RULE BOOK - GMT Games
Living Rules • December 2013
This is the “Living Rules” document for the game. It includes errata and clarifications to the original rules. To aid readability, errata is indicated in blue text.
Dedication: To my very patient wife, Tammy, with all my heart.
R ULE BOOK
Table of Contents
1. Introduction.................................................................... 2
2. Preparing for First Play.................................................. 2
3. Key Terms and Concepts................................................ 2
4. Brief Summary of Game Play........................................ 4
5. Player Houses................................................................. 4
6. Victory Conditions......................................................... 4
7. Game Board................................................................... 5
8. Wooden Pieces............................................................... 9
9. Counters and Markers.................................................. 11
10.Cards............................................................................ 12
11. Outline of Sequence of Play......................................... 19
12.Draw Phase................................................................... 19
13.Operations Phase.......................................................... 20
14.Event Text Cards ......................................................... 21
15.Operations/OPS Points................................................. 24
16. Land Movement............................................................ 25
17. Sea Movement.............................................................. 28
18. Mustering..................................................................... 29
19. Political Influence......................................................... 29
20. Combat......................................................................... 28
21. Post-Operations Phase Actions..................................... 37
22. Attrition........................................................................ 37
23. Influence Phase............................................................. 38
24. King Phase (Including Affairs of State)........................ 39
25. Victory Check Phase..................................................... 41
26. Office Phase.................................................................. 41
27. Wintering Phase............................................................ 43
28. Clean-Up Phase............................................................ 44
29. Glossary........................................................................ 45
30. Card Errata................................................................... 46
Credits................................................................................ 47
Shire and Home Estate Locations....................................... 48
GMT Games, LLC • P.O. Box 1308, Hanford, CA 93232-1308
www.GMTGames.com
2
Crown of Roses Rule Book
1.0 Introduction
3.0 Key Terms and Concepts
Crown of Roses is a multi-player strategy game for two to
four players set in the Wars of the Roses period of 15thCentury
England (1455-1485). Each player represents one of the rival
royal houses vying for control of the throne of England. They
use their noble retainers to bring the enemy to battle, influence
nobles to vote their way in Parliament, and wield their influence
to gain the support of the landed gentry.
Attrition (22.0): The gradual wearing down of the combat effectiveness of a Block as represented by Step Losses. Attrition
occurs when you exceed the Stacking Limits (7.2.9), Force
March (16.3), use special Fens (16.2.2) or Wash movement
(16.2.3), or do an Adjacent Sea Zone Sea Move (17.0).
A full campaign game and several shorter scenarios are included. See the Play Book for details.
These rules are laid out as follows. First a brief description
of how to prepare for your first game of Crown of Roses is
provided, followed by some key terms, a brief description of
game play, and a detailed description of the Victory Conditions
needed to win the game. We then describe in detail the various
interactions of the game components (map board, blocks, cards,
etc.), before providing a detailed walk through of the various
Phases of the Sequence of Play.
2.0 Preparing for First Play
Your copy of Crown of Roses should include the following:
““ Three small black cylinders
““ 24 small colored cylinders (six each of red, white, yellow
and blue)
““ 54 neutral colored large blocks
““ One sheet of 54 die-cut labels to be peeled and affixed to
the neutral colored large blocks
““ 225 ¾” die-cut counters on two counter sheets
““ One deck of 110 Crown of Roses cards
““ Eight 4¼” x 5½” Parliament cards
““ One Rule Book (this book)
““ One Play Book
““ One map board
““ 15 six-sided dice (five each of green, blue and red)
““ Two Player Aid Cards
““ Four 5½” x 8” Player Mats (one each of red, white, yellow and blue)
If any of these components are damaged or missing, please
write to the following address:
GMT Games
P.O. Box 1308
Hanford, CA 93232-1308 www.GMTGames.com
Before playing for the first time, apply the stickers to the blocks.
Only one sticker is applied to each block (i.e., one face of each
block is left “blank”). Lightly position the label, make sure that
it is straight, and then press firmly to adhere to the block surface.
Battles Sequence/Terminology (20.0): A Battle is an overall
combat between two or more Players in a Shire. Each Battle
involves one or more Engagements, each of which lasts one or
more Combat Rounds.
Block States (8.2): Blocks can be In-Play (currently controlled
by a Player and on the map); Undeclared (controlled by a
Player, but off-map); Inactive (not controlled by a Player, but
still in the game/scenario); Unavailable (not controlled by a
Player and not available until next Turn); and Out of Play (no
longer available at all).
Block Values and Indicators (8.3): In addition to their name
and heraldry, Blocks have up to four important pieces of information on them.
““ Their Combat Strength, which generally refers to the
number of dice icons on a Block’s top edge, but is also
reflected by the color (red > blue > green).
““ Their Command Rating/Limit, which is the number of
other Blocks a Noble can lead in Movement (16.1) or in
Combat (20.4.4), is located in a circle at the lower-left
of the Block.
““ Their Noble Rank, which only appears on Noble Blocks
and is located in a square in the lower-right of the block.
It determines which Block can lead for Movement (16.1)
and Combat (20.4.4), and also plays a part in determining
the number of votes a Player receives in the King Phase
(24.2.2).
““ Potential Heirs (8.3.2) have a Crown icon in their upper
right corner. A Noble Block only becomes an active Heir
when their Heir Card (10.3) is played. Each Player can
have no more than two active Heirs at any time. The Heir
with the lowest Heir number on its Card is the Senior
Heir for the Player, while the higher numbered Heir is
the Junior Heir.
Exile Boxes (7.3.1): The playable areas outside of England
proper where a Noble can hide out and lick his wounds. Only
one Player’s Blocks may occupy any given Exile Box; Blocks
may enter only during the Operations Phase (16.2.4) and may
exit in either the Operations Phase or the Wintering Phase
(27.0). Entering and “wintering over” in an Exile Box costs a
Player 1 point of Popular Support (28.3.1). Margaret (10.3.4)
and some Officers have special abilities that mitigate some of
the negative effects of Exile Boxes (7.3.2 & 7.3.3).
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Rule Book
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Heir (8.3.2): Only Heir Blocks (those with a small crown on
their Block label) can be crowned King; if your opponents’
Heirs are eliminated, you win a Military Victory (6.1). Heir
Blocks either start the game on-map as an “at start Heir” or
enter later when their Heir Card (10.3) is played. Others are
transformed from a regular on-map Noble Block to an Heir
Block when their Heir Card is played. All Heirs are Nobles,
but not all Nobles are Heirs.
Player Houses (5.0): The four competing factions involved in
the War of the Roses (White = York; Red = Lancaster; Yellow
= Buckingham; and Blue = Warwick).
Host (8.3.3 & 20.4.3): A Block that has at least one other Block
attached to it. A Host and its attached Block(s) move as one, but
fight separately. An attached Block may take damage assigned
to a Host Block in the same Main Force (20.5.3).
Reserves (20.3.2): Blocks involved in a Battle in a Shire that
are not currently fighting in a Combat Round (i.e., not part of
the Main Force); either due to Player decision or due to having
a Leader with an insufficient Command Rating to lead all the
Blocks in the Battle.
Influence Points (IPs): A “commodity” in the game generally
representing a Player’s economic and political influence. They
are gained by control of Shires, Offices and certain Events
(23.0). A Player’s IPs are usually located in one of three spots:
their Unclaimed Pool (IPs not yet earned); their Stock (those
IPs available to be used by the Player); or on a Noble’s Box
on the Roll of Parliament (attempting to win that Noble to the
Player’s side).
Leader: For all movement types, a Block designated to move
either alone, or with additional Blocks up to their Command
Rating (16.1). For combat, a Block designated to fight a
Combat Round either alone, or with additional Blocks up to
their Command Rating (20.4.1). The Leader may change each
Combat Round.
Noble (8.3.1): A Block with a Noble Rank is a Noble. All
potential Heirs are Nobles, but not all Nobles are Heirs. A
potential Heir only changes from a mere Noble to a full Heir
when a Player plays the appropriate Heir Card from his hand.
Main Force: The forces of the Attacking and Defending
Player that are fighting each other in a Combat Round (20.4).
This is distinguished from the initial two forces that arrived
in the contested Shire (Starting Forces) and from Blocks in
the Combat, but not currently fighting (Reserves). All other
Blocks that arrived into the Combat after the Starting Forces
are Reinforcements (20.3.1).
Movement Points (MPs) (16.1): The amount of movement
each stack can perform when activated. Generally equal to four
(4) MPs, though this can be increased by Force March (16.3).
Operations Phase (13.0): The heart of each Game Turn is the
Operations Phase—where all Players conduct movement with
their Blocks, influence Nobles and play Events on themselves
or their opponents. Each Operations Phase is composed of a
number of Impulses equal to the smallest starting hand size,
and each Impulse has a number of Action Steps (13.2) equal
to the number of Players.
Reinforcements (20.3.1): Blocks that came to a Battle after
the Main Force. Reinforcements enter starting on the second
Combat Round, at a rate of one (1) Leader and appropriately
led Blocks per Combat Round.
Retainer Strength (8.3): The weakest Combat Strength of a
Block before it is removed from the map; i.e., the last combat
step of a Block.
Shires (7.2): A playable area of the map that Players vie for
control of in order to gain Influence Points and to achieve
Military Victory. Shires can be Friendly, Enemy, Neutral or
Contested (7.2.8). Each Shire has a Shire Value (SV, the number
in the box in each Shire) (7.2.1) and a Shire Loyalty (SL, the
color of box in each Shire: Black = none; White = York; Red =
Lancaster; Yellow = Buckingham; and Blue = Warwick) (7.2.2).
Stacking Limit (7.2.9): The number of Blocks of each player
that may occupy a Shire. All Shires have a Stacking Limit of
the Shire Value plus 1. Exceeding the Stacking Limit at the end
of all Battle resolutions will result in Attrition (22.0).
Starting Force (20.4.1): The first group of Blocks that fight in
an Engagement. Includes a Leader and may include additional
Blocks up to the Leader’s Command Rating. The Starting Force
is the group of Blocks that determined the Engagement order.
Tie Breaker (10.5.1): The Player controlling the King Office
Card almost always decides ties. In the case where there is no
King (perhaps the King was eliminated in combat), the Player
controlling the next-highest Ranking Officer decides the tie
break, i.e., Chancellor if no King, then Treasurer, and so on. In
the rare case no Offices are held, the Player with the highest IPs
gained during the previous Influence Phase (as indicated on the
track bordering the map) decides ties. If multiple Players have
the highest IPs gained, roll a die to determine the Player who
will be the tie-breaker. If the tie-breaking Player is established
by IP Value (including die roll), then that Player will continue
to decide tie breaks as needed until the end of the current Turn.
Note: For a complete listing of definitions of terms, see the
Glossary at the end of this Rule Book.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
4.0 Brief Summary of Game Play
In Crown of Roses, two to four Players will vie for control of
England (represented by the map on the game board) using
both military and political means. All actions are governed by
the following rules, which are laid out by first describing the
components available to the Players, then how the Players can
use those components to achieve victory.
Game play revolves around a series of Turns, which are broken
up into separate Phases. All Turns begin with a Draw Phase,
where Players draw new Cards and determine the number of
Impulses in the Operations Phase. In the Operations Phase—
the heart of Crown of Roses—Players decide how to use their
limited Operations (OPs) Points; either to move Blocks, muster
Reinforcements, or to influence Nobles in Parliament using Influence Points (IPs). They must also use their Blocks to control
Shires in England and/or to attack the opposing Players’ Blocks,
including those Players’ Royal Heirs.
At the conclusion of the Operations Phase, new IP Markers are
usually collected, followed by Parliament Phases, including
the King Phase, where the King is voted into Office. Once the
King is elected, Players use their collected IPs to bid on the
other Offices, but note that these same IPs are also needed to
influence Nobles during the next Operations Phase! During the
Parliament Phases of the game, almost all Blocks are removed
from the map. After all Offices are voted on, Players take turns
returning their Blocks to the map in the Home Estates for each
Block. Once all Blocks are placed, a new Game Turn is ready
to start.
5.0 Player Houses
Each player in the game controls a Player House. There are four
Player Houses: York, Lancaster, Buckingham, and Warwick.
Each Player House is comprised of the Nobles it controls along
with its Royal Heirs. In a two-player game, players control
Lancaster and York; three-player games add Buckingham; and
four-player games add Warwick.
Each Player House is assigned a color:
Player House Color
York White
Lancaster Red
Buckingham Yellow
Warwick Blue
Various game components match these colors and generally are
for the sole use of the corresponding player. Note, however, that
while some Block labels are in Player House colors, this only
indicates historical allegiances of noble families, and aids in
game setup. During game play, except for a few certain cases,
any Player House may control Blocks of any color.
“Friendly” in these rules are a Player’s own game pieces, cards,
etc. “Enemy” means those pieces, cards, etc. belonging to an
opposing Player.
Throughout the rules the term “Player” and “Player House” are
used interchangeably, but have the same meaning. Likewise, the
terms “Heir” and “Royal Heir”, and “Strength” and “Combat
Strength”, have the same meanings, respectively.
6.0 Victory Conditions
There are three paths to victory listed in every scenario: Military
Victory, Political Victory and Economic Victory. Typically,
victory is checked in the above order—first checking for Military Victory, then Political if no Military Victory is achieved;
and finally Economic Victory (also at the end of the scenario).
Some scenarios may modify this order, however.
6.1 Military Victory
In order to win a Military Victory, ONE of the following conditions must be met.
““ In a single Turn, during the King Phase (24.1.1), control
a set number of non-Devastated Enemy-loyal Shires and
retain control of a set number of your own non-Devastated
Shires, as noted below:
No. of Players
2
3
4
Enemy
5
8
12
Friendly
4
4
3
““ In a single Turn, during the King Phase, keep all enemy
Heirs from attending Parliament AND send your Senior
Heir to Parliament.
““ In a single Turn, during the Victory Check Phase, have
at least one In-Play Heir and all enemy In-Play Heirs are
killed or driven into Exile. Heirs that have not yet entered
play are not counted as Heirs for this rule. Any player
with an Heir currently in Exile may consider that Heir
as In-Play IF they have a Popular Support that is at least
one higher than all other Players AFTER accounting for
the loss from the Exile itself.
Example: It is the Victory Check Phase of Turn 4 in a
2-player game. Lancaster has an In-Play Heir and the York
Player has lost the York, March, and Clarence Blocks while
they were all Heirs (removing their Blocks and Cards from
the game). Rutland is currently in Exile in Scotland and
York’s Popular Support is only three while the Lancaster
Popular Support is five. As such, York has no Heirs In-Play
(Gloucester is not able to be played until Turn 5 and Rutland
does not count as he is in Exile and York’s Popular Support
is not at least one higher than Lancaster’s Support value);
therefore, Lancaster wins a Military Victory. Had York been
able to keep his Popular Support higher, he would have
prevented Lancaster from achieving a Military Victory as
Rutland would have counted as an In-Play Heir.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Rule Book
6.2 Political Victory
In order to win a Political Victory, ONE of the following conditions must be met during the Victory Check Phase.
““ Hold the Office of the King for a specified number of
Turns (as indicated in the Scenario instructions). Holding
the Chancellor’s Office, but not the King, counts as onehalf of a Turn for this condition (and would be considered
consecutive for scenarios requiring such).
““ Must control at least 3/4ths (75%) of all the Nobles
attending Parliament on a given Turn, EXCLUDING
Heirs and Margaret (rounded up). Note that it is the
number of Nobles; not the number of actual votes; that
matters for this Political Victory type.
Example: On Turn 5, fourteen Nobles attend Parliament.
Three of them are Heirs and one of the “Nobles” is Margaret.
If any one Player controls at least 3/4ths of the ten remaining
Nobles (or 7.5, rounded up to eight), that Player achieves a
Political Victory.
6.3 Economic Victory (Optional Rule)
A Player wins an Economic Victory by accumulating the most
Victory Points total, collected from various sources during the
game. Points are awarded as they are earned. Players receive
points as follows:
ts Awarded
P
1
1
2
–1
–1*
–2*
For Event
Enemy Heir Killed by You in a Battle
Elected Chancellor, but not King
Chosen as King
Popular Support at 1 during Parliament Phase
Your Junior Heir Killed
Your King Killed
* If a Player does not have enough VP to fill a loss requirement,
subtract any excess from Popular Support instead. Popular Support
cannot drop below one. Death from Events and Attrition do not result
in a VP penalty. Automatic Victory occurs during any Victory Check
Phase if a Player has the following:
No. of Players
2
3
4
Economic VPs for Automatic Victory
14
12
10
6.4 Scenario Specific Victory
5
7.0 Game Board
The game board depicts England and the seas bordering it, as
well as parts of the neighboring countries Ireland, Scotland,
and France. This is where the players will fight for the throne
of England!
7.1 Tracks and Tables
Several tracks and tables used to record and monitor each Player’s progress towards victory are also found on the game board.
7.1.1 Influence Track
The Influence
Track, on the
perimeter of the board, is used to record the amount of Influence
Points each Player collected during a Game Turn. Small
wooden cylinders of each Player House color are used to track
these amounts.
7.1.2 Popular Support Track
The Popular Support
Track records the support a Player has earned
for keeping England
safe and stable. Reminders for the effects of each Popular Support Value are printed on this track. Small wooden cylinders of
each Player House color are used to track these amounts. The
maximum Support Value is nine (9). Increases beyond this
value are ignored; likewise decreases below a value of one (1)
are also ignored. The zero (0) box on the Track is used as a
staging area for Player pieces.
Most additions/subtractions to Popular Support are done instantly. However, in the odd occasion where a Player needs
to adjust his Popular Support both positively and negatively
at the same time, always apply the negative adjustment first.
Each Player tracks his own Popular Support value, which grants
him such things as extra votes in Parliament, extra Influence at
court, and extra resources (Card draws) from the countryside.
Additionally, actions such as responding to Raids (14.2.1), winning a Battle against an opposing Heir (20.7.1), or holding an
important Office of government (10.5) will increase a Player’s
Support Value while losing Offices or hiding in Exile (7.3.1 &
28.3.1) will lower a Player’s Support Value.
7.1.3 Turns as King Track
Each scenario may establish additional Victory conditions.
Make sure to check the scenario to see if any additional conditions apply.
The Turns as King Track records the number of Game Turns
that a Player has been voted King in Parliament (24.0); these
can be non-consecutive. This is tracked using a small wooden
cylinder of the Player’s House color.
7.1.4 Other Tracks
There is also a Turn Track, a Sequence of Play Track, and an
Impulse Track to help Players with the flow of the game. These
three tracks all use a small black cylinder.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
7.1.5 Roll of Parliament
The map has a Roll of Parliament
(RoP) where Players place Influence
Markers to attempt to gain control of
Nobles (19.0). Note that only Nobles
that can be Influenced have a RoP
Box; some Nobles, like York or Lancaster only become In-Play as Heirs not subject to Influence.
This is also where markers are placed to indicate which, if any,
Noble holds an Office of Parliament (10.5) and when a Noble
becomes an Heir (10.3).
Note that Clarence has special rules associated with him
(10.3.5).
The large number in the box indicates the minimum amount of
Influence Points (IP) needed to win control of that Noble, and
the colored Rose icons (Tendency Bonus) indicate the strength
of that Noble’s allegiance to the Player House of that color.
These are used in the King Phase (24.0).
7.1.6 Charts
Included on the game board are several charts to aid in game
play, such as a Terrain Effects Chart (TEC) and a chart listing
the Draw bonuses.
7.2 Shires
Shires correspond roughly to the historical county borders at
the time. Note that the Isle of Man, the Pale of Ireland and the
Pale of Calais (henceforth “Calais”) are treated as Shires.
Name of Shire
Home Estate
heraldry in Shire
Shire Value
(the number) and
Shire Loyalty
(color of box)
Each Shire has a numbered box. The number in the box is the
“Shire Value”. The color of the box indicates the “Shire Loyalty”. Each Shire is identified by its Shire name and usually
one or more heraldic shields or squares.
7.2.1 Shire Value (SV)
The Shire Value, or SV, specifies:
““ the number of Influence Points earned by the Controlling
House during the Influence Phase (23.0);
““ the number of troop steps the Shire can raise in a Muster
action (18.0);
““ the number of dice rolled for a Planned Uprising (14.2.1);
““ the losses caused by a Plague Event (14.1.2);
does not have an active Player (e.g. Warwick or Buckingham
in a 2-player game) are treated as having black boxes for their
Shire Loyalty for all purposes.
Shire Loyalty (SL) gives benefits to that Player House in the
Muster action (18.0), during Planned Uprisings (14.2.1), and
for Shire Control (7.2.8). Also, Players may earn a Military
Victory by controlling Shires that are loyal to an active enemy
Player House (24.1.1).
Note that the “Merchants of the Staple” Ally Card (Card 12)
replaces the Warwick SL in Calais for as long as the Ally remains In-Play.
7.2.3 Home Estates
Most Shires contain at least one heraldic shield icon (“shield”). These
shields indicate the locations of the
major estates held by the family represented by that shield, within the time
frame of the game. Each Noble and Heir Block (8.1) has a
shield on their label as well. Blocks with the same shield belong
to the same Noble family. The exceptions are Margaret and
Henry VI, who have portraits on their Blocks (see 7.2.6 as to
which Shires they may use as Home Estates).
A shield in a Shire that matches a family shield is said to be a
Home Estate for that family. Each family has at least one Home
Estate. A Shire may be a Home Estate for more than one family.
Example: Northumberland in the North Marches has three
shield icons, one corresponding to the Noble Block “Northumberland” (see RoP and the Northumberland Block), one
corresponding to the Lord Warden of the North Marches
Office, and the Red Rose shield corresponding to House
Lancaster (see the Lancaster Block). The Northumberland
Block, the Lancaster Block and the Block holding the Lord
Warden Office could all consider Northumberland one of
their Home Estates.
7.2.4 Crown Estates
A Crown symbol in a Shire indicates the
Shire holds a Crown Estate. These are lands
held by the King and Parliament (e.g., State
houses and such). Any friendly Heir (10.3) [treat Margaret as
an Heir for the purpose of this rule] of the current King’s
Player House may treat these Shires as additional Home Estates,
in all respects and for all game purposes.
7.2.5 Office Estates
Some icons match the heraldry shield of the
Blocks associated with Offices (10.5). When
a Noble holds an Office, it may treat Shires
containing those icons as Home Estates, in
all respects and for all game purposes.
““ and (with a +1 modifier) the Stacking Limit for that Shire
(7.2.9).
7.2.2 Shire Loyalty (SL)
When the numbered box in the Shire is the color of a Player
House (blue, white, yellow or red, see 5.0), that Shire is said
to be loyal to that Player House. Shires with black boxes are
not loyal to any Player House. Shires loyal to a House that
Example: Carnafon is considered a Home Estate for the
Noble holding the Chancellor Office (which matches the red
& white heraldry shown in the Figure above).
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Rule Book
7.2.6 Shared Estates
Nobles/Heirs with identical shield icons treat all Home Estates
with that shield icon as if it were their own Home Estate for all
game purposes (e.g., Pembroke’s and Richmond’s Home Estates
are the same, and Clarence’s and all other York Noble’s Home
Estates are the same).
Margaret and Henry VI: In addition, note that
Henry VI and Margaret (and their associated Host
Block(s), if any) may use a Lancaster Estate (Red
Rose heraldry) as their Home Estate. Margaret may
also use the France Exile Box as a Home Estate.
However, each particular Estate may only be utilized by one
Player during the Wintering Phase (27.0). Specifically, if an
Enemy-controlled Noble with an identical shield icon as your
Noble already occupies a Shire containing a Shared Estate, you
may only place your Noble in that Shire if there is a second,
legal Estate at which your Noble may enter.
Example: If Clarence is controlled by a Player other than
York and starts in West Riding, York would normally be
prevented from placing a York Noble there as well, since the
York Estate in that Shire is “occupied” by Clarence. However,
note that if York is the current King, York could place York
Nobles in West Riding by using the Crown Estate and not
the York Estate “occupied” by Clarence—since the Crown
Estate would be a second, legal Estate in this situation.
7.2.7 Shire Borders
Shire borders are either solid, indicating difficult terrain with
few (if any) usable roads; or broken, indicating easier terrain or
more (and more usable) roads. Movement costs (16.2) depend
on the type of border.
Shires are considered to be adjacent to one another whenever
they share a common border, regardless of its type.
The Shire borders marked with a skull near the region labeled
“The Fens” and “The Wash” are a reminder of special movement rules along those borders (16.2.2).
7.2.8 Shire Control
A Shire is in one of three states of control at any given time:
Controlled: The Shire a) has Blocks of only one Player present;
OR b) has no Blocks present, but has a SL (7.2.2) in the color of
a Player House. Such a Shire is said to be “Controlled” by that
Player House. The Shire is “Friendly-Controlled” for the Player
that controls it and “Enemy-Controlled” for all other Players.
Contested: The Shire is occupied by Blocks of two (2) or more
Players. Note: After all Combat is resolved, there will be no
Contested Shires, until possibly during the next Wintering or
Operations Phases (when Blocks move into the same Shire).
Neutral: The Shire a) has no Blocks present; AND b) has a
black SL.
7
Control of a Shire is determined immediately when a Player
places a Block into it or removes a Block from it. Thus, as forces
move around the board, control states will continually change.
Example: Northumberland is empty of all Blocks and is considered “Controlled” by (i.e., “Friendly to”) Lancaster given
its red SL. If a York Block moves into Northumberland, it
now becomes Controlled by York. If a Lancaster controlled
Block then moves into the Shire and the York Block does
not Evade out, the Shire is considered “Contested” until after
the combat resolution (when, necessarily, at most one of the
two Houses will remain in the Shire).
7.2.9 Shire Stacking Limits
Each Shire has a limit to the number of Blocks that each Player
may put into it without suffering Attrition effects (22.0). This is
known as the Stacking Limit. The limit for each Player is equal
to the SV plus one (1). Therefore, in a four-player game, each
layer can put five (5) Blocks in London for a total of 20 Blocks.
Design Note: Players may voluntarily exceed the Stacking Limit, especially if involved in a Combat in a Shire, as
Stacking Limits are only checked after all Battles are resolved
(21.1); and the Victor in a Battle is usually given the opportunity to move overstacked Blocks (20.7.2).
7.3 Regions
Broadly speaking, there are two geographic areas represented
on the map: “England”, which includes England proper, Wales,
Ireland and the Pale of Calais, and “Exile Boxes”, which represent areas outside the map in Scotland, France and Ireland.
Within “England” there are five special regions marked with
thick colored borders on the map. They are: London (gray);
North Marches (purple); Pale of Calais (blue); Pale of Ireland
(green); and Wales & the Welsh Marches (red).
Some Cards refer to these regions in the Event text or the
Card’s ability.
Design Note: The area labeled “London” could have been
called Middlesex instead. However, in play testing that version of the map we found players often asking “where is
London?” For that reason we decided to err on the side of
familiarity in this case.
7.3.1 Foreign Nations and Exile Boxes
The areas of the Pale of Ireland and Calais are considered the
same as regular Shires for all purposes.
The Foreign Nation of Scotland cannot be entered, except to
go into the Exile Box. Note that the Pale of Ireland and Calais
are considered part of England for all game purposes (i.e.,
everything on the map except the Exile Boxes are considered
part of “England” for the purposes of these rules and Card play,
unless otherwise noted).
Exile Boxes represent locations inside nearby Foreign Nations,
outside of the map area, where a Noble might flee to lick his
wounds and build up his strength (though at a cost in losing
Popular Support). There are Exile Boxes associated with each
Foreign Nation. These Nobles are still “In-Play” for the purpose
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
of having at most two (2) active Heirs at any one time (10.3.2),
but may be considered eliminated for the purposes of determining a Military Victory (6.1) for your opponents.
Immediately upon entering an Exile Box, a Player will suffer a
–1 in Popular Support (16.2.4), and any Player with one or more
Nobles in an Exile Box during the Clean-Up Phase (28.3.1)
will suffer a loss in Popular Support for every Turn that they
remain in Exile.
Restrictions on entering and exiting an Exile Box are explained
in the Movement rules (16.2.4).
IMPORTANT: As noted above, an Heir is still treated as InPlay and so still counts toward the maximum of two (2) ac-tive
Heirs at a time while in an Exile Box; but may also count as
eliminated for Military Victory.
7.3.2 Scotland
Scotland is a Foreign Nation that is not playable, except for
the Exile Box.
Any Block that moves to the Scotland Exile Box (by land or sea)
must immediately reduce its Combat Strength to Retainer Strength
(8.3). The following are exception
to this rule and may retain their
current strength:
““ Queen Margaret (10.3.4) and her Host Block (8.3.3) moving into the Exile Box
““ The Lord Warden of the North Marches (10.5.8) moving
into the Scotland Exile Box (as well as any Blocks he
leads)
7.3.3 Ireland & Calais
As noted above, the non-Exile portions of Ireland and Calais
are treated as regular Shires for all purposes.
Any Block that moves into the
Exile Box of either of them (by
land or sea) must immediately
reduce its Combat Strength to
Retainer Strength (8.3). The
following are exceptions to this rule and retain their strength:
““ Queen Margaret (10.3.4) and her Host Block (8.3.3) moving into the Exile Box
““ The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and the Pale (10.5.7)
moving into the Ireland Exile Box (as well as any Blocks
he leads)
The English Channel and the North Sea are Adjacent Seas, as
are the English Channel and the Irish Sea. Seas can never be
controlled. Blocks may move across the seas during play via Sea
Movement (17.0), but they may never end their move in a sea.
A Shire that is adjacent to a sea is called a “Coastal Shire”.
Most Coastal Shires are adjacent to only one sea. There are
two exceptions:
““ Cornwall is a Coastal Shire for both the Irish Sea and the
English Channel
““ Suffolk is a Coastal Shire for both the North Sea and the
English Channel.
London is a Coastal Shire. However, the Burgundian and French
Mercenary Blocks (Cards #49 and #52) may not enter play
there. The English (especially at that time) were not about to
let the French, for example, simply sail up the Thames and land
at what is now Festival Pier (or anywhere else for that matter
)– it would have been considered an invasion.
7.4.1 Estuaries
On the West side of the map, the
Severn Estuary separates Glamorgan
in Wales from Somerset. Note, however, Gloucester and Glamorgan are adjacent and movement is allowed between them.
On the East side, the Thames Estuary separates Essex from Kent
and the Humber Estuary (just north of The Wash) separates East
Riding from Lincoln. Note that the map contains reminders for
these last two.
7.5 Map Addendum
7.5.1 Unplayable Islands
There are three “Seas”: the North Sea, the English Channel
and the Irish Sea. A solid line on the map indicates the border
between Adjacent Seas (near Suffolk and near Cornwall).
The Isle of Anglesey and
The Isle of Wight are not
playable areas.
7.5.2 Terrain features
As noted previously, the map includes a Terrain Effects Chart
which lists the various Shire terrain features discussed above.
In addition, note that swamps, rivers and cities are decorative
only—they have no effect on movement or combat in the game.
7.5.3 Office Holding Box
““ The Lord Captain of Calais and the Pale (10.5.6) moving
into the France Exile Box (as well as any Blocks he leads)
7.4 Seas & Coastal Shires
There are three estuaries on the map.
Land Movement is not allowed between Shires separated by them.
In the Roll of Parliament section
of the map there is a rectangular
box for placing any Office markers not currently held by a Noble.
7.5.4 Combat Holding Boxes
At the bottom of the map there is a series of three squares to
hold Blocks for any single Battle in a Shire, should Players feel
necessary. The squares are ordered to indicate which are the
first, second and third Attackers/Defenders, based on the order
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
of entrance into the Shire. It is suggested to leave the original
holder of the Shire in the Shire, and place the Blocks that first
entered after them in the square marked “1stin”; then the Blocks
that entered next go in the “2ndin” square; and the Blocks that
entered third go in the “3rdin” square.
When resolving the Battle (20.0), the Blocks in the “3rdin”
square will be the “1stout”; the “2ndin” will be the “2ndout”; and
the “1stin” will be the “3rdout”.
8.0 Wooden Pieces
Six small wooden cylinders in each Player House color are
included for use on the Influence, Turns as King, and Popular
Support tracks; as well as marking on map locations where a
Planned Uprising (14.2.1) is taking place. Three small black
cylinders are included for use on the Turn, Sequence of Play,
and Impulse tracks.
The fifty-four (54) large wooden blocks represent the various
noble families, as well as political and mercenary forces of
the day. Depending on the scenario being played, some of the
Blocks may not be available for the game; or are available only
on certain turns of the game.
8.1 Block, Noble, and Heir
The distinction between Blocks, Nobles, and Heirs is very
important.
Block: Any large wooden block with a label attached. Blocks
include Nobles, Heirs, Offices, and Mercenaries.
Offices: The “King” Block and the other purpletinted Blocks that have only a Noble Rank Value
(a number in a square in the lower-right corner) of
its label. The +1 on the King’s Block (in the circle
in the lower-left corner) increases the Command Rating of the
Host Block by 1
Mercenaries: The Burgundians, French, Scots and
Welsh Blocks (see also 24.1.2). These Blocks have
no Noble Rank Value or Command Rating on their
label.
Noble: Any Block that has both a Noble Rank
Value (a number in a square in the lower-right
corner) and a Command Rating (a number in a
circle in the lower-left corner) of its label (exception: the King Block is an Office Block, not a Noble Block).
Heir: Any Noble that has a Royal Heir Indicator
(a Crown icon in the upper-right corner) on its
label is a potential Heir. Once its corresponding
Heir Card (10.3) is played for the Event text, the
Noble then becomes an active Heir.
9
Each Block has between two and four levels of Combat Strength
(8.3), depending on the number of sides of its label that have
dice icons. To maintain a “fog of war”, Blocks are usually placed
so that the controller can see them, but his opponent(s) cannot,
with the current Combat Strength of the Block being indicated
by the icons on the top edge of the Block.
When the Block is revealed to the opponent(s), the Block is
tipped forward and placed flat, with the edge farthest from its
controller being the current Combat Strength.
As an alternative to standing the Blocks upright, Players may
keep their Blocks face down by tipping the top of the upright
Block towards the controller, so that the current Combat
Strength is the edge closest to its controller. When revealed, flip
the Block so that the edge of the Block closest to the controller
becomes the edge farthest from him.
8.2 Block States
Each Block can exist in one of five states:
In-Play: The Block is controlled by a Player and occupies a
Shire or Exile Box.
Undeclared: The Block is controlled by a Player, but placed
off-board in the Player’s Undeclared Pool. Undeclared Nobles
can be summoned by an Event Card (and become In-Play), but
they cannot have a Writ (10.5.1) played on them or use a Writ
of their own. Undeclared Nobles will still be available to attend
Parliament (24.2).
Inactive: The Block is not controlled by any Player and is kept
next to the game board until a Player gains control through
play of Influence on the RoP or by play of an Heir Card (10.3).
Potential Heirs without a box in the RoP, as well as the York
Heir Clarence, are Inactive until their corresponding Heir Cards
bring their Block In-Play.
Unavailable: The Block is not controlled by any Player and
may not be used by any Player temporarily due to Scenario
Special Rules or game effects. An Unavailable Block is placed
face up in its corresponding RoP Box. Unavailable Blocks
become Inactive during the Clean-Up Phase of the Turn (28.1).
Design Note: Effectively, an Unavailable Block loses out on
the rest of the Turn, including any chance of attending Parliament, but is then available to be Influenced the following
Turn.
Out of Play: The Block has been removed by Scenario Special
Rules or game effects and will not be used for the remainder of
the game. Place these Blocks face down on their space on the
RoP or back in the game box if they do not have such a space.
Remember: All Heirs are Nobles, but not all Nobles can be
Heirs!
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
Example: Some Nobles will start each scenario In-Play and
controlled by a respective Player House. If the Noble is not
an Heir and is Eliminated in a Battle, that Noble rolls on the
Elimination Chart (20.6.1) to determine what happens to
the Block. Blocks that “Escape” damage, remain controlled by
their Player House and are placed off the map in the Player’s
Undeclared Pool. They will re-enter the map either via play of
certain Event Cards, or during the Wintering Phase (27.0)—
after they also attend Parliament.
If Killed, the Noble status reverts to Unavailable, losing out
on the rest of the Turn and then becoming Inactive the following Turn—no longer controlled by the Player’s House. A
similar status change happens if the Block is Wounded—the
Noble immediately becomes Inactive, reverting out of that
Player’s House’s control.
Inactive (resulting from either a Wounded or Killed Noble,
per above) and Undeclared Blocks return In-Play during the
Gather Supporters portion of Parliament (24.2.1). Influence
Points played on each Noble’s RoP Box during a Game Turn
(19.0) are compared to see who gains control of the Noble;
if a Player has successfully influenced the Noble (note that
Undeclared Nobles are “influenced” by their controlling
Player until another Player successfully influences them via
IP play—which is different than Inactive Nobles who are
controlled by no-one until a Player successfully influences
them). In-Play Nobles may also switch control, remaining
In-Play but now controlled by the new Player’s House.
Heirs never become Inactive or Unavailable; instead they suffer permanent elimination and end up Out of Play. An Heir
may end up Undeclared, in which case it returns In-Play to
its controlling Player during the Gather Supporters portion
of Parliament, unless forced to return In-Play earlier (13.3).
8.3 Block Layout
A Block’s Title/Name and Heraldic Shield, Banner, or Image
is used for identification.
Full Combat Strength
(always at top edge of Block)
Royal Heir
Name
indicator
Heraldry
Command Rating
Retainer Strength
(always the last/lowest set
of dice on Block)
Special rule
applies (square
around crown)
Noble Rank
Combat Strength: A Block’s Combat Strength is the number
and color of dice icons along the edges of the Block. This is the
number and color of dice the Block rolls in combat.
Each Block has between two and four levels of Combat
Strength, depending on the number of sides of its label that
have dice icons. The current Combat Strength of the Block is
indicated by the icons on the top edge of the Block (or the edge
farthest from its controller, if the Block is face-up and lying flat).
Retainer Strength: The lowest Combat Strength for that Block,
usually only one die. Can be on any of the non-top sides of
the Block.
Steps and Step Losses: Each side of the Block is called a
Step. Whenever a Block takes damage (20.5.3), it takes a “Step
Loss”. For each Step Loss suffered, it is rotated 90 degrees
counter-clockwise, thereby reducing its Combat Strength. When
a Block is reduced below Retainer Strength, it is said to have
been “eliminated” (and “eliminated” is used hereafter to mean
“reduced below Retainer Strength”). For non-Noble Blocks, this
means they are removed from the map. For Noble (and Heir)
Blocks, they will make a final roll on the Elimination Chart to
determine their ultimate fate (20.6.1).
Adding Steps: To add a Step to a Block, rotate it 90 degrees
clockwise. A Block at its maximum strength cannot have any
steps added to it. Steps are added via Mustering (18.0) or via
some Event Cards.
Combat Value: The number shown on the individual dice
icons. Die color is also used as an indicator of Combat Value,
with red (hits on a 4-6) being better than blue (hits on a 5-6),
and blue being better than green (hits on a 6).
8.3.1 Nobles
Nobles are Blocks with additional attributes:
Command Rating. A Noble’s Command Rating,
or CR, is the number of other Blocks that the
Noble can lead during Movement (16.1) or can command in
Combat (20.4.4). This is the circled value in the Noble Block’s
lower left corner.
Example: Herbert, shown above, can only command one (1)
additional Block.
Noble Rank & Influence. The value in a Noble’s lower right
corner is his Rank. A Noble’s Rank determines which Block will
command in combat (20.4.1) as well as how many votes that
Noble has in the King Phase (24.2.2). Rank “1” is the lowest,
and “4” is the highest.
Note that a Noble cannot be commanded or led in movement or
combat by a Noble with a lower Rank (16.1 & 24.2.2), except
that Heirs always outrank non-Heirs, regardless of the actual
Rank Value. Less senior Heirs are outranked by more senior
Heirs. The King outranks all others (10.5.1).
Example: Warwick, Noble Rank of 4, is the highest ranking
Noble in the game and would command over any other nonHeir Nobles. However, if he is not an Heir himself, then he
could not lead even the lowest rank Heir. For example, Clarence
(Noble Rank of 2) would command over Warwick if Clarence
were an Heir and Warwick were not. (This particular situation,
by the way, is impossible in a four Player game, but could occur
in two or three player games.)
Nobles may hold Offices won in the Office Phase (26.0).
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
8.3.2 Heirs
Each Noble Block that can become an Heir has a
Crown icon in its upper right corner. George of
Clarence’s Crown is contained in a box as a reminder of his special rules (10.3.5).
Once a Noble becomes an Heir, Players may not place Influence
on its RoP Box. Place an Heir marker on the box as a reminder
of this status. Clarence is an exception to this as noted below
(10.3.5). A Noble becomes an active Heir when its associated
Heir Card (10.3) is played for the Event text.
Each Player can have at most two (2) active Heirs, with one Heir
being the Senior Heir, and the other being the Junior Heir (10.3).
Remember: A Noble with a Crown icon is not an Heir unless
the appropriate Heir Card is In-Play.
8.3.3 Attached Blocks
At certain times Blocks will be indicated as being “attached”
to another Block (usually a Noble) the latter referred to as the
“Host” Block. Attached Blocks move as one with the Host
Block and, in most circumstances, count for command and
Stacking Limits (exceptions are the Henry VI and Queen Margaret Blocks (10.3.3 & 10.3.4)). In order for a Block to function
as a Host, it must possess a Command Rating of 1 or higher.
Blocks with no command rating (e.g., Queen Margaret, Henry
VI, Burgundians, etc.) cannot Host other Blocks.
In the case that a Host Block is removed from the map due to a
change in state (8.2) or responds to an Embassy Event (14.1.1),
but the Attached Block is/does not, the status of the Attached
Block depends on whether it is an Office Block (10.5) or a
non-Office Block (10.3.3, 10.3.4 & 24.1.2). An Office Block
remains with the Host Block, whereas a non-Office Block may
immediately attach to a new Host in the same Shire meeting
the requirements for attachment (exception: Henry VI—if his
Host Block suffers a “killed” result on the Elimination Chart
due to combat (10.3.3) and Henry VI and Margaret alone in
a Shire). If no such new Host exists, place the now Host-less
Block in the Player’s Undeclared Pool.
Note that other than Henry VI and Margaret, no Attached
Blocks may ever be left without a Host (i.e., Office Blocks and
Mercenary Blocks (24.1.2) may never be voluntarily detached/
left behind, and if a Mercenary Block has its Host killed, a new
Host must immediately be adopted).
9.0 Counters and Markers
9.1 Influence Markers
Influence Points (IP) represent political and
economic factors, favorable contracts, lucrative
trading terms, and the like. Each Player has a set
of Influence Markers in their House color and in
several denominations, including zero (0). The
zero value IP Markers are useful for bluff and misdirection
during the hidden bidding parts of the game. Each House starts
the game with 4 zero, 12 one, 10 two, 6 three, 6 five and 2 ten
value IP Markers, for a maximum IP Stock of 100 IPs.
IP Markers will usually be in one of three locations: in an Unclaimed Pool for the Player; in the Player’s available Stock;
or on a Noble’s Box in the Roll of Parliament. In all cases, IP
Markers are placed face down and can only be inspected by
the owning Player. A Player can freely make change for any
IP Marker in their Stock with the available IP Markers in their
Unclaimed Pool.
To do so, the Player simply reveals the Stock IP Marker(s) and
equivalent non-zero (0) value IP Marker(s) in the Unclaimed
Pool, swapping and then re-inverting to their hidden side. Zero
(0) value IP Markers can only be added to a Player’s Stock
during the Influence Phase (23.0), but the Player may add any
number of them from the Unclaimed Pool up to the maximum
number available.
9.2 Support and Office Markers
Support markers are used when casting votes for
King (24.2.3) and for attempting to influence
who receives an Office (26.0). These are explained more in the corresponding sections.
9.3 Shire Status Markers
All Shires are considered to have a normal status, unless marked
with a Shire Status marker. A non-normal Shire status is denoted
by placing one of four status markers: Plague, Devastated,
Depleted or Plundered.
Attached Blocks may absorb combat losses from their Host
Block (and vice versa). If Eliminated for any reason, they are
removed from the map, returning at full strength as follows:
Office Blocks return with the new Officer in the Parliament
Phase; Mercenaries the next time their Card is played; Henry VI
and Margaret per the Elimination Chart result and their special
rules (10.3.3 and 10.3.4).
A Host Block may have Attached at most:
““ one Mercenary Block (24.1.2),
““ both of Henry VI and Margaret,
““ and Office Blocks subject to the restrictions in 26.3.
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Plague markers are placed to note which Shire
is suffering the Plague. Once the Plague is resolved (14.1.2), the marker is flipped to the
Devastated side.
Devastated markers are replaced with Depleted
markers at the end of the Turn and impact which
Shires can grant replacements through Mustering
(18.0), gain IP’s (23.1.1), or count for Military
Victory (6.1 and 24.1.1).
Depleted markers are placed as above, or when
a Player musters two (2) or more steps from a
Shire in a single Impulse (18.0). Depleted Shires
prevent Mustering (18.0).
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
Plundered markers are usually placed when a
Shire is subject to a Planned Uprising, Revolt or
Raid (14.2.1). Plundered Shires prevent Mustering (18.0) or gaining of IP’s (23.1.1).
9.4 Heir/Senior Heir Markers
Heir and Senior Heir markers are placed on the
Roll of Parliament to denote when a particular
Noble has become immune to outside political
influence (10.3.2).
9.5 Miscellaneous Markers
Included in the game are markers for denoting each Player’s
Total Economic Victory Points (6.3 & 25.0), the Total Votes
they can cast for King (24.2.2), Attack and Defend markers
for helping to identify who is the attacker or defender in each
Contested Shire (20.0), Charge markers to denote when an Heir
has conducted a Battle Charge in combat (20.5.1) and a Combat
Round marker to aid in determining when Reinforcements are
available to each side (20.3.1).
10.0 Cards
Crown of Roses is a card-driven game. As such, the Cards play
an integral role in the mechanics of how the game is played.
There are three types of Cards. Two types, House Cards and
Operations Cards, are similar and can be used fairly interchangeably by Players to perform almost all the actions they
wish during the game. Parliament Cards are the larger Cards
and play a more administrative role.
In-Play Cards: While most Cards are discarded after being
played from a Player’s hand, some Cards (e.g., Allies & Heirs)
are placed face-up in front of their controlling Player. These
face-up Cards are considered “In-Play”. Any Card that remains
In-Play for a length of time is a Persistent Card (10.4).
10.1 Common Characteristics
Card Type Operations
Value
Card ID
Plague
location
9.6 London Garrison
The London Garrison counter functions like a
Block, except it is always face-up and is permanently stationed in London. It cannot move under
any circumstance (including Retreats—it simply
reverts to the new controller of London). It does
not count against any Command Limits or Stacking Limits and
is never affected by any Attrition or Events (e.g., Plague, Raids,
etc).
The first Player to have a Block or Blocks enter London, either
via Movement (16.0, 17.0), Interception (16.5), or Wintering
(27.0), attaches the Tower Garrison to one Block of his choice
by placing it directly under the Block (whether the Blocks are
placed face-down (8.1) or standing up-right). This Block is
the Host Block for the Tower Garrison, which is considered
Attached (8.3.3) to this Block for combat purposes only, but
does not count against any Leader Command Limit (20.4.4).
When the Host Block enters combat, the Tower Garrison always has the same status (e.g. in Reserve, in the Main Force,
a Reinforcement, etc.) as the Host Block. See 20.2 for some
combat examples using the London Block.
If the Host Block is eliminated in combat or leaves London
for any reason, the owning Player must immediately attach it
to another friendly-controlled Block in London at its current
Combat Strength. If unable to do so, the London Garrison
counter is set aside until after the Combat Step of the current
Impulse (i.e. it won’t be available to any Player for the rest of
the Impulse). At that point, if a Player controls London, they
may attach the London Garrison to any one Block, as above.
If no Player controls London, set the Tower Garrison counter
in London as a reminder that the first Player entering London
gains control of the counter. Finally, reset the Tower Garrison
to its maximum strength by placing it so that its current strength
is the side facing north (toward the top of the map).
Title
Descriptive
text of event
Special text
All non-Parliament Cards share several common characteristics.
In the upper left corner is the Operations Value (OPS Value),
ranging from 1 to 3 in value (exceptions: at-start Heirs and Affairs of States). House Cards have their OPS Value in a Rose of
the House color (Yellow for Buckingham, Red for Lancaster,
etc). In the upper middle, below the Card ID, is a descriptor
giving the type of Card: Royal Heir, Event, Mandatory Event,
Ally or Surprise. Next to this in the upper right is a Plague
location, used to determine which Shire is subject to a Plague
should that Mandatory Event be played (14.1.2).
The center of the Card includes the title of the Card and, for
Royal Heir Cards, an Heir Number (H-#). Under the title there
is descriptive text describing what occurs should the Card be
played for its Event. Finally, at the bottom of the Card is any
special text for unusual characteristics of the Card.
Cards that recite the special text (in red) “Remove after ...” are
removed from the game (i.e. permanently Out of Play) after
that condition is met. This applies only to House Event/Surprise
Cards (10.2.1) and the Ally Card #21: Francesco Dei Coppini.
The Mercenary Block Cards (Card #s’: 49, 52, 55 and 56),
the Embassy Cards (Card #’s: 58 and 59), and the Assist with
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
Command Card (#72) should recite “Discard”, not “Remove”
(see Card Errata).
10.2 House Cards
The front of each House Card
has a colored Rose icon in the
upper left corner.
Each Player controls a unique
set of Cards known as their
“House Cards”. House
Cards consist of Heir Cards
and Event and Surprise
Cards that match historical
figures and events related to
each par-ticular royal house,
respec-tively.
Except where noted on the
Cards or in these rules,
House Cards are considered part of a Player’s hand
of Cards (except they do
not count against hand size
limits) and can be used just
like Operations Cards for
Event text or OPS Points
(13.0). They are not counted
towards the Desperate Times
Event.
The front of each House Card has a colored Rose icon to indicate
which Player controls the Cards (5.0). Players may only control,
and use, their own House’s Cards (exception: Henry VI starts
one scenario “captured” by the York Player, though the York
Player may not use his Block or House Card for any purpose).
House Cards never go into the discard pile, and therefore can
only be used once per game, although some stay In-Play until
their effect ends.
10.2.1 House Event & House Surprise Cards
These House Cards operate the same as Operation Cards of the
same type (10.4.1 & 10.4.4), except they are always removed
from the game instead of being placed in the discard pile once
their effect ends.
Note: No replacement Card is drawn for play of a House Surprise Card Event (10.4.4).
13
10.3 Royal Heir Cards
Crown with
H-# gives
Heir order
(10.3.2)
Heir name
and title
Royal
Heir
Card
Corresponding
Heir Block
shown on
card and in
card text
Royal Heir Cards are similar to Events, in that when played,
the Player implements the Card text. Heir Cards with an OPS
Value may be used for OPS Points during the Operations Phase,
just like an Operations Card; but doing so has significant consequences noted below.
Each Heir Card designates its corresponding Heir Block (in
the descriptive text, and shown in the graphic on the Card). If
played for the Card text, the Heir Card is kept face up in front
of the owning Player until the Heir Block is killed in Battle
(20.6.1) or by some other game effect. The Heir Card is then
removed from the game.
Prior to play of their Heir Card, all potential Heirs with a RoP
Box are treated as regular Nobles (exception: Clarence – see
10.3.5). This means that they may be Inactive, In-Play, Undeclared or Unavailable, just like any other Noble. Clarence
and Heirs without a RoP Box are Inactive until their Heir Card
brings them In-Play. When an Heir Card is played for the Event,
consult the list below:
““ If the Heir is Inactive when the Heir Card is played, the
Block enters in any of the Heir’s Home Estates at full
Combat Strength.
““ If the Heir is friendly-controlled and Undeclared when
the Heir Card is played, the Block enters in any of the
Heir’s Home Estates at full Combat Strength.
““ If the Heir is friendly-controlled and Unavailable, the
Block enters as above, but at Retainer Strength only.
““ If the Heir is friendly-controlled and In-Play, simply leave
the Heir Block where it is at its current Combat Strength.
““ If the Heir Block is currently enemy-controlled, see 10.3.1.
If played for OPS, the Card is removed from the game once
the Player completes all of their actions and the Event text is
not implemented. The associated Noble Block immediately
becomes Out of Play (i.e. pick the Block up and remove it
from the game) and is considered eliminated for the purposes
of determining Military Victory (6.1). And remember, if all of
a Player’s Heir Cards and Blocks are removed from the game,
the Player is eliminated!
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10.3.1 Playing an Heir Card when Noble is, or was,
under Enemy Control
If an Heir Card enters play when an opponent has (or had)
control of the Heir Block (8.3.2), control of the Noble switches
to the Card player and the Noble becomes an Heir as normal.
Wherever the Noble is at the time, it is given to its new controller to place In-Play in any of the Noble’s Home Estates. If
the Noble was Unavailable at the time, it is placed at Retainer
Strength. If the Noble was In-Play, any Combat Strength possessed by the Noble is maintained when ownership is transferred. Otherwise, place the Noble at full Combat Strength;
e.g., if the Noble was Undeclared (8.2). For George of Clarence
(10.3.5), this transfer of control happens only when he becomes
the Senior Heir (10.3.2).
10.3.2 Senior and Junior Heir
Each House’s Heir Card has an Heir number
indication (e.g., Heir #1, Heir #2, and so on).
The In-Play Heir Card with the lowest Heir
number indicates the Senior Heir for that House.
The In-Play Heir Card with the next lowest Heir
number indicates the Junior Heir. Any time an Heir is eliminated or an Heir Card is played, the assignment of Senior and
Junior Heirs is reevaluated. Only the Senior Heir can be King;
and, if a more senior Heir is played which would make the King
a Junior Heir, then the new Senior Heir becomes King, instead.
This transfer of the Office of the King happens immediately.
NOTE: Players may have a maximum of two (2) active Heirs
at any one time (including in an Exile Box).
Important: If all of a Player’s Heir Cards have been removed
from the game, the Player is eliminated from the game (6.1).
Also, there are times when a Player may be required to play an
Heir Card (13.3). Obviously, the Player is not required to do
so if he has no Heir Cards which can be played due to Game
Turn restrictions on the Card(s). Heir Cards do not need to be
played in Heir order, the only restriction on play is the Game
Turn requirement.
During the Wintering Phase (27.4), Henry VI’s Block must be
Attached (8.3.3) to a Noble that the Lancaster Player controls.
This may be a different Noble each Wintering Phase. If there
are no Lancaster-controlled Nobles, the Henry VI Block must
be kept in the Undeclared Pool.
If Henry VI is currently in an Exile Box, he may only be Attached to a Noble in the same Exile Box, or to a Noble not in
Exile (which removes Henry VI from Exile, as well).
If Henry VI is Senior Heir when the Lancaster Player is voted
King (24.2.3), the Henry VI Block does not attach the King
Office Block and the Lancaster Player may not use the King’s
once per Turn ability of utilizing another Office’s ability (10.5.1
& 24.2.3) (he still gains the bonus support, votes and IPs listed
on the King Card, however).
If the Henry VI Block is eliminated in combat (i.e., reduced
below Retainer Strength) or his Host Noble suffers a combat
result of “Killed” on the Elimination Chart (20.6.1), Henry is
assumed to have been captured in his tent and executed by the
Victor. If this occurs, remove Henry’s Card and Block from
the game.
Design Note: Yes, Henry VI is removed from the game before any roll is made on the Elimination Chart for his Block, if
either his Block is reduced below Retainer Strength as a result
of combat, or if his Host Noble is killed as a result of a roll on
the Elimination Chart.
10.3.4 Margaret of Anjou – Lancaster
While technically not an “Heir”, as the Queen can
never become King, the Margaret Block behaves
in many ways like any other Royal Heir Block. The
Queen’s Block does not count against Command
Limits for Battle, and unlike Henry VI, also does not count
against Command Limits for Movement either.
Her Block cannot be a Leader for movement or combat (it has
no Command Rating).
Margaret can control a Shire if dropped off via Movement (16.1)
in a Shire, but cannot move on her own once dropped off (given
that she cannot be a Leader for movement).
The following Heir Cards merit further explanation:
10.3.3 Henry VI – Lancaster
The Henry VI Block cannot be a Leader for movement or combat (it has no Command Rating), and
may be led in movement or combat only by a
Noble with a Rank of two (2) or higher.
The Henry VI Block does not count against Command Limits
for Battle, but does count against the Command Limits for
Movement.
Henry VI can control a Shire if dropped off via Movement
(16.1) in a Shire, but cannot move on his own once dropped
off (given that he cannot be a Leader for movement).
His Block may not conduct a Battle Charge.
Historical Note: Henry VI was a terrible warrior; he himself will never be in the actual battle even if his Block is. He
will be in his tent, “contemplating”.
Her Block may not conduct a Battle Charge.
Historical Note: Henry VI’s implacable Queen, Margaret,
was perhaps the strongest leader of the Lancastrian faction
(leading in her husband’s name). She herself will never be in
battle, even if the Block is.
If her Block enters any Exile Box, adjust her Combat Strength
to its maximum amount (Margaret was very good at gaining
support from abroad).
During the Wintering Phase (27.4), Margaret’s Block must be
Attached (8.3.3) to a Noble that the Lancaster Player controls
with a Rank of two (2) or higher. This may be a different Noble
each Wintering Phase. If there are no Lancaster-controlled
Nobles, the Queen’s Block must be kept in the Undeclared Pool.
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
If the Queen’s Block is currently in an Exile Box, she may only
be Attached to a Noble in the same Exile Box or to a Noble not
in Exile (which removes Margaret from Exile, as well).
If the Queen’s Block is eliminated during combat, she will
return during the next Wintering Phase.
If both Henry VI and Prince Edward (the Lancaster Block) are
Out of Play, the Queen goes into permanent exile in France.
Immediately remove the Margaret Card from the game and
place the Margaret Block Out of Play.
As noted on the Queen Margaret Card, the Lancaster Player has
the opportunity to gain one (1) OPS with any CC, whether the
CC is played for the Event or the OPS. However, it cannot be
used if the Lancaster Player Passes (13.1) that Impulse.
10.3.5 George of Clarence – York
Clarence is a Royal Heir for the York Player, but
he has two unique qualities:
““ No Influence can be played on his RoP Box
until his Heir Card is played (Turn 4 or after).
with a caveat for Mandatory Cards (14.1), this value is also the
number of OPS Points a Player may use when he chooses to use
the Card for Operations (15.0), instead of for the Event (14.0).
The text below the picture on each Card is gener-ally referred
to as the “Event text”, and Players can choose to implement the
effects of this text instead of using the Card for its OPS Points
when they play the Card (exception: Mandatory Cards must
always be played as an Event, but the Player then utilizes the
OPS after implementing the Event).
To repeat, for non-Mandatory Cards, a Player must choose
whether to implement the Event text—or—use the Card for
OPS Points. He cannot do both.
After most Operations Cards are played from a hand, or an Ally
Card has its discard ability implemented (14.2.2), the Card is
“discarded”, i.e., placed face up on top of the discard pile next
to the draw deck. Some Operations Cards have a persistent
game effect (e.g., Manpower Shortage), in which case leave
the Operations Card face-up where all Players can see it until
its game effect ends; at which point discard the card as above.
Operations Cards with persistent game effects are denoted by having a rectangular color-coded bar under the
Card type and red text at the
bottom indicating when the
Card effects end.
““ Influence can be played on his RoP Box when he is an
Heir, but not after he becomes a Senior Heir (place the
“Senior Heir” counter on his RoP Box as a reminder).
As a reminder there is a box around his Royal Heir indicator
on his RoP Box, and on his Block label.
Clarence can be the target of the Treachery Surprise Card just
like any other Noble. However, if Clarence becomes the Senior
Heir while controlled by a non-York Player, see Heirs under
Enemy Control (10.3.1).
Example: George of Clarence has been successfully influenced by Lancaster and is currently at full strength controlling
Sussex for the Lancaster Player. The York Player—having no
active Heirs—plays the Clarence Heir Card (becoming the
Senior York Heir). Clarence immediately becomes controlled
by the York Player, who picks him up and decides to places
him in Chester at his current Combat Strength. Had Clarence
been Unavailable at this time, he would have been placed only
at his Retainer Strength.
10.4 Operations Cards
Operations Cards are the
Cards that make up the draw
deck and will be dealt to all
Players. Each Card has a
type specified at the top:
Event, Mandatory, Ally, or
Surprise. The Card type
determines how and when it
can be played.
All Operations Cards (except Affairs of State) have
an OPS Value listed in the
upper left corner, which is
used to determine Player
order during the Operations
Phase (13.2). In addition,
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Example of an Operations Card
with persistent game effects.
Example: In a two player game, York plays first and plays a
Royal Heir Card, placing the corresponding Block on the
map and the Royal Heir Card in front of him. Lancaster
goes second and plays Manpower Shortage for the Event.
The Event is left face-up on the table for the remainder of
the Operations Phase, as noted on the Card. Had Lancaster
played it for OPS, it would have simply been discarded as
normal.
10.4.1 Event Cards
Events give Players a special ability, or create a game effect,
as noted on the Card. Some bring new Blocks into play, others allow a Player to bend or break the standard game rules.
Text on Cards always supersedes these game rules. See Action
Steps (13.2) for details on how Event Cards are played during
the Game Turn.
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10.4.2 Mandatory Cards
Mandatory Event Cards have
a black background behind
the Card type. A Mandatory
Event Card must be played
during the current Turn. It
may not be voluntarily held
for a future Turn. The choice
of when to play it is at the
discretion of the Player
holding the Card, but it must
be one of the Cards that are
played that Turn. However,
if the Player is prevented
from playing it on the current Turn due to the Turn
ending early from a game
Event, he must hold it until
Mandatory Event Card
next Turn; even if not otherwise allowed to hold Cards.
In this case it will count as a Held Card (12.2).
Note: A Player loses Popular Support for each Held Mandatory Card (28.3.2)!
Mandatory Event Cards cannot be used solely for OPS and can
never be voluntarily discarded. See Action Steps (13.2) for details on how Mandatory Cards are played during the Game Turn.
10.4.3 Ally Cards
Ally Card
Ally Cards have a green
persistent rectangle behind
their Card type, as all Ally
Cards are persistent Cards.
Like Event Cards, Ally
Cards can be played for their
Event text or for their OPS
Value. They represent influential individuals who can
provide support to a Player
House. See Action Steps
(13.2) for details on how
Ally Cards are played during the Game Turn.
10.4.4 Surprise Cards
Surprise Cards have a red
background behind their
Card type. These Cards can
be played at any time during an Operations Phase
(unless the Card text says
otherwise) to implement
their Event text, even during another Player’s Turn.
When played this way, they
do not count as a Card
played for an Impulse
(13.1).
Once the Surprise Event has
been resolved, the Player
draws a replacement Card
Surprise Card
from the draw deck. If the
draw deck has been depleted, shuffle the discard pile to create a new draw deck and
then draw the replacement Card.
Alternatively, Surprise Cards may be played as a Command
Card for OPS during the Operations Phase. When played in
this latter way, a replacement Card is not drawn.
Example: At the start of the Operations Phase, York plays
“Secret Plots” to take control of one of Lancaster’s Allies. This
does not count as York’s Card play, so they draw a replacement
Card and select a new Card to play for their Operation Phase
play—which could be the newly drawn Card, or another one
from their hand.
10.5 Parliament Cards & Offices
Title of
Office
Office
Heraldry
Office
Ranking
Bonuses to
Influence
gained, Votes
for King,
and Popular
Support
Listing of
Special
Abilities
Offices—represented by Parliament (or “Office”) Cards and
Blocks—are awarded to Nobles in the Parliament Phases (24.0
& 26.0). Each Office Card lists one or more special abilities
(and their restrictions) usable during the Operations Phase by
the Player controlling the Noble that holds the Office (the Card
will say “you” may do such-and-such). That Player may use
the ability at any time during the Operations Phase, subject to
the restrictions listed on the Card.
Note: The terms “Parliament Card” and “Office Card” are synonymous and are used interchangeably throughout these rules.
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
Some Cards may also give special abilities to the Noble Block
which holds the Office (the Card will say “he” gets such-andsuch ability or bonus). For example, the Noble that holds the
Lord Captain Office does not lose any troop strength when in
Exile in France (7.3.3). For abilities that may only be used
once per Game Turn, when the ability is used we recommend
either rotating the Parliament Card 90 degrees, or turning it
upside down as a reminder that it cannot be used again until
next Game Turn. Note that even when so turned, the Parliament
Card still provides all the additional benefits associated with
the Office Card.
Note: The special abilities granted by the Parliament Card are
available to the Noble Block holding the Office, even if the Office Block has been eliminated. It is the Parliament Card which
conveys the special abilities, not the Block itself (exception:
the King Block grants the +1 Command Rating (10.5.1); which,
if eliminated, is no longer gained by the current King).
Players receive certain bonuses, specified on the Office Card
when a Noble they control gains the Office. However, should
the Noble be eliminated, the Player returns the Office Card
and marker to the Unclaimed Pool and immediately loses any
benefits of the Office. This also applies should another Player
gain control of the Noble, or gains control of the Office for one
of their Nobles. The other Player immediately gains the Office
Card and its bonuses.
All Parliament Cards provide a bonus to Influence gained during the Influence Phase, votes for choosing King and Support
Track adjustments (remember to adjust the track back down
when a Player loses the Card for any reason). Influence and
vote gains are handled in the King Phase (24.0) and after, in
the Office Phase (26.0). As noted above, Player Support is adjusted upwards when they gain the Office Card and downward
when they lose it.
Each Office provides an additional Block to be placed into
play by the owning Player. It must be Attached to the Noble
who holds the corresponding Office (8.3.3) and may never be
voluntarily detached from the Noble for movement (it may
detach for combat; see 20.4.3).
17
participating in the same Combat Round) as the current King.
Note that Henry VI does not attach the King’s Office Block if
he is King (10.3.3).
The King Office (or Henry VI if King):
““ May use Crown Estates as Home Estates (7.2.4).
““ Responds to Embassy Events (14.1.1).
““ Cannot be subject to a Writ (see below).
““ Is always the highest Ranking Noble/Heir (27.3).
The Player controlling the King Office (or Henry VI if King):
““ Gains a Support Bonus of three (3).
““ Can use Writs (see below) against a Planned Uprising.
““ Gains a bonus Card Draw during the Draw Phase (12.3).
““ May assign troops raised in a Mustering action (18.0) to
any Block in England, regardless of location.
““ Shuffles and flips the Office Cards during the Parliament
Phase (26.0).
““ Decides all tie breakers (see below).
If the King is held by any Noble other than Henry VI, the
King may:
““ Attach the King Block to the Noble holding the King
Office.
““ Gain a +1 to his Command Rating (as long as the King
Block remains Attached).
““ Once per Game Turn, use any one of the other Officers
“once per Turn” abilities, as listed on the back of the
King’s Office Card. If the King and the other Officer both
want to use their ability at the same time, or are involved
in the same Engagement, the King decides whether to use
his ability after the other Officer decides and the King
decides whether the other Officer must implement his
ability first or second.
Office Blocks always count against Command Limits for both
combat and movement.
Note that the Noble Rank on the Block associated with an Office is simply a mnemonic to remember the Votes contributed
by holding the Office Card and does not also contribute to
Votes in Parliament; e.g., the Lord Chancellor gains a total of
+3 Votes in Parliament only, and the Block can be Attached to
(and led by) any Noble winning the Office, regardless of the
Noble’s own Rank.
10.5.1 His Majesty the King of England
During the Parliament Phase (24.0) of each Turn, one Senior
Heir is chosen to be King for the next Turn. The King’s Office
and its controlling Player are then entitled to certain privileges
and have certain responsibilities. In addition, the King’s Office
Block conveys an increase of +1 to the Host Noble’s Command Rating as long as the King’s Office Block is attached (or
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Writ: Similar to a Surprise Card (i.e., can be played at any
time) any three (3) Value OPS Card may be discarded to select
a valid In-Play Noble (Friendly or Enemy) as a substitute for a
Friendly Noble or Office that could be the Responding Noble
to a Planned Uprising or Raid Event (14.2.1). The King may
always use a Writ to send someone as a Responding Noble
and, in addition, the King may use a Writ to send a valid InPlay Noble (Friendly or Enemy) as a substitute for the King
in response to an Embassy Event (14.1.1). Though note that
once a Noble becomes the Responding Noble, no Writ may
be played by anyone, King included. The Uprising/Raid or
Embassy Event is then resolved with the substitute as the
Responding Noble or King, respectively.
Only a Player who controls the King, an Officer of Parliament, or Queen Margaret (when in England) may perform a
Writ. The Player does not draw a replacement for the Card
used for the Writ.
If multiple Players want to play a Writ in response to an
Event Card, use the tie break rule (see below) to determine
who may play it.
An In-Play Block cannot be subject to a Writ more than once
in response to an Event Card and none of the follow may be
subject to a Writ:
““ An In-Play Heir
any OPS and can be done even if the Command Card (13.1) is
played as an Event (14.0). If there is no King, The Lord Chancellor decides how ties are broken and gets a bonus of +5 votes
instead of his normal +3.
10.5.3 The Lord Treasurer of the Exchequer
Once per Turn, when his controller uses all the
OPS of a Card for Political Influence actions
(19.0), that Player may Influence one additional
Noble (so playing a 1 OPS Card for a Political
Influence action would allow the influencing of
two (2) Nobles using this ability).
10.5.4 The Lord Earl Marshal of England
Once per Turn in an Engagement including the
Lord Marshall (or King, if using this ability), his
controller may force one Noble (Friendly or
Enemy) [exception: not Margaret or Henry VI]
and any attached Office(s) to re-roll all their
Combat Round dice. If he is the Leader during an Engagement
(20.4.1), his controller always forms his Main Force and conduct Replacements after the Enemy has done so, even if he is
the defender, unless the King is the Leader of the Enemy force
and chooses to use this Lord Marshall ability.
10.5.5 The Lord High Admiral of England
Once per Turn his controller may use two (2)
OPS Points to use Sea Movement (17.0) with
him as the Leader. Pirate Raids (14.2.1) roll only
one die when he is the Responding Noble.
““ A Block in a Contested Shire
““ The current King
““ Blocks in Exile in a Foreign Nation
““ Prince Edward (i.e., the “Lancaster” Block) by anyone
other than the Lancaster Player
10.5.6 The Lord Captain of Calais and the Pale
French Raids (14.2.1) roll only two dice when
he is the Responding Noble. Neither he, nor
Blocks that he leads, lose any steps when moving
to the France Exile Box (7.3.3).
““ Henry VI or Queen Margaret and their Host Block(s)
by anyone other than the Lancaster Player
All other Noble Blocks are valid targets of a Writ and must
respond if selected.
Tie Breaker: In most cases during the game when a situation
requires a tie-break to be decided (e.g., Impulse Order, Voting
for Offices, etc.) it is the Player controlling the King Office
Card who makes the decision. In the case where there is no
King (perhaps the King was eliminated in combat), the Player
controlling the next-highest Ranking Officer (27.3) decides
the tie break, i.e., Chancellor if no King, then Treasurer, and
so on. In the rare case no Offices are held, the Player with
the highest IPs gained during the previous Influence Phase
(23.0) decides ties. If multiple Players have the highest IPs
gained, roll a die to determine the Player who will be the
tie-breaker. If the tie-breaking Player is established by IP
Value (including die roll), then that Player will continue to
decide tie breaks as needed until the end of the current Turn.
10.5.2 The Lord Chancellor of England
Once per Turn, during one of his Impulses his
controller may exchange one IP stack in Parliament with another without examining their
values (the stacks need not have the same number of IP Markers in them). This does not cost
10.5.7 The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and the Pale
Neither he, nor Blocks that he leads, lose any
steps when moving to the Ireland Exile Box
(7.3.3).
10.5.8 The Lord Warden of the North Marches
Scots Raids (14.2.1) roll only one die when he
is the Responding Noble. Neither he, nor Blocks
that he leads, lose any steps when moving to the
Scotland Exile Box (7.3.2).
10.6 Player Aid Cards
Also included in the game are two identical Player Aid Cards
(PACs) and four Player Aid House Mats. The PACs contain
various charts and rule references for ease of reference. The
House Mats provide each Player a detailed map showing
Home Estates for each Heir Block, a location to place their
Senior and Junior Heirs, their Stock and Unclaimed IP Pools,
their Undeclared Pool and a location to place held Offices and
available Ally Cards.
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
11.0 Outline of Sequence of Play
Each Turn of the game has the following Phases, which must
be completed in the order listed:
Draw Phase (12.0): Players draw Operations
Cards to fill their hands and determine the number of Impulses for the Turn.
Operations Phase (13.0): Players choose and
play a Command Card from their hand. The
OPS value of the Card determines Player Turn
order. When a Player is allowed to act, they must
decide how to use the Card (Mandatory Cards
force behavior)—as an Event, or as Operations
Points (OPS).
Once all actions have taken place, any Combats
are resolved, and Players check for Attrition in
over-stacked areas.
The Operations Phase will repeat based on the
number of such phases determined in the Draw
Phase.
Note: the play of the “Affairs of State” Card
may shorten the number of Impulses in a Turn.
Influence Phase (23.0): In the Influence Phase
new IP Markers are collected from FriendlyControlled Shires, as well as bonuses from controlled Offices or the Popular Support Track, held
Home Estates, and any discarded Ally Cards.
Note: This Phase is skipped in the same turn that
the “Affairs of State” card is played.
King Phase (24.0): In the King Phase, Players will check
for Military Victory by controlling Shires, and all rebel and
Mercenary Blocks are removed. Following this, the Players
will determine the loyalty of all Nobles with IP Markers on
their RoP Boxes. They then total their Votes from all of their
Nobles, Offices, the Popular Support Track, and any discarded
Ally Cards. Finally, the new King is chosen with these Votes.
Victory Check Phase (25.0): During this brief Phase, the
Players check to see if any of the other victory conditions have
been achieved.
Office Phase (26.0): In this Phase, all Office cards and Blocks
are returned to Parliament, and Players bid on all Offices in a
random order, using IP Markers from their Stock.
Wintering Phase (27.0): In this Phase, the Players will return
all, some, or none of their Blocks to the map, one at a time.
Blocks are returned in a specific order: Non-Officers first in
Player order from highest to lowest Votes, followed by Officers
in rank order from 8 down to 1 (King places last). Finally, any
special Blocks (Henry VI and Margaret) are placed with Hosts.
Blocks which are not placed (for whatever reason), go into the
Player’s Undeclared Pool.
19
Clean-Up Phase (28.0): In the Clean Up Phase, markers
tracking game status are changed or removed, Players decide
on any Cards they wish to hold (if they are allowed to do this)
and discard the remainder (Mandatory Cards must be held
with a penalty) and the Popular Support Track is adjusted as
appropriate for each Player.
After completing a full Turn, the Turn marker is advanced by
one and the next Turn is played as above, until the last Game
Turn of the the chosen scenario is reached.
12.0 Draw Phase
Each Player draws a number of Operations Cards equal to the
Base Hand Size less the number of Held Cards (12.2) from the
previous Turn, if any, plus any Bonus Draws (12.3) to which
they are eligible. House Cards are not included in the calculation of the number of Cards to draw.
Each Player, in descending Influence Point order (ties broken
according to 10.5.1), draws all their Cards before the next
Player draws theirs. If the draw deck is depleted, the discard
pile is shuffled and becomes the new draw deck, and Players
continue drawing their Cards.
12.1 Hand Size
The Base Hand Size is five (5) Operations Cards. The maximum Hand Size is nine (9) Operations Cards. If Players gain
more than four (4) Bonus Draws (12.3) in one turn, they only
draw four (4) extra Cards when filling out their Hand (the extra
Bonus Draws are lost).
12.2 Held Cards
Operations Cards may be held in a Player’s hand from a prior
Turn due to Heir bonus abilities or by Card Events. Each Held
Card causes the Player to draw one Card less during the Draw
Phase.
12.3 Bonus Draws
A Player may gain bonus Cards based upon his current Popular
Support level (see Popular Support Track on the map).
In addition, a Player draws an extra Card for each of the following:
““ Control of London.
““ Control of Calais.
““ Control of the Office of King.
““ Control of the Warwick Block in two-player and threeplayer games only.
Bonus draws for control of London and/or Calais are gained
regardless of the Shire status (Depleted, Plundered, etc).
12.4 House Cards
Remember, House Cards never count in determining the number of Cards in a Player’s hand, and therefore do not affect the
number of Operations Cards drawn at the start of a Turn.
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13.0 Operations Phase
Once Players have drawn their Cards, play moves to the Operations Phase where each Player will have an opportunity to
execute their plans for victory.
The Operations Phase is composed of multiple Impulses, played
one after another. Each Impulse is composed of a Command
(Card-play) Step and one or more Action Steps for each Player,
followed by a Combat step for all Contested Shires.
At the start of the Operations Phase, determine
the number of Impulses for the Turn by counting
the number of non-House Cards in each Player’s
hand. The smallest number is the number of
Impulses this Turn. Place the “Final Impulse”
counter on the Impulse track at the appropriate number of
impulses determined above and place a small black cylinder
on Impulse track “1”—indicating the first impulse to be resolved.
Example: After the Draw Phase in a two-player game, York
has six Operations Cards in his hand, but Lancaster only has
five. There will be five Impulses this Turn, with each Impulse
having two (2) Action Steps (for a total of 10 Actions Steps
in the entire Operations Phase). The players place the “Final
Impulse” counter on the “5” space of the Impulse track and
begin thinking about their first Command Card play.
13.1 Command Step
During the Command Step of every Impulse, each Player in
descending Influence Point order (ties broken according to
10.5.1) selects one Card from their hand and places it face-down
in front of them. This can be a House Card or Operations Card,
and is the Player’s “Command Card” (CC). Once placed facedown, the CC may not be changed. If a Player wishes to pass
(see below), they must place a House Card face-down in front
of them as their psuedo-CC. Once all Players have selected a
CC, they are revealed simultaneously.
Immediately upon revealing a House Card as a CC, if a Player
has only House Cards in their hand, they may choose to pass
instead of utilizing their pseudo-CC (they must reveal their
hand at this time to show that they only have House Cards
remaining). A Player may not pass if they have any non-House
Cards in their hand and must utilize the played CC. A Player
that passes does not conduct any Action Steps that Impulse. If
a Player passes on one Impulse it does not prevent them from
playing a Card on a subsequent Impulse.
Design Note: This may occur when a Player uses his 3 OPS
Cards for Writs (10.5.1) or Pursuit/Retreat prevention (20.5.4),
which may result in him having less Non-House Cards than
the originally determined number of Impulses in the Operations Phase.
Players may generally choose any Card from their hand to play
with the following restrictions, in priority order:
““ If a Player has no In-Play Heir Blocks, see 13.3.
““ If a Player holds any Mandatory Cards, he must play to
guarantee that all held Mandatory Cards will be played
in the current Operations Phase (exception: see Affairs
of State, below).
““ Affairs of State (14.1.3) may not be played on the first
Impulse of a Turn, but otherwise may be played even if
the Player holds other Mandatory Cards.
Example: York holds six (6) Cards, including the Affairs of
State (AoS) Card and one additional Mandatory Card. Assuming York had no active Heirs, his first impulse Command
Card (CC) must be an Heir Card. York’s second impulse
CC can be any Card including AoS. It does not have to be a
Mandatory Card, since there are still greater than 2 impulses
remaining. However, assuming the total impulses were five
(5), if York has not played either Mandatory Card by Impulse
4 (i.e., second to last impulse), then he must play one of the
Mandatory Cards. Note that if he plays AoS before playing
the other Mandatory Card, York will be forced to hold the
other Mandatory Card for next Turn (though would suffer
no loss in Popular Support per 28.3.2).
13.2 Action Steps
Players then take turns executing their Action Steps in descending order of the OPS Value of the Command Card played (ties
broken per 10.5.1).
Example: York plays “Rutland”, a 2 OPS Heir Card and
Lancaster plays “Desertions”, a 2 OPS Operations Card.
Assuming that York is the current King, he would have to
decide whether to let Lancaster go first before knowing
whether Lancaster intended to use his revealed Card for the
OPS Value or the Event. He decides to let Lancaster go first
so that he can’t play the Event against his incoming Heir.
This Turn order is known as the “Impulse Order”. The Player
conducting his Action Step is called the “Acting Player”. All
other Players are “Enemy Players”.
If the Acting Player’s Command Card is a Mandatory Card, it
must be played as an Event. If it is a Surprise Card, it must be
used for OPS and no replacement Card is drawn (because the
Event did not occur). Otherwise, when the Player is required
to conduct their Action Step he must choose whether he will
use his Command Card as an Event or for its OPS.
When the last Player of the Impulse has finished conducting his
Action Step(s), conduct all combats in the Combat Step (20.0)
discard all CC’s without on-going persistent effects (14.0),
and then move the small black cylinder on the Impulse track
to the next higher numbered space (i.e., “1” to “2” to “3”, etc).
When this cylinder is on the same space as the “Final Impulse”
counter, it is the last Impulse of the current OPS Round. Once
that last Impulse is complete (including combat), slide the
cylinder off the track and proceed to the Influence Phase (23.0)
(or King Phase (24.0), if the Turn ends due to play of the Affairs of State Card).
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
13.3 Required Heirs
If a Player has no In-Play Heir Blocks, he must either play an
Heir Card as his CC (subject to the limit of only two active
Heirs and the Game Turn restrictions on his remaining Heir
Cards) or return an Undeclared Heir to In-Play status (remember, Margaret is not an Heir). Returning an Heir to In-Play
status can be accomplished by either playing a CC that has an
Event that allows him to return an Undeclared Noble to In-Play
status (he must select an Heir) or by playing a CC for OPS
and spending the first OPS Point to return an Undeclared Heir
to In-Play status (15.1). In the latter case, the Heir returns at
Retainer Strength, only. A Mandatory Card may be played, as
they generate OPS Points—the first of which would be required
to be spent returning the Heir to In-Play status. No other CC
plays are allowed and if a CC is revealed that cannot return an
Undeclared Noble to In-Play status via the Event text, it must
be played for OPS per above.
Example: York has a Senior Heir (only), but its Block is in
his Undeclared Pool at the start of an Impulse—leaving him
with no In-Play Heir Blocks. He may either active a Junior
Heir by playing the appropriate Heir Card, or return his Senior Heir to In-Play from his Undeclared Pool (and he may
be forced to do the latter if he has no valid Junior Heirs to
play due to Game Turn restrictions). York chooses to play a
regular OPS Card and spends the first OPS Point to return
his Senior Heir to the map at Retainer Strength.
14.0 Event Text Cards
If the Player chooses to use his Command Card as an Event,
Mandatory Event, Ally, or Heir, conduct the steps below based
on the type of Card. If the Event, Mandatory or Ally Card’s text
grants the Player any OPS Points, the Acting Player may also
conduct actions just as if he had played a Card for that number
of OPS Points, after any other Event text is implemented. Unless explicitly stated otherwise, the Event effects only apply to
the Player who played the Event.
Some Event Cards have a lasting, persistent, effect—in those
cases, do not place the Event Card in the discard pile until the
game effect has ended (this will be indicated in the red text
at the bottom of the Card). Keep the Card visible by the edge
of the board so that all Players can see the active game effect
(e.g., Card #34 “Manpower Shortage” prohibits Mustering actions for the rest of the Operations Phase; so once played, this
Card would be kept face-up by the game board until the end
of the current OPS Phase). All persistent effect Cards have a
rectangular box behind their Card type to indicate that they are
not immediately discarded.
If an Event requires the deck to be reshuffled, this is done after
the Impulse is complete by combining the discard pile and draw
deck into one, and then reshuffling.
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14.1 Mandatory Event Cards
Similar to regular Events that grant OPS Points, implement the
Event text first, then utilize the listed OPS Points, and discard
the Card.
Important: As noted above, a Player must make every attempt
to play a held Mandatory Card during the current Operations
Phase. If a Player fails to play a Mandatory Card and must hold
it until next Turn, that Player loses Popular Support equal to
the OPS Value of the held Mandatory Card(s) (28.3.2). The
only exception to this is if the Turn ended due to play of the
Affairs of State Card, in which case unplayed Mandatory Cards
must still be held to the next Turn, but do not result in any lost
Popular Support.
There are three kinds of Mandatory Event Cards. Details on
their effects are below:
14.1.1 Embassy
A foreign emissary has come
to England to treat with the
King. Roll a die and con-sult
the Card to determine where
the meeting shall take place.
The only Blocks that attend
are the current King (or
representative via a Writ),
any Attached Office
Block(s), and the Host of
Henry VI—if Henry VI is
the current King. Move the
appropriate Block(s) immediately to the designated
Shire (simply pick up the
Block(s) and move them to
the indi-cated Shire). The
King or representative may
Embassy Card
not leave this Shire for the
duration of this Impulse and, in keeping the King’s peace, no
Enemy Blocks may enter that location on this Impulse. This
includes Enemy Blocks that Retreat or Evade combat. Furthermore, combat cannot take place in that Shire.
If one or more Enemy Blocks are already in that Shire, they
must immediately Retreat to an adjacent Shire, if able. If unable to Retreat, the Enemy Block(s) are placed in their owner’s
Undeclared Pool. Place the King’s Office Block (or the sent
representative) flat on the map in the Shire (current Strength
farthest from the controller) to serve as a reminder that no
Enemy Blocks may enter this Shire for the rest of the Impulse.
If there is currently no King, this Event has no effect (i.e. do not
implement any of the Card text). On the off chance that multiple
Embassy Events occur in the same Impulse, the King decides
the order that they are resolved (including forcing Blocks to
Retreat and no combat in those Shires—use any available
marker to help remember the Shires that cannot have combat).
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Example: In a three-player game, Buckingham goes second
with a played Embassy Mandatory Event, ending up with
the King going to Devon. York—the current King—moves
his Senior Heir King Block and the King’s Office Block to
Devon; which is currently occupied by a Lancaster Noble.
The Lancaster Noble must Retreat to an adjacent Shire per
the Retreat rules, but all are occupied by Enemy players. As
such, the Lancaster Noble is pulled off the map and placed in
the Lancaster Undeclared Pool and the York Player flips up
the King’s Office Block to remind everyone that they cannot
enter Devon the rest of this Impulse.
14.1.2 Plague
When it is the time in the
Impulse to resolve the
Plague Event, the controller
draws an additional Card
from the draw deck and
notes the revealed Plague
location (listed at the top
right of the new Card). Place
a Plague marker there and
discard the additional Card.
Each Player distributes a
number of Step Losses equal
to the affected Shire’s Value
(SV) to their stack of Blocks
in the Shire. The controller
of the stack decides which
Blocks receive Step Losses
Plague Card
one at a time, but no Block
may receive more losses once they have been reduced below
Retainer Strength. Blocks reduced below Retainer Strength are
moved to their controller’s Undeclared Pool. Ignore any Step
Losses which cannot be applied.
According to the same procedure as above, stacks of Blocks in
each Shire adjacent to the affected Shire take Step Losses as
well. The number of Step Losses for each Player’s stack is equal
to the adjacent Shire’s SV –1, minimum of one (1) (exception:
London always loses steps equal to its SV, even if the Plague
originates in an adjacent Shire).
Once all Step Losses have been distributed, flip the Plague
marker to its “Devastated” side.
Example: A Plague Card has been revealed. When the time
comes for it to activate in the Impulse, the top Card of the
draw deck is discarded, revealing Lincoln as the Plague location. All Players with stacks in Lincoln must lose two (2)
steps. All Players with stacks in Cambridge or West Riding
must lose one (1) step (SV = 2, so SV – 1 = 1). Players with
stacks in Nottingham, Leicester, Rutland and Huntingdon
also suffer one (1) step loss even though 1 – 1 = 0, since the
minimum is one (1) step loss per Shire. East Riding and
Norfolk—not being adjacent to Lincoln—suffer zero (0)
step losses.
14.1.3 Affairs of State
When this Card is first revealed its controller takes
the top Card of the draw
deck and shows it to all
Players. Treat the Card
drawn as if the Player had
played it as his Command
Card (including determining Impulse order). It must
be played for OPS unless it
is a Mandatory Event (Embassy or Plague), in which
case it must be played for
the Event text.
Once the current Impulse
is complete, end the Operations Phase regardless
Affairs of State Card
of whether any additional
Impulses remain. Resolve all combats (20.0) and then skip the
Influence Phase (23.0) and continue play of this Turn with the
King Phase (24.0).
Note that Affairs of State can not be played on the first Impulse
of the Operations Phase.
14.2 Non-Mandatory Event Cards
Implement the Event text, and then a) Operations Cards are
discarded (exception: if having persistent game effects); b)
House Cards are removed from the game. See Cards (10.0) for
an overview of House Event Cards and Operations Event Cards.
If an Event Card designates a Shire and there are more than
one enemy Player present (e.g. Desertions), select one enemy
Player to be affected by the Event. Most other Cards should
be self-explanatory, but the following Events warrant some
explanation:
14.2.1 Planned Uprisings & Raids
Some Cards allow a Player, the “Controlling Player”, to cause
a Planned Uprising (representing a peasant revolt) or a Pirate,
French or Scots Raid in a Shire.
In Impulse order, each Player who has an In-Play Officer
Noble with a Home Estate in the Shire in Revolt (or subject to
the Raid) declares whether he will respond to the Event, and
with which Officer (if he has more than one). If no Officer
volunteers, again in Impulse order Players can choose to send
a non-Officer Noble with a Home Estate in the targeted Shire.
Regardless, only the first Player to elect to send a Block may
respond and remember that any Home Estate, including Shared
Estates, Office Estates, etc., can be used.
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
A Player capable of using a
Writ (10.5.1) may command
any Officer to respond at
any time in the above process, or if all Players have
declined at this point. If this
results in two potential Responding Nobles, resolve
ties as usual. Only one Writ
may be played—if multiple
Players desire to play a Writ,
use the tie breaker rules
(10.5.1) to determine who
may play it. If no Player has
responded voluntarily or by
a Writ, the Player with the
most Blocks currently in the
Planned Uprising Card
Shire (if any) must respond,
with ties resolved as usual.
If none, see below for what happens when there is no Responding Noble.
For Planned Uprisings only, if the Responding Noble is controlled by the Controlling Player, the Responding Noble immediately gains two Steps (up to its maximum) [the peasants
favor that Player’s House, so join his army as new recruits!].
In all other situations (e.g., if the Responding Noble is not
controlled by the Controlling Player of a Planned Uprising
or when anyone is responding to a Raid), make a single Line
Combat Roll (20.5.2) against the Responding Noble (and any
attached Blocks) according to the Card played (and roll immediately on the Elimination Chart for any Blocks that are
reduced below Retainer Strength. For Responding Nobles with
attached Blocks, any hits may be distributed to either Block per
the normal damage allocation rules (20.5.3).
““ Planned Uprising: Roll a number of Green Dice (hits on
a 6) equal to the Shire Value. Roll an additional die if the
Shire in revolt is loyal to a House other than the Responding Noble’s controller (e.g., a Buckingham-controlled
Noble responding to a Planned Uprising in Stafford
would roll two (2) dice, but any other non-Buckinghamcontrolled Responding Noble would roll three (3)).
““ Pirate Raid: Roll two Green Dice (hits on a 6)
““ French Raid: Roll three Blue Dice (hits on a 5)
““ Scots Raid: Roll two Blue Dice (hits on a 5)
After resolution—and regardless of whether the Responding
Noble survived—increase the Popular Support of the Responding Noble’s House by one (1). This increase in Popular Support
is gained even for Planned Uprisings where the Responding
Noble is controlled by the Controlling Player.
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The Shire is considered Controlled by the Controlling Player
for all purposes as long as the small colored cylinder (hereafter
“rebels”) remains. When any Enemy stack moves into a Shire
containing rebels, the rebels make their Line Combat Roll
against the stack, as above. When a Friendly stack enters a Shire
with rebels, they gain two Steps distributed as the Controlling
Player wishes, with no Block exceeding its maximum. In either
case, the rebel cylinder is then removed. If they still remain,
the rebels are removed at the beginning of the upcoming King
Phase (24.1.2).
Finally, for any Raid or Planned Uprising where
a Line Combat roll was required—or—for any
Raid where there was no Responding Noble,
place a Plundered marker in the Shire.
Design Note: On the off chance that there are already 10
Plundered/Depleted markers on the map when an 11th is
needed to be placed, the Player who needs to place the marker
must remove one from any Shire with the lowest SV among
those that are Depleted, selecting from Shires that do not
contain any of that Player’s Blocks, if able.
Jack Cade’s Rebellion: Players will note that this Event
Card does not list London as an illegal Shire for conducting
the Planned Uprising, while all others do (e.g., Robyn of
Holderness). This is by design.
Example: In a three-player game, Buckingham (the current
King’s House), plays their 1 OPS Value House Card “Buckingham’s Rebellion” as his Command Card. Both York and
Lancaster play 2 OPS Cards and take their Action Rounds
first in the Impulse. When Buckingham’s Action Round
comes, he places a small yellow cylinder in Stafford (a 2 SV
pro-Buckingham Shire) with the thought of having his Buckingham Block (currently down to Retainer Strength) respond
in order to gain two (2) steps by “recruiting” the rebels into
his army. However, York—who went before Buckingham in
the Impulse—has control over Shrewsbury, who also has a
Home Estate in Stafford and is currently the Lord Admiral.
Since York doesn’t want Buckingham to gain the two (2)
steps—and has first choice in sending a Responding Noble
due to Impulse order—he sends Shrewsbury and the Lord
Admiral Block to Stafford as the “Responding Noble”. Three
dice are rolled against him: ‘3’ , ‘6’ and ‘6’. The York player
grimaces as he applies one hit to Shrewsbury and one hit to
the Admiral Block. He then increases his Popular Support
Value by one (1) and places a Plundered marker in the Shire,
hoping his gamble pays off and that he or Lancaster can kill
Buckingham while he is still at Retainer Strength.
If no Noble responds to a Planned Uprising, place a small cylinder of the color of the Controlling Player’s House in the Shire
in revolt to represent the rebels (Raids do not deploy rebels).
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Respond to a Raid, Revolt
or a Writ: A Player may use
this discard ability to send
Lord Stourton as the Responding Noble to any Raid
or Revolt, or in place of a
Block that has been Writ (for
any reason). The Player still
gains the +1 Popular Support and no dice are rolled
against Lord Stourton (who
is discarded after responding).
14.2.2 Ally Cards
Place the Ally Card In-Play in front of the owning Player. The
Player may use the discard ability of the Card at any time,
including immediately after being placed In-Play.
All Ally Cards have a “Discard this Card (choose one)” ability
that becomes available once the Card is In-Play. The controlling
Player may choose to activate this ability any time he wishes
(exceptions: bonus combat dice only in Combat involving
that Player; Parliament Phase, Gather Supporters—see 24.2.1,
step 2 for last opportunity; bonus Votes—see 24.2.3 for last
opportunity). To do so, he announces his intent, choose one of
the powers to invoke, and discards the Ally Card.
Should more than one Player want to use their Ally powers
at the same time, the King (per tie breaker rules; see 10.5.1)
decides the order the Players will resolve their powers. Players are not required to specify the power they are going to use
until the order of play is determined, and may even choose a
different power than first specified if they wish. However, once
declared that they are using an Ally power, they must use one
of the Ally powers when it is their time to act.
Most Ally abilities are self-explanatory, but several require a
bit more explanation:
Add “X” Ally Influence: A Player may use this discard ability
to place X (i.e., one, two, etc.) IP Point(s) (not Markers!) from
his Stock onto one Noble’s RoP Box (subject to the restrictions
of the Political Influence action in 19.0).
Example: York discards Ally Card #16 (Sir Robert Ratcliffe)
while controlling Lovel. He may place a single 1 IP Marker
on two different Nobles, or a 2 IP Marker on a single Noble.
Regardless, York can only add two additional IPs (in total)
to Nobles by use of this ability.
Assist with Command: A Player may use this discard ability
to increase the Command Rating of one Friendly Leader by
one (+1) point until the end of his current Impulse, or until
the end of a Battle (20.0) in a Shire. Note that the Event of the
Surprise Card “Leadership” (Card #72) functions in the same
manner as above.
Gain control of an Office Block: A Player that gains control of
a uncontrolled Office or Mercenary Block Attaches the Block
per the language on the Card; but, if an Office, does not gain
any of the benefits conveyed to being the corresponding Officer
(unless, of course, the Host Noble happens to be that Officer
already!). “Uncontrolled Blocks” are any Block that is either
Inactive or Unavailable.
Activate an Undeclared Noble: A Player may use this discard
ability to place one (1) friendly Undeclared Noble onto the map
at full Combat Strength in any Shire containing a Home Estate
for that Noble. The Noble may enter into an Enemy controlled
or a contested Shire this way.
14.2.3 Heir Cards
Play of an Heir Card as an Event to activate the Heir is restricted
to certain turns as indicated in the Card text. The Card cannot
be played as an Event in a Turn earlier than specified. Also,
remember that no Player may have more than two (2) active
Heirs at once.
If the restrictions are met, place the Card face up in front of
the controlling Player; if the corresponding Heir Block is not
already In-Play, put it In-Play in a Home Estate at full Combat
Strength. If the Heir Block is controlled by another Player, see
Heirs under Enemy Control (10.3.1).
Once the Heir Card is played, the corresponding Block is now
considered an Heir for the remainder of the game. For Heirs
other than George of Clarence, place an “Heir” counter on
the Roll of Parliament (“RoP”) Box (if the Heir has one) as a
reminder that Influence Markers can no longer be played there
(move any IP Markers there to their respective Unclaimed
Pools). When Clarence becomes Senior Heir, place the “Senior
Heir” counter on his RoP Box (10.3.5) for the same effect.
15.0 Operations/OPS Points
If the Acting Player’s Command Card (“CC”) is a Surprise Card
(10.4.4), or the Player chooses to use his Card for OPS instead
of for the Event, the Player will have a number of points (OPS
Points) to spend on actions equal to the OPS Value of the Card
(e.g., playing “Hidden Schemes” for OPS will give the Player
two (2) OPS Points to spend). Note that some Cards give OPS
Points as part of the Event text …these points are spent as if
received by playing a CC for OPS, but only after implementing the Event text. A Player with OPS to spend may perform
as many actions as they wish subject only to the costs of those
actions— from zero up to the OPS value of the CC played.
Important: Remember that a Surprise Card used for a Command
Card must be used for OPS; it cannot be used for its Event text.
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Operations Points may be spent on multiple uses of the same
action or on different actions, as desired. A Player does not have
to spend all of his OPS, but OPS cannot be saved for future
use—any not used are lost.
Once the Player has conducted all the actions they are willing
or able to perform, the Card is discarded. None of the Event
text is implemented when the CC is played for OPS. Obviously
this does not apply for Cards where the Event text grants the
Player OPS Points to spend.
The following actions can be performed by spending the specified amount of OPS Points:
““ Return an Undeclared Heir (only) to In-Play Status (15.1)
_ 1 OPS/Heir
““ Land Movement (16.0) _ 1 OPS/stack
““ Sea Movement (17.0) _ 3 OPS/stack [exception: once
per Turn, 2 OPS for a stack led by the Lord Admiral]
““ Mustering (18.0) _ 1 OPS/Step
““ Political Influence (19.0) _ 1 OPS/ Noble to be influenced
Details on these actions are given below.
15.1 Returning an Undeclared Heir to
In-Play Status
A Player may (and occasionally must) return an Undeclared Heir
to In-Play status by spending 1 OPS Point. Heirs returned via
this method return to any valid Home Estate (Friendly, Enemycontrolled or Contested) at Retainer Strength. They may not
move during the Action Step that they returned In-Play, but
may be the target of a Mustering action (18.0).
16.0 Land Movement
16.1 Basics of Movement
It costs one (1) OPS to move a “stack” (“stack” being one
or more Blocks) from one location to another. Hereafter,
“Stack”/”stack” will always refer to one or more Blocks moving
together. To designate a stack for movement, the Acting Player
designates a single Block with a positive (non-zero) Command
Rating as a Leader for movement (exception: the King Office
Block cannot lead movement—the +1 only increases the Command Rating of its Host Block).
Important: Remember that a Leader always has to be the
highest Ranking Noble (or tied) in a Stack, that Heirs always
outrank non-Heirs, and that a Leader can only lead a number
of Blocks equal to its Command Rating!
The Moving Stack may consist of the Leader alone or the
Leader and additional Blocks in the same Shire or Exile Box.
The maximum number of additional Blocks is limited to the
Leader’s Command Rating (8.3.1), also called the Leader’s
“Command Limit”. Likewise, the stack may not contain any
Noble Block that has a higher Rank than the Leader.
Note: A Moving Stack has a movement allowance of four (4)
Movement Points, or MPs.
The Moving Stack may pick up, or drop off, any number of
non-Leader Blocks at any time during the move [meaning the
Leader Block can never be dropped off, nor changed during
the move], provided the number of Blocks in the moving stack
does not exceed the Leader’s Command Rating at any specific
time. Office Blocks cannot be detached; they must stay with
their assigned Noble, and remember, they do count against the
Command Limit (10.5). Any Block that is part of a Moving
Stack (even if dropped off before spending all four (4) MPs)
must stop moving for the remainder of that Impulse. It may,
however, move in a later Impulse of the same Operations Phase.
Design Note: If a Player plays a 2 OPS CC and uses one (1)
OPS to activate a Leader and two (2) Blocks, none of those
three (3) Blocks can move (either as a Leader or a “led” Block)
with the second of the OPS Points in that Action Round.
However, they are available to move in a subsequent Impulse
when a new CC is played.
A Moving Stack cannot drop off its Leader. However, the Leader
may drop off the rest of the Moving Stack and keep moving.
Example: Non-Heir Exeter—Rank 2 and Command Rating of 2, is picked to move as a Leader, along with Stanley.
This is allowed, since they are tied at Rank 2. He spends two
(2) of his four (4) MPs moving from Derby to Stafford to
Shropshire, where Exeter drops off Stanley and picks up Fauconberg and Hastings. Note that the owning Player cannot
use Fauconberg’s Command Rating of 3 to also keep Stanley,
since Fauconberg is not the current Leader—Fauconberg is
also only of Noble Rank 1. Exeter, Fauconberg and Hastings
move to Powys, spending one (1) MP (safe roads; see below)
since friendly controlled Lancaster and Northumberland are
currently stacked there. However, since Exeter is not an Heir
and does not have a Rank of at least three (3), he cannot pick
up either Lancaster (an Heir) or Northumberland (Rank = 3).
Instead, he drops Hastings and moves back to Shropshire with
Fauconberg (still one (1) MP due to safe roads since Stanley
was left in Shropshire!). Note that the Lancaster Player will
have to activate Lancaster or Northumberland to avoid ending
the Impulse with three (3) Blocks in Powys, or suffer possible
Attrition—though neither of these could lead Hastings, since
Hastings already moved once this Action Round.
16.2 Movement Costs
As noted above, each Moving
Stack has a total of four (4)
MPs (16.1). Each time a Moving Stack moves across a
border between Shires and/or
Foreign Nations, it expends MPs. The amount expended depends on the type of border crossed.
Border Type Rough (Solid Black)
Clear (Broken Black)
Sea Zone (Solid Black)
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Normal Safe Road
MP Cost MP Cost
2
1
1
Special
½
N/A
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16.2.1 Safe Roads
The unmodified cost to cross a land border is one half (½) of
the normal MP unmodified cost when the two Shires that share
the crossed border are both Friendly Controlled. Note that this
does not apply to the special Wash or Fens movement, below
(16.2.2 & 16.2.3), or to any movement cost additions via Event
text (e.g. “Bad Roads”).
Example: March—a York Heir—is currently in Huntington
and moves to Rutland (unoccupied) for one (1) MP, Leicester
(unoccupied) for ½ MP, Derby (occupied by a York stack)
for ½ MP and ends in Lancaster (two (2) MPs), spending
a total of four (4) MPs due to the safe roads in Rutland,
Leicester and Derby.
An Exile Box (7.3.1) may only be entered
during the Operations Phase of a Game
Turn, not during Wintering (27.0). A
Block may exit an Exile Box during the
Operations or Wintering Phases.
Exile Boxes are entered either via special
move due to Card play or special circumstances (in which case the Block is simply picked up and
placed in the designated Exile Box), or via regular movement.
The MP cost to enter or exit an Exile Box is 2 MPs by Land
Movement from an adjacent Shire. A stack must immediately
stop its movement for the rest of the Action Step upon entry
of an Exile Box.
““ The Irish Exile Box is only adjacent to the Pale of Ireland
16.2.2 The Fens
The water and swamp area
near Lincoln and Norfolk,
was treacherous to cross, even
in the best of circumstances.
These land borders are marked with a Skull icon and indicate
a special “Fens” border. A Moving Stack may cross any of the
Fens borders with Land Movement at a cost of two (2) MPs,
or utilize the special Fens movement noted below.
The cost to move across a Fens border via special Fens movement is one (1) MP. This form of movement is only allowed
across the indicated borders. This one MP cannot be reduced
by safe roads (16.2.1).
Any Block moving via special Fens movement or Retreating
across a Fens border must roll for Attrition (22.0). Note that
Force Marching (16.3) across a Fens border only incurs a single
Attrition check.
Design Note: This is the “two if by land, one if by water”
rule …in that it costs two (2) MP to cross these land borders
normally with no Attrition, but using the special Fens movement to cross costs only one (1) MP. However, there is a risk
of losing Steps from the Blocks that make the crossing at the
one (1) MP rate, as they must roll Attrition.
6.2.3 The Wash
16.2.4 Exile Boxes
The crossing between Lincoln
and Norfolk is referred to as
“the Wash”. A Player may
move from Lincoln to Norfolk (or vice versa) via the
Wash using a special “Wash”
movement.
The cost to move across the Wash using the special Wash movement is one (1) MP. This one (1) MP cannot be reduced for safe
roads above. In addition, any Block moving across the Wash
must roll for Attrition (22.0). Retreating or Evading across the
Wash is not permitted.
““ The France Exile Box is only adjacent to the Pale of Calais
““ The Scotland Exile Box is adjacent to both Cumberland
and Northumberland
Sea Movement (17.0) may also be used to enter Exile Boxes,
with the Scotland Exile Box being considered to be on both
the Irish Sea and the North Sea.
Immediately upon entering an Exile Box, decrease a Player’s
Popular Support by one (1); and, for each Turn that a Player
winters at least one Noble over in at least one Exile Box, their
Popular Support will decrease by one (1) again in the Clean-up
Phase (28.3.1).
Note that only a single Player’s Blocks may be in any given
Exile Box. Once a Player has their Block(s) in the Exile Box,
no other Player may place his Blocks there until the Exile Box
is once again vacant. Note that this means that there can never
be combat in an Exile Box!
Upon entry of an Exile Box, Blocks immediately drop to
Retainer Strength, unless led by the appropriate Officer or if
Hosting Queen Margaret (7.3.2 & 7.3.3).
16.3 Force March
After a Moving Stack has expended all of its four (4) MPs, the
Acting Player may move the Moving Stack to one adjacent
Shire or Exile Box by performing a Force March.
Once the Force March is announced it must be taken. To perform a Force March, the Acting Player declares which Blocks
from the Moving Stack will participate. The Leader always
participates, but it may move alone. The Leader and the chosen
Blocks must then move to any one adjacent Shire or Foreign
Nation (they cannot split up).
Each Block, including the Leader, making the Force March
suffers Attrition (22.0).
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Force Marches are subject to the following restrictions:
““ Not after Sea Movement (17.0).
““ Not across the Wash (Force Marching across the Fens is
allowed at no additional penalty).
““ Once per Impulse only (i.e., Blocks can only move to an
adjacent Shire once, until a new CC is played and they
are again selected for Movement).
““ Not after moving into a Shire containing Enemy Blocks,
even if those Blocks successfully Evade (16.6).
Example: Warwick has the Capt. of Calais Block attached
and moves with Suffolk into Essex with their fourth MP. The
controlling Player decides to have Warwick Force March to
an adjacent Shire, but leaves Suffolk in Essex. Both Blocks
would roll Attrition (22.0), with Warwick adding +1 to its
roll for being the Leader Block.
16.4 Pinning
When a stack enters a Shire containing Enemy Blocks (and
those Blocks do not Evade; see16.6), some of the moving
Blocks are required to end their movement in that Shire.
The number of moving Blocks that must end their movement is
equal to the number of Enemy Blocks in the Shire. These Blocks
are considered “Pinned”. Excess Blocks above the number of
Enemy Blocks may continue moving (with the stack Leader).
If the number of Enemy Blocks exceeds the number of moving
Blocks, all moving Blocks must stop and are all Pinned.
Place Pinned Blocks near the border from which they entered
the Shire, since it will be important to know from which Shire
these units arrived during combat (20.5.4).
Blocks that start their movement in a Shire with Enemy Blocks
are likewise Pinned. The Acting Player may move a stack out
of such a Shire, but must leave behind a number of Blocks in
the Shire equal to, or exceeding, the number of Enemy Blocks
in that Shire. Note: This means that the Blocks that cause the
moving force to be pinned will likewise be pinned and will
not be able to move if their chance to move comes in a later
Action Step.
A Block can be pinned from Wintering placement (27.0), as
well as from movement. The effects are the same.
Pinning does not prevent a Block from responding to an Event
(e.g., 14.1.1 & 14.2.1), but no Block in a Contested Shire may
be subject to a Writ (10.5.1), nor may they conduct Interception
into adjacent Shires (16.5).
16.5 Interception
Whenever a Moving Stack first enters a Shire that is adjacent
to a non-Contested Shire containing Enemy Blocks, the Enemy Player controlling those Blocks may attempt to Intercept
the Moving Stack. Players may not Intercept across the Wash
(16.2.3), but may Intercept across the Fens (16.2.2).
27
Enemy Players wishing to intercept must declare their intent. If
there are multiple possible Enemy Players wishing to Intercept,
the Enemy Player who conducts/conducted their Impulse earliest in the current Turn gets to make the attempt. Note that a
maximum of one (1) Interception attempt can be made for each
Shire entered (not one per Enemy Player!). The Enemy Player
making the attempt forms an Intercepting Stack with a Leader
and additional Blocks, just as a Moving Stack in the Movement
rules (16.1). Any Interception attempt must be resolved before
any Blocks in the Shire may attempt to Evade (16.6).
Design Note: Remember that negotiations are always allowed
in CoR, so Players are free to negotiate who should attempt
the Interception, or even whether they can be “talked out” of
Intercepting in the first place!
The Intercepting Player then rolls a single die and compares
the result with the Leader’s Command Rating. If the die roll is
less than or equal to the Leader’s CR, the Intercepting Stack
moves into the Shire with the Moving Stack. The Moving Stack
immediately stops in the current Shire and may not move any
more during this Impulse.
Note: The Intercepted Moving Stack may not use Evasion (16.6)
against a successful Interception..
If the die roll is higher than the Leader’s CR, the Intercepting Stack remains put. The Moving Stack may stop or may
continue moving up to the limits of MPs (16.2) and/or Force
Marching (16.3).
For the purpose of determining Engagement order (20.1), a
stack that entered the Shire through Interception is treated as
if it had moved there just before the Blocks it Intercepted, and
will be the Defender against those Blocks.
16.6 Evasion
After any Interception (16.5) attempt, if the Moving Stack
enters a Shire containing Enemy Blocks, Players controlling
those Enemy Blocks may be able to move some of them before
they are Pinned (16.4) by conducting an Evasion. Previously
Pinned Blocks may not Evade. In the situation where the Shire
is already Contested, the Enemy Player with the most Blocks
already in the Shire can attempt to Evade with their unpinned
Blocks (i.e., any Blocks of their choice exceeding the number of
Enemy Blocks currently occupying the Shire—do not consider
the currently moving Blocks).
Each Enemy Player may attempt only one Evasion with one
stack of Blocks each time another Player moves his Blocks into
a Shire. To attempt an Evasion, the Enemy Player must declare
the attempt and form an Evasion Stack with a Leader and additional Blocks, just like a Moving Stack in the Movement rules
(16.1). The Enemy Player then rolls one die.
If the roll is less than or equal to the Leader’s CR, the Leader and
its stack may Evade based on the Evasion requirements, below.
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Example: Lancaster and Oxford are in Lincoln when the
York Player moves Shrewsbury into the Shire. The Lancaster
Player, not wanting to be in combat or Pinned, attempts
to Evade and fails. Later in that impulse, the Buckingham
Player enters Lincoln with a stack including Stafford, Suffolk
and the Admiral Block. York controlled Shrewsbury cannot
Evade since Lancaster is the “Enemy Player with the most
Blocks already in the Shire”. Lancaster, seeing the writing
on the wall, attempts to Evade with the Lancaster Block (he
can only Evade with one (1) Block, since Shrewsbury Pins
the other) and rolls a 2. He waves goodbye to Oxford and
Retreats the Lancaster Block to an adjacent Shire.
Evading Blocks must move to an adjacent Shire subject to the
following restrictions:
““ Cannot Evade to any Shire containing Enemy Blocks
(even if the Shire also contains Friendly Blocks).
““ Cannot Evade by Sea Movement (17.0) or across the Wash
border between Lincoln and Norfolk (16.2.3).
““ All Blocks must Evade to the same Shire, and that Shire
must be one to which it would be possible to perform
legal Land Movement.
““ Cannot Evade across any border that Enemy Blocks
crossed to enter the Contested Shire.
““ Blocks can Evade across a Fens borders (16.2.2), but must
suffer Attrition with an additional –1 die roll modifier.
If there is no available Evasion route, the Enemy stack cannot
Evade. Evasions do not count as movement.
Blocks moving by Evasion cannot be Intercepted and Interceptions cannot be Evaded. If the Moving Stack still has MPs
available, it may continue moving—including following the
stack that just Evaded (assuming it has enough MPs). However,
note that it can not Force March (16.3).
An Evasion does not create a Victor for purposes of PostCombat (20.5.5).
Example (continued): Even if Norfolk was empty or Friendlycontrolled, Lancaster could not Retreat there since the only
way to move to that Shire from Lincoln would be via special
Wash movement. Instead, he has to Retreat to any other valid
adjacent Shire. If he Retreated to Huntingdon, Rutland or
Cambridge, he would suffer Attrition with a net +0 modifier
[+1 for Heir/Leader and –1 for Evasion across a Fens border].
17.0 Sea Movement
It costs three (3) OPS Points to
perform Sea Movement. To
conduct the Sea Movement, the
Acting Player forms a Sea
Movement Stack just like a
Moving Stack in Land Movement (16.1). The exception to this
is the Lord Admiral perform Sea Movement using only two (2)
OPS Points once per Game Turn (10.5.5).
The Sea Movement Stack then
moves to any other Coastal
Shire or Exile Box in the same
or an Adjacent Sea Zone. If the
Sea Movement Stack moves to a Shire or Exile Box in an Adjacent Sea Zone, each Block in the Sea Movement Stack must
roll for Attrition (22.0).
Blocks that move by sea must end their movement in the
destination Shire; they cannot remain at sea. The Blocks may
not conduct additional Land Movement (16.0) before, or after,
conducting a Sea Movement (including Force Marching; see
16.3). The destination Shire of a Sea Movement may contain
Enemy Blocks.
If a Sea Movement ends in a Shire containing Enemy Blocks,
those Blocks may Evade if eligible. Sea Movement may only
be Intercepted in the destination Shire—never while “at sea”.
Example: A York-controlled Shrewsbury—the current Lord
Admiral—is currently located in Chester (a Coastal Shire on
the Irish Sea), stacked with his Office Block and Clifford.
York plays a 3 OPS Value CC and chooses to use the Lord
Admiral’s once per Turn special ability for two of the three
OPS Points. He flips the Lord Admiral Parliament Card
upside down to indicate this, and sails Shrewsbury, the Lord
Admiral Block and Clifford to a Lancaster-occupied Devon.
Since Devon has a coast on the Irish Sea, no Attrition is suffered by the Sea Movement Stack. Lancaster, having a stack
both in Devon and in adjacent Somerset, attempts to first have
the Somerset Blocks Intercept the landing into Devon. This
fails when the Lancaster Player rolls a 6. Then the Lancaster
Player tries to have his stack in Devon Evade... which also
fails when he rolls another 6. He can only hope his string of
6’s continues to the combat portion of the Phase.
18.0 Mustering
A Noble in a Friendly Controlled Shire can Muster troops to
gain Combat Strength Steps. Mustering costs one (1) OPS Point
per step gained.
The maximum number of steps that can be Mustered in a Shire is equal to the Shire Value (7.2.1).
If the Shire is loyal to the Player House controlling the Noble, one (1) additional step can be
Mustered. Once the Mustering action is com-
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
pleted, if more than one step in total was Mustered from that
Shire in a single Player’s Action Step, place a Depleted marker in the Shire.
Design Note: On the off chance that there are already 10
Depleted markers on the map when an 11th is needed to be
placed, the Player who needs to place the marker must remove
one from any Shire with the lowest SV among those that are
Depleted, selecting from Shires that do not contain any of
that Player’s Blocks, if able.
All steps gained via Mustering must be added to Blocks located
in the Shire where they were Mustered, unless the Block performing the Mustering is the King. In that case, the King may
assign the steps to any friendly Block(s) not in Exile. Mustering
cannot be performed in a Shire that is Depleted, Devastated,
or Plundered.
Example: York has a stack of Blocks in Rutland (a pro-York
Shire). During the York Action Step, he plays a 3 OPS Card
and Musters two (2) steps in Rutland for two OPS Points.
He is able to do this since Rutland is pro-York (SV of 1, +1
for pro-York = two (2) maximum steps). He then places a
Depleted marker in Rutland, prohibiting any subsequent
Mustering in that Shire. Had he only Mustered one (1) step,
no Depleted marker would have been placed and Rutland
would have still been available for Players to Muster from
later in the Turn. Note that a Depleted marker would still
have been placed if he Mustered one (1) step with one (1)
OPS point, moved a stack with his second OPS point, and
then Mustered a second step in Rutland with his third OPS
point—as more than one step in total would have been Mustered in Rutland during the York Action step.
A Noble that Musters cannot voluntarily move during the rest
of the current Action Round, but can Evade (16.6), Intercept
(16.5) or participate in Combat (20.0). In addition, the Noble
is still permitted to respond to Events (14.1.1 & 14.2.1), and
can move if summoned by a Writ (10.5.1).
Events that refer to “Mustering” are affected by all the Mustering rules above. Events that do not explicitly use the word
“Muster” (e.g., Card #W4—“deploy” or Card #46—“gain”) are
not affected by any Mustering rules—including those Events
that prohibit Mustering, such as Manpower Shortage (Cards
#34 and #35).
19.0 Political Influence
It costs one (1) OPS Point to increase the amount of Influence
applied to a single Noble. This is considered taking a “Political
Influence action”.
The Player taking the Political Influence action selects one or more of
the IP Markers from his Stock and
places them face down, in secret,
on one Noble’s RoP Box. This
represents the economic benefits
29
the Noble family has been promised and political clout being
brought to bear to recruit them to the Player House’s cause.
Influence Markers may not be placed on a Noble’s RoP Box if:
““ There is a scenario restriction in place
““ The Box contains an Heir or Senior Heir marker (14.2.3)
““ The Box contains a face-down Block (indicating it is
Out of Play) or a face-up Block (indicating it is currently
Unavailable).
Any or all the IP Markers a Player has in his Stock, regardless
of the values, may be placed on a Noble’s RoP Box in this way.
However, at least one IP Marker must be placed. Note: Some IP
Markers have a value of zero (0), which can be used to obscure
bids and bluff, although a bid of only zero (0) IP Markers will
have no effect once revealed in the Parliament Phase (24.2).
IP Markers may be placed on any Noble’s Box, even if there
are Friendly or Enemy IP Markers already there, and regardless
of which House may be in control of that Noble at the time.
When a Noble with a Box on the RoP becomes an Heir (10.3
& 14.2.3), there will be an “Heir” marker on its corresponding
RoP Box as a reminder.
Note: Clarence is an exception to the above rule. He may
have Influence Markers played on him while a Junior Heir,
but not once he becomes the Senior Heir. He will only have
a “Senior Heir” marker placed on his RoP Box once he
becomes the York Senior Heir. Until that time, Players may
freely place Influence Markers on Clarence subject to the
restrictions of 10.3.5.
IP Markers on a Noble that become Unavailable (8.2), Out of
Play (8.2) or an Heir/Senior Heir (for Clarence) are immediately
removed and placed in the respective Player’s Unclaimed Pool
(i.e., they have no impact on the Noble).
20.0 Combat
Once all Players have completed their Action
Steps (13.2) for the current Impulse, Players
resolve all potential combats in a Combat Step.
A Battle is conducted in each Shire containing
Blocks controlled by two or more Players. Each
Battle will have a number of Engagements equal to the number
of Players in the Shire minus one (1) (see below), with each
Engagement lasting one or more Combat Rounds.
Design Note: The hierarchy is Combat Round < Engagement < Battle, in that one or more Combat Rounds make
up an Engagement between two Players, and one or more
Engagements make up a Battle in a Shire.
The order that Battles are resolved in is based on Player order
in the last Impulse played. The Player that went first picks any
Shire in which the initial Engagement of the Battle has him as
the first Attacker (see 20.1). After resolving all Engagements
in that Shire, the Player continues to pick Shires meeting the
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above requirement (i.e., where he is the attacker in the initial
Engagement). When the first Player is done with attacks, the
next Player gets to initiate Combat where he is the attacker
(see the following Design Note for more clarity). When he is
done, the third and fourth Players go, respectively. After each
Battle is resolved, conduct Post-Battle Events (20.7) before
resolving the next.
Design Note: This may seem a bit complicated at first read,
but it boils down to the first Player in the previous Impulse
gets to determine the order that combat is resolved for any
Shire where he is the attacker, then the next Player picks the
Shire order for Shires where they are the attacker, etc. Since
all Engagements in a Shire are resolved before picking the
next Shire, it only matters who is the attacker in the first
Engagement to be fought for the purpose of this rule.
Example: York, Lancaster and Warwick all have units in
Contested Shires. York went first, so he gets to resolve any
Shires that include York Blocks as the initial Attacker (and
either or both of Lancaster or Warwick Blocks defending)
in an order of his choosing. Warwick went second, so will
set the order to resolve any remaining Shires that contain
Warwick attackers and Lancaster or York defenders. Finally,
Lancaster would resolve any remaining Shires where Lancaster was the attacker.
20.1 Determine Attacker & Defender
Attackers in a Battle are chosen by a last-in,
first-out system – even if the “movement” was
by responding to/play of an Event or entering
from Undeclared. The Player who last moved
Blocks into the Shire is the first Attacker (the
last Blocks moved in by that Player establish the Engagement
order). The next to last Player to move Blocks in, or was already
in the Shire at the beginning of the Turn, is the first Defender
(the last Blocks moved in—or only Blocks of that Player if no
Blocks moved in—establish the Engagement order). Each such
pairing (one Attacker and one Defender) is an “Engagement”.
The Blocks that establish the Engagement order for each
Player will be the respective Starting Forces, with all other
Blocks being Reinforcements (see 20.3.1).
The sole exception to this is for Battles that result from placement of Blocks during the Wintering Phase. In such a case, the
King decides who will be the “Defender” and who will be the
“Attacker” (normal tie breaking rules—see 10.5.1—apply in
the case where there is no King at this point).
A stack that entered the Shire through Interception (16.5) is
treated as if it had moved there just before the Blocks they
intercepted, and will be the Defender against those Blocks.
20.2 Engagements
Battles are resolved one Engagement at a time between one
Attacker and one Defender. When there are Blocks of three or
four Players in a Shire, the Engagement is resolved between
the first pair of Attacker and Defender as described above. The
winner of that Engagement then becomes the Attacker and a new
Engagement is fought with a new Defender. The new Defender
is the remaining Player who moved his Blocks most recently
into the Shire. Repeat for the fourth Player if necessary.
Note that since Battles are fought between all of a Player’s
Blocks in a Shire, this may result in the Player with Blocks
originally in the Shire fighting as an Attacker or Defender earlier
in the Battle (see Examples, below).
Immediately prior to an Engagement being fought—even before Blocks are revealed—both Players may voluntarily avoid
combat, with either side (not both) Retreating. This must be
via a negotiated agreement and both Players must agree to
avoid combat, otherwise the Engagement must be fought.
Remember, agreements and negotiations are encouraged... but
are never binding!
Surprise Card sequencing in, or before, an Engagement can
be either a free-for-all or via the following sequence, at the
choice of the Players (decide before beginning the game). In a
free-for-all format, Players may play Surprise Cards at any time
based on the timing restrictions on the Card, and if there is a
disagreement on who plays when, the King (or see tie-breaker
rules (10.5.1) if no King) decides the order of Card play. The
same rules apply to declaring Ally abilities during, or before,
an Engagement. Should the Players desire a sequenced format,
the Houses not involved in the immediate Engagement must
decide first, in Impulse order, then the Attacker, and finally
the Defender.
Surprise Cards stating “Play before the start of an Engagement”
(e.g., Withdraw before Combat or Bad Weather Delays Attacks)
must be played before a Player selects his Main Force (20.4.1)
using the sequencing described above. Surprise Cards stating
“Play before the start of any combat round (round of combat)”
must be played after Main Forces are selected, but before the
opponents’ Blocks are revealed (note: both sides must give
ample time for Players to make the decision on Surprise Card
play before revealing their Main Forces). This can be before
any round of combat, not just the first. Treachery (Card #76) can
be played after forces are revealed, since its target is randomly
determined. Likewise, Cards that do not list a specific timing
(e.g., England for the English!) can be played at any time, even
after Blocks have been revealed. Sequencing of all Card play
is per the rules above.
Example (continued): Note that a Shire that had Lancaster
in the Shire first, then York entered, then Warwick entered
would be resolved during the Warwick portion of combat
resolution, as Warwick—not York—would be the Attacker
in the first Engagement (Warwick vs. York).
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Example 1: In a four player game, the Warwick Player has
a single Block currently in Sussex. The York Player, moving
second, moves York and the Lt. of Ireland Block into Sussex from Hampshire. Next, the Lancaster Player moves into
Sussex from Kent, but with only one Block. Not wanting to
be left out, the Buckingham Player—moving last—moves
Arundel and Hastings into Sussex, also through Hampshire
(now vacant). The Warwick Player decides to intercept this
last move with a stack in Surrey, and succeeds in bringing in
Warwick and the Capt. of Calais Block. None of the Players
desire to exercise their right to attempt an Evasion.
After all other Players have resolved Shires where they are
the Attacker, Buckingham gets to pick Sussex to resolve.
This is because the initial Engagement will be between the
Buckingham Player (Attacker) and the Warwick Player (Defender), due to the successful interception by Warwick—and
will include all the Warwick Blocks, including the one that
was originally in the Shire before any other Blocks. Warwick
wins and then is the Attacker against the lone Lancaster
Block. Another Warwick victory sees him the Attacker, again,
against the last remaining House—York.
Example 2: If the above occurred in London, note that
Warwick—having the single Block in London before any
other Players, would have the London Garrison attached.
The London Garrison would enter as a Reinforcement with
the single Block in the first Engagement between Warwick
and Buckingham.
Example 3: Continuing the above, this is slightly different in a
two player game. For example, in a two player game, Lancaster
has a Block in London and York moves a stack into London
to attack it. If Lancaster successfully Intercepts, he will still
be the last Defender in London and—since he had a Block
in London before York - will gain the benefit of the London
Garrison; though it will arrive as a reinforcement. This is because a successful Interception is taken to place those Blocks
in the Shire as the Defender against the Intercepted Force
(20.1) and the Blocks that Intercepted will be the Blocks that
establish the Engagement order.
CR). The order of bringing in Reinforcements is not otherwise
limited (exception: see 20.4.2) and a Player may “mix and
match” from various stacks that have arrived from different
movements than that of the Starting Force.
Example (continued): In the initial combat between Buckingham and Warwick, Warwick and the Capt. of Calais will be
the Starting Force since they were the group that established
the Engagement order. The single Warwick Block originally
in Sussex will enter as a Reinforcement in the second Combat Round.
Design Note: Players may want to line up stacks in order
of arrival as a way to remember sequencing. Also, spare Influence Markers can be used to keep track of the order in
which Blocks arrived into the Shire. As each force enters the
Shire, place a marker for the controlling House face down
in the Shire. Once Engagements start, pull markers off the
top of the stack to determine the next Attacker. We’ve also
included some “Attack!” and “Defend!” markers which can
be used to help remember which stack is the Defender and
Attacker (and from which direction they came) for each
Contested Shire. These can also be used to differentiate the
Starting Force from any Reinforcements.
20.3.2 Reserves
Reserves are Blocks that are currently involved in the Engagement, but not fighting in the current Combat Round. Reserve
Blocks are available to fight, but are not fighting due to Player
choice (20.4.1 & 20.4.2), Command Limits (20.4.4), etc., as
noted below. This is distinct from Reinforcements as Reinforcement Blocks are not available to fight as they have not yet
arrived to the Engagement.
20.4 Combat Rounds
Each Engagement between the Attacker and
Defender is fought in one or more Combat
Rounds, according to the sequence below, one
after the other until one side is eliminated or
voluntarily Retreats.
20.4.1 Force Selections – First Combat Round
20.3 Reinforcements and Reserves
20.3.1 Reinforcements
When different stacks controlled by the same Player are
involved in a combat with Enemy Blocks, the stack that determined the En-gagement order is the Starting Force and all
others are Reinforce-ments (even if arriving by Interception or
if previously in the Shire).
Stacks arriving as Reinforcements (i.e., all stacks except the
Starting Force; 20.1) participate in the Engagement in the
second and subsequent Combat Rounds (this is on the back
of the Combat Round marker to remind you). Starting on the
second Combat Round, each player with arriving Reinforcements must bring in a single stack of Reinforcements per the
normal Movement rules (16.1; noting a single Block leads the
movement and can lead up to additional Blocks based on its
The Defender forms his force first, then the Attacker according
to the following:
The Defender chooses a Leader for the Engagement. This must
be the most senior Heir (exception: Henry VI, who cannot lead
a force) if any are present in the Starting Force, otherwise,
the Defender must choose a Noble with the highest (or tied
for the highest) Rank in the Starting Force. Do not reveal this
Block yet.
Important: Remember, Rank is the number in the square in
the lower right corner of the Block.
The Defender may then choose Blocks, remaining from the Starting Force, if any, to fight with the Leader as the defending force
up to this Leader’s Command Rating. Blocks not cho-sen are
placed upright into the Reserves. The chosen Blocks, in total, will
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be referred to as the Defending Player’s “Main Force”, with the
non-chosen Blocks making up the Defending Player’s “Reserves”.
The Attacker then chooses his Leader, though for the first
Combat Round the Leader of the Attacking Force must be the
Noble that led the Attacking Player’s Starting Force into the
Shire. The Attacker may then choose Blocks, remaining from
the Starting Force, if any, to fight with the Leader as the attacking force up to this Leader’s Command Rating. Blocks not
chosen are placed upright into the Reserves.
Design Note: We recommend placing an “Attack!” marker on
the Leader Block when the first force enters the Defender’s
Shire as a reminder for which Block must be the Leader in
the first Combat Round.
Note that each Combat Round will always have a Main Force
(those Blocks that are fighting) and may have Reserve Blocks
(available Blocks, but not fighting in the current Combat Round)
and/or Reinforcement Blocks (Blocks not yet arrived at the
Battle). The “Starting Force” is simply the group of Blocks for
each Player that established the Engagement order.
Example: Continuing the above, the first Combat Round of
the first Engagement will be between the Warwick and the
Capt. of Calais Blocks as the defenders; and at least Arundel
for Buckingham (as Arundel had to have been the Leader
given that Hastings could not lead Arundel due to having a
lower Rank). The reason is that even though Warwick had a
single Block in the Shire first, it was the interception by the
Warwick and Capt. of Calais Blocks that established the first
Engagement; so those two Blocks are considered the Starting
Force. In establishing the Main Forces, for Buckingham, it
would be his choice as to whether to include Hastings in the
first Combat Round, or leave Hastings as a Reserve. Knowing that the Warwick Player has a Reinforcement coming
in Round 2, Buckingham decides to go “all in” and use both
Blocks in the Main Force in the first Combat Round. Likewise, the Warwick Player could choose to leave the Capt.
of Calais Block as a Reserve, but instead keeps him with
Warwick in the Main Force.
20.4.2 Force Selections – Second and Subsequent
Combat Rounds
First, assuming neither Player Retreated at the end of the previous Combat Round (20.5.4), each Player brings in any desired Reinforcements, should they have Reinforcement Blocks available.
A minimum of one (1) Reinforcement Block must be brought
in, with the maximum being based on the Command Rating of
the Block leading the Reinforcement Movement (20.3.1; 16.1).
After the first Combat Round, the Leader Block for the Main
Force must be chosen from among all Noble Blocks in the Shire,
including available Reinforcements. This may mean a Player is
required to bring in a more Senior Heir or higher Ranking Noble
if such a Block was not the Leader in the previous Combat
Round. Remember that Heirs always outrank non-Heirs, and a
Senior Heir outranks a Junior Heir (exception: Henry VI, who
cannot lead a force).
Next, each Player must determine/choose a Leader Block for
the next Combat Round, as outlined above. Note that a Player
may be required to change Leaders if a more senior Heir or
higher Rank Noble joined their force as a Reinforcement (see
20.4.1, above). The Defender selects first, then the Attacker.
Finally, each Player may move any of his Blocks currently
involved in the Combat to the Reserves and move Blocks from
the Reserves into his Main Force. These latter Blocks are known
as “Replacements”. The Defender conducts his Replacements
first, followed by the Attacker. Note that Blocks still waiting
to arrive as Reinforcements are not “currently involved in the
Combat”. Remember to ensure that the Main Force meets the
Command Limits of the current Leader Block!
Example (continued): When the additional War-wick Block
enters on Combat Round 2 as a Reinforcement, Warwick—an
Heir with the highest Rank in the game—must still be chosen
as the Leader for the second Combat Round.
Additional Example: Let us instead assume that Warwick
and the Capt. of Calais Block enter as Reinforcements on
Round 2, and that Warwick had a Starting Force with Fauconberg (Command Rating 3) and three other Blocks. In the
first Combat Round, the Warwick Player could fight with
all four Blocks (Fauconberg and the three Blocks he could
lead). However, on Combat Round 2, Warwick must be
chosen as the Leader for the next Combat Round, reducing
the maximum number of Blocks that could participate to
three (Warwick plus two other Blocks, given his Command
Rating of two). The other Blocks not chosen to fight would
be placed in the Reserves, to serve as Replacements later in
the Engagement.
Once all force selections are made, both Players reveal any
upright Blocks in their Attacking/Defending Force by tipping
them forward (to preserve their Combat Strength). Thus the
Blocks will have their current Combat Strength indicated by
the edge of the Block that is furthest from their controller.
20.4.3 Attached/Host Blocks
In general, all Blocks fight individually in Combat,
though Attached/Host Blocks (8.3.3) in the Main
Force with their Host/Attached Block (e.g., Offices, Margaret, Henry VI, etc.) may be allowed
to suffer associated losses if their Host/Attached
Block incurs Step Losses (20.5.3), including if those losses are
suffered when the Host Block is Charged, but not if the Host
Block did any Charging (20.5.1). Note that Office Blocks cannot choose a new Host Block (they are always associated with
the Noble holding the Parliament Card of that Office), but
other non-Office Attached Blocks may be given a new Host
each Combat Round (remember that Margaret and Henry VI
always use their special attachment rules; 10.3.3 and 10.3.4).
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Place any Attached Block(s) in the Main Force next to their
Host Block(s).
Attached Blocks (8.3.3) must be Attached to a Host Block to
fight in a Main Force; they cannot fight if they are not Attached
to a controlling Host Block. The sole exception is for Henry VI
and/or Margaret if they are the only available Block(s) (including Main Force and Reserves). Office Blocks are immediately
set aside with their Host Noble if their Host Noble is Eliminated
(reduced below Retainer Strength). Other Attached Blocks must
immediately be given a new Host per 8.3.3 (exception: Henry
VI if his Host Noble suffers a “Killed” result on the Elimination Chart – see 10.3.3).
If the only available Blocks in the Main Force and Reserves are
Mercenary Blocks, that side immediately cedes the field and
loses the Combat. The Mercenary Blocks then switch allegiance
to the Victor. The Victor takes the associated Mercenary Card
and attaches the Mercenary Block (at its current Strength) to a
valid Noble in the victorious force. If the Victor has no valid
Nobles (either all are eliminated or none may Host), all Mercenary Blocks turn rogue and plunder the Shire. All Mercenary
Blocks go Inactive (8.2), place a Plundered marker in the Shire,
and discard the Mercenary Card.
Design Note: Since most Attached Blocks count against a
Leader’s Command Rating (below), there may be times when
a controlling Player leaves the Attached Block as a Reserve,
even though its original Host Block is in the Main Force.
20.4.4 Command Limits
The maximum number of Blocks that can fight with a Leader
is equal to the Leader’s Command Rating Value (which is
the Leader’s Command Limit, exactly as done for Movement
purposes). Office Blocks do count against this limit and can be
detached from their Officer Noble if desired (e.g., to be placed
in Reserve).
20.5 Combat Resolution
20.5.1 Battle Charges
First, each Player must decide if any of his Blocks
are able to conduct a Battle Charge, and whether they wish to do so.
The only Blocks which may conduct a Battle
Charge are Heirs in the Attacking or Defending Main Force. A
maximum of one Heir per Player may make a Battle Charge.
The Attacker decides first, followed by the current Defender.
Note: Neither Henry VI nor Margaret may conduct a Battle
Charge. Their Host Blocks cannot Charge either, unless the
Host Block is a valid Heir Block.
If the Attacker decides to make a Battle Charge, he designates
a single Enemy Block as the target of the Charge [hereafter: the
“target Block”]. Then, the Defender—if also Charging—designates a target Block. A Charging Defender can be the target
Block of the Attacker’s Charge, and can choose the Attacker’s
Charging Heir as his target Block (but does not have to). If
both Players Charge, the Charges are considered simultaneous.
33
Each Charging Heir makes a Charge Attack Roll against its
target Block (resolved as per Line Combat in 20.5.2, but with a
+1 modifier to each die rolled). Blocks Attached to the Charging
Heir (Office or otherwise) are ignored and have no effect on
the Battle Charge, nor can they take associated losses (20.4.3).
If the target Block is also Charging, it still conducts its Charge
as above. If a Charging Defender picks a Charging Attacker
(regardless of which Block is the target Block of the Charging
Attacker), the two Charging Heirs will only roll their Charge
Attack Rolls.
If a target Block is not also Charging, the target Block (but
not any of its Attached Blocks) makes a Charge Defense Roll
against the Heir that is Charging it (no +1 modifier applies
and resolve as per Line Combat in 20.5.2) All Step Losses are
resolved simultaneously. Blocks that are not involved in the
Charge (i.e. all Blocks other than the Charging Block and the
target Block) do not roll yet. However, Blocks Attached to a
Non-Charging target Block (not to a Charging Heir!) may
absorb step losses per 20.4.3, and if Eliminated at this point,
will not get to conduct their Line Combat Rolls.
Target Blocks that are reduced below Retainer Strength must
immediately roll on the Elimination Chart (20.6.1) with a –2
modifier. Do not wait until the Post-Engagement Actions.
Heirs that conduct a Battle Charge may not attack
in subsequent Line Combat, however, target
Blocks may if they were not eliminated. Mark
any Heir(s) that Charged with a “Charge!”
marker as a reminder that they may not attack in
Line Combat (they may still suffer losses in regular Line Combat per 20.5.3).
Remember: Noble Blocks are not considered Heirs until their
Heir Card is In-Play. Until that time, they will not receive any
of the benefits available to Heirs (Battle Charge, +1 on attrition rolls, etc.).
Design Note: Deciding when to Charge with your Heir is
always a tough decision, as you are opening your Heir up to
damage from return fire (that can’t be spread to other Blocks).
However, if you have the opportunity to Charge a reduced
strength enemy Heir before you think he is going to Retreat,
you might reduce him below Retainer Strength and force him
to roll on the Elimination Chart with a –2 modifier. And that
is a great way to maximize your chance of eliminating him!
Example: Gloucester, a York Heir, charges at (targets) Exeter,
a Lancaster Heir, who is also conducting a Battle Charge.
However, Exeter targets the York-controlled Warwick Block.
Gloucester rolls for his Charge—with a +1 modifier—against
Exeter, Exeter rolls for his Charge at Warwick—also with a
+1 modifier; and Warwick rolls back at Exeter, with no modifier (note: Exeter does not get to roll back at Gloucester since
Exeter is Charging himself ). All results are resolved simultaneously. If Exeter decided to counter-Charge Gloucester
instead, they would both roll with a +1 modifier against each
other and that is it.
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20.5.2 Line Combat Rolls
Each Block in the Main Force of both Players, excluding Heirs
that conducted a Battle Charge (above), roll a number and type
of dice indicated by their current Combat Strength. In-Play Ally
Cards may be discarded at this time to provide Line Combat
dice before any dice are rolled. Those extra dice are rolled as if
they appeared on a Block’s Combat Strength, but only function
for the current Combat Round.
The Attacker rolls first, followed by the Defender—but all
results are applied simultaneously. Roll for each Block individually before rolling for the next Block, applying damage
only after all Blocks have rolled for both sides. Total all hits
scored by each Player and apply damage to the Enemy Force
as specified below (20.5.3).
Design Note: In a Battle where the Marshall or a King able
to use the Marshall’s once per Turn ability are not present,
all combat dice can be rolled together as there are no Events
that allow for re-rolling a single Block’s combat dice.
A hit is scored when the die roll is equal to or greater than the
number of pips shown on the Block’s Combat Strength.
Example: A full-strength Richmond will roll two blue dice
and one green die. Richmond scores a hit for each blue die
result of 5 or 6, and for a green die result of a 6—a maximum
of three (3) possible hits.
Example: The Attacker inflicts four hits on the Defender.
The Defender has four Blocks in his Main Force. One Block
is strength three (3), one is strength two (2), and the other
two are strength one (1). The Defender applies the first hit to
the “strongest” Block, which is strength three (3), reducing it
to strength two (2). The second hit can be applied to either
Block that is now strength two (2) (they are both “strongest”),
reducing one of them to strength one (1). Now the remaining
Block that is strength two (2) is the “strongest”, so it takes
the third hit. After this, all Blocks are strength one (1). The
Defender may now choose which Block takes the fourth hit
since they are all “strongest”. If the strength three (3) Block
had the Admiral Office Block Attached and in the Main
Force (as one of the strength two (2) Blocks), the owning
Player could have applied the first two hits to the three (3)
strength Block, but taken the Step Losses on the Attached
Admiral Block, eliminating it. The last two Step Losses would
then be applied as above.
20.5.4 Retreat Decision
After the second and subsequent Combat Rounds, each Player
has the option to Retreat from the Battle (i.e., all combats last
a minimum of two rounds!), with the Attacker choosing first.
Only one Player may Retreat, so only if the Attacker declines
does the Defender get a chance to do so. When a Player chooses
to retreat, all of their remaining Blocks (even Reinforcements
that have not yet entered the combat) must retreat.
20.5.3 Damage Allocation
Note that Retreats forced by Card Play may occur before, or
after, any Combat Round, even before or after the first Combat
Round. Cards that require a legal Retreat path (see below) have
no effect if played when the Enemy Blocks cannot legally retreat
(a retreat across a Fens border is a legal retreat path; albeit one
that requires an Attrition roll!).
The strongest Block is the one with the largest strength points,
which is the number of dice in its current Combat Strength (the
color of the dice is irrelevant). If there is more than one Block
tied for strongest, the controlling Player chooses which Block
will suffer the Step Loss.
The Attacker must Retreat back to a Shire from which he entered
the Battle if possible; otherwise, he may Retreat to any other
valid Shire, subject to the Retreat Path Restrictions below. A
Defender may Retreat to any valid Shire. If no valid Retreat
path exists for an Attacker (or Defender), all Retreating Blocks
are placed in the owner’s Undeclared Pool.
The Attacker’s hits are applied to the Defender’s Blocks and
vice versa. One at a time, apply each hit to the strongest (see
below) Enemy Block as one (1) Step Loss. Once that Block has
taken its Step Loss, re-evaluate which Block is the strongest,
and apply the next hit and so on until all hits are applied.
Rotate the Block 90 degrees counter-clockwise for each Step
Loss it suffers. Blocks that suffer a Step Loss while at Retainer
Strength are eliminated. Move them to the side, for now. Their
true fate will be determined in the Post-Engagement Actions
(20.6.1).
Note: If the Attack is solely as a result of Wintering placement, the Attacker cannot Retreat to “the Shire from which he
entered the Battle”.
If a Noble has an Attached Block in the Main Force (i.e., not as
a Reserve), hits applied to the Noble or its Attached Block may
be taken as a Step Loss by either, according to the controlling
Player’s choice.
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
The Lancaster House Card
“Queen Margaret Proclaims
a Love Day” is unique in
that it affects all Battles.
Each Battle is determined as
outlined above, along with
determination of which
House is the Attacker in
each Engagement fought in
each Battle. Resolving one
Battle at a time, each and
every Attacker must Retreat
in order. If no valid Retreat
path exists for an Attacker,
all attacking Blocks are
placed in the owner’s Undeclared Pool.
Example: Going back to the Warwick, York, Lancaster and
Buckingham example in Sussex above, if Lancaster played
the “Love Day” card before any Engagements were fought,
Buckingham would be forced to Retreat first, as he was the
first Attacker. However, since Enemy stacks entered the Shire
though all three borders (remember, York also entered Sussex
via Hampshire), the Buckingham Blocks would be removed
from the map and placed in the Buckingham Player’s Undeclared Pool. Warwick, who entered the Shire next to last with
his Intercepting stack, is the next Attacker and Retreats all
his Blocks to Surrey. Lancaster, who entered right before
Warwick, Retreats his lone Block to Kent, and York breathes
a sigh of relief as he is now the controller of Sussex. Note that
York also would have been forced to the Undeclared Pool if he
had to Retreat, as Buckingham’s entry via Hampshire would
likewise keep York from Retreating to that Shire.
If a Player declares a Retreat and his Retreating force includes
an Heir, the other Player involved in the combat may discard a
3 OPS Card (including a House Card) from his hand to conduct
a Pursuit, which will cancel that Retreat. The Retreating Player
then has the option of discarding one of his 3 OPS Cards (if any)
to resume the Retreat, and so-on until one Player is unwilling or
unable to discard in this way. No replacement Card(s) are drawn
for any Cards used for Pursuit or to resume a Retreat.
Retreat Procedure: The owning Player groups all Blocks into
stacks of one or more Blocks following the normal movement
rules (16.1). Then, one stack at a time, the Player Retreats his
stacks per the Retreat requirements (which may result in overstacking if an Attacker must Retreat all forces into a Shire from
which he entered the Battle).
Retreat Path Restrictions: Retreating Blocks must move to
an adjacent Shire subject to the following restrictions:
35
““ Cannot Retreat across any border that Enemy Blocks
crossed to enter the Contested Shire (even if they came
across that same border!).
““ Blocks can Retreat across a Fens border (16.2.2), but must
suffer Attrition with an additional –1 die roll modifier.
A Player may Retreat to a Shire with rebels, but must immediately deal with the rebels per 14.2.1.
If neither side chooses to Retreat, another Combat Round is
fought. It is not possible for both sides to Retreat. If either Player
chose to Retreat, perform Post-Engagement Actions (20.6) and
conduct the next Battle, if any.
Note: Remember that Combat is broken down as follows: each
contested Shire has one Battle, which has one or more Engagements, with each Engagement having one or more Combat
Rounds. After the second Combat Round, both sides have the
option to Retreat (Attacker chooses first).
20.5.5 Engagement Victor Determination
If, at this point, only one Player has non-Mercenary Blocks
in their Main Force and Reserves (of the two Houses that just
fought the Engagement), that House is the Victor of the current
Engagement. Proceed to “Post-Engagement Actions”, below
(20.6). Note that Reinforcements that have not yet entered the
Combat do not count for the determination of who is the Victor in an Engagement. See 20.4.3 if one or both Players have
only Mercenary Blocks left in their Main Force and Reserves.
Otherwise, increase the Combat Round marker by 1 and continue the Engagement until only one Player (of the two that
are currently fighting the Engagement) has Blocks remaining
in the Battle.
If there are additional Engagements to be fought and the Victor has Reinforcements to enter, see 20.6.2. If there are no
additional Engagements to be fought, the Victor enters all
their Reinforcements at this time. The losing side must always
Retreat all of their Reinforcements that had not yet entered the
Engagement (20.5.4).
Optional “Where do you think you’re going?” Rule:
For Players desiring even more blood and chaos during
their Battles, the following rule can be used: If a Victor is
about to be declared for an Engagement where neither side
Retreated, but the losing side has Reinforcements that have
not yet entered the Engagement, either Player may choose to
prolong the Engagement. If the Engagement is prolonged; a
Victor is not declared, and the Player who would have lost
does not Retreat their Reinforcing Blocks. Instead, a new
Combat Round is fought with the regular determination of
new Main Forces and the bringing in of any applicable Reinforcements (20.3.1).
““ Cannot Retreat to any Shire containing Enemy Blocks
(even if the Shire also contains Friendly Blocks).
““ Cannot Retreat by sea or across the Wash (16.2.3).
““ All Blocks from one stack must Retreat to the same Shire,
and that Shire must be one to which it would be possible
to perform Legal Land Movement.
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20.6 Post-Engagement Actions
20.6.1 Block Status Determination
Each Noble that was eliminated in an Engagement (20.5.3)
must roll one die, apply any applicable modifiers and consult
the below Elimination Chart for the appropriate effect. Do not
make a check for Blocks that successfully Retreated before being eliminated. Office Blocks and other non-Noble Blocks that
are eliminated are automatically Inactive (see Killed Blocks,
below) and placed off the board until they are gained back
through normal means (e.g., play of the appropriate Card or
winning of the appropriate Office). The exceptions are Henry
VI, who is considered Killed and Out of Play if his Block is
eliminated in an Engagement (20.5.3) or if his Host Block is
Killed from a roll on the Elimination Chart (10.3.3); and Margaret, who has special rules regarding her elimination (10.3.4).
Elimination Chart (1d6)
Die Roll Result 0-3 Killed 4-5 Wounded
6+ Wounded Blocks
It was only a flesh wound. Noble Blocks become Inactive
(and are placed next to the game board) and Heir Blocks
become Undeclared (place in the controller’s Undeclared
Pool) (see Block States, 8.2).
If the wounded Noble held any Offices, the corresponding
Office Block(s) and Card(s) are lost and placed off map.
Adjust the Popular Support Track and Influence Track to
account for loss of the Office. Office Blocks and the Office
Card associated with a wounded Heir are kept with the Heir
and are not lost.
Escaped/Retreated Blocks
Effect
Noble = Unavailable
Heir = Out of Play
Noble = Inactive
Heir = Undeclared
Escaped
If Henry VI was Attached (8.3.3) to the just Killed Noble
at the time that the Noble was eliminated, Henry VI is immediately considered to have also been Killed and is placed
Out of Play, as noted above.
All = Undeclared
Elimination Die Roll Modifiers:
+2 if Block was eliminated by an Attrition roll
+1 if Enemy force Retreated
+1 if Block is an Heir*
–2 if Block was eliminated by a Battle Charge
* Does not apply if Heir reduced below Retainer Strength in an
Engagement.
The modifiers for a force Retreating are if the remaining, noneliminated Blocks Retreated (versus a force being entirely
eliminated in the Engagement).
Killed Blocks
The Block was either killed in the Battle or captured and
executed shortly thereafter. Heir Blocks are placed Out of
Play (face down on Parliament or back in the game box).
Any Office Block(s) become Inactive. Noble Blocks become
Unavailable (place face-up on the RoP Box) (see Block
States, 8.2).
If the Killed Noble held any Offices, the corresponding Office Block(s) and Card(s) are lost and placed off map. Adjust
the Popular Support Track and Influence Track to account
for loss of the Office.
Remember that if the Office Block itself was eliminated, it
is removed from the map as noted above (without rolling on
the Elimination Chart). The Player keeps the Office Card and
the Noble maintains the Office abilities (exception: the +1 to
Command Rating associated with the King Block per 10.5.1).
Only the Office Block is lost. The Office Block will be reattached to the new Officer in the next Office Phase (26.0).
If this result was obtained, it looked much worse than it was.
The Nobles becomes Undeclared (place in the controller’s
Undeclared Pool) (see Block States, 8.2). Office Blocks and
Office Cards associated with an escaped/Retreated Noble are
kept with the Noble and are not lost.
20.6.2 Check for Subsequent Engagements
If the Shire where the Engagement was just fought is still contested, return back to Force Selections—First Combat Round
(20.4.1), with the Victor of the previous Engagement being the
Attacker for the subsequent Engagement. Otherwise, proceed
to “Post-Battle Actions”, below (20.7).
If there are additional Engagements to be fought, the current
Victor may enter one set of Reinforcements (20.3.1) before
resolving the next Engagement. All remaining Reinforcements
will be Reinforcements during the next Engagement.
Example: York, Buckingham and Lancaster are fighting over
London, with several Blocks between them. The initial Main
Force has Lancaster, Command Rating 2, leading himself
and two (2) additional Blocks against a single Buckingham
Block. Waiting as Lancaster Reinforcements—from stacks
that entered prior to Lancaster—are four (4) additional
Blocks. Assuming that Lancaster wins on Combat Round
1, the Lancaster Player may enter one set of Reinforcements before fighting the first Combat Round against York.
Lancaster decides to enter Stanley as Leader, with Ormonde
(Stanley has CR = 1, so can only lead 1 additional Block). The
remaining two (2) Lancaster Reinforcement Blocks will have
to wait until Combat Round 2 in the Engagement against
York before they can enter the fight.
20.7 Post-Battle Actions
20.7.1 Battle Victor Determination
After the Battle is resolved (i.e., all Engagements are complete
in the single Shire), the Player whose Blocks remain in the
Shire, if any, is declared the Victor. If no Player has Blocks
remaining, then no-one is declared Victor.
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If any Heirs were present in any Enemy force fought in the
Shire, the Victor receives a +1 increase to his Popular Support
Value.
21.0 Post-Operations Phase Actions
Design Note: Note that the Victor need not have fought an
Engagement against the Heir, only that one of the losing
Houses had an Heir involved in combat in that Shire!
After all Battles have been completed, Stacking Limits in every
Shire are checked (even for those where there were no Battles
fought!). Each Player that has a number of Blocks in a Shire
exceeding the Stacking Limit (7.2.9, equal to Shire Value +1)
must roll for Attrition (22.0) for each of their Blocks in the Shire
(i.e., if two Players exceed the Stacking Limit in a Shire, both
Players would need to roll for Attrition for all of their Blocks).
Note that the only modifier to these Attrition rolls is whether the
Block is an Heir (there is no “Leader Block” when the Blocks
are not moving or fighting…).
20.7.2 Post-Battle Movement
First, if there are any surviving non-Office attached Blocks
(e.g., Welsh, Burgundians, etc), attach them to any valid Block
in the Victor’s force (8.3.3). If there are no valid Blocks to Host
them (for instance, if the only Block that survived the Battle
was one of these Blocks), place these surviving Attached Blocks
into the owner’s Undeclared Pool (exception: Margaret and/
or Henry VI, as they can exist in a Shire without a Host Block;
see 10.3.3 & 10.3.4).
Important exception: If Henry VI and/or Margaret are the sole
surviving Blocks, instead of remaining in the Shire, the Lancaster Player may immediately place them into any valid Exile
Box. If no valid Exile Boxes exist (i.e., they are all occupied by
non-Lancaster forces), the Lancaster Player may place them
into his Undeclared Pool.
If the Victor’s Blocks violate the Stacking Limit in the Battle
Shire, at this time he may move Blocks according to the below
restrictions until his remaining Blocks equal the Stacking Limit
(he may not reduce below the Stacking Limit, though). Obviously, if there are no valid movement paths the Victor may not
move any Blocks from the Shire. The Victor may choose to
leave his Blocks in violation of the Stacking Limit by not moving any Blocks out, or only moving some of the excess Blocks.
Post-Battle Movement Restrictions: Blocks may move to an
adjacent Shire (only) subject to the following restrictions:
21.1 Stacking Check
As noted in the Attrition rules, Blocks reduced below Retainer
Strength in this way roll on the Elimination Chart with a +2
die roll modifier.
Example: If, after a Battle in Kent, the York Player had five
(5) Blocks remaining, he would have to make Attrition rolls
for each of his five (5) Blocks. Assuming one of his Blocks
was an Heir, that Block would suffer a Step Loss on a roll of
a ‘1’ and the other four Blocks would suffer a Step Loss on
a roll of a ‘1’ or ‘2’.
21.2 Block Facing
Any Blocks in a Shire that are still revealed are returned to
their hidden state by tipping the Block backwards towards the
Player, such that the current Combat Strength is indicated by
the top edge of the Block.
21.3 London Garrison
Reset the London Garrison (9.6) to its full Combat Strength.
““ Cannot move to any Shire containing Enemy Blocks (even
if the Shire also contains Friendly Blocks).
““ Cannot move by sea or across the Wash (16.2.3).
““ Blocks can move across a Fens border (16.2.2), and do
so without suffering Attrition.
Example: Lancaster gangs up on a York stack in Derby
(Stack-ing Limit = 2), bringing in two (2) stacks totaling four
(4) Blocks. Assuming Lancaster is the Victor after resolution
of all Engagements in Derby, he may reduce his stack size
to two (2) Blocks (total), assuming he has a legal movement
paths for two (2) Blocks. He may not reduce below two (2),
and may choose to leave all four (4) Blocks in the Shire and
suffer Attrition.
22.0 Attrition
In certain circumstances, Players will be forced to suffer potential Attrition to their Blocks. Attrition represents the gradual
degradation of fighting capabilities—represented in the game
by lost Steps on the Blocks. In all cases, a non-Noble Block at
Retainer Strength that suffers a Step Loss due to Attrition will
be removed from the map and become Inactive. A Noble Block
(remember, all Heirs are Nobles) that suffers a Step Loss due
to Attrition while at Retainer Strength rolls on the Elimination
Chart with a +2 die roll modifier.
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Players earn IPs for the following:
For each Block suffering Attrition, roll a single d6.
Attrition Chart (1d6)
Die Roll 1-2 3+ 23.1.1 Controlled Shires
Result
Occupied: Each Shire occupied by at least one Friendly
Block earns the controlling Player a number of IPs equal to
the Shire Value (7.2.1). Shires with a Shire Loyalty (7.2.2)
in the Player’s color add one to this.
Lose 1 Step
No Effect
Attrition Die Roll Modifiers:
+1 if the Block is an Heir1—or—if the Block is the Leader
Block1, 2 and
–1 for any Block Retreating or Evading across a “Fens” border (remember: neither Retreats nor Evasions can occur
between Lincoln and Norfolk, i.e., across the Wash)
Notes:
1
These modifiers are not cumulative—a maximum of one +1 drm may
be obtained even for an Heir who is also a Leader Block.
2
The Leader Block drm does not apply for Attrition suffered due to
Stacking Limit violation (21.1).
Example: March—a York Heir—will only lose a Step due
to Attrition on a roll of a 1 (+1 = 2), unless March is forced
to Retreat across a Fens border; in which case, March will
lose a Step on a roll of a 1 or 2. If reduced below Retainer
Strength by this Step Loss, March would roll on the Elimination Chart with a net +3 due to the +1 for being an Heir
and +2 for Attrition loss (i.e., an Heir will never be killed for
failing an Attrition roll).
23.0 Influence Phase
Unoccupied: Empty Shires loyal to the Player’s House
(7.2.2) earn one (1) IP for the controlling Player.
Enemy-controlled Shires and Shires marked with a Devastated
or Plundered marker earn the Player no IPs, even if that Shire
is loyal to their House. Note that there will be no Contested
Shires (7.2.8) at this point in the game (all Contested Shires
were resolved during the previous Combat Step).
23.1.2 Home Estates (Optional Rule)
Each Shire occupied by one or more Blocks possessing at least
one Home Estate in that Shire (7.2.3-7.2.6) earns its controlling
Player one (1) IP.
Example: The Noble holding the Lord Admiral Office gains
one (1) IP to the Player if in Dorset, Hampshire or one of
the Noble’s own Home Estates.
23.1.3 Offices
In this Phase, Players will collect Influence Markers for their accomplishments during the Turn,
and add them to their Stock. Influence Points
(IPs) can be used in two ways: in the Office Phase
(26.0) to bid on Offices or during an Operations
Phase to influence Nobles (19.0). Once earned, they can be
used im-mediately (i.e., the same Turn) or saved for future use.
Important: this Phase is skipped when the Turn ends by play
of the Affairs of State Card.
Each Player calculates the total sum of all IPs earned this Turn
(see below) and adjusts his marker (small wooden cylinder of
their House color) on the Influence Track to that number. This
is their net “IPs gained” for the Turn. Once so marked, Players
may freely take a number of IP Markers from their Unclaimed
Pool with a total IP value equal to their gained IPs. These are
taken face-up and may include any and all 0 value IP Markers in
the Unclaimed Pool (remember, Players may also make change
at any time). After insuring the proper value of IP Markers have
been taken, each Player adds these new IP Markers face-down
to their Stock (9.1).
Each Office Card specifies the number of IPs earned by the
Player who’s Noble holds that Office; e.g., The Lord Admiral
grants two (2) IPs.
23.1.4 Ally Cards
Some In-Play Ally Cards can be discarded at this time to gain
IPs, while some Ally Cards provide an IP bonus while In-Play.
Each Player should check his In-Play Ally Cards for any bonuses granted to him and add to these bonus IPs to his total (if
automatic, or if discarded).
23.1.5 Popular Support
The Popular Support Track specifies the number of IPs earned
by the Player as indicated by the Player’s marker on the track.
Example: At a Popular Support Level of four (4), the Player
earns two (2) bonus IPs.
Design Note: Don’t add to the number from last Turn...use
the Block to only indicate the current total of IPs gained!
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24.0 King Phase
(Including Affairs of State)
For every Game Turn, the King Phase is conducted at this
point. This includes when the Affairs of State Mandatory Card
is played during an Operations Phase Impulse (only the Influence Phase is skipped).
24.1 Non-Parliamentary Steps
Several steps are conducted in the King Phase, two related to
non-Parliament activities and several related to the politics of
voting on the current King and obtaining Offices. First, the
non-Parliament activities are performed.
24.1.1 Check for Military Victory
Each Player counts the number of non-Devastated Shires he
controls that are loyal to another Player. Include in this count
any Shires that are loyal (i.e., have a Shire Loyalty per 7.2.2)
to Players that have been eliminated this Game Turn, but not if
they were eliminated in a prior Game Turn. Do not count any
Shires loyal to Houses for which there is no active Player in
the game (e.g., do not count Shires loyal to Warwick (blue) in
three-player games).
Design Note: At this point, there should be no Blocks on
the map except those in Exile or still on the RoP. All controlled Nobles and Office Blocks should be in front of their
corresponding Player face-up, and all other non-Noble Blocks
are removed per 24.1.2.
24.2.1 Gather Supporters
Players determine, by the procedure below, if they have gained
control of any Nobles based on IP bids on the RoP.
For each RoP Box that has IP Markers on it, do the following
(in order):
1. Select a Noble
The current King (see 10.5.1 if no King) selects any one
Noble with IP Markers on its RoP Box. The exact order of
selection is up to the King/selecting Player.
2. Compare IP Totals
Reveal and total each Player’s Influence Markers on the
selected Noble, with each IP Marker being worth the number printed on it. To these totals, add any of the following
applicable bonuses to determine each Player’s effective bid:
Tendency Bonus
Each Player then counts the number of nonDevastated Shires he controls that are loyal to
his House. Compare these totals to the Military
Victory conditions to see if any Player has
achieved a Military Victory (6.1).
24.1.2 Remove Event Items
If any rebel markers from Planned Uprisings are still on the
map, remove them at this time.
If still In-Play, the following Mercenary Blocks become Inactive (8.2):
““ Burgundians
““ French
““ Scots
IP Threshold
Tendency Bonus: Some Parliament Boxes have a number
of colored Rose icons, indicating the tendency of a Noble
to side with a particular House. If the corresponding Player
House placed a non-zero bid on the Noble’s Box, increase
their bid by the number of rose icons.
Example: The Lancaster Player placed a 1, 3 and 5 IP
Marker on Beaumont. For Beaumont, Lancaster’s effective bid, so far, is eleven (11) because of the two red Rose
icons (1 + 3 + 5 = 9; with +2 = 11).
Ally Bonus: At this point, within the order determined by
the King (or per 10.5.1, if no King), Players must choose
whether they are using any “Add X Ally Influence” discard
abilities to place IPs on the indicated Noble.
3. Compare IP to Threshold
““ Welsh
24.2 Attending Parliament
After the above actions, each Player prepares his Nobles to attend Parliament, vote on the new King, and bid on all Offices.
Every controlled Noble that is not in Exile must attend Parliament (including those in a Player’s Undeclared Pool). Nobles
in Exile may not attend Parliament—leave them where they
are for now. Move all attending Nobles and any attached Office Blocks to a place near, but off, the game board, placing
them face-up at this time. Take care to remember which Player
controls which Block.
If there is a tie for the highest effective bid (“bid”, hereafter),
there is no change in control of the Noble. Continue checking
the remaining bids on other Nobles.
If a single Player has the highest bid, they compare it to
the Influence Threshold in the Noble’s Parliament Box (the
large number in the lower right corner). If the bid is equal to
or higher than the threshold, the Player gains control of the
Noble and places it in front of him with his other controlled
Nobles (if any). If controlled by another Player at the time,
that other Player loses control of the Noble. Any Offices held
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by a Noble switching allegiance also switch with the Noble
(be sure to adjust the Popular Support Track at this time).
Example: Game
Tu r n 4 s t a r t s
with York cont r o l l i n g Wa r
wick, but during
the Turn Lancaster places
three hidden IP
Markers (totaling nine (9) IPs) on Warwick. York, seeing that Lancaster is making a play at taking control of Warwick, but
not know-ing how strongly, places two hidden IP Markers of his own on Warwick (totaling four (4) IPs). York
gets a three IP bonus from the white Roses, so feels this
should be enough.
During the King
Phase they reveal
the IP totals on
t h e Wa r - w i c k
Box in the Roll
of Parlia-ment.
The York Player
grimaces as he
sees the nine (9) IPs for Lancaster, knowing that the four
(4) IPs he put there are lost… and so is Warwick! The
ef-fective bid totals are nine (9) for Lancaster and seven
(7) for York. Warwick’s Rank will now count towards
Lan-caster’s total of votes for King—an eight (8) vote
swing in favor of Lancaster!
Example 2: As above, but let us assume that Lancaster
placed only seven (7) IPs on Warwick. When the IP
Mark-ers are revealed, Warwick would remain under York
control since both effective bids are seven (7). A tie for
highest bid leaves control of the Noble as is. If Lancaster
had an Ally with a “Add X Ally Influence” discard ability,
they could utilize it now, after seeing the revealed IP’s.
Example 3: If Lancaster is the only Player to bid on Warwick, but placed only three (3) IP Points then this is not
enough to meet Warwick’s threshold of four. Control of
Warwick would remain with York. Note that some Events
(and the Chancellor’s once per Turn ability) allow for
move-ment of IP Markers on the RoP, so this scenario is
definitely possible in a game!
4. Remove IP
Whether or not any Player gained control of the Noble, place
all IP Markers which were on the Noble’s RoP Box back
into their respective Unclaimed Pool.
5. Send to Parliament
Players place these newly controlled Nobles with those that
are attending Parliament. These Nobles are now In-Play
controlled by the respective Player.
6. Select the next Noble
If there are still Nobles with IP Markers on their RoP box,
return to step 1, above.
24.2.2 Available Votes
Each Player calculates the number of votes his
House will have in Parliament. This is the sum
of:
““ …the rank values of the Ranks of all controlled Noble in
attendance; plus
““ …the sum of all Office Bonus votes (specified on the
Office Card) for all controlled Nobles in attendance who
hold an Office, plus
““ …any bonus Votes from Ally Cards that are discarded at
this time; plus
““ …any bonus votes from the Popular Support Track.
This total is the effective number of votes for the Player for
the current Game Turn. Votes cannot be saved from previous
Turns, so this value solely represents the current Turn’s votes.
Mark this total on the Influence Track by using the “Total
Votes” marker.
Important: Don’t add to the number from last Turn… use the
marker to only indicate the current total of available votes!
24.2.3 Vote for King
Each Player places his set of four (4) “Support”
markers face down in front of him: one for each
House in the game.
Players should then feel free to converse, debate,
and make deals, etc. before deciding how they
will vote. However, no deals are binding by any game rule.
Treachery and political backstabbing are allowed and should
be expected (and even encouraged!).
All Players vote, but each Player may only vote for a House
that has a living, Senior Heir that has attended Parliament.
When a Player is ready to cast his vote, he secretly selects one
“Support” marker from those in front of him and places it into
his hand and keeps it hidden until all Players have made their
choice. This is whom the Player will be voting for as the next
King. Players may not abstain from voting and must select a
valid Support marker when voting for the King.
Design Note: In a two-player game, this effectively means
that the only Support markers that will be used will be “York”
and “Lancaster”, as these are the only two Houses that will
have In-Play Heirs.
Once all Players have made their choice, the markers are simultaneously revealed. The number of votes cast for a Player House
to be King is the sum total of the effective votes (marked on
the track above) from each Player who chose a corresponding
“Support” marker for that Player House. Adjust each Player’s
“Total Votes” marker to correspond to their sum total (note:
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a Player House with no Heir will end on the zero (0) box).
The order of these markers will be important for placement of
Nobles during the Wintering Phase.
Design Note: Don’t add these new values to the current “Total
Votes” marker value, instead, adjust the Total Votes marker
to reflect your new vote total for just this Turn.
Players may discard any In-Play Ally Cards they control
which provide a vote bonus to increase their vote total at this
time. Record this increase on the Influence Track by moving
the Player’s marker the appropriate amount. If more than one
Player discards Ally Cards at this point, the King may dictate
the order that those discard are made in.
If there is a tie between two or more Houses see 10.5.1 for
tie-breaking rules, considering there is no King at this point
of the game.
Example: In a three-player game, the Buckingham Player
has 12 votes based on Noble Ranks, etc., the York Player 10
and the Lancaster Player 15. Only the York and Lancaster
Player have their Senior Heir at Parliament, so Buckingham
cannot be King. York convinces Buckingham to vote for him,
with a promise of helping to clear Lancaster from any one
Buckingham Home Estate next Turn, so Buckingham secretly
selects the York “Support” marker. When revealed, Lancaster
has 15 votes (no surprise there, he voted for himself ) and the
York Player has 22 (10 for his votes + 12 from Buckingham).
The York Total Votes marker is adjusted to “22”, Lancaster
stays at “15”, and Buckingham’s drops to zero (0). Next Turn,
York’s Senior Heir will be King and Buckingham can only
hope that he keeps his “campaign promises”.
25.0 Victory Check Phase
If no Player has yet achieved a Military Victory (6.1), check
to see if any Player has achieved a Political Victory (6.2). If
no Player has achieved a Political Victory, check to see if any
Player has achieved an Economic Automatic Victory, if playing
with this rule (6.3).
If it is the last Game Turn and no Player has won via a Military
or Political Victory, then the Player with the most accumulated
Economic Victory Points is the winner (6.3), if playing with this
rule. If tied, the winner is determined by the following, in order:
““ The Player with the most turns as King.
““ The Player with the most IP Value in his Stock.
““ The Player currently controlling the King Block.
““ The Player that last controlled the King Block (if no
current King).
26.0 Office Phase
After determining the new King and if no Player
has just won the game, the Players now determine
which, if any, Offices will be held by the various
Nobles in attendance at Parliament.
26.1 End of Terms
The Officers’ terms have expired. The King gathers and shuffles
all the non-King Office Cards (10.5), and places them face down
in a stack near the game board (including those from Nobles
that did not attend Parliament for whatever reason).
The Player who won the vote takes the King Office Card, places it in front of him, and puts the
King marker on his Senior Heir Card. If the Heir
is not Henry VI, he attaches the purple-colored
Office Block labeled “The King” Block to the Heir
Block at full Combat Strength.
Each Player adjusts his marker on the Support Track based on
any Officer bonuses that have been lost (even though this may
be temporary). Detach and return any Blocks acquired from
Office Cards and return all Office markers to the Vacant Offices
holding box on the map.
Design Note: What this means is that if Henry VI is the
Lancaster Senior Heir and they win the Office of the King,
the Lancaster Player does not get all the benefits of being
King (see 10.3.3).
The King then draws
the top Office Card
and reveals it to all
Players. Players who
wish to bid on the revealed Office secretly
select any number of
IP Markers (represent-ing political
votes/influence, as
well as economic influence) from their Stock and place them hidden into their
hand—this is their “bid”. They also place one “Support”
marker in their hand, as well. This marker indicates for which
Player the bid will count.
Decrease the Popular Support Track value for the previous
King’s House by three (3) points. Then the Player with the
current King increases his Support Track Value by three (3)
points, as indicated on the King Office Card. Of course, if the
same Player is King again this Turn, the Support Track Value
does not change.
Advance the “Turns as King” marker one space to the right for
the Player who now controls the newly elected King.
26.2 Determine New Officers
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Example: A Player could place an IP Marker with a value of
three (3) in their hand, along with their York Support marker
to cast three (3) votes for York to have the revealed Office.
The Player who won the Office takes the Office Card and
places in front of himself. The Player also chooses a Friendlycontrolled Noble or Heir in attendance at Parliament to hold
the Office.
Do not forget the zero-value IP Markers to use for bluffing.
Note that a Player may only cast a vote for a Player that has a
Noble capable of holding the Office (i.e., one that is attending
Parliament and has the capability to hold the Office should it be
won; see 26.3). This includes Players voting for themselves or
other Players. Players are not required to bid on any Offices—it
is solely at their discretion.
Optional Rule: Players may always vote for an Office other
than the Chancellor and King, even if they do not have a valid
Noble in Parliament to hold the Office. If that Player wins the
Office, they may either leave the Office Vacant or bestow it
upon any Noble currently in attendance that can hold the Office and accepts it.
Example: Buckingham has had a bad series of events this
Turn and finds himself with only one Noble in attendance
at Parliament. He wins the Chancellor Office, but when
the Treasurer Office comes up for vote he cannot vote for
himself. Nor can anyone else vote for Buckingham to win
it, since a Noble may only hold one of King, Chancellor or
Treasurer; and the lone Buckingham Noble already holds the
Chancellor Office.
Players should feel free to negotiate, barter, and make promises in order to secure an Office for themselves. Remember,
however, that no agreements are binding.
Once all Players have made their choice, the bids are simultaneously revealed. The number of votes bid for a Player House
is the sum total of all bids (i.e., IP Marker Values) placed in
anyone’s hand with the corresponding House “Support” marker.
The Player with the highest non-zero bid wins the Office (ties
broken according to 10.5.1).
Example: The Office of Lord Admiral is currently up for vote.
The York Player places a 1 and 3 IP Marker in his hand with
a “Support” Marker having the York shield. The Lancaster
Player places a 5 IP Marker in his hand with a “Support”
Marker hav-ing the Lancaster shield, and the Buckingham
Player places a 2 and a 3 IP Marker with a “Support” Marker
having the Buckingham shield. When the votes are revealed,
both Lan-caster and Buckingham are tied at five (5) IPs.
The current King would get to decide which of Lancaster or
Buckingham was willing to make the best “deal” to be named
Lord Admiral…
Place the IP Markers used for all Player’s bids back into their
Unclaimed Pools. They are considered spent and cannot be
used for subsequent bids. Place the Support marker aside for
use in the next bid.
Place the corresponding Office marker on the Heir
Card or on the Noble’s RoP Box if not an Heir.
That Noble/Heir is said to be an “Officer”.
low (26.3).
Attach (8.3.3) the appropriately labeled purplecolored Office Block at full Combat Strength the
Noble Block who is the Officer (e.g., the Treasurer Block with the Noble selected to be Treasurer, etc.), subject to the restrictions listed be-
Adjust the Player’s Popular Support amount if the Office Card
indicates a Support Bonus.
Repeat the procedure above until all Office Cards have been
flipped over.
26.3 Office Limits
Important: A Noble/Heir may hold only one of King, Chancellor
or Treasurer (the “big three”). Otherwise, a Noble/Heir may
hold a number of Offices equal to his Command Rating. The
exceptions to the above are:
““ The current King may never hold any additional Offices.
““ Henry VI may only hold the Office of the King (he may
never be awarded a non-King Office)
““ Margaret is not allowed to hold any Office (much to her
annoyance, we are sure!).
If a Player is found to have won an Office, but does not have
a valid Noble to hold the Office, it is immediately awarded to
the House with the next highest bid total, if any.
26.4 Vacant Offices
Players are not required to bid on any Office, and it
may be that no Offices are awarded at all. Any Office
that is not presently held by a Noble should have
the Office marker flipped to its “Vacant” side and
set near the game board where all Players can see.
If no Player wins the Chancellor Office, the
Player with the lowest “IPs gained” value on the
Influence Track (23.0) and a Noble capable of
holding the Chancellor Office is awarded the Office as if he had successfully bid and won this
Office. If the Player with the lowest IPs gained does not have
a Noble capable of holding the Chancellor’s Office, then the
Office is awarded to the Player having the next lowest value of
IPs gained, and so on, until a Player with a valid Noble capable
of holding the Office is found (if any).
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27.0 Wintering Phase
43
27.3 Place Officers
27.1 Ally Cards
In-Play Ally Cards (14.2.2) are kept In-Play until their benefit
is used.
27.2 Place Nobles
In order from highest to lowest votes received in vote for King
(24.2.3) (ties broken according to 10.5.1), Players first decide
if any of their Nobles currently in an Exile Box (7.3.1) wish to
remain in their current Exile Box. If a Player chooses to have
Blocks come out of Exile, immediately place them with that
Player’s Nobles that attended Parliament. Nobles that stay in
Exile are simply left on the map in their current Exile Box.
These Nobles will be at Retainer Strength unless led by the appropriate Officer or if Hosting Queen Margaret (7.3.2 & 7.3.3).
Then, in the same order, Players alternate placing one nonOfficer Noble they control (which attended Parliament or left
Exile) onto the map at full strength in any Home Estate (7.2.37.2.6) for that Noble. This placement is done so that the Block
is hidden from your opponents.
Henry VI and/or Margaret may be placed along with a Host at
this point (using either the Host’s Home Estate(s) or one of their
Home Estates), or may wait and be placed later. Even when
being placed later, Margaret and/or Henry VI may designate a
non-placed Host Noble (Officer or non-Officer) to be placed
with their Block according to 27.3 or 27.4.
If there is a question on whether a Home Estate is available for
placement, the placing Player must reveal his Block, designate
a valid Home Estate and only if the already present Block occupies that Home Estate must it be revealed.
Example: At the start of placement of the non-Officer
Nobles, Lancaster designates Somerset (holding no Offices) as the Host for both Henry VI (the current King) and
Margaret. He could place all three (3) Blocks during 27.2
(as Somerset is a non-Officer) or at the end of 27.3 (as the
King is Ranking 1 and places last). Had he not designated
Somerset as the Host for Margaret, he could have placed her
Block separately per 27.4.
A Player having no unplaced non-Officer Heirs may pass instead
of placing a Noble; if they do so, the remaining non-Officer
Nobles controlled by that Player become Undeclared (8.2) and
are moved to that Player’s Undeclared Pool.
Players continue taking turns placing their non-Officer Nobles
(or passing) until all Player-controlled, non-Officer Nobles are
in Shires, Exile Boxes, or Player Undeclared Pools (as a result
of passing).
Design Note: Once all the Offices have been bid on, Players
begin returning their Nobles to the map. The first Nobles to
return are those without any Office, as this allows the Of-ficer
Nobles to see where enemy formations are gathering before
returning from Parliament.
In order from lowest (Ranking 8) to highest (Ranking 1) Officer Ranking (shown below), Players take turns placing one
Officer Noble with attached Office Block(s) they control onto
the map in any Home Estate, corresponding Office Estate or,
if appropriate, Crown Estate (7.2.3-7.2.6) for that Noble. The
Noble and Office Block are placed at full strength.
Officers must be placed on the map. Players may not pass if they
control an Officer. For Nobles holding multiple Offices, place
the Noble when it is the time for its highest Ranking (closest
to 1) Office. Officers must be placed with their attached Office
Blocks at this time. If an unplaced Henry VI is King and he
already has a designated Noble as his Host, both Blocks (Henry
VI and the Host) are placed per the King’s Ranking. Valid Home
Estates are those for either Block, or Crown Estates.
Example: Warwick holds the Office of Treasurer (Ranking 3)
and Admiral (Ranking 5). After the Lord Captain (Ranking
6) is placed, players will skip to the Lord Marshall (Ranking 4) and then place Warwick with both the Treasurer and
Admiral Office Blocks, as the Treasurer with its Ranking of
3 is the highest Ranking Office held by Warwick.
Office Ranking is shown on the Parliament Cards and Offices
are listed below in descending Ranking order (i.e., Ranking 1
is the highest Ranking Officer):
1. His Majesty the King of England
2. Lord Chancellor of England
3. Lord Treasurer of the Exchequer
4. Lord Earl Marshal
5. Lord High Admiral
6. Lord Captain of Calais and the Pale
7. Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and the Pale
8. Lord Warden of the North Marches
27.4 Place Other Blocks
If not already placed or Out-of-Play (8.2), place
Henry VI with a Lancaster-controlled Host Noble
of Rank two (2) or more (10.3.3). Note that if
Henry VI is currently in Exile, there are limitations on his placement (see 10.3.3 – can’t change
Exile Boxes).
Even if Margaret of Anjou was eliminated in
Battle, place her with a Lancaster-controlled Host
Noble of Rank two (2) or more (10.3.4) if not
previously placed. However, if Henry VI and
Prince Edward/Lancaster have been removed from
play, she does not return. Note that if Queen Margaret is currently in Exile, there are limitations on her placement (see
10.3.4 – can’t change Exile Boxes).
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
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Crown of Roses Rule Book
27.5 Multiple Houses in a Shire
If after placement, Blocks controlled by two or more Houses
occupy a single Shire, follow the normal Pinning rules (16.4)
during the upcoming Impulse. Combat will be determined after
the first Impulse with the King deciding which House is the
Defender (20.1), if the order is not changed due to other Blocks
entering the Shire during the Impulse.
28.0 Clean-Up Phase
28.1 Marker and Block Adjustment
First remove all the Depleted markers (9.3). Then
replace all Plundered and Devastated markers
(9.3) with Depleted markers (on the back of the
Plundered markers). If, for whatever reason,
when replacing a Devastated marker with a
Depleted marker there are none available, simply remove the
Devastated marker and return the Shire to good order.
All Unavailable Blocks become Inactive (8.2) (i.e., move faceup Blocks from the Roll of Parliament off of, but next to the
game board).
If face-down, flip over the Queen Margaret of Anjou Card (Lancaster House Card) and any flipped Parliament Cards (10.5).
28.2 Held Cards
Some Heir Cards, when InPlay, allow a Player to keep
a number of Operation
Cards in their hand between
turns. These abilities are not
cumulative (i.e., having two
Heirs with “You may hold
up to one Card between
turns…” only allows a Player to hold one Card between
turns). If allowed per above,
each Player decides which
(if any) non-House Cards to
hold for next Game Turn,
and discards the rest. Remember that Mandatory
Cards must be held and do
count towards the above limit! House Cards may never be
discarded and are always held for free.
28.3.2 Held Mandatory Cards
If the Player is forced to hold any Mandatory Cards, reduce
that Player’s Popular Support by the OPS Value of any held
Mandatory Card(s). Exception: there is no reduction of Popular
Support for held Mandatory Cards if the Operations Phase
ended due to play of the Affairs of State Card.
28.3.3 No Junior Heir
Any Player without an In-Play Junior Heir and who had an Heir
Card that was capable of being played during the Operations
Phase of the just completed Game Turn reduces his Popular
Support by one (1) [Note: a Junior Heir in an Exile Box does
count for the purposes of this rule]. “Capable of being played”
means that the Player had a valid Heir Card for the current Game
Turn and at least one Impulse with no Junior Heir In-Play (i.e.,
if you lose an Heir in the final combat step of the Operations
Phase, you will never lose Popular Support; as you would not
have had an opportunity to play a new Heir).
Example: On the last Impulse of the Operations Phase, one
of York’s current Heirs gets killed. York will not lose a point
of Popular Support this Game Turn, since he did not have a
chance to play an Heir Card after his Heir was killed. Next
Turn, York intends to play his last Heir Card, but Lancaster
plays Affairs of State before York plays his Heir. At the end
of the Turn, he loses one (1) point of Popular Support for not
having a Junior Heir In-Play, since he had at least one Impulse
where he could have played the Heir Card. Not wanting to
suffer another loss in Support, York plays his last Heir at the
start of the following Turn—only to see the Heir killed off
in the very same Impulse. York will no longer be subject to
the penalty for not having a Junior Heir since he no longer
has any additional Heir cards to play. His last Heir is In-Play
as his lone (Senior) Heir.
28.4 Turn Advances
Advance the Turn Marker one space to the next Game Turn.
28.3 Popular Support Adjustments
28.3.1 Blocks in Exile
Each Player that currently has one or more
Blocks in Exile (7.3.1-7.3.3) loses one (1)
point of Popular Support (i.e., a maximum
of one (1) point per Player, regardless of
the number of Blocks that particular
Player has in Exile).
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Rule Book
29.0 Glossary
45
Heir (8.3.2): A Noble Block with a played (i.e., face up) Heir
Card. All Heirs are Nobles, but not all Nobles are Heirs.
Attached Blocks (8.3.3): Blocks that require being Attached
to a Host Block to function normally. These include all Office
Blocks, all Mercenary Blocks (24.1.2), Henry VI and Margaret.
These are the only Blocks that may Attach to a Host Block.
Attrition (22.0): The gradual wearing down of the combat effectiveness of a Block as represented by Step Losses. Attrition
occurs when you exceed the Stacking Limits (7.2.9), Force
March (16.3), use special Fens (16.2.2) or Wash (16.2.3) movement, or perform an Adjacent Sea Zone Sea Movement (17.0).
Battle (20.0): Overall combat between two or more Players in
a Shire. Each Battle involves one or more Engagements (20.2),
each of which lasts one or more Combat Rounds (20.4).
Battle Charge (20.5.1): A special form of Combat allowed only
to Heir Blocks, granting +1 drm to each of their attack dice.
Coastal Shire (7.4): A Shire that is adjacent to a Sea. Cornwall
is a Coastal Shire for both the Irish Sea and the English Channel
and Suffolk is a Coastal Shire for both the North Sea and the
English Channel. Sea Movement (17.0) must begin and end in
a Coastal Shire.
Combat Round (20.4): Part of an Engagement (20.2). Selecting force compositions, rolling dice, allocating damage (20.5.3)
and conducting Retreats (20.5.4).
Combat Strength/Strength Points (20.5.3): The number (and
occasionally, color) of dice icons on a Block’s top edge.
Command Card (CC) (13.1): The single Card that each Player
places face down in front of him for play during that Impulse.
Command Rating/Command Limit: The number of other
Blocks a Noble can lead in Movement (16.1) or in Combat
(20.4.4), in a circle at the lower-left of the Block.
Contested Shires (7.2.8): A Shire with two or more Player’s
Blocks in it.
Controlled Shires (7.2.8): A Shire that contains a Player’s
Blocks or an SL box of the Player’s color and no Blocks.
Controlling Player (14.2.1): The Player that played an OPS
card used as a Raid or Planned Uprising Event. The Controlling
Player determines which Shire is affected and rolls any Battle
dice against the Responding Noble.
Host (8.3.3 & 20.4.3): A Block that has at least one other Block
attached to it.
Impulse Order (13.2): The final order, after any ties are decided
by the King (10.5.1), of players in a single Impulse. Goes from
highest OPS Value CC to lowest OPS Value CC.
In-Play (8.2): Any Block controlled by a Player that occupies
a Shire or Exile Box.
Inactive (8.2): Any Block not controlled by any Player and
kept off-map. It may come into play via Influence.
Influence Points (IPs): A “commodity” in the game generally
representing a Player’s House’s economic and political influence. They are gained by control of Shires, Offices and certain
Events (23.0). A Player’s IPs are usually located in one of three
spots: their Unclaimed Pool (IPs not yet earned); their Stock
(those IPs available to be used by the Player); or on a Noble’s
box on the Roll of Parliament (attempting to win that Noble
to the Player’s side).
Junior Heir (10.3.2): When a Player has two active Heirs, the
Heir with the higher Heir number on its Card.
Leader: For movement, a Block designated to move either
alone, or with additional Blocks up to their Command Rating
(16.1). For combat, a Block designated to fight a Combat Round
either alone, or with additional Blocks up to their Command
Rating (20.4.1). The Leader may change each Combat Round.
Main Force: The forces of the Attacking and Defending Player
that are fighting each other in a Combat Round (20.4). This
is distinguishable from those Blocks that are not fighting in
that Combat Round, but could have been (i.e., Reserves; see
20.3.2), and from those that have not yet arrived at the Battle
(i.e., Reinforcements; see 20.3.1).
Mercenary Blocks (24.1.2): The Blocks brought in by play of
the French, Burgundian, Welsh and Scots Cards.
Movement Points (MPs) (16.1): The amount of movement
each stack can do when activated. Generally equal to four (4)
MPs, though can be increased by Force March (16.3).
Neutral Shires (7.2.8): A Shire with no Blocks and a black
SL box.
d6 (or D6): The roll of one six sided die numbered one each
of 1 through 6 (no cheating with all 6’s for you!)
Out of Play (8.2): Any Block face-down on its RoP Box (or put
back in the game box). It does not return for the rest of the game.
DRM (Die Roll Modifier): A modifier, either plus or minus,
that is applied to a roll of a d6 to get a final, modified result.
Parliament: A major house of government in England, where
Nobles would meet and govern (and scheme and backstab!). For
game purposes, it generally is represented by the King Phase
(24.0), Victory Check Phase (25.0) and Office Phase (26.0),
where the King for the next Game Turn is determined, autovictory conditions are checked, and the other Offices voted on.
Engagement (20.2): Part of a Battle. The resolution of combat
between two Players.
Exile Boxes (7.3.1): The playable areas outside of England
proper that represent a Noble hiding out in the countryside.
Force March (16.3): A special type of movement that allows
a Leader and any led Blocks to move one additional Shire.
Foreign Nation (7.3.1): Scotland and the areas represented by
Exile Boxes are considered Foreign Nation territory and, except
for the Exile Boxes, may not be entered.
Rank (Noble Rank): Only on Noble and Officer Blocks (8.3.1),
located in a square at the lower-right of the Block. Used for
determining who can lead for Movement (16.1) and Combat
(20.4.1), and also plays a part in determining the number of
votes in the King Phases (24.2.2).
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
46
Crown of Roses Rule Book
Ranking (Officer Ranking) (27.3): The order of importance
of each Office, starting with the King (Ranking 1, the highest
Ranking) and going to the Lord Warden of the North Marches
(Ranking 8, the lowest Ranking).
Reinforcements (20.3.1): Blocks that came to a Battle after the
Main Force. Reinforcements enter starting on Combat Round
2, at a rate of one (1) Leader and appropriately led Blocks per
Combat Round.
Reserves (20.3.2): Blocks involved in a Battle in a Shire that are
not currently fighting in a Combat Round; either due to Player
decision or due to having a Leader with insufficient Command
Rating to lead all the Blocks in the Battle.
Responding Noble (14.2.1): The Noble that responds to a Raid
or Planned Uprising Event. Must have a Home Estate in the
Shire and Officers have first choice to respond.
Retainer Strength (8.3): The weakest Combat Strength of a
Block before it is removed from the map; i.e., the last combat
step of a Block.
Roll of Parliament (RoP) (7.1.5): The portion of the game
board showing which Nobles are eligible to be Influenced.
Sea Zone (7.4): Used interchangeably with “sea”, there are
three Sea Zones that break the water around England into three
regions: Irish Sea, North Sea and the English Channel.
Senior Heir (10.3.2): Sole Heir, or the Heir with the lower
Heir number on its Card.
Shire (7.2): A playable land area on the map, generally corresponding to separate regions of England during the game period.
Shire Loyalty (SL) (7.2.2): The color of box in each Shire:
Black = none; White = York; Red = Lancaster; Yellow = Buckingham; and Blue = Warwick.
Shire Value (SV) (7.2.1): The number in the box in each Shire.
Stacking Limit (7.2.9): The number of blocks of each player
that may occupy a Shire. All Shires have a Stacking Limit of
the Shire Value plus 1. Exceeding the Stacking Limit at the end
of all Battle resolutions will result in Attrition (22.0).
Starting Force (20.4.1): The first group of Blocks that fight in
an Engagement. Includes a Leader and may include additional
Blocks up to the Leader’s Command Rating. The Starting Force
is the group of Blocks that determined the Engagement order.
Stock (9.1): The number of IPs available to a Player to use on
various activities; such as influencing Nobles by placement on
the RoP (19.0) or attempting to purchase Offices (26.0).
Unavailable (8.2): Any Block that is face-up on its RoP Box.
It becomes Inactive next Turn.
Unclaimed Pool (9.1): The remaining of a Player’s IP Markers that are not currently available to a Player to use by being
in his Stock. A Player may always make change between his
Stock and Unclaimed Pool, but may only take 0 IP Markers
when gathering new IPs during the Influence Phase.
Undeclared (8.2): Any Block controlled, but off-map in a
Player’s Undeclared Pool.
30.0 Card Errata
1.Cards, in general: Any reference on the Cards to “IP Tokens”
should be taken as “IP Markers”.
2.Card W3: First sentence should read: “Play at the start of
any Combat Round before Blocks are revealed. ”
3.Card B3: First sentence should read: “Play at the start of
any Combat Round before Blocks are revealed.”
4.Card Y4: First sentence should read: “Play at the start of
any Combat Round before Blocks are revealed.”
5.Cards 9, 13, and 15: “Active” should be “Activate”.
6.Card 12: “house” should be capitalized to “House”.
7.Card 41: The second sentence should be ignored and deleted.
8.Cards 49, 52, 55 and 56: Red text at bottom should read:
“Card and Block Remain In-Play until Eliminated in Combat
or King Phase, whichever comes first” (or just “Discard Card
and Block during the King Phase if In-Play”).
9.Card 49: After “English Channel”, it should also read:
“(except London)”.
10. Card 52: After “English Channel”, it should also read:
“(except London)”.
11. Cards 58 and 59: Red text at bottom should read: “Card
Remains In-Play until after Combat Step” (or just “Discard
Card after Combat Step”).
12. Card 64:First sentence should read: “Play at the start of
an Engagement before Blocks are revealed.”
13. Card 67: First sentence should read: “Play at the start of
any Combat Round before Blocks are revealed.”
14. Card 72: Last line of red text at bottom should read: “Remains In-Play until end of current Impulse/Battle, per above”
(or just “Discard after current Impulse/Battle, per above”).
15. Card 74: First sentence should read: “Play when one of
your stacks is Intercepted.”
16. Card 76: First sentence should read: “Play only during an
Engagement involving a friendly-controlled Block”.
17. Card 77: First sentence should read: “Play at the start of
any Combat Round before Blocks are revealed.”
18. Card 78: The black-print card text should read: “Play at the
start of any Combat Round before Blocks are revealed. Select
any enemy Block in the battle. If the Block is an Heir, Margaret
or Henry VI, nothing happens. Otherwise, roll one die and if
greater than the Block’s Rank, that Block (and any Attached
Office Blocks) must Retreat. Office Blocks and a Noble unable to Retreat become Undeclared. Mercenaries automatically
become Inactive if selected. See 20.4.3 if a new Host is needed
for a non-Office Block.”
Wintering (27.0): The portion of the game where Blocks are
returned to the map after Parliament.
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
Crown of Roses Rule Book
Credits
Game Design: Stephen A. Cuyler
Development: Andrew Young and Kevin Bernatz
Art Director, Cover Art & Package Design: Rodger B.
MacGowan
Map: Knut Grünitz
Counters & Stickers: Charles Kibler
Manuals, Cards & Player Aid Cards: Charles Kibler
Player Mats: Stephen A. Cuyler,
Rules Editing: Kevin Bernatz, Nick Drochak, and William Place
Playtesters: Wendell Albright, Mark Beazer, Steph Brochu, Michael Debije, Walter Devore, Michael Drueen,
Daniel Harrison, Paul Haseler, Donal Hegarty, Neil Henning, Dan Hyer, Les Kramer, John Lapham, Kenneth Li,
Ric Manns, Nate Merchant, Scott Moore, Brian Morris,
Michael S. Owens, Kevin Rohrer, and William O’Neal
Playtest Artwork: Stephen A. Cuyler, Rodger B. MacGowan, David Rayner, and Nathan Trimmer
Proofreaders: Hans Korting, Nick Drochak and Wendell
Albright
Production Coordination: Tony Curtis
Producers: Tony Curtis, Rodger MacGowan, Andy Lewis,
Gene Billingsley, and Mark Simonitch VASSAL Support:
Joel Toppen, Tim McCarron
Special Thanks: The Rochester Boardgaming Society,
Millennium Games, Neil Randall, Andy Lewis, Mark
Godson, Armorial Gold
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
47
48
Crown of Roses Rule Book
Grid
Noble Arundel Audley Beaumont Buckingham (B)
Clarence (Y)
Clifford de Ros Devon Essex Exeter (L) Fauconberg (W)
Hastings Herbert Kent Lovel Montague (W)
Norfolk Northumberland
Ormonde Oxford Pembroke (L)
Richmond (L)
Home Estate(s)
Flint, Surrey, Sussex
Derby
Lincoln, Norfolk
East Riding, Stafford, Powys, Buckingham,
Gloucester, Kent
Ireland, West Riding, Shropshire, Powys, Hereford,
Hertford
Westmorland, Lincoln
North Riding
Devon, Dorset
Essex
Bedford, Devon
North Riding, East Riding
Leicester
Pembroke
Flint
Lancaster, Oxford
Wiltshire, Somerset
Lincoln, Suffolk, Glamorgan, Surrey, Sussex
Northumberland, Cumberland, East Riding
Ireland, Wiltshire
Cambridge, Essex
North Riding, Pembroke
North Riding, Pembroke
Noble Rivers
Salisbury (W)
Scrope
Shrewsbury
Somerset (L)
Southwick (B)
Stanley
Suffolk
Warwick (W)
Westmorland
Wiltshire (B)
Worcester
Officer King/Crown
Chancellor
Treasurer
Marshal
Admiral
Capt. of Calais
Lt. of Ireland
Warden
Home Estate(s)
Northhampton, Kent
Cumberland, North Riding, Kent
Nottingham
Stafford, Shropshire, Hereford
Somerset, Dorset, Hampshire
Wiltshire, Somerset
Isle of Man, Lancaster
Buckingham, Suffolk, Essex
Durham, Warwick, Worcester, Hertford, Gloucester, Glamorgan
Durham, Lincoln
Northampton, Huntingdon
Cambridge, Hampshire
Bedford Berkshire Buckingham Calais Cambridge Carnarfon Chester Cornwall Cumberland Derby Devon Dorset Durham East Riding Essex Flint France Exile Glamorgan Gloucester Hampshire Hereford Hertford Huntingdon Isle of Man Ireland Ireland Exile Kent Lancaster Leicester Lincoln London Norfolk North Riding Northampton Northumberland
Nottingham Oxford Pembroke Powys Rutland Scotland Exile Shropshire Somerset Stafford Suffolk Surrey Sussex Warwick West Riding Westmorland Wiltshire Worcester Locations
7/21
6/22
6/21
9/23
8/20
3/18
4/18
1/24
4/15
5/18
3/23
5/23
6/15
7/17
8/21
3/18
9/24
3/21
4/21
6/22
4/20
7/21
7/20
2/16
1/15
1/16
9/22
4/17
6/19
7/18
7/21
9/19
6/16
6/20
5/14
6/18
6/21
2/20
3/20
7/19
4/14
4/19
4/22
5/19
9/20
7/22
7/23
6/20
6/17
4/16
5/22
5/20
* based on the track numbers along
the North and East edges of the
mapboard, read as North/East map
edge.
Home Estate(s)
Berkshire, West Riding, Oxford, London, Cornwall
Carnarfon
Carnarfon
Chester, Norfolk, Berkshire
Dorset, Hampshire
Calais, France Exile Box
Ireland, Irish Exile Box
Scotland Exile Box, Cumberland, Northumberland
Officers listed in Ranking order
© 2013 GMT Games, LLC
GMT Games, LLC
P.O. Box 1308
Hanford, CA 93232-1308
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