Rook - Winning Moves Games

Rook - Winning Moves Games
RULES
ABOUT Rook®
My Grandfather, George S. Parker, founded Parker
Games in 1883. A few years later, he brought his two
elder brothers into the business and renamed the company Parker Brothers, Inc. George was still active in
the business while I was growing up. His brothers had
retired.
I remember George as a kindly and devoted grandfather. More than anything else in his life he loved to play
games with my siblings and me. Often my grandmother
would participate, especially if it involved ROOK. This,
to my knowledge, was the only game where she played a
major role in its creation. George was especially proud
of ROOK because it combined the great fun of tricktaking card play with bright, numerical cards, avoiding
the stigma attached to regular playing cards at the turn of
the Twentieth Century.
I wish you and yours much
fun and enjoyment whenever
you play the great game of
ROOK!
ROOK game, 1912
Randolph P. Barton
Former President
Parker Brothers, Inc.
CARD-PLAYING TERMS
FOR NEW ROOK PLAYERS
There are four color-coded suits of otherwise identically numbered cards. Two players generally play
against two other players in partnership. At the beginning of each hand, a dealer will shuffle the deck and
deal cards to each player. Players hold their cards in
their hand. Each player may then “bid” for the privilege
of naming the “trump” suit. Next, each plays a card
onto each “trick.” The winner of each trick collects the
card. When all cards are played, “scoring” occurs-certain cards have value, others don’t. In some versions of
ROOK, a “nest” is also part of play.
Bid: Before play begins, all players bid (as in an auction)
for the privilege of naming the trump suit. During the
hand, the player who bid the highest “takes the bid” and
must win tricks to collect count cards worth enough
points to equal or exceed the amount bid.
Trump: The player who bid highest is known as the
“declarer.” The declarer “picks trump,” naming one of
the four suit colors to be trump for that hand. Any card
of the trump color beats any card of the other three
colors.
Trick: One player “leads” a card face up on the table
from his hand, and each other player-in turn-lays a card
on it. The highest card of the color led “takes the trick”
unless someone plays a trump; then the trump (or highest trump) card takes it.
Ruff: When a non-trump card is led on a trick, and
later-during that trick-a trump card is played, the trump
card is said to “ruff” the trick.
Scoring: At the end of the hand, players count up the
count cards (“counters”) in the tricks they have taken
in order to calculate their scores. A declarer who does
not collect the number of points at least equal to his bid
“goes down” and subtracts the total amount of that bid. Nest: Some versions of ROOK require that a few
cards be dealt, face down, to the “nest” which is then
claimed by the declarer. After adding these cards to his
hand, the declarer will then replace a like number of
cards into the nest. The nest is then won by the player
who takes the final trick of the hand.
RULES FOR TOURNAMENT ROOK
(“KENTUCKY DISCARD”)
A Partnership Game for 4 Players
The game of KENTUCKY DISCARD has been one of
the most popular of all ROOK games for decades. It is
the version played at most ROOK clubs and at ROOK
Tournaments.
KENTUCKY DISCARD has one variation–adding the
ROOK Bird Card. Including this card adds an exciting
element of surprise and speeds the game up as well. Decide before play if you will include it.
Note: The tips on bidding, discarding, and play which
follow these rules assume the ROOK Bird Card is not
in Play. When in play, the ROOK Bird Card can be
thought of as the equivalent of the 14 of Trump.
Dealing
Pick a dealer. First, dealer removes all 1’s 2’s, 3’s,
and 4’s from the deck. This will result in a deck of
40 cards (or 41 if the ROOK Bird Card is included). Dealer shuffles and offers a cut to the player seated
on his right. Dealer deals 9 cards face down to each
player and a face down nest of four cards (five if the
ROOK Bird Card is included). The nest cards should
be dealt one at a time, after each player has been
dealt another card, until the nest is “full.” Place the
nest in the center of the table, apart from any player’s
hand. If any card ranked 10 or higher is inadvertently
exposed during the deal, the dealer must re-deal the
hand. If any lower ranked card is exposed, it is the
right of any player to demand a new deal. Deal will
rotate to the left on subsequent hands.
Object
300 points wins the game. If both sides surpass 300
points at the end of the same hand, the higher total
wins. If there is a tie, play another hand.
Scoring
Appoint a scorekeeper to keep score on a piece
of paper. Count cards (“counters”) are the 14’s and
10’s (which are each worth ten points) and the 5’s
(which are each worth five points). The ROOK Bird
Card (if it is used) is worth twenty points. All other
cards have no value in scoring. Captured tricks have
no separate value. Total points in the deck are 100
(120 if the ROOK Bird Card is used). The counters captured by partners are added together for their joint score for that hand. However, if
the high bidder fails to make the bid, the partnership
is set back the full amount of the bid, even if this gives
that partnership a minus score.
Bidding
After the deal, each player sorts the cards in his hand
according to colors and the bidding begins with the
player at dealer’s left and continues clockwise around
the table. Players bid for the privilege of choosing the
trump color. There is a great advantage in being the
player who chooses trump color, since a trump card
can capture any card of any other color. Your opening
bid must be at least 70 points. Bids must be divisible
by 5, such as 70, 75, 80. You are bidding the number of points (from count cards) you think you and
your partner will be able to capture with your hands,
provided you are able to name the color that will be
trump. If you capture all count cards, you score 120
points (or 100 points if playing without the ROOK
Bird Card).
You should remember, there’s always a risk when you
take the bid. If you do not wish to bid, you may “pass.” After passing, you may not bid again on this hand.
Playing
The Nest: The highest bidder (declarer) adds the cards
in the nest to his hand and then exchanges a like
amount of cards in his hand to form a new nest. Any
card may be placed in the nest including (for strategic
purposes) counters. After discarding to the nest,
declarer places the nest aside, away from all players,
and then announces the trump color. The player who
takes the last trick captures the nest and scores any
counters found in it.
First Lead:
The player to the left of the dealer (who
may or may not be the highest bidder) makes the
initial lead and play begins. Any color may be led and
play moves around the table to the left.
Players must, if possible, follow suit (i.e., play a
card of the same color that was led). If it is impossible
to follow suit, any card may be played. That includes
a trump card, or a non-counter of another suit, or a
counter of another suit if a player believes his partner
may take the trick.
Play:
Highest Card:
The highest card of the color led takes
the trick unless the trick is trumped, in which case the
highest trump takes the trick.
Note: The ROOK Bird Card, when used, is the highest
card, no matter what color has been chosen as trumps. It may be played at any time the holder wishes, regardless of the color led. It is the only card that has this
privilege. If led, it calls for the play of the trump color.
You must play the ROOK Bird Card when trump is
led and you have no other trump cards.
Next Trick:
Whoever takes the trick places it face
down near him and leads a card for the next trick. Any card of any color may be led.
Scoring
The winner of the final trick claims the discarded
nest and includes in his score the value of any counters contained in it.
A partnership scores the value of all counters won
during play. However, if declarer’s partnership fails
to score at least as many points as bid, the amount
of declarer’s bid is DEDUCTED from their current
score. It is possible, therefore, for a partnership’s
score to be negative.
On the first hand, you bid 80, but you and your
partner only score 75 points of counters. Result: your
score is minus 80 (0 - 80 = -80). If on a later hand you fail to
make a bid, the bid is deducted from your current score.
Example: You have 140 points and fail to make your
Example:
bid of 80. Your new score is 60 (140 - 80 = 60).
After Four Hands
One set of partners should exchange seats to
change the play order of the four players. A penalty
of 40 points should be taken from the score of a player
who improperly discards (to the nest) or makes any
suggestion to affect partner’s play. If a misdeal is discovered before three tricks are taken, the cards are
withdrawn and re-dealt, the deal passing to the left. If a misdeal is not discovered until later in the game,
the dealer’s partnership is set back 40 points for the
error and the other partnership does not score. The
deal then passes to the left. If a player plays a card of a different color when
he could follow the color led, the error may be corrected if discovered before the next trick is taken. If the error is not discovered until later, the “hand”
is ended, and the side making the error is set back
the full amount of the bid, regardless of who made
the highest bid for that hand. The opponents score
all the counters they captured before the error was
discovered.
PARTNERSHIP ROOK
Major Differences Between Regular Rook and
Tournament Rook
Note:
PARTNERSHIP ROOK is akin to Contract
Bridge in scope. However, the bidding is much simpler to learn.
The three major differences between PARTNERSHIP
ROOK and TOURNAMENT ROOK are:
1. REGULAR PARTNERSHIP ROOK uses the en-
tire 56 card deck.
2. The partnership taking the most tricks scores a
20 point bonus.
3. T
here is no nest (nor is the ROOK Bird Card in
play).
REGULAR PARTNERSHIP ROOK takes longer to
play each hand, simply because each player begins
with fourteen cards rather than ten. Because taking
the most tricks earns a bonus score, players need
to plan their hands to try and win the eight tricks
needed to score this bonus.
In REGULAR PARTNERSHIP ROOK, the opponents of the declarer have a much better opportunity
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to save their counters because it is more difficult for
declarer to void one suit, let alone two, and declarer is not likely to have a commanding control over
trumps, since there are 4 more trump cards in play.
A player should be more cautious when risking a
counter. Cards as high as a 12 should be played with
caution. The discard principle used by the player to
declarer’s left–either risking a counter or making the
best effort to capture each doubtful trick–doesn’t
work nearly as often here. Instead, it is best not to
waste a high middle card (cards higher than 10, but
not the highest unplayed card of the suit) except when
there is a high probability of an opposing 10 taking the
trick, thereby saving itself.
Declarer wins a smaller percentage of tricks and
counters in REGULAR PARTNERSHIP ROOK. More
small cards and fewer high middle cards are led by declarer’s partner. The opponents do not lead 5’s hoping declarer will have to trump them. A knowledge of
standard leads is more important in this game than in
TOURNAMENT ROOK.
The ROOK PARTNERSHIP
Game for 4 Players
Object of the Game
Be the first partnership to reach game score of
200
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by capturing count cards (“counters”) in tricks,
namely: 14’s, 10’s, and 5’s. If both sides exceed game
score at the end of the same hand, the higher total wins.
In the case of a tie, play another hand to determine the
winner.
points
Choose partners
If you wish, draw for partners. High cards play
against low cards.
Choose the dealer
Players draw cards for first deal. Highest card deals.
Dealing
The basic deck consists of all 56 cards, numbered
1 through 14 in each of four different colors (Green,
Red, Black and Yellow). Shuffle and cut the deck, then
deal out all cards, face down, one at a time, until each
player has 14 cards. There is no nest. Players sort
their cards in their hands according to color. At the
start of each hand, the player to the left of the previous dealer deals.
Misdeal
If any card as high as a 10 is exposed during the deal,
a new deal is required. If any card, even though it is
lower than a 10, is exposed, it is the right of any player
to demand a new deal. In either case the same dealer
re-deals.
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Bidding
Players bid for the privilege of choosing the trump
color. There is a great advantage in being the player
who chooses trump color, since a trump card can
capture any card of any other color. Bidding can start
at any number. Bids must be divisible by 5, such as
70, 75, 80. You are bidding the number of points you
think you and your partner will be able to capture
with your hands provided you are able to name the
trump color. If you capture all of the count cards and
take more tricks than the opponents, you will score
120 points. You should remember that there’s always
a risk when you take the bid!
Note: To calculate what you should bid, count up the
value of the count cards in your hand and look at the
number of high cards you have. Also, look at the distribution of colors. If you have no cards of one color
you can trump that color when it is led and win the
trick. Bidding starts with the player on the dealer’s
left and passes clockwise.
You may, but need not, bid on your turn. Either bid
at least 5 points higher than the last bidder or say, “I
pass.” Having passed, you may not bid again on this
hand. Bidding continues in turn until no player will bid
higher.
Bidding example:
Four people (Norma, Steve, Ellen,
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and Wes) are playing. Steve has six high Green cards
and some each of the other colors. Norma, on the
dealer’s left, examines her hand and bids 70. Steve
bids 80. Ellen, having a poor hand, passes. Wes bids
85. Norma then has a chance to bid again, and bids
90. Steve, having a strong hand, bids 95. Ellen, having
already passed, may not bid again. Next, Wes passes. Now Norma passes. Steve takes the bid at 95 and announces, “Green is trump.”
Playing
After trump color has been announced, the player to
the left of the dealer (who may or may not be the
highest bidder) “leads” any card of any color face up
to the center of the table. Play passes to the left, each
player in turn playing one card face up.
Note: You must “follow suit” if possible (if you have a
card
of the color led, you must play that color).
If you can’t follow suit, you may throw away a worthless card, or play a trump. The highest card of the color
led takes the trick unless trump is played, in which
case the highest trump takes the trick. Remember,
you and your partner will add your counters together
so, if you think your partner may take the trick, play
a counter.
The person who takes the trick makes the next
lead. When you take a trick, place it face down on
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the table, criss-crossing them to make counting tricks
easier at the end of each hand. With the exception of
the one just played, tricks may not be reviewed until
the hand is completed. Any card of any color may be
led.
Scoring
Only certain cards in the deck, called “count cards” or
“counters,” have point values:
Each 5.................................... 5 points
Each 10.................................10 points
Each 14.................................10 points
The counters are the only cards that have value for
scoring. Each partnership’s score is the sum of all the
count cards in the tricks they captured. Note: If declarer and his partner do not capture enough
counters to make a score equal to (or greater than)
the bid, their partnership is set back the full amount
of the bid, and they get no credit for the counters that
they did capture. If they capture more than their bid,
full credit is given for all counters. If your partnership
did not win the bid, you still receive points for your
count cards.
Most Tricks
The partnership taking more tricks than their opponents will score a bonus of 20 more points. (If each
partnership takes 7 tricks, no bonus is awarded.)
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On each hand, 120 points are at stake (100 points
for counters and 20 points for the most-tricks-won
bonus).
Scoring example: The partnership that took the bid
at 90 collected only 75 points in count cards and did
not take more tricks than their opponents. The full
90 points is deducted from their score; they do not
score the 75 points that they did collect. A score can
drop below zero, so if it’s the first hand, their score
would be -90. Their opponents, who collected the
remaining count cards, are given 45 points: 25 points
for counters and a 20 point bonus for taking the most
tricks.
made the bid for that hand. The opponents score all
the count cards they captured before the error was
discovered.
Winning
The first partnership to reach 200 points wins.
Penalties
A penalty of 40 points is deducted from the score of
the partnership of any player who discards the incorrect number of cards to the nest or makes any “table
talk” suggestions to affect the partner’s play.
If a player “reneges” by playing a card of a different
color when he could have followed suit, the error
may be corrected if discovered before the next trick
is taken. If the error is not discovered until later, the
“hand” is ended, and the side that made the error is
set back the full amount of the bid, regardless of who
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VARIATIONS ON THE ORIGINAL ROOK GAME
These variations follow the same format as established in the rules for both TOURNAMENT ROOK
and PARTNERSHIP ROOK. The basic rules are not
repeated for each variation.
More Partnership Games
DIXIE
A Partnership Game for Four or Six Players
DIXIE is similar to TOURNAMENT ROOK except
that each captured 13 card, instead of each captured
14 card, counts 10 points.
Dealing
Use the basic deck of 56 cards. Deal out the entire
deck plus a nest of four cards for four players or a
nest of two cards for six players.
Object
300 points wins the game.
Scoring
Each 5 card counts 5 points, each 10 card counts 10
points, and each 13 card counts 10 points. 17
Note: The 14 card is not a count card, but is still the
most powerful card in each suit. The side taking the
majority of the tricks wins the nest (which scores 20
bonus points). If each side takes the same number
of tricks, the 20 points go to the opponents of the
high bidder. Their are 120 total points “up for grabs”
during each hand. Partners’ scores are both added
together at the end of each hand. If the high bidder
and his partner fail to make their bid, they are set
back the total amount of the bid (and score nothing
for the count cards they did capture).
Bidding
Same as in TOURNAMENT ROOK. The opening
bid must be at least 70. Remember that your score is
counted together with your partner’s. However, bids
rarely exceed 95.
Playing
The high bidder may exchange any cards in his hand
for cards in the nest. He may leave or place counters
in the nest. The player who takes the last trick also
takes the nest, counting it as an additional trick. After
the exchange, the high bidder announces trump color.
The player who deals makes the opening lead. DIXIE
is the most successful and interesting when played by
six players–three against three–friend and rival alter18
nating around the table, so that no two partners sit
side-by-side.
Winning at DIXIE (“Life with the Counter 13”)
DIXIE is a great partnership game for 4 or 6 people
because of its twist–the 13 in each suit is a counter
instead of the 14. But the 14 is still the high card in
each suit.
Bidding
When
bidding in DIXIE, remember that the 13 can
not be led on the first trick. You have to wait for
the 14 to be played before risking it. Always count
20 points for cards because usually a hand strong
enough to take the bid will win the nest and make
eight tricks.
The blank suit count is 10 points: 4 points for a 13
not held, 4 for the 10 and 2 for the five. After picking
up the nest, and holding seventeen cards in hand, it is
always possible to discard each counter not in a suit
four cards long. Thus, counters in the declarer’s hand
should score their full value. Only consider suits of
four, five or six cards in length.
Your fourth (and shortest) suit has a value of 22
points because the opponents are likely to save a
counter from this suit by playing it on a trick led by
another suit.
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Playing the Hand
A thirteen, if not
in a suit that is at least four cards
long, should be discarded to the nest. If you hold a thirteen and at least three other cards in the same suit, it
will be safe and it will win a trick and “save” itself.
Many times a 10 is lost because declarer holds back his
14 waiting for the 13 to appear. 13’s are in little danger
unless part of a doubleton or if the 13 is a singleton.
Depend on your partner to take care of the 13 if it is
held by your left-hand opponent.
As left-hand opponent, you shouldn’t play a 13 until
the 14 of the same suit has been played. This is true
unless your 13 is only guarded once. Another way of
remembering this rule is: “Hold onto your 13 until the
next to the last chance to play it.”
As right-hand opponent, you have a more sane existence. This is because you generally play last on a trick. You’re likely to save your 13 unless it is a singleton, and
even then the 14 may not be played right away, enabling
you to save it.
As partner, hold back your 14 to finesse the opponent
at declarer’s left unless there is a chance for a 10 to be
lost.
THE ORIGINAL GAME
A Game for Three Individual Players
This is the same as THE ORIGINAL GAME for 2 players
except there is no “dummy.” The third player plays his
own hand.
THE ORIGINAL GAME
A Game for Five or Six Individual Players
Dealing
Use the basic deck of 56 cards. (Do not use the
ROOK Bird Card.) For 5 players, deal a 6-card nest.
For 6 Players, deal a 2-card nest.
Object
150 Points wins the game.
Scoring
Same as in TOURNAMENT ROOK. Total points
for each hand are 100. If the declarer fails to make
the bid, declarer receives no score for counters and
is set back the amount bid.
Bidding
Same as in TOURNAMENT ROOK except the min-
imum bid is 30 points.
Playing
20
Same as in TOURNAMENT ROOK.
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HIGH CARD PARTNER
A Partnership Game for Five Players
Dealing
Remove all 1’s, 2’s, 3’s and 4’s from the deck. Add
the ROOK Bird Card, which gives you a deck of 41
cards. Deal out the cards to each player plus six cards
to the nest.
Object
500 points wins the game.
Scoring
Same as in PARTNERSHIP ROOK. The ROOK Bird
Card counts 20 points. Each partnership’s score is
the total of the count cards captured by both players
in the partnership. However, if the declarer fails to
make the bid, their partnership is set back the amount
of the bid.
Bidding
Same as in PARTNERSHIP ROOK.
this pair. The player to the left of the dealer makes
the opening lead. The winner of the last trick also
takes the nest.
PARTNERSHIP FOR SIX
A Partnership Game for Six Players
Dealing
Use the basic deck of 56 cards, plus the ROOK
Bird Card–8 cards for each player and 9 cards for the
nest.
Scoring
Count cards score as in TOURNAMENT ROOK. The ROOK Bird Card counts 20 points. Captured
tricks have no additional value. This is a game of two
partnerships of three players each. Players should be
seated so that no two partners sit next to each other. The score for each partnership is the sum of the
points captured by all three players.
Playing
The declarer may exchange any cards in his hand
for cards in the nest and then announces trump color. Declarer then names a particular card (usually
the highest cards that declarer does not hold). The
person holding that card becomes declarer’s partner. The remaining three players become partners against
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Bidding & Playing
Same as in TOURNAMENT ROOK.
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THE ORIGINAL GAME
A Game For Two Players
Dealing
Remove all l’s, 2’s and 3’s from the deck, leaving 44
cards. (Do not use the ROOK Bird Card.) Deal the
cards as if there were three Players, dealing the third
hand to the imaginary “dummy” to your right. Stack
the dummy’s cards face down as you deal. Deal all but
the last five cards in this manner, then set the five remaining cards face down at your left to form a nest.
Object
150 points wins the game.
Scoring
Score counters as in TOURNAMENT ROOK. In
addition, score 2 points for each trick captured. Total
amount for each hand is 126 points. If the player who
took the bid makes the bid in tricks and count cards,
both players record their separate scores. But if the
player who took the bid fails to make it, he scores
nothing for that hand, and the opponent’s score for
that hand is doubled. Dummy’s score may, but need
not, be kept.
Bidding
Same as in TOURNAMENT ROOK except that the
opening bid only needs to be at least 30 points.
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The Nest
The declarer may exchange any two of the cards
in his hand for any two in the nest. Declarer then
names trump. Then, declarer removes the nest from
the table.
Playing
Refer to the rules for TOURNAMENT ROOK. The
opponent starts the game by “leading” any card face
up to the table. The dummy’s card is then played by
the dealer, who lifts the top card from the dummy’s
hand and plays it on the trick. Remember that the
dummy’s cards are kept face down throughout the
game. Dealer then plays a card. If the dummy’s card
takes the trick, it is put near the dummy’s hand and
the dealer leads the dummy’s top card for the next
trick.
TENNESSEE FOR TWO
A Game for Two Players
Dealing
Remove all 1’s, 2’s and 3’s from the deck. Use
the remaining 44 cards plus the ROOK Bird Card. Deal out the cards until both players have 11 cards. Next, deal five cards face down to the center of
the table to form the nest. Place the remainder of
the deck face down on the table to the left of the
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dealer, halfway between the two players. This is
the drawing pile. Place the top card face up next
to the drawing pile.
Object
300 points wins the game.
Scoring
Same as in TOURNAMENT ROOK, with the following additions. The ROOK Bird Card has a value
of 20 points. Each captured trick counts 2 points. Total count for each hand is 160 points. If the declarer
fails to make the bid, he does not score. In that case,
declarer’s opponents score double for that hand.
choice of drawing the top card from the drawing pile
or the exposed card alongside it. The other player
must draw the other card. After both players have
drawn, the next card on the drawing pile is turned face
up. Players continue to draw and take tricks until the
drawing pile is exhausted. At that point, each player
will be left with 11 cards, and play continues without
the drawing pile until the last card is played.
Bidding
ROOK game, 1965
Same as in TOURNAMENT ROOK except that the
opening bid must be at least 80 points.
Playing
The declarer may exchange any of the cards in the
nest for cards in his hand. Declarer is not allowed to
leave or place count cards in the nest. The nest is
removed from the table after the exchange has been
made.
The declarer’s opponent makes the opening lead. A player may lead trumps or any other color of his
choice. The ROOK Bird Card acts as the highest
trump. After a player has captured a trick, he has his
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ROOK game, 1977
ROOK game, 1992
DOWNLOAD SCORE SHEETS
You can print out more score sheets by going
to winning-moves.com and clicking on the
Rules and Score Sheet Link on the left side
navigation bar, then clicking on Deluxe Rook
under the Score Sheets section of links.
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winning-moves.com
write: Winning Moves Games
75 Sylvan St., Suite C-104 Danvers, MA 01923
phone: 1.800.664.7788 extension 114
fax: 978.739.4847
email: [email protected]
ROOK® is a trademark of Hasbro, Inc. Used with permission. © 2008 Hasbro, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Manufactured and Distributed by Winning Moves Inc. Danvers, MA, 01923, USA. Colors and Parts may vary. Made in the USA.
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