-admission and be granted permission to
re-enroll by the dean of the school or
college from which the student
was dropped.
Incompletes
You may be given an incomplete if you have carried a subject
successfully until near the end of the semester but,
because of illness
or other unusual and substantiated cause beyond your control, have been
unable to take or complete
the final examination or to complete some
limited amount of coursework. An incomplete is not given unless you
prove
to the instructor that you were prevented from completing the
course requirements for just cause as indicated above.
Undergraduates are required to complete a course marked
incomplete prior to the end of the next succeeding semester
(excluding
summer sessions and UWinteriM). If you do not remove the incomplete
during this period, the report of I
will lapse to
F.
Overloads
The maximum credit load for undergraduates is 18 credits in all schools
and colleges, except Fine Arts (18 credits or
three studio courses).
Students enrolling in more than 18 credits will be assessed extra
tuition above the normal full-time
rate. A student must obtain approval
for an overload in the office of his/her academic dean. Different
credit load
maximums apply during the summer and winter sessions.
Consult the UWinteriM or Summer Sessions Schedule of
Classes.
Repeating Courses
Unless a restriction is stated in the Schedule of Classes,
undergraduates may repeat a course only once, and only the
higher of
the two grades will be calculated into the grade point average (GPA).
Both attempts will appear on the
student's transcript.
If the UWM course repeats a course for which the student received
transfer credit, only the UWM course will be
calculated into the GPA,
regardless of grade. Both attempts will be shown on the transcript.
Once a bachelor's degree
has been earned, the academic career (credits,
GPA, and coursework) starts over with any subsequent enrollment and
the
original record cannot be altered. Courses taken after the bachelor's
degree has been earned do not count as repeats
of courses taken prior
to the posting of the degree.
A student will not be permitted to repeat any course more than
once without the prior approval of the student's
school/college
advising office. Further restrictions apply; check with the
school/college or particular department. The
single repeat limit also
applies to courses taken for audit or credit/no credit.
Note: Exceptions to this policy are variable-topic courses,
which may be taken for credit as often as permitted for that
particular
course, as specified in the Schedule of Classes. A variable-topic course may count as a repeat of a previously
taken course only if
the topic is identical to that of the student's earlier enrollment and
the repeat occurs within the same
academic career.
Students who took a course as a repeat prior to fall 1988 are
entitled to one additional enrollment. Transfer students who
did not
previously take a course at UWM are entitled to one repeat at UWM of a
course taken at a previous institution.
In courses of limited enrollment, students who have not taken the
course previously have priority over students who are
repeating the
course. Individual schools and colleges may adopt stricter criteria. It
is generally advisable for any student
to consult an advisor before
registering to repeat a course.
If you have previously earned your degree from UWM, your
attempted and earned credits as well as your cumulative
GPA will start
over with the courses you take in pursuit of your second degree.
Courses taken as part of your first
degree will not be considered
repeats. Your original record cannot be altered.
Residence Credit Requirement
Consult individual school or college
sections for requirements regarding the number and kinds of credits a
student must
take in residence at UWM to be eligible to receive a UWM
degree.
Graduation
Students must meet the graduation requirements of their school or
college, which includes notifying the advising office
in the school or
college of their intent to graduate at least one semester prior to
graduation. Generally, students may
begin to apply for May Commencement
in mid-November, and December Commencement in mid-April. To apply for
graduation, log in to PAWS (www.paws.uwm.edu). From the
"Academics" section of your Student Center, click on the
"Other Academic" drop-down box, select "Apply for
Graduation," and click on the double arrows to proceed to the
application.
Commencement exercises are held in either May or December.
Students who graduate at the end of the summer sessions
may participate
in the May or December Commencement. Students who graduate at the end
of the UWinteriM session
may participate in December Commencement.
Attendance at Commencement is optional.
Commencement Honors are listed below.
Excess Credits Policy
A University of Wisconsin System (UWS) policy is in effect at all UWS
institutions. Under this policy, students
pursuing their initial
undergraduate degree(s) who have accumulated more than 165 total
credits (counting all credits
earned at UW campuses as well as credits
taken at WTCS institutions and accepted for degree credit at UWS
institutions) will be assessed a 100% surcharge on tuition
for any additional credits (i.e., your tuition will be doubled).
For more
specific information about this policy, contact your academic advisor.
Students Called to Military Service
Students called into active military service should contact the
Military Educational Benefits Office for more
information, Mellencamp Hall 168, (414) 229-5699, or visit the website at uwm.edu/financialaid/types-of-aid/militaryeducation-benefits-2.
Honors for Scholarship
Type of Honors
Architecture
and
Urban
The Arts
Business Administration1
Education
Engineering
and
Applied
Planning
Science
Commencement Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.500 or
above, based on a minimum of 40 graded UWM credits
Honors
earned prior to
the final semester, will receive all-university commencement honors
and be awarded
the traditional gold cord at the December or May
Honors Convocation. In schools and colleges in
which fewer than 15%
of the traditional students have a 3.500 GPA, all-university honors
will be
awarded to approximately the top 15% of graduating students.
A criterion GPA (not lower than
3.200) for this 15% will be
calculated based on statistics from the previous comparable
semester.
Please note that for honors calculation, the GPA is not
rounded and is truncated at the third decimal
(e.g., 3.499).
Dean's Honor GPA of 3.750
GPA of
GPA of 3.750 or
GPA of 3.750
2
or above
GPA of 3.500 or above
3.500 or
List
above
or above
(Levels 1, 2)
above
Dean's Honors To graduating
Major
seniors with 2
achievments in
highest cum
one or more of
GPAs (Level
the arts.
2).
Departmental
Dept.
Curr & InstHonors
recommendation
cumulative
for Honors
GPA of 3.500
excellence in
or above,
performance not
based on a
reflected in
minimum of
GPA.
40 graded
UWM credits
earned prior
to the final
semester.
Final Honors3 Earned on a minimum of 60 graded
UWM credits: Cum Laude - 3.500 or above; Magna Cum Laude
- 3.650 or
above; Summa Cum Laude - 3.800 or above.
High Honors in GPA of 3.750 Cum GPA of
Ed Pol &
the Major
or above for
3.500 and dept.
Comm
courses in
recommendation.
Studies: 3.500
major &
3.500
cum GPA on
GPA for last 60
all
SOE
UWM cr
credits.
(Level 2).
Honors Degree To graduating seniors who complete Honors
College requirements.
and Honors
Degree with
Thesis
Honors in the
GPA of 3.500 3.500 GPA in
Ed Pol &
4
or
above
for
major
and
dept.
Comm
Major
courses in
recommendation.
Studies: 3.200
major &
3.250
GPA on all
for last 60
SOE
credits.
UWM cr
(Level 2).
Phi Beta Kappa
Sophomore
Sophomores with 24 or more graded
UWM credits and a 3.500 GPA qualify for Sophomore Honors.
Honors
They are
invited to an honors convocation in April of each year.
Honors for Scholarship (cont.)
Information
Health
Social
Letters and Science
Nursing
5
Welfare
Studies6
Sciences
Commencement Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.500 or above, based on a
minimum of 40 graded UWM credits
Honors
earned prior to the final
semester, will receive all-university commencement honors and be
awarded
the traditional gold cord at the December or May Honors
Convocation. In schools and colleges in
which fewer than 15% of the
traditional students have a 3.500 GPA, all-university honors will
be
awarded to approximately the top 15% of graduating students. A
criterion GPA (not lower than
3.200) for this 15% will be
calculated based on statistics from the previous comparable
semester.
Please note that for honors calculation, the GPA is not
rounded and is truncated at the third decimal
(e.g., 3.499).
Type of Honors
Dean's Honor
2
List
Dean's Honors
Departmental
Honors
Final Honors3
High Honors in
the Major
GPA of 3.750
or above
GPA of 3.750 or
GPA of 3.750 or above
above
-
-
-
-
-
-
GPA of
GPA of 3.750
3.750 or
or above
above
-
-
Earned on a minimum of 60 graded UWM credits:
Cum Laude - 3.500 or above; Magna Cum Laude
- 3.650 or above; Summa
Cum Laude - 3.800 or above.
-
GPA of 3.750 or
above for
courses in the
major.
-
Honors Degree To graduating seniors who complete Honors
College requirements.
and Honors
Degree with
Thesis
3.500 GPA or GPA of 3.500 or 3.000 cum GPA on all cr attempted.
Honors in the
4
above on
above for
3.500 GPA on
all cr that count
Major
courses
courses in the
toward the major, and 3.500 GPA
completed at
major.
on all advanced
cr that count
UWM
toward the major.
following
Departments/programs set course
entrance to a
and other requirements.
major (a
minimum of 30
credits must be
included).
Phi Beta Kappa
To be elected to Phi Beta Kappa,
must be L&S
degree candidate;
have sufficient cr in humanities,
social sciences,
foreign languages,
math, and general liberal studies;
and have
completed at least 60
graded cr at UWM. Jrs. must be in
upper 2% of
class, with 3.800 cum
GPA. Srs. must be in upper 8% of
-
-
-
-
3.500 GPA
in major
courses,
including
social
science
credits
completed at
UWM.
-
Sophomore
Honors
class, with
3.600 cum GPA.
Sophomores with 24 or more graded UWM credits
and a 3.500 GPA qualify for Sophomore Honors.
They are invited to an
honors convocation in April of each year.
1
Beta Gamma Sigma is the national
scholastic honor society in the field of business. Election to
membership is
available to both undergraduate and graduate students in
business. Each semester, students are invited to join Beta
Gamma
Sigma. Selection is based upon outstanding scholastic achievement.
2 Applies
to a full-time student's GPA on
12 or more graded credits in a given semester.
3 The
Final University Honors criteria
have been revised to make them standard across all UWM schools and
colleges.
The new criteria take effect beginning with students who
graduate in May 2011.
4 Refers
to GPA earned in courses in the
major.
5
Juniors in Occupational Therapy with a
cumulative 3.500 GPA in required courses, and faculty/staff
sponsorship, can
apply to the Honors Committee for Honors in
Occupational Therapy.
6 Applies
to Bachelor of Science in
Information Science and Technology degree program.
Credit/No Credit Option
To be granted credit for a course for which you have registered
credit/no credit, you must earn a grade of C- or better.
Consult the
table below to determine whether you may enroll for courses on a
credit/no credit basis. Courses may not
be taken credit/no
credit if they are to be used to satisfy the GER English and
mathematics competencies or awarding of
final honors.
School or
College
Who qualifies?
Academic
AOC undergraduates follow rules
Opportunity
listed for L&S students.
Center (AOC)
Which courses may be
taken?
-
Pre-Architecture students and
Elective courses; courses
upper-level
students with a 2.500 other than the 48
credits
cumulative GPA.
required for the
Architectural Studies
degree.
The Arts
Undergraduates in The Arts.
Courses outside the major.
Any course that
would
fulfill the core curriculum
requirements.
Business
Undergraduates in Business and All non-Business (courses
Administration Pre-Business.
outside the School of
Business Administration)
that are not required as
part of the
student's major.
Architecture
and
Urban
Planning
Limits
Maximum of eight courses; one
course per
semester.
One course per semester; maximum of
eight
courses.
Maximum of eight courses; one
course per
semester. No Business
course may be taken on a C/NC basis
by any
student regardless of their
program unless it is only offered on a
C/NC basis.
Pre-Business students may not take
Education
Engineering
and
Applied
Science
Health
Sciences
Undergraduates in Education and Please see your advisor.
Pre-Education.
Undergraduates in Engineering
Free elective or
and Applied
Science.
arts/humanities/social
science
elective courses.
Undergraduates admitted to the
College of
Health Sciences.
Information
Studies
Undergraduates in Information
Resources.
Letters and
Science
Undergraduates in Letters and
Science.
Nursing
Undergraduates in Nursing.
Social Welfare Undergraduate majors and premajors in Social Work and
Criminal Justice.
University
Special and
Off-Campus
No required courses in
any of the
pre-professional
or professional programs
may be taken on a C/NC
basis.
All non-Information
Studies (courses outside
the School of Information
Studies) that are not
required as part of
the
student's major.
Courses other than Honors
courses that are not
in the
student's major or minor.
Non-clinical elective
courses in Nursing.
Only used in courses
outside the 54-65 credit
requirements in the Social
Work or Criminal Justice
major.
University Special Students
should contact an advisor in the
the Undergraduate Admissions.
Off-campus students should
contact
the appropriate program
coordinator.
Econ 103, Econ 104, or
Math 211 on a
C/NC basis.
Please see your advisor.
Maximum of 12 credits; no more than
three
credits in any one semester.
Only one course, regardless of number
of credits,
may be taken per semester.
A maximum of 12 credits may be
taken
C/NC.
Maximum of eight courses; one
course per
semester.
One course per semester; maximum of
eight
courses.
Maximum of six credits; no more than
one course
per semester.
One course
per semester; maximum of
eight courses.
Some courses are offered on a C/NC basis only. These may be taken in
addition to the above limits. C/NC courses are
not counted in the GPA,
but courses in which credit is earned will count toward graduation.
Courses may be changed
from a regular graded basis to C/NC or vice
versa only during the same period as courses may be added. Only one
such
change may be made per semester per course.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
[ Contents | How to
Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration |Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES
Academic Opportunity Center
Advanced Placement Program (AP)
African American Student Academic Services (AASAS)
American Indian Student Services (AISS)
American Indian Studies (AIS)
Audit Program
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Cultures & Communities Program
English as a Second Language (ESL) Courses
Evening Degree Programs
Freshman Seminar Program
Honors College
International Baccalaureate (IB)
International Study
Military Science Program
Off-Campus Courses
Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR)
The Roberto Hernández Center
Institute for Service Learning (ISL)
Latino Studies Certificate Program (LSCP)
Southeast Asian American Student Services (SAASS)
Academic Opportunity Center
Mitchell Hall, Room 177
(414) 229-4696
http://uwm.edu/academic-opportunity-center/
The Academic Opportunity Center (AOC) educates and empowers a diverse group of students whose prior education and
experiences may not have adequately prepared them for college, but who possess a commitment to higher learning. By
doing so, we facilitate and support the academic growth of students and their transition and inclusion in university life.
When a student is admitted via the AOC, the advisor becomes the
student's first point of contact. The advisor helps each
student
interpret placement test scores and register for classes. S/he also
encourages tutoring when necessary, informs
students of university
policies and procedures, serves as a referral source, helps students
gain information about financial
aid, and provides other information
as needed to succeed at UWM.
Many of the foundational courses are taught in
classes that typically are smaller than general university classes,
and offer
more individualized instruction. The program's academic
advisors have a smaller student caseload, which enables them to
offer
intensive advising and to monitor progress in regular meetings with
each student throughout the semester.
For more
information, please contact the Academic Opportunity Center at (414)
229-4696, or visit our website at
uwm.edu/academic-opportunity-center/.
Advanced Placement Program (AP)
Vogel Hall, 3253 North Downer Ave.
(414)
229-2222
High school seniors who have taken college-level courses in
cooperation with the College Entrance Examination Board's
(CEEB)
Advanced Placement Program (AP) may take the appropriate exams and have
their scores sent to the University.
Credit for courses and advanced placement are given for high
achievement on certain tests. Questions about the UWM
policy on the AP
examinations may be directed to the Department of Admissions and
Recruitment, (414) 229-2222, or
check online at uwm.edu/registrar/students/transfer-information/transfer-credit/transferring-non-coursework-credit/.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
CLEP is a series of examinations that allow individuals to earn college
credit for what they already know regardless of
where they learned it.
CLEP is the most widely
accepted credit-by-examination program in the United States.
CLEP exams are computer-based and are composed of multiple-choice
questions. Candidates receive an instant official
score report
following completion of the exam. An exception to this is the College
Composition exam, which includes
two mandatory essays.
CLEP granting policies vary from college to college. A list of
examinations and registration information can be found at
www.cleptesting.uwm.edu.
International Baccalaureate
The International Baccalaureate (IB) program is a rigorous pre-university course of study that meets the needs of highly
motivated and academically gifted secondary school students. Examinations are offered for study at a "Higher" level
(minimum 240
teaching hours) and at a "Standard" level (minimum 150 teaching
hours). Each examination is graded on a
scale of 1 (minimum) to 7
(maximum).
International Baccalaureate students who enroll at the
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee are generally awarded three
credits
for a score of 5, 6, or 7 on the "Standard" level exams. Three
credits are also generally awarded for a score of 4 on
the "Higher"
level exams. Students who earn a score of 5, 6, or 7 on a "Higher"
level exam are generally awarded 6
credits. Those who are awarded the
full diploma receive 3 additional credits. Contact the Registrar's
Office in
Mellencamp 212, (414) 229-3800, with questions regarding
the IB policy.
African American Student Academic Services
(AASAS)
Bolton Hall, Room 170
(414) 229-6657
Housed in the College of Letters and Science, the Office of African
American Student Academic Services (AASAS) is a
campus-wide support
program that is committed to helping African American students
achieve their educational goals.
AASAS provides to enrolled and
prospective African American students academic and supportive
services that include
recruitment, help with admission and financial
aid forms, academic advising and assistance, personal counseling,
social
programming, and peer mentoring.
American Indian Student Services (AISS)
Bolton Hall, Room 195
(414) 229-5880; fax (414)
229-5930
uwm.edu/letters-science/advising/student-advising/american-indian-student-services
Helping American Indian students reach their educational objectives by providing assistance from application to
graduation is the primary goal of American Indian Student Services. Administered by
the College of Letters and Science,
AISS is a strong, campus-wide
support program committed to helping admitted and potential American
Indian students
connect to campus and community networks. The AISS
staff members make every effort to give students a home away
from
home by providing a student lounge and computer lab and by
coordinating seasonal events, student fundraisers, and
various social
activities. AISS also plans campus sociocultural and educational
programs, such as an annual powwow and
American Indian Awareness
week. Support services include recruitment, pre-college visits,
academic advising and
personal counseling, help with the admission
and financial aid processes, liaison between campus and tribes, peer
mentoring, a computer lab, and cultural enrichment programming.
A fundamental tenet of AISS's basic philosophy is the belief
that getting an education is important not only for individual
students, but also for the growth, health, and future of American
Indian tribes/nations.
American Indian Studies (AIS)
Bolton Hall, Room 706
(414) 229-4259
uwm.edu/american-indian-studies/
American Indian Studies (AIS), based in the College of Letters and
Science, is an interdisciplinary program that
cooperates with
University departments to offer courses designed to acquaint all
students with the American Indian
heritage. The AIS Program also is
involved with research, writing, and publication related to American
Indian Studies as
an academic discipline. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes or the AIS coordinator, Donald Green, for more
information on course offerings. Interested students may earn an interdisciplinary major in American Indian Studies.
Audit Program
Mellencamp Hall, Room 212
(414) 229-6571
Expand your horizons . . . without tests or grades. If you would
like to take a course for information or enrichment
without
fulfilling all the course requirements, consider auditing a course.
An auditor does not receive a grade or credit for
the course, and in
most cases is not expected to take major exams or submit projects or
term papers required of students
enrolled for credit. Requirements
may vary, so if you want to audit a course you should discuss with
the instructor such
factors as attendance, coursework standards, and
other expectations before enrolling, or no later than the first week
of
class.
No degree credit is awarded for courses taken on an audit basis, and
such courses do not count in determining the
minimum credit load
required for student athletes, or in determining eligibility for
financial aid or other benefits. Audited
courses may be counted in
determining maximum credit load a student may carry. Each department
has restrictions on
courses open to auditors. Courses not open to
auditors are annotated in the Schedule of Classes.
Students will pay lower fees for audited courses (approximately
30% for Wisconsin residents or 50% for nonresidents).
Residents of
Wisconsin who are 60 years of age or older as of the first day of
classes of the term for which enrollment is
desired may audit classes
for free, subject to space availability and instructor approval. For
information about auditing
courses, please contact an advisor from the Department of Admissions and Recruitment at (414) 229-2222 or
uwm.edu/contact to set up an appointment.
Cultures & Communities Program
Holton Hall, Room G36
(414) 229-5960
uwm.edu/cultures-communities
The Cultures and Communities (CC) Program is an alternative to
the standard track for completing UWM's General
Education
Requirements. Students who choose the CC option fulfill their
requirements by taking select classes that focus
on multicultural
understanding, community engagement, service learning, environmental
and global awareness, and the
appreciation of artistic, intellectual,
and social diversity. CC students earn a Certificate (equivalent to
an interdisciplinary
minor) that documents their advanced knowledge
in these areas and that serves as excellent preparation for graduate
study
or most any career in today's multicultural, globalized
society.
The CC program is designed to work with any major and is open
to all undergraduate students. A list of CC courses may
be found
online at uwm.edu/cultures-communities/. For additional information, see the program
requirements in the
College of Letters and Science section of this
catalog or contact the CC Program office.
English as a Second Language (ESL) Courses
Brooke Haley, ESL Credit Course Coordinator, Curtin Hall, Room 678
[email protected]
UWM students who learned another language before learning English can complete the English portion of their General
Education Requirement (GER) by taking English as a Second Language (ESL) writing courses instead of English writing
courses designed for native speakers of English. In the ESL writing courses, students learn not only what native speakers
of English learn in college writing courses, but also the English language skills that non-native speakers of English need
to succeed in their university
studies.
The ESL-PIC test (not the EPT) determines placement in ESL
writing courses. Contact the Testing Center
[www.testingcenter.uwm.edu, (414) 229-4689, Mellencamp B28] to make an
appointment to take the ESL-PIC test.
In addition to the ESL Writing Courses, UWM students whose first language is not English can benefit from taking other
academic English skill building courses in reading, grammar and editing, and listening and speaking. Please see the
English as a Second Language (ESL) section in the Schedule of Classes for a complete list of course offerings.
For more information about ESL courses for credit at UWM, contact the ESL credit course coordinator, Brooke Haley
[[email protected], Curtin 678].
Evening Degree Programs
Vogel Hall, 3253 North Downer Ave.
(414) 229-2222
Students can earn a baccalaureate degree in a number of majors by
attending UWM exclusively during the evening. For
more information,
please visit uwm.edu/undergrad-admission/student-type/evening-degree-programs.
At present, these
majors include accounting, anthropology,
communication, community education, criminal justice, economics,
educational
studies, English, finance, human resources management,
information resources, management information systems,
marketing,
mathematics, organizational administration, political science,
production and operations management, social
work, and Spanish. Many
additional majors and programs, such as engineering, can be completed
primarily during
evening hours.
Freshman Seminar Program
Holton Hall, Room G16/18
(414) 229-6041
uwm.edu/first-year-seminars/
Administered by the College of Letters and Science, the
Freshman Seminar Program affords freshmen the opportunity to
participate in a small learning community during their first year at
UWM, helping to ease the transition to college. The
program offers a
range of seminars to students of all ability levels.
Limited to 20 first-year students, each Freshman Seminar
provides a unique opportunity for students to get to know their
professors and fellow students. In this small setting, the professor
serves as a mentor, coaching and helping students to
achieve success
in their first year. Freshman Seminars emphasize the development of
collaboration, teamwork, written
and oral communication skills,
creative and analytical thinking, and university literacy.
Seminars are offered in a wide variety of interest areas. Course
titles in recent semesters have included Forensic
Chemistry:
Solving Crime With Science; How to Think Like a Psychologist;Voyages in Cyberspace; and The World of
Your
Parents and Grandparents: American Culture in the 1950s. Most
freshman seminars are offered for three credits
and can be applied to
degree requirements. See the Schedule of Classes for a list of
Freshman Seminars taught in this
current semester.
In addition to offering seminars, the Program fosters a sense
of community by offering students the opportunity to apply
for peer
mentoring positions and by sponsoring other events.
For more information, visit the Freshman Seminar website at uwm.edu/first-year-seminars/
or call (414) 229-2641.
Honors College
Honors House, Room 154
(414) 229-4658
http://honors.uwm.edu
Admission
Eligibility for Continuing
Enrollment
Notification of Ineligible
Students
Regaining Honors College
Eligibility
Graduation Requirements
Course of Study
Courses:
Honors College (HONORS)
Administration
The Honors College is open to qualified undergraduates in all
UWM schools and colleges. The college offers seminars
and
individualized instruction in the humanities, arts, social sciences,
and natural sciences. It is appropriate particularly
for students
who want more engaged and writing-intensive studies or who are
preparing for graduate, law, medical, or
professional school.
Students receive the degree designations "Honors" or
"Honors with Distinction" on their diplomas and
transcripts.
Admission
Students pursuing their first degree can join the Honors College as freshmen, continuing, or transfer students. Freshmen
are admitted based upon a holistic review of their UWM application and high school record. Continuing UWM and
transfer students should have
a cumulative GPA equivalent to their academic standing (see below)
and have met the
University English requirement by testing out of,
or receiving a B-, or better, in English 102. All students new to
Honors
must meet with an Honors advisor to discuss how the Honors
College can be integrated into their academic plans.
Continuing in the
Honors College
Honors College students must meet the following cumulative
GPA/enrollment criteria:
1. To continue in the Honors
College, students must maintain the following minimum grade point
averages for work
done at UWM by the beginning of their year in
school:
Freshman (after first
semester)
3.0
Sophomore
3.3
Junior
3.4
Senior/to graduate with
an Honors degree 3.5
2. Students admitted as new freshmen who need to complete the University English Requirement
must complete
Honors 200 in the first semester following their
completion of the English Requirement.
3. Students who do not take
Honors courses for two consecutive semesters will be considered
“inactive” and dropped
from the Honors College.
Graduating with
Honors
All UWM Undergraduate Schools and Colleges now offer the
Honors Degree, a special diploma awarded to students who
complete
Honors College requirements. Students who complete a Senior Thesis
or Project, or complete two semesters of
Research in Honors, receive
a special “Honors with Distinction” degree. Graduating
with an Honors Degree provides
convincing evidence of outstanding
academic achievement, a valuable accomplishment students can note on
resumes and
graduate school applications. To graduate with Honors,
students must achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 and
accumulate at least 21 Honors credits.
Notification of
Ineligible Students
At the end of each semester, the Honors College will review
students’ academic records to determine whether they meet
the
criteria for continuation in the program. The Honors College will
notify by mail all students who fail to meet these
criteria, stating
that they no longer are eligible to enroll in Honors classes. If
these students already are enrolled in Honors
classes for the next
semester, they will be dropped administratively.
Regaining Honors
College Eligibility
1.
Students who become
ineligible by failing to maintain the minimum grade point average
may apply for
reinstatement if they subsequently raise their
grade point average to the required level.
2. Students who become
ineligible after two consecutive semesters with no Honors courses
may apply for
reinstatement.
3. In either case, students
applying for reinstatement must indicate in writing how they
propose to complete
Honors requirements before graduation.
Graduation Requirements
An Honors degree requires 21 Honors credits and at least a 3.5
cumulative grade point average at graduation. All Honors
credits
count toward the total credits required for graduation. Students
must earn a grade of B- or better to receive Honors
credit for a
course. At least 12 of the 21 Honors credits must be earned at UWM,
with at least 9 credits in upper-level
Honors seminars at UWM.
Students also may choose to graduate with "Honors with
Distinction." The designation "Honors with
Distinction" is
awarded to students who, as part of their
Honors requirements, successfully complete 6 credits in
"Research in Honors," a
"Senior Honors Project,"
or a "Senior Honors Thesis." This designation will appear
on the students' transcripts. Students
complete the required credits
through enrollment in Honors 686, 687, or 689 (see below).
Course of Study
Honors Seminars. Freshmen and sophomores entering the Honors
College must complete Honors 200, earning a grade of
B- or better,
before taking other honors courses (except for honors calculus,
which can be taken concurrently). Following
Honors 200, which may be
repeated once with change in topic, students with sophomore standing
or above may take
departmental Honors seminars at 3H credits each.
Honors 200
Honors Seminar: The Shaping of the Modern Mind: (Subtitle)
3H
Math 221
Honors Calculus I
5H
Math 222
Honors Calculus II
5(1)H
Africol 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Anthro 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
ArtHist 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Atm Sci 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Bio Sci 380
HHonors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Chem 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Classic 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Commun 380
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
CompLit 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Econ 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
English 685
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
French 383
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Geog 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Geo Sci 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
German 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Hebr St 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Hist 398
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Hist 399
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Honors 350 (680)
University Honors Seminar in the Humanities: (subtitle)
3H
Honors 351 (683)
University Honors Seminar in the Social Sciences: (subtitle)
3H
Honors 352 (682)
University Honors Seminar in the Natural Sciences: (subtitle)
3H
Honors 380
Honors Seminar in the Arts: (subtitle)
3H
Italian 383
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
JAMS 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Linguis 380
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Math 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Philos 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Physics 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Pol Sci 380
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Psych 380
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Russian 385
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Sociol 380
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Spanish 381
Honors Seminar: (subtitle)
3H
Urb Std 381
Honors Seminar in the Social Sciences: (subtitle)
3H
With the exception of Honors 200 and 380, variable content seminars
(those marked "subtitle") are retakable with a
change in
topic to a maximum of 9 credits. Honors 200 and 380 are retakable
once.
Advanced Independent Study (3H
cr): Independent study courses offered through departments. Course
numbers vary.
Prerequisite: junior standing.
Honors 685 (Honors Tutorial; 3H cr): An independent study course for students who cannot arrange independent study
through one of the departments. Prerequisite: junior standing.
Honors 686 (Research in Honors; 3H or 6H cr):
Students assist a faculty member in his/her research and then design
and
complete an original and major research project under the
supervision of a faculty advisor. Students who complete 6 cr
are
awarded “Honors with Distinction” on their transcripts.
Prerequisite: junior standing and 9H credits.
*Honors 687 (Senior Honors Project; 3H cr;
retakable to a max of 6H cr): The Senior Honors Project is
intended for
students in majors in which an Honors Thesis is not
appropriate. It consists of a performance, exhibit, musical
composition, or technical/professional project completed under the
supervision of a faculty advisor. Students who
complete 6H cr are
awarded “Honors with Distinction” on their transcripts.
Prerequisite: senior standing.
*Honors 689 (Senior Honors Thesis; 6H cr over two
semesters): The Senior Honors Thesis allows students the
opportunity
to write an extended paper (usually 50-75 pages) reflecting
independent research conducted in some aspect of
their major field
of study under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Students who
complete the thesis are awarded
“Honors with Thesis” on
their transcripts. Prerequisite: senior standing.
*Students may not do both a Senior Thesis and a
Senior Project.
Graduate Courses. Courses at the 700 level and above may be counted toward the Honors College graduation
requirements. This option normally is open only to seniors in the program who meet the necessary prerequisites.
Permission for an Honors student to take a graduate course must be
obtained from the instructor of the course, the
department chair,
the dean of the appropriate school/college, and the Honors College
director.
Other Options. A maximum
of 9H credits earned at other universities may be applied to the
Honors College graduation
requirements with the director’s
approval. Honors credits also may be earned through approved Study
Abroad Programs.
Courses
Honors College (HONORS)
Administration
Peter Sands, Director
Robin
Weigert, Associate Director
International Study
Pearse Hall, Room 166
(414) 229-5182
www.uwm.edu/cie/study-abroad/
The Center for International Education (CIE) provides numerous
opportunities for UWM students to broaden their world
perspective
through study abroad. Short (six weeks or fewer), semester, and
academic year programs are offered in
various regions of the world,
including Asia, Latin America, Africa, the British Isles, and Europe.
Programs are available
for all undergraduate majors.
CIE's Study Abroad library is the place to begin one's journey overseas. The library provides updated materials on study
abroad programs. It also contains information on international internships, service-learning opportunities, the Peace
Corps, volunteering abroad,
and work abroad. After doing initial research, students can talk with a
peer advisor or attend a
Study Abroad workshop. Study Abroad advisors
also are available to assist with the application process, instruct
students
on credit transfer procedures, and help identify different
options to finance a study abroad program.
UWM students have studied in England, France, Germany, Ghana,
Chile, Poland, Ireland, China, Japan, and Mexico,
among many other
countries. Upon their return, they universally comment that this
educational experience changed their
lives.
Military Science Program
Army ROTC
Air Force ROTC
Naval ROTC
Army ROTC
UW-Milwaukee students have the opportunity to participate in the
Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (AROTC) at
Marquette University.
The AROTC program provides university students with leadership,
management, technical, and
tactical skills that will enable them to
start their journey as commissioned officers in the United States Army,
Army
Reserve, or Army National Guard.
Army ROTC is not a major field of study. It is a program in which
students pursue a baccalaureate degree of their choice
and take AROTC
courses in military-oriented subject matter. AROTC provides a general
knowledge of the contemporary
role of the Army in support of national
objectives and a practicum in management and leadership skills. Credits
earned in
military science courses apply toward graduation
requirements.
The Army ROTC program offers competitive two-, three-, and four-year
scholarships to qualified students. Currently, the
scholarships offered
for UWM students cover full tuition and fees or room
and board, $1,200 a year for books, and a
$300-$500 monthly stipend.
General Eligibility. To be eligible for an AROTC scholarship,
students must:
be a United States citizen;
be a full-time student;
have no major civil convictions;
not be a conscientious objector;
be medically qualified;
have a minimum 2.5 GPA; and
have a minimum ACT score of 19 or SAT score of 950.
The Army ROTC program is divided into two parts – the basic course (freshman and sophomore years) and the
advanced course (junior and senior years). The freshman year course currently is being offered at UWM; the remainder of
the courses are offered at Marquette University. Credit hours earned at Marquette University are transferred to UWM
student transcripts and count towards GPA and elective credit.
Basic Course. In the basic course, cadets learn basic military
skills and receive the foundation for leadership and
management skills
that are expanded during the advanced course. The basic course is open
to all full-time UWM students
without any obligation to the Army.
Advanced Course. During the advanced course, cadets learn more
extensive leadership and management skills, and they
are placed into
various leadership positions in the battalion. Cadets also develop
skills and attributes that are essential for
all commissioned officers
in the U.S. Army.
In addition to completing the military science courses, advanced-course students are required to attend the Advanced
Leadership Course at Fort Lewis, Washington, during the summer between the junior and senior years. During this fiveweek camp, cadets are expected to apply all of the skills that they have learned in the AROTC program. In addition,
cadets are offered the opportunity to compete for a chance to attend Airborne School, Air Assault School, or Cadet Troop
Leadership Training (CTLT). CTLT is an "internship" in which cadets have a chance to see what a Second Lieutenant
does on an active duty Army
post.
To qualify for the Advanced Course, students must accomplish one
of the following:
complete the two years of the basic course;
attend the Basic Leaders Course, a six-week camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky; or
complete the U.S. Army Basic Training or its equivalent.
Field Exercises: Once a semester, all of the cadets in the
program go to Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, to practice all of the
skills that
they have learned. Advanced-course cadets also are given the
opportunity to improve their leadership skills by
being placed in
various leadership positions leading other cadets.
Physical Training: Three times a week, cadets are required to attend physical training (PT). During PT, cadets do
physical activities
such as push-ups, sit-ups, and running. PT currently is conducted at
both UWM and Marquette
University.
For more information about enrolling in the Army ROTC program, contact
[email protected] or the Department of
Military Science at Marquette
University, (414) 288-7195, or www.marquette.edu/rotc/army.
Air Force ROTC
UWM students have the opportunity to participate fully in the Air
Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC)
Program. Students
enrolled in the Air Force ROTC program attend AFROTC courses at
Marquette University.
Through this program, UWM offers its students the opportunity to
prepare for initial active duty assignments as Air Force
Commissioned
Officers. In order to receive a commission, AFROTC cadets must complete
all university requirements for
a degree and courses specified by the
Air Force. AFROTC offers three- and four-year programs leading to a
commission
as an Air Force officer. Four-year program students complete
the general military course and the professional officer
course.
General qualifications:
be a full-time student;
be a United States citizen (for scholarship appointment);
be in good physical condition;
be of good moral character;
for pilot or navigator training, fulfill all commissioning requirements before age 29;
for scholarship recipients, fulfill all commissioning requirements before age 31; and
for non-scholarship students, fulfill all commissioning requirements before age 31.
General Military Course. The first- and second-year educational
program in Air Force Aerospace Studies consists of a
series of one-hour
courses designed to give students basic information on world military
systems and the role of the U.S.
Air Force in the defense of the free
world. All required textbooks and uniforms are provided free. The
general military
course is open to all students at UWM without advance
application and does not obligate students to the Air Force in any
way.
Field Training. AFROTC Field Training is offered during the
summer months at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, and
provides
leadership and officer training in a structured military environment.
Major areas of study include physical
training, drill and ceremony,
marksmanship, and survival training. The Air Force pays all expenses
associated with field
training.
Professional Officer Course. The third and fourth years of Air
Force Aerospace Studies are designed to develop skills
and attitudes
vital to the professional officer. Students completing the professional
officer course are commissioned as
officers in the U.S. Air Force upon
college graduation. All students in the professional officer course
receive a nontaxable subsistence allowance per month during the
academic year. Students wanting to enter the professional officer
course should apply early in the spring semester in order to begin this
course of study in the following fall semester.
Leadership Lab. Leadership Lab is a cadet-centered activity. It
is largely cadet-planned and -directed, in line with the
premise that it
provides leadership training experience that will improve a
cadet's ability to perform as an Air Force
officer. The freshman
and sophomore leadership laboratory program introduces Air Force
customs and courtesies, drill
and ceremonies, wearing the uniform,
career opportunities in the Air Force, education and training benefits,
the life and
work of an Air Force officer, and opportunities for field
trips to Air Force installations throughout the U.S. Initial
experiences include preparing the cadet for individual squadron and
flight movements in drill and ceremonies and for the
field training
assignment prior to the junior year.
The junior and senior leadership laboratory program involves the
cadets in advanced leadership experiences. Cadet
responsibilities
include planning and directing the activities of the cadet corps,
preparing briefings and written
communications, and providing
interviews, guidance, information, and other services that will
increase the performance
and motivation of other cadets.
AFROTC College Scholarship and High School Scholarship Programs.
While participating in AFROTC, scholarship
students receive a stipend
per month along with paid tuition, fees, and a fixed textbook
reimbursement. To be eligible for
either of these programs, students
must:
be a U.S. citizen;
be at least 17 years of age on the date of enrollment and under 31 years of age on December 31 of the estimated
year of commissioning;
pass an Air Force physical exam;
be selected by a board of Air Force officers;
have no moral objections or personal convictions that prevent bearing arms and supporting and defending the
Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic (applicants must not be conscientious
objectors); and
maintain a 2.5 grade point average.
High school students can apply for scholarships late in their
junior year or early in their senior year. Information on Air
Force
ROTC and applications for Air Force scholarships is available at
www.AFROTC.com. Scholarship applications
will not be accepted after
December 1 of the year before entering college.
For more information, contact the Department of Aerospace Studies at
Marquette University, (414) 288-7682.
Naval ROTC
The Naval Science Department at Marquette University administers
the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC)
program. Graduates
who complete all requirements will receive reserve commissions and
serve on active duty in the Navy
or Marine Corps with a minimum
three-year commitment for non-scholarship students, and five-year
commitment for
scholarship students.
Scholarships
NROTC offers two-, three-, and four-year scholarships to
qualified applicants. Four-year scholarships are awarded on a
national
level to qualified high school applicants (visit www.nrotc.navy.mil for
more information and to apply). Two- and
three-year scholarships are
awarded to students who have completed at least one, but not more than
four, terms of college
while a member of the NROTC Unit. Two-year
scholarships for students who are entering their junior year and have
not
previously been enrolled in the NROTC program also are available.
Students entering UWM with a four-year scholarship, earned on a
competitive basis while still in high school, will receive
full
tuition, fees, laboratory expenses, a stipend for books, and a
subsistence allowance of $250 to $400 per month,
depending on class
year. Necessary uniforms and textbooks for required Naval Science
courses are issued as well.
Basic Requirements:
Be a U.S. citizen;
Not less than 17 years old
by Sept. 1 of year starting college, and no more than 23 on June 30
of that year;
Be of good moral character;
Be a high school graduate;
Be 27 or younger by June 30
of the year you will graduate;
Be physically qualified by
Navy/Marine Corps standards; and
Achieve qualifying scores
on the SAT or ACT – ACT:
22 verbal, 22 math (22 composite for Marine Corps);
SAT:
530 verbal, 520 math (1000 composite for Marine Corps).
Students not on scholarship can still participate in the NROTC
College Program. They receive uniforms and Naval
Science textbooks, and
$350 and $400 per month during their junior and senior years,
respectively. All College Program
students are eligible to compete for
Naval Education and Training Command scholarships. Students are
selected on a
competitive basis after completing at least one term as
an NROTC College Program student. Selection boards meet semiannually
in March and June to consider students based on their most recent term.
Students may receive scholarship
benefits for two or three academic
years. Once selected, the students receive the same benefits and incur
the same active
duty requirements as students in the four-year
scholarship program.
The Naval Science Department teaches Naval Science courses and
supervises a midshipman-run drill program that instills
leadership
skills and professional development in all members of the midshipman
battalion. All midshipmen are required
to register for and participate
in this two-hour weekly drill period, which occurs at the Marquette
University Gymnasium.
One Naval Science class each term is also
required, with the exception of Nurse Corps and Marine Corps Options.
Students enrolled in the program from UWM attend Naval Science classes
at Marquette as "cross-town" students, while
the rest of their major is
completed on the UWM campus. Midshipmen on scholarship or in advanced
standing status also
are required to attend a four- to six-week
training period each summer. This summer training introduces midshipmen
to
the fleet and to the life of a junior Naval Officer. The summer
training period also provides an orientation to each of the
different
warfare specialties available upon graduation (aviation, surface,
submarine, and the Marine Corps).
All Navy Option scholarship students are required to complete one
year of calculus by the end of their sophomore year,
and one year of
calculus-based physics by the end of their junior year. Navy Option
college program students must
complete one year each in mathematics and
physical science. One course on World Cultural Awareness, one year of
English, and either an American Military History or National Security
Policy course also are required for all NROTC
students.
All scholarships are awarded on the basis of merit and personal
qualifications. Neither a Parents' Confidential Financial
Statement nor
a standard FAF is required for consideration for Naval ROTC
scholarships.
For more information, contact the Department of Naval Science at
Marquette University, (414) 288-7076, or visit our
website at
www.Marquette.edu/rotc/navy.
Off-Campus Courses
UWM offers a variety of courses beyond the boundaries of its
East Side campus. An extensive program of off-campus
instruction makes
regular UWM courses available in community locations throughout the
Milwaukee area and on other
University of Wisconsin System campuses.
Education Outreach Activities. The School of Education offers
off-campus courses at the undergraduate and graduate
levels.
Information on the School's courses, workshops, and other off-campus
educational activities may be obtained from
the Education Outreach
Office, Enderis Hall, Room 579, phone (414) 229-5255.
Online and Blended Learning. UWM offers an extensive array of
fully online and "blended" (partially online/partially
in-person) courses and programs at both the graduate and undergraduate
levels. For more information, go to
www.online.uwm.edu.
Office of Undergraduate Research
Bolton Hall, Room 192
(414) 229-2666
uwm.edu/our/
The Office of Undergraduate Research is a centralized location for undergraduates seeking on-campus research
opportunities and faculty members seeking enthusiastic, motivated undergraduate students with whom to collaborate.
OUR programs that promote this collaborative work are the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP),
which pairs students with faculty research mentors for academic credit, and the Support for Undergraduate Research
Fellows (SURF) program, which enables faculty research mentors to co-apply with top-performing students to provide an
hourly wage for the student's work on a faculty-led research project.
Also included under the OUR umbrella of offerings are travel grants to support undergraduates who are presenting their
work at national conferences and the [email protected] Summer Research Program for first-year students. Interested students
can apply to get involved at the website above or can stop by the OUR office in Bolton 192 for more information.
The Roberto Hernández Center (RHC)
Bolton Hall, Room 183
(414) 229-6156
uwm.edu/robertohernandezcenter/
The Roberto Hernández Center is committed to increasing the presence of Latinos at UWM, specifically students,
faculty, and academic staff. One of its main goals is to provide effective advising and mentoring to Latino students to
foster their retention and to guide them to completion of their degree requirements. The Center is committed to
developing and expanding Latino community outreach programs through interactions and partnerships with other
organizations. The RHC also seeks to promote and validate research on Latino culture.
The RHC houses two programs that serve Latino students on campus: Student Recruitment and Community Outreach,
and Advising and Academic Services. The RHC also assists the College of Letters and Science in coordinating the Latino
Studies Certificate Program.
Advising and Academic Services can help you with admission to the University and to register for classes, apply for
scholarships, and complete financial aid forms. AAS can also help you obtain tutorial assistance, locate services for
solving academic or personal problems, find organizations and programs on campus to support your goals, and help you
learn more about your career opportunities.
Institute for Service Learning (ISL)
Holton Hall, Room G30
(414) 229-2348
uwm.edu/community
Service learning programs bring students out of their classrooms
and into the community for experiences that offer them a
chance to
enrich their academics while making a meaningful contribution to
community organizations. Through their
work, students gain a deeper
understanding of course content along with a greater awareness of
societal needs and civic
responsibility.
Service learning courses are available for all
undergraduate students. For additional information, please
contact the ISL
office or visit the website.
Latino Studies Certificate Program (LSCP)
Enrique Figueroa, Coordinator
Bolton Hall, Room 272
(414) 229-6156
The Latino Studies Certificate Program (LSCP) provides the opportunity for students to focus on Latino issues in the
United States. The program utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the experiences, cultures, and social
conditions of Latinos. In consultation with the program advisor, Latino Studies students select courses from the
humanities, social sciences, and education. Many
Latino Studies courses satisfy other University and college
requirements. Students who have completed Latino Studies courses prior
to program enrollment are granted appropriate
credits toward satisfying
certificate requirements. Upon completion of all course requirements,
students are issued a
Certificate in Latino Studies by the College of
Letters and Science, and a notation stating that the program has been
completed is added to their transcripts.
Southeast Asian American Student Services
(SAASS)
Bolton Hall, Room 160
(414) 229-5282
(414) 229-3921
Administered by the College of Letters and Science, Southeast
Asian American Student Services (SAASS) provides
academic support for
Southeast Asian (Cambodian, Hmong, Laotian, and Vietnamese) heritage
students attending UWM.
Support services include academic advising,
admissions and financial aid procedures, tutorial referrals, career
information, cultural enrichment, and personal support. To serve
students effectively, SAASS works closely with
faculty/staff, students,
and Southeast Asian community organizations in Milwaukee and Wisconsin.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About
UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
ADITIONAL INFORMATION
Pursuant to the U.S. Department of Education’s Program Integrity Rule, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is
required to provide all prospective and current students with the contact information of the state agency or agencies that
handle complaints against postsecondary education institutions offering distance learning or correspondence education
within that state. Students are encouraged to utilize the institution’s internal complaint or review policies and procedures
through the Dean of Students Office (uwm.edu/deanofstudents/report-it; 414-229-4632; [email protected]) or Office of the
Provost (414-229-3203) prior to filing a complaint with the state agency or agencies. This link provides a list of contacts
in each state with whom a student may file a complaint.
The following states require UWM to publish specific statements regarding the offering of online programs in their
states:
Alabama
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is authorized by:
Alabama Commission on Higher Education
P.O. Box 302000
Montgomery, ALÂ 36104-3758
Alaska
UW-Milwaukee is exempt from authorization under AS 14.48 and 20 AAC 17.015 because the programs are online or
distance delivered and do not have a physical presence in the state.
Georgia
UWM is registered with the Georgia Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission and is subject to the complaint
procedures posted on the GNPEC website (gnpec.org/consumer-resources).
Indiana
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is authorized by:
The Indiana Board for Proprietary Education
101 W. Ohio Streete, Suite 670
Indianapolis, IN 46204-1984
Maryland
UWM is registered with the Maryland Higher Education Commission. UWM is subject to investigation of complaints
by the Office of the Attorney General of the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC). Contact information for
MHEC:
Maryland Higher Education Commission
6 N. Liberty Street, 10th Floor
Baltimore, Maryland 21201
Minnesota
UW-Milwaukee is registered as a private institution with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to
Minnesota Statutes, sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned
at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions.
Washington
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is authorized by the Washington Student Achievement Council and meets the
requirements and minimum educational standards established for degree- granting institutions under the DegreeGranting Institutions Act. This authorization is subject to periodic review and authorizes the University of WisconsinMilwaukee to offer field placement components for specific degree programs. The Council may be contacted for a list
of currently authorized programs. Authorization by the Council does not carry with it an endorsement by the Council
of the institution or its programs. Any person desiring information about the requirements of the act or the
applicability of those requirements to the institution may contact the Council at P.O. Box 43430, Olympia, WA 985043430.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
[ Contents
| How to Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About
UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
ADMINISTRATION
The University of Wisconsin System Regents
John Robert Behling
Mark J. Bradley
José Delgado
Tony Evers
Margaret Farrow
Michael M. Grebe
Eve Hall
Nicolas Harsy
Tim Higgins
James A. Langnes III
Edmund Manydeeds
Regina Millner
Janice Mueller
Drew Petersen
Charles Pruitt
S. Mark Tyler
José F. Vásquez
Gerald Whitburn
University of Wisconsin System Administration
Ray Cross, President
David Miller, Vice President for
Administration and Fiscal Affairs
David J. Ward, Interim Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs
Julie Gordon, Interim Vice President for Finance
James Villa, Vice President for University
Relations
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Administration
Mark Mone, Chancellor
Johannes Britz, Provost and Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs
Michael Laliberte, Vice Chancellor, Student Affairs
Tom Luljak, Vice Chancellor, University Relations and Communications
Robin Van Harpen, Vice Chancellor, Finance and Administrative Affairs
Patricia Borger, Vice Chancellor, Development and Alumni Relations
Joan Prince, Vice Chancellor, Global Inclusion and Engagement
Deans of Schools and Colleges
Robert Greenstreet, School of Architecture and Urban Planning
Scott Emmons, Peck School of the Arts
V. Kanti Prasad (Interim), Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business
Alan Shoho, School of Education
Brett Peters, College of Engineering and Applied Science
David Garman, School of Freshwater Sciences
Marija Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Graduate School
Ron Cisler (Interim), College of Health Sciences
Tomas Lipinski, School of Information Studies
Rodney Swain, College of Letters and Science
Sally Lundeen, College of Nursing
Ron Perez (Interim), Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health
Stan Stojkovic, Helen Bader School of Social Welfare
Paula Rhyner (Interim), School of Continuing Education
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
ADMINISTRATION
[ Contents
| How to Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Administration Policies
Administration Policies
UWM Equal Opportunity Policy
Hate/Bias Incident Reporting
University Policies and Programs Concerning Illicit Drugs and Alcohol
ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is an equal opportunity, affirmative action institution, and does not
discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, creed, national origin, disability, or any other protected status recognized by
Wisconsin or federal law. In 1990, s. 36.12, Wisconsin Statutes, was enacted, which provides as follows: No student
may be denied admission to, participation in, or the benefits of, or discriminated against in any service, program, course,
or facility of the (UW) System or its institutions or centers because of the student’s race, color, creed, religion, sex,
national origin, disability, ancestry, age, sexual orientation, pregnancy, marital status, or parental status.
University policies also prohibit harassment or retaliation against complainants on any of these bases. These policies are
in compliance with all relevant Wisconsin and federal laws, rules, and regulations.
Questions about the application of any of these policies, or complaints about violations, may be directed to the
appropriate admitting or employing office, or to the campus Office of Equity/Diversity Services, Mitchell Hall, Room
359, or phone (414) 229-5923.
An information booklet on the UWM Disciplinary Guidelines and the appropriate sections of the Wisconsin
Administrative Code covering conduct on University lands and student disciplinary procedures is available in the lobby
of Mellencamp Hall and in several offices, including the Office of the Dean of Students, Mellencamp Hall, Room 118.
Board of Regents rules require adherence by students and others present on the campus. Failure to comply with these
rules may subject students to disciplinary action and to civil forfeitures. State of Wisconsin Statutes and Federal Law
also apply on the campus of the University.
Under the provision of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, a student is entitled to review the
education records related to the student that the University maintains. A student may request a hearing regarding any
alleged inaccurate, misleading, or inappropriate information contained in the record.
The University may not disclose information from a student’s record to a third party unless the student gives consent, or
unless permitted to do so by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. A student may contact the
Undergraduate Records Office or the Office of the Dean of Students, both in Mellencamp Hall, for further information.
You may restrict the release of your address and phone number and other limited information by checking a box on your
registration form. If you do this, your address and phone number will not appear on most mailing lists used by UWM
student organizations, campus departments, or on mailing lists obtained from UWM by non-University groups.
The various academic units at UWM have set up appeals and grievance procedures. Students may avail themselves of
these procedures by contacting a department chair, the dean’s office of the school or college from which the course was
taken, or the Office of the Dean of Students.
UWM Equal Opportunity Policy
It is the policy of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee to
provide equal opportunity and prohibit discrimination and
harassment
for its employees and students in all programs, activities, and
employment. UWM is committed to actively
implement all federal and
state equal opportunity and affirmative action laws, executive orders,
policies, plans, rules,
and regulations.
UWM's Discriminatory Conduct Policy (Including Sexual Harassment)
(S-47) defines discrimination as conduct that (1)
adversely affects any
aspect of an individual's employment, education, or participation in
activities or programs at
UWM; and (2) is based on one or more
characteristics of the individual that are protected under federal,
state, or local
laws. Characteristics that are protected under federal,
state, or local law (protected statuses) may include age; ancestry;
arrest or conviction record; color; disability; gender
identity/expression; identity as a veteran, disabled veteran, or
Vietnam veteran; marital status; membership in the National Guard,
state defense force, or any other reserve component
of the military
forces of the United States or this state; national origin; pregnancy; political affiliation; race; religion;
sex; sexual orientation; or use
of lawful products off the premises during non-working hours (e.g.,
smoking cigarettes).
Harassment is a form of prohibited discrimination. UWM defines
harassment as conduct that (1) is of any type (oral,
written, graphic,
or physical); (2) is directed towards or against a person because of
the person's protected status (as
listed above); and (3) unreasonably
interferes with the individual's work, education, or participation in
activities or
programs at UWM, or creates a working or learning
environment that a reasonable person would find threatening or
intimidating. Sexual harassment includes unwanted sexual advances,
requests for sexual favors, and other verbal and
physical conduct of a
sexual nature.
Speech or expressive behavior (e.g., use of visual, recorded, or
written materials) used in the context of an instructional
setting may
be found to constitute harassment only if the speech is persistent,
pervasive, and not germane to the subject
matter, or so singularly
severe as to create a hostile environment. Protected Expressive
Behavior in an instructional
situation is explained in UWM Selected
Academic and Administrative Policies No. S-44, Public Expression of
Opinion.
In addition, the University prohibits retaliation against
individuals who engage in protected activities under the policy.
Retaliation is defined as employment or academic decisions that are
made because a student, employee, or applicant for
employment has made a
complaint, assisted with or served as a witness in an investigation, or
instituted proceedings
alleging discrimination.
UWM maintains a written affirmative action plan in order to meet
its commitment to the principles of equal opportunity
and affirmative
action. The plan is available to all persons for inspection and is on
reserve in the University Library and
on UWM's website.
To protect the rights of employees and students, numerous
grievance procedures have been developed on this campus.
Although all
grievants are encouraged to resolve complaints by working with the
relevant parties and administrators,
inquiries involving complaints of
discrimination or harassment based on protected class status may be
directed to the
UWM Office of Equity/Diversity Services, Mitchell Hall
359, (414) 229-5923.
Hate/Bias Incident Reporting
In the last few years, there has been an increased focus on the
reporting of hate- and bias-motivated incidents on
university campuses
across the nation. UWM defines a hate- or bias-motivated incident as
any disruptive conduct (oral,
written, graphic, or physical) that is
against an individual, or individuals, because of their actual, or
perceived, race,
color, national origin/ancestry, religion, sex, age,
disability, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, veteran and
National Guard status, marital status, pregnancy, political
affiliation, or arrest/conviction record. If you believe the
incident
involves criminal conduct, please call 911 or 9-911 (UWM campus police)
from a UWM phone, in addition to
completing the Hate/Bias
Incident Reporting Form. You may use this form to report any hate/bias
incident that has
occurred 1) on UWM property, buildings, or housing;
and/or 2) at UWM-sponsored events or activities, regardless of
location.
University Policies and Programs Concerning
Illicit Drugs and Alcohol
Consistent with the federal Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, the
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM)
maintains a comprehensive
alcohol and other drug abuse prevention program. This includes
interventions that target atrisk individuals, programs that target the
student body as a whole, and environmental-level strategies that impact
the
college and surrounding community. UWM prohibits the unlawful
possession, use, distribution, manufacture, or
dispensing of illicit
drugs and alcohol on university property or as part of university
activities. Each semester, students
receive information that describes
pertinent laws, rules, and sanctions, as well as the health effects of
abuse, and a list of
treatment resources.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES
[ Contents | How to
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[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM
- Endless Possibilities | Academic
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[ Schools and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
ADMISSION
Undergraduate Admission: General Information
Freshman Admission Policy Statement
Freshman Admission Standards
Application Deadlines
Variations in Admission Requirements and Deadlines
Application Process
Four-Year Graduation Guarantee
Special Admission Programs for Students Still Enrolled in High School
Admission to Pre-professional Programs
Transfer Student Admission and Acceptance of Transfer Credit
Recommended Filing Dates for Transfer Students
Application Deadlines for Transfer Students
Transfer Credit Acceptance
UWM/WTCS Credit Transfer
International Student Admissions
Re-entering and Re-admitted Students
Summer Sessions Enrollment
Non-Degree Students
Information for Out-of-State Students
Advising and Orientation for New Students
Placement Testing
For the latest admissions information, visit our website at http://uwm.edu/registrar/.
Department of Admissions and Recruitment
Vogel Hall,
3253 North Downer Ave.
(414) 229-2222
Undergraduate Admission: General Information
If you wish to apply as a degree candidate (freshman, re-entry, or
transfer student), visit the University of Wisconsin
System application
website at https://apply.wisconsin.edu.
You will need to supply the necessary documents like test
scores and
transcripts separately. We will accept transcripts and test results
submitted electronically from a vendor or
testing agency. You will be
notified of any additional materials needed to complete your
application and can track the
receipt of these documents as well as the
progress of your application review online via PAWS (Panther Access to
Web
Services) at paws.uwm.edu, including what we still need from you to
make an admission decision.
If you wish to apply as a non-degree or summer guest student, you also
may use the electronic applications available at
https://apply.wisconsin.edu/. If you
require a paper application, you can download a PDF of any applications
from this
site.
Students may get in touch with us at
uwm.edu/contact for easy access to an online information request form,
phone,
email, live chat or social media. We are able to respond to any
questions about visiting UWM, the application process,
materials
required, which application to submit, or any other concerns you might
have.
Freshman Admission Policy Statement
UWM will consider applicants who present evidence of appropriate
preparation and potential for intellectual
development. Both academic
and non-academic factors will be assessed in an individualized,
comprehensive applicant
review. Academic factors considered include
high school graduation or the equivalent, completion of an appropriate
college preparatory curriculum, and evidence of academic ability and
readiness based on the applicant's high school
record and performance
on standardized tests. Relevant non-academic factors include
characteristics or experiences that
will contribute to UWM's diversity,
support the University's educational mission, and provide additional
evidence of the
applicant's academic potential.
Freshman Admission Standards
Freshman applicants will typically demonstrate an appropriate level of preparation and potential by providing evidence
of the following:
1. High school graduation or its equivalent
Graduation from a recognized high school or its equivalent (e.g., high school equivalency certificate or a diploma based
on the GED or Wisconsin High School Equivalency Examination) is required. All freshman applicants must submit an
official high school transcript with their application.
Those who have completed the General Educational Development or Wisconsin High School Equivalency Examination
are required to submit official test results, in addition to ACT or SAT test results, and an official transcript of any high
school work they have completed. Applicants who are home-schooled, who have completed an alternative high school
curriculum, or whose secondary school credentials are otherwise non-traditional, will be given full consideration for
admission but may be required to present additional evidence demonstrating academic preparation.
2. Completion of an appropriate college preparatory curriculum
Satisfactory completion of at least 17 credits (1 credit = 1 year) of high school courses, distributed as shown in the
following chart, is the minimum expectation. Additional coursework beyond this minimum level is strongly encouraged
and will increase the applicant’s likelihood of academic success at the university. Some academic programs have
additional academic preparation requirements. Course
English
Including at least 3 years of literature and composition.
Mathematics
College prep courses at or above algebra level. Additional math
is strongly recommended, particularly for engineering and
science majors.
Natural Science
Including at least 1 year of lab science.
History/Social Science
Additional Academic Courses
May be chosen from any of the above areas, foreign language,
speech/communication, or other academic areas. At least two
years of foreign language is strongly recommended.
Additional Academic Courses or Other Electives
Chosen from above areas, computer science, fine arts, or other
appropriate courses.
Total
Credits
Required
4
3
3
3
2
2
17
3. Evidence of academic ability and readiness as demonstrated by academic performance in high school
All relevant academic factors are considered, including grades and grade point average; high school class rank (if
available); choice of curriculum; and strength of the academic program relative to the course offerings available to the
student in the high school.
4. Evidence of academic ability and readiness as demonstrated by performance on standardized test
All freshman applicants except those who are age 21 or older the semester they wish to enter UWM must submit official
ACT or SAT scores. Students over the age of 21 may submit standardized test scores if they so desire. In some cases,
applicants may be asked to undergo additional testing or supply additional materials before an admission decision is
made. 5. Additional factors considered
Additional factors will be considered as part of the application review process. These might include, but are not limited
to: evidence of leadership, creativity, special talents or abilities; membership in an underrepresented racial or ethnic
group; veteran status; involvement in community service; educational or economic disadvantage; evidence of
motivation and maturity; or other relevant factors which provide evidence of the applicant’s readiness for universitylevel study. If we need to obtain additional information from you, we will communicate this to you after the initial
review of your application.
Applicants lacking some of the specific academic qualifications listed in sections 1-4 above may be offered admission
if, on the basis of other factors, they appear to have a reasonable probability of success. In some cases, applicants may be offered admission through our Academic Opportunity Center (AOC), a program
which provides supportive pre-enrollment counseling, academic advising, and special instructional services specifically
targeting students who have academic potential, but whose prior education may not have adequately prepared them for
college.
Application Deadlines
UWM begins accepting undergraduate applications on September 15 for the
following fall term. For most programs,
applications are accepted until
the following July 1, but earlier deadlines may apply if enrollment
capacity has been
reached. Applications for the spring term (classes
start in January) are typically accepted until December 1. However,
some programs have earlier deadlines and/or additional requirements.
See below and check our website for upto-date information.
It is to your advantage to apply early so that you receive
important information as soon as possible, not to mention
scholarship
consideration.
Variations in Admission Requirements and Deadlines
Architecture and Urban Planning
Admission to the School of Architecture and Urban Planning is selective
and competitive. Most students admitted to the
School wil have a high school cumulative grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 unweighted scale and have a composite
ACT score of at least 23 (SAT 1070). The application priority date for Architecture and Urban
Planning is March 1 (for
the subsequent fall term), or
December 1 (for the spring term), but earlier
application is advised. Performance on
standardized tests, grade point average, and class rank is only a portion of the admission decision. Other factors include
the applicant statements, rigor of high school curriculum, letters of recommendation, and extra-curricular activities.
Engineering and Applied Science
Admission to the College of Engineering and Applied Science is
selective. The primary review factors are the strength
and quality of
the high school curriculum, high school class rank if available, grade
point average, and ACT or SAT
results. Well-prepared applicants will
have four years of high school mathematics at the level of algebra and
above, and
four years of natural science including biology, chemistry,
and physics. Relevant non-academic factors are also
considered. See the
CEAS section of this Catalog for additional specific
information.
Nursing
High school science units must include at least one year of high
school chemistry. Admission to the pre-nursing
program is selective.
The application priority date is March 1 for fall applicants. Apply as
early as possible;
applications will be accepted only until program
capacity has been reached. Peck School of the Arts
Dance: An audition is required for
entry into both the Dance BFA and BA. Audition dates are scheduled
during
the fall, spring, and summer terms. More information at:
uwm.edu/arts/dance.
Art & Design: The Department of Art & Design
requires all incoming students to submit a portfolio for review.
The
portfolio is required in order to be considered for the Art & Design Incoming
Student Scholarship. Portfolio
deadlines are October 15 (for spring admission) and March 15 (for summer or for fall admission with
consideration for scholarships). More information at: uwm.edu/arts/art-and-design.
Music: Students wishing to enter the UWM Music
Department must interview and/or audition for admittance to
any of
the Music degree programs. You must arrange for an instrument or
voice audition in person, online, or
with a tape/CD submission. More information at: uwm.edu/arts/apply.
Application Process
It is strongly recommended that you apply online at https://apply.wisconsin.edu/. Most
applicants find it faster and more
convenient, and applications are
received and processed much more quickly. To apply for admission as a
new freshman,
refer to Undergraduate
Admission: General Information.
For the latest
admissions information, visit the UWM website at uwm.edu/admission/ or call
the Department of
Admissions and Recruitment at (414) 229-2222.
Four-Year Graduation Guarantee
Many students choose to attend classes part time, but for others,
attending full time in order to obtain their degree as
quickly as
possible is the top priority. If that is your goal, UWM's Four-Year
Graduation Guarantee may be for you.
To qualify, students must enter UWM as new freshmen during the
fall term and must have appropriate academic
preparation and placement
test scores. They then sign a contract agreeing to satisfy other
specified academic progress
requirements while following the prescribed
program of study. UWM, in turn, guarantees that students who fulfill
these
requirements will be able to complete their undergraduate degree
within four years of initial enrollment at UWM. This
program is
available within all of UWM's baccalaureate programs, although specific
requirements may vary. Your
academic advisor can provide more
information about this option. Or, contact the academic advising office
of the school
or college to which you will be seeking admission.
Special
Admission Programs for Students Still Enrolled in High School
The High School Special Student Program and the Youth Options Program are designed to allow qualified high school
juniors and seniors to
enroll in university courses concurrently with high school classes.
Applicants must generally rank
in the upper 10% of their high
school class and have completed an appropriate pattern of academic
courses. For further
information, contact your high school guidance
counselor or the UWM Department of Admissions and Recruitment at
(414)
229-2222. You also may want to review the information available on the
website at uwm.edu/undergradadmission/student-type/new-freshmen.
Admission to Pre-professional Programs
Students pursuing pre-professional programs in the School of
Architecture and Urban Planning, Peck School of the
Arts, Sheldon B.
Lubar School of Business, School of Education, College of Engineering
and Applied Science, College
of Health Sciences, College of Nursing,
and Helen Bader School of Social Welfare are admitted directly into
those
schools and colleges and are advised there. However, admission
to a pre-professional program does not guarantee
subsequent admission
to the professional program or major.
Admission to the professional program/major occurs only after a
student has completed the specific pre-professional
requirements
outlined in the school and college sections of this catalog. Admission
to the pre-professional program does
not imply or guarantee that a
student will be able to enter or complete a professional program/major
within any specific
time period and, in fact, admission to some
professional programs/majors is very competitive. Enrollment in
required
courses is subject to limitation.
Requirements for employment, licensing, or
professional organizations: Students should be aware that some
professions and occupations are subject to licensing and/or bonding
requirements. When a course of study includes
clinical or field
training, practice teaching, internships, or the like, students may be
subjected to a check of criminal
conviction records prior to
acceptance by the placement site. Students are responsible for
obtaining the information
necessary to become knowledgeable about
special requirements such as these and should plan their studies
accordingly.
Transfer Student Admission and Acceptance of
Transfer Credit
TRANSFER ADMISSION STANDARDS
Admission to UWM as a transfer student typically requires at least an
overall C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) grade point average
on 12 or more transferable
credits. However, this is the minimum standard. Some academic programs
have higher
standards and/or additional requirements (see examples
below).
Each transfer application receives a comprehensive review.
In addition to reviewing the student's record of postsecondary work
for evidence of appropriate academic preparation, other factors
considered may include the student's
high school record, test scores,
grade patterns, and evidence of motivation, maturity, and/or other
relevant non-academic
information. Under certain circumstances,
transfer applicants who do not meet our standard admission criteria
may be
considered for admission via the Academic Opportunity Center.
Additional Specific Requirements
Transfer admission to the College of Engineering and
Applied Science, the School of Architecture and
Urban
Planning, and the College of Nursing is
selective. Many programs in the Peck School of the
Arts have audition or
portfolio requirements. In addition, admission
to many other individual programs/majors is competitive and subject to
capacity limitations, with higher standards or additional criteria
considered. For more details, check the admission
requirements listed
for the particular academic program in which you are interested.
International students have additional application requirements;
see that section for details.
APPLICATION PROCESS
Apply electronically via the University of Wisconsin System electronic
application website at
https://apply.wisconsin.edu.
If you apply electronically, you will need to submit the necessary
supporting documents
separately. Transfer applicants must submit, at
minimum:
a completed application form;
official high school transcript(s);
official transcript(s) from any post-secondary institution(s)
attended; and
the application fee (if required).
You will be notified of any additional materials needed to complete your application. Complete instructions and
information about applicable deadlines are available on the website.
If you are unable to apply online, a PDF may be
downloaded from https://apply.wisconsin.edu
to print and mail in.
The Registrar’s Office will review your prior college
coursework and post your transfer credit equivalencies to your
PAWS
account. This process can take 2-4 weeks, so it is important that you
apply early in order to have this information
in time for academic
advising and registration prior to your desired term of enrollment
(see dates and deadlines below).
Recommended Filing Dates for Transfer Students
Filing and completing your application for admission (including all
transcripts and the application fee) as early as
possible is
recommended so that transfer students are able to receive an
appointment to register for classes at
approximately the same time as
continuing students. In general, a decision on a complete application
is made by the
Department of Admissions and Recruitment within 2-4
weeks and transfer credit evaluations are completed within four
weeks
of the date of admission. Recommended dates by which a completed
application should be on file are as follows:
February 15 (summer and fall terms) and September 15 (spring term).
Application Deadlines for Transfer Students
Fall
term: Applications for most programs are accepted until July
1 (classes start in early September).
Spring term: Applications for most programs are
accepted until December 1 (classes start in late
January).
Earlier deadlines apply for certain programs and applications received after enrollment capacity has been reached may
not be reviewed. The application priority date for
Nursing and Architecture and Urban Planning is March 1 (for the
subsequent fall term) or November 1 (for the spring term). For Art &
Design or Music, apply by March 15 for
scholarship consideration.
Check our website at uwm.edu/admission/
for up-to-date information and for applicable
deadlines for other
terms.
Transfer Credit Acceptance
Credit is generally awarded for relevant and appropriate college-level
coursework successfully completed at institutions
accredited by a regional
accrediting association. Credit also may be awarded for college-level
work successfully
completed at degree-granting institutions accredited
by other national accrediting organizations that are
recognized by
the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA),
assuming the provisions outlined below also are met. (Foreign
institutions must be recognized by the Ministry of Education, or
equivalent, of the home country.)
In order for credit to be awarded, courses must typically be similar
in nature, level, and content to a course in UWM's
undergraduate
curriculum, and applicable to one of UWM's academic programs at the
baccalaureate level. Credit
generally is not awarded for continuing
education coursework, or for courses that are remedial, vocational,
technical, or
doctrinal in nature.
Additional transfer
credit may be awarded to students who enter specific programs for
which UWM has established
articulation agreements, or other
program-specific transfer credit agreements, with a partner
institution.
Seventy-two (72) credits is the maximum
total number of credits that may be awarded for coursework earned at
one or
any combination of two-year (associate degree level)
institution(s).
Credit Transfer from the Wisconsin
Technical College System (WTCS)
Students enrolled in the Wisconsin Technical College System who
wish to continue their education at UWM may
transfer credits toward
their bachelor's degree in the following ways:
Students enrolled in a WTCS liberal arts program (at present,
these are offered at Chippewa Valley Technical
College, Madison
College, Milwaukee Area Technical College, Nicolet Area Technical
College, and Western
Technical College) may be eligible to transfer
up to 72 credits toward the baccalaureate degree.
Students enrolled at other WTCS programs or campuses may be
eligible to transfer some appropriate general
education coursework
toward the baccalaureate degree.
There also are many program-specific transfer credit
agreements governing acceptance of credit from some
WTCS programs.
For details, uwm.edu/transfer-information/transfer-credit/.
The UWM Department of Admissions and Recruitment maintains an
office at the MATC-Milwaukee downtown
campus in order to assist
students with transfer-related questions. For more specific
information, get in touch at
uwm.edu/contact for easy access to an
online information request form, phone, email, live chat, or social
media.
For more information about these or other transfer
opportunities, students should consult with their Wisconsin Technical
College advisor, the UWM Department of Admissions and Recruitment, or
the UWM Registrar's Office.
Another helpful resource is the online Transfer Information System
(TIS), located at tis.uwsa.edu.
TIS shows students
how courses can transfer from one public
Wisconsin institution to another.
International Student Admission
UWM's Center for International Education is responsible for the
admission of international (non-immigrant) students. In
addition, the
Center for International Education processes undergraduate
applications submitted by U.S. permanent
residents with foreign
academic work.
Applicants are encouraged to apply online at https://apply.wisconsin.edu/.
Application materials are located on the
Center for International
Education website at uwm.edu/cie/ or can be requested via
email to [email protected] Prospective
students may visit the Center for
International Education, located in Garland Hall, Room 138, or write
to The Center for
International Education, International Student and
Scholar Services, Garland Hall 138, P.O. Box 413, University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413. Application materials
sent via express mail should be addressed to
the Center for
International Education, ISSS, 2441 E. Hartford Ave., Milwaukee, WI
53211. The telephone number is
(414) 229-4846.
Students are encouraged to apply a year in advance of the term
in which they wish to enroll at UWM. The length of the
application
process can vary depending on how quickly the applicant provides all
required materials to complete the
application. The following
materials are required to be considered for admission to UWM.
1. A completed and signed application form.
2. An $84 fee ($44 state-required application fee plus a $40
evaluation fee for applicants with non-U.S. academic
credentials).
These fees cannot be waived, refunded, or applied to any other
University fee or bill. Fees are subject
to change.
3. Original or officially certified copies of all grade reports,
transcripts, or marks sheets for all secondary and higher
studies
undertaken, as well as original or officially certified attested
copies of all academic diplomas, certificates,
and national or other
major examination results. Official records must be submitted in the
native language and
must be accompanied by an official English
translation. Notarized copies are not accepted. Whenever possible,
academic records must be sent directly to the Center for International
Education from the issuing institution.
All non-native speakers of English are required to meet the
University's English proficiency requirement.
Undergraduate
applicants must submit an official TOEFL (Test of English as a
Foreign Language) or
IELTS (International English Language Testing
Service) score that meets the minimum requirements
below. Test scores
must be received directly from the testing service and must be no
more than two years
old. TOEFL: 520 (paper-based); 68 (internet-based). IELTS: 5.5.
You can be admitted to UWM if
you do not meet the minimum English proficiency requirements. There
are two
different types of admission with English deficiency:
Conditional Admission: If you did not take
the TOEFL or IELTS or received a TOEFL score of less than 500
(paperbased)/61 (internet-based) or an IELTS score below 5.0, you
can be conditionally admitted to UWM. You will then be
required to
satisfy one of the following requirements prior to becoming eligible
to enroll in academic courses:
1. Submit a TOEFL score of 520 (paper-based)/68
(internet-based) or an IELTS score of at least 5.5.
2. Successful completion of the UWM ESL Immersion program with
a grade of B or higher.
Dual Admission: If you received a TOEFL score
between 500 and 519 (paper-based)/61-67 (internet-based) or an
IELTS
score of 5.0, you will be admitted to UWM, but you will only be
allowed to register for part-time academic
courses (maximum of 6
credits). You must also complete part-time ESL courses so that you
may meet the minimum
English proficiency requirements.
1. Additional departmental requirements may apply. Please
contact the International Student and Scholar Services
office for
more details.
2. International students who require an F or J visa must submit
proof that they have adequate financial support to
live and study
full time at UWM. Updated financial figures can be found at uwm.edu/cie/. Financial verification is
required before the University will issue
the U.S. government form (Form I-20 or DS-2019) necessary to obtain a
foreign student visa or to transfer from another U.S. institution.
Re-entering and Re-admitted Students
Students who have not been enrolled at UWM for more than two semesters must file a re-entry application to return to
the University. Official
transcripts of all college work taken during the absence from
UW-Milwaukee must be
submitted. This application is available at uwm.edu/undergrad-admission/student-type/re-entry.
Applications for most programs will be accepted until July 1 (for fall
term admission) or December 1 (for admission to
UWinteriM or the
spring term, for which classes start in January). However,
earlier deadlines apply for certain
programs and applications received after enrollment capacity has been reached may not be reviewed. See
uwm.edu/admission/.
In addition to filing a re-entry application to the University,
re-admission for a student who has been dropped from the
University
because of poor academic performance must be approved by the dean
of the school or college from which
the student was dropped. Students
should schedule an appointment with their academic advisor to begin
the school or
college approval process.
For more information about re-entry procedures or to request an
application form, contact the Department of
Admissions and Recruitment
at (414) 229-2222.
Summer Sessions Enrollment
Students admitted as degree candidates at UWM for the summer
term may attend Summer Sessions and continue in the
fall semester,
provided they continue to satisfy established academic standards.
Admission requirements are the same as
for other semesters. Students
enrolled for the spring semester automatically receive registration
information for Summer
Sessions.
New freshmen or transfer students admitted for the fall semester also
may request a change of term to the preceding
Summer Session in order
to begin their studies earlier at UWM. For more information about a
term change, call the
Department of Admissions and Recruitment at
(414) 229-2222. Or go to uwm.edu/undergrad-admission/student-type/reentry
to print off a term change form and submit it for processing.
Students enrolled at another college or university during the academic
year who wish to attend UWM during the
summer term only may qualify
for admission as Summer Guest students. See Non-degree
Students section below for
specific information.
For
more information about summer sessions enrollment go to uwm.edu/undergrad-admission/student-type/summersession.
Non-degree Students
There are a number of different options, described below, for students who wish to
attend classes at the University but
who are not seeking a
degree. Please note that in most cases,
non-degree students are not eligible for financial aid.
Non-Degree Students. This program is designed for individuals
interested in taking undergraduate courses for personal
enrichment,
career change, preparation for admission to graduate school, or as a
first step into a degree program. Nondegree students earn college
credit for courses successfully completed and pay tuition at the same
rate as degree-seeking
students.
If you wish to be admitted as a non-degree student and do not
have a bachelor's degree, you must have graduated from a
recognized
high school at least one year prior to the desired semester of
enrollment. All students out of high school less
than two years must
present official transcripts and meet regular admission requirements
for undergraduate degree
students.
If you already have completed an undergraduate degree at an
accredited institution, you must still complete the nondegree
("Special Student") application form, but you will not be
required to submit transcripts in order to be admitted.
Non-degree students need to maintain a C grade point average
in order to continue in good standing. Individuals who
enter a degree
program at UWM in the future will be able to transfer all
undergraduate credits into their program. With a
few exceptions, no
credits earned will be considered now or in the future as graduate
credits.
Many courses are open to non-degree students, but there are some
restrictions in high-demand areas. Information on
courses open to
non-degree students can be found in the Schedule of Classes
at uwm.edu/schedule/.
Admission and registration information and advising services for non-degree students are available in the Department of
Admissions and Recruitment, Vogel Hall, 3253 N. Downer Ave., (414)
229-2222.
Summer and UWinteriM Guest Students. Most Guest students attend another college or university
during the
academic year, but take summer or UWinteriM courses at UWM
for personal enrichment or for credit transfer to the
institution
where they are pursuing a degree. This category also is used for
individuals who have an undergraduate
degree but wish to enroll during
a summer or UWinteriM term only. Guest students may qualify for
admission without
providing official university transcripts. For more
information, contact the Department of Admissions and Recruitment,
Vogel Hall, 3253 N. Downer Ave., (414) 229-2222.
School/College Non-degree Students. Students
who do not wish to enroll in a degree program, but who want to take
courses in a specialized area of study such as business
administration, engineering, or certain majors within the College
of
Letters and Science, may be admitted as Special Students by a specific
UWM school or college.
Non-degree students admitted under these classifications may be
eligible to enroll in certain high-demand courses that
are not open to
other non-degree students. In the College of Letters and Science,
students who have not completed an
undergraduate degree are expected
to meet the regular requirements for admission and submit transcripts.
For more
information, contact the specific UWM school or college in
which you wish to enroll.
Education Non-degree Students. Students with
bachelor's degrees who are interested in pursuing a teacher
certification program may be admitted as Education Certification
Non-degree ("Special") Students. Admission to the
teacher
certification program requires approval from the School of Education.
For more information, contact the
Curriculum and Instruction Office at
(414) 229-4904.
Audit-Only Students/Auditors.
Students may opt to audit courses rather than enroll for credit.
Students who are only
auditing courses will typically pay lower fees
for audited courses and in some cases may audit courses free of
charge,
subject to space availability and instructor approval.
Additional information about auditing classes is found in this
catalog
in the "Academic Opportunities" section. Or, contact the
Registrar's Office, Mellencamp Hall, Room 212, (414)
229-6571.
Information for Out-of-State Students
Residency. Residency, for tuition purposes, is
governed by Wisconsin statute. It is the mutual responsibility of the
University and the student to make certain that he or she is correctly
classified as a resident or non-resident for tuition
purposes. If an
error is discovered, the student will be notified that he or she must
pay the non-resident portion of the
tuition immediately. Students who
question their status should contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions in
Mellencamp Hall, Room 212, (414) 229-4672. A student
who wishes to appeal the nonresident classification should
request a
non-residency appeal form prior to the tuition due date for the
semester. For more information regarding
residency, go to the website
at uwm.edu/undergrad-admission/student-type/out-of-state.
Minnesota/Wisconsin Reciprocity Agreement. Minnesota residents
may be eligible to participate under the
Minnesota/Wisconsin
Reciprocity Agreement. Students certified under this program pay
tuition at a special rate that is
less than non-resident tuition. A
certification year runs from July 1 through June 30, although degree
students are
normally certified once during the full duration of their
academic career if they remain continuously enrolled.
Persons not certified by the date on which fees are due will be required to pay
non-resident tuition and fees. The
appropriate amount will then be
refunded upon certification by the State of Minnesota Office of Higher
Education
Reciprocity Program. For more information, contact the State
of Minnesota Office of Higher Education Reciprocity
Program, 1450
Energy Park Dr., Suite 350, St. Paul, MN 55108, (651) 642-0567, (800)
657-3866, or
www.ohe.state.mn.us.
Midwest Student Exchange Program. UWM participates in
the Midwest Student Exchange Program (MSEP), a
collaborative program
that enables qualified students to attend a participating college or
university in another MSEP
state at a substantial discount from the
usual tuition rate. Students attending UWM as part of the MSEP will
pay 150%
of the Wisconsin resident rate. For more information, visit www.msep.uwm.edu.
Milwaukee Advantage Program (MAP)
Out-of-state students are eligible to receive an additional $1,000 award (Minnesota residents are eligible to receive a
$500 award) each year through the Milwaukee Advantage Program (MAP). The MAP award is renewable.
MAP will be offered at both fall/spring terms. Spring term admits will be eligible for $500 ($250 for Minnesota
residents).
Must be enrolled full time in order to be eligible. Falling below full-time status will result in cancellation of
award.
Advising and Orientation for New Students
All new students are assigned an academic advisor upon admission to
UWM. New freshmen are required to participate
in an
advising, registration, and orientation program prior to their first
semester of enrollment. These programs are held
during the summer for
students entering in the fall semester and during January for
students entering in the spring
semester. Accommodations can be made
for out-of-town students who need to combine placement testing,
advising,
registration, and orientation in a single trip to campus. A
family and guest orientation program is held concurrently with
the
student program.
In order to be invited to an orientation, new freshmen must take
their Placement Tests, complete their University
Housing contract or
exemption form, pay their University Housing down payment (if
applicable), and pay the $100 New
Student Confirmation Deposit. More detailed
information about this process will be mailed to you upon admission to
the University. For more information, go to nsorientation.uwm.edu.
Advising and registration programs for transfer and
non-traditional
students also are conducted each year. Participation is strongly
encouraged. For more information, go to
taso.uwm.edu.
Placement Testing
All incoming freshmen admitted to UW-Milwaukee are required
to complete placement testing in math and English.
Depending on your
course of study, you also may be required to take an exam in chemistry
and/or foreign language.
These tests help determine appropriate
placement in your college courses and must be completed before you
can register
for classes. Transfer students and re-entry students may
be required to take placement tests also, depending on previous
coursework and intended degree plan. Check with your advisor to determine if
you need to complete placement tests.
English Placement Test (EPT). The English placement test
consists of three subtests in the following areas: English
Usage,
Sentence Correction, and Reading Comprehension. The English Placement
test takes 90 minutes to complete.
OR
English as a Second Language - Placement in Composition Test (ESL-PIC). If you grew up speaking a language
other than English, you should take this test. As an ESL (English as a Second Language) writer, you can complete your
English requirement by taking ESL writing courses instead of the English composition courses designed for native
speakers of English. The ESL writing courses also can help you do better in all of your university courses. This test lasts
75 minutes and dictionaries are optional.
Math Placement Test (MPT). The Mathematics Placement
Test measures three different sets of skills: Math Basics,
Algebra,
and Trigonometry. The test takes 90 minutes to complete. Students are
allowed to use a scientific calculator.
Graphing calculators may not
be used and will not be permitted in the testing room. Only
non-graphing, nonprogrammable calculators are permitted for use on
this test.
Foreign Language Placement Tests. These are tests of
grammar and reading comprehension, and take 60 minutes to
complete.
Students who have taken French, German, or Spanish in high school and
plan to continue in the same
language should take the appropriate
foreign language test. Students are allowed to enroll in a course one
semester more
advanced or one semester less advanced than the
recommended one. Students may be eligible for retro-credits upon
completion of that UWM course. For example, if you place into the
third semester course and complete that course with
a grade of B or
better, you can apply to receive credits for that course in addition
to the retro-credits for the first
semester and second semester courses.
The Japanese language program has its own placement test
administered in the Testing Center. Students who take this
test are
required to meet with the coordinator of Japanese. For most other
languages, students who wish to enroll in a
course beyond the
introductory one should confer with the relevant language coordinator.
Students will be asked to
complete a test administered through that
particular office. For example, if you wish to be placed into the
third semester
course, you will be asked to take the final exam from
the second semester course.
Chemistry Placement Test. The purpose of this test is to assist
with placement in college-level general chemistry
courses. Student
preparation is assumed to include one full year of high school
chemistry and one full year of high
school algebra. Certain plans
require completion of the Chemistry placement test. Check the Schedule
of Classes for
course prerequisites or contact the Testing Center to
determine if you need to complete the test. There are three parts to
the test: General Mathematics, General Chemical Knowledge, and
Specific Chemical Knowledge. This test is 55
minutes. Only
non-graphing, non-programmable calculators are permitted for use on
this test.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
ADMISSION
[ Contents
| How to Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About
UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Financing Your Education
Military Educational Benefits
Fees/Tuition
Please Note:
For the latest Financial and Financial Aid Information, as well as
current advising hours, please visit
uwm.edu/financialaid/.
Financing Your Education
Department of Financial Aid, Student Employment, and
Military Education Benefits
Mellencamp Hall, Room 162
(414) 229-4541
[email protected]
uwm.edu/financialaid/
Attending college is one of the most exciting and challenging
times of your life. College tuition could be one of the
largest
expenditures you ever make—but also one of your best investments.
The typical bachelor's degree recipient can
expect to earn about 66% more during a 40-year working life than a high school graduate.
Most students (and their
families) will need to use a combination of
tools to help finance their higher education. Our staff can help take
the
challenge out of financing a college education. Information is
provided here and on our website to help you formulate a
financing
plan. We are confident you will find UWM very affordable as you compare
your out-of-pocket costs with
other colleges.
Costs
Before you can create a financing plan, you need to know how much money
you will need. Unfortunately, tuition costs
are often not available
until mid- to late summer. However, you can look at the prior
semester/year's costs and use them
as an estimate. In fact, the budgets
used by the Financial Aid Department are all based on estimates. If
increases in
expenses are anticipated, those are built into the
estimates each year. You are encouraged to become familiar with the
Bursar Office website (uwm.edu/business-financial-services/bursar),
which contains detailed information on costs and
how to pay your bill.
You can review University Housing cost and meal plan information on the
University Housing website,
uwm.edu/housing.
The Financial Aid Department develops an "Estimated Cost of
Attendance" that is kept on our website and itemizes
allowable
costs that will be used in determining your budget if you apply for
financial aid. These numbers include direct
costs (those due the University) and indirect costs you may incur and are used in determining your eligibility
for
financial aid. Even if you don’t apply for financial
aid, you may find the numbers useful as a starting point in
determining
your own individual budget. For 2015-16, the estimated direct costs for a dependent student living on
campus were $19,482. Once you have an idea of what it will cost,
you will want to determine what you will have
available for resources.
Resources
Savings. Parents (and students) are encouraged to
incorporate college savings as one component of their overall
financial
plan. While you may not be able to save enough to pay the entire cost
of a college education, any savings will
mean that much less that you
have to worry about financing.
Families with a desire to save for future college expenses have more
options than ever before. Powerful investment
vehicles, including
Section 529 college savings programs and Coverdell education savings
accounts, were added to
traditional investment options—savings
accounts, taxable investment accounts, annuities, and U.S. Savings
Bonds—as a
means to save for college. You may wish to review www.savingforcollege.com, which contains information on the
basics of saving for college. Of
course, the earlier you start saving for college, the better. If the
tuition bill is right
around the corner, you may need to supplement any
savings you have accumulated with other resources.
Scholarships. Numerous scholarship opportunities are
available through the Financial Aid Office, academic
departments, and
UWM Foundation. For a complete listing of all campus scholarships, please visit
scholarships.uwm.edu. You will also find links to
free scholarship searches on our website. If you are in high school,
don't forget to check with your guidance counselor for potential
scholarship opportunities.
Financial Aid. All students are strongly encouraged to
apply for financial aid. It is free, easy, and should be done online
at
www.fafsa.ed.gov (Free Application for Federal Student Aid site). January 1 prior to the start of the fall semester is
the earliest date you can apply for the upcoming academic year. If you submit your federal tax returns online two weeks
prior to submitting your FAFSA, and pay any tax owed, you may be able use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT). Using
the DRT means copies of your tax returns will not be requested. It could also mean a lower chance of being selected for
verification, which may cause delays in determining your aid eligibility. If you can't use the DRT or typically have your
taxes completed later, you should file using your best estimates by our priority filing date – March 1. Then go back
and update the information once your figures are final. Many programs have a limited
amount of funding and aid is
awarded on a first-come, first-served
basis, so file as early as possible to receive the best aid package available. In most
cases, it will take a minimum of one month from the date
the FAFSA is submitted to complete the process of applying
for aid and
having your eligibility determined. Applicants waiting until after May
1 to file a FAFSA or submit a loan
application will most likely
experience longer processing times. You are required to complete a new
FAFSA each year.
Effective with the 2017-18 academic year (fall 2017 and later), the FAFSA can be submitted as early as October 1 prior
to the fall semester, and will use tax information from two years prior (for the 2017-18 year, file October 1, 2016, using
tax information from 2015.)
Many parents of college-bound students don’t file a
FAFSA because they think they make too much money to
qualify
for any financial assistance. In reality, many
underestimate their eligibility for financial aid. More than 80% of UWM
students receive financial assistance. Minimally, most students can receive
a Federal Direct Stafford Loan (with a low
fixed interest rate), but
only after filing a FAFSA. To receive an early estimate of your
expected family contribution as
well as aid eligibility, you can go to
www.fafsa4caster.ed.gov or use the UWM Total Cost Estimator and Net Price
Calculator.
A student qualifies for need-based aid if the total cost of
attendance (which includes tuition and fees, an allowance for
room and meals, transportation, books and supplies, and personal miscellaneous
expenses) is greater than their expected
family contribution (EFC).
Students who do not qualify for need-based aid may still be eligible
for a non-need-based
loan. To be eligible for financial aid, a student
must also maintain satisfactory academic progress, be a United States
citizen or an eligible non-citizen, be admitted to the University, and,
in most cases, attend UWM on at least a half-time
basis.
Financial aid falls into three broad categories, any or all of which may be offered to a student as part of his or her
financial aid package: grants and scholarships (gift aid that does not need to be repaid), loans (money borrowed at low
interest that must be repaid), and Federal Work-Study (a program that provides employment opportunities for students).
For details on grants, scholarships, student employment, and loans, please visit the various subsections of our website.
Many students work while attending college. Although some
students, based on the results of their FAFSA, will be
offered
employment through the Federal Work-Study program, many more find
employment on their own—both on and
around campus. Current listings can be found on Panther Jobs at uwm.edu/careerplan.
A great way to increase the affordability of a college education is to take advantage of federal tax breaks aimed at
families/students saving and paying for college.
Installment Payment Plan. This plan is offered by the
University through the Bursar Office to those who are unable to
pay
their bill in full (minus any financial aid) by the first due date.
Additional Loans/Resources
Many students (and often their parents) have no choice but to borrow. There are steps that can be taken to reduce the
amount owed at graduation. To start, reduce your budget wherever possible. You may
have heard the saying, “Live like
a poor college student now so
that you don’t have to live like one after you graduate.”
Also, make sure you take full
advantage of the Federal Direct Stafford
Loan program before you take out any private loans. Additional
information on
the Direct Loan program can be found in the loan area of our website.
Parent PLUS Loan. A FAFSA must be completed before a
Parent PLUS Loan can be certified. Parent PLUS Loans
have a fixed
interest rate that is determined in early June for the upcoming
academic year. The interest rate for Parent
PLUS Loans disbursed for
2015-16, was 6.84%. Parents must borrow this loan through the Federal
Direct Loan
program. A credit check is required. The Parent PLUS
application is found online at www.studentloans.gov.
Private Alternative Loan. These are private student
loans, usually in the student’s name, which aren't guaranteed by
the federal government. Some have fixed interest rates, but most have
variable rates that are typically tied to the prime
rate or another
benchmark. Rates range from about 6% to more than 14%. These loans
should only be used as a last
resort. Students usually need to apply
with a co-signer. Not doing so generally means you will pay much higher
rates or
you might not be able to get a private loan at all.
Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Standards
University and federal regulations require that a student be
making satisfactory academic progress (SAP) toward a
degree to be
eligible for financial aid. SAP consists of two components of
measurement: qualitative and quantitative. A
student's SAP is reviewed
on a semester-by-semester basis.
Qualitative: Financial aid recipients are governed by the
performance standards of the school or college in which they
are
enrolled. Failure to meet the required standards may make a student
ineligible to continue enrollment and therefore
ineligible for
financial aid.
Quantitative: Students will be expected to be making satisfactory
"pace" toward a degree by passing two-thirds, 66.67%,
of the
classes they enroll in. Students' aid eligibility will be limited to
180 attempted credits for their first undergraduate
degree. Students
not meeting these standards will be notified of their status shortly after grades are posted after the end
of each semester. For more information about the SAP policy, please
refer to the Academic Progress Standards page of
our website.
Military Education Benefits
Students may be eligible for military education benefits if the
criteria are met under one of the programs listed: Post9/11 Veterans
Education Assistance Act of 2008, Montgomery GI Bill - Vocational
Rehabilitation, and Dependent
Educational Assistance. Wisconsin
veterans also may be eligible for educational assistance under the
Veterans
Education Grant Program and the Wisconsin GI Bill. The
Wisconsin GI Bill also allows for tuition and fee waivers for
eligible spouses and children of Wisconsin veterans who are deceased or
30% or more disabled. For detailed
information about each
program, please refer to the UW-Milwaukee Military Educational Benefits
link on the financial
aid website.
Members of the National Guard also may be eligible for tuition
reimbursement under the National Guard Tuition Grant
Program. Guard
members should contact their unit for additional information on
eligibility.
Members of the Reserves or students attending school while on
active duty may be eligible for Federal Tuition
Assistance to help with
tuition costs.
To determine qualifications under these programs or to apply,
contact the staff in the Military Educational Benefits
Office (located
west of the Financial Aid Office) in Mellencamp Hall, Room 168A, by
phone at (414) 229-6627, or via
email at [email protected]
Fees/Tuition
Rates. The base undergraduate fees/tuition rate
for Wisconsin residents during the 2014-15 academic year was
approximately $9,400 for a full-time (12-18 credits) student. The
full-time rate for non-residents was approximately
$19,120. These
tuition amounts do not include the differential tuition charged for
some programs, additional special
course fees for online/distance
education classes, or special course fees related to materials,
equipment rental, or field
trips. Consult the Bursar Office website
(bursar.uwm.edu) for the fee/tuition rates currently in effect.
Financial Obligation and University Credit Agreement. Students make a financial commitment
when registering for
classes at UWM. All students are required to sign
a University Credit Agreement. The University Credit Agreement is
now
available online from the Student Center (Home Page) in PAWS. Students
can click on the Credit Agreement link
located in the Finances section
to view and complete the agreement.
NOTE: It is recommended that students check their
Finances section on PAWS to make sure they have no outstanding
financial obligations with a prior due date. If there are charges with
a prior due date, payments posted to PAWS will
apply to those charges
first.
Due Date. Payment is due on the
date specified on the student PAWS account. General tuition and fee due
dates are
available from the Bursar Office website
(uwm.edu/business-financial-services/bursar/tuition-information). You must
view your PAWS account for exact due
dates. Failure to view PAWS does not negate the
student's responsibility to
pay by the due date. Past due PAWS charges are subject to late fees, finance charges, and Bursar holds.
Continued enrollment
at UWM is contingent on full payment of tuition and fees and any
outstanding charges on the
PAWS account.
Payments on PAWS. To review PAWS accounts, view
payment due dates, or make payments online, select the
Finances option
on PAWS at www.paws.uwm.edu. All
PAWS charges may be paid with webCheck, an electronic check
payment
option. MasterCard and American Express credit cards also are
accepted. A 2.5% convenience fee is charged
for PAWS online credit card
payment transactions. For more payment options, visit the Bursar Office
website
(bursar.uwm.edu).
Installment Payment Plan. The Bursar Office
administers the Installment Payment Plan, primarily for students who do
not have sufficient funds at the start of the semester to pay in full
by the fee due date. To use the Installment Payment
Plan, you must pay all prior term PAWS charges plus $100 toward fall charges (fall semester) or $100 toward spring
charges (spring semester) by the tuition date. For more information about the Installment Payment
Plan, contact the
Bursar Office, Mitchell 295, phone (414) 229-4914, or
see the Bursar Office website (bursar.uwm.edu).
Withdrawal. Charges are assessed for withdrawal
beginning with the first day of the class session. Nonattendance
does not constitute withdrawal. Students who fail to formally withdraw by dropping all classes online via PAWS or
submitting a withdrawal form will remain responsible for full fees/tuition and will be subject to failing grades. In
accordance with UW System policy, proof of
withdrawal rests with the student.
Students' financial aid eligibility will be recalculated if they
withdraw, are dismissed, or take a leave of absence prior to
completing
60% of the semester. The recalculation is based on the equation
"aid minus earned aid equals unearned aid."
Unearned aid is
returned to the funding source. When unearned aid for institutional
costs is returned, students may incur
a tuition, housing, or food
service balance with the University. If students need to repay unearned
aid for noninstitutional costs, they will be contacted by the
Department of Financial Aid.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
[
Contents
|
How to Use This Book
|
Calendar
|
Index
]
[
Admission
|
Registration
|
Financial Information
|
Academic Information
]
[
Administration
|
About UWM
|
Academic Opportunities
|
Campus Resources
]
[
Schools and Colleges
]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
REGISTRATION
Eligibility to Register
Academic Advising Prior
to Registration
Registration Procedures and
Deadlines
Change of Registration/Add
and Drop or Withdrawal from Classes
Late Registration and Late
Payment Fees
Concurrent Registration
ID Cards
Please Note:
For the latest registration information, check online at uwm.edu/registrar/.
Eligibility to Register
Continuing students who completed (or registered but withdrew
from) the preceding term in good or probationary
academic standing are
eligible to continue at UWM unless they received a degree. Students who
previously attended
UWM but were not enrolled the preceding two terms
must be re-admitted to UWM.
Students who have been out more than two terms must file a
re-entry application to return to the University. Transcripts
of college
work taken during the absence from UWM must be submitted.
New students, as well as students who received a degree but wish
to return for further study, must be officially readmitted in order
to be eligible to register. All students must clear any "holds"
resulting from overdue obligations before
being eligible for
re-admission or registration.
For more information about the application and admission processes, see
the Admission section of this catalog.
Academic Advising Prior to Registration
All students are assigned an academic advisor upon admission to
UWM and all new freshmen must meet with their
advisor before they will
be permitted to register for their first term. Academic advising prior
to registration is also
required for Academic Opportunity Center (AOC)
students and is strongly encouraged for all students.
These requirements are subject to change. If you are unsure of the
requirements for your particular program, or do not
know who your
academic advisor is, consult your school/college advising office. See Advising and Orientation for New
Students
for more information.
Registration Procedures and Deadlines
The initial registration cycle begins with the availability of the Schedule
of Classes, which occurs in April for the
following fall term;
mid-October for the winter term; November for the spring term; and
January for the summer term.
The Schedule of Classes may be
viewed online at www.uwm.edu/schedule.
Continuing students will be assigned registration appointment times
that can be viewed on PAWS. Enrollment
appointments indicate the first
opportunity to register online using PAWS after priority
registration begins. New and reentering students will receive
registration information as soon as appropriate after admission. New
freshmen register as
part of a new student advising and registration
program (see Advising and Orientation
for New Students).
Students will be assigned an "earliest possible" registration
date and time based on their level and total earned credits
within
their level (e.g., graduate student, senior, freshman, junior,
sophomore, special/non-degree student). More
information may be found
online at www.enrollappointment.uwm.edu.
Details about the registration process, deadlines for a particular
term, and penalties for late registration are described in
the Schedule
of Classes. Please ensure that you are taking advantage of your
earliest opportunity to register, as well as
complying with necessary
procedures and deadlines.
Change of Registration/Add and Drop or
Withdrawal from Classes
After initial registration, students have the opportunity to modify
their class schedule by adding, dropping, or
withdrawing from classes
during specific periods prior to the start of the semester. Such
changes can be made without
financial penalty until shortly before the
start of the term (or before the start of a particular summer session).
However,
significant financial penalties can apply for changes made
beyond the appropriate deadline, and some departments have
unique
deadlines and approval requirements governing how and when students may
add and drop particular courses.
Some academic programs also require
their students to obtain specific approval for adding or dropping
courses. Consult
the online Schedule of Classes for dates,
deadlines, and procedures.
Late Registration and Late Payment Fees
Additional fees and penalties will be assessed of students who register
after published deadlines or who pay their
fee/tuition assessments
late. Consult the Schedule of Classes or Bursar Office website
at www.bursar.uwm.edu in order
to avoid these penalties.
Concurrent Registration
Students wishing to enroll concurrently at UWM and at another
college or university may do so only with the advance
approval of their
UWM school/college advising office.
Students enrolled part time at more than one UW campus normally pay
fees separately to each campus. Students
enrolled full time at one
campus and part time at another generally pay full-time tuition at
their full-time campus and
only segregated fees at the part-time
campus. However, some specialized programs or courses with special
class fees
may require payment above the full-time fee rate. Contact
the Registrar's Office for additional details.
ID Cards
UW System regulations require that each student have a picture ID
card. This card is used in the UWM Library, the
Klotsche Center, the
Union, and other places to verify student status and eligibility for
participation or service. Students
are expected to obtain their ID
during their first semester at UWM. ID cards may be obtained in the
Registrar's Office,
Mellencamp Hall, Room 274.
If you are enrolled only in online courses and wish to obtain an ID
card verifying your affiliation with UWM, go to
www.onlineid.uwm.edu for more
information.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
REGISTRATION
[ Contents
| How to Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
CAMPUS RESOURCES
Athletics
Career Planning & Resource Center (CPaRC)
Center for International
Education
Dean of Students/Office of
Student Life
University Information
Technology Services
Intensive English Program
(IEP)
Services for Adult and
Returning Students
Accessibility Resource Center
Student Health
UWM Children's Center
Athletics
Pavilion
(414) 229-5151
mkepanthers.com
UWM offers 15 NCAA Division I sports that are highly competitive
both regionally and nationally. The teams compete
in the Horizon League
and the Panthers have won the league's all-sports trophy five times
while also regularly ranking
among the top schools in the league for
academic accomplishment.
UWM men's sports offerings include baseball, basketball, cross
country, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor
and outdoor track,
and volleyball. Women's intercollegiate sports are basketball, cross
country, soccer, swimming,
tennis, indoor and outdoor track, and
volleyball.
To be eligible for intercollegiate competition, you must be
admitted to a degree-granting program, be enrolled with 12
degree
credits during competition, and maintain satisfactory progress toward a
degree.
Students also can get involved in athletics by attending events
throughout the year. UWM students are admitted free to
all games with
their student ID. Home events take place on campus in the Klotsche
Center and at Engelmann Stadium,
as well as off campus at the UW-Milwaukee Panther Arena, Henry Aaron Field, and Le Club.
A wide range of intramural sports for individuals and teams also
are offered by the Department of Recreational Sports
and Facilities.
Most sports are offered both semesters. For more information, contact
the intramural office at (414) 2296433.
Career Planning and Resource Center (CPaRC)
Mellencamp Hall, Room 128
(414) 229-4486
uwm.edu/careerplan
The Career Planning and Resource Center (CPaRC) helps students choose
satisfying majors, build career skills, and
make successful
transitions from campus to career. Through a variety of programs,
students can plan an education that
is both rewarding and marketable.
They also can plug into the largest job market in the state. Nearly
two out of three
jobs in Wisconsin are found in the Milwaukee
metropolitan area.
CPaRC offers several services, including career counseling;
walk-in advising/resume review; classroom and student
organization
workshops on a variety of topics like Choosing a Major/Career
Direction, Resume Writing, Networking,
Securing Internships, Using
Social Media, and Interview Preparation; Career Days, which bring more
than 100
employers to campus; two-credit courses in College Major
Career Decision Making and Successful Career Transitions;
a
comprehensive website that serves as a virtual career center; and a
Career Information Library and Media Center,
Computer Labs, and
personal assistance from a trained group of Peer Advisors (Career
Resource Assistants).
Employer partnerships are a significant aspect of the CPaRC
program. Representatives from companies like BMO
Harris Banks, The
Milwaukee Bucks, Northwestern Mutual, Roundy’s, Direct Supply,
Kohl’s, Target, Coca-Cola, Best
Buy, General Mills, and
Metropolitan Life, as well as the Milwaukee Public Schools and
non-profit organizations, often
interview and participate in events on
campus. PantherJobs, a web-based technology, connects UWM students and
alumni with employers at all levels, including internships and
part-time opportunities and campus jobs.
Center for International Education
Garland Hall, Room 102
(414) 229-3757
uwm.edu/cie
The Center for International Education offers a full array of
international learning opportunities that help students
develop the
knowledge and skills necessary to understand and succeed in today's
increasingly interconnected world. CIE
coordinates several of UWM's
international academic majors, minors, and certificate programs, as
well as its study
abroad programs. Film series, public lectures and
conferences, and internationally focused student organizations further
engage students with critical global issues. The Beyond Borders:
International Living and Learning Community
connects new freshmen
with peers who share an interest in learning about the broader world.
CIE also coordinates UWM's international student admissions and
immigration services. Specialized orientation
programs and advising
help to ensure that international students experience a smooth
transition to and positive
experience while at UWM.
For more information about CIE programs, please see our website
or visit us in Garland Hall, Room 102.
Dean of Students/Office of Student Life
Mellencamp Hall, Room 118
(414) 229-4632
uwm.edu/deanofstudents/
The Dean of Students (DOS) Office is a central resource for
students and is here to support their success as members of
the
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee community. Students might come to
DOS to seek help resolving problems or to
seek support in times of
crisis. We help students navigate University offices and processes and
find appropriate
resources. We also work with students to resolve
fee appeals and support individuals who need to withdraw for severe
medical reasons. Additionally, the Dean of Students Office promotes
students' rights and responsibilities by addressing
student behavior
on campus and in the surrounding communities.
The Dean of Students Office publishes a Panther Planner &
Undergraduate Student Handbook that provides students
with information
about the range of campus activities and resources available, as well
as access to important policies
and procedures. Planners are available
from the Office in Mellencamp Hall, Room 118.
Contact the DOS Office if there is an incident or problem you'd like
to report; if you need someone to listen, help, or
lend a hand; or if
you just can't figure out where to go.
University Information Technology Services
UWM Help Desk, 7 a.m. to midnight
(414)
229-4040; toll-free 877-381-3459; uwm.edu/technology/help
Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.: Help with wireless and
clickers at the UWM Walk-in Help Desk, Bolton 225; help with UWM
WiFi
at Library Learning Commons IT Consultant desk
uwm.edu/technology
Technology services are provided to assist students with their
coursework, in the classroom, and with their research.
An ePantherID and password are assigned to applicants so they can track
their application online. Once enrolled in
classes, the ePantherID and
password provide access to UWM online services such as email and calendar services;
PAWS student services to register for
classes, view final grades, and pay tuition; pantherFILE
to securely store and
share files; D2L online course management system
for coursework; and other IT services and resources. To assist in
their
research, students have access to a powerful online survey tool and
UWM's High Performance Computing service.
Computer hardware and software services are available to students
via the UWM TechMall. There, students will find
information about and
access to the UWM TechStore to purchase computers with an educational
discount, iPads, iPods,
printers, and technology-related peripherals
and accessories. Students can also use the UWM TechRepair computer
repair facility in Bolton 218, purchase discounted software through the
online Wisconsin Integrated Software Catalog
(WISC), and get in-person
training and on-demand how-to videos for UWM technology services and
commonly used
software from Learning TECHniques.
Wireless service is offered in University buildings via PROWLnet
and UWM WiFi. Students will find Campus
Computer Labs (CCLs) with Macs,
PCs, printers and scanners; and Web Kiosks located in many UWM
buildings for a
quick check of the Internet. The UWM Mobile app
provides real-time information and is available for free download at
the Apple App Store or the Android Market.
Intensive English Program (IEP)
Curtin Hall, Room 672
(414) 229-5757
[email protected]
uwm.edu/esl/programs/intensive-english-program
The Intensive English Program (IEP) is a non-credit, pre-university
program that offers intensive English language
training to students who
are preparing for either undergraduate or graduate university studies
and overall English
fluency. The instruction is designed to strengthen
listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills. Elective courses are
offered in grammar and TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)
preparation as well as in additional skill areas.
Five eight-week
sessions of English as a Second Language (ESL) classes are available
every year: two consecutive
sessions in the fall and spring semesters
and one in the summer. For more information about IEP courses and
enrollment, contact the ESL office in Curtin Hall 672 at (414) 229-5757
or [email protected]
Services for Adult and Returning Students
Vogel Hall, 3253 North Downer Ave.
(414) 229-2222
uwm.edu/undergrad-admission/student-type/adult-returning
Have you followed another life path and now want to explore your
college options? Been away from school long
enough to realize it's time
to come back? Enrolling in college coursework after a long time away
from school can be a
daunting task.
The Admissions and Recruitment staff is here to help adult
students navigate through the back-to-school transition and
find their
niche at UWM. Advisors help prospective students identify their
educational goals, assist non-degree
undergraduates through the
application and course selection process, and provide a home base to
which adult students
return for support and referrals. If the
prospective adult student does not meet admission standards, advisors
provide
information about available options and assistance appropriate
to the person's specific circumstances.
Applications are encouraged from veterans, educationally disadvantaged
students, and other non-traditional applicants.
Pre-admission advising
for adults and other non-traditional students is available by
appointment through the Department
of Admissions and Recruitment. For
more information or to schedule an appointment with an advisor, call
(414) 2292222. Or, feel free to connect with us at uwm.edu/contact for easy access
to an online request form, phone, email, live
chat, or social media, all
in one convenient location.
Accessibility Resource Center
Mitchell Hall, Room 112
(414) 229-6287 (V/TTY)
www.uwm.edu/arc/
The Accessibility Resource Center's (ARC) mission is to create an accessible and inclusive campus environment for
students with disabilities that fosters the development of each student's full potential. ARC facilitates reasonable
academic accommodations to promote equal access to students in their educational programs at UWM.
Reasonable accommodations are determined on an individual basis
and need to be supported in current documentation
of disability
submitted to ARC. Accommodations may include, but are not limited to:
note taking, sign language
interpreting and captioning services,
adaptive equipment and materials, electronic textbook service, priority
registration,
and alternative testing.
ARC encourages students with disabilities to contact the office
upon acceptance to UWM or immediately following
diagnosis of
disability. Early notification assists in arranging services that begin
the first day of class, and is critical for
students using sign
language interpreters, captioning or note-taking services, and for those
students requiring textbooks
and materials in alternative formats.
Student Health
Norris Health Center
(414) 229-4716
uwm.edu/norris
The Norris Health Center can help you stay healthy while coping
with the demands of college life. The center provides
high quality
medical, mental health, and wellness services, at low cost, to enrolled
students.
Diagnosis and treatment of illnesses and injuries are provided Monday
through Friday. Center services include
counseling, gynecological
care, immunizations, allergy injections, sports medicine, men's health,
physical examinations,
confidential STD counseling and testing, and a
variety of health promotion and wellness services. Laboratory testing
and pharmacy are provided on site at a nominal charge. Appointments
preferred; same-day options available.
UWM Children's Learning Center
2114 E. Kenwood Blvd.
(414) 229-5384
www.uwm.edu/children/
The UWM Children's Learning Center provides high-quality care for the children
of UWM students, faculty, staff,
UWM Alumni Association members, and
Hartford University School families and teachers. The Center serves
children
six weeks through 12 years of age, and is accredited by the
National Association for the Education of Young Children
(NAEYC).
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
CAMPUS RESOURCES
[ Contents
| How to Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
CAMPUS TOURS
Walking tours of campus are offered year-round 10 times per week
(Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 10 a.m. and 1
p.m.; Tuesday and
Thursday at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.) and Saturdays during the academic year
(10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.).
Tours last approximately two hours and
include a general information presentation. Due to limited space,
reservations
are required. For more information on visit opportunities
or to make a tour reservation, go to www.visit.uwm.edu,
contact the Department
of Admissions and Recruitment at (414) 229-2222, or email [email protected]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
CAMPUS TOURS
[ Contents | How to Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About
UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
ABOUT UWM
Academic Worlds
The Student Community
The Milwaukee Community
Student Right to Know
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee offers a world of
intellectual, social, and personal possibilities. Whether you
study at
UWM for one semester or all the way through to an undergraduate degree,
this catalog can help you make the
most of those possibilities. UWM
features:
103 bachelor's degree programs, 63 master's programs, one
specialist degree, and 34 doctoral programs.
14 schools and colleges.
More than 3,000 different courses, including evening and
off-campus classes.
Faculty members who are nationally recognized for research and
publication and are active citizens of the
metropolitan community.
A community of 30,000 students, 1,674 faculty and
instructional staff, and more than 2,000 staff members.
UWM was established 60 years ago, in 1956, with the merger of Wisconsin
State College, Milwaukee, and the
University of Wisconsin Extension
Center in Milwaukee. (Wisconsin State College traces its origin to the
Milwaukee
State Normal School, founded in 1885.) Since then, UWM has
become a major part of the intellectual, cultural, and
economic life of
Southeastern Wisconsin.
Academic Worlds
The academic worlds at UWM include:
School of Architecture and Urban Planning
Peck School of the Arts
Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business
School of Education
College of Engineering and Applied Science
School of Freshwater Sciences
College of Health Sciences
School of Information Studies
College of Letters and Science
College of Nursing
Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health
Helen Bader School of Social Welfare
Graduate School
School of Continuing Education
The Student Community
With increasing regularity, the world's students are making UWM a
first-choice destination. UWM's diverse student
body, representing 80
countries and all 50 states and the District of Columbia, is attracted
by UWM's academic
excellence and urban setting, convenient to the
professional, cultural, and recreational advantages only a large
metropolitan area can offer.
There's a lot for students to do at UWM. In the Peck School of
the Arts complex and elsewhere on campus, you can
enjoy concerts, art
exhibitions, dance performances, and films by student and faculty
artists and by distinguished visitors
from the broader art world. You
can cheer for UWM athletic teams, work off your tensions in organized
or pickup
sports, or keep in shape at the Klotsche Center. The Center,
and the campus in general, are accessible to disabled
students. As a
student, you're also eligible for medical services at the Student
Health Center.
At UWM, social life centers on the Union, where students can see
internationally acclaimed authors, buy Panther gear,
dine at restaurants from very fast to sit-down-and-stay, view French
and Latin American film festivals, or wait for the
bus. UWM's four
residence halls house mostly first-year students in suite-style
accommodations. Residents have access
to a variety of dining and
activity options in all complexes.
The Student Association and hundreds of other campus groups give
students a voice in University life and opportunities
to explore
interests ranging from politics to sailing. Students are represented on
University committees, publish
newspapers, and are involved in radio
station WUWM-FM 89.7.
The Milwaukee Community
As a student at Wisconsin's major urban university, you have
access to the employment, social, cultural, and recreational
opportunities of a large city, while enjoying the closeness of the UWM
community.
UWM's 104-acre main campus is located on Milwaukee's upper East
Side, one of the city's most attractive residential
areas and home to
many faculty, staff, and students. UWM also is just a short walk from
historic Lake Park and the
beautiful Lake Michigan shoreline, and a
short drive or bus ride from a wealth of cultural and recreational
resources.
Our location in the cultural and economic heart of Wisconsin puts
students in the center of a growing metropolitan area
that doubles as a
learning laboratory.
Student Right to Know
The University has created a website to notify prospective and
current students and their parents about their rights and
responsibilities, as well as the services and programs offered at UWM.
The items available include information about
campus safety, academics,
financial aid, and graduation rates. To access this website, go to
Student Right to Know. If
you require paper copies, feel free to print
the information directly off the Web or contact the department that
provides
that information, and a copy will be sent to you.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
ABOUT UWM
[ Contents | How to Use This Book | Calendar | Index ]
[ Admission | Registration
|Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | About
UWM | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
[ Schools
and Colleges ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
Architecture and Urban Planning (School of)
Arts (Peck School of the)
Business (Sheldon B. Lubar School of)
Education (School of)
Engineering and Applied Science (College of)
Freshwater Sciences (School of)
Health Sciences (College of)
Information Studies (School of)
Letters and Science (College of)
Nursing (College of)
Public Health (Joseph J. Zilber School of)
Social Welfare (Helen Bader School of)
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
School of Architecture and Urban Planning
Web Home Page:
School
of Architecture and Urban Planning
Degree Programs
Architecture
Architectural Studies
Minor
Courses: Architecture (ARCH)
Urban Planning
Courses: Urban Planning (URBPLAN)
Faculty and Staff
ARCHITECTURE
AND URBAN PLANNING
Student Advising Office
Architecture and Urban
Planning Building, Room 225
(414) 229-4015
uwm.edu/sarup
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science, Architectural Studies
Master of Architecture
Master of Science, Architecture
Master of Urban Planning
Doctor of Philosophy, Architecture
The School of Architecture and Urban Planning (SARUP) at UWM offers the only professional program in architecture
in Wisconsin that is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board; one of the two graduate planning
programs in the state accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board (PAB) of the American Planning Association; and
one of very few doctoral programs in architecture in the United States. SARUP offers a four-year Bachelor of Science in
Architectural Studies (BSAS) undergraduate pre-professional degree that prepares students for professional, masterslevel training in architecture and other design fields. As the urban center of the state with strong ethnic communities,
Milwaukee makes an appropriate setting for the study of architecture and urban planning.
In addition to the degrees listed above, SARUP offers a Master of Architecture/Master of Urban Planning, a coordinated
professional degree program designed for persons seeking integrated study in both areas. A non-professional Master of
Science in Architecture is available for students who want to develop a personalized and specialized program of
architectural studies centered on scholarly studies and research. A PhD in Architecture is offered for persons who seek
careers in research and teaching in architecture and allied fields, in consulting, or in roles in government and
professional practice requiring advanced skills and research experience. For more information on the SARUP graduate
programs, refer to the Graduate School Bulletin.
Most states require that an individual intending to become an
architect hold an accredited degree. There are two types of
degrees
that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board:
(1) the Bachelor of Architecture, which
requires a minimum of five
years of study, and (2) the Master of Architecture, which requires a
minimum of three years
of study following an unrelated bachelor's
degree or two years following a related pre-professional bachelor’s
degree.
These professional degrees are structured to educate those who
aspire to registration/licensure as architects.
The four-year, pre-professional degree, where offered, is not
accredited by NAAB. The pre-professional degree is useful
for those
wishing a foundation in the field of architecture, as preparation for
either continued education in a professional
degree program or for
employment options in architecturally related areas.
Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional
Organizations. Students should be aware that some
professions,
occupations, and employers are subject to licensing and/or bonding
requirements. When a course of study
includes clinical or field
training, practice teaching, internships, or the like, students may be
subjected to a check of
criminal conviction records, prior to
acceptance of a student by the placement site. Students are responsible
for
obtaining the information necessary for them to become
knowledgeable about these requirements and plan their studies
accordingly. Please contact the appropriate department or program
office for further information.
Faculty and Staff
Administration
Robert Greenstreet
Dean
Stephen Heidt
Assistant Dean, Business Affairs
Joan Simuncak
Assistant Dean, Student Affairs
Graduate Advisor
Tammy Taylor
Undergraduate Advisor
Erica Chappelear
Educational Outreach & Recruiting Advisor
Architecture
Sherry Ahrentzen, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Jasmine Benyamin, Asst. Prof., PhD
Princeton University
Nikole Bouchard, Asst. Prof., MArch
Princeton University
Uriel Cohen, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Chris T. Cornelius, Assoc. Prof., MArch
University of Virginia
Kevin Forseth, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, MArch
Robert Greenstreet, Prof., PhD, Dean
Oxford Brookes University
Donald L. Hanlon, Prof., MArch
University of Washington
Nancy Hubbard, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Thomas C. Hubka, Prof. Emeritus,
MArch
Raymond Isaacs, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of
California, Berkeley
Frederick Jules, Prof. Emeritus, MArch
Mark Keane, Prof., MArch
University of Illinois
Linda R. Krause, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Whitney Moon, Asst. Prof., BARCH
California Polytechnic, San Luis Obispo
Jeffrey Ollswang, Prof. Emeritus,
MSc
Harvey Rabinowitz, Prof. Emeritus, MArch
Amos Rapoport, Distinguished Prof. Emeritus, MArch
Kyle
Reynolds, Asst. Prof., MArch
Princeton University
Douglas Ryhn, Prof. Emeritus, MS
Brian Schermer, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Michigan
Anthony Schnarsky, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, MArch
Arijit Sen, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley
James W. Shields, Assoc. Prof., MArch
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Gil Snyder, Assoc. Prof., MArch, Associate Dean
Columbia University
Manu Sobti, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Georgia Institute of Technology
Josef Stagg, Assoc. Prof., DArch
University of Michigan
Kyle Talbott, Assoc. Prof., MArch
Texas A&M
Filip Tejchman, Asst. Prof., MSAAD
Columbia University
Gregory Thomson, Assoc. Prof., MArch
University of Oregon
Michael Utzinger, Assoc. Prof., MSE
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Karl Wallick, Assoc. Prof., MArch, Chair
University of Pennsylvania
James H. Wasley, Prof., MArch
Rice University
Gerald Weisman, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Larry Witzling, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Maureen Zell, Assoc. Prof., MArch
Yale
University
Urban Planning
Ernest Alexander, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Carolyn Esswein, Adjunct Asst. Prof., MArch, MUP
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Enrique Figueroa, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Davis
Nancy Frank, Assoc. Prof., PhD, Chair
State University of New York at Albany
Kirk Harris, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Cornell University
Lingquan Hu, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Southern California
William Huxhold, Prof. Emeritus, MS
Mordecai Lee, Prof., PhD
Syracuse University
Joseph Mangiamele, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Robert Schneider, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley
Sammis White, Prof., PhD
University of Pennsylvania
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
School of Architecture and Urban Planning
[
Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
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Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business
Web Home Page: Lubar School of Business
Degree Programs
Admission
Admission to a Major
Course of Study
Business Core Courses
Degree Requirements
Accounting
Finance
Human Resources Management
Information Technology Management
Marketing
Supply Chain and Operations Management
Double Majors
General Business Minor
Certificate Programs
Enterprise Resource Planning
International Business
Real Estate
Entrepreneurship
Investment Management
Technology Entrepreneurship
Joint Degree Program
Academic Regulations
Other Options
Academic and Career Counseling
Student Organizations
Student Academic Appeals
Courses:
Business Administration (BUS ADM)
Faculty and Staff
SHELDON B. LUBAR SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Student Services Center
Lubar Hall, N297
(414) 229-5271
uwm.edu/business
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA): Accounting, Finance, Human Resources Management, Information Technology Management, Marketing, Supply
Chain & Operations Management
Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies: Global Management Track: Jointly offered by Lubar School of Business and College of Letters and Science
Master of Business Administration (MBA): With career focus concentrations available in Health Care Management and Supply Chain Management
Master of Management (MS): Accounting, Professional Accounting, Finance Analysis, Management, Marketing, and Taxation
MS-ITM.MBA: A coordinated degree program combining MBA and MS-ITM curricula
Master of Science in Human Resources and Labor Relations (MHRLR): Jointly offered by Lubar School of Business and College of Letters and Science
Master of Science in Information Technology Management (MS in ITM): Innovative, STEM-designated program combining technical, managerial, and business
knowledge
Master of Science in Non-profit Management and Leadership: Jointly offered by Lubar School of Business and College of Letters and Science
Master of Public Administration (MPA): Jointly offered by Lubar School of Business and College of Letters and Science
MBA-Doctor of Nursing Practice: Administered collaboratively by the UWM College of Nursing and the Lubar School of Business
Doctor of Philosophy in Management Science (PhD): Accounting, Finance, Management Information Systems, Marketing, Organizations & Strategic
Management, Supply Chain & Operations Management
The UWM Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business is a major
metropolitan business school committed to academic excellence.
Because of its metropolitan location, the
School offers several
advantages. Milwaukee-area firms provide an exciting, real-world
laboratory for students to gain valuable insights and skills in their
chosen
professional fields as well as providing part-time or
full-time employment opportunities. Students can also gain practical
work experience by participating in
internship programs. Business
leaders from the community participate in School activities, both in
the classroom and on the School's advisory councils.
High-quality management education that incorporates
state-of-the-art technology is delivered to a diverse group of
graduate and undergraduate students and
practicing executives and
professionals. We address the professional development and lifelong
learning needs of individuals.
Through scholarly research, we advance knowledge pertaining to
management decision making and practice and further enrich our
teaching effectiveness.
Our undergraduate degree programs provide students with a
career foundation leading to managerial advancement and/or
entrepreneurial careers.
Our master's degree programs prepare students to assume
general management or functional specialist positions, with potential
for senior-level leadership positions
or entrepreneurial careers.
Our doctoral degree programs prepare students for research and
teaching careers in higher education and research careers in
industry.
Our executive education programs provide customized problem
solving for organizations.
We also employ our professional skills in service to the
School, University, scholarly and professional organizations, and the
regional business community. We
capitalize on the diversified
resources of the Metropolitan Milwaukee business community and use
them as a living laboratory to enrich our scholarly and
instructional
pursuits.
The Lubar School of Business undergraduate and graduate degree
programs are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSBInternational), the internationally recognized accrediting body for business schools.
Completion of the accounting major, which is accredited by the
Wisconsin State Board of Accountancy, serves as basic preparation for
the CPA exam.
The BBA in Finance has been accepted into the CFA Institute University Recognition Program. For further information, see the Finance major description.
Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional Organizations. Students should be aware that some professions,
occupations, and employers are
subject to licensing and/or bonding
requirements. When a course of study includes clinical or field
training, practice teaching, internships, or the like, students may
be
subjected to a check of criminal conviction records prior to
acceptance of a student by the placement site. Students are responsible for obtaining the necessary
information about these requirements and for planning their studies
accordingly. Please contact the appropriate department or program
office for further information.
Admission
The Bachelor of
Business Administration degree is based on two years of college work
in pre-business, followed by two years of study in the business
curriculum.
Potential applicants should consult the Department of
Admissions and Recruitment, Vogel Hall, (414) 229-2222, for current
information.
New Freshmen. Admission of freshmen into the Lubar School of
Business would be granted to students who fulfill the UWM admission
standards. All new
freshmen are admitted into intended business
programs. Intended business students who meet additional requirements
will be admitted to a major in the Lubar School
of Business (see "Admission to a Major" below).
Direct Admission for New Freshmen. New freshman
applicants with a composite ACT of 25 or better, a math subscore of
23 or better, and a high school GPA of
3.5 or higher will be admitted
directly to the major in the Lubar School of Business and are
eligible for Direct Admit Scholarship awards ranging from
$22,000$39,000 during the course of four years. Contact Lubar School
of Business Scholarship Coordinator, Andrea Wrench, for further
information ([email protected]).
Transfer Students. Students seeking to transfer to the School
with fewer than 56 transfer credits will be admitted into intended
business if they meet the UWM
admission requirements for transfer.
Applicants with 56 or more transfer credits will be admitted to
the major if a review of their academic record indicates that they
meet the admission criteria for the
major requested (see "Admission to a Major" below).
At least 50% of the business credit hours required for
the business degree must be earned at UWM, and at least 12 credits in each major must be completed in
residence.
Students from two-year institutions (community colleges and
two-year UW Colleges) are limited to the transfer of up to 72 credits
required for the bachelor's degree.
Admission to a Major
Intended business students may apply for admission to the major
after completing all of the following requirements:
1. Complete at least 56 credits and satisfy
the UWM Oral and Written Communication-Part A and Quantitative Literacy-Part A
requirements; and
2. Successfully complete (with a cumulative grade point average of
2.25 or higher) the Business Foundation Course Group: Commun
103 (Public Speaking)
or Commun 105 (Business and Professional
Communication); Econ 103 (Principles
of Microeconomics); Econ 104 (Principles of Macroeconomics); Math 211
(Survey of Calculus and Analytic Geometry) or equivalent; Bus Adm 201
(Introduction to Financial Accounting); and Bus Adm 230 (Introduction
to
Information Technology Management); and
3. Obtain a cumulative grade point average
equal to or higher than the standard established by the Lubar School
of Business each semester. Students who have
a 2.5 cumulative grade
point average or higher (including transfer work, if any) are
guaranteed admission.
Students must be admitted to the major in order to enroll in
400-level and above business coursework. Please see the Lubar School
of Business academic advising
staff in LUB N297 for more information.
Course of Study
All students must
meet the UWM General Education Requirements (GER). Detailed
information is provided at
uwm.edu/academics/ger.cfm.
Satisfaction of the
Lubar School of Business GER requirements fulfills
UWM GER requirements. The following degree requirements apply to
students who begin at UWM in fall 2012
or thereafter. Other students
should contact the Student Services Center, Lubar Building, Room N297,
for details regarding their degree requirements.
GER Competency Requirements
Oral and Written Communication: Part A - English 102 (or equivalent) and
Part B - English 205
Quantitative Literacy:
Part A - Math 105 (or equivalent) and Part B - Math 211 (221, 226, or 231)
Foreign Language Requirement: Refer to the website listed above
for details describing satisfaction of this requirement.
GER Distribution Requirements
Arts: 3 cr
Humanities: 6 cr
(excluding Commun 103 if used to satisfy a Foundation course requirement)
Social Science: 6 cr (excluding Commun 105 if used to satisfy a Foundation course requirement), only one 100- or 200-level economics
course can be used to satisfy
the Social Science requirement
(excluding Econ 103 and 104). Human Resources majors must complete
Psych 101.
Natural Science: 6 cr, must complete at least two courses, one
of which must be a lab or field experience (excluding Math 211, 221,
226, or Math 231).
Cultural Diversity: At least 3 credits of a designated cultural
diversity course must be taken as part of either the arts, humanities,
or social science requirement.
Business Elective Credits
All business majors must complete a minimum number of business
elective credits, which varies by major. Accounting, Finance, Human
Resources Management,
Marketing, and Supply Chain & Operations
Management majors are required to complete a minimum of 12 business
elective credits; ITM majors are required to
complete a minimum of 9
business elective credits.
General Elective Credits
All business majors must
complete a minimum number of general elective credits, which varies by
major. Finance, Human Resources Management, Information
Technology
Management, Marketing, and Supply Chain & Operations Management
majors are required to complete a minimum of 18 elective credits.
Accounting
majors are required to complete a minimum of 17 general
elective credits.
Business Core Courses (25 cr)
Accounting Majors
Bus Adm 210
Introduction to Management Statistics*
Bus Adm 404
Cost Management
Bus Adm 330
Organizations*
Bus Adm 350
Principles of Finance*
OR
Bus Adm 380
Introduction to Real Estate Markets
OR
Bus Adm 451
Investment Finance
Bus Adm 360
Principles of Marketing*
Bus Adm 370
Introduction to Supply Chain Management*
Bus Adm 391
Business Law I
Bus Adm 600
Management Analysis
TOTAL
Non-Accounting Majors
Bus Adm 210
Introduction to Management Statistics*
Bus Adm 302
Managerial Accounting
Bus Adm 330
Organizations*
Bus Adm 350
Principles of Finance*
Bus Adm 360
Principles of Marketing*
Introduction to Supply Chain Management*
Bus Adm 370
Bus Adm 391
Business Law I
Bus Adm 600
Management Analysis
TOTAL
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
25
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
25
* Business Scholars course option
International Business Component (3 cr)
All business majors must complete one course from the list of
international business-related courses: Bus Adm 456 (International
Financial Management), Bus Adm
465 (International Marketing), Bus Adm
496 (International Business), Bus Adm 498 (Study Abroad: Business
Topics), Bus Adm 535 (Global Information
Technology Management), Bus Adm 541 (Cross-Cultural Management), or Bus Adm 551 (International
Investments).
Major (21-24 cr)
The major prepares students for
productive careers in business and provides specialized analytical
skills and understanding for professional advancement. See
individual
majors for required courses. Please check with the Student Services
Center (LUB N297) regarding the frequency of major course offerings.
Business Scholars Program (23 cr)
The
Business Scholars Program allows outstanding business students to
build a rich portfolio of academic, extracurricular, and professional
achievements. Students
will build strong business competencies as well
as enhanced communication and quantitative skills. International study
is encouraged through the use of two-week
study abroad opportunities.
Eligibility. To be admitted to the Business Scholars
Program, the following requirements must be met: 1) A student must
complete 24 credits with an overall
cumulative grade point average of
3.3 (on a 4.0 scale), including completion of Math 211 (or equivalent)
with a grade of B or better, completion of English 101 and
102 with a
grade of B or better (or attainment of placement score of 525 or
higher), and completion of Econ 103 with a grade of B or better;
and 2) A student must
submit an application that includes a one-page
essay. The application is available in the Student Services
Center (LUB N297).
Requirements
Foundation Courses: Bus Adm 207 (Business
Scholars: Introduction to Financial Accounting), Bus Adm 211 (Business
Scholars: Introduction to Management
Statistics), and Bus Adm 231
(Business Scholars: Introduction to Information Technology
Management).
Core Courses (choose 2 from the following): Bus Adm
331 (Business Scholars: Organizations), Bus Adm 351 (Business
Scholars: Principles of Finance), Bus Adm
361 (Business Scholars:
Principles of Marketing), and Bus Adm 371 (Business Scholars:
Introduction to Supply Chain Management).
Business Scholars Seminars: Complete two 400-level
seminar courses or one 400-level seminar course and Bus Adm 498 (Study
Abroad: Business Topics).
Continuation and Graduation Requirements. Students must maintain a cumulative UWM GPA of 3.25 or higher, complete a
minimum of 23 credits of Business
Scholars coursework, participate in
Business Scholars activities, and meet with the Business Scholars
academic advisor during the final semester before graduation to
verify
degree requirements are met.
Degree Requirements
Credits. A minimum of 123 credits is required for graduation
for all majors. At least 50% of the business credit hours
required for the business degree must be
completed at UWM.
Grade Point Average. Students are required to earn at least a
2.25 overall GPA to graduate. Non-accounting majors are required to
maintain a minimum 2.25 GPA
in all business and economics courses, as
well as a 2.25 GPA in all business and economics courses completed at
UWM, to graduate.
Accounting majors must have earned a 2.5 GPA
for all business and economics courses completed (including transfer
credits), as well as a 2.5 GPA in all business
and economics courses
completed at UWM, to graduate.
Residence Requirements. A minimum of 12 credits must be
completed in residence at UWM in each Business Administration major.
Students must earn their last 30 credits at
UWM. BBA degree and major requirements must be completed within 10
years of initial enrollment at UW-Milwaukee.
Should students not
complete the degree and major within the 10-year time frame, the
students will switch to the most current degree and major
requirements. A new
10-year time frame would then begin.
Accounting
An accounting degree provides graduates with a challenging career path
clearly pointed toward growth and opportunity. The new economy is
creating new ways of
working, living, and growing. Position yourself
with a career that understands the questions the new economy poses.
Accounting graduates who take positions in
public accounting firms provide management consulting, tax, and audit
services to external clients. Other accounting
graduates, who take
positions with industry and not-for-profit organizations, work as part
of the management team providing information for decision support and
performance evaluation. Accountants within organizations specialize in
tax reporting and planning. Students desiring to become a Certified
Public Accountant (CPA)
must complete 150 credits. In most cases, a
student will combine a 123-credit undergraduate accounting degree with
a graduate degree program.
For the major in accounting, 22 credits are
required beyond the 4 credits of Bus Adm 201 (Introduction to
Financial Accounting) or Bus Adm 207 (Business
Scholars: Introduction
to Financial Accounting). A minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA, completion of
Math 211 (Survey in Calculus and Analytic Geometry), Bus Adm
230
(Introduction to Information Technology Management) or 231 (Business
Scholars: Introduction to Information Technology Management), and a
grade of B or
better in Bus Adm 201/207 are required to
enroll in Bus Adm 301 (Intermediate Accounting). A grade of
B or better in Bus Adm 301 is required to enroll in Bus
Adm 402, 404 (Business Core course), and 409.
Required Core Courses
All students majoring in
accounting must complete the following accounting core courses:
Bus Adm 301
Bus Adm 402
Bus Adm 405
Bus Adm 406
Bus Adm 408
Bus Adm 409
Bus Adm 450
TOTAL
Intermediate Accounting
Advanced Financial Accounting
Income Tax Accounting I
Income Tax Accounting II
Accounting Information Systems
Auditing: Procedures and Applications
Intermediate Finance
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
22
Business Electives (12 cr): Students must complete an additional 12 credits
in the Lubar School of Business. Bus Adm 400 (Accounting Professional
Internship)
may be utilized in this area.
Additional Notes: Students who have completed Bus Adm 404 will
not be allowed to complete Bus Adm 302 for credit.
Finance
The finance major provides the needed tools to work in investment
management, corporate financial management, and banking. Position
titles for finance majors
include loan officers, mortgage review
officers, stockbrokers, bond and security analysts, and ultimately,
chief financial officers. Finance majors are increasingly
taking and
passing the Chartered Financial Analysts (CFA) examination. Thorough
training in finance and related fields provides the practical and
theoretical
background needed to succeed in the fast-paced and
fascinating world of domestic and international finance.
The finance major highlights two tracks of concentration:
investments and corporate finance. Investment management has been
revolutionized by rapid advances in
computerization. Modern investment
theory of portfolio selection, asset pricing models, pricing of
options and other derivative securities, and views on the efficiency
of security markets has provided major improvements in investment
management practice.
Other finance majors may concentrate in corporate finance.
Corporate financial officers oversee the efficient allocation of funds
within enterprises and borrow funds
on the most favorable terms
through banks, corporate paper, bonds, or new stock issues. Corporate
financial managers examine corporate policies toward dividends,
debt
leverage, and agency conflicts between firm stakeholders.
For the major in finance, a minimum of 21 credits is required
beyond the 3 credits of Bus Adm 350 (Principles of Finance) or Bus Adm
351 (Business Scholars:
Principles of Finance). A minimum
C grade must be earned in Bus Adm 350/351 to pursue the
finance major. It is recommended that Bus Adm 350 be taken in the
first semester of junior status. Bus Adm 450 (Intermediate Finance) is
a prerequisite or co-requisite for several courses in the finance
major. Accordingly, finance
majors should enroll in Bus Adm 450 soon
after completing Bus Adm 350 or 351.
Required Courses (9 cr)
Bus Adm 450
Bus Adm 451
Bus Adm 455
Intermediate Finance
Investment Finance
Financial Institutions
3
3
3
Major Electives (12 cr)
Choose four
courses from the following list:
Bus Adm 301
Bus Adm 452
Bus Adm 453
Bus Adm 454
Bus Adm 456
Bus Adm 457
Bus Adm 458
Bus Adm 459
Bus Adm 481
Bus Adm 551
Total
Intermediate Accounting
Applied Portfolio Management
Corporate Finance Seminar
Analysis of Options and
Futures
International Financial
Management*
Financial Modeling
Venture Finance
Finance Professional
Internship
Real Estate Finance
International Investments*
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
21-22
The following finance major courses represent
foundational material for the CFA Level 1 Exam: Bus Adm 301, 450,
451, 452, 454, 455, 456 or 551, and 481.
Business Electives (12 cr): Students must complete 12
additional credits in the Lubar School of Business. The Finance
Internship (Bus Adm 396) may be utilized in
this area.
*If Bus Adm 456 or 551 is selected as the International
Business Component course, students must choose a different finance
elective to complete the major.
Human Resources Management
Human resource managers are increasingly relied upon to make optimal
decisions about such topics as motivation and productivity of
employees, compensation, and
performance appraisals. This field is
particularly challenging due to the diverse interests of management,
labor, consumers, regulatory agencies, political constituents,
and
environmental issues in a competitive, global economy.
This major prepares students for entry-level careers in either
generalist or specialist areas of human resources management. The
curriculum provides a framework
through which students learn how
human resource management decisions affect, and are affected by,
virtually all other management decisions.
Human Resources Management majors are required to complete
Psych 101 (Introductory Psychology) as part of their Social Sciences
requirement.
The major in human resources management requires 21 human resources
management credits beyond the 3 credits of Bus Adm 330
(Organizations) or Bus Adm 331
(Business Scholars: Organizations).
Required Course (3 cr)
Bus Adm 444
Human Resources Management*
3
Core Courses (9 cr)
Choose three courses from the following list:
Bus Adm 440
Bus Adm 441
Bus Adm 443
Bus Adm 445
Bus Adm 448
Econ 415
Compensation Management*
Diversity in Organizations*
Special Topics in HRM
(Topic: Employment Law)*
Training and Development in
Organizations*
Staffing Human Resources*
Economics of Employment
& Labor Relations
3
3
3
3
3
3
HRM Elective Courses (9 cr)
Choose three courses from the Core Courses
listed above or from the following list of courses:
Bus Adm 442
Bus Adm 443
Bus Adm 449
Commun 300
Industrial Psychology
Special Topics in HRM
(subtitle)
Human Resources Management
Professional Internship
Interviews and Interviewing
3
3
3
3
Commun 310
Econ 448
Psych 325
Total
Communication in Organizations
Economics of Human Resources
Research Methods in
Psychology
3
3
3
21
* These HRM major courses represent
foundational material for the SHRM Assurance of Learning
Certification exam.
Business Electives (12 cr): Students must complete 12 additional credits in the Lubar
School of Business. The HRM Internship (Bus Adm 394) may be
utilized in
this area.
Information Technology Management
The Information Technology Management (ITM) degree provides
undergraduate students with the knowledge needed to develop creative
and effective business
solutions, based on a thorough comprehension
of business problems and opportunities.
To that end, students are provided with a strong technical
foundation in contemporary approaches to business application systems
development—which includes
planning, analysis, design, project
management, programming, maintenance, and support—using
state-of-the-art technologies, tools, and techniques, as well as an
essential background in various business functional areas, such as
management, marketing, accounting, finance, supply chain, and
economics. In addition, there is an
emphasis on the communication
skills and teamwork critical to client understanding and
satisfaction.
The ITM program is intended to be the first step in a lifelong
learning experience in the exciting and dynamic field of ITM. It
provides a strong foundation for
advancement and success in ITM
careers and ventures.
The major requires 24 ITM credits beyond the 3 credits of Bus Adm 230
(Introduction to Information Technology Management) or
231 (Business Scholars:
Introduction to Information Technology
Management). A grade of C or better in Bus Adm 230/231 is
required to enroll in Bus Adm 335; a grade of C or better
in
Bus Adm 335 is required to enroll in advanced ITM courses.
Required Courses (12 cr)
Bus Adm 335
Bus Adm 432
Bus Adm 434
Bus Adm 436
Visual System Development
Object-Oriented Systems
Development
Database Management Systems
Systems Analysis and Design
3
3
3
3
Major Electives (12 cr)
Choose at least four of the following courses:
Bus Adm 433
Bus Adm 438
Bus Adm 439
Bus Adm 530
Bus Adm 531
Bus Adm 532
Bus Adm 533
Bus Adm 534
Bus Adm 535
Bus Adm 536
Bus Adm 537
Bus Adm 538
Bus Adm 539
Total
Information Technology
Project Management
Information Technology
Management Topics
Information Technology
Management Professional Internship
Introduction to eBusiness
Developing Web Applications
Using Web Services
Web Development for Open
Business Systems
Information Technology
Infrastructure for Business
Advanced Information
Technology Project Management
Global Information
Technology Management**
Business Intelligence*
Enterprise Systems Concepts
and Issues*
Business Process
Integration*
Web Application Server
Development*
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
* These ITM courses represent foundational material for
the TERP 10 Certification preparation course exam.
** If Bus Adm 535 is selected as the International Business Component course, students must choose a different ITM elective to complete the major.
Business Electives (9 cr): Students must complete 9 additional
credits in the Lubar School of Business. Bus Adm 336 (Enterprise
Systems and Data Analytics) may
be utilized in this area.
Marketing
Marketing is a key factor contributing to the success of any business
organization. It is the dynamic and creative process of the
development, pricing, promotion, and
distribution of products and
services to satisfy customer and organizational objectives. Effective
marketing requires an integration of eclectic knowledge and the
skills pertinent to understanding consumer behavior, planning and
analyzing marketing research data, thinking strategically, and managing
people. Graduates of the
marketing major find an exciting and broad
spectrum of career opportunities in brand/product management,
industrial selling, retailing, sales management,
advertising,
marketing research, customer-service management, and others.
The major in marketing requires 21 marketing credits beyond the
3 credits of Bus Adm 360 (Principles of Marketing) or Bus Adm 361
(Business Scholars: Principles
of Marketing).
Required Courses (9 cr)
Bus Adm 461
Bus Adm 462
Consumer Behavior
Marketing Research
3
3
Bus Adm 463
Marketing Management
3
Major Electives (12 cr)
Choose four courses
from the approved list below:
Bus Adm 447
Bus Adm 460
Bus Adm 464
Bus Adm 465
Bus Adm 466
Bus Adm 467
Bus Adm 468
Bus Adm 469
Total
*
Entrepreneurship
Retail Management
Management of Promotion
International Marketing*
Business to Business Sales
and Marketing
Marketing Seminar
Internet Marketing
Marketing Professional
Internship
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
21
If Bus Adm 465 is selected as the International Business
Component course, students must choose a different marketing
elective to complete their major.
Business Electives (12 cr): Students must complete 12
additional credits in the Lubar School of Business. The Marketing
Internship (Bus Adm 397) may be utilized
in this area.
Supply Chain and Operations Management
Supply chain management is the integration of all key business
processes from original suppliers through end users, and provides
products, services, and information
that add value for customers and
other stakeholders. It includes the supply, storage, and movement of
materials, information, personnel, equipment, and finished
goods
within the organization and between the organization and its environment. The operations
function, within the supply chain, relates to the creation of goods
and services through efficient and effective use of personnel,
material, and machines, and includes acquisition of resources,
planning of production and inventory
levels, scheduling of work
assignments, and the control of production and quality. Recent
concepts in supply chain and operations management include lean
operations, Six Sigma, ERP, and mass customization.
The major in Supply Chain and Operations Management (SCOM)
requires 21 credits beyond the 3 credits of Bus Adm 370 (Introduction
to Supply Chain
Management) or Bus Adm 371 (Business Scholars:
Introduction to Supply Chain Management).
Required Courses (12 cr)
Bus Adm 475
Bus Adm 476
Bus Adm 477
Bus Adm 478
Operations Planning and
Control
Logistics and Transportation
Management
Purchasing and Supply
Management
Supply Chain Analytics
3
3
3
3
Elective Courses (6 cr)
Choose two courses from the following list:
Bus Adm 450
Bus Adm 460
Bus Adm 466
Bus Adm 472
Bus Adm 479
Bus Adm 537
Bus Adm 538
Bus Adm 571
Intermediate Finance
Retail Management
Business to Business Sales
and Marketing
Special Topics in Supply
Chain and Operations Management
(subtitle)
Supply Chain and Operations
Management Professional Internship
Enterprise Systems Concepts
and Issues
Business Process Integration
Quality and Six Sigma Tools
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Capstone (3 cr)
Bus Adm 576
Total
Enterprise Planning in the
Supply Chain
3
21
The SCOM major required courses represent
foundational material for the APICS CPIM certification preparatory
course.
Business Electives (12 cr): Students must complete 12
additional credits in the Lubar School of Business. The Supply Chain
& Operations Management Internship
(Bus Adm 398) may be utilized
in this area.
Double Majors
Students majoring
in business administration may pursue a double major in a second area
of the Lubar School of Business. The double major can be declared in
Lubar Hall N297; the advising staff in the Student Services
Center will explain this option and discuss the curriculum required.
General Business Minor
A General
Business Minor consisting of 29 credits in business and economics is
available to provide a professional business education dimension to
non-business
students at UWM schools and colleges.
Required Courses
Econ 103
Econ 104
Bus Adm 201
Bus Adm 210
Bus Adm 230
Bus Adm 330
Bus Adm 350
Bus Adm 360
Bus Adm 370
Total
Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Introduction to Financial
Accounting
Introduction to Management
Statistics*
Introduction to Information
Technology Management*
Organizations
Principles of Finance
Principles of Marketing
Introduction to Supply Chain
Management
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
29
* Or equivalent.
At least 15 credits for the General Business Minor must be
completed at UWM. You must also complete all 29 credits with an
overall grade point average of at least
2.25. No courses may be taken
on a credit/no credit basis.
Post-baccalaureate General Business Minor
The General Business Minor is available at the post-baccalaureate
level. Students requiring no more than 6 credits to complete the
minor are eligible. At least 15
credits for the post-baccalaureate
General Business Minor must be completed at UWM. A minimum of 3
post-baccalaureate credits must be completed at UWM. A
minimum overall
GPA of 2.25 on all General Business Minor courses must be earned; a
minimum UWM post-baccalaureate GPA of 2.0 is required.
Interested students should contact the academic advisors in Room N297 of Lubar Hall, (414) 229-5271, for further details.
Certificate Programs
Certificate in Enterprise Resource Planning
The Certificate in Enterprise Resource Planning is designed for
business students who desire a sequence of courses that focus
specifically on the Enterprise Resource
Planning (ERP) area. The
certificate is designed for non-Information Technology Management
majors. This five-course sequence prepares students for the SAP
TERP
10 certification exam. The market demand for professionals with
skills in this area is high.
To obtain the certificate, a student must complete 15 credits of
required coursework while fulfilling all requirements of the
baccalaureate degree.
Required Course (3 cr)
Bus Adm 336
Enterprise Systems and Data
Analytics
3
Elective Courses (12 cr)
Choose four
of the following courses:
Bus Adm 536
Bus Adm 537
Bus Adm 538
Bus Adm 539
Bus Adm 540
Total
Business Intelligence
Business Systems Concepts
and Issues
Business Process Integration
Web Application Server
Development
TERP 10 Certification
3
3
3
3
3
15
Note: A business student may count no more than 6
credits from a major towards the Certificate in Enterprise Resource
Planning.
Eligibility. To apply to the Certificate in
Enterprise Resource Planning program, students must be admitted to
Lubar School of Business and have completed the
foundation courses.
Graduation. Students must complete all coursework
required for the certificate with at least a 2.25 GPA to have the
certificate posted on the transcript at graduation.
At least half of
the credits required for the certificate must be taken in residence at
UWM. No courses may be taken on a credit/no credit basis.
Students interested in the certificate program should contact the
Lubar School of Business Student Services Center, Lubar Hall N297, (414) 229-5271,
[email protected], to make a formal declaration
of their intention.
Certificate in International Business
The Certificate in International Business is designed to offer UWM
students the opportunity to complement their major field of study with
an additional
concentration in international business. Students will
take a coordinated series of international courses and receive a
certificate that signifies their knowledge in this
area.
To obtain the certificate, the student must complete a minimum of 15
approved international business credits while fulfilling all
requirements of the baccalaureate
degree, including UWM's foreign
language requirement. The certificate is open to all undergraduate business and non-business majors, and to students who have
previously earned a bachelor's degree from UWM or any accredited college or university. Non-business majors will need at least 17 prerequisite credits
of business
coursework, in addition to Econ 103 and 104, to complete
this certificate.
Completing the certificate requires
the following:
The following three courses:* (9
cr)
Bus Adm 456**
Bus Adm 465**
Bus Adm 496*
International Financial
Management
International Marketing
International Business
3
3
3
and at least two additional internationally-oriented courses (6 cr) from the following list:
3
Bus
Marketing Seminar (International topics only)
Adm
467**
Bus
International Business
3
Adm
Internship                                                            494
Bus
Special Topics in Business (International topics only)
3
Adm
495***
Bus
Study Abroad (International topics only)
3
Adm
497***
Bus
Study Abroad: Business Topics
3
Adm
498
Bus
Global Information Technology Management
3
Adm
535**
Bus
Cross-Cultural Management
3
Adm
541
Bus
International Investments
3
Adm
551**
Econ
Introduction to International Economic Relations
3
351
Econ
International Trade
3
454
Pol Sci International Law
3
316
Pol Sci The Politics of International Economic Relations
3
330
Pol Sci European Integration
3
339
Pol Sci Asian International Relations
3
343
Pol Sci U.S.-Latin American Relations
3
346
Global Contexts for Global Management
3
311
TOTAL 15
* Students majoring in business administration and completing an
International Business Certificate can count Bus Adm 496 toward their
International Business
component.
** A business student may count no more than 6 credits from a
major towards a business certificate.
*** Repeatable for credit with a change in topic up to 6
credits.
Note: Non-business students will need at least 17 prerequisite credits
from the Lubar School of Business, in addition to Econ 103 and 104, to
complete this
certificate. Bus Adm 456 requires Bus Adm 350 (which
requires Econ 103, Econ 104, Bus Adm 201, and Bus Adm 210 or
equivalent); Bus Adm 465 requires Bus
Adm 360 (which also requires
Econ 104); and Bus Adm 496 requires Bus Adm 330 (plus 350 and 360).
Students must complete all coursework required for the
certificate with at least a 2.5 GPA to have the certificate posted
on the transcript at graduation. At least half of
the credits
required for the certificate must be taken in residence at UWM. No
courses may be taken on a credit/no credit basis.
Students interested in the certificate program should contact the
Lubar School of Business Student Services Center, Lubar Hall N297,
(414) 229-5271,
[email protected],
to make a formal declaration of their intentions.
Certificate in Real Estate
The Real Estate Certificate is designed to offer business students
the opportunity to complement their major field of study with an
additional concentration in real
estate. Students completing the Real
Estate Certificate will have coursework in real estate finance,
valuation, environmental real estate issues and property
development,
as well as real estate law. This background, when added to a business
major, opens career opportunities to students in mortgage banking and
commercial real estate lending, commercial leasing and brokerage,
appraisal and valuation, real estate investment analysis, and property
development and
management.
Completing the certificate requires the following
five courses* (15 cr):
Bus Adm 380
Bus Adm 481
Bus Adm 482
Bus Adm 483
Introduction to Real Estate
Markets
Real Estate Finance
Valuation of Real Estate
Property Development and
Management
3
3
3
3
Choose one elective course:
Bus Adm 389
or
Bus Adm 484
or
Bus Adm 485
Real Estate Internship
Real Estate Law
Environmental Issues in Real
Estate
3
3
3
* Business students completing a real estate certificate may utilize
the courses as part of their business elective requirements. Note:
Non-business majors are required
to complete Econ 104
(Macroeconomics) in order to fulfill requirements for this
certificate. It also is recommended that students complete Bus Adm 201
(Introduction to Financial Accounting) and Bus Adm 350
(Principles of Finance) prior to taking Bus Adm 481 (Real Estate
Finance). A business minor also satisfies
the prerequisite coursework
for non-business students.
All coursework required for the Real Estate Certificate must be
completed with at least a 2.5 GPA in order to post the certificate
on the transcript. At least half of the
credits required for the
certificate must be taken in residence at UWM. Real Estate
Certificate courses may not be taken on a credit/no credit basis
except for Bus
Adm 389, Real Estate Internship. Students interested
in the certificate program should contact the Lubar School of
Business Student Services Center, Lubar Hall
N297, (414) 229-5271, [email protected], to make a formal declaration of
their intention.
Certificate in Entrepreneurship
The Entrepreneurship Certificate is designed to offer UWM students
the opportunity to complement their major field of study with an
additional concentration in
entrepreneurship. Students will take a
coordinated series of courses and receive a certificate that
signifies their knowledge in this area.
To obtain the certificate, the student must complete a minimum of 15 approved entrepreneurship credits while fulfilling all requirements of the baccalaureate degree.
The certificate is open to all students in good standing seeking a bachelor's degree at the
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and to all students who have
previously
received a bachelor's degree from UWM or any other
accredited college or university. Non-business majors will be
required to complete prerequisites for the required
courses and electives to
fulfill the requirements for this certificate.
Required (12 cr)
Bus Adm 447
Bus Adm 458*
Bus Adm 466*
Bus Adm 492
Entrepreneurship
Venture Financing
Business to Business Sales
and Marketing
Business Models of New
Ventures
3
3
3
3
Elective (3 cr)
Choose one of the following courses:
Bus Adm 380
Bus Adm 444*
Bus Adm 450*
Bus Adm 462*
Bus Adm 465*
Bus Adm 467*
Bus Adm 490
Bus Adm 495
Total
Introduction to Real Estate
Markets
Human Resources Management
Intermediate Finance
Marketing Research
International Marketing
Marketing Seminar
Entrepreneur Internship
Special Topics in Business
(Entrepreneurship topics only)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
* A business student may count no more than 6 credits
from a major towards a business certificate.
Students must complete all coursework required for the
certificate with at least a 2.5 GPA to have the certificate posted
on the transcript at graduation. At least half of
the credits
required for the certificate must be taken in residence at UWM. No
courses may be taken on a credit/no credit basis.
Students interested in the certificate program should contact the
Lubar School of Business Student Services Center, Lubar Hall N297, (414) 229-5271,
[email protected], to make a formal
declaration of their intentions.
Certificate in Investment Management
The Investment Management Certificate is designed to offer business
students the opportunity to enhance their major field of study in
finance (or additional major
including finance) with an additional
certificate in investment management. Students completing the
Investment Management Certificate will have coursework in
investment-related subjects and three special courses comprising
intensive research and real-time practical training in investment
portfolio management. This training
will utilize the David O.
Nicholas Applied Finance Lab located in the Sheldon B. Lubar School
of Business. Finance majors who have completed this certificate will
gain a substantial competitive edge in pursuing a career initially as
a financial analyst and as an investment advisor, later as an investment
portfolio manager, possibly
as a chief investment officer, and ultimately, as an
independent financier.
To obtain the certificate, a student must complete 18 credits of required coursework while fulfilling all requirements of the baccalaureate degree. It is recommended
that students complete Bus Adm 301 (Intermediate Accounting) and Bus Adm 451 (Investment Finance) prior to admission to the program. If not completed prior to
admission to the program, Bus Adm 301 and Bus Adm 451 must be taken as co-requisites with Bus Adm 552 (Investment Management Practice I). Due to the
intensity of the coursework in the Investment Management Certificate, the program will be of most interest to students pursuing the finance major.
Required
Courses (18 cr)
Bus Adm 452*
Bus Adm 454*
Bus Adm 551*
Bus Adm 552*
Bus Adm 553
Bus Adm 554
Total
Applied Portfolio Management
Analysis of Options and
Futures
Global Investments
Investment Management
Practice I
Investment Management
Practice II
Investment Management
Practice III
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
* Note: A business student may count no more than 6
credits from a major towards the Certificate in Investment
Management.
Eligibility. To apply to the Certificate in Investment Management program, students must be admitted to the Lubar School of Business, have earned a minimum B
grade in Bus Adm 201 (Introduction to Financial Accounting) or Bus Adm 207 (Business Scholars: Intro to Financial Accounting), be eligible to enroll in Bus Adm
301 (Intermediate Accounting), and have completed or be enrolled in Bus Adm 450 (Intermediate Finance). Admission is competitive and is based on cumulative
GPA, quantitative-related course grades, personal statement, a possible interview and interview essay, interest in investments and finance, and other considerations.
Internship Requirement.
Students completing the certificate also are required to have an
internship experience prior to graduation from the certificate
program. The
internship experience must be approved by the IMCP
director.
Graduation Requirements.
Students must complete all coursework required for the certificate
with at least a 3.0 GPA to have the certificate posted on the
transcript
at graduation. At least half of the credits required for the
certificate must be taken in residence at UWM. No courses may be taken
on a credit/no credit basis.
Students interested in the
certificate program should contact the Lubar School of Business
Student Services Center, Lubar Hall N297, (414) 229-5271,
[email protected], to make a formal declaration of their
intention.
Certificate in Technology Entrepreneurship
The online Certificate in Technology Entrepreneurship is designed for business or engineering students who desire a sequence of undergraduate level courses that
focus specifically on Technology Entrepreneurship and that are delivered through an online instructional environment. The focus of the certificate is to prepare
students to meet the growing global need for individuals who can think innovatively and successfully pursue the commercialization of their innovative ideas and
technological solutions, either independently or within the confines of an established organization. Students who complete this certificate will gain a substantial
competitive edge in pursuing a career – either as an engineer or as a business specialist – by combining their entrepreneurial skills and capabilities with their
particular field of expertise. The program will prepare students for fast-track leadership positions in technology-based and/or manufacturing companies.
Required Courses (15 cr)
Bus Adm/MechEng
542
Bus Adm/MechEng
543
Bus Adm/MechEng
544
Bus Adm/MechEng
546
Bus Adm/MechEng
548
Total
Introduction to Technology Entrepreneurship
3
Introduction to Technology Management and Innovation
3
New Product Development
3
Global Innovation Management
3
Technology Venturing Project
3
15
In addition, to fulfill graduation requirements, students will complete pre-approved, zero-credit professional activities.
A maximum of 6 credits from the Undergraduate Certificate in Technology Entrepreneurship may also count toward other UWM undergraduate degrees.
Eligibility. Students currently enrolled in a UWM business or engineering undergraduate program (or at any other accredited engineering or business baccalaureate
program) are eligible to earn the Certificate in Technology Entrepreneurship. This certificate is also open to business and engineering graduates. For more
information regarding the application process, business majors may contact the Lubar School of Business Undergraduate Student Services Center (LUB N297) or call
414-229-5271, and CEAS majors may contact the Student Advising Office (EMS E386) or call 414-229-4667.
Graduation Requirements. Students must complete all coursework required for the certificate with at least a 2.5 GPA to have the certificate posted on the transcript
at graduation. Students must complete all certificate courses within 3 years of initial enrollment in the certificate program.
Joint Degree Program
A student who plans to pursue a joint degree business program with
another UWM college or school should seek advising early to design an
appropriate program.
The student must concurrently complete all
requirements for the degree in the area other than the Lubar School of
Business, as well as the requirements in the Lubar
School of Business,
as indicated below in the requirements for a second bachelor's
degree.
A student electing to pursue a joint degree should submit a
proposed program of study to the Lubar School of Business as soon as
possible.
Academic Regulations
For information on the University-wide Academic Action Policy and
honors for scholarship, see Academic Information.
Semester Course Load. A full-time undergraduate student in
business administration takes a class load of 12 to 18 credits.
Other Options
Second Bachelor's Degree. A student with an accredited
bachelor's degree may work toward a second bachelor's
degree in the Lubar School of Business. Interested
students should
contact the academic advisors in Room N297 of Lubar Hall for further
details. The second bachelor degree program is not offered in
accounting.
Degree requirements include completion of these BBA
requirements: functional courses, administrative analysis and
techniques courses, a professional major, and
mathematics and
economics courses. Of these, at least 30 credits must be earned
in residence at UWM while classified as a second-degree candidate.
Students may
receive credit towards a
second bachelor's degree for coursework taken in equivalent
areas at other institutions. However, at least 50% of the
business credit hours
required for the business degree must be
completed at UWM.
Business Special Student Opportunities. Business Special
Student status is available to applicants who have earned a
baccalaureate degree at an accredited
university or college. Also
eligible for consideration are students needing one or two courses to
complete a degree from another accredited institution. Business
Special Students are eligible to take undergraduate courses only.
Applications should be submitted directly to the Lubar School
of Business (Room N297, Lubar Hall) and should include: 1) an
official degree transcript of
undergraduate work; 2) official
transcripts of graduate and other work completed; and 3) a statement
of goals and objectives as a special student, along with a listing
of
requested courses. Applications are reviewed weekly. Applicants
without a degree who wish to take one or two courses in order to
graduate from another
institution must also submit a statement from
their advisor, on official letterhead, verifying the circumstances
and courses required.
Post-baccalaureate Opportunities. Students who have completed a
BBA degree at UWM can return to the campus and complete an additional
business major.
Students who have completed a bachelor's degree
in business at another accredited university can earn a Certificate
of Major in the School. The Certificate of Major
consists of a
minimum of 12 UWM degree credits. The additional major option is not
available in accounting.
Academic and Career Counseling
To meet the needs of a diverse student population, the Lubar School
of Business schedules classes throughout a 14-hour day, offers access
to many internship and
part-time job opportunities, and provides an
array of services.
Academic Advising Services. The Student Services Center,
Lubar Hall Room N297, (414) 229-5271, offers academic counseling with
professional staff
members
who are familiar with the curriculum and the special needs of
business students. They provide services such as new student
orientation, program advising, course
selection, registration
guidance, and credit transfer. The Center's full-time
academic advisors are trained to provide all the technical
information needed for students
to make their own decisions regarding
their education.
It is, however, the responsibility of the student to satisfy
all requirements for graduation from the Lubar School of Business.
All students should meet with an
academic advisor at least once a semester.
The advisors are a knowledgeable and supportive
resource for students. The Center has late hours on Mondays and
Tuesdays during the academic year, and the staff is available on an
appointment or walk-in basis.
Career Services. The Lubar School of Business Career Services
Center, located in Room N203 of Lubar Hall, complements the services
offered by UWM's Career
Development Center and meets the special
needs of business students. Interview facilities are provided to
firms hiring Business School graduates, and the Center's
staff
helps students prepare for professional employment through internship
programs and part-time employment referrals. Internship positions and
job requests are
posted on a special bulletin board, which is
maintained by the School as a service to students and to businesses
that have specifically requested UWM business
students to fill
positions. The Career Services Center also provides a resume referral
service. Potential employers may request resumes by functional area
or by
special interests within functional areas.
Online national job searches and an alumni placement service
are other services offered. Please call (414) 229-5445 for further
information.
Student Organizations
There are many professional fraternities, clubs, and honorary
organizations for students interested in business administration.
These organizations offer the student an
opportunity to gain
practical understanding from professionals working in a chosen field.
Examples of student organizations in the Lubar School of Business include:
Alpha Kappa Psi - national professional business
administration fraternity.
American College of Healthcare Executives - student
chapter of national organization for students in MS-Health Care
Management program.
American Marketing Association - campus chapter of the
national professional organization of the same name.
Beta Alpha Psi - national professional honor society for
students majoring in accounting.
Beta Gamma Sigma - national scholastic honor society for
business administration students.
Collegiate Entrepreneurs Organization - national network
for students interested in owning and running a business.
Delta Sigma Pi - professional fraternity open to all
business or economics students.
Graduate Business Association - open to all MBA, MS, and
PhD students.
Lubar School of Business Black & Gold Committee
- business students interested in enhancing the student
experience.
Logistics, Operations, and Management Information
Systems - professional development and increasing exposure to
supply chain and operations management
and information technology
industries.
National Association of Black Accountants, Inc. - campus
chapter of the national professional organization of the same name.
Society for Human Resources Management - campus chapter
of the national organization for students interested in careers in
personnel/human resources.
Sports Business Association - for undergraduate
business students interested in careers within the sports industry.
Student Investment Club - for undergraduate students
interested in finance.
Women in Business (WIB) - Women in Business is a community for career- and academically-driven women that provides resources and opportunities for
members, and empowers women in the business community. Activities include networking and career development events, professional speaker events, community
outreach and volunteer activities, social events for members, and annual fundraising.
Student Academic Appeals
Students may appeal an academic action to the appropriate curriculum
committee. An appeal is a request for an exception to an established
policy or rule. The content
of each appeal is carefully reviewed in
order to reach a decision. Appeals should be submitted in writing to
the School's Student Services Center. Undergraduate
student
appeals are reviewed by the School's Undergraduate Program
Committee's Appeals Subcommittee. Students are advised in
writing of the decision of the
Committee. The Appeals Subcommittee
considers individual cases concerning the degree requirements and
other academic rules and regulations established by the
Lubar School
of Business faculty.
The Lubar School of Business has established written procedures
for undergraduate student academic grievances. Copies of the
grievance procedure are available in
the Student Services Center. As
a first step, students must discuss the grievance with the faculty
member or administrator within 30 working days from the date of the
action that prompted the grievance.
Faculty and Staff
Administration
V. Kanti Prasad
Dean
Purushottam Papatla
Interim Associate Dean, Academic Affairs
Sarah J. Freeman
Associate Dean, Executive Education
Faculty and Staff
Larry Abbott, Assoc. Prof., PhD, CPA
University of Oregon
Mary Alberti
Associate Director, Executive Programs-Executive Education
Layth C. Alwan, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Chicago
Grace Ambrose, Lect., PhD
Southern Illinois, Carbondale
Esther Ancel, Sr. Lect. Emerita, PhD
Patricia J. Arnold, Prof. Emerita, PhD, CPA
Jennifer Balogh
MBA/MS Associate Academic Advisor
Bruce A. Bender, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Amit Bhatnagar, Assoc. Prof., PhD
State University of New York at Buffalo
Janice Blankenburg, EMBA
Washington University
Colleen Boland, Asst. Prof., PhD, CPA
Michigan State University
Veena Brown, Asst. Prof., PhD, CPA
Florida Atlantic University
Mary K. Bruno
Human Resources Manager
Monica Camacho
Sr. Academic Advisor
Jennifer Christensen
MBA/MS Programs Recruiter
Jaemi Cummins
Assoc. Academic Advisor
Brian Daugherty, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Texas at San Antonio
Eric Dietenberger
Senior Information Processing Consultant
Stanislav D. Dobrev, Robert L. & Sally S. Manegold Chair in Strategic Management, Prof., PhD
Stanford University
Xiang Fang, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Case Western Reserve University
Russell W. Fenske, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
James Fischer, Lect., PhD, CPA
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Paul M. Fischer, Jerry Leer Prof., PhD, CPA
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Sarah J. Freeman, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Michigan
Michael Freimark, Lect., PhD
Southern Illinois University
Dennis H. Gensch, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Sanjoy Ghose, Prof., PhD
Carnegie-Mellon University
Maria Goranova, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Syracuse University
Timothy C. Haas, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Colorado State University
Joseph Halford, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Utah
James Hardy
Academic Advisor
William D. Haseman, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Tingting He, Asst. Prof., PhD
Washington University in St. Louis
John Healy, Sr. Lect. Emeritus, MS
Ross Hightower, Lect. and Director, SAP University Competency Center, PhD
Georgia State University
Der-Ann Hsu, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Hemant K. Jain, Wisconsin Distinguished Prof., PhD
Lehigh University
Matthew Jensen
MBA/MS Programs Manager
Thomas Jeske
Assistant Dean - Student Services
Erika Joslin
Information Processing Consultant, SAP University Competence Center
Jason Kantrowitz
Senior Career Advisor
James Kasum, Sr. Lect. Emeritus, PhD
Donghyun Kim, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Texas at Austin
Yong-Cheol Kim, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Ohio State University
Paul D. Kimmel, Assoc. Prof., PhD, CPA
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Dawn M. Koerten
Academic Affairs & PhD Program Coordinator
Charles A. Konkol, Sr. Lect., MS, CPA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Mark Kosfeld, Lect., MBA
Assoc. Dir., Supply Chain Management Institute
Greg Krejci
Career Services Director
Leslie Kren, Assoc. Prof., PhD, CPA
University of Houston
Keith Kunkel
Senior Information Processing Consultant
Kaan Kuzu, Asst. Prof., PhD
The Pennsylvania State University
Quincy LaGrant
Undergraduate Program Recruiter
Jerry Leer, Prof. Emeritus, MBA, CPA
Edward Levitas, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Texas A&M University
Alejandra Lopez
Coordinator of Retention Initiatives/Sr. Academic Advisor
Jerad Lumina
Information Processing Consultant, SAP University Competence Center
Aaron Mandell, Asst. Prof., PhD, CPA
University of Oregon
Richard D. Marcus, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Chicago
Michael Markiewicz
Director, Executive Programs-Executive Education
Michael McBain, Sr. Lect. Emeritus, PhD
Janice Miller, Prof. and Senior Assoc. Dean Emerita, PhD
Sandy Mollberg
Information Processing Consultant
Mary Moore-Geissler
Assoc. Academic Advisor
Satish Nambisan, Prof. of Entrepreneurship & Technology Management, PhD
Syracuse University
Derek L. Nazareth, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Case Western Reserve University
Daniel Neely, Assoc. Prof., PhD
The University of Houston
Jeffrey Neuhauser
MBA/MS Senior Academic Advisor
Daniel Neuwirth
Senior Career Advisor
George Nezlek, Lect., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Paul C. Nystrom, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Massimiliano Ostinelli, Asst. Prof., PhD
McGill University
Chris Pahl
Academic Advisor
Purushottam Papatla, Prof., PhD
Northwestern University
Laura A. Peracchio, Prof., PhD
Northwestern University
Kristine J. Piwek
Assistant Dean, Administrative Affairs & Communication
Rachel Pocras
Senior Administrative Specialist
V. Kanti Prasad, Bostrom Prof. of Entrepreneurship and Dean, PhD
Michigan State University
Katherine Price
Director, Executive MBA
Atis Purins
Senior Information Processing Consultant, SAP University Competence Center
Belle R. Ragins, Prof., PhD
University of Tennessee at Knoxville
Keshavamurthy Ramamurthy, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Jude Rathburn, Sr. Lect., PhD
Arizona State University
Raymond Rausch, Lect., Emeritus, JD
Will Rayms, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Hong Ren, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Pennsylvania State University
Anthony Ross, Rockwell Automation Endowed Chair in Supply Chain Management, PhD
Indiana University
Deborah Roy
International Business Center Manager
Jeffrey Rymaszewski, Sr. Lect., MS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Jonathan Saffold, Lect., JD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Michael Schadewald, Assoc. Prof., PhD, CPA
University of Minnesota
Joslyn Schiedt
Marketing Manager
Eric Schenker, Prof. Emeritus and Dean Emeritus, PhD
Margaret Shaffer, Notebaert Distinguished Chair of International Business & Global Studies, PhD
University of Texas at Arlington
Sol S. Shalit, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Valeriy Sibilkov, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Purdue University
Romila Singh, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Drexel University
Atish Sinha, Prof., PhD
University of Pittsburgh
Timothy L. Smunt, Prof., DBA
Indiana University
Ehsan S. Soofi, UW-Milwaukee Distinguished Professor, PhD
University of California, Riverside
G. Kevin Spellman, Sr. Lect., PhD
Durham University
Mark Srite, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Florida State University
Laura Swenson, Asst. Prof., PhD, CPA
University of Wisconsin-Madison
William J. Taylor, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD, CPA
Terese Teachout
Sr. Administrative Specialist
Steven Trick, Lect., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Sheila Viel, Lect., CPA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
C. Edward Weber, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Andrea Wrench
Administrative Affairs and Scholarship Coordinator
Xiaojing Yang, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Indiana University
Xiaohang Yue, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Texas at Dallas
Fatemah (Mariam) Zahedi, Prof., DBA
Indiana University
Huimin Zhao, Prof., PhD
University of Arizona
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
School of Education
Web Home Page: School of Education
Degree Programs
Teacher License Applications
Advising
Field Experience
Post-Baccalaureate Certification Program
Programs of Study Leading to Certification
Programs of Study Not Leading to Certification
Continuing Education for Teachers
Enrollment Plans for Undergraduate Programs
Admission
Degree Requirements
Curriculum for Teacher Education Programs
Student Teaching
Certification Requirements
Academic Regulations
Special Opportunities
Certificate Programs
Interdisciplinary Courses
Courses: Education (EDUC)
Administrative Leadership
Courses: Administrative Leadership (AD LDSP)
Educational Policy and Community Studies
Courses: Educational Policy and Community Studies (ED POL)
Curriculum and Instruction
Courses: Curriculum and Instruction (CURRINS)
Educational Psychology
Courses: Counseling (COUNS)
Courses: Educational Psychology (ED PSY)
Exceptional Education
Courses: Exceptional Education (EXCEDUC)
Major in Educational Studies
Faculty and Staff
EDUCATION
Office of Student Services
Enderis Hall, Room 209
(414) 229-4721
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science Community Engagement and Education,
Education, Educational Studies, Exceptional Education
Master of Science Administrative Leadership, Curriculum &
Instruction, Educational Psychology, Exceptional
Education, Cultural
Foundations of Education
Educational Specialist School Psychology
Doctor of Philosophy Urban Education, Educational Psychology
The School of Education prepares educators who seek careers in
schools, and offers training for educators who want to
work in
non-school settings such as business, industry, and community agencies.
The faculty provide consulting and inservice assistance to school
systems at the local and national levels. Practitioners
have
opportunities to update knowledge and extend expertise through
inservice work and through enriched study in five
master's degree
programs and Wisconsin's only PhD in Urban Education.
Programs in the School of Education leading to professional roles
in public schools are approved by the Wisconsin
Department of Public
Instruction (DPI).
Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional
Organizations. Applicants to School of Education
programs that involve
student teaching, practicum, internship, or other field placements must
complete an information
disclosure statement and be subject to a
criminal background check to comply with placement site requirements
and
state regulations. Criminal background checks are required by state
law to help employers and government officials in
making employment and
licensing decisions. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
(DPI) conducts a check
as part of licensing. Agencies regulated by the
Division of Health and Family Services must have on file a criminal
background check for persons who have access to clients within
caregiving organizations, including students.
Students in a program with a clinical experience must undergo a
criminal background check at the time of admission to
the School of
Education, or prior to placement in a major clinical experience if that
occurs earlier. The student will be
charged the cost of the background
check administered through School of Education procedures. Students are
responsible for obtaining the information necessary for them to become
knowledgeable about these requirements and
plan their studies
accordingly. Contact the Office of Professional Education Programs for
further details.
Teacher License Applications
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction License Application
Forms and information about applying for a teaching
license may be
obtained from the Office of Student Services, Enderis
Hall, Room 209, or by calling (414) 229-4153.
A departmental recommendation for certification is required. This
recommendation is not automatic upon graduation or
completion of a
post-baccalaureate certification program. After all program
requirements have been completed, a
student may submit a license
application to the Office of Student Service, Enderis
209, for processing.
The DPI conducts a criminal background check of each applicant
for a teaching license. If you have ever lived, worked,
or attended
school outside of Wisconsin since the age of 18, you are also required
to complete fingerprint cards as part
of your criminal background
check. Based on this information, an applicant may be denied a license
even if
recommended for certification by the University. The DPI takes
12 to 16 weeks to process an endorsed license.
Advising
Advisors provide students with the academic advice and
information that will assist them in completing degree
programs and
becoming professionals in urban education.
Advisors are available on a walk-in basis, by appointment, by
phone, or online.
Field Experience
Students are required to complete a full-day/full-semester
student teaching experience during the final year in the
teacher
education program. However, many programs require more than one
semester of student teaching. For
information, please call (414) 229-4352.
Post-Baccalaureate Certification Program
Students who already hold a bachelor's degree and seek
certification must meet the following minimum criteria when
submitting
an application: completion of a bachelor's degree, a cumulative
undergraduate grade point average of 2.5,
and passing basic skills test scores.
Applicants to the Early Adolescence Through Adolescence programs are
required to
have a minimum GPA of 2.75 in their majors.
Students interested in a post-baccalaureate certification program
in Curriculum and Instruction will be denied admission
if they have a
grade of C- or below in any prior student teaching experience, or if
they have been previously counseled
out of student teaching and/or have
graduated without certification from a teacher education program
because of poor
performance in student teaching.
Additional criteria may be required for some programs. For
specific admission and program information, contact the
Office of
Student Services.
Programs of Study Leading to Certification
Early Childhood Level. Teachers are prepared to teach at the
approximate ages of birth through 8.
Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence Level. Teachers are
prepared to teach pupils at the approximate ages
of 6 through 12 or 13.
Students who are interested in pursuing exceptional education
certification have the option of
doing so as a fifth year
post-baccalaureate student.
Early Adolescence Through Adolescence Level. Teachers are
prepared to teach pupils at the approximate ages of 10
to 21. Several
teaching subjects, such as English, mathematics, science, and social
studies, fall into this licensure
category.
Early Childhood Through Adolescence Level.
Teachers are prepared to teach at the ages of birth through 21. Several
teaching subjects, such as world languages and English as a Second
Language, fall into this licensure category.
Exceptional Education.
Teachers are prepared to work at the early childhood, middle childhood
through early
adolescence, and early adolescence through adolescence
levels. The Deaf and Hard of Hearing program prepares
students for
teaching early childhood through adolescence.
Other School Service Positions: Reading teacher, school
counselor, school psychologist, school administrator.
Programs of Study Not Leading to
Certification
Community Engagement and Education. A non-certification
bachelor's degree program for community-based
educators. For
admission and program information, contact the Department of
Educational Policy and Community
Studies at (414) 229-6552.
Interpreter Training Program (ITP). Offered through the
Department of Exceptional Education, this program
prepares students to
meet the needs of deaf and hard of hearing individuals in a variety of
settings. It is available as a
two-year post-baccalaureate certificate
or as part of an undergraduate bachelor's degree. Contact the
department at (414)
229-5251.
DPI Certification Programs in Other Schools and Colleges
Specific degree programs are managed by schools and colleges
outside of the School of Education. The certification
process is
handled by the School of Education.
Fine Arts Education. Programs leading to a Bachelor of Fine Arts
degree with certification to teach art, dance, music,
or theater are
offered by the Peck School of the Arts. For additional information,
contact the office of the Administrator
of Student Affairs, Peck School
of the Arts. Post-baccalaureate programs are available in art, music,
dance, and theater.
Communication Sciences and Disorders. State certification as a
speech pathologist requires completion of a master's
degree. Work
toward this license should be started at the undergraduate level.
Undergraduate students, as well as those
who already hold a
bachelor's degree, should contact the Department of Communication
Sciences and Disorders in the
College of Health Sciences.
Instructional Library Media. The School of Information Studies,
in collaboration with the School of Education, offers
post-baccalaureate
programs leading to State of Wisconsin licensing as Initial
Instructional Library Media Specialist and
Instructional Library Media
Supervisor.
School Social Work. The Helen Bader School of Social Welfare, in
conjunction with the School of Education, offers a
program leading to
State of Wisconsin licensing as a school social worker.
Continuing Education for Teachers
Teachers who need to earn credits to renew a teaching license to
meet local school system or state Department of Public
Instruction
requirements should contact the Office of Student Services or
Education Outreach, Enderis 579, for
information and admission.
Enrollment Plans for Undergraduate
Programs
Community Engagement and Education students enroll in the School
of Education through the Department of
Educational Policy and Community
Studies. Students planning to major in Educational Studies or in any
teacher
education program register as pre-education students. They
follow the general curriculum requirements of their
proposed major in
the School of Education and are advised by faculty and staff in the
School. All academic actions such
as adds, drops, permission to
continue, withdrawals, etc., are approved by designated staff in the
School of Education.
Admission
Students in all programs except Community Engagement and
Education must apply for admission to the School of
Education. Students
who apply to the School of Education must meet the minimum admission
requirements of the
School and of their program that exist at the time
of their admission application.
Individual Program Requirements. Specific
program requirements are listed in each program section. To
be
admitted, students must apply to and be accepted into a specific
program. Academic major/minor forms for early
adolescence through
adolescence education majors and proposal forms for all other programs
require the faculty
advisor’s signature prior to submitting the
application to be accepted into a specific program. Applicants should
follow
specific admission procedures for their program.
Application Submission. Application periods for admission vary
by program. Most programs have September and
January deadlines. Contact
the Office of Student Services each semester for details.
Application Review. All applications are reviewed by faculty of
the appropriate department. If admission is deferred or
denied, the
student may consult with the appropriate department chairperson and/or
request a hearing under appeals
procedures. The School of Education
reserves the right to limit admission due to staffing and space
limitations.
Enrollment as a pre-education student and/or meeting the
minimum requirements does not guarantee admission to a
professional
education major in the School of Education.
A student who transfers from one program to another within the
School must re-apply and meet requirements in effect
for that program at
the time of transfer.
Admission requirements for the Educational Studies major are
listed at the end of the School of Education section of the
catalog.
Re-entering Students. Students who do not maintain continuous
enrollment/registration at the university should meet
with their
advisor upon re-entry. It is possible that the program requirements were
revised in their absence.
If a student is out for more than one full semester (not
including Summer Session), the student must meet the program
and
graduation requirements in effect at the time of his or her return.
Options will be discussed on a case-by-case basis.
An admitted student who has not been enrolled for two or more semesters may be required to re-apply for admission.
Students admitted into the post-baccalaureate program have five years from the semester of admission to complete their
program.
Please refer to specific programs for
additional information on admission requirements.
Degree Requirements
1.Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 128 credits or 120 credits, depending on program and the
requirements
of the student's curriculum.
2.Satisfactory completion of the School of Education core
curriculum requirements and the University's General
Education
Requirements. See individual department and program general education
core curriculum requirements
for the credits required and the
distribution.
3.For professional education certification programs, a minimum
cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all
professional education
coursework. This includes any transfer coursework that is counted
towards certification at
UWM, as well as any grades earned in student
teaching or field experiences. General education coursework
and/or
electives that do not fulfill requirements towards certification will
not be included in the cumulative GPA
calculation.
4.Completion of the last year of work (30 credits) in residence at
UW-Milwaukee. Special permission to earn
credits on another campus of
the UW System, at another institution, or through correspondence work
from the
UW Extension must be obtained in advance. Students should
meet with their academic advisor. Students who
transfer to UWM from
any accredited institution must take a minimum of 18 hours of graded
credits at UWM to
establish a GPA for graduation.
Substitution for Requirements. Any variations from the approved
curriculum in the student's program must be
approved in writing by
the student's faculty advisor, department chair, and the Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs.
This must be done in advance of course
selection.
Change in Requirements. When a change in program or graduation
requirements is adopted, students currently
enrolled may complete
either the new requirements or those in effect at the time of their
admission to the School of
Education, but not a combination. Changes in
state requirements for teacher certification may lead to changes in
requirements in a student's program. Satisfaction of state
requirements is necessary for eligibility for teacher
certification.
Advisement Report. Students who have been admitted to a major
will have an Advisement Report indicating course
requirements completed
as well as those needed. The Advisement Report assists students in
planning future semesters,
and is one of the documents used in clearing
Education students for graduation. Community Engagement and Education
students contact the Department of Educational Policy and Community
Studies for their summaries and graduation
clearance.
Curriculum for Teacher Education Programs
All teacher education programs in the School of Education follow
a basic pattern of required courses as described in the
following
sections. For each standard, a set of knowledge and performance
indicators is given to students so that they
understand the
expectations of the program.
Portfolio. Each student will be required to keep a portfolio of
evidence to document progress toward the standards. The
portfolio is
developmental and will be reviewed at several points during a student's
program to ensure that appropriate
progress is being made. The
portfolio will play a critical part in determining final
recommendations for certification.
Praxis II Test. The State of Wisconsin requires all
certification students to pass the Praxis II exam. This test covers the
subject matter that the teacher is expected to teach. Students should
consult an advisor or program director about the
specific exam from the
Praxis II series that is required for their certification. A passing
score on the appropriate content
test is required for admission into
student teaching.
edTPA (Teacher Performance Assessment). The State of
Wisconsin requires all certification students who complete
after August
31, 2015, to pass the edTPA. The edTPA is a multiple-measure assessment
system aligned to state and
national standards. Students should consult
an advisor or program coordinator for specific information.
Foundations of Reading Test.
Students in the Early Childhood, Middle Childhood-Early
Adolescence, Special
Education, Reading Teacher, and Reading Specialist
certification programs will be required to pass the Foundations of
Reading Test. This applies to any license received by the Wisconsin DPI
starting January 1, 2014. Students should
consult an advisor or program
coordinator for specific information.
General Requirements. The core curriculum requirement, which is
part of the general education component of all
teacher education
programs, includes credits from the categories of fine arts,
humanities, natural sciences, and social
sciences. General requirements
are chosen to provide a broad general education background.
Subject Specialization Requirements. See individual program
requirements.
Human Relations Certification Requirement. The Human Relations
Requirement provides prospective teachers with
awareness and
understanding of intercultural relations within the educational
setting. The requirement is met with
coursework and classroom
experience.
Effective July 1, 1992, a license to teach may not be granted
unless the applicant has received instruction in the study of
minority
group relations, including instruction in the history, culture, and
tribal sovereignty of American Indian tribes
and bands located in this
state. Currently, this requirement is met through satisfactory
completion of Ethnic 203, Anthro
213, Hist 263, or English 276, or
seminar attendance. Questions regarding this requirement should be
directed to the
student’s academic advisor.
Exceptional Education Requirement. Persons applying for an
initial license to teach any subject in Wisconsin
elementary and
secondary schools must demonstrate knowledge and understanding of
procedures used for assessing and
providing education for children and
youth with disabilities, including the roles and responsibilities of
regular and
special education providers. See the program requirements
for your teaching major for information about meeting the
requirement.
Statutory Requirements for Teachers of Early
Adolescence Through Adolescence Science and Social Studies. A
student
may satisfy the requirement in environmental education by taking Geog 350, CES 471,
or CES 201, or by
submitting evidence that the
statutory requirement has been otherwise fulfilled. Teachers of science
must have
coursework in the history and philosophy of science. Early
adolescence through adolescence social studies students may
satisfy the
requirement in cooperative marketing and consumers’ cooperatives
by taking CurrIns 313, or by submitting
evidence that the statutory
requirement has been otherwise fulfilled. Econ 100 is a prerequisite
for CurrIns 313. The
Phonics Requirement is met with a variety of
Curriculum and Instruction courses.
Statutory Requirement for Early Childhood and Middle Childhood
Through Early Adolescence Teachers.
Effective July 1, 1985, adequate
preparation in conservation of natural resources (environmental
education) is required
for these majors.
Student Teaching
Student teaching experiences are designed to promote a
student's ability to integrate learning and practice and to give
the student opportunities to teach independently and collegially in
urban school settings. Students are required to
complete a full-day/full-semester
student teaching experience during the final year in
the teacher education program.
However, many programs require more than
one semester of student teaching.
Early Childhood. Please see an advisor or program coordinator
for specific requirements. Middle Childhood Through Adolescence. Please see an advisor or
program coordinator for specific requirements. Early Adolescence Through Adolescence. Early
Adolescence through Adolescence program students typically
complete a
middle school student teaching placement as their first placement in
conjunction with subject area methods,
middle school curriculum, and
"Fieldwork in Reading in the Content Area." During the final
placement they are
assigned to a high school for a full-day,
full-semester experience in which the calendar and daily schedule of
the
cooperating school district is followed. Assignments and grade
levels may vary by program.
Exceptional Education. Students are required to
complete a full semester of student teaching unless they have a current
Wisconsin teaching license. Field experiences are required for
most programs.
Student Teaching: General. The number of student teachers that
each program can accommodate in any given
semester is limited by the
availability of approved placements and supervisors; therefore,
departments in the School of
Education reserve the right to limit their
student teaching enrollment. Admission to the School of Education does
not
automatically guarantee admission to student teaching.
The field experience coordinator for the School of Education
makes all necessary administrative arrangements for
student teaching
placements and communicates placement information to students in
writing. Because of the number of
individuals involved in the placement
process, and because established procedures have been approved by
cooperating
school personnel, students should not contact schools to
arrange placements.
Students must earn a grade of C or better in all student teaching
courses to be eligible for recommendation for
certification.
Application for Placement. Students who plan to register for any
student teaching course in the fall or spring must
apply by February 15
of the academic year preceding placement(s). Applications for student
teaching are available in
the Office of Clinical Experiences, Enderis 371, or online at uwm.edu/education/academics/clinical-experiences/.
Student Teaching Eligibility Requirements for All Programs.
Listed below are the minimum eligibility requirements
for admission to
student teaching. Some subject areas require a higher grade point
average and/or additional coursework
as prerequisites to student
teaching.
1.Admission to a School of Education Certification Program.
2.Completion of all required coursework including teaching
methods and pre-student teaching fieldwork as
outlined for each
program during the semester prior to student teaching.
3.An overall cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 and a GPA
requirement of the student's specific program. A GPA of
2.75 in all
professional and major/minor courses is required to qualify for
student teaching.
4.Passing score on the Praxis II content test. For
Exceptional Education programs, a passing score is required for
admission to the final semester of teaching experience.
5.Removal of all F or I (incomplete) grades in courses that
count toward graduation or certification.
6.Evidence of freedom from tuberculosis.
7. Some school districts require a criminal background check
prior to accepting a student for clinical placement in
the district.
Please refer to specific programs for
additional requirements.
Certification Requirements
Applicants for certification in the state of Wisconsin are
required to achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average
of 2.75 in
all professional education coursework. This includes any transfer
coursework that is counted towards
certification at UWM, as well as any
grades earned in student teaching or field experiences. General
education
coursework and/or electives that do not fulfill requirements
towards certification will not be included in the cumulative
GPA
calculation.
Applicants for certification in the State of Wisconsin are
subject to a criminal background check prior to the granting of
a
teaching license.
The State of Wisconsin requires a content test for certification.
This test covers the subject matter that the teacher is
expected to
teach. Students should consult an advisor or program director about the
nature of the tests that are required.
Academic Regulations
For information on academic actions for unsatisfactory grades and
honors for scholarship, see Academic Information,
University-Wide
Academic Action Policy and Honors for Scholarship.
Semester Course Load. An overload for undergraduate and special
students in the School of Education is 18 or more
credit hours during a
regular semester. Students who want to take an overload during a
regular semester should contact
their academic advisor.
Any student in the School of Education who takes an unapproved
overload will not be permitted to count the overload
credits toward
graduation and/or certification. The particular credits that would not
be counted toward graduation will
be designated by the student's
advisor and approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.
Substitution for Requirements or Courses. Any
variations from the approved curriculum in the student’s program
must be approved in writing by the student’s faculty advisor,
department chair, and the Associate Dean for Academic
Affairs. This
must be done in advance of course selection.
Special Opportunities
Departmental Examinations. Departments may grant degree credit
to a student who, instead of taking a course,
requests and passes an
examination administered by the department on the content of that
course.
Permission to take such examinations must be obtained from the
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Enderis Hall
583, who will require
a recommendation from the department chairperson or program director to
whom evidence of
work justifying an examination must be presented by
the student.
Study Abroad. Qualified students can complete equivalent coursework
in another country. For information, consult the
Office of
Student Services, Enderis Hall 209.
Undergraduate Certificate Programs
The School of Education offers undergraduate certificates that can enhance professional development. Certificates
consist of focused coursework designed to provide targeted academic preparation. The following certificate programs
are available to all UWM undergraduates and to those who already hold a bachelor's degree (from any institution).
Autism Spectrum Disorders
The Autism Spectrum Certificate program will train students to help persons with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in
numerous settings. Potential students include therapists and family members working with children at home, special and
general education teachers working with children in school settings, and job coaches working with young adults and
adults in the work place.
Through courses, field experiences, and other planned learning experiences, students will critically examine the
characteristics, etiology, and prevalence of ASD and related disorders; understand assessment, diagnosis, and
intervention; learn how to work with family members of individuals with ASD; understand the language,
communication, and social needs of individuals with ASD; and learn to apply interventions.
Course of Study:
Required courses:
ExcEduc 560 Foundations of Autism Spectrum Disorders
3
ExcEduc 561 Methods of Working with Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders
3
Field Experience Requirement (choose one of the following or another field experience
approved by the faculty advisor):
ExcEduc 585 Supervised Practicum in Child and Youth Care
2-4
Psych 292
Psychology Field Placement Lower Division
3
Psych 692
Field Placement in Psychology
3
Elective Courses (choose 2 from the following):
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning and Development
3
Ed Psy 575
Infant and Early Childhood Assessment
3
Community-Based Organizations: Policy and Leadership
This certificate program prepares students for mid-level positions in community-based organizations and provides a
base for graduate work in non-profit management and other related areas. Students take coursework in foundations
and policy, which provides an overview of the workings and role of CBOs, fundraising and marketing, and in leadership
to provide knowledge in preparation for supervisory and management roles.
Course of Study:
Required courses:
Foundations and Policy (6 credits)
Ed Pol 601
Foundations of Community-Based Organizations
Ed Pol 603
Policy Analysis for Community-Based Organizations
Fundraising and Marketing (6 credits)
Ed Pol 602
Proposal Writing and Fundraising Skills for Community-Based
Organizations
Ed Pol 604
Marketing for Community-Based Organizations
Leadership Course (3 credits—choose one)
Ad Ldsp 537 Leadership and Management of Volunteer Programs
Ad Ldsp 617 Leadership in Youth-Serving Organizations
3
3
3
3
3
3
Community Leadership
The Community Leadership Certificate provides students from any major with a way to explore leadership theory and
identity in the community (including the campus community) and community-based institutions. The program will be
based on a social justice model of leadership development, but will expose students to additional philosophies such as
servant leadership and authentic leadership. Students will also gain practical experience by attending teambuilding
activities such as ROPES courses, participating in community service, and doing a practicum in a leadership position,
among other experiential learning activities.
The certificate program consists of 16 credits, three of which will come from an experiential learning course, with
activities specific to the student’s major. Sites for this section of the program could include community health clinics
(group facilitation or advocacy roles), campus organizations (campus ambassadors, peer health advocates, etc.), local
non-profits (board positions), and others.
Course of Study:
Required courses:
Ed Pol 315
Group Process and Civic Engagement
3
Ad Ldsp 691 Leadership Ethics in Multicultural Organizations
1
Leadership Practice Course (choose one from the following)
Ed Pol 111
Introduction to Community Change and Engagement
3
Ad Ldsp 507 Introduction to Group Leadership
3
Ad Ldsp 537 Leadership and Management of Volunteer Programs
3
Social/Historical Foundations Elective – 3 credits from list of selected courses – see advisor
or program sheet
Practical Elective – 3 credits from list of selected courses – see advisor or program sheet
Leadership Capstone/Practicum (choose one from the following)
Ed Pol 409
Fieldwork/Practicum in Education and the Community
3
Ad Ldsp 630 Field Work in Schools, Agencies and Institutions
3
Nurs 403
Practice, Research and Leadership Role Development
3
WGS 489
Internship in Women's and Gender Studies
3
Commun 698 Internship in Communication
3
For more information, contact Dr. Aaron Schutz: (414) 229-4150, [email protected]
Youth Work
The Youth Work Certificate is available to students in Social Work, Community Education and Engagement,
Exceptional Education, and Educational Studies. It is ideal for students who want to learn more about adolescence and
working with youth in a variety of settings, including large and small community based programs, group homes, foster
care, and residential treatment centers. The focus is on youth who are troubled or at high risk, but much of the learning
applies to youth in general and younger children as well. Course of Study:
Required Courses:
Ed Pol/Soc Wrk 580 An Overview of Child/Youth Care
Ed Pol/Soc Wrk 581 Youth Work Practice
Ed Pol 409
Supervised Practicum in Child and Youth Care
6 cr of courses focused on Human Development or Family Work
For more information, contact Dr. Raji Swaminathan: (414) 229-6740, [email protected]
Interdisciplinary
Courses
3
3
2-4
Interdisciplinary Courses
Faculty and Staff
Administration
Alan Shoho
Dean
Hope Longwell-Grice
Associate Dean, Academic Affairs
Cindy Walker
Associate Dean, Research and Engaged Scholarship
ADMINISTRATIVE LEADERSHIP
Delbert K. Clear, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus
Carol Colbeck, Prof., PhD
Stanford University
Simone Conceição, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Barbara Daley, Prof., PhD
Cornell University
James Fisher, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
William Kritek, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Larry Martin, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Liliana Mina, Asst. Prof., PhD
Michigan State University
Gail Schneider, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Regina O. Smith, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Michigan State University
Alfonzo Thurman, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
Barbara Bales, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Lori Becker, Lect., MA
Silver Lake College
Craig Berg, Prof., PhD
University of Iowa
Helena Curtain, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Nancy File, Prof., PhD
Purdue University
Randolph Goree, Sr. Lect. Emeritus, MA
Maria Hamlin, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Michigan
Richard Haney, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Jeffrey Hawkins, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of San Francisco
Angel Hessel, Lect., MA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
DeAnn Huinker, Prof., EdD
University of Michigan
Mary Jett, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Henry Kepner, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Hope Longwell-Grice, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Delaware
Laura Luebke, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Susan Masland, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Tania Mertzman, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of
South Florida
Lawrence Moburg, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, EdD
Jennifer Mueller, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Michigan
Donald Neuman, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Donna Pasternak, Prof., PhD
New York University
Bette Peltola, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Tracy Posnanski, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Linda Post, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Syracuse University
Marleen Pugach, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Randall Ryder, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Felicia Saffold, Assoc. Prof., EdD
Cardinal Stritch
University
Mark Schug, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Ray Scolavino, Sr. Lect., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Tom Scott, Lect., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Ruth Short, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Cyrus Smith, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, EdD
John Stewig, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
John Zahorik, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
EDUCATIONAL POLICY AND COMMUNITY STUDIES
Frank Besag, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Michael Bonds, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Edgar Epps, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Raquel Farmer-Hinton, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Walter Farrell, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Ian Harris, Prof. Emeritus, EdD
Julie Kailin, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Ronald Podeschi, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Marie Sandy, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Claremont Graduate University
Aaron Schutz, Prof., PhD
University of Michigan
Rajeswari Swaminathan, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Syracuse University
Javier Tapia, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Arizona
Gary Williams, Adj. Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Henry Woessner, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
Razia Azen, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Toronto
Thomas Baskin, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Shannon Chavez Korell, Assoc. Prof., PhD
The Pennsylvania State University
Adrian Chan, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Roberta Corrigan, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Jerry Davis, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Anne Ellison, Prof. Emerita, EdD
Nadya Fouad, Distinguished Prof., PhD
University of Minnesota
Gerald Gleason, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Anthony Hains, Prof., PhD
University of Notre Dame
Kyongboon Kwon, Asst Prof., PhD
University of Georgia
Susie Lamborn, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Denver
Ronald H. Lingren, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Ann Meyer, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Doug Mickelson, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Martin Sapp, Prof., EdD
University of Cincinnati
Philip Smith, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Karen Stoiber, Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
John Surber, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Cindy Walker, Prof., PhD
University of Illinois
Stephen Wester, Prof., PhD
University of Florida
Kenneth Wodtke, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Bo Zhang, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Pittsburgh
EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION
Maggie Bartlett, Asst. Prof., PhD
Francis Blair, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Elizabeth Drame, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Northwestern University
Dave L. Edyburn, Prof., PhD
University of
Illinois
Eve Dicker Eiseman, Clinical Assoc. Prof. Emerita
Alison Ford, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of
Wisconsin-Madison
Richard Fox, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Elise Frattura, Assoc. Prof., EdD
University of
Wisconsin-Madison
Susan Gruber, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, EdD
Ann Hains, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Paul Haubrich, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Anita Hermann, Asst. Prof. Emerita, MS
Maureen Keyes, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
James Olson, Prof. Emeritus, EdD
Amy Otis-Wilborn, Prof., PhD
University of Kansas
Laura Owens, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Nancy Rice, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Syracuse University
Joanne Vandenbusch, Clinical Assoc. Prof. Emerita, MS
Judith Winn, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Michigan State University
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
School of Education
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
School of Freshwater Sciences
Web Home Page:
School
of Freshwater Sciences
About the School
Applied Urban Aquaculture Certificate
Undergraduate Courses
School of Freshwater Sciences
School of Freshwater Sciences
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
600 E. Greenfield Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53204
Contact
Information
www.uwm.edu/freshwater
About Freshwater Sciences
The School of Freshwater Sciences offers a graduate program of studies providing students with advanced training and
education in four areas: Freshwater System Dynamics; Human and Ecosystem Health; Freshwater Technology; and
Freshwater Policy and Economics. Each of these focus areas is interrelated with the others, and includes biologic,
physical, technologic, and policy aspects of freshwater.
The Master of Science program has two tracks designed to provide a strong foundation necessary for the training of
graduates that will utilize novel approaches to the sustainable and equitable use and management of freshwater systems
worldwide. The Doctor of Philosophy program is a research degree designed to explore and discover novel approaches
to the sustainable and equitable use and management of freshwater systems worldwide. These programs will create an
interdisciplinary atmosphere for training the next generation of scientists armed with the knowledge, skills, and
experience to anticipate and address the freshwater issues of the future.
Applied Urban Aquaculture Certificate
Dr. Jhonatan Sepulveda, Assistant Professor of Freshwater Sciences, Certificate Coordinator, GLRF 3017, (414) 3821740, [email protected]
The Certificate in Applied Urban Aquaculture is open to all students seeking a bachelor’s degree from UWM, to those
who previously received a bachelor’s degree from UWM or any other accredited college or university. To be admitted
to the university as non-degree students, individuals must meet regular university admission requirements. Students who
are not currently enrolled and have not applied to UW-Milwaukee in the past need to fill out an online application and
pay the $44 application fee. All applicants must submit transcripts that provide evidence of the following required
coursework (or equivalent) prior to admission:
Chemistry 104: General Chemistry & Qualitative Analysis
Biology 152: Foundations of Biological Sciences II
Math 116: College Algebra
To formally declare your intent to pursue the Certificate in Applied Urban Aquaculture, complete the Declaration Form
and make an appointment with the certificate coordinator.
Program Requirements Students must complete 15 credits (5 courses) with a minimum grade point average of 2.75. Courses for this certificate
may not be taken on a credit/no credit basis.
Freshwater 511: Ichthyology
Freshwater 562: Principles of Aquaculture Systems
Freshwater 563: Finfish Aquaculture & Nutrition Principles
Freshwater 564: Â Water Quality in Aquaculture
Freshwater 565: Fish Health
Credits earned at other accredited institutions equivalent to courses in the certificate program may be accepted in partial
fulfillment of the program requirements, subject to review by the Certificate Program Advisory Committee. This
information should be included on the Declaration Form for approval when you apply to the certificate program.
Undergraduate Courses
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
School of Freshwater Sciences
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Inter-School/College Programs
Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Bachelor of Science in
Food Studies Certificate
Courses: Food Studies (FoodBev)
Forensic Sciences Certificates
Global Health Certificate
Global Studies, Bachelor of Arts in
Courses: Global Studies (Global)
Bachelor of Science in Applied
Mathematics and Computer Science
Bruce Wade, Professor of Mathematics, Coordinator, EMS E447,
(414) 229-5225, [email protected]
This course of study leads to a
Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics and Computer Science awarded
jointly by
the College of Letters and Science and the College of
Engineering and Applied Science. As such, it contains in-depth
study in
both colleges. The degree retains the flavor of a liberal arts degree
through humanities and social science course
requirements that go
beyond the minima required by the University’s general education
requirements. The liberal arts
coursework will enhance the analytical
skills that are the focus of the applied mathematics portion of the
curriculum.
The computer science coursework will both strengthen the
application of mathematics in problem solving and, in turn,
be enhanced
by the analytical skills acquired through the applied math coursework.
Students who intend to complete the program in four years will
need to begin taking mathematics in their first semester.
Such students
should have a University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee mathematics placement
level of B (ready for
precalculus) or better.
Admission
As soon as students realize their
interest in the AMCS degree, they should consult with an AMCS advisor
either in
CEAS or L&S, who assists in planning a program. Students
may be given the AMCS classification at any point in their
studies;
however, they are not formally admitted to the major until their junior
year. Admission to the junior year of the
program requires a GPA of at
least 2.500 in 8 credits of mathematics courses at or above the 200 level
and 6 credits of
computer science courses at or above the 200 level.
General Requirements
For the BS (AMCS)
degree, 120 credits are required, of which 80 must be taken from the
College of Letters and
Science. Students must satisfy the general
education requirements (GER) of the University. They must complete at
least
6 credits each from humanities and social sciences, 3 credits
from the arts, and 6 additional credits in any of these three
areas or
in foreign languages. Students also must take at least 8 credits of
natural sciences outside of mathematics or
mathematical statistics,
including at least one laboratory course from biological sciences,
chemistry, or physics. A
cultural diversity course must be included
among the humanities and social science courses selected.
An overall GPA of 2.000 on all coursework attempted at UWM is required
for this degree. In addition, students must
achieve a 2.000 GPA on all
coursework attempted, including transfer work. A minimum 2.0 GPA must
be earned on all
300-level and above courses taken to satisfy the
advanced requirements. Students satisfy the residency requirement for
the degree by completing at UWM both a minimum of 15 credits of the
required advanced courses and one of the
following:
The last 30 credits;
45 of the last 60 credits;
Any 90 credits.
Core Requirements
CompSci 201
CompSci 315
Introductory Computer Programming
Introduction to Computer Organization and Assembly Language
Programming
CompSci 317
Discrete Information Structures
CompSci 251
Intermediate Computer Programming
Math 231, 232, 233 Calculus and Analytic Geometry
Math 234
Math 341
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Seminar: Introduction to the Language and Practice of Mathematics
3
3
3
4
4 each sem (or
equivalent)
4
3
Advanced Requirements
At least 48 credits
selected from CompSci, Math, and MthStat courses at the 300 level or
above, beyond those listed
above, including the following:
CompSci 351
CompSci 535
Data Structures and Algorithms
Algorithm Design and Analysis
4
3
9 additional credits in CompSci
12 credits from Math and/or MthStat, including
one of the following two-course sequences:
Math 313/315
Linear Programming and Optimization/Mathematical Programming and
Optimization
Introduction to Differential Equations/Introduction to Partial Differential
Equations
Introduction to Numerical Analysis/Introduction to Scientific Computing
Advanced Calculus
Modern Algebra/Linear Algebra
Modern Algebra
Introduction to Mathematical Statistics I & II
Math 320/322
Math 413/415
Math 521/522
Math 531/535
Math 631/632
MthStat 361/362
3 cr each sem
3 cr each sem
3 cr each sem
3 cr each sem
3 cr each sem
3 cr each sem
3 cr each sem
Potential Course of Study
Fall I: 14 credits
CompSci 201
English 101
Math 116
Math 117
Introductory Computer Programming
Introduction to College Writing
College Algebra
Trigonometry
Humanities or Social Science
3
3
3
2
3
Spring II: 17 credits
CompSci 251
Intermediate Computer Programming
4
English 102
Math 231
Arts
College Writing and Research
Calculus and Analytic Geometry
Humanities or Social Science
3
4
3
3
Fall III: 17 credits
CompSci 315
CompSci 351
Math 232
Math 341
Introduction to Computer
Organization and Assembly Language Programming
Data Structures and Algorithms
Calculus and Analytic Geometry
Seminar: Introduction to the Language and
Practice of Mathematics
Humanities or Social Science
3
4
4
3
3
Spring IV: 14-15 credits
CompSci 317
Math 233
Math 234
Discrete Information Structures
Calculus and Analytic Geometry
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Natural Science with lab
3
4
4
3-4
Fall V: 15 credits
CompSci 535
Algorithm Design and Analysis
CompSci or Math elective
Math sequence course
Natural Science
3
6
3
3
Spring VI: 15 credits
CompSci advanced elective
Math sequence course
Math advanced elective
Math advanced elective
Math or CompSci elective
3
3
3
3
3
Fall VII: 15 credits
CompSci advanced elective
Math advanced elective
Humanities or Social Science
Math or CompSci elective
3
3
6
3
Spring VIII: 13-15 credits
CompSci or Math advanced electives
Elective
12
1-3
(Note: Select a sufficient number of elective credits from the
College of Letters and Science to earn a minimum of 80
L&S
credits.)
Food Studies Certificate Program
Lori Klos, Assistant Professor, Kinesiology, Co-Coordinator,
END 455, (414) 229-3162, [email protected]
Larry Kuiper, Associate Professor, French, Co-Coordinator,
CRT 782, (414) 229-5966, [email protected]
Kate Powers, Advisor, HLT 286, (414) 229-6686, [email protected]
The interdisciplinary undergraduate certificate program in Food Studies
explores the many facets of food, from the field
and sea to the table,
through the lenses of the arts, humanities, and natural and social
sciences. Combining courses in the
Liberal Arts and Health Sciences, it
addresses the production and consumption of food and its symbolic and
ideological
meanings, across cultures and over time, from the beginning
of agriculture to globalization.
The Certificate
in Food Studies is open to all students seeking a bachelor’s
degree from UWM, to those who previously
received a bachelor’s
degree from UWM or any other accredited college or university, and to
those who do not plan to
pursue a college or university degree
(non-degree students) but who have a strong interest in this subject.
To be
admitted to the university as non-degree students, individuals
must meet regular University admission requirements.
The
Certificate is awarded jointly by the College of Health Sciences and
the College of Letters and Science.
Students
concurrently enrolled in a degree program who successfully complete the
certificate program requirements will
be awarded the certificate at the
time of graduation. Post-baccalaureate and non-degree students will receive the
certificate upon completion of the program requirements. Graduate
students are eligible to pursue the Food Studies
certificate
concurrently with their graduate studies, and they will be awarded the
certificate upon completion of the
program requirements.
Program Requirements
To earn the certificate, students must complete 18 credits in
approved Food Studies courses, with a minimum grade
point average of
2.500, including:
FoodBev 101: Introduction to Food Studies (3 cr), with a grade of
C or better.
At least 12 credits selected from the approved courses list,
including one course each in the humanities and the
social sciences.
At least one course in natural or health sciences, nursing, or
engineering.
A senior research course, taken either as FoodBev 699
(independent study) or as a senior research or capstone
course offered
by another program and approved as a Food Studies content course.
Of the 18 required credits, at least 9 credits must be taken at the
advanced level (courses numbered 300 and above) and
at least 9 credits
must be taken in residence at UWM. No more than 9 credits in one
curricular code may be counted
towards the certificate. Students are
limited to 3 credits in independent studies and 3 credits in
internships.
Approved Electives
The following courses are approved to count toward the Food
Studies Certificate. Additional courses may be found each
semester in
the Schedule of Classes. In addition, students are encouraged to
consult the Program Coordinators and to
petition for the inclusion of
relevant courses as appropriate.
Anthro 441
BMS 232
BMS 290
BMS 332
BMS 590
CES 571
Chinese 160
CompLit 350
CompLit 360
English 625
FoodBev 199
FoodBev 289
FoodBev 297
FoodBev 299
FoodBev 489
FoodBev 497
FoodBev 499
FoodBev 699
French 145
French 432
Hist 600
Italian 256
Italian 456
Japan 220
Kin 241
Kin 290
Urb Std 360
Nature, Knowledge, and Technoscience in Anthropological Perspective
Introduction to Nutrition
Topics in Health Sciences: “Introduction to Food Principles and Preparation”; “Life Cycle
Nutrition”
Clinical Nutrition
Current Topics in Human Kinetics: “Community Nutrition in Action”; “Public Health
Nutrition”
Practical Approaches to a Sustainable Future
A Taste of China: Learning Chinese Culture and Society Through Cuisine
Topics in Comparative Literature: “Discovering Food”
Seminar in Literature and Cultural Experience: “Cuisine, Community, and Literature”
Seminar in Literary History: “Eating English Literature”
Independent Study
Internship in Food Studies, Lower Division
Study Abroad: (Subtitle)
Ad Hoc: (Subtitle)
Internship in Food Studies, Upper Division
Study Abroad: (Subtitle)
Ad Hoc: (Subtitle)
Advanced Independent Study
Views of France: “Learning French Culture Through Cuisine”
Seminar in French and Francophone Cultures: “Cuisines et Cultures Françaises”
Seminar in History: “Food, Culture, and Power”; “Food and the City”
Introduction to Italian Food Studies: A Cultural History
Topics in Italian Food Studies: (Subtitle)
Introduction to Japanese Food Studies
Why We Eat What We Eat: An Ecological Approach
Special Topics in Human Movement Sciences: “Nutrition for the Health Professions”
Perspectives on the Urban Scene: “You Are Where You Eat: Urban Food Geographies”
Food Studies (FOOD)
Forensic Sciences Certificate Program
Certificate in Death Investigation
Certificate in Forensic Science
Certificate in Forensic Toxicology
Fred Anapol, Professor of Anthropology, Director, Center for
Forensic Sciences, (414) 229-0510, [email protected]
The Biomedical Sciences Program, Criminal Justice Program, and Departments of Anthropology and Chemistry
cooperate in offering three
certificates in the area of forensic sciences. Sponsored jointly by
the Colleges of Letters and
Science and Health Sciences and the Helen
Bader School of Social Welfare, these certificate curricula are
designed to
train students in basic skills that will provide the
foundation for careers in the fields of law enforcement, death
investigation, pathology, and toxicology. Certificates are offered in
Death Investigation, Forensic Science, and Forensic
Toxicology. Where
applicable, the curriculum meets the criteria required for
professional certification examinations
(Medicolegal Death
Investigation, Toxicological Chemist).
Undergraduate students who pursue a forensic sciences
certificate maintain their identity as majors in their home
departments and continue to progress toward a baccalaureate degree
while in the certificate program. Courses include
lecture
presentations and laboratory experiences that cover fundamental areas
of forensic science and provide unique
instruction on techniques that
are essential in the specific certificates. Students are given
instruction by faculty members
at UWM and forensic professionals in
the Milwaukee community. Any of the programs may be pursued as a
postbaccalaureate educational certificate. Individuals who are not
enrolled in a degree program at UWM, but are seeking
continuing
education for career development, may be admitted to courses in the
certificate programs by meeting
prerequisites with equivalent
experience or consent of the instructor.
Curricular Requirements
To receive one of the following certificates, students must complete at least one half of the required credits on the UWM
campus. A minimum grade point average of 2.500 must be achieved on the required credits. All options within the
certificate require at least a basic knowledge of chemistry and biology. To meet this requirement, prior to registering
themselves in the Forensic Sciences Certificate Program,
students must successfully complete Chem 100 (Chemical
Science) or
equivalent and Bio Sci 100 (Survey of Zoology) or equivalent.
Note: The abbreviation ABCC is used in the course listings
below to represent the four departments/programs that are
jointly
offering these courses: Anthro/BMS/Chem/Crm Jst; students may enroll
in the courses under any of the four
curricular areas.
Certificate in Death Investigation
The following courses must be completed successfully to obtain a
Certificate in Death Investigation:
ABCC 281
ABCC 285
ABCC 481
Anthro 403
Anthro 405
Crm Jst 110
Crm Jst 480
One of:
BMS 610
HCA 212
Dead Men Do Tell Tales: An
Introduction to Forensic Science
Medicolegal Death
Investigation
Criminalistics
The Human Skeleton
Forensic Anthropology
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Criminal Evidence and Investigation
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Pharmacology
Drugs Used and Abused
3
3
Additional courses with forensic content are listed below. Check
prerequisites or consult the instructor for eligibility.
These courses
are recommended, but are not required, for the Certificate in Death
Investigation:
ABCC 585
ABCC 589
ABCC 594
Anthro 404
Bio Sci 539 (663)
Chem 194
Chem 524
Chem 602
BMS 555
BMS 560
BMS 561
Internship in Forensic
Toxicology
Internship in Death
Investigation
Internship in Forensic
Science
Seminar in Human
Evolutionary Physiology
Laboratory Techniques in
Molecular Biology
First-Year Seminar (with
forensic subtitle)
Intermediate Analytical
Chemistry
Biochemistry: Cellular
Processes
Toxicology and Therapeutic Drug
Monitoring
Molecular and Genetic
Diagnostics
Molecular Diagnostics
Laboratory
1-3
1-3
1-3
3
4
3
3-5
3
1
2
1
BMS 620
Forensic Pathology
2
Certificate in Forensic Science
The following courses must be completed successfully to obtain a
Certificate in Forensic Science:
ABCC 281
Dead Men Do Tell Tales: An
Introduction to Forensic Science
ABCC 481
Criminalistics
Crm Jst 110
Introduction to Criminal
Justice
Crm Jst 480
Criminal Evidence and
Investigation
One of:
Anthro 403
The Human Skeleton
Anthro 404
Seminar in Human
Evolutionary Physiology
One of:
BMS 610
Pharmacology
HCA 212
Drugs Used and Abused
One of:
Bio Sci 539 (663)
Laboratory Techniques in
Molecular Biology
Chem 602
Biochemistry: Cellular
Processes
BMS 560/561
Molecular and Genetic
Diagnostics/Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
Additional courses with forensic content are listed below.
Check prerequisites or consult the instructor for eligibility.
These
courses are recommended, but are not required, for the Certificate in
Forensic Science:
ABCC 285
ABCC 585
ABCC 589
ABCC 594
Anthro 405
Chem 194
Chem 524
One of:
BMS 555
BMS 620
Medicolegal Death Investigation
Internship in Forensic Toxicology
Internship in Death Investigation
Internship in Forensic
Science
Forensic Anthropology
First-Year Seminar: (with
forensic subtitle)
Intermediate Analytical
Chemistry
Toxicology and Therapeutic
Drug Monitoring
Forensic Pathology
3
1-3
1-3
1-3
3
3
3-5
1
2
Certificate in Forensic Toxicology
The following courses must be completed successfully to obtain a
Certificate in Forensic Toxicology:
ABCC 281
Dead Men Do Tell Tales: An
Introduction to Forensic Science
ABCC 481
Criminalistics
Chem 524
Intermediate Analytical
Chemistry
BMS 610
Pharmacology
Crm Jst 110
Introduction to Criminal
Justice
Crm Jst 480
Criminal Evidence and
Investigation
One of:
Anthro 403
The Human Skeleton
Anthro 404
Seminar in Human
Evolutionary Physiology
3
3
3-5
3
3
3
3
3
Additional courses with forensic content are listed below.
Check prerequisites or consult the instructor for eligibility.
These
courses are recommended, but are not required, for the Certificate in
Forensic Toxicology:
ABCC 285
Medicolegal Death
Investigation
3
ABCC 585
ABCC 589
ABCC 594
Anthro 405
Bio Sci 539 (663)
Chem 194
Chem 602
BMS 555
BMS 560
BMS 561
BMS 620
Internship in Forensic
Toxicology
Internship in Death
Investigation
Internship in Forensic
Science
Forensic Anthropology
Laboratory Techniques in
Molecular Biology
First-Year Seminar: (with
forensic subtitle)
Biochemistry: Cellular
Processes
Toxicology and Therapeutic
Drug Monitoring
Molecular and Genetic
Diagnostics
Molecular Diagnostics
Laboratory
Forensic Pathology
1-3
1-3
1-3
3
4
3
3
1
2
1
2
Global Health Certificate
Anne Dressel, Director, Center for Global Health Equity, Nursing, CUN G7, (414) 229-3995, Certificate Coordinator
Deatra Holloway, Senior Advisor, Nursing, CUN 129, (414) 229-5484, [email protected]
Global Health is an interdisciplinary undergraduate certificate administered by the Director of the Center for Global
Health Equity and the Global Health Advisory Committee (GHAC). The world is economically, politically, culturally, and technologically connected and interdependent with increasingly
mobile populations seeking economic opportunity, security, and safety as a result of civil unrest, regional conflicts,
diminished natural resources, poverty, and disease. Although some health problems and issues remain specific to
levels and contexts of socio-cultural, economic, and political development within countries, many of the same problems,
issues, and concerns transcend geographic boundaries, as should appropriate approaches and solutions. The concept of
“global health” describes and addresses these realities. An undergraduate certificate in Global Health will provide
students with academic inquiry into:
the global burden of disease
the social determinants of health in a global context
the principles, language, and measurement tools used in global health
ethics and global health
the global cultural, religious, and historical contexts of health, disease, and health care
The Global Health Certificate will provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to focus on current global health
issues and concerns, policies, processes, programs, and practices that contribute to and hinder global health
improvement. A wide array of courses will help students better comprehend the interdisciplinary approach to
understanding and addressing global health issues.
Eligibility
The Global Health Certificate is intended to enhance a bachelor’s degree. The certificate is available to all students
seeking a bachelor’s degree from UWM and to students who previously have received a bachelor’s degree from UWM
or any other accredited college or university.
Program Requirements
To obtain the certificate, the student must complete, with a minimum grade point average of 2.500, at least 21 credits in
approved Global Health courses, of which 12 must be earned in residence at UWM. Of these 12 residence credits, nine
must be taken at the 300 level or above. A minimum of 6 credits must be taken in the College of Letters and
Science. A minimum of 6 credits must be taken in the College of Nursing. No more than 9 credits from any one
department may count toward the certificate. A maximum of 6 credits of independent study may count toward program
requirements. Courses for the certificate may not be taken on a credit/no credit basis. The following are required:
Core Course (3 cr)
Nurs 110
Introduction to Global Health
World Regions (3 cr)
Select one of the following:
Geog 110
The World: Peoples and Regions
Hist 132
World History Since 1500
Pol Sci 106
Politics of the World’s Nations
Electives (minimum of 9 cr)
Select at least three courses from the following:
Africol 329
Economic Growth and Sustainable Development in Africa
Africol 351
Sex, Marriage, and Health Care in the Afro World
Anthro 102
Introduction to Anthropology: Culture and Society
Anthro 104
Lifeways in Different Cultures: A Survey of World Societies
Anthro 440
Medical Anthropology
Anthro 447
The Global Politics of Human Rights
CES 210
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Science
BMS 204
Plagues, Pandemics, and Epidemics
Econ 353
Economic Development
Ethnic 275
Global Violence, Disease, and Death
Nurs 440
Nursing Specialty: Vulnerable Populations: (Subtitle)
Nurs 497
Study Abroad
PH 101
Introduction to Public Health
Sociol 472
Population and Society
Spanish 388
Health Issues in the Hispanic World
Fieldwork (3 cr)
Students are required to do an internship, self-designed research project, or study abroad (for a minimum of 3
credits) in the field of global health. The purpose of this requirement is to enable the student to engage in global
health work through "practical" experience or research. The area of study must be approved by the coordinator of
the Global Health Certificate and must meet the requirements of the department through which it is being
completed. The fieldwork requirement can be fulfilled in one of three ways:
Internship – A number of global health internships are available through the International
Studies Major (IntlSt 450), as well as other departments and organizations. Study Abroad – UWM offers a number of Global Health study abroad programs, through
several departments.
Independent Study – The student may propose a global health research project to a professor
in an area of interest. The independent study also must be discussed with and approved by the
Global Health Certificate Coordinator.
Capstone (3 cr)
Nurs 475
Global Health: Ethics and Human Rights
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
Independent study courses focusing on global health issues may be accepted with the approval of the Certificate
Program Coordinator. Other courses not on this list but relevant to the study of global health may be accepted with the
approval of the Certificate Program Coordinator.
Credits earned at other institutions equivalent to courses in the certificate program may be accepted in partial fulfillment
of the program requirements, subject to review by the Certificate Program Coordinator. Students currently enrolled at
UWM who have fulfilled some of the program’s requirements prior to the approval of this program may count those
courses toward completion of the certificate requirements.
Awarding the Certificate
Students currently involved in baccalaureate studies who successfully complete the requirements of the program will be
awarded the certificate at the time of graduation. Students who already have a bachelor’s degree will receive the
certificate upon completion of the program requirements.
Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies
Coordinator: Patrice Petro, Vice Provost for International
Education and Professor of English
Christine Wolf, Advisor, Garland 111, (414) 229-6925,
[email protected]
The College of Letters and Science and several of UWM's professional
schools have formed a partnership to offer
students a unique program of
study that will prepare them for positions of global leadership in our
increasingly
interconnected world.
The Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies combines the considerable
strengths of a liberal arts and sciences education with
the
specialized knowledge of professional studies enhanced by a thorough,
integrated international emphasis. While
graduates of the Global
Studies program will have a competitive advantage, especially in areas
of employment that
benefit from an international education, the
analytical, communication, and cultural awareness knowledge and skills
acquired through the Global Studies degree will serve students well in
any area of work.
Courses of Study
Global Studies at UWM is a four-year undergraduate program
consisting of the following pre-professional tracks:
Global Communications, Global Management, Global Security, Global
Sustainability, and Global Urban Development.
Common to all tracks is the degree's core curriculum,
which includes three foundational Global Studies core courses;
one
semester (12 cr minimum) of study abroad; an international internship;
eight semesters (or equivalent) of foreign
language study; and a
course in world regions. In addition, students take specialized
courses designated for their elected
Global Studies track.
The Global Communications track focuses on the
relevance of language, culture, and identity in understanding
innovations in and applications of technology, media, communications,
information science, and technology transfer.
This track will allow
students to build technical competencies while also grounding them in
a broader understanding of
technology's impact on human lives. This
track affords a range of options that allows students to prepare for
careers in
fields such as marketing, international business,
advertising, information technology, new media, and translation.
The
College of Letters and Science awards this degree. However, the College of Letters and Science and the School of
Information Studies (SOIS) will award the degree jointly to students who complete at least 21 credits of elective courses
through SOIS.
The Global Management track, focusing on the impact
of globalization on business and the world economy, will
prepare
students as future managers capable of analyzing transnational issues;
strategizing within a global, cross-cultural
context; and implementing
projects with a strong understanding of globalization's implications
for the private and public
sectors. This track will prepare students
to assume leadership roles in many areas, but it will be advantageous
especially
in such fields as international business, consulting,
education, government, and public policy. In addition, graduates of
this track will meet all the requirements for admission to an MBA
program.The College of Letters and Science and the
Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business jointly award this degree.
The Global Security track examines the changing
conceptions and conditions shaping security in a global context. In
addition to exploring traditional notions of security based on the
nation-state and the international system, coursework in
this track
considers a wide range of issues including global health, the
environment, human rights, peace-building
efforts, 21st-century
conflict, social movements, migration, ethnicity, and identity. This
track will prepare students to
pursue careers in government agencies
and non-governmental organizations addressing areas such as
international
development, global conflict management, and global
sustainability.
The College of Letters and Science awards this
degree.
The Global Sustainability track develops student
expertise in the diverse concepts of global sustainability and their
application to development fields. Students following this track will
be able to recognize and explain principles of
sustainability in
human, environmental, and governance systems; and evaluate and
identify methods for planning and
implementing sustainable development
strategies in differing contexts. This track affords graduates a range
of career
options including positions such as sustainability
specialists/coordinators/officers, educators/outreach coordinators,
and
project managers, working in industry, consultancy, utilities,
regulatory agencies, non-profits, governmental agencies,
and
non-governmental organizations. Students are also prepared to enter
graduate programs in sustainability.
The
College of Letters and Science awards this degree.
The Global Urban Development track will help students
acquire a holistic understanding of the global dimensions and
local
variations of urban development, the histories and economy of global
cities, the causes and implications of urban
growth, and nuances of
international development as applied to changing global
scenarios. It will prepare students for
further professional studies
and careers in architecture, urban planning, public policy, community
development, or
Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The College of Letters and Science and the School of Architecture and Urban
Planning (SARUP) jointly award this degree.
Enrolling in the Global Studies BA Degree Program
Students applying to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and
declaring a primary interest in Global Studies on their
application
forms will be assigned a Global Studies advisor at the Center for
International Education. Students may
enroll in the Global Studies
degree program by declaring their major as global studies, which is
possible after they have
earned 56 credits. The process includes (1)
reviewing the degree requirements with a Global Studies advisor and
(2)
signing the declaration of major form. Students who intend to
pursue a Global Studies degree are strongly advised to
declare before
earning 75 credits.
Curriculum Requirements. To earn the Bachelor of Arts
in Global Studies, students in all tracks must complete 120
credits,
including a minimum of 36 credits in upper-division courses (numbered
300 or above), while fulfilling the
requirements below. GPAs of at
least 2.000 overall and 2.500 in the selected track are required for
graduation. Students
also are responsible for completing the
University-wide General Education Requirements.
GENERAL STUDIES - CORE REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL TRACKS
Global Studies Core Courses (9 cr) - Introduction to the
nature and impact of global processes.
Global 101
Global 201
Global 202
Introduction to Global Studies I: People and Politics
Introduction to Global Studies II: Economics and the Environment
Introduction to Global Studies III: Globalization and Technology
3 (SS)
3 (SS)
3 (SS)
Global Studies Capstone (3 cr) - Culminating
experience in the senior year. Students must complete a capstone
course
appropriate to their track.
World Regions Course (3 cr) - Introduction to area
studies.
One of the following:
Geog 110
Hist 132
Pol Sci 106
The World: Peoples and Regions
World History Since 1500
Politics of the World's Nations
Foreign Language - The requirement may be satisfied in one of
the following ways:
Option 1 One Language: Eight semesters (or equivalent) of a
single foreign language with passing grades.
3 (SS)
3 (HU)
3 (SS)
Option 2 Two Languages: First- through sixth-semester (or
equivalent) of a first language other than English and two
semesters
(or equivalent) in a second language other than English, all with
passing grades.
Study Abroad
Students must complete a minimum of 12 credits while studying abroad.
International Internship
Students must complete a 3-credit internship at a location outside of
the U.S. The internship normally will be completed
during the semester
abroad, in the summer following the semester abroad, or in the senior
year.
General Education Distribution Requirements
In order to establish core competencies in writing and communication, develop quantitative literacy, and build a
foundation in the arts, humanities, social
sciences, and natural sciences, students are required to take courses
that satisfy
the distribution areas of the UWM General Education
Requirements (GER), as outlined below:
Core Competencies
Oral and Written Communication Parts A & B (OWC-A, OWC-B)
Quantitative Literacy Parts A & B (QL-A, QL-B)
Distribution Areas
Arts (A)
Cultural Diversity (CD)
Natural Sciences (NS), including one lab (NS+)
Humanities (HU) (3 cr may be satisfied by selecting Hist 132 under the world regions
course
options)
Social Sciences (SS) (9 cr are satisfied by Global core courses and 3 additional cr are
satisfied by
selecting Geog 110 or Pol Sci 110 under the world regions
course options)
3 cr
3 cr
6-7 cr
12 cr
12 cr
A list of courses in each distribution area is provided in the UWM Schedule
of Classes under "Courses Approved for
GER Distribution."
TRACK CORE CURRICULA
Additional requirements designated for each track appear in the sections below. Under track core curriculum, students
are required to complete only the requirements for their elected track.
Global Communications Track
To earn the Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies through the
Global Communications track, students must complete the
following
requirements. At least one writing course (*) must be selected.
GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS TRACK
CORE COURSES (21 cr)
Choose two of the following courses (6 cr):
Bus Adm 230
Commun 103
Commun 105
English 205
English 206
Introduction to Information Technology Management
Public Speaking
Business and Professional Communication
Business Writing*
Technical Writing*
3
3
3
3
3
English 214
English 431
English 435
English 436
English 449
JAMS 201
InfoSt 110
InfoSt 250
Writing in the Professions:* (with appropriate subtitle)
Topics in Advanced Writing:* (with appropriate subtitle)
Professional and Technical Writing*
Writing for Information Technology*
Writing Internship in English*
Media Writing*
Introduction to Information Science and Technology
Internet Communications and Information Transfer
3
3
3
3
1-4
3
3
3
All five of the following
courses (15 cr):
Econ 103
Econ 104
Global 351
Global 451
Global 551
Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics
Language, Media, and Social Practice
in Global Communications
Access, Security, and Intercultural
Contexts in Global Communications
Global Communications Capstone: Future Trends
3
3
3
3
3
GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS ELECTIVES
(24 cr)
Students must complete 24 credits from the following lists of
courses, with a minimum of 15 credits taken from List A.
There is no
minimum number of credits that must be selected from Lists B-E.
Electives from Lists C-E should be
courses about the country or region
in which the student will pursue language study and/or study abroad.
Any individual
course may count only once toward degree requirements.
Students in this track who are awarded their degree by L&S
only
must complete at least 36 credits in L&S upper-division (numbered
300 or above) courses.
List A (A minimum of 15 credits must be
completed from the following):
Anthro 349
Anthro 570
Art 227
ART 309/305
Art 393 (293)
Bus Adm 230
Bus Adm 335
Bus Adm 360
Bus Adm 433
Bus Adm 465
Bus Adm 467
Bus Adm 495
Bus Adm 496
Bus Adm 530
Bus Adm 531
Bus Adm 532
Bus Adm 533
Chinese 441 (310)
Commun 192
Commun 313
Commun 350
Commun 380
Commun 402
Commun 410
Seminar in Ethnography and Cultural Processes
Issues in Bilingualism (jointly offered with Linguistics)
Design Workshop (with appropriate subtitle)
Migration and Visual Art
Digital Printmaking I
Introduction to Information Technology (if not selected above)
Visual System Development
Principles of Marketing
Information Technology Project Management
International Marketing
Marketing Seminar: (with appropriate subtitle)
Special Topics in Business: (with appropriate subtitle)
International Business
Introduction to eBusiness
Developing Web Applications Using Web Services
Web Development for Open Business Systems
Information Technology Infrastructure for Business
Business Chinese
Freshman Seminar: "The Digital Mirror" subtitle
Human Communication and Technology
Intercultural Communication
Honors Seminar: “The Social History of the Internet” subtitle
Gender and Communication
Organizational Communication Technology
3
3
1-3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3H
3
3
Commun 413
Commun 450
Commun 550
Commun 655
Commun 665
Commun 675
Dance 370
English 214
English 431
English 435
English 436
English 437
English 439
English 449
Film 202 (102)
Film 203
Film 222
Film 255
FineArt 327 (351)
FLL 216
French 311
French 361
French 415 (425)
French 465
Geog 215
Geog 225
German 361
German 425
German 525
German 672 (461)
Global 311
Global 448
Global 541 (411)
Italian 313
JAMS 101
JAMS 201
JAMS 204
JAMS 207
JAMS 225
JAMS 226
JAMS 231 (431)
JAMS 232
JAMS 262
JAMS 307
JAMS 320
JAMS 336
JAMS 361
JAMS 524
JAMS 562
InfoSt 110
InfoSt 120
InfoSt 240
InfoSt 310
Rhetoric and the Internet
Cross-Cultural Communication
International and Global Communication
Cultural Training and Adjustment
Introduction to Mediation
Communication in International Mediation and Peacebuilding
World Movement Traditions: All Topics
Writing in the Professions: (with appropriate subtitle) (if not selected above)
Topics in Advanced Writing (with appropriate subtitle) (if not selected above)
Professional and Technical Writing (if not selected above)
Writing for Information Technology (if not selected above)
Project Management for Professional Writers
Document Design
Writing Internship in English (if not selected above)
Current Topics in Media Arts Production
Media Workshop: (with appropriate subtitle)
Introduction to Digital Filmmaking
Introduction to Digital Arts
Digital Media Workshop: (with appropriate subtitle)
Survey of Civilization: (with appropriate subtitle)
French for International Business/Professional Communication: Oral
Emphasis
French for International Business/Professional Communication: Writing Focus
Introduction to Translation: French to English
Introduction to Translation: English to French
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences
The Language of Maps
German for the Global World
Introduction to German Translation
Seminar in Advanced German Translation
German for Professional Purposes
Contexts for Global Management
Intellectual Property in the Global Information Economy
Cross-Cultural Management
Translation: Italian-English, English-Italian
Introduction to Mass Media
Media Writing (if not selected above)
News Writing and Technology
Introduction to Advertising and Public Relations
Nature and Culture in the Information Age
Religion, Media, and Culture
Publication Design
Photojournalism
Principles of Media Studies
Persuasive Media Writing and Production
Print and Online News
Media Graphics
Media Ethics
Advertising and Public Relations Campaigns
Media Studies and Culture
Introduction to Information Science and Technology (if not selected above)
Information Technology Ethics
Web Design I
Human Factors in Information Seeking and Use
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-4
3
1-3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
InfoSt 330
InfoSt 340
InfoSt 410
InfoSt 430
InfoSt 440
Linguis 410
Linguis 420
Linguis 430
Linguis 565
Linguis 570
PeaceSt 201
Russian 419
Sociol 327
Spanish 348
Trnsltn 465
Trnsltn 530
Electronic Information Retrieval Systems
Introduction to Systems Analysis
Database Information Retrieval Systems
Multimedia Application Development
Web Application Development
Literacy, Grammar, and Methodologies in ESL Education
Introduction to Second Language Acquisition
Language and Society
Introduction to Adult/University-Level TESOL
Issues in Bilingualism (jointly offered with Anthro)
Introduction to Conflict Resolution and Peace
Introduction to Translation: Russian to English
The Social Organization of Technology: A Comparative Perspective
Introduction to Translation: English to Spanish
Introduction to Translation: English to French
Business and Professional Aspects of Translation
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
List B Topical Electives:
Anthro 441
Anthro 543
Art 118
Art 317
ArtHist 111
Bus Adm 330
Bus Adm 436
CompLit 350
CompLit 365
CompLit 461
CompSci 112
CompSci 113
CompSci 201
CompSci 251
English 111
English 192
English 210
English 253
English 290
English 291
English 316
English 320
English 394
English 402
English 404
English 434
English 465
English 627
English 630
Film 116
Film 201 (101)
Film 302
Nature, Knowledge, and Technoscience in Anthropological Perspective
Cross-Cultural Study of Religion
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, and Practice
3D Imaging I
Entertainment Arts: Film, Television, and the Internet (jointly offered with
English and FilmStd)
Organizations
Systems Analysis and Design
Topics in Comparative Literature: (with appropriate subtitle)
Literatures and Cultures of the Americas: (with appropriate subtitle)
Film-Fiction Interaction: (with appropriate subtitle)
Introduction to the Internet and the World Wide Web
Introduction to Web Document Production
Introductory Computer Programming
Intermediate Computer Programming
Entertainment Arts: Film, Television, and the Internet (jointly offered with
ArtHist and FilmStd)
First-Year Seminar: (with appropriate subtitle)
International English
Science Fiction: (with appropriate subtitle)
Introduction to Film Studies
Introduction to Television Studies
World Cinema: (with appropriate subtitle)
Studies in Film Authorship: (with appropriate subtitle)
Theories of Mass Culture: (with appropriate subtitle)
Theories of Language and Literature: (with appropriate subtitle)
Language, Power, and Identity
Editing and Publishing
Women Writers: (with appropriate subtitle)
Seminar in Literature and Culture: (with appropriate subtitle)
Seminar in Literature and the Other Arts: (with appropriate subtitle)
Listening and Recording
Introduction to Experimental Media Arts
Video in the Classroom
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
FilmStd 111
FineArt 511
Hist 372
InfoSt 150
InfoSt 210
InfoSt 250
InfoSt 691
IntlSt 550
Japan 331
JAMS 111
JAMS 112
JAMS 113
JAMS 114
JAMS 115
JAMS 116
JAMS 260
JAMS 280
JAMS 360
JAMS 450
JAMS 559
JAMS 614
JAMS 615
JAMS 620
JAMS 659
Linguis 100
Linguis 200
Linguis 210
Linguis 350
Linguis 468
Music 327
Music 328
Spanish 341
Entertainment Arts: Film, Television, and the Internet (jointly offered with
ArtHist and English)
Spatial Interactivity II
Topics in Global History (with appropriate subtitle)
Introduction to Information Resources on the Internet
Information Resources for Research
Internet Communications and Information Transfer
Special Topics in Information Science: (with approved subtitle)
Senior Seminar in International Studies: (with appropriate subtitle)
Reading Japanese Short Stories
Gender and the Media
Global Media
Internet Culture
Media and Popular Culture
Introduction to Media and Politics
Journalism, Documentary, and Democracy
Contemporary Non-Fiction Media
Selected Topics in Mass Communication: (with appropriate subtitle)
History of Mass Media
Race and Ethnicity in the Media
Law of Mass Communication
Seminar in Mass Media and Public Opinion
Seminar in Media and Politics
Seminar in Global Media
Seminar in Comparative Media Law
The Diversity of Human Language
Aspects of Language: (with appropriate subtitle)
Power of Words
Introduction to Linguistics
Language in Its Various Forms: (with appropriate subtitle)
Analog and Digital Synthesis I
Digital Synthesis and Systems II
Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
List C Area Studies Electives:
Africol 232
Africol 311
Africol 320
Africol 450
Anthro 315
Anthro 320
Anthro 322
Anthro 325
Anthro 326
Hist 282
Hist 345
Hist 378
Hist 382
Hist 392
Hist 393
Hist 395
Jewish 328
Survey of African Societies and Cultures
African Religious Thought and Social Organizations
Black Cultures in Latin America and the Caribbean
Cultural Transmissions: Black Africa and Black America
Peoples and Cultures of Mexico and Central America
Peoples and Cultures of Africa
Europe in Anthropological Perspective
Japanese Culture and Society
Peoples and Cultures of South Asia
The Modern Middle East in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
The Modern Balkans: Nationalism, War, and Democracy
Revolution in China
Southeast Asia: The Age of Imperialism and Revolution Since 1800
The History of Southern Africa
History of Mexico
History of Japan Since 1600
The Arab-Israeli Conflict
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Jewish 358
Jewish 379
The Jews of Modern Europe: History and Culture
Introduction to Jewish History
3
3
List D Foreign Language
Electives - Up to 6 credits beyond those taken to meet the foreign
language requirement of
upper-division courses (300-level or
fifth-semester and above) on contemporary culture or
literature in a foreign
language may count as electives for this
track, provided that the language of instruction is not English.
The following
are recommended; however, see language program listings in this catalog for a complete list:
Chinese 320
French 324 (327)
French 426 (326)
French 427
French 431
French 432
French 450
French 592
German 331
German 332
German 333
German 334
German 360
German 410
German 411
German 415
German 672
Italian 312
Italian 629
Portugs 360
Portugs 457
Spanish 315
Spanish 461
Spanish 470
Spanish 472
Spanish 474
Contemporary Chinese Societies Through Film
Contemporary French Language and Culture
Growing Up French
Advanced Written Expression
Seminar in Literature and the Francophone World: (with appropriate subtitle)
Seminar in French and Francophone Cultures: (with appropriate subtitle)
Institutions and Culture of Contemporary France
Seminar in French Language: (with appropriate subtitle)
Intermediate German Grammar and Usage
Intermediate Conversation and Composition
Analysis of German Texts
Introduction to German Literature and Culture
German for the Global World
German Cultural History
Modern-Day Germany
Topics in German Civilization: (with appropriate subtitle)
German for Professional Purposes
Contemporary Italian Language and Culture
Major Film Directors: (with appropriate subtitle)
Brazilian Culture: (with appropriate subtitle)
Seminar in Luso-Brazilian Literature
Spanish Immersion Experience
Topics in Hispanic Culture: (with appropriate subtitle)
Survey of Hispanic Literature and Civilization
Survey of Spanish-American Literature and Civilization
Survey of Spanish Literature and Civilization
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
List E
Literature-in-Translation - Credits in 100-level courses may be
elected only prior to the student's study abroad:
Complit 208
CompLit 230
CompLit 233
CompLit 360
CompLit 365
CompLit 457
French 145
French 357
French 451
German 112
German 115
Hebr St 254
Italian 145
Italian 229
Italian 245
World Literature in Translation: The 17th to the 21st Century: (subtitle)
Literature and Society: (with appropriate subtitle)
Literature and Film: (with appropriate subtitle)
Seminar in Literature and Cultural Experience: (with appropriate subtitle)
Literatures and Cultures of the Americas: (subtitle)
Topics in French and Francophone Studies in Translation: (subtitle)
Views of France: (Subtitle)
Literature of the French-Speaking World in Translation: (subtitle)
Cinema of the French Speaking World: (with appropriate subtitle)
German Life and Civilization: Part II
Seminar on Scandinavian Culture
Studies in Hebrew Culture: (with appropriate subtitle)
Views of Italy: (with appropriate subtitle)
Italian Cinema
Italian Fictions: (with appropriate subtitle)
3
2-4
2-4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Italian 258
Italian 357
Italian 457
Japan 200
Polish 236
Portugs 225
Portugs 380
Russian 245
Spanish 225
Contemporary Italian Society and Culture
Topics in Italian Culture in Translation: (with appropriate subtitle)
Topics in Italian Literature and Culture in Translation: (with appropriate
subtitle)
Japanese Culture and Its Effect on Language
Polish Culture in Its Historical Setting
Understanding Brazil: (with appropriate subtitle)
Luso-Brazilian Literature in Translation: (with appropriate subtitle)
Russian Life and Culture
Understanding the Hispanic World
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Global Management Track
To earn the Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies through the
Global Management track, students must fulfill the following
requirements (49 credits):
Bus Adm 201
Introduction to Financial Accounting
Bus Adm 210
Introduction to Management Statistics
Bus Adm 230
Introduction to Information Technology Management
Bus Adm 330
Organizations
Bus Adm 350
Principles of Finance
Bus Adm 360
Principles of Marketing
Bus Adm 465
International Marketing
Bus Adm 496
International Business (capstone)
Econ 103
Principles of Microeconomics
Econ 104
Principles of Macroeconomics
Econ 351
Introduction to International Economic Relations
English 205
Business Writing
Global 541 (411)
Cross-Cultural Management
Math 211
Survey in Calculus and Analytic Geometry
One of the following two courses (3 credits):
Bus Adm 535
Global Information Technology Management
Global 311
Contexts for Global Management
One of the following three courses (3 credits):
Commun 350
Intercultural Communication
Commun 450
Cross-Cultural Communication
Commun 550
International and Global Communication
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
ELECTIVES (6 credits)
Complete a minimum of two courses from the approved list:
Bus Adm 456
Bus Adm 495
Bus Adm 535
Commun 350
Commun 450
Commun 365 (520)
Commun 550
Commun 665
Econ 325
Econ 353
International Financial Management
Special Topics in Business: "Global Innovation Management" subtitle
Global Information Technology Management (if not selected above)
Intercultural Communication (if not selected above)
Advanced Intercultural Communication (if not selected above)
Negotiation Skills Workshop
International and Global Communication (if not selected above)
Introduction to Mediation
Money and Banking
Economic Development
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Econ 447
Econ 454
German 360
German 672
Global 311
Global 451
Global 448
JAMS 361
Pol Sci 316
Pol Sci 330
Pol Sci 339
Pol Sci 343
Pol Sci 346
Labor Economics
International Trade
German for the Global World
German for Professional Purposes
Contexts for Global Management (if not selected above)
Access, Security, and Intercultural Contexts in Global Communications
Intellectual Property in the Global Information Economy
Media Ethics
International Law
The Politics of International Economic Relations
European Integration
Asian International Relations
U.S.-Latin American Relations
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Global Security Track
To earn the Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies through the
Global Security track, students must complete the
requirements listed
below. Students in this track must complete at least 36 credits in
L&S upper-division (numbered 300
or above) courses.
GLOBAL SECURITY TRACK CORE
COURSES (24-25 cr)
All four of the following courses (12 cr):
Econ 103
Principles of Microeconomics
Econ 104
Principles of Macroeconomics
Global 371
Rethinking Global Security
Global 571
Global Security Capstone: Future Trends
One of the following three courses (3 cr):
Global 442
Humanitarianism in Global Perspective (jointly offered with Anthro)
Global 447
Global Politics of Human Rights
Global 471
Strategies for Realizing Security in Global Contexts
One of the following two courses (3 cr):
Econ 210
Economics Statistics
MthStat 215
Elementary Statistical Analysis
One of the following seven courses (3-4 cr):
Anthro 540
Applications of Anthropology
Anthro 560
Introduction to Research Methods in Anthropology
Anthro 561
Techniques and Problems in Ethnography
Geog 215
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences
Geog 525
Geographic Information Systems
Pol Sci 390
Political Data Analysis
WGS 411
Women's and Gender Studies Research and Methods: (with appropriate
subtitle)
One of the following three courses (3 cr):
Commun 365
Negotiation Skills Workshop
Commun 665
Introduction to Mediation
Commun 675
Communication in International Mediation and Peacebuilding
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
GLOBAL SECURITY ELECTIVES (21
cr)
Students must complete 21 credits from the following lists, with
at least 15 credits selected from List A. There is no
minimum number
of credits that must be taken from List B.
List A Electives:
Anthro 156
Anthro 355
Anthro 440
Anthro 447
Anthro 448
Anthro 449
Anthro 450
Anthro 543
Art 309/509
BMS 232
BMS 539
BMS 540
CES 210
Commun 350
Commun 363
Commun 365
Commun 450
Commun 550
Commun 631
Commun 665
Commun 675
Commun 681
CompLit 232
CompLit 350
Complit 365
CES 210
Crm Jst 291
Crm Jst 410
Econ 351
Econ 353
English 443
Ethnic 350
Ethnic 375
Geog 231
Geog 309
Geog 310
Geog 350
Geog 400
Geog 443
Geog 464
Geog 540
Geog 564
Global 299
Global 321
Global 421
Global 442
Global 443
Global 447
Food and Culture
Globalization, Culture, and Environment
Medical Anthropology
The Global Politics of Human Rights (jointly offered with Global 447)
Cultural and Human Ecology
The Human Economy
Political Anthropology
Cross-Cultural Study of Religion
Migration and Visual Art
Introduction to Clinical Nutrition
Public Health Microbiology
Public Health Microbiology Lab
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Science
Intercultural Communication
Communication in Human Conflict
Negotiation Skills Workshop (if not selected above)
Cross-Cultural Communication
International and Global Communication
Current Topics in Interpersonal Communication/Conflict Management: (with
appropriate subtitle)
Introduction to Mediation (if not selected above)
Communication in International Mediation and Peacebuilding
Seminar in Communication in a World of AIDS
Literature and Politics: (with appropriate subtitle)
Topics in Comparative Literature: (with appropriate subtitle)
Literatures and Cultures of the Americas
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Sciences
Current Issues in Criminal Justice: (with appropriate subtitle)
Comparative Criminal Justice
Introduction to International Economic Relations
Economic Development
Grant Writing
Advanced Topics in Comparative Ethnic Studies: (with appropriate subtitle)
Global Violence, Disease, and Death
Geography of Islam
Nationalities and Nations of the World
General Climatology
Conservation of Natural Resources
Population, Environment, Development
Cities of the World: Comparative Urban Geography
Environmental Problems
Globalization and the City
Urban Environmental Change and Social Justice
Ad Hoc: (with appropriate subtitle)
The Global City in History
Social Justice in the Global City
Humanitarianism in Global Perspective (if not selected above) (jointly offered
with Anthro)
Medicine and Pharmaceuticals in the Global Age (jointly offered with
Anthro)
The Global Politics of Human Rights (if not selected above) (jointly offered
with Anthro)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-6
3
3
3
3
3
Global 448
Global 499
Hist 210
Nurs 101
Nurs 110
Nurs 365
PeaceSt 201
PH 101
PH 375
Philos 350
Pol Sci 175
Pol Sci 316
Pol Sci 330
Pol Sci 337
Pol Sci 338
Pol Sci 365
Pol Sci 370
Pol Sci 371
ReligSt 350
Sociol 235
Sociol 327
Sociol 450
Sociol 495
WGS 401
WGS 500
Intellectual Property in the Global Information Economy
Ad Hoc: (with appropriate subtitle)
The Twentieth Century: A Global History
Cultural Diversity in Health Care
Introduction to Global Health
Current Topics of Nursing: (with appropriate subtitle)
Introduction to Conflict Resolution and Peace
Introduction to Public Health
Topics in Public Health for Undergraduates: (with appropriate subtitle)
Introduction to Comparative Study of Religion
Introduction to International Relations
International Law
The Politics of International Economic Relations
International Organization and the United Nations
Seminar in International Relations: (with appropriate subtitle)
Theories and Methods in International Politics
International Conflict
Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict
Selected Topics in Religious Studies: (with appropriate subtitle)
Social Change in the Global Economy
The Social Organization of Technology: A Comparative Perspective
Environmental Sociology
Seminar in Sociology: (with appropriate subtitle)
Global Feminisms
Advanced Social Science Seminar in Women's and Gender Studies: (with
appropriate subtitle)
1-6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
List B Electives (6 cr):
Africol 232
Africol 299
Africol 311
Africol 320
Africol 329
Africol 450
Africol 565
Anthro 250
Anthro 315
Anthro 320
Anthro 322
Anthro 325
Anthro 326
Anthro 441
Bus Adm 330
Chinese 320
Civ Eng 492
CompLit 233
CompLit 461
Econ 447
Econ 454
Econ 455
English 240
Survey of African Societies and Cultures
Ad Hoc: Africa in the Reconfiguring Global System: (with appropriate
subtitle)
African Religious Thought and Social Organizations
Black Cultures in Latin America and the Caribbean
Economic Growth and Sustainable Development in Africa
Cultural Transmissions: Black Africa and Black America
Selected Texts/Topics in Africology: (with appropriate subtitle)
Women's Roles in Cross-Cultural Perspective
Peoples and Cultures of Mexico and Central America
Peoples and Cultures of Africa
Europe in Anthropological Perspective
Japanese Culture and Society
Peoples and Cultures of South Asia
Nature, Knowledge, and Technoscience in Anthropological Perspective
Organizations
Contemporary Chinese Society Through Film
Environmental Impact Assessment
Literature and Film: (with appropriate subtitle)
Film-Fiction Interaction
Labor Economics
International Trade
International Finance
Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture: (with appropriate subtitle)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
English 247
English 268
English 316
English 431
Ethnic 102
Ethnic 250
Ethnic 550
Geog 213
Geog 215
Geog 247
Geog 309
Geog 330
Geog 332
Geog 340
Geog 403
Geog 410
Geog 421
Geog 462
Geog 470
Global 699
Hebr St 238
Hebr St 254
Hist 180
Hist 192
Hist 200
Hist 282
Hist 286
Hist 287
Hist 290
Hist 345
Hist 372
Hist 375
Hist 378
Hist 382
Hist 392
Hist 393
Hist 395
Hist 434
IntlSt 550
InfoSt 660 (625)
Philos 204
Pol Sci 255
Pol Sci 300
Pol Sci 302
Pol Sci 325
Pol Sci 326
Pol Sci 327
Pol Sci 328
Pol Sci 339
Pol Sci 340
Pol Sci 343
Pol Sci 346
Pol Sci 423
Literature and Human Experience: (with appropriate subtitle)
Introduction to Cultural Studies: (with appropriate subtitle)
World Cinema: (with appropriate subtitle)
Topics in Advanced Writing: (with appropriate subtitle)
Transnational Migrations: Asian-, Arab-, Euro-American, and Latino Identity
Selected Topics in Ethnic Studies: (with appropriate subtitle)
Senior Seminar in Comparative Ethnic Studies: (with appropriate subtitle)
Geography of Asia
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences
Quantitative Analysis in Geography
Nationalities and Nations of the World
Europe: East and West
China: Peoples, Regions, and Development
Biogeography
Remote Sensing: Environmental and Land Use Analysis
Gendered Geographies
Geography of Latin America
Cultural Geography of Latin America
Geography of South Asia
Advanced Independent Study
Studies in Hebrew/Jewish Literature, Art, and Culture: (with appropriate
subtitle)
Studies in Hebrew Culture: (with appropriate subtitle)
Latin American Society and Culture: (with appropriate subtitle)
First-Year Seminar: (with appropriate subtitle)
Historical Roots of Contemporary Issues: (with appropriate subtitle)
The Modern Middle East in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
The Korean Conflict, 1950-1953
The Vietnam War
Topics in Global History: (with appropriate subtitle)
The Modern Balkans: Nationalism, War, and Democracy
Topics in Global History: (subtitle)
Contemporary European History, 1945 to the Present
Revolution in China
Southeast Asia: The Age of Imperialism and Revolution Since 1800
The History of Southern Africa
History of Mexico
History of Japan Since 1600
The United States as a World Power in the 20th Century
Seminar in International Studies: (with appropriate subtitle)
Information Policy
Introduction to Asian Religions
Great Issues of Politics
Western European Politics
Politics of Eastern Europe
Latin American Politics
Brazilian Politics and Society
Politics of the Middle East and North Africa
The Arab-Israeli Conflict
European Integration
Politics of Nuclear Weapons
Asian International Relations
U.S.-Latin American Relations
Conduct of American Foreign Affairs
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Soc Wrk 691
Sociol 304
Sociol 325
Sociol 330
Sociol 472
Sociol 476
WGS 200
WGS 290
WGS 599
Practice Methods in Social Work: (with appropriate subtitle)
Political Sociology
Social Change
Economy and Society
Population and Society
Sociology of International Public Health
Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies: A Social Science Perspective
Selected Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: (with appropriate subtitle)
Topics in Women's and Gender Studies: (with appropriate subtitle)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
1-3
Global Sustainability Track
To earn the Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies through the
Global Sustainability track, students must complete 51-56
credits in
the requirements listed below. Students in this track must complete at
least 36 credits in upper-division
(numbered 300 or above) courses, of
which 24 credits must be in L&S.
GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY TRACK CORE COURSES (36-41 cr)
All six of the following courses (18 cr):
CES 210
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Science
Econ 103
Principles of Microeconomics
Econ 104
Principles of Macroeconomics
Global 361
Environment and Sustainability
Global 461
The Politics and Policy of Sustainability
Global 561
Preparing for Sustainable Peacebuilding and Social Change
One of the following six courses (3-4 cr):
Anthro 568
Introduction to Anthropological Statistics
Bus Adm 210
Introduction to Management Statistics
Chem 221
Elementary Quantitative Analysis
Econ 210
Economic Statistics
Geog 247
Quantitative Analysis in Geography
MthStat 215
Elementary Statistical Analysis
Two of the following fourteen courses (6-10 cr):
Bio Sci 150
Foundations of Biological Sciences I
Bio Sci 152
Foundations of Biological Sciences II
Bio Sci 310
General Ecology
Chem 102
General Chemistry
Chem 104
General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis
Geog 105
Introduction to Human Geography
Geog 120
Our Physical Environment
Geog 125
Introduction to Environmental Geography
Geog 140
Our Urban Environment: Introduction to Urban Geography
Geo Sci 100
Introduction to the Earth
Geo Sci 102
Principles of Historical Geology
Geo Sci 105
Earth, Air, Fire, and Water
Geo Sci 106
The Earth Environment
Geo Sci 150
Introduction to Ocean Sciences
One of the following three courses (3 cr):
Ed Pol 602 (421)
Proposal Writing and Fundraising Skills for Community-Based Organizations
Ed Pol 605 (424)
Community-Based Organization Funding
English 443
Grant Writing
One of the following seven courses (3 cr):
Global 541
Cross-Cultural Management (jointly offered by Lubar)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Commun 310
Communication in Organizations
Commun 350
Intercultural Communication
Commun 365
Negotiation Skills Workshop
Commun 450
Cross-Cultural Communication
Commun 665
Introduction to Mediation
Commun 675
Communication in International Mediation and Peacebuilding
One of the following seven courses (3 cr):
Anthro 355
Globalization, Culture, and Environment
Anthro 441
Nature, Knowledge, and Technoscience in Anthropological Perspective
Bus Adm 495
Special Topics in Business: (with appropriate subtitle)
CES 471
Principles of Natural Resources Management
Geog 464
Environmental Problems
Hist 432
North American Environmental History
Philos 337
Environmental Ethics
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY ELECTIVES (15 cr)
Students must complete 15 credits from the following list:
Anthro 355
Anthro 431
Anthro 441
Anthro 448
Anthro 449
Bio Sci 310
Bio Sci 458
Bio Sci 505
Bus Adm 485
Bus Adm 495
Civ Eng 492
CES 471
CES 490
CES 499
CES 550
CES 551
CES 571
Econ 328
Econ 353
Econ 525
FrshWtr 502
FrshWtr 504
FrshWtr 650
FrshWtr 690
Geog 215
Geog 304
Geog 350
Geog 400
Geog 403
Geog 415
Geog 441
Geog 443
Geog 464
Globalization, Culture, and Environment (if not selected above)
Urban Anthropology
Nature, Knowledge, and Technoscience in Anthropological Perspective (if
not selected above)
Culture and Human Ecology
Economic Anthropology
General Ecology (if not selected above)
Community Ecology
Conservation Biology
Environmental Issues in Real Estate
Special Topics in Business: (with appropriate subtitle) (if not selected above)
Environmental Impact Assessment
Principles of Natural Resources Management (if not selected above)
Senior Seminar: Conservation and Environmental Science
Ad Hoc: (subtitle)
Introduction to Science Interpretation
Application of Science Interpretation
Practical Approaches to a Sustainable Future
Environmental Economics
Economic Development
The Economics of Water
Aquatic Ecosystem Dynamics
Quantitative Freshwater Analysis
Topics in Freshwater Sciences (with appropriate subtitle)
Undergraduate Seminar in Freshwater Sciences (with appropriate subtitle)
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences
Human Impact on the Environment
Conservation of Natural Resources
Population, Environment, Development
Remote Sensing: Environmental and Land Use Analysis
Hydrogeography
Geography of Cities and Metropolitan Areas
Cities of the World: Comparative Urban Geography
Environmental Problems (if not selected above)
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
1-6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
1-3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
Geog 475
Geog 520
Geog 540
Geog 564
Geo Sci 400
Geo Sci 401
Geo Sci 463
Geo Sci 562
Global 321
Global 421
Ind Eng 590
PH 375
Philos 337
UrbPlan 315
UrbPlan 684
Geography of Soils
Physical Geography of the City
Globalization and the City
Urban Environmental Change and Social Justice
Water Quality
General Soil Science
Physical Hydrogeology
Environmental Surface Hydrology
The Global City in History
Cities in the Global Economy
Topics in Industrial and Systems Engineering: (with appropriate subtitle)
Topics in Public Health for Undergraduatess: (with appropriate subtitle)
Environmental Ethics (if not selected above)
Great Cities of the World: Their Growth and Guided Urbanization
Planning Local Economic Development
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Global Urban Development Track
CORE COURSES (21-22 cr)
One of the following courses (3 cr):
Global 321
The City in History
Sociol 495
Seminar in Sociology: (with approved subtitle)
UrbPlan 315
Great Cities of the World: Their Growth and Guided Urbanization
One of the following courses (3 cr):
Global 421
Cities in the Global Economy
Arch 533
Topics in Architectural Theory: "Politics of Urban Disaster" subtitle
Geog 443
Cities of the World: Comparative Urban Geography
One of the following courses (3 cr):
Global 521 (500)
Global Urban Development Capstone: Future Trends
Geog 540
Globalization and the City
Both of the following courses (6 cr):
Econ 103
Principles of Microeconomics
Econ 104
Principles of Macroeconomics
One of the following courses (3-4 cr):
Bus Adm 210
Introduction to Management Statistics
Econ 210
Economic Statistics
Geog 214
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences
Geog 247
Quantitative Analysis in Geography
MthStat 215
Elementary Statistical Analysis
Psych 210
Psychological Statistics
Sociol 261
Introduction to Statistical Thinking in Sociology
One of the following courses (3 cr):
Arch 300
Architectural History and Theory
Arch 301
Architectural Technologies
Arch 302
Architecture and Human Behavior
Arch 303
Architecture and Environmental Responses
Arch 330
Design Methodology
Arch 340
Urban Design
Arch 533
Topics in Architectural Theory: "Urban Design and Practical Theory" and
"Politics of Urban Disaster" subtitles (if not chosen above)
Arch 534
Field Study
Arch 585
Research Methods in Architecture
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
ELECTIVES (24 cr)
List A Students
must select 12 cr from this list:
Arch 100
Arch 101
Arch 210
Arch 280
Arch 281
Arch 300
Arch 301
Arch 302
Arch 303
Arch 310
Arch 320
Arch 330
Arch 340
Arch 390
Arch 392
Arch 410
Arch 420
Arch 533
Introduction to Architecture (A)
Introduction to Architectural Theory (A)
Introduction to Building Technologies
Introduction to Architectural Drawing
Virtual Modeling
Architectural History and Theory
Architectural Technologies
Architecture & Human Behavior
Architecture & Environmental Response
Architectural Fundamentals I
Architectural Fundamentals II
Design Methodology
Urban Design
Special Topics: "Real Estate Development" subtitle
Independent Study
Architectural Design I
Architectural Design II
Topics in Architectural Theory: “Urban Design and Practical Theory”;
“Politics of Urban Disaster” subtitles
Arch 534
Field Study
Arch 560
Introduction to Historic Preservation
Arch 585
Research Methods in Architecture
Arch 645
Studies in Urban and Community Design Theory
Arch 692
Foreign Studies Studio
Geog 247
Quantitative Analysis in Geography
Geog 403
Remote Sensing: Environmental and Land Use Analysis
Geog 525
Geographic Information Systems
Geog 547
Spatial Analysis
Geog 625
Intermediate Geographic Information Science
UrbPlan 140
Issues in Contemporary Urban Planning (SS)
UrbPlan 141
Urban Planning Solutions to Contemporary Urban Problems (SS)
UrbPlan 315
Planning for Great Cities of the World
UrbPlan 591
Introduction to Urban Geographic Information Systems for Planners
UrbPlan 614
Planning for the Suburbs
UrbPlan 630
Budgeting and Finance in the Public Sector
UrbPlan 651
Land Use Planning Practice
UrbPlan 655
Negotiation Theory and Practice for Planners
UrbPlan 661
Neighborhood Planning and Revitalization
UrbPlan 662
Land Use Planning for Urban Redevelopment
UrbPlan 684
Planning Local Economic Development
UrbPlan 692
Special Topics in Architectural Theory: "Land Use, Transportation, and the
Environment"; "Suburban Downtown Redevelopment II"; "Transportation
Planning and Policy Analysis" subtitles
                                       3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
6
3
3
1-3
3
6
6
3
3
3
3
6
6
3
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
List B Students must select 12 cr from this list:
Africol 300
Urban Violence
3
Anthro 102
Anthro 104
Anthro 431
ArtHist 360
ArtHist 361
ArtHist 458
Bus Adm 210
CES 210
Econ 210
Econ 323
English 214
English 240
English 268
English 624
FineArt 389
Geog 140
Geog 213
Geog 215
Geog 330
Geog 332
Geog 405
Geog 421
Geog 430
Geog 441
Geog 443
Geog 462
Geog 470
Geog 520
Geog 540
Geog 564
Global 321
Global 361
Global 421
Global 461
HCA 245
Hist 463
MthStat 215
Nurs101
Nurs 110
Nurs 410
Pol Sci 213
Pol Sci 413
Pol Sci 450
Pol Sci 452
PH 101
PH 375
ReligSt 250
Sociol 193
Sociol 261
Sociol 377
Sociol 495
Introduction to Anthropology: Culture and Society
Lifeways in Different Cultures: A Survey of World Societies
Urban Anthropology
Modern Architecture II: The Rise of Modern Architecture
Modern Architecture III: Contemporary Architecture
A Comparative History of Architecture and Urbanism: (with approved
subtitle)
Introduction to Management Statistics
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Science (NS)
Economic Statistics
Urban Economics
Writing in the Professions: (with approved subtitle)
Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture: (with approved subtitle)
Introduction to Cultural Studies: (with approved subtitle)
Seminar in Modern Literature: (with approved subtitle)
Fine Arts Workshop I: "Cultural Organizations of Global Cities" subtitle
Our Urban Environment: Introduction to Urban Geography (SS)
Geography of Asia
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences
Europe: East and West
China: Peoples, Regions, and Development
Cartography
Geography of Latin America
Geography of Transportation
Geography of Cities and Metropolitan Areas
Cities of the World: Comparative Urban Geography
Cultural Geography of Latin America
Geography of South Asia
Physical Geography of the City
Globalization and the City
Environmental Change and Social Justice
The Global City in History
Environment and Sustainability
Social Justice in the Global City
The Politics and Policy of Sustainability
Client Diversity in Health Sciences: An Interdisciplinary Perspective
History of the American City
Elementary Statistical Analysis (NS)
Cultural Diversity in Health Care
Introduction to Global Health
Nursing Science: Concepts in Community and Family Health
Urban Government and Politics (SS)
Governing Metropolitan Areas
Urban Political Problems
Administrative Law
Introduction to Public Health
Topics in Public Health for Undergrads
Topics in Religious Studies: "Global Perspectives on Religion and Science"
subtitle
First-Year Seminar: "College in the City" subtitle
Introduction to Statistical Thinking in Sociology
Urbanism and Urbanization
Seminar in Sociology: "Urban International Sociology" (and other approved
subtitles)
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Sociol 495
UrbPlan 316
UrbPlan 350
Urb Std 193
Urb Std 250
Urb Std 360
Urb Std 450
Theory of Development (Tentative title)
Planning for the Great Cities of America
Social Justice, Urban Planning, and the New Multicultural America
First-Year Seminar: (with approved subtitle)
Exploring the Urban Environment (SS)
Perspectives on the Urban Scene: (with approved subtitle)
Urban Growth and Development: A Global View
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
HONORS IN THE GLOBAL STUDIES DEGREE
Honors in
the Global Studies Degree is different from all-university honors and
signifies that a student has attained a
significant level of
achievement in their specific academic program. While the exact
number of students who receive
Honors in the Global Studies Degree
will vary from year to year, on average recipients can be considered
to rank among
the top 10% of Global Studies graduates.
Eligibility requirements for Honors in the Global Studies Degree are:
GPA of 3.000 or higher for all graded UWM credits attempted;
GPA of 3.500 or higher for all courses required in the Global Studies degree;
GPA of 3.750 or higher for all upper-level courses required in the Global Studies degree (minimum of 15 credits);
GPA of 3.750 or higher for all Global courses (minimum of 18 credits).
Non-UWM/transfer credits are excluded from GPA calculations for Honors
in the Global Studies Degree.
Awarding the Degree
Students who complete the Global Studies degree requirements
through the Global Urban Development track are
awarded the Bachelor of Arts
degree jointly by the College of Letters and Science and the School of
Architecture and
Urban Planning.
Students who complete the Global
Studies degree requirements through the Global Management track are
awarded the
Bachelor of Arts degree jointly by the College of Letters
and Science and the Lubar School of Business.
Students who complete
the Global Studies degree requirements through the Global
Communications track, with a
minimum of 21 credits completed in the
School of Information Studies, are awarded the Bachelor of Arts degree
jointly
by the College of Letters and Science and the School of
Information Studies. All other students who complete the
Global
Studies degree requirements through the Global Communications track
are awarded the Bachelor of Arts degree
by the College of Letters and
Science.
Students who complete the Global Studies degree requirements
through the Global Security or the Global Sustainability
track are
awarded the Bachelor of Arts degree by the College of Letters and
Science.
Exit Survey
All Global Studies degree and minor students are required to complete an assessment assignment and an exit survey
upon completion of their required coursework. This assessment process allows Global Studies students to reflect on
their experience while providing important information to help improve the program.
The exit survey is conducted online for a limited period of time during the fall, spring, and summer terms. Students who
are about to complete or who have finished all coursework and need to take the exit survey should contact Tracy Buss
([email protected]).
Courses
Global Studies (GLOBAL)
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Inter-School/College Programs
[ Schools and Colleges ]
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Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
School of Information Studies
Web Home Page:
School
of Information Studies
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science in Information
Science & Technology
Minor in Information Science &
Technology
Master of Library and Information Science
Courses: Information Studies (INFOST)
Faculty and Staff
INFORMATION STUDIES
SOIS Student Services
NWQB, 3rd Floor
(414)
229-4707
uwm.edu/informationstudies
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science Information
Science and Technology
The School of Information Studies offers
a Bachelor of Science degree in Information Science and Technology
(BSIST), an undergraduate minor in Information Science and Technology
(IST), a Master of Library and Information
Science (MLIS), a Certificate of
Advanced Studies in Archives and Records Administration, a Certificate
of Advanced
Studies in Digital Libraries, and a PhD in Information
Studies.
Master of Library and
Information Science
The master's program offered by the
School is accredited nationally by the American Library Association.
Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional
Organizations. Students should be aware that some
professions,
occupations, and employers are subject to licensing and/or bonding
requirements. When a course of study
includes clinical or field
training, practice teaching, internships, or the like, students may be
subjected to a check of
criminal conviction records, prior to
acceptance of a student by the placement site. Students are
responsible for
obtaining the information necessary for them to become
knowledgeable about these requirements and plan their studies
accordingly. Please contact the appropriate department or program
office for further information.
IST Mission Statement
The Bachelor of Science in Information Science and Technology
aims to prepare graduates who are information and
technology literate,
and who are able to effectively deal with the theory, organization,
management, and implementation
of information tools and associated
technologies in a range of interdisciplinary environments. In
addition, we will:
Educate
students, including those who might not
traditionally consider an educational path in information and
technology, especially women and minorities.
Open rewarding career
opportunities by allowing students to combine the IST program with
another area of
study.
Serve the state of Wisconsin by
way of education, community participation, and collaborative
research
partnerships.
Expand relationships with
industry to develop and advance research in Information Science and
Technology and
its applications in interdisciplinary environments.
Produce graduates who will
become leaders in the growing information economy of Wisconsin and
the world.
IST Core Competencies
The successful BSIST student will demonstrate understanding of
the following:
theoretical nature of information science and information
technologies;
organization and architecture of information based on
understanding of the context, the content, and the user
needs;
user-centered information system and service development;
information storage and retrieval systems;
management of information, including the processes to enable the
flow of information; and
use of information and communication technology for managing and
organizing information and content.
Bachelor of Science in Information
Science and Technology Program
Information science, on which the Information Science and
Technology program is based, is the study of the
organization,
storage, retrieval, dissemination, and use of information. Information
technology (IT) is the collection of
tools that make it possible to
access and use information. Some graduates will go directly
into jobs in business and
industry sectors that rely heavily on
information as a raw material or as a product. Other graduates may go
on to
graduate study in library and information science, information
management, computer science, or telecommunications.
Related Area of Study. Each student will work with his/her
advisor to select general electives, including related areas
of study
that are appropriate to his/her career goals and to complete the 120
total credit requirements for the BSIST
degree. Because of its
interdisciplinary and cross-functional nature, the BSIST program
allows students to apply the
study of the concepts and tools of
information science, information architecture, and information
technology to one or
more related areas of study. The related area of
study is a set of courses outside of the BSIST major, normally a minor
or certificate in another field of study, typically including 18-22
credits. In some cases, students may choose to study
two related areas
as part of their BSIST program.
Related Areas of Study Selected List
Computer Science
Health Care Administration
Art & Design
General Business
Library & Information Science
Philosophy
Global Studies
Intelligent Systems
Communications
Digital Arts & Culture
Mass Communication & Journalism
With the help of their advisor, students
create and customize their own associate area of study. This may be
credit-
bearing courses that students will take to prepare for
certification examinations such as Microsoft certifications, CISCO,
etc., or a customized selection of courses chosen by students that
will sharpen their skills in one or more selected areas
of study.
Career Opportunities. The Bachelor of Science in Information
Science and Technology will give students a head start
on any number
of careers in the information industry:
Information Architect
Business Information Coordinator
Network Manager
IT Consultant
Web Designer
Technology Trainer
Multimedia Specialist
Human-Computer Interface Designer
Software/Systems Developer
Technical Writer
Database Developer
Digital Library Specialist
E-Commerce Web Administrator
Admission to the BSIST Program
Standard UWM admission policies for freshmen and transfer
students apply. Students may begin the program as
freshmen or after
completing several semesters as undeclared or other majors. Students may
begin as transfer students
from another accredited college or
university or as students returning to get a second degree.
In addition to being available during standard class times, the
BSIST degree is available fully online to
serve students
both on and off campus.
Entrance Guidelines. Students who meet the standard University
admission requirements are admissible to the School
of Information
Studies. The same criteria for acceptance are applied to in-state and
out-of-state students. For
undergraduate admission requirements, see
the Admission section of this catalog.
Advising. Students accepted by UWM who declare an interest in
the IST program will be assigned a SOIS advisor.
Students are expected
to work closely with their IST advisor to tailor a program of
electives to best suit their interests
and career goals. IST students
may also wish to explore minors or certificates in related areas such
as computer science
or technical writing.
Completing the Degree. The BSIST degree includes a total of 120
credits as follows:
Area I: UWM Distribution Requirements:
General Education Requirements (GER) (21 credits).
Area II: 27 required credits in the IST major:
InfoSt 110
InfoSt 210
InfoSt 230
InfoSt 240
InfoSt 310
InfoSt 340
InfoSt 410
InfoSt 440
InfoSt 490
Introduction to Information
Science
Information Resources for
Research
Organization of Knowledge
Web Design I
Human Factors in Information
Seeking and Use
Introduction to Systems
Analysis
Database Information
Retrieval Systems
Web Application Development
Senior Capstone
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Area III: Information Studies Electives (15 credits).
Students take 5 additional Information Studies
courses at
the 300, 400, or 600 level or equivalent coursework.
Area IV: BSIST Cross-functional Electives (15
credits).
Area V: General Electives, including Associate
Area(s) of Study (42 credits).
To continue and graduate in the BSIST program, each student
must maintain a grade point average of at least 2.5 in the
major
and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 on all credits
counted toward the degree.
Four-Year Graduation Guarantee
If a student satisfies all the obligations described in the Four-Year Graduation Guarantee, the student will be able to
complete an
undergraduate degree within four years. If the undergraduate degree
completion in four years is delayed by
the unavailability of courses,
then UWM will relieve the student of the financial tuition burden for
courses still required
for graduation.
Minor in IST Option
For undergraduate students in other degree programs outside the
School of Information Studies, SOIS also offers an
undergraduate minor
in Information Science and Technology (IST). Fulfillment of the minor
entails completion of 18
credits from the following list of courses:
Required:
InfoSt 110
6 credits from:
InfoSt 210
InfoSt 230
InfoSt 240
9 credits from:
InfoSt 310
InfoSt 330
InfoSt 340
InfoSt 410
InfoSt 430
InfoSt 440
Introduction to Information
Science
3
Information Resources for
Research
Organization of Knowledge
Web Design I
Human Factors in Information
Seeking and Use
Electronic Information
Retrieval Systems
Introduction to Systems
Analysis
Database Information
Retrieval Systems
Multimedia Application
Development
Web Application Development
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Students who wish to become information and technology
literate while pursuing studies in their major areas are
candidates.
For example, the minor is attractive to students majoring in the humanities, arts, and social sciences where
the combination of their major
field with the IST minor will help prepare students for careers in
information-related
work. Fields that combine well with the IST minor
include English (particularly Technical Writing), Modern
Languages,
Communication, Mass Communication, Psychology, Sociology, and the
arts. It should also be of interest to
students majoring in
professional fields such as Computer Science and Business
Administration where the courses from
IST will complement their major.
For information on SOIS's graduate degree programs,
including the Master of Library and Information Science, and
PhD in
Information Studies, see the SOIS website at uwm.edu/informationstudies.
Courses
Information Studies
(available to all undergraduates)
Faculty and Staff
Administration
Tomas Lipinski
Dean and Professor
Laretta Henderson
Associate Dean
and Associate Professor
Heidi Janzen
Interim Assistant Dean (UBR)
Karen Masetti-Moran
Assistant Dean
(PREP)
Chad Zahrt
Assistant Dean
Laura Meyer
Business Office Assistant
Dustin Wolk
Accountant
Twyla
McGhee
Senior Academic Advisor
Sharon Lake
Senior Academic Advisor
Angela Sadowsky
Senior Academic Advisor
Tobiah Deutsch
Senior Academic Advisor
Brian Williams
Senior Academic Advisor
Julie Walker
Career Services
M. Linda Barajas
University Services Program
Associate
Rebecca Hall
Marketing Coordinator
Richard Kessler
Development Director
Evelyn Scott
Secretary to the Dean
Wendy Lohr
Administrative Assistant
Jim Schultz
Systems Administrator
Faculty
Mohammed Aman, Prof., PhD
University of Pittsburgh
Rakesh Babu, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of North Carolina
Johannes Britz, Provost, Prof., PhD
University of Pretoria, South Africa
Alexandra Dimitroff, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Michigan
Jacques du Plessis, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Utah State University
Donald Force, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of British Columbia
Matt Friedel, Sr. Lect., MBA
Marquette University
Maria Haigh, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Drexel University
Thomas Haigh, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Catherine Hansen, Sr. Lect., MLIS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Shaun Hayes, Arch. Coord., MLIS
University of Pittsburgh
Laretta Henderson, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Iowa
Adam Hudson, Sr. Lect., MLIS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Margaret Kipp, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Western Ontario
Nadine Kozak, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of California-San Diego
Joyce Latham, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Illinois
Hur-li Lee, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Rutgers University
Steven J. Miller, Sr. Lect. Emeritus, MLIS
Xiangming Mu, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Terrance Newell, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Hope Olson, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Wilhelm Peekhaus, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Western Ontario
Shana Ponelis, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Pretoria, South Africa
Betsy Schoeller, Lect., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Lyndsay Smanz, Lect., MLIS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Richard Smiraglia, Prof., PhD
University of Chicago
James Sweetland, Prof. Emeritus
Kevin Trainor, Lect., MBA
University of Chicago
Mary Wepking, School Library Media Coordinator, MLIS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Dietmar Wolfram, Prof., PhD
University of Western Ontario
Hong (Iris) Xie, Prof., PhD
Rutgers University
Jin Zhang, Prof., PhD
University of Pittsburgh
Michael Zimmer, Assoc. Prof., PhD
New York University
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
School of Information Studies
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
College of Nursing
Web Home Page:
College of Nursing
Degree Programs
Non-Nurse College Graduates
Admission: Pre-Professional (Freshmen)
Admission: Pre-Professional (Transfer Students)
Admission: Nursing Major
Student Responsibilities in the Major
Academic Regulations
Degree Requirements
Professional Credentials
Registered Nurses
Courses
Courses: College of Nursing (NURS)
Courses: UW System Collaborative Nursing Program (UWS NSG)
Faculty and Staff
NURSING
Student Affairs Office
Cunningham Hall, Room 129
(414) 229-5047 (Milwaukee);
(262) 595-2480 (Parkside)
uwm.edu/nursing
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science (BSN)
Master (MN)
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Doctor of
Nursing Practice (DNP)
The College of Nursing offers a Bachelor of Science degree (BS)
in nursing, a Master of Nursing (MN) degree, and a
Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree. These nursing
programs are fully approved through the State of Wisconsin
Board of
Nursing and accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. The
College also offers a Doctor
of Philosophy degree (PhD) in nursing.
The undergraduate program, which is offered on the Milwaukee
campus and through a Consortial Program at the UWParkside and
UW-Washington County campuses, prepares students for beginning
positions of responsibility and
leadership in providing professional
care for clients and their families in a variety of health care
settings.
Students gain experience through a range of diverse programs in
classroom and clinical settings.
The Nursing Learning Resource Center (NLRC), which serves students,
faculty, and the community, is an integral
component of the
undergraduate curriculum. This college laboratory is a mediated and
simulated learning environment
in which students perform skills
foundational to safe nursing practice in settings with clients. In
addition, the NLRC
houses a modern, well-equipped computer laboratory.
The Dr. Harriet H. Werley Center for Nursing Research and
Evaluation staff work to develop the research potential
of nursing
faculty, students, and the nursing community they serve. Personnel
offer consultation in research design,
methodology, data analysis,
computer programming, grant proposal writing, and writing for
publication. Center staff
assist faculty who have nursing research
facilitator appointments in local clinical agencies, and they contract
to provide
research-related services to agencies that do not have
direct faculty support.
The Nursing Centers at House of Peace and Silver Spring Neighborhood Center have
three purposes: 1) provide
opportunities for nursing students to
conduct health screening, health assessment and information gathering,
and support
activities; 2) demonstrate nursing as an accountable
health care profession; and 3) provide low-cost health promotion
care
to the Milwaukee community and southeastern Wisconsin. Service
programs simultaneously promote faculty
practice and research
activities as well as student learning experiences. Student
participation in the Centers' programs is
guided by faculty.
The Center for Cultural Diversity and Global Health houses a
collection of comprehensive health behavior
information for culturally
diverse groups in the Milwaukee community. The major goal of the
center is to promote the
delivery of quality health and nursing care
for culturally diverse individuals, families, groups, and communities.
To
meet this goal, the center provides students, faculty, and health
professionals stimulating learning opportunities in health
care for
culturally diverse groups through continuing education seminars,
clinical practice models, and research in
meeting the health needs of
culturally diverse groups.
The College of Nursing's Center for Nursing History includes
the Inez G. Hinsvark Historical Gallery, a unique
learning resource
located in Cunningham Hall. The
significant role of nurses in history is brought to life by artifacts,
mementos, and photographs as well as borrowed collections.
Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional
Organizations. Students should be aware that some
professions,
occupations, and employers are subject to licensing and/or bonding
requirements. When a course of study
includes clinical or field
training, practice teaching, internships, or the like, students will be
subject to a check of
criminal conviction records, prior to
acceptance of a student by the placement site. Drug testing is also a requirement
prior to starting clinical, as is verification of health and immunization status. Students are
responsible for obtaining the
information necessary for them to become
knowledgeable about these requirements and plan their studies
accordingly.
Please contact the appropriate department or program
office for further information.
Non-Nurse College Graduates
After prerequisites are met, non-nurse college graduates may be
admitted into the professional nursing major or the
master's (MN) program. Individuals' records, including consideration
of related work experiences, are assessed to assign
transfer credit
for previous college-level coursework and to offer opportunities for
credit by examination.
Admission: Pre-Professional (Freshmen)
Students intending to pursue study in professional nursing are
advised to complete the following units (one unit equals
one year) in
high school:
1/2 unit of speech (if available)
2 - 4 units of a foreign language
3 units of college preparatory mathematics at or above algebra
level (required by UWM)
1/2 unit of computer science
1 unit of biology
1 unit of chemistry
1 unit of history
3 units of social studies
4 units of English (required by UWM)
In addition to completing high school courses, applicants
seeking admission to the pre-nursing program must have a
composite ACT
score of at least 19 (SAT equivalent of 910).
Admission: Pre-Professional (Transfer
Students)
Students intending to transfer into the pre-nursing curriculum
must meet the following criteria:
1.Completion of a minimum of 15 credits;
2. Cumulative GPA of 2.5 on all completed coursework; and
3. Completion of one transferable science class with a grade of B or better.
(The required pre-nursing science courses include: Bio Sci 101,
Bio Sci 202, Bio Sci 203, Chem 101, Chem 103, and
BMS 332.)
The policies and procedures of the College apply to all students
even though the student may be enrolled in courses in
another college
or school within the University.
The general regulations governing UWM presented in this catalog
apply to all pre-nursing students. The pre-nursing
classification does
not automatically guarantee acceptance into the nursing major.
Admission: Nursing Major
Students who seek to enter the major and meet eligibility criteria (see below) are required to file an application with the
Student Affairs Office, College of Nursing. (This form is in addition to the application form required for admission to
the University.) The College of Nursing Undergraduate Program Committee reviews the applications and makes
recommendations for admission. Admission to the nursing major is highly competitive. The average GPA of
students accepted to the nursing major can be significantly higher than the minimum required GPA of 2.75, and
a science minimum GPA of 2.5, needed for application to the major.
Application Deadlines
Students who seek to enter the nursing major in September must submit applications by the preceding January 15; for
January entrance the deadline is the preceding August 15. Applications received after these dates will be reviewed on a
space-available basis.
Eligibility Criteria
Students are required to meet the following criteria
to be reviewed for selection into the nursing major:
1. Satisfactorily complete or be enrolled in the following
courses:
Chem 101*
and
Chemical Science
4
Chem 103*
Sociology (any
course)
English 102*
Psych 101
Social Science
Elective
Bio Sci 202
and
Bio Sci 203
BMS 332
Bio Sci 101
Nurs 203
Nurs 102
Nurs 101
Nurs 251
Total
Survey of Biochemistry
4
3
Writing and Critical Thinking
Introduction to Psychology
3
3
3
Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomy and Physiology II
Clinical Nutrition
General Survey of Microbiology
Growth and Development Across the Lifespan
Perspectives on Health Care Systems
Cultural Diversity in Health Care
Genetics and Genomics in Healthcare
4
4
2
4
4
2
3
2
45
2.Courses may be repeated only once. No more than three (3)
required courses may be repeated. All credit for
required courses
must have been earned in the 10 years preceding progression into the
nursing major. Grades of
less than 2.0 (C) must be replaced by grades
greater than 2.0 (C) no later than August 31 for fall applicants and
December 30 for spring applicants.
3.Achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.75 on a 4.0
scale and 2.5 in the required science courses. This
GPA is computed
on the courses listed above.
4.Achieve a minimum grade of 2.0 (C) in each required
nursing and non-nursing course as listed under 1.
5.Remove all Incompletes and replace with acceptable grades
before beginning the nursing major.
6.In addition to the satisfactory completion of courses
listed in 1, applicants must demonstrate competency in
math and
English. Competencies must be fulfilled through testing or coursework
by the date of entry into the
clinical major. Information about
competency testing is available through your advisor.
7.A statement written by the applicant to include: reason
for choosing nursing and UWM; statement of long-term
plans and goals;
and description of work/life experience and how these are viewed in
relation to nursing.
8. A letter of recommendation is required if an applicant has been enrolled in clinical nursing courses at another
College of Nursing. This reference must be from the director of that College of Nursing. The letter should reflect
a positive recommendation for the
student's progression into the nursing major.
9.An interview with the student making application may be
requested at the discretion of the Undergraduate
Program Committee.
10. Following a review of the student's record and the
progression of the student into the nursing major, the
Undergraduate
Program Committee may make recommendations intended to assist the
student. These
recommendations will be communicated to the student.
* Enrollment in freshman-level courses is based on placement test
scores. Depending on the outcome of the placement
tests, one or more
of the following preparatory courses may be required before enrollment
in higher-level courses is
permitted: Chem 100; preparatory math courses and Math 105;
English 090, 095, and 101. Credits earned in preparatory
courses
do not apply to the 124 credits
required for graduation.
After an offer of admission to the nursing major is made,
admission is contingent on demonstration of satisfactory
health as
evidenced by physical examination and fulfillment of the health and
immunization requirements by the
appropriate deadline. The College of
Nursing reserves the right to require a student to seek advice of
health care
professionals where it is believed that a condition of
health would impede his or her progress or jeopardize the health of
others. The College of Nursing does not discriminate based on a
disability and provides reasonable accommodation to
qualified students
on an individual basis.
Other requirements:
1.Prior to enrolling in the first semester of the Nursing
Major, students will be expected to have some knowledge
of a computer
word processing application. It is not recommended that students wait
until they are in the course to
learn this application due to time
constraints. It also will be helpful if students become familiar with
computerassisted library research and use of databases.
2. Prior to enrolling in the first clinical practice course, Nurs 353, students must complete a Level 3 CPR
certification program. Students will be required to upload a copy of the CPR card into the Certified Background
check.
3.Upon admission to the nursing major, successful completion of a
criminal background check is required.
Should a background check
reveal that a student has a history of a criminal charge and/or
conviction, he or she
will be asked to make an appointment with the
Academic Affairs Coordinator to discuss the implications of this
finding on his or her educational plan. For all criminal background
findings, the decision to accept a student for
clinical placement
will be made by the clinical agency, not the College of
Nursing. More information on the
Wisconsin Caregiver Background
Check Law is available at www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/caregiver.
Consult with the
College of Nursing Office of Academic Affairs at (414)
229-2310 with questions specific to this area.
Student Responsibilities in the Major
Students are expected to provide their own transportation,
uniforms, books, supplies, equipment, and other learning
resources,
such as clients for practice experience, as deemed necessary to meet
course objectives.
Health. Good physical and mental health are essential for study
and practice in professional nursing. The faculty of the
College of
Nursing reserves the responsibility for retaining only those students
who demonstrate qualities of physical
and mental health generally
considered to be imperative for professional nursing practice.
Health and accident insurance is not provided for
students by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, or by any
clinical
agency where students may be assigned for clinical experience. Nursing
students are expected to provide for
their own personal health and
accident insurance coverage.
A physical examination and specified immunizations are required of all students prior to enrollment in nursing practice
courses. Expenses of this examination are the student's responsibility. Evidence of a physical examination – to be
completed by a nurse practitioner, physician, or a physician assistant of the student's choice – must be submitted to the
UWM College of
Nursing Student Affairs Office on a date specified by the College of
Nursing. The examination must
be completed within one year before the
date on which the student begins clinical nursing coursework.
Students who do
not meet these requirements may not continue in a
clinical nursing practicum course.
Students are required to pass a 10-panel urine drug screen prior
to participating in a clinical nursing practicum course.
The
purposes of the drug screen are to comply with expectations of area
health care agencies, to provide optimal health
care, and to support
professional nursing’s zero tolerance position related to the
unlawful use of substances. Students
must abide by the drug screen
policies of each health care agency to which they are assigned for
clinical practicums.
Illness or Prolonged Absence. Students are expected to be present at all scheduled classes and clinical laboratory
experiences. Since space in nursing courses is assigned during the
first week of the semester, students are expected to be
present for
all instructional periods during that week as well. Frequent or
prolonged absences from scheduled classes
and/or clinical experiences
may necessitate that the student drop a nursing course. Any planned
interruption in
coursework should be discussed with the
student’s advisor at the earliest possible date.
Safe Professional Practice in Clinical Settings. Students are expected to demonstrate patterns of professional
behaviors that follow the legal and ethical codes of nursing; promote the actual or potential well-being of clients, health
care workers, and self in the biological, psychological, sociological, and cultural realms; demonstrate accountability in
preparation, documentation, communication, and continuity of care; and show respect for the human rights of
individuals. A student whose pattern of behavior is found to be unsafe may be terminated from a clinical practicum for
reason of unsafe practice at any time during the semester. If the behavior is
identified before the drop date, the student
will be directed to drop.
If the drop date has passed, the student will receive a grade of
F for the course. In order to
continue in the nursing
program, a student who is terminated from a clinical practicum must
appeal to the
Undergraduate Program Committee for re-admission to the
nursing program.
Travel. Students in nursing are responsible for arranging
transportation to and from all agencies or clients' homes used
to
provide clinical experience for the program. They are also responsible
for any related liability. Students are expected
to carry insurance on
their vehicles.
Uniforms. Information about the uniform, a one-time investment,
is sent to each student with the official letter of
acceptance into
the major. Students purchase their uniforms after acceptance.
Academic Regulations
For information on actions on unsatisfactory grades and honors
for scholarship, see Academic Information.
Required Grade Point Average. Every nursing student is required
to maintain a minimum of a C average (cumulative
GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0
scale) on all work attempted in each semester or summer session.
Failure to meet this minimum
GPA will automatically result in a status
of academic probation.
In addition to maintaining a cumulative GPA of 2.0, a student must earn at least a C (2.0) in each required nursing
course. (In a practicum nursing course, a student must earn at least a C in both the clinical and theoretical components in
order to receive a C as the final course grade.) Any student who earns a grade below C (2.0) in a required nursing course
is automatically dropped from the nursing
major. Such a student must appeal to the Undergraduate Program
Committee
for readmission and permission to repeat the course in which
a minimum grade of C was not earned.
In a nursing course with limited enrollment or a waiting list,
qualified students who have not taken the course previously
will have
enrollment priority. Progression to the next level of courses is not
permitted until all courses of the previous
level have been
successfully completed.
Dropping Courses. Students should refer to a current class
schedule for information concerning existing University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee drop policy guidelines and any exceptions for
individual courses.
Following admission to the nursing major, a student who wishes
to drop from a required or elective clinical nursing
course or to
withdraw must discuss the matter with the instructor, course
coordinator or department chair, and the
Associate Dean for Academic
Affairs. In addition, the student may wish to discuss the matter with
an academic advisor
in the Student Affairs Office. Written approval to
drop must be secured from the instructor and the Associate Dean
irrespective of the week of the semester. Any such interruption in the
sequence of courses following acceptance into the
major requires
re-admission to the clinical major. Information about applying for
re-admission is available in the
College of Nursing's Student
Affairs Office.
Grievance Procedure. The College of Nursing has a formal
written grievance procedure, available in the College of
Nursing's Student Affairs Office. A grievance is defined as any
situation affecting the status of a student in which the
student
believes his/her rights have been compromised or denied because of an
erroneous or arbitrary interpretation or
application of rules. Student
grievances are reviewed by the College of Nursing's Undergraduate
Program Committee,
which recommends the disposition of the grievance
to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. In addition, this
Committee reviews and acts upon all cases of academic misconduct as
described in Chapter UWS 17, UWM Student
Disciplinary Procedures.
Degree Requirements
Students must earn a minimum of 124 semester credits to complete
requirements for the undergraduate degree. A
cumulative GPA of 2.0 for
all credits earned at UWM is required for graduation. Thirty semester
credits must be
completed on the Milwaukee campus; at least 20 of
these credits must be earned in nursing. The required courses are
listed below.
English
English 112/102
Humanities
Consult class schedule
The Arts
Consult class schedule
History
Any course offered by History
Department
Social Sciences (9 cr)
Sociology – any
introductory course
Psych 101
GER – Social Science
Elective
Physical Sciences (14 cr)
Bio Sci 101
Bio Sci 202, 203
BMS 332
Electives
Credits
(GER*)
Credits (All
others)
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
4
8
2
4
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
4
8
2
10
FOREIGN LANGUAGE - Successful completion of two years
of the same foreign language
in high school or two semesters
of the same language at the college level will meet this requirement.
NURSING
Pre-Nursing (11 cr)
101
Cultural Diversity in Health Care
102
Perspectives on Health Care Systems
203
Growth and Development Across the Lifespan
251
Genetics and Genomics in Healthcare
Nursing Theory and Science (59 cr)
351
Professional Role I: Foundations of Nursing Practice
352
Health and Illness Concepts I: Introduction
353
Clinical Practicum I: Foundations
398
Health Assessment and Promotion in Nursing Practice
399
Concepts of Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapeutics I
400
Concepts of Pathophysiology and Pharmacotherapeutics II
419
Concepts of Evidence-based Nursing Practice
420
Professional Role II: Provider of Care
421
Health and Illness Concepts II: Acute and Chronic Conditions
422
Clinical Practicum II: Acute and Chronic Conditions
430
Professional Role III: Interprofessional Practice
431
Health and Illness Concepts III
432
Health and Illness Concepts IV: Population Health
433
Clinical Practicum III: Population Health
3
2
4
2
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
434
476
477
478
479
Nursing Informatics and Technology
Professional Role IV: Leading in Complex Systems
Health and Illness Concepts V: Complex
Clinical Practicum IV: Clinical Intensive
Clinical Practicum V: Capstone
3
3
3
3
3
* All students are responsible for checking whether they must
meet the UWM General Education Requirements.
Professional Credentials
Wisconsin state law requires nurses to be licensed to practice
nursing within the state. Licensure is obtained by
endorsement or by
passing an examination. Students graduating from the College of
Nursing are eligible to write the
examination if they: 1) are at least
18 years of age; 2) are graduates of a high school or its equivalent;
3) are able to
speak, read, and write English; and 4) pay the fee for
licensure. Applicants for registration/licensure in the State of
Wisconsin will be asked to state if they have ever been convicted of a
criminal offense, excluding minor traffic
violations. When individuals
have such a conviction, an explanation is requested. An investigation
may follow
depending upon the circumstances and all the facts related
to the situation. Some organizations may require background
reviews
prior to acceptance of a student by the placement site.
Registered Nurses
BSN Completion (RN-BS Program)
Flexible, affordable options have been arranged for Registered Nurses
to facilitate BSN completion. These include faceto-face courses
offered in partnership with area hospitals and off-site college
campuses, the collaborative University of
Wisconsin System BSN @ Home
online option and the Flex Option allowing for the demonstration of
competency
through assessment. Registered Nurses who wish to earn a
baccalaureate degree can progress on a full- or part-time
basis, at a
speed compatible with their other personal and professional
commitments.
Nurses who graduated from Wisconsin Technical Colleges after Dec.
31, 1989, can transfer credits from these programs
through formal VTAE
articulation agreements.
Admission. Registered Nurses follow admission procedures for transfer students, with deadlines well in advance of
the beginning of each semester. The Flex Option has unique admission requirements. To ensure success in
enrollment and advising, individuals interested in BSN completion should consult with an advisor in the Student Affairs
Office, (414) 229-5047. The advisor will provide information on all three degree completion options and route the
student through the appropriate admission procedures. The advisor
will also work with the student to complete an
individual plan of
study.
Degree Requirements. Registered Nurse students must earn a
minimum of 124 semester credits to complete
requirements for the
undergraduate degree. A cumulative GPA of 2.0 for all credits earned
at UWM is required for
graduation. Thirty semester credits must be
completed on the UWM campus; at least 20 of these credits must be
earned
in nursing.
NON-NURSING CREDITS
English Composition (second-semester level)
Humanities
The Arts
History
Social Science
Growth and Development
Sociology
Psych 101
Physical/Biological Sciences
3
3-6
0-3
3
3
3
3
Inorganic/Organic Chemistry
Biochemistry
Anatomy/Physiology
Microbiology
Nutrition
Subtotal
Electives
Total
3
3
8
4
3
39-48
16-25
64
Competencies
Math
English
Demonstration of mathematics and English proficiency by Registered
Nurse students is a requirement for enrollment in
Capstone Practicum
for Registered Nurses (445). Refer to the UWM Timetable for
definition of competencies.
Cultural Diversity
Foreign language (may or may not apply)
NURSING CREDITS
Registered Nurse students are permitted to enroll in courses out
of the usual sequence in the undergraduate curriculum
with the
exception of Capstone Practicum for Registered Nurses (445). This is
the final course and all other required
courses are prerequisite to
this course.
30 Nursing credits are awarded for previous nursing experience
when the first nursing core course is completed with a
minimum grade
of C or higher.
Advanced Nursing Courses
UWS NSG 407
UWS NSG 441
UWS NSG 445
UWS NSG 446
UWS NSG 447
UWS NSG 453
UWS NSG 454
Nursing Electives
Subtotal
Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice
Chronic Care Management
Community Health Nursing
Research Evidence-Based Practice
Leadership and Management
Information Management and Health Care Technology
Capstone Practicum
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
9
30
Equivalent courses are available on campus.
Credit Totals
Non-Nursing
Nursing
Previous Nursing Credit
Total
64 cr
30 cr
30 cr
124 cr
Courses
UW System Collaborative Degree
Program for Registered Nurses
Nursing (NURS)
Faculty and Staff
Administration
Sally Lundeen
Dean
Kim Litwack
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Rachel Schiffman
Associate Dean for Research, Center for Nursing Research and Evaluation
Bev Zabler
Assistant Dean for Practice and Partnerships
Linda Scalzo
Director, Undergraduate Program
Lisa Mihlbauer
Director, RN-BSN Program
Julie Darmody
Director, Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program
Ann Aschenbrenner
Director, Master of Nursing (MN) Program
Jean Bell-Calvin
Director, Clinical Services, Silver Spring Nursing Center
Beth Peterman
Director, Clinical Services, House of Peace Nursing Center and Franklin Pierce School
Sarah Morgan
Interim Director, Nursing Learning Resource Center
Rochelle Nelson
Coordinator, UWM/UW-Parkside Consortial Nursing Program
Lauren K. Glass
Coordinator, Center for Nursing History
Anne Dressel
Director, Center for Cultural Diversity and Global Health and Institute for Urban Health Partnerships
Student Affairs Office
Robin Jens
Assistant Dean, Student Services
Sylvia Forbes
Program Manager, RN-BS Program
Jennifer Daood
Graduate Advisor
Deatra Holloway
Undergraduate Advisor
Donna Wier
Undergraduate Senior Advisor
Ericka Wade
UWP/Gateway Tech Advisor
Kristin Hoffmann
Flex Advisor
Ebony Cobb
Outreach Specialist, WCTC & MATC
Carrie Von Bohlen
Coordinator, Academic Enrichment Center
Faculty
Mary Jo Baisch, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Aaron Buseh, Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Jeeyae Choi, Asst. Prof., DNSc.
Columbia University-New York
Jacqueline Clinton, Prof. Emerita, PhD; FAAN
Amy Coenen, Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Kathleen V. Cowles, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Susan L. Dean-Baar, Prof. Emerita., PhD; FAAN
Elizabeth C. Devine, Prof. Emerita, PhD; FAAN
Jennifer Doering, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Arizona
Susan A. Fontana, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Illinois-Chicago
Lauren K. Glass, Prof. Emerita, PhD; FAAN
J. June Grommes, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, MPH
Jeanne B. Hewitt, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Illinois-Chicago
Eugenie Hildebrandt, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Teresa Johnson, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Illinois-Chicago
Peninnah Kako, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Jennifer Kibicho, Asst. Prof., PhD
Wayne State University
Christine Kovach, Prof., PhD; FAAN
University of Rochester
Alice M. Kuramoto, Prof. Emerita, PhD; FAAN
Norma Lang, Prof. Emertia, PhD; FAAN
Jane S. Leske, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Kim Litwack, Assoc. Prof., PhD; FAAN
Kent State University
Harriet E. Lazinski, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, MS
Sally Lundeen, Prof., PhD; FAAN
University of Illinois-Chicago
Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Karen Morin, Prof. Emerita, DSN; FAAN
University of Alabama-Birmingham
Sandra Millon-Underwood, Prof., PhD; FAAN
Northwestern University
Ellen K. Murphy, Prof. Emerita, JD; FAAN
Lois C. Olsen, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, MS
Joan E. Oppeneer, Asst. Prof. Emerita, MS
Sandra Plach, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Michele Polfuss, Asst. Prof., PhD
Marquette University
Carol M. Porth, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Beth L. Rodgers, Prof. Emerita, PhD; FAAN
Kathleen Sawin, Prof., DNS; FAAN
Rachel Schiffman, Prof., PhD; FAAN
University of Connecticut
Nuananong Seal, Asst. Prof., PhD
Case Western Reserve University
Florence E. Selder, Prof. Emerita, PhD; FAAN
Eileen P. Sheil, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Julie Snethen, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Patricia E. Stevens, Prof., PhD; FAAN
University of California, San Francisco
Hong Tao, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Illinois at Chicago
Vipavee Thongpriwan, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Illinois-Chicago
Mary E. Wierenga, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Joan A. Wilk, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
College of Nursing
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health
Web Home Page:
Zilber School of Public Health
About the School
Undergraduate Courses
Zilber School of Public Health
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
1240 N. 10th Street
Milwaukee, WI 53205
p. (414) 227-3001
About Public Health
The UW-Milwaukee Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health advances population health, health equity, and social and
environmental justice among diverse communities in Milwaukee, the state of Wisconsin, and beyond through education,
research, community engagement, and advocacy for health-promoting policies and strategies. Public health differs from
healthcare in two main ways. First, public health is population-based. Instead of treating patients one-on-one, public
health studies health trends in neighborhoods, cities, states, countries, or across the world. Second, public health focuses
on prevention. Instead of treating patients after they are sick or injured, public health professionals work to decrease
rates of illness and injury.
UWM’s Zilber SPH offers graduate degree programs and select undergraduate courses in-person and online. Public
health courses cover a range of topics, helpful to prepare for many careers. Start with the introduction course, PH 101,
and if it sparks your interest, enroll in a specialized, more advanced class. These cover topics as diverse as climate
change and human health (PH 303), common risky behaviors in adolescence (PH 306), and how factors like race impact
population health (PH 319). PH 101 and PH 306 meet the Social Sciences (SS) GER, and PH 303 meets the Natural
Sciences (NS) GER.
Graduate degree programs include three doctoral degrees and the Master of Public Health with five tracks: Biostatistics,
Community and Behavioral Health Promotion, Environmental Health Sciences, Epidemiology and Public Health Policy
and Administration. Graduates from across UWM may have an interest in one of these exciting tracks of study.
Interested undergraduates should contact [email protected] to learn more.
Undergraduate Courses
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Zilber School of Public Health
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Peck School of the Arts
Web Home Page: The Arts
Degree Programs
Admission
Degree Requirements
Teacher Certification Program - Peck School of the Arts
Declaration of Submajor
Academic Regulations
Special Opportunities
The Arts Core Curriculum
Art and Design
Courses: Art (ART)
Courses: Art Education (ART ED)
Dance
Courses: Dance (DANCE)
Film
Courses: Film (FILM)
Music
Courses: Music (MUSIC)
Courses: Music Performance (MUSPERF)
Courses: Music Education (MUS ED)
Theatre
Courses: Theatre (THEATRE)
Inter-Arts
Courses: Fine Arts (FINEART)
Faculty and Staff
THE ARTS
Peck School of the Arts Office of Student Services
(414) 229-4763
[email protected]
uwm.edu/arts
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Arts Art, Dance, Music, Theatre
Bachelor of Fine Arts Art, Art Education, Dance, Film,
Inter-Arts, Music, Music Education, Theatre
Master of Arts Art
Master of Fine Arts Art, Performing Arts (Dance and Film)
Master of Music (including Music Education)
Master of Science Art Education
The Peck School of the Arts includes five departments: Art &
Design, Dance, Film, Music, and Theatre. Curricula are
available for
students interested in careers in the arts or in teaching at the
elementary, secondary, or college level. An
Inter-Arts major, which
prepares the student for an interdisciplinary arts career, is also
offered.
ATTENTION - Special Information Regarding Laptop
Requirement in Peck School of the Arts Degree
Programs.
All
students entering the following degree programs/areas in the Peck
School of the Arts are required to participate in
the PSOA Laptop
Program:
• BFA/BA Art & Design;
• BFA/BA
Dance;
• BFA Film;
• BFA Music Composition and
Technology Track in the Department of Music;
• BFA
Technical Production, BA Design Emphasis, BA Stage Management, and BA
Theatre Education programs in the
Department of Theatre; and
• BFA Interdisciplinary Arts and Technology Track (IAT) of the
Inter-Arts Program.
This includes students transferring
from an institution external to UWM or from another UWM program,
school, or
college. Requirements will include either the purchase of or
regular access to a laptop. The laptop must be equipped to
enable
students to effectively perform all required coursework, including that
accomplished during class time. For
additional information, please see
requirements posted on the PSOA Laptop Requirement web page:
uwm.edu/arts/apply/laptop.
Admission
New Freshmen. New freshmen must meet the general University
admission requirements (as described in the front
section of this
catalog) in addition to specific department requirements. Admission to
all music programs requires an
audition and a theory placement
examination. Admission to the Musical Theatre track of the Inter-Arts
degree program
requires a live audition interview. A portfolio of artworks is required by the Department of Art & Design. For details,
please refer to the individual department sections of this catalog.
Transfer Students. Transfer students from other universities
and colleges or UWM units are accepted by the Peck
School of the Arts
provided they meet the UWM admissions criteria and have a 2.0
cumulative GPA (on a 4-point
scale). They must also meet the specific
departmental audition requirements described above. Although a
portfolio is
not required for acceptance into the Department of Art
& Design, the submission of a portfolio is helpful in evaluating a
student's work for advanced placement.
Second Bachelor's Degree Candidates. Students with good
scholastic records who wish to earn a second bachelor's
degree in
the Peck School of the Arts must obtain the recommendation of the Peck
School of the Arts department in
which they wish to major before they
can be accepted. Upon acceptance, students must earn in residence a
minimum of
30 credits beyond the studies for the first degree and must
satisfy all curriculum requirements.
New Major Program. By choosing this program, students who have
completed baccalaureate degrees at UWM or other
accredited
institutions may earn an additional major only. It is not necessary to
complete all requirements for an
additional baccalaureate degree or to
observe the 30-credit-in-residence regulation. At present, the
Departments of Art
& Design, Dance, Film, and Music offer majors
through this option.
Theatre Minor. Students wishing to earn a theatre minor can do
so by completing 18 credits of theatre courses as
specified under the
Theatre Program listing.
Degree Requirements
Students must earn their last 30 credits in residence at UWM. Of
this total, a minimum of 15 credits must be in
advanced major
subjects. Under extraordinary circumstances, a student may receive
permission to earn a maximum of 9
credits of the last 30 credits at
another college/university but must obtain the written approval of the
Director of Student
Services prior to enrollment in such courses.
Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art, Dance, Music, and Theatre.
Requires a total of 120 credits. To receive this degree,
students must
fulfill the requirements listed in Nos. 1-4 under the BFA degree
below. See the individual department
listings in this catalog for
additional information.
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Art, Dance, Film, Inter-Arts,
Music, or Theatre. Requires a total of 120-130
credits. To receive
this degree students must:
1.Attain a minimum GPA of 2.0 for all university-level
work;
2.Fulfill all the curriculum requirements of the School and
of the departmental major, and the University's
General
Education Requirements;
3.Meet the specific departmental standards; and
4.Fulfill the residence requirements as detailed above.
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree with Teacher Certification in Art
or Music and Bachelor of Arts Degree in Theatre
with Teacher
Certification. The BFA degree in Art Education or Music Education
requires a total of 130 credits; the
BA degree in theatre with teacher
certification requires a total of 120 credits. To receive these
degrees students must:
1.Attain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75;
2.Fulfill all curriculum requirements of the School, of the
departmental major, and the University's General
Education
Requirements;
3.Fulfill the certification requirements in human relations
(see School of Education section of this catalog),
developmental
reading, and exceptional education (see Teacher Certification Program
description below for
details and admission requirements);
4.Fulfill the Act 31 certification requirement regarding
"specific attention to the history, culture and tribal
sovereignty of
the federally recognized American Indian tribes and bands located in
this state" through selected
coursework. Consult with the Director
of Student Services for specific courses; and
5.Fulfill residence requirements as described above.
Post-baccalaureate Teacher Certification Program. Offered in
art, dance, music, and theatre. All applicants should
consult the
appropriate department chairperson concerning requirements in these
programs.
Teacher Certification Program - Peck
School of the Arts
Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional
Organizations. Students should be aware that some
professions,
occupations, and employers are subject to licensing and/or bonding
requirements. When a course of study
includes clinical or field
training, practice teaching, internships, or the like, students may be
subjected to a check of
criminal conviction records, prior to
acceptance of a student by the placement site. Students are
responsible for
obtaining the information necessary for them to become
knowledgeable about these requirements and plan their studies
accordingly. Please contact the appropriate department or program
office for further information.
All PSOA teacher education students (art, dance, music, theatre)
are required to keep a portfolio of evidence to
document satisfaction
of PI 34 standards. Portfolio content is defined, evaluated, and
reviewed by individual programs.
Passing scores on the Praxis I and
successful completion of K-12 required classes are required before
admission to
student teaching. Art, music, and theatre teacher
education students are also required to pass the content test (Praxis
II)
prior to student teaching. See specific program for more
information.
Admission Requirements. All students should submit an
application to the Director of Student Services and confer
with the
education area head of their department.
Art education students may apply to the program upon completion
of 30 credits if they have fulfilled the freshman
year
foundation courses in art and the requirements listed below.
Music education majors may apply upon completion of 58 credits
and junior standing and the listed requirements.
Theatre teacher certification students may apply upon
completion of the required 32-credit core in the major, junior
standing, and the requirements listed below. In addition, theatre
certification students must successfully pass an
interview with
theatre certification faculty.
All students must attain the following before making application
to the teacher certification programs in art, music, and
theatre:
Grade Point Average. 2.75.
Communication Competency. A grade of C or higher in one of the
following: Commun 101, 103, or 201.
The communicative abilities
of students remain under constant review as a factor for retention in
the program. Students
experiencing communication difficulty may be
remanded for remedial work. Students who have satisfactorily
completed
an interpersonal course at another college or university may request
an evaluation of their communication
status through the Department of
Communication.
English Composition
Requirement. The English Composition Requirement is satisfied by
earning a grade of C or
higher in English 102 or its equivalent, or by
scoring 637 or better on the English Placement Test (or an appropriate
score as determined by the Department of English on the English ACT
examination).
Mathematical Skills
Requirement. Must be demonstrated by achieving a placement code of at
least 30 on the
mathematics placement test, or by earning at least 3
credits with a grade of C or higher in Mathematical Sciences 105,
106,
109/175, or equivalent courses.
Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST). Must earn scores in Reading 175,
Math 173, Writing 174. Registration forms are
available in the Peck
School of the Arts Office of Student Services.
Developmental Reading Course Requirement. All teachers of
special subjects (e.g., music, art, theatre) wishing to be
certified
by the State of Wisconsin (K-12) must complete one course in
developmental reading at the elementary or
secondary level.
At present, the Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers
CurrIns 343, for those interested in the elementary
level, and CurrIns 545, for those interested in the
secondary level. Only one of these 3-credit courses is necessary to
fulfill the requirement. This course may be applied toward the core
curriculum requirement.
Exceptional Education Requirement. Persons applying for an
initial license to teach any subject in the elementary and
secondary
schools of Wisconsin after July 1, 1981, must have completed at least
3 credits or the equivalent study of
exceptional education to be
eligible for a license. See the Art, Dance, Music, or Theatre
Department sections for
appropriate course requirements.
Student Teaching. Eligibility for student teaching is
determined by admission to the Teacher Certification Program of
the
Peck School of the Arts, departmental recommendation, and completion
of all prerequisite courses and any other
departmental requirements.
In general, education methods courses are not transferable from
other institutions. These courses must be taken in
residence. Other
criteria include removal of all incompletes in required courses,
compliance with the Human Relations
Requirement, satisfactory class
standing, health clearance, recommendation by the department, and
submission of the
student teacher application.
Applications to student teach during the first semester are due
March 15; during the second semester, October 15.
Application blanks
are available in, and must be filed with, the Peck School of the Arts
Office of Student Services. No
applications will be accepted after
these dates.
Teacher's License Applications. Students eligible for
graduation are not automatically recommended for certification
to the
State Department of Public Instruction. They must first be approved
for certification by their departments.
After all requirements for the BFA or BA degree with Teacher
Certification or a post-baccalaureate degree certification
program are
completed, and the departmental approval is obtained, a student may
apply for a state teacher's license. A
Wisconsin Credential
Application form is available from the Peck School of the Arts Office
of Student Services, UWM,
P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, or from the
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 126 Langdon
Street,
Madison, Wisconsin 53702.
The Department of Public Instruction conducts a criminal record
check of each applicant for a teaching license. Based
on this
information, an applicant may be denied a license even if recommended
for certification by the University.
Declaration of Submajor
In most instances, after two years of basic preparatory courses
in the major, students choose an area of specialization
within their
respective departments, known as a submajor. Students must declare a
submajor after they have
accumulated 45 to 75 credits in order to
assure completion of the appropriate curriculum requirements for
graduation.
Academic Regulations
For information on actions on unsatisfactory grades and honors
for scholarship, see Academic Information - Universitywide Academic
Action Policy, and Honors for Scholarship.
Semester Credit Load. A full-time Peck School of the Arts
student is one who takes a minimum of 12 credits per
semester.
Normally, Peck School of the Arts students are not permitted to carry
more than 18 credits per semester.
Students who have a cumulative GPA
of 3.0 or higher may, with the permission of the Peck School of the
Arts Office of
Student Affairs, carry up to 20 credits per semester.
Program Changes. All program changes must be signed by the
instructor and the Peck School of the Arts Office of
Student Services.
No studio or performance courses may be dropped after the second week
of classes without the written approval of the
instructor and the
department chairperson. Certain other courses may require this
approval also and these will be
indicated in the semester's Schedule
of Classes.
For general information and instructions regarding program
changes, see the Academic Information page.
Audit Courses. No studio or performance courses may be audited.
For general information regarding the UWM audit
policy, see Academic
Opportunities.
Independent Study. Under special conditions, juniors and
seniors are permitted to take courses in independent study.
For
regulations on independent study, see the departmental advisor.
Special Opportunities
Honors Program. The Peck School of the Arts confers a Bachelor
of Fine Arts Honors degree upon those students who
complete the
University Honors Program. The Honor designation appears on both the
diploma and transcript.
This program is administered by the College of Letters and
Science and offers seminars and individualized instruction in
the
humanities, arts, social sciences, and natural sciences to qualified
students who desire more intensive and
individualized studies.
Application forms and further information are available from the
Honors College, Honors House
154, (414) 229-4658.
Foreign Study. The Peck School of the Arts looks favorably upon
foreign educational experiences and encourages
students to seek study
abroad at accredited institutions. Every effort will be made to
integrate such courses into a
student's major program. Students
should consult the departments involved prior to registration at a
foreign university.
Periodically, the Department of Art & Design offers credit
courses in foreign countries under the direction and
instruction of
Department of Art & Design faculty members.
The Arts Core Curriculum
In addition to the specific requirements of their majors, all
Peck School of the Arts students must fulfill the core
curriculum (45
cr), which includes competency in English composition and mathematical
skills as described below.
Students need not complete the core
curriculum before registration in a professional program.
Students are expected to begin work in their major fields during the
freshman year. Core courses are taken concurrently
with the course
sequence of the major. Any questions regarding core curriculum
requirements or changes should be
directed to the Peck School of the
Arts Office of Student Services.
The core curriculum requires a minimum of 45 credits and includes the
University's General Education Requirements.
COMPETENCY REQUIREMENTS
Oral and Written Communication (OWC) Competency
OWC Part A: Completion of OWC Part A can be
demonstrated by satisfying one of the following options:
1. Earning at least three credits with a grade of C or higher in
English 102;* or
2. Transferring at least three credits with a grade of C or
higher in a course equivalent to English 102 or higher level
expository writing course;* or
3. Achieving an appropriate score on the English Placement Test
(EPT).
OWC Part B: The OWC Part B is satisfied by completing
an approved advanced course (at least three credits) with a
significant
written or oral communication component by students who have completed
the Part A requirement.
Peck School of the Arts majors should contact the PSOA Student Services Office for information on the course in their
major that will satisfy the OWC Part B requirement.
Quantitative Literacy (QL) Competency
QL
Part A: Completion of QL Part A can be demonstrated by satisfying one
of the following options:
1. Earning at least three credits with a grade of C or higher in
Math 103 (formerly 106), 105, 175 or equivalent
courses;* or
2. Achieving a placement code of at least 30 on the mathematics
placement test.
QL Part B: The QL Part B is satisfied by completing at
least one approved QL Part B course (at least three credits) as
decided by
the major. QL Part B courses make significant use of quantitative tools in
the context of other course
material.
* These courses
may not be taken credit/no credit if they are to be used to satisfy the
OWC Part A requirement or QL
Part A requirement.
Foreign Language. Completion of the foreign language
requirement can be demonstrated by satisfying one of the
following
options:
1. Complete with passing grades, prior to enrollment at UWM, at
least two consecutive years of high school-level
instruction in a
single foreign language; or
2. Complete with passing grades at least two consecutive
semesters (minimum of 6 credits) of college level
instruction in a
single foreign language; or
3. Demonstrate foreign language ability at least equivalent to
No. 2 above by means of a satisfactory score on an
approved placement,
proficiency, departmental or other appropriate examination.
DISTRIBUTION
REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES: 30 CREDITS
Thirty credits of distribution requirements and electives chosen from
any school or college outside the Peck School of
the Arts:
Arts (appropriate courses
earned in the major may satisfy)
Humanities
Social Sciences
Natural Sciences
Cultural Diversity (May be
met by any 3-credit course so designated and which has
been
approved for GER distribution in the humanities, social sciences, or
the arts.)
Electives (depends upon the
major)
3
6
6
6
0-18
Two courses, totaling 6 credits, must be taken in the humanities,
social sciences, and natural sciences. At least one of the
natural
science courses must include a laboratory or field experience. Courses that satisfy this distribution requirement
are listed in the current
Schedule of Classes. Special departmental curricula may specify
certain courses to be included
in the 30-credit requirement. Consult
curriculum requirements.
PECK SCHOOL OF THE ARTS COURSE REQUIREMENT: 12
CREDITS
Nine credits are required in Peck School of the Arts courses outside the student’s discipline, i.e., art, dance, film, music
or theatre. These credits are to be distributed as follows: Three credits must be taken in each of three Arts disciplines. In
addition, three credits must be taken in any one of the five disciplines in the Peck School of the Arts at the discretion of
the student's major department. (Do not confuse the term “discipline” with a concentration, e.g., ceramics, music
performance, or costume construction, etc.)
A list of suggested courses to fulfill this requirement is
available in the Peck School of the Arts Office of Student
Services.
Free Electives: 3 Cr
Remaining credits (3) of the 45-credit total required may be
elected from any area of the University, including Peck
School of the
Arts courses outside the student's discipline.
Faculty and Staff
ADMINISTRATION
Scott Emmons
Dean
Kimberly Cosier
Associate Dean
James Burmeister
Interim Assistant Dean
Amanda Obermeyer
Assistant Dean for Business Administration
Robert Scudder
Assistant Dean Emeritus for Business
Louis Molina
Assistant Dean of Student Services
ART & DESIGN
John Balsley, Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Kimberly Beckmann, Assoc. Prof., MFA
Cranbrook Academy of Art
Adream Blair, Assoc. Prof., MA
North Carolina State University
Marna Brauner, Prof. Emerita, MFA
Robert Burkert, Prof. Emeritus, MS
Kyoung Ae Cho, Prof., MFA, Chair
Cranbrook Academy of Art
Allison Cooke, Sr. Lect. Emerita, MFA
Kimberly Cosier, Prof., PhD, Assoc. Dean
Indiana University
Christopher Davis-Benavides, Prof., MFA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Raoul Deal, Sr. Lect., MA
National School of Plastic Arts, UNAM (San Carlos)
Frankie Flood, Assoc. Prof., MFA
University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana
Lee Ann Garrison, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, MFA
Robert Grame, Assoc. Prof., MFA
Kansas State University
Shelleen Greene, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Irvine
Karen Gunderman, Prof. Emerita, MFA
Rolf Hickman, Prof. Emeritus, MEd
Yevgeniya Kaganovich, Prof., MFA
State University of New York at New Paltz
Kay Knight, Assoc. Prof., MFA
Washington University
Charles Kraus, Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Rina Kundu, Asst. Prof., PhD
Ohio State University
Frank G. Lutz, Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Ryan Mandell, Asst. Prof., MFA
Indiana University
Jessica Meuninck Ganger, Asst. Prof., MFA
Minneapolis College of Art and Design
Lisa Moline, Assoc. Prof., MFA
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Joseph Mougel, Asst. Prof., MFA
University of New Mexico
William Nichols, Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Narendra Patel, Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Stephen Pevnick, Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Adolph Rosenblatt, Prof. Emeritus, BFA
Stephen B. Samerjan, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Denis Sargent, Prof. Emeritus, MFA
William Smith, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Nathaniel Stern, Assoc. Prof., PhD
New York University
Leon Travanti, Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Leslie Vansen, Prof., MFA
University of Colorado
Christine Woywod, Asst. Prof., PhD
Northern Illinois University, Dekalb
DANCE
Daniel Burkholder, Asst. Prof., MFA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Ferne Caulker-Bronson, Prof., BS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Simone Ferro, Prof., MFA
University of Iowa
Maria Gillespie, Asst. Prof., MFA
University of California, Los Angeles
Gloria Gustafson, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, BA
Mary Hibbard, Asst. Prof. Emerita
Danielle Kuepper, Sr. Lect., MFA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Marcia Parsons, Prof., M.A.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Darci Brown Wutz, Assoc. Prof., MFA, Chair
Smith College
FILM
Richard Blau, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Carl Bogner, Sr. Lect., BFA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Portia Cobb, Assoc. Prof., MA
San Francisco State University
Cecelia Condit, Prof., MFA
Tyler School of Art, Temple University
Rob Danielson, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Lori Felker, Visiting Asst. Prof., MFA
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Steven Foster, Prof. Emeritus, MFA
Kelly Kirshtner, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of California, Irvine
Diane Kitchen, Prof. Emerita, MFA
Jesse McLean, Asst. Prof., MFA
University of California, Irvine
Stephen Wetzel, Asst. Prof., MFA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Iverson White, Assoc. Prof., MFA
University of California, Los Angeles
Rob Yeo, Assoc. Prof., MFA, Chair
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
MUSIC
Elena Abend, Sr. Lect., MM
The Juilliard School
Beverly Belfer, Sr. Lect., MM
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Barry Benjamin, Prof. Emeritus, BM
Efim Boico, Prof., Diploma
Gnessin Music School, Moscow, Russia
Jane Bowers, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Mitchell Brauner, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
James Burmeister, Sr. Lect. and Interim Asst. Dean, MM
University of Michigan
John Climer, Prof., DMA
University of Missouri-Kansas City
Jennifer Clippert, Asst. Prof., DM
Northwestern University
Robert Cohen, Artist-in-Residence, Diploma
Guildhall School of Music and Drama, London
Wayne Cook, Prof. Emeritus, MS
Scott Corley, Sr. Lect., MM
University of Georgia
Margery Deutsch, Prof. Emerita, MM
Zachary Durlam, Asst. Prof., DMA
Michigan State University
William H. Duvall, Jr., Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, MMA
Thomas Dvorak, Prof. Emeritus, MM
Scott Emmons, Prof., PhD, Dean
Eastman School of Music
Valerie Errante, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, DMA
Ralph Evans, Prof., DMA
Yale University
Sheila Feay-Shaw, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Washington
Gregory Flint, Assoc. Prof., BM
Northwestern University
Robert Goodberg, Prof. Emeritus, MA
Curt Hanrahan, Sr. Lect., MM
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Gloria Hansen, Sr. Lect., MM
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Sharon A. Hansen, Prof. Emerita, DMA
Kevin Hartman, Prof., MM
Northwestern University
William Heinrichs, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Iowa
Juan-Miguel Hernandez, Artist-in-Residence, Graduate Diploma
New England Conservatory
Jerry Horner, Prof. Emeritus, MM
Rene Izquierdo, Assoc. Prof., MM
Yale University
Judit Jaimes, Prof. Emerita, BM
Stefan Kartman, Prof., MM
Juilliard School of Music
Jun Kim, Asst. Prof., DMA
University of Cincinnati
Abram Loft, Distinguished Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Franklin S. Miller, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Jonathan Monhardt, Sr. Inst. Spec., PhD
University of Iowa
Daniel Nelson, Prof. Emeritus, MM
Stephen Nelson-Raney, Sr. Lect. Emeritus, MMEd
Tim Noonan, Sr. Lect., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Mary Pautz, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Jeffry Peterson, Prof., MM
University of Illinois-Urbana
Gillian Rodger, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Pittsburgh
Tanya Kruse Ruck, Asst. Prof., MM
University of Cincinnati
William R. Schmid, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
John Stropes, Faculty Associate, BS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Gregoria Karides Suchy, Prof. Emerita, MM
Robert K. Thompson, Prof. Emeritus, BM
Jon Welstead, Prof., PhD, Chair
University of Iowa
Yehuda Yannay, Prof. Emeritus, DMA
Bernard Zinck, Assoc. Prof., MM
The Juilliard School
THEATRE
Anne Basting, Prof., PhD
University of Minnesota
Richard H. Graham, Assoc. Prof., BFA
North Carolina School of Performing Arts
Christopher Guse, Assoc. Prof., BFA
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Rebecca Holderness, Assoc. Prof., MFA
Columbia University
Anthony Horne, Assoc. Prof., MFA
University of Memphis
Jeffrey Lieder, Prof., MFA
Ohio State University
Michelle Lopez-Rios, Assoc. Prof., MFA
University of Houston
Raeleen McMillion, Sr. Lect., MFA
Ohio University
Robin Mello, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Lesley University
Corliss E. Phillabaum, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Alvaro Saar Rios, Asst. Prof., MFA
Northwestern University
Pamela Schermer, Assoc. Prof., MFA
Queens College
LeRoy Stoner, Assoc. Prof., MA, Chair
Indiana University
Sandra Strawn, Prof., BSE
Emporia State University
Jewel Walker, Prof. Emeritus
William Watson, Assoc. Prof., MFA
University of Washington
Stephen White, Sr. Lect., MFA
Northwestern University
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Peck School of the Arts
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Helen Bader School of Social Welfare
Web Home Page:
Helen Bader School of Social Welfare
Degree Programs
Admission
Degree Requirements
Course of Study
Academic Regulations
Social Work
Courses: Social Work (SOC WRK)
Criminal Justice
Courses: Criminal Justice (CRM JST)
Military Science
Courses: Military Science (MIL SCI)
Certificate Program in Forensic Sciences
Faculty and Staff
SOCIAL WELFARE
Student Services
Enderis Hall, Room 1110
(414) 229-4852
uwm.edu/socialwelfare
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science Criminal Justice, Social Work
Master of Science Criminal Justice
Master of Social Work
Doctor of Philosophy Social Welfare
The Helen Bader School of Social Welfare offers programs to
educate students about social policies and programs, and
to train them
for beginning level practice in a variety of professional roles in
social work and criminal justice. Its
location in metropolitan
Milwaukee gives students numerous opportunities to gain practical
experience in social, health,
educational, or criminal justice
agencies.
Undergraduate majors in both social work and criminal justice
lead to the Bachelor of Science degree, and are designed
to prepare
students for available entry-level positions in their respective
fields. These programs also provide excellent
preparation for graduate
work.
The School also offers graduate programs at the master's degree
level in both criminal justice and social work (see the
UWM Graduate
School Bulletin).
Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional
Organizations. Effective October 1, 1998, changes in
Chapters 48
(Children's Code) and 50 (Uniform Licensure) of the Wisconsin
State Statutes make it a requirement for
selected organizations to
perform rigorous background checks of persons who provide care for
vulnerable adults and
children or who have access to people who
receive such care.
The results of these background checks are intended to help employers
and government officials in making employment
and licensing decisions.
The law affects anyone who is employed as a caregiver or who has
access to clients within
caregiving organizations, including
students. The organizations required to perform these background
checks are those
which are regulated by the State Department of Health
and Family Services (DHFS).
The law means that if you are going to train (including a field
or clinical placement) or work in an agency providing
care to
vulnerable adults or children, and that agency is regulated by DHFS, a
background check will be required of you.
A background check may be
required even if you do not have direct caregiving responsibilities to
clients. Depending on
the circumstances, a student may be disqualified
from field placement in certain agencies as a result of this law.
Students are responsible for obtaining the information necessary for
them to become knowledgeable about these
requirements and plan their
studies accordingly.
Admission
Freshmen entering UWM who indicate an interest in criminal
justice or social work are admitted directly into the Helen
Bader
School of Social Welfare, and are designated criminal justice or
social work intended majors.
Admission to the University does not guarantee enrollment in the
social work or criminal justice major; separate
applications will be
required for these programs in the junior year.
Transfer students who transfer from outside UWM to criminal
justice or social work become criminal justice or social
work intended
majors upon admission regardless of the number of credits they
transfer. They can apply for admission to
the major when they have at
least junior standing and have completed one full-time semester or the
equivalent at UWM.
Those who transfer from two-year UW College
campuses, Milwaukee Area Technical College, and other two-year
institutions (junior colleges) are generally allowed to transfer up to
72 credits toward a degree in the Helen Bader
School of Social
Welfare.
Second bachelor's degree students applying to the
University who already hold one bachelor's degree and who wish to
pursue a second degree in either criminal justice or social work are
admitted as intended majors and then apply for
admission to the major.
They must complete at least 30 credits at UWM beyond the credits that counted toward the first
degree, and must satisfy the same degree and
curriculum requirements as students working towards a first degree in
the
same major.
Special students in the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare and
University special students are permitted to register in
any
undergraduate course offered by the School, provided they meet the
stated prerequisites or are admitted to the
course by the instructor.
Degree Requirements
To receive the bachelor's degree with a criminal justice or
social work major, the student must complete at least 30
degree
credits at UWM. In both majors, an overall GPA (including non-UWM
college work) of 2.0 and a total of 120
credits are needed for
graduation. At least 15 credits in the criminal justice or 21 credits
in the social work portion of the
major must be earned at UWM. Social
work students must complete at least one semester of field placement
at UWM.
Students must earn their last 30 credits at UWM.
Course of Study
All social work and criminal justice majors who began their
education in fall 1999 or later must meet the requirements
below.
Others should contact an advisor in the School to determine their
degree requirements.
GENERAL CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS: SOCIAL
WORK AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
For courses that satisfy the distribution requirements in humanities,
natural science, and social science, see the GER
listing in the
current Timetable. The UWM General Education Requirements apply
to all students who were not enrolled
in an accredited institution
prior to 1986.
Proficiency Requirements in English and Mathematics. Refer to
General Education Requirements. Contact a school
advisor for specific
information.
Liberal Arts Foundation. The student must fulfill the following
course distribution requirements:
Arts. 3 credits of General Education-approved arts course in
the history, philosophy, theory, or practice of the creative
and
interpretive arts.
Foreign Language. Completion of two years of high school-level
instruction in a single foreign language, or
satisfactory completion
of at least two semesters of a single foreign language, or approved
demonstration of foreign
language ability.
Humanities. 12 credits of General Education-approved humanities
courses, including Commun 103, Public Speaking.
Natural Science. 6 credits of General Education-approved
natural science courses to include a lab or field course.
United States History and Institutions, 6 credits. Either one
continuous-year course in U.S. history chosen from
option I below or
one semester in advanced U.S. history courses (numbered over 400) plus
one of the courses taken
from option II.
OPTION I
Hist 151
and
Hist 152
or
Hist 421
and
Hist 422
American History: 1607 to 1865
American History: 1865 to the Present
3
American Thought and Culture: To 1860
American Thought and Culture: Since 1860
3
Introduction to Economics
Principles of Microeconomics
American Politics: The National Scene
State Politics
American Political Thought
State Government
Constitutional Law: The Supreme Court and Political Process
Constitutional Law: Individual Rights and Liberties
Special Problems in Civil Liberties
Contemporary American Society
3
3
3
3
3
OPTION II
Econ 100
Econ 103
Pol Sci 104
Pol Sci 105
Pol Sci 385
Pol Sci 405
Pol Sci 411
Pol Sci 412
Pol Sci 471
Sociol 200
REQUIREMENTS IN THE MAJOR
3
3
3
3
3
3
A minimum total of 57-69 credits is required. See the section on
the social work and criminal justice majors.
ELECTIVES
Students may take up to 30 elective credits in courses outside
the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare and the College
of Letters and
Science. Credits earned in H687 (Senior Honors Project) or H688/689
(Senior Honors Thesis) will not
count towards either major.
Academic Regulations
For information on actions on unsatisfactory grades and honors
for scholarship, see Academic Information.
Semester Course Load. Registration for more than 18 credits in a
given semester requires the advisor's permission. For
students in the
School's majors, this permission will be given upon advice of the
appropriate program chair.
Change in Requirements. If curriculum requirements are changed
after the student has been formally accepted in the
major, the student
is free to remain with the former requirements or to follow the new
ones.
Social Work
Criminal Justice
Faculty and Staff
Administration
Stan Stojkovic
Dean
Gwat Lie
Associate Dean
Deborah Padgett
Chair, Social Work Department
Margaret Maillet
Coordinator, Undergraduate Social Work Program
Tina Freiburger
Chair, Criminal Justice Department
Social Work
Johanna Bartei, Clinical Asst. Prof., MSW
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Lisa Berger, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Joan Blakey, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Chicago
Michael Brondino, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of South Carolina
Roberta Hanus, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MSW
University of California, Berkeley
Melinda Kavanaugh, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jung Kwak, Assoc. Prof, PhD
University of South Florida
Gwat Lie, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Margaret Maillet, Senior Lecturer, PhD
Louisiana State University
Katie Mangan, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MSW
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Steve McMurtry, Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Josh Mersky, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Laura Otto-Salaj, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Temple University
Deborah L. Padgett, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Washington University, St. Louis
David Pate, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Nancy Rolock, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Illinois-Chicago
Susan Rose, Prof., PhD
University of Illinois-Chicago
Timothy Schwaller, Clinical Asst. Prof., MS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
James Dimitri Topitzes, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jeanne Wagner, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MSW
Jane Addams College of Social Work
Criminal Justice
Steven G. Brandl, Prof., PhD
Michigan State University
Tina Freiburger, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Kimberly Hassell, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Nebraska-Omaha
Thomas LeBel, Assoc. Prof., PhD
SUNY-Albany
Blake Randol, Asst. Prof., PhD
Washington State University
Aleksandra Snowden, Asst. Prof., PhD
Indiana University
Stan Stojkovic, Prof., PhD
Michigan State University
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Helen Bader School of Social Welfare
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
College of Health Sciences
Web Home Page: College of Health Sciences
Degree Programs
Certificate Programs
Admission
Academic Regulations
Academic Advising
Degree Requirements
Special Opportunities/Requirements
Course: College of Health Sciences
Biomedical Sciences
Courses: Biomedical Sciences
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Courses: Communication Sciences and Disorders
Health Care Administration
Courses: Health Care Administration
Courses: Health Sciences
Athletic Training
Kinesiology
Courses: Kinesiology
Pre-Physical Therapy
Courses: Kinesiology
Courses: Sport & Recreation
Nutritional Sciences (Interdisciplinary)
Courses: Nutritional Sciences
Occupational Studies
Courses: Occupational Studies
Courses: Therapeutic Recreation
Certificate Program in Healthy Aging
Certificate Program in Strength and Conditioning
Certificate Program in the Study of Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Certificate Program in Forensic Sciences
Certificate Program in Health Care Informatics
Certificate Program in Molecular Diagnostics
Certificate Program in Therapeutic Recreation
Faculty and Staff
College of Health Sciences
Office of Student Affairs
2025 E. Newport
NWQ Building B 6th floor
(414) 229-2758
[email protected]
uwm.edu/healthsciences
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science Programs Available to Incoming Freshman in 2016-17:
Biomedical Sciences (BMSBiomedical Science,
BMS-Cytotechnology, BMS-Diagnostic Medical Sonography, BMS-Medical Laboratory Science,
BMS-Public Health Microbiology, BMS-Radiologic Technology, BMS-Diagnostic Imaging Completion, BMSDiagnostic Imaging Completion - FLEX Option, BMS-Health Sciences Completion, BMS-Health Sciences Completion
- FLEX Option), Communication Sciences
and Disorders, Health Care Administration
(HCA), Kinesiology, Nutritional
Sciences, and Occupational Studies.
Master of Science Programs Available to Incoming Graduate Students in 2016-17:
Athletic Training, Biomedical
Sciences, Kinesiology, Communication
Sciences and Disorders, Healthcare Administration, Occupational Therapy, and
Health Care Informatics
Doctor of Philosophy Health Sciences and Kinesiology
Doctor of Physical Therapy
Faculty and Scholars
UWM's College of Health Sciences' faculty comprises an esteemed group of scholars. The research activities of our
faculty and staff encompass groundbreaking urban and population studies, pioneering biomedical research
investigations, advances in movement science, ingenious rehabilitation research and development, innovative applied
clinical technologies, and novel disease prevention approaches. These activities are supported by the resources of eight
academic centers and twenty-seven state of the art laboratories within the College, and millions of dollars in funds from
reputable institutions, such as the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Department of Education.
Facilities: Laboratories, Centers, and Clinics
CLINICS (open to the public): Speech and Language Clinic, Community Audiology Services
LABORATORIES (Research and Teaching)
Communication Sciences and Disorders: Aphasia Laboratory, Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Laboratory, Child Language Laboratory, Dysphagia Laboratory, Language Analysis Laboratory, Speech Science
Laboratory, Stuttering and Fluency Laboratory.
Biomedical Sciences: Biomedical Sciences Laboratory, Immunology Laboratory, Lyme Borreliosis Laboratory,
Medical Microbiology Laboratory, Multiple Sclerosis Laboratory, Pharmacology/Toxicology Laboratory, Prostate
Cancer Laboratory.
Health Informatics and Administration: Social Media and Health Research and Training Laboratory
Kinesiology: The Body Weight and Shape Research Laboratory, Human Performance and Sport Physiology
Laboratory, Laboratory for Sport Psychology and Performance Excellence, Neuromechanics Laboratory, Pediatric
Neuromotor Laboratory, Photomedicine Research Laboratory, Physical Activity and Health Research Laboratory,
Visumotor Laboratory.
Occupational Therapy: Assistive Technology and Universal Access (ATUA) Laboratory, Behavioral Health and
Human Occupation Laboratory, Gait Analysis and Biodynamics Laboratory, Occupational Ergonomics Laboratory.
CENTERS (Research and Training)
Campus Ergonomics Services, Center for Aging and Translational Research, Center for Biomedical Data and Language
Processing (BioDLP), Center for Forensic Science, Center for Urban Population Health, Performance and Injury Center,
Rehabilitation Research Design and Disability (R2D2) Center, The HUB Wellness Center.
Certificate Programs
Baccalaureate
Forensic Sciences (Death Investigation, Forensic Sciences, and Forensic Toxicology),
Health Care Informatics, Healthy
Aging, Strength and Conditioning, Study of Complementary
and Alternative Medicine, Molecular Diagnostics, and
Therapeutic Recreation
Admission
The College of Health Sciences is the largest school of its kind in the state of Wisconsin. It prepares students for careers
in health care administration and informatics, diagnostic medicine, health and fitness, and the rehabilitation therapies.
Our metropolitan location gives us ties to more than 100 local health care and recreation agencies, providing jobs, a
setting for practical experience to augment classroom instruction, and community service opportunities.
Freshmen are admitted to the pre-professional component in the College of Health Sciences with one of the following
plans: pre-health sciences, pre-biomedical sciences, pre-communication sciences and disorders, pre-health care
administration, pre-kinesiology, pre-nutritional sciences, and pre-occupational studies.
Admission policies of the College comply with the general regulations of UWM
as presented earlier in this catalog and
on the University's website. Upon admission to the College, the policies
and procedures of the College of Health
Sciences apply, even though the student
may be enrolled in courses in another UWM school or college.
Enrollment in the preparatory program does not guarantee admission to the professional
component or major, although
nearly all eligible students over the past three
years have been admitted. Admission criteria and timelines vary by major,
and
students are urged to consult regularly with their advisor for specific program
application procedures.
Criteria for Selecting Candidates. Selection for progression into the
professional component or major will be based on
requirements met and other
individual program factors. Each program in the College reserves the right to
select its own
candidates. More information and student applications are available
from the Office of Student Affairs.
Certificate Completion. Students wishing to complete any of the College of Health Sciences' Baccalaureate Certificate
Programs must meet with an academic advisor in the Office of Student Affairs to declare their intention to complete the
Certificate. Certificate enrollment
is open to all UWM students.
Academic Regulations
For information regarding action on unsatisfactory grades or about honors for
scholarship, see Academic Information
and Honors for Scholarship.
Students in all College of Health Sciences majors whose cumulative or semester GPA in professional studies falls below
2.5 (except Nutrition, Occupational Studies and all Kinesiology majors, who must have a semester GPA of 2.75;
semesterly GPA of 3.0 is required for BS in Communication Sciences and Disorders) are required to consult with their
program head and obtain the Dean's permission to continue in the program.
Academic Advising
Academic advising and counseling for all pre-professional students is available
in the Office of Student Affairs.
Students who have been admitted to their major/professional
program may be assigned a faculty advisor. Professional
and faculty advisors
are prepared to guide academic planning, provide career and job market information,
and to assist
students in making appropriate career choices within the health
professions. Students are strongly encouraged to
schedule one advising session
per semester (preferably before the registration process).
Students who believe they have a disability that might affect their academic
or job performance are encouraged to meet
with an advisor early in their academic
planning to discuss appropriate accommodations. Graduation clearance service
is available for all students planning to register for the last two semesters.
Call (414) 229-2758 for an appointment.
Detailed descriptions of the College of Health Sciences programs are available
in the Office of Student Affairs or on our
website: uwm.edu/healthsciences.
Transfer Students.
The College of Health Sciences welcomes students
from other academic areas on the UWM
campus, and students transferring to UWM
from other institutions. Students planning to transfer into any of the
College's
majors should meet with an advisor in the Office of Student Affairs to plan their
curriculum as early as
possible. Most students find that a number of their courses
transfer in meeting specific program and General Education
Requirements (GER)
needed for graduation. Students may meet with their advisor in person or by
phone; quick
questions to advisors may be handled by email as well. Please
call (414) 229-2758 for an appointment or information.
Degree Requirements
1. Satisfactory completion of 128 credits (120 credits for Kinesiology, BMS-Diagnostic Imaging Degree
Completion, BMS-Health Sciences Completion, Occupational Studies; 123 for Nutritional Sciences; 129 credits
for Biomedical Sciences-Biomedical Science, Biomedical
Sciences-Cytotechnology, Biomedical SciencesMedical Laboratory Science; and 130 for Biomedical Sciences-Diagnostic Medical Sonography and Biomedical
Sciences-Radiologic
Technology), and all course and program requirements of student's curriculum.
2. Satisfaction of all University-wide General Education Requirements (GER),
including meeting English
proficiency and mathematics requirement and completion
of course distribution requirements. Second degree
candidates are exempt from
these requirements.
3. A cumulative 2.5 GPA in all credits earned at UWM.
4. Completion of the last 30 credits in residence at UWM. Second degree
candidates must complete a minimum of
30 credits in residence beyond those required
for previous degree.
5. A student who does not maintain continuous registration during the academic
year and is re-admitted to the
College must meet the program and graduation requirements
in effect at the time of re-entry.
6. Any deviations from the curriculum must be approved in writing by the
student's program director or chairperson,
and the Associate Dean. It is required that a student consult his/her advisor before requesting
any program
changes or waivers.
Special Opportunities/Requirements
Correspondence Courses. Correspondence courses may be taken only through
the University of Wisconsin-Extension,
with the permission of the Associate
Dean. Students may not exceed 18 credits during one semester,
including
correspondence courses and work in residence, without permission.
Only elective course requirements may be met
through correspondence and Extension
study.
Independent Study. Independent study is available in each department. Credits are awarded for academic activities
pursued outside the formal classroom setting under the supervision of a faculty member. Activities may include reading,
research, and special projects and must be approved, in advance, by the full-time faculty supervisor. Independent study
is offered at the lower and upper levels. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 at UWM to pursue independent
study.
Upper-division independent study requires junior status. For more information,
see the catalog course listings or
contact the department chairperson.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Credit for specific college
courses may be earned through the College
Level Examination Program (CLEP) of
the College Entrance Examination Board. Students will be granted degree credit
only for subject examinations, and if they score at the 50th percentile or higher
on the National Sophomore norm. Credit
for subject examinations may only be used
to satisfy elective credits within the College of Health Sciences degree
programs.
A list of acceptable examinations may be found in the introductory section of
this catalog under Academic
Opportunities.
Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional Organizations. Students
should be aware that some
professions, occupations, and employers are subject
to licensing and/or bonding requirements. When a course of study
includes clinical
or field training, practice teaching, or internships, students will be required
to have a check of criminal
conviction records prior to acceptance of a student
by the placement site. Students are responsible for obtaining the
information
necessary for them to become knowledgeable about these requirements and plan
their studies accordingly.
Health Insurance Documentation. Students may be required to carry health
insurance during internship or fieldwork
experiences. As a condition of placement
in an internship program, students may also be required to have updated
vaccinations
(e.g., MMR, Hbv). In addition, a physical examination and TB test may be required.
Course
College of Health Sciences
100 New Student Seminar in Allied Health Professions. 1 cr U. An overview of the Allied Health Professions, the
College of Health Sciences, and academic requirements. Strategies for academic success. Prereq: none.
Faculty and Staff
ADMINISTRATION
Ron Cisler, PhD
Dean
Jeri-Annette Lyons, PhD
Associate Dean
Kate Brondino, MEd
Senior Administrative Program Specialist
Susan Cashin, PhD
Assistant Dean, Office of Student Affairs
Cheri Dzieken Chapman
Communications Manager
Chi (Chris) Cho, MS
Biostatistician
Mike Hauer, PhD
Assistant Dean Emeritus
Michelle Janowiak
Senior Student Services Coordinator
Debra Maglio
Senior Administrative Program Specialist, Business Office
Karen Miyoshi, MA
Administrative Program Manager II
Marion McDowell
Administrative Program Manager III Emerita
Bill Mueller, MS
Academic Advisor
Agnes Northrup, MS
Academic Advisor
Nancy Nelson, PhD
Assistant Dean, Outreach and Continuing Education
Torry Rufer, MS
Recruiter, Academic Advisor
Roger O. Smith, PhD, OTR, FAOTA
Director, R2D2
Joel Spiess, MS
Academic Advisor
Susan Stalewski, MBA, MLS (ASCP)
Director, E-learning, Academic Affairs
Scott Strath, PhD
Director, Center for Aging and Translational Research
BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
Shahla Anders, Clinical Asst. Prof., MEd
Carroll University
Anthony Azenabor, Prof., PhD
University of Benin
Cynthia Brown, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MA
Central Michigan University
Danieal Cordas, Clincal Instructor, BS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Lora deOliveira, Outreach Program Manager II, MBA, MPH
Marquette University, University of Minnesota
Bradley DePons, Laboratory Manager, MLS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Jennifer Doll, Asst. Prof., PhD
Washington University
Janis Eells, Prof., PhD
University of Iowa
Margaret Hirschfeld, Clinical Asst. Prof., BS
University of Saint Francis, IL
Melissa Klug, Clinical Instructor, BS
Concordia University
Randall Lambrecht, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Elizabeth Liedhagner, PhD
Case Western Reserve University
Jeri-Annette Lyons, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Medical College of Wisconsin
Dean Nardelli, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Amanda Smith, Clinical Asst. Prof., MS
Marian University, WI
Susan Stalewski, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MT, ASCP, MBA
Keller Graduate School of Management
Jayne Wisniewski, Clinical Asst. Prof., MEd
Carroll University, WI
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS
Tricia Chirillo, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MS
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Caitlin Croegaert, Clinical Asst. Prof., MS
Marquette University
Marylou Gelfer, Prof., PhD
University of Florida
John Heilmann, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Dawn Hennes, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Sabine Heuer, Asst. Prof., PhD
Ohio University
Erin LeSage, Clinical Instructor, MS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Shelley Lund, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Pennsylvania State University
Barbara Pauloski, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Northwestern University
Paula Rhyner, Prof., PhD
Kent State University
Betty Ritchie, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Stacy Ryan, Assoc. Clinical Audiologist, PhD
Pennsylvania College of Optometry
Carol Seery, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Washington
Sherri Sieff, Clinical Prof., PhD
University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Kathleen Wangerin, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MA
Northern Michigan University
Susan Yorio, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MS University of Nebraska
Heather Zingler, Assoc. Clinical Audiologist, AuD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
HEALTH INFORMATION AND ADMINISTRATION
Ron Cisler, Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Jennifer Fink, Asst. Prof., PhD University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Rene Gratz, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Rohit Kate, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Texas at Austin
Jake Luo, Asst. Prof., PhD
Queen's University, Belfast, UK
John Lynch, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Mary K. Madsen, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Priya Nambisan, Asst. Prof., PhD
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Neil Oldridge, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Kathleen Olewinski, Clinical Asst. Prof., MS, RHIA, NHA, FACHE
Cardinal Stritch University
Timothy Patrick, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Missouri-Columbia
Rashmi Prasad, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Hanh Trinh, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Medical College of Virginia
Min Wu, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of North Carolina
OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
(Occupational Therapy, Therapeutic Recreation)
Kris Barnekow, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Joyce Engel, Prof., PhD
University of Kansas
Arun Garg, Prof., PhD
University of Michigan
Carol Haertlein Sells, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Mark Johnston, Prof., PhD
Claremont Graduate University
Jay Kapellusch, Asst. Prof., PhD University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Phyllis King, Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Theodore King, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Nancy Nelson, Clinical Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Heidi Plach, Clinical Asst. Prof., MS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Bhagwant Sindhu, Assoc. Prof., PhD University of Florida
Brooke Slavens, Asst. Prof., PhD
Marquette University
Roger O. Smith, Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Virginia Stoffel, Assoc. Prof., PhD University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Patricia Thomas, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MPA
Long Island University
Dana Washburn, Clinical Asst. Prof., MS
Rush University, Chicago
KINESIOLOGY
Carlynn Alt, Clinical Assoc. Prof., PhD
Marquette University
Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Asst. Prof., PhD University of Northampton, United Kingdom
Thomas Birk, Prof., PhD
University of Mississippi
Susan Cashin, Clinical Assoc. Prof., PhD
Southern Illinois University
Stephen Cobb, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Georgia State University
Ann Dietrich, Clinical Assoc. Prof., MS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Margaret Duncan, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Jennifer Earl-Boehm, Assoc. Prof., PhD
The Pennsylvania State University
Kyle Ebersole, Assoc. Prof., PhD University of Nebraska
Chukuka Enwemeka, Distinguished Prof. Emeritus, Dean Emeritus, PhD
Christy Greenleaf, Prof., PhD
University of North Carolina-Greensboro
William Gregory, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Barbara Hart, Assoc. Prof. Emerita, PhD
Cynthia Hasbrook, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Wendy Huddleston, Assoc. Prof., PhD, PT, OCS
Medical College of Wisconsin
Kevin Keenan, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Colorado
Lori Klos, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Cornell University
Susane Kundrat, Clinical Asst. Prof., MS
Iowa State University
Renee Mazurek, Clinical Asst. Prof., PT, DPT
Arizona School of Health Sciences, A.T. Still University
Barbara Meyer, Prof., PhD
Michigan State University
Nora Miller, Assoc. Researcher, MS University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Victoria Moerchen, Assoc. Prof., PhD, PT
University of Wisconsin-Madison
John Ochsenwald, Clinical Asst. Prof., MS
University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana
Kristian O'Connor, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Massachusetts
Tracy Oles-Fairchild, Clinical Asst. Prof., MA
University of Illinois
Renee Reckelberg, Athletic Trainer I
Eastern Michigan University
Erika Sander, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Ann Snyder, Prof. Emerita, PhD
Scott Strath, Prof., PhD
University of Tennessee
Ann Swartz, Prof., PhD
University of Tennessee
Carrie Truebenbach, Clinical Asst. Prof., MS University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Rhonda Verdegan, Clinical Asst. Prof., PhD
Capella University
Jinsung Wang, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Arizona State University
Kathryn Zalewski, Assoc. Prof., PhD, PT
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
College of Health Sciences
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents |
How to Use This Book |
Calendar ]
[ Admission |
Registration |
Financial Information |
Academic Information ]
[ Administration |
UWM - Endless Possibilities |
Academic Opportunities |
Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
College of Engineering and Applied Science
Web Home Page: College of
Engineering and Applied Science
Degree Programs
Mission
Vision
Accreditation
Admission
Academic Advising
Diversity Programs Office
Student Organizations
Co-op and Internship Program
CEAS Minors
Academic Regulations
Biomedical Engineering
Courses: Biomedical Engineering
Computer Science and Engineering Programs
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Courses: Computer Science
Civil Engineering
Courses: Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Electrical Engineering
Courses: Electrical Engineering
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
Courses: Industrial Engineering
Materials Engineering
Courses: Materials Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Courses: Mechanical Engineering
Courses
Courses: Biomedical Engineering (BME)
Courses: Civil Engineering and Mechanics (CIV ENG)
Courses: Computer Science (COMPSCI)
Courses: Electrical Engineering (ELECENG)
Courses: Engineering & Applied Science (EAS)
Courses: Industrial Engineering (IND ENG)
Courses: Materials (MATLENG)
Courses: Mechanical Engineering
Faculty and Staff
ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Office of Student Services
Engineering and Mathematical Sciences Building, Room E386
(414) 229-4667
[email protected]
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
in Biomedical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical
Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Materials
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
Master of Science in Computer Science
Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics and Computer Science (offered in collaboration with the College of
Letters and Science)
Bachelor of Science/Master of Science Integrated Program
Master of Science in Engineering in Civil Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Energy Engineering,
Engineering Mechanics, Industrial and Management Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, Materials Engineering,
Mechanical Engineering
Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering in Civil Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Industrial
Engineering, Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering
PhD in Biomedical and Health Informatics (offered in collaboration with the Medical College of Wisconsin and
UWM's College of Health Sciences, College of Nursing, School of Information Studies, and Lubar School of Business)
Mission
To educate students to become creative problem solvers, conduct leading-edge research with global impacts, and act as
a catalyst for improved economic development and quality of life in Wisconsin.
Vision
To become a globally prominent engineering education and research institution.
Our location in the major industrial center of the state of Wisconsin offers
engineering and computer science students
several advantages. Professional engineers
and computer scientists from the industrial community share their expertise
with the College in the classroom, research laboratory, and on the College's
advisory committees. Our very successful
co-op and internship programs give
students work experience in their field of study before graduation. Many of
the
projects that students work on in the classroom are real projects brought
to us by local companies. In short, Milwaukeearea companies offer our students
a real-world laboratory to gain valuable insights and skills in their major
field.
Accreditation
Accreditation. The College is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and
Secondary Schools. In
addition, the programs in civil engineering, electrical
engineering, industrial engineering, materials engineering, and
mechanical engineering
are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. The computer science
program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET. ABET, Inc., 111 Market Place, Suite
1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.
Requirements for Employment, Licensing, or Professional Organizations.
Students should be aware that some
professions, occupations, and employers are
subject to licensing and/or bonding requirements. When a course of study
includes
clinical or field training, practice teaching, internships, or the like, students
may be subjected to a check of
criminal conviction records prior to acceptance
of a student by the placement site. Students are responsible for obtaining
the necessary information about these requirements and for planning their studies accordingly. Please contact the
appropriate department
or program office for further information.
Admission
NEW FRESHMEN
Admission to the College of Engineering and Applied Science is based on an
overall assessment of both academic and
non-academic qualifications. The primary
review factors for admission are the strength and quality of the high school
curriculum, high school class percentile, grade point average, and the result
of the ACT or SAT. Well-prepared
freshman applicants will have four years of
mathematics (including one-and-a-half years of algebra, one year of
geometry,
and one-half year of trigonometry) and four years of natural science (including
biology, chemistry, and
physics). The College also will consider non-academic
qualifications such as leadership skills, diversity in personal
background,
work experience, motivation, and maturity.
The College offers three levels of placement for admitted new freshmen:
I. Admission Directly to Major
Admission directly to one of the College's
seven majors is selective. Typically, freshman applicants who have
completed a
rigorous high school curriculum with a 3.5/4.0 grade point average and have earned an ACT composite
score
of at least 25 and an ACT math score of at least 28 will be admitted directly to major status.
II. Admission to Pre-Engineering or Pre-Computer Science
Typically, freshman applicants who have completed a rigorous high school curriculum
with a 3.0/4.0 grade point
average and have earned an ACT composite
score of at least 23 and an ACT math score of at least 25 will be admitted
to
pre-engineering or pre-computer science.
III. Admission to the CEAS Bridge Program
A limited number of freshman applicants who do not meet the requirements
for pre-engineering or pre-computer science
will be considered for admission
to the CEAS Bridge Program. The CEAS Bridge Program is an academic support
program
for first-year students. Students admitted to this program may be asked to participate
in a summer program
prior to their first semester.
A student's initial placement will be reconsidered after the completion of
required course placement exams. Students
who place into Math 105 or lower will
be placed into the CEAS Bridge Program and may be asked to participate in a
summer program.
TRANSFER STUDENTS
Transfer student admission is based on an overall assessment of both academic
and non-academic qualifications. For
transfer applicants, the primary factors
considered for admission are the grade point average on transferable courses
and
the level of curriculum completion. The college also will consider non-academic
qualifications such as leadership skills,
diversity in personal background,
work experience, motivation, and maturity.
To be considered for admission directly to the major, transfer applicants must
have completed the equivalent of Math
232 (with at least a C grade), Chem
104 or 105 for engineering students or CompSci 201 for computer science students,
and have a minimum of 24 transferable credits with a 3.00 cumulative GPA. Transfer
applicants who do not meet the
requirements for direct admission to the major
will be considered for admission to pre-engineering or pre-computer
science.
In order to provide maximum flexibility while preserving the institutional identity of a UWM degree, the College
requires residence: a) during the last 30 credits; b) during 45 of the last 60 credits; or c) during any 90 credits of the
student's undergraduate career. At least 15 credits of advanced work in the major must be completed in residence at
UWM.
ACCEPTANCE TO THE COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR
Pre-Computer Science students may apply for major status with their academic
advisor at any time they believe they
meet the requirements. Advancement to
the major is a graduation requirement. The program may impose major status as
a prerequisite for courses numbered 400 or above.
ADVANCEMENT TO MAJOR REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE:
1.
Completion of the following courses: Math 231, 232; CompSci 250, 252, 315, 317; and ElecEng 354.
2.
Minimum GPA in the above coursework as set by the department.1
3.
Complete EAS 200 (Professional Seminar).
4.
Satisfy the GER English composition requirement.
1
Initially, the GPA requirement is set as 2.3.
The Dean may grant temporary major status for up to two semesters. Generally, this will only be done for transfer
students or foreign exchange students with formal articulation agreements with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,
or the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
Questions on admission to CEAS or choosing a major should be directed to the Office of Student Services, (414) 2294667.
ADVANCEMENT TO MAJOR REQUIREMENTS FOR ENGINEERING:
For All Engineering Majors:
1.
Complete Math 232 (or 222) with C or better grade.
2.
Complete EAS 200 (Professional Seminar).
3.
Satisfy the GER English composition requirement.
For Biomedical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Industrial, and Materials Engineering Majors:
4.
Complete a minimum of 24 credits required for major. (Excludes: general education, prerequisite, and
orientation courses). Consult with an academic advisor for required courses.
5.
Obtain a minimum cumulative grade point average in all required math, science, and engineering courses as
set by the major department. Currently, the cumulative grade point average has been set at:
2.00 for Biomedical, Industrial and Materials Engineering
2.33 for Civil and Computer Engineering
2.50 for Electrical Engineering
For Mechanical Engineering Majors:
4.
Complete MechEng 101 and 110, Chem 105 (or 102), and Physics 209 and 214.
5.
Obtain a 2.33 GPA in all required math, science, and engineering courses.
Questions on admission to CEAS or choosing a major should be directed to the
Office of Student Services, (414) 2294667.
PLACEMENT TESTING
Most new freshmen are required to take placement exams in English and mathematics. Engineering students also take a
placement exam in chemistry, provided they have had previous coursework in chemistry. Students with previous
college-level credits in chemistry, English, and math may not be required to take placement tests. Additional
prerequisite coursework may be required as a result of these placement tests. Credit for prerequisite academic work may
not count toward the degree program. Entering students are urged to take their placement exams when scheduled. All
placement exams must be completed before beginning coursework in the subject area. Students who place into Math
105 or lower will be placed into the CEAS Bridge Program and may be asked to participate in a summer program.
Academic Advising
The College's Office of Student Services, located in Room E386 of the Engineering and Mathematical Sciences
Building, offers undergraduate
students academic advising from professional advisors who are familiar with
the
curriculum, College requirements, and the special needs of engineering and
computer science students. These advisors
provide services such as freshman
orientation, course selection, program planning, and credit transfer evaluation.
Students are assigned to a permanent professional advisor as soon as they are
accepted into the College, and are urged to
confer with their advisor at least
once each semester. Students also are assigned to a faculty advisor who provides
technical expertise specific to the student's area of study.
Diversity Programs Office
The College of Engineering and Applied Science has developed a strategic plan
that promotes a collaborative culture
through communication and acceptance of
students, faculty, and staff. The Office of Diversity is responsible for meeting
this challenge through participating in the UW System and UWM's multicultural,
diversity, and community endeavors.
The office also will review methods of increasing
enrollment and of improving retention and graduation rates of all
students,
especially for students of color. The office will work closely with community initiatives,
the Milwaukee Public
Schools, and the Pre-College programs to attract and retain
more minority students in engineering and computer
science.
Student Organizations
In addition to the wide variety of activities that are available for all UWM
students, CEAS students have the opportunity
to participate in many organizations
relating to their professional interests. Involvement in these organizations is
recognized as a valuable component of their professional education.
ORGANIZATIONS
AAO - Aeronautics and Aerospace Organization
AFS - American Foundrymen's Society
ASCE - American Society of Civil Engineers
ASM/TMS - Materials Engineering Society
ASME - American Society of Mechanical Engineers
IEEE - Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
IEEE-CS - Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Computer Society
IIE - Institute of Industrial Engineers
ITE - Institute of Transportation Engineers
NSBE - National Society of Black Engineers
RC - Rocket Club
ROV - Remotely Operated Vehicle Team
SAE - Society of Automotive Engineers
SHPE - Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
SME - Society of Manufacturing Engineers
SWE - Society of Women Engineers
PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITY
Triangle
HONOR SOCIETIES
Pi Tau Sigma
Tau Beta Pi
Co-op and Internship Program
In today's competitive job market, it takes more than a college degree
to find employment upon graduation. The Career
Services Office in the College
provides the link between your education and the real world. This office is
dedicated to
helping all CEAS students secure engineering or computer science-related
work experience before graduation, because
related work experience in combination
with good academics are the criteria most employers use to select new hires.
The College offers students two ways to gain that experience: internships and
co-ops. The principal goals of the
programs are to provide career orientation
to students and enhance their professional development. All internships and
co-ops are paid at a rate commensurate with educational background and experience.
For more information, contact the
Career Services Office at (414) 229-6960 or
[email protected]
CEAS Minors and Certificates
The College offers minors in computer science, electrical, industrial, materials, mechanical,
and structural engineering
and a certificate in web development, open to UWM undergraduate students. All of the CEAS
minors and the certificate
can be completed as part of the first bachelor's degree at UWM or
after completing a degree at UWM or another
institution. For minor requirements,
please see appropriate department.
Joint Programs with Other Campuses
Pre-engineering. Qualified students may enroll in coordinated pre-engineering
programs at UW-Green Bay, UWParkside, and UW-Waukesha for two years of pre-engineering
coursework. These coordinated programs ensure
equivalent coursework, appropriate
advising, and early access to the Cooperative Education Program at UWM.
Dual Degree Programs. Qualified students may enroll in coordinated dual
degree programs at Carroll University, UWGreen Bay, UW-La Crosse, and UW-Whitewater. Students in
these programs will earn a bachelor's degree in physics
(Carroll University, UW-La Crosse, or
UW-Whitewater) or in environmental science (UW-Green Bay) and a bachelor
of
science in engineering from UWM in five years. Students transfer to UWM after
three years at the partner university.
For more information, contact the Office
of Student Services at (414) 229-4667.
Joint Programs with Wisconsin Technical Colleges
Milwaukee Area Technical College. An agreement with MATC allows joint
admission and enrollment at MATC and
CEAS. Qualified students may take English,
mathematics, chemistry, and general education courses at MATC. The
program ensures
equivalent coursework and appropriate advising. Students complete a bachelor
of science degree in
engineering or computer science at UWM.
Waukesha County Technical College. An agreement with WCTC allows those students having associate degrees in
the Industrial Occupations Division at
WCTC the opportunity to be given credit for courses required in the UWM
bachelor
of science in engineering or bachelor of science in computer science program.
For more information, contact
the Office of Student Services at (414) 229-4667.
Academic Regulations
For information on University and College academic regulations such as course
loads, grading, actions on unsatisfactory
grades, overloads, etc., see Academic
Information. A number of special College regulations are given below.
Degree Requirements. Students must maintain an average GPA of at least 2.0 on all work attempted at the University
and in all courses offered by the College. Students majoring in biomedical engineering, computer engineering, computer
science, industrial engineering, and materials engineering must maintain an average GPA of at least 2.00 in all 300-level
and above courses in the student's major department. Students majoring in civil engineering, electrical engineering, and
mechanical engineering must maintain an average GPA of at least 2.50 in all 300-level and above courses in the major
department. Transferable courses will be included as appropriate. Advancement to major status is required for
graduation.
In order to provide maximum flexibility while preserving the institutional identity of a UWM degree, the College
requires residence (a) during the last 30 credits, (b) during 45 of the last 60 credits, or (c) during any 90 credits of a
student’s undergraduate career. At least 15 credits of advanced work in the major must be completed in residence at
UWM.
A student who does not maintain continuous registration during the academic year and is re-admitted to the College
must meet the program and graduation requirements in effect at the time of re-entry.
Degree and major requirements must be completed within 10 years of initial enrollment at UW-Milwaukee. Should
students not complete the major within the 10-year time frame, the students will switch to the most current degree and
major requirements. A new 10-year time frame would then begin.
Dual Majors. Students wishing to major in more than one field can do
so in two ways:
1.Complete the requirements for more than one major before receiving a degree from the College. In this case,
the degree will list both majors.
2.Be admitted to the College as a second degree candidate (after earning a bachelor's degree in any field),
providing University and College entrance requirements are met. Such a student must meet all undergraduate
degree requirements in the College and present a minimum of 30 credits beyond the previous bachelor's degree.
Concurrent Registration at Other Institutions. CEAS students wishing
to establish concurrent enrollment at another
institution must obtain prior
permission from their academic advisor.
Student Academic Appeals. Students may appeal an academic action to
the Office of Student Services. An appeal is a
request for an exception to an
established policy or rule. The content of each appeal is carefully reviewed
in order to
reach a decision. Appeals should be submitted in writing to the
Office of Student Services. The appeals committee
considers individual cases
concerning the degree requirements and other academic rules and regulations
established by
the College of Engineering and Applied Science faculty.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science has established written procedures
for undergraduate student academic
grievances. Copies of the grievance procedure
are available in the Office of Student Services. As a first step, students
must
discuss the grievance with the faculty member or administrator as soon as possible
to attempt to resolve the issue,
but not later than 30 days after the action
that prompted the grievance/appeal.
Computer Science and Engineering Programs
Detailed descriptions of the CEAS undergraduate programs are given on the following
pages. All courses are not
offered every semester. A few technical elective
courses may be offered only once every three to four semesters. In
addition,
since computer science and engineering curricula are continually evolving to
keep current with the state of the
art, students are encouraged to consult with
their advisors to plan each semester's list of classes. Part-time students
should always maintain a plan that looks ahead two to three semesters to avoid
scheduling difficulties.
The curricula outlined in the pages linked to below are applicable to new students entering CEAS in fall 2016 or later.
Students who enrolled in computer science or engineering programs
prior to that date should consult with the
appropriate previous editions of
this catalog for information about their program requirements. As a general
rule, when
program changes occur, continuing students have the choice of continuing
in their existing program or following the
new requirements. Occasionally, a
program change will be required of all students regardless of their date of
matriculation, so long as it does not increase the total credits needed for
graduation.
These program descriptions represent the minimum requirements for graduation
from UWM in computer science or
engineering. In all cases, it is important that
students consult with their advisor before making course selections to avoid
errors in programming.
Biomedical Engineering
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
Materials Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Courses
Biomedical Engineering (BME)
Civil Engineering and Mechanics (CIV ENG)
Computer
Science (COMPSCI)
Electrical
Engineering (ELECENG)
Engineering
& Applied Science
Industrial
& Systems Engineering
Materials
(MATLENG)
Mechanical
Engineering (MECHENG)
Faculty and Staff
Administration
Brett Peters
Dean
Ethan Munson
Associate Dean, Academic and Administrative Affairs
Adel Nasiri
Associate Dean for Research
Student Services
Todd R. Johnson
Director, Student Services
Julianne Pickering
Co-op Program Coordinator
Tina Current
Senior Academic Advisor
Sharon Kaempfer
Senior Academic Advisor
Jennifer Klumpp
Senior Academic Advisor
Ashlie Schaffner
Academic Advisor
Graduate Programs and Research
Betty Warras
Graduate Program Specialist
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Edward A. Beimborn, Prof. Emeritus, PhD, PE
Hector R. Bravo, Prof., PhD
University of Iowa
Erik R. Christensen, Prof. Emeritus, PhD, PE
Rani El-Hajjar, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Nebraska
Al Ghorbanpoor, Prof., PhD, PE
University of Maryland
Zhen He, Asst. Prof., PhD
Washington University
Sam Helwany, Prof., PhD, PE
University of Boulder, Colorado
Alan J. Horowitz, Prof. Emeritus, PhD, PE
Kwang K. Lee, Prof. Emeritus, PhD, PE
Jin Li, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Cincinnati
Qian Liao, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Cornell University
Yu Liu, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Maryland
Tarun R. Naik, Prof. Emeritus, PhD, PE
Adeeb Rahman, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Xia Qin, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Connecticut
Konstantin Sobolev, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Research Institute of Concrete and Reinforced Concrete, Russia
Habib Tabatabai, Assoc. Prof., PhD, PE
University of Florida, Gainesville
Hani H. Titi, Assoc. Prof., PhD, PE
Louisiana State University
Yin Wang, Asst. Prof., PhD
Washington University in St. Louis
Jian Zhao, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Brian Armstrong, Prof., PhD
Stanford University
John T. Boyland, Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley
Christine T. Cheng, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Johns Hopkins University
Robert Cuzner, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Wisconsin-Madison
George I. Davida, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Adrian Dumitrescu, Prof., PhD
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Mukul Goyal, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Ohio State University
George Hanson, Prof., PhD, Chair
Michigan State University
S. Hossein Hosseini, Prof., PhD, Computer Science
University of Iowa
Yi Hu, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Texas at Dallas
Charles E. Kahn, Jr., Adjunct Prof., MD
University of Illinois at Chicago
Nikolai A. Kouklin, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Robert J. Krueger, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Chiu T. Law, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Purdue University
Leonard P. Levine, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Amol D. Mali, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Arizona State University
David McClanahan, Faculty Associate, MSEE
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Susan McRoy, Prof., PhD
University of Toronto
Devendra K. Misra, Prof., PhD
Michigan State University
Ethan V. Munson, Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley
Adel Nasiri, Prof., PhD
Illinois Institute of Technology
Ramin Pashaie, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Mahsa Ranji, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Ali Reza, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Jayson Rock, Sr. Lect., MS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Robert Sorenson, Sr. Lect., MS
Marquette University
George R. Steber, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Ichiro Suzuki, Prof., PhD
Osaka University, Japan
Lingfeng Wang, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Texas A&M University
Weizhong Wang, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Maryland, College Park
K. Vairavan, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Guangwu Xu, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University at Buffalo, SUNY
David C. Yu, Prof., PhD
University of Oklahoma
Zeyun Yu, Assoc. Prof., PhD
The Ohio State University
Jun Zhang, Prof., PhD
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Tian Zhao, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Purdue University
Industrial Engineering
Daniel A. Beller, Sr. Lect., MS
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Naira Campbell-Kyureghyan, Prof., PhD
The Ohio State University
Tsong-How Chang, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Jaejin Jang, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Purdue University
Edward W. Knoblock, Assoc. Prof. Emeritus, MS
Wilkistar Otieno, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of South Florida
Matthew Petering, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Michigan
Umesh K. Saxena, Prof. Emeritus, PhD, PE
Hamid K. Seifoddini, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Oklahoma State University
Materials Engineering
Nidal Abu-Zahra, Assoc. Prof., PhD, Chair
Cleveland State University
George S. Baker, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Benjamin Church, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Georgia Institute of Technology
Changsoo Kim, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Carnegie Mellon University
Hugo F. Lopez, Prof., PhD
Ohio State University
Joachim P. Neumann, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Junjie Niu, Asst. Prof., PhD
Zhejiang University, China
Pradeep K. Rohatgi, Wisconsin Distinguished Prof., ScD
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dev Venugopalan, Assoc. Prof., PhD, Assoc. Vice Chancellor
McMasters University
Mechanical Engineering
Ryoichi S. Amano, Prof., PhD
University of California, Davis
Illya Avdeev, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Pittsburgh
Robert T. Balmer, Prof. Emeritus, ScD
S. H. Chan, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Woo-Jin Chang, Asst. Prof., PhD
Inha University
Junhong Chen, UWM Distinguished Prof., PhD
University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
Anoop K. Dhingra, Assoc. Prof., PhD, Chair
Purdue University
Andrew Dressel, Lecturer, PhD
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Roshan D'Souza, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley
Satish Nambisan, Prof., PhD
Syracuse University
Kenneth F. Neusen, Prof. Emeritus, PhD, PE
Michael Nosonosky, Assoc. Prof., PhD
Northeastern University
Ronald A. Perez, Assoc. Prof., PhD, PE
Purdue University
Krishna Pillai, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Delaware
Deyang Qu, Prof., Johnson Controls Endowed Chair, PhD
University of Ottawa, Canada
Mohammad H. Rahman, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of Quebec, Canada
Vitaliy Rayz, Asst. Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley
John R. Reisel, Prof., PhD, PE
Purdue University
Kevin J. Renken, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of Illinois at Chicago
Nathan Salowitz, Asst. Prof., PhD
Stanford University
Yongjin Sung, Asst. Prof., Phd
Keh C. Tsao, Prof. Emeritus, PhD
Emmanuel Wornyoh, Asst. Prof., PhD
Carnegie Mellon University
Mohamed Yahiaoui, Lecturer
Chris Yingchun Yuan, Assoc. Prof., PhD
University of California, Berkeley
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
College of Engineering and Applied Science
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents |
How to Use This Book |
Calendar ]
[ Admission |
Registration |
Financial Information |
Academic Information ]
[ Administration |
UWM - Endless Possibilities |
Academic Opportunities |
Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
College of Letters and Science
Office of L&S Student Academic Services
Holton Hall 142
(414) 229-4654
[email protected]
uwm.edu/letters-science
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Arts: Actuarial Science; Africology; American Indian Studies (CIM); Anthropology; Art History and
Criticism; Biochemistry; Biological
Sciences; Chemistry; Chinese (CIM); Classics; Committee Interdisciplinary;
Communication; Comparative
Literature; Conservation and Environmental Science;
Economics; English; Film Studies;
French; Geography; Geosciences; German; Global
Studies; History; International Studies; Italian; Japanese (CIM);
Jewish Studies;
Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies; Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. [email protected] Studies;
Linguistics; Mathematics; Microbiology; Philosophy; Physics; Political
Science; Psychology; Religious Studies;
Russian; Sociology; Spanish; Urban Studies (CIM); Women's and Gender Studies
Bachelor of Science: Applied Mathematics and Computer Science; Atmospheric Sciences; Biochemistry; Biological
Sciences;
Chemistry; Committee Interdisciplinary; Conservation and Environmental Science;
Course in Chemistry;
Geography; Geosciences (Geology-Geophysics
Option only); Mathematics; Medical Science (for early admits to
medical school
only); Microbiology; Physics; Psychology
Master of Arts: Art
History; Communication; Economics; English; Geography; History; Language, Literature, and
Translation;
Linguistics; Media Studies; Philosophy; Political Science; Sociology; Women's and Gender Studies
Master of Science: Anthropology; Biological Sciences; Chemistry; Geography; Geosciences; Mathematics;
Non-profit
Management and Leadership; Physics; Psychology; Urban Studies
Master of Human Resources
and Labor Relations
Master of Liberal Studies
Master of Public Administration
Doctor of Philosophy: Africology; Anthropology; Biological Sciences; Chemistry; Communication; Economics;
English; Geography; Geosciences; History; Linguistics; Mathematics; Physics; Political Science; Psychology;
Sociology; Urban Studies
Administration
Rodney Swain
Dean
Kristene Surerus
InterimAssociate Dean, Natural Sciences
James Moyer
Associate Dean, Social Sciences
David Clark
Associate Dean, Humanities and Communication
Deanna Ding
Assistant Dean, College Relations, Marketing, Communication, PR
Mike Darnell
Assistant Dean, Curriculum, Governance, and Assessment
Patricia Kissinger
Assistant Dean, Unit Business Representative
Cindy Piercy
Interim Assistant Dean, Student Academic Services
Craig Wesley
Assistant Dean, Administrative Affairs and Personnel
Diane Amour
Coordinator, American Indian Student Services
Dao Vang
Coordinator, Southeast Asian Student Academic Services
Susan Fields
Coordinator, African American Student Academic Services
The College of Letters and Science is the largest academic unit of the University
of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Nearly
every student at UWM completes a significant
amount of coursework in the College prior to graduation.
Study of the liberal arts and sciences in the College encourages students to
develop critical and open minds and provides
them with an intellectual foundation
in the basic areas of knowledge. Students acquire a broad range of essential
skills
including the ability to communicate effectively, approach problems analytically,
and adapt to new and changing
situations.
Admission
Students who meet the standard University admission requirements are admissible
to the College of Letters and Science.
The same criteria for acceptance are
applied to in-state and out-of-state students. See Admission section.
Advising
The College of Letters and Science provides academic advising for all students
pursuing a degree in the College,
undecided majors, and any students
seeking information concerning majors, minors, and courses in the College. Letters
and Science offers specialized advising services to any UWM student interested
in the areas of pre-law, pre-medicine,
pre-dentistry, pre-chiropractic medicine,
pre-optometry, pre-podiatry, pre-physician assistant, pre-pharmacy, and preveterinary
medicine. Upon admission, students are assigned an advisor in the College advising
office. Academic
advising is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. Evening advising is available during
registration periods and at other
times by appointment. The advising office is located on the first floor of Holton
Hall,
(414) 229-4654.
When students declare a major, they are assigned an additional advisor within
the major department. Prior to the
assignment of a specific major advisor within
the discipline, students may obtain major advising from the department's
undergraduate advising coordinator. All students should consult their academic
advisors in Holton Hall and in their
department prior to each registration period.
Declaration of Pre-major
Students who are not yet eligible to declare
a major formally may declare a pre-major in an academic discipline of
interest
to them. The declaration of a pre-major is encouraged as soon as a student finds
s/he is interested in a particular
area. This action permits the department
to identify students to whom to send information concerning programs, awards,
opportunities (e.g., internships), and other matters relating to the area of
study. Students may declare a pre-major by
completing a brief form available
from the L&S Advising Office (HLT 142) or from the department office.
Course of Study – Bachelor of Arts Degree
(For all new freshmen beginning fall 2008; students who entered prior to that date may follow requirements in the
2006-07 Undergraduate Catalog.)
In addition to the requirements listed below, L&S students must complete
the University-wide GERs
(www.uwm.edu/academics/ger.cfm).
I. ENGLISH WRITING
REQUIREMENT
Students must satisfy the English Writing Requirement by completing English 102 with a grade of C or higher or by
placing beyond English 102 on the English Placement Test (EPT).
II. MATHEMATICS AND
FORMAL REASONING REQUIREMENT
To satisfy the Mathematics and Formal Reasoning Requirement, students must satisfy the following two requirements:
A.Achieve a math placement
code of at least 30 or earn at least 3 credits with a grade of C or higher in
Math 102,
103, 105, 108, 175, or an equivalent course; and
B. Complete one course (at
least 3 credits) at the 200 level or above chosen from courses in mathematics,
Philos
211 (Elementary Logic), or Letters and Science statistics courses. For
a list of approved statistics courses, see the
College
of Letters and Science website: uwm.edu/letters-science/advising/degree-requirements/major-approvedstatistics-courses.
III. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
Students may satisfy the language requirement in one of two ways: (1) successful completion of the fourth semester of
college work or equivalent in one language other than English or (2) successful completion of the third semester of
college work or equivalent in one language other than English PLUS the second semester of college work or equivalent
in another language other than English. Contact your academic advisor or the L&S Advising Office for an explanation
of equivalent work.
IV. INTERNATIONAL REQUIREMENT
Students must satisfy the International Requirement by 1) completing three
courses (at least 9 credits) in a single foreign
language (not including literature-in-translation)
at the 200 level and above, or 2) completing three non-language
courses (at
least 9 credits) with international content chosen from at least two curricular
areas, or 3) completing 9 credits
in combination from options 1 and 2. For
a list of approved courses, see the College of Letters and Science website:
uwm.edu/letters-science/advising/degree-requirements/international-requirement.
V. BREADTH REQUIREMENT
L&S Breadth
Areas
Credits
Humanities
12
Social Sciences
12
Natural Sciences (must
include at least one laboratory or field course)
12
No more than 6 credits from a single curricular area may be used to satisfy
any single area of the Breadth Requirement.
For a list of approved courses,
see the College of Letters and Science website: uwm.edu/letters-science/wpcontent/uploads/sites/255/2016/05/LS-Breadth-Courses.pdf.
VI. THE MAJOR
After completing 15 credits and before 75 credits have been earned, students
must declare a major by contacting the
appropriate academic department or program.
Failure to declare the major before 75 credits have been earned may result
in a delay of graduation. Some departments or programs specify course and/or
GPA requirements that students must
satisfy prior to declaring the major.
The College requires that students attain at least a 2.5 GPA in all credits
in the major attempted at UWM. In addition,
students must attain a 2.5 GPA
on all major credits attempted, including any transfer work. Individual departments or
programs
may require higher GPAs for graduation. Some departmental majors require courses
from other departments.
Contact your major department for information on whether
those credits will count as part of the major GPA. The
College requires that students must complete in
residence at UWM at least 15 credits in upper-division (numbered 300
or above) courses
in their major.
Research Requirement. Within their
majors, students must complete a research experience approved by the L&S
Faculty.
To complete a major, students must satisfy all the requirements of the major
as stated in the department or program
entry in this catalog. Students
who declare their majors within five years of entering the UW System as a degree
candidate may satisfy the requirements outlined in any catalog issued since the
time they entered. Credits used to satisfy
the major also
may be used to satisfy other degree requirements.
MAJOR OPTIONS
Students may declare a departmental major, an interdepartmental major, or a
committee interdisciplinary major.
Departmental Major. A departmental major
ordinarily offers one of three orientations: 1) general concentration in
the
discipline, 2) preparation for graduate work in the discipline, or
3) pre-professional training. Students should select one
of these orientations
in consultation with their major advisor.
Interdepartmental
Major. For the requirements of the eight interdepartmental majors offered,
see the
Interdepartmental Majors section in this catalog.
Committee Interdisciplinary Major. The Committee Interdisciplinary Major is designed to meet the individual needs
of the students. Upon request by a student, a committee of three or more individuals from two or more academic units
may develop a major based on that student’s abilities and needs. All committee majors must be approved by the major
academic units involved.
The committee interdisciplinary
major requires a minimum of 30 credits, of which at least 15 must be in upper-division
(numbered 300 or above) Letters and Science courses taken in residence at UWM.
The CIM must include coursework in
at least two L&S academic units. Most units outside the College also may be selected as part of the major.
However, at
least 18 credits in the major must be earned in Letters and Science
courses. Non-L&S courses selected as
part of a CIM
will not count toward the 90 L&S credits required for the degree,
but they will satisfy part of the 30 elective credits
available to L&S students.
To propose a committee interdisciplinary major, students should obtain a “Declaration of Committee Interdisciplinary
Major” form from the Office of Student Academic Services. They must prepare a written statement defining the goals of
their proposed major, and then identify three individuals from two or more academic units who are willing to function
as the major oversight committee. One individual may be an academic staff member, but at least two must be faculty
members. Academic staff members of CIM committees must be approved by the CIM committee chair and the
Assistant Dean for L&S Student Academic Services. At least two committee members must be from L&S. A member
of the L&S faculty serves as committee chair and major advisor. The student and committee members together identify
the courses that will be required for the major. The declaration form is completed and signed by the committee chair and
then sent for approval to the chair/director of every academic unit in which courses in the major will be taken.
Students present the completed declaration form to the Office of Student Academic Services at any time between the
15th and 75th credit. An academic advisor, in consultation with the assistant dean for Student Academic Services, will
either approve or deny the proposal. Should the proposal be denied, the student and the committee chair will receive a
written explanation of the denial. Students may appeal a denial to the L&S Academic Policies and Curriculum
Committee. The proposal also may be reworked and resubmitted.
Second Major. With the approval of the Assistant Dean for Student Academic
Services, students may elect a second
major.
VII. THE MINOR
The completion of a minor is optional. The College requires that students attain at least a 2.5 GPA in all credits in the
minor attempted at UWM. In addition, students must attain a 2.5 GPA on all minor credits attempted, including any
transfer work. Individual departments may require higher GPAs for graduation. Students must complete in residence at
least 9 credits of upper-division (numbered 300 or above) courses in the minor.
VIII. CREDIT REQUIREMENTS AND LIMITATIONS
To complete the BA, 120 degree credits are required, including at least 36 credits in upper-division (numbered 300 or
above) courses offered by the College of Letters and Science. At least 90 credits must be completed in L&S courses,
allowing students to take as electives up to 30 credits in courses
offered by other UWM academic units. There is no
limit to the number of credits
that may be taken in one department. No more than 6 credits in any single course
outside
the College may be counted toward the BA (or BS) degree. A maximum
of 6 credits in military science courses may be
counted toward the degree as
non-L&S electives. No more than 6 credits of field experience taken outside
the College
and no more than 6 credits in sport and recreation courses may
be counted toward the degree. No “life experience”
credits may
be counted toward the degree.
Course of Study – Bachelor of Science Degree
(For all new freshmen beginning fall 2008; students who entered prior to that date may follow requirements in the
2006-07 Undergraduate Catalog.)
In addition to the requirements listed below, L&S students must complete
the University-wide GERs
(www.uwm.edu/academics/ger.cfm).
Students seeking the BS degree are urged to begin their math and science
studies in the earliest possible semester to
avoid delays in graduation.
I. ENGLISH WRITING REQUIREMENT
See Bachelor of Arts Degree.
II. MATHEMATICS AND FORMAL REASONING REQUIREMENT
All candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must complete Math 211, 221,
226, 227, 228, or 231 and one
additional course at the 200 level or above chosen
from courses in mathematics, Philos 212 (Modern Deductive Logic),
or Letters
and Science statistics courses. For a list of approved statistics courses, see
the College of Letters and Science
website: uwm.edu/letters-science/advising/degree-requirements/major-approved-statistics-courses.
III. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
Two courses (minimum 6 credits) in a language (including American Sign Language) other than English at the 100 level
or above are required. This requirement is satisfied by two years of a single language (including American Sign
Language) other than English taken in high school.
IV. INTERNATIONAL REQUIREMENT
See Bachelor of Arts Degree.
V. BREADTH REQUIREMENT
L&S Breadth Areas
Humanities
12
Social Sciences
12
Natural Sciences
(must include laboratory courses from three different curricular areas)
12
No more than 6 credits from a single curricular area may be used to satisfy
any single area of the Breadth Requirement.
For a list of approved courses,
see the College of Letters and Science website: uwm.edu/letters-science/wpcontent/uploads/sites/255/2016/05/LS-Breadth-Courses.pdf.
VI. THE MAJOR
Requirements are the same as for the Bachelor of Arts degree, with the exception that students must declare a science
major. The science major may be one of three kinds: a departmental major from among atmospheric sciences, biological
sciences, biochemistry, chemistry, geography, geosciences (geology-geophysics option only), mathematical sciences,
microbiology, physics, and psychology; the conservation and environmental sciences major; or a committee
interdisciplinary major. (See Bachelor of Arts Degree for the last option.) The courses for the
committee
interdisciplinary major must be selected from the departments of Biological
Sciences, Chemistry, Geography (physical),
Geosciences, Mathematical Sciences,
Physics, Psychology (natural sciences), or from other courses approved to meet
the natural science requirement (uwm.edu/letters-science/advising/degree-requirements/ls-degree-requirements-fall2013-current/fall-2013-bachelor-of-arts-ba-degree-requirements).
Second Major. With the approval of the assistant dean for Student Academic
Services, students may elect a second
major. The second major need not be
selected from the natural sciences.
VII. THE MINOR
The completion of a minor is optional. Requirements are the same as for the
Bachelor of Arts degree. The minor need
not be selected from the natural sciences.
VIII. CREDIT REQUIREMENTS
To complete the BS, 120 degree credits are required, including at least 36
credits in upper-division courses (numbered
300 or above) offered by the College
of Letters and Science. For the Bachelor of Science degree, at least 30 of these
36
credits must be from natural science curricular areas or other courses approved
as advanced natural sciences
(uwm.edu/letters-science/advising/degree-requirements/ls-degree-requirements-fall-2013-current/fall-2013-bachelor-ofarts-ba-degree-requirements).
See Bachelor of Arts Degree for additional credit requirements and limitations.
Eligibility for Prior Degree Requirements. Students enrolled at UWM prior to September 2008 and transfer students
who began their studies prior
to September 2008 may meet the requirements listed above or may satisfy the
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts/Science degree programs outlined in any Undergraduate Bulletin or Catalog
between 1998-99 and 2006-07.
Course of Study – Second Baccalaureate Degree
Candidates for a second baccalaureate degree must satisfy all current requirements
for an undergraduate degree in the
College of Letters and Science. Transfer
work may be used for these requirements. In addition, students must complete
at least 30 credits in residence at UWM after the date on which the first
degree is awarded. If more than 30 credits are
needed to complete all degree requirements,
the last 30 credits must be completed in residence. Of these 30 credits, at
least 24 must be in courses in the College of Letters and Science. At least
20 of these credits must be in upper-division
courses. Students must satisfy
current requirements for a major. Students who have been awarded a Bachelor of Arts by
the College of Letters and Science are not eligible for a second BA degree from L&S. Those who have earned a
Bachelor of Science in L&S are not eligible for a second L&S BS degree.
Course of Study – Additional Majors Program
All College of Letters and Science departments participate in the University's
Additional Majors Program. This program
serves students who have completed a
degree, either at UWM or elsewhere, as well as those currently enrolled in
another
school/college at UWM who wish to complete an additional major in L&S. Students
who opt for an additional
major must complete only the major requirements; they
are not required to complete an entire second degree. A regular
departmental
major, an interdepartmental major, or a committee interdisciplinary major may
be selected.
All credit and grade point average requirements currently in effect for the
selected major are enforced. This means that
students must complete a minimum
of 15 advanced credits (numbered 300 or above) in residence at UWM, and they
must complete the version of the major in effect at the time of declaration.
Students participating in the program must
provide transcripts of all prior
non-UWM work. Those with a prior degree are admitted with senior standing.
Completion
of the major is certified by the major department and recorded on an official
UWM transcript.
Residence Requirements
In order to provide maximum flexibility while preserving the institutional
identity of a UWM degree, the College
requires residence (a) during the last
30 credits, (b) during 45 of the last 60 credits, or (c) during any 90 credits
of a
student's undergraduate career.
Students who transfer to UWM from a UW two-year college, Milwaukee Area Technical College, Madison Area
Technical College, or Nicolet Technical College may transfer up to 72 credits
taken at a two-year school.
Students who transfer to UWM from a junior college outside Wisconsin must earn
the final 48 credits here or in another
bachelor's-degree-granting
college or university in accord with the requirements stated above.
At least 15 credits of advanced work in the major, and 9 credits of advanced
work in the minor (if applicable), must be
completed in residence at UWM. Departures
from this rule due to extraordinary circumstances require a
recommendation, including evidence of equivalent work
completed elsewhere, from the major or minor department to
the Office of Student
Academic Services.
Credits earned through credit-by-examination, retroactive credit in foreign
languages, and the College Level
Examination Program do not count toward residency, but they do not interrupt residency.
Grade Point Average
To be eligible for a bachelor's degree, students must attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 on all credits that count toward
a
degree in the College, including any transfer work. In addition, students must
earn a cumulative 2.0 GPA on all UWM
credits that count toward the degree.
Semester Course Load
Students in Letters and Science may carry a maximum of 18 credits in a regular
semester. In extraordinary
circumstances, an overload may be granted to a student
with a high GPA who has no outstanding incompletes. Students
should contact
the College's advising office for instructions on requesting an overload. Additional fees are assessed for
credits beyond 18.
Academic Regulations
For information on actions on unsatisfactory grades and honors for scholarship,
see Academic Information.
Special Opportunities
Attainment Examinations
Students may take an attainment examination in some departments to demonstrate
mastery of the subject matter of
courses that are prerequisite for advanced
courses or are required for graduation. Although passing such an examination
does not grant credits toward graduation, it enables students to move more quickly
to advanced work in a subject area.
Correspondence and Extension Study
With the permission of the assistant dean for Student Academic Services, students
may take correspondence courses
through the University of Wisconsin-Extension
for credit while enrolled in the College of Letters and Science. The total
number
of credits per semester may not exceed 18, including correspondence courses
and work in residence.
Credit for Demonstrated Equivalent Preparation
In special cases, a department may grant credits toward graduation for knowledge or abilities attained through previous
work, i.e., coursework or other systematic study as determined by the department. Although the College of Letters and
Science places no limit on the number of credits that may be obtained in this way,
departments, if they choose to do so,
may set limits on the number of credits they will
grant.
Departments other than foreign language departments may grant a student credits
toward graduation for a University
course in which s/he requests and passes a special
University examination. An examination for credit must be based on
work equivalent
to a course given at UWM, and the credits granted will be for the corresponding
course. Evidence of
work justifying an examination for credit must be presented
to the department.
Permission for such examinations must
be secured in advance from the Dean of
the College upon recommendation of the department chair. Examinations for
credit
will be taken at a time
specified by the department. In general, a student may not take such an examination
if any
previous enrollment in the target course appears on the student's record, whether or not the course was completed.
Foreign language departments may allow students to receive credit for some
prerequisite language courses at the 100
and 200 level upon completion of specified higher-level "entry"
courses. A student who skips a course or courses in the
100-200 language sequence after having taken a lower-level course may earn credits for demonstrated equivalent
preparation ("retro" credits) in the skipped course(s) if s/he earns a grade of B or better in the higher-level course. As a
general policy, a grade of B or above is required,
but individual departments may set a higher grade requirement. Only
the grade in the completed course is computed into the grade point average.
A student who earns below the required
grade in this entry course becomes, thereafter, ineligible for "retro" credits in the
language involved.
The number of credits that can be earned in this way is limited to a maximum of 16 in any one language. Credits granted
for prerequisite courses will be equal to the credit value of the prerequisite course(s) or a maximum of 4 credits for each
prerequisite course, whichever is the smaller number. Students may not be granted "retro" credits for courses at the 300
level and above, except where the fourth-semester course in a regular language sequence is numbered 300 or above.
In the foreign languages, credit for prerequisite courses ("retro credits") also may be granted to transfer students under
the following circumstances:
Retro credits granted by another institution will be accepted at UWM if they were granted based on a course that
generates retro credits at UWM and if the student has earned the grade that is required at UWM.
A transfer student coming from an institution that does not grant retro credits but who took a foreign language
course that transfers as a qualifying course at UWM may apply for retro credits if the student satisfies UWM
standards for receiving retro credits.
In both cases, the number of retro credits awarded will be limited to the number of credits students at UWM are granted
for each prerequisite course.
Students who want more information
should contact the chair of the appropriate language department.
Evening Degree Opportunities
The College of Letters and Science seeks to accommodate the needs and interests of students who plan to complete
degree programs during the evening hours. At present, six degree programs offered by departments in the College can
be completed through evening coursework. With the approval of the major department and the assistant dean for
Student Academic Services, modifications often can be made
in degree programs that cannot be completed in this
manner. Questions
concerning the availability of courses and specific degree programs during late
hours should be
directed either to Andrew Cuneo, (414) 229-2787, or to the appropriate
department.
First-Year Seminar Program
The First-Year Seminar Program affords freshmen the opportunity to participate
in a small learning community during
their first year at UWM, helping to ease
the transition to college. The Program offers a range of seminars to students
of
all ability levels.
Limited to just 20 first-year students, each first-year seminar provides a unique
opportunity for students to get to know
their professors and fellow students.
In this small seminar setting, the professor serves as a mentor, coaching and
helping students to achieve success in their first year. First-year seminars emphasize
the development of collaboration,
teamwork, written and oral communication skills,
creative and analytical thinking, and university literacy.
Seminars are offered in a wide variety of interest areas. Course titles in
recent semesters have included What Is
Randomness; Urban Legends of the Supernatural; Aspects of Hell; and What’s So Funny? Most first-year seminars are
offered for three credits and can
be applied to degree requirements. See the Schedule of Classes for a list of first-year
seminars taught in the current semester.
For more information, visit the First-Year Seminar website at uwm.edu/first-year-seminars or call Associate Dean Dave
Clark at (414) 375-0457.
Independent Study
Certain departments allow qualified students to register for independent study.
Credits are awarded for academic
activities pursued outside the formal classroom
setting under the supervision of a member of the Letters and Science
faculty or instructional academic staff.
The activities may include reading, research, or special projects. In most
departments, independent
study is offered at the lower and upper levels, although both levels are not
available in all
departments.
Students register in course numbers 199 or 699 in an appropriate department
(290, 697, 698 in Bio Sci or 399 in Sociol)
after preparing, with the approval of the
supervising instructor, a statement (study proposal) describing the plan of
study.
The study proposal must be approved by the department chair and forwarded to
the Office of Student Academic
Services.
In order to apply for lower-level independent study, students must have a 2.5
GPA or above on all credits attempted at
UWM. The upper-level independent study
course carries a prerequisite of junior standing and a 2.5 UWM GPA.
Departments
may opt to set higher GPA prerequisites. To ascertain class standing
and cumulative GPA for new transfer,
special, and summer-only students, a transcript of all
previous college work must be submitted. Some independent study
courses may
have departmental prerequisites in addition to these college-wide prerequisites.
Departments do not have
the authority to waive college-wide prerequisites. See
the course listings in this catalog to determine if a particular
department
offers independent study.
Innovative Weather
UWM’s Innovative Weather is a 24/7 weather operation that trains the next generation of meteorologists while
providing weather-related services to the community and business partners throughout southeastern Wisconsin and the
Midwest. Led by Dr. Paul Roebber and Mike Westendorf, Innovative Weather gives students hands-on experience in
operational meteorology and professional job skills. It also provides community and business partners with reliable
risk assessment forecasts and services, and it provides Milwaukee radio listeners with accurate and in-depth weather
forecasts on 89.7 WUWM.
Innovative Weather hires UWM students pursuing degrees in atmospheric science or related fields. Employees
develop skills in short- and long-range forecasting, broadcasting, and client communication as they progress from intern
to meteorologist. The rigorous 24/7 schedule prepares students for the demands of a career in meteorology. Students
also receive excellent training to acquire the soft skills that so many companies are seeking.
Email: [email protected]
Internship Opportunities
The Washington Center Internship. The College of Letters and Science
participates in a program that arranges
internships in Washington, D.C. Students
earn 15 UWM credits in the fall or spring semester and 12 credits during the
summer semester. The internships are full-time, non-paid positions. For more
information on this opportunity, contact
Lenore Fuller, Office of Student Academic
Services, (414) 229-5899.
International Internships. A limited number of overseas internship opportunities
are available to students accepted to
some of the overseas study programs sponsored
by the College. For more information on internships abroad, contact the
Center for International Education, (414) 229-5182.
Local and Regional Internships. Internships are available in a variety
of public and private agencies in the Milwaukee
metropolitan area. For more
information on internship opportunities, contact Cindy Piercy, Office of Student
Academic
Services, Holton 118, (414) 229-5872.
Overseas Study Opportunities
The College of Letters and Science, through the Center for International Education,
offers a wide range of opportunities
for students to study overseas through
a variety of exchange and study abroad programs. Foreign language
proficiency
is required for some of the programs but is not required for all. Students accepted for participation earn UWM credits
and make progress
in their major and/or toward their degree at UWM. There also are numerous faculty-led,
short-term
UWinteriM or summer programs in which
students may earn three to six credits. Program locations change from year to
year and have included Taiwan, Cuba, Ghana, Italy, Peru, India, United Kingdom,
China, Brazil, Costa Rica, and
France. For certain programs, students may apply
for national, regional, or program-specific scholarships.
The programs listed below are sponsored by the College of Letters and Science
through the Center for International
Education. For additional program information,
see the International Study entry in the Academic Opportunities
section of this
catalog.
Argentina: CEA Buenos Aires Study Abroad. Partnering with the University of Belgrano, this program is offered
during the fall and spring semesters. Students can study Spanish language, Argentine immersion, international
business, Latin American studies, liberal arts, or social sciences. Some classes are taught in English.
Australia and New Zealand Study Abroad. Students may earn UWM credit and receive a small program fee
reduction by studying in a wide variety of disciplines at one of seven Australian or two New Zealand universities
sponsored by UWM through our affiliation with GlobalLinks. Students can study during the fall, spring, or academic
year.
Brazil: Pontificia Universidade Católica Exchange. Located in Rio de Janeiro, this fall or spring semester program
offers students the opportunity to take classes in English while also learning Portuguese. The courses taught in English
have a content based on aspects of Brazil and Latin America, such as culture, literature, business, design, civilization,
and history, among others.
Chile: Pontificia Universidad Católica Study Abroad. Located in Santiago, Chile, this fall, spring, or academic-year
program offers participants the opportunity to study a wide variety of courses from many disciplines, including liberal
arts and Spanish language courses, at the prestigious Catholic University.
China: China Studies Institute Study Abroad. Study in Beijing during the summer, fall, spring, or academic year at
this Chinese language and culture unit within Peking University. Non-language courses are taught in English in a broad
range of disciplines. Field studies and internships are available.
Egypt: American University in Cairo Study Abroad. Study in this American-style university in the city center of
Cairo. This program is for students of all majors with an interest in Arabic studies and languages.
Egypt: AMIDEAST Study Abroad in Cairo. AMIDEAST partners with the Arab Academy for this program. Students
can choose from a Middle East Studies track and an Egyptology track. In both, students take Arabic language and
relevant subject-area courses. Internships are available.
England: London Study Program. Located in central London, this spring semester, faculty-led study abroad program
offers a liberal arts curriculum with guest lecturers, regional excursions, internships, and cultural events.
England: British Universities Exchange Programs. Selected students enroll in fall, spring, or academic-year courses
at the University of Birmingham, University of Sunderland, or University of Kent at Canterbury. We also have an
exchange with the University of Sheffield that runs during the spring semester or academic year. Students may take a
wide variety of courses in many different disciplines.
England: Herstmonceux Castle Study Abroad. Located in East Sussex about one hour south of London, students can
study liberal arts and business for a fall, spring, or summer term in this renovated 15th-century castle. Scholarships,
regional excursions, and social events are highlights of this program.
France: Eurocentres Study Abroad. This summer, UWinteriM, or fall or spring semester program gives students the
opportunity to study intensive French. It is open to students of all levels and includes cultural excursions and field trips
to encourage cultural immersion. Students have the opportunity to study in Paris, Amboise, or La Rochelle.
France: Paris Semester Study Abroad. This is a spring semester, faculty-led program with course offerings in French
language and literature, art, history, geography, and politics at the Institut de Langue et de Culture Françaises of the
Institut Catholique in Paris as well as a credit internship teaching in French schools and the opportunity to take a
business class at a French business school. The program includes tours and visits to places of historical and cultural
interest.
France: Sciences Politiques Exchange. This fall, spring, or academic-year exchange is for advanced French speakers
with strong social science backgrounds (political science, international studies, history), and is offered at one of the
most prestigious higher education institutions in France. Many French presidents and diplomats have graduated from
this school, located in Paris. Other campuses include Dijon, Le Havre, Menton, Nancy, Poitiers, and Reims.
France: Novancia Business Exchange. A fall, spring, or academic-year offering at Novancia in Paris, endorsed by the
Lubar School of Business at UWM, this exchange program for undergraduate and graduate students will be of special
interest to business, communication, or mass communication students. Courses are taught in English. A wider variety of
courses are available for advanced French speakers.
France: MICEFA Exchange. A fall, spring, or academic-year program coordinated by the Mission Interuniversitaire
de Coordination Échanges Franco-Américains (MICEFA) in Paris, this immersion program is for advanced French
speakers who are placed at one of ten different Parisian universities for study of a wide variety of subjects.
France: ESA Exchange. Enroll in Architecture and Urban Planning course offerings in French at the École Spéciale
d’Architecture (ESA) in Paris during the fall or spring semester.
France: ESSEC International Business School Exchange. Students can study during the fall or spring semester at the
campus located in Cergy-Pontoise, just outside of Paris. Classes include business administration, business management,
economics, human resources, and intensive French language. Several courses are taught in English.
Germany: Eurocentres Berlin Study Abroad. This summer, UWinteriM, fall, or spring program gives students the
opportunity to study intensive German. It is open to students of all levels and includes cultural excursions and field trips
to encourage cultural immersion.
Germany: Giessen Exchange. This is a spring semester or academic-year program in which qualified UWM students
enroll at Justus Liebig Universität in Giessen, Germany. Participation in the exchange fulfills a large portion of credits
needed for a German Studies Certificate. Several scholarships are available for this program.
Germany: Hessen-Wisconsin Exchange. This is a unique program, managed by UWM, for students of the University
of Wisconsin System. The exchange can be for a semester, year, or summer session at any one of the 13 participating
Hessian universities located in Darmstadt, Frankfurt, Fulda, Giessen, Kassel, Marburg, Offenbach, and Wiesbaden.
Immersion courses, language learning at all levels, and some courses in English are offered.
Germany: Europa-Universität Viadrina Exchange. This is a fall, spring, or academic-year program located on the
border between Germany and Poland. Students can pursue law, economics, and cultural studies in German, Polish, or
English languages.
Germany: Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg Exchange. This academic year-long program is located in Bamberg,
a charming town located in central Germany that was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage City. Students may take
courses in German, English, or a combination of both. Bamberg offers a wide array of subject options such as
humanities, social sciences, business, and applied computer science and information systems.
Northern Ireland: Colmcille Study Abroad. This unique spring semester study program starts in Dublin and moves to
Gleanncholmcille (both in the Irish Republic) for Irish language and culture training; then the program continues in
Derry, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom), for studies in peace and conflict resolution at the Magee College of the
University of Ulster.
Israel: Rothberg International School - Hebrew University of Jerusalem Study Abroad Program. Students have
the opportunity to study in English at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in a wide variety of subjects, such as
religious, Israeli, and Middle Eastern studies; business; psychology; environmental studies; dance; and music. Students
also develop proficiency in Hebrew and participate in a comprehensive program of extracurricular activities, including
tours in Jerusalem and throughout the country.
Israel: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev-Ginsburg Ingerman Overseas Student Program. Students will have
the opportunity to study Hebrew language in addition to choosing from a variety of courses taught in English that are
designed to enhance and connect their experience in Israel. Students will be encouraged to participate in volunteer
service to deepen their knowledge of and exposure to Israel and its people. This program is offered during the fall,
spring, and academic year.
Italy: Eurocentres Florence Study Abroad. This summer, UWinteriM, or fall or spring semester program gives
students the opportunity to study intensive Italian. It is open to students of all levels and includes cultural excursions and
field trips to encourage cultural immersion.
Italy: Santa Reparata International School of Art Study Abroad. Santa Reparata International School of Art
(SRISA) provides accredited academic-year and semester studio art programs, short workshops, and summer classes of
the highest caliber. SRISA believes that a balanced curriculum of studio art courses and academic courses provides the
most comprehensive experience for students who have chosen Florence as their place of study. Course offerings in
liberal arts and culture complement the studio disciplines to provide students with an intellectual framework and
historical context for their creative work. With the exception of Italian, all courses are taught in English.
Japan: Chiba University Exchange. This exchange is located in Chiba, the prefecture adjacent to Tokyo and the sisterstate of Wisconsin. Students take courses in Japanese language and culture. For those proficient in Japanese, a wide
variety of courses in many different disciplines are offered.
Japan: Eurocentres in Kanazawa Study Abroad. This summer, UWinteriM, fall, or spring semester program gives
students the opportunity to study intensive Japanese. It is open to students of all levels and includes cultural excursions
and field trips to encourage cultural immersion.
Japan: Nanzan University Exchange. This exchange in Nagoya, Japan, is ideal for learners of Japanese at the
intermediate levels. The program offers intensive Japanese language instruction and English-taught courses in business,
economics, history, culture, politics, and general area studies. Students with high Japanese proficiency can choose to
take subject courses taught in Japanese. Courses in a variety of disciplines are taught in English.
Japan: Seijo University Exchange. Qualified students may enroll for spring semester or academic-year course
offerings at Seijo University in Tokyo, Japan. An intensive Japanese language course precedes the start of the program.
Japan: Japan Center for Michigan Universities (JCMU) Study Abroad. Students participating in this fall, spring, or
academic-year program will take classes in Japanese language and elective courses in Japanese area studies.
Jordan: AMIDEAST Study Abroad in Jordan. Students study in Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The Qasid
Institute for Modern Standard & Classical Arabic is AMIDEAST's partner for this program. Students will take up to 7
credits of Arabic and an interdisciplinary course on contemporary Jordan, and they will choose from elective courses in
several diverse subject areas, including social sciences, the humanities, and natural sciences. Internships are available.
Korea: Ajou University Exchange. This summer, spring, or academic-year program is located in Suwon, South Korea.
The University is unique because there are over 100 courses taught in English that closely match UWM offerings,
especially in the sciences. Korean language and culture classes also are offered.
Korea: Korea University Sejong Campus. University Sejong Campus (KU-Sejong) is located in the center of Korea,
in Jochiwon, a small town that is in proximity of three major cities that are accessible easily by either bus or train. KUSejong hosts 24 departments in the College of Humanities, Business and Economics, Science and Technology,
Pharmacy, the School of Public Administration, and the School of Sports and Leisure Studies. Students may attend KUSejong during the fall, spring, or academic year.
Mexico: Tec Monterrey Exchange. This fall, spring, summer, or academic-year exchange at the Instituto Tecnológico
y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey offers students a wide variety of liberal arts, business, and engineering courses
for intermediate to advanced Spanish speakers.
Morocco: AMIDEAST Study Abroad in Rabat. AMIDEAST partners with Mohammed V University-Agdal for this
program that is offered during the fall, spring, and academic year. All students take Modern Standard and Moroccan
Arabic and then choose from various Middle East and North African studies courses. French courses also are available.
Morocco: AMIDEAST Study Abroad in Ifrane. For this program, AMIDEAST partners with Al Akhawayn
University (known as AUI) located in the mountain resort town of Ifrane about 60 miles south of Fez. Students can
study during the fall, spring, or academic year and are required to participate in a three-week orientation located in
Rabat. This orientation is designed to introduce students to Moroccan Arabic, culture, and daily life, and familiarize
them with the logistics of the program.
Peru: Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru Study Abroad. Located in Lima, Peru, this fall, spring, or academicyear program offers participants the opportunity to study a wide variety of courses from many disciplines, including
liberal arts and Spanish language courses, at the prestigious university.
Russia: Wyoming Saratov Study Abroad Program. Partnering with the University of Wyoming and Saratov State
University, this summer program gives students the opportunity to study Russian language.
Spain: CIEE Seville Study Abroad Program. This semester, year, or summer program in Seville is sponsored by
CIEE. Students study Spanish language and choose a variety of other courses in civilization, culture, business, and
education by following a distinct program track. Credit-bearing internships also are available. Courses taken through
this program cannot be counted toward a Spanish major or minor at UWM.
Spain: Universidade de Vigo Exchange. Located in Galicia, Spain, students will have the opportunity to earn
undergraduate or graduate credits in a variety of disciplines during a spring semester or year-long stay.
Spain: Universidad de Santiago de Compostela Exchange. In this spring semester or year-long exchange program,
students can earn undergraduate or graduate credits in a wide variety of disciplines.
Sweden: Jönköping Exchange. Students may study at Jönköping University for a semester or for an academic
year. Engineering, business, and economics courses are taught in English.
Sweden: Mälardalen Exchange. Learn about Swedish language and culture, Scandinavian studies, and a variety of
other classes, some of which are conducted in English. The subjects taught at the university range from engineering; the
natural, social, and behavioral sciences; to the humanities.
Switzerland: Eurocentres in Lausanne Study Abroad. This summer, UWinteriM, fall, or spring program gives
students the opportunity to study intensive French. It is open to students of all levels and includes cultural excursions
and field trips to encourage cultural immersion.
Taiwan: Mandarin Training Center Study Abroad. The Mandarin Training Center is the Chinese language training
unit of the National Taiwan Normal University in Taipei, which is known for its innovative curriculum and small class
sizes. Students can study during the summer, fall, spring, or academic year.
Thailand: Mae Fah Luang University Exchange. Students select from a variety of courses in English that include
Hmong and heritage studies, computer science, management, and law.
For more information concerning these exchange and study abroad programs, please contact the Center for International
Education, located in Pearse
Hall 166, (414) 229-5182, www.studyabroad.uwm.edu.
Pre-Physician Assistant
Dorrie VanKerkvoorde, Academic Advisor, Student Academic Services, Pre-PA Advisor, (414) 2294654, [email protected], uwm.edu/letters-science/advising/student-advising/pre-professional-advising.
Students wishing to become a physician assistant should consult the pre-PA advisor early in their undergraduate career
for help in planning a program. An appointment with the advisor each semester is strongly recommended. Later, the
advisor also can assist students in the application process.
The vast majority of PA programs in the country are highly competitive master’s degree programs and take 2-3 years to
complete once admitted to the professional program. Many, but not all, PA schools require that applicants take the
Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Significant clinical exposure to patient care is required to become a competitive
candidate for most PA programs. Students are strongly encouraged to work or volunteer in a health care setting on an
ongoing basis.
Requirements for admission to PA schools vary widely. However, many PA schools consider the following as minimal
preparation for admission: 1 year of English; mathematics through pre-calculus and statistics; 2 – 3 years of
chemistry, including inorganic and organic chemistry and biochemistry; and several biology courses (see below).
Physics is rarely required.
Many PA schools specify additional courses as part of the minimal preparation for admission. Therefore, pre-PA
students should ascertain the specific requirements of the schools to which they intend to apply and plan their
undergraduate programs accordingly.
Courses That Typically Satisfy PA School Admission Requirements:
Bio Sci 150 Foundations of Biological Sciences I
Bio Sci 152 Foundations of Biological Sciences II
Bio Sci
Anatomy and Physiology I
202*
Bio Sci
Anatomy and Physiology II
203*
Bio Sci 101 General Survey of Microbiology
or
Bio Sci 383 General Microbiology
Chem 102 General Chemistry
Chem 104 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis
Chem 343 Organic Chemistry
Chem 344 Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Chem 345 Organic Chemistry
Chem 501 Introduction to Biochemistry
Psych 101 Introduction to Psychology
HS (HCA) Medical Terminology
222**
Math – a semester of calculus
Statistics – any statistics course
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
3
2
3
3
3
3
4
3
Although the courses listed above are often required for admission to almost all PA schools, the rest of the program can
be whatever the student wishes. Students are not required to major in Biological Sciences or Chemistry in order to gain
admission to PA school.
* Some PA schools may have a three- to five-year expiration date on anatomy and physiology coursework. Please
consult with the pre-PA advisor and PA schools of choice regarding your individual circumstances.
** Some PA schools may have a five-year expiration date on medical terminology coursework. Please consult with the
pre-PA advisor and PA schools of choice regarding your individual circumstances.
Undergraduate Research Opportunity (UROP)
The Undergraduate Research Opportunity Project (UROP) in the College of Letters and
Science pairs students with
faculty researchers across the University. Building
on a long tradition of undergraduate research at UWM, the UROP
assists undergraduates,
even in their first years at UWM, to have the opportunity to engage, in a structured
setting, with
the research mission of the University. Students work side by side
with faculty members on faculty research projects,
and they receive academic
credit for their work. The UROP is designed for highly motivated students who
want to
contribute to the creation of knowledge instead of just acquire it.
Interested students can request information online at uwm.edu/our or by contacting the UROP office (414) 229-2641.
The UROP staff will help students identify possible research projects and arrange for students to meet with the faculty
members. Accepted students commit to a year-long course (for up to 6 credits) as an apprentice to a faculty mentor and,
participate in a required one-credit research seminar with other students in
the program. For more information, visit the
UROP
website.
Wisconsin Universities United Nations Summer Seminar
Since 1966, students from all UW System campuses and other universities have
participated in this 6-credit program.
Selected students spend one week at
UW-Milwaukee in intensive study of international organizations and the United
Nations. The Seminar then moves to New York City for one month, where attention
shifts to briefings, library research,
and personal interviews with the personnel
of the UN and various national missions. Students also use the UN’s Dag
Hammarskjöld Library for documentary research.
This program is administered by the Center for International Education (CIE) in the
College of Letters and Science at
the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. For
more information, contact CIE, Pearse
Hall 166, (414) 229-5182.
Cultures and Communities Program
Administered by the College of Letters and Science, the Cultures and Communities
Program is open to undergraduate
students in all of UWM's schools and colleges.
The Cultures and Communities (CC) certificate brings together students
and faculty
members from many areas of the arts, sciences, humanities, social sciences,
education, and the health
professions.
The CC certificate provides a meaningful general education experience through
courses focusing on U.S. multicultural
studies, global and international perspectives,
and the community and cultural contexts of art, science, health, and
technology.
It also contains a service learning/community engagement component that offers
students the opportunity to
participate in a wide variety of off-campus learning
experiences in the Milwaukee community.
Students may earn the CC certificate while satisfying their L&S distribution
and University general education
requirements. In doing so, students can strengthen
their preparation for careers in education, business, law, government,
health
care, and any other career areas that involve community engagement. Such professions
increasingly demand
applicants who have developed multicultural awareness, intercultural
communication skills, and an understanding of
how globalization affects us all.
More detailed information about the CC certificate can be found online at uwm.edu/cultures-communities.
Requirements for the certificate are listed in the General Education Requirements
section of this catalog. A list of
courses approved for the certificate appears
in the L&S Certificate Programs section of the catalog. For more
information, consult with the Interdepartmental Programs coordinator, Kate Powers, at [email protected] or (414)
229-6686.
Certificate Programs
Like a departmental minor, certificate programs offer a specific academic focus
but differ by being interdisciplinary,
allowing students to combine related
courses in different disciplines to explore a common theme. Students who earn
certificates demonstrate their intellectual commitment to a subject and their
competence in scholarly areas, which can
prove valuable at the graduate level
or in the workplace.
The certificate programs listed below are available to all UWM undergraduates
and, in most cases, to students who have
previously earned a bachelor's degree
from UWM or any other accredited institution. Others may be able to enroll as
non-degree students if they meet UWM admission requirements.
Certificates are awarded at the time of graduation or upon completion of the
program requirements.
American Indian Studies
Courses: American Indian Studies (AIS)
Ancient Mediterranean Studies
Asian Studies
Business and Technical Communications
Celtic Studies
Courses: Celtic Studies (CELTIC)
Childhood and Adolescence Studies
Comparative Ethnic Studies
Courses: Ethnic Studies (ETHNIC)
Cultures and Communities
Death Investigation (see Forensic Sciences)
Digital Arts and Culture
Ethics, Values, and Society
Food Studies
Courses: Food Studies (FOOD)
Forensic Sciences
Forensic Toxicology (see Forensic Sciences)
French and Francophone Studies
Global Health (see Inter-School/College Programs)
Hmong Diaspora Studies
Courses: Hmong (HMONG)
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Courses: Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)
Latino Studies
Courses: Latino Studies (LATINO)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
Courses: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
(LGBT)
Middle Eastern and North African Studies
Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution
Courses: Peace Studies (PEACEST)
Premedical Studies
Russian and East European Studies
Scandinavian Studies
Courses: Scandinavian Studies (SCNDVST)
Spanish for Health Professionals
TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages)
Urban Studies
Courses: Urban Studies (URB STD)
Pre-Professional Programs
Pre-Dentistry
Pre-Forestry
(Wildlife Management)
Pre-Law
Pre-Medicine
Pre-Pharmacy
Pre-Physician Assistant
Pre-Veterinary Medicine
Other Pre-Professional Health Study
Special Areas of Study
Courses that do not appear elsewhere in this catalog are listed herein.
Courses
L&S
Humanities (L&S HUM)
L&S
Natural Sciences (L&S NS)
L&S
Social Sciences (L&S SS)
Literature in Translation
Peer Mentoring. See L&S Hum 291, 292, 391.
UROP. See L&S Hum 296, L&S NS 296, L&S SS 294, 295, 296.
Washington Internship. See L&S SS 498.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
College of Letters and Science
Web Home Page: College of Letters and Science
Degree Programs
Administration
Admission
Advising
Declaration of Pre-Major
Course of Study - Bachelor of Arts Degree
Course of Study - Bachelor of Science Degree
Course of Study - Second Baccalaureate Degree
Course of Study - Additional Majors Program
Course of Study - Minor
Certificate Programs
Residence Requirements
Grade Point Average
Semester Course Load
Academic Regulations
Special Opportunities
Attainment Examinations
Correspondence and Extension Study
Credit for Demonstrated Equivalent Preparation
Evening Degree Opportunities
First-Year Seminar Program
Independent Study
Innovative Weather
Internship Opportunities
Overseas Study Opportunities
Pre-Physician Assistant
Undergraduate Research Opportunity (UROP)
Wisconsin Universities United Nations Summer Seminar
Cultures and Communities Program
Actuarial Science (see Mathematical Sciences)
Africology
Courses: Africology (AFRICOL)
Anthropology
Courses: Anthropology (ANTHRO)
Arabic (see Foreign
Languages and Literature)
Archaeology (see Anthropology)
Art History
Courses: Art History (ARTHIST)
Astronomy (see Physics)
Atmospheric Sciences (see Mathematical
Sciences)
Biochemistry (see Chemistry and Biochemistry)
Biological Sciences
Courses: Biological Sciences (BIO SCI)
Cell and Molecular Biology (see Biological Sciences)
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Courses: Chemistry (CHEM)
Chinese (see Foreign
Languages and Literature)
Classics (see Foreign
Languages and Literature)
Communication
Courses: Communication (COMMUN)
Comparative Literature (see French,
Italian, and Comparative Literature)
Economics
Courses: Economics (ECON)
English
Courses: English (ENGLISH)
Courses: English as a Second Language (ESL)
Foreign Languages and Literature
Courses: Arabic (ARABIC)
Courses: Chinese (CHINESE)
Courses: Classics (CLASSIC)
Courses: Foreign Languages and Literature (FLL)
Courses: German (GERMAN)
Courses: Greek (GREEK)
Courses: Hebrew Studies (HEBR ST)
Courses: Japanese (JAPAN)
Courses: Korean (KOREAN)
Courses: Latin (LATIN)
Courses: Polish (POLISH)
Courses: Russian (RUSSIAN)
Courses: Swedish (SCNDVST)
French (see French,
Italian, and Comparative Literature)
French, Italian, and Comparative Literature
Courses: Comparative Literature (COMPLIT)
Courses: French (FRENCH)
Courses: Italian (ITALIAN)
Geography
Courses: Geography (GEOG)
Geosciences
Courses: Geosciences (GEO SCI)
German see Foreign Languages and Literature)
Global Studies (see also Special Degree Programs)
Greek (see Foreign Languages and Literature)
Hebrew Studies
(See Jewish Studies)
Courses: Hebrew Studies (HEBR ST)
History
Courses: History (HIST)
Italian (see French, Italian, and Comparative Literature)
Japanese (see Foreign
Languages and Literature)
Jewish Studies
Courses: Jewish Studies (JEWISH)
Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies
Courses: Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies (JAMS)
Korean (see Foreign Languages and Literature)
Latin (see Foreign
Languages and Literature)
Linguistics
Courses: Linguistics (LINGUIS)
Mathematical Sciences
Courses: Atmospheric Sciences (ATM SCI)
Courses: Mathematical Sciences (MATH)
Courses: Mathematical Statistics (MTHSTAT)
Mathematical Statistics (see Mathematical
Sciences)
Microbiology (see Biological
Sciences)
Philosophy
Courses: Philosophy (PHILOS)
Physics
Courses: Astronomy (ASTRON)
Courses: Physics (PHYSICS)
Polish (see Foreign Languages and Literature)
Political Science
Courses: Political Science (POL SCI)
Portuguese (see Spanish and Portuguese)
Psychology
Courses: Psychology (PSYCH)
Public and Non-profit Administration
Courses: Nonprofit Administration (NONPROF)
Courses: Public Administration (PUB ADM)
Russian (see Foreign Languages and Literature)
Scandinavian Studies (SCNDVST)
Slavic Languages
Sociology
Courses: Sociology (SOCIOL)
Spanish and Portuguese
Courses: Portuguese (PORTUGS)
Courses: Spanish (SPANISH)
Swedish (see Scandinavian Studies)
Translation and Interpreting
Courses: Translation (TRNSLTN)
Urban Studies Programs
Courses: Urban Studies (URB STD)
Women's and Gender Studies
Courses: Women's and Gender Studies (WGS)
Special Degree Programs
Applied Mathematics and Computer Science
Course in Chemistry
Global Studies, Bachelor of Arts in
Interdepartmental Majors
American Indian Studies (CIM)
Courses: American Indian Studies (AIS)
Comparative Ethnic Studies (CIM)
Courses: Comparative Ethnic Studies (ETHNIC)
Conservation and Environmental Science
Courses: Conservation and Environmental Science (CES)
Film Studies
Courses: Film Studies (FILMSTD)
International Studies
Courses: International Studies (INTLST)
Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. [email protected] Studies
Courses: Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies (LACUSL)
Religious Studies
Courses: Religious Studies (RELIGST)
Urban Studies (see Urban Studies Programs)
Certificate Programs
American Indian Studies
Courses: American Indian Studies (AIS)
Ancient Mediterranean Studies
Asian Studies
Business and Technical Communication
Celtic Studies
Courses: Celtic Studies (CELTIC)
Childhood and Adolescence Studies
Comparative Ethnic Studies
Courses: Ethnic Studies (ETHNIC)
Cultures and Communities
Death Investigation (see Forensic Sciences)
Digital Arts and Culture
Ethics, Values, and Society
Food Studies
Courses: Food Studies (FOOD)
Forensic Sciences
Forensic Toxicology (see Forensic Sciences)
French and Francophone Studies
Global Health (see Inter-School/College Programs)
Hmong Diaspora Studies
Courses: Hmong (HMONG)
Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Courses: Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)
Latino Studies
Courses: Latino Studies (LATINO)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies
Courses: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies (LGBT)
Middle Eastern and North African Studies
Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution
Courses: Peace Studies (PEACEST)
Premedical Studies
Russian and East European Studies
Scandinavian Studies
Courses: Scandinavian Studies (SCNDVST)
Spanish for Health Professionals
TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages)
Urban Studies
Pre-Professional Programs
Pre-Forestry (Wildlife Management)
Pre-Chiropractic
Pre-Dentistry
Pre-Law
Pre-Medicine
Pre-Optometry
Pre-Pharmacy
Pre-Physician Assistant
Pre-Podiatry
Pre-Veterinary Medicine
Other Pre-Professional Health Study
Special Areas of Study
Courses: L&S Humanities (L&S HUM)
Courses: L&S Natural Sciences (L&S NS)
Courses: L&S Social Sciences (L&S SS)
Literature in Translation
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
College of Letters and Science
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents |
How to Use This Book |
Calendar ]
[ Admission |
Registration |
Financial Information |
Academic Information ]
[ Administration |
UWM - Endless Possibilities |
Academic Opportunities |
Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
School of Architecture and Urban Planning
Architecture
Courses: Architecture (ARCH)
Course of Study
The study of architecture at UWM consists of three levels that lead to
the accredited professional degree of Master of
Architecture. Students
can enter the program at various levels depending on their background.
Students with previous
non-professional baccalaureate degrees should see
the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Graduate School Bulletin
for more information on the Master of Architecture program.
All undergraduate students are required to meet the UWM General
Education Requirements.
Level 1 (Pre-Architecture). Freshman year should be taken at
UWM. If taken at another institution whose credits are
accepted for
transfer by UWM, the student is expected to achieve equivalent
background and skills. Significant
differences in courses will require
that additional coursework be completed prior to Level 2 admission.
Level 2 (Architectural Studies). Sophomore, junior, and senior
years, taken in the Department of Architecture. This
period provides a
general introduction to the problems and techniques of architectural
design. Students who are accepted
into Level 2 and complete the program
receive the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies. This is not
an
accredited professional degree. It can provide, however, a
foundation for employment as a non-professional in
architecture or in
fields related to architecture, construction, design, and planning, or
for graduate study in architecture
or in other disciplines concerned
with the physical environment.
Level 3 (Master of Architecture). Graduate study taken in the
Department of Architecture. See the University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Graduate School Bulletin for details.
Level 1 (Pre-Architecture)
Admission. Students applying to the University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee and declaring a primary interest in
architectural
studies on their application forms will be designated as
Architectural Studies-Intended (Pre-Architecture)
students. They will be advised by the School's
undergraduate advisor in the Student Advising Office. The policies and
procedures of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning apply to
admitted students, even though they may be
enrolled in courses in
another school or college at UWM.
Pre-Architecture students are not automatically accepted into the
Level 2 program. A separate application is required.
New freshman admission to the School of Architecture
and Urban Planning is based on an overall assessment of both
academic
and non-academic qualifications. The primary review factors for
admission are the strength and quality of the
high school curriculum,
high school class percentile, grade point average, and the ACT or SAT.
For preferential
consideration, applications (including ACT or SAT
scores) must be completed no later than March 1 (for summer/fall
term)
or December 1 (for spring term). Applications not complete by the
priority date or not meeting these admission
criteria will be
considered on a space-available basis.
See general freshman admission requirements of the University.
Academically qualified international student applicants must have
a TOEFL score of at least 79 (iBT) or 550 (PBT), or
they may be
admitted following successful completion of the Intensive English
Program at UWM, as demonstrated by
an appropriate TOEFL score.
Transfer students are admitted on a selective basis. Preference
is given to students whose applications are completed,
including all
required supporting documents, no later than March 1 (for the following
summer/fall term) or December 1
(for the following spring term) and who
have completed (or will have completed by the anticipated enrollment
date) at
least 24 degree credits with a cumulative grade point average
of at least 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale). In addition, transfer
applicants
must meet the same high school English and mathematics course
requirements as new freshman applicants.
International transfer student
applicants also must meet the minimum TOEFL requirement.
Students enrolled in other UWM schools or colleges who wish to
enter the architecture program will also be considered
for admission on
the basis of the criteria listed above. They must file an internal
transfer intent form (available in the
Student Advising Office) no
later than February 1 (for the following summer/fall term) or December
1 (for the
following spring term) to be considered for preferential
review.
Course of Study. The Level 1 curriculum consists of a series of
required courses within the Department and
recommended courses outside
the Department to satisfy competency and distribution requirements.
Coursework offered
by the Department at Level 1 introduces the student
not only to architecture as a field of study and a profession, but also
to the skills and project experiences useful in deciding whether to
pursue further study in the field of architectural
design.
Freshman Year Requirements
Arch 100
Arch 102
Arch 103
Arch 104
Architectural Making I
Architectural Making II
Architectural Thinking I
Architectural Thinking II
3
3
3
3
In addition, the Department occasionally offers a special topics
course (190) for experimental coursework.
Competency Requirements. Demonstrated competency in English,
mathematics, physics, and foreign language is
required for admission
to Level 2.
English.
Oral and Written Communication Competency - Part A:
Complete English 102 with a grade of C or
higher or place
beyond English 102 on the English Placement Exam (EPT).
Oral and Written
Communication - Part B: Complete at least one OWC
- B course (see schedule
of classes for this
listing).
Mathematics. Placement code of a 36 on the Math
Placement Test; or a grade of C or better in both Math 105 and 117
(Quantitative Literacy Competency Part A); Quantitative Literacy
Competency Part B satisfied by completing at least
one QL Part B
course (see schedule of
classes for this listing).
Physics. Satisfactorily complete a college-level physics course
(100, 107, 120 or higher).
Foreign Language. Please refer to the Academic Information
section at the beginning of this catalog for specific
information on
this requirement.
Directed Electives (30 cr). The Department requires courses
outside the department to give students a foundation in the
arts,
humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. These courses
satisfy the distribution area of the UWM General
Education
Requirements (GER).
Arts
6
Humanities
6
Social Sciences
6
Natural Sciences, to include a lab
6
Additional 6 from any of the above categories
One course must satisfy the GER Cultural Diversity Requirement. A list
of courses is provided in the online Schedule of
Classes each
semester under "General Education Requirements."
One course must satisfy the Service Learning Requirement. A list of
courses is provided in the online Schedule of
Classes each
semester.
Directed electives can be completed in Level 2.
Level 2 (Architectural Studies)
Admission. Entrance into this level requires the following
standards: completion of a minimum of 30 credits
(sophomore standing);
a cumulative GPA of at least 2.75 in both the overall college record
and required Level 1
architecture courses (Arch 100, 102, 103, and 104, or
their equivalent). Because enrollment is contingent upon available
staffing and facilities, satisfaction of the minimum requirements does
not guarantee admission to Level 2. The academic
quality of the
student's Level 1 studies are carefully reviewed by the
School's BSAS Committee. Admission to the
University does not guarantee acceptance by the Department of Architecture.
Enrollment priority is given to students with the highest
cumulative GPAs for admission into Architecture 310.
Application instructions are available in the School's
Student Advising Office. Students applying for the fall semester
must
submit a Level 2 application by May 1. Transfer students should apply
at least one month prior to this date to
assure adequate time for
receipt and evaluation of transcripts by the University's
Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
Transfer students applying to Level 2 must demonstrate that
they have taken the equivalent of the Level 1 program of
study (Arch 100, 102, 103, and 104).
Advanced students transferring from another architectural or
related program (design, engineering, landscape
architecture) may
petition the BSAS Committee for advanced standing. Students must show
that prior coursework
parallels coursework in the Level 2 program. A
minimum of two semesters of work, consisting of at least 24 credits in
total, must be completed in residency for the bachelor's degree.
Second-degree candidates enrolled in architecture courses are
classified as seniors in architecture. They are not subject
to the
University's General Education Requirements; however, they must
complete (or have completed) the Level 1
Mathematics and Physics
Competency Requirements. Admission to the School as a second-degree
candidate requires a
cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75
(on a 4.0 scale) on the previous undergraduate record. Applications
must
be completed no later than March 1 (for the summer/fall term) or
October 1 (for the spring term). For information on
second-degree
requirements, students should schedule an appointment with Tammy
Taylor, Undergraduate Advisor,
(414) 229-4015.
Course of Study. Students admitted to the Level 2 program must
complete the courses listed below.
Two introductory core studios in the sophomore year (12 cr)
Arch 310
Fundamentals of Architectural Design I
6
Arch 320
Fundamentals of Architectural Design II
6
1. Core Studios (12 cr)
Arch 410
Architectural Design I
6
Arch 420
Architectural Design II
6
2. Core Courses (18 cr)
Arch 282
Visualization I
3
Arch 283
Visualization II
3
Arch 301
Architectural Structures and Construction
3
Arch 302
Architecture and Human Behavior
3
Arch 303
Architecture and Environmental Response
3
Arch 304
Contemporary Citicism and Urbanism
3
3. Electives at the 300 level or above (24 cr)
Of these, 15 must be completed in the Department of Architecture. A minimum of 9 credits at
the 300 level or above must be taken outside the Department of Architecture. Students intending
to enter the Level 3 program will need to complete a third, 600-level studio. For the BSAS
degree, at least the last 24 credits must be earned in residency at UWM. A total of 120 credits is
required for graduation. The minimum cumulative GPA required for all UWM credits and for all
Level 2 credits attempted is 2.5.
BSAS Requirements
Total credits needed to graduate: 120
Completion of this degree does not
guarantee admission to the graduate programs in Architecture.
Architectural Studies Minor
The Department of Architecture offers a Minor in
Architectural Studies for students enrolled in other degree programs
on
campus. To receive recognition for coursework completed toward the
minor, students must satisfactorily complete
courses in the minor
track.
Course of Study
Students who choose the Minor in Architectural Studies must have a
declared major in another school or college at
UWM and must have a
minimum of a 2.75 grade point average. The minor consists of 18 credits in architecture courses. Nine
credits numbered 300 or above must be taken in residence
at UWM. All
credits in the minor must be completed with an overall grade point
average of at least 2.75, and no courses
may be taken on a credit/no
credit basis.
Limitations
The Department reserves the right to cap admissions into the
minor on the basis of course availability. Students in the
major have
first priority registration for all courses in the Department. In cases of full capacity, students enrolled in the
minor will be
ranked and admitted into the program or into a course on the basis of
overall GPA.
For more information about requirements for the minor, contact Tammy Taylor, Undergraduate
Advisor, School of
Architecture and Urban Planning, AUP 225, [email protected], (414) 229-4015.
Academic Regulations
For information on the University-wide Academic Action Policy
and honors for scholarship, please refer to the
Academic Information
section at the beginning of this catalog.
Special Opportunities
The Department of Architecture provides the following
opportunities for students and faculty to develop coursework
with a
special focus.
The Independent Studies course (Arch 392) rewards students with
credits for worthwhile activities originated by the
students, such as
special reading or research programs, community service, or
independent design projects. To be
eligible, students in the
Department of Architecture must have completed one semester of work
and must have a
cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 in their work in the
Department. Students in other UWM departments must have the
permission
of their own departments and the Department of Architecture.
The Directed Research course (Arch 391) offers an opportunity
for students to participate in current research projects
of
architecture faculty. Eligibility and approval for registration are at
the discretion of the faculty members in charge of
the projects.
The Special Topics course (Arch 390) permits individual faculty
members to develop special subjects on a onesemester basis. Special
Topics courses are announced at registration for the following
semester.
The Department has developed a semester-long Study Abroad
Program that allows students to combine foreign travel
and study
under the tutelage of one or more departmental faculty member. The location
of the program may vary from
year to year. Admission to the program is
selective, based on the student's previous academic performance.
Accident and Health Insurance. Use of the School's
woodworking shop requires that students provide evidence of
personal
accident and health insurance to the School of Architecture and Urban
Planning Dean's Office.
Level 3 (Master of Architecture)
A student who receives the Bachelor of Science in Architectural
Studies does not automatically qualify for the Level 3
graduate
program, which must be completed for the accredited professional
degree. Students must satisfy both the
general admission requirements
of the Graduate School and the special requirements of the Department
of Architecture.
Applicants should consult the University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee Graduate School Bulletin.
Courses
Architecture (ARCH)
Web Home Pages:
[ School
of Architecture and Urban Planning ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Architecture
[ School
of Architecture and Urban Planning ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
School of Architecture and Urban Planning
Urban Planning
Courses: Urban Planning (URBPLAN)
Although the professional planning program offered at UWM is a
master's degree requiring two years of graduate study,
a number of
planning courses are available to undergraduates. They include:
1.A cluster of introductory
courses reviewing urban problems and solutions for freshmen and
sophomores, and introducing
urban planning to upper-level
undergraduates.
2.A cluster presenting the planning process in a general
urban context.
3.A group of upper-level courses that introduce more
specialized aspects of planning in contexts ranging from
neighborhoods,
through suburbs, to new towns and planned communities;
and approaches from fiscal planning to environmental issues.
These courses are offered to students interested in learning more
about planning and the roles of planners in addressing
urban problems,
and complement other programs such as architecture, business,
economics, engineering, geography,
social work, sociology, and
political science.
Certificate Program
The Department of Urban Planning also offers undergraduates the
opportunity to obtain a Certificate in Urban Planning.
All
undergraduate students are eligible. A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better
and a total of 18 credits from among
designated courses are required.
The intent of the program is to recognize those students who obtain a
thorough
introduction to urban planning through coursework. These
courses provide students with an understanding of many of
the most
important problems facing urban society and help prepare students for a
variety of careers and graduate study.
Interested students should
inquire in the Student Advising Office about either the Certificate
Program or appropriate
courses as preparation for graduate study in
urban planning.
DESIGNATED COURSES: 12
CR
Both of the following (6 cr)
UrbPlan 140
Issues in Contemporary Urban Planning
3
UrbPlan 141
Urban Planning Solutions to Contemporary Urban Problems
3
One "Great
Cities" course (3 cr)
UrbPlan 315
Planning for Great Cities of the World
3
UrbPlan 316
Planning for the Great Cities of America
3
UrbPlan 591
Introduction to Urban Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
3
UrbPlan 651
Land Use Planning Practice
3
UrbPlan 655
Negotiation Theory and Practice for Planners
3
One skills course (3 cr)
Electives: 6 Cr
Students may take any urban planning courses, including those
listed above, to fulfill the elective credit requirement. Courses may
be
counted only once toward the certificate.
Total: 18 Urban Planning Credits
Courses
Urban Planning (URBPLAN)
Web Home Pages:
[ School
of Architecture and Urban Planning ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Urban Planning
[ School
of Architecture and Urban Planning ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Civil Engineering
Web Home Pages:
College of Engineering
and Applied Science
Civil Engineering
and Mechanics
Courses:
Civil Engineering and Mechanics (CIV ENG)
Civil engineering is a profession that deals with the
infrastructure of society. Civil engineers design bridges, buildings,
and other structures; develop and design water resources, waste
treatment, and environmental management facilities;
plan and design
highway and transportation systems; and design foundations, earth and
rock structures, and tunnels.
Students completing a civil engineering
program have an opportunity for professional employment with industry;
utilities; consulting firms; contractors; local, state, and federal
government agencies; research laboratories; and
academia.
Mission Statement: The mission of the UWM
undergraduate Civil Engineering Program is to educate students to
become civil engineering professionals who plan, design, build, and
manage the infrastructure needed for a modern
urban society and the
environment.
Program Educational Objectives: The educational
objectives of the undergraduate Civil Engineering Program are:
1. Graduates apply broad-based knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering science for solving
engineering problems and creating engineering designs in the civil engineering profession.
2. Graduates demonstrate leadership in infrastructure design by creating solutions for complex urban problems by
synthesizing and implementing knowledge from multiple disciplines.
3. Graduates are leaders in the workplace and in professional organizations by demonstrating effective
communication skills, ethical responsibility, and social awareness.
4. Graduates adapt to changes in the urban and global environment by exhibiting intellectual curiosity, innovating,
pursuing continuous education, and embracing diverse ideas.
Objective 1. Graduates apply broad-based knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering science for solving
engineering problems and creating engineering designs in the civil engineering professional field.
This objective implies that graduates will have a solid preparation that includes the knowledge of mathematics, sciences,
statistics, engineering science disciplines, and computer applications as a foundation for later studies and lifelong
learning. Through a rigorous program preparation, graduates will also be well-versed in different ways of addressing
engineering problems.
Objective 2. Graduates demonstrate leadership in infrastructure design by creating solutions for complex urban
problems by synthesizing and implementing knowledge from multiple disciplines.
This objective implies that graduates will have the necessary breadth and depth of technical knowledge and professional
training to sustain a lengthy career as a civil engineer. It also encompasses broad knowledge of four traditional fields of
civil engineering such as with an in-depth specialization knowledge in one focus area, as well as proficiency in
experimentation, design, professional tools, communication skills, relationships between the engineering design and
legal, environmental, and societal concerns.
Objective 3. Graduates are leaders in the workplace and in professional organizations by demonstrating effective
communication skills, ethical responsibility, and social awareness.
This objective relates to the non-technical aspects of professional practice. Included in professional preparation are
ethics, participation in professional organizations, interactions between professionals, and integrating non-engineering
factors in designs and decisions.
Objective 4. Graduates adapt to changes in the urban and global environment by exhibiting intellectual curiosity,
innovating, pursuing continuous education, and embracing diverse ideas.
This objective recognizes the speed of technological change, changing professional environments, and the need to keep
the program up-to-date, both in terms of the knowledge transmitted and the means by which it is transmitted.
Accreditation: The civil engineering program is
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET,
111
Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410)
347-7700.
Structural Engineering Minor
The minor in structural engineering is designed especially for
students in the following majors: Architecture,
Mechanical
Engineering, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Materials,
Geology, and Physics. This minor is not
available to civil engineering
majors. The 18-credit minor requires Civ Eng 335, 360, and 372, and
one of the following
two courses: Civ Eng 571 or 572. Choose any two
additional courses from the following list: Civ Eng 401, 431, 456,
463, 502, 560, 566, 571, 572, 573, 574, 578, 579; and Arch 301, 510,
and 516. More information on the minor may be
obtained from the Civil
Engineering department, (414) 229-5422.
The Civil Engineering and Mechanics Department offers many
elective courses that normally allow each student to
concentrate in
one of four areas: geotechnical engineering, structural engineering,
transportation and municipal
engineering, or water resources and
environmental engineering.
Geotechnical engineering deals with soil and rock as
engineering materials. Geotechnical engineers may be involved
in the
analysis, design, and construction of foundations, retaining
structures, earth and rock dams, excavations, tunnels,
landfills,
toxic waste remediation projects, and other areas related to
construction.
Structural engineering deals with the analysis, design,
fabrication, and construction of all types of structures, including
buildings, bridges, tunnels, retaining walls, foundations, dams, and
aerospace and pressure vessels. With recent
advances in the area, the
structural engineer must have considerable competence in the use of
computers and
understanding of structural materials.
Transportation and municipal engineering includes activities to
carry out the public works programs of local
government units,
including the planning, design, construction, and management functions
related to street, sewerage,
and water supply systems. Transportation
engineering deals with the planning, design, and operation of
transportation
systems, such as highways, public transit, airports,
and railways.
Water resources and environmental engineering deals with
problems of water resources and environment. It includes
water
resources development such as water supply systems for human,
irrigation, energy, and industrial use; and
environmental mitigation
practices such as sewerage systems, contamination remediation,
drainage, flood and erosion
control, as well as pollution control. It
also includes natural resources management such as river, lake, and
groundwater
restoration and management.
CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM
The minimum number of credits required to complete the Bachelor
of Science in Engineering with a major in civil
engineering is 127.
Students who need background preparation courses in math, English,
foreign language, and
chemistry may need additional credits.
Engineering
Core Courses: 37 credits
EAS 100
CEAS Freshman Orientation (recommended only)
1
EAS 200
Professional Seminar
1
Ind Eng 111
Introduction to Engineering
3
Ind Eng 112
Engineering Drawing and Computer-Aided Design/Drafting
3
Ind Eng 360
Engineering Economic Analysis
3
Civ Eng 280
Computer-Based Engineering Analysis
3
Civ Eng 201
Statics
3
Civ Eng 202
Dynamics
3
Civ Eng 303
Strength of Materials
4
MatlEng 201
Engineering Materials1
4
ElecEng 306
Introduction to Electrical Engineering
4
MechEng 301
Basic Engineering Thermodynamics
3
MechEng 320
Introduction to Fluid Mechanics
3
1
Civil engineering majors may take Civ Eng 431 (with proper prerequisites) in place of MatlEng 201.
Civil Engineering Major: 23 credits
Civ Eng 250
Surveying for Construction
3
Civ Eng 335
Soil Mechanics
3
Civ Eng 372
Introduction to Structural Design
4
Civ Eng 411
Water Resources Design
3
Civ Eng 413
Environmental Engineering
3
Civ Eng 490
Transportation Engineering
3
Civ Eng 494
Principles of Civil Engineering Design
1
Civ Eng 495
Senior Design
3
Mathematics Requirement: 14-16 credits1
One of the following Calculus sequences must be completed:
Math 231-232-233
or
Math 221-222 (Honors)
and
ElecEng 234 (Analytical Methods in Engineering)
Chemistry Requirement: 5-10 credits1
One of the following sequences must be completed:
Chem
102-104
or
Chem 105 (Suggested)
Physics Requirement: 8 credits
Physics 209 - 210
GER Distribution Requirement: 15 credits
Arts
Humanities
English 310
Social Science
Writing, Speaking, and Technoscience in the 21st Century
3
3
3
3
One of the arts, humanities, or social science courses selected
must also meet the UWM cultural diversity requirement.
Free Electives: 2 credits
English Composition Requirement: 0-6 credits1
The English Composition requirement is satisfied by:
1. Earning a satisfactory score on the English placement test, or
2. Earning a grade of C or higher in English 102.
Foreign Language Requirement: 0-8 credits (for students
starting fall 1999 or later)
The foreign language requirement can be completed with one of these options:
1. Two years of a single foreign language in high school;
2. Two semesters of a single foreign language in college; or
3. Demonstrate ability by examination.
1
Placement Examinations. Once admitted to UWM, most engineering students are required to take placement
examinations in mathematics, English, and chemistry. Students with previous college-level credits in these areas may
not be required to take placement exams. The placement exams are administered by the UWM Testing Center,
Mellencamp Hall, Room B28, (414) 229-4689. The results of these tests
help students determine the appropriate course
in which to register.
Background prerequisite courses may be required in addition to the
courses listed above.
Technical Electives - Civil Engineering Major: 21 Credits Required. The Civil Engineering and Mechanics
Department offers
numerous elective courses that allow students to work in one of four
areas of concentration.
Normally a minimum of 12 credits will be taken
in an area of concentration. Students who do not follow one of the
four
areas of concentration will require approval by the Department
chairperson for their programs.
Students interested in geotechnical engineering should take Civ Eng 456 and select at least three courses from Civ Eng
360, 412, 463,
492, and 598. Students also are strongly recommended to take Geo Sci
470.
Students interested in municipal and transportation engineering
should select at least three courses from Civ Eng 492,
590, 592, 594,
596, 598, and 610.
Students interested in structural engineering should take Civ Eng 360, 463, 571, and 572, and select at least two courses
from Civ Eng 456, 560, 573, 574, 578, and 579.
Students interested in water resources and environmental
engineering should take at least three courses from Civ Eng
412, 511,
521, and 610.
Group A Technical Electives: Take minimum of 12
credits of Group A electives, or minimum of
9 credits of Group A
electives and 3 credits of Group B electives.
Cr
Civ Eng 412
Applied Hydrology
3
Civ Eng 456
Foundation Engineering
3
Civ Eng 463
Introduction to Finite Elements
3
Civ Eng 492
Environmental Impact Assessment
3
Civ Eng 511
Water Supply and Sewerage
3
Civ Eng 521
Water Quality Assessment
3
Civ Eng 571
Design of Concrete Structures
3
Civ Eng 572
Design of Steel Structures
3
Civ Eng 573
Design of Masonry Structures
3
Civ Eng 574
Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures
3
Civ Eng 579
Earthquake Engineering
3
Civ Eng 590
Urban Transportation Planning
3
Civ Eng 592
Traffic Control
3
Civ Eng 594
Physical Planning and Municipal Engineering
3
Civ Eng 596
Transportation Facilities Design
3
Civ Eng 598
Pavement Analysis and Design
3
Civ Eng 610
Introduction to Water and Sewage Treatment
3
Group B Technical Electives: Select no more than 9 credits from this list.
Civ Eng 360
Introduction to Structural Analysis
3
Civ Eng 431
Materials of Construction
3
Civ Eng 502
Experimental Stress Analysis
3
Group C Technical Electives: Select 3 to 6 credits from this list of science and math courses with a minimum of
3 credits from Group C1.
Group C1 Technical Electives: Take a minimum of 3 credits of Group C1 electives.
Geo Sci 414
Structural Geology
3
Geo Sci 463
Physical Hydrogeology
3
Geo Sci 464
Chemical Hydrogeology
3
Any Biology course 150-level or above
Any Atmospheric Science course 200-level or above
Group C2: Select no more than 3 credits from the C2 list.
Ind Eng 467
Introductory Statistics for Physical Sciences and Engineering Students
3
Any Mathematics course
400-level or above, Math 313, Math 321, Math 322
Any Chemistry course
200-level or above, Chem 104*
Any Physics course 300-level
or above, Physics 214, Physics 215
* Students who take Chem 102 (or 117) may use Chem 104
(118) to satisfy three credits of the Group C technical
elective
requirement.
Group D Technical Electives: Select no more than 3 credits from this list.
EAS 1
Co-op Work Period*
3
English 206
Technical Writing
3
Geog 403
Remote Sensing
3
Geog 215
Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences
3
CompSci 250
Introductory Computer Programming
3
Ind Eng 455
Basic Optimization Techniques
3
Ind Eng 465
Operations Analysis
3
MatlEng 431
Welding Engineering
3
MechEng 321
Basic Heat Transfer
4
UrbPln 591
Introduction to Urban Geographic Information Systems
3
* Students who earn 3 or more credits of Co-op may use 3 of those credits as approved technical electives.
Web Home Pages:
[ College
of Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Civil Engineering and
Mechanics ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Civil Engineering
[ College
of Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
Computer Engineering
Web Home Pages:
College of Engineering and Applied
Science
Computer Engineering
Courses: Computer Science (COMPSCI)
Courses: Electrical Engineering (ELECENG)
Computer Engineering is part of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UWM. Computer
engineering pertains to the design, implementation, and maintenance of hardware and software components of
computers and computer-controlled equipment. Our program provides students with a broad and strong technical
background in the field. It also helps students develop a solid grounding in computing, mathematics, and engineering.
The students will learn to apply these theoretical principles to design hardware, software, networks, and computerized
equipment for diverse application domains.
Mission Statement: The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science is committed to outstanding
undergraduate and graduate education, distinguished research programs, and strong service to our students, professional
and technical societies, and the community.
Program Educational Objectives: The educational objectives of the undergraduate Computer Engineering Program
are:
1. Graduates will have successful careers in computer engineering fields or will be able to successfully pursue advanced
degrees.
2. Graduates will provide solutions to challenging problems in their profession by applying computer engineering theory
and principles.
3. Graduates will communicate effectively, work collaboratively, and exhibit high levels of professionalism and ethical
responsibility.
4. Graduates will engage in lifelong learning and professional development to adapt to rapidly changing work
environments.
Computer Engineering Major. The minimum number of credits required to complete the Bachelor of Science in
Computer Engineering is 126. Students who need background preparation courses in math, English, and foreign
language may need additional credits.
Engineering Core Courses: 12-13 credits
EAS 200
Professional Seminar
CompSci 250
Introductory Computer Programming
ElecEng 301
Electrical Circuits I
Ind Eng 467
Introductory Statistics for Physical Science and Engineering
MechEng 101 OR Computational Tools for Engineering
CompSci 240
Introduction to Engineering Programming
Computer Engineering Major: 55 credits
CompSci 251
Intermediate Computer Programming
1
3
3
3
2
3
3
ElecEng 305
ElecEng 310
CompSci 317
ElecEng 330
ElecEng 335
CompSci 337
CompSci 351
ElecEng 354
CompSci 361
ElecEng 367
CompSci 395
ElecEng 457
CompSci 458
CompSci 520
CompSci 535
CompSci 537
Bus Adm 447
CompSci 459
CompSci 520
CompSci 530
Electrical Circuits II
Signals and Systems
Discrete Information Structures
Electronics I
Electronics II
Systems Programming
Programming Data Structures
Digital Logic
Introduction to Software Engineering
Introduction to Microprocessors
Social, Professional, and Ethical Issues
Digital Logic Laboratory
Computer Architecture
Computer Networks
Data Structures and Algorithms
Introduction to Operating Systems
Entrepreneurship
Fundamentals of Computer Graphics
Computer Networks
Computer Networks Laboratory
4
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Mathematics Requirement: 14 to 16 credits suggested**
One of the following Calculus sequences must be completed:
Math 231-232-233
or
Math 221-222 (Honors)
and
ElecEng 234 (Analytical Methods in Engineering)
Chemistry Requirement: 5 credits suggested**
One of the following Chemistry sequences must be completed:
Chem 105 (5 credits suggested)
or
Chem 102-104 (10 credits)
Physics Requirement: 8 credits
Physics 209-210
GER Distribution Requirement: 15 credits
Arts
Humanities
English 310
Social Science
Commun 105
Writing, Speaking, and Technoscience in the 21st Century
Business and Professional Communication
3
3
3
3
3
One of the arts, humanities, or social science courses selected must also meet the UWM cultural diversity requirement.
Free Electives: 0-1 credits
English Composition Requirement: 0-6 credits**
The English Composition requirement is satisfied by:
1. Earning a satisfactory score on the English placement test; or
2. Earning a grade of C or higher in English 102.
Foreign Language Requirement: 0-8 credits (for students starting fall 1999 or later)
The foreign language requirement can be completed with one of these options:
1. Two years of a single foreign language in high school;
2. Two semesters of a single foreign language in college; or
3. Demonstrate ability by examination.
** Placement Examinations. Once admitted to UWM, most engineering students are required to take placement
examinations in mathematics, English, and chemistry. Students with previous college-level credits in these areas may
not be required to take placement exams. The placement exams are administered by the UWM Testing Center,
Mellencamp Hall, Room B28, (414) 229-4689. The results of these tests help students determine the appropriate course
in which to register. Background prerequisite courses may be required in addition to the courses listed above.
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES: COMPUTER ENGINEERING MAJOR (16 credits)
Students must choose courses from Groups A, B, and C as indicated below:
Group A Technical Electives. Select 9 to 12 credits from the following list:
All Computer Science and Electrical Engineering courses 300-699 that are not explicitly listed in another category.
Ind Eng 475
Ind Eng 572
Simulation Methodology
Reliability Engineering
3
3
Group B Technical Electives. Choose 4 credits from the following list:
CompSci 595
ElecEng 595
Capstone Design Project
Capstone Design Project
4
4
Group C Technical Electives. Choose 0-3 credits from the following list:
CompSci 481
CompSci 482
CompSci 581
CompSci 658
ElecEng 471
ElecEng 472
Bio Sci 150
Bio Sci 152
Bus Adm 292
Bus Adm 447
EAS 200
EAS 497
English 206
Ind Eng 360
Server-side Internet Programming
Rich Internet Applications
Web Languages and Standards
Topics in Applied Computing
Electrical Power Systems
Introduction to Wind Energy
Foundations of Biology I
Foundations of Biology II
Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Foundation
Entrepreneurship
Co-op Work Period
Study Abroad
Technical Writing
Engineering Economic Analysis
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
MatlEng 201
MatlEng 481
MechEng 301
MechEng 321
Engineering Materials
Electronic Materials
Basic Engineering Thermodynamics
Basic Heat Transfer
Web Home Pages:
[ College of
Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Computer Engineering ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Computer Engineering
[ College of Engineering and Applied Science
]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents |
How to Use This Book |
Calendar ]
[ Admission |
Registration |
Financial Information |
Academic Information ]
[ Administration |
UWM - Endless Possibilities |
Academic Opportunities |
Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
4
3
3
4
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
Computer Science
Web Home Pages:
College of Engineering and Applied Science
Computer Science
Courses:
Computer Science (COMPSCI)
The discipline of computer science pertains to the study and design of computer
systems, hardware and software,
computing techniques, and underlying theory. Our program provides
a student with a broad technical background in
computer science. It is a flexible
program providing breadth and permitting a student to develop strengths in selected
areas within computer science, as well as in related areas such as electrical
engineering, mathematics, or business,
depending on a student's interests.
Technical electives available in the Computer Science major span courses in
a broad
spectrum of areas such as Networks, Computer Security, Artificial Intelligence,
and Database Systems.
Mission Statement: The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science is committed to outstanding
undergraduate and graduate education, distinguished research programs, and strong service to our students, professional
and technical societies, and the community.
Program Educational Objectives: The educational objectives of the undergraduate Computer Science Program are:
1. Alumni of the program will have successful careers built on their understanding of formal and applied methods of
solving problems using computer theory, hardware, and software.
2. In their professional lives, alumni of the program will demonstrate problem-solving and design skills, including
the ability to formulate problems and their solutions, think creatively, communicate effectively, and work
collaboratively.
3. Alumni of the program will exercise professional responsibility and be able to adapt to an ever-changing
professional environment.
Accreditation: The computer science program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET,
111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.
Computer Science Minor. The computer science minor is directed toward
those students wishing to develop some
strength and background in computer science.
This minor also is available to those who have already graduated. The
minor requires 18 credits selected from Computer Science courses, with a minimum of 9 credits from 300-level
coursework or higher. May not include CompSci 395 and prior consent is required to include CompSci 657 or 658. No
more than 6 credits may overlap with a student's undergraduate major. The student must obtain a minimum GPA, as
specified by the department, in the courses used to complete the minor.
Web Development Certificate. The Web Development Certificate is designed to offer students the opportunity to
complement their major field of study with an additional concentration in web programming. This certificate is also
available to those who have already graduated. The 15-credit certificate requires CompSci 481 and 482; one course to
be selected from CompSci 113, CompSci 581, or InfoSt 685. The remaining 6 credits are selected from Art 218, 224,
325, Bus Adm 531, 532, Commun 313, 413, CompSci 112, 351, 361, 425, 444, CurrIns 530, 547, English 439, HCA
444, 542, L&I Sci 110, 240, 310, 410. No more than 6 credits may overlap with a student's undergraduate major. At
least 8 credits must be completed at UWM. The student must maintain a minimum GPA, as specified by department, in
courses used to complete the certificate.
Computer Science Major. The minimum number of credits required to complete
the Bachelor of Science in Computer
Science with a major in Computer Science
is 120. Students who need background preparation courses in math, English,
and
foreign language may need additional credits.
COMPUTER SCIENCE CURRICULUM
Computer Science Major: 53 credits
CompSci 150
EAS 200
CompSci 250
CompSci 251
CompSci 315
CompSci 317
CompSci 337
CompSci 351
CompSci 361
CompSci 395
CompSci 417
CompSci 431
CompSci 458
CompSci 520
CompSci 535
CompSci 537
CompSci 557
CompSci 595
ElecEng 354
Survey of Computer Science (recommended)
Professional Seminar
Introductory Computer Programming
Intermediate Computer Programming
Introduction to Computer Organization and Assembly Language
Programming
Discrete Information Structures
Systems Programming
Programming Data Structures
Introduction to Software Engineering
Social, Professional, and Ethical Issues
Introduction to the Theory of Computation
Programming Language Concepts
Computer Architecture
Computer Networks
Data Structures and Algorithms
Introduction to Operating Systems
Introduction to Database Systems
Capstone Project
Digital Logic
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Mathematics Requirement: 8 credits1
One of the following Calculus sequences must be completed:
Math 231-232
or
Math 221-222 (Honors)
Natural Science Requirement: 12 credits (including at least 1 laboratory credit)
Bio Sci 150-152
Foundations of Biology I and II
8
Bio Sci 202-203
Anatomy & Physiology I and II
8
Chem 102-104
General Chemistry I and II
10
Physics 120-122
General Physics I and II
8
Physics 209-210
Physics I and II
8
Remaining credits to be chosen from the natural sciences electives from GER List, except that CompSci 150 may
not be used as part of the Natural Sciences Requirement.
GER Distribution Requirement: 15 credits
Arts
Humanities
English 310
Social Science
Commun 105
Writing, Speaking, and Technoscience in the 21st Century
Business and Professional Communication
3
3
3
3
3
One of the arts, humanities, or social science courses selected must also meet
the UWM cultural diversity requirement.
English Composition Requirement: 0-6 credits1
The English Composition requirement is satisfied by:
1. Earning a satisfactory score on the English placement test, or
2. Earning a grade of C or higher in English 102.
Foreign Language Requirement: 0-8 (for students starting fall 1999 or later)
The foreign language requirement can be completed with one of
these options:
1. Two years of a single foreign language in high school;
2. Two semesters of a single foreign language in college; or
3. Demonstrate ability by examination.
1
Placement Examinations. Once admitted to UWM, most computer science
students are required to take placement
examinations in mathematics and English.
Students with previous college-level credits in these areas may not be
required
to take placement exams. The placement exams are administered by the UWM Testing
Center, Mellencamp
Hall, Room B28, (414) 229-4689. The results of these tests
help students determine the appropriate course in which to
register. Background
prerequisite courses may be required in addition to the courses listed above.
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES – Select 12 credits from the following three lists:
All non-required Computer Science courses numbered 400-699 are either Computer Science or Applied Technology
Electives. The Applied Technology Electives are in the range 480-489, or 680-689. All other non-required Computer
Science courses in the 400-699 range are Computer Science Electives.
Computer Science Electives (Select 6 to 12 credits.)
All non-required Computer Science courses in the 400-699 range as described above.
ElecEng 367
ElecEng 451
ElecEng 457
Introduction to Microprocessors
Introduction to VLSI Design
Digital Logic Laboratory
4
3
3
Applied Computer Science Electives (Select 0 to 6 credits from this list.)
CompSci 481
CompSci 482
CompSci 658
Server-side Internet Programming
Rich Internet Applications
Topics in Applied Computing
3
3
3
Supplemental Electives (Select 0 to 6 credits from this list.)
Bus Adm 490
EAS 1
EAS 497
English 206
Entrepreneur Internship
Engineering Co-op Work Period
Study Abroad
Technical Writing
3
1-3
1-3
3
Applied Mathematics Electives (Select 6 credits from the following list.)
Math 233
ElecEng 234
Math 240
Math 320
Math 431
Math 451
MthStat 361
Ind Eng 467
Math 234
Math 467
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
Analytical Methods in Engineering
Matrices and Applications
Introduction to Differential Equations
Modern Algebra with Applications
Axiomatic Geometry
Introduction to Mathematical Statistics I
Introductory Statistics for Physical Sciences and Engineering Students
(Alternative to ElecEng 234)
(Equivalent to Ind Eng 467)
May include only one of Math 240, Math 234, ElecEng 234.
May include only one of Math 320, Math 234, ElecEng 234.
Free Electives: Variable credits
University-level courses of your choice as needed to reach a minimum of 120 total credits.
Web Home Pages:
[ College of
Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Computer Science ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Computer Science
[ College of Engineering and Applied Science
]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents |
How to Use This Book |
Calendar ]
[ Admission |
Registration |
Financial Information |
Academic Information ]
[ Administration |
UWM - Endless Possibilities |
Academic Opportunities |
Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Electrical Engineering
Web Home Pages:
College of Engineering
and Applied Science
Electrical Engineering
Courses:
Electrical Engineering (ELECENG)
Electrical engineers are at the forefront of developing
technologies to improve and enhance our society. They are
involved with
understanding the fundamentals of nature to improve design methods and
techniques, as well as applying
their creativity to solving challenging
problems. Electrical engineers design and analyze systems for supplying
electric
power; navigation systems for automobiles, aircraft, and
spacecraft; audio and visual communication systems; and
systems for
information processing and computing.
The major in electrical engineering provides the undergraduate
student with a broad understanding of the many areas
within the field
of electrical engineering. At the same time, the curriculum provides a
choice of technical electives
designed to strengthen the student in a
chosen area of specialization.
Mission Statement: The Department of Electrical
Engineering is committed to outstanding
undergraduate and graduate
education, distinguished research programs,
and strong service to our students, professional and technical
societies, and
the community.
Program Educational Objectives: The educational
objectives of the undergraduate Electrical Engineering Program
are:
1. Graduates are creative problem solvers who provide and
communicate solutions to challenging problems by
applying fundamental
mathematical, scientific, and engineering principles, while giving
special considerations to
social issues, human factors, and ethical
issues.
2. Graduates solve problems as members of a team, and will
exhibit high levels of professionalism in their work.
3. Graduates are successfully engaged in careers in electrical
engineering and related fields that support the regional
and national economy.
4. Graduates are engaged in continued professional development.
Accreditation: The civil engineering program is
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET,
111
Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.
Electrical Engineering Minor
The minor in electrical engineering is designed for students in
engineering and science majors. The minor is not
available to
electrical engineering majors. It requires students to take a minimum
of 21 credits, of which not more than 6
credits overlap with the
student's major. Students must attain a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the
minor.
Students must take at least 15 credits from
the following core courses: ElecEng 301, 305, 310, 330, 335, 354, 361,
362,
367, and 595.
No more than 6 credits from the
following list may be counted towards the minor: ElecEng 410, 420,
421, 429, 436,
437, 451, 457, 461, 462, 465, 471, ElecEng 474 or MechEng 474,
490, 541, 561, 562, 565, 572, ElecEng 574 or
MechEng 574, EE 575, CompSci 458,
459, 536, MatlEng 481, MechEng 321. More information on the minor may
be
obtained from the Department of Electrical Engineering, (414) 229-5252.
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING CURRICULUM
The minimum number of credits required to complete the Bachelor
of Science in Engineering with a major in electrical
engineering is
126. Students who need background preparation courses in math,
English, foreign language, and
chemistry may need additional credits.
Engineering Core Courses: 23 credits
ElecEng 101
EAS 200
CompSci 240
Civ Eng 201
Civ Eng 202
MatlEng 201
ElecEng 301
MechEng 301
Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering
Professional Seminar
Introductory Engineering Programming
Statics
Dynamics
Engineering Materials
Electrical Circuits I
Basic Engineering
Thermodynamics
3
1
3
3
3
4
3
3
Electrical Engineering Major: 36 credits
ElecEng 305
ElecEng 310
ElecEng 330
ElecEng 335
ElecEng 354
ElecEng 361
ElecEng 362
ElecEng 367
ElecEng 420
ElecEng 595
Electrical Circuits II
Signals and Systems
Electronics I
Electronics II
Digital Logic
Electromagnetic Fields
Electromechanical Energy
Conversion
Introduction to
Microprocessors
Random Signals and Systems
Capstone Design Project
Mathematics Requirement: 14 to 16 credits suggested 1
One of the following calculus sequences must be completed:
Math 231-232-233
or
Math 221-222 (Honors)
and
ElecEng 234 (Analytical Methods in Engineering)
Chemistry Requirement: 5 credits
Complete one of the following courses:
Chem 105
or
Chem 102
Physics Requirement: 8 credits
Physics 209-210
GER
Distribution Requirement: 15 credits
4
3
4
4
3
3
4
4
3
4
Arts
Humanities
English 310
Social Science
Writing, Speaking, and Technoscience in the 21st Century
3
3
3
6
One of the arts, humanities, or social science courses selected
must also meet the UWM cultural diversity requirement.
Free Electives: 2 credits
English Composition Requirement: 0-6 credits1
The English Composition requirement is satisfied by:
1. Earning a satisfactory score on the English placement test, or
2. Earning a grade of C or higher in English 102.
Foreign Language Requirement: 0-8 (for students starting fall 1999 or later)
The foreign language requirement can be completed with one of
these options:
1. Two years of a single foreign language in high school;
2. Two semesters of a single foreign language in college; or
3. Demonstrate ability by examination.
1
Placement Examinations. Once admitted to UWM, most engineering students are required to take placement
examinations in mathematics, English, and chemistry. Students with previous college-level credits in these areas may
not be required to take placement exams. The placement exams are administered by the UWM Testing Center,
Mellencamp Hall, Room B28, (414) 229-4689. The results of these tests help students determine the appropriate course
in which to register. Background prerequisite courses may be required in addition to the courses listed above.
Electives: Electrical Engineering Major. The electrical
engineering program requires a total of 21 credits of technical
electives and 3 credits of a probability and statistics elective,
chosen as follows.
Group A Technical Electives: Select at least 15
credits from the following list. All non-required Electrical
Engineering courses numbered 400-699 are Group A Technical Electives.
ElecEng 410
ElecEng 421
ElecEng 436
ElecEng 437
ElecEng 451
ElecEng 457
ElecEng 458
ElecEng 461
ElecEng 462
ElecEng 464
ElecEng 465
ElecEng 471
ElecEng 474
ElecEng 482
ElecEng 490
Principles of Discrete
Systems and Digital Signal Processing
Communication Systems
Introduction to Medical
Instrumentation
Introduction to Biomedical Imaging
Introduction to VLSI Design
Digital Logic Laboratory
Computer Architecture
Microwave Engineering
Antenna Theory
Fundamentals of Photonics
Broadband Optical Networks
Electric Power Systems
Introduction to Control Systems
Introduction to Nanoelectronics
Special Topics
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ElecEng 541
ElecEng 562
ElecEng 565
ElecEng 572
ElecEng 574
ElecEng 575
ElecEng 588
ElecEng 599
Bus Adm 447
CompSci 459
CompSci 520
CompSci 530
EAS 1
EAS 497
Ind Eng 360
MatlEng 481
MechEng 321
Integrated Circuits and
Systems
Telecommunication Circuits
Optical Communications
Power Electronics
Intermediate Control Systems
Analysis of Electric
Machines and Motor Drives
Fundamentals of Nanotechnology
Senior Thesis
Entrepreneurship
Fundamentals of Computer
Graphics
Computer Networks
Computer Networks Laboratory
Co-op Work Period1
Study Abroad2
Engineering Economics
Electronic Materials
Basic Heat Transfer
1
Students who earn 3 or more credits of Co-op may use 3 of
those credits as approved technical electives.
2
Students who earn 3 or more credits of Study Abroad may
use 3 of those credits as approved technical electives.
Group B Technical Electives: Choose no more than 6 credits from the following list.
Any Mathematics course 400-level or above, or Math 313, Math 321,
or Math 322
Any Chemistry course 200-level or above, or Chem 104
Any Physics course 300-level or above, or Physics 214, or Physics 215
Any Biology course 150-level or above
Any Atmospheric Science course 200-level or above
Any Computer Science course 200-level or above
Web Home Pages:
[ College
of Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Electrical Engineering ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Electrical Engineering
[ College of Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
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Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
Web Home Pages:
College of Engineering
& Applied Science
Industrial
and Manufacturing Engineering
Courses:
Courses: Industrial Engineering (IND ENG)
Industrial and manufacturing engineers are concerned with the design,
improvement, installation, and operation of
integrated systems of
people, material, information, and energy for the development of
environmentally sound and
globally competitive enterprises.
Industrial/manufacturing engineers are needed in industries ranging from medical products and equipment
manufacturing to automotive and electronic components manufacturing. Their skills benefit organizations such as
hospitals, banks, airlines, telecommunications companies, and more. Some activities of an industrial/manufacturing
engineer include: methods improvement; plant layout; integration of automation components (CAD and CAM);
logistics; supply chain management; economic analysis; optimization of resources; quality control; reliability analysis;
and ergonomics, i.e., design of workplaces, equipment, and tools for maximum productivity and employee comfort and
safety.
In manufacturing companies, industrial/manufacturing engineers may be responsible for production and inventory
control, quality control, plant layout, and work station design, and may lead the effort for the introduction of new
technologies and other advancements. In
service organizations these engineers may develop methods for optimal
utilization of resources, such as doctors, nurses, and medical
equipment in a hospital; determine the optimal number of
communication lines and service level for a telephone company;
participate in the development of a total quality
management system
for a bank, etc.
Mission Statement: The mission of the department is
to provide a broad-based education in industrial and
manufacturing
engineering and to prepare students for a diversified career in
industry, academia, government, and
private sectors.
Program Educational Objectives: The educational
objectives of the undergraduate Industrial Engineering Program
are:
1. Graduates will have successful careers as professionals in
industrial engineering or related fields.
2. Graduates contribute to improving efficiency, productivity,
and/or quality of products manufactured or services
provided by
their organization.
3. Graduates demonstrate professionalism and continue their
professional development.
Accreditation: The
industrial engineering program is accredited by the Engineering
Accreditation Commission of
ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050,
Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
CURRICULUM
The minimum number of credits
required to complete the Bachelor of Science in Engineering with a
major in industrial
engineering is 125. Students who need background
preparation courses in math, English, foreign language, and
chemistry may need additional credits.
Engineering Core Courses: 26 credits
EAS 200
Ind Eng 111
Ind Eng 112
Ind Eng 360
CompSci 240
Civ Eng 201
Civ Eng 202
MatlEng 201
ElecEng 301
Professional Seminar
Introduction to Engineering*
Engineering Drawing and
Computer-Aided Design/Drafting*
Engineering Economic
Analysis
Introductory Engineering
Programming
Statics
Dynamics
Engineering Materials
Electrical Circuits I
1
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3
3
3
3
3
4
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* MechEng 110 and 111 may substitute for Ind Eng 111 and 112 for
transferring students.
Industrial Engineering Major: 36 credits
Ind Eng 350
Ind Eng 370
Ind Eng 455
Ind Eng 465
Ind Eng 467
Ind Eng 470
Ind Eng 475
Ind Eng 485
Ind Eng 571
Ind Eng 575
Ind Eng 580
Ind Eng 583
Manufacturing Processes
Introduction to Operations
Analysis
Operations Research I
Operations Research II
Introductory Statistics for
Physical Science and Engineering Students
Methods Engineering
Simulation Methodology
Senior Design Project
Quality Control
Design of Experiments
Ergonomics
Facility Layout and
Material Handling
Mathematics Requirement: 14-16 credits1
One of the following Calculus sequences must be completed:
Math 231-232-233
or
Math 221-222 (Honors)
and
ElecEng 234 (Analytical Methods in Engineering)
Natural Science Requirement: 16-18 credits
Chem 102-104
or
Chem 105
and
Approved Natural Science Elective**
(Minimum 3 credits)
Physics 209-210 (8 credits)
GER Distribution Requirement: 15 credits
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3
3
3
3
3
3
Arts
Humanities
English 310
Social Science
Writing, Speaking, and Technoscience in the 21st Century
3
3
3
6
One of the arts, humanities, or social science courses
selected must also meet the UWM cultural diversity requirement.
Free Electives: 4 credits
English Composition Requirement: 0-61
The English Composition requirement is satisfied by:
1. Earning a satisfactory score on the English placement test, or
2. Earning a grade of C or higher in English 102.
Foreign Language Requirement: 0-8 (for students starting fall 1999 or later)
The foreign language requirement can be completed with one of
these options:
1. Two years of a single foreign language in high school;
2. Two semesters of a single foreign language in college; or
3. Demonstrate ability by examination.
** Approved Natural Science Elective Courses
Atmospheric Science (100 level or above)
Biological Sciences (150 or above)
Physics (300 level or above)
Conservation and Environmental Sciences 210
Geosciences (100, 102, 150 or above)
Math (240, 300 or above)
1
Placement Examinations. Once admitted to UWM, most
engineering students are required to take placement
examinations in
mathematics, English, and chemistry. Students with previous college-level credits in these areas may
not be required to take placement
exams. The placement exams are administered by the UWM Testing
Center,
Mellencamp Hall, Room B28, (414) 229-4689. The results of
these tests help students determine the appropriate course
in which
to register. Background prerequisite courses may be required in
addition to the courses listed above. Possible
math placements for
engineering students are Math 090, 095, 105, 225, 116, 117, 231, or
221. Possible English
placements are English 090, 095, 101, or 102.
Possible chemistry placements are Chem 100, 102, or 105.
Technical Electives–Industrial Engineering Major. The
industrial engineering program requires a total of 12 credits
of
technical electives, chosen from the following list. At least 6
credits must be in courses from the Industrial and
Manufacturing
Engineering Department.
Ind Eng 390
Ind Eng 405
Ind Eng 572
Ind Eng 582
Senior Thesis
Product Realization
Reliability Engineering
Ergonomic Job Evaluation
Techniques
3
3
3
3
Ind Eng 584
Ind Eng 587
Ind Eng 590
Ind Eng 699
EAS 1
MechEng 474/
ElecEng 474
Bus Adm 330
Bus Adm 473
MechEng 301
Biodynamics of Human Motion
Lean Production Systems
Topics in Industrial and
Systems Engineering
Independent Study
Co-op Work Period1
Introduction to Control
Systems
Organizations
Business Logistic
Management
Basic Engineering
Thermodynamics
1
This
option is open only to students who earn 3 or more credits of Co-op.
Web Home Pages:
[ College
of Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Industrial and
Manufacturing Engineering ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
[
College of Engineering and Applied Science
]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
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UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Materials Science & Engineering
Web Home Pages:
College of Engineering
& Applied Science
Materials Science & Engineering
Courses:
Materials Engineering (MATLENG)
In today's world there is a constant demand for new
materials of superior quality or with particular combinations of
properties. It is the task of the materials engineer to use chemical
and physical processes to provide new materials, more
useful and
valuable products, and improvements in the properties of existing
materials on a cost-effective basis.
Materials engineering, like other branches of engineering, is
based on mathematics, physics, and chemistry.
Necessarily, the engineer must work with every type of
material, whether it be metal, glass, plastic, or naturally occurring
rock or wood; and electrical conductors, semiconductors, or
insulators, transparent or otherwise. The variety of available
materials is as wide as the applications; to use them to good effect,
the engineer must understand the nature of the
substances that might
be used for a particular purpose and the chemical and physical
processes that are involved in their
production.
Being in a central position in the development and design of
new products, the materials engineer has excellent and varied
career
opportunities, extending from fundamental research through primary
production processes and subsequent
manufacturing to quality control
and failure analysis.
Mission Statement: The Materials Department is
committed to provide comprehensive undergraduate and graduate
education in Materials Engineering, outstanding research, and service
to our students, College, the University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and
the community, as well as to active participation in professional
societies.
Program Educational Objectives: The educational
objectives of the undergraduate Materials Engineering Program are:
1. Graduates have successful careers in materials engineering
and/or related fields, including graduate education.
2. Graduates utilize their materials engineering knowledge to
address contemporary issues for society.
3. Graduates apply their knowledge of materials engineering to
problem solving and projects in their chosen field of
employment.
Accreditation: The materials engineering program is
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET,
111
Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410)
347-7700.
Materials Minor. The Materials minor is directed toward
students who want to strengthen their background in materials
engineering. The 18-credit minor requires MatlEng 330, 402, and 451.
Choose any three additional courses from the
following list: MatlEng
380, 410, 411, 421, 431, 442, 455, 461, 465, 471, and 481. More
information on the minor may be
obtained from the Materials
Department, (414) 229-5181.
MATERIALS ENGINEERING CURRICULUM
The minimum number of credits required to complete the Bachelor
of Science in Engineering with a major in materials
engineering is
124. Students who need background preparation courses in math,
English, foreign language, and chemistry
may need additional credits.
Engineering Core Courses: 24 credits
EAS 200
Professional Seminar
Ind Eng 467
Introductory Statistics for Physical Sciences and Engineering Students
1
3
CompSci 240
Introduction to Engineering Programming
Civ Eng 201
Statics
Civ Eng 202
Dynamics
Civ Eng 303
Strength of Materials
MatlEng 201
Engineering Materials
ElecEng 301
Electrical Circuits I
Materials Engineering Major: 28 credits
MatlEng 330
Materials and Processes in Manufacturing
MatlEng 402
Physical Metallurgy
MatlEng 410
Mechanical Behavior of Materials
MatlEng 411
Materials Laboratory
MatlEng 442
Thermodynamics of Materials
MatlEng 443
Transport and Kinetics in Materials Processing
MatlEng 452
Ceramic Materials
MatlEng 453
Polymeric Materials
MatlEng 490
Senior Design Projects I
MatlEng 491
Senior Design Projects II
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Mathematics Requirement: 14-16 credits1
One of the following Calculus sequences must be completed:
Math 231-232-233
or
Math 221-222 (Honors)
and
ElecEng 234 (Analytical Methods in Engineering)
Chemistry Requirement: 5-10 credits1
One of the following sequences must be completed:
Chem 105 (Suggested)
or
Chem
102-104
Physics Requirement: 10 credits
Physics 209 and 214
Physics 210 and 215
GER Distribution Requirement: 15 credits
Arts
Humanities
English 310
Social Science
Writing, Speaking, and Technoscience in the 21st Century
3
3
3
6
One of the arts, humanities, or social science courses selected
must also meet the UWM cultural diversity requirement.
Free Electives: 4 credits
English Composition Requirement: 0-6 credits1
The English Composition requirement is satisfied by:
1. Earning a satisfactory score on the English placement test, or
2. Earning a grade of C or higher in English 102.
Foreign Language Requirement: 0-8 (for students starting fall 1999 or later)
The foreign language requirement can be completed with one of
these options:
1. Two years of a single foreign language in high school;
2. Two semesters of a single foreign language in college; or
3. Demonstrate ability by examination.
1
Placement Examinations. Once admitted to UWM, most
engineering students are required to take placement
examinations in
mathematics, English, and chemistry. Students with previous college-level credits in these areas may not
be required to take placement
exams. The placement exams are administered by the UWM Testing
Center, Mellencamp
Hall, Room B28, (414) 229-4689. The results of
these tests help students determine the appropriate course in which
to
register. Background prerequisite courses may be required in
addition to the courses listed above.
Technical Electives – Materials Engineering Major.
24 credits of technical electives are to be selected from the
following lists. At least 18 of the Technical Electives credits must
be from Groups A1 and A2 as outlined below:
Group A1 Technical Electives (Structure): Select
at least 3 courses:
MatlEng 380
Engineering Basics for
Materials
MatlEng 461
Environmental Degradation
of Materials
MatlEng 465/
Friction and Wear
MechEng 465
MatlEng 481
Electronic Materials
MatlEng 483
Materials for Energy
Systems
MatlEng 485
Introduction to
Biomaterials
MatlEng 511
Advanced Materials
Characterization
Group A2 Technical Electives (Processing): Select
at least 2 courses:
MatlEng 421
Metal Casting Engineering
MatlEng 431
Welding Engineering
MatlEng 455
Engineering Opposites
MatlEng 460
Nanomaterials and Nonmanufacturing
MatlEng 471
Engineering Composites
Group B Technical Electives: Select no more than
6 credits:
Chem 104
General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis
Chem 223
Elementary Quantitative
Analysis
Chem 341
Introductory Survey of
Organic Chemistry
Civ Eng 401
Intermediate Strength of
Materials
Civ Eng 431
Materials for Construction
Civ Eng 466
Mechanics of Composite
Materials
Civ Eng 502
Experimental Stress
Analysis
EAS 1
Co-op Work Period1
English 206
Technical Writing
Ind Eng 111
Introduction to Engineering
Ind Eng 112
Engineering Drawing and
Computer-Aided Design/Drafting
Ind Eng 360
Engineering Economic
Analysis
Math 413
Introduction to Numerical
Analysis
MatlEng 699
Independent Study
MechEng 110
Engineering Fundamentals I
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MechEng 111
MechEng 301
MechEng 320
Engineering Fundamentals II
Basic Engineering
Thermodynamics
Introduction to Fluid
Mechanics
1
Students who earn 3 or more credits of Co-op may use 3
of those credits as approved technical electives.
Web Home Pages:
[ College
of Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Materials
Engineering ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Materials Engineering
[ College of Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
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UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Mechanical Engineering
Web Home Pages:
College of Engineering and Applied Science
Mechanical Engineering
Courses:
Mechanical Engineering (MECHENG)
Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest and most general fields
of engineering. Combining some of the basic
elements found in
electrical and civil engineering with more in-depth use of mechanical
design and thermal science
principles, a mechanical engineering
education will provide its students with the tools required to solve a
wide range of
technological problems.
Mechanical
engineers work on the design, development, analysis, production, and
testing of a wide variety of devices,
products, and systems. The
devices and systems developed by mechanical engineers can be found in
many fields,
including energy conversion, power generation,
environmental control, manufacturing, materials handling and
processing, and transportation and construction equipment.
The mechanical engineering curriculum is based upon fundamental
engineering science courses in mechanics, the
thermal sciences,
mechanical design, and controls. Students also take courses in
experimentation, computer-aided
engineering, vibrations, and
mechatronics. A variety of technical elective courses are also offered.
With these courses, a
student can either pursue a general mechanical
engineering education, or can tailor a program of study towards a
concentration in either thermal sciences or mechanical systems.
Mission Statement: The mission of the UWM Mechanical
Engineering Department is:
1. To provide quality educational programs for undergraduate and
graduate students planning careers in mechanical
engineering or
related fields.
2. To create and disseminate knowledge through research,
publications, and other scholarly activities.
3. To foster a close partnership with industry and government.
4. To engage in professional and academic service activities of
value to the University and the community at large.
Program Educational Objectives: The educational
objectives of the undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Program
are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Graduates have a successful professional career in Mechanical Engineering or related fields.
Graduates apply their knowledge of mechanical engineering to problem solving in their field of employment.
Graduates are recognized as creative problem solvers and effective communicators.
Graduates are successfully engaged in continued professional development.
Accreditation: The mechanical engineering program is
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of
ABET, 111
Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.
Thermal sciences deals with the transformation of energy from
one form to another, as well as the transmission and use
of energy.
Areas of interest in thermal sciences include (a) power generation
through fossil-fueled steam power plants
and solar energy, as well as
design of heat exchangers and boilers, (b) propulsion systems, such as
internal-combustion
engines, for all types of vehicles, (c) heating,
ventilation, and air conditioning systems, and (d) the environmental
effects
and control of pollutants produced in these applications.
Mechanical systems focuses on the synthesis, analysis, and
optimization of different types of devices and machines.
The scope of
problems studied ranges from small individual components to automated
factory systems using robots and
CNC tools. Designers must use
imagination, ingenuity, and good judgment to create workable ideas
and transform them
into physical realities. Use of modern
computational tools such as finite element methods, solid modeling, and
CAD/CAM packages is emphasized. An understanding of industrial design
practices and standards is also required.
A general mechanical engineering course of study may be
desirable for students preferring the broadest background.
The program
consists of taking the basic courses required by all mechanical
engineering students, and supplementing
these courses with a range of
technical electives that provide the student with background in key
areas in thermal and
mechanical systems.
Students should consult their advisors for help in choosing the
most appropriate concentration and technical electives
for their own
interests. Suggested technical elective sequences for all three areas
are outlined below.
It is recommended that students interested in thermal sciences
take MechEng 402 and at least two courses from
MechEng 415, 423, 432,
434, 435, 451, or 463.
It is recommended that students interested in mechanical systems
take MechEng 463 and at least two courses from
MechEng 461, 462, 475,
476, or 478.
It is recommended that students interested in general mechanical
engineering take at least two courses from MechEng
402, 463, or 475.
Mechanical Engineering Minor
The minor in mechanical engineering is designed for students in
engineering, architecture, and physics. The minor is not
available to
mechanical engineering majors. The minor requires 20 credits of
coursework in 300-level or above courses
in mechanical engineering.
Students interested in obtaining the minor should contact the director
of undergraduate
studies for advice on the appropriate program of
study, (414) 229-5191.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM
The minimum number of credits required to complete the Bachelor
of Science in Engineering with a major in
Mechanical Engineering is
128. Students who need background preparation courses in math,
English, foreign language,
and chemistry may need additional credits.
Engineering Core Courses: 34 credits
EAS 100/
Freshman Orientation or How Things Work
MechEng 150
EAS 200
Professional Seminar
MechEng 101
Computational Tools for Engineers
MechEng 110
Engineering Fundamentals I
MechEng 111
Engineering Fundamentals II
Civ Eng 201
Statics
Civ Eng 202
Dynamics
Civ Eng 303
Strength of Materials
ElecEng 301
Electrical Circuits I
MatlEng 201
Engineering Materials
MechEng 301
Basic Engineering
Thermodynamics
MechEng 320
Introduction to Fluid
Mechanics
Mechanical Engineering Major: 33 credits
MechEng 321
Basic Heat Transfer
MechEng 323
Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
MechEng 330
Materials and Processes in
Engineering
MechEng 360
Mechanical Design I
MechEng 366
Design of Machine Elements
MechEng 370
Computer-Aided Engineering
Laboratory
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MechEng 438
MechEng 474
MechEng 479
MechEng 405
or
MechEng 496
Ind Eng 467
Mechanical Engineering
Experimentation
Introduction to Control
Systems
Control and Design of
Mechatronic Systems
Product Realization
Senior Design Project
Introductory Statistics for
Physical Science and Engineering Students
3
4
3
3
3
3
Mathematics Requirement: 14-16 credits1
One of the following Calculus sequences
must be completed:
Math 231-232-233
or
Math 221-222
(Honors)
and
ElecEng 234
(Analytical Methods in Engineering)
Chemistry Requirement: 5-10
credits1
One of the following sequences must be
completed:
Chem 105 (Suggested)
or
Chem 102-104
Physics Requirement: 10 credits
Physics 209 and 214
Physics 210 and 215
GER Distribution Requirement: 15
credits
Arts
Humanities
English 310
Social Science
Writing, Speaking, and Technoscience in the 21st Century
3
3
3
6
One of the arts, humanities, or social
science courses selected must also meet the UWM cultural diversity
requirement.
English Composition Requirement: 0-6 credits1
The English Composition requirement is satisfied by:
1. Earning a satisfactory score on the English placement test, or
2. Earning a grade of C or higher in English 102.
Foreign Language Requirement: 0-8 (for students starting fall 1999 or later)
The foreign language requirement can be completed with one of
these options:
1. Two years of a single foreign language in high school;
2. Two semesters of a single foreign language in college; or
3. Demonstrate ability by examination.
1
Placement
Examinations. Once admitted to UWM, most engineering students are
required to take placement
examinations in mathematics, English, and
chemistry. Students with previous college-level credits in these areas
may
not be required to take placement exams. The placement exams are
administered by the UWM Testing Center,
Mellencamp Hall, Room B28,
(414) 229-4689. The results of these tests help students determine the
appropriate course
in which to register. Background prerequisite
courses may be required in addition to the courses listed above.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING MAJOR
The Mechanical Engineering Department
regularly offers elective courses that allow students to concentrate
in either
energy engineering or mechanical design. While the College
does not guarantee that specific electives will be offered
annually,
there will be a sufficient number offered to allow for one of these
concentrations.
Technical Electives–Mechanical Engineering Major (15 Credits).
Select a minimum of 15 credits of technical
electives from Groups A, B,
and C as indicated below.
Group A Technical Electives: Students must select
at least 6 credits from this list.
MechEng 402
Thermal-Fluid Engineering
MechEng 420
Fluid Mechanics
MechEng 462
Intermediate Design of Machinery
MechEng 463
Introduction to Finite
Elements
MechEng 475
Vibrations in Mechanical
Design
Group B Technical Electives: Students may select up to 6 credist from this list.
Civ Eng 401
Intermediate Strength of
Materials
MatlEng 380
Engineering Basis for Materials Selection
MatlEng 410
Mechanical Behavior of Materials
Ind Eng 455
Basic Optimization Techniques
Math 413
Introduction to Numerical
Analysis
Math 601
Advanced Engineering
Mathematics
MechEng 405
Product Realization
MechEng 411
Heat Transfer
MechEng 415
Modern Thermo Manufacturing Processes
MechEng 423
Applied Fluid Mechanics
MechEng 425
Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines
MechEng 430
Energy Modeling
MechEng 432
Internal Combustion Engines
MechEng 434
Air Conditioning System Design
MechEng 435
Power Plant Theory and Design
Mech Eng 436
Solar Engineering
MechEng 455
Processing of Plastics
MechEng 456
Metal Casting Engineering
MechEng 457
Engineering Composites
MechEng 460
Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing
MechEng 461
Intermediate Kinematics and Dynamics
MechEng 465
Friction and Wear
MechEng 466
Mechanics of Composite Materials
MechEng 469
Introduction to Biochemical Engineering
MechEng 472
Introduction to Wind Energy
MechEng 476
Introduction to Robotics
MechEng 490
Topics in Mechanical Engineering
MechEng 574
Intermediate Control Systems
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MechEng 580
MechEng 584
MechEng 699
Engineering Analysis in Applied Mechanics
Biodynamics of Human Motion
Independent Study1
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Students who earn 3 or more
credits of MechEng 699 may use only 3 of those credits as approved
Free Technical
Electives.
Group C Technical Electives: Take
up to a maximum of 3 credits in this category.
Bus Adm 447
EAS 100
EAS 497
Ind Eng 360
MechEng 490
MechEng 542
MechEng 543
MechEng 544
MechEng 546
MechEng 548
Entrepreneurship
Co-op Work Period
Study Abroad
Engineering Economic Analysis
Professional Development Topics
Introduction to Technical Entrepreneurship
Introduction to Technology Management and Innovation
New Product Development
Global Innovation Management
Technology Venturing Project
Web Home Pages:
[ College
of Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Mechanical Engineering ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Mechanical Engineering
[ College of Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
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UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
Biomedical Engineering
Web Home Pages:
College of Engineering and Applied
Science
Biomedical Engineering
Courses: Biomedical Engineering (BME)
Biomedical engineering is a cross-disciplinary program that applies principles and methods from engineering, science,
and technology to understand, define, and solve problems of life and medical sciences. Biomedical engineers design and
manufacture devices and instrumentation such as electrocardiography, electroencephalography, and blood-flow
monitoring systems, as well as electrical stimulators for muscles and nerves. These systems and devices assist medical
specialists with diagnosis and treatment of patients. Biomedical engineers also design and manufacture therapeutic and
prosthetic devices to improve the quality of life for individuals. These devices include cochlear and visual prosthesis,
prosthetic fingers, joints, and limbs. Biomedical engineers are also involved in development of artificial/bionic
pancreas, heart, eyes, and other human organs.
According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of biomedical engineers is projected to grow 23
percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growing technology and its application to
medical equipment and devices, along with an aging population, will increase demand for the work of biomedical
engineers.
Student Learning Outcomes
Upon the completion of the program, a graduate of the program will be able to:
1. Apply principles of engineering, biology, human physiology, basic science, mathematics, and statistics.
2. Solve biomedical engineering problems, including those associated with the interaction between living and nonliving systems.
3. Analyze, model, design, and realize biomedical engineering devices, systems, components, or processes, and
make measurements and interpret data from living systems.
4. Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic,
environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
6. Demonstrate the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global,
economic, environmental, and societal context.
7. Demonstrate an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering
practice.
Biomedical Engineering Major. The minimum number of credits required to complete the Bachelor of Science in
Biomedical Engineering is 120. Students who need background preparation courses in math, English, and foreign
language may need additional credits
BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM
D_EAS_Biomed.html[5/7/17, 3:29:20 AM]
Engineering Core Courses: 26 credits
BME 101
Fundamentals of Biomedical Engineering
Civ Eng 201
Statics
Civ Eng 203
Dynamics
EAS 200
Professional Seminar
ElecEng 301
Electrical Circuits I
ElecEng 305
Electrical Circuits II
MatlEng 201
Engineering Materials
MechEng 101
Computational Tools for Engineers
MechEng 301
Basic Engineering Thermodynamics
Biomedical Engineering Major: 37 credits
Bio Sci 202
Anatomy and Physiology I
Bio Sci 203
Anatomy and Physiology II
Bio Sci 465 OR
Biostatistics
Ind Eng 467
Introductory Statistics for Physical Science and Engineering Students
BME 495
Biomedical Instrumentation Lab
BME 595
Capstone Design Project
ElecEng 310
Signals and Systems
ElecEng 436
Introduction to Medical Instrumentation
MatlEng 485
Introduction to Biomaterials
MechEng 469
Introduction to Biomechanical Engineering
MechEng 474
Introduction to Control Systems
MechEng 479
Control and Design of Mechatronic Systems
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Mathematics Requirement: 14 to 16 credits suggested**
One of the following Calculus sequences must be completed:
Math 231-232-233
or
Math 221-222 (Honors)
and
ElecEng 234 (Analytical Methods in Engineering)
Chemistry Requirement: 5 credits suggested**
One of the following Chemistry sequences must be completed:
Chem
102-104
or
Chem 105 (Suggested)
Physics Requirement: 10 credits
Physics 209 and 214
Physics 210 and 215
GER Distribution Requirement: 15 credits
Arts
Humanities
English 310
Social Science
Writing, Speaking, and Technoscience in the 21st Century
D_EAS_Biomed.html[5/7/17, 3:29:20 AM]
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One of the arts, humanities, or social science courses selected must also meet
the UWM cultural diversity requirement.
English Composition Requirement: 0-6 credits**
The English Composition requirement is satisfied by:
1. Earning a satisfactory score on the English placement test; or
2. Earning a grade of C or higher in English 102.
Foreign Language Requirement: 0-8 credits (for students starting fall
1999 or later)
The foreign language requirement can be completed with one of these options:
1. Two years of a single foreign language in high school;
2. Two semesters of a single foreign language in college; or
3. Demonstrate ability by examination.
** Placement Examinations. Once admitted to UWM, most engineering
students are required to take placement
examinations in mathematics, English, and chemistry.
Students with previous college-level credits in these areas may
not be required
to take placement exams. The placement exams are administered by the UWM Testing
Center,
Mellencamp Hall, Room B28, (414) 229-4689. The results of these tests
help students determine the appropriate course
in which to register. Background
prerequisite courses may be required in addition to the courses listed above.
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES: BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING MAJOR (16 credits)
The Biomedical Engineering program requires a total of 16 credits of technical electives, chosen from the following list:
Bio Sci 150
Bio Sci 152
Bio Sci 354
Bio Sci 355
Bus Adm 447
Chem 102
Chem 104
Chem 343
Chem 344
Chem 345
Civ Eng 303
CompSci 250
EAS 001
EAS 497
ElecEng 361
ElecEng 410
ElecEng 437
ElecEng 438
ElecEng 537
ElecEng 539
Ind Eng 360
Ind Eng 584
MechEng 320
MechEng 370
Physics 305
Physics 306
Psych 254
Foundations of Biological Sciences I
Foundations of Biological Sciences II
Introduction to Neuroscience I
Introduction to Neuroscience II
Entrepreneurship
General Chemistry
General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Organic Chemistry
Strength of Materials
Introductory Computer Programming
Co-op Work Period
Study Abroad
Electromagnetic Fields
Principles of Discrete Systems and Digital Signal Processing
Introduction to Biomedical Imagining
Bioanalytics and Biomedical Diagnostics
Fundamentals of Neuroimaging Technology
Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Engineering Economic Analysis
Biodynamics of Human Motion
Introduction to Fluid Mechanics
Computer Aided Engineering Laboratory
Medical Physics
Introduction to Biophysics
Physiological Psychology
D_EAS_Biomed.html[5/7/17, 3:29:20 AM]
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Courses
Biomedical Engineering (BME)
Web Home Pages:
[ College of
Engineering and Applied Science ]
[ Biomedical Engineering ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Computer Engineering
[ College of Engineering and Applied Science
]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents |
How to Use This Book |
Calendar ]
[ Admission |
Registration |
Financial Information |
Academic Information ]
[ Administration |
UWM - Endless Possibilities |
Academic Opportunities |
Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
D_EAS_Biomed.html[5/7/17, 3:29:20 AM]
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
School of Education
Curriculum and Instruction
Early Childhood Level
Middle Childhood - Early Adolescence Level
Mathematics: Early Adolescence - Adolescence Level
English: Early Adolescence - Adolescence Level
Science: Early Adolescence - Adolescence Level
Social Studies: Early Adolescence - Adolescence Level
Bilingual Education (supplemental)
English as a Second Language (Major): Early Adolescence - Adolescence Level
English as a Second Language (Minor)
World Language Major: Early Adolescence - Adolescence Level
World Language Minor
Courses: Curriculum and Instruction (CURRINS)
The goal of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is to prepare PK–12 teachers who are able to provide maximum educational opportunities for children in the urban community.
At the undergraduate level, this department offers teacher education programs
at the Early Childhood Level (grades PK-3), Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence Level (grades 1-8),
Early Adolescence Through Adolescence Level (grades 6-12), and Early Childhood Through Adolescence Level (PK-12).
The graduate program, which includes inservice education, is described in
the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Graduate School Bulletin and in materials
provided by the Department of
Curriculum and Instruction, Room 310, Enderis
Hall.
Undergraduate students majoring in curriculum and instruction programs are initially enrolled as Education-Intended majors. They are advised in the School of Education and follow the
curriculum requirements of their department program.
Early Childhood Education Program Requirements
The Early Childhood Education (ECE) program is available for those interested in teaching young children from birth to age 8 or third grade in a variety of early care/education and school
programs. Students are admitted to the major immediately in the first year or upon transfer to UWM. Those who wish to acquire a State of Wisconsin teaching license can complete the statemandated assessments through the program. Additionally students can attain add-on certification in ECE and English as a Second Language (ESL) or Bilingual Education.
Sequenced Courses
Sequenced courses must be taken in the order indicated. Add additional courses with those listed under “Additional Course Requirements.”
Semester 1, 2, or 3
The English Composition and Math Skills requirements must be completed in the first year if placement testing allows the student to start with English 102 and Math 175 or in the second year
if English 095 and/or 101 or Math 090 and/or 094/095 must be completed first.
English 102
Math 175
CurrIns 140
College Writing and Research (with a C or better) or a 4 or higher on the
English Placement Test (OWC-A)
Mathematical Explorations for Elementary Teachers I (with a C or better)
(QL-A)
Field Experience with Families and Communities
0-3
3
1
CurrIns 312
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3
Semester 4
CurrIns 240
Field Experience with Dual Language Learners
2
CurrIns 501
Language Acquisition for Children of Diverse Backgrounds
3
Semester 5
CurrIns 302
Curriculum Design in Early Childhood
3
CurrIns 340
Field Experience in Preschool and Kindergarten Classrooms
2
CurrIns 502
Emergent Literacy and Biliteracy in the Early Childhood Classroom
3
CurrIns 534
Instructional Strategies in Early Childhood
3
Semester 6
CurrIns 440
Field Experience in the Primary Grades
2
CurrIns 504
Teaching Reading and Writing in Early Childhood: The Primary Years
3
Semester 7
CurrIns 338
Teaching of Science in Early Childhood
3
CurrIns 540
Advanced Field Experience in Early Childhood Education
3
CurrIns 541
Principles and Methods of Teaching ESL
3
Semester 8
Choose one of the following options:
Option 1: Education Degree in Early Childhood
CurrIns 540
Advanced Field Experience in Early Childhood Education
6
Electives as needed to reach 120 credits (See an advisor for appropriate
options.)
Option 2: Education Degree in Early Childhood plus Early Childhood Certification
CurrIns 601
Early Childhood Seminar for Student Teaching
3
CurrIns 640
Student Teaching in Early Childhood
12
Option 3: Education Degree in Early Childhood plus Early Childhood and English as a Second Language
Certification
CurrIns 601
Early Childhood Seminar for Student Teaching
3
CurrIns 640
Student Teaching in Early Childhood
9
CurrIns 443
Student Teaching in English as a Second Language: Minor
3
Option 4: Education Degree in Early Childhood plus Early Childhood and Bilingual Certification
CurrIns 601
Early Childhood Seminar for Student Teaching
3
CurrIns 640
Student Teaching in Early Childhood
9
CurrIns 442
Student Teaching in Bilingual Education
3
Option 5: Education Degree in Early Childhood plus Early Childhood, English as a Second Language, and
Bilingual Certification
CurrIns 601
Early Childhood Seminar for Student Teaching
3
CurrIns 640
Student Teaching in Early Childhood
6
CurrIns 442
Student Teaching in Bilingual Education
3
CurrIns 443
Student Teaching in English as a Second Language: Minor
3
Additional Required Courses:
The following courses may be taken any semester the prerequisites are met.
Arts (3 credits)
Choose a course in Art, Music, Theatre, Dance, or Film from this GER list:
www.uwm.edu/academics/ger-courses.cfm
Art Elective (GER-A)
3
English and Humanities (9-12 credits)
Commun 103
Public Speaking (with a C or better)
3
Literature GER-H (See your advisor for a list of approved options.)
3
English 201
Strategies for Academic Writing (OWC-B)
3
or
Business Writing (OWC-B)
3
English 205
Foreign Language (0-6 credits)
Note: American Sign Language is accepted as a foreign language. See your advisor if English is not your first
language. Not required if first semester as a freshman was prior to September 1999. Complete one:
2 consecutive semesters of college instruction in a single foreign language (at least six credits) with passing
grades;
2 consecutive years of high school instruction in a single foreign language with passing grades; or
Language proficiency on approved exam.
Mathematics (3 credits)
Math 176
Mathematical Explorations for Elementary Teachers II (with a C or better)
(QL-B)
Natural Sciences (9 credits)
Choose a GER-NS course from this list:
www.uwm.edu/academics/ger-courses.cfm
One of the two electives must be a GER-NS with a lab.
CES 210
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Science
Earth Science Elective (GER-NS: Astron, Atm Sci, Geog, and Geo Sci)
Physical Science Elective (GER-NS: Chem or Physics)
Social Sciences (6 credits)
Hist 151
American History, 1607 – 1877
or
Hist 152
American History, 1877 – present
or
Pol Sci 104
Introduction to American Government and Politics
or
Pol Sci 105
State Politics
Social Sciences Elective (GER-SS) (See your advisor for options.)
Cultural Diversity and Act 31 Requirements (3 credits)
Choose one:
Anthro 213
American Indian Peoples of Wisconsin
English 276
Introduction to American Indian Literature: Literature, History, and
Sovereignty of Upper Midwest Indians
AIS 203
Western Great Lakes American Indian Community Life of the Past
Hist 263
North American Indian History Since 1887
Professional Education Courses:
CurrIns 301
Infants and Toddlers: Curriculum and Teaching
CurrIns 330
Teaching of Mathematics: Early Childhood
CurrIns 323
Teaching of Social Studies in Early Childhood
CurrIns/ExcEduc 612 Collaborations for Teachers with Families, Schools, and Communities
CurrIns 511
Curriculum and Guidance for Social Emotional Learning
CurrIns 512
Reflective Practice in Teaching and Learning
CurrIns 651
Literature for the Young Child (See advisor for alternative options.)
Art Ed 130
Art and Visual Learning in Elementary School
Mus Ed 260
Making Music Connections with Children
Ed Pol 375
Cultural Foundations of Education
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning and Development
Ed Psy/ExcEduc 613 Infant/Early Childhood Assessment
ExcEduc 630
Survey of EC Intervention: Young Children with Special Needs, Families
A C or better must be earned in all professional education courses and sequenced CurrIns courses.
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.
Benchmarks
Students must meet benchmarks at 30, 60, and 85 credits and prior to student teaching. Benchmarks are monitored through tracking systems and advising. A student will be restricted from
moving forward in the program if the benchmarks are not completed.
30 Credit Benchmarks
Reviewed with your advisor the semester after completion of 30 credits
Mandatory meeting with your advisor
Completion of English 102 and Math 175 with a C or better
Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.25 on all UWM and transfer courses
Certification majors only:
Passing scores on a pre-professional skills test (See your academic advisor for additional information.)
60 Credit Benchmarks
Reviewed with your advisor the semester after completion of 60 credits
Mandatory meeting with your advisor
Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 on all UWM and transfer courses
Certification majors only:
Registered for the appropriate Praxis II exam
Elementary Education Content Knowledge Exam #5014
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages #5361
85 Credit Benchmarks
Reviewed with your advisor the semester after completion of 85 credits
Mandatory meeting with your advisor
Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 on all UWM and transfer courses
Complete and sign form to declare intention: Education Degree in Early Childhood only or degree with certification in Early Childhood, ESL, and/or Bilingual
Student Teaching Benchmarks (certification majors only)
Mandatory attendance at Pre-Student Teaching Orientation
Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 on all UWM and transfer courses
Removal of all F or I (Incomplete) grades in courses
C or better in professional education and CurrIns sequenced courses
Successfully pass the appropriate Praxis II exam(s)
Elementary Education Content Knowledge Exam #5014
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages #5361
Successfully pass the Wisconsin Foundations of Reading Test (WiFORT).
Graduation Benchmarks (must be met to be approved for graduation)
Reviewed during the student teaching semester
Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 on all UWM and transfer courses
Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 120 credits
Completion of the last year of coursework (30 credits) in residence at UWM
Certification majors only:
Completion of Teacher Performance Assessment
Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence Program Requirements
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence (MCEA) Program is designed for students seeking to teach at the middle childhood-early adolescence level (ages 6-12 or -13, grades 1-8).
This program prepares students to work in urban settings and takes place in close partnership with local school districts. The UWM School of Education's urban mission is upheld in the MCEA
program's commitment to preparing pre-service teachers to meet the needs of diverse populations. Students are admitted into the MCEA program upon admission to the University, and it is
possible to complete the program in four years. Students who satisfactorily meet program requirements will be recommended for student teaching. Upon successful completion of all student
teaching requirements, including several state-required assessments, students will be licensed to teach grades 1-8. After completion of the MCEA program, students may opt to pursue an add-on
certification in Exceptional Education, English as a Second Language, or Bilingual Education by completing streamlined course paths that include an additional student teaching requirement. Students completing the Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence program will receive a bachelor’s degree in Education, a Cultures and Communities certificate, and endorsement to be
licensed to teach children in grades one through eight in the State of Wisconsin. ADDITONAL PROGRAM OPTIONS
Add-On Teacher Certifications. Following completion of the MCEA program, students may opt to add a certification in English as a Second Language (ESL), Bilingual Education, or World
Languages by completing additional coursework and student teaching requirements. Special Education Certification. Students who successfully complete the MCEA program may seek dual licensure in special education, which requires a fifth year of school. Credits in the
fifth year may be integrated into a master's program in Exceptional Education provided the student is admitted into the graduate program at UWM. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
A C or better is required in all coursework. No courses may be taken for credit/no credit. Students must take at least one Cultures and Communities (C&C) course that has a “service learning”
component. Note: All courses numbered 150 meet this requirement if taken during the spring or fall semesters.
PRE-PROFESSIONAL COURSEWORK
Arts
Credits
Theatre 260
Storytelling (only subtitles that meet Cultures and Communities Area IV will be accepted) (GER-A, CC-IV)
3
English
English 102
College Writing and Research or a 4 or higher on the English Placement Test (OWC-A)
3
English 201
Strategies for Academic Writing (OWC-B)
3
Foreign Language
Note: Not required if first semester as a freshman was prior to September 1999. American Sign Language is accepted as a foreign language. See your advisor if English is not your first
language. Complete one:
2 consecutive years of high school instruction in a single foreign language
2 consecutive semesters of college instruction in a foreign language
At least 6
Language proficiency on approved exam
Humanities
CurrIns 233
Introduction to Children’s and Young Adult Literature (GER-H)
3
Humanities elective (GER-H) or English elective (English minors only – see minor)
3
Mathematics
Math 175
Mathematical Explorations for Elementary Teachers I (QL-A)
3
Math 176
Mathematical Explorations for Elementary Teachers II (QL-B)
3
Natural Sciences
Physical science elective (Physics/Chem) – must include a lab
3+
CES 210
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Science
3
Social Sciences (Courses that appear in bold are highly recommended.)
Hist 151
American History 1607-1877
3
or
Hist 152
American History 1877-Present
3
Pol Sci 104
Introduction to American Government and Politics
3
or
Pol Sci 105
State Politics
3
Cultural Diversity and Act 31 – Choose one:
Anthro 213
American Indian Peoples of Wisconsin
3
English 276
Introduction to American Indian Literature: Literature, History, and Sovereignty of Upper Midwest Indians
3
AIS 203
Western Great Lakes American Indian Community Life of the Past
3
Hist 263
North American Indian History Since 1887
3
Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence courses
Ed Pol 375
Cultural Foundations of Education
CurrIns 333
Introduction to Teaching in Urban Schools, Grade 1-8
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning and Development
3
3
3
Gateway Check at 40 Credits Completed
Mandatory meeting with advisor in the semester following 40-credit semester;
Minimum cumulative GPAÂ of 2.5 in required program courses (all courses listed on the program sheet);
Passing scores on a pre-professional skills test (see your academic advisor for additional information);
Completion of dispositions and field evaluation from CurrIns 333;
Completion of Cultures and Communities requirements; and
Completion of Math 175 and English 102 (or score of 4 or higher on English placement test).
PROFESSIONAL COURSEWORK
Semester 1
CurrIns 306
MCEA Clinical Experience, Grades 1-3
CurrIns 536
Literacy 1: Assessing and Teaching Early Literacy
CurrIns 556
Professional Seminar 1: Foundations of Curriculum and Instruction
Ed Psy 325
Practice of Classroom Assessment
ExcEduc 605
Child, Learner, Disability
Semester 2
CurrIns 307
MCEA Clinical Experience II, Grades 4-8
CurrIns 537
Literacy 2: Assessing and Teaching Literacy Through Early Adolescence
CurrIns 541
Principles and Methods of Teaching ESL
CurrIns 557
Professional Seminar 2: Classroom Management Theory, Practice, and Context
Semester 3
CurrIns 406
Advanced MCEA Clinical Experience
CurrIns 538
Literacy 3: Introduction to New Literacies
CurrIns 558
Professional Seminar 3: Building Learning Communities
Any Semester Prior to Student Teaching
Art Ed 130
Art and Visual Learning in Elementary School
CurrIns 320
Introduction to Critical Media Literacy
CurrIns 323
Teaching of Social Studies
CurrIns 327
Teaching of Science-Elementary School
CurrIns 331
Teaching of Mathematics, Elementary School
CurrIns 332
Teaching of Math, Middle School
Mus Ed 260
Making Music Connections through Children
Gateway Check Prior to Approval to Student Teach
Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 in required courses (all courses listed on program sheet);
Removal of all F or I (incomplete) grades in courses;
C or better in required program courses (all courses listed on the program sheet);
Passing scores on the Wisconsin Foundations of Reading Test (after semester 2);
Completion of practice Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA);
Passing scores on the Praxis II posted on transcript (take during semester 2); and
Completion of disposition and field evaluation in CurrIns 406.
A mandatory meeting with your academic advisor will be required if you have not met the above gateway checks.
Semester 4
CurrIns 407
CurrIns 471
Student Teaching, Middle Childhood-Early Adolescence
Professional Seminar 4: The Effective Urban Educator
9
3
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3
3
2
3
2
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
Additional Requirements for Graduation and Certification
Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 in all UWM and transfer courses;
Satisfactory completion of a minimum 128 credits;
Completion of the last year of coursework (30 credits) in residence at UWM; and
Completion of edTPA.
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
Select one minor from each group. Each minor requires a minimum of 18 credits. Pre-professional coursework can be used to meet minor requirements. All minor courses must be
completed with a C or better.
Group A
Select one:
English/Language Arts
Social Studies
Group B
Select one:
Math
Natural Science
Social Studies (Courses that appear in bold are highly recommended.)
Hist 151 American History 1607 – 1877
or
Hist 152
American History 1877 – present
Pol Sci 104
Introduction to American Government and Politics
or
Pol Sci 105
State Politics
Hist 294
Seminar on Historical Method: Research Techniques
Geog 110
The World: Peoples and Regions
Choose one:
Hist 131
World History to 1500
Hist 201
The Ancient World: The Roman Republic and Empire
Choose one:
Hist 150
Multicultural America
UrbPlan 350
Social Justice, Urban Planning, and the New Multicultural America
Urb Std 150
Multicultural America
WGS 150
Multicultural America
English/Language Arts
English 150
Multicultural America
English 233
Introduction to Creative Writing
or
English 432
The Rhetoric of Argument
CurrIns 233
Introduction to Children’s and Young Adult Literature
English 445
The Composing Process
English 215
Introduction to English Studies
Choose one:
CompLit 208
World Literature in Translation: The 17th to the 21st Century
CompLit 230
Literature and Society
CompLit 231
Literature and Religion
CompLit 232
Literature and Politics
English 192
First Year Seminar: Multicultural Milwaukee
Jewish 261
Representing the Holocaust in Words and Images
Mathematics
Math 175
Mathematical Explorations for Elementary Teachers I
Math 176
Mathematical Explorations for Elementary Teachers II
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Math 275
Problem Solving for Elementary Education Majors
Math 277
Geometry for Elementary Education Majors
Choose one:
Math 205
Introductory Finite Mathematics
Math 276
Algebraic Structures for Elementary Education Majors
Choose one:
Math/MthStat 278
Discrete Probability and Statistics for Elementary Education Majors
MthStat 215
Elementary Statistical Analysis
Science
CES 210
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Science
Physical Science Choose one (Courses that appear in bold are highly recommended.):
Physics 185
Basic Physics for Teachers
Physics 107
Physics in Everyday Life
and
Laboratory for Physics in Everyday Life
Physics 108
Physics 120
General Physics I
and
Physics 121
General Physics Laboratory
Chem 101
Chemical Science
Chem 102
General Chemistry
Chem 106
Chemistry in the World Around Us – Chemistry for the Non-Science Major
Chem 185
Basic Chemistry for Teachers
Earth Science
Choose one (Courses that appear in bold are highly recommended.):
Geo Sci 185
Introductory Earth Science for Teachers
Geo Sci 100
Introduction to the Earth (Do not take if you have taken Geo Sci 185.)
Geo Sci 102
Principles of Historical Geology
Biology
Choose one (Courses that appear in bold are highly recommended.):
Bio Sci 185
Introductory Biology for Teachers
Bio Sci 102
Elements of Biology (Do not take if you have taken Bio Sci 185.)
Bio Sci 150
Foundations of Biological Science I
Science electives
Choose courses above or from the list below to total 18 credits in the science minor (Courses that appear in bold are
highly recommended.):
Astron 185
Astronomy for Pre-Education Majors
Astron 103
Survey of Astronomy
and
Astron 104
Astronomy Laboratory
Atm Sci 100
Survey of Meteorology
Atm Sci 240
Introduction to Meteorology
Bio Sci 103
Topics in Modern Biology
Bio Sci 152
Foundations of Biological Science II
Chem 100
Chemical Science
Chem 103
Survey of Biochemistry
Chem 104
General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis
Chem 105
General Chemistry for Engineering
CurrIns 525
Environmental Resources Workshop
CurrIns 570
Improving Science Teaching and Learning
CurrIns 565
Pedagogy Labs (Science only)
CurrIns 326
Environmental Education for Teachers
Geo Sci 208
Geology of Wisconsin
Geo Sci 105
Earth, Air, Fire, and Water
Geo Sci 106
The Earth Environment
Physics 110
Physics for the Health Professions
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
4
1
4
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
4
3
3
3
4
3
4
5
5
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
Physics 133
Physics 209
and
Physics 214
High Points of Physics for Beginners
Physics I
3
5
Lab Physics I
Mathematics Education, Early Adolescence – Adolescence.
The Early Adolescence Through Adolescence (EA-A) Program in Mathematics is available for students who plan to teach mathematics to children from age 10 to age 21, in 6th through 12th
grade.
Mathematics Program students gain real-world experience in the classroom through student teaching at area schools. Students who satisfactorily complete the program requirements also meet
the Wisconsin teacher certification requirements for teaching mathematics subject areas in those grades.
Major. A minimum of 34 credits in mathematics at the calculus level and above is required. Consult a mathematics education advisor in Curriculum and Instruction for changes in mathematics
major based on changes in requirements due to course revisions and prerequisites in mathematics.
To be accepted as a teaching major in mathematics, a student must complete Math 231, 232, 233, or an equivalent three-semester sequence of calculus and analytical geometry. The student also
must complete Math 234 or an equivalent one-semester course in linear algebra and differential equations. A minimum grade point average of 2.75 must be maintained in the above courses and
all courses numbered 300 or above for admission to the School of Education.
Faculty Advisor: Professor Michael Steele, [email protected]
English Education Program Requirements: Early Adolescence - Adolescence
Students who successfully complete the English Education program are eligible for a State of Wisconsin teaching certificate
to teach English in grades 6-12.
PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Application to the English Education program requires satisfactory completion of the requirements listed below. For more information about the application process, visit our website at:
http://uwm.edu/education/academics/english/.
Pre-Professional Skills Test: Passing scores on one of the following exams: Praxis I, CORE, ACT, SAT, or GRE. ACT, SAT, and GRE scores must be within five years of admission term to
academic program. Please see your academic advisor for additional information.
English Composition: Achieve a placement level of 4 or higher on the English Placement Test, or complete English 102 or an equivalent with a grade of C or better.
Mathematics Skills: Achieve a placement level of 30 or higher on the Math Placement Test, or complete Math 103, 105, 175, or an equivalent with a grade of C or better.
Completion of CurrIns 300, Introduction to teaching, with a grade of C or better.
Completion of Commun 103 with a grade of C or better. Note: Completion of Commun 103 will also fulfill part of your Humanities requirement.
A 2.5 minimum cumulative GPA in all UWM and transfer courses at the time of admission application.
A 2.75 cumulative GPA in all English content courses.
A minimum of 58 credits (UWM and transfer credits) at the time of admission application. It is not required to have all the Core Curriculum courses completed at the time of application.
Meeting with faculty advisor to review admission application. Faculty signature required on application.
GENERAL EDUCATION AND CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS
Completion of the coursework in this section will meet the general education requirements (GER) of the University. THese requirements include Oral and Written Communication Competency,
Quantitative Literacy Competency, Foreign Language, and Distribution Requirements. Please consult with the University GER requirements. Some programs specify courses to meet the
University GER; please contact your advisor for information on required courses.
STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS
Act 31 Requirement. A component of the Human Relations Requirement for Teacher Certification is met by completing one of the following courses or a one-day seminar.
Anthro 213
English 276
Ethnic 203
Hist 263
American Indian Peoples of Wisconsin
Introduction to American Indian Literature: Literature, History, and
Sovereignty of Upper Midwest Indians
Western Great Lakes American Indian Community Life of the Past
North American Indian History Since 1886
3
3
3
3
.
Non-Western History or Contemporary Culture
Non-Western History/Contemporary Culture (African, Latin American, Asian, Native American,
etc.). Suggested: Anthro 213, English 276, Ethnic 203, or Hist 263.
3
.
ELECTIVE COURSE
Select an elective to ensure 128 credits at the time of graduation.
ENGLISH CONTENT AREA – 51 credits (including 8 GERs from Core Curriculum)
English 212
Grammar and Usage
English 215
Introduction to English Studies (GER)
Select one literature course (3 cr each) from the following:
CompLit 207 (GER), CompLit 208 (GER), CompLit 230 (GER), English 221-225 (all GER),
or English 269-281 (GER 276, 277)
English 233
Introduction to Creative Writing
Select one of the following courses:
English 201
Strategies for Academic Writing
or
English 208
Writing and Research
Advanced Writing Courses – 6 cr
English 430
Advanced Writing Workshop
Select one course from the following:
CurrIns 547
Curricular Applications of the Internet
English 440
Introduction to Peer Tutoring and Practice
English 445
The Composing Process
Advanced Linguistic Courses – 6 cr
Select one course from the following:
English 400
Introduction to English Linguistics
English 401
History of English Language
Linguis 350
Introduction to Linguistics
Select one course from the following:
English 403
Survey of Modern English Grammars
English 404
Language, Power, and Identity
Advanced Literature Courses – 24 cr
Survey I: Periodization/Historical
Select one course from the following:
English 301
Survey of English Literature, Beginnings to 1500
English 302
Survey of English Literature, 1500-1660
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
English 303
Survey of English Literature, 1660-1798
English 304
Survey of English Literature, 1798-1900
English 305
Survey of English Literature, 1900 to the Present
English 306
Irish Literature
English 307
American Literature to 1865
English 308
American Literature, 1865-1965
English 309
Contemporary American Literature
Survey II: Literature and Culture
Select one course from the following:
English 332
Gay and Lesbian Literature
English 372
Survey of American Indian Literature (GER)
English 373
Survey of Ethnic Minority Literature (GER)
English 374
Survey of U.S. Latino/a Literature
English 375
Survey of Asian-American Literature
English 376
Survey of African-American Literature to 1930
English 377
Survey of African-American Literature, 1930-Present
English 379
LGBT Literature
English 381
World Literatures Written in English
English 463
Writers in African-American Literature
Genre
Select one course from the following:
English 326
The Development of the Novel
English 327
The Development of the Short Story
English 328
Forms of Experimental Literature
English 329
Film and Literature
English 341
The Development of Drama
English 361
The Development of Poetry
Young Adult Literature
CurrIns 650
Reading Interests of Adolescents
Literary Critical Theory
Select one course from the following:
English 378
Survey of Literary and Cultural Theory
English 545
Studies in the History of Literary Criticism
English 547
Studies in Theory and Criticism
English 626
Seminar in Critical Theory
Focus
Select one course from the following:
English 451
Chaucer
English 452
Shakespeare
English 454
Milton
English 456
Writers in English Literature, 1500-1660
English 457
Writers in English Literature, 1660-1798
English 458
Writers in English Literature, 1798-1900
English 459
Writers in English Literature, 1900 to the Present
English 460
Writers in American Literature, 1800-1900
English 461
Writers in American Literature, 1900 to the Present
English 464
Women Writers
Capstone Course I: Historical Concentration
Select one of the following:
English 500
Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Literature
English 501
Studies in Literature, 1500-1600
English 504
Studies in Literature, 1660-1800
English 505
Studies in Literature, 1800-1900
English 507
Studies in Literature, 1900 to the Present (GER)
English 530
Studies in Shakespeare
English 621
Seminar in the Literature of England
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
English 623
Seminar in American Literature
English 624
Seminar in Modern Literature
English 625
Seminar in Literary History
English 685
Honors Seminar (GER)
Capstone Course II: Literature and Culture
Select one of the following:
English 514
Literature in Context
English 515
Literature and the Other Arts
English 517
Studies in African-American Literature
English 518
Studies in Irish Literature
English 519
Studies in Irish-American Literature
English 520
Studies in American Indian Literature
English 521
Studies in Ethnic Minority Literature
English 522
Studies in World Literature Written in English
English 523
Studies in U.S. Latino/a Literature
English 524
Studies in Asian-American Literature
English 627
Seminar in Literature and Culture
English 628
Seminar in Literature by Women
English 629
Seminar in Literature and Sexuality
English 630
Seminar in Literature and Other Arts
English 631
Seminar in African American Literature
English 632
Seminar in American Indian Literature
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: 40-42 cr
The following courses may be taken prior to admission to the School of Education:
Select one of the following two courses (3 cr each):
Ed Pol 375
Cultural Foundations of Education
Ed Pol 530
Urban Education Foundation
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning Development
CurrIns 510
Cooperative Strategies for Pre- and Early Adolescents (English-only spring
section)
CurrIns 657
Approaches to Teaching and Assessing Texts in the Secondary School
(Offered only during the spring semester. Prereq for CurrIns 658. Take
657 and 658 in sequential semesters.)
CurrIns 659
Teaching and Assessing Grammar to Enrich Writing
3
1
3
2
.
The following courses may be taken only after admission to the School of Education:
ExcEduc 531
CurrIns 545
Inclusion for Secondary Educators
Reading in the Content Area: Middle, Junior, and Senior High School
3
3
.
Student Teaching. Students must complete paperwork in order to be assigned a student teaching placement. To determine your deadline (February or April), visit the Office of Clinical
Experiences website at www4.uwm.edu/soe/academics/clinical-experiences.cfm.
To be approved for placement, you must meet the following criteria:
Be admitted to the School of Education;
Completion of all required coursework;
Cumulative GPA of a minimum 2.5;
A minimum of 2.75 in all your content area and professional education courses;
Passing scores reflected on your transcript for the Praxis II exam: English Language Art: Content Knowledge #5038;
Removal of all F or I (incompletes) grades;
TB test results submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences;
Criminal Background Check submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences; and
Completion of CurrIns 316 (English), 415 (English), 510 (English), 650, 657, 658, and 659 with a C+ or better.
Taken as a block in the fall of the final academic year:
CurrIns 658
CurrIns 516
CurrIns 510
Teaching and Assessing of English (prerequisite CurrIns 657)
Field Work in Middle School
Cooperative Strategies for Pre- and Early Adolescents (English-only fall
section)
3
5
2
.
Taken in the spring semester of the final academic year:
CurrIns 452
Student Teaching in English
10-12
.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
Completion of CurrIns 452 with a C+ or better;
Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all professional education courses. This includes any transfer coursework that is counted towards certification at UWM, as well as
grades earned in student teaching or field experiences;
Satisfactory completion of a minimum 128 credits; and
Completion of the last year of coursework (30 credits) in residence at UW-Milwaukee.
Science Education Program Requirements: Early Adolescence - Adolescence
Students who successfully complete the science program are eligible for a State of Wisconsin teaching certificate to teach science in grades 6 to 12.
PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Application to the Science Education program requires satisfactory completion of the requirements listed below. For more information about the application process, visit our website at:
http://uwm.edu/education/academics/science/.
Pre-Professional Skills Test: Passing scores on one of the following exams: Praxis I, CORE, ACT, SAT, or GRE. ACT, SAT, and GRE scores must be within five years of admission term to
academic program. Please see your academic advisor for additional information.
English Composition: Achieve a placement level of 4 or higher on the English Placement Test, or complete English 102 or an equivalent with a grade of C or better.
Mathematics Skills: Achieve a placement level of 30 or higher on the Math Placement Test, or complete Math 103, 105, 175, or an equivalent with a grade of C or better.
Completion of CurrIns 328, Intorduction to teaching Science in Middle and High School, with a grade of C or better.
Completion of Commun 103 with a grade of C or better. Note: Completion of Commun 103 will also fulfill part of your Humanities requirement.
A 2.5 minimum cumulative GPA in all UWM and transfer courses at the time of admission application.
A 2.75 cumulative GPA in all Science content courses.
A minimum of 58 credits (UWM and transfer credits) at the time of admission application. It is not required to have all the Core Curriculum courses completed at the time of application.
Meeting with faculty advisor to review admission application. Faculty signature required on application.
GENERAL EDUCATION AND CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS
Completion of the coursework in this section will meet the general education requirements (GER) of the University. These requirements include Oral and Written Communication Competency,
Quantitative Literacy Competency, Foreign Language, and Distribution Requirements. Please consult with the University GER requirements. Some programs specify courses to meet the
University GER; please contact your academic advisor for information on required courses.
STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS
Act 31 Requirement. A component of the Human Relations Requirement for Teacher Certification is met by completing one of the following courses or a one-day seminar.
Anthro 213
English 276
Ethnic 203
Hist 263
American Indian Peoples of Wisconsin
Introduction to American Indian Literature: Literature, History, and
Sovereignty of Upper Midwest Indians
Western Great Lakes American Indian Community Life of the Past
North American Indian History Since 1887
3
3
3
3
.
Non-Western History or Contemporary Culture
Non-Western History/Contemporary Culture (African, Latin American, Asian, Native American,
etc.). Suggested: Anthro 213, English 276, Ethnic 203, or Hist 623
3
.
Conservation of Natural Resources – Three credits required.
Select one of the following:
CES 471
Principles of Natural Resource Management
CES 210
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Science
Geog 350
Conservation of Natural Resources
History and Philosophy of Science – Two to three credits required.
Select one of the following (each course is 3 cr):
Hist 226, 227, 332; Philos 213, 324, 335, 338, 520; Bio Sci 220; or Chem 502
Required Math Elective Courses
MathStat 215
Elementary Statistical Analysis
Math
Elective
3
3
3
3
3
ELECTIVE COURSES
Select electives to ensure 128 credits at the time of graduation. Two must be in mathematics.
SCIENCE CONTENT AREA
The selection of at least one major and one minor (highly suggested) should be made in consultation with the faculty advisor prior to applying for admission to the School of Education.
Majors: Must select one.
Biology
Broad Field Science (See below.)
Chemistry
Earth and Space Science
Environmental Studies
Life and Environmental Science
Physical Science
Physics
Minors
Biology
Earth and Space Science
Chemistry
Physics
Contact your faculty advisor for the "MACSTEP Program Packet" for course lists and specific details regarding the majors and minors.
The Broad Field Science major consists of 54 credits in science, including:
14 credits in each of two of the following sciences: biology, chemistry, earth, and physics;
8 credits in each of the remaining science areas; and Electives to be selected in consultation with a faculty advisor.
Note: Broad Field Science majors can earn a certification in another subject (biology, chemistry, physics, and earth and space science) if they have 15 credits in that subject area.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
MACSTEP Sequence: Milwaukee Area Collaborative Secondary Science (and Math) Teachers Education Program. It is important to meet with your faculty advisor in planning this
sequence. All of the MACSTEP courses require formal admission to the School of Education.
Summer
CurrIns 510
CurrIns 518
CurrIns 545
CurrIns 629
Ed Psy 541
Cooperative Strategies for Pre- and Early Adolescents
Science Methods I
Reading in the Content Areas: Middle, Junior, and Senior High School
Change and Change Strategies in Education
Alternative Assessment in Science and Math
2
3
3
3
1
Cooperative Strategies for Pre- and Early Adolescents
Field Experience/Student Teaching in Middle School
Science Methods II
Alternative Assessment in Science and Math II
Inclusion for Secondary Science Educators
Math and Science Methods for All Learners
1
3
6
1
1
1
.
Fall
CurrIns 510
CurrIns 516
CurrIns 519
Ed Psy 542
ExcEduc 536
ExcEduc 537
.
Student Teaching. Students must complete paperwork in order to be assigned a student teaching placement. Student teaching deadlines (February or April) are posted on the Office of Clinical
Experiences website at www4.uwm.edu/soe/academics/clinical-experiences.cfm.
To be approved for placement, you must meet the following criteria:
Be admitted to the School of Education;
Completion of all required coursework;
Cumulative GPA of a minimum 2.5;
A minimum of 2.75 in all your science content area and professional education courses;
Passing scores reflected on your transcript for the Praxis II exam: General Science: Content Knowledge #10435;
Removal of all F or I (incompletes) grades;
TB test results submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences; and
Criminal Background Check submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences.
Spring
CurrIns 427
CurrIns 427
Ed Psy 543
ExcEduc 538
Student Teaching in Secondary Science
Student Teaching in Secondary Science
Alternative Assessment in Science and Math III
Teaching Math and Science to All Learners
5-6
5-6
1
1
.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all professional education courses. This includes any transfer coursework that is counted towards certification at UWM, as well as
grades earned in student teaching or field experiences;
Satisfactory completion of a minimum 128 credits; and
Completion of the last year of coursework (30 credits) in residence at UW-Milwaukee.
Social Studies Education Program Requirements: Early Adolescence - Adolescence
Students who successfully complete the social studies program are eligible for a State of Wisconsin teaching certificate
to teach social studies in grades 6-12.
PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Application to the Social Studies program requires satisfactory completion of the requirements listed below. For more information about the application process, visit our website at:
http://uwm.edu/education/academics/social-studies/.
Pre-Professional Skills Test: Passing scores on one of the following exams: Praxis I, CORE, ACT, SAT, or GRE. ACT, SAT, and GRE scores must be within five years of admission term
to academic program. Please see your academic advisor for additional information.
English Composition: Achieve a placement level of 4 or higher on the English Placement Test, or complete English 102 or an equivalent with a grade of C or better.
Mathematics Skills: Achieve a placement level of 30 or higher on the Math Placement Test, or complete Math 105 or an equivalent with a grade of C or better.
Completion of CurrIns 300, Introduction to Teaching, with a grade of C or better.
Completion of Commun 103 with a grade of C or better.
A 2.5 minimum cumulative GPA in all UWM and transfer courses at the time of admission application. A 2.75 cumulative GPA in all economics, geography, history, psychology, political science, and sociology courses.
A minimum of 58 credits (UWM and transfer credits) at the time of admission application. It is not required to have all the Core Curriculum courses completed at the time of application.
Meeting with faculty advisor to review admission application. Faculty signature required on application.
GENERAL EDUCATION AND CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS
All undergraduate students must complete the general education requirements (GER) of the University. These requirements include Oral and Written Communication Competency, Quantitative
Literacy Competency, Foreign Language, and Distribution Requirements. Please consult with the University GER requirements, http://www4.uwm.edu/academics/ger.cfm. Some programs
specify courses to meet the University GER; please contact your academic advisor for information on required courses.
STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS
Act 31 Requirement. A component of the Human Relations Requirement for Teacher Certification must be met by
completing one of the following courses or a one-day seminar.
Anthro 213
American Indian Peoples of Wisconsin
3
English 276
Introduction to American Indian Literature: Literature, History, and
3
Sovereignty of Upper Midwest Indians
Ethnic 203
Western Great Lakes American Indian Community Life of the Past
3
Hist 263
North American Indian History Since 1887
3
Non-Western History or Contemporary Culture
Non-Western History/Contemporary Culture (African, Latin American, Asian, Native American, etc.). Suggested:
Anthro 213, English 276, Ethnic 203, or Hist 263.
Conservation of Natural Resources. Three credits required.
CES 210
Introduction to Conservation and Environmental Science
3
Note: Other statutory requirements are met through other program experiences.
Prerequisite Courses
One of the following courses is required to meet the prerequisite for CurrIns 313, Teaching Economics in the
Social Studies Curriculum.
Econ 103
Principles of Microeconomics
3
Econ 104
Principles of Macroeconomics
3
Select one of the following:
Ed Pol 375
Cultural Foundations of Education
3
Ed Pol 530
Urban Education: Foundations
3
Social Studies Content Area
Students must complete 36 credits in one social studies field (18 credits must be 300-level or higher coursework),
12 credits in a second social studies field, and 12 credits in a third social studies field (12 credits of the total 24 in
the second and third social studies field must be 300-level or higher coursework). See advisor for specific course
and distribution requirements for chosen major.
Fields of study include economics, geography, history, psychology, political science, and sociology.
See advisor for specific course and distribution requirements of chosen fields of study. .
Specific course and distribution requirements can be found at http://uwm.edu/education/academics/social-studies/.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
After admission to the program, the following sequencing of courses is recommended.
Spring Semester (15 credits)
CurrIns 313
Teaching Economics in the Social Studies Curriculum
CurrIns 321
Introduction to the Teaching of Social Studies
CurrIns 510
Cooperative Strategies for Pre- and Early Adolescents
CurrIns 516
Field Work in Middle School
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning Development
ExcEduc 531
Inclusion for Secondary Educators
Fall Semester (14 credits)
CurrIns 323
Teaching of Social Studies: Secondary
CurrIns 415
Preliminary Student Teaching
CurrIns 545
Reading in the Content Area: Middle, Junior, and Senior High School
Ed Psy 320
Principles for Classroom Appraisal and Evaluation
2
1
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
2
.
Student Teaching. Students must complete paperwork in order to be assigned a student teaching placement. Student teaching deadlines (February or April) are posted on the Office of Clinical
Experiences website at www4.uwm.edu/soe/academics/clinical-experiences.cfm.
To be approved for placement, you must meet the following criteria:
Be admitted to the School of Education;
Completion of all required coursework;
Cumulative GPA of a minimum 2.5;
A minimum of 2.75 in all your social studies content area and professional education courses;
Passing scores reflected on your transcript for the Praxis II exam: Social Studies: Content Knowledge #5081;
Removal of all F or I (incompletes) grades;
TB test results submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences; and
Criminal Background Check submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences.
Spring Semester
CurrIns 423
Student Teaching in Social Studies
10-12
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all professional education courses. This includes any transfer coursework that is counted towards certification at UWM, as well as
grades earned in student teaching or field experiences;
Satisfactory completion of a minimum 128 credits; and
Completion of the last year of coursework (30 credits) in residence at UW-Milwaukee.
Note: Not all courses are offered every semester.
Early Childhood Through Adolescence Level Language Education
The purpose of the Early Childhood Through Adolescence Language Education program is to prepare teachers for working with children from birth to age 21 in the areas of bilingual education,
English as a Second Language (ESL), and World Languages. Students who successfully complete the language education program for the ESL or World Languages major are recommended by
the Department for licensure and are eligible for the State of Wisconsin Teaching Certificate at the Early Childhood Through Adolescence Level (birth through age 21). Students in Early
Childhood (EC), Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence (MCEA), Early Adolescence Through Adolescence (EAA), and Early Childhood Through Adolescence (ECA) education may
complete a minor for certification in bilingual, ESL, or World Languages for certification at the same level as their major certification.
Bilingual Education Program Requirements (Supplemental Certification)
The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee offers coursework for a supplemental certification in Bilingual Education. This minor is designed for individuals who wish to teach in a classroom in
which two languages (English and another language) are used for instruction. Students wishing to pursue this certification must be in process of or already have a certification. To obtain a
Bilingual Education supplemental certification, students must meet the following requirements.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
CurrIns 503
CurrIns 541
CurrIns 542
CurrIns 543
CurrIns 546
CurrIns 655
CurrIns 442
CurrIns 445
Assessment Issues in Language Education
Principles and Methods of Teaching ESL
History and Politics of Second Language Education
Developing Biliteracy
Language, Content, and Comprehensible Input
Applied Educational Linguistics
Student Teaching in Bilingual Education
Seminar in Language Education (Not required for students currently
completing a portfolio in their major certification.)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
.
Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement. Demonstration of foreign language proficiency is required for all prospective language teachers. Submit scores from your language department
proficiency test to the academic advisor for languages prior to student teaching. A minimum score of Advanced-Low on the ACTFL OPI or equivalent is required prior to student teaching.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION
Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all professional education courses. This includes any transfer coursework that is counted towards certification at UWM, as well as
grades earned in student teaching or field experiences;
Undergraduate students must meet the graduation requirements for their primary certification.
Program Portfolio. Students complete a program portfolio based on the 10 WI Teacher Standards.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS - Major to Teach Grades PK-12.
A teaching certification in English as a Second Language (ESL) is for those who wish to teach English to non-native speakers.
PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Application to the English as a Second Language program requires satisfactory completion of the requirements listed below. For more information about the application process, visit our
website at: http://uwm.edu/education/academics/second-language/.
Pre-Professional Skills Test: Passing scores on one of the following exams: Praxis I, CORE, ACT, SAT, or GRE. ACT, SAT, and GRE scores must be within five years of admission term
to academic program. Please see your academic advisor for additional information.
English Composition: Achieve a placement level of 4 or higher on the English Placement Test, or complete English 102 or an equivalent with a grade of C or better.
Mathematics Skills: Achieve a placement level of 30 or higher on the Math Placement Test, or complete Math 103, 105, 175, or an equivalent, with a grade of C or better. Note: Math 103 or
105 are recommended as they also meet core curriculum requirements.
Completion of CurrIns 300, Introduction to Teaching, with a grade of C or better.
Completion of Commun 103 with a grade of C or better.
A 2.5 minimum GPA in all English as a Second Language content courses.
A minimum of 48 credits (UWM and transfer credits) at the time of admission application. It is not required to have all the Core Curriculum courses completed at the time of application.
GENERAL EDUCATION AND CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS
Completion of the coursework in this section will meet the general education requirements (GER) of the University. These requirements include Oral and Written Communication Competency,
Quantitative Literacy Competency, Foreign Language, and Distribution Requirements. Please consult with the University GER requirements. Some programs specify courses to meet the
University GER; please contact your academic advisor for information on required courses.
PL 34 STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS
Act 31 Requirement. A component of the Human Relations Requirement for Teacher Certification must be met by
completing one of the following courses or a one-day seminar.
Anthro 213
American Indian Peoples of Wisconsin
3
English 276
Introduction to American Indian Literature: Literature, History, and Sovereignty
3
of Upper Midwest Indians
Ethnic 203
Western Great Lakes American Indian Community Life of the Past
3
Hist 263
North American Indian History Since 1887
3
Non-Western History or Contemporary Culture
Non-Western History/Contemporary Culture (African, Latin American, Asian, Native American, etc.). Suggested:
Anthro 213, English 276, Ethnic 203, or Hist 263.
ELECTIVE COURSES
Select electives to ensure 128 credits at the time of graduation.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CONTENT AREA - 36 cr Recommended Sequence:
Select one of the following two courses:
English 400
Introduction to English Linguistics
Linguis 350
Introduction to Linguistics
English 402
Theories of Language and Literature (writing emphasis)
English 403
Survey of Modern English Grammar
Linguis 410
Linguistics and Grammar in ESL Education
Linguis 420
Introduction to Second Language Acquisition
Select one of the following two courses:
English 404
Language, Power, and Identity
Linguis 430
Language and Society
English 567
Materials for ESL Instruction
CurrIns 541
Principles and Methods of Teaching ESL
CurrIns 542
History and Politics of Second Language Education
CurrIns 543
Developing Biliteracy
CurrIns 546
Language, Content, and Comprehensible Input
CurrIns 655
Applied Educational Linguistics
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
A grade of C or better is required for all professional education requirements, including student teaching. Prerequisites may be required.
Select one of the following:
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning and Development
Ed Psy 631
Cognition: Learning, Problem Solving, and Thinking
Ed Psy 640
Human Development: Theory and Research
Select one of the following:
ExcEduc 300
The Exceptional Individual
ExcEduc 531
Inclusion for Secondary Education
ExcEduc 600
Survey of Exceptional Education
ExcEduc 605
Child, Learner, Disabilities
Select one of the following:
CurrIns 504
Teaching Reading and Writing in Early Childhood
CurrIns 544
Improvement in the Teaching of Reading
CurrIns 545
Reading in the Content Areas: Middle, Junior, and Senior High School
CurrIns 503
Assessment Issues in Language Education
3
3
3
3
Student Teaching. Students must complete paperwork in order to be assigned a student teaching placement. Student teaching deadlines (February or April) are posted on the Office of Clinical
Experiences website at www4.uwm.edu/soe/academics/clinical-experiences.cfm.
To be approved for placement, you must meet the following criteria:
Be admitted to the School of Education;
Completion of all coursework. An exception to allow a student to take a course concurrently with student teaching requires approval of the student's faculty advisor;
Cumulative GPA of a minimum 2.5;
A minimum 2.75 in all your content area and professional education courses;
Passing scores reflected on your transcript for the Praxis II exam: English to Speakers of Other Languages: Content Knowledge #5361;
Removal of all F or I (incompletes) grades; and
TB test results submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences.
CurrIns 444
CurrIns 445
Student Teaching in ESL, EC-A
Seminar in Language Education
10
3
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION AND CERTIFICATION
Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all professional education courses. This includes any transfer coursework that is counted towards certification at UWM, as well as
grades earned in student teaching or field experiences;
Satisfactory completion of a minimum 128 credits.
Completion of the last year of coursework (30 credits) in residence at UW-Milwaukee.
Program Portfolio. Students complete a program portfolio based on the 10 WI Teacher Standards.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS -Minor.
A teaching certification in English as a Second Language (ESL) is for those who wish to teach English to non-native speakers. Students wishing to pursue a minor in ESL must be in
the process of obtaining or already have a certification to teach at the Early Childhood, Early Childhood Through Adolescence, Middle Childhood Through Early Adolescence, or
Early Adolescence Through Adolescence level.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CONTENT AREA - 18 cr
CurrIns 503
CurrIns 541
CurrIns 542
CurrIns 543
CurrIns 546
CurrIns 655
Assessment Issues in Language Education
Principles and Methods of Teaching ESL
History and Politics of Second Language Education
Developing Biliteracy
Language, Content, and Comprehensible Input
Applied Educational Linguistics
3
3
3
3
3
3
Student Teaching. Students must complete paperwork in order to be assigned a student teaching placement. Student teaching deadlines (February or April) are posted on the Office
of Clinical Experiences website at www4.uwm.edu/soe/academics/clinical-experiences.cfm.
To be approved for placement, you must meet the following criteria:
Be admitted to the School of Education;
Completion of all coursework. An exception to allow a student to take a course concurrently with student teaching requires approval of the student's faculty advisor;
Cumulative GPA of a minimum 2.5;
A minimum 2.75 in all your content area and professional education courses;
Passing scores reflected on your transcript for the Praxis II exam: English to Speakers of Other Languages: Content Knowledge #5361;
Removal of all F or I (incompletes) grades; and
TB test results submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences.
Criminal Backgroun Check submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences.
CurrIns 443
CurrIns 445
Student Teaching in English as a Second Language
Seminar in Language Education (Not required for students who are currently
completing a portfolio in their major certification.)
3
3
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION
A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all professional education coursework. This includes any transfer coursework that is counted towards certification at
UWM, as well as grades earned in student teaching or field experiences. Undergraduate students must meet the graduation requirements for their primary certification.
Program Portfolio. Students complete a program portfolio based on the 10 WI Teacher Standards.
World Languages Program Requirements - Major to Teach Grades PK-12
PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Application to the World Languages program requires satisfactory completion of the requirements listed below. For more information about the application process, visit our
website at http://uwm.edu/education/second-language/.
Pre-Professional Skills Test: Passing scores on one of the following exams: Praxis I, CORE, ACT, SAT, or GRE. ACT, SAT, and GRE scores must be within five years of
admission term to academic program. Please see your academic advisor for additional information.
English Composition: Achieve a placement level of 4 or higher on the English Placement Test, or complete English 102 or an equivalent with a grade of C or better.
Mathematics Skills: Achieve a placement level of 30 or higher on the Math Placement Test, or complete Math 103, 105, 175, or an equivalent, with a grade of C or better. Note: Math
103 or 105 are recommended as they also meet core curriculum requirements.
Completion of CurrIns 300, Introduction to Teaching, with a grade of C or better.
Completion of Commun 103 with a grade of C or better.
A 2.5 minimum GPA in all UWM and transfer courses at the time of admission application.
A 2.75 cumulative GPA in all language content courses.
A minimum of 48 credits (UWM and transfer credits) at the time of admission application. It is not required to have all the Core Curriculum courses completed at the time of
application.
GENERAL EDUCATION AND CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS
Completion of the coursework in this section will meet the general education requirements (GER) of the University.
PL 34 STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS
Act 31 Requirement. A component of the Human Relations Requirement for Teacher Certification must be met by
completing one of the following courses or a one-day seminar.
Anthro 213
American Indian Peoples of Wisconsin
3
English 276
Introduction to American Indian Literature: Literature, History, and
3
Sovereignty of Upper Midwest Indians
Ethnic 203
Western Great Lakes American Indian Community Life of the Past
3
Hist 263
North American Indian History Since 1887
3
Non-Western History or Contemporary Culture
Non-Western History/Contemporary Culture (African, Latin American, Asian, Native American, etc.). Suggested:
Anthro 213, English 276, Ethnic 203, or Hist 263.
ELECTIVE COURSES
Select electives to ensure 128 credits at the time of graduation.
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CONTENT AREA
Consult with a faculty or academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
CHINESE CONTENT AREA – 30 cr (plus any prereqs)
Chinese 301
Fifth Semester Chinese
Chinese 302
Sixth Semester Chinese
Chinese 401
Seventh Semester Chinese
Chinese 402
Eighth Semester Chinese
Chinese 200
Chinese Calligraphy
Select five of the following from at least three different departments:
Chinese 310
Business Chinese
3
3
3
3
3
3
Chinese 320
Contemporary Chinese Societies Through Film
Chinese 699
Advanced Independent Study
CompLit 363
Chinese Literature in the Global Context
Geog 332
China: Peoples, Regions, and Development
Hist 376
History of Ancient China, Earliest Times to 220 AD
Hist 377
Modern China
Hist 378
Revolution in China
ArtHist 382
Chinese Art and Architecture
ArtHist 480
Chinese Painting
FRENCH CONTENT AREA – 30 cr (plus any prereqs)
French 324
Contemporary French Language and Culture
French 325
Intensive Grammar and Usage
French 332
Approaches to Poetry and Fiction
French 392
Phonetics
French 426
Growing Up French
Select three of the following:
French 427
Advanced Written Expression
French 431
Seminar in Literature of the Francophone World
French 432
Seminar in French and Francophone Culture
French 433
Seminar in French Literature
French 450
Institutions and Culture of Contemporary France
French 451 (351)
Cinema of the French-Speaking World
French 510
Seminar in Masterpieces of Literature Written in French
French 592
Seminar in French Language
Select two of the following:
French 428
Castles, Cathedrals, and Common People
French 429
Royalty, Reason, and Revolution
French 430
Reaction and Innovation: French Culture of the 19th and 20th Centuries
GERMAN CONTENT AREA – 30 cr (plus any prereqs)
German 331
Intermediate German Grammar and Usage
German 332
Intermediate Conversation and Composition
German 333
Analysis of German Texts
German 334
Introduction to German Literature and Culture
400-Level or Higher German Literature Elective
400-Level or Higher German Literature Elective
400-Level or Higher German Literature Elective
400-Level or Higher German Literature Elective
German 626 (526) Advanced German Grammar and Usage
German 671
Seminar on Phonetics
HEBREW CONTENT AREA
Consult with a faculty or academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
ITALIAN CONTENT AREA – 30 cr (plus any prereqs)
Italian 310
Italian Immersion
Italian 310
Italian Immersion
Italian 310
Italian Immersion
Italian 311
Advanced Conversation and Composition*
Italian 311
(Change in Topic)
Italian 312
Contemporary Italian Language and Culture*
Italian 312
(Change in Topic)
Italian 321
Introduction to Italian Literature
Italian 322
Introduction to Italian Literature and Film
Italian 357
Topics in Italian Culture in Translation
Italian 457
Topics in Italian Literature and Culture in Translation
Select one of the following courses:
Italian 670
Studies in Italian Literature
Italian 383
Honors Seminar
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
* Retakeable with change in topic.
LATIN CONTENT AREA – 30 cr (plus any prereqs)
Latin 103
First Semester Latin
Latin 104
Second Semester Latin
Latin 205
Third Semester Latin
Latin 306
Readings in Latin Literature
Latin 508
Latin Prose Composition
Select at least 15 credits from a combination of the following courses:
Latin 501
Readings in Latin Prose*
Latin 502
Readings in Latin Poetry*
Latin 699
Directed Reading*
* Retakeable with a change in topic.
RUSSIAN CONTENT AREA
Consult with a faculty or academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
SPANISH CONTENT AREA – 30 cr (plus any prereqs)
Spanish 308
Advanced Writing and Reading
Select one of the following courses:
Spanish 318
Advanced Speaking and Listening
Spanish 319
Advanced Speaking and Listening for Heritage Speakers
Spanish 341
Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
Spanish 350
Introduction to Literary Analysis
Spanish 461
Topics in Hispanic Culture (may be taken twice with a change of topic)
Select two of the following courses:
Spanish 470
Survey of Hispanic Literature and Civilization
Spanish 472
Survey of Spanish-American Literature and Civilization
Spanish 474
Survey of Spanish Literature and Civilization
300-Level or Higher Spanish Elective
300-Level or Higher Spanish Elective
300-Level or Higher Spanish Elective
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
OTHER PROGRAM RQUIREMENTS
Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement. A minimum score of Intermediate-High on the ACTFL OPI or equivalent is required prior to student teaching placement. Submit
scores from your language proficiency test to your academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
Immersion Requirement. An immersion experience is required for all prospective language teachers. This requirement must be met by spending a semester or a year in a country
where the chosen major language is spoken. Submit documentation of immersion experience to your academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction prior to
student teaching placement.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
A grade of C or better is required for all professional education requirements including student teaching. Prerequisites may be required.
Select one of the following courses:
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning and Development
Ed Psy 631
Cognition: Learning, Problem Solving and Thinking*
Ed Psy 640
Human Development: Theory and Research*
Select one of the following courses:
ExcEduc 300
The Exceptional Individual
ExcEduc 531
Inclusion for Secondary Education*
ExcEduc 600
Survey for Exceptional Education*
ExcEduc 605
Child, Learner, Disabilities*
Select one of the following courses:
CurrIns 503
Assessment Issues in Language Education
CurrIns 504
Teaching Reading and Writing
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
CurrIns 542
CurrIns 543
CurrIns 544
CurrIns 545
CurrIns 546
CurrIns 637
CurrIns 639
CurrIns 655
History and Politics of Second Language Education
Developing Biliteracy
Improvement in the Teaching of Reading*
Reading in the Content Areas: Middle, Junior, and Senior High School*
Language, Content, and Comprehensible Input
World Language Methods and Materials
Critical Issues and Methods in World Languages Education
Applied Educational Linguistics
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Student Teaching. Students must complete paperwork in order to be assigned a student teaching placement. Student teaching deadlines (February or April) are posted on the Office
of Clinical Experiences website at www4.uwm.edu/soe/academics/clinical-experiences.cfm.
To be approved for placement, you must meet the following criteria:
Be admitted to the School of Education;
Completion of all required coursework;
Cumulative GPA of a minimum 2.5;
A minimum of 2.75 in all your world languages content area and professional education courses;
Removal of all F or I (incompletes) grades;
TB test results submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences;
Criminal Background Check submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences;
Completion of language proficiency requirement; and
Completion of immersion requirement.
CurrIns 438
CurrIns 445
Student Teaching in World Languages, EC-A
Seminar in Language Education
10
3
English as a Second Language Minor. World Language majors wishing to complete an English as a Second Language minor should complete these additional requirements:
CurrIns 541
CurrIns 444
Principles and Methods of Teaching ESL
Student Teaching in ESL-EC-A*
* Taken concurrently with CurrIns 438 for a total of 10 credits. Passing scores on the Praxis II (#5361) prior to student teaching placement.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION
A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all professional education courses. This includes any transfer coursework that is counted towards certification at UWM,
as well as grades earned in student teaching or field experiences.
Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 128 credits.
Completion of the last year of coursework (30 credits) in residence at UW-Milwaukee.
Program Portfolio. Students complete a program portfolio based on the 10 WI Teacher Standards.
World Languages Program Requirements - Minor
The World Languages minor is designed for individuals who wish to earn a Wisconsin teaching certification to teach a foreign language. Students wishing to pursue this certification
must be in the process of obtaining or already have an initial certification.
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CONTENT AREA
Consult with a faculty or academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
CHINESE CONTENT AREA – 18 cr (plus any prereqs)
Chinese 301
Fifth Semester Chinese
Chinese 302
Sixth Semester Chinese
Chinese 401
Seventh Semester Chinese
Chinese 402
Eighth Semester Chinese
Chinese 200
Chinese Calligraphy
Select one of the following courses:
Chinese 310
Business Chinese
Chinese 320
Contemporary Chinese Societies Through Film
Chinese 699
Advanced Independent Study
CompLit 363
Chinese Literature in the Global Context
Geog 332
China: Peoples, Regions, and Development
Hist 376
History of Ancient China, Earliest Times to 220 AD
Hist 377
Modern China
Hist 378
Revolution in China
ArtHist 382
Chinese Art and Architecture
ArtHist 480
Chinese Painting
FRENCH CONTENT AREA – 18 cr (plus any prereqs)
French 324
Contemporary French Language and Culture
French 325
Intensive Grammar and Usage
French 332
Approaches to Poetry and Fiction
French 392
Phonetics
French 426
Growing Up French
Select one of the following courses:
French 428
Castles, Cathedrals, and Common People
French 429
Royalty, Reason, and Revolution
French 430
Reaction and Innovation: French Culture of the 19th and 20th Centuries
French 431
Seminar in Literature of the Francophone World
French 432
Seminar in French and Francophone Culture
French 433
Seminar in French Literature
French 450
Institutions and Culture of Contemporary France
French 451
Cinema of the French-Speaking World
French 510
Seminar on Masterpieces of Literature Written in French
French 592
Seminar in French Language
GERMAN CONTENT AREA – 18 cr (plus any prereqs)
German 331
Intermediate German Grammar and Usage
German 332
Intermediate Conversation and Composition
German 333
Analysis of German Texts
German 334
Introduction to German Literature and Culture
400-Level or Higher German Literature and Culture
400-Level or Higher German Culture or Linguistics Elective
HEBREW CONTENT AREA
Consult with a faculty or academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
ITALIAN CONTENT AREA – 18 cr (plus any prereqs)
Italian 310
Italian Immersion
Italian 310
Italian Immersion
Italian 310
Italian Immersion
Italian 311
Advanced Conversation and Composition
Italian 312
Contemporary Italian Language and Culture
Italian 321
Introduction to Italian Literature
Italian 322
Introduction to Italian Literature and Film
300-Level or Higher Italian Elective
LATIN CONTENT AREA – 18 cr (plus any prereqs)
Latin 103
First Semester Latin
Latin 104
Second Semester Latin
Latin 205
Third Semester Latin
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Latin 306
Readings in Latin Literature
Latin 508
Latin Prose Composition
Select one of the following courses:
Latin 501
Readings in Latin Prose*
Latin 502
Readings in Latin Poetry*
Latin 699
Directed Reading*
* Retakeable with a change in topic.
RUSSIAN CONTENT AREA
Consult with a faculty or academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
SPANISH CONTENT AREA – 18 cr (plus any prereqs)
Spanish 308
Advanced Writing and Reading
Select one of the following courses:
Spanish 318
Advanced Speaking and Listening
Spanish 319
Advanced Speaking and Listening for Heritage Speakers
Spanish 341
Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
Spanish 350
Introduction to Literary Analysis
Select one of the following courses:
Spanish 446
Hispanic Sociolinguistics
Spanish 470
Survey of Hispanic Literature and Civilization
Spanish 472
Survey of Spanish-American Literature and Civilization
Spanish 474
Survey of Spanish Literature and Civilization
Spanish 461
Topics in Hispanic Culture
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
OTHER PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement. A minimum score of Intermediate-High on the ACTFL OPI or equivalent is required prior to student teaching placement. Submit
scores from your language proficiency test to your academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
Immersion Requirement. An immersion experience is required for all prospective language teachers. This requirement must be met by spending a semester or a year in a country
where the chosen major language is spoken. Submit documentation of immersion experience to your academic advisor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction prior to
student teaching placement.
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
A grade of C or better is required for all professional education requirements, including student teaching. Prerequisites may be required.
CurrIns 542
CurrIns 637
CurrIns 639
History and Politics of Second Language Education
World Language Methods and Materials
Critical Issues and Methods in World Language Education
3
3
3
Student Teaching. Students must complete paperwork in order to be assigned a student teaching placement. Student teaching deadlines (February or April) are posted on the Office
of Clinical Experiences website at www4.uwm.edu/soe/academics/clinical-experiences.cfm.
To be approved for placement, you must meet the following criteria:
Be admitted to the School of Education;
Completion of all required coursework;
Cumulative GPA of a minimum 2.5;
A minimum of 2.75 in all your world languages content area and professional education courses;
Removal of all F or I (incompletes) grades;
TB test results submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences;
Criminal Background Check submitted to the Office of Clinical Experiences;
Completion of language proficiency requirement; and
Completion of immersion requirement.
CurrIns 437
CurrIns 445
Student Teaching in World Languages
Seminar in Language Education (Not required for students who are currently
completing a portfolio in their major certification.)
3
3
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION
A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 in all professional education courses. This includes any transfer coursework that is counted towards certification at UWM,
as well as grades earned in student teaching or field experiences.
Undergraduate students must meet the graduation requirements for their primary certification.
Program Portfolio. Students complete a program portfolio based on the 10 WI Teacher Standards.
Courses
Curriculum and Instruction (CURRINS)
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University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Curriculum and Instruction
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Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
School of Education
Exceptional Education
Web Home Pages:
School of Education
Exceptional Education
Courses: Exceptional Education (EXCEDUC)
The Department of Exceptional Education offers an array of programs that prepare
teachers in the fields of special
education, interpreter training, and American
Sign Language. Students interested in these programs should contact the
Office of Student Services, Enderis 209, or visit http://uwm.edu/education/academics/exceptional-edu-department for
more detailed information.
Special Education Teacher Certification Programs
The Department of Exceptional Education offers teacher certification programs
in the following areas:
• Early Childhood Special Education (approximate ages
of birth through 8).
• Middle Childhood-Early Adolescence (approximate ages
of 6 through 12 or 13). Cross-categorical Special Education
with a concentration
in one of the following: Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, Cognitive Disabilities,
or Learning
Disabilities.
• Early Adolescence-Adolescence (approximate ages of
10 through 21). Cross-categorical Special Education with a
concentration in
one of the following: Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities, Cognitive Disabilities, or Learning Disabilities.
• Deaf or Hard of Hearing (Early Childhood through Adolescence
level); with certification in Middle Childhood-Early
Adolescence Learning Disabilities
for those who are enrolled in the full, two-year program.
Early Childhood, Middle Childhood through Early Adolescence, and Early Adolescence through Adolescence special
education programs offer teacher certification at both the undergraduate and post-baccalaureate levels. Early Childhoold
and Middle Childhood through Early Adolescence also have a "5th Year" program for students to pursue a regular
education license and add on a special education license with an additional year of work. Interested students can contact
the Office of Student Services at [email protected]
Post-baccalaureate certification programs in special education can be combined with a master's degree in Exceptional
Education.
Early Childhood Special Education (birth to age 8)
Undergraduate Program:
The Early Childhood Special Education program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee leads to the bachelor's degree
through the School of Education. In addition, the program results in the Wisconsin 809 teaching license in Early
Childhood Special Education, which certifies intervention with and instruction of children from birth through third grade
with disabilities in Wisconsin. Coursework for the ECSE program is offered in collaboration with the Early Childhood
Education program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
During Year 1
CurrIns 140
Field Experience with Families and Communities
CurrIns 312
Models and Issues for Early Childhood Education
Semester 3
Currins 240
Field Experience with Dual Language Learners
CurrIns 501
Language Acquisition for Children of Diverse Backgrounds
Semester 4
CurrIns 302
Curriculum Design in Early Childhood
CurrIns 340 Field Experience in Early Childhood Education
or
CurrIns 440
Field Experience in Preschool and Kindergarten
CurrIns 502
Emergent Literacy and Biliteracy in the Early Childhood Classroom
Semester 5
ExcEduc 569
Curriculum and Methods for Special Education: Preschool
ExcEduc 648
Early Childhood Special Education Field Experience: Preschool
CurrIns 330
Teaching of Mathematics: Early Childhood
Semester 6
ExcEduc 570
Curriculum and Methods in Special Education: Primary
ExcEduc 649
Early Childhood Special Education Field Experience: Primary
Ed Psy/ExcEduc 613 Infant and Early Childhood Assessment
CurrIns 504
Methods for Biliteracy and Language Arts in Primary Grades
Semester 7
ExcEduc 568
Curriculum and Methods in Special Education: Birth to Three
ExcEduc 647
Early Childhood Special Education Field Experience: 0 to 3 Yrs
ExcEduc 682
Language and Literacy in Early Childhood Special Education
Semester 8
ExcEduc 481
Student Teaching with Students Having Early Childhood Exceptional Ed Needs
Highly recommended:
CurrIns/ExcEduc 376 Developing and Understanding the edTPA
Other required professional courses:
Art Ed 130
Multicultural Art and Visual Learning in Elementary Education
Mus Ed 260
Making Music Connections with Children
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning and Development
ExcEduc 630
Survey of Early Childhood Intervention
CurrIns/ExcEduc 612 Collaborations for Teachers with Families, Schools, and Communities
Students are required to meet the University's General Education Requirements. Early Childhood Special Education
students must meet some of these requirements with specific courses.
Humanities (6 cr): 3 cr Commun 103 and 3 cr GER Literature Elective
Natural Sciences (9 cr): 3 cr CES 210; 3 cr Earth Science Elective (Astron, Atm Sci, Geog, Geo Sci); 3 cr Physical
Science Elective (Chem or Phys)
DPI Human Relations requirement: Anthro 213 or English 276 (topic: Literature, History, and Sovereignty of Upper
Midwest Indians) or AIS 203 or Hist 263
1
3
2
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
1
3
3
3
3
3
Competency requirements: Math 175, Math 176, English 102, English 201 or 205
Electives ensure the minimum 120 credits required for graduation.
Post-baccalaureate Program (Under revision; please see an advisor for information):
YEAR ONE
Summer I (6 cr)
CurrIns 302
Curriculum Design in Early Childhood
ExcEduc 630
Survey of EC Intervention: Young Children with Special Needs, Families
Fall I (9 cr)
ExcEduc 569
Curriculum and Methods for Special Education: Preschool
ExcEduc 648
Early Childhood Special Education Field Experience: Preschool
CurrIns 502
Emergent Literacy and Biliteracy in the Early Childhood Classroom
Spring I (9 cr)
CurrIns 504
Teaching Reading and Writing in Early Childhood: The Primary Years
ExcEduc 570
Curriculum and Methods for Special Education: Primary
ExcEduc 649
Early Childhood Special Education Field Experience: Primary
YEAR TWO
Summer II (6 cr)
ExcEduc 568
Curriculum and Methods for Special Education, Birth to Three
ExcEduc 647
Early Childhood Field Experience: 0 to 3 years
Fall II (9 cr)
ExcEduc 682
Language and Literacy in Early Childhood Special Education
CurrIns 330
Teaching of Mathematics: Early Childhood
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning and Development
or
Ed Psy 640
Human Development: Theory and Research
Spring II (6 cr)
ExcEduc 652
Developmental Evaluation of Young Children with Disabilities
ExcEduc 651
Working with Families in Urban Communities
Other Teaching Experience Coursework Requirements
ExcEduc 481
Student Teaching with Students Having Early Childhood Exceptional Education
Needs
or
ExcEduc 776
Fieldwork with Students Having Early Childhood Exceptional Education Needs
CurrIns 400
Fieldwork in Curriculum and Instruction
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-6
Middle Childhood-Early Adolescence (teaching students across
disability areas including cognitive disabilities,
emotional disabilities, and
learning disabilities, in elementary and middle school settings)
Undergraduate Program:
Program Admission Requirements:
At least 30 credits of Pre-Professional Coursework completed;
Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and a C or better in all required courses;
Successful completion of dispositions and field evaluation from CurrIns 300 or 333;
Successful completion of Math 175 and English 102 (or placement of 4 or higher on English placement test);
Successful completion of pre-professional skills test (If the CORE is taken, all subsections must be taken and 2 of
the 3 subsections must be passed prior to an interview. The failed subtest must be passed by the end of your first
year in the program.); and
Successful application and interview.
MCEA-Special Education Bachelor Degree/Certification Requirements:
Completion of Pre-Professional Coursework, Content Focus Area Coursework, and the Professional Course
Sequence, as outlined below;
Passing scores on the state-required licensure tests: Praxis II, the Wisconsin Foundations of Reading Test, and the
edTPA;
Completion of ACT 31 requirement;
Completion of foreign language requirement;
At least 30 program credits must be earned in residence at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, following
admission to the program;
Completion of the ePortfolio;
Completion of a minimum 120 degree credits; and
Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 and a C or better in all professional courses.
Pre-Professional Coursework:
The Pre-Professional Coursework consists of 54 credits and is designed to meet UWM's general education requirements
(GER) and foundations in urban education and content knowledge related to teaching in elementary and middle schools.
Foreign language (6 credits or equivalent);
Cultural Diversity/Act 31 - Anthro 213, or AIS 203, or English 276, or Hist 263 (3 credits);
Arts - Theatre 260 (3 credits);
English 102 and 201 (6 credits);
Humanities - CurrIns 233; and English elective (6 credits);
Mathematics - Math 175 and 176 (6 credits);
Natural Sciences - Physical Science elective and CES 210 ( 6 credits);
Social Sciences - History 151 or 152; Political Science 104 or 105 (6 credits); and
Urban Education foundation courses - Ed Pol 375, CurrIns 300 or 333, Ed Psy 330, ExcEduc 605 (12 credits).
Content Focus Area Coursework:
Content Focus Area Coursework (18 credits) is designed to extend the GERs and add depth to subject matter knowledge
related to teaching in elementary and middle schools. One or two of the following focus areas are selected under the
guidance of an advisor: Arts, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Science, Social Science, and World Language.
PROFESSIONAL COURSE SEQUENCE
Fall I
ExcEduc 586
Teaching Experience I
CurrIns 306
MCEA Clinical Experience Grades 1-3
CurrIns 536
Literacy I: Assessing and Teaching Early Literacy
ExcEduc 571
Curriculum Accommodations I: Primary/Middle
GER and content courses
Spring I
ExcEduc 586
Teaching Experience I
ExcEduc 681
Literacy II
CurrIns 331
Teaching of Mathematics, Elementary School
ExcEduc 662
Collaborative Strategies
ExcEduc 595
Technology Applications for Diverse Learners
YEAR TWO
Fall II
ExcEduc 587
Teaching Experience II
ExcEduc 532
Assessment and Monitoring
ExcEduc 601
Behavioral Supports
CurrIns 537
Literacy II: Assessing and Teaching Literacy through Early Adolescence
GER and content courses
Spring II
ExcEduc 588
Teaching Experience III
2
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
9
ExcEduc 574
ExcEduc 488
Curriculum Accommodations II: Primary and Middle
Linking Seminar: Professional Development
3
1
Special Education Dual Certificate Program (5th year)
In partnership with Department of Curriculum and Instruction, this fifth-year program is geared toward undergraduates
who are interested in becoming special educators. After successfully completing the regular education MCEA program,
students are admitted into the fifth-year special education option. Many students receive their bachelor's degrees upon
completion of UWM's collaborative regular education program, while others complete the tgh-year special education
option as part of a master's degree program. Please contact the Office of Student Services at 414-229-4721 or
[email protected] for program information and requirements.
Post-baccalaureate Program (Under revision; please see an advisor for information):
YEAR ONE
Summer I (9 certification credits)
ExcEduc 586
Teaching Experience I
ExcEduc 680
Literacy I
ExcEduc 605
Child, Learner, Disabilities
Fall I (9 certification credits)
ExcEduc 587
Teaching Experience II
ExcEduc 571
Curriculum Accommodations I: Primary/Middle
ExcEduc 601
Behavioral Supports
Spring I (10 certification credits)
ExcEduc 587
Teaching Experience II
ExcEduc 681
Literacy II
or
CurrIns 543
Developing Biliteracy
CurrIns 561
Issues in Elementary and Middle School Mathematics
ExcEduc 487
Linking Seminar II: Primary/Middle-Behavioral Support, Planning, Assessment
YEAR TWO
Summer II (6 graduate credits)
ExcEduc 662
Collaborative Strategies
Ed Pol 530
Urban Education: Foundations or alternate with advisor approval
Fall II (6 certification credits/9 graduate credits)
ExcEduc 588
Teaching Experience III
or
ExcEduc 771
Fieldwork with Students Having Exceptional Needs (graduate students)
ExcEduc 532
Assessment and Monitoring
ExcEduc 715
Issues and Trends in Exceptional Education (graduate students)
Spring II (7 certification credits/6 graduate credits/portfolio presentation review
ExcEduc 574
Curriculum Accommodations II
ExcEduc 488
Linking Seminar: Professional Development
Selected course with advisor approval:
Advanced Methods in Learning Disabilities
Assistive Technology
Transition from School to Work
Teaching English Language Learners
Early Adolescence-Adolescence (teaching students across disability
areas in middle or high school settings)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
Undergraduate Program:
Application Requirements:
Achieve a placement level 4 or higher on the English placement test, or complete English 102 or an equivalent with
a C or better (OWC-A);
Score of 30 or higher on the Math placement test or Math 105, 106, 175, or equivalent with a C or better (QL-A);
Successful completion of a Wisconsin Approved Basic Skills Test;
Completion of CurrIns 300, Introduction to Teaching (or equivalent), with a C or better;
Completion of ExcEduc 300, The Exceptional Individual (or equivalent), with a C or better;
Completion of Ed Pol 375, Cultural Foundations of Education (or equivalent), with a C or better;
Completion of an approved advanced course (at least three credits) with significant written or oral communication
component (OWC-B), with a C or better (recommendations: ExcEduc 560, English 215, English 240, English 201,
English 206, or equivalent);
Completion of an approved advanced course (at least three credits) making use of quantitative tools (QL-B), with a
C or better (recommendations: Philos 211 or equivalent);
Completion of a minimum of 45 credits at the time of application (must complete 58 by the time of program
commencement with a minimum of 37 successfully completed credits in GER/content area coursework;
Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.5;
Completion of a program application; and
Interview
EAA Completion/Certification Requirements:
Completion of all admission requirements, granted admission to the EAA program, and completion of EAA
professional course sequence;
Successful completion of the Praxis II. Passage of Wisconsin Foundations of Reading Test. Passage of edTPA
(beginning 2015-16 school year);
Completion of a minimum of 53 GER and elective credits focused on content area(s) relevant for a Special
Educator in middle and high school settings;
Completion of EAA GER requirements;
Completion of Act 31 requirement;
Completion of foreign language requirement;
At least 30 program credits must be earned in residence at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, following
admission to the program;
Completion of a minimum of 128 degree credits; and
Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.75.
Students may enter the professional courses only after formal admission to the School of Education. The professional
program consists of four semesters, including fieldwork/student teaching. Students must have a minimum grade of C or
better in all professional coursework.
PROFESSIONAL COURSE SEQUENCE
Fall I
CurrIns 545
Reading in the Secondary Content Areas
Ed Psy 330
Introduction to Learning and Development
ExcEduc 635
Individualized Planning and Instructional Methods
CurrIns 643
Balanced Literacy Education in the Elementary School
ExcEduc 486
Linking Seminar I: Teaching in Urban Schools
Field Requirement: 1.5 days per week or 135 hours
Spring I
CurrIns 332
Teaching of Mathematics, Middle School
ExcEduc 489
Linking Seminar II: Middle/High Behavioral Support, Planning, and Assessment
ExcEduc 595
Technology Applications for Diverse Learners
ExcEduc 636
Curriculum Accommodations
ExcEduc 662
Collaborative Strategies
3
3
3
3
1
3
1
3
3
3
ExcEduc 680
Literacy
3
ExcEduc 586
Teaching Experience I
1
Field Requirement: 2 days per week or 190 hours
It is strongly recommended that students take the reading test required for initial certification at the end of the first year of
the
professional sequence.
Fall II
ExcEduc 532
Assessment and Monitoring
3
ExcEduc 671
Behavioral Support and Intervention for Mid/High Students with Disabilities
3
ExcEduc 679
Critical Issues in Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities
3
ExcEduc 496
Linking Seminar III: Middle/High Professional Development
2
ExcEduc 587
Teaching Experience II
3
Field Requirement: Half-days (M-F)
Praxis II requirement: All students are required to successfully complete the Praxis II examination prior to their final
student teaching semester (spring II).
Spring II
CurrIns 543
Developing Biliteracy
3
ExcEduc 588
Teaching Experience III
9
Field Requirement: Twenty weeks full-time (M-F)
Post-baccalaureate program:
YEAR ONE
Summer I (9 certification credits)
ExcEduc 586
Teaching Experience I
ExcEduc 680
Literacy I
ExcEduc 605
Child, Learner, Disabilities
Fall I (9 certification credits)
ExcEduc 587
Teaching Experience II
ExcEduc 635
Individualized Planning and Instructional Methods
ExcEduc 671
Behavior Support and Intervention for Mid/High Students with Disabilities
Spring I (10 certification credits/portfolio/performance review)
ExcEduc 587
Teaching Experience II
ExcEduc 636
Curriculum Accommodations
CurrIns 332
Teaching of Mathematics: Middle School
ExcEduc 486
Linking Seminar I: Teaching in Urban Schools
YEAR TWO
Summer II (6 Â certification credits/6 graduate credits)
CurrIns 545
Reading in the Content Areas: Middle, Junior, and Senior High School
Ed Pol 530
Urban Education: Foundations
Fall II (6 certification credits/9 graduate credits)
ExcEduc 588
Teaching Experience III
or
ExcEduc 771
Field Work with Students Having Exceptional Education Needs (graduate students)
ExcEduc 532
Assessment and Monitoring
ExcEduc 679
Critical Issues in Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities
Spring II (8 certification credits/6 graduate credits/portfolio/performance review)
Selected Course with Advisor Approval:
ExcEduc 588
Teaching Experience III
or
ExcEduc 771
Field Work with Students Having Exceptional Needs
CurrIns 541, 543, or for ESL Focus
546
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
or
Focus area (e.g., Advanced Methods in Learning Disabilities, Assistive Tech)
ExcEduc 496
Linking Seminar III: Middle/High – Professional Development
ExcEduc 662
Collaborative Strategies
2
3
Deaf and Hard of Hearing (teaching in early childhood,
elementary, middle, and high school settings)
YEAR ONE
Summer I (13 credits) (excluding sign language)
ExcEduc 586
Teaching Experience I
ExcEduc 680
Literacy I
ExcEduc 605
Child, Learner, Disabilities
ExcEduc 562
Hearing Science
ExcEduc 655
Introduction to Education of Individuals Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Sign Language (depending upon skill level)
ExcEduc 301 (ASL I), ExcEduc 302 (ASL II), ExcEduc 303 (ASL III), ExcEduc 304 (ASL IV)
Fall I (12 credits)
ExcEduc 587
Teaching Experience II
ExcEduc 571
Curriculum Accommodations I: Primary/Middle
ExcEduc 601
Behavioral Supports
ExcEduc 559
Communication in the Classroom II: Deaf/Hard of Hearing
Spring I (13 certification credits/portfolio/presentation review)
ExcEduc 587
Teaching Experience II
ExcEduc 681
Literacy II
or
CurrIns 543
Developing Biliteracy
CurrIns 561
Issues in Elementary and Middle School Mathematics
ExcEduc 487
Linking Seminar II: Primary/Middle-Behavioral Support, Planning, Assessment
ExcEduc 563
Speechreading/Auditory Rehabilitation
YEAR TWO
Summer II (10 credits) (excluding sign language)
ExcEduc 662
Collaborative Strategies
ExcEduc 587
Teaching Experience II
or
ExcEduc 771
Field Work with Students Having Exceptional Education Needs (graduate students)
ExcEduc 488
Linking Seminar III: Primary/Middle - Professional Development
Ed Pol 530
Urban Education: Foundations or Alternate with advisor approval
Sign Language (depending upon skill level)
ExcEduc 301 (ASL I), ExcEduc 302 (ASL II), ExcEduc 303 (ASL III), ExcEduc 304 (ASL IV)
Fall II (10 credits)
ExcEduc 588
Teaching Experience III
or
ExcEduc 772
Field Work with Students Having Hearing Impairments
ExcEduc 532
Assessment and Monitoring
ExcEduc 533
Assessment/Monitoring: Deaf and Hard of Hearing
ExcEduc 715
Issues and Trends in Exceptional Education
Spring II (4 credits/portfolio/presentation review)
ExcEduc 574
Curriculum Accommodations II: Primary/Middle
ExcEduc 488
Linking Seminar III: Primary/Middle – Professional Development
Non-Certification Programs in Exceptional Education
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
1
NOTE: American Sign Language I-VI courses in the Department of Exceptional Education satisfy University foreign
language requirements. For all programs that require American Sign Language, students with previous experience in
American Sign Language can take the American Sign Language Proficiency Interview (ASLPI) to determine appropriate
placement level. If a B or better is received on the ASLPI, credit will be received for courses up through ASL 4. Any
individual who would like to take the ASLPI will be responsible for the cost of the assessment. Please call (414) 229-5251
for more information.
Interpreter Training Program
The Interpreter Training Program (ITP) may be completed as an undergraduate or post-baccalaureate program. Graduates
of the program are prepared to work in a variety of settings as interpreters for children, youth, and adults who are deaf and
hard of hearing. Students applying for the post-baccalaureate program should contact the Department of Exceptional
Education for specific requirements at (414) 229-5251. Students who seek application to the ITP program as
undergraduates must meet the following admission requirements:
Admission Requirements:
• ExcEduc 348, Introduction to the Profession of Interpreting, with a grade of C or better;
• ExcEduc 352, American Deaf Culture, with a grade of C or better;
• ExcEduc 301-306, American Sign Language I-VI. ASL I-II with a grade of C or better; ASL III-VI with a grade of B
or better;
• ExcEduc 320, Intro to Interpreting Skills: English to American Sign Language with a grade of B or better;
• ExcEduc 321, Intro to Interpreting Skills: American Sign Language to English with a grade of B or better;
• 58 credits complete;
• Cumulative GPA of 2.5; and
• Completion of Screening Interview, which occurs after application is submitted.
ITP Bachelor Degree Requirements:
• Completion of all admission requirements, granted admission to the ITP, and completion of ITP professional course
sequence;
• Completion of ITP GER requirements;
• At least 30 program credits must be earned in residence at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, following
admission to the program;
• Completion of a minimum 121 degree credits; and
• Professional coursework minimum GPA of 2.75.
Language and Licensure Requirements:
• Ed Psy 330, Intro to Learning and Development (3 cr);
• ExcEduc 300, The Exceptional Individual (3 cr); and
• ExcEduc 510, Classifiers or ExcEduc 520, ASL Literature (3 cr).
Professional Course Sequence
Students must have a grade of B or better for identified skill courses, a B- in remaining courses, and a minimum 2.75
GPA in all professional coursework.
Fall I
ExcEduc 345
ExcEduc 347
ExcEduc 349
ExcEduc 358
Spring I
ExcEduc 350
ExcEduc 351
ExcEduc 354
ExcEduc 360
Interpreting Skill Development I (B)
English Skills Development (B)
Fieldwork: Interacting in the Deaf Community I (B-)
ASL/English Linguistics I (B-)
Interpreting: Spoken English to ASL II (B)
Interpreting: ASL to Spoken English II (B)
Fieldwork: Interacting in the Deaf Community II (B-)
Transliteration/Oral I (B)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
ExcEduc 363
Summer I
ExcEduc 371
ExcEduc 357
Fall II
ExcEduc 355
ExcEduc 356
ExcEduc 359
ExcEduc 361
Spring II
ExcEduc 362
ExcEduc 364
ExcEduc 372
ASL/English Linguistics II (B-)
Strategies for the National Interpreter Certification Exam (B-)
Issues and Trends for Educational Interpreters (B-)
Interpreting: ASL to Spoken English III (B)
Transliteration II (B)
Interacting in the Deaf Community III (B-)
Interpreting: Spoken English to ASL III (B)
Specialized Interpreting Across Diverse Settings (B)
Interacting with the Deaf Community IV (B-)
Interpreter Training Program Capstone (B-)
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
3
58 total credits in ITP Sequence plus 9 credits in Language and License requirements.
Certificate of Completion Requirements:
Completion of Wisconsin Department of Instruction Educational Interpreter License course requirements with a C
or better: Ed Psy 330, Intro to Learning and Development, ExcEduc 300, The Exceptional Individual, and ExcEduc
510, Classifiers;
Pass written exam for the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf National Interpreter Certification (RID, NIC) and/or
the Educational Interpreter Proficiency Assessment (EIPA);
Pass the performance exam for Wisconsin Interpreter and Transliteration Assessment (WITA) with a 1/2 or 2/1 and
higher and/or the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf National Interpreter Certification (RID, NIC) and/or the
Educational Interpreter Proficiency Assessment (EIPA) with a 3.5 or higher; and
Minimum grade of B-/B or better in all professional coursework.
American Sign Language (ASL) Studies
The American Sign Language Studies program incorporates all of the cultural and linguistic components of American
Sign Language. Several objectives will be covered during the program, such as Deaf culture, Deaf folklore, and Deaf
literature, and the relationship between the signing community and the non-signing community. This program also covers
linguistic components with several course offerings in ASL as well as specialized skill areas of ASL, such as a focus on
grammatical structure and an overview of linguistic components of ASL.
ASL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Score a 4 or higher on the English Proficiency Exam, or English 102 with a C or better;
Score a 30 or higher on the Math Placement Test, or Math 105, 106, 175, or equivalent with a C or better;
Communication Proficiency, Commun 101 or Commun 103, with a C or better;
Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.5;
Students must have a minimum grade of C or better in all professional coursework;
Completion of ASL GER requirements;
At least 30 program credits must be earned in residence at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, following
admission to the program; and
Completion of a minimum 128 degree credits.
ASL COURSE REQUIREMENTS
ExcEduc 301
ExcEduc 302
ExcEduc 303
ExcEduc 304
American Sign Language I
American Sign Language II
American Sign Language III
American Sign Language IV
3
3
3
3
ExcEduc 305
ExcEduc 306
ExcEduc 330
ExcEduc 346
ExcEduc 352
ExcEduc 358
ExcEduc 363
ExcEduc 500
ExcEduc 510
ExcEduc 520
American Sign Language V
American Sign Language VI
Deaf History
Skill Development: Semantics
American Deaf Culture
ASL/English Linguistics I
ASL/English Linguistics II
Fingerspelling and Numbers
Classifiers
ASL Literature
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Education Electives: Choose one of the following:
ExcEduc 348
Introduction to the Profession of Interpreting
ExcEduc 655
Introduction to Education of Individuals Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing
CurrIns 300
Introduction to Teaching: Colloquium and Fieldwork
Other Major/focus elective approved by advisor
3
1
3
American Sign Language (ASL) Studies Minor Area
The American Sign Language (ASL) Studies minor area addresses the needs of students who are already pursuing a major
in another area of study, but want to supplement their studies with knowledge and skill in ASL. This will allow students to
be able to communicate with Deaf persons they may meet in their professions. Students must have a minimum grade of C
or better in all ASL minor coursework.
ASL Minor Area Course Requirements
ExcEduc 301
ExcEduc 302
ExcEduc 303
ExcEduc 304
ExcEduc 305
ExcEduc 306
ExcEduc 330
ExcEduc 346
ExcEduc 352
ExcEduc 510
American Sign Language I
American Sign Language II
American Sign Language III
American Sign Language IV
American Sign Language V
American Sign Language VI
Deaf History
Skill Development: Semantics
American Deaf Culture
Classifiers
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Courses
Exceptional Education (EXCEDUC)
Web Home Pages:
[ School of Education ]
[ Exceptional Education ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Exceptional Education
[ School of Education ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents |
How to Use This Book |
Calendar ]
[ Admission |
Registration |
Financial Information |
Academic Information ]
[ Administration |
UWM - Endless Possibilities |
Academic Opportunities |
Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
School of Education
Educational Psychology
Web Home Pages:
School of Education
Educational
Psychology
Courses: Counseling (COUNS)
Courses: Educational Psychology (ED
PSY)
The Department of Educational Psychology offers undergraduate courses
in human development and learning,
measurement, research, evaluation
and statistics, school psychology, school counseling, and community
counseling.
These courses are for students enrolled in teacher
preparation programs in the School of Education and for interested
students in other schools and colleges. Undergraduates may not major or
minor in educational psychology. For graduate
programs, see The
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Graduate School Bulletin.
Courses
Counseling (COUNS)
Educational Psychology (ED PSY)
Web Home Pages:
[ School
of Education ]
[ Educational
Psychology ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Educational Psychology
[ School
of Education ]
[ Schools and
Colleges ]
[ Contents | How to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
School of Education
Educational Policy and Community Studies
Web Home Pages:
School of Education
Educational Policy and
Community Studies
Community Engagement and Education
Courses:
Educational Policy and Community Studies (ED POL)
The Department of Educational Policy and Community Studies at UWM provides students with a deeper understanding of
education and community contexts in urban areas. The department offers a Bachelor of Science in Community Engagement and
Education (CEED).
Students often choose to focus their coursework in one of the following areas:
Alternative Education/At-Risk Students
Child Care (Educator or Administrator Track)
Community Organizing for Social Change
Policy and Leadership in Community-Based Organizations
Urban Education
Youth Work
Students, past and present, are employed by charities, hospitals, schools, community-based organizations, and local government
units in metropolitan Milwaukee. The Department does not offer licensure for teaching in K-12 public schools, but many
graduates either seek post-baccalaureate certification or teach in private schools.
The degree program helps those working in schools and the community better understand the social and political contexts of their
jobs and provides a range of skills for better addressing the challenges they face. Students can also select one of four optional
submajors: Child Care, Community-Based Organizations Policy and Leadership, Child and Family Services, or Community
Leadership. Students may seek certificates in Community Organizing, Community-Based Organizations & Leadership,
Community Leadership, and Youth Work. Licensed teachers may seek an add-on state DPI certification in Alternative Education.
The Bachelor of Science degree in Community Engagement and Education is also available as a second degree option. Candidates
for a second degree must satisfy all current requirements for an undergraduate degree for the degree program. Some of the
requirements may be met by transfer credits. Students must complete at least 30 credits in residence at UWM after the date on
which the first degree is awarded. If more than 30 credits are needed to complete all degree requirements, the last 30 credits must
be completed in residence.
Students in the department come from a range of educational and community-based backgrounds. Our students and alumni
include state and local elected officials; community organizers and developers; personnel in human resource institutions,
including program planners, outreach workers, and administrators; teachers and directors of community day care programs; youth
workers in community and group home care; teachers and directors of alternative schools; and directors of community-based
organizations.
The Department also offers a master’s degree program in Cultural Foundations of Education with areas of concentration in
educational foundations and multicultural education, focusing on sociological, historical, philosophical, and other frames of
reference. Many of the same focus areas that are available in the CEED BS program can be pursued at a more advanced level in
our MS program. Additional information about the master’s degree program is available at
www4.uwm.edu/soe/academics/ed_policy/cfe.cfm.
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND EDUCATION
Community Engagement and Education Admission. Community Engagement and Education majors must meet regular
University requirements for admission and are admitted through the Department.
Prior Professional Educational Experience. A student who has been accepted as a major in Community Engagement and
Education may earn Prior Professional Educational Experience (PPEE) credit that will be counted toward the Community
Engagement and Education degree. Students pay for one three-credit course, and all additional credits they receive through the
course are awarded without cost. Students must demonstrate competence by completing examinations. Credit is awarded in 3credit blocks, if the student earns a grade of C or better, on each of 14 essay examinations. The specific competencies are listed
below:
Competency Areas
Community Perspectives on Human Resource Programs
Resource Development
Local Community Systems
Political/Economic Analysis
Personal Growth Competency
Philosophies of Change
Group Process Skills
Leadership Issues
Research Skills
Change Strategies
Educational Advocacy
Administrative Skills
Social Problem Analysis
Conflict Resolution
Cr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Community Engagement and Education majors wishing to demonstrate their competencies for these credits are required to enroll
in the competency examination course (Ed Pol 100, Community Education I) during their first or second semester of study.
Students will be apprised of deadlines and procedures once they are enrolled in the course. The student may earn a maximum of
42 PPEE credits. These credits may be applied only to a Community Engagement and Education degree and only as lowerdivision electives. Students who leave the CEED program will not be able to use these credits in other programs.
COURSE OF STUDY: MAJOR
Students take a common core of required introductory courses to help them learn to evaluate community and educational social
problems, devise appropriate change strategies, and improve their skills as advocates and educators. Students will have the
opportunity to relate their programs of study to their community work.
A minimum of 120 credits distributed within specific categories is required for graduation. Please see your advisor for
additional information.
The Department requires its students to meet the University’s General Education Requirements. Community Engagement and
Education majors have until the beginning of their junior year (58 credits) to meet this requirement. Students admitted to the
University for Semester I, 1986-87 or later must meet UWM’s General Education Requirements. University GER requirements
were recently updated to include Oral and Written Communication and Quantitative Literacy Competencies. See your advisor to
find out which set of requirements you must fulfill.
University GER Competency Requirements
Oral and Written Communication Competency
Quantitative Literacy Competency
Foreign Language
University GER Distribution Requirements
Arts
Humanities
Social Sciences
Natural Sciences
Cultural Diversity
Total
3 cr
6 cr
6 cr
6 cr
3 cr
24 cr
CURRICULUM FOR THE COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND EDUCATION PROGRAM
Requirements for all CEED majors:
Credits
3 cr from the following
3 cr
3 cr
3 cr
3 cr
3 cr
3 cr
3 cr
3 cr
Course
English 201,** Strategies for Academic Writing
English 202, Writing in the Humanities
English 205,** Business Writing
English 206,** Technical Writing
English 207,** Health Science Writing
English 214,** Writing in the Professions: (subtitle)
English 230, Writing with Style
Ed Pol 111, Organizing for Social Action in Urban Communities
Ed Pol 112, Introduction to Community Education
Ed Pol 113, The Milwaukee Community
Ed Pol 114, Community Problems
Ed Pol 375, Cultural Foundations of Education
Ed Pol 506, Research Techniques for Community Organizers and Community Educators
Ed Pol 601, Foundations of Community-Based Organizations
Cultural Diversity—choose from:
Ed Pol 460, The Chicano Experience
Ed Pol 532, Male Identity: Education and Development
Ed Pol 533, Educating Black Males: Theories, Methods, and Strategies
Ed Pol 560, Education and Hispanics
Ed Pol 561,* Education Issues in American Indian Communities
Ed Pol 610, Reproduction of Minority Communities
Ed Pol 620, History of the Education of African Americans
Ed Pol 621,* History of Native Education and Policy Development
Ed Pol 624, Gender and Education
Ed Pol 625,* Race Relations in Education
Ed Pol 626, Antiracist Education
Ed Pol 630, Race and Public Policy in Urban America
Child Care submajors choose 625 or consult with advisor.
Lower-Division Electives — upper- or lower-division courses from any school/college.
39 cr
(Child and Family Services submajor
Students may earn elective units through Educational Policy and Community Studies
requires 30 cr)
courses, including prior professional educational experience, transfer units, or other UWM
courses.
Total 66 cr (57 for CFS)
* Meets University GER Cultural Diversity Requirement also.
** Meets University GER Oral and Written Communication Part B Competency requirement.
In addition to these common requirements, students must complete one of the following sets of requirements:
CEED—no submajor:
Educational Policy Foundations
Upper-Division Electives
Total 30 cr
12 cr Ed Pol 300-level or higher; a maximum of 6 cr of fieldwork (Ed Pol
409, 688, or 698) may be used toward meeting this requirement; Ed Pol 499
cannot be used for this requirement.
15 cr 300-level or higher from any school/college; including upper-division
transfer units. These courses should be chosen by the student in consultation
with an Educational Policy and Community Studies advisor.
Submajor-specific Requirements
CEED—Community-Based Organizations Policy and Leadership submajor
6 cr
CBO Policy Analysis Required
6 cr from the following:
CBO Policy Analysis Elective
6 cr from the following:
Management and Leadership
12 cr
Upper-Division Electives
Total 30 cr
Ed Pol 602, Proposal Writing and Fundraising Skills for Community-Based
Organizations
Ed Pol 605, Community-Based Organization Funding
Ed Pol 409, Fieldwork/Practicum in Education and the Community
Ed Pol 603, Policy Analysis for Community-Based Organizations
Ed Pol 604, Marketing for Community-Based Organizations
Ed Pol 510, Human Relations for Community Organizations and Community
Engagement
Ed Pol 609, Community Partnerships
Ed Pol 610, Reproduction of Minority Communities
Ed Pol 612, Community Participation and Power
Ed Pol 630, Race and Public Policy in Urban America
Ed Pol 633, Community Development for Low-Income and Minority
Communities
Ad Ldsp 507, Introduction to Group Leadership
Ad Ldsp 537, Leadership and Management of Volunteer Programs
Ad Ldsp 581, Administration and Supervision in Early Childhood Programs
Ad Ldsp 582, Operations Management in Early Childhood Programs
Ad Ldsp 607, Coordination of Staff Development and Training Program
Ad Ldsp 617, Leadership in Youth-Serving Organizations
Ad Ldsp 647, Evaluation of Adult, Continuing, and Higher Education
Programs
Ad Ldsp 667, Program Planning in Adult Education
300-level or higher from any school/college or transfer credit equivalent. See
Professor Michael Bonds.
CEED—Child Care submajor
Also listed below are course substitutions for students who matriculate into the department with an associate of applied science
(AAS) degree in Early Childhood Education under the department's articulation agreement with the Wisconsin Technical College
System (WTCS).
NOTE: Students completing the Administrator Track also receive a Certificate in Child Care Administration from the UWM
Center for Early Childhood Professional Development and Leadership, and earn the Wisconsin Professional Credential for Child
Care Administrators from The Registry.
6 cr
Educational Policy Foundations
Ed Pol 375, Cultural Foundations of Education
or
Ed Pol 530, Urban Education: Foundations
6 cr
Child Care Foundations
3 cr
Program Focus
Ed Pol 534, The Student at Risk (Causes)
or
Ed Pol 535, Educating At-Risk Students
Ed Pol 381, Introduction to Child Care
(WTCS AAS substitute: Analysis of Child Care Environments)
Ed Pol 383, Child Care Programming: (subtitle)
(WTCS AAS substitute: Developing Early Childhood Programs)
CurrIns 585, Best Practices in Early Childhood for Children and Families
(WTCS AAS substitute: Regulation of Child Care)
Plus the following, for either the Educator or Administrator track:
9 cr
Educator Track Requirements
6 cr
Educator Track Electives
or
15 cr
Administrator Track Requirements
Total 30 cr
Ed Pol 302, Approaches to Relationships in the Child Care Setting
Ed Pol 340, Organizing and Operating a Child Care Center
Ed Pol 416, Analysis of Child Care Environments
300-level or higher from any school/college or transfer credit equivalent
(WTCS AAS Substitute: CurrIns 301, Infants and Toddlers Care, 3 cr; and
CurrIns 302, Curriculum at the Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten Levels, 3
cr.)
Ed Pol 582, Operations Management in Early Childhood Programs
Ed Pol 584, Early Childhood Programs and the External Environment
Ad Ldsp 581, Administration and Supervision in Early Childhood Programs
Ad Ldsp 583, Financial Management and Planning in Early Childhood
Programs
Ad Ldsp 586, Administrative Seminar: Leadership in Early Childhood
Programs
CEED—Community Leadership submajor
3 cr
Ed Pol 315, Group Process and Civic Engagement
Community Leadership Foundation
3 cr from the following:
Ad Ldsp 579, Current Topics: (Leadership and Ethics)
Professional Standards
Ed Pol 510, Human Relations for Community Organizations and Community
Engagement
9 cr from the following:
Ed Pol 409, Fieldwork/Practicum in Education and the Community
Community Leadership
Ed Pol 603, Community Policy Analysis
Concentration
Ed Pol 607, Service Learning and Community Engagement
Ed Pol 608, Social Media and Technology for Community Engagement
Ed Pol 609, Community Partnerships
Ed Pol 610, Reproduction of Minority Communities
Ed Pol 612, Community Participation and Power
Ed Pol 630, Race and Public Policy in Urban America
Ed Pol 633, Community Development for Low-Income and Minority
Communities
3 cr from the following:
Ad Ldsp 507, Introduction to Group Leadership
Management and Leadership
Ad Ldsp 537, Leadership and Management of Volunteer Programs
Ad Ldsp 607, Coordination of Staff Development and Training Program
Ad Ldsp 617, Leadership in Youth-Serving Organizations
Ad Ldsp 647, Evaluation of Adult and Continuing Education Programs
Ad Ldsp 667, Program Planning in Adult Education
3 cr from the following:
Commun 472, Rhetoric of Radicalism in the United States
Social/Historical Foundations
Ed Pol 640, The Rise and Fall of America's Southern Civil Rights Movement
Ed Pol 650, The Civil Rights Movement in Northern Cities
Hist 440, History of the American Working Classes
3 cr from the following:
Capstone/Practicum
6 cr
Upper-Division Electives
Total 30 cr
Hist 446, African Americans Since the Civil War
Hist 460, The History of Poverty in America
Hist 468, The American Feminist Movement
Sociol 235, Social Change in the Global Economy
Sociol 304, Political Sociology
Sociol 321, Contemporary Issues of the American Indian
Sociol 323, Perspectives on Latino Communities
Sociol 324, Comparative Race Relations
Sociol 325, Social Change
Sociol 333, Social Class in Industrial Society
WGS 303, Feminist Activism and Movements: (subtitle)
Ed Pol 409, Fieldwork/Practicum in Education and the Community
Ad Ldsp 630, Field Work in Schools, Agencies, and Institutions
Nurs 403, Practice, Research, and Leadership Role Development I
WGS 489, Internship in Women's Studies
Commun 698, Internship in Communication
300-level or higher from any school/college
CEED—Child and Family Services submajor
9 cr
Social Work Lower Division
3 cr from the following:
CBO Practice
3 cr from the following:
At-Risk Children
3 cr from the following:
Youth Work
3 cr
Race Relations
3 cr
Fieldwork
5 cr
Social Work
10 cr
Upper-Division Electives
Total 39 cr.
Soc Wrk 100, Introduction to Social Work
Soc Wrk 206, Introduction to Social Welfare Policy
Soc Wrk 250, Human Behavior and the Social Environment
Ed Pol 602, Proposal Writing and Fundraising Skills for Community-Based
Organizations
Ed Pol 604, Community Policy Analysis
Ed Pol 605, Community-Based Organization Funding
Ed Pol 633, Community Development for Low-Income and Minority
Communities
Ed Pol 534, The Student at Risk (Causes)
Ed Pol 535, Educating At-Risk Students
Ed Pol 580, An Overview of Child/Youth Care
Soc Wrk 580, An Overview of Child/Youth Care
ExcEduc 580, An Overview of Child/Youth Care
Ed Pol 625, Race Relations in Education
Ed Pol 409, Fieldwork/Practicum in Education and the Community
Soc Wrk 310, Social Work Methods I
Soc Wrk 562, Child and Family Services
300-level or higher from any school/college
COURSE OF STUDY: MINOR
The minor in Community Engagement and Education is open to all undergraduate students, but should be of particular interest to
majors in Africology, anthropology, business, communication, curriculum and instruction, philosophy, political science,
psychology, social welfare, and sociology.
With this minor, students can learn about local urban communities and how to improve them. This practical knowledge can
provide a foundation for building a career in human services.
Students may declare the minor after completing at least 45 credits, but prior to completing 75 credits.
The minor consists of 18 credits distributed in the following manner:
3 cr
3 cr
12 cr
Ed Pol 112, Introduction to Community Education
Ed Pol 114, Community Problems
Upper-Division Ed Pol Courses
Courses
Educational Policy and Community Studies (ED POL)
Web Home Pages:
[ School of Education ]
[ Educational Policy and
Community Studies ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Educational Policy and Community Studies
[ School of Education ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents |
How to Use This Book |
Calendar ]
[ Admission |
Registration |
Financial Information |
Academic Information ]
[ Administration |
UWM - Endless Possibilities |
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Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017
School of Education
Major in Educational Studies
Web Home Pages:
School of Education
Major in Educational Studies (Non-certification)
Educational Studies. A non-certification bachelor's degree as well as a second undergraduate degree program to
prepare educators in non-school settings. For admission and program information, contact the Educational Studies
program advisor, Enderis Hall 209, (414) 229-4721.
The Educational Studies major, based in the Department of Administrative Leadership, is an individualized professional
education program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree or a second undergraduate degree in Educational Studies. It
is an interdisciplinary degree option for students who wish to examine education as a discipline or to pursue careers as
educators in non-school settings. In particular, the major provides opportunities for study in the areas of adult education,
youth leadership, and training and workforce development.
It is recommended that students declare Educational Studies as their intended major prior to admission to ensure
meeting program requirements. Contact the Office of Academic Services for more information, (414) 229-4721.
Admission
1. Completion of a minimum of 58 degree credits with a minimum GPA of 2.50;
2. Completion of the UWM Oral and Written Communication Competency-Part A;
3. Completion of the UWM Quantitative Literacy Competency-Part A; and
4. Submission of an Educational Studies Program Plan developed with an academic advisor, listing courses to be taken.
Course of Study
The major is based in the Department of Administrative Leadership, and students, with their advisors, develop a course
of study that emphasizes coursework appropriate to the academic/professional goals of the student. Currently the focus
areas are adult education, youth leadership, and training and workforce development.
Degree Requirements
A minimum of 128 credits is needed for graduation. Students must satisfy all UWM, School of Education, and
Educational Studies program requirements, and have satisfactorily completed the following minimum requirements:
Educational Studies Core Curriculum Requirements. A total of 36 credits is required in liberal arts coursework with
9 credits in each of the following areas: the humanities, fine arts, natural siences, and social sciences. For courses that
satisfy the distribution requirements in these areas, see the current Schedule of Classes.
Students not enrolled in a degree program in an accredited institution prior to September 1986 must also meet the
General Education Requirements (GER).
Educational Studies Major. The Educational Studies Major is a means of developing professional skills. It requires
completing at least 42 credits, 34 of them in the School of Education, with a 2.75 grade point average overall. The major
contains three components:
Focus Area. A minimum of 18 credits in the chosen area of concentration (i.e., adult education, youth leadership, or
training and workforce development).
Fieldwork. 3-6 credits. Practical experience applying the professional fieldwork skills of the student in an appropriate
work setting.
Common Learning Component. Each student must earn 24 credits in coursework that develops knowledge of social
cultural perspectives, human development and learning, program development, and communication skills/group
processes. Contact the Office of Academic Services for a list of acceptable course titles.
Advanced-Level Coursework Outside the School of Education. Students enrolled as Educational Studies majors
must complete a minimum of 12 credits of advanced-level coursework offered through departments outside the School
of Education. Courses must be numbered 300 or above.
General University Electives. The program allows for a significant number of general University electives. For
example, Educational Studies majors may elect supportive coursework in psychology, business, information studies,
and/or other appropriate schools and departments.
Educational Studies Second Degree Requirements
1. Complete 42 credits.
At least 30 of the program credits must be earned in residence at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and
following admission to the Educational Studies Program. The remaining 12 credits may be transferred from
previous institutions/programs or earned inclusively within the Educational Studies program.
At least 20 of the 42 credits must be earned in upper-division courses (300 level or above). The common learning
components allow for accommodation of this requirement.
Earn at least 18 credits in selected focus areas. Select from adult education, youth leadership, and training and
workforce development.
Earn 3 credits in fieldwork within the selected focus area. The fieldwork placement will be determined by the
faculty advisor and academic advisor.
Earn 24 credits in the common learning components. These credits will be selected in consultation with the
faculty advisor: social cultural perspectives, human development and learning, program development, and
communication skills and group processes.
2. Achieve a 2.75 GPA on all focus area and common learning components credits.
Web Home Pages:
[ School of Education ]
[ Educational Studies ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Exceptional Education
[ School of Education ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents |
How to Use This Book |
Calendar ]
[ Admission |
Registration |
Financial Information |
Academic Information ]
[ Administration |
UWM - Endless Possibilities |
Academic Opportunities |
Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
School of Education
Administrative Leadership
Web Home Pages:
School of Education
Administrative
Leadership
Courses:
Administrative Leadership (AdLdshp)
The Department of Administrative Leadership offers a
Bachelor’s Degree in Educational Studies. The degree is
an interdisciplinary degree option for students who wish to examine education as a discipline or to pursue careers as
educators in non-school settings. Students work with an advisor to develop a course of study appropriate to the
academic and professional goals of the student. In particular, the major provides opportunities for
study in the areas of
adult education, youth leadership, and training
and workforce development.
For admission and program information, contact the Educational
Studies program advisor, within the Office of Student
Services,
located in Enderis Hall 209, (414) 229-4721. Admission Requirements
1. Completion of a minimum of 58 degree credits with a minimum GPA of 2.5;
2. Completion of the UWM Oral and Written Communication Competency Part A;
3. Completion of the UWM Quantitative Literacy Competency Part A; and
4. Submission of an Educational Studies Program Plan developed
with an academic advisor, listing courses to be taken.
Degree Requirements
A minimum of 128 credits is
needed for graduation. Students must satisfy all UWM, School of
Education, and
Educational Studies program requirements, and have
satisfactorily completed the following minimum requirements:
1. Students not enrolled in a degree program in an accredited
institution prior to September 1986 must also meet the
University’s General Education Requirements (GER).
2. Educational Studies Major. The Educational Studies Major is a
means of developing professional skills. It requires
completing at
least 42 credits, 34 of them in the School of Education, with a 2.75
grade point average overall. The major
contains three components:
Focus Area. A minimum of 18 credits in the chosen area of
concentration (i.e., adult education, youth leadership,
or training
and workforce development).
Fieldwork. 3-6 credits. Practical experience applying the
student’s professional skills in an appropriate work
setting.
Common Learning Component. Each student must earn 24 credits in coursework that develops knowledge of
social/cultural perspectives, human development and learning, program development, and
communication
skills/group processes. Contact the Office of Academic
Services for a list of acceptable course titles.
3. Advanced-Level Coursework Outside the School of Education.
Students enrolled as Educational Studies majors must
complete a
minimum of 12 credits of advanced-level coursework offered through
departments outside the School of
Education. Courses must be numbered
300 or above.
4. General University Electives. The program allows for a
significant number of general University electives. For
example,
Educational Studies majors may elect supportive coursework in
psychology, business, information studies,
and/or
other appropriate schools and departments.
Educational Studies Second Degree Requirements
1. Complete 42 credits.
At least 30 of the program credits must be earned in
residence at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and
following
admission to the Educational Studies Program. The remaining 12 credits
may be transferred from
previous institutions/programs or earned
inclusively within the Educational Studies program.
At least 20 of the 42 credits must be earned in upper-division courses (300 level or above). The common learning
components
allow for accommodation of this requirement.
2. Earn at least 18 credits in selected focus areas. Select from:
adult education, youth leadership, and training and
workforce
development.
Earn 3 credits in fieldwork within the selected focus area.
The fieldwork placement will be determined by the
faculty advisor and
academic advisor.
Earn 24 credits in the common learning components. These
credits will be selected in consultation with the
faculty advisor:
social cultural perspectives, human development and learning, program
development, and
communication skills and group processes.
3. Achieve a 2.75 GPA on all focus area and common learning
components credits.
Other Programs
The Department of
Administrative Leadership also offers master's degree programs and
specializations within the Urban
Education Doctoral Program in Adult, Continuing, and Higher Education Leadership and Educational Administration.
The Adult, Continuing, and Higher Education Leadership specialization
prepares students for positions of leadership in
a wide range of
post-secondary programs, including vocational and technical education,
university extension, continuing
education, training and human resource
development, instructional design, instructional technology, adult
basic
education, adult literacy, and community education.
The Educational Administration specialization prepares teachers
for administrative positions in elementary and
secondary schools as a
principal, supervisor/director of instruction, director of special
education and pupil services, and
school business manager. A
post-master's Specialist Certificate program for the school
superintendent license also is
offered through the Educational
Administration specialization.
Consult the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Graduate School Bulletin
for admission criteria and procedures for
graduate degree or certificate
programs.
Web Home Pages:
[ School
of Education ]
[ Administrative
Leadership ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Administrative Leadership
[ School of Education ]
[ Schools and Colleges ]
[ Contents | How
to Use This Book | Calendar ]
[ Admission | Registration | Financial Information | Academic Information ]
[ Administration | UWM - Endless Possibilities | Academic Opportunities | Campus Resources ]
Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Peck School of the Arts
Art & Design
Admission Requirements
Degree Requirements
Degree Programs
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Studio
Art)
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Art Education)
Bachelor of Arts (Art)
Minor in Art and Design
Certificate in Community Arts
Certificate in Digital Fabrication and Design
Program-to-Program Articulation Agreements
Courses: Art
Courses: Art Education
Admission Requirements
To be admitted in good standing, applicants (incoming freshmen and transfer students) must meet general University
academic requirements. Applicants to the Art & Design program must also submit a portfolio of artworks and additional
supporting materials, as described below, for review by Art & Design faculty:
1. Art & Design Portfolio form. Complete the form and send it in with your packet. (Form is online at
http://www4.uwm.edu/psoa/artdesign/admission.)
2. Portfolio of artworks. The portfolio should ideally include 8-10 examples of the applicant's artwork (digital images on
CD only), preferably from courses taken over the last two years. Include at least three drawings from observations (not
from photographs). Label the digital images on CD with artist's name, media, size, and year of completion. Do not send
actual work samples.
3. Copy of high school transcript or, for transfer students, college transcript(s). Unofficial copies are acceptable for this
purpose.
4. Personal statement (one or two pages) describing how your past experiences, interests, and concerns relate to your
college choice and career goals. Students who have not had significant prior exposure to formal art courses, or who do
not have a portfolio of artworks to submit, are encouraged to write more extensive personal statements. The Department
of Art & Design will accept students who do not have an art background but have a desire to learn.
5. Two confidential letters of recommendation, preferably from instructors familiar with the student's artwork and/or
academic ability. Letters should be submitted in sealed envelopes and will remain confidential and the property of the
Department of Art & Design.
Art & Design applicants must submit their portfolios as one complete packet containing all of the above items, and may
do so in person or by mail to the address indicated below. Portfolios should NOT be submitted along with the initial
application for admission to the University. Art & Design continues to accept students until UWM capacity is met.
Art & Design awards art scholarships based on this incoming portfolio. To be considered for art scholarships, the
portfolio submission deadline is February 15. Art & Design scholarship notification will be in March.
Send materials to: Director of First Year Program - Portfolio, Dept. of Art & Design - Mitchell Hall 371, Peck School of
the Arts, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3203 N. Downer Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211. General information: 414229-4200; [email protected]; www4.uwm.edu/psoa/artdesign.
Art-Intended Classification
Students accepted into the Art & Design program receive the Art-Intended designation and priority registration over
non-art majors. The Art-Intended designation applies to all incoming freshman and transfer students. To advance to the
Art & Design major, students must complete the 36 credits outlined below with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher:
1. Complete 12 credits in academic subjects outside of PSOA, including courses that fulfill the university-wide Oral and
Written Communications Competency Part A (OWC-A) and Quantitative Literacy Competency Part A (QL-A)
requirements.
2. Complete First Year Program courses (15 credits; see course list below.)
3. Complete 9 credits required 200-level studios (See course list below.)
After completion of the above, the Art-Intended designation changes to ArtBFA, ArtEdBFA, or ArtBA. All First Year
Program courses must be completed in the first 45 credits.
The required First Year Program courses are:
Art 101
Art 106
Art 108
Art 109
Art 118
Drawing I
Art Survey
2D Concepts
3D Concepts
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
3
3
3
3
200-Level Studio Requirements: 9 cr
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the second semester of the First
Year.
Select 3-6 credits from the following list:
Art 201
Drawing II
Art 208
Color Studio
Art 212
Introduction to Digital Studio Practice
Art 221
Introduction to Design
Film 222
Introduction to Digital Filmmaking
Art 227
Design Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 243
Introduction to Painting
Art 249
Painting and Drawing Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 253
Introduction to Photography
Art 259
Photography Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 277
Design for Digital Fabrication
Art 291
Introduction to Print and Narrative Forms: (subtitle)
Art 299
Printmaking Workshop: (subtitle)
Select 3-6 credits from the following list:
Art 231
Introduction to Fibers
Art 238
Fibers Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 261
Introduction to Sculpture
Art 269
Sculpture Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 271
Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Art 278
Introduction to Industrial Craft
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Art 279
Art 281
Art 289
Jewelry and Metalsmithing Workshop: (subtitle)
Introduction to Ceramics
Ceramics Workshop: (subtitle)
3
3
3
Art Education Program
Art Ed Intended designation is given to all students intending to pursue the BFA (Art Education). Art Ed Intended
students will get priority registration in art courses over non-art majors. Art Ed Intended students may apply to this
program upon completion of 30 art credits if the following requirements have been fulfilled:
1. First Year Program courses in art (see above).
2. Oral and Written Communication Competency (Part A).
3. Quantitative Literacy Competency (Part A).
4. Communication Proficiency.
5. 2.75 cumulative grade point average (GPA).
6. Basic Skills Requirement. This requirement can be fulfilled through a test called Core, or through specific scores in
college entrance tests (ACT/SAT/GRE). Records of college entrance tests can only be accepted when they are fewer
than 5 years old at the time of applying for the Art Education program. See details below on accepted scores:
Core Academic Skills for Educators Test
(Begins September 1, 2014)
Core Test in Reading
156 Passing Score
Core Writing
162 Passing Score
Core Math
150 Passing Score
ACT/SAT/GRE
ACT
Composite 23
SAT
Composite 1070
GRE
Composite 298
Math 20
Math 450
Math 145
English/WR 20
Verbal 450
Verbal 150
Reading 20
7. Dept. of Public Instruction (DPI) Act 31 requirement. (This can be met by taking the Act 31 Workshop, History 263,
Ethnic Studies 203, Anthropology 213, or English 276, subtitled "Literature, History, and Sovereignty of Upper
Midwest Indians" only.)
8. Completion of ArtEd 227 Introduction to Art Education, with a B or higher.
After successful completion of the above, students should contact the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office
for an application to enter the BFA (Art Education) Program. The application requires the following documents:
1. Application form.
2. Copies of college transcripts (unofficial copies are acceptable for this purpose) demonstrating completion of all PreArt Ed requirements (1 through 7 above).
3. Copy of Basic Skills Test Requirement.
4. One- to two-page personal statement describing how past experiences, interests, and concerns relate to your decision
to apply to the Art Education Program. Students who have had experience working with young people in the past should
describe their teaching experiences to date. Students who have not had significant prior teaching experience are
encouraged to write more extensive personal statements. The Art Education Area will accept students who do not have
prior teaching experience, provided they demonstrate a disposition to learn to teach.
5. Assessment of performance in Art Ed 227, Introduction to Art Education. Candidates must achieve a grade of B or
better in Art Ed 227, demonstrating proficiency in the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required of teacher candidates
to be considered for the program.
Applicants are requested to submit application materials as one complete packet containing all of the above items, all
of which will be used as criteria for acceptance to the program. The recommended submission deadline is April 15.
After grades have been posted for the spring semester (approximately 7 weeks after the submission deadline), applicants
will be notified of their status.
Send application to: Art Education Area Head, Mitchell Hall 371, Department of Art & Design, Peck School of the Arts,
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, 3203 N. Downer Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211.
For further details and procedures, see the general section on teacher certification degree requirements at the beginning
of the Peck School of the Arts section of the undergraduate catalog.
Certification Requirements
Following admission to the Art Education Program (see admission requirements), and successful completion of the
specified Art Education course of studies, a student seeking recommendation for teacher certification must successfully
fulfill the following requirements:
1. Fulfill all degree requirements.
2. Fulfill the Field Experience Requirement.
3. Maintain a 2.75 cumulative GPA or higher while being in the program.
4. Pass the Praxis II Art Content Exam.
5. Successfully complete student teaching.
6. Demonstrate mastery of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for a career in the field of art education
through the use of a Teaching Portfolio (see description below).
The Art Education Area and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction require that students compile a teaching
portfolio that demonstrates teaching proficiency. The required reflections, artifacts, statements, and assessment
composing this portfolio will be compiled mostly as a part of their major two art education methods classes (Art Ed 327
and 328). Fewer documents will be produced during their student teaching capstone classes (Art Ed 425 and 426). Some
of the documents that this portfolio includes are: Copy of current resume, teaching philosophy, reflections on the Ten
Wisconsin Teaching Standards, artifacts supporting the reflections showing your work as a teacher and your students’
work, lesson plans written and taught in field experiences, field experience assessments, clinical assessments during
student teaching, and your professional development plan.
7. Teacher Performance Assessment, EdTPA (see explanation below).
This is a performance-based test in which student teachers plan, instruct, and assess a visual arts lesson plan for K-12
following the requirements outlined in the EdTPA Handbook. Among these requirements student teachers must show
strong curriculum based on four types of objectives, the use of academic language derived from the research of art
content and contexts, and cohesive sequencing of art appreciation, artmaking, and art critique. Along with all this,
students should demonstrate a theoretical use of visual art learning theory, elaborated skills in the documentation of inprogress and finalized student work, and an ability to reflect on their own teaching, as a way to inform the following
steps in their instructional sequence.
Area of Concentration Requirements and Enrollment Management
In order to maintain the highest quality of service to our students, all areas (Ceramics, Cross-Disciplinary Studio, Digital
Studio Practice, Fibers, Jewelry and Metalsmithing, Painting and Drawing, Photography and Imaging, Print and
Narrative Forms, Sculpture, Design and Visual Communication, and Art Education) may select their own enrollment
management mechanisms. Options available to areas include portfolio review, gateway courses, registration prioritizing
(ex: "seniors only" and/or "majors only" courses), higher GPA for the area of concentration, or other appropriate
mechanisms. Students who successfully matriculate as BFA degree candidates should make themselves familiar with
the requirements of their chosen area (as outlined in the undergraduate catalog). Students also should discuss area
requirements with area faculty to ensure that they understand fully what will be required of them.
Appeal Process
An appeal process is established for students who do not meet the department's criteria for admissions, classification,
GPA, and area of concentration enrollment management requirements. The appeal process will provide an opportunity
for individual students to request admission as an art major or enrollment into courses as exceptions to the department's
enrollment policies based on defined, pre-determined conditions. All appeals are to be directed to the Undergraduate
Advisor or PSOA advisor, who will forward the appeals to the department chair or appropriate appeals committee. The
department chair or appeals committee will consult with the First Year Program Director, area head, faculty, advisors,
and student if necessary before making a decision.
Laptop Requirement
Laptops are required for all Art & Design programs. The goal of the Peck School of the Arts laptop requirement is to
provide the opportunity for students to work extensively and intuitively with the most significant contemporary tool for
their work so that they will excel not only in their courses but also in their profession after they graduate.
Degree Requirements
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Studio Art). The Bachelor of Fine Arts (Studio Art) degree requires a total of 130 credits for
graduation distributed as follows:
University Core Curriculum
(includes 12 cr Art History and 9 cr PSOA Arts Distribution)
First Year Program
Art and Design Courses
Critical Thinking
BFA Exhibition
Total
45
15
63
6
1
130
Note: PSOA Arts Distribution is 9 credits that the student must take within PSOA, outside of Art & Design, in 3 of the 4
other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Studio Art) in Design and Visual Communication. The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design
and Visual Communication degree requires a total of 130 credits for graduation distributed as follows:
University Core Curriculum
(includes 12 cr Art History and 9 cr PSOA Arts Distribution)
First Year Program
Art and Design Courses
Critical Thinking
BFA Exhibition
45
15
63
6
1
Total
130
Note: PSOA Arts Distribution is 9 credits that the student must take within PSOA, outside of Art & Design, in 3 of the 4
other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Art Education). The Art Education program requires a total of 130 credits for graduation
distributed as follows: University Core Curriculum
(includes 12 cr Art History, 9 cr Education, and 6 cr. PSOA Arts
Distribution*)
First Year Program
Required Studio Courses**
Critical Thinking
Art Education Courses
Total
45
15
39
3
28
130
* 12 cr Art History are included in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER. 9 cr School of Education courses are included in the Core Curriculum (See academic advisor). PSOA Arts
Distribution for Art Education is 6 credits that the student must take within PSOA, outside of Art & Design, in two of the
four other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
** Art Education students are required to take the following Art Studio courses as part of these 39 credits: Art 201
(Drawing II), Art 342 (Introduction to Figure Drawing), 18 cr of 200 level courses reflecting 2D, 3D studio and digital
studio experiences, and 12 cr of upper-level studios to create further concentration in a studio area of choice. See
academic advisor for 2D, 3D, and digital course designations at the 200 level, and for upper-level studios.
Bachelor of Arts (Art). The Bachelor of Arts (Art) degree requires a total of 120 credits for graduation distributed as
follows:
University Core Curriculum
(includes 12 cr Art History and 9 cr PSOA Arts Distribution)
First Year Program
Art and Design Courses
Directed Electives
Critical Thinking
Professional Practices
BA Project
Total
45
15
18
32
6
3
1
120
Note: PSOA Arts Distribution is 9 credits that the student must take within PSOA, outside of Art & Design, in 3 of the 4
other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
Degree Programs
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (STUDIO ART)
This undergraduate degree prepares students for entrance into professional art fields. Once students meet the 36-credit
Art-Intended requirements outlined above, they are admitted to the Art & Design program. In addition to satisfying the
core curriculum, art students select studio courses from both 2D and 3D disciplines, take required art history courses,
choose studio electives, and begin satisfying the requirements of their declared art area concentration.
A choice of curricula is offered to permit students to concentrate in ceramics, cross-disciplinary studio, digital studio
practice, fibers, jewelry and metalsmithing, painting and drawing, photography, print and narrative forms, or sculpture.
Students must complete a minimum of 24 credits in their area of concentration but may take more by choosing
additional studio electives in their area.
In order to graduate, students must complete two 3-credit critical thinking courses and a 4-credit capstone: Art 604
Professional Practices (3 cr) and Art 605 BFA Exhibition (1 cr). Students must complete a total of 85 credits of art to
graduate with a BFA (Studio Art).
Courses
1. Art History: 12 cr (These credits are part of the University Core Requirements. 6 cr, Art History 101 and 102, count
as Humanities GER.)
ArtHist 101
ArtHist 102
ArtHist
ArtHist
Ancient and Medieval Art
and Architecture
Renaissance to Modern Art and
Architecture
Any Advanced Course
Any Advanced Course
3
3
3
3
2. PSOA Distribution: 9 cr (part of University Core)
Choose any courses within 3 of the 4 PSOA Departments outside of Art & Design (Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film,
Video, Animation, and New Genres).
3. Art & Design First Year Program: 15 cr
4. Art & Design 200-level Studio Requirement: 9 cr
5. Art & Design Electives: 27 cr
15 credits must be 300-level and above studio courses.
6. Critical Thinking: 6 cr
Art 309
Art 509
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle) (Required OWC-B course)
3
3
7. Area of Concentration Requirements: 24 cr
(see specific course requirements for each area below)
8. Senior Capstone: 4 cr
Art 604
Art 605
Professional Practices (Required QL-B course)
BFA Exhibition
3
1
CERAMICS
1. Ceramics Introductory Course: 3 cr
Art 281
Introduction to Ceramics
2. Ceramics Studio Courses: 18 cr.
Select any six courses from the following list:
Art 381
Throwing and Wheel Construction
Art 382
Building from the Figure in Clay
Art 383
Molds and Multiples in Ceramics
3
3
3
3
Art 384
Experimental Processes in Woodfiring I
Art 389
Ceramics Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 481
Ceramics Special Topics and Portfolio I
Art 482
Ceramics Special Topics and Portfolio II
Art 483
Ceramics Special Topics and Portfolio III
Art 489
Ceramics Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 584
Experimental Processes in Woodfiring II
3. Ceramics Capstone Course: 3 cr
Art 583
Senior Project in Ceramics
3
1-3
3
3
3
1-3
3
3
Art BFA - Sample Curriculum in Ceramics
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Art 281
Introduction to Ceramics
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art
1
3
University Core
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art 281
Introduction to Ceramics
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 381
Throwing and Wheel Construction
3
Art 384
Experimental Processes in Woodfiring I
3
or
Art 389
Ceramics Workshop: (subtitle)
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year (Fall)
Art 381
Throwing and Wheel Construction
or
Art 382
Building from the Figure in Clay
or
Art 383
Molds and Multiples in Ceramics
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Junior Year (Spring)
Art 384
Experimental Processes in Woodfiring I
or
Art 381
Throwing and Wheel Construction
or
Art 489
Ceramics Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 481
Ceramics Special Topics and Portfolio I
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall)
Art 604
Professional Practices
Art 482
Ceramics Special Topics and Portfolio II
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 605
BFA Exhibition
Art 583
Senior Project in Ceramics
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
18
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
15
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
34
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2
The 12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
CROSS-DISCIPLINARY STUDIO
The Cross-Disciplinary concentration in Art & Design allows students to combine two studio areas. Students must select
a “home” area of concentration, and then select a second area as the cross-disciplinary focus. Students must complete
the area course requirements and capstone course for their home concentration, and then fulfill at least 12 credits in their
cross-disciplinary focus area (at least 6 of these credits must be at 300 level or above).
Students with a Cross-Disciplinary Studio major should follow the 4-year curriculum for their home concentration, and
work with their advisor to schedule the coursework for their cross-disciplinary focus.
DIGITAL STUDIO PRACTICE
Students wishing to major in Digital Studio Practice must complete the following requirements:
1. Meet all Art & Design Department admission and minimum GPA requirements.
2. Complete Digital Studio Practice Introductory Requirement (3 credits): Art 212 (Introduction to Digital Studio: A/V
Strategies) and one other 200-level class (in your cross-disciplinary focus area; see below).
3. Pass Digital Studio Practice portfolio review. First opportunity to apply to Portfolio Review takes place at the
completion of Art 212.
4. Complete 12 credits in a cross-disciplinary focus (6 of which must be at 300 level and above).
5. Students in Digital Studio Practice are required to have a laptop computer with required software beginning with Art
212. Visit https://www4.uwm.edu/psoa/admission/laptoprequirement/ for more information.
1. Digital Studio Practice Introductory Course: 3 cr
Art 212
Intro to Digital Studio: A/V Strategies
2. Digital Studio Practice Core Courses: 18 cr
Part I. Required Core Course 1: 3 cr
Art 312
Intermediate Digital Studio
Part II. Required Core Course 2: 3 cr
Art 315
Participatory Art and Social Practice or
Art 316
Interactive Art Part III. Required Core Choices: 12 cr
Select any four courses from the following list:
(subtitled classes may be taken twice with change of topic)
Art 314
Digital Painting
Art 315
Participatory Art and Social Practice Art 316
Interactive Art Art 318
Physical Computing
Art 324
Web Design
Art 327
Digital Media Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 378
Industrial Processes
Art 393
Digital Printmaking
Art 405
Product Realization
Art 412
Advanced Digital Studio
Art 418
Advanced Physical Computing: (subtitle)
Art 426
Motion Graphics
Art 456
Advanced Digital Imaging
Art 478
Digital Fabrication and Craft
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3. Digital Studio Practice Capstone Course: 3 cr
Art 612
Senior Project in Digital Studio Practice
3
4. Cross-Disciplinary Focus: 12 credits
All DSP students must choose a secondary focus area within the Department of Art &
Design, with which to combine their digital skill sets. Students must fulfill at least 12
credits in their cross-disciplinary focus area (at least 6 of these credits must be at 300 level
or above).
Art BFA–Sample
Curriculum in Digital Studio Practice
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Art 212
Introduction to Digital Studio: A/V Strategies*
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art (Art 261 or 277 recommended)
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art 212
Introduction to Digital Studio: A/V Strategies*
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art (Art 261 or 277 recommended)
Art
200-level studio (Art 221, 231, 241, 253, 261, 271, 281, or
3
291)
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
* Digital Studio Practice Portfolio Review takes place at the completion of Art 212.
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 312
Intermediate Digital Studio
3
Art 315
Participatory Art and Social Practice
3
or
Art 316
Interactive Art
Art
Art & Design Elective (Recommend 200- or 300-level crossdisciplinary focus)
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year (Fall)
Art
300+ Core Choice DSP Studio course (315, 316, 318, 324,
327, 378, 393, 405, or 426)
Art
300+ Core Choice DSP Studio course (315, 316, 318, 324,
327, 378, 393, 405, or 426)
Art
Art & Design Elective (recommend 300-level or above crossdisciplinary focus)
Art
Art & Design Elective
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2 (recommend contemporary or
new media art course, or one related to architecture)
University Core1
Subtotal
Junior Year (Spring)
Art
300+ Core Choice DSP Studio course (315, 316, 318, 324,
327, 378, 393, 405, or 426)
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2 (recommend contemporary or
new media art course, or one related to architecture)
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall)
Art 604
Professional Practices
Art
300+ Core Choice DSP Studio course (315, 316, 318, 324,
327, 378, 393, 405, or 426)
Art
Art & Design Elective (may include DSP Core Choices)
Art
Art & Design Elective (may include DSP Core Choices)
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 605
BFA Exhibition
Art 618
Senior Project in DSP
Art
Art & Design Elective (may be Core Choice or crossdisciplinary focus)
Art
Art & Design Elective (may be Core Choice or crossdisciplinary focus)
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
3
15
33
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
15
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
34
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2
The 12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
FIBERS
1. Fibers Introductory Course: 3 cr
Art 231
Introduction to Fibers
2. Fibers Core Courses: 18 cr
Select any six courses from the following list:
Art 332
Woven Structure I
Art 333
Pliable Materials/Sculptural Form
Art 336
Paint, Print, and Dye on Fabric
Art 337
Screenprinting on Fabric
Art 431
Special Topics in Fibers: (subtitle)
Art 432
Woven Structure II
Art 433
Digital Imaging for Fabric
Art 435
Mixed Materials: Concept/Object
Art 436
Cloth Construction - Surface to Structure
Art 539
Fibers Independent Study
3. Fibers Capstone Course: 3 cr
Art 531
Senior Project in Fibers
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-6
3
Art BFA–Sample Curriculum in Fibers
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
or
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
University Core1
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
or
Art 108
2D Concepts
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Art
Introduction to Fiber
3
212Â Â Â Â Â Â or
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
University Core1
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art 212
Introduction to Fiber
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
2
ArtHist 101
3
Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 337
Screenprinting on Fabric
3
or
Art 336
Paint, Print, and Dye on Fabric
Art 332
Woven Structure
3
or
Art 431
Special Topics in Fibers
or
Art 435
Mixed Materials: Concept/Object
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
2
ArtHist 102
3
Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Sophomore Year
33
Junior Year (Fall)
Art 333
Pliable Material/Sculptural Form
3
Art 336
Paint, Print, and Dye on Fabric
3
or
Art 433
Digital Imaging for Fabric
or
Art 436
Cloth Construction - Surface to Structure
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice2
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
18
Junior Year (Spring)
Art 431
Special Topics in Fibers
3
or
Art 432
Woven Structure II
or
Art 435
Mixed Materials: Concept/Object
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
2
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Junior Year
33
Senior Year (Fall)
Art 604
Professional Practices
Art 433
Digital Imaging for Fabric
OR
Art 436
Cloth Construction - Surface to Structure
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 605
BFA Exhibition
Art 531
Senior Project in Fibers
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
34
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2
The 12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
JEWELRY AND METALSMITHING
1. Jewelry and Metalsmithing Introductory Course: 3 cr
Art 271
Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmithing
2. Jewelry and Metalsmithing Core Courses: 18 cr
Part I. Required Core Courses: 6 cr
Art 371
Construction and Fabrication in Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Art 474
Portfolio Development in Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Part II. Required Core Choices: 12 cr
Select any four courses from following list:
Art 372
The Multiple in Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Art 378
Industrial Processes and Fabrication
Art 470
Metal Forming
Art 472
Color on Metal
Art 473
Special Topics in Jewelry and Metalsmithing (subtitle)
Art 478
Digital Fabrication and Craft
3. Jewelry and Metalsmithing Capstone Course: 3 cr
Art 575
Senior Project in Jewelry and Metalsmithing
4. Recommended Electives: 18 cr
 Could include any courses from the following list:
Art 279
Jewelry and Metalsmithing Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 379
Jewelry and Metalsmithing Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 473
Special Topics in Jewelry and Metalsmithing: (subtitle)
Art 479
Jewelry and Metalsmithing Workshop: (subtitle)
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Global Craft Culture
3
Art BFA–Sample Curriculum in Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Art
Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmithing
3
271Â Â Â Â or
Art
200-level studio in Art
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art
Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmithing
3
271Â Â Â Â or
Art
200-level studio in Art
Art 371
Construction and Fabrication in Jewelry and Metalsmithing
3
Art 378
Industrial Processes and Fabrication
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 372
The Multiple in Jewelry and Metalsmithing
3
Art 478
Digital Fabrication and Craft
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art (Art 231 or 261 or 281)
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
2
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year (Fall)
Art 470
Metal Forming
Art 473
Special Topics in Jewelry and Metalsmithing: (subtitle)
or
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Junior Year (Spring)
Art 472
Color on Metal
Art 474
Portfolio Development in Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall)
Art 604
Professional Practices
Art 473
Special Topics in Jewelry and Metalsmithing: (subtitle)
or
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 605
BFA Exhibition
Art 575
Senior Project in Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
15
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
34
1 Consult
your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2 The
12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
PAINTING AND DRAWING
1. Painting and Drawing Introductory Course: 3 cr
Art 243
Introduction to Painting
3
2. Painting and Drawing Core Courses: 18 cr
Part I. Required Core Courses: 15 cr
Art 342
Introduction to Figure Drawing
Art 343
Figure Painting
Art 441
Advanced Drawing Strategies I
Art 443
Painting Strategies
Art 543
Painting Studio
Part II. Required Core Choices: 3 cr
Select any course from following list:
Art 442
Figure Drawing Explorations
Art 541
Advanced Drawing Strategies II
Art 543
Painting Studio (recommended retake)
3. Painting and Drawing Capstone Course: 3 cr
Art 643
Senior Project in Painting
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Art BFA–Sample Curriculum in Painting and Drawing
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
1
3
University Core
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Art
Drawing II
3
201Â Â Â Â 3
University Core1
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art 243
Introduction to Painting
3
Art 342
Introduction to Figure Drawing
3
Art
200-level Studio (Art 231 or 261 or 271 or 281)
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 343
Figure Painting
3
Art
200-level Studio in Art
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year (Fall)
Art 443
Painting Strategies
Art 441
Advanced Drawing Strategies I
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Junior Year (Spring)
Art 543
Painting Studio
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall)
Art 604
Professional Practices
Art 442
Figure Drawing Explorations
or
Art 541
Advanced Drawing Strategies II
or
Art 543
Painting Studio (recommend retake)
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 605
BFA Exhibition
Art 643
Senior Project in Painting
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
3
15
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
15
33
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
34
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the
Arts Student Services Office for distribution of the Core
Curriculum.
Core Curriculum Arts Distribution Requirement: Six credits are
required in Peck School of the Arts
courses outside of Art &
Design. Three credits must be taken in two different Arts
disciplines: Dance, Film, Music, or
Theatre.
2
The 12 Art History credits
count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102)
count as Humanities
GER.
PHOTOGRAPHY AND IMAGING
Students in Photography and Imaging (PI) are required to have a laptop computer for their coursework by the first week
of class, beginning with Art 350 (Visualizing Ideas in Photography) and Art 357 (Studio Lighting and Digital Imaging)
and for all subsequent 400 and 500 level courses in Photography and Imaging. Students are recommended to have a
computer for Art 253 (Introduction to Photography). Visit http://www4.uwm.edu/psoa/laptop for more information.
Students who major in Photography and Imaging are required to have access to cameras. Please contact the Art &
Design Department at 414-229-4200 for an updated list of courses and the required camera equipment.
To be admitted into Photography and Imaging, students must pass the PI Portfolio Review. To be eligible for
consideration, students must complete Art 253 (Introduction to Photography) and Art 350 (Visualizing Ideas in
Photography) with a B- or better, a cumulative GPA of 2.67 for all PI courses taken, and admission to Art & Design.
After admission into Photography and Imaging, students must:
1. Complete 1-2 of the following 2 courses (3-6 credits): Art 357 (Studio Lighting and Digital Imaging) and/or Art 358
(Medium and Large Format Photography).
2.Complete Art 452 (Contemporary Issues in Photography) with a grade of B- or better, in addition to completing 2-3 of
the following 4 courses (6-9 credits): Art 451 (Special Topics in Photography), Art 454 (Narrative Photography), Art
456 (Advanced Digital Imaging in Photography), and/or Art 458 (Photographic Materials and Processes).
3. Complete all 18 credits of the required 300 and 400 level PI courses with a cumulative 2.67 GPA in PI curriculum to
enroll in Art 552 (Studio Practice and Research in Photography).
4. Complete Art 552 (Studio Practice and Research in Photography) with a grade of B- or better to enroll in Art 553
(Senior Project in Photography).
5. Complete Art 553 (Senior Project in Photography).
Grading Requirements
Prior to consideration for admission in the Photography and Imaging program, students must receive a B- or better in
Art 350 (Visualizing Ideas in Photography), with a cumulative 2.67 GPA in all PI courses. Subsequent to admission in
the PI program, students must receive a letter grade of B- or better in Art 452 (Contemporary Issues in Photography)
and Art 552 (Studio Practice and Research in Photography). Should they fail to do so, students must retake the course
and receive a B- or better in order to continue in the program. Any student receiving a second grade of less than B- in
any area required courses would need to formally reapply to the PI program or be dropped from the
program. Additionally, students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.67 within all PI courses taken.
1. Photography Introductory Course: 3 cr
Art 253
Introduction to Photography
2. Photography Required Courses: 18 cr
Part I. Required Core Sequence: 6 cr
Art 350
Visualizing Ideas in Photography
Art 452
Contemporary Issues in Photography
Part II. Required Intermediate Courses: 3-6 cr
Select one or both courses below:
Art 357
Studio Lighting and Digital Imaging
Art 358
Medium and Large Format Photography
Part III. Required Advanced Courses: 6-9 cr
Select two or three courses from courses below*:3
Art 451
Special Topics in Photography: (subtitle)
3
3
3
3
3
3
Art 454
Narrative Photography
Art 456
Advanced Digital Imaging in Photography
Art 458
Photographic Materials and Processes
*Total 12 credits in Parts II and III combined.
3. Photography Capstone Courses: 6 cr
Art 552
Studio Practice and Research in Photography
Art 553
Senior Project in Photography
3
3
3
3
3
Art BFA–Sample Curriculum in Photography and Imaging
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Art 253
Introduction to Photography
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year). Portfolio
Review for students in Photography and Imaging is held in both the fall and spring
semesters. Students must complete Art 253 and Art 350 to be eligible. Portfolio review
guidelines are available from the area.
Art 350
Visualizing Ideas in Photography
3
Art 358
Medium and Large Format Photography
3
or
Art
200-level Studio
Art
200-level Studio (Art 212Â or 221 or 291)
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 357
Studio Lighting and Digital Photography
3
or
Art
200-level Studio
Art 452
Contemporary Issues in Photography
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year (Fall)
Two of the following three courses:
Art 358
Medium and Large Format Photography
and/or
Art 454
Narrative Photography
and/or
Art 456
Advanced Digital Imaging in Photography
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Junior Year (Spring)
Students are reminded that enrollment into Art 552 requires acceptance into
the Photography and Imaging program, completion of the 18-credit PI core
requirements with a cumulative GPA of 2.67, and a B- or better in both Art
350 and Art 452.
Two of the following three courses:
Art 357
Studio Lighting and Digital Photography
and/or
Art 451
Special Topics in Photography (subtitle)
and/or
Art 458
Photographic Materials and Processes
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that enrollment into Art 553 requires the completion
of Art 552 with a B- or better.
Art 604
Professional Practices
Art 552
Studio Practice and Research in Photography
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 605
BFA Exhibition
Art 553
Senior Project in Photography (Capstone)
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
18
36
6
3
3
3
3
18
6
3
3
3
15
33
3
3
3
3
15
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
34
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2
The 12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
PRINT AND NARRATIVE FORMS
1. Print and Narrative Forms Introductory Course: 3 cr
Art 291
Introduction to Print and Narrative Forms
2. Print and Narrative Forms Core Courses: 18 cr
Select any six courses from the following list:
Art 337
Screenprinting on Fabric
Art 350
Visualizing Ideas in Photography
Art 391
Intermediate Printmaking: (subtitle)
Art 392
Lithography
Art 393
Digital Printmaking
Art 394
Intaglio
Art 397
Book Arts Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 398
Photo Printmaking
Art 433
Digital Imaging for Fabric
Art 495
Advanced Printmaking: (subtitle)
Art 496
Sequence and Structure
Art 591
Portfolio in Print and Narrative Forms
3. Print and Narrative Forms Capstone Course: 3 cr
Art 597
Senior Project in Print and Narrative Forms
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Art BFA–Sample Curriculum in Print and Narrative Forms
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Art 291
Introduction to Print and Narrative Forms
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art (recommend Art 253)
3
University Core1
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art 291
Introduction to Print and Narrative Forms
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art (Art 253 recommended )
Art
200-level studio (Art 231 or 262 or 271 or 281)
3
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 391
Intermediate Printmaking: (subtitle)
3
or
Art 398
Photo Printmaking
Art
Art & Design Elective (Art 350 recommended )
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Sophomore Year
33
Junior Year (Fall)
Art 394
Intaglio
3
or
Art 395
Advanced Printmaking: Intaglio
Art 393
Digital Printmaking
3
or
Art 496
Sequence and Structure
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
2
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
18
Junior Year (Spring)
Art 392
Lithography
3
or
Art 493
Advanced Digital Printmaking
Art 395
Advanced Printmaking: Lithography
3
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
3
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice2
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Total
Junior Year
33
Senior Year (Fall)
Art 604
Professional Practices
3
Art 591
Portfolio in Print and Narrative Forms
3
or
Art 396
Photo Screenprinting
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 605
BFA Exhibition
Art 597
Senior Project in Print and Narrative Forms
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
18
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
34
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2
The 12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
SCULPTURE
1. Sculpture Introductory Course: 3 cr
Art 261
Introduction to Sculpture
3
2. Sculpture Required Core Courses: 18 cr
Part I. Select 6-12 credits from the following list (retakable with change of topic):
Art 269
Sculpture Workshop: (subtitle)
1-3
Art 368
Sculpture Practices: (subtitle)
3
Art 369
Sculpture Workshop: (subtitle)
1-3
Part II. Select 6-12 credits from the following list (retakable with change of topic):
Art 468
Advanced Sculptural Practices: (subtitle)
3
Art 469
Sculpture Workshop (subtitle)
1-3
3. Sculpture Capstone Course: 3 cr
Art 567
Senior Project in Sculpture
3
Art BFA–Sample Curriculum in Sculpture
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 108
2D Concepts
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Art 261
Introduction to Sculpture
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art 261
Introduction to Sculpture
3
or
Art
200-level studio in Art
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 368
Sculptural Practices: (subtitle)
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Sophomore Year
33
Junior Year (Fall)
Art 368
Sculptural Practices: (subtitle)
3
Art 369
Sculpture Workshop: (subtitle)
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
2
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Junior Year (Spring)
Art 468
Sculptural Practices: (subtitle)
3
Art 469
Sculpture Workshop: (subtitle)
3
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
3
2
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Junior Year
33
Senior Year (Fall)
Art 604
Professional Practices
3
Art 468
Sculptural Practices: (subtitle)
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
1
University Core
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 605
BFA Exhibition
Art 567
Senior Project in Sculpture
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
18
1
3
3
3
3
3
16
34
1
Consult
your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services
Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts distribution requirement is part of the 45-credit core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in three
of the four other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2
The 12 Art History
credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and
102) count as Humanities
GER.
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (STUDIO ART) IN DESIGN
AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION (130-Credit
BFA Degree)
Students in Design and Visual Communication are required to have a laptop computer for their coursework by the first
week of class, beginning with Art 221 (Introduction to Design) and for all subsequent courses in Design and Visual
Communication. Visit http://www4.uwm.edu/psoa/admission/laptoprequirement/ for more information.
To be admitted into Design and Visual Communication, students must pass Design and Visual Communication Portfolio
Review. To be eligible for acceptance into DVC, students must complete Art 124 (Design Survey), Art 221
(Introduction to Design), and Art 223 (Introduction to Typography) with a B- or better, and admission to Art & Design.
After admission into Design and Visual Communication, students must:
1. Complete Art 321 (DVC I) and Art 323 (Typography II)Â with a grade of B- or better to enroll in Art 421 and Art
423.
2. Complete Art 421 (DVC II) and Art 422 (Design Methodologies) with a grade of B- or better to enroll in Art 529.
3. Complete Art 529 (DVC III) as Senior Capstone Experience concurrently with Art 606 (BFA Exhibition in Design).
4. Complete Art 324 (Web Design) and either Art 325 (Web Design II) or Art 424 (Topics in Web, Interaction, and
Screen Design). These required courses are not part of the core sequence, and may be taken any time after prerequisites
are met.
5. Complete two of the six following courses (6 credits): Art 423 (Experimental Typography), Art 426 (Motion
Graphics), Art 524 (Professional Practice), Art 526 (Research in Universal Design and Fabrication), Art 528 (Print
Production and Presentation Techniques) or either Art 325 or Art 424 not taken in point 4.
6. Complete 9 credits of Design and Visual Communication Expanded Studies (ES) all outside the Peck School of the
Arts. See your advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for an updated list of recommended
courses.
Students may petition to substitute for some or all of the DVC Expanded Studies courses. Likely candidates would be
students with a high GPA who have tested out of freshman English; double majors; and students with a keen and
credible interest in another area of study. Petitions to substitute for courses will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis by
Design faculty and will be subject to an appeals process.
1. DVC Introductory Course: 3 cr
Art 221
Introduction to Design
2. DVC Additional Introductory Courses: 6 cr
Art 124
Design Survey
Art 223
Introduction to Typography
3. DVC Core Courses: 24 cr
Part I. Required Core Sequence: 12 cr
Art 321
Design and Visual Communication I
Art 323
Typography II
Art 421
Design and Visual Communication II
Art 422
Design Methodologies
Part II. Required Interaction Design Courses: 6 cr
Art 324
Web Design
Art 325
Web Design II
or
Art 424
Topics in Web, Interaction, and Screen Design: (subtitle)
Part III. Required Core Choices: 6 cr
Select any two courses from the following list:
Art 325*
Web Design II
or
Art 424*
Topics in Web, Interaction, and Screen Design: (subtitle)
Art 423 Experimental Typography
Art 426
Motion Graphics
Art 427
Advanced Design Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 524
Professional Practice in Design
Art 526
Research in Universal Design and Fabrication (subtitle)
Art 528
Print Production and Presentation Techniques
* Whichever course is not taken in Part II. 4. DVC Capstone Courses: 4 cr
Art 529
Design and Visual Communication III (Senior Capstone)
Art 606
BFA Exhibition in Design
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
Art BFA in Design and Visual Communication - Recommended Curriculum
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
3
University Core1
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Art
200-level studio in Art
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year). Portfolio
review for students in Design and Visual Communication is held in spring semester only.
Students must complete Art 124, 221, and 223 to be eligible. Portfolio review guidelines are
available from the area.
Art 221
Introduction to Design
3
Art 124
Design Survey
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 223
Introduction to Typography (Counts as 2D 200 level.)
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
Art 324
Web Design
3
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Total
Sophomore Year
33
Junior Year (Fall)
Art 321
Design and Visual Communication I
3
Art 325
Web Design II
3
or
Art 424
Topics in Web, Interaction, and Screen Design: (subtitle)
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice2
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Junior Year (Spring)
Art 323
Typography II
3
Art
DVC Required Core Choice
3
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
3
2
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Total
Junior Year
33
Senior Year (Fall)
Art 421
Design and Visual Communication II
3
Art 422
Design Methodologies
3
Art
DVC Required Core Choice
3
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 529
Design and Visual Communication III (Capstone)
Art
Art & Design Elective
Art
Art & Design Elective
University Core1
University Core1
Art 606
BFA Exhibition in Design
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
1
16
34
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2
The 12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (ART EDUCATION)
This undergraduate degree prepares students to teach art both in schools and in the community. Once students are
admitted to the Art & Design program, they can apply to the Art Education program through Art Ed 227, Introduction to
Art Education (see application procedures). In addition to satisfying the core curriculum, art education students also
must take required art history and critical thinking courses, and three education courses. They are required to take studio
courses from both 2D and 3D disciplines, and to focus their choices of studio electives to develop an emphasis in an
area. In addition to top-notch studio preparation in a wide range of media, our students focus on urban issues and art
education for social justice. Theory is integrated into practical early field and student teaching experiences. Throughout
the program, assessment is aligned with the requirements for licensure under “PI-34,” the state law governing
certification in Wisconsin. Students who demonstrate mastery of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of professional
educators during student teaching are recommended to the Department of Public Instruction in the State of Wisconsin
for a PK4-12 teaching license.
Bachelor of Fine Arts (Art Education). The Art Education program requires a total of 130 credits for graduation
distributed as follows:
University Core Curriculum
(includes 12 cr Art History, 9 cr Education, and 6 cr PSOA Arts
Distribution*)
First Year Program
Required Studio Courses**
Critical Thinking Requirement
Art Education Courses
Total
45
15
39
3
28
130
* 12 cr Art History are included in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER. 9 cr School of Education courses are included in the Core Curriculum (see academic advisor). PSOA Arts
Distribution for Art Education is 6 credits that the student must take within PSOA, outside of Art & Design, in 2 of the 4
other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
** Art Education students are required to take the following Art Studio courses as part of these 39 credits: Art 201
Drawing II, Art 342 Introduction to Figure Drawing, 18 cr of 200-level courses reflecting 2D, 3D studio and digital
studio experiences, and 12 cr of upper-level studios to create further concentration in a studio area of choice. See
academic advisor for 2D, 3D, and digital course designations at the 200 level, and for upper-level studios.
Art Education BFA–Sample Curriculum in Art Education
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 109
3D Concepts
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 202
Drawing II
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
or
1
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year). Admission to
the Pre-Art Ed Program requires completion of the 30-credit First Year Program and two
200-level studio courses.
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
or
Art Ed 227 Intro to Art Ed
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
3
University Core1
3
University Core1
Subtotal
18
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art Ed 227 Introduction to Art Education
3
or
Art Ed 228 Learning Processes in Art Education
or
Art
200-level studio in Art
Art
200-level studio in Art
Art
200-level studio in Art
Art
200-level studio in Art
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year (Fall)
Art Ed 327 Art Education Theory and Practice: Elementary
Art Ed 228 Learning Processes in Art Education
or
Art
200-level studio in Art
Art 342
Intro to Figure Drawing
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Junior Year (Spring)
Art Ed 328 Art Education Theory and Practice: Secondary
Art
Upper Studio Elective
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: (subtitle)
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall or Spring)
Art
Studio Elective
Art
Studio Elective
Art
Studio Elective
Art
Studio Elective
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Fall or Spring)
Art Ed 425 Student Teaching: Elementary
Art Ed 426 Student Teaching: Secondary
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
3
3
3
18
36
6
3
3
3
3
18
6
3
3
3
3
18
36
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
5
5
10
28
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement for Art Education is part of the 45-credit Core: 6 credits outside of
Art & Design, in 2 of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New
Genres.
2
The 12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
BACHELOR OF ARTS (ART)
This undergraduate degree offers students a concentrated studio art experience to complement a broad exposure to the
humanities, fine arts, social sciences, and natural sciences. Bachelor of Arts (Art) students have four course tracks to
choose from:Â Studio Arts, Design Studies, Community Arts, and Digital Fabrication and Design.
The courses required and recommended for each of the four tracks (Studio Arts, Design Studies, Community Arts, and
Digital Fabrication and Design) are listed below. The “Recommended 4-Year Sequence” for each of the four tracks
suggests course sequencing across all four years so students can meet the degree requirements. Students are required to
complete 18 studio credits after the First Year Program, but may take more studio courses as part of their Directed
Electives if they desire. Students in the Community Arts track are required to complete the 15-credit Cultures and
Communities certificate program. Those credits can be counted as part of the University Core or as BA Directed
Electives as desired in consultation with advising. Students in the Digital Fabrication and Design program must take Art
277 as their First Year 200-level class.
The Bachelor of Arts (Art) degree requires a total of 120 credits for graduation distributed as follows:
University Core Curriculum
(includes 12 cr Art History and 9 cr PSOA Arts Distribution)
First Year Program
Art & Design Courses
Directed Electives
Critical Thinking
Professional Practices
BA Project
Total
45
15
18
32
6
3
1
120
Note: PSOA Arts Distribution is 9 credits that the student must take within PSOA, outside of Art & Design, in 3 of the 4
other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
BACHELOR OF ARTS (ART) TRACKS:
BA STUDIO ARTS
Introductory Studios (any two courses from the following list): 6 cr
Art 212
Introduction to Digital Studio Practice
Art 231
Introduction to Fibers
Art 243
Introduction to Painting
Art 253
Introduction to Photography
Art 261
Introduction to Sculpture
Art 271
Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Art 277
Introduction to Digital Fabrication
Art 281
Introduction to Ceramics
Art 291
Introduction to Print and Narrative Forms: (subtitle)
Studio Concentration (300-level and above): 12 cr
Students should select studio courses that best fit their curricular goals (academic doublemajor, minor, etc.) in conjunction with Art & Design undergraduate advisor, followed by
faculty in the areas of interest.
Directed Electives (Art & Design and academic electives): 32 cr
Directed Electives are intended to build upon and augment each student’s curricular goals
(academic double-major, minor, etc.). Depending on their curricular goals, students should
consult with advising in Art & Design, PSOA, and other schools on campus (double-majors,
minors, etc.) to help guide their choice of electives.
BA DESIGN STUDIES
Introductory Studios: 6 cr
Art 221
Introduction to Design
Art 223
Introduction to Typography
Studio Concentration (300-level and above): 12 cr
Select any four courses from the following list:
Art 322
Illustration
Art 324
Web Design
Art 325
Web Design II
Art 424
Topics in Web, Interaction, and Screen Design: (subtitle)
Art 427
Advanced Design Workshop: (subtitle)
Art 524
Professional Practice in Design
Art 526
Research in Universal Design: (subtitle)
Art 528
Print Production and Presentation Techniques
Art 608
Art & Design Internship
Directed Electives (Art & Design and academic electives): 32 cr
Directed Electives are intended to build upon and augment each student’s curricular goals
(academic double-major, minor, etc.). Depending on their curricular goals, students should
consult with advising in Art & Design, PSOA, and other schools on campus (double-majors,
minors, etc.) to help guide their choice of electives. The Art & Design Undergraduate
Advisor has lists of suggested studio and academic courses to help students develop a
cohesive curriculum in design.
BA COMMUNITY ARTS
Introductory Studios: 6 cr
Select any two courses from the following list:
Art 212
Introduction to Digital Studio Practice
Art 221
Introduction to Design
Art 231
Introduction to Fibers
Art 243
Introduction to Painting
Art 253
Introduction to Photography
Art 261
Introduction to Sculpture
Art 271
Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Art 277
Introduction to Digital Fabrication
Art 281
Introduction to Ceramics
Art 291
Introduction to Print and Narrative Forms: (subtitle)
Art Ed 227 Introduction to Art Education
Studio Concentration (300-level and above): 12 cr
Art 306
Introduction to Community Arts
Art 406
Community Art II
Remaining six credits: Students should select courses at the 300 level and above that best fit
their curricular goals (academic double-major, minor, etc.) in conjunction with advising.
Directed Electives (Art & Design and academic electives): 32 cr
Directed Electives are intended to build upon and augment each student’s curricular goals
(academic double-major, minor, etc.). Students in Community Arts track must complete the
courses for the Cultures and Communities certificate (15 credits) as part of the Directed
Electives or University Core. 150 Multicultural America (any discipline) is a prerequisite to
Art 306 Introduction to Community Arts, and can be taken as a Directed Elective or as a
University Core class in the fall semester of the sophomore year. Remaining credits:
Students should consult with advising in Art & Design, PSOA, and other schools on
campus (double-majors, minors, etc.) to help guide their choice of electives.
BA DIGITAL FABRICATION AND DESIGN
Introductory Studios: 6 cr
Art 277
Design for Digital Fabrication
Art 278
Introduction to Industrial Craft
Studio Concentration (300-level and above): 12 cr
Art 378
Industrial Processes and Fabrication
Art 478
3D Digital Fabrication and Craft
Art 578
Research in Digital Fabrication and Craft: (subtitle)
Art 526
Research in Universal Design and Fabrication: (subtitle)
Directed Electives (Art & Design and academic electives): 32 cr
Directed Electives are intended to build upon and augment each student’s curricular goals
(academic double-major, minor, etc.). Depending on their curricular goals, students should
consult with advising in Art & Design, PSOA, and other schools on campus (double-majors,
minors, etc.) to help guide their choice of electives.
Art and Design Bachelor of Arts (Art)
Recommended Four-Year Sequence in Studio Arts
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
3
3
Directed Elective
3
University Core1
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Art & Design Lecture Series
3
or
3
Directed Elective
University Core2
Subtotal
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art
300-level Studio Concentration
ArtHist102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Art & Design Lecture Series
or
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year (Fall)
Art
300-level and above Studio Concentration
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Junior Year (Spring)
Art
300-level and above Studio Concentration
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall)
Art
300-level and above Studio Concentration
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 505
BA Project
Art 604
Professional Practices
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
University Core 1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
15
1
3
2
3
3
3
15
30
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2 The
12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
3
The 32 credits Directed Electives can be courses in Art & Design and/or other disciplines to be chosen in conjunction
with Art & Design Undergraduate advisor, followed by faculty in the areas of interest.
Art and Design Bachelor of Arts (Art)
Recommended Four-Year Sequence in Design Studies
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
3
University Core1
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
3
3
Directed Elective
3
University Core1
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art 124
3
Design Survey3
Art 221
Introduction to Design
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Art & Design Lecture Series
3
or
3
Directed Elective
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 223
Introduction to Typography
3
ArtHist102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
3
4
Art
3
300-level and above Studio Concentration
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Art & Design Lecture Series
3
or
3
Directed Elective
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year (Fall)
Art
300-level and above Studio Concentration
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Junior Year (Spring)
Art
300-level and above Studio Concentration
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
ArtHist
Advanced Art History choice2
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall)
Art
300-level and above Studio Concentration
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 505
BA Project
Art 604
Professional Practices
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
30
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
15
1
3
2
3
3
3
15
30
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2
The 12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
3
The 32 credits Directed Electives can be courses in Art & Design and/or other disciplines to be chosen in conjunction
with Art & Design Undergraduate advisor, followed by faculty in the areas of interest. Art 124 Design Survey is highly
recommended.
4
The 12 credits of 300-above Studio Concentration for Design Studies must be chosen from the approved list. Take note
of prerequisites for advanced courses.
Art and Design Bachelor of Arts (Art)
Recommended Four-Year Sequence in Community Arts
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
3
3
Directed Elective
3
University Core1
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
Art
200-level studio in Art
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
150
3
Multicultural America (any discipline)3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 306
Introduction to Community Arts
3
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
3
3
Directed Elective3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Art & Design Lecture Series
3
1
3
University Core
Subtotal
15
Total
Sophomore Year
30
Junior Year (Fall)
Art
300-level and above Studio Concentration
3
2
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice
3
Directed Elective3
3
Directed Elective3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Junior Year (Spring)
Art
300-level and above Studio Concentration
3
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice2
Art 406
Community Arts II
3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall)
Art
300-level and above Studio Concentration
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 505
BA Project
Art 604
Professional Practices
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
15
30
3
3
3
3
3
15
1
3
2
3
3
3
15
30
1 Consult
your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2 The
12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
3 The
32 credits Directed Electives can be courses in Art & Design and/or other disciplines to be chosen in conjunction
with Art & Design Undergraduate advisor, followed by faculty in the areas of interest. Courses required to satisfy the
Cultures and Communities Certificate can be part of the Directed Electives or University Core. 150 Multicultural
America is a prerequisite for Art 306 Introduction to Community Art, and is recommended as a Directed Elective.
Art & Design Bachelor of Arts (Art)
Recommended Four-Year Sequence in Digital Fabrication & Design
Freshman Year (Fall) First Year Program
(Includes OWC-A and QL-A Requirements)
Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 200-level course they wish to take in the
second semester of the First Year and enroll in the appropriate First Year Program courses
in fall.
Art 101
Drawing I
3
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
3
University Core1
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Freshman Year (Spring) First Year Program
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Art 106
Art Survey
3
Art 277*
Design for Digital Fabrication
3
1
3
University Core
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Freshman Year
30
* Art 277 requires that students take Art 118 in the fall semester.
Sophomore Year (Fall)
Students are reminded that admission to the Art & Design Program requires completion of
the 36-credit Art-Intended requirements and that all First Year Program courses must be
completed in the first 45 credits (usually in fall semester of sophomore year).
Art 278
Introduction to Industrial Craft
3
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture2
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Art & Design Lecture Series
3
or
3
Directed Elective
3
Directed Elective3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Sophomore Year (Spring)
Art 378
Industrial Processes and Fabrication
3
ArtHist102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture2
3
Art
3
Directed Elective3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Art & Design Lecture Series
3
or
3
Directed Elective
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Total
Sophomore Year
30
Junior Year (Fall)
Art 478
Digital Fabrication and Craft
3
2
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice
3
Directed Elective3
3
Directed Elective3
3
University Core1
Subtotal
15
Junior Year (Spring)
Art 578
Research in Fabrication and Craft: (subtitle)
3
Art 509
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)
3
2
ArtHist
3
Advanced Art History choice
3
Directed Elective3
3
University Core 1
Subtotal
15
Total
Junior Year
30
Senior Year (Fall)
Art 526
Research in Universal Design and Fabrication: (subtitle)
3
3
3
Directed Elective
3
Directed Elective3
1
University Core
University Core1
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 505
BA Project
Art 604
Professional Practices
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
Directed Elective3
University Core1
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
15
1
3
2
3
3
3
15
30
1
Consult your academic advisor in the Peck School of the Arts Student Services Office for requirements in the Core
Curriculum. PSOA Arts Distribution Requirement is part of the 45-credit Core: 9 credits outside of Art & Design, in 3
of the 4 other departments in PSOA: Dance, Music, Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres.
2
The 12 Art History credits count in the Core Curriculum. Six credits (Art History 101 and 102) count as Humanities
GER.
3 The
32 credits Directed Electives can be courses in Art & Design and/or other disciplines to be chosen in conjunction
with Art & Design Undergraduate advisor, followed by faculty in the areas of interest.
4 The
12 credits of 300-above Studio Concentration for Design Studies must be chosen from the approved list. Take note
of prerequisites for advanced courses.
MINOR IN ART & DESIGN
A minor in Art & Design consists of a minimum of 18 art credits. Nine of the final 12 credits must be taken in residence
at UWM. Students choose between the Studio Minor (2D, 3D, and Digital Tracks), the Design Minor, the Photography
Minor, and the Community Arts Minor. Art & Design minor students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.5.
All students interested in enrolling as an Art & Design minor should contact the Art & Design Department
undergraduate advisor to develop a plan of study prior to enrolling in art courses. Students must take note of
prerequisites for 200-level and above coursework in Art & Design.
Students who decide to become Art & Design majors based on their Art & Design minor experience will need to
complete the remaining First Year Program credits and the 200-level introductory studio courses prior to continuing
with the remaining BA or BFA requirements.
Art & Design Minor: Studio (18 credits)
Required: 6 credits
Part I. (3 cr):
Art 101
Drawing I
Part II. (3 cr):
Choose any course from the following list:
Art 106
Art Survey
Art 100
American Art and Culture
Art 124
Design Survey
Art 105
Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
3
3
3
3
Select Track: 3 credits
2D Track:
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
3D Track:
Art 109
3D Concepts
3
Digital Track:
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
3
Select 200-level Intro Course(s): 3-6 credits
2D Track:
Art 243
Introduction to Painting
3
Art 253
Introduction to Photography
3
Art 291
Introduction to Print and Narrative Forms
3
3D Track:
Art 231
Introduction to Fibers
3
Art 261
Introduction to Sculpture
3
Art 271
Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmithing
3
Art 278
Introduction to Industrial Craft
3
Art 281
Introduction to Ceramics
3
Digital Track:
Art 212
Introduction to Digital Studio Practice
3
Art 221
Introduction to Design
3
Art 277
Design for Digital Fabrication
3
200-level courses are grouped according to track, but students are free to take what interests
them as long as they meet the prerequisites.
Select 300-level and above: 3-6 credits
Students in all three Studio tracks select 3-6 credits of 300-level and above Art courses in
consultation with the Art & Design Undergraduate Advisor and the Concentration Area
Head (Ceramics, Digital Studio Practice, Fibers, Jewelry and Metalsmithing, Painting and
Drawing, Photography, Print and Narrative Forms, Sculpture).
Art & Design Minor: Design (18 credits)
Required: 9 credits
Art 108
2D Concepts
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
Art 124
Design Survey
or
Art 106
Art Survey
Required 200-level Intro Course: 6 credits
Art 221
Introduction to Design
Art 223
Introduction to Typography
Select 300-level and above: 3 credits
Select 3 credits of 300-level or above electives in Design and Visual Communication in
consultation with Art & Design Undergraduate Advisor and Area Head for Design and
Visual Communication. Design minor students are not eligible to take Design and Visual
Communication Required Core Courses.
Art & Design Minor: Photography (18 credits)
Required: 6 credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
Art 100
American Art and Culture
3
or
Art 106
Art Survey
or
Art 124
Design Survey
or
Art 150
Multicultural America
or
Art 152
Photography Survey
Art 108
2D Concepts
3
or
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
Required 200-level Intro Courses: 3 credits
Art 253
Introduction to Photography
3
Select 300-level and above: 9 credits
Select 9 credits of 300-level or above electives in Photography and Imaging from the
following list, in consultation with Art & Design Undergraduate Advisor and Area Head for
Photography and Imaging. Students must be aware of the prerequisites for the 300+ level
courses they wish to take.
Art 350
Visualizing Ideas in Photography
3
Art 357
Studio Lighting and Digital Imaging
3
Art 358
Medium and Large Format Photography
3
Art 451
Special Topics in Photography: (subtitle)
3
Art 452
Contemporary Issues in Photography
3
Art 454
Narrative Photography
3
Art 456
Advanced Digital Imaging in Photography
3
Art 458
Photographic Materials and Processes
3
Art & Design Minor: Community Arts (18 credits)
Required: 6 credits
Art 101
Drawing I
Art 150
Multicultural America*
Select Track: 3 credits
2D Track:
Art 108
2D Concepts
3D Track:
Art 109
3D Concepts
Digital Track:
Art 118
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
Select 200-level Intro Course(s): 3 credits
2D Track:
Art 243
Introduction to Painting
Art 253
Introduction to Photography
Art 291
Introduction to Print and Narrative Forms
3D Track:
Art 231
Introduction to Fibers
Art 261
Introduction to Sculpture
Art 271
Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Art 278
Introduction to Industrial Craft
Art 281
Introduction to Ceramics
Digital Track:
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Art 212
Introduction to Digital Studio Practice
3
Art 221
Introduction to Design
3
Art 277
Design for Digital Fabrication
3
200-level courses are grouped according to track, but students are free to take what interests
them as long as they meet the prerequisites.
Select 300-level and above: 6 credits
Art 306
Introduction to Community Arts
3
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art
3
* Note: If Community Arts minors have previously taken 150 Multicultural America in
another department, they may substitute another Art & Design course for which they have
the prerequisites.
CERTIFICATE IN COMMUNTY ARTS
Coordinators: Raoul Deal, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Art and Design, and the Undergraduate Advisor for the
Department of Art and Design
The Certificate in Community Arts is open to all students seeking a Bachelor’s degree from UWM, to students who
previously received a Bachelor’s degree from UWM or any other accredited college or university, and to people who do
not plan to pursue a college or university degree (non-degree students) but who have a strong interest in this subject
area. To be admitted to the university as non-degree students, individuals must meet regular university admission
requirements. Students completing the certificate not in conjunction with a degree are not eligible for financial aid.
The certificate is designed to give students an opportunity to explore art in community settings. It is geared towards
those interested in social engagement, environmental issues, community building, public art, and place making. Most
certificate courses highlight art practices that integrate collaborative processes and social cooperation. Certificate
students will also benefit from a minimum of three service-learning experiences. They will be prepared to work as
artists in grassroots organizations, community institutions, non-profit arts organizations, and educational institutions.
Students enrolling in the Community Arts Certificate Program are required to earn a minimum of 18 credits. The
required credits are organized to be taken sequentially, and range from a 200-level course to 400-level
courses. Courses counting for the certificate may not be taken on a credit/no credit basis. Students must achieve a
grade point average of 2.5 or above in all courses counting toward the certificate.
Interested students should contact the program coordinator as soon as they decide to pursue the Community Arts
Certificate. The coordinator’s function is to help the student design a program of study from among the available
courses and to guide the student in completing that program in sequence.
To earn the Community Arts Certificate (18 credits) the following requirements must be met:
Complete the 18 Core Course credits in the Community Arts track with a minimum grade point average of 2.5.
Core Courses: 18 cr.
Art 101
or
Art 108
or
Art 109
or
Art 118
or
ArtEd 130
xxx 150
Drawing I
2D Concepts
3D Concepts
Digital Arts: Culture, Theory, Practice
Multicultural Art and Visual Learning in Elementary Education Multicultural America (Art 150 recommended)
3
3
Art 306
Art 309
Art 406
Art 309
or
Art 509
Introduction to Community Art
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Community Art II
Issues in Contemporary Art: (subtitle)*
Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle)*
3
3
3
3
* Art & Design majors who complete the Certificate in Community Arts must take 9 credits Critical Thinking: Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series, Art 509 Art & Design Seminar: (subtitle) and 3 additional
credits in either 309 or 509. This is because the 3 credits of Art 509 required as part of the BA and BFA degrees does
not count towards the Certificate.
Credits earned at other institutions equivalent to courses in the certificate program may be accepted in partial fulfillment
of the program requirements, subject to approval by the Certificate Program Committee.
CERTIFICATE IN DIGITAL FABRICATION AND DESIGN
Coordinator:Â Frankie Flood
Undergraduate Advisor, Department of Art and Design: Allison B. Cooke
The Certificate in Digital Fabrication and Design is open to all students seeking a bachelor’s degree from UWM, to
students who previously received a Bachelor’s degree from UWM or any other accredited college or university, and to
people who do not plan to pursue a college or university degree (non-degree students) but who have a strong interest in
this subject area. To be admitted to the University as non-degree students, individuals must meet regular University
admission requirements. Students completing the certificate not in conjunction with a degree are not eligible for
financial aid.
This certificate is designed to give students an understanding of the software environments, materials, and equipment
used in 2D and 3D digital fabrication excluding architectural scale. The certificate is for students in any major at the
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, but specifically for Art & Design students who wish to complement their major
with an additional concentration in Digital Fabrication. Students enrolling in the Digital Fabrication and Design Certificate Program are required to earn a minimum of 18
credits. The required credits are organized to be taken sequentially, and range from a 200-level course to 500-level
courses. Courses counting for the certificate may not be taken on a credit/no credit basis. Students must achieve a
grade point average of 2.5 or above in all courses counting toward the certificate.
Interested students should contact the program coordinator as soon as they decide to pursue the Digital Fabrication and
Design Certificate. The coordinator’s function is to help the student design a program of study from among the available
courses and to guide the student in completing that program.
To earn the Digital Fabrication and Design Certificate (18 credits) the following requirements must be met:
Complete the 18 Core Course credits in the Digital Fabrication and Design track with a minimum grade point average of
2.5.
Core Courses: 18 cr
Art 277
Art 278
Art 378
Art 478
Design for Digital Fabrication
Introduction to Industrial Craft
Industrial Processes and Fabrication
Digital Fabrication and Craft
3
3
3
3
Art 526
Art 578
Research in Universal Design and Fabrication: (subtitle)
Research in Digital Fabrication and Craft: (subtitle)
3
3
Credits earned at other institutions equivalent to courses in the certificate program may be accepted in partial fulfillment
of the program requirements, subject to approval by the Certificate Program Committee.
PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS
The Department of Art & Design has Program-to-Program Articulation Agreements with several regional and
international institutions, including the following agreements with the Milwaukee Area Technical College's (MATC)
Graphic Design Associate Degree Program and with the Hubei University of Technology in Wuhan, China.
MATC GRAPHIC DESIGN ASSOCIATE DEGREE AND UWM BACHELOR OF ARTS (ART) IN DESIGN
STUDIES DEGREE PROGRAM
MATC students who have successfully completed the Graphic Design AAS degree will be granted junior status in the
UWM PSOA A&D BA in Design Studies program.
Laptops are required for the BA in Design Studies program.
Students need a 2.50 GPA from MATC and need to complete the OWC-A and QL-A requirements for UWM while at
MATC. It's advisable that students also complete the Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Cultural Diversity GER
requirements as part of their MATC Graphic Design Associate Degree. Students should select from approved GER
courses (SS, NS, NS+, CD/&). Students need to complete the UWM Foreign Language proficiency: two years of the
same Foreign Language in High School, or two semesters of Foreign Language at MATC or UWM.
MATC students will enter the Department of Art & Design with up to 72 credits, and will take 58 credits minimum to
complete the BA in Design Studies.
Program-to-Program transfer courses/credits are accepted only for the program/degree specified in this agreement. A
change of major/degree/program invalidates these courses/credits for transfer unless they are approved within other
Program-to-Program Articulation Agreement for a different major/degree/program at UWM.
Four-semester course sequence for completion of the MATC/UWM BA in Design Studies at UWM:
Junior Year (Fall)
Art 106
Art Survey
ArtHist 101 Ancient and Medieval Art and Architecture
Art 101
Drawing I
Art 422
Design Methodologies
Art Studio Elective
Subtotal
Junior Year (Spring)
ArtHist 102 Renaissance to Modern Art and Architecture
Art 124
Design Survey
Art 324
Web Design
Art Studio Elective
Art
Studio Elective
Subtotal
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year (Fall)
Art Hist
Advanced Art History choice
Art 309 Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
2
14
29
3
3
Art 325 Web Design II
Art 524 Professional Practice in Design
Art  Studio Elective
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Art 427
Advanced Design Workshop: Design Studies BA Supervision
Art 505
BA Project
Art 604
Professional Practices
ArtHist Advanced Art History choice
Art 509 Art and Design Seminar: (subtitle)
Art Studio Elective
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
TOTAL
CREDITS
3
3
3
15
1
1
3
3
3
3
14
29
58cr
HUBEI 3+1 BACHELOR OF ARTS (ART) DEGREE PROGRAMS
The Department of Art & Design and the Hubei University of Technology in Wuhan, China, have created a unique
program for the students at Hubei University to finish their BA degree at UWM. There are two 3+1 BA tracks: Design
Studies and Digital Fabrication and Design.
Laptops are required for both 3+1 BA programs. The goal of the Peck School of the Arts laptop requirement is to
provide the opportunity for students to work extensively and intuitively with the most significant contemporary tool for
their work so that they will excel not only in their courses but also in their profession after they graduate.
Hubei 3+1 BA in Design Studies
Students will enter UWM with 90 credits towards the BA in Design Studies (see sequence for Freshman, Sophomore,
and Junior years above). The Senior year sequence of courses at UWM for the Hubei 3+1 BA in Design Studies follows:
Senior Year (Summer – optional*)
ESL
ESL course
Art
Directed Elective
Senior Year (Fall)
ESL 118
Advanced College Writing in ESL
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Art 321
Design and Visual Communication I
Art 324
Web Design
Art 604
Professional Practices
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Eng 102
College Writing and Research
Art 212
Introduction to Digital Studio: A/V Strategies
Art 427
Advanced Design Workshop: Design Studies BA Supervision
Art 505
BA Project
Art 509
Art and Design Seminar
Art 524
Professional Practice in Design
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
1
1
3
3
14
29
* Note: Summer Session is optional. Students who participate in summer session have the opportunity to gain more
English language experience before beginning the fall semester, and also have the option to take extra electives during
the year or spread out the required courses over 2 semesters + summer for a less-full workload.
Hubei 3+1 BA in Design & Digital Fabrication
Students will enter UWM with 90 credits towards the BA in Digital Fabrication and Design (see sequence for Freshman,
Sophomore, and Junior years above). The Senior year sequence of courses at UWM for the Hubei 3+1 BA in Design
and Digital Fabrication follows:
Senior Year (Summer – optional*)
ESL
ESL course
Art
Directed Elective
Senior Year (Fall)
ESL 118
Advanced College Writing in ESL
Art 309
Issues in Contemporary Art: Visiting Artist Lecture Series
Art 378
Industrial Processes and Fabrication
Art 578
Research in Digital Fabrication and Craft: (subtitle)
Art 604
Professional Practices
Subtotal
Senior Year (Spring)
Eng 102
College Writing and Research
Art 478
3D Digital Fabrication and Craft
Art 505
BA Project
Art 509
Art and Design Seminar
Art 527
Research in Universal Design and Fabrication
Subtotal
Total
Senior Year
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
1
3
3
13
28
* Note: Summer Session is optional. Students who participate in summer session have the opportunity to gain more
English language experience before beginning the fall semester, and also have the option to take extra electives during
the year or spread out the required courses over 2 semesters + summer for a less-full workload.
Courses
Art
Art Education
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University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
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Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Peck School of the Arts
Dance
Dance
Courses: Dance
Dance
The Department of Dance offers three undergraduate degree
programs that lead to a bachelor's degree in dance: two
tracks in the
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance (Performance and
Choreography/Contemporary, and Performance and
Choreography/Africa and
the Diaspora), and the Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Dance. Also available
is a minor in Somatics.
Please note that admissions to the
Post-Baccalaureate Early Childhood through Adolescence (EC-A)
Teaching
Certificate in Dance have been temporarily suspended
(effective with the 2014 spring semester).
Admission and Retention Requirements
Students must meet
general university admission requirements to be admitted to any of the
undergraduate curricula as a
freshman or transfer student. Passing the
Dance Entrance Audition (on-capmus or video) is required for entrance into
the Dance BA or
BFA degree programs.
On-campus auditions consist of a variety of technique classes, writing sample, one-minute solo performance (can be
self-choreographed), and Q&A session. Video submission (only with prior authorization via email to [email protected]) consists of writing sample, 5 minutes each of two contrasting dance techniques, and 2-3 minutes of
performance video (DVD or URLs in online form). Auditions after the last on-campus audition will be by appointment
or via video submission. If unsuccessful, students may re-audition, but are limited to auditioning twice per academic
year (via any method).
To RSVP for a specific audition date, or to submit the video audition form (after authorization), prospective students
must: (a) complete the appropriate online form at arts.uwm.edu/dance/admission and (b) submit separate copies of their
high school and/or college transcripts (unofficial copies are acceptable for this purpose). Transcripts and/or video
footage should be sent to [email protected] or UWM Dance Admission, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201.
UWM priority application deadline is March 1.
Transfer students must complete a minimum of half of the required
dance credits while in residence at UWM in order to
graduate. The exact
total is available upon admission to the program. Transcript evaluation
by a dance advisor is
required before placement into dance major
courses.
Once accepted, students may enter the program during either fall
or spring semesters, but are strongly encouraged to
enter in the fall
term to progress more smoothly through the BA or BFA curricular
sequence.
Each undergraduate dance major's coursework will be reviewed at
the end of his/her sophomore year to determine
continuance in the
major, as part of the Mid-Program Portfolio Review. Students must
maintain a minimum grade point
average of 3.0 in the dance major.
All students are expected to demonstrate a strong commitment to
their health and overall conditioning in order to fulfill
the
department's academic requirements. Each student's ability to undertake
the demands of the dance program,
including his/her overall physical
ability to perform in classes, auditions, rehearsals, and/or
performances, will be a
factor in the following: grading at the end of
each semester; the audition/rehearsal/performance process for
departmental
productions and outreach events; the Mid-Program Portfolio
Review assessment; determining "probation" status; and
potentially removing a student from the program.
Scholarships
Dance Incoming Student Scholarships are awarded based on the entrance audition’s technique classes, writing
sample, and performance, and are faculty-nominated. Scholarships may not be available after the UWM prioritiy
application deadline (March 1).
Dance Undergraduate Student Scholarships require an application, and applicants must have completed at least one
semester of the Dance Program. Demonstrated excellence in the Dance Major is the main criteria. To be eligible for any
Dance Scholarship, students must meet the following criteria (additional criteria for each scholarship available on
arts.uwm.edu/dance):
Full-time enrollment (6 or more Dance credits each semester).
Dance GPA of 3.5 or above.
Adherence to departmental curricular requirements.
Students who do not meet these criteria for all semesters of their award may forfeit all or part of their scholarship.
Laptops
Dance BA and BFA students are required to have a laptop computer (or comparable tablet meeting minimum
specifications) by the beginning of their sophomore year, but are strongly encouraged to have one when they enter the
program. The hardware and software must meet or exceed the current departmental requirements, as stated on the
website (arts.uwm.edu/laptop) and in the Dance Undergraduate Student Handbook. Website also includes information
on using financial aid to fund this expense.
Dance Program Mission Statement and Program
Descriptions
The Department of Dance at UWM is committed to the development and training of skillful and vibrant dance artists
and educators in their pursuit of a comprehensive education built upon diverse dance practices, research, and
community engagement. Our department supports a thriving local and regional presence, while it opens avenues and
opportunities for national and global perspectives. We offer undergraduate and graduate programs that emphasize
artistic individuality and the development of the professional skills required for successful careers in dance
performance, choreography, and education. Our innovative curriculum integrates multiple dance disciplines and somatic
practices, creating a learning environment that prioritizes a balance of body and mind knowledge with informed,
creative expression. The Performance and Choreography/Contemporary Track
in the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance prepares
students to
perform and create original dance choreography for theatrical
productions. Dance BFA students complete a
rigorous technical and
creative curriculum designed to develop the student's individual
artistic voice. Contemporary
Track majors additionally study body/mind
sciences, dance pedagogy, historical and cultural contexts for dance,
and the
interactive collaboration skills necessary to bring dance to
the theatre with a high degree of excellence.
The Performance and Choreography/Africa and the
Diaspora Track in the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance
prepares
students to perform and create original dance choreography for
theatrical productions. Africa and the Diaspora
majors complete a
rigorous technical and creative curriculum with a foundation in Africa
and the Diaspora techniques
with cross training in ballet and modern.
African Track majors additionally study body/mind sciences, dance
pedagogy,
historical and cultural contexts for dance, and the
interactive collaboration skills necessary to bring dance to the
theatre
with a high degree of excellence.
The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Dance prepares students
to teach participatory movement traditions in community
settings, and
to lead community groups in creating and performing their own dances
and movement rituals. Communitybased service-learning experiences
provide many opportunities to realize these goals. Many Dance BA students pursue a
double major at UWM; the service-learning component provides an opportunity to integrate the content of the two areas
of study.
The Minor in Somatics prepares students to undertake
further study in an array of artistic, teaching/learning, and
health/wellness disciplines. Students will study a wide range of
somatic practices, including Laban Movement Analysis,
Bartenieff
Fundamentals, Alexander Technique, Pilates Method, Ideokinesis,
Body-Mind Centering, Authentic
Movement, Iyengar Yoga, and Martial
Arts.
Students in both the BFA and BA dance degree programs must complete the
following Dance Foundations curriculum
in their freshman year:
Dance
Foundations Curriculum
Dance 110
Dance 111
Dance 113
Dance 135
Dance 192
Dance 233
Total
Introduction to the Art of
Dance
Ballet I
Modern Dance Technique I
Introduction to Dancemaking
Skills
Dance Freshman Seminar
Improvisation for Dancemaking
3
3
3
3
1
3
16
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN DANCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Completion of 130 credits, fulfilling the
following curriculum requirements:
1. General University Core Curriculum, 42 cr, which includes the following:
Courses that fulfill the university-wide Oral and Written Communication Competency Part A (OWC-A) and
Quantitative Literacy Competency Part A (QL-A) requirements. These should be completed within the first 30
credits of the degree; and
Nine (9) credits from Peck School of the Arts non-Dance courses, chosen from three of the five other departments
in PSOA: Art & Design, Fine Arts, Music (required), Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres. Three
of the nine credits must be chosen from the following Music course list, or alternate approved by Dance Faculty
Advisor: Music 100-Intro to Classical Music, 101-Fundamentals of Music, 102-American Popular Music, 130Beginning Piano, 140-Class Voice, 150-Beginning Guitar, 309-American Folk and Popular Music, 310-Intro to
World Musics (OWC-B), 317-Intro to American Music, 356-Music in Society, 449-Women in Music, 450-Intro
to Musicology, 489-Workshop with sub-topics, 680-Special Studies in Music with sub-topics.
2. Required Dance Courses, 88 cr, which include the following:
Dance Foundations courses, 16 credits; and
Dance courses that fulfill the university-wide Oral and Written Communication Competency Part B (OWC-B)
and Quantitative Literacy Competency Part B (QL-B) requirements.
BFA PERFORMANCE AND CHOREOGRAPHY/CONTEMPORARY TRACK DANCE
CURRICULUM
Dance Technique Courses
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition - minimum of 6 semesters (16
credits)
Chosen from Dance 113, 114, 213, 214, 317, 318 –
2 or 3 credits each.
(100- and 200-level technique classes taken for
3 credits; 300-level for 2 credits)
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition - minimum of 6 semesters (16 credits)
Chosen from Dance 111, 112, 211, 212, 311, 312 – 2 or 3 credits
each.
(100- and 200-level technique classes taken for
3 credits; 300-level for 2 credits)
Complementary Dance Technique - minimum of 2 semesters (4 credits)
Jazz Dance I (Dance 115) and Africa and the Diaspora Technique I (Dance 122) – 2 credits each.
One Jazz or African technique class is required during sophomore year. If GER-Cultural Diversity credits are desired
for Dance 122, 3-credit section is mandatory.
Option: Students wishing to substitute one or two semester(s) of either ballet or modern (minimum 5 semesters of ballet
and modern are required) for additional Complementary Dance Technique course(s) in Jazz, Africa and Diaspora
Technique, Tap, Music Theatre Styles: chosen from Dance 116, 117, 123, 217, 222, 327, 427. Student must approach
his/her Dance Faculty Advisor the semester prior to enrollment for substitution approval.
Somatic and Conditioning Practices - minimum of 3 semesters (6 credits)
(Yoga, Pilates, Body Sense, Alexander Technique)
Chosen from
Dance 103, 220, 321, 323, 403, 421, 623 – 2 or 3 credits each.
Total Technique Credits
42
Dance Creative Courses
Dance 135
Dance 231
Dance 233
Dance 352
Dance 412
Dance 413
Dance 414
Introduction to Dancemaking
Skills
Music and Dancers
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Digital Media Portfolio for
Performers
Dance Composition I
Dance Composition II
Dance Composition III (Dance 415 may be substituted only with prior dance
faculty approval)
Dance 490*
Repertoire and Ensemble
Total Creative Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
Dance Academic Courses
Dance 110
Dance 192
Dance 209
Dance 250
Dance 251
Dance 309
Dance 314
Dance 350
Dance 371
Dance 460
Introduction to the Art of
Dance
Dance Freshman Seminar
Dance Production
Dance Sophomore Seminar
Laban Movement Analysis
Dance Production Practicum
Contemporary Dance History
Dance Senior Seminar
Applied Anatomy
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
3
1
2
0
3
1
3
0
3
3
Dance 601
Senior Project
Total Academic Credits
3
22
* Any dancer cast in faculty or guest artist choreography must be enrolled in at least 3 UWM Department of Dance
technique classes per week during the rehearsal semester.
Recommended Course of Study
Freshman Year (Includes Foundations Curriculum)
Fall Semester
Dance 111
Ballet I
Dance 113
Modern Dance Technique I
Dance 135
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
Dance 209
Dance Production
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 110
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Dance 112
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition II
Dance 114
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition II
Dance 233
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Dance 309
Dance Production Practicum
University Core
Total
Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Dance 103, 321, or Introduction to Iyengar Yoga, Alexander Technique, or Body Conditioning:
323
Pilates
Dance 115 or 122
Jazz Dance I or African Dance and Diaspora Technique I (3 cr. if GER-CD is
desired)
Dance 213
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition III
Dance 250
Dance Sophomore Seminar
Dance 314
Contemporary Dance History (OWC-B)
Dance 412
Dance Composition I
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 211
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition III
Dance 231
Music and Dancers
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy
Dance 490**
Repertoire and Ensemble
University Core
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 214
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition IV
Dance 251
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Dance 350
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Dance 413
Dance Composition II
Dance 490**
Repertoire and Ensemble
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 103, 321, or Introduction to Iyengar Yoga, Alexander Technique for the Performer, or
323
Body Conditioning: Pilates Method
Cr
3
3
3
1
2
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
31
Cr
2
2
3
0
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
6
32
Cr
3
3
0
3
1
6
Cr
2
Dance 212
Dance 352
Dance 414
Total
Senior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 403, 421, or
623
Dance 311
Dance 317
Dance 460
Dance 601
Spring Semester
Dance 115 or 122
Dance 312
Dance 318
Dance 490**
Total
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition IV
Digital Media Portfolio for Performers
Dance Composition III
University Core
Junior Year
Intermediate Yoga for Dancers, Alexander Technique Practicum, or Body
Conditioning: Pilates Method II
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition V
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition V
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
Senior Project
University Core
Jazz Dance I or African Dance and Diaspora Technique I (3 cr. if GER-CD is
desired)
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition VI
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition VI
Repertoire and Ensemble
University Core
Senior Year
3
3
3
6
33
Cr
2
2
2
3
3
6
Cr
2
2
2
1
9
34
** Per departmental policy, any time a student is cast in a faculty or guest artist work and is enrolled for under 18
credits, he/she must enroll in Dance 490 for 1 credit during the appropriate semester.
TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS FOR BFA DEGREE
130
BFA PERFORMANCE AND CHOREOGRAPHY/AFRICA AND
THE DIASPORA TRACK DANCE
CURRICULUM
Dance Technique Courses
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition - minimum of 2 semesters (6 credits)
Chosen from Dance 113, 114, 213, 214, 317, 318 – 2 or 3 credits each.
(100- and 200-level technique classes taken for 3 credits; 300-level for 2 credits)
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition - minimum of 1 semester (3 credits)
Chosen from Dance 111, 112, 211, 212, 311, 312 – 2 or 3 credits each.
(100- and 200-level technique classes taken for 3 credits; 300-level for 2 credits)
Complementary Dance Technique – (4 credits)
Jazz Dance I (Dance 115) and Tap I (Dance 117) – 2 credits each..
African Dance and Diaspora Technique – minimum of 6 semesters (16 credits)
Chosen from Dance 122, 123, 222, 223, 322, 522 – 2 or 3 credits each.
(100- and 200-level technique classes taken for 3 credits; 300-level for 2 credits)
Somatic and Conditioning Practices – minimum of 2 semesters (4 credits)
Yoga, Pilates, Alexander Technique, Body Sense: Chosen from Dance 103, 220, 321, 323, 403, 421, 623 – 2 or 3
credits each.
Total Technique Credits
33
Dance Creative Courses
Dance 135
Dance 233
Dance 231 or 331
Dance 352
Dance 412
Dance 413
Dance 414
Introduction to Dancemaking
Skills
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Music and Dancers or African Percussion Ensemble
Digital Media Portfolio for
Performers
Dance Composition I
Dance Composition II
Dance Composition III (Dance 415 may be substituted only with prior dance
faculty approval)
Dance 490*
Repertoire and Ensemble
Total Creative Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
Dance Academic Courses
Dance 110
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
Dance 209
Dance Production
Dance 250
Dance Sophomore Seminar
Dance 251
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Dance 309
Dance Production Practicum
Dance 313
History of Dance in the African Diaspora (OWC-B)
Dance 314
Contemporary Dance History (OWC-B)
Dance 350
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy
Dance 441
History of African Dance Theory I
Dance 460
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
Dance 541
History of African Dance Theory II: (subtitle)
Dance 601
Senior Project
Total Academic Credits
3
1
2
0
3
1
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
3
31
* Any dancer cast in faculty or guest artist choreography must be enrolled in at least 3 UWM Department of Dance
technique classes per week during the rehearsal semester.
Recommended Course of Study
Freshman Year
Fall Semester
Dance 111
Dance 122
Dance 135
Dance 192
Dance 209
Spring Semester
Dance 110
Dance 113
Dance 123
Dance 233
Dance 309
Ballet I
African Dance and Diaspora Technique I
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance Freshman Seminar
Dance Production
University Core
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Modern Dance Technique I
African Dance and Diaspora Technique II
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Dance Production Practicum
University Core
3
2
3
1
2
6
3
3
2
3
1
3
Total
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Dance 114
Dance 117
Dance 250
Dance 314
Dance 412
Spring Semester
Dance 222
Dance 231 or 331
Dance 313
Dance 371
Dance 490**
Total
Junior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 103, 321, or
323
Dance 223
Dance 251
Dance 350
Dance 413
Spring Semester
Dance 115
Dance 352
Dance 414
Dance 441
Dance 490**
Total
Senior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 322
Dance 403, 421, or
623
Dance 460
Dance 601
Spring Semester
Dance 490**
Dance 522
Dance 541
Total
Freshman Year
Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition II
Tap I
Dance Sophomore Seminar
Contemporary Dance History (OWC-B)
Dance Composition I
University Core
African Dance and Diaspora Technique III
Music and Dancers or African Percussion Ensemble
History of Dance in the African Diaspora (OWC-B)
Applied Anatomy
Repertoire and Ensemble
University Core
Sophomore Year
Introduction to Yoga, Alexander Technique for the Performer, or Body
Conditioning: Pilates Method
African Dance and Diaspora Technique IV
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Dance Composition II
University Core
Jazz Dance I
Digital Media Portfolio for Performers
Dance Composition III
History of African Dance Theory I
Repertoire and Ensemble
University Core
Junior Year
African Dance and Diaspora Technique V
Intermediate Yoga for Dancers, Alexander Technique Practicum, or Body
Conditioning: Pilates Method II
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
Senior Project
University Core
Repertoire and Ensemble
African Dance and Diaspora Technique VI
History of African Dance Theory II (subtitle)
University Core
Senior Year
32
3
2
0
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
1
3
33
2
3
3
0
3
6
2
3
3
3
1
3
32
3
2
3
3
6
1
3
3
9
33
** Per departmental policy, any time a student is cast in a faculty or guest artist work and is enrolled for less than 18
credits, he/she must enroll in Dance 490 for 1 credit during the appropriate semester.
TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS FOR BFA DEGREE
130
Suggested Classes for
University Core Curriculum – Africa and the Diaspora Track
Humanities – 6 cr
Africol 100
Africol 111
Africol 112
Africol 210
Art Hist 104
English 150
English 507
Black Reality: Survey of African-American Society
Introduction to African-American History to 1865
Introduction to African-American History 1865 to the Present
African-American Novel
African, New World, and Oceanic Art and Architecture
Multicultural America
Studies in Literature, 1900 to the Present: (subtitle) Fictions of
Multiculturalism
Ethnic 101
The Making of American Cultures: Africans, Europeans, and Indian Nations
Ethnic 102
Transnational Migrations: Asian-, Arab-, Euro-American and Latino Identity
Freshman Seminar Course 192 in multiple departments: (subtitle)
Hist 150
Multicultural America
Hist 267
History of Latinos in the United States
Hist 272
The Blues: History and Culture
Portugs 225
Understanding Brazil: (subtitle)
Spanish 225
Understanding the Hispanic World: (subtitle)
Spanish 373
Topics in Latino Literature in English: (subtitle)
Spanish 391
Social and Historical Issues in the Hispanic World: (subtitle)
Spanish 470
Survey of Hispanic Literature and Civilization
Social Sciences – 6 cr
Africol 215
Introduction to Black Social and Cultural Traditions
Anthro 104
Lifeways in Different Cultures: A Survey of World Societies
Anthro 150
Multicultural America
Commun 350
Intercultural Communication
Econ 248
Economics of Discrimination
Sociol 150
Multicultural America
Soc Wrk 665
Cultural Diversity and Social Work
Arts – 9 cr. from PSOA non-Dance courses (see above for more information)
Film 150
Multicultural America
Film 420
Intermediate Media Arts Module: Movement and New Media Collaborations
(co-taught with Dance 415)
Music 489
Workshop in Music: (subtitle)
Theatre 101
Acting for Non-Major
Theatre 260
Storytelling: (subtitle)
Theatre 281
Stage Management/Communication Tech
General University Electives
Bus Adm 100
Introduction to Business
Bus Adm 201
Introduction to Financial Accounting
Dance 116
Jazz Dance II
Dance 217
Tap II
Dance 319
Dance Service Learning (public/private schools)
Dance 338
Capoeira: Afro-Brazilian Dance
Dance 497
Dance Study Abroad (Africa, Caribbean, Brazil, Peru)
Dance 699
Independent Study
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN DANCE
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
Var
2
Var
Var
1. General University Core Curriculum, 42 credits, which includes the following:
Courses that fulfill the university-wide Oral and Written Communication Competency Part A (OWC-A) and
Quantitative Literacy Competency Part A (QL-A) requirements. These should be completed within the first 30
credits of the degree; and
Nine (9) credits from Peck School of the Arts non-Dance courses, chosen from three of the five other departments
in PSOA: Art & Design, Fine Arts, Music (required), Theatre, or Film, Video, Animation and New Genres. Three
of the nine credits must be chosen from the following Music course list, or alternate approved by Dance Faculty
Advisor: Music 100-Intro to Classical Music, 101-Fundamentals of Music, 102-American Popular Music, 130Beginning Piano, 140-Class Voice, 150-Beginning Guitar, 309-American Folk and Popular Music, 310-Intro to
World Musics (OWC-B), 317-Intro to American Music, 356-Music in Society, 449-Women in Music, 450-Intro
to Musicology, 489-Workshop with sub-topics, 680-Special Studies in Music with sub-topics.
2. Required Dance Courses, 66 credits, which include the following:
Dance Foundations courses, 16 credits; and
Dance courses that fulfill the university-wide Oral and Written Communication Competency Part B (OWC-B)
and Quantitative Literacy Competency Part B (QL-B) requirements.
3. General Electives, 12 cr.
BA DANCE CURRICULUM
Dance Technique and
Somatics Courses
Dance 103
Introduction to Iyengar Yoga
Dance 111
Ballet I
Dance 113
Modern Dance Technique I
Dance 112, 211, & Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet Tradition II-IV (Students must pass 212
212
with a B minimum.)
or
Dance 114, 213, & Contemporary Dance Practice: Modern Tradition II-IV (Students must pass
214
214 with a B minimum.)
Dance 122, or 335, or African Form: African Dance and Diaspora Technique I, or Hip Hop I, or
338, or 370
Capoeira: Afro-Brazilian Dance, or approved World Movement Traditions
Sub-topic (3 credits if GER-CD is desired for Dance 122.)
Dance 220
Body Sense
Dance 336, or 338, or Latino/Hispanic Form: Salsa and Merengue I or Capoeira: Afro-Brazilian
370
Dance or approved World Movement Traditions Sub-topic
Dance 334 or 370
Asian Form: Tai Chi Chuan or approved World Movement Traditions Subtopic
Dance 337 or 370
European Form: Ballroom Forms I or approved World Movement Traditions
Sub-topic
Total Techniques and Somatics Credits
2
3
3
9
9
2
3
2
2
2
28
Dance Creative
and Academic Courses
Dance 110
Dance 135
Dance 192
Dance 219
Dance 233
Dance 250
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance Freshman Seminar
Arts in Community Service
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Dance Sophomore Seminar
3
3
1
3
3
0
Dance 251
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Dance 313, 314, or History of Dance in the African Diaspora, Contemporary Dance History, or
315
History of the American Musical Theater (OWC-B)
Dance 319
Dance Service Learning
Dance 320
Rituals and Culture
Dance 350
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Dance 352
Digital Media Portfolio for Performers
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy
Dance 420
Creating Dance in the Community
Dance 460
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
Dance 601
Senior Project
Total Creative and Academic Credits
3
3
1
3
0
3
3
3
3
3
38
Recommended General Electives
Dance, Movement, and Theatre electives from the following Dance and Theatre courses.
Dance 115 and 116
Dance 117 and 217
Dance 313, 314
and/or 315
Dance 321 and 421
Dance 323 and 623
Dance 327 and 427
Dance 403
Dance 490/491*
Theatre 101
Theatre 260
Theatre 275
Theatre 320
Jazz Dance I and II
Tap I and II
History of Dance in the African Diaspora, Contemporary Dance History, or
History of the American Musical Theater (OWC-B)
Alexander Technique for the Performer, Alexander Technique Practicum
Body Conditioning: Pilates Method, Body Conditioning: Pilates Method II
Dance for Musical Theatre Styles I and II
Intermediate Yoga for Dancers
Repertoire and Ensemble, Repertory/Student Choreographer
Acting for Non-Majors
Storytelling (subtitle)
Performing Arts Management
Performing Community
2
2
3
2
2
2
1-3**
3
3
3
3
* Any dancer cast in faculty or guest artist choreography must be enrolled in at least 3 UWM Department of Dance
technique classes per week during the rehearsal semester.
** Per departmental policy, any time a student is cast in a faculty or guest artist work and is enrolled for less than 18
credits, he/she must enroll in Dance 490 for 1 credit during the appropriate semester.
Recommended Course of Study
Freshman Year (Includes Foundations Curriculum)
Fall Semester
Dance 111
Ballet I
Dance 135
Introduction to Dancemaking Skills
Dance 192
Dance Freshman Seminar
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 110
Introduction to the Art of Dance
Dance 113
Modern Dance Technique I
Dance 219
Arts in Community Service
Dance 233
Improvisation for Dancemaking
University Core
Total
Freshman Year
3
3
1
9
3
3
3
3
3
31
Sophomore Year
Fall Semester
Dance 122, or 335, or African Form: African Dance and Diaspora Technique I, or Hip Hop I, or
338, or 370
Capoeira: Afro-Brazilian Dance, or approved World Movement Traditions
Sub-topic
Dance 220
Body Sense
Dance 250
Dance Sophomore Seminar
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 112 or 114
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet or Modern Tradition II
Dance 319
Dance Service-Learning
Dance 320 or 420
Rituals and Culture or Creating Dance in the Community
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy
University Core
Total
Sophomore Year
Junior Year
Either Fall or Spr History of Dance in the African Diaspora, or Contemporary Dance History,
Dance 313, or 314, or or History of the American Musical Theater (OWC-B)
315
Fall Semester
Dance 313
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Dance 350
Dance Upper-Level Seminar
Dance 336, or 338, or Latino/Hispanic Form: Salsa and Merengue I, or Capoeira: Afro-Brazilian
370
Dance, or approved World Movement Traditions Sub-topic
Dance 460
Teaching Dance in Community Settings
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 211 or 213
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet or Modern Tradition III
Dance 320 or 420
Rituals and Culture or Creating Dance in the Community
Dance 352
Digital Media Portfolio for Performers
University Core
Total
Junior Year
Senior Year
Fall Semester
Dance 103
Introduction to Iyengar Yoga
Dance 337 or 370
European Form: Ballroom Forms I or approved World Movement Traditions
Sub-topic
University Core
Spring Semester
Dance 212 or 214
Contemporary Dance Practice: Ballet or Modern Tradition IV
Dance 334 or 370
Asian Form: Tai Chi Chuan or approved World Movement Traditions Subtopic
Dance 601
Senior Project
University Core
Total
Senior Year
TOTAL REQUIRED CREDITS FOR BA DEGREE
2
3
0
9
3
1
3
3
6
30
3
3
0
2
3
3
3
3
3
6
29
2
2
12
3
2
3
6
30
120
SOMATICS MINOR REQUIREMENTS
Admission Requirements. Students must meet general University admission requirements to be admitted to any of the
undergraduate curricula as a freshman or transfer student. Prior to completing 6-8 credits of the Somatics Minor
coursework, students must apply for and be accepted into the minor. Application consists of (a) online application at
arts.uwm.edu/dance (click on Somatics Minor) and (b) submission of unofficial UWM transcript to the Dance Office in
Mitchell 345. No more than 6-8 credits (2-3 courses) will be applied toward the minor until after a student has been
admitted and a Dance Faculty Advisor has been assigned.
Continuation Requirements. Students are required to submit a one-page paper each time they complete a class in the
Minor, reflecting on how the class fits within the broader context of somatic integration. The paper should be submitted
via email to the co-directors of the program at [email protected] If the paper is not emailed within a week of
the end of the term, that course may not count towards Minor requirements.
Students must maintain a 2.75 GPA overall to remain in the Somatics Minor.
All students are expected to demonstrate a strong commitment to their health and overall conditioning in order to fulfill
the department's academic requirements for the Somatics Minor.
SOMATICS MINOR CURRICULUM
Required Courses in Dance
Dance 103
Dance 133 or 233
Dance 220
Dance 251
Dance 321
Dance 414 or 601
Dance 371
Total
Introduction to Iyengar Yoga
Creative Movement (for Non-Dance majors) or Improvisation for
Dancemaking (for Dance majors)
Body Sense
Laban Movement Analysis (QL-B)
Alexander Technique for the Performer
Capstone Course: Dance Composition III (for Dance BFA majors) or Senior
Project (for Dance BA or Non-Dance majors)
Applied Anatomy
2
3
3
3
2
3
3
16
Electives in Dance (please choose 12 cr from the
following):
Dance 122, or 334, or African Dance and Diaspora Technique I, or Tai Chi Chuan, or approved
370
World Movement Traditions Sub-topic
Dance 323
Body Conditioning: Pilates Method
Dance 360
Movement and Learning
Dance 371
Applied Anatomy (strongly recommended for students whose major doesn’t
include anatomy/kinesiology)
Dance 403
Intermediate Yoga for Dancers
Dance 421
Alexander Technique Practicum
Dance 489
Workshop in Dance: approved Somatic sub-topic(s) only
Dance 623
Body Conditioning: Pilates Method II
Total
Total Credits for Somatics Minor
Recommended Course of Study
Freshman Year
Fall Semester: Dance 220 taught by Dance Faculty
Spring Semester: Dance 321
28
2
2
3
3
2
2
2-3
2
12
Sophomore Year
Dance 103, Dance 133 or 233, Dance 371
Junior Year
Dance 251, Dance 323 or 421, Dance 360
Senior Year
Dance 334, Dance 414 or 601
Courses
Dance (DANCE)
Web Home Pages:
[ Peck
School of the Arts ]
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Dance
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Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Peck School of the Arts
Inter-Arts
Courses: Fine Arts (FINEART)
COURSE OF STUDY
ATTENTION PROSPECTIVE INTER-ARTS BFA/MUSICAL THEATRE TRACK STUDENTS: No new
students are being accepted into the Inter-Arts/Musical Theatre track as of the 2015 fall semester. A new Musical
Theatre degree program is now being offered under the Theatre Department of the Peck School of the Arts.
Please consult the Theatre Department’s degree program information in this catalog for detailed information on
the new program.
The BFA in Inter-Arts is designed to nurture and develop a mature
interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary artist, critic, or
scholar. The
two tracks leading to the Inter-Arts BFA degree lay strong
developmental foundations coupled with
advanced project creation by
students in both tracks. Each track provides a capstone experience in
which the student
reveals advanced interdisciplinary/multidisciplinary
accomplishment as well as a unique personal voice.
Students majoring in Inter-Arts can choose one of two tracks:
the Dual Discipline Track (Track 1) or the
Interdisciplinary Arts and
Technology Track (Track 2).
Laptop Requirement. All entering Interdisciplinary
Arts and Technology (IAT) students are required to participate in
the
PSOA Laptop program. Please see requirements posted on the PSOA Laptop
Requirement web page:
www.uwm.edu/psoa/laptop.
The two Inter-Arts tracks leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Fine Arts require a minimum of 120 credits for
graduation distributed
as follows:
1. Peck School of the Arts Inter-Arts Major/Dual Discipline Track:
Core Curriculum
Studio Courses
Electives
Total
45*
72
3
120
2. Peck School of the Arts Inter-Arts Major/Interdisciplinary Arts and Technology (IAT) Track:
Core Curriculum
IAT Courses
Electives
Total
45*
66
9
120
* All Inter-Arts BFA students who complete an introductory-level course
in four of the PSOA's five departments will
have met the PSOA
distribution requirement.
DUAL DISCIPLINE TRACK (TRACK 1)
Students must select two 36-credit options from the following
five department curricula in order to complete the 72credit studio
course component of the Inter-Arts Track 1.
Art Curriculum (36 cr)
A portfolio review is required for admission. Please see
admission requirements for Art & Design Program.
Pre-Art Requirements
Art 101
Art 106
Art 108
Art 109
Art 118
Subtotal
Drawing I
Art Survey
2D Concepts
3D Concepts
Digital Arts: Culture,
Theory, Practice
3
3
3
3
3
15
Areas of Concentration
Students choose either one area (Option #1) or two areas (Option
#2) of concentration from the following options:
Ceramics
Cross Disciplinary
Digital Studio Practice
Fibers
Jewelry and Metalsmithing
Painting and Drawing
Photography
Print and Narrative Forms
Sculpture
Option #1
Art 2xx
Art 3xx/4xx
One intro-level course in
area of concentration
Five advanced-level courses
in area of concentration
3
15
Two intro-level courses from two different areas of concentration
Four advanced-level courses
in area of concentration
6
12
Option #2
Art 2xx
Art 3xx/4xx
Art & Design Capstone
Requirement
Art 604
Art 605
Subtotal
Professional Practices
BFA Exhibition
3
0
3
Art Curriculum Total
36
Dance Curriculum (36 cr)
Audition Requirement. Students selecting the Inter-Arts Dance
Curriculum option must pass an entry audition into the
Dance program.
Dance 110
Introduction to the Art of
Dance
Dance 135
Introduction to Dancemaking
Skills
Dance 213
Modern Dance Technique III
Dance 214
Modern Dance Technique IV
Dance 233
Improvisation for Dancemaking
Dance 314
Contemporary Dance History
Dance 317
Modern Dance Technique V
Dance 318
Modern Dance Technique VI
Dance 412
Dance Composition I
Dance 415
Movement and New Media Collaborations
Dance 490
Repertoire and Ensemble
Dance 601
Senior Project
Dance 122 or Dance 1 semester of cultural dance
style chosen from African Dances: (subtitle) or
370
World Movement Traditions: (subtitle)
Dance Curriculum Total
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
3
2
36
All dance majors must maintain a 3.0 GPA in department courses
to remain in the program. In addition, Dance InterArts BFA candidates
must pass a mid-program performance review for continuance in the
program.
Film/Video/Animation/New Genres Curriculum (36 cr)
Film 116
Film 117
Film 201
or
Film 202
Film 114
or
Film 210
Subtotal
Listening and Recording
Filmmaking Technologies and
Techniques
Introduction to Experimental
Media Arts
Current Topics in Media Arts
Production
Film and Experience: The Filmmaker and the Viewer
Concepts of Production in the Media Arts
3
3
3
3
3
3
12
Film/Video/Animation/New Genres Pre-Portfolio Studios
(Students select two courses for a total of 6 credits.)
Film 220
Film 222
Film 255
Subtotal
Basic Elements of Filmmaking
Introduction to Digital Filmmaking
Introduction to Digital Arts
3
3
3
6
Film/Video/Animation/New Genres Electives
15 credits of electives selected from Film courses that are 300-level and above. To be taken after portfolio review. A
minimum of 9 credits must be selected from the following:
Film 380
Media Arts Module:
(subtitle)
Film 420
Intermediate Media Arts
Module: (subtitle)
Film 460
Advanced Media Arts Module:
(subtitle)
Subtotal
Film 509
Senior Project I
Subtotal
Film/Video/Animation/New Genres Curriculum Total
3-9
3-9
3-9
15
3
3
36
Music Curriculum (36 cr)
Audition Requirement. Students selecting the Inter-Arts Music
Curriculum option must pass an audition at the 200
level of
proficiency.
Music 101
Fundamentals of Music*
or
Music 123 and 127 Aural Theory I (1 cr) and Materials of Theory I (2 cr)
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
Music 211
General History of Western
Music I
Music 212
General History of Western
Music II
Music 307
General History of Western
Music III
MusPerf 2xx
Performance Instrument (4
semesters)
MusPerf 1
Fundamentals of Piano: (subtitle)**
Music xxx
Performing Organization
Courses (4 semesters)
Music xxx
Music History Electives
Music xxx
Music Theory Electives
Music xxx
Music Electives
Music Curriculum Total
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
4
1
4
3
3
5-9
36
* May be required as determined by proficiency examination. If waived by proficiency exam, then credits must be taken
as Music electives.
** MusPerf 1 may be waived by examination. If MusPerf 1 is waived, then credit must be taken as either a Music
elective or as an additional semester of MusPerf 2xx Performance Instrument.
Theatre Curriculum (36 cr)
Theatre Core
Theatre 110
Fundamentals of the Actor's Process
Theatre 213
Play Analysis
Theatre 236
Theatre Production and Design
Theatre 275
Performing Arts Management
Theatre 305
The Theatrical Experience: (subtitle)
Select one of the following:
Theatre 214
Stagecraft
Theatre 225
Costume Construction
Pick any two of the following:
Theatre 321
The Theatre – Beginnings
Through Realism
Theatre 322
The Theatre – Modern and
Contemporary Period
Theatre 323
Special Topics in World Theatre: (subtitle)
Subtotal
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
25
Theatre Electives: 11
credits from the following electives
Costume Option
Theatre 304
Theatre 325
Theatre 224
Theatre 343
Theatre 401
Costume Design
History of Costume
Make-up
Patternmaking I
Fabric Painting and Dyeing
3
3
3
3
3
Introduction to Musical Theatre
Theatre Games
Participatory Theatre
Acting II – Text and
Performance
Introduction to Voice and Speech
Storytelling
Acting Topics
Stage Directing
Performance Workshop Capstone
Independent Study
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
Playwriting
Playwriting II
Theatre Capstone: (subtitle)
3
3
3
Performance Option
Theatre 108
Theatre 111
Theatre 204
Theatre 230
Theatre 231
Theatre 260
Theatre 330
Theatre 410
Theatre 472
Theatre 699
Playwriting Option
Theatre 359
Theatre 459
Theatre 465
Technical Theatre Option
Theatre 215
Properties Production
Theatre 318
Scene Design
Theatre 319
Scenic Painting
Theatre 337
Sound Production
Theatre 338
Lighting Production
Theatre 437
Sound Design and Technology
Theatre Curriculum Total
3
3
3
3
3
3
36
INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY (IAT) (Track 2)
Admission Requirements
Students planning to pursue the IAT track of the Inter-Arts degree
must meet the admission and degree requirements of
the Peck School of
the Arts. After completing the Inter-Arts/IAT core (12 cr) and the
Pre-IAT Studios (12 cr), IAT track
majors will have their portfolio
reviewed for approval by the IAT Review Committee.
Inter-Arts/IAT
BFA Degree Requirements
University Core Curriculum
45
Inter-Arts/IAT Requirements
Electives
BFA Degree in Inter-Arts/IAT
Track
66
9
120
IAT Requirements
Inter-Arts/IAT Core: 12 cr (included in University Core
Curriculum)
Art 118
Film 116
Music 220
Dance 321
Digital Arts: Culture,
Theory, Practice
Listening and Recording
Introduction to Computers
with Music
Alexander Technique for the
Performer
3
3
3
3
Pre-IAT Studios: 12 cr
Art 218
Film 222
Film 255
Music 327
2D Design Strategies
Introduction to Digital Filmmaking
Introduction to Digital Arts
Analog and Digital Synthesis
I
3
3
3
3
Portfolio review:
After completing the Inter-Arts/IAT Core and Pre-IAT Studio requirements,
students submit:
1. A portfolio of three projects: two projects from different IAT
studio courses and one project in any medium;
2. A completed
application form; and
3. A copy of their academic transcript.
The IAT Review Committee will consider the artistic strength of the portfolio projects, student performance in classes,
and overall GPA. All materials must be received by the posted deadline at the end of fall and spring semesters. The IAT
Review Committee consists of a minimum of one representative faculty member from each discipline and the program
coordinator(s), with a maximum of six faculty members.
Faculty who have worked with these students are encouraged
to share
impressions of student work, maturity, and growth.
IAT Post-Portfolio Core: 15 cr
Art 316
Dance 415
Film 380
FineArt 313
Music 680
Interactive and Multimedia Art
Movement and New Media Collaborations
Media Arts Module: Physical
Computing
Programming for Artists
Special Studies in Music:
(subtitle)*
3
3
3
3
3
* Topics as approved on list maintained by IAT Coordinator
IAT Electives: 21 cr
Courses are selected from the approved list maintained by the
IAT Coordinator. Students must take course prerequisites
or seek
permission of instructor for admission.
Art 224
Art/Film 259/459
Art 393
Art 493
Art 317
Dynamic Typography
Photography Workshop:
(subtitle)
Digital Printmaking
Advanced Digital Printmaking
3D Imaging I
3
3
3
3
3
Art 319
Art 324
Art 327
Art/Film 350
Art 402
Art 427
Film 380
Film 420
Film 455
Film 460
FineArt 411
FineArt 311
FineArt 511
Music 301
Music 328
Music 420
Music 680
Hybrid Sculptural Forms:
(subtitle)*
Web Design
Digital Media Workshop:
(subtitle)*
Color Photography
Art and Design Workshop:
(subtitle)*
Advanced Design Workshop:
(subtitle)*
Media Arts Module:
(subtitled)*
Intermediate Arts Module:
(subtitle)*
Integrated Film/Video
Exploration
Advanced Media Arts Module:
(subtitle)*
Time/Space II
Spatial Interactivity I
Spatial Interactivity II
Music Theory for
Interdisciplinary Studies
Digital Synthesis and Systems
II
Advanced Computing and Music
Special Studies in Music:
(subtitle)*
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
* Topics as approved on list maintained by IAT Coordinator
Theory and Context Courses: 6 cr
Electives (300-level or above
from approved list)
Capstone Courses: 12 cr
FineArt 410
FineArt 510
IAT Junior Project
IAT Senior Project
6
6
IAT Junior and Senior Projects. Students must
complete the projects in good standing and present their work in a
public exhibition/screening at the end of the semester.
General Electives: 9 cr
Total Inter-Arts/IAT BFA Degree Credits
120
Courses
FINEART
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University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017:
Inter-Arts
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Copyright 2016 by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, all rights reserved.
UWM Undergraduate Catalog
2016-2017
Peck School of the Arts
Music
Undergraduate Programs
Graduate Programs
Music for the Non-major
Admission, Audition, and Scholarship Procedures
Music Degree Requirements
Music Performance Major
Music Education (Bachelor of Fine Arts with Teacher Certification)
Music Education - Instrumental (Wind and Percussion) K-12 Program Requirements
Music Education - Instrumental (Wind and Percussion) K-12 Curriculum
Music Education - Instrumental (Strings) K-12 Program Requirements
Music Education - Instrumental (Strings) K-12 Curriculum
Music Education - Choral 6-12 Program Requirements
Music Education - Choral 6-12 Curriculum
Music Education - General Music K-12 Program Requirements
Music Education - General Music K-12 Curriculum
Music History and Literature
Music Composition and Technology
Bachelor of Arts in Music
Courses: Music (MUSIC)
Courses: Music Performance (MUSPERF)
Courses: Music Education (MUS ED)
Undergraduate
Programs
The Department of Music offers courses of study in Music Performance (Winds, Brass, Percussion, Strings, Piano,
Organ, Voice, and Guitar), Music Education, Music History and Literature, Jazz Studies, and Music Composition and
Technology. The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) program is designed for students seeking intensive study to develop
those skills needed for a professional career and/or preparation for graduate school. The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree is
designed for students looking for a broad-based understanding of multiple aspects of music in addition to areas outside
of the music field. Our faculty and programs maintain strong partnerships with performance organizations in Milwaukee
and the surrounding region providing a vibrant urban location that puts students in the cultural mainstream of a thriving
and sophisticated metropolis of over one million people.
The department is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) and provides
professional training and personal enrichment as the main focus of the music curriculum. Visit us at:
www.uwm.edu/psoa/music.
The various undergraduate curricula lead to the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Music, Bachelor of Fine Arts in Music
Education, or Bachelor of Arts in Music degree. The following courses of study are available:
Music Performance. A curriculum in voice, keyboard, or another instrument that prepares the student for both
professional performance and studio teaching.
Jazz Studies. A curriculum that prepares the student for professional jazz performance and studio teaching in jazz.
Music Education. A curriculum in choral, instrumental, and/or general (K-12) music education culminating in
certification by the State of Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction that prepares students to teach music in the
elementary and secondary schools.
Music History and Literature. A curriculum that focuses on the historical and critical study of music and prepares the
student for specialization and graduate work in musicology, music librarianship, and music criticism.
Music Composition and Technology. A curriculum that prepares the student for a professional career in composition
and specialization in creative musical writing and related analytical skills and electronic music software applications.
Bachelor of Arts in Music. A general music degree designed for music students interested in combining a music major
with a second major or minor in a non-music degree program.
Graduate Programs
The various graduate curricula lead to the Master of Music or
Master of Fine Arts degree with concentrations in Music
Performance,
Conducting, Music Theory, Music History and Literature, and Music
Education. (See the Graduate
School Bulletin for details.)
The Leonard Sorkin International Institute of Chamber Music is a
two-year program leading to a Certificate in Chamber
Music Performance.
Music for the Non-Major
While professional training is the main thrust of the UWM music
curricula, the department offers many personal
enrichment courses for
the non-music major. UWM students have the opportunity to participate in
a wide range of
performing organizations such as the Concert Chorale,
Jazz Band, Symphony Band, Symphony Orchestra, University
Band,
University Choir, Wind Ensemble, Women's Chorus, Men's Chorus, Gospel
Choir, and University Community
Orchestra.
Private or class music lessons are also offered to the non-music
major under the following conditions:
1.A successful audition;
2.Consent of instructor and
availability of instructional time;
and
3.Concurrent registration in an
approved Music Performance organization. For further information
contact the
Department of Music at (414) 229-5162.
Admission, Audition, and Scholarship
Procedures
Throughout the year, the Music Department schedules new student audition days. In addition to meeting the general
University admission requirements, a prospective music degree candidate must successfully complete an audition in his
or her primary performance area (Principle Instrument), and take music theory and piano placement exams.
Composition majors must submit original works to the Composition faculty for consideration. In certain degree
programs, students must successfully pass an audition on a secondary instrument as required.
Pre-Music Education majors must audition for the certification program with the Music Education Area, while enrolled
in Mus Ed 350, preferably in their fourth semester.
Students accepted through auditions who lack basic aural, theory, and/or keyboard skills must successfully complete
Music 1 (Theory Fundamentals) and/or MusPerf 1 (Piano Fundamentals) in their first year of study. A final grade of
“B” or higher is required to enroll in the subsequent Music Theory and Piano courses.
Provisional. Students declared Provisional at the time of auditions could achieve Music Major status based on the
successful Jury performance at the end of the first semester. Students not performing a successful first semester Jury
will not be allowed to continue as a Music Major and will be dropped from the Music Department. Provisional students
must take all required first semester music courses during the provisional semester.
Probation. A Music Major who has a studio performance grade of C or lower for two consecutive semesters may be
placed on Music Department Probation. (A 2.75 GPA is required for continuation in the Music Education degree
program.) Cleared Probation: Either re-audition or a passing grade for the performance lessons and final Jury is
attained during the semester of probation and a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above.
Not Accepted. Prospective students not accepted at their initial audition are allowed one additional audition
opportunity.
Re-audition. Required after an absence of two consecutive semesters from the UWM Music Department as a music
major actively progressing toward degree. The returning student must successfully re-audition in their principle
area. The Music Education major must re-audition in their principle area and re-interview with the Music Education
faculty.
Transfer students. All transfer students must audition on their principle instrument, be accepted by the faculty in their
course of study, and take placement exams in Music Theory and piano. Transfer students must enroll in the level of
Music Theory recommended by the Theory Area. Undergraduate transfer students who have completed two years at
another university, college, or junior college may not be able to graduate with only two years of study at
UWM. Students transferring from another Music Education program should contact the Chair of the Music Education
area prior to audition.
Scholarship. If you wish to be considered for a music scholarship, you are encouraged to audition no later than March
of the school year preceding your intended matriculation. Lists of suggested repertoire, which can serve as a helpful
guideline for your audition, can be obtained from the Peck School of the Arts Department of Music website at: http://www4.uwm.edu/psoa/music/admission/. For additional information, contact the Music Department at (414) 2295162.
University Competency Requirements. OWC Part A and QL Part A should be completed within the first two
semesters of pursuing a music program.
Oral and Written Communication (OWC) Competency
OWC Part A: Completion of OWC Part A can be demonstrated by satisfying one of the following options:
Earning at least three credits with a grade of C or higher in English 102,* or
Transferring at least three credits with a grade of C or higher in a course equivalent to English 102 or higher level
expository writing course,* or
Achieving an appropriate score on the English Placement Test (EPT).
OWC Part B: The OWC Part B is satisfied by completing Music 310 (Introduction to World Musics) with a written or
oral communication component for students who have completed the Part A requirement.
Quantitative Literacy (QL) Competency
QL Part A. Completion of QL Part A can be demonstrated by satisfying one of the following options:
Earning at least three credits with a grade of C or higher in Math 102, 103 (formerly 106), 105, 108, 175 or
equivalent courses,* or
Achieving a placement code of at least 30 on the mathematics placement test.
QL Part B: The QL Part B is satisfied by completing QL-B course Music 225 (Materials of Theory III). QL-B courses
make significant use of quantitative tools in the context of other course material.
*These courses may not be taken credit/no credit if they are to be used to satisfy the OWC-A requirement or QL-A
requirement.
Foreign Language Requirement. Completion of the UWM foreign language requirement can be demonstrated by
satisfying one of the following options:
Complete with passing grades, prior to enrollment at UWM, at least two consecutive years of high school-level
instruction in a single foreign language, or
Complete with passing grades at least two consecutive semesters (minimum of 6 credits) of college level
instruction in a single foreign language, or
Demonstrate foreign language ability equivalent to two semesters of college-level instruction by means of a
satisfactory score on an approved placement, proficiency, departmental, or other appropriate examination.
Foreign language requirements in Music vary based on degree program. Consult individual degree programs for
requirements.
Department of Music Foreign Language Requirements: Minimum of 6 crs. See individual area requirements.
Winds, Brass, and Percussion; Piano/Organ; Guitar; Jazz Studies; Multiple Winds; Composition and Technology;
Music Education; Strings – 0-6 cr. May be fulfilled by two consecutive years of high school instruction or a
minimum 6 credits in a language (including American Sign Language) other than English at the college 100 level
or above.
Collaborative Piano-Vocal – 12 cr. The three-semester foreign language requirement must be fulfilled by the
study of 3 different languages at the introductory level. Must include German I, French I, and Italian I.
Voice – 16 cr. Two languages required at Level I and Level II chosen between German, French, or Italian.
Music History and Literature – 14 cr. Requirements may be fulfilled by a minimum of four semesters of study in a
single language, which amounts to 14 credits (4 + 4 + 3 + 3). German is the preferred language but depending on
a student’s interest, Italian is also accepted. Consult with the History Area.
Music Degree Requirements
All music curricula for the BFA require 125-130 credits,
distributed as follows: Music courses as specified in each
curriculum:
75-80 credits; core curriculum: 45 credits; general electives: 0-5
credits. The BA in music requires 120
credits, distributed as
follows: Music courses, 48 credits; core curriculum, 45 credits;
general electives, 27 credits.
Performance Ensemble Requirement. All music majors are required to participate in performing ensembles during the
course of their study. All Performance and Music Education majors must be registered in an approved major performing
ensemble concurrent with each semester of private study. The director of bands, the director of choral activities, and the
director of orchestras make ensemble assignments at the beginning of each semester. Only one approved ensemble
credit per semester can apply toward degree requirements. For the purpose of fulfilling the Performance Ensemble
requirement, the Department of Music recognizes the following approved major performing Ensembles: Concert
Chorale, University Choir, Women’s Chorus, Wind Ensemble, Symphony Band, University Band, Symphony
Orchestra, and University Community Orchestra.
(Other performance ensembles may be approved in certain degree
programs; see individual degree programs below for
specific
requirements in each area.)
Performance Ensemble Requirement for Transfer Students.
Credits from an accredited college/university for
performing
organizations may be granted as follows:
All transfer students to UWM, regardless of entry level,
must take at least two semesters of an approved major
performing
ensemble. The performing ensemble must conform to the
individual degree requirements: instrumentalists
take band or
orchestra, vocalists take choral ensembles;
Entering sophomores with 30 or more earned credits may only transfer up to two completed semesters of an
approved performing ensemble from another university; and
Entering juniors with 60 or more earned credits may only transfer up to four completed semesters of an approved
performing ensemble from another university.
Recital Attendance and Music Convocation Requirements. All music majors must attend weekly Music Convocation
meetings for a minimum of five semesters. All students entering the Music Department as freshmen are required to take
one semester of Music 106 (Foundations of Music) during their freshman year.
All music majors, except transfer students and second-degree candidates, must earn 80 recital attendance credits for
graduation. This requirement may be met by attending:
Campus recitals (one attendance credit per recital);
Weekly departmental Music Convocation (five attendance credits per semester); and
Off-campus recitals (one attendance credit per recital to a maximum of three per semester).
Transfer students and second-degree candidates must earn 10 recital credits (including weekly Music Convocation) for
each semester on the UWM campus, to a total of 80, or until the completion of the degree.
Music Performance Course Enrollment Requirements. The study of
music performance in private lessons, master
classes, and seminars is
governed by four special conditions:
1. Performance courses (lessons) cannot be dropped after the second week of each semester;
2. Eligibility for undergraduate music major private lessons requires a minimum of 4 credits in Music Department
courses. Only one ensemble credit can be applied to the 4-credit minimum;
3. All music majors are required to enroll in an approved ensemble concurrent with each semester of Performance
lessons; and
4. Students enrolled in Music Performance lessons at the 300 level or above must enroll in the appropriate master
class. Students enrolled in Music Performance lessons at the 200 level or below may apply Master Class toward
music electives.
Music Theory and History Requirements. The Music Theory core comprises a three-semester sequence of Materials
of Theory concurrently with three semesters of Aural Theory. This is followed by a semester of Form Analysis.
The Music History core comprises the three-semester sequence of
the General History of Western Music.
Additional Music Theory and Music History courses are required in all music degree programs. See individual programs
for details.
Laptop Requirement. Music students in all areas will
be encouraged to have a laptop computer during their course of
study
in the department. Students in the BFA Music Composition and
Technology program will be required to have a
laptop computer once
they are admitted. Please see requirements posted on the PSOA Laptop
Requirement web page:
www4.uwm.edu/psoa/laptop.
Music Performance Major
A prospective student must demonstrate advanced technical and
artistic skills at the admission audition for a
performance degree.
Music Course Requirements--65-80 credits with variable
electives. See individual area requirements.
Principle Instrument or Voice--16 cr.
Includes four semesters of Music Performance at 300 level (2 cr/sem
totaling 8
cr) and four semesters at 400 level (2 cr/sem totaling 8
cr). Guitar majors are required to complete eight semesters of
Music Performance study on their Principle Instrument at 300 level (2 cr/sem totaling 8 cr) and four semesters at 400
level (2 cr/sem totaling 8 cr) and four semesters of Music Performance in Secondary Guitar Style at the 100 level. The
Multiple Woodwind majors are required to complete six semesters of Music Performance on a secondary instrument at
the 100 level (1cr/sem) and four semesters of Music Performance on a tertiary instrument at the 100 level (1cr/sem).
The Piano Pedagogy program includes 8 credits at the 200 level.
Master Class. Students enrolled in Music Performance lessons at the 300 level or above must enroll in the appropriate
master class. Students enrolled in Music Performance lessons at the 200 level or below may apply Master Class toward
music electives. See individual area requirements.
Piano Requirement--2-8 cr.Based on audition results, students enroll in MusPerf 1 (Levels I and II) for up to 2
semesters or MusPerf 101 up to 6 semesters. MusPerf 1 will not be counted toward degree requirement. See individual
area requirements.
Major Ensemble--6-8 cr.
(1 cr per sem) Students taking individual lessons must concurrently
be enrolled in an
approved Performance Ensemble. See Performance
Ensemble requirements.
Chamber Ensemble--3-8 cr.
Applies to Instrumental Curriculum only.
Music Theory and History--31-47 cr. See individual area
requirements or electives.
Conducting--2-4 cr.
See individual area requirements or electives.
Junior Recital--0 cr.
Supervised preparation towards full or one-half junior recital. See
individual area requirements.
Senior Recital--0-2 cr.
Supervised preparation towards required full senior recital.
Foundations of Music (Music 106), one semester taken during freshman year and Music Convocation (Music
107), five semesters. See Recital and Music Convocation Requirements.
0 Credit Courses: A 1 credit fee will be assessed by the University if course load is less than 12 credits or greater
than 18.
Electives--0-12 cr.
See individual area requirements or electives.
MUSIC PERFORMANCE CURRICULUM
Recommended Curricular Order for Each Program
WINDS, BRASS, AND PERCUSSION
Freshman Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
1
Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
MusPerf 1 or 101
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 123
Aural Theory I
Music 127
Materials of Theory I
2
Foundations
of Music
Music 106
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Freshman Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
1
Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
MusPerf 1 or 101
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Materials of Theory III
Music 22510
Music 226
Aural Theory III
Music 211
General History of Western Music I
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 230
Form Analysis
Music 212
General History of Western Music II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 361-370, 561 Chamber Ensemble
Music 307
General History of Western Music III
Music 321
Counterpoint
Music 353
Conducting
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester II
Cr
2
1
1
1
2
0
8
15
Cr
2
1
1
1
3
0
8
16
Cr
2
1
3
1
3
0
6
16
Cr
2
1
3
3
0
8
17
Cr
2
1
1
3
3
2
0
5
17
Cr
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 361-370, 561 Chamber Ensemble
Music 659
Junior Recital
Music 354
Instrumental Conducting
Choose one of the following Music History electives:
Music 303
Jazz History – 3 cr.
Music 308
Selected Topics in Music History and Literature: (subtitle) – 3 cr.
Music 311
Music of the Baroque Era – 3 cr.
Music 312
Music of the Classic Era – 3 cr.
Music 313
Music of the Romantic Era – 3 cr.
Music 314
Music Since 1900 – 3 cr.
Music 611
Music of the Medieval Era – 3 cr.
Music 612
Music of the Renaissance and Early Modern Era – 3 cr.
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 361-370, 561 Chamber Ensemble
Music 310
Introduction to World Musics
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 660
Senior Recital
Choose one Music Theory elective:
Music 323
Instrumentation – 3 cr.
or
Music 421
Materials of Contemporary Music – 3 cr.
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
2
1
1
0
2
3
0
8
17
Cr
2
1
1
3
9
16
Cr
2
1
2
3
8
16
PRINCIPLE INSTRUMENT: STRINGS
Freshman Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
1
Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
MusPerf 1 or 101
Music 182
Symphony Orchestra
Music 361-370, 561 Chamber Ensemble
Music 123
Aural Theory I
Music 127
Materials of Theory I
2
Foundations
of Music
Music 106
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Freshman Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
1
Fundamentals
of Piano or Lessons in Piano
MusPerf 1 or 101
Music 182
Symphony Orchestra
Cr
2
1
1
1
1
2
0
9
17
Cr
2
1
1
Music 361-370, 561 Chamber Ensemble
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 182
Symphony Orchestra
Music 361-370, 561 Chamber Ensemble
Materials of Theory III
Music 22510
Music 226
Aural Theory III
Music 211
General History of Western Music I
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 182
Symphony Orchestra
Music 361-370, 561 Chamber Ensemble
Music 230
Form Analysis
Music 212
General History of Western Music II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 182
Symphony Orchestra
Music 361-370, 561 Chamber Ensemble
Music 307
General History of Western Music III
Choose one Music Theory elective:
Music 220
Introduction to Computers and Music – 3 cr.
Music 321
Counterpoint – 3 cr.
Music 323
Instrumentation – 3 cr.
Music 327
Analog and Digital Synthesis I – 3 cr.
Music 328
Digital Synthesis and Systems II – 3 cr.
Music 420
Advanced Computing and Music – 3 cr.
Music 421
Materials of Contemporary Music – 3 cr.
Music 680
Special Studies in Music Theory: (subtitle) – 3 cr.
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 182
Symphony Orchestra
Music 361-370, 561 Chamber Ensemble
Music 659
Junior Recital
Choose one Music History elective:
Music 303
Jazz History – 3 cr.
Music 308
Selected Topics in Music History and Literature: (subtitle) – 3 cr.
Music 311
Music of the Baroque Era – 3 cr.
Music 312
Music of the Classic Era – 3 cr.
Music 313
Music of the Romantic Era – 3 cr.
1
1
3
0
8
17
Cr
2
1
1
3
1
3
0
7
18
Cr
2
1
1
3
3
0
7
17
Cr
2
1
1
3
3
0
6
16
Cr
2
1
1
0
3
Music 314
Music Since 1900—3 cr.
Music 611
Music of the Medieval Era – 3 cr.
Music 612
Music of the Renaissance and Early Modern Era—3 cr.
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Choose One Music Elective
Music 353
Conducting – 2 cr.
Music 447
String Pedagogy – 2 cr.
Music 561
Advanced Ensemble – 1-3 cr.
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 182
Symphony Orchestra
Music 361-370,561 Chamber Ensemble
Introduction to World Musics
Music 3109
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
Music 182
Symphony Orchestra
Music 361-370,561 Chamber Ensemble
Music 660
Senior Recital
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
0
3
6
16
Cr
2
1
1
3
8
15
Cr
2
1
1
2
8
14
PRINCIPLE INSTRUMENT: PIANO AND ORGAN4
Freshman Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Piano or Organ
Performance
Choral Ensemble
Ensemble5
Music 123
Aural Theory I
Music 127
Materials of Theory I
2
Foundations
of Music
Music 106
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Freshman Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Piano or Organ
Performance
Choral Ensemble
Ensemble
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Piano or Organ
Performance
Any ensemble with piano instructor consent
Ensemble
Materials of Theory III
Music 22510
Music 226
Aural Theory III
Cr
2
1
1
2
0
10
16
Cr
2
1
1
3
0
9
16
Cr
2
1
3
1
Music 211
General History of Western Music I
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Piano or Organ
Performance
Any ensemble with piano instructor consent
Ensemble
Music 230
Form Analysis
Music 212
General History of Western Music II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Piano or Organ
Performance
Any ensemble with piano instructor consent
Ensemble
Music 259
Accompanying
Music 275
Keyboard Performance Repertoire I
Music 307
General History of Western Music III
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Music 353
Conducting
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Piano or Organ
Performance
Any ensemble with piano instructor consent
Ensemble
Music 276
Keyboard Performance Repertoire II
Music 323
Instrumentation
Music 659
Junior Recital
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
9
Introduction to World Musics
Music 310
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Piano or Organ
Music 259
Accompanying
Choose one Music History elective:
Music 303
Jazz History – 3 cr.
Music 308
Selected Topics in Music History and Literature: (subtitle) – 3 cr.
Music 311
Music of the Baroque Era—3 cr.
Music 312
Music of the Classic Era – 3 cr.
Music 314
Music Since 1900 – 3 cr.
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Piano or Organ
Music 448
Piano Pedagogy
Music 421
Materials of Contemporary Music
Music 660
Senior Recital
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
3
0
7
17
Cr
2
1
3
3
0
7
16
Cr
2
1
2
2
3
0
2
6
18
Cr
2
1
2
3
0
0
3
6
17
Cr
2
2
3
8
15
Cr
2
2
3
2
6
15
PRINCIPLE INSTRUMENT: COLLABORATIVE PIANO-VOCAL7
Freshman Year – Semester I
MusPerf 304
Lessons in Collaborative Piano-Vocal (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
MusPerf 101
Lessons in Piano (technique)
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Music 123
Aural Theory I
Music 127
Materials of Theory I
2
Foundations
of Music
Music 106
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Freshman Year – Semester II
MusPerf 304
Lessons in Collaborative Piano-Vocal (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
MusPerf 101
Lessons in Piano (technique)
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester I
MusPerf 304
Lessons in Collaborative Piano-Vocal (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
MusPerf 101
Lessons in Piano (technique)
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Music 245
Basic and Italian Lyric Diction
10
Materials of Theory III
Music 225
Music 226
Aural Theory III
Music 211
General History of Western Music I
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester II
MusPerf 304
Lessons in Collaborative Piano-Vocal (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
MusPerf 101
Lessons in Piano (technique)
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Music 246
German and French Lyric Diction
Music 230
Form Analysis
Music 212
General History of Western Music II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
First Semester German
German 1013
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 404
Lessons in Collaborative Piano-Vocal (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
Music 457
Opera Theatre
Music 307
General History of Western Music III
Music 377
Song Literature I: Italy, Germany, France, Great Britain
Music 321
Counterpoint
Cr
2
1
1
1
2
0
9
16
Cr
2
1
1
1
3
0
8
16
Cr
2
1
1
1
3
1
3
0
5
17
Cr
2
1
1
1
3
3
0
4
2
17
Cr
2
1
3
2
3
Music Convocation
Music 1072
3
First Semester Italian
Italian 101
Total
Junior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 404
Lessons in Collaborative Piano-Vocal (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
Music 457
Opera Theatre
Music 659
Junior Recital
Choose one Music History elective:
Music 303
Jazz History – 3 cr.
Music 308
Selected Topics in Music History and Literature: (subtitle) – 3 cr.
Music 311
Music of the Baroque Era – 3 cr.
Music 312
Music of the Classic Era – 3 cr.
Music 313
Music of the Romantic Era – 3 cr.
Music 314
Music Since 1900 – 3 cr.
Music 611
Music of Medieval Era – 3 cr.
Music 612
Music of the Renaissance and Early Modern Era – 3 cr.
Music 378
Song Literature: United States and Select European Countries
Music Convocation
Music 1072
Electives or Core Curriculum
First Semester French
French 1013
Total
Senior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 404
Lessons in Collaborative Piano-Vocal (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
MusPerf 111
Lessons in Voice
Music 457
Opera Theatre
Music 353
Conducting
9
Introduction
to World Musics
Music 310
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 404
Lessons in Collaborative Piano-Vocal (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
Music 660
Senior Recital
MusPerf 111
Lessons in Voice
Choose one Music Theory elective:
Music 220
Introduction to Computers and Music – 3 cr.
Music 323
Instrumentation – 3 cr.
Music 326
Advanced Aural Theory – 1 cr.
Music 327
Analog and Digital Synthesis I – 3 cr.
Music 328
Digital Synthesis and Systems II – 3 cr.
Music 421
Materials of Contemporary Music – 3 cr.
Music 457
Opera Theatre
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
0
4
15
Cr
2
1
0
3
3
2
0
3
4
15
Cr
2
1
1
2
3
9
18
Cr
2
2
1
3
1
7
16
PRINCIPLE INSTRUMENT: PIANO PEDAGOGY7
Freshman Year – Semester I
MusPerf 201
Lessons in Piano
8
Master
Class in Keyboard Instruments, Piano
MusPerf 501
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choral Ensemble
Cr
1
0
1
Music 123
Aural Theory I
Music 127
Materials of Theory I
2
Foundations
of Music
Music 106
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Freshman Year – Semester II
MusPerf 201
Lessons in Piano
8
Master
Class in Keyboard Instruments, Piano
MusPerf 501
Music 44, 42, or 56 Choral Ensemble
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester I
MusPerf 201
Lessons in Piano
8
Master
Class in Keyboard Instruments, Piano
MusPerf 501
Music 211
General History of Western Music I
10
Materials
of Theory III
Music 225
Music 226
Aural Theory III
2
Piano
Ensemble
Music 261
Music Convocation
Music 1072
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester II
MusPerf 201
Lessons in Piano
8
Master Class in Keyboard Instruments, Piano
MusPerf 501
Music 212
General History of Western Music II
Music 230
Form Analysis
Music 261
Piano Ensemble
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 201
Lessons in Piano
8
Master Class in Keyboard Instruments, Piano
MusPerf 501
Music 259
Accompanying
Music 261
Piano Ensemble
Music 307
General History of Western Music III
Music 332
Piano Pedagogy I
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Mus Ed 460
Teaching Elementary General Music
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 201
Lessons in Piano
8
Master
Class in Keyboard Instruments, Piano
MusPerf 501
Music 259
Accompanying
Music 261
Piano Ensemble
Music 333
Piano Pedagogy II
Music 421
Materials of Contemporary Music
1
2
0
11
16
Cr
1
0
1
1
3
0
11
17
Cr
1
0
3
3
1
1
0
8
17
Cr
1
0
3
3
1
0
8
16
Cr
1
0
2
1
3
3
0
3
3
16
Cr
1
0
2
1
3
3
Music Convocation
Music 1072
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 201
Lessons in Piano
8
Master
Class in Keyboard Instruments, Piano
MusPerf 501
Music 261
Piano Ensemble
Music 275
Keyboard Performance Repertoire I
Music 434
Piano Pedagogy III
Choose one Music History elective:
Music 303
Jazz History – 3 cr.
Music 308
Selected Topics in Music History and Literature: (subtitle) – 3 cr.
Music 311
Music of the Baroque Era – 3 cr.
Music 312
Music of the Classic Era – 3 cr.
Music 313
Music of the Romantic Era – 3 cr.
Music 314
Music Since 1900 – 3 cr.
Choose one Music Theory elective:
Music 220
Introduction to Computers and Music – 3 cr.
Music 323
Instrumentation – 3 cr.
Music 327
Analog and Digital Synthesis I – 3 cr.
Music 328
Digital Synthesis and Systems II – 3 cr.
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 201
Lessons in Piano
8
Master Class in Keyboard Instruments, Piano
MusPerf 501
Music 261
Piano Ensemble
Music 276
Keyboard Performance Repertoire II
9
Introduction
to World Musics
Music 310
Music 435
Piano Pedagogy IV
Music 660
Senior Recital: (subtitle)
Electives of Core Curriculum
Total
0
7
17
Cr
1
0
1
2
3
3
3
4
17
Cr
1
1
2
3
3
2
2
14
PRINCIPLE INSTRUMENT: VOICE
Freshman Year – Semester I
MusPerf 311
Lessons in Voice (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
MusPerf 1 or 1016 Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Music 245
Basic and Italian Lyric Diction
Music 123
Aural Theory I
Music 127
Materials of Theory I
2
Foundations of Music
Music 106
Theatre 101
Acting for the Non-Major
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Freshman Year – Semester II
MusPerf 311
Lessons in Voice (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
MusPerf 1 or 1016 Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
2
1
1
1
1
2
0
3
6
17
Cr
2
1
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Music 246
German and French Lyric Diction
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester I
MusPerf 311
Lessons in Voice (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
MusPerf 1 or 1016 Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Music 211
General History of Western Music I
Music 22510
Materials of Theory III
Music 226
Aural Theory III
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
French, German, or Italian Level I
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester II
MusPerf 311
Lessons in Voice (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
MusPerf 1 or 1016 Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Music 212
General History of Western Music II
Music 230
Form Analysis
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
French, German, or Italian Level I or Level II
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 411
Lessons in Voice (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Music 307
General History of Western Music III
9
Introduction to World Musics
Music 310
Music 353
Conducting
Music 377
Song Literatuare I: Italy, Germany, France, Great Britain
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
French, German, or Italian Level I
Total
Junior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 411
Lessons in Voice (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Dance 321
Alexander Technique
Music 378
Song Literature II: United States and Select European Countries
Music 457
Opera Theatre
Music 659
Junior Recital (Optional)
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
French, German, or Italian Level I or Level II
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 411
Lessons in Voice (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
1
1
1
3
0
6
15
Cr
2
1
1
3
3
1
0
4
15
Cr
2
1
1
3
3
0
4
3
17
Cr
2
1
3
3
2
2
0
4
17
Cr
2
1
3
2
3
0
0
4
3
18
Cr
2
1
Choose one Music Theory elective:
Music 220
Introduction to Computers and Music – 3 cr.
Music 321
Counterpoint – 3 cr.
Music 327
Analog and Digital Synthesis I – 3 cr
Music 328
Digital Synthesis and Systems II – 3 cr
Music 421
Materials of Contemporary Music – 3 cr (recommended)
Music 680
Special Studies in Music: (subtitle) – 3 cr
Music 444
Vocal Pedagogy I
Music Convocation
Music 1072
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 411
Lessons in Voice (plus Voice Lab Master Class8)
Music 44, 52, or 56 Choir
Choose one:
Music 445
Vocal Pedagogy II – 2 cr
OR
Music 457
Opera Theatre – 2 cr
Music 660
Senior Recital: (subtitle)
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
3
2
0
8
16
Cr
2
1
2
2
8
15
PRINCIPLE INSTRUMENT: GUITAR
Freshman Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx (346, Lessons in Guitar – Classical, Finger-Style, Jazz, or Flamenco
347, 348, or 349)
MusPerf 1 or 1011 Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
Music 40
University Choir
Music 123
Aural Theory I
Music 127
Materials of Theory I
Foundations of Music
Music 1062
Music 248
Sight Reading for Guitar I
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Freshman Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx (346, Lessons in Guitar – Classical, Finger-Style, Jazz, or Flamenco
347, 348, or 349)
Piano
MusPerf 1 or 1011
Music 40
University Choir
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
Music 348
Sight Reading for Guitar II
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Music Electives
Fret Board Essentials (Music 280) – Recommended – 3 cr.
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx (446, Lessons in Guitar – Classical, Finger-Style, Jazz, or Flamenco: Primary Style
447, 448, or 449)
(required)
MusPerf 1xx (146, Secondary Style Guitar (required)
Cr
2
1
1
1
2
0
1
9
17
Cr
2
1
1
1
3
1
0
3
6
17
Cr
2
1
147, 148, or 149)
Music 211
Music 274
General History of Western Music I
Guitar Repertoire and Ensemble (Classical, Finger-Style, or Flamenco Guitar
majors only)
OR
Music 402
Jazz Combo (Jazz Guitar majors only)
10
Materials
of Theory III
Music 225
Music 226
Aural Theory III
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx (446, Lessons in Guitar – Classical, Finger-Style, Jazz, or Flamenco: Primary Style
447, 448, or 449)
(required)
MusPerf 1xx (146, Secondary Style Guitar (required)
147, 148, or 149)
Music 212
General History of Western Music
Music 274
Guitar Repertoire and Ensemble (Classical, Finger-Style, or Flamenco Guitar
majors only)
OR
Music 402
Jazz Combo (Jazz Guitar majors only)
Music 230
Form Analysis
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx (446, Lessons in Guitar – Classical, Finger-Style, Jazz, or Flamenco: Primary Style
447, 448, or 449)
(required)
MusPerf 1xx (146, Secondary Style Guitar (required)
147, 148, or 149)
Music 274
Guitar Repertoire and Ensemble (Classical, Finger-Style, or Flamenco Guitar
majors only)
OR
Music 402
Jazz Combo (Jazz Guitar majors only)
Music 307
General History of Western Music III
Choose one Guitar History course:
Music 280/680
History of Classical Guitar
OR
Music 478
Finger-Style Guitar: History and Performance
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Electives of Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx (446, Lessons in Guitar – Classical, Finger-Style, Jazz, or Flamenco: Primary Style
447, 448, or 449)
(required)
MusPerf 1xx (146, Secondary Style Guitar (required)
147, 148, or 149)
Music 274
Guitar Repertoire and Ensemble (Classical, Finger-Style, or Flamenco Guitar
majors only)
OR
Music 402
Jazz Combo (Jazz Guitar majors only)
Mus Ed 385
Guitar Pedagogy
Music 421
Materials of Contemporary Music
3
1
1
3
1
0
7
18
Cr
2
1
3
1
1
3
0
7
17
Cr
2
1
1
1
3
3
0
6
16
Cr
2
1
1
1
2
3
Music 659
Junior Recital
Choose one Music History elective:
Music 300
Literary Aspects of Rock and Roll – 3 cr.
Music 303
Jazz History – 3 cr.
Music 308
Selected Topics in History and Literature – 3 cr.
Music 309
American Folk and Popular Music – 2 cr.
Music 311
Music of the Baroque Era – 3 cr.
Music 312
Music of the Classic Era – 3 cr.
Music 313
Music of the Romantic Era – 3 cr.
Music 314
Music Since 1900 – 3 cr.
Music 611
Music of the Medieval Era – 3 cr.
Music 612
Music of the Renaissance and Early Modern Era – 3 cr.
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx (446, Lessons in Guitar – Classical, Finger-Style, Jazz, or Flamenco
447, 448, or 449)
Music 274
Guitar Repertoire and Ensemble (Classical, Finger-Style, or Flamenco Guitar
majors only)
OR
Music 402
Jazz Combo (Jazz Guitar majors only)
Music 353
Conducting
Choose one Music Theory elective:
Music 220
Introduction to Computers and Music – 3 cr.
Music 321
Counterpoint – 3 cr.
Music 323
Instrumentation – 3 cr.
Music 327
Analog and Digital Synthesis I – 3 cr.
Music 328
Digital Synthesis and Systems II – 3 cr.
Music 680
Special Studies in Music: (subtitle) – 3 cr.
Core Curriculum and Electives
Total
Senior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx (446, Lessons in Guitar – Classical, Finger-Style, Jazz, or Flamenco
447, 448, or 449)
Music 274
Guitar Repertoire and Ensemble (Classical, Finger-Style, or Flamenco Guitar
majors only)
OR
Music 402
Jazz Combo (Jazz Guitar majors only)1
Music 3109
Introduction to World Musics
Music 660
Senior Recital: (subtitle)
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
0
2-3
0
3
14-15
Cr
2
1
1
2
3
7
15
Cr
2
1
3
2
7
15-16
PRINCIPLE INSTRUMENT: MULTIPLE WOODWINDS
Freshman Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
1
Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
MusPerf 1 or 101
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 123
Aural Theory I
Music 127
Materials of Theory I
Cr
2
1
1
1
2
Foundations of Music
Music 1062
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Freshman Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
MusPerf 1 or 1011 Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Secondary Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Materials of Theory III
Music 22510
Music 226
Aural Theory III
Music 211
General History of Western Music I
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Secondary Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 230
Form Analysis
Music 212
General History of Western Music II
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Secondary Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Tertiary Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 365 or 271
Chamber or Jazz Ensemble
Music 307
General History of Western Music III
Music 321
Counterpoint
Music 353
Conducting
2
Music Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Junior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Secondary Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Tertiary Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 265 or 271
Chamber or Jazz Ensemble
Music 659
Junior Recital
Music 354
Instrumental Conducting
Choose one Music History elective:
0
9
16
Cr
2
1
1
1
3
0
9
17
Cr
2
1
1
3
1
3
0
6
17
Cr
2
1
1
3
3
0
6
16
Cr
2
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
0
4
18
Cr
2
1
1
1
1
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2
3
Music 308
Selected Topics in Music History and Literature: (subtitle) – 3 cr.
Music 311
Music of the Baroque Era – 3 cr.
Music 312
Music of the Classic Era – 3 cr.
Music 313
Music of the Romantic Era – 3 cr.
Music 314
Music Since 1900 – 3 cr.
Music 611
Music of the Medieval Era – 3 cr.
Music 612
Music of the Renaissance and Early Modern Era – 3 cr,
2
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Secondary Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Tertiary Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 365 or 271
Chamber or Jazz Ensemble
Music 3109
Introduction to World Musics
Music 660
Senior Recital (Secondary Instrument)
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
Senior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Secondary Instrument
MusPerf 1xx
Lessons in Tertiary Instrument
Music 30, 40, 42, 182 Band or Orchestra
Music 660
Senior Recital (Principle Instrument)
Choose one Music Theory elective:
Music 302
Jazz Theory – 2 cr.
Music 323
Instrumentation – 3 cr.
Music 330
Improvisation – 1 cr.
Music 421
Materials of Contemporary Music
Electives or Core Curriculum
Total
0
6
17
Cr
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
5
15
Cr
2
1
1
1
2
3
4
14
Footnotes for Music Performance Degree Programs
1
Piano Requirement: Depending upon audition results, students may be required to enroll in MusPerf 1 (Fundamentals
of Piano) for up to two semesters or until they can pass a satisfactory piano audition through the piano faculty. Credit
toward the degree will not be counted. Students must take two semesters of MusPerf Piano at 101 level.
2
Foundations of Music (Music 106) and Music Convocation (Music 107) credit does not count towards overall degree
total. A one-credit fee will be assessed by the University if course load is less than 12 or greater than 18 cr.
3
Foreign Language Collaborative Piano-Vocal: The three semester foreign language requirement must be fulfilled by
the study of three different languages at the introductory level. Must include German I, French I, and Italian I.
4 Organ: Check
with department for availability.
5
Piano Performance Requirement: See Performance Ensemble Requirement Chart.
6
Voice: Depending upon audition results, students may be required to enroll in MusPerf 1 (Fundamentals of Piano) for
up to two semesters or until they can pass a satisfactory piano audition through the Piano faculty. Credit toward degree
will not be counted. Students must take four semesters of MusPerf Piano at 101 level.
7
Collaborative Piano-Vocal and Piano Pedagogy: Once accepted into this program, students become pre-majors until
they successfully complete the first two years of required courses for the Collaborative Piano-Vocal track or the Piano
Pedagogy track, and maintain a 3.00 GPA in those courses. At that point, their academic and artistic growth is reviewed
for official entry into the track by the program faculty. The jury at the end of the fourth semester of study will determine
whether the student meets the artistic standard necessary to officially enter either the Collaborative Piano-Vocal
Program or Piano Pedagogy Program. The Piano faculty will listen to the jury and determine a letter grade based on the
performance. The student must receive an average grade of B to continue in the program.
8
Lab Master Class: Eight semesters at 0 credit is required as part of your individual lesson obligation.
9
Music 310 (Introduction to World Musics) fulfills the OWC-B requirement.
10
Music 225 (Theory and Materials III) fulfills the QL-B requirement.
11
Voice Foreign Language Requirement: Two languages required at Level I and Level II chosen between German,
French, or Italian.
JAZZ STUDIES
Admittance to the Jazz Studies
Program. Students wishing to pursue a Jazz Studies major should
declare their
intention at the time of application to the Music
Department, indicating Jazz Studies. Students must pass an entrance
audition, which will include both traditional and jazz material, in
order to be admitted to the program. For the jazz
portion of the
audition, students will be asked to perform the following: (1) an
improvisation based on the twelvemeasure blues progression, (2) an
improvisation based on a standard song form, (3) an improvisation on
material of the
student’s choosing, and (4) a notated melodic line
to be played with jazz rhythmic inflections (this will be provided
by
the Jazz Studies faculty).
Performance Ensemble Requirement. A minimum of four semeseters of any approved music ensemble is required. In
addition, all Jazz Studies majors are required to take four semesters of Jazz Ensemble.
Studio Instruction Requirements. All Jazz Studies majors are required to take four semesters of traditional studio
instruction and four semesters of jazz studio instruction on their Principle instrument. The traditional studio instruction
will be at the 300 level; jazz studio instruction will be two semesters at the 300 level and two semesters at the 400 level.
Graduation Requirement
- Senior Recital. Completion of a BFA in Jazz Studies requires
the student to register for
Senior Recital in the semester he/she
intends to graduate. Registering for Senior Recital stipulates a
public recital lasting
a minimum of one hour in duration. The
program for this recital must include at least two original jazz
compositions by
the student.
Required Music
Courses. The following music courses are required.
Music Performance Courses. 8
cr. See Performance Organization Requirement above.
Studio Instrument Lessons. 16
cr. See Studio Instruction Requirements above.
Piano. 2 cr. See Required
Piano Proficiency above.
Music Theory. 20 cr.
Music History. 12 cr.
Jazz Studies. 20 cr.
Senior Recital. 2 cr. See
Graduation Requirement - Senior Recital above.
General Music Electives. 5 cr.
Foundations of Music (Music 106), 1 semester taken during freshman year, and Music Convocation (Music 107),
5 semesters. See Recital and Convocation Requirements.
JAZZ STUDIES
CURRICULUM
Recommended curricular order.
Freshman Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument (Traditional)
1
Fundamentals of Piano or Lessons in Piano
MusPerf 1 or 101
2
Performing Ensemble
Music xxx
Music 123
Aural Theory I
Music 127
Materials of Theory I
3
Foundations of Music
Music 106
Core Curriculum and Electives
Total
Freshman Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument (Traditional)
1
Fundamentals
of Piano or Lessons in Piano
MusPerf 1 or 101
Performing Ensemble
Music xxx2
Music 124
Aural Theory II
Music 128
Materials of Theory II
3
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Core Curriculum and Electives
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument (Traditional)
2
Performance
Ensemble
Music xxx
Music 211
General History of Western Music I
5
Materials
of Theory III
Music 225
Music 226
Aural Theory III
3
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Core Curriculum and Electives
Total
Sophomore Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument (Traditional)
Music xxx
Performance Ensemble
Music 212
General History of Western Music II
Music 230
Form Analysis
3
Music Convocation
Music 107
Core Curriculum and Electives
Total
Junior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument (Jazz)
Cr
2
1
1
1
2
0
8
15
Cr
2
1
1
1
3
0
8
16
Cr
2
1
3
3
1
0
6
16
Cr
2
1
3
3
0
7
16
Cr
2
Music 271
Jazz Ensemble
Music 302
Jazz Theory I
Music 307
General History of Western Music III
Music 323
Instrumentation
Music 330
Improvisation I
Music 421
Materials of Contemporary Music
3
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Total
Junior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 3xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument (Jazz)
Music 271
Jazz Ensemble
Music 303
Jazz History
Music 306
Jazz Theory II
Music 331
Improvisation II
Music 402
Jazz Combo
3
Music
Convocation
Music 107
Core Curriculum and Electives
Total
Senior Year – Semester I
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument (Jazz)
Music 271
Jazz Ensemble
Music 304
Jazz Arranging
Music 402
Jazz Combo
Music 404
Improvisation III
Core Curriculum and Electives
Total
Senior Year – Semester II
MusPerf 4xx
Lessons in Principle Instrument (Jazz)
Music 271
Jazz Ensemble
4
Introduction
to World Musics
Music 310
Music 402
Jazz Combo
Music 405
Improvisation IV
Music 660
Senior Recital: (subtitled) (Principle Instrument)
Core Curriculum and Electives
Total
1
2
3
3
1
3
0
15
Cr
2
1
3
2
1
2
0
6
17
Cr
2
1
3
2
1
9
18
Cr
2
1
3
2
1
2
6
17
Footnotes for Jazz Studies Degree Program
1
Piano Requirements: Depending upon audition results, students
may be required to enroll in MusPerf 1, Fundamentals
of Piano, for up
to two semesters or until they can pass a satisfactory piano
audition through the Piano faculty. Credit
toward the degree will
not be counted. Students must take two semesters of MusPerf Piano at
the 100 level.
2
Performing
Organization. Four semesters minimum are required from
an approved ensemble: University Band, Wind
Ensemble, Choir, or
Orchestra. In addition, all