handbook on welding techniques - rdso

handbook on welding techniques - rdso
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(For Official Use Only)
Hkkjr ljdkj GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
jsy ea=ky; MINISTRY OF RAILWAYS
HANDBOOK
ON
WELDING TECHNIQUES
END USER: Newly Recruited/ Promoted Welders
CAMTECH/ E/ 14-15/ Welding/ 1.0
February, 2015
egkjktiqj, Xokfy;j & 474 005
Maharajpur, GWALIOR - 474 005
HANDBOOK
ON
WELDING TECHNIQUES
QUALITY POLICY
“To develop safe, modern and cost
effective Railway Technology
complying with Statutory and
Regulatory requirements, through
excellence in Research, Designs and
Standards and Continual
improvements in Quality
Management System to cater to
growing demand of passenger and
freight traffic on the railways”.
FOREWORD
Welding is a very common metal joining technology and it is widely used in
Railways in various production and maintenance units. Railways recruit ITI qualified
welders as well as promote staff to welder category by providing appropriate training.
CAMTECH has prepared this handbook on “Welding Techniques” to provide
basic information on the subject. This handbook contains various terms used in
electric arc and gas welding.
I hope this handbook will prove to be useful for the newly recruited and
promoted welders as well as working welders for updating their knowledge.
CAMTECH, Gwalior
Date : 23rd Feb, 2015
A. R. Tupe
Executive Director
PREFACE
Welding is the most commonly used method of joining and repairing metallic
structures permanently. The basic knowledge of weld procedures, weld joints,
different techniques is essential to upgrade the workmanship of a welder and to
improve productivity in an industry.
CAMTECH has prepared this handbook on “Welding Techniques” by
compiling useful information from various sources and books available on the subject.
This handbook covers various welding processes, weld types, different electric arc
welding processes, safety in electric arc welding, welding electrodes, oxy acetylene
gas welding, its equipment, safety in gas welding filler rods, oxy acetylene gas cutting
etc. Relevant sketches are given wherever required to make the subject interesting.
It is clarified that this handbook does not supersede any existing instructions/
provisions laid down by Railway Board, RDSO, Zonal Railways. This handbook is
for guidance only and it is not a statutory document.
I am sincerely thankful to all field personnel who helped us in preparing this
handbook.
Technological up-gradation & learning is a continuous process. Please feel free
to write to us for any addition/ modification in this handbook. We shall highly
appreciate your contribution in this direction.
CAMTECH, Gwalior
Date: 20th Feb, 2015
Peeyoosh Gupta
Director Electrical
e - mail id : [email protected]
CONTENTS
Item No.
1.
Page No.
Foreword
Preface
Contents
Correction Slip
iii
iv
v
xi
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
01
1.1
METAL JOINING METHODS
01
1.2
COMPARISON BETWEEN WELDING AND OTHER METAL
JOINING METHODS
01
1.3
ADVANTAGES OF WELDING
02
1.4
DIFFERENT METHODS OF WELDING
02
1.4.1
1.4.2
1.4.3
02
02
03
1.5
Fusion welding without pressure
Pressure welding
Non-fusion welding
CLASSIFICATION OF WELDING PROCESSES ACCORDING
TO HEAT
03
1.6
CODES FOR WELDING PROCESSES
04
1.7
APPLICATIONS OF VARIOUS WELDING PROCESSES
04
1.8
STATES OF MATTER
05
1.9
COMMON METALS AND ALLOYS
06
1.10
PROPERTIES OF METALS
06
1.10.1
1.10.2
1.10.3
1.10.4
06
06
07
08
1.11
1.12
2.
Description
Chemical properties
Physical properties
Mechanical Properties
Effect of welding heat on the properties of metals
EFFECT OF ATMOSPHERIC AIR ON WELDING
TYPES OF WELDS
08
09
1.12.1
1.12.2
1.12.3
1.12.4
09
09
10
10
Bead weld
Butt weld or groove weld
Fillet welds
Plug or slot welds
ELECTRIC WELDING PROCESSES
11
2.1
ELECTRIC WELDING
11
2.2
TYPES OF ELECTRIC WELDING
11
2.3
ELECTRIC ARC WELDING
12
2.3.1
2.3.2
2.3.3
2.3.4
2.3.5
12
12
12
13
2.3.6
2.3.7
2.3.8
Metallic arc welding
Carbon arc welding
Atomic hydrogen arc welding
Tungsten inert gas arc welding (TIG)
Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) or Metal inert
gas arc welding (MIG)
Submerged arc welding
Electro-slag welding
Plasma arc welding
13
14
14
14
Item No.
2.4
3.
Description
Page No.
SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW)
15
2.4.1
2.4.2
2.4.3
2.4.4
15
15
16
16
Salient Features
Advantages
Limitations
Applications
2.5
ARC LENGTH
2.5.1 Medium, normal arc
2.5.2 Long arc
2.5.3 Short arc
16
16
17
17
2.6
SAFETY IN MANUAL METAL ARC WELDING
2.6.1 Safety apparels
2.6.2 Welding hand screens and helmet
17
18
19
2.7
ARC WELDING ACCESSORIES
2.7.1 Electrode-holder
2.7.2 Earth Clamp
2.7.3 Welding cables/ leads
20
20
20
20
2.8
MATERIAL PREPARATION METHOD
2.8.1 Cutting
2.8.2 Cleaning
21
21
21
2.9
OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGE AND ARC VOLTAGE
22
2.10
POLARITY IN DC ARC WELDING
2.10.1 Importance of polarity in welding
2.10.2 Indication of wrong polarity
22
22
23
2.11
MILD STEEL WELDING ELECTRODES
2.11.1 Electrode sizes
2.11.2 Functions of an electrode in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW)
2.11.3 Identification of Electrodes
2.11.4 Types of electrodes
23
23
24
24
25
2.12
FLUX COATED ELECTRODES
2.12.1 Merits of Flux coated electrodes
2.12.2 Coating factor
2.12.3 Types of material used in flux coated electrode
2.12.4 Electrode coding
26
26
27
27
27
2.13
WELDING MACHINES (POWER SOURCES)
2.13.1 Welding transformer
2.13.2 Welding Rectifiers
2.13.3 Welding Generator
2.13.4 Welding inverters
27
27
28
28
29
OXY-ACETYLENE GAS WELDING
30
3.1
GAS WELDING
30
3.2
OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING
30
3.2.1
3.2.2
30
30
3.3
Acetylene
Oxygen
OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES
31
3.3.1
3.3.2
31
31
Oxygen gas cylinders
Dissolved acetylene cylinders
Item No.
Description
3.3.3
3.3.4
3.3.5
3.3.6
3.3.7
3.4
4.
Oxygen pressure regulator
Acetylene regulator
Rubber hose pipes and connections
Hose protectors
Blowpipe and nozzle
Page No.
31
31
32
32
32
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS IN HANDLING OXY-ACETYLENE
GAS WELDING PLANT
3.4.1 General safety precautions
3.4.2 Safety concerning gas cylinders
3.4.3 Safety of rubber hose-pipes
33
33
34
35
3.5
TROUBLE WITH BLOW PIPE & CYLINDERS
3.5.1 Backfire
3.5.2 Flashback
3.5.3 Cylinder catches fire
36
36
36
37
3.6
TYPES OF OXY-ACETYLENE FLAMES
3.6.1 Neutral flame
3.6.2 Oxidizing flame
3.6.3 Carburizing flame
3.6.4 Chemistry of oxy-acetylene flame
37
37
38
38
38
3.7
FILLER RODS FOR GAS WELDING
3.7.1 Filler rod and its necessity
3.7.2 Sizes as per IS:1278-1972
3.7.3 Types of filler rods
3.7.4 Selection of the filler rod
3.7.5 Care and maintenance
3.7.6 Different filler metals and fluxes for gas welding
39
39
40
40
40
41
42
3.8
WELDING TECHNIQUES OF OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING
3.8.1 Leftward Welding Technique
3.8.2 Rightward welding technique
44
44
46
3.9
WELDING OF LOW CARBON STEEL AND MEDIUM CARBON
STEEL
3.9.1 Low carbon steels
3.9.2 Medium carbon steel
3.9.3 High carbon steels
45
47
47
47
OXY-ACETYLENE GAS CUTTING
48
4.1
INTRODUCTION
48
4.2
PRINCIPLE OF GAS CUTTING
48
4.2.1
Cutting Operation
48
4.2.2
Application of Cutting Torch
49
OXY-ACETYLENE CUTTING EQUIPMENT
49
4.3.1
Cutting Torch
49
4.3.2
Difference between Cutting Torch (Blow Pipe) & welding Blow Pipe
49
4.3.3
Care & Maintenance
50
4.3.4
Problem with Cutting Torch
50
4.3
Item No.
5.
Description
Page No.
FAULTS AND DEFECTS IN GAS WELDING
51
5.1
WELD DEFECTS & TYPES
51
5.1.1
External Defects
51
5.1.2
Internal Defects
51
5.2
TYPES OF FAULTS IN GAS WELDING
52
5.3
GAS WELD DEFECTS – POSSIBLE CAUSES AND REMEDIES
55
5.4
ARC WELD DEFECTS – POSSIBLE CAUSES AND REMEDIES
57
ANNEXURE - I
CLASSIFICATION OF ELECTRODE
63
ANNEXURE – II
USAGE & STORAGE OF ELECTRODES
66
ANNEXURE – III
GUNA BAR TECHNIQUE FOR REPAIRING OF CRACKED
CAST STEEL BOGIE FRAMES
68
ANNEXURE – IV
WELDING SYMBOLS
REFERENCES
70
71
ISSUE OF CORRECTION SLIPS
The correction slips to be issued in future for this handbook will be numbered as
follows :
CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/C.S. # XX date--------Where “XX” is the serial number of the concerned correction slip (starting from 01
onwards).
CORRECTION SLIPS ISSUED
Sr. No.
Date of issue
Page no. and Item
no. modified
Remarks
CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
1
CHAPTER 1
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
1.1
METAL JOINING METHODS
The art of joining metals is about 3000 years old. The origin of welding is
probably to be traced to the shaping of metals. In industry every worker is working for
changing the shape of metals by different methods and machines. Welding is a metal
joining method. The following methods are used for joining metals:
(i)
Soldering
This joint is made on thin metals using solder as a joining medium. The melting
point of solder is less than the metals to be joined. The joint can be opened by
heating upto the solder melting temperature (below 400°C).
(ii)
Brazing
The joint is similar to soldering but has more strength. The joining medium used
is brass, which has a higher melting temperature than solder. The joint can also be
opened by heating upto the melting point of brass (850-950°C).
(iii)
Welding
A metal joining method in which the joining edges are heated and fused together
with or without filler metal to form a permanent (homogeneous) bond is known as
welding.
Or in other words, “Welding is a process of joining two or more pieces of the
same or dissimilar materials to achieve complete coalescence. This is the only
method of developing monolithic structures and it is often accomplished by the
use of heat and/or pressure.
1.2
COMPARISON
METHODS
BETWEEN
WELDING
AND
OTHER
METAL
JOINING
Joining methods like riveting, assembling with bolt, seaming, soldering and
brazing all result in temporary joints. Welding is the only method to join metals
permanently.
The temporary joints can be separated if:
-
the head of the rivet is cut
nut of the bolt is unscrewed
hook of the seam is opened
more heat is given than that required for soldering and brazing.
Welded joints cannot be separated like soldering and brazing because it is made
homogeneous by heating and fusing the joining edges together.
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1.3
CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
ADVANTAGES OF WELDING
Welding is superior to other metal joining methods because it:
- is a permanent pressure tight joint
- occupies less space
- gives more economy of material
- has less weight
- withstands high temperature and pressure equal to joined material
- can be done quickly
- gives no colour change to joints.
It is the strongest joint and any type of metal of any thickness can be joined.
1.4
DIFFERENT METHODS OF WELDING
Welding is a method of joining metals permanently. It is an ancient method, about
1500 years old. The method used in ancient days was forge or blacksmith welding.
One of the methods of classifying welded joints is the method used to effect the joint
between metal pieces. Accordingly the methods are:
- fusion method without pressure/ with pressure
- non-fusion method
1.4.1 Fusion Welding Without Pressure
A method of welding in which similar and dissimilar metals are joined together
by melting and fusion their joining edges with or without the addition of filler metal but
without the application of any kind of pressure is known as fusion welding without
pressure.
The joint made is permanent. The common heating
sources are:
- arc welding
- gas welding
- chemical reaction (thermit welding)
1.4.2 Pressure Welding
This is a method of welding in which similar metals are joined together by
heating them to plastic or partially molten state and then joined by pressing or
hammering without the use of filler metal. This is fusion method of joining with pressure.
Heat source may be blacksmith forge (forge welding) or electric resistance (resistance
welding) or friction.
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1.4.3 Non-Fusion Welding
This is a method in which similar or dissimilar metals are joined together without
melting the edges of the base metal by using a low melting point filler rod but without the
application of pressure.
1.5
CLASSIFICATION OF WELDING PROCESSES ACCORDING TO HEAT
SOURCE
According to the sources of heat, welding processes can be broadly classified as:
- Electric welding processes (heat source is electricity)
- Gas welding processes (heat source is gas flame)
- Other welding processes (heat source is neither electricity nor gas flame)
 Electric welding processes can be classified as:
- Electric arc welding
- Electric resistance welding
- Laser welding
- Electron beam welding
- Induction welding
 Electric arc welding can be further classified as:
- Metallic arc welding
- Carbon arc welding
- Atomic hydrogen arc welding
- Inert gas arc welding/ TIG welding
- CO2 gas arc welding
- Flux cored arc welding
- Submerged arc welding
- Electro-slag welding
- Plasma arc welding
 Electric resistance welding can be further classified as:
- Spot welding
- Seam welding
- Butt welding
- Flash butt welding
- Projection welding
 Gas welding processes can be classified as:
- Oxy-acetylene gas welding
- Oxy-hydrogen gas welding
- Oxy-coal gas welding
- Oxy-liquefied petroleum gas welding
- Air acetylene gas welding
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
1.6
The other welding processes are:
- Thermit welding
- Forge welding
- Friction welding
- Ultrasonic welding
- Explosive welding
- Cold pressure welding
- Plastic welding
CODES FOR WELDING PROCESSES
Code
AAW
BMAW
EBW
ESW
FW
GCAW
GTAW
LBW
OHW
PGW
RSEW
SAW
SCAW
TW
1.7
Welding process
Air acetylene
Bare metal arc
Electron beam
Electro slag
Flash
Gas carbon arc
Gas tungsten arc
Laser beam
Oxy-hydrogen
Pressure gas
Resistance seam
Submerged arc
Shielded carbon arc
Thermit
Code
AHW
CAW
EGW
FCAW
FLOW
GMAW
IW
OAW
PAW
RPW
RSW
SMAW
SW
UW
Welding process
Atomic hydrogen
Carbon arc
Electro gas
Flux cored arc
FLOW
Gas metal arc
Induction
Oxy-acetylene
Plasma arc
Resistance projection
Resistance spot
Shielded metal arc
Stud arc
Ultrasonic
APPLICATIONS OF VARIOUS WELDING PROCESSES

Forge welding is used in olden days for joining metals as a lap and butt joint.

Metallic arc welding is used for welding all ferrous and non-ferrous metals using
consumable stick electrodes.

Carbon arc welding is used for welding all ferrous and non-ferrous metals using
electrodes and separate filler metal. But this is a slow welding process and so not
use now-a-days.

Submerged arc welding is used for welding ferrous metals, thicker plates and for
more production.

CO2 welding (gas metal arc welding) is used for welding ferrous metals using
continuously fed filler wire and shielding the weld metal and the arc by carbon-dioxide gas.

TIG welding (inert gas arc welding) is used for welding ferrous metals, stainless
steel, aluminium and thin sheet metal welding.

Atomic hydrogen welding is used for welding all ferrous and non-ferrous metals
and the arc has a higher temperature than other arc welding processes.
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5

Electro-slag welding is used for welding very thick steel plates in one pass using
the resistance property of the flux material.

Plasma arc welding: The arc has a very deep penetrating ability into the metals
welded and also the fusion is taking place in a very narrow zone of the joint.

Spot welding is used for welding thin sheet metal as a lap joint in small spots by
using the resistance property of the metals being welded.

Seam welding is used for welding thin sheets similar to spot welding. But adjacent
weld spots will be overlapping each other to get a continuous weld seam.

Projection welding is used to weld two plates one over the other on their surfaces
instead of the edges by making projection on one plate and pressing it over the other
flat surface. Each projection acts as a spot weld during welding.

Butt welding is used to join the ends of two heavy section rods/ blocks together to
lengthen it using the resistance property of the rods under contact.

Flash butt welding is used to join heavy sections of rods/ blocks similar to butt
welding except that arc flashes are produced at the joining ends to melt them before
applying heavy pressure to join them.

Oxy-acetylene welding is used to join different ferrous and non-ferrous metals,
generally of 3 mm thickness and below.

Oxy-other fuel gases welding: Fuel gases like hydrogen, coal gas, liquefied
petroleum gas (LPG) are used along with oxygen to get a flame and melt the base
metal and filler rod. Since the temperatures of these flames are lower than the oxyacetylene flame, these welding are used to weld metals where less heat input is
required.

Air-acetylene gas welding is used for solder, heating the job etc.

Induction welding is used to weld parts that are heated by electrical induction coils
like brazing of tool tips to the shank, joining flat rings etc.

Thermit welding is used for joining thick, heavy irregularly shaped rods, like rails,
etc using chemical heating process.

Friction welding is used to join the ends of large diameter shafts etc. by generating
the required heat using the friction between their ends in contact with each other by
rotating one rod against the other rod.
STATES OF MATTER
There are three states of matter exist as:

Solid

Liquid

Gas
In welding, a metal to be welded will be in the solid state before welding. During
welding the solid state changes to liquid state and at the end of the welding operation, the
liquid state again changes to solid state.
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1.9
CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
COMMON METALS AND ALLOYS
Metals may be ferrous, non-ferrous metals and alloys.
Ferrous metals are those which have iron as their base. They include iron and its alloys
such as steel, cast iron and alloy steels such as stainless steel etc.
Non-ferrous metals do not contain iron as base. They include copper, aluminium, zinc,
tin etc and non-ferrous alloys.
Alloys
If two or more metals are chemically combined they form an alloy e.g. iron,
chromium nickel and carbon form an alloy called chromium nickel steel (stainless),
manganese, iron and carbon form an alloy called manganese steel, copper and zinc form
an alloy called brass, copper and tin form an alloy called bronze, lead and tin form an
alloy called soft solder.
1.10
PROPERTIES OF METALS
Properties of metals can be classified mainly into:
 Chemical properties
 Physical properties
 Mechanical properties
1.10.1 Chemical Properties
Chemical properties are those which involve chemical effect such as:
 Corrosion
 Oxidation
 Reduction
Corrosion will spoil the metal surface due to the effect of various elements in the
atmosphere and water.
Oxidation is the formation of metal oxides which occur when oxygen combines with
metals.
Reduction refers to the removal of oxygen from the surrounding molten puddle to reduce
the effect of atmospheric contamination.
1.10.2 Physical Properties
Physical properties are those, which affect metals when they are subjected to heat
generated by welding such as:
 melting point
 thermal conductivity
 thermal expansion
 grain growth
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Melting point
Melting point is the degree of temperature, when a solid metal changes into liquid.
Melting points of some metals are given below:
1.
Mild steel
1500 to 1530°C
2.
Cast iron
1150°C
3.
Copper
1083°C
4.
Aluminium
659°C
5.
Brass and bronze
850°C-950°C
6.
Zinc
419°C
7.
Tin
232°C
8.
Lead
327°C
9.
Nickel
1452°C
10
Soft solder
216°C
(50% lead, 50% tin)
Thermal conductivity
Thermal conductivity is the rate at which a metal conducts heat to the adjacent area of
the heated job. Copper conducts heat faster than aluminium. Aluminium conducts heat
faster than iron.
Thermal expansion
Whenever metals are heated there will be increase in its dimensions due to their thermal
expansion property. Depending on the nature of metal, different metals will have
different thermal expansion.
Grain structure
Like salt or sugar, the metal is also a crystalline substance. In metals the crystals are
called grains. Grains are composed of atoms. Atomic structure determines the grain
structure just as the arrangement of bricks determines the shape of the building. During
welding (due to heating effect) the grain size increases resulting in the loss of strength.
1.10.3 Mechanical Properties
Mechanical properties are those which determine the behavior of metals under applied
load such as:
 Tensile strength
 Ductility
 Hardness
 Toughness
 Brittleness
Tensile strength is the property of the metal which resists forces acting to pull it apart.
Ductility is the ability of the metal to stretch, bend or twist without breaking or cracking
or to draw into fine wires.
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Hardness is the ability of the metal to withstand abrasions, cutting action by a tool.
Usually any hard metal will resist the compressive forces. Normally a hard metal will
also be brittle.
Toughness is the ability of a metal to withstand sudden force without breaking.
Brittleness is the property of the metal which is opposite of ductility and is applied to a
metal which cracks suddenly if placed pressure or load to bend or twist.
1.10.4 Effect of Welding Heat on the Properties of Metals
During welding the properties of the weld metal may be affected.
 Important alloying elements may be destroyed.
 Brittle, hard or cracked welds may be produced.
 There may be reduction in the corrosion resistance properties of the welds.
 Main properties of the base metal and weld metal will get affected
1.11
EFFECT OF ATMOSPHERIC AIR ON WELDING
The atmospheric air is a gaseous mixture of mainly nitrogen and oxygen, with
some other gases like hydrogen, etc. in small percentages.
Since the atmospheric air contains 21% of oxygen, whenever a red hot or molten
iron comes in contact with atmospheric air the metal gets oxidized.
Oxygen contamination i.e. oxidation will reduce the mechanical properties of the
weld metal. In other words the tensile strength, toughness and ductility of the weld
decrease with increased oxygen contamination.
The nitrogen injected into the weld pool, during the solidification of the weld
metal, forms bubbles and results in the formation of gas porosity in the weld metal. This
reduces the strength of the joint. In addition, the atmospheric nitrogen will combine with
the molten metal and the weld hardened due to the formation of iron nitride. For the
above reason the weld metal must be protected from the atmospheric contamination
either by using suitable flux or with insert gas shielding.
If there is more moisture (water) present in the atmospheric air (particularly
during rainy and winter season) the iron gets oxidized (i.e. rusted) due to long storage.
The formation of oxides and nitrides due to the contact of atmospheric air with
the molten metal is also called as atmospheric contamination.
Effects of oxidation
During the welding process the combination of a metal with oxygen (oxide) may cause
the following effects:
i. Produce blow holes in the weld beads.
ii. Produce oxides which are having a higher melting point than that of the surrounding
metals. This will form solid particles (oxide inclusions) in the weld metal in the case
of non-ferrous metals.
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iii. Produce oxides which will dissolve in the molten metal and make the metal brittle
and weak.
iv.
The oxides of wrought iron and steel melt at a temperature lower than that of the
parent metal, and being light, float to the surface as a scale.
If care is taken in the welding process, the oxides will not cause trouble
during welding.
There are some effects of oxidation on the filler rods, powder type fluxes used in
gas welding and on the electrode core wire and the flux coated on them. If proper care is
not taken to protect the filler rods, fluxes and M.S. coated electrodes to store them
properly, they will get rusted. The fluxes will pick up moisture from the wet atmosphere
and will become useless/ deteriorated.
However, the oxidation of metals has also certain useful effects i.e. a stream of
pure oxygen if applied (used) on a red hot mild steel plate through a nozzle, the plate will
get cut into 2 pieces. Hence the principle of oxidation is effectively used in Gas cutting
and gouging of mild steel.
1.12
TYPES OF WELDS
To get different welding joints the following types of weld are used:
 Bead weld
 Groove or butt weld
 Fillet weld
 Plug or slot weld
1.12.1 Bead Weld
Bead weld is a type of weld composed of one or more
stringer or weave beads deposited on an unbroken surface
to obtain the desired properties and dimensions.
1.12.2 Butt Weld or Groove Weld
Butt weld or groove weld is a weld made in the groove between two members to be
joined as butt joint. Groove welds are also done on T fillet joints if the plate thickness is
more than 12mm.
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1.12.3
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Fillet Welds
Fillet weld is a weld, having a triangular cross-section, joining two surfaces at right
angle to each other such as:
 Lap joint
 Tee joint
 Corner joint
1.12.4 Plug or Slot Welds
Plug or slot welds are welds used to join two over-lapping pieces of metal by welding
through circular holes or slots. These welds are often used in the place of rivets.
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CHAPTER 2
ELECTRIC WELDING PROCESSES
2.1
ELECTRIC WELDING
This is a process of welding in which the heat energy is obtained from electricity.
Formula for converting electrical energy to heat energy
H = I2RT
Where
H
is the amount of heat produced in ‘joules’.
I
is the amount of current passing in amps.
R
is the resistance of medium in ohms.
T
is the time during which the current flows.
This is useful only in the resistance welding process.
2.2
TYPES OF ELECTRIC WELDING
There are mainly two types of electric welding processes classified as follows:
(i)
Electric arc welding
It is a fusion-welding (nonpressure) process in which the
welding heat is obtained from an
arc,
formed
between
an
electrode and the welding job
connected to a suitable welding
machine.
(ii)
Electric resistance welding
It is a pressure-welding process in
which the heat is obtained by passing
a heavy momentary electric current
through
the
inherent
electric
resistance of the joint to be welded.
When the joint reaches a plastic state,
sufficient pressure is applied to
produce
fusion
and
get
a
homogeneous weld.
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2.3
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ELECTRIC ARC WELDING
Electric arc is formed when both the terminals of an electric circuit are brought
together and then separated by a small gap. When high current passes through an air gap
from one conductor to another, it produces very intense and concentrated heat in the form
of a spark. The temperature of this spark (or arc) is app. 3600°C, which can melt and fuse
the metal very quickly to produce a homogeneous weld. The types of electric arc welding
are as follow.
2.3.1 Metallic Arc Welding
This is an arc welding process in which the
welding heat is obtained from an arc, formed between
a metallic (consumable) electrode and welding job.
The metal electrode melts itself and acts as a filler
metal.
2.3.2 Carbon Arc Welding
Here the arc is formed between a carbon
electrode (non-consumable) and the welding job.
A separate filler rod is used since the carbon
electrode is a non-metal and will not melt.
2.3.3 Atomic Hydrogen Arc Welding
In this process the arc is formed between
two tungsten electrodes in an atmosphere of
hydrogen gas. The welding job remains out of
the welding circuit and a separate filler rod is
used to add the filler metal.
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2.3.4 Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding (TIG)
In this process the arc is formed between the tungsten electrodes (nonconsumable) and the welding job in an atmosphere of an inert gas (argon or helium). A
separate filler rod is used to add the filler metal. This process is also called gas tungsten
arc welding (GTAW) process.
2.3.5 Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) or Metal Inert Gas Arc Welding (MIG)
In this process the arc is formed between a continuous, automatically fed, metallic
consumable electrode and welding job in an atmosphere of inert gas, and hence this is
called metal inert gas arc welding (MIG) process.
When the inert gas is replaced by carbon dioxide then it is called CO2 arc
welding or metal active gas (MAG) arc welding.
The common name for this process is gas metal arc welding (GMAW).
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2.3.6 Submerged Arc Welding
In this process the arc is formed between a continuous, automatically fed, metallic
consumable electrode and the welding job under a heap of powdered/ granulated flux.
The arc is totally submerged in the flux (invisible).
2.3.7 Electro-Slag Welding
The arc is formed between a continuous,
automatically fed,
metallic consumable
electrode and the welding job under a thick pool
of molten flux (slag). This automatic process
requires special equipment and is used only in
vertical position for the welding of heavy thick
plates.
2.3.8 Plasma Arc Welding
In this process the arc is formed
between a tungsten electrode and the welding
job in an atmosphere of plasma-forming gasnitrogen, hydrogen and argon. A separate
filler rod is used to add the filler metal in the
joint, if necessary. But normally no filler rod
is used.
The process is similar to TIG welding.
Plasma cutting is used to cut non-ferrous metals and alloys successfully and quickly.
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2.4
15
SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW)
2.4.1 Salient Features

It is an arc welding process in which the heat required for the welding comes from
an electric arc.

The electric arc develops when electricity jumps across an air gap (ionization of air)
between the end of the metallic electrode and the welding job surface.

The metallic electrode is generally coated with a flux which is consumable.

The arc created due to the ionization of air between the electrode tip and the base
metal generates an intense arc heat having a temperature between 3600°C-4000°C.

The welding current is provided by an AC or DC machine.

The intense heat of the arc melts a small portion (molten pool) on the job directly
under the arc and at the end of the electrode instantaneously.

The melted electrode fuses into the molten pool of the welding job and produces a
homogeneous weld on cooling.

The flux coating on the electrode
also melts and provides a gaseous
shield around the arc which protects
the molten metal from atmospheric
contamination. Hence this is called
shielded metal arc welding
(SMAW).

The welding speed and feed of the
electrode is controlled manually by
the welder himself. So it is also
called manual metal arc welding
(MMAW).

When the weld metal solidifies, the slag (of flux coating) gets deposited on its
surface as it is lighter than the metal and the weld metal is allowed to cool gradually
and slowly.
2.4.2 Advantages
The process is widely used because of the following advantages:

All kinds of light and heavy gauge metals can be welded.

It can be used for fabrication, construction as well as maintenance works.

All types of metals (ferrous, non-ferrous and alloys) can be welded.

It permits a skilled operator to perform the welding operation quickly and easily.

It is more suitable for short length welds.

It is less expensive than the other processes.

It is less sensitive to weld than the other arc welding processes.

It is portable.
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2.4.3 Limitations

Less metal is deposited per hour and so can not be used for heavy fabrication
welding.

Requires more welders to be employed.

Controlling the distortion is difficult.

Continuous and automatic welding is not possible due to the specific length of the
electrode.

More strain to the welder.
2.4.4 Applications
2.5

It is used for welding thin gauge as well as thick gauge metals in small and
medium scale industries.

Used in welding bridges, bus bodies, domestic items like grills for gate, windows,
doors, chairs and tables.

Used in welding roof structures for workshops, broken and cracked castings,
water and oil tanks.

Whenever welding is done in outdoor work, this process is very useful as a diesel
generator welding set can be used.

This process is used for reconditioning, hard facing, rectifying broken parts and
repair welding.
ARC LENGTH
It is the straight distance between the electrode tip and the job surface when the arc is
formed. There are three types of arc lengths:
-
Medium or normal
-
Long
-
Short
2.5.1 Medium, Normal Arc
The correct arc length or normal arc length is
approximately equal to the diameter of the core wire
of the electrode. This is a stable arc producing steady
sharp cracking sound and causing:
-
Even burning of the electrode
-
Reduction in spatters
-
Correct fusion and penetration
-
Correct metal deposition
It is used to weld mild steel using a medium
coated electrode. It can be used for the final covering
run to avoid undercut and excessive convex fillet/
reinforcement.
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2.5.2 Long Arc
If the distance between the tip of the
electrode and the base metal is more than the
diameter of the core wire it is called a long
arc. It makes a humming sound causing:
- unstable arc
- oxidation of weld metal
- poor fusion and penetration
- poor control of molten metal
- more spatters, indicating wastage of
electrode metal.
It is used in plug and slot welding, for
restarting the arc and while withdrawing the
electrode at the end of a bead after filling the
crater. Generally long arc is to be avoided as
it will give a defective weld.
2.5.3 Short Arc
If the distance between the tip of the
electrode and the base metal is less than the diameter
of the core wire, it is called a short arc. It makes a
popping sound causing:
- the electrode melting fastly and trying to freeze
with the job
- higher metal with narrow width bead
- less spatters
- more fusion and penetration.
It is used for root runs to get good root
penetration, for positional welding and while using a
heavy coated electrode, low hydrogen, iron, powder
and deep penetration electrode.
2.6
SAFETY IN MANUAL METAL ARC WELDING
During arc welding the welder is exposed to hazards such injury due to harmful
rays (ultra violet and infra red rays) of the arc, burns due to excessive heat from the arc
and contact with hot jobs, electric shock, toxic fumes, flying hot spatters and slag
particles and objects falling on the feet.
The following safety apparels and accessories are used to protect the welder and other
persons working near the welding area from the above mentioned hazards.
1. Safety apparels
a. Leather apron
b. Leather gloves
c. Leather cape with sleeves
d. Industrial safety shoes
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2. Hand screen
a. Adjustable helmet
b. Portable fire proof canvas screens
3. Chipping/ grinding goggles
4. Respirator and exhaust ducting
2.6.1 Safety Apparels
The leather apron, gloves, cape with sleeves and leg guard are used to protect the
body, hands, arms, neck and chest of the welder from the heat radiation and hot spatters
from the arc and also from the hot slag particles flying from the weld joint during
chipping off the solidified slag.
All the above safety apparels should not
be loose while wearing them and suitable size has
to be selected by the welder.
The industrial safety boot is used to avoid
slipping, injury to the toes and ankle of the foot.
It also protects the welder from the
electric shock as the sole of the shoe is specially
made of shock resistant material.
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2.6.2 Welding Hand Screens and Helmet
These are used to protect the eyes and
face of a welder from arc radiation and sparks
during arc welding.
A hand screen is designed to hold in hand
A helmet screen is designed to wear on the head.
It provides better protection and allows the
welder to use his both hands freely.
Screens are made of non-reflective, nonflammable, insulated, dull coloured, light material
with coloured (filter) glasses fitted with plain
glasses on both sides to see the arc and molten pool
while welding. Clear glasses are fitted on each side
of the coloured glass to protect it from weld
spatters.
Coloured (filter) glasses are made in
various shades depending on the welding current
ranges used as given below:
Recommendation of filter glasses for manual metal arc welding
Shade No. of coloured glass
Range of welding current in amperes
8-9
Upto 100
10-11
100 to 300
12-14
Above 300
Portable fire proof canvas screens are used to protect the persons who work
near the welding area from arc flashes.
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Plain goggles are used to protect the eyes while
chipping the slag or grinding the job. It is made of
Bakelite frame fitted with clear glasses and an elastic
band to hold it securely on the operators head. It is
designed for comfortable fit, proper ventilation and full
protection from all sides.
2.7
ARC WELDING ACCESSORIES
Some very important items used by a welder with an arc welding machine during
the welding operation, are called arc welding accessories.
2.7.1 Electrode-Holder
It is a clamping device used to grip and
manipulate the electrode during arc welding. It
is made of copper/ copper alloy for better
electrical conductivity. Partially or fully
insulated holders are made in various sizes i.e.
200-300-500 amps.
The electrode-holder is connected to welding
machine by a welding cable.
2.7.2 Earth Clamp
It is used to connect the earth cables
firmly to the job or welding table. It is also
made of copper/ copper alloys. Screw or spring
loaded earth clamps are made in various sizes
i.e. 200-300-500 amps.
2.7.3 Welding Cables/ Leads
These are used to carry the welding current from the welding machine to the work
and back. The lead from the welding machine to the electrode-holder is called electrode
cable and the lead from the work or job through the earth clamp to the welding machine
is called earth (ground) cable.
Cables are made of super flexible rubber insulation, having fine copper wires and
woven fabric reinforcing layers. Welding cables are made in various sizes (crosssections) i.e. 300, 400, 600 amps etc.
The same size welding cables must be used for the electrode and the job.The
cable connection must be made with suitable cable attachments (lugs). Loose joints or
bad contacts cause overheating of the cables.
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2.8
21
MATERIAL PREPARATION METHOD
2.8.1 Cutting
Cutting and preparing the base metal to the required dimensions from the original
material available is necessary before welding them. Different methods used to cut metals
are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
By chiseling the sheets
By hack-sawing
By shearing using hand lever shear
By using guillotine shear
By gas cutting
For thin sheets the first 4 methods are used. For thick materials method 2, 4 and 5
are used.
Tools and equipments used to cut metals:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Cold chisel
Hacksaw with frame
Hand lever shear
Guillotine shear
Oxy-acetylene cutting torch
The cut edges of the sheet or plate are to be filed to removed burrs and to make
the edges to be square (at 90° angle) with each other. For ferrous metal plates, which are
more than 3mm thick, the edges can be prepared by grinding them on a bench/ pedestal
grinding machine.
2.8.2 Cleaning
The base metals before cutting them to size will have impurities like dirt, oil,
paint, water and surface oxides, due to long storage. These impurities will affect the
welding and will create some defects in the welded joint. So in order to get a strong
welded joint, it is necessary to clean the surfaces to be joined and remove the dirt, oil,
paint, water, surface oxide etc. from the joining surfaces before welding.
Importance of cleaning
The basic requirement of any welding process is to clean the joining edges before
welding. The joining edges or surfaces may have oil, paint, grease, rust, moisture, scale
or any other foreign matter. If these contaminants are not removed the weld will become
porous, brittle and weak. The success of welding depends largely on the conditions of the
surface to be joined before welding.
Methods of cleaning
Chemical cleaning includes washing the joining surface with solvents of diluted
hydrochloric acid to remove oil, grease, paint etc.
Mechanical cleaning includes wire brushing, grinding, filing, sand blasting,
scraping, machining or rubbing with emery paper.
For cleaning ferrous metals a carbon steel wire brush is used. For cleaning
stainless and non-ferrous metals, a stainless steel wire brush is used.
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2.9
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OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGE AND ARC VOLTAGE
Figure given below shows an electric circuit used in arc welding. After switching
on the welding machine, when there is no arc created/ struck between the electrode tip
and the base metal then the voltage “V” shown by the voltmeter in the circuit is called
“Open circuit voltage”. The value of this open circuit voltage will vary from 60V to
110V depending on the type of machine.
After switching on the welding machine, if the arc is struck/ created between the
tip of the electrode and the base metal then the voltage “V” shown by the voltmeter in the
circuit is called “Arc voltage”.
The value of this arc voltage will vary from 18V to 55V depending on the type of
machine.
2.10
POLARITY IN DC ARC WELDING
2.10.1 Importance of Polarity in Welding
In DC welding 2/3 of the heat liberated from the positive end and 1/3 from the negative
end. To have this advantage of unequal heat distribution in the electrode and base metal,
the polarity is an important factor for successful welding.
In AC, the polarity can not be utilized as the power source changes its poles
frequently.
Kinds of polarity are two:
-
Straight polarity or electrode negative (DCEN).
-
Reverse polarity or electrode positive (DCEP).
(i)
Straight polarity (DCEN)
In straight polarity the electrode is connected to the negative and the work to the
positive terminal of the power source.
Straight polarity is used for:
-
welding with bare light coated and
medium coated electrodes
-
welding the thicker sections in down
hand position to obtain more base
metal fusion and penetration.
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(ii)
23
Reverse polarity (DCEP)
In reverse polarity the electrode is connected to the positive and the work to the
negative terminal of the power source. It provides stable arc, low spatter, a good weld
bead profile and the greatest depth of root & side wall penetration.
Reverse polarity is used for:
- welding of non-ferrous metals
- welding of cast iron
- welding with heavy and superheavy coated electrodes
- welding in horizontal, vertical and
overhead positions
- sheet metal welding.
DC is preferred to AC for
hard facing and stainless steel welding.
Choice of the polarity also depends on the instruction of the electrode
manufacturers.
In order to get the best results, it is essential to attach the electrode with the
correct terminal of the welding machine.
2.10.2 Indication of Wrong Polarity
If the electrode is used on wrong polarity it will result in:
2.11
excess spatter and poor penetration
improper fusion of the electrode
heavy brownish deposition on the face of the weld metal
difficulty in manipulation of the arc
abnormal sound of the arc
poor weld bead appearance with surface defects and more spatter.
MILD STEEL WELDING ELECTRODES
2.11.1 Electrode Sizes
The electrode size refers to the diameter of its core wire. Each electrode has a
certain current range. The welding current increases with the electrode size (diameter).
Electrode size
1.6mm
2.0mm
2.5mm
3.15mm
4.0mm
Electrode size
5.0mm
6.0mm
6.3mm
8.0mm
10.0mm
Standard length of electrodes
The electrodes are generally manufactured in the length of 250mm to 450mm.
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2.11.2 Functions of an Electrode in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)
There are two main functions of an electrode in shielded metal arc welding:
-
The core wire conducts the electric current from the electrode holder to the base
metal through the arc.
It deposits weld metal across the arc onto the base metal.
The flux covering melts at a slower rate than the metal core and a cup is formed at the tip
of the electrode which helps to direct the molten metal to the required spot.
2.11.3 Identification of Electrodes
For easy identification and selection of a suitable arc welding electrode for
welding mild steel plates, the electrodes are coded by Bureau of Indian Standards (B.I.S).
According to the B.I.S., the electrodes to be used for welding mild steel for training a
beginner is coded as ER4211.
The classification for the electrode ER4211 is given below for easy
understanding:
E = Flux coated or covered electrode
R = Type of flux covering (Rutile)
4 = Strength of the joint (UTS = 410-510 N/nm2 and YS = 330N/nm2 min.
2 = Elongation and impact properties of the weld
(Elongation = 22% min. and impact = 47 J min. at 0°C)
1 = Welding position (all position) welding can be done in all positions
1 = Welding current and voltage conditions. This means that for DC welding, the
electrode can be connected to the +ve or –ve terminal. For AC welding, the
open circuit voltage should be 50 volts.
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2.11.4 Types of Electrodes
Electric arc welding electrodes are of generally following three types:
(i)
Carbon electrodes
(ii)
(iii)
Bare electrodes
Flux coated electrodes
Carbon electrodes are used in the carbon arc welding process. The arc is created
between the carbon electrode and the job. The arc melts a small pool in the job and filler
metal is added by using a separate rod.
Normally the carbon arc has very little use of welding. Its main application is in cutting
and gouging operations.
Bare electrodes are also used in some arc welding processes. An inert gas is used to
shield the molten weld metal and prevent it from absorbing oxygen and nitrogen. Filler
metal is separately added through a filler rod. Usually tungsten is used as one of the bare
wire electrode. In CO2 welding and submerged arc welding processes the mild steel bare
wire electrode is also used as a filler wire.
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Flux coated electrodes are used in the manual metal arc welding process for welding
ferrous and non-ferrous metals. The composition of coating provides the flux, the
protective shield around the arc and a protective slag which forms over the deposited
weld metal during cooling.
2.12
FLUX COATED ELECTRODES
Flux coated electrodes
1. Light coated
2. Medium coated
3. Heavy coated electrodes
1. Non-ferrous.
2. Cast iron.
3. Alloy steel and mild
steel electrodes.
2.12.1 Merits of Flux Coated Electrodes

A good quality weld is made.



The arc remains stable.
The weld penetrates into the job.
The slag produced during welding reduces the cooling rate of the weld metal.


Low oxidation.
Protect the weld metal to become brittle.


Overhead and vertical welding is easy.
The spatter loss is low and the bead remains controlled.
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2.12.2 Coating Factor
The ratio of electrode dia to the core wire dia is called coasting factor.
Total dia of an electrode
Coating factor =
Core dia of an electrode
a)
Light coated electrode coating factor
= 1.24 approx.
b)
Medium coated electrode coating factor
= 1.44 approx.
c)
Heavy coated electrode coating factor
= 1.6 to 2.2
2.12.3 Types of Material used in Flux Coated Electrode
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Ferro-silicon or Ferro-manganese for de-oxidation of the molten pool.
Magnesium silicate, Potassium silicate and Calcium carbonate for obtaining a
stable arc.
Aluminium silicate, Sodium silicate and magnesium silicate for producing a
slag.
Wooden sawdust, Cellulose, Calcium carbonate for covering arc.
Iron fillings for obtaining a fine arc and uniform bead.
2.12.4 Electrode Coding
At present three methods are for electrode coding:
1. B.S. or BEAMA (British standard or British electrical and Allied Manufacturing
Association) method.
2. A.W.S. or A.S.T.M. (American Welding Society or American Society of Testing
Material) method.
3. I.S. (Indian Standard) method.
2.13
WELDING MACHINES (POWER SOURCES)
The basic requirements for any arc welding power source are high amperages for
welding and relatively low voltage. The first commercially made available welding
power source is the welding transformer. The commonly used arc welding power
sources are as given here.
2.13.1 Welding Transformer
Welding transformer, basically steps down the voltage & hence the output is low
voltage high current AC supply. As the output is AC, it has a sinusoidal wave form. Due
to its design, it has a lot of circuit power losses like hysterical losses. Thus a welding
transformer operates at low efficiency & hence has a low power factor.
Disadvantages of welding with transformer power sources are that with the
sinusoidal wave output the current crosses the zero mark twice in a cycle which means
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that the arc distinguishes 100 times a second. This produces high weld spatter. There is
high peak to peak current variation which causes an unstable arc. The machine
consumes high power during welding & also when machine is ON. The machine is very
economical for capital investment but the running costs are very high.
For MMAW & TIG welding processes constant current (CC Type) welding
transformers are designed. These are available in air cooled & oil cooled versions. The
machines are also available in single phase & three phase models from a range of 150A600A. Welding transformers are also available for aluminium TIG welding as it offers
AC output.
These transformers are used by small time fabricators & also by process
industries where welding is done for maintenance purposes. However, nowadays
rectifiers & inverters are replacing the transformers.
2.13.2 Welding Rectifiers
Welding rectifier provides a DC output by rectifying the low voltage high current
AC output obtained from the step down transformer. The output is DC which has a ripple
in the DC wave form. With the improvement in transformer design & PCB circuit
controls, the rectifier could offer an improved welding quality & better electrical
efficiency.
Rectifiers offer a more stable arc & the spatter is considerably low. Even though it
has a DC output, the AC content of the sinusoidal wave is imposed in the output as
ripples. However, the response time is slow & the output is dependent on the input
variations. The machine consumes high power due to its moderate efficiency & power
factor.
Welding rectifiers are used for MIG/ MAG, MMAW & TIG welding processes. It
is available in constant current (CC Type) and constant voltage (CV Type) power
sources. The machines are available in single phase & three phase models from a range
of 150A – 1200A. The constant current type of rectifiers can be used for rutile & basic
coated electrodes. The constant voltage type of rectifier is used as MIG/ MAG power
sources.
Rectifiers are very popular and used by most of the fabricators in the field of
automobile, ship building, construction machinery etc.
2.13.3 Welding Generator
Welding generator delivers a pure DC output having no ripple content which
produces the most stable welding arcs suitable for MMAW process. The machine design
produces a step down voltage with a pure DC output. Generators offer a very stable arc &
the spatter is considerably low.
The disadvantages of generators are as below:




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High noise level.
Bulky and hence difficult to transport.
More moving parts & more wear & tear.
High maintenance cost due to the design.
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Applications
Ideal for MMAW welding and all types of coated electrodes. Very popular
machine used in construction industry and particularly for pipe welding applications.
2.13.4 Welding Inverters
Welding inverters are the boon to the welding industry. The technology provides
best quality of welding, birth to new welding processes, power efficient, light weight etc.
The 3 phase AC input supply is inverted to DC by a rectifier. This high voltage
DC is converted to high frequency AC (HFAC) by a transistor switching device. HFAC
is stepped down by a transformer & inverted again by a rectifier to get a DC output.
A 50Hz AC supply when rectified will produce high ripple content in the resultant
DC, whereas a high frequency AC at 20 KHz and above will produce an almost straight
line DC output, HFAC is produced by IGBT (Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor) or
MOSFET (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) type of switching
devices.
The distinctive advantages of inverter based welding power sources are:

Excellent welding characteristics

Quick response time & constant output supply

Improved features for welding applications

Energy efficient due to its high power factor & efficiency

Low weight & hence easy to transport.
Inverter technology power sources are available for MMAW, TIG, MIG/ MAG,
PLASMA and many other processes. Inverters are available with Analogue controls
& Digital controls.
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CHAPTER 3
OXY- ACETYLENE GAS WELDING
3.1
GAS WELDING
This term relates to a group of welding processes wherein weld is produced
by heating with a gas flame or flames, with or without application of pressure and
with or without the use of filler wire.
The most common gases are oxygen and acetylene, certain fuel gases
hydrogen, LPG, Coal gas etc. are used.
3.2
OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING
Oxy-acetylene welding is a method of joining metals by heating them to the
melting point using a mixture of oxygen and acetylene gases.
3.2.1 Acetylene
Acetylene is a fuel gas which produces a very high temperature flame with
the help of oxygen because it has more amount of carbon (92.3%) than any other fuel
gas. Its chemical symbol is C2 H2 and composed of:
-
Carbon 92.3% (24 parts)
Hydrogen 7.7% ( 2 parts)
It is a colourless gas, lighter than air and highly inflammable and burns with a
brilliant flame. Commercial acetylene has pungent odour because of certain
impurities. It forms a long range of explosive mixture with air any percentage
between 3 x 80 becoming explosive on ignition. It may also explode when under
unduly high pressure even in absence of air, when mixed with oxygen it explodes
more violently. Acetylene absorbs heat during producing and liberates heat when
decomposed.
There are two type of acetylene generators:
- Water – to – Carbide generators.
- Carbide – to – Water generators.
Dissolved acetylene means compressed acetylene pumped into steel cylinder filled
with porous filling material soaked in acetylene.
3.2.2 Oxygen
Oxygen is a supporter of combustion. Its chemical symbol is O2. It is a clear,
colourless, odourless and tasteless gas. It is slightly soluble in water. It does not burn
itself, but supports combustion of fuels. It is industrially produced by two methods:
- by air liquefaction.
- by electrolysis of water.
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31
OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES
3.3.1 Oxygen gas Cylinders
The oxygen gas required for gas
welding is stored in bottle shaped
cylinders. These cylinders are painted
in black colour. Oxygen cylinders can
store gas to a capacity of 7m3 with the
pressure ranging between 120 to 150
kg/cm2. Oxygen gas cylinder valves
are right hand threaded.
3.3.2 Dissolved Acetylene Cylinders
The acetylene gas used in gas welding
is stored in steel bottle shaped
cylinders painted in maroon colour.
The normal storing capacity of storing
acetylene in dissolved state is 6m3 with
the pressure ranging between 15-16
kg/cm2.
3.3.3 Oxygen Pressure Regulator
This is used to reduce the oxygen cylinder
gas pressure according to the required
working pressure and to control the flow of
oxygen at a constant rate to the blowpipe.
The threaded connections are right hand
threaded.
3.3.4 Acetylene Regulator
This is also used to reduce the cylinder gas
pressure to the required working pressure
and to control the flow of acetylene gas at a
constant rate to the blowpipe. The threaded
connections are left handed. For quickly
identifying the acetylene regulator, a
groove is cut at the corners of the nut.
There are two types of regulators
Handbook on Welding Techniques
-
single stage regulator
-
double stage regulator
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3.3.5 Rubber Hose Pipes and Connections
These are used to carry gas from the regulator to the blowpipe. These are made of
strong canvas rubber having good flexibility. Hose-pipes which carry oxygen are black
in colour and the acetylene hoses are of maroon colour.
3.3.6 Hose Protectors
At the blowpipes end of the rubber hoses hose-protectors are fitted. The hose
protectors are in the shape of a connecting union and have a non-return disc fitted inside
to protect from flashback and backfire during welding.
3.3.7 Blowpipe and Nozzle
Blowpipes are used to control and mix the oxygen and acetylene gases to the
required proportion.
A set of interchangeable nozzles/ tips of different sizes is available to produces smaller or
bigger flames.
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The size of the nozzle varies according to the thickness of the plates to be welded.
Plate thickness
mm
0.8
1.2
1.6
2.4
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
8.0
10.0
12.0
19.0
25.0
Over 25.0
3.4
Nozzle size
number
1
2
3
5
7
10
13
18
25
35
45
55
70
90
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS IN HANDLING OXY-ACETYLENE GAS WELDING
PLANT
One must observe safety rules in day-to-day working to avoid accident.
“Accident starts when safety ends.”
Oxy-acetylene equipment is safe if it is properly handled, but it may become a
great destructive power if handled carelessly. It is important that the operator be familiar
with all the safety rules before handling gas cylinders.
In gas welding, the welder must follow certain safety precautions while handling
gas welding plants in order to prevent accidents to others and him. Observing the
following precautions will help the gas welder to avoid accidents to a great extent.
3.4.1 General Safety Precautions

Never use oil or grease in any part or
assembly of a gas welding plant as it may
cause an explosion.

All inflammable materials should be kept
away from the welding area.

Always wear goggles with filter glasses
during welding.

Wear fire-resistant clothes, asbestos gloves
and an apron while welding.

Never wear nylon or greasy clothes while
welding.

Rectify the gas leakages noticed immediately
as even a small leakage can lead to serious
accidents.

Always keep fire extinguishing devices handy
and in working order.

While leaving the work area, make sure the place is free from any form of fire.
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3.4.2 Safety Concerning Gas Cylinders

Do not roll gas cylinders for shifting.
Always use a trolley to carry cylinders.

Do not drop the gas cylinders.

Close the cylinder valves when not in use
or empty.

Keep the empty cylinders and full cylinders
separately.

Always open the cylinder valves slowly
and not more than one and a half turn.

Use always the correct size cylinder keys.

Stand aside when opening the cylinders.

Do not remove the cylinder keys from the cylinders during welding. It will help to
close the cylinders quickly in case of an emergency.

Always keep the cylinders in an upright position keeping in view safety and ease in
handling.

Always crack the cylinder valves to clean
the valve socket before attaching the
regulators.

Never fall or trip over gas cylinders.

A valve broken in the oxygen cylinder will
cause it to become a rocket with
tremendous force.

Keep the gas cylinders away from exposure
to high temperature.

Remember the pressure in the gas cylinders
increases with the temperature.

Mark the empty cylinders (MT/EMPTY)
with chalk.

Put on the valve protection caps when the
cylinders are not in use or they are being
moved.

Close the cylinder valves both when they are full and empty.

Never remove the valve protection cap while lifting cylinders.

Avoid exposing the cylinders to furnace heat, open fire or sparks from the torch.

Smoking or naked lights should be strictly prohibited near gas cylinders.

Never strike an arc of direct gas flame on a gas cylinder.
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3.4.3 Safety of Rubber Hose-Pipes

Use only the type of hose recommended for use in gas welding.

Use only black coloured hoses for oxygen and maroon coloured ones for
acetylene gas.

Avoid damage to the hose-pipes
caused by rubbing against hard or
sharp edges.

Ensure that the hoses do not cross the
gangways.

Do not add bits of hose together to
make up the length.

Blow out the hose-pipes before
connecting to the blowpipe to remove
dirt or dust.

Protect the regulators from water, dust, oil etc.

Never attempt to interchange oxygen and acetylene regulators while fitting as it
can damage the threads.

Always remember the oxygen connection is right-hand threaded and the
acetylene connections have left hand threads.

In the event of backfire shut both the blowpipe valves (oxygen first) quickly and
dip the blowpipe in water.

While igniting the flame, point the blowpipe nozzle in a safe direction and use the
spark lighter to ignite the flame to
avoid fire hazards.

While extinguishing the flame, shut off
the acetylene valve first and then the
oxygen to avoid backfire.

Check for leakage before using oxyacetylene welding equipment.
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 Toxic and poisonous fumes given out during
welding of some materials should be
collected and cleared so as to be prevented
from inhaling. For this an exhaust ducting
and a respirator may be used.
 Containers used for the storage of flammable
materials should not be welded without
thorough cleaning as otherwise the containers
may explode.
3.5
TROUBLE WITH BLOW PIPE & CYLINDERS
3.5.1 Backfire
At certain times during ignition in gas welding a small explosion of the flame occurs at
the torch tip. The flame may or may not go off. This is known as ‘backfire’.
Causes:
A backfire is caused when:
 the gas pressure setting is low
 the nozzle is overheated
 the nozzle orifice is blocked by carbon or spark deposits
 the nozzle touches the molten pool
 there is leakage near the nozzle
Eliminate the causes before proceeding further to avoid backfire.
3.5.2 Flashback
Sometimes during backfire, the flame goes off and the burning acetylene gas travels
backward in the blowpipe, towards the regulator or cylinders. This is known as
‘flashback’.
Indications of flashback:
 A
sharp squealing sound inside the
blowpipe may be heard.
 Heavy black smoke and sparks come out
of the nozzle.
 The blowpipe handles starts heating.
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Immediate steps:
 Close the blowpipe valves (oxygen first)
 Immerse the blowpipe in water and close the cylinder valves.
If the backfire or flashback is not checked in time, it may cause serious accidents to
men and machines.
3.5.3 Cylinder Catches Fire
If the cylinder catches fire externally due to the leakage of gas at the connection:
-
close the cylinder valve immediately (wearing asbestos gloves as a safety measure)
-
use carbon dioxide fire extinguisher to extinguish the fire.
-
Rectify the leakage thoroughly before putting into further use.
If the cylinder becomes overheated due to internal or external fire:
3.6
-
close the cylinder valve
-
detach the regulator from the cylinder
-
remove the cylinder to an open space, away from smoking or naked light.
-
Cool the cylinder by spraying with water
-
Inform the gas cylinder supplier immediately
-
Never keep such defective cylinders with the other cylinders.
TYPES OF OXY-ACETYLENE FLAMES
The oxy-acetylene gas flame has following features which make it useful for gas
welding:
 it has a well controlled flame with high temperature
 the flame can be easily manipulated for proper melting of the base metal
 it does not change the chemical composition of the base metal/ weld.
Three different types of oxy-acetylene flames as given below can be set:
 Neutral flame
 Oxidising flame
 Carburizing flame
3.6.1 Neutral Flame
Oxygen and acetylene are
mixed in equal proportion in the
blowpipe and complete combustion
takes place in this flame. This flame
does not have a bad effect on the
metal/ weld i.e. the metal is not
oxidized and no carbon is available for
reacting with the metal.
It is used to weld most of the common metals, i.e. mild steel, cast iron, stainless
steel, copper and aluminium.
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3.6.2 Oxidizing Flame
It contains an excess of oxygen over
acetylene as the gases come out of the
nozzle. The flame has an oxidizing effect
on metals which prevents evaporation of
zinc/ tin in brass welding/ brazing.
It is used for welding of brass and
for brazing of ferrous metals.
3.6.3 Carburizing Flame
It receives an excess of acetylene over
oxygen from the blowpipe. The flame
has a carburizing effect on steel, causing
hard, brittle and weak weld.
It is Useful for stelliting (hard
facing), ‘Linde’ welding of steel pipes,
and flame cleaning.
The selection of the flame is based on the metal to be welded. The neutral flame is
the most commonly used flame. Metals and flame to be used are as given below:
Metal
Flame

Mild steel
Neutral

Copper (de-oxidised)
Neutral

Brass
Oxidising

Cast iron
Neutral

Stainless steel
Neutral

Aluminium (pure)
Neutral

Stellite
Carburising
3.6.4 Chemistry of Oxy-acetylene Flame
Oxy-acetylene flame is produced by the combustion of a mixture of oxygen and
acetylene in various proportions. The temperature and characteristics of the flame depend
on the ratio of the two gases in the mixture.
Features of neutral flame
Oxy-acetylene flame consists of the following features by appearance:
-
Inner core
-
Inner reducing zone
-
Outer zone or envelope
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Different zones and temperature
To know and make the best use
of oxy-acetylene flame, the temperature
in different zones is shown below:
The greatest amount of heat is
produced at just ahead of the inner cone
called the hottest point or region of
maximum temperature.
Combustion ratio of oxygen
and acetylene in flame
For complete combustion/ burning one volume of acetylene requires two and a
half volumes of oxygen.
Acetylene
1 litre
:
:
Oxygen
2.5 litres
Equal volumes of acetylene and oxygen are supplied from the blowpipe to
produce a neutral flame
Acetylene
1 litre
:
(Primary combustion)
oxygen
1 litre
So another 1.5 litres of oxygen is required for complete burning of acetylene. The flame
takes an additional 1.5 litres of oxygen from the surrounding atmosphere (secondary
combustion)
3.7
FILLER RODS FOR GAS WELDING
3.7.1 Filler Rod and its Necessity
Pieces of wires or rods of standard diameter and length used as filler metal in the
joint during gas welding process are called filler rods or welding rods. These rods are
made out of ferrous or non-ferrous metal.
To obtain best results, high quality filler rods should be used. The actual cost of
welding rods is very small compared with cost of job, labour, gases and flux.
Good quality filler rods are necessary to:
 reduce oxidation (effect of oxygen)
 control the mechanical properties of the deposited metal
 make up for the loss of certain elements in the weld metal caused by
fusion.
While welding, a cavity or depression will be formed at the joints of thin section
metals. For heavy/ thick plates a groove is prepared at the joint. This groove is necessary
to get better fusion of the full thickness of the metal, so as to get a uniform strength at the
joint. This groove formed has to be filled with metal. For this purpose also a filler rod is
necessary. Each metal requires a suitable filler rod.
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3.7.2 Sizes as Per IS:1278-1972
The size of the filler rod is determined from the diameter as: 1.00, 1.20, 1.60,
2.00, 2.50, 3.15, 4.00, 5.00 and 6.30 mm.
For leftward technique filler rods upto 4 mm dia. are used. For rightward
technique upto 6.3 mm dia. is used. For cast iron welding filler rods of 6 mm dia. and
above are used.
Length of filler rod are 500 mm or 1000 mm.
Filler rods above 4 mm diameter are not used often for welding of mild steel. The
usual size of mild steel filler rods used are 1.6 mm and 3.15 mm diameter. All mild steel
filler rods are given a thin layer of copper coating to protect them from oxidation
(rusting) during storage. So these filler rods are called copper coated mild steel
(C.C.M.S) filler rods.
All types of filler rods are to be stored in sealed plastic covers until they are used.
3.7.3 Types of Filler Rods
The following types of filler rods are classified in gas welding:
-
Ferrous filler rod
-
Non-ferrous filler rod
-
Alloy type filler rod for ferrous metals
-
Alloy type filler rod for non-ferrous metals
A ferrous type filler rod has a major % of iron.
The ferrous type filler rod contains iron, carbon, silicon, sulphur and
phosphorous.
The alloy type filler rod contains iron, carbon, silicon and any one or many of the
elements such as manganese, nickel, chromium, molybdenum etc.
The non-ferrous filler rod is a filler rod which contains elements of non-ferrous
metals. The composition of non-ferrous type filler rods is similar to any non-ferrous
metal such as copper, aluminum.
A non-ferrous alloy type filler rod contains metal like copper, aluminium, tin
etc. alongwith zinc, lead, nickel, manganese, silicon, etc.
3.7.4 Selection of the Filler Rod
Selection of the correct filler rod for a particular job is a very important step for
successful welding. Composition of filler metal is chosen with special consideration to
the metallurgical requirement of a weldment.
A wrong choice due to either ignorance or a false consideration of economy may
lead to costly failures. IS:1278-1972 specifies requirements that should be met by filler
rods for gas welding. There is another specification IS:2927-1975 which covers brazing
alloys.
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It is strongly recommended that filler material confirming to these specifications
is used. In certain rare cases, it may be necessary to use filler rods of composition not
covered by these specifications; in such cases filler rods with well established
performance should be used.
To select a filler rod in respect to the metal to be welded, the filler rod must have
the same composition with respect to the base metal to be welded.
Factors to be considered for selection of filler rod are:
a.
the type and composition of base metal
b.
the base metal thickness
c.
the type of edge preparation
d.
the weld is deposited as root run, intermediate runs or final covering run
e.
welding position
f.
whether there is any corrosion effect or loss of material from the base metal due
to welding.
3.7.5 Care and Maintenance
-
Filler rods should be stored in clean, dry condition to prevent deterioration.
-
Do not mix different types of filler rods.
-
Ensure that packages and their labels are in order for easy and correct selection.
-
Where it is not practicable to store filler rods under heated conditions, an absorbent
for moisture such as silica-gel may be used in the storage area.
-
Ensure the rod is free from contamination such as rust, scale, oil, grease and
moisture.
-
Ensure the rod is reasonably straight to assist manipulation during welding.
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3.7.6 Different Filler Metals and Fluxes for Gas Welding
Filler metal
type
Applications
Flux
A general purpose rod for welding mild steel
Mild steel-type where a minimum butt-weld tensile strength of
Not required
S-FS1
35.0 kg/mm2 is required. (Full fusion technique
with neutral flame).
Intended for application in which minimum buttMild steel-Type
weld tensile strength of 44.0kg/mm2 is required. Not required
S-FS2
(Full fusion technique with neutral flame).
Building up worn out crossings and other
Wear resisting application where the steel surfaces are subject to
Not required
alloy steel
extreme wear by shock and abrasion. (Surface
fusion technique with excess acetylene flame)
These rods are intended to be used in repair and
3 % nickel steel reconditioning parts which have to be subsequently special flux (If
Type S-FS4
hardened and tempered. (Full fusion technique necessary)
with neutral flame)
Stainless steel
decay-resistant
(nobium
bearing) Type
S-Bo2MoNb
These rods are intended for use in the welding of
corrosion-resisting steels such as those containing
Necessary
18% chromium and 8% nickel. (Full fusion
technique with neutral flame).
High
silicon Intended for use in the welding of cast iron where
cast iron-Type an easily achineable deposit is required. (Full Flux necessary
S-C11
fusion technique with neutral flame).
Copper
filler
For welding of de-oxidized copper (Full fusion
rod – Type SFlux necessary
technique with neutral flame).
C1
For use in the braze welding of copper and mild
Brass filler rod- steel and for the fusion welding of material of the
Flux necessary
Type S-C6
same or closely similar composition. (Oxidising
flame)
Manganese
bronze
(high
tensile brass) –
Type S-C8
February, 2015
for use in braze welding of copper, cast iron and
malleable iron and for the fusion welding of
Flux necessary
materials of the same or closely similar
composition (Oxidising flame)
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43
Applications
Flux
Medium
nickel For use in the braze welding of mild steel,
Flux required.
bronze-Type S-C9 cast iron and malleable iron (Oxidising flame)
Aluminium (Pure) For use in the welding of aluminum grade 1B.
Flux necessary
-Type S-C13
(Full fusion technique with neutral flame).
For welding of aluminium casting alloys,
except those containing magnesium or zinc as
Aluminium alloy the main addition. They may also be used to
5% silicon – Type
Flux necessary.
weld wrought aluminium-magnesium-silicon
S-NG 21
alloys. (Full fusion technique with neutral
flame).
Aluminium alloy- For welding high silicon aluminium alloys.
10-13% silicon – Also recommended for brazing aluminium. Flux necessary
Type 5-NG2
(Neutral flame)
For welding aluminium casting particularly
Aluminium alloy
those containing about 5% copper. (Full Flux necessary.
5% copper
fusion technique with neutral flame)
None is usually
required. A cast
iron flux may be
used, if necessary.
Stellite: Grade 1
Hard facing of components subjected mainly
to abrasion. (Surface fusion technique with
excess acetylene flame)
Stellite: Grade 6
Hard facing of components subjected to shock
and abrasion. (surface fusion technique with -doexcess acetylene flame)
Stellite: Grade 12
Hard facing of components subjected to
abrasion and moderate shock. (Surface fusion -dotechnique with excess acetylene flame)
Copper
phosphorous
brazing
alloyType BA-CuP2
Brazing
copper,
brass
and
bronze
components. Brazing with slightly oxidizing
necessary
flame on copper; neutral flame on copper
alloys.
For making ductile joint in copper without
copperflux. Also widely used on copper based alloys
phosphorous
of the brass and bronze type in conjunction
brazing alloy – with a suitable silver brazing flux. (Flame
Type BA-CuP5
slightly oxidizing on copper; neutral on
copper alloys)
Handbook on Welding Techniques
None for copper.
A
flux
is
necessary
for
brazing copper
alloys.
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Filler metal type
Applications
Flux
Similar to type BA-CuP5 but with a slightly
lower tensile strength and electrical
Silver-copper-zinc conductivity (flame slightly oxidizing on
(61% silver) type copper; neutral on copper alloys).
brazing
alloysNOTE: Phosphorous bearing silver brazing
type BA-CuP3
alloys should not be used with ferrous metal
or alloys of high nickel content.
None for copper.
A
flux
is
necessary
for
brazing copper
alloys.
Silver-copper-zinc This brazing alloy is particularly suitable for
(61% silver) - type joining electrical components requiring high Flux necessary.
BA-Cu-AG6
electrical conductivity. (Flame neutral)
This is a general purpose brazing alloy and is
Silver-copper-zinc
particularly suitable for joining electrical
Flux necessary
(43% silver)-type
components
requiring
high
electrical
BA-Cu-Ag16
conductivity. (Flame neutral)
An ideal composition for economy in brazing
Silver-copperoperation requiring a low temperature, quick
zinc-cadmium
and complete penetration. Suitable on steel, Flux necessary
(43% silver) type
copper, copper, brass, bronze, copper-nickel
BA-Cu-Ag16A
alloys and nickel silver. (Flame neutral)
Silver-copperThis alloy is also suitable for steel, copperzinc-cadmium
nickel alloys and nickel-silvers. (Flame Flux necessary.
(50% silver) type
neutral)
BA-Cu-Ag11
Silver-copperzinc-cadmiumnickle
(50%
silver) type BACu-Ag12
3.8
Specially suitable for brazing tungsten carbide
tips to rock drills, milling cutters, cutting and
shaping tools; also suitable for brazing steels Flux necessary.
which are difficult to ‘wet’ such as stainless
steels. (Flame neutral)
WELDING TECHNIQUES OF OXY-ACETYLENE WELDING
There are following two welding techniques used in oxy-acetylene welding process:
1.
2.
Leftward welding technique (Forehand technique)
Rightward welding technique (Backhand technique)
3.8.1 Leftward Welding Technique
It is the most widely used oxy-acetylene gas
welding technique in which the welding
commences at the right hand edge of the welding
job and proceeds towards the left. It is also called
forward or forehand technique.
The blowpipe is held at an angle of 60 ° 70° with the welding line. The filler rod is held at
an angle of 30°-40° with the welding line. The
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welding blowpipe follows the filler rod. The welding flame is directed away from the
deposited weld metal.
The blowpipe is given a circular or side-to-side motion to obtain even fusion on
each side of the joint. The filler rod is added in the (weld) molten pool by a piston like
motion and not melted off by the flame itself.
If the flame is used to melt the filler rod itself into the pool, the temperature of the
molten pool will be reduced and consequently good fusion cannot be obtained.
Edge preparation for leftward technique

For fillet joints
preparation is done.

For butt joints the edges are prepared
as shown in figure given below.
square
edge
The table given below shows the details for welding mild steel by leftward technique (for
butt joint)
metal
thickness
in mm
C.C.M.S. filler
rod diameter
in mm
Blow pipe
nozzle size
edge
preparation
root gap
in mm
0.8
1.6
1
flange
Nil
1.6 to 2.0
1.6
3
square
2
2.5
2
5
square
2
3.15
2.5
7
square
3
4.0
3.15
7
80°Vee
3
5.0
3.15
13
80°Vee
3
flux to be used
for gas welding
of mild steel no
flux is required
to be used
For fillet joints one size larger nozzle is to be used.
Above 5.0 mm thickness, the rightward technique should be used.
Application - This technique is used for the welding of:
 Mild steel upto 5mm thickness
 All metals both ferrous and non-ferrous
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3.8.2 Rightward Welding Technique
It is an oxy-acetylene gas welding
technique, in which the welding is begun
at the left hand edge of the welding job
and it proceeds towards the right.
This technique was developed to
assist the production work on thick steel
plates (above 5mm) so as to produce
economic welds of good quality. It is also
called backward or backhand technique.
The blowpipe is held at an angle
of 40°-50° with the welding line. The
filler rod is held at an angle of 30°-40°
with the welding line. The filler rod
follows the welding blowpipe. The
welding flame is directed towards the
deposited weld metals.
The filler rod is given a rotational or circular loop motion in the forward direction.
The blowpipe moves back in a straight line steadily towards the right. This technique
generates more heat for fusion, which makes it economical for thick steel plate welding.
Edge preparation for rightward technique
For butt joints the edges are prepared as shown
in figure:
The table given below gives the details for welding mild steel by rightward technique for
butt joint:
Metal
thickness
in mm
C.C.M.S filler
rod diameter
in mm
Blow pipe
nozzle size
Edge
preparation
root gas
in mm
flux to be used
5
3.15
10
square
2.5
6.3
4.0
13
square
3.0
8
5.0
18
60°Vee
3.0
for gas welding
of mild steel no
flux is required
to be used
10 to 16
6.3
18
60°Vee
4.0
above 16
6.3
25
60° double Vee
3.0
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47
Application:
This technique is used for the welding of steel above 5mm thickness and ‘LINDE’
welding process of steel pipes.
Advantages:
Less cost per length run of the weld due to less bevel angle, less filler rod being used and
increased speed. Welds are made much faster.
3.9
WELDING OF LOW CARBON STEEL AND MEDIUM CARBON STEEL
A plain carbon steel is one in which carbon is the only alloying element. The
amount of carbon in the steel controls its hardness, strength and ductility. The higher the
carbon content, lesser the ductility of the steel.
Carbon steels are classified accordingly to the percentage of carbon they contain.
They are referred to as low, medium and high carbon steels.
3.9.1 Low Carbon Steels
Steels with a carbon range of 0.05 to 0.30 percent are called low carbon steel or
mild steel. Steels in this class are tough, ductile and easily machineable and quite easy to
weld.
Welding technique: Up to 6 mm, leftward technique is a suitable one. Above 6 mm
rightward technique is preferable.
Type of flame: Neutral flame to be used.
Application of flux: No flux is required.
After treatment: Most of them do not respond to any heat treatment process. Therefore
except cleaning no post-heat treatment is required.
3.9.2 Medium Carbon Steel
These steels have a carbon range from 0.30 to 0.6 percent. They are strong and
hard but can not be welded as easily as low carbon steels due to the higher carbon
content. They can be heat treated. It needs greater care to prevent formation of cracks
around the weld area, or gas pockets in the bead, all of which weaken the weld.
Welding procedure: Most medium carbon steels can be welded in the same way as mild
steel successfully without too much difficulty but the metal should be preheated slightly
to 160°C to 320°C (to dull red heat). After completion of welding, the metal requires
post-heating to the same preheating temperature and allowed to cool slowly.
After cooling the weld is to be cleaned and inspected for surface defects and
alignment.
The plate edge preparation depends on the thickness of the material to be welded.
3.9.3 High Carbon Steels
These steels have a carbon range from 0.6 to 1.2 percent. This type of steel is not weldable by gas welding process because it is difficult to avoid cracking of base metal and the
weld.
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CHAPTER 4
OXY-ACETYLENE GAS CUTTING
4.1
INTRODUCTION
The most common method of cutting mild steel is by an oxy-acetylene cutting
process. With an oxy-acetylene cutting torch, the cutting (oxidation) can be confined to a
narrow strip and with little effect of heat on the adjoining metal. The cut appears like a
saw cut on a wooden plank. The method can be successfully used to cut ferrous metals
i.e. mild steel.
Non-ferrous metals and their alloys cannot be cut by this process.
4.2
PRINCIPLE OF GAS CUTTING
When a ferrous metal is heated to
red hot condition and then exposed to pure
oxygen, a chemical reaction takes place
between the heated metal and oxygen. Due
to this oxidation reaction, a large amount of
heat is produced and cutting action takes
place.
In oxy-acetylene cutting the combination of
red hot metal and pure oxygen causes rapid
burning and iron is changed into iron oxide
(oxidation). By this continuous process of
oxidation the metal can be cut through very
rapidly. The iron oxide is less in weight
than the base metal.
The iron oxide in molten condition is also
called slag. So the jet of oxygen coming
from the cutting torch will blow the molten
slag away from the metal making a gap
called “Kerf”.
4.2.1 Cutting Operation
There are two operations in oxy-acetylene gas cutting. A preheating flame is directed on
the metal to be cut and raises it to bright red hot or ignition point (900°C app.) Then a
stream of high pressure pure oxygen is directed on to the hot metal which oxidizes and
cuts the metal. The two operations are done simultaneously with a single torch.
The torch is moved at a proper travel speed to produce a smooth cut. The removal of
oxide particles from the line of cut is automatic by means of the force of oxygen jet
during the progress of cut.
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4.2.2 Application of Cutting Torch
Oxy-acetylene cutting torch is used to cut mild steel plates above 4mm thickness.
The M.S. plate can be cut to its full length in straight line either parallel to the edge or at
any angle to the edge of a plate. Bevelling the edges of a plate to any required angle can
also be done by tilting the torch. Circles and any other curved profile can also be cut
using the cutting torch by using a suitable guide or template.
4.3
OXY-ACETYLENE CUTTING EQUIPMENT
The oxy-acetylene cutting equipment is similar to the welding equipment, except
that instead of using a welding blowpipe, a cutting blowpipe is used.
 Acetylene gas cylinder
 Oxygen gas cylinder
 Acetylene gas regulator
 Oxygen gas regulator (Heavy cutting requires higher pressure oxygen regulator)
 Rubber hose-pipes for acetylene and oxygen
 Cutting blowpipe
4.3.1 Cutting Torch
The cutting torch differs
from the regular welding blowpipe
in most cases. It has an additional
lever for the control of the cutting
oxygen used to cut the metal. The
torch has the oxygen and acetylene
control valves to control the
oxygen and acetylene gases while
preheating the metal.
The cutting tip is made with an
ORIFICE in the centre surrounding
by five smaller holes. The centre
opening permits the flow of the
cutting oxygen and the smaller
holes are for the preheating flame.
Usually different tip sizes are
provided for cutting metals of
different thicknesses.
4.3.2 Difference Between Cutting Torch (blowpipe) and Welding Blowpipe

A cutting blowpipe has two control valves (oxygen and acetylene) to control the
preheating flame and one lever type control valve to control the high pressure pure
oxygen for making the cut.

A welding blowpipe has only two control vales to control the heating flame.

The nozzle of the cutting blowpipe has one hole in the centre for cutting oxygen and
a number of holes around the circle for the preheating flame.
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
The nozzle of welding blowpipe has only one hole in the centre for the heating
flame.

The angle of the cutting nozzle with the body is 60°.

The angle of the welding nozzle with the neck is 120°.

The cutting nozzle size is given by the diameter of the cutting oxygen orifice in mm.

The welding nozzle size is given by the volume of oxy-acetylene mixed gases
coming out of the nozzle in cubic meter per hour.
4.3.3 Care and Maintenance

The high pressure cutting oxygen lever should be operated only for gas cutting
purpose.

Care should be taken while fitting the nozzle with the torch to avoid wrong thread.

Dip the torch after each cutting operation in water to cool the nozzle.

To remove any slag particles or dirt from the nozzle orifice use the correct size
nozzle cleaner.

Use an emery paper if the nozzle tip is damaged to make it sharp and to be at 90°
with the nozzle axis.
4.3.4 Problems with Cutting Torch
Trouble
gas
leakage
Part to be
checked
hose joint
Method
remedy
When to be
checked
soap water or tighten further at the beginning
water
or replace
of the work.
valve
& soap water or replace
regulator
water
torch
the at the beginning
of the work.
cutting tip soap water or tighten further at the beginning
attaching
water
or replace
of the work.
part
February, 2015
suction of injector
acetylene
plug the fuel replace
gas
hose
mouth
with
your finger.
periodical check
for the low
pressure torch.
preheating
flame
shape
neutral flame Clean
by
visual replace.
inspection
or at the beginning
of the work or
at random
cutting
oxygen
flow
visible
gas clean or replace
flow by visual
inspection
at the beginning
of the work or
at random.
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51
CHAPTER 5
FAULTS AND DEFECTS IN GAS & ARC WELDING
5.1
WELD DEFECTS & TYPES
A defect or fault is one which does not allow the finished joint to withstand or
carry the required load.
Weld defects may be considered under two heads.
-
External defects
Internal defects
The defects which can be seen with bare eyes or with a lens on the top of the weld
bead, or on the base metal surface or on the root side of the joint are called external
defects.
Those defects, which are hidden inside the weld bead or inside the base metal surface
and which cannot be seen with bare eyes or lens are called internal defects.
Some of the weld defects are external defects, some are internal defects and some
defects like crack, blow hole and porosity, slag inclusion, lack of root penetration in fillet
joints, etc. will occur both as external and internal defects.
5.1.1 External Defects
1. Undercut
2. Cracks
3. Blow hole and porosity
4. Slag inclusions
5. Edge of plate melted off
6. Excessive convexity/ oversized weld/ excessive reinforcement
7. Excessive concavity/ insufficient throat thickness/ insufficient fill
8. Incomplete root penetration/ lack of penetration
9. Excessive root penetration
10. Overlap
11. Mismatch
12. Uneven/ irregular bead appearance
13. Spatters
5.1.2 Internal Defects
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Cracks
Blow hole and porosity
Slag inclusions
Lack of fusion
Lack of root penetration
Internal stresses or locked-up stresses or restrained joint.
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5.2
CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
TYPES OF FAULTS IN GAS WELDING
A fault is an imperfection in the weld which may result in failure of the
welded joint while in service. The following faults occur commonly in gas welding:

Undercut
A groove of channel formed
along the toe of the weld on one side or
on both sides.
Reinforcement

Excessive
Excessive
Convexity
Excessive convexity
Too much weld metal added to the
joint so that there is excessive weld
reinforcement.
Reinforcement
Overlap

Overlap
Metal flowing into the surface
of the base metal without fusing it.
Overlap

Excessive penetration
Depth of fusion at the root of the
grooved joint is more than the required
amount.
Excess Weld Metal at the Root
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
53
Lack of penetration
Required amount of
penetration is not achieved i.e.
fusion does not take place upto
the root of the weld.
Lack of Penetration

Lack of fusion
If there is no melting of the edges of the base metal at the root face or on the side
face or between the weld runs, then it is called lack of fusion.
Lack of Inter Run Fusion
Lack of Side Fusion
Lack of Root Fusion

Root Run
Porosity
Number of pinholes formed on the
surface of the deposited metal.
Porosity

Blow-holes
These are similar to pinholes
but have a greater diameter.
Blow Holes

Cracks
A discontinuity in the base metal
or weld metal or both.
Cracks
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
Unfilled crater
A depression formed at the end of the weld.
Unfilled Crater

Excessive concavity/ insufficient throat thickness
Enough weld metal is not added to the joint so that there is insufficient
throat thickness.
Excessive
Concavity
AB-
Throat Thickness due to
Excessive Concavity
Required Throat Thickness
Collapse of Weld Pool
through Parent Metal

Burn through
A collapse of the molten pool
due to excessive penetration, resulting
in a hole in
the weld run.
Burn Through
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5.3
55
GAS WELD DEFECTS – POSSIBLE CAUSES AND REMEDIES
Sr.
Defect
Possible causes
Appropriate remedies
1.
Fillet weld with Incorrect angle of filler Maintain filler rod and blowpipe
insufficient throat rod and blowpipe.
at the appropriate angles.
thickness.
2.
Excessive
Excess heat build-up Use the appropriate size nozzle
concavity in butt with too fast a speed of and filler rod with the correct
weld profile.
travel or filler rod too speed of travel.
small.
3.
Excessive
Angle of slope of Maintain the nozzle at the correct
penetration.
nozzle too large.
speed of travel.
Excess fusion of Insufficient
forward Select correct nozzle size.
root edges.
heat.
Flame size and/or Regulate flame velocity correctly.
velocity too high.
Use correct size of filler rod.
Filler rod too large or
too small.
Speed of travel too Travel at the correct speed.
slow.
4.
Burn through.
5.
Undercut
along Incorrect angle of tilt Maintain blowpipe at the correct
vertical member used
in
blowpipe angle.
of fillet welded tee manipulation.
joint.
6.
Undercut in both Wrong
blowpipe Use correct nozzle size, speed of
sides of weld face manipulation,
in- travel and lateral blowpipe
in butt joint.
correct distance from manipulation.
plate surface, excessive
lateral movement. Use
of too large a nozzle.
7.
Incomplete root
penetration in butt
joint (single Vee
or double Vee)
Incorrect set up and
joint preparation.
Use of unsuitable
procedure
and/or
welding technique.
Ensure joint preparation and set
up are correct.
Appropriate
procedure and/ or welding
technique must be used.
8.
Incomplete root Incorrect set up and
penetration
in joint preparation.
close square Tee Use of unsuitable
joint.
procedure
and/or
welding technique.
Ensure joint preparation and set
up are correct. Appropriate
procedure and/ or welding
technique must be used.
Handbook on Welding Techniques
Excessive penetration
has produced local
collapse of weld pool
resulting in a hole in
the root run.
Maintain blowpipe at the correct
angles. Check nozzle size, filler
rod size.
Travel at the correct speed.
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Sr.
Defect
Possible causes
Appropriate remedies
9.
Lack
of
penetration
10.
Lack of fusion on
root and side faces
of double Vee butt
joint.
11.
Lack of inter-run Angles of
fusion
blowpipe
incorrect.
12.
Weld face cracks Use of incorrect welding
in butt and fillet procedure.
welds.
Unbalanced expansion and
contraction stresses.
Presence of impurities.
Undesirable
chilling
effects.
Use of incorrect filler rod.
Use correct procedure and
filler rod.
Ensure uniform heating and
cooling.
Check suitability and surface
preparation of material before
welding.
Avoid draughts and use
appropriate heat treatment.
13.
Surface porosity Use of incorrect filler rod
and
gaseous and technique.
intrusions.
Failure to clean surfaces
before welding.
Absorption of gases due to
incorrectly stored fluxes,
unclean filler rod.
Atmospheric
contamination.
Clean plate surfaces.
Use correct filler rod and
technique.
Make sure the flame setting is
correct
to
avoid
gas
contamination.
14.
Crater at end of
weld run. Small
cracks may be
present.
Reduce the angle of the
blowpipe progressively with
speed of travel to lower the
heat input and deposit, and
deposit sufficient metal to
maintain the toe of the weld
pool at the correct level until it
has completely solidified.
February, 2015
root Incorrect joint preparation Prepare and set up the joint
and set up. Gap too small.
correctly.
Vee
preparation
too
narrow.
Root
edges
touching.
Incorrect set up and joint Ensure the use of correct joint
preparation.
preparation, set up and welding
Use of unsuitable welding technique.
technique.
nozzle and Correct the angles of slope and
manipulation tilt.
Use
blowpipe
manipulation
to
control
uniform heat built-up.
Neglect to change the angle
of blowpipe, speed of travel
or increase the rate of weld
metal deposition as welding
is completed at the end of
the seam.
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5.4
57
ARC WELD DEFECTS – POSSIBLE CAUSES AND REMEDIES
 UNDERCUT
A groove or channel formed in the parent
metal at the toe of the weld.
Causes
 Current too high
 Use of a very short arc length
 Welding speed too fast
 Overheating of job due
continuous welding
 Faulty electrode manipulation.
 Wrong electrode angle.
to
Remedies
a. Preventive action
Ensure
 Proper current is set
 Correct welding speed is used
 Correct arc length is used
 Correct
manipulation
of
electrode is followed.
b. Corrective actions
 Deposit A thin stringer bead at the
top of the weld using a 2mm 
electrode to fill up the undercut.
 OVERLAP
An overlap occurs when the molten metal from the electrode flows over the
parent metal surface without fusing into it.
Causes
 Low current
 Slow arc travel speed.
 Long arc
 Too large a diameter
electrode
 Use of wrist movement
for electrode weaving
instead of arm movement.
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Remedies
(a)
Preventive actions
(b)

Correct current setting

Correct arc travel speed

Correct arc length

Correct diameter electrode as per metal thickness.

Proper manipulation of electrode
Corrective actions


Remove the overlap by grinding without an undercut.
BLOWHOLE AND POROSITY
Blow hole or gas pocket is a large diameter hole inside a bead or on the
surface of the weld caused by gas entrapment. Porosity is a group of fine holes on
the surface of the weld caused by gas entrapment.
Causes

Presence of contaminants/ impurities on the job surface or on electrode flux.

Presence of high sulphur in the job or electrode materials.

Trapped moisture between joining surfaces.

Fast freezing of weld metal.

Improper cleaning of the edges.
Remedies
a.
February, 2015
Preventive actions

Remove oil, grease, rust, paint, moisture, etc. from the surface.

Use fresh and dried electrodes.

Use good flux-coated electrodes.

Avoid long arcs.
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b.

59
Corrective action
If the blowhole or porosity is inside the weld then gouge the area and
reweld. If it is on the surface then grind it and reweld.
SPATTER
Small metal particles which are thrown out of the arc during welding along
the weld and adhering to the base metal surface.
Causes

Welding current too high.

Wrong polarity (in DC).

Use of long arc.

Arc blow.

Uneven flux coated electrode.
Remedies
(a)
Preventive actions
(b)

Use correct current

Use correct polarity (DC)

Use correct arc length

Use good flux coated electrode
Corrective actions


Remove the spatters using a chipping hammer and wire brush.
EDGE OF PLATE MELTED OFF
Edge of plate melted
off defect takes place in lap
and corner joints only. If
there is excess melting of one
of the plate edges resulting in
insufficient throat thickness
then it is called edge of plate
melted off defect.
Causes

Use of oversize electrode

Use of excessive current.

Wrong manipulation of the electrode i.e. excessive weaving of electrode.
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Remedies
(a)
Preventive action
 Select correct size electrode
 Set correct current
 Ensure correct manipulation of electrode
(b)
Corrective action
 Deposit additional weld metal to increase throat thickness.

CRACK
A hairline separation
exhibits in the root or
middle or surface and inside
of the weld metal or parent
metal.
Causes
 Wrong selection of
electrode.
 Presence of localized
stress.
 A restrained joint
 Fast cooling
 Improper welding techniques/ sequence
 Poor ductility
 Absence of preheating and post-heating of the joint
 Excessive sulphur in base metal.
Remedies
(a)
(b)
February, 2015
Preventive actions

Preheat and post-heating to be done on copper, cast iron, medium and
high carbon steels.

Select a low hydrogen electrode

Cool slowly

Use fewer passes

Use proper welding technique/ sequence.
Corrective actions

For all external cracks to a smaller depth, take a V groove using a
diamond point chisel upto the depth of the crack and reweld (with
preheating if necessary) using low hydrogen electrode. Cool the job
slowly.

For internal/ hidden cracks gouge upto the depth of the cracks and
reweld (with preheating if necessary) using low hydrogen electrode.
Cool the job slowly.
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
61
INCOMPLETE PENETRATION
Failure of weld metal to reach
and fuse the root of the joint.
Causes

Edge preparation too narrow-less
bevel angle.

Welding speed too much.

Key-hole not maintained during
welding the root run of a grooved
joint.

Less current

Use of larger dia. Electrode.

Inadequate cleaning or gouging before depositing sealing run.

Wrong angle of electrode.

Insufficient root gap.
Remedies
(a)
Preventive actions
(b)

Correct edge preparation is required.

Ensure correct angle of bevel and required root gap.

Use correct size of electrode

Correct welding speed is required.

Maintain a key-hole throughout the root run.

Correct current setting is required.
Corrective actions


For butt welds and open corner welds gouge the root of the joint and
deposit the root run from the bottomside of the joint. For a Tee & lap
fillet welds blow of the full weld deposit and reweld the joint.
SLAG INCLUSION
Slag or other non-metallic foreign materials entrapped in a weld.
Causes
 Incorrect edge preparation
 Use of damaed flux coated
electrode due to long
storage.
 Excessive current
 Long arc length
 Improper welding technique.
 Inadequate cleaning of each
run in multi-run welding.
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Remedies
(a)
Preventive actions
 Use correct joint preparation.
 Use correct type of flux coated electrode.
 Use correct arc length.
 Use correct arc welding technique.
 Ensure thorough cleaning of each run in multi-run welding.
(b)
Corrective actions
 For external/ surface slag inclusion remove them using a diamond
point chisel or by grinding and reweld that area. For internal slag
inclusions use gouging upto the depth of the defect and reweld.
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63
ANNEXURE - I
CLASSIFICATION OF ELECTRODES AS PER THEIR APPLICATION ALONG WITH
IS/ AWS SPECIFICATION AND CODING THEREOF (Ref: IRS:M28/2012)
S.N.
IRS
CLASS
USE
IS/AWS
SPEC.
IS/AWS CODE
1.
A-1
Fabrication of component meant for static IS: 814-04 ER 4112
application made of steels to IS: 2062-11, Gr
(Medium
E250 Quality A, IS: 1875-04 Class 1 & 1A or
coated)
equivalent. Suitable for joining steel sheets to
IS:513-98, IS: 1079-94 & Gr. Fe 330 to
IS:5986-02 or equivalent and for repair welding
of cast steels to IS: 1030-98 Gr.-200-400W.
This electrode can also be used for welding
where strength requirement is not specified.
2.
A-2
Fabrication of component meant for semi- IS: 814-04 ER 4211X
dynamic application such as bridges etc., made
(Medium
of steel to IS: 2062-11 Gr. E250 Quality
coated)
BR&B0, IS: 1875-04 Class I & IA or similar.
The weld deposit shall be of radiographic
quality.
3.
A-3
Fabrication of component meant for highly IS: 814-04
dynamic application made of steels to IS: 206211 Gr.E 250 quality C or for other applications
where low temperature impact property is
required. The weld deposit shall be of
radiographic quality.
4.
A-4
Application same as A3 above with high
deposition efficiency.
IS: 814-04 EB 5326H2JX
(Heavy coated)
5.
A-5
For pipe welding or other applications where
high penetration of arc is needed.
IS: 814-04 EC 4316X
(Medium
coated)
6.
B-1
Fabrication of component made of steels to IS: 814-04 EB5426H3X
IS:2062-11 Gr.E300 & E350 all quality,
(Heavy coated)
IS:2002-01 Gr.1&2, IS: 1875-04 Class 2, 2A
and 3 or similar. Also suitable for repair
welding of cast steels to IS: 1030-98 Gr.230450W. The weld deposit shall be radiographic
quality. Also for joining of stainless steels type
3 Cr12, IRS M-44 or its equivalent with mild
steel/ low alloyed steel/ Corten steel.
7.
B-2
Application same as B-1 above with high IS: 814-04 EB5426H3JX
deposition efficiency
(heavy coated)
8.
B-3
Fabrication of components made of steel to IS: 1395-03 E55BC126
ASTM 516 GR. 70 or equivalent where low
(heavy coated)
temperature (at-46OC) impact properties are
required. The weld deposit shall be of
radiographic quality.
Handbook on Welding Techniques
EB 5326H2X
(Heavy coated)
February, 2015
64
S.N.
CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
IRS
CLASS
9.
B-4
10.
C-1
11.
C-2
12.
D
13.
USE
IS/AWS
SPEC.
IS/AWS CODE
Application same as B-3 above with high IS: 1395deposition efficiency.
03
Fabrication of components made of steel to IS: IS: 13952062-11 Gr.E410, 450, IS: 2002-01 GR.3, IS:
03
1875-04 class 3A or similar. The weld deposit
shall be of radiographic quality.
Application same as C1 above with high IS: 1395deposition efficiency.
03
For joining weathering steels conforming to
AWS
IRS M-41 or M-42 with same steel or steels to
A5.5
IS: 2062-11, IS: 2002-01, IS: 1875-92 as
mentioned above. This can also be used for
combination joint of IRS M-44 & IRS M-41
and IRS M-41 & M-42. The weld deposit shall
be of radiographic quality.
E55BC126J
(heavy coated)
E63BD126
(heavy coated)
E-1
For fabrication & repairing of Buckles, Gear
cases, Protector Tubes, Door Patches, Side
Panels, End Wall Patches etc. of rolling stock
& locomotives. The electrodes shall be low
heat input type with 350 mm length.
ER4211X
(medium
coated)
14.
E-2
For repair welding of bogies, both cast & IS: 1395- E55BG1Ni26
fabricated. The electrodes shall be low heat
03
(heavy coated)
input type with 350mm length.
15.
F
For reclamation of cast iron with non- IS: 5511- EFe B26 (medium
machineable deposit.
03
coated)
16.
G
For welding of cast iron with machinable IS: 5511- ENiFeG16
deposit (Ni-Fe type core wire). Also suitable
03
(Medium coated)
for joining of cast iron to other ferrous & nonferrous materials.
17.
H3
For resurfacing of fabricated medium-Mn steel
or cast Mn. Steel crossings to withstand traffic
density of 15 GMT minimum.
--
--
18.
H3A
Application same as H3 above to withstand
traffic density of 25 GMT minimum.
--
--
19.
H3B
Application same as H3 above to withstand
traffic density of 35 GMT minimum.
--
--
20.
H3C
Application same as H3 above to withstand
traffic density of 50 GMT minimum.
--
--
21.
H4A
For non-machinable hard facing of ferrous IS: 7303- EFe-IC314
items with hardness range of 55-62 Rc.
03
(heavy coated)
22.
H4B
For machinable hard facing of ferrous items IS: 7303- EFe-B314
with hardness range of 30-40 HRc
like
03
(heavy coated)
reclamation of equalizing beam etc.
23.
K
For welding of copper, bronze and other copper
alloys including gun-metal
February, 2015
IS: 81404
IS:866603
E63BD126J
(heavy coated)
E8018W2
(heavy coated)
ECuSn-A
(medium coated)
Handbook on Welding Techniques
CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
S.N.
IRS
CLASS
65
USE
IS/AWS
SPEC.
IS/AWS CODE
24.
L
For welding of aluminium and aluminium
alloys
AWS
A5.3
AL-43
(Medium coated)
25.
M1
For fabrication of stainless steels type 18% Cr
8% Ni type or its equivalent.
IS: 520603
E19.9R26
(Heavy coated)
26.
M2
For fabrication of stainless steels type 3Cr12,
IRS M-44 or its equivalent. Also suitable for
fabrication of 18% Cr 8% Ni stainless steels
with low carbon.
IS: 520603
E19.9LR26
(Heavy coated)
27.
M3
For fabrication of stainless steels type 316 or its
equivalent.
IS: 520603
E19.12.2R26
(Heavy coated)
28.
M4
For fabrication of ferritic stainless steels type
3Cr12, IRS M-44 or its equivalent. Also
suitable for joining dissimilar stainless steels as
mentioned in M1, M2 and M3 or their
equivalent. This is also suitable for joining M1,
M2 and M3 type of stainless steels as
mentioned above or their equivalent with mild
steel or low alloyed steel. This can also be used
for welding of heat resisting stainless steels
22% Cr 12% Ni type or its equivalent.
IS: 520603
E23.12LR26
(heavy coated)
29.
M5
For joining of manganese steel liners and other
austenitic manganese steel components with
steel casting to IS: 1030-98 Gr.230-450W/280520W or to IS: 2062-11
IS: 520603
E18.8MnR26
(Heavy coated)
30.
M6
For repair welding of cracked gas inlet casting
of diesel locomotives. These can also be used
for other repair welding of stainless steels
castings having higher percentage of carbon
and for welding of high heat resisting stainless
steels 25% Cr 20% Ni type or its equivalent.
IS: 520603
E25.20R26
(heavy coated)
31.
M7
For joining of cast ferrous alloy of similar
composition, dissimilar metals such as carbon
steels to stainless steels & welding of steels of
unknown composition.
IS: 520603
E29.9R26
(Heavy coated)
32.
N-1
--
--
33.
N-2
For cutting mild steels, low alloy steels,
stainless steels, austentic manganese steels, cast
iron, cast steel & non-ferrous alloys such as
nickel alloys, Al, Cu, bronzes etc.
For gouging & piercing of steels and nonferrous alloy as described in class N1.
--
--
34.
N-3
For gouging of mild steels, low alloy steels,
stainless steels, austenitic manganese steels and
cast iron & cast steel. The electrode shall be of
copper coated graphitic type.
--
--
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66
CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
ANNEXURE - II
USAGE AND STORAGE OF ELECTRODES
Usage and Storage of Electrodes
 Electrodes are costly, therefore, use and consume every bit of them.
 Do not discard STUB ENDS more than 40-50 mm length.
 Electrode coating can pick up moisture if exposed to atmosphere.
 Store and keep the electrodes (air tight) in a dry place.
 Heat the moisture affected/ prone electrodes in an electrode drying oven at 110-
150°C for one hour before using.
Remember a Moisture Affected Electrode:
-
has rusty stub end
-
has white powder appearance in coating
-
produces porous weld.
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Storage of Electrodes:
The efficiency of an electrode is affected if the covering becomes damp.
-
Keep electrodes in unopened packets in a dry store.
-
Place packages on a duckboard or pallet, not directly on the floor.
-
Store so that air can circulate around and through the stack.
-
Do not allow packages to be in contact with walls or other wet surfaces.
-
The temperature of the store should be about 5°C higher than the outside shade
temperature to prevent condensation of moisture.
-
Free air circulation in the store is as important as heating. Avoid wide fluctuations in
the store temperature.
-
Where electrodes cannot be stored in ideal conditions place a moisture absorbent
material (e.g. silica gel) inside each storage container.
Drying Electrodes:
Water in electrode covering is a potential source of hydrogen in the
deposited metal and thus may cause.
-
Porosity in the weld
-
Cracking in the weld
Indications of electrodes affected by moisture are:
-
White layer on covering
-
Swelling of covering during welding
-
Dis-integration of covering during welding
-
Excessive spatter
-
Excessive rusting of the core wire.
Electrode affected by moisture may be dried before use by putting them in a controlled
drying oven for approximately one hour at a temperature around 110-150°C. This should not be
done without reference to the conditions laid down by the manufacturer. It is important that
hydrogen controlled electrodes are stored in dry, heated conditions at all times.
For further details, refer the manufacturer’s instructions and follow them.
Handbook on Welding Techniques
February, 2015
68
CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
ANNEXURE - III
GUNA BAR TECHNIQUE FOR REPAIRING OF CRACKED CAST STEEL BOGIE
FRAMES
EWAC Alloys Limited Mumbai (a subsidiary of L&T Limited) has developed special
technique for certain situations/service conditions of cast steel.
Casto-Guna Technique
This process involves welding the crack fully or partially and then reinforcing Guna bars
across the length of the crack.
Casto-guna process is used in two different areas:
1)
Where the crack is very deep, making a U grove preparation up to depth of the crack in
root will enable considerable amount of welding material. This will increase the cost of
repair and also the welding stresses. In such situation, only the 2/3rd of the crack is filled
up and reinforcing bars are placed across to compensate for the reduced strength due to
1/3 un-welded area at bottom.
2)
This guna bar technique is also adopted where full welding is done but additional strength
is required.

The first step in casto-guna process is to weld up to the depth of the crack. If practically
not possible, then welding to whatever depth possible should be done using the normal
techniques.

When welding is done only part of the depth, an AISI 304 SS tube of 2 or 3 mm wall
thickness and about 15 – 20 mm diameter, must be placed along the length of the crack to
prevent propagation of the crack while welding, the tube must be welded both the side by
using CPEM 021 only.

Guna bars are then welded using EWAC 660 NH/CPEM 021

The guna bars normally selected are steels of EN 8 or EN 24 type annealed and tempered,
both these have good strength and are readily available.

The length of the bar should be such that it overlaps the weld bead by at list 75 mm on
both sides, the bar should be cylindrical only.

Cylindrical bars are preferred and diameter could be about 20 -25 mm
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69

The bars are to be placed in a staggered fashion with 2/3 rd of the length on one
side and 1/3rd on the other side of the crack.

Guna bars serves to compensate for loss of strength due to unwelded depth.

Selection of number of bars for such purposes has to be made as per the following
formula
Total strength of bars welded area:
No. of bars x yield strength of bar x cross sectional area of bar = tensile strength
of cast steel x relevant cross sectional area of cast steel

Yield strength is considered so as not to allow any plastic deformation of guna
bars and thereby an additional safety margin is provided to the joint. If further
strength to be improved, filling of inter bar spacing provides additional strength.

If crack is not in a single plain and in such cases guna bars will have to be bent to
the profile before placing for final welding. This technique can be adopted for
other metals like cast iron, copper alloys etc. The changes of welding consumable
and guna bar are essential.
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CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
ANNEXURE - IV
Welding Symbols
Welding symbols are used on drawings to indicate the type and specifications of the
weld. The figure shows the American Welding Society (AWS) standard welding symbol.
The most important features of the welding symbol are illustrated below:
The table shows the Basic weld symbol for the different types of welds.
The figures below show some examples for the use of welding symbols.
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71
REFERENCES
1.
Literature provided by EWAC Alloys Limited Mumbai (a subsidiary of L&T
Limited).
2.
Book on Welding Engineering Technology by Dr.R.S.Parmar.
3.
Book on Welder Trade Theory published by National Instructional Media
Institute, Chennai (under Directorate General of Employment and Training,
Ministry of Labour and Employment, Govt. of India).
4.
Book “Welding notes for Artisans” issued by Basic Training Centre (C&W),
Nagpur Division, Central Railway.
5.
Suggestions received during seminar held on 14th November, 2011 at CAMTECH
Gwalior on “Welding process for good quality weld”.
6.
Information available on Internet.
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CAMTECH/E/14-15/Welding/1.0
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73
OUR OBJECTIVE
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assets and manpower which inter-alia would
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Comments please write to us.
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0751 – 2470803
Fax
:
0751 – 2470841
Email
:
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Handbook on Welding Techniques
February, 2015
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