qfg 200/201 user`s guide - All Categories On Cooper Instruments

qfg 200/201 user`s guide - All Categories On Cooper Instruments
QFG 200/201
USER’S GUIDE
www.cooperinstruments.com
PH: 540-349-4746 • FAX: 540-347-4755
CONTENTS
1.0 INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................... 1
2.0 DESCRIPTION.......................................................................................................... 1
Impact Sensors .......................................................................................................................1
Ring Sensors...........................................................................................................................2
General Purpose – Radial ......................................................................................................2
General Purpose – Axial.........................................................................................................3
Force Links..............................................................................................................................3
Three Component Force Sensors .........................................................................................4
Penetration ..............................................................................................................................4
Miniature/High Sensitivity ......................................................................................................4
3.0 INSTALLATION ........................................................................................................ 5
Force Ring Installation ...........................................................................................................6
Preload Requirements For Force Ring And 3-Component Force Sensors .......................6
4.0 OPERATION ............................................................................................................. 8
Application Of A Force ...........................................................................................................8
Typical System Configuration ...............................................................................................8
5.0 POLARITY ................................................................................................................ 8
6.0 LOW-FREQUENCY MONITORING .......................................................................... 9
7.0 DISCHARGE TIME CONSTANT .............................................................................. 9
Step Function Response......................................................................................................10
8.0 CALIBRATION........................................................................................................ 10
9.0 TROUBLESHOOTING............................................................................................ 10
10.0 MAINTENANCE.................................................................................................... 11
11.0 WARRANTY REPAIR POLICY............................................................................. 11
Limited Warranty On Products ............................................................................................11
Obtaining Service Under Warranty .....................................................................................11
Repair Warranty ....................................................................................................................11
CF 115
ii
18218 rev. D
1.0 INTRODUCTION
Cooper force sensors incorporate a built-in MOSFET microelectronic amplifier. This serves to convert the
high impedance charge output into a low impedance voltage signal for analysis or recording. Cooper
sensors, powered from a separate constant current source, operate over long ordinary coaxial or ribbon
cable without signal degradation. The low impedance voltage signal is not affected by triboelectric cable
noise or environmental contaminants.
Power to operate Cooper sensors is generally in the form of a low cost, 24-27 VDC, 2-20 mA constant
current supply. Figure 1 schematically illustrates a typical Cooper sensor system. Cooper offers a
number of AC or battery-powered, single or multi-channel power/signal conditioners, with or without gain
capabilities for use with force sensors. In addition, many data acquisition systems now incorporate
constant current power for directly powering Cooper sensors. Because static calibration or quasi-static
short-term response lasting up to a few seconds is often required, Cooper manufactures signal
conditioners that provide DC coupling.
Figure 2 summarizes a complete 2-wire Cooper system
configuration.
Typical
Quartz sensor
Output
Cable
Standard
Sensor Cable
Cooper Force
Sensor
Cooper Sensor
Signal Conditioner
Figure 1 - Cooper Sensor System
Schematic
Readout
Device (not
supplied)
Figure 2 - Typical Cooper Sensor System
In addition to ease of operation, Cooper force sensors offer significant advantages over charge mode
types. Because of the low impedance output and solid-state, hermetic construction, Cooper force sensors
are well suited for continuous, unattended force monitoring in harsh factory environments. Also, Cooper
sensor cost-per-channel is substantially lower, since they operate through standard, low-cost coaxial
cable, and do not require expensive charge amplifiers.
Refer to the installation/outline drawing and specification sheet at the front of this manual for details and
dimensions of the particular sensor model number(s) purchased. The following pages give a brief
description of the various sensor series available, recommended mounting procedures, operation and
recommended calibration.
Charge mode versions with high output impedance are also available for higher temperature applications.
These models can also be used for applications where it is desirable to manually set the output range. In
addition to standard products, Cooper has the ability to design and manufacture custom sensors/systems
for specific applications.
If questions arise regarding the operation or characteristics of the force sensor products as outlined in this
manual, feel free to contact an experienced applications engineer from Cooper Instruments toll-free at
800-344-3921.
2.0 DESCRIPTION
Impact Sensors
Series 200 Impact Sensors are designed to measure compression and impact forces from 10 lbs to
50,000 lbs (44.48 N to 22.4 kN). The flat sensing surface is located on the top of the sensor and is
designed to measure force as it is applied axially to the sensor.
CF 115
1
18218 rev. D
As highlighted in Figure 3 compression forces directed against the sensing surface produce a positivegoing output. This force-directed input and corresponding output apply to all charge mode sensors. If
desired, adding the prefix “N” to a model number upon order can indicate polarity reversal.
Figure 3 - Series 200 Impact Sensor
Polyimide film tape covers the cap surface to reduce high frequency ringing associated with metal-tometal impacts. Internal mounting holes with uniform 10-32 threads are prepared on each end of the
sensor. Two mounting studs are supplied.
Versions offering full-scale measurement ranges of 10 lb to 5000 lb compression (45 to 22k N) and 500 lb
(2,200 N) tension are available. For higher ranges, consider the dedicated ring, link, or impact style
sensor configurations.
Applications include matrix print-head studies, drop testing, machinery studies, punching and forming
operations, tensile testing, fatigue testing, fracture analysis, and materials testing.
Ring Sensors
QFG Ring Sensors are designed to measure compression forces from 10 lbs to 100,000 lbs (44.48 N to
444.8k N).
Each sensor is provided with a calibration certificate reflecting the sensitivity of the sensor using the
supplied mounting stud. If the supplied stud cannot be used for installation, Cooper can provide a
custom calibration using the desired bolt for accurate sensitivity readings. Using a different mounting
stud will result in a sensitivity that differs from the original calibration. Refer to Section 3 for
recommended force ring mounting and preload requirements.
Figure 4 - Cooper Ring Force Sensors
General Purpose – Radial
Model QFG 200 General Purpose Sensors are designed to measure compression and impact forces from
10 lbs to 5,000 lbs (44.48 N to 22.24 kN). Tension forces can be measured to 500 lbs. (2.224 kN). A
convex, stainless steel cap with integral 10-32 mounting stud is supplied for impact measurements.
Polyimide film tape covers the cap surface to reduce high frequency ringing associated with metal-tometal impacts.
CF 115
2
18218 rev. D
General Purpose – Axial
Model QFG 201 Axial Sensors provide performance and possess specifications similar to the QFG 200
Sensors. These sensors are designed primarily to measure compression and impact forces from 10 lbs
to 5,000 lbs (44.48 N to 22.24 kN). Tensile forces can be measured to 500 lbs (2.224 kN). The 10-32
axial electrical connector orientation associated with these sensors makes them ideal for installations
where radial space is restricted or where physical connector damage may occur due to the nature of the
specific application. The M7 x 0.75-6g mounting threads may be installed directly into a test structure so
that the 10-32 electrical connector exits from the opposite side of the mounting fixture to prevent potential
damage. This version also uses the cap for impact measurements.
Figure 5 – QFG 200-201 General Purpose Cooper Force Sensors
Force Links
Cooper Link Sensors are designed for measuring compression from 10 lbs to 50,000 lbs (44.48 N to
222.4 kN), and tension forces from 10 lbs to 30,000 lbs (44.48 N to 133.4 kN). A link consists of a
standard Cooper ring sensor, preloaded between two hex end nuts. All hex nuts are internally threaded
for mounting ease. External preloads are not required with these sensors, as they are internally
preloaded during manufacture. Loosening or tightening of the hex nuts will change the internal preload of
the sensor. At this point, the sensitivity provided on the calibration certificate will no longer represent that
of the sensor. If this should occur, refer to the service and repair document for proper information.
CF 115
3
18218 rev. D
Figure 6 – Cooper Force Link Sensor
Three Component Force Sensors
3-Component force sensors are capable of simultaneously measuring force in three orthogonal directions
(X, Y, and Z). They contain three sets of quartz plates that are stacked in a preloaded arrangement.
Each set responds to the vector component of an applied force acting along its sensitive axis. 3Component force sensors must be preloaded for optimum performance and linear operation. Versions
are available with ranges up to 10k lb (45kN) in the Z-axis (perpendicular to the top surface), and up to
4,000 lbs (18kN) in the X and Y (shear) axes.
Cooper designs utilize built-in microelectronic circuitry that provides a low-impedance voltage output via a
multi-pin connector. This arrangement offers system simplicity by requiring only a single multi-conductor
sensor cable. The low impedance voltage signal makes this sensor ideal for use in harsh industrial
environments.
Figure 7 - Cooper 3-Component Force Sensors
Penetration
Penetration style sensors are specifically designed for compression and impact force measurements in
materials testing applications. Smooth, cylindrical housings and curved impact caps avoid cutting through
specimens permitting yield, deformation, and break point measurements of polymers, composites, and
other materials. The axial connector configuration installs into force thruster apparatus and protects the
connector from potential damage. Versions offering full-scale measurements of 100 lb to 5,000 lb (444.8
N to 22.24kN) are available. Tension measurements are possible with units having removable caps.
Figure 8 - Cooper Penetration Force Sensor
Miniature/High Sensitivity
Miniature Sensitivity Sensors permit low amplitude, dynamic compression, tension, and impact force
measurements. A full-scale measurement range of 2.2 lbs (9.79 N) compression and 1 lb (4.45 N)
CF 115
4
18218 rev. D
tension is standard. Two configurations are available, one with a tapped mounting hole and impact cap,
and the other with tapped holes on both ends of the sensor. Link, integrated link, and freestanding
installations are possible.
Axial application of forces is critical during measurements due to the sensitivity to bending moments.
NOTE: Due to its highly sensitive characteristic, miniature/high sensitivity sensors may be susceptible to
thermal drift caused by temperature transients. These sensors are recommended for use in temperature
stable environments only.
Figure 9 - Miniature/High Sensitivity Cooper Force Sensor
3.0 INSTALLATION
CAUTION!
Please read all instructions before attempting to operate this product.
Damage to built-in amplifier due to incorrect power or misapplication is NOT covered by warranty.
Refer to the Installation Drawing supplied with this manual for specific outline dimensions and installation
details for your particular model. The specification is also included to provide details of the sensor’s
characteristic properties.
It is important that the surface to which each sensor is mounted be perfectly flat to avoid flexing of the
base, which could affect sensor sensitivity and result in erroneous data (see Figure 10). A good mating
surface may be obtained by lapping, turning, spotfacing, or surface grinding. Surface flatness should be
held to within 0.001 (TIR) over the entire mating surface. The protective cap should remain on the
connector during installation to prevent contamination or damage.
Correct – flat surface
Incorrect – curved surface
Figure 10 - Force Sensor Installation
A light coating of silicon grease (DC-4 or equivalent) on the mating surface enhances the coupling
between the mounting base and mounting surface and provides the best high-frequency response.
Connect one end of the coaxial cable to the sensor connector and the other end to the XDCR jack on the
signal conditioner. Make sure to tighten the cable connector to the sensor. DO NOT spin the sensor onto
the cable, as this fatigues the cable’s center pin, resulting in a shorted signal and a damaged cable.
CF 115
5
18218 rev. D
For installation in dirty, humid, or rugged environments, it is suggested that the connection be shielded
against dust or moisture with shrink tubing or other protective material. Strain relieving the cable/sensor
connection can also prolong cable life.
Mounting cables to a test structure with tape, clamps, or
adhesives minimizes cable whip. See Figure 11 for an example of a sensor installation with a securely
fastened cable.
Wrong – cable unfastened
Correct – cable fastened
with tape or clamp
Figure 11 - Cable Strain Relief
Force Ring Installation
The sensor is mounted using the supplied mounting stud and pilot bushing. The supplied beryllium
copper stud is elastic so it allows force transmission to the sensor while holding the sensor in place. The
pilot bushing centers the sensor about the mounting stud. After installing the mounting stud in the lower
of the two surfaces, the pilot bushing is threaded over the mounting stud. The sensor is then placed over
the stud and pilot bushing combination. The pilot bushing should fit loosely inside of the sensor inner
diameter, holding it in place. Properly machined holes for the mounting stud will ensure proper vertical
orientation of the sensor. The upper surface should be installed and tightened onto the mounting stud.
Refer to the installation drawing for additional mounting details.
When installing the sensor as an integrated member, it is recommended that the supplied antifriction
washers be used to eliminate the possibility of damage to the sensing surface of the sensor. This type of
damage may occur when imperfections in the mounting surface grind against the sensor surface while
the mounting surfaces are being twisted during installation. Refer to the installation drawing for additional
mounting details.
Preload Requirements For Force Ring And 3-Component Force Sensors
Cooper Force Rings and 3-Component Force Sensors are generally installed between two parts of a test
structure, as shown in Figure 4. During installation, the sensor should be pre-loaded to the amount
specified on the specification sheet using the supplied elastic beryllium-copper stud or customer-supplied
bolt. Preloading in this arrangement ensures that the sensor will perform as calibrated and have good
output linearity at the sensor’s lower operating range.
The stud or bolt holds the structure together and applies preload to the force ring as shown in Figure 12.
In the typical installation, shown on the left in Figure 12, part of the force between the two structures is
shunted through the mounting stud. The amount of force shunted may be up to 5% of the total force for
the beryllium-copper stud supplied with the sensor and up to 50% for steel studs. This typical installation
setup is used by Cooper during standard calibrations.
Another non-typical installation is shown on the right side of Figure 12. In this installation, the stud or bolt
used to apply the preload does not shunt part of the applied force. The plate on top of the sensor has a
clearance hole that the stud or bolt passes through. In this installation, the stud or bolt is not directly
connected to the top plate by its threads, as it is in the typical installation, so it does not shunt any force.
NOTE: If any of the following conditions apply to the preloading of the force ring in the actual
application, the sensitivity and linearity performance of the sensor will not match the standard
Cooper calibration values.
1. Use of a stud or bolt other than the supplied beryllium-copper stud.
2. Use of no stud or bolt.
CF 115
6
18218 rev. D
3. Use of an amount of preload other than the recommended amount.
4. Use of the non-typical installation setup shown below.
In these cases, please contact a Cooper application engineer to discuss your special calibration
requirements.
Typical
Installation
Non-Typical
Installation
Figure 12 – Force Ring Sensor Installations
Cooper in-house calibration procedure requires the installation of a force ring with BeCu stud, in the
typical installation setup above, in series with a NIST traceable reference sensor. Generally, a preload of
20% (full scale operating range of the force ring) is applied before recording of measurement data.
Contact a Cooper application specialist for proper preload requirements. Allow the static component of
the signal to discharge before calibration.
3-component force sensors must be preloaded to achieve proper operation, particularly for the shear x-,
and y-axis. The recommended applied preload for 3-component force sensors is 10 times their x-axis or
y-axis measurement range. This preload provides the sensing crystals with the compressive loading
required to achieve an output in response to shear direction input forces. As with force rings, the
sensitivity achieved from a 3-component force sensor is dependent upon the applied preload and the
elasticity characteristics of the mounting bolt or stud used. If the unit is to be installed with a stud or bolt
other than the supplied elastic, beryllium copper stud, a calibration using the actual mounting hardware
must be preformed. Errors in sensitivity of up to 50% can result by utilizing studs or bolts of different
materials.
When installing Cooper ring and 3-component type sensors, a Cooper signal conditioner with DC
coupling capabilities is recommended to properly monitor sensor output voltage as it corresponds to the
desired preload. A DC-coupled signal conditioner will provide a longer system discharge time constant,
which will result in slower signal decay. When used with a DVM or similar readout device, the installer
can monitor the sensor output voltage directly for correct preloading.
When preloading 3-component type sensors, monitor the output from the Z-axis connector. These
sensors require a preload in the Z-axis that is 10 times their shear range. Some models require this to be
accomplished in steps, not to exceed the usable voltage. To prevent “clipping” of the signal, increments
should not exceed 10 VDC.
Force Ring Models
3-Component Models
Pre-Load (lbs) from 60-20K
Pre-Load (lbs) 5k to 40k
Figure 13-Force Sensor Preload Requirements
CF 115
7
18218 rev. D
4.0 OPERATION
Application Of A Force
For best results, the applied force should be distributed evenly over the contact surface of the sensor.
Care should be taken to limit the bending moment induced into the sensor. This is accomplished by
applying a force to the sensor as close as possible to the center of the sensor. It will not be practical to
limit this induced bending moment if the sensor is used singularly and if it is mounted beneath a thick
plate. In this case, it may be necessary to use an arrangement of two to four sensors in a measuring
platform. Independent sensor output can be monitored or the sensors can be connected electrically in
parallel to measure the resulting summed forces when used in a plate type arrangement.
Typical System Configuration
Sensors with built-in Cooper circuitry require a constant-current excitation voltage for operation. The
enclosed Specification Sheet provides specific power requirements. Required supply voltage is normally
20 to 30 VDC, while the constant current required ranges from 2 to 20 mA.
Cooper standard battery-powered signal conditioners are factory set at 2 mA and may be used to
adequately drive a signal for 100 feet. Cooper line signal supplies are factory set at 4 mA (and adjustable
from 2 to 20 mA), enabling signals to be transmitted over hundreds of feet. It is necessary to supply the
sensor with a 2 to 20 mA constant current at +20 to +30 VDC through a current-regulating diode or
equivalent circuit, contained in all Cooper signal conditioners. See Guide G-0001B for powering and
signal conditioning information pertaining to all Cooper instrumentation.
Most of the signal conditioners manufactured by Cooper have an adjustable current feature allowing a
choice of input currents from 2 to 20 mA. In general, for lowest noise (best resolution), choose the lower
current ranges. When driving long cables (to several thousand feet), use the higher current, up to 20 mA
maximum. Consult the factory to determine if higher current settings are required. Connect the sensor to
the power unit as shown in the typical Cooper sensor systems below. Operation requires the connection
of the force sensor first to a signal conditioner, then to a readout device (oscilloscope, meter, recorder, or
A-to-D board) or to a readout device with built-in Cooper sensor excitation. Tighten the coaxial cable to
the sensor by hand to ensure good electrical contact. Operation requires the connection of the force
sensor first to a signal conditioner, then to a readout device (oscilloscope, meter, recorder, or A-to-D
board) or to a readout device with built-in Cooper sensor excitation. Tighten the coaxial cable to the
sensor by hand to ensure good electrical contact.
Standard Sensor
Cable or Output
Cable
Cooper
Force
Sensor
Standard
Sensor Cable
Cooper Force
Sensor
Readout Device with
Built-in Cooper Sensor
Excitation (not supplied)
Output
Cable
Cooper Sensor
Signal Conditioner
Readout Device
(not supplied)
Figure 14 - Typical Cooper System Configurations
5.0 POLARITY
Compressive forces upon a Cooper force sensor produce a positive-going voltage output. Tensile forces
produce a negative-going voltage output. Sensors with reversed polarity are available upon request.
CF 115
8
18218 rev. D
6.0 LOW-FREQUENCY MONITORING
Force sensors used for applications in short term, steady state monitoring, such as sensor calibration, or
short term, quasistatic testing should be powered by signal conditioners that operate in DC-coupled
mode. Cooper Model QSC 484 Signal Conditioner operates in either AC or DC-coupled mode and may
be supplied with gain features or a zero “clamped” output often necessary in repetitive, positive polarity
pulse train applications.
If you wish to learn more about Cooper sensors, contact Engineering Sales at 1-800-344-3921.
7.0 DISCHARGE TIME CONSTANT
The discharge time constant (DTC) of the entire transduction system from sensor to readout must be
considered when attempting to calibrate a force sensor by static methods. In order to take full advantage
of the long DTC built into the force sensor, it is best to DC couple from the sensor to the readout device.
Several dual-mode Cooper signal conditioners (e.g. QSC 484) use direct coupling techniques to decouple
the output signal from the sensor bias voltage. With the output of the signal conditioner coupled to a DC
readout, such as a digital voltmeter (DVM) or oscilloscope, the time constant of the sensor is not
compromised by AC coupling elsewhere in the system.
When DC coupling to a system, it is important to DC couple the entire system and not just from the
sensor to the signal conditioner. The system time constant is determined by the shortest time constant in
the system. For this reason, the signal conditioner, as well as the readout device, must be DC coupled.
Figure 15 - Characteristic Discharge Time Constant Curve
The discharge time constant represents the decay rate of an input signal. One DTC represents the
amount of time taken for the signal to decay to 37% of the initial peak value. As illustrated in Figure 15,
this is an exponential decay. Approximately five DTC intervals are needed for a peak signal to naturally
decay back to zero.
The rule of thumb for signal discharge, as outlined in Figure 16, is this: for the first 10% of the DTC, the
signal lost is approximately proportional to the time elapsed.
Figure 16 - Step Function Response
CF 115
9
18218 rev. D
Step Function Response
For example, a sensor with a 500-second DTC loses approximately 1% of its output level the first five
seconds (1% of 500) after the application of a steady state force within the measuring range. In this case,
the output reading must be taken within five seconds of the force application for 1% accuracy. If it is
impossible to avoid AC coupling somewhere in the sensing system, try to keep the coupling DTC at least
an order of magnitude longer than the DTC of the force sensor. This avoids compromising the sensor
DTC.
8.0 CALIBRATION
A NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) traceable calibration graph is supplied with each
force sensor certifying its voltage sensitivity (mV/lb). Calibration procedures follow accepted guidelines
as recommended by ANSI (American National Standards Institute), ISA (Instrument Society of America),
and ISO (International Organization for Standardization). These standards provide the establishment and
management of complete calibration systems, thus controlling the accuracy of a sensor’s specifications
by controlling measuring and test equipment accuracy.
9.0 TROUBLESHOOTING
When a Cooper signal conditioner with any of the following indicators are used, turn the power on and
observe the voltmeter (or LED’s) on the front panel.
NORMAL OPERATION
INDICATOR
OPERATION
GREEN (Mid-Scale)
DMV
READING
8 to 14 V
GREEN (Low End)
GREEN (High End)
RED
YELLOW
3 to 7 V
15 to 17 V
0 Volts
24 to 28 V
Proper range for low bias Cooper sensors.
Proper range for high bias Cooper sensors.
Short in the sensor, cable, or connections.
Open circuit in the sensor, cable, or connections.
(Excitation voltage is being monitored.)
Proper range for most Cooper sensors.
Output voltage moves from YELLOW to GREEN slowly until charging is complete. AC coupled signal
conditioners require sufficient time to charge the internal coupling capacitor. Allow signal conditioner to
charge for after 5 discharge time constants for stable operation.
Note: Most Cooper force sensors have an output bias of 8-14 VDC. Refer to the specification sheet in
this manual for the bias range of the model you are using. If you are using a low bias sensor, the
indicator will be at the bottom end of the green portion of the dial indicator, and may even be in the red
portion. This is the expected range and indicates proper operation.
CF 115
10
18218 rev. D
10.0 MAINTENANCE
The sensor connector must be kept clean, especially if it is operating in a dusty and/or wet environment.
Because the force sensor is of welded construction, it should be returned to the factory for servicing in the
event of serious malfunction.
Observe the following precautions in using the sensor:
A. Do not exceed the maximum load levels for the force sensor (see specification sheet).
B. Do not subject the sensor to temperatures exceeding that of the specification, normally 250°F
(121°C).
C. Do not apply voltage to the sensor without current-limiting diodes or other current protection.
D. Do not apply more than 20 mA of current to the force sensor.
E. When mounting the force sensor, observe installation procedures detailed in Section 3.0 and as
outlined on the specific sensor Installation Drawing to avoid overtorquing when mounting.
F. Do not apply more than 30 volts to the sensor.
G. Avoid metal-to-metal impacts during applications, which can produce a high-frequency ringing.
Electrical low-pass filtering or a damping material can help reduce such effects.
H. Do not spin the sensor onto the cable. This may fatigue the cable center pin, causing cable
damage. Always insert the cable pin into the sensor and tighten the knurled cable nut to the
sensor.
11.0 WARRANTY REPAIR POLICY
Limited Warranty On Products
Any Cooper Instruments product which, under normal operating conditions, proves defective in material
or in workmanship within one year of the date of shipment by Cooper will be repaired or replaced free of
charge provided that a return material authorization is obtained from Cooper and the defective product is
sent, transportation charges prepaid, with notice of the defect, and it is established that the product has
been properly installed, maintained, and operated within the limits of rated and normal usage.
Replacement or repaired product will be shipped F.O.B. from our plant. The terms of this warranty do not
extend to any product or part thereof which, under normal usage, has an inherently shorter useful life than
one year. The replacement warranty detailed here is the buyer’s exclusive remedy, and will satisfy all
obligations of Cooper whether based on contract, negligence, or otherwise. Cooper is not responsible for
any incidental or consequential loss or damage which might result from a failure of any and all other
warranties, express or implied, including implied warranty of merchantability or fitness for particular
purpose. Any unauthorized disassembly or attempt to repair voids this warranty.
Obtaining Service Under Warranty
Advance authorization is required prior to the return to Cooper Instruments. Before returning the item,
contact the Repair Department c/o Cooper Instruments at (540) 349-4746 for a Return Material
Authorization number. Shipment to Cooper shall be at buyer’s expense and repaired or replacement
items will be shipped F.O.B. from our plant in Warrenton, Virginia. Non-verified problems or defects may
be subject to a $100 evaluation charge. Please return the original calibration data with the unit.
Repair Warranty
All repairs of Cooper products are warranted for a period of 90 days from date of shipment. This warranty
applies only to those items that were found defective and repaired; it does not apply to products in which
no defect was found and returned as is or merely recalibrated. It may be possible for out-of-warranty
products to be returned to the exact original specifications or dimensions.
CF 115
11
18218 rev. D
* Technical description of the defect: In order to properly repair a product, it is absolutely necessary for
Cooper to receive information specifying the reason the product is being returned. Specific test data,
written observations on the failure and the specific corrective action you require are needed.
CF 115
12
18218 rev. D
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement