National Lifeguard Pool
National Lifeguard Pool
Recertification Guide
NATIONAL LIFEGUARD POOL
CANDIDATE RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
Published by the Lifesaving Society. First printing January 2014.
Copyright 2014 by the Royal Life Saving Society Canada. Reproduction, by any
means, of materials contained in this book is prohibited unless authorized by the
publisher. Requests should be directed to the Alberta and Northwest Territories office
(see back cover for address).
The Lifesaving Society is Canada’s Lifeguarding Expert. The Society works to prevent
drowning and water-related injury through its training programs, Water Smart® public
education initiatives, water-incident research, aquatic safety management services,
and lifesaving sport.
Annually, more than one million Canadians participate in the Society’s swimming,
lifesaving, lifeguard, and leadership training programs. The Society sets the standard
for aquatic safety in Canada and certifies Canada’s National Lifeguards.
The Society is an independent, charitable organization educating Canadian lifesavers
since the first Lifesaving Society Bronze Medallion Award was earned in 1896.
The Society represents Canada internationally as an active member of the Royal
Life Saving Society and the International Life Saving Federation. The Society is
the Canadian governing body for Lifesaving Sport - A sport recognized by the
International Olympic Committee and the Commonwealth Games Federation.
® Water Smart, Swim for Life, Swim to Survive, and Lifesaving Society are registered trademarks of the
Royal Life Saving Society Canada. Trademarks other than those owned by the Lifesaving Society used in
this document belong to their registered owners.
NATIONAL LIFEGUARD POOL
RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
About the Lifesaving Society
- Saving lives for over 100 years
The Lifesaving Society is a full service provider of programs, products, and services designed
to prevent drowning. The Society saves lives and prevents water-related injuries through
its training programs, Water Smart® public education, drowning research, aquatic safety
management and lifesaving sport. The Society is a national volunteer organization and
registered charity composed of ten provincial/territorial branches, tens of thousands of
individual members, and over 4,000 affiliated swimming pools, waterfronts, schools, and clubs.
The Society has been teaching swimming, water safety and water rescue in Canada since
1986. Established in England (1891) as the Swimmers’ Lifesaving Society, it became The Royal
Lifesaving Society in 1904. Today, it is known simply as the Lifesaving Society. The Lifesaving
Society is a leader and partner in the delivery of water safety education throughout Canada
and around the world.
Teaching Canadians to save themselves and rescue others
Annually 1,000,000 Canadians participate in the Lifesaving Society’s swimming, lifesaving,
lifeguard, first aid, and leadership programs. Each year, the Society certifies thousands of instructors who provide the leadership for its training programs. Over 30,000 Canadians earn the
Society’s Bronze Medallion each year. As Canada’s lifeguarding experts, the Lifesaving Society
sets the standard for lifeguard training and certifies Canada’s National Lifeguards.
Making Canadians Water Smart
The Lifesaving Society focuses Water Smart drowning prevention efforts on people most at
risk - like men fishing in small boats - or on those who can make a significant difference, such
as parents of young children. The Society delivers Water Smart messages through its swim
program, through the media and community action. The Society’s Swim to Survive® Program
provides the essential minimum skills required to survive an unexpected fall into deep water.
Drowning Research
The Lifesaving Society conducts research into fatal and non-fatal drowning, aquatic injury and
rescue interventions. Ongoing research and analysis supports the Society’s evidence-based
water rescue training and Water Smart drowning prevention education.
Setting the Standard
The Lifesaving Society establishes aquatic safety standards and consults on aquatic safety
issues for the aquatic industry, governments and the judiciary. The Society offers a suite of
services to help aquatic facility operators maintain and improve safe pool and waterfront
operations. The Society performs aquatic safety audits and serves as experts in legal cases
involving aquatic safety.
LIFESAVING SOCIETY
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
Contents
Page
About the Lifesaving Society
i
Introduction1
LIFESAVING SOCIETY
ii
Part 1: National Lifeguard Pool Recertification At-a-glance
2
Part 2: Recertification Items - Physical Standards
3
Part 3: Recertification Items - Management Items
4
Part 4: Recertification Items - Lifeguard Situations
9
Part 5: Training Tips and Activities
11
NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
Introduction
The Lifesaving Society is pleased to release the National Lifeguard Pool Recertification Guide.
The guide is designed as a resource for candidates to prepare and familiarize with the items
covered in a National Lifeguard recertification, as well as to assist in planning for training
supports for success. This guide should be used in combination with the Alert and Canadian
Lifesaving manuals.
National Lifeguard is a vocational training award. Certified National Lifeguards should be
familiar with the code of conduct in the Policies and Procedures.
Certification is based on the ability to meet the purpose statements and ALL performance criteria
(Must Sees).
With practice and review, the National Lifeguard recertification is achievable by everyone.
Candidates are encouraged to practice skills and review knowledge to prepare for the
recertification course.
Ongoing training and maintaining an appropriate level of fitness is important to being able to
lifeguard effectively.
The Recertification Guide provides you with the following information:
•
•
•
Items to be covered in a recertification
Must sees of the items
Brief explanation of the purpose of each item
The items you will need to bring with you to the recertification may include:
•
•
•
•
LIFESAVING SOCIETY
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Swimsuit and towel
Whistle
Comfortable warm clothing suitable for pool deck activities
Proof of National Lifeguard certification in the option being recertified (E.g. Pool)
NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
National Lifeguard Pool
Recertification At-a-glance
Part 1
Evaluation Criteria There is no written exam for the National Lifeguard Recertification.
The practical application of the National Lifeguard award items are evaluated by a national lifeguard
instructor. As part of the evaluation process, you should receive feedback from your instructor. The
feedback generally takes two forms; acknowledgement of successful completion of the skill or as a
teaching comment designed to explain the behaviour that must be demonstrated to successfully achieve
the award item.
If you can successfully apply the feedback and demonstrate the appropriate knowledge, skill and
judgement, you should pass the award item. The purpose of the National Lifeguard Recertification is
to reconfirm that you can perform at the National Lifeguard standard. You are expected to actively
participate in 100% of the National Lifeguard Recertification.
Suggested Time Guidelines A minimum of time of 4 hours is recommended based on a class size of 12 candidates for National
Lifeguard pool recertification. The actual time needed will vary depending on the:
•
Recertification format
•
Number of candidates and National Lifeguard examiners
•
Pool space
National Lifeguard Pool Recert Welcome and Introductions
Physical Standard Items:
•
Item 2a Object Recovery
•
Item 2c Sprint Challenge
•
Item 2e Endurance Challenge
Judgement and Skill Items:
•
Item 9a Management of a distressed or drowning victim
•
Item 9b Management of a submerged, non-breathing victim
•
Item 9c Management of a spinal-injured victim
•
Item 9d Management of an injured swimmer (may be evaluated in Lifeguarding
Situations)
•
Item 10 Lifeguarding Situations
Closing session including evaluation results for each candidate
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
Recertification Items
Physical Standard Item Must-Sees
Part 2
Items 2a: Object Recovery
Description:
Demonstrate anaerobic fitness and strength for an object recovery. Starting in the water, swim 15
metres and surface dive to recover a 20lb object; surface and carry the object 5 metres – all within 40
seconds.
Purpose:
The purpose of this item in the exam is to ensure that lifeguards have the necessary skill and fitness to
recover a submerged victim. Candidates need to demonstrate sufficient strength and speed to retrieve
a submerged 20 lb weight and carry it 5 m within the required time.
Must-sees:
• In-water start
•
15 m approach into surface dive
•
Object recovered from depth
•
Head above surface during 5 m carry
•
Time limit met
Materials for reference: Alert Manual Chapter 10: Pre-season and Inservice Lifeguarding Training
Canadian Lifesaving Manual Chapter 10: Physical Fitness and Lifesaving
Item 2c: Sprint Challenge
Description: Demonstrate anaerobic fitness: Starting in the water, swim 50 metres head-up within 60 seconds (50
yards within 55 sec).
Purpose: The purpose of this item in the exam is to ensure that lifeguards have the minimum level of anaerobic
fitness required of a pool lifeguard. Candidates need to demonstrate the anaerobic fitness required to
swim the distance within the required time.
Must-sees:
•
In-water start
•
Head-up breaststroke or head-up front crawl throughout*
•
Distance completed within the time limit.
* A combination of head-up breaststroke and head-up front crawl is acceptable.
Materials for reference: Alert Manual Chapter 10: Pre-season and In-service Lifeguarding Training
Canadian Lifesaving Manual Chapter 10: Physical Fitness and Lifesaving
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
Recertification Items
Physical Standard Item Must-Sees
Part 2
Item 2e: Endurance Challenge
Description:
Demonstrate aerobic fitness and endurance: Swim 400 metres within 10 minutes (400 yards within 9:10
minutes).
Purpose:
The purpose of this item in the exam is to ensure that lifeguards have the minimum level of aerobic
fitness required of a pool lifeguard. Candidates need to demonstrate the aerobic fitness required to
swim the distance in the required time.
Must-sees:
• Continuous swim
•
Recognizable stroke(s) – any combination is acceptable
•
Distance completed within the time limit
Materials for reference: Alert Manual Chapter 10: Pre-season and In-service Lifeguarding Training
Canadian Lifesaving Manual Chapter 10: Physical Fitness and Lifesaving
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
Recertification Items
Management Item Must-Sees
Part 3
Item 9a: Management of a distressed or drowning victim
Description:
Demonstrate effective management of a distressed or drowning victim in deep water.
Purpose:
The purpose of this item in the exam is to ensure that lifeguards have the necessary judgment,
knowledge and skill to rescue a victim in deep water. Candidates need to demonstrate effective
individual skills in the management of a distressed or drowning victim in deep water.
Must-sees:
• Quick recognition and immediate response
•
Approach such that victim is unlikely to grasp rescuer
•
Victim’s head is supported above surface (victim’s shoulders at or above during transport to
closest point of safety)
•
Appropriate communication with other lifeguards
•
Victim reassurance
•
Victim removal – with assistance
•
Appropriate follow-up treatment
•
ABC assessment
•
Contact with EMS if required
•
Victim information gathered for incident
Materials for reference: Alert Manual Chapter 3: Aquatic Emergencies: Characteristics of different types of victims
Canadian Lifesaving Manual Chapter 4: The Rescue of Others
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
Recertification Items
Management Item Must-Sees
Part 3
Item 9b: Management of a submerged non-breathing victim
Description:
Demonstrate effective management of a submerged, non-breathing victim and perform 10 cycles of 3compressions: 2 ventilations on a CPR manikin.
Purpose:
The purpose of this item is to ensure that lifeguards have the necessary judgment, knowledge, skill and
fitness to rescue a submerged, non-breathing victim. Candidates need to demonstrate the skill and
fitness required to recover a submerged, non-breathing victim, transfer him or her to a point of safety
and perform 10 cycles of 30 compressions: 2 ventilations on a CPR manikin.
Must-sees:
• Quick recognition and immediate response
•
Quick entry, approach, descent
•
Rapid ascent, with secure hold on victim
•
Protection of airway during ascent and thereafter
•
Quickest route to location where CPR may be effectively initiated and complications dealt
with
•
Safe and effective removal with back-up lifeguard assistance
•
EMS activated at earliest possible moment
•
Effective use of barrier devices
•
Ability to deal with complications at any time
•
Assessment (ABC’s) of victim
•
Effective single-rescuer CPR (10 cycles) on manikin
Materials for reference: Canadian Lifesaving Manual Chapter 4: The Rescue of Others; Chapter 7: Lifesaving Priorities: The
ABC’s: Rescue Breathing
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
Recertification Items
Management Item Must-Sees
Part 3
Item 9c: Management of a spinal-injured victim
Description:
Demonstrate effective management of a suspected spinal-injured victim:
• Enter and approach a face-down victim in deep water; roll victim over, immobilize and carry
15 m.
•
With the assistance of one back-up lifeguard and one bystander, manage a spinal-injured
victim on land or in shallow water.
Purpose:
The purpose of this item in the exam is to ensure that lifeguards have the necessary judgment,
knowledge and skill to rescue a spinal-injured victim. Candidates need to demonstrate effective
individual skills in the transport and management of a breathing or non-breathing spinal-injured
victim including adapting immobilization and transport techniques in response to physical features and
environmental conditions.
Must-sees - Deep Water Carry:
• Quick recognition and immediate response
•
Appropriate entry and approach
•
Smooth roll-over if victim face down
•
Immobilization of spine during roll-over and throughout
•
Victim carried 15 m maintaining immobilization and airway above surface
•
Effective lifesaving kick with control of direction
Must-sees - Shallow-water or land spinal:
•
Quick recognition and immediate response
•
Appropriate entry and approach (in-water victim only)
•
Smooth roll-over if victim face down (in-water victim only)
•
Immobilization of spine during roll-over (if required) and throughout (in-water victim only)
•
EMS activated at earliest possible moment
•
Victim assessment (ABC’s) and CPR if required
•
Victim re-assessment (ABC’s) and ability to deal with complications and treatments as
required
•
Secondary assessment
•
Effective use of barrier devices
•
Effective direction for back-up lifeguard and bystander
•
Stabilization on spineboard or other appropriate device (in-water only)
•
Preparation for transport and safe removal from water when possible
Materials for reference: Alert Manual Chapter 3: Aquatic Emergencies: Characteristics of different types of victims; Chapter 4:
Lifeguarding Skills and Procedures: Management of spinal injuries
Canadian Lifesaving Manual Chapter 5: Specialized Lifesaving Skills: Rescue procedures for spinal
injuries
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
Recertification Items
Management Item Must-Sees
Part 3
Item 9d: Management of an injured swimmer
Description:
Demonstrate effective management of an injured swimmer.
Purpose:
The purpose of this item in the exam is to ensure that lifeguards can apply first aid skills in responding
to an injured swimmer (in or out of water). Candidates need to demonstrate effective individual skills in
the management of an injured swimmer.
Must-sees:
• Quick recognition and immediate response
•
Quick entry and approach such that victim is unlikely to grasp rescuer
•
Effective communication with the victim and back-up lifeguard
•
Selection and demonstration of effective rescue techniques
•
Appropriate response and execution of procedures
•
Appropriate selection and proper use of equipment including barrier devices
•
Victim removed with assistance
•
ABC assessment
•
Appropriate first aid treatment
•
Contact with EMS if required
•
Victim information collected for incident report
Materials for reference: Canadian Lifesaving Manual
Canadian First Aid Manual
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
Recertification Items
Lifeguard Situations Must-Sees
Part 4
Item 10: Lifeguarding situations
Description: Respond to emergency situations as a single lifeguard and as both a member and a leader of a
lifeguard team.
Purpose: The purpose of this item in the exam is to ensure that lifeguards can apply lifeguard principles
and practices in emergency situations. Candidates need to demonstrate appropriate judgement,
knowledge, skill and fitness in responding to emergencies in a pool environment.
Must-sees:
• Effective lifeguard positioning
•
Effective observation skills and scanning techniques
•
Timely recognition and appropriate response
•
Effective communication – other lifeguards, victim(s), patrons
•
Appropriate execution of procedures
•
Effective execution of role(s) in the management of the situation
•
Selection and demonstration of effective rescue techniques
•
Appropriate selection and proper use of equipment including barrier devices
•
Appropriate first aid treatment if required
•
Accurate communication with EMS at earliest possible moment
•
Continued safety supervision of other patrons throughout
•
Concern for good public relations
•
Appropriate and effective direction of bystanders where applicable
•
Accurate reporting and appropriate follow-up
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
Recertification Items
Part 4
Lifeguard Situations Must-Sees
Item 10: Lifeguarding situations
Situations can include the following:
Minor Emergency
Major Emergency
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Asthma
Chest Pain
Hyperventilation
Hypoglycemia (food/fluids available)
Illness (e.g., nausea/vomiting results in pool
contamination)
Heat exhaustion (fluids available)
Burn (e.g., 1st or 2nd degree on arm)
DNS (“double clutch”)
Minor bleed (e.g., from nose, lip, or finger)
Cramp (e.g., leg)
Sprain (e.g., ankle sprain)
Fight (e.g., kick to stomach –victim winded)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Anaphylaxis (with or without medications)
Seizure (land or water)
Stroke (e.g., one-sided paralysis and altered
LOC)
Missing child (e.g., missing child found
chewing gum, choking: severe obstruction to
unconscious)
Fainting
Heat stroke
Shallow water blackout
Aspiration (e.g., with laryngospasm)
Major bleed
Dislocated joint (e.g., shoulder)
Head injury with scalp laceration
Pool clear (e.g., fire alarm and panicked
patron falls and breaks their lower leg)
Materials for reference: Alert Chapter 4: Lifeguarding Skills and Procedures; Chapter 6: Aquatic Emergency Care
Canadian Lifesaving Manual: The Rescue of others
Canadian First Aid Manual
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
National Lifeguard
Pool
Recertification Guide
Training Tips and Activities
Part 5
By far the fastest stroke that can be used for items 2c and 2e, is front crawl. Therefore, efforts should
be made to perform these items, as much as possible, with front crawl. Alternating lengths with breast
stroke is an option. Alternating breathing (breathing on both sides) should also be practiced. Recall
that there are many forms of this other than once every three breaths. Other “bi-lateral breathing”
patterns could include, two breaths on one side, then two on the other, once every five strokes, or
“bilateral-by-length,” where you may be always looking at the same side of the pool.
Swimming front crawl for extended periods is usually a pacing exercise. Making sure that each arm pull
moves you through the water as far as possible could mean slowing the stroke down to ensure that
good technique is used. When practicing for the endurance challenge, counting lengths per stroke and
trying to decrease these, is an excellent training exercise to use.
Don’t underestimate the use of equipment, such as hand paddles and pull buoys, as well. In front crawl,
most of the propulsive forward motion should come from the arms (90%) and the legs should only kick
enough to maintain a streamlined position. Excessive kicking with front crawl uses large muscle groups
and energy that accomplishes very little forward motion for the average person. This is not necessarily
what elite competitive swimmers will practice where kick is used to decrease time and portions of
seconds count. During a rescue, if a lifeguard can achieve the distance to a victim as efficiently as
possible, more energy can be diverted to the remainder of the rescue, such as carry, tow, or follow-up.
Head down, tucked chin, and easy roll to the side can assist with streamlining.
Head down cannot apply to Item 2c sprint challenge as head-up, eyes-forward is a requirement. In
the same manner mentioned in the paragraph above, although the head is up, kicking should only be
employed enough only to maintain a streamlined position. It helps to use lower back muscles tightened
to maintain body position with heals at surface. Visualize a banana shaped position with the body.
Avoid excessive kick, as it adds very little to forward motion. Use exaggerated shoulder roll to reach as
far forward with each stroke.
If breast stroke must be used, do so by attempting to alternate with front crawl by length. In lifesaving,
two, often under improved areas of breast stroke, are the final glide phase, and streamlining during
the glide. Swimmers should allow themselves to glide very nearly until stopping; just before full stop,
another stroke is instigated thereby maintaining inertia. Glide phase streamlining can be practiced by
making sure that the head is down, arms nearly over ears, and body is small as possible in cross section.
Many find it helpful to add a very small dolphin kick during the glide phase to encourage streamlining.
Unlike front crawl where propulsion is accomplished mainly by arms, it is the whip-kicking legs that
accomplish most of the distance during breast stroke. Candidates should take care to not have the legs
too far apart, and think about streamlining even during the propulsion whip of the legs. To finish the
kick off, use of the ankles is permitted, completing the push with a flexion (from dorsi-flexed, to plantar
flexed, like a ballerina . . .) of the ankles. Toes can remain pointed throughout the glide phase, until the
next kick is instigated.
References
Canadian Lifesaving Manual Chapter 10
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
Training Activities
Personal fitness chart
Notes
• The following are sample training
activities that may help lifeguards
prepare for and be successful in
completing their National Lifeguard
Recertification.
Target heart rate zone
Required equipment
Required equipment
• Sample personal fitness chart
• Target heart rate zone chart
Develop a personal fitness chart to measure
improvement by increasing the amount of
physical activity over the set training period.
Establish a minimum performance number.
Perform the skill at this level for two weeks and
continue to increase the performance number
until final goal is reached (Overload Principle).
Understand the importance of achieving one’s
target heart rate and that it must be at a lower
limit when beginning training . A higher level
may indicate that performance is “too much too
soon.” Measure your physical endurance gains
thought the following suggestions:
Personal fitness chart should be divided into
sections by day of the week and include exercise
type, duration, intensity (light, moderate, intense) and overall satisfaction.
“Set it, get it, beat it.”
‰‰ Establish target zone (see chart in Canadian
Lifesaving Manual).
‰‰ Measure the minimum level of endurance
fitness at the start of training (should be
close to lower limit on chart).
‰‰ Start with a minimum 10 min. of activity,
three times per week.
Power start drill
‰‰ Increase the activity level over the duration
of the training program; for example, 20-30
min. of activity, three times per week.
Required equipment
• Pace clock or stopwatch
Complete a warm-up of swimming, stretching,
and in-water jumps to begin training sessions.
Sample warm-up:
‰‰ 10 min. stretching
‰‰ 200 m swim
‰‰ Ten “leapers”: stand in waist or chest
deep water. Leap as high out of the water
as possible. Repeat while traveling into
shallower (or deeper) water.
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
Half sprints
Required equipment
• Pace clock or stopwatch
Complete a long warm-up.
Then, try this activity:
From dive start, swim about half a length of the
pool. Perform swim at full speed, face in the
water, without lifting head to breathe.
Repeat the drill six times allowing resting for
one min. between each sprint.
Training Activities
Swim workout
Notes
Required equipment
Required equipment
• Pace clock
• Stopwatch
Warm-up (sample):
‰‰ Complete a warm-up.
‰‰ 10 x 75 m stroke drills leaving every 1:45 min.
Then, try this activity:
Endurance set: (sample)
‰‰ Swim as many lengths as you can in five min.
‰‰ 5 x 200 m; 30 sec. rest between each swim
‰‰ Record number of lengths
‰‰ 2 x 200 m; 2 min. rest between each swim
‰‰ Repeat drill throughout duration of training
program
Warm-down (sample):
Number of lengths should increase over a period
of weeks. Be sure to pace yourself to lessen
fatigue in the final stages of the swim. Aim to be
completing at least 200 m in the 5 min. in order
to complete the National Lifeguard endurance
swim.
‰‰ 200 m participant’s choice
Pyramid workout
Required equipment
• Pace clock
Warm-up (sample):
‰‰ 10 x 50 m swim; 10 sec. rest between each
swim. Swim 1 slow, 1 fast, etc.
Pyramid set (sample)s:
‰‰ Swim 50 m with a 5 sec. rest
‰‰ Swim 100 m with a 10 sec. rest
‰‰ Swim 150 m with a 15 sec. rest
‰‰ Swim 200 m with a 20 sec. rest
‰‰ Swim 150 m with a 15 sec. rest
‰‰ Swim 100 m with a 10 sec. rest
‰‰ Swim 50 m and stop
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Time limit swim
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
Training Activities
Active eggbeater
Lower leg endurance builder
Required equipment
Required equipment
• Balls or bricks
• 10 lb. (4.5 kg) brick
Try this eggbeater kick endurance program:
Notes
A strong eggbeater kick is required for effective
rescues. Improve your eggbeater skills using
games such as waterpolo, dodgeball, or other
similar activity. These games also help improve
fitness.
• If these activities are easy to
complete using a 10 lb. (4.5
Kg) brick a 20 lb. (9 Kg) brick
may be used.
To emphasize the use of eggbeater, ensure that
one of the rules of the game involves being
unable to touch the bottom.
1 & 2 3 - 5 min.
3 & 4
4 - 6 min.
5 & 6
5 - 7 min.
7 & 8
7 - 9 min.
9 & 10
9 - 11 min.
Support a weight
Required equipment
• 10 lb. (4.5 kg) brick
Begin holding the weight under the water and as
training progresses, moves the weight to a higher
elevation until eventually the weight is above
your head.
Emphasize:
‰‰ Continuous action
‰‰ Each leg completes kick before other leg
begins
‰‰ Kick down instead of out and down
‰‰ Flexed foot position (as in breaststroke), not
pointed toes
‰‰ Knees further apart than shoulder width; feet
wider apart than knees
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NATIONAL LIFEGUARD: POOL • RECERTIFICATION GUIDE
10 lb. (4.5 kg) object should be supported
throughout the activity.
Weeks
Length of Time
Watch for excessive upper leg movement in
eggbeater kick.
Publications of the Lifesaving Society are available from any Branch office. Inquiries from outside
Canada should be directed to the National Office.
Alberta and Northwest Territories Branch
13123 - 156 Street
Edmonton, Alberta T5V 1V2
Telephone: (780) 415-1755
Fax: (780) 427-9334
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesaving.org
Nova Scotia Branch
5516 Spring Garden Road, 4th Floor
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 1G6
Telephone: (902) 425-5450
Fax: (902) 425-5606
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesavingsociety.ns.ca
British Columbia & Yukon Branch
112 - 3989 Henning Drive
Burnaby, British Columbia V5C 6N5
Telephone: (604) 299-5450
Fax: (604) 299-5795
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesaving.bc.ca
Ontario Branch
400 Consumers Road
Toronto, Ontario M2J 1P8
Telephone: (416) 490-8844
Fax: (416) 490-8766
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesavingsociety.com
Manitoba Branch
504-138 Portage Avenue East
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 0A1
Telephone: (204) 956-2124
Fax: (204) 944-8546
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesaving.mb.ca
Prince Edward Island Branch
P.O. Box 2411
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 8C1
Telephone: (902) 368-7757
Fax: (902) 368-1593
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesavingpei.ca
National Office
287 McArthur Avenue
Ottawa, Ontario K1L 6P3
Telephone: (613) 746-5694
Fax: (613) 746-9929
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesaving.ca
Quebec Branch
4545 Pierre de Coubertin Avenue
Montreal, Quebec H1V 0B2
Telephone: (514) 252-3100 or 1-800-265-3093
Fax: (514) 254-6232
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesaving.qc.ca
New Brunswick Branch
55 Whiting Road, Unit 34
Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5Y5
Telephone: (506) 455-5762
Fax: (506) 450-7946
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesavingnb.ca
Saskatchewan Branch
2224 Smith Street
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 2P4
Telephone: (306) 780-9255
Fax: (306) 780-9498
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesavingsociety.sk.ca
Newfoundland & Labrador Branch
P.O. Box 8065, Station “A”
St. John’s, Newfoundland A1B 3M9
Telephone: (709) 576-1953
Fax: (709) 738-1475
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.lifesavingnl.ca
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