Administration and Reference Guide
Oracle® Database Appliance
Administration and Reference Guide
Release 12.1.2.10.0 for Linux x86-64
E83201-02
March 2017
Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide, Release 12.1.2.10.0 for Linux x86-64
E83201-02
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Contents
Preface ............................................................................................................................................................... xv
Audience ...................................................................................................................................................... xv
Documentation Accessibility .................................................................................................................... xv
Conventions................................................................................................................................................ xvi
1 Updating Oracle Database Appliance Software
1.1 About the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle ..................................................................
1-1
1.2 About Installing the Latest Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle ..............................
1-3
1.3 Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle ......................................................
1-4
1.3.1 Preparing to Install Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundles ..............................
1.3.2 Step 1: Download the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle from My Oracle
1-5
Support .........................................................................................................................................
1-6
1.3.3 Step 2: Copy and Unpack the Patch Bundle......................................................................
1-7
1.3.4 Step 3: Verify Components that Require Patching ...........................................................
1-9
1.3.5 Step 4: Patch the Server ........................................................................................................
1-9
1.3.6 Step 5: Patch the Shared Storage (Optional).................................................................... 1-11
1.3.7 Step 6: Patch Oracle Database............................................................................................ 1-11
1.3.8 Step 7: Validate the Patch Update..................................................................................... 1-12
1.4 Reimaging Oracle Database Appliance ....................................................................................... 1-13
2 Managing Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance
2.1 About the Oracle Database Appliance OAKCLI Utility .............................................................
2-1
2.2 Oracle Database Features and Oracle Database Appliance........................................................
2-2
2.2.1 Oracle Database Appliance Plug-in for Oracle Enterprise Manager .............................
2-3
2.2.2 Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express and Oracle Database Appliance .........
2-3
2.2.3 Data Migration and Management and Oracle Database Appliance..............................
2-3
2.2.4 Oracle Clusterware and Oracle Database Appliance.......................................................
2-4
2.2.5 Oracle RAC One Node and Oracle Database Appliance.................................................
2-4
2.2.6 Oracle Real Application Clusters and Oracle Database Appliance ...............................
2-4
2.2.7 Administrative Groups and Users on Oracle Database Appliance ...............................
2-5
2.3 Creating and Converting Databases with OAKCLI ....................................................................
2-5
2.3.1 About Creating Databases with OAKCLI Commands ....................................................
2-6
iii
2.3.2 Creating, Using, and Removing Database Configuration Files with OAKCLI............
2-6
2.3.3 Creating Snapshot Databases With OAKCLI....................................................................
2.3.4 About Converting Single-Instance Databases to Oracle RAC or Oracle RAC One
2-7
Node ............................................................................................................................................
2-8
2.4 About Managing Multiple Databases on Oracle Database Appliance .....................................
2-9
2.5 About Managing Multiple Database Instances Using Instance Caging ................................. 2-10
2.6 About Oracle Database Appliance SSDs ..................................................................................... 2-10
2.7 How to Upgrade and Update the Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance ............ 2-12
2.7.1 About Oracle Database Upgrades and Updates on Oracle Database Appliance ...... 2-12
2.7.2 Updating to Oracle Database 12.1.0.2.161018 from Previous Oracle Database
12.1.0.2.x Releases ..................................................................................................................... 2-13
2.7.3 Upgrading to Oracle Database 11.2.0.4.161018 from Oracle Database 11.2.0.4.x
Releases ...................................................................................................................................... 2-14
3 Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
3.1 About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform ...........................................................
3-2
3.2 Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture.................................................
3-3
3.2.1 About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture.........................
3-3
3.2.2 About Virtual Machines and Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms .......
3-4
3.3 About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Deployment ....................................
3-7
3.4 How to Create and Manage Shared Repositories ........................................................................
3-8
3.4.1 Creating a Shared Repository..............................................................................................
3-8
3.4.2 Showing the Status of Shared Repositories .......................................................................
3-9
3.4.3 Starting a Shared Repository ...............................................................................................
3-9
3.4.4 Stopping a Shared Repository ........................................................................................... 3-10
3.4.5 Deleting a Shared Repository ............................................................................................ 3-10
3.4.6 Increasing the Size of a Shared Repository...................................................................... 3-10
3.5 How to Manage Virtual Disks in Shared Repositories.............................................................. 3-11
3.5.1 Creating a Virtual Disk for Use in a Shared Repository................................................ 3-11
3.5.2 Viewing Information About Virtual Disks ...................................................................... 3-12
3.5.3 Cloning Virtual Disks ......................................................................................................... 3-12
3.5.4 Attaching a Virtual Disk to a Virtual Machine ............................................................... 3-13
3.5.5 Deleting a Virtual Disk ....................................................................................................... 3-13
3.6 How to Manage Virtual Machine Templates.............................................................................. 3-13
3.6.1 About Managing Virtual Machine Templates ................................................................ 3-14
3.6.2 Listing Virtual Machine Templates .................................................................................. 3-15
3.6.3 Importing Virtual Machine Templates............................................................................. 3-15
3.6.4 Configuring a Virtual Machine Template........................................................................ 3-17
3.6.5 Showing Configured Values for a Virtual Machine Template ..................................... 3-17
3.6.6 Modifying a Virtual Machine Template Configuration................................................. 3-18
3.6.7 Removing a Virtual Machine Template ........................................................................... 3-18
3.7 How to Create Clones and Snap Clones of a Template ............................................................ 3-18
3.7.1 About Creating Clones and Snap Clones of a Template ............................................... 3-19
iv
3.7.2 Cloning a Template With OAKCLI .................................................................................. 3-19
3.7.3 Creating a Snap Clone from a Template With OAKCLI ............................................... 3-20
3.7.4 Creating a Snap Clone of an Existing Virtual Machine With OAKCLI....................... 3-20
3.7.5 Creating a Snap Clone of an Existing Virtual Machine That Uses a Different
Domain ....................................................................................................................................... 3-20
3.8 How to Manage Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform ... 3-21
3.8.1 About Managing Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform...................................................................................................................................... 3-22
3.8.2 Listing the Virtual Machines in Your Repositories ........................................................ 3-22
3.8.3 Creating a Virtual Machine................................................................................................ 3-23
3.8.4 Configuring a Virtual Machine ......................................................................................... 3-24
3.8.5 Starting and Stopping a Virtual Machine ........................................................................ 3-25
3.8.6 Externally Configuring a Virtual Machine ...................................................................... 3-25
3.8.7 Opening a Virtual Machine Console for a Virtual Machine ......................................... 3-25
3.8.8 Creating an Image for a New Virtual Machine............................................................... 3-26
3.8.9 Setting Up a Virtual Machine for Access from eth0 Using an IP Address ................. 3-26
3.8.10 Adding or Removing a Virtual Disk to or from a Virtual Machine........................... 3-26
3.8.11 Removing a Virtual Machine from a Shared Repository ............................................ 3-26
3.8.12 Performing a Live Migration for an Oracle Database Appliance Virtual Machine. 3-27
3.9 How to Manage High Availability on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform... 3-27
3.10 How to Manage CPU Pools on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform............. 3-28
3.10.1 About Managing CPU Pools for Resource Allocation ................................................. 3-28
3.10.2 About Over-Subscribed CPU Pools ................................................................................ 3-30
3.10.3 Creating a New CPU Pool on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Nodes.......................................................................................................................................... 3-30
3.10.4 Showing the CPU Pools Configured on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform Nodes ......................................................................................................................... 3-30
3.10.5 Changing the Number of CPUs Assigned to a CPU Pool on Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform Nodes ................................................................................. 3-30
3.10.6 Assigning a Virtual Machine to a CPU Pool on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform................................................................................................................. 3-31
3.11 About Network Infrastructure and Virtual Local Area Networks on Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform...................................................................................................... 3-31
3.12 Managing Virtual Local Area Networks on User Domains and on ODA_BASE ............... 3-35
3.13 How to Resize ODA_BASE ......................................................................................................... 3-38
3.13.1 About Resizing ODA_BASE ............................................................................................ 3-38
3.13.2 Changing the ODA_BASE Core Count.......................................................................... 3-38
4 Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface
4.1 About the Oracle Appliance Manager Command-line Interface (OAKCLI) ...........................
4-3
4.2 Managing OAKCLI Privileges and Security with SUDO ...........................................................
4-5
4.3 oakcli add disk -local........................................................................................................................
4-7
4.4 oakcli apply........................................................................................................................................
4-7
v
4.5 oakcli clone commands ....................................................................................................................
4-8
4.5.1 oakcli clone vdisk ..................................................................................................................
4-8
4.5.2 oakcli clone vm ......................................................................................................................
4-9
4.6 oakcli configure commands .......................................................................................................... 4-11
4.6.1 oakcli configure additionalnet........................................................................................... 4-12
4.6.2 oakcli configure asr ............................................................................................................. 4-13
4.6.3 oakcli configure cpupool .................................................................................................... 4-14
4.6.4 oakcli configure firstnet...................................................................................................... 4-14
4.6.5 oakcli configure ib2fiber..................................................................................................... 4-15
4.6.6 oakcli configure network.................................................................................................... 4-15
4.6.7 oakcli configure oda_base .................................................................................................. 4-16
4.6.8 oakcli configure repo .......................................................................................................... 4-17
4.6.9 oakcli configure vm............................................................................................................. 4-18
4.6.10 oakcli configure vmtemplate ........................................................................................... 4-20
4.7 oakcli copy ....................................................................................................................................... 4-22
4.8 oakcli create commands................................................................................................................. 4-23
4.8.1 oakcli create cpupool .......................................................................................................... 4-23
4.8.2 oakcli create database ......................................................................................................... 4-24
4.8.3 oakcli create dbhome .......................................................................................................... 4-27
4.8.4 oakcli create dbstorage ....................................................................................................... 4-28
4.8.5 oakcli create db_config_params ........................................................................................ 4-29
4.8.6 oakcli create repo................................................................................................................. 4-30
4.8.7 oakcli create snapshotdb .................................................................................................... 4-31
4.8.8 oakcli create vdisk ............................................................................................................... 4-31
4.8.9 oakcli create vlan ................................................................................................................. 4-32
4.9 oakcli delete commands................................................................................................................. 4-33
4.9.1 oakcli delete cpupool .......................................................................................................... 4-34
4.9.2 oakcli delete database ......................................................................................................... 4-34
4.9.3 oakcli delete db_config_params........................................................................................ 4-34
4.9.4 oakcli delete dbhome .......................................................................................................... 4-35
4.9.5 oakcli delete dbstorage ....................................................................................................... 4-35
4.9.6 oakcli delete repo................................................................................................................. 4-36
4.9.7 oakcli delete vdisk ............................................................................................................... 4-36
4.9.8 oakcli delete vlan ................................................................................................................. 4-37
4.9.9 oakcli delete vm ................................................................................................................... 4-37
4.9.10 oakcli delete vmtemplate ................................................................................................. 4-38
4.10 oakcli deploy ................................................................................................................................. 4-38
4.11 oakcli describe-cpucore................................................................................................................ 4-39
4.12 oakcli expand storage................................................................................................................... 4-40
4.13 oakcli diskwritecache ................................................................................................................... 4-40
4.14 oakcli import vmtemplate ........................................................................................................... 4-41
4.15 oakcli locate disk ........................................................................................................................... 4-43
4.16 oakcli manage diagcollect............................................................................................................ 4-43
vi
4.17 oakcli migrate vm ......................................................................................................................... 4-44
4.18 oakcli modify commands ............................................................................................................ 4-45
4.18.1 oakcli modify database ..................................................................................................... 4-45
4.18.2 oakcli modify vm............................................................................................................... 4-46
4.18.3 oakcli modify vmtemplate ............................................................................................... 4-47
4.19 oakcli orachk.................................................................................................................................. 4-47
4.20 oakcli reconfigure osparams ....................................................................................................... 4-49
4.21 oakcli resize dbstorage ................................................................................................................. 4-50
4.22 oakcli restart oda_base ................................................................................................................. 4-50
4.23 oakcli show commands................................................................................................................ 4-51
4.23.1 oakcli show asr................................................................................................................... 4-53
4.23.2 oakcli show cooling........................................................................................................... 4-54
4.23.3 oakcli show controller....................................................................................................... 4-54
4.23.4 oakcli show core_config_key ........................................................................................... 4-55
4.23.5 oakcli show cpupool ......................................................................................................... 4-55
4.23.6 oakcli show databases....................................................................................................... 4-56
4.23.7 oakcli show db_config_params ....................................................................................... 4-56
4.23.8 oakcli show dbhomes........................................................................................................ 4-57
4.23.9 oakcli show dbstorage ...................................................................................................... 4-57
4.23.10 oakcli show disk .............................................................................................................. 4-58
4.23.11 oakcli show diskgroup.................................................................................................... 4-59
4.23.12 oakcli show enclosure..................................................................................................... 4-60
4.23.13 oakcli show env_hw........................................................................................................ 4-60
4.23.14 oakcli show expander ..................................................................................................... 4-60
4.23.15 oakcli show ib .................................................................................................................. 4-61
4.23.16 oakcli show fs................................................................................................................... 4-61
4.23.17 oakcli show iraid ............................................................................................................. 4-61
4.23.18 oakcli show ismaster ....................................................................................................... 4-61
4.23.19 oakcli show memory....................................................................................................... 4-62
4.23.20 oakcli show network ....................................................................................................... 4-62
4.23.21 oakcli show power .......................................................................................................... 4-62
4.23.22 oakcli show processor..................................................................................................... 4-63
4.23.23 oakcli show raidsyncstatus ............................................................................................ 4-63
4.23.24 oakcli show repo.............................................................................................................. 4-64
4.23.25 oakcli show server........................................................................................................... 4-65
4.23.26 oakcli show storage ......................................................................................................... 4-65
4.23.27 oakcli show validation storage ...................................................................................... 4-65
4.23.28 oakcli show validation storage errors .......................................................................... 4-65
4.23.29 oakcli show validation storage failures........................................................................ 4-66
4.23.30 oakcli show vdisk ............................................................................................................ 4-66
4.23.31 oakcli show version......................................................................................................... 4-67
4.23.32 oakcli show vlan .............................................................................................................. 4-68
4.23.33 oakcli show vm ................................................................................................................ 4-69
vii
4.23.34 oakcli show vmconsole................................................................................................... 4-70
4.23.35 oakcli show vmtemplate................................................................................................. 4-71
4.24 oakcli start commands ................................................................................................................. 4-72
4.24.1 oakcli start oda_base ......................................................................................................... 4-72
4.24.2 oakcli start repo ................................................................................................................. 4-72
4.24.3 oakcli start vm.................................................................................................................... 4-73
4.25 oakcli stop command ................................................................................................................... 4-73
4.26 oakcli stordiag ............................................................................................................................... 4-74
4.27 oakcli test asr ................................................................................................................................. 4-75
4.28 oakcli unpack................................................................................................................................. 4-75
4.29 oakcli update ................................................................................................................................ 4-76
4.30 oakcli update-cpucore .................................................................................................................. 4-78
4.31 oakcli upgrade............................................................................................................................... 4-79
4.32 oakcli validate................................................................................................................................ 4-80
5 Validating and Troubleshooting Oracle Database Appliance
5.1 Oracle Database Appliance Diagnostics and Validation ............................................................
5-1
5.1.1 Oracle Database Appliance Validation Command Overview........................................
5-2
5.1.2 Examples of OAKCLI Validate Command Checks..........................................................
5-3
5.2 Validate the Host Name...................................................................................................................
5-6
5.3 Oracle Database Appliance Configuration Error Messages.......................................................
5-6
5.4 Preparing Log Files for Oracle Support Services .........................................................................
5-8
5.5 Additional Troubleshooting Tools and Commands....................................................................
5-8
5.5.1 Oracle Appliance Manager Tools for Configuration Auditing and Disk Diagnosis...
5-8
5.5.2 Trace File Analyzer Collector ..............................................................................................
5-9
5.6 Oracle Database Appliance Hardware Monitoring Tool.......................................................... 5-10
A Oracle Database Appliance Software Configuration Defaults
A.1 Directory Paths for Oracle Database Appliance ......................................................................... A-1
A.2 Oracle Groups and Users Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance .............................. A-2
A.3 Database Disk Group Sizes for Oracle Database Appliance ..................................................... A-2
A.4 Usable Storage on Oracle Database Appliance X5-2 .................................................................. A-4
A.5 Storage on Oracle Database Appliance ........................................................................................ A-6
A.5.1 About Oracle Database Appliance Storage ...................................................................... A-6
A.5.2 Oracle ACFS Mount Points and Storage Space................................................................ A-7
A.5.3 Oracle ACFS Space Management ...................................................................................... A-8
A.6 System Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance .............................................................. A-9
B Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
B.1 Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance.................................................. B-1
Index
viii
List of Examples
1-1
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-10
3-11
3-12
3-13
3-14
3-15
3-16
3-17
3-18
3-19
3-20
3-21
3-22
3-23
3-24
3-25
3-26
3-27
3-28
3-29
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
4-14
Validating Readiness for Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set..........................................
Example of Showing the Status of All Shared Repositories..................................................
Example of Showing the Status of a Selected Shared Repository........................................
Example of Starting a Shared Repository..............................................................................
Example of Stopping a Shared Repository............................................................................
Example of Deleting a Shared Repository.............................................................................
Example of Increasing the Size of a Shared Repository.......................................................
Example of Creating a Shared Virtual Disk..........................................................................
Example of Displaying the Information for All Vdisks.......................................................
Example of Displaying Information for a Single Vdisk.......................................................
Example of Cloning a Virtual Disk.........................................................................................
Example of Attaching a Virtual Disk To a Virtual Machine...............................................
Example of Deleting a Virtual Disk from a Shared Repository..........................................
Example of Importing Virtual Machine Templates from an External Repository
Assembly File.......................................................................................................................
Example of Importing a Virtual Machine Template from Dom0.......................................
Example of Importing a Virtual Machine Template Using an External Repository URL
................................................................................................................................................
Example of Creating a Virtual Machine Clone from a Virtual Machine Template.........
Example of Creating a Snap Clone From a Virtual Machine Template............................
Example of Creating a Snap Clone From an Existing Virtual Machine............................
Example of Migrating a Virtual Machine from the Currently Running Node to
Another Node.......................................................................................................................
Example of Showing CPU Pools on a Node..........................................................................
Example of Creating a New CPU Pool on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform Nodes....................................................................................................................
Example of Showing CPUs Assigned to Defined CPU Pools on Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform Nodes............................................................................
Example of Changing the Number of CPUs Assigned to a CPU Pool on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Nodes...........................................................
Example of Assigning a Virtual Machine to a CPU Pool on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform............................................................................................................
Example of Creating a Virtual Local Area Network............................................................
Example of Assigning and Removing a Virtual Local Area Network for a User
Domain..................................................................................................................................
Example of Assigning and Removing a Virtual Local Area Network for ODA_BASE..
Example of Viewing Virtual Local Area Networks..............................................................
Example of Deleting Virtual Local Area Networks.............................................................
Reconfiguring Oracle Database Appliance with a New Core Count .................................
Cloning a Virtual Disk................................................................................................................
Creating a Virtual Machine Image..........................................................................................
Creating a Virtual Machine Image in Driver Domain Mode..............................................
Preparing a Copy of the Configuration File..........................................................................
Deploying the Complete Oracle Database Appliance.........................................................
Running the Configurator........................................................................................................
Running the Offline Configurator with Advance Mode.....................................................
Preloading an Existing Configuration File............................................................................
Changing a User Group Name or ID......................................................................................
Viewing the Log File.................................................................................................................
Displaying the Current Core Configuration.........................................................................
Expanding Storage....................................................................................................................
Displaying the Write Cache Status of Disks..........................................................................
1-9
3-9
3-9
3-10
3-10
3-10
3-11
3-12
3-12
3-12
3-13
3-13
3-13
3-16
3-16
3-16
3-20
3-20
3-20
3-27
3-29
3-30
3-30
3-31
3-31
3-35
3-36
3-36
3-37
3-37
4-8
4-9
4-11
4-11
4-23
4-39
4-39
4-39
4-39
4-39
4-39
4-40
4-40
4-41
ix
4-15
4-16
4-17
4-18
4-19
4-20
4-21
4-22
4-23
4-24
4-25
4-26
4-27
4-28
4-29
4-30
4-31
4-32
4-33
4-34
4-35
4-36
4-37
4-38
4-39
4-40
4-41
4-42
4-43
4-44
4-45
4-46
4-47
4-48
4-49
A-1
x
Importing a Virtual Machine Template from Dom0............................................................
Importing a Virtual Machine Template from a Remote Server..........................................
Importing Virtual Machine Templates from an Assembly on a Remote Server..............
Importing Virtual Machine Templates Into a Shared Repository From an Assembly on
a Remote Server...................................................................................................................
Locating an Oracle ASM Disk by Turning on the Disk’s LED...........................................
Modifying the Database Type.................................................................................................
Modifying the Database Size...................................................................................................
Sending a Message to a Running Virtual Machine..............................................................
Modifying the Network Defined in a Virtual Machine Template.....................................
Reconfiguring the Kernel Based on Available RAM............................................................
Increasing the Size of the DATA Volume..............................................................................
Displaying Information About the Local Disks....................................................................
Displaying Information About the Shared Disks.................................................................
Displaying Information About a Specific Shared Disk........................................................
Determining Which Node is the Master Node.....................................................................
Displaying Power Supply Information..................................................................................
Displaying the Available Virtual Machine Repositories.....................................................
Displaying Details About a Specific Shared Repository......................................................
Determining if Storage Validation is Enabled.......................................................................
Displaying Information for All Virtual Disks.......................................................................
Displaying Information for a Single Virtual Disk................................................................
Displaying Details of Available Virtual Area Networks (VLANs)....................................
Opening a Virtual Machine Console......................................................................................
Display Information About a Virtual Template...................................................................
Starting ODA_BASE on the Local Node................................................................................
Starting a Shared Repository on Node 0................................................................................
Starting a Virtual Machine on Node 0....................................................................................
Forcing a Virtual Machine to Stop..........................................................................................
Stopping a Shared Repository.................................................................................................
Stopping the Local ODA_Base................................................................................................
Running Diagnostic Tests on a Disk in the Expansion Storage Shelf................................
Unpacking Packages into the Oracle Appliance Manager Repository..............................
Verify the Contents of a Patch Bundle...................................................................................
Enabling 12 CPU Cores for Oracle Database Appliance.....................................................
Enabling All CPU Cores for Oracle Database Appliance....................................................
Oracle ACFS Storage Space.......................................................................................................
4-42
4-42
4-42
4-42
4-43
4-46
4-46
4-47
4-47
4-49
4-50
4-59
4-59
4-59
4-62
4-63
4-64
4-64
4-65
4-66
4-67
4-69
4-71
4-71
4-72
4-73
4-73
4-74
4-74
4-74
4-75
4-76
4-77
4-79
4-79
A-8
List of Figures
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture........................................... 3-4
Architecture Overview of Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Shared
Repositories............................................................................................................................. 3-6
Basic Virtual Machine Local Area Network.......................................................................... 3-34
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform with Virtual Local Area Networks... 3-35
xi
xii
List of Tables
1-1
1-2
2-1
3-1
3-2
3-3
A-1
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-5
A-6
A-7
B-1
B-2
B-3
B-4
B-5
B-6
B-7
B-8
Patch Components and Purposes.............................................................................................. 1-2
Supported and Recommended Appliance Manager Software Versions............................. 1-3
Operating System Groups and Users on Oracle Database Appliance................................. 2-5
Oracle Database Appliance Version 1 Virtualized Platform Network Interfaces........... 3-32
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Dual Port 10-GbE Network
Interfaces (Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 and later).................................................. 3-32
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform On Board Quad Port 10-GbE
Network Interfaces (Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 and Later)............................... 3-33
Directory Paths for Oracle Database Appliance..................................................................... A-1
Oracle Groups and Users Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance.......................... A-2
Approximate Database Disk Group Sizes for Oracle Database Appliance Version 1,
X3-2, and X4-2........................................................................................................................ A-3
Approximate Database Disk Group Sizes for Oracle Database Appliance X5-2............... A-4
Usable Storage on Oracle Database Appliance X5-2.............................................................. A-5
Oracle ACFS Mount Points and Related Oracle ASM Disk Groups and Volume
Information............................................................................................................................. A-8
System Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance.......................................................... A-9
Oracle Database Appliance Database Generic Template Name Conversions................... B-3
Oracle Database Appliance OLTP Database Template Sizes............................................... B-3
Oracle Database Appliance DSS Database Template Sizes................................................... B-4
Oracle Database Appliance In-Memory Database Template Size....................................... B-5
Oracle Database Appliance X5-2 Database Template Size Storage Performance.............. B-6
Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 Database Template Size Storage Performance.............. B-6
Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 Database Template Size Storage Performance.............. B-7
Oracle Database Appliance Version 1 Database Template Size Storage Performance..... B-8
xiii
xiv
Preface
Oracle Database Appliance is an optimized, prebuilt and ready-to-use clustered
database system that is easy to deploy, operate, and manage. By integrating hardware
and software, Oracle Database Appliance eliminates the complexities of
nonintegrated, manually assembled solutions. Oracle Database Appliance reduces the
installation and software deployment times from weeks or months to just a few hours
while preventing configuration and setup errors that often result in suboptimal, hardto-manage database environments.
Audience (page xv)
Documentation Accessibility (page xv)
Conventions (page xvi)
Audience
This guide is intended for anyone who configures, maintains, or uses Oracle Database
Appliance. This includes:
•
System administrators
•
Network administrators
•
Database administrators
•
Application administrators and users
This does not include information about Oracle Database architecture, tools,
management, or application development that is covered in the main body of Oracle
Documentation unless there are features specific to Oracle Database Appliance. Users
of Oracle Database Appliance software are expected to have the same skills as users of
any other Linux-based Oracle Database and Oracle Real Application Clusters
installations.
Documentation Accessibility
For information about Oracle's commitment to accessibility, visit the Oracle
Accessibility Program website at http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?
ctx=acc&id=docacc.
Access to Oracle Support
Oracle customers that have purchased support have access to electronic support
through My Oracle Support. For information, visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/
xv
topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=info or visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?
ctx=acc&id=trs if you are hearing impaired.
Conventions
The following text conventions are used in this document:
Convention
Meaning
boldface
Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements.
italic
Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables for
which you supply particular values.
Italic type can also indicate a new term.
xvi
monospace
Monospace type inside a paragraph indicates an operating system
command, or a filepath. In a separate line, it can indicate screen
output, or a command example.
monospace
italic
Monospace italic type indicates a variable in a command line. You
provide the information for your system in place of that variable.
#
The pound (#) prompt indicates that you are logged in as the
Superuser (root user) on a Linux operating system.
1
Updating Oracle Database Appliance
Software
To keep Oracle Database Appliance running with the latest software, check for and
apply Oracle Database Appliance patch bundles when they are released.
Patches can include new features and bug fixes, and may improve the functionality of
existing features. Oracle Database Appliance patch bundles are released on a quarterly
schedule. My Oracle Support note 888888.1 provides information about the latest
Oracle Database Appliance patch bundle.
Topics:
About the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle (page 1-1)
All patching of Oracle Database Appliance is done using the quarterly
Oracle Database Appliance patch bundle.
About Installing the Latest Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
(page 1-3)
Understand how to patch an existing Oracle Database Appliance to the
latest version.
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle (page 1-4)
Review these topics to prepare for and to carry out the patch set bundle
installation.
Reimaging Oracle Database Appliance (page 1-13)
Oracle Database Appliance ships from the factory with a default ISO
image preinstalled.
1.1 About the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle
All patching of Oracle Database Appliance is done using the quarterly Oracle
Database Appliance patch bundle.
Oracle Database Appliance patch set release includes enhancements and fixes. The
patch bundle provides all relevant patches for the entire system, including the
following:
•
BIOS
•
Hardware drivers, Hardware Management Pack (HWM), and firmware drivers
for various components
•
Oracle Appliance Manager
•
Oracle Linux
•
Oracle VM
Updating Oracle Database Appliance Software 1-1
About the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle
•
Java Development Kit (JDK)
•
Oracle Integrated Lights Out Manager (Oracle ILOM)
•
Oracle Database Patch Set Update (PSU)
•
Oracle Auto Service Request (Oracle ASR)
•
Oracle Grid Infrastructure
•
Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI)
The patch bundle consists of three logical groups of patches:
Table 1-1
Patch Components and Purposes
Patch Component
Objects Patched
SERVER (server)
Server components: Linux Operating System, Oracle ILOM, BIOS, Hardware
Management Pack, IPMI, OAKCLI, Oracle ASR. For the virtualized platform, this
component also includes Dom0 updates. The Server patch also includes Oracle
Grid Infrastructure stack.
STORAGE (storage)
Shared storage: Disk firmware, Controller Firmware.
DB (database)
Oracle Database RDBMS stack.
Note:
You must apply patch bundle components in this order:
1.
SERVER (server)
2.
STORAGE (storage)
3.
DB (database)
Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Guidelines
You can carry out rolling upgrades with both the server and DB patches.
Apply the server patch first. You must apply the storage patch and DB patch
after completing a server patch. The DB patch can be deferred and does not require
system downtime. You must schedule downtime and restart the system for the
storage patch. However, you can usually defer running the storage patch until a
scheduled maintenance window.
Caution:
Apply the server patch before you apply the storage patch. Apply the server
patch to each node before you apply any other patches. You must restart each
server node after it is patched. The server patch restarts a server node. The
storage patch restarts both nodes.
If you have Oracle Database running using High Availability options such as Oracle
Real Application Clusters (RAC), then there is no downtime required while the
patches are being installed. Oracle Appliance Manager verifies that the host meets all
1-2 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
About Installing the Latest Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
prerequisites to prevent you from installing patches in the wrong order. For example,
you cannot install the database patch before you install the server patch. When
applied, the output displayed by the patch process advises you if the patch is being
installed on one or both nodes. For older patches that only install on a single node, you
must run the command oakcli update -patch on the second node.
Supported and Recommended Appliance Manager Software Versions
Table 1-2
Supported and Recommended Appliance Manager Software Versions
Oracle Database Appliance
Hardware Model
Minimum Supported Software
Version
Recommended Software
Version
X6-2-HA, X6-2L
12.1.2.8.1
12.1.2.10.0
X6-2S, X6-2M
12.1.2.8.0
12.1.2.10.0
X5-2
12.1.2.5.0
12.1.2.10.0
X4-2
12.1.2.5.0
12.1.2.10.0
X3-2
12.1.2.5.0
12.1.2.10.0
V1
12.1.2.5.0
12.1.2.10.0
1.2 About Installing the Latest Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set
Bundle
Understand how to patch an existing Oracle Database Appliance to the latest version.
Oracle Database Appliance patch set releases include software and firmware updates
for Oracle Database Appliance.
Note: You must be on at least Patch Set Release 12.1.2.6.0 before you can
upgrade to the latest patch version.
About Oracle Database Appliance Software Updates
To keep Oracle Database Appliance running with the latest software, check for and
apply Oracle Database Appliance patch bundles when they are released. As well as
offering new features, patches may improve the functionality of existing features.
Oracle Database Appliance patch bundles are released on a quarterly schedule. My
Oracle Support note 888888.1 provides information about the latest Oracle Database
Appliance patch bundle.
Updating Oracle Database Appliance Software 1-3
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
Caution:
Do not patch Oracle Database Appliance using individual patches for Oracle
Grid Infrastructure, Oracle Database, or Oracle Linux. Also do not use
individual infrastructure patches, such as firmware patches. You must only
use Oracle Database Appliance patches.
If you use patches that are not intended for Oracle Database Appliance, or if
you use Opatch, or a similar patching tool, then Oracle Database Appliance
inventory is not updated, and you cannot complete future patch updates.
Overview of the Patch Upgrade
The patch set upgrade consists of the following steps:
1.
Download the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle from My Oracle Support.
2.
Copy and unpack the patch bundle.
3.
Verify components that require patching.
4.
Patch the server.
5.
(Optional) Patch the shared storage.
6.
Patch Oracle Database.
7.
Validate the patch update.
Related Topics:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&type=NOT&id=888888.1
1.3 Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
Review these topics to prepare for and to carry out the patch set bundle installation.
Topics:
Preparing to Install Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundles (page 1-5)
Decide how you want to patch Oracle Database Appliance.
Step 1: Download the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle from My Oracle
Support (page 1-6)
Use this procedure to download the Oracle Database Appliance patch
set bundle.
Step 2: Copy and Unpack the Patch Bundle (page 1-7)
Copy the patch to your server, and use oakcli unpack -package to
unpack the patch bundle.
Step 3: Verify Components that Require Patching (page 1-9)
Use command-line interface commands to check for any problems
before you start the patch upgrade.
Step 4: Patch the Server (page 1-9)
Use Oracle Appliance Manager (oakcli) to patch the server. You can
use automatic patching, or manual patching.
1-4 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
Step 5: Patch the Shared Storage (Optional) (page 1-11)
Use this procedure to patch the shared storage now, or to patch the
shared storage during a maintenance window.
Step 6: Patch Oracle Database (page 1-11)
Apply the Oracle Database Appliance patch set to update Oracle
Database on Node 0 and Node 1.
Step 7: Validate the Patch Update (page 1-12)
Run the command oakcli show version -detail to verify that all
components of the Oracle Database Appliance patch installation are
updated.
1.3.1 Preparing to Install Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundles
Decide how you want to patch Oracle Database Appliance.
You can patch Oracle Database Appliance using either automatic rolling patching, or
manual rolling patching. Review the steps for each procedure, and decide which
option you want to use. For each option, the steps are the same, except for the server
patch.
For both options, the storage patch requires a system restart of Oracle Database
Appliance after completing the storage patch update. However, you can defer the
update to a maintenance window.
Automatic Rolling Patching Option
The advantage of automatic rolling patching is that it is simple to do, in that you start
the patch, and the patch process completes automatically. However, services and
clients may experience delays during node restarts.
Automatic rolling patching consists of the following steps:
1.
Download the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle from My Oracle Support.
2.
Copy and unpack the patch bundle to both Oracle Database Appliance nodes.
3.
Verify the components that require patching.
4.
From node 0, start the patch. The automatic patch option performs the server
patch update on Node 1, and restarts node 1. It then patches the server on Node 0,
and restarts node 0.
5.
(optional) Patch the shared storage components. This patch requires a system
restart, but you can usually defer the restart.
6.
Patch Oracle Databases. No restart is required.
7.
Validate the Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure patch installation.
Manual Rolling Patching Option
The advantage of manual rolling patching is that you can first migrate the services and
clients from one node to another before the node restarts, and then manually patch the
second node. This migration can be more graceful than a failover, so it can minimize
interruptions to ongoing transactions.
Manual rolling patching consists of the following steps:
1.
Download the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle from My Oracle Support.
Updating Oracle Database Appliance Software 1-5
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
2.
Copy and unpack the patch bundle to both Oracle Database Appliance nodes.
3.
Verify the components that require patching.
4.
Complete the patch manually in a two-step process.
a.
Log in to Node 0, and patch the server on Node 0 by running the oakcli
patch command using the --local option.
b.
Wait until the patch operation completes, and Node 0 is available.
c.
Log in to Node 1, and patch the server on Node 1 by running the oakcli
patch command using the --local option.
5.
(optional) Patch the shared storage. This patch requires a system restart, but you
can usually defer the restart.
6.
Patch Oracle Databases. No restart is required.
7.
Validate the Oracle Database and Oracle Grid Infrastructure patch installation.
1.3.2 Step 1: Download the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle from My Oracle
Support
Use this procedure to download the Oracle Database Appliance patch set bundle.
1. From an external client machine, open My Oracle Support note 888888.1:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&type=NOT&id=888888.1
2. Locate the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle in My Oracle Support.
•
•
In My Oracle Support note 888888.1, go to the section titled ODA Bundle
Patch.
a.
Locate the patch number and file names for the release.
b.
Click the patch number to go to the patch download page.
Go to Patches and Updates in My Oracle Support.
a.
Under Patch Search, select Oracle Database Appliance from the Product
list.
b.
Select the patch release number from the Select a Release list.
c.
Click Search.
3. Select the patch or patches that you want to download, and click Download.
1-6 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
Caution:
Only use either an Oracle Database Appliance patch bundle, or if you are an
SAP customer, an SAP patch bundle downloaded from the SAP Service
Marketplace. Do not patch Oracle Database Appliance using individual
patches for Oracle Grid Infrastructure, Oracle Database, or Oracle Linux. Also
do not use individual infrastructure patches, such as firmware patches. You
must only use Oracle Database Appliance patches.
If you use patches that are not intended for Oracle Database Appliance, or if
you use Opatch, or a similar patching tool, then Oracle Database Appliance
inventory is not updated, and you cannot complete future patch updates.
1.3.3 Step 2: Copy and Unpack the Patch Bundle
Copy the patch to your server, and use oakcli unpack -package to unpack the
patch bundle.
On Oracle Database Appliance systems, you must log in as root, and copy the patch
bundle to the path /tmp.
On Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms, you must log in as root, and
copy the patch bundle to ODA_BASE (Dom1).
After you copy the patch to the required location, run the command oakcli unpack
-package. This command extracts (unzips) the patch bundle, and copies the patch
bundle contents into the patch repository. Use the following syntax to specify the
complete path to the patch bundle file, where path is the absolute path to the patch
file:
# oakcli unpack -package absolute_package_name
Note:
You must have root access for Oracle Database Appliance to perform this
task.
1. Copy the patch files (patch_number_release number_Linux-
x86-64_1of2.zip and patch_number_release number_Linuxx86-64_2of2.zip) into the /tmp directory on each node.
2. Run the following oakcli unpack -package commands on Node 0 and Node
1:
Node 0:
# oakcli unpack -package /tmp/p25499210_1212100_Linuxx86-64_1of2.zip
# oakcli unpack -package /tmp/p25499210_1212100_Linuxx86-64_2of2.zip
Node 1:
# oakcli unpack -package /tmp/p25499210_1212100_Linuxx86-64_1of2.zip
# oakcli unpack -package /tmp/p25499210_1212100_Linuxx86-64_2of2.zip
Updating Oracle Database Appliance Software 1-7
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
3. Run the oakcli update -patch release --verify command on Node 0
and Node 1 to view the proposed changes included in the patch. For example, the
patch upgrades the OAK component from Installed Version 12.1.2.9.0 to Proposed
version 12.1.2.10.0. For Component OL, the Installed Version is 6.8 and is up-todate.
# oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10 --verify
INFO: 2017-02-13 14:20:37: Reading the metadata file now...
Patch Version
---------------
Component Name
-----------------Controller_INT
Installed Version
----------------4.230.40-3739
Proposed
---------Up-to-
date
Controller_EXT
09.00.00.00
10.00.00.00
Expander
0291
Up-to-date
A29A
Up-to-
A29A
Up-to-
SSD_SHARED {
[ c2d20,c2d21,c2d22,
date
c2d23 ]
[ c2d0,c2d1,c2d2,c2d
date
3,c2d4,c2d5,c2d6,c2d
7,c2d8,c2d9,c2d10,c2
d11,c2d12,c2d13,c2d1
4,c2d15,c2d16,c2d17,
c2d18,c2d19 ]
}
SSD_LOCAL
0R3Q
Up-to-
ILOM
3.2.7.26.a r112632
3.2.8.24
BIOS
38050100
38070000
IPMI
1.8.12.4
Up-to-
HMP
2.3.5.2.5
2.3.5.2.8
OAK
12.1.2.9.0
OL
6.8
date
r114611
date
12.1.2.10.0
date
GI_HOME
12.1.0.2.170117(2473
12.1.0.2.161018(2400
6101,23854735)
2082,24828633)
DB_HOME
12.1.0.2.170117(2473
12.1.0.2.160719(2305
4246,23054327)
2082,24828633)
1-8 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Up-to-
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
ASR
5.5.1
Up-to-
date
1.3.4 Step 3: Verify Components that Require Patching
Use command-line interface commands to check for any problems before you start the
patch upgrade.
Before installing the patch, use the oakcli validate command on Node 0 to
identify any possible problems in your environment, such as missing dependencies or
other conflicts that can cause issues with patch installation. Conflicts can be
introduced if you customize the standard configuration. The oakcli validate
command shows a report that lists the components that require patching. If a
component is listed as Up-to-date for the supported version that you indicate with
the -ver flag, then that component does not require patching.
Run the oakcli validate command using the following syntax to validate your
system, where patch_version is the patch version for which you want to validate
your system:
oakcli validate -c ospatch -ver patch_version
Example 1-1
Validating Readiness for Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set
Use the following commands to check for any problems on your system before
installing the patch bundle:
Run the patch validation check for the patch set:
# oakcli validate -c ospatch -ver patch version
The output of these commands inform you if the patch can be installed on your
environment. If the output from the command indicates that there is a problem (for
example, if there are missing RPM dependencies on the server), then address the issue,
and run oakcli validate again.
Note:
These commands run only on the local node. Run the commands on both
nodes to check both Oracle Database Appliance nodes.
1.3.5 Step 4: Patch the Server
Use Oracle Appliance Manager (oakcli) to patch the server. You can use automatic
patching, or manual patching.
To patch the servers, select the automatic patching procedure, or select the manual
patching procedure.
You must download the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Bundle from My Oracle
Support. Either download it directly, or download it to a thumb drive, and copy the
file to server nodes using the thumb drive.
Automatic Server Patch Procedure
The automatic server patching process is a rolling upgrade that automatically patches
Node 0 after patching Node 1. This automatic procedure enables Oracle Grid
Infrastructure to continue to be up and running on one of the nodes during patching.
Updating Oracle Database Appliance Software 1-9
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
1.
Download the Oracle Database Appliance server patch bundle from My Oracle
Support to Node 0.
2.
Log in to Node 0 as the root user.
3.
Run the command oakcli update -patch version --server, where
version is the patch set bundle version.
For example:
#/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0 --server
This command patches the server on Node 1. After that patch update is complete,
it then automatically patches Node 0
4.
Observe the patch status reports.
As the patch runs, it displays output that advises you of the installation progress.
Part of the server patch update requires node 1 to be restarted, then node 0 to be
restarted. Wait until Node 0 shuts down and completes restarting before
proceeding to the next step.
Manual Server Patch Procedure
You can manually control patching the nodes. The manual server patching process
requires you to log in to a node and run Oracle Appliance Manager (oakcli) using a
local node server patch update. After you complete the patch procedure on the first
node, log into the second node, and patch the second node.
1.
Download the Oracle Database Appliance server patch bundle from My Oracle
Support to node 0.
2.
Log in to Node 0 as the root user.
3.
Run the Oracle Appliance Manager command oakcli update -patch
version --server --local, where version is the patch set bundle version.
For example:
#/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0 --server --local
The Oracle Appliance Manager command carries out the patch on Node 0. As the
patch runs, it displays output that advises you of the installation progress.
4.
Oracle Appliance Manager prompts you to restart the node. Restart the node, and
wait until Node 0 shuts down and completes restarting before proceeding to the
next step.
5.
Log out of Node 0, and log in to Node 1 as the root user.
6.
Run Oracle Appliance Manager on Node 1 using the --local flag to patch the
server.
For example:
#/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0 --server --local
7.
Oracle Appliance Manager prompts you to restart the node. Restart the node, and
wait until Node 0 shuts down and completes restarting.
When both servers are patched and restarted, proceed to the next step.
1-10 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
1.3.6 Step 5: Patch the Shared Storage (Optional)
Use this procedure to patch the shared storage now, or to patch the shared storage
during a maintenance window.
Patching the storage requires downtime when shared components are being patched.
If a failure occurs, then you can restart the patching process by reissuing the same
command.
Start the storage patching command only on one node (Node 0). The command
patches storage for both nodes at the same time.
1. Log into Node 0 as the root user.
2. Run the command oakcli update -patch version --storage, where
version is the patch set bundle version.
For example:
#/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0 --storage
The storage patch runs, and automatically installs itself on both nodes. The output
displayed by the patch process advises you of the installation progress. If you are
running this step in sequence, then wait for the patch to complete before proceeding to
the next step.
1.3.7 Step 6: Patch Oracle Database
Apply the Oracle Database Appliance patch set to update Oracle Database on Node 0
and Node 1.
1. Run the command oakcli show databases on Node 0.
For example:
#oakcli show databases
Name Type
Storage HomeName
---- ---------- -------db1 RAC
ACFS
OraDb12102_home1
12.1.0.5.0(20831110,20831110)
db2 SINGLE
ACFS
OraDb12102_home2
12.1.0.2.160119(21948354,21948344)
db3 RACOneNode ACFS
OraDb12102_home3
12.1.0.5.0(20831110,20831110)
db4 RAC
ACFS
OraDb12102_home4
12.1.0.2.160119(21948354,21948344)
HomeLocation
Version
-----------------/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_2
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_3
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_4
Note:
You cannot perform individual database updates for databases running in the
same home. All databases running in the homes that you update are patched
to the Oracle Database 12c release 1 patch for Oracle Database Appliance
(12.1.0.2.170117). For Oracle Database 11.2, the database is patched to
11.2.0.4.161018.
2. Run the oakcli update -patch version --database command, on Node 0
only. The command automatically patches both nodes. If you have more than one
Updating Oracle Database Appliance Software 1-11
Installing the Oracle Database Appliance Patch Set Bundle
database home that can be patched, then the software provides a selection list. You
can select, one, a set, or all of the Oracle Database homes to upgrade.
oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0 --database
3. After the update command completes on both nodes, run the command oakcli
show databases on Node 0 to verify that the database version is updated.
#oakcli show databases
1.3.8 Step 7: Validate the Patch Update
Run the command oakcli show version -detail to verify that all components
of the Oracle Database Appliance patch installation are updated.
When you apply the patch and then run the command oakcli show version detail, the output shows the installed version and that the supported versions are
Up-to-date. If you unpack the patch bundle (oakcli unpack -pack) and then run the
command oakcli show version -detail before applying the patch, the output
shows that the supported versions are No-update.
To confirm that your Oracle Grid Infrastructure and Oracle Database software
components are updated, run the following command:
# /opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli show version -detail
Mon Feb 13 03:31:48 PST 2017
Reading the metadata. It takes a while...
System Version Component Name
Installed Version
Version
-------------- -----------------------------------------------12.1.2.10.0
Supported
Controller_INT
4.230.40-3739
Up-to-date
Controller_EXT
09.00.00.00
Up-to-date
Expander
0291
Up-to-date
A29A
Up-to-date
A29A
Up-to-date
SSD_SHARED {
[ c2d20,c2d21,c2d22,
c2d23 ]
[ c2d0,c2d1,c2d2,c2d
3,c2d4,c2d5,c2d6,c2d
7,c2d8,c2d9,c2d10,c2
d11,c2d12,c2d13,c2d1
4,c2d15,c2d16,c2d17,
c2d18,c2d19 ]
}
1-12 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Reimaging Oracle Database Appliance
SSD_LOCAL
0R3Q
Up-to-date
ILOM
3.2.7.26.a r112632
Up-to-date
BIOS
38050100
Up-to-date
IPMI
1.8.12.4
Up-to-date
HMP
2.3.5.2.5
Up-to-date
OAK
12.1.2.9.0
Up-to-date
OL
6.8
Up-to-date
GI_HOME
12.1.0.2.161018(2400
Up-to-date
6101,23854735)
DB_HOME
12.1.0.2.160719(2305
Up-to-date
4246,23054327)
1.4 Reimaging Oracle Database Appliance
Oracle Database Appliance ships from the factory with a default ISO image
preinstalled.
To use Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform, you must reimage Oracle
Database Appliance.
To reimage Oracle Database Appliance:
1.
Go to My Oracle Support note 888888.1:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&type=NOT&id=888888.1
2.
Download the required ISO image.
3.
Refer to the readme file for detailed installation instructions.
Updating Oracle Database Appliance Software 1-13
Reimaging Oracle Database Appliance
1-14 Administration and Reference Guide
2
Managing Oracle Database on Oracle
Database Appliance
This chapter describes how to create and manage databases on Oracle Database
Appliance. It also covers how to use Oracle Database Appliance solid-state drives
(SSDs) and how to update and upgrade Oracle Database on Oracle Database
Appliance.
Topics:
About the Oracle Database Appliance OAKCLI Utility (page 2-1)
Manage and maintain Oracle Database Appliance components using the
Oracle Appliance Manager Command-Line Utility (OAKCLI).
Oracle Database Features and Oracle Database Appliance (page 2-2)
Review the Oracle Database features that are available with Oracle
Database Appliance.
Creating and Converting Databases with OAKCLI (page 2-5)
Use the Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface (OAKCLI)
to create and manage databases on Oracle Database Appliance.
About Managing Multiple Databases on Oracle Database Appliance (page 2-9)
Review this topic to understand Oracle requirements for multiple Oracle
home support.
About Managing Multiple Database Instances Using Instance Caging
(page 2-10)
Use instance caging to manage your system resources on Oracle
Database Appliance.
About Oracle Database Appliance SSDs (page 2-10)
Oracle Database Appliance includes solid-state drives (SSDs) to enhance
storage performance.
How to Upgrade and Update the Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance
(page 2-12)
Review the information in these topics to select the procedure for
upgrading and updating your Oracle Database release.
2.1 About the Oracle Database Appliance OAKCLI Utility
Manage and maintain Oracle Database Appliance components using the Oracle
Appliance Manager Command-Line Utility (OAKCLI).
Oracle Database Appliance provides its own command-line tool, OAKCLI, to manage
all components on the system. Use OAKCLI commands for the following tasks:
•
Create, upgrade, and patch databases
Managing Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance 2-1
Oracle Database Features and Oracle Database Appliance
•
Create and upgrade Oracle homes
•
Create and modify database creation parameter files
Many tasks related to managing Oracle Databases are also required with databases on
Oracle Database Appliance. Tasks common to Oracle Database generally are described
in the Oracle Database documentation library. However, to simplify database creation
and related tasks, use the OAKCLI utility. The OAKCLI utility combines the
capabilities of the SYS database administrator role and the operating system Superuser
(root user). Always perform administrative tasks using the OAKCLI utility.
Caution: Do not use Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA) to
create databases on Oracle Database Appliance. Only use Oracle Appliance
Manager for database configuration. Deploying Oracle Database instances
using Oracle Appliance Manager ensures that these databases are properly
configured, optimized, and supported on Oracle Database Appliance.
2.2 Oracle Database Features and Oracle Database Appliance
Review the Oracle Database features that are available with Oracle Database
Appliance.
Topics:
Oracle Database Appliance Plug-in for Oracle Enterprise Manager (page 2-3)
Use the Oracle Database Appliance plug-in for Oracle Enterprise
Manager to monitor Oracle Database Appliance targets that are
configured in Oracle Database Enterprise Edition.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express and Oracle Database Appliance
(page 2-3)
You can use Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express, also known
as EM Express, to manage your database.
Data Migration and Management and Oracle Database Appliance (page 2-3)
Oracle Database Appliance supports the use of standard Oracle
Database loading and migration tools.
Oracle Clusterware and Oracle Database Appliance (page 2-4)
Oracle Clusterware provides the clustering infrastructure for Oracle
Database Appliance.
Oracle RAC One Node and Oracle Database Appliance (page 2-4)
Oracle RAC One Node is available with Oracle Database Appliance.
Oracle Real Application Clusters and Oracle Database Appliance (page 2-4)
Oracle Database Appliance supports administrator-managed Oracle
RAC Databases.
Administrative Groups and Users on Oracle Database Appliance (page 2-5)
Oracle Database Appliance Web Console deployment creates operating
system groups and users whose members are granted system
administration privileges on the appliance.
2-2 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Oracle Database Features and Oracle Database Appliance
2.2.1 Oracle Database Appliance Plug-in for Oracle Enterprise Manager
Use the Oracle Database Appliance plug-in for Oracle Enterprise Manager to monitor
Oracle Database Appliance targets that are configured in Oracle Database Enterprise
Edition.
When you install the Oracle Database Appliance plug-in with Oracle Enterprise
Manager Cloud Control 12c or Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c, you can
Monitor Oracle Database Appliance targets. The plug-in provides configuration and
monitoring information about any Oracle Database Appliance target running
Appliance Manager 12.1.2.2 or later.
See Oracle Enterprise Manager Plug-in for Oracle Database Appliance User's Guide for
more information about the plug-in.
2.2.2 Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express and Oracle Database Appliance
You can use Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express, also known as EM Express,
to manage your database.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express is a web-based tool for managing Oracle
Database 12c. Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express is installed with Oracle
Database on the Oracle Database Appliance.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express provides the following features:
•
Support for basic administrative tasks, such as storage and user management
•
Comprehensive solutions for performance diagnostics and tuning
•
Performance advisors in a graphic user interface
•
Oracle Database utilities in a graphic user interface, such as SQL*Loader and
Oracle Recovery Manager (RMAN)
2.2.3 Data Migration and Management and Oracle Database Appliance
Oracle Database Appliance supports the use of standard Oracle Database loading and
migration tools.
If you are loading data or migrating data from an existing database to Oracle Database
Appliance, then you can use the standard Oracle Database loading and migration
tools. These tools include the following:
•
Oracle GoldenGate
•
SQL*Loader
•
Oracle Data Pump
•
transportable tablespaces
•
RMAN
You can also use the RMAN utility to back up and recover databases on Oracle
Database Appliance.
Managing Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance 2-3
Oracle Database Features and Oracle Database Appliance
2.2.4 Oracle Clusterware and Oracle Database Appliance
Oracle Clusterware provides the clustering infrastructure for Oracle Database
Appliance.
Oracle Clusterware provides the cluster technology required for Oracle Real
Application Clusters (Oracle RAC). In addition, Oracle Clusterware manages
applications and processes as resources that you register with Oracle Clusterware, to
provide high availability services. The number of resources that you register with
Oracle Clusterware to manage an application depends on the application.
Applications that consist of only one process are usually represented by only one
resource. More complex applications that use multiple processes or components can
require multiple resources to maintain high availability.
Refer to Oracle Clusterware Administration and Deployment Guide for information about
making applications highly available with Oracle Clusterware.
2.2.5 Oracle RAC One Node and Oracle Database Appliance
Oracle RAC One Node is available with Oracle Database Appliance.
Oracle Real Application Clusters One Node (Oracle RAC One Node) is a single
instance of an Oracle RAC database that runs on one node in a cluster. Instead of
stopping and starting instances, you can use the Oracle RAC One Node online
database relocation feature to relocate an Oracle RAC One Node instance to another
server.
Administration of Oracle RAC One Node databases on Oracle Database Appliance is
different from administering Oracle RAC or single-instance Oracle Databases. For
Oracle RAC One Node databases, one node is the primary node, and the other node is
a candidate node, which is available to accommodate services if the primary node
fails, or is shut down for maintenance. The nodes, Oracle Databases, and database
services reside in the generic server pool.
2.2.6 Oracle Real Application Clusters and Oracle Database Appliance
Oracle Database Appliance supports administrator-managed Oracle RAC Databases.
Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC) provides technology that links two or
more individual computers so that they function as one system. Oracle RAC deployed
on Oracle Database Appliance enables each node to share access to a database. If one
node fails or is taken offline, then the other node continues operating and the entire
Oracle RAC database remains available.
Oracle Database Appliance currently supports only administrator-managed databases,
where the database administrator allocates each instance of the database to a specific
node in the cluster. Oracle Database Appliance does not support Policy-managed
databases, where the database administrator defines the number of database instances
required, but not the nodes where they run.
When you review the database resource for an administrator-managed database, you
see a server pool defined with the same name as the Oracle Database. This server pool
is part of a special Oracle-defined server pool, called the Generic server pool. The
Generic server pool stores any server that is not in a top-level server pool and is not
policy managed. Servers that host administrator-managed databases are statically
assigned to the Generic server pool. Oracle RAC manages the Generic server pool to
support administrator-managed databases. You cannot use SRVCTL or Oracle
Clusterware Control (CRSCTL) utility commands to modify the Generic server pool.
2-4 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Creating and Converting Databases with OAKCLI
2.2.7 Administrative Groups and Users on Oracle Database Appliance
Oracle Database Appliance Web Console deployment creates operating system groups
and users whose members are granted system administration privileges on the
appliance.
During configuration, two administrative accounts are created for Oracle Database
Appliance: the user grid, with a user ID (UID) of 1001, and the user oracle, with a
UID of 1000. The user grid is the Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation owner. The
user oracle is the Oracle Database installation owner, and the owner of all Oracle
Database homes (Oracle homes). By default, these users are members of operating
system groups whose members are granted privileges to start up and administer
Oracle Database and Oracle Automatic Storage Management.
The following table describes the Oracle system privileges groups, and information
about the operating system authentication groups:
Table 2-1
Operating System Groups and Users on Oracle Database Appliance
Oracle System
Privileges
Group Name
Group ID (GID)
grid is a
member
oracle is a
member
Oracle Inventory
group
(OINSTALL)
oinstall
1001
yes (primary
group)
yes (primary
group)
OSOPER for
dbaoper group
dbaoper
1002
yes
yes
OSDBA group
dba
1003
no
yes
OSASM Group
for Oracle ASM
asmadmin
1004
yes
no
OSOPER for
ASM group
asmoper
1005
yes
no
OSDBA for ASM
group
asmdba
1006
yes
yes
If you create an initial database during deployment, then the password for the SYS
and SYSTEM users is the Master Password that you set in the Web Console. Change
this password for both users as soon as possible after configuration to prevent
unauthorized access to your database using these privileged accounts.
2.3 Creating and Converting Databases with OAKCLI
Use the Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface (OAKCLI) to create and
manage databases on Oracle Database Appliance.
Topics:
About Creating Databases with OAKCLI Commands (page 2-6)
Create additional Oracle Databases using the Oracle Appliance Manager
Command-Line Utility (OAKCLI) to ensure that your database is
configured optimally for Oracle Database Appliance.
Managing Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance 2-5
Creating and Converting Databases with OAKCLI
Creating, Using, and Removing Database Configuration Files with OAKCLI
(page 2-6)
You can use OAKCLI to create and use configuration files to deploy
databases on Oracle Database Appliance. Also use OAKCLI to remove
unwanted configuration files.
Creating Snapshot Databases With OAKCLI (page 2-7)
You can use OAKCLI to create snapshot databases.
About Converting Single-Instance Databases to Oracle RAC or Oracle RAC One
Node (page 2-8)
Oracle provides utilities to enable you to convert your existing singleinstance databases to Oracle Real Application Clusters or Oracle RAC
One Node databases.
2.3.1 About Creating Databases with OAKCLI Commands
Create additional Oracle Databases using the Oracle Appliance Manager CommandLine Utility (OAKCLI) to ensure that your database is configured optimally for Oracle
Database Appliance.
OAKCLI assists you to deploy Oracle Databases that follow Optimal Flexible
Architecture guidelines. The Optimal Flexible Architecture standard provides best
practices configurations to help to ensure database deployments that are easier to
support and maintain. Optimal Flexible Architecture includes the following
•
Structured organization of directories and files, and consistent naming for critical
database files, such as control files, redo log files, and other critical files, which
simplifies database administration.
•
Separation of tablespace contents to minimize tablespace free space
fragmentation, and maximize administrative flexibility
•
Stripe and Mirror Everything (SAME) deployment, which safeguards against
database failures
Refer to "Optimal Flexible Architecture" in Oracle Database Installation Guide for Linux
for more information about Optimal Flexible Architecture.
Start the OAKCLI utility by using the command oakcli create database to
create additional databases on Oracle Database Appliance.
When you run this command, respond to each prompt by entering the number that
corresponds with the option you want to apply to your database. When a default is
supplied, and the default is the value you want to use (typically shown as option 1),
click Enter to accept that value. When there are many options, and the value you want
is not displayed, press 0 to show all of the options.
2.3.2 Creating, Using, and Removing Database Configuration Files with OAKCLI
You can use OAKCLI to create and use configuration files to deploy databases on
Oracle Database Appliance. Also use OAKCLI to remove unwanted configuration
files.
Use the Oracle Appliance Manager Command-Line Utility (OAKCLI) ommand option
oakcli create db_config_params to create a configuration file that you can use
to configure multiple Oracle Database deployments. The command uses the following
syntax, where params_file is the name of the configuration file that you want to
create:
2-6 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Creating and Converting Databases with OAKCLI
oakcli create db_config_params params_file
When you run oakcli create db_config_params, you are prompted to select
one of a set of available parameter setting options to use in the configuration file.
Respond to each prompt by entering the number that corresponds to the configuration
that you want to use to set up your databases. If there is a default value, and you want
to use this value (typically option 1), then press Enter to accept that value. If there are
many options, then you may need to select option 0 to show all of the available
parameter options.
To see your existing database configuration files, use the commandoakcli show
db_config_params command. For example
# oakcli show db_config_params
Available DB configuration files are:
default
eurodbs
4kblockdbs
mytest.params
Configuration files using the default extension .dbconf do not show the extension in
this command output. Oracle recommends that you use this default file extension to
simplify file management. If you create a configuration file that does not use
the .dbconf default extension, then the nondefault extension is shown as part of the
output of oakcli show db_config_params.
To use a database configuration file to create a single Oracle Database, or to use the
command to create many Oracle Database instances with the identical profile, use the
following command syntax, where db_name is the name of the database that you
want to create, and params_file is the name of the parameter configuration file that
you want to use to configure the database:
oakcli create database -db db_name -params params_file
For example, this command creates the database named myxldb, using the parameter
configuration file myxldb.dbconf:
oakcli create database -db myxldb -params myxldb.dbconf
After you have completed using configuration files, you can delete files that you do
not plan to use again.
Remove unwanted database configuration files using the following command syntax,
where params_file is the name of the parameter configuration file that you want to
delete:
oakcli delete db_config_params params_file
As with other Oracle Database Appliance Manager commands related to database
configuration files, you do not need to include the parameter configuration filename
extension if your file has the default extension value, which is .dbconf.
2.3.3 Creating Snapshot Databases With OAKCLI
You can use OAKCLI to create snapshot databases.
An Oracle snapshot database is created by taking a snapshot of the Oracle ASM
Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS) where the source data files reside. The source
database can be a single instance, Oracle RAC, or Oracle RAC One Node. Compared
to other methods of creating copies of databases, snapshot databases require less time
Managing Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance 2-7
Creating and Converting Databases with OAKCLI
and storage space and involve no downtime of the source database. Additionally, you
can create any database type and class from any other type and class. For example,
you can create an Oracle RAC database from an Oracle RAC One Node database.
Similarly, you can create a database that is different in size than the source database.
On Oracle Database Appliance, you can create snapshot databases from any Oracle
Database instance stored on Oracle ACFS. Beginning with Oracle Database Appliance
release 12.1.2.0.0, you can create snapshot databases with Oracle Database 11g release
2 (11.2.0.4) or later databases created or upgraded on the system.
Snapshot database candidates must meet the following requirements:
•
They must not be a standby or container database
•
They must not be running in read-only mode, or in restricted mode, or in online
backup mode
•
They must be in ARCHIVELOG mode
•
They must have all defined data files available and online
•
They must not use centralized wallets with Transparent Data Encryption.
Also, ensure that the system clocks on the two Oracle Database Appliance nodes are
synchronized before you create a snapshot database. If the clocks are significantly
different, then the command can fail.
To create a snapshot database, use the command oakcli create snapshotdb. The
following example creates a snapshot database named snapprod from the database
named prod.
oakcli create snapshotdb -db snapprod -from prod
Caution:
Oracle Database Appliance does not support centralized wallets with
Transparent Data Encryption. Recovery of encrypted data may fail in the
snapshot database if the source database relies on an external, centralized
wallet.
2.3.4 About Converting Single-Instance Databases to Oracle RAC or Oracle RAC One
Node
Oracle provides utilities to enable you to convert your existing single-instance
databases to Oracle Real Application Clusters or Oracle RAC One Node databases.
Use the procedures for converting your single-instance database as described in Oracle
Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide. You can convert a singleinstance database either to Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC), or to Oracle
RAC One Node.
For example, you can use RCONFIG to convert your single instance Oracle Database.
Open the template fileConvertToRAC_AdminManaged.xml, and modify it as
required for your migration, in accordance with the instructions in the file. Then save
the file with a new filename. The information you provide determines how your
converted database is configured. The template file is located in the following path:
$ORACLE_HOME/sampleXMLs/ConvertToRAC_AdminManaged.xml
2-8 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
About Managing Multiple Databases on Oracle Database Appliance
Refer to the section "Converting to Oracle RAC and Oracle RAC One Node from
Single-Instance Oracle Databases" in Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation and
Configuration Guide for more information.
2.4 About Managing Multiple Databases on Oracle Database Appliance
Review this topic to understand Oracle requirements for multiple Oracle home
support.
The Oracle home is the directory in which you install Oracle Database binaries, and
from which Oracle Database runs. Use Oracle Appliance Manager OAKCLI
commands to create and manage multiple Oracle homes and databases on Oracle
Database Appliance. Oracle Database Appliance Manager automatically creates an
Oracle Database Oracle home that is compliant with Oracle’s Optimal Flexible
Architecture (OFA) standards.
Oracle Database Appliance supports multiple Oracle homes, including support of
different release Oracle Database homes. Check the related readme files or the Release
Notes to obtain information about the specific Oracle software releases supported for
your Oracle Database Appliance platform.
For information about supported releases, refer to My Oracle Support note 888888.1:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&id=888888.1
When you use OAKCLI commands to create multiple homes on Oracle Database
Appliance, the commands start the Oracle Grid Infrastructure cloning process. In
Oracle Database Appliance deployments, the user oracle is the software installation
owner account that owns the Oracle homes.
Note:
If you are not upgrading from an earlier release, then download the Oracle
Database Appliance End-User Bundle for the Oracle Database version that
you want to install. See My Oracle Support note 888888.1 for more details:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&type=NOT&id=888888.1
Use OAKCLI commands to create, manage, patch, and upgrade multiple databases on
Oracle Database Appliance. The command oakcli create database enables you
to create a database with minimal user input. When you run this command without
any additional options, the command creates a new database home. You can also
create a database in an existing home by running the command oakcli create
database -oh oracle_home, where oracle_home is the Oracle home in which
you want to create the Oracle Database.
Caution:
Do not apply Oracle Database patches directly to Oracle Databases on Oracle
Database Appliance. Only use Oracle Database Appliance patch bundles,
which are tested to work across the whole software stack.
Only use oakcli commands to create new databases in either existing Oracle
homes, or in new Oracle homes.
Managing Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance 2-9
About Managing Multiple Database Instances Using Instance Caging
2.5 About Managing Multiple Database Instances Using Instance Caging
Use instance caging to manage your system resources on Oracle Database Appliance.
Oracle Database provides a method for managing CPU allocations on a multi-CPU
server that runs multiple database instances. This method is called instance caging.
Instance caging and Oracle Database Resource Manager (the Resource Manager) work
together to support your desired service levels across multiple instances.
Consolidation can minimize idle resources, maximize efficiency, and lower costs.
Oracle Database Appliance templates are already tuned for the size of each database
instance workload. They are designed to run on a specific number of cores. Instance
caging ensures that each database workload is restricted to the set of cores allocated by
the template, enabling multiple databases to run concurrently with no performance
degradation, up to the capacity of Oracle Database Appliance. You can select database
template sizes larger than your current needs to provide for planned growth.
Note:
Oracle strongly recommends that you use the Oracle Database Appliance
templates, because they implement best practices and are configured
specifically for Oracle Database Appliance.
The Oracle Database Appliance Manager interface refers to the database sizing
templates as database classes.
By default, instance caging is not enabled on Oracle Database Appliance. To enable
instance caging, set the initialization parameter, RESOURCE_MANAGER_PLAN, for each
database on Oracle Database Appliance. The parameter specifies the plan to be used
by the Resource Manager for the current instance. Setting this parameter directs the
Resource Manager to allocate core resources among databases. If a plan is not
specified with this parameter, then the Resource Manager and instance caging are not
enabled.
Instance caging allocation of core resources is enabled in accordance with the Oracle
Database Appliance database template size that you select for each database. The
CPU_COUNT initialization parameter is set in the template. Use the CPU_COUNT setting
that matches the size of each database to consolidate, and follow the standard
instructions for configuring instance caging.
2.6 About Oracle Database Appliance SSDs
Oracle Database Appliance includes solid-state drives (SSDs) to enhance storage
performance.
Oracle Database Appliance includes solid-state drives (SSDs) to enhance the
performance of certain operations. SSDs increase the speed of storage operations by
accelerating redo log writes, caching database data more efficiently than standard disk
drives, and improving read/write (I/O) performance for database files.
Accelerating Redo Log Writes
Accelerating Redo Log Writes
Oracle Database Appliance contains four dedicated SSDs in slots 20 through 23
specifically for database redo logs. An Oracle ASM disk group named +REDO with
High Redundancy is provisioned during the deployment process to accelerate
2-10 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
About Oracle Database Appliance SSDs
database redo log write operations and improve latency. Databases automatically
utilize these SSDs, and no other files can be hosted on them.
Caching Database Data
Oracle Database Appliance X5-2 introduces four additional 400 GB SSDs in slots 16
through 19 that can be used to host database files, or as a database flash cache in
addition to the buffer cache.
An Oracle ASM disk group named +FLASH with Normal Redundancy is provisioned
on these SSDs. All of the storage in the +FLASH disk group is allocated to an Oracle
ASM Dynamic Volume (flashdata), and formatted as an Oracle ACFS file system.
Storage in this flashdata file system is then made available as an Oracle ACFS file
system and is used to create database flash cache files that accelerate read operations.
The file that contains the flash cache is automatically created for each database and is
specified using the database init.ora parameter db_flash_cache_file. By
default, db_flash_cache_size is set to 3 times the size of SGA, up to 196 GB,
unless there is not enough space, in which case the size parameter is set to 0. After you
change the db_flash_cache_size parameter, you must restart the database to use
the newly sized flash cache.
Improving I/O Performance for Database Files
Oracle Database Appliance Manager Configurator and Oracle Appliance Manager
(OAKCLI) both give you the option to configure your appliance to store entire
databases in flash memory using the flash data Oracle ACFS file system on 400 GB
SSDs. These SSDs are also used for the database flash cache.
The OAKCLI command oakcli create database gives you the option to create
the database using the SSD drives for data file storage. If there is not enough space
available in the +FLASH disk group, then the oakcli create database command
does not prompt you with the option to store the database data files on the SSD drives.
Database files instead are created automatically in the +DATA disk group. You can
also store database data files on both flash and hard disk drives. However, you must
manage this storage allocation manually. Oracle recommends that you attempt to
manage your files on both flash and hard disk files only if you have an advanced
storage administrator understanding of database usage patterns
Your Oracle Database must meet the following requirements to use SSDs for data file
storage:
•
Oracle Databases must be release 11.2.0.4 or later
•
The database types must be OLTP
•
Oracle Databases stored completely in the +FLASH storage space must be noncontainer databases (non-CDBs).
•
There must be 160 GB of available space in the +FLASH disk group.
Related Topics:
Storage on Oracle Database Appliance (page A-6)
Review this section to understand Oracle Database Appliance storage
architecture and options and how to determine usable storage.
oakcli create database (page 4-24)
Use the oakcli create database command to create additional
databases on Oracle Database Appliance.
Managing Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance 2-11
How to Upgrade and Update the Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance
2.7 How to Upgrade and Update the Oracle Database on Oracle Database
Appliance
Review the information in these topics to select the procedure for upgrading and
updating your Oracle Database release.
Topics:
About Oracle Database Upgrades and Updates on Oracle Database Appliance
(page 2-12)
Use Oracle Database Appliance bundles to upgrade or update Oracle
Database instances, as well as other components and features of Oracle
Database Appliance.
Updating to Oracle Database 12.1.0.2.161018 from Previous Oracle Database
12.1.0.2.x Releases (page 2-13)
Use this example to understand steps required to update Oracle
Database 12c release 1 (12.1) releases on Oracle Database Appliance.
Upgrading to Oracle Database 11.2.0.4.161018 from Oracle Database 11.2.0.4.x
Releases (page 2-14)
Use this example to understand steps required to upgrade Oracle
Database 11g release 2 (11.2) releases on Oracle Database Appliance.
2.7.1 About Oracle Database Upgrades and Updates on Oracle Database Appliance
Use Oracle Database Appliance bundles to upgrade or update Oracle Database
instances, as well as other components and features of Oracle Database Appliance.
Oracle Database Appliance upgrades and updates use specially developed Oracle
Database Appliance patch bundles. Only use these patch bundles to perform upgrades
and updates on Oracle Database Appliance.
Use the appropriate Oracle Database Appliance patch bundle for your appliance.
Typically, Oracle recommends that you use the latest Oracle Database Appliance
patch bundle.
Oracle Database Appliance patch bundles can include updates and upgrades to Oracle
Database software, and updates and upgrades to other components of Oracle
Database Appliance, including updates to Infrastructure (infra) and Grid
Infrastructure (gi) components.
The Oracle Database Appliance patch set update for Oracle Database uses a new
numbering sequence. The Oracle Database update for Oracle Database Appliance
patch set 12.1.2.6 is 12.1.0.2.160119.
For information about patch set bundles, known issues, workarounds, and any other
information you may require for upgrades and updates, refer to My Oracle Support
note 888888.1. Also refer to the patch readme file.
Related Topics:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&type=NOT&id=888888.1
2-12 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Upgrade and Update the Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance
2.7.2 Updating to Oracle Database 12.1.0.2.161018 from Previous Oracle Database
12.1.0.2.x Releases
Use this example to understand steps required to update Oracle Database 12c release 1
(12.1) releases on Oracle Database Appliance.
You use Oracle Appliance Manager (OAKCLI) to update Oracle Database
installations. In this scenario, you have updated two databases to Oracle Database 12c
release 1 12.1.0.2.161018 when you ran the Oracle Database Appliance 12.1.2.6 patch
set update, but you have not updated two other Oracle Database instances that are
patched at Oracle Database 12c release 1 (12.1.0.2.4). This procedure describes how to
update databases manually after the patch set update.
The Oracle Database Appliance patch set for Oracle Database uses a new numbering
sequence. The Oracle Database update for Oracle Database Appliance patch set
12.1.2.6 is 12.1.0.2.161018.
1. Run the command oakcli show databases on Node 0 only. Review the output
of this command to confirm that you have databases with the appropriate release
number for this update.
The following example shows that there are four databases, db1, db2, db3, and db4:
# oakcli show databases
Name Type
Storage
---- ---------db1 RAC
ACFS
db2 SINGLE
ACFS
db3 RACOneNode ACFS
db4 RAC
ACFS
HomeName
-------OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home2
OraDb12102_home3
OraDb12102_home4
HomeLocation
-----------/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_2
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_3
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_4
Version
------12.1.0.2.4(20831110,20831110)
12.1.0.2.4(20831110,20831110)
12.1.0.2.160119(21948354,21948344)
12.1.0.2.160119(21948354,21948344)
Note:
In this example, the databases are in separate Oracle home locations. This
option provides the ability to update individual databases, but requires more
administration and storage allocation. Databases in separate homes must be
updated individually.
Databases in the same database home require less storage allocation, and can
be updated as a group. However, you cannot update individual databases in a
shared Oracle database home location.
2. Run the command oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.9.0 --database on
Node 0 only. When you run this command without specifying a database or a
database home, the command automatically patches both nodes.
If you have more than one database home that is a candidate for patching, then the
command displays a selection list from which you can pick one, some, or all of the
candidate database homes that you want to update.
3. After the update command completes running, run the command oakcli show
databases on Node 0 again.
The command and output should now look similar to the following example:
# oakcli show databases
Name Type
---- ---db1 RAC
db2 SINGLE
Storage
------ACFS
ACFS
HomeName
-------OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home2
HomeLocation
-----------/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_2
Version
------12.1.0.2.161018(24927502,24340679)
12.1.0.2.161018(24927502,24340679)
Managing Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance 2-13
How to Upgrade and Update the Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance
db3 RACOneNode ACFS
db4 RAC
ACFS
OraDb12102_home3 /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_3 12.1.0.2.161018(24927502,24340679)
OraDb12102_home4 /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_4 12.1.0.2.161018(24927502,24340679)
The Oracle Database instances db1 and db2 are now updated to 12.1.0.2.161018.
2.7.3 Upgrading to Oracle Database 11.2.0.4.161018 from Oracle Database 11.2.0.4.x
Releases
Use this example to understand steps required to upgrade Oracle Database 11g release
2 (11.2) releases on Oracle Database Appliance.
You use Oracle Appliance Manager (OAKCLI) to upgrade Oracle Database
installations. In this scenario, you have upgraded the Oracle Database Appliance
infrastructure and Oracle Grid Infrastructure to Oracle Database Appliance patch set
12.1.2.6, but you have not upgraded Oracle Database installations. This procedure
describes how to upgrade Oracle Database 11g release 2 (11.2) databases.
The Oracle Database Appliance patch set upgrade for Oracle Database uses a new
numbering sequence. The Oracle Database upgrade for Oracle Database Appliance
patch set 11.1.2.9 is 11.2.0.4.161018.
Before you start this procedure, you must complete the following tasks:
•
Completed running the Oracle Database Appliance 12.1.2.6 patch set update for
infrastructure and Oracle Grid Infrastructure.
•
Configured at least one Oracle Database Appliance database home for release
11.2.0.4.161018.
You configure an Oracle Database home using Oracle Appliance Manager, either as
part of your patch set update initially, or as a manual procedure using the command
oakcli create dbhome. You can run multiple Oracle Database instances on one
Oracle Database home, to save storage space and obtain greater ease of management,
or you can run Oracle Database instances in individual Oracle Database homes, for
greater flexibility.
You must always have an Oracle Database Appliance database home for the database
release to which you want to upgrade. In a new 12.1.2.9 deployment, a new
11.2.0.4.161018 Oracle Database home is set up for you automatically. If you are
updating from an earlier release, then you must create at least one 11.2.0.4.161018
Oracle Database home manually using oakcli create dbhome.
1. If necessary, download the 11.2.0.4.161018 RDBMS Clone Patch from My Oracle
Support, and create an Oracle Database home on Node 0 for Oracle Database
release 11.2.0.4.161018.
For example:
# /opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli create dbhome -version 11.2.0.4.161018
2. Run the command oakcli show dbhomes.
The output appears similar to the following example:
Oracle HomeName Oracle Home Version
Type
--------------- ------------------------------OraDb11204_home1 11.2.0.4.7(20760997,17592127)
Oracle HomeLocation
Database Name
-------------
-------------
/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0.4/dbhome_1 db1
Database
RAC
3. Run the command oakcli show databases on Node 0 only. Review the output
of this command to confirm that you have databases with the appropriate release
number for this upgrade.
2-14 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Upgrade and Update the Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance
The following example shows that there is one database,db1, which is a database
that is not an upgraded from release 11.2.0.4, and that is patched to a level from
which you can upgrade (11.2.0.4.7):
# oakcli show databases
Name Type
---- ---db1 RAC
Storage HomeName
HomeLocation
Version
------- ------------------------ACFS
OraDb11204_home1 /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0.4/dbhome_1 11.2.0.4.7(20760997,17592127)
4. Upgrade databases by running the command oakcli upgrade database on
Node 0.
Run the command on Node 0 only. Provide names of databases that you want to
upgrade, and provide names of database homes where you want the upgraded
databases placed. Run the command with the following options, where database
is the name of the database that you want to upgrade, and dbhome is the name of
the Oracle home where you want the upgraded database to be placed:
oakcli upgrade database -db database -to dbhome
The following example shows how to upgrade the database db1 identified in step 3
as an upgrade candidate, and how to place the upgraded database in the new
database home, OraDb12102_home2, which is also identified in step 3:
# oakcli upgrade database -db db1 -to dbhome12102_home2.
5. After the upgrade command completes running, run the command oakcli show
databases on Node 0 again.
The command and output should now look similar to the following example:
Name Type
---- ---db1 RAC
Storage HomeName
HomeLocation
Version
------- ------------------------ACFS
OraDb12102_home2 /u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 11.2.0.4.161018(24927502,24340679)
The database db1 is now in release 11.2.0.4, and the database home name is now
OraDB12102_home2, which is in the path /u01/app/oracle/product/
11.2.0.4/OraDb12102_home2.
Managing Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance 2-15
How to Upgrade and Update the Oracle Database on Oracle Database Appliance
2-16 Administration and Reference Guide
3
Managing Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform
Review the concepts and procedures for Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform.
These topics provides a conceptual overview of the Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform architecture, and procedures for how to deploy a guest virtual
machine, manage high availability, manage CPU pools, and configure network
settings for Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform. Learn about resizing
your Oracle Database domain (ODA_BASE), a privileged virtual machine.
Topics:
About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform (page 3-2)
You can use Oracle VM to optimize your system resource use for
databases and applications.
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture (page 3-3)
Review these topics to understand Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform, and how you can use it to optimize system
resource use.
About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Deployment (page 3-7)
Review this topic to understand the procedure for carrying out Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform deployment.
How to Create and Manage Shared Repositories (page 3-8)
These topics describe how to use OAKCLI to create and manage shared
repositories on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
How to Manage Virtual Disks in Shared Repositories (page 3-11)
These topics describe how to use OAKCLI to create, view, clone, attach,
and delete virtual disks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform.
How to Manage Virtual Machine Templates (page 3-13)
These topics describe how to use OAKCLI to import, configure, modify
and check virtual machine templates on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform.
How to Create Clones and Snap Clones of a Template (page 3-18)
Review these topics for an overview of clones and snap clones, and for
procedures to use to create clones.
How to Manage Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform (page 3-21)
Review these topics for an overview of virtual machines, and for
procedures to create and manage virtual machines.
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-1
About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
How to Manage High Availability on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform (page 3-27)
Use the oakcli configure vm command to configure high
availability services for your virtual machines.
How to Manage CPU Pools on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
(page 3-28)
These topics describe how to use OAKCLI to create and manage CPU
pools on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
About Network Infrastructure and Virtual Local Area Networks on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform (page 3-31)
To specify which network you want to use to access a virtual machine,
you employ network infrastructure components of Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Managing Virtual Local Area Networks on User Domains and on ODA_BASE
(page 3-35)
Use these examples to understand how to configure and manage virtual
local area networks (VLANs).
How to Resize ODA_BASE (page 3-38)
You can increase or decrease the number of CPU cores that you assign
the ODA_BASE domain to add or reduce computing power and
memory as required for your workloads.
3.1 About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
You can use Oracle VM to optimize your system resource use for databases and
applications.
You can deploy a virtualized platform on Oracle Database Appliance. The virtual
platform is based on Oracle VM. With Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform, you can use the capabilities of Oracle VM to effectively allocate resources to
databases and applications running on the same physical Oracle Database Appliance.
Rather than simply disabling unnecessary server cores, you can use the excess capacity
to host other workloads. This enables consolidation of both databases and
applications, while retaining the ease of deployment and management associated with
Oracle Database Appliance.
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform is supported on all versions of Oracle
Database Appliance hardware. All templates and operating systems supported by
Oracle VM are also supported on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Supported operating systems include Linux, Windows, and Solaris x86.
Note:
All new systems are currently shipped from the factory with the
nonvirtualized ISO image
If you are currently on the nonvirtualized deployment of Oracle Database
Appliance, and you want to use Oracle Database Appliance as a virtualized
platform, then you must reimage the servers with the Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform ISO image Refer to MOS Note 888888.1 for a
link to download the Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform ISO
image.
3-2 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture
Why Virtualize?
Oracle Appliance Manager (oakcli) makes it easy to setup and manage the virtualized
environment with little virtualization expertise. With the Virtualized Platform
deployment, you can consolidate entire multi-tier environments within a single Oracle
Database Appliance system.
The following are some of the advantages of deploying Oracle Database Appliance
with the Virtualized Platform option:
1.
Deploy database and applications in a single hardware environment.
2.
Use the pre-configured VM application templates to rapidly deploy database and
applications.
3.
Run the database in a virtual machine (ODA_BASE) with direct access to storage
(for native performance) .
4.
Control licensed CPUs by configuring ODA_BASE domain with the required
number of CPU cores (and memory).
5.
Use your CPU cores (and memory) efficiently. CPU cores not assigned to the
ODA_BASE domain are not wasted and are available for use by other, nondatabase virtual machines
6.
Use virtual local area networks (VLANs) to provide separate networks to different
virtual machines.
7.
Use shared repository to grow storage for the virtual machine (VM) repository.
8.
Improves data center efficiency by increasing space utilization and reducing
energy consumption and cooling costs.
3.2 Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture
Review these topics to understand Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform,
and how you can use it to optimize system resource use.
Topics:
About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture (page 3-3)
Review this topic to understand how Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform works with Oracle Database Appliance hardware.
About Virtual Machines and Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms
(page 3-4)
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform is designed to run and
deploy virtual machines to manage system resources.
3.2.1 About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture
Review this topic to understand how Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
works with Oracle Database Appliance hardware.
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform provides virtualization technology
that enables multiple isolated databases and applications to share the same physical
server. The Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform ISO image is engineered
specifically to leverage the Oracle Database Appliance hardware capabilities.
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-3
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture
The Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform architecture uses the virtual
machine components shown in the following illustration:
Figure 3-1
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture
•
Oracle Database Appliance Base Domain (ODA_BASE): A privileged virtual
machine domain, specifically for databases, that provides database performance
similar to bare metal deployments. A PCI pass-through driver provides
ODA_BASE direct access to the shared storage.
•
Domain 0 (Dom0): Default domain that initiates Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform provisioning processes and hosts virtual machine templates.
Most of the responsibility of hardware detection in an Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform environment is passed to the management domain, referred
to as domain zero (or Dom0). On x86-based servers, the Dom0 kernel is actually a
small-footprint Linux kernel with support for a broad array of devices, file
systems, and software RAID and volume management. In Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform, Dom0 provides access to much of the system
hardware, creating, deleting and controlling guest operating systems, and
presenting those guests with a set of common virtual hardware.
•
Guest Domains (Domain U): Virtual machines that are provisioned to host nondatabase workloads, such as applications and middleware. Guest operating
systems each have their own management domain, called a user domain,
abbreviated to "Domain U". These domains are unprivileged domains that have
no direct access to the hardware or to the device drivers. Each Domain U starts
after Dom0 is running on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
3.2.2 About Virtual Machines and Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform is designed to run and deploy virtual
machines to manage system resources.
Configure virtual machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform to
manage your application use of shared repository resources, such as the CPU pool,
memory, and other shared resources.
Virtual Machine Templates
Virtual machines can be created from a template or assembly containing
preconfigured virtual machines. The creation of a virtual machine from a template is
based on cloning: the template is imported as an archive, unpacked, and stored as a
3-4 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture
virtual machine configuration file with disk images. These disk images are cloned to
create a new instance in the form of a virtual machine. In the same way, an existing
virtual machine can be cloned to create a new virtual machine, or cloned to create a
new template.
Virtual Machine Assemblies
Virtual machine assemblies are often described as a template of a group of virtual
machines, or a collection of virtual machine templates. An assembly can contain a
single virtual machine or a collection of virtual machine templates.
Domains, Guests and Virtual Machines
The terms domain, guest, and virtual machine are often used interchangeably, but they
have subtle differences. A domain is a configurable set of resources, including memory,
virtual CPUs, network devices, and disk devices, in which virtual machines run. A
guest is a virtualized operating system running within a domain. Multiple guests can
run on the same instance of Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform, each
within its own domain. A virtual machine is granted virtual resources, and can be
started, stopped, and restarted independently.
Virtual Disks
In addition to virtual machines, you can create virtual disks in shared repositories.
Virtual disks provide additional storage options for virtual machines by enabling you
to attach additional block storage to your virtual machines. Similarly, you can detach
the storage if you no longer need the additional space. You can use virtual disks to
expand existing file system storage inside the virtual machine by extending the
storage volume onto a virtual disk, or by creating a new file system on a virtual disk.
Your virtual disks can also share multiple virtual machines running on the same
shared repository.
A driver domain is a user domain that has special privileges and responsibilities for a
particular piece of hardware. When you use the driver domain option, the newly
created virtual disks are mounted directly from ODA_BASE to a guest virtual machine.
The option improves performance by enabling guest virtual machines to use
ODA_BASE instead of Dom0 to access virtual disks. The driver domain option is
available beginning with release 12.1.2.7.0 and is supported with Oracle Linux,
Windows, and Oracle Solaris x86 guest operating systems. Live migration of virtual
machines is not supported.
Shared Repositories
A shared repository is a central location for storing resources that are essential to
creating and managing virtual machines. These resources include virtual machine
templates and assemblies, ISO files (virtual DVD images), virtual machine
configuration files, and virtual disks. Shared repositories are configured on an Oracle
Automatic Storage Management Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS) and then
presented to the Oracle Database Appliance nodes that need access to those resources.
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform uses shared repositories to optimize
available disk space usage in the environment, and for easy reallocation of virtual
machines if a physical server fails. The virtual machine files can be stored on shared
disks, providing shared storage for the virtual machines. Additionally, you can
configure CPU pools and a resizeable Oracle Database domain (ODA_BASE) to ensure
that the virtual machines do not consume cycles from each other or from your
assigned database CPU cores.
•
The shared disks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform are
connected directly to ODA_BASE.
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-5
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Architecture
•
ODA_BASE contains three shared repositories named fs1, fs2, and fs3.
•
Each shared repository is an Oracle ACFS in ODA_BASE created on top of the
Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) disk group (DATA or
RECO) chosen by the user when creating the shared repository.
•
The process that creates a shared repository also performs a network file system
(NFS) export of the shared repository to the respective Dom0 by using the private
network.
•
The export enables shared storage for the virtual machine files.
Figure 3-2 Architecture Overview of Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform Shared Repositories
With the configuration shown in the illustration, you can:
•
Create multiple repositories.
•
Mount these repositories either on the nodes where the virtual machine needs to
run (such as fs2 and fs3 in the illustration), or on both the nodes (such as fs1 in
the illustration).
•
Create one or more virtual machines or virtual machine templates on the shared
repositories.
•
Use OAKCLI commands to create and manage shared repositories, virtual disks,
and their virtual machines, and the underlying architecture shown in the
illustration.
Note: Virtual machine (VM) repositories on Oracle Database Appliance can
only be on the boot drives or an Oracle Database Appliance shared storage
shelf. External storage cannot be used for VM shared repositories on Oracle
Database Appliance.
3-6 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Deployment
3.3 About Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Deployment
Review this topic to understand the procedure for carrying out Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform deployment.
Domain Deployment Configuration
You use Oracle Appliance Kit Command-Line Interface, also known as OAKCLI, to
deploy Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
When you deploy Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform, your system is
configured with two domains on each server node: Dom0 and ODA_BASE (also known
as Dom1). You can use the CPU cores not assigned to Oracle Database (ODA_BASE) for
virtual machines, each of which is referred to as a Domain U.
The virtual disk and vm.cfg files are stored in the following directories:
•
Dom0: /Repositories/vm_repo_name/.ACFS/snaps/vm_name/
VirtualMachines/vm_name
•
ODA_BASE: /app/sharedrepo/vm_repo_name/.ACFS/snaps/vm_name/
VirtualMachines/vm_name
A driver domain is a user domain with special privileges. The Driver Domain
functionality allows guest virtual machines to use ODA_BASE as the driver domain for
access to virtual disks By default, the driver domain functionality applies to nonsystem disks. Once a virtual machine is created in driver domain mode, any new
vDisks are added in driver domain mode.
When a user domain is configured in driver domain mode, the storage in the vm.cfg
file at DomU might be similar to the following:
vm.cfg: disk = [u'file:/OVS/Repositories/myreposh1/.ACFS/snaps/v1_shared/
VirtualMachines/v1_shared/System.img,xvda,w', u'file:/u01/app/sharedrepo/
Repositories/myreposh1/.ACFS/snaps/v1_shared/VirtualMachines/v1_shared/
u01.img,xvdb,w,oakDom1']
Note: The second virtual disk is specified as a file on shared storage (in the
shared repository) and it uses the ODA_BASE domain (oakDom1) as the driver
domain.
Overview of Deploying a Guest Virtual Machine
Deploying a Guest virtual machine requires the following steps:
1.
Create a new repository, if necessary. See "How to Create and Manage Shared
Repositories".
2.
Import the required template or assembly. See "How to Manage Virtual Machine
Templates".
3.
Configure the template or assembly. See "Configuring a Virtual Machine
Template".
4.
Clone the template or assembly. See "How to Create Clones and Snap Clones of a
Template".
5.
Update the virtual machine as required. See "Modifying a Virtual Machine
Template Configuration".
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-7
How to Create and Manage Shared Repositories
6.
Start the virtual machine. See the oakcli start commands.
7.
Manage the virtual machine using the virtual machine console. See the oakcli
show vmconsole command.
3.4 How to Create and Manage Shared Repositories
These topics describe how to use OAKCLI to create and manage shared repositories
on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Topics:
Creating a Shared Repository (page 3-8)
Use the oakcli create repo command to create a shared repository
on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Showing the Status of Shared Repositories (page 3-9)
Use the oakcli show repo command to display information about
virtual machine repositories on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platforms.
Starting a Shared Repository (page 3-9)
Use the oakcli start repo command to start a virtual machine and
assign it to a shared repository on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platforms
Stopping a Shared Repository (page 3-10)
Use the oakcli stop repo command to command to stop a shared
repository on a node on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platforms.
Deleting a Shared Repository (page 3-10)
Use the oakcli delete repo command to delete a shared repository
on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Increasing the Size of a Shared Repository (page 3-10)
Use the oakcli configure repo command to increase the size of a
shared repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
3.4.1 Creating a Shared Repository
Use the oakcli create repo command to create a shared repository on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
When you run the oakcli create repo command, you identify the repository
name using the option repo, you identify the disk group that you want to use for its
storage (DATA or RECO) using the option -dg, and you identify the size of the
repository in gigabytes or megabytes (the default size unit is gigabytes) using the size option.
Other Oracle Appliance Manager shared repository commands, including commands
to show and to stop (dismount) existing repositories, are similar to those used for
nonshared repositories. Unlike the default repositories, which are permanent, you can
delete a shared repository that has no active (mounted) virtual machines.
Example of Creating a Shared Repository
The following command creates a shared repository named repo1 in the ASM DATA
disk group (data) with 30 gigabytes of available storage:
3-8 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Create and Manage Shared Repositories
oakcli create repo repo1 -dg data -size 30
3.4.2 Showing the Status of Shared Repositories
Use the oakcli show repo command to display information about virtual machine
repositories on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
To see all repositories, omit the repository name and node number. To see a specific
shared repository, include the repository name and node number.
Example 3-1
Example of Showing the Status of All Shared Repositories
To show the status of all shared repositories, use the oakcli show repo command:
oakcli show repo
NAME
---odarepo1
odarepo2
repo1
repo1
repo2
repo2
Example 3-2
TYPE
---local
local
shared
shared
shared
shared
NODENUM FREE SPACE
------- --------0
N/A
1
N/A
0
68.25%
1
68.25%
0
N/A
1
89.83%
STATE
----N/A
N/A
ONLINE
ONLINE
OFFLINE
ONLINE
Example of Showing the Status of a Selected Shared Repository
To display information for a particular node in a shared repository, specify the
repository name and node number as part of the command syntax. In the following
example, information is displayed for Node 1 in the repo1 shared repository:
oakcli show repo repo1 -node 1
Resource: repo1_1
AutoStart
DG
Device
ExpectedState
FreeSpace
MountPoint
Name
Node
RepoType
Size
State
Version
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
restore
DATA
/dev/asm/repo1-286
Online
87.703125M
/u01/app/repo1
repo1_0
all
shared
30720
Online
2
3.4.3 Starting a Shared Repository
Use the oakcli start repo command to start a virtual machine and assign it to a
shared repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms
Before you can assign a virtual machine to a shared repository, use the oakcli
start repo command to start the repository and make the storage available. Note
that the oakcli start repo command will also start any virtual machines assigned
to the repository that are defined to be automatically started.
You must have a repository already configured. Identify the repository that you start
by using the option repo name, where name is the repository name. Identify the
name of the node on which the repository is located by using the option -node
nodename, where nodename is the name of the node on which the repository is
located.
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-9
How to Create and Manage Shared Repositories
Example 3-3
Example of Starting a Shared Repository
This command starts the shared repository named repo1 on Node 1:
oakcli start repo repo1 -node 1
3.4.4 Stopping a Shared Repository
Use the oakcli stop repo command to command to stop a shared repository on a
node on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Identify the repository that you want to stop by using the repo reponame option,
where reponame identifies the repository that you want to stop. Identify the node on
which the repository that you want to stop is running by using the -node number
option where number is the node number that you want to stop.
Note:
Do not issue an oakcli stop repo command while virtual machines are
still active in the repository for the selected node.
Example 3-4
Example of Stopping a Shared Repository
The following example stops the shared repository named repo1 on Node 0:
oakcli stop repo repo1 -node 0
3.4.5 Deleting a Shared Repository
Use the oakcli delete repo command to delete a shared repository on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Identify the repository that you want to delete by using the repo reponame option,
where reponame identifies the repository that you want to delete.
Note:
The shared repository that you want to delete must be offline (stopped) on
both nodes before you attempt to delete it.
Example 3-5
Example of Deleting a Shared Repository
The following command deletes the shared repository named repo1 on both nodes:
oakcli delete repo repo1
3.4.6 Increasing the Size of a Shared Repository
Use the oakcli configure repo command to increase the size of a shared
repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Identify the repository that you want to expand by using the -repo reponame
option, where reponame identifies the repository that you want to expand. Use the
option -incsize size to specify the size of the increase that you want to configure,
where size is the size (in gigabytes) that you want to add to the configured size.
3-10 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Manage Virtual Disks in Shared Repositories
Example 3-6
Example of Increasing the Size of a Shared Repository
The following command increases the size of the shared repository repo1 by 2
gigabytes:
# oakcli configure repo repo1 -incsize 2G
Configured Shared Repo : repo1 with new size 3712.0.
3.5 How to Manage Virtual Disks in Shared Repositories
These topics describe how to use OAKCLI to create, view, clone, attach, and delete
virtual disks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Topics:
Creating a Virtual Disk for Use in a Shared Repository (page 3-11)
Use the command oakcli create vdisk to create a virtual disk
within a shared repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platforms.
Viewing Information About Virtual Disks (page 3-12)
Use the command oakcli show vdisk to view information about
virtual disks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Cloning Virtual Disks (page 3-12)
Use the oakcli clone vdisk command to create clones of virtual
disks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Attaching a Virtual Disk to a Virtual Machine (page 3-13)
Use the oakcli modify vm command to attach a virtual disk to a
virtual machine on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Deleting a Virtual Disk (page 3-13)
Use the oakcli delete vdiskcommand to remove a virtual disk
from a shared repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platforms.
3.5.1 Creating a Virtual Disk for Use in a Shared Repository
Use the command oakcli create vdisk to create a virtual disk within a shared
repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
The command oakcli create vdisk defines the size of the virtual disk, the shared
repository in which that disk is created, defines the unique name for that disk within
that shared repository, and defines if the disk is used for one virtual machine, or can
be shared by multiple virtual machines.
The name of the vdisk you create is defined by the command oakcli create
vdisk name, where name is the name of the vdisk you create. Identify the repository
in which you create the vdisk by using the -repo reponame option, where
reponame identifies the repository where you want to create the vdisk. Use the option
-size sizeG to specify the vdisk size (in gigabytes), where sizeG is the size (in
gigabytes) that you want to add to the configured size. If you want to configure the
vdisk as a shared disk, then use the option -type shared to designate the vdisk as a
shared disk.
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-11
How to Manage Virtual Disks in Shared Repositories
Example 3-7
Example of Creating a Shared Virtual Disk
This example creates a virtual disk named sdisk1 in the repo2 shared repository
that is 1 gigabyte in size, and that virtual machines can share:
oakcli create vdisk sdisk1 -repo repo2 -size 1G -type shared
3.5.2 Viewing Information About Virtual Disks
Use the command oakcli show vdisk to view information about virtual disks on
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
You can use oakcli show vdisk by itself to see information about all of your
configured virtual disks. To see information about an individual virtual disk, enter the
command oakcli show vdisk diskname -repo reponame, where diskname
is the name of the disk that you want to check, and reponame is the name of the
shared repository where the virtual disk is located.
Example 3-8
Example of Displaying the Information for All Vdisks
This example displays information about all virtual disks configured on an Oracle
Database Appliance:
# oakcli show vdisk
NAME
---myvdisk
newv
Example 3-9
SIZE
---10G
1G
TYPE
---local
local
REPOSITORY
---------vdiskrepo
vdiskrepo
Example of Displaying Information for a Single Vdisk
This example displays information for the virtual disk named myvdisk1:
# oakcli show vdisk myvdisk1
Resource: myvdisk_vdiskrepo
Name
:
myvdisk_vdiskrepo
RepoName
:
vdiskrepo
Size
:
10G
Type
:
local
VmAttached :
0
3.5.3 Cloning Virtual Disks
Use the oakcli clone vdisk command to create clones of virtual disks on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
The command oakcli clone vdisk defines the size of the virtual disk, the shared
repository in which that disk is created, defines the unique name for that disk within
that shared repository, and defines if the disk is used for one virtual machine, or can
be shared by multiple virtual machines.
The name of the vdisk you create is defined by the command oakcli clone vdisk
name, where name is the name of the vdisk you create. Identify the repository in
which you create the vdisk by using the -repo reponame option, where reponame
is the name of the repository where the original vdisk is located. Use the option -src
sourcevdiskname, where sourcevdiskname is the name of the virtual disk that
you are cloning. Add the option -h to display help for this command.
3-12 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Manage Virtual Machine Templates
Note: Once the virtual disk is attached to a virtual machine, the system
administrator should perform normal disk addition tasks for the given
operating system to make the newly added storage available to the virtual
machine.
Syntax
oakcli clone vdisk name -repo reponame -src sourcevdiskname [-h]
Example 3-10
Example of Cloning a Virtual Disk
This example clones a virtual disk named my_vdisk2 from an existing virtual disk
named vdisk1 that is stored in the repository named vrepo1:
oakcli clone vdisk my_vdisk2 -repo vrepo1 -src vdisk1
3.5.4 Attaching a Virtual Disk to a Virtual Machine
Use the oakcli modify vm command to attach a virtual disk to a virtual machine
on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
The command oakcli modify vm name enables you to modify a virtual machine,
where name is the name of the virtual machine that you want to modify. To attach a
disk to a virtual machine, use the option -attachvdisk vdiskname, where
vdiskname is the name of the virtual disk that you want to attach to the virtual
machine.
Example 3-11
Example of Attaching a Virtual Disk To a Virtual Machine
This example attaches the virtual disk named sdisk1 to the virtual machine named
myol6u_test:
oakcli modify vm myo16u_test -attachvdisk sdisk1
3.5.5 Deleting a Virtual Disk
Use the oakcli delete vdiskcommand to remove a virtual disk from a shared
repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
The command oakcli delete vdisk vdiskname removes a virtual disk, where
vdiskname is the name of the virtual disk that you want to remove. The option repo reponame indicates the shared repository on which the virtual disk is located,
where reponame is the name of the shared repository.
Example 3-12
Example of Deleting a Virtual Disk from a Shared Repository
This example removes a virtual disk named t2g from the shared repository named
repoprod1:
oakcli delete vdisk t2g -repo repoprod1
3.6 How to Manage Virtual Machine Templates
These topics describe how to use OAKCLI to import, configure, modify and check
virtual machine templates on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Topics:
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-13
How to Manage Virtual Machine Templates
About Managing Virtual Machine Templates (page 3-14)
Import and configure virtual machine templates as the source for the
virtual machines deployed on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform.
Listing Virtual Machine Templates (page 3-15)
Use the oakcli show vmtemplate command to display virtual
machine template details.
Importing Virtual Machine Templates (page 3-15)
Use the oakcli import vmtemplate command to import virtual
machine templates and assemblies on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platforms.
Configuring a Virtual Machine Template (page 3-17)
Use the oakcli configure vmtemplate command to configure a
virtual machine template on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform.
Showing Configured Values for a Virtual Machine Template (page 3-17)
Use the oakcli show vmtemplate command to show values for the
configurable options in a virtual machine template.
Modifying a Virtual Machine Template Configuration (page 3-18)
Use the oakcli modify vmtemplate command to modify a virtual
machine template.
Removing a Virtual Machine Template (page 3-18)
Use the oakcli delete vmtemplate command to remove a virtual
machine template.
3.6.1 About Managing Virtual Machine Templates
Import and configure virtual machine templates as the source for the virtual machines
deployed on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
If you have created shared repositories, then import templates into one of those shared
repositories. If you have not created shared repositories, then import templates into
the local repository on one of the local nodes.
You can import assemblies that contain one or more templates. When you import a
template or assembly into a shared repository, select a node that you want to perform
the operation. Select the node carefully to avoid overloading the node. After you
create the repository, the repository becomes available to both nodes, regardless of
which node performs the import.
Templates imported into local nodes use the repository name supplied in the import
command to identify the node that completes the import, and that provides the
storage. On Node 0, the local repository is named odarepo1 and on Node 1, the local
repository is named odarepo2. If you want to import a template to both local
repositories, then you must provide a different template name when you import the
template into the second node.
3-14 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Manage Virtual Machine Templates
Note:
You cannot create or clone templates directly on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform. Find virtual machine templates at the following URL:
http://edelivery.oracle.com/linux.
If you import an assembly that contains more than one template, then the command
automatically modifies the template name that you provide, so that all template names
remain unique. The first template you import has the number "1" appended to the
name. The second template as the number "2" appended, and additional templates
have 3, 4, 5 and so on appended in sequence.
After you import a virtual machine template, you can customize the template using
OAKCLI commands.
3.6.2 Listing Virtual Machine Templates
Use the oakcli show vmtemplate command to display virtual machine template
details.
The oakcli show vmtemplate command displays the name and repository for
each virtual machine template as well as the default number of CPUs and default
amount of memory that Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform would assign
to a virtual machine created from the template.
Example
Display information about the sample1_odarepo1 virtual template:
oakcli show vmtemplate sample_odarepo1
Resource: sample1_odarepo1
CPUPriority
:
100
Disks
:
|file:/OVS/Repositories/odarepo1/Te
mplates/otml_sample1_odarepo1/Syste
m.img,xvda,w||file:/OVS/Repositorie
s/odarepo1/Templates/otml_sample1_o
darepo1/u01.img,xvdb,w|
Domain
:
XEN_PVM
Keyboard
:
en-us
MaxMemory
:
2048
MaxVcpu
:
2
Memory
:
2048
Mouse
:
OS_DEFAULT
Name
:
sample1_odarepo1
Networks
:
|bridge=priv1||bridge=net1||bridge=
net2|
NodeNum
:
0
OS
:
OL_5
ProcessorCap
:
100
RepoName
:
odarepo1
Vcpu
:
2
3.6.3 Importing Virtual Machine Templates
Use the oakcli import vmtemplate command to import virtual machine
templates and assemblies on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-15
How to Manage Virtual Machine Templates
You import virtual machine templates and assemblies contained in an external
repository assembly file. Use the name of the shared repository and include a clause to
identify the node where you want to import a template or an assembly.
You can import virtual machine templates and assemblies directly from a remote
repository using a URL to identify the source of the files. You can choose to use a
remote copy command to copy files from the remote repository into your Dom0 /OVS
directory, and then import the files using the path and names to identify the
downloaded files.
Note:
When importing templates or assemblies to a local repository, do not use the node option. The target node is implicit in the name of the repository.
Syntax
oakcli import vmtemplate vmtemplatename -files image_files | -assembly assembly_file
-repo repo_name [- node 0 | 1 ]
Example 3-13 Example of Importing Virtual Machine Templates from an External
Repository Assembly File
Use the oakcli import vmteplate vmtemplatename -assembly
assembly_file -repo repo_name command to import virtual machine templates
contained in an external template repository assembly file.
This example imports the template in an external template repository assembly file
located at the URL 'http://example.com/assemblies/OEL6/
OVM_OL6U1_x86_PVHVM.ova' to a new template named OL6U1 in a new repository
named odarepo1:
oakcli import vmtemplate OL6U1 -assembly 'http://example.com/assemblies/OEL6/
OVM_OL6U1_x86_PVHVM.ova' -repo odarepo1
Note the single quotation marks that enclose the URL.
Example 3-14
Example of Importing a Virtual Machine Template from Dom0
Use this command syntax to import a virtual machine template from the /OVS file
system on Dom0:
oakcli import vmtemplate vmtemplatename -files image_files -repo repo_name
This example imports the virtual machine template named
OVM_OL5U7_X86_64_PVM_10GB.tgz from the /OVS directory in Dom0 into the
odarepo1 repository. The template is assigned the name OL5U7:
oakcli import vmtemplate OL5U7 -files /OVS/OVM_OL5U7_X86_64_PVM_10GB.tgz -repo
odarepo1
Example 3-15 Example of Importing a Virtual Machine Template Using an External
Repository URL
Use the command oakcli import vmtemplate vmtemplatename -files
image_files -repo repo_name to import a virtual machine template file from an
external template repository.
This example imports a virtual machine template named
OVM_OL5U7_X86_64_PVM_10GB.tgz from an external template repository at the
3-16 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Manage Virtual Machine Templates
URL 'http://example.com/assemblies/OEL6/
OVM_OL6U1_x86_PVHVM.tgz'. Note the single quotation marks that enclose the
URL. The template is assigned the name OL5U7, and is imported into the odarpo1
repository:
oakcli import vmtemplate OL5U7 -files 'http://example.com/assemblies/OEL6/
OVM_OL6U1_x86_PVHVM.tgz'-repo odarepo1
3.6.4 Configuring a Virtual Machine Template
Use the oakcli configure vmtemplate command to configure a virtual machine
template on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
The values become the default values for any virtual machine cloned from this
template. You can change any or all of them later with the oakcli configure vm
command.
Example
Set values for the virtual machine template named myol5u7_10gb:
oakcli configure vmtemplate myol5u7_10gb -vcpu 2 -maxvcpu 4 -cpucap 40
-memory 1536M -maxmemory 2G -os OTHER_LINUX
•
-vcpu 2 sets the number of CPUs to be assigned when the virtual machine starts
up to 2.
•
-maxvcpu 4 sets the maximum number of CPUs that can be assigned to the
virtual machine to 4.
•
-cpucap 40 sets the maximum percentage of a CPU's capacity that can be
assigned to the virtual machine to 40%.
•
-memory 1536M sets the amount of memory to be assigned when the virtual
machine starts up to 1536 MB.
•
-maxmemory 2G sets the maximum amount of memory that can be assigned to
the virtual machine to 2 GB.
•
-os OTHER_LINUX sets OTHER_LINUX as the operating system used by the
virtual machine.
3.6.5 Showing Configured Values for a Virtual Machine Template
Use the oakcli show vmtemplate command to show values for the configurable
options in a virtual machine template.
Example
Display information about the sample1_odarepo1 virtual template:
oakcli show vmtemplate sample_odarepo1
Resource: sample1_odarepo1
CPUPriority
:
100
Disks
:
|file:/OVS/Repositories/odarepo1/Te
mplates/otml_sample1_odarepo1/Syste
m.img,xvda,w||file:/OVS/Repositorie
s/odarepo1/Templates/otml_sample1_o
darepo1/u01.img,xvdb,w|
Domain
:
XEN_PVM
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-17
How to Create Clones and Snap Clones of a Template
Keyboard
MaxMemory
MaxVcpu
Memory
Mouse
Name
Networks
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
NodeNum
OS
ProcessorCap
RepoName
Vcpu
:
:
:
:
:
en-us
2048
2
2048
OS_DEFAULT
sample1_odarepo1
|bridge=priv1||bridge=net1||bridge=
net2|
0
OL_5
100
odarepo1
2
3.6.6 Modifying a Virtual Machine Template Configuration
Use the oakcli modify vmtemplate command to modify a virtual machine
template.
After you import a virtual machine template to a storage repository, examine the
template configuration parameters with the oakcli show vmtemplate command.
If you need to reconfigure the template for specific requirements, then use the oakcli
configure vmtemplate command. This is useful if you plan to deploy multiple
virtual machines with the same characteristics from a single template. If you will be
deploying only one virtual machine or many virtual machines but with different
characteristics, then set required values in the virtual machines with the oakcli
configure vm command after you deploy the template.
When you are satisfied with the configuration of your virtual machine template, use
the oakcli modify command to assign a new network to the virtual machine
template.
Example
Replace the network assigned to the gc_11g virtual machine template with the net1
network:
oakcli modify vmtemplate gc_11g -addnetwork net1
3.6.7 Removing a Virtual Machine Template
Use the oakcli delete vmtemplate command to remove a virtual machine
template.
If you no longer need a template that you previously stored, then you can remove the
template from the repository.
Example
Remove the virtual machine template named myol6u_15gb3 from Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform:
oakcli delete vmtemplate my0l6u_15gb3
3.7 How to Create Clones and Snap Clones of a Template
Review these topics for an overview of clones and snap clones, and for procedures to
use to create clones.
Topics:
3-18 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Create Clones and Snap Clones of a Template
About Creating Clones and Snap Clones of a Template (page 3-19)
You can create, or clone, virtual machines from imported templates (or
assemblies) or from an existing virtual machine on Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Cloning a Template With OAKCLI (page 3-19)
Use the oakcli clone vm command to clone virtual machines that
have attached virtual disks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platforms.
Creating a Snap Clone from a Template With OAKCLI (page 3-20)
Use the oakcli clone vm command to create a snap clone of a virtual
machine template on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Creating a Snap Clone of an Existing Virtual Machine With OAKCLI
(page 3-20)
Use the oakcli clone vm command to create a snap clone of an
existing virtual machine on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platforms.
Creating a Snap Clone of an Existing Virtual Machine That Uses a Different
Domain (page 3-20)
Use the oakcli clone vm command and options to create a virtual
machine that uses a different domain than the source virtual machine on
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
3.7.1 About Creating Clones and Snap Clones of a Template
You can create, or clone, virtual machines from imported templates (or assemblies) or
from an existing virtual machine on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Clones and snap clones can be an effective way to provision and clone new databases
for test and development systems. They are much more efficient to create than using
RMAN scripts, or other cloning approaches.
You can create virtual machines that are a complete clone of the template or assembly,
or you can create virtual machines that are snap clones. Snap clones contain only the
metadata defined for the virtual machine.
Creating snap clones is a very fast operation compared to cloning the entire template
or assembly. However, if you update the contents of a snap clone, then review your
space requirements. Unless your changes to the snap clone are carried out on shared
virtual disks, you require additional storage on your system for the clone to retain
both the original content, as well as changed content.
3.7.2 Cloning a Template With OAKCLI
Use the oakcli clone vm command to clone virtual machines that have attached
virtual disks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
When you clone virtual machines with attached virtual disks, a clone of a virtual
machine contains the contents of virtual disks attached locally, but does not contain
contents of virtual disks attached in shared mode. If needed, you can clone the virtual
disks required by a cloned virtual machine in a separate step.
Use the command oakcli clone vm to create a virtual machine from a virtual
machine template. Use the -repo name option to provide the name of the shared
repository, where name is the name of the repository. Use the -node number option
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-19
How to Create Clones and Snap Clones of a Template
to identify clause to identify the node on which you want to perform the cloning
process, where number is the number of the node.
Note:
The -node option identifies the node where the cloning activity is carried out.
The node value does not assign the default startup node for the virtual
machine. You can set the startup assignment with the command oakcli
configure vm.
Example 3-16
Template
Example of Creating a Virtual Machine Clone from a Virtual Machine
This example creates a virtual machine named myol6u_test from the virtual
machine template named myol6u_15gb1, which is located in a shared repository
named repo2 on Node 0:
oakcli clone vm myol6u_test -vmtemplate myol6u_15gb1 -repo repo2 -node 0
3.7.3 Creating a Snap Clone from a Template With OAKCLI
Use the oakcli clone vm command to create a snap clone of a virtual machine
template on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Use the -vmtemplate name option to provide the name of the virtual machine
template that you want to clone, where name is the name of the template. Use the snap option to designate that you want to create a snap clone.
Example 3-17
Example of Creating a Snap Clone From a Virtual Machine Template
This example creates a snap clone named myol15u_snap from the virtual machine
template named myol5u:
oakcli clone vm myol15u_snap -vmtemplate myol5u -snap
3.7.4 Creating a Snap Clone of an Existing Virtual Machine With OAKCLI
Use the oakcli clone vm command to create a snap clone of an existing virtual
machine on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Use the -vm name option to provide the name of the virtual machine that you want to
clone, where name is the name of the virtual machine. Use the -snap option to
designate that you want to create a snap clone.
Example 3-18
Example of Creating a Snap Clone From an Existing Virtual Machine
This example creates a snap clone named myol15u_test1 from a virtual machine
named myol15u_test:
oakcli clone vm myol15u_test1 -vm myol15u_test1 -snap
3.7.5 Creating a Snap Clone of an Existing Virtual Machine That Uses a Different
Domain
Use the oakcli clone vm command and options to create a virtual machine that
uses a different domain than the source virtual machine on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platforms.
3-20 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Manage Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Whether or not the source virtual machine is using a driver domain, you can use the
oakcli clone vm command and options to specify the type of domain for the
cloned virtual machine.
When the source virtual machine is not in driver domain mode, use the -snap option
to designate that you want to create a snapshot of the source virtual machine and the
–force and –driverdomain options to indicate that the new virtual machine will
use the driver domain. Use the -vm name option to provide the name of the virtual
machine and use –vmsource virtual machine name to identify the source
virtual machine.
oakcli clone vm vm_name -vm src_vm_name -snap -force -driverdomain
When the source virtual machine is in driver domain mode, you can clone a virtual
machine that does not use the driver domain option. If you want to create a new
virtual machine that does not use the domain mode, use the oakcli clone vm
without specifying the -driverdomain option.
oakcli clone vm <vm_name> -vm <src_vm_name> -snap [-force]
Note: You must stop the virtual machine before taking the snapshot.
Example of Creating a Virtual Machine in Driver Domain Mode When the Source
is not in Driver Domain Mode
The following command creates a virtual machine named my_vm_1 from the source
virtual machine named my source vm . The source virtual machine is not in driver
domain mode, the new virtual machine is in driver domain mode:
oakcli clone vm my_vm_1 -vm my source vm -snap [-force] [-driverdomain]
Example of Creating a Virtual Machine That is Not in Driver Domain Mode When
the Source is in Driver Domain Mode
When a virtual machine has the driver domain functionality enabled, you can clone a
guest virtual machine that does not use the driver domain option. In this example, the
source virtual machine, my source vm, is in driver domain mode. If you want to
create a guest virtual machine that does not use the domain mode, use the oakcli
clone vm without specifying the -driverdomain option.
The following command creates a virtual machine named my_vm_2 that is using the
source virtual machine named my source vm :
oakcli clone vm my_vm_2 -vm my source vm -snap [-force]
3.8 How to Manage Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform
Review these topics for an overview of virtual machines, and for procedures to create
and manage virtual machines.
Topics:
About Managing Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform (page 3-22)
Deploy virtual machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform to run other workloads that are independent of databases
running in ODA_BASE
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-21
How to Manage Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Listing the Virtual Machines in Your Repositories (page 3-22)
Creating a Virtual Machine (page 3-23)
Configuring a Virtual Machine (page 3-24)
Starting and Stopping a Virtual Machine (page 3-25)
Externally Configuring a Virtual Machine (page 3-25)
Opening a Virtual Machine Console for a Virtual Machine (page 3-25)
Creating an Image for a New Virtual Machine (page 3-26)
Setting Up a Virtual Machine for Access from eth0 Using an IP Address
(page 3-26)
Adding or Removing a Virtual Disk to or from a Virtual Machine (page 3-26)
Removing a Virtual Machine from a Shared Repository (page 3-26)
Performing a Live Migration for an Oracle Database Appliance Virtual Machine
(page 3-27)
If your system meets requirements for live migration, then you can use
the oakcli migrate vm command to migrate a virtual machine from
the currently running node to another node.
3.8.1 About Managing Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform
Deploy virtual machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform to run
other workloads that are independent of databases running in ODA_BASE
Use OAKCLI commands to create and manage virtual machines, including starting
and stopping them, and opening consoles for graphical user interface (GUI) access.
Note:
You can use a Virtual Network Computing (VNC) session to open a GUI
console for a virtual machine.
You can reconfigure an active virtual machine. However, your changes do not take
effect until you stop and restart the virtual machine. You can display high-level
information about all of your virtual machines, or display detailed information about
the configuration of single virtual machines. When you no longer have use for a
particular virtual machine, delete the virtual machine to regain storage.
3.8.2 Listing the Virtual Machines in Your Repositories
Use the oakcli show vm command to display a list of your existing virtual
machines.
The command displays the name, the repository, and the current state (online or
offline) for each virtual machine. The output also contains the default number of CPUs
and default amount of memory that Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
will assign to each virtual machine.
3-22 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Manage Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Examples
Displaying Details for All Virtual Machines
Display the virtual machine names, memory and vCPU allocations, status, virtual
disks, and repository name for all virtual machines:
oakcli show vm
NAME
---sample5_odarepo1
sample6_odarepo1
test1_odarepo1
test2_odarepo2
vm1_odarepo1
vm2_odarepo2
win_vm1
MEMORY
-----2048
2048
2048
2048
4096
2048
1500
VCPU
---2
2
2
2
4
2
1
STATE
----OFFLINE
OFFLINE
OFFLINE
OFFLINE
ONLINE
OFFLINE
ONLINE
REPOSITORY
---------odarepo1
odarepo2
odarepo1
odarepo2
odarepo1
odarepo2
odarepo1
Displaying Information for a Single Virtual Machine
Display information about the vm1_odarepo1 virtual machine:
oakcli show vm vm1_odarepo1
Resource: vm1_odarepo1
AutoStart
:
CPUPriority
:
Disks
:
Domain
ExpectedState
FailOver
IsSharedRepo
Keyboard
MaxMemory
MaxVcpu
Memory
Mouse
Name
Networks
NodeNum
NodeNumStart
OS
PrivateIP
ProcessorCap
RepoName
State
TemplateName
Vcpu
cpupool
vncport
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
restore
100
|file:/OVS/Repositories/odarepo1/Vi
rtualMachines/vm1_odarepo1/System.i
mg,xvda,w||file:/OVS/Repositories/o
darepo1/VirtualMachines/vm1_odarepo
1/u01.img,xvdb,w|
XEN_PVM
online
false
false
en-us
3000
4
4096
OS_DEFAULT
vm1_odarepo1
|mac=00:21:F6:00:00:E4|
0
OL_5
None
100
odarepo1
Online
otml_sample1_odarepo1
4
twocpu
5901
3.8.3 Creating a Virtual Machine
You can create or clone virtual machines from imported templates (or assemblies) or
from an existing virtual machine. A virtual machine can be a complete clone of the
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-23
How to Manage Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
template or assembly, or it can be a snap clone, which contains only the metadata
defined for the virtual machine.
See the section “How to Create Clones and Snap Clones of a Template” for more
details.
3.8.4 Configuring a Virtual Machine
Use the oakcli configure vm command to configure a virtual machine on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Include a -prefnode clause, to identify the node where you want the virtual
machine to run by default and a -failover clause to indicate if you want the virtual
machine to use the other node when the preferred node is not available (either at
startup or while already active).
If you reconfigure a virtual machine that is currently running, then your changes do
not take effect until you stop and restart the virtual machine.
Parameter
Description
-vcpu 2
Sets two (2) as the number of CPUs to be assigned to the virtual machine
when started
-cpuprio 150
Sets the CPU access priority to 150
-cpucap 20
Sets the maximum percentage of a CPU's capacity that will be assigned to
the virtual machine to 20%
-memory 1G
Sets the amount of memory assigned when the virtual machine starts to 1
GB
-cpupool
linpool
Specifies linpool as the CPU pool to be assigned to the virtual machine
-keyboard enus
Defines the keyboard type used to access the virtual machine as en-us
-mouse
USB_MOUSE
Defines the mouse type used to access the virtual machine as a USB
mouse
These values will override values assigned to these same parameters in the virtual
machine template from which this virtual machine was derived. The virtual machine
will use default values for parameters that are not defined in either the parent
template or in a configuration command.
Note:
CPU capacity is controlled by the CPU pool assigned to a virtual machine by
either the -cpupool parameter or by the default_unpinned_pool (if the
virtual machine is not configured with a -cpupool parameter). Values for vcpu and -maxvcpu parameters that are larger than the number of CPUs in
the assigned CPU pool are ignored.
3-24 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Manage Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Example of Configuring a Virtual Machine
Set values for specific resources in the virtual machine named myol15u_test:
oakcli configure vm myol5u_test
-vcpu 2 -cpuprio 150 -cpucap 20 -memory 1G
-cpupool linpool -keyboard en-us -mouse USB_MOUSE
3.8.5 Starting and Stopping a Virtual Machine
Use the oakcli start vm command to start a virtual machine on Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform. Similarly, use the oakcli stop vm command to
stop a virtual machine.
Note:
If you reconfigure a virtual machine that is currently running, then your
changes will not be effective until you stop and restart the virtual machine.
3.8.6 Externally Configuring a Virtual Machine
You can initially configure your virtual machines externally without connecting to the
virtual machine console. This is done using Oracle VM Guest Additions by passing
key-value pairs to the virtual machine. Use the oakcli modify vm -s command to
pass parameters to the virtual machine:
# oakcli modify vm vmname-s 'key1:value1;key2:value2...'
Example
The following example has two value pairs:
oakcli modify vm vmo16u3 -s 'com.oracle.linux.network.device.
0:eth0;com.oracle.linux.network.ipaddr.0:192.1.2.18'
Note:
•
Refer to the section "Using the Oracle VM Guest Additions" in the Oracle VM
Utilities Guide for x86 for more information about Oracle VM Guest
Additions.
•
Refer to the whitepaper Oracle Database Appliance: Automated Virtual
Machine Provisioning for more information.
Related Topics:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/database-appliance/
overview/oda-automatedvmprovisioning-2348232.pdf
3.8.7 Opening a Virtual Machine Console for a Virtual Machine
To open a virtual machine console window for an active virtual machine, run the
Oracle Appliance Manager oakcli show vmconsole command. If the console does
not display correctly, then close the console, set the DISPLAY environment variable to
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-25
How to Manage Virtual Machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
an appropriate value for your monitor, and then rerun the oakcli show
vmconsole command.
You can also configure your virtual machine (using oakcli modify vm command
with the -s parameter) to allow access from the OAKCLI command line instead of a
graphical user interface (GUI) virtual machine console.
Example
Open a console for the virtual machine named vm1_odarepo1:
oakcli show vmconsole vm1_odarepo1
3.8.8 Creating an Image for a New Virtual Machine
Use the oakcli clone vm command to create an image for a new virtual machine
on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform. By default, the image inherits the
content and configuration information from the template or from the virtual machine
that you are cloning and resides in the same repository as the source. Unless you are
using local repositories for your virtual machines, include the-node clause in the
oakcli clone command to identify the node that should run the cloning process. To
create a snap clone, which will only contain the configuration metadata, include the snap clause in the oakcli clone command.
3.8.9 Setting Up a Virtual Machine for Access from eth0 Using an IP Address
The following set of commands configures the virtual machine vmol6u3 (which has
ovmd) with the IP address 192.168.16.51 for the eth0 interface and sets the root
password to password123a.
oakcli
oakcli
oakcli
oakcli
oakcli
oakcli
oakcli
oakcli
oakcli
clone vm vmol6u3 -vmtemplate ol6u3 -repo shrepo -node 0
modify vm vmol6u3 -addnetwork priv1
start vm vmol6u3
modify vm vmol6u3 -s 'com.oracle.linux.network.device.0:eth0'
modify vm vmol6u3 -s 'com.oracle.linux.network.onboot.0:yes'
modify vm vmol6u3 -s 'com.oracle.linux.network.bootproto.0:static'
modify vm vmol6u3 -s 'com.oracle.linux.network.ipaddr.0:192.168.16.51'
modify vm vmol6u3 -s 'com.oracle.linux.network.netmask.0:255.255.255.0'
modify vm vmol6u3 -s 'com.oracle.linux.root-password:password123'
oakcli modify vm myol5u_test -attachvdisk sdisk1
oakcli delete vm my0l5u_test
3.8.10 Adding or Removing a Virtual Disk to or from a Virtual Machine
To add or remove a virtual disk, use the oakcli modify vm vm_name command
with an -attachvdisk or a -detachvdisk clause that names the virtual disk.
3.8.11 Removing a Virtual Machine from a Shared Repository
When you no longer have use for a particular virtual machine, use the oakcli
delete vm command to delete the virtual machine to reclaim storage and resources.
Example
Delete the ovu22 virtual machine from node 1:
oakcli delete vm ovu22 -server 1
3-26 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Manage High Availability on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
3.8.12 Performing a Live Migration for an Oracle Database Appliance Virtual Machine
If your system meets requirements for live migration, then you can use the oakcli
migrate vm command to migrate a virtual machine from the currently running node
to another node.
Live Migration refers to the process of moving a running virtual machine between
physical machines without disconnecting the client or application running in the
virtual machine. Memory, storage, and network connectivity of the virtual machine
are transferred from the original host machine to the destination.
You must meet the following requirements before performing a live migration:
•
The virtual machine must be on a shared repository and the repository must be
online on both nodes.
•
The virtual machine must be running.
•
The destination host must have the required resources (memory, CPUs and so on)
for successful migration.
•
The destination host must have a CPU pool with the same name as the CPU pool
of the virtual machine that is being migrated.
Use the oakcli migrate vm vmname command to migrate a virtual machine from
the currently running node to another node. vname is the name of the virtual machine
to be migrated.
When you run this command, the virtual machine must be online and corresponding,
and the shared repository must be online on both nodes. If a virtual machine is in the
migration process, then OAKCLI will display the virtual machine state as MIGRATING.
Example 3-19 Example of Migrating a Virtual Machine from the Currently Running
Node to Another Node
This example migrates a virtual machine named myvm1
oakcli migrate vm myvm1
3.9 How to Manage High Availability on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform
Use the oakcli configure vm command to configure high availability services for
your virtual machines.
A system that is highly available is designed to provide uninterrupted computing
services during essential time periods, during most hours of the day, and during most
days of the week throughout the year. Reliability, recoverability, timely error
detection, and continuous operations are primary characteristics of a highly available
solution. Two essential parts of high availability are automatic restart and failover.
Unless you are using local repositories, you can set high availability options for your
virtual machines. High availability options identify the node where the virtual
machine should be started by default and whether the virtual machine should be
failed over to the other node. Failover can occur if the node where the virtual machine
is already running fails or if the preferred node is not available when the virtual
machines attempt to start.
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-27
How to Manage CPU Pools on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Configuring Automatic Restart for High Availability
A virtual machine automatically restarts after a hardware or software failure or
whenever your database host computer restarts. Use the oakcli configure vm
command to start a virtual machine on a preferred node by using the-prefnode
option.
Configuring Failover for High Availability
Configuring failover provides high availability by enabling a virtual machine to restart
on the other node after an unplanned failure, without requiring manual intervention.
Use the command oakcli configure vm with the -failover option to configure
fail over from one node to another.
3.10 How to Manage CPU Pools on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform
These topics describe how to use OAKCLI to create and manage CPU pools on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Topics:
About Managing CPU Pools for Resource Allocation (page 3-28)
Use CPU pools to cage and manage resource allocations to workloads
for virtual machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platforms.
About Over-Subscribed CPU Pools (page 3-30)
Configure virtual machines so that they do not subscribe to more CPU
resources than the resources available in CPU pools.
Creating a New CPU Pool on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Nodes (page 3-30)
Use the command oakcli create cpupool to create a CPU pool.
Showing the CPU Pools Configured on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform Nodes (page 3-30)
Use the command oakcli show cpupool command to display the
CPUs assigned to each defined CPU pool.
Changing the Number of CPUs Assigned to a CPU Pool on Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform Nodes (page 3-30)
Use the oakcli configure cpupool command to change the
number of CPUs assigned to a CPU pool.
Assigning a Virtual Machine to a CPU Pool on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform (page 3-31)
Use the command oakcli configure vm to assign a virtual machine
to a CPU pool.
3.10.1 About Managing CPU Pools for Resource Allocation
Use CPU pools to cage and manage resource allocations to workloads for virtual
machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
Workloads are isolated by creating CPU pools and assigning (pinning) virtual
machines to a specific CPU pool. When you pin a virtual machine to a CPU pool, you
ensure that the virtual machine uses CPUs in only that CPU pool.
3-28 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Manage CPU Pools on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
When you initially configure Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform, a
default-unpinned-pool is created on each node. The size of this pool depends on the
hardware model:
•
On Oracle Database Appliance X6-2-HA Virtualized Platform, the defaultunpinned-pool contains 40 CPUs.
•
On Oracle Database Appliance X5-2 Virtualized Platform, the default-unpinnedpool contains 72 CPUs.
•
On Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 Virtualized Platform, the default-unpinnedpool contains 48 CPUs.
•
On Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 Virtualized Platform, the default-unpinnedpool contains 32 CPUs.
•
On Oracle Database Appliance Version 1 Virtualized Platform, the defaultunpinned-pool contains 24 CPUs.
When you create the ODA_BASE domain, a new CPU pool is created on both nodes.
The pool is named odaBaseCpuPool. The CPUs requierd for this pool are removed
from the default-unpinned-pool. ODA_BASE is the only domain allowed to use the
CPUs in the odaBaseCpuPool. When you start other virtual machines, the virtual
machines run on CPUs that are left in the default-unpinned-pool, effectively removing
ODA_BASE from the work being done by other virtual machines.
You can also cage groups of virtual machines by creating additional CPU pools. These
additional pools enable you to pin a virtual machine, or a set of virtual machines, to its
own CPU pool. Virtual machines running in a specific CPU pool do not share CPU
cycles with virtual machines running in other CPU pools. Define as many CPU pools
as you want, up to the number of available CPUs on your system.
If your application requirements change over time, then Oracle recommends that you
resize, add, or drop CPU pools as needed to make the best use of your resources. You
may also want to resize ODA_BASE. However, if you want to resize ODA_BASE, then
you must use a special command that also updates your Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform license.
Example 3-20
Example of Showing CPU Pools on a Node
A CPU pool can have a different size on each node (except for the odaBaseCpuPool),
as shown by the following oakcli show cpupool commands, one for each node:
oakcli show cpupool -node 0
Pool
Cpu List
default-unpinned-pool [14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 2
1, 22, 23]
twocpu
[12, 13]
odaBaseCpuPool [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
10, 11]
oakcli show cpupool -node 1
Pool
Cpu List
default-unpinned-pool [12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 1
9, 20, 21, 22, 23]
odaBaseCpuPool [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
10,11]
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-29
How to Manage CPU Pools on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
3.10.2 About Over-Subscribed CPU Pools
Configure virtual machines so that they do not subscribe to more CPU resources than
the resources available in CPU pools.
A CPU resource can belong to one, and only one, CPU pool. You can assign multiple
virtual machines to a CPU pool. A CPU pool becomes oversubscribed when the virtual
machines that are active in the pool require more CPUs than you configured for the
pool. For example, if a CPU pool has four CPUs, then you can start two virtual
machines that are defined to use four CPUs each. In this case, the CPU pool is
oversubscribed, because each of the four CPUs is supporting two virtual machines.
If you stop one of those virtual machines, but start another one that requires two
CPUs, then the CPU pool is still oversubscribed. This is because two of the CPUs are
supporting both virtual machines. When oversubscribing a CPU pool, assess the
performance of the virtual machines in that pool. Reassign one or more virtual
machines to a different CPU pool if sharing an oversubscribed pool degrades
performance to unacceptable levels.
3.10.3 Creating a New CPU Pool on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Nodes
Use the command oakcli create cpupool to create a CPU pool.
Manage resource use by creating CPU pools, and then assign these resources to virtual
machines.
Example 3-21 Example of Creating a New CPU Pool on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform Nodes
This example creates a CPU pool named winpool that is allocated 4 CPUs on Node 0:
oakcli create cpupool winpool -numcpu 4 -node 0
3.10.4 Showing the CPU Pools Configured on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform Nodes
Use the command oakcli show cpupool command to display the CPUs assigned
to each defined CPU pool.
You can use oakcli show cpupool to display any virtual machines assigned to
each CPU pool.
Example 3-22 Example of Showing CPUs Assigned to Defined CPU Pools on
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Nodes
This oakcli show cpupool example shows the CPUs assigned to each defined
CPU pool on Node 0:
oakcli show cpupool -node 0
3.10.5 Changing the Number of CPUs Assigned to a CPU Pool on Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform Nodes
Use the oakcli configure cpupool command to change the number of CPUs
assigned to a CPU pool.
3-30 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
About Network Infrastructure and Virtual Local Area Networks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
An Oracle VM Server can belong to only one virtual pool. However, you can change
the resources allocated to a virtual pool to increase the CPU resources available to the
virtual machine.
Example 3-23 Example of Changing the Number of CPUs Assigned to a CPU Pool
on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Nodes
This oakcli configure cpupool example changes the number of CPUs assigned
to the CPU pool named linpool on Node 1. After the command runs, the new
number of CPU resources assigned to the CPU are six.
oakcli configure cpupool linpool -numcpu 6 -node 1
3.10.6 Assigning a Virtual Machine to a CPU Pool on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform
Use the command oakcli configure vm to assign a virtual machine to a CPU
pool.
Review the availability of CPU pools on nodes as part of your placement policy for
virtual machines on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platforms.
If your virtual machine is assigned to a specific CPU pool, and the virtual machine is
allowed to fail over, then the virtual machine attempts to use the same CPU pool on
the secondary node. If the CPU pool exists on the other node, but the CPU pool is a
different size, then the performance of your virtual machine can be affected when it
runs on the secondary node. If the assigned CPU pool does not exist on the secondary
node, then the virtual machine cannot fail over.
Note:
Do not manage odaBaseCpuPool by using oakcli cpupool commands.
Instead, use commands that configure ODA_BASE, as discussed in "How to
Resize ODA_BASE."
Example 3-24 Example of Assigning a Virtual Machine to a CPU Pool on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
This oakcli configure vm example pins the virtual machine named wintest to
the CPU pool named winpool:
oakcli configure vm wintest -cpupool winpool
3.11 About Network Infrastructure and Virtual Local Area Networks on
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
To specify which network you want to use to access a virtual machine, you employ
network infrastructure components of Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform.
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform manages all of the high-level network
infrastructure components for you by pre-creating the bridges for all networks. The
front-end point for accessing a virtual machine is one of the bridges defined for Dom0.
The network interfaces differ, depending on your Oracle Database Appliance
hardware. In all cases, connections to user domains are through the selected interfaces.
Refer to the tables for your Oracle Database Appliance. Refer to the figure "Basic
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-31
About Network Infrastructure and Virtual Local Area Networks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Virtual Machine Local Area Network" for an overview of network interface
configuration.
Oracle Database Appliance Version 1 Virtualized Platform Network Interfaces
The following table lists the default network interfaces for Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform on Oracle Database Appliance version 1 (systems without an
external storage shelf).
Table 3-1 Oracle Database Appliance Version 1 Virtualized Platform Network
Interfaces
Type
Interfaces at
Dom0
Bond Devices at
Dom0
Bridge in
Dom0
Interfaces in
ODA_BASE Domain
Private
eth0
bond0
priv1
eth0
bond1
net1
eth1
bond2
net2
eth2
bond3
net3
eth3
xbond0
net4
eth4
eth1
On Board
Public
eth2
1st Pair Quad
Port
eth4
2nd Pair Quad
Port
eth6
10-GbE
Interface
eth8
eth3
eth5
eth7
eth9
Note:
If you define a fiber (instead of copper) public network connection, then
bond0 is configured on PCIe boards.
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Network Interfaces for Oracle
Database Appliance X3-2 and later
The following two tables the default network interfaces for Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform on Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 and later (systems with an
external storage shelf).
Table 3-2 Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform Dual Port 10-GbE
Network Interfaces (Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 and later)
Interfaces at Dom0
1.
eth0
2.
eth1
Bond Devices at Dom0 Bridge in Dom0 Interfaces in
ODA_BASE Domain
icbond0
3-32 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
priv1
eth0
About Network Infrastructure and Virtual Local Area Networks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Table 3-3 Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform On Board Quad Port 10GbE Network Interfaces (Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 and Later)
Interfaces at Dom0
1.
eth2
2.
eth3
1.
eth4
2.
eth5
Bond Devices at Dom0
Bridge in Dom0 Interfaces in
ODA_BASE Domain
bond0
net1
eth1
bond1
net2
eth2
Note:
If you define a fiber (instead of copper) public network connection, then
bond0 is configured on PCIe boards.
Configuration Overview of Oracle Database Appliance Virtual Machine Local
Area Networks
When you configure a virtual machine, you define which network the virtual machine
should use by identifying the related bridge.
For example, to connect a virtual machine named myvm1 to the net1 network, you
would use the following command:
oakcli modify vm myvm1 -addnetwork net1
The illustration “Basic Virtual Machine Local Area Network" shows a typical Oracle
Database Appliance local area network configuration that results from this virtual
machine network configuration:
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-33
About Network Infrastructure and Virtual Local Area Networks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
Figure 3-3
Basic Virtual Machine Local Area Network
You assign default Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) to ODA_BASE during the
installation and configuration of Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform. The
figure "Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform with Virtual Local Area
Networks" shows a typical Oracle Database Appliance configuration using VLANs.
The illustration shows the same configuration as in "Basic Virtual Machine Local Area
Networks," but with three tagged VLANs added for backups (backup), for
applications (application), and for management (mgnt).
3-34 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Managing Virtual Local Area Networks on User Domains and on ODA_BASE
Figure 3-4
Networks
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform with Virtual Local Area
3.12 Managing Virtual Local Area Networks on User Domains and on
ODA_BASE
Use these examples to understand how to configure and manage virtual local area
networks (VLANs).
To manage VLANs for user domains, log in to ODA_BASE. To manage VLANs for
ODA_BASE, log in to Dom0. The examples in this section use a VLAN named
sample10.
Note:
You can configure VLANs on the physical switches from Dom0 before
deploying Oracle Database Appliance or Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform.
Example 3-25
1.
Example of Creating a Virtual Local Area Network
Prepare the following information to create a VLAN:
•
A VLAN name that is unique on the node where the VLAN is created (but
which can be the same as a VLAN name on the other node of Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform).
•
A VLAN tag number between 2 to 4096 inclusive that is unique on the node
where the VLAN is created (but which can be the same as a VLAN tag
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-35
Managing Virtual Local Area Networks on User Domains and on ODA_BASE
number on the other node of Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform).
2.
•
The name of the interface on which the VLAN is to be created. Find the
available interfaces for your hardware listed in the Bond Devices at Dom0
column in the tables in "About Network Infrastructure and Virtual Local Area
Networks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform."
•
The node on which to create the VLAN
Enter the following command to start creating the VLAN. Enter the information
you have prepared when prompted:
oakcli create vlan
Note:
If you need to create the same VLAN on both nodes, then enter the command
oakcli create vlan twice: once for node 0 and once for node 1.
The following oakcli create vlan example creates the VLAN sample10 on node
0:
oakcli create vlan sample10 -vlanid 10 -if bond0 -node 0
Caution:
If you are planning to use a VLAN with a virtual machine created in a shared
repository, then create that VLAN on both nodes. A virtual machine fails if an
assigned network is not available on the node where the virtual machine is
configured to run by default, or where the virtual machine is configured to
start up following a failover.
Example 3-26 Example of Assigning and Removing a Virtual Local Area Network
for a User Domain
Use the oakcli modify vm command with the option -addnetwork to assign an
existing VLAN to a virtual machine and with a -deletenetwork clause to remove a
VLAN from a virtual machine. The clauses must also contain the name of the VLAN.
The following oakcli modify vm example assigns the sample10 VLAN to the
virtual machine myol5u_test:
oakcli modify vm myol5u_test -addnetwork sample10
Example 3-27 Example of Assigning and Removing a Virtual Local Area Network
for ODA_BASE
Use the command oakcli configure oda_base to add an existing VLAN to
ODA_BASE, or to remove a VLAN from ODA_BASE. Note that this command also
enables you to resize ODA_BASE and domain memory size. If you only want to
manage VLANs, then enter the number that corresponds to the number of your
current CPU cores and the current number for your memory.
In the following partial example, the CPU core count and default memory values are
left unchanged, while the VLAN test01 is assigned to ODA_BASE. Note that the
3-36 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Managing Virtual Local Area Networks on User Domains and on ODA_BASE
current CPU core count, 6, corresponds to selection number 3 in the Core Licensing
Options list of values.
# oakcli configure oda_base
Core Licensing Options:
1. 2 CPU Cores
2. 4 CPU Cores
3. 6 CPU Cores
4. 8 CPU Cores
5. 10 CPU Cores
6. 12 CPU Cores
Current CPU Cores
:6
Selection[1 : 6](default 12 CPU Cores) : 3
ODA base domain memory in GB(min 8, max 88)(Current Memory 48G)[default
64]
: 48
INFO: Using default memory size i.e. 64 GB
Additional vlan networks to be assigned to oda_base? (y/n) [n]: y
Select the network to assign (test00,test01,test02,test03): test01
Additional vlan networks to be assigned to oda_base? (y/n) [n]:
Vlan network to be removed from oda_base (y/n) [n]:
INFO: . . .
Example 3-28
Example of Viewing Virtual Local Area Networks
To see what VLANs currently exist in ODA_BASE, run the oakcli show vlan
command.
The following example shows VLANs in addition to the sample10 VLAN used in
previous examples:
oakcli show vlan
NAME
---net1
net1
net2
net2
net3
net3
net10
net10
ID
-1
1
1
1
2
4
20
20
Example 3-29
INTERFACE
--------bond0
bond0
bond1
bond1
bond1
bond0
bond1
bond1
NODENUM
------0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
Example of Deleting Virtual Local Area Networks
To remove an unwanted VLAN from a node, use the oakcli delete vlan
command and provide the VLAN name and the node number.
This example remove the VLAN sample10 from node 0 (where the VLAN was
assigned in the earlier oakcli create vlan example):
oakcli delete vlan sample10 -node 0
Note:
You cannot delete a native VLAN. A native VLAN is a virtual local area
network configured during the deployment of Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform software.
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-37
How to Resize ODA_BASE
3.13 How to Resize ODA_BASE
You can increase or decrease the number of CPU cores that you assign the ODA_BASE
domain to add or reduce computing power and memory as required for your
workloads.
Topics:
About Resizing ODA_BASE (page 3-38)
Oracle recommends that you use the following guidelines in reviewing
your ODA_BASE resource allocation, and in carrying out resizing.
Changing the ODA_BASE Core Count (page 3-38)
3.13.1 About Resizing ODA_BASE
Oracle recommends that you use the following guidelines in reviewing your
ODA_BASE resource allocation, and in carrying out resizing.
Increase the number of CPU cores assigned to the ODA_BASE domain on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform if you need more computing power or
memory for your installed Oracle databases. Alternatively, decrease the CPU cores if
you need more CPUs assigned to your virtual machine domains. You must increase or
decrease the assigned CPU core count on each node by two or multiples of two.
Oracle recommends that you use templates to size the databases that you deploy in
ODA_BASE, following the guidelines in Appendix A of Oracle Database Appliance
Getting Started Guide. Sum the number of CPUs that these databases require, using the
tables in that appendix, and divide the value by two to determine the number of CPU
cores that you require for ODA_BASE.
The ODA_BASE domain shuts down during the resizing process. For this reason, plan
to change your ODA_BASE core count either when there is no critical activity running
on your Oracle databases, or when you schedule a planned maintenance window.
3.13.2 Changing the ODA_BASE Core Count
After you have performed the pre-requisites described previously, complete these
steps to change the ODA_BASE core count.
1. Log in to Dom0 and run the oakcli configure oda_base command as shown
in this example, which changes the CPU core count from six to eight in
ODA_BASE:
# oakcli configure oda_base
Core Licensing Options:
1. 2 CPU Cores
2. 4 CPU Cores
3. 6 CPU Cores
4. 8 CPU Cores
5. 10 CPU Cores
6. 12 CPU Cores
Current CPU Cores
:6
Selection[1 : 6](default 12 CPU Cores) : 10
ODA base domain memory in GB(min 8, max 88)(Current Memory 64G)[default
32]
:
INFO: Using default memory size i.e. 32 GB
Additional vlan networks to be assigned to oda_base? (y/n) [n]:
Vlan network to be removed from oda_base (y/n) [n]
INFO: Node 0:Configured oda base pool
3-38 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
How to Resize ODA_BASE
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
Node 1:Configured oda base pool
Node 0:ODA Base configured with new memory
Node 0:ODA Base configured with new vcpus
Changes will be incorporated after the domain is restarted on Node 0
Node 1:ODA Base configured with new memory
Node 1:ODA Base configured with new vcpus
Changes will be incorporated after the domain is restarted on Node 1
2. Perform any actions listed in the output from the command. Not all versions of the
software, such as the one shown in the preceding example, require any additional
actions before restarting ODA_BASE.
3. Restart the domain to implement the changed configuration for ODA_BASE by
running the following restart command on Dom0 of both nodes:
oakcli restart oda_base
Managing Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform 3-39
How to Resize ODA_BASE
3-40 Administration and Reference Guide
4
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line
Interface
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface (OAKCLI) is a command line
interface (CLI) dedicated to Oracle Database Appliance.
Topics:
About the Oracle Appliance Manager Command-line Interface (OAKCLI)
(page 4-3)
The oakcli commands are the primary method for performing
database and system administration on Oracle Database Appliance, and
on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Managing OAKCLI Privileges and Security with SUDO (page 4-5)
Oracle Appliance Manager command-line utility requires root system
privileges for most administration actions. You may want to use SUDO
as part of your system auditing and security policy.
oakcli add disk -local (page 4-7)
Use the oakcli add disk -local command to add a local disk to
the system after physically replacing a failed disk.
oakcli apply (page 4-7)
Use the oakcli apply command from Node 0 to reconfigure your
Oracle Database Appliance core capacity.
oakcli clone commands (page 4-8)
Use the oakcli clone commands to clone virtual machines or virtual
disks.
oakcli configure commands (page 4-11)
Use the oakcli configure commands to configure components on
Oracle Database Appliance.
oakcli copy (page 4-22)
Use the oakcli copy command to prepare a copy of the configuration
file for use during the configuration of Oracle Database Appliance.
oakcli create commands (page 4-23)
Use the oakcli create commands to create components on Oracle
Database Appliance.
oakcli delete commands (page 4-33)
Use the oakcli delete commands to delete components from Oracle
Database Appliance.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-1
oakcli deploy (page 4-38)
Use the command oakcli deploy to deploy Oracle Grid
Infrastructure for a cluster on Oracle Database Appliance.
oakcli describe-cpucore (page 4-39)
Use the oakcli describe-cpucore command to display the current
core configuration and the modification date and time.
oakcli expand storage (page 4-40)
oakcli diskwritecache (page 4-40)
Use the oakcli diskwritecache command to locate disks with write
cache enabled and to disable disk write cache for those disks.
oakcli import vmtemplate (page 4-41)
Use the oakcli import vmtemplate command to import virtual
machine templates.
oakcli locate disk (page 4-43)
Use the oakcli locate disk command to locate the physical disk
that is associated with a named Oracle ASM disk by turning the disk's
LED light on or off.
oakcli manage diagcollect (page 4-43)
Use the oakcli manage diagcollect command to collect diagnostic
information about Oracle Database Appliance for troubleshooting
purposes, and for working with Oracle Support Services.
oakcli migrate vm (page 4-44)
Use the oakcli migrate vm command to migrate a currently running
virtual machine to another node.
oakcli modify commands (page 4-45)
Use the oakcli modify commands to modify the database, an existing
virtual machine or virtual machine template.
oakcli orachk (page 4-47)
Use the oakcli orachk command to audit configuration settings with
the ORAchk utility.
oakcli reconfigure osparams (page 4-49)
Use the oakcli reconfigure osparams command to adjust the
kernel parameters based on the available RAM after you upgrade
memory or DIMM.
oakcli resize dbstorage (page 4-50)
Use the oakcli resize dbstorage command to resize the space
used for a storage structure that was created for the purpose of
migrating databases from Oracle ASM to Oracle ACFS.
oakcli restart oda_base (page 4-50)
Use the oakcli restart oda_base command to stop and restart
ODA_BASE on the local node.
oakcli show commands (page 4-51)
Use the oakcli show commands to display the status of Oracle
Database Appliance components.
4-2 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
About the Oracle Appliance Manager Command-line Interface (OAKCLI)
oakcli start commands (page 4-72)
Use the oakcli start commands to start a virtual machine, to start a
shared repository on a node, or to start ODA_BASE on the local node.
oakcli stop command (page 4-73)
Use the oakcli stop command to stop a virtual machine, to stop a
shared repository on a node, or to stop ODA_BASE on the local node.
oakcli stordiag (page 4-74)
Use the oakcli stordiag command to run diagnostic tests on a disk
in the storage shelf or storage expansion shelf.
oakcli test asr (page 4-75)
Use the oakcli test asr command to send a test trap to determine if
Oracle Auto Service Request (Oracle ASR) is configured and working
correctly.
oakcli unpack (page 4-75)
Use the oakcli unpack command to unpack packages into the Oracle
Appliance Manager repository.
oakcli update (page 4-76)
Use the oakcli update command to apply Oracle Database Appliance
patches.
oakcli update-cpucore (page 4-78)
oakcli upgrade (page 4-79)
Use the oakcli upgrade command to upgrade the Oracle Database
software on Oracle Database Appliance.
oakcli validate (page 4-80)
Validates the state of an Oracle Database Appliance or the viability of an
operating system patch.
4.1 About the Oracle Appliance Manager Command-line Interface
(OAKCLI)
The oakcli commands are the primary method for performing database and system
administration on Oracle Database Appliance, and on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform.
You can perform the following tasks with OAKCLI commands:
•
List the hardware components
•
Validate and diagnose the hardware components
•
Install and upgrade software
•
Apply software patches
•
Create and drop databases
•
Install and uninstall Oracle Homes
•
Deploy and manage virtual machines
•
Test Oracle Auto Service Request (Oracle ASR)
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-3
About the Oracle Appliance Manager Command-line Interface (OAKCLI)
•
Enable CPU cores
Depending on your version of Oracle Appliance Manager and your hardware, some of
the OAKCLI commands may not be available to you. To see which OAKCLI
commands are supported on your version of Oracle Appliance Manager and your
hardware, run the help command for OAKCLI: oakcli -h
OAKCLI Command Location and Path Configuration
The Oracle Appliance Manager command-line interface is in the following directory:
/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli
Configure the root user account on your Oracle Database Appliance servers to have
the PATH variable defined to search for oakcli commands in the path /opt/
oracle/oak/bin/oakcli.
OAKCLI Syntax
Oracle Appliance Manager command-line interface commands and parameters are
case-insensitive.
An oakcli command uses the following command syntax:
oakcli command object [options]
•
command is an action you want to perform on the appliance. For example: show,
locate, apply.
•
object is the target or object on which the oakcli command performs the
operation. For example, you issue a command to create or configure a disk, or a
controller, or perform other system or software administration. You can also use
object abbreviations.
•
options are optional parts of the oakcli command. Options can consist of one
or more options that extend the use of the oakcli command carried out on an
object. Options include additional information about the action that you want to
perform on the object. Option names are preceded with a dash. Many options
require the name of an object for the command to perform the action that you
want to carry out. The help option (-h) is an option that is available with every
command. When you include the -h option, you can obtain additional
information about the command that you want to perform.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command-Line Interface Help
Run the following command to see the usage information for all oakcli commands
available for your Oracle Database Appliance:
oakcli -h
Run the following command to see detailed help about a specific oakcli command:
oakcli command -h
Run the following command to see detailed help about a specific oakcli command
carried out on an object, and the options that are available for you to use with that
object.
oakcli command object -h
4-4 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Managing OAKCLI Privileges and Security with SUDO
4.2 Managing OAKCLI Privileges and Security with SUDO
Oracle Appliance Manager command-line utility requires root system privileges for
most administration actions. You may want to use SUDO as part of your system
auditing and security policy.
For most tasks, Oracle recommends that you log in as root to use the Oracle
Appliance Manager command-line interface on Oracle Database Appliance. If you are
not logged in as root, then you cannot carry out most actions on the appliance. For
example, if you are not logged in as root, then you can view storage information, but
you cannot modify the storage.
Allowing Root User Access Using SUDO
In environments where system administration is handled by a different group than
database administration, or where security is a significant concern, you may want to
limit access to the root user account and password. SUDO enables system
administrators to grant certain users (or groups of users) the ability to run commands
as root, while logging all commands and arguments as part of your security and
compliance protocol.
A SUDO security policy is configured by using the file /etc/sudoers. Within the
sudoers file, you can configure groups of users and sets of commands to simplify
and audit server administration with SUDO commands.
Caution:
Configuring SUDO to allow a user to perform any operation is equivalent to
giving that user root privileges. Consider carefully if this is appropriate for
your security needs.
SUDO Example 1: Allow a User to Perform Any OAKCLI Operation
This example shows how to configure SUDO to enable a user to perform any OAKCLI
operation. You do this by adding lines to the commands section in the /etc/sudoers
file:
## The commands section may have other options added to it.
##
Cmnd_Alias OAKCLI_CMDS=/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli *
jdoe ALL = OAKCLI_CMDS
In this example, the user name isjdoe. The file parameter setting ALL=
OAKCLI_CMDS grants the user jdoe permission to run all oakcli commands that are
defined by the command alias OAKCLI_CMDS. After configuration, you can copy one
sudoers file to multiple hosts. You can also create different rules on each host.
Note:
Before database creation, you must set up user equivalency with SSH for the
root user on each server. If you do not set up user equivalency and configure
SSH on each server, then you are prompted to provide the root password for
each server during database creation.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-5
Managing OAKCLI Privileges and Security with SUDO
After you configure the sudoer file with the user, the user jdoe can run the set of
oakcli commands configured with the command alias OAKCLI_CMDS. For example:
$ sudo oakcli create database -db newdb
INFO: 2015-08-05 14:40:55: Look at the logfile '/opt/oracle/oak/log/scaoda1011/
tools/12.1.2.4.0/createdb_newdb_91715.log' for more details
INFO: 2015-08-05 14:40:59: Database parameter file is not provided. Will be using
default parameters for DB creation
Please enter the 'SYSASM' password : (During deployment we set the SYSASM password
to 'welcome1'):
Please re-enter the 'SYSASM' password:
INFO: 2015-08-05 14:41:10: Installing a new home: OraDb12102_home3 at /u01/app/
oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_3
Please select one of the following for Database type [1 .. 3]:
1
=> OLTP
2
=> DSS
3
=> In-Memory
SUDO Example 2: Allow a User to Perform Only Selected OAKCLI Operations
To configure SUDO to allow a user to perform only selected OAKCLI operations, add
lines to the commands section in the /etc/sudoers file as follows:
[[email protected] ~]$ sudo /opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli create database -db test
INFO: 2015-09-30 15:49:07: Look at the logfile '/opt/oracle/oak/log/servernode1/
tools/12.1.2.4.0/createdb_test_59955.log' for more details
INFO: 2015-09-30 15:49:12: Database parameter file is not provided. Will be using
default parameters for DB creation
Please enter the 'SYSASM' password : (During deployment we set the SYSASM password
to 'welcome1'):
Please re-enter the 'SYSASM' password:
INFO: 2015-09-30 15:49:27: Installing a new home: OraDb12102_home2 at /u01/app/
oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_2
Please select one of the following for Database type [1 .. 3]:
1
=> OLTP
2
=> DSS
3
=> In-Memory
In this example, the user jdoe2 tries to run the oakcli show databases
command, which is not part of the set of commands that is configured for that user.
Sudo prevents jdoe2 from running the command.
[[email protected] ~]$ sudo /opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli show database
Sorry, user jdoe2 is not allowed to execute '/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli show
database' as root on servernode1.
4-6 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli add disk -local
See Also:
The SUDO man pages for more information about configuring and using
SUDO:
http://www.sudo.ws/sudo.html
4.3 oakcli add disk -local
Use the oakcli add disk -local command to add a local disk to the system after
physically replacing a failed disk.
Syntax
oakcli add disk -local
Usage Notes
•
You cannot add more than two disks per node.
•
You must remove the failed drive and replace it with a new drive before running
the oakcli add disk -local command.
•
The new disk must be inserted into the slot before you run this command.
•
The oakcli add disk -local command is supported only on bare metal
deployments. It is not supported on virtualized configurations.
4.4 oakcli apply
Use the oakcli apply command from Node 0 to reconfigure your Oracle Database
Appliance core capacity.
Syntax
Use the following syntax where core_config_key_file is the full path name of a
configuration key file generated on My Oracle Support and copied to Oracle Database
Appliance:
oakcli apply core_configuration_key core_config_key_file [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
core_config_key_file
Identifies the full path and name of the configuration key file
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
•
This command applies only to bare metal deployments.
•
Run the oakcli apply command from the first node in Oracle Database
Appliance as the root user.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-7
oakcli clone commands
•
After you run the oakcli apply command, Oracle Database Appliance applies
the key to both nodes and reboots both nodes. Run the oakcli show
core_config_key command to view the core configuration key.
•
The core key application is applicable only to bare metal implementations. It is not
available on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Example 4-1
Reconfiguring Oracle Database Appliance with a New Core Count
Reconfigure Oracle Database Appliance with a new core count using the configuration
key file /tmp/set8cores.conf:
oakcli apply core_configuration_key /tmp/set8cores.conf
...................done
INFO: Cluster will be rebooted after applying the core_configuration_key successfully
INFO: ....................................
INFO: Applying core_configuration_key on '192.0.2.21'
INFO: ........................................................................
INFO: Running as root: /usr/bin/ssh -1 root 192.0.2.21 /tmp/tmp_lic_exec.pl
INFO: Running as root: /usr/bin/ssh -1 root 192.0.2.21 /opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli
enforce core_configuration_key /tmp/.lic_file
INFO: Applying core_configuration_key on '192.0.2.20'
INFO: ........................................................................
INFO: Running as root: /usr/bin/ssh -1 root 192.0.2.20 /tmp/tmp_lic_exec.pl
INFO: Running as root: /usr/bin/ssh -1 root 192.0.2.20 /opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli
enforce core_configuration_key /tmp/.lic_file
INFO: Applying core_configuration_key on '192.0.2.20'
Related Topics:
oakcli show core_config_key (page 4-55)
Use the oakcli show core_config_key command to display
information about how to deploy your Oracle Database Appliance cores.
4.5 oakcli clone commands
Use the oakcli clone commands to clone virtual machines or virtual disks.
Topics:
oakcli clone vdisk (page 4-8)
Use the oakcli clone vdisk command to create clones of virtual
disks.
oakcli clone vm (page 4-9)
Use the oakcli clone vm command to create clones and snap clones
of virtual machines.
4.5.1 oakcli clone vdisk
Use the oakcli clone vdisk command to create clones of virtual disks.
Syntax
oakcli clone vdisk new_vdisk_name -repo repo_name -src source_vdisk_name [-h]
4-8 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli clone commands
Parameters
Parameter
Description
new_vdisk_name
Name given to the clone virtual disk
repo_name
Name of the repository source for the virtual disk being cloned
source_vdisk_name
Name of the virtual disk being cloned
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage
The virtual disk and vm.cfg files are stored in the following directories:
•
Dom0: /Repositories/vm_repo_name/.ACFS/snaps/vm_name/
VirtualMachines/vm_name
•
ODA_BASE: /app/sharedrepo/vm_repo_name/.ACFS/snaps/vm_name/
VirtualMachines/vm_name
Example 4-2
Cloning a Virtual Disk
Clone a virtual disk named my_vdisk2 from an existing virtual disk named vdisk1
that is stored in the repository named vrepo1:
oakcli clone vdisk my_vdisk2 -repo vrepo1 -src vdisk1
4.5.2 oakcli clone vm
Use the oakcli clone vm command to create clones and snap clones of virtual
machines.
Syntax
To create a virtual machine from a template:
oakcli clone vm vm_name -vmtemplate template_name -repo repo_name [-node 0|1] [driverdomain]
To create a snapshot clone of an existing virtual machine:
oakcli clone vm vm_name -vm src_vm_name -snap [-force] [-driverdomain]
To create a virtual machine snapshot from a template:
oakcli clone vm <vm_name> -vmtemplate src_vmtempl_name -snap [-driverdomain]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-vmvm_name
Identifies the name given to the new cloned virtual machine.
-vmtemplate
template_name
Identifies the name of the template containing the virtual
machine that you want to clone.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-9
oakcli clone commands
Parameter
Description
-repo repo_name
Identifies the name of the repository that contains the template
being cloned.
-node 0 | 1
Identifies the Oracle Database Appliance node that contains the
shared repository from which the virtual machine is to be
cloned.
-vm src_name
Identifies the name of the virtual machine that is to be cloned.
-snap
(Optional) Creates a snapshot of the source virtual machine or
virtual machine template.
-driverdomain
(Optional) Creates the virtual machine with the driver domain
option.
The driver domain option improves performance by enabling
guest virtual machines to use ODA_BASE instead of Dom0 to
access virtual disks. Newly created virtual disks are mounted
directly from ODA_BASE to a guest virtual machine.
-force
(Optional) When cloning a source virtual machine, the -force
option enables you to make a change from the source virtual
machine. For example, if the source file does not use a driver
domain, you can use -force -driverdomain to create a
clone virtual machine that does use the driver domain.
-h
(Optional) Displays help for using the command.
Usage Notes
•
The -node parameter must be used when you clone from a shared repository.
The -node parameter is invalid for non-shared repositories.
•
The virtual disk and vm.cfg files are stored in the following directories:
–
Dom0: /Repositories/vm_repo_name/.ACFS/snaps/vm_name/
VirtualMachines/vm_name
–
ODA_BASE: /app/sharedrepo/vm_repo_name/.ACFS/snaps/
vm_name/VirtualMachines/vm_name
•
Live migration of virtual machines is not supported.
•
The driver domain option is available beginning with release 12.1.2.7.0 and is
supported with the following guest operating systems:
•
–
Oracle Linux with the latest Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel 2 (UEK2) or
Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel 3 (UEK3).
–
Microsoft Windows with Oracle VM Windows PV Driver 3.4.1. Oracle VM
Windows PV Driver 3.4.1 release is available for download on My Oracle
Support as patch number 23346086.
–
Oracle Solaris 11.3 or higher x86.
The driver domain only works when you add virtual disks to a guest virtual
machine. When -driverdomain is specified, the cloned virtual machine is in
4-10 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli configure commands
driver domain mode. The corresponding virtual machine configuration file,
vm.cfg, has the following disk entries:
When -driverdomain is specified, the cloned virtual machine is in driver
domain mode. The corresponding virtual machine configuration file, vm.cfg, has
the following disk entries:
disk = [u'file:/OVS/Repositories/repo5/.ACFS/snaps/vm10/
VirtualMachines/
vm10/System.img,xvda,w',
u'file:/u01/app/sharedrepo/repo5/.ACFS/snaps/
vm10/VirtualMachines/vm10/u01.img,xvdb,w,oakDom1']
All disks, with the exception of the xvda boot disk, have the path from oakDom1,
that is odabase.
•
The driver domain functionality applies to non-system disks. Once a virtual
machine is created in driver domain mode, any new vDisks are added in driver
domain mode.
•
To determine if a virtual machine is configured in driver domain mode, use the
oakcli show vm vmname command. When the virtual machine is in driver
mode, the output for the DriverDomain attribute is TRUE.
Example 4-3
Creating a Virtual Machine Image
Create a virtual machine image named myol6u_test from the virtual machine
template named myol6u_15gb1, which is stored in the shared repository named
repo2 on Node 0:
oakcli clone vm myol6u_test -vmtemplate myol6u_15gb1 -repo repo2 -node 0
Example 4-4
Creating a Virtual Machine Image in Driver Domain Mode
Create a virtual machine image named myol6u_test from the virtual machine
template named myol6u_15gb1, which is stored in the shared repository named
repo2 on Node 0 in driver domain mode:
oakcli clone vm myol6u_test -vmtemplate myol6u_15gb1 -repo repo2 -node 0 driverdomain
4.6 oakcli configure commands
Use the oakcli configure commands to configure components on Oracle Database
Appliance.
Topics:
oakcli configure additionalnet (page 4-12)
Use the oakcli configure additionalnet command to configure
any unconfigured public networks in bare metal, Domain 0, and
ODA_BASE.
oakcli configure asr (page 4-13)
Use the oakcli configure asr command to configure Oracle Auto
Service Request (Oracle ASR) on Oracle Database Appliance.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-11
oakcli configure commands
oakcli configure cpupool (page 4-14)
Use the oakcli configure cpupool command to configure a CPU
pool on one Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform node.
oakcli configure firstnet (page 4-14)
Use the oakcli configure firstnet command to configure an
initial network on Oracle Database Appliance that enables you to
download deployment software.
oakcli configure ib2fiber (page 4-15)
Run the oakcli configure ib2fiber command after replacing
InfiniBand 10GbE SFP+ cards (fiber) cards and before deployment to
unconfigure IB setup and configure fiber cards.
oakcli configure network (page 4-15)
Use the oakcli configure network command to configure the
network after either replacing a network card or swapping the public
network from copper to fiber and vice versa. The meaning of the
command changes depending on which parameter you use.
oakcli configure oda_base (page 4-16)
Use the oakcli configure oda_base command to change the CPU
core count assigned to ODA_BASE, add or remove virtual local area
networks assigned to ODA_BASE, and adjust resource allocation among
user domains and between ODA_BASE and other user domains.
oakcli configure repo (page 4-17)
Use the oakcli configure repo command to increase the size of a
shared repository.
oakcli configure vm (page 4-18)
Use the oakcli configure vm command to configure a virtual
machine on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform and to
increase or decrease resource allocation to user domains.
oakcli configure vmtemplate (page 4-20)
4.6.1 oakcli configure additionalnet
Use the oakcli configure additionalnet command to configure any
unconfigured public networks in bare metal, Domain 0, and ODA_BASE.
Syntax
oakcli configure additionalnet [-h]
Parameter
-h displays online help for using the command.
Usage Notes
The oakcli configure additionalnet command automatically detects any
unconfigured networks and runs an interactive script that guides you through how to
configure the network. The script requires the following input:
•
Interface name
•
DHCP [Y/N]
4-12 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli configure commands
•
IP
•
Netmask
Note:
If you are running the command on a bare metal deployment, then the
interface name expects a bond name. If you are running the command on
Dom0, then the interface name expects a net name. If you are running the
command on Dom1, then the interface name expects an eth name.
4.6.2 oakcli configure asr
Use the oakcli configure asr command to configure Oracle Auto Service
Request (Oracle ASR) on Oracle Database Appliance.
Syntax
oakcli configure asr [-h]
Parameter
-h displays help for using the command.
Usage Notes
•
•
The oakcli configure asr command initiates an interactive script that
requests the following information to implement Oracle ASR on Oracle Database
Appliance:
–
Action to be performed (setup internal, setup external, deinstall, or
reconfigure Oracle ASR Manager)
–
PROXY server name, port, user ID, and password
–
Oracle ASR user ID and password
–
Oracle ASR Manager IP and port
You can configure Oracle ASR on Oracle Database Appliance to use its own ASR
Manager (internal Oracle ASR) or use Oracle ASR Manager configured on
another server in the same network as your appliance (external Oracle ASR). If
you already have Oracle ASR Manager configured in your environment, you can
register Oracle Database Appliance with your existing Oracle ASR Manager.
Note: With an internal Oracle ASR Manager, an alert is not sent when the
server goes down. If a critical event occurs on Oracle Database Appliance with
an external Oracle ASR Manager, then an alert can still be sent to Oracle.
Configuring Oracle ASR
# oakcli configure asr
INFO : Logging all actions in /opt/oracle/oak/onecmd/tmp/
scaoda1011-20150805153300.log and traces in /opt/oracle/oak/onecmd/tmp/
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-13
oakcli configure commands
scaoda1011-20150805153300.trc
Please enter
1 to setup Internal ASR
2 to setup External ASR
3 to Deinstall ASR
0 to Exit
[1]:INFO : Logging all actions in /opt/oracle/oak/onecmd/tmp/
scaoda1011-20150805153300.log and traces in /opt/oracle/oak/onecmd/tmp/
scaoda1011-20150805153300.trc
4.6.3 oakcli configure cpupool
Use the oakcli configure cpupool command to configure a CPU pool on one
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform node.
Syntax
oakcli configure cpupool poolname -numcpu cpu_count -node nodenum [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
poolname
Unique name for the CPU pool
-numcpu cpu_count
Number of CPUs for the CPU pool
-node nodenum
Node where the CPU pool will be created (0 or 1)
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Configuring a CPU Pool
Configure a CPU pool named twonode with two cores on Node 1 of Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform:
oakcli configure cpupool twonode -numcpu 2 -node 1
4.6.4 oakcli configure firstnet
Use the oakcli configure firstnet command to configure an initial network on
Oracle Database Appliance that enables you to download deployment software.
Syntax
oakcli configure firstnet
Example
The oakcli configure firstnet command creates an initial network on a new
Oracle Database Appliance using an interactive script. The following example shows
how to configure the initial network on a bare metal Oracle Database Appliance:
oakcli configure firstnet
Select the interface to configure network on [bond0 bond1 bond2 xbond0]:bond0
Configure DHCP on bond0?(yes/no):no
INFO: Static configuration selected
4-14 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli configure commands
Enter the IP address to configure:192.0.2.18
Enter the netmask address to configure:255.255.252.0
Enter the gateway address to configure:192.0.2.1
Plumbing the IPs now
Restarting the network
:::::::::::::::::
Note:
Oracle recommends using the oakcli configure firstnet command
only one time on Oracle Database Appliance. Subsequent use after
configuring the initial network can cause unpredictable changes to your
network settings.
4.6.5 oakcli configure ib2fiber
Run the oakcli configure ib2fiber command after replacing InfiniBand
10GbE SFP+ cards (fiber) cards and before deployment to unconfigure IB setup and
configure fiber cards.
Note:
If you are using Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform, then you
must execute the command from Dom0.
Usage Notes
This command must be run before deployment to configure 10GbE SFP+ (fiber) cards.
Syntax
oakcli configure ib2fiber [-h]
Parameter
-h displays help for using the command.
4.6.6 oakcli configure network
Use the oakcli configure network command to configure the network after
either replacing a network card or swapping the public network from copper to fiber
and vice versa. The meaning of the command changes depending on which parameter
you use.
Syntax
oakcli configure network [-changeNetCard|-publicNet][-h]
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-15
oakcli configure commands
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-changeNetCard
Configures the network card after it has been replaced. You
must run the oakcli configure network changeNetCard command on each node if the network card
was replaced. This parameter is supported on all Oracle
Database Appliance hardware models. This command must be
executed from Dom0 on virtualized platforms.
-publicNet
Configures the network after you have swapped the public
network from copper to fiber and vice versa. You must run the
oakcli configure network -publicNet command on
each node, and this requires the stack to be down. The stack
includes GI and RDBMS. If you are using Oracle Database
Appliance Virtualized Platform, the virtual machines must be
down. The virtual machines may need some configuration
changes, especially if they are using VLANs. This parameter is
supported only on Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 hardware
models.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4.6.7 oakcli configure oda_base
Use the oakcli configure oda_base command to change the CPU core count
assigned to ODA_BASE, add or remove virtual local area networks assigned to
ODA_BASE, and adjust resource allocation among user domains and between
ODA_BASE and other user domains.
You must restart the domain for the resource allocation change to take effect.
Syntax
oakcli configure oda_base
Examples
Here are examples of how to use the oakcli configure oda_basecommand.
Changing the CPU Core Count in ODA_BASE
Change the CPU core count from six to eight in ODA_BASE:
# oakcli configure oda_base
Core Licensing Options:
1. 2 CPU Cores
2. 4 CPU Cores
3. 6 CPU Cores
4. 8 CPU Cores
5. 10 CPU Cores
6. 12 CPU Cores
Current CPU Cores
:6
Selection[1 : 6](default 12 CPU Cores) : 4
ODA base domain memory in GB(min 8, max 88)(Current Memory 64G)[default
32]
:
INFO: Using default memory size i.e. 32 GB
Additional vlan networks to be assigned to oda_base? (y/n) [n]:
Vlan network to be removed from oda_base (y/n) [n]
4-16 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli configure commands
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
INFO:
Node 0:Configured oda base pool
Node 1:Configured oda base pool
Node 0:ODA Base configured with new memory
Node 0:ODA Base configured with new vcpus
Changes will be incorporated after the domain is restarted on Node 0
Node 1:ODA Base configured with new memory
Node 1:ODA Base configured with new vcpus
Changes will be incorporated after the domain is restarted on Node 1
Changing the Amount of Memory Allocated to ODA_BASE
1.
Log in to Dom0.
2.
Execute the oakcli configure oda_base command and change the
configuration.
3.
Restart ODA_BASE.
Assigning VLANs to ODA_BASE
1.
Log in to Dom0.
2.
Execute the oakcli configure oda_base command.
3.
Change the setting for Additional vlan networks to be assigned to
oda_base? (y/n) to y.
4.
Follow the prompts to assign additional VLANs to ODA_BASE.
5.
Restart ODA_BASE.
4.6.8 oakcli configure repo
Use the oakcli configure repo command to increase the size of a shared
repository.
Syntax
oakcli configure repo reponame -incsize size [M|G] [-h]
Parameter
Description
reponame
Name of the shared repository
size
Number that can be followed by M to define the size as
megabytes or by G to define as size as gigabytes
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Increasing the Size of a Shared Repo
Increase the size of the repo1 shared repository by 2 gigabytes:
# oakcli configure repo repo1 -incsize 2G
Configured Shared Repo : repo1 with new size 3712.0.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-17
oakcli configure commands
4.6.9 oakcli configure vm
Use the oakcli configure vm command to configure a virtual machine on Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform and to increase or decrease resource
allocation to user domains.
You must restart the domain for the resource allocation change to take effect.
Syntax
oakcli configure vm name [-vcpu cpucount -maxvcpu maxcpu -cpuprio priority
-cpucap cap -memory memsize -maxmemory max_memsize -os sys -keyboard lang -mouse
mouse_type -domain dom -network netlist -autostart astart -disk disks -bootoption
bootstrap -cpupool pool -prefnode 0|1 -failover true|false][-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
name
The name assigned to the virtual machine.
-vcpu cpucount
Number of nodes assigned to the virtual machine. The range is 1 to
72. This number depends on your Oracle Database Appliance
configuration
-maxvcpu maxcpu
Maximum number of CPUs that the virtual machine can consume.
The range is 1 to 72. This number depends on your Oracle Database
Appliance configuration.
-cpuprio
priority
Priority for CPU usage, where larger values have higher priority. The
range is 1 to 65535.
-cpucap cap
Percentage of a CPU the virtual machine can receive. The range is 10
to 100.
-memory memsize
Amount of memory given to the virtual machine: (1 to 248)G to (1to
760G) or (1 to 253952)M to (1 to 778240)M, based on RAM. The
default is M.
-maxmemory
max_memsize
Maximum amount of memory allowed for the virtual machine: (1 to
248)G to (1 to 760)G or (1-253952)M to (1-778240)M, based on RAM.
The default is M.
-os sys
Operating system used by the virtual machine (WIN_2003,
WIN_2008, WIN_7, WIN_VISTA, OTHER_WIN, OL_4, OL_5, OL_6,
RHL_4, RHL_5, RHL_6, LINUX_RECOVERY, OTHER_LINUX,
SOLARIS_10, SOLARIS_11, OTHER_SOLARIS, or NONE)
-keyboard lang
Keyboard used by virtual machine (en-us, ar, da, de, de-ch, en-gb, es,
et, fi, fo, fr, fr-be, fr-ca, hr, hu, is, it, ja, lt, lv, mk, nl, n--be, no, pl, pt,
pt-br, ru, sl, sv, th, or tr)
-mouse
mouse_type
Mouse type used by the virtual machine (OS_DEFAULT,
PS2_MOUSE, USB_MOUSE, or USB_TABLET)
4-18 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli configure commands
Parameter
Description
-domain dom
Domain type from the following options:
•
Hardware virtualized guest (XEN_HVM)
- The kernel or operating system is not virtualization-aware and
can run unmodified.
•
- Device drivers are emulated.
Para virtualized guest (XEN_PVM)
- The guest is virtualization-aware and is optimized for a
virtualized environment.
•
- PV guests use generic, idealized device drivers.
Hardware virtualized guest (XEN_HVM_PV_DRIVERS)
•
The PV drivers are hypervisor-aware and significantly reduce
the overhead of emulated device input/output.
Hardware virtualized guest (UNKNOWN)
-network netlist
MAC address and list of networks used by the virtual machine
-autostart
astart
Startup option for virtual machine (always, restore, or never)
-disk disks
List of disks (slot, disktype, and content) used by virtual machine
-bootoption
bootstrap
Boot option used to bootstrap the virtual machine (PXE, DISK, or
CDROM)
-cpupool pool
Named CPU pool assigned to the virtual machine
-prefnode 0|1
Preferred node on which the virtual machine will attempt to start
(Node 0 or Node 1). This parameter is only valid for virtual machines
created in shared repositories.
-failover true|
false
Allow (use the keyword "true") or disallow (use the keyword "false")
the virtual machine to start or restart on a node other than the node
defined by the -prefnode parameter. This parameter is only valid
for virtual machines created in shared repositories.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
•
All of the parameters, except for name, are optional.
•
You must include at least one optional parameter for the command to work.
•
When you create a virtual machine, select the Processor Cap as a percentage,
between 10 and 100%. The default is 100%. This value is then converted to a CPU
utilization limit in the vm.cfg file for the virtual machine. The value set in the
vm.cfg file limits the amount of CPU a guest is allowed to consume. If the
Processor Cap is set at 100% in Oracle VM, then the value set in vm.cfg is 0,
which means there is no limit to CPU utilization.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-19
oakcli configure commands
See Also:
Oracle VM release 3.1 documentation contains more information about the
options in the preceding table. Access the library at the following URL:
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E27300_01
For example, refer to 2.8. Virtual Machines for information about the the domain dom options:
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E27300_01/E27309/html/vmusg-ovm-vms.html
Changing the Number of Virtual CPUs
This command example changes the number of virtual CPUs to 3, and changes the
virtual memory size to 4 GB in a virtual machine named odarep01:
oakcli configure vm odarep01 -vcpu 3 -memory 4196
4.6.10 oakcli configure vmtemplate
Use the oakcli configure vmtemplate command to configure a virtual machine
template on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Syntax
oakcli configure vmtemplate name [-vcpu cpucount -maxvcpu maxcpu -cpuprio
priority -cpucap cap -memory memsize -maxmemory max_memsize -os sys -keyboard
lang -mouse mouse_type -domain dom -network netlist -disk disks][h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
name
Name assigned to the virtual machine template
-vcpu cpucount
Number of nodes assigned to virtual machines cloned from the
template:
•
•
•
•
-maxvcpu maxcpu
On Oracle Database Appliance X5-2, the range is from 1 to 72.
On Oracle Database Appliance X4-2, the range is from 1 to 48.
On Oracle Database Appliance X3-2, the range is from 1 to 32.
On Oracle Database Appliance, the range is 1 to 24.
Maximum number of CPUs that virtual machines cloned from the
template can consume:
•
•
•
•
On Oracle Database Appliance X5-2, the range is from 1 to 72.
On Oracle Database Appliance X4-2, the range is from 1 to 48.
On Oracle Database Appliance X3-2, the range is from 1 to 32.
On Oracle Database Appliance, the range is 1 to 24.
-cpuprio
priority
Priority for CPU usage, where larger values have higher priority (1 to
256).
-cpucap cap
Percentage of a CPU that virtual machines cloned from the template
can receive (1 to 100).
-memory memsize
Amount of memory given to virtual machines cloned from the
template (1G to 88 G or 1M to 90112M)
4-20 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli configure commands
Parameter
Description
-maxmemory
max_memsize
Maximum amount of memory allowed for virtual machines cloned
from the template
-os sys
Operating system used by virtual machines cloned from the template
(WIN_2003, WIN_2008, WIN_7, WIN_VISTA, OTHER_WIN, OL_4,
OL_5, OL_6, RHL_4, RHL_5, RHL_6, LINUX_RECOVERY,
OTHER_LINUX, SOLARIS_10, SOLARIS_11, OTHER_SOLARIS, or
NONE)
-keyboard lang
Keyboard used by virtual machines cloned from the template (en-us,
ar, da, de, de-ch, en-gb, es, et, fi, fo, fr, fr-be, fr-ca, hr, hu, is, it, ja, lt, lv,
mk, nl, n--be, no, pl, pt, pt-br, ru, sl, sv, th, or tr)
-mouse
mouse_type
Mouse type used by virtual machines cloned from the template
(OS_DEFAULT, PS2_MOUSE, USB_MOUSE, or USB_TABLET)
-domain dom
Domain type from the following options:
•
Hardware virtualized guest (XEN_HVM)
- The kernel or operating system is not virtualization-aware and
can run unmodified.
•
- Device drivers are emulated.
Para virtualized guest (XEN_PVM)
- The guest is virtualization-aware and is optimized for a
virtualized environment.
•
- PV guests use generic, idealized device drivers.
Hardware virtualized guest (XEN_HVM_PV_DRIVERS)
The PV drivers are hypervisor-aware and significantly reduce the
overhead of emulated device input/output.
-network netlist
MAC address and list of networks used by virtual machines cloned
from the template
-disk disks
List of disks (slot, disktype, and content) used by virtual machines
cloned from the template
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
•
All of the parameters, except for name, are optional.
•
You must include at least one optional parameter for the command to work.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-21
oakcli copy
See Also::
Oracle VM Release 3.1 documentation, which is available at the following
URL:
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E27300_01 for more information about the
options in the preceding table.
For example, see 2.8. Virtual Machines for details about the option -domain
dom
http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E27300_01/E27309/html/vmusg-ovm-vms.html
Example
Set values for the following configuration values in the virtual machine template
named myol5u7_10gb:
oakcli configure vmtemplate myol5u7_10gb
-vcpu 2 -maxvcpu 4 -cpucap 40 -memory 1536M -maxmemory 2G
-network "['type=netfront,bridge=net1']" -os OTHER_LINUX
•
-vcpu 2 = Two CPUs will assigned when the virtual machine starts up
•
-maxvcpu 4 = The maximum number of CPUs that can be assigned to the virtual
machine is 4.
•
-cucap 40 = The maximum percentage of a CPU's capacity that will be assigned
to the virtual machine is 40%.
•
-memory 1536M = The amount of memory assigned when the virtual machine
starts up is 1536 MB.
•
-maxmemory 2G = The maximum amount of memory that can be assigned to the
virtual machine is 2 GB.
•
-network type=netfront,bridge=net1 = This is the list of networks used
by virtual machines cloned from the template.
•
-os = The operating system used by the virtual machine is OTHER_LINUX.
4.7 oakcli copy
Use the oakcli copy command to prepare a copy of the configuration file for use
during the configuration of Oracle Database Appliance.
Syntax
oakcli copy -conf absolute_conf_file [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-conf absolute_conf_file
Specifies the full path name of the configuration file
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4-22 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli create commands
Example 4-5
Preparing a Copy of the Configuration File
If you created a configuration file previously and copied this file to Oracle Database
Appliance, then prepare the configuration file to be used during the configuration
process. For example, if you copied the file myserver1.conf to /tmp, then enter the
following command:
oakcli copy -conf /tmp/myserver1.conf
4.8 oakcli create commands
Use the oakcli create commands to create components on Oracle Database
Appliance.
Topics:
oakcli create cpupool (page 4-23)
Use the command oakcli create cpupool to create a CPU pool on
one Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform node.
oakcli create database (page 4-24)
Use the oakcli create database command to create additional
databases on Oracle Database Appliance.
oakcli create dbhome (page 4-27)
Use the oakcli create dbhome command to create a new database
home on Oracle Database Appliance.
oakcli create dbstorage (page 4-28)
Use the oakcli create dbstorage command to create a storage
structure for migrating databases from Oracle ASM to Oracle ACFS.
oakcli create db_config_params (page 4-29)
Use the oakcli create db_config_params command to generate a
database configuration file.
oakcli create repo (page 4-30)
Use the oakcli create repo command to create a new shared
repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
oakcli create snapshotdb (page 4-31)
Use the oakcli create snapshotdb command to create a snapshot
database from an existing database.
oakcli create vdisk (page 4-31)
Use the oakcli create vdisk command to create a new virtual disk
in a shared repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform.
oakcli create vlan (page 4-32)
Use the oakcli create vlan command to create a new virtual local
area network (VLAN) on an Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform node.
4.8.1 oakcli create cpupool
Use the command oakcli create cpupool to create a CPU pool on one Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform node.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-23
oakcli create commands
Syntax
oakcli create cpupool poolname -numcpu cpu_count -node nodenum [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
poolname
Uniquely names the CPU pool
-numcpu cpu_count
Defines the number of CPUs for the CPU pool
-node nodenum
Defines the node where the CPU pool will be created (0 or 1)
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
Create a CPU pool with two CPUs on Node 1 of Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform:
oakcli create cpupool twonode -numcpu 2 -node 1
4.8.2 oakcli create database
Use the oakcli create database command to create additional databases on
Oracle Database Appliance.
When you run oakcli create database, the command prompts you for further
inputs.
Note: Do not use Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA) to create
databases on Oracle Database Appliance. Only use Oracle Appliance Manager
for database configuration. Deploying Oracle Database instances using Oracle
Appliance Manager ensures that these databases are properly configured,
optimized, and supported on Oracle Database Appliance.
Syntax
oakcli create database -db db_name [[[-oh home] | [-version version]] [-params
params_file] [-cdb]][h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-db db_name
Name of the database that you want to create
-oh home
(Optional) Name of an existing Oracle home to use when
creating the database. By default, the command creates a new
database home.
-version version
(Optional) Version of the database that you want to create. By
default, Oracle Database Appliance uses the highest version
that you have downloaded.
4-24 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli create commands
Parameter
Description
-params params_file
(Optional) Name of the configuration file. By default, Oracle
Database Appliance uses the default configuration file.
-cdb
(Optional) Creates the database as a container database
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
•
The -oh and the -version parameters are mutually exclusive. Attempting to use
both in the same command will generate an error.
•
When a database is created without identifying an Oracle home, a new Oracle
home is created using a standard naming convention (for example,
OraDb11203_home3). The number at the end of the name is incremented by one
for each new home created with the same version number.
•
When you upgrade the database, infrastructure, and Oracle Grid Infrastructure,
you must specify an existing home to create a new database.
•
If you try to create a database using the option -version version before
downloading and unpacking the specific version database clone files, then the
command will fail.
•
You can create configuration files with the oakcli create
db_config_params command.
•
The prompt "Do you want to keep the data files on FLASH storage: [ Y | N ] " is
only shown if you choose the OLTP database type and if there is some free space
available on flash storage.
Examples
This section shows different scenarios for using the commandoakcli create
database.
Creating a New Database Showing Prompts
When you run oakcli create database, you are prompted for several inputs.
The options listed for each input depend on the platform on which you run the
command. For example, Database Class options 9 and 10 are available only on Oracle
Database Appliance X5-2.
The following command creates a database named mydb using an existing Oracle
home named OraDb12102_home1:
oakcli create database -db mydb -oh OraDb12102_home1
Please enter the 'root' password :
Please re-enter the 'root' password:
Please enter the 'oracle' password :
Please re-enter the 'oracle' password:
Please enter the 'SYSASM' password : (During deployment we set the
SYSASM password to 'welcome1'):
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-25
oakcli create commands
Please re-enter the 'SYSASM' password:
Please select one of the following for Database Deployment [1 .. 3]:
1
=> OLTP
2
=> DSS
3
=> In-Memory
1
Selected value is : OLTP
Please select one of the following for Database Deployment [1 .. 3]:
1
=> EE : Enterprise Edition
2
=> RACONE
3
=> RAC
3
Selected value is : RAC
Do you want to keep the data files on FLASH storage: [ Y | N ]?N
Specify the Database Class (1. odb-01 '1 core, 8 GB memory'
Others) [1]:2
Please select one of the following for Database Class
1
=> odb-01s ( 1 cores ,
4 GB memory)
2
=> odb-01 ( 1 cores ,
8 GB memory)
3
=> odb-02 ( 2 cores ,
16 GB memory)
4
=> odb-04 ( 4 cores ,
32 GB memory)
5
=> odb-06 ( 6 cores ,
48 GB memory)
6
=> odb-12 ( 12 cores ,
96 GB memory)
7
=> odb-16 ( 16 cores , 128 GB memory)
8
=> odb-24 ( 24 cores , 192 GB memory)
9
=> odb-32 ( 32 cores , 256 GB memory)
10 => odb-36 ( 36 cores , 256 GB memory)
2.
[1 .. 10]:
Creating a New Database in an Existing Oracle Home
Create a database called sales1 in OraDb11203_home2:
oakcli create database -db sales1 -oh OraDb11203_home2
Creating a New Database from a Template
Create a database called sales2 from the salesdbtemplate.bconf file (by
appending the default file extension to the file name provided). This example also
creates a new Oracle home:
oakcli create database -db sales2 -params salesdbtemplate
Creating a New Database as a Container Database
Create a version 12.1.0.2 container database called sales3:
oakcli create database -db sales3 -version 12.1.0.2 -cdb
Creating an Enterprise Edition Database
Create a version 12.1.0.2 database named DBPROD from the database configuration file
named dbprodconf:
oakcli create database -db DBPROD -version 12.1.0.2 -params
dbprodconf
The oakcli create database command starts a wizard that requires some basic
inputs such has the root, oracle and SYSASM password. After you enter the password
information, specify the type of database and running node:
4-26 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli create commands
Please select one of the following for Database Deployment [1 .. 3]:
Selected value is: ODADBI2-base
1 => EE : Enterprise Edition
2 => RACONE
3 => RAC1
Selected value is: EE
Please select one of the following
for Node Number [1 .. 2]:
1 => ODADBI1-base
2 => ODADBI2-base2
Selected value is: ODADBI2-base
Specify the Database Class (1. Medium 2. Others) [1]:2Please select one of the
following for
Database
1
=>
2
=>
3
=>
4
=>
5
=>
6
=>
7
=>
8
=>
9
=>
10 =>
Class [1 .. 8] :
odb-01s (1 cores , 4 GB memory)
odb-01 (1 cores , 8 GB memory)
odb-02 (2 cores , 16 GB memory)
odb-04 (4 cores , 32 GB memory)
odb-06 (6 cores , 48 GB memory)
odb-12 (12 cores, 96 GB memory)
odb-16 (16 cores, 128 GB memory)
odb-24 (24 cores, 192 GB memory)
odb-32 (32 cores, 256 GB memory)
odb-36 (36 cores, 256 GB memory)
3
Selected value is: 2 cores
The database class only defines the Oracle Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA)
template to be used for the database creation. Oracle Database Appliance comes with
eight templates and none can be added. See "Database Templates for Oracle Database
Appliance" for template specifications.
4.8.3 oakcli create dbhome
Use the oakcli create dbhome command to create a new database home on
Oracle Database Appliance.
Syntax
oakcli create dbhome [-version version] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-version version
(Optional) Version that you want to install. If this is not
provided, then Oracle Database Appliance uses the latest
available version.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-27
oakcli create commands
Example
Create a database home called sales1 using Oracle Database version 12.1.0.2.4.
oakcli create dbhome -version 12.1.0.2.4
4.8.4 oakcli create dbstorage
Use the oakcli create dbstorage command to create a storage structure for
migrating databases from Oracle ASM to Oracle ACFS.
Syntax
oakcli create dbstorage -db db_name [-cdb][-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-db db_name
Sets up the required Oracle ACFS storage structure for the
database to be created called db_name
-cdb
Must be passed if you are creating a multitenant container
database
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
The oakcli create dbstorage command requests user input to determine the
size of the storage structure to create, as shown in this example:
oakcli create dbstorage -db sales
Please enter the 'root' password :
Please re-enter the 'root' password:
Please enter the 'oracle' password :
Please re-enter the 'oracle' password:
Please enter the 'SYSASM' password : (During deployment we set the SYSASM password
to 'welcome1'):
Please re-enter the 'SYSASM' password:
Specify the Database Class (1. odb-01 '1 core, 8 GB memory' 2. Others) [1]:2
Please select one of the following for Database Class [1 .. 8] :
1 => odb-01s ( 1 cores , 4 GB memory)
2 => odb-01 ( 1 cores , 8 GB memory)
3 => odb-02 ( 2 cores , 16 GB memory)
4 => odb-04 ( 4 cores , 32 GB memory)
5 => odb-06 ( 6 cores , 48 GB memory)
6 => odb-12 ( 12 cores , 96 GB memory)
7 => odb-16 ( 16 cores , 128 GB memory)
8 => odb-24 ( 24 cores , 192 GB memory)
Selected value is: odb-01s ( 1 cores , 4 GB memory)
...
4-28 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli create commands
4.8.5 oakcli create db_config_params
Use the oakcli create db_config_params command to generate a database
configuration file.
The configuration file is created in /opt/oracle/oak/install/dbconf and is
given the default extension .dbconf.
Syntax
oakcli create db_config_params -conf filename [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-conf filename
Name you want to give to the configuration file, without its
path name.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command
Example
Create the database parameter file: /opt/oracle/oak/install/dbconf/
newconf.dbconf:
# oakcli create db_config_params -conf newconf
Please select one of the following for Database Block Size [1 .. 4]:
1 ==> 4096
2 ==> 8192
3 ==> 16384
4 ==> 32768
2
Selected value is: 8192
Specify the Database Language (1. AMERICAN 2. Others) [1]:
Selected value is: AMERICAN
Specify the Database Characterset (1. AL32UTF8 2. Others) [1]:2
Please select one of the following for Database Characterset [0 .. 10] :
0 => Others
1 => AL32UTF8
2 => AR8ADOS710
3 => AR8ADOS710T
4 => AR8ADOS720
5 => AR8ADOS720T
6 => AR8APTEC715
7 => AR8APTEC715T
8 => AR8ARABICMACS
9 => AR8ASMO708PLUS
10 => AR8ASMO8X
1
Selected value is: AL32UTF8
Specify the Database Territory (1. AMERICA 2. Others) [1]:2
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-29
oakcli create commands
Please select one of the following for Database Territory [0 .. 10] :
0 => Others
1 => ALBANIA
2 => ALGERIA
3 => AMERICA
4 => ARGENTINA
5 => AUSTRALIA
6 => AUSTRIA
7 => AZERBAIJAN
8 => BAHRAIN
9 => BANGLADESH
10 => BELARUS
3
Selected value is: AMERICA
Specify the Component Language (1. en 2. Others) [1]:2
Please select one of the following for Component Language [0 .. 10] :
0 => Others
1 => en : English
2 => fr : French
3 => ar : Arabic
4 => bn : Bengali
5 => pt_BR : Brazilian Portuguese
6 => bg : Bulgarian
7 => fr_CA : Canadian French
8 => ca : Catalan
9 => hr : Croatian
10 => cs : Czech
1
Selected value is: en
Successfully generated the Database parameter file 'newconf'
4.8.6 oakcli create repo
Use the oakcli create repo command to create a new shared repository on
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Syntax
oakcli create repo repo_name -size size [M|G] -dg DATA|RECO [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
repo_name
Name assigned to the shared repository
-size size [M|G]
Amount of storage to be assigned to the shared repository. It
can be defined in megabytes with the M option or in gigabytes
with the G option.
-dg DATA|RECO
Oracle ASM disk group in which the shared repository is to be
stored, either the DATA+ disk group or the RECO+ disk group,
selected by using the DATA or RECO option respectively
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4-30 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli create commands
Usage Notes
•
The -size parameter requires a whole number for size.
•
The minimum value for size is 500 when M is used or 1 when G is used for the
sizing unit.
•
The default unit for size is G (gigabytes).
•
A shared repository should only be used for the virtual machine and not as a file
staging area. Avoid copying or moving files into a shared repository.
Example
Create a 25-gigabyte shared repository named repoprod1 in the DATA+ disk group:
oakcli create repo repoprod1 -dg DATA -size 25
4.8.7 oakcli create snapshotdb
Use the oakcli create snapshotdb command to create a snapshot database from
an existing database.
Syntax
oakcli create snapshotdb [-db snap_dbname -from dbname] | [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-db snap_dbname
Name of the snapshot database to be created
-from source_dbname
Name of the source database
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command
Example
Create a new snapshot database, name snapprod, from the database named prod:
oakcli create snapshotdb -db snapprod -from prod
4.8.8 oakcli create vdisk
Use the oakcli create vdisk command to create a new virtual disk in a shared
repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Syntax
oakcli create vdisk vdisk_name -repo repository_name -size size -type shared|local sparse [-h]
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-31
oakcli create commands
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vdisk_name
Name assigned to the virtual disk that is unique within the
name repository
-repo repository_name
Name of the shared repository where the virtual disk will be
created and from which it will acquire its storage
-size size
Amount of storage to be assigned from the shared repository to
the shared disk. The default unit is G (for gigabytes) and the
minimum size is 500 M (for megabytes)
-type shared | local
Sets the option of allowing the virtual disk to be shared by
more than one virtual machine (shared) or used by only one
virtual machine (local)
-sparse
Creates a sparse vdisk
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
Create a virtual disk named t2g in the shared repository named repoprod1 for use
by only one virtual machine at a time in that repository. Assign the t2g virtual disk 2
GB in the repoprod1 shared repository.
oakcli create vdisk t2g -repo repoprod1 -type local -size 2G
4.8.9 oakcli create vlan
Use the oakcli create vlan command to create a new virtual local area network
(VLAN) on an Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform node.
Syntax
oakcli create vlan vlan_name -vlanid tag_id -if interface_name -node 0|1 [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vlan_name
Name assigned to the VLAN
-vlanid tag_id
Tag number, used for packet routing, from 2 to 4096 inclusive.
It uniquely identifies the VLAN on a node. The same tag
number can be used on both nodes.
-if interface_name
Name of the interface on which the VLAN network is created
-node 0 | 1
Node on which the VLAN is created, either 1 or 2
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Examples
Here are examples of how to use the oakcli create vlan command.
4-32 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli delete commands
Creating a New VLAN
Create a VLAN named sample10 on Node 1 using the bond1 interface and a tag with
the number 10:
oakcli create vlan sample10 -vlanid 10 -if bond1 -node 1
Duplicating a VLAN on the Second Node
Create a VLAN named sample10 on Node 0:
oakcli create vlan sample10 -vlanid 10 -if bond1 -node 0
4.9 oakcli delete commands
Use the oakcli delete commands to delete components from Oracle Database
Appliance.
Topics:
oakcli delete cpupool (page 4-34)
Use the oakcli delete cpupool command to delete a CPU pool
from one Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform node.
oakcli delete database (page 4-34)
Use the oakcli delete database command to delete a database
from Oracle Database Appliance.
oakcli delete db_config_params (page 4-34)
Use the oakcli delete db_config_params command to delete a
database configuration file.
oakcli delete dbhome (page 4-35)
Use the oakcli delete dbhome command to delete a database home
from Oracle Database Appliance.
oakcli delete dbstorage (page 4-35)
Use the oakcli delete dbstorage command to delete a storage
structure that was created for the purpose of migrating databases from
Oracle ASM to Oracle ACFS.
oakcli delete repo (page 4-36)
Use the oakcli delete repo command to delete a shared repository.
oakcli delete vdisk (page 4-36)
Use the oakcli delete vdisk command to delete a virtual disk
from a shared repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform.
oakcli delete vlan (page 4-37)
Use the oakcli delete vlan command to delete a virtual local area
network.
oakcli delete vm (page 4-37)
Use the oakcli delete vm command to delete a virtual machine.
oakcli delete vmtemplate (page 4-38)
Use the oakcli delete vmtemplate command to delete a virtual
machine template.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-33
oakcli delete commands
4.9.1 oakcli delete cpupool
Use the oakcli delete cpupool command to delete a CPU pool from one Oracle
Database Appliance Virtualized Platform node.
Syntax
oakcli delete cpupool poolname -node nodenum [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
poolname
Name of the CPU pool to be deleted
-node nodenum
Node from which the CPU pool will be deleted (0 or 1)
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
Delete the CPU pool named twonode from Node 1 of Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform:
oakcli delete cpupool twonode -node 1
4.9.2 oakcli delete database
Use the oakcli delete database command to delete a database from Oracle
Database Appliance.
Syntax
oakcli delete database -db db_name [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
db_name
Name of the database that you want to delete
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command
Example
Delete the database named sales1:
oakcli delete database -db sales1
4.9.3 oakcli delete db_config_params
Use the oakcli delete db_config_params command to delete a database
configuration file.
4-34 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli delete commands
Syntax
oakcli delete db_config_params -conf filename [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-conffilename
Name of the configuration file that you want to remove,
without its path name
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command
4.9.4 oakcli delete dbhome
Use the oakcli delete dbhome command to delete a database home from Oracle
Database Appliance.
Syntax
oakcli delete dbhome -oh oracle_home [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-oh oracle_home
The database home to be uninstalled
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
Delete a database home called ora11_1:
oakcli delete dbhome -oh ora11_1
4.9.5 oakcli delete dbstorage
Use the oakcli delete dbstorage command to delete a storage structure that
was created for the purpose of migrating databases from Oracle ASM to Oracle ACFS.
For example, run this command if you created a storage structure using create
dbstorage that is no longer required.
Syntax
oakcli delete dbstorage -db
db_name [-cdb] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
db db_name
Name of the database structure to be deleted
-cdb
Must be passed if you are deleting a multitenant container
database
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-35
oakcli delete commands
Parameter
Description
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command
Example
Delete the sales storage structure:
oakcli delete dbstorage -db sales
4.9.6 oakcli delete repo
Use the oakcli delete repo command to delete a shared repository.
Syntax
oakcli delete repo repository_name [-h]
Parameter
Parameter
Description
repository_name
The name of the shared repository to be deleted
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
Delete the testrepo01 shared repository:
oakcli delete repo testrepo01
The command will not succeed if testrepo01 is active on one or both nodes.
4.9.7 oakcli delete vdisk
Use the oakcli delete vdisk command to delete a virtual disk from a shared
repository on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Syntax
oakcli delete vdisk vdisk_name -repo repository_name [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vdisk_name
Name assigned to the virtual disk
-repo
repository_name
Name of the shared repository where the virtual disk was
created
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4-36 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli delete commands
Example
Remove a virtual disk named t2g from the shared repository named repoprod1:
oakcli delete vdisk t2g -repo repoprod1
4.9.8 oakcli delete vlan
Use the oakcli delete vlan command to delete a virtual local area network.
Syntax
oakcli delete vlan vlan_name -node node_number [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vlan vlan_name
Name of the virtual local area network to be deleted
-node node_number
Oracle Database Appliance node from which you want to
remove the virtual local area network
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
Delete the sample1 virtual local area network from Node 1:
oakcli delete vlan sample1 -node 1
4.9.9 oakcli delete vm
Use the oakcli delete vm command to delete a virtual machine.
Syntax
oakcli delete vm vm_name [-server node_number] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vm vm_name
(Optional) Name of the virtual machine to be deleted
-server node_number
(Optional) Oracle Database Appliance node from which you
want to remove the virtual machine. If this optional parameter
is not included, then the virtual machine is removed from both
nodes.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
Delete the ovu22 virtual machine from Node 1:
oakcli delete vm ovu22 -server 1
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-37
oakcli deploy
4.9.10 oakcli delete vmtemplate
Use the oakcli delete vmtemplate command to delete a virtual machine
template.
Syntax
oakcli delete vmtemplate template_name [-server=node_number][-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
template_name
Name of the virtual machine template to be removed
-server node_number
(Optional) Oracle Database Appliancenode from which you
want to remove the virtual machine template. If this optional
parameter is not included, then the virtual machine template is
removed from both nodes.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
Delete the ovu22 virtual machine template from both nodes:
oakcli delete vmtemplate ovu22
4.10 oakcli deploy
Use the command oakcli deploy to deploy Oracle Grid Infrastructure for a cluster
on Oracle Database Appliance.
Syntax
oakcli deploy [-config] [-conf config_file] [-advance][-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-config
(Optional) Run the Oracle Appliance Manager Configurator.
-conf config_file
(Optional) Preload the configuration stored in the named
configuration file, config_file.
-advance
(Optional) Perform the deployment, or run the Oracle
Appliance Manager Configurator, in advance mode. Use this
option to launch Oracle Appliance Manager and change the
default user ID or group user ID.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4-38 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli describe-cpucore
Usage Notes
When defining the user ID and the group ID, it is a best practice to use different
values.
Examples
Use these examples to understand how to use the command oakcli deploy.
Example 4-6
Deploying the Complete Oracle Database Appliance
oakcli deploy
Example 4-7
Running the Configurator
oakcli deploy -config
Example 4-8
Running the Offline Configurator with Advance Mode
To run the offline Configurator with advance mode, update the config.sh file and
add -advance.
cat config.sh #!/bin/sh java -Djava.util.logging.config.file=onecommand.properties jar onecommand.jar config -advance run ./config.sh
Example 4-9
Preloading an Existing Configuration File
Preload the configuration stored in the configuration file MYCONFIG-VM:
oakcli deploy -conf myconfig -vm_file
Example 4-10
Changing a User Group Name or ID
You can change the following group user names or IDs on the User Group
Information page: GI User, DB User, Install Group, DBA Group, DBA Oper Group,
ASM DBA Group, ASM Oper Group, and ASM Admin Group.
1.
Run the Configurator or Offline Configurator in -advance mode.
2.
Select Custom to display the User Group Information page.
3.
Change the group name or ID, then click Next.
4.
Click Finish.
Example 4-11
Viewing the Log File
The command oakcli deploy creates a log file that is prepended with the character
string STEP*. The log file is stored in the following location:
/opt/oracle/oak/onecmd/tmp/
4.11 oakcli describe-cpucore
Use the oakcli describe-cpucore command to display the current core
configuration and the modification date and time.
File Path
$ORACLE_HOME/opt/oracle/dcs/bin/oakcli
Syntax
oakcli describe-cpucore [-h]
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-39
oakcli expand storage
Parameters
Parameter
Description
--help, -h
(Optional) Displays help for using the
command.
Example 4-12
Displaying the Current Core Configuration
# oakcli describe-cpucore
Node Cores Modified
Job Status
----- ------ ------------------------------ --------------0
8
November 5, 2016 9:39:59 AM SGT Configured
4.12 oakcli expand storage
Use the oakcli expand storage command to configure the 10-pack solid-state
drives (SSDs) for data storage into the existing base configuration to fully populate the
base storage shelf.
File Path
$ORACLE_HOME/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli
Syntax
oakcli expand storage [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the
command.
Usage Notes
After all 10 disks are inserted into the slots, execute the oakcli expand storage
command on both nodes. First on the master node and then wait for 30 seconds and
execute from the slave nodes. It takes about 10 to 12 minutes to add all of the disks.
Example 4-13
Expanding Storage
#oakcli expand storage
Precheck passed.
Successfully formatted 1.6TB SSD disks...
Check the progress of expansion of storage by executing 'oakcli show disk'
Waiting for expansion to finish ...
4.13 oakcli diskwritecache
Use the oakcli diskwritecache command to locate disks with write cache enabled
and to disable disk write cache for those disks.
4-40 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli import vmtemplate
Enabled write caches should be disabled as soon as downtime for Oracle Database
Appliance can be scheduled. During the downtime, use this command with the
disable option for each disk, in turn, that has an enabled write cache.
Syntax
oakcli diskwritecache [disable disk_name | enable disk_name |
status ] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
disable disk_name
(Optional) Disable disk write cache for named disk.
enable disk_name
(Optional) Enable disk write cache for named disk.
status
(Optional) Show the write cache status of all disks.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example 4-14
Displaying the Write Cache Status of Disks
Show the write cache status of all disks:
oakcli diskwritecache status
4.14 oakcli import vmtemplate
Use the oakcli import vmtemplate command to import virtual machine
templates.
Syntax
oakcli import vmtemplate vmtemplatename -files image_files | -assembly assembly_file
-repo repo_name [- node 0 | 1 ][-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vmtemplatename
Name that you want to assign to the template
-files
Use the -files option when importing one or more files that
comprise a template.
image_files
image_files is one of the following:
•
•
•
A single template file name
A comma-separated list of files that comprise a single
template
A URL enclosed in single quotation marks that links to a
template file
-assembly
Use the -assembly option when importing an assembly file.
assembly_file
An assembly file, or a URL enclosed in single quotation marks,
that links to an assembly file
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-41
oakcli import vmtemplate
Parameter
Description
repo_name
Name of the repository to store the template or templates that
you are importing
-node
When you are importing to a shared repository, use the -node
option with a value of 0 or 1 to identify the node.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
•
Include only one of the options, -files or -assembly, each time you run this
command. You cannot include both of these options in the same statement.
•
If the command imports more than one template from an assembly, then each
template will automatically be given a unique name. These template names will
include the name given in the vmtemplate vmtemplatename clause followed
by a sequence number, such as vmtemplatename1, vmtemplatename2, and
vmtemplatename3.
•
When importing into a shared repository, you must include the -node option
with a valid node number, 0 or 1. Using the -node option for imports into nonshared repositories will cause the command to fail.
Examples
Here are examples of how to use the oakcli import vmtemplate command.
Example 4-15
Importing a Virtual Machine Template from Dom0
Import the required template (OVM_OL5U7_X86_64_PVM_10GB.tgz) from the /OVS
directory in Dom0 into the odarepo1 repository and name the template file OL5U7:
oakcli import vmtemplate OL5U7 -files /OVS/OVM_OL5U7_X86_64_PVM_10GB.tgz -repo
odarepo1
Example 4-16
Importing a Virtual Machine Template from a Remote Server
Import a template from a remote server using a URL to identify the server and the
template file:
oakcli import vmtemplate OL5U6 -files 'http://example.com/vm-template/OEL-5/
OVM_OL5U6_X86_64_PVM_10GB.tgz' -repo odarepo2
Example 4-17
Server
Importing Virtual Machine Templates from an Assembly on a Remote
Import the templates contained in the assembly file stored on a remote server at the
URL provided into the odarepo1 repository:
oakcli import vmtemplate OL6U1 -assembly 'http://example.com/assemblies/OEL6/
OVM_OL6U1_x86_PVHVM.ova' -repo odarepo1
Example 4-18 Importing Virtual Machine Templates Into a Shared Repository From
an Assembly on a Remote Server
Import the templates contained in the assembly file stored on a remote server at the
URL provided into a shared repository named repo4 on Node 1:
4-42 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli locate disk
oakcli import vmtemplate OL6U1 -assembly 'http://example.com/assemblies/OEL6/
OVM_OL6U1_x86_PVHVM.ova' -repo repo4 -node 1
4.15 oakcli locate disk
Use the oakcli locate disk command to locate the physical disk that is
associated with a named Oracle ASM disk by turning the disk's LED light on or off.
Syntax
oakcli locate disk diskname [on|off][-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
diskname
Name of the Oracle ASM disk to locate
on
(Optional) Turns on the LED of the named disk
off
(Optional) Turns off the LED of the named disk
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example 4-19
Locating an Oracle ASM Disk by Turning on the Disk’s LED
Turn on the LED of the Oracle ASM disk named disk pd_23:
oakcli locate disk pd_23 on
4.16 oakcli manage diagcollect
Use the oakcli manage diagcollect command to collect diagnostic information
about Oracle Database Appliance for troubleshooting purposes, and for working with
Oracle Support Services.
Syntax
oakcli manage diagcollect [--all | --crs [--crshome crs_home_dir]
(continued)
[--core] | --install | --chmos [--incidenttime time] [--incidentduration time]
(continued)
|--adr adr_location [--afterdate date]
(continued)
[--aftertime time] [--beforetime time] ]
[excl comp1,comp2,...] [--clean] [--storage][-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
--all
Collect all of the diagnostic information excluding Automatic
Diagnostic Repository (ADR) and Cluster Health Monitor. This
is the default option.
--crs
Collect Oracle Clusterware diagnostic information.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-43
oakcli migrate vm
Parameter
Description
--crshome
crs_home_dir
Specifies the location of the Oracle Clusterware home directory
--core
Package core files with the Oracle Clusterware diagnostic data.
--install
Collect the installation logs when the installation failed before
running the script root.sh.
--adr adr_location
Collect diagnostic information for ADR, where adr_location
specifies the location of the ADR information.
--afterdate date
Collect archives from the specified date. Specify the date in the
mm/dd/yyyy format.
--aftertime time
Collect the archives after the specified time. Enter the time
using the format YYYYMMDDHHMMSS24. Supported only with
the -adr parameter.
--beforetime time
Collect the archives before the specified time. Enter the time
using the format: YYYYMMDDHHMMSS24. Supported only the
with the -adr parameter.
--chmos
Collect Cluster Health Monitor data.
--incidenttime time
Collect Cluster Health Monitor data from the specified time.
Enter the time using the format: YYYYMMDDHHMMSS24.
If you do not use the --incidenttime parameter, then the
command collects data for the past 24 hours.
--incidentduration
time
Collect Cluster Health Monitor data for the duration after the
specified time. Enter the time using the format: HH:MM. If you
do not specify a duration, then the command collects all Cluster
Health Monitor data after the specified incident time.
--excl [comp1,comp2...]
Exclude the specified component logs. Valid components are:
acfs, invt, sys, ocr, crs, home, and base.
--clean
Remove the diagnosability information gathered by this
command.
--storage
Collect all of the logs for any storage issues. The logs can be
used when you are experiencing any problems with storage
and need support to diagnose the logs.
--h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4.17 oakcli migrate vm
Use the oakcli migrate vm command to migrate a currently running virtual
machine to another node.
Syntax
oakcli migrate vm vmname [-h]
4-44 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli modify commands
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vmname
Name of the virtual machine to be migrated
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4.18 oakcli modify commands
Use the oakcli modify commands to modify the database, an existing virtual
machine or virtual machine template.
You can use oakcli modify to modify databases, attach virtual disks to or detach
virtual disks from virtual machines, transmit first-boot installation configuration
messages to virtual machines, and to assign networks to or delete networks from
virtual machines and virtual machine templates.
Topics:
oakcli modify database (page 4-45)
Use the oakcli modify database command to modify the database
type or size class for a named database.
oakcli modify vm (page 4-46)
Use the oakcli modify vm command to modify an existing virtual
machine.
oakcli modify vmtemplate (page 4-47)
Use the oakcli modify vmtemplate command to add networks to
or delete networks from an existing virtual machine template.
4.18.1 oakcli modify database
Use the oakcli modify database command to modify the database type or size
class for a named database.
Syntax
oakcli modify database -db db name [-dbtypeOLTP|DSS|in-Memory] [-to dbSizeclass]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-db db-name
Identifies the database being modified.
-dbtype OLTP|DSS|inMemory
(Optional) Changes the database type. The parameter dbtype
takes one of the following three options:
•
•
•
OLTP: Online transaction processing
DSS: Decision support system
in-Memory: Oracle Database In-Memory
-to dbclass
(Optional) Changes the database size class.
-h
(Optional) Displays help for using the command.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-45
oakcli modify commands
Usage Notes
Note: When you resize the database, the redo log file size is not modified
automatically. Change the size of the redo log manually to the size that you
require for your applications.
Example 4-20
Modifying the Database Type
Here are examples of how to use the oakcli modify database command.
Change the database type assigned to the database dbhome_1 to a DSS database:
oakcli modify database DB dbhome_1 -dbtype DSS
Example 4-21
Modifying the Database Size
Change the database size for the database named dbhome_1 to a 6-core CPU Oracle
Database Appliance DSS database template:
oakcli modify database dbhome_1 -to odb-06
4.18.2 oakcli modify vm
Use the oakcli modify vm command to modify an existing virtual machine.
Syntax
oakcli modify vm vmname [-attachvdisk|-deletenetworkvlanname] [-s
key1:value1;key2:value2;...] [-addnetwork|-deletenetworkvlanname] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-attachvdiskvdisk_name
(Optional) Attaches the named VDisk (virtual disk) to the
named virtual machine.
-detachvdiskvdisk_name
(Optional) Detaches the named VDisk disk from the named
virtual machine.
-s
key1:value1;key2:val
ue2;...
(Optional) Identifies a message consisting of one or more
semicolon separated key:value pairs to send to the ovmd utility.
Each key and value is separated by a colon (:) and each key/
value pair is separated from the next key/value pair by
quotation marks.
-addnetworkvlanname
(Optional) Adds a VLAN network to the named virtual
machine.
deletenetworkvlannam
e
(Optional) Removes a VLAN network from the named virtual
machine.
-h
(Optional) Displays help for using the command.
4-46 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli orachk
Usage Notes
•
Do not use the -attachvdisk or the -detachvdisk option with the addnetwork, -deletenetwork, or -s parameters.
•
Include only one of the -addnetwork, -deletenetwork, or -s parameters
when you use this command.
Example 4-22
Sending a Message to a Running Virtual Machine
Update the root user password for the gc_11g virtual machine:
oakcli modify vm gc_11g -s "com.oracle.linux.root-password:root123"
4.18.3 oakcli modify vmtemplate
Use the oakcli modify vmtemplate command to add networks to or delete
networks from an existing virtual machine template.
Syntax
oakcli modify vmtemplate vmtemplatename [-addnetwork|-deletenetworkvlanname] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-addnetworkvlanname
(Optional) Adds a VLAN network to the named virtual
machine template
deketenetworkvlannam
e
(Optional) Deletes a VLAN network from the named virtual
machine template
-h
(Optional) Displays help for using the command.
Example 4-23
Modifying the Network Defined in a Virtual Machine Template
Replace the network assigned to the gc_11g virtual machine template with the net1
network:
oakcli modify vmtemplate gc_11g -addnetwork net1
4.19 oakcli orachk
Use the oakcli orachk command to audit configuration settings with the ORAchk
utility.
Syntax
oakcli orachk [-a|-b|-v|-h|-p|-f|-m[-u -o][o]-c -t][clusternodes |-localonly][-debug][-dbnames |-dbnone|-dball]
[upgrade]listlist
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-47
oakcli orachk
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-a
Perform a best practice check and recommended patch check.
-b
Perform a best practice check only without the recommended
patch check.
-v
Display version.
-h
Display command usage (help).
-p
Perform patch check only.
-f
Run the command offline.
-m
Exclude checks for Maximum Availability scorecards.
-u -o
Perform check on pre-upgrade best practices (-u -o pre) or on
post-upgrade best practices (-u -o post).
-o
As an argument to an option, if -o is followed by v, V,
Verbose, or VERBOSE, output will display checks that pass on
the display. Without the -o option, only failures will display on
the screen.
-c
Determines granularity of information displayed on the screen.
For use only when working with Oracle Support Services.
-clusternodes list
list is a comma-delimited list containing the names of the
nodes where the command should run.
-localonly
Run the command only on the local node.
-debug
Creates a debug log.
-dbnames list
list is a comma-delimited list containing the names of the
subset of databases on which the command should run.
-dbnone
Skip all database-related checks on all databases without
prompting to select which database to skip.
-dball
Run all database-related checks on all databases without
prompting to select which databases to check.
-upgrade
Force upgrade of the version of the ORAchk utility being run.
Usage Notes
•
The command offers multiple options that are generic to the ORAchk command
when run on servers other than the Oracle Database Appliance server. You can
find details about these options by running the command oakcli orachk -h.
The options are grouped into the following categories, but this document does not
list the options for each category:
–
Report Options
4-48 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli reconfigure osparams
•
–
Auto Restart Options
–
Daemon Options
–
Profile Run Options
For more information about ORAchk, see My Oracle Support note 1268927.2,
"ORAchk Health Checks for the Oracle Stack" at https://
support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&amp;amp;type=NOT&amp;amp;id=1268927.2
4.20 oakcli reconfigure osparams
Use the oakcli reconfigure osparams command to adjust the kernel
parameters based on the available RAM after you upgrade memory or DIMM.
After you change or expand memory on Oracle Database Appliance, use the oakcli
reconfigure osparams command to display the current configuration and
suggested values for memlock and vm.nr_hugepages. When prompted, answer yes
or no to change the value to the suggested value.
Syntax
oakcli reconfigure osparams [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-h
(Optional) Displays help for using the command.
Usage Notes
After you change or expand memory on Oracle Database Appliance, use this
command to update the kernel parameters.
Note: When adjusting the settings, ensure that you make the changes on both
nodes.
Example 4-24
Reconfiguring the Kernel Based on Available RAM
In this example, the output displays the configured and suggested values for memlock
and the configured and suggested values for vm.nr_hugepages. In this example the
responses were no for both parameters and the suggested values were not
implemented.
# oakcli reconfigure osparams
Configured value for memlock is: 11000000
Suggested value for memlock is: 11000000
Do you want to use suggested value of memlock?: yes/no
no
User entered no, not updating kernel.memlock
Configured value for vm.nr_hugepages is: 2048
Suggested value for vm.nr_hugepages parameter is: 4150
Do you want to update to suggested value?: yes/no
no
User entered no, not updating kernel.vm.nr_hugepages
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-49
oakcli resize dbstorage
4.21 oakcli resize dbstorage
Use the oakcli resize dbstorage command to resize the space used for a
storage structure that was created for the purpose of migrating databases from Oracle
ASM to Oracle ACFS.
You can check the current space usage using oakcli show fs and then add space
using oakcli resize dbstorage.
Note: You cannot decrease the size of the space used for Oracle ACFS.
Syntax
oakcli resize dbstorage -data size -reco size -redo size -db
db_name [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-data size
Extendable size in GB for the DATA volume.
-reco size
Extendable size in GB for the REDO volume.
-redo size
Extendable size in GB for the RECO volume.
-db db_name
Database for which these volumes must be resized.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example 4-25
Increasing the Size of the DATA Volume
Increase the size of the volume by 10 GB on the DATA volume:
oakcli resize dbstorage -data 10
4.22 oakcli restart oda_base
Use the oakcli restart oda_base command to stop and restart ODA_BASE on
the local node.
Use this command only when you are not concerned about the current status of
ODA_BASE, because it performs a forced shutdown. You must run this command
from Dom0. Typically, if ODA_BASE needs to be restarted, then you must restart it on
both nodes.
Syntax
oakcli restart oda_base [-h]
The ODA_BASE that you want to restart is on the same node as the Dom0 from which
you run this command.
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4-50 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli show commands
4.23 oakcli show commands
Use the oakcli show commands to display the status of Oracle Database Appliance
components.
The oakcli show commands display status information for the node where you run
the command. To see the list of components available on the current node, use the
help option: oakcli show -h:
Note:
Depending on your model and version of Oracle Database Appliance
software, the oakcli show command options may differ from the ones
shown in this section and explained in the following sections. To obtain an
annotated list of components available on your system, run the command
oakcli show -h.
Topics:
oakcli show asr (page 4-53)
Use the oakcli show asr command to display your Oracle Auto
Service Request configuration details.
oakcli show cooling (page 4-54)
Use the oakcli show cooling command to display the status of the
cooling units.
oakcli show controller (page 4-54)
Use the oakcli show controller command to display information
about the disk controllers.
oakcli show core_config_key (page 4-55)
Use the oakcli show core_config_key command to display
information about how to deploy your Oracle Database Appliance cores.
oakcli show cpupool (page 4-55)
Use the oakcli show cpupool command to display core allocations
to virtual machine mappings.
oakcli show databases (page 4-56)
Use the oakcli show databases command to display information
about each existing database, including database name, database type,
database home name and location, and database version.
oakcli show db_config_params (page 4-56)
Use the oakcli show db_config_params command to display
configuration file names and parameters.
oakcli show dbhomes (page 4-57)
Use the oakcli show dbhomes command to display information
about each existing Oracle database home, including home name, home
location, and database version.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-51
oakcli show commands
oakcli show dbstorage (page 4-57)
Use the oakcli show dbstorage command to display database
storage information for databases created on Oracle Automatic Storage
Management Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS).
oakcli show disk (page 4-58)
Use the oakcli show disk command to display disk information.
oakcli show diskgroup (page 4-59)
Use the oakcli show diskgroup command to display Oracle
Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) disk group information.
oakcli show enclosure (page 4-60)
Use the oakcli show enclosure command to display information
about the storage enclosure subsystem on the node where the command
is executed.
oakcli show env_hw (page 4-60)
Use the oakcli show env_hw command to display the environment
type and hardware version of the current node.
oakcli show expander (page 4-60)
Use the oakcli show expander command to display information
about a SAS expander.
oakcli show ib (page 4-61)
Use the oakcli show ib command to display InfiniBand card and
port information if InfiniBand exists in the system.
oakcli show fs (page 4-61)
Use the oakcli show fs command to display all database and cloudfs
file systems created on ASM Cluster File System (ACFS) in addition to
the local file systems on the Oracle Database Appliance node.
oakcli show iraid (page 4-61)
Use the oakcli show iraid command to display internal RAID and
local disk information.
oakcli show ismaster (page 4-61)
oakcli show memory (page 4-62)
Use the oakcli show memory command to display information about
memory modules.
oakcli show network (page 4-62)
Use the oakcli show network command to display information
about the network subsystem.
oakcli show power (page 4-62)
Use the oakcli show power command to display information about
the power supply subsystem.
oakcli show processor (page 4-63)
Use the oakcli show processor command to display information
about CPU processors.
oakcli show raidsyncstatus (page 4-63)
Use the oakcli show raidsyncstatus command to display the
status of the RAID rebuild after a failed local disk is replaced.
4-52 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli show commands
oakcli show repo (page 4-64)
Use the oakcli show repo command to display information about
virtual machine repositories.
oakcli show server (page 4-65)
Use the oakcli show server command to display information about
the server subsystem.
oakcli show storage (page 4-65)
Use the oakcli show storage command to display information
about the storage for controllers, expanders, and disks.
oakcli show validation storage (page 4-65)
Use the oakcli show validation storage command to show
whether validation storage is enabled or disabled.
oakcli show validation storage errors (page 4-65)
Use the oakcli show validation storage errors command to
show hard storage errors.
oakcli show validation storage failures (page 4-66)
Use the oakcli show validation storage failures command
to show soft validation errors. A typical soft disk error would be an
invalid version of the disk firmware.
oakcli show vdisk (page 4-66)
Use the oakcli show vdisk command to display information about
virtual disks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
oakcli show version (page 4-67)
Use the oakcli show version command to display the applied patch
versions for Oracle Database Appliance software and firmware.
oakcli show vlan (page 4-68)
Use the oakcli show vlan command to display information about
virtual local area networks (VLANs) configured on Oracle Database
Appliance.
oakcli show vm (page 4-69)
oakcli show vmconsole (page 4-70)
Use the oakcli show vmconsole command to open a GUI virtual
machine console to manage a specific virtual machine.
oakcli show vmtemplate (page 4-71)
Use the oakcli show vmtemplate command to display information
about virtual machine templates.
4.23.1 oakcli show asr
Use the oakcli show asr command to display your Oracle Auto Service Request
configuration details.
Syntax
oakcli show asr [-h]
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-53
oakcli show commands
Parameters
(Optional) -h displays the help for using this command.
4.23.2 oakcli show cooling
Use the oakcli show cooling command to display the status of the cooling units.
Syntax
oakcli show cooling [-h]
Parameters
(Optional) -h displays the help for using this command.
Example
Display the cooling unit information for the node where the command is executed:
oakcli
NAME
Fan_0
Fan_1
Fan_10
Fan_11
Fan_12
Fan_13
Fan_14
Fan_15
Fan_2
Fan_3
Fan_4
Fan_5
Fan_6
Fan_7
Fan_8
Fan_9
show cooling
HEALTH HEALTH_DETAILS
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
-
LOCATION
FM0
FM0
FM2
FM2
FM3
FM3
FM3
FM3
FM0
FM0
FM1
FM1
FM1
FM1
FM2
FM2
FAN %
30 %
19 %
34 %
23 %
32 %
22 %
24 %
14 %
29 %
18 %
32 %
20 %
33 %
22 %
33 %
22 %
FAN SPEED
6300 RPM
3800 RPM
6600 RPM
4100 RPM
6300 RPM
3900 RPM
4700 RPM
2500 RPM
6400 RPM
3700 RPM
6400 RPM
3700 RPM
6400 RPM
3800 RPM
6400 RPM
3900 RPM
4.23.3 oakcli show controller
Use the oakcli show controller command to display information about the disk
controllers.
Syntax
oakcli show controller controller_id [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
controller_id
Specifies the controller for which to display information
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Displaying Disk Controller Details
Display details of controller 0:
4-54 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli show commands
oakcli show controller 0
4.23.4 oakcli show core_config_key
Use the oakcli show core_config_key command to display information about
how to deploy your Oracle Database Appliance cores.
Syntax
oakcli show core_config_key
Examples
Here are examples of how to use the oakcli show core_config_key command.
Determining Whether the Oracle Database Appliance Core Configuration Key
Has Been Applied
Show the core count status on a new Oracle Database Appliance that has not been
configured:
oakcli show core_config_key
Optional core_config_key is not applied on this machine yet!
Displaying the Oracle Database Appliance Core Count Status on a Configured
Oracle Database Appliance
Show the core count status on a previously configured Oracle Database Appliance:
oakcli show core_config_key
Host's serialnumber = 1132FMW003
Configured Cores = 20
4.23.5 oakcli show cpupool
Use the oakcli show cpupool command to display core allocations to virtual
machine mappings.
Syntax
oakcli show cpupool -node nodenum
nodenum is the number of the Oracle Database Appliance node that you want to
examine, either 0 or 1.
Displaying Core Mapping for Node 0
Display the core mapping information for Node 0:
oakcli show cpupool -node 0
Pool
Cpu List
default-unpinned-pool [14, 15, 16, 17,
18, 19, 20, 21,
22, 23]
twocpu
[12, 13]
odaBaseCpuPool
[0, 1, 2, 3, 10
, 11]
VM List
['test1_odarepo1','sample5_odarepo1',
'vm_very_long_name_sample1_odarepo1',
'win_vm1']
['vm1_odarepo1']
['oakDom1']
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-55
oakcli show commands
4.23.6 oakcli show databases
Use the oakcli show databases command to display information about each
existing database, including database name, database type, database home name and
location, and database version.
Syntax
oakcli show databases [-h]
Parameters
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
Example
#oakcli show databases
Name Type
Storage
---- ---------db1 RAC
ACFS
db2 SINGLE
ACFS
db3 RACOneNode ACFS
db4 RAC
ACFS
HomeName
-------OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home2
OraDb12102_home3
OraDb12102_home4
HomeLocation
-----------/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_2
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_3
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_4
Version
------12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
4.23.7 oakcli show db_config_params
Use the oakcli show db_config_params command to display configuration file
names and parameters.
The command searches for files with the extension .dbconf located in the /opt/
oracle/oak/install/dbconf directory.
Syntax
oakcli show db_config_params [-conf filename] [-detail] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-conf filename
(Optional) Name of configuration file to be displayed. If not
included, then the command displays all configuration files.
-detail
(Optional) Display the parameter values stored in the
configuration file or files.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Displaying the Default Database Configuration Parameters
Display the default database configuration parameter values stored in the
configuration file or files:
oakcli show db_config_params -detail
Available DB configuration files are:
Default
4-56 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli show commands
DATABASE_BLOCK_SIZE
DATABASE_LANGUAGE
DATABASE_CHARACTERSET
DATABASE_TERRITORY
COMPONENT_LANGUAGES
=>
=>
=>
=>
=>
8192
AMERICAN
AL32UTF8
AMERICA
en
4.23.8 oakcli show dbhomes
Use the oakcli show dbhomes command to display information about each
existing Oracle database home, including home name, home location, and database
version.
Syntax
oakcli show dbhomes [-detail] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-detail
(Optional) Include a list of databases associated with each
home.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example
oakcli show dbhomes -detail
Oracle HomeName
--------------OraDb11203_home1
OraDb11204_home1
OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home1
OraDb12102_home1
Oracle Home Version
------------------11.2.0.3.15(20760997,17592127)
11.2.0.4.8(21352635,21352649)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
12.1.0.2.5(21359755,21359758)
Oracle HomeLocation
Database Name Database Type
------------------------------- ------------/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0.3/dbhome_1 no DB available
/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0.4/dbhome_1 no DB available
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 one43
RACOneNode
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 ee120
SINGLE
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 one311
RACOneNode
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 ee311
SINGLE
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 rac311
RAC
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 ee43
SINGLE
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 one120
RACOneNode
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 odacn
RAC
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 rac43
RAC
/u01/app/oracle/product/12.1.0.2/dbhome_1 rac120
RAC
4.23.9 oakcli show dbstorage
Use the oakcli show dbstorage command to display database storage
information for databases created on Oracle Automatic Storage Management Cluster
File System (Oracle ACFS).
All non-cdb databases are listed together, because they share a common set of
volumes. Each CDB database is listed separately.
Syntax
oakcli show dbstorage [-db ][-h]db_name
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-57
oakcli show commands
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-db dbname
(Optional) Display the name of the database for the storage
information.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 or X4-2 with a Storage Expansion Shelf
Here is an example of the oakcli show dbstorage command output for an Oracle
Database Appliance plus the storage expansion shelf. The output includes both CDB
and non-CDB databases. The Available heading shows the available AFCS storage,
which can be auto-extended. Half of the available disk group storage is allocated to
Oracle ACFS, except for the FLASH disk group. In the FLASH disk group, all storage
is allocated to Oracle ACFS.
# oakcli show dbstorage
All the DBs with DB TYPE as non-CDB share the same volumes
DB_NAMES DB_TYPE Filesystem
-------- ------- ---------odacn
CDB
/u01/app/oracle/oradata/rdoodacn
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/datodacn
/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/rcoodacn
Size
---5G
100G
132G
Used Available AutoExtend Size DiskGroup
---- --------- --------------- --------3.15G
1.85G
1G
REDO
3.86G 96.14G
10G
DATA
0.92G 131.08G
13G
RECO
rac120, rac401, ra non-CDB /u01/app/oracle/oradata/datastore 60G 11.30G 48.70G
c408
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/datastore
1027G 5.77G 1021.23G
/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/datastore 1336G 7.27G 1328.73G
cdbracon CDB
/u01/app/oracle/oradata/rdocdbracon
6G
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/datcdbracon
100G
/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/rcocdbracon 132G
4.15G
1.85G
4.05G 95.95G
0.79G 131.21G
5G
REDO
102G
133G
DATA
RECO
1G
10G
13G
REDO
DATA
RECO
Oracle Database Appliance X5-2 with a Storage Expansion Shelf and Non-CDB
Databases
Here is an example of the oakcli show dbstorage command output for an Oracle
Database Appliance plus the storage expansion shelf. The output includes only nonCDB databases. Half of the available disk group storage is allocated to Oracle ACFS,
except for the FLASH disk group. In the FLASH disk group, all storage is allocated to
Oracle ACFS.
# oakcli show dbstorage
All the DBs with DB TYPE as non-CDB share the same volumes
DB_NAMES
DB_TYPE Filesystem
Size
Used
-------------- -------------- ---db1, db2, db3, db4 non-CDB /u01/app/oracle/oradata/datastore 62G 27.26G
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/datastore 3730G 7.86G
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/flashdata 558G 205.25G
/u01/app/oracle/fast_recovery_area/datastore
4958G 21.05G
Available AutoExtend Size
--------- --------------34.74G
6G
3722.14G
373G
352.75G
55G
4936.95G
495G
4.23.10 oakcli show disk
Use the oakcli show disk command to display disk information.
4-58 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
DiskGroup
--------REDO
DATA
FLASH
RECO
oakcli show commands
Syntax
oakcli show disk [-shared | -local | -shared_disk_name |-asm [-all][-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-local
(Optional) Display information for all of the local disks.
-shared
(Optional) Display information for all of the shared disks.
-shared_disk_name
(Optional) Display information for only the specified shared
disk.
-asm
(Optional) Displays information for an assembly.
-all
(Optional) Display complete details of the selected disk or
disks.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
•
Running the command with no parameters is identical to running the oakcli
show disk -shared command.
•
The -all parameter produces valid output only when used with the
shared_disk_name parameter. All other parameters are optional and cannot be
combined with other parameters.
Example 4-26
Displaying Information About the Local Disks
oakcli show disk -local
Example 4-27
Displaying Information About the Shared Disks
oakcli show disk -shared
Example 4-28
Displaying Information About a Specific Shared Disk
Display information about the shared disk named pd_01:
oakcli show disk -shared pd_01
4.23.11 oakcli show diskgroup
Use the oakcli show diskgroup command to display Oracle Automatic Storage
Management (Oracle ASM) disk group information.
Syntax
oakcli show diskgroup [disk_group_name][-h]
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-59
oakcli show commands
Parameters
Parameter
Description
disk_group_name
(Optional) The name of an Oracle ASM disk group for which
complete details should be displayed. If you do not specify this
parameter, then information for all of the Oracle ASM disk
groups is displayed.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4.23.12 oakcli show enclosure
Use the oakcli show enclosure command to display information about the
storage enclosure subsystem on the node where the command is executed.
Syntax
oakcli show enclosure [-h]
Parameter
-h displays help for using the command.
4.23.13 oakcli show env_hw
Use the oakcli show env_hw command to display the environment type and
hardware version of the current node.
Syntax
oakcli show env_hw [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
Example
Show the environment type and hardware model when logged in to ODA_BASE on
Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 Virtualized Platform:
oakcli show env_hw
VM-ODA_BASE ODA X3-2
4.23.14 oakcli show expander
Use the oakcli show expander command to display information about a SAS
expander.
Syntax
oakcli show expander [expander_id] [-h]
4-60 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli show commands
Parameter
Parameter
Description
expander_id
(Optional) Identifies the specific SAS expander
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4.23.15 oakcli show ib
Use the oakcli show ib command to display InfiniBand card and port information
if InfiniBand exists in the system.
Syntax
oakcli show ib [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4.23.16 oakcli show fs
Use the oakcli show fs command to display all database and cloudfs file systems
created on ASM Cluster File System (ACFS) in addition to the local file systems on the
Oracle Database Appliance node.
Syntax
oakcli show fs [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4.23.17 oakcli show iraid
Use the oakcli show iraid command to display internal RAID and local disk
information.
This command is only available on X5-2 systems and later.
Syntax
oakcli show iraid [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4.23.18 oakcli show ismaster
Use the oakcli show ismaster command to determine which node is the master
node.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-61
oakcli show commands
File Path
$ORACLE_HOME/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli
Syntax
oakcli show ismaster [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the
command.
Example 4-29
Determining Which Node is the Master Node
# oakcli show ismaster
4.23.19 oakcli show memory
Use the oakcli show memory command to display information about memory
modules.
Syntax
oakcli show memory [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4.23.20 oakcli show network
Use the oakcli show network command to display information about the network
subsystem.
Syntax
oakcli show network
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4.23.21 oakcli show power
Use the oakcli show power command to display information about the power
supply subsystem.
Syntax
oakcli show power [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4-62 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli show commands
Example 4-30
Displaying Power Supply Information
Display the power supply information of the node where the command is executed:
# oakcli show power
NAME
HEALTH HEALTH_DETAILS PART_NO. SERIAL_NO.
LOCATION
INPUT_POWER OUTPUT_POWER INLET_TEMP
EXHAUST_TEMP
Power_Supply_0 OK
7047410 476856F+1242CE0020 PS0
Present
113 watts
33.250 degree C 36.688 degree C
Power_Supply_1 OK
7047410 476856F+1242CE004J PS1
Present
89 watts
37.000 degree C 39.438 degree C
4.23.22 oakcli show processor
Use the oakcli show processor command to display information about CPU
processors.
Syntax
oakcli show processor [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
Displaying CPU Processor Information
Display the CPU processor information of the node where the command is executed:
oakcli show processor
NAME HEALTH HEALTH_DETAILS PART_NO. LOCATION
MODEL
MAX_CLK_SPEED TOTAL_CORES ENABLED_CORES
CPU_0 OK
060D
Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2690 2.900 GHZ
CPU_1 OK
060D
Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2690 2.900 GHZ
P0 (CPU 0)
8
P1 (CPU 1)
8
8
8
4.23.23 oakcli show raidsyncstatus
Use the oakcli show raidsyncstatus command to display the status of the
RAID rebuild after a failed local disk is replaced.
Note:
The show raidsyncstatus command is only supported on a bare metal
platform; it is not supported on the virtualized platform. For general RAID
information, use the oakcli show iraid command.
Syntax
oakcli show raidsyncstatus [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-63
oakcli show commands
4.23.24 oakcli show repo
Use the oakcli show repo command to display information about virtual machine
repositories.
Syntax
oakcli show repo [reponame -node 0|1] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
reponame
[Optional] Identifies a specific repository name
-node
[Optional] Identifies the node number 0 or 1
-h
[Optional] Display help for using the command.
To see all repositories, omit the repository name and node number. To see a specific
shared repository, include the repository name and node.
Examples
Here are examples of how to use the oakcli show repo command.
Example 4-31
Displaying the Available Virtual Machine Repositories
Display the virtual machine repositories on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform nodes:
oakcli show repo
NAME
odarepo1
odarepo2
repo1
repo1
Example 4-32
REPOTYPE
local
local
shared
shared
NODENUM
0
1
0
1
Displaying Details About a Specific Shared Repository
Display information about the repository named repo1 on Node 1:
oakcli show repo repo1 -node 1
Resource: repo1_1
AutoStart
DG
Device
ExpectedState
MountPoint
Name
Node
RepoType
Size
State
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
restore
DATA
/dev/asm/repo1-286
Online
/u01/app/repo1
repo1_0
all
shared
102400
Online
4-64 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli show commands
4.23.25 oakcli show server
Use the oakcli show server command to display information about the server
subsystem.
Syntax
oakcli show server [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4.23.26 oakcli show storage
Use the oakcli show storage command to display information about the storage
for controllers, expanders, and disks.
Syntax
oakcli show storage -errors [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-errors
Display detailed information about reported errors.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4.23.27 oakcli show validation storage
Use the oakcli show validation storage command to show whether
validation storage is enabled or disabled.
Syntax
oakcli show validation storage [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
Example 4-33
Determining if Storage Validation is Enabled
# oakcli show validation storage
Enabled
4.23.28 oakcli show validation storage errors
Use the oakcli show validation storage errors command to show hard
storage errors.
Hard errors include having the wrong type of disk inserted into a particular slot, an
invalid disk model, or an incorrect disk size.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-65
oakcli show commands
Syntax
oakcli show validation storage errors [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4.23.29 oakcli show validation storage failures
Use the oakcli show validation storage failures command to show soft
validation errors. A typical soft disk error would be an invalid version of the disk
firmware.
Syntax
oakcli show validation storage failures [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
4.23.30 oakcli show vdisk
Use the oakcli show vdisk command to display information about virtual disks
on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform.
Syntax
oakcli show vdisk [vdisk_name -repo repository_name] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vdisk_name
(Optional) Display information for just one virtual disk.
-repo repository_name
Required parameter if a virtual disk is specified in the
command
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Examples
Here are examples of how to use the oakcli show vdisk command.
Example 4-34
Displaying Information for All Virtual Disks
Display information about all virtual disks on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform:
# oakcli show vdisk
NAME
myvdisk
newv
SIZE
10G
1G
TYPE
local
local
4-66 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
REPOSITORY
vdiskrepo
vdiskrepo
oakcli show commands
Example 4-35
Displaying Information for a Single Virtual Disk
Display information for the virtual disk named myvdisk1:
# oakcli show vdisk myvdisk1
Resource: myvdisk_vdiskrepo
Name
:
myvdisk_vdiskrepo
RepoName
:
vdiskrepo
Size
:
10G
Type
:
local
VmAttached :
0
4.23.31 oakcli show version
Use the oakcli show version command to display the applied patch versions for
Oracle Database Appliance software and firmware.
Syntax
oakcli show version [-detail] [-h]
Parameter
Description
-detail
(Optional) Display detailed version information.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
When you apply the patch and then run the command oakcli show version detail, the output shows the installed version and that the supported versions are
Up-to-date for each component. If you unpack the patch bundle (oakcli unpack
-pack) and then run the command oakcli show version -detail before
applying the patch, the output shows No-update in the Supported Version column.
Note: After unpacking the patch bundle, but before applying the patch, use
the oakcli update -patch version --verify command to verify the
contents of the patch instead of issuing oakcli show version -detail.
Displaying the Oracle Database Appliance Version
This is an example of how to determine if all of the components are successfully
updated after applying the 12.1.2.10.0 patch. You can also view the applied patch
version information for the software and firmware on Oracle Database Appliance. All
components are successfully updated when Up-to-date appears in the Supported
Version column.
# oakcli show version -detail
Mon Feb 13 03:31:48 PST 2017
Reading the metadata. It takes a while...
System Version Component Name
Installed Version
Version
-------------- -----------------------------------------------12.1.2.10.0
Controller_INT
4.230.40-3739
Supported
Up-to-date
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-67
oakcli show commands
Controller_EXT
09.00.00.00
Up-to-date
Expander
0291
Up-to-date
A29A
Up-to-date
A29A
Up-to-date
SSD_LOCAL
0R3Q
Up-to-date
ILOM
3.2.8.24 r114611
Up-to-date
BIOS
38070000
Up-to-date
IPMI
1.8.12.4
Up-to-date
HMP
2.3.5.2.8
Up-to-date
OAK
12.1.2.10.0
Up-to-date
OL
6.8
Up-to-date
GI_HOME
12.1.0.2.170117(2473
Up-to-date
SSD_SHARED {
[ c2d20,c2d21,c2d22,
c2d23 ]
[ c2d0,c2d1,c2d2,c2d
3,c2d4,c2d5,c2d6,c2d
7,c2d8,c2d9,c2d10,c2
d11,c2d12,c2d13,c2d1
4,c2d15,c2d16,c2d17,
c2d18,c2d19 ]
}
2082,24828633)
DB_HOME
12.1.0.2.170117(2473
Up-to-date
2082,24828633)
Related Topics:
oakcli update (page 4-76)
Use the oakcli update command to apply Oracle Database Appliance
patches.
4.23.32 oakcli show vlan
Use the oakcli show vlan command to display information about virtual local
area networks (VLANs) configured on Oracle Database Appliance.
4-68 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli show commands
Syntax
oakcli show vlan [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
Example 4-36
Displaying Details of Available Virtual Area Networks (VLANs)
Display the names, tag ID numbers, networks, and node assignments for the available
virtual local area networks:
oakcli show vlan
NAME
net1
net1
net2
net2
net3
net3
net4
net4
priv1
priv1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
ID
INTERFACE
bond1
bond1
bond2
bond2
bond3
bond3
xbond0
xbond0
bond0
bond0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
NODENUM
4.23.33 oakcli show vm
Use the oakcli show vm command to display information about virtual machines.
Syntax
oakcli show vm [vm_name | -h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vm_name
(Optional) The name of the virtual machine for which details
should be displayed. If you do not specify this parameter, then
information for all the virtual machines is displayed.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
When a virtual machine is configured in driver domain mode, the output of the
oakcli show vm vmname command displays TRUE for the DriverDomain attribute.
Examples
Here are examples of how to use the oakcli show vm command.
Displaying Details for All Virtual Machines
Display the virtual machine names, memory and vCPU allocations, status, virtual
disks, and repository name for all virtual machines:
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-69
oakcli show commands
oakcli show vm
NAME
MEMORY
VCPU
2048
2048
2048
2048
4096
2048
1500
2
2
2
2
4
2
1
sample5_odarepo1
sample6_odarepo1
test1_odarepo1
test2_odarepo2
vm1_odarepo1
vm2_odarepo2
win_vm1
STATE
REPOSITORY
OFFLINE
OFFLINE
OFFLINE
OFFLINE
ONLINE
OFFLINE
ONLINE
odarepo1
odarepo2
odarepo1
odarepo2
odarepo1
odarepo2
odarepo1
Displaying Information for a Single Virtual Machine
Display information about the vm1_odarepo1 virtual machine:
oakcli show vm vm1_odarepo1
Resource: vm1_odarepo1
AutoStart
:
CPUPriority
:
Disks
:
Domain
ExpectedState
FailOver
IsSharedRepo
Keyboard
MaxMemory
MaxVcpu
Memory
Mouse
Name
Networks
NodeNum
NodeNumStart
OS
PrivateIP
ProcessorCap
RepoName
State
TemplateName
Vcpu
cpupool
vncport
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
restore
100
|file:/OVS/Repositories/odarepo1/Vi
rtualMachines/vm1_odarepo1/System.i
mg,xvda,w||file:/OVS/Repositories/o
darepo1/VirtualMachines/vm1_odarepo
1/u01.img,xvdb,w|
XEN_PVM
online
false
false
en-us
3000
4
4096
OS_DEFAULT
vm1_odarepo1
|mac=00:21:F6:00:00:E4|
0
OL_5
None
100
odarepo1
Online
otml_sample1_odarepo1
4
twocpu
5901
4.23.34 oakcli show vmconsole
Use the oakcli show vmconsole command to open a GUI virtual machine
console to manage a specific virtual machine.
Syntax
oakcli show vmconsole vm_name [-h]
4-70 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli show commands
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vm_name
Name of the virtual machine for which you want to open a
console.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example 4-37
Opening a Virtual Machine Console
Open a console for the virtual machine named vm1_odarepo1:
oakcli show vmconsole vm1_odarepo1
4.23.35 oakcli show vmtemplate
Use the oakcli show vmtemplate command to display information about virtual
machine templates.
Syntax
oakcli show vmtemplate [vmtemplate_name | -h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vmtemplate_name
(Optional) The name of the virtual template for which details
should be displayed. If you do not specify this parameter, then
information for all of the virtual templates is displayed.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example 4-38
Display Information About a Virtual Template
Display information about the sample1_odarepo1 virtual template:
oakcli show vmtemplate sample_odarepo1
Resource: sample1_odarepo1
CPUPriority
:
100
Disks
:
|file:/OVS/Repositories/odarepo1/Te
mplates/otml_sample1_odarepo1/Syste
m.img,xvda,w||file:/OVS/Repositorie
s/odarepo1/Templates/otml_sample1_o
darepo1/u01.img,xvdb,w|
Domain
:
XEN_PVM
Keyboard
:
en-us
MaxMemory
:
2048
MaxVcpu
:
2
Memory
:
2048
Mouse
:
OS_DEFAULT
Name
:
sample1_odarepo1
Networks
:
|bridge=priv1||bridge=net1||bridge=
net2|
NodeNum
:
0
OS
:
OL_5
ProcessorCap
:
100
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-71
oakcli start commands
RepoName
Vcpu
:
:
odarepo1
2
4.24 oakcli start commands
Use the oakcli start commands to start a virtual machine, to start a shared
repository on a node, or to start ODA_BASE on the local node.
Topics:
oakcli start oda_base (page 4-72)
Use the oakcli start oda_base command to start ODA_BASE on
the local node.
oakcli start repo (page 4-72)
Use the oakcli start repo command to start a shared repository on
a node.
oakcli start vm (page 4-73)
Use the oakcli start vm command to start a virtual machine on a
node.
4.24.1 oakcli start oda_base
Use the oakcli start oda_base command to start ODA_BASE on the local node.
Syntax
oakcli start oda_base [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
Example 4-39
Starting ODA_BASE on the Local Node
Connect to Dom0 on the desired node and enter the following command to start
ODA_BASE on that node:
oakcli start oda_base
4.24.2 oakcli start repo
Use the oakcli start repo command to start a shared repository on a node.
Syntax
oakcli start repo repo_name [-node node_number] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
repo_name
repo_name is the name of the shared repository to be started.
-node node_number
Specifies the node on which to start the shared repository.
node_number is the number of the node where it is to be
started, either 0 or 1. If -node is not specified, the shared
repository is started on both nodes.
4-72 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli stop command
Parameter
Description
-h
(Optional) Displays help for using the command.
Example 4-40
Starting a Shared Repository on Node 0
Start the shared repository named repo1 on Node 0:
oakcli start repo repo1 -node 0
4.24.3 oakcli start vm
Use the oakcli start vm command to start a virtual machine on a node.
Syntax
oakcli start vm vm_name [-node node_number] [-d] [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vm_name
vm_name is the name of the virtual machine to be started.
-node node_number
Specifies the node on which to start the virtual machine.
node_number is the number of the node where it is to be
started, either 0 or 1. If -node is not specified, a virtual machine
is started on both nodes.
-d
Provides details about the virtual machine starting procedure
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example 4-41
Starting a Virtual Machine on Node 0
Start the virtual machine named vm1_odarepo1 on Node 0.
oakcli start vm vm_odarepo1 -node 0
4.25 oakcli stop command
Use the oakcli stop command to stop a virtual machine, to stop a shared
repository on a node, or to stop ODA_BASE on the local node.
Syntax
oakcli stop [vm vm_name [-force] | repo repo_name [-node node_number] | oda_base ] [h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
vm vm_name
vm_name is the name of the virtual machine to be stopped.
-force
(Optional) forces the virtual machine to stop.
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-73
oakcli stordiag
Parameter
Description
repo repo_name
repo_name is the name of the shared repository to be stopped.
-node node_number
node_number is the number of the node where the shared
repository is to be stopped, either 0 or 1. The -node parameter
is only valid when stopping a virtual machine on a shared
repository. If -node is not specified, the shared repository is
stopped on both nodes.
oda_base
Stops ODA_BASE on the local node
-h
(Optional) Displays help for using the command.
Examples
Here are examples of how to use the oakcli stop command.
Example 4-42
Forcing a Virtual Machine to Stop
Force the virtual machine named vm1_odarepo1 to stop:
oakcli stop vm vm_odarepo1 -force
Example 4-43
Stopping a Shared Repository
Stop the shared repository named repo1 on Node 0:
oakcli stop repo repo1 -node 0
Example 4-44
Stopping the Local ODA_Base
Connect to Dom0 on the desired node and enter the following command to stop
ODA_BASE on that node:
oakcli stop oda_base
4.26 oakcli stordiag
Use the oakcli stordiag command to run diagnostic tests on a disk in the storage
shelf or storage expansion shelf.
The tool produces a list of 14 disk checks for each node.
Syntax
oakcli stordiag resource_type [n| [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
resource_type
Prefix that depends on the configuration. See "Usage Notes."
n
(Optional) Disk number (starting with 0 and increasing to one
less than the number of disks)
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
4-74 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli test asr
Usage Notes
Select the value for resource_type based from one of the following options:
•
On Oracle Database Appliance Version 1, use d.
•
On Oracle Database Appliance with a single storage shelf, use pd_.
•
On Oracle Database Appliance with an expansion storage shelf, use e0_pd_ for a
disk in the storage shelf and use e1_pd_ for a disk in the expansion storage shelf.
For Oracle Database Appliance systems that have internal storage, use the format
d_[..] to identify the disk to be diagnosed. For Oracle Database Appliance systems that
have connected a storage shelf (and optional storage expansion shelf), use the format
e[0..1] pd_[0..23] to identify the disk to be diagnosed.
Example 4-45
Running Diagnostic Tests on a Disk in the Expansion Storage Shelf
Runs the diagnostic tests on disk 3 in the expansion storage shelf:
# oakcli stordiag e1_pd_3
Node Name : hr0
Test : Diagnostic Test Description
1 : OAK Check
NAME
pd_03
PATH
/dev/sdw
TYPE
HDD
STATE
ONLINE
STATE_DETAILS
Good
2 : ASM Check
. . .
<output truncated>
4.27 oakcli test asr
Use the oakcli test asr command to send a test trap to determine if Oracle Auto
Service Request (Oracle ASR) is configured and working correctly.
The command returns a success message if Oracle ASR is functioning properly.
Syntax
oakcli test asr [-h]
Parameter
(Optional) -h displays help for using the command.
Usage Notes
Run the command on both nodes. The Oracle ASR logs are always on the node where
the ASR Manager is installed, which is the master node.
4.28 oakcli unpack
Use the oakcli unpack command to unpack packages into the Oracle Appliance
Manager repository.
Syntax
oakcli unpack -package absolute_package_name
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-75
oakcli update
Parameters
Parameters
Description
absolute_package_nam
e
Identifies the package to be unpacked using the package's full
absolute path and file name
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Example 4-46
Unpacking Packages into the Oracle Appliance Manager Repository
Unpack the p13982331_23000_Linux-86-62.zip package, which was
previously copied to /tmp on the current node, into the node's Oracle Appliance
Manager command-line interface repository:
oakcli unpack -package /tmp/p13982331_23000_Linux-86-62.zip
4.29 oakcli update
Use the oakcli update command to apply Oracle Database Appliance patches.
You can apply patches using the patch bundle and use the --local patching option
to patch components one node at a time without impacting the other node. This
reduces the downtime when applying the patch.
Note: You must use the --local patch option to patch the server and grid
components. If you want to update only the Oracle Database software, use the
oakcli upgrade command.
Syntax
oakcli update -patch version [--server | --storage | --database] [--local} [-noreboot] | [--clean] | [--verify][-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
- patch version
Patch version that you want to install. For example: 12.1.2.10.0.
--server
Contains the patches previously obtained in earlier releases
from the Infrastructure (infra) and Grid Infrastructure (gi) patch
updates.
--storage
Contains only patches for shared storage components.
--database
(Optional) Patches Oracle database homes.
--local
Patches the component only on the local node. By default, this
is set to false. For Oracle Database Appliance release 12.1.2.6,
you must use the --local option to patch the server and grid.
--noreboot
(Optional) Node is not rebooted after patching.
--clean
(Optional) Cleans up all temporary files on the local node.
--verify
(Optional) Lists the patchable components on the node.
4-76 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli update
Parameter
Description
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
After unpacking the patch bundle, but before applying the patch, verify the contents
of the patch for the release.
Example 4-47
Verify the Contents of a Patch Bundle
Display the installed version and the version available in the 12.1.2.10.0 release patch
bundle for each of the components on the node. When the latest supported version is
installed, Up-to-date appears in the Proposed column.
# oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0 --verify
INFO: 2017-02-13 14:20:37: Reading the metadata file now...
Patch Version
---------------
Component Name
-----------------Controller_INT
Installed Version
----------------4.230.40-3739
Proposed
---------Up-to-
date
Controller_EXT
09.00.00.00
10.00.00.00
Expander
0291
Up-to-date
A29A
Up-to-
A29A
Up-to-
SSD_SHARED {
[ c2d20,c2d21,c2d22,
date
c2d23 ]
[ c2d0,c2d1,c2d2,c2d
date
3,c2d4,c2d5,c2d6,c2d
7,c2d8,c2d9,c2d10,c2
d11,c2d12,c2d13,c2d1
4,c2d15,c2d16,c2d17,
c2d18,c2d19 ]
}
SSD_LOCAL
0R3Q
Up-to-
ILOM
3.2.7.26.a r112632
3.2.8.24
BIOS
38050100
38070000
IPMI
1.8.12.4
Up-to-
HMP
2.3.5.2.5
2.3.5.2.8
OAK
12.1.2.9.0
OL
6.8
date
r114611
date
12.1.2.10.0
Up-to-
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-77
oakcli update-cpucore
date
GI_HOME
12.1.0.2.170117(2473
12.1.0.2.161018(2400
6101,23854735)
2082,24828633)
DB_HOME
12.1.0.2.170117(2473
12.1.0.2.160719(2305
4246,23054327)
2082,24828633)
ASR
5.5.1
Up-to-
date
oakcli update -patch Command Examples
Update the current node with the 12.1.2.10.0 patch:
oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0
Patch the server with the 12.1.2.7 patch:
oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0 --server --local
Patch the grid home only on the local node:
oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0 --storage --local
Patch the Oracle Database homes on both nodes:
oakcli update -patch 12.1.2.10.0 --database
4.30 oakcli update-cpucore
Use the oakcli update-cpucore command to enable a specified number of
licensed CPU cores for Oracle Database Appliance X6-2-HA.
Prerequisites
If all cores are not enabled, you can enable multiples of 2 licensed CPU cores up to the
maximum number of cores.
File Path
$ORACLE_HOME/opt/oracle/oak/bin/oakcli
Syntax
oakcli update-cpucore -cores number of cores per server [-h]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-cores
Defines the number of cores to enable per
server, in multiples of 2. To enable all
available cores, specify All instead of the
number of cores.
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the
command.
4-78 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli upgrade
Usage Notes
•
This command applies only to bare metal deployments.
•
The number of licensed cores you enable must be a multiple of 2, up to the
maximum number of cores.
•
After the initial configuration, you cannot reduce the number of cores. You can
purchase additional cores and increase the number of cores, up to the maximum
number of cores. For example, up to the maximum of 20 cores for Oracle Database
Appliance X6-2-HA.
Example 4-48
Enabling 12 CPU Cores for Oracle Database Appliance
The following command enables 12 CPU cores on an Oracle Database Appliance
system.
oakcli update-cpucore -cores 12
Please enter the 'root' password:
Please re-enter the 'root' password:
Setting up SSH ..............Completed
INFO : Running as root: /usr/bin/ssh -l root 192.0.2.1 /etc/rc.d/rc3.d/S90cpu-core
INFO : Running as root: /usr/bin/ssh -l root 192.0.2.1 /etc/rc.d/rc3.d/S90cpu-core
Example 4-49
Enabling All CPU Cores for Oracle Database Appliance
The following command enables all cores on an Oracle Database Appliance system.
oakcli update-cpucore -cores All
Please enter the 'root' password:
Please re-enter the 'root' password:
Setting up SSH ..............Completed
INFO : Running as root: /usr/bin/ssh -l root 192.0.2.1 /etc/rc.d/rc3.d/S90cpu-core
INFO : Running as root: /usr/bin/ssh -l root 192.0.2.1 /etc/rc.d/rc3.d/S90cpu-core
4.31 oakcli upgrade
Use the oakcli upgrade command to upgrade the Oracle Database software on
Oracle Database Appliance.
For patching Oracle Database Appliance itself, use the oakcli update command.
Syntax
oakcli upgrade database [-db db_names | -from source_home] -to destination_home
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-db db_names
Specifies the name or names (in a comma-delimited list) of the
database or databases you want to upgrade
-from source_home
Specifies the current Oracle Database home of the databases
you are upgrading
-to destination_home
Specifies the Oracle Database home containing the version to
which you want to upgrade the databases
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-79
oakcli validate
Parameter
Description
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
Usage Notes
•
You must include either a -db parameter or a -from parameter.
•
Running the command with a -db parameter upgrades only the named
databases, regardless of their current Oracle Database homes. If you include a from parameter in addition to a -db parameter, then the command ignores the from parameter. That is, the command upgrades named databases from other
homes and ignores the databases in the named home if they are not listed in the db parameter.
•
Running the command without a -db parameter will upgrade all of the databases
in the named Oracle Database home.
•
You must always provide a -to parameter that names an existing Oracle
Database home.
Example
Upgrade an Oracle 11.2.0.2.5 database named tpcc from Oracle Database 11.2.0.2.5 to
Oracle Database 11.2.0.3.1 using the Oracle Database home directory
OraDb11203_home1:
oakcli upgrade database -db tpcc -to OraDb11203_home1
4.32 oakcli validate
Validates the state of an Oracle Database Appliance or the viability of an operating
system patch.
Syntax
oakcli validate [[-V | -l | -h]] | [[-v][-f output_file] [-a | -d | -c checklist][ver patch_version]]
Parameters
Parameter
Description
-V
Display the version of oakValidation.
-l
List the items that can be checked (and their descriptions).
-h
(Optional) Display help for using the command.
-v
Show verbose output (must be used with a parameter that
generates a validation report).
-f output_file
Send output to a file with a fully qualified file name,
output_file, instead of to the screen (stdout).
4-80 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli validate
Parameter
Description
-a
Run all system checks, including DiskCalibration. Oracle
recommends that you use this command to validate system
readiness before deployment. Do not run oakcli validate
with this option on a busy production system, because the
DiskCalibration system check can cause performance
issues.
-d
Run only the default checks. The default checks are
NetworkComponents, OSDiskStorage, SharedStorage,
and SystemComponents.
The NetworkComponents validation check is not available on
Oracle Database Appliance V1.
-c checklist
Run the validation checks for the items identified in
checklist, a comma-delimited list. Use this parameter to
check either a single item or subset of items.
-c ospatch
Run the validation checks for the patch version identified in ver patch_version.
-ver patch_version
Report any reasons for not being able to patch Oracle Database
Appliance with the patch named in patch_version.
Listing All Checks and Their Descriptions
oakcli validate -l
Checkname -- Description
=========
===========
*SystemComponents -- Validate system components based on ilom sensor data
readings
*OSDiskStorage -- Validate OS disks and filesystem information
*SharedStorage -- Validate Shared storage and multipathing information
DiskCalibration -- Check disk performance with orion
*NetworkComponents -- Validate public and private network components
*StorageTopology -- Validate external JBOD connectivity
asr -- Validate asr components based on asr config file and ilom sensor
data readings
* -- These checks are also performed as part of default checks
Running All Checks
Enter the following command to run all checks:
oakcli validate -a
Validating Storage Cable Connections
Check the cable connections between the system controllers and the storage shelf, as
well as the cable connection to the storage expansion shelf (if one is installed):
oakcli validate -c storagetopology
Oracle recommends that you run the oakcli validate -c StorageTopology command
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-81
oakcli validate
before deploying the system. This will avoid and prevent problems during deployment
due to wrong or missing cable connections. The output shown in the following example
reports a successful configuration. If the cabling is not correct, you will see
errors in your output.
# oakcli validate -c storagetopology
It may take a while. Please wait...
INFO : ODA Topology Verification
INFO : Running on Node0
INFO : Check hardware type
SUCCESS : Type of hardware found : X4-2
INFO : Check for Environment(Bare Metal or Virtual Machine)
SUCCESS : Type of environment found : Virtual Machine(ODA BASE)
SUCCESS : Number of External LSI SAS controller found : 2
INFO : Check for Controllers correct PCIe slot address
SUCCESS : External LSI SAS controller 0 : 00:15.0
SUCCESS : External LSI SAS controller 1 : 00:16.0
INFO : Check if powered on
SUCCESS : 1 : Powered-on
INFO : Check for correct number of EBODS(2 or 4)
SUCCESS : EBOD found : 2
INFO : Check for External Controller 0
SUCCESS : Controller connected to correct ebod number
SUCCESS : Controller port connected to correct ebod port
SUCCESS : Overall Cable check for controller 0
INFO : Check for External Controller 1
SUCCESS : Controller connected to correct ebod number
SUCCESS : Controller port connected to correct ebod port
SUCCESS : Overall Cable check for controller 1
INFO : Check for overall status of cable validation on Node0
SUCCESS : Overall Cable Validation on Node0
INFO : Check Node Identification status
SUCCESS : Node Identification
SUCCESS : Node name based on cable configuration found : NODE0
INFO : Check Nickname
SUCCESS : Nickname set correctly : Oracle Database Appliance - E0
INFO : The details for Storage Topology Validation can also be found in log
file=/opt/oracle/oak/log/<hostname>/storagetopology/
StorageTopology-2014-07-03-08:57:31_7661_15914.log
Validating Oracle ASR
Enter the following syntax to validate your Oracle ASR configuration:
# oakcli validate -c asr
INFO: oak Asr information and Validations
RESULT: /opt/oracle/oak/conf/asr.conf exist
RESULT: ASR Manager ip:10.139.154.17
RESULT: ASR Manager port:1162
SUCCESS: ASR configuration file validation successfully completed
RESULT: /etc/hosts has entry 141.146.156.46 transport.oracle.com
RESULT: ilom alertmgmt level is set to minor
RESULT: ilom alertmgmt type is set to snmptrap
RESULT: alertmgmt snmp_version is set to 2c
RESULT: alertmgmt community_or_username is set to public
RESULT: alertmgmt destination is set to 10.139.154.17
RESULT: alertmgmt destination_port is set to 1162
SUCCESS: Ilom snmp confguration for asr set correctly
RESULT: notification trap configured to ip:10.139.154.17
RESULT: notification trap configured to port:1162
SUCCESS: Asr notification trap set correctly
4-82 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
oakcli validate
INFO: IP_ADDRESS HOST_NAME SERIAL_NUMBER ASR PROTOCOL SOURCE PRODUCT_NAME
INFO: --------------- ------------------------------ ------------------------------------- --------- -------------- -----------------------------10.170.79.98 oda-02-c 1130FMW00D Enabled SNMP ILOM SUN FIRE X4370 M2 SERVER
10.170.79.97 oda-01-c 1130FMW00D Enabled SNMP ILOM SUN FIRE X4370 M2 SERVER
INFO: Please use My Oracle Support 'http://support.oracle.com' to view the
activation status.
SUCCESS: asr log level is already set to Fine.
RESULT: Registered with ASR backend.
RESULT: test connection successfully completed.
RESULT: submitted test event for asset:10.139.154.17
RESULT: bundle com.sun.svc.asr.sw is in active state
RESULT: bundle com.sun.svc.asr.sw-frag is in resolved state
RESULT: bundle com.sun.svc.asr.sw-rulesdefinitions is in resolved state
RESULT: bundle com.sun.svc.ServiceActivation is in active state
SUCCESS: ASR diag successfully completed
Checking the Viability of a Patch
Use the oakcli validate ospatch -ver patch_version command to report
any reasons for not being able to patch Oracle Database Appliance with the patch
named in patch_version. Run this command before you attempt to patch Oracle
Database Appliance to determine if it will succeed or if you need to make changes
before applying the patch.
# oakcli validate -c ospatch -ver 12.1.2.5.0
INFO: Validating the OS patch for the version 12.1.2.5.0
WARNING: 2015-10-10 06:30:32: Patching sub directory /opt/oracle/oak/pkgrepos/
orapkgs/OEL/5.10/Patches/5.10.1 is not existing
INFO: 2015-10-10 06:30:32: May need to unpack the Infra patch bundle for the
version: 12.1.2.5.0
ERROR: 2015-10-10 06:30:32: No OS patch directory found in the repository
Validating Hardware System and Network Components
The following command runs system checks to validate hardware system components
and Oracle Database Appliance network components:
# oakcli validate -c SystemComponents,NetworkComponents
Oracle Appliance Manager Command Line Interface 4-83
oakcli validate
4-84 Administration and Reference Guide
5
Validating and Troubleshooting Oracle
Database Appliance
This chapter contains information about how to validate changes and troubleshoot
Oracle Database Appliance problems.
Topics:
Oracle Database Appliance Diagnostics and Validation (page 5-1)
Use oakcli validate to check your Oracle Database Appliance
configuration, and if necessary, to provide information to Oracle
Support Services.
Validate the Host Name (page 5-6)
The host name at the log in prompt should be oak1 for Node 0 and
oak2 for Node 1.
Oracle Database Appliance Configuration Error Messages (page 5-6)
If you encounter errors while configuring Oracle Database Appliance,
then review the following messages and actions:
Preparing Log Files for Oracle Support Services (page 5-8)
If necessary, use the command oakcli manage diagcollect to
collect diagnostic files to send to Oracle Support Services.
Additional Troubleshooting Tools and Commands (page 5-8)
This section describes additional tools and commands for diagnosing
and troubleshooting problems with Oracle Database Appliance.
Oracle Database Appliance Hardware Monitoring Tool (page 5-10)
The Oracle Database Appliance Hardware Monitoring Tool displays the
status of different hardware components in Oracle Database Appliance
server nodes.
5.1 Oracle Database Appliance Diagnostics and Validation
Use oakcli validate to check your Oracle Database Appliance configuration, and
if necessary, to provide information to Oracle Support Services.
The oakcli validate command is the Oracle Appliance Manager diagnostic and
validation utility to identify and resolve support issues. If you experience problems
with Oracle Database Appliance, then use the oakcli validate command options
to verify that your environment is properly configured, and that best practices are in
effect. When placing a service request, also use Oracle Appliance Manager as
described in this chapter to prepare the log files to send to Oracle Support Services.
Topics:
Validating and Troubleshooting Oracle Database Appliance 5-1
Oracle Database Appliance Diagnostics and Validation
Oracle Database Appliance Validation Command Overview (page 5-2)
Use the oakcli validate command and options to validate the status
of Oracle Database Appliance.
Examples of OAKCLI Validate Command Checks (page 5-3)
Review these examples to see you can perform validation checks using
the oakcli validate command and options.
5.1.1 Oracle Database Appliance Validation Command Overview
Use the oakcli validate command and options to validate the status of Oracle
Database Appliance.
You must run the oakcli validate command as the root user.
Syntax
The command oakcli validate uses the following syntax, where checklist is a
single check or a comma-delimited list of checks, and output_file is the name that
you designate for a validation output file:
oakcli validate -h
oakcli validate [-V | -l | -h]
oakcli validate [-v] [-f output_file] [-a | -d | -c checklist] [-v patch_version]
Parameters
Option
Purpose
-a
Run all system checks, including DiskCalibration. Oracle
recommends that you use this command to validate system
readiness before deployment. Do not run oakcli validate with
this option on a busy production system, because the
DiskCalibration system check can cause performance
degradation.
-c checklist
Run the validation checks for the items identified in checklist, a
comma-delimited list. Use this parameter to check either a single
item or subset of items.
-d
Run only the default checks. The default checks are
NetworkComponents, OSDiskStorage, SharedStorage, and
SystemComponents.
-f output_file
Send output to a file with a fully qualified file name,
output_file, instead of to the screen (stdout).
-h
Display the online help.
-l
List the items that can be checked (and their descriptions).
-v
Show verbose output (must be used with a parameter that
generates a validation report).
-V
Display the version of oakValidation.
-ver patch_version
Report any reasons for not being able to patch Oracle Database
Appliance with the patch named in patch_version.
5-2 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Oracle Database Appliance Diagnostics and Validation
VALIDATE Options
Command
Purpose
-c asr
Validate Oracle Auto Service Request (Oracle ASR) components
based on the Oracle ASR configuration file and Oracle Integrated
Lights Out Manager (Oracle ILOM) sensor data.
-c DiskCalibration
Preinstallation check for the storage disk performance
using /opt/oracle/oak/bin/orion
Do not run this check after you have deployed Oracle software on
Oracle Database Appliance, because running the
DiskCalibration command on a deployed system creates
performance issues.
Use the default check option (oakcli validate -d) if you do
not want to perform a system check for disk calibration.
-c
NetworkComponents
Validate public and private network hardware connections.
-c OSDiskStorage
Validate the operating system disks, and file system information.
-c ospatch
Validate that the system can complete an upgrade successfully
using the named patch.
-c SharedStorage
Validate shared storage and multipathing information.
-c StorageTopology
Validate the storage shelf connectivity.
-c
SystemComponents
Validate system components, based on Oracle ILOM sensor data
readings.
5.1.2 Examples of OAKCLI Validate Command Checks
Review these examples to see you can perform validation checks using the oakcli
validate command and options.
Listing All Checks and Their Descriptions
oakcli validate -l
Checkname -- Description
=========
===========
*SystemComponents -- Validate system components based on ilom sensor data
readings
*OSDiskStorage -- Validate OS disks and filesystem information
*SharedStorage -- Validate Shared storage and multipathing information
DiskCalibration -- Check disk performance with orion
*NetworkComponents -- Validate public and private network components
*StorageTopology -- Validate external JBOD connectivity
asr -- Validate asr components based on asr config file and ilom sensor
data readings
* -- These checks are also performed as part of default checks
Validating and Troubleshooting Oracle Database Appliance 5-3
Oracle Database Appliance Diagnostics and Validation
Note:
The NetworkComponents validation check is not available on hardware
prior to Oracle Database Appliance X3-2.
Running All Checks
Enter the following command to run all checks:
oakcli validate -a
Validating Storage Cable Connections
Check the cable connections between the system controllers and the storage shelf, as
well as the cable connection to the storage expansion shelf (if one is installed):
oakcli validate -c storagetopology
Oracle recommends that you run the oakcli validate -c StorageTopology
command before deploying the system. This will avoid and prevent problems during
deployment due to wrong or missing cable connections. The output shown in the
following example reports a successful configuration. If the cabling is not correct, you
will see errors in your output.
# oakcli validate -c storagetopology
It may take a while. Please wait...
INFO : ODA Topology Verification
INFO : Running on Node0
INFO : Check hardware type
SUCCESS : Type of hardware found : X4-2
INFO : Check for Environment(Bare Metal or Virtual Machine)
SUCCESS : Type of environment found : Virtual Machine(ODA BASE)
SUCCESS : Number of External LSI SAS controller found : 2
INFO : Check for Controllers correct PCIe slot address
SUCCESS : External LSI SAS controller 0 : 00:15.0
SUCCESS : External LSI SAS controller 1 : 00:16.0
INFO : Check if powered on
SUCCESS : 1 : Powered-on
INFO : Check for correct number of EBODS(2 or 4)
SUCCESS : EBOD found : 2
INFO : Check for External Controller 0
SUCCESS : Controller connected to correct ebod number
SUCCESS : Controller port connected to correct ebod port
SUCCESS : Overall Cable check for controller 0
INFO : Check for External Controller 1
SUCCESS : Controller connected to correct ebod number
SUCCESS : Controller port connected to correct ebod port
SUCCESS : Overall Cable check for controller 1
INFO : Check for overall status of cable validation on Node0
SUCCESS : Overall Cable Validation on Node0
INFO : Check Node Identification status
SUCCESS : Node Identification
SUCCESS : Node name based on cable configuration found : NODE0
INFO : Check Nickname
SUCCESS : Nickname set correctly : Oracle Database Appliance - E0
INFO : The details for Storage Topology Validation can also be found in
log file=/opt/oracle/oak/log/<hostname>/storagetopology/
StorageTopology-2014-07-03-08:57:31_7661_15914.log
5-4 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Oracle Database Appliance Diagnostics and Validation
Validating Oracle ASR
Enter the following syntax to validate your Oracle ASR configuration:
# oakcli validate -c asr
INFO: oak Asr information and Validations
RESULT: /opt/oracle/oak/conf/asr.conf exist
RESULT: ASR Manager ip:10.139.154.17
RESULT: ASR Manager port:1162
SUCCESS: ASR configuration file validation successfully completed
RESULT: /etc/hosts has entry 141.146.156.46 transport.oracle.com
RESULT: ilom alertmgmt level is set to minor
RESULT: ilom alertmgmt type is set to snmptrap
RESULT: alertmgmt snmp_version is set to 2c
RESULT: alertmgmt community_or_username is set to public
RESULT: alertmgmt destination is set to 10.139.154.17
RESULT: alertmgmt destination_port is set to 1162
SUCCESS: Ilom snmp confguration for asr set correctly
RESULT: notification trap configured to ip:10.139.154.17
RESULT: notification trap configured to port:1162
SUCCESS: Asr notification trap set correctly
INFO: IP_ADDRESS HOST_NAME SERIAL_NUMBER ASR PROTOCOL SOURCE PRODUCT_NAME
INFO: --------- ---------- ------------- --- -------- ------ -----------10.170.79.98 oda-02-c 1130FMW00D Enabled SNMP ILOM SUN FIRE X4370 M2 SERVER
10.170.79.97 oda-01-c 1130FMW00D Enabled SNMP ILOM SUN FIRE X4370 M2 SERVER
INFO: Please use My Oracle Support 'http://support.oracle.com' to view the
activation status.
SUCCESS: asr log level is already set to Fine.
RESULT: Registered with ASR backend.
RESULT: test connection successfully completed.
RESULT: submitted test event for asset:10.139.154.17
RESULT: bundle com.sun.svc.asr.sw is in active state
RESULT: bundle com.sun.svc.asr.sw-frag is in resolved state
RESULT: bundle com.sun.svc.asr.sw-rulesdefinitions is in resolved state
RESULT: bundle com.sun.svc.ServiceActivation is in active state
SUCCESS: ASR diag successfully completed
Checking the Viability of a Patch
Use the oakcli validate ospatch -ver command to report any reasons for not
being able to patch Oracle Database Appliance with the patch named in
patch_version. Run this command before you attempt to patch Oracle Database
Appliance to determine if it succeeds or if you must make changes before applying the
patch.
# oakcli validate -c ospatch -ver 12.1.2.5.0
INFO: Validating the OS patch for the version 12.1.2.5.0
WARNING: 2015-10-10 06:30:32: Patching sub directory /opt/oracle/oak/pkgrepos/
orapkgs/OEL/5.10/Patches/5.10.1 is not existing
INFO: 2015-10-10 06:30:32: May need to unpack the Infra patch bundle for the
version: 12.1.2.5.0
ERROR: 2015-10-10 06:30:32: No OS patch directory found in the repository
Validating Hardware System and Network Components
The following command runs system checks to validate hardware system components
and Oracle Database Appliance network components:
# oakcli validate -c SystemComponents,NetworkComponents
Validating and Troubleshooting Oracle Database Appliance 5-5
Validate the Host Name
5.2 Validate the Host Name
The host name at the log in prompt should be oak1 for Node 0 and oak2 for Node 1.
When a default manufacturing host name, such as mtnk4t1-d05-01-host, appears
in the log in prompt instead of oak1 oroak2, there is an issue that can cause problems
when you configure Oracle Database Appliance.
The most likely cause of unexpected host names is that the storage cabling is incorrect
or cables are not properly seated in the ports.
Verify the Storage Cabling for Oracle Database Appliance
Review the cabling instructions for your Oracle Database Appliance model and verify
that the color-coded cables are in the correct ports. Also, verify that connections are
secure. The SAS cables must be locked in place. Gently pull on each cable to confirm
that it is properly seated. If you can pull the cable out, push it into the port until it
clicks into place.
Verify the Storage Cabling for Models Earlier than X5-2
How you connect the storage tray to the appliance determines which Server is Node 0
and which is Node 1. This is important as all installation and configuring of software
going forward is done from Node 0. In most cases the Server on the bottom is Node 0.
Ensure that the Node Files Exist and are Accurate
If the cabling appears to be correct and you still have unexpected host names, then
confirm that the /opt/oracle/oak/conf/node_num.conf file exists for each
node. Ensure that the NODENUM parameter is properly defined for each node. Set the
parameter to NODENUM=0 for Node 0 and NODENUM=1 for Node 1. Create or edit the
files, as needed.
5.3 Oracle Database Appliance Configuration Error Messages
If you encounter errors while configuring Oracle Database Appliance, then review the
following messages and actions:
Error Encountered in Step 11 Validation VIP appears to be up on the network
Cause: This message is most likely to occur when you attempt to redeploy the EndUser Bundle without cleaning up a previous deployment. This error occurs because
an existing VIP is configured for the addresses assigned to Oracle Database
Appliance.
Action: Run cleanupDeploy.pl on Node 0, and then restart Oracle Appliance
Manager.
Error "CRS-4402: The CSS daemon was started in exclusive mode but found an
active CSS daemon on node oda2-1, number 1, and is terminating"
Cause: This error occurs when the Oracle Grid Infrastructure CSS daemon attempts to
start the node as a standalone cluster node, but during startup discovers that the other
cluster node is running, and changes to cluster mode to join the cluster.
Action: Ignore this error.
5-6 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Oracle Database Appliance Configuration Error Messages
Installation requires partitioning of your hard drive
Cause: This message occurs on a node if one of the two operating system disks is not
installed, but you are attempting to reimage the operating system.
Action: Ensure that both operating system disks are installed and are available.
Machine Check Exception ...This is not a software problem
Cause: There is a hardware system error.
Action: Log in to the Oracle ILOM Remote Console to determine the specific
hardware error.
No volume control GStreamer plug-ins and/or devices found
Cause: Operating system plug-ins required for sound cards for the Oracle ILOM
remote redirection console are not installed.
Action: Ignore this message. You do not require volume control for the console.
Reboot and select proper boot device or insert boot media in selected boot device
and press a key
Cause: One or both operating system disks are not available. This message occurs if
you select "Default hard disk" during reimaging the system, but that disk is not
available.
Action: Ensure that both operating system disks are installed and are available.
The AoDB Linux installation tree in that directory does not seem to match your
boot media
Cause: If you select "Default (use BIOS settings)" as your imaging option, but one or
both of the disks is not available, this message occurs on a node if both operating
disks are installed, and you choose to reimage the operating system disks.
Action: Ensure that both operating system disks are available for use.
ERROR: Gateway IP is not pingable
Cause: On Windows platforms, the Oracle Appliance Manager configurator uses the
echo service on port 7 to contact the gateway. If the echo service is disabled, possibly
for security reasons, the ping fails.
Action: Run the native platform ping command. If the ping is successful, then the
configurator validation output can be ignored.
ACFS resources failed to start after applying 2.2 INFRA patch
Cause: Oracle Database Appliance operating system upgrade includes upgrade of
Oracle Linux to Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK). Because Oracle Automatic
Storage Management Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS) is not supported on all
versions of Oracle Linux, a successful upgrade of the operating system may
effectively disable Oracle ACFS.
Upgrade to Oracle Database Appliance 2.2 has three options: —infra, —gi, and —
database. The —infra option includes upgrade from Oracle Linux to UEK. Before
the —infra upgrade to 2.2, the operating system is Oracle Linux with 11.2.0.2.x Grid
Infrastructure. After the —infra upgrade, the operating system is UEK and 11.2.0.2.x
Oracle ACFS, which is not compatible with UEK.
For example, upgrade to Oracle Linux 2.6.32-300.11.1.el5uek causes
reco.acfsvol.acfs and ora.registry.acfs to temporarily go to an OFFLINE
Validating and Troubleshooting Oracle Database Appliance 5-7
Preparing Log Files for Oracle Support Services
state, because 2.6.32-300.11.1.el5uek does not support Oracle 11.2.0.2.x ACFS.
However, when Oracle Grid Infrastructure is upgraded to 11.2.0.3.2, these
components are online again.
Action: Upgrade to Oracle Database Appliance 2.2 with the —gi option. This version
of the software includes Oracle Grid Infrastructure 11.2.0.3.2, which includes Oracle
ACFS modules that work with UEK.
For more information, see My Oracle Support note 1369107.1:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&type=NOT&id=1369107.1
5.4 Preparing Log Files for Oracle Support Services
If necessary, use the command oakcli manage diagcollect to collect diagnostic
files to send to Oracle Support Services.
If you have a system fault that requires help from Oracle Support Services, then you
may need to provide log records to help Oracle support diagnose your issue.
Collect log file information by running the commandoakcli manage
diagcollect. This command consolidates information from log files stored on
Oracle Database Appliance into a single log file for use by Oracle Support Services.
The location of the file is specified in the command output.
5.5 Additional Troubleshooting Tools and Commands
This section describes additional tools and commands for diagnosing and
troubleshooting problems with Oracle Database Appliance.
Although some of these tools are specific to Oracle Database Appliance, others are
tools for all clustered systems.
Topics:
Oracle Appliance Manager Tools for Configuration Auditing and Disk Diagnosis
(page 5-8)
Oracle Appliance Manager provides access to a number of sophisticated
monitoring and reporting tools, some of them derived from standalone
tools that require their own syntax and command sets.
Trace File Analyzer Collector (page 5-9)
Trace File Analyzer (TFA) Collector simplifies diagnostic data collection
on Oracle Grid Infrastructure and Oracle Real Application Clusters
systems.
5.5.1 Oracle Appliance Manager Tools for Configuration Auditing and Disk Diagnosis
Oracle Appliance Manager provides access to a number of sophisticated monitoring
and reporting tools, some of them derived from standalone tools that require their
own syntax and command sets.
The following list briefly describes the ORAchk command, and the disk diagnostic
tool:
•
ORAchk
The ORAchk Configuration Audit Tool audits important configuration settings
for Oracle RAC two-node deployments in the following categories:
5-8 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Additional Troubleshooting Tools and Commands
–
Operating system kernel parameters and packages
–
RDBMS
–
Database parameters, and other database configuration settings
–
Oracle Grid Infrastructure, which includes Oracle Clusterware and Oracle
Automatic Storage Management
ORAchk is aware of the entire system. It checks the configuration to indicate if
best practices are being followed. For example, ORAchk reviews the system and
identifies best practice issues that are specific to Oracle Database Appliance when
ORAchk is run by Oracle Appliance Manager. To explore ORAchk on Oracle
Database Appliance, use the following command:
oakcli orachk -h
Also review My Oracle Support note 1268927.2, which is available from My
Oracle Support.
•
Disk Diagnostic Tool
Use the Disk Diagnostic Tool to help identify the cause of disk problems. The tool
produces a list of 14 disk checks for each node. To run the tool, enter the following
command:
# oakcli stordiag resource_type
See also: https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?
cmd=show&amp;type=NOT&amp;id=1268927.2
5.5.2 Trace File Analyzer Collector
Trace File Analyzer (TFA) Collector simplifies diagnostic data collection on Oracle
Grid Infrastructure and Oracle Real Application Clusters systems.
TFA behaves in a similar manner to the ion utility packaged with Oracle Clusterware.
Both tools collect and package diagnostic data. However, TFA is much more powerful
than ion, because TFA centralizes and automates the collection of diagnostic
information.
TFA provides the following key benefits and options:
•
Encapsulation of diagnostic data collection for all Oracle Grid Infrastructure and
Oracle RAC components on all cluster nodes into a single command, which you
run from a single node
•
Option to "trim" diagnostic files during data collection to reduce data upload size
•
Options to isolate diagnostic data collection to a given time period, and to a
particular product component, such as Oracle ASM, RDBMS, or Oracle
Clusterware
•
Centralization of collected diagnostic output to a single node in Oracle Database
Appliance, if desired
•
On-Demand Scans of all log and trace files for conditions indicating a problem
•
Real-Time Scan Alert Logs for conditions indicating a problem (for example,
Database Alert Logs, Oracle ASM Alert Logs, and Oracle Clusterware Alert Logs)
Validating and Troubleshooting Oracle Database Appliance 5-9
Oracle Database Appliance Hardware Monitoring Tool
Refer to My Oracle Support note 1513912.1 "TFA Collector - Tool for Enhanced
Diagnostic Gathering" for more information. https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/
article?cmd=show&amp;amp;type=NOT&amp;amp;id=1513912.1
5.6 Oracle Database Appliance Hardware Monitoring Tool
The Oracle Database Appliance Hardware Monitoring Tool displays the status of
different hardware components in Oracle Database Appliance server nodes.
The tool is implemented with the Trace File Analyzer collector. Use the tool both on
bare-metal and on virtualized systems.
You can see the list of monitored components by running the command oakcli
show -h
To see information about specific components, use the command syntax oakcli
show component, where component is the hardware component that you want to
query. For example, the command oakcli show power shows information
specifically about the Oracle Database Appliance power supply:
oakcli show power
NAME
HEALTH HEALTH DETAILS PART_NO. SERIAL_NO.
INPUT POWER OUTPUT POWER INLET TEMP
EXHAUST TEMP
Power Supply_0
Present
88
Power Supply_1
Present
66
OK
watts
OK
watts
-
7047410
31.250 degree C 34.188
7047410
31.250 degree C 34.188
LOCATION
476856F+1242CE0020 PS0
degree C
476856F+1242CE004J PS1
degree C
Note:
Oracle Database Appliance Server Hardware Monitoring Tool is enabled
during initial startup of ODA_BASE on Oracle Database Appliance
Virtualized Platform. When it starts, the tool collects base statistics for about 5
minutes. During this time, the tool displays the message "Gathering
Statistics…" message.
The Oracle Database Appliance Hardware Monitoring Tool reports information only
for the node on which you run the command. The information it displays in the output
depend on the component that you select to review.
5-10 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
A
Oracle Database Appliance Software
Configuration Defaults
Oracle Database Appliance software configuration defaults.
Topics:
Directory Paths for Oracle Database Appliance (page A-1)
Oracle homes on Oracle Database Appliance follow Optimal Flexible
Architecture guidelines.
Oracle Groups and Users Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance
(page A-2)
Review the table to see the groups and default users created when you
deploy the appliance. All passwords are set to the Master password that
you define during deployment.
Database Disk Group Sizes for Oracle Database Appliance (page A-2)
The tables in this section show the sizes for DATA, RECO, REDO, and
FLASH disk groups on various configurations of Oracle Database
Appliance.
Usable Storage on Oracle Database Appliance X5-2 (page A-4)
The table shows the usage storage available for various configurations of
Oracle Database Appliance X5-2.
Storage on Oracle Database Appliance (page A-6)
Review this section to understand Oracle Database Appliance storage
architecture and options and how to determine usable storage.
System Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance (page A-9)
Review to see the configuration options for Oracle Database Appliance.
A.1 Directory Paths for Oracle Database Appliance
Oracle homes on Oracle Database Appliance follow Optimal Flexible Architecture
guidelines.
Table A-1
Directory Paths for Oracle Database Appliance
Item
Directory Path
Grid home
/u01/app/release-specific_name/grid
Grid base
/u01/app/grid
Oracle home
/u01/app/oracle/product/dbhome_releasespecific_namesequence_number
Oracle Database Appliance Software Configuration Defaults A-1
Oracle Groups and Users Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance
Table A-1
(Cont.) Directory Paths for Oracle Database Appliance
Item
Directory Path
Oracle base
/u01/app/oracle
Oracle Inventory
/u01/app/oraInventory
A.2 Oracle Groups and Users Configuration for Oracle Database
Appliance
Review the table to see the groups and default users created when you deploy the
appliance. All passwords are set to the Master password that you define during
deployment.
Oracle Groups and Users Configurations
Table A-2
Oracle Groups and Users Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance
Groups and Users
Default Value
Oracle Grid Infrastructure installation owner
grid, UID 1001
Oracle Database installation owner
oracle, UID 1000
Oracle Database system administrator
sys
Oracle Database generic administrator
system
Oracle Inventory system privileges group
oinstall, GID 1001
Oracle ASM Administrators system privileges
asmadmin, GID 1004
Oracle ASM Users system privileges
asmdba, GID 1006
Oracle ASM Operator system privileges
asmoper, GID 1005
Oracle Database Administrators system
privileges
dba, GID 1003
Oracle Database Operator system privileges
dbaoper, GID 1002
A.3 Database Disk Group Sizes for Oracle Database Appliance
The tables in this section show the sizes for DATA, RECO, REDO, and FLASH disk
groups on various configurations of Oracle Database Appliance.
Each table row has values for either normal or for high redundancy levels. The disk
capacities shown in the tables vary, because they are derived by converting disk
hardware terabytes (based on 1 kilobyte equals 1,000 bytes) into data storage terabytes
(based on 1 kilobyte equals 1,024 bytes).
The space calculated with a storage expansion shelf approximately doubles the space
mentioned in these tables.
A-2 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Database Disk Group Sizes for Oracle Database Appliance
Note:
The storage expansion shelf can only be used with Oracle Database Appliance
X3-2, X4-2, and X5-2.
Table A-3
and X4-2
Approximate Database Disk Group Sizes for Oracle Database Appliance Version 1, X3-2,
Sizing
Version 1 (GB)
X3-2 (GB)
X4-2 (GB)
HDD Size
559
838
838
Total HDD
11,180
16,760
16,760
Total SSD (REDO Disk Group)
272
744
744
Total SSD (FLASH Disk Group)
N/A
N/A
N/A
Total HDD with High Redundancy
3,727
5,587
5,587
Total HDD with Normal Redundancy
5,590
8,380
8,380
DATA Disk Group with High Redundancy - External Backup
3,205
4,805
4,805
RECO Disk Group with High Redundancy - External Backup
522
782
782
DATA Disk Group with High Redundancy - Local Backup
1,603
2,402
2,402
RECO Disk Group with High Redundancy - Local Backup
2,124
3,185
3,185
DATA Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - External Backup
4,807
7,207
7,207
RECO Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - External Backup
783
1,173
1,173
DATA Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - Local Backup
2,404
3,603
3,603
RECO Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - Local Backup
3,186
4,777
4,777
REDO Disk Group
91
248
248
FLASH Disk Group
N/A
N/A
N/A
Note:
High Redundancy is triple-mirroring and Normal Redundancy is doublemirroring. The REDO Disk Group is always High Redundancy. The FLASH
Disk Group is always Normal Redundancy.
See Also:
See the Oracle Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide, "Managing
Capacity in Disk Groups" for more information about determining the amount
of free space in your Oracle Database Appliance disk groups for Oracle ASM.
The tables in this topic only provide the raw disk information.
Oracle Database Appliance Software Configuration Defaults A-3
Usable Storage on Oracle Database Appliance X5-2
Table A-4
Approximate Database Disk Group Sizes for Oracle Database Appliance X5-2
Sizing
X5-2 (GB), 4 TB
X5-2 (GB), 8 TB
HDD Size
3,816
7,631
Total HDD
61,056
122,096
Total SSD (REDO Disk Group)
744
744
Total SSD (FLASH Disk Group)
1,492
1,492
Total HDD with High Redundancy
20,352
40,699
Total HDD with Normal Redundancy
30,528
61,048
DATA Disk Group with High Redundancy - External Backup
15,315
30,626
RECO Disk Group with High Redundancy - External Backup
2,493
4,986
DATA Disk Group with High Redundancy - Local Backup
7,473
16,407
RECO Disk Group with High Redundancy - Local Backup
9,906
21,748
DATA Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - External Backup
24,513
49,220
RECO Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - External Backup
4,007
8,013
DATA Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - Local Backup
12,307
24,610
RECO Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - Local Backup
15,920
32,623
REDO Disk Group
248
248
FLASH Disk Group
746
746
Note:
1.
For non-CDB databases, the REDO disk group has 50% free disk space.
2.
For CDB databases, an Oracle ACFS mount point is created per CDB
database, based on the template log file size. If this is a Single Instance (SI)
database, then multiply by 3. If this is an Oracle RAC database, then
multiply by 4.
3.
Accelerator volume size is 0.4% of the database DATA Oracle ACFS file
system size and shared REPO Oracle ACFS file system size.
A.4 Usable Storage on Oracle Database Appliance X5-2
The table shows the usage storage available for various configurations of Oracle
Database Appliance X5-2.
The reserved storage is the amount of ASM storage required to maintain redundancy
in the event of a disk failure. If you use the reserve storage capacity, then the system
continues to run, and it is protected through ASM mirroring. However, in the event of
a second disk failure, the system is then running in a non-protected and degraded
A-4 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Usable Storage on Oracle Database Appliance X5-2
mode. In this event, you must replace disks immediately. Refer to Oracle Automatic
Storage Management Administrator’s Guide for more information about ASM disk group
capacity.
Table A-5
Usable Storage on Oracle Database Appliance X5-2
Sizing
Raw Value (GB)
Reserve (GB)
Usable (GB)
Total SSD (REDO Disk Group)
764
191
191
1,528
382
573
(based on an estimated 190,780 GB)
See the Note.
Total SSD (FLASH Disk Group)
(based on an estimated 3,816 GB)
7,631
HDD Size: 8 TB
External Backup/Normal Redundancy (86%/14% split)
DATA Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - External
Backup
105,003
6,563
49,220
RECO Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - External
Backup
17,093
1,068
8,013
DATA Disk Group with High Redundancy - External
Backup
105,003
13,125
30,626
RECO Disk Group with High Redundancy - External
Backup
17,093
2,137
4,986
DATA Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - Internal
Backup
52,501
3,281
24,610
RECO Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - Internal
Backup
69,595
4,350
32,623
DATA Disk Group with High Redundancy - Internal
Backup
52,501
3,281
16,407
RECO Disk Group with High Redundancy - Internal
Backup
69,595
4,350
21,748
HDD Size: 4 TB
3,816
External Backup/High Redundancy
Internal Backup/Normal Redundancy (43%/57% split)
Internal Backup/High Redundancy
(Total: HDD Raw: 59,584 GB)
External Backup/Normal Redundancy (86%/14% split)
DATA Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - External
Backup
52,508
3,282
24,613
RECO Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - External
Backup
8,548
534
4,007
Oracle Database Appliance Software Configuration Defaults A-5
Storage on Oracle Database Appliance
Table A-5
(Cont.) Usable Storage on Oracle Database Appliance X5-2
Sizing
Raw Value (GB)
Reserve (GB)
Usable (GB)
DATA Disk Group with High Redundancy - External
Backup
52,508
6564
15,315
RECO Disk Group with High Redundancy - External
Backup
8,548
1,068
2,493
DATA Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - Internal
Backup
26,254
1,641
12,307
RECO Disk Group with Normal Redundancy - Internal
Backup
33,963
2,123
15,920
DATA Disk Group with High Redundancy - Internal
Backup
25,621
3,203
7,473
RECO Disk Group with High Redundancy - Internal
Backup
33,963
4,245
9,906
External Backup/High Redundancy
Internal Backup/Normal Redundancy (43%/57% split)
Internal Backup/High Redundancy
A.5 Storage on Oracle Database Appliance
Review this section to understand Oracle Database Appliance storage architecture and
options and how to determine usable storage.
Topics:
About Oracle Database Appliance Storage (page A-6)
Oracle Database Appliance uses the Oracle Automatic Storage
Management Cluster File System (Oracle ACFS) for storage of database
and virtual machine files.
Oracle ACFS Mount Points and Storage Space (page A-7)
Review Oracle ASM Cluster file system (ACFS) mount points for Oracle
Database Appliance.
Oracle ACFS Space Management (page A-8)
The Oracle ACFS file systems are automatically created when you create
a database on Oracle Database Appliance.
A.5.1 About Oracle Database Appliance Storage
Oracle Database Appliance uses the Oracle Automatic Storage Management Cluster
File System (Oracle ACFS) for storage of database and virtual machine files.
Oracle ACFS provides both servers with concurrent access to some or all of the shared
storage on Oracle Database Appliance. Oracle ACFS supports space-efficient storage
snapshots, which provides fast provisioning databases and virtual machines within
Oracle Database Appliance.
A-6 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Storage on Oracle Database Appliance
Storage Systems Used With Oracle Database Appliance
Three types of Oracle ACFS file systems are used in Oracle Database Appliance:
•
Database File Systems
•
Shared repositories
•
General-purpose storage
About Database File Systems
Database file systems are used exclusively for storing database files, and they include
a FLASH file system for storing database data files and flash cache files, a DATA file
system for database data files, a RECO file system for storing archive files and
backups, and a REDO file system for storing redo log files.
About Shared Repositories
Shared repositories are file systems created on Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized
Platform, and they are used to store virtual machine templates, runtime images, and
virtual disks.
About General Purpose Storage
Every Oracle Database Appliance has a general-purpose cluster file system created by
default That cluster file system is named cloudfs. You can use the cloudfs file
system for general-purpose storage of files that must be shared between the servers.
For example, you can use the cloudfs file system for staging data loads.
All Oracle ACFS file systems are created on Oracle ASM Dynamic Volumes
provisioned from disk groups that are created in the shared disk storage pool. In a
bare-metal deployment, these file systems are mounted directly in the operating
system hosting the databases. In a virtualized deployment, these file systems are
managed and mounted directly in ODA_BASE.
A.5.2 Oracle ACFS Mount Points and Storage Space
Review Oracle ASM Cluster file system (ACFS) mount points for Oracle Database
Appliance.
If you select Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle ASM) for database
storage when you create a database, then an Oracle ASM Cluster file system (ACFS) is
not created. All files are in an Oracle ASM diskgroup.
If you select Oracle ACFS for database storage, then each database has its own Oracle
ACFS mount point:
•
DATA diskgroup: /u02/app/oracleuser/oradata/db_name
•
RECO diskgroup: /u03/app/oracleuser.
With Oracle ACFS, the following are created:
•
A 100G ACFS is created from +DATA diskgroup for each database. This Oracle
ACFS automatically extends the space on demand.
•
A common Oracle ACFS with 25% of +RECO diskgroup is created with auto
extension on. This file system is used for fast recovery area and redo logs for all
databases.
Oracle Database Appliance Software Configuration Defaults A-7
Storage on Oracle Database Appliance
Table A-6
Oracle ACFS Mount Points and Related Oracle ASM Disk Groups and Volume Information
File System
Oracle
ASM Disk
Group
Oracle ASM Dynamic Volume
Mount Point
DATA
+DATA
/dev/asm/datdbname-nnn
/u02/app/oracleuser/
oradata/dbname
For example: /dev/asm/
RECO
+RECO
datodacn-123
For example: /u02/app/example/
oradata/odacn
/dev/asm/reco-nn
/u03/app/oracleuser
This mount point is shared by all
databases for fast_recovery_area
and redo logs.
For fast_recovery_area, the path
is: /u03/app/oracleuser/
fast_recovery_area/db_name
For redo logs, the path is: /u03/app/
oracleuser/redo/db_name
Example A-1
Oracle ACFS Storage Space
When the Oracle ACFS file systems are created, they do not initially consume all of the
storage in the appliance. Space is preserved for additional repositories, or in some
cases, database files stored directly in Oracle ASM. You can check for available storage
space in your file systems by running the operating system command df -k as shown
in the following example.
# df -k
Filesystem
Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroupSys-LogVolRoot
tmpfs
1%
/dev/shm
/dev/sda1
boot
/dev/mapper/VolGroupSys-LogVolOpt
opt
/dev/mapper/VolGroupSys-LogVolU01
u01
/dev/asm/reco-62
2%
/u03/app/oracle
/dev/asm/datrdb2-268
4%
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/rdb2
/dev/asm/datndb11-268
1%
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/ndb11
/dev/asm/datndb12-268
1%
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/ndb12
1K-blocks
Used
Available Use%
30963708
65952292
14203568
647800
15187276
65304492
49%
/
495844
43872
426372
10%
/
61927420
18594420
40187272
32%
/
103212320
49621560
48347880
51%
/
76546048
1469676
75076372
104857600
3872368
100985232
104857600
247160
104610440
104857600
247160
104610440
A.5.3 Oracle ACFS Space Management
The Oracle ACFS file systems are automatically created when you create a database on
Oracle Database Appliance.
When you use Oracle ACFS for database storage, the following is created:
A-8 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
System Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance
•
A 100G ACFS is created from +DATA diskgroup for each database. This Oracle
ACFS automatically extends the space on demand.
•
A common Oracle ACFS with 25% of +RECO diskgroup is created with auto
extension on. This file system is used for fast recovery area and redo logs for all
databases.
When the Oracle ACFS file systems are created, they do not initially consume all of the
storage in the appliance. Space is preserved for additional repositories, or in some
cases, database files stored directly in Oracle ASM. You can check for available storage
space in your file systems by running the operating system command df -k as shown
in the following example.
# df -k
Filesystem
Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroupSys-LogVolRoot
tmpfs
1%
/dev/shm
/dev/sda1
boot
/dev/mapper/VolGroupSys-LogVolOpt
opt
/dev/mapper/VolGroupSys-LogVolU01
u01
/dev/asm/reco-62
2%
/u03/app/oracle
/dev/asm/datrdb2-268
4%
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/rdb2
/dev/asm/datndb11-268
1%
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/ndb11
/dev/asm/datndb12-268
1%
/u02/app/oracle/oradata/ndb12
1K-blocks
Used
Available Use%
30963708
65952292
14203568
647800
15187276
65304492
49%
/
495844
43872
426372
10%
/
61927420
18594420
40187272
32%
/
103212320
49621560
48347880
51%
/
76546048
1469676
75076372
104857600
3872368
100985232
104857600
247160
104610440
104857600
247160
104610440
A.6 System Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance
Review to see the configuration options for Oracle Database Appliance.
Table A-7
System Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance
Item
Value
Oracle Linux with the
Red Hat-compatible
kernel
Oracle Linux 6.7 with kernel-uek-2.6.39-400.264.13.el6uek.x86_64
Oracle Database release
12.1.0.2.161018, 11.2.0.4.161018
Oracle Database Enterprise Edition, Oracle Database Standard Edition 2, Oracle
Database Standard Edition 1, Oracle Database Standard Edition
SCAN port number
1521
Oracle Enterprise Edition
DB control port
1158
To access Enterprise Manager , enter the following URL string, where hostname is
the name of one of the Oracle Database Appliance server nodes:
https://hostname:1158/em
Oracle Database Appliance Software Configuration Defaults A-9
System Configuration for Oracle Database Appliance
A-10 Administration and Reference Guide
B
Database Templates for Oracle Database
Appliance
Use the information in this appendix to select database templates for your planned
databases.
Topics:
Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance (page B-1)
Choose a database template that best meets your database workload and
hardware.
B.1 Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
Choose a database template that best meets your database workload and hardware.
About Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
Oracle Database Appliance enables you to consolidate many databases into a single
system. Consolidation can minimize idle resources, maximize efficiency, and lower
costs. By using instance caging in conjunction with Oracle Database Resource Manager
(the Resource Manager), you can provide desired levels of service across multiple
instances on a single Oracle Database Appliance.
Oracle Database Appliance templates are already tuned for the size of each database
instance workload. They are designed to run on a specific number of cores. Caging
ensures that each database workload is restricted to the set of cores allocated by the
template, enabling multiple databases to run concurrently with no performance
degradation, up to the capacity of Oracle Database Appliance. You can select database
template sizes larger than your current needs to provide for planned growth, which
you accommodate later by adjusting System Global Area (SGA) and Program Global
Area (PGA) sizes as well as the number of cores.
The Oracle Appliance Manager Configurator refers to the database sizing templates as
classes of databases.
Note:
Oracle strongly recommends that you use the Oracle Database Appliance
templates, because they implement best practices and are configured
specifically for Oracle Database Appliance.
Use the following tables to help select the best templates for your databases. When
using these tables remember that:
•
The information in the tables assumes that you are creating disk backups. The
information in the tables assume that you are creating local disk backups.
Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance B-1
Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
Consider the space requirements for your database and the policy for local disk
backups versus external backups. Typically, external backups have more space
available for the database than local backups.
•
Container databases are created on Oracle ACFS.
•
I/O per second (IOps) values are derived from an 8-kilobyte random read-write
response time of 10 to 12 milliseconds for Hard Disk Drives (HDDs), and less than
1 millisecond for Flash, for Oracle Database Appliance X5-2; 5 to 7 milliseconds
for Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 and X3-2; and 5 milliseconds for Oracle
Database Appliance Version 1 to service an online transaction processing (OLTP)
I/O request. The rates are not based on the number of CPUs and assume that the
system is running at capacity.
•
Throughput, in megabytes per second (MBps) is based on a 1 MB sequential read/
write for a data warehousing system. As with IOps, the MBps is a measure of
throughput when the system is at capacity. With just a single small database
running, the MBps would be the maximum available on the system for a large
database.
•
The log file size assumes four redo log groups for each instance with a log switch
every 15 minutes when the system is running at full capacity.
•
Storage is shared between the servers on Oracle Database Appliance.
About Improved Oracle Database Appliance Template Options
Oracle Appliance Manager release 12.1.2.2.0 and later releases provide improved
database templates that are configured specifically for the type of database workload
that you want to carry out on your databases on Oracle Database Appliance. Choose
the template that best matches the common workload your databases perform (OLTP,
DSS, In-Memory).
The improved Oracle Database templates replace the generic database templates from
previous releases that only provided sizing parameters for OLTP workloads. The
database sizing tables provide updated template names and sizing based on the
number of CPUs and memory attributes for each type of database workload. The table
“Oracle Database Appliance Database Template Name Conversions” provides a
reference between the generic database template names and the database template
names based on CPU cores.
Identify the template type that is appropriate to your database workload and
hardware:
•
Use Oracle Database Appliance OLTP Database Templates if your database
workload is primarily online transaction processing (OLTP).
•
Use Oracle Database Appliance DSS database templates if your database
workload is primarily decision support services (DSS) or data warehousing.
•
Use Oracle Database Appliance In-Memory (IMDB) database templates if your
database workload can fit in memory, and can benefit from in-memory
performance capabilities.
•
Use Oracle Database Appliance X5-2 generic database templates if your database
is on Oracle Database Appliance X5-2.
•
Use Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 generic database templates if your database
is on Oracle Database Appliance X4-2.
B-2 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
•
Use Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 generic database templates if your database
is on Oracle Database Appliance X3-2.
•
Use Oracle Database Appliance Version 1 generic database templates if your
appliance is the original model of Oracle Database Appliance.
The templates provide general guidelines about the maximum number of databases
on a fully deployed Oracle Database Appliance. Base the memory and CPU sizing on
the number of instances per server, not the number of databases. Memory and CPUs
are shared by all databases and the number of databases impacts performance. For
example, when you have one database, the database receives full I/O throughput. If
you have 9 databases, then each database has only 1/9th of the available I/O
throughput for all disks.
When you have multiple databases, they share and compete over available CPU
resources. When choosing a template, do not have more CPU_COUNTs distributed
than available threads in the system. Oracle recommends partitioning, where every
database has exclusive CPUs. If you choose to exceed the recommended maximum
number of databases on Oracle Database Appliance (over-provision), be aware of your
I/O results and performance degradation. With the over-provisioned approach, the
sum of the CPU_COUNT across all instances can exceed the number of CPUs. Better
resource utilization is provided with over-provisioning; however, it is possible for
contention to occur when multiple databases are heavily loaded at the same time.
Over-provisioning is best used for systems running non-critical applications. Avoid
using over-provisioning for databases with high I/O requirements or those with high
transaction rates. If you choose to over-provision, then do not exceed twice the
number of total CPUs. Twice the allocation of total CPUs is based on hyper-threading
of 2 CPU threads per core.
Table B-1
Oracle Database Appliance Database Generic Template Name Conversions
CPU Core-Based Database
Template Names
odb-01s odb-01
odb-02
odb-04
odb-06
odb-12
odb-16
odb-24
Generic Database Template
Names
Very,
very
small
Small
Mediu
m
Large
Extra
Large
Extra
Extra
Large
Extra
Extra
Extra
Large
Very
Small
Note:
Extra Extra Large is applicable to Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 and Oracle
Database Appliance X4-2. Extra Extra Extra Large is applicable to Oracle
Database Appliance X4-2 only.
Table B-2
Oracle Database Appliance OLTP Database Template Sizes
Template
CPU
Cores
SGA
PGA
Flash
Processes LOG buffer, Redo
Log
odb-01s (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2,
and V1)
1
2 GB
1 GB
6 GB
200
16 MB, 1 GB
odb-01 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
1
4 GB
2 GB
12 GB
200
16 MB, 1 GB
Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance B-3
Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
Table B-2
(Cont.) Oracle Database Appliance OLTP Database Template Sizes
Template
CPU
Cores
SGA
PGA
Flash
Processes LOG buffer, Redo
Log
odb-02 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
2
8 GB
4 GB
24 GB
400
16 MB, 1 GB
odb-04 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
4
16 GB
8 GB
48 GB
800
32 MB, 1 GB
odb-06 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
6
24 GB
12 GB
72 GB
1200
64 MB, 2 GB
odb-12 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
12
48 GB
24 GB
144 GB
2400
64 MB, 4 GB
odb-16 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2
Only)
16
64 GB
32 GB
192 GB
3200
64 MB, 4 GB
odb-24 (X5-2, X4-2 Only)
24
96 GB
48 GB
192 GB
4800
64 MB, 4 GB
odb-32 (X5-2 Only)
32
128 GB
64 GB
256 GB
6400
64 MB, 4 GB
odb-36 (X5-2 Only)
36
128 GB
64 GB
256 GB
7200
64 MB, 4 GB
Note:
Flash is applicable to Oracle Database Appliance X5-2 only.
Table B-3
Oracle Database Appliance DSS Database Template Sizes
Template
CPU
Cores
SGA (GB) PGA (GB) Processe
s
Redo log file
size (GB)
Log buffer
(MB)
odb-01s (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2,
and V1)
1
1
2
200
1
16
odb-01 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2,
and V1)
1
2
4
200
1
16
odb-02 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2,
and V1)
2
4
8
400
1
16
odb-04 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2,
and V1)
4
8
16
800
1
32
odb-06 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2,
and V1)
6
12
24
1200
2
64
odb-12 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2,
and V1)
12
24
48
2400
4
64
B-4 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
Table B-3
(Cont.) Oracle Database Appliance DSS Database Template Sizes
Template
CPU
Cores
SGA (GB) PGA (GB) Processe
s
Redo log file
size (GB)
Log buffer
(MB)
odb-16 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2
Only)
16
32
64
3200
4
64
odb-24 (X5-2, X4-2 Only)
24
48
96
4800
4
64
odb-32 (X5-2 Only)
32
64
128
6400
4
64
odb-36 (X5-2 Only)
36
64
128
7200
4
64
Table B-4
Oracle Database Appliance In-Memory Database Template Size
Template
CPU
Cores
SGA
(GB)
PGA
(GB)
InMemory
(GB)
Processe
s
Redo log
file size
(GB)
Log
buffer
(MB)
odb-01s (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2,
and V1)
1
2
1
1
200
1
16
odb-01 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
1
4
2
2
200
1
16
odb-02 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
2
8
4
4
400
1
16
odb-04 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
4
16
8
8
800
1
32
odb-06 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
6
24
12
12
1200
2
64
odb-12 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2, and
V1)
12
48
24
24
2400
4
64
odb-16 (X5-2, X4-2, X3-2
Only)
16
64
32
32
3200
4
64
odb-24 (X5-2, X4-2 Only)
24
96
48
48
4800
4
64
odb-32 (X5-2 Only)
32
128
64
64
6400
4
64
odb-36 (X5-2 Only)
36
128
64
64
7200
4
64
Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance B-5
Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
Table B-5
Oracle Database Appliance X5-2 Database Template Size Storage Performance
Template
Number of
databases
that you
can deploy
using this
template
Container
Database
ACFS Size
on DATA
Disk Group
(GB)
I/Ops with
single
storage
shelf (HDD/
FLASH)
Throughput
(MBps) with
single
storage
shelf (HDD/
FLASH)
I/Ops with
storage
shelf plus
storage
expansion
shelf (HDD/
FLASH)
Throughput Log
(MBps) with generation
storage
(MBps)
shelf plus
storage
expansion
shelf (HDD/
FLASH)
odb-01s
36
100
42/4167
83/83
83/8333
167/167
6.83
odb-01
36
100
42/4167
83/83
83/8333
167/167
6.83
odb-02
18
200
83/8.3K
167/167
167/16.7K
333/333
6.83
odb-04
9
400
167/16.7K
333/333
333/33.3K
667/667
13.65
odb-06
6
800
250/25K
500/500
500/50K
1000/1000
27.3
odb-12
3
1600
500/50K
1000/1000
1000/100K
2000/2000
27.3
odb-16
2
1600
750/75K
1500/1500
1500/150K
3000/3000
27.3
odb-24
1
1600
1500/150K
3000/3000
3000/300K
6000/6000
27.3
odb-32
1
1600
1500/150K
3000/3000
3000/300K
6000/6000
27.3
odb-36
1
1600
1500/150K
3000/3000
3000/300K
6000/6000
27.3
Note:
The number of databases that you can deploy using this template is for the
entire Oracle Database Appliance.
Actual I/O per second (I/Ops) and throughput for a database depends on the
percentage of I/O operations that are serviced through the FLASH, compared
with the operations serviced through the hard disk drives (HDDs). The I/Ops
weighting in these tables assumes an OLTP workload calculated as a mixed
workload (80 percent reads, serviced through the FLASH cache, and 20
percent writes serviced through the HDDs).
Table B-6
Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 Database Template Size Storage Performance
Template
Number of
databases
that you
can deploy
using this
template
Container
Database
ACFS Size
on DATA
Disk Group
(GB)
I/Ops with
single
storage
shelf
Throughput
(MBps) with
single
storage
shelf
I/Ops with
storage
shelf plus
storage
expansion
shelf
Throughput Log
(MBps) with generation
storage
(MBps)
shelf plus
storage
expansion
shelf
odb-01s
24
100
138
146
275
229
B-6 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
6.83
Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
Table B-6
(Cont.) Oracle Database Appliance X4-2 Database Template Size Storage Performance
Template
Number of
databases
that you
can deploy
using this
template
Container
Database
ACFS Size
on DATA
Disk Group
(GB)
I/Ops with
single
storage
shelf
Throughput
(MBps) with
single
storage
shelf
I/Ops with
storage
shelf plus
storage
expansion
shelf
Throughput Log
(MBps) with generation
storage
(MBps)
shelf plus
storage
expansion
shelf
odb-01
24
100
138
146
275
230
6.83
odb-02
12
200
275
292
550
458
6.83
odb-04
6
400
550
583
1100
917
13.65
odb-06
4
800
825
875
1650
1375
27.3
odb-12
2
1600
1650
1750
3300
2750
27.3
odb-16
1
1600
3300
3500
6600
5500
27.3
odb-24
1
1600
3300
3500
6600
5500
27.3
Table B-7
Oracle Database Appliance X3-2 Database Template Size Storage Performance
Template
Number of
databases
that you
can deploy
using this
template
Container
Database
ACFS Size
on DATA
Disk Group
(GB)
I/Ops with
single
storage
shelf
Throughput
(MBps) with
single
storage
shelf
I/Ops with
storage
shelf plus
storage
expansion
shelf
Throughput Log
(MBps) with generation
storage
(MBps)
shelf plus
storage
expansion
shelf
odb-01s
16
100
206
219
413
344
6.83
odb-01
16
100
206
219
413
344
6.83
odb-02
8
200
413
438
825
688
6.83
odb-04
4
400
825
875
1650
1375
13.65
odb-06
2
800
1650
1750
3300
2750
27.3
odb-12
1
1600
3300
3500
6600
5500
27.3
odb-16
1
1600
3300
3500
6600
5500
27.3
Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance B-7
Types of Database Templates for Oracle Database Appliance
Table B-8
Oracle Database Appliance Version 1 Database Template Size Storage Performance
Template
Number of
databases that you
can deploy using
this template
Container
Database ACFS
Size on DATA
Disk Group (GB)
I/Ops
Throughput Log generation
(MBps)
(Mps)
odb-01s
12
100
333
250
6.83
odb-01
12
100
333
250
6.83
odb-02
6
200
667
500
6.83
odb-04
3
400
1333
1000
13.65
odb-06
2
800
2000
1500
27.3
odb-12
1
1600
4000
3000
27.3
Note:
For a single database, select a template that best fits your expected workload
(the CPU and I/Ops capabilities you require) on the hardware that you are
using. When creating multiple databases, calculate the overall workload;
available system resources for any new database are affected by the CPU and
I/Ops consumed by the existing databases that are already on the system.
B-8 Oracle Database Appliance Administration and Reference Guide
Index
Symbols
10-GbE network interface, 3-31
A
ACFS, A-6–A-8
ACFS mount points, A-7
administrative account users, 2-5
administrative accounts, 2-5
ASM Cluster File System
See Oracle ACFS
ASR
See Oracle ASR (Auto Service Request)
Automatic Storage Management
See Oracle ASM
B
backup and recovery
RMAN, 2-3
bond
network interface, 3-31
bridge
network interface, 3-31
C
caching database data, 2-10
cleaning up deployment, 5-6
cloudfs
display file systems, 4-61
Cluster Health Monitor
collect diagnostic data, 4-44
component version
display, 4-76
Configuration Audit Tool (ORAchk), 5-8
configure virtual machine, 3-27
controllers
display details, 4-65
convert single instance database
to Oracle RAC, 2-8
to Oracle RAC One Node, 2-8
cooling
cooling (continued)
show status, 4-54
cores
display how allocated to virtual machines, 4-55
CPU
caging, 3-28
display details, 4-55
display processor details, 4-63
CPU core
current configuration, 4-39
update, 4-78
CPU pool
default-unpinned-pool, 3-28
over-subscribed, 3-30
D
database
configuration file
remove, 2-6
view contents, 2-6
consolidate multiple, B-1
display file systems, 4-61
home
create multiple, 2-9
multiple, 2-9
managing and maintaining, 2-1
upgrade, 2-12
database configuration
display parameters, 4-56
database configuration file
create, 4-29
delete, 4-34
database snapshot
create, 4-31
database storage, A-6
database template
See template, database
database templates, B-1
dbhome
delete, 4-35
default groups and users, A-2
DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)
Index-1
DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) (continued)
initial network, 4-14
directory paths, A-1
disk
display details, 4-58
disk controllers
display details, 4-54
disk diagnostic tool, 5-8
disk group sizes, A-2
disk storage
display details, 4-65
Dom1 (ODA_BASE), 3-7
domain
definition, 3-4
Domain 0 (Dom0)
definition, 3-3
Domain U
definition, 3-3
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
See DHCP
E
EM Express, 2-3
Enterprise Manager plug-in, 2-3
errors
display validation, 4-65
expander
display information, 4-60
error detection, 4-60
expanders
display details, 4-65
F
failures
display validation, 4-66
firmware
display version, 4-67
invalid version failure, 4-65, 4-66
patching, 4-76
flash storage, 2-10
HRD tool, 5-8
I
InfiniBand
display details, 4-61
display port, 4-61
instance caging
enable, 2-10
template, B-1
ISO
downloading, 1-13
L
LED
physical disk identifier, 4-43
Linux
and virtualization, 3-2
local disk
display details, 4-61
local repository, 3-14
log files
sending to Oracle Support Services, 5-8
log switch
select template, B-1
M
manual database updates, 2-13
manual database upgrades, 2-14
master node
command, 4-61
memory module
display details, 4-62
migration
from an existing database, 2-3
multiple database instances
instance caging, 2-10
multiple Oracle homes
create, 2-9
My Oracle Support
send log files for troubleshooting, 5-8
G
Grid user, 2-5
group user
change name or ID, 4-38
groups and users defaults, A-2
Guest Domains (Domain U)
definition, 3-3
guest virtual machine
definition, 3-4
H
high availability, 3-27
Index-2
N
network
display details, 4-62
network infrastructure, 3-31
network interface
default values, 3-31
O
oakcli
show cooling, 4-54
oakcli commands
oakcli commands (continued)
-driverdomain, 3-20
-repo parameter, 3-19
-snap, 3-20
-vm, 3-20
-vmtemplate, 3-20
add disk -local, 4-7
apply, 4-7
clone, 4-8
clone vdisk, 3-12, 4-8
clone vm, 3-19, 3-20, 4-9
clones and snap clones, 3-19
configure, 4-11
configure additionalnet, 4-12
configure ASR, 4-13
configure cpupool, 3-30, 4-14
configure firstnet, 4-14
configure ib2fiber, 4-15
configure network, 4-15
configure networks, 4-12
configure oda_base, 4-16
configure ODA_BASE, 3-38
configure repo, 3-10, 4-17
configure vm, 3-17, 3-18, 3-27, 3-31, 4-18
configure vmtemplate, 3-17, 3-18
copy, 4-22
create
db_config_params, 4-29
dbhome, 2-14
create cpupool, 3-30, 4-23
create database, 2-6, 2-9, 4-24
create db_config_params, 2-6
create dbhome, 4-27
create dbstorage, 4-28
create repo, 3-8, 4-30
create vdisk, 3-11
create vlan, 3-35, 4-32
delete, 4-33
delete cpupool, 4-34
delete database, 4-34
delete db_config_params, 2-6, 4-34
delete dbhome, 4-35
delete dbstorage, 4-35
delete repo, 3-10, 4-36
delete vdisk, 3-13
delete vlan, 3-35, 4-37
delete vm, 3-26, 4-37
delete vmtemplate, 3-18, 4-38
deploy
change group name and ID, 4-38
log file, 4-38
describe-cpucore, 4-39
diskwritecache, 4-40
expand storage, 4-40
import vmtemplate, 3-15, 4-41
locate, 4-43
oakcli commands (continued)
manage diagcollec, 5-8
manage diagcollect, 4-43
migrate vm, 4-44
modify, 4-45
modify database, 4-45
modify vm
-addnetwork parameter, 3-35
modify vmtemplate, 4-47
oakcli create db_config_params, 4-29
oakcli create snapshotdb, 4-31
oakcli create vdisk, 4-31
oakcli delete vdisk, 4-36
oakcli oakcli show ib, 4-61
oakcli show dbstorage, 4-57
oakcli show fs, 4-61
oakcli show iraid, 4-61
oakcli show vmconsole, 4-70
orachk, 4-47
reconfigure kernel parameters, 4-49
reconfigure memlock, 4-49
reconfigure osparams, 4-49
reconfigure vm.nearhugepage, 4-49
resize dbstorage, 4-50
restart oda_base, 4-50
restart ODA_BASE, 3-38
show
databases, 1-11, 2-13
dbhome, 2-14
show -h
with Oracle Database Appliance Hardware
Monitoring Tool, 5-10
show asr, 4-53
show controller, 4-54
show core_config_key, 4-55
show cpupool, 3-30, 4-55
show databases, 4-56
show db_config_params, 2-6, 4-56
show dbhomes, 4-57
show disk, 4-58
show diskgroup, 4-59
show enclosure, 4-60
show env_hw, 4-60
show expander, 4-60
show ismaster, 4-61
show memory, 4-62
show network, 4-62
show power
example, 5-10
show processor, 4-63
show raidsyncstatus, 4-63
show repo, 3-9, 4-64
show server, 4-65
show storage, 4-65
show validation storage, 4-65
show validation storage errors, 4-65
Index-3
oakcli commands (continued)
show validation storage failures, 4-66
show vdisk, 3-12, 4-66
show version, 1-12, 4-67
show vlan, 3-35, 4-68
show vm, 4-69
show vmtemplate, 3-15, 3-18, 4-71
start, 4-72
start oda_base, 4-72
start repo, 3-9, 4-72
start vm, 4-73
stop, 4-73
stop repo, 3-10
stop vm, 3-26
stordiag, 4-74, 5-8
test asr, 4-75
unpack, 4-75
update, 1-11, 2-13, 4-76
update-cpucore, 4-78
upgrade, 4-79
upgrade database, 2-14
validate, 4-80, 5-1–5-3
validate -c ospatch, 1-9
OAKCLI commands
create database, 2-6
oakcli deploy, 4-38
ODA_BASE
caging, 3-28
definition, 3-3
Dom1, 3-7
domain, 3-28
resize, 3-38
resizing, 3-38
VLAN management, 3-35
odarepo1
local repository, 3-14
odarepo2
local repository, 3-14
OINSTALL group, 2-5
Optimal Flexible Architecture
and Oracle homes, A-1
ORAchk, 5-8
Oracle ACFS
display database storage information, 4-57
Oracle ACFS (Oracle Automatic Storage Management
Cluster File System)
shared repository, 3-4
Oracle Appliance Kit
Command-Line Interface
Database management, 2-1
Oracle Appliance Manager command-line interface
alphabetical list of commands, 4-1
help for, 4-3
location of, 4-3
uses for, 4-3
Oracle Appliance Manager command-line-interface
operational notes, 4-3
Index-4
Oracle ASM (Oracle Automatic Storage Management)
configuration check, 5-8
data migration, 2-3
physical disk identifier, 4-43
trace file analyzer diagnostics, 5-9
user group, A-2
Oracle ASM disk group
display details, 4-59
Oracle ASR (Auto Service Request)
configure, 4-13
display configuration details, 4-53
test asr, 4-75
Oracle Automatic Storage Management
See Oracle ASM
Oracle Clusterware
description, 2-4
Oracle Database
upgrading, 1-11
See also database
Oracle Database Appliance Hardware Monitoring
Tool, 5-10
Oracle Database Appliance Virtualized Platform
and oakcli, 4-3
Oracle Database Resource Manager
instance caging, 2-10
Oracle DBCA (Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant)
add database, 2-4
convert database, 2-8
drop database, 2-4
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express, 2-3
Oracle home
multiple, 2-9
Oracle RAC (Oracle Real Application Clusters)
check configuration settings, 5-8
convert single-instance database to, 2-8
description, 2-4
Oracle Clusterware, 2-4
trace file analyzer, 5-9
Oracle RAC One Node
convert single instance database to, 2-8
description, 2-4
Oracle Real Application Clusters
See Oracle RAC
Oracle Support Services
See My Oracle Support
Oracle user, 2-5
Oracle VM, 3-2
OSASM group, 2-5
OSDBA, 2-5
OSDBA for ASM group, 2-5
OSDBA group, 2-5
OSOPER groups, 2-5
over-subscribed CPU pool, 3-30
P
patch bundle
unpack, 1-7
patching
Oracle Database, 1-11
validating patches, 1-9
patching, downloading patch bundle, 1-6
performance, 2-10
performance tuning, 3-30, 3-31
physical disk
LED identifier, 4-43
power supply
display details, 4-62
software
installation troubleshooting, 5-6
Solaris x86
and virtualization, 3-2
space management, A-7, A-8
SQL*Loader, 2-3
SRVCTL (server control utility)
add and remove database, 2-4
SSDs, 2-10
storage
show enclosure subsystem, 4-60
storage expansion
command, 4-40
T
R
RAID
display details, 4-61
raidsyncstatus
display, 4-63
Real Application Clusters
See Oracle RAC
redo log writes
and SSDs, 2-10
resource management
CPU pools, 3-30
Oracle VM, 3-2
supported virtual operating systems, 3-2
RMAN (Recovery Manager utility)
database management, 2-3
S
SAS expander
display details, 4-60
SCAN (single client access name)
system configuration, A-9
sending log files to Oracle Support Services, 5-8
server
display details, 4-65
shared repositories
about, 3-4
architecture, 3-4
shared repository
creating and managing, 3-8
delete, 4-36
deleting, 3-10
increasing the size, 3-10
show status, 3-9
starting, 3-9
stopping, 3-10
single client access name
See SCAN
single instance database
convert to Oracle RAC or Oracle RAC One Node,
2-8
snapshot database, 2-7
template
database
choosing, B-1
virtual machine
automatic unique naming, 3-14
unique name for each node, 3-14
templates, B-1
Trace File Analyzer utility, 5-9
troubleshooting
AoDB Linux installation tree, 5-6
expander, 4-60
hrd disk diagnostic tool, 5-9
log files for Oracle Support Services, 5-8
machine check exception, 5-6
partitioning hard drive, 5-6
performance issues, 5-2
preinstallation deployment checks, 5-2
software installation, 5-6
system startup, 5-6
trace file analyzer, 5-9
U
upgrade database, 2-12
upgrading
Oracle Database, 1-11
V
validation errors
display, 4-65
validation failures
display, 4-66
virtual disk
attaching to a virtual machine, 3-13
cloning, 3-12
create, 4-31
creating, 3-11
delete, 4-36
deleting, 3-13
display details, 4-66
Index-5
virtual disk (continued)
viewing information about, 3-12
virtual disks, 3-4
virtual local area network
assigning to ODA_BASE, 3-35
assigning to user domain, 3-35
create, 3-35
native, 3-35
on ODA_BASE, 3-35
on user domains, 3-35
removing from ODA_BASE, 3-35
removing from user domain, 3-35
virtual machine
about, 3-4
assemblies, 3-4
caging, 3-28
display repository details, 4-64
high availability, 3-27
ODA_BASE caging, 3-28
Index-6
virtual machine (continued)
open console, 4-70
pin, 3-28
template, 3-14
templates, 3-4
virtual machine templates
importing, 3-15
listing, 3-15
virtualization, 3-2
VLAN
display details, 4-68
vm templates
display details, 4-71
W
web interface
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Express, 2-3
Windows
and virtualization, 3-2
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