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Hydro Office
Software for Water Sciences
Well Plotter 1.0
User Manual for Well Plotter and Well Plotter 3D
Software
HydroOffice.org
User Manual for Well Plotter and Well Plotter 3D Software
© Miloš Gregor, PhD. / [email protected]
HydroOffice.org – software for water science
This file is published under Creative Common License
Contents at a Glance
1 Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 5
2 Licensing .......................................................................................................................................... 6
3 Installing .......................................................................................................................................... 6
4 User Interface .................................................................................................................................. 7
5 Well Plotter ...................................................................................................................................... 9
5.1 Panel Wells ............................................................................................................................. 9
5.2 Data Source Panel ................................................................................................................ 11
5.3 Map View ............................................................................................................................. 37
5.4 D Well Log ........................................................................................................................... 40
6 Well Plotter 3D .............................................................................................................................. 68
6.1 Section Data Panel ............................................................................................................... 68
6.2 3D View ............................................................................................................................... 75
6.3 2D/3D Diagram .................................................................................................................... 89
7 Saving your project ..................................................................................................................... 101
8 Exporting Visualisations ............................................................................................................. 102
9 Conclusion.................................................................................................................................... 103
Annex 1 Custom hatch pattern ......................................................................................................... 104
Annex 2 1D Heat map ...................................................................................................................... 105
Annex 3 Description of your geological scheme ............................................................................. 106
Annex 4 2D Geological Section defining mixed sand and clay sediments ..................................... 107
Annex 5 Examples of 1D, 2D and 3D visualisations in Well Plotter software ................................ 108
Table of Contents
1 Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 5
2 Licensing .......................................................................................................................................... 6
3 Installing .......................................................................................................................................... 6
4 User Interface .................................................................................................................................. 7
5 Well Plotter ...................................................................................................................................... 9
5.1 Panel Wells ............................................................................................................................. 9
5.2 Data Source Panel ................................................................................................................ 11
5.2.1 Technical Scheme ................................................................................................................... 13
5.2.2 Geological Scheme ................................................................................................................. 17
5.2.3 Point Data ............................................................................................................................... 21
5.2.4 Point Sum Data ....................................................................................................................... 22
5.2.5 Range Data.................................................................................................................... 24
5.2.6 Range Sum Data ............................................................................................................ 25
5.2.7 Heat Maps ............................................................................................................................... 27
5.2.8 Other Data .............................................................................................................................. 31
5.2.8.1 Textual data.................................................................................................................. 32
5.2.8.2 Images data .................................................................................................................. 34
5.2.8.3 Tectonic data ................................................................................................................ 35
5.2.8.4 Time Series data........................................................................................................... 36
5.3 Map View ............................................................................................................................. 37
5.4 1D Well Log ......................................................................................................................... 40
5.4.1 Plot Area ................................................................................................................................. 42
5.4.2 Plot Header / Footer................................................................................................................ 43
5.4.3 Plot Body ................................................................................................................................ 49
5.4.4 Plot Columns .......................................................................................................................... 50
5.4.4.1 Technical Scheme ........................................................................................................ 53
5.4.4.2 Geological Scheme ...................................................................................................... 54
5.4.4.3 Numerical Data ............................................................................................................ 56
5.4.4.4 Heat Maps .................................................................................................................... 58
5.4.4.5 Textual Data ................................................................................................................. 59
5.4.4.6 Images.......................................................................................................................... 60
5.4.4.7 Tectonic Data ............................................................................................................... 61
5.4.4.8 Time Series Data.......................................................................................................... 64
5.4.4.9 Custom text column ..................................................................................................... 65
5.4.4.10 Conclusions ............................................................................................................... 66
6 Well Plotter 3D .............................................................................................................................. 68
6.1 Section Data Panel ............................................................................................................... 68
6.1.1 2D Geological Section ............................................................................................................ 70
6.1.2 2D Heat Map Section ............................................................................................................. 73
6.2 3D View ............................................................................................................................... 75
6.2.1 Basic properties of 3D View ................................................................................................... 76
6.2.2 3D Content.............................................................................................................................. 78
6.2.3 2D Content.............................................................................................................................. 82
6.2.4 GIS Data ................................................................................................................................. 84
6.3 2D/3D Diagram .................................................................................................................... 89
6.3.1 The 2D Geological Scheme .................................................................................................... 92
6.3.2 Legend .................................................................................................................................... 97
6.3.3 Image ...................................................................................................................................... 98
6.3.4 Text Area................................................................................................................................. 99
7 Saving your project ..................................................................................................................... 101
8 Exporting Visualisations ............................................................................................................. 102
9 Conclusion.................................................................................................................................... 103
Annex 1 Custom hatch pattern ......................................................................................................... 104
Annex 2 1D Heat map ...................................................................................................................... 105
Annex 3 Description of your geological scheme ............................................................................. 106
Annex 4 2D Geological Section defining mixed sand and clay sediments ..................................... 107
Annex 5 Examples of 1D, 2D and 3D visualisations in Well Plotter software ................................ 108
1 Introduction
This is a new tool from HydroOffice package for 1D, 2D and 3D visualization of geological,
technical, numerical, structural and other types of data from geological and hydrogeological
boreholes and wells.
Although other programs currently exist for these purposes, these all have specific options
and constraints. It is imperative that you quickly and easily find a program which suits your needs,
so I have put all the possibilities of our program in this manual, and in our video-tutorials. The
beauty of our program is that you can try our Demo Version before you purchase the program.
However, if visualization and reports of drilling exploration are your daily task, the demo program
will most likely be insufficient for you, and you will need to buy the full program. All possibilities
and limitations of this program are described in detail herein. You should find this program
superior to similar marketed products, because I designed it for my personal needs in practical
hydrogeology, and I have focused on complete functionality and easy use of this program.
The program is released in two editions; as Well Plotter and Well Plotter 3D. Their purpose
and functionality are described in the next chapter, and the following sections describe all
individual steps for working with the program. When you have read this manual and tried the
program you will quickly become an experienced user. You will be able to comprehensively analyse
and visualize data from exploration drilling in 1D, 2D and 3D views. You will be able to create very
impressive professional graphical visualizations, and this manual will help you to quickly master
the program by referring to it when necessary.
2 Licensing
This Well Plotter program is a commercial tool, released in two Editions (Table 1). To use
either of them, you must purchase a licence at HydroOffice.org. The basic version includes
functionality for well data analysis and visualization in basic 1D. Well Log also allows you to view
wells on the map. Well Plotter 3D has all the same features but has extra features to display data
in both 2D Schemes and 3D Fence Diagrams. That edition is richer in functionality, but if you only
need to create 1D Well Logs, the basic version is sufficient.
In addition, a Demo Version is distributed in HydroOffice package for you to test all
functionality. This version is based on the 3D edition and includes the functionality of both
programs. However, it has the limitation that while you can import your data from boreholes into
the program and visualize them in 1D Well Log in 2D Scheme or in 3D View, it is not possible to
export these visualizations or save your created project on disk.
Tab. 1:
Functionality description of individual software editions.
Functionality
Input data import
Save project file
1D Well log
2D geological section
3D fence diagram
Visualization export
Well Plotter
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Well Plotter 3D
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Demo version
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
3 Installing
Installing the program in all editions (Basic, 3D, Demo)
is very simple and it works such as in other HydroOffice tools.
These tools can be installed directly from the main window of
HydroOffice software. If you have purchased a license, click in
the main window on the Install button. After entering the
user name and password, a list of installable tools will be
displayed. Here can be shown these tools – Well Plotter /
Well Plotter 3D or Well Plotter 3D Demo, in relation to
license that you have purchased (Fig. 1). When you click on
the button for installing, the program is downloaded from
server, installed and appears in the list of available tools in
the main window. Then, we can use this tool for work.
Fig. 1:
Well Plotter in the list
of installable tools.
4 User Interface
The user interface of described program was designed in relation to simplicity and
efficiency and consistency. Graphical user interface is shown in Figure 2.
Fig. 2:
Graphical user interface of Well Plotter.
This interface is divided into four parts; the ribbon toolbar, application panels, ribbon main
menu button and the documents area. Under the application main menu button you find basic
functions to show (1) the user manual, (2) managing project files and (3) export of visualizations.
The main features of the program for working with data are shown in the ribbon toolbar called
Home (Fig. 3).
Fig. 3:
Home – the most important ribbon toolbar tab of the application.
Your first command “Wells” activates a panel with a list of all wells in your current project
(Fig. 4).Although, you can create an unlimited number of wells in one project file, in practice I store
a maximum of 56, because this program is not designed for long-term data archiving. But when
you create the project file, you have immediate access to all wells with related data for rapid
Fig. 4:
Application data panels (Top – Wells panel;
Bottom Left – Data Sources panel; Bottom Right – Section
Data panel).
Fig. 5:
visualization. Addition of wells into the
project is discussed in chapter (5.1).
The remaining two commands
(Data Sources and Section Data)
display panels of imported well data,
containing, for example, technical and
geological
schemes,
numerical
measurements, pictures and structural
data. It also shows your prepared 2D
Sections (Fig. 4).
Other commands on the ribbon
toolbar tab are used to visualize data.
Although the basic program edition
doesn’t have visualization of spatial
data in 3D View and 2D/3D Diagrams,
the commands for Map View and 1D
Well Log are included in both editions.
Thus, the program has three
data panels in the 3D Edition and 2 in
the Basic. Where the Wells panel
displays your wells, the Data Sources
panel displays all imported and
prepared data for individual wells in a
structured manner and the Section
Data panel, which is only available in
the3D edition, compares stored 2D
Sections of pairs of wells. The
important Application Main Menu
Button function is now explained (Fig.
5).
Features under Application Main Menu Button.
Under this button you find Open, Save and Create New Project functions for Export and
commands for loading the HydroOffice Home Page and User Manual. Also visible here is the
Documents Area, where individual data documents and visualizations are displayed.
5 Well Plotter
The following section describes the basic functionality of the program in Basic and 3D
editions. It highlights functions for adding wells, creating, editing and viewing well data, and their
visualization in Map View and in 1D Well Log plot. The first subsection is devoted to managing
wells in the program.
5.1 Panel Wells
The Wells panel manages all wells created in your current project. All functionality is
contained in this panel, so it is not necessary to use any buttons from the ribbon toolbar. Just rightclick inside the panel and all commands are displayed in the context menu (Fig. 6).
Fig. 6:
Functions in context menu for wells managing.
Clicking in an empty panel area gives you the context menu shown in Figure 6 Left. Here
you create a single well, several wells with built-in wells editor or you select all wells and then
delete them if that is what you want to do. When you click on an individual well record, extra
commands are displayed in the properties window for renaming that well (Fig. 6 Right).
When you click on the Add New... a form appears where you can define the basic
parameters of your added well record (Fig. 7 Left). It is mandatory that you supply at least the new
well name. While adding well parameters is optional, it is advisable to enter as many values as
possible. One of the most important is well depth; (defined as a positive number such as 100
metres), and because this value is frequently required for future visualizations, failure to specify it
at this stage may lead to later incorrect visualizations.
If you are only working with the basic edition of the program, just enter Latitude /
Longitude coordinates for display in the Map View window. But, when using the 3D edition, it is
good to enter the well altitude and its coordinates in an arbitrary metric coordinate system. I use
the Krovak S-JTSK coordinate system in my country, but you just have to keep your same units
throughout the whole project. When you define the basic properties of your new well, just click
the Add New button and it is added to your list. If you click on the Properties function in the panel
context menu, you achieve the same result. In addition to this option, you can add multiple wells
simultaneously Just click on Add Multiple and your new window supplies a list of all your new
wells (Fig. 8).
Fig. 7:
Left – adding a single new well; Right –editing properties of your selected well.
Fig. 8:
Window for adding several wells at once.
Use the Add Row button to add the required number of records into your table and you can
manually edit them. The Apply button places your added wells into the Wells panel. If you have
prepared a list of wells in a spreadsheet editor such as Excel or Calc., you can import them directly
into the program (Fig. 9).
Select these in the spreadsheet editor together with your column headings and press
Ctrl+C. If you have copied them on your clipboard, just go back into the program and click on the
Paste picture button. This creates a new table, which appears in another window and you can then
synchronize these column names with your programmed ones using the combo boxes below the
table. The program also synchronizes them automatically if the names are identical or similar
enough. Simply click on the Apply button and your new data is added to the existing data in the
main table. This procedure gives fast import of extra data from Excel.
The last function Deletes selected wells simultaneously, together with all the data and
geological sections linked to them.
Fig. 9:
Fast data import into your program from spreadsheet editors using Copy–Paste.
5.2 Data Source Panel
The Data Sources is the most important panel in the program, because here you can access
all data for individual wells. This panel always displays imported data for each selected well and it
is completely logically structured (Fig. 10).
Fig. 10:
Data Source panel (Left – structured data view for selected well; Right – expanded list of
technical schemes).
After launching your program, this panel is empty. If you have already defined some wells
in your program through the Wells panel, just double-click on your selected well and all related
data is revealed. The current well is shown in the top part of this panel, with its data divided into
the following sub-directories:
−
−
−
−
−
−
−
technical schemes
geological schemes
points data
points sum data
range data
heat maps
all other data types
Variable parameters can be defined for each borehole based on well geological and
technical schemes. Additional documents include numerical data of measurements and heat
maps, while the Other Data group defines textual, tectonic, time-dependent and image data.
Description and functionality of these data groups is contained in following sections.
All individual sub-lists can be expanded or collapsed by clicking on the circular button in the
header, and these appear empty until parameters are added. To add new technical, geological
scheme or numerical data, just right-click on the header of the data type and select Add Item in
the context menu. The program first asks you to name your new entry, and this is added to your list
as an empty document. The second command Delete All deletes all items in your list (Fig. 10
Right).
The quantity of uploaded data in your selected group is unlimited, and it depends only on
your requirements. If you want to edit the document, right-click on it and expand the context
menu functions. Again, data management here does not require use of ribbon toolbar buttons. If
you simply want to view the selected document, click the Show command in the context menu, or
double-click on the selected item.
5.2.1 Technical Scheme
Fig. 11:
Context menu
commands for edit selected technical
scheme.
Fig. 12:
In the technical schemes group you can prepare
visualization of the technical construction of well. If you
created an empty new document, just click it right mouse
and select from context menu the Edit item (Fig. 11).
After click on this item a form displays for the
technical scheme definition. Use this form is very simple and
intuitive. An example is shown in Figure 12. In the left pane
is displayed resulted technical scheme of well, which we
generate by properties located in the right pane. The entire
production of technical scheme is very fast. Using these
properties user define visual rendering of scheme. For this
purpose, may be freely combined functions that are
described in following text.
At first you define segments of the borehole in the
top table. These segments are defined by their beginning
and end in depth, by diameter, and filling. Each segment is
defined basically as a simple rectangle. For create new well
segments use the Add button and by Delete button you can
delete these segments at once. If you click on the Add
button, a form will be displayed, in which we define a new
segment (Fig. 13).
The technical scheme editor.
In this dialogue, you define the start and end depth at which the segment will occur and its
diameter. Then you need to edit the fill property. For its definition, click on the lower rectangle and
the fill editor will display (Fig. 14).
This editor we use not only for technical schemes, but
also for defining textures and colours of layers in geological
schemes. This editor contains more than 500 build-in textures, so
the user can select from a relatively high number. In the left
pane, select a texture or you can import into program your own.
In detail is this process defined in Annex 1. Then by using two
colours canvas user defines the foreground and background
colour of selected texture. By the up-down control can user setup rotation of texture. If it is defined, click on the Apply button
and defined texture is applied to a new segment of the borehole.
Fig. 13:
Help dialogue for On previous Figure 12, you can see an example of three borehole
definition of well segment.
segments use with defined depths, diameters and textures.
The next step is to
define segments of the well
casing. These segments are
drawn on the previous group
of segments. The principle is
identical to the previous case.
Combining these two types of
segments you can display
very variable types of
technical schemes. In addition
to the technical part, it is
possible to render the
geological layers around the
well. For the definition of
Fig. 14:
Texture editor for filling technical and geological
schemes.
geological data, however, we
prefer to use separate –
specialized data documents
(chapter 5.2.2).
These options do not
stop
the
rendering
possibilities
of
technical
schemes. As a hydrogeologist,
I often work with wells that
include multiple piesometers.
These can be defined and
edited in the third table. To
add a new piesometer, click
on the Add button. Help form
displays as shown in Figure
Fig. 15:
Well casing definition in technical scheme.
16.
Inside this form, you define for each piesometer its depth and the position of filter
segment. The filter section is then displayed as a segment with horizontal hatching. Finally, if you
want, you can define the depth of ground water level in the piesometer. This is inside the
piesometer displayed as a blue triangle. For each well, we can define unlimited number of
piesometers. If there are multiple, they probably will not be fully visible. This problem, however,
occurs only in preview mode in this form and in the resulting visualization you can adjust the
overall width of the technical scheme so all piesometer s will be sufficiently visible. The picture 17
shows an example of well with two piesometers.
Fig. 17:
An example of technical scheme with two defined piesometers.
Fig. 16:
Form for piesometer definition
Fig. 18:
Form for groundwater
level definition.
Finally, in the last table, you can define several groundwater levels. These levels are defined
as in previous cases, using help form, which is shown in Figure 18. In this form we define the depth
of groundwater levels and by combo box you choose a mark that will define the level. By this way,
you can for example display an encountered and also steady groundwater level. The individual
technical parameters can be optionally used, adjusted, combined and plotted in extremely variable
technical diagrams. Examples of created technical schemes are in Figure 19.
The defined schema is automatically stored in your document, and if you are satisfied with your
prepared technical scheme, just clicks the Close button in the lower right corner of the window.
When you want to quickly display a selected technical scheme, double-click on it in the list and the
document area is displayed in a separate window (Fig. 20).
Your prepared schemes can be visualized with other data in the 1D Well Log or in other
types of visualizations. Complex multiple technical schemes for each well can be presented parallel
to each other in the resultant plot. The following sub-section covers importing and defining
geological schemes.
Fig. 19:
Examples of well technical schemes.
Fig. 20:
An example of document view with a prepared technical scheme.
5.2.2 Geological Scheme
Geological structure arising from drilling exploration constitutes the most important data
for analysis and visualization. The second section of the Data Sources panel handles this data (Fig.
21). To add a new geological section, simply right-click in the header area of the geological section
context menu and select Add Scheme.
Fig. 21:
Left – addition of a new geological scheme via context menu; Right – commands for
working with stored geological schemes.
Similar to working with technical schemes, multiple interpreted and uninterpreted
geological schemes can be added for each well. Here, you add a new empty document and edit it
in two stages. You first define your individual geological layers with their description, geological
index and depth of occurrence. To achieve this, right-click on the selected geological scheme and
select Edit Data from the context menu (Fig. 21 Right). . In the second step, you define a visual
representation of the geological strata on the resultant form by inserting individual profile items
(Fig. 22).
You use the Add Row button
to get sufficient rows in the table for
the number of layers in your profile.
Then these items can be manually
edited directly in the table. In
addition to manual editing, you can
use two additional functions for
profiling.
If your data is stored in a
spreadsheet in a similar format, you
can use Copy–Paste. An example is
Fig. 22:
Layer editor of geological profiles.
shown in Figure 23. Select the data
table with column names in the external program and press Ctrl+C. Then switch to the geological
scheme editor window and press the Paste picture. The program automatically reads the copied
clipboard data, parses it and displays in table (Fig. 23).Next, synchronize your original and
externally derived column headings in this new window using the combo boxes below the table.
Then click “Apply”, so that the help-window closes, and all external data is imported into your
main table.
In addition, you can just read the data using the Import Data button which allows you to
import data from a CSV file. This is used by default in the HydroOffice software package. Unlike
classical CSV files, however, the programs in this package use a tab space as column separator. You
can create this type of document structure in Excel by saving the file as "Tab Delimited Text File".
When you select this, a form identical to the one in Figure 23 opens for you to add data and to
synchronize the column headings in your current file.
You must properly define the range of occurrence where the layer is located and also
define the GeoID and Name parameters. The GeoID parameter is very important in this program,
because this column can include a string index or a number that identifies your type of
sedimentary rock. Here, I use the standardized geology indexes in my country, where each rock
type keeps the same index. If you have substitution of sand and clay layers in your geological
profile, then you place your own indexes in Table 2, and these are always repeated thereafter. The
input of these indices is very important because you will constantly refer to them in your future
work.
Fig. 23:
Data import using Copy–Paste.
The Name parameter is used to describe strata in your visualizations. The other columns
are optional and these can be used in visualizations if you want to view particular phenomena.
When you have defined all data in your table, press the Apply button and close the window. When
you display your prepared document, you see that the colour and texture is the same for all items.
This is predefined by the program (Fig. 24). To change this setting, right-click on the selected
geological scheme document and select the Edit Visual Properties function from the context menu
(Fig. 21 Right).
Fig. 24:
Display of the geological scheme document, after definition of textual and depth data.
The dialog in Figure 25 Left contains the unique GeoID’s in your document. If your
geological profile has substitution of multiple sand and clay layers, this table will contain only those
two records.
Fig. 25:
Editor of visual properties for geological profile (Left – before set-up; Right – after set-up).
A preview of geological texture is given when your GeoID parameter is set in the table
row. This can be changed by clicking on the Screwdriver image, so that the Figure 14 texture editor
dialog appears. You can change the texture, foreground and background colour and the rotation of
your selected texture using this dialog’s options. After clicking the Apply button your changes
appear in the table. When you have defined visual settings for all your records, the table of
geological indices appears as in Figure 25 Right. These settings are transferred to the geological
scheme by clicking the Apply button, and subsequent images of your geological scheme document
appear as in Figure 25.
The described Figure 25 dialog
also contains Import and Export buttons
(Fig. 25). Their function is important if
you frequently use the same visual
settings for the same geological indexes.
You can then export these settings from
this program and reuse them in other
projects. The settings are stored in a
separate XML document where you can
edit their structure and content outside
the program. For example, you can
change colours, or add new geological
index records (Fig. 26).
This prepared file can then be reused
Fig. 25:
An example of document with defined
visual geological layer properties.
to set up the visual properties of
geological schemes from other wells. In
my work, I prepare this type of file, to
define the visual settings for a variety of
geological
indexes.
This
feature
significantly saves time because you can
reload these settings into your programs
with the Import button.
The greatest improvement in this
program is that you can simultaneously
set all visual properties for multiple
geological schemes in your project. Just
click the Data Source panel in the context
menu to Edit Visual Properties of All
Schemes (Fig. 21 Right). When you click
on this item, the exact form in Figure 25
appears, showing all unique geological
indices in your project. You can then
individually set or edit their properties
from an external XML file. The alternative
dialog from Figure 27 is obtained when
you click on the Apply button. This allows
Fig. 26:
An example of exported settings for
you to choose all geological schemes you
individual geological indexes.
want to set-up from the provided list; and
the program automatically sets up your visual properties in all selected documents.
If you subsequently see a geological section document where bulk editing was used, you
will notice that the predefined texture of items has been changed. The majority of functions
described in previous text is also available in the displayed document window when you right-click
in the table area (Fig. 28). You can also copy your table data onto the clipboard.
Fig. 27:
Selection of wells with their
geological schemes, where you can immediately
apply visual properties.
Fig. 28:
Functions shown in the context menu,
when you display the geological scheme.
5.2.3 Point Data
This sub-chapter explains the
import and view options of numerical
point data. This gives a set of point
measurements of selected variables
with your own values for defined
depths. These include depths, for
example,
for
groundwater
temperatures,
pressures
and
sediment clay content.
The Data Sources panel
sublist defines this data (Fig. 29). As
in previous cases, you add a new
document to the list by right-clicking
Fig. 29:
Point Data editing in Data Sources panel using on the header – Point Data, and then
the context menu functions.
you select Add Point Data Set from
the context menu. After your
addition, you can work with this
document by right-clicking again to
obtain a pop-up menu. If you want to
edit data, for example, just click on
the Edit Data function (Fig. 29 Right).
This function a new form
displays, where you can edit point
data (Fig. 30). Here, you can add
numeric values at defined depths
manually, using Copy-Paste, or you
can import data from a CSV file with
Fig. 30:
The form for point data edits.
tab separated values.
When your data is prepared in the table, click the Apply button and close this form. Future
display of your document appears as in Figure 31. This again only presents a quick preview. Final
visualizations are explained throughout the text for the individual program applications.
Explanations are described later.
Fig. 31:
Example of prepared point data document.
5.2.4 Point Sum Data
You also need point summary data. These are different so that you can display multiple
numerical values at defined depths. They include your clay concentrations, sediment sand and dust
contents, and dissolved groundwater solids. Adding a new document or working with your current
document is exactly as described for previous operations (Fig. 32).
When you click
Edit Data in the pop-up
menu, the blank form in
Figure 33 is revealed. But
you cannot add your
data by typing manually
here, so you incorporate
it by Copy–Paste or
import it from a tabseparated CSV file.
An example of a
prepared CSV document
is shown in Figure 34.
This lets you add defined
depth values for Ca, Mg
and Na + K groundwater
Fig. 32:
Left – adding a new document; Right – commands for edit
concentrations.
and view of selected document
Fig. 33:
An empty window for data processing.
Fig. 34:
Fig. 35:
CSV file.
Synchronization and definition of input data from external
Fig. 36:
An example of prepared input data table.
Example of prepared CSV file.
When your data is
imported into the program
by either of the functions
described above, the Figure
35 form is displayed. This
prepared new data table is
taken from an input file.
Firstly, you define the
column for stored depth
measurement values using
the combo box below the
table, and then you select
the columns you want to
import into the program
from the checked list-box
and press the Apply button.
These settings allow
new structural data to be
added into your table. You
can also add new rows to
the table and manually edit
them before closing this
window.
Your
prepared
document with input data
will look like Figure 37; with
your data displayed as a
vertically
stacked
area
series. The final visualization
of all data is described later.
Fig. 37:
Example of prepared data document.
5.2.5 Range Data
If your numerical data is defined for a
depth range rather than at a point in depth
or your values are measured at regular depth
intervals, you use the appropriate group from
the Data Sources panel in Figure 38.
Documents here are added exactly as in
previous cases, and if you want to view or
edit your document, you choose the
appropriate function from the context menu
(Fig. 38).
Clicking on the Edit Data function
displays the data editing form in Figure 39.
Fig. 38:
Commands from the context menu for
The table has three columns. The first two
displaying and editing range data sets.
define the depth range for measured values
and the third column stores your numerical
values.
Depth ranges can be defined as
segments of equal or variable size. As usual,
you can add data to the table by typing your
values manually, or by Copy–Paste, or
importing them from tab separated CSV file.
When your data is entered, click
Apply and close the form. Your prepared data
document will resemble the example in
Fig. 39:
Form for editing range data type.
Figure 40. Measured inflows of groundwater
into the well related to depth can be illustrated, and all types of numerical range data can be
imported into your document.
Fig. 40:
Example of document preview with range type of numerical data.
5.2.6 Range Sum Data
Fig. 41:
Functions from context menu for edit
Range Sum Data.
Fig. 42:
Data group.
Edit window for data in the Range Sum
When
recording
depth
measurements, if you have several
numerical parameters within a defined
range, you can use Range Sum Data to
define your depth intervals. The basic
condition for this is that the same defined
ranges are used in all imported parameters.
This is useful when you want to record
values of combined dissolved solids in
groundwater; and here you can add and edit
new documents from the Data Sources
context menu (Fig. 41).
After creating your new blank
document, the import data form will appear
as in Figure 42, and your entered data can
be edited using the Edit Data function. The
Table structure and definition is undefined
exactly as in the Point Sum Data function.
This depends entirely on your input data, so
Copy-Paste your own input table from your
spreadsheet or CSV file.
An example prepared CSV document
for import is shown in Figure 43. The first
two columns define the depth ranges of your
measured values and the following columns
list your measured values. The number of
columns available for measured numerical
values is unlimited; dependent only on your
Fig. 43:
format.
Example of prepared data document in CSV
Fig. 44:
Help form for Range Sum Data import.
Fig. 45:
Prepared data set of Range Sum Data.
Fig. 46:
Document example containing Range Sum Data.
own requirements.
The Figure 44 help-form
appears when you import data into
program, with parsed values in
individual columns. The combo boxes
below the table define the columns for
your initial and final depths, and then
you use the check-list box to select the
value columns you want import from
the external file. Here, you can import
all columns or only the selected ones
you need.
Press the Apply button, and
your structured data set is imported
into the main table as in Figure 45.
You can then edit it manually and add
new rows with the Add Row button.
Figure
46
illustrates
a
document with your prepared data in
a stacked bar-series, with variable
column width for well depth.
5.2.7 Heat Maps
Another important data
type you use is multivariate
numerical data. This can contain
numerical measurements for
well depth and time, or
geophysical measurements of
depth and distance from the
well. Examples are shown in
Figure 47. There is a numerical
heat map on the left side and a
temporal heat map on the right.
The difference in these two heat
maps is in units on the horizontal
X-axis.
You can use the functions
in Figure 48 context menu to
Fig. 47:
Heat maps examples (Left – numerical heat map;
create your heat maps.
Right – temporal heat map).
After adding your new
empty heat map, you can fill and
edit it using the Edit Data
context menu functions. The
form in Figure 49 allows you to
enter depth measurements as a
positive number in the Depth
column, while column Y defines
times or additional numerical
values. The time must be
entered in numerical format, not
in date form, so that means that
your initial time is zero. Other
values are then defined in
Fig. 48:
Context menu commands for work with heat maps.
numerical days, months, years or
other time based periods as the difference
between your zero and end times. Numerical
measurements are then placed in the last
column, as depicted in Fig. 50.
A prepared document example is in
Figure 50. It has measurements from depth
0 to 200 metres in periods of 0 to 40 days.
Definition of the actual date values for
horizontal axis (Fig. 47 Right) is in another
Fig. 49:
Form for heat map input data definition. place.
This prepared file can be imported into the
program by Copy-Paste, by typing manually or by import from a CSV file with tab separated
values. Your resultant window will be similar to Figure 51.
Fig. 51:
The input data window for heat map definition.
When your input data is entered, close this window. To
create your heat map, right-click on the document and select the
Edit Visual Properties function from the context menu shown in
Fig. 48 Right, and the window in Figure 52 is now ready for you.
The top area of this window is initially empty to display
your heat map; and you create this using the properties and
settings in the bottom part of the window. You must define the
following parameters to view your map. The delta Depth and delta
Y parameters are used to set resolution of your map. Both of these
have the predefined value of 1, so you can accurately define the
Fig. 50:
Example of
required map in both horizontal and vertical directions. The lower
data file in heat map
production.
these values are, the higher the resolution you will have in your
final visualization. The highest resolution is achieved when you setup your values manually, by decreasing them until your desired resolution is obtained. This
resolution also depends on the measurement density. It is not possible to make this adjustment
automatically, so an example with different resolution settings is shown in Figure 53.
Fig. 52:
Window for heat map creation from imported data.
Fig. 53:
resolution).
Two examples of heat map resolution settings (Left – predefined resolution; Right – modified
The next line offers the
choice
of
heat
map
interpolation methods, but
since this current program
version contains only the bilinear interpolation method,
you do not have to change
this parameter.
The following line lets
you define the colour palette
used for your result. In Fig. 53
this result was obtained using
only red and blue, but Figure
54 shows a palette created
from eight colours. The
number and order of colours
is unlimited, so you can create
highly variable colour palette
combinations. The program
initially offers you the red and
blue combination, but you
change this by simply clicking
on the palette preview and
selecting your colours from
the dialog box.
The final visual setting
is the mode of display from
your defined colour palette
Fig. 54:
Colour palette modes for heat map (Top – palette with
(Fig. 54). You choose if you
continuous colour gradient; Bottom – a palette with sharp colours
want to display colours as a
edges).
continuous gradient for your
value ranges (Fig. 54 Top), or if you want sharp colour boundaries between them (Fig. 54 Bottom).
For this second option, you set the number of colours you want in your heat map. In my Figure 54
examples, I used 25 passages and the resultant heat maps consist of 25 colours.
If you wish to prepare a temporal heat map, now you define the resulting horizontal time
axis (Fig. 47 Right). If your numerical values in column Y represent time steps, you can change
these values to date format values by clicking on the Y-Axis as Date check-box (Fig. 55). The
additional two fields define your initial and final measurement dates, and these will be displayed
on the horizontal time axis in your final visualization.
Fig. 55:
Setting temporal axis for the final heat map.
After applying the described settings, you can create your resultant heat map by pressing
the Interpolate Values button. If you are satisfied with the result, just close the window and your
prepared heat map is completed for future visualization. To achieve this, click the Show command
in the context menu, and you see your document with all imported data illustrated as a simple
heat map preview (Fig. 56). Although the preview does not contain the horizontal axis, it is
included in the final visualization.
Fig. 56:
Example of created heat map with input data.
In addition to the described 2D heat maps, you can create a 1D Heat Map. Its preparation
and display is described in Annex 2. Sub-chapter 5.2.8 now explains the preparation and display of
additional specific data you frequently require for well visualization and interpretation.
5.2.8 Other Data
The Other Data group contains functions for working with additional borehole and well
data. As usual, these functions are controlled by the context menu (Fig. 57). An advantage here is
that you can add and edit multiple data types. These include textual descriptions, images, tectonic
data and numerical values for time series related to defined depths and depth ranges.
If you want to
add a new data
document, right-click
on this group header
and select the type of
data document that
you want to add from
the Add Data Set
contextual menu.
Following your
document
addition,
you work with it as
usual with functions
from the context menu
(Fig. 57 Right). The
various types of data
Fig. 57:
Functions from the context menu for adding and editing data
documents
are
documents in the “Other Data” group.
distinguished by icons
in this menu list.
Examples
of
data prepared for this
group of documents
are in Figure 58; and
the following subsections explain the
step
by
step
procedures to obtain
documents with these
results.
Fig. 58:
group.
Examples of data types that can be prepared in the described
5.2.8.1 Textual data
Textual data is
described first. Here, you
can add labels for defined
depths and depth ranges.
Click on the Edit Data
function in the context
menu and the Figure 59
help-dialog appears. You
can now add or edit text
you want displayed in
your
well’s
vertical
profile.
Unlike
previous
data types, these cannot
Fig. 59:
Form for adding and editing textual items.
be imported from an
external file because of the character of these objects. Therefore, you click the Add Row button
and obtain the form in Figure 60 Left.
Fig. 60:
Help dialogues for text definition.
Here, you can combine parameters for each entry to create four types of text labels (Fig.
61). First, set the Label Icon property. If you need an icon in front of your text, click the Add button
and select your icon from the 142 choices in Figure 60 Right. To use your own custom icon from
disk, you must load the icon into the program using the From File button. Click the Apply button
after choosing your icon and the window will close. If you want to delete this icon later, just click
on the Clear button (Fig. 60 Left).
The following three lines; Depth From, Depth To and Depth In, are used to define the depth
interval at which you want your label displayed. You can set your edited label at a defined depth or
to a selected depth interval. If you choose depth interval, write a zero value in the Depth In line.
Conversely, if you want to use only the Depth In property, the remaining Depth From and Depth To
properties must remain zero. Finally, set the property Text containing the text string you want to
appear in your visualization. This text information can be used, for example, as a sample indicator
or to describe technical scheme segments. When you set-up
this item, simply click on the Apply button and your item is
added to the table in the main editing window.
Examples of text label types you can create in this
program are shown in Figure 61. The top two items were
defined by the Depth In parameter; to the exact depth. The
first label contains an icon and the second does not. If you use
the Depth In parameter, the label will be displayed at the
exact depth and it will consist of a single line. If your text is
too long, it will not be shown in full. The bottom two Figure
61 examples illustrate labels defined in depth range. The first
example has a label icon and the second has not.
When you have finished editing your text labels, simply
click on the Apply button and close the window. A preview of
your document is similar to Figure 62. In this way, you can add
unlimited structured text into each document, and their
complex visualizations are described later. The following
subsection explains preparing, editing and viewing your depth
and depth range files.
Fig. 61:
Examples of text
label definitions.
Fig. 62:
Example of document with prepared text labels.
5.2.8.2 Images data
Images of well vertical profiles
can be displayed in this document
type. If you want to edit your image
data document, right-click in the Data
Sources panel and select the Edit Data
command from the context menu. The
window in Figure 63 then appears.
As usual, individual images can
be added into your list with the Add
Row button. Editing a selected row in
your table involves clicking on the
screwdriver icon at the end of the row.
Care in editing is required here,
because if you click on the last icon,
the selected row will be deleted from
your table. (This, however, could also
be your editing intention).
When you click on the icon for
Fig. 63:
Window for editing images in data documents.
editing the row or you press the Add
Row button, you have the window in
Figure 64, where you can edit
individual records. You press the Open
button to import a picture from a
computer disk, and your selected file is
loaded into the right area of the
window. After saving your project into
the file, you need the images in the
same location because the program
only stores information on where the
image is located on the disk. If you
Fig. 64:
Window for editing and adding new image
items into the document.
change this location, it is impossible to
reload it into the program later. The remaining three text boxes define where the vertical profile of
the well’s depth or depth range interval is displayed. These settings work exactly as the text labels
described in the previous chapter.
The last three
combo boxes define your
image display in defined
depth intervals. The
Stretch parameter sets
the display method. You
can set this in three
states – None, Fill or
Uniform. Examples of
these settings are shown
in Figure 65. When you
Fig. 65:
Examples of Stretch property states.
set it to None, the image
is shown in actual size, so if
it is greater than available
space, you will see only the
part of it trimmed to the
current block size. If you set
it to Fill, the image will
cover all the available space,
and if this space is
insufficient, the image will
be deformed. The Uniform
choice expands your image
within
the
maximum
available space without
deformation.
The last two combo
boxes allow you to adjust
the horizontal and vertical
Fig. 66:
Example of image data document preview.
alignment of the image.
These can be aligned to one side or centred to the middle of the space. These settings are
explained in chapter 5.4.4.6 for 1D Well Log rendering. Finally, Figure 66 gives an example of your
document preview.
5.2.8.3 Tectonic data
Tectonic and structural data can also be displayed in Well Plotter. This is prepared and
edited in the document shown in Fig. 67.
Fig. 67:
Window for preparating and editing tectonic and structural data.
The Figure 67 structural data is determined by depth, angle and magnitude. For each
structural measurement you must define the vertical profile depth as shown in Figure 68.
Fig. 68:
Example of document preview of tectonic and structural data.
5.2.8.4 Time Series data
Your next step is to
set the time series data. If
you
want to enter
numerical
logger
measurements over time,
this can be displayed, in
your well profile. The new
document will contain the
time series data, and you
can add all types of
previous data to this one.
You can then edit this new
Fig. 69:
Window for editing time series data document.
document with Edit Data in
the context menu. Figure
68 empty table and graph
has been prepared for you.
Using the Import
Data and Apply buttons
you can import time series
from external sources into
this window via Copy–
Paste or an external CSV
file. Your document can
Fig. 70:
Example of prepared time series data document.
contain more than one
parameter, for example, continuous temperature and water electrical conductivity. After importing
the time series, you must define the observed depth of your values in the text box above the
graph; as in Figure 70. In this example, I imported continuous measurements at 22 metres depth.
Now click on the Apply
button and close the window.
A preview of your document is
in Figure 71. This has a table of
imported
continuous
measurements
of
your
selected parameters and their
simple linear graph.
Fig. 71:
Example of time series document preview.
5.3 Map View
The previous subsections gave step by step descriptions of the data types you can use in the
Well Plotter program. This chapter describes your data visualization options, and explains well
displays on the base map available in all program editions. Press the Map View button on the
Home ribbon tab to display visualizations. Each well you have created in your work must have
defined Latitude and Longitude coordinates. When you click on Map View, the new document
window in Figure 72 appears. This shows a world map with a cluster of points indicating the
position of your individual wells.
Fig. 72:
The Map View feature in the Well Plotter program.
This map does not initially allow zooming, but if you want to work dynamically with this
map, right-click on the map and select Map Provider from the context menu (Fig. 73).
Fig. 73:
selection.
Left - Functions from the context menu for working with Map View; Right - Map Provider
In this window, you have a wide choice of online Map Providers for the underlying map.
However, some providers only allow the use of their maps under various licences and not for
commercial purposes. Therefore, before choosing your selected provider, check the actual licence
terms for map usage on the internet. The best licence terms has OpenStreetMap provider. When
you have chosen your provider, press Apply and you can use the map’s zooming and panning
features. Map View has a built-in function, so that when you load the map once from the internet
in a selected scale, this is automatically stored on computer disk and you can always view it offline.
A zoomed map example of displayed wells and geological sections is shown in Figure 74.
Fig. 74:
Example of map view in actual practice.
Map View can edit wells
and geological sections display
settings. All features are
accessible from the context
menu displayed when you rightclick in the map (Fig. 75). For
example, you can set wells
markers by clicking on Wells
Marker and a separate window
is displayed with your list of 142
icons in Figure 60 Right. Choose
one of these or use an external
image from a disk as your
Fig. 75:
Functions for adjusting wells labels.
marker. Here, you can also set
your well-label visual properties,
such as background colour, text
colour and font size. The last
command in the context menu
is Save Image, and this exports
your well map to a file on disk.
The context menu also
contains Wells and Sections
functions where, you can set the
visibility of individual wells and
geological sections (Figs. 76 and
77). Click on Wells, and you
have Figure 76. In this window
you can set well visibility on
your map; with one line
Fig. 76:
Display settings of wells.
available for each well. The
check boxes in the first column
set whether the well is visible on
the map or not and the second
check box sets if you want your
well-label
displayed.
The
following two check boxes
simultaneously set-up whether
you want to show or hide all
wells and their labels.
The Well Plotter 3D
edition sets the display of
geological sections in the map
window in thick blue lines.
Clicking on Sections in the
context menu gives you the
Figure 77 window, where you
can select sections you want to
Fig. 77:
Display settings of geological sections.
see or hide. Here, you can use
the check box below the list to simultaneously set the same value for all geological sections.
Here, you have all Map View options for well and geological section description. This is a
quick and easy way to visualize wells in 2D on the map. Figure 78 shows some map providers
Fig. 78:
Examples of various map providers in use.
5.4 1D Well Log
Previous sections have described how to add wells to your project, define their properties
and assign your various data types. This chapter focuses on data visualization; describing the
options and settings in 1D Well Log. This visualization has columns parallel to each different type of
data display depending on well depth. These 1D Logs can be created in both editions of the Well
Plotter program. The rendered visualizations here are designed as hardware accelerated vector
graphics, so you can plot large visualizations and these can be dynamically zoomed and panned. It
is first necessary to create a plot paper, so click the 1D Well Log ribbon button (Fig. 79) to display
the form in Figure 79 Right. Here,
you can set your basic visualization
properties in this dialogue. These
include its size, background and
border colour and also header and
footer visibility. You then define the
maximum depth of each well’s
vertical profile. You can always
change these settings later if you
wish.
First, set your paper size by
predefined traditional formats or by
manual
size
definition
in
centimetres, and set the paper
Fig. 79:
Basic settings of 1D Well Log plot.
orientation to Landscape or
Portrait.
Resolution
visualization is set from the
combo box. You can leave the
predefined value or you can
change it to enlarge or
reduce paper size. The actual
resolution depends only on
your system and monitor. You
can then set the background
colour, border line colour
and the thickness and
visibility of your header and
footer area.
The maximum depth
of your well can be changed
Fig. 80:
Empty plot paper prepared for 1D Well Log.
manually from the initial
vertical profile depth plotted in external documents. Set all your parameters and press Create. Your
initial window will be closed and the new document window will display with your inserted papersize (Fig. 80). The Ribbon Toolbar also changes as in Figure 81, but all functions illustrated there are
only active when you view your document.
Fig. 81:
Commands in the context ribbon toolbar tabs for work with 1D Well Log.
5.4.1 Plot Area
The Figure 82 toolbar features the Plot Area ribbon tab. This is used to set basic visualization
properties. Each function in this tab has identical character to the properties in the previously
described help window for 1D Well Log formation. The Close button at the beginning of each
contextual ribbon tab hides the ribbon context tabs, but these automatically reappear when you
view your document.
Fig. 82:
Plot Area ribbon tab with commands for basic plot-paper set-up.
Fig. 83:
Functions
for background colour
display.
Fig. 84:
Functions in (Fig. 82) Properties group are used to define
visualization size and plot-diagram maximum depth. The Visual
features allow you to set your basic plot-paper visual parameters.
These define background colour and paper border colour and
thickness. You can then choose your background colour from Figure
83.
The program enables to set your background as solid colour, or
with two-coloured linear gradient or radial gradient. When you click
on Linear Gradient, Figure 84 window opens.
Help window for dual coloured linear gradient.
Examples of other available background colour settings are shown in Figure 85. Using these
functions it is possible to define highly variable backgrounds.
Fig. 85:
Examples of plot background colour compositions.
The last two buttons in Figure 82 Layout Definition group show or hide your Header and
Footer Areas; now described in Section 5.4.2.
5.4.2 Plot Header / Footer
Creation and modification of Header and Footer Areas in the 1D Well Log is prepared for
the insertion of additional information. This includes a location map of your borehole, basic drilling
parameters or corporate logo. Although both header and footer areas are described, the only
difference is their position in the resulting plot; with header at the top and footer at the bottom.
The ribbon toolbar tabs for their modification are shown in Figure 86.
Fig. 86:
Ribbon toolbar tabs for header and footer modification.
The functionality of
these ribbon tabs is identical.
Here, you can set all the
basic parameters in the
previous chapter, including
offsetting objects from the
edge of the plot, the
background colour and the
Fig. 87:
Example of header area modifications.
width and colour of your
border lines. An example is shown in Figure 87. The Content group in both tabs contains two
functions. Using the Clear button you can delete the current content of the described areas, and
clicking on Predefined Layouts gives you a ribbon gallery with predefined headers and footers
(Figs. 88 and 89). Figure 88 Right shows that this command only creates a basic template structure,
so you then define your content manually.
Fig. 88:
Left – selection from predefined headers; Right – examples of header templates created
using this feature.
Fig. 89:
Selection from predefined footer layout templates.
for direct work in the header area.
Fig. 90:
Example of edited header area.
A
header
example
prepared in this way is shown in
Figure 90. You can create dynamic
headers and footers. Because this
ribbon
toolbar
has
few
predetermined features, here you
insert your own content and edit it
to suit your purposes. The
following text describes options
You have almost unlimited editing options for your headers and footers. When you want to
edit your header area, right-click on it and a pop-up menu appears with the basic functions (Fig.
91). Height defines the height of header and footer areas, and selection of the Mode sub-menu
defines the essential character of these areas. Here you have a choice of Rich Text Box or Grid
Layout.
Fig. 91:
Basic properties of header and footer areas.
When you define the header area using the Rich Text Box, it behaves as pure text box
control (Fig. 92). This text box is easy to understand and edit. Click on your text and the Fig. 90
pop-up toolbox offers basic editing functions; but not functions for complex structures and
adjustments. These can be performed from a table created in external programs such as MS Word
or OpenOffice Writer. Then, you just paste this content into your text field using CTRL+V. An
example of this content is shown in Figure 92, where the external table was created with different
cell and text format, and the content is copied directly into the header area. Although you may
occasionally experience problems with transmission of very complex text, this program has good
compatibility with OpenOffice programs.
Fig. 92:
Header area defined as classic Rich Text Box.
Using the Grid Layout for header and footer area definition offers greater scope than using
the Rich Text Box, because the context menu includes the new functions illustrated in Fig. 93.
Fig. 93:
Functions in context menu for Grid Layout.
This menu includes the possibility of Mode selection and setting up the area Height. It also
contains functions for working with, and adding content, into a grid layout. Here, the grid lines give
structure to your grid cells (Fig. 94). The entire area first defines a single cell. Just click on the
Define Grid command to display the Figure 94 form which allows you set your number of columns
and rows. After setting these features, click Apply.
Fig. 94:
Dialog for grid cell definition.
The Cells Size menu defines uniform sized cells or cell size defined by the content. It is best
to start with Uniform size so that the customized content expands to fill the entire cell. You can
then change it to your text and numerical content requirements using defined by the content. .
When the number of grid rows and columns are defined, you can add the content into the
header. Individual objects can be added by pressing Add Control in the context menu (Fig. 95).
Fig. 95:
Object selection for insertion in the grid.
All objects placed in the grid
appear in the top left cell. Figure 96
example shows insertion of Text Area.
Now, you can immediately edit its
contents. Functionality is the same as in
Rich Text Box where you can import
and paste the content created in
external text editors.
Fig. 96:
Text Area editing after insertion into the grid
Figure 97 shows how the layout
cell.
changes when you change the Cells Size
parameter from Uniform to By Content. You change the cell size for your embedded objects
utilizing the Size command. To change your grid insertion from its initial top-left cell position, click
on Row / Column (Fig. 98). Then use the combo box dialog to set your new grid position, and this
will be automatically shown by pressing Apply.
If you need the object spread over several cells use the Row / Column Span function from
the context menu, and set the span property in the rows or columns direction. Figure 100 example
illustrates the span property set on three columns and two rows.
You can insert the following four types of objects in your grid; (1) Image, (2) a single-line
Label, (3) Text Area and also (4) the Map. Their size and position set in the header area grid is
shown in Figure 101. You can then hide the grid-lines and edit the content of individual objects. To
display the grid context menu you must to click on an empty area outside the embedded objects.
Fig. 97:
objects).
Setting the size of grid cells (Top – uniform size; Bottom – size defined by embedded
Fig. 98:
Context menu commands for Text Area object.
Fig. 99:
Object position within the grid using the row / column position property.
Fig. 100:
Setting the Row and Column Span properties for objects in the grid.
Fig. 101:
Example of size and position properties of multiple objects within the grid.
If you have never previously worked with grid layout technology, it can initially be difficult
to set your object to the desired shape and
position. Practice ensures you create visually
impressive header and footer areas.
In addition to described methods, the grid
can also be composed using a different method.
You begin using the grid layout with only one cell,
and gradually place all objects and their position by
Size, Margin and Alignment combinations from the
Fig. 102:
Example of object composition
in a one grid cell using the Size, Margin and
context menu. Figure 102 illustrates your result.
Alignment properties of individual objects.
Even when your grid-lines are hidden, you
can start editing individual objects as shown in the
context menus in Fig. 103. Most functions are identical for all objects, and these can later be
deleted from your grid by clicking Delete. The Position in the grid is controlled by two additional
functions. Identical functions for all objects are at the bottom of the context menu, and these set
the object’s background colour, the colour and width of the border lines and the object’s size,
margin and alignment. The central context menu area contains functions which differ from one
type of object to another.
Fig. 103:
Map.
Commands from context menus for individual types of objects – Label, Text Area, Image and
The Label column allows you to set text content, font and colour, but no specific functions
are set in the Text Area column. The Image column lets you alter the Image Source, and the final
Stretch commands import the image into your plot and stretch its properties’ configuration.
Finally the Map Properties command adjusts your map display in the form in Figure 104.
Here, you set your map provider and simple well marker displays; but this property offers less
settings than the Map View visualization previously described. The Main Well and Others Well
parameters set well displays in the
map
and
you
can
visually
distinguished the actual well you are
working on from others in your
project. Mouse scrolling and panning
within the map adjusts the position
and scale of your map display. When
all your required settings are
completed, you press Apply and the
resultant map is in the header area. If
you need a map not provided in this
program, just create an image file
and import it into your header area.
Figure 105 shows how the
resulting header looks after editing.
Here, the Image object shows the
Fig. 104:
Map properties dialog.
photo of your well, the Map display
of the well position and Text Area with the created and copied table from an external text editor
such as OpenOffice Writer. The footer area is defined in exactly the same way with the same
features and settings. The following text lets you set-up the Plot Body area.
Fig. 105:
Example of resultant header area.
5.4.3 Plot Body
The Plot Body fills the area between header and footer, and the Body functions in the
ribbon toolbar tab set up your content in this area (Fig. 106).
Fig. 106:
Commands in the ribbon toolbar tab for placing content in the Plot Body area.
Functions in the Visual group modify your visual settings in the plot body area (Fig. 107).
The functions in this group set your background area, the Body area position between the plot
edges and your border lines’ colour and thickness. These commands function exactly as in the
previous ribbon tab example.
The added BodyLayout functions in Fig. 108 set
the structure of your 1D Well Log. You first define the
number of columns you need in the body area to
display your well data. Then the Grid Lines button
displays or hides lines separating your individual
columns. The Plot Body area contains three columns
created by default. If you want to increase or decrease
this number, just click on the Definition button.
Fig. 108:
Commands in the Body Layout group.
Figure 109 dialog displays your defined number
Fig. 107:
Display of plot segments
of columns. The maximum number available is 20. Click
for header, body and footer.
the Apply button, and the number of columns you have
chosen is displayed. Finally, you can define the width of your columns. If you want equal width
columns leave the predefined Uniform command. Use By Content when the column width is
defined by the size of your embedded well data. Using the default Uniform command makes it
easier to correctly use the other features. The following Plot Columns chapter explains how to
insert and modify data in your plot body columns, and how to hide the help grid-lines for future
visualization.
Fig. 109:
Dialog for definition of column number.
5.4.4 Plot Columns
Using the Columns ribbon tab in Figure 110 is most important, because it enables you to
add required data into the plot. This data can include geological and technical schemes or
numerical data. The following text describes the step by step procedure for adding, editing and
deleting all data in your prepared columns.
The first button to use is Add.
This places your chosen data in the
plot. For example, you can add
technical or geological schemes,
numerical data, heat maps or other
specific data types. This creates a
plot similar to Figure 111.
Clicking on the menu Add
button allows you to choose the type
of data you want to display. A help
window appears similar to the one in
Figure 112 Left. In this example, a
Fig. 110:
Ribbon tab Columns with functions for adding
geological scheme was chosen. The
and editing displayed data in individual columns in the Plot
help windows are similar for all data
Body area.
types and differences between them
are described in the following supchapters. In this window you select
your well and the related data you
want to show. Then choose the
column where you want to insert it
and set the type of vertical axis you
want. This axis is defined by the
depth from the surface or by altitude
values. Here, you have the choice to
display both axes, either axis or
none. Clicking Apply displays your
selected column data. The plot first
shows only the vertical axis without
the data, so right-click in this area,
then press Refresh in the context
menu and your data becomes fully
visible.
Fig. 111:
Example of plot after adding your-defined data.
Two buttons in this ribbon
group are used to clear data from
your plot. The Delete All command
deletes all data, and Delete Selected
deletes only what you select for
deletion. This help form is shown in
Figure 112 Right.
This help form lets you select
columns for data deletion. These
columns can be chosen by checkboxes and when you click Apply, the
content in those selected columns is
Fig. 112:
Left - Form to add selected data into the plot;
deleted.
Right - Form for deleting data from plot according to column
number.
Figure 113 gives an example
of placing geological content into a column and clicking Refresh to display a geological scheme.
Two items are created in the column. The first is the header which describes the data type and the
second displays the actual data content in your document. These two parts are linked. If you move
the mouse over them, they are
highlighted by changing the background
colour. The ribbon tool bar contains few
features, but many others are hidden in
the context menu in Figure 114
described next.
Figure
114
highlights
modification options for both header
and column content using the context
menu. Here, you can individually
modify header and your displayed data
content. When you click on any object,
Fig. 113:
Example of active areas highlighted when
Figure 114 context menu is displayed.
you move the mouse over them.
The header has only minor editing
options
because
it
already
automatically displays data type and
notes in relation to this data type. This
is editable, and you can also change the
background
colour,
the
margin
properties and border line colour and
thickness. The most important part of
the header is the text area where you
can type custom content.
Work in this text area is exactly
the same as always, where you can
directly edit content in the plot or you
Fig. 114:
Functions from context menus for object
modification.
can paste content from external text
editors. Alternatively, click on any text item and a pop-up panel appears with functions for text
formatting.
The modification options in Fig. 114 should suffice for your most complex work. These
functions are accessed by right-clicking in the desired area, and they are identical for all types of
displayed data. Additional specific options are described in the following subsections.
The first three functions exemplify their use for all data types (Fig. 115 Left).
(1) The Refresh function is used to render the visual content. If you change the plot height, the
data that are already displayed is not automatically redrawn; only the vertical axis is redrawn. This
setting was chosen for economy of computational performance. For example, if you plotted a
geological scheme and you subsequently want to increase the plot size, you must redraw the
object by clicking on the Refresh command.
(2) The Set Column function moves data from one column to another. When you click on it, the
Figure 115 Right help form defines the new column you want your data moved to. The program
does not automatically check whether data already exists in the column you want your selected
data moved to, so you must know in advance if your new intended column is already empty.
(3) The Set Width function
defines the width of the object
in your column. If you type a
negative value in the input box,
the object will be automatically
expanded to fill the available
Fig. 115:
Left – selection from basic functions in the context
free space.
menu; Right – form for column position set-up.
Specific functions for each displayed data type are always placed in the middle of the
context menus, and similar functions are located at the bottom (Fig. 116 and 117). Features shown
in Figure 116 are used to adjust visual characteristics, but these same features are also contained
in the ribbon tab (Fig. 116 Right). The only difference between them is when you use the context
menu functions these are applied only to the selected object and when you use the ribbon tab,
they are simultaneously applied to all objects in the plot body area. Using these functions, you can
change the background, the margin properties and the colours and thickness of your border-lines.
Fig. 116:
Features for adjustment of visual properties of objects in columns (Left – functions from the
context menu for individual objects; Right – functions for simultaneous adjustments of all objects in the plot
body area).
The two remaining
Depth Axis and Altitude Axis
items in the context menu
change your vertical axes
properties. These include
their visibility, width and the
intervals at which the labels
are displayed on the axes.
(Fig. 117)
Fig. 117:
Left – Commands in the context menu for definition and
You are now able to
adjustment of vertical axes; Right – example of Axis Interval change.
display data in your plot body
columns, to move them within columns and to change basic parameters such as background colour
and vertical axes. You can also delete unnecessary content. The following sub-sections modify the
display of individual data types and explain the function of specific plot objects.
5.4.4.1 Technical Scheme
Your options for displaying technical schemes are explained first. You can view your created
technical scheme in a data document by clicking on Add – Technical Scheme in the ribbon tab. This
displays your selected document in a plot body-area column, and clicking Refresh in the context
menu shows your selected technical scheme (Fig. 118 Left). Your scheme also contains a header
which can be adjusted to suit your requirements. Since this technical scheme has only a few editing
options, you can right-click in the display area to obtain a context menu for increased editing.
Most editing features have already been described in the previous chapter; so this subsection concentrates on additional features. One new feature is Well Margin (Fig. 118 Middle).
This sets the horizontal offset of the well from both sides. It does not change the size of the
displayed object, but resizes the offset of the well from the vertical axis and from the right side of
your object. Figure 188 provides an example of this offset reduction.
The remaining commands in the context menu are identical to those described in the
previous chapter. Examples include adjusting background colour, setting vertical axis visibility and
changing columns and content in the plot body-area.
Fig. 118:
Left – technical scheme in plot; Middle – context menu with commands for scheme
adjustment; Right – example of Well Margin parameter modification.
5.4.4.2 Geological Scheme
Multiple
geological
schemes
can
be
simultaneously added to your
plot using Add – Geological
Scheme in the ribbon toolbar
(Fig. 119 Left). Clicking on this
brings down the help form in
the middle of Figure 119.
You use the two combo
boxes in this form to select
your well and its related
geological scheme. Then, set
Fig. 119:
Left - adding a geological scheme to the plot, Middle form for selection of the geological scheme document, Right - basic
the column you want to show
view of geological scheme after adding it and clicking
it in and choose your vertical
axis. When you click Apply,
your
selected
geological
scheme is in the plot, but not
visible. To visualize it, click
Refresh and your scheme
comes up as in figure 119
Right.
Geological
hatch
patterns occupy the entire
content space and information
about the number of your
Fig. 120:
Features from the context menu for geological scheme
displayed layers is in the
content.
header column. The context
menu for your scheme has the three extra adjustable features of Display Mode, Hatch Size % and
Text Mode (Fig. 120).
These three functions significantly modify the appearance of your geological scheme.
Figure 121 gives an example of the Display Mode parameter. This modifies the way data is
displayed in your geological
section. This can be viewed
only in visual hatch
pattern, by a combination
of hatch patterns and text
content or else by referring
to the explanatory text
description.
By
setting
the
Display Mode parameter
to Hatch and Text in Figure
121 Middle, you can
change the width of the
hatch pattern according to
your
needs.
This
adjustment is finalised by
Fig. 121:
Example of various states using Display Mode.
clicking on Hatch Size (%),
which defines the hatch
pattern
width
in
percentage values. Figure
122 gives the example of
20, 40 and 60 % widths.
Fig. 122:
Example of Hatch Size (%) parameter changing.
The Text Mode
function adjusts your displayed text. This function changes the geological index and the name and
description of the geological layer imported from your source data file, as described in Chapter
5.2.2. You add your comments or a combination of any prepared data in the text area, and all this
new information is displayed in your geological scheme document. Examples of these Text Mode
property changes are given in Figure 123.
Fig. 123:
Examples of Text Mode changes.
Fig. 124:
Direct editing
of text inside the geological
scheme.
In addition to these changes using functions from the
context menu, you also have the opportunity to edit your geological
scheme directly in the plot. Typographical error correction and
information addition can be edited before visualization export.
Similarly, if you want to change the textual format, just select the
part you want changed and the context panel displays functions for
font, size and colour editing (Fig. 124). However, here you must
remember that if your changes alter the size of the entire plot, it
will be necessary to redraw your geological scheme by clicking
Refresh. This function reloads the data from the underlying data
document. Customised data is not stored in the background data
document, so lost material here must be replaced. Therefore, if you
want to make any interventions directly in the plot, make these
modifications at the end, before exporting the plot from the
program. In some cases it may happen that a textual area for your geological scheme is not large
enough or your text caption is not fully visible, Annex 3 explains how to overcome these problems.
5.4.4.3 Numerical Data
This chapter describes your options for simultaneously displaying all numeric data types in
your plot. These all use the same rendering method and can be combined in one column.
First, click on Add – Numerical Data in the ribbon toolbar, and help form Figure 125 comes
up. This form is slightly different from previous ones. Here you do not choose data you want
rendered, instead you select only the column where you want your object inserted and select
whether your horizontal axis should be linear or logarithmic. These are illustrated in figure 126.
Fig. 125:
Form for adding
numerical data to your plot.
Fig. 126:
Display examples of horizontal axis (Left – linear
type; Right – logarithmic type).
The logarithmic scale can be used only if the data does not include a zero or negative value.
Click Apply on the blank graph display and add your data by right-clicking on the displayed object.
Using the Add item, select the type of data you want to see. These types have the same division as
in the Data Sources panel previously described. According to their type, you can choose the type of
series that you want to use. For point data, for example, you can choose Line/Point Series or Area
Series in Figure 127
Fig. 127:
Context menu functions for adding data to a graph.
Clicking on the selected item displays Figure 128 help form. The dialogue corresponding to
your chosen series type is now displayed. Select the numerical data you want to show from the
first two combo boxes and use the following settings to define your series display. Here you can
define the background colour, your border lines’ type and thickness, and smoothing of the lines
connecting your points.
Press Apply and a new data series for your settings is added to the graph. Various types of
numerical data from several wells can be displayed in one object. Examples of the different series
types that can be displayed in your graph are shown in Figure 129.
Fig. 128:
Help forms for data series set-up in your graph.
Fig. 129:
Examples of different numerical data types display, using various types of series.
Figure 129 show that you can
Fig. 130:
Left – example of numerical data display in a
graph using a combination of several series types; Right –
contextual menu with functions for the horizontal axis in the
column header area.
display data in your graph in variable
forms and with a variety of visual
settings. Your variable series can be
combined to create any chart you
want. The example in Figure 130
provides a graph with three series
types; (1) stacked columns of variable
height, (2) a partly transparent area
series and (3) a point series.
If you want to delete a
displayed series in your graph, just
click Delete Series in the context
menu. In addition to the context menu
for the graph object, you can also use
the pop-up menu associated with the
horizontal axis in the column header.
With this menu, you can set the label
intervals on your axis and also their
font and colour (Fig. 130 Right).
5.4.4.4 Heat Maps
Heat Maps provide your most impressive
visualizations. These display numerical data, related to
dimensions such as time intervals or distances from the
well. Heat Map display in a plot is easier than its
preparation. Clicking on the Add – Heat Map ribbon menu
button gives Figure 131 help form. Select the document
with your prepared heat map and set the column where
you want it displayed. Finally, you set your vertical axis
type.
Now click Apply, and your heat map is added to
your selected plot column. You can then click Refresh for
Fig. 131:
Dialogue for heat map
your heat map display, as in Figure 132. Here, there are
addition.
two types of displayed heat maps. Figure 132 Left shows a
heat map with value changes in your well related to another numerical value and Figure 132 Right
gives value changes in your well over time.
Fig. 132:
Examples of heat maps displayed in the plot.
There are no specific functions in the context menu for this object. All the functions are
general, as described in Chapter 5.4.5.
5.4.4.5 Textual Data
Your text labels can also be displayed in the plot. These can
be added pressing the Add - Text Column in the ribbon toolbar
which brings up Figure 133 help dialog.
In this dialogue, you select the data document you want to
display. The Apply button defines your object in the plot, and
clicking Refresh renders visualisation of this selected data
document. Figure 134 provides an example of two label views. The
first is for a depth of 30 metres in a single-line label. The second
label is for the depth range of 33 to 55 metres and here the label
Fig. 133:
Form for
can have multiple lines. The image icons discussed earlier in the
adding text labels into the plot.
preparation of data documents were also assigned to individual
labels in Figure 134.
Your object displayed in the plot has only the three individual specific functions illustrated
in Figure 134 Right. The Mode parameter defines how your labels can be edited inside the plot.
You must remember that if you edit your labels inside the plot, your editing is not stored in the
source data document, so if you then click on the Refresh button, only the original data will be
reloaded and your edits will be lost. Figure 135 gives an example of label editing.
Fig. 134:
Left – example of text labels in your plot column; Right – specific functions in the labels
context menu.
In addition, you can use features in the context menu to set label font style and font colour.
Using these, you can provide additional information related to your defined depth; such as
sampling depths.
Fig. 135:
Editing option for text labels in your plot.
5.4.4.6 Images
Images are the next data type that can be rendered in your plot. You add these to the plot
using the Add button in the ribbon toolbar. Then click Refresh in the context menu and your
images are visible in the column. There are two specialized, functions in the context menu for this
type of visualization; namely Use Unified Properties and Properties (Fig. 136).
The first is Use Unified Properties which sets the same parameters for all images, thus overriding the possibility of individual parameter control in your data document. The second Properties
item in the context menu sets these unified properties (Fig. 136 Right). Clicking on Apply
simultaneously adjusts these properties for all images. Examples of different variations of these
settings are shown in Figure 137
where, the Stretch, Horizontal
Alignment
and
Vertical
Alignment parameters were
edited.
Fig. 136:
Left – image data object in the plot column; Top
Right – functions from the context menu to customize the display of
images in the profile; Bottom Right – form to set your unified image
properties.
Fig. 137:
images.
Examples of Stretch, Horizontal and Vertical Alignment parameter variations for profile
5.4.4.7 Tectonic Data
Fig. 138:
Left – example of structural data visualisation in your
well’s vertical profile; Right Top – commands for visualisation adjustment;
Right Bottom – functions for adjustment of your selected single
tectonogram
Your tectonic and
structural data can also be
displayed in the plot. This
data is defined in the
document
by
three
parameters;
depth,
magnitude and azimuth.
Display your tectonic data
in the plot, click Refresh in
the context menu and
visualization appears as in
Figure 138 Left. This
visualization consists of a
single rose diagram with
data and arrows indicating
your
displayed
depth
range. A single diagram
displays all data for the
whole well.
Right-clicking
on
your object displays editing
functions. In addition to
standard features, this menu has all the new features which are specially designed for this object
(Fig. 138 Top Right). In addition, right-clicking on the selected diagram brings up your editing
options (Fig. 138 Bottom Right).
The first function in the context
menu for your entire plot object is
Vertical Mode which can show tectonic
data in three ways. If you have a small set
of data, use the One Diagram property
and all data is displayed in a single
diagram. If you have larger sets of
measurements, use the By Data
property. Multiple vertical diagrams are
then displayed for individual depth
measurements. This setting is good if you
want to display a limited amount of data
related to depth, but if you have a lot of
data concentrated in a relatively short
Fig. 139:
Form for layers definition where all
depth range, the individual diagrams will
measurements will be merged into one diagram.
overlap.
Therefore, for very large datasets
it is best to use the third property - By
Layers. Here, measurements are merged
in your diagrams according to your
defined number of layers. An example of
this setting’s benefits is that you can
display summary diagrams according to
changes in geological properties.
However, when you use this setting, you
must define your depth ranges using the
Create Layers help form in Figure 139.
This form defines your depth intervals,
so that once again all measurements fit
in one diagram. Figure 139 defines two
layers; at 0 to 30 metres and 30 to 100
metres. Click Apply, and two diagrams
are rendered in your plot showing data
from the two depth levels. Examples of
your three choices are displayed in
Figure 140.
Another feature in the context
menu is the Mode property which
defines the type of diagram used. This
setting is applied for all diagrams in the
profile. However, if you want to set this
property individually for each diagram,
Fig. 140:
Examples of Vertical Mode parameter
just right-click on it and use the pop-up
choices (Left – One diagram; Middle – By Data; Right – By
menu (Fig. 138 Bottom Right). Examples
Layers).
of the four choices for your diagram
display are illustrated in Figure 141.
The program’s predefined method of
viewing data is by Bars. This is useful if you have a
small amount of data, but for a greater amount of
data you can use the as Points setting. This mode
displays individual measurements as points, so here
a number of similar measurement values are more
easily recognized. Similarly, the as Occurrence
Segments option highlights segments with 10° step
azimuth and magnitude marks when your data falls
into these ranges. Your fourth choice is as Density
Segments. This setting is similar to the previous
one, except that the segment colour is defined by
the number of measurements falling in that
segment. Here, segments with a small number of
measurements are highlighted in blue and multiple
Fig. 141:
Modes of tectonogram display
measurement segments are in red.
in the plot (Top Left – as Bars; Top Right – as
Finally when you click on the Properties
Points; Bottom Left– as Occurrence Segments;
Bottom Right – as Density Segments).
item, you receive the form in Figure 142. This
defines your diagram’s visual parameters, and can
be used for individual diagrams or for all diagrams concurrently. Again, you must remember that if
you change only one individual diagram and click Refresh in the context menu all editing changes
you have made to its visual settings will be cancelled. The combined parameters are shown in
Figure 142 Right. Here, set the Vertical Mode parameter to By Data and your measurements are
rendered at a defined depth from the surface. Since the diagrams in your profile overlap, their
visual characteristics are modified so that all measurements become visible. The colour of multiple
diagram objects is set to transparent. These described features give you highly variable
visualizations of tectonic and
structural measurements. The
next section describes adding
the time series of your
measured numerical values into
the vertical well profile.
Fig. 142:
Left – dialogue for adjusting tectonogram properties;
Right –example of property combinations for displaying values at their
actual depth.
5.4.4.8 Time Series Data
The last data type to render in your plot is the time series of
numerical values. This visualization is used where you have
continuous measurements at various well depths. Using data
loggers allows continuous measurements of the water temperature,
TDS and the electrical conductivity of water. This displays your
values in depth graphs after you have prepared individual time
series using the Data Source panel. When you want to view them,
click Add - Time Series in the ribbon toolbar and this displays the
form in Figure 143. Here, you select the well you want to view then
select your data from the list and press Apply.
After inserting this in your profile and redrawing it by clicking
Refresh, the data is displayed in the predefined format of Figure 144
Right. This example illustrates continuous measurements at three
Fig. 143:
Help window
well depths. For specific visualization adjustment, you use the
for definition of time series to
Properties function in Figure 144 Top Right).
be displayed in the well’s
vertical profile.
Clicking on the Properties function displays this form where
you can modify your graph’s visual properties (Fig. 144 Right). Here,
you adjust graph background colour, grid line colour and you can
show or hide the X and Y -axes and
adjust the colour and size of your font.
The following text boxes allow you to
edit the graph margin values and adjust
the colours of your imported series. The
first series in each chart is displayed in
steel blue colour. The Color Dialog
property allows graph display in up to
20 Color series. This is used when you
import several value columns, such as
those defining concentrations of
dissolved solid components, Clicking
Color Dialog in your selected item also
allows you to change colours. The last
text box lets you adjust your chart
height. Figure 145 gives an example of
the adjusted visualization for three time
series in vertical profile. Here, the chart
border colour and grid lines have been
set to fully transparent and the X and Y
axis labels are hidden. The chosen
display colour for this series was red, in
order to clearly illustrate the final
Fig. 144:
Left – example of predefined display of time
visualization
of
continuous
series in the well’s vertical profile.; Top Right – function for
measurements at three points in your
graph adjustment in the context menu; Bottom Right – help
well.
form for adjusting your graph’s visual properties.
5.4.4.9 Custom text column
There is one more addition to complete the description of data visualizations in the 1D Well
Log Plot. By pressing Add you can insert a Custom Text Column which is empty. Here, you can
enter any of your own required textual data such as well descriptions and photographs. You just
define the columns where you want these items to go and use Copy-Paste. After its insertion, you
can directly edit the content. Selecting any part of your added data brings up the classic contextual
toolbar if you need formatting changes. An example of self-generated textual content is given in
Figure 146.
Fig. 145:
Example of the adjusted object in
the plot with three time series values at different
depths
Fig. 146:
Example of text content generated in
an external text editor and inserted by Copy-Paste.
5.4.4.10 Conclusions
This ends chapter 5.4 description of display options for different data types in the 1D Well
Log. It explained insertion and editing modification for extremely variable types of data in your plot
so that you now have the most impressive display of well data and measurements.
Following your entire visualization, you now have printing and export options. Right-clicking
in the grey area outside the fence displays these functions (Fig. 147). The first is Full Screen where
you can re-size your window to monitor full-screen and convert the plot into an-image (Fig. 148).
You can quickly zoom and scroll visualization in this new image size. Then Active Plot - Export
displays options for direct printing of your plot and exporting the created visualization from the
program as an image (Fig. 149). Beneath Figure 149 is the final depiction of your 1D Well Log
created in Well Plotter.
Fig. 147:
Functions in the context menu when
you click outside the plot.
Fig. 148:
Full Screen display of your plot.
Fig. 149:
image file.
Plot export from your program as an
6 Well Plotter 3D
Chapter 6 now explains 2D and 3D visualization of your well data. To use these features,
you need a licence for Well Plotter 3D, but you can try the program’s Demo version first. The 3D
edition is an extension of the basic version so you must be able to prepare basic data as explained
in Chapters 4 and 5. There is minimal visual difference between these two editions. The ribbon
toolbar includes two additional buttons for viewing your data in 3D space (3D View) creating your
final 2D / 3D diagram. (Fig. 150), Inside the window there is also one extra panel, called Section
Data. Functions for these additional features are described in the following text.
Fig. 150:
Function additions in the Well Plotter 3D program.
6.1 Section Data Panel
The 3D edition Section Data panel displays the list of 2D sections appears between pairs of
wells (Fig. 151). When you click in the panel’s empty area, Figure 151 Top Right context menu
appears. Using Add New, you can create a new 2D section. The second item on of this menu
deletes all created sections simultaneously. If you right-click on an existing item, the context menu
appears as in Figure 151 Bottom Right.
Fig. 151:
Left - Section Data Panel; Right - functions in the context menus.
Using these functions, you can edit, rename or delete a selected section. Clicking on Add
New gives the window in Figure 152. Here the combo boxes allow you to select two wells for your
2D profile. You define its name, click Apply and your, new section is displayed in the panel.
It is crucial in creating a 2D profile of several 2D
sections that you understand that the final visualization of
your geological profile is always based on the creation of your
individual sections. For example, if you want to display the
profile between wells PK-1, PK-2 and PK-3 in this order, you
need to create two separate sections: PK-1/PK-2 and PK-2/PK3. The current version does not contain horizontal flipping of
Fig. 152:
Dialog for adding a
your created sections and therefore if you create a section PKnew 2D section for two selected
3/PK-2, it is impossible to combine and compare it with the
wells.
PK-1/PK-2 section. This factor is not important for 3D
visualization, where both PK-2/PK-3 and PK-/PK-2 sections can be included and compared to your
PK-1/PK-2 section.
If you add a new section to the panel, double-clicking on it will open it for editing in a
separate window. The new blank area in the document part appears as in Figure 153. In addition,
the ribbon toolbar contains the new 2D Section context tab shown in Figure. 154.
Fig. 153:
Display of the newly-created 2D sections for two selected wells.
Before editing, this document window contains four objects. Two are for horizontal and
vertical axis. The horizontal axis in the upper part shows the distance between the selected wells in
metres; or in your defined metric coordinate units. The vertical axis shows the wells’ location
altitude. This data is read from your basic well properties described in Chapter 5.1. The remaining
two objects are black rectangles where you import the wells’ geological profiles referenced to their
actual altitudes. You edit your 2D section in this window, using features in the contextual ribbon
tab (Fig. 154).
This ribbon tab contains all editing features you require, and the Close button then closes
this contextual tab. The functionality of other buttons is explained in the following two subsections. The first sub-section describes options for generating 2D profiles with geological layers
and the second explains creating 2D heat maps from numerical data.
Fig. 154:
Contextual tab in the ribbon toolbar for 2D section editing.
6.1.1 2D Geological Section
The most common use for 2D sections is to produce geological profiles. This chapter
explains how they can be created in Well Plotter 3D. When you create individual sections for pairs
of wells, these are then used to render your geological profile in 2D and 3D view.
The rectangles in the previously empty 2D
section are now filled with your wells’ geological
profiles, and these are automatically displayed. But
if you have a well in the Data Sources panel with
several geological profiles (such as schematic and
classified), the program automatically selects the
first one it finds. If you want to use a different
profile to the one automatically selected, press the
ribbon button in the Well Geology group (Fig. 155
Left), and Figure 155 Right window comes up.
All existing geological profiles can be loaded
in
this
window.
Selecting your alternative geological
Fig. 155:
Selection of geological profiles
to be displayed in your document.
scheme and pressing Apply changes the profile in
the document.
The Layer group in Figure 156 has three basic
but very important buttons. Here, you can Add a
new layer to your profile, Edit existing layers and
Delete unnecessary ones. Clicking on Add New
gives you the window in Figure 157.
Fig. 156:
Basic features for definition of
You can manually set the description and
your 2D geological profile.
visual properties of new layers in Figure 157
window. If you want to apply texture already used in the program, you can choose this from a Geo
ID combo box. All unique Geo ID-s
used in your previous work are loaded
here. If you want to edit the texture,
just click on it to get the standard
window for hatch editing. Then edit
and press Apply.
When you have added a new
layer, that dialogue closes and you get
the next choice of buttons in the
ribbon toolbar in Figure 158.
Fig. 157:
section.
Window for adding a new layer to the 2D
Each layer you add into the 2D
section is defined by the top and
bottom slices. The first two buttons
in the Edit Slice group are used to
select the slice that you currently
Fig. 158:
Commands for layer editing in the 2D section.
want to edit. If you want to edit the
top slice, click the first Top Slice button. Subsequently, you use buttons from the following group
Slice Points to define the geometry of your layer. Clicking on the New button adds new points to
the layer slice. The following Clear button deletes profile points. The Move button allows you to
manually move existing points in your section. The last button is used for precise definition of the
point position in the 2D section. Finally, when you have finished editing the layers, click on the
Finish Edit button.
Figure 159 gives
an
example
of
a
constructed layer, with
visible points limiting the
extent of your created
layer. This figure shows
that the profile has two
types of points. The ones
that look like a T limit the
layer top (Top Slice) and
those that resemble a
vertically rotated T limit
the layer bottom (Bottom
Slice).
After adding these
Fig. 159:
Formation of new layer in the 2D profile defining your
points, click on the Finish
boundary points.
Edit button and the layer
in Figure 160 is created.
This layer now shows the
visual parameters you
defined in its preparation.
You can freely edit
the created layer. Pressing
the Edit Layer button
gives you the dialogue in
Figure 161. Select a layer
and press Apply. That
window closes and the
selected layer is displayed
again
showing
your
boundary points. Click on
the Move button and
Fig. 160:
Example of created layer using the boundary points in the
these points can be for
previous figure.
example moved with the
mouse. An example of this type of point shift from the bottom slice is shown in Figure 162. At the
end of each item in this window is an icon for editing the layer’s visual properties. An example of
its use here is alteration of texture colours.
Fig. 161:
Window for
selecting layers to edit.
Fig. 162:
Example of layer editing by manual shift of one
boundary point.
The last button from the Slice
Points group is Position. This precisely
defines the position of current and new
points. Clicking on a selected item gives
the form in Figure 163, with text boxes
to coordinate the points you change. In
addition, this form contains four buttons
Fig. 163:
Form for exact positioning of the slice point. in the right half of the window. These
buttons move the point to
a selected edge of your
section. For example, if
you want to move the start
point to the left edge, click
on the Min button on the
Distance
line.
Your
selected point is then
moved to this edge. This
option is used especially to
clip layers to the edge of
your 2D section, because it
is difficult to click the
mouse on the border pixel.
Similarly, if you want to
clip the layer to the right
edge, you use the Max
Fig. 164:
An example of layer clipping to the edge of 2D sections
button. Results of these
using the Position function.
modifications
are
highlighted in Figure 164.
In addition, you can also use this form if you have created overburden or ground layer.
Here, it is necessary that the edges of the layers overlap. An example is given in Figure 165. This
shows creation of the
second layer from the
top. Actually existing
layers are displayed with
increased transparency
and
their
definition
points are in blue colour.
If you want to add a new
layer clipped to the edges
of the existing layer, click
on the Position button in
the ribbon toolbar and
then
click
on
the
boundary points from an
existing layer. Click on
one these points and the
Fig. 165:
An example of selected layer editing by clipping points from
form from Figure 163
points in previous layers.
reappears, and the Add
New button can be used.
The coordinates of the
point you clicked on are
now in the text box.
When you press Add New
above the existing point
from the previous layer, a
new point for the new
layer is displayed. This
operation
precisely
defines the new point
position with no holes or
overlaps between layers.
After layer editing,
click Finish Edit, and all
Fig. 166:
Example of a 2D geological section created in the Well
created
layers
are
Plotter program.
displayed in their actual
form; without showing the help points from the top or bottom slices. An example of a 2D
geological profile created in this manner is shown in Figure 166. If you have any problems with
your geological profile preparation, the video tutorial shows all described features in actual use.
Although the preparation of 2D geological sections is labour-intensive, your resultant realistic
course of geological layers between selected pairs of wells is completely satisfying. This result
surpasses the simple linear inter-connection available in other programs.
The following chapter briefly describes 2D section creation using bi-linear interpolation of
numerical values between two wells. If you require more complex types of geological sections,
Annex 4 contains further options for their construction.
6.1.2 2D Heat Map Section
Figure 167 illustrates commands for creating a 2D heat map. Heat maps can be constructed
from the numerical point datasets using simple bi-linear interpolation between the nearest four-
point values. This methodology is optimal when wells are located in
relatively planar areas and your measurement depths are
approximately equal. However, 2D heat map creation between wells in
the Plotter Well 3D program is currently in the initial testing phase,
because present methodology is unsuitable for wells located on a
slope. Future extended versions of this program will cover this
Fig. 167:
Features
deficiency. To create your heat map, click on HeatMap in the ribbon
for working with 2D heat
toolbar and select Create HeatMap. The next button in Figure 167
maps.
deletes 2D heat maps from your section.
2D heat maps are produced using Figure 168 help window; with similar settings to those
explained in Chapter 5.2.7 for 1D Well Log heat maps. You first choose the data documents you
want to use in the top two combo boxes.
Fig. 168:
The window for set-up and production of section 2D heat map.
You can adjust map resolution exactly as in 1D Well Log heat map modulation. The smaller
your values, the sharper the heat map will be through longer calculation processes. Using the
Colour Palette, you define the colours to be used in your heat map. The most important features
are Palette Max / Min Value. Leaving these text boxes at zero in individual sections ensures that
the colour scale in the heat maps will always be adjusted to your current range of numerical values.
However, if you want to use 2D heat maps in several sections you put absolute minimum and
maximum values. These are then generated in your heat map so that identical values in all sections
have the same colour. The last radio buttons give you the option of setting heat maps as a
continual transition of colours or having sharp transition. Examples of 2D heat maps with different
parameters are shown in Figure 169.
Clicking Apply produces the heat map displayed in Figure 170. Both the heat map and your
geological profile are added inside each 2D section; with the heat map displayed in the background
of the 2D section
Fig. 169:
Examples of 2D heat maps using the same numerical values but different settings.
This
chapter
completes input data
creation in Well Plotter
3D.
The
following
chapters under paragraph
6 focus on the final 2D
and 3D visualizations of
all prepared data in the
program. Chapter 6.2
deals with data display in
3D space, and chapter 6.3
describes the formation
of your final 2D/3D plot.
Fig. 170:
window.
Resultant heat map displayed inside the 2D section document
6.2 3D View
Fig. 171:
3D space.
Example of window for data display in
Now that you have prepared all data
associated with your wells’ defined
coordinates and altitudes, you can create the
spatial 2D and 3D visualizations. The 3D
visualization is described first because
resultant 3D displays can be later combined
with your 2D data display. To display data in
3D, just click on the 3D View button in the
ribbon toolbar to bring up the window in
Figure 171. This automatically loads all data
in your program.
Your automatically loaded data
appears as follows; Wells are shown as simple
cylinders in steel blue colour and 2D sections
are shown as geological layers. This 3D
model can be fully adjusted using the
features in the four ribbon toolbar
tabs in Figure 172.
Each tab has a different
function. (1) The Home tab gives the
basic visualization set-up, (2) The 3D
Wells tab edits the display of 3D
objects, (3) The 2D Wells tab adjusts
the settings of 2D objects and (4) The
last tab is GIS which imports spatial
data from ESRI GIS files in the form of
Shapes (points, lines and polygons)
and Grids.
The following sub-sections are
divided according to those ribbon
toolbar tabs; beginning with the basic
set-up and functionality of the 3D
View.
Fig. 172:
Features for 3D visualization of well data.
6.2.1 Basic properties of 3D View
The basic settings for 3D visualization are on the Home Tab (Fig. 173). These features define
the basic properties of the 3D image. The Export As Image button is then used to export the
visualization from the program to an image file.
The Clear Model
and Refresh Model
buttons
erase
and
redraw the entire 3D
scene. The first two
functions under the
Model button display or
hide auxiliary objects in
the 3D scene. These are
Fig. 173:
Features on the Home tab.
the coordinate-system
axes / Coordinate System and the cube of the model / View
Cube (Fig. 174). The View Cube object has the specific
function that allows you to click on one side of the cube and
automatically rotate the whole model to that side. An
Fig. 174:
Auxiliary objects
from the 3D scene (Left – coordinate example of this function is that you can automatically rotate
the entire model to view it from any side or from above.
system; Right – view cube).
The Colors item defines the colour of the following
three objects; the background of the scene and coordinate system labels (Pictured in Figure 175),
and also the predefined colour of displayed wells.
Fig. 175:
Example of colour setting for scene background and axis labels.
Fig. 176:
Example of vertical scaling of your model.
Vertical Scaling changes the scale of the vertical axis. This feature is used when you display
shallow wells over a relatively large surface area. Here, you can scale the vertical parameter so that
the horizontal extent of your wells is maintained while the vertical data of shallow wells is also
clearly visible. An example of this scaling is shown in Figure 176.
The Grid button delineates a 3D cube enclosed
in grid lines, with boundary conditions set
automatically according to the well’s position.
Pressing Grid brings up the dialog in Figure 177. In
this window you can adjust all your grid parameters.
You can show or hide the grid, define the colours and
thickness of the main and secondary lines and display
or hide individual cube walls. The text boxes also
allow you to adjust the size of the cube by changing
the boundary coordinates. An example created grid is
shown in Figure 178.
Finally, this chapter explains interactive control
of the 3D model. Here, your displayed 3D model can
be dynamically controlled – rotated, moved and
zoomed. You can do this using the mouse or the
keyboard. Table 2 shows the individual Gestures and
Commands and the functions they perform in the 3D
image. Figure 179 gives an example of Field of View
property changes. Orographic and Perspective
displays are initiated by pressing Alt + right mouse
Fig. 177:
Dialogue for grid set-up.
button + shift.
Table 2:
Mouse and keyboard gestures for
interactive 3D control.
Fig. 178:
Example of created grid.
Gesture
Command
RMB
rotate
Shift + RMB
pan
Ctrl + RMB
zoom
Ctrl + Shift + RMB
zoom rectangle
Alt + RMB
change field of view
Mouse Wheel
zoom
Shift + Mouse wheel
change field of view
Double-click RMB
set target point
Double-click MMB
reset camera
Home
zoom extents
Page Up / Page Down zoom
Arrow keys
rotate
Ctrl + U / D / L / R /
F/B
look from side
RMB - Right mouse button
MMB - Middle mouse button
Fig. 179:
Examples of 3D Projection / Field of View changes (Left – orographic view, Right –
perspective view).
6.2.2 3D Content
This chapter explains options for adjusting the display of 3D objects in space. Functions in
the 3D Wells tab customize well displays as three-dimensional cylinders (Fig. 180), while 2D
sections are oriented as
two-dimensional
planar
objects.
All well objects and
2D sections are initially
imported into this window.
Fig. 180:
Commands for 3D objects adjustment.
Using the first two buttons
Wells and Sections, you can you
show or hide them, and also set
their visual properties. These can
be individually moderated by
using these buttons to bring up
the help window in Figure. 181.
All objects are displayed
in the list in Figure 181 windows.
The check boxes at the beginning
of each line select objects to be
hidden or displayed. Clicking on
the check box below the list
immediately sets this property
for all wells and 2D sections.
Clicking on the icon at the end of
each row of the list displays the
help window to individually set
properties for each object.
Figure 182 gives an
example of this sub-dialog for
Fig. 181:
Dialogs for 3D object set-up (Left – dialogue for
wells. The first line has a label for
wells; Right – dialogue for 2D sections).
your selected well. Using the
combo box in the second row, you can set the well display. Here, you can choose from three
options. (1) You can leave the original predefined colour, (2) you can define individual colours or (3)
you can display different colours for different geological layers. If you use colours for different
geological profiles, then the texture background colour remains exactly as it was previously defined
in your geologic hatch patterns. The next row lets you define the width of the well. The pre-defined
program value for this is 10, but you can change this to suit your needs. The last combo box shows
or hides your 3D well caption. Clicking on Apply sets your properties.
Figure 182 Bottom shows an example of the various well display settings. The first example
shows wells with a predefined colour. The middle example displays a defined unique colour (Here,
the well width property is increased), and the third example has different colours for individual
geological profiles.
Figure 183 gives the dialog for editing 2D section properties. As described in a previous
chapter, one 2D section document can simultaneously include a 2D heat map and a 2D geological
profile.
Figure 183 dialog shows or hides objects in the 3D scene. You can set the display of either
or both the geological section and 2D heat map, and you can define different degrees of
transparency. An example of various settings is shown in Figure 184.
Figure 185 ribbon tab provides additional features. Functions beneath the Show Wells
button set the type of display simultaneously for all wells. This feature is very fast if you have a
large number of wells in your 3D image; and manual modification can be time consuming.
Fig. 182:
Visual modifications for well display (Top – help dialogue for editing visual properties;
Bottom Left - wells with predefined colour; Bottom Middle - wells with individual colours and widths;
Bottom Right - wells with colours defined for different geological profiles).
Fig. 183:
Dialog for setting-up 2D section properties.
Fig. 184:
Examples of visual variations of 2D sections.
Fig. 185:
Additional features in the 3D Wells ribbon tab.
Functions under the Wells Label button set your label
parameters. You can show or hide them and set the
background and also the size and colour of your font. The
Geology Layers button hides functionality. This is very practical
because you can set different widths for well sections which
have the same Geo ID units. To achieve this, press the Use
Different - True menu item, click on Layers Definition and
adjust the width of your individual geological units. Clicking this
menu item brings up Figure 186 help dialog.
All geological indexes used in your wells are
automatically loaded in this window. You can the set their
width. Closing this dialog ensures that your prepared settings
are now in 3D image. An example is given in Figure 187.
In this example there are a large number of wells in a
small area. Widths can be adjusted depending on what you
want to display. Here, sandy layers are distinguished by using
larger widths for sediments with higher sand content.
The described ribbon tab also contains Hatch Scaling
and Show Sections functions for 2D geological sections. Hatch
Scaling sets the scaling of hatch patterns in geological sections
as shown in Figure 188. This feature is used when there are
Fig. 186:
Dialogue for width
large distances between wells. If you enter a number less than
definition of individual well
segments according to their
1, the texture will be less dense, and conversely a number
geological structure.
greater than 1 results in greater texture density. Where your
wells have a large distance between them, sometimes the texture becomes deformed when you
change the default scaling. Therefore, for your geological section 2D representation in these
circumstances, it is best to use a simple solid colour which doesn’t need scaling.
Fig. 187:
Example of different well segment widths according to their geological structure.
The Show Sections menu contains two commands which simultaneously define the type of
view for all sections. Here, you have the option to display your 2D Sections as geological profiles or
heat maps.
Fig. 188:
Example of hatch pattern density change using the hatch-scaling property.
6.2.3 2D Content
The next tab is called 2D Content. This includes functions for adding 2D objects into the 3D
space (Fig. 189). This program function is in the experimental stage, so some parameters must be
set manually. You must also remember that computer rendering of 3D objects relies on you first
displaying each well’s data as 2D objects. The program then converts this to a 3D image.
Your 2D objects are
displayed at the positions of
individual wells. When you
want to display them, you
must first hide 3D wells
because the 3D objects
Fig. 189:
Features for displaying 2D objects in 3D space.
have higher priority in
program. Otherwise, if you
show a 3D well and also a
2D object, your 2D object
will not be displayed.
Display and data definition
is performed using the first
Fig. 190:
Dialog for setting-up 2D object contents.
button in the ribbon
toolbar – Wells. A dialog similar to that for 3D
wells appears. Clicking on your selected well
gives you Figure 190 help window. Here, you
set the data type you want to display and
select the document. When you press Apply,
you return to the previous dialog of all wells,
and when you close this help window your
changed settings are applied to the 3D image.
After applying your settings, your work
looks like Figure 191 Left. Here, you have a 3D
well with its 2D object, but your 2D object is
most likely invisible due to its small width. For
different sized 3D models you need to modify
the width and content scaling of your 2D
Fig. 191:
Left – initial display of 2D objects in a objects using those Elements Width and
3D scene; Right – 2D object visibility after increasing
Content Scaling buttons. The height of each
the width.
2D object is computer defined as well depth,
but you must manually adjust width using Elements Width. This value must be defined by
gradually varying the predefined values until your 2D objects have sufficient width. Figure 191 has
an example of sufficiently increased width value, so that now both the well’s 2D technical and
geological schemes become visible in the 3D image.
Although the width is now sufficient and all objects are visible, the graphic resolution
content remains insufficient, and your geological section’s text may not be entirely visible or it may
be vertically stretched. The Content Scaling button rectifies this so that you can set both horizontal
and vertical resolution. Again, you change these values gradually until content is correctly visible.
The Elements Rotation and Duplex Rendering functions remain in the toolbar. As
previously explained, 2D objects appear in the model at the well’s position; and these are always
oriented in the X-axis direction. Model rotation changes the visibility of 2D objects, so if you want
to change the orientation
of 2D objects in your 3D
image,
press
the
Elements
Rotation
button and change the
predefined value. Figure
192 gives an example of
this change. Here, the
model was not rotated
and it remains in the
same position in both
figures. Only the 2D
object’s orientation is
altered.
Rotation of your
Fig. 192:
Example of 2D objects orientation in 3D space.
model around the Z-axis
gives you 2D content visible only from one side, with the second side fully transparent. If you also
want to display the content from the reverse side, clicking the Duplex Rendering button displays
the same content from both views.
Setting
these
parameters perfectly takes
practice, but they allow you
to display extremely variable
data types in 3D view. The
greatest advantage of using
these functions is that all the
visual properties of 2D
objects described in Chapter
5.4.5 are accessible. An
example is shown in Figure
The 193 example highlights
that all displayed objects can
be individually adjusted
according
to
your
requirements. These include
setting the background
colour or the vertical axis for
Fig. 193:
Example of direct adjustment of 2D objects in the 3D
altitude. It is most important
image.
to remember here that all
your adjustments are active only if the model is not redrawn. Take care, because redrawing occurs
automatically if you click on any button in the ribbon toolbar. Finally, Figure 194 gives examples of
various data displayed as 2D content in 3D space.
Fig. 194:
Example of data displayed as 2D objects in 3D space.
6.2.4 GIS Data
This chapter explains the final data category to
be displayed in a 3D image. Buttons on Figure 195
ribbon tab enable display of GIS spatial data
Using these buttons you can import three basic
types of spatial data into the program; (1) 2D images
such as satellite maps and schemes, (2) points, lines
and polygons from ESRI ShapeFiles and (3) grids, such
Fig. 195:
Features for working with
GIS data.
as digital terrain models.
Addition of Image Data is achieved when you press Images - Add Image and open Figure
196 help form. Here, you can insert any 2D picture, such as area satellite images or geological
maps, into your 3D image. The Open button allows you to choose images you want to import from
the disk and load them in the right window pane.
Fig. 196:
Form for addition and set-up of 2D images.
Subsequently,
you
must
define
parameters required
for correct display in
3D space. Since this is
a 2D object, the
Altitude Position at
which the image is
displayed must be kept
constant. You then
define the coordinates
of the image edges
with your X and Y
coordinates of the
bottom left and top right corner of the image, respectively. The image is inserted at this defined
position, and you can modulate image transparency using the slider. When the slider is moved to
the left, the image is more transparent, while right movement gives greater opacity. After setting
these parameters and pressing Apply, the 3D image appears as in Figure 197.
Individual parameters of your imported images can be edited after insertion, using the
Images button to open a window listing all your imported images. Double-clicking on the selected
dialog in the image returns Figure 196 for alteration of your imported parameters.
Fig. 197:
Example of a satellite map displaying the 3D image with partial transparency.
The second button has features for working with objects stored as points, lines or polygons
in ESRI Shape Files (Fig. 198). Clicking Add Shape imports all type of ShapeFiles to the program.
Editing an existing ShapeFile requires the following menu items; where each type of objects has a
separate control window. Clicking Add Shape displays the Open File Dialog. Here, you select the
file on disk where your data is stored. The program allows you to import files with *.shp file extent.
After data selection, the Figure 198 Right dialog is displayed. If you want to insert GIS data into the
3D space, you must know both its X/Y
space and vertical positions. The program
assumes that the altitude position of
each object is defined in the shapefile’s
attribute table. Therefore, in the attribute
table dialog, you only need to select the
column where your objects’ altitude
values are stored. Clicking on Apply
imports this data into your 3D image.
Fig. 198:
Left – features for working with ESRI
Examples of this 2D imported
Shape Files; Right – dialog for altitude coordinate
points and lines method are shown in
definition in the attribute table.
Figures 199 and 200. Importing gives all
objects in the steel blue predefined colour. If you want to change their visual characteristics, press
the Shapes menu items to give you a prepared window with your imported data, ready for you to
select and edit visual properties. The example dialog for visual adjustment of 3D points is given in
Figure 199. Here, you can set point size and colour. You can define the visual properties of 3D
objects as a single colour as in Figure 199 Left. If you want a combination of colours, choose the
colour palette, and your points are coloured-coordinated with your altitude values (Figure 199
Right). In the same way, you can modify the visual characteristics of the 3D lines as in Figure 200.
Fig. 199:
Example of visual properties adjustment for 3D Points in your model.
Fig. 200:
Example of visual properties adjustment for 3D Lines in your model.
The import of polygon shapes has a specific purpose in Well Plotter 3D. Information about
3D objects, such as buildings, can be stored in this type of shape file.
If you wish to store building shapes in your files, these can only have a maximum of four sides. If
the polygon has more than four edges, only the first four are read and the rest are ignored. You
first prepare two numeric columns in the attribute table for this shape file. In one you store the
altitude of your 3D object’s base in metres above sea level, and the second contains the height of
your object in metres. This prepared file can then be imported into the program. When you choose
your file from the disk, the dialogue in Figure 201 is displayed. Then using the combo boxes you
assign columns from the attribute table to the properties and press the Apply button. The selected
file is now imported into the 3D scene; as in the example in figure 201 Right. Your 3D polygons can
be edited using the built-in dialogs; exactly as you edited previous 3D object types.
Fig. 201:
Left – dialogue to assign the required properties from the attribute table for shape files;
Right – example of rendered 3D polygons.
The last type of file that can be imported into the
program contains grids, and here the program enables you to
read a relatively large number of grids types, including ESRI ASCII
Grid, GeoTiff and USGS ASCII DEM (Fig. 202).
For grid import and management, you use functions
below the last ribbon button. After loading your file, the grid is
displayed in your 3D image as in Figure 203. Each imported grid is
initially rendered in opaque steel-blue colour. You can then
optionally edit them. When you click on the Grid - Grids item in
the ribbon toolbar, Figure 202 dialog listing all imported grid
Fig: 202:
Grid data import
choices appears. Double-clicking on your selection brings up the
options.
next dialog where you can visually adjust your grids.
The window initially resembles Figure 204 Top Right where the dialog has a predefined
palette and combo box. You can then make the visual adjustments to the grid shown in Figure 204.
If you want to change the colour palette, just click on it with your mouse. You have the option of
the following four described display types; One Colour, Wire Frame, Heat Map and Image.
The first display type is One Color. Here, you choose one colour for the entire grid from the colour
palette. An example is shown in Figure 205, where the predefined colour was changed so that
individual wells are visible (transparency property). The second display type in Figure 206 is used
to draw your grid as a Wire Frame in one colour. The third Heat Map grid display is rendered using
the colour palette to define altitude. This mode gives you the option of continuous transition or
sharp colour definition, as shown in Figures 207 and 208.
Fig. 204
Dialog for adjustment of your selected grid’s visual properties.
Fig. 203:
Initial display of imported grid.
Fig. 205:
Color mode.
Fig. 206:
Frame mode.
Example of grid display in Wire
Fig. 207:
Example of 3D grid display using a
continuous coloured heat map for altitude.
Example of grid display in One
Fig. 208:
Example of 3D grid display using a
heat map with colours fringes.
Fig. 209:
Example of a satellite image for
your 3D-grid background.
The last mode is Image. Here, you display the grid’s satellite background image from your
disk, as pictured in Figure 209. The spatial extent of both axes (Xmin, Xmax, Ymin and Ymax) must be
identical in both your grid and image, otherwise the image will be incorrectly displayed.
All possibilities for importing and editing 3D image visual
properties have now been covered. The described functions can be
combined in various ways to get your 3D visualization in its desired
form. You can export this image from program to disk as an image
file by choosing the Export As Image button on the toolbar (Fig.
210).
The exported image can be used in the next step for
Fig. 210:
Command for
3D model export from
producing your final 2D/3D plot, which will be described in following
program to disk as an image
chapter. In addition, Annex 5 shows some examples of 3D scenes
file.
based on real data.
6.3 2D/3D Diagram
2D/3D Diagram is a specific type of visualization for spatial data that you create in Well
Plotter 3D. The result is an
image-file
displaying
selected data in a structured
form. You can create this
visualisation by pressing the
2D / 3D Diagram button
situated under the Home
ribbon toolbar tab (Fig. 211
Left). Pressing this button
gives you the form in Figure
211 Right.
This form helps you
Fig. 211:
Left – function for 2D / 3D Diagram plot display; Right – set the basic characteristics
help form for defining the basic properties in your Diagram plot.
of your visualisation plot.
This includes its size, orientation, background colour, thickness and border line colour. Here you
can also set header and footer visibility. Parameter Resolution (DPI) does not function here as it
does in the 1d-Well-Log and it does not define your final rendering resolution. Here, the DPI only
increases paper size. Clicking on the Create button displays the empty document for your plot
shown in Figure 212.
Fig. 212:
Example of the empty newly-created 2D / 3D Diagram.
This document initially contains only one empty 2D Section, with the option of empty
header and footer areas. The ribbon toolbar is also altered to give contextual tabs designed for
work with the Diagram, as illustrated in Figure 213.
Fig. 213:
Ribbon context tabs for working with the 2D / 3D Diagram.
The functionality of the contextual tabs is very similar to those in the 1D Well Log
described in Chapter 5.4. Work with the basic functions, such as definition and creation of header
and footer areas and setting the visual parameters for the paper and its parts is described in detail
in that chapter; and it works exactly the same here. Therefore, only the features specific for the 2D
/ 3D Diagram are now described. The first difference in functionality is in the ribbon tab called
Body, where you process the Body Area of the plot displaying your data (Fig. 214).
In contrast to the 1D Well
Log, here you can use functions to
define both the number of
columns and the number of rows.
The resulting diagram can be
divided into any number of areas
Fig. 214:
New features in the Body ribbon toolbar tab.
and cells. Figure 215 below
illustrates body area division into
four cells.
You can add graphical
content in these cells by choosing
the last ribbon tab, called Cells
(Fig. 216).
Four types of visual objects
can be added to your diagram.
These are the 2D Geological
Scheme, the Legend for geological
schemes, the Image object, and
the Text Area object. Figure 217
shows addition of these graphical
objects, and the next four subchapters describe your work with
Fig. 215:
Row and column definition in the Body area of the
these objects, beginning with the
Diagram.
2D Geological Scheme.
Fig. 216:
Ribbon tab with features for adding graphical
content to your plot.
Fig. 217:
Example of graphical objects you can add to your Diagram.
6.3.1 The 2D Geological Scheme
Fig. 218:
Functions for working with the 2D
Geological Scheme hidden in the context menu.
Fig. 219:
structure.
Object position set-up in the Body area cell
The initial display of your 2D / 3D
Diagram contains only one empty 2D
Scheme. This Scheme consists of two
axes; the vertical elevation axis and a
horizontal axis for the distance between
wells. Each time you add a new 2D
Geological Scheme, you always start with
an empty rectangle with two axes. To
work with this object, use “features
hidden in the context menu” which is
displayed when you right-click on the
Scheme (Fig. 218).
Using these functions, you can setup all the following for correct 2D Section
display; (1) the Refresh function is used
to redraw the whole 2D Section, (2) the
Delete item deletes your object from the
plot, (3) the Row / Column and Row /
Column Span functions define the
object’s location in the cell structure, as
depicted in Figure 219. Here the object is
moved to the second column and
stretched across two rows, (4) several
menu items following this are used for 2D
Section definition related to the well data
you want rendered, and (5) all the
remaining functions from Size to the end
serve for graphical adjustment of your
entire object. These adjust the size of
your section, the background colour, the
offset from the edges, the horizontal and
vertical alignment, the colour and
thickness of the border line and the
interval for axes label display.
If you want to display selected
wells and 2D Sections in this object, you
use the commands from the central part
of the contextual menu in Figure 220.
The first three menu items in
Figure 220 set-up your 2D Scheme and
the rest display the well data. Clicking on
Sections Definition brings up the
dialogue in Figure 221 where you can
choose individual 2D Sections you want
to display in one Scheme from the list on
the left side. An important condition here
is that the individual sections must follow each other. After your selection, click on the Apply
button and the selected Sections are displayed as a 2D Scheme illustrated in Figure 222. Depending
on the data you import, you can adjust values on the X altitude axis and the program automatically
calculates distances between selected wells on the Y horizontal axis. The position of individual
wells in the final 2D Scheme is displayed as a simple white rectangle with black-coloured border
lines, and the well names are displayed under the scheme.
Fig. 220:
Commands for selected data you can
display in the 2D Scheme.
Fig. 222:
Fig. 221:
sections.
Dialog for selection of individual 2D
Example of 2D Scheme based on selected 2D Sections.
If an individual 2D Section contains both geological strata and a 2D heat map, you can
choose which you want to display using Sections Definition – HeatMaps and Geology. Using these
features, you can set the visibility of these elements and the degree of transparency, as shown in
Figure 223. You can therefore
display either the geological
structure or numerical heat
maps in a 2D Scheme.
Alternatively, these objects can
be combined using different
transparency settings.
The Wells Definition
item in the context menu
allows you to define well data
and related data documents
you want displayed in the 2D
Scheme. Clicking on this item
gives you Figure 224 dialog.
With the Well, Data Type and
Data Set combo boxes, you
must define the exact data that
you want in your 2D Scheme.
You nominate your Well in the
first of these, and Data Types
are automatically loaded. The
third combo box lists individual
data documents for your
selected well. Then, press
Apply, and your selected data is
displayed in the 2D Scheme
shown in Figure 225.
Figure
225
2D
Geological Section has adjusted
transparency to give clear
distinction. These well data
objects have dynamic visibility,
when you adjust them using
the features in their related
context menu which appears
when you right-click on the
object. However, again you
must remember that these
customized adjustments are
inactivated when you press the
Redraw function for the entire
2D Scheme. The example of an
Fig. 223:
Examples of combined views consisting of geological
adjusted geological object is
structure and numerical 2D heat map.
shown in Figure 226. This can
then be edited exactly as for 1D Well Log objects described in Chapters 5.4.5.1 to 5.4.5.9. Figure
227 gives an example of different well data types used in 2D Schemes.
Fig. 224:
Dialogue for well data selection.
Fig. 226:
Example of manually adjusted
geological object in your 2D Scheme.
Fig. 225:
Example of imported geological schemes for individual wells.
Fig. 227:
Example of different well data types used in 2D Schemes.
It may occasionally happen that your viewed
well data extends beyond the vertical altitude axis
(Fig. 228 Left). Alternatively, data may be excised
from the end of the Scheme. Here, the Horizontal
Margin property in the context menu extends the
space before the first well and after the last one to
provide sufficient space to correctly display your well
data (Fig. 228 Right).
.
Fig. 228:
Example of Horizontal Margin
adjustment to correctly display your well data.
6.3.2 Legend
This chapter deals with the display and set-up possibilities for your 2D geological Scheme
Legend in the 2D / 3D Diagram. The Legend object is closely related to your 2D Geological Scheme
objects displayed in the 2D/3D Diagram. It displays labels for individual rocks types used in your 2D
schemes. When you first add this to visualization, it appears empty with only the description label,
as in Figure 229. You must then import your individual items. Exactly as in 2D Schemes, all Legend
features are hidden in the contextual menu (Fig. 229 Right). Using the Delete item removes your
object from visualization.
The Row / Column and Row /
Column Span functions set
the location of the legend in
your grid cell structure. You
can then adjust the width of
the legend items using the
Item Width option. The
following properties in the
context menu are used for
visual adjustments to the
legend. For example, you can
adjust the size of your legend
object, set-up the background
colour
or
adjust
the
Fig. 229:
Left – empty legend after inserting it into the 2D / 3D
Horizontal
and
Vertical
Diagram; Right – context menu functions for working with your legend.
alignment of your object in
the cell. Individual legends items are loaded automatically when you click Refresh in the context
menu. The program automatically scans all 2D Schemes in your current plot and selects all unique
geological indexes. These unique Id’s in all 2D Diagrams are sorted alphabetically by Geo ID
parameters and displayed in the Legend. An example is shown in Figure 230. Because the program
scans all 2D Schemes, it is sufficient to add only one Legend object into the Diagram.
Fig. 230:
Example of a Legend created for your 2D Geological Scheme.
Fig. 231:
Example of direct editing of legend items.
6.3.3 Image
The text content
and legend header can
be manually edited after
they are load into the
legend; as in Figure 231.
Remember again that
manual editing will be
lost, if you press the
Refresh item in the
context menu.
Image objects can also be inserted in
the 2D/3D Diagram (Fig. 232). As in previous
cases, you can modify properties such as the
position of the object and its visual
characteristics using features hidden in the
context menu.
If you want to insert an image from a
computer disk, click Image Source and select
your image in the Open File Dialog. The Stretch
property can then be set to your image to keep
the original size, or to fill all available space
with visual deformation, or it can be stretched
to avoid deformation. An Example of using a
satellite photo to display your area of interest is
given in Figure 232.
Fig. 232:
Example of inserted Image object.
Fig. 233:
Example of a satellite image in your 2D / 3D Diagram.
6.3.4 Text Area
The last type of object that can be embedded in a 2D/3D Diagram is the Text Area, where
you insert all text content. Functions for the content’s location and visual adjustments are hidden
in the context menu shown in Figure 234. This Text Area object completes the description of
possible 2D/3D Diagrams. You can always create quite diverse visualizations using the available
combinations and modifications. An example of an actual visualization prepared in Well Plotter 3D
is shown in Figure 235.
Fig. 234:
Example of Text Area component in your 2D / 3D Diagram.
Fig. 235:
Example of an actual complete 2D / 3D Diagram prepared in Well Plotter 3D.
7 Saving your project
It is often necessary to do your work in stages and store your data on disk for later
continuation. Therefore, the program allows storage of your progressive work. These management
features are found under the Main Ribbon Menu Button in the Project section (Fig. 236). Here you
can open and save your project during interruptions to your work on it.
Fig. 236:
Features for project management.
This program allows you to save your project file with *.wpt extension, so that all data is
stored. Although the current version does not save visualizations in both a Well Log 1D and 2D /
3D Diagram, your project stored in one edition of the program can then be opened in the second
edition. For example, a project created in the 3D Edition can be opened in both the 3D and Basic
Editions of the program.
8 Exporting Visualisations
Completed visualizations can be exported from the program using commands under the
Main Ribbon Menu Button in the Active Plot section (Fig. 237). These commands export your 1D
Well Log and 2D / 3D Diagram visualizations using the Export and Export Visible Part commands.
If you choose the Export option, the whole visualization is exported in your defined size, and if you
choose Export Visible Part, the program only exports the part you see in the document window.
This therefore depends on the extent of your zooming. Examples of these two options are
illustrated in Figures 238 and 239.
Fig. 237:
Features for exporting visualisations from the program.
Fig. 238:
Example of export using the Export command.
Fig. 239:
Example of export using the Export Visible Part command.
9 Conclusion
The previous text completely describes the functionality of Well Plotter software in its two
editions. Reading this manual thoroughly will enable you to fully utilize its functionality and all 1D,
2D and 3D data visualization techniques. The program does not provide absolute control over
rendering, but possibilities for its use are far wider. In addition to this manual, demonstrations of
working with this program and video tutorials clearly illustrating individual parts of its functionality
are available on both the HydroOffice.org website and on YouTube
Since this edition of the program is its first version, this program will continue to evolve. Its
development can be followed on HydroOffice.org in the blogs section. The final Appendix section
describes working with selected specific features of this program.
If you have any queries about the program, any problems with its control or you have any
comments for its improvement, please feel free to contact me in the forum, or directly through
email. I will be grateful for all your responses.
Annex 1 Custom hatch pattern
The manual text informs you how to use more than 500 predefined hatch pattern textures
to fill-in objects in all your technical and geological schemes and in your 2D geological profiles.
However, you can also create your own customized textures using MS Paint. This is a simple
graphics program containing each operating system.
The basis for each texture is as follows; you lay out images side by side, and a resultant
image is created with the same structure. The only difference is its size. An example of this new
texture preparation generated in MS Paint is illustrated in Figure 1. This example has black and
white texture, but you can choose any colours you want.
Fig. 1:
Example of a newly created texture in 15 by 8 pixel size.
If you save your new texture to disk, you can use it directly in this program. Here, you
choose the option to import customized textures in Textures Editor and press the Open button
(Fig. 2). After importing it, your selected texture is used to fill the selected object.
Fig. 2:
Option for customized texture import in the Textures Editor.
An example of texture use is given in Figure 3. Here, an external texture filled the geological
unit. You can thus apply external texture to any object that can be edited in the Textures Editor.
Fig. 3:
Example of customized texture use for filling a geological unit.
Annex 2 1D Heat map
Chapter 5.4.5.4, described options for creating a 2D heat map from numerical data for
depth measurements and time. This type of visualization can also be used to display 1D heat maps
where numerical data is related only to depth measurement.
Fig. 1:
Left – example of a source document prepared for processing in your program; Right –
example of 1D Heat Maps created from your source document.
For example, you can display groundwater
mineralization changes with depth. To create your 1D
Heat Map you use the same data object, but you add
the following innovation. You load depth and
measurement values twice in the source file as series
values below, The first series defines the Y value = 0
and the second series uses the value of Y = 1. You
then import this prepared document into the
program as in Figure 1 Left. Utilizing the Heat Map
Editor as you did for 2D Heat Map formation, you
achieve the result in Figure 1 Right.
You then add this prepared 1D Heat Map to
the 1D Well Log to give the result shown in Figure 2.
Here, you can use continuous or sharp transition
between selected colours from the colour palette;
exactly as you did in your 2D Heat Map creation.
Fig. 2:
1D Heat Map example of
groundwater mineralization changes related to
depth measurement.
Annex 3 Description of your geological scheme
Fig. 1:
Example of geological layers where
the entire text description is not fully visible.
This manual annex covers options in the
Well Plotter program for plotting geological
schemes. If you simultaneously want both a
coloured texture and a view of your geological
unit’s text description, it may occasionally
happen that the text description in some layers
is not fully visible. This aberration is depicted in
Figure 1.
The current version of this program does not allow manual replacement of your geological
legend in geological layers. Therefore, this problem is solved by increasing the size of your
visualization paper or, increasing the geological scheme’s width. If these processes are insufficient,
you can alternatively reduce the font size of your selected item; as shown in Figure 2 Top Left.
A further alternative is to adapt your text label as described in chapter 5.2.8.1. This is
shown in Figure 2 Top Right. Using this document approach allows you to precisely define the
position of each label in your profile without overlap. Here, you can insert your text label object in
the next column, and then adjust its depth as required.
Finally, you can add the Custom Text Column to your plot, as described in section 5.4.5.9.
When this is inserted, you add all your descriptions. Then press the Enter Key and move each item
to its appropriate depth. An example of this method is shown in Figure 2 Bottom Left. These
alternative methods avoid text overlap in your geological scheme.
Fig. 2:
Examples of solutions to text item overlap in your geological scheme (Top Left – font size
decrease; Top Right – using the labels document; Bottom Left – using the Custom Text Area to show text
descriptions.
Annex 4 2D Geological Section defining mixed sand and clay
sediments
Chapter 6.2 described how to
prepare 2D Geological Profiles in this
program. This method is based on gradual
addition of individual geological layers to
your 2D section. Occasionally, your
geological structure may be so complex
that it is impossible to form a profile by
progressively adding individual layers. This
could occur, for example, when a block of
clay sediments has chaotically distributed
lenses and laminas of sandy sediments. In
this case, you generate your 2D profile as
depicted in Figure 1, and described below
it.
Here, you first create a profile
background as one block of homogeneous
sediments (Fig. 1 Top). This basic block of
sediments is selected according to the
density of particular sediments types. You
must always use the most abundant
sediment in the prepared background, and
then add required individual sediment
laminas and lenses (Fig. 1 Bottom). This
example shows addition of chaotically
distributed sandy sediments to a basic
abundant loamy environment. This
procedure will now create all type of 2D
geological profiles; precisely according to
your needs.
Fig. 1:
creation.
Example of complex geological profile
Annex 5 Examples of 1D, 2D and 3D visualisations in Well Plotter
software
This final annex illustrates Well Plotter visualization based on actual data. It depicts drilling
exploration for hydrological assessment in the temporary storage of low-radioactive waste.
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