Outdoor Mesh Wireless Networks - AI3-ITB

Outdoor Mesh Wireless Networks - AI3-ITB
Design and Deployment of Outdoor Mesh
Wireless Networks
BRKEWN-2027
Abstract
 This intermediate session will describe the Outdoor wireless products
involved in delivering outdoor broadband wireless services for Service
Providers, Municipalities, Transportation and other end user customers.
The Cisco Outdoor Wireless Bridging and MESH Technologies will be
discussed in detail.
 The session is intended for wireless network architects, network designers, network
planners working in Public Sector, Service Providers, Systems Integrators, small
providers and enterprise customers. Attendees should have some basic knowledge
in configuration of IP routers, Wi-Fi access points, and Radio Frequency planning.
Basic understanding of the Controller Architecture is required.
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Agenda
 Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture overview
- From bridging to Mesh
- Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture components
- Bringing Wi-Fi innovation to outdoors
 How to deploy an outdoor wireless network
- Standard and normative
- Design & Planning
- Site Survey and Deployment
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Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture overview
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Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture overview
Bridging
L3/L2 switch
L2 switch
5GHz/2.4 GHz
Point To Point
L2 switch
Internet
Point To Multipoint
Bridging: basic LAN to LAN wireless connectivity
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Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture overview
From Bridging to Mesh
2.4 GHz Access
L3/L2 switch
RAP
(Root AP)
Controller
MAP
Backhaul 5GHz
Backhaul 5GHz
(Mesh AP)
L2 switch
5 GHz Access
WGB
Wired access
MAP
5 GHz Access
Mesh Deployment Flexibility:
 LAN-to-LAN connectivity
 Multiple hop backhaul
 2.4 GHz and 5GHz wireless client access
 Ethernet Access to wired clients
 LAN-to-LAN in motion with Work Group Bridge (WGB)
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Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture overview
Self-configuring, self-healing Mesh
 Optimal parent selection selects the
path “ease” across each available
backhaul
 Ease based on number of hops and
link SNR (Signal Noise Ratio)
RAP
Neighbor
Controller
Parent
MAP
 AWPP uses a “Parent Stickiness”
value to mitigate Route Flaps
 AWPP integrates 802.11h DFS
(Dynamic Frequency Selection) for
radar detection and avoidance
 From release 7.0.116 preferred parent
can be configured
Adaptive Wireless Path Protocol (AWPP)
establishes the best path to the Root
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Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture overview
MAP
Deployment flexibility
Ethernet in
mesh header
WLAN
Controller
RAP
Intranet
Mesh carries two types of traffic:
CAPWAP in
mesh header
Wired client traffic
Wireless client traffic
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Mesh header
CAPWAP traffic
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MAPs dynamically
build a tree with
the best path to
the RAP
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Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture overview
Scalability at different layers
Access Point
Management
32 MAPs per RAP (20 recommended)
NCS manages up to 15000 APs
8 Hops (4 recommended)
16 SSIDs per AP (512 at WLC)
More RAPs for sector capacity
Intranet
Controller
Up to 72 Controllers can be
part of an N+1 or N+N+1 cluster
Dynamic RF optimization on
access link for additional radios
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Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture overview
Inter-controller Roaming
L3 Roaming
Intra-controller
Seamless user mobility
AP-10
AA-AA
WLC-A
VLAN =2
Tunnel EoIP
B to A
AP-22
WiSM
WLC-B
AP-47
MAC
SSID
AP
WLAN
WLC
VLAN
IP
AA-AA
OpenWiFi
22
47
10
2
B-A
A
2
10.10.10.2
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Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture overview
Robust embedded security
AP X.509 Certificate Authentication
802.1x WPA/WPA2
AMR
Mutual AP Auth
Controller
Internet
EAP for
Encrypted
Links
Dynamic
VLAN
Assignment
IPSec VPN
 802.11i WPA/WPA2 security + Dynamic VLAN assignment
 AP to AP and AP to Controller mutual authentication
Si
Muni
Public
Safety
Departmental
L3 VPNs
 EAP authenticated and AES-based encrypted backhaul mesh links
 Encrypted control traffic between AP and Controller
 Rogue AP detection and blacklisting
 Integrated Wireless IDS and Attack correlation software
 Mobile L3 VPNs for “confidential” client traffic
Cisco’s AnyConnectVPN Client uninterrupted L3 roaming between Wi-Fi, cellular, etc. networks
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Cisco Outdoor Mesh architecture components
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Cisco Wireless Outdoor Architecture components

Access Points:
Context Aware
Advanced
Wireless IPS
CleanAIr – Spectrum
Intelligence
WLAN Controller
(WLC)
NetworkControl System
(NCS)
Indoor Hotspot
Root AP
(RAP)
802.11abgn
-
CleanAIr, ClientLink, etc.
-
Outdoor enclosure, AC/DC power; PoE
capable. Battery backup
-
POE port for peripheral devices
 Wireless LAN Controller (WLC):
IP
Backhaul
Mobility Service Engine
(MSE)

-
Handles RF algorithms and optimization
-
Seamless WiFi L3 mobility
-
Provides security at each Layer
-
Image and configuration Management
Prime NCS
Mesh
Network
Mesht AP
(MAP)
Metro Wi-Fi
-
-
Network-wide policy configuration and
device management
-
Design and deployment tools
-
Monitoring and troubleshooting
 Mobility Service Engine (MSE)
Client
Enables Mobility services (WIPS, Context
aware)
Stadium / Large Venue
Residential
CPE
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Cisco SP Wifi solution
MSP
Credentials
End to end solution
AAA
DHCP Captive NCS
Svcs PCRF
Portal
UCS Reporting
Cisco
ASR 5000
3G/4G Macro Site
WLAN Controller
(WLC)
NetworkControl System
(NCS)
Indoor Hotspot
ISG
Internet
IP
Backhaul
IP Core
Partner Net
Mesh
Network
Metro Wi-Fi
Indoor Hotspot
Client
Stadium / Large Venue
Residential
CPE
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Mesh AP 1552:
Bringing Wi-Fi innovation to Outdoors
Cisco AP 1550 series
High Performance outdoor wireless
Benefits
Features
 Outdoor 802.11n Access Point
 Dual-Radio APs (2.4 & 5 GHz)
 CleanAir & ClientLink
(beamforming)
 Dual-band Antennas
- Stick
- Integrated; Low-Profile
 Backhaul
-
DOCSIS 3.0 / EuroDOCSIS 3.0
Fiber
Ethernet
Mesh
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 RF Excellence:
Integrated spectrum intelligence
 Unified Mode:
Authentication, Security, Mobility,..
 Flexible Deployment:
Access or mesh network, extension
of an Ethernet network, Fiber,
Wireless or Cable backhaul
 High Performance:
Multipurpose network with low
CAPEX & OPEX
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Aspects of 802.11n
MIMO
Packet
Aggregation
40MHz Channels
Backward
Compatibility
MIMO (Multiple Input, Multiple Output)
With Beam Forming
Transmissions Arrive in Phase,
Increasing Signal Strength
Without Beam Forming
Transmissions Arrive out of
Phase and signal is weaker
Performed by
Transmitter
(Talk Better)
Ensures Signal
Received in
Phase
Beam Forming
Increases
Receive
Sensitivity
Works with
non-MIMO
Clients
Maximal Ratio Combining
Spatial Multiplexing
Beam Forming gives a gain of 4+ dB in DL
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ClientLink (Beamforming)
Essential facts
 Beam Forming is effective for downstream
traffic (MRC for upstream)
802.11a/g
Beam
Forming
 Measureable advantages:
- Increased SNR at cell edges
- Increased downstream data rates at cell edges
- Increased downstream throughput at cell edges
 ClientLink benefits the whole cell with an
overall quality coverage increased
 Beam Forming is performed in hardware and
use both UDP and TCP traffic (no Bidirectional
Traffic required)
802.11n
 Can beam form to up to 30 clients per AP
 Applicable to legacy rates of 9, 12, 18 (added
for outdoors) and 24, 36, 48, 54 Mbps
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Aspects of 802.11n
40MHz Channels
Packet
Aggregation
Backward
Compatibility
MIMO (Multiple Input, Multiple Output)
Without MRC
With MRC
Multiple Signals Sent;
One Signal Chosen
Multiple Signals Sent and Combined
at the Receiver Increasing Fidelity
MIMO AP
Performance
Performed by
Receiver
(Hear Better)
Combines
Multiple Received
Signals
Beam Forming
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Increases
Receive
Sensitivity
Works with
non-MIMO and
MIMO Clients
Maximal Ratio Combining Spatial Multiplexing
MRC gives a gain of 4.7 dB in UL for all Data Rates
MRC Gain is added in Rx Sensitivity number
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MRC effect on received signal
Combined Effect (Adding all Rx Paths)
3 Antennas Rx Signals
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Aspects of 802.11n
Packet
Aggregation
40MHz Channels
Backward
Compatibility
MIMO (Multiple Input, Multiple Output)
Information is Split and Transmitted on Multiple Streams
stream 1
MIMO AP
stream 2
Performance
Transmitter and
Receiver
Participate
Concurrent
Transmission on
Same Channel
Beam Forming
Increases
Bandwidth
Maximal Ratio Combining
Requires MIMO
Client
Spatial Multiplexing
AP1550 has the capability of 2 X 3 MIMO
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What is CleanAir technology
Monitoring, Locate
Mitigate
NCS, MSE
Wireless LAN Controller
GOOD
POOR
 •Classification
Classificationprocessed
processed
on
onAccess
AccessPoint
Point
 •Interference
Interferenceimpact
impactand
and
data
datasent
senttotoWLC
WLCfor
forrealrealtime
timeaction
action
 •WCS
NCSand
andMSE
MSEstore
storedata
data
for
forlocation,
location,history,
history,and
and
troubleshooting
troubleshooting
Maintain Air Quality
Visualize and
Troubleshoot
CH
1
AIR QUALITY
PERFORMANCE
Visibility of
the RF
Spectrum
Cisco
CleanAir
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CleanAir: Self-healing and optimization
Interference
Aware
RRM
Maximizes performance by avoiding interference
Event
Driven
RRM
CH 1
CH 1
CH 11
CH 1
Self Healing to avoid Wi-Fi degradation
Persistent
Device
Avoidance
Self Learning to increase reliability
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CleanAir: Network Visibility
Map – Air Quality View
Zone of Impact
Interferer Details
Context Aware Services enable NCS to show Interferer’s location
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CleanAir for Mesh
 Clean Air on 2.4 GHz for AP1552 & AP3500/3600 in Bridge (Mesh) mode
 No Clean Air on 5 GHz (Backhaul)
 No Monitor Mode
 No Spectrum Connect Mode (SE-Connect AP)
 Interferers detected by Clean Air on 2.4 GHz include
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CleanAir recommendations for Mesh
 AP Density recommendation for CleanAir remains the same as normal
Mesh AP Deployment
 APs should be RF neighbors for any possibility of Merging (spatial
proximity)
 Location Resolution in the Outdoors is to the nearest AP
 Outdoor Custom Calibration possible from 7.0.116.0 onwards
- Location error may double without custom calibration model
 Installation with a low density of sensors has the possibility of having
duplicate entries of interferers
 Mixing CleanAir (AP1552) and Legacy AP’s (AP152X) operating in Local
Mode (serving clients) is Not supported – nor is recommended
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For Your
Reference
CleanAir Licensing
 A CleanAir AP is the license: no special controller license required
 Adding an MSE – requires NCS or WCS Plus for location
 CAS (Context Aware) license required for Interference location
 100 Permanent Interferers licenses are embedded in MSE. Interferer Licenses
open up as Clean Air APs are detected, in stages of 5 per CleanAir AP
 Interference and Client location functionally identical – and use the same
license count
 If license is 1000, and interferers are 500, then 500 clients can be displayed
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How to deploy a Cisco Outdoor Mesh network
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How to deploy an outdoor wireless network
Wi-Fi network planning and deployment involves….
 Regulatory considerations:
-
802.11 Standard, Radio Emissions, Radar and Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS).
Certifications. All this varies per country.
 Design and Planning
-
Coverage considerations
-
Client type (Smart Phones, Tablets, Laptops, …). Weakest Link typically would be the Uplink on
a Smart Phone
-
User Experience: Minimum Throughput to User, Type of Applications (Internet, Video, Gaming,
….)
-
CAPEX & OPEX available for project; match to type of Service, robustness of Coverage, etc.
 Site Survey
-
Location & Height, Line-of-Sight (LoS)/Partial LoS, Interference, Access to wired backhaul (i.e.
Max # Hops)
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Current Standards and Directives:
The 5 GHz Bridging Spectrum
4.94
4.99 5.15
2 Channels
5.25
5.35
UNII-2
5.725
Extended
5.470
4 Channels 4 Channels
5.825
5.850
5 Channels
US
(FCC)
33 dBm
UNII-1
UNII-2
17 dBm
27 dBm
8 channels
27 dBm
Radiated Power
EIRP inc antenna
ISM 30 dBm
UNII-3, 30 dBm
Europe
(ETSI)
23 dBm
(200 mW)
23 dBm
(200mW)
11 Channels (*)
30 dBm
Indoor
only
Indoor
only
Indoor and
Outdoor
Radiated Power
EIRP inc Antenna
DFS + TPC required (**)
(*) 8 channels available today: 120, 124, 128 disabled to be compliant to EN 301 893 v1.5.1 / v1.6.1
(**) Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) – Transmit Power Control (TPC)
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Current Standards and Directives:
Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) requirements
Frequency (MHz)
1 5150 – 5250
(UNII-I)
36
40
44
48
DFS Not Required
2 5250 – 5350
(UNII-II)
52
56
60
64
5470 – 5725
(UNII-II extended)
3 5725 – 5850
(UNII-III)
 DFS required by ETSI to allow WLAN to
share the 5Ghz band with Radar
 All Cisco products are compliant. Channels
120, 124, 128 are disabled to be compliant to
EN 301 893 v1.5.1 / v1.6.1
 Best Practices for Radars:
100
104
108
112
116
120
124
128
132
136
140
- Do a Survey and contact the local authorities
to know if there are radars nearby
- Use “Full Sector DFS Mode” that prevents
MAPs to be isolated after detecting a radar
- Correctly mount the APs (spacing and
antennas alignment)
- Remove the radar affected channels from the
Controller channel list
149
153
157
161
165
DFS Not Required
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Current Standards and Directives:
Cisco certifies AP + Antennas
 Importance of AP + antenna certification:
- Regulatory compliance is certified
- Quality, performance and reliability are guaranteed
- RF connectivity is TAC supported
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For Your
Reference
Cisco Mesh AP certified antennas
Antennas for 1552E/1552H
Description
AIR-ANT2547V-N
Dual Band 2.4 (4dBi) /5 GHz (7dBi), Omni
2.4 GHz Antennas for 1522/1524
Description
AIR-ANT2450V-N
2.4 GHz, 5 dBi Compact Omni-Directional
AIR-ANT2455V-N
2.4 GHz, 5.5 dBi Compact Omni-Directional
AIR-ANT2480V-N
2.4 GHz, 8 dBi Omni-Directional
AIR-ANT2420V-N (gray)
2.4 GHz, 2 dBi Compact Omni-Directional
5GHz Antennas for 1522/1524
Description
AIR-ANT5180V-N
4.9 to 5.85 GHz, 8 dBi Omni-Directional
AIR-ANT5114P-N
4.9 to 5.85 GHz, 14 dBi Patch
AIR-ANT5117S-N
4.9 to 5.85 GHz, 17 dBi 90o Sector
AIR-ANT5140V-N (gray)
4.9 to 5.85 GHz, 4 dBi Omni
AIR-ANT5175V-N
4.9 to 5.85 GHz, 7.5 dBi Omni
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Design and planning
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Design and planning
Network Architecture (an example)
Small village in Digital Divide
WLC
LOS 5GHz link up to 8 km
RAP
5GHz/
2.4GHz
MAP
POP
RAP
Business Area in Digital Divide
5GHz/
2.4GHz
MAP
Service Provider
Network
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Design and planning
Greenfield deployment in a flat environment
MAP
180 meters (cell radius) at 2.4 Ghz
RAP
MAP
1 square km, 10 Cells
 Recommendations
 Consider your weak link (client)
 AP to AP distance = double AP to client
AP1552C/I: 360 m
AP1552E/H: 360 m
 Decreasing AP to AP improves
coverage
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 Assumptions:






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100% coverage needed
APs are at 10 m; client at 1 m height
Data rate of 9 Mbps to estimate range
Throughput @ client >= 1 Mbps
LoS or Near LoS
Flat Terrain Environment
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Design and planning
General consideration
 In real world scenario you need to take
in consideration obstacles; add more
APs to have Line of Sight (LOS)
1 km
MAP
 At 2.4Ghz MAPs’ distance is given by
the coverage you want for clients
RAP
 Client type (smart phones, tablets, etc):
weakest link typically would be the
Uplink on a smart phone
 For backhaul set the data rate to “auto”
 The number of MAPs per RAP should
be less than 32 but really depends on
the application and bandwidth you want!
 Max hop count is 8. Four hops
recommended..again throughput!
 Use link calculator:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/acces
s_point/1550/range/calculator/1552_Link_Calcula
tor_V1.xls
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Design and planning
Typical Backhaul Throughput and Latency
Avg 2-3 msec
latency per hops
HOPS
RAP
One
Two
Three
Four
MAX Throughput
(20MHz BH)
112 Mbps
83 Mbps
41 Mbps
25 Mbps
15 Mbps
MAX Throughput
(40MHz BH)
206 Mbps
111 Mbps
94 Mbps
49 Mbps
35 Mbps
Numbers are average of US and DS
 Latency: 10 ms per Hop, 0.3-1 milliseconds typical
 Hops: Outdoor: code supports 8 Hops; 3–4 Hops are recommended
 Nodes: 20 MAPs per RAP are recommended
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Design and planning
At what distance shall I place the MAPs?
 It all depends on the bandwidth you need. Need to consider Data rate vs SNR
(*) LinkSNR = Minimum SNR – MRC gain + fade margin
 Need to find a compromise between coverage and throughput
MCS index
Spatial Stream
Media capacity (Mbps) **
MCS 0
1
15
Minimum LinkSNR * (dB)
9.3
MCS 1
1
30
11.3
MCS 2
1
45
13.3
MCS 3
1
60
17.3
MCS 4
1
90
21.3
MCS 5
1
120
24.3
MCS 6
1
135
26.3
MCS 7
1
157.5
27.3
MCS 8
2
30
12.3
MCS 9
2
60
14.3
MCS 10
2
90
16.3
MCS 11
2
120
20.3
MCS 12
2
180
24.3
MCS 13
2
240
27.3
MCS 14
2
270
29.3
MCS 15
2
300
30.3
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(**) Max data rate considering
5Ghz, 40 Mhz channel, 40ns GI
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Design and planning
How to check backhaul connected data rate?
 How do you see the actual backhaul rate? Is it 802.11n rate?
(Cisco Controller) >show mesh neigh summary MAP_8c40
AP Name/Radio
Channel Rate Link-Snr Flags
State
----------------- ------- ---- -------- ------- ----RAP_e380
136
m15 33
0x0
UPDATED NEIGH PARENT BEACON
Or:
Cisco Controller) >show mesh neigh detail MAP_8c40
AP MAC : 1C:AA:07:5F:E3:80 AP Name: RAP_e380
backhaul rate m15
FLAGS : 86F UPDATED NEIGH PARENT BEACON
Neighbor reported by slot: 1
worstDv 0, Ant 0, channel 136, biters 0, ppiters 10
Numroutes 1, snr 0, snrUp 40, snrDown 43, linkSnr 39
adjustedEase 8648576, unadjustedEase 8648576
[…snip]
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Design and planning
Real case example of urban coverage
2.4 GHz Interferers
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Design and planning
Sectorization (Bridge Group)
3 Hops
 Logically groups APs and controls
the association of the radios
2 Hops
 For adding capacity we recommend
that you have more than one RAP in
the same sector, with the same
BGN, but on different channels
1 Hop
RAP
MAP
 Having multiple RAPs with same
BGN in an area is good for
redundancy: when a RAP goes
down its MAPs will join a different
sector with same name
 A factory default BGN is empty
(NULL VALUE). It allows the MAP to
do the first association
MAP
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Design and planning
Mesh coverage model
Ch 108
Ch 116
Ch 132
 A Wired POP building might
have 4 RAPs.
Ch 140
 Each RAP has 20-25 Mesh
APs (MAPs)
 Each RAP on a different non
adjacent channel, but same
Bridge Group Name
 Most of MAPs within 3 hops
of RAP
 If a RAP fails the MAPs
belonging to the sector will go
in SCAN mode and register to
another MAP/RAP on a
different channel/sector
2 km
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Design and planning
High Availability: anti-stranded features
 Stranded: a MAP that is not able to associate and find a path to WLC
 DEFAULT BGN (Bridge Group Name): Mesh APs with incorrect BGN, can
still join a running network using BGN named “DEFAULT”. With “DEFAULT”
BGN:
- MAP associates clients, and forms mesh relationships
- After 15 minutes APs will go to SCAN state rather than rebooting
- Do not confuse an unassigned BGN (null value) with DEFAULT, which is a mode
that the access point uses to connect when it cannot find its own BGN.
 DHCP fall back: this features allow a MAP configured with a wrong static IP
address to fall back to DHCP and find a WLC. If even this fails, AP then
attempts to discover a controller in Layer 2 mode
 FULL SECTOR DFS: DFS functionality allows a MAP that detects a radar
signal to transmit that up to the RAP, which then acts as if it has experienced
radar and moves the sector.
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Design and planning
Features not supported on mesh
 CAPWAP Data Plane encryption with DTLS
 Multi-country support on the same WLC and in the Mesh tree
 High availability (fast heartbeat and primary discovery join timer)
 BandSelect
 Location-based services (accuracy is half the AP to AP distance)
 Voice support is best effort on outdoor mesh
 Load-based CAC (mesh networks support only bandwidth-based CAC)
 802.1X authentication of the RAP Ethernet port
 Access point “join priority” (mesh access points have a fixed priority)
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Site Survey and deployment recommendations
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Site Survey and deployment
The importance of site surveys
 Given the nature of the outdoor environment and the lightly licensed
spectrum being used for WiFi based outdoor MESH
•
•
•
•
Site Survey’s are important
Spectrum scans are equally important
You may not be able to remove the interference source
But you can design around it
 Remember to also survey at street level where clients will be
operating
 If possible survey with either the client or “worst” client you expect to
support
 Time based surveys may also be required n months after deployment
 Check for power availability
 Do you have the permits?
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Site Survey and deployment
Get creative, use different tools
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Site Survey and deployment
Mounting the APs
 Mount the Root AP to have a good view of the area to be covered.
 Understand RAP coverage
 Max recommended height for MAPs is 10 meters
 Recommended placing the APs at the same height
 Minimum recommendation is 20 dB of SNR
 Do not install the MAPs in an area where structures, trees, or hills obstruct radio signals to
and from the access point.
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RF “Shadow” Close to
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Building;
Poor
Beyond RF Coverage
Area; Poor SNR
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Site Survey and deployment
Collocating APs
•
•
•
•
•
Proper spacing = better performance and coverage
Minimum Vertical Separation of 3 meters (10m if on adjacent channels)
Recommended horizontal separation: 30 meters
Antennas vertical alignment is another important factor
Consider RF interferences: use Spectrum Expert
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Site Survey and deployment
Grounding the AP
POWER
INJECTOR
10 AWG
or Larger
Ground Wire
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Site Survey and deployment
Environmental impact
Equipment
Inside
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Design use case: Video Surveillance over Mesh
Cisco Video Solution over Mesh: why?
 Open standards based architecture
 Easy & Flexible
 Reliability & Availability under extreme conditions
 Reduced Infrastructure/cabling cost
 Cohesive solution with both Analog & IP video technology
 Ease of deployment in both outdoor & indoor environments
 End-to-End solution & security
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Design use case
Design consideration specific for Video Surveillance over Mesh
 Make sure you have Line Of Sight (LOS) between APs
 Make sure you have the backhaul SNR is 30db or better
 Set the backhaul to “auto” and enable bridging on all APs
 Measure the backhaul throughput and camera throughput: this is important to
plan for the numbers of camera and type the mesh can support at each hop
 Ethernet bridging needs to be enable on all Aps, it’s off by default. It is also
possible to enable VLAN tagging so that the video traffic gets assigned to a
specific VLAN on the backhaul and then wired network.
 AP 1552 gives you advantages of 802.11n higher throughput but it degrades
with the number of hops
 AP 1524 gives you more antenna flexibility and dual backhaul to maintain the
throughput over multiple hops
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Design use case
IP Camera Configurations & Throughput
Thruput measured on the Wire with VLC/Real Player/Sniffer capture
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Design use case
Design consideration specific for Video Surveillance over Mesh
1552 RAP
WLC
BH: 108 Mbps
VS: 4.64 + 8.31 Mps
BW: 95 Mbps
LAN
 Add one mesh node at the time
BH: 72 Mbps
VS: 2.32 + 5.99 Mbps
BW: 63.6 Mbps
1552
MAP1
2x
 At each step:
-
Verify link SNR between nodes
-
Add the camera/cameras
-
Observe impact on the added link
-
Observe impact on the tree back to RAP
-
BH: Backhaul available throughput at hop
-
VS: video traffic added at each hop (mbps)
-
BW: remaining available throughput for other traffic (mbps)
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BH: 48 Mbps
VS: 2.32 + 3.67 Mbps
BW: 42 Mbps
1552
MAP2
1552
MAP3
BH: 38 Mbps
VS: 2.32 Mbps
BW: 35.6 Mbps
1552
MAP4
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Câmara Municipal de
São João da Madeira
Wireless Project
Jan2012
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Municipality Objectives
 Sao Joao da Madeira:
- high population density and the smallest
county in Portugal (8km2),
- Very attractive city due to its industry,
commerce, services, schools and cultural
activities.
 The goal of the project:
- Improving the Municipial Services (telemetering of water and electricity,
management of parking meters, civil
protection services, security, municipal
corporate television, voice over IP and
telemedicine
- Introducing innovation and positive
differentiation.
- Democratize access to the Internet
- Attracting visitors,
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Network topology
Data Center
Cisco WLC 5500
4x Gbe cada
Servidor
Cisco WCS
City
locations
Cisco Switch
........
........
map
layer
98 1552
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rap
layer
12 1552
Cisco Switch
Fiber
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Design and implementation considerations
 Coverage model
- Estimated around 80 APs (10 MAPs every
square km)
- Added 20 more to overcome NLOS scenarios
and to reach desired capacity
 Used AP-Group feature to advertized only
selected SSIDs in selected areas
 WCS used to monitor the health of the
network
- measure link SNRs
- RRM used to evaluate the quality of the Air
and keep monitoring interferences
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Design and implementation considerations
 AP placement
- Placed as many RAPs are possible, where fiber was available
- Often these location were not ideal: RAPs were mounted at 20mt and higher
- Problem solved with 3rd party directional antennas
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Why Cisco
 Coverage
 Speed of implementation/ quick rollout
 Centralized management (WLC) important on a large network
ensuring quality of service
 Reliability
 Network management and support
 Efficiency of wifi roaming (watch video)
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Thank you.
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