67 - American Radio History

67 - American Radio History
BROADCAST
BROADCAST
..
..
BROADCAST
BROADCAST
BROADCAST
WORKING FOR DEFENSE
BRi:141úkt;
I
BROADCAST
Vol. No. 67
JAN.-FEB., 1952
BROADCAST
BROADCAST
.A.t , P.
401,4,1.
,e.
BROADCAST
-
MoMe
BROADCAST
ti r.., \.[,: R-1
BROADCAST
w r4 sum mum
..,
BROADCAST
w.
#;/* /7/#
sra*&,4&604.5-
... from your
RCA
nearest
Sales Representative
This 64 -page book is prepared
specifically for TV station management, chief engineers, architects,
consultants, and attorneys con-
nected with station designing, planning, building, and operating. In a
single reference it contains concise
descriptions of RCA's entire line of
TV transmitter and antenna equip-
200,000 Watts
Power to
Radiated
for Any
blidiulels 2
t
ment- including transmitter plans
and layouts, general application
data, and cost charts.
For your copy, get in touch with
the RCA Broadcast Sales Representative nearest you:
New York 20, N. Y.
36 W. 49th Street
Telephone: Circle
6 -4030
Dallas 1, Texas
1907-11 McKinney Ave.
Telephone: R -1371, 1372, 1373
Cleveland 15, Ohio
718 Keith Building
Telephone: Cherry 1 -3450
3, Ga.
Atlanta
522 -533 Forsyth Bldg.
Forsyth and Lucide Streets, N. W.
Telephone: Walnut 5946
K
City 8, Me.
221 W. 18th Street
Telephone: Victor 6410
Hollywood 28, Calif.
1560 North Vine Street
Telephone: Hollywood 9.2154
San Francisco 3, Calif.
1355 Market Street
Telephone: Hemlock
1
-8300
Chicago 11, Hl.
666 North Lake Shore Drive
Telephone: Delaware 7 -0700
Washington 6, D.
C.
1625 K Street, N. W.
Telephone: District 1260
Boston 34, Mass.
John Hancock Building
200 Berkeley Street
Telephone: Hubbard 2 -1700
\-/
RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA
ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT
www.americanradiohistory.com
CAMDEN, N.J.
OUR COVER, as you hardly need be told, is a
reprodaiti.m of the covers of all issues of BROAD.
CAST NE%' from Vol. No. 1 (October 1931) to the
last previous issue (Vol. No. 66). On the back
cover (did you notice it ?) are the covers from
1931 through May 1941. These are arranged chron
Broadcast News
ologically, in rows, from top to bottom. On the
front cover are all issues from September 1941 to
date, similarly arranged.
AM FM TELEVISION
HISTORY OF BROADCAST NEWS is portrayed
in picture and story, starting on Pg. 2. If the
story seems to get a little sticky now and then,
please forgive us. When we think of how the industry has grown, and our business (and BROAD.
CAST News) with it, we get a little carried away
by it all.
Published by the
RADIO
CORPORATION
ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT
AMERICA
OF
...
CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY
THE INDEX, which we have been promising you
for too I.u,g has finally been put in shape and
appears oil Pg. 14-27 of this issue. Main credit for
getting this done goes to Dick Newman of our
broadcast transmitter sales group. Dick, who has
been in Camden as Product Manager for Transmitters for the past two years, has now returned
to his old stamping grounds in the San Francisco
area. However, before he left he managed to get
the index almost done and Norm Rivkees, who
recently joined our group, has completed it. We
hope you like it, and find it useful. But if you
lind any errors, please write Dick, not the editor.
JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1952
NUMBER 67
Subscription Rates
In continental U.
In other countries
JOHN
M.
L.
P.
S.
A.
-
GASKILL,
B.
for
for
12 issues
issues
12
W. O. HADLOCK, Managing Editor
TAYLOR, Editor
E.
1;1.00
$5.00
- -
MAY,
E. C.
MASON, W.
R.
COULTER, Associate Editors
Contents
by JOHN
TWENTY YEARS OF BROADCAST NEWS
P. TAYLOR
2
BROADCAST NEWS CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX
14
BROADCAST NEWS CONTENTS INDEX
15
BROADCAST NEWS CROSS- REFERENCE INDEX (by Subject Matter)
BROADCAST AUDIO
TRENDS IN
IMPROVED TELEVISION PICTURE PERFORMANCE
TELEVISION ON THE WING
VERSATILE
ANTENNA
ASSEMBLY -LINE TV
WRZE WHITE
28
34
49
by M. RETTINGER
50
by QUINTEN G. CUMERALTO
52
by E. T. JONES
54
ENLARGING THE TELEVIEWING AUDIENCE
FOR
by W. E. STEWART
49
STUDIOS
BROADCASTING
t'
GEORGE KOFHLER AND E. C. MASON
HAM FORUM
25 -KW CONVERSION
.
EQUIPMENT
RECTIFIER TUBE PROTECTION
.
Copyright 1952
Radio Corporation of America
RCA Victor Division
Camden. N. J.
58
60
NINTH BROADCASTERS' TV TRAINING PROGRAM
times more broadcast operating personnel than it
would in any other place. To these men we owe a
real debt -and we hereby acknowledge it.
23
by H. N. KOZANOWSKI
APPARATUS
ROSE BROADCASTING CO.
FUTURE TALENT
.
.
.
TEST
.
ACKNOWLEDGMENT is also due here to all of
tlu 1;1'.:\ engweer* who have given of their time
( usually
their own, not the company's) to make
BROADCAST NEws as interesting and technically
accurate as it has been. In many, if not most,
cases, they could have "sold" their material to outside magazines. However, because of their interest
in the broadcasting business they preferred to see
it in BROADCAST NEWS where it reaches several
by M. L. GASKILL
62
by F. E.
TALMAGE
64
by I.IAL MOBLEY, JR.
74
THANKS also to all of you station and network
engineers-and not a few managers-who have
taken time to furnish material for all the many
issues of BROADCAST News that have rolled off
the presses. It is your stories that have kept
BROADCAST NEWS from becoming as one-sided as
many house organs are. We hope you will continue to supply us with your material -and we'd
not so
even like to have a little more of it
much the beaming face of your station manager
and the pretty front of your new transmitter (although we have nothing against them), but rather
more of the details of how you did it. Especially
those little ideas that are your very own. Maybe
you would be surprised how interested others
would be in them.
...
ANTENAPLEX, the community kind, comes in for
a few kind words in the article starting on Pg. 54.
RCA has developed and is marketing high-quality
equipment suitable for serving communities in
fringe areas of TV stations. As Ed Jones points
out, such installations actually increase the audi
ence of the station since, in most cases, they bring
signals to homes which otherwise would have no
service. Just how widely such systems will be used
is still a matter of conjecture. However, the number of installations being made is such that coy
erage will definitely be a factor in some parts of
the country.
BRJIDVIST NEWS
1411(1101.10041
mnl
M1,OOi
NX34
MAW.
tovfvAOf-,
Al.,. ItonOCAP
[ane
RCA Victor Company,lnc., Camden. N.J.
IXILAB
VOLUME NO. 1. October 1931, was a thin 12
pages, with a single color cover, which by today's standards looks a bit old-fashioned. Contents. however, were not too different from our
most recent issues. The feature story was a description of KFI's then brand new RCA 50B installation -"the first 50 KW west of Texas"
incidentally, is still going strong). In
addition, there were two engineering "know
how" stories: one of them on Microphone Placement by T. A. Smith, now Assistant General
Manager of the Engineering Products Department; another on Field Intensity Measurements
by the present editor.
(which,
-
VOLUME NO. 21, July 1936, was much flossier.
By this time BROADCAST NEWS had grown to
a nice big 36 pages. The cover of this volume, a
special Convention Number, was unusual in that
it featured a picture of L R. Baker, who managed
RCA's broadcast transmitter business from 1930
to 1943. It was Bake who formulated RCA's policy of building the best in broadcast equipment
and of merchandising it with directness and honesty. BROADCAST NEWS. too, was Bake's idea
-and certainly no one deserved more to grace
the cover. However, such was his modesty that
he was considerably irked when, without his
foreknowledge, this cover appeared.
VOLUME NO. 30. May 1939 marked a milestone
in BROADCAST NEWS, when, for the first time,
a piece of "commercial" television gear appeared
on the cover. The TT -1A Television Transmitter
shown on this cover, and described in following
issues, was announced coincidentally with the
start of "commercial telecasting" in New York.
Although the "start" was somewhat premature it
was an unmistakable portent of things to come,
and of postwar issues of BROADCAST NEWS
which have been more and more marked by the
gradual ascendance of television as a main topic
of conversation among non -TV broadcasters as
well as present telecasters.
TWENTY YEARS OF BROADCAST NEWS
by JOHN
P. TAYLOR
Engineering Products Department
BROADCAST NEWS is now in its twenty first year! The cover of this issue, which
so proudly proclaims our 20th Anniversary,
is actually a little late, for the first issue
of BROADCAST NEWS was dated October
1931. Whether or not that impresses you,
and how it impresses you if it does, will
depend on how old you are and how long
you've been in the broadcast business.
If you were in the business in 1931 we
don't need to tell you how different it was
then. But if you were not, then we will
have a difficult time convincing you. If
you are statistically minded maybe we can
do it by pointing out that in 1931 the total
gross revenue of all the stations in the
United States was only 56 million, about
8% of 1951's total gross revenue. That
sounds as if broadcasting in 1931 was a
small thing -and by today's standards it
was. But this comparison tells only half
the story. To complete the picture you
must also note that only four years before, in 1927, the total gross of all the
stations was less than five million dollars.
In other words, in 1931 the industry was
still an infant, dollar-wise, but it was a
husky brat that had grown ten times over
in only four years.
So much for the statistics. If you are
technically minded, and you weren't around
then, maybe we can place it for you by
telling you that all audio equipment was
operated from storage batteries, a one kilowatt transmitter required a water-cooled
tube, most plate power (as well as filament
power) was supplied by motor -generators,
the condenser microphone was the high
favorite in the studios, radiating towers
were only just coming into use, and directional antennas were only a subject of
conversation.
Of some 700 stations on the air in 1931
the great majority were of "composite"
manufacture. Many of them were really
"home- made" in the homiest sense of the
word. This was not surprising, for many.
2
www.americanradiohistory.com
if not most, of the broadcast stations taking the air during the twenties did so by
the grace, if not the inspiration, of some
aspiring amateur. However, by 1931, quite
a few stations were making money (a development which originally came as something of a surprise). As the cash registers
started ringing broadcasters stopped looking on their stations as hobbies, or prestige
operations, and began running them like
businesses. That's where we came in.
RCA had started selling broadcast equipment in 1927, but did not aggressively go
after the market until its manufacturing
operation was established in Camden, N. J.,
in 1930. In the early part of 1931 there
were just 30 RCA transmitters on the air.
Six RCA transmitter salesmen were running themselves ragged trying to sell all the
other 670 stations the advantages of RCA
equipment.
It soon became evident that in order to
get information about our new equipment
out to 700 stations in a hurry we would
need some other means to augment personal calls. But how?
WORKING FOR DEFENSE
VOLUME NO. 37, September '.941 marked another
important milestone. By this time BROADCAST
NEWS covers had gone through several metamorphoses. (See outside front and back covers
of this issue.) Only the masthead stayed reasonably constant. But it remained for this issue to
strike a really different note. Although Pearl
Harbor was yet to come, its shadow was on the
land. BROADCAST NEWS, on cover and in editorial. recognized the state of national emergency.
And, within months thereat ter, it, like everyone
else, went to war. From this time until V.f Day,
issues were few and far between.
The answer we arrived at was BROADNEWS -our own magazine, for our
own customers (and fair prospects). A
magazine devoted to the interests of broadcasters-particularly those of a technical
bent- and carrying only information of
interest and usefulness to them.
CAST
The selfish purpose of BROADCAST NEWS,
of course, was to present information on
our equipment, its uses, its advantages, and
its operation. We soon found, however,
that this need not be a one -way street.
From the very beginning we had sugarcoated our message by using at least half
the page space for presentation of engineering "know -how" articles. To our delight station engineers all over the country
received BROADCAST NEWS with obvious
pleasure. Best of all, they sent in not
only their kind comments, but also pictures of their installations, and articles on
various ideas they had used successfully.
Most of this material found its way into
and thus the
BROADCAST NEWS pages
magazine became a sort of meeting place
for station engineers.
...
Naturally we were very happy with this
development and have done our best to
encourage it. Proof of this is found in the
1948 symbolized the
post -war boom of the broadcasting industry
and of BROADCAST NEWS. Now a big grown -up
boy of 72 pages, with a four -color varnished
cover, this issue of BROADCAST NEWS featured
a detailed technical description of RCA's 5KW
TV Transmitter, Type TT -5A. This is the transmitter which made today's television a reality.
On the market, and available in quantity, long
before any competitive make, it powered -and
still powers most of this country's first one hundred television stations. It set the standard of
today's television.
VOLUME 68, March 1952. is, so to speak, a
glimpse in the future. This - preview- of our next
issue's cover shows BROADCAST NEWS still
leaing the way in picturing new developments.
This time it's UHF. Featured on the cover, and
in the feature story, is RCA's new UHF antenna,
now in production to meet the demand of post
freeze stations in the new UHF bond. Also featured in this issue will be a description of RCA's
completely new TV camera and camera control
units. In addition, there will be the usual station
and engineering articles which have featured
every BROADCAST NEWS from the very first.
fact that in recent years nearly half of the
content material has been supplied by
sources outside of RCA. We have not
stopped there, however. In order to further supplement these engineering type
articles we have enlisted the assistance of
our own large corps of engineers. Nowadays almost every issue carries at least
one article by one of these engineers. Ranking at the top of the profession, and working day -to -day on the newest and most
advanced developments, they speak with
authority, whether they write about theory, equipment design, or operation.
issues from the very first
chronological
order. These covers, in themselves, tell
most of our twenty -year history in the
briefest, and probably most interesting,
manner. Then, just above, we have reproduced some of our "milestone" covers
with a few comments about their significance. Finally, in the pages immediately
following we have collected a representative sampling of BROADCAST NEWS articles
over the twenty -year period. This is just
to refresh the memories of the old- timersand perhaps to slightly awe the new -comers
(and Johnny-come -latelies).
To these article by station engineers and
our own engineers, we add station stories
and equipment news stories written by our
own technical staff. Then we throw in a
few of our best and prettiest ads, and
that's it. No cheesecake, no cartoons (well,
not many), no company puffs; in fact, no
extraneous material at all. Just broadcast
engineering and operation- straight. That
has been the continuing policy for twenty
years, and, if we're here, it will be for another twenty.
Starting on Pg. 14 will be found an overall index to all issues of BROADCAST NEWS
to date. To those of you who have carefully hoarded your back copies this should
be of some usefulness. To those who
haven't it may still be a useful reference
to material available elsewhere.
VOLUME NO. 48. March
On the outside cover of this Anniversary
Issue we have reproduced the covers of all
-
-in
-
However, please note that we have a
supply of only a few back issues. Those
available are Nos. 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47,
48, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59,
60, 61, 63, 64. First come, first served as
long as they last. Twenty cents each for
handling and mailing.
3
www.americanradiohistory.com
kOADCAST
1936
APRIL.
NEWS
1ROADCAS1
A FIELD INTENSITY
Top
A Simple Method of Adjusting
DlcEy5E5
W
193,
SLIDE RULE
Loaded and Sectionalized Antennas
n
BROADCAST NEWS
.
NOYFAIEI 193-
LIGHTNING IS A MENACE
tROADCAST NEWS
.
...,,,,,,
113
MAY
C
LOGARITHMIC RECORDING OF FIELD
A
INTENSITIES
Brief Survey
JULY. 1935
etoADCAST NEWS
of the Characteristics
Broadcast
S
OR
G
SIMPLIFIED SOLUTION FOR ANTENNA
IMPEDANCE MATCHING NETWORKS
SIMPLIFIED
/J,,;Ed;r,;
Y.r
r
.,
rl
i,,..l. .,t
..
11
A/r...;/i.vl
SUMUN13
.Irma. Slr..i_n
IROADCAST NEWS.
JANUARY
1
Twenty
NEWS
Years of
!',..IrrrN,r...
r,..rr,..r.
A LAMONT
63.0ADCAST
111
rr
of
RCA YEAR,
Fe, O.e.
Ir..rl
913
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
rd.lr Irr
hnd
r. ..
W0WN
NETWORK SYNTHESIS
arra
739
33^9.
NEWS
eROA DC AST
Antennas
N
BROADCAST
9, .t vOtieNWr3DEA
lN
YOUNG
NEWS
r.
,
MARCH,
PARALLEL MIXER CIRCUIT
CALCULATIONS
1139
NrN.N,
MECHANICAL DESIGN
OF OPEN WIRE
TRANSMISSION
Jhi. /rrrprrJ,rnr ,¿,,.At
I.',rRrrr.. r+
l+
LINES
II
GA
At
XI
BROADCAST
SUGGESTIONS
1930
JULY
'NEWS
'-1sECC3S'
1
NEWS
AUOUSy
F OR
To MEASURINGCOUPLING OF
EQUIPMENT
T.I.F.
CALCULATION OF
LOADS
FOR TRANSMITTER
E930
R -F
CHARACTERISTICS
NEWS
ADCASt
ER
OVERHEAD
1931
MN,
OF UNBALANCED
TRANSMISSION
LINES
l.w.n.r.. ..._r-
LINE
TRANSMISSION
SIX WIRE
-r
FM
STATION
FM
AN
GROUNDED-GRID
Anylit'ers Own
R30isf
reeUenos Power
Handle Wider
Bandwidths
AMPLIFIERS
POWER
CaÉ
Sy
aCie
THE GROUNDED -GRID
-
At Hüner f revolves
Comets Operate
Covets
Graunded.God
TUSE
And Can
iRMEp
A NON-
FOR
SITE
A
SELECTING
AUDIO MEASUREMENTS
with an AM
RECEIVER
I
I
Grounded -Cathode
"n "lited
C.
Rik MOBILE
pNENNp
AMPLIFIER
h3
WEBER
E
I
F1Ett
Dsc ILLOSCOPES
BAND
ZHE FM
HOWbrTHo
ST4RNTk
AND VACUUM
TUBE
VOLTMETERS
WHAT THEY
DO
YERE RAaDGAND
UREMENjiNN
3.
TECHNICAL ARTICLES on
TECHNIQUES
MEASURING
FOR
DISTORTION
AND
FREQUENCY RESPONSE
AUDIO
SPEECH INPUT SYSTEMS
TRANSMITTING SYSTEMS
FM
lbeA
I
I
,. u..m
nvrbrvl.E.,w.
..T
.
the Prn. ,...,.
nl
.,
.,
Ln.,,,-
By
REQUENCY
RECORDING AND
Fine GROOVE TECHNIQUE
H.
E.
RANGE
PREFERENCE
SPEECH
FOR by
AND MUSIC
By
ROYS
RSA
MARRY
i
OLSON
station operation have always been the most important part of BROADCAST
NEWS. Many of these
articles have emphasized
the how.to -do-it angle. All
have been chosen because
of their direct usefulness
to station engineers. In
twenty years of publishing, BROADCAST NEWS
has printed literally hundreds of such articles, most
of them by the top men in
the profession. The wide
range of subjects covered
by these articles is indicated by the headings in
the columns
MEASURED
:HARACTERISTICS
of the
PYLON ANTENNA
.,...
r3,13313
i..
A
r,`
'
.
1
M. .r
.r n1iW
.
.
43
R'N
4e'
',>RrM9.rm
.'nRrr
.
.,
.a.,w..Rr1
,6+eriAt
OrfCR1tT1ON Or
9.
1ww+iw.in.rr,a.
.ST
.emi.lnnWmr3
r. __
W.I.
M
R4
E-RVRW,'NO*.
N.eMN.n
SrT111
°: 13, °rI_':
A METHOD OF
DETER
TRACKI NG
THE
CAPABILITIES
ILITIES MI
by
OF A PICKUP
EO
óS
.
u3
"
S393
33,31.33
,
NAAR
3'.
.
'A'^^...
<.R.a...
N.
J.
I,t
vrlrr
www.americanradiohistory.com
- STrLUS
at the left.
Broadcast
INTERESTING
WGAR
News
DETAILS OF THE
50 -F
TRANSMITTER
^Jw. ..l
INSTALLATIONS
AT
THESE TWO
RICHARDS' STATIONS,
BOTH OF WHICH
ARE NOW OPERATING WITH
CLEVELAND
re
.^n1
sere,
M.
50,000 WATTS
,
i
1
reel.
I
w..l..
.
.1
:p'
d1.1
1..
tom
°petee
le
sm.
...As
.
KMPC
I1.11sA'
T..,
el.
LOS ANGELES
.,.
1R
i
a
At'
h.
r
u:
9rAW x.A
r
n. w 10114
+mM.
Ae
Solos S.. IS
e..w...
4
nl
Y'
A....
x°
L .... °u....Mn,,.,
.Il-e,
Ae r
,
Mn'^
n, L*
seen. tonemeas
N
L.yMiensA
A
a. NI
er
mP
VN
A
+-.p.
IL.A
Rr.
,
A.
R:.
+aAt.
wee
.
,,..
CAA-KGKO
STUDIOS
nut
rrele
neee
lu
Or-
;..Àer+d y.
.
...r
4. +
KOMG'S NEW 50,000
By F.
STATION
'\
DESCRIPTIONS
have been a close second
to technical articles in
popularity as a BROADCAST NEWS feature. More
than 200 station installalions have been described
in detail. Many of these
station stories have included detailed floor plans,
schematic diagrams, and
photographs showing details of construction, arrangement of equipment,
etc. From these. station
engineers have been able
to learn "how the other
fellow
did it ".
pick
Yal
er.
14Jr+,1
.
4
°
nsl
.
Y.
1
rk Ja,...a ,,.
V
r
,
ASV L
n.
.....
..., .....
...
,.,a..
N
el,
A
Y
w,a-p.:
nl rww..r
..
e.
^;`
.....
wn.r.
Iu
.
n
1
up
KOMO
BUILDS
,
Seattle Station,
New Studio Aoridl,g
Studio and Transmitting
Equipment
NEW
A
PLANT
New 50.000 Wan
transmitter Building
and All One of the
Conprvalon and equipmentFiner Anywhere
full Derails
In This
Molle
hT) \IO
h LN 1. I.-a
s
l
t
.nove
NI..
I
1
II
Issue
no
e
+..
AA.
r4
M
?Aa.l....
bJ6 .S,1,, .m
_°
q
.
-' e1..
/
N
r
m1
Ilvlhrnn.u.+a
, e
V
rrT
.
,,....1
Jrn
w, ,..,i.
té
ideas they could use in
planning their stations.
y
Tu
^r
_gr
.
r.
7,.....-.7.,...,
.
1
,..
TRANSMI
MIIIER
;1_17.-',....',7,,,,....----,.......-7,,,.--..-
.., !.
tl.y
WATT
BROTT
uS,,.,r,dyÓ,.F.
,.r
}M1
h
l.
/ )'A
w
r..,
..
.
rl.. ..i
-'
R
T,..,...,,., ..
RCA PRESENTS TELEVISION TO
BROADCASTERS
TELEVISION
TELEVISION RECEIVERS ARE HERE
IS
HERE
rr.n-T, LT:71'
.,!
:
k_...........
DECEMBER 1936 issue described demonstration o
RCA Television on November 12, 1936. Nearly
300 station executives attended. A part of firs
large scale field test of TV, this demonstration
was the first of RCA's "progress reports on tele-
vision" to the broadcast industry.
1939 issue reported the introduction o
commercial" television receivers in the New
York market, noted the wild -eyed enthusiasm o
crowds viewing television for the first time a
the World's Fair. Some of the receivers shown
(modified for 525 line operation) are still in use.
JULY
'
issue, proclaiming that "Television Is
Here
also announced the first TV Transmitter
to be offered for general sale -the RCA Type
TT -1A, predecessor of the RCA TT -5A Transmitter
now used by nearly 100 TV stations. Also announced the first "commercial model" TV camera.
JULY 1939
TELEVISION PIONEERING MILESTONES AS REPORTED
IN TWENTY YEARS OF BROADCAST NEWS
+v AONIR I.
NBC's
RCA TELEVISION FIELD PICKUP EQUIPMENT
/MOT
MYtOW
R.
SI
EXPERIENCE
with
PORTABLE
TELEVISION
EOUIPMENT
UMEU
OEiWI
COMP.
fAMERR
uMER.
u1
UMEU
m«raw
uMOO.
cAMER.
.uuMn
fEP
._...
.
EOnMOE
EE:i
UMIT
vraq
PULSE
THREE CAMERA
CA.'
SYSTEM
issue described RCA's new "Field Pickup Equipment ". This
was the first commercial -type field equipment to be produced. It set
a pattern for field units which is still being followed. Today's units,
although using image orthicons instead of iconoscopes, are arranged
in very similar manner.
JULY 1940
O
AUGUST 1944 issue carried this article on NBC's experience with the
RCA Fielc Equipment (described in the July 1940 issue). The
of NBC engineers with this, and other early equipment,
formed the background of nearly all early post -war TV planning.
prewar
experience
rh.
TK -30A CAMERA
with the
RCA'S NEW
REVOLUTIONIZES
IMAGE ORTHICON
HIGHSENSITIVITY CAMERA
TELEVISION PICKUP TECHNIQUE
JANUARY 1946 saw the first article describing the new RCA Image Orthicon,
the camera pickup tube which obviated the need for extremely high light
levels and thereby made possible today's TV techniques. BROADCAST NEWS
was among the first to recognize the tremendous portent of this development.
In a six -page article, complete with illustrations depicting televising by candle-
light. the new tube was described in terms of near rapture.
OCTOBER 1946 issue carried an eight -page picture story describing the
new RCA TK -30A TV Camera --the first TV camera to use the image
orthicon, and the first TV camera to be produced in quantity. An unusual
engineering success, and an immediate hit, this camera has been the
standard of the industry ever since. Today. some five years later,
nearly 800 TK -30A Cameras are in use all over the world.
-
KSD -TV
A
POST -WAR TELEVISION
by RORIRT
Kre
L.
.3á3GS
12
2.61
Q.ta
STATION
COI
.r..,.......w..:...ew»+.
FIRST UHF TV TRANSMITTER SHIPPED
Television Tranrminxr Installed at NBC .
Experimental "Satellite' Station in Bridgeport, Connecticut
RCA Type TTU -IA
l<i
ç1;
I
heralded the advent
of the first new TV station to go on the
close race for this honor was KSD -TV in
Louis. BROADCAST NEWS paid tribute with a ten-page article describing
station's equipment facilities in detail. This was the first of a series of
Station stories which in the five years since then has included descriptions
17 of America's top TV stations.
JUNE 1947 issue
air following the war. Winner
St.
the
TV
of
I
of a
JANUARY 1950 issue carried first story on a new aspect of television -the burgeoning interest in the UHF' spectrum. As a result
of early tests in Washington, D. C.. RCA decided to field test
UHF television at a site near Bridgeport, Conn. A '"commercial
type" transmitter, built by RCA for this test, was the subject of
this BROADCAST NEWS article.
-
7
www.americanradiohistory.com
f
HOW
pF OUR TV SYSTEM
pPIv
y
OF
PHILOS
th
Parts of
NE
Important
rboice of
of t e Most
Behind the
of the Functions
Pulse, Et.
of the Reasoning
Brief Review
Explanation
of
With
Shope of Synchronizing
stem,
o} Transmission,
type
andards, TYPe
by JOHN
,1d. -.... ".I Sé.d'n
mar. m n:
H. ROE
4w.r'a
SZ
AND
pl
THE
YOUR IMAGE
by
BEST PICTURE
ORTHICON
OUT
CAMERA
H. N.
KOZANOWSKI
.... O. ym.r O,mn
°
V10E0
PROEDVRE
GNMENT LIFIERS
AMP
N. T. 1011.01111
PA
f
NóNn:ru:
fM'
synw+
'xdrr"WO4
'
HIGH GAIN
AND DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
TELEVISION BROADCASTING
..:.+ ..
r
6Y
,..Y.4
GET
,...,.
,.
R1..y
:"..n.[o..-
TO
.a
FOR
is
by IS,ER
¡.. r..r 4.
..r+n:.`
x
r.1,nx
.
v.m^. ...w
R...nn..,,
4
.al
bR
1b 4
y¡.MCGMS.
line v,.bP
I,9.........
Twenty
WOLF
J
Lhldk
... ni.
M1,t-n
Years of
^
PP'
TV REMOTE CONTROL
um
wpm
SWITCHING
W.
TUCKER &
E.
FOR TV
IN VIDEO AMPLIFIERS
Many and
Switching Systems Handle
TV Programs Economically
Complex Variations of
New Video Relay
RESPONSE
FREQUENCY
ADJUST
HOW TO
MONRO
R.
C.
JOHN H. ROE
VERSATILE VIDEO
SPECIAL EFFECTS SYSTEM
By
TELEVISION STUDIO ACOUSTICS
M. GORE
E.
1
by
M. RETTINGER
liellywasst
Plate A. C.Voltage
of Output
Interval
Measurement
Scanning
of
On Means
Circuit During
Television
Deflection
HOW TO
USE
SABILIZING
THE TELEVISION
MRAUGH
eRU
by J. M.
..Y..r
5.nr,..
AMPLIFIER
JOHN H.
ROE
b
IHrEOpyCnOW
}I,.r J,4..W
.n
l
n
1h.
QIREOIIONAE
COMPOSITION OF
AAi ENA
SI
EMS
THE
,¡w^`b r,rk
,...h.
VIDEO
rM1.
WAVEFORM
AS SEEN ON THE SCOPE
By ROBERT M.
°
d
M
d.,
TV TECHNICAL ARTICLES
v,A,.rrF
h.Tl.
.I,.,.,r...N+Iw. *.
.14r1b<hNli..
wr..e. ,r:u
a mdr ,
m14Jw nt
n. ;Hw,-,....a any. .:I Ih. toold
W
;1i,...
have, in
.
w
,.d
'
mmal
h. TM
,. k o-.+.1
R
veiny
unN r
..h...l
J
la-
w
wI.t«.I.
e,Mnn !n.n ,b mrl
w1
I..,r. ...11 AIR,
Wah L.H :'
a......z .IF.1K E. :. M16
.6w1 x. ,r,.rm e-x rh. c,..
it. rw,::
:t..!4
IMyr,an
J,.n:,.WhaAnTw.m1á.,
^. .,
Ynn4aily
-m.
^
STANDARDIZING AND MEASURIN
VIDEO LEVELS IN A TV STATIOI
J. H. ROE
I.,.br
IV
....,.
,04.,
u
r
TV STUDI
STUDIO
hr..N,'
A.
teal u
ILLUMINATION
H. M.
B
R.
mien.
mint,
InM<
n.
..,
.
K
.1,.-.rI,.
rtes.
1
k.
FM,
.n4N
ax4
Poo
6.:
.wn.
.Ire`w..4
r,1441
ì
N.n6.
my
MINA.
4.sy
dn+Lmi ,. nih
.. eY r4.
R..w .l
.4.w
rv
r.,.
.L.
'
I
.,r
.6i.1w
[ ,h. .i,d.
,.,, .
h.
MM1
x
ru.Xrn1
rv
T4,m,r
br
hn
d,rf
^;ghI
y,nwn4
Im
.,
.4x .
4ar:mdM
4
MLe
:
e
,1'dlr'rn,.N ton.
ÏM 1aHr In. ism
w
..n..L.y
ay41
n.¡d ..x..-r..ul. n
,rMrn mnd
,4...h.yur4.V....
e.w. ,X
'
h.n,u
rfww' u'1
r
.V
dh
rl
TM`
noni}
Lye
yan
4.M
u.
OmM4
II.F!,.. +.-''T.a.,r`.rewl aLIiN,
le,n1y6n
,e110
54.4
q
mtmóteml,.rri4.
4.,. 4I,
n
r
ly.h4 nl,n6s1,
L
:ui
M
a
M 1541.1.1
.., ... l..,Lwr.
,erM
,y
"r"n17"trt1Y
,r 4eih1¡n iy
w.Inf ,rÇ
'Irma
rrri,
h:
4
LrWrnIh.6Ti.m..',4s
,.wN
AHOUR
..,.r..i va.r..,.,n. h-exo
.4 b,.,ù.rrrl
mmpu,
n
r^A+'nyNhiwl,d,
u rAr a,1er
By
GURIN'
II
,Y.i44 W............
p
recent years,
gradually replaced similar
!
J
nn
I46lirIM.
maimal. e4
.M
..
°;,:.a:N
I
en
articles on AM and FM.
While most station engineers were not yet in television, nevertheless, nearly
all were looking forward
it
to it, and preparing for
insofar as possible. Articles of this kind, containing material of a type
found almost nowhere else,
have been received with
great enthusiasm by TV
station engineers.
PRACTICAL
I
EQUIPMENT
LAYOUTS
TELEVISION
STATIONS
I
FOR
1w
r
A
HOW
CAN
GROW
ioyl
..
STAGE ONE:
STAGE TWO:
TELEVISION STATION
IN
1
network programs only
film
providing [oddities for
,,,,.,.....,.
.11
AI
.I.i.di
Broadcast
m.l.
t-
t... prv.
1.
le
a
STAGES
EASY
own.. M f.:.io. Á!.úl
tiIl.'Ad...14...N....ivrM
. RI
..tl. ,Ir h. .411..
AAA.
Iti. .I.11+^' rwl
,,.p,y.me.'.
1
m
.1.
.
Ail
k
^I
iel.. 14 r.g4
T...1
I.In....
:
r^.'
4
.r
1.....
I.... ..a
,..1..
T
L
4
1.
v. .''`1v
d'4.
4
I
..
.
R.
.i14144.nI.v.A4'n1.,
Ih aft
.I.0
I
p..,.iN.iN.JM il...I1...Iti«m
fill.
I
An.
and
rv.n
p.r1aLL
4. a.n.sa l!.
.. ...,,
ä
.I.J.
.W 1u
di
..
nnd.l
A.11.
a R. u4m
Ialw
.
dly mat
..d
wvJ
kw
L
ol
MrJw~.
..Irl uA.. a ...Err.
d.W4F
1..go1.Jxa1
provide+
add.Toa of poeoble e9uipmentstud. .news
field pickup, and live talon.
._
'v..Jüd
.
w.
...' .h.41.r...r 141 nr p1.1
SCALE MODELS
MADE FROM
PAPER CUTOUTS
AID TV STATION
PLANNING
by MARVIN
News
GASRIII
L.
l
Allits
11
;.:
H°usNG
04
F10
..w
St 11p, t.E
..
Y
PIANS
FOR
BUILDINGS
WGS
'TYPES
SES G
FUNCTIONAL
SpT10N5 AFFEC'TIN ANE
FAC1ORS
THE
REQUIREMENTS
..
OF
TELEVISION
ph
,
Al,
By DR.
WAIT
IV
yoga. Anon
fvgemen.
bade
J.
R
.............
STATION
DVECNINfKY'
DESIGN
of An
1
VIDEO
TV PLANNING ARTICLES
RELAY
SWITCHING LAYOUTS
..,..
MONRO
have also been very popular. All of these articles
were written especially for
BROADCAST NEWS and
have been slanted to the
special interests of station
engineers with the idea
that they should be of direct
usefulness
to
these
engineers in planning their
own installations. They
cover every aspect, from
first "idea" planning down
to the actual choice
of
equipment.
PLANNING
THE
TRANSMITTER
taHN V4tan.
by
BUILDING
1NG
www.americanradiohistory.com
bY
RENE
ggUGNONI
FC
A DBLE
DESIGN OF
55N ADLER
-
by CARLTON O. NOPPER
WMr,PSM
CrN
fy'w,
wMPPTV.
Old .aOPn.nw`AW
ast
..
.
m.rt
..,n°MNuñ
WHIO -TV
DAYTON
Miami Valley Broadcasting
Corporation's Unusually Well -Planned
Transmitter Plant Was Designed
Studio
and Erected By The Austin
Twenty
$TIDiOS
Years of
TV
OR'$
.
.
MiN
F
NEWwNa
9Y
.....
m,YloLiV.^rM+
.
vtY
f
W C AU-TV
,Mw.
bY JOHN co.
I
11, eKAµrPP
1
J(
utrGs
eG14ry
wi.rud11wRnyrvw
I
nd*
Ñ
y
RV.uv.yW'
. Om*,
bmrni
.
A¿
I414114
M w.1 .ode
.
Ì`w- 4P'a+
A
.
k Innil
e..
fa..
iv ii
;GO-TV, SAN FRANCISCO
orin9 Staff
KGO-N En9inh
a
.rad..
...
1
P
N.
vN d
.
rrW
MnYn t.' rMT.Pn
.. .m
>,
,p11
,...,
.
n
o-.wt+4
MP.-
Y^n
',t
.l,n.t
yti
e,i v..
sswe
arv^
mM
`
n
1
s
.ofi
nPMUJP.
AA..
v
!P`
Rat
W..a
mer1,.Mltu..If.JAW^,^
,u.+rn
TV STATION STORIES
.have become an outstand.
have
g feature of almost every
issue. Some 17 of these
stories running from eight
to twenty or more pages
in length, have appeared
since the first KSD -TV
story (see Pg. 7). All have
been accompanied by
large numbers of photo.
graphs showing, not only
equipment, but also the
design of studio and transmitter buildings, construction of studios, etc.
KANSAS CITY'S
=
WDF-TV
KANSAS CITY
-
.n:.:°«w..
a. ,
Co,
.V ,.
ws..
`
1.Y
---S--
?
r.
"Prf
MISSOURI
tertiAnut
mittml
`,-
as
.cn
_
i
sue:
fi
WOR -TV MASTER
-.....
te` t
ç:...Ii
,j:--'iYj
kti
Nom" -.+i
CIRCUIT DIAGRAM
OF THE VIDEO
SYSTEM LAYOUT
Broadcast
Yam
News
i
',pop
u' :° ¡;
.,
:,.,
r`
wwu.,
r
'Nrd.,
,awa,;
"aa;e.. ..m
àµ;
..
v
irrhJ il arm*
»e....,w,l n"".K`.ù M.
or
I+4e
r.a
.; ;I
il
Wwrire. u
...Om. k.
.r.we...W,n
.:
,w'Ia
.,i.AA,,.
_
I
ni.. ewnl,4ln.
.
'w`!I4..brpT
x.4
NarTq,. y,4InI
,
W
!....._
,
.
IwI,,iury;
.
®
I
I
an
xW
:41:414m..,
.
._.
.-
..11.1, un
kW
x
"-
I
,"-
ti
Y
w
.
___
,
I
N
b
ï
Mm
NG4rv.tup
..~`
--------
_s_s9CIZA
24'.1.--
f
reae9ex
nwi
a
. ..yá
u.lm..
J,
1
11f4
Iw.'4aew.,r.VI,.I`srNró:r
k.I e. tl Niw.
~Ia,.aN xI
y,
Ieryer avail
,
ÿ'
I'.,,.,,I
I
"°,lrv
,ru'64rt.
'a,hmu wave
4v
dauE
wu
na
p
TV Mr'
rao
NüN,d
°r.
,M .Y
W w,I,+M'
, m
.a
II
,
lmvl'N
l.uL
W
r".44
M.
nvn.4
W.tl.;a..wS
Oa
I
I
m.r,oW
M.'t M
:
_ e..w.rl
I
SYSTGM.
NOEa
aafo,M
II
I
t.w.AMd ad
bi. uee ,Nau
^
m
.
w
l
nwuJ P°ruud^
.iM.
whr ,weh^'
cr, ud
kre
N
ru.al,
r
.
.,._
a.n.A^n r
is
ti
SCHEMATIC
ltVtll
roe
..w.w^,°°..
DIAGRAMS
showing extent and arrangement of audio and
video circuits used in the
TV stations described have
been a part of most TV
station stories. When related to the physical op
eration of these stations.
the description of these
circuits serves to indicate
to other station engineers
the extent of equipment
facilities required for various types and sizes of
operations.
Special
By WOW-TV
Designed
"9System
9ineecs
n
ta
r..,,a...
¡r :
,rw
a`"n>rM
...,..,r
.
a
.,
` --`^aL
.,=
_
-
a,
.
WHAT THE VIEWER SEES AS THE CAMERAMAN
"ZOOMS IN" ON VARIOUS PARTS OF THE FIELD
Et" emesnt
/MM..
WPIX Baseball
71,
01111,
(MO..
.10
PI
Apop
HE
.
1,1,,11.1$
41.c.
SELECTS ONE
.
OF THREE
-
IN TYPICAL SWITCHING
-
CAMERA PICTURES
SEOUfNCE
WPIX MIXES ZOOMAR SHOTS WITH
-
No.253
CLOSEUPS FROM CAMERAS
FOR TRANSMISSION
.
In CAMERA SETUP
ES TILE COLECTOR
A
ear
SHOTS
OE CROCE OF
If
NE
WISHES HE CAN DO
SWITCHING
ZOOMAR
A
WHOLE
SEQUENCE WITH
CAMERA ALONE
THE
ON AN OUTFIELD HIT WPIX USUALLY
FOLLOWS THE BALL OUT
MD
BACA
WITH THE ZOOMAR
COME
NATURALLY
BASEBALL
TELECASTS
COMMERCIALS
ON
WPIX
t
BASEBALL TELEVISING
TECHNIQUES have been described
number of baseball telecasts
the early experience in this fieldin exhaustive detail in several issues of BROADCAST
NEWS. Because of a large
was considerable and could be
used as a guide to other types
of field operation.
FOOTBALL TELEVISING TECHNIQUES,
less standardized
NEWS articles, was written
especialy for this publicationthan baseball telecasts, were the subject of this article which,
by an outstanding network engineer
like many
with direct personal experience BROADCAST
in this field.
Teieui4iss9. FOOTBALL
FROM
LOS ANGELES COLISEUM
Ifilt
O. 41.0W1LL
43
?_11
www.americanradiohistory.com
'
tali
rrs,
_HOW
TV STOLE THE SHOW_
CONVENTION
CONVENTION VIDEO
-
CBS' EQWPME
VIDEO-LOCATION
OF THE CAMERAS
i
.iYe;i //,h:,,
CONVENTION
CONVENTION
CONVENTION AUDIO
-
THE
VIDEO
VIDEO
-
NBC'S EQUIPMENT
ABC'S EQUIPMENT SETUP
AUDIO POOL SETUP
VIDEO
CONVENTION
00.0.0 TeLECAM
-
WPIX'S
CONVENTION
NIL
IS fan 110.-P00.0 Ttlf
tS1
AUDIO
THE
"Non- Pooled"
_......
FACILITIES
_-°-
-t
_,.....
=4my.____._
....,....,,....,
,.........
w..
;k,(.
11
CONVENTION TELEVISING
and copy, the equipment TECHNIQUES were exhaustively
T
setups IQdEb
described in this
Y each of the
networks in coveringarticle which portrayed in photographs,
the 1948 Political
conventions for television.
OTHER TV DEVELOPMENTS,
in fields outside
such developments
that of broadcasting,
seem to portend future
have occasionally been
developments in broadcast
reported in BROADCAST
TV equipment,
NEWS.
as, for instance, this
story on evolutionThi s has been done only when
of lightweight
"airborne"
TELEVISION'S
AIRBORNE
e d
t
..-
C
_'
Vatragar
AN
RCA
by
a
Demonstrated
and RING nososh
Cul n Marsh ore the
Anas t
Navy
and Me Nan
o Airborne television
a Work
'Ca
Ten
of
m,nanon
BLOCK
This is
I
in the Bomb_
the Television Equipment
1
Equipment
the Television
Closeups o
he Control Plane
the
the Bomb and
used
rim
aw,n,
Bomb looks
This is what a Television
,
n:
;,4N`
sm.
.. r: -,._..""
TV.
DEVELOPMENT
RCA
t
w.
.fir
like-
This is hew
its course is
Controlled..
"MIME "
sIMPIIdlt hu $t
SM+TLLER
STILL
THE NEW
THIS IS
EQUIPMENT
AIRBORNE TELEVISION
.e.e.r
TMs
Amyy°g1
un
se.
`d-
Nlst
th
no
awn h
ohm
"ROC"
IS THE
NIGN
"IS
ANGLE
THE
TELEVISION
FOR WNICN
GUIDED BOMB
"WHO
h hen
n.
MAS RESIGNED
SETUP
tier
add
IN1
EQ
INTRODUCTION TO BROADCAST NEWS INDEXES
WHAT IS INCLUDED
I'he BROADCAST NEWS Master Cross -Reference Index is a
handy guide for reference to the numerous articles which have
appeared in the 66 volumes of BROADCAST NEWS since 1931.
Representing a 20 year accumulation of technical information,
the index has been composed in three main parts to facilitate
its use. The first section is a "Chronological Listing of BROADCAST
NEws" issues, showing issue or volume number, printing date,
and an "index key number" (this is simply the volume number
followed by two zeros). The second section is a "Master Table
of Contents" which lists by title and author -according to
volume and page number -every article printed in volumes 1
through 66. The third section is the "Cross- Reference Index"
which includes every article, in volumes 1 through 66, listed
categorically, under main and subheadings according to subject
matter, uses, or other helpful classifications.
WHAT THE NUMBERS MEAN
The numbering system indicates the
HOW TO
The main headings are used to designate particular subject
matter, in alphabetical order, within a particular alphabet letter group. In cases where one heading satisfactorily includes all
pertinent articles, only one appears. Where it is necessary to
break down further the main headings, two or more subheadings
are used. These subheadings have been indented to show further
breakdowns as needed.
NEWS"
USE IT
l'he BROADCAST NEws Cross -Reference Index is easy to use,
since practically every listing appears several times, under a different heading. For example, the user seeking information about
"transmitting equipment" will find it listed "all- inclusively"
under "E
Equipment, and "T Transmitting Equipment.
If it is desired to obtain data which applies only to a specific
class of Transmitting Equipment such as AM, FM or TV, the
user will find these listed "selectively" under "A" AM- Transmitting Equipment, "F" FM- Transmitting Equipment and
"T" Television- Transmitting Equipment. Thus, it is not necessary to sort through information which is not pertinent to the
user's immediate needs.
"-
WHAT THE "INDEX" HEADINGS MEAN
"BROADCAST
issue or volume number as well as the page number in the specific
issue or volume. For the issues 1 through 9 all references are
3 digit numbers-the first digit designates the volume number
and the second and third digits designate the page or pages in
the particular issue. For the issues 10 through 66 the the same
system is used, but references are made to 4 digit numbers.
The first two digits designate the volume number and the third
and fourth signify the page or pages in the particular volume.
For example, 904 refers the user to page 4 of volume 9: similarly, 3521 refers the user to volume 35, page 21.
"-
BROADCAST NEWS -CHRONOLOGICAL LISTING
Index
Volume
Date
Date
Key No.
Volume
Date
Key No.
23
2300
2400
2500
2600
2700
2800
2900
3000
3100
3200
3300
3400
3500
3600
3700
3800
3900
4000
4100
4200
4300
4400
45
46
26
27
28
29
30
December 1936
May 1937
June 1937
November 1937
December 1937
June 1947
September 1947
December 1947
March 1948
May 1948
August 1948
October 1948
December 1948
February 1949
4500
4600
4700
4800
4900
5000
5100
5200
5300
5400
5500
5600
5700
5800
5900
6000
6100
6200
6300
6400
6500
6600
October 1931
2
January 1932
3
April 1932
100
200
300
4
July 1932
400
5
October 1932
6
January 1933
13
April 1933
August 1933
November 1933
February 1934
May 1934
August 1934
December 1934
14
February 1935
15
April 1935
June 1935
September 1935
December 1935
April 1936
June 1936
8
9
10
11
12
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
July 1936
October 1936
Index
Volume
I
7
Index
Key No.
500
600
700
800
900
1000
1100
1200
1300
1400
1500
1600
1700
1800
1900
2000
2100
2200
24
25
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
July 1938
January 1939
May 1939
July 1939
May 1940
July 1940
August 1940
February 1941
May 1941
September 1941
January 1944
August 1944
43
January 1945
June 1945
January 1946
June 1946
44
October 1946
41
42
14
www.americanradiohistory.com
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
April 1949
June 1949
September 1949
65
Jan.-February, 1950 ...
March-April 1950
May -June 1950
July -August 1950
Sept.-October, 1950 ...
Jan.-February, 1951 ...
March-April, 1951 ....
May -June 1951
July- August 1951
66
Sept.-October 1951
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
61
....
BROADCAST NEWS MASTER TABLE OF CONTENTS
(Volumes Through 66)
1
INDEX NUMBERING (ISSUES
KEY TO
(A)
First
digit indicates "Broadcast News" volume or issue number.
Index
No.
102
106
107
108
110
Author
Subject
STATION KFI, LOS ANGELES
MICROPHONE PLACING....
L. S. YULE AND I. R. BAKER
RCA VICTOR PERSONALITIES
WHAT IS YOUR "COVERAGE ".
POLICE ALARM
BROADCAST
602
605
606
Taylor
610
612
614
614
615
616
618
619
620
623
624
626
628
629
by
J.
P.
Randall
202
204
206
208
210
MAINTENANCE MEANS MONEY....
211
POLICE ALARM BROADCAST NEWS
POLICE RADIO FROM AN ADMINISTRATION
212
213
214
219
STANDPOINT
by E. K. Jett, Federal Radio Commission
by T. A. Smith
A NEW STATION FOR READING, PA... _..
KFGQ RUNS SIX HOUR DX TEST
HOW ABOUT YOUR "MODULATION
WANTED -A FREE WHEELING TYPEWRITER
302
304
306
312
314
318
320
322
324
402
404
406
408
409
410
411
411
412
416
416
by
C.
J.
by C. L. Beach
by A. H. Castor
"'
by
J.
P.
PIONEER NBC STATIONS MODERNIZED
by Raymond Guy
_
by W. L. Lyndon
100 -250 WATT BROADCAST TRANSMITTER.....
MERCURY VAPOR RECTIFIER RADIOTRONS
by A. H. Castor and W. G. Moran
RCA PERSONALITIES
by Harold C. Vance
_.
ST. LOUIS POLICE RADIO_
_
by Harold C. Vance
CHICAGO NBC STUDIOS
by Henry Grossman
PIPE ORGAN PICKUP
BROADCAST FROM SPEEDING TRAIN
by J. P. Taylor
NEWS ABOUT YOUR FREQUENCY MONITOR
NEW WCAU STATION NEARS COMPLETION
SURGE IMPEDANCE AND SERIES RESISTANCE OF
RADIO FREQUENCY TRANSMISSION LINES
DIRECTIONAL BROADCASTING AT WFLA -WSUN
.....
MODERN STATION AT WORCESTER, MASS.
RADIO IN THE PALMY DAYS -(filler)
WHAT IS IT, OLD TIMER?
MILAN AND ROME STATIONS
THE NATURAL MISTAKE
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
POLICE ALARM BROADCAST NEWS
5 METERS.._
(with the Model ET -5000 HF Transceiver)
GOING DOWN TO
by
_.
R. B. Dome
by 8. Adler
by Ted Hill
by Fred Muller
by
P. A.
Anderson
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT CHICAGO, 1933
by Hans Roder
BROADCAST ANTENNAS
by Albert Meyer
UNDER VOLTAGE RELAY FOR TUBE TRANSMITTERS
WLBG CHANGES HANDS
A NEW INSTALLATION FOR WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA (WWNC)
PUBLIC TO HEAR ORGAN IN SCHWAB MANSION ON RADIO
417
418
422
422
423
424
THE
502
506
509
.... by Earle J.
WBT EXPANDS TO 25,000 WATTS.._
by Dr. H. F.
THE VELOCITY MICROPHONE
KOYL 10 YEARS OLD
RCA BROADCAST TRANSMITTERS IN SOUTH AMERICA... by Fred
STUDIO NOTES
by Ralph L.
INSULATION FOR VERTICAL RADIATORS
by J. P.
A NEW HIGH- FREQUENCY BROADCAST TRANSMITTER
510
511
512
516
518
520
521
524
525
526
528
529
532
536
540
Taylor
LET'S GET
Gluck
Olson
Muller
Jenner
Taylor
ACQUAINTED
by George Malcom Smith
A NEW NETWORK FOR NEW ENGLAND
WCAU USES DEAD END AND LIVE END STUDIOS
WBEN -THE BUFFALO EVENING NEWS STATION
by T. A. Smith
INSTALLS NEW TRANSMITTER. __.
WHAT IS IT, OLD TIMER?
by Edmund A. Loport
THE LINE TO THE ANTENNA.
POLICE ALARM BROADCAST NEWS
POLICE RADIO -MODEL ET -3670
RCAC DIVERSITY TELEPHONE EQUIPMENT AS USED
by
IN ITS ADDRESSED PROGRAM SERVICE
BROADCASTING STATION WWSW, PITTSBURGH
TRANSCEIVER BROADCAST FROM GLIDER
by H. C. Vance
H. Simpson, Jr.
by M. J. Sartory
by T. A. Smith
S.
1
THROUGH 9)
Next two digits indicate the pages on which articles begin
Index
No.
by I. R. Baker
by T. A. Smith
EQUIPMENT
BROADCASTING IN EUROPE........
TRANSMITTING RADIOTRONS
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
(B)
Subject
Author
WSM GOES ON HIGH POWER
by George D. Hoy
WHO BUT GEORGE CLARK COULD
THE SELECTION OF SITES FOR BROADCASTING
STATIONS
by H. E. Gihring
RADIO STATION WWL
by Ben Adler
PIONEER "LIVE -END, DEAD END" STUDIOS..
by C. Gordon Jones
RADIO BROADCAST RESCUES NAVAL AIRPLANE FLEET
OLD FAITHFUL (UV -864 TUBE)
DID YOU KNOW
......
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING
WHAT IS IT, OLD TIMER?
by
RADIO'S DEBT TO CALVIN COOLIDGE
NIPPER MAKES HIS BOW ON THE AIR
THE NEW BEAT FREQUENCY OSCILLATOR
POLICE ALARM BROADCAST NEWS
A MINIATURE ULTRA -HIGH FREQUENCY RECEIVER
631
ORGAN REVEILLE (artist -Fred Feibel)
702
WCAU -A MODERN MONUMENT TO THE
ART OF BROADCASTING.... .._. _.
A VISITOR TOURS WCAU
710
716
F.
Muller
by Orestes H. Caldwell
by J. P. Taylor
by W. F. Diehl
by P. A. Anderson
by John G. Leitch
by Kenneth W. Stowmon
STRONG BROADCAST
SIGNALS
by Allred N. Goldsmith (Dr.)
TWO GIRLS, TWENTY FINGERS
LEON COLE, ORGANIST AND TECHNICIAN
POLICE ALARM BROADCAST NEWS -The Baltimore Police Radio System
721 -1 RCA VICTOR DEMONSTRATES POLICE RADIO
AT POOR RICHARD LUNCHEON
721.2 FRANCE ESTABLISHES POLICE RADIO SERVICE
724
THE INAUGURAL BROADCAST-A Tribute to the Advertisers
726
NEW RCA VICTOR EXECUTIVE
726
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
730
VELOCITY MICROPHONE TEST CURVES
by J. P. Taylor
735
DID YOU KNOW
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
RCA VICTOR LABORATORY TEST INSTRUMENTS
736
by William F. Diehl
742
WHAT IS IT, OLD TIMER?
742
HOG CALLER SHOOTS THE WORKS (WJAG)
743 -1 PRIDE GOETH BEFORE A FALL -AND SOMETIMES AFTER
743-2 NEWS FROM FOREIGN FIELDS
A NEW MERCURY VAPOR RECTIFIER TUBE
744
THE BATTLE FOR
719
719
720
.
802
INCREASED POWER FOR WOC -WHO
806
814
818
THE ICONOSCOPE
THE RCA 850 RADIOTRON
by P. A. Loyer
by Dr. V. K. Zworykin
by H. F. Dart
TURNTABLE WINS RECOMMENDATIONS
NEW TRANSCRIPTION
KTBS BUILDS OWN VERTICAL RADIATOR
KTBS BUILDS OWN VERTICAL RADIATOR
RADIO TELEPHONY ON THE SOUND MOVIE LOT
GETTING HOT AT WLW
821
NBC BROADCASTS MAMMOTH ORGAN
822
DID YOU KNOW
..
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
MEASURING ANTENNA RESISTANCE
824
by L. F. Jones
TRANSMISSION LINE FORMULAS
826
by L. F. Jones
827
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
830
WCAM- CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY
831
STUDIO NOTES
NEW STATION SERVES SOUTH CAROLINA -WFBC
832
by T. A. Smith
UNIQUE LOW POWER STATION
834
by Peter Goelet
TOWER AT WSM
._.. by George Dewey Hay
835
836
SOUND REENFORCING AND BROADCAST PICKUP
_.
AT ROBIN HOOD DELL
by Kenneth W. Stowmon
837
STUDIO NOTES
THE BALTIMORE POLICE RADIO SYSTEM
838
841.1 WILBUR RHODES
841-2 POLICE CHIEF QUINN BROADCASTS AS HOBBY
NEW POLICE RADIO SYSTEM FOR EAST TENNESSEE...
by Ben Adler
842
WHAT POLICE RADIO IS DOING FOR CENTRAL KENTUCKY
844
846
STATEMENT ISSUED BY W. R. G. BAKER
847
HIS MASTER'S VOICE OF THE AIR
848
WHAT IS IT, OLD TIMER?
CITY
MANAGER OF MIAMI RECOMMENDS POLICE RADIO
848 -2
819
819.1
819.2
820
.....
15
BROADCAST NEWS MASTER TABLE OF CONTENTS- (Cont'd)
KEY TO INDEX NUMBERING (ISSUES
1
THROUGH 9)
KEY TO
digit indicates "Broadcast News' volume or issue number.
Next two digits indicate the pages on which articles begin.
(A) First
(A)
(B)
(B)
Index
Index
No.
902
906
909
910
912
915
916
918
924
925
926
930
933
933
933
934
Author
Subject
KW TRANSMITTER
UNIQUE
NEW METHODS OF SOLUTION OF
VACUUM TUBE PROBLEMS
by
1
WSYR BROADCASTS
DID YOU KNOW
PRIZE
L.
1002
1004
1007
1008
Jones and J.
F.
No,
Young
1202
by loury G. Maloff
1204
E.
by W.
S.
by
Fitzpatrick
F. Muller
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF A
1209
1210
LET'S GET
1207
1211
MODERN RADIO STATION
KPO GOES TO 50 KW
DICK LEIBERT
LEADING A DOG'S LIFE AT THE WORLD'S FAIR
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
A CATHODE RAY MODULATION INDICATOR
LEW WHITE "RADIO CITY" ORGANIST
NEW MOBILE TRANSMITTER FOR NBC
by D. M. Stonier
by Raymond F. Guy
1213
1214
1217
1221
by
Ballantine
C.
E.
1224
1226
WITHOUT A DOUBT
TERRA -WAVE POLICE RADIO SYSTEMS OF
by
A VISIT TO THE NEW WLW
PROGRAM AMPLIFIER-1934 DESIGN
WBRE AT WILKES -BARRE IS MODERNIZED
BYRD ANTARCTIC EXPEDITION TO ORIGINATE
Anderson
A.
P.
ENGLEWOOD, N. J., GETS POLICE RADIO SYSTEM
DEANS OF RADIO MEET AT CHICAGO
CBS FIELD ENGINEER GETS BYRD EXPEDITION POST
CHANGE NOTES
by George
ON TIME -A RAILROAD'S DAILY RADIO STUNT
STATION IDENTIFICATION NAMEPLATES FOR
THE NEW VELOCITY MICROPHONES
1230
1232
1233
F.
McClelland
Baker
by Edmund Frost
by I.
R.
1034
WEBC AT DULUTH- SUPERIOR
WHO'S WHO AT "RADIO HEADQUARTERS"
1036
1038
1042
1046
1047
1048
1049
-
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED- BROADCASTING PERSONALITIES
A 1934 MONITORING EQUIPMENT.
by W. L. Garnett
RCA VICTOR DEVELOPS NEW FIELD INTENSITY METER.... by Wm. F. Diehl
AIR CONDITIONING AT THE RADIO CITY
STUDIOS OF NBC
by Oscar McClellan
BABE GOES ON "THE AIR"
WHAT
IS
...
AN "RA" TAG?
1051
1052
RADIO FROM STRATOSPHERE
NEW MOBILE TRANSMITTER FOR RADIO CITY SERVICE
HOLLYWOOD ON THE AIR
by George Greaves
1102
FIVE HUNDRED KILOWATTS
1109
CONVENTION COMMITTEE -9TH ANNUAL
1110
1116
1118
1134
1138
1140
1142
1143
1145
1146
1149
1150
1152
1152
1157
1158
1159
1160
1161
1162
PIONEER BROADCASTING
SYNCHRONIZATION
NBC AT RADIO CITY
RECORDINGS AND TRANSCRIPTIONS
F.
Jones
IRE
by George H. Clark
.._. by C. W. Horn
by C. L. Beach
(Raymond Sooy and Charles Sooy)
1312
1314
1316
1318
1322
1324
1326
1327
1328
1329
1330
1331
1402
1404
1405
1406
1410
1414
1416
1418
1420
1423
1424-1
SHORT -WAVE RADIO...
by H. H. Beverage
THE OPERATION OF MERCURY VAPOR
RECTIFIER TUBES
by J. B. Epperson
POLICE RADIO PROTECTION
by George E. Anderson
(RADIO) POLICE AT ENGLEWOOD GET TWO NOTORIOUS CRIMINALS
NEW POLICE TRANSMITTER AT KANSAS CITY.. by Lt. Roy DeShaffen, Sr.
14242
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
1430
1433
1434
1436
RCA GLOBE TROTTER PROGRAM POPULAR
by Howard Allan Chinn
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
1427-1
1427.2
1428
1429
1502
by George
by Kenneth
P.
B.
Hopkins
Slowman
by
E.
E.
Taylor
Barton
W. Olandar
B.
S.
Patterson
Fitzpatrick
by Kenneth W. Slowman
"WHO'S WHO" AT RADIO HEADQUARTERS
ROSELLE, N. J., "TERRA- WAVE" GETS ITS MEN
A BRIEF SURVEY OF THE CHARACTERISTICS
TERRESTRIAL MAGNETISM AND
WM. A. GOLDSWORTHY, ORGANIST
WHO'S WHO AT RADIO HEADQUARTERS
THE COLUMBIA RADIO PLAYHOUSE
DID YOU KNOW
50 YEARS OF PROGRESS -WSM
RCA FREQUENCY MEASURING SERVICE
NEW STUDIO EQUIPMENT FOR KOMO -KJR
THE ELECTRONIC PIANO
THE ELECTRONIC ORGAN
ET-4230)....by L.
MARGARET BOURKE-WHITE (Industrial Photographer)
DID YOU KNOW
by W.
COMBINED RADIO PICKUP AND PUBLIC ADDRESS
P.
1302
1304
1408
by Loren
by J.
by Loy
Jones
F.
1238
1240
1242
1309
1310
1019
1022
1026
1030
1033
by Loren
2000 KVA HIGH -PRESSURE CAPACITOR
by V. E. Trouant
WTAG INSTALLATION AT NEW LOCATION
TYPE 50-A INDUCTOR MICROPHONE
by L. J. Anderson
FATHER, SON HEAR EACH OTHER ON
BYRD PROGRAM (reciprocal broadcasts)
THE SHOW MUST GO ON
by Louise Landis
NEW BROADCAST ORGAN AT WBEN
by Oscar McClellan
MORE RCA TRANSMITTERS IN THE FOREIGN FIELD
by Fred Muller
1234
1237
PROGRAMS FROM SOUTH POLE
by Howard Allan Chinn
GRAND RAPIDS POLICE RADIO INSTALLATION
by A. A. Kirchner
POLICE RADIO NEWS
SOLUTION OF VACUUM TUBE PROBLEMS
BY THE ISOCLINE METHOD
by I. G. Maloff
NEW ART IN RADIO -An Outline of John Vassos
DID YOU KNOW
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
THE ADMIRAL BYRD BROADCAST PICKUP
by D. B. Templeton
THE IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD STRENGTH SURVEY
by Wm. L. Foss
SOMETHING NEW IN VERTICAL RADIATORS
1012
1014
ACQUAINTED
BROADCASTING PERSONALITIES
NEMO SPEAKING
100 -WATT BROADCAST TRANSMITTER (Type
CATHODE -RAY NOTES
INSTALLATIONS
1228
WEEKLY
1011
Author
Subject
A NEW HIGH- FIDELITY 5 -KW TRANSMITTER
(Type 5-C KW Broadcast Transmitter)
NEW LAPEL VELOCITY MICROPHONE
(Type 30-A Lapel Microphone)
TUBE CONSIDERATION IN CLASS B AMPLIFICATION.
WTAR GOES NBC
WINNING ORCHESTRAS
13,000 FEET ABOVE THE SEA
THE WONDERS OF WIRELESS
ABINGTON AND HAVERFORD
937
937
938
939
939
940
INDEX NUMBERING (ISSUES 10 THROUGH 66)
First two digits indicate "Broadcast News" volume or issue number.
Next two digits indicate the pages on which articles begin.
1506
1510
BROADCASTING
CARACAS....by Edgar J. Anzola (in interview by editor)
OF BROADCAST ANTENNAS
by H. E. Gihring and Dr. G. H. Brown
RADIO RIDES THE ZEPHYR
THE RCA RADIO TUBE THAT FELL OUT OF THE STRATOSPHERE
AND STILL WORKS (8 -w xtmr)
THE TYPE OP -4 PORTABLE BROADCAST
SPEECH INPUT EQUIPMENT
by A. N. Curtiss
DETROIT ORCHESTRA HALL
by Howard Allan Chinn
LET'S GET
ACQUAINTED
WTAR GOES HIGH FIDELITY
DID YOU KNOW
RECENT POLICE RADIO INSTALLATIONS
-
by J. L. Grether
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
Norfolk, Suffolk, Danville, Virginia; Roselle, N. J.
HOW ECHOES ARE PRODUCED (artificial sound reflection)
"ACORN" TUBE FOR RADIO EXPERIMENTERS
WFBC GETS A NEW 1 -D TRANSMITTER
FROM MICROPHONE TO LOUDSPEAKER
A PLEA FOR BETTER STATION MANAGEMENT
BRITISH TV COMMISSION VISITS CAMDEN, N. J.
by Ben Adler
by J.
E.
Young
SHORT-WAVE HIGH FIDELITY PIONEER
by S. E. Warner
INTERESTING VOICE-GRAPHS
CBS BROADCAST FROM S. S. REX
by A. B. Chamberlain
LIGHTNING PROTECTION FOR THE
GIANT WLW TOWER
by Joseph A. Chambers
THE SPECIFIC TRANSMITTER PERFORMANCE
REQUIRED FOR HIGH FIDELITY
by Loren F. Jonas
KOA GOES TO 50 KW
by Raymond F. Guy
NBC BROADCAST SOUND EFFECTS
DID YOU KNOW
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
BRILLIANT IDEA BOOSTS POPULARITY OF WPEN
BROADCAST STATION MAINTENANCE (2nd in series)
by J. E. Young
REMOTE STAR BROADCASTS FOR CBS
by Henry Grossman
OLD FRIENDS ADOPT NEW NAMES (RCA Manufocturing Co.)
BROADCAST PERSONALITIES
WHIO GOES ON THE AIR
FIRE IMPERILS WMCA
A SEA -GOING BROADCAST STATION ( "Seth Parker" installation)
NEW RCA EQUIPMENT INSTALLED IN WCAU
AUDITORIUM STUDIO
by Kenneth W. Slowman
HUM COMPENSATOR FOR BROADCAST STATIONS
by Loy E. Barton
NEAR AND FAR
NBC SYNDICATED PROGRAM SERVICE- Transcription Activities Increasing
POLICE RADIO INSTALLATIONS -W5XB
DIRECT READING AND AVERAGING OF
SIGNAL INTENSITIES
RCA CATHODE RAY OSCILLOGRAPH
COMPLETE FIELD INTENSITY SURVEY
OF ALL NBC NETWORK
16
www.americanradiohistory.com
by John P. Taylor
by J. P. Allen
by Raymond
F.
Guy
BROADCAST NEWS MASTER TABLE OF CONTENTS -(Cont'd)
(A)
KEY TO INDEX NUMBERING (ISSUES 10 THROUGH 66)
First two digits indicate "Broadcast News" volume or issue number.
(B) Next two digits indicate the pages on which articles begin.
Index
Index
No.
1514
1516
1518
1520
1522
1524
1526
1530
1534
Author
Subject
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
DID YOU KNOW
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
ELABORATE CEREMONIES MARK INAUGURATION OF WHIO
BY THE MIAMI VALLEY BROADCASTING CORP.
RADIO CENTRE, PHILADELPHIA GOES FLUORESCENT
(Devised by Frank Hartman)
BROADCASTING GRAND OPERA
BROADCAST STATION MAINTENANCE
by A. R. Hopkins
GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF TOWER ANTENNAS
FOR BROADCAST USE
by Dr. G. H. Brown and H. E. Gihring
MOBILE POLICE RADIO EQUIPMENT.. by P. A. Anderson and W. L. Lyndon
TERRA -WAVE CRASHES THROUGH IN DANVILLE, ILLINOIS
1602
1605
NEW STUDIOS FOR WIP
by Edward R. Johnston, Tech. Sup. -WIP
DAVID SARNOFF'S STATEMENT ON TV CREATES STIR
IN BROADCASTING INDUSTRY
1606
1607
1608
NBC BROADCASTS FROM THE NORMANDIE
GEORGE CLARK VIEWS NORMANDIE'S ARRIVAL
DELUXE TRANSCRIPTION TURNTABLE EQUIPMENT
Type 70 -A Transcription Equipment
VICTOR BOOK OF THE SYMPHONY (book written by Charles O'Connell)
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
DID YOU KNOW
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED- BROADCASTING PERSONALITIES
RECORDED
PROGRAMS
TREASURE HOUSE OF
"THESAURUS "
FAST TELETYPE NEWS SERVICE FEATURED ON PROGRAMS
OF PHILADELPHIA STATION (WFIL)
RCA ISSUES PARTS REFERENCE BOOK
THE WCAU PHOTONA
by John G. Leitch
by S. Gubin
BROADCAST STATION MAINTENANCE
Adjusting the Class B Linear R. F. Stage
by
Loy
E. Barton
MODULATION SYSTEMS FOR TRANSMITTERS
VERSATILE ENGINEERS RIG POLICE RADIO ANTENNA
GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF TOWER ANTENNAS
by Dr. G. H. Brown and H. E. Gihring
FOR BROADCAST USE
LATEST IN AVIATION RADIO EQUIPMENT- AVT -3A
1611
1612
1614
1616
1618
1620
1621
1623
1624
1627
1628
1637
1702
1704
1706
1707
1708
-A
"CITY VOICES" AN UNUSUAL PROGRAM
by Joseph D'Agostino
MICROPHONE PROGRESS
by W. S. Fitzpatrick
DID YOU KNOW
KVSO -"THE VOICE OF SOUTHERN OKLAHOMA"
LET'S GET ACQUAINTED
1710
IMPEDANCE-MATCHING ATTENUATION
1712
1713
1714-1
1714-2
1715
NEW
1716
1718
1719
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1808
1809
1810
1814
1818
1823
1824
1825
1826
1834
1902
1904
1906
1908
1910
1911
1912
1914
HOME FOR KSD
NETWORKS._. by J. P. Epperson
by Robert L. Coe
WIOD "THE GOOD WILL STATION OF THE CARIBBEAN EMPIRE"
NEW VERTICAL RADIATOR AT WDOD
WBEN PUTS CURVES ON AIR
WBT ADDS VERTICAL RADIATOR TO
by William A. Schudt, Jr.
RCA TRANSMITTER
POINTED FACTS ABOUT TRANSCRIPTION NEEDLES
GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF TOWER ANTENNAS
by Dr. G. H. Brown and H. E. Gihring
FOR BROADCAST USE
ASIDES AT THE NAB CONVENTION (Photo Page)
HAVANA GREETS INTERNATIONAL RADIO CLUB
by Maynard Marquardt
THE VOICE OF LABOR ON THE AIR
by Chester M. Sinnott
A DISCUSSION OF THE DYNAMIC AMPLIFIER
by Jerry Stone
PERSONAL APPEAL IS TOPS AT SKYTOP
by the Editor
THERE'S GOLD IN THE AIR
by Loy E. Barton
SOME FURTHER THOUGHTS ON MODULATION
AN IDEA ON THE AIR
THE TRANSMISSION OF 9 CM WAVES....by Irving Wolff and E. G. Linder
GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF
by Dr. G. H. Brown and H. E. Gihring
TOWER ANTENNAS
by Frederick Wheeler
HIGH FIDELITY FOR WREN
by John Vassos
MODERN DESIGN
AVIATION HEADQUARTERS AT RADIO HEADQUARTERS
BUSINESS IS GOOD AT WEMP
by H. E. Gihring
A FIELD INTENSITY SLIDE RULE
FIELD INTENSITY AND SIGNAL RECORDING EQUIPMENT
WHAT THE EUROPEANS ARE DOING
THE ELECTRON IMAGE TUBE
CBS EXPANDS, MODERNIZES
THE AUDIO FREQUENCY DISCRIMINATOR
KFBK, 5000 -WATTER
MEASURING EAR SENSITIVITY
NBC'S NEW HOLLYWOOD STUDIOS
A SIMPLE METHOD OF ADJUSTING TOP LOADED
AND SECTIONALIZED ANTENNAS
by L. M. Clement
by Dr. V. K. Zworykin
by A. B. Chamberlain
by M. A. Mclennan
by Norman Webster
No.
1916
1918
1922
1923
1931
1933
1934
2002
2005
2006
2009
2010
2012
2014
2016
2017
2018
2020
2021
2022
2032
2034
2035
2101
2102
2103
2104
2105
2106
2108
2109
2110
2111
2112
2113
2114
2115
2116
2117
2118
2120
2121
2122
2123
2124
2125
2126
2127
2128
2129
2130
Author
Subject
MODERN TRANSMITTER HOUSE DESIGN
BEAUTY AND UTILITY COMBINED IN NEW STUDIOS
W8XH, NEW HIGH FREQUENCY STATION
A NEW MODULATION MONITOR
ULTRA VIOLET LIGHT RECORDING
NEW RCA PRODUCTS
A DIGEST FOR THE RADIO READER
TENTATIVE PROGRAM,
FCC MEMBERS
PROMINENT STATION PERSONALITIES
4 MICROPHONES -TYPE 44 -B, TYPE 50-A, TYPE 77 -A, TYPE 74-A
NEW SPEECH INPUT EQUIPMENT
100W BROADCAST TRANSMITTER-TYPE 100 -E
TYPE 100 -F BROADCAST TRANSMITTER
TYPE ET- 4250 -100 /250W BROADCAST TRANSMITTER
TYPE
-D
KW BROADCAST TRANSMITTER
TYPE 5 -C 5 KW BROADCAST TRANSMITTER
TYPE 40-D PROGRAM AMPLIFIER
TYPE 41 -C PRE- AMPLIFIER
TYPE 58-A TRI -AMPLIFIER
TYPE 64 -A MONITORING SPEAKER
NEW MODULATION MONITORS -TYPE 66 -A (large) and 66 -B (fast action)
A NEW TUBE -TYPE 892
1
1
PORTABLE AMPLIFIER -TYPE 62 -A
HIGH QUALITY STUDIO MONITORING AMPLIFIER-TYPE 94 -C
ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENTS AT CBS by A. B. Chamberlain, C. E., CBS
WITH THE ENGINEERS AT NBC
by O. B. Hanson, C. E., NBC
COMBINED MIXER AND SWITCHING PANEL -TYPE 46 -B
AND GENERAL PURPOSE METER PANEL--TYPE 15 -C
A TREATISE ON PIEZO- ELECTRIC QUARTZ CRYSTALS
A TECHNICAL CLOSEUP OF WGN
AN ENGINEER REPORTS
SOME THOUGHTS ON STATION MANAGEMENT
NEW COMMUNICATION SERVICE POSSESSES
VAST COMMERCIAL POSSIBILITIES
2216
2218-1
2218-2
Taylor
CBS REPRESENTATIVES
WORLD CONGRESS OF BROADCASTERS MEETS IN PARIS
WELL KNOWN LEADERS IN THE BROADCASTING INDUSTRY
FROM THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS -NAB
LEADING STATIONS WELL REPRESENTED
2202
by O. B. Hanson
P.
NBC REPRESENTATIVES
ENGINEERS AND MANAGERS ATTENDING
PROMINENT IN BROADCASTING AND
RECORDING ATTACHMENT -TYPE 72 -A
ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DIVISION
IN THE FIELD WITH RCA
PRINCIPAL PRODUCTS
by Dr. G. H. Brown
by J.
Hopkins
NAB CONVENTION
RCA LINE AMPLIFIER-TYPE 55 -A
2212
2214
R.
NAB OFFICIALS
2132
2133.1
2133-2
2134
2135
2136
2208
2210
by A.
CRIME CONTROL WITH RADIO
by David Sarnoff
UP GOES POWER AT WFBC
A STUDY OF NOISE CHARACTERISTICS
by Vernon D. Landon
NEW TRANSMITTER PLACED IN SERVICE BY WRAW
CARE OF WATER COOLED TUBES
by Ben Adler
SOUTHWEST HEARS NEW WKY
by Earl C. Hull
NBC SOUND EFFECTS TECHNIQUE
"HAM" OPERATORS PROVE THEIR WORTH IN FLOOD AREAS
VIEWS OF THE NEW RCA DISPLAY ROOM
Photograph by N. Newell, RCA Studios
BUENOS AIRES NOW HEAR 'ROUND THE WORLD.... by R. V. Beshgatoor
UNUSUAL STUDIOS FOR WMEX
MILESTONES IN VACUUM TUBE PROGRESS
by Joseph D'Agostino
RECORDED SOUND EFFECT EQUIPMENT
ALSO MAKES NOTABLE PROGRESS
by R. H. Heacock
A REVIEW OF BROADCAST ENGINEERING
by J. P. Taylor
NEW RCA PRODUCTS
NOTES ABOUT OUR CONTRIBUTORS
2131
2204
2206
by John Vassos
by Carl Meyers
Diehl
Hopkins
by John N. Dyer
by Frank S. Lane
by W.
by A.
F.
R.
MICROPHONES AND MICROPHONES
A NOTE ON THE PLACEMENT OF THE COIL IN A
SECTIONALIZED ANTENNA
by Dr. G. H. Brown
WBT DEDICATES NEW STUDIOS
POPULAR FORT WORTH STATION INCREASES POWER. by Eibert Haling
by John Vassos
AN ARTIST LOOKS AT DETAILS
17
www.americanradiohistory.com
BROADCAST NEWS MASTER TABLE OF CONTENTS -(Cont'd)
(A)
KEY TO INDEX NUMBERING (ISSUES 10 THROUGH 66)
First two digits indicate "Broadcast News" volume or issue number.
(B) Next two digits indicate the pages on which articles begin.
Index
Index
No.
2222
2224
2227
2230
2232
2302
2304
2305
2306
2310
2312
2316
2318
2320
Subject
Author
MAKING RADIO WAVES BEHAVE
by
WORLD CONGRESS OF BROADCASTERS
A REVIEW OF BROADCAST ENGINEERING
NOTES ABOUT OUR CONTRIBUTORS
FOURTH ESTATE VIEWS TELEVISION._. _.. _._.
WTRC
2412
2415
2416
2417
2418
2420
2425
2426
2428
2431
2434
2502
2515
2516
2517
2518
2519
2520
2522
2523
2602
2604
2607
2608
2609
2610
2802
2805
2806
2808
MODERN DESIGN-SIMPLICITY
P.
by David Sarnoff
_
HEARST EXPANDS COAST STATIONS
by
LOGARITHMIC RECORDING OF FIELD INTENSITIES
MODEL HOME FOR WORCESTER STATION
NEW EQUIPMENT SOLVES PROBLEM
FOR SMALLER STATIONS
by James Galloway
Frederick Ragsdale
by John P. Taylor
2902
2904
LISTENERS
LETTERS FROM LISTENERS
TUBES
2907
2908
2911
2915
2916
2918
2921
2924
2928
2929
2932
3002
3003
3006
3007
3008
3010
3012
STATION BUILDINGS
SPEAKING OF PICTURES
IN THE FUTURE
EQUIPMENT
3015
3016
3018
3021
THE HUMAN SIDE OF MARCONI
IMPROVED SERVICE FOR CBS FOREIGN
3024
3027
3035
LISTENERS
CONVENIENCE
by John
GOING PLACES IN DIXIE..
MISTAKES ABOUT MARCONI
FACTOR
_.
SPACE BECOMES A
FURTHER NOTES ON EXTERNAL
CROSS MODULATION
2822
2832
2833
P.
BUILDING A TRANSMITTER
MAP OF INSTALLATIONS
PRESS
2812
2814
2817
2818
2819
2820
Taylor
by John
...................
STREAMLINED
2811
2824
2826
by W. L. Lyndon
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
by Dr. G. H. Brown
REAL DRAMA ON THE AIR
FLOODS MAKE WORK FOR NBC STAFF
STEADY PROGRESS FOR WRAK
by Louis N. Persio
TWIN BUFFALO STATIONS MODERNIZE
by Ralph J. Kingsley and P. E. Fischler
FEATURES BRING NEW TRANSMITTER TO THE FRONT
by C. M. Lewis
ELECTRON PATHS MADE VISIBLE....by Dr. V. K. Zworykin and E. A. Massa
UNIQUE FEATURES AT SEATTLE
by Francis J. Brott
BUILDINGS FOR MEDIUM POWERED TRANSMITTERS
by T. A. Smith
SIZE ISN'T EVERYTHING
A REVIEW OF BROADCAST ENGINEERING
by John P. Taylor
2616
2710
2712
2716
2718
_.
WAVES AREN'T ALWAYS IN THE AIR
LIGHTNING IS A MENACE....
A NEW LIMITING AMPLIFIER
2702
2704
2706
2708
Taylor
by J.
INCREASES COVERAGE
WRGA INSTALLS NEW ANTENNA
A REVIEW OF BROADCAST ENGINEERING
2612
2614
2618
2620
2622
2630
2634
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
A REVIEW OF BROADCAST ENGINEERING
WHBL IMPROVES FACILITIES
RCA PRESENTS TELEVISION TO BROADCASTERS
GRAPHIC RECORDING OF FIELD INTENSITIES
by John P. Taylor
POWER GOES UP AT WDBJ
A TREATISE ON PIEZO- ELECTRIC QUARTZ CRYSTALS
RAPID GROWTH FOR WHIO
by Palmer A. Greer and Charles E. Gay
HOOSIERS LISTEN IN ON NEW WSBT
A TURNSTILE ANTENNA FOR USE
AT HIGH FREQUENCIES
by Dr. G. H. Brown
2329
2402
2404
2406
2408
2410
Author
Subject
2720
2723
MEETS IN PARIS
PROBABLE PERCENTAGE MODULATION AT
VARIOUS AUDIO FREQUENCIES
2334
No.
C. Rundquist
by Dr. G. H. Brown
by J. P. Taylor
NEW ANTENNA FOR WIZ
2326
2331
E.
by
..
B.
W. Robins and
J.
by Lynn Brodlon
WAGA AND A -DA
5000 WATTS FOR WRC
1
by Raymond F. Guy
A RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE METER
WITH MANY USES
by Dr. G. H. Brown and Gilbert Swift
KELO EXPANDS FACILITIES
COLUMBUS STATION JOINS 5 -D TREND
by Lester H. Notxger
TRANSMISSION LINES
by R. D. Duncan, Jr.
SANTA BARBARA STATION COMPLETELY RCA
A GLIMPSE OF STATION PERSONALITIES
LOOKING IN ON THE STATIONS
A CATHODE RAY TUBE HIGH SPEED
RESPONSE INDICATOR AND RECORDER...
by R. A. Hackley
WLAW FORGES AHEAD
by Irving E. Rodgers
IT'S A 5 -D AT BIRMINGHAM
SIMPLIFIED SOLUTION FOR ANTENNA
IMPEDANCE MATCHING NETWORKS
by A. Vollenweider
AN ULTRA DIRECTIONAL MICROPHONE
by Dr. H. F. Olson
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
by Dr. G. H. Brown
THE PRINTING PRESS GETS
WINGS_..
MECHANICAL DESIGN OF OPEN WIRE
TRANSMISSION LINES
NEW STUDIOS FOR WOAI
MODERN DESIGN -SIMPLICITY
"BETTER THAN RATINGS" -RADIO STATION KFAM
NEW STUDIOS IN WASHINGTON
SOMETHING NEW IN SPEECH INPUT EQUIPMENT
by H. C. Vance
by
H. M.
Kearney
by Lynn Brodton
by C. M. Lewis
ONE OF AMERICA'S MOST MODERN
RADIO STATIONS
by James L. Middlebrooks and Royal V. Howard
HERE AND THERE IN THE RADIO WORLD
SIMPLIFIED NETWORK SYNTHESIS
by Edmund A. Laport
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
Dr. G. H. Brown
NOTES ON THE USE OF OSCILLOGRAPHS
by B. W. Robins
WCOU ENLARGES AREA
by Leslie R. Hall
RCA FACSIMILE FOR SCHOOLS
THE UNI -DIRECTIONAL MICROPHONE
CENTRAL OREGON'S -KBND
by Ellsworth C. Dent
by Dr. H. F. Olson
_
MORE POWER TO WHBF
LACQUER DISC RECORDING
AND REPRODUCING
by H. J. Hasbrouck and R. F. Brady
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION
TOMORROW'S TRANSMITTER TODAY.
by J. E. Eiselein
WMBI DEDICATES NEW STUDIOS
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
by Dr. G. H. Brown
MODERN IS THE WORD FOR WMCA
WDAN- COMMUNITY STATION
SIMPLIFIED NETWORK SYNTHESIS..
by Edmund A. Laport
LOOKING IN ON WCCO
WHLS -THE BLUE WATER STATION
Vassos
by J. L. Talley
by G. H. Clark
by C. M. Lewis
by J. E. Young
M. Brumbaugh
by Dudley E. Foster
by Karl B. Hoffman
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
by Dr. G. H. Brown
WIDER COVERAGE FOR WFBM
by M. R. Williams
COLUMBIA'S TELEVISION TRANSMITTER NEARS COMPLETION
A REVIEW OF BROADCAST ENGINEERING
by J. P. Taylor
BUFFALO STATION INCREASES POWER
MODERN IN EVERY DETAIL
NEW HIGH POWERED SOUND PROJECTORS
by Mox L. Graham
A MODERN COMMUNITY STATION
by Allan O. Brophy
COMBINATION HORN AND DIRECT RADIATOR
by H. F. Olson and R. A. Hackley
LOUDSPEAKER.
RAPID GROWTH FOR IOWA STATION
WJDX INSTALLS FIRST AIR -COOLED TRANSMITTER.... by Wiley P. Harris
AN ULTRA -SENSITIVE D -C METER
by John M. Brumbaugh
RECEPTION BEGINS IN THE ANTENNA
by C. W. Horn
3101
3102
3103
3104
3105
3106
3107
3108
3109
3110
3111
3112
3113
3114
3115
3116
3117
3118
EARLY TRANSMITTER INSTALLATIONS
LOOKING AT EARLY RECEIVERS
EARLY RECEIVERS WERE CRUDE BUT AWE
EARLY RADIO INTERESTED MILLIONS
STUDIOS OF ANOTHER DAY
DESIGNS HAVE BEEN REVOLUTIONIZED
INSPIRING
MODERN STATIONS OF TODAY
NEW WORLDS FOR EVERYONE
TWO DECADES LATER
TELEVISION IS HERE
TELEVISION HISTORY IN THE MAKING
TELEVISION RECEIVERS ARE HERE
FACSIMILE- JOURNALISM ON THE AIR
THE NEWSPAPER OF TOMORROW
SAFETY IS SERVED BY RADIO
RADIO ENTERS LIMITLESS FIELDS
RADIO AIDS INDUSTRY
AT BOTH FAIRS -IT'S RCA
Also included in this issue on back of front cover are excerpts from o
letter written in 1916 by David Sarnoff
"I have in mind a plan
of development which would make radio a 'household utility' in the some
sense as the piano or phonograph...
18
www.americanradiohistory.com
.
.
BROADCAST NEWS MASTER TABLE OF CONTENTS- (Cont'd)
(A)
KEY TO INDEX NUMBERING (ISSUES 10 THROUGH 66)
First two digits indicate "Broadcast News" volume or issue number.
(B) Next two digits indicate the pages on which articles begin.
Index
Index
3202
3203
3206
3208
3211
3214
3216
3217
3222
3224
3228
3232
3236
Author
Subject
No.
WCKY -FIFTY GRAND IN WATTS..
FROM THE TOP OF THE WORLD
(Photos-Pages 4 -5) Photos by Hylen Photo Shop
NEW EQUIPMENT TO MEASURE INTENSITY
OF RADIO NOISE
THE NEW STANDARD VOLUME INDICATOR
AND REFERENCE LEVEL_
NORTH OF THE BORDER
(Photos -Pages 12 -13)
FLEXIBLE AND COMPACT
WAY DOWN YONDER IN NEW ORLEANS
THE STANDARD VOLUME INDICATOR
AND REFERENCE LEVEL
3310
3312
3314
3316
3317
3320
3323
3326
3327
3331
3332
3336
3402
3403
3404
3408
3409
3410
3412
3414
3415
3416
3417
3419
3420
3421
3422
3502
3504
3506
3508
3510
3512
3514
3518
3520
3522
3525
3526
3534
3536
3602
3604
3606
3607
3608
by R. M. Morris
by Edmund A. [apart
ELECTRON MICROSCOPE
THE
3304
3308
by Charles M. Burrill
__._.._._.._ _..........by L. J. Flodman
NEW COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVER
by Edward Braddock
by F. A. Dieringer
IT'S MODERN -IT'S WFMJ....
(Photos -Pages 18.19)
PARALLEL MIXER CIRCUIT CALCULATIONS
by C. W. Slaybaugh
by J. C. Walter
CALCULATIONS OF T.I.F. FOR TRANSMITTER LOADS
WHBC AMONG THE LEADERS
DOING A MAN -SIZED JOB IN MANSFIELD
FROM THE ARCTIC TO THE TROPICS
3áO2
3306
by C. H. Topmiller
by Stanton D. Bennett
by J. D. Bloom
by R. M. Morris
MEASUREMENTS OF FREQUENCY MODULATED
FIELD INTENSITIES
by B. W. Robins
IT'S A 5 -DX FOR WOI
by Professor W. 1. Griffith
RCA TELEVISION FIELD PICKUP EQUIPMENT
by Henry E. Rheo
NEW 1000 WATTERS FOR THE NORTHERN CANADIAN
by Wm. K. Marks
MINING REGIONS
FLASH -ARC CURRENTS IN TRANSMITTER TUBES
by J. C. Walter
A STREAMLINED KILOWATT FOR WCAR
by Wiley D. Wenger
by J. M. Brumbaugh
NEW BROADCAST FREQUENCY MONITOR
by Edward Braddock
NEW COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVER
IMPROVED INSTANTANEOUS RECORDING ATTACHMENT
by C. N. Reifsteck
RCA SPECIAL UNITS REQUIRE SEPARATE PLANT
FEED THE LINE WITH QUALITY
CALCULATIONS OF T. I. F. FOR TRANSMITTER LOADS....by J. C. Walter
NEW RCA 64 -B SPEAKER
CONVENTION CAMERA CONTEST
VIEWS OF A FEW WELL-KNOWN WESTERN INSTALLATIONS
A DIRECTORY OF COAST STATIONS
FOR NAB VACATIONERS
NEW RCA EQUIPMENT
FOR THE EPICURE AND EPICURIOUS
SAN FRANCISCO -WHERE THE EAST, THE WEST, AND THE NAB MEET
NEW RCA EQUIPMENT
A GUIDE FOR VISITORS TO TREASURE ISLAND
A TOUR OF SAN FRANCISCO
A DRIVE WHICH INCLUDES THE LEADING POINTS
OF INTEREST IN SAN FRANCISCO
SOME OUTSTANDING COAST INSTALLATIONS
RCA AT THE GOLDEN GATE EXPOSITION
NEW RCA EQUIPMENT
SUGGESTIONS FOR COUPLING OF R -F TO MEASURING EQUIPMENT
NEW STUDIOS FOR WIRE
LATERAL DISC RECORDING
by
AT KYCA IT'S RCA
WBOC, SALISBURY, MD. -VOICE OF THE EASTERN SHORE
WWNC -ONE OF NORTH CAROLINA'S PROGRESSIVE STATIONS
CHARACTERISTICS OF UNBALANCED OVERHEAD
TRANSMISSION LINES
by Dr. G. H. Brown
ANOTHER STOP ON OUR 250-K PARADE -WCBI, COLUMBUS, MISS.
3622
3623
A FINE TRANSMITTING PLANT AT WTAG
3626
5000 WATTS AT WFLA, TAMPA, FLORIDA STATION,
HAS LATEST IN RCA EQUIPMENT
TWO STATIONS ON PACIFIC TIME
3627
NOISE REDUCTION IN DISC RECORDING
3628
by R. A. Lynn
3630.1 KYUM- ATTENTION -GETTER IN THE SOUTHWEST
3630-2 DOWN GEORGIA WAY THERE'S WMGA IN MOULTRIE
3631-1 TWO VIEWS OF WMCA
3631.2 IT'S WLOK IN WESTERN OHIO
3703
3704
3706
3708
3710
3712
3714
3717
3718
3720
3721
3722
3732
3735
by
S. V.
Perry
BALTIMORE
PATTERNS TAILORED TO FIT
SMARTNESS PLUS EFFICIENCY -WREC
DOWN SOUTH IN SAVANNAH
UP NORTH IN CANADA
THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPE GOES INTO ACTION
A TWO-FIFTY IN TEXAS
A COMPACT SET -UP FOR KHAS
WISH, INDIANAPOLIS
...
MEDIEVAL TORTURE
1943
LET'S LOOK AT THE RECORD
3816
3820
3824
THE STORY OF RCA RESEARCH AT WAR
THE 5 -E, AN ENGINEER'S TRANSMITTER
TELEVISION REMOTE PICKUP EQUIPMENT..
THE 50 -SW, A NEW TRANSMITTER FOR
-
by Loren F. Jones
by J. E. Eiselein
by
H.
E.
Rhea
INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING
3828
3832
3835
3838
3841
3844
3846
3849
3902
3923
by J. W. Sanborn
3936
3938
E.
...
by Thomas F. Joyce
by Stokes Gresham, Jr.
RCA TESTING CHAMBERS
3812
Eiselein
by J.
DELUXE RECORDERS AT WFM1
WHAT YOU HEAR
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TELEVISION MARKET
IN THE POST -WAR PERIOD
3928
3932
3935
WCBM,
INTERESTING NEW SCHOOL INSTALLATION_
by K. L. Dragoo
HIGHER VOLTAGES FOR THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPE
SUPER INSTALLATION FOR PENNSYLVANIA'S SUPER HIGHWAY
KOB PICKS 50 -E
by George S. Johnson
KOB- PROGRESSIVE STATION OF THE GREAT SOUTHWEST
IN EMBATTLED CHUNGKING RCA EQUIPMENT CARRIES ON
HERE AND THERE AMONG THE STATIONS
SPEECH INPUT SYSTEMS
by C. M. Lewis and J. D. Colvin
3806
3810
3925
FINEST
EQUIPMENT FEATURED AT WFBC
REMOTE CONTROL IN ALASKA
by Stanton D. Bennett
PORTABLE PERFECTION IN RECORDING
by W. L. Lyndon
SHEER MAGIC IN AUTOMATIC RECORD CHANGER
UP -TO -DATE
3802
Fredenhall, NBC Audio Facilities Group
THE DECIBEL SCALE
RCA's 250'S (K'S) GET AROUND
"RADIO CARACAS"-ONE OF VENEZUELA'S
Author
IN MONTERREY IT'S RCA
3613.2
3614
3615
3616
3903
3906
3914
B. F.
Subject
No.
3613-1
3941
3944
O BRASIL FALA
.
.
.
BRAZIL SPEAKS
FM NOISE LEVEL AND AM NOISE LEVEL
WARTIME OPERATION OF THE .5-D
AND 5 -DX TRANSMITTERS
KMPC- STATION OF THE STARS
by W. J. Reilly
by
.1.
Keachie
H.
WYOMING!
HIGHWAY PATROL RADIO . .
by H. C. Hill
GOOD TUBES FOR OLD
"ATTENTION MEN! THIS IS THE
CHAPLAIN SPEAKING .
by F. S. LeRoy
ABOUT OUR REPLACEMENT AND REPAIR PARTS SERVICE
.
PICTURES OF NEW INTERNATIONAL STUDIOS
OF ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS
THE FM -10.A TRANSMITTER FOR 10 KW FM STATIONS
ANTENNAS FOR FM STATIONS..
by John
NBC'S EXPERIENCE WITH PORTABLE
P.
Taylor
TELEVISION EQUIPMENT
by Robert E. Shelby and Harold P. See
KLRA'S 10 -E TRANSMITTER
by Kermit F. Tracy
FM AUDIO MEASUREMENTS WITH AN AM RECEIVER.... by R. J. Newman
THE 2 -A STUDIO CONTROL CONSOLE
by J. E. Colvin
"DC" PICTURE TRANSMISSION
by H. N. Kozanowski
RCA ENGINEERING IN OTHER FIELDS: RF POWER
AIDS PENICILLIN PRODUCTION
THE NEW RCA 9C21 AND 9C22 TRIODES
by H. C. Vance
TELEVISION LINEARITY CHARACTERISTICS
by C. D. Kenfner
FROM JUNGLE DRUMS TO 50 KW
by Belly Fellows
by R. D. Duncan, Jr.
COVERAGE CURVES FOR FM ANTENNAS
ORTHACOUSTIC REPRODUCING FILTER -MI -4914
by
Walter and
Keachie
SIX WIRE TRANSMISSION LINE
A SEA -GOING INSTALLATION
WSAM -"RCA ALL THE WAY"
KDYL-A BUSY STATION IN THE BEEHIVE STATE
by C. M. Lewis and J. D. Colvin
SPEECH INPUT SYSTEMS
J. C.
J. H.
4002
POLYCYLINDRICAL DIFFUSERS IN
ROOM ACOUSTIC DESIGN
4008
4011
4012
PERFORMANCE OF BROADCAST STUDIOS
WITH CONVEX SURFACES OF PLYWOOD
WHLD STUDIOS
KARK STUDIOS
4013
A MODERN MUSIC RECORDING STUDIO
by John E. Volkmann
DESIGNED
by C. P. Boner
by M. Rettinger
19
BROADCAST NEWS MASTER TABLE OF CONTENTS -(Cont'd)
KEY TO INDEX NUMBERING
(A)
First two digits indicate "Broadcast News" volume or issue number.
Index
No.
4019
4022
4026
4031
4038
4046
4048
4057
NBC STUDIOS 6A AND 6B
NAVY SETS UP PEARL HARBOR AND GUAM
BROADCASTING FACILITIES
WFAA -KGKO STUDIOS
by George M. Nixon
by J. D. Colvin
WFAA -KGKO STUDIO EQUIPMENT
by John P. Taylor
SELECTING A SITE FOR AN FM STATION
TO
THE
CAPPER
STATIONS'
GIRL
OPERATORS..
by Judy J. Alesi
ORCHIDS
WWV- BROADCASTING FREQUENCY STANDARDS
by R. J. Newman
WITH RCA TYPE ET -7285 TRANSMITTERS
TELEVISION COVERAGE CURVES FOR
by R. D. Duncan, Jr.
TURNSTILE ANTENNAS
4118
WOOC
4139
4144
4145
4151
4156
Next two digits indicate t::e pages on which articles begin.
.
WOOW, INTERNATIONAL BROADCAST
__.by R. N. DeHart
STATIONS INSTALLED BY CBS AT WAYNE, N. J.
HOW TO DETERMINE THE AREA AN FM STATION
by John P. Taylor
SHOULD SERVE........
HOW TO DETERMINE THE REQUIRED TRANSMITTER
by John P. Taylor
POWER OF AN FM STATION
ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS INSTALL 50 KW SHORTWAVE AND
EQUIPMENT FOR NEW INTERNATIONAL STUDIOS....by Royal V. Howard
BERT SILEN TELLS HOW IT FEELS TO BLOW UP
by Judy J. Alesi
AN RCA TRANSMITTER
WJBO -WBRL, AM -FM STATIONS AT BATON ROUGE, LA.
by L. A. Thomas
"BUNCH OF WIRES"
"SINGA PAMBA"
by E. A. Henry
PRACTICAL DESIGN OF VIDEO AMPLIFIERS
.
.
.
.
No.
4444
4456
4460
RCA ENGINEERS TEST PROJECTION TELEVISION RECEIVER
AUDIO FREQUENCY RESPONSE AND DISTORTION MEASURING
by R. J. Newman
TECHNIQUES FOR FM TRANSMITTING SYSTEMS
4132
(B)
Index
Author
Subject
4102
4112
4126
(ISSUES 10 THROUGH 66)
.
4463
4466
4508
4518
4522
4524
4536
4538
4542
4546
4554
4556
4604
4609
4612
4621
4622
4624
4628
Subject
Aut:-.or
PLUG-IN
AMPLIFIERS.
_..
THE BTF -10B TRANSMITTER
THE BTF -50A TRANSMITTER
by H.
by J. E.
by C. J.
DETERMINING THE POPULATION SERVED BY AN FM STATION
GROUNDED -GRID POWER AMPLIFIERS
by E. E.
Duszak
Young
A NEW 50 KW AM TRANSMITTER
A NON -DIRECTIONAL ANTENNA FOR MOBILE
FIELD STRENGTH MEASUREMENT IN THE FM BAND
by W.
Lyndon
THE ATLANTIC CITY STORY
by Judy J. Ales!
L.
Starner
Spitzer
by B. W. Robins
WTCN PLANS TELEVISION..
by Clifford J. Rion
TELEVISING A CONVENTION
by John P. Taylor
TELEVISING AN OPERATION
TELEVISING THE BULLFIGHTS
by Edward K. Price
KSD -TV INAUGURATES COMMERCIAL VIDEO SERVICE IN ST. LOUIS
KSD -TV -A POSTWAR TELEVISION STATION
by Robert L. Coe
MILWAUKEE JOURNAL PLANS INSTALLATION OF
RCA TELEVISION TRANSMITTER
by Beatrice Ann Gehrung
IMAGE ORTHICON FIELD EQUIPMENT
by John H. Roe
NAB ENGINEERING
_.._
CLINIC
HOW NAB USES THE RCA IMAGE
ORTHICON CAMERA
by F. A. Wankel and
WARNER BROTHERS AND RCA PLAN JOINT PROGRAM
ON LARGE -SCREEN TELEVISION
THE NEWS OF THE HOUR STATION -WMIN
AT LAST
FM QUALITY SPEAKER
FREQUENCY RANGE PREFERENCE FOR SPEECH
-AN
E.
C.
Wilbur
by Frank M. Devaney
by G. E. Rand
AND MUSIC
4206
4224
NEW FM TRANSMITTERS NOW IN PRODUCTION
A NEW FM EXCITER UNIT OF GREATLY IMPROVED
4230
THE GROUNDED -GRID
....
PERFORMANCE
4236
4240
4242
4245
4246
4248
4253
4254
4258
4261
4266
4271
4306
4312
4322
4324
4342
4348
4350
4354
4362
4369
4372
4406
4414
4420
4428
4436
4442
Newman
4633
4636
by N. J. Oman
by C. J. Starner
4638
4644
by
AMPLIFIER
R. J.
MULTI -UNIT CONSTRUCTION-A FEATURE
by John L. Ciba
OF NEW FM TRANSMITTERS
RANGE PREDICTION CHART FOR FM STATIONS
by F. C. Everett
ANTENNA
_...
THE SUPER TURNSTILE
by R. W. Masters
WCAU PLANS NEW STUDIO BUILDING
NEW RATIO DETECTOR SIMPLIFIES
FM RECEIVER DESIGN
by Stuart W. Seeley
RCA'S NEW HIGH -SENSITIVITY CAMERA REVOLUTIONIZES
TELEVISION PICKUP TECHNIQUE
ARMY DEMONSTRATES TWO RCA RADIO RELAY SYSTEMS
GIMBELS AND RCA TEST INTRA -STORE TELEVISION
by Judy J. Alesi
RCA MICRO -WAVE RELAY SYSTEM
by H. F. Mickel
ABC'S VANDERBILT STUDIOS
by Ben Adler
CANADA'S LOUDEST VOICE
THE 77 -D POLYDIRECTIONAL MICROPHONE
by J. B. Epperson
THE RCA ANTENNALYZER
by G. H. Brown and W. C. Morrison
HOW A TELEVISION STATION CAN GROW IN EASY STEPS
WMT INSTALLS RCA 5F
AIRBORNE TELEVISION IS AN RCA DEVELOPMENT
by Henry Rhea
AN FM CALIBRATOR FOR DISC RECORDING HEADS
by H. E. Roy;
WMC INSTALLS RCA 10F
FILAMENT SUPPLY IN THE BTA -50! TRANSMITTER.
by T. J. Boerner
HOW TO MAKE A FIELD SURVEY
OF AN FM STATION_.. ..
by G. W. Klingman
FM FIELD SURVEY TECHNIQUES
by P. B. Loeser
THE TYPE 301 -B FIELD INTENSITY METER
by K. B. Redding
FM FIELD SURVEY METHODS AS OUTLINED
IN THE FCC "STANDARDS"
THE TK -30A CAMERA
RCA WAR RESEARCH
by Norman
by Loren
S.
Bean
F.
Jones
MICROWAVE
EQUIPMENT FOR TELEVISION
RELAY SERVICE
by W. J. Poch
RCA SALES ORGANIZATION
THE "PYLON" ANTENNA
ISOLATION METHODS FOR FM ANTENNAS
MOUNTED ON AM TOWERS
and
J.
P.
Taylor
by
R.
F.
Holtz
by
R. F.
Holtz
4649
4650
4652
4657
4708
4713
4714
4722
4726
4732
4736
4738
4742
4746
4748
4752
4758
4762
4764
4769
4804
4816
4818
4820
4828
4832
4836
4838
4841
4842
4846
4856
4858
_.....
... by Harry F. Olson
RECORDING STUDIO 3A
by G. M. Nixon
KOOL IN ARIZONA
WFIL'S TELEVISION PLANNING
THE RCA TYPE T.1-50A TELEVISION
MOBILE UNIT
by W. J. Poch and H. C. Shepard
TTR -1 AND TRR -1 TELEVISION RELAY LNITS
TESTED OVER LONG DISTANCE
TOP ENGINEERS ATTEND TELEVISION COURSE
by E. B. May
A HIGH SCHOOL GOES FM
by John W. Stahl
CAMERA PLACEMENT AND SWITCHING
FOR BASEBALL TELECASTING
by John P. Taylor
LIGHTNING TESTS ON THE PYLON ANTENNA
WSAV'S PYLON
by
T.
1.
Eldridge, Jr.
MEASURED CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PYLON ANTENNA.... by O. O. Fiet
300 KILOWATTS OF FM POWER
TELEVISION PROGRESS
by David Sarnoff
RCA AT THE NAB EXHIBII
LARGE -SCREEN TELEVISION AT NAB
TELEVISION ENGINEERING CLINIC REPEATED
by E. B. May
WWL CELEBRATES 25TH ANNIVERSARY
WMOX, MERIDIAN, MISSISSIPPI
WAAT READIES TELE
WBAL'S "NEW WORLD OF TOMORROW" STUDIOS.... by Harold C. Burke
TECHNICAL FACILITIES FOR WBAL'S NEW STUDIOS
by R. S. Duncan
WBRE -FM, WILKES- BARRE, PA.
by David Baltimore
WSBA AND WSBA -FM, YORK, PA
by W. G. Eberhart
AMERICAN TELEVISION SHOWN IN THE VATICAN._. __..by E. K. Price
THE TT -5A TELEVISION TRANSMITTER
THE
by C. D. Kentnor
RCA 8D21
QUICK CHANGING OF 8D21 TUBE
WNBW AND WRC -FM
TRIPLEXED ANTENNA AT WNBW /WRC -FM
WOPI'S MILE HIGH FM INSTALLATION
KGKL, SAN ANGELO, TEXAS
by E. H. Potter
by R. F. Guy
by L. E. Wolle
WKY'S MOBILE STUDIO
WACE AND WACE-FM
WTMJ.TV ON THE AIR
PLANNING THE TRANSMITTER BUILDING.. by John Vassos and
KFBK'S FM AND STUDIO INSTALLATIONS
WCVS AND WCVS -FM, SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS
20
www.americanradiohistory.com
S.
W. Pike
BROADCAST NEWS MASTER TABLE OF CONTENTS- (Cont'd)
KEY TO INDEX NUMBERING (ISSUES 10 THROUGH 66)
First two digits indicate "Broadcast News" volume or issue number.
(B) Next two digits indicate the pages on which
(A)
Index
Index
No.
4860
4862
Author
Subject
4866
WKBH, LaCROSSE, WISCONSIN
HOW TO CONVERT A STANDARD TELEVISION RECEIVER
INTO A DIRECT -VIEWING VIDEO EXTENSION MONITOR.... by
WBEN -TV NEARLY READY
4906
4908
MIDGET FIELD INTENSITY METER
WJPG -FM -FIRST FM SERVICE IN
4912
4920
4924
4928
4933
4934
4942
4946
4950
4952
4968
5002
5008
5018
5028
5032
5036
5052
:058
5105
5106
5108
5122
5128
5132
5145
5151
5154
5758
5166
5172
5174
5206
5208
5212
5240
5244
5248
5252
5258
5Z07
5208
5318
5320
5326
5332
5336
5344
5346
articles begin.
by
R.
E.
E.
K. Price
.
.
300 BROADCASTERS COMPLETE RCA TV ENGINEERS' COURSE
FACILITIES HOUSING FOR TV
by Rene Brugnoni and Ben Adler
PLANS FOR CBS' GRAND CENTRAL TELEVISION
by A. B. Chamberlain
STUDIOS
NAB BROADCAST ENGINEERING CONFERENCE
_.. ._. _by J. P. Taylor
TELEVISION IN THE SPOTLIGHT AT NAB
HIGHLIGHTS OF THE "SUPER POWER" 8- SECTION PYLON....by O. O. Fiet
_. by R. H. Frye
WKJG -FM ERECTS HIGH POWER FM ANTENNA.
PHILADELPHIA STORY
SALUTE TO KOMO
KOMO BUILDS A NEW PLANT
PLANNING THE NEW KOMO STUDIOS
by F. J. Brott and S. D. Bennett
CONSTRUCTING THE NEW KOMO STUDIOS
by S. D. Bennett
HEATING AND VENTILATING THE NEW
_.. _..__..
KOMO STUDIOS
by J. K. Gannett
EQUIPMENT FOR THE NEW KOMO STUDIOS
by M. E. Gunn
KOMO'S NEW 50,C0) WATT TRANSMITTER by F. J. Brott and C. E. Miller
NEW LIGHTWEIGHT REMOTE AMPLIFIER
by R. C. Abbett
CONSULTANTS ATTEND SPECIAL CLINIC
by Erwin B. May
WFIL'S TV STUDIOS
WEWS TV ANTENNA INSTALLATION
by J. B. Epperson
WPAY-FM SERVES WIDE AREA
CUSTOM-BUILT DUAL- RECORDING CONSOLE._
by A. S. Kerker
WSAV ENLARGES FM BROADCASTING FACILITIES
SCALE MODELS MADE FROM PAPER CUTOUTS
AID TV STATION PLANNING..
by Marvin L. Gaskill
PRACTICAL EQUIPMENT LAYOUTS FOR TELEVIS:ON STATIONS
SECOND ANNUAL FMA CONVENTION
by R. S. Mannheimer
WWNC ON -AIR WITH NEW 5 KW TRANSMITTER
WJAC -FM INSTALLS RCA TRANSMITTER
AMERICAN TV SHOWN IN SPAIN
_
by Edw. K. Price
PLANNING RADIO AND TELEVISION STUDIOS
by George M. Nixon
HOW TO SHOCK MOUNT 70 SERIES TURNTABLES..... by W. E. Stewart
BTF -50A, 50 KW FM TRANSMITTER....
by C. J. Starner
THE 50 KW FM POWER CUTBACK SWITCH
by C. J. Starner
WTMJ -FM
WORLD'S FIRST "SUPER- POWER" M....by Phillip 8. Loeser
WBRC-FM
WORLD'S MOST POWERFU'FM STATION.
by G. P. Hamann
8- SECTION PYLON MAKES 546 KW A REALITY
...
...
AT WBRC -FM
HOW TO MAKE FM
MEASUREMENTS
WGPA, 250 W AM
WMPS
.
.
.
5406
5414
5432
5437
5443
5452
5474
THE NEW
5478
5504
5508
5516
5520
5524
5528
5530
5538
5542
5550
5552
5563
5604
5608
5628
5640
5646
5654
5655
5656
5657
5660
5662
5664
5666
5668
5672
5708
5714
5724
5728
5732
5740
5745
5746
5748
5758
5762
5764
by O. O. Fief
5804
Talmage
_..._ by Arthur McCracken
5807
5808
5810
by
KW FM
MEMPHIS' 10 KW AM
3
_.
..
_.
F.
E.
ABC PIONEERS WITH MET TV
PHILOSOPHY OF OUR TELEVISION SYSTEM
by J. H. Roe
PORTABLE TAPE RECORDER
by W. E. Stewart
WENR -TV
by E. C. Horstman and J. M. Valentine
TELEVISION FILM RECORDING
by R. V. Little, Jr.
THE PHILOSOPHY OF OUR TV SYSTEM (Part II)
by John H. Roe
RCA COMPLETES
WCAU -TV
SIXTH
TV CLINIC
by John G. Leitch
HOW TO GET THE BEST PICTURE OUT OF YOUR
IMAGE ORTHICON CAMERA
by H. Kozanowski
THE "BERKSHIRE " -A RADIO -PHONOGRAPH BUILT TO
TRANSMITTING EQUIPMENT STANDARDS
by Marvin Hobbs
OPTIMUM HIGH -FREQUENCY BIAS
IN MAGNETIC RECORDING
by G. L. Dimmick and S. W. Johnson
TV AND FM SITE TESTING..
by E. S. Clammer and E. M. Brown
RCA DISPLAYS COMPLETE LINE OF EQUIPMENT AT NAB CONVENTION
.
CROSSOVER FILTER FOR DISK RECORDING HEADS
BROADCASTERS COMPLETE 7TH RCA TV CLINIC
NEW CUSTOM MOBILE UNIT
WMGM CUSTOM EQUIPMENT
by H.
E.
Roys
by E. L. Schacht
by M. E. Gunn
by Robert C. Deigert and David N. Yerkes
A NEW 150 KW AM TRANSMITTER
by T. J. Koerner
WRAK -FM, WILLIAMSPORT, PA.
OSCILLOSCOPES AND VACUUM TUBE
VOLTMETERS
by George E. Reding and Paul A. Greenmeyer
THE PHILOSOPHY OF OUR TV SYSTEM (Part III)
by John H. Roe
TV BLUEPRINT
SUPERGAIN TV ANTENNA DEVELOPED
BASEBALL TELEVISION.
WPIX BASEBALL
THE "NEW LOOK" AT KTBS
KTBS'S NEW TRANSMITTER
BY RCA
KAKE
KOOS
KSYC
_..
KXLL
KRDO
PROOF -OF- PERFORMANCE
-
Author
Subject
IMPROVED LACQUER DISK RECORDING HEAD
by H. E. Rays
CMQ- HAVANA'S KEY STATION
BROADCASTING STUDIO PICKUP TECHNIQUE _..._..... by H. M. Guerin
Grimm
NORTH EAST WISCONSIN AREA
_.
by Elmo W. Reed
WSBA -FM GOES TO 10 KW
by W. E. Tucker and F. E. Talmage
KCMO- KANSAS CITY'S 50 KW
UP THEY GO
AT WATV,
NEWARK
by W. O. Hodlock and M. L. Gaskill
THE TP -16A 16MM TELEVISION PROJECTOR.
by R. V. Little, Jr.
A 10- KILOVOLT TEST PROBE FOR TELEVISICN_ _... by J. M. Brumbaugh
HOW TO USE THE TELEVISION STABILIZING AMPLIFIER_.. by John H. Roe
WLOS MAKES ITS DEBUT IN THE WONDER -UL
LAND OF THE SKY
_.. by Palmer A. Greer
TRAINING A TELEVISION STAFF -WOW, OMAHA
by Joe Herold
NOTE ON MEANS OF MEASUREMENT OF OUTPUT PLATE A.C.
VOLTAGE OF A TELEVISION DEFLECTION CIRCUIT by J. M. Brumbaugh
WGAR, CLEVELAND -KMPC, LOS ANGELES
KRON -FM SERVICE OF THE SAN FRANCISCO
_
by R. A. Isberg
CHRONICLE
.
No.
5350
5354
5358
5366
5373
WHHM
WSRS
--
--
..
...
_...
WISL
WLAK
WBCK
WBAL-TV
by John
Taylor
P.
by W. M. Witty
by Harold H. Newby
.... by Roger L. Spaugh
by Jack R. Wagner
... by Paf M. Goodover
by Joseph Rohrer
by William Marsh
by Ben H. Whittaker
by B. T. Marshall
by William P. Lee
by A. J. Geronis
by William C. Bareham
FIRST UHF TRANSMITTER SHIPPED
WMAR -TV, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
VOICE OF AMERICA'S 150 KW TRANSMITTER.
RADIO ISTANBUL COVERS NEAR EAST
WITH 150 KW TRANSMITTER
WTCN, MINNEAPOLIS
KENI, ANCHORAGE, ALASKA
HOW TO USE THE TM -5A MONITOR
THE STRANGE CASE OF THE FIVE BASEBALLS
WHIO -TV, DAYTON
by C. G. Nopper
by E. L. Schacht
by Paul C. Brown
by John M. Sherman
by A. G. Hiebert
by H. J. Markley
THEATRE TELE
WPTZ'S USE OF THE REFLECTAR AND ZOOMAR LENSES
KSEI, POCATELLO, IDAHO
by Henry H. Fletcher
HOW TO USE STANDARD FILTERS WITH
NEW FLAT MAGNETIC PICKUP
THE BN -2A PROVIDES FLEXIBILITY
NEW SUPER -POWER BEAM TRIODE
THE GENLOCK FOR IMPROVED TV PROGRAMMING
.
by
H.
E.
Roys
by J. H. Roe
21
BROADCAST NEWS MASTER TABLE OF CONTENTS -(Cont'd)
KEY TO
(A)
5814
5818
5828
5836
5842
5846
INDEX NUMBERING (ISSUES 10 THROUGH 66)
two digits indicate "Broadcast News" volume or issue number.
5904
5907
5916
5924
5932
5936
5946
5950
5960
5962
5963
5964
6004
6008
6018
6026
6028
6034
6036
6038
6042
6048 -1
6048-2
6049
6050
6052
6054
6056
6058
6060
6068
6078
BRAZIL'S LARGEST RADIO NETWORK INSTALLING RCA
TV TRANSMITTER
by L. J. Anderson and L. M. Wigington
THE "BANTAM" MIKE -KB -2C
by B. Wolfe and G. Lohman
WAAM, BALTIMORE
by C. A. Rosencrans
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNA SYSTEMS
RCA BROADCAST SALES REPRESENTATIVES
TV REMOTE CONTROL SWITCHING._. by W. E.
Tucker and C.
by
HOW TO ADJUST FREQUENCY RESPONSE IN
VIDEO AMPLIFIERS FOR TV
L.
6242
6250
6256
6266
J.
Wolf
by J. H. Roe
HIGH -FIDELITY, NOISE CANCELLING
by L. J. Anderson and L. M. Wigington
MICROPHONE
1057 -FOOT FM -TV ANTENNA
COMBINING TV TRANSMITTER CONTROL AND
by W. L. Lyndon and W. T. Douglas, Jr.
PROGRAM SWITCHING
NEW "UNOBTRUSIVE" RIBBON -PRESSURE
by H. F. Olson and John Preston
MICROPHONE
NAB ENGINEERING CONFERENCE
RCA SHOWS NEW EQUIPMENT AT NAB CONVENTION
KRMG, TULSA'S NEW "FIFTY "..... _by A. F. Wooster and K. W. McCrum
KANSAS CITY'S WDAF -TV
DEVELOPMENT OF MULTIPLE-STATION ANTENNA FOR
EMPIRE STATE BUILDING NOW UNDER WAY
WALL-TYPE HOUSING FOR LC -1A "OLSON" SPEAKER
HOW TO SHOCK-MOUNT "70" SERIES TURNTABLE
COMPOSITION OF THE VIDEO WAVEFORM
by Robert M. Crotinger
AS SEEN ON THE SCOPE
6352
6354
6357
6366
6374
NEW LIMITING AMPLIFIER, BA -6A_.
by G. A. Singer
by R. J. Newman
ALL NEW 250 -WATT AM TRANSMITTER
WDSU, AM -FM -TV
by The WDSU Engineering Staff
A VERSATILE VIDEO SPECIAL EFFECTS SYSTEM
by E. M. Gore
KRNT 709 -FOOT TV TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION
THE REQUIREMENTS OF TELEVISION STATION DESIGN
(Part III)
.___........____....._.by Dr. Walter J. Duschinsky
FACTORS AFFECTING PERFORMANCE OF
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
by A. Earl Cullum, Jr.
RCA BROADCAST SALES EXECUTIVES
RCA BROADCAST FIELD SALES REPRESENTATIVES
MORE BASEBALL TELEVISION
by John P. Taylor
A PROFESSIONAL TAPE RECORDER
by W. E. Stewart
TWO NEW STUDIO CONSOLETTES
by David Bain
6406
6408
KGVO, MISSOULA, MONTANA
NEW LIGHTWEIGHT PICKUP AND
6304
6308
6316
6330
6334
6336
KB -3A,
by J. P. McGrenra
by H. E. Roys
by Glenn Flynn
TV FIELD EQUIPMENT ACCESSORIES
RECORDING AND FINE GROOVE TECHNIQUE
WOW-TV, OMAHA, NEBRASKA
HOW TO MODIFY RCA CAMERAS FOR SETTING
CORRECT TARGET VOLTAGE.
UHF SYMPOSIUM AT KC2XAK, BRIDGEPORT
by J. H. Roe
by
WGAN ANNOUNCER-TURNTABLE SETUP
EMPIRE STATE TELEVISION
HOW TO PLOT TV STUDIO
LIGHTING
R.
W. Hodgkins
by W. C. Eddy and H. Duszak
by Thomas E. Howard
WPIXIock
RADIOMIKE COVERS REMOTES FROM HELICOPTER
UNIQUE TAPE RECORDER CONSOLE AT WEEI
NEW AM MODULATION MONITOR, TYPE BW -66E
by Daniel M. Reed
KPRS, OLATHE, KANSAS
by David G. Sinclair
KVFD, FORT DODGE, IOWA
by Neil Arveschoug and Jack Casey
WDHN, NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J
by Gerald R. Chinski
KXYZ, HOUSTON, TEXAS
by J. V. Sanderson
WSGN, BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA
by P. G. Caldwell
TELEVISING FOOTBALL FROM L. A. COLISEUM
by H. M. Gurin and R. L. Zahour
TV STUDIO ILLUMINATION
by G. W. Tunnel!
NEW PORTABLE TV FILM PROJECTOR
WBSM, WBSM -FM
FLYING SPOT CAMERA, TYPE TK -3A
6134
THE
WKPT, WKPT -FM
by Otto F. A. Arnold
by C. R. Monro
by Thomas Phillips
AND ALIGNMENT PROCEDURES
by F. E. Cone and N. P. Kellaway
FOR VIDEO AMPLIFIERS
REQUIREMENTS OF TELEVISION
by Dr. Walter J. Duschinsky
STATION DESIGN
TEST
6343
6415
6418
6420
6428
6434
6442
6448
6451
6452
6455
6456
6466
6506
6508
6514
6528
6530
6534
6536
6548
6555
6558
6561
6606
6608
by R. J. Newman
AM, FM and TV BROADCAST STATIONS
NEW LINK FOR THE AMERICAS.... by Meade Brunet
RCA TELEVISION
by George M. Burbach
KSD AND KSD -TV, ST. LOUIS
6616
6618
6624
6630
6636
by C. R. Yarger
KSD'S AM FACILITIES
by J. E. Risk
KSD TELEVISION FACILITIES
THE REQUIREMENTS OF TELEVISION STATION DESIGN
by Dr. Walter J. Duschinsky
(Part II)
6640
6648
6656
EMPIRE STATE TELEVISION
6146
WOR.TV STUDIOS
6204
FCC AUTHORIZES STUDIO- TRANSMITTER LINK FOR
by Newland
F.
...
.............
by A. D. Dahl and Clarence
L.
Touw
TONE ARM
by L. J. Anderson and C. R. Johnson
METHOD OF DETERMINING THE CAPABILITIES
OF A PICKUP
by H. E. Roys
RADIO PIONEERS DINNER
RCA'S LARGEST NARTB SHOW FEATURES
NEW VHF TV EQUIPMENT
by W. O. Hadlock
THE REQUIREMENTS OF TELEVISION STATION DESIGN
(Part IV)
by Dr. Walter J. Duschinsky
KGO -TV, SAN FRANCISCO
by The KGO -TV Engineering Staff
A SOLUTION TO THE MAGNETIC TAPE
TIMING PROBLEM
by D. R. Andrews
PRECISION AM FREQUENCY MONITOR
by R. S. McKinney
HAM FORUM
by M. L. Gaskill
TELEVISION TRANSMITTER
MONITORING
by R. A. Boot and I. E. Goldstein
HOW TO ADJUST LIMITING AMPLIFIERS
by W. E. Stewart
VIDEO RELAY SWITCHING LAYOUTS
by C. R. Monro
AN EDITING MACHINE FOR MAGNETIC
TAPE
Smith
6141
Author
Subject
EMPIRE STATE TOWER NEARS COMPLETION
by Nevin L. Straub
WJAC -TV, JOHNSTOWN, PENNA
DESIGN OF MOBILE TWO -WAY RADIO COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT AT 152 -174 MC
by R. A. Beers, W. A. Harris, A. D. Zappacosta
by W. L. Lyndon
A FLEXIBLE TV AUDIO SYSTEM
Munro
R.
HIGH GAIN AND DIRECTIONIL ANTENNAS
6108
6116
6122
6128
6208
6222
6224
6230
6236
Next two digits indicate the pages on which articles begin.
No.
Author
Subject
FOR TELEVISION BROADCASTING
5854
(B)
Index
Index
No.
5812
First
RECORDING
by D. C. Yarnes
A CARRIER -AUDIO ALARM CIRCUIT FOR MONITORING
BROADCAST TRANSMITTERS
by Stan Bennett
A NEW AM -FM -TV CONSOLE....
..
by P. W. Wildow and G. A. Singer
NEW "TV PEAK" IN SAN FRANCISCO
by Al Isberg
WNAG'S NEW "250," BTA -250M
by Robert McRoney
STANDARDIZING AND MEASURING VIDEO LEVELS
IN A TV STATION
by J. H. Roe
RADIO AT INDIANA STATE TEACHERS
by Dr. C. M. Morgan
WTAR, AM -FM- TELEVISION
by WTAR Engineering Staff
A LABORATORY TELEVISION SYSTEM
by R. L. Hucaby
TELEVISION STUDIO ACOUSTICS
by M. Rettinger
KNBC'S NEW AM VERTICAL
HAM FORUM
by M. L. Gaskill
BROADCAST AUDIO WIRING PRACTICE
by W. E. Stewart
THE RCA "BASIC BUY" EQUIPMENT
LAYOUT
by L. E. Anderson and W. O. Hadlock
WFIL GOES "45"
by Louis E. Littlejohn
TELEVISION MICROPHONE TECHNIQUES
by Whitney M. Boston
KOTA AND KOZY, RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA
by A. E. Griffiths
NEW 3' /a -INCH UHF ULTRA LOW LOSS COAXIAL LINE
by O. O. Fiet
"EIGHTH" BROADCASTERS'
TV TRAINING PROGRAM
by E. C. Mason and W. R. Coulter
U. S. ARMY SIGNAL CORPS NOW HAS "ELECTRONIC EYES"
NEW 5 KW AM TRANSMITTER
by M. H. Hutt
HAM FORUM
by M. L. Gaskill
THE
22
www.americanradiohistory.com
BROADCAST NEWS CROSS -REFERENCE INDEX
(Volumes
-AACOUSTICS (Studio)
AM FM
5728, 5640, 5354, 5258,
4968, 4752, 4633, 4002, 4008,
4013, 4017, 4018, 4019, 4026,
TV..
6555, 5258,
5108, 5122,
4011, 4312,
3105
5008, 5018
AIR CONDITIONING and HEATING
(Stations)
.. 5128, 1048
AM /FM
TV
_. _..
5748
AMATEUR RADIO
STATIONS
5654,
5666,
3217,
STATIONS (50kw and 150kw)....5946, 5724, 5728,
5105, 5108, 4920, 4952, 4752, 4118, 4139,
3828, 3211, 1410, 918, 802, 702
STATIONS (others)
2012
6455, 6304, 5807, 5151, 4444, 3409, 3331,
2614, 2523, 2120, 2126, 2131, 2006, 1908,
1312, 1207, 1004
6558, 4261, 4019, 3419 -3, 2918, 2604, 2416,
2427, 2128, 2129, 1906, 1912, 1618, 1510,
1522, 1404, 1405, 1410, 1428, 1116, 1118,
1008, 1046, 1049, 1051, 918, 933-2, 938, 724
2208, 1623, 1524,
... 5552, 5358, 3835, 3422, 3316,
3224, 2326, 1914, 1808, 1624, 1408,
TECHNIQUES..
ANTENNAS (DIRECTIONAL ARRAYS)
5646, 4952, 3514, 3016, 2928,
2720, 2620, 2412, 406
ANTENNAS (NON- DIRECTIONAL)
2826, 2612, 2426, 2214, 2227,
1718, 1628, 1526, 1406, 1304,
3332,
6343, 5946,
2808, 2833,
1430, 1207, 1116, 404, 422
Proof of Performance
6558, 4442,
1914, 1814,
1033, 819 -1,
512, 526, 418
MONITORING
6506, 6448, 6049, 3421, 3320,
2124, 1923, 1038, 930, 324, 214
TEST AND MEASURING.... 5552, 4906, 4369, 3424,
3206, 2929, 2808, 2820, 2716, 2406, 2306,
1826, 1834, 1502, 1506, 1217, 1042, 824, 736,
-
4048, 3824, 3510, 2604, 1922,
SHORTWAVE
1402, 1310, 912, 516
STANDARD BROADCAST (250w- 1kw)._.... 6528,
6308, 3508, 3101, 3011, 2523, 2420, 2114,
1214, 902, 915, 304
STANDARD BROADCAST (over 1kw)._._._..6646,
6406, 6224, 5946, 5724, 5728, 5542, 5145,
4508, 4350, 3816, 3106, 2118, 1202, 1232,
1102
TRANSMISSION LINES..._... 3602, 3616, 2904, 2814,
826, 526, 404
TUBES.
5936, 5808, 3936, 3316, 2125, 2010,
814, 614, 206
Installation Practices
EQUIPMENT.
Layout and Planning
3602,
ANTENNAS AND TRANSMISSION LINES.
3616, 3016, 2904, 2928, 2826, 2833, 2720,
2612, 2412, 1526, 1406, 404
GENERAL EQUIPMENT.. ..6506, 6508, 5258, 4846,
4633, 2428, 302
_
4838
4906, 4820, 3206, 2406, 1834, 1502
SURVEYS AND
METHODS__.
1138, 1030, 716, 606
2616, 1826,
1510,
CHIA
WOOW
4266
4118
..4118
4144
3902
KZRH
KWIX
WIXBS
(1)
1402
Stations -AM (Std. B'cst) 50w-500w
WNAG
(250)
(250)..
WBSM
..(250)..
WKPT
KVFD
KAKE
...(250)
...(250)
..(250)
..(250)_
_
KOOS
KSYC
KXLL
..
WHHM
..(250)_
..(250)..
WGPA
WSAV
WCVS
..(250)..
.
WBOC
WCBI
...
WMGA
WMAN
KBND
WDAN
KFAM
WCOU
KGLO
WROW
WRAK
WEBR
WSBT
WTRC
KFJZ
WRAW
_.
(250).
__(250)._
KYCA
WJHP
WCBM
KROD
KHAS
WFMJ
.........5656
..
_.
WSRS
WSOO
_.
...
...
(250)_
(250)..
(250)
.(250)_
...(250)..
....(250)
(250)
(250)
.
(250)
..(250)
(250)
.(250).
...(250)_
....(250).
(250)..
(250).
(250)
(100)
(250)
..(100)..
...(250)_
(250)..
(500).
.(250).
(250)..
(100)
6528
6108
6122
....6052
.._..5654
5655
.................5657
(250)
WSPB
KFPW
.
...
.....(250)
KRDO
KROC
WEMP
KVSO
WTAR
__.(250)
._.
....
5658
5660
5662
.5344
.5206
4858
.4746
...3613
..3614
.3622
....3630
3508 -2
.3508 -1
..3509 -2
3509 -1
...3512
..3526
3534
3217
.3232
3006
...3021
2911
.2932
..2710
...2608
_.2417
...2418
2318
2329
2218
2009
(100)
(100)
2031
1809
...
-1825
825
1
(250)_..
(100)_...
(500).
(100) ..
.(500)...
150).
.
WTAG
WBRE
...
WGAM
WGNY
WWSW
....
WSUN
WFLA
WORC
-
....
-1007
830
_834
536
.406
406
408
_.
...
Stations-AM (Std. B'cst)
KPRS
1707
1318, 1209
1233
...
(100)
(250)..
(250).
(100).
_...
kw and 21/2kw
1
(1)
WISL
WLAK
WBCK
WACE
WSBA
..
KFAR
..
(1)(1)..
...
.....
(1)
(1).
WTAG
(1)
...(1)
(1).
WCAR
WHBF
KSOO
(212)
...2811
2811
(21/2)(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
CKCK
WROK
WTAG
WFBC
(1)....
KTBS
(1)
(1)
(1)
WWNC
WEEV
4841
4764
3704, 3303
....
3623
_....
3627
.._.
....3314
..
3317
3007
...
2805
.
(1)
(1)
WAGA
.6050
5664
5666
5668
-
(I)_.
KRSC
CJKL
_
..
(1)
(1)
WLAW
(50)
(50)
(50)
WOOC
WHOM
KELO
Stations -AM (Short Wave)
WMOX
ANTENNAS AND TRANSMISSION LINES
3602,
3616, 2904, 2612, 2214, 1526, 1406, 1304,
512
6506, 6508, 4758, 3018,
CONTROL EQUIPMENT
2404
TRANSMITTING EQUIPMENT (250w -1 kw)
6528,
4838, 3526, 3314, 3317, 3203, 3217, 2702,
2710, 2428, 2318, 1318
TRANSMITTING EQUIPMENT (5kw-10kw- 25kw)__
6648, 6406, 6222, 6224, 5740, 5646, 5244,
4836, 4860, 4636, 4145, 3502, 3518, 3522,
3310, 2806, 2812, 2712, 2604, 2418, 610, 502
TRANSMITTING EQUIPMENT (50kw and over)
5946, 5724, 5728, 5354, 5108, 4920, 4952,
4752, 4633, 4118, 4139, 3828, 3211, 2918,
2216, 1410, 918, 802, 702
UNITS
Operating Practices
STATION MAINTENANCE
1420, 1330, 916, 202
AM
Equipment
MOBILE
5354, 3018, 3027, 2404,
Networks
AMPLIFIERS (Audio)
TRANSMITTING
(250w- 1kw)__6528, 6308, 6050, 6052,
5655, 5656, 5657, 5658, 5660, 5664,
5668, 5670, 3502, 3526, 3317, 3203,
2318, 1318
STATIONS (5kw, 10kw and 25kw)......6648, 6406,
6222, 6224, 6056, 6058, 5740, 5646, 5346,
5244, 4636, 4145, 3522, 3310, 2604, 502
6656, 6561, 6451, 3323, 3336 -2, 3216, 2016
108
Through 66)
1
2822
2702
2706
2408
_1328,832
819
-
423
212
_.
Stations -AM (Std. B'cst) 5kw and 10kw
KOTA
WTAR
KGVO
(5)
..
(5)
WSGN
(5)
(5)
KENI
(5)...
KSEI
(5).._.
WMPS
_.
_ ..
.
_.
..
....
(10).
WWNC
(5)
WLOS
(5)_.
.(5)._.
KGKL
WKBH
WMT
WMC
WJBO
KLRA
.._.
.
(5)....
KSD
KXYZ
6624
.6536
6406
....6222
6056
....6058
5740
5764
5346
5244
_._...__.
-.(5)
-4942
(5)
(5)_..
(5)_.
(5) (10)
(5) ..
(5)
..
WISH
KDYL
WFLA
WMCA
WIRE
CBM
WOI
WRC ._
..
..
..
...
._
4836
4860
4322
4348
4145
3923
___..3806
3607, 509
(5)3626
(5)
.3631, 3018, 1427
(5)
3502
(5)...
3522
(5)
3310
5)...
2806
(5)...
2812
(5 )....
2824
(5)
2712, 2629
(5)
2618
(5)
2618
(5)
2622
(5).._
2629
(5)_. .2418, 1714, 1240, 524
(5)...
2310
'5)
.2316, 1518, 1427
(5)..
3703, 2005
(5)...
1910
..
(5)... .-_._.
_
_1803
._
(
WBNS
.
WBRC
_
.
WJDX
WGR
WKBW
WFBM
WIP ....
WBEN
WDBJ
WHIO
WFBC
KFBK
WCFL
WREN
..
(5).
1818
23
A-E
BROADCAST NEWS CROSS- REFERENCE INDEX- (Cont'd)
Stations-AM (Std. B'cst) 50kw and over
KNBC
KRMG
KCMO
KMPC
(50)
6558
5946
(50)
(50)...
4920
4952, 3830, 411
(50)
(50)
4952
WGAR
4742, 610
WWL
(50)
WBAL
4752, 4758
(50)
WCAU
(50)
4245, 1621, 1429, 1237, 1161,
1162, 702, 710, 722, 521, 402
4266
CHTA
(50)
3717
KOB .._... _ .. ...........(50)
3304
WWL ._.
.....(50)
3202
WCKY
(50)
3211
CBA
(50)
3211
CBK
(50)
1410
KOA
..(50)
1002,
820
WLW
(500)
802
WOC
(50)
802
WHO
(50)
520
WTIC
(50)
.
.
Stations-AM (Std. B'cst) unclassified
WFIL
WDFU
WGAN
WEEI
WMGM
WKY
..
WMIN
KZRH
6616
6316
6034
6048
5646, 5640
5530
4838
4622
4144
4011
WHLD
KARK
WFAA
KCKN
WIBW
WSAM
WWNC
KVEC
WLOK
KFI
KOMO-K)R
KNX
KARM
KSFO
WHBC
WMBI
WCCO
WHLS
WOAI
KSFO
WOSU
4012
4026, 4031
4046
4046
3606
3615
3629
3631
3403
3403, 2426, 1159
3403
3419
3419
3228
3015
3027
3035
2907
2918
2921
WGIL
2921
KTMS
2817
2819
2819
2819
2519
2519
2519
2519
2519
2519
2519
2402
2404
2415, 1157, 939, 835, 602
WMPS
KVI
KPFA
WFAA
WEST
W KY
KRBC
KTOK
KARK
KTSM
WGRC
KEHE
WSM
2431
2331
2331
KPLT
WSYR
WRGA
WGN
WDOD
WBT
WJz
WKY ._
WMEX
WDAS
2204, 1918
2208, 1714
2216, 1715, 502
2227
2012
2020
1805
KSD
WIOD
WIP
WFK
WPEN
WRAX
WSYR
24
1520,
1712
1713
1602
1618
1418
1520
909
WLS
609
614
614
412
412
412
413
413
413
213
KFSD
WENR
WOAI
WFAA
WJDX
WSUN
WFLA
WQBC
KFGQ
AVIATION RADIO
3115,
2921
-3,
1824,
1637,
847
-BBROADCAST ENGINEERING
A REVIEW OF (Reading References)
2434, 2334,
2230, 2032,
2723, 2634,
1934
CAMERA LENSES (TV)
5762, 5608, 5628
ANTENNAS
AM DIRECTIONAL
6343, 5946, 5646, 4952,
3514, 3016, 2928, 2808, 2833, 2720, 2620,
2412, 406
AM NON- DIRECTIONAL 6558, 4442, 2826, 2612,
2426, 2214, 2227, 1914, 1814, 1718, 1628,
1526, 1406, 1304, 1033, 819 -1, 512, 526, 418
FM PYLON
5908, 5332, 5036, 4708, 4713,
4714, 4722
FM TURNSTILE
4828, 4442, 4242, 3906, 2320
INSTALLATION PRACTICES
AM ANTENNAS
3602, 3616, 2904, 2612,
2214, 1526, 1406, 1304, 512
6630, 6514, 6334, 6036, 5828,
TV ANTENNAS
4924, 4748
LAYOUT AND PLANNING -AM ANTENNAS....3602,
3616, 3016, 2904, 2928, 2826, 2833, 2720,
2612, 2412, 1526, 1406, 404
TELEVISION ANTENNAS.... 6334, 6242, 6028, 6036,
5908, 5960, 5846, 5604, 5508, 5166, 4828,
4242
TEST AND MEASURING (ANTENNA) 5508, 4306
-
COMBINATION AM -FM -TV
LAYOUT AND
PLANNING
6058, 5732, 5764, 5662,
5052, 4942, 4820, 4828,
INSTALLATIONS....6514, 6536,
5732, 5206, 5052, 4820,
INSTALLATION PRACTICES
5764, 5344, 5206, 5052,
4858, 4764
OPERATING PRACTICES
6536, 6316,
5344, 5346,
4858, 4764
6316, 6052,
4858, 4764
6316, 5908,
4942, 4820,
6052,
5206,
6058,
5732,
4828,
6316
COMMUNICATIONS
Emergency
FIRE
AND POLICE.... 3841, 3115, 2002, 1627, 1530,
1534, 1436, 1324, 1230, 1142, 1143, 1145,
1011, 1012, 934, 937, 838, 841, 842, 844,
848, 720, 721, 628, 629, 528, 529, 416, 314,
210, 211, 110
HIGHWAY AND OTHER
3714, 3115, 819
R.C.A.
1049, 1026, 532, 222
ARMY, U.
Two Way Mobile Radio
AUDIO
Equipment
CONTROL EQUIPMENT; CONSOLETTES
S.
6604, 4414, 4253, 4018, 4056, 3806
6256, 4838
AM
AMPLIFIERS....6455, 6304, 5807, 5151, 4444, 3409,
3331, 2614, 2523, 2120, 2126, 2131, 2006,
1908, 1312, 1207, 1004
CONTROL, CONSOLETTES
6606, 6506, 6374,
6266, 5936, 4451, 3214, 2915, 2916, 2610,
2523, 2410, 2204, 2216, 2113, 2130, 2022,
1226, 836
CUSTOM EQUIPMENT
5530, 5132, 5174, 4031,
3928, 3703, 3722, 3608, 3106, 2216
MICROPHONES
6618, 6048, 5904, 5924, 5936,
5814, 4271, 3414, 3003, 2832, 2523, 2212,
2112, 2034, 1704, 1204, 1234, 940, 730, 506,
6506, 6508, 4758, 3018, 2404
AUDIO
6606, 6506, 6374, 6266, 5936, 4451,
3214, 2915, 2916, 2610, 2523, 2410, 2204,
2216, 2113, 2130, 2022, 1226, 836
CONVENTIONS; CLINICS
6418, 6420, 5932, 5713 -2,
5032, 4732, 4609, 4524, 3402,
3412, 3415, 3416, 3417, 2101
OTHERS
6636, 6028, 5524, 5443,
5002, 4726, 4738, 4604, 4650,
2707, 2717, 2302, 2305, 2224,
925
NARTB
320, 104
RECORDING
CUSTOM EQUIPMENT
1908, 1217, 626
TRANSCRIPTION
6616, 6408, 6034, 5963, 5804,
5520, 5307, 3536, 3008, 1608, 818, 624
CRYSTALS
6442, 6466, 6366, 6008, 6048,
5936, 5406, 5350, 3706, 3732, 3409, 3414,
3326, 3008, 2133, 1930
TEST AND MEASURING....6415, 6442, 4628, 4342,
2312, 2202
-D-
CUSTOM
Layout and Planning
EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS
6266, 5530, 4444, 4451,
3024, 2924, 1906, 1602,
318
TECHNIQUES
6618,
6606, 6514, 6374,
3722, 3608, 3222,
1314,
1118,
1702,
1434, 1314, 1326,
820, 831, 837, 511
2014, 2022,
6008, 6034, 2520
(INTERESTING FACTS)
1706, 1612, 1516, 1416,
1322, 1224, 1152, 1154, 1022, 910, 822, 735,
615
DIRECTIONAL ANTENNAS
AM
6343, 5946, 5646, 4952, 3514, 3016, 2928,
2808, 2833, 2720, 2620, 2412, 406
DIRECTORIES
COAST STATIONS
STATE AND MUNICIPAL POLICE
1606,
1221,
1522, 1414, 1423,
1238, 1118, 1051,
Operating Practices
TECHNIQUES
6618, 6455, 6466, 6266, 6008,
5804, 5307, 3628, 3536, 3208, 3008, 1704,
1716, 1326, 1329, 1226, 730, 320, 322
5504, 5520, 4342, 3735, 3504, 3506,
3306, 1710
THEORY
Surveys and Statistics
4628, 3506, 1911
DID YOU KNOW?
1154,
Networks
5240, 5154,
3118, 3010,
2106, 1109,
AUDIO..
5530, 5132, 5174, 4031, 3928, 3703,
3722, 3608, 3106, 2216
INSTALLATION PRACTICES
6606, 6034, 6048,
5530, 5307, 3518
Installation Practices
6606, 6034, 6048, 5530, 5307, 3518
STANDARD 6618, 6514, 6048, 5963, 4444, 4451,
3536, 3420, 1906, 1918, 1602, 1314, 1118,
1154
THEORY
3722, 3608
5516, 5028,
3408, 3410,
STATIONS
3404
316
-EEQUIPMENT
AM
-
ANTENNAS
DIRECTIONAL ARRAYS
6343, 5946, 5646,
4952, 3514, 3016, 2928, 2808, 2833, 2720,
2620, 2412, 406
NON -DIRECTIONAL
6558, 4442, 2826, 2612,
2426, 2214, 2227, 1914, 1814, 1718, 1628,
1526, 1406, 1304, 1033, 819 -1, 512, 526, 418
BROADCAST NEWS CROSS- REFERENCE INDEX -(Cont'd)
TRANSMISSION LINES
3602, 3616,
2814, 826, 526, 404
MONITORING
6506, 6448, 6049, 3421,
2124, 1923, 1038, 930, 324, 214
TEST AND MEASURING._. 5552, 4906, 4369,
3206, 2929, 2808, 2820, 2716, 2406,
1826, 1834, 1502, 1506, 1217, 1042,
736, 108
-
TRANSMITTING
SHORT WAVE
2904,
3320,
3424,
2306,
824,
STANDARD BROADCAST (1 kw and under)
6528, 6308, 3508, 3101, 3011, 2523, 2420,
2114, 1214, 902, 915
6649,
STANDARD BROADCAST (over 1kw)
6406, 6224, 5946, 5724, 5728, 5542, 5145,
4508, 4350, 3816, 3106, 2118, 1202, 1232,
1102
TUBES
5936, 5808, 3936, 3316, 2125, 2010,
814, 614, 206
Antennas
Studio- Transmitter Link
(MICROWAVE)._ ._.6204, 6018, 5828, 5058, 4736,
4639, 4420
Test and Measuring
5552, 4906, 4369, 3424, 3206, 2929, 2808,
2820, 2716, 2406, 2306, 1826, 1834, 1502,
1506, 1217, 1042, 824, 736, 108
ANTENNA
5508, 4306
AUDIO 6415, 6442, 4628, 4342, 1908, 1217, 626
FM
5508, 5552, 4708, 4518, 4352, 4354, 4369,
4112, 3925, 3832, 3421, 3424
6530, 6128, 5964, 5508, 5552, 4933, 4823,
3308
TV
Transmission Lines
AM._.
TV _.
..3602, 3616, 2904, 2814, 826, 526, 404
_.
__
6630
_...._.
Transmitting
....6343, 5946, 5646, 4952,
AM DIRECTIONAL
3514, 3016, 2928, 2808, 2833, 2720, 2620,
2412, 406
AM NON -DIRECTIONAL
6558, 4442, 2826,
2612, 2426, 2214, 2227, 1914, 1814, 1718,
1628, 1526, 1406, 1304, 1033, 819-1, 512,
526, 418
FM PYLON
5908, 5332, 5036, 4708, 4713,
4714, 4722
FM TURNSTILE
4828, 4442, 4242, 3906, 2320
TV
6334, 6242, 6028, 6036, 5908, 5706, 5846,
5604, 5508, 5166, 4828, 4242
Audio
6455, 6304, 5807, 5151, 4444,
3409, 3331, 2614, 2523, 2120, 2126, 2131,
2006, 1908, 1312, 1207, 1004
CONTROL EQUIPMENT; CONSOLETTES; SWITCH ERS
6606, 6506, 6374, 6266, 5936, 4451,
3214, 2915, 2916, 2610, 2523, 2410, 2204,
2216, 2113, 2130, 2022, 1226, 836
CUSTOM
5530, 5132, 5174, 4031, 3928, 3703,
3722, 3608, 3106, 2216
MICROPHONES
6618, 6048, 5904, 5924, 5936,
5814, 4271, 3414, 3003, 2832, 2523, 2212,
2112, 2034, 1704, 1204, 1234, 940, 730, 506,
320, 104
RECORDING.... 6442, 6466, 6366, 6008, 6049, 5936,
5406, 5350, 3706, 3732, 3409, 3414, 3326,
3008, 2133, 1930
SPEAKERS
5962, 4624, 3414, 3336, 2708, 2123
TRANSCRIPTION
6616, 6408, 6034, 5963, 5804,
5520, 5307, 3536, 3008, 1608, 818, 624
AM- SHORTWAVE
Lighting
(STUDIO)....__ 6038, 6068, 5936, 5452, 5158,
4546
3117, 2802, 2704, 2210, 1018
3712, 3525, 3302
FACSIMILE...
3113, 3002, 2902, 2908
RF HEATING
3935
RESEARCH
3812, 3116, 2425, 1904, 1138
ALL OTHERS
3327, 3104, 3108, 3109, 2908,
2607, 2206, 2218 -2, 1916, 1806, 1823, 1605,
1607, 1611, 1616, 1424-1, 1110, 1134, 1160,
846, 743 -1, 623, 424, 219
ELECTRON MICROSCOPE
Mobile
TWO WAY RADIO...
TRANSMITTING
5528,
6256, 4838
4838, 3704, 1051, 933,
938, 540
VIDEO
6640, 6004, 6018, 6042, 6069, 4644,
4556, 4406, 3903, 3820, 3312
5728, 5542, 5145, 4508, 4350, 3816, 3106,
2118, 1202, 1232, 1102
FM
5308, 5318, 5320, 5326, 4722, 4456, 4460,
4206, 4224, 4230, 4236, 3421
MOBILE
5528, 4838, 3704, 1051, 933, 938, 540
TVUHF
VHF
5708
6420, 6028, 5916, 4804, 3914, 3110
FM
5936, 5808, 3936, 3316, 2125, 2010, 814,
614. 206
4466, 4230
TV
6506, 6448, 6049, 3421, 3320, 2124, 1923,
1038, 930, 324, 214
..6452, 4862
Proof of Performance
AM_...
FM
4816
4248, 1904, 806
TV
TV (IMAGE)
UNCLASSIFIED
3844, 2518, 1310,
906, 744, 521, 306
Two Way Radio
1140, 1014,
HIGHWAY
-F-
4906, 4820, 3206, 2406, 1834, 1502
4318, 4362, 3944, 3925, 3308
Stations (FM) -3kw
KOZY
KVFD
WSGN
WPGA
WPAY
WKJG
WJPG
WLOS
KRON
WRC
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
WOPI
WACE
WCVS
WSBA
5036, 4708, 47 13, 4714,
4722
.._ 4828, 4442, 4242,
6624
6052
6058
5344
5172
5052
4908
4942
4968
4820
4832
4841
4858
....4764
Stations (FM) -5kw and 10kw
WBSM
WKPT
.
__(10) _........__.....
WSAV
WSBA
KOOL
(10)
(5)
(10)
(5)_.
6108
6122
5206, 4713
4912, 4764
4636
(50)
(50
5320, 4554
Stations (FM) -50kw
WTAR
WTMJ
6536
Unclassified
6316
5326, 5332
4838
Test and Measuring
5508, 5552, 4708, 4518, 4352, 4354, 4369,
4112, 3925, 3832, 3421, 3424
Transmitting Equipment
5308, 5318, 5320, 5326, 4722, 4456, 4460,
4206, 4224, 4230, 4236, 3421
Tubes
-GGOVERNMENT
S
6640, 4414, 4253, 4018, 4056,
3806
NAVY, U. S
4414, 4324, 4017, 4022, 3806,
3846, 614, 409
ARMY, U.
-H4536
Antennas
PYLON.... .5908, 5332,
4145
3710
HOSPITAL TELEVISION
FM
3
906, 2320
Installation Practices
6508, 5550, 5318, 5320, 5326, 5248, 5172,
5036, 5052, 4908, 4912, 4924, 4968, 4832,
4838, 4714, 4633, 4145, 3710
Layout and Planning
6508, 6052, 6054, 6058, 5908, 5550, 5318,
5320, 5326, 5248, 5258, 5172, 4908, 4912,
4924, 4968, 4832, 4833, 4838, 4846, 4652,
4145
5552, 5318, 5358
Proof of Performance
EQUIPMENT
_.. _..... _.
KALW
6054
5764
5662
5550
5248
4856
4762
4466, 4230
3714, 3115, 819
6256, 4838
TWO WAY MOBILE
4518, 4362, 3925, 3944, 3308
AND METHODS
.5336, 4463, 4354,
4362, 4372, 4240, 4112, 4126, 4132, 4038,
3944, 3832
SURVEYS
.. _.
-
EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS
FIRE AND POLICE........ 3841, 3115, 2002, 1627,
1530, 1534, 1436, 1324, 1230, 1142, 1143,
1145, 1011, 1012, 934, 937, 838, 841, 842,
844, 848, 720, 721, 628, 629, 528, 529, 416,
314, 210, 211, 110
TURNSTILE... _._
(1)
(1)
(1)
(1)
..(1)
(1)
WKY
Tubes (Transmitting)
kw
(253w).
WRAK
WJAC
WBRC
1327
AM
KSEZ
WSRS
KFBK
WBRE
WBRL
1
(1)
(1)
WDSU
Tubes (Receiving)
Operating Practices
Monitoring
AM
2604,
-
Miscellaneous
COMMERCIAL
4048, 3824, 3510,
1922, 1402, 1310, 912, 516
AM- STANDARD BROADCAST
1KW AND UNDER
6528, 6308, 3508, 3101,
3011, 2523, 2420, 2114, 1214, 902, 915
OVER 1KW
6646, 6406, 6224, 5946, 5724,
AMPLIFIERS
TV
WDHN
6048
4048, 3824, 3510, 2604, 1922,
1402, 1310, 912, 516
Stations (FM) -250w to
Radiomike
AM
E-1
-IINSTALLATIONS
Combination (AM- FM -TV)
6514, 6536, 6316, 6052, 6058, 5732, 5206,
5052, 4820, 4858, 4764
Practices (AM)
250W-1KW
6528, 4838, 3526, 3314, 3317,
3203, 3217, 2702, 2710, 2428, 1318
5KW- 10KW -25KW
6648, 6406, 6222, 6224,
5740, 5646, 5244, 4836, 4860, 4636, 4145,
3502, 3522, 3310, 2806, 2812, 2712, 2604,
2418, 610, 502
50KW AND OVER....5946, 5724, 5728, 5354, 5108,
4920, 4952, 4752, 4633, 4118, 4139, 3828,
3211, 2918, 2216, 1410, 918, 802, 702
UNCLASSIFIED
3518, 3027, 2012
CONTROL EQUIPMENT
6506, 6508, 4758, 3018,
2404
ANTENNAS AND TRANSMISSION LINES
3616,
3602, 2904, 2612, 2214, 1526, 1406, 1304,
512
25
I-R
BROADCAST NEWS CROSS- REFERENCE INDEX -(Cont'd)
Practices (Audio)
TV
6606, 6034, 6048, 5530, 5307, 3518
STANDARD....6618, 6514, 5963, 4444, 4451, 3536,
3420, 1906, 1918, 1602, 1314, 1118, 1154
3722, 3608
THEORY
CUSTOM
Practices (FM)
6508, 5530, 5318, 5320, 5326, 5248, 5172,
5036, 5052, 4908, 4912, 4924, 4968, 4832,
4838, 4856, 4714, 4633, 4145, 3710
Practices (TV)
ANTENNAS
4924, 4748
6630, 6514, 6334, 6036, 5828,
INTERESTING FACTS AND FEATURES
1706, 1612, 1516, 1416,
DID YOU KNOW?
1322, 1224, 1152, 1154, 1022, 910, 822, 735,
615
848, 619, 525, 410
WHAT IS IT OLD TIMER?
MISCELLANEOUS 3327, 3104, 3108, 3109, 2908,
2607, 2206, 2218 -2, 1916, 1806, 1823, 1605,
1607, 1611, 1616, 1424-1, 1110, 1134, 1160,
846, 743 -1, 623, 424, 219
INTERNATIONAL
Broadcasting
5812, 3613 -1, 3510, 1802, 1302,
912, 743.2, 510
50KW
4139, 4151, 3941, 3828, 2018, 1242, 620,
UNDER 50KW
411
..5928, 4118, 204
OVER 50KW_..
6428,
5538,
5058
1430,
TECHNIQUES
6618, 6455, 6466, 6266, 6008,
5804, 5307, 3628, 3536, 3208, 3008, 1704,
1716, 1326, 1329, 1226, 730, 322, 320
THEORY
5504, 5520, 4342, 3735, 3504, 3506,
3306, 1710
Combination AM -FM -TV
6316
.5762, 5608, 5628
TV CAMERA
AM
3602, 3616, 2904, 2814, 826, 526, 404
_.._..
6630
TV
-MMAINTENANCE (Station)
2208,
TV
FM
5552, 5318, 5358
LINES (Transmission)
AM
1623, 1524, 1420, 1330, 916, 202
5854
MARINE RADIO
TV
MAINTENANCE
5552, 4906, 4369, 3424, 3206, 2929, 2808,
2820, 2716, 2406, 2306, 1834, 1826, 1502,
1506, 1217, 1042, 824, 736, 108
ANTENNA
5508, 4306
AUDIO .6415, 6442, 4628, 4342, 1908, 1217, 626
FM
5508, 5552, 4708, 4518, 4352, 4354, 4369,
4112, 3952, 3832, 3421, 3424
FREQUENCY MEASURING SERVICE
1158
TV
6530, 6128, 5964, 5508, 5552, 4933, 4820,
3308
1704, 1204, 1234, 940, 730, 506, 320, 104
Others
MICROWAVE
STL
MISCELLANEOUS
3602, 3616, 3016, 2904, 2928,
ANTENNAS
2826, 2833, 2720, 2612, 2412, 1526, 1406,
404
4838
6308,
6050,
250W-1KW
6528,
5655, 5656, 5657, 5658, 5660,
5668, 5670, 3502, 3526, 3317,
2318, 1318
6648, 6406,
5KW- 10KW -25KW
6056, 6058, 5740, 5646, 5346,
3522,
3310,
2604,
502
4145,
5946, 5724,
50KW AND OVER
5108, 4920, 4952, 4752, 4118,
3211, 1410, 918, 802, 702
6052, 5654,
5664, 5666,
3203, 3217,
6222, 6224,
5244, 4636,
AM
TRANSMITTING
5528, 4838, 3704, 1051,
938, 540
TWO WAY RADIO
6256,
VIDEO
6640, 6004, 6018, 6042, 6069,
4556, 4406, 3903, 3820, 3312
3849, 1048
PERSONALITIES
6352, 6354, 5836, 5713 -1, 5606, 5607, 5446,
5247, 4919, 4620, 4545, 4428, 4353, 4138,
3721, 3230, 3234, 3036, 2937, 2818, 2823,
2715, 2602, 2608, 2633, 2516, 2436, 2325,
2331, 2232, 2102, 2103, 2104, 2105, 2108,
2109, 2110, 2111, 2134, 2135, 2035, 1708,
1724, 1614, 1514, 1424-2, 1433, 1316, 1331,
1210, 1228, 1146, 1149, 1150, 1036, 926, 933,
937, 827, 828, 841, 719, 726, 727, 616, 631,
518, 407, 414, 311, 312, 313, 323, 208, 106,
107
6506, 6448,
5354, 3018, 3027, 2404, 2012
EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS
6266, 5530, 4444, 4451,
3024, 2924, 1906, 1602,
318
6618,
TECHNIQUES
1118,
1154,
6536, 6316, 6052, 6058, 5732,
5344, 5346, 5206, 5052, 4942,
4858, 4764
FM
6508, 6052, 6054, 6058, 5908, 5550, 5318,
5320, 5326, 5248, 5258, 5172, 4908, 4912,
4924, 4968, 4832, 4833, 4838, 4846, 4652,
933,
AND METHODS
1138, 1030, 716, 606
AM
1834,
2616, 1826,
1510,
EQUIPMENT
4518, 4362, 3925, 3944, 3308
5336, 4463, 4354,
4362, 4372, 4240, 4112, 4126, 4132, 4038,
3944, 3832
TV
4254, 4057, 3802
PYLON ANTENNAS
5908, 5332, 5036, 4708, 4713, 4714, 4722
6049, 3421, 3320, 2124,
1923,
6558, 4261, 4019, 3419 -3, 2918, 2604,
2416, 2427, 2128, 2129, 1906, 1912, 1618,
1510,
1118,
3206, 2406,
FM
4644,
-N1522,
1008,
1404, 1405,
1046, 1049,
1410, 1428, 1116,
1051, 918, 933 -2,
938, 724
AUDIO
2014, 2022, 1702, 1606, 1522, 1414,
1423, 1434, 1314, 1326, 1221,
1051, 820, 831, 837, 511
TV
5764, 5662,
4820, 4828,
4906, 4820,
4838
NETWORKS
6008, 6034, 2520
Combination AM -FM -TV
EQUIPMENT
1502
4838
1038, 930, 324, 214
6606, 6514, 6374,
3722, 3608, 3222,
1314,
PROOF OF PERFORMANCE
AM
MONITORING (AM)
Audio
5552, 5563, 5437,
SURVEYS AND METHODS
MOBILE
5728, 5105,
4139, 3828,
6330,
5745,
4934,
4538,
PARTS (Replacement)
SURVEYS
3327, 3104, 3108, 3109, 2908, 2607, 2206,
2218 -2, 1916, 1806, 1823, 1605, 1607, 1611,
1616, 1424-1, 1110, 1134, 1160, 846, 743 -1,
623, 424, 219
AM
STATION INSTALLATIONS
6204, 6018, 5828, 5058, 4736, 4639,
4420
LAYOUT AND PLANNING
MOBILE UNITS
-TV
6530, 6452,
5916, 5810,
5366, 4933,
4657, 4536,
-P-
AM
6618, 6048, 5904, 5924, 5936, 5814, 4271,
3414, 3003, 2832, 2523, 2212, 2112, 2034,
-L-
5854
TECHNIQUE
6608, 6618,
6357, 6128, 6042, 6060,
5762, 5608, 5628, 5474,
4946, 4950, 4842, 4612,
4542, 3312
THEORY
6026, 5964, 5746,
5373, 4156, 3932, 3938
3604, 3115, 2415, 1405
MEASURING AND TESTING
6208, 5252, 4769
5354, 4144, 3720, 3236, 3010, 1902, 618
1207, 1116, 404, 422
Audio
MICROPHONES
Television
4145
6508,
6018,
5414,
4638,
LENSES
6608, 6508, 6230, 6146, 5916,
EQUIPMENT
5950, 5818, 5748, 5714, 5672, 5414, 5452,
5158, 4866, 4748, 4638, 4546
6618, 5916, 5058
TECHNIQUES
UNCLASSIFIED
5552, 5358, 3835, 3422, 3316,
3332, 3224, 2326, 1914, 1808, 1624, 1408,
TECHNIQUES
BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT._.6608, 6618,
6434, 6456, 6222, 6230, 6116, 6146,
6028, 5950, 5818, 5714, 5748, 5672,
5452, 5206, 5212, 5158, 5018, 4748,
4546
SYSTEMS- STATION DESIGN
6630, 6514,
6336, 6236, 6134, 5908, 5828, 5508,
5563, 5437, 5258, 5008, 4924, 4312
TECHNIQUES.
6038, 6060, 5916, 5608,
1238,
1118,
6434, 6146, 6060, 6068, 5708, 5366, 5258,
5058, 5018, 4820, 4726, 4612, 3914, 3928,
2630
-OOperating Practices
AM
MAINTENANCE
.2208, 1623, 1524, 1420, 1330,
916, 202
26
www.americanradiohistory.com
-RRCA
COMMUNICATIONS.... ........1026, 1049, 532, 222
FREQUENCY MEASURING SERVICE
1158
REPLACEMENT PARTS
3849, 1048
RADIO
AMATEUR.... 6656, 6561, 6451, 3323, 3336 -2, 3216,
2016
AVIATION
MARINE
3115, 2921 -3, 1824, 1637, 847
3604, 3115, 2415, 1405
TWO WAY MOBILE
6256, 4838
RADIOMIKE
6048
RECEIVER (AM-FM-TV)
5478, 4862, 4246, 4102, 3802, 3708, 3323,
3216, 3102, 3103, 3110, 3111, 3112, 2718,
2034, 1804, 1309, 629, 540
RECEIVING TUBES
1327
R-Z
BROADCAST NEWS CROSS-REFERENCE INDEX -(Cont'd)
Lighting
RECORDING
6442, 6466, 6366, 6008, 6048, 5936, 5406,
5350, 3706, 3732, 3409, 3414, 3326, 3008,
2133, 1930
RESEARCH AND THEORY
3812, 3116, 2425, 1904,
1138
-S-
TEST
Layout and Planning
BUILDING
6434,
6028,
5452,
4546
AND EQUIPMENT
6608, 6618, 6508,
6456, 6222, 6230, 6116, 6146, 6018,
5950, 5818, 5714, 5748, 5672, 5414,
5206, 5212, 5158, 5018, 4748, 4638,
SYSTEMS AND DESIGNS
6630, 6514, 6428,
6336, 6236, 6134, 5908, 5828, 5842, 5508,
5538, 5563, 5437, 5258, 5008, 4924, 4312
STATION HEATING AND
AIR CONDITIONING
5128,
AM / FM
1048
5748
TV
....6618, 6008, 6034, 2520
TECHNIQUES
5762, 5608, 5628
AM
6528, 4838, 3526, 3314, 3317.
3203, 3217, 2702, 2710, 2428, 1318
6648, 6406, 6222, 6224,
5KW- 10KW -25KW
5740, 5646, 5244, 4836, 4860, 4636, 4145,
3502, 3522, 3310, 2806, 2812, 2712, 2604,
2418, 610, 502
5946, 5724, 5728, 5354,
50KW AND OVER
5108, 4920, 4952, 4752, 4633, 4118, 4139,
3828, 3211, 2918, 2216, 1410, 918, 802, 702
3518, 3027,
UNCLASSIFIED
2012
FM
6508, 5550, 5318, 5320, 5326, 5248, 5172,
5036, 5052, 4908, 4912, 4924, 4968, 4832,
4838, 4856, 4714, 4633, 4145, 3710
TV
6608, 6508, 6230, 6146, 5916, 5950, 5818,
5714, 5748, 5672, 5414, 5452, 5158, 4866,
4748, 4638, 4546
STATION MAINTENANCE
2208, 1623, 1524, 1420, 1330, 916, 202
5854
AM
TV
5728, 5640, 5354, 5258, 5108, 5122,
4968, 4752, 4633, 4002, 4008, 4011, 4012,
4013, 4017, 4018, 4019, 4026, 3105, 1918,
AM /FM
1602, 612, 521 -1
6555, 5258, 5008, 5018
TV
SURVEYS (and Methods)
2616, 1826, 1510, 1138, 1030, 716, 606
AM
4628, 3506, 1911
5336, 4463, 4354, 4362, 4372, 4240, 4112,
4126, 4132, 4038, 3944, 3832
6434, 6146, 6060, 6068, 5708, 5366, 5258,
5018, 5058, 4820, 4726, 4612, 3914, 3928,
2630
TECHNIQUES
6608,
6357, 6128, 6042,
5762, 5608, 5628,
4946, 4950, 4852,
4542, 3312
TV
1118,
1154, 318
6630, 6514, 6428, 6336, 6236, 6134, 5908,
5822, 5842, 5508, 5538, 5563, 5437, 5258,
5008, 4924, 4312
-T-
6530,
5916,
5366,
4657,
6334, 6242, 6028, 6036, 5908, 5960, 5846,
5604, 5508, 5166, 4828, 4242
Film Recording
Radiomike
Stations (5kw)
6048
(5)
6536
6316
(5) ....6222, 6230, 4542, 4546
(5)
6250
(5)
6018
(5)
5950
(5)
5818
(5)
5714
(5)
5732
(5)
5748
(5)
5672
(5)
5414
(5)
5452
(5)
4924
(5)
4820
(5)
4842, 4554
(5)
4866
(5)
4748
(5)
4522
(5).
KSD
WJAC
WDAF
WAAM
WMAR
WTCN
WHIO
WBAL
WENR
WCAU
WATV
..
KRNT
WOR
WPIX
W PTZ
ACOUSTICS
5748
5158, 4866, 4748, 4638, 4546
6618, 5916, 5058
1327
Transmitting
5936, 5808, 3936, 3316, 2125, 2010, 814,
AM.
614, 206
4466, 4230
FM
TVIMAGE
4248,
1904, 806
4816
UNCLASSIFIED
3844, 2518, 1310, 1140, 1014,
906, 744, 521, 306
OTHERS
TWO WAY RADIO
6256, 4838
UHF -TV
TRANSMISSION LINE
TRANSMITTING
U.
6630
5708
ARMY
S.
6640, 4414, 4253, 4018, 4056, 3806
NAVY
U. S.
VHF -TV
TRANSMITTING
3110
6420, 6028, 5916, 4804, 3914,
(MOBILE)
6640, 6004, 6018, 6042, 6069,
4644, 4556, 4406, 3903, 3820, 3312
STUDIO
6608, 6420, 6434, 6456, 6330, 6116,
6004, 6026, 6042, 5916, 5929, 5936, 5810,
5842, 5745, 5762, 5432, 4928, 4934
FIELD
Transmitting Equipment
EQUIPMENT
6608, 6508, 6230, 6146, 5916,
5950, 5818, 5714, 5748, 5672, 5414, 5452,
Receiving
VIDEO
5758, 4736, 4621
ANTENNAS.... 6630, 6514, 6334, 6036, 5828, 4924,
4748
TUBES
6555, 5258, 5008, 5018
Theater
Installation Practices
VHF
4414, 4324, 4017, 4022, 3806, 3846, 614, 409
Studio
6208, 5252, 4769
5708
6420, 6028, 5916, 4804, 3914, 3110
UHF
MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS
6514
6434
6334
6146
6042, 5628
5762
5562
5158, 4638
5166
KRON
KGO
6204, 6018, 5828, 5058, 4736, 4639, 4420
International
TV
Systems, Techniques
4536
5326, 4722, 4456, 4460,
4236, 3421
5528, 4838, 3704, 1051, 933, 938, 540
4254, 4057, 3802
Studio -Transmitter Link
Hospital
5308, 5318, 5320,
4206, 4224, 4230,
Mobile
Proof of Performance
AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING.
5432
6452,
5810,
4933,
4536,
FM
WFIL
WEWS
Antennas
TECHNIQUES..
6618,
6060,
5474,
4612,
WGN
TELEVISION
6330,
5745,
4934,
4538,
2523, 2420, 2114, 1214, 902, 915
OVER 1KW
6648, 6406, 6224, 5946, 5724,
5728, 5542, 5145, 4508, 4350, 3816, 3106,
2118, 1202, 1232, 1102
6026, 5964, 5746, 5552, 5563, 5437,
5373, 4156, 3932, 3938
WTMJ
WBEN
WAAT
WTCN
1602, 1314,
5854
SHORTWAVE
4048, 3824, 3510, 2604, 1922,
1402, 1310, 912, 516
STANDARD BROADCAST
250W- 1KW....
6528, 6308, 3508, 3101, 3011,
THEORY
WNBW
AUDIO
6606, 6514, 6374, 6266, 5530, 4444,
4451, 3722, 3608, 3222, 3024, 2924, 1906,
AM
-
MAINTENANCE
FM
AND DESIGN
6630
TRANSMITTING EQUIPMENT
Operating Practices
WTAR
WDSU
5520, 5307,
TV
Networks
AUDIO
SYSTEMS
6616, 6408, 6034, 5963, 5804,
3536, 3008, 1608, 818, 624
AM__..........3602, 3616, 2904, 2814, 826, 526, 404
6452, 4862
WOW
STUDIO ACOUSTICS
TRANSCRIPTION
TRANSMISSION LINES
Monitoring
250W -1KW
5552, 4906, 4369, 3424, 3206, 2929, 2808,
2820, 2716, 2406, 2306, 1826, 1834, 1502,
1506, 1217, 1042, 824, 736, 108
ANTENNA
5508, 4306
AUDIO..
6415, 6442, 4682, 4342, 1908, 1217,
626
FM.
5508, 5552, 4708, 4518, 4352, 4354, 4369,
4112, 3925, 3832, 3421, 3424
TV
6530, 6128, 5964, 5508, 5552, 4933, 4820,
3308
Lenses (Camera)
STATION INSTALLATIONS
AND MEASURING
AM
6038, 6068, 5936, 5452, 5158, 4546
UHF
....5708
VHF
6420, 6028, 5916, 4804, 3914, 3110
-W-
Tubes
IMAGE
TRANSMITTING
_
.4248, 1904, 806
....4816
WHAT
IS IT
(FEATURE)
OLD TIMER?
........848, 619, 525, 410
27
BROADCAST
IN
AUDIO
W.
E.
STEWART, Mgr.
Audio Engineering Section
The latest RCA Mi
crophone to be announced is the BK -1A Pressure
type, successor to the 88.A.
1
952
The
indicating the period at which an item first
appeared. There are several phases to
trends that can be considered.
audio equipment required to set up
satisfactory studio installation comprises
an important part of the Broadcast Station's investment. Thus, its purchase and
installation is generally treated with serious
study; and once installed, it must serve
for a long time. To discern trends we must
go back over 20 to 25 years of Broadcast
history, since most of the installations of
10 to 15 years ago are still in use.
a
The BK-4A Starmaker
Microphone, a Ribbon- Pressure type suited for
1959
Television use.
Suppose we start with styling. Most of
the early control room equipment was
black as was the power plant equipment
and the automobile of 25 years ago.
The first attempts to liven the appearance of this equipment consisted of adding
chrome plate. Whole chassis and various
louvres were plated to give them a flashier
appearance.
The accompanying group of pictures
have been chosen to illustrate typical construction as nearly as possible, with some
The
Pressure Microphone (suc1938 cessor88 -A
to the 50 -A) has been widely
used for announce and newscasting.
193c
The
Type
77 -A
Universal
(Rib
bon) Microphone, forerunner
the present -day "77 -D ".
28
www.americanradiohistory.com
of
1933
The Model 50 -A Pressure type,
first in the line of induction
microphones.
1948
The KB -2C "Bantam" Veloc.
ity Microphone, designed
1944
for studio or remote use.
The popular 77 -D Ribbon type which
may be used as a "bi- directional ", "non"
directional", or "uni- directional" microphone.
About this time the use of color became
common and various manufacturers stand-
1900 The 77-C, Universal (Ribbon type)
7UV Microphone. a predecessor of the
famous 77-D.
makes it easier for the station to change
for TV; and the new RCA consolette are
the color to its choosing.
examples of this trend.
ardized on certain colors to make their
equipment distinctive. This made the sta-
Now that TV is with us, the control
A well planned control room can be a
room must be darkened. Dull surfaces.
real show place for visitors, and the smooth
tions more color conscious (or perhaps the
lighted meters and dials, and better vision
lines of today can give an impression of
stations led the manufacturer, I don't know
over the control desk are some of the most
efficiency even better than the gadgety
who was first)
recent changes in this line.
racks of
,
and they occasionally de-
manded color schemes of their own.
As color came in chrome went out so
far as the control room is concerned, and
outside surfaces were made plainer. This
1932
15
years ago.
Color has been put to work in several
In the studio, microphones have had
recent cases to indicate related switching
and mixing functions. The CBS Audio
quite a different history. This item is before the producer and subject to his demands. It remained large and gaudy until
Console for TV; the NBC Audio Console
The 44 -BX Velocity Microphone
has become the standard
broadcasting where the highest quality
reproduction is desired.
of
of
An early model Ribbon Microphone
1930 (Velocity type). Note attached preamplifier and use of electromagnetic field.
1928
early Condenser type Microphone with pre-amplifier attached.
An
TV came along. Now, it must suddenly
become unobtrusive. It must have its glitter removed, lest it become a beam in the
TV camera's eye. Smaller microphones,
and microphones with dull finishes are now
available for this application. For AM,
the smaller microphones are finding use in
interview work, but the old standards are
not changing rapidly in the studio.
Again in the control room, the reduction
in size of units, compactness of control
consoles, and
technical improvement
in
put
6 in 84/4 inches.
The new CBC Master
installations. 25 to 50 circuit switching is
still
required in some cases. A control system
Control System in Montreal has
a
City, Italy, last
smaller amplifier and so does the new RCA
was installed in Vatican
consolette.
summer that accommodates ten men at the
Master control systems are becoming
larger. More and more stations have come
the realization
that
central control desk, each man handling
the program in a different language.
well planned
While the systems are becoming large,
Master Control system can reduce the cost
and more input and output channels are
to
a
and improve the performance of their op-
required, stress on planning with skillful
eration at the same time. As the oppor-
application of these trends which have im-
tunity ripens, various stations are rebuild-
proved efficiency and flexibility has kept
ing their systems.
the size of the control room and central
switching has kept up with the growth of
The Voice of America installation in
operating desks to a minimum of expan-
Amplifiers are getting smaller.
New York City, built during the last war,
sion. Note the increased amount of equip-
the new CBC switching system at
ment within reach of the operator in recent
systems.
Where a preamplifier formerly
3% to
1948
5
required
inches of rack space, you can now
and
Montreal are outstanding examples of large
Modern Broadcast Studio Control Console and companion audio equipment rack
of the BR-84 series. Note matched appearance and styling of rack and console.
30
www.americanradiohistory.com
control desks.
1940
Audio equipment rack of the RCA
Type "9 AX"' series. Note trend
toward streamlining.
equipment rack
Audio
showing use of chrome
plate, different amplifiers, and
"square-type" meter.
1936
Early audio rack which employs round meters and some
components still mounted on the front
1934
Early version which shows the use of
tubes and components mounted on the
front panels.
1932
panels.
Some form of preset system is usually
necessary. This is usually planned to conform to the division of labor as found in
the particular union contracts, to use men's
time more efficiently, to make the switching as mistake proof as possible, and to
assign definite responsibility. If an oper-
ator knows that he is responsible for a certain operation and that errors in its execution can be traced to him, he is less likely
to make an error. Error prone operators
can be quickly pinned down and moved to
other jobs. Recent Master Control plans
show
definite improvement
along these
lines.
Another early audio equipment rack in
1932 which tubes, components
are mounted
directly on panels. Note the greater number of
controls and adjustments required.
www.americanradiohistory.com
A deluxe, custom -built Master Control Console installed at Radio Station WMGM. It
.7YU handles ten studio inputs and feeds six channels simultaneously, or individually by
preset relay system. Note how the twelve audio equipment racks are installed "in- line" at either
side of the operator's position for convenience and accessibility.
1948
TV has made new problems in MC
switching and interesting results are be-
Trends in Audio would not be complete
without some mention of recording.
many records as ever and fine groove recording is gaining slowly.
ginning to emerge from the struggle with
this operation. In nearly every case, ways
The most important item has been the
are being sought to make a single control
sudden addition of magnetic tape record-
improvement in acetate recording but
perform both the audio and video switch-
ing. Its use is still on the increase. New
still somewhat experimental.
ing. To do this and still keep flexibility as
applications are still being found for this
to source, previewing and other functions
excellent programming tool.
under control presents many new engineering problems. Several approaches to this
problem are in use or being planned and
will no doubt be the subject of future
Audio Engineering articles.
Hot stylus recording has offered some
In summary:
is
Overall trends indicate
larger installations, circuit -wise; smaller
The advent of tape seems to have slowed
components to give more compact installa-
disc recording somewhat, but it is still a
tions; and centralization of control. With
respect to style we have the additional use
of color, and simpler appearance.
big business. Discs still have many advan-
tages. The disc jockey programs use as
32
www.americanradiohistory.com
Master Control Console
installed at Radio Sta-
1940
tion WLS. In this
ar
rangement controls, meters and switches are
convenient to operator
by a "U" type turret
arrangement. Audio
racks are installed
nearby at the rear of
console.
t_--+-
_-
_s_._
_T_ ___.
.--
..
Master Control Console and
1938 associated audio equipment
racks installed at Radio Station WFBR.
This shows the trend toward bringing
controls, meters and switches into convenient operating range.
++r111e
%
á
Early WGN Master
1935 Control Console. Note
that fewer controls and switches
are convenient to the operator's
position.
.
1. External Edge-Light Pro
Ìector Assembly shown in oper.
ating position on the under side
of the Tx -20A Film Camera.
FIG.
-
IMPROVED TELEVISION
PICTURE PERFORMANCE
Step -by -Step Description on How to Modify
RCA Film Camera Equipment
by H. N. KOZANOWSKI
TV TERMINAL
Developments in the art of television
broadcasting during the past few years have
shown very forcibly that programming is
depending more and more heavily on film
material either as a basic source of programs or for continuity in live broadcasts
as well as for the usual advertising sources.
It has also been recognized that the quality
of film transmission as compared to live talent material leaves, in many cases, much
to be desired. An ideal situation would be
one in which the home viewer would not
be aware whether the source of broadcast
material were live talent or film recording.
With the now wide -spread and continuing
increase of kine -photography this criterion
of performance becomes more and more
vital to the success of any long -range op34
EQUIPMENT ENGINEERING
eration. For this reason, we have studied
possible methods of improving motion picture reproduction in television broadcasting and have arrived at a very encouraging
conclusion. The iconoscope film chain,
when suitably operated and improved according to our recent findings, can produce
pictures which closely approach studio
quality.
We shall discuss the basic philosophy of
operation of the iconoscope film chain,
paying specific attention to the factors
which at present limit performance, pointing out their relative importance, and then
outlining in greater detail the changes
which can be made in existing equipment
to bring the standard of performance up
to the quality which has been produced in
the laboratory. Work during the last year
on developmental iconoscope film chains
has resulted in the crystallization of specific improvements which contribute to bet-
ter overall film reproduction. Demonstrations to critical viewers over a long period
have indicated that these improvements are
significant.
We have prepared this discussion and
information in order that stations which
wish to introduce these improvements will
have sufficient detailed data to do this
themselves without waiting approximately
six months, the estimated time in which
RCA can furnish the required modification
items. For purposes of logical presentation,
we can list the areas of improvement and
then discuss each item in detail.
1.
Video Amplifier
Mosaic Illumination
3. High Peaking and Microphonics
4. Amplifier Over -load
5. Black Level Control
2.
Amplifier
The predominant source of noise in an
iconoscope chain is not the iconoscope itself
but the first -stage amplifier. Extensive
study of this problem has resulted in the
development of a cascode preamplifier using
the Western Electric 417A triode for the
input, feeding an RCA 6J6 as the output
tube. This preamplifier unit, shown in
Fig. 2, physically replaces the conventional
triode -connected RCA 6AK5 stage used in
existing equipment. Since the transconductance of the 417A tube is approximately
25,000, the improvement in equivalent
noise resistance over the RCA 6AK5 is
5 to 1 giving an equivalent reduction in
noise voltage which is the square -root of
this number of 2.24 to 1. This means that
1. Video
for the same voltage amplification the signal -to-noise ratio of the chain increases by
at least a factor 2. This is certainly of
primary importance. In addition, the use
of the cascode amplifier makes the Miller
effect relatively small as compared to that
which exists in the conventional triode preamplifier. The overall voltage gain of the
WE417A, RCA 6J6 cascode amplifier with
a 1000 ohm load resistance is 24 as compared to approximately 8 for the original
RCA 6AK5 stage. The 417A -6J6 cascode
amplifier is particularly subject to parasitic
self-oscillation in the region of 80 to 240
Mcs. These have been suppressed by the
use of small resistors in the first and second
grid circuits and in the output -plate coupling condenser lead. By -pass condensers of
very low inductance have also been provided in the filament circuits to provide
stability against parasitic oscillations and
pickup from filament supply. We have
found it essential to operate the heaters
of the cascode amplifier from D.C. in order
to eliminate completely the familiar sharp
60 -cycle "glitches" which exist on practically all 60-cycle power lines. The matter
of heater power supply will be discussed
in detail later. It has been found that the
use of the RCA 6J6 in the second stage
of the cascode amplifier entails practically
no sacrifice in performance and at the same
time allows the tube to be operated within
heater -to- cathode voltage rating. Since the
tube is already used in the output stage of
the camera, its application in the cascode
amplifier represents a definite advantage
from the standpoint of reduction in the
tube cost and stock maintenance.
2. Mosaic Illumination
A. EDGE LIGHTING
This problem is one of the most subtle
problems connected with the correct operation of an iconoscope chain. It is perhaps
interesting to outline the function of an
edge light in this manner: Any iconoscope
which has "normal" sensitivity resolution
and storage will have a rather restricted
range of beam current (0.1 to 0.2 micro amps.) within which satisfactory operation
can be obtained. This is determined fundamentally by the effectiveness of edge lighting in providing sufficient photo -emission
from the mosaic frame to suppress edge
and bottom flare associated with a given
beam current. Restating the situation: It
is important to operate with a maximum
beam current within the above limits which
can be used with the available edge lighting to produce a substantially flat and
"flare-free field when the active portion of
the mosaic is in complete darkness. This
edge -lighting requirement may vary between iconoscopes. The reason for choosing
an unilluminated mosaic as a reference lies
in the fact that flare is particularly prominent and annoying in fades to black and in
low -key scenes. If the field can be made
flat and black by the control of edge -light
intensity and by introduction of electrical
shading signals, all other modes of operation at higher light levels on the mosaic are
non-critical of adjustment. It is important
to point out that when correct and adequate edge-lighting is used, the flare is no
longer dependent on the picture content of
the active portion of the mosaic and therefore edge-lighting is introduced as a fixed
adjustment during the initial setup of the
iconoscope and need not be changed during
actual use.
B. EFFECTS OF STRAY LIGHT ON STORAGE
A factor which cannot be ignored is the
effectiveness of edge- lighting in the illumination of the edges of the mosaic, also
called the frame or mask, without at the
same time throwing an appreciable amount
of useless stray light on the active mosaic
area. This useless light produces two effects which are inter -related. We are here
concerned primarily with motion picture
operation with light -pulse exposure occurring during vertical blanking time. In this
case, all available picture information is
on the mosaic as a stored charge image
and should ideally persist at full amplitude
from top to bottom of the vertical scan.
Stray light from any source, either edge
lighting, back lighting, or accidental ambient room light, falling on the mosaic will
tend to wipe out the charge image, giving
a poor storage characteristic, and will produce a signal of progressively decreasing
amplitude from top to bottom of the picture. This can, of course, be electrically
shaded to have a flat axis but will show
progressive slumping of detail contrast
from top to bottom of the picture. Evidence from pulsed -light single-frame operation of stationary film indicates that, in
the absence of edge, back, and stray light,
the average iconoscope storage characteristic is excellent, but deteriorates rapidly
with an increase in the intensity of stray
light falling on the working surface of the
mosaic.
The mechanism of the effect of stray
light on the mosaic can be outlined by the
following argument. Assume that the light
application pulse is rectangular and lasts
for 5% of the total field scanning time
and that the light input-mosaic potential
relationship is substantially linear. Then
the average value of lighting is 1 /20th of
the rectangular light pulse peak. Now let
us further assume that the stray light is
uniformly distributed over the mosaic.
What must be its maximum permissible
value in order to have a tolerable small
effect on storage? If the light range of film
material is 40 to 1, a typical value for
motion picture film, the black gamma step
would be represented by 0.5 foot -candles
on the mosaic and the white level step by
20 -foot candles. Now if there is an area
at the bottom of the mosaic which is black
0.5 foot-candles, as a result of the light
application pulse, an increment of a 0.5
foot -candles due to stray light will raise
the effective potential of this area to that
corresponding to one -foot candle; whereas
the highlight potential has at the time been
raised to 20.5 foot -candles equivalent, decreasing the effective charge image contrast ratio from 40 to 1 to 20.5 to 2. Thus
a stray -light level of 2.5% of the average
projector light intensity is sufficient to
knock down the contrast ratio in the image
by 2 to 1 at the bottom of the raster. Tests
have been made of this reasoning by the
use of a calibrated grey -scale wedge at
the top and bottom of the picture under
pulse-light or motion picture operating
conditions.
Using an external projector to produce
uniform stray light and adjusting the stray
light to equal the average projector illumination, it is very easy to bracket the limits
for permissible stray light. Using neutral
density filters having 1, 2, and 5% transmission, one can demonstrate that 5% produces intolerable wash -out of storage, 2%
is quite noticeable, while 1% represents
an adequately low and readily attainable
value. It should be pointed out that the
effect of stray light is cumulative, having
very little influence immediately after the
35
www.americanradiohistory.com
RCA-6J6
W.E.417-A
FIG. 2.
Low -Noise Cas-
code Preamplifier shown
as it appears from the
front.
light pulse and having greater and greater
effect towards the bottom of the scan. The
present edge-lighting produced by the line
source filament and the opaque slotted
mask results in rather poorly defined edgelighting and a rather large amount of scattered light on the active mosaic area when
compared with the same "effective" edge lighting intensity from an external edgelight projector. This is due to a great extent to the necessity for firing the edgelighting image through the lower glass
seal region of the iconoscope front face
plate. This region may be inhomogeneous,
striated, and quite variable from tube to
tube. "Effective" edge lighting intensity is
that which will suppress the edge and bottom flare in the iconoscope output signal
with no light on the mosaic at the maximum operable beam current without causing the storage characteristic to deteriorate
markedly. Various possibilities for edge
lighting were investigated. An external projector edge -light mounted below the camera has been developed which has excellent
performance and which does not hamper
the chain operationally. This is shown in
Fig. 1 and will be described in detail later.
As a result of our tests, it is our opinion
that many iconoscopes criticized for poor
storage actually have adequate storage but
may work under severe handicaps as a result of limitations in the edge- lighting or
back -lighting sources.
C. INFRA -RED FILTERS
The use of infra-red and heat absorbing
filters in the projector light path and in
edge lighting sources has been investigated
by several independent groups. It has been
found that a polished plate of Corning
#9788 filter glass* approximately Smin in
thickness or equivalent does an excellent
job in attenuating the high-energy infrared and red components of the incandescent source to which the iconoscope is
normally quite sensitive and thereby gives
improved detail contrast and apparent gain
in resolution.
The improved contrast with the use of
a red cut -off filter for technicolor movies
is truly startling, the contrast range going
from very small values with no filter to
completely acceptable values with the filter.
A probable explanation of the observed
effect is that when the lens is focused for
a visible light image, the infra -red image is
out of focus or diffuse, but still responsible
for a large proportion of the mosaic photo
emission. Removal of this component by
the filter leaves only the sharp image information which results in gain of both
resolution and contrast ratios. In the case
of color film, the transmission of infra-red
components between various color dyes in
the various sections of the picture is substantially the same, producing practically
no differential contrast. With removal of
the infra-red, the dye absorption of visible
light previously masked by the over -riding
infra -red transmission is again normal and
gives the observed increase in contrast.
D. BIAS
OR BACK -LIGHTING AND AUTOMATIC BLACK LEVEL CONTROL
The main function of variable intensity
bias lighting is the illumination of the
photosensitive walls of the iconoscope in
* Corning Catalogue #9788 ground to Transmission Curve 4 -97, approximately 5mm. thick.
Can be obtained from : Esposito and Stuhier
Optical Co., 911 Willow Avenue, Hoboken, N. J.
36
www.americanradiohistory.com
order to furnish an easily adjustable source
of low velocity electrons which act to
stabilize the D.C. photoemission of the
mosaic, the "floating" mosaic frame, and
to actually increase the signal output of
the iconoscope itself. It was pointed out
by Schade in an unpublished memorandum
in 1942 that with correct adjustment of
edge and back-lighting intensity, taking
precautions to keep stray light from the
useful picture area of the mosaic, the
iconoscope is capable of true D.C. operation. The iconoscope under these conditions
generates a constant "peak white" signal
in its output load resistor which is determined by wall and edge illumination and
is generated during the horizontal and vertical blanking intervals when pulses are
applied to the control grid of the iconoscope
to cut off the beam current. This peak
white signal is substantially independent
of the illumination of the mosaic itself and
once adjusted remains fixed for a given
value of beam current. By adding to this
peak white signal a constant "black pulse"
or blanking wave, the resultant output
wave behaves normally and, using circuits
essentially identical to those in the image
orthicon field and studio chains, gives a
close approximation to true d -c presentation. Thus, an unilluminated mosaic will
give zero pedestal height and a "fully"
illuminated mosaic will give maximum pedestal height. With a slide, the action is
fully automatic and produces a video signal in which elemental signal amplitude is
directly related to the elemental mosaic
illumination. Under pulsed -light motion picture operation conditions, the black
level setting addition is a fairly good approximation to the ideal, even when the
iconoscope is used as a full storage device,
ONE -SIDE FROSTED
BACK LIGHT FILTER
FILTER
MASK
BACK-OFLENS IRIS
LENS BARREL
LOCK
FIG.
where the picture is pulsed on the mosaic
during the vertical retrace interval. We believe that this "d -c" mode of iconoscope
camera operation is one which has great
operational importance since, with the
other improvements, it makes it unnecessary for the operator to manipulate any
pedestal height controls for artificial black level setting. In addition; with controllable
but fixed edge- and -back -lighting, any motion picture having tolerable transmission
characteristics can be shown over the chain
without touching any controls. This appears to us a major step forward from the
present mode of operation where shading
and pedestal contror variation during a
program has become a fine art requiring
a well -developed sense of anticipation or
reflex action, or has been ignored altogether.
The primary function of the back lighting in our mode of operation is that of
effectively cancelling the application pulse
signal in the video amplifier which is developed during vertical retrace time which
has no direct functional part in operation
but is the cause of serious amplifier overload. It is quite normal for this video pulse
signal during retrace time to be 5 to 15
times as large as the useful video signal
during the scan cycle. It is essential in setting up a chain to use the minimum amount
of edge- and -back lighting to achieve flare
suppression and application -pulse cancellation for smallest signal deterioration due
to stray -light effects over the active mosaic
surface.
Tests have shown that the present backlight source operated from D.C. and using
an infra -red filter with additional diffusion
is adequate for our purpose. Fig. 3 shows
the back -light diffusing filter, projector
lens barrel lock to provide additional rigidity in the assembly, special edge-lighting
mask slide, iris, and edge -light lens filter.
EDGE LIGHT
EDGE LIGHT
3.
Details of Edge and Back -Light Elements.
3. High Peaking and
Microphonics
Detailed study of the high peaking problem as it applies to iconoscope input circuit compensation has shown that our
present high impedance R -C plate compensating circuit can be replaced by a two stage R -C low impedance cathode peaking
arrangment with substantial improvements
both from the standpoint of compensation
and freedom from microphonics. Calculations have shown that the frequency characteristic of the iconoscope output resistor
shunted by the stray capacity can be compensated completely by a two -stage cathode
high peaker arrangement having two timeconstants which are substantially independent of each other in adjustment. The short
time-constant peaking circuit affects only
the high -end of the passband and the long
time- constant peaking circuit affects only
the low -end (45 kc). These two circuits
can be adjusted exactly for no high frequency overshoot or low frequency trailing
by a technique which is almost intuitive
and very easy to acquire. The physical arrangements are shown in Fig. 4. It is important to point out that some very low
frequency trailing may probably be present
in the picture which is not affected by
either of the cathode peaker controls. This
is due to inadequate phase and frequency
fidelity in the video amplifier low-frequency
coupling circuits and can be practically
eliminated by the use of a suitable low boost circuit in the camera preamplifier
as will be described later in detail. In
order to suppress residual streaking in the
film with a wide range of picture content
the low frequency amplitude and phase
characteristics of all video pre- amplifiers
should be good to 300 cycles or even lower
instead of to half -line frequency as had
previously been assumed.
A very important improvement which results directly from the change in high peaking arrangement is that of eliminating
of microphonics. The present high -peaker
is driven from two video amplifiers in
series, having a total gain of 50, through
the R -C -R divider having a low frequency
attenuation of the order of 200 to 1. This
means that with a 10 millivolt signal at
low frequencies from the iconoscope 2.5
millivolts appear at the high peaker grid.
Laboratory tests indicate that with tubes
of the 6AK5 variety the equivalent sine
wave voltage for an "average" microphonic
tube is at least of this order of magnitude.
Thus with a "microphonic" excitation of
this reference amplitude the signal-tomicrophone ratio is unity. With the cathode
high peaker which has been developed the
previous sampling network is no longer
necessary and the low frequency input signal rises to 0.5 volts giving signal -tomicrophonic ratio for the same microphonic
excitation, of 200 to 1. The new arrangement allows us to use 6AK5's throughout
and has shown that the microphonics
problem due to the high -peaker has been
eliminated.
On occasions we have definitely traced
an appreciable portion of amplifier shot
noise to the presently used high peaker.
Since low frequency video input voltage
to the high peaker grid is 1/4th of that
existing at the iconoscope, sufficient amplification must be provided to bring this up
to standard level, the tube behaving as
another first stage and contributing shot
noise.
4. Amplifier Over -Load
With the 417A -6J6 cascode input stage
and two -stage cathode high peaking compensation we get considerable increase in
system gain. This excess gain has been ab37
JONES PLUG FOR BEAM
CURRENT -METERCIRCUIT
FIG. 4.
sorbed in additional cathode degeneration,
in order to obtain greater signal latitude
for the video and application pulse signals
and to minimize the problem of amplifier
overload. It is important to point out that
adjustments of bias lighting and edgelighting will decrease, cancel, or reverse the
polarity of the useless high amplitude video
signal generated during the vertical blanking interval. Therefore, in actual operation, it is desirable to adjust back -lighting
so as to just cancel the application-pulse
signal, providing a condition of greatest
freedom from amplifier setup and overload.
of Deflection Non -Linearity
and Yoke Distortion
The effectiveness of appropriate edge
lighting on suppression or cancellation of
flare is based on uniform or constant scanning velocity at the mosaic during horizontal and vertical sweep time. This requires careful adjustment of horizontal and
vertical mosaic sweep linearity. Any serious
non -linearities may produce false flare signals which cannot be controlled by the
action of edge light but which will disEffects
38
Location of Compensation Controls.
appear when the sweep is adjusted to be
linear. Excessive geometric distortion or
bowing in the deflection yoke particularly
at the bottom will make it difficult to
suppress bottom flares completely over the
whole mosaic width at the same time. In
this case, it may be necessary to replace
the yoke.
Gamma Characteristics
During the past year, there has been a
great deal of discussion resulting in conflicting recommendations for modifying the
transfer characteristic of the iconoscope
film chain. Tests made on a wide variety
of motion picture film subjects and accurately calibrated grey-scale step film, have
shown that at least a range of 50 to 1 can
be transmitted by the iconoscope and a
conventional kinescope so that the gradation between adjacent steps can be definitely recognized. This indicates that, with
a kinescope gradient of 2.5, the iconoscope
transfer gradient is substantially less than
unity, approaching square root, in its
upper light range. Attempts at white expansion with fixed peak kinescope bright-
ness result in a final display with compressed blacks.
Our demonstrations have indicated that
by using a linear amplifier transfer characteristic, with the iconoscope as the
gradient- determining element in the system, a grey -scale range of at least 50 to 1
can be used. It is possible that with some
films and kine-recordings which crush
whites, white- expansion may be useful.
However, we believe that this does not hold
true in general for normal, typical motion
picture film.
Concepts Involved in the Overall
Operation of an Iconoscope Film Chain
In order to clarify the procedures involved in operating an iconoscope chain so
as to obtain the best possible picture we
can tabulate the variables involved as:
1.
Film characteristics
2. Projector lamp
3. Beam current
intensity
4. Video gain
5.
6.
Edge and back lighting
Shading signal
-_-
V16-6AK5
R20-8200
V15-6AK5
R15-8200
PIC.
AMP.
C9
O S
11CO"
1I
s
-_1
n
47
G
1
Iá
I
-
.os
---'¡--
ó
F.
CIS
-4C
C14
I
+I
79
6
Cu
I
PICTURE
POLARITI
47
I
1
A
1
o
l-1
ó13
ol
11
__l2_1
3
G
14
a
e
I
;.j7,1;-11
A
1
O
O
CIOAI
I-I
ó
80T
H
C65
COMP.
T
IIDób63,4
C12
1
4
3
o
Vn -6J6
PIC. OU TPU
AMP.
m
7
R18
oo
T8
1
J
c-
1
80T
I
ni
R25-IOK
PIC.
220
.ST
MMF
O
CI,
qp
a
'YING TK-20A
CI3A
PICTURE
GAIN
5
FIG. 9A. Schematic of new Jones
Power Plugs circuit. This entire
section would be heavy if shown
in a general schematic.
NT
JONES
PARTS FOR FILM CAMERA MODIFICATION
Qty.
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
3
1
1
I
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
2
Symbol No.
R201, R202
R125, R126
R207, R209
R208
R210
R206
R203, R205
R204
R117, R120, R121
R130
R68, R119, R134
R116
R118
R129
R124
R115
RI23
R122, R127
R133
C60, C61, C58. C59
C62
C64
C65
C67
C66
L2
S201
X20
X12, X201
12
1
1
I
2
1
1
1
L
2
J3
P2
P3
V201, V12
V20
V14
M1
S-406
SB
Description
50,000 Ohm Potentiometers, 2 W. Linear
2000 Ohm Potentiometers, 2 W. Linear
Resistors, 1 Meg., I W., ±10 %a
Resistor, 300 Ohm, 1 W., ±5%
Resistor, 1000 Ohm, 1 W., ±5%
Resistor, 2.7 Meg., 1 W., ±5%
Resistors, 100,000 Ohm, 1 W., -±-10%
Resistor, 47,000 Ohm, 1 W., ±10%
Resistors, 100 Ohm,
W., ±10%
Resistor, 39 Ohm,
W., ±10%
Resistors, 100,000 Ohm,
W., ±10%
Resistor, 120,000 Ohm, % W., ±10%
Resistor, 1000 Ohm, 2 W., --10%
Resistor, 1200 Ohm, 2 W., ±10%
Resistor, 15,000 Ohm, 10 W.
Resistor, 1.0 Meg.,
W., -1.-10%
Resistor, 1500 Ohm, 1 W., -±-10%
Resistors, 330 Ohm,
W., ±10%
Resistor, 1.0 Meg., 1 W., ±5%
Capacitors, .01 MFD, 600 W. V. D.C. (Ceramic)
Capacitor, 225 MF, 15 V. (Electrolytic)
Capacitor, 2200 MMF, 500 V. (Mica)
Capacitor, 220 MMF, 500 V. (Mica)
Capacitor, 80 -10 MFD, 400 V. (Electrolytic)
Capacitor, .47 MFD, 200 V.
Peaking Coil; approximately 10 Micro H., wound on
slug tuned coil form, 2 pies, 18 turns each,
1/16" wide, spaced 1/16 ", #30 S.C.E. wire
Switch, 3 Position, 4 Pole-Oak Type #49530K1
Tube Socket, 9 Pin with Lug Strap and Shield Base
Tube Sockets, 7 Pin
Connector (Jones Catalog #P- 406SB)
Connector (Jones Catalog #S- 406SB)
Plug (Jones Catalog #P- 406CCE)
Iza
0"120
J2
// /
/
/
D'8U
J3
II
U
-0
'
I2-"
JONES
P-406
SB
R133
/e
Plug (Jones Catalog #S- 406CCE)
Tubes, 6J6
Tube, WE -417A
Tube, 6AK5
Meter
-100 Microamps
Power Supply (Stancor Model #752)
Kodaslide Type lA Projector
Filter Glass (See Fig. 3)
LI9100
I.
MEG
(Iw±S;
C661 \
Q'
.47
1
U7
GND. CO -AX.
AT THIS
lJ
END ONLY
I
TO V19
dl
www.americanradiohistory.com
circuit values and wiring details of the
cascode amplifier. The photograph of Fig.
8 shows the installation of the cascode
amplifier in the iconoscope compartment.
It is important to adhere to a single path
grounding system in order to minimize the
possibility of spurious feedback from later
stages.
The plate current of this cascode amplifier in normal operation is approximately
24 m.a. and can be checked by measuring
the voltage drop across the plate filter resistor R -129 in the above schematic. It
should be noted that the plate and screen
supply filters which formerly provided
voltages for the normal first and second
video stages now supply only the second
stage alone and must be revised accordingly.
High Peaker Circuits
The photograph of Fig. 4 shows the location of the two compensation potentiometers in the cathode circuits of the two
video stages, V14 and V15. The appropriate
R -C time constant values are given in the
schematic of Fig. 9, which outlines all of
the changes required in the video amplifier
to obtain the new improved form of operation. The potentiometer marked "A" and
located on the video amplifier shelf is used
to control low- frequency compensation for
the iconoscope input circuit characteristic.
The control marked "B" governs the response at the upper end of the frequency
characteristic. These are mutually independent and can be set using a standard
test pattern as the basis for alignment. It
is easily possible to set the high frequency
control for good resolution with no white
overshoot and the low frequency control
for no low -frequency trailing or black or
white smear. It may be found that after
adjustment of these two controls there will
still be present some residual very low
frequency streaking which is not affected
RCA
HEATER
SUPPLY
12
PEAK COIL
CATHODE
BY-PASS C.
INPUT
BY -PASS
OUTPUT
CONDENSERS
FIG. 5. Side View of Cascade Preamplifier showing details of by -pass condensers and connections.
by the controls previously mentioned. This
is due to inadequate phase and frequency
fidelity at extremely low frequencies and
can be corrected almost completely by the
use of a plate-booster filter CIA, and C,B,
and R123 (1500 ohms) shown in Fig. 9.
Heater Supply
Fig. 10 shows a dimensioned photograph
of the rear of the camera giving details
of the Jones Plug at the left which has been
added to provide an easy means for connecting to an external d -c, 6.3 volt dry rectifier filtered power supply which we
have located in the base of the camera. It
D -C
necessary for making the unit.
BY-PASS C's
RCA 6J6
9-20MICROHENRY
W.E.417-A
Ta,
FIG. 6. Wiring View of Cascode Preamplifier, showing wiring structure
OUTPUT
6J6
W,E.417A
INPUT
CATHODE
BY PASS
is necessary to reconnect all camera heater
circuit leads to provide for 6.3 volt d -c
operation instead of the balanced 12.6 volt
circuits previously used. These changes are
indicated in the schematic of Fig. 9.
It has been found that the use of D.C.
in the first two tubes of the cascode amplifier is essential in order to eliminate the
effect of "glitch" disturbances introduced
by the usual A-C heater supplies. It is
just as convenient to provide for complete
d -c heater operation in the camera unit
using the Stancor Model 752 power supply shown in the photograph of Fig. 11 to
furnish the 9 ampere, 6.3 volt D -C heater
power. Suitable Jones connectors are provided for easy interconnection of the d -c
filament supply and camera unit.
Beam Current Metering
The plug at the right of the camera
(Fig. 10) provides connections for the
iconoscope beam current metering circuit
located on the camera control console. The
iconoscope beam current normally operates
within the range of 0.1 to 0.2 microamperes. The center conductor of the coaxial metering line is attached to the collector terminal of the iconoscope, and
terminates at the camera Jones plug in
a 1 megohm resistor and suitable bypass
as shown in Fig. 4. The voltage drop across
this resistor, which is directly proportional
to iconoscope beam current, is applied
through an interconnecting cable to a D -C
Average photographic film has a typical
density range D = 0.2 to D = 1.8, or a
range of 40 to I, in release prints where
density D is defined as log 1/T and T is
the transmission in per cent. With D = 0.2
or a transmission of 62% the minimum
open -gate illumination from the projector
should be 32- foot -candles to obtain a 20foot- candle highlight illumination on the
mosaic. For these conditions the low -light
mosaic illumination will be 1.6% of 32foot- candles or 0.5 foot -candles. Increased
illumination in the projector above this
level does not produce radical changes in
the appearance of the picture because of
the wide latitude of the iconoscope characteristic. However, decrease of illumination may cause the picture to deteriorate.
primarily because of lower output signal
and hence poorer signal -to-noise ratio, and
accentuation of residual flare and local defects which would ordinarily be unnoticed
with normal illumination. For this reason
we have found that stopping down the projector lens to obtain greater sharpness or
depth of focus of the projected image produces poorer overall performance.
Since the standard f:2.6 Kollmorgen Projector Lens has a television resolution of
at least 1200 television lines at the magnification used, it alone does not represent
a limitation in 16mm film reproduction. All
cases investigated, in which significant improvement in resolution was noted on stopping down the lens, were traced to clamping
strain distortion of the front surface multiplexer mirrors, or were due to insufficient
care in aligning the iconoscope itself to
coincide with the focal plane of the projection system. When these difficulties were
eliminated there was no noticeable difference in resolution between wide-open and
stopped -down lens operation. Providing
depth of focus by stopping down the lens
to take care of system errors is a rather
uneconomical method of operating the
iconoscope chain. The adjustable iris in the
present lens furnishes a convenient means
of checking these factors and of decreasing
light output for special films in which this
may be advantageous. In order to obtain
maximum light output, it is important to
make sure that the condenser lens system
and the reflector in the projection lamp
path are clean and that the projector lamp
is operated close to rated voltage since a
5% decrease in lamp terminal voltage produces a 16% decrease in the light output.
It is apparent that the success of a motion picture film chain depends directly on
the quality of the film itself. In general,
the resolution and gray scale of commercial 35mm film releases are excellent.
whereas 16mm film has appreciably poorer
resolution and more variable range characteristics. It is beyond the scope of this
discussion to analyze the factors involved
in poorer film quality, but it is only fair
to point out that poor film does not make
good television pictures. Side-by -side comparisons of 16mm and 35mm motion picture film material using a well-adjusted
iconoscope film chain are very striking; the
35mm film giving quality very close to that
obtained in a studio shot, while 16mm film
is decidedly softer and lacks snap. In such
a comparison the only variables in an in
stantaneous mechanical switching or dousing operation are the two film sources and
projectors, the iconoscope chain adjustment
remaining untouched.
One must be quite sure that in the process of evaluating film chain performance
the quality of the film used is adequate.
Otherwise, this evaluation becomes a comparison of relative film performance, which
in 16mm film is a bottleneck limiting performance at much lower levels than the
capabilities of the iconoscope chain itself
allow. Even the currently available 16mm
television test film prints used for checking television performance leave a great
deal to be desired particularly in the resolution and detail contrast in the various
resolution frames of the film. One can
verify this easily by examining such frame
sections under a microscope, using a magnification of 30 to 50 times. The same criticism holds true for available 2 x 2 television test slides, except that, in addition.
the performance of the still projector lens
often limits resolution seriously. We have
found that a simple circular front -of -lens
stop Yi to 5/ inch in diameter produces a
decided improvement in picture appearance and still provides sufficient light for
good operation. This test is very easy to
try and provides a method for producing
an optical image on the mosaic which approaches the quality required to obtain
meaningful information on system performance.
Beam Current Edge and Back Lighting
As previously mentioned, with adequate
provisions for edge lighting and back lighting, the iconoscope should be operated with
the maximum permissible beam current
which can be accommodated to produce a
flare -free field. This beam current will be
between 0.1 and 0.2 microamperes. The
video gain is then adjusted with normal
illumination on the mosaic to provide an
output signal of 1 volt peak -to -peak across
the 70 ohm output line. It has been found
that with a continuous indication of beam
current, one can duplicate accurately the
results with a given chain from day to day.
In the absence of beam current metering
facilities the operator is governed entirely
by intuition and he is likely to set up for
smaller than normal beam current, making
up for decreased iconoscope signal output
by increasing video amplifier gain at the
expense of poor signal-to -noise ratio or
will select a beam current which is higher
than normal and will sacrifice overall performance from the standpoint of excess
flare. The addition of a beam current
metering circuit makes it possible to provide straightforward means of setting up
and maintaining a high standard of operating quality.
Edge lighting and back lighting should
be used to provide satisfactory cancellation
of flare, cancellation of light application
video pulse and to improve signal output.
It is again important to point out that
these factors should be handled with some
discretion in order to minimize stray light
and to preserve good storage characteristics with acceptable gray -scale rendition.
In principle, it is possible to manipulate
edge- lighting intensity and distribution and
back lighting amplitude so as to produce
an output signal from the chain which requires no addition of electrical shading signals. However, the problem is made much
simpler if edge -lighting is used primarily
to control the abrupt flare components at
the sides and bottom of the picture and
electrical shading is introduced horizontally
and vertically in the familiar available
sawtooth and parabolic waveforms to produce flat output and flat shading. Our experience has shown that with preliminary
setup of edge lighting, back lighting and
electrical shading using an unilluminated
mosaic as the most difficult condition, it is
thereafter unnecessary to touch either the
edge lighting, back lighting or the electrical shading signal controls during the
reproduction of film.
DETAILS OF IMPROVEMENTS
IN THE TK -20A FILM CAMERA
EQUIPMENT
Video Amplifier
The cascode video amplifier consisting
of a Western Electric 417A and an RCA
6J6 tube has been designed to replace the
present 6AK5 single stage triode preamplifier located in the iconoscope compartment. The chassis- mounting features are
identical with the previous design. The
photograph of Fig. 5 shows a side view of
the cascode preamplifier chassis and Fig. 6
shows a rear view including the important
features of parasitic suppression resistors.
heater by -pass condensers, and general wiring arrangement, including d -c filament
supply leads. The schematic of Fig. 7 gives
(Continued on page 42)
39
AMPLIFIER
CASCODE
j
C63
V13- 6AK5
PIC.
AMP.
V 12
6J6
R
7-8200
V14 - 6AK5
1M/
PIC.
AMP.
PIC.
AMP.
80T
16
a
*
o
o
m_
3
C58
.011,
Of
.01
m
PREAMP
CHASSIS
100 K
I
R119
11wwwr
R
I29-2W
zoo
-=L
TO
v19 ICONOSCOPE
SIGNAL PLATE
FIG. 9. General Schematic of Compensation Control Changes in the Film Camera Circuit. New parts or changes are indicated in heavy lines.
INFORMATION FOR MOD!'
COMPLETE
FILM CAMERA
TABLE
MODIFICATIONS:
For those who have no spare cameras,
the modifications have been divided up
and listed below in steps. The camera may
be used after each change has been accomplished:
OF
MODIFICATIONS
The potentiometer in place of R122 is
adjusted so that with a normal picture
input to iconoscope .5 volts peak-topeak is obtained at the 51 ohm camera
output. Later, when the preamplifier is
installed R122, 330 ohms, is installed
in this position.
1.
EQUIPMEI
3A. Metering Panel:
Assemble the metering circuit according
to schematic, Fig. 13. A cable containing one coax as well as three individual
conductors must be provided between
the camera and camera control, where
the metering panel may be mounted.
Cathode Type High Peaking:
Remove the following components from
the camera:
R9, C4, R10, R11, C6, R6, and R23.
Disconnect C5A.
At V14, install R125, 2000 ohm pot.
and C64, 2200 mmfd cap.
At VIS, install R126, 2000 ohm pot.
and C65, 220 mmfd. cap.
Change V14 to Type 6AK5.
At V16, install R127, 330 ohm resistor.
At V13, install temporary pot., 500
ohms, in place of R122.
At V13, connect C7 to T6, pin 4.
2. Jones Plugs:
Cut holes in rear of camera and mount
6 pin Jones plugs as shown in Fig. 10.
These plugs are the H. B. Jones type,
400 series.
Power Supply and Iconoscope
Metering Provision:
Remove the heater circuits from Plug
J I and ground and connect to the Jones
plug J2, as shown in Fig. 9.
3. D.C.
Connect D.C. supply to camera through
plug J2.
Remove the collector wire from the
iconoscope, V19, to ground and connect
iconoscope through a suitable length of
RG -59/U to J3 as shown in Fig. 9.
At J3, connect R133, 1 megohm, and
C66, .47 mfd., as well as heater and
plate voltages as shown in the same
figure.
The iconoscope camera will operate satisfactorily with or without a connection
to the metering circuit.
Schematic of V19 1850A
Iconoscope and new installation of
RG 59/U Ground Coax.
FIG. 9B.
40
www.americanradiohistory.com
4. Edge Light:
Remove original edge light assembly
and control.
Cut clearance holes in bottom of camera.
Mount previously made projector support and mirror assembly on camera.
It will be necessary to provide a Variac
or a high wattage variable resistor to
control the intensity of the edge light.
5. Preamplifier Stage:
Assembly preamplifier as shown in Fig.
7.
Remove temporary potentiometer in V13
cathode.
Remove R2, R17 at V17, and original
preamplifier.
Disconnect C2A, C2B, and CIA.
Connect R124, 15,000, R123, 1500
ohms ; C67, 90 mfd. mounted in place
of C6; CIA and B, .5- .Smfd.; R121,
100 ohms; C2, 90 mfd.; R129, 1200
ohms; and R134, 100,000 at V17.
Install preamplifier.
Connect output to C63.
Connect B+ to preamplifier at C2.
Connect heater coax center to V13.
pin 4 and shield to ground lug at V13.
Connect input to iconoscope.
GASCODE
PREAMPLIFIER
OUTPUT
TO C63
?
1000
367
ó
N
V12
6J6
R 118
L2
6
PIC
AMP.
FIG. 7. Circuit diagram
of the new Cascode
R117
Preamplifier.
100
R120
C60
I00
C58
01
C62
.01
PRE-AMP CHASSIS
RI 9
100
K
225
V V V
-(_1.'113, PIN 4
R29
+280
1200 -2W
C?
90 IA FD
bridge -type amplifier, meter, and controls
located in a separate panel, as shown in
Fig. 13. Since the metering circuit is cornpletely self- contained, it can be located
where operational control is most convenient. This D-C bridge amplifier is shown
schematically in the drawing of Fig. 13.
The 100 microampere D -C meter for
beam current indication is calibrated for
sensitivity by variation of the series meter
resistor, and the bridge is balanced by the
zero -adjusting potentiometer to give zero
meter reading. The three -way switch allows the operator to select zero, calibrate,
and operate positions with a minimum of
effort. The calibration voltage is obtained
from regulated B- supply using a resistordivider to provide one -tenth volt D -C, corresponding to 0.1 microampere beam current, and applied for bridge calibration to
the opposite grid of the 6J6 dual-triode
bridge amplifier. It is easy to adjust for a
full scale sensitivity of 100 or 200 milli microamperes merely by changing the sensitivity control. This metering circuit has
been in daily use for several months and
shows very little tendency towards drift
after the initial warm -up period. The approximations introduced in calibration and
design were made on the basis that it is
more important to provide a stable simple
indicator of beam current rather than a
precise measuring means since the original
selection of an appropriate b °am current
is made on the basis of freedom from picture flare. It is then only necessary to
maintain this current during operation
without any direct regard for its absolute
value. The photograph of Fig. 4 indicates
the arrangement of coaxial conductor, Jones
plug and the location of pilot voltage resistor and filter condenser. Plate and heater
supply voltages are furnished to the remote
ti.GNDATVI3
INPUT
V
V19 SIGNAL PLATE
amplifier and meter circuit from the Jones
plug as indicated in the same photograph.
It is desirable to preserve a one-point
ground at the camera Jones plug, leaving
the circuit at the camera control floating
in order to avoid disturbing effects of interchassis differences of potential.
New Edge-Light Arrangement
The photograph of Fig. 2 shows the
edge -light arrangement which has finally
been developed for use with the iconoscope
chain. This is basically an Eastman 1A
projector using a special metal -insert key-
stoned edge -lighting slide, an infra -red cutoff filter and a back -of -lens iris. The projector is installed below the camera in the
normal operating position. In order to
change iconoscopes or to service the equipment, it is merely necessary to push the
projector forward on the guide-rails by
means of the supporting bracket, giving
ample clearance for opening the swinging
door to the rear compartment, as shown in
the photograph of Fig. 14. The diagram of
Fig. 17 gives the layout of projector,
bracket, guide rails, reflecting mirror and
the dimensions of the special preamplifier
FIG. 8. The Cas code Preamplifier
is shown installed
in position inside
the
TK -20A
Film
Camera.
43
www.americanradiohistory.com
chassis and edge -lighting slide. It is preferable to use D -C on the edge -light to eliminate the possibility of introducing a light hum component in the video output. In
the edge-light layout drawing are given the
exact dimensions of the clearances required
in the various chassis locations for mirror
and adjustable edge light bracket and the
dimensions of the slide mask.
Back Light
Tests have shown that the present backlighting system operated from D -C is adequate for the purpose. It is desirable to
add an infra-red cut -off filter and a diffusing screen.
Black -Level Control
While automatic black-level set in a developmental camera control amplifier has
been in satisfactory operation for some
time, it should be pointed out that this
feature is not absolutely essential at the
present time to improve camera performance in all other details. We believe it advisable to postpone the actual conversion
of the camera control to a later date, at
which time we expect to have complete
simplified information which will require
the minimum number of changes. These
are not extensive and consist basically in
providing a convenient adjustable source
of pre -blanking, d -c clipper -level control,
and a physical rearrangement of the
FIG. 10.
clamper so that it is d-c coupled to the
grid of the clipper stage.
Suggestions on Conversion
In our investigation of the problems of
conversion, particularly with stations which
have one, or a limited number of cameras
which cannot be taken out of service for
an extended period, it is safer to plan on
this conversion in several stages which will
allow for interim operation of the camera
chain and which will finally result in complete introduction of all of the new features without taking the camera out of
service except during the usual maintenance
and overhauling intervals. For this possibility, we suggest that the work be divided
as follows:
1. The high peaker circuit can easily be
revised by addition of the two potentiometers and the appropriate condensers to give immediate improvement in
microphonics and high peaking characteristics. It will at the same time be
necessary to introduce variable degeneration (approximately 80 ohms) in the
cathode circuit of video amplifier V13
Fig. 4, so that when these changes are
introduced the excess gain can be absorbed in this degeneration to provide
normal signal output levels.
2. Holes can be cut and Jones plugs installed for the D -C heater supply and
Location of the new !ones Power Plugs.
FIG. 11. D.C. Power Supply Unit suit.
able for use in the modification procedure.
for the iconoscope beam current metering circuit.
3. The metering circuit can be installed
and calibrated.
4. The edge lighting hole in the bottom
of the iconoscope camera can be cut, the
5.
mirror and support installed, and the
Eastman lA Projector with special
bracket and slide can be adjusted for
improved edge lighting.
The cascode preamplifier previously described in detail can be installed and
appropriate peaking and degeneration
gain settings can be frozen to provide
for normal systems operation. By proceeding in the manner outlined, it will
be possible to modify the chain a section at a time without at any point
being caught in the position of having
the iconoscope equipment unavailable
for film use.
In
HEATER
SUPPLY
For convenience in carrying out the
camera changes, the following table of
component additions, removals or change
of values has been prepared. In all cases.
the part numbers are those used in the
schematics of Instruction Books for the
TK -20A Film Camera Chain. New part
numbers are assigned to added components.
When the changes have been completed,
that the improved performance in
picture quality, signal -to-noise ratio, and
simplicity of operation, with the assurance
of continuously controlled high standards
of picture excellence, will more than repay
the required modification efforts.
we feel
We take this opportunity to express our
appreciation to Mr. Vernon J. Duke of the
NBC Television Engineering Staff, working under the direction of Mr. George M.
Nixon, in charge of NBC Development
Engineering. He first recognized many of
44
FIG. 12.
Circuit
R202
Diagram of Beam
Current Metering
Panel.
50 K
FILM CAMERA
Rí01
50K
8209
lees
a
MI
I
OPERATE
CAL
4
SZOI
OPERATE
CALIBRATE
BEAM CURRENT
A
I
MEG
ZERO ADJUST
.7
OPERATE
FIG. 13.
R207
Beam Current Metering Control Panel.
R208
300
DO NOT
GROUND
TO CHASSIS
-
9
ZERO
ZERO
-39-K---C
J9-R---f'-
--
PARTS LIST
Qty.
Symbol No.
5
Cl, C4, CS, C6, C12
1
C3
1
2
RI, R8
1
R2, R3, R4, RS
R6
R7
R9
R10, R11
R12
1
L1
4
the limitations in iconoscope camera performance, and first demonstrated the improvements possible in commercial equipment by careful attention to many details
which had hitherto been neglected. We
wish also to thank Mr. Otto Schade for
his fundamental studies on the iconoscope,
which evaluated many of the factors which
we have introduced in commercial equipment. Dr. Janes and Mr. Marschka of RCA,
Lancaster have cooperated completely in
discussion and analysis of iconoscope problems and in furnishing special and standard
tubes for test. Mr. E. M. Gore of our
Advance Development Group, and Mr. R.
J. Marian of Product Design, deserve special commendation for their many contributions during the initial and final phases
of this study.
C7
I
1
I
2
2
V1, V2
1
V3
2
1
X1, X2
X3
for
ALTERNATE PREAMPLIFIER
Description
Capacitors, .01 mfd. 600 V.D.C. (Ceramic)
Capacitor, 2000 mfd. 6 WVDC, non -inductive, Electrolytic, (Aerovox Type E3A208)
Capacitor, .1 mfd., 400 V.
Resistor 100,000 Ohm,
W., ±10%
Resistors 100 Ohm,
W., ±10%
Resistor, 15 Ohm,
W., ±10%
Resistor, 12 Ohm,
W.
Resistor, 1 Meg.,
W., ± 10%
Resistors, 1800 Ohm, 2 W., ±10%
Resistor, 470 Ohm, 2 W., x-10%
Peaking Coil: approx. 10 micro. H. wound on
slug -tuned coil form, 2 pies, 18 turns each, 1/16"
wide, spaced 1/16", #30 S.C.E. wire
Tubes, 6BQ7
Tube, 6AG7
Tube Socket, 9 pin (no shield)
Tube Socket, Octal (Amphenol type S)
// /
//
;
(The above symbols refer to Figure
1
yt
15 only.)
Refer to Figure 9. Change value of C64 to:
C64
Capacitor, 3900 mmfd. (mica)
ALTERNATE MODIFICATION
During the preparation of this article,
development and study of Film Camera
Modifications have continued. As a result.
we have found that substantially the same
improvement in video amplifier signal -tonoise ratio can be realized by the use of
two RCA -6BQ7 double triodes driving an
RCA 6AG7, triode connected, in exactly
the same cascode arrangement as was described for the Western Electric 417 -A,
RCA 6J6 tube complement. As these tubes
are much more readily available and lower
in cost than the W.E. -417A, we feel that
they can be used to advantage in the camera modifications we have outlined. A detailed schematic, parts list, general remarks,
and chassis details for the 6BQ7 -6AG7
cascode amplifier are shown in Figs. 15
and 16.
FIG. 14. External Edge -Light Projector Assembly is shown pushed forward to the farthest
point in the track so that easy access makes possible work inside the film camera.
45
www.americanradiohistory.com
CASCODE PREAMPLIFIER
OUTPUT
TO C63
6AGT
PIC AMP
PIG. AMP
6
2
LI
9 -15
INPUT
V 19 SIGNAL
PLATE
Cj
CI
.Nh
C6
Cl2
C5
20oq
01
.01
.01
T01
T2_1
PRE AMPLIFIER CHASSIS
V13-P11.4
4
GND.AT V1j
+280 V.
CZ
90 M FDI.
FIG. 15.
RIZ
410-21V
Circuit diagram of alternate Cascode Preamplifier.
NOTE: The case of the Stancor pack should be connected to the
negative output terminal. However, with the alternate modification
the heater drain is increased and a heavier supply is recommended.
This d -c supply which has a continuous current rating of 20 amperes
at 6 volts is the Electro Model "B" manufactured by Electro
Products Labs., Inc., 4501 Ravenswood Ave., Chicago 40, III.
V3, 6AG7 should be mounted so that pins
plane. (See RCA Tube Manual.)
2
and
are in a vertical
7
FIG. 16. Preamplifier Chassis.
GRIND3Ze APPROX TO BLEND WITH
ADJOINING
.257 WA. 3-HOLES
SURFACES
7
.199 DIA. HOLE
167
toot
.0935
0937
.750 DIA.
2 -HOLES
147 DIA.
4 -HOLES
16
XiX34R-3- SLOTS-
120 °APART
CA
3-DIA HOLE
s
L2
61
V3- 6AG7
VI-6BQ7
1.172 DIA.HOLE
45!_
V2
-6007
q *á - 2- CHAMFERS
MATERIAL-
'NC
+"STEEL
1-...\
4
t
46
www.americanradiohistory.com
CS
:.\
wowç;'vñ1°w
.-i
:r,
FIG. 17. Assembled scale draw.
ings- continued on next page.
47
www.americanradiohistory.com
7
.17!-DIA. SHOLlS
4 EOUAL SPACES @iT
_-.. -+--
4 EQUAL SPACES
Viz 6-
-
OMATERIAL --THICK ALUMINUM
173-DIA. S- HOLES
®
.147 -DIA. 2 -NOMES
2
-i
TR. ALUMINUM
MATERIAL
AR ALL INSIDE BENDS
-
HOLES
3
THICK ALUMINUM
I
1111
4-40 TAPI
4 DEEP
2 MOLES
N
N
4w
OMATERIAL
- ¡THICK ALUMINUM
CLI
FRONT SURFACE
MIRROR
-6 -THICK
PREAMPLIFIER CHASSIS
125 DIA.
-
6/44"STEEL
IT2
32
3
DIA.
-L
i
3-TABS
12O°*36O°
o
C)
IRIS STOP
(2
STANDARD 2s2 SLIDE
MASKED AS SHOWN
OVERLAP 45.APPROX.
FIG. 17. The assembled scale drawings shown on these two
pages give the detailed dimensions of the various parts. By
following the construction directions given for each part, the
engineer should have no difficulty in converting the TK-20A
Film Camera for improved results.
48
M
APPROX.
-56 TAP. *DEEP
B
OATeRIAL
y
MATERIAL-.01S TM. PHOSPHOR BRONZE
SPRING TEMPER
MATERIAL-.020 THK. PHOSPHOR BRONZE
SPRING TEMPER
TELEVISION
ON THE WING
...
The
first attempt to receive television
aboard a transpacific Hawaii -bound airline met with great success on United Air
Lines' Flight 49, outbound from San
Francisco.
The joint experiment, conducted by technicians of United and KRON -TV of San
Francisco, was the first of its kind on the
West Coast.
The photo (at right) shows intent passenger interest as Phyllis Chase, United
Air Lines stewardess adjusts the three -yearold RCA Victor television receiver (10 -inch
screen), which was used in the test.
Richard Grace, United radio engineer
who monitored reception of a KRON -TV
newscast, reported that the program came
in clear while the Mainliner Stratocruiser
prepared for take -off. During take-off the
image grew fuzzy, but sharpened as the
plane gained altitude.
VERSATILE ANTENNA TEST
The
Broadcast Design Group of the RCA
Engineering Products Department is the
proud possessor of a new and easy method
for testing broadcast antennas. It consists
of a 100 -foot circular concrete apron which
resembles a huge sundial. upon which are
Reception at 20.000 feet was perfect for
250 miles west of San Francisco. Beyond
that point the signal grew progressively
weaker and finally faded out 306 miles
from the West Coast.
APPARATUS
mounted five wooden dollies that support
the steel frame. The center dolly revolves
through a 360- degree arc around a vertical
shaft in the center of the apron, while the
steel frame holding the antennas being
tested is built in sections that can be used
to extend it up to 140 feet in length.
This $25,000 test installation, located at
Medford, New Jersey, eliminates the need
for erecting antennas in the normal vertical
position. This system permits movement of
antenna elements in a horizontal position,
the only reliable means of establishing the
gain characteristics of broadcast antennas.
The antennas are connected by cables to
electrical test equipment in a nearby building. A signal generator is located at a distant point, and the antenna is rotated on
its horizontal axis while data is recorded
by means of a selsyn drive.
irr
Such facilities enable the engineers to
continue their measurements with the highest degree of accuracy with a minimum of
lost time for construction changes in the
units under test. It's the answer to a test
engineer's dream.
49
www.americanradiohistory.com
CARPENTER
PLASTER
DRAPERY
PROPERTY
TURNTABLE
SET
PLATFORM
STUDIO
EFFECTS
METAL
PAINT
ELECTRIC
MINIATURE
-(DOOR
REH EARSAL
"ASSEMBLY -LINE TV STUDIOS"
In
the field of motion picture production
it has at various times been suggested to
construct all necessary sets outside of the
sound stages, and to convey them to a certain stage when needed there. After the
use of the set, it was to be removed and
another set was to take its place. By this
method of production fewer sound stages
would be required, while the sets could be
constructed near the machines frequently
required for this purpose, such as joiners,
band -saws, plaster mixers, etc. One such
system is known in the motion picture
field as the "Pelton System" after F. E.
Pelton;' another is referred to as the
"Kasold System";2 a third as the "Berkely
System" .3
At least a half dozen patents have been
issued decsribing various means and methods of prefabricating sets and then conveying them in some manner to the locale of
production, as may be noted in the references given at the end of this paper.4 Indeed, the problems involved are often well
stated in the patents, as in British Patent
No. 439,969, to quote:
50
By
M. RETTINGER
stages into stationary theatre spaces of
different sizes for filming the different
scenes.
RCA Victor Division
Radio Corporation of America
Hollywood, California
"According to the invention, a filmtaking installation is proposed, wherein the
filming apparatus together with at least a
part of the lighting equipment constitute
an independent unit, and a number of successive rooms, cubicles or the like accommodating the built -up sets or scenery for
"At the present time, the cost of production of motion pictures (silent or with
sound) is materially increased by the time
and labour involved (apart from that occupied by the actual scene -shooting) in
erecting and dismantling the sets in the
studios and in assembling and dismounting the lighting installation required for
each scene, and also by the players' fees
which have to be paid during this time
and from which no immediate benefit is
derived.
"It has already been proposed to overcome part of the above disadvantages by
employing movable stages having sets already prepared thereon and inserting such
sets constitute another unit, the said units
being movable relatively to one another,
for example on rails, in such manner that
any desired combination of the filming and
lighting unit with a set may be selected
therefrom."
While such "systems" generally lay
claims to motion picture production, they.
can with equal benefits be applied to television work. Indeed, the construction of
pre- fabricated sets which can be wheeled
on and off a sound stage when needed appears even more desirable in the case of
television work than for motion picture
production. First, most motion picture stu-
C
o
Ó
Floor plan layout of a
TV studio constructed
on 20' x 40' platforms. Platforms are
supported by wheels which move
on rails. Platform floors and shop
floors are at same elevation.
FIG.
1.
"streamlined"
dios are located in suburbs where ground
is not very expensive, while television studios, like radio stations, tend to occupy
metropolitan areas where ground can be
had only at a premium. Secondly, television production is more nearly a round -theclock activity which employs various programs and directors, while a motion picture
is most always made by one director, cameraman, and cast, who require rest periods.
Thirdly, motion picture scenes are of relatively short duration, and hence may be
rehearsed in the sound ,tage after the set
has been built. Television scenes are frequently rather lengthy, however, and are
preferably rehearsed at some place outside
the sound proof and voluminous sound
stage. Indeed, under the present method of
television production the set may be photographed, that is, used in actual production,
for some 20 minutes, while it may be employed for several hours during rehearsing.
These difficulties are not unknown to the
television industry, and have recently been
noted by various authors, as for instance
Morton H. Read and Eugene N. Bunting,
who write:5
"Set design in a small studio can be
something of a problem, especially if it is
necessary to have several sets ready at the
same time. When budgets are low and
space is limited, casts cannot be kept on
subsistence while sets are changed and the
studio is rearranged. This is especially true
when a series of television commercials involves (as they often do) a kitchen, dining room, living room, hallway with front
door, etc. If the studio can be completely
set up in advance with all top lighting in
place, it is possible to do a vast amount
of work in a minimum of time."
The problem becomes even more complicated when it is realized how many different material -processing and fabricating
shops and subdepartments go into a large
television set. A cursory summary includes
the following factors: carpentering, drapery, property, paint, scenic, lumbermill,
foundry, cabinet, hardware, mechanical,
greenery, miniature and special effects. For
this reason, as well as those mentioned
above, it appears desirable to construct a
set off -stage, to use it for rehearsing at
a convenient location, and then to wheel
it onto the sound stage where a low noise
level is assured, where high platforms provide adequate lighting facilities, and where
room is available for the operation of microphone booms.
In the design of television studios employing an assembly -line type of production method, a U- shaped set construction
area has to be provided containing various
shops-painting, plastering, metal work,
etc. When the set has been constructed it
is conveyed in some manner-either by
the rehearsal room
wheels, or elevator
or stage. Several rehearsals can well take
place simultaneously in that enclosure,
with the lighting adjusted and noted in a
book. At the program hour, the set is conveyed to the sound stage where the actual
recording and televising takes place. At the
end of the program the set is removed and
another set is wheeled in. It should be
noted that this method of production is
possible also when the sound stage is of
the type which accommodates an audience.
Indeed, if such is used for the presentation
of a theatrical feature with several acts,
hardly any other method appears practical
if the sets are to be "real ".
-to
Fig. 1 shows the layout of a "streamlined" television studio. The set is constructed on 20 -foot by 40-foot platforms
in a locale containing the various shops
required to fabricate sets. Thus, in the car-
penter shop the essential "flats" are constructed, which may be made of press wood, compositionboard, plywood, fiberboard, etc. In the plastering shop are built
all necessary "casts ", and plaster forms
made by sprayingthe material on with special spray guns. The platforms are supported by wheels which roll on rails set at
such a height that the platform floors have
the same elevation as the floors of the
shops.
After the set has been constructed it is
rolled into the rehearsal studio, the "apron"
floor of which is again at the same elevation as the platform on which the set is
built. It should be realized that, at present,
in a rehearsal studio intended for rehearsing as well as set construction, rehearsing
is constantly interrupted by men hauling
set props, carrying ladders, hammering,
sawing, and perhaps even operating machinery. To facilitate lighting operations,
the rehearsal studio, like the sound stage,
may be equipped with grids which can be
raised and lowered. These may be suspended from the roof trusses, with all
cables located overhead, instead of lying
across the studio floor as at present.
Sound proof doors obviously are required
between the shops and the rehearsal studio
as well as between the rehearsal studio and
the sound stage. They must be large enough
to allow the sets to pass as a whole.
At program time, the set is wheeled onto
the auditorium stage, if the studio has an
audience, or into the sound stage if no such
audience is present. The stage may be
equipped with a number of "catwalks" for
lights which can be raised and lowered to
accommodate sets of various heights.
Two turntables in the sound stage assure a practically continuous flow of sets
into and out of the enclosure. They are
made of steel and electrically operated. The
stage contains, of course, the usual video
monitoring rooms, and may incorporate an
orchestra pit.
References
Pelton, F. E., "The Pelton System," a privately published and mimeographed folder
dated May 1, 1947.
2 Kasold, E. B., U. S. Patent No. 2,290,242.
s Berkely, B., U. S. Patent No. 1,979,363.
4 U. S. Patent No. 479,001 Issued to J. H.
Gutierrez.
U. S. Patent No. 748,116 Issued to O. Stoll.
U. S. Patent No. 1,045,398 Issued to C. L.
Hagen.
British Patent No. 439,969 Issued to Normaton
Filmgesellschaft.
o Read, Morton H., and
Bunting. Eugene N.,
"Practical Operation of a Small Motion Picture Studio," SMPTE Journal, July, 1951,
Vol. 57. No. 1, Page 24.
1
51
WÑt'
F
Broadcasting
M EXCL.
VE LY
By
QUINTEN G. CUMERALTO
Chief Engineer, WRZE -FM
BUILDING
HALL
i
FIRE
DOWN
AP
EI-/
- ELFTYPE
DOWN
1
FUSE Box
CLOSET
SOUND
CLOSET
LOCK
DOWN
WOMEN
1. Floor plan show
ing the WRZE arrangement of studio, offices
and studio control room.
FIG.
ÿ
BACI(
GENERAL
OFFICE
I.
NAGER
FFICE Or-
,-,A C:
MEN
J
A
STUDIO
"A'
Yó
STUDIO
L-JI
CONTROL
MEE
MIM
REC
located in York, Pennsylvania, is an "FM only" station with coverage that takes in a large portion of southeastern Pennsylvania, and northeastern
Maryland.
and to move solid rock in order to make
room for the building and tower. This task
being completed, the remaining construction both at the transmitter and at the
studio went along smoothly.
The construction permit for WRZE was
granted on August 17, 1947, for eventual
operation on channel 253 with an ERP
of 8 KW. Clearing of the land for the
transmitter location was begun shortly
thereafter. This proved to be somewhat of
a job, as it was necessary to construct a
road for some distance through the woods
Since the remodeling of the building for
our studio location had to be completed
first, installation of the audio equipment
began during May of 1948. Soon after, the
transmitter building and tower was completed, and a crew proceeded with the installation of the transmitting equipment.
Even though we had no communication
,
UTTIN
EQUI P.
O
,
MOBILE
REC.
T
E
Cou
sel.
-
ELI
-I
equipment between studio and transmitter
during this phase of the work, very little
trouble was encountered. The only real
difficulty occurred while attempting to
orientate our STL antennas without communications. However, we managed to get
enough signal to the transmitter, to operate the receiver, and when our communications equipment arrived shortly thereafter,
we were able to touch up the rough spots.
WRZE went on the air with program on
September 6, 1948, and we have encountered very little trouble since that time.
The only exception has been power failure
several times. However, this will be taken
care of when the 31.25 KVA stand -by unit,
now located at the main transmitter, is
installed.
Studios
As our main studios are quite small, it
is necessary to take advantage of all possible space, and this is done in the following manner: The Main studio is equipped
with two mikes with facilities for a third
mike if necessary. Our control room is
ideally suited for combination work and
has facilities for two mikes and three turntables. In addition, as the floor plans show.
Quinten G. Cumeralto, Chief Engineer,
shown at the controls of the 3-KW FM Trans.
FIG. 2.
miner, RCA Type BTF.3B.
it is possible to use the manager's office for
an announce booth, should the occasion
arise.
The studio has the ordinary run of equipment which includes the RCA 76B Con solette, Two Turntables, Two Portable
Cutting Tables with associated amplifier
and an audio rack with VU meters, amplifiers, etc. In addition, the communication
equipment consisting of the RCA CT1A
transmitter and the CRIA receiver is
mounted on shelves in the control room
as is the remote receiver which is part of
the RCA Model BTM -1B remote equipment. Of course, our STL transmitter is
also located at the studios with the low
power section in the control room and the
IPA tripler and the PA doubler section in
a small closet adjacent to the control room.
The STL antenna and the remote receiving antenna, of the ground plane variety
manufactured by RCA, are located on a
thirty foot tower on top of the studio
building, with the Communications antenna
mounted at roof level.
The transmitting portion of the BTM 1B
remote equipment is mounted in a Willys
Jeep at the present time. However, we hope
to improve these facilities in the near future since the frequency allocations for this
type of service have been completed. Our
audio equipment for remote use consists
of the OP -6 and -7 as well as a three channel amplifier and a tape recorder.
Transmitter
The transmitter location is some fifteen
miles southeast of York. As this is one of
the highest points in York County, 705
feet above average, this location was
chosen even though it is somewhat inconvenient with respect to mileage. Our transmitter building is a two story structure
with all radio equipment on the second
FiG. 3. Transmitter house. FM antenna and relay tacilities are located about fifteen miles southeast of York.
floor and the heating plant and storage
space on the first. The original plans called
for a one story structure with basement,
however, it was found to be impractical to
excavate for the basement, and this accounts for the two story building. The
second floor of the building is quite elaborate as it contains a complete studio control room, office, shop and bath room
with shower. The studio- control room is of
the "room within a room" type of construction and is quite effective in eliminating
the blower noise from the transmitter.
We are presently using the RCA BTF -3B
operating with a power output of 2.1 KW
feeding the RCA 3 Bay Super Turnstile
Antenna with a gain of four, giving WRZE
an ERP of 8 KW. The audio equipment,
all located in the studio -control room, consists of a standard console, two turntables
and the audio rack with the RCA 86 -A
limiter, VU meter Panel, and Monitor amplifier which feeds the hall speaker from
any portion of the audio line chosen with
the selector switch on the VU meter Panel.
In addition, the modulation monitor and
an FM receiver for re- broadcast purposes
are also located in the rack. Adjacent to
the audio rack is the STL receiver on the
right and the Monitor speaker on the lef t
with the control box for the communications equipment, which is also the CT lA
transmitter and the CR lA receiver; with
the antenna located atop the transmitter
building as is the FM receiving antenna.
All wiring in the building is run in conduit with each joint welded and the conduit bonded every foot of the way to a
system of ground wires which are terminated to a buried ground system located
behind the building. As it was felt that this
would not be adequate, due to the poor
conductivity of the soil, the ground system
is also connected to the copper water pipe
which runs some 800 feet under ground to
a 200 -foot well. Each of the tower legs is
also connected to this ground system.
STOI1.36e
00
Ilan
CONTROL.
STUDIO
SHOP
SW
Fuá!
asea
Ig
CON
50..77 F
s
BTr-3B
i
The Super Turnstile is mounted on a
40 -foot supporting structure complete with
stairs to the top, which enable the engineering staff to do all maintenance on the
antenna and associated lighting. Also included is a 110 volt AC receptacle at the
base of the Turnstile, and it has proven a
very handy accessory. As seen by the accompanying photo, our STL receiving antenna is mounted on one corner of the
supporting tower.
--rOFFICE
FIG. 4. Floor plan of the WRZE transmitter building showing location of the FM transmitter and
control equipment.
53
ENLARGING
TELEVIEWING
AUDIENCE
THE
By
E. T.
JONES
Engineering Products Advertising
RCA's
interest in its customers and
products extends far beyond the actual
design and sale of the equipment. No constructive phase of the business is overlooked. As a concrete example, take the
case of the Television Broadcaster. In certain locations a good portion of his potential audience has been unable to view the
programs because:
(a) apartment house management refused
to permit tenants to erect a multitude of
television antennas on the roofs of their
buildings.
Bedside television receivers to brighten the road to convalescence is lust one of the many conveniences made available
by the management of Hahnemann Hospital.
(b) in some communities individual rooftop antennas were shielded from TV signals by mountains which surrounded the
city or town.
To overcome the above mentioned difficulties, RCA engineers developed and perfected special Television Receiving Antenna and Distribution equipment .
RCA Antenaplex® System.
.
APARTMENT -HOTEL- HOSPITAL
.
SYSTEM
With a single array of antennas on the
roof, this system is capable of distributing
New York City's famous Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
serves its guests with clear, sharp television pictures. Seven television channels are fed to 2.500
receivers by means of
RCA Antenaplex system.
signals equivalent in quality and quantity
to those provided by individual antennas
to as many as 350 TV receivers located in
as many apartments or rooms.
Rooftops no longer need be disfigured
by an unsightly and hazardous clutter of
antennas. A modern installation of this
kind, employing only one array of antennas, prevents damage to the roof and
lessens the hazard of personal injury -with
resultant law suits-through the collapse
of individual rooftop antennas.
The Twin Oaks Apartment House
of Kansas City. Missouri--designed
for gracious living-provides tele-
vision reception to more than 600
apartments through the expedient of
RCA Television Antenaplex System.
The RCA Television Antenaplex array looms above the 20 -story
hospital. The hospital is the first in the world to provide
patients and staff with this multiple- outlet RCA master tele.
vision Antenaplex system.
Hahnemann Hospital of Philadelphia.
the first hospital in the world to install
an RCA Television Antenaplex system.
provides clear and uniform television reception for patients and staff members in
virtually any part of the 20 -story building.
The system is especially free from interference presented by diathermy, X -ray,
and other hospital equipment.
Television at the patient's bedside affords many hours of fine entertainment by
bringing to him the world's greatest entertainers. He can derive a variety of enter-
Frank E. Douglas. jr.. Business Manager of Hahnemann
Medical College and Hospital, is shown with RCA Anten
plex amplifier and distribution equipment. Excellent reception throughout the entire hospital area is assured.
tainment from Drama, Comedy, Sports and
Religious programs which are broadcast
from nationwide networks. The hospitalized
patient is truly a receptive audience.
HOW THE WALDORF INSTALLATION
OPERATES
It is capable of receiving, through the
seven antennas mounted on five masts on
the roof, every channel presently locally
receivable or programmed for the future,
whether in color or in black and white. A
special pre -amplifier located in the Tower
feeds ten individual risers, one for each
4 Typical of the units installed
at the Waldorf- Astoria Hotel,
this 7- Channel Antenaplex
Amplifier intensifies the re
ceived signals and assures
excellent reception in every
apartment.
.
Wall outlets provide the final
link of the distribution system. The television receiver is
ready for operation as soon
as the cord is plugged in.
www.americanradiohistory.com
channel with three spares running from
the 45th to the 6th floor. These risers assure full strength signals at every floor
level of the house. To cover the needs of
the East and West Towers, the Lower
Tower and the various guest and public
rooms in the main body, individual amplifiers serving upwards to 250 outlets each,
are tapped off the system at the 45th, 18th
and the 6th floor. Each amplifier represents
a typical antenaplex master antenna system, distributing signals through a single
coaxial cable approximating the size of a
The shielding effect of Sharps Mountain on the
homes in the city of Pottsville is clearly illustrated.
This 80 -foot tower reaches out over the top of Sharps Mountain,
itself 1.390 feet above sea level, to pick up the throe Philadelphia
television stations and distribute their programs to the residents
of Pottsville.
pencil to the individual set outlet in each
room. This unique system gives the Waldorf a capacity for operating over 2500
television receivers simultaneously. Moreover, all television receivers throughout the
house give clear sharp pictures on every
channel. As far as television is concerned
This special RCA Community Television Antenaplex Amplifier
greatly intensifies the signals picked up on top of Sharps
Mountain- assuring excellent reception in Pottsville homes.
the Waldorf can truly be said to be "ghostfree". All equipment is RCA throughout,
built to the highest standards of quality.
These features, outstanding as they are,
are only a partial measure of the system's
value, for in tackling the problem of the
Waldorf's public rooms, Master Video and
56
www.americanradiohistory.com
RCA Service engineers developed the special "Master Video control panel" for the
public room system which is installed in
the Radio Room. This panel enables the
Waldorf to completely control the signals
to all public rooms from the small parlors
and meeting rooms on the fourth floor, to
the Grand Ballroom. By means of this control panel, the hotel can give its clientele
any desired capacity, from one to 200 receivers operating simultaneously in any
public room. Thus the hotel is able to offer
to manufacturers, distributors and dealers
a proven means of demonstrating their sets
or their products through television.
Waldorf, like many buildings in the area
is still faced with the DC problem in portions of the house. Master Video's modifications incorporating the hotel's radio
system in TV receivers, provide the hotel's
guests with the finest combination system
yet evolved.
At the same time, by utilizing the spare
risers from the roof level to the control
panel, the hotel can take off the air direct
radio relay signals beamed exclusively to
the Waldorf and transmit that signal to
any given public room; or the hotel can
transmit a closed circuit sales meeting or
similar telecast to one or more of the public rooms. All this can be done without disturbance to the Waldorf's guests or normal
television reception in other parts of the
hotel. Any number of public rooms can be
linked for such closed circuit meetings.
Or, if the hotel desires, it can transmit its
own telecasts to its patrons and guests
without resort to outside facilities.
example, was installed by Master Video in
the Peacock Lounge for the World Series,
naturally contributing towards an increase
in restaurant and beverage business. The
results were substantial both in revenue
and in guest satisfaction.
RCA Victor set equipment was carefully
tailorded to the hotel's needs. Seventeen inch consolette-type receivers have been
expressly modified, both to incorporate the
hotel's radio system and to permit the hotel
to cover the needs of those portions of the
house still not equipped with the master
system and alternating current; for the
A special 6' x 9' projection unit, for
RCA COMMUNITY ANTENAPLEX SYSTEM
Even entire communities, previously
shielded by mountains, have been added
to the televiewing audience through the
application of the RCA Community Antenaplex System. Clear programs may be
obtained from stations up to 100 miles or
more depending on the strength of the
signals.
Providing television signal reception and
distribution service for an entire community, the system consists of a master antenna assembly, mounted on a tall mast
on the highest nearby elevation; a network
of coaxial cable, strung over utility poles
from the antenna site through the areas to
be served; amplifiers mounted on poles at
fixed intervals to boost the strength of the
In addition to the main amplifier, line amplifiers like those below are in-
serted wherever needed to maintain a definite value
of
signal strength.
signals; and lead -off lines terminating in
wall or baseboard outlets in the homes of
set -owners subscribing for the service. On
the antenna mast are three separate elements, each tuned for a channel on which
programs are available.
The system eliminates the television
"blind spots" represented by mountain ringed communities, as well as those on flat
terrain where the nearest broadcast stations are too remote to permit reception
with individual roof -top antennas.
At Pottsville, Pennsylvania, a mountainringed community, an RCA installation of
this kind is bringing high -quality television reception to more than 400 families
whose receivers are connected to the corn
munity antenna system. Programs are received from three stations in Philadelphia,
more than 75 miles away.
Before the community antenna system
was installed, television reception in Pottsville homes was extremely poor, even with
elaborate roof -top installations costing in
excess of $500 and very often more than
the cost of the television receivers.
The new system makes use of roof -top
antennas unnecessary. Local operating companies, such as the Trans -Video Corporation at Pottsville, Pa., offer the service
for a fixed installation fee, plus a monthly
service charge.
From these
distribution boxes, individual homes are fed
strong signals which provide high -quality pictures and sound.
57
www.americanradiohistory.com
Student announcer gets acquainted
with the RCA 77 -D Microphone.
The "Studio Schoolhouse," jointly sponsored by RCA
Victor and Station WFIL is a busy student activity.
9
7atee
FOR
BROADCASTING
By GEORGE KOEHLER
Promotion Director
Philadelphia Inquirer Stations, WFIL -WFIL -TV
and
E.
C.
MASON
Associate Editor -BROADCAST NEWS
Radio
Station WFIL has helped Temple
University establish a radio department to
provide a practical laboratory for teaching the finest techniques of broadcasting.
Temple's Department of Radio Speech
and Theatre operates a campus Radio
Station-WRTI. Advice and assistance in
the functioning of WRTI is provided by
members of the WFIL Stations' Staffs.
The University's Philadelphia Collegiate
Network consists of four stations linked
together by telephone lines to provide
afternoon and evening listening. Temple's
WRTI is the Network's key switching
center with programs provided by WXPN
-the University of Pennsylvania, WPWT
-the Philadelphia Wireless Technical Institute and WRTI. The Intercollegiate
Network is an agency of good will and a
community service.
WRTI frequently contributes recordings
of important campus speeches and other
events for broadcast over Philadelphia's
WFIL. Students trained on WRTI appear
five times each week in WFIL's Studio
Schoolhouse programs, designed for inschool listening. Other students assist in
television productions over WFIL -TV.
Located in the basement of Thomas
Hall, Park Avenue and Norris Street and
directed by Professor John B. Roberts,
WRTI is a completely independent operating unit .
four studios, four control
rooms, reception rooms and lavatories.
WRTI, a small but efficient radio station, operates on a frequency of 640 kilocycles. Costing more than $40,000, it was
constructed in 1947 with the aid of a grant
from Philadelphia's radio station WFIL.
Completely RCA-equipped (as WFIL),
WRTI uses everything in microphones from
the RCA 44 -BX down to the Bantam
KB -2C's. Also RCA 70 -D Turntables and
RCA type 76-C consolletes. The OP6 and
Transmission eminates from two 10watt transmitters operating simultaneously
through the University's electrical system,
covering a 4- square -block area. Radiation
the OP7 RCA Remote Amplifier and Mixer
is used for remote broadcasts.
is
never beyond 200 feet from the power
lines.
Although registered with the FCC,
is not licensed because signal radiation is confined to such a small area. However, there is strict adherence to FCC
regulations at all times.
WRTI
58
www.americanradiohistory.com
.
.
In the hands of the ingenious and alert
student broadcasters, this remote equipment has been a versatile instrument,
bringing to the listening audience the voices
of such distinguished personalities as President Harry S. Truman, Senator Francis
J. Myers, Carl Sandburg, Arthur Garfield
Hays, Adolph Berle, Thurman Arnold and
Dr. Ralph Bunche. In the field of enter-
tainment, Virginia Mayo, Joe Walcott,
Duke Ellington and others. WRTI broad
casts more remotes (other than sports)
than any other Philadelphia or surrounding
area stations.
Thirty-five percent of WRTI's programs
are "live" programs-more than any other
Philadelphia professional station. Over 200
students take part in some phase of its
activity.
WRTI MEANS BUSINESS!
WRTI sells time and is a complete replica of the most efficient commercial station
with regard to programming. Audience
analysis, scheduling and logging of programs and maximum utilization of available talent follows the pattern of the most
highly organized broadcast service.
In radio, the signing of an advertising
contract is an important event. WRTI
offers the advertiser a highly select radio
audience.
A positive friendly relationship has
been constantly maintained with the local
.
During the football season, WRTI's flag
waves from the press box in the stadium,
where WRTI sports men cover the game.
Basketball, baseball, track, and all physical
training meets are handled by the roving
special -events staff.
TEMPLE'S TECHNICAL INSTITUTE
To provide the Radio and Television Industry with technical men, the Temple University Technical Institute offers courses
designed to meet the needs of a highly specialized field. The work is intensive in
nature and the lectures are supplemented
by thorough and practical laboratory experiments. Competent instructors are from
radio and television industries in the area
-field, test, and telecasting engineers.
Thus, Temple gives a completely rounded
group of courses in all phases of radio,
electronics and television.
WRTI'S PURPOSE
WRTI has been dedicated as a means
of improving present radio standards. Since
WFIL helped launch WRTI as a means
of providing a reservoir of trained per-
Technical Men of the Future.
sonnel. it is natural that many graduates
have become a part of WFIL's organization. But others have become affiliated
with WCAU, WDEL, WORK, WCOJ, as
well as TV stations. Many other stations
have been availing themselves of students
graduating with a B.A. degree in radio.
stations.
RCA Professional Broadcast Audio Equipment creates the "authentic atmosphere" at WRTI-prepares the student Broadcaster adequately for his future.
HANDLED WITH CARE!
Discussion type programs that most
stations would not tackle are handled at
WRTI
Minority Group Problems .. .
Republican to Democrat
Progressive
to Socialist
all receive full and fair
treatment!
...
...
...
WELL- BALANCED DIET
WRTI listeners have enjoyed programs
ranging from newscasts received in a teletype- equipped news room, to classical music
and dramatic shows. The music library is
large and constantly growing.
In the dramatic line, "stay -at -home
theatre goers" hear weekly presentations
by the Temple Theatre Guild. Many of
these half -hour shows are written by WRTI
staffers. All this means hours of rehearsal
time for actors, announcers, musicians, and
sound -effects men. WRTI has grown from
a sparsely- staffed, "trial and error" operation to a well -organized, smoothly functioning team.
The "Ninth" Television Training
THE
c(
t'"
BROADCASTERS' TV TRAINING PROGRAM
V,',
November 26, 1951 the "Ninth"
Broadcasters' Television Training Session
was presented by RCA Engineering Products Department in the Exhibition Room
in Camden, New Jersey. More than 60
Broadcasters attended the week -long session bringing the number of Broadcasters
attending all sessions since their inauguration to the grand total of 500.
hearty welcome was extended by
W. W. Watts and T. A. Smith with genA
A
group
of
Program- Tuesday Morning Class.
announcements and introductions
made by E. T. Griffith. The topics discussed at the Monday session were: "What
It Takes to Make a TV Station "-by
E. C. Tracy; "Introduction to TV Studio
Equipment" H. Duszak; "Television
Theory"
H. Roe and A. H. Lind;
"TV Camera Equipment"
A. Reisz;
"Flying Spot Equipment " -W. E. Tucker
"Synchronizing Generator "-R. J. Smith..
'TV Switching " -L. E. Anderson.
eral
-J.
-
-
;
Broadcasters inspect a four -section version of ACA's new
Antenna- one of the many Items of Interest displayed.
TFU -24B UHF
The Exhibition Room was divided into
three sections: a lecture room, a display
area and a luncheon section. An intermission at each morning and afternoon session-with refreshments-provided relaxation and an opportunity to "get acquainted". During the recess much interest
was shown in a four -section version of
RCA's new TFU-24B UHF Antenna. A
showcase displayed a model studio layout
of RCA's "Basic Buy" TV Studio Package-fully described in BROADCAST NEWS
No. 66, and soon to be released as a 12page brochure. Many familiar pieces of
equipment and many items entirely new to
the Broadcasters were shown.
Luncheon was served each day at 12:30
and high -fidelity music was provided by
the RCA RT-11A Professional Tape Recorder and LC -1A Loudspeaker.
TUESDAY'S PROGRAM
The Tuesday program included talks on
"Film Projectors" - --by A. E. Jackson;
"Video Amplifiers " -R. J. Hucaby; "Video
Monitors "-N. P. Kellaway; "Genlock
and Special Effects " -E. M. Gore; "Mi.
crowave Relay "-C. A. Rosencrans; "TV
Mobile and Supplementary Equipment"
L. E. Anderson; "TV Pick -Up Tubes"
R. Johnson (RCA Tube Dept.); "TV
-
--
60
www.americanradiohistory.com
REGISTRANTS AT THE 9TH TELEVISION TRAINING PROGRAM
WALTER
KALB
H. ALLEN
... WDET -FM
THEODORE ANDRAS
GEORGE ANDREWSKV
.... WBRE
WJDA
JAMES ASCHER
MAJOR JOHN BAURIEDEL
ALLEN BELL
EDGAR T. BELL
ROBERT
WELM -WCLI
KTOK
M. BOOTH
WPTZ
WNOE
WXEL
.. WTAG
KWBU
WMAR
WWNY
WIBW
WFAA
GEORGE BORDEN
RAY BOYD
HAROLD BRINKMAN
ELLIOT A. BROWNING
NESTOR CUESTA
W. DARLING
MAYNARD DAVIS
LEWIS DICKENS FLEETS
WILLIAM ELLIS
CRC
J. GILMOUR ...
WJLS
A. J. GINKEL
A. GOODMAN
WMAR
KTOK
A. HILL
WBRY
FRANK HAIES
J. HAROLD HAUGHAWOUT KTAR
GEORGE HIXENBAUGH ..WMT
KARL B. HOFFMAN ... WGR
WIBW
ARTHUR HOLBROOK ..
WFBM
HAROLD HOLLAND
.......
.
WMAR
W. HOOPER
ARTHUR HOPWOOD
PAUL HUHNDORFF
.... WPTZ
.. KPRC
ALEXANDRIA, I.A.
DETROIT, MICH.
WILKES-BARRE, PA.
QUINCY, MASS.
JOLIET, ILL.
ELMIRA, N. Y.
OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA.
WASHINGTON, D. C.
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
CLEVELAND, OHIO
WORCESTER, MASS.
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX.
BALTIMORE, MD.
WATERTOWN, N. Y.
TOPEKA, KANSAS
DALLAS, TEX.
`\WILLIAM
HUNT
NORAN E. KERSTA
C. LAU
WMAR
D. LEIBENSPERGER
WILLIAM G. MATTA
MONTREAL, QUEBEC
BECKLEY, W. VA.
BALTIMORE,
AL SMITH
MD.
Studio Lighting " -H. M. Gurin (NBC);
H. Roe; "Installation,
"TV Systems "
Tune -Up and Maintenance "-T. Griffin
(RCA Service Co.)
-J.
.
WEDNESDAY'S SESSION
On Wednesday morning a laboratory
visit was conducted under the direction of
W. J. Poch to acquaint the Broadcaster
with new developments in video equipment.
After having lunch and returning to the
lecture room, discussions covering "Introduction to Audio Equipment "-by D.
Bain; "Audio Systems for TV "-W. E.
Stewart; "Custom Audio for TV " -M.
Gunn; and "Microphones and Microphone
Techniques " -by G. Graham (NBC) were
presented.
WHIZ
_
CRC
WARD MILLER
J. H. MITCHELL
CARLTON NOPPER
N. J. PAPPAS
BEN PARRISH
CHESTER RECTOR
F. REMLEY
JOSEPH H. ROHRER
JOHN ROTH
CHARLES SAKOSKI
R. F. SANTO
JOSEPH H. SAXON
ERWIN SCHONEY
OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA.
WATERBURY, CONN.
PHOENIX, ARIZ.
CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA
BUFFALO, N. Y.
TOPEKA, KANS.
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.
BALTIMORE, MD.
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
HOUSTON, TEX.
.
J. H. JONES
WHP
.. WLOA
WHLD
WFLA
.
WMAR
CBC
KHMD
WIOU
W. WEAVER
L. A. WILKINSON
W. A. WILSON
ROBERT J. WILSON
CHARLES WIRTENAN
G. WOODEN
tenna " -W. Darling; "TV Antenna Components"-L. J. Wolf ; "TV Super -Turnstile Antennas " --H. Wescott.
Thursday evening provided a little diversion -with Cocktails and a Banquet. Truly
a cordial evening!
FRIDAY'S SESSION
Friday's session included such topics as:
"VHF Custom Antennas " -by L. J. Wolf;
.
RRADDOCK,
PA.
NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y.
TAMPA, FLA.
BALTIMORE, MD.
MONTREAL, QUEBEC
CBC
MONTREAL,
KCOM
WMAR
WFPG
GEORGE TOWNSEND
CITY
MD.
HARRISBURG, PA.
WPTZ
WBRE
WTOK
WGBP
BLAIR THRON
OHIO
QUEBEC
HANNIBAL, MO.
KGKOMO, IND.
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO.
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
WILKES- BARRE, PA.
KRDO
H. SNYDER
ZANESVILLE,
MONTREAL,
NEW YORK
BALTIMORE,
WSPR
WNOW
WTOP
KBOR
WHLD
., WIBM
WMAR
QUEBEC
MERIDIAN, MISS.
EVANSVILLE, IND.
SIOUX CITY, IOWA
BALTIMORE, MD.
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
SPRINGFIELD, MASS.
YORK, PA.
WASHINGTON, D. C.
BROWNVILLE, TEX.
NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y.
JACKSON, MICH.
BALTIMORE, MD.
"UHF Antenna Systems Equipment " -O.
-D.
Balmer; "TV
O. Fiet; "TV Towers "
Markets "
Halpin; "Monitor and Test
-D.
Equipment " -W. T. Douglas.
Since 1947, RCA has played host to
over 500 enthusiastic Broadcasters at nine
Television Training sessions. The "Tenth"
Training Program will be held February
25, 1952.
Discussing the RCA "Basic Buy" and 20 KW Conversion Equipment display are
(I. to r.): Paul Huhndorff, KPRC. Houston, Texas: Harold Brinkman, WXEL, Cleveland, Ohio: Nestor Cuesta, KWBU, Corpus Christi, Texas: James Barclay, RCA.
THURSDAY'S PROGRAM
Thursday's schedule included "Introduction to Transmitters " -by R. J. Newman;
"Principles of TV Transmitter Design"
Gluyas; "TT- 2AL /2AH, 2 K\\
TV Transmitter " -W. T. Douglas; "TT10AL/10AH, 10 KW TV Transmitter "
R. Meisenheimer; "TT- 25AL /20AH, 25
Talmage;
and 20 KW TV Amplifiers"
"TTU -1B, TTU -10A, 1 KW and 10 KW
P. Tissot; "GenUHF Transmitters "
eral Principles and Theory of TV An-
-T.
-
-F.
-T.
61
RAM
FORUM
-41W
A DEPARTMENT FOR THE BROADCAST RADIO AMATEUR
-
LIVING ROOM STYLE!
HAM SHACK
Those who have been in the Broadcast
Business for at least 10 years won't have
to guess what was used to make this attractive ham console.* Construction of this
neat, convenient desk for receiver, VFO,
freq. meter, speech amplifier and monitor
scope, with all power supplies, was the ingenious work of Fred de Jaager, W2CGJ,
Chief Engineer of Empire Broadcasting
This should give
Corporation, N.
somebody i- d -e -a -s
!
Y....
...
Fred's transmitter, shown beside the console, is a 750 -watt job, 100% TVI- proofed,
with push -pull 100TH's in the final. This
transmitter made DXCC in 1949, operates on 3.5, 7, 14 and 28 mc. Beams for
10 and 20, mounted atop a 50 -foot pole
several feet behind the house, are fed with
one piece of co -ax. A relay at the top of
the pole selects either beam. Co-ax and all
control wires between the house and pole
are underground.
W2CGJ made this attractive ham desk (above) from an RCA Broadcast Type 80 -B Console Desk.
Below, Allen Jones, W1NW of WHDH is shown operating W1TOP, Tri Tower Radio Club
Headquarters Station.
W1TOP GOES AFTER W -A -C 75 FONE
Philip K. Baldwin, WIZW, Chief Engineer of WHDH and WHDH -FM, Boston,
reports excellent results with W1TOP, 200 watt headquarters station of the Tri Tower
Radio Club. In only a few months operation, they have worked all districts several
times and dx including two ZL contacts
all on 75 -meter phone! Club membership
is limited to employees of WHDH and
WHDH -FM, Boston.
-
W1TOP is installed in the WHDH transmitter building at Needham, Mass., twelve
miles southwest of Boston. One corner of
the workshop bench (see photo at left) is
utilized for the club's installation. The
transmitter uses a pair of 812's in the final
modulated by Class B 811's, and a surplus
*
RCA Type 80 -B Console Desk.
Address correspondence to:
HAM FORUM
Marvin L. Gaskill (W2BCV)
Associate Editor, Broadcast News
RCA, Camden, New Jersey
62
www.americanradiohistory.com
aircraft transmitter ECO. Two receivers,
an SX -28 and NC100 are used with a
switching arrangement for selection of
either to feed the speaker.
Groundplane Vertical Antenna
The W1TOP antenna is a groundplane
vertical radiator 61 feet long. The radiator, constructed of aluminum tubing, is
supported by a 30 -foot pole and wire guys.
Four horizontal radials spaced at 90- degree
intervals terminate in a copper ring at the
base of the radiator about 16 feet above
ground. The antenna is fed at this point
with RG8U cable. Operation is presently
confined to 75 -meter phone.
Let's hear from some W6's and K6's.
All districts have been heard from but the
sixth.
Shame!
73, W2BCV
...
-
NAA 1914 How Many Do You Know?
John Stenger, Jr., W3ZS of WBAX,
Wilkes Barre, Pa., submits this picture of
the 1914 crew at famous NAA. Are any
of the sigs familiar to you? Inset shows
John at his ham station, SNR, in 1912.
inHe was 5G in 1908, 8ZS in 1915
terrupted his ham career during World
War I when he joined the Navy.
...
Effective
1/4
wave vertical
Below, 1914 NAA personnel of U. S. Naval Station, Arlington, Va.
Top row, left to right: J. E. O'Neil, Chief Machinist: Simonton, Civil
Clerk; W. A. Eaton, Chief Elect.: Penland, Chief Elect.: George Clark,
Radio Inspector; Wood, Chief Yeoman; J. W. Scanlon, Chief Elect.,
Radio, In Charge; Lt. Cmdr. S. W. Bryant, Asst. Supt. Naval Radio
of W1TOP is
shown in above photo behind WHDH station wagon.
Service: J. H. Knapp, Asst. Paymaster. Middle row, left to right:
Pritchett: Palmer: (the mascot. "Static "): Bain; Burge: Carbin: Hunter;
Pitts, all Operators; and Hildum, Yeoman. Bottom row, left to right:
Burke, Operator; Kweeder, Yeoman; Ferree and Wilken, Operators;
M. E. Eason. Chief Elect.
FIG. 2. External view of
the low bond amplifier
for channels 2 to 6.
TT- 25AL/20AH
CONVERSION
EQUIPMENTS
HOW TO CONVERT
AN OPERATING 5 -KW
TV STATION ON VHF
TO 200 KW (ERP)
The TT -25AL
and the TT-20AH conversion equipments are high power amplifiers
for use with 5 kilowatt television transmitters. The TT -25AL operates on channels 2
through 6 and will provide up to 25 KW
peak visual power and 12.5 KW aural
power. The TT -20AH operates on channels
7 through 13 and will supply up to 20 KW
peak visual power and 10 KW aural power.
These equipments are designed primarily to
operate with the RCA TT -5A television
transmitter but can also be furnished for
use with any other 5 KW television transmitter meeting the FCC and RTMA
specifications.
In the light of the effective radiated
power increases which the FCC has granted
recently to operating TV stations in the
VHF band, the RCA Transmitter Power Conversion Equipment has assumed new
importance to the industry. For the TV
station on- the-air which began life on a
small scale, the opportunity to raise its effective radiated power is afforded through
a conversion job, rather than a complete,
new installation.
by
F. E.
TALMAGE
BROADCAST TRANSMITTER
ENGINEERING
Using the TT- 25AL /20AH Conversion
Units with a 5 -KW Transmitter as a
driver, it is possible for a station to multiply its transmitter power 4 or .5 times, depending upon whether the channel in use
is low band or high band. Thus, a transmitter with a 20 -KW output, used in conjunction with a 6 -bay antenna and an
average length of line would give an effective radiated power of at least 100 KW.
With a 12 -bay antenna, the ERP would
become at least 200 KW.
The advantages of higher power are obvious. The station gets increased coverage
with its signal, plus better signal to noise
ratio in the picture. More effective use of
indoor antennas is possible in the reception
area, and there is less receiver oscillation
interference.
Fig. 1 is a block diagram of the
TT-25AL /TT -20AH equipment. The internal circuits of the 5 KW driver are not
64
www.americanradiohistory.com
changed. The video and audio signals are
fed to the driver and the modulation occurs
in this unit. The RF output from the visual
driver is fed to a class "B" linear amplifier. The aural amplifier is similar to the
visual amplifier except that it may be operated class "C" since the sound carrier is
frequency modulated.
Construction
The power and control equipment for
the amplifiers are housed in four cabinets
which match the cabinet of the RCA
TT-5A. These cabinets may be placed
either in line with the TT-SA or at right
angles. Several suggested floor plans are
shown on the preceding pages. Since the
two power supply cabinets do not contain
any operating controls or meters, they can
be mounted either with the other cabinets
or in the rear as shown in the second floor
plan.
The RF circuits are housed in two cylindrical cabinets illustrated in Fig. 2. The
units for the visual and for the aural amplifier are mechanically almost identical.
TO
ANT.
DIPLE)kER
I
I
SIDE BAND
I
FILIE R
I
MONITOR
MONITOR
UNIT
2-RCA GALS
I -RCA 2021
2
UNIT
RCA6AL5
I- RCA 2021
SOUND
R C A
AMPLIFIER
5 -RCA
SOUND IN
H.V. POWER
SUP PLY
6 -RC A
673
I
-TT5A
BIAS SUPPLY
-RCA SR4GY
LINEAR
AMPLIFIER
7 -RCA 5762
Equipment as used with TT -5A
Television Transmitter.
4
PICTURE IN
BIAS SUPPLY
I -RCA 5R4GY
7-RCA 6AS7G
I-RCA 65H7
-RCA
I -RCA
I
The lower rectangular section of the amplifier unit houses the blower, filament transformers, meters and tuning controls while
the upper cylindrical section contains the
tubes and RF circuits. Air for cooling the
tubes is drawn in through two filters on
the sides of the bottom section and is expelled out the top of the unit. Access to
the tubes is obtained through four hinged
doors near the top of the unit. All other
parts are easily accessible for servicing by
removing the top dust cover, the side plates
or the filters. The refiectometer and monitor circuits are contained in a separate
unit which may be inserted in any convenient place in the output line.
FIG. 1. Block diagram of the
TT -25AL / TT -20AH Conversion
PICTURE
TELEVISION
TRANSMITTER
5762
H.V. POWER
SUP PLY
6-RCA 673
003
0A3
Circuit Description
The visual RF amplifiers for both the
low -band and the high -band equipments
each employ seven RCA -5762 air cooled
tubes operating in parallel in a grounded
grid circuit. The tubes are placed in a circle
as shown in Fig. 3. The aural amplifier also
contains seven RCA-5762 tubes in an almost identical circuit, however, the filaments of two of the seven tubes may be
turned off if desired, leaving only five operating tubes. The general appearance of
the low and high band units are similar
but the internal circuits necessarily differ
in several important respects. Both the low
and the high band units will be described
separately below in more detail.
Low-band Amplifier: The operation of
the low -band unit can best be understood
by referring both to the simplified equivalent circuit Fig. 5 and the cut -away view
of the amplifier shown in Fig. 4. The plate
tank circuit is tuned by (L -10). As can be
seen in the cut -away view, this inductance
is a co -axial tank formed by the outer shell,
and an inner cylinder, and varied by a
shorting bar located below the tubes. The
shorting bar is motor driven and controlled
from the front panel. The output transmission line is brought up through the center of the tank and coupled to the plate
circuit through a variable capacitor (C -40).
This capacitor is also motor driven and
controlled from the front panel. What is
equivalent to a second tuned circuit is
formed by inserting a shunt capacitor
(C -10) in the output transmission line apFIG.
3.
Closeup showing the cluster
of seven air -cooled 5762 triodes used
in the 20 kw amplifier equipment.
proximately one quarter wave from C -40.
This secondary circuit is tuned by sliding
capacitor (C-10) along the line. The inductance L-30 shown in the equivalent circuit is actually the first quarter wave of
the output transmission line. By a suitable
selection of the value of capacitor (C-10)
and proper adjustment of the coupling
capacitor (C-40) a broadband flat- topped
circuit can be obtained as illustrated in
Fig. 6. The optimum circuit has been found
to be 8% to 10 megacycles wide between
half power points and almost fiat over the
six megacycle channel.
The input or cathode circuit is also essentially a co -axial tank circuit tuned by
a shorting bar shown near the center of
Fig. 4 just above the tube level. In the
equivalent circuit this is shown as a variable inductance (L-40). Because of the
high input capacity of seven tubes in parallel this tank is actually much less than a
quarter of a wavelength long. A large part
of the inductance is formed in the tube and
by the tube leads. The input line is fed
through the center of the cathode tank and
is connected in series with the input circuit
at a low impedance point. In order to
match this impedance to the 72 ohm line
from the driver two quarter -wave transformer sections T9 and T10 are employed.
In the cut -away view these are shown built
into the 3%" input line by using the proper
size center conductors for the quarter -wave
sections.
To allow for variation in tube input
capacity and for variation in feed- through
power, a means for making some adjustment to the input coupling must be provided. In the low band amplifier this is ac65
Range (20 to 200 kw). For a new station desiring to start with
power, the 20 -kw Type TT -20B Transmitter will provide the full
used in connection with an RCA 12- section Super Turnstile Antenna.
the TT -20B Transmitter is located "In-line" with associated power
the rear. Some Broadcasters may prefer a block "U" arrangement.
20 -KW. VHF ERP
the maximum
200 kw when
In this layout
equipment at
PLANS
FLOOR
20-KW CONVERSION ERP Range (20 to 200 kw). For stations
already on the air with 5 -kw transmitters, the 20 -kw VHF con
version equipment shown here provides the means for increasing
power without disturbing existing facilities. With suitable RCA
antennas, ERP's of up to 200 kw may be obtained.
AND
STATION
Floor plan of TT -25AL TT -20AH with power supply and power control racks located
at the ends of the transmitter. Shaded portions of the diagram are TT -SA units.
j//i/%'
/
i
010.0tER
t
AURAL PA
BLOWER
TANK
+NiNN
VESTIGIAL
BAND
FILTER
SIDE
24VISUAL PA.
BLOWER & TANK
SAmemIXMAII
î
TER
A
COOLER
2,3650H101.1
200
VISUAL
CONTROL
AND
OISTRIBUTIO
AURAL
POWER
SUPPLY &
FILTER
VISUAL
POWER
SUPPLY
FILTER
t
VISUAL
\N
25-
WATER COOLER MAY BE INSTALLED AT ANY
CONVENIENT PLACE NEAR THE TRANSMITTER
NOTE
#2
PLATE TRANSFORMERS SHOULD BE LOCATED
NEAR THE POWER SUPPLIES TO AVOID
LONG RUNS OF HIGH VOLTAGE WIRING.
NOTE
MONITORING
EQUIP RACKS
43,
ALL DIMENSIONS ARE MINIMUM
www.americanradiohistory.com
PLATE
TRANSFORMER
LAYOUTS
FOR
/
/ / /!/ // / /
/ // / // // / ///
4
/
24
%/
+T
I
AURAL
/imo
VISUAL PA
PA
BLOWER &TARR
BLOWER &TANK
O
AURAL
VISUAL
POWER
POWER
QRREAER
L.
12Tb:tet
SUPPLY SUPPLY
AND
AND
FILTER FILTER
84-NIGH 64 NIGN
1.-36
WATER
COOLER
VESTIGIAL 4-24"
SIDE BAND
2íA361
FILTER
34:421.4CMN
SO NIGN
3B
1
--4
iI`C>,y,
AURAL
PLATE
TRANSFORMER
2iE2
VISUAL
PLATE
JAL
AURAL
TRANSFORMER
2iÁ42
CONTRD
Floor plan of TT -25AL/
with power
TT -20AH,
AND
AND
DISTRIB
DI STRIE
supply and power control racks located behind
the transmitter. Shaded
portions of the diagram
are TT -5A units.
Y
25'
200-
NOTE
WATER COOLER MAY BE INSTALLED AT
ANY CONVENIENT PLACE NEAR THE
TRANSMITTER.
NOTE
MONITORING CONTROL RACKS
20A 441 B4 -NIGH
,I
42
PLATE TRANSFORMER SHOULD BE LOCATED
NEAR THE POWER SUPPLIES. TO AVOID
LONG RUNS OF HIGH VOLTAGE WIRING
NOTE
*3
ALL DIMENSIONS
25/20
ARE MINIMUM
CONVERSIONS
KW TRANSMITTER
%//// /r/////////iii/JI// ////// /a(// /i//iii/////////// /. ///////
t
/
/
VISUAL PA
BLOWER d TANN
AURAL PA
(BLOWER & TANK
24
AURAL VI UAL
PLATE
TRANS-
PLATE
2í-r TRANS-
FORMER FORMER
24142
24"x 42
R'FsAER
(IWATER
(COOLER
t36Á
50 NIGH
24ya
. EF -R
L-
Floor plan showing the
straight line arrangement
of TT- 25AL /TT -20AH. The
shaded portions of the
diagram are TT-5A units.
FILTER
24'42..44.4I
AND
STRIE
Ar,I
DIS-
,e,/\'.\e/.,ÌNA
í
zs:-.14-2s-
3/
VISUAL
VISUAL POWER
CCNTgpI SUPPLY
POWER
SUPPLY
AND
FILTER
2t
VESTIGIAL.2Ó
SIDE BAND
ÌU 0
1
f
N
AND
FILTER
\7\,V/V
25'
200'
25-. 1.-3'
69.
NOTE PI
WATER COOLER MAY BE INSTALLED AT ANY
CONVENIENT PLACE NEAR THE TRANSMITTER
NOTE
.2
PLATE TRANSFORMER SHOULD BE LOCATED
NEAR THE POWER SUPPLIES TO AVOID
LONG RUNS OF HIGH VOLTAGE WIRING
NOTE
.3
ALL DIMENSIONS ARE
.1
RACKS
1
MINIMUM
MONITORING
EQUIP
complished by adding in shunt capacitors
C- 101
-107. As can be seen in Fig. 4
these capacitors take the form of seven
co -axial capacitors. To vary the capacity
a mycalex cylinder which has a dielectric
constant of approximately 6 is inserted between the center and outer tubes. These
seven mycalex cylinders are mechanically
ganged together and driven by a tuning
motor. Since the tube leads form a portion
-C
of the tank inductance these capacitors are
not actually in parallel with the tube input
but are part way down the tank circuit
where it has been found that they serve as
a coupling adjustment and have little effect
on the resonant frequency of the circuit.
High Band Amplifier: A cut-away view
of the high band amplifier is shown in Fig.
8 and the simplified equivalent circuit is
shown in Fig. 9. The general appearance
of this unit is similar to the low band unit.
but the circuit actually differs in several
important details. Because the operating
frequency is much higher, it would be impractical to use a simple quarter wave concentric line tank similar to that used in the
low band amplifier since there would be
little or no tank circuit left outside of the
tubes themselves. To overcome this, two
T9 -INPUT TRANSFORMER
T
10
-INPUT TRANSFORMER
L40
C101
-
INPUT TUNING
-C107
INPUT COUPLING
FIG. 4.
Cut-
away view
showing
circuits
R
C
40 - OUTPUT COUPLING
L
10
-F
of
TT -25AL
Amplifier.
the
- PLATE TUNING
L30 - OUTPUT TANK
C10- OUTPUT TUNING
58
POSITION OF HANDLE AND OUTER
CONDUCTOR FOR MAXIMUM Ee
7-RCA 5752 TUlES
FIG.
5.
Simplified equivalent circuit of the TT -25AL
(low band amplifier).
co -axial tank circuits are employed. One
of these tanks is inside the other as shown
in Fig. 8. These function as inductances in
parallel and thus raise the effective resonant frequency. In the equivalent circuit
these inductances are (L -10) and (L -20).
The output is coupled to the inner of these
plate tank circuits across a shunt inductance L-60. To preserve the circuit symmetry this inductance is actually made up
of seven small adjustable shorted transmission lines connected in parallel and located on a circle just inside the inner plate
tank. Like the low band unit, the secondary
or output circuit is formed by inserting a
shunt capacitor C -10 in the output transmission line and is tuned by sliding this
capacitor along the line. Because the two
circuits are coupled at a low impedance
point this capacitor is located approxiwave length along the line. This
mately
secondary circuit, coupled to the plate circuit by means of a mutual reactance L -60,
forms the necessary elements of an overcoupled broadband circuit whose response
is equivalent to that shown in Fig. 6 for
channel 6.
F:G. 7. Cross -section view of variable Z.
transformer used bi TT-20AH.
provide for an input coupling adjustment
one of the transformers (T-9) is constructed so as to have a variable characteristic impedance as the outer shell is
rotated through 90 °. A cross sectional view
of this transformer is shown in Fig. 7
(above).
Power and Control Equipment: The control equipment is of conventional design.
An instantaneous trip relay is connected in
the cathode return circuit of each of the
seven power amplifier tubes. In addition,
a total d -c current relay is provided and a-c
relays are inserted in the primary leads of
the high voltage plate transformer. The
overload system has an automatic reset
feature. After an overload occurs the plate
/
The cathode circuit, like the plate circuit, cannot be made a conventional quarter -wave tank because the first low impedance point will occur on the tube straps.
To compensate for this extra inductance
of the straps, the seven co -axial capacitors
C- 101
-107 are connected in series with
the tube leads instead of in shunt as was
the case in the low band amplifier. These
capacitors are variable and when mechanically ganged together serve as the input
tuning control. This cathode circuit is
matched to the 72 ohm input by two quarter -wave transformer sections in series. To
-C
voltage will be removed momentarily then
automatically returned twice. If the overload persists for the third time the plate
voltage will remain off. All circuits such
as the filament bus, the blower and the
bias supply are protected by breakers with
built -in overload trip coils. The control
equipment for the aural transmitter is
identical to that for the visual transmitter
and the two are arranged so that the
two carriers may be turned on and off
independently.
Except for the bias supply and slight
differences in the high voltage filter, the
power equipment for the aural and visual
equipments are identical. The high voltage
rectifiers for each employs six RCA -673
I.--- CHANNEL WIDTH- --Ad
20
I
PICTURE
CARRIER -
-
ML
RESPONSE
I
i
)0
60
FIG. 6. Curve showing typ-
ical response
output circuit,
of
TT -25AL
6.
N\
60
channel
to
>o
0
76
SO
82
84
ee
es
so
92
PREO. MC
69
mercury vapor rectifier tubes in a three phase full wave circuit with a balance coil.
The bias supply for the visual amplifier is
well regulated, its output voltage remaining constant for large changes in grid current. The bias for the aural amplifier is
essentially obtained from grid leaks with
just enough fixed bias to protect the tubes
when there is no drive.
Installation
The layouts shown in the floor plans on
the pages preceding this article are only
three of many possible arrangements. In
all three views the amplifiers are shown in
the rear of the driver. Actually they can be
located at the ends or at right angles to
the TT-5A. This feature should be of particular interest to those stations which already have their 5 KW driver and are limited in available space to add an amplifier.
The important thing to keep in mind is
that the length of transmission line between
the driver and the amplifier should be kept
as short as possible. Distances between the
output of the driver and the center line of
the amplifier of 15 feet or less should be
satisfactory. If the distance is much greater
than this it will be difficult to obtain the
required bandwidth. To understand why
the line cannot be too long it should be
remembered that the amplifier input circuit
is essentially a single tuned circuit and can
terminate the line exactly at only one frequency. To provide for a line of indefinite
length, it would have to have a standing
wave ratio of better than 1.1 to 1 over the
six megacycle channel. This would mean
that the bandwidth of the terminating cir-
T9 - INPUT TRANSFORMER
(VARIABLE)
T IO
INPUT TRANSFORMER
CI01 -C107
INPUT TUNING
FIG. 8.
Cut-
showing
R -F
away view
circuits of
the TT.20AH
high.band
amplifier.
LIO - PLATE TUNING
L20 -PLATE TUNING
(OUTER)
(INNER)
L60
OUTPUT COUPLING
70
L30 -OUTPUT TANK
CIO-OUTPUT TUNING
7-RCA5762
TUBES
l.i1
p
A
INPUT
TRANSrORNCR
RCA TTSA
TT25AL
ANPLIPIER
CHANNEL NO.AfINCHESI
FIG. 9.
Equivalent circuit of the
for channels 7 to
TT -20AH
['CINCHES)
¡WAVELENGTH
2
121
3
10I
5
9314
175
77
64
5
141
45
741-
6
125
29
698
25
IO31%-
Amplifier
13.
Table and sketches showing length of line
between driver and 25 kw amplifier and several
ways of running the line to obtain the correct length.
FIG. 10.
cuit be 60 megacycles between half power
points. On channel 2 this is equivalent to
having a Q of 1 which is obviously an impractical condition. It is necessary, therefore, that the input circuit of the amplifier
must be a part of the driver output circuit.
On the low channels it is not only important that the length of line be kept short
but the effective length of line should be
in approximate multiples of % wavelength.
Fig. 10 gives a table of the recommended
length of line for the low band channels.
This line does not necessarily have to be
straight but can have a right angle bend or
a 180° fold as shown in the two bottom
views in Fig. 10.
Performance
A summary of the performance specifications is shown on the next page. When
the TT -25AL or the TT -20AH amplifier
is used with the TT -5A the overall performance will meet all the RTMA and
FCC requirements. The overall linearity
curve is shown in Fig. 12 and the linearity
curve for the input signal is shown in
Fig. 13. From these two curves we have
plotted the linearity of the amplifier alone.
This is shown in Fig. 14. It will be noted
that the amplifier introduces almost negligible amplitude distortion except in the
sync region where it can be easily compensated for by the sync stretcher in the
TT -5A.
175A
T
T2
S
AL
Overall frequency response of the
Driver. Measurements were made on channel
FIG. 11.
7
TT25AL
Transmitter including the TT -5A
with the side band response analyzer.
TT -25AL
2
TS
FtG. 12. Overall linearity curve of the TT-20AH
including the TT-SA driver.
A typical overall frequency response
curve without a sideband filter as viewed
on the sideband response analyzer is shown
in Fig. 11. Note that the response at 4 mc.
is considerably better than the 4 db limit
proposed by the RTMA standard.
Performance Specifications*
Type of Emission:
Aural
Visual
A3
A5
Frequency Range:
TT -25AL
TT -20AH
Channels
Channels
Power Output:
TT -25AL
Aural
2 -6
7 -13
Visual
FIG. 13. Linearity curve of the TT-5A driver made under
the same conditions as those of Fig. 12.
***2 db at 0.5
2 db at 1.25
2 db at 2.0
2 db at 3.0
3 db at 4.0
Power Line Requirements:
Voltage
Phase
mc
mc
mc
mc
Ambient Temperature:
+10°
+45°
Minimum
Maximum
208/230
3
Frequency
60 cycles
Instantaneous Regulation
+3%
Slow Time Drift
+5%
Power Consumption (approx.)
60 kw (with black picture)
(Conversion Equipment only)
Power Factor (approx.)
0 90
Exhaust air recommended for cooling, aural
and visual amplifiers only, each 2000
cf m.t
* The overall performance of a TV Transmitter using a TT-25AL or TT -20AH Ampli-
fier is necessarily dependent upon and governed
by the performance of those portions of the
transmitter preceding the amplifier.
** For pre-emphasized response, the preemphasis filter (MI- 4926 -A) may be inserted
in the 600 ohm audio input at the most effective point.
* ** Maximum variation with respect to the
idealized rectified vestigial sideband response.
These are overall limits when the amplifier is
used with the TT -5A Television Transmitter.
t Air ducts from the top of each amplifier are
recommended. The above figure is based on a
duct with approximately four square feet cross
section. Operation without ducts requires considerably more air movement.
SYNC PEAR
22RW PEAR OUTPUT
100
kw from sideband filter
i
Aural
Visual
BLACK LEVEL
75
TT-20AH
10 kw
FIG. 14. Linearity curve of th e amplifier only. The curve was plotted
by comparing Figs. 12 and 13.
20 kw from sideband filter
ós0
é
25
R -f
Output Impedance
51.5 ohms
WRITE LEVEL
Frequency Response:
Aural
25
100
50
O75
INPUT VOLTAGE/
*
*Uniform -!-1 db
LINEARITY CURVE TT20AM AMPLIFIER ONLY
30 to 15000 cy.
72
www.americanradiohistory.com
C
mc
12.5 kw
Visual....25
C
Field Engineering Service
to Broadcasters... AM, FM, TV
/IIJTTIJuhLy
Ulf
444
PAGES
RCA Service Company engineers are
experienced in all the latest techniques
and are equipped with the most modern
specialized measuring equipment. The
RCA Service Company has been working hand in hand with the nation's
broadcasters for over 25 years.
OUR SERVICE TO
BROADCASTERS
.
.
.
Installation supervision and measure.
merits of transmitting, studio and
FM
. .
. AM,
accessory equipment
or TV.
Instruction and
tr
g
of station op-
erating personnel.
Measurement and curves on FM and
TV antennas and accessory equipment, including transmission lines,
matching networks, diplexers.
Prompt help in emergencies. Technical
advice, service, and assistance on special problems.
Performance measurements and adjustments for station compliance with FCC
regulations.
For further information call or write
Communications Service Section, RCA
Service Company, Inc., Camden, N. J.
(For .serr ire outside the l'. S. A.. consult your Authorized RC.4 Distributor)
NOW- restore the original quality of your
RCA
micro-
phones, transcription pick -ups and test and measuring
equipment under the new Factory- Reconditioning Plan.
For complete details, write: Return Apparatus Control,
Building 11-1, Camden, N. J.
OF
TV
TECHNICAL
DATA
.
Al1TIIORITATIVE
An up -to -date reference for the
television station engineer or
planner. Provides complete coverage on television equipment,
its operation and maintenance.
Contains complete descriptions,
schematics, floor layouts, and
illustrations that add clarity to
the topics covered. Extensive,
new material on UHF!
Used as a basis for successful
RCA Television Broadcast train-
ing sessions, this reference has
Typical
of
. .
COMPLETE
earned the approval and acceptance of many Broadcasters.
It's a "must" for any TV library,
and will enable you to effect
appreciable savings by knowing
how to properly plan, what
equipment to buy and how to get
the most out of your equipment.
with payment of eight dollars
direct to E. T. Griffith, RCA Engineering
Products Commercial Service, Building 15 -6,
Camden, New Jersey. Your RCA Training
Manual will be promptly mailed to you.
Send orders
the
wealth of engineering information on television
which the
RCA
Manual contains,
is the spread il-
lustrated
Floor
here.
plans,
schematics,
circuit
diagrams,
and
theoretical illustrations are included.
RCA Service Company, Inc.
A
Subsidiary of the Radio Corporation of America
CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY
73
RECTIFIER TABE Projection
from high- uoltage ouerloads resulting from grounding stick shorts
By
MAL MOBLEY,
JR.
Field Supervisor
Radio Station KMPC
Los
Angeles, California
Summary
A simple means of protecting rectifier
tubes against excessive overloads resulting
from grounding stick shorts has been devised, insuring against premature arc back
and subsequent program interruptions.
The KMPC transmitter plant utilizes
both
RCA 10E and 50F transmitters. These
transmitters are equipped with the usual
safety devices such as door interlocks,
high -voltage grounding relay, and grounding sticks in the power amplifier, modulator and high -voltage rectifier bays. As an
added safety precaution, grounding sticks
have been added to all other units where
high voltage is present, such as in the 50F
exciter bay and in the transformer vault.
The use of grounding sticks upon entering high- voltage bays are important to the
safety of the operating personnel, but on
occasion have proved detrimental both to
the operation and to the longevity of the
high -voltage rectifier tubes. For example,
during testing or work on the transmitter
following a carrier failure, occasionally a
grounding stick is left shorted across the
high voltage. Consequently, on application
of plate voltage, a direct short to ground
places an excessive overload on the mercury vapor rectifier tubes, thereby reducing
their expected tube life and possibly resulting in an additional delay in restoring
the program. Mercury -vapor rectifier tubes,
such as 857B's, will withstand a considerable overload under normal operating conditions, however, as the tube ages, its
ability to withstand overloads lessens, and
arc backs become more prevalent.
74
Experience with 857B rectifier tubes
used in KMPC's 50F transmitter over five
years of operation has indicated that premature arc backs and tube failures can be
indirectly attributed to excessive overloads
caused by grounding stick shorts.
In an effort to increase rectifier tube
life, but maintaining rigid safety precautions set forth in KMPC's operation,
thought was given toward a means of providing rectifier tube protection and main-
taining the usefulness and protection of the
grounding sticks.
This problem was resolved by devising
a series of grounding stick switches in such
a manner that, if any grounding stick is
left off its hook, a micro switch in series
with the door interlock circuit will be
actuated, preventing application of plate
voltage, thereby offering protection to the
rectifier tubes.
KMPC Engineer, Tom Crosnoe is shown at BTA -50F High.Voltage
rectifier bay demonstrating a lever actuated micro switch which
provides protection against accidental grounding switch shorts.
CAV TION!
USE GROUNDING
STICK
The grounding -stick switches were assembled from surplus aircraft parts consisting of normally open micro
switches, lever -type actuators, aluminum junction boxes,
lead hookup wire and some ingenuity. The lever -type
actuators were modified, installing hooks for hanging the
grounding sticks which have sufficient weight to actuate
the switches. The switches were wired into the transmitter
door interlock circuit, as this was both convenient and
effective, since the door interlock switches in the 50F
transmitter are in series with interlock relay 6E7, which
is in the control circuit, preventing application of plate
voltage unless all door and grounding stick switches are
closed. Transmitter and console interlock-indicator lights
are also actuated, giving a visual indication of whether
the interlock circuit is completed.
The photo shows a grounding -stick interlock-switch installation as installed in the high -voltage rectifier bay of
KMPC's S0F transmitter. This is a typical installation
of those made in other units of 50F and 10E transmitters.
In conclusion, it is felt that the addition of this protective circuit will increase rectifier tube life, with
added assurance against arc backs and resulting program
interruptions.
TH
HT
1S YOUR
forced -air cooled tube
... still
a
favorite
a gleam
cooled tubes were just
minBack when forced-air
of 5 gallons of water
in our eye, it took upwardsof this class. Today, i's done
tube
in mainute to cool a power
greater convenience
entirely with air. Benefits:
tenance and operation.
le of RCA's
is only one example
Forced -air cooling
the best in modern
you
bring
to
efforts
for your
on RCA quality tubes
tube design. Insist
station operations.
I
tubes
can supply
Your RCA Tube Distributor time. Call himl
minimum
in
station
for your
FIGHT
INFANTIL[
MtALY91t
NI
NATIONAL FDUNDATNIN
OR
INMNTIIt PARALYSIS
FRANKLIN D.
RDOftYtLT,
FtRM\
RADIO CORPORATION
ELECTRON TUBES
of AMERICA
HARRISON, N. J.
75
www.americanradiohistory.com
Good-bye'.
11
.s0.1: OVE
Annoying "Roll- over "-starts up in TV
sets
when you mix remotes with locals
Good -bye "Roll-over "! The RCA TV
RCA's TV Genlock TG -45 ends picture slipping when you
"lap dissolve" and "superimpose."
Now you can lock two entirely different programs together -remote
or local -and hold pictures steady right through switching! No
manual adjustments of phasing to fiddle with. No extra equipment
needed at remote pick -up points. Here's how the GENLOCK works.
Located in your main studio, this simple unit compares the signal
of your remote sync generator with the signal of your local sync
generator. The difference in the phasing of the pulses produces an
"error" signal which locks your local generator as a "slave" to your
remote generator as a master. This enables you to treat remote
signals as local signals -and switch back and forth without picture
"roll- over," no matter where your program originates!
The RCA GENLOCK is simple in design, completely automatic in
operation-"locks-in" much faster than you can switch. It fits any
standard 19-inch TV rack.
Give your programming a lift. Switch as you please between
programs for variety and for special effects. It's easy with a GENLOCK.
For more information call your RCA TV equipment representative.
Or write Dept. 19AE, RCA Engineering Products, Camden, N. J.
.
Z
tightly locks your local and
remote sync generators together -instantaneously and automatically.
GENLOCK
This is
the simple, automatic system that electrically locks two separate television
pick-up systems together.
RCA GENLOCK, Type TG -45.
TELEVISION BROADCAST EQUIPMENT
RA®/® CORPORATION
of AMERICA
ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT, CAMDEN,N.J.
In Canada: RCA VICTOR Company Limited, Montreal
www.americanradiohistory.com
1-"P
VI"
ot
levision St
ns
in Latin Ame 'ca, RCA Equippe
jeft
New Transmitters add millions
to audience of TV- the New Teacher
ONE YEAR AGO there were five television transmitters
supplied by RCA in operation, or on order, in Latin
America. Today nine are completed or planned for early
inauguration, all RCA equipped. These are: three in
Mexico; three in Cuba; two in Brazil; one in the
Dominican Republic.
RCA is First in Television in the U.S.A.... and in all
the Americas.
RCA welcomes creative video talent around the world
... as Television the New Teacher helps to advance educational programs of nations both old and new.
Your RCA Distributor will be glad to keep you fully
informed on RCA television, or write the RCA International Division.
First in Radio
-
RCA I
First in Sound
Television receivers embody the experience of over 2,000,000 instruments in use
in the U.S.A., Canada, and Latin America.
RCA
- World Leader in Television
NATIONAL DIVISION
RADIO
CORPORATION of AMER/CA
RCA BUILDING
30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, N.Y. U.S.A.
77
a
rF:,
AIqF
ppOhTS
X.
,NSFORMERS
Ts
IOX,
NOTE._
ALL WEIGHTS
ARE APPROX.
500
www.americanradiohistory.com
LBS
THE drawings spread across these pages are layouts
Typical 2 -kw TV station layout
for
VHF (ERP
range,
2
to 20 kw)
A low -cost arrangement for
getting up to 20 kw ERP
with an RCA high -gain
antenna. The installation
includes: an RCA 2 -kw transmitter, control console, trans-
mitter monitoring equip-
ment, audio equipment, sync
generator, video equipment,
and power supplies.
of typical TV transmitter rooms using RCA equipment. They are prepared expressly for TV station
planners in accordance with the best engineering
practice known today. Each plan represents the basic
or minimum TV transmitter room equipment needed
to get "on the air" for a specific power. Each indicates
the approximate space needed for the equipment
including approximate weights of individual units.
Each provides wide flexibility for equipment rearrangements to meet the special or future requirements of individual stations.
"Ready -to-use" plans like these are just one of
RCA's many television services now available to you
through your RCA Sales Representative. For a
complete engineering analysis of your station requirement;, call this expert. He can show you exactly
what you will need to get "on the air" for a minimum
investment.
-
Effective radiated power
ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT
CAMDEN, N.J.
Radio beams
Radio beams never ice. The invisible
beam of the RCA Microwave system can
provide reliable communication channels
through ice storms, lightning, wind, sleet
and even amid falling trees.
Repeater stations, usually built on hilltops, spanning distances up to thirty -five
miles, provide signal paths over mountains, rivers, swamps and rolling countryside. Each station picks up microwaves
from its neighbor and focuses them like
a searchlight at the next station. RCA
Microwave systems eliminate pole lines,
simplify right -of-way problems, eliminate line maintenance expense and cost
ice!
locations which are inaccessible for
periods of several months.
Are you missing a bet on RCA Microwave? It is being used by power and light
companies, telegraph companies, highway commissions, game commissions,
pipeline companies and many others.
RCA Microwave is quick and easy to install. If you need reliable communications
that can span long distances over any
terrain and through all kinds of weather,
let an RCA engineer survey your situation. Find out how RCA Microwave can
Designed for unattended operation,
help solve your communication problem. Investigate today.
RCA Microwave can be installed at
You'll find RCA Service Ens' leers with U. S. Air, Land and Sea Forces.
less per mile than any other type of
system with comparable communication
facilities.
RCA Microwave with its "multiplexing" system can do many other things
than provide two-way voice communication. RCA Microwave can provide for
remote control of switchgear, telemeter ing (transmitting pictures of voltage,
current, power and pressure meter readings), teleprinter, facsimile and many
other services.
RADIO CORP RAT/ON of AMER /CA
ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT, CAMDEN, N.J.
It plays -45's, 331/3 fine- grooves', 33'/3 standards', 78 standards'
l.t.o
The All -New RCA Pick -up and Tone Arm
installed on a 70 -D turntable.
t
`1
r PICK-UP... one arm, all speeds!
RCA's All -New Tone Arm -with magnetic lateral
plug -in heads -fits all standard turntables. Only
two heads are needed for all speeds.
...
This versatile pick -up and tone arm combination
installed on your turntable ... can play every record and
transcription in your library. Just plug in the head for
the right record groove -and spin the platter. It's as easy
as that.
Designed for studio- quality at all standard speeds, this
unique system has outstanding features over previous
types. For instance, plug -in magnetic heads need no adjustments for stylus pressure. Vsibility of the stylus (from
the top of the head) permir accurate groove-spotting.
AUDIO E
Anti-friction pivots and low inertia provide easy tracking
on eccentric and warped records. Lower weight assures
better record service -longer stylus life. Tracking error of
the arm is less than 4 degrees.
Arm assembly MI -11885 is complete with tone arm,
mounting plate, hardware, and the filter modification kit
MI -11874 (for 70-series turntables).
You use plug -in head MI -t 1874 -4 with the -mil stylus
for fine -groove records. You use plug-in head MI- 11874 -5
with the 21/2-mil stylus for standard transcriptions and
78 rpm records.
Order from your RCA Broadcast Sales Engineer, or
direct from Dept. O -7, RCA Engineering Products,
1
Camden, New Jersey.
)AD CAST EQUIPMENT
RADA.. CORPORATION of AMER/CA
ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DEPARTMENT, CAMDEN, N.J.
In Canada: RC A VICTOR Company Limited, Montreal
2.1623.
www.americanradiohistory.com
--111ENIK11
BRQADVIST NEWS
ISItijilDVIST NEWS
BMWS?
111110.446MMIIILMP±iilla
NEWS
IIMIDANST NEWS
BIRWIDVIST NEWS
BRO4INIST NEWS
k/fr
a
e
RCA
an."
umpaor,
t
s
111.11111111111111111
N
SWAMI
IKAVMs.
kt
I
tar lorep.n411,
(*v.,.
llterge Ce.inak, km. Corisol.
I
,
14/
.1..
-411111111111L
-
BRowsT
NEWS
ISITADIAST NEWS
BROADVIST NEWS
lawfavisr NEWS
BROIDVIST NEUS
Nmcior,
t\
ICA
kin*
(oo.d.t.
Altalor
laa
-31110=IMINA
RIZOKIST NEWS
RI
Aare..
Caomponlwa... Camilos
.1
SC
as
,
REWS BROADCAST REWS
BROADCAST RE1115 BROADCAST
BRUADOST NEWS BRU
It
LW Uri
..
o
Ito
PRono CJITT iTup
BRaill1Ç
Blom Has
BROADCAST 11E115
EIRNOCAST flET5
I
--
ST 11EILIS
5
BROADCAST fl
6
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement