Essential Single-Family Rehabilitation Loan Pool

Essential Single-Family Rehabilitation Loan Pool
Administrator’s Manual
North Carolina Housing Finance Agency
Essential Single-Family Rehabilitation Loan Pool (ESFRLP16)
Revised August, 2016
North Carolina Housing Finance Agency
3508 Bush Street
Raleigh, NC 27609
Phone: 919/877-5700
FAX: 919/877-5599
Website: nchfa.com
ESSENTIAL SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION LOAN POOL
ADMINISTRATOR’S MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PROGRAM GUIDELINES
Page
SECTION 1. INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND……….……………….………….…. 3
SECTION 2. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS .............................................................................. 7
2.1
Eligible Activities ............................................................................................. 7
2.2
Eligible Uses of Funds ..................................................................................... 7
2.3
Forms of Assistance ......................................................................................... 9
2.4
Eligible Households ......................................................................................... 9
Eligible Units .................................................................................................. 11
2.5
2.6
Essential Rehabilitation Criteria .................................................................. 11
2.7
Environmental Standards ............................................................................. 12
2.8
Household Relocation .................................................................................... 12
SECTION 3. PROJECT FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION .................................................... 14
3.1
Funding Agreement ....................................................................................... 14
Reservations and Disbursements ................................................................. 15
3.2
3.3
Recipient Accounts ........................................................................................ 17
3.4
Program Income ............................................................................................ 17
3.5
Accounting System Requirements ................................................................ 18
3.6
Recordkeeping ................................................................................................ 18
Procurement ................................................................................................... 19
3.7
3.8
Financial Audit Requirements ..................................................................... 21
3.9
Project Monitoring by the Member ............................................................. 21
3.10 Project Reporting .......................................................................................... 22
3.11 Project Monitoring by the Agency ............................................................... 23
3.12 Project Close-Out .......................................................................................... 24
SECTION 4. LOAN PROCESSING REQUIREMENTS ........................................................... 26
4.1
Selecting Applicants ...................................................................................... 26
4.2
Rehabilitation Procedures ............................................................................ 28
4.3
Program Documents ...................................................................................... 31
4.4
General Loan and Grant Procedures .......................................................... 33
4.5
Preparing Loan Documents .......................................................................... 35
4.6
Loan Closing Procedures .............................................................................. 36
4.7
Loan Disbursement Procedures ................................................................... 36
Loan Close-out Procedures ........................................................................... 37
4.8
INDEX to the Administrator’s Manual
(Following page 38)
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APPENDIX
A. ESSENTIAL REHABILITATION CRITERIA
Section:
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
Introduction
General Requirements
Essential Property Standards
Essential Rehabilitation Standards
Environmental Protection
Lead-Based Paint Requirements
B. INCOME LIMITS
C. PROGRAM FORMS AND DOCUMENTS


Unit Management Workbook
Unit Management Forms:
1. Instructions
2. Project Data
3. Loan Application & Reservation Request
4. Environmental Screening and Instructions
5. SHPO – Historical Evaluation
6. Post Rehabilitation Value Certification
7. Homeowner Written Agreement
8. Settlement Data Sheet
9. Requisition for HOME Funds and Invoice Log
10. Unit Completion Report (UCR)







Written Agreement (Member/Contractor)
Contract for Rehabilitation
Release of Liens
Request for Project Amendment
Lead-Based Paint Requirement Worksheet
Essential Property Standards Checklist
Certification of Completion and Final Cost (CCFC)
2
SECTION 1. INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND
1.1
Introduction. 2016 marks the twenty third year since the beginning of the Single Family
Rehabilitation Program as the Agency’s primary program for comprehensive rehabilitation
of owner occupied homes. Since the Program’s creation, a total of $132,250,184 has been
committed to rehabilitate 3,896 homes in the state.
Throughout this period, the program has evolved and changed in response to internal
program evaluation and to feedback offered by recipient organizations -- both individually
and through small, user roundtables convened for that purpose. This year we have
introduced additional changes to better meet the needs of our partners by focusing on
essential and critical repairs. These changes include:
1)
Name changed to include “Essential” starting with the 2016 cycle (e.g.,
SFRLP16 to ESFRLP16);
2) Minimum property standard modified to address essential, critical repairs for
health, safety, reasonable energy-efficiency measures, and life-expectancy of
major building systems;
3) Maximum hard cost per unit reduced from $45,000 to $25,000;
4) Established a maximum soft cost per unit at $10,000;
5) Expanded special needs eligibility to include Veteran households;
6) Expanded service areas to include all of North Carolina except the cities of
Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, Raleigh and Winston-Salem;
7) Added the three entitlement counties to the three year rotation;
8) Increased Member Set Aside from $170,000 to $175,000;
9) Added Section 3 reporting for Members that amend their contracts with the
Agency above $200,000;
10) Added a first-come, first-served “limited pool” to reimburse soft cost
expenses for assisted units that do not meet the ESFRLP Property Standard
due to no fault of the Member; and,
11) Added risk based monitoring goals per project for case file desk top reviews
and field unit monitoring visits.
While most of the goals and objectives did not change (i.e., to serve seniors and disabled
home owners, to promote aging-in-place, energy-efficiency and lead-safety, etc.), the
program rehabilitation standards and maximum costs per unit changed in numerous ways.
Personnel with years of SFR experience are strongly encouraged to read these guidelines
carefully and work with their Agency case managers closely to ensure compliance with the
Program Guidelines.
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Some changes will be seen by Members as major improvements. The continuation of the
three-year funding cycle ESFRLP goes far in furthering the ideal of steady-state rehab
funding and continuity of local efforts. There is the real possibility that a given county
might have rehab assistance opportunities available continuously over time to serve its
neediest homeowners. Local and regional rehab organizations can recruit rehab specialists,
attract contractors and market their services to the community with assurance that they
have a fair chance of being able to do so on a continuous basis. Similar to past SFRLP
cycles, a first-come, first-served “pool” of funds is available for ESFRLP. These funds
may be accessed after a Member has completed two (2) units under its initial allocation.
Groups with the capacity to use their $175,000 allocations within 18 months will be able,
with reasonable limitations, to keep rehabilitating additional homes until the pool funds
($2.05 million in 2016) are all committed. It is hoped that this will help more productive
Members do more work without penalizing groups that work at a slower pace. Of equal
importance, it should mean that all the funds committed to the program will be invested,
and more low-income homeowners will be helped. The inclusion of most CDBG
Entitlement communities and the revised Essential Property Standard will provide
Members with increased local flexibility to reach more families and provide critical repairs.
As always, we hope you will share with us your ideas about the future of the Program.
Please let us know, as specifically as possible, what your community needs, how the current
program does or does not meet your needs, and what we might do to improve it. Please
keep in touch with your case manager and allow him or her to help you through whatever
Program-related challenges you may face.
1.2
Program Goals and Objectives. The primary goal of the Essential Single-Family
Housing Rehabilitation Loan Pool (ESFRLP) is to encourage the essential rehabilitation of
scattered-site single-family housing units owned and occupied by very low- and lowincome homeowners with special needs.
The objectives of ESFRLP are:
1) to promote equitable distribution of Program funds across the state;
2) to serve elderly, disabled and Veteran households and households with a child
under the age of six whose health is threatened by the presence of lead hazards,
with incomes at or below eighty percent (80%) of area median incomes;
4
3)
4)
5)
6)
to facilitate aging in place amongst elderly and disabled fulltime household
members of eligible dwelling units through accessibility modifications;
to promote the long-term affordability and lower operating costs of ESFRLPassisted units through cost-effective, energy-efficiency measures;
to facilitate the continued development of rehabilitation management skills
among recipient organizations across the entire state; and,
to ensure that all available program funds are invested within the limited time
available.
The Essential Rehabilitation Criteria ensures that each assisted unit will make a positive
impact on the state’s housing stock by providing decent, safe, affordable housing.
1.3
How To Use This Manual. Your Administrator’s Manual contains program guidelines
along with many of the forms and documents needed to successfully manage your project
under ESFRLP16. For your convenience, all forms and documents can now be found
online at NCHFA’s website: http://www.nchfa.com/homeownershippartners/community-partners/community-programs/single-family-rehabilitation-loanpool/forms-and-resources . Scroll down to ESFRLP16 once you have clicked the link
and the web-page opens. An alphabetical, cross-referenced index is provided at the end
of the Program Guidelines (following page 39). It is a useful tool for finding all
significant references to subjects of interest. For example, if you needed to review
Program requirements regarding final inspections of rehabilitated properties, you could
find the relevant information by looking under either “close-out procedures,” “final
inspections”, or “inspections, final”. Each listing would direct you to several different
locations in the Program Guidelines (listed by section number) where final inspection
requirements are mentioned or discussed. Members are encouraged to call, write or
email the Agency with any questions regarding interpretation of Program Guidelines.
The Agency has assigned a case manager to serve as your primary contact person for
matters relating to SFRLP.
All correspondence should be directed to your case manager. Case managers are:
Housing Rehabilitation Officer, Chuck Dopler, 919-981-5008 or email
[email protected], Community Development Coordinator, Donna Coleman, 919-9815006 or email [email protected] and Manager of Housing Rehabilitation, Michael
Handley, 919-877-5627 or email [email protected] Mr. Handley also serves as
ESFRLP program coordinator for the Agency.
Other key Agency-ESFRLP staff are Manager of Strategic Investment Services, Sonia
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Joyner, 919-877-5630 or email, [email protected], Senior Program Compliance
Coordinator, Mark Lindquist, 919-501-4263 or [email protected] who reviews
ESFRLP case file desk audits, reports and documents to help monitor compliance with
Program Guidelines and project timelines, Senior Program Documentation Specialist,
Deborah Hamilton, 919-877-5709 or email [email protected] who processes all
ESFRLP documentation and requisitions for funds, and Administrative Assistant, Amy
Batel, 919-877-5689 or [email protected]
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SECTION 2. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
2.1
1.
2.
2.2
1.
Eligible Activities
Members may use Program funds to effect the rehabilitation of owner-occupied
site-built or modular dwelling units in accordance with the Member’s approved
Application for Funding and these Program Guidelines. New construction and
replacement housing are not eligible.
Manufactured housing units that are real property are eligible for rehabilitation if
they meet all other program requirements. (See Section 4.1.4.3, Property
Requirements for a definition of “permanently affixed”.)
Eligible Uses of Funds
ESFRLP will utilize funds from the HOME Investment Partnerships Program
(HOME), only. (Note: The C.F.D.A. number for the HOME Program is 14.239.) The
maximum amount of Program assistance, excluding soft costs to any housing unit
cannot exceed $25,000. Variances from this maximum will be considered on a case
by-case basis where certain exceptional expenditures, such as water and/or sewer
installations or excessive lead-based paint remediation costs are necessary.
2.
The minimum amount of Program funds that can be spent on rehabilitation hard
costs for any assisted dwelling unit is five thousand dollars ($5,000).
3.
Members must ensure that each dwelling unit assisted will meet all requirements of
Essential Rehabilitation Criteria. Other Program hard cost expenditures are limited
to work items consistent with Section 2.2.4, Eligible Uses of Funds.
4.
Program funds may be used to pay for hard costs, including the cost of temporary
relocation, and soft costs.
1)
Eligible rehabilitation hard costs are costs necessary to:
i)
Meet the more stringent of local minimum housing code or the
Essential Property Standard;
ii)
Meet the requirements of HUD’s final regulation on Lead-Based
Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Housing and Housing Receiving
Federal Assistance, published September 15, 1999 in 24 CFR 35 for
the remediation of lead-based paint hazards. (See Appendix A
ESFRLP Rehabilitation Standards), Section F;
7
iii)
iv)
2)
(reserved)
Eliminate threats to the health or safety of occupants, and to the
structural integrity of the dwelling unit;
v)
Install (where practicable) new or replacement items in accordance
with “Universal Design” principles, including wheelchairaccessible outlets and switches, wider doors, curbless entries, and a
barrier-free corridor connecting bedrooms, baths, kitchens and
living rooms, etc. (Refer to the publication “Residential
Rehabilitation, Remodeling and Universal Design” available at
http://www.ncsu.edu/ncsu/design/cud/pubs_p/docs/residential_rem
odelinl.pdf for further information.);
vi)
Take reasonable measures to strengthen homes against natural
disasters such as wild fire, flooding, and in coastal areas, hurricane
force winds;
vii)
Make other eligible improvements to dwelling units; and
viii) Pay for reasonable, temporary relocation costs in accordance with
Agency-approved written relocation plan. (See Section 2.8,
Household Relocation).
ESFRLP soft costs are the reasonable and necessary support costs directly
associated with the rehabilitation of eligible units. Soft costs are paid on a
unit-by-unit basis in accordance with the ESFRLP Member’s Agencyapproved ESFRLP Budget for Soft Costs, as referenced in the Funding
Agreement and cannot exceed $10,000. Potential eligible Soft Costs
include:
 Outreach & Advertising
 Environmental Review Preparation
 Asbestos Testing/Clearance
 Radon Testing
 LBP Inspection/Risk Assessment
 LBP Clearance
 Loan Document Execution; recording & legal fees
 Pre-rehab Inspection including scope of work
 Work Write-ups
 Cost Estimate
 Project & Construction Management
 Flood Insurance (units in Flood Hazard Zones)
 Post-rehab Value Certification
8
3)
4)
5)
2.3
1.
2.
2.4
1.
ESFRLP funds may not be used to pay for administrative expenses.
No ESFRLP funds may be used to rehabilitate housing units that have been
rehabilitated with $25,000 or more of State or Federal funds within the
previous ten years without the prior written consent of the Agency.
ESFRLP Members may request reimbursement of soft cost expenses for
assisted units that do not meet the Essential Rehabilitation Criteria due to
no fault of the Member. A first-come, first-served “limited pool” of funds
has been set aside for this purpose. Members may receive only partial
reimbursement of their expenses or no reimbursement if the pool is
exhausted.
Forms of Assistance
ESFRLP assistance covering only the hard costs of rehabilitation will be provided
to eligible homeowners in the form of interest-free loans secured by a Deed of
Trust, forgiven at the rate of $3,000 per year, until the principal balance is reduced
to zero. Soft costs associated with SFR-assisted units will be granted to
homeowners.
Agency-prepared loan (Promissory Note and Deed of Trust) and grant (Grant
Agreement) documents for each unit to be assisted under ESFRLP shall be provided
to Members, by the Agency, for execution by the Homeowner, following receipt,
by the Agency, of information necessary to complete the referenced documents
from the Member. The Member shall submit the necessary information to the
Agency by completing the “Settlement Data Sheet” (see Unit Management
Workbook).
Eligible Households
No household with a gross annual income exceeding eighty percent (80%) of the
area median, as determined by HUD and provided by the Agency, with adjustments
for family size, can occupy units assisted under ESFRLP. Members must select
Program beneficiaries in a manner consistent with their Agency-approved
Assistance Policy, which must allow for assistance to households with elderly,
disabled or Veteran fulltime household members, or to households with a child
under the age of six whose health is threatened by the presence of lead hazards in
the unit, exclusively. Documentation used to determine income eligibility must be
current, that is, within 6 months of the date on which funds are committed to the
unit. (Funds are committed to a unit on the date which the “Written Agreement”
9
(see Unit Management Workbook) between the Homeowner and the Member is
executed. See Section 3.2.1, Reservations and Disbursements for additional
information on the Homeowner Written Agreement.
2.
Income Limits for applicants for ESFRLP assistance are based on the estimates of
county median household incomes published by HUD, with adjustments for
household size. Each year Members must use updated income limits and amend
their assistance policies to reflect updated income limits as published by HUD
annually.
3.
Annual Income is the anticipated gross annual income from all sources received by
the family head and spouse (even if temporarily absent) and by each additional
member of the family, including all net income derived from assets for the 12month period following the effective date of certification of income, exclusive of
certain types of income. “Anticipated” means projecting future income based on
current circumstances, which may include recent job loss, recent promotion etc.
Gross annual income of households for ESFRLP must be calculated in accordance
with the part 5 definition of annual income as found at the following link
https://www.onecpd.info/incomecalculator/. Should the calculator be unreliable
refer to the Office of Affordable Housing Program’s “Technical Guide for
determining income and allowances for the HOME Program.”
4.
Members must use the calculator provided at this site and place a copy of calculated
results in case file, or place a copy of worksheets used to determine income
eligibility in the case file. If it is not feasible to anticipate a level of income over a
twelve (12) month period, the income anticipated over a shorter period may be
annualized, subject to a redetermination at the end of the shorter period. Members
must examine at least two months of source documentation (wage statements,
interest statements, or unemployment compensation documentation) when
determining household income for all potential HOME beneficiaries (HOME Final
Rule 2013: 24 CFR 92.203).
5.
Members must have a fair, systematic and uniform policy (written into their
assistance policy) for responding to appeals from applicants who have been denied
assistance under ESFRLP, pursuant to (Section 4.8.4, Loan Closeout Procedures).
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2.5
1.
Eligible Units
Members must certify prior to committing funds to a unit that the value of the
property (assisted unit) after rehabilitation will not exceed the most recent HUD
issued limits that represent 95% of the area median purchase price for existing
single-family housing units. NCHFA has updated the ESFRLP Unit Workbooks
incorporating these new limits. Please use the updated workbooks for all future
ESFRLP units located on the NCHFA website (HOME Final Rule 2013: 24 CFR
92.254).
2.
Rental units are not eligible under ESFRLP. However, the following are
acceptable forms of homeownership: a) Inherited property with multiple owners1;
b) Life estate2; c) Inter vivos trust3, also known as a living trust; and d)
Beneficiary deed4; (HOME Final Rule 2013, 24 CFR 92.254).
3.
Assisted units, upon completion, must meet the Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
without exceeding the ESFRLP hard cost limit ($25,000).
2.6
1.
Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
All units assisted with any HOME funding from ESFRLP must, upon completion,
meet the Essential Rehabilitation Criteria. The Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
incorporates either the local minimum property standards or the Essential
Rehabilitation Property Standard which exceeds HUD’s Section 8 Housing
Quality Standards and Uniform Physical Condition Standards, Environmental
1 Inherited property. Inherited property with multiple owners: Housing for which title has been passed to several individuals by
inheritance, but not all heirs reside in the housing sharing ownership with other nonresident heirs. (The occupant of the housing
has a divided ownership interest.) The participating jurisdiction may assist the owner-occupant if the occupant is low-income,
occupies the housing as his or her principal residence, and pays all the costs associated with ownership and maintenance of the
housing (e.g., mortgage, taxes, insurance, utilities).
2 Life estate. The person who has the life estate has the right to live in the housing for the remainder of his or her life and does
not pay rent. The participating jurisdiction may assist the person holding the life estate if the person is low-income and occupies
the housing as his or her principal residence.
3 Inter vivos trust, also known as a living trust. A living trust is created during the lifetime of a person. A living trust is created
when the owner of the trust holds legal title and the beneficiary holds equitable title. The person may name him or herself as the
beneficiary. The trustee is under a fiduciary responsibility to hold and manage the trust assets for the beneficiary. The
participating jurisdiction may assist if all beneficiaries of the trust qualify as a low-income family and occupy the property as
their principal residence (except that contingent beneficiaries, who receive no benefit from the trust nor have any control over the
trust assets until the beneficiary is deceased, need not be low-income). The trust must be valid and enforceable and ensure that
each beneficiary has the legal right to occupy the property for the remainder of his or her life.
4 Beneficiary deed. A beneficiary deed conveys an interest in real property, including any debt secured by a lien on real
property, to a grantee beneficiary designated by the owner and that expressly states that the deed is effective on the death of the
owner. Upon the death of the owner, the grantee beneficiary receives ownership in the property, subject to all conveyances,
assignments, contracts, mortgages, deeds of trust, liens, security pledges, and other encumbrances made by the owner or to which
the owner was subject during the owner’s lifetime. The participating jurisdiction may assist if the owner qualifies as low-income
and the owner occupies the property as his or her principal residence.
11
Standards consistent with federal HOME program requirements, as well as
additional standards for energy-efficiency.
2.7
1.
2.8
1.
2.
Environmental Standards
In selecting dwelling units for rehabilitation assistance, and in determining the
scope of work for each unit selected, Members must consider and mitigate any
significant threats from, or threats to the environment. An Environmental
Checklist must be completed and submitted to the Agency in accordance with the
instructions at the top of the checklist, prior to committing funds to a unit. The
environmental review process is described in the Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
under section E, Environmental Protection.
Household Temporary Relocation
The Member’s Assistance Policy may allow for the temporary relocation of
beneficiary households where necessary to facilitate construction activities or to
protect the household from dangers inherent in the construction process (such as
lead-based paint dust and temporary structural instability). Voluntary, temporary
relocation at homeowner’s expense may be included as a condition of
participation or allowed as an option where temporary relocation would be
required, so long as the requirement is uniformly applied in all cases. No project
activities shall result in permanent displacement of households.
Households selected for ESFRLP rehabilitation assistance may be temporarily
displaced (relocated) using Program funds if:
a.
The Member has incorporated into its Assistance Policy (and
submitted to the Agency for approval) a written plan specifying
terms and conditions of relocation assistance and ensuring
temporarily relocated households access to standard temporary
housing at reasonable cost to the Program;
b.
The Agency has approved the Member’s relocation plan in writing;
and,
c.
There is a documented need for temporary displacement
(relocation) of a household. (e.g. due to lead-based paint abatement
or lead hazard reduction activities, asbestos removal, “gut”
rehabilitation, etc.) Occupant protection requirements for work
involving lead-based paint must be adhered to and are detailed in
24 CFR 35.1345. (See Essential Rehabilitation Criteria, Section F,
12
“Lead-Based Paint (LBP) Requirements”).
3.
ESFRLP-eligible temporary relocation expenses are limited to reimbursement of
reasonable out-of-pocket expenses incurred by relocated households in connection
with temporary relocation, including the cost of moving to and from the
temporarily occupied housing, and any cost associated with the rent of the
temporarily occupied housing and storage space necessary to protect home
furnishings and effects.
4.
Households to be temporarily relocated during construction activities, whether at
personal or Program expense, should be given reasonable, advance-written notice
of the date and approximate duration of the temporary relocation.
5.
Households to be temporarily relocated at Program expense should also be
advised in writing of:
1)
The location of any known suitable, decent, safe and sanitary
dwellings which may be made available for the temporary period;
2)
The terms and conditions under which the household may
reoccupy their dwelling unit; and
3)
The provisions of Section 2.8.3, regarding relocation.
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SECTION 3. PROJECT FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION
3.1
1.
Funding Agreement
“Members” are those organizations which have access to the ESFRLP16 “Pool”
for which a funding allocation has been set aside under ESFRLP16. All Members
must sign a Funding Agreement (the “Agreement”) with the Agency before funds
will be released for disbursement. The Funding Agreement is a contract between
the Agency and the Member. It will identify the amount of funding allocated to
the Member and allow them access to the ESFRLP16 Pool. It also specifies the
proposed use of the funds, the effective date of the Agreement, and the required
Date of Completion.
2.
Before executing a Funding Agreement, the Member must adopt written policies
and procedures meeting Program requirements. These policies and procedures
must include:
1)
The Member’s financial management system;
2)
The Member’s Agency-approved Assistance Policy governing eligibility
and priority for Program assistance see Section 4.1.2 and,
3)
The Member’s rehabilitation management system, including its written
procurement and disbursement policies, specific to ESFRLP16.
3.
The Funding Agreement is subject to these ESFRLP Program Guidelines which
are incorporated into the Agreement by reference. These Guidelines may be
revised by the Agency and revisions will be forwarded to the Member and made
part of the Agreement.
4.
The Agency may terminate the Funding Agreement before the Date of
Completion if it determines the Member has failed to comply with the conditions
of the Agreement or has failed to implement its project consistent with the
approved Application for Funding, Post Approval Documentation or Assistance
Policy.
5.
The Agency or the Member may terminate the Funding Agreement prior to the
Date of Completion by mutual consent with 60 days notice to the other party, or
as otherwise provided by law, when both parties agree that continuation would
not produce beneficial results commensurate with the further expenditure of
funds.
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6.
Members are not permitted to assign all or any part of their interest in the Funding
Agreement or delegate any duty or obligation under the Agreement without the
prior written approval of the Agency.
7.
Changes to the Member’s approved, written Assistance Policy and/or
procurement policy, staff assignments, and/or sources or amounts of other funds
leveraged must be approved in advance by the Agency. Proposed changes must
be submitted via the ESFRLP form Request for Project Amendment with an
explanation of the reasons for, and/or advantages of, the proposed change.
Requests regarding a proposed change in staffing must be accompanied by
resumes of any staff members (or consultants) proposed for ESFRLP roles who
were not identified in the Member’s original, approved Application for Funding.
8.
Proposed changes will be reviewed with regard to how the change(s) would affect
the Member’s original Application for Funding rating score, if applicable. If a
proposed change would result in a loss of rating points, another rating factor
should be changed to affect a comparable increase in points such that no net loss
of points would result.
9.
If a net loss in rating points results from a Member’s proposed amendment, the
reasons given for the proposed change(s) will be critical to the success of the
request.
10.
Failure to fulfill the terms of the Funding Agreement will result in sanctions and
penalties which may affect future applications for funding, and which will, at the
Agency’s discretion, apply to the Member and to any key personnel on the project
(and, if applicable, to any firms and individuals contracted to manage the project,
or any part of the project).
3.2
1.
Reservations and Disbursements
Once a Member has selected the units to be assisted under ESFRLP, the Member
then submits a Loan Application and Reservation Request with the following
attachments (see Unit Management Workbook) for each unit: the Environmental
Screening Checklist, the Historical Evaluation Form and SHPO Response, if
applicable, the Post-Rehabilitation Property Value Certification and the
Homeowner Written Agreement. The Agency then conducts a title search and
environmental review and notifies the Member of the results. Once the Member
receives approval from the Agency they may proceed with the rehabilitation
15
process.
2.
Under the original set-aside of $175,000, each Member may reserve funds, for at
least 5 units, by submitting the above-stated, required documents to the Agency.
Members have until December 31, 2017 to reserve funds under their original setaside. Any funds not reserved by that date will be returned to the ESFRLP16 Pool
and made available to all Members. Funds for additional units may be reserved
from the pool on a unit-by-unit, first-come, first-served basis after the Member has
completed two (2) units under ESFRLP16. No funds may be reserved after
December 31, 2018 and all units must be completed and closed out by June 30,
2019.
3.
Prior to submitting the first requisition for funds, each Member must submit a
completed Signatory Form and Certification card and Direct Deposit form to the
Agency with its Post Approval Documentation packet.
4.
Reserved
5.
Disbursements of ESFRLP funds will be made to Members by electronic transfer
or by check, once a completed and authorized Requisition for HOME Program
Funds and Invoice Log have been received by the Agency. The final requisition
for hard and/or soft costs for a unit shall be processed only when the requisition is
accompanied by the completed IDIS Activity Completion Report section found at
the top of the Unit Completion Report, in the Unit Management Workbook. The
final requisition is that requisition which, if processed, causes a $0.00 balance in
the unit account.
6.
A Unit Completion Report must be submitted for each completed dwelling unit,
within 60 days of the final drawdown of funds for that unit (i.e., from the date on
the check from the Agency).
7.
Unless instructed otherwise, all unit completion forms shall be sent to Senior
Program Compliance Coordinator, Mark Lindquist at the Agency.
8.
Failure of the Member to comply with any requirements of these Guidelines may
result in suspension of disbursements, a reduction in the amount of Program monies
available and/or other sanctions listed at Section 3.11.5.
16
3.3
1.
Recipient Accounts
The Member shall establish a Federally-insured master account to hold all ESFRLP
funds. Once ESFRLP funds are received, they MUST be expended for eligible costs
within twelve (12) days. Any interest earned within the twelve-day period must be
treated as program income per Section 3.4, below.
2.
Any funds that are “drawn down” and not expended for eligible costs within twelve
days MUST be returned to the Agency, immediately. Any SFRLP funds held
beyond the 12-day period will be subject to Agency-imputed interest charges.
3.
ESFRLP funds for soft costs may be paid from the Member’s account only after a
written agreement (see Written Agreement Member/Contractor) has been entered
into between the Member and the entity receiving payment. (e.g. If a consultant is
to receive payment for a work write-up, or a lead inspector is to receive payment
for a lead inspection, then there must be a written agreement between the Member
and the entity providing the service, prior to the disbursement of funds to that
entity.) Any such agreement must at a minimum contain a scope of work, an
amount to be paid for the services and a schedule with a deadline for completing
the tasks. (see Section 3.7.3.2, below)
4.
Furthermore, hard costs for the actual rehabilitation of a unit may be paid from a
Member’s account only after the following:
1)
A Note (in the full amount of hard costs) and Deed of Trust have been
properly executed and the Deed of Trust has been properly recorded by the
Register of Deeds (see Section 4.8, below); and
2)
A Contract for Rehabilitation has been executed between the Homeowner
and the contractor undertaking the work.
3.4
1.
2.
Program Income
Program income is income from monies deposited in interest-bearing accounts and
ESFRLP loan payments received. Matching funds are not considered Program
income.
All program income must be credited to the Member’s ESFRLP account and treated
as part of its ESFRLP allocation. Any net program income not used for eligible
Program activities must be paid to the Agency, along with any unused ESFRLP
funds on hand, at the time of submitting a Certification of Completion and Final
17
Cost form (CCFC). Also, any undisbursed balance of the Member’s ESFRLP award
will be de-obligated after receipt by the Agency of the Member’s CCFC.
3.5
1.
2.
3.6
1.
2.
Accounting System Requirements
Members must establish and maintain a system (consistent with financial
information reported on Unit Completion Reports, ESFRLP Requisitions and
Invoice Logs) to account for ESFRLP funds separately from funds received from
other sources.
The accounting system must provide for:
1)
Accurate, current and complete disclosure of the financial condition and
financial results of the Project in accordance with the reporting
requirements herein;
2)
Records that adequately identify the source and application of funds for
activities supported by ESFRLP (These records must contain information
pertaining to ESFRLP Project awards and authorizations, obligations,
unobligated balances, assets, liabilities, expenditures and income);
3)
Effective internal control over, and accountability for, all funds received
under the Funding Agreement (for example there should be a system
whereby ESFRLP contract amendments, or change orders are approved by
more than one staff member to ensure against impropriety);
4)
Comparison of actual expenditures with budgeted amounts for the Project;
5)
Accounting records that are supported by source documentation (e.g.,
invoices, receipts or contracts); and,
6)
Systematic methods to ensure timely and appropriate resolution of audit
and/or monitoring findings, concerns and recommendations.
Recordkeeping
The Member must maintain financial records (including copies of all Unit
Completion Reports and the Certification of Completion and Final Cost form), case
files (See Section 4.3, Program Documents, below), statistical records and all other
records pertinent to the Project for five (5) years from the date of the project
closeout letter from the Agency. All records must be sufficient to determine
compliance with the requirements and objectives of the Program.
The record retention period starts from the date of the close-out letter. If any
litigation, claim or audit starts before the expiration of the five years, the records
must be retained until all litigation, claims or
18
3.
3.7
1.
Financial records must be made available to the Agency immediately upon request
for the purpose of making audits, examinations or reports. All invoices, vouchers,
statements of cost and records pertaining to the disbursement of Program funds and
Project-related matching funds are subject to audit by the Agency. Failure to
comply with this requirement will result in the Agency taking one or more of the
actions identified in Section 3.11.5 below.
Procurement
Members may not incur any Project costs until a Funding Agreement between the
Member and the Agency has been executed.
2.
Members must establish written ESFRLP-specific procurement procedures
consistent with Section 4.2, which provides that proposed procurement and
contracting actions will be properly managed. Said procedures must specify how
all procurement activities will be conducted so as to promote fair, open/transparent
competition to the maximum practicable extent. The procurement procedures shall
be approved by Agency staff prior to adoption by the Member.
3.
Contract Documents
1)
Members must use and retain written contracts with all firms providing
services for work under the Program. The Member must include in all
Contracts for Rehabilitation those provisions and clauses required by 2 CFR
200. To view a sample Contract for Rehabilitation click on the link
provided. Also, see Section 4.3.1.8, below;
2)
A Written Agreement must be executed between the Member and any entity
providing services (lead-based paint inspections/risk assessments, energy
assessments, blower door testing, providing work write-ups and cost
estimates etc.) prior to funds being disbursed to that entity. To obtain a
sample “Written Agreement Member/Contractor” click on the link
provided.
4.
Materials and supplies purchased with funds received under the Program will be
accounted for separately from all other materials and supplies obtained from any
other source.
5.
Members should conduct all Project activities fairly, openly (transparently) and
competitively so as to eliminate any conflicts of interest and even the appearance
19
of impropriety. In addition, Members that are cities and counties must also comply
with state laws applicable to the procurement of supplies, construction and services,
including Session Laws 2001-424, Section 6.6 (Conflict of Interest), and G.S. 44A25 through 33 (Model Payment and Performance Bond).
6.
Members must comply with Procurement standards established in 2 CFR 200.
7.
Members are required to comply with federal equal opportunity standards in all
Program-funded procurement activities pursuant to 24 CFR 92.350. Contracting
firms, professional service companies, employees and materials suppliers must be
selected without regard to, or discrimination based on, race, color, national origin,
religion, age or gender.
8.
Contracting activities must be conducted in compliance with Executive Order
11625 and 12432 (concerning Minority Business Enterprises) and 12138
(concerning Women’s Business Enterprises). For compliance guidelines to these
requirements see Section 4.2.6, Rehabilitation Procedures below.
9.
Members must ensure that no Program-funded rehabilitation work will be
contracted with businesses or individuals which are debarred, suspended or
otherwise ineligible under the terms of 24 CFR part 24, see Section 3.10.4, Project
Reporting. When in doubt, the Member should contact its case manager at the
Agency.
10.
Any modification to a contract completion date, scope of work, or cost must be
reduced to writing as a contract addendum, or “change order,” which clearly and
completely defines all agreed-upon changes. Change orders must be signed by all
parties to the contract and shall be approved by two different representatives of the
Member organization. The Member must produce and file a detailed written cost
estimate (with the same level of specificity outlined in Section 4.2.2, Rehabilitation
Procedures) for each change order and negotiate a fair and reasonable price for the
work based on the estimate. (Note: Changes in the overall cost of rehabilitation
shall be reflected in an Estoppel Agreement drawn up by the Agency at the close
out of the unit, which will indicate the total amount of hard costs expended on the
unit.
20
3.8
1.
Financial Audit Requirements
Members during FY 2016 must comply with the financial audit provisions
provided for by GS 159-34 (for units of local government that are subject to the
audit and other reporting requirements of the Local Government Commission) or
143C-6-23 (for non-governmental organizations), as well as the requirements of 2
CFR 200 and the State Single Audit Act. Because these statutes are subject to
change from time to time, please refer to the following websites for the applicable
audit requirements: http://www.treasurer.state.nc.us (units of local government),
or http://www.ncgrants.gov (non-governmental organizations). All required audit
reports must be forwarded to the Agency in PDF format.
2.
Copies of the current requirements, GS 159-34, “Annual Independent Audit:
Rules and Regulations” and GS 143C-6-23 (“Report on State funds by non-state
entities”) and applicable forms are found at Audit Requirements. Also see 2 CFR
200.
3.
When an auditor’s report, or auditor’s statement, discloses material noncompliance with the Agreement or material weakness in internal controls, the
Member must submit to the Agency within 60 days of the date of the auditor’s
opinion letter or statement, a written response to the auditor’s findings and a plan
for corrective action.
3.9
1.
Project Monitoring by the Member
The Agency expects the Member to be active in the ESFRLP Project and to
adequately train and supervise its staff in the operation of the Project.
2.
The Member’s approved Application for Funding included its work plan for
staffing and administering the Project. The Member must notify the Agency of
any material changes in its work plan or of any events that may have a significant
impact on the Project (see Section 3.1.7, Funding Agreement above).
3.
If the Member is monitored by the Agency, and if a lack of proper financial or
project controls is observed, the Agency may withhold all Program funds not
already disbursed to the Member and require that unused funds be returned
promptly to the Agency.
21
4.
Members must monitor and approve the performance of contractors undertaking
rehabilitation work funded by ESFRLP to ensure that work specifications and all
applicable licensing, insurance, inspection and code requirements are complied
with and schedules are met (see Appendix A, Essential Rehabilitation Criteria for
additional guidance).
5.
The Agency is currently employing a “desk monitoring” system, under which,
Members scan the requested file documents and email them to the Agency
throughout the project cycle. This system allows Housing Rehabilitation Officers
to spend more time providing technical assistance and inspecting the
rehabilitation work performed by the Member and staff at the Agency time to
provide in depth technical assistance of the case files.
3.10
1.
Project Reporting
Members will be provided with reporting forms (electronic versions) to be
submitted to the Agency including:
1)
Unit Completion Reports, see Unit Management Workbook; and;
2)
The Certification of Completion and Final Cost form.
2.
A Unit Completion Report (see Unit Management Workbook) must be completed
by the Member and submitted, with required documentation attached, within 60
days of the final drawdown of funds for a unit (i.e., from the date of the final
disbursement of funds, for the unit, by the Agency).
3.
The Certification of Completion and Final Cost form must be submitted to the
Agency by the project close-out date (within 6 months following the Completion
Date specified in the Funding Agreement). The project completion date for
ESFRLP16 projects is December 31, 2018, and the project closeout date is June
30, 2019.
4.
Members must ensure that no contractors are allowed to perform Program-funded
rehabilitation work if they are then subject to applicable sanctions by HUD,
including a Limited Denial of Participation (LDP), suspension or debarment. The
listing of LDP contractors is available electronically through the World Wide
Web here:
http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/topics/limited_denials_of_participation
Suspended or debarred contractors are listed on the System for Award
22
Management (SAM). To screen contractors on a case-by-case basis you may call
your Case Manager at the Agency.
3.11
1.
Project Monitoring by the Agency
The Agency will use the following criteria to review the Member’s performance:
1)
Conformance with the Member’s Application for Funding;
2)
Compliance with the requirements of the Program as stated in the Funding
Agreement and ESFRLP Program Guidelines.
2.
The Agency will conduct desk audits and site visits to review the performance of
Members and to provide technical assistance. The Agency will review progress
made by the Member on its project work plan and will review the Member’s case
files, financial management, loan and grant processing procedures, rehabilitation
management system and other control systems.
3.
A monitoring goal with a minimum number of reviewed case files and units
inspected per project will be determined by the review of the Member’s capacity
during the application process. The capacity indicator score includes a rating of
the staff and/or consultant qualifications and experience and recent performance
under other housing rehabilitation projects. Members with a superior capacity
score will have at least three case files and unit inspections. Members with an
acceptable capacity score will have at least five case files and unit inspections.
Members with a problematic capacity score will have at least ten case files and
unit inspections. If the Member completes less units than the monitoring goal for
the project, all of the units will be monitored. Case managers may choose to
review more than the minimum case files or units upon their discretion.
4.
Members will be required to provide the Agency with data, records, and other
information needed for the Agency to conduct the review including, but not
limited to, the Member’s:
1)
Loan and grant procedures and records;
2)
Case file;
3)
Rehabilitation procedures and contract documents; and,
4)
Financial records
23
5.
The Agency will also inspect some of the construction work performed with
ESFRLP funds to determine if:
1)
The scope of work was appropriate;
2)
Completed units meet the more stringent of a local minimum housing code
or Essential Property Standard.
3)
All work specified in the contract (including the work write-up and all
change orders) was completed as specified;
4)
Any unresolved warranty claims are being dealt with as appropriate; and
ESFRLP funds were appropriately utilized in the rehabilitation.
6.
If the Agency determines, based on its review of the Member’s performance, that
the Member is not in compliance with the requirements of ESFRLP, the Agency
may:
1)
Require the Member to submit additional information to determine the
reason for the noncompliance, and describe and document actions being
taken to correct the problem;
2)
Issue a letter of warning advising the Member of the deficiency and
identifying possible sanctions if the deficiency is not corrected;
3)
Instruct the Member to suspend, discontinue or not incur costs for the
affected activity;
4)
Instruct the Member to reimburse the Agency for any amounts improperly
expended, with interest if applicable (see Section 3.3.2, Recipient
Accounts above);
5)
Reduce or withhold all ESFRLP funds or terminate the Funding
Agreement; and/or,
6)
Impose rating penalties under future program funding cycles (affecting the
Member, key project staff and/or contracted personnel and their
companies).
3.12
1.
Project Close-Out
The Member must initiate close-out procedures when the Date of Completion
identified in the Funding Agreement is reached.
2.
No new rehabilitation contracts obligating any ESFRLP funds may be executed
after the Date of Completion. Contracts executed prior to the Date of Completion
may be amended after that date by no more than ten percent (10%) of the original
contract amount in order to accommodate necessary changes to the scope of work.
24
3.
Members will be required to submit the Certification of Completion and Final Cost
form (CCFC) to the Agency no later than six (6) months following the Date of
Completion. The Member will also be required to submit revisions and updates of
the Certification that may be necessary as a result of audits or reporting errors.
4.
All ESFRLP funds not disbursed for eligible costs associated with rehabilitation
contracts executed prior to the Date of Completion, including all net Program
income/interest earned, must be remitted to the Agency with the CCFC.
5.
Members are required to submit a minimum of one (1) human interest story, with
photographic documentation of before and after rehabilitation, focusing on one of
the households assisted under ESFRLP16. The story should tell us about your work
and about people who have benefitted from your efforts. Some of the things we
would like you to tell us about are:
1) Who are the people who were assisted?
2) Are there any unique facts about the household?
3) Were any needs met by incorporating special features in the rehab?
4) What was the condition of the home prior to rehab?
5) Has the rehab changed their lives in any way?
6) What energy-efficiency measures or accessibility measures were done?
6.
Much of this can be told through pictures of homes and of homeowners and other
household members. Interior “before and after” shots of some notable repairs or
improvements showing a dramatic difference – whole house exterior shots, both
before and after, from the same position, casual shots of the homeowner and/or
family; digital JPEG images in a high resolution format, if possible. Digital images
in 6-12 megapixel resolution are best. These can be attached to emails, one or two
at a time if needed. Also, Members are encouraged to submit any written
correspondence from households assisted under the project, to the Agency, if such
correspondence would be beneficial in promoting the Program. The story and the
photo documentation are to be submitted with or prior to the CCFC.
7.
Members are required to submit a minimum of five (5) before and five (5) after
rehabilitation photos of various repairs completed on each unit assisted with the
UCR for the unit. Digital images in 6-12 megapixel resolution are best. These can
be attached to emails, one or two at a time if needed.
25
SECTION 4. LOAN PROCESSING REQUIREMENTS
4.1
1.
2.
Selecting Applicants
Members must establish a system for inviting households to participate in ESFRLP.
Members must serve all areas of the targeted county equally except the large CDBG
Entitlement cities of Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, Raleigh and Winston-Salem.
Within those areas, Members may prioritize households according to need (e.g.,
income level or housing condition). Members may draw from existing, or establish
new, waiting lists to select eligible applicants, but a system of internal controls must
be in place to ensure fair play. Members are required to publicly advertise
ESFRLP, so that both those on existing waiting lists and those responding to the
public advertisement have equal access to the available assistance.
The Member’s policy for screening and prioritizing applications for rehabilitation
assistance must be contained in a concise written policy adopted by the Member,
provided to all applicants for assistance, readily available to the general public and
applied uniformly. Said “Assistance Policy” should be consistent with Program
Guidelines, as well as the Member’s approved Application for Funding and Post
Approval Documentation, and should clearly identify and describe:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
The goals of the Program;
The eligibility criteria for ESFRLP assistance;
Priority system by which eligible applicants will be ranked;
The forms of assistance;
The specific terms of assistance;
Specific service area;
The availability of Essential Rehabilitation Criteria;
The rehabilitation process (from the initial inspection to the warranty
period);
Any limitations to the range of rehabilitation choices (lead-based paint
abatement costs, manufactured housing, relocation, etc.);
Specific sources of all project funding;
Total amount of funding;
Maximum and minimum assistance amounts;
The Project schedule;
A statement certifying that applicants will not be selected or denied
assistance based on race, color, religion, gender or national origin;
A reference to the lead-based paint requirements;
26
16)
17)
18)
A description of the Member’s plan for marketing the Project;
The right of all applicants for Program assistance to receive a written Notice
of Disposition informing them of their status within 30 days of the date of
their completed application for an ESFRLP loan; and
The process for handling complaints and appeals see Section 4.8.4, Loan
Closeout Procedures.
3.
Ownership Requirements
1)
Loan recipients (borrowers) assisted under ESFRLP must possess an
ownership interest in the property and have the legal authority to create a
valid and unrestricted lien on the property in the form of a Deed of Trust.
2)
Housing units must be owned and occupied by very low-and low-income
homeowners that meet the income eligibility requirements contained in
Section 2.4, Eligible Households, with one or more elderly and/or disabled
and/or Veteran fulltime household member(s) or a child under the age of 6
whose health is threatened by lead hazards in the home.
4.
Property Requirements
1)
The property must be located in North Carolina and within the service area
identified in the Member’s approved Application for Funding.
2)
Every ESFRLP-assisted housing unit must remain “affordable” (pursuant
to 24 CFR 92.254) after its rehabilitation is complete. The value of the
property, after rehabilitation (determined prior to committing funds to a
unit), must not exceed the most recent HUD issued limits that represent 95%
of the area median purchase price for existing single-family housing units.
Members must complete, and retain on file, a copy of the PostRehabilitation Property Value Certification (see Unit Management
Workbook) form for each unit assisted with ESFRLP funds. Additionally,
Members must submit this form to the Agency along with the ESFRLP
Loan Application and Reservation Request (see Unit Management
Workbook). Members must carefully follow the instructions on this form
and choose one of the three methods presented on the form and consistently
use the chosen method throughout the duration of the project to determine
the post-rehab value of properties.
3)
The property must be owner-occupied and must be affixed on a permanent
foundation on property owned by the borrower. Manufactured housing is
eligible only if it is owner-occupied by a low- or very low-income
household and the manufactured home is on real estate owned by the
27
4)
5)
borrower and is permanently affixed and has permanent utility hook-ups.
Permanently affixed means the transporting equipment has been removed
(e.g. wheels, axles, tongue) and the home has been placed on masonry
supports with a full masonry foundation and tie-downs in place.
No more than fifty percent (50%) of the total area of the unit may be used
for an office or business (e.g. day care). Program funds may only be used
to improve the residential portion of mixed-use buildings.
5.
Members must evaluate households using a standard application form developed
by the Member. The form must contain, at a minimum:
1)
Name, address and phone number;
2)
Size of household;
3)
Age, sex, race and ethnicity (Hispanic or non-Hispanic) of household head;
4)
The total amount and all sources of household income,
5)
Veteran status, and;
6)
Disability status.
6.
Members must obtain and retain written third-party verification of the household’s
principal source(s) of income. The information received from verified sources will
be used to determine Program eligibility. (See Section 2.4)
7.
Members must calculate “gross annual income” for households to be assisted under
ESFRLP in accordance with Section 2.4.3.
8.
Members must maintain on file all Application forms, Written Agreements and
Notices of Loan Disposition for all applicants for ESFRLP assistance, whether or
not approved for assistance.
4.2
1.
2.
Rehabilitation Procedures
Members must have an inspection of the property to identify either local minimum
housing code or Essential Property Standards violations prior to preparing a work
write-up. The required Essential Property Standards Checklist will be provided for
this purpose. This written list of violations must be part of the case file for the
property.
Members must prepare a work write-up detailing necessary improvements to the
property and an itemized estimate of the cost, broken down by materials, labor,
profit and overhead, of all proposed improvements, including the installation of
28
energy efficiency measures and lead hazard remediation.
1)
2)
3)
4)
3.
Members are encouraged to maintain a file of the rehabilitation specialist’s
notes and calculations used in developing the cost estimate.
Work write-ups should be logically organized (trade-by-trade or room-byroom), with individually numbered sections and items. Spaces should be
provided for the contractor’s cost breakdown. Work write-ups should
provide all information necessary to ensure that all contractors are bidding
on the same high quality end product. That information should include, for
a given work item: 1) the scope of work; 2) the construction method; 3)
the quantity; 4) the quality standard; 5) the location; 6) reference to the
Member’s “performance manual” or “general specification manual”; and/or
installation and performance standards.
If matching funds are used, amounts attributed to each source (ESFRLP and
source(s) of matching funds) must be identified separately, on an item-byitem basis.
If a unit requires lead-hazard reduction or abatement as part of an ESFRLPfunded rehabilitation job, amounts attributed to those activities must be
identified on an item-by-item basis on the winning bidder’s final cost
breakdown (typically on the work write-up document). If matching funds
are used with ESFRLP funds to affect lead-hazard reduction or abatement
activities, the charges to each source must be identified.
Members must secure competitive bids from contractors for the eligible
improvements or follow written, Agency-approved, procurement standards for
work to be performed by the Member.
1) If competitive bidding is used, a written ESFRLP-specific bid procedure
must be adopted by the overseeing body of the Member Organization and
made readily available to contractors and the general public. The bid
process must be transparent—designed to maximize fair and open
competition, prevent corruption and avoid even the appearance of
impropriety.
2) An itemized bid breakdown must be secured from the winning bidder and
maintained on file. (The Member must require that all bids be itemized –
broken down line item by line item.)
3) Members proposing to perform rehabilitation work themselves or to act as
general contractors on their own jobs must not disburse any ESFRLP funds
29
until the Agency has reviewed and approved their written procurement
standards. Said standards must detail the Member’s proposed methods of:
1) maximizing free and open competition in materials procurement; 2)
exerting internal controls against impropriety and the appearance of
impropriety; and 3) cost accounting and verification.
4) If the Member is approved to perform rehabilitation work, each case file
must contain an itemized summary account of all costs paid for with
ESFRLP funds, with each work write-up item broken down by labor (hours
worked times pay rate, plus taxes and benefits) and materials (each item, by
quantity times unit price). Any other job costs charged to the Project must
also be detailed in the summary account. Necessary transportation costs
directly associated with Program-funded improvements may be charged at
a rate not to exceed the lesser of: a) the current IRS mileage reimbursement
rate, which at the time of this publication is fifty-four cents ($0.54) per mile
or b) two percent (2%) of total materials and labor costs. Necessary tool
rental costs may be charged at a maximum rate not to exceed the lesser of
fifty dollars ($50) per day or two percent (2%) of total materials and labor
costs. No other improvement costs can be charged to the Program without
the expressed written consent of the Agency. All improvement expenses
listed in the itemized summary account must be supported by original
source documentation such as itemized materials invoices, payroll records,
indirect cost plans, etc.
4.
Members must hold a pre-construction conference (which should include a “walk
thru”) prior to commencement of rehabilitation work to discuss the improvements
with both the property owner and the contractor. Case files must contain a signed
record of the date, time and attendance of the pre-construction conference. The
record shall be signed by the homeowner, contractor and a Member representative
and dated.
5.
Members must have written procedures for the disbursement of ESFRLP funds
awarded to each property owner and must ensure the proper completion of all work
to be performed under the Contract for Rehabilitation (see Section 4.7, Loan
Disbursement Procedures, below).
6.
Pursuant to Section 3.7.8, Procurement and consistent with, Section 3.7.7,
Procurement above, Members must ensure and document the inclusion of Minority
Business Enterprises (MBE) and Women Business Enterprises (WBE) in
30
procurement activities to the maximum possible extent. Generally, this means that
the Member must take affirmative steps to ensure that such enterprises are made
aware of, and invited to compete for, all Program-funded contracting opportunities.
At a minimum, it is recommended that the Member advertise, at the beginning of
the SFRLP project and at least once annually, thereafter, in a local newspaper of
general circulation. A Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) is defined as a business
enterprise which is at least 51 percent owned by one or more minority individuals
and whose management and daily operations are controlled by one or more such
individuals. “Minority individuals” include African-Americans who are not of
Hispanic origin, Native Americans, Hispanics, and Asians or Pacific Islanders.
“Control” means exercising the power to make policy decisions. Women Business
Enterprises (WBE) are defined as a business enterprise that is at least 51 percent
owned by a woman or women who also control and operate it. “Control” means
exercising the power to make policy decisions. “Operate” means being actively
involved in the day-to-day management.
7.
4.3
1.
Pursuant to Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968,
Members who amend their contract with our Agency to exceed $200,000 will be
required to implement Section 3 reporting for their organization beginning at the
contract amendment date and will submit annual reports to the Agency. The
Agency will continue to aggregate the information for all our pool members and
submit a HUD-60002 form to HUD as required.
Program Documents
Members must use, and retain in individual case files, the following documents;
1)
Application for assistance (see Section 4.1.5, Selecting Applicants above);
2)
Verification of occupant income; (see Section 4.1.6, Selecting Applicants
above), including a copy of the income eligibility worksheet (see Section
2.4.4);
3)
Verification of ownership see Section 2.5.2, Eligible Units;
4)
Work write-up;
5)
Cost estimate;
6)
Rehabilitation proposals (bids received);
7)
Pre-construction conference record;
8)
Contract for Rehabilitation and/or other written agreements, Written
Agreements Member/Contractor with specialty service providers (e.g. lead
inspections, blower door testing, etc.);
31
9)
10)
11)
12)
13)
14)
15)
Contractor’s Release(s) of Liens *;
A detailed breakdown of Program-eligible expenditures;
Post Rehabilitation Property Value Certification*;
Homeowner Written Agreement;* See Unit Management Workbook;
Promissory Note;
Deed of Trust;
Essential Property Standards Checklist with Pre- and Post-Rehab Sections
thoroughly completed and related certifications signed and dated;
16)
A completed copy of the Unit Completion Report*, see Unit Management
Workbook;
17)
Any documentation required by the age of the unit or the scope of
rehabilitation, including, but not limited to, lead-based paint clearance test
reports, and flood insurance documentation;
18)
Before and after photographs (at least 2 of each) documenting the need
for, and results of, rehabilitation;
19)
Unit financial log documenting all financial transactions by date, amount,
payee, balance, etc., and consistent with information reported on the Unit
Completion Report;
20)
A copy of the invitation to bid on the work, and a record of all contractors
invited to bid;
21)
Bid opening record/tally identifying date and time of the bid opening, all
parties present for the opening, all bidders and the amounts of their bids.
The bid tally must be witnessed and signed by all present;
22)
Owner’s Certificate of Satisfaction in which the homeowner certifies that
the work has been completed to his/her satisfaction. It should also include
language to certify that the homeowner received all warranties from the
contractor as well as counseling from the project manager and/or
contractor(s) on maintenance issues, instructions on operating new
appliances and/or systems, etc.).;
23)
Request for Notice of Sale*, if applicable (see Section 4.4.5, below);
24)
Privacy Notice*, (provided by Agency)
25)
Lead Based Paint Requirements Worksheet*; and
26)
Unrepresented Borrower Affidavit*;
Documents with an asterisk (*) must be used in the form provided in the Program
Guidelines.
2.
Members are responsible for the proper completion of all documents, including
32
having signatures notarized.
3.
Do not use correction fluid (“white-out”) or scratch outs on Program legal
documents unless each such change/correction is initialed and dated, in ink, by all
parties to the transaction.
4.
Where applicable, it is recommended that Members also maintain, in the individual
case files, the following documentation:
1)
A chronological record of all case-related contacts and correspondence,
including phone calls, office visits by the owner or contractor, site visits,
inspections, emails, etc.;
2)
Floor plans (existing and proposed, if relevant);
3)
A record of interim inspections of the property, including date, time,
inspector, issues and on-site discussions;
4)
A “certification of compliance” form signed by a local Code Enforcement
Officer certifying that all work completed under the Project was found to
meet the N.C. State Building Code;
5)
All contractor’s invoices and receipts, consistent with payment data
reported on the Unit Completion Report; and
6)
A file documentation index or checklist detailing items in file, their
location within the file and status.
5.
The Member’s case files should be logically and uniformly organized (with
documentation arranged by date, by phase, etc.). The use of a case file checklist or
documentation index in each case file is highly recommended. Members are
encouraged to use the Agency’s case file checklist so that the Member’s file are
organized in a manner consistent with that which the Agency performs its “desk
monitoring” of the Member’s files.
6.
It is not necessary for all records that are required to document individual cases to
be kept in a single case file. However, the locations of all required documents not
kept in the case file must be specifically identified in said file and readily available
for review by Agency personnel upon request.
4.4
General Loan and Grant Procedures for ESFRLP Program monies
1.
Assistance under ESFRLP shall take the following forms: a) a grant to the
Homeowner, not to exceed $10,000 or the maximum total soft costs in Member’s
33
Agency-approved ESFRLP soft cost budget; and b) a 0%-interest, deferredforgivable loan, not to exceed $25,000 to cover the cost of actual rehabilitation of
the home. So long as the Borrower/Homeowner is not in default, the original note
balance will automatically be reduced by $3,000 on each anniversary of the date of
the Note such that on the Maturity Date, the principle balance will be zero. The
loan, or balance thereof, is due immediately upon transfer of title or default.
Prepared Loan and grant documents are provided by the Agency.
2.
Under certain circumstances the Agency may allow assumption or refinancing of a
loan (e.g., to heirs or income eligible buyers). See Section 4.4.4, General Loan and
Grant Procedures, below.
3.
Default is defined as:
1)
Sale or transfer of the property; or,
2)
Failure to use the home as a principal residence.
4.
Requests for loan assumptions, subordinations, or refinancing must be submitted to
the Agency in writing. In all cases, the Member should offer their recommendation
on the action (in the event that they have knowledge beneficial to assist the Agency
in making a decision).
1)
When a borrower wishes to request the subordination of an ESFRLP
deferred- forgivable loan to a new private-sector loan, the first step is for
the Member to contact their case manager and request a “Request for
Subordination” form. The Member will then be contacted by Agency staff
and provided with the form and additional instructions on completing the
form.
2)
After receiving, reviewing and approving the completed Request for
Subordination form (with attachments) the Agency will execute a
Subordination Agreement and return it to the new lender. Subordination is
typically approved only when the Agency is assured that (1) the new loan
is being made by a legitimate lender at competitive terms and rates to
informed, responsible borrowers, (2) the appraised value of the property
exceeds the principal value of all liens, (3) loan payments for all mortgage
loans combined do not exceed 30% of income, and (4) the borrower needs
funds for a medical emergency or equivalent.
3)
With Agency approval, ESFRLP deferred-forgivable loans may be assumed
by new owners if the transaction is deemed to have no negative impact on
34
4)
5.
Program goals. All assumption requests must be made in writing. This
request letter must be provided to the Agency, along with a supporting letter
from the Member assuring the Agency that the goals of ESFRLP will not
be adversely affected by the transaction. If occupancy has changed, the
Member must also certify that the new occupant’s income-eligibility has
been verified or that the new occupant is a family member who has chosen
to reside in the unit.
With Agency approval, ESFRLP deferred-forgivable loans may be
refinanced by new owners if the transaction is deemed to have no negative
impact on Program goals. New loan documents, including the terms, will
be provided by the Agency at that time. A request to refinance must be
submitted to the Agency in writing. Refinancing may be an option in the
event of either the sale of the dwelling unit by the original borrower or the
death of the original borrower. All requests (other than those involving
family members) must be accompanied by a certification of the new
borrower’s household income.
The following documents must be completed prior to the loan closing:
1)
Application for Assistance;
2)
Work Write-Up and Cost Estimate;
3)
Contract for Rehabilitation;
4)
Homeowner Written Agreement;
5)
Promissory Note (provided by Agency);
6)
Deed of Trust (provided by Agency);
7)
Grant Agreement (provided by Agency)
8)
Request for Notice of Sale (if applicable, provided by Agency); and,
9)
Unrepresented Borrower Affidavit (if applicable, provided by Agency).
Deeds of Trust and Requests for Notice of Sale (if SFRLP lien position other than
first) must be recorded at the County Register of Deeds office prior to the start of
construction. *Note: A Request for Notice of Sale (provided by Agency with
completed Promissory Note and Deed of Trust) must be completed and recorded
for every loan holding superior lien position. It is the Member’s responsibility to
have the documents recorded.
4.5
Preparing Loan Documents
It shall be the responsibility of the Member to facilitate the loan closing by
35
presenting, or cause to have presented by an attorney, the Agency-prepared loan
documents to the Homeowner for execution and to have the documents recorded
and submitted to the Agency once completed.
4.6
1.
Loan Closing Procedures
Members are responsible for obtaining the appropriate signature(s) on all
documents listed in Section 4.4.5, General Loan and Grant Procedures at closing,
and prior to the initiation of construction.
2.
The Note and Deed of Trust must be executed by all titleholders, with an interest
in the property, and their spouses.
3.
The Deed of Trust and Request for Notice of Sale (if applicable) should be recorded
the day of closing.
4.
The Borrower must keep the property and all improvements constantly insured for
the benefit of the Beneficiary against loss by fire, windstorm and such other
casualties and contingencies, in the manner and with companies as may be
satisfactory to the Member or the Agency. The amount of the insurance required
by this provision is one hundred percent (100%) of the amount of the loan secured
by the Deed of Trust. If the property is located in a special flood hazard zone, the
Borrower must maintain flood insurance on the Property in a minimum amount of
one hundred percent (100%) of the amount of the loan secured by the Deed of Trust.
4.7
1.
Loan Disbursement Procedures
Members must have written procedures for the periodic disbursement of all
Program funds for work to be completed Section 4.2.5, Rehabilitation Procedures
including:
1)
Inspecting work prior to each contractor payment;
2)
Paying only for satisfactorily-completed work;
3)
Making a maximum of five (5) payments per contract;
4)
Ensuring that adequate funds are always available to complete the work
(e.g., paying 80% or less of the bid value for any completed line item); and,
5)
Ensuring that any changes in the work write-up are agreed to in writing by
the owner and the contractor and approved and attested to by the Member
or Member representative and the Rehab Specialist. See Section 3.7.10,
Procurement above).
36
2.
4.8
1.
Members must ensure that the contractor provides lien waivers for ESFRLP funds
received and work completed. It is recommended that lien waivers be required for
all payments, including progress payments, and final lien waivers (for the final
payment) must be signed by the general contractor as well as all subcontractors and
materials suppliers. To obtain a Release of Liens form click the link.
Loan Close-out Procedures
Members must have procedures for closing out the work under the loan including:
1)
Making a final inspection and having a lead-based paint clearance test, if
applicable, prior to the final contractor payment;
2)
Ensuring and certifying that all items in the work write-up have been
satisfactorily completed, and that all applicable code and inspection
requirements have been met;
3)
Ensuring that a completed Release of Liens has been provided by the
contractor for final payment of Program funds;
4)
Ensuring that unspent Program funds reserved for the benefit of the loan
recipient are either used for eligible work items through an addendum to the
work write-up (“change order”) or the loan balance is reduced, through an
executed and recorded estoppel agreement, to reflect the actual loan
amount;
5)
Securing a signed statement from the owner certifying that the work was
satisfactorily completed (see Section 4.3.1.23, Program Documents above);
and,
6)
Conducting a post-construction conference with the owner and contractor
in the home to review and hand over warranties, owner’s manuals,
maintenance schedules, etc.
2.
For each loan, the Member must remit the following documents to the Agency:
1)
Promissory Note;
2)
Deed of Trust (recorded); and,
3)
Recorded Request(s) for Notice of Sale (Needed if ESFRLP Deed of Trust
is not the “first” lien.) (NOTE: All documents must have original
signatures).
3.
Members are responsible for the proper completion of all documents, including
having signatures notarized and documents recorded, as required.
4.
Members must have systematic, fair and uniform written policies for resolving
disputes between contractors and homeowners, for responding to complaints from
37
homeowners, contractors and/or unsuccessful applicants for Program assistance,
and for addressing appeals of decisions by the Member. Resolution of disputes
between contractors and homeowners may be addressed in the rehabilitation
contract, directly or by reference. Complaints and appeals from homeowners or
applicants must be covered in the Member’s Assistance Policy. The Member’s
Complaint Policy must, at a minimum:
1)
Be readily available to the public;
2)
Describe the form in which appeals and/or complaints must be submitted;
3)
List the name, address and telephone number of the person charged with
receiving the appeal or complaint;
4)
Describe the time limits within which appeals or complaints will be
accepted;
5)
Describe the time limits within which the Member’s written response may
be expected;
6)
Describe the process by which the response may be appealed to a higher
local authority;
7)
Describe the time limits for the secondary appeal and for the response;
8)
Allow for a final mediated or arbitrated settlement in the event that the
dispute cannot be settled by the previous steps;
9)
Describe the time limits for the mediation or arbitration of the final appeal;
10)
Ensure a written response to the homeowner stating the Member’s final
ruling on the appeal or complaint; and,
11)
Provide a form to be signed by the homeowner accepting resolution of the
appeal or complaint.
38
SINGLE-FAMILY HOUSING REHABILITATION PROGRAM
INDEX TO PROGRAM GUIDELINES
Item
Section(s)
A
Accounting System Requirements
Annual Income
Appeals
Application Form
Application for Funding
Area Median Income (AMI)
Asbestos
Assistance Policy
3.05
2.4.3
2.4.5, 4.8.4, 4.8.4.2, 4.8.4.4
4.1.5
2.1.1, 3.01.4, 3.01.7, 3.01.8, 3.09.2, 3.11.1.1, 4.1.2
1.2.2, 2.1.2
2.2, 2.8.2.c
2.4.1, 2.4.2, 2.7.1, 2.8.1, 2.8.2.a, 3.01.2.2, 3.01.4,
3.01.7, 4.1.2, 4.8.4
3.05.6 3.08.3
Audit Findings
B
Beneficiary
Bids
Building Code
4.6.4
4.2.3, 4.2.3.2, 4.3.1.06, 4.3.1.22
4.3.4.4
C
Case Files
Case Managers
CCFC
3.06.1, 4.2.4, 4.3.1, 4.3.4, 4.3.5
1.3
3.04.2, 3.06.1, 3.10.1.2, 3.10.3, 3.12.3, 3.12.4,
3.12.6, Appendix C
See CCFC
3.05.3, 3.07.10, 3.11.4.4, 3.12.2
3.12
4.2.3.1
4.8.4, 4.8.4.2, 4.8.4.4
3.10.3
3.03.4.2, 3.11.4.4, 4.3.1.08, 4.4.4.5.3
3.07.10, 3.12.2
3.09.4
4.2.2.2
3.07.03.1, 3.12.2, 3.12.4
3.11.2
4.3.4.1
3.12.6
1.3
4.3.1.05
Certification of Completion and Final Cost
Change Orders
Close-Out
Competitive Bidding
Complaints
Completion Date
Construction Contract
Contract Amendments
Contractor Performance
Contractor’s Cost Breakdown
Contracts
Control Systems
Correspondence during Rehabilitation
Correspondence from Homeowners
Correspondence with the Agency
Cost Estimate
D
Date of Completion
Death
Debarred Contractors
Deed of Trust
Default Defined
3.01.1, 3.01.4, 3.01.5, 3.12.1, 3.12.2, 3.12.3,
3.12.4
4.4.4.4
3.07.09, 3.10.4
2.3.1, 2.3.2, 3.03.4.1, 4.1.3.1, 4.3.1.14, 4.4.4.5,
4.4.4.5.6, 4.6.2, 4.6.3, 4.6.4, 4.8.2.2
4.4.3
39
Desk Monitoring
Disbursement Policy
Disbursement Procedures, Loan
Discrimination
Displacement
Disputes
3.09.5
3.01.2.3, 4.7.1
4.2.5, 4.7
3.07.07
2.8.1, 2.8.2, 2.8.3, 2.8.4, 2.8.5
4.8.4
E
Effective Date
Efficiency Standards
Eligible Activities
Eligible Households
Eligible Units
Eligibility
Energy Efficiency Standards
Environmental Standards
Estoppel
Expenses
2.4.3, 3.01.1
Appendix A
2.1
2.4, 3.01.2.2, 4.1.3.2
2.5, 4.3.1.03
2.4.1
4.2.1, Appendix A
2.6.1, 2.7
3.07.10
4.2.3.4
F
Failure to Comply
Final Inspection
Financial Audit Requirements
Financial Management System
Financial Records
Flood Insurance
Forms
Forms of Assistance
Funding Agreement
3.02.7
1.3, 4.8.1.1
3.08
3.01.2.1
3.06.1, 3.06.3
4.3.1.17, 4.6.4
1.3, 3.02.1, 3.02.6, 3.08.2, 3.10.1
2.3
3.01, 3.01.1, 3.01.10, 3.01.2, 3.01.3, 3.01.4,
3.01.5, 3.01.6, 3.05.3, 3.07.01,3.09.2, 3.10.3,
3.11.1.2, 3.11.5.5, 3.12.1,
3.03.2
Funds not Expended within 12 Days
G
Grant Procedures
Gross Annual Income
4.4.1
2.4.1, 2.4.3, 4.1.7
H
Hard Costs
2.2.2, 2.3.1, 2.4, 2.4.1, 3.02.4, 3.03.4, 3.03.4.1,
3.07.10
2.2.1, 2.6.1, 3.02.4
See Relocation
3.11.4.2
2.6.1, 4.2.1, Appendix A
1.1, 2.4.1, 2.4.1.ii, 2.4.2, 2.6.1
HOME Program
Household Relocation
Housing Code
Housing Quality Standards
HUD
I
IDIS
Imminent Threats
Income Eligibility
Incurring Project Costs
Inspections by the Agency
Interest Earned
3.02.4.a
2.4.1.iv, 3.11.4.3
4.1.3.2, 4.1.6, 4.4.4.3
3.07.01
1.3
3.03.1
40
Internal Control
Itemized Summary of Costs
3.05.3
4.2.3.4
L
Lead-Based Paint
1.2, 1.2.2, 2.1.2, 2.2, 2.2.1, 2.4.1, 2.4.1.ii, 2.8.1,
2.8.2.c, 3.07.03.2, 4.3.1.17, 4.3.1.26, 4.8.1.1
3.11.5.2
4.3.1.09, 4.7.2
2.5.2
4.1.2.9
3.02.1, 4.1.4.2
4.4.4
4.8
4.6
4.4, 4.4.2, 4.6.1
Letter of Warning
Lien Waivers
Life Estates
Limitation to Rehabilitation
Loan Application and Reservation Request
Loan Assumptions
Loan Close-out
Loan Closing Procedures
Loan Procedures
M
Manufactured Housing
Marketing
Master Account
Matching Funds
Materials and Supplies
Member Defined
Member Organization
Member Performance
Mileage Reimbursement
Minimum Housing Code
Minority Business Enterprises
Mixed-Use Buildings
Mobile Homes
Modification of Contract
Monitoring by Agency
Monitoring by Member
2.1.2, 4.1.4.3
4.1.1
3.03.1
4.2.2.3
3.07.04
1.1, 3.01.1
3.07.10
3.11.1, 3.11.2, 3.11.5
4.2.3.4
4.2.1
3.07.08, 4.2.6
4.1.4.5
2.1.2, 4.1.4
3.07.10
3.11
3.09
N
NC Housing Partnership
Noncompliance
Notarizing Signatures
Notice of Disposition
Notice of Sale
2.2.1
3.11.5.1
4.3.2, 4.8.3
4.1.8,
4.3.1.24, 4.4.4.5, 4.4.4.5.7, 4.6.3, 4.8.2.3
O
Organization of case files
Original Set-Aside
Owner Occupied
Ownership
Ownership Documentation
Ownership Requirements
4.3.4
3.02.2
4.1.4.3
4.1.3.1, 4.3.1.03
4.3.1.03
4.1.3
P
Payment
Payment from the Agency
Performance Manual
4.3.4.5, 4.7.1.1, 4.7.2, 4.8.1.1, 4.8.1.4
3.03.3
4.2.2.2
41
Performance Testing
Photographs
Pool Funds
Post Approval Documentation
Post-Construction Conference
Post-Rehabilitation Property Value
Pre-Construction Conference
Preparing Loan Documents
Prioritizing Applicant Households
Privacy Notice
Procurement
1.2.4
3.12.5, 3.12.6
1.1, 3.02.2
3.01.4, 3.02.3, 4.1.2
4.8.1.7
4.1.4.2
4.2.4, 4.3.1.07
4.5
4.1.2
4.3.1.25
3.01.7, 3.07, 3.07.02, 3.07.05, 3.07.07, 3.10.4,
4.2.3, 4.2.3.3, 4.2.6
3.01.2.3, 3.01.7
4.2.2
4.3
3.04, 3.04.1
3.09.3
2.3.2, 3.03.4.1, 4.3.1.13, 4.4.4.5, 4.4.4.5.5, 4.8.2.1
2.1.2, 2.5.1, 4.1.4
Procurement Policy
Profit and Overhead
Program Documents
Program Income
Project Controls
Promissory Note
Property Requirements
R
Radon
Recipient Accounts
Record Retention Period
Recordkeeping
Rehabilitation Checklist
Rehabilitation Procedures
Rehabilitation Standards
2.2
3.11.5.4,
3.06.2
3.06.1, 3.06, 3.11.3, 4.1.8, 4.3.1
4.3.1.15
4.2
1.2, 2.3, 2.4.1.i, 2.4.1.ii, 2.6, 2.7.1, 2.8.2.c, 3.09.4,
3.11.4.2, 4.2.1
4.2.1
4.3.1.09
2.4.1.viii, 2.4, 2.8.1, 2.8.2, 2.8.3, 2.8.4, 2.8.5
2.8.3
3.01.7, Appendix C
4.4.4.1
Rehabilitation Standards Checklist
Release of Liens
Relocation
Relocation Expenses
Request for Project Amendment
Request for Subordination
S
Sample Construction Contract
Selecting Applicants
SFRLP Program Goals and Objectives
SFRLP Staff
Soft Costs
Specification Manual
Structural Integrity
Subordination
Supporting Documentation for Expenses
Suspended Contractors
3.07.03.1
4.1, 4.3.1.01
1.2
1.3
2.2, 2.2.1, 2.4, 3.02.4, 3.03.3
4.2.2.2
2.4.1.iv, 3.11.4.3
4.4.4.2
4.2.3.4
3.07.09, 3.10.4
T
Tool Rental
4.2.3.4
U
Unit Close-Out
Unit Completion Report
3.07.10
3.02.5, 3.10.2
42
Universal Design
2.4.1.v
V
Verification of Income
4.3.1.02
W
Women Business Enterprises
Work Write-up
4.2.6, 3.07.08
3.03.3, 3.11.4.4, 4.2.1, 4.2.2, 4.2.3.4, 4.7.1.5,
4.8.1.3, 4.8.1.5
43
Appendix A
ESSENTIAL REHABILITATION CRITERIA
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
Introduction
General Requirements
Essential Property Standards
Essential Rehabilitation Standards
Environmental Protection
Lead-Based Paint Requirements
44
NORTH CAROLINA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY
ESSENTIAL SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION LOAN POOL
Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
(effective July, 2016)
A. Introduction
1.
The goal of Essential Single-Family Rehabilitation Program is to make a positive
impact on the state's stock of standard affordable housing by encouraging the
essential rehabilitation of existing, single-family, owner-occupied housing units
occupied by lower-income (less than 80% area median income) households with
one or more elderly, disabled or Veteran fulltime household members or owneroccupied units with lead hazards and a child six years old or younger.
2.
Contents. The Essential Rehabilitation Criteria are segmented into 6 major subject
areas as follows:
A.
Introduction;
B.
General Requirements;
C.
Essential Property Standards;
D.
Essential Rehabilitation Standards;
E.
Environmental Protection; and,
F.
Lead-Based Paint.
Within each segment you will find an introduction to the topic, the specific
applicable standards, and related documents, forms, checklists, etc.
3.
General Principles. When determining the feasibility of rehabilitation for a given
dwelling unit and the prioritization of optional rehabilitation work items, recipients
should be guided by these general principles:
3.1
Do not "throw good money after bad." That is, if a unit cannot be made
standard (decent, safe, sanitary and affordable) with the funds available for
the purpose, do not treat the unit.
3.2
Do not leave "bad apples." Whenever possible avoid leaving dilapidated
units in close proximity of treated units. Such structures contribute to
neighborhood disinvestment and can ultimately undermine the work you
have done.
3.3
When in doubt about the appropriateness of an optional energy-related
rehabilitation work item, consider whether the proposed improvement will
pay for itself over its expected useful life. If it will not, it may be best not
to do it.
45
3.4
Remember that home energy conservation is a year-round process. In
addition to winter heat-loss, attention should be paid to summer heat-gain,
ventilating, shading, drainage, etc.
3.5
Where local utility companies offer discount rates to homes meeting certain
energy standards, every effort should be made to qualify each dwelling unit
for the discount.
46
NORTH CAROLINA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY
ESSENTIAL SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION LOAN POOL
Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
B. General Requirements
1. All rehabilitation work funded by ESFRLP must meet or exceed N.C. State Building
Code standards, and all local permitting and inspection requirements.
2. In those jurisdictions with an adopted minimum housing code, all units rehabilitated with
ESFRLP funds must meet or exceed all local codes, rehabilitation standards, ordinances
and zoning ordinances upon the completion of rehabilitation.
3. On July 29, 2013 the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) issued
the Final HOME Rule, which contains several revisions to the previous Final HOME
Rule published in 1996. Because the Essential Single-Family Rehabilitation Loan Pool
Program is funded with HOME funds, this section will soon be updated with a delineated
version of the Uniform Physical Condition Standards (UPCS) replacing the Housing
Quality Standards (HQS). A memo will be sent to all ESFRLP Members as soon as we
receive guidance from HUD specifying which inspectable items and areas in UPCS must
be included in ESFRLP inspections. Until then, all units rehabilitated with ESFRLP
funds must meet or exceed our Essential Property Standard which exceeds HUD's HQS
(see Essential Property Standard Section C) upon the completion of rehabilitation.
4. No unit rehabilitated with ESFRLP funds shall retain threats to the health or safety of the
occupants or to the structural integrity of the unit.
5. All units rehabilitated with ESFRLP funds must meet or exceed the Essential Property
Standards stated herein.
6. All units considered for rehabilitation assistance must be reviewed for environmental
effects pursuant to Section E, below.
7. It is imperative that close attention be paid to manufacturers' installation instructions and
the workmanship applied to all ESFRLP-related rehabilitation items.
8. It is the Member’s responsibility to advise clients of proper care and maintenance of
equipment and materials installed with ESFRLP funds. Examples include when and how
to change HVAC filters, how to set thermostats, when and how to use bath and kitchen
exhaust fans, when and how to clean and/or replace range hood filters, how to test and
reset GFCI breakers/outlets, and when to have HVAC equipment cleaned and tuned.
9. The North Carolina Housing Finance Agency promotes the concept of “universal
design.” Therefore, ESFRLP-funded work should, where practicable, be performed in
47
accordance with universal design principles, including things such as wheelchair ramps,
wheelchair-accessible electrical outlets and switches, wider doors, curbless entries, and a
barrier-free corridor connecting bedrooms, baths, kitchens and living rooms. For more
information regarding universal design click on web-link provided NCSU Center for
Universal Design.
10. To the maximum practicable extent, excessive moisture in crawlspaces or basements
shall be eliminated. Remedial measures may include foundation/footing drainage
systems, sealing plumbing penetrations, water-proofing foundations below grade, gutter
systems, and/or sump pumps. All accessible crawlspace area must have continuous 6-mil
poly ground cover, wall to wall.
11. In addition to the above general requirements all units and work performed must comply
with the Essential Rehabilitation Standards.
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NORTH CAROLINA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY
ESSENTIAL SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION LOAN POOL
Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
C. Essential Property Standards
1.
SITE HEALTH AND SAFETY
Site. The site components, such as fencing and retaining walls, grounds, lighting,
mailboxes/project signs, parking lots/driveways, play areas and equipment, refuse
disposal, roads, storm drainage and walkways must be free of health and safety hazards
and be in good repair. The site must not be subject to material adverse conditions, such as
abandoned vehicles, dangerous walks or steps, poor drainage, septic tank back-ups, sewer
hazards, excess accumulations of trash, vermin or rodent infestation or fire hazards.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Property Access and Egress
1.
Exterior platforms and/or steps shall be provided to serve exits and shall be
maintained in a safe condition.
a. Every porch, terrace or entrance platform located at more than thirty (30)
inches above the adjacent finished grade shall be equipped with guardrails
not less than thirty-six (36) inches high.
b. Exterior stairs, handrails and railings shall be constructed with moisture
resistant materials or protected with paint or other approved covering or
material to prevent moisture penetration.
Infrastructure: Utilities & Storm/Site Drainage
1.
Water Supply. Every dwelling unit shall be connected to an approved public or
private water supply and sewage disposal system that is sanitary and free from
contamination.
2.
Drainage. Every yard shall be properly graded so as to obtain positive drainage and
so as to prevent the accumulation of stagnant water in the yard or under the structure.
Gutter and downspouts, if installed, shall be provided to properly collect, conduct and
discharge the water from the roof and away from the structure.
Fire Safety.
1.
Site Address: Address numbers. Buildings shall have approved address numbers,
building numbers or approved building identification placed in a position that it is
plainly legible and visible from the street or road fronting the property.
Sanitary Conditions
1.
Infestations: The dwelling unit and its equipment must be in sanitary condition: free
of vermin and rodent infestation(s).
Hazardous Site Conditions
1.
Site Hazards. The site may not be subject to serious adverse natural or manmade
environmental conditions, such as dangerous walks or steps, soil/geologic instability,
flooding, poor drainage, septic tank back-ups or sewer hazards, mudslides, excessive
accumulations of trash, or fire hazards.
49
2.
BUILDING HEALTH AND SAFETY
Dwelling. All areas and components of the housing must be free of health and safety
hazards. These include, but are not limited to, air quality, electrical hazards, emergency/
fire exits, flammable materials, garbage and debris, handrail hazards, infestation, and
lead-based paint. For example, the buildings must have fire exits that are not blocked and
have hand rails that are undamaged and have no other observable deficiencies. The
housing must have no evidence of infestation by rats, mice, or other vermin, or of
garbage and debris. The housing must have no evidence of electrical hazards, natural
hazards, or fire hazards. The dwelling must have proper ventilation and be free of mold,
odor (e.g., propane, natural gas, methane gas), or other observable deficiencies. The
housing must comply with all requirements related to the evaluation and reduction of
lead-based paint hazards and have available proper certifications of such (see 24 CFR
part 35).
A.
Dwelling Access, Egress and Security
1.
Access. The dwelling unit must be able to be used and maintained without
unauthorized use of other private properties. The building must provide an alternate
means of exit in case of fire (such as fire stairs or egress through windows). Access
shall be provided to all rooms within a dwelling unit without passing through a public
space. Access to toilet and bathing facilities shall be through a weather-tight area
without going outside the building.
2.
Egress. Each dwelling unit must provide two (2) remote exits or if only one (1) exit
door is provided, every sleeping room must have at least one (1) openable window
approved for emergency egress. The window must be operable from the inside
without use of a key or tool. It is preferable that the window sill height does not
exceed forty-four (44) inches above the floor and provides a minimum clear opening
width of twenty (20) inches and a minimum clear opening height of twenty-two (22)
inches. The total net clear opening shall not be less than four (4) square feet. Bars,
grills or other obstructions placed over these windows must be releasable or removed
from the inside with the use of reasonable force/dexterity and without the use of a
key or tool.
3.
a. Each sleeping room must have at least one operable window in proper
working order.
b. Stairwells and flights of stairs, attached to or within a dwelling unit, that
contain four (4) or more risers shall have handrails. Every rail shall be
firmly fastened and maintained in good condition
c. Every stair riser on the path of egress from the home’s sleeping rooms
shall be reasonably uniform and shall not exceed eight and one-fourth (8
¼) inches in height and shall be securely fastened in position.
Security. The dwelling unit must provide adequate security for the family.
a. The exterior doors of the dwelling unit must be lockable. Exterior doors
are doors by which someone can enter or exit the dwelling unit.
b. Unit windows located on the first floor, at the basement level, on a fire
escape, porch, or other outside space that can be reached from the ground
and that are designed to be opened must have a locking device. (Windows
with sills less than six feet off the ground are considered accessible.)
Traditional window locks, those provided by storm/screen combination
windows, window pins, and nails are acceptable. Windows leading to a
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B.
fire escape or required to meet egress or ventilation requirements may not
be permanently nailed shut.
Hazardous Interior Conditions
1.
Egress. Safe, continuous and unobstructed exits shall be provided from the interior of
the structure to the exterior at street or grade level.
2.
C.
D.
a. There shall be no loose flooring or floor covering.
b. There shall be no dirt floors or wood floors on the ground.
c. No flight of stairs settled more than one (1) inch out of its intended
position or pulled away from supporting or adjacent structures shall be
allowed.
Interior Air Health Threats. The dwelling unit must be free of air pollutant levels that
threaten the occupants’ health, including carbon monoxide, sewer gas, fuel gas, dust,
and other harmful pollutants.
Fire Safety
1.
Alarms and Detectors: The dwelling unit must include at least one battery-operated
or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper operating condition and less than 10 years
old, on each level of the unit, including basements, but excluding crawl spaces and
unfinished attics.
2.
Combustibles and Combustible Materials. The dwelling units must have proper
ventilation and be free of odor (e.g., propane, natural gas, methane gas), or other
observable combustion deficiencies.
a. Liquid fuel stored on the premises shall be stored in accordance with the
provisions of the North Carolina State Building Code and any other
applicable codes.
b. Hearths shall be of noncombustible material and shall extend at least
twelve (12) inches beyond the face and six (6) inches beyond each side of
the fireplace opening. No combustible materials shall be permitted within
seven (7) inches of the top and seven (7) inches on either side of the
fireplace opening.
c. No holes shall be permitted in the flue/vent of any fuel-burning equipment
or waste pipe except for necessary vent connections and clean-out doors.
d. Existing chimneys shall be tight, safe and capable of maintaining proper
draft of combustion by-products to outside air. Thimbles shall be grouted
tightly and shall be located high enough to provide proper draft for the
heating appliance served thereby.
e. No combustible material shall be located within six (6) inches of the
thimble.
f. There shall be no cardboard, newspaper, or other similar highly
combustible wall finish.
Sanitary Facilities
1.
General: The dwelling unit must have hot and cold running water, including an
adequate source of potable water.
a. Every dwelling unit shall be connected to an approved water supply and sewage
disposal system.
b. Every dwelling unit used or intended for use as human habitation shall
have an enclosed bathroom and toilet facilities complete with water closet,
tub or shower and lavatory; and shall also have a kitchen sink, all of which
51
2.
E.
F.
shall be connected to approved water and sewer systems with unimpeded
flow to each inlet or outlet.
c. Water-heating facilities shall be provided which are properly installed, are
maintained in safe and good working condition, are properly connected
with the hot water line to each tub, shower, lavatory, kitchen sink, washing
machine, and/or any other supplied plumbing fixture and are capable of
supplying water at a temperature of not less than one hundred twenty
(120) degrees Fahrenheit. Such supplied water-heated facilities shall be
capable of operating independently of the space-heating equipment.
Human Hygiene. The dwelling unit’s sanitary facility must be in proper operating
condition, usable in privacy, and adequate for personal hygiene and the disposal of
human waste.
3.
Food Preparation. The dwelling unit must have suitable space and equipment to
store, prepare, and serve food in a sanitary manner. All required equipment must be
in proper operating condition.
Light, Heat and Ventilation
1.
Light. Each room must have adequate natural or artificial illumination to permit
normal indoor activities and to support the health and safety of occupants. Every
habitable room in a dwelling or dwelling unit shall contain a window or windows
facing outside.
2.
Heat. The dwelling unit must be able to provide a thermal environment that is healthy
for the human body.
3.
Ventilation. There must be adequate air circulation in the dwelling unit.
a. Bathroom areas must have one openable window or other adequate
passive or mechanical ventilation.
b. Attics shall be properly ventilated.
c. Clothes dryers shall be exhausted in accordance with the manufacturer’s
instructions. Dryer exhaust systems shall be independent of all other
systems and shall convey the moisture and any products of combustion to
the outside of the building.
d. The home must have at least one exhaust fan in any bedroom, living room,
bathroom or kitchen vented to the outside for every 1800 SF. The exhaust
fan must be capable of continuous operation to provide fresh air from a
clean source. Additionally, the home shall have an exhaust fan vented to
the outside in at least one of the following locations: bathroom or kitchen.
If this fan meets the minimum criteria for an exhaust fan (see Section 4)
and the home is less than 1800 SF, then a single exhaust fan in the home is
acceptable.
e. A filtered and protected passive or mechanical fresh air intake system is
required if the home or occupants meet any of the following criteria:
inoperable or no windows in any habitable room; an open fireplace is
present; known indoor contaminants are present (for example: lead,
asbestos, radon, carbon monoxide, mold, cigarette smoke) and/or a home
occupant has a respiratory illness.
Lead, Asbestos, Radon and Other Toxins
The dwelling unit must be free of lead, asbestos, radon and other toxin hazards that
1.
threaten occupants’ health.
52
3.
BUILDING SPACE AND STRUCTURE STANDARDS
Dwelling Unit. The dwelling unit must be structurally sound, habitable, and in good
repair. All areas and aspects of the dwelling unit (for example, the unit's bathroom,
ceiling, doors, floors, kitchen, patio/porch/balcony, stairs, walls, and windows) must be
free of health and safety hazards, functionally adequate, operable, and in good repair.
A.
Minimum Space Requirements
1.
General. The dwelling unit must provide adequate space for the family.
2.
Habitable Rooms. At a minimum, the dwelling unit must have a living room, a
kitchen and a bathroom and at least one sleeping area.
3.
4.
B.
a. No cellar shall be considered a habitable area.
b. No basement shall be used as a habitable room or housing unit unless: the
floors and walls are impervious to leakage of underground and surface
runoff water and insulated against dampness and condensation and there is
at least one means of egress that meets building exit standards.
Sanitary Facilities. The dwelling unit must include sanitary facilities within the unit.
The sanitary facilities must be in proper operating condition and adequate for
personal cleanliness and disposal of human waste. The sanitary facilities must be
usable in privacy.
a. The bathroom must be located in a separate room and have a flush toilet in
proper operating condition.
b. The unit must have a fixed basin (lavatory) with a sink trap as well as a
shower or tub both with hot and cold running water in proper operating
condition.
c. All sanitary facilities must utilize an approved public or private sanitary
waste disposal system.
Food Preparation. The dwelling unit must have suitable space and equipment to
store, prepare, and serve food in a sanitary manner.
a. The dwelling unit must have a kitchen sink in proper operating condition, with a
sink trap and hot and cold running water. The sink must drain into an approved
public or private system.
5.
Sleeping Areas. The dwelling unit must have at least one sleeping area (bedroom or
living/sleeping room) for every two persons.
Exterior Surfaces
1.
General. Each building on the site must be structurally sound, secure, habitable, and
in good repair. Each building's doors, fire escapes, foundations, lighting, roofs, walls,
and windows, where applicable, must be free of health and safety hazards, operable,
and in good repair. All exterior surfaces shall be structurally sound.
2.
a. All exterior surface shall be protected with paint or other approved
protective covering to prevent deterioration and the entrance or
penetration of moisture.
Foundation.
a. The foundation shall be on firm, reasonably dry ground, and there shall be
no water standing or running under the building.
b. Homes with a crawl space have unobstructed foundation vents.
53
C.
3.
Walls.
4.
Roof.
4.
E.
a. Roofing shall prevent the entrance of moisture into the dwelling unit.
a. There shall be a minimum of Class C roof covering.
b. There shall be no roof with more than two (2) roof coverings.
Interior Surfaces
1.
General: Interior finish materials/finish substrates shall be free of serious defects.
2.
Floors: Floors shall be in sound condition and good repair and shall be safe to use
and capable of supporting the load which normal use may cause to be placed thereon.
3.
D.
a. The exterior wall surface must not have any serious defects such as
leaning, buckling, sagging, large holes, or defects that may result in water
infiltration or vermin infestation
b. There shall be proper flashing at walls and chimney, windows, doors or
any other wall penetration. For hidden/non-visible flashing, the presence
of no damage assumes proper flashing.
Doors
a. After removal of any non-affixed treatment or object including all
furniture, floors shall be reasonably smooth, not rotten or worn through,
and without visible or excessive cracks/deterioration which permit rodents
to penetrate rooms.
b. Floors shall be reasonably level.
c. All bathroom, toilet room, laundry and kitchen floors shall be constructed
reasonably impervious to water so as to permit such floor to be readily
kept in a clean and sanitary condition
Walls: Walls shall be in sound condition, not seriously out of plumb and structurally
sound.
a. After removal of any non-affixed treatment or object including all
furniture, there shall be no visible loose plaster, loose boards or other
loose wall materials susceptible to falling.
b. There shall be no exposed/evident/visible seriously rotted, termitedamaged, fire-damaged or broken studs.
Ceiling:
a. The ceiling shall be substantially vermin and rodent-proof. After removal
of any non-affixed treatment(s) or object(s), there shall be no visible loose
plaster, boards, sheetrock or other ceiling finish susceptible to falling.
a. General: Doors shall be provided at all doorways leading to bedrooms, toilet
rooms, and bathrooms and all rooms adjoining a public space. Toilet and bath
doors shall have an operable privacy lock.
b. Exterior doors shall be water and rodent-proof and lockable from inside
and outside.
c. Doors shall be in sound working condition and good repair.
Windows
1.
General. There must be at least one window in both the living room and each
sleeping room.
2.
Function. Window frames and glass shall have no missing, cracked or broken glass.
a. All operable windows shall be provided with suitable hardware to include
operable locks and shall be made to open freely.
54
F.
b. All operable and openable windows shall be adequately screened. Screens
shall not be permanently fixed to the window frame or sash. The screens
on windows and doors may be omitted for dwelling units containing a
permanently installed heating and air conditioning system providing the
dwelling unit with year round mechanical ventilation. Screens shall be
installed in dwellings with window air conditioning units which are not
permanently installed.
Structural Support
1.
General. The dwelling unit must be structurally sound. The structure must not
present any threat to the health and safety of the occupants and must protect the
occupants from the environment. Any structural issue uncovered during the execution
of the scope of work must be addressed for the health, safety and protection from the
environment of the occupants.
2.
Foundation. The foundation and exterior wall structure and surface must not have
any serious defects such as serious leaning, buckling, sagging, large holes, or defects
that may result in air infiltration or vermin infestation.
3.
a. The foundation shall be on firm, reasonably dry ground, and there shall be
no water standing or running under the building.
b. Broken, overloaded, decayed or excessively sagging sills, beams, girders
and joists shall be prohibited.
c. All elements of the foundation including piers, underpinning and masonry,
shall be in good repair. Piers shall be sound.
i. There shall be no wood stiff knees piers or other improper piers.
ii. No isolated masonry pier shall exceed (10) times the least dimension.
d. Underpinned units shall use an approved material so as to be substantially
weatherproof and rodent-proof.
e. Units with a crawl space will have a crawl space access, with cover.
Adequate ventilation shall be provided to the foundation area by approved
methods.
Roofs, Ceilings & Floors. Roofs shall be in sound condition and capable of
supporting the load intended. Floors, attic floors and ceilings shall be in sound
condition and good repair and shall be safe to use and capable of supporting the load
which normal use may cause to be placed thereon.
a. The roof must be structurally sound and weather-proof.
b. There shall be no exposed/evident/visible rotten, broken, sagging, or firedamaged joists or improperly supported ends.
c. Joists and supporting members shall provide sufficient support.
d. Rafters shall be adequately braced.
e. Broken, overloaded, decayed or excessively sagging sills, beams, girders
and joists shall be prohibited.
f. There shall be no loose, or visibly rotted or fire-damaged sheathing or roof
covering.
g. All existing hanging masonry chimneys shall be removed or reattached.
h. There shall be no chimneys or parts thereof which are defective,
deteriorated or in danger of falling, or in such condition or locations as to
constitute a fire hazard.
55
4.
5.
4.
Walls. All load-bearing walls, exterior or interior, shall not be substantially bowed or
out-of-plumb and shall be structurally sound.
a. Walls must not have any serious defects such as severe bulging or leaning,
large holes, loose surface materials, severe buckling, missing parts, or
other serious damage.
b. The foundation and exterior wall structure must not have any serious
defects such as serious leaning, buckling, sagging, or defects that may
result in unsafe conditions or vermin infestation.
c. Studs shall provide sufficient support for sheathing or exterior finish and
shall not be visibly rotten or termite damaged.
d. There shall be no visibly rotted, termite [-damaged], fire-damaged or
broken studs.
Other.
a. Porches: Foundation, floor, ceiling and roof shall be equal to standards as
set forth above, except sills and joists need not be level if providing
drainage of floors; floors need not be weather-tight. Posts and railings
shall not be visibly rotted or termite-damaged.
b. Stairs: They shall be safe to use and capable of supporting the load that
normal use may cause to be placed thereon. Every rail shall be firmly
fastened and maintained in good condition. No rotting, sagging or
deteriorated supports shall be allowed.
BUILDING SYSTEM STANDARDS
Building Systems. Each dwelling unit's domestic water, electrical system, HVAC, and
sanitary system must be free of health and safety hazards, functionally adequate, and
operable. Any electrical, plumbing, heating or other utilities furnished to an accessory
structure shall be free of health and safety hazards. Major building systems (e.g.
structural support, roofing, cladding and weatherproofing, plumbing, electrical & HVAC)
must have a remaining useful life of a minimum of five years.
A.
Plumbing
1.
Supply. Hot and cold water must be available at the kitchen sink, tub, shower, and
lavatory taps. The definition of hot water (temperature) required at the lavatory, tub,
or shower should be determined from local health standards or applicable local code.
All water piping shall be protected from freezing by approved methods.
2.
Waste. The kitchen sink, tub/shower, toilet, and basin/lavatory must have a proper
sewer trap, drain, and vents to prevent the escape of sewer gases or severe leakage of
water. Drains must not be clogged and the toilet must flush.
3.
a. All existing and necessary plumbing vents shall be properly sized and
functioning.
b. Sewer and water lines shall be properly supported with no broken or
leaking lines.
Fixtures. All fixtures shall be in proper working condition with no leaks
existing.
a. The unit must have these minimum fixtures in proper operating condition:
a fixed basin (lavatory) with a sink trap and hot and cold running water; a
shower or tub with hot and cold running water and a kitchen sink, with a
sink trap and hot and cold running water.
56
B.
b. No fixtures shall be cracked, broken or badly chipped.
c. Water closets shall be properly connected to a cold water line; water
closets without traps are prohibited.
Heating, Cooling and Ventilation
1.
General. The dwelling unit must be able to provide a thermal environment that is
healthy for the human body.
a. There must be a safe system in proper operating condition for heating (and
cooling in US Department of Energy climate zones 3 & 4) the dwelling
unit, such as electric baseboard, radiator, or forced air systems. In order to
ensure a healthy living environment appropriate for the climate, the
system must be able to adequately provide or reduce adequate heat either
directly or indirectly to each habitable room.
b. The dwelling unit must not contain unvented room heaters or other nonsealed combustion equipment. Electric heaters are acceptable. Existing
wood-burning open fireplaces which are supplemental heating are exempt
from this requirement but any combustion equipment installed in an open
fireplace is not exempt.
c. One carbon monoxide (CO) detector shall be installed outside each
bedroom area and to manufacturer specifications in homes that have a
combustion appliance(s) or an attached garage (minimum one per floor).
2. Heating/Cooling Equipment. Every central or electric heating system including any
ductwork, controls, return/delivery grills, etc. shall be properly installed and capable
of safely and adequately heating all habitable rooms, bathrooms, and water closet
compartments to a temperature of at least sixty-eight (68) degrees Fahrenheit with an
outside temperature of 20 degrees Fahrenheit.
a. All gas and oil burning equipment existing on the premises shall be of a
type approved and installed in accordance with the provisions of the North
Carolina State Building Code and any other applicable codes.
b. Fireplace(s) shall be used only for supplemental heat and not for primary
heating, and shall have no loose mortar or damaged firebrick.
3. Ventilation and Fresh Air. There must be adequate air circulation in the dwelling
unit.
a. Exhaust fan: A mechanical exhaust fan is one that is rated to exhaust 80
CFM minimum and capable of exhausting at a rate of 50 CFM minimum.
Additionally, the fan should be capable of continuous, quiet (by
homeowner preference) operation in conjunction with either a passive or
mechanical filtered air intake system to provide fresh air. Existing fans in
a home meeting this criteria are acceptable.
b. Vented to the outside: All ventilation/exhaust ducts shall terminate at or
beyond the exterior skin of the building. No exhaust air can be delivered
to/terminated in the attic, crawl, enclosed/screened porch or other semienclosed space.
c. Fresh Air: Mechanical and gravity outdoor air intake openings shall be
located not less than 10 feet (3048 mm) horizontally from any hazardous
or noxious contaminant source, such as vents, chimneys, plumbing vents,
sanitary sewer vent, streets, alleys, parking lots and loading docks, except
as specified in the current NC Residential Codes. Intakes shall be located
57
C.
not less than 3 feet (914 mm) below contaminant sources where such
sources are allowed by the NC Residential Code to be located within 10
feet of the opening. Intake openings on structures in flood hazard areas
shall be at or above the 100 year flood plain. No intake air can be sourced
from the attic, crawl, enclosed/screened porch or other semi-enclosed
space.
d. Filters: The washable or throwaway filter for passive fresh air intake shall
be designed to keep insects, pollens and dust mites out of the home but
allow maximum infiltration (this is equivalent to a MERV rating of 3-4).
e. Protection: Fresh air intake openings in residential occupancies shall meet
the following minimum and maximum opening sizes in louvers, grilles
and screens, measured in any direction: not <1/4” and not >1/2 inch.
Electrical
1.
General: The dwelling unit must have sufficient electrical sources so occupants can
use essential electrical appliances. The dwelling unit shall be safely wired for existing
or required electrical lights, convenience receptacles, central heating (and cooling
when present) equipment, the major appliances/equipment and water pumps/septic
systems when applicable.
2.
3.
a. Electrical fixtures and wiring must not pose a fire hazard. All electric
wiring, devices, appliances and fixtures shall be installed in accordance
with the North Carolina State Building Code and none shall be dangerous
or hazardous.
b. Hanging light fixtures or outlets from electric wiring, missing cover plates
on switches and outlets, badly cracked outlets or cover plates, exposed
fuse box connections and, overloaded circuits are unacceptable.
c. All receptacles, ceiling fixtures or other fixtures shall be securely attached.
No flexible cords shall be used as a substitute for the fixed wiring of a
structure, nor run through holes in walls, ceiling or floors; through
doorways, windows or similar openings; attached to building surfaces, or
concealed behind building walls, ceilings or floors.
Electrical Supply:
a. Fuses and branch circuits shall be sized and installed properly.
b. The living room and each sleeping space must have at least two electrical
outlets in proper operating condition. The kitchen must have at least one
electrical outlet in proper operating condition. This outlet must be GFCI if
located within 6’ of a water supply outlet/faucet.
c. Outlet(s) that exist in the bathroom must be GFCI.
Electrical Appliances:
a. The dwelling unit must have an oven and a stove or range. A microwave
oven may be substituted for an oven and stove or range.
b. The dwelling unit must have a refrigerator. The refrigerator must be
capable of maintaining a temperature low enough to keep food from
spoiling. A counter-top or under-counter type refrigerator is not acceptable
as the only refrigerator. The freezer space must be present and working,
and the equipment must not present an electrical hazard.
58
4.
Lighting Fixtures: At least one (1) fixed in place ceiling or wall type electric light
fixture shall be provided in every bedroom, laundry room, furnace room, hall,
basement or any other area in which artificial light is required for the safety and
welfare of the occupants. A switched wall receptacle shall be acceptable in a
bedroom, living room or den. The kitchen area and the bathroom must have a
permanent ceiling or wall-mounted fixture in proper operating condition. Permanent
overhead or wall-mounted light fixtures may count as one of the required electrical
outlets in the living room and sleeping areas.
a. All switches and fixtures shall be safely operable or sealed off and
disconnected.
b. Lights at entrances and exits are required.
5.
ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS
A.
B.
C.
Air Tightness. The dwelling unit shall be weatherproof and capable of being adequately
heated. Existing insulation, light/fan fixtures, coverplates, HVAC grills/panels, cabinets,
plumbing fixtures are all considered affixed.
1.
Attics/Ceilings: After removal of any non-affixed treatment(s) or object(s), there shall
be no visible holes, loose plaster, boards, sheetrock or other ceiling finish susceptible
to air infiltration.
2.
Floors: After removal of any non-affixed treatment or object including all furniture,
floors shall be without visible holes or excessive cracks which permit air to penetrate
the dwelling unit.
3.
Walls: After removal of any non-affixed treatment or object from interior walls
including all furniture, there shall be no visible holes, loose plaster, visible cracks
that would permit air to penetrate the dwelling unit. All exterior wall surfaces and the
foundation shall be waterproof, weatherproof and rodent proof with no visible holes,
cracks or rotted boards.
4.
Doors and Windows: Exterior doors shall be substantially weather-tight with no
visible light at the header, jambs or threshold. Window frames and glass shall be
reasonably weather-tight.
Insulation. Insulation shall be installed in ceilings to the insulation manufacturer’s
specifications with no gaps, voids, compression or wind intrusion. Insulation and the air
barrier shall be installed in physical contact with each other. Accessible attics shall be
insulated to R-38 or greater.
Crawlspaces: All crawlspaces shall have a 100 percent ground cover of 6 mil thickness or
greater.
59
C1.
1.
Priority Lists of Additional Repairs
PRIORITY PROJECTS
If after rehabilitation work required to comply with either the Essential Property
Standards and/or the local Minimum Housing Code are completely accounted for in the
budget and ESFRLP HOME funds or ESFRLP local matching funds remain, then
additional rehabilitation work that matches closely the scope of listed Priority Projects
may be addressed without consulting NCHFA. Additional rehabilitation work that does
not match closely with the scope of work identified below must be approved by your case
manager. Priority Projects are organized by topic; numerical order is not necessarily
indicative of the importance as this is often dictated by the specific home or homeowner.
Some cross-cutting topics are included on more than one list.
A.
B.
Accessibility
1.
Exterior entry path is improved to include one or more of the following: max. 6’x6’
level landing at the door; area to support groceries/store outside shoes; 10’ long mud
walk-off area; entry landing is protected overhead by min. 2’ deep overhang OR a
maximum 7’x 7’ covered entry roof.
2.
Rehab one bathroom to provide appropriate turn around space and human hygiene
facilities to meet needs of the homeowner and the NC Accessibility Code.
3.
Increase entry door to 32” wide clear or better; add a vision panel (max. 144 square
inches).
Durability/Longevity
1.
Remediate the surrounding grade of the home so that no standing water occurs within
10 feet of the home and/or no plantings closer than 3’-0 to the home (measured from
the center of the plant roots).
2.
Exterior entry path is improved to include one or more of the following: max. 6’x6’
level landing at the door; area to support groceries/store outside shoes; 10’ long mud
walk-off area; entry landing is protected overhead by min. 2’ deep continuous
overhang; create 5’x5’ area of vinyl/wood/tile/solid surface flooring at all exterior
entries with no trip hazards OR a maximum 7’x 7’ covered entry roof.
3.
Remove any carpet in the home and replace with solid surface, easily cleanable
flooring with a minimum 15 year life.
4.
Increase structural and occupant safety by one of the following improvements which
meets the current NC Residential Building code: For a crawlspace, provide
foundation venting OR crawlspace is semi-conditioned and weathertight OR other
approved method.
5.
Increase the durability of the plumbing system or a specific subset of the system
(supply, waste, venting) to meet the requirements of the current NC Residential
Building Code.
6.
Extend the life of the roofing and structure by upgrading the roof soffit and
ventilation system to meet the current NC Residential Building Code. This only
applies when the existing roof appears to have 5 or more years of life in its current
condition.
7.
Improve or extend the life of the exterior cladding system by reducing moisture
penetration. Discussion of this project with your case manager prior to including it in
the scope of work is highly recommended.
60
C.
D.
Energy
1.
The building envelope between exterior and interior air shall not leak greater than 8
ACH @ 50 PA or less than 3 ACH @ 50 PA. At the end of the project, choose one of
the following protocols to perform a blower door test: WAP, BPI, RESNET. Contact
your Case Manager if the home leakage is outside this range. All methods must
properly deal with combustion appliances for occupant safety.
2.
Install an outdoor thermostat for a home with a heat pump or any type of electronic
strip backup heating.
3.
Floors over crawl spaces insulated to at least R-19 when a minimum clearance of 18”
between the ground and the bottom of the floor joists exists.
4.
Heating and air conditioning delivery ducts shall be tested and remediated to meet
current NC Residential Building Code airtightness and delivery standards.
5.
Improve the weather tightness of the home by one of the following methods: certify to
meet ENERGYSTAR (current version) OR certify to meet SystemVision for Existing
Homes OR home has HERS score of 70 or lower OR home meets requirements of the
current residential energy code. All scenarios must properly deal with combustion
appliances and fresh air for occupant health and safety.
6.
Insulate exterior walls; insulation in contact with the air barrier.
Health
1.
Reduce moisture issues in the home by installing or upgrading an existing exhaust
system as follows: a min. 70-80 cfm mechanical exhaust system in any bathroom
with a tub or shower and a 100-150 cfm exhaust system in the kitchen. Both systems
must be tested to insure proper air delivery as follows: 50-80 cfm in bathroom and
100-150 cfm in the kitchen.
2.
Heating and air conditioning delivery ducts shall be tested and remediated to meet
current NC Residential Building Code airtightness and delivery standards.
3.
Remove carpet and replace with solid surface easily cleanable flooring with a
minimum 15 year life.
4.
Encapsulate/abate potential lead hazards in the home especially in horizontal
locations (floors, window sills) and areas where friction from operations (window
jambs, door jambs) provide a higher potential for lead deterioration in the future.
5.
Encapsulate/ abate potential asbestos hazards in the home especially in horizontal
locations (floor coverings) and areas where household operations (wall
compound/textured finishes) provide a higher potential for asbestos deterioration in
the future.
6.
Exterior entry path is improved to include one or more of the following: max. 6’x6’
level landing at the door; area to support groceries/store outside shoes; 10’ long mud
walk-off area; entry landing is protected overhead by min. 2’ deep overhang OR a
maximum 7’x 7’ covered entry roof.
7.
Install air conditioning (cooling) or dehumidification system where none exists
(applicable to zone 5 only).
8.
Provide a whole-house mechanical fresh air ventilation system in compliance with
ASHRAE 62.2-2010. This ventilation system typically includes either a fresh air
make-up duct to the return side of the air handler (the preferred approach) or a
continuously running bathroom fan set at the calculated air flow rate in compliance
with ASHRAE 62.2.
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E.
Safety
1.
Install wired, interconnected smoke/CO detectors throughout the home to meet
current NC Residential Building Code.
2.
Replace or provide new stairs or handrails/guardrails to increase safety, meeting the
current NC Residential Building Code.
3.
Upgrade the electrical system or a specific subset of the system (service, panel or
distribution) to meet the current NC Residential Building Code.
4.
Replace bedroom windows to meet current NC Residential Building Code for egress
and energy efficiency [note: this is not considered an energy efficiency project].
5.
Increase entry door to 32” wide clear or better and add a vision panel (max. 144
square in.)
6.
Improve the safety of the property by removing a dilapidated outbuilding, repairing
existing retaining walls or other physical site hazard. Note that no new construction
or non-life threatening repair of existing structures is allowed.
62
C2.
Request for Waiver of ESFRLP
Property Standard Requirement
Date: _____________
Agency:_______________________________________________________________
Contact:______________________________________________________________
Phone:________________________________________________________________
Owner: _______________________________________________________________
Phone: ______________________________________________________________
Project Address: _______________________________________________________
City/State/Zip: _________________________________________________________
County: ______________________________________________________________
By signing this document, the undersigned acknowledges NCHFA’s Minimum Requirements of
the Essential Single-Family Rehabilitation Loan Pool (ESFRLP) are for the benefit of meeting
and/or exceeding building codes and the design standard is intended to promote minimum
housing code construction for this project address.
I, ________________________________________________________________, affirm I am
the authorized representative of the funded entity for this project and do hereby request a waiver
of the following Minimum Requirement for my project:
[Enter ESFRLP Minimum Property Standard Section Reference Number/s]
Please state how this waiver will meet or exceed the above ESFRLP Minimum Property
Standard requirement for this project:
63
I hereby acknowledge that by requesting this waiver, I will hold harmless any party providing
funding, administration, or construction, due to omission of this provision of the North Carolina
Housing Finance Agency’s ESFR Property Standard and that implementation of this request will
not violate any state or local codes or ordinances.
Homeowner: __________________
Rehabilitation Specialist: _________________
NCHFA Partner Contact: _________________
Date:__________________
_________________________________________________________________________
For NCHFA use only below this line:
NCHFA Case Manager Comments:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
Case Manager: ____________________Date reviewed: ________________
NCHFA Manager of Housing Rehab Comments:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
NCHFA Manager of Housing Rehab: ________________ Review Date: _________________
Date of:
Approval_________
Denial_________
64
NORTH CAROLINA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY
ESSENTIAL SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION LOAN POOL
Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
D. Essential Rehabilitation Standards
These standards are based on the Sample NSP Single-Family Housing Rehabilitation
Standard created for HUD’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP). They have been
adjusted to reflect the requirements of the ESFRLP as it is administered by the NC
Housing Finance Agency in North Carolina. Website for the source document is:
https://www.hudexchange.info/resource/745/sample-nsp-singlefamily-housingrehabilitation-standard/
Exceptions: On a case-by-case basis, deviations from the minimum requirements of this
standard will be permitted with approval of an ESFRLP Waiver. See the Program
Guidelines for the Waiver Process.
1 - Health & Safety
Contaminants-Interior Only
Minimum Life NA
Repair Standard
If any paint, sealant, caulk, adhesive, particleboard or MDF is used in a repair, meet the
replacement standard.
Minimum Life 10 years
Replacement Standard
All materials installed will meet the following standards to minimize the presence of Volatile
Organic Compounds (VOC) and Formaldehyde:
 All adhesives, paints/sealants and primers must meet the most recent Green Seal G-11
Environmental Standard (paints and primers) or have obtained GreenGuard
certification for the appropriate product. Product lookup websites:
http://www.greenseal.org/FindGreenSealProductsandServices.aspx?vid=ViewProduct
Detail&cid=0&sid=6 (GreenSeal product finder)
http://productguide.ulenvironment.com/quickSearch.aspx (GreenGuard product finder)
 All caulks should be low VOC labeled caulking.
 All particleboard components will meet ANSI A208.1 for formaldehyde emission
limits, or all exposed particleboard edges will be sealed with a low-VOC sealant or
have a factory-applied, low-VOC sealant prior to installation. All MDF edges will
meet ANSI A208.2 for formaldehyde emission limits, or all exposed MDF edges will
be sealed with a low-VOC sealant or have a factory-applied, low-VOC sealant prior to
installation.
65
Lead Based Paint (LBP)
Minimum Life 5 yrs.
Repair Standard
See Section F of the Program Guidelines for complete LBP requirements.
All units rehabilitated with ESFRLP assistance are deemed "HUD-associated housing" for the
purpose of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. 4821, et seq.) and are,
therefore, subject to 24 CFR part 35 (as published in the Federal Register on September 15,
1999) requiring testing, abatement and/or lead hazard reduction activities under certain
circumstances. Members are responsible for ensuring that rehabilitation specialists,
contractors and workers are trained and/or certified in accordance with 24 CFR part 35.
Essentially, any lead hazard identified during the inspection and testing process must be
addressed. It is also the responsibility of the Member to provide the pamphlet, “Renovate
Right”, to households occupying pre-1978 dwelling units.
Website: http://epi.publichealth.nc.gov/lead/lhmp.html
Minimum Life 20 years
Replacement Standard
See Section F of the Program Guidelines for complete LBP requirements.
When stabilization of surfaces containing LBP is impractical, the most affordable solution for
abatement of the component will be chosen. Examples include walls containing LBP which
may be covered with drywall or gutted and replaced with drywall. Trim and other wood or
metal components containing LBP may be removed and replaced with similar materials.
Lead-safe work practices must be followed, and only certified abatement contractors used to
perform the work.
Asbestos
Minimum Life NA
Repair Standard
Non-friable intact Asbestos materials that are not creating a hazard such as cementitious
exterior wall shingles may be left intact and painted if appropriate. Asbestos-resilient floor
tiles may be labeled as such and covered with underlayment and new resilient flooring.
Certain threshold limits regarding the quantity and type of asbestos to be removed may require
certified contractors. Applicable federal regulations are found at 40 CFR, Part 61, Subpart M.
The rehabilitation specialist should contact the Asbestos Hazard Management Branch of the
Division of Epidemiology to discuss the treatment of any suspected asbestos hazard. Resource
website: http://epi.publichealth.nc.gov/asbestos/ahmp.html
Minimum Life NA
Replacement Standard
Friable asbestos components such as boiler or pipe insulation, badly deteriorated cementitious
shingles or deteriorated flooring will be removed and, if necessary, replaced with nonhazardous materials. Applicable federal regulations are found at 40 CFR, Part 61, Subpart M.
The rehabilitation specialist should contact the Asbestos Hazard Management Branch of the
Division of Epidemiology to discuss the treatment of any suspected asbestos hazard. Resource
website: http://epi.publichealth.nc.gov/asbestos/ahmp.html
66
Radon
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
All housing in this program will be subject to a “Short Term” Radon Test, and if the result is a
reading of 4 pCi/L or higher, a follow-up “Short Term” test will be performed. When a
second test is required, average the results. If the average is above 4 pCi/L, remediation is
required.
Minimum Life 20 years
Replacement Standard
If, as a result of the testing above, there is a presence of Radon at or above the 4 pCi/L level,
remediation will be undertaken per the EPA guidance in their Consumer’s Guide to Radon
Reduction. Resource website: http://www.epa.gov/radon/pubs/consguid.html
Mold - Conditioned Space
Minimum Life NA
Repair Standard
Any presence of mold is unacceptable and must be addressed per the National Center for
Healthy Housing protocol “Creating a Healthy Home.”
http://www.nchh.org/Portals/0/Contents/FloodCleanupGuide_screen_.pdf
Minimum Life NA
Replacement Standard
All carpeting, drywall or other gypsum-based wall coverings or any other non-structural
components with mold present will be removed and replaced. The National Center for
Healthy Housing protocol “Creating a Healthy Home” will be followed for remediation of
structural components.
Fire Safety - Egress
Minimum Life NA
Repair Standard
NA
Minimum Life NA
Replacement Standard
Where egress windows are required (but not existing) or improved, the dimensions for an
egress window’s net clear opening must meet the current NC Residential Building Code [min.
20” wide by min. 22” tall, with a clear opening of 5 square feet for ground floor windows and
5.7 square feet for upper story windows]. Existing egress windows that do not meet the current
NC Residential Building Code should be discussed with your case manager. No bedrooms
should be created in attics or basements unless Life Safety Code egress requirements are met
and the space meets habitability requirements per the Essential Property Standards.
67
Fire and CO Alarms
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Existing fire and smoke and carbon monoxide detectors or systems that meet the ESFR
Property Standard will be repaired to operating condition.
Minimum Life 5 years CO, 10 years Smoke
Replacement Standard
Directly wired smoke detectors are required to meet the NC Residential Building Code which
includes detectors on each dwelling floor and in all sleeping rooms. CO detectors are required
with all fuel-burning furnaces and water heaters in sleeping rooms and on each floor level.
2 - Site
Grading
Minimum Life 1 year
Repair Standard
All grading adjacent to the building and for a distance of at least 5 feet away from the building
will slope away from the structure to provide positive drainage.
Replacement Standard
All grading adjacent to the building and for a distance of at least 10 feet away from the
building will slope away from the structure at a pitch of at least 3 inch per 5 feet. All bare
earth will be reseeded or sod will be installed to cover.
Outbuildings
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Unsafe and blighted structures, including outbuildings, will be removed if it is not financially
feasible to complete the repairs required to make them structurally sound, leak-free and with
lead hazards stabilized.
Minimum Life NA
Replacement Standard
No outbuilding replacement is permitted in this program.
Fencing
Minimum Life 3 years
Repair Standard
If replacements are needed, replacing sections in kind is permissible if the budget permits.
Minimum Life NA
Replacement Standard
No wholesale replacement of deteriorated fencing is permitted in this program.
68
Paving And Walks
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Essential paving (required for egress), such as front sidewalks and driveways with minor
defects, will be repaired to match. Tripping hazards greater than ¾” must be addressed. Nonessential, highly deteriorated paving, such as sidewalks that are unnecessary, will be removed
and appropriately landscaped if they pose a site hazard.
Minimum Life 40 years
Replacement Standard
A wood-framed ramp creating an accessible route coupled with an accessible entrance meeting
Chapter 11 of the NC Building Code are eligible expenses.
Un-repairable essential walks and driveways may be replaced with paving under the following
circumstances:
- when financially feasible and identified in the scope of work to be bid and
- when funds remain in the project and required by local ordinance and all bid work has been
completed.
Trees and Shrubbery
Minimum Life NA
Repair Standard
Trees that are or hazardous to the structure or infrastructure will be removed. Removal may
include cutting close to the ground, grinding of the stump to 12 inches below the finished
grade, installation of topsoil and re-seeding as financially feasible and desired by the
homeowner.
Minimum Life 1 year
Replacement Standard
Replacement trees and shrubs are not permitted except when required by local ordinance. If
not specified by local ordinance, trees and shrubs must be selected from drought-resistant and
non-invasive plant materials. Resources for finding these plants include:
https://ncsu.edu/goingnative/howto/mapping/invexse/index.html (Invasive, Exotic Plants of
the Southeast)
http://infohouse.p2ric.org/ref/01/00088.htm (Drought Tolerant Plants for NC Landscapes)
http://ncwildflower.org/native_plants/recommendations (Garden with Natives)
http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/other/landscaping/hgic1717.html (Plants that
Tolerate Drought)
In placement of trees, attention should be paid to shading the house to reduce air conditioning
costs while minimizing maintenance costs or creating future site hazards. Trees should be
located a sufficient distance from foundations, sidewalls, walkways, driveways, patios and
sidewalks in order to avoid future damage from root growth and branches brushing against the
structure. Setbacks from structures should typically exceed half of the canopy diameter of a
full-grown example of the species.
69
Lawn
Minimum Life 1 year
Repair Standard
Bare sections of lawn created by a repair necessary to meet the ESFR Property Standard will
be reseeded with drought-resistant varieties. Resource website:
https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/extension-gardener-handbook/9-lawns (Extension Gardner
Handbook, Chapter 9 Lawns).
Minimum Life 1 year
Replacement Standard
Wholesale replacement of lawn grass is not allowed, over-seeding is allowed if recommended
by the grass seed distributor. Use drought-resistant varieties as recommended by the resource
website.
3 - Exterior Building Surfaces
Exterior Cladding
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Siding and trim will be intact and weatherproof. All existing exterior wood components will
have a minimum of one coat of paint such that no exterior painted surface will have any
exposed wood. New exterior wood used to make repairs will blend with existing and will be
spot-primed and top-coated on all exposed and non-exposed surfaces to provide moisture
resistance and enhance longevity. Buildings designated as historic shall follow applicable
historic guideline requirements.
Minimum Life 40 years
Replacement Standard
Buildings not designated as historic may have siding replaced with vinyl siding of .042 gauge
or better. If replaced, soffit material will be vented/perforated vinyl of .05 gauge or better.
New wood components will be painted or sealed on all exposed and non-exposed surfaces to
provide moisture resistance and enhance longevity.
Exterior Porches
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Deteriorated concrete entry porches will be repaired when site hazards exist. Unsafe wood
porch components will be repaired with readily available materials to conform closely to the
replaced components or to historically accurate porches in the neighborhood. Porch repairs
will be structurally sound, with smooth and even decking surfaces. Deteriorated wood
structural components will be replaced with preservative-treated wood.
Minimum Life 10 years
Replacement Standard
Porches on a home designated as historic shall follow applicable historic guidelines. Decks on
non-historic porches will be replaced with 5/4” preservative-treated decking. Replaced
railings will meet code. Replaced wood structural components will be preservative-treated.
70
Exterior Railings
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Existing handrails will be structurally sound. 36” guard rails are required on any accessible
area with a walking surface over 30" above the adjacent ground level. Sound railings may be
repaired if it is possible to maintain the existing style. On historic structures railing repairs
will be historically sensitive or shall follow applicable historic guidelines.
Minimum Life 10 years
Replacement Standard
Install Handrails on at least one side of all interior and exterior steps or stairways with more
than two risers and around porches or platforms over 30" above the adjacent ground level, and
will meet local ordinances. Handrails and guard rails will conform to the style of similar
components in the neighborhood. On historic structures new railings will be historically
sensitive or shall follow applicable historic guidelines.
Exterior Steps and Decks
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Steps, stairways, and porch decks will be structurally sound, reasonably level, with smooth
and even surfaces. Repairs will match existing materials,
Minimum Life 5 years
Replacement Standard
In non-historic structures wood decking may be replaced with 5/4” X 6” preservative-treated
material and new steps will be constructed from nominal 2” preservative-treated wood. On
historic structures new wood decking will be ¾” clear T & G fir, primed on all 6 sides before
installation.
Exterior House Numbers and Mailboxes
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair & Replacement Standard
All houses will have minimum 4” house numbers clearly displayed and near the front entry.
Visibility will be as required by the ESFR Property Standard. A standard size mailbox and
necessary attachments/support is an allowable expense when financially feasible.
4 - Foundations & Structure
Foundations
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Foundations will be repaired to be sound, reasonably level, and free from movement.
All crawlspaces will have a 100 percent ground cover of 6-mil plastic thickness or greater.
Minimum Life NA
Replacement Standard
Foundation replacements are beyond the scope of the program.
71
Structural Walls
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Structural framing and masonry will be free from visible deterioration, rot, or serious termite
damage, and be adequately sized for current loads. All sagging floor joists or rafters will be
visually inspected, and significant structural damage and its cause will be corrected.
Minimum Life 20 years
Replacement Standard
New structural walls will be minimum 2" x 4", 16" OC. The new/rebuilt section of an exterior
wall that is part of the building envelope (the air barrier and thermal barrier separating the
conditioned space from the non-conditioned space) will be built, insulated and sheathed to
meet the current NC Residential Building Code. Knee walls shall be insulated and backed
with support material.
5 - Windows and Doors
Interior Doors
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Baths and occupied bedrooms will have operating doors and lock sets.
Replacement Standard
Hollow-core, pressed-wood product consistent with the style of existing doors including a lock
set to complement existing hardware finish and style.
Exterior Doors
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Exterior doors will be solid, weather-stripped and will operate smoothly. They will include a
peep site, a dead bolt, and an entrance lock set.
Minimum Life 50 years
Replacement Standard
Replacement doors at the front of the property for historically significant buildings will be
historically sensitive or shall follow applicable historic guidelines. Steel, six-panel doors may
be installed at entrances not visible from the front street and on the front of the property for
buildings that are not historically significant. Dead bolt locks will be installed on all exterior
doors keyed to match. All new doors will be weather-stripped to be air tight (no visible light).
Windows
Minimum Life NA
Repair Standard
All windows required to be operable by the ESFR Property Standard will operate, remain in an
open position when placed there, lock when closed and the open section will be covered with a
screen (screens for egress windows will be easily removable).
Minimum Life 20 years
Replacement Standard
Windows that are not repairable and are required by the ESFR Property Standard may be
replaced and will meet the NC Residential Building Code. New windows may be vinyl and
double-glazed. Windows on key façades of historically sensitive properties will be of the style
original to the building or shall follow applicable historic guidelines.
72
6 - Roofing
Flat and Low-Slope Roofing
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Built-up roofing that is leak-free will be re-coated and flashing and accessories repaired if their
minimum life is questionable.
Minimum Life 10 years
Replacement Standard
The most cost-effective roof – either 3-ply, hot built-up or EPDM – will be installed.
Pitched Roofs
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Missing and leaking shingles and flashing will be repaired on otherwise functional roofs with
minimum Class C shingles or better. Slate, metal and tile roofs will be repaired when
financially feasible.
Minimum Life 30 years
Replacement Standard
No more than 2 layers of roofing are permitted. At minimum, fiberglass, asphalt, 3-tab, class
A shingles with a prorated 30-year warranty with a continuous ridge vent will be installed to
shingle manufacturer’s specifications over 15-lb. felt (or other weather resistant barrier as
required by the shingle manufacturer) with new drip edge on all edges. Inoperable equipment,
vents and other unnecessary roof penetrations will be removed and the sheathing
repaired/replaced as needed.
Gutters and Downspouts
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Existing gutters and downspouts must be in good repair, leak free and collect storm water from
all lower roof edges where they are installed. The system must move all storm water away
from the building and prevent water from entering the structure. In addition to positive
drainage away from the building, outlets will be a minimum of 5 feet away from the
foundation whenever there is a history of water problems. Splash blocks must be installed in
such a manner as to assist in moving water away from the foundation.
Minimum Life 5 years
Replacement Standard
Consider the ability of the homeowner to maintain the system prior to replacing gutters as
unmaintained gutters can create more severe problems than no gutters. Replaced gutters and
downspouts will be installed and collect storm water from all lower roof edges although it is
not the intent to install gutters and downspouts in locations they do not currently exist without
demonstrated need. The system must move all storm water away from the building and
prevent water from entering the structure. In addition to positive drainage away from the
building, outlets will be a minimum of 5 feet away from the foundation whenever there is a
history of water problems. Splash blocks must be installed in such a manner as to assist in
moving water away from the foundation.
73
7 - Insulation and Ventilation
Infiltration
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
As required in the Essential Property Standards on all interior and exterior walls, repair all
visible cracks and holes with appropriate materials compatible with existing adjacent surfaces
so that: no light is visible, no air is moving, the surface is smooth/cleanable and, if necessary,
the joint provides for minor movement without deterioration of the filler. No testing is
required but may be completed when financially feasible (see Replacement Standard, below).
Minimum Life 5 years
Replacement Standard
All homes tested with a Blower Door and/or duct blaster must use the protocols and meet the
requirements of the program chosen as stated in the ESFR Priority Projects section under
Energy. All homes where the Priority Project chosen seeks to reduce air infiltration will
require air sealing and mechanical or passive fresh air exchange to meet the minimum Blower
Door and/or Duct Blaster test fresh air introduction requirements. Homes with combustion
appliances may have additional requirements for occupant safety.
Insulation
Minimum Life NA
Repair Standard
All homes with an accessible attic will have minimum R38 insulation in physical contact with
the air barrier. Insulation with be installed to manuafacturer’s specifications and the NC
Residential Building Code with no gaps voids, compression or wind intrusion.
Minimum Life 20 years
Replacement Standard
All homes choosing to complete one of the ESFR Priority Projects in the Energy section must
meet the insulation requirements of the program. Choices include the current versions of the
following programs: WAP, ENERGYSTAR, SystemVision for Existing, HERS or the
residential energy code (Chapter 11). Typical measures required in these programs include: a
continuous air barrier and a continuous thermal barrier that is in contact with the air barrier;
exterior walls opened in the course of renovations shall be insulated to meet the existing NC
Residential Building Code. When financially feasible, insulating rim joists to R19 with either
foil-faced foam board or Class 1-rated spray foam is allowed.
74
Ventilation
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Repair all existing exhaust fans as needed to meet the requirements of the ESFR Property
Standards. If it is financially feasible, repair or replace all fans all fans to last for 7 years. All
homes shall have a minimum of one mechanical exhaust fan in any sleeping room, living
room, bathroom or kitchen per 1800 sf of floor space, rated for 80 cfm minimum, and capable
of exhausting at a rate of 50 cfm minimum, while operating at a quiet noise level acceptable to
the homeowner continuously (ie. make it clear to the homeowner that they would hear the
sound all of the time). The exhaust duct(s) shall terminate at or beyond the exterior skin of the
home. Homes with heating, cooling and operational mechanical fresh air makeup connected to
the return system but with no exhaust fan in one of the rooms indicated should add an exhaust
fan. Locate new, required fans in a centrally located bathroom as the first choice, a high use
bathroom as the second choice and the kitchen as a third choice.
Minimum Life 7 years
Replacement Standard
When financially feasible, replace or add new fans to meet the most recent ASHRAE 62.2
standard for fresh air. All new ductwork will be heavy gauge galvanized metal, air tight with
mastic-sealed seams (no tape). All terminations will occur beyond the exterior skin.
Whole House Ventilation: One option of doing this is to provide fresh air make-up duct to the
return side of the air handler (preferred). A second option of doing this is by using one
bathroom fan continuously operating at a verified CFM rate sufficient to meet the ASHRAE
standard. The fan will also have a > 80 CFM boost function switched one of three ways: by a
switch at the entrance, with an adjustable time-delay function that runs the fan for an
additional period after the switch is turned off; or a motion detector with an adjustable timedelay function that runs the fan for an additional period after the motion detector ceases to see
motion; or by a humidistat. The strategy used must be either a balanced or exhaust strategy.
Bathroom Fans: Fans should be rated to move 80 cfm air and create < 0.3 Sones of fan noise.
Kitchen Fans: Fans should be rated to move no less than 100 cfm and no more than 150 cfm
air after accounting for duct configuration losses and creating < 20 sones of fan noise.
Roof Ventilation
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Repair any leaks in the roof ventng system to include but not limited to: soffit vents, ridge
vents, box vents and gable-end vents. There is no requirement to upgrade the roof venting
system if the roof is not being replaced or there is no evidence of degradation attributable to
the lack of or inadequacy of a roof vent system.
Minimum Life 20 years
Replacement Standard
When installing a new roof, 1 square foot of free venting (this may be achieved by keeping
gable vents in place and free to vent) must be supplied for every SF of area directly under the
roof if there is no soffit venting. 1 square foot of free venting must be supplied for every 300
SF of area directly under the roof if 20% of the venting is soffit vent and if the living space
ceiling directly below the roof has a rating of one perm or less. 1 perm is achievable with a
coating of ICI Dulux Ultra Hide Vapor Barrier paint 1060-1200 per manufacturer’s
instructions.
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8 - Interior Standards
Interior Walls and Ceilings
Minimum Life 3 years
Repair Standard
Holes, cracks and deteriorated and un-keyed plaster will be repaired to match the surrounding
surfaces. All visual surfaces will be stabilized (minimizing the potential for new lead paint
hazards when the potential exists) using premium vinyl acrylic paint.
Minimum Life 25 years
Replacement Standard
When necessary plaster will be replace by ½” gypsum board. Fire-rated assemblies will be
specified on a project-by-project basis as required by the NC Residential Building Code.
Flooring
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Bathroom, kitchen and other water-susceptible floor areas will be covered with water-resistant
flooring that is free from tears or tripping hazards. Wood floor with trip hazards will be
repaired to complement the existing floor whenever possible, leaving a cleanable surface.
Deteriorated and/or damaged carpet with trip hazards shall normally be replaced with vinyl
floor or other flooring with a cleanable surface. Existing basement floors will be continuous
concrete at least 1" thick.
Minimum Life 10 years
Replacement Standard
Baths will receive resilient sheet goods over plywood underlayment, and kitchens will receive
resilient sheet goods or tile over plywood underlayment. When existing deteriorated carpet is
installed over hardwood floors in a room not required to be impervious to water, the hardwood
will be refinished whenever possible to be moisture resistance. Whenever possible rooms
other than kitchens and baths with existing wood flooring will be maintained as wood floors
and refinished when appropriate. Rooms other than kitchens or baths without usable wood
floors may be finished with continuous vinyl or other solid surface cleanable flooring.
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Kitchen Cabinets and Countertop
Minimum Life 3 years
Repair Standard
Kitchens will have a minimum of 3 feet of clear food preparation area; add 1 foot per each
additional household member, not including homeowner. Existing laminate countertop(s) as
well as base and wall cabinets with hardwood doors and face frames may be repaired if in
good condition; hinges shall be secure and drawers operable. All cabinets will be sound and
cleanable.
Minimum Life 30 years
Replacement Standard
Required new countertop will be a minimum of 6 lineal feet of post-formed material (3’ for
sink base cabinet and 3’ of clear food preparation area) with corresponding base cabinets and
wall cabinets (wall cabinets required only for the length of the food preparation area). Add 1
lineal foot per each additional household member, not including homeowner. Any new kitchen
cabinets will meet the ANSI A208.1 and A208.2 standard for formaldehyde content of
particleboard and MDF, or have exposed edges of particleboard and MDF sealed to prevent
the out-gassing of formaldehyde. Cabinets will have hardwood doors and face frames. A
drawer base (12” min.) will be included in new cabinetry. Corners in countertop designs are
permitted if factory assembled. A splash panel to match or coordinate with the countertop will
be installed as a base cabinet to wall cabinet backsplash behind an existing or new range and
extending 6 inches past the range on both sides, or if the range is in a corner along the side
wall; trim with chrome metal edging.
9 - Electric
Ground Fault Interrupter Circuits
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Non-functioning GFCIs will be replaced. Kitchen counter, bath and laundry receptacles
within 6' of a sink will be replaced with a GFCI-protected receptacle or protected by a GFCI
device.
Minimum Life 15 years
Replacement Standard
Kitchen counter, bath and laundry receptacles within 6' of a sink will be replaced with a GFCIprotected receptacle or protected by a GFCI device.
Passage Lighting
Minimum Life 7 years
Repair Standard
All lights and switches in hallways, stairs and other passages will be operable and safe.
Minimum Life 5 years
Replacement Standard
All halls, stairs and rooms necessary to cross to other rooms and stairways must be well lit and
controlled by a 3-way switch using concealed wiring. Attics, basements and crawl spaces
must have utility fixtures. All new light fixtures will be ENERGY STAR labeled and will
utilize compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), light emitting diodes (LEDs) or tubular fluorescent
bulbs.
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Kitchen Electric Distribution
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Minimum of one outlet in kitchen is required. Existing receptacles, fixtures and switches will
be safe and grounded.
Minimum Life 15 years
Replacement Standard
Permanently installed or proposed stoves, refrigerators, freezers, dishwashers and disposals,
washers and dryers will have separate circuits sized to N.E.C. Two separate 20-amp counter
circuits are required with each kitchen area.
Interior Electric Distribution
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Exposed knob and tube will be replaced. Every bedroom and living room will have a
minimum of two duplex receptacles, placed on separate walls and one light fixture or
receptacle switched at each room entrance. Where the source wiring circuit is accessible (e.g..
first floor above basements, in gutted rooms, etc.), receptacles will be grounded. All switch,
receptacle, and junction boxes will have appropriate cover plates. Wiring will be free from
hazard, and all circuits will be properly protected at the panel. Floor receptacles will be
removed and a metal cover plate installed. Exposed conduit is allowed. Bedrooms receptacles
will be protected by an Arc Fault breaker. Basements will have a minimum of 2 keyless bare
bulb fixtures switched at the top of the stairs.
Minimum Life 25 years
Replacement Standard
When a room's wall finishes are removed, it will be rewired to the latest version of the
National Electric Code.
Service and Panel
Minimum Life 10 years
Repair Standard
Distribution panels will have a main disconnect, at least 10 circuit-breaker-protected circuits, a
100-amp minimum capacity and be adequate to safely supply existing and proposed devices.
If a working central air conditioning system is present, the minimum service will be 150 amp.
Minimum Life 50 years
Replacement Standard
200-amp service with a main disconnect panel containing at least 30 circuit breaker positions.
10 - Plumbing System
Drain, Waste, Vent Lines
Minimum Life 1 year
Repair Standard
Waste and vent lines must function without losing the trap seal.
Minimum Life 50 years
Replacement Standard
When walls are removed exposing vent and waste lines those lines will be reworked to the
current NC Plumbing c=Code.
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Plumbing Fixtures
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
All fixtures and faucets will have working, drip-free components. Toilets with greater that a
1.6 GPF rating will be replaced with a maximum 1.3 GPF model.
Minimum Life 5 years
Replacement Standard
Single lever, metal faucets and shower diverters with 15-year, drip-free warranty and
maximum 2.0 GPM flow. White ceramic low-flow toilets (1.3 Gal), double bowl stainless
steel sinks, and fiberglass tubs with surrounds.
Plumbing Minimum Equipment
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Existing equipment will be repaired to conform to the ESFR Property Standards.
Minimum Life 5 years
Replacement Standard
Every dwelling unit will have a minimum of one single bowl sink with hot and cold running
water in the kitchen and at least one bathroom containing a vanity with a sink, and a
shower/tub unit, both with hot and cold running water, and a toilet.
Water Heaters
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Water heaters more than 5 years old may be repaired if it is clear that a repair will make it
operable.
Minimum Life 10 years
Replacement Standard
Provide a water heater with a 10-year warranty installed to the current NC Plumbing code. If a
new water heater is installed, then electric water heaters shall have an energy factor (EF) of at
least .92 and gas water heaters shall have and EF of .61. High efficiency power-vented or
sealed combustion tankless models are acceptable when financially feasible.
Water Supply
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
The main shut off valve must be operable and completely stop the flow of water to the house.
All fixtures must be leak-free and deliver sufficient cold water and, where applicable, hot
water.
Minimum Life 50 years
Replacement Standard
The main shut off valve must be operable and completely stop the flow of water to the house,
and should be replaced if it does not. Lead and galvanized pipe that is part of the water service
or the distribution system that is operating and not malfunctioning is encouraged as a Priority
Project when financially feasible, particularly when mixed pipe materials with the potential for
material corrosion are distributing water to faucets. All fixtures will have brass shut off valves.
One freeze-protected exterior hose bib is recommended.
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11 - HVAC
Air Conditioning
Minimum Life - NA
Repair Standard
Non-functioning, non-repairable air conditioners will be removed and drained of all CFCs.
Existing central air conditioning will be inspected, serviced and refurbished to operate safely.
Minimum Life 20 years
Replacement Standard
New HVAC systems will have a rough-in installed for air conditioning (> 15 SEER). See
HVAC Distribution System and Heating System for additional requirements.
Chimney Repair
Minimum Life NA
Repair Standard
Unused chimneys will be removed to below the roof line wherever roofing is replaced.
Unsound chimneys will be repaired or removed. When chimneys must be used for combustion
ventilation, they will be relined.
Minimum Life NA
Replacement Standard
The creation of new flues is not recommended in this program. The use of high efficiency
closed combustion appliances is recommended to avoid the need for new flues. Replacement
furnace flues, when required, will be metal double- or triple-walled as recommended by the
furnace manufacturer.
HVAC Distribution System
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Duct work and radiator piping will be well supported, insulated in unconditioned space and
adequate to maintain 68F measured 36" off the floor when the outside temperature is the
average yearly minimum, in all habitable rooms. Repaired duct work that requires removal of
insulation will be insulated to R-7 and sealed at all seams with UL-listed bucket mastic (not
tape).
Replacement Standard
Minimum Life 25 years
New duct work will be installed to meet the NC Residential Mechanical Code, Chapter 6
including design using ACCA Manual D, sealing all seams with UL-listed bucket mastic (not
tape) and insulating to R-7. Pressure testing of the new and existing ductwork to eliminate
leakage will occur if new ductwork comprises 50% or more of the ductwork, see Section
N1103 of the NC Residential Building Code.
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Heating System
Minimum Life 5 years
Repair Standard
Workable existing heating systems will be inspected and serviced to operate in a safe manner.
Minimum Life 15 years
Replacement Standard
New or replacement mechanical systems will be sized to within ½ ton of an ACCA Manual J
load calculation. ACCA Manual J load calculations, including all inputs, shall be available for
review by your case manager for each replacement unit to verify sizing when necessary. Gasfired heating plants will be rated at > 90% AFUE or better. Heat pumps will be rated at > 15
SEER. Setback thermostats are required. Heat pumps will have an outdoor thermostat installed
and set to the balance point of the house to prevent supplementary heater operation when the
heat pump is capable of meeting the load. Replacement of any electric resistance heating
appliance being used as the home’s primary heat system with a more efficient system meeting
the above requirements is strongly encouraged when financially feasible.
12 – Appliances
Kitchen Appliances
Minimum Life NA
Repair Standard
Existing ranges will have a working and cleanable range (at least 3 functional burners); a
microwave is an acceptable substitution for a range if desired by the homeowner. Refrigerators
will maintain temperatures low enough to keep food from spoiling and have a freezer and not
present an electrical hazard; repair of non-functioning ice and water delivery equipment is
required for leaks and electrical hazards only. If there is an existing dishwasher in working and
cleanable condition, it may be retained with minor repairs.
Minimum Life 15 years
Replacement Standard
All replaced kitchen appliances will have ENERGY STAR-labeled appliances where
applicable. All new cooking ranges will be electric.
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NORTH CAROLINA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY
ESSENTIAL SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION LOAN POOL
Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
E. Environmental Protection
1.
Threats from the environment Section B.4 in General Requirements requires that units
rehabilitated with ESFRLP assistance retain no threats to the health or safety of the
household or to the structural integrity of the dwelling itself. Examples of such threats
from environmental sources include, but are not limited to:
1.1
Radon gas. Reducing infiltration through rehabilitation can exacerbate existing
radon threats. All assisted units must be tested for radon levels. In the event that
measured levels of radon exceed 20 picoCuries per liter of air (pCi/l), remediation
measures must be taken to reduce the level to 4 pCi/l or below. Where tested levels
are between 4 and 20, homeowners must be informed of the level and provided with
EPA’s “Home Buyer’s and Seller’s Guide to radon” or an Agency-approved
alternative.
1.2
Friable asbestos. A dangerous mineral, especially when its microscopic fibers are
inhaled, asbestos is found in several building products common in North Carolina.
Among them are ceiling tiles, pipe or duct wrap resembling coarse, thick paper or
papier mache. Asbestos-cement shingle siding is not considered friable and is not
a hazard unless removed, sawn, broken or otherwise disturbed, at which point it
must be treated as a hazard. There are over 3,000 different building products, which
contain asbestos. Some are considered "friable and regulated", some are not and
some depend on the method of removal to trigger regulation. Rehabilitation
specialists must learn to recognize the most commonly encountered of these
products and how to stabilize, encapsulate or have them removed safely and legally
to protect the health of workers, the household and the environment. Certain
threshold limits regarding the quantity and type of asbestos to be removed may
require certified contractors. Applicable federal regulations are found at 40 CFR,
Part 61, Subpart M. The rehabilitation specialist should contact the Asbestos
Hazard Management Branch of the Division of Epidemiology to discuss the
treatment of any suspected asbestos hazard.
1.3
Over-hanging trees. Members should consider whether limbs or trees that overhang
an assisted unit pose a threat to the unit and/or its occupants. If so, appropriate
pruning should be included in the scope of work.
1.4
Poor drainage. Excessive moisture in crawlspaces and basements may be the most
common and odious environmental threat encountered in ESFRLP-funded
rehabilitation work, serving as a catalyst to decay, mildew, mold, radon-transfer,
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corrosion, and other problems. Correcting drainage problems should be a priority
in ESFRLP-funded rehabilitation work.
2.
1.5
Lead-based paint. All units rehabilitated with SFRLP assistance are deemed "HUDassociated housing" for the purpose of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention
Act (42 U.S.C. 4821, et seq.) and are, therefore, subject to 24 CFR part 35 (as
published in the Federal Register on September 15, 1999) requiring testing,
abatement and/or lead hazard reduction activities under certain circumstances (See
Section F, below). Members are responsible for ensuring that rehabilitation
specialists, contractors and workers are trained and/or certified in accordance with
24 CFR 35. It is also the responsibility of the Member to provide the pamphlet,
“Renovate Right”, to households occupying pre-1978 dwelling units.
1.6
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Rehabilitation specialists should avoid
specifying, especially for indoor use, building products high in VOCs which may
threaten the comfort and/or well-being of the household. Particular sensitivities or
allergies should be ascertained in initial interviews with applicants for assistance.
1.7
Flooding. If the Member's Assistance Policy allows for assistance to units within
the floodplain, owners of any such units selected for assistance must be required to
carry flood insurance in a minimum amount equal to 100% of Program loan's
principal balance for the term of the loan.
1.8
Natural Disasters. Reasonable measures should be taken to strengthen homes
against natural disasters such as wild fire, flooding, and in coastal areas, hurricane
force winds.
Threats to the environment. Although single-family rehabilitation activities are
"categorically excluded" under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA),
such activities are not excluded from individual compliance requirements of other
environmental statutes, including the North Carolina Environmental Policy Act (SEPA).
To ensure that all ESFRLP-funded activities are in compliance, the Member must complete
a brief review ("Environmental Screening Checklist"), using forms and instructions
supplied by the Agency, for each unit targeted for rehabilitation assistance. An
Environmental Screening Checklist must be submitted to the Agency prior to committing
funds to a unit. Although numerous areas of concern are covered in the required review,
only a few of them are often relevant to ESFRLP work. Those are:
2.1
Historic Properties. If a property deemed to have bonafide historical significance
is targeted for ESFRLP-funded rehabilitation, the scope of work must meet or
exceed the Secretary of the Interiors Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines
for Historic Buildings. To ensure compliance with applicable regulations and
guidelines, Members must complete an additional form ("Historical Evaluation
Request Form") for any unit targeted for Program-funded rehabilitation which is 45
years old or older or is deemed by the Member to have potentially significant
architectural or historical importance. Historical Evaluation Request Form must be
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forwarded, with photographs of the unit and a location map attached, to the state
Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) for review, and a copy, with the SHPO's
response, must be submitted to the Agency with the Environmental Screening
Checklist. (Note: meeting the required standards for historic properties can be
expensive. Members may deem it necessary to exclude historic properties from
eligibility in their Assistance Policies or require matching funds from other sources
in order to meet their average-cost targets.)
2.2
Floodplain Management. Although traditionally listed with threats to the
environment for the purposes of environmental reviews, the primary concern here
is with protection of the property from the environment (as discussed at section
2.6.2, above). The owner of any dwelling unit located within the 100-year
floodplain, which is rehabilitated with Program funds is required to carry flood
insurance on the unit continuously throughout the term of the SFRLP loan in an
amount not less than 100% of the principal balance of the ESFRLP loan. NCHFA,
as mortgagee for the ESFRLP loan, shall be named as an insured lender on the
policy. The first year's premium is an eligible Program soft cost. Property location
must be documented by providing the map and panel numbers as supporting
documentation to the Environmental Screening Checklist. (See “Instructions to
Environmental Review” and “Environmental Review Checklist”)
2.3
Toxic chemicals. Defunct buried oil or gas tanks, stored chemicals, old car
batteries and the like are sometimes found in or near units targeted for
rehabilitation. The Member's rehabilitation specialist should ask the homeowner
and inspect the house and grounds to determine if any such hazard exists and, if so,
consult their case manager at the Agency regarding appropriate mitigation
measures. Though lead-based paint, another toxic chemical, can be a threat to the
environment, it is discussed above (Section E.2) as a threat from the environment.
2.4
Wells and septic systems. The installation of a new well or septic system could
conceivably have a deleterious effect on wetlands and/or water quality. To ensure
that this is not the case, any such installations must be done under the supervision
of local health department officials.
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NORTH CAROLINA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY
ESSENTIAL SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION LOAN POOL
Essential Rehabilitation Criteria
F. Lead-Based Paint Requirements
As you know, ESFRLP is funded with dollars from the HOME Program and, therefore, any unit
to which ESFRLP funds were committed after September 10, 2001 is subject to the requirements
of 24CFR35 regarding lead-based paint. I’m sure you are also very aware that there has been
much confusion about implementing the lead-based paint rule.
We hope the following will provide some clarification on implementing 24CFR35, as well as
offer some guidance on what your case manager will be looking for during a monitoring visit
with respect to this regulation. Our goal is to be as flexible as we can by providing you, the
ESFRLP Member, with options that you can take to comply with 24CFR35.
Lead Hazard Information Pamphlet For all pre-1978 units assisted with ESFRLP funds,
24CFR35 requires that the occupants of the units be provided with the lead hazard information
pamphlet developed by HUD, EPA and the Consumer Product Safety Commission entitled
“2010 Lead-Safe Certified Guide to Renovate Right”. Members must keep documentation in the
case file certifying that the households received this pamphlet.
Notices For all pre-1978 units assisted with ESFRLP funds, Members have the option of
evaluating the units for lead-based paint, or presuming that lead-based paint is present
throughout a unit. Copies of all notices must be kept in the respective case file.
Notice of Presumption If the presumption is made that lead-based paint is present, then the
occupants must be provided with a notice of presumption within 15 calendar days of the date on
which the presumption was made. The notice shall include: a) the nature and scope of
presumption; b) a contact name, address and telephone number for additional information and; c)
the date of the notice. Along with the copy of the notice of presumption there must be
documentation certifying the date on which the presumption was made.
Notice of Evaluation If evaluation (a lead hazard screen, lead-based paint inspection, paint
testing, risk assessment or combination thereof) is undertaken and lead-based paint or lead-based
paint hazards are found to be present, then the occupants must be provided with a notice of
evaluation within 15 calendar days of the date when you, the Member, receive the evaluation
report. The notice of evaluation shall include: a) the nature, scope and results of the evaluation;
b) a contact name, address and telephone number for additional information and to allow access
to the actual evaluation report and; c) the date of the notice.
Notice of Hazard Reduction When hazard reduction activities (i.e., measures designed to
reduce or eliminate human exposure to lead-based paint hazards through methods including
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interim controls or abatement or a combination of the two) are undertaken, occupants must be
provided with a notice of hazard reduction activities within 15 days of the completion of such
activities. Completion is designated by clearance. The notice of hazard reduction shall include:
a) a summary of the nature, scope and results (including clearance), of the hazard reduction
activities; b) a contact name, address and telephone number for additional information and; c)
available information on the location of any remaining lead-based paint in the rooms, spaces or
areas where hazard reduction activities were conducted, on a surface-by-surface basis.
Temporary Relocation It may be necessary to temporarily relocate the occupants of the units
to be assisted under ESFRLP. During hazard reduction activities occupants shall not be
permitted to enter the worksite until hazard reduction is complete and clearance has been
achieved. With some exceptions, as listed at 24CFR35.1345, occupants shall be temporarily
relocated before and during hazard reduction activities to a suitable, decent, safe and similarly
accessible dwelling unit which does not have lead-based paint hazards
Calculating hard costs of rehabilitation, and determining the approach to LBP Lead-Based
Paint requirements for the rehabilitation of units using ESFRLP funds fall into three categories
that depend on the amount of federal funds applied toward the hard costs of rehabilitation of the
unit. Under 24CFR35.915 hard costs of rehabilitation do not include LBP hazard evaluation and
hazard reduction activities, cost of site preparation, occupant protection, relocation, interim
controls, abatement, clearance, or waste handling attributable to LBP hazard reduction.
Therefore, the hard cost of rehabilitation is equal to the contract price (labor and materials) of
performing “ordinary” rehabilitation, in other words, the cost of bringing the unit up to the
rehabilitation standards of ESFRLP in the absence of the LBP regulation.
Work write-ups should provide the following information: a description of the item to be
addressed, the material cost (without lead work), the labor cost (without lead work), total rehab
cost for each item (i.e. labor + material, without lead) and the extra cost of completing the item
due to the presence, or presumed presence, of LBP. See example below:
Item
Replace window
(using safe work practices)
Material
$300
Labor
$50
Rehab
$350
LBP
$50
Rehabilitation costs (excluding all lead-based paint hazard evaluation and reduction activities)
are then calculated by totaling the Rehab column. The total of all figures in the Rehab column
will then determine the appropriate approach to lead hazard evaluation and reduction.
If rehabilitation costs total $5,000 or less, then the approach would be that outlined in
24CFR35.930(b), which says to either conduct paint testing on surfaces to be disturbed by
rehabilitation or presume the presence of LBP. Following evaluation or presumption, the
measure to be taken to address LBP would be that of using safe work practices.
If rehabilitation costs total more than $5,000 but are less than or equal to $25,000, then the
approach would be that outlined in 24CFR35.930(c), which states to conduct paint testing or
presume the presence of LBP, and conduct a risk assessment if paint testing results are positive
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(one has the option of not doing paint testing, but beginning with the risk assessment).
Following evaluation the use of interim controls and safe work practices is the prescribed
measure of lead hazard reduction. Following the presumption of LBP, use standard treatments as
the prescribed measure.
Where rehabilitation costs exceed $25,000, the approach would be that outlined in
24CFR35.930(d), which says to conduct paint testing or presume LBP. If the paint test is
positive, then conduct a risk assessment. In this approach also one has the option of not doing
paint testing, but beginning with the risk assessment. Following evaluation, abate all LBP
hazards identified in the paint testing or risk assessment and any LBP hazards created as a result
of the rehabilitation work, except, if you choose, interim controls may be used on exterior
surfaces that are not disturbed by rehabilitation. Following presumption of LBP, abate all
applicable surfaces.
North Carolina’s Lead Hazard Management Program for Lead-Based Paint Renovation,
Repair and Painting Rule (RRP) Many of you have asked how “RR&P” or “RRP” will affect
your rehab projects. As public health authorities have learned more and more over the last
decades about the danger from working on old houses with lead-based paint, more and more
targeted controls have been implemented. RRP is the latest, and it affects all repair and rehab
work, whether publicly funded or not.
The RRP rule, which took effect January 1, 2010, requires (1) that all contractors working in
homes built before 1978 become NC Certified Renovation Firms, and (2) that all workers on
these homes work under the direction of an accredited NC Certified Renovator. Under RRP,
those working on pre-1978 homes are also required (1) to follow specific work practices to
prevent lead contamination and (2) to provide the lead pamphlet "2010 Lead-Safe Certified
Guide to Renovate Right" to owners and occupants before starting renovation work.
For a wealth of information on North Carolina’s requirements under RRP -- how to get training,
guidance documents, forms and applications, links to other resources, etc. -- go to
http://www.epi.state.nc.us/epi/lead/lhmp.html. There you will find the actual North Carolina
Rules, a 7-page document, which makes frequent reference to the 79-page Federal law.
Although the Housing Finance Agency is not the enforcement entity for RRP, your program
guidelines require you to remain in compliance with all state and local construction laws.
Documentation associated with LBP hazard reduction Throughout the process of
implementing 24CFR35 there are certain items that the Member must maintain in the case file to
document the lead hazard reduction process such as the “Lead Requirements Worksheet”.
In addition to the required notices listed above and the work write-up/cost estimate delineating
those items attributable to lead hazard reduction from those associated with the rehabilitation of
the unit, the Member must be prepared to provide the following documentation during a typical
monitoring visit: 1) documentation showing the amount of federal funds attributed to the hard
costs of rehabilitation of a unit and the method used in calculating this amount; 2) documentation
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showing the approach used in addressing lead hazard reduction (e.g.., safe work practices,
interim controls, abatement); 3) documentation of the necessary certifications required by
24CFR35 for those performing evaluations, clearances, lead hazard reduction activities, etc. (e.g.
Abatement Worker Certification for those involved with the abatement of lead hazards or Risk
Assessor Certification for those performing risk assessments); 4) documentation showing
clearance of the worksite/unit; and 5) documentation showing that the recipient has complied
with 24CFR35.1345 regarding the relocation of the occupants of the dwelling unit.
The Office of Community Planning and Development (CPD) and the Office of Healthy Homes
and Lead Hazard Control (OHHLHC) have jointly created the Lead-Safe Housing Rule
Checklist” and the “Lead-Safe Housing Rule Applicability Form” to aid in the implementation
and compliance with the Lead-Safe Housing Rule. These forms may be used and kept in the
case file to ensure the required procedures are performed and the appropriate documentation is
maintained for each assisted unit. However, the “Lead Requirements Worksheet” must be used
and kept in each ESFRLP-assisted case file.
88
Lead Requirements Worksheet
North Carolina Housing Finance Agency
Single-Family Rehabilitation Program (SFR)
DIRECTIONS: This worksheet must be completed and placed in all unit files assisted with SFR funds.
Street Address:
DU#
City:
State:
NC
Zip:
Part 1: Regulation Eligibility Statements
Check all that apply:

Property is receiving Federal funds.
Unit was built prior to 1978.
Note: Continue with the Exemption Statements below. If the home was built after January 1, 1978,
check the first exemption and file form in the case file.
Part 2: Full Exemptions from All Requirements of 24 CFR Part 35 (The Lead Regulation)
If any of the exemptions are applicable, the property is exempt from the requirements of 24CFR Part
35 per the regulatory citation. Note: ONLY eligible exemptions for SFR are listed.
Check all that apply:
The property was constructed after January 1, 1978. [35.115(a)(1)]
A paint inspection conducted in accordance with 35.1320(a) established that the property is
free of lead-based paint. [35.115(a)(4)]
The date of the original paint inspection was
paint inspection conducted on
. An optional
confirmed this prior finding.
ALL lead-based paint in the property been identified and removed, and has clearance been
achieved. [35.115(a)(5)]
ALL rehab excludes disturbing painted surfaces. [35.115(a)(8)]
Emergency repairs to the property are being performed to safeguard against imminent
danger to human life, health or safety, or to protect the property from further structural
damage due to natural disaster, fire or structural collapse. The exemption applies only to
repairs necessary to respond to the emergency. [35.115(a)(9)]
Page 1 of 2
Lead Requirements Worksheet
North Carolina Housing Finance Agency
Single-Family Rehabilitation Program (SFR)
Part 3: Hazard Reduction Requirements - Partial Waivers
If any of the partial waivers are applicable, the grantee and/or homeowner may waive certain requirements as described below.
A) De minimis [35.1350(d)(1) & (2)]
The amount of painted surface that is being disturbed during construction is below "de minimis" levels. Safe work
practices and clearance are not required in that work area.
Less than 9 SF of bare soil?
Less than 20 square feet on an exterior surface
Less than 2 square feet in the following rooms:
,
,
,
B) Elderly Relocation Waiver [Interpretive Guidance Question J-24]
The home is only occupied by an elderly person(s). Relocation of elderly homeowners is not required if complete
disclosure of the nature of the work is provided and informed consent is obtained prior to rehabilitation.
C) Historic Abatement Waiver [35.115(13)]
The home that is subject to abatement requirements is listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic
Places, or contributes to a National Register Historic District. The State Historic Preservation Office may request that
interim controls be implemented rather than abatement.
D) No Exterior Work [35.930(d)(3)]
No exterior paint is to be disturbed during renovation. (Only exterior stabilization required even in abatement jobs.)
E) No Children [35.1330(d)(1)]
All of the residents are over the age of 6. (No chewable or play area treatments required.)
F) No Bite Marks [35.1330(d)(1)]
All chewable surfaces are free of bite marks made by children under 6. (No chewable surface treatment required)
G) No Dust Hazards [35.1330(c)(1)(i)]
The closest horizontal surface dust wipe is below the clearance threshold. (No friction and impact surface treatments
required in the following work areas:
Part 4: Level of Rehabilitation Assistance [35.915]
A. Amount of federal funding for home
$
B. Amount of rehabilitation Hard Costs (not
including any soft costs or costs of lead hazard
evaluation, reduction, clearance and training)
$
C. Level of Assistance (lower of A or B)
$
Approach Required (Based on answer to C, above)
$5,000 - $25,000
Risk Assessment and Interim Control of Lead Hazards
Note - If abatement work was subtracted from the hard cost to get the
unit below $25,000. The subtracted abatement items must be
performed by a NC licensed abatement contractor and crew.
$25,001 and above
Risk Assessment and Abate Lead Hazards
Page 2 of 2
Lead-Safe Housing Rule Checklist
For General Compliance Documentation
Program participants can use this checklist as a guide for determining whether or not they are proceeding in a
manner required by the Lead-Safe Housing Rule, and that they are maintaining documentation for each SFRLPassisted project. Compliance with the program-specific requirements may not be substantiated solely by the
documents included on this general checklist. Additional guidance is provided as referenced in the checklist.
Applicability Form- Attach the Lead-Safe Housing Rule Applicability form indicating
that the property is covered by or exempt from Lead-Safe Housing Rule.
(Note: (A) If the property owner is exempt, the file should include the reason for the exemption and no
further documentation is required; (B) if the property is covered by the Rule, the file should include the
appropriate documentation to indicate basic compliance, as listed below.)
Summary Paint Testing Report or Presumption Notice- Attach a paint testing report
to indicate the presence of lead-based paint (LBP) for projects receiving up to $5,000 per
unit in rehabilitation assistance. If no testing was performed, then LBP is presumed to be
on all disturbed surfaces and the Notice of Lead Hazard Presumption should be attached.
Risk Assessment Report- Attach the Risk Assessment Report (in addition to the
requirement to indicate any presence of lead-based paint hazards for projects receiving
more than $5,000 per unit in rehabilitation assistance.
(Note: If the property receives more than $25,000 in assistance, more stringent requirements apply.)
Notice of Evaluation- Attach the Summary Notice of Lead Hazard Evaluation & LeadBased Paint Risk Assessment demonstrating that an evaluation summary was provided to
residents following risk assessment or other LBP inspection or paint testing.
Clearance Report- Attach the clearance report indicating a “clearance examination” was
performed of the work-site upon completion, and the Clearance Report Review
Worksheet.
Notice of Hazard Reduction Completion- Upon completion, attach the Summary Notice
of Completion of Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Activity to show that a LBP remediation
summary was provided to residents
LEAD-SAFE HOUSING RULE
APPLICABILITY FORM
Address/location of subject property:
Regulation Eligibility Statements (check all that apply):
Property is receiving Federal funds.
Unit was built prior to 1978.
Note: If both Eligibility Statements above have been checked, continue with the Exemption Statements
below. Otherwise, the regulation does not apply, sign and date the form.
Regulation Exemption Statements [24 CFR 35.115] (check all that apply):
Emergency repairs to the property are being performed to safeguard against imminent
danger to human life, health or safety, or to protect the property from further structural
damage due to natural disaster, fire or structural collapse. The exemption applies only to
repairs necessary to respond to the emergency.
The property will not be used for human residential habitation. This does not apply to
common areas such as hallways and stairways of residential and mixed-use properties.
Housing "exclusively" for the elderly or persons with disabilities, with the provision that
children less than six years of age will not reside in the dwelling unit.
An inspection performed according to HUD standards found the property contained no
lead-based paint.
According to documented methodologies, lead-based paint has been identified and
removed; and the property has achieved clearance.
The rehabilitation will not disturb any painted surface.
The property has no bedrooms.
The property is currently vacant and will remain vacant until demolition.
If any of the above Exemption Statements have been checked, the Regulation does not apply.
In all cases, sign and date the form.
I,
Signature
Organization
(Printed Name)
, certify that the information listed above is true
and accurate to the best of my knowledge.
Date
Appendix B
Income Limits
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
$53,100
Alexander
$52,200
Alleghany
$41,800
Anson
$40,700
Ashe
$48,400
Avery
$48,100
Beaufort
$50,900
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 11,200
$ 18,600
$ 22,320
$ 29,750
$ 11,000
$ 18,300
$ 21,960
$ 29,250
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,250
$ 17,050
$ 20,460
$ 27,300
$ 10,700
$ 17,850
$ 21,420
$ 28,500
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 12,800 $ 14,400 $ 15,950 $ 17,250 $ 18,550 $ 19,800
$ 21,250 $ 23,900 $ 26,550 $ 28,700 $ 30,800 $ 32,950
$ 25,500 $ 28,680 $ 31,860 $ 34,440 $ 36,960 $ 39,540
$ 34,000 $ 38,250 $ 42,500 $ 45,900 $ 49,300 $ 52,700
$ 12,550 $ 14,100 $ 15,650 $ 16,950 $ 18,200 $ 19,450
$ 20,900 $ 23,500 $ 26,100 $ 28,200 $ 30,300 $ 32,400
$ 25,080 $ 28,200 $ 31,320 $ 33,840 $ 36,360 $ 38,880
$ 33,400 $ 37,600 $ 41,750 $ 45,100 $ 48,450 $ 51,800
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,400 $ 21,800 $ 24,200 $ 26,150 $ 28,100 $ 30,050
$ 23,280 $ 26,160 $ 29,040 $ 31,380 $ 33,720 $ 36,060
$ 31,000 $ 34,850 $ 38,700 $ 41,800 $ 44,900 $ 48,000
$ 11,700 $ 13,150 $ 14,600 $ 15,800 $ 16,950 $ 18,150
$ 19,500 $ 21,950 $ 24,350 $ 26,300 $ 28,250 $ 30,200
$ 23,400 $ 26,340 $ 29,220 $ 31,560 $ 33,900 $ 36,240
$ 31,200 $ 35,100 $ 38,950 $ 42,100 $ 45,200 $ 48,300
$ 12,200 $ 13,750 $ 15,250 $ 16,500 $ 17,700 $ 18,950
$ 20,400 $ 22,950 $ 25,450 $ 27,500 $ 29,550 $ 31,600
$ 24,480 $ 27,540 $ 30,540 $ 33,000 $ 35,460 $ 37,920
$ 32,600 $ 36,650 $ 40,700 $ 44,000 $ 47,250 $ 50,500
Eight
Person
$ 21,100
$ 35,050
$ 42,060
$ 56,100
$ 20,700
$ 34,500
$ 41,400
$ 55,150
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,150
$ 31,950
$ 38,340
$ 51,100
$ 19,300
$ 32,150
$ 38,580
$ 51,450
$ 20,150
$ 33,600
$ 40,320
$ 53,750
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Bertie
$53,100
$41,900
Bladen
$44,300
Brunswick
$58,300
Buncombe
$57,900
Burke
$52,200
Cabarrus
$67,000
Caldwell
$52,200
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 12,600
$ 21,000
$ 25,200
$ 33,600
$ 12,150
$ 20,300
$ 24,360
$ 32,450
$ 11,000
$ 18,300
$ 21,960
$ 29,250
$ 14,100
$ 23,450
$ 28,140
$ 37,550
$ 11,000
$ 18,300
$ 21,960
$ 29,250
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 14,400 $ 16,200 $ 18,000 $ 19,450 $ 20,900 $ 22,350
$ 24,000 $ 27,000 $ 30,000 $ 32,400 $ 34,800 $ 37,200
$ 28,800 $ 32,400 $ 36,000 $ 38,880 $ 41,760 $ 44,640
$ 38,400 $ 43,200 $ 48,000 $ 51,850 $ 55,700 $ 59,550
$ 13,900 $ 15,650 $ 17,350 $ 18,750 $ 20,150 $ 21,550
$ 23,200 $ 26,100 $ 28,950 $ 31,300 $ 33,600 $ 35,900
$ 27,840 $ 31,320 $ 34,740 $ 37,560 $ 40,320 $ 43,080
$ 37,050 $ 41,700 $ 46,300 $ 50,050 $ 53,750 $ 57,450
$ 12,550 $ 14,100 $ 15,650 $ 16,950 $ 18,200 $ 19,450
$ 20,900 $ 23,500 $ 26,100 $ 28,200 $ 30,300 $ 32,400
$ 25,080 $ 28,200 $ 31,320 $ 33,840 $ 36,360 $ 38,880
$ 33,400 $ 37,600 $ 41,750 $ 45,100 $ 48,450 $ 51,800
$ 16,100 $ 18,100 $ 20,100 $ 21,750 $ 23,350 $ 24,950
$ 26,800 $ 30,150 $ 33,500 $ 36,200 $ 38,900 $ 41,550
$ 32,160 $ 36,180 $ 40,200 $ 43,440 $ 46,680 $ 49,860
$ 42,900 $ 48,250 $ 53,600 $ 57,900 $ 62,200 $ 66,500
$ 12,550 $ 14,100 $ 15,650 $ 16,950 $ 18,200 $ 19,450
$ 20,900 $ 23,500 $ 26,100 $ 28,200 $ 30,300 $ 32,400
$ 25,080 $ 28,200 $ 31,320 $ 33,840 $ 36,360 $ 38,880
$ 33,400 $ 37,600 $ 41,750 $ 45,100 $ 48,450 $ 51,800
Eight
Person
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 23,800
$ 39,600
$ 47,520
$ 63,400
$ 22,950
$ 38,250
$ 45,900
$ 61,150
$ 20,700
$ 34,500
$ 41,400
$ 55,150
$ 26,550
$ 44,250
$ 53,100
$ 70,800
$ 20,700
$ 34,500
$ 41,400
$ 55,150
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Camden
$53,100
$71,900
Carteret
$54,500
Caswell
$47,100
Catawba
$52,200
Chatham
$74,900
Cherokee
$44,300
Chowan
$44,700
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 15,100
$ 25,200
$ 30,240
$ 40,250
$ 12,350
$ 20,550
$ 24,660
$ 32,850
$ 10,200
$ 17,000
$ 20,400
$ 27,200
$ 11,000
$ 18,300
$ 21,960
$ 29,250
$ 14,850
$ 24,750
$ 29,700
$ 39,600
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 17,250 $ 19,400 $ 21,550 $ 23,300 $ 25,000 $ 26,750
$ 28,800 $ 32,400 $ 35,950 $ 38,850 $ 41,750 $ 44,600
$ 34,560 $ 38,880 $ 43,140 $ 46,620 $ 50,100 $ 53,520
$ 46,000 $ 51,750 $ 57,500 $ 62,100 $ 66,700 $ 71,300
$ 14,100 $ 15,850 $ 17,600 $ 19,050 $ 20,450 $ 21,850
$ 23,450 $ 26,400 $ 29,300 $ 31,650 $ 34,000 $ 36,350
$ 28,140 $ 31,680 $ 35,160 $ 37,980 $ 40,800 $ 43,620
$ 37,550 $ 42,250 $ 46,900 $ 50,700 $ 54,450 $ 58,200
$ 11,650 $ 13,100 $ 14,550 $ 15,750 $ 16,900 $ 18,050
$ 19,400 $ 21,850 $ 24,250 $ 26,200 $ 28,150 $ 30,100
$ 23,280 $ 26,220 $ 29,100 $ 31,440 $ 33,780 $ 36,120
$ 31,050 $ 34,950 $ 38,800 $ 41,950 $ 45,050 $ 48,150
$ 12,550 $ 14,100 $ 15,650 $ 16,950 $ 18,200 $ 19,450
$ 20,900 $ 23,500 $ 26,100 $ 28,200 $ 30,300 $ 32,400
$ 25,080 $ 28,200 $ 31,320 $ 33,840 $ 36,360 $ 38,880
$ 33,400 $ 37,600 $ 41,750 $ 45,100 $ 48,450 $ 51,800
$ 17,000 $ 19,100 $ 21,200 $ 22,900 $ 24,600 $ 26,300
$ 28,300 $ 31,850 $ 35,350 $ 38,200 $ 41,050 $ 43,850
$ 33,960 $ 38,220 $ 42,420 $ 45,840 $ 49,260 $ 52,620
$ 45,250 $ 50,900 $ 56,550 $ 61,100 $ 65,600 $ 70,150
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
Eight
Person
$ 28,450
$ 47,500
$ 57,000
$ 75,900
$ 23,250
$ 38,700
$ 46,440
$ 61,950
$ 19,250
$ 32,050
$ 38,460
$ 51,250
$ 20,700
$ 34,500
$ 41,400
$ 55,150
$ 28,000
$ 46,700
$ 56,040
$ 74,650
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Clay
$53,100
$47,800
Cleveland
$50,000
Columbus
$47,100
Craven
$53,400
Cumberland
$52,200
Currituck
$70,500
Dare
$66,100
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,500
$ 17,500
$ 21,000
$ 28,000
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 11,950
$ 19,900
$ 23,880
$ 31,850
$ 11,000
$ 18,300
$ 21,960
$ 29,250
$ 14,850
$ 24,700
$ 29,640
$ 39,500
$ 14,000
$ 23,350
$ 28,020
$ 37,350
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 12,000 $ 13,500 $ 15,000 $ 16,200 $ 17,400 $ 18,600
$ 20,000 $ 22,500 $ 25,000 $ 27,000 $ 29,000 $ 31,000
$ 24,000 $ 27,000 $ 30,000 $ 32,400 $ 34,800 $ 37,200
$ 32,000 $ 36,000 $ 40,000 $ 43,200 $ 46,400 $ 49,600
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 13,650 $ 15,350 $ 17,050 $ 18,450 $ 19,800 $ 21,150
$ 22,750 $ 25,600 $ 28,400 $ 30,700 $ 32,950 $ 35,250
$ 27,300 $ 30,720 $ 34,080 $ 36,840 $ 39,540 $ 42,300
$ 36,400 $ 40,950 $ 45,450 $ 49,100 $ 52,750 $ 56,400
$ 12,550 $ 14,100 $ 15,650 $ 16,950 $ 18,200 $ 19,450
$ 20,900 $ 23,500 $ 26,100 $ 28,200 $ 30,300 $ 32,400
$ 25,080 $ 28,200 $ 31,320 $ 33,840 $ 36,360 $ 38,880
$ 33,400 $ 37,600 $ 41,750 $ 45,100 $ 48,450 $ 51,800
$ 16,950 $ 19,050 $ 21,150 $ 22,850 $ 24,550 $ 26,250
$ 28,200 $ 31,750 $ 35,250 $ 38,100 $ 40,900 $ 43,750
$ 33,840 $ 38,100 $ 42,300 $ 45,720 $ 49,080 $ 52,500
$ 45,150 $ 50,800 $ 56,400 $ 60,950 $ 65,450 $ 69,950
$ 16,000 $ 18,000 $ 20,000 $ 21,600 $ 23,200 $ 24,800
$ 26,700 $ 30,050 $ 33,350 $ 36,050 $ 38,700 $ 41,400
$ 32,040 $ 36,060 $ 40,020 $ 43,260 $ 46,440 $ 49,680
$ 42,700 $ 48,050 $ 53,350 $ 57,650 $ 61,900 $ 66,200
Eight
Person
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,800
$ 33,000
$ 39,600
$ 52,800
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 22,550
$ 37,500
$ 45,000
$ 60,000
$ 20,700
$ 34,500
$ 41,400
$ 55,150
$ 27,950
$ 46,550
$ 55,860
$ 74,450
$ 26,400
$ 44,050
$ 52,860
$ 70,450
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Davidson
$53,100
$49,100
Davie
$58,500
Duplin
$43,100
Durham
$74,900
Edgecombe
$49,800
Forsyth
$58,500
Franklin
$76,600
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 11,000
$ 18,350
$ 22,020
$ 29,300
$ 12,300
$ 20,500
$ 24,600
$ 32,800
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 14,850
$ 24,750
$ 29,700
$ 39,600
$ 10,500
$ 17,450
$ 20,940
$ 27,900
$ 12,300
$ 20,500
$ 24,600
$ 32,800
$ 16,100
$ 26,850
$ 32,220
$ 42,950
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 12,600 $ 14,150 $ 15,700 $ 17,000 $ 18,250 $ 19,500
$ 20,950 $ 23,550 $ 26,150 $ 28,250 $ 30,350 $ 32,450
$ 25,140 $ 28,260 $ 31,380 $ 33,900 $ 36,420 $ 38,940
$ 33,500 $ 37,700 $ 41,850 $ 45,200 $ 48,550 $ 51,900
$ 14,050 $ 15,800 $ 17,550 $ 19,000 $ 20,400 $ 21,800
$ 23,400 $ 26,350 $ 29,250 $ 31,600 $ 33,950 $ 36,300
$ 28,080 $ 31,620 $ 35,100 $ 37,920 $ 40,740 $ 43,560
$ 37,450 $ 42,150 $ 46,800 $ 50,550 $ 54,300 $ 58,050
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 17,000 $ 19,100 $ 21,200 $ 22,900 $ 24,600 $ 26,300
$ 28,300 $ 31,850 $ 35,350 $ 38,200 $ 41,050 $ 43,850
$ 33,960 $ 38,220 $ 42,420 $ 45,840 $ 49,260 $ 52,620
$ 45,250 $ 50,900 $ 56,550 $ 61,100 $ 65,600 $ 70,150
$ 12,000 $ 13,500 $ 14,950 $ 16,150 $ 17,350 $ 18,550
$ 19,950 $ 22,450 $ 24,900 $ 26,900 $ 28,900 $ 30,900
$ 23,940 $ 26,940 $ 29,880 $ 32,280 $ 34,680 $ 37,080
$ 31,900 $ 35,900 $ 39,850 $ 43,050 $ 46,250 $ 49,450
$ 14,050 $ 15,800 $ 17,550 $ 19,000 $ 20,400 $ 21,800
$ 23,400 $ 26,350 $ 29,250 $ 31,600 $ 33,950 $ 36,300
$ 28,080 $ 31,620 $ 35,100 $ 37,920 $ 40,740 $ 43,560
$ 37,450 $ 42,150 $ 46,800 $ 50,550 $ 54,300 $ 58,050
$ 18,400 $ 20,700 $ 23,000 $ 24,850 $ 26,700 $ 28,550
$ 30,650 $ 34,500 $ 38,300 $ 41,400 $ 44,450 $ 47,500
$ 36,780 $ 41,400 $ 45,960 $ 49,680 $ 53,340 $ 57,000
$ 49,050 $ 55,200 $ 61,300 $ 66,250 $ 71,150 $ 76,050
Eight
Person
$ 20,750
$ 34,550
$ 41,460
$ 55,250
$ 23,200
$ 38,650
$ 46,380
$ 61,800
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 28,000
$ 46,700
$ 56,040
$ 74,650
$ 19,750
$ 32,900
$ 39,480
$ 52,650
$ 23,200
$ 38,650
$ 46,380
$ 61,800
$ 30,400
$ 50,600
$ 60,720
$ 80,950
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Gaston
$53,100
$67,000
Gates
$55,000
Graham
$40,600
Granville
$56,300
Greene
$52,100
Guilford
$57,200
Halifax
$43,700
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 14,100
$ 23,450
$ 28,140
$ 37,550
$ 12,400
$ 20,600
$ 24,720
$ 32,950
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 11,850
$ 19,750
$ 23,700
$ 31,550
$ 11,000
$ 18,250
$ 21,900
$ 29,200
$ 11,900
$ 19,850
$ 23,820
$ 31,750
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 16,100 $ 18,100 $ 20,100 $ 21,750 $ 23,350 $ 24,950
$ 26,800 $ 30,150 $ 33,500 $ 36,200 $ 38,900 $ 41,550
$ 32,160 $ 36,180 $ 40,200 $ 43,440 $ 46,680 $ 49,860
$ 42,900 $ 48,250 $ 53,600 $ 57,900 $ 62,200 $ 66,500
$ 14,150 $ 15,900 $ 17,650 $ 19,100 $ 20,500 $ 21,900
$ 23,550 $ 26,500 $ 29,400 $ 31,800 $ 34,150 $ 36,500
$ 28,260 $ 31,800 $ 35,280 $ 38,160 $ 40,980 $ 43,800
$ 37,650 $ 42,350 $ 47,050 $ 50,850 $ 54,600 $ 58,350
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 13,550 $ 15,250 $ 16,900 $ 18,300 $ 19,650 $ 21,000
$ 22,550 $ 25,350 $ 28,150 $ 30,450 $ 32,700 $ 34,950
$ 27,060 $ 30,420 $ 33,780 $ 36,540 $ 39,240 $ 41,940
$ 36,050 $ 40,550 $ 45,050 $ 48,700 $ 52,300 $ 55,900
$ 12,550 $ 14,100 $ 15,650 $ 16,950 $ 18,200 $ 19,450
$ 20,850 $ 23,450 $ 26,050 $ 28,150 $ 30,250 $ 32,350
$ 25,020 $ 28,140 $ 31,260 $ 33,780 $ 36,300 $ 38,820
$ 33,400 $ 37,550 $ 41,700 $ 45,050 $ 48,400 $ 51,750
$ 13,600 $ 15,300 $ 17,000 $ 18,400 $ 19,750 $ 21,100
$ 22,700 $ 25,550 $ 28,350 $ 30,650 $ 32,900 $ 35,200
$ 27,240 $ 30,660 $ 34,020 $ 36,780 $ 39,480 $ 42,240
$ 36,300 $ 40,850 $ 45,350 $ 49,000 $ 52,650 $ 56,250
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
Eight
Person
$ 26,550
$ 44,250
$ 53,100
$ 70,800
$ 23,300
$ 38,850
$ 46,620
$ 62,150
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 22,350
$ 37,200
$ 44,640
$ 59,500
$ 20,700
$ 34,400
$ 41,280
$ 55,050
$ 22,450
$ 37,450
$ 44,940
$ 59,900
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Harnett
$53,100
$55,100
Haywood
$53,400
Henderson
$57,900
Hertford
$42,800
Hoke
$55,000
Hyde
$43,200
Iredell
$62,500
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 11,600
$ 19,300
$ 23,160
$ 30,900
$ 11,200
$ 18,700
$ 22,440
$ 29,900
$ 12,150
$ 20,300
$ 24,360
$ 32,450
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 11,550
$ 19,250
$ 23,100
$ 30,800
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 13,150
$ 21,900
$ 26,280
$ 35,000
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 13,250 $ 14,900 $ 16,550 $ 17,900 $ 19,200 $ 20,550
$ 22,050 $ 24,800 $ 27,550 $ 29,800 $ 32,000 $ 34,200
$ 26,460 $ 29,760 $ 33,060 $ 35,760 $ 38,400 $ 41,040
$ 35,300 $ 39,700 $ 44,100 $ 47,650 $ 51,200 $ 54,700
$ 12,800 $ 14,400 $ 16,000 $ 17,300 $ 18,600 $ 19,850
$ 21,400 $ 24,050 $ 26,700 $ 28,850 $ 31,000 $ 33,150
$ 25,680 $ 28,860 $ 32,040 $ 34,620 $ 37,200 $ 39,780
$ 34,200 $ 38,450 $ 42,700 $ 46,150 $ 49,550 $ 52,950
$ 13,900 $ 15,650 $ 17,350 $ 18,750 $ 20,150 $ 21,550
$ 23,200 $ 26,100 $ 28,950 $ 31,300 $ 33,600 $ 35,900
$ 27,840 $ 31,320 $ 34,740 $ 37,560 $ 40,320 $ 43,080
$ 37,050 $ 41,700 $ 46,300 $ 50,050 $ 53,750 $ 57,450
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 13,200 $ 14,850 $ 16,500 $ 17,850 $ 19,150 $ 20,500
$ 22,000 $ 24,750 $ 27,500 $ 29,700 $ 31,900 $ 34,100
$ 26,400 $ 29,700 $ 33,000 $ 35,640 $ 38,280 $ 40,920
$ 35,200 $ 39,600 $ 44,000 $ 47,550 $ 51,050 $ 54,600
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 15,000 $ 16,900 $ 18,750 $ 20,250 $ 21,750 $ 23,250
$ 25,000 $ 28,150 $ 31,250 $ 33,750 $ 36,250 $ 38,750
$ 30,000 $ 33,780 $ 37,500 $ 40,500 $ 43,500 $ 46,500
$ 40,000 $ 45,000 $ 50,000 $ 54,000 $ 58,000 $ 62,000
Eight
Person
$ 21,850
$ 36,400
$ 43,680
$ 58,250
$ 21,150
$ 35,250
$ 42,300
$ 56,400
$ 22,950
$ 38,250
$ 45,900
$ 61,150
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 21,800
$ 36,300
$ 43,560
$ 58,100
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 24,750
$ 41,250
$ 49,500
$ 66,000
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Jackson
$53,100
$49,800
Johnston
$76,600
Jones
$50,300
Lee
$57,000
Lenoir
$46,500
Lincoln
$63,600
McDowell
$47,100
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 10,500
$ 17,450
$ 20,940
$ 27,900
$ 16,100
$ 26,850
$ 32,220
$ 42,950
$ 10,600
$ 17,650
$ 21,180
$ 28,200
$ 12,000
$ 19,950
$ 23,940
$ 31,950
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 12,500
$ 20,850
$ 25,020
$ 33,350
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 12,000 $ 13,500 $ 14,950 $ 16,150 $ 17,350 $ 18,550
$ 19,950 $ 22,450 $ 24,900 $ 26,900 $ 28,900 $ 30,900
$ 23,940 $ 26,940 $ 29,880 $ 32,280 $ 34,680 $ 37,080
$ 31,900 $ 35,900 $ 39,850 $ 43,050 $ 46,250 $ 49,450
$ 18,400 $ 20,700 $ 23,000 $ 24,850 $ 26,700 $ 28,550
$ 30,650 $ 34,500 $ 38,300 $ 41,400 $ 44,450 $ 47,500
$ 36,780 $ 41,400 $ 45,960 $ 49,680 $ 53,340 $ 57,000
$ 49,050 $ 55,200 $ 61,300 $ 66,250 $ 71,150 $ 76,050
$ 12,100 $ 13,600 $ 15,100 $ 16,350 $ 17,550 $ 18,750
$ 20,150 $ 22,650 $ 25,150 $ 27,200 $ 29,200 $ 31,200
$ 24,180 $ 27,180 $ 30,180 $ 32,640 $ 35,040 $ 37,440
$ 32,200 $ 36,250 $ 40,250 $ 43,500 $ 46,700 $ 49,950
$ 13,700 $ 15,400 $ 17,100 $ 18,500 $ 19,850 $ 21,250
$ 22,800 $ 25,650 $ 28,500 $ 30,800 $ 33,100 $ 35,350
$ 27,360 $ 30,780 $ 34,200 $ 36,960 $ 39,720 $ 42,420
$ 36,500 $ 41,050 $ 45,600 $ 49,250 $ 52,900 $ 56,550
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 14,300 $ 16,100 $ 17,850 $ 19,300 $ 20,750 $ 22,150
$ 23,800 $ 26,800 $ 29,750 $ 32,150 $ 34,550 $ 36,900
$ 28,560 $ 32,160 $ 35,700 $ 38,580 $ 41,460 $ 44,280
$ 38,100 $ 42,850 $ 47,600 $ 51,450 $ 55,250 $ 59,050
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
Eight
Person
$ 19,750
$ 32,900
$ 39,480
$ 52,650
$ 30,400
$ 50,600
$ 60,720
$ 80,950
$ 19,950
$ 33,200
$ 39,840
$ 53,150
$ 22,600
$ 37,650
$ 45,180
$ 60,200
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 23,600
$ 39,300
$ 47,160
$ 62,850
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Macon
$53,100
$46,800
Madison
$57,900
Martin
$45,800
Mecklenburg
$67,000
Mitchell
$47,700
Montgomery
$44,200
Moore
$60,600
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 12,150
$ 20,300
$ 24,360
$ 32,450
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 14,100
$ 23,450
$ 28,140
$ 37,550
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 12,800
$ 21,300
$ 25,560
$ 34,100
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 13,900 $ 15,650 $ 17,350 $ 18,750 $ 20,150 $ 21,550
$ 23,200 $ 26,100 $ 28,950 $ 31,300 $ 33,600 $ 35,900
$ 27,840 $ 31,320 $ 34,740 $ 37,560 $ 40,320 $ 43,080
$ 37,050 $ 41,700 $ 46,300 $ 50,050 $ 53,750 $ 57,450
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 16,100 $ 18,100 $ 20,100 $ 21,750 $ 23,350 $ 24,950
$ 26,800 $ 30,150 $ 33,500 $ 36,200 $ 38,900 $ 41,550
$ 32,160 $ 36,180 $ 40,200 $ 43,440 $ 46,680 $ 49,860
$ 42,900 $ 48,250 $ 53,600 $ 57,900 $ 62,200 $ 66,500
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 14,600 $ 16,450 $ 18,250 $ 19,750 $ 21,200 $ 22,650
$ 24,350 $ 27,400 $ 30,400 $ 32,850 $ 35,300 $ 37,700
$ 29,220 $ 32,880 $ 36,480 $ 39,420 $ 42,360 $ 45,240
$ 38,950 $ 43,800 $ 48,650 $ 52,550 $ 56,450 $ 60,350
Eight
Person
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 22,950
$ 38,250
$ 45,900
$ 61,150
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 26,550
$ 44,250
$ 53,100
$ 70,800
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 24,100
$ 40,150
$ 48,180
$ 64,250
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Nash
$53,100
$49,800
New Hanover
$65,100
Northampton
$38,200
Onslow
$51,200
Orange
$74,900
Pamlico
$56,100
Pasquotank
$57,000
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 10,500
$ 17,450
$ 20,940
$ 27,900
$ 13,700
$ 22,800
$ 27,360
$ 36,500
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,750
$ 17,950
$ 21,540
$ 28,700
$ 14,850
$ 24,750
$ 29,700
$ 39,600
$ 11,800
$ 19,650
$ 23,580
$ 31,450
$ 12,000
$ 19,950
$ 23,940
$ 31,950
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 12,000 $ 13,500 $ 14,950 $ 16,150 $ 17,350 $ 18,550
$ 19,950 $ 22,450 $ 24,900 $ 26,900 $ 28,900 $ 30,900
$ 23,940 $ 26,940 $ 29,880 $ 32,280 $ 34,680 $ 37,080
$ 31,900 $ 35,900 $ 39,850 $ 43,050 $ 46,250 $ 49,450
$ 15,650 $ 17,600 $ 19,550 $ 21,150 $ 22,700 $ 24,250
$ 26,050 $ 29,300 $ 32,550 $ 35,200 $ 37,800 $ 40,400
$ 31,260 $ 35,160 $ 39,060 $ 42,240 $ 45,360 $ 48,480
$ 41,700 $ 46,900 $ 52,100 $ 56,300 $ 60,450 $ 64,650
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 12,300 $ 13,850 $ 15,350 $ 16,600 $ 17,850 $ 19,050
$ 20,500 $ 23,050 $ 25,600 $ 27,650 $ 29,700 $ 31,750
$ 24,600 $ 27,660 $ 30,720 $ 33,180 $ 35,640 $ 38,100
$ 32,800 $ 36,900 $ 40,950 $ 44,250 $ 47,550 $ 50,800
$ 17,000 $ 19,100 $ 21,200 $ 22,900 $ 24,600 $ 26,300
$ 28,300 $ 31,850 $ 35,350 $ 38,200 $ 41,050 $ 43,850
$ 33,960 $ 38,220 $ 42,420 $ 45,840 $ 49,260 $ 52,620
$ 45,250 $ 50,900 $ 56,550 $ 61,100 $ 65,600 $ 70,150
$ 13,500 $ 15,200 $ 16,850 $ 18,200 $ 19,550 $ 20,900
$ 22,450 $ 25,250 $ 28,050 $ 30,300 $ 32,550 $ 34,800
$ 26,940 $ 30,300 $ 33,660 $ 36,360 $ 39,060 $ 41,760
$ 35,950 $ 40,450 $ 44,900 $ 48,500 $ 52,100 $ 55,700
$ 13,700 $ 15,400 $ 17,100 $ 18,500 $ 19,850 $ 21,250
$ 22,800 $ 25,650 $ 28,500 $ 30,800 $ 33,100 $ 35,350
$ 27,360 $ 30,780 $ 34,200 $ 36,960 $ 39,720 $ 42,420
$ 36,500 $ 41,050 $ 45,600 $ 49,250 $ 52,900 $ 56,550
Eight
Person
$ 19,750
$ 32,900
$ 39,480
$ 52,650
$ 25,850
$ 43,000
$ 51,600
$ 68,800
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 20,300
$ 33,800
$ 40,560
$ 54,100
$ 28,000
$ 46,700
$ 56,040
$ 74,650
$ 22,250
$ 37,050
$ 44,460
$ 59,300
$ 22,600
$ 37,650
$ 45,180
$ 60,200
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Pender
$53,100
$55,200
Perquimans
$52,500
Person
$50,800
Pitt
$59,300
Polk
$55,300
Randolph
$57,200
Richmond
$41,400
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 11,600
$ 19,350
$ 23,220
$ 30,950
$ 11,050
$ 18,400
$ 22,080
$ 29,400
$ 10,850
$ 18,050
$ 21,660
$ 28,850
$ 11,700
$ 19,500
$ 23,400
$ 31,150
$ 11,650
$ 19,400
$ 23,280
$ 31,000
$ 11,900
$ 19,850
$ 23,820
$ 31,750
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 13,250 $ 14,900 $ 16,550 $ 17,900 $ 19,200 $ 20,550
$ 22,100 $ 24,850 $ 27,600 $ 29,850 $ 32,050 $ 34,250
$ 26,520 $ 29,820 $ 33,120 $ 35,820 $ 38,460 $ 41,100
$ 35,350 $ 39,750 $ 44,150 $ 47,700 $ 51,250 $ 54,750
$ 12,600 $ 14,200 $ 15,750 $ 17,050 $ 18,300 $ 19,550
$ 21,000 $ 23,650 $ 26,250 $ 28,350 $ 30,450 $ 32,550
$ 25,200 $ 28,380 $ 31,500 $ 34,020 $ 36,540 $ 39,060
$ 33,600 $ 37,800 $ 42,000 $ 45,400 $ 48,750 $ 52,100
$ 12,400 $ 13,950 $ 15,450 $ 16,700 $ 17,950 $ 19,200
$ 20,600 $ 23,200 $ 25,750 $ 27,850 $ 29,900 $ 31,950
$ 24,720 $ 27,840 $ 30,900 $ 33,420 $ 35,880 $ 38,340
$ 33,000 $ 37,100 $ 41,200 $ 44,500 $ 47,800 $ 51,100
$ 13,400 $ 15,050 $ 16,700 $ 18,050 $ 19,400 $ 20,750
$ 22,250 $ 25,050 $ 27,800 $ 30,050 $ 32,250 $ 34,500
$ 26,700 $ 30,060 $ 33,360 $ 36,060 $ 38,700 $ 41,400
$ 35,600 $ 40,050 $ 44,500 $ 48,100 $ 51,650 $ 55,200
$ 13,300 $ 14,950 $ 16,600 $ 17,950 $ 19,300 $ 20,600
$ 22,150 $ 24,900 $ 27,650 $ 29,900 $ 32,100 $ 34,300
$ 26,580 $ 29,880 $ 33,180 $ 35,880 $ 38,520 $ 41,160
$ 35,400 $ 39,850 $ 44,250 $ 47,800 $ 51,350 $ 54,900
$ 13,600 $ 15,300 $ 17,000 $ 18,400 $ 19,750 $ 21,100
$ 22,700 $ 25,550 $ 28,350 $ 30,650 $ 32,900 $ 35,200
$ 27,240 $ 30,660 $ 34,020 $ 36,780 $ 39,480 $ 42,240
$ 36,300 $ 40,850 $ 45,350 $ 49,000 $ 52,650 $ 56,250
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
Eight
Person
$ 21,850
$ 36,450
$ 43,740
$ 58,300
$ 20,800
$ 34,650
$ 41,580
$ 55,450
$ 20,400
$ 34,000
$ 40,800
$ 54,400
$ 22,050
$ 36,700
$ 44,040
$ 58,750
$ 21,950
$ 36,500
$ 43,800
$ 58,450
$ 22,450
$ 37,450
$ 44,940
$ 59,900
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Robeson
$53,100
$38,900
Rockingham
$52,300
Rowan
$52,700
Rutherford
$39,700
Sampson
$44,700
Scotland
$37,000
Stanly
$56,100
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 11,000
$ 18,350
$ 22,020
$ 29,300
$ 11,100
$ 18,450
$ 22,140
$ 29,550
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 11,800
$ 19,650
$ 23,580
$ 31,450
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 12,600 $ 14,150 $ 15,700 $ 17,000 $ 18,250 $ 19,500
$ 20,950 $ 23,550 $ 26,150 $ 28,250 $ 30,350 $ 32,450
$ 25,140 $ 28,260 $ 31,380 $ 33,900 $ 36,420 $ 38,940
$ 33,500 $ 37,700 $ 41,850 $ 45,200 $ 48,550 $ 51,900
$ 12,650 $ 14,250 $ 15,800 $ 17,100 $ 18,350 $ 19,600
$ 21,100 $ 23,750 $ 26,350 $ 28,500 $ 30,600 $ 32,700
$ 25,320 $ 28,500 $ 31,620 $ 34,200 $ 36,720 $ 39,240
$ 33,750 $ 37,950 $ 42,150 $ 45,550 $ 48,900 $ 52,300
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 13,500 $ 15,200 $ 16,850 $ 18,200 $ 19,550 $ 20,900
$ 22,450 $ 25,250 $ 28,050 $ 30,300 $ 32,550 $ 34,800
$ 26,940 $ 30,300 $ 33,660 $ 36,360 $ 39,060 $ 41,760
$ 35,950 $ 40,450 $ 44,900 $ 48,500 $ 52,100 $ 55,700
Eight
Person
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 20,750
$ 34,550
$ 41,460
$ 55,250
$ 20,900
$ 34,800
$ 41,760
$ 55,650
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 22,250
$ 37,050
$ 44,460
$ 59,300
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Stokes
$53,100
$58,500
Surry
$44,100
Swain
$52,900
Transylvania
$53,100
Tyrrell
$39,500
Union
$67,000
Vance
$43,000
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 12,300
$ 20,500
$ 24,600
$ 32,800
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 11,200
$ 18,650
$ 22,380
$ 29,850
$ 11,200
$ 18,600
$ 22,320
$ 29,750
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 14,100
$ 23,450
$ 28,140
$ 37,550
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 14,050 $ 15,800 $ 17,550 $ 19,000 $ 20,400 $ 21,800
$ 23,400 $ 26,350 $ 29,250 $ 31,600 $ 33,950 $ 36,300
$ 28,080 $ 31,620 $ 35,100 $ 37,920 $ 40,740 $ 43,560
$ 37,450 $ 42,150 $ 46,800 $ 50,550 $ 54,300 $ 58,050
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 12,800 $ 14,400 $ 15,950 $ 17,250 $ 18,550 $ 19,800
$ 21,300 $ 23,950 $ 26,600 $ 28,750 $ 30,900 $ 33,000
$ 25,560 $ 28,740 $ 31,920 $ 34,500 $ 37,080 $ 39,600
$ 34,100 $ 38,350 $ 42,600 $ 46,050 $ 49,450 $ 52,850
$ 12,800 $ 14,400 $ 15,950 $ 17,250 $ 18,550 $ 19,800
$ 21,250 $ 23,900 $ 26,550 $ 28,700 $ 30,800 $ 32,950
$ 25,500 $ 28,680 $ 31,860 $ 34,440 $ 36,960 $ 39,540
$ 34,000 $ 38,250 $ 42,500 $ 45,900 $ 49,300 $ 52,700
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 16,100 $ 18,100 $ 20,100 $ 21,750 $ 23,350 $ 24,950
$ 26,800 $ 30,150 $ 33,500 $ 36,200 $ 38,900 $ 41,550
$ 32,160 $ 36,180 $ 40,200 $ 43,440 $ 46,680 $ 49,860
$ 42,900 $ 48,250 $ 53,600 $ 57,900 $ 62,200 $ 66,500
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
Eight
Person
$ 23,200
$ 38,650
$ 46,380
$ 61,800
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 21,100
$ 35,150
$ 42,180
$ 56,250
$ 21,100
$ 35,050
$ 42,060
$ 56,100
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 26,550
$ 44,250
$ 53,100
$ 70,800
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Wake
$53,100
$76,600
Warren
$45,800
Washington
$44,800
Watauga
$61,600
Wayne
$53,200
Wilkes
$37,200
Wilson
$48,400
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 16,100
$ 26,850
$ 32,220
$ 42,950
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 12,950
$ 21,600
$ 25,920
$ 34,550
$ 11,200
$ 18,650
$ 22,380
$ 29,800
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
$ 10,300
$ 17,100
$ 20,520
$ 27,350
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 18,400 $ 20,700 $ 23,000 $ 24,850 $ 26,700 $ 28,550
$ 30,650 $ 34,500 $ 38,300 $ 41,400 $ 44,450 $ 47,500
$ 36,780 $ 41,400 $ 45,960 $ 49,680 $ 53,340 $ 57,000
$ 49,050 $ 55,200 $ 61,300 $ 66,250 $ 71,150 $ 76,050
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 14,800 $ 16,650 $ 18,500 $ 20,000 $ 21,500 $ 22,950
$ 24,650 $ 27,750 $ 30,800 $ 33,300 $ 35,750 $ 38,200
$ 29,580 $ 33,300 $ 36,960 $ 39,960 $ 42,900 $ 45,840
$ 39,450 $ 44,400 $ 49,300 $ 53,250 $ 57,200 $ 61,150
$ 12,800 $ 14,400 $ 15,950 $ 17,250 $ 18,550 $ 19,800
$ 21,300 $ 23,950 $ 26,600 $ 28,750 $ 30,900 $ 33,000
$ 25,560 $ 28,740 $ 31,920 $ 34,500 $ 37,080 $ 39,600
$ 34,050 $ 38,300 $ 42,550 $ 46,000 $ 49,400 $ 52,800
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
$ 11,750 $ 13,200 $ 14,650 $ 15,850 $ 17,000 $ 18,200
$ 19,550 $ 22,000 $ 24,400 $ 26,400 $ 28,350 $ 30,300
$ 23,460 $ 26,400 $ 29,280 $ 31,680 $ 34,020 $ 36,360
$ 31,250 $ 35,150 $ 39,050 $ 42,200 $ 45,300 $ 48,450
Eight
Person
$ 30,400
$ 50,600
$ 60,720
$ 80,950
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 24,450
$ 40,700
$ 48,840
$ 65,100
$ 21,100
$ 35,150
$ 42,180
$ 56,200
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
$ 19,350
$ 32,250
$ 38,700
$ 51,550
2016 HOME Income Limits by County, by Household Size*
Effective June 6, 2016
County
Median
Income
Alamance
Yadkin
$53,100
$58,500
Yancey
$46,900
Percent
Median
Income
30%
50%
60%
80%
30%
50%
60%
80%
One
Person
$ 12,300
$ 20,500
$ 24,600
$ 32,800
$ 10,150
$ 16,950
$ 20,340
$ 27,100
Household Size (Number of Household Members)
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
Seven
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
Person
$ 14,050 $ 15,800 $ 17,550 $ 19,000 $ 20,400 $ 21,800
$ 23,400 $ 26,350 $ 29,250 $ 31,600 $ 33,950 $ 36,300
$ 28,080 $ 31,620 $ 35,100 $ 37,920 $ 40,740 $ 43,560
$ 37,450 $ 42,150 $ 46,800 $ 50,550 $ 54,300 $ 58,050
$ 11,600 $ 13,050 $ 14,500 $ 15,700 $ 16,850 $ 18,000
$ 19,350 $ 21,750 $ 24,150 $ 26,100 $ 28,050 $ 29,950
$ 23,220 $ 26,100 $ 28,980 $ 31,320 $ 33,660 $ 35,940
$ 30,950 $ 34,800 $ 38,650 $ 41,750 $ 44,850 $ 47,950
Eight
Person
$ 23,200
$ 38,650
$ 46,380
$ 61,800
$ 19,150
$ 31,900
$ 38,280
$ 51,050
Appendix C
PROGRAM FORMS & DOCUMENTS

Unit Management Workbook
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.







Instructions
Project Data
Loan Application & Reservation Request
Environmental Screening and Instructions
SHPO – Historical Evaluation
Post Rehabilitation Value Certification
Homeowner Written Agreement
Settlement Data Sheet
Requisition for HOME Funds and Invoice Log
Unit Completion Report (UCR)
Written Agreement (Member/Contractor)
Contract for Rehabilitation
Release of Liens
Request for Project Amendment
Lead-Based Paint Requirement Worksheet
Pre/Post Rehab Checklist
Certification of Completion and Final Cost (CCFC)
Written Agreement
(Member/Contractor)
ORGANIZATION NAME
WRITTEN AGREEMENT
IMPORTANT NOTICE: Any change which occurs after the execution of this written agreement and
not agreed to by the Organization in writing, including the terms of any funding source, may result in a
Reduction of the loan amount or the cancellation of this commitment.
Contractor:
1
SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION PROGRAM
Written Agreement (Contractor)
This Agreement is entered into this ______ day of __________________, ________, by and between
______________________________________________(herein after referred to as the “SFR Project
Administrator”, “Project Administrator” or “Member”) and____________________________________
(herein after referred to as “the Contractor”), for the purpose of
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
(provide description of work to be performed e.g. conducting a Lead-Based Paint Inspection/Risk
Assessment, Energy Assessment, or Blower Door test; or if Member is acting as GC, then for plumbing,
electrical or installation of HVAC system)
Funds from the HOME Investment Partnerships Program shall be provided by the North Carolina
Housing Finance Agency (NCHFA) to the Project Administrator to pay the Contractor for completing
the scope of work outlined above.
1. Amount of HOME Funds Budgeted
The total amount of HOME funds budgeted for this work is ___________. See attached budget,
included as part of the written agreement.
2. The Use of the Funds
HOME funds, received by the Project Administrator from NCHFA shall be used to pay the
Contractor for completing the work described above.
3. Performance Measures
The Contractor shall begin performance of this Agreement on the ____ day of ___________,
201__ and shall complete performance no later than one year from this date. This Agreement
will expire in 12 months from this date.
The Project Administrator's shall disburse funds to the Contractor only for completed work or
services. Failure to meet the approved construction schedule or scope of work may result, at
the discretion of the Project Administrator, in a reduction of the amount of funds available
under this Agreement.
2
4. Other Requirements
At all times during the term of participation in the project, the Contractor shall comply with all
the regulations pursuant to HOME Program Regulations, as the same may be amended from
time to time, including but not limited to the following:
a. The Project shall qualify as and shall be maintained as "affordable housing" as
prescribed in the applicable Program Regulations (24 CFR 92.254) and shall be
suitable for occupancy.
b. The Project shall meet the "Property Standards" as prescribed in the Program
Regulations (24 CFR 92.251).
c. The Borrower shall comply with the limitations on the uses of HOME funds as
prescribed in the Program Regulations (for example, 24 CFR 92.257).
5. Entire Agreement
This Agreement consists of 3 pages, including the cover page, and is the entire Written
Agreement between the Project Administrator and the Contractor. In witness whereof, the
parties below have executed this Agreement on the date first written above and is evidence of the
commitment of HOME funds to this Agreement. It will expire upon work completion or one
year from today, the _____ of _______________, 201__, whichever is sooner.
Contractor
Attest
By:
Its:
(Title)
Project Administrator
Attest
By:
Its:
(Title)
3
Contract for Rehabilitation
(Model)
Release of Liens
(Model)
NORTH CAROLINA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY
Single-Family Rehabilitation Program Loan Pool
Contractor's Release of Liens
A. Sub-contractor's and Supplier's Certification
WHEREAS we, the undersigned sub-contractor(s) and/or supplier(s), have furnished the materials and work for
the repair of the dwelling unit described below:
HOME OWNER:
ADDRESS:
PRIME/GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
CONTRACT DATE:
WHEREAS we, the undersigned sub-contractors and suppliers, have agreed to release all liens which we, or any
of us, have, or might have on the said buildings for work or materials contracted for or furnished in, for, or about
the repairing or modification of the said building.
WITNESSETH, that we, the undersigned sub-contractors and suppliers, do hereby certify that all work required to
be done by us in association with the above-referenced contract has been done in good and workmanlike manner
in accordance with the terms thereof, and that we have been paid or definite arrangements have been made for us
to be paid by the prime/general contractor;
WITNESSETH, that we, the undersigned sub-contractors and suppliers, do hereby release any and all claims for
damages, loss or amounts owed or claimed to be owed by either the Contractor or Homeowner as a result of the
above contract and work done thereunder.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, we hereunto set our hands and seals, on the date written opposite our respective
signatures:
(1)
Date
Sub-contractor/Supplier
By:
Witness
Authorized Signature
(2)
Date
Sub-contractor/Supplier
By:
Witness
Authorized Signature
(3)
Date
Sub-contractor/Supplier
By:
Witness
Authorized Signature
1
(4)
Date
Sub-contractor/Supplier
By:
Witness
Authorized Signature
(5)
Date
Sub-contractor/Supplier
By:
Witness
Authorized Signature
B. Prime/General Contractor's Certification and Request for Payment:
I do hereby certify to the Owner of the above property that the signatures signed to this Release of Leins comprise
a true and complete list of all corporations and persons who have contracted for or furnished any and all repairs or
improvements of the said building(s) or premises, or who are, or have been, sub-contractors upon said building(s)
or any part thereof or for any furnishing and any and all fixtures or improvements to said real estate under any
contract or agreement with the undersigned.
Upon receipt of payment of the balance due under the contract this document shall become effective to release all
liens which I, the undersigned, have or might have on the said buildings for work or materials contracted for or
furnished in, for, or about the repairing or modification of the said building. Payment shall be considered
received when the related payment check has been properly endorsed and has been paid by the bank upon which it
is drawn.
I hereby request payment of the balance due under the contract.
Contractor
Date
Authorized Signature
Title
Witness
2
Request for Project Amendment
North Carolina Housing Finance Agency
Single-Family Rehabilitation Loan Pool
Request for Project Amendment
Member Organization:
Date:
Amount of SFRLP Award, per Funding Agreement:
1. Dwelling units served:
(Please check either A or B.)
A. No change in number of dwelling units to be served is requested.
B. The Member requests that the number of dwelling units to be served be amended in accordance with
the following matrix.
Number of Dwelling units
Totals =
DUs
Approved
SFRLP $ Amount SFRLP $ per unit
$170,000
DUs
Proposed
SFRLP $ Amount SFRLP $ per unit
Reason for requested change:
(Attach additional page if needed)
2. Other Funds:
(Please check either A or B)
A. No change in other funds to be leveraged is requested.
B. The Member requests that the other funds target be amended in accordance with the following:
Total number of approved dwelling units:
Approved
Actual to date
Proposed
Source 1:
Source 2:
Total amount of other funds:
Other funds per dwelling unit:
Reason for requested change:
(Attach additional page if needed)
Pct. Change
North Carolina Housing Finance Agency
Single-Family Rehabilitation Loan Pool
Request for Project Amendment
4. Project Role:
(Please check either A or B.)
No change of personnel is requested.
A.
The Member requests approval of changes in key personnel as indicated below.
B.
for each officer who was not named in our approved application.
Project Role
As Approved
a. Project
Name:
administration
Title:
b. Financial management/
Name:
loan administration
Title:
c. Attorney
Name:
Title:
d. Rehabilitation
Name:
management
Title:
e. Work write-ups/
Name:
cost estimates
Title:
f. Interim inspections of work
Name:
Title:
g. Final inspections of work
Name:
Title:
h. Applicant intake/
Name:
qualification
Title:
i. Client
Name:
Counseling
Title:
j. Other: (Identify below.)
Name:
Title:
A current resume is attached
Proposed Changes
Name:
Title:
Name:
Title:
Name:
Title:
Name:
Title:
Name:
Title:
Name:
Title:
Name:
Title:
Name:
Title:
Name:
Title:
Name:
Title:
5. Budget for Soft Costs:
No change is requested.
A.
B.
The Member requests approval of changes in the Budget for Soft Costs.
SFR Soft Costs/unit
As Approved
1 Outreach & Advertising
2 Environmental Review preparation
3 Asbestos testing/clearance
4 Radon testing
5 LBP inspection/risk assessment
6 LBP clearance
7 Energy Assessment and Test Out by HPwES Contractor
8 Loan document execution, recording & legal fees
9 Pre-rehab Inspection including scope of work
10 Work write-ups
11 Cost estimate
12 Project & construction management
13 Flood Insurance (units in Flood Hazard Zones)
14 Post-rehab value certification
15 Home Performance w/Energy Star Quality Assurance
$500
Total SFR Soft Costs/unit
Proposed Changes
$500
6. Member Certifications:
The above-named Member organization hereby requests that its NCHFA Single-Family Rehabilitation Loan Pool
project, (Funding Agreement #
) be amended as indicated above. I certify that all supporting
information provided herein is accurate and the proposed changes are feasible and necessary to the success of the project.
Authorized Officer
Date
Title
7. NCHFA Approval:
The North Carolina Housing Finance Agency hereby approves the above Funding Agreement changes
as proposed,
or
as revised by Agency staff (in blue ink). Said changes are hereby made a part of the Funding Agreement by
mutual consent.
Authorized Officer
Title
Date
Lead-Based Paint Requirement
Worksheet
Lead Requirements Worksheet
North Carolina Housing Finance Agency
Single-Family Rehabilitation Program (SFR)
DIRECTIONS: This worksheet must be completed and placed in all unit files assisted with SFR funds.
Street Address:
DU#
City:
State:
NC
Zip:
Part 1: Regulation Eligibility Statements
Check all that apply:

Property is receiving Federal funds.
Unit was built prior to 1978.
Note: Continue with the Exemption Statements below. If the home was built after January 1, 1978,
check the first exemption and file form in the case file.
Part 2: Full Exemptions from All Requirements of 24 CFR Part 35 (The Lead Regulation)
If any of the exemptions are applicable, the property is exempt from the requirements of 24CFR Part
35 per the regulatory citation. Note: ONLY eligible exemptions for SFR are listed.
Check all that apply:
The property was constructed after January 1, 1978. [35.115(a)(1)]
A paint inspection conducted in accordance with 35.1320(a) established that the property is
free of lead-based paint. [35.115(a)(4)]
The date of the original paint inspection was
paint inspection conducted on
. An optional
confirmed this prior finding.
ALL lead-based paint in the property been identified and removed, and has clearance been
achieved. [35.115(a)(5)]
ALL rehab excludes disturbing painted surfaces. [35.115(a)(8)]
Emergency repairs to the property are being performed to safeguard against imminent
danger to human life, health or safety, or to protect the property from further structural
damage due to natural disaster, fire or structural collapse. The exemption applies only to
repairs necessary to respond to the emergency. [35.115(a)(9)]
Page 1 of 2
Lead Requirements Worksheet
North Carolina Housing Finance Agency
Single-Family Rehabilitation Program (SFR)
Part 3: Hazard Reduction Requirements - Partial Waivers
If any of the partial waivers are applicable, the grantee and/or homeowner may waive certain requirements as described below.
A) De minimis [35.1350(d)(1) & (2)]
The amount of painted surface that is being disturbed during construction is below "de minimis" levels. Safe work
practices and clearance are not required in that work area.
Less than 9 SF of bare soil?
Less than 20 square feet on an exterior surface
Less than 2 square feet in the following rooms:
,
,
,
B) Elderly Relocation Waiver [Interpretive Guidance Question J-24]
The home is only occupied by an elderly person(s). Relocation of elderly homeowners is not required if complete
disclosure of the nature of the work is provided and informed consent is obtained prior to rehabilitation.
C) Historic Abatement Waiver [35.115(13)]
The home that is subject to abatement requirements is listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic
Places, or contributes to a National Register Historic District. The State Historic Preservation Office may request that
interim controls be implemented rather than abatement.
D) No Exterior Work [35.930(d)(3)]
No exterior paint is to be disturbed during renovation. (Only exterior stabilization required even in abatement jobs.)
E) No Children [35.1330(d)(1)]
All of the residents are over the age of 6. (No chewable or play area treatments required.)
F) No Bite Marks [35.1330(d)(1)]
All chewable surfaces are free of bite marks made by children under 6. (No chewable surface treatment required)
G) No Dust Hazards [35.1330(c)(1)(i)]
The closest horizontal surface dust wipe is below the clearance threshold. (No friction and impact surface treatments
required in the following work areas:
Part 4: Level of Rehabilitation Assistance [35.915]
A. Amount of federal funding for home
$
B. Amount of rehabilitation Hard Costs (not
including any soft costs or costs of lead hazard
evaluation, reduction, clearance and training)
$
C. Level of Assistance (lower of A or B)
$
Approach Required (Based on answer to C, above)
$5,000 - $25,000
Risk Assessment and Interim Control of Lead Hazards
Note - If abatement work was subtracted from the hard cost to get the
unit below $25,000. The subtracted abatement items must be
performed by a NC licensed abatement contractor and crew.
$25,001 and above
Risk Assessment and Abate Lead Hazards
Page 2 of 2
Pre/Post Rehab Checklist
Certification of Completion and Final
Cost (CCFC)
NORTH CAROLINA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY
SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION LOAN POOL PROGRAM
CERTIFICATION OF COMPLETION AND FINAL COST
(Please Type or Print Legibly in Ink AND Please round to the nearest dollar)
Member Organization:
Date of Report:
Funding Agreement #:
Program Completion Date:
Report Prepared by:
A.
Phone Number:
ACCOUNT BALANCES
1. Receipts:
a. Amount of total SFRLP Program funding allocation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
b. Sum of HOME-funded SFRLP Program monies drawn from IDIS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
c. Sum of other Program income (recapture/loan defaults, etc.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (+).
...........................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .
d. Total receipts (b. plus c.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (=).
2. Disbursements by Member of HOME-funded SFRLP Program monies:
a. Rehabilitation hard costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
b. Rehabilitation soft costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
c. Total of disbursements (a. plus b. plus c.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3. Balance of SFRLP funds in local SFRLP Account (1.d. minus 2.d.) (Return to NCHFA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B.
CUMULATIVE PRODUCTION
1. Dwelling units rehabilitated:
County Served
Total Funds (SFRLP + Other Leveraged)
Number of Completed Units
SFRLP Funds Disbursed
Hard
Soft
Admin
Average Funds (SFRLP + Other Leveraged)
Total
Other Leveraged Funds Disbursed
Hard
Soft
Admin
Total
Total
Average
2. Total other funds leveraged for Hard Costs (only Hard Costs) , by source:
CDBG
Other Leveraged Funds Disbursed for Hard Costs
USDA HPG USDA 504
W.A.P
HOME
Owner Cont. Local govt.
Total
For NC Housing Finance Agency Use Only
Case Manager
Date
Received?
Payment
Received?
SFR Funds
deobligated?
CCFC
signed?
Date checked by
Case Manager
Page 1 of 2
Date entered into all
data systems
All loan docs sent to
Servicing?
Monitor
Resp. OK?
NORTH CAROLINA HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY
SINGLE-FAMILY REHABILITATION LOAN POOL PROGRAM
CERTIFICATION OF COMPLETION AND FINAL COST
(Please Type or Print Legibly in Ink)
Date of Report:
Member:
C. CERTIFICATIONS
(Please check the box beside each applicable statement.)
1. All dwelling units rehabilitated under the direction of the Member with SFRLP assistance now
meet HUD's Housing Quality Standards and the Agency SFRLP Rehabilitation Standards and
contain no imminent threats to the occupants of the unit or the structural integrity of the unit.
2. All Program-funded rehabilitation work was inspected, as required, by State building code
enforcement officers.
3. All required security documents have been properly executed, recorded and submitted to the
Agency pursuant to the Program regulations.
4. All Agency concerns stemming from its monitoring of the Member's SFRLP Project (as stated in a
letter from the Agency) have been resolved.
5. Unit Completion Reports have been submitted for all activity accounts that were set-up in the HUD
Integrated Disbursement & Information System (IDIS), leaving a IDIS balance of zero (0).
6. (Please check a. or b.)
a. All audit reports or financial statements (as per P.G. 3.8.) have been submitted to the
Agency covering each fiscal year in which Program funds were on hand; or,
b. All required audit reports or financial statements have been submitted except that covering
the current fiscal year. Said current-year document will be submitted as soon as it is made
available to the Member. (Estimated date:
)
7. If the figure entered at line A.3 of this Certification of Completion and Final Cost is greater than zero
(0), a check in the amount there shown, made out to the North Carolina Housing Finance Agency,
accompanies this document.
8. All dwelling units rehabilitated with program funds have a post rehabilitation value of less than 95
percent of the median purchase price for the type of single-family housing for the jurisdiction as
determined by HUD.
As chief operating officer of the Member
I certify that the information contained
in this report is complete and accurate.
Authorized signature
Page 2 of 2
Date
NCHFA 6/4/13 (SFRLP13)
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