Method and apparatus for identifying vibration level of previously

Method and apparatus for identifying vibration level of previously
US005893048A
Ulllted States Patent [19]
[11] Patent Number:
Pate et al.
[45]
[54]
Date of Patent:
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR
4,956,831
9/1990 Saffaf et a1. ............................ .. 369/32
5,032,776
7/1991 Garflgnon ----- --
PREVIOUSLY TESTED CD ROM DISCS
5,428,473
6/1995 TakIZaWa et 91
Inventors: John
McMahan
Pate, Austin;
Cedar Park
Robert
bothI4Iof TeX
’
’
AsslgneeZ De“ USA’ L- P” Roundrock TeX-
i
..
6/1997
5,731,973
3/1998 Takaishi et a1.
5,768,286
6/1998 Hsu et a1. ............................ .. 371/212
OhIIll
........... ..
.. 360/7303
.. 360/7809
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
Jan- 13 1997
’
0560529A3
3/1993
European Pat. Off. .
0565068A2
4/1993
European Pat. Off. .
11/1994
European Pat. 0a. .
[51]
Int. Cl.6 ................................................... .. G01H 17/00
0655736A2
[52]
US. Cl. ............................. .. 702/56; 702/35; 702/115;
.
[58]
Field Of Search ................................ .. 702/56 34 35
369/53; 369/4432; 360/7303; 395/18318
702/103; 113; 115; 123; 142; 145; 148;
7809, 75, 7705, 31, 7301, 7306, 73_07_73_09,
.
Prlmary Ex“m‘”e’—Ha1 Dodge Wachsman
Attorney’ Agent’ 0’ F"m_HayneS and Boone’ LLP
[57]
183; 185; 186; 360/7303; 43; 78.04; 78.06;
[56]
Hatton ......... ..
5,636,193
[21] APPL NO; 782,226
Filed.
11/1995
~
5,581,715 12/1996 Vermsky
LCVYIS .................................
et a1. ......................
.. .. 395/309
'
.
[22]
Apr. 6, 1999
IDENTIFYING VIBRATION LEVEL OF
5,465,183
[73]
5,893,048
ABSTRACT
_
_
_
_
_
_
The vibration level of a CD-ROM disc is determined in a
7807; 371/211, 212; 395/18318, 18507,
computer system by installing the disc onto the disc drive.
309; 369/4413, 4432, 53, 56, 57, 32, 27,
33, 4426, 4427, 127_130, 189, 190, 217,
233, 239_241, 247, 263, 2755; 318/611,
615, 565, 56824, 616, 617, 460; 359/199;
The disc is spun on the disc drive up to an identi?cation
speed. The table of contents on the disc is read to determine
by disc serial number that the disc is a data disc. Also; the
serial number is compared With a ?le stored in memory to
73/148, 570, 578, 597, 602, 660, DIG 1;
388/9075, 909
determine that the data disc has been previously tested. The
system memory also provides testing information indicating
a speed for operating the identi?ed disc Without noticeable
vibration. The disc drive then operates the identi?ed disc at
References Cited
the indicated speed.
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
4,477,755 10/1984 Rickert .................................. .. 318/611
18 Claims, 4 Drawing Sheets
INSERT DISC
SPIN TO
READ T.O.C.
5pm To
MAX SPEED
SET PROPER
SPEED FROM
DATABASE
MEASURE
VIBRATION
LOWER
DRIVE SPEED
MAINTAIN
MAX SPEED
ADD RESULTS
TO DATABASE
BY S.N.
U.S. Patent
Apr. 6, 1999
Sheet 1 of4
SYSTEM MEMORY
MICROPROCESSOR
VIDEO CONTROLLER
41/
F"Lg.
1 a 13/
(PRIOR ART)
f23
,21
MASS STORAGE
(HARD DISC)
INPUT DEVICE
(KEY
(MO
\17
5,893,048
U.S. Patent
Apr. 6, 1999
5,893,048
Sheet 2 0f 4
INSERT DISC
SPIN TO
READ T.O.C.
SPIN IX
PREVIOUSLY
TESTED?
SPIN TO
MAX SPEED
SET PROPER
SPEED FROM
DATABASE
I
MEASURE
VIBRATION
VIBRATION
TOO HIGH?
LOWER
DRIVE SPEED
MAINTAIN
MAX SPEED
I
I
ADD RESULTS
TO DATABASE
BY S.N.
U.S. Patent
Apr. 6, 1999
Sheet 3 of4
VIBRATION TEST
5,893,048
[22
INFORMATION STORED IN MEMORY
I
STORED INFORMATION ACCESSED
BY CD ROM SYSTEM FIRMWARE
I
DRIVE SPEED OF CD DRIVE
CONTROLLED BY SYSTEM FIRMWARE
Fig. 4
10
TEST DISC
vIBRATION TEST INFORMATION
4'
STORED ON HARD DISC DRIvE
MEMORY
NOT TESTED
I
STORED INFORMATION
I
ACCESSED BY SYSTEM BIOS
ACCESS
1,
RESULTS
STORED INFORMATION
"
TESTED
I———-—I
COMMUNICATED TO CD
DRIvE BY SYSTEM BIOS
INFORMATION
I
TEST
READ AND SENT
To DRIVE
CONTROLLER
DRIVE SPEED OF CD
DRIvE CONTROLLED BY
DRIVE MICROCONTROLLER
I
I
Fig. 6
Fig. 5
U.S. Patent
Apr. 6, 1999
Sheet 4 of4
5,893,048
'90
SYSTEM BIOS
fm'
M
A
V
V
FIRMWARE
BIOS
DRIVE MICRO
CONTROLLER
HARD
\
DIsc DRIVE
11/6 ®
CD DRIVE
120
119
I]
\\
112
-
118
F1g. 7
'1/2
:
II
FLASH RAM
\
126
FIRMWARE
130
\
128
CD ROM BOARD
V /
DRIVE MICRO
CONTROLLER
/
12Ar
134
\132
CD DRIVE
Fig. 8
5,893,048
1
2
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR
IDENTIFYING VIBRATION LEVEL OF
PREVIOUSLY TESTED CD ROM DISCS
discs so as to identify an indicated speed at Which any CD
can operate Without noticeably vibrating and enable the user
to repeatedly operate that disc at that speed. To this end, a
computer system including a CD disc drive, provides a
method of identifying the vibration level of CD-ROM discs.
A CD-ROM disc is installed onto the disc drive. The disc is
BACKGROUND
The disclosures herein relate generally to a method and
apparatus for identifying the vibration level of CD-ROM
spun on the disc drive up to an identi?cation speed. The table
of contents on the disc is read to determine that the disc is
discs and more particularly to identifying a speed at Which
a CD can operate Without noticeably vibrating and subse
quently identifying that CD each time it is used so that the
CD is automatically operated at that speed.
10
With the advent of faster and faster CD ROM drives,
Which are attaining speeds of 10x, 12x, and faster, vibration
and noise from the use of unbalanced or Warped CDs has
become more pronounced. Such vibration can be caused by
CDs Which are out-of-round and thus vibrate from the
eccentric effect of uneven forces directed radially coincident
15
a data disc. System memory is searched for testing infor
mation indicating a speed for the identi?ed disc to operate
Without noticeable vibration. The disc is then operated at the
indicated speed Where vibration is not noticeable.
Aprincipal advantage of this embodiment is that once the
indicated speed for a disc is determined, the system Will
automatically operate the disc at the speed each time the disc
is used. Time is saved each time a tested disc is re-run since
With the plane in Which the CD spins. Vibration from Warped
the indicated speed for operating the disc has previously
CDs causes a Wobble effect of uneven forces directed aXially
been measured and recorded, and thus is referenced.
and substantially coincident With the spin aXis of the CD.
In the normal spin-up of a CD-ROM disc, the disc is
inserted into the appropriate slot in the computer and spun
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 is an isometric vieW illustrating an embodiment of
up to 1x to read the table of contents. The disc is automati
cally identi?ed as either an audio (i.e. music) or data disc. If
it is an audio disc it is operated at 1x Which is a speed Which
Would not cause noticeable vibration even if the disc Was 25
unbalanced or Warped. If it is a data disc it spins up to the
maximum speed of the drive Which is often 8x or faster. At
this speed, vibration due to Warped or unbalanced discs is
FIG. 2 is a side vieW illustrating an embodiment of the
portable computer of FIG. 1.
not only noticeable but can cause data to be mis-read.
The use of CDs manufactured to less than eXacting
standards can result in such vibration and noise. Present
manufacturing speci?cations call for the manufacture of
CDs to be used With drives running at 1x and 2x. At these
speeds, vibration and noise are not as pronounced. Also, in
the past, faster CD ROM drives Were available only for
desktop computers Where vibration is less noticeable due to
a portable computer disclosed herein.
FIG. 1a is a diagrammatic vieW illustrating an embodi
ment of a typical computer system.
35
the relatively larger siZe of the desktop units, i.e., more
FIG. 3 is a How chart illustrating the steps of an embodi
ment of the method disclosed herein.
FIG. 4 is a block diagram illustrating the steps of an
embodiment of a component level method disclosed herein.
FIG. 5 is a How chart illustrating the steps of an embodi
ment of the method disclosed herein.
FIG. 6 is a block diagram illustrating the steps of an
embodiment of a system level method disclosed herein.
FIG. 7 is a diagram illustrating an embodiment of the
damping mass.
NoW, faster CD ROM drives are being introduced into the
system level method and apparatus disclosed herein.
portable PC market. HoWever, the relatively smaller, lighter
Weight laptop portable units, i.e., notebooks as they are
component level method and apparatus disclosed herein.
FIG. 8 is a diagram illustrating an embodiment of the
knoWn, have less damping mass than the desktop siZe units
and thus provide little room to implement vibration damping
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
measures. Also, due to the nature of notebook computer use,
Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, illustrated is a portable,
the unit is often placed on the users lap Where vibration is 45
notebook siZe computer designated 10 including a self
even more noticeable and can be quite annoying.
One method has been developed for testing CD Rom discs
contained computer system 41, FIG. 1a, and having a hinged
for vibration. That method measures laser head movement
and thus determines the vibration level of a disc. When
vibration is too great, the speed is reduced to a level Where
vibration is not noticeable. HoWever, each time a disc is to
nested position “N”, FIG. 2, With a horiZontal base 16, to a
substantially vertical or open position “V” shoWn in FIG. 1.
top or lid 12 rotatable about a pivotable member 14 from a
In one embodiment, computer system 41, FIG. 1a,
includes a microprocessor 11 Which is connected to a bus 13.
Bus 13 serves as a connection betWeen microprocessor 11
be used, Whether it is a disc being used for the ?rst time, or
a disc that has been previously tested, the disc must be tested
for vibration and the speed reduced if necessary. There is no
knoWn method for identifying previously tested discs and
automatically setting the correct speed for that disc at Which
55
no noticeable vibration Will occur.
and other components of computer system 41. An input
device 15 is coupled to microprocessor 11 to provide input
to microprocessor 11. EXamples of input devices include
keyboards, touchscreens, and pointing devices such as
Therefore, What is needed is a method and apparatus for
reading and storing speed data at Which a particular CD can
mouses, trackballs and trackpads. Programs and data are
operate Without noticeable vibration, by testing the CD and
microprocessor 11. Mass storage devices include such
stored on a mass storage device 17 Which is coupled to
devices as hard disks, optical disks, magneto-optical drives,
?oppy drives and the like. Computer system 41 further
includes a display 19 Which is coupled to microprocessor 11
subsequently enabling a user to access the data to repeatedly
operate the previously tested CD at the speed at Which the
CD Will not noticeably vibrate.
SUMMARY
One embodiment, accordingly, provides a method of
identifying the vibration level of previously tested CD ROM
by a video controller 21. A system memory 23 is coupled to
65
microprocessor 11 to provide the microprocessor With fast
storage to facilitate eXecution of computer programs by
microprocessor 11. It should be understood that other busses
5,893,048
3
4
and intermediate circuits can be deployed betWeen the
components described above and microprocessor 11 to
facilitate interconnection betWeen the components and the
hoWever, the vibration is above the acceptable level, the disc
drive speed is sequentially reduced to 4x, 2x etc. until the
microprocessor.
Opening of the notebook style portable computer by
manipulation of a latch 18, reveals a plurality of keys 20,
FIG. 2, on an eXposed horiZontal keyboard surface 22 of
base 16, and a monitor screen 12a in an eXposed portion of
lid 12, FIG. 1. Computer 10 also includes a sideWall 16a
vibration is reduced to beloW the acceptable level and the
disc can be successfully read. Then, the indicated speed
information is added to the database information stored in
the system memory so that each time the disc is identi?ed by
the table of contents and the database is checked, the disc
drive Will be operated at the highest speed at Which the
identi?ed disc Was successfully tested.
The foregoing can be accomplished by a system level
solution or a component level solution. Generally, either
solution is described in FIG. 5 Which provides a system for
having plurality of external ports, an exemplary one of
Which is designated 24. Base 16 may also include a pointing
device 26, FIG. 1, such as a track pad, track ball or the like.
10
Apalm rest 28 is commonly provided adjacent keyboard 22,
testing a disc. Test results are relayed to a non-volatile
memory Which can include a hard disc drive, a Flash RAM,
15 or the like. Test results can be accessed by a system BIOS
Which forms an upper surface of a battery housing 30.
Housing 16 includes a disc access slot 32, FIG. 2, formed in
a sideWall 16b opposite sideWall 16a of housing 16. Slot 32
(basic input, output system), CD ROM ?rmWare, or the like.
is generally rectangular and is integrally formed With a slit
Accessing the test results indicates Whether a disc has been
tested or has not been tested. If the disc has been tested, the
information accessed is read and sent back to the CD ROM
controller. If the disc has not been tested, the system is
instructed to test the disc.
34. Slot 32 is of a siZe suf?cient to receive a rectangular CD
ROM disc drive module 132 for driving a CD ROM disc
134.
Referring to FIG. 3, the How chart illustrates that a
CD-ROM disc is inserted into an operating computer system
such as an activated notebook computer. The disc drive spins
the disc at a speed of 1x so that a Well knoWn laser head
reads the table of contents of the disc. Typically, the table of
contents identi?es the disc by serial number as either an
The system level solution 110, FIGS. 6 and 7, includes
vibration test information being stored on a hard disc drive
25
audio disc or a data disc. If the table identi?es the disc as an
audio disc, the drive continues to spin the disc at the 1x
speed, Which is a speed Where unbalanced or Warped discs
can be spun Without any noticeable or adverse affects.
eXample.
If the table identi?es the disc as a data disc, the serial
number is compared With a ?le stored in memory to deter
mine that the disc has been previously tested according to
the present invention. A record of the disc indicated oper
ating speed, stored in a database in the system memory, can
instruct the disc drive to adjust to the identi?ed speed for the
respective disc. The database Would include information
regarding the CD disc serial number, the identi?ed speed for
112. The stored vibration test information is accessed by the
system BIOS 114. The stored information is communicated
to a ?rmWare BIOS 116 in a CD drive 118 by the system
BIOS 114. The drive speed of the CD drive 118 is then
controlled to spin a disc 119 by a drive microcontroller 120.
In this type of system solution 110, the hard drive access
time may be on the order of 10—15 milliseconds, for
The component level solution 122, FIGS. 4 and 8,
includes vibration test information being stored on a CD
ROM board 124 such as in a Flash RAM 126. The stored
35
information is accessed by CD ROM component ?rmWare
128, i.e., analogous to the system BIOS. The ?rmWare
controls a drive microcontroller 130, to operate CD drive
132 and spin a disc 134, i.e., the ?rmWare 128 is the BIOS
for drive 132. In this type of system solution 122, the Flash
the tested disc and the date the disc Was last used.
RAM 126 access time may be on the order of 30
In the disclosed embodiments, hoWever, if the ?le stored
nanoseconds, for eXample.
in memory has no record of the data disc having been
previously tested, the disc drive Will respond accordingly
The component ?rmWare 128 is modi?ed by adding code
and spin up to the maXimum speed of the drive and the
vibration data Will be measured by the laser head (not
to carry out the preferred embodiment. When the disc table
of contents identi?es the disc as a data disc, and identi?es the
45
serial number, the component ?rmWare 128, instructs the
shoWn). In order for a CD drive to be able to read data from
a disc, the laser head must be able to stay focused on spiral
system to read the Flash RAM 126 to locate the previously
determined test results of the identi?ed disc. The ?rmWare
128 instructs the drive microcontroller 130 to spin the disc
134 at the previously determined indicated speed. This
indicated speed may be the maXimum speed of drive 132 or
may require a doWnshift to possibly 4x or 2x, for eXample.
When the disc table of contents identi?es, by serial
tracks Which contain information represented by small pits
formed in a layer of the disc. Therefore, it is essential for the
laser head to be properly aligned along the spiral tracks. The
laser head must also be focused vertically (in the Z direction)
Which indicates relative distance betWeen the disc and the
laser read head. Therefore, When a vibrating disc is spinning,
the laser must move very quickly to stay focused on the
spiral track. Thus, the magnitude of the laser head movement
number, the disc as a data disc, but the memory has no ?le
55
is proportional to the vibration of the disc. In this manner,
stored indicating that the disc has been previously tested, the
?rmWare 128 of the CD ROM disc 134, instructs the system
to test the disc. This is accomplished by spinning the
CD-ROM drive 132 and disc 134 at the maXimum system
speed to measure the vibration. This is accomplished by the
the laser head functions as a sensor for sensing the vibration
in both unbalanced and Warped discs.
The vibration sensed is converted to a suitable measure
read head interpreting voltage peaks caused by the vibration
ment and then compared to an acceptable level of vibration
at Which the disc can be successfully read. If the vibration
is beloW the acceptable level, the maXimum speed is main
and taking an average of minimum and maXimum voltage
readings. The average is then compared in a compare step,
tained and this information is added to the database infor
mation stored in the memory. Subsequently, each time the
disc is identi?ed by the table of contents and the database is
hardWare communicating With the CD ROM disc 134. If the
compare step determines that the vibration is acceptable, the
checked, the disc drive Will be operated at maXimum speed
Where the identi?ed disc Was successfully tested. If,
again accomplished by the component ?rmWare 128 and
65
maXimum spin speed is accepted as the indicated spin speed
and that information is added to the database in the Flash
5,893,048
5
6
RAM 126 identi?able by the serial number of the tested disc.
If the compare step determines that the vibration is
unacceptable, the maximum spin speed is loWered or doWn
comprises the step of communicating the stored test data to
the disc drive and controlling the disc drive by a microcon
troller.
shifted to an exemplary 4x or 2x indicated speed. Once the
6. The method of testing a CD-Rom disc as de?ned in
reduced speed is accepted as the indicated spin speed, that
claim 4 Wherein the step of operating the identi?ed disc
information is added to the database in the system Flash
RAM 126 identi?able by the serial number of the tested disc.
In operation, a CD-ROM disc 134 is inserted into the disc
slot on a notebook computer. The disc spins at 1x While the
table of contents is read. A previously read data disc is
identi?ed and the system database is checked for the indi
cated speed data for the identi?ed disc. The system then sets
comprises the step of controlling the disc drive by the system
softWare.
7. A method of identifying the vibration level of previ
ously tested CD-Rom discs comprising the steps of:
installing a CD-Rom disc onto a disc drive in a computer
system:
spinning the disc on the disc drive up to an identi?cation
the indicated speed for the identi?ed disc thus assuring that
speed;
the disc is properly read during operation.
As it can be seen, the principal advantages of these
embodiments are that once the indicated speed for an
15
identi?ed disc is determined, the system Will automatically
contents included on the disc, that the disc is a data
disc;
operate the identi?ed disc at that speed each time that disc
is used. If the disc has not been tested, the testing procedure
Will determine an indicated speed for that disc and identify
the disc and store the testing information in the system
determining, by comparing the serial number With a ?le
stored in memory, if the data disc has been previously
tested for vibration and that test data is stored in the
memory in the system;
testing the disc for vibration and determining an indicated
speed at Which the disc Will operate Without noticeable
database. Time is saved each time a tested disc is re-run
since there is no need to search for and determine a suitable
speed for a tested disc. The embodiments herein negate the
necessity to test CD ROM discs that have been previously
tested by a vibration testing CD ROM drive. This may
provide a 4 second time savings in the ability to retrieve
identifying, by reading a disc serial number in a table of
vibration;
25
information from a CD ROM drive each time a disc is
recording and storing test results data in system memory;
spinning subsequently a previously tested disc on the disc
drive;
inserted.
Although illustrative embodiments have been shoWn an
described, a Wide range of modi?cations, change and sub
identifying by reading the disc serial number in the table
of contents, that the disc is a data disc;
accessing the test results data by system softWare; and
automatically operating the disc drive at the indicated
speed When the previously tested disc is reinstalled on
stitution is contemplated in the foregoing disclosure and in
some instances, some features of the embodiments may be
employed Without a corresponding use of other features.
the disc drive.
8. The method of identifying the vibration level as de?ned
construed broadly and in a manner consistent With the scope 35
in claim 7 Wherein the step of recording and storing data
of the embodiments disclosed herein.
comprises the step of storing data in a non-volatile memory.
What is claimed is:
9. The method of identifying the vibration level as de?ned
1. A method of testing a CD-Rom disc in a computer
Accordingly, it is appropriate that the appended claims be
in claim 7 Wherein the step of recording and storing data
system comprising the steps of:
comprises the step of storing data on a hard disc drive.
10. The method of identifying the vibration level as
de?ned in claim 9 Wherein the step of accessing the data
installing the CD-ROM disc onto a disc drive in the
computer system;
spinning the disc on the disc drive up to an identi?cation
comprises the step of accessing the data by system BIOS.
speed;
identifying, by reading a disc serial number in a table of
11. The method of identifying the vibration level as
45
contents included on the disc, that the disc is a data
disc;
12. The method of identifying the vibration level as
de?ned in claim 10 Wherein the step of accessing the data
determining, by comparing the serial number With a ?le
stored in memory, if the data disc has been previously
comprises the step of accessing the data by CD ROM system
tested for vibration and that test data is stored in the
memory in the system;
searching, in response to determining that the disc has
been tested, for test data stored in the memory indicat
ing a speed for the identi?ed disc to operate Without
noticeable vibration; and
operating the identi?ed disc at the indicated speed.
de?ned in claim 7 Wherein the step of recording and storing
data comprises the step of storing data in a Flash RAM.
?rmWare.
13. A method of identifying the vibration level of previ
ously tested CD-ROM discs comprising the steps of:
installing a CD-ROM disc onto a disc drive in a computer
system;
55
spinning the disc on the disc drive up to an identi?cation
speed;
2. The method of testing a CD-Rom disc as de?ned in
identifying, by reading a disc serial number in a table of
claim 1 Wherein the step of searching for test data comprises
the step of searching memory stored on a hard disc drive.
3. The method of testing a CD-Rom disc as de?ned in
contents included on the disc, if the disc is a data disc
claim 1 Wherein the step of searching for test data comprises
the step of searching memory stored in a Flash RAM.
determining, in response to the disc being identi?ed as a
or an audio disc;
data disc, by comparing the serial number With a ?le
stored in memory, if the data disc has been previously
tested for vibration;
4. The method of testing a CD-Rom disc as de?ned in
claim 1 Wherein the step of searching for test data comprises
the step of accessing the stored test data by system softWare.
5. The method of testing a CD-Rom disc as de?ned in
claim 4 Wherein the step of operating the identi?ed disc
65
spinning the disc on the disc drive at a maXimum oper
ating speed in response to the data disc being deter
mined not to be a previously tested disc;
5,893,048
8
7
measuring vibration of the disc at the maximum speed;
means for spinning the disc in the disc drive up to an
identi?cation speed;
determining an indicated speed at Which the disc can
operate Without noticeable vibration;
relaying data determining the indicated speed to memory
means for identifying, by reading a disc serial number in
a table of contents included on the disc, that the disc is
a data disc;
for referenced access from the memory;
spinning, subsequently, the disc on the disc drive;
identifying, by reading the disc serial number in the table
means for determining by comparing the serial number
With a ?le stored in a memory, if the data disc has been
of contents, that the disc is a data disc;
determining by comparing the serial number With a ?le
stored in memory the indicated speed at Which the disc
10
can operate Without noticeable vibration; and
operating the identi?ed disc at the indicated speed.
14. The method of identifying the vibration level as
de?ned in claim 13 Wherein the step of determining the
previously tested for vibration and that test data is
stored in the memory in the system;
means for searching, in response to determining that the
disc has been tested, for test data stored in the memory
indicating a speed for the tested disc to operate Without
noticeable vibration;
15
indicated speed comprises the step of searching memory in
the system.
means for operating the tested disc at the indicated speed;
a CD ROM board;
memory means on the board for storing CD ROM disc
15. The method of identifying the vibration level as
vibration information;
de?ned in claim 13 Wherein the step of determining the
indicated speed comprises the step of searching memory
a drive microcontroller on the board for driving the drive
stored on a hard drive in the system.
to spin the CD ROM disc; and
system ?rmWare for accessing the stored information, the
?rmWare controlling the drive microcontroller.
16. The method of identifying the vibration level as
de?ned in claim 13 Wherein the step of determining the
indicated speed comprises the step of searching memory
stored in a Flash RAM in the system.
18. The system as de?ned in claim 17, Wherein the
25
memory means is a Flash RAM.
17. A computer system comprising:
a disc drive in the computer system;
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