Game Summary
Saturday, August 10, 2013
Game Summary
6 nimmt!
2 - 10
45
8+
1994
396
6.88
5
1.2 (Light)
Card Game
Hand Management, Simultaneous Action Selection
In 6 nimmt!, a.k.a. Category 5 and many other names, you want to score as few points as possible.
To play the game, you shuffle the 104 number cards, lay out four cards face-up to start the four rows, then deal ten cards to each
player. Each turn, players simultaneously choose and reveal a card from their hand, then add the cards to the rows, with cards
being placed in ascending order based on their number; specifically, each card is placed in the row that ends with the highest
number that's below the card's number. When the sixth card is placed in a row, the owner of that card claims the other five cards
and the sixth card becomes the first card in a new row.
In addition to a number from 1 to 104, each card has a point value. After finishing ten rounds, players tally their score and see
whether the game ends. (Category 5 ends when a player has a score greater than 74, for example, while 6 nimmt! ends when
someone tops 66.) When this happens, the player with the fewest points wins!
6 nimmt! works with 2-10 players, and the dynamics of gameplay change the more players that you have. One variant for the
game has you use 34 cards, 44 cards, 54 cards, etc. (instead of all 104 cards) when you have three, four, five, etc. number of
players. This change allows you to know which cards are in play, thereby allowing you to track which cards have been played
and (theoretically) make better choices as to which card to play when.
Page 1 of 187
7 Wonders
2-8
30
10+
2010
14
7.93
9
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Ancient, Card Game, Civilization
Card Drafting, Set Collection, Simultaneous Action Selection, Variable Player Powers
7 Wonders: Leaders
2011
7.9
7 Wonders: Cities
2012
8.0
7 Wonders: Wonder Pack
2013
7.7
You are the leader of one of the 7 great cities of the Ancient World. Gather resources, develop commercial routes and affirm
your military supremacy. Build your city and erect an architectural wonder which will transcend future times.
7 Wonders lasts three ages. In each age, players receive seven cards from a particular deck, choose one of those cards, then pass
the remainder to an adjacent player, as in Fairy Tale or a Magic: the Gathering booster draft. Players reveal their cards
simultaneously, paying resources if needed or collecting resources or interacting with other players in various ways. (Players
have individual boards with special powers on which to organize their cards, and the boards are double-sided as in Bauza's
Ghost Stories.) Each player then chooses another card from the deck they were passed, and the process repeats until players
have six cards in play from that age. After three ages, the game ends.
In essence 7 Wonders is a card development game along the lines of Race for the Galaxy or Dominion. Some cards have
immediate effects, while others provide bonuses or upgrades later in the game. Some cards provide discounts on future
purchases. Some provide military strength to overpower your neighbors and others give nothing but victory points. Unlike
Magic or Fairy Tale, however, each card is played immediately after being drafted, so you'll know which cards your neighbor is
receiving and how his choices might affect what you've already built up. Cards are passed left-right-left over the three ages, so
you need to keep an eye on the neighbors in both directions.
Though the box of earlier editions is listed as being for 3-7 players, there is an official 2-player variant included in the
instructions.
Page 2 of 187
Acquire
3-6
90
12+
1962
112
7.41
4
2.5 (Medium)
Economic
Hand Management, Stock Holding, Tile Placement
This Sid Sackson classic has taken many different forms over the years depending on the publisher. Each player strategically
invests in businesses, trying to retain a majority of stock. As the businesses grow with tile placements, they also start merging,
giving the majority stockholders of the acquired business sizable bonuses, which can then be used to reinvest into other chains.
All of the investors in the acquired company can then cash in their stocks for current value or trade them 2-for-1 for shares of
the newer, larger business. The game is a race to acquire the greatest wealth.
Some versions of the 3M bookshelf edition included rules for a 2-player variant.
The original version is part of the 3M Bookshelf Series.
Page 3 of 187
Adel Verpflichtet
2-6
45
12+
1990
727
6.58
7
1.8 (Medium/Light)
Bluffing
Rock-Paper-Scissors, Set Collection, Simultaneous Action Selection
What do bored English noblemen do with their free time? Well, according to this Klaus Teuber Spiel des Jahres (1990) winner,
they like collecting old junk and then showing it off. Players buy or steal various pieces of junk in the form of cards, trying to
form the largest and oldest collection. Built on a 'rock-paper-scissors' mechanism, this game gives all players a couple of
choices each turn. The trick is in guessing what your opponents are likely to do, and planning your choice accordingly -- only
after everyone's decision is revealed do you know for certain whether you made the right one.
Note: Hoity Toity (Uberplay, 2004) is for 3 to 6 players.
Page 4 of 187
Agricola
1-5
120
2
8.23
12+
2007
3.6 (Medium/Heavy)
Economic, Farming
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Worker Placement
Description from BoardgameNews
In Agricola, you're a farmer in a wooden shack with your spouse and little else. On a turn, you get to take only two actions, one
for you and one for the spouse, from all the possibilities you'll find on a farm: collecting clay, wood, or stone; building fences;
and so on. You might think about having kids in order to get more work accomplished, but first you need to expand your house.
And what are you going to feed all the little rugrats?
The game supports many levels of complexity, mainly through the use (or non-use) of two of its main types of cards, Minor
Improvements and Occupations. In the beginner's version (called the Family Variant in the U.S. release), these cards are not
used at all. For advanced play, the U.S. release includes three levels of both types of cards; Basic (E-deck), Interactive (I-deck),
and Complex (K-deck), and the rulebook encourages players to experiment with the various decks and mixtures thereof.
Aftermarket decks such as the Z-Deck and the L-Deck also exist.
Agricola is a turn-based game. There are 14 game rounds occurring in 6 stages, with a Harvest at the end of each stage (after
Rounds 4, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 14).
Each player starts with two playing tokens (farmer and spouse) and thus can take two turns, or actions, per round. There are
multiple options, and while the game progresses, you'll have more and more: first thing in a round, a new action card is flipped
over.
Problem: Each action can be taken by one player each round, so it's important to do some things with high preference.
Each player also starts with a hand of 7 Occupation cards (of more than 160 total) and 7 Minor Improvement cards (of more
than 140 total) that he/she may use during the game if they fit in his/her strategy. Speaking of which, there are countless
strategies, some depending on your card hand. Sometimes it's a good choice to stay on course, and sometimes it is better to react
to your opponents' actions.
Page 5 of 187
Agricola: All Creatures Big and Small
2
30
137
7.63
13+
2012
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Animals, Farming
Tile Placement, Worker Placement
Agricola: All Creatures Big and Small is a new take on Uwe Rosenberg's Agricola designed for exactly two players and focused
only on the animal husbandry aspect of that game. So long plows and veggies!
In Agricola: All Creatures Big and Small, you become an animal breeder of horses, cows, sheep and pigs and try to make the
most of your pastures. Players start with a 3x2 game board that can be expanded during play to give more room for players to
grow and animals to run free. Sixteen possible actions are available for players to take, with each player taking three actions
total in each of the eight rounds.
The player who amasses the most victory points through enclosing space with fences and acquiring the largest number and
variety of animals and victory point-generating buildings will be the winner.
Four Standard Buildings and 4 special buildings are available in the base game. These buildings each provide unique special
abilities during play and/or VP at game end. Balancing the tension between building infrastructure (fenced pastures and
buildings) and acquiring animals (the single biggest source of end-game scoring) is the key to success!
Page 6 of 187
Airlines Europe
2-5
75
185
7.43
10+
2011
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Aviation / Flight, Economic
Route/Network Building, Set Collection, Stock Holding
Before Ticket to Ride, before Santa Fe Rails, before Union Pacific – yet after Acquire – there was Airlines, one
of the earliest published games from designer Alan R. Moon and publisher ABACUSSPIELE.
More than two decades after the publication of that game, Moon and ABACUSSPIELE present Airlines Europe, the design of
which Moon began in 2007. According to the publisher, "He wanted to preserve the feel of the original game and its successor,
Union Pacific, while confronting the player with even more exciting choices." The result of that redesign process is Airlines
Europe, featuring a reduced playing time, a new point structure, a European setting, and 112 tiny detailed airplanes.
At its heart, Airlines Europe is a stock game, with players earning points for the stock they hold in particular airline companies
when one of the randomly determined scorings takes place. On a player's turn, that player either expands an airline and claims a
stock, plays stock onto the board and receives dividend, invests in a special airline called Air ABACUS or gets a certain amount
of money from the bank. A player scores only for stock in play, but the value of an airline is determined by the value of the
route licenses that airline owns – thus, you're torn in terms of what to play when.
Some changes compared to Airlines:
map of Europe
no flight cards
special Air ABACUS airline similar to the Union Pacific
share track system
separate victory point and money systems
airplane miniatures
no sabotage
up to 5 players
reduced playtime
Some changes compared to Union Pacific:
airplane theme
map of Europe
no track cards
Air ABACUS is acquired by trading in other shares
share track system
separate victory point and money systems
up to 5 players
reduced playtime
Re-implements:
Airlines
Union Pacific
Promo Expansions:
Airlines Europe: Flight Ban (adding the option to block routes)
Airlines Europe: New Bonus Connections (adding bonus connections for the black and the brown airline)
Airlines Europe: The Presidents (adds tie breaker for stock payouts)
Page 7 of 187
Alhambra
2-6
60
8+
2003
277
7.05
8
2.1 (Medium/Light)
City Building
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Set Collection, Tile Placement
Granada, 1278. At the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountains, one of the most exciting and interesting project of the Spanish
Middle Ages begins: the construction of the ALHAMBRA.
The best master builders in the whole of Europe and Arabia want to demonstrate their skill. Employ the most suitable teams of
builders and make sure that you always have enough of the right currency. Because no matter whether they are stonemasons
from the north or horticulturalists from the south, they all want a proper wage and insist on their "native" currency. With their
help towers can be constructed, gardens laid out, pavilions and arcades erected and seraglios and chambers built.
In Alhambra, players are acquiring buildings to be placed within their Alhambra complex.
The money in Alhambra comes in four different currencies and is available in the open money market. The 54 buildings of six
types become available for purchase in the building market four at a time; one building is available in each of the four different
currencies. On a player's turn, a player may 1) take money from the open money market, 2) purchase a building from the
building market and either place it in his Alhambra or reserve, or 3) engage in construction and re-construction projects with
buildings that have been placed in the player's Alhambra or reserve. The game rewards efficiency, as when a player purchases a
building from the market for the exact amount of money, the player may take another turn.
Players with the most buildings in each of the six building types in his Alhambra score in each of the scoring phases, and points
are awarded for players' longest external "wall" section within their complex. The game ends when the building market can no
longer be replenished from the building tile supply, and there is a final scoring, whereupon the player with the highest score
wins.
Integrates with:
Alhambra: The Dice Game (a variant in which you can combine Alhambra buildings with Alhambra dice.)
Page 8 of 187
Amun-Re
3-5
90
12+
2003
120
7.42
7
3.1 (Medium)
Ancient, Farming
Auction/Bidding
Everyone knows of the pyramids on the Nile - eternal monuments of a powerful and beautiful culture, that can still take our
breath away. The pharaohs choose their sites, build their pyramids, and thank Amun Re and the other Gods for their bounty.
Each player wants, as pharaoh, to build the most pyramids. To accomplish this, he must first acquire a province, where he can
trade and farm. With his profits, he can buy new provinces and building stones to erect pyramids. For all his actions, the player
must make clever use of his power cards, and always offer appropriate sacrifices to Amun Re. Players must always keep his
eyes on his goal of the building of the eternal pyramids or risk falling behind in points.
Page 9 of 187
Android: Netrunner
2
45
5
8.45
14+
2012
3.2 (Medium)
Bluffing, Card Game, Science Fiction
Hand Management, Secret Unit Deployment, Take That, Variable Player Powers
Game description from the publisher
Welcome to New Angeles, home of the Beanstalk. From our branch offices in this monument of human achievement, NBN
proudly broadcasts all your favorite media programming. We offer fully comprehensive streaming in music and threedee, news
and sitcoms, classic movies and sensies. We cover it all. Ours is a brave new age, and as humanity hurtles into space and the
future with an astonishing series of new advances every day, NBN and our affiliates are keeping pace, bringing you all the vid
that's fit to view.
Android: Netrunner is an asymmetrical Living Card Game for two players. Set in the cyberpunk future of Android and
Infiltration, the game pits a megacorporation and its massive resources against the subversive talents of lone runners.
Corporations seek to score agendas by advancing them. Doing so takes time and credits. To buy the time and earn the credits
they need, they must secure their servers and data forts with "ice". These security programs come in different varieties, from
simple barriers, to code gates and aggressive sentries. They serve as the corporation's virtual eyes, ears, and machine guns on
the sprawling information superhighways of the network.
In turn, runners need to spend their time and credits acquiring a sufficient wealth of resources, purchasing the necessary
hardware, and developing suitably powerful ice-breaker programs to hack past corporate security measures. Their jobs are
always a little desperate, driven by tight timelines, and shrouded in mystery. When a runner jacks-in and starts a run at a
corporate server, he risks having his best programs trashed or being caught by a trace program and left vulnerable to corporate
countermeasures. It's not uncommon for an unprepared runner to fail to bypass a nasty sentry and suffer massive brain damage
as a result. Even if a runner gets through a data fort's defenses, there's no telling what it holds. Sometimes, the runner finds
something of value. Sometimes, the best he can do is work to trash whatever the corporation was developing.
The first player to seven points wins the game, but not likely before he suffers some brain damage or bad publicity.
Page 10 of 187
Apples to Apples
4 - 10
30
12+
1999
1189
6.28
4
1.2 (Light)
Card Game, Humor, Party Game, Word Game
Hand Management, Simultaneous Action Selection
Apples to Apples consists only of two decks of cards: Things and Descriptions. Each turn, a player (referee) selects a
Description card and the other players try to pick, from the Things cards in their hands, the Things that best match that
Description.
The player (referee) then chooses the Thing card that appeals most to them and awards the card to the player who played it. The
referee player role is then passed to the next player.
Once a player has won a pre-determined number of Thing cards, that player wins.
Page 11 of 187
Asara
2-4
45
459
7.12
9+
2010
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Fantasy, Medieval
Hand Management, Pattern Building, Worker Placement
In Asara, you take on the role of a wealthy builder competing to bring the most prestige to your name through constructing the
largest and most ornate towers in the city. The game is played over 4 rounds (years), during which you will be acquiring the
pieces for your towers and assembling them.
Players are given a hand of cards with different colors. On their turn, players play a card from their hand to an action space on
the board. These spaces allow players to acquire tower pieces, get money, build a portion of their towers, etc. Once a card has
been played in one of the action spaces on the board, all subsequent cards played in that area have to follow the original card's
color. Turns continue around the table until all players are out of cards for that round.
Scoring happens at the end of each round based on the number of towers a player has and the ornamentation present on those
towers. After the scoring at the end of round 4, a final scoring occurs and bonus prestige points are given to the players with the
largest towers of each color, the most towers, and the largest tower overall. The player with the most prestige points is the
winner.
Page 12 of 187
Assyria
2-4
60
610
7.06
12+
2009
3.0 (Medium)
Ancient, Civilization
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Worker Placement
In Assyria, each player will lead a tribe through the desert. The goal of each tribe is to survive (by gathering food cards) and to
build wells and ziggurats. The game spans over three reigns, with a flood in between each reign. As usual, there will be many
different strategies and many ways to score points!
Page 13 of 187
Augustus
2-6
30
8+
2013
896
6.93
6
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Ancient, Card Game
Card Drafting, Set Collection
In Augustus, you will vie with your fellow players to complete "objective" cards for special powers and ultimately for victory
points. Each card has 2-6 symbols which you must populate with legionnaire meeples in order to complete the card. These
symbols are drawn one at a time from a bag, with all player gaining the benefit equally, but interestingly, there are more of
some symbols than others.
So the pivotal skill you'll deploy is in making your choice of which three objectives you'll start the game with (you're dealt six) - balancing potential difficulty of completion against value of the reward -- and then which of five available objectives you'll
add to your plate each time you complete one of your three. The game ends when someone completes seven. So there's real
strategy but the game is still ruled by luck of the draw.
Beautifully illustrated, about 30 minutes to play, and already a favorite for many families, Augustus is one of the nominees for
the 2013 Spiele des Jahres.
Page 14 of 187
Automobile
3-5
120
130
7.48
12+
2009
3.5 (Medium/Heavy)
Economic, Industry / Manufacturing
Commodity Speculation
Automobile is a 3-5 player game that bears a modern setting when compared to most of Wallace's releases. Players are
competing in the U.S. auto industry in the early 20th century, purchasing factories that turn out low-, medium- and high-valued
vehicles, starting with the 1893 Duryea and moving through history from there.
Each player knows a portion of the market demand each round and must make his purchasing and manufacturing decisions
based on the information. Players can fund distributors across the country, but if they don't supply distributors with vehicles to
sell, they go bankrupt, taking your investment with them. Alternatively, players can drop the prices on their cars to move their
market share, or even temporarily improve sales rates at the cost of research. Special action spaces are available that give a
player a one-turn special ability with the actions provided by Ford, Durant, Kettering, and others some what related to their
actual business history.
As newer models make their way onto the market, they sell at the expense of the older models. Older factories give inefficiency
cubes as time passes, encouraging you to keep pace with technology.
To get money, you need to build cars with your factories, but if you build more than there is demand theylose not only the
money spend to make them, but gain inefficiency cubes that hurt them for the rest of the game. Whoever manages their car
factories the best over this 120-150 minute game will win.
Page 15 of 187
Balloon Cup
2
30
524
6.74
8+
2003
1.5 (Light)
Aviation / Flight, Card Game
Hand Management, Set Collection
In Balloon Cup, the players compete in several short balloon flights (hops) to collect the colored cubes associated with each
hop. Four landscape cards – two plains alternating with two mountains – are laid out, and 1, 2, 3, or 4 cubes in
assorted colors (gray, blue, green, yellow, red) are added to these cards. From a hand of eight balloon cards, you must try to
pass each landscape by adding cards matching the colored blocks onto their side of table, although winds (and cunning) may
occasionally cause them to play on their opponent's side – a move that can really ruin the opponent's plans.
High-valued balloons are played on the mountains, and low-valued balloons are played on the plains. Whoever is the better
balloonist takes the cubes from the card, which is then flipped over – mountains becomes plains and vice-versa –
and refilled with cubes. Five trophy cards of value 3 to 7 are placed at the top of the cards. When a player has collected enough
cubes of a given color, he earns the trophy card for that color. Players may even trade three otherwise useless cubes for one they
can use. The first player to earn three trophy cards is the winner!
Page 16 of 187
Battle Line
2
30
12+
2000
102
7.45
7
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Ancient, Card Game
Hand Management, Set Collection
Two opponents face off across a 'battle line' and attempt to win the battle by taking 5 of 9 flags or 3 adjacent flags. Flags are
decided by placing cards into 3 card poker-type hands on either side of the flag (similar to straight flush, 3 of a kind, straight,
flush, etc). The side with the highest 'formation' of cards wins the flag.
This is a rethemed version of Schotten-Totten with different graphics and wooden flag bits in place of the boundary stone cards.
Game play is identical, except the cards run from 1 to 10 (not 9), you hold seven cards in your hand (not 6), and the rule that
stones may only be claimed at the start of your turn is presented as an "advanced variant". Also the tactics cards were introduced
by Battle Line; these cards were only added to later editions of Schotten-Totten.
Some have reported that the production quality of the cards is inferior to the Schotten-Totten cards, however, for most readers
Battle Line will be much easier to find in stores. In the second edition of GMT's Battle Line the card quality is higher.
Page 17 of 187
Beep! Beep!
2-6
5
8+
2008
4831
5.81
3
1.0 (Light)
Action / Dexterity, Animals, Card Game, Children's Game, Real-time
Pattern Recognition, Set Collection
Beep! Beep! Is a fast paced game of driving through a forest and swerving to miss the wildlife.
The game consists of a small rubber squeaky car and 112 cards each with an animal in a particular color on it. Players
simultaneously try to match either the animal OR the color to those they have already avoided. When three of the same color or
animal appear at the same time, hit the squeaky car to Beep! Beep! your horn and get them out of the way.
The player who avoids the most animals wins.
Publisher blurb:
Save the animals from the squeaky red car! Collect matching animals or colors, and be quick, because you all act at the same
time! But take care to see whether in the middle of the table there are three identical animals or colors - then quickly squeeze the
red car and win bonus points. Who can save the most animals and squeeze the most bonus points wins the game.
Page 18 of 187
Biblios
2-4
30
303
7.14
10+
2007
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Dice, Medieval, Religious
Auction/Bidding, Card Drafting, Hand Management, Set Collection
info from the designer's website
THE GAME CONCEPT
You are an abbot of a medieval monastery competing with other abbots to amass the greatest library of sacred books. To do so,
you need to have both the workers and resources to run a well-functioning scriptorium. To acquire workers and resources, you
use a limited supply of donated gold. In addition, you must be on good terms with the powerful bishop, who can help you in
your quest.
OUTLINE OF GAME PLAY
The object of the game is to score the most Victory Points. You win Victory Points by winning any of the 5 categories:
Illuminators, Scribes, Manuscripts, Scrolls, and Supplies. You win a category by having the highest total number of workers
(Scribes, Illuminators) or resources (Manuscripts, Scrolls, Supplies) in that category. This is determined by the numbers in the
upper left corner on the cards. At the start of the game, each category is worth 3 Victory Points. As the game progresses, the
values on the Value Board will change and some categories will become worth more or less Victory Points than others. The
game is divided into 2 stages: a Donation stage and an Auction stage. During the Donation stage, players acquire free cards
according to an established plan. In the Auction stage, players purchase cards in auction rounds. After the two stages, winners of
each category are determined and Victory Points awarded. The player with the most Victory Points wins.
GAME CHARACTERISTICS
The game involves a good deal of strategic planning, some bluffing, and a little bit of luck. The rules are easy to understand, but
you have to play it a few times to develop a playing strategy. It plays differently from 2-4 players, but each game is equally fun
and challenging.
Page 19 of 187
Bohnanza
2-7
45
13+
1997
234
7.11
4
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Farming, Negotiation
Hand Management, Set Collection, Trading
Bohnanza is the first in the Bohnanza family of games and has been published in several different editions.
As card games go, this one is quite revolutionary. Perhaps its oddest feature is that you cannot rearrange your hand, as you need
to play the cards in the order that you draw them. The cards are colorful depictions of beans in various descriptive poses, and
the object is to make coins by planting fields (sets) of these beans and then harvesting them. To help players match their cards
up, the game features extensive trading and deal making.
The original German edition supports 3-5 players.
The newest English version is from Rio Grande Games and it comes with the first edition of the first German expansion
included in a slightly oversized box. One difference in the contents, however, is that bean #22's Weinbrandbohne (Brandy
Bean) was replaced by the Wachsbohne, or Wax Bean. This edition includes rules for up to seven players, like the
Erweiterungs-Set, but also adapts the two-player rules of Al Cabohne in order to allow two people to play Bohnanza.
Note: As mentioned above, the Rio Grande Games edition supports more players than the Amigo release, and also sports twoplayer rules. You should keep that in mind when perusing the ratings.
Page 20 of 187
Bombay
2-5
45
1160
6.51
10+
2009
2.0 (Medium/Light)
Economic, Transportation
Action Point Allowance System, Pick-up and Deliver, Point to Point Movement, Set Collection
Bombay sees the players take on the role of Merchants in the land of India. In this pick-up and deliver game the players seek to
acquire goods at trading posts and deliver them to the cities where they are in demand. Of course they must do so on Elephant
back and along the way they can build Palaces, which can earn them riches should the opposition be forced to travel through
them.
Driving the play, each player must make use of a limited number of Action Points each turn. Visiting each city earns a City
Token and having 3 or 4 of these earns rupees. Rupees are also earned for building palaces and collecting client tokens over the
course of the game. The players with the best 3 totals also earn rupees and the most rupees gained at the end of the game
determines the winner.
During the game the players will acquire goods which they will try to resell at the best price in four cities. Each type of good
has its own market where the prices of the goods will fluctuate. To transport their goods, each player owns a charming elephant
able to transport up to two bundles.
Up to now Bombay will be one of Ystari's lightest games.
It's the third game of author Cyril Demaegd. Illustrations are by Stéphane Poinsot.
Page 21 of 187
Bora Bora
2-4
90
12+
2013
146
7.88
7
3.7 (Medium/Heavy)
Dice
Dice Rolling, Set Collection, Worker Placement
Stake your fortunes in the mysterious island world of Bora Bora. Journey across islands, building huts where the resilient men
and women of your tribes can settle, discovering fishing grounds and collecting shells. Send priests to the temples, and gather
offerings to curry favor with the gods.
In Bora Bora, players use dice to perform a variety of actions using careful insight and tactical planning. The heart of the game
is its action resolution system in which 5-7 actions are available each round, the exact number depending on the number of
players. Each player rolls three dice at the start of the round, then they take turns placing one die at a time on one action. Place a
high number on an action, and you'll generally get a better version of that action: more places to build, more choices of people
to take, better positioning on the temple track, and so on. Place a low number and you'll get a worse action – but you'll
possibly block other players from taking the action at all as in order to take an action you must place a die on it with a lower
number than any die already on the action.
Three task tiles on a player's individual game board provide some direction as to what he might want to do, while god tiles
allow for special actions and rule-breaking, as gods are wont to do. The player who best watches how the game develops and
uses the most effective strategy will prevail.
Page 22 of 187
Botswana
2-5
30
8+
1994
778
6.62
5
1.3 (Light)
Animals, Card Game
Stock Holding
This game was originally published by AMIGO Spiel + Freizeit GmbH as Flinke Pinke. This game is one of those 'painfully
simple' Reiner Knizia games. There are five different colored chips, with six cards, zero through five, in each of the colors. The
cards are dealt out, and then players take turns playing a card and taking any available chip. When one color has all six cards
played on it, then the game is over, and players use the last card played in each category to value their chips. The highest total
value wins.
Description of 1994 Milton Bradley re-issue Quandary, for 2-4 players:
A game of placement, shares and nerve by Reiner Knizia, this is a lovely edition with nice, heavy tiles akin to Mah-jong pieces
in weight and feel. Players in turn lay numbered pieces on tracks curling to the centre, and then take a share in any colour. The
round ends when a track is filled. Scoring is based on your total share multiplied by the value of the final tile played on each
track. So if you are collecting blue shares, I'll try and lay a blue 1 as near last as possible. Then you'll want to play a blue 5 to
raise your possible score, but must take a share in a different colour. Same game, different production.
Description of 2003 Fantasy Flight Games re-issue, Loco!, for 2-4 players:
Here is the FOURTH version of the game that was originally Flinke Pinke only this time, the added "rule" is that whenever you
play a card with a value of "0", you must say "Loco!" aloud or forfeit your opportunity to select one of the colored chips. Apart
from that, the game is identical.
Description of 2010 Gryphon Games games re-issue, Botswana, for 2-5 players:
This fifth version of the game adds a safari theme. Rules and gameplay are unchanged from the original version (no rules about
animal noises), but the chips are replaced by plastic animal figures and the cards are covered in matching animal fur patterns.
Re-implemented by:
Thor
Page 23 of 187
Brass
3-4
120
11
8.06
13+
2007
3.9 (Medium/Heavy)
Economic, Industry / Manufacturing, Transportation
Hand Management, Route/Network Building
In Brass the players represent industrialists in northern England during the hey-day of the industrial revolution. Each player
needs to build an economic engine that surpasses the other by the time railways are established and the foreign markets have
been saturated with english cotton.
The goal of the game is to have the most points at the end of the game. These are obtained in three ways:
1) Building industries and having them successfully utilized
2)Building canal or rail connections to cities that have many successfully utilized industries
3) money at the end of the game (very inefficient).
Game play is divided into two phases - the Canal Phase and the Rail Phase. At the beginning of each phase players are dealt a
hand of cards that represent a mix of the cities and the available industries.
On his turn, a player has two actions (except first turn of the game where there is only one action) and must spend a card for
each one. Available actions include:
1) building an industry
2) building a connection [either canals or rails based on phase of the game]
3) develop their own industries which removes lower victory point industries from a player's board in favor of higher victory
point ones
4) sell cotton
5) take a loan (absolutely necessary a few times a game.
At the end of a player's turn they replace the two cards they played with two more from the deck. Turn order is determined by
how much money a player spent on the previous turn - from lowest spent first to highest spent. This turn order mechanic opens
some strategic options for players going later in the turn order allowing possibility of back-to-back turns.
After all the cards have been played the first time (deck size adjusted for number of players) the Canal phase ends and a scoring
round commences. After scoring, all canals and all of the lowest level industries are removed for the game, new cards are dealt
and the Rail Phase begins. Rail phase is identical to Canal Phase except players may now occupy more than one location in a
city and a double connection build (though expensive) is possible. At the end of the Rail Phase there is another scoring round
and a winner is crowned.
The use of the cards limit where you can build your industries but any card can be used for the develop, sell cotton or building
connections actions. This leads to a strategic timing/storing of cards. Resources are common so that if one player builds a rail
line (which requires coal) they have to use the coal from the nearest source which may be an opponent's coal mine which gets
that coal mine closer to scoring (i.e. being utilized).
[Side Note]
Brass provides a game of timing and positioning yourself to have your opponents propel you victory. The rule book is
notorious for being difficult to understand. After a few turns the game reveals itself to being far more simple than the rules
suggest. A teacher or viewing a how to play video is definitely worth the time.
Page 24 of 187
Campaign Manager 2008
2
50
574
6.86
10+
2009
2.2 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Educational, Political
Area Control / Area Influence, Card Drafting, Dice Rolling, Hand Management, Simulation
Campaign Manager 2008 challenges players to develop a winning political strategy within the tumultuous context of the 2008
presidential campaign. Employing a new take on card driven game systems, each player will create a unique deck that
represents their advice to their candidate. The players will struggle to influence voters in the critical swing states from this
election, while targeting key constituencies that just might put them over the top. Players will try to define the key issue in the
states. Will McCain dominate the national security debate, or can Obama play on people's fears over the economy? As the
campaign manager of a national presidential campaign, you will either identify the road to the White House, or the road to
irrelevance.
Online Play
Yucata (turn-based)
Page 25 of 187
Can't Stop
2-4
30
7+
1980
407
6.87
4
1.2 (Light)
Dice
Dice Rolling, Press Your Luck
In this Sid Sackson classic, players must press their luck with dice and choose combinations tactically to close out three
columns. The board has one column for each possible total of two six-sided dice, but the number of spaces in each column
varies: the more probable a total, the more spaces in that column and the more rolls it takes to complete. On their turn, a player
rolls four dice and arranges them in duos: 1 4 5 6 can become 1+4 and 5+6 for 5 & 11, 1+5 and 4+6 for 6 & 10, or 1+6 and 4+5
for 7 & 9. The player places or advances progress markers in the open column(s) associated with their chosen totals, then
chooses whether to roll again or end their turn and replace the progress markers with markers of their color. A player can only
advance three different columns in a turn and cannot advance a column which any player has closed out by reaching the end
space; if a roll doesn't result in any legal plays, the turn ends with that turn's progress lost.
A predecessor from 1974, The Great Races, exists as a paper-and-pencil game.
Page 26 of 187
Carcassonne
2-6
45
8+
2000
89
7.45
8
2.0 (Medium/Light)
City Building, Medieval
Area Control / Area Influence, Tile Placement
Carcassonne: Inns & Cathedrals
2002
7.6
Carcassonne: Traders & Builders
2003
7.6
"What's that game with those cute little figures?"
"You mean meeples?"
"Yes, I see them everywhere on the Geek!"
"They are from Carcassonne."
Carcassonne is a tile-placement game in which the players draw and place a tile with a piece of southern French landscape on it.
The tile might feature a city, a road, a cloister, grassland or some combination thereof, and it must be placed adjacent to tiles
that have already been played, in such a way that cities are connected to cities, roads to roads, etcetera. Having placed a tile, the
player can then decide to place one of his meeples on one of the areas on it: on the city as a knight, on the road as a robber, on a
cloister as a monk, or on the grass as a farmer. When that area is complete, that meeple scores points for its owner.
During a game of Carcassonne, players are faced with decisions like: "Is it really worth putting my last meeple there?" or
"Should I use this tile to expand my city, or should I place it near my opponent instead, giving him a hard time to complete his
project and score points?" Since players place only one tile and have the option to place one meeple on it, turns proceed quickly
even if it is a game full of options and possibilities.
Page 27 of 187
Carcassonne: Hunters and Gatherers
2-5
45
233
7.17
8+
2002
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Prehistoric
Area Control / Area Influence, Tile Placement
Carcassonne: Hunters and Gatherers is a standalone game in the Carcassonne series set in the stone age.
As in other Carcassonne games, players take turns placing tiles to create the landscape and placing meeples to score points from
the map they're creating. The player with the most points at the end of the game wins.
Instead of cities, roads, and farms, Carcassonne: Hunters and Gatherers has forests, rivers, lakes, and meadows. Players'
meeples can represent hunters (when placed in the meadows), gatherers (in a forest), or fishermen (on a river segment). They
also have huts, which can be placed on rivers or lakes to get fish from the entire river system.
It includes many of the familiar mechanics from Carcassonne with a few new rules, including:
- A player who completes a forest with a gold nugget in it gets to immediately draw and place a tile.
- A meadow is worth 1 point for every animal in it, except tigers, which negate certain other animals.
- A river segment is worth the number of tiles in the segment plus the number of fish in the lakes at each end.
- A fishing hut scores at the end of the game and is worth the number of fish in all the lakes connected by rivers.
The Devir edition includes (the relevant part of) the Carcassonne: King & Scout expansion.
Page 28 of 187
Caylus
2-5
120
13
7.97
12+
2005
3.8 (Medium/Heavy)
City Building, Economic, Medieval
Worker Placement
Once upon a time ...
1289. To strengthen the borders of the Kingdom of France, King Philip the Fair decided to have a new castle built. For the time
being, Caylus is but a humble village, but soon, workers and craftsmen will be flocking by the cartload, attracted by the great
prospects. Around the building site, a city is slowly rising up.
The players embody master builders. By building the King's castle and developing the city around it, they earn prestige points
and gain the King's favor. When the castle is finished, the player who has earned the most prestige wins the game. The
expansion Caylus Expansion: The Jeweller was included in the 2nd Edition.
Each turn, players pay to place their workers in various buildings in the village. These buildings allow players to gather
resources or money, or to build or upgrade buildings with those resources. Players can also use their resources to help build the
castle itself, earning points and favors from the king, which provide larger bonuses. Building a building provides some
immediate points, and potentially income throughout the game, since players receive bonuses when others use their buildings.
The buildings chosen by the players have a heavy impact on the course of the game, since they determine the actions that will
be available to all the players.
As new buildings are built, they stretch along a road stretching away from the castle, and not all buildings can be used every
turn. Players have some control over which buildings are active by paying to influence the movement of the Provost marker.
The final position of the marker is the newest building that can be used that turn. The Provost marker also helps determine the
movement of the Bailiff marker, which determines the end of the game. Generally, if players are building many buildings and
the Provost is generous in allowing them to be used, the game ends more quickly.
Page 29 of 187
Cheeky Monkey
2-6
20
7+
2007
1282
6.64
6
1.2 (Light)
Animals, Children's Game
Press Your Luck, Set Collection
The push-your-luck game Cheeky Monkey includes eight sets of animals – three elephants, four seals, and so on up to
ten monkeys – with a plastic chip representing each animal. To start the game, you place all the chips in a bag.
On a turn, a player may draw chips until either (1) he chooses to stop or (2) he draws an animal that he has lying in front of him
from a previous draw this turn. In this latter case, he returns all chips in front of him from the current turn to the bag, and the
next player then takes his turn. In the former case, he stacks the chips in whatever order he wants on top of any chips he's
collected in previous turns. (If a player has animals of only a single type, he can tuck them on the bottom of his stack.) Two
special rules come into play while the player draws chips:
If a player draws an animal chip that matches the animal on top of an opponent's stack, the player can steal this animal,
adding it to the chips currently in front of him. (If he busts for drawing a duplicate animal, this stolen chip is also returned to the
bag.)
If a player draws a monkey, he can either keep the monkey (as with any other animal) or he can swap the monkey for the
chip on top of an opponent's stack.
When the last chip has been added to a stack, the game ends. Any player who has more chips of an animal type than any other
player receives bonus points equal to the total number of that animal in the game. The player with the most points wins.
Page 30 of 187
Chicago Express
2-6
60
12+
2007
186
7.29
5
2.8 (Medium)
Economic, Trains, Transportation
Auction/Bidding, Route/Network Building, Stock Holding
Harry Wu's Chicago Express is an innovative new boardgame with no luck factor. Chicago Express was originally released in a
limited format by Winsome Games as Wabash Cannonball and it was the first game in Winsome's Historic Railroads System.
In the game the B&O, C&O, Pennsylvania and New York Central railroads drive from the East Coast across the growing
eastern US to Chicago. Smaller, more aggressive railroads like the Wabash spring up to further expand America's extensive
railroads. The sharpest railroad executives vie for the maximum return on their investment in this business game lasting about
one hour.
Page 31 of 187
Chicken Cha Cha Cha
2-4
20
4+
1997
818
6.69
7
1.1 (Light)
Animals, Children's Game, Memory
Memory
Theme: Chickens are learning to dance ("cha cha") by completing circuits around the yard.
Goal: To "cha cha" your chicken past every single other player's chicken, stealing each one's "tail feathers" as you go by them.
The first player to collect all of the tail feathers wins.
Setup: There are two sets of large, thick cardboard tiles. One set of 12 are shaped as octagons, and the other set of 24 are
shaped as eggs. Each octagon shows a different chicken-related image, and the same image appears on two of the eggs. The
octagons are spread out randomly on the table, face down. The eggs are then arranged randomly, but face up, in a large circle
around the octagons, creating a kind of "pathway" of egg tiles that is encircling the "yard" (of octagons). Each player has a
single large wooden chicken in their color, and each chicken has slots on its backside into which wooden "tail feathers" may be
stuck. Each chicken begins with only one tail feather, in its color. The chickens are then placed randomly on the egg tiles, with
an equal number of unoccupied tiles separating each chicken from the next chicken "ahead" of it on the pathway as separate it
from the next chicken "behind" it, with the goal that they be well spread out on the pathway.
Gameplay: The game is then played in turns, with players attempting to move their chickens clockwise around the pathway. On
a player's turn, she looks at the image on the next egg tile in front of her chicken. The player then turns over one of the 12 face
down octagon yard tiles. If the tile turned over shows the same image as the egg tile, the player moves forward one space on to
that egg tile, turns the octagon back face down, and then repeats the process with the next egg tile. When the player turns over
an octagon with an image that does not match the next egg tile in front of her, her turn ends and her chicken goes no farther. If
the next tile in front of a player is occupied by someone else's chicken, then the player looks at the image that is on the egg tile
in front of the other chicken, and then attempts to turn over the octagon showing *that* image. If the player succeeds, her
chicken "leapfrogs" over the chicken in front of her to land on that egg tile, and in the process steals all tail feathers that the
other chicken had - including those it stole from other players in the same manner. When one player has all of the tail feathers,
that player wins the game.
In Sum: A creative memory game that ties memory to pawn movement. The first player to successfully memorize the images
on each of the 12 octagon tiles, both from their own turns and from watching other players flip the octagons on their turns, will
be able to move their chicken around the yard without stopping, and in doing so will win the game. The placement of the
octagons is random, so the challenge is fresh each game.
This game is part of The Chicken Family of Zoch
The Zicke Zacke Igelkacke version has the same rules but hedgehogs instead of chicken, and it's in a smaller box.
The Hasbro version has the same rules, but is a Dragon Tales re-theme with large cardboard dragons as player pieces.
Page 32 of 187
Cinque Terre
2-5
60
13+
2013
2207
6.98
6
2.7 (Medium)
Farming, Transportation
Pick-up and Deliver, Set Collection
The Cinque Terre are five coastal villages in the Liguria region of Italy known for their beauty, culture, food, and proximity to
one another. Produce carts are commonly found in each village marketplace.
In Cinque Terre, a game of strategy, players compete to sell the most valuable produce in the five villages. Players act as
farmers and operate a cart in which they will harvest produce and deliver them to the five villages to sell. Additionally, players
will compete for Produce Order cards, which reward Lira points for selling desirable produce in specific villages. Players track
sold produce in each village using their Fulfillment Cards. The winner is the player who gains the most Lire by selling valuable
produce, gaining popularity in the villages, and fulfilling Produce Orders.
Game Set Up and Play
During setup in Cinque Terre, colored dice are randomly pulled from a cloth bag and rolled to establish the prices each village
will pay for select produce. Each player also begins play with a private order only she can fulfill. Five public orders are turned
up that all players can work on, though only the first player to fulfill each public order will score points for it. The Most Popular
Vendor cards (1 for each village) are placed face up along one side of the board. The first player to fill an entire row with
produce cubes for a particular village earns the Most Popular Vendor card for that village, which provides bonus points. Four
Produce cards are turned face up and each player receives 4 to begin with along with a Fulfillment board and Produce Truck in
their color.
On your turn, you can perform 3 actions in any order or combination you choose:
Take a Produce Card - either a faceup card or one from the deck.
Move your Produce Cart up four spaces clockwise around the board.
Harvest produce from the location your cart is currently at. Each produce cube you wish to harvest requires a matching card.
Two identical cards can be used in place of any one other card. Your cart can hold up to 4 produce cubes at a time.
Deliver produce to a village. Unload the produce cubes you wish to deliver and place them in the appropriate spaces for that
village on your fulfillment card.
At the end of your turn, if you complete a public order or achieve Most Popular Vendor, take the appropriate card, scoring the
points indicated. You can only complete one public order per turn. When you complete a public order, you must draw a new
card from the Order Deck. If you would like to keep that card as a private order, add it to your hand and draw another and place
it face up to replace the public order just completed. If you do not wish to keep the card you drew as a private order, place it
face up instead. Any private orders not fultilled by game end count as negative points against you.
Players take turns taking their 3 actions until one player has completed 5 public orders (Most Popular Vendor Cards also count
as public orders for determining game end), then everyone gets one more turn, including the player who caused the game to end
Page 33 of 187
Civilization
2-7
360
94
7.56
12+
1980
3.7 (Medium/Heavy)
Ancient, Civilization, Economic, Negotiation
Area Movement, Set Collection, Trading
CIVILIZATION is a game of skill for 2 to 7 players. It covers the development of ancient civilizations from the invention of
agriculture c. 8000 B.C. to the emergence of Rome around the middle of the third century B.C. Each player leads a nation of
peoples over a map board of the Eastern Mediterranean and Near East as they attempt to carve a niche for themselves and their
culture.
Although battles and territorial strategy are important, this is not a war game because it is not won by battle or conquest.
Instead, the object of play is to gain a level of overall advancement involving cultural, economic, and political factors so that
such conflicts that do arise are a result of rivalry and land shortage rather than a desire to eliminate other players. Nomad and
farmer, warrior and merchant, artisan and citizen all have an essential part to play in the development of civilization. It is the
player who most effectively changes emphasis between these various outlooks who will achieve the best balance - and win.
(from the Introduction to the Avalon Hill edition rulebook)
This game has a huge following and is widely regarded as one of the best games about ancient civilizations. Each player takes
on the role of leader of an ancient civilization, such as the Illyrians or Babylonians. Your task is to guide your people through
the ages by expanding your empire and using its proceeds to finance new technological advances, such as Literacy,
Metalworking, or Law. The advancements help your civilization better cope with its problems as well as help bring new
advancements.
Page 34 of 187
Coloretto
2-5
30
8+
2003
304
6.99
6
1.3 (Light)
Animals, Card Game
Card Drafting, Memory, Set Collection
Game play in Coloretto is simple: Either draw a card to play to a row, or take a row of cards to add them to your collection. A
row can have at most three cards, so at some point everyone is forced to take a row. Once all the rows have been claimed,
players start a new round, drawing or taking once again.
What are you trying to do with these cards? Collect huge sets - but only in three colors as every color beyond the third will cost
you points. Jokers are highly-prized as they always match what you want, and +2 cards provide sure points, giving you a backup plan if everything goes south in terms of the colors you're collecting.
Once only a few cards remain in the deck, the round ends and everyone tallies their score, choosing three colors of cards to
score positively while any other colors count against you. Each color is scored using a triangular number system: the first card
in a color is ±1 point, the second card is ±2 points, and so on. The player with the high score wins!
A two-player variant is included with some versions of Coloretto, with the only change being that rows can have only 1-3 cards
placed in them, depending on the icons on the row cards.
Page 35 of 187
Coup
2-6
15
10+
2012
590
7.08
6
1.3 (Light)
Bluffing, Card Game, Economic, Political
Hand Management, Player Elimination, Take That, Variable Player Powers
You are head of a family in an Italian city-state, a city run by a weak and corrupt court. You need to manipulate, bluff and bribe
your way to power. Your object is to destroy the influence of all the other families, forcing them into exile. Only one family will
survive...
In Coup, you want to be the last player with influence in the game, with influence being represented by face-down character
cards in your playing area.
Each player starts the game with two coins and two influence – i.e., two face-down character cards; the fifteen card deck
consists of three copies of five different characters, each with a unique set of powers:
Duke: Take three coins from the treasury. Block someone from taking foreign aid.
Assassin: Pay three coins and try to assassinate another player's character.
Contessa: Block an assassination attempt.
Captain: Take two coins from another player, or block someone from stealing coins from you.
Ambassador: Draw two character cards from the Court (the deck), choose which (if any) to exchange with your face-down
characters, then return two. Block someone from stealing coins from you.
On your turn, you can take any of the actions listed above, regardless of which characters you actually have in front of you, or
you can take one of three other actions:
Income: Take one coin from the treasury.
Foreign aid: Take two coins from the treasury.
Coup: Pay seven coins and launch a coup against an opponent, forcing that player to lose an influence. (If you have ten
coins, you must take this action.)
When you take one of the character actions – whether actively on your turn, or defensively in response to someone else's
action – that character's action automatically succeeds unless an opponent challenges you. In this case, if you can't reveal
the appropriate character, you lose an influence, turning one of your characters face-up. Face-up characters cannot be used, and
if both of your characters are face-up, you're out of the game.
If you do have the character in question, you reveal it, the opponent loses an influence, then you shuffle that character into the
deck and draw a new one, perhaps getting the same character again and perhaps not.
The last player to still have influence – that is, a face-down character – wins the game!
In the 2013 reissues of Coup, a new character called the Inquisitor has been added. The Inquisitor character cards may be used
to replace the Ambassador cards.
Inquisitor: Draw one character card from the Court (the deck), choose which (if any) to exchange with your face-down
characters, then return one. OR Force an opponent to show you one of their character cards (their choice which). If you wish it,
you may force them to shuffle the card into the deck. They then get to draw a new card. Block someone from stealing coins
from you.
Page 36 of 187
Courtier
2-4
45
1704
6.82
10+
2012
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Renaissance, Territory Building
Area Control / Area Influence, Card Drafting, Hand Management, Variable Player Powers
The social elite of Tempest live in a world of power, intrigue, and alliances that can often shake the very foundations of the
city's society. In Courtier, you move within these circles of social power to further your goals. Work with established courtiers
to gain influence and stymie the rise of your rivals as you attempt to earn or cheat your way into their world.
In Courtier, 2–4 players compete for recognition in the royal court. Your mission is to act as an influence broker,
manipulating the levers of power and granting favors to important supplicants. You accomplish this by influencing key people
to act at your behest.
Play influence cards to gain sway over a key courtier, or play power cards to manipulate the board in your favor. Control each
of the courtiers listed on a given petition, and you earn victory points for completing that request. Bonus points can be earned
from cards and abilities. The winner is the player with the highest score at the end of the game.
Number 1 in the Tempest Shared World Game Series
Page 37 of 187
Cuba
2-5
120
191
7.27
10+
2007
3.3 (Medium)
Economic, Farming
Auction/Bidding, Hand Management, Variable Phase Order, Voting
Game description from the publisher:
Cuba prior to the revolution: Under turbulent circumstances, the villages of the island strive for independent wealth and
influence. Who can buy and sell his products and goods on the domestic market profitably or take in the most on the trading
ships? Who can send the right delegate to parliament in order to influence the government legislative process, or erect
distilleries, hotels and banks at the right moment to the benefit of his village?
Whoever has accumulated the most victory points in Cuba by the end of the game wins. Players earn victory points by shipping
merchandise from the harbor, but also by erecting and using buildings, and by abiding by the law.
Page 38 of 187
Days of Steam
2-4
60
2552
6.05
10+
2009
2.0 (Medium/Light)
Dice, Racing, Trains, Transportation
Dice Rolling, Hand Management, Pick-up and Deliver, Point to Point Movement
Route/Network Building, Tile Placement
Players place track and cities, create routes, and deliver goods. Bonuses are awarded to players who deliver multiple types of
goods. This game requires careful management of steam to move your train as well as hand management to thwart other
players as well as enable your own route.
500 copies manufactured for Essen 2008.
Days of Steam is #5 in the Valley Games Modern Line
Page 39 of 187
Die Macher
3-5
240
58
7.74
14+
1986
4.4 (Medium/Heavy)
Economic, Political
Auction/Bidding
Die Macher is a game about seven sequential political races in different regions of Germany. Players are in charge of national
political parties, and must manage limited resources to help their party to victory. The winning party will have the most victory
points after all the regional elections. There are four different ways of scoring victory points. First, each regional election can
supply one to eighty victory points, depending on the size of the region and how well your party does in it. Second, if a party
wins a regional election and has some media influence in the region, then the party will receive some media-control victory
points. Third, each party has a national party membership which will grow as the game progresses and this will supply a fair
number of victory points. Lastly, parties score some victory points if their party platform matches the national opinions at the
end of the game.
The 1986 edition featured 4 parties from the old West Germany and supported 3-4 players. The 1997 edition supports up to 5
players in the re-united Germany and updated several features of the rules as well. The 2006 edition also supports up to 5
players and adds a shorter 5 round variant and additional rules updates by the original designer.
Die Macher is #1 in the Valley Games Classic Line
Page 40 of 187
Diplomacy
2-7
360
12+
1959
285
7.13
2
3.4 (Medium)
Bluffing, Negotiation, Political, Post-Napoleonic, Wargame
Area Control / Area Influence, Area Movement, Player Elimination
Simultaneous Action Selection
This classic game of pure negotiation has taken many forms over the years.
The first Avalon Hill version has perhaps the widest release, but Avalon Hill (Hasbro) re-released the game in 1999, complete
with a colorful new map and metal pieces. They recently released a 50th anniversary edition with a new map and cardboard
pieces representing the armies and navies.
In the game, players represent one of the seven "Great Powers of Europe" (Great Britain, France, Austria, Germany, Italy,
Russia or Turkey) in the years prior to World War I. Play begins in the Spring of 1901, and players make both Spring and
Autumn moves each year. There are only two kinds of military units: armies and fleets. On any given turn, each of your military
units has limited options: they can move into an adjoining territory, support an allied unit in an attack on an adjoining territory,
support an allied unit in defending an adjoining territory, or hold their position. Players instruct each of their units by writing a
set of "orders." The outcome of each turn is determined by the rules of the game. There are no dice rolls or other elements of
chance. With its incredibly simplistic movement mechanics fused to a significant negotiation element, this system is highly
respected by many a gamer.
Avalon Hill Complexity rating - 3
Re-implemented by:
Colonial Diplomacy
Diplomacy: Classical Variant
Diplomacy: Hundred Variant
Page 41 of 187
Domaine
2-4
90
321
7.09
12+
2003
2.7 (Medium)
Medieval, Territory Building
Area Enclosure, Hand Management, Modular Board
The king shall return... But before he does, the realm falls into anarchy and chaos. The lords of the kingdom struggle to improve
their place and standing. New borders are drawn, and expanded through strength of arms and subtle maneuver. Each duke seeks
to establish a claim over the most valuable parts of the kingdom before the king finally returns. In the dark of the Middle Ages,
control of the land was the key to wealth and power. Can you control enough territory to become the most prestigious duke
before the king's return?
In Domaine, players try and form domaines by placing walls on the modular board. Completed domaines can then be
expanded, even into your opponents'. Protect domaines by placing knights. Actions are taken by playing cards which have a
cost associated with them. Gain money by selling cards and controlling mines.
Page 42 of 187
Dominant Species
2-6
180
18
7.96
14+
2010
4.0 (Medium/Heavy)
Animals, Environmental, Prehistoric
Area Control / Area Influence, Area Movement, Modular Board, Tile Placement
Variable Player Powers, Worker Placement
Game Overview
90,000 B.C. -- A great ice age is fast approaching. Another titanic struggle for global supremacy has unwittingly commenced
between the varying animal species.
Dominant Species is a game that abstractly recreates a tiny portion of ancient history: the ponderous encroachment of an ice age
and what that entails for the living creatures trying to adapt to the slowly-changing earth.
Each player will assume the role of one of six major animal classes -- mammal, reptile, bird, amphibian, arachnid or insect.
Each begins the game more or less in a state of natural balance in relation to one another. But that won't last: It is indeed
"survival of the fittest."
Through wily action pawn placement, players will strive to become dominant on as many different terrain tiles as possible in
order to claim powerful card effects. Players will also want to propagate their individual species in order to earn victory points
for their particular animal. Players will be aided in these endeavors via speciation, migration and adaptation actions, among
others.
All of this eventually leads to the end game -- the final ascent of the ice age -- where the player having accumulated the most
victory points will have his animal crowned the Dominant Species.
But somebody better become dominant quickly, because it's getting mighty cold....
Game Play
The large hexagonal tiles are used throughout the game to create an ever-expanding interpretation of earth as it might have
appeared a thousand centuries ago. The smaller tundra tiles will be placed atop the larger tiles -- converting them into tundra in
the process -- as the ice age encroaches.
The cylindrical action pawns (or "AP"s) drive the game. Each AP will allow a player to perform the various actions that can be
taken, such as speciation, environmental change, migration or glaciation. After being placed on the action display during the
Planning Phase, an AP will trigger that particular action for the owning player during the Execution Phase.
Generally, players will be trying to enhance their own animals' survivability while simultaneously trying to hinder that of their
opponents' -- hopefully collecting valuable victory points (or "VP"s) along the way. The various cards will aid in these efforts,
giving players useful one-time abilities or an opportunity for recurring VP gains.
Throughout the game, species cubes will be added to, moved about in, and removed from the tiles in play (the "earth"). Element
disks will be added to and removed from both animals and earth.
When the game ends, players will conduct a final scoring of each tile -- after which the player controlling the animal with the
highest VP total wins the game.
Reimplemented by
Dominant Species: The Card Game
Page 43 of 187
Dominion
2-4
30
8+
2008
17
7.89
10
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Medieval
Card Drafting, Deck / Pool Building, Hand Management
Dominion: Seaside
2009
8.2
Dominion: Prosperity
2010
8.5
Dominion: Cornucopia
2011
8.0
Dominion: Hinterlands
2011
8.3
Dominion: Dark Ages
2012
8.4
Dominion: Guilds
2013
8.4
(from the back of the box:)
"You are a monarch, like your parents before you, a ruler of a small pleasant kingdom of rivers and evergreens. Unlike your
parents, however, you have hopes and dreams! You want a bigger and more pleasant kingdom, with more rivers and a wider
variety of trees. You want a Dominion! In all directions lie fiefs, freeholds, and feodums. All are small bits of land, controlled
by petty lords and verging on anarchy. You will bring civilization to these people, uniting them under your banner.
But wait! It must be something in the air; several other monarchs have had the exact same idea. You must race to get as much of
the unclaimed land as possible, fending them off along the way. To do this you will hire minions, construct buildings, spruce up
your castle, and fill the coffers of your treasury. Your parents wouldn't be proud, but your grandparents, on your mother's side,
would be delighted."
In Dominion, each player starts with an identical, very small deck of cards. In the center of the table is a selection of other cards
the players can "buy" as they can afford them. Through their selection of cards to buy, and how they play their hands as they
draw them, the players construct their deck on the fly, striving for the most efficient path to the precious victory points by game
end.
Dominion is not a CCG, but the play of the game is similar to the construction and play of a CCG deck. The game comes with
500 cards. You select 10 of the 25 Kingdom card types to include in any given play—leading to immense variety.
Part of the Dominion series.
Integrates with:
Dominion: Intrigue
Page 44 of 187
Dominion: Intrigue
2-4
30
15
7.95
8+
2009
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Medieval
Card Drafting, Deck / Pool Building, Hand Management
Dominion: Seaside
2009
8.2
Dominion: Prosperity
2010
8.5
Dominion: Cornucopia
2011
8.0
Dominion: Hinterlands
2011
8.3
Dominion: Dark Ages
2012
8.4
Dominion: Guilds
2013
8.4
In Dominion: Intrigue (as with Dominion), each player starts with an identical, very small deck of cards. In the center of the
table is a selection of other cards the players can "buy" as they can afford them. Through their selection of cards to buy, and
how they play their hands as they draw them, the players construct their deck on the fly, striving for the most efficient path to
the precious victory points by game end.
You are a monarch, like your parents before you, a ruler of a small pleasant kingdom of rivers and evergreens. Unlike your
parents, however, you have hopes and dreams! You want a bigger and more pleasant kingdom, with more rivers and a wider
variety of trees. You want a Dominion! You will bring civilization to these people, uniting them under your banner.
From the back of the box: "Something's afoot. The steward smiles at you like he has a secret, or like he thinks you have a secret.
There are secret plots brewing, you're sure of it. At the very least, there are yours. A passing servant murmurs 'The eggs are on
the plate.' You frantically search your codebook for the translation before realizing he means that breakfast is ready. Excellent.
Everything is going according to plan."
Dominion: Intrigue adds rules for playing with up to 8 players at two tables or for playing a single game with up to 6 players
when combined with Dominion. This game adds 25 new Kingdom cards and a complete set of Treasure and Victory cards. The
game can be played alone by players experienced in Dominion or with the basic game of Dominion.
Part of the Dominion series.
Integrates with:
Dominion
Page 45 of 187
Egizia
2-4
75
12+
2009
128
7.54
7
2.8 (Medium)
Ancient, Farming
Card Drafting, Worker Placement
The players are builders in Ancient Egypt, competing to get the most fame building different monuments requested by the
Pharaoh (the Sphinx, the Obelisk, the Temple, and the Pyramid).
The game lasts 5 turns. In each turn, the players place their pawns on the board, along the banks of the Nile, getting the
advantages shown on each square. On the right bank there are fixed squares where the players may get workers, improve their
mercantile capabilities, influence the floods (and thus the fertility of the fields) and reserve the right to build the monuments
(that are built only after all the placements are done). On the left bank the players may take cards that are deployed randomly on
the 10 squares at the start of each turn; some of these cards are kept until the end of the game (cultivable fields, stone quarries,
deities granting special advantages), while others are discarded after the use and offer multiple immediate advantages.
In Egizia, the twist on the worker placement mechanic is that the players must place their pawns following the course of the
Nile, moving northwards (from the top to the bottom of the board, that is seen from the Mediterranean Sea). In this way, each
placement not only blocks the opponents from choosing the same square (except monuments, where multiple players are always
allowed), but also forces the player to place his remaining pawns only on the squares below the one he just occupied (note that
"pawns" are placed, since "workers" are one of the resources of the game, like grain and stones).
When the placement phase is over, the workers of the players must be fed with the grain produced in the fields. The production
of each field is based on the floods of the Nile, so some fields may not give grain each turn. If a player has not enough grain for
all his workers, he has to buy it with Victory Points (the ratio is better for players with improved mercantile capabilities,
recorded on a specific track on the board).
After that, stones are received from the owned quarries and used to build the monuments (if the right to do was reserved earlier)
along with the workers.
When the game ends, the points scored during the game (mainly building the monuments) are added to the bonuses obtained
fulfilling certain conditions on the Sphinx cards. Whoever has the highest total is the winner.
Online Play
Yucata (turn-based)
Page 46 of 187
El Grande
2-5
90
12+
1995
20
7.86
7
3.1 (Medium)
Political, Renaissance
Area Control / Area Influence, Auction/Bidding, Hand Management, Secret Unit Deployment
Simultaneous Action Selection, Variable Phase Order, Variable Player Powers
In this award-winning game, players take on the roles of Grandes in medieval Spain. The king's power is flagging, and these
powerful lords are vying for control of the various regions. To that end, you draft caballeros (knights in the form of colored
cubes) into your court and subsequently move them onto the board to help seize control of regions. After every third round, the
regions are scored, and after the ninth round, the player with the most points is the winner.
In each of the nine rounds, you select one of your 13 power cards to determine turn order as well as the number of caballeros
you get to move from the provinces (general supply) into your court (personal supply).
A turn then consists of selecting one of five action cards which allow variations to the rules and additional scoring opportunities
in addition to determining how many caballeros to move from your court to one or more of the regions on the board (or into the
castillo - a secretive tower). Normally, you may only place your caballeros into regions adjacent to the one containing the king
pawn. The one hard and fast rule in El Grande is that nothing may move into or out of the king's region. One of the five action
cards that is always available each round allows you to move the king to a new region. The other four action cards varying from
round to round.
The goal is to have a caballero majority in as many regions (and the castillo) as possible during a scoring round. Following the
scoring of the castillo, you place any cubes you had stashed there into the region you had secretly indicated on your region dial.
Each region is then scored individually according to a table printed in that region. Two-point bonuses are awarded for having
sole majority in the region containing your Grande (large cube) and in the region containing the king.
Page 47 of 187
Elk Fest
2
15
8+
1999
1630
6.20
5
1.1 (Light)
Action / Dexterity, Animals, Racing
Modular Board
Players attempt to help their moose across a river by flicking wooden disks into position so as to create 'stepping stones' from
one end of the table to the other. If you flick well, you'll be able to move your moose quicker than your opponent. But you
must be careful not to make the gap too large, as the miniature wooden moose can only span a relatively small distance.
Elchfest is part of the Kosmos two-player series.
Page 48 of 187
En Garde
2
30
8+
1993
1069
6.54
6
1.4 (Light)
Card Game, Sports
Hand Management
Experience the thrill of fencing— board game style! In this two-player game, tactics, skill, and a little bit of luck will
determine the best fencer. Teach yourselves the concepts with the basic game, test yourselves with the standard game, and
challenge yourselves with the advanced game. Cards fly back and forth as the fencers attack, and parry-riposte.
Who will be bold enough to attack first? Is it possible to win with that initial attack or has your opponent beguiled you into an
attack while waiting to mount a parry-riposte?
En Garde is a very dynamic game— strategically rich yet easy to learn and play. Three levels of rules are included in the
game.
Re-Imagined as:
Flash Duel: Second Edition
Page 49 of 187
Ergo
2-4
30
6712
5.77
12+
2009
3.6 (Medium/Heavy)
Abstract Strategy, Card Game
This logical card game is just made for the geek in us. Utilizing cards with variables (A, B, C & D) and familiar logical
operators such as 'Not', 'And', 'Or', 'If-Then' and the dreaded 'Parenthesis' (and some gotcha cards such as 'Fallacy!'), players
take turns creating and changing up to four lines of 'true' statements. Each player tries to prove that they (their variable) exists
(is definitely true) and everyone else...doesn't. Finally, with the Ergo card, whoever at last exists gets the points.
A fun romp and definitely one for the gray matter in us all.
Page 50 of 187
Fairy Tale
2-5
20
481
6.79
10+
2004
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Fantasy
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Set Collection, Simultaneous Action Selection
Players use card drafting and simultaneous action selection to score points while interfering with other players' ability to do so.
The game consists of four rounds. In each of them, players are dealt five cards. They simultaneously select one each and pass
the remainder, repeating until done. Then, they start playing cards simultaneously, playing three and discarding two. When the
cards are revealed after each selection, card abilities turn other cards face-up or face-down. At the end of the four rounds there
are 12 cards in front of each player. The players each score based on their face-up cards.
Art by Nachigami.
Home Page at Edge Entertainment (Spanish): http://www.fairytale.edgeent.com/
Home Page for original publisher (Japanese)
http://yuhodo.jp/fairytale/fairytail-top.htm
Home Page at What's Your Game? New edition: WYG/Fairy Tale
Page 51 of 187
Famiglia
2
30
10+
2010
752
6.72
4
1.8 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Mafia
Card Drafting, Hand Management
The new 2 player card game from 2F-Spiele - a game you cannot refuse!
Story:
Two Mafia-bosses try to recruit the most and also best members for their gangs.
Prepare yourself for a fierce duel. Cleverly use the features of the four different families, snatch the most valuable gangsters
away from your opponent. Your goal: have the best gang at the end of the game.
Idea of the game:
The players collect gangsters, with the goal of collecting the higher-valued gangsters. With the exception of the smallest
gangsters (the “0” cards), a player normally needs two identical gangsters (same family, same value), to be able
to take a gangster with the next higher value of the same family into his hand. When he does this, he places one of the smaller
gangsters from his hand into his play area (the area near him on the table). To get the higher gangsters in a faster way, the player
may use the special abilities of the different families, but at the cost of placing more gangsters in his play area. By doing so,
however, a player may reduce his options and so must carefully plan these actions so that he can end the game with the most
influential gang.
Components:
60 game cards, game rules
Famiglia FAQ
Online Play
Yucata (turn-based)
Page 52 of 187
Feed the Kitty
2-5
15
4+
2003
8799
4.75
3
1.0 (Light)
Animals, Children's Game, Dice, Educational
Dice Rolling
From the Gamewright website:
Roll the dice but don't lose your mice! In this fast moving game, try to keep your mice away from the kitty. Roll an arrow and
pass one to the left. Roll a sleeping cat and you're lucky to squeak by. But roll a bowl and it's dinner time for kitty! The last
player left with mice wins.
Feed the Kitty is as simple as a cat's life. Mice are on the menu, and as they move from place to place, it's anyone's guess who
will end up hungry and who will get to have a full belly. Will you be caught catnapping or will you pounce into the lead? The
answer is all in the roll of the dice!
Ages 4 and up, no reading required. The International Playthings version supports up to 6 players.
Page 53 of 187
Finca
2-4
45
317
7.06
10+
2009
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Economic, Farming
Commodity Speculation, Set Collection
The gameboard of Finca shows the mediterranean island of Mallorca. Players try to crop and deliver the fruits of Mallorca (such
as oranges, lemons, almonds, grapes etc.) by means of moving workers on a traditional windmill. Object of the game is to
distribute your crop as effectively as possible in order to deliver faster than your opponents.
From the Box: Mallorca, Island of the Wind. A place of golden beaches and a light-blue sea. The almond harvest is at hand, in
addition, juicy oranges, lemons, and figs are ready to be picked and taken to the market. Olive trees bewitch the country with
their curled branches and sumptuous vineyards invite passers-by to walk among their warm earth. In the midst of this landscape,
your centuries-old natural stone farmhouse provides a home and supports your large windmill: your FINCA.
Listen to the wind, which propels your windmill! Then take in the course of the yearly harvest the sweetest and most valuable
fruits from the land. Load them on your old donkey cart and travel around the island, selling them everywhere. If you manage
this quickly, you will soon be the richest farmer on the island.
Recommendations:
2011 Hungarian Boardgame Prize Winner
2011 Ludoteca Ideale (Italy)
Nominee "Spiel des Jahres 2009"
4th place "Deutscher Spielepreis 2009"
Nominee "Graf Ludo 2009"
Adult Game of the year 2010 (Finland)
Page 54 of 187
For Sale
3-6
20
8+
1997
194
7.20
6
1.3 (Light)
Card Game, Economic
Auction/Bidding, Simultaneous Action Selection
For Sale is a quick, fun game nominally about buying and selling real estate. During the game's two distinct phases, players first
bid for several buildings then, after all buildings have been bought, sell the buildings for the greatest profit possible.
The Überplay 2005 Edition has new art, rules and card distribution changes, and it accommodates 3-6 players.
The Gryphon 2009 Edition uses the Überplay art for the faces of the property cards, while replacing most other art. The
rules are the same as the Überplay edition, with the exception of the rounding rule.
Page 55 of 187
Forbidden Island
2-4
30
10+
2010
314
6.99
4
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Adventure
Action Point Allowance System, Co-operative Play, Grid Movement, Modular Board
Set Collection, Variable Player Powers
From the publisher's website:
Dare to discover Forbidden Island! Join a team of fearless adventurers on a do-or-die mission to capture four sacred treasures
from the ruins of this perilous paradise. Your team will have to work together and make some pulse-pounding maneuvers, as the
island will sink beneath every step! Race to collect the treasures and make a triumphant escape before you are swallowed into
the watery abyss!
Atrévete a descubrir la Isla Prohibida! Únete a un intrépido grupo de aventureros en una misión
para capturar los cuatro tesoros sagrados de este peligroso paraíso." La Isla Prohibida es un emocionante juego
colaborativo en el que los jugadores tratan de hacerse con los tesoros de una mítica isla misteriosa, antes de que las
aguas la cubran por completo.
Page 56 of 187
Formula D
2 - 10
60
258
7.14
8+
2008
2.0 (Medium/Light)
Racing, Real-time, Sports
Dice Rolling, Grid Movement, Partnerships, Player Elimination, Press Your Luck
Roll / Spin and Move, Simulation
Formula D is a high stakes Formula One type racing game where the players race simulated cars with the hope of crossing the
finish line first. This is a re-release of Formula Dé with several changes from the original format. Whilst old tracks can be used
with the updated Formula D rules, the new game features boards that have an F1 track and a Street Track on the other side.
These street tracks each have a novel inclusion or two to add greater theme The game mechanisms are a simple race, get to the finish line first! However, players have to use a significant amount of
planning, and rely on quite a bit of luck. Each player manages when to shift gears, with each gear providing a different speed.
(For example, 5th gear is a die that rolls random numbers from 7 to 12 for spaces moved.) Each turn, players may move up one
gear, stay in that gear, or move down gears. This forces players to match possible rolls with the optimum distance for that turn,
and hopefully plan ahead. However, speed is not the only issue! Corners have a "stop" rule that requires players to stop once,
twice, or three times on that corner in consecutive turns or face a penalty. This creates an effective speed limit to the corners.
Of course, things do not always go as planned! Players take penalties if they miss their roll, bump into another car, are blocked
by other cars, have to brake heavily, or have to downshift several gears. These are taken off of a car's attributes (Tire health,
Brake wear, Transmission Gears, Body, engine, and Suspension). Losing the maximum in any of these categories will result in
elimination, or a severe setback for that car. This requires that players manage their car's health, plan for their best path, and
have good luck on their rolls. This high amount of luck gives the game its family appeal, and lets weaker players have a chance
at winning once in a while.
However, the fun does not end with a single race! The rules include the ability to customize your cars, use a pre-generated
character, add Slipstreaming (Drafting) rules and road debris, and change tire types to modify your distance rolls. There are
also variations for a single lap race, or multiple laps with pit stops to repair some of your damage points. In addition, numerous
expansion tracks can be purchased to vary the demands on each driver and car. Each track may also have weather effects (rain)
that change car handling and die rolls due to skidding on wet track. This opens up the game for rally rules giving championship
points over a number of races.
Formula D adds a few items that are not in the original Formula De: There is the added excitement of illegal racing in the
streets of big cities - anything goes! This adds custom cars, nitro acceleration, drifting in the curves, dirty tricks, gun battles,
and trash on the road to add more variation. A basic change is the use of a "Dashboard" with movable pegs to manage your
car's attributes instead of the paper forms from Formula De. There are also two sets of pre-painted cars; a Formula 1 set and the
Street Race set of stock cars. The street cars come with "Character" profiles to give a bit of role-playing to the game. Finally,
the old category of "Fuel" for the car has been renamed Transmission Wear to give a better thematic fit to the effect of multiple
downshifting.
The popularity of this game has given it a lot of expansions, some simplifications to the rules (See Formula Dé Mini), and a lot
of "after market" parts. There are also fan expansions and tracks for the very dedicated player. In many ways, this has become
a multiple game system.
Page 57 of 187
Formula Motor Racing
3-6
20
8+
1995
1278
6.37
6
1.2 (Light)
Card Game, Dice, Racing
Dice Rolling, Hand Management
In this light racing card game the players must try to maneuver their team of 3 racing cars into the podium positions over a
series of races by playing cards to manipulate the line of vehicles to their advantage.
Players can advance their position by playing cards that move their vehicles up the line or drag other team cars back. More
powerful cards may require the roll of a dice and can result in great gains or disastrous engine blow-outs that can put cars out of
the race and cannot rejoin the fray until the next race begins.
Play is quick and simple with players required to play one action per turn, carry out its effects and drawing a card to end their
turn. Each race will end after the draw deck is exhausted with one final turn taking place. Points are then awarded for positions
1-6 and a leaderboard is recorded. As the game evolves the leaderboard will be forever changing and in the final race the drivers
will know what they have to do to earn the points in order to sit atop the final standings!
Page 58 of 187
Fresco
2-4
60
144
7.41
10+
2010
2.6 (Medium)
Renaissance
Action / Movement Programming, Set Collection, Simultaneous Action Selection
Worker Placement
In Fresco, players are master painters, working to restore a fresco in a Renaissance church.
Each round begins with players deciding what time they would like to wake up for the day. The earlier you wake up, the earlier
you will be in turn order, and the better options you will be guaranteed to have. Wake up early too often, however, and your
apprentices will become unhappy and stop working as efficiently. They would much rather sleep in!
Then, players decide their actions for the turn, deploying their apprentice work force to various tasks. You'll need to buy paint,
mix paint, work on painting the fresco, raise money by painting portraits (which you'll need to buy the aforementioned paint!),
and perhaps even send your apprentices to the opera in order to increase their happiness. Points are scored mostly by painting
the fresco, which requires specific combinations of paints, so you'll need to buy and mix your paints wisely, in addition to
beating other players to the paints and frescos you would like to paint.
Fresco includes several expansion modules, so you can play without expansions for a lighter family game or add in expansions
to vary play and increase the decision-making and difficulty, resulting in a very flexible game with a high replay value.
Page 59 of 187
Friday
1
25
216
7.42
10+
2011
2.2 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Novel-based, Pirates
Deck / Pool Building, Hand Management
Friday, the second game in Friese's Freitag-project, (Black Friday was the first) is about Robinson and Friday (Freitag). The
player is Friday and must help Robinson to survive and prepare him for the last two battles against the pirates.
Friday is a deck-building game in which you try to add good cards to the deck and get rid of the bad ones. With this deck you
fight against the dangers. If you defeat one danger (card), you will add this card to your deck (good). If you lose against a
danger, you lose some health tokens, but you can get rid of the cards you lost with (generally weaker cards).
If you have no health tokens left and lose one more health point: game over; if you defeat both pirates, you win.
Page 60 of 187
Glen More
2-5
60
168
7.36
10+
2010
2.7 (Medium)
City Building, Economic, Farming
Commodity Speculation, Dice Rolling, Set Collection, Tile Placement, Time Track
Each player represents the leadership of a 17th century Scottish clan looking to expand its territory and its wealth. The success
of your clan depends on your ability to make the correct decision at the opportune time, be it by establishing a new pasture for
your livestock, growing grain for the production of whisky, selling your goods on the various markets, or investing in the
cultivation of special places such as lochs and castles.
Glen More offers a unique turn mechanism. Players take territory tiles from a rondell. Picking a tile has not only influence on
the actions you get by the surrounding tiles in your territory, it also determines when you'll have your next turn (and how many
turns you will have in the game). But having a lot of turns is not always the best strategy for a successful chieftain.
Glen More is 6 in the Alea medium box series, and is rated a 4 on the alea complexity level.
Page 61 of 187
Glory to Rome
2-5
60
67
7.58
12+
2005
2.9 (Medium)
Ancient, Card Game, City Building
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Variable Phase Order
In 64 A.D., a great fire originating from the slums of Rome quickly spreads to destroy much of the city, including the imperial
palace. Upon hearing news of the fire, Emperor Nero Caesar races back to Rome from his private estate in Antium and sets up
shelters for the displaced population.
Reporting directly to Nero, you are responsible for rebuilding the structures lost in the fire and restoring Glory to Rome.
Glory to Rome is a card-based city building and resource management game with a novel mechanism. Each card may act as a
building, a patron, a raw material, or a valuable resource, frequently forcing players into difficult decisions regarding how each
card should be used. In addition, much of the game is played from the discard pool, giving players some control over what cards
are accessible to opponents.
Scoring is a combination of completing buildings and storing resources, with end-of-game bonuses for storing a diverse
assortment. Game length is player-controlled, and is triggered in a few different ways.
The lighthearted artwork and slim rulebook belie the strong strategic and tactical elements of Glory to Rome.
Page 62 of 187
Goa: A New Expedition
2-4
90
12+
2004
40
7.74
7
3.4 (Medium)
Economic, Nautical
Action Point Allowance System, Auction/Bidding, Hand Management, Press Your Luck
Goa, a strategy game of auctions and resource management, is set at the start of the 16th century: beautiful beaches, a mild
climate, and one of the most important trading centers in the world. Competing companies deal in spices, send ships and
colonists into the world, and invest money. Are you on top or at the bottom? It depends on how you invest your profits. Will
you make your ships more efficient? Enhance your plantations? Recruit more colonists? Only a steady hand in business will
help.
Each turn begins with an auction phase, where each player gets to auction one item (and the starting player two items). The first
item being auctioned gives the right to go first the next turn (along with a card that gives an extra action). If you buy your own
item, you pay it to the bank. If someone else buys the item you sell, they pay you. Items include plantations complete with
crops, income tiles (income in money, ships, plantation refills each turn etc.), ships, settlers, and later on tiles that score points
for certain achievements.
After the auction, players get three actions to either improve their technologies or produce things such as spices on plantations,
ships, money or build more plantations. Each player has a board showing their advancement for various things: getting ships,
planting new spices, getting colonists, etc. The more a player advances along one track, the better one is doing that particular
action. The further you get along a certain track, the more points that track is worth at the end, and there are also rewards to the
first player who reaches the last two levels along each track. On the other hand, each player normally needs to perform the
actions for all the tracks at some point, so it's not necessarily a good idea to concentrate on just a couple of them. Goa is a game
that gives plenty of opportunity for tough decisions, since a player always has at least one action too few.
The game mixes an interactive element of the auction, which encourages you to nominate things that otherplayers want so you
receive cash with the solitaire management of your plantation which then interacts late on as players race to be first in the top
tech. levels.
The 2012 edition of Goa includes four new tiles and a new play variant, as noted on the cover of the Z-Man Games edition.
Page 63 of 187
Great Wall of China
2-5
30
1306
6.31
10+
2006
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Card Game
Area Control / Area Influence, Hand Management
This game lets each player take on the role of a Northern Chinese prince. His task: the construction of a massive wall. His
reward: Honor everlasting! To gain the honor, though, requires some sweat. The requirements are the same for each player.
Each player has a set of cards in his color: seven wall cards (worth 1 point), three gate cards (worth 2 points) and one
watchtower card (worth 3 points). Additionally, each player gets nine more cards of varying point value and which may also
allow special actions to be carried out.
At the start of the game, each player shuffles his deck of 20 cards and places it face-down in front of himself. He then draws
five cards from the deck. Now, depending on the number of players, 2 to 4 pairs of prestige tiles (with values from 1 to 8) are
set out as the starts of card rows.
On a player's turn, he first checks to see if he has a point majority in any of the card rows. Then, he carries out two additional
actions. He has the choice of either drawing another card from the deck or adding cards to one of the rows. The added cards
must be identical. It is then the next player's turn.
If, when checking point totals, a player sees that he does have one or more majorities, then he chooses one of the prestige tiles
and puts it onto one of his cards in that row. That prestige comes at a price: as long as the second prestige tile isn't claimed, the
value of the prestige is subtracted from that player's total for that row. Once the second tile is claimed (which can be by the
same player on a later turn), then both winning players set the tiles they won aside to score. Two new prestige tiles are revealed
and the prestige for that row replenished.
The fight for prestige is also influenced by cards with special actions. For example, if a 'noble' card (1) is played, then the values
of all cards in that row are reduced to 1. A 'dragon' card (1) can be played onto another player's card, neutralizing it. 'Cavalry'
(2) are worth 2 points, and, equally valuably, do not cost an action. 'Infantry' (5) are strong in groups. A single 'infantry' card is
only worth 1 point, but the next one is worth 2, and then 3, etc.
The game ends either when one player has played his last card or when the last prestige tile is taken. Afterwards, each player
gets one last turn and then all card rows are resolved in turn order. The player with the most prestige at the end of the game
wins. Players only receive prestige for tiles they have set aside for scoring. Tiles remaining on wall segments do not score.
Page 64 of 187
Guillotine
2-5
30
12+
1998
720
6.54
7
1.3 (Light)
Card Game, Humor
Hand Management
The French Revolution is famous in part for the use of the guillotine to put nobles to death, and this is the macabre subject of
this light card game. As executioners pandering to the masses, the players are trying to behead the least popular nobles. Each
day the nobles are lined up and players take turns killing the ones at the front of the line until all the nobles are gone. However,
players are given cards which will manipulate the line order right before 'harvesting,' which is what makes the game interesting.
After three days worth of chopping, the highest total carries the day.
Page 65 of 187
Hanabi
2-5
25
8+
2010
132
7.55
6
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Deduction, Memory
Co-operative Play, Hand Management, Memory, Press Your Luck, Set Collection
Hanabi – named for the Japanese word for "fireworks" and consisting of the ideograms "Flower" and "Fire" – is a
cooperative game in which players try to create the perfect fireworks show by placing the cards on the table in the right order.
The card deck consists of five different colors of cards, numbered 1-5 in each color. For each color, the players try to place a
row in the correct order from 1-5. Sounds easy, right? Well, not quite as in this game you hold your cards so that they're visible
only to other players. To assist other players in playing a card, you must give them hints regarding the numbers or the colors of
their cards. Players must act as a team to avoid errors and to finish the fireworks display before they run out of cards.
Hanabi is also available as Hanabi & Ikebana.
Page 66 of 187
Hannibal: Rome vs. Carthage
2
300
12+
1996
45
7.90
4
3.4 (Medium)
Ancient, Political, Wargame
Area Control / Area Influence, Campaign / Battle Card Driven, Dice Rolling
Point to Point Movement, Simulation
This game uses the very popular card system which first appeared in Avalon Hill's We the People game to detail the struggle
between Carthage's Hannibal and the Roman Republic in approximately 200 BC. Players use strategic-level cards for multiple
purposes: moving generals, levying new troops/reinforcing existing armies, gaining political control of the provinces involved
in the war, and generating historical events. If perchance two armies meet on the battlefield, a second set of cards is used to
determine the winner. Ultimately both players seek victory by dominating both fronts: military and political.
Page 67 of 187
Hawaii
2-5
90
13+
2011
261
7.38
7
2.9 (Medium)
Action Point Allowance System, Area Movement, Modular Board
Game description from the publisher:
Don't expect to lie around the sun, lazily sipping cocktails and passively watching hula dancers, because the tactical game
Hawaii is not a paradise for idlers, but rather for bold, active strategists. Restlessly, they'll move their pieces on the game board,
facing constant challenges in terms of making their beautiful villages on this beautiful island as profitable as possible. Only
those who will be able to use their dwindling resources to meet the increasing demands over five rounds will find a spot for
themselves on the beach.
In Hawaii, players must make use of their limited resources to score points by growing their villages and exploring the
surrounding islands. Your chieftains move around the board to purchase new tiles for their villages, hopefully grabbing the best
deals before their opponents. Three different currencies are used to pay for these trips, so make sure you don't run out of any of
them too quickly. Players are also rewarded for providing for their people (measured essentially by how much they bought on a
given turn), but your meager income shrinks as the game goes on. Players will have to balance a number of ways to score points
to secure their victory.
Page 68 of 187
Hey! That's My Fish!
2-4
20
8+
2003
366
6.88
7
1.5 (Light)
Abstract Strategy, Animals
Area Enclosure, Grid Movement, Modular Board
In Hey, That's My Fish!, players want to catch as many fish as possible with their waddle of penguins. Each turn, a player
moves one penguin in a straight line over hex-shaped ice tiles with 1, 2 or 3 fish on them. The player then collects the hex from
where the penguin started its movement from the table, thereby creating a gap which penguins can't cross on future turns. When
a penguin can't move, it's removed from play with its owner claiming the tile on which it stands. The player who collects the
most fish wins.
Page 69 of 187
High Society
3-5
15
490
6.81
10+
1995
1.6 (Medium/Light)
Card Game
Auction/Bidding
In Reiner Knizia's High Society, players bid against each other to acquire the various trappings of wealth (positive-number and
multiplier cards) while avoiding its pitfalls (negative number and divisor cards). While bidding, though, keep an eye on your
remaining cash - at the end of the game, even though all those positive-number cards might add up to a win, the player with the
least money isn't even considered for victory.
In 2003 re-published by Überplay.
In 2004 published with a new theme by Amigo as Einfach Tierisch.
In 2006, published by University Games as Animalement Vôtre (French version) and Beestenveiling (Dutch version).
In 2008, re-published by Gryphon Games
Page 70 of 187
Hive Carbon
2
20
121
7.37
9+
2001
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Abstract Strategy, Animals
Grid Movement, Tile Placement
From the Publisher:
Hive is a highly addictive strategic game for two players that is not restricted by a board and can be played anywhere on any flat
surface. Hive is made up of twenty two pieces, eleven black and eleven white, resembling a variety of creatures each with a
unique way of moving.
With no setting up to do, the game begins when the first piece is placed down. As the subsequent pieces are placed this forms a
pattern that becomes the playing surface (the pieces themselves become the board). Unlike other such games, the pieces are
never eliminated and not all have to be played. The object of the game is to totally surround your opponent's queen, while at the
same time trying to block your opponent from doing likewise to your queen. The player to totally surround his opponent's queen
wins the game.
Page 71 of 187
Hotel Samoa
3-6
60
1558
6.45
10+
2010
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Economic
Auction/Bidding, Set Collection, Simultaneous Action Selection, Tile Placement
Samoa. A popular vacation resort, where groups of tourists arrive every week. The hotel owners' only care is to give these
tourists the stay of their life - and of course to rid them of as much money as possible.
Each round, new tourists of various nationalities will arrive at the island, and new upgrades in the form of build tiles will be
available to buy for your hotel. Players will simultaneously choose one of their price cards to play, which indicates both your
bid for building a hotel upgrade, and the price you set on your hotel rooms. The tourists will of course seek out the cheapest
hotels first, so you must carefully plan when to demand sky high prices, and when to drop prices low in order to attract the
tourists right under your opponents' noses. All the tourists have different personalities and abilities - so be sure to get the ones
that benefit you the most. And of course you can enhance your hotel by building extra rooms, a swimming pool, or perhaps a
luxury suite?
In the end, it's the cash that counts.
This is a fast and varied game of medium-light complexity, and as most decicions are made simultaneously by the players, the
game has very little down time.
Page 72 of 187
Igloo Pop
2-6
20
1569
6.29
7+
2003
1.1 (Light)
Action / Dexterity, Children's Game
Betting/Wagering, Simultaneous Action Selection
A children's game where players shake plastic igloos in an attempt to identify how many beads (between 2 and 13) they hold.
Nine cards are dealt face-up in a circle around the igloos, with each card showing a different number (or range of numbers).
Players then start shaking the igloos to find one that matches the number of beads shown on a card. When a match is found, the
player marks that igloo with a colored chip and places it on the card with the same number. If the guess is correct, that player
receives the card (worth points) as a reward. If the guess is incorrect, that player loses the chip used to mark the igloo. The
game is finished when one player has no chips left, or when all of the cards have been claimed!
Although the appearance of Igloo Pop is quite silly, it takes a steady hand and well-trained ear to be able to determine how
many beads are inside an igloo. The sound and vibration when shaking each igloo is slightly different, allowing skilled players
to judge the contents quickly and accurately. Also, a risk/reward system is introduced in the cards: cards with several numbers
are easier to guess, but are worth less points; cards with a single number are often difficult to guess exactly, but are worth more
points.
Background story, from the back of the box:
The young ice giant has a big problem: he wants to buy fish sticks, but he cannot remember how many and he has nine
shopping lists in his basket.
So he goes from igloo to igloo and shakes each. In each he listens to the delicious fish sticks bouncing off the igloo walls. When
he thinks that the igloo in his hand has the same number of fish sticks as one of his shopping lists, he takes it home.
When he gets home, there are no fish sticks in the igloo. Instead, wild and laughing Inuit children tumble out of the igloo.
Excitedly they shout, "Shake us again!" "That was great fun!" "This is super", thinks the young ice giant. "Now, I have found
some new friends to play with!" And, he promptly forgets all about his shopping lists.
Page 73 of 187
Imperial
2-6
120
53
7.70
13+
2006
3.6 (Medium/Heavy)
Economic, Fighting, Nautical, Political
Area Control / Area Influence, Area Movement, Stock Holding, Variable Phase Order
Europe is in the age of imperialism. Internationally operating financial investors aim for the highest political influence in
Europe. Great Britain, German Reich, Russian Empire, Austria-Hungary, Kingdom of Italy, and Republic of France are each
controlled by different investors. The six imperial nations build factories, troops and fleets to expand their power in Europe.
They collect taxes from occupied regions to pay interests to their investors. As financial control over the imperial nations
changes, there are always new strategic alliances and conflicts emerging between them.
The players represent internationally operating investors who stay in the background. There are always six imperial nations
acting in the game, no matter how many investors take part. Only the investor who gets the best return on his investments, who
controls the most powerful imperial nations, and who shows the best diplomatic skill, may win the game!
Imperial is a challenging strategy game without any luck of cards or dice. Players take over the role of internationally operating
financial investors and control European diplomacy in imperial times.
Page 74 of 187
In the Year of the Dragon
2-5
75
104
7.47
12+
2007
3.1 (Medium)
Economic, Medieval
Hand Management
Treasure Chest
2009
7.4
Stefan Feld's 3rd game by Alea is Im Jahr des Drachen (In the Year of the Dragon).
Players take on the role of Chinese rulers around the year 1000. The game plays out in twelve rounds, with each round
representing one month in a year that seems to go from bad to worse. Disease, drought, and attacks from the Mongols may
claim lives, but make sure you have enough money to offer a tribute to the Emperor.
The game play is easier than it may appear. Every player has a set of "person" cards. Each round, you choose one action (most
of which call on your workers' abilities) help you prepare for the months ahead. Then you play one person card, recruiting that
person and placing him into one of your palaces. Each person brings different skills and abilities to help you ride out the year.
(Farmers help you gain rice to survive a drought month, Tax Collectors raise money, etc.) At the end of each round, that month's
event is triggered, which may cost you some of your workers, some money, or give you points.
Careful planning is the key to surviving "the year of the dragon," but survival alone may not win you the game.
Page 75 of 187
Indigo
2-4
30
8+
2012
1568
6.72
6
1.6 (Medium/Light)
Abstract Strategy
Tile Placement
Indigo is a tile-laying game along the lines of Metro, Tsuro and Linie 1 in which players build paths bit by bit, with no player
owning the individual paths and everyone trying to exploit the paths already present. Unlike those earlier games, however, your
goal is to move gemstones from their starting locations on the board to your designated goals, with the player who scores the
most points winning the game.
To set up the game board, place the central hex tile, then add five green and one indigo gems to it. Place six "u-turn" tiles at
their designated locations on the outer edge of the game board, then place a yellow gem on each such tile. Each player places
goal markers on goals between these u-turn tiles on the edge of the game board: in a two-player game, the players alternate
goals; in a three-player game, each player has one goal to herself, while sharing two others; and in a four-player game, each
player shares a goal with every other player.
On a turn, a player places a tile on any space on the game board, with the only restriction being that a player cannot create a
route directly from one goal to another. Each tile has three route segments on it, connecting one pair of edges. If a player places
a tile next to a gemstone, that gemstone "moves" as far as possible along the route so that all players can see where to place tiles
to next move that gemstone. (Thus players avoid the mental gymnastics required in Metro and Linie 1 in which nothing moves
until a route is complete.) When connecting to the central tile, the green gems move off first, with the indigo gem moving only
with the sixth connection.
If a player places a tile so that one gem would run into another, both gems are removed from the game!
When a gem is moved to a goal owned by only one player, that player keeps the gem. If two players own the goal, then both
players collect a gem of that color, taking the extra gem needed from the reserve. Once all the gems have been claimed, the
game ends, with players earning 3 points for an indigo gem, 2 for green and 1 for yellow. The player with the most points wins.
Page 76 of 187
Ingenious
1-4
45
10+
2004
160
7.28
7
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Abstract Strategy
Hand Management, Pattern Building, Tile Placement
Anyone who knows a little about Reiner Knizia's games will know that the good Doctor loves games that deal with trying to get
points in various different categories and then only score that category in which the player has the fewest.
The game is played on a hex board. 120 equally sized pieces, each consisting of two joined hexes, come with the game. There
are symbols on each hex that make up the piece – some pieces have two identical symbols, some have two different
symbols (not unlike dominoes). The goal of the game is, through clever placement, to obtain points in the different symbol
colors. Points are claimed by placing a piece such that the symbols on it lie next to already-placed pieces with the same symbol.
The game ends when no more tiles can be placed onto the board or when a player reaches the maximum number in every color.
Now each player looks to see how many points they scored in the colour they 'scored the least'. Whoever has the most points in
their least-scored colour is the winner. Simple.
The author of the game has also come up with solitaire and team play, in which two teams of two play with each player not
being able to see his partner's tiles.
[From a preview by Spielbox]
Other Versions:
Ingenious: Travel Edition
Page 77 of 187
Ivanhoe
2-5
45
10+
2000
959
6.59
8
1.6 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Fighting, Medieval
Auction/Bidding, Hand Management
Take on the role of a knight and join the prestigious tournaments at the king's court. Use your cards to win the jousting
competitions, and to fight with your sword, axe or morning-star. Rally your squires, gain the support of a maiden, and play
action cards against your opponents.
Clever use of action cards can change the type of tournament that is in progress. One card will 'unhorse' you, forcing everyone
still in the jousting competition to switch to a weapon battle of the action card holder's choice.
Other actions cause you to drop whatever other weapon you are using and resort to hand-to-hand battles in which the player
with the most cards- not the highest point total- will win a token. Depending on the number of players in the game, the first
player to win four or five different tournaments becomes the overall victor.
There is a lot more strategy involved in the game than first meets the eye.
Re-implements:
Attacke
Page 78 of 187
Jaipur
2
30
12+
2009
118
7.49
6
1.6 (Medium/Light)
Card Game
Hand Management, Set Collection, Trading
Jaipur, capital of Rajasthan. You are one of the two most powerful traders in the city.
But that's not enough for you, because only the merchant with two Seals of Excellence will have the privilege of being invited
to the Maharaja's court.
You are therefore going to have to do better than your direct competitor by buying, exchanging and selling at better prices, all
while keeping an eye on both your camel herds.
A card game for two seasoned traders!
When it's your turn, you can either take or sell cards.
If you take cards, you have to choose between taking all the camels, taking 1 card from the market or swapping 2 to 5 cards
between the market and your cards.
If you sell cards, you get to sell only one type of good per turn, and you get as many chips from that good as you sold cards. The
chips' values decrease as the game progresses, so you'd better hurry ! But, on the other hand, you get increasingly high rewards
for selling 3, 4, or 5 cards of the same good at a time, so you'd better wait!
You can't sell camels, but they're paramount for trading and they're also worth a little something at the end of the round, enough
sometimes to secure the win, so you have to use them smartly.
Jaipur is a fast-paced card game, a blend of tactics, risk and luck.
Page 79 of 187
Jamaica
2-6
45
497
6.84
8+
2007
1.6 (Medium/Light)
Nautical, Pirates, Racing
Dice Rolling, Simultaneous Action Selection
Setting: In 1675, after a long career in piracy, Captain Henry Morgan skillfully gets appointed to be Governor of Jamaica, with
the explicit order to cleanse the Caribbean of pirates and buccaneers! Instead, he invites all of his former "colleagues" to join
him in his retirement, to enjoy the fruits of their looting with impunity. Each year, in remembrance of the "good old days,"
Morgan organizes the Great Challenge, a race around the island, and at its end, the Captain with the most gold is declared Grand
Winner.
Goal: The game ends on the turn when at least one player's ship reaches the finish line, completing one circuit around the island
of Jamaica. At that point, players are awarded different amounts of gold in accordance with how far away from the finish line
they were when the race concluded. This gold is added to any gold a player gathered along the way by detouring from the race
to search for valuable treasure, by stealing gold or treasure from other players, or just by loading gold as directed by the cards
the player played during the race. The player with the most total gold acquired through all these means is then declared the
winner.
Gameplay: The game is played in rounds. Each player always has a hand of three cards, and a personal board depicting the five
"holds" of their ship, into which goods can be loaded during the game. Each round, one player is designated as "captain," with
the next clockwise player being captain in the following round, and so on. The captain rolls two standard D6 dice, examines her
cards, then announces which die will correspond to the "day" and which to the "night." Each player then simultaneously selects
a card from their hand and places it face down in front of them. Each card has two symbols on it, one on the left - corresponding
to "day" - and one on the right ("night"). The symbols indicate either ship movement (forward or backward) or the loading of a
type of good. After every player has selected a card, all cards are revealed simultaneously and then resolved clockwise one by
one, starting with the captain's. When it is a player's turn to resolve her card, for first the left symbol on her card and then for the
right symbol, the player will load a number of goods or move a number of spaces equal to the number of pips showing on the
corresponding day or night die for that round. Thus the main decision each player makes during the game is which of their
current three cards would best serve them on a particular turn, given the values of the day and night dice. Finally, during the
race, when a player lands on a spot already occupied by another player, there is a battle. Battles are mainly resolved by rolling a
"combat" die, but players may improve their chances by using "gunpowder" tokens from their holds, if they loaded any on
previous turns. The winner of a battle may steal some goods or treasure from the loser.
In Sum: This is a pirate-themed tactical race game with player interaction and side goals (e.g. detouring for treasure), so that the
winner is the player who best balances their position in the race with their success at the side goals.
Online play
Jeux sur un Plateau (turn-based)
Page 80 of 187
Jambo
2
45
253
7.13
12+
2004
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Economic
Action Point Allowance System, Hand Management, Set Collection
Original description from Games4You.
Players take on the role of merchants offering their wares from market stands. On a player's turn, he has five actions to choose
from. Actions can be used to draw cards, play cards and activate buildup cards.
In order to sell wares, the merchants must first lay the wares out, since customers will only buy where all the wares they want
are being offered. And since market space is at a premium, players have to think hard about which wares to offer.
By owning important buildup cards and properly using the assets of other village inhabitants, the merchants succeed in
attracting especially many customers to their stalls, making bargain buys, and messing with their opponents' plans.
The first player to reach a set cash level through buying and selling of wares is the winner.
The game's attraction lies with the many special cards. Many different combinations are possible during the game, and each
game plays out differently as a result.
Integrates with:
Asante
Page 81 of 187
Kahuna
2
30
10+
1998
625
6.68
6
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Abstract Strategy
Area Control / Area Influence, Card Drafting, Hand Management, Route/Network Building
Originally published in 1997 as Arabana-Ikibiti by the designer's own publisher Bambus Spieleverlag, then reprinted by
Funagain in the U.S., Kosmos' Kahuna – part of its Kosmos two-player series – is the best known implementation
of this design.
In this simple two-player game, players use cards to place or remove bridges from a collection of islands. If you get the majority
of bridges around an island, you place one of your marker stones on it and also remove any of your opponent's bridges to that
island – which might cause them to lose a bridge majority on an adjacent island and lose a marker stone there. The
Kosmos edition has excellent graphics and nice wooden pieces and plays very well.
Reimplements:
Arabana-Ikibiti
Reimplements:
Kanaloa
Page 82 of 187
Kingdom Builder
2-5
45
8+
2011
247
7.17
7
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Medieval, Territory Building
Area Control / Area Influence, Area Enclosure, Grid Movement, Modular Board
Route/Network Building
Kingdom Builder: Nomads
2012
7.6
In Kingdom Builder, the players create their own kingdoms by skillfully building their settlements, aiming to earn the most gold
at the end of the game.
Nine different kinds of terrain are on the variable game board, including locations and castles. During his turn, a player plays his
terrain card and builds three settlements on three hexes of this kind. If possible, a new settlement must be built next to one of
that player's existing settlements. When building next to a location, the player may seize an extra action tile that he may use
from his next turn on. These extra actions allow extraordinary actions such as moving your settlements.
By building next to a castle, the player will earn gold at the end of the game, but the most gold will be earned by meeting the
conditions of the three Kingdom Builder cards; these three cards (from a total of ten in the game) specify the conditions that
must be met in order to earn the much-desired gold, such as earning gold for your settlements built next to water hexes or
having the majority of settlements in a sector of the board.
Each game, players will use a random set of Kingdom Builder cards (3 of 10), special actions (4 of 8), and terrain sectors to
build the map (4 of 8), ensuring you won't play the same game twice!
Kingdom Builder FAQ - please read before posting questions in the forum.
Page 83 of 187
Kingsburg
2-5
90
175
7.25
13+
2007
2.4 (Medium/Light)
City Building, Dice, Fantasy, Medieval
Dice Rolling, Worker Placement
In Kingsburg, players are Lords sent from the King to administer frontier territories.
The game takes place over five years, a total of 20 turns. In every year, there are 3 production seasons for collecting resources,
building structures, and training troops. Every fourth turn is the winter, in which all the players must fight an invading army.
Each player must face the invaders, so this is not a cooperative game.
The resources to build structures and train troops are collected by influencing the advisers in the King's Council. Players place
their influence dice on members of the Council. The player with the lowest influence dice sum will be the first one to choose
where to spend his/her influence; this acts as a way of balancing poor dice rolling. Even with a very unlucky roll, a clever player
can still come out from the Council with a good number of resources and/or soldiers.
Each adviser on the King's Council will award different resources or allocate soldiers, victory points, and other advantages to
the player who was able to influence him/her for the current turn.
At the end of five years, the player who best developed his assigned territory and most pleased the King through the Council is
the winner.
Many alternate strategies are possible to win: will you go for the military way, disregarding economic and prestige buildings, or
will you aim to complete the big Cathedral to please the King? Will you use the Merchant's Guild to gain more influence in the
Council, or will you go for balanced development?
Expanded by:
Kingsburg: To Forge a Realm
Page 84 of 187
Le Havre
1-5
150
9
8.05
12+
2008
3.7 (Medium/Heavy)
Economic, Industry / Manufacturing, Nautical
Worker Placement
In Le Havre, a player's turn consists of two parts: First, distribute newly supplied goods onto the offer spaces; then take an
action. As an action, players may choose either to take all goods of one type from an offer space or to use one of the available
buildings. Building actions allow players to upgrade goods, sell them or use them to build their own buildings and ships.
Buildings are both an investment opportunity and a revenue stream, as players must pay an entry fee to use buildings that they
do not own. Ships, on the other hand, are primarily used to provide the food that is needed to feed the workers.
After every seven turns, the round ends: players' cattle and grain may multiply through a Harvest, and players must feed their
workers. After a fixed number of rounds, each player may carry out one final action, and then the game ends. Players add the
value of their buildings and ships to their cash reserves. The player who has amassed the largest fortune is the winner.
Le Havre was released by Lookout Games October 2008 in German and Australian English.
Online Play
Instructions for multiplayer using Hamachi
Page 85 of 187
Leaping Lemmings
2-6
60
10+
2010
1137
6.59
6
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Animals, Humor, Racing
Dice Rolling, Hand Management, Hex-and-Counter
Leaping Lemmings - The Original Cliff Divers
Leaping Lemmings is a humorous game for 2-6 players. Each player controls a cloned clan of lemmings that have been
specially trained to compete with the other lemming clans, all trying to scurry down a canyon and hurl themselves over a cliff.
Distance and style points are important. One lemming diving with style and élan is worth as many as five of the more
mundane divers. But beware the hungry eagles circling overhead or your lemmings might not even make the cliff edge!
Objective: The player with the most victory points wins the game. To earn victory points, players dive their lemmings over the
cliff edge and/or collect Lemming Chow Pellets.
The game board is a hex-based map representing the canyon down which up to six separate lemming clans will travel. The
canyon ends with the cliff edge hexes, which are the lemmings' ultimate goal. Between the lemmings and their goal there are
two eagles circling overhead hoping for multiple lemming snacks.
Each turn a movement card is revealed which will allow for 2-5 lemming movement points. Card luck is mitigated in that all
players use the same card to move that turn. Only the top lemming in each stack is allowed to move, so covering your
opponents' lemmings is one tactic that is used to slow them down. The down side is that the top lemming in each stack is the
only one in danger of becoming eagle chow.
Special Actions allow players to briefly alter the normal rules of the game to their advantage or to their opponents' detriment.
There are 16 different Special Actions in the game.
Home Page: http://www.gmtgames.com/p-143-leaping-lemmings.aspx
Page 86 of 187
Long Shot
3-8
60
693
6.79
10+
2009
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Racing, Sports
Betting/Wagering, Dice Rolling, Hand Management
Long Shot is YOUR ticket to the track. In this exciting family-friendly horse racing board game, up to 8 players bet, buy horses,
and strategize as the race unfolds.
Long Shot includes over 100 unique cards allowing players to combine strategies and resources for maximum control of the
race. Will you buy a horse or two in the hopes of winning some of the purse, or will you bet it all on the long shot?
Whether a novice or a horse racing enthusiast, everyone's a winner in this interactive strategy game where anytime is post time!
Page 87 of 187
Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation
2
30
207
7.26
12+
2002
2.2 (Medium/Light)
Adventure, Bluffing, Deduction, Fantasy, Movies / TV / Radio theme, Novel-based
Area Movement, Hand Management, Secret Unit Deployment, Simultaneous Action Selection
Variable Player Powers
A Stratego-like game themed around Lord of the Rings. Players each control a force of 9 characters (light vs. dark) whose
identities are hidden from their opponent at the beginning of the game. Combat is resolved by playing special cards.
Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation has also been the object of an extended edition (see Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation
(Deluxe Edition)) comprising the original characters and a full set of new characters.
Page 88 of 187
Lost Cities
2
30
10+
1999
220
7.13
8
1.5 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Exploration
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Set Collection
In Lost Cities, a card game from the Kosmos two-player series, the object is to mount profitable expeditions to one or more of
the five different lost cities. Card play is straightforward, with a few agonizing moments sprinkled through what is mostly a
fast-moving game. If you start a given expedition, you'd better make some progress in it, or it'll score you negative points. If
you can make a lot of progress, you'll score quite well. After three rounds, the highest total score takes the day.
Rules are included for a four-player team game that requires two copies to play.
Page 89 of 187
Love Letter
2-4
20
10+
2012
141
7.46
8
1.2 (Light)
Bluffing, Card Game, Deduction, Renaissance
Hand Management
All of the eligible young men (and many of the not-so-young) seek to woo the princess of Tempest. Unfortunately, she has
locked herself in the palace, and you must rely on others to bring your romantic letters to her. Will yours reach her first?
Love Letter is a game of risk, deduction, and luck for 2–4 players. Your goal is to get your love letter into Princess
Annette's hands while deflecting the letters from competing suitors. From a deck with only sixteen cards, each player starts with
only one card in hand; one card is removed from play. On a turn, you draw one card, and play one card, trying to expose others
and knock them from the game. Powerful cards lead to early gains, but make you a target. Rely on weaker cards for too long,
however, and your letter may be tossed in the fire!
Number 4 in the Tempest Shared World Game Series
Page 90 of 187
Macao
2-4
90
117
7.51
12+
2009
3.1 (Medium)
Dice, Nautical
Action Point Allowance System, Card Drafting, Dice Rolling, Hand Management
Pick-up and Deliver, Route/Network Building
At the end of the 17th century, Macao – the mysterious port city on the southern coast of China – is a Portuguese
trading post in the Far East. The players take on the role of energetic and daring adventurers. Many exciting tasks and
challenges await the players, whether they are a captain, governor, craftsman, or scholar. Those who chose the wisest course of
action and have the best overall strategy will earn the most prestige at the end.
Macao lasts twelve rounds, and in each round players select one new card from a display specific to that round, two of which
were revealed at the start of the game and others that were revealed only at the start of the round. The deck of 96 cards includes
all sorts of special abilities, with the more powerful actions costing more resources to put into play.
One player rolls six different-colored dice, then each player selects two of those dice (possibly the same ones chosen by
opponents), then places cubes equal to the number and color of the two dice on a personalized "ship's wheel." For example, if a
player chooses the blue die that shows a 5, he places five blue cubes on the ship's wheel position five spots away from the
current round. (A player can never claim more cubes than the number of remaining rounds).
Players rotate their ship's wheels each round, then use the cubes available to them in that round to perform various actions:
activating cards selected in that round or earlier rounds, buying city quarters and collecting the goods located there, moving that
player's ship around Europe to deliver those goods, acquiring gold coins, taking special actions with card previously activated,
and advancing on a turn order track.
Players score points by delivering goods, paying gold coins, using the powers on their cards, and building in Macao. Whoever
has the most points at the end of twelve rounds wins.
Macao is number 13 in the alea big box series, with an estimated difficulty on the alea scale of 6/10.
Page 91 of 187
Maharaja: The Game of Palace Building in India
2-5
90
238
7.23
12+
2004
3.2 (Medium)
City Building
Area Control / Area Influence, Point to Point Movement, Route/Network Building
Simultaneous Action Selection, Variable Player Powers
A boardgame for two to five players with elements of worker placement and resource management games. During the game the
players take different roles and travel from city to city in India. Their architects build palaces and houses for the maharadja.
Of course, building a palace is expensive. Therefore it is important to earn enough money in the cities. The first player who
builds seven palaces is the winner.
Players choose their actions simultaneously but reveal and resolve them in turn. Actions include generating money, building
houses or palaces, manipulating the Maharaja's movements or choosing new architects (each architect has a unique power but
the more powerful ones come further down the turn order).
At the end of each round the Maharaja scores the city he is currently in based on the number of buildings and players recieve
money accordingly. He then moves to a new city.
Besides the basic game, the rules booklet contains two advanced versions for players who seek even more depth in their game
play.
Page 92 of 187
Maharani
2-4
40
8+
2012
2809
6.48
7
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Tile Placement, Worker Placement
Game description from the publisher:
In Maharani, the players are architects helping the King to complete the Taj Mahal palace by placing beautiful mosaic tiles.
These tiles come into play through a rotating rondel, which enables every player to place the tiles in different parts of the palace.
Once the mosaic is complete, the best architect wins the game.
Page 93 of 187
Maria
2-3
210
142
8.02
14+
2009
3.4 (Medium)
Negotiation, Political, Wargame
Hand Management, Point to Point Movement, Secret Unit Deployment, Simulation
MARIA is a game based on the War of the Austrian Succession, where Austria was attacked by Prussia, France, Bavaria and
Saxony, while only Great Britain, Hanover and the Netherlands (by forming the so-called Pragmatic Army) helped her. The
game is about conquest of fortresses. Other mechanics deal with Politics, Hussars, Emperor-election, Saxony's betrayal,
Prussia's annexation of Silesia, etc.
Page 94 of 187
Martinique
2
30
1636
6.45
10+
2009
2.0 (Medium/Light)
Bluffing, Deduction, Pirates
Area Enclosure, Grid Movement, Set Collection
An ancient legend says a great pirate treasure is buried on the island of Martinique. Pirates would have attacked various
merchant vessels, confiscated their loads and eventually sunk the ships. Afterwards they would have brought the stolen jewels,
objects and coins to the island to bury the treasure over there. Many have tried to find the Lost Treasure, but nobody has
succeeded so far. You are the captain of a pirate ship heading for Martinique. After dropping anchor in the morning, you set off
in a rowboat towards the island with four of your most loyal pirates to find the Lost Treasure. Will you unravel the legend and
add your name to the illustrious list of great pirates and rulers of the seven seas?
Page 95 of 187
Medici
3-6
60
10+
1995
275
7.14
8
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Renaissance
Auction/Bidding, Set Collection
Another Reiner Knizia standby, this game plays very well with varying numbers of people. The object is to accrue the most
points during three rounds, which you do by spending your points to bid on sets of cards. Each turn the current player turns up
one to three cards for all the players to bid on, with the highest bid taking all cards. The cards denote a commodity type and
quantity/value. The round ends when each player's ships are full, or the commodity card deck is exhausted. After each round,
points are awarded to each player having the most of a given commodity, and to the one with the most valuable total "cargo
load".
Part of the Knizia auction trilogy.
One of the Knizia Florentine auction games.
Related Games:
Medici vs Strozzi (two-player version)
Strozzi
Page 96 of 187
Memoir '44
2-8
60
8+
2004
71
7.54
7
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Miniatures, Wargame, World War II
Campaign / Battle Card Driven, Dice Rolling, Grid Movement, Hand Management
Modular Board
Memoir '44: Eastern Front
2005
8.0
Memoir '44: Terrain Pack
2005
7.4
Memoir '44: Winter/Desert Board Map
2005
7.2
Memoir '44: Pacific Theater
2006
7.8
Memoir '44: Air Pack
2007
7.6
Memoir '44: Mediterranean Theater
2008
7.8
Memoir '44: Campaign Book Volume 1
2009
8.2
Memoir '44: Sword of Stalingrad
2009
7.9
Memoir '44: Breakthrough
2010
8.2
Memoir '44: Disaster at Dieppe
2010
7.7
Memoir '44: Winter Wars
2010
8.1
Memoir '44: Campaign Book Volume 2
2011
8.3
Memoir '44: Equipment Pack
2012
7.5
Memoir '44 is a historical boardgame where players face-off in stylized battles of some of the most famous historic battles of
World War II including Omaha Beach, Pegasus Bridge, Operation Cobra and the Ardennes.
Memoir '44 includes over 15 different battle scenarios and features a double-sided hex game board for both beach landings and
countryside combat. Each scenario mimics the historical terrain, troop placements and objectives of each army. Commanders
deploy troops through Command and Tactic cards, applying the unique skills of his units -- infantry, paratrooper, tank, artillery,
and even resistance fighters -- to their greatest strength.
"By design, the game is not overly complex", says Memoir '44 designer, Richard Borg. "The game mechanics, although simple,
still require strategic card play, timely dice rolling and an aggressive yet flexible battle plan to achieve victory." In addition to
the large, double-sided gameboard, Memoir '44 includes 144 amazingly detailed army miniatures - including historically
accurate infantry, tanks and artillery; 36 Obstacle pieces, 60 illustrated Command cards, 44 Special Terrain tiles, and 8 Custom
Wooden dice.
Memoir '44 is designed for 2 players but easily accommodates team play. And with Memoir '44 Overlord scenarios, players can
use multiple boards and up to 8 players to conduct large scale operations, experiencing the challenges of troop coordination and
military chain of command on a large scale battlefield. Average game length is between 30 and 60 minutes, encouraging match
play where players can command first one side and then the other.
The Memoir '44 series consists of the base game and a number of expansions.
This game is based upon Richard Borg's Command and Colors system.
Page 97 of 187
Merchant of Venus (second edition)
1-4
180
326
7.56
14+
2012
3.1 (Medium)
Economic, Exploration, Science Fiction, Space Exploration, Transportation
Commodity Speculation, Dice Rolling, Pick-up and Deliver, Point to Point Movement
Roll / Spin and Move
Merchant of Venus uses many elements which come together to form a very interesting game. Players take on the roles of space
traders who move their ships through interconnected systems discovering new alien worlds to trade with. As players start to
make money delivering commodities in a unique supply-and-demand system, their earnings can be used to purchase better ships
and equipment (shields, lasers, engines, etc...) and construct their own spaceports (which speed up trading) and factories (which
create better commodities). Variations included in the rulebook allow for interplayer combat. The player who first acquires
enough total value ($1000, $2000, $3000, $4000) in cash and port/factory deeds takes the day.
For the 2012 edition of Merchant of Venus from Fantasy Flight Games, the company promises that this revision "remains true
to its magnificently campy core while updating the map and game components and expanding game play in surprising ways that
will cause even the most hardcore fan to celebrate." That said, the player count has been lowered from six (in the Avalon Hill
edition) to four, with the four races in the game being Human, Whynom, Qossuth, and Eeepeeep.
Reimplements
Merchant of Venus
Page 98 of 187
Modern Art
3-5
45
139
7.35
10+
1992
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Economic
Auction/Bidding, Commodity Speculation, Hand Management
Buying and selling paintings is a very lucrative business, at least that's what Hollywood's led us to believe, and that's the
premise of this game. Five different artists have produced a bunch of paintings, and it's the player's task to be both the buyer
and the seller, hopefully making a profit in both roles. He does this by putting a painting from his hand up for auction each turn.
He gets the money if some other player buys it, but must pay the bank if he buys it for himself. After each round, paintings are
valued by the number of paintings of that type that were sold. The broker with the most cash after four rounds is the winner.
Part of the Knizia auction trilogy.
Page 99 of 187
Montgolfiere
2-6
45
7+
1992
4077
5.79
7
1.2 (Light)
Aviation / Flight, Racing
Auction/Bidding, Hand Management, Simultaneous Action Selection
Each player tries to fly his balloon as high as possible. For this, he is equipped with ballast which can be dumped at the right
opportunity, grappling hooks for linking to other balloons, soporific gas for knocking out balloons below, and a super motor.
Players can also use tempest cards to reverse the game play.
Extrapolated From Balloning Games: Each player starts with an identical set of cards, chooses a random subset and adds one
card each turn. The higher the card played, the more likely one is to move up, but there are other interesting plays such as
grappling onto another balloon, using soporific gas on lower balloons or storms which defeat the leaders. It can be especially
interesting to compete against the non-player Black Baron who has been known to win the game from time to time, even
playing randomly.
Page 100 of 187
Navegador
2-5
90
12+
2010
68
7.67
6
3.1 (Medium)
Economic, Exploration, Nautical, Renaissance
Area Movement, Commodity Speculation, Variable Phase Order
This game is inspired by the Portuguese Age of Discoveries in the 15th-16th century. Players take actions such as contracting
men, acquiring ships and buildings, sailing the seas, establishing colonies in discovered lands, trading goods on the market, and
getting privileges.
Each player starts with only two ships and three workers and tries to expand his wealth.
There are several undiscovered lands that allow players, once discovered, to found some colonies there. Colonies exist in
different places where sugar, gold and spices are available and can be sold to the market to make some money. Money is used to
build ships, erect buildings such as factories, shipyards and churches, and to get workers. Workers are necessary to found
colonies or to acquire buildings and privileges, which exist in five categories and therefore encourage players to follow
different strategies competing with each other.
At the end of the game the player who is most successful in combining his privileges with his achievements (colonies, factories,
discoveries, shipyards, and churches) is the winner.
Page 101 of 187
No Thanks!
3-5
20
8+
2004
313
6.98
6
1.2 (Light)
Card Game
Auction/Bidding, Press Your Luck, Set Collection
No Thanks! is a card game designed to be as simple as it is engaging.
The rules are simple. Each turn, players have two options:
play one of their chips to avoid picking up the current face-up card
pick up the face-up card (along with any chips that have already been played on that card) and turn over the next card
However, the choices aren't so easy as players compete to have the lowest score at the end of the game. The deck of cards is
numbered from 3 to 35, with each card counting for a number of points equal to its face value. Runs of two or more cards only
count as the lowest value in the run - but nine cards are removed from the deck before starting, so be careful looking for
connectors. Each chip is worth -1 point, but they can be even more valuable by allowing you to avoid drawing that unwanted
card.
The first versions of the game supported up to five players, but a 2011 edition supports up to seven.
This game was originally published in Germany by Amigo as Geschenkt ...ist noch zu teuer!, meaning Even given as a gift, it is
still too expensive!. Amigo's international edition, titled No Merci! (a delightful multi-lingual pun), had rules in several
languages, including English. The game has subsequently been released in other countries under an assortment of names.
Page 102 of 187
Notre Dame
2-5
75
106
7.43
10+
2007
2.8 (Medium)
Economic, Renaissance
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Modular Board, Point to Point Movement
Treasure Chest
2009
7.4
Rio Grande Games Description:
The players take on the roles of the heads of influential families in Paris at the end of the 14th century. In the shadow of the
Notre Dame cathedral, the players compete for prosperity and reputation. Each family controls one of the 3 - 5 boroughs that
surround the site of Notre Dame. As head of his family, each player tries, through clever use of his action cards, to advance the
power and prestige of his family, but penalties are assessed on those who do not take care of the health of the people who live in
their borough. The player with the most prestige at the end is the winner.
--Players play as well-off Parisians in the 15th century who wish to improve the importance and appearance of the city quarter
around the famous Notre Dame cathedral. The primary game concept is original, but simple, card play players use to
permanently improve their influence in the quarter. However, turn after turn, round after round, players must make choices that
can have major implications. If one does one thing, then the other can't be done. Concentrating on one aspect means
automatically ignoring another, which, above all others, is particularly dangerous in the case of the gradually approaching
plague....
After 9 exciting rounds and about 75 action-filled minutes, Notre Dame is over. The 'maitre' who has made the most of his cards
and has garnered the most prestige points is the winner.
Description from Alea.
This game is #11 in the Alea big box series.
Expanded by:
6-/7-player expansion (unofficial)
Treasure Chest
Reimplemented by:
Notre Dame Express (unofficial)
Page 103 of 187
Odin's Ravens
2
30
10+
2002
631
6.71
5
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Animals, Card Game, Mythology, Racing
Hand Management
Each morning Odin sends the ravens Hugin and Munin to race over the world of Midgard and report back what they have seen.
The first to return wins Odin's favor, but any cunning corvid has a few tricks in store and these are the two most brilliant birds in
Middle Earth.
Odin's Ravens is a two-player card game in which two ravens race across separate tracks, the tracks being comprised of
domino-style landscape cards that feature different types of land. Each player has his own deck of cards, using them to match
cards to the land types in front of his raven and advance the raven toward the end of the flight path. Odin Cards allow a player
to take special actions, such as rearranging the track of landscape cards or impeding the other player's raven. During play, each
player can create an auxiliary stack, playing cards from the hand now to set up plays in the future.
The round ends when a raven reaches the end of the flight path, and that raven's player scores points equal to the distance
separating the two ravens. In addition, whoever has played more cards to the "Magic Way" during the round – a separate
playing area in which players may play a particular type of card – wins three points. The game lasts multiple rounds until
one of the players reaches a total of 12 or more points and wins!
--In the second edition of Odin's Ravens, players have separate movement and action decks and can draw from either deck;
auxiliary stacks are no longer part of the game; and the game is no longer a series of races but a single race in which the ravens
move to the end of their individual tracks, then return to the starting point on the other track – thereby forcing them to
face all the obstacles that they originally threw at one another. Whoever returns his raven to the starting point first wins.
Page 104 of 187
Ora et Labora
1-4
150
13+
2011
22
8.00
6
3.9 (Medium/Heavy)
City Building, Economic, Industry / Manufacturing, Medieval, Religious, Territory Building
Modular Board, Pattern Building, Set Collection, Tile Placement, Worker Placement
In Ora et Labora, each player is head of a monastery in the Medieval era who acquires land and constructs buildings –
little enterprises that will gain resources and profit. The goal is to build a working infrastructure and manufacture prestigious
items – such as books, ceramics, ornaments, and relics – to gain the most victory points at the end of the game.
Ora et Labora, Uwe Rosenberg's fifth "big" game, has game play mechanisms similar to his Le Havre, such as two-sided
resource tiles that can be upgraded from a basic item to something more useful. Instead of adding resources to the board turn by
turn as in Agricola and Le Havre, Ora et Labora uses a numbered rondel to show how many of each resource is available at any
time. At the beginning of each round, players turn the rondel by one segment, adjusting the counts of all resources at the same
time.
Each player has a personal game board. New buildings enter the game from time to time, and players can construct them on
their game boards with the building materials they gather, with some terrain restrictions on what can be built where. Some
spaces start with trees or moors on them, as in Agricola: Farmers of the Moor, so they hinder development until a player clears
the land, but they provide resources when they are removed. Clever building on your personal game board will impact your
final score, and players can buy additional terrain during the game, if needed.
Players also have three workers who can enter buildings to take the action associated with that location. Workers must stay in
place until you've placed all three. You can enter your own buildings with these workers, but to enter and use another player's
buildings, you must pay that player an entry fee so that he'll move one of his workers into that building to do the work for you.
Ora et Labora features two variants: France and Ireland.
Page 105 of 187
Origins of World War II
2-5
60
12+
1971
6153
5.67
6
2.2 (Medium/Light)
Negotiation, Political, Wargame, World War II
Area Control / Area Influence, Auction/Bidding, Variable Player Powers
Origins of World War II is an Avalon Hill bookcase game. A game in which the players take the roles of the major powers of
World War II in the 1930s. Each attempts to achieve its diplomatic objectives while preventing the other players from gaining
theirs. If Germany or the USSR win World War II starts, if one of the allied powers wins the war would have been prevented.
The game is played in a series of six turns (the final one being December 1939), actions are resolved via the diplomatic conflict
table by comparing the diplomatic points of the attacker vs. those of the defender in each given area (Poland, Romania, etc).
Several different "What if" policies are available such as Strong Franco-British alliance, Aggressive French policy and the AntiBolshevik Crusade.
Includes a good chronology of the actual diplomatic moves made by each of the major powers leading up to the second world
war.
Avalon Hill Complexity rating - 1
The german Schmidt Spiele edition "Diplomatie" was published as a game of the Schmidt Spiele-Bar series in book case
format.
Page 106 of 187
Pandemic
2-4
60
47
7.63
10+
2008
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Medical
Action Point Allowance System, Co-operative Play, Hand Management, Point to Point Movement
Set Collection, Variable Player Powers
In Pandemic, several virulent diseases have broken out simultaneously all over the world! The players are disease-fighting
specialists whose mission is to treat disease hotspots while researching cures for each of four plagues before they get out of
hand.
The game board depicts several major population centers on Earth. On each turn, a player can use up to four actions to travel
between cities, treat infected populaces, discover a cure, or build a research station. A deck of cards provides the players with
these abilities, but sprinkled throughout this deck are Epidemic! cards that accelerate and intensify the diseases' activity. A
second, separate deck of cards controls the "normal" spread of the infections.
Taking a unique role within the team, players must plan their strategy to mesh with their specialists' strengths in order to
conquer the diseases. For example, the Operations Expert can build research stations which are needed to find cures for the
diseases and which allow for greater mobility between cities; the Scientist needs only four cards of a particular disease to cure it
instead of the normal five—but the diseases are spreading quickly and time is running out. If one or more diseases
spreads beyond recovery or if too much time elapses, the players all lose. If they cure the four diseases, they all win!
The 2013 edition of Pandemic includes two new characters—the Contingency Planner and the Quarantine
Specialist—not available in earlier editions of the game.
Page 107 of 187
Pax Porfiriana
1-5
120
621
7.73
12+
2012
3.1 (Medium)
Card Game, Economic, Political
Card Drafting
Pax Porfiriana – Latin for "The Porfirian Peace" – refers to the 33-year reign of dictator Porfirio Díaz,
who ruled Mexico with an iron hand until toppled by the 1910 Revolution.
As a rich businessman (Hacendado) in the turbulent pre-revolutionary borderlands of the U.S. and Mexico, players compete to
build business empires of ranches, mines, rails, troops, and banks while subverting opponents with bandidos, Indians, and
lawsuits. Each turn goes as follows:
1. Action Phase: Perform three actions, such as play new cards, get new cards from the market, speculate on cards in the market,
buy land, or redeploy troops.
2. Discard Headlines: Remove any Headlines (i.e. cards with the Bull-Bear icon) that have reached the leftmost position in the
Market.
3. Restore Market: Restore the Market to twelve cards.
4. Income Phase: Collect one gold per Income, Extortion, and Connection Cube in play. If Depression, pay one gold for each
card in play (includes Partners and Enterprises in your Row, and all of your Troops).
Four "scoring" cards (Toppling) are in the game and their effect depends on the current form of government. The government
can change if troops are played and as a result of other cards. The form of government also influences different production
values of the game, such as how much mines produce. Players win by toppling Díaz, either by coup, succession,
revolution, or annexation of Mexico by the U.S. If Díaz remains firmly seated at the end of the game, then the player
with the most gold wins.
Pax Porfiriana includes 220 cards, but only fifty cards (along with ten for each player) are used in a game, so no two games will
be the same!
Page 108 of 187
Pergamon
2-4
45
565
7.00
10+
2011
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Ancient
Set Collection
Pergamon is a tactical collecting game with a theme based on excavating archaeological discoveries and managing their
exhibition.
Set in the year 1878, the first excavations in what is now modern Turkey are uncovering the remains of ancient Pergamon. Soon
the precious discoveries will make their way abroad to public exhibitions before a waiting audience, eliciting substantial honor
and glory.
The players attempt to gain federal research grants to cover the costs of their excavations through a bidding mechanism.
Whoever is modest and less demanding can travel to the excavating areas before his or her competitors, and the rule is first
come, first dig. Only fragments will remain for the later expeditions. Recovered treasures are placed in valuable exhibitions, for
which the discoverer receives glory and recognition.
The player who accumulates the most glory after 12 rounds wins the game.
The combination of soliciting funds and racing for the best locations to excavate makes Pergamon a variable game with rules
that are easily accessible. Players are forced to make choices based on the money they can obtain and the sequence in which
they choose where to dig.
Page 109 of 187
Piece o' Cake
2-5
20
948
6.60
8+
2008
1.3 (Light)
Children's Game
Set Collection
Everyone knows the cake rules: one person cuts,the other chooses. In this way, one makes the slices as equal as possible so that
one does not end up with the short end. But this rule does not apply to "...aber bitte mit Sahne (...but please, with whipped
cream)." Here a person can cleverly offer larger pieces to the others and still get the most in the end.
5 cakes with 11 slices of different varieties are divided. Each variety awards a different amount of points. One can immediately
eat slices to guarantee a number of points, or collect them in the hope of scoring bonus points for having the most of that variety
at the end of the game. Only skilled dividers with an eye on their opponents' pieces can score the most points and win the game.
Page 110 of 187
Pirate's Cove
3-5
90
8+
2002
616
6.65
5
2.0 (Medium/Light)
Adventure, Fighting, Nautical, Pirates
Dice Rolling, Hand Management, Simultaneous Action Selection
Come aboard and sail to Pirate's Cove... the legendary hideaway of thieving pirates and cutthroat buccaneers. The tales of those
legendary pirates of old who've fought and survived these mysterious waters still haunt all those who yearn for a life at sea.
Armed with a secret map and starting with a modestly outfitted sloop salvaged from last winter's storm, you set sail to Pirate's
Cove - your eyes filled with visions of treasure and fame, your lungs filled with the salty air of the High Seas.
Your objective: to battle for the rights to plunder and become the most famed and feared Pirate the world has ever seen. To do
so, you will need to navigate shrewdly, fight recklessly and pillage mercilessly. You will gain fame by winning battles; burying
gold and treasure; and bragging about your exploits at the Tavern. At the end of twelve months, the pirate with the most fame
will be declared the most fearsome Pirate of the High Seas!
The game has 12 turns and at the start of every turn, each pirate must decide (secretly) which of the 6 islands they will visit. All
players reveal their navigation directions simultaneously and then the turn is resolved. If any two or more pirates end up at the
same island, Combat ensues.
Combat resolution is determined by the strengths of your ship and the results of cannon fire (dice). The goal of combat is to
scare away rival pirates so that you are the only pirate left at the island. If you stay in combat too long, your ship will suffer and
make subsequent turns more difficult, so there is a fine balance of when to stay and fight and when to let the bigger ship have its
booty. If you flee from combat, you end up at Pirate's Cove where you receive a small compensation for the turn. Once all
conflicts are resolved, then the bounty for each island is given out.
Each island (except Pirate's Cove and Treasure Island) offer various amounts of Fame, Gold, Treasure or Tavern cards. The
bounty is skewed so that some Islands are clearly better choices than others, so it can force you to decide (or bluff) if you think
you can take the island should other pirates go after the same bounty. Once you have your bounty, you can purchase upgrades
for your ship. Each Island offers a different ship component. The four parts of your ship are: Sails (determines speed and
initiative in combat), Hull (how much treasure you can carry), Crew (needed to man the cannons), and Cannons. (The lower
number of Crew and Cannons determines how many dice you roll in combat).
There is also an island with a Pub that offers useful strategy cards to help you in all aspects of the game. The last island is
treasure island which offers no real bounty other than the chance to bury treasures that you have in the hull of your ship. Buried
treasure is converted to Fame (which is the ultimate goal of the game).
Other random elements of the game include the dreaded Legendary Pirates who are highly dangerous ships that patrol the
islands in order. One of 5 different Legendary Pirates (which include famous names like Blackbeard and The Flying Dutchman)
is drawn at the beginning of every game, and stays until defeated. If you end up at the same island as one of them, you had
better have a strong ship and helpful allies or they will blast you with their powerful cannons. However, if you can manage to
sink their ships, you can score a good amount of fame! But beware, once you defeat him/her a new Legendary Pirate will appear
to wreck havoc in the islands.
At the very end of the game, there is a chance for everyone to tell "tall tales" about themselves to increase their final fame
standings. These tall tale cards are gained at the pub and offer yet another fun "pirate" mechanic. In all, Pirate's Cove offers you
the chance to truly play like a pirate where you can fight and plunder your way to victory.
Page 111 of 187
Power Grid
2-6
120
7
8.05
12+
2004
3.3 (Medium)
Economic, Industry / Manufacturing
Auction/Bidding, Route/Network Building
Power Grid is the updated release of the Friedemann Friese crayon game Funkenschlag. It removes the crayon aspect from
network building in the original edition, while retaining the fluctuating commodities market like Crude: The Oil Game and an
auction round intensity reminiscent of The Princes of Florence.
The object of Power Grid is to supply the most cities with power when someone's network gains a predetermined size. In this
new edition, players mark pre-existing routes between cities for connection, and then bid against each other to purchase the
power plants that they use to power their cities.
However, as plants are purchased, newer, more efficient plants become available, so by merely purchasing, you're potentially
allowing others access to superior equipment.
Additionally, players must acquire the raw materials (coal, oil, garbage, and uranium) needed to power said plants (except for
the 'renewable' windfarm/ solar plants, which require no fuel), making it a constant struggle to upgrade your plants for
maximum efficiency while still retaining enough wealth to quickly expand your network to get the cheapest routes.
Power Grid FAQ:
Power Grid FAQ - Please read this before posting a rules question! Many questions are asked over and over in the forums...
Page 112 of 187
Puerto Rico
3-5
90
4
8.22
12+
2002
3.3 (Medium)
City Building, Economic, Farming
Variable Phase Order
Treasure Chest
2009
7.4
The players are plantation owners in Puerto Rico in the days when ships had sails. Growing up to five different kind of
crops—corn, indigo, sugar, tobacco, and coffee—they must try to run their business more efficiently than their
close competitors: growing crops and storing them efficiently, developing San Juan with useful buildings, deploying their
colonists to best effect, selling crops at the right time, and, most importantly, shipping their goods back to Europe for maximum
benefit.
The game system lets players choose the order of the phases in each turn by allowing each player to choose a role from those
remaining when it is their turn. No role can be selected twice in the same round. The player who selects the best roles to
advance their position during the game will win.
Page 113 of 187
Qin
2-4
30
8+
2012
1322
6.84
6
2.2 (Medium/Light)
Abstract Strategy, Ancient, Territory Building
Area Control / Area Influence, Tile Placement
In Qin players colonize the Chinese hinterland, seize territories, and expand their influence by placing tiles and pagodas.
A move is simple: You choose one out of three tiles from your hand, place it onto the grid of the board, then draw a new tile.
Each tile shows two landscapes. If you create a territory that consists of at least two spaces of the same landscape, you seize it.
You can also expand your territories, take over territories from other players, and connect your territories to villages on the
board. All of this enables you to place pagodas. The player who is first to get rid of all his pagodas wins.
Page 114 of 187
Queen's Necklace
2-4
45
1019
6.49
8+
2003
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Bluffing, Card Game, Novel-based
Betting/Wagering, Commodity Speculation, Hand Management, Set Collection
Queen's Necklace is a game of gem-selling, influence, and intrigue at the Court. Two to four players compete in the role of
Royal Jeweler to sell rare jewels to the Queen and her court.
Jeweler's loupe in hand, you must decide how best to spend your hard-earned ducats: on the acquisition of beautiful gems
(diamonds, emeralds, and rubies); or to buy the favors of the various court followers. After three years of craftsmanship, the
jeweler who sells the most precious gems and builds the largest fortune will receive the coveted title of King's Jeweler and a
place at the Court!
Set in Paris, on the eve of the French Revolution
From the slums, where purse-snatchers and courtesans work their respective trades, to the inner salons of the Louvre, where
confessors, royal astrologers, musketeers, and court favorites mingle and scheme in hushed conversations. The position of
King's Jeweler has suddenly become a lot more dangerous!
Page 115 of 187
Qwirkle
2-4
45
451
6.85
6+
2006
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Abstract Strategy
Pattern Building, Pattern Recognition, Tile Placement
While Qwirkle is as simple as matching colors and shapes, it is a game that also requires tactical maneuvers and well-planned
strategy. The game consists of 108 wooden blocks with six different shapes in six colors. Using the blocks, players attempt to
score the most points by building lines that share a common attribute – either color or shape. Qwirkle is a quick game to
learn, but you'll soon discover that you'll need to think strategically in order to score the most points.
Page 116 of 187
Ra
2-5
60
12+
1999
63
7.54
9
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Ancient, Mythology
Auction/Bidding, Press Your Luck, Set Collection
Ra is an auction and set-collection game with an Ancient Egyptian theme. Each turn players are able to purchase lots of tiles
with their bidding tiles (suns). Once a player has used up his or her suns, the other players continue until they do likewise,
which may set up a situation with a single uncontested player bidding on tiles before the end of the round occurs. Tension
builds because the round may end before all players have had a chance to win their three lots for the epoch. The various tiles
either give immediate points, prevent negative points for not having certain types at the end of the round (epoch), or give points
after the final round. The game lasts for three "epochs" (rounds). The game offers a short learning curve, and experienced
players find it both fast-moving and a quick play.
From the Box:
The game spans 1500 years of Egyptian history in less than an hour!
The players seek to expand their power and fame and there are many ways to accomplish this: Influencing Pharaohs, Building
monuments, Farming on the Nile, Paying homage to the Gods, Advancing the technology and culture of the people. Ra is an
auction and set collecting game where players may choose to take risks for great rewards or... And all this is for the glory of the
Sun God Ra!
Page 117 of 187
Race for the Galaxy
1-6
30
12+
2007
19
7.84
9
2.9 (Medium)
Card Game, Civilization, Economic, Science Fiction, Space Exploration
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Simultaneous Action Selection
Race for the Galaxy: The Gathering Storm
2008
8.1
Race for the Galaxy: Rebel vs Imperium
2009
8.1
In the card game Race for the Galaxy, players build galactic civilizations by playing game cards in front of them that represent
worlds or technical and social developments. Some worlds allow players to produce goods, which can be consumed later to gain
either card draws or victory points when the appropriate technologies are available to them. These are mainly provided by the
developments and worlds that are not able to produce, but the fancier production worlds also give these bonuses.
At the beginning of each round, players each select, secretly and simultaneously, one of the seven roles which correspond to the
phases in which the round progresses. By selecting a role, players activate that phase for this round, giving each player the
opportunity to perform that phase's action. For example, if one player chooses the settle role, each player has the opportunity to
settle one of the planets from their hand. The player who has chosen the role, however, gets a bonus that applies only to him.
But bonuses may also be acquired through developments, so one must be aware when another player also takes advantage of his
choice of role.
Page 118 of 187
Railways of the World
2-6
120
44
7.75
10+
2005
3.0 (Medium)
Trains, Transportation, Video Game Theme
Action Point Allowance System, Auction/Bidding, Card Drafting, Pick-up and Deliver
Route/Network Building, Tile Placement
Railways of the World (2009) is the new edition of the base game for Eagle Games' popular Railways of the World series, first
published as Railroad Tycoon in 2005. It reimplements the original game with several improvements.
Revisit the early days of the Age of Steam as you begin with a locomotive (the venerable John Bull, the first locomotive to run
in North America) and a vision (your Tycoon "mission" card). From there, build your budding railroad network into a vast
empire. Connect New York to Chicago, earn the most money, develop bigger and faster locomotives and maybe even span
North America and build the Transcontinental Railway!
Multiple expansions featuring different maps are available. Railways of the World is the new base game for the system and
includes the engine placards, railroad tiles, train tokens, money, bonds, and other items that are needed in almost all the
Railways of the World series. A gameboard depicting the eastern half of the United States is included in the base game, as well
as a mounted map of Mexico.
This game is preceded by the designer's other Winsome train games: Age of Steam, Australian Railways, Volldampf, New
England Railways, Veld Spoorweg, Lancashire Railways, and Ferrocarriles Pampas. Railroad Tycoon was the result of a
collaboration with Glenn Drover, in which the mechanics and game-play of Martin Wallace's Age of Steam were simplified and
streamlined and attractive over-produced components were added, in order to make Railroad Tycoon more appealing to less
hardcore gamers and more accessible to a wider audience.
A revised reprint was published at the end of 2010 which made some component improvements, such as the addition of
Railroad Operation cards for the Mexico map.
Complete series overview - The Railways of the World Series: Introducing the family members of the ideal medium-weight
train game
Note: The RailRoad Tycoon board itself is gigantic (about 36x45 inches, 91x114 cm) and requires a huge table or playing on
the floor.
Similar to:
Steam
Page 119 of 187
Saint Petersburg
2-5
45
10+
2004
131
7.35
8
2.5 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Economic
Card Drafting, Set Collection
Saint Petersburg: New Society & Banquet Expansion
2008
7.5
On May 16th, 1703, Czar Peter laid the cornerstone for the first building in Saint Petersburg. Quickly, glorious buildings were
added, always being expanded, so that Nobility (bringing victory points) may want to move in. But to accomplish this, one
needs merchants who can bankroll the necessary Rubles, or the glory is over. The competition isn't sleeping either, and can
sometimes steal a desired card right out from under your nose.
Saint Petersburg has a board to tally victory points and to set out the four types of cards. It is the cards themselves that players
need to collect. In each round – with the number of rounds dependent on the number of players and the randomness of
card availability – players first pay for CRAFTSMEN who supply money for further purchases; then BUILDINGS to
score points; then ARISTOCRATS, who are needed for money, points, and end-of-game scoring; and finally, unique cards from
all three categories which give greater benefits. During the first rounds, players never have enough money to buy every card
they want. During later rounds, they have plenty of money, but the cards they'd like to buy may have already come and gone...
Expanded by:
Saint Petersburg: The Banquet
Saint Petersburg: New Society & Banquet Expansion (includes The Banquet)
Page 120 of 187
Samarkand: Routes to Riches
2-5
30
618
7.00
8+
2010
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Arabian, Economic, Transportation
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Route/Network Building, Stock Holding
As members of merchant families the players marry into other wealthy merchant families. They expand the trading routes of
these families and establish trade relationships with other families. The player having gained the most victory points with
relationships and goods will be the winner at the end of the game.
Each turn the players either marry into a merchant family or expand the trading route of a family (they are already married into).
To marry into a family, the player pays the cost of the family. Only two players may marry into each family.
To expand the trading route of a family, the player must be married into the family and may pay for the route with the money of
the family. The goal is to meet other families not met before (gaining trade relationship markers) and reaching goods spaces
first (gaining good tokens).
If all families have established at least one trade relationship OR one family has established 5 trade relationship, the game ends.
Each player scores his good cards with the corresponding good markers he has acquired, the trade relationship markers he has
collected and his money.
Samarkand is a family game with its simple to understand rules and fast access to play.
This entry has been split from the Winsome Games publication Age of Scheme: Routes to Riches. As the rules have been
altered, number of players differs and updates to the artwork have been made, the two games are regarded as separate entities.
Page 121 of 187
Samurai
2-4
45
92
7.46
10+
1998
2.5 (Medium)
Medieval
Area Control / Area Influence, Hand Management, Set Collection, Tile Placement
Part of the Knizia tile-laying trilogy, this game is set in medieval Japan. Players compete to gain the favor of three factions:
samurai, peasants, and priests, represented by helmet, rice paddy, and Buddha tokens scattered about the board, which
represents some of the islands of Japan. The competition is waged through the use of hexagonal tiles, each of which help curry
favor of one of the three factions (or all three at once!). Players can make lightning-quick strikes with horseback ronin and ships
or approach more methodically. As each token (helmets, rice paddies, and Buddhas) is surrounded, it is awarded to the player
with who has gained the most favor with the corresponding group.
Gameplay continues until all the symbols of one type have been removed from the board or four symbols have been removed
due to a tie for influence.
At the end of the game, players compare captured symbols of each type, competing for majorities in each of the 3 types. Ties
are not uncommon and are broken based on the number of other, "non-majority" symbols each player has collected.
Page 122 of 187
San Juan
2-4
45
10+
2004
138
7.32
7
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, City Building, Economic
Hand Management, Variable Phase Order
Treasure Chest
2009
7.4
A card game based on Puerto Rico. The pack of 110 cards consists of production buildings (indigo, sugar, tobacco, coffee, and
silver) and "violet" buildings that grant special powers or extra victory points. Cards from the hand can be either built or used as
money to build something else. Cards from the deck are used to represent goods produced by the production buildings, in which
case they are left face-down. A seven-card hand limit is enforced once per round.
In each round or governorship, each player in turn selects from one of the available roles, triggering an event that usually affects
all players, such as producing goods or building. The person who picks the role gets a privilege, such as producing more goods
or building more cheaply.
Though similar in concept to Puerto Rico, the game has many different mechanics. In particular, there are no colonists and no
shipping of goods; goods production and trading are normally limited to one card per phase; and trades cannot be blocked.
Victory points are gained exclusively by building, and the game ends as soon as one player has put up 12 buildings.
Sequel to:
Puerto Rico
Expanded by:
Treasure Chest
Page 123 of 187
Set
1 - 20
30
860
6.49
6+
1988
1.8 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Puzzle, Real-time
Pattern Recognition, Set Collection
In Set, each card contains 1-3 objects, with all of the objects on a card having the same color, shape and shading, e.g., two
purple shaded ovals. Colors, shapes, and shadings come in three different types: green, purple and red; oval, diamond and
squiggle; and solid, shaded and outlined.
All players compete simultaneously and try to claim sets of cards in a single pass through the deck. A set consists of three cards
that are either all alike or all different in each attribute. For example, if all three cards have the same number of objects, but
three different shapes, shadings, and colors, then those cards are a set; if two of the cards have a common attribute that is not
shared by the third, they are not a set.
To play, one person takes the deck and lays out twelve cards face up. The first person to spot a set collects those three cards; if
the player was mistaken, then this player cannot claim a set until after another player has done so. After someone has claimed a
set, the cardholder lays out three more cards. (If all players agree that no sets can be claimed, then the cardholder lays out three
more cards. These cards aren't replaced after someone claims a set.) Whoever claims the most sets wins!
Page 124 of 187
Show Manager
2-6
60
10+
1996
479
7.18
7
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Card Game
Card Drafting, Set Collection
The players put together four shows in any order: Queenie, Wolf, King Lear, and Ballet. To accomplish this, players draft actor
cards from a constantly changing queue of cards. Each card represents actors of varying skills at roles. Once a player puts
together all the needed roles for a show, the value is judged against all the other productions of that type, with points given
relative to the other productions.
This is a Queen Games reprint of the db-Spiele original, Premiere.
Re-implemented as:
Atlantic Star
Page 125 of 187
Sid Meier's Civilization: The Board Game
2-4
180
52
7.71
13+
2010
3.8 (Medium/Heavy)
Civilization, Exploration, Negotiation, Video Game Theme
Modular Board, Rock-Paper-Scissors, Variable Player Powers
Please note: this article covers the 2010 release of Sid Meier's Civilization: The Board Game by FFG. This game is unrelated to
the similarly named 2002 Eagle Games Sid Meier's Civilization: The Boardgame.
From Press Release:
Before you lies a vast bounty of land, ripe for the plucking. Your meager beginnings will influence the paths you must take.
Lead your people well and they will take you to infinite heights of greatness. If civilization manages to endure the ages, your
name will hang in every whisper of its legacy...
Fantasy Flight Games is excited to announce the upcoming release of Sid Meier's Civilization: The Board Game! Forge an
empire to stand the test of time using innovative game mechanics with multiple paths to victory.
Will you lead the greatest army in the world to conquer your foes? Or will you be the first to journey to the stars, becoming the
most technologically advanced civilization known to man? The choice is yours.
Designed by Kevin Wilson, Civilization: The Board Game is inspired by the legendary video game series created by Sid Meier.
Players are tasked with guiding an entire civilization throughout the ages, taking ownership of your people's technology,
economy, culture, and military, as well as all the choices that go along with them. There are four different paths to victory, and
each is riddled with opposition.
In Civilization: The Board Game, 2-4 players take on the roles of famous leaders in charge of historical civilizations, each with
their own abilities. Players will be able to explore a module game board, build cities and buildings, fight battles, research
powerful technology, and attract great people by advancing their culture. No matter what your play style is, there is a
civilization for you!
Fans of Sid Meier's classic video game franchise will find familiar footing in Civilization: The Board Game. Staying true to the
foundations of its video game predecessor while creating a new and unique way to play, Civilization: The Board Game captures
the spirit and grandeur of carving out a magnificent empire from modest beginnings.
Players start off with a single city, one army figure, and one scout, and from these meager origins you must forge through the
ages and become the greatest civilization in the world.
Those unfamiliar with the video game series will find Civilization: The Board Game a great way to enter into the world of
Civilization. The strategy and tactical decisions involved in Civilization: The Board Game will appeal to strategy gamers and
war gamers alike, and the ability to win through culture and technological advancement will give those who only wish to focus
on their own empire a chance at victory as well.
Page 126 of 187
Slapshot
2 - 10
30
8+
1982
1686
6.35
5
1.4 (Light)
Card Game, Sports
Simultaneous Action Selection, Trading
Slapshot is a wheeling, dealing game for hockey nuts of all ages. Each participant in Slapshot assumes the role of a team
manager. The object is to skillfully manage your team into the playoffs and then win the championship. During the regular
season, you will be able to improve your team with trades and drafts. Injuries and luck will play a part, but it is your skill as
manager that will guide your team to victory or defeat.
Contents: 1 gameboard, 54 Player cards, 6 pawns, & the rulebook
Phantoms of the Ice and Power Play are subsequent versions of this game with some different rules and new art by Doris
Matthaus. Contents vary for these versions as well.
Expanded by:
Phantoms of the Ice Sonderspieler (for Phantoms of the Ice)
Page 127 of 187
Sleeping Queens
2-5
10
8+
2005
1723
6.39
5
1.1 (Light)
Card Game
Hand Management, Memory
From Box: Sleeping Queens - A Royally Rousing Card Game
Imagine a place where there's a queen of all pancakes, a king of cookies and a pack of over-protective dragons? If this sounds
like something out of a dream, it actually is! Sleeping Queens was invented by 6-year-old Miranda Evarts, who thought up the
game one night when she couldn't fall asleep. She awoke the next morning and with help from her older sister, Madeleine, and
her parents, Denise and Max, created this wonderfully whimsical world of napping nobles.
Rise and Shine! The Pancake Queen, the Ladybug Queen and ten of their closest friends have fallen under a sleeping spell and
it's your job to wake them up. Use strategy, quick thinking and a little luck to rouse these napping nobles from their royal
slumbers. Play a knight to steal a queen or take a chance on a juggling jester. But watch out for wicked potions and dastardly
dragons! The player who wakes the most queens wins.
Page 128 of 187
Small World
2-5
80
8+
2009
72
7.50
6
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Civilization, Fantasy, Territory Building
Area Control / Area Influence, Dice Rolling, Variable Player Powers
Grand Dames of Small World
2009
7.5
Small World: Cursed!
2009
7.6
Small World: Be Not Afraid...
2010
7.8
In Small World, players vie for conquest and control of a world that is simply too small to accommodate them all.
Designed by Philippe Keyaerts as a fantasy follow-up to his award-winning Vinci, Small World is inhabited by a zany cast of
characters such as dwarves, wizards, amazons, giants, orcs, and even humans, who use their troops to occupy territory and
conquer adjacent lands in order to push the other races off the face of the earth.
Picking the right combination from the 14 different fantasy races and 20 unique special powers, players rush to expand their
empires - often at the expense of weaker neighbors. Yet they must also know when to push their own over-extended civilization
into decline and ride a new one to victory!
Reimplements:
Vinci (released in 1999)
Re-implemented by:
Small World Underground (released in 2011)
Small World Designer Edition (released in 2014)
Clarifications: available in a pinned forum post.
Page 129 of 187
Snow Tails
2-5
45
352
7.00
10+
2008
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Animals, Racing, Sports
Hand Management, Modular Board
Fragor's 2008 Essen release is set in the snowy world of the Arctic Circle, where brave sledders compete in a test of skill and
endurance. Action is fast and furious and not all sleds may make it to the finish. Huskies only have one setting and that is full
speed! Hang on to your furs, the reins, your sled and anything else you can get hold of.
The game contains modular track pieces which can be fitted together to form different courses. Players have their own Dog
Decks which they draw from and play onto their sled mat. Movement is rarely in a straight line as the sled may drift left or
right. Losing control or speeding into a corner results in Dent cards being acquired which will limit a player's hand size.
The game features a fun and original movement mechanism.
An Asmodee edition was released in 2009.
Expanded by:
Snow Tails: The Leap of Death
Page 130 of 187
Sobek
2-4
40
863
6.84
8+
2010
1.8 (Medium/Light)
Ancient, Card Game
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Memory, Set Collection
From the Publisher:
Spring/Summer 2010
Pitch: Ancient Egypt... The temple of Sobek is being built and the market place is thriving. Loads of goods arrive by ship for the
construction site and it is a race to pick the best items in order to sell them with the most profit.
Of course, with so much at stake, not all the moves are legal, corruption is everywhere and cordiality scarce. Because in the end
there can be only one winner!
--Famous Bruno Cathala's (Cyclades, Dice Town, Shadows Over Camelot, Mr. Jack, MOW...) latest design is a fast paced card
game well suited for the whole family, with tactical choices, luck, and a bit of cunning.
Each turn you have to choose if you want to take a goods card, play a character with a special power or display a set of
matching goods cards.
While taking a profitable card, you often collect corruption points, which add up in a pile in front of you.
During each each round five sets of nine cards are put at the players' disposal. When all cards are gone, there is a scoring for all
displayed cards, but beware, the player with the most corruption sigils sees his income almost cut down in half.
The game ends after 3 rounds or if a player has reached a hundred points.
Online Play
Yucata (turn-based)
Page 131 of 187
Speed Circuit
2-6
120
12+
1971
886
6.85
5
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Racing, Sports
Action Point Allowance System, Modular Board, Simultaneous Action Selection
In Speed Circuit, each player takes control of a Formula 1 racecar zipping around the tracks. Each person then distributes a
number of points to Start Speed, Top Speed, Wear and other attributes, five points per lap. Then, each player moves based on
their speed, and can adjust their speed, choosing to forfeit a Wear Point, or roll the Chance Die, where a bad roll could cause
you to move through, spin out, or even crash out of the race. Whoever gets over the line first wins.
Before the race begins the players prepare their cars by allocating points, so if you want faster acceleration or speed you have to
sacrifice start speed or braking or tire wear.
Each turn, the players write their planned speed for the next turn and then move their cars 1 space per 20 mph. Each curve on
the track has a speed limit that cannot be exceeded without penalty. If you exceed curve speed, overaccelerate or overdecelerate
your car, etc., you pay penalties in tire wear or possible damage to your car or elimination from the race.
The original 3M Sports Games version used speedometer wheels to select speed, used a random card draw to determine the car
characteristics and has no random elements.
Expanded by:
Speed Circuit - British Grand Prix
Speed Circuit: Detroit Grand Prix
Speed Circuit: Grand Prix de Belgique
Speed Circuit: Grand Prix de France
Speed Circuit: South African Grand Prix
Speed Circuit Accessory Pack 1
Speed Circuit Accessory Pack 2
Speed Circuit Accessory Pack 3
Speed Circuit Accessory Pack 4
Speed Circuit Tournament Tracks
Speed Circuit Turnier Kurs
Page 132 of 187
Steam
3-5
90
34
7.82
10+
2009
3.5 (Medium)
Economic, Trains, Transportation
Auction/Bidding, Pick-up and Deliver, Route/Network Building, Tile Placement
Martin Wallace's new train game is published by Mayfair. The game is of the same family of rail games as Age of Steam and
Railroad Tycoon, both previous games designed by Wallace.
The game plays very similarly to Age of Steam but with modifications to some of its mechanics and artwork. Tracks for
income, train level, etc. are all printed on the board around the map such that alternate maps can be overlaid on the board and
the necessary tracks will still be able to be used.
Similar to:
Railways of the World
Page 133 of 187
Stone Age
2-4
60
10+
2008
38
7.70
7
2.5 (Medium)
Prehistoric
Dice Rolling, Set Collection, Worker Placement
The "Stone Age" times were hard indeed. In their roles as hunters, collectors, farmers, and tool makers, our ancestors worked
with their legs and backs straining against wooden plows in the stony earth. Of course, progress did not stop with the wooden
plow. People always searched for better tools and more productive plants to make their work more effective.
In Stone Age, the players live in this time, just as our ancestors did. They collect wood, break stone and wash their gold from
the river. They trade freely, expand their village and so achieve new levels of civilization. With a balance of luck and planning,
the players compete for food in this pre-historic time.
Players use up to ten tribe members each in three phases. In the first phase, players place their men in regions of the board that
they think will benefit them, including the hunt, the trading center, or the quarry. In the second phase, the starting player
activates each of his staffed areas in whatever sequence he chooses, followed in turn by the other players. In the third phase,
players must have enough food available to feed their populations, or they face losing resources or points.
Page 134 of 187
Stratego
2
45
8+
1947
1960
6.00
5
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Abstract Strategy, Bluffing, Deduction, Fighting, Memory, Napoleonic, Wargame
Grid Movement, Memory, Secret Unit Deployment
From the box:
The gameboard is your battlefield. You have an army of men at your disposal and six bombs. Your mission--protect your flag
and capture your opponent's flag.
Secretly place your men, bombs, and flag on the gameboard with these objectives in mind. But remember your opponent is
doing the same thing, so you must plan a defense as well as an offense.
Once the armies are in place, advance your men. When you're one space away from an enemy, attack. You and your opponent
declare ranks. The lower-ranking man is captured and out of play.
You control your pieces and risk your men in battles where the strength of your enemy is unknown. The suspense builds as your
men move deeper into enemy territory. Move with caution and courage. The next piece you attack could be a bomb. And when
attacked, it could "blast" your man off the board and out of play.
The first to capture an enemy flag is the winner!
This game is similar to, and almost certainly derived directly from, the H.P. Gibsons (UK) game L'Attaque (1909). It is not
exactly the same, but not far from it (numbered pieces, spy (same name) can kill the strongest piece but only when attacking,
flag, bombs, etc.)
Re-implemented by:
Stratego (Revised Edition) (aka Stratego Fire & Ice)
The Generals
Stratego: Legends
Stratego: Star Wars
Stratego: The Lord of the Rings
Ultimate Stratego
Electronic Stratego
Stratego: Marvel Heroes
Stratego: Star Wars Saga Edition
Stratego: The Chronicles of Narnia
and numerous others.
Similar to:
Admirals
Lu Zhan Jun Qi
L'Attaque
Batalj
Sharpe's Attack
Different Edition Complications
When first produced in Europe, the most powerful pieces had higher numbers. I.e. the Marshall (most powerful piece) was a
10, the General was a 9, and so on. The higher the rank, the higher the number.
When they introduced Stratego in the USA, the numbering was reversed, so the Marshall was a 1, the General 2, and so on. The
1st rank (most powerful) was 1, the second most powerful was 2, 3rd most powerful was 3....
Then, in 2000s Hasbro re-imagined Stratego in the USA and made a few changes. They reduced the number of Page
pieces135
perofside
187
(from 40 to 30), added additional powers, and changed the numbering to reflect the European system.
Taj Mahal
3-5
90
135
7.42
12+
2000
3.0 (Medium)
Bluffing, Political
Auction/Bidding, Card Drafting, Hand Management, Route/Network Building, Set Collection
Another game in Alea's bookcase series, this game takes place in India. There are twelve turns with an auction for up to six
different prizes each turn. Players use cards to bid for the various prizes. The trick is when you take a turn and you make the
highest bid on a prize, you can either spend more cards to try for other things or simply take your winnings and walk away. The
prizes are mostly positions on the board, and players get more points for connecting provinces on the map. But as is typical for
Dr. Knizia, there are several other ways of scoring points in this game. After the final area on the board is auctioned, the player
with the highest point total takes the game.
This game is #3 in the Alea big box series.
Page 136 of 187
Targi
2
60
12+
2012
458
7.55
6
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Card Game
Modular Board, Set Collection, Worker Placement
Game description from the publisher:
Male members of the Tuareg desert people are called "Targi," and as tribal leaders they deal in goods from near and far such as
dates, salt, and pepper to get highly coveted gold coins and benefits.
In Targi, a new entry in Kosmos' two-player line, players are leaders of a Tuareg tribe and want to increase their tribe's strength
and influence. To do this, they need to gain the right items and use their possible actions wisely to end up with a bit of gold in
their pockets. If you don't reach a dealer quickly, the opponent might do so first – but what if you bring a whole caravan
of coveted goods?
Page 137 of 187
The Castles of Burgundy
2-4
90
12+
2011
12
8.05
7
3.1 (Medium)
Dice, Medieval, Territory Building
Dice Rolling, Set Collection, Tile Placement
The game is set in the Burgundy region of High Medieval France. Each player takes on the role of an aristocrat, originally
controlling a small princedom. While playing they aim to build settlements and powerful castles, practice trade along the river,
exploit silver mines, and use the knowledge of travellers.
The game is about placing settlement tiles into the princedom. Every tile has a function that starts when the tile is placed. The
princedom itself consists of several regions, each of which demands its own settlement tile.
The core game mechanism involves two dice. The pips show the kind of action the players are allowed to do (example: roll a 2
and a 5: using the 2 the player buys a watch tower and places it on a 5 city tile which triggers the function of the tower with
additional advantages).
It is also possible to influence the dice, so the player is not completely subject to luck.
The rules include basic and advanced versions.
This game is #14 in the Alea big box series.
Page 138 of 187
The Princes of Florence
2-5
90
41
7.72
13+
2000
3.3 (Medium)
City Building, Renaissance
Auction/Bidding, Tile Placement
Treasure Chest
2009
7.4
Players attract artists and scholars trying to become the most prestigious family in Florence. Each player is given a palace grid
and reference chart and attempts to gain the most victory points after seven rounds. Scoring victory points can be done in a
variety of ways although most will be earned by playing profession cards to generate work points. There are a variety of
professions such as astronomers, organists and architects. Each is attracted to a particular combination of building, landscape
feature, and social freedom. The more the player can match these preferences then the more work points are generated. If a
player satisfies the minimum requirement of work points, which increases each round, then the work can be created and the
player can then trade the work points for cash and/or victory points.
Page 139 of 187
The Resistance
5 - 10
30
13+
2009
76
7.54
5
1.6 (Medium/Light)
Bluffing, Card Game, Deduction, Negotiation, Party Game, Science Fiction, Spies/Secret Agents
Partnerships, Simultaneous Action Selection, Voting
The Empire must fall. Our mission must succeed. By destroying their key bases, we will shatter Imperial strength and liberate
our people. Yet spies have infiltrated our ranks, ready for sabotage. We must unmask them. In five nights we reshape destiny or
die trying. We are the Resistance!
The Resistance is a party game of social deduction. It is designed for five to ten players, lasts about 30 minutes, and has no
player elimination. The Resistance is inspired by Mafia/Werewolf, yet it is unique in its core mechanics which increase the
resources for informed decisions, intensify player interaction, and eliminate player elimination.
Players are either Resistance Operatives or Imperial Spies. For three to five rounds, they must depend on each other to carry out
missions against the Empire. At the same time, they must try to deduce the other players' identities and gain their trust. Each
round begins with discussion. When ready, the Leader entrusts sets of Plans to a certain number of players (possibly including
himself/herself). Everyone votes on whether or not to approve the assignment. Once an assignment passes, the chosen players
secretly decide to Support or Sabotage the mission. Based on the results, the mission succeeds (Resistance win) or fails (Empire
win). When a team wins three missions, they have won the game.
Rule Correction:
For first printing (2010 purchases), the expansion rules should read: "Games of 5-6 players use 7 plot cards, games with 7+
players use all 15 Plot Cards." and "...each Round the leader draws Plot cards (1 for 5-6 players, 2 for 7-8 players and 3 for 9-10
players)" - This has been corrected in the subsequent printings.
Page 140 of 187
The Settlers of Catan
3-6
90
10+
1995
103
7.45
7
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Negotiation
Dice Rolling, Hand Management, Modular Board, Route/Network Building, Trading
The Settlers of Catan: 5-6 Player Extension
1996
7.1
Catan: Cities & Knights
1998
7.5
2
In Settlers of Catan, players try to be the dominant force on the island of Catan by building settlements, cities, and roads. On
each turn dice are rolled to determine what resources the island produces. Players collect these resources to build up their
civilizations to get to 10 victory points and win the game. Multi-award-winning and one of the most popular games in recent
history due to its amazing ability to appeal to non-gamers and gamers alike.
Die Siedler von Catan was originally published by Kosmos and has gone through multiple editions. It was licensed by Mayfair
and has undergone at least 4 editions as Settlers of Catan. It has also been re-published in a travel edition by Kosmos and in yet
another edition for Japan/Asia, Settlers of Catan: Rockman Edition.
Settlers of Catan is the original game in the Catan Series.
Page 141 of 187
The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow
8 - 18
30
10+
2001
309
7.08
7
1.3 (Light)
Bluffing, Deduction, Horror, Murder/Mystery, Party Game
Partnerships, Role Playing, Variable Player Powers, Voting
Werewolves of Miller's Hollow is a game that takes place in a small village which is haunted by werewolves. Each player is
secretly assigned a role - Werewolf, Ordinary Townsfolk, or special character such as The Sheriff, The Hunter, the Witch, the
Little Girl, The Fortune Teller and so on... There is also a Moderator player who controls the flow of the game. The game
alternates between night and day phases. At night, the Werewolves secretly choose a Villager to kill. During the day, the
Villager who was killed is revealed and is out of the game. The remaining Villagers (normal and special villagers alike) then
deliberate and vote on a player they suspect is a Werewolf, helped (or hindered) by the clues the special characters add to the
general deliberation. The chosen player is "lynched", reveals his/her role and is out of the game. Werewolf is a social game that
requires no equipment to play, and can accommodate almost any large group of players.
The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow/les Loups-Garous de Thiercelieux/Die Werwölfe von Düsterwald is a
published version arranged by Hervé Marly and Philippe des Pallières and published by Lui-même, 2001 for 8-23 players. This
has been nominated for the 2003 Spiel des Jahres award.
Werewolves of Miller's Hollow is a separate game from Werewolf, and was split from that entry at the request of Asmodee.
Expanded by:
The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow: New Moon
Re-Implemented by:
The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow: Village
Home Page: http://lesloupsgarous.free.fr/
Page 142 of 187
Thebes
2-4
60
206
7.23
10+
2007
2.2 (Medium/Light)
Ancient, Exploration, Travel
Card Drafting, Point to Point Movement, Time Track
Thebes is a game of competitive archeology. Players are archaeologists who must travel around Europe, northern Africa, and
the Middle East to acquire knowledge about five ancient civilizations -- the Greeks, the Cretans, the Egyptians, the Palestinians,
and the Mesopotamians -- and then must use this knowledge to excavate historical sites in the areas of these civilizations.
Through the course of the game, expositions are revealed, and an archaeologist who has treasures from the requisite
civilizations may claim the prize (this is a change from the first edition's handling of exhibitions). The archaeologist who learns
the most about the civilizations, claims the greatest-valued artifacts, and collects the most exhibitions will win out over his or
her colleagues.
The key element to the game is that it is played out over a period of two (or three) years, and each action a player performs takes
a certain amount of time -- traveling is a week between cities, gathering knowledge takes time for the level of the knowledge,
and actually digging at a cultural site takes time to yield a certain number of artifact tiles. The game uses a novel mechanism to
keep track of this. There is a track of 52 spaces around the outside of the board. Each time a player moves and takes an action,
he or she moves their player token forward in time. Players take turns based on being the one who is furthest back in "time." So,
a player can go to an excavation site and spend 10 weeks digging for artifacts, but that will also mean that the other players will
likely be taking several actions in the interim while that player waits for the "time" to catch up.
In addition, the artifact tiles for each civilization are drawn from a bag that also contains dirt. When a player excavates a site,
that player pulls tiles from the bag, but some may only be worthless dirt instead of valuable treasure. That dirt is then returned
to the bag, making the first draw more likely to provide useful tiles.
This is the new entry for the Queen printing of Jenseits von Theben. As the new game changes several mechanisms of the
original, and is available in a much wider release, the two games should be regarded as separate entities.
Re-implements:
Jenseits von Theben
Page 143 of 187
Through the Desert
2-5
45
10+
1998
239
7.12
6
2.2 (Medium/Light)
Abstract Strategy, Arabian
Area Enclosure, Route/Network Building, Tile Placement
Each player attempts to score the most points by snaking caravan routes through the desert, trying to reach oases and blocking
off sections of the desert. Many people feel that it is reminiscent of Go.
Publisher's Description
From the award-winning game designer Reiner Knizia comes a game of strategy, patience, and cool plastic camels! The desert
is still treacherous, mysterious, and without mercy. But for those willing to risk the dangers of the shifting, sun-baked sands, the
desert holds riches beyond compare.
In Through the Desert, two to five players each control a tribe of nomads vying for control of the desert. By establishing
caravans and taking over oases, the players gain points as their tribes increase in power.
Strategy is essential in deciding how and where to build your tribe's caravans. There are multiple ways to gain points and
several ways to win. Should you try to build the longest caravan? Or should you dominate the desert's oases? Don't forget to
keep an eye on your opponents' caravans, or you may find your own tribe cut off from valuable water holes.
Through the Desert is part of the so called Knizia tile-laying trilogy.
Page 144 of 187
Thurn and Taxis
2-4
60
10+
2006
203
7.17
7
2.3 (Medium/Light)
Renaissance, Transportation
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Route/Network Building, Set Collection
In Thurn & Taxis, players build post office routes across Bavaria and the regions around, collecting bonus points in various
ways. The board shows a map of all the towns, with roads leading from each one to some of its neighbors. There are various
colored regions around the board, most with one or two towns, and a large region with all the Bavarian towns in the center.
From a display of six city cards (or the top of the deck), you draw one or two cards each turn, add one or two to your route, and
score for it if you're ready to score. The fact that you *must* add at least one city to your route each turn or lose the whole
route gives the game an enjoyable planning element.
Page 145 of 187
Tichu
3-6
60
46
7.72
10+
1991
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Card Game
Betting/Wagering, Hand Management, Partnerships, Trick-taking
Partnership climbing card game -- object is rid yourself of your hand. The deck is a standard 52-card pack with four special
cards added. When it's your turn, you may either beat the current top card combination or pass. If play passes all the way back
to the player who laid the top cards, he wins the trick and can lead the next one. The card led determines the only combination
of cards to be played on that trick. So if a single card is led, then only single cards are played. If a straight of seven cards is led,
then only straights of seven cards, etc. The last player out gives all the cards he won to the player who exited first, and the last
player's unplayed cards are handed to the opposite team. Fives, Tens and Kings are worth points, with each hand worth one
hundred points (without bonuses). The first team to 1000 points wins.
Page 146 of 187
Ticket to Ride
2-6
45
8+
2004
78
7.49
8
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Trains, Transportation, Travel
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Route/Network Building, Set Collection
Ticket to Ride: USA 1910
2006
8.0
Ticket to Ride: Europa 1912
2009
7.6
Ticket to Ride Map Collection: Volume 1 - Team Asia ...
2011
7.8
Ticket to Ride Map Collection: Volume 2 - India & Swi...
2011
7.9
Ticket to Ride Map Collection: Volume 3 - The Heart o...
2012
7.6
8
With elegantly simple gameplay, Ticket to Ride can be learned in 3 minutes, while providing players with intense strategic and
tactical decisions every turn. Players collect cards of various types of train cars they then use to claim railway routes in North
America. The longer the routes, the more points they earn. Additional points come to those who fulfill Destination Tickets
– goal cards that connect distant cities; and to the player who builds the longest continuous route.
"The rules are simple enough to write on a train ticket – each turn you either draw more cards, claim a route, or get
additional Destination Tickets," says Ticket to Ride author, Alan R. Moon. "The tension comes from being forced to balance
greed – adding more cards to your hand, and fear – losing a critical route to a competitor."
Ticket to Ride continues in the tradition of Days of Wonder's big format board games featuring high-quality illustrations and
components including: an oversize board map of North America, 225 custom-molded train cars, 144 illustrated cards, and
wooden scoring markers.
Since its introduction and numerous subsequent awards, Ticket to Ride has become the BoardGameGeek epitome of a "gateway
game" -- simple enough to be taught in a few minutes, and with enough action and tension to keep new players involved and in
the game for the duration.
Part of the Ticket to Ride series.
Re-implemented by:
Ticket to Ride: Europe
Ticket to Ride: Märklin
Ticket to Ride: Nordic Countries
Ticket to Ride: The Card Game
Zug um Zug: Deutschland
Page 147 of 187
Ticket to Ride: Europe
2-6
60
8+
2005
62
7.56
7
2.0 (Medium/Light)
Trains, Transportation, Travel
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Route/Network Building, Set Collection
Ticket to Ride: Europa 1912
2009
7.6
Ticket to Ride Map Collection: Volume 1 - Team Asia ...
2011
7.8
Ticket to Ride Map Collection: Volume 2 - India & Swi...
2011
7.9
Ticket to Ride Map Collection: Volume 3 - The Heart o...
2012
7.6
8
Ticket to Ride: Europe takes you on a new train adventure across Europe. From Edinburgh to Constantinople and from Lisbon
to Moscow, you'll visit great cities of turn-of-the-century Europe. Like the original Ticket to Ride, the game remains elegantly
simple, can be learned in 5 minutes, and appeals to both families and experienced gamers. Ticket to Ride: Europe is a complete,
new game and does not require the original version.
More than just a new map, Ticket to Ride: Europe features brand new gameplay elements. Tunnels may require you to pay extra
cards to build on them, Ferries require locomotive cards in order to claim them, and Stations allow you to sacrifice a few points
in order to use an opponents route to connect yours. The game also includes larger format cards and Train Station game pieces.
The overall goal remains the same, collect and play train cards in order to place your pieces on the board, attempting to connect
cities on your ticket cards. Points are earned both from placing trains and completing tickets but uncompleted tickets lose you
points. The player who has the most points at the end of the game wins.
Part of the Ticket to Ride series.
Online Play
Xbox LIVE Arcade
Page 148 of 187
Ticket to Ride: Nordic Countries
2-3
45
66
7.69
8+
2007
2.0 (Medium/Light)
Trains, Transportation, Travel
Card Drafting, Hand Management, Route/Network Building, Set Collection
Ticket to Ride: Nordic Countries takes you on a Nordic adventure through Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden as you
travel to the great northern cities of Copenhagen, Oslo, Helsinki, and Stockholm. This version was initially available only in the
Nordic Countries of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland; a worldwide limited-edition release occurred in August 2008 and
it has since been kept in print again by Days of Wonder.
The goal in "Nordic" remains the same as base Ticket to Ride: collect and play cards to place your trains on the board,
attempting to connect the different cities on your ticket cards. The map incorporates tunnels from Europe and also has routes
containing ferries. Ferries will require a certain number of Locomotives to be played, as well as other cards, in order to be
claimed. Locomotives are handled a bit differently as well. On your turn you may take 2 Locomotives if you want, but you can
only use them on ferries, tunnels, or the special 9 length route.
Unlike the USA or Europe maps, Nordic is designed for 2-3 players only and has a heavier focus on blocking your opponent
and more aggressive play.
Part of the Ticket to Ride series.
Page 149 of 187
Tigris & Euphrates
2-4
90
12+
1997
23
7.82
5
3.5 (Medium/Heavy)
Ancient, Civilization, Territory Building
Area Control / Area Influence, Hand Management, Set Collection, Tile Placement
Regarded by many as Reiner Knizia's masterpiece, the game is set in the ancient fertile crescent with players building
civilizations through tile placement. Players are given four different leaders: farming, trading, religion, and government. The
leaders are used to collect victory points in these same categories. However, your score at the end of the game is the number of
points in your weakest category, which encourages players not to get overly specialized. Conflict arises when civilizations
connect on the board, i.e., external conflicts, with only one leader of each type surviving such a conflict. Leaders can also be
replaced within a civilization through internal conflicts.
NOTE: More recent editions of the game by Mayfair and Pegasus (possibly among other publishers) contain a double sided
board and extra components for playing the advanced version of the game and includes the zikkurat expansion
Part of what is considered Reiner Knizia's tile-laying trilogy.
The Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH version states it is for 2-4 players; the Mayfair Games version states it is for 3-4 players.
Re-implemented by:
Euphrates & Tigris Card Game
Page 150 of 187
Tikal
2-4
120
124
7.37
10+
1999
2.9 (Medium)
Exploration
Action Point Allowance System, Area Control / Area Influence, Auction/Bidding, Modular Board
Set Collection, Tile Placement
Tikal is a game of exploration within the Central American jungles in search of lost temples and the treasures within. Players
send their team of explorers into the jungle, exposing more and more of the terrain. Along the way, you find temples that
require further uncovering and treasures. Players attempt to score points for occupying temples and holding onto treasure.
Tikal is the first game of the Mask Trilogy.
Sequel:
Tikal II: The Lost Temple
Page 151 of 187
Times Square
2
30
1623
6.32
12+
2006
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Card Game
Hand Management
An unusual, complex, yet tightly balanced board/card game for two from the prolific Reiner Knizia. The original title, "Auf der
Reeperbahn...," alludes to a popular German movie from 1954.
Near the center of a 17-space track start the six game figures which the players compete to attract to their opposite ends of the
board. You play as many cards of the same color on your turn as you wish, and much of the movement is a direct result of card
play: e.g., by playing a red 4 you bring the red figure ("Rote Lola" or "Dancing Deb") 4 spaces closer to your end of the board.
However, there are special tricks and restrictions which must be learned and gotten firmly in mind before the sense of the game
begins to emerge. The central green figure ("Brilli-Lilli" or "Saucy Sue") which wins for you if the game ends with her on your
half of the board, for example, can only move within the bounds of her "bodyguards," two grey figures. The yellow figure
("Blonde Hans" or "Handsome Hal") can summon, without benefit of a card played, any of these three figures to his square.
The companion green figure ("Schampus-Charly" or "Champagne Charlie") which can also win the game if you get him into
one of the two spaces at your end of the board (your "nightclub"), only moves toward you if the board situation at the end of
your turn involves both bodyguards on your half of the board and/or one of the other figures in your nightclub. And so on.
The game, part of the Kosmos two-player series, is one of attack and counterattack, defense and forward thinking, and can be
won early or on the turn of the last card on the second time through the deck. At 10-15 minutes, it begs to be played again
immediately.
Page 152 of 187
Titan: The Arena
2-5
60
8+
1997
419
6.87
6
2.0 (Medium/Light)
Card Game, Fantasy, Mythology
Betting/Wagering, Commodity Speculation, Hand Management
In Colossal Arena there is a group of eight creatures that are fighting. Each round, one of the creatures will die. To decide
which unlucky soul will be the victim, players put numbered power cards in front of the creatures, with the lowest one going the
way of the dodo. But what makes this game interesting at all is that players can make five bets throughout the game which will
sometimes allow them to use a creature's special power and gives the game a method of scoring at the end.
Titan: The Arena is actually a reworking of a Reiner Knizia game called Grand National Derby, but Avalon Hill's remake was
quite significant from a gameplay standpoint.
The Titan: The Arena printing is often confused with its namesake, Titan. But other than the fact that they both use fantasy
creatures as a general theme, there is very little that is similar between the two.
Reimplemented by: Galaxy: The Dark Ages
Online Play
Ludoholic (no longer available)
Page 153 of 187
Tobago
2-4
60
248
7.16
13+
2009
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Adventure, Exploration
Grid Movement, Hand Management, Modular Board, Press Your Luck, Set Collection
Tobago is an adventure game, in which the players possess different parts of treasure maps. During the game, more and more
information about the locations of the treasures are revealed, and the possible locations are narrowed down. When a player
identifies the location of one of the treasures, they try to reach it as fast as possible to secure the findings.
The game features a modular game board.
Page 154 of 187
Torres
2-4
60
213
7.22
12+
1999
2.9 (Medium)
Abstract Strategy, Medieval
Action Point Allowance System, Area Control / Area Influence, Area Enclosure, Card Drafting
Grid Movement, Hand Management, Tile Placement
Torres is an abstract game of resource management and tactical pawn movement. Players are attempting to build up castles and
position their knights to score the most points each turn. Players have a limited supply of knights and action cards that allow
special actions to be taken. Efficient use of pieces and cards, along with a thoughtful awareness of future possibilities, is the
heart of this game.
Torres is considered by many to be an informal member of what is referred to as the Mask Trilogy.
Page 155 of 187
Trajan
2-4
90
37
7.91
12+
2011
3.6 (Medium/Heavy)
Ancient, Political
Area Movement, Card Drafting, Hand Management, Set Collection, Worker Placement
Set in ancient Rome, Trajan is a development game in which players try to increase their influence and power in various areas
of Roman life such as political influence, trading, military dominion and other important parts of Roman culture.
The central mechanism of the game uses a system similar to that in Mancala or pit-and-pebbles games. In Trajan, a player has
six possible actions: building, trading, taking tiles from the forum, using the military, influencing the Senate, and placing Trajan
tiles on his tableau.
At the start of the game, each player has two differently colored pieces in each of the six sections (bowls) of his tableau. On a
turn, the player picks up all the pieces in one bowl and distributes them one-by-one in bowls in a clockwise order. Wherever the
final piece is placed, the player takes the action associated with that bowl; in addition, if the colored pieces in that bowl match
the colors shown on a Trajan tile next to the bowl (with tiles being placed at the start of the game and through later actions),
then the player takes the additional action shown on that tile.
What are you trying to do with these actions? Acquire victory points (VPs) in whatever ways are available to you – and
since this is a Feld design, you try to avoid being punished, too. At the Forum you try to anticipate the demands of the public so
that you can supply them what they want and not suffer a penalty. In the Senate you acquire influence which translates into
votes on VP-related laws, ideally snagging a law that fits your long-term plans. With the military, you take control of regions in
Europe, earning more points for those regions far from Rome.
All game components are language neutral, and the playing time is 30 minutes per player.
Page 156 of 187
TransAmerica
2-6
30
13+
2001
596
6.66
4
1.4 (Light)
Trains, Transportation
Route/Network Building
A very simple railway game. Each player has a set of 5 cities strung across the US that need to be connected by rail. Players
place either 1 or 2 rails each turn. The game ends when the first player completes a connected route between his 5 cities. The
player who can make the best use of the other players' networks is generally victorious.
Re-implements:
Iron Road
Re-implemented by:
TransEuropa
Expanded by:
Vexation
Awards
2002 Japan Boardgame Prize Winner, The Best Foreign Game for Beginners.
Online Play
BrettspielWelt (real-time)
Cycloops (turn-based)
Page 157 of 187
Twilight Struggle
2
180
13+
2005
1
8.34
7
3.4 (Medium)
Bluffing, Modern Warfare, Political, Wargame
Action Point Allowance System, Area Control / Area Influence, Campaign / Battle Card Driven
Dice Rolling, Hand Management, Simultaneous Action Selection
"Now the trumpet summons us again, not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled
we are – but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle..."
– John F. Kennedy
In 1945, unlikely allies toppled Hitler's war machine, while humanity's most devastating weapons forced the Japanese Empire to
its knees in a storm of fire. Where once there stood many great powers, there then stood only two. The world had scant months
to sigh its collective relief before a new conflict threatened. Unlike the titanic struggles of the preceding decades, this conflict
would be waged not primarily by soldiers and tanks, but by spies and politicians, scientists and intellectuals, artists and traitors.
Twilight Struggle is a two-player game simulating the forty-five year dance of intrigue, prestige, and occasional flares of
warfare between the Soviet Union and the United States. The entire world is the stage on which these two titans fight to make
the world safe for their own ideologies and ways of life. The game begins amidst the ruins of Europe as the two new
"superpowers" scramble over the wreckage of the Second World War, and ends in 1989, when only the United States remained
standing.
Twilight Struggle inherits its fundamental systems from the card-driven classics We the People and Hannibal: Rome vs.
Carthage. It is a quick-playing, low-complexity game in that tradition. The game map is a world map of the period, whereon
players move units and exert influence in attempts to gain allies and control for their superpower. As with GMT's other carddriven games, decision-making is a challenge; how to best use one's cards and units given consistently limited resources?
Twilight Struggle's Event cards add detail and flavor to the game. They cover a vast array of historical happenings, from the
Arab-Israeli conflicts of 1948 and 1967, to Vietnam and the U.S. peace movement, to the Cuban Missile Crisis and other such
incidents that brought the world to the brink of nuclear annihilation. Subsystems capture the prestige-laden Space Race as well
as nuclear tensions, with the possibility of game-ending nuclear war.
A deluxe edition, published in 2009 includes the following changes from the basic game:
Mounted map with revised graphics
Two double-thick counter sheets with 260 counters
Deck of 110 event cards (increased from 103)
Revised rules and player aid cards
Revised at start setup and text change for card #98 Aldrich Ames
Upgrade kit for the owners of the previous version includes the following:
Mounted Map with revised graphics
New card decks
Updated Rules & Charts
There are also the deluxe mounted map and deluxe euro-style countersheet upgrades.
Page 158 of 187
Tzolk'in: The Mayan Calendar
2-4
90
13+
2012
16
8.09
8
3.5 (Medium)
Ancient, Civilization, Farming, Mythology
Set Collection, Worker Placement
Tzolkin: The Mayan Calendar presents a new game mechanism: dynamic worker placement. Players representing
different Mayan tribes place their workers on giant connected gears, and as the gears rotate they take the workers to different
action spots.
During a turn, players can either (a) place one or more workers on the lowest visible spot of the gears or (b) pick up one or more
workers. When placing workers, they must pay corn, which is used as a currency in the game. When they pick up a worker, they
perform certain actions depending on the position of the worker. Actions located "later" on the gears are more valuable, so it's
wise to let the time work for you – but players cannot skip their turn; if they have all their workers on the gears, they
have to pick some up. 
The game ends after one full revolution of the central Tzolkin gear. There are many paths to victory. Pleasing the gods by
placing crystal skulls in deep caves or building many temples are just two of those many paths...
Page 159 of 187
Union Pacific
2-6
90
12+
1999
208
7.31
6
2.6 (Medium)
Economic, Trains
Card Drafting, Route/Network Building, Stock Holding
Union Pacific is a train-themed stock market game. On each turn, players must choose between expanding a company to
increase its value and adding a share of stock to their hand, or playing stock onto the table from their hand to increase their
ownership of one or two companies. There are four semi-random scoring events, in which the first and second place share
holder in each company are paid dividends. Only stock that has been previously played onto the table is considered during the
scoring rounds. Union Pacific is a special company whose shares are claimed according to special rules. Union Pacific is not
represented on the board but instead pays dividends to all share holders according to a fixed progression chart. Money is only
used to track victory conditions and cannot be spent during the game. The winner is the player with the most money at the end
of the game.
Re-implements:
Airlines
Re-implemented as:
Airlines Europe
Page 160 of 187
Up Front
2-3
60
12+
1983
116
7.89
6
3.4 (Medium)
Card Game, Wargame, World War II
Campaign / Battle Card Driven, Hand Management, Simulation, Variable Player Powers
A card game that is loosely based on Avalon Hill's Squad Leader series. Each player directs a squad of men in various scenarios
with cards driving the action.
"UP FRONT is a game of man-to-man infantry combat set in WWII Europe loosely based on the Squad Leader game system.
UP FRONT is a far simpler adaptation of Squad Leader principles designed to a card game format. Yet, in many ways is more
realistic than its predecessor in that its inherent mechanics simulate the fear and confusion of the battlefield and the inability of
leadership to assert itself far better than any tactical game yet published.
There is no playing board; it has been replaced by Terrain cards which become the "hexagons" of the game as players maneuver
their forces via Action Cards over constantly changing terrain. The scale of the game is measured in terms of relative ranges
between opposing forces, with most combat occurring within a scale distance of 500 meters during the course of player turns
measured in varying seconds of actual time."
Inventory of Contents:
A new un-punched game should have the following:
3 Decks of Standard Sized playing cards in cellophane. Total number: 162
120 infantry cards. 30 American plus 10 generic, 30 Russian plus 10 generic, and 29 German infantry plus 11 generic. These
would need to be separated in a "new" copy.
39 vehicle cards. 11 American, 11 Russian, and 17 German. Note, the vehicle cards are larger than the infantry cards. These
would need to be separated in a "new" copy.
Also there is one "Close Combat Modifiers Vs. AFV" card that is the same size as the Vehicle cards.
NOTE: The inventory on the back of the box calls for 120 Vehicle cards. I can only find 39 vehicles in all of my copies, and the
one manifest that I have found online, matches my count. If you the count "Close Combat" card with the other vehicle cards,
then the total equals 40. So the list on the box does not seem not 100% correct, in the fact that there are NOT 40 Vehicle cards.
2 counter sheets:
One titled: "UP Front Infantry Counters" with 152 counters.
Second one titled: "UP Front Range Markers" with 152 counters.
4 blank counters from "UP Front Range Markers" are not for use. So just 300 counters total are for use.
Page 161 of 187
Vasco da Gama
2-4
90
196
7.39
12+
2009
3.3 (Medium)
Nautical, Renaissance
Action / Movement Programming, Tile Placement, Variable Phase Order, Worker Placement
Recruit workers, buy projects, build ships. And use the ships to open new commercial routes to eastern Africa and India, to earn
money and glory.
This is a resource management game, with an element of risk management, that works like this:
Beginning with the start player, each player takes one numbered disc and places it on top of his own coloured disc in one of the
four action areas of the board. A Vasco da Gama tile states a number; everything above this number is free of charge, anything
below will have to be paid for, so players will take this into account when taking numbered discs. When all players have placed
four discs, a modifier to this 'activation number' is shown, and discs are worked by number. In the crew area players may hire
crew and a captain, but this costs money. Each round there is a window of ships. The number on the left is the navigation
strength, the number on the right is the required amount of different crew. Players choose a ship, pay for the crew and turn the
tile to its other side - with a captain on top. In the navigation area, a player takes his ship and places it in a row of his choice, but
he has to take care not to exceed the navigation strength of the ship.
The game lasts five rounds, after which the player with the most points has won.
A brief description from the rule book:
Vasco da Gama was charged with finding a maritime route to India.
Players play the part of rich shipowners who, under his patronage, aim to achieve prestige and riches.
To succeed in the enterprise, they must manage the money and actions at their disposal in order to hire captains, recruit crew,
build ships, launch them, and send them to the landings of Natal, Terra de Boa Gente, Mozambique, Malindi, Mombasa, and
Calicut.
For each ship sent, players will receive an immediate reward and will gain prestige (Victory Points).
The farther the ship is sent, the lower the compensation, but the higher the victory score that the player will earn.
Ships at landings that are "complete" at the end of the round (i.e. reached by a certain number of Ships) will earn further Victory
Points for their owners and will then advance, under certain conditions, to the next Landing. This creates the opportunity to earn
again Victory Points in the following Rounds.
During each Round, Players take actions in various Areas (Navigation, Recruiting, or Purchase Projects or Characters).
Planning is fundamental: The right to take an Action could be free of charge or paid for.
The earlier a Player plans to take an Action, the more likely that he will have to pay for it.
Players will have to ask themselves if and how much they are ready to pay for the right to act first in a certain area.
Vasco da Gama himself will decide which is the first free of charge Action for each Round. He will also help some of the
Players by making some money available to them.
This great maritime enterprise raises the interest of 4 influential Characters.
Aiming to have a substantial role in the development of the new commercial route, they will also provide their favors free of
charge to the Players.
Francisco Alvares (The Priest) will make available a number of Missionaries to be used as crew members, Girolamo Sernigi
(The Merchant) will organize Ships built and manned, Bartolomeu Dias (The Leader) will grant an increased initiative and
additional Victory Points, and Manuel 1st (The King) will allow Players to take an additional Action in the name of the
Portuguese Kingdom.
The winner is the Player with the highest Victory Points score at the end of the game.
Page 162 of 187
Vegas Showdown
3-5
75
12+
2005
210
7.26
6
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Economic
Auction/Bidding, Route/Network Building, Tile Placement
Players compete to build the most famous hotel/casino. Room tiles representing slot machines, lounges, restaurants, and other
casino-related places appear on a central board and the players hold auctions to win the rights to have those rooms in their
building, garnering them income, population, or fame. Bidding wars escalate, values fluctuate, and designers renovate until
finally the hotel/casinos are put to the test to determine whose garners the most fame.
Page 163 of 187
Via Appia
2-4
45
8+
2013
3032
6.87
6
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Ancient
Game description from the publisher:
Via Appia, the most famous road of the Roman Empire is under construction. Be a part of this historic event and finish the road
that connects Rome and Brindisi. Prove your intuition in the quarry to get the best stones. Whoever builds the most valuable
sections and reaches the different cities early will be victorious and the most famous builder in all of Rome.
Goal of the Game (from the Rules)
Rome needs a connection to Brundisium, and the players have been tasked with building the Via Appia in order to allow for fast
travel between the two cities. To create the road, they'll need to break off stone tiles in the quarry, then travel to Brundisium,
laying out the tiles and creating the path that all will follow in the years ahead. This travel costs sesterces, but will bring crucial
victory points and glory from Rome in return.
Page 164 of 187
Village
2-4
75
12+
2011
64
7.69
7
3.1 (Medium)
Farming, Medieval
Worker Placement
Game description from the publisher:
Life in the village is hard – but life here also allows the inhabitants to grow and prosper as they please. One villager
might want to become a friar. Another might feel ambitious and strive for a career in public office. A third one might want to
seek his luck in distant lands.
Each player will take the reins of a family and have them find fame and glory in many different ways. There is one thing you
must not forget, however: Time will not stop for anyone and with time people will vanish. Those who will find themselves
immortalized in the village chronicles will bring honor to their family and be one step closer to victory.
Village is a game full of tactical challenges. A smart and unique new action mechanism is responsible for keeping turns short
and yet still tactically rich and full of difficult decisions. Also unique is the way this game deals with the delicate subject of
death; as a natural and perpetual part of life in the village, thoughts of death will keep you focused on smart time-management.
Page 165 of 187
Wallenstein (second edition)
3-5
120
591
8.03
12+
2012
3.3 (Medium)
Economic, Renaissance, Territory Building
Action / Movement Programming, Action Point Allowance System, Area Control / Area Influence
Area Movement, Simultaneous Action Selection, Variable Phase Order
The 2012 rerelease of Wallenstein tweaks the 2002 title from designer Dirk Henn and publisher Queen Games, while including
two new expansions.
The setting and game play of the two games are mostly the same. In 1625, the Thirty Years' War is underway, and military
leaders like Albrecht von Wallenstein and Gottfried Heinrich Graf zu Pappenheim are roaming the country, fighting for land,
and trying to establish the best of everything for themselves. The game lasts two "years," with players taking actions in the
spring, summer, and fall, then possibly suffering from grain shortage and revolts in the winter before scoring points for the year.
After two years, the player with the most points – with points being scored for land and buildings under one's control
– wins.
In each of the "action" seasons, ten action cards are shuffled, then laid out, with five face-up and the rest face-down. The five
bonus tiles (which provide extra money, grain, or armies) are also laid out. Each player then secretly assigns one of his county
cards (or a blank card) to each of the ten actions on his individual player board, in addition to bidding for player order and
choice of bonus tile.
After revealing that round's event card and determining player order, players carry out actions in the order determined earlier,
revealing which county is taking the current action, then revealing the next face-down action, thus giving players some
information about when actions will occur, but not all. Taxing a county or taking grain from it can increase the chance of a
revolt during winter, but without money you can't deploy troops or build palaces or churches and without grain you increase the
chance of revolt.
Combat and revolts are handled via a dice tower in which players drop army units and peasants (colored wooden cubes) into the
top of the tower and see which ones emerge in the bottom tray (representing the fighting forces for that combat) and which get
stuck in the tower's baffles to possibly emerge in the future.
Wallenstein includes two expansions: "Emperor's Court," in which a player's army tokens that fall from the dice tower at the
start of the game become courtiers who compete for favors (special actions) from the emperor; a player can convert armies to
courtiers during the game, and whoever has the most courtiers in the court's entrance hall each turn gets first shot at the favors
available. "Landsknechte," which can be used with "Emperor's Court" or on its own, consists of a set of four cards for each
player stacked in a particular order. If after determining turn order, a player controls counties in four different regions, he
removes the top card from the stack, then takes one of the bonuses (such as money or armies in the tray) shown on the newly
revealed card. This stack resets after winter ends.
Reimplements:
Wallenstein (first edition)
Similar to:
Shogun
Page 166 of 187
Walnut Grove
1-4
45
10+
2011
680
6.97
5
2.4 (Medium/Light)
American West
Chit-Pull System, Simulation, Tile Placement, Worker Placement
Walnut Grove is a cross between jigsaw puzzles and worker placement, with the players as farmers who find their plots merging
into a single landscape as time passes and their holdings grow. Come fall they must head to the city with their goods as winter
will soon return.
Walnut Grove could be described as a light mashup between Carcassonne and Agricola. The goal of the game is to develop your
own ranch. The better the ranch, the more points you will score at the end of the game. Players can improve their ranch during
the game by adding new land tiles to it, hiring more workers, building improvements, etc
The game play is divided into eight years, and each year is divided into Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter phases. During
Spring, players add land tiles to their ranch. During Summer, players place their workers to gather resources from the fields.
When Autumn comes, all players get to visit the city. Finally, during the Winter phase, players need to feed their workers and
heat their homes.
In the city you can hire workers, trade goods to coins, build improvements, and so on. Each player may do only one action in
the city though. The city is a kind of rondel that is divided into halves; each time you cross the midline you have to pay a coin.
Therefore it is wise to move as slowly as possible on the rondel, but then again, you have consider what actions you want to
take!
The land areas will produce resources when you place the workers there. Also, the tiles do not need to match, but you want
them to, as larger areas of the same type will give you greater production.
Spring, Summer and Winter phases can be done simultaneously, providing fast game play. The game also works as a solo game.
Page 167 of 187
Win, Place & Show
3-6
120
8+
1966
1220
6.70
4
2.1 (Medium/Light)
Animals, Racing, Sports
Betting/Wagering, Dice Rolling, Roll / Spin and Move
A race meeting consisting of 6 races, each with 6 horses of varying power and characteristics. Board shows an oval track of six
lanes, straightforward in straights but graduated on the curves. Although dice play a part in the game there is plenty of room for
skillful maneuvering in the course of each race, which can be from 5 furlongs to 1 1/4 miles. An important part of the game is
provided by certain marked squares: if you can get your horse to stop on one of these it can overtake one horse ahead of it in the
same line, which can be vital considering that only two swerves are permitted in each turn (only one if the jockey is an
apprentice). Every horse has a distinctive racing pattern (slow or fast starter, stayer or fader etc.) represented by a set of
numbers, one for each turn. These numbers are added to a single dice throw (common to all the horses), so that the speed of
each race can vary substantially. There are many other interesting factors too numerous to describe in a short review. Odds on
each horse are pre-set and depend largely on the number patterns described above.
Originally released as part of the 3M Sports Games line.
Page 168 of 187
You Suck
2-6
30
8+
6.48
2013
1.7 (Medium/Light)
Animals, Card Game, Humor
Trick-taking, Variable Player Powers
All your life all you've wanted was to have the best, the biggest, and the most awesome tick collection in the world. With You
Suck, that dream is close to becoming a reality.
Using a suited deck, you and your opponents will play cards onto seven different ticks, each with a unique power. Take
advantage of these powers to ensure that you'll match your bid and capture even more ticks. You'll score points for bidding
correctly and for capturing special bonus point ticks!
That's right – it's a tick-taking game, a close cousin of "trick-taking" games, but oh-so-much better because it has cute
ticks. And it's more fun.
Page 169 of 187
Ys
2-4
90
424
7.04
12+
2004
2.9 (Medium)
Bluffing, Medieval
Area Control / Area Influence, Commodity Speculation
The players embody merchant-princes of Ys. By skillfully using their network of brokers, they speculate on the purchase of
precious stones, thus amassing gold. At each turn, ships filled with gems land in the city's ports. In order to obtain gems, make
the market prices rise, and be able to draw cards, the players must get majorities on the board by placing brokers in carefully
chosen places. Brokers can be displayed either face up or face down, so you can try to bluff your opponents.
Page 170 of 187
Yspahan
2-5
60
8+
2006
209
7.22
8
2.4 (Medium/Light)
Arabian, Dice, Economic
Area Control / Area Influence, Dice Rolling
Ystari Box
2009
7.1
1598. Yspahan the fair becomes the capital of the Persian empire. Thus, being placed at the center of the world, the city enjoys a
period of cultural and economic blossoming. The cities and villages of the region intend to take advantage of this expansion.
Caravans loaded with goods and jewels set out for the desert, bearing the promises of a radiant future....
The players embody merchants trading with Yspahan. Meaning to take advantage of the coming of the Shah's supervisor, they
score points by placing their merchandise in the right shops, by sending them to the caravan, and by constructing buildings.
In Yspahan, players draft their action for the turn in order, but a roll of the dice determines which actions are available and how
powerful they will be. You can earn points in the short-term by claiming shops in the city or by sending your traders to the
caravan. You can also improve your infrastructure by constructing buildings that improve your actions or picking up action
cards that give you extra options. Every 7 turns (each "week"), points are scored in the city and caravan, and after 3 weeks, the
wise traders will see who among them has profited the most....
Page 171 of 187
Zooloretto
2-5
45
8+
2007
345
6.94
6
1.9 (Medium/Light)
Animals
Set Collection, Tile Placement
In Zooloretto, each player uses small, large, wild, and exotic animals and their young to try to attract as many visitors as
possible to their zoo – but be careful! The zoo must be carefully planned as before you know it, you might have too
many animals and no more room for them. That brings minus points! Luckily, your zoo can expand. A zoo of a family game in
which less is sometimes more...
Reimplements
Coloretto
Can be combined with
Aquaretto
Zooloretto Mini
Page 172 of 187
Supported Players, Playing Time & Complexity
Friday
Ingenious
Walnut Grove
Ora et Labora
Merchant of Venus (second edition)
Agricola
Pax Porfiriana
Le Havre
Race for the Galaxy
Set
Elk Fest
Hive Carbon
Agricola: All Creatures Big and Small
Balloon Cup
Battle Line
En Garde
Famiglia
Jaipur
Kahuna
Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation
Lost Cities
Martinique
Odin's Ravens
Times Square
Android: Netrunner
Jambo
Stratego
Campaign Manager 2008
Targi
Twilight Struggle
Hannibal: Rome vs. Carthage
Ticket to Ride: Nordic Countries
Up Front
Maria
Chicken Cha Cha Cha
Hey! That's My Fish!
Love Letter
Biblios
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
25
2 3 4
45
2 3 4
45
2 3 4
150
2 3 4
180
2 3 4 5
120
2 3 4 5
120
2 3 4 5
150
2 3 4 5 6
30
2 3 4 5 6 ... 20 30
2
15
2
20
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
30
2
45
2
45
2
45
2
50
2
60
2
180
2
300
2 3
45
2 3
60
2 3
210
2 3 4
20
2 3 4
20
2 3 4
20
2 3 4
30
Page 173 of 187
Can't Stop
Dominion
Dominion: Intrigue
Ergo
Forbidden Island
Indigo
Qin
Maharani
Sobek
Asara
Courtier
Finca
Pergamon
Queen's Necklace
Qwirkle
Samurai
San Juan
Via Appia
Assyria
Days of Steam
Fresco
Pandemic
Stone Age
Thebes
Thurn and Taxis
Tobago
Torres
Egizia
Village
Bora Bora
Domaine
Goa: A New Expedition
Macao
The Castles of Burgundy
Tigris & Euphrates
Trajan
Tzolk'in: The Mayan Calendar
Vasco da Gama
Ys
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
40
40
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
60
60
60
60
60
60
60
60
60
75
75
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
90
Page 174 of 187
Tikal
Sid Meier's Civilization: The Board Game
Sleeping Queens
Feed the Kitty
Fairy Tale
Piece o' Cake
Hanabi
Botswana
Coloretto
Great Wall of China
Guillotine
Samarkand: Routes to Riches
Bombay
Carcassonne: Hunters and Gatherers
Ivanhoe
Kingdom Builder
Saint Petersburg
Snow Tails
Through the Desert
Zooloretto
Cinque Terre
Glen More
Glory to Rome
Origins of World War II
Ra
Titan: The Arena
Yspahan
Airlines Europe
In the Year of the Dragon
Notre Dame
Small World
El Grande
Hawaii
Kingsburg
Maharaja: The Game of Palace Building...
Navegador
The Princes of Florence
Caylus
Cuba
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
120
180
10
15
20
20
25
30
30
30
30
30
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
60
60
60
60
60
60
60
75
75
75
80
90
90
90
90
90
90
120
120
Page 175 of 187
Beep! Beep!
Coup
Cheeky Monkey
Igloo Pop
Augustus
TransAmerica
You Suck
Adel Verpflichtet
Carcassonne
Jamaica
Montgolfiere
Ticket to Ride
Alhambra
Chicago Express
Leaping Lemmings
Show Manager
Ticket to Ride: Europe
Union Pacific
Imperial
Power Grid
Railways of the World
Speed Circuit
Dominant Species
Bohnanza
Civilization
Diplomacy
7 Wonders
Memoir '44
Slapshot
6 nimmt!
Formula D
Brass
High Society
No Thanks!
Modern Art
Vegas Showdown
Amun-Re
Pirate's Cove
Puerto Rico
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
15
20
20
30
30
30
45
45
45
45
45
60
60
60
60
60
90
120
120
120
120
180
7
45
7
360
7
360
7 8
30
7 8
60
... 10 30
... 10 45
... 10 60
120
15
20
45
75
90
90
90
Page 176 of 187
Steam
Taj Mahal
Automobile
Wallenstein (second edition)
Die Macher
For Sale
Formula Motor Racing
Hotel Samoa
Medici
Tichu
Acquire
The Settlers of Catan
Win, Place & Show
Long Shot
Apples to Apples
The Resistance
The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
90
90
120
120
240
20
20
60
60
60
90
90
120
7 8
60
... 10 30
... 10 30
18 30
Page 177 of 187
Index by: My Rating
10 - Outstanding. Always want to play and expect this will never change.
Dominion
9 - Excellent game. Always want to play it.
7 Wonders
Ra
Race for the Galaxy
44
2
117
118
8 - Very good game. I like to Play. Probably I'll suggest it and will never turn down a game.
Alhambra
8
Carcassonne
27
Ivanhoe
78
Lost Cities
89
Love Letter
90
Medici
96
Saint Petersburg
120
Ticket to Ride
147
Tzolk'in: The Mayan Calendar
159
Yspahan
171
7 - Good game, usually willing to play.
Adel Verpflichtet
Amun-Re
Battle Line
Bora Bora
Chicken Cha Cha Cha
Egizia
El Grande
Goa: A New Expedition
Guillotine
Hawaii
Hey! That's My Fish!
Ingenious
Kingdom Builder
Maharani
Memoir '44
Montgolfiere
San Juan
Show Manager
Stone Age
The Castles of Burgundy
The Settlers of Catan
The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow
4
9
17
22
32
46
47
63
65
68
69
77
83
93
97
100
123
125
134
138
141
142
Page 178 of 187
Thurn and Taxis
Ticket to Ride: Europe
Twilight Struggle
Village
145
148
158
165
6 - Ok game, some fun or challenge at least, will play sporadically if in the right mood.
Augustus
Cheeky Monkey
Cinque Terre
Coloretto
Coup
En Garde
For Sale
Formula Motor Racing
Hanabi
Indigo
Jaipur
Kahuna
Leaping Lemmings
Navegador
No Thanks!
Ora et Labora
Origins of World War II
Qin
Small World
Targi
Through the Desert
Titan: The Arena
Union Pacific
Up Front
Vegas Showdown
Via Appia
Zooloretto
14
30
33
35
36
49
55
58
66
76
79
82
86
101
102
105
106
114
129
137
144
153
160
161
163
164
172
5 - Average game, slightly boring, take it or leave it.
6 nimmt!
Botswana
Chicago Express
Elk Fest
Odin's Ravens
Pirate's Cove
Slapshot
Sleeping Queens
Speed Circuit
Stratego
1
23
31
48
104
111
127
128
132
135
Page 179 of 187
The Resistance
Tigris & Euphrates
Walnut Grove
4 - Not so good, it doesn't get me but could be talked into it on occasions.
Acquire
Apples to Apples
Bohnanza
Can't Stop
Famiglia
Forbidden Island
Hannibal: Rome vs. Carthage
TransAmerica
Win, Place & Show
140
150
167
3
11
20
26
52
56
67
157
168
3 - Likely won't play this again although could be convinced. Bad.
Beep! Beep!
Feed the Kitty
18
53
2 - Extremely annoying game, won't play this ever again.
Diplomacy
41
Not Rated
Agricola
Agricola: All Creatures Big and Small
Airlines Europe
Android: Netrunner
Asara
Assyria
Automobile
Balloon Cup
Biblios
Bombay
Brass
Campaign Manager 2008
Carcassonne: Hunters and Gatherers
Caylus
Civilization
Courtier
Cuba
Days of Steam
Die Macher
Domaine
Dominant Species
Dominion: Intrigue
Ergo
5
6
7
10
12
13
15
16
19
21
24
25
28
29
34
37
38
39
40
42
43
45
50
Page 180 of 187
Fairy Tale
Finca
Formula D
Fresco
Friday
Glen More
Glory to Rome
Great Wall of China
High Society
Hive Carbon
Hotel Samoa
Igloo Pop
Imperial
In the Year of the Dragon
Jamaica
Jambo
Kingsburg
Le Havre
Long Shot
Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation
Macao
Maharaja: The Game of Palace Building in India
Maria
Martinique
Merchant of Venus (second edition)
Modern Art
Notre Dame
Pandemic
Pax Porfiriana
Pergamon
Piece o' Cake
Power Grid
Puerto Rico
Queen's Necklace
Qwirkle
Railways of the World
Samarkand: Routes to Riches
Samurai
Set
Sid Meier's Civilization: The Board Game
Snow Tails
Sobek
Steam
Taj Mahal
51
54
57
59
60
61
62
64
70
71
72
73
74
75
80
81
84
85
87
88
91
92
94
95
98
99
103
107
108
109
110
112
113
115
116
119
121
122
124
126
130
131
133
136
Page 181 of 187
The Princes of Florence
Thebes
Tichu
Ticket to Ride: Nordic Countries
Tikal
Times Square
Tobago
Torres
Trajan
Vasco da Gama
Wallenstein (second edition)
You Suck
Ys
139
143
146
149
151
152
154
155
156
162
166
169
170
Page 182 of 187
Index by: Name
6
6 nimmt!
1
7 Wonders
2
7
A
Acquire
Adel Verpflichtet
Agricola
Agricola: All Creatures Big and Small
Airlines Europe
Alhambra
Amun-Re
Android: Netrunner
Apples to Apples
Asara
Assyria
Augustus
Automobile
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
B
Balloon Cup
Battle Line
Beep! Beep!
Biblios
Bohnanza
Bombay
Bora Bora
Botswana
Brass
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
C
Campaign Manager 2008
Can't Stop
Carcassonne
Carcassonne: Hunters and Gatherers
Caylus
Cheeky Monkey
Chicago Express
Chicken Cha Cha Cha
Cinque Terre
Civilization
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
Page 183 of 187
Coloretto
Coup
Courtier
Cuba
35
36
37
38
D
Days of Steam
Die Macher
Diplomacy
Domaine
Dominant Species
Dominion
Dominion: Intrigue
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
E
Egizia
El Grande
Elk Fest
En Garde
Ergo
46
47
48
49
50
F
Fairy Tale
Famiglia
Feed the Kitty
Finca
For Sale
Forbidden Island
Formula D
Formula Motor Racing
Fresco
Friday
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
G
Glen More
Glory to Rome
Goa: A New Expedition
Great Wall of China
Guillotine
61
62
63
64
65
H
Hanabi
Hannibal: Rome vs. Carthage
Hawaii
Hey! That's My Fish!
High Society
66
67
68
69
70
Page 184 of 187
Hive Carbon
Hotel Samoa
71
72
Igloo Pop
Imperial
In the Year of the Dragon
Indigo
Ingenious
Ivanhoe
73
74
75
76
77
78
Jaipur
Jamaica
Jambo
79
80
81
I
J
K
Kahuna
Kingdom Builder
Kingsburg
82
83
84
L
Le Havre
Leaping Lemmings
Long Shot
Lord of the Rings: The Confrontation
Lost Cities
Love Letter
85
86
87
88
89
90
M
Macao
Maharaja: The Game of Palace Building in India
Maharani
Maria
Martinique
Medici
Memoir '44
Merchant of Venus (second edition)
Modern Art
Montgolfiere
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
N
Navegador
No Thanks!
Notre Dame
101
102
103
Page 185 of 187
O
Odin's Ravens
Ora et Labora
Origins of World War II
104
105
106
P
Pandemic
Pax Porfiriana
Pergamon
Piece o' Cake
Pirate's Cove
Power Grid
Puerto Rico
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
Q
Qin
Queen's Necklace
Qwirkle
114
115
116
R
Ra
Race for the Galaxy
Railways of the World
117
118
119
S
Saint Petersburg
Samarkand: Routes to Riches
Samurai
San Juan
Set
Show Manager
Sid Meier's Civilization: The Board Game
Slapshot
Sleeping Queens
Small World
Snow Tails
Sobek
Speed Circuit
Steam
Stone Age
Stratego
T
Taj Mahal
Targi
The Castles of Burgundy
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
Page 186 of 187
The Princes of Florence
The Resistance
The Settlers of Catan
The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow
Thebes
Through the Desert
Thurn and Taxis
Tichu
Ticket to Ride
Ticket to Ride: Europe
Ticket to Ride: Nordic Countries
Tigris & Euphrates
Tikal
Times Square
Titan: The Arena
Tobago
Torres
Trajan
TransAmerica
Twilight Struggle
Tzolk'in: The Mayan Calendar
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
U
Union Pacific
Up Front
160
161
V
Vasco da Gama
Vegas Showdown
Via Appia
Village
162
163
164
165
W
Wallenstein (second edition)
Walnut Grove
Win, Place & Show
166
167
168
Y
You Suck
Ys
Yspahan
169
170
171
Z
Zooloretto
172
Generated by 'BGG Games Report Generator' v. 1.0.0.59. Available for free at:
http://bggreportgenerator.nors-jensen.dk/publish.htm
Page 187 of 187
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