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Game:
Sid Meier’s CIVILIZATION:
THE BOARD GAMES
Publisher:
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Fantasy Flight Games (2010)
Rules summary front
Rules summary back
Play reference front
Play reference (combat) back
Fame & Fortune rules summary
Wisdom & Warfare rules summary
v3
Sep 2013
Print on card (ensure you are printing at 100% scale) laminate and trim to size.
Universal Head. Design That Works. www.universalhead.com
Germany gains 2 extra infantry units from the market board,
adding the units to their standing forces.
Setup
Players choose a player color then select or randomly draw a
civilization sheet each and place it faceup in front of them.
Each player takes, in their color: 8 plastic figures (6 armies and
2 scouts); 3 city markers (1 capital and 2 cities); 4 military
tech markers; and a deck of 36 tech cards; also a reference
sheet, a setup card and a deck of 4 government cards each.
Place the unit cards on the market board, shuffled into artillery,
infantry, mounted, and aircraft decks. Each player takes one
artillery, one infantry, and one mounted unit and places them
facedown in a single pile as their standing forces.
Each player takes their lower ranked military tech markers
for artillery, infantry, and mounted units, and places them in
the area below the appropriate unit deck with one stripe sides
faceup. Then each player takes their aircraft military marker
and places it below the aircraft unit deck with the star side
facedown. Set aside the other military tech markers for now.
Sort the building markers by type and place them on their
spaces. An upgraded building has an arrow next to its name.
Build the wonder deck by shuffling the ancient, medieval,
and modern wonders separately. Place the modern wonders
facedown on the top space of the wonder market; then place
the medieval wonders facedown on top. Then place the ancient
wonders faceup in the 4 market spaces below the wonder deck.
Egypt, if playing, receives one of the ancient wonders at random
before the rest are placed in the market; one of the medieval
wonders is then drawn and replaces it in the market.
Place the matching wonder marker for each of the 4 faceup
wonder cards in the space next to its card.
Separate and shuffle the culture event cards into ancient (1
column), medieval (2 columns), and modern (3 columns) decks,
and place each deck facedown on its space below the culture
track at the bottom of the market board. Each player takes the
culture level marker showing their leader and places it on the
start space of the culture track.
Place one of each market resource token per player near the
market board, returning extras to the box.
Each player takes their home map tile and places it faceup in
front of them, oriented as indicated in the setup diagram for the
number of players. Return unused home tiles to the box. Shuffle
the neutral map tiles and deal them out facedown to form the
rest of the map as indicated. Return unused neutral map tiles
unseen to the box.
Shuffle the great people markers, the hut markers and the
village markers facedown near the market board in separate
piles. Place the culture, wound, and coin tokens next to the
market board in separate piles. Place the combat bonus cards
and the Space Flight tech card faceup near the market board
along with the disaster markers.
Choose a first player and give him the first player marker.
Each player places their capital city marker (unwalled side up)
on one of the 4 center squares on their home map tile. The
city’s square is the city center, and the adjacent 8 squares are
the city outskirts.
Rome begins governed by Republic instead of Despotism.
Russia gains the white Russian army figure; when figures are
placed on the map, this is also. Russia begins governed by
Communism instead of Despotism.
Collecting Trade
Each player takes one of their army figures and one of their
scout figures and places them (separately or together) in one (or
2) of their city outskirts squares (not water squares).
Scouts may gather trade symbols in their squares. A square
occupied by enemy figures does not produce trade.
Each player places their starting tech card faceup in front of
them (always in the bottom row of their tech pyramid regardless
of the card’s level). If another player learns that tech through
any means, the tech is still considered to be its normal level.
Each player stacks their government cards so that the
Despotism/Republic card is on top (Despotism side faceup), and
places the stack on the civilization sheet space. Players starting
with different governments place the appropriate card faceup on
top of their cards.
Each player counts all of the trade symbols in the 8 squares of
their city outskirts and sets the large outer trade dial on their
civilization sheet to that total. Set the small inner economy dial
to 0 (or more if the player receives coins from a map square or
great person during setup).
Negotiating and Trading
Players may negotiate and/or trade among themselves. Trades
may include an exchange of any or all non-binding promises;
points of trade; unspent culture tokens; resource tokens from
the market or from hut/village tokens; and culture event cards.
A player who exceeds their culture hand size as a result of a
trade must immediately discard down to their hand size.
Items not listed may not be given or traded to another player
unless specifically allowed by a card or ability.
3. City Management
Starting with the first player, each player takes one city action
with each of their cities.
a. Produce a Figure, Unit, Building, or Wonder
Each game turn is composed of 5 phases performed in the
following order.
The entire production cost for an item must come from the city
producing it. Excess production cannot be saved.
1. Start of Turn
Pass the first player marker to the left (except on the first turn).
Starting with the new first player, each player performs any start
of turn actions, builds any new cities, and changes governments
if desired.
Building New Cities
If you have fewer built cities than your maximum number of
cities (2 normally, 3 if you have researched the Irrigation tech),
you may build one or more new cities.
You must have a scout figure in each square you wish to place a
city marker in. In addition, the square cannot be a water square;
there must be 8 revealed squares adjacent to the square; it
cannot be adjacent to a hut or village token or an enemy figure
(army or scout); and it must be 3 squares or more away from
any other city marker (including diagonals).
Return the scout to your civilization sheet, then place a city
marker on the space, unwalled side up. Only squares in a city’s
outskirts provide icons and resources.
Any friendly figures in the square where a city is built (besides
the sacrificed scout) are immediately moved to an adjacent
square that they can legally end their movement in.
A city generates trade and production in the same turn it is built.
Changing Governments
If you unlock a new form of government during the Research
Phase, you may change to that government during the Start of
Turn Phase of the following turn. Place the corresponding card,
appropriate side faceup, on top of your government deck.
China begins with its capital city marker walled side up.
Egypt gains a random ancient wonder (already taken from the
market board), placed in the outskirts of the player’s capital.
Any ongoing benefits from a government only last while your
civilization continues to be ruled by that government.
America gains a random great person, placed in the outskirts of
their capital at the end of setup.
Each player increases his trade dial by the total trade
symbols in the city outskirts of all his cities.
Each player places one city marker, their remaining 5 army
figures, and their remaining scout figure by their civilization
sheet. The other city marker is set aside until the player learns
the Irrigation tech and may add it to these available items.
If you wish to change to a different government on any
turn other than the turn immediately after unlocking that
government, you must first change to the Anarchy transitional
government. If you are in Anarchy, you may change to any other
government you know during the Start of Turn Phase of the next
turn after entering Anarchy.
Each player takes bonuses as listed on their civilization sheet:
2. Trade
Each player (simultaneously if desired) collects trade; then all
players may negotiate and/or trade.
The city can produce one item with a production cost equal
to or less than the total production symbols in its outskirts.
For every 3 points by which you reduce your trade dial, you may
boost the production of one of your cities by 1 for a single turn.
You may do this as often as desired.
Scouts may gather production symbols in their squares. A
square occupied by enemy figures does not generate production.
Producing Figures
You may produce an army or scout figure if you have at least
one unbuilt figure of that type and can meet its production cost.
Take one of the figures from next to your civilization sheet and
place it in the outskirts of the city that produced it. Figures may
not be placed in a water square unless you have learned a tech
that allows your figures to end their movement in water. Figures
may be placed in the same square as other friendly figures, but
the total figures in a square cannot exceed your stacking limit.
Army figures cost 4 each, and are the only figures that can fight
battles and explore huts and villages.
Scout figures cost 6 each, and may be used to build new cities
or to gather extra trade, production, or other resources. They
cannot enter squares containing huts or villages and are killed
immediately if attacked by an army (unless they have a friendly
army escorting them).
Producing Units
Unit cards represent an army’s specific units. To produce a unit,
ensure the city can meet its production cost, then draw a unit
card at random from the appropriate deck and add it to your
standing forces pile.
If a unit deck is empty, units of that type are not available until
some are killed and returned to the deck. Aircraft units require
the Flight tech to be produced.
If you reach units that have been returned faceup to the bottom
of a deck when drawing, turn the deck over and shuffle it.
To determine the production cost of a unit, look at the market
board to see how advanced the units of that type are:
Artillery, infantry, or mounted units, cost per unit:
Rank 1: 5; Rank 2: 7; Rank 3: 9; Rank 4: 11.
Aircraft units always cost 12 each (once unlocked).
Producing Buildings
To produce a building, you must know a tech that unlocks it.
Its cost is on the tech that unlocks it and on the market board.
Buildings are limited to the available components. Once all of
a certain type have been produced, no more can be produced
until one of that type is destroyed.
A building must be placed in the outskirts of the city that
produced it.
Buildings are restricted to certain types of terrain, as noted on
the market board. Any number of a given type of building may
be built in a city as long as suitable terrain exists.
Building names separated by a slash are the basic and
upgraded forms of the same building type, on the front and
back of the same marker.
Once a building marker is placed on a square, its icons replace
any on the square. A water square with a Harbor placed in it is
still considered to be water for the purposes of movement.
Limited buildings (star) are restricted to one per city.
City walls may be built using the Masonry tech and are treated
like any other building, except they are considered to be in the
city’s center. Flip the city marker to its walled side. Only one
City Walls may be built per city.
Producing Wonders
To produce one of the wonders faceup in the market, pay the
production cost on its wonder card (or the discounted cost if
you know the specific tech listed).
The entire cost must be paid by a single city.
Place the wonder card faceup in front of you and the wonder
token in the outskirts of the relevant city. Then draw a new
wonder from the wonder deck and add it to the market, with its
corresponding wonder marker next to the card.
Wonders may be placed on any terrain except for water and are
restricted to one per city. A city may contain both a wonder and
one limited building.
Abilities affecting buildings do not affect wonders unless
explicitly stated.
Certain tech cards allow a player to obsolete a wonder, negating
its special ability for the rest of the game.
Replacing Buildings and Wonders
You may replace one of your existing buildings or wonders when
placing a new building or wonder (a wonder may replace a
building and vice versa). The new building or wonder must be
able to be legally placed once the old one is removed. You may
not replace another player’s building or wonder.
Old buildings are returned to the market. Old wonders and their
cards may not be rebuilt for the rest of the game.
b. Devote to the Arts
Take one culture token from the stockpile, plus one
additional token per culture icon that appears in the
outskirts of the city.
Scouts may gather culture symbols in their squares. A square
occupied by enemy figures does not produce culture.
Spending Culture
Any time during your City Management Phase, you may choose
to spend some or all of your culture tokens to advance your
culture level marker up the culture track on the market board.
Pay the cost listed on the space your marker is entering, move
your marker, then claim the reward shown on the space.
Higher up, advancing on the track costs trade as well as culture.
Both costs must be paid in full for each space advanced (trade
is spent from your trade dial).
You may advance as many spaces up the culture track each turn
as you can afford. Multiple markers may occupy the same space.
The three different types of spaces are:
Culture Event Draw a culture event card from the culture event
deck pictured on the space and secretly add it to your hand. If
you exceed your culture hand size, immediately discard down to
your hand size before any culture event cards can be played.
Great People Draw a great person marker at random from the
facedown pile. You may then either immediately place the great
person in a city or hold it in reserve.
Culture Victory You immediately win the game (culture victory).
Culture Event Cards
Culture event cards are kept secret in a player’s hand. Your
maximum hand size starts at 2, but may be increased by tech.
They may only be played during the phase indicated on the
card. Read the title and the effect and then perform the effect
before discarding the card.
Discarded culture event cards are placed faceup at the bottom
of the appropriate deck. If you reach a card that is faceup, turn
the deck over and shuffle it to create a new culture event deck.
Great People
A new great people marker may be immediately placed in the
outskirts of one of your cities, on any terrain except water. They
replace any building or wonder they are placed on.
A great person marker that is replaced (by having a building,
wonder, or another great person placed in their square), is held
in reserve and returned to your civilization sheet instead of
being discarded (they have no effect when not on the map).
During the Start of Turn Phase of any turn, you may place any
great people on your civilization sheet back on the map as above.
c. Harvest a Resource
To take this action, the city must have a square with that
resource’s icon in its outskirts.
Take one resource token of that type from the market board and
place it on your civilization sheet. You cannot harvest a resource
if the market is out of that resource, and a city may only harvest
one resource per action.
Resources power resource abilities on tech cards. Each time
you want to use a resource ability, pay its cost by spending the
appropriate resource(s).
Scouts may harvest resources in their squares. A square
occupied by enemy figures cannot be harvested.
4. Movement
Starting with the first player, each player moves any or all of
their figures (armies and scouts), one at a time, up to a number
of squares equal to their civilization’s travel speed.
A civilization’s travel speed starts at 2, but may be increased by
learning tech such as Horseback Riding. Figures cannot move
diagonally. A figure that has begun its move must complete it
before any other figure may move.
You may move several figures as a group if they all begin this
phase in the same square. You may never have more figures in a
single square than your stacking limit. The stacking limit starts
at 2, but may be increased by learning tech such as Masonry.
At the start of the game, figures cannot enter water squares,
but acquiring certain tech can allow your figures to do so. The
Navigation tech allows a player’s figures to cross water but not
make any movement that would result in ending their movement
in a water square.
Certain tech cards, such as Sailing, allow your figures to both
move through and end their movement on water squares.
Unexplored Map Tiles
A facedown map tile cannot be moved onto or crossed for any
reason, nor can the effects of any tech or culture event card
cross or affect any of its squares.
You may discover (turn faceup) a facedown map tile by
spending one square of movement when one of your figures is
orthogonally adjacent to the tile. Orient the tile so that the arrow
points away from the tile that the figure is on.
Draw one random hut marker place it facedown, without looking
at it, on each square with a hut icon on the map tile. Draw one
random village marker and place it facedown, without looking at
it, on each square with a village icon.
The Tech Pyramid
Level I tech cards may always be legally placed in your tech
pyramid, forming its bottom row.
When you learn a level II tech, it must be placed above two
level I tech cards already in your pyramid. Level III tech cards
must be placed above two level II tech cards in their pyramid,
and so on.
Exploring Huts and Villages
Scout figures cannot enter a square with a hut or village marker.
An army figure that enters a square with a hut or village marker
immediately ends its movement and explores the hut or village.
Tech Card Abilities
Unlocking Units, Buildings, and Governments When you learn
a tech showing a new unit type, building, or government, you
immediately unlock the ability to produce that unit or building
or to change to that government.
If the marker is a hut, look at it, then place it facedown on your
civilization sheet. The resources on the back of Hut markers
may be spent like resource tokens taken from the market, but
they are returned to the box after being spent.
At the start of the game, all figures, only the 3 basic unit
types (artillery, infantry, and mounted), and the Despotism
government are unlocked.
If the marker is a village,the player to the left of the invading
player becomes the barbarian player and draws one artillery, one
infantry, and one mounted unit from the respective decks (if
one or more of the decks are depleted, make up the difference
from one of the other decks, as chosen by the barbarian player).
These units are barbarians and are kept separate from the
barbarian player’s own units. A battle then takes place between
the barbarian player’s barbarian units (the defender) and the
invading player. Barbarian units are always rank 1.
If the invading player wins, he looks at the village marker. If
it shows a great person icon, he discards the village marker
and then gains a random great person. Otherwise, the village
marker shows a resource and is placed facedown on the player’s
civilization sheet, where it acts like a hut marker.
If the invading player loses, the army figure that entered the
square (or the entire group of figures) is killed and is returned to
the player’s civilization sheet.
Enemy Figures
Scouts cannot enter a square with enemy figures. An army that
enters a square with enemy figures immediately ends its move.
If the square contains only enemy scouts, the scouts are
immediately killed and the attacking player collects loot as
though they had won a battle. If the square contains at least
one enemy army, a battle occurs. If the square contains a mix of
both enemy armies and scouts, a battle occurs, but if the losing
side in the battle has any scouts in the square, they are killed
along with the armies; loot is then collected as normal.
Friendly and Enemy Cities
A player may move their figures through their own city centers,
but they may not end any figure’s movement in their city center.
Scouts may enter enemy city outskirts, but they cannot enter
enemy city centers. Armies may enter enemy city outskirts, and
may also enter an enemy city center—but this immediately
results in an attack on the city.
5. Research
Simultaneously, each player may learn one new tech by spending
trade, then add their newly learned tech to their tech pyramid.
Upgrading Units When you learn a tech with a unit upgrade on
it, check to see if you already know a better upgrade for that
unit type. If not, find the military tech marker for the improved
unit type and place it below the appropriate unit deck on the
market board to show that your units of that type have been
upgraded (or flip the current marker over if the new rank is on
the back). Rank 4 is marked with a star.
All units of that type that you have already produced are
immediately upgraded. Once you have upgraded a unit, you
must now pay the higher cost to produce new units of that type.
Upgrading Buildings Some buildings have a basic and an
upgraded form (on the front and back of the same markers).
On the market board, upgraded buildings have an arrow next
to their names. When you learn a tech unlocking an upgraded
building, immediately flip over any of the corresponding basic
buildings that you’ve already produced in your cities.
Once you have unlocked the upgraded version of a building, you
can no longer produce the basic version, and must now produce
the higher-cost building.
You do not need to know the tech that unlocks the basic building
in order to learn the tech that unlocks its upgraded form.
If you have a scout in the outskirts of an enemy city on top
of a building or wonder, then you both deny your opponent the
icons and/or resources in that square, and may also send them
home to one of your cities.
Consequently, the city benefits from any trade, production, or
other icons in the square for the turn.
Blockades
A square in a city’s outskirts that contains one or more enemy
figures (scouts or armies) does not generate production, trade,
culture, coins, or resources for the city’s owner. A square may
be blockaded even if it contains a building or a great person.
While an enemy figure remains in the same square as a
wonder’s marker, the special ability on the wonder’s card
cannot be used and the culture produced by its marker cannot
be collected.
Buildings, wonders, great people, and scouts cannot be placed
in a blockaded square after being produced. Army figures may
be placed in a blockaded square, but doing so immediately
results in a battle, with the blockading player as the defender.
A scout may gather icons in a blockaded square in the outskirts
of an enemy city. In this case, the square is considered to be a
part of the city the scout is sending it to for the turn rather than
the city being blockaded.
Obsoleting Wonders
Resource Abilities require resource tokens to be spent. Each
has a picture of the resource or resources required to use it (a
question mark means any resource of your choice); the phase in
which the ability may be used; and the actual ability.
Certain techs (Monarchy and Gunpowder) allow a player to
obsolete a wonder. When a wonder is obsoleted, turn its wonder
card facedown, but leave its wonder marker on the map. The
wonder’s special ability is negated and cannot be used for the
rest of the game. However, the wonder marker still produces
culture when the city it is in is devoted to the arts.
Each given resource ability may only be used once per turn,
regardless of how many resource tokens a player has. If a player
knows several techs with similar resource abilities, then each
may be used once per turn.
Culture Victory As soon as a player advances to the Culture
Victory space on the market board, he wins the game.
Other Abilities can be granted by tech cards; see the icon key.
Coins and Economic Power
Players track their coins on their economy dials. Coins do not
allow you to keep trade after any event other than researching
a tech. Therefore, your trade can still be reduced below your
number of coins when spending trade to rush production or
when trade is taken after the loss of a battle.
You must meet the minimum trade cost for the tech and have a
legal space in your civilization’s tech pyramid. Then place the
chosen tech card facedown in your tech pyramid.
Coins on the Map
Coins gained from squares on the map are only kept as long
as the player retains control of the square (i.e., the square is
contained in the outskirts of one of the player’s cities or one of
the player’s scouts remains in the square to gather from it).
Once all players have chosen their tech cards for the turn, all
researched tech cards are revealed simultaneously. Tech learned
by a player only applies to that player.
If an enemy figure blockades the square containing the coin,
it is lost while the enemy figure remains there. If a building
granting a coin to a player is destroyed, the coin is lost.
You need at least 6 trade to research a level I tech, as indicated
on the dial by the ‘I’ that replaces the number 6. It costs an
additional 5 trade for each level thereafter. Researching a tech
spends all of your remaining trade.
Coin Tokens
Coin tokens placed on a tech card as a reward for accomplishing
a certain task are treated just like coins on the map, except that
there is a maximum number of times a given task will provide a
coin token. Coin tokens advance the economy dial when gained
and cannot be lost.
However you may retain one trade for each coin you possess
(this never increases your current trade).
Scout Gathering
Each turn, beginning the turn after it was placed on the map,
a scout gathers the contents of the square it occupies. The
player declares which of their cities the scout is ‘sending’ the
square to during the Start of Turn Phase, and all of the icons
in that square (including trade, production, culture, coins, and
resources) are then considered to be in that city’s outskirts for
the rest of the turn.
Winning the Game
Tech Victory When a player researches the level 5 Space Flight
tech, he wins the game. The fewest level I tech cards a player
must know to reach level V is five (and a minimum of 15 techs
overall is required for a tech victory).
Economic Victory When a player accumulates 15 coins on his
economic dial, he wins the game. Coins are either gained from
squares on the map and building, or from certain techs.
Military Victory A player who conquers another player’s capital
city wins the game.
Advanced Tie-Breaker Variant
On a military victory, the game ends immediately and that
player wins. If a player completes a culture, economic, or
technology victory, the rest of the turn is played out. After the
end of the turn, every player who has completed a non-military
victory (remembering that military victories instantly win the
game) calculates their victory score, as follows:
Victory Score = Number of Learned Technologies + Number of
Spaces Advanced on Culture Track + Number of Coins
The player with the highest Victory Score wins the game.
In the event that 2 or more players are still tied, they share
the victory.
Turn Summary
Tech card Icons and Abilities
1. Start of Turn
Unlock Building
Allows you to build the pictured building for the
listed
cost.
Pass the first player marker clockwise.
In player order, each player may:
Perform start of turn actions
Build new cities
Replace scout figure in a legal square with an unwalled city.
Unlock Government
Allows you to change your civilization to the
listed government type. This is free if done the
turn after it is unlocked, otherwise you must
first change your government to Anarchy.
Change government
First change to Anarchy government if you did not unlock the
new government last turn.
2. Trade
Each player increases his trade dial by the total trade
city outskirts of all his cities.
Increase Culture Hand Size
Increases your culture hand size by one card.
Multiple techs with this ability are cumulative.
in the
All players may make deals to exchange unspent culture tokens,
culture event cards, resource tokens from the market or from
hut/village tokens; non-binding promises, and/or points of trade.
Constant Ability
Permanently grants you the listed ability, to
be used as often as you like unless otherwise
stated.
3. City Management
In player order, each player takes one city action with each of
their cities.
At any time you may choose to spend some or all of your culture
tokens to advance your culture level marker.
Upgrade Building
Grey arrow to the left of the building’s name.
Allows you to build the pictured building for the
listed
cost, and upgrades all buildings you
already own of a certain type (see market board)
to that type of building.
City Actions
Build a figure, unit, building, or wonder
City must pay the production cost from
in its outskirts.
For every 3 points off your trade dial, you may boost one city’s
production by 1.
Upgrade Unit
Upgrades all unit cards of the indicated type to
the listed rank. Units never decrease in rank,
and ranks may be skipped.
Army figures: 4; scout figures: 6.
Artillery, infantry, or mounted units, cost per unit:
Rank 1: 5; Rank 2: 7; Rank 3: 9; Rank 4: 11; Aircraft: 12
(once unlocked).
Devote city to the arts
Gain 1 culture , plus 1 extra per
Gain Coin
You gain one coin when the tech is learned.
in that city’s outskirts.
Harvest a resource
Gain 1 resource token from the market board if that matching
resource icon is in the city’s outskirts.
Resource Ability
Allows you to spend the pictured resource to
activate the listed ability during the stated
phase of the turn. Resource abilities may only
be used once per turn.
4. Movement
In player order, each player moves any or all of their figures
(armies and scouts), one at a time, up to a number of squares
equal to their civilization’s travel speed (no diagonals).
Exploration Pay 1 square of movement to flip adjacent facedown
tile; place random hut and village markers. Army figures
entering a hut or village square must end movement and either
take hut marker and resources, or attack barbarian village.
Tech Card Resources
Battles occur when an army enters a square with enemy figures.
Armies may explore huts and villages by moving onto them (if
they do so, or join battle, their movement ends).
Scouts cannot enter huts or villages. A scout that enters a battle
is immediately killed. If accompanied by an army, a scout is
only killed if the army figures die.
Incense
Iron
Silk
Spy
Uranium Wheat
Any
Scouts
Simultaneously, each player may research 1 new tech by paying
the tech’s minimum
cost, then adding the tech to a legal
spot in their tech pyramid.
Build Cities Sacrifice a scout to build a city in its square. You
must have an unbuilt city, and the scout must be at least 3
spaces away from any other city, and 2 away from any hut,
village, or enemy figure. It cannot be in water, adjacent to the
map edge, or adjacent to any unrevealed squares.
Researching reduces your trade dial to 0, plus 1 for each coin
you have on your economy dial (trade cannot increase).
Gather Each scout adds the icons of the space it is in to one of
its player’s cities (that player’s choice) each turn.
5. Research
C ombat
When an army moves into a square containing a village marker,
an enemy army, or an enemy city, a battle takes place.
A unit still inflicts its full strength in wounds to any unit that
attacks it, even if previously wounded.
The player whose army is entering the square is the attacker,
and the player whose figure or city is being attacked is the
defender (if a village is being attacked, the player to the
attacker’s left becomes the defender).
Trumping Units
The rock-paper-scissors relationship between artillery, infantry,
and mounted units is shown on the cards by trump symbols.
1. Assembling the Battle Force
The attacker and defender each shuffle their standing forces
and randomly draw a number of unit cards equal to their battle
hand size.
Battle hand size starts at 3 and may be increased as follows:
+2 for each friendly army in the square beyond the first
+1 if governed by Fundamentalism
+3 if defending a city or capital
A side of a unit card lists its unit name, military rank, strength
value, trump symbol, and unit type. You only use the side
corresponding to the rank of your matching military tech marker.
You may wish to turn your cards so the top edge is the one you
are using, as indicated by the unit’s rank.
Your battle force cards are held in hand and kept secret from
your opponent until played. You should always try to keep
the number of units in your standing forces at or above your
expected battle hand size. Also, having too many units reduces
your chances of drawing the units you really want in battle.
When a unit attacks or is attacked by a unit that it has pictured
on its card as a trump symbol, it trumps that unit, dealing its
damage before the other unit can do so. If this damage kills the
trumped unit, the trumped unit deals no damage back.
Battle Abilities
Tech cards with resource abilities used in battle are always used
before or after attacking an enemy front, never during—even if
the effects may last through an attack.
Aircraft Units
A player who learns the Flight tech may produce aircraft units;
they cannot trump or be trumped by any unit.
4. Resolving the Battle
The battle is over after both players have played all of their
battle forces. All wounds are removed from surviving units, then
each player tallies up the strength of all of their surviving units,
adding in the value of the combat bonus card, if they have it.
The player with the highest total wins; ties go to the defender.
The winner loses one army figure in the square for every 2 of
their units that were killed in the battle. A player’s last army
figure in the square can never be lost this way.
2. Calculating Combat Bonuses
He also receives a reward as follows:
Players look to see if either side has any combat bonuses. The
player with the highest combat bonus takes the combat bonus
card and turns it so that it is set to his combat bonus minus his
opponent’s combat bonus.
The loser had one or more figures in the square:
The loser’s figures in that square are all killed and removed
from the board (although they may be built again later). The
winner may then take their choice of one of the following from
the loser:
Available combat bonuses are as follows:
+2 for every Barracks the player has built
Up to 3 points of trade from the loser’s trade dial.
+4 for every Academy the player has built
Up to 3 culture tokens.
+4 for every Great General the player has on the map
Any one resource token. (facedown hut and village tokens may be chosen, but the
winner does not get to see what they are before choosing).
+6 if defending a non-capital city
+12 if defending a capital city
+4 if defending a walled capital or non-capital city (stacks with either of the two other city bonuses)
Every +4 in combat bonuses is about equivalent to one unit.
3. Engaging in Battle
Starting with the defender, then alternating back and forth,
each player must play a unit from their battle force faceup on
the table between them until both players have played all of the
units in their battle forces.
If the attacker is attacking a walled city, the attacker must play
the first unit rather than the defender.
The first unit played in battle creates the first front. After that,
each time a player plays a unit, they must either start a new
front or attack an existing enemy front (if any exist to attack).
A unit played without attacking another is starting a new front.
The new unit remains in play until killed or until the end of the
battle. There can never be more than one unit in a front.
To attack an existing enemy front, place your unit card in front
of a faceup enemy unit already played. The two unit cards then
immediately attack each other. Each deals wounds equal to its
strength to the other unit. A unit that suffers wounds equal to
its strength is immediately killed and returned faceup to the
bottom of the unit deck it originally came from. A surviving unit
has wound tokens placed on it to indicate the damage.
The loser was defending one of their non-capital cities:
The loser’s city is destroyed and its city marker is returned to
its owner’s civilization sheet. Any buildings in its outskirts are
returned to the market, and any wonders or great people in its
outskirts are removed from the game.
The winner’s figures remain in the square where the city center
was, and the winner then gets to do one of the following:
Learn one of the loser’s known techs that the winner does not
know, without having to pay the trade cost. The winner must
have a legal spot in their tech pyramid to do so.
Steal one of the loser’s culture event cards. The winner only gets to look at the card backs when choosing.
Steal up to any 2 resource tokens from the loser. Facedown hut and village tokens may be chosen, but the
winner does not get to see what they are before choosing.
The loser was defending their capital city:
The winner immediately wins the game with a military victory.
Aftermath
Any surviving units (whether owned by the winner or the loser)
are returned to their owner’s standing forces.
Any killed units are placed faceup on the bottom of their
respective unit decks.
Looting After Battle
The looting system is adjusted as follows:
If the loser had one or more figures in the square:
The winner gains 1 loot.
FAME AND FORTUNE
Setup
Add the 4 new civilization sheets.
Add the 4 new tech cards to each player’s existing tech deck,
and the metropolis markers to each player’s city markers. Place
the military reference cards with each player’s setup card.
Add the new home map tiles and shuffle the new neutral map
tiles in with the other neutral map tiles. Then add the hut and
village markers to those from the core game.
Shuffle the new wonder and culture event cards into their
respective decks.
If playing with 5 players, use the setup diagram for 5 players in
the expansion rulebook.
Build the Wonder deck by shuffling the modern wonders and
dealing 4 of them facedown into a deck. Return the remaining
modern wonders to the box unseen. Repeat this process with
the medieval wonders, dealing the 4 medieval wonders on
top of the modern wonders. Then repeat the process with the
ancient wonders, dealing the 4 ancient wonders on top of the
medieval wonders. Once the wonder deck has been built, Egypt,
if playing, receives the top card, and then the top 4 cards are
turned faceup and placed in the wonder market spaces.
Set up the great person deck and/or investments if playing with
those expansions.
A basic building is a building that is not upgraded.
A player immune to anarchy never needs to change to the
Anarchy government. Culture events cannot force the player to
do so, and he may switch directly to a new government type,
even if he did not learn that government on the previous turn.
Civilization Bonuses for New Civilizations
Arabia gains one of each type of resource token (1 incense, 1
iron, 1 silk, and 1 wheat); and Arabia’s artillery military level
marker starts the game at rank 2.
Greece begins the game governed by Democracy instead of by
Despotism; and Greece’s infantry military level marker starts the
game at rank 2.
India starts the game with a metropolis instead of a normal
capital; this must occupy 2 of the 4 center squares on India’s
home map tile and cannot be placed diagonally.
Spain takes the white Spanish scout figure. When figures are
placed on the map, Spain places the white scout figure as
well. As with Russia, this increases the number of figures that
Spain can have on the map at the same time. However Spain’s
stacking limit still starts at 2, so Spain may not place all 3 of
its figures in the same square at the start of the game.
America When playing with the great person deck, America
draws a great person card at the start of the game.
Rules changes & clarifications
Adding Wonders to the Market Board
Each time a wonder is purchased from the market, the next
wonder in the deck is drawn and placed faceup in the market to
replace it, along with its accompanying wonder marker.
Obsoleting Wonders in the Market
When obsoleting a wonder using a tech card, you may choose
a wonder still in the market to obsolete. The obsoleted wonder
is discarded from the market along with its marker, and a new
wonder is drawn from the deck to replace it.
If the loser was defending one of their non-capital cities:
The winner gains 2 loot.
If the loser was defending their capital city:
The winner immediately wins the game with a military victory.
The winner immediately spends the loot they received to
purchase effects as follows. A winner receiving more than 1 loot
may purchase as many effects as they can afford, and they may
purchase the same effect multiple times.
1 Loot Effects
• Steal up to 3 points of trade from the loser’s trade dial.
• Steal up to 3 culture tokens from the loser.
• Steal any 1 resource token from the loser (facedown hut and
village tokens may be chosen, but the winner does not get to
see what they are before choosing).
• Force the loser to discard a coin token of the winner’s choice.
This cannot affect investments.
2 Loot Effects
• Learn one of the loser’s known techs that the winner does not
know, without having to pay the trade cost. The winner must
have a legal spot in their tech pyramid to do so.
• Steal one of the loser’s culture event cards. The winner only
gets to look at the card backs when choosing.
• Steal one of the loser’s coin tokens and place it on the
winner’s civilization sheet. This cannot affect investments.
Expansion Rules
New Hut and Village Effects
Friendly Barbarian: Immediately reveal and discard
this marker, then either build one unlocked unit for
free and add it to your standing forces, or build a
figure for free and place it in the square where this
marker was found (do not exceed stacking limit).
Friendly Workers: Reveal and discard this marker
during city management to have one of your cities
produce an extra 4
that turn.
Native Art: Immediately reveal and discard this
marker, then gain either 3 or 6 culture tokens, as
indicated on the marker.
Teacher: Keep this marker. Reveal and discard it
during the Start of Turn Phase to learn a level I tech
for free.
Wealth: Immediately reveal and discard this marker,
then gain one coin token, placing it on your
civilization sheet.
Disbanding Figures, Fortifying Cities, and
Sending Caravans
Armies and scouts may be voluntarily disbanded: first move the
figure into the city center of one of your own cities. Then remove
it from the board. Figures may still move through friendly city
centers as long as they don’t end their movement there.
Fortifying a City
If you disband an army, you may fortify the city the army figure
was disbanded in. Place a fortification/caravan marker on the
city center, fortification side up. When you defend a fortified
city, you receive a +2 combat bonus.
If a fortified city successfully defends itself against an attacker
in combat, the fortification marker is discarded. A city may only
have one fortification marker on it at a time, and a fortified city
cannot also have a caravan marker placed on it.
Caravans
If you disband a scout, you may send a caravan to the city the
scout figure was disbanded in. Place a fortification/caravan
marker on the city center, caravan side up. When you take a
build action in a city with a caravan marker, you may discard the
caravan marker to have the city produce 2 extra
that turn.
Optional Additions
All players must agree at the start of the game whether or not to
use these game additions.
1. Great Person Deck
Relics
Setup
During setup, instead of shuffling the great person markers;
turn them faceup and sort them by type (artist, builder, general,
humanitarian, industrialist, and scientist). Then shuffle the
great person deck and place it on the table facedown.
When a map tile with a relic is discovered, place the matching
relic marker on the appropriate square. While it remains in
place, the square cannot be built in or altered by any culture
event, tech, or other game effects, nor may any cities may be
built adjacent to it, or any scout figures enter the square unless
accompanied by one or more armies (not even if owned by a
player whose civilization is governed by a Republic).
Gaining Great People
When you gain a great person, draw a card from the deck and
keep it facedown and secret from the other players until used.
Take the type of great person marker that matches the picture
shown on the card. This marker may be placed on the board or
held in reserve as normal.
When one or more army figures end their movement on a relic
square, their owner removes the relic marker from the board,
gaining a special one-time ability. Once the marker is removed,
the relic square may be built over or altered as normal.
If no markers of the type shown on the card are available,
discard the card faceup to the bottom of the deck and draw
again until you draw an available one. If there are none
available at all, you don’t receive a great person.
A city may only have one caravan marker on it at a time, and
a city with a caravan cannot also have a fortification marker
placed on it.
Atlantis (water square):
Learn a free tech of your choice at the start of the
next turn. You must have a legal space in your tech
pyramid to place the new tech.
School of Confucius (mountain square):
Immediately gain 2 great people. A Greek player
removing this relic marker first draws 2 great people
and chooses one to keep, and then draws 2 more
great people and chooses one to keep.
Seven Cities of Gold (forest square):
Invest 2 coins for free at the start of the next turn
(ie, you gain 2 investment markers, but do not lose
2 coin tokens to pay for them).
Metropolises
The Agriculture tech allows you to grow your capital into a
metropolis. When devoted to the arts, a metropolis produces a
base of 2 culture instead of 1. A metropolis receives an extra
+2 combat bonus when you are defending it.
Both squares containing a metropolis marker are that city’s
center, while the 10 squares surrounding the metropolis marker
are the city’s outskirts. It may extend partially into water and
doesn’t count as water for movement, so its owner can use it as
a makeshift bridge.
Growing a Capital into a Metropolis
When you learn the Agriculture tech, your capital immediately
grows into a metropolis, if possible. Remove your capital marker
and place your metropolis marker on the map, as follows:
The metropolis must occupy the square the capital marker
occupied plus one of its 4 non-diagonally adjacent squares (its
expansion square).
The expansion square must not contain any enemy figures. If
the expansion square contains any friendly figures, immediately
move them to an adjacent square they can legally end their
movement in.
If the expansion square contains a wonder, great person, or
building, then the square’s previous contents are overbuilt,
as described in the core rules. An expansion square may be a
water square (the square is no longer considered to be water for
purposes of movement).
If the players go through the entire great person deck and a
faceup card is revealed on top of the deck, turn the deck over
and shuffle it to create a new deck.
Great Person Abilities
Each ability on a great person card indicates when it can be
used. To use an ability, turn the card faceup and keep it in front
of you (if the card must be discarded for the ability to be used,
discard it faceup to the bottom of the great person deck).
You cannot use a great person’s ability unless you have at least
one great person marker of that person’s type on the map.
Killing Great People
You may only have one great person card (faceup or facedown)
for each great person marker of that type you possess (including
markers on the map and those in reserve).
If you have too many of the same type of great person card,
randomly discard cards of that type one at a time until you no
longer have too many.
2. Investment Deck
When playing with the Arabs, the investment deck must be used.
Setup
During setup, each player takes their deck of 4 investment cards.
Investing Coins
Each player may invest one coin token (not coins printed on the
map, tech cards, or buildings) at the start of the each turn by
discarding a coin token to gain one investment marker. Then
choose one of your investment cards and place the marker on
top of it, keeping the card faceup.
Each time you invest, you may place the new investment marker
on a different one of your investment cards, or you may pile
several investment markers on top of the same card.
Investments do not count towards the 15 coins needed for an
economic victory, but neither can investments be discarded
from play by other players.
Investment Effects
When adding an investment marker to an investment card, you
look to see if an ability becomes active.
The metropolis’s new outskirts cannot overlap another city’s
outskirts, or extend off the map or into unexplored territory.
An investment ability becomes active when the total number of
investment markers on the card is equal to or higher than the
number shown to the left of the investment ability.
If a capital can be grown into a metropolis when Agriculture is
learned, then it must be. If it cannot be grown into a metropolis
that turn, you must do so during the Start of Turn Phase on any
subsequent turn in which it becomes possible.
Only the most expensive active ability on an investment card
has an effect. Once a more expensive ability on an investment
card becomes active, less expensive abilities on that card cease
to function.
Rules changes & clarifications
Adding Wonders to the Market Board
Each time a wonder is purchased from the market, the next
wonder in the deck is drawn and placed faceup in the market to
replace it, along with its accompanying wonder marker.
WISDOM AND WARFARE
Setup
Add the 6 new civilization sheets.
Add the 6 new tech cards to each player’s existing tech deck,
and remove the old Metal Casting and Railroad techs. If you are
not using the Fame and Fortune expansion, ignore the purple
tech cards.
Shuffle the new wonder and culture event cards into their
respective decks.
Add the new home map tiles and shuffle the new neutral map
tiles in with the other neutral map tiles. Then add the hut and
village markers to those from the core game, along with the new
relic markers.
Add the shipyard buildings to the buildings, and cover the
harbor area of the market board with the new market overlay.
Separate the 5 city-state markers from the rest of the markers
and shuffle them in a facedown pile near the market board.
Replace the unit and government cards from the core game
with the new unit and government cards. The new units are
still separated by type, and are not compatible with the original
units.
If using the Fame and Fortune expansion, remove the old
Leonidas card from the great person deck and remove the
Endowment for the Arts card from each investment deck.
Replace them with the new cards included with this expansion.
Otherwise, ignore these replacement cards.
Each player receives one deck of social policy cards.
Build the Wonder deck by shuffling the modern wonders and
dealing 4 of them facedown into a deck. Return the remaining
modern wonders to the box unseen. Repeat this process with
the medieval wonders, dealing the 4 medieval wonders on
top of the modern wonders. Then repeat the process with the
ancient wonders, dealing the 4 ancient wonders on top of the
medieval wonders. Once the wonder deck has been built, Egypt,
if playing, receives the top card, and then the top 4 cards are
turned faceup and placed in the wonder market spaces.
Civilization Bonuses for New Civilizations
The Aztecs have no special setup bonuses other than their
starting tech. Their home tile has only 3 starting options for
their capital city because one of the 4 central squares on their
home map tile is a water square.
The English have no special setup bonuses other than their
starting tech.
The French start with a social policy maximum of 2, and their
social policy maximum is increased by one.
The Japanese start governed by Feudalism instead of
Despotism. In addition, due to Chivalry, Japan’s mounted
military marker starts the game at rank 2.
The Mongols start with 2 extra mounted units from the market
board, adding the units to their standing forces. In addition,
due to Horseback Riding, their travel speed starts at 3.
The Zulu start with 2 extra artillery units from the market board,
adding the units to their standing forces.
Obsoleting Wonders in the Market
When obsoleting a wonder using a tech card, you may choose
a wonder still in the market to obsolete. The obsoleted wonder
is discarded from the market along with its marker, and a new
wonder is drawn from the deck to replace it.
Looting After Battle
The looting system is adjusted as follows:
Any unit that suffers wounds equal to its health value is
immediately killed. Return killed units faceup to the bottom of
the unit deck they were originally acquired from.
Engaged Units
Units cannot attack an existing front that has 2 units already
engaged on it. If all fronts are currently engaged from both
sides, you must start a new front.
Resolving a Battle
After both players have played all of their battle forces, the
battle is over. Before wound tokens are removed from surviving
units in the battle, each player adds together the health values
of all their surviving units.
If the loser had one or more figures in the square:
The winner gains 1 loot.
Then each player subtracts the total number of wounds on his
surviving units, and adds the value of the combat bonus card (if
he has it) to determine his final combat value.
If the loser was defending one of their non-capital cities:
The winner gains 2 loot.
The player with the highest total wins the battle, with ties going
to the defender.
If the loser was defending their capital city:
The winner immediately wins the game with a military victory.
New Culture Event Cards
The winner immediately spends the loot they received to
purchase effects as follows. A winner receiving more than 1 loot
may purchase as many effects as they can afford, and they may
purchase the same effect multiple times.
1 Loot Effects
• Steal up to 3 points of trade from the loser’s trade dial.
• Steal up to 3 culture tokens from the loser.
• Steal any 1 resource token from the loser (facedown hut and
village tokens may be chosen, but the winner does not get to
see what they are before choosing).
• Force the loser to discard a coin token of the winner’s choice.
This cannot affect investments.
2 Loot Effects
• Learn one of the loser’s known techs that the winner does not
know, without having to pay the trade cost. The winner must
have a legal spot in their tech pyramid to do so.
• Steal one of the loser’s culture event cards. The winner only
gets to look at the card backs when choosing.
• Steal one of the loser’s coin tokens and place it on the
winner’s civilization sheet. This cannot affect investments.
Expansion Rules
New City Action: Start a Building Program
There is a fourth city action available to all players: Start a
building program.
When a city starts a building program, place a building program
marker on it. A city cannot have more than one such marker on
it at a time. The marker stays until the city is destroyed or the
city is used to produce a figure, unit, building, or wonder.
The next time that city is used to produce a figure, unit,
building, or wonder, discard its building program marker and
double the amount of
the city has in its outskirts for the
duration of the action. A city must use a building program
marker when it produces. The city does not double any
gained from other sources, and any excess
after the produce
action is complete is wasted.
The new culture event card Roaming Horde gives a player the
ability to cause barbarians to attack another player’s army figure
or city. A player who plays one of these cards becomes the
barbarian player and controls the barbarian units. Barbarian
units are stronger than normal, and use rank II units instead of
rank I. If the player who was attacked by barbarians wins the
battle, he does not receive any rewards.
Several other new culture cards have 2 effects, with each effect
tied to a different phase. You must choose in which phase you
are playing the card, and cannot resolve both effects.
Wealth Hut and Village Effect
Wealth: Immediately reveal and discard this marker,
then gain one coin token, placing it on your
civilization sheet.
City-state Hut and Village Effect
City-states are a new hut and village effect that can generate
bonuses for the controlling civilization each turn.
Founding a City-state
A city-state is founded by discovering its reward on
the back of a hut or village marker. Draw the top citystate marker and place it on the square the hut or
village was on.
Effects of a City-state
You control a city-state if you have a figure on the square it
occupies. A controlled city-state is considered in the outskirts
of the controlling player’s capital. It can generate production,
trade, culture, and other bonuses for the controlling player. You
can also place figures you build with your capital in the squares
of city-states you control, following normal stacking limits.
Armies garrisoned in a city-state can be attacked by other
players. City-states provide a small defensive bonus (+4) if its
garrison is attacked.
If a scout on a city-state is attacked, it is removed from the
board without a battle, as normal.
Combat
You may build cities in the same square as a city-state. When a
city is built on top of a city-state, the city-state is destroyed and
you receive 3 .
Each unit now has strength (how many wounds the unit deals
when it attacks) and health (how many wounds the unit can
sustain before it is killed) values.
You cannot build cities adjacent to city-states. If the Zulu
explore a city-state by building a city, the city-state is
immediately destroyed and the Zulu receive 3 .
Abandoning a City-state
You can move your figures away from a city-state per normal
movement rules. If you leave a city-state, you no longer gain
any of the bonuses for controlling it. City-states exist even if no
player controls them.
Social Policies
Social policies are represented by a set of 4 double-sided cards,
and every civilization begins the game with one set. They are
always unlocked at the start of a game, but a civilization cannot
benefit from a social policy until it adopts it.
Each social policy card has a title and one or more abilities.
Each Start of Turn ability can only be used once per turn. If a
card has 2 abilities, both can be used once.
Adopting Social Policies
A civilization’s social policy maximum is equal to the number of
its built cities. Each time a civilization’s social policy maximum
increases, it must immediately adopt a new social policy.
Each civilization begins the game with a social policy maximum
of 1, and should adopt a social policy during setup (note the
French start with an additional policy).
When your civilization adopts a new social policy, choose a
social policy card you do not currently have and flip it to its
desired side. After you have adopted a social policy, you cannot
adopt another from that same card; to use the reverse side of
the card, the social policy must be switched.
Losing Social Policies
Each time your civilization’s social policy maximum decreases,
choose a social policy card you currently have and return it to
your pile of unused social policies (any policy on the card can
be re-adopted later).
Switching Social Policies
After a social policy is adopted it cannot normally be changed.
If an effect allows you to switch a currently adopted social
policy, you may either flip a currently adopted policy to its
reverse side, or switch out a currently adopted policy card for a
different card you are not currently using.
Relics
When a map tile with a relic is discovered, place the matching
relic marker on the appropriate square.
While the marker remains in place, the square cannot be built
in or altered by any culture event, tech, or other game effects.
While the marker remains in place, no cities may be built
adjacent to it, nor may any scout figures enter the square unless
accompanied by one or more armies (not even if their owner’s
civilization has adopted the Pacifism social policy).
When one or more army figures end their movement on a relic
square, their owner removes the relic marker from the board,
gaining a special one-time ability. Once the marker is removed,
the relic square may be built over or altered as normal.
Armies may move through a relic square without ending their
movement.
Ark of the Covenant
If you remove the Ark of the Covenant relic from the
board, receive 2 free advances on the culture track.
The Ark of the Covenant is a desert square.
Attila’s Village
If you remove the Attila’s Village relic from the
board, immediately build 2 unlocked units of your
choice for free. Attila’s Village is a grassland square.
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