Citrus College - Ascending Lights iGraduate

Citrus College - Ascending Lights iGraduate
CATALOG
STUDENT SERVICES
2013-2014
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
citrus college
catalog
Citrus Community College District
1000 West Foothill Boulevard, Glendora, California 91741-1899
www.citruscollege.edu • (626) 963-0323,
(TDD) Telecommunication Device for the Deaf, (626) 914-8674 (available 24 hours)
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Table of Contents
Welcome to Citrus College: Superintendent/
How Do I Adjust to Campus Life?
President's Message ............................................... 5
Assessment, Orientation, and Counseling
Board of Trustees ..................................................... 5
What is Assessment? ................................................ 21
What is Required Orientation? ................................... 21
Institutional Memberships ..................................... 6
Counseling/Advisement ............................................. 22
2013-2014 Academic Calendar ............................. 7
Prerequisites, Co-Requisites, and Recommendations .... 22
Verification of Prerequisites ....................................... 22
Who are We? History, Mission and Community
Challenging Prerequisites .......................................... 23
Overview/History ....................................................... 8
Accreditation and Affiliations ....................................... 8
Información en Español
Mission Statement and Objectives ................................ 8
Admisión ................................................................. 24
Vision and Values ...................................................... 9
Estudiantes de la Preparatoria ................................... 24
Foundation and Alumni .............................................. 9
Cómo Solicitar Admisión ............................................ 24
Requisitos de Residencia ........................................... 25
Citrus College: A College of Completion………….10
Exención para no Pagar la Cuota No-Residente de
California (AB 540) .............................................. 25
College Directory ........................................... 11-14
Cuotas y Costos........................................................ 25
Póliza de Reembolso de Cuotas .................................. 26
How Do I Get Started? Admission,
Obligaciones Financieras de los Estudiantes ................ 26
Registration, Student Success and Support Program
Ayuda Financiera ...................................................... 26
Admission ................................................................ 15
Asesoría y Orientación Qué es la Asesoría? ................. 28
International Student Admission ............................... 15
Que es una Orientación Requerida? ............................ 28
High School Students................................................ 15
Consejería/Asesoría Académica .................................. 29
How to Apply .......................................................... 15
EOP&S/CARE............................................................ 29
Residency Requirements .......................................... 16
Educación Continua y Educación No-crédito ................ 30
Transcripts ............................................................ 16
Lista de personal que habla español: .......................... 30
Class Schedules ....................................................... 16
Registration ............................................................ 17
What are the Rules? Academic Policies and
Unit Limitations ........................................................ 17
Requirements, Attendance and Enrollment
WingSpan .............................................................. 17
Attendance Policy ..................................................... 31
Waitlist .................................................................... 18
Absences ................................................................. 31
Add Codes ............................................................... 18
Adding and Dropping Classes..................................... 31
Enrollment Verification ............................................. 18
Instructor Drop ........................................................ 31
Distance Education ................................................. 19
Auditing Courses ...................................................... 31
Fees and Expenses .................................................. 19
Program Changes: Adding and Dropping Classes ........ 31
Refund Policy .......................................................... 19
Credits, Grades and Academic Status ......................... 31
Student Financial Obligations ................................... 20
Academic Record Symbols and Grade Points ............... 31
Cancelled Classes ..................................................... 20
Evaluating Academic Progress ................................... 32
Student Success and Support Program ...................... 20
Probation, Dismissal and Reinstatement .................... 32
Matriculation ............................................................ 20
Course Repetition .................................................... 34
Criteria for Exemption from Matriculation.................... 20
New Rules on Course Repeatability and
Refusal of Matriculation Services ................................ 20
Course Families .................................................... 35
Pass/No Pass Courses ............................................... 36
Credit by Examination ............................................... 37
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CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Citrus College Credit for Advancement Placement
College Success Program ........................................... 56
(AP) Tests ....................................................... 39-44
Cashier/Bursar‘s Offices .....................................…..….57
Golf Driving Range .................................................... 57
How Does Citrus Recognize High Achievers?
Haugh Performing Arts Center ................................... 57
Honors Programs and Recognition
Learning Center ........................................................ 58
Academic Honors ..................................................... 45
The Writing Café....................................................... 58
Achievement Awards ............................................... 45
Library Services ...................................................... 58
Honors at Graduation ............................................... 45
STEM Resource Center ............................................. 59
Honors Program ...................................................... 45
Study Abroad Program .............................................. 59
Honor Societies ....................................................... 45
Technical Services and Computer Labs ....................... 59
Who Records My Grades and Credits?
What Majors and Programs Does Citrus College
Policies Regarding Academic Records
Offer?............................................................... 60-62
Academic Records .................................................... 46
Academic Renewal .................................................... 46
How Do I Earn a Degree at Citrus College?
Transcripts ............................................................... 46
Programs of Study Leading to an Associate Degree
Challenge of Educational Records............................... 46
Requirements for Majors ........................................... 63
Degree Programs List ............................................... 63
Where Do I Find Help and How Do I Become
Associate Degrees for Transfer ................................... 63
Involved? Student Services and Student Life
Core Competencies and Student Learning
Admissions and Records ............................................ 47
Outcomes ........................................................... 64
Athletics ................................................................. 47
Bookstore ................................................................ 47
Graduation Requirements for an Associate
CalWORKs ............................................................... 48
Degree .................................................................. 65
Campus Safety ........................................................ 48
Associate in Art and Associate in Science Degrees........ 65
Career/Transfer Center ............................................. 48
Associate in Art and Associate in Science Degrees for
Cashier .................................................................... 49
Transfer ................................................................... 66
Center for Teacher Excellence ................................... 49
General Education Philosophy and
Counseling & Advisement Center ............................... 49
Requirements ...................................................... 66
Disabled Students Programs & Services ...................... 49
Application for Graduation ......................................... 70
EOP&S/CARE .......................................................... .49
Planning for Transfer................................................. 71
Financial Aid .......................................................... 50
California State University .......................................... 71
Food Services ........................................................... 53
University of California .............................................. 78
Health Center ........................................................... 53
Intersegment General Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) ..... 79
International Student Center ..................................... 54
Associate Degrees..................................................... 84
Student Employment Services .................................... 54
Associate Degrees for Transfer ................................... 84
Student Government and Student Affairs .................... 54
Associate Degrees (A.A. and A.S.) .............................. 96
Student Activities and Organizations ........................... 54
Veterans Center ....................................................... 54
What Career and Technical Programs Does
Citrus Offer? Programs of Study Leading to a
What Additional Resources are Available at
Certificate of Achievement
Citrus? Campus Facilities and Learning Resources
Program Listings ..................................................... 128
Adaptive PE/Fitness Center ....................................... 56
Programs of Study .................................................. 129
Aquatic Center ......................................................... 56
Art & Coffee Bar ....................................................... 56
How Do I Earn a Skill Award From Citrus? Programs
Art Gallery ............................................................... 56
of Study Leading to a Skill Award
Athletics Facilities ..................................................... 56
Program Listings ................................................... 147
Campus Center ........................................................ 56
Programs of Study .................................................. 147
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Does Citrus Offer Courses for Growth and
Development? Continuing Education
Continuing Education, Noncredit Education and
Faculty and Administrators .............................. 262
Faculty and Administrators Emeriti................... 268
Community Education .............................................. 150
Definitions .......................................................... 272
How are Citrus College‘s Academic Programs
Maps ................................................................... 274
Organized? Academic Divisions, Departments, and
Subjects
Index .................................................................. 275
Subjects by Division and Department ........................ 151
Course Code Directory ............................................. 152
A Guide to Understanding the Course
Descriptions ........................................................ 153
Course Descriptions
Credit Courses ........................................................ 154
Non-Credit Courses ................................................. 249
College Policies and Notices: Rules for Safety and
Success
Academic Freedom Statement .................................. 256
Academic Honesty ................................................... 256
Athletic Eligibility ..................................................... 256
Drug Free Policy ..................................................... 256
Campus Disturbances .............................................. 256
Cheating and Plagiarism........................................... 256
Code of Conduct ..................................................... 256
Notice to Students
The information contained in this catalog is advisory only
and does not constitute a contractual agreement by the
college or guarantee that course content will be strictly followed or fulfilled. Citrus College and the Citrus Community
College District reserves the right to change at any time,
without notice, academic requirements to graduate, curriculum course content and structure, and such other matters
as may be within their control, notwithstanding any information set forth in this catalog.
All changes, corrections, and revisions to the catalog that
occur after printing will be posted in the online version of
the catalog and accessed by visiting www.citruscollege.edu.
There is a $3.00 charge for the Citrus College Catalog.
Citrus College publications are available in an alternate
format upon request by persons with verifiable disabilities.
Citrus College is an Equal Opportunity Institution.
Standards of Conduct .............................................. 257
Driving and Parking ................................................. 258
Grievance Procedures .............................................. 258
Hazing ................................................................... 258
Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment
Prevention ........................................................... 258
Smoking on Campus ................................................ 258
Substance Abuse Policy ........................................... 258
Notices
Campus Safety ........................................................ 260
Registered Sex Offender Information ........................ 260
Catalog Rights ........................................................ 260
Continuous Enrollment ............................................. 260
Nondiscrimination Policy .......................................... 260
Open Enrollment ..................................................... 260
Public Safety ........................................................... 260
Student Rights and Privacy Act ................................. 261
Student Right-to-Know ........................................... 261
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CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Superintendent/President‘s Message
I am pleased you have chosen Citrus College to be a part of your educational journey. The fact
that you are reading this catalog indicates you are intentional about pursuing and completing
your college education. You are a part of the College of Completion!
The Citrus College Catalog provides important information that you will need from application to
graduation. When you refer to the college catalog and seek the advice and counsel of the
faculty and staff, you become empowered to earn an associate degree, receive a career and
technical certificate of achievement, transfer to a four-year college or university—or achieve a combination of
these opportunities.
Citrus College has a 98-year tradition of producing graduates who succeed in many academic and career areas
such as business, science, fine and performing arts, journalism, athletics, education, and public service. The
college is consistently recognized as one of the nation‘s leading community colleges in awarding associate
degrees, and it ranks among the country‘s top 50 community colleges in associate degrees granted to Hispanic
students. In fact, last June the college conferred 1,508 associate degrees, breaking its record for the third
consecutive year!
The college‘s faculty and staff are dedicated to providing the finest community college education available, while
preparing you to take advantage of the higher education and career opportunities that await you. We look forward to helping you achieve your goals, and we wish you a productive and successful experience here at Citrus
College.
Sincerely,
Geraldine M. Perri, Ph.D.
Superintendent/President
Citrus Community College District Board of Trustees
Mrs. Susan M. Keith
Vice President
Claremont and portions of
Pomona and La Verne
Representative
Dr. Patricia Rasmussen
Member
Glendora and portions of
San Dimas Representative
Mrs. Joanne
Montgomery
President
Monrovia/Bradbury and
portions of Duarte
Representative
Dr. Edward C. Ortell
Member
Duarte and portions of
Azusa, Monrovia, Arcadia,
Covina and Irwindale
Representative
Dr. Gary L. Woods
Clerk/Secretary
Azusa and portions of
Duarte Representative
Ms. Marianna Vega
Student Representative
The Citrus Community College District Board of Trustees establishes policies, approves current and long-range
educational plans and programs, and promotes the orderly growth and development of the college.
Residents of the district communities–Azusa, Claremont, Duarte, Glendora and Monrovia–elect a representative
to serve on the board for a four-year term. The student trustee is elected annually in a general student body
election and serves on the board in a non-voting capacity.
The Board of Trustees meets on the first and third Tuesdays of every month at 4:15 p.m. All meetings of the
board are open to the public and meeting dates are announced in advance. A record of all board transactions is
available to the public in the college library.
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Institutional Memberships and Professional Certifications
Citrus College is proud of its memberships and certifications with
some of the most credible and prestigious organizations in the
country. These affiliations include, but are not limited to, the
following:
American Association of Community Colleges
American Choral Directors Association
Associated Collegiate Press
Automotive Engine Rebuilders Association (AERA)
Automotive Service Councils, Foothill Chapter #5(ASC)
Azusa Chamber of Commerce
Califa Library Group
California Association of Postsecondary Educators of the Disabled
California Community College Athletic Association
Claremont Chamber of Commerce
Duarte Chamber of Commerce
Glendora Chamber of Commerce
Foundation for California Community Colleges
Honors Transfer Council of California
Irwindale Chamber of Commerce
Monrovia Chamber of Commerce
National League for Nursing
San Gabriel/Foothill Association of Community Colleges
Society of Professional Audio Recording Services
Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA)
Western States Conference
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CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
2013-2014 Academic Calendar
Please refer to the Schedule of Classes for registration deadlines
Fall Semester 2013
August 23-December 14
August 23
Convocation
August 24 & 26
Instruction Begins
Aug. 31 & Sept. 2
Labor Day Holiday
November 9 & 11
Veterans Day Holiday
November 28-30
Thanksgiving Holiday
December 9-14
December 16-
2013
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Staff Development
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February 13
Instruction Begins
April 14-19
Spring Break
May 24 & 26
Memorial Day Holiday
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Final Exams
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June 23-August 14
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CITRUS COLLEGE
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Although many six week classes will end
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www.citruscollege.edu
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Who Are We?
History, Mission and Community
Overview and History
Citrus College is located in Glendora, California, near the foothills of
the San Gabriel Mountains, and
approximately 25 miles northeast of
metropolitan Los Angeles. The
college has the distinction of being
the oldest community college in Los
Angeles County and the fifth oldest
in California.
This public community college
serves more than 200,000 residents
and the students of the Azusa,
Claremont, Duarte, Glendora and
Monrovia school districts.
Citrus College was founded in 1915
under the leadership of Dr. Floyd S.
Hayden, who helped bring the community college movement to California. From 1915 to 1961, the college
was operated by the Citrus Union
High School District. In July 1961,
the Citrus Community College District was created to include the
Azusa and Glendora unified school
districts. In 1967, the district expanded to include the Claremont,
Duarte and Monrovia school districts.
Today, Citrus College occupies a
104-acre campus. Since 2004, the
college has been undergoing a major facilities expansion project that
is changing the look of the campus
and providing facilities that will enhance learning.
The college enrolled 27 students in
1915 and currently serves over
12,000 students.
Accreditation and Affiliations
Citrus College is accredited by the
Accrediting Commission for
Community and Junior Colleges
(ACCJC) of the Western Association
of Schools and Colleges (WASC), 10
Commercial Boulevard, Suite 204,
Novato, CA 94949, (415) 506-0234.
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CITRUS COLLEGE
Citrus College, Class of 1917
ACCJC is an institutional accrediting
body recognized by the Council for
Higher Education and the U.S.
Department of Education. Citrus
College‘s professional memberships
include the American Association of
Community Colleges (AACC) and the
Community College League of
California (CCLC). Citrus College is
also a G.I. Jobs magazine ―Military
Friendly School.‖
Mission Statement
Citrus College delivers high quality
instruction to students both within
and beyond traditional geographic
boundaries. We are dedicated to
fostering a diverse educational
community and learning environment by providing an open and
welcoming culture that supports
successful completion of transfer,
career/technical education, and
basic skills development.
We demonstrate our commitment
to academic excellence and
student success by continuously
assessing student learning
and institutional effectiveness.
Mission Objectives
Citrus College is a safe, friendly,
accessible environment where all
students and community members may optimize their academic,
career, and cultural development.
As Citrus College continues to
advance as a dynamic center for
life-long learning, we will:
•
•
•
•
provide general, lower division
coursework leading to an associate degree in the arts or the
sciences;
prepare students to transfer to
four-year colleges and universities;
offer technological services and
support for students, faculty,
and staff;
deliver programs to improve
basic math, reading, communication, and ESL skills;
grant opportunities for students
to develop a global perspective
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
through a curriculum with
international and multicultural
applications;
furnish support services for the
intellectual and personal development of all Citrus College students, including opportunities to
participate in campus governance;
foster a comprehensive and enriching program of extracurricular
activities;
conduct community education
programs that encourage learning
at every stage of life; award
occupational certificates and
degrees for career preparation
and advancement;
administer customized training
programs for business and industry;
increase career development
support for students, faculty, and
staff through career exploration,
counseling, job preparation, job
opportunities, and academic and
classified staff development;
collaborate with local high schools
in articulation and curriculum
development;
advance cultural and personal
enrichment programs for the
college and community members,
and promote inter-collegiate
competition opportunities for
students.
Vision Statement
Citrus College will provide
excellent educational opportunities
that are responsive to the needs of
the community and help students
meet economic, social, and environmental challenges to become active
participants in shaping the world of
the future.
Values
1. Student Focus
Meeting community and student
needs by creating an education
al environment and culture so
students can attain a variety of
goals.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Members of the Citrus College Class of 2013
2. Excellence
Maintain a high standard of
integrity and performance
leading to the achievement of
academic and professional
goals.
Foundation and Alumni
The Citrus College Foundation is a
501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation
founded in 1966 and revitalized in
1982. It is governed by a volunteer
board of directors.
3. Collaboration
Seeking input from all sectors of
the college and the community.
In 2012, the Foundation awarded
221 scholarships and grants valued
at over $127,000. This assistance
enabled Citrus College students to
accomplish their educational goals.
4. Diversity
Fostering a learning community
in which the values, goals, and
learning styles of all students
are recognized and supported.
5. Life-Long Learning
Serving enthusiastic,
independent thinkers and
learners striving for personal
growth.
6. Integrity
Behaving ethically in all
interactions at all levels.
7. Technological
Advancement
Keeping pace with global
technology trends and
enhancing traditional instruction
with technology to prepare
students for success in the work
place.
The Citrus Alumni and Friends
Association advances the general
interest of Citrus College alumni,
promotes goodwill in the community, raises funds for scholarships,
helps Citrus Union High School and
Citrus College alumni plan reunions,
and assists with special projects that
benefit Citrus College students.
Every year during the month of May
the college observes Alumni Month,
and members of the Alumni and
Friends Association select and
announce the recipients of the
Distinguished Alumni Award.
www.citruscollege.edu
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Citrus College: A College of Completion
In 2012, the Citrus College
community adopted the national
community college completion
agenda established by the American Association of Community
Colleges, the Phi Theta Kappa
Honor Society and the White
House. The initiative is designed
to encourage and support students as they strive to complete
their education, transfer to fouryear colleges and universities, and
pursue the careers of their choice.
Faculty and Staff Call to
Action In Support of Students
We believe the student success
and completion agenda is the
future of Citrus College.
We believe that completion
matters and every student counts.
We believe in every student’s
potential and responsibility to
succeed.
We believe the “open door” must
not be a “revolving door.”
We believe that community
colleges are the gateways to the
middle class and beyond.
We commit to courageous
conversations about diversity,
equity, and evidence reflecting
student success and institutional
performance.
We commit to eliminating the
attainment gaps that separate
student groups.
We commit to acting on facts to
make positive changes.
We commit to promoting faculty
and staff development focused on
evidence based educational practice.
We commit to providing development opportunities, for college
administrators, trustees, faculty,
staff, and students.
We ask every trustee, employee,
and student organization to
identify ways to help students
understand the added value of
degrees and certifications.
We ask every student to help one
other student succeed.
We ask community members to
work with us.
We believe that community
colleges are an invaluable
economic engine driving the
nation toward prosperity.
We ask elected officials to create
the policy conditions that enable,
support, and reward our work to
strengthen student success.
We believe that talented people
working at Citrus College are
ready to take on leadership roles.
We ask other community colleges
to join us by signing this call to
action.
We believe in changing institutional culture, from emphasis on
access only to emphasis on access
and success.
Student Pledge: Commitment
to Completion
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CITRUS COLLEGE
We believe every student has
the potential and responsibility to
succeed.
We believe completion matters
and every student counts.
We believe in an institutional
culture that emphasizes student
success.
We believe community college
allows individuals to grow as far
as their talents will allow.
We commit to reaching out to
students in need by encouraging,
nurturing, and guiding them
toward college completion.
We commit to serving as role
models by attending classes, being prepared, and participating in
and engaging in discussions with
professors and students inside
and outside of class.
We commit to discussing
career-planning with professors
and staff to ensure timely completion.
We commit to learning about
and using college support services.
We ask and trust every trustee,
employee, and student organization to help the student body understand the great value of obtaining degrees and certifications.
We ask and trust our college to
encourage the faculty and staff to
create meaningful ways of
supporting students in scholarly
endeavors, social engagement,
and career planning efforts.
We ask and trust the community
as a whole to work with us towards our pursuit of college completion.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Citrus College Directory
Office of the Superintendent/President
(All telephone numbers are area code 626)
Superintendent/President
Executive Assistant
Administrative Assistant
Supervisor
Dr. Geraldine M. Perri
Christine Link, 914-8821
Patricia Robidoux, 914-8821
Tedd Goldstein, 914-8821
Administrative Divisions
Finance and Administrative Services
Vice President
Administrative Assistant
Environmental Health & Safety Programs Supervisor
Facilities and Construction Director
Fiscal Services Director
Golf Driving Range Supervisor
Mailroom Coordinator
Purchasing/Warehouse Director
Reprographics Supervisor
Risk Management Supervisor
Carol R. Horton
Judy Rojas, 914-8890
Jeff Eichler, 914-8704
Fred Diamond, 914-8691
Rosalinda Buchwald, 914-8897
Lauri Stoner, 914-8835
Dawn Dineley, 857-4116
Robert Iverson, 914-8888
Thomas Reynolds, 914-8740
Eric Guzman, 914-8889
Development
Foundation Director
Administrative Assistant
Christina M. Garcia
Clarence Cernal, 914-8825
Human Resources
Director
Administrative Assistant
Human Resources/Staff Diversity Manager
Dr. Robert Sammis
Sandra Coon, 914-8552
Brenda Fink, 914-8830
Institutional Research
Director
Administrative Secretary
Research Analyst
Dr. Lan Hao
Linda Swan, 914-8002
Sunny Liu, 852-8038
Technology and Computer Services, External and Government Relations
Chief Information Services Officer
Linda Welz
Administrative Secretary
Millie Franco, 914-8810
Communications Director
Paula Green, 914-8873
Network Central Computing & Telecommunications
Systems Supervisor
Leigh Buchwald, 914-8810
Protocol and Government Relations Officer
Marilyn Grinsdale, 914-8824
Technology Operations & Support Services Supervisor
Glenna Johnson, 914-8812
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
11
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Academic Affairs
(All telephone numbers are area code 626)
Interim Vice President
Administrative Assistants
Administrative Secretary
Dr. Arvid Spor
Jerry Capwell, 914-8881
Jaclyn Vazquez, 914-8882
Kathleen Bueno, 914-8858
Curriculum, Career/Technical and Continuing Education Programs
Architecture, Automotive Technology (Automobile/Light Truck, and Medium/Heavy Truck ),
Career/Technical Education Programs, CTE Transitions, Community Education, Computer Information Systems,
Computer Science, Contract Education, Cosmetology, Curriculum, Drafting and Design Technology, Esthetician,
Information Technology, Noncredit Instruction (English as a Second Language; Heating, Ventilation and Air
Conditioning; Basic Skills), Office Technology and Computer Applications, Public Works, Water Technology
Dean
James Lancaster
Administrative Secretary
Lois Bottari, 852-6402
Career Technical Programs Supervisor
Marti De Young, 914-8702
Continuing Education Supervisor
Debbie Vanschoelandt, 852-8022
Cosmetology Program Coordinator
Albert Graciano, 914-8713
Fine and Performing Arts, Haugh Performing Arts Center
Fine Arts: Art (Art History, Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, 2-D and 3-D Design, Digital Media, Photography)
Performing Arts: Music (Commercial, Education, Performance), Dance, Theatre, Recording Arts, Haugh
Performing Arts Center
Dean
Robert Slack
Administrative Secretary
Autumn Leal, 914-8580
Fine and Performing Arts Programs
Ann Heming, supervisor, 914-8579
Haugh Performing Arts Center Interim Director
John Vaughn, 852-8004
Kinesiology/Health/Athletics
Intercollegiate Athletics, Kinesiology, Aquatics Center, Fitness Center
Dean
Jody Wise
Administrative Secretary
Isabel Bellman, 914-8650
Assistant Athletics Director
Mary Brawner, 914-8686
Assistant Athletics Director
Cliff Wurst, 914-8845
Language Arts and Enrollment Management
Communications, Clarion student newspaper, English, English as a Second Language, Enrollment Management,
Foreign Languages (Chinese, German, Japanese, Spanish), Honors, Learning Center (Assessment/Testing,
Tutoring Center, Language Lab, Writing Café, College Success Center), Reading, Speech Communications
Dean
Dr. Samuel Lee
Administrative Secretary
Cathy Day, 914-8856
Honors Program Coordinator
Brian Waddington, 857-4039
Honors Program Counselor
Stephanie Yee, 914-8638
Learning Center Supervisor
Gerald Helm, 857-4035
12
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Mathematics, Business and Health Sciences
Accounting, Business, College Success Program (Basic Skills), Computer Science, Learning Communities,
Mathematics, Real Estate, Teacher Preparation, Dental Assisting, Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), Licensed
Vocational Nursing (LVN), Nurse Assistant (NA), Registered Nursing (RN)
Dean
James McClain
Administrative Secretary
Cynthia Audelo, 914-8792
Administrative Secretary
Diana Gill, 914-8577
Bridges to Success Grant Director
Becky Rudd, 857-4056
College Success Program Coordinator
Suzanne Martinez, 857-4191
STEM Grants Director
Dr. Marianne Smith, 914-8701
Health Sciences Director
Administrative Secretary
Administrative Secretary
Dental Assisting Coordinator
Health Occupations (EMT) Coordinator
Nursing (ADN) Coordinator
Nursing (CNA) Coordinator
Nursing (LVN) Coordinator
Dr. Maureen Renaghan
Cheryl Hall, 914-8791
Julie Tunno, 914-8720
Claudia Pohl, 914-8728
Dr. Cliff Hadsell, 914-8755
Salima Allahbachayo, 914-8791
Deborah Bowman, 914-8791
Gail Tucker, 914-8720
Natural and Physical Sciences and Library Services
Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Wildland Resources and Forestry, Natural History, Physics,
Faculty and Staff Development
Dean
Dr. Eric Rabitoy
Administrative Secretary
Chris Pagano, 914-8789
Administrative Secretary
Caroline Locke, 914-8874
Library and Audio Visual
Audiovisual Technician
Public Services Librarian/Bibliographic
Instruction
Technical Services/Systems Librarian
Tina Gutierrez, 914-8576
Sarah Bosler, 914-8642
Lanette Granger, 857-4061
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Administration of Justice, Anthropology, Child Development, Distance Education, Economics, Ethnic Studies,
Geography, History, Humanities, Leadership (Student Government), Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology,
Sociology, Study Abroad Program
Dean
Dr. Dana Hester
Administrative Secretary
Gayle Allen, 914-8860
Foster/Kinship Care Education & Resources
Coordinator
Lillian Sass, 857-4088
Study Abroad Specialist
Lynn Jamison, 914-8560
Distance Education Faculty Coordinator
Dr. Beverly Van Citters, 857-4124
Distance Education Supervisor
Lari Kirby, 914-8569
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
13
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Student Services Division
(All telephone numbers are area code 626)
Vice President
Administrative Assistant
Dr. Arvid Spor
Tonya Ryan, 914-8532
Admissions and Records
Admissions, Records, Financial Aid
Dean
Administrative Secretary
Registrar
Financial Aid Director
Dr. Gerald Sequeira
Jamie Richmond, 914-8519
Kristina Spalding, 914-8597
Carol Thomas, 914-8591
Counseling Programs and Services
Articulation, Career/Transfer Center, Center for Teacher Excellence, Counseling/Advisement Center, EOP&S/
CARE, CalWORKs, DSP&S, Matriculation (credit and noncredit)
Dean
Dr. Lucinda Over
Administrative Secretary
Cynthia Patino, 914-8541
Articulation Officer
Michelle Plug, 914-8637
Athletics Counselor
Alicia Longyear, 914-8662
Career/Technical Education Counselor
Grace Kim, 914-8732
Career/Transfer Center Coordinator
Raul Sanchez, 857-4064
Center for Teacher Excellence Coordinator
Deanna Smedley, 857-4078
Counseling and Advisement Center Faculty Lead
Claudia Castillo, 914-8537
College Success Counselor
Barry Gropp, 914-8530
DSP&S Coordinator
Jennifer McLeod, 914-8677
Early Alert Counselor
Robin McBurney, 914-8542
EOP&S/CARE, CalWORKs Director
Sara Gonzales-Tapia, 914-8556
Honors Counselor
Stephanie Yee, 914-8638
International Student Center Supervisor
Coe Lamoureux, 914-8548
Noncredit/Credit Counseling and Matriculation Counselor
Kristie Shimokawa, 852-8021
Nursing Program Counselor
Eileen Sin, 914-8791
STEM Counselor/Coordinator CSUF(STEM)2
Emily Versace, 914-8716
STEM Counselor/Coordinator CSUF(STEM)2
Debbie Boudreau, 914-8716
STEM Counselor (RACE to STEM)
Becky Iott, 852-6419
STEM Counselor (RACE to STEM)
Raul Rodriguez, 852-6419
Veterans Counselor
Laura Villegas, 852-6421
Student Affairs
Athletic Eligibility, Bookstore, Campus Safety, Food Services, International Student Center, School Relations and
Outreach, Student Business Office, Student Conduct, Student Life and Leadership Development, Student Health
Center, Veterans Center
Dean
Dr. Martha McDonald
Administrative Secretary
Teri Shamhart, 914-8601
Bookstore Supervisor
Eric Magallon, 914-8624
Campus Safety Supervisor
Benjamin Macias, 914-8611
Food Services Supervisor
Philomena O'Shea, 914-8615
School Relations/Outreach Coordinator
Ivon McCraven, 857-4162
Student Life and Leadership Development Supervisor
Adrienne Thompson, 914-8603
Student Health Center, College Nurse
Shauna Bigby, 914-8671
Veterans Center Project Director
Monica Christianson, 852-6457
14
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
How Do I Get Started? Admission, Registration,
Student Success and Support Program
Admission
Citrus College is an open access
institution, offering admission to
high school graduates or persons
who are at least 18 years of age
and possess a high school
diploma, GED, certificate of proficiency, or the equivalent. Special
provisions for high school students
are addressed in this section.
A person 18 years of age or older
who has not received a high
school diploma may be admitted
to Citrus College to take general
education courses or to enroll in
specialized vocational programs.
The student also may prepare for
transfer to a four-year institution
without a high school diploma.
Concurrent High School
Student to First-Time
Freshman
If you are a graduating high
school senior concurrently enrolled
at Citrus College and plan to
attend a subsequent term you will
need to file a Change of Status High School Student to First-Time
Freshman Form.
International Student
Admission
The Citrus College International
Student Office admits international
students holding or attempting to
obtain an F-1 Student Visa upon
approval of their applications.
These students are required to
pay international student tuition.
In order to qualify for admission,
an international student must do
the following:
1. Submit a Citrus College
application for admission
2. Complete the international
student application and pay a
fee
3. Submit confidential financial
support documents
CITRUS COLLEGE
4. Obtain a passing score of the
TOEFL examination: 450
(paper based), 133 (computer
based), or 45 (Internet based)
5. Provide transcripts from high
school and/or college
6. Provide proof of Tuberculosis
(TB) test
The following items are required
for current F-1 Visa students
transferring to Citrus College:
1. Copy of I-20
2. Copy of 1-94
3. Transfer Form
4. Visa
5. Passport
6. College transcripts
The TOEFL, admissions application, and all supporting materials
must be received on or before the
published application deadlines for
the intended semester. Students
are required to take the
Accuplacer ESL exam when they
arrive at the college.
High School Students
Classes for High School
Students
Citrus College offers selected
programs and classes for high
school students who are in the
11th and 12th grades. These
students must be enrolled
concurrently at their high schools
and at Citrus College. They are
required to complete and submit
an application and a High School
Registration Authorization
Form. This form, which requires
signatures from a parent and from
a counselor or principal, is available online at
www.citruscollege.edu/ar.
High school students that do not
meet the grade level requirement
can appeal. The appeal form can
be found online at
www.citruscollege.edu/ar.
Citrus College summer school
classes are offered at Azusa,
Claremont, Duarte and Monrovia
high schools through the Noncredit Program. For more information, contact the counseling office
at these high schools.
Early Decision Program
The Early Decision Program enables seniors from Azusa, Claremont, Duarte, Gladstone, Glendora and Monrovia high schools,
who have submitted a Citrus College application, to visit the campus, take the assessment test and
meet with a counselor during the
second semester of their senior
year.
Seniors who attend other high
schools and who are interested in
the Early Decision process are
encouraged to call the School Relations and Outreach Office at
626-857-4162.
How to Apply
The process of applying to Citrus
College begins when prospective
students submit an application
online through our website, at
https:wingspan.citruscollege.edu.
There is no charge to submit an
application and an application can
be submitted at any time. Computers allowing access to the college Web site are also available in
the lobby of the Student Services
Building, as well as other areas on
campus.
Once an application is completed
and submitted, the new student
will receive a "Welcome to Citrus
College," e-mail which will include
a student user ID and Personal
Identification Number (PIN). The
student will need the ID and PIN
to register for classes, pay fees,
and officially enroll at Citrus
College.
www.citruscollege.edu
15
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
First-Time Freshmen Under 18
Years Old
Proof of graduation is required for
students who will not be 18 years
of age by the first day of instruction at Citrus College. A verification of graduation must be submitted to the Admissions
and Records Office.
Acceptable documents of verification include a high school diploma,
GED, Certificate of California Proficiency, a Target Letter submitted
on school letterhead stating that
you have fulfilled your graduation
requirements, or a sealed high
school transcript with your
graduation date posted.
Residency Requirements
As a public community college,
Citrus College is required by law
to verify each applicant's residence in accordance with Title 5
and the California Education Code.
Residence status, known as the
residence determination date, is
determined as of the day before
each term begins and establishes
the fees and tuition to be collected
at the time of registration.
Residency Classification
Residency classifications shall be
determined for each student at
the time of application.
California Residents
California residents attend Citrus
College tuition free and pay enrollment and other fees.
Nonresidents
Students who do not meet the
California residence requirements
will be charged nonresident tuition, plus enrollment and other
fees. For more information, visit
www.citruscollege.edu/ar.
16
CITRUS COLLEGE
California Nonresident Tuition
Exemption (AB 540)
Any student, other than a nonimmigrant alien, who meets all of
the following requirements, shall
be exempt from paying nonresident tuition.
The student must have attended a high school (public
or private) in California for
three or more years.
The student must have graduated from a California high
school or attained the equivalent prior to the start of the
term; for example, passing
the GED, California High
School Proficiency exam, or
California High School Exit
Exam.
An alien student who is without lawful immigration status
must file an affidavit with the
college stating that he or she
has filed an application to
legalize his or her immigration
status, or will file an application as soon as he or she is
eligible to do so.
Students who hold non-immigrant
visas; for example, Tourist (B-1, B
-2), Foreign Student (F-1), NAFTA
(TN & TD) and Exchange Student
(J), are not eligible for this exemption.
Residency Reclassification
Students who enroll into classes
pending notification of approval
for the qualifying semester are
responsible for the quoted tuition.
Students, who are approved
based on the submitted documents, will receive a refund of the
nonresident tuition they have
paid.
The burden of residency proof
rests with the applicant. For more
information visit
www.citruscollege.edu/ar
Transcripts
Transcripts from Other
Institutions
Official high school transcripts are
required of new students who attended high school within the last
three years. Official college transcripts are required of new students who were previously enrolled in a college or university.
To ensure a smooth registration
process it is recommended that
transcripts are received and are
on file prior to a student's registration appointment. This may
expedite clearance to enroll in
courses with prerequisites. Transcripts are also required for financial aid and veterans benefits consideration.
Transcripts from colleges accredited by a regional accrediting institution may be evaluated during a
student's first semester of attendance at Citrus College.
Military service credits based on a
DD-214 are posted after a veteran‘s first semester of attendance.
Citrus College Transcripts
Students who request their Citrus
College transcript receive their
first two transcripts free. Thereafter, the student will be charged
$3.00 per transcript. Please note:
Electronic requests of transcripts
are available through Transcripts
Plus/Credentials Solutions for an
additional handling fee. Please go
to the Admissions Web page for
more information.
Students may access a copy of
their unofficial transcripts through
WingSpan.
Class Schedules
Citrus College publishes a Schedule of Classes each semester and
session. These class schedules list
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
the intended credit course offerings and teaching assignments. All
class schedules are available
online.
www.citruscollege.edu/schedule
Fee Based and Noncredit, Continuing Education schedules are
published separately.
Registration
Registration is conducted prior to
every semester and session. In
addition to class selection, all fees
must be paid during registration.
Dates, deadlines, policies, and
guidelines for registration are
listed in the class schedule published for a specific semester or
session.
Registration Limits
A student will not be able to add a
course if he or she:
• Has a fee hold, admission hold,
or another type of hold;
• Is on academic or progress
dismissal;
• Is subject to expulsion or
suspension;
• Registers for a class that places
him or her on overload, and the
student has not been approved
for an overload;
• Has scheduled a class, and the
class time overlaps with another
class he or she is enrolled in;
Has failed to clear the prerequisites(s) for the course or
the enrollment exceeds the
number of repetitions allowed.
Important: Loss of Priority
Registration
The California Community Colleges Board of Governors has approved changes that will establish
system-wide enrollment priorities.
These priorities are designed to
ensure that classes are available
for students seeking job training,
degree attainment, or transfer.
These priorities also reward students who make progress toward
CITRUS COLLEGE
their educational goals.
Beginning fall 2014, the following students will receive enrollment priority:
• New students who have
completed college orientation
and assessment, and have
developed educational plans
• Continuing students in good
academic standing who have
not exceeded 100 units
classification categories are:
Full time:
Enrolled in 12 or more units
Part time:
Enrolled in fewer than 12 units
Three-quarter time:
Enrolled in 9 but fewer than
12 units
Half time:
Enrolled in 6 but fewer than 9
units
The following students will
continue to receive enrollment priority:
• Active-duty military and veterans
• Current and former foster youth
• Extended Opportunity Programs
and Services (EOP&S) students
• Disabled Students Programs and
Services (DSP&S) students
New Student
You are a new student if you have
never filed an application and/or
enrolled in credit classes at
Citrus College.
Dropping Classes Online
Students are able to drop classes
using WingSpan. Drop/Refund
deadlines apply. If you wish to receive a refund for your dropped
class, you must have dropped the
class online by the refund deadline. Please visit the important
dates section of the Admissions
and Records web page for deadline dates. To receive refunds for
your paid parking pass and/or
paid student service sticker, you
must return those items to the
cashier by the refund deadline(s)
for your classes.
Paying for Classes
WingSpan allows Citrus College
students two options to pay their
fees quickly and easily.
• Choose to pay online by credit
card: VISA, MasterCard, Discover
or American Express.
• Pay in person with cash or check
Student Classifications
A Citrus College student who has
earned fewer than 30 units is
classified as a freshman, and a
student with more than 30 units is
a sophomore. Other student
Continuing Student
You are a continuing student if
you registered in any of the
preceding four sessions. K-12
students do not receive continuing
student status for purposes of
priority registration.
Returning Student
You are a returning student if you
previously enrolled in Citrus College credit classes but have been
away for two or more semesters.
Unit Limitations
There is no minimum, but the
maximum number of units a student may enroll in a semester is
21 units (fall and spring). The
maximum number of units a student may enroll in for summer
and winter session is 13 units.
High school students are limited to
11 units in a semester and 3 units
in a session.
A student wishing to take
more than the maximum units
may file a petition through the
Counseling Department.
WingSpan
WingSpan is Citrus College's onestop resource for information and
the primary method of registration. It provides online access for
www.citruscollege.edu
17
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
students to:
• Apply for admission
• Check application status
• View appointments for
registration
• Check registration status
• Register for classes
• Add/drop classes
• Print individual student
schedules
• Pay fees by credit or debit card
• Print enrollment verifications
WingSpan features include access
to grades and unofficial transcripts. Visit the college website
https:wingspan.citruscollege.edu
and download the student guidelines handbook for more information.
Waitlist
During registration, once a class
has reached its enrollment capacity, the status of that class will
change from Open to Closed.
When a class closes, a waitlist
may open, allowing students the
option to place themselves on the
list.
The waitlist has a limit of 20
spots, with the exception of
classes that need special approvals, such as cosmetology, nursing
or music and may have a different
limit. Check with the department
for information.
How Does the Waitlist Work?
Once a class has reached its
enrollment capacity, the
status of that class will change
from "Open" to "Closed."
When a class closes, a waitlist may open, allowing you
the option to place yourself on
the list.
The waitlist option is not
automatic. Students on the
waitlist may have a chance to
register for the class based on
their position on the list.
18
CITRUS COLLEGE
Being on a waitlist does
not guarantee enrollment.
Students on the waitlist will be
contacted via their Citrus
College student e-mail
address if a seat opens.
Notification is based on
the student's rank on the
waitlist.
You may view your waitlist
position on the WingSpan registration page.
If you are the first student on
the waitlist, you will be the
first to have the opportunity
to register.
If you are the second person
on the waitlist, you will be the
next, and so on.
Once you are notified, you will
have 24 hours to register for
the class through the normal
WingSpan registration process.
If you miss the 24-hour
window to register, you
will be removed from the
waitlist.
When you register for a class
or are removed from the waitlist, the waitlist will have an
opening and another student
may join the list.
The ability to waitlist will close
at midnight on the Sunday
prior to the beginning of the
term.
From the first day of class
forward, students will need an
add code from their instructor
to register for the class.
Add codes will be issued at
the instructor's discretion.
Add Codes
An add code may be provided by
an instructor to students who
were unable to enroll in the class
through waitlist. Add codes will be
available from the instructor at the
first class meeting for both open
and closed classes. When an add
code is provided, students must
add the class online before the
―Last Day to Add,‖ which varies
per class and can be found on the
Admissions and Records webpage.
The instructor has the discretion
to issue add codes when he or she
has a space available in the class.
Add codes may only be used once
and become invalid thereafter.
For more details visit
www.citruscollege.edu/ar/waitlist.
Misuse of Add Codes
Students who receive Authorization Codes (Add Codes) from a
faculty member or another Citrus
College official are the only
students authorized to use these
codes.
Students may not sell or give
Add Codes to another student.
The misuse of Add Codes is considered a student conduct violation.
Students who misuse Add Codes
will be dropped from the course
and will be subject to student discipline proceedings as outlined in
Administrative Procedure 5520 of
the Citrus Community College District Board of Trustees.
Enrollment Verification
Citrus College has authorized the
National Student Clearinghouse to
act as its agent for verification of
student enrollment status. An official Enrollment Verification Certificate may be obtained through
WingSpan.
This certificate may be presented
to parties such as health insurance
agencies, housing authorities,
consumer-product companies, and
banks when asked to provide
official evidence of enrollment at
Citrus College.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Distance Education (Online
Classes)
Distance Education classes utilize
computer technology to deliver
instruction to students. These
classes have the same content
and meet the same requirements
as traditional classes, but provide
a more flexible way for students
to take courses. Many of these
online classes require orientations
and testing on campus.
Students who do well in online
courses are typically selfmotivated, organized, and
proactive about their education.
Some knowledge of how to use a
computer is helpful. In addition,
online classes rely heavily on the
exchange of information through
reading and writing, so proficiency
in these skills is important.
For a complete list of available
classes, or for more information,
visit the Distance Education Web
site at www.citruscollege.edu/de
or call the Distance Education office at 626-914-8831.
2013-2014 Fees and
Expenses
The enrollment fee is set by the
California State Legislature.
Enrollment Fee:
$46 per unit
International
Student Tuition*
$209 per unit
Nonresident Tuition* $209 per unit
Campus Service Fees
Health Service Fee
Fall & Spring
$19
BOGW Students
$14
Winter & Summer $16
BOGW Students
$11
Parking Fee
Fall & Spring
$50
Winter & Summer $25
Student
Representation Fee
$1
Student Service Fee
Fall & Spring
$15
Winter & Summer $10
CITRUS COLLEGE
*Nonresident and international
students are required to pay tuition and enrollment fees.
Health Service Fee
The Health Services Fee is mandatory for both full-time and parttime students. The following
students are exempt from payment of the fee:
• Students who depend
exclusively upon prayer for
healing in accordance with the
teachings of a bona fide
religious sect, denomination, or
organization. To receive an
exemption, these students must
present valid documentation of
his or her membership in such a
religion to the office of the vice
president of student services.
• Students who are attending
Citrus College under an
approved apprenticeship
training program.
Student Service Fee
The Student Service Fee is a
voluntary fee that supports
campus activities such as
athletics, clubs, cultural events,
campus improvements and other
special programs and services that
directly benefit students and campus life.
Students receive an ASCC sticker
upon receipt of all payments.
Stickers may be picked up with
the parking permit at the Bursar‘s
Office or the Student Business
Office. The accompanying flier
lists the many benefits, services
and discounts available to students who have paid the service
fee and received a sticker. Because of the broad range of programs and services provided, all
students are requested to pay the
Student Service Fee.
Students may waive this fee prior
to payment of classes by obtaining
a waiver form from the Office of
Student Life, located in the
Campus Center. Proof of registration is required. Students who
waive the fee will become ineligible for the
benefits associated with this fee,
but not for any other student services.
Student Representation Fee
The Student Representation Fee is
a $1 mandatory fee to be used
solely for advocacy purposes on
behalf of students. A student may
refuse to pay for political, religious, financial or moral reasons.
Students desiring to waive this fee
must submit a written statement
justifying their refusal to pay.
This waiver will be subject to approval by the Dean of Students‘
office.
Instructional Materials Fee
A student may be charged this fee
for instructional or other
materials required for specific
classes. These materials may
include but are not limited to,
textbooks, tools, equipment and
clothing.
Fee Refund Policy
Refund of parking, enrollment,
non-resident tuition, health and/or
student service fees shall be made
to eligible students who file a refund request by the college‘s established deadlines.
In the case of an active or
reserve military service member
who receives orders compelling
them to withdraw from Citrus
College, a full refund shall be
made upon verification of his or
her orders.
It is the student's responsibility to
return their parking permit before
the refund deadline in order to
receive a refund for parking. Parking permits must be returned
upon official withdrawal from the
college and if a student changes
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19
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
from an on-campus schedule to a
Distance Education schedule. Cash
refunds will not be issued.
Credit will be immediately issued
to credit card payments. However,
the student and cardholder must
be present, with the credit card
and the credit card receipt, at the
time of the refund request. Otherwise, a refund request form must
be submitted. Fee payments made
with cash, check or debit card will
receive a refund by check. This
check will be mailed to the address on file with the Admissions
and Records Office. Therefore, it
is important the address on file is
current and correct.
Student Financial Obligations
All fees must be paid prior to the
rollout date to avoid being
dropped from classes, including
waitlisted classes. Fee payment
schedules are included in the class
schedules and online.
Citrus College will withhold
grades, transcripts, degrees, registration privileges, or any combination thereof, from any student
or former student who has failed
to pay any financial obligation due
the college. Holds on a student's
record will be released when the
debt obligation has been met.
Debts must be paid in the form of
cash or money order: a bank
service charge or chargeback fee
may apply.
Cancelled Classes
Classes may be cancelled at the
discretion of the college. Students
enrolled in a cancelled class may
enroll in other open classes.
Students who have a class or
classes cancelled by the college
because of low enrollment are
eligible for a full refund of fees
paid for those classes. The student must file a refund request at
the Cashier's (Bursar's) Office. All
20
CITRUS COLLEGE
applicable receipts, cards and permits must be attached to the request form.
Student Success and
Support Program
What is the Student Success
and Support Program?
The objective of the Student
Success and Support Program
(also known as Matriculation) is to
assists students in designing and
planning their educational goals.
The process begins with admission
and ends when the student
achieves his/her educational goal.
Matriculation
Matriculation is defined by the
Seymour-Campbell Student Success Act of 2012 as ―a process
that brings a college and a student into an agreement for the
purpose of achieving the student‘s
educational goals and completing
the student‘s course of study.‖
The agreement involved the
responsibilities of the college and
the student. The Student Success
and Support Program includes
services to optimize students‘
opportunities to foster academic
success.
The college‘s responsibility is
to provide:
Orientation services
Assessment before course
registration
Counseling and other education planning services
Referrals to specialized
support services
Evaluation of each student‘s
progress and referral to appropriate interventions
The student‘s responsibility is
to:
Identify an academic and
career goal upon application
Declare a specific course of
study after a specified period
of unit accumulation, as
defined by the board of
governors
Attend class and complete
assigned coursework
Complete courses and maintain academic progress toward
an educational goal and
course of study identified in
the Student Educational Plan
(SEP).
Criteria for Exemption from
Matriculation Activities
A student may be exempted from
matriculation activities including
orientation, assessment, counseling or advisement based on one
or more of the following:
1. Completed an associate
degree or higher from a
regionally accredited college;
2. Is enrolled in course work to
advance in current job, or to
pursue personal enrichment, or
to maintain a certificate/
license, AND is enrolled in
fewer than five (5) units;
3. Completed the assessment/
orientation components at
another college, with
placement scores on file at
Citrus College.
Refusal of Matriculation
Services
Citrus College strongly believes in
the value of its matriculation process. However, the college
recognizes the right of students
to refuse to participate in its
assessment, orientation, counseling and advisement services.
Please contact the Counseling and
Advisement Center at
626-914-8530, for more information.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
How Do I Adjust to Campus Life ?
Assessment, Orientation and Counseling Ensure a Smooth Academic Transition
Assessment and
Orientation
What is Assessment?
All new students who are not
exempt from Student Success and
Support Program activities are
required to participate in an assessment, orientation and
advisement process. This process
is designed to assist students in
reaching their educational and
career goals.
The assessment process at Citrus
College provides information
regarding language, mathematics
skills, and other activities necessary for a successful college experience. Student-reported information is also used, along with
available high school and/or college transcripts. Other factors that
are used in assessing college
readiness may include evaluation
of study skills, student goals and
career aspirations, and the results
of the placement exam.
Assessment information assists
the counselor in outlining a useful
and clear educational program for
the student's long-range educational plans and the eventual
attainment of a chosen career.
Students who have a disability
that requires testing accommodations are advised to make
arrangements through the DSP&S
Office, (626) 914-8675. Deaf Services are available 24 hours, (626)
914-8674 TDD.
Review of Placement
Students who feel their placement
does not reflect their abilities may
request a Review of Placement.
Please contact the Counseling and
Advisement Center for more
information.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Students may appeal their English
and/or math placement if they can
demonstrate alternate proof of
course equivalency or competency. If extenuating circumstances exist that may affect
course placement, students may
seek consultation in the appropriate division office. Students
should be prepared to present
documentation such as high
school or college transcripts, or
additional test results. After a student‘s information is reviewed,
preparation placement may be
adjusted or a retest may be recommended.
What is Required Orientation?
Effective summer 2010, students
who are new to Citrus College are
urged to complete the assessment and MUST complete orientation. All future registration will
be withheld from students who
have applied to the college and
did not complete the orientation
requirement by their specific
deadline date. Students who believe they are exempt or those
who want to read about procedures for challenging
matriculation regulatory
provisions can be referred to the
matriculation section in the Citrus
College catalog at:
http://www.citruscollege.edu/
schedule/catalog/Pages/
default.aspx
Assessment/Orientation
Options
Orientation can be satisfied
through any of the following
options:
• In-person orientation
(recommended for new
students)
- Orientation following
assessment
- Assessment/Orientation held
at high schools
- Early Decision Day at Citrus
College (only available
through high school districts)
Online orientation at http://
orientation.citruscollege.edu
The assessment and orientation
process is an effort by Citrus
College to provide students with
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21
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
the finest academic advisement
and counseling possible. The New
Student Assessment/Orientation
Session is scheduled throughout
the year. For more information,
please visit the
Assessment Testing Web page,
http://www.citruscollege.edu/
stdntsrv/transcntr/Pages/
default.aspx
Counseling/Advisement
Students on probation are
required to complete an online
probation workshop at
http://citruscollege.edu/stdntsrv/
counsel/Pages/
NewStudentMandatoryOrientation/
aspx well in advance of
registration.
Registration is withheld until the
workshop is completed.
All students are encouraged to
meet with a counselor every
semester to ensure their
educational plan accurately
reflects their educational goal.
Veterans planning to receive
G.I. benefits are required to
make an appointment with the
Veterans Center prior to seeing a
counselor.
The college counseling staff
provides a variety of services
including but not limited to,
educational planning, career
counseling, university transfer
counseling, personal counseling
(personal concerns and issues
affecting students' academic
progress), Disabled Student
Programs and Services (DSP&S),
Extended Opportunity Program
and Services (EOP&S), and
financial assistance programs. The
counselors assist in long-range
planning and checking
specific requirements so that students meet graduation requirements and course prerequisites,
secure career/technical certificates
and licenses, and fulfill requirements for transfer to other colleges or universities.
It is important for all students to
have a Student Educational Plan
(SEP) while attending Citrus
College. Counselors assist students in developing an educational
plan that reflects their goals. As
students progress, the plan can be
changed as frequently as their
goals change. When these
changes occur, the student should
meet with a counselor to update
his/her SEP.
New, non-exempt students are
strongly encouraged to see a
counselor. If meeting with a
counselor is not an option, it is
strongly recommended that the
student take COUN 156,
College Planning Today For
Tomorrow; or COUN 159, On
Course to Success; or COUN
160 Strategies for College
Success during their first
semester at Citrus College.
22
CITRUS COLLEGE
Counseling Follow-up
Follow-up services are designed to
evaluate and track the student's
academic progress. Special services are provided to students on
academic and/or progress probation, students in basic skills
courses, and students who are
undecided about their educational
goal. Counselors also give
referrals to appropriate programs
and services, both on and off
campus.
Prerequisites,
Co-Requisites and
Recommendations
Citrus College students receive
information about courses that
require specific knowledge or skills
needed to be successful in that
course. This information is presented as a requisite statement
under the title of the course. The
definitions of these statements
are:
Prerequisite - A course that
a student is required to complete in order to demonstrate
current readiness for enrollment in a course or program.
(Example: SPAN 101 must be
completed before taking SPAN
102.)
Co-Requisite - A course that
a student is required to take
at the same time with another
course. (Example: DANC 266
must also be taken with
DANCE 264.)
Recommendation - A skill
or course that is strongly
suggested before enrollment
in a course, but is not
required. (Example:
ENGL 101 is strongly recommended before HIST 108H.)
Verification of Prerequisites
Prior to registration, students are
required to provide verification of
how skill or course prerequisites
have been satisfied. Students unable to verify how a prerequisite
has been satisfied will not be allowed to enroll in those courses.
Official transcripts from other colleges may be used to verify course
prerequisites. Skills prerequisites
must be verified through the Citrus College assessment process or
the assessment process from another college.
Challenging Prerequisites
Students may challenge a course
prerequisite or co-requisite if they
meet one of the following conditions:
1. Demonstrated knowledge
or the ability to succeed in
the course without the
prerequisite, or
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
2. The possibility of undue
delay in attaining the goals
established in an educational plan because the
prerequisite or co-requisite
course has not been made
reasonably available, or
3. Belief that the prerequisite
is discriminatory or is being
applied in a discriminatory
manner, or
4. Belief that the prerequisite
was established in violation
of regulations and/or the
established districtapproved policy and
procedures.
A Prerequisite Challenge Form
can be obtained from the registrar in the Admissions and
Records Office. The completed
form must be presented to the
registrar two weeks prior to the
beginning of the semester in
which it is to be considered.
Veterans celebrating their graduation, 2013
Women of the Year Jocelyn Vizcarra and Stephanie Miramontez, with
Man of the Year Ferrando Salazar Jr. (far right) and Dr. Arvid Spor,
vice president os Student Services (2nd from left)
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
23
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Información en Español
Admisión
Citrus College es una institución de
acceso abierto, que ofrece admisión a
estudiantes que se gradúan de la preparatoria o a personas que tienen por
lo menos 18 años de edad y que
cuentan con un diploma de la preparatoria, un certificado ‗GED‘, o un certificado de constancia, o el equivalente. Reglas especiales para los estudiantes de la preparatoria se encuentran en esta sección.
Una persona que tiene 18 años o es
mayor de 18 años, y no cuenta con su
diploma de la preparatoria puede ser
admitida a Citrus College para inscribirse en clases de educación general o
para inscribirse en programas vocacionales de especialización. El estudiante
también puede prepararse para transferirse a una institución de cuatro
años de estudios sin contar con un
diploma de la preparatoria.
Estudiante Actual de Preparatoria a Estudiante de Primer Año
Si es un estudiante que se va a graduar de la preparatoria y que está
inscrito de forma simultánea en Citrus
College y planea continuar asistiendo
por otro semestre, necesitará cambiar
su estatus en el formulario deEstudiante de Preparatoria a Estudiante de Primer Año (High School Student to First-Time Freshman Form).
Admisión para Estudiantes
Extranjeros
La Oficina para Estudiantes Extranjeros de Citrus College admite a estudiantes extranjeros que tiene una visa
o estén en trámites para obtener una
Visa de Estudiante F-1 una vez que se
apruebe su solicitud. Se requiere que
estos estudiantes paguen cuotas de
estudiantes extranjeros.
Para poder calificar para admisión, un
estudiante extranjero debe hacer lo
siguiente:
1.
Entregar una solicitud de admisión para Citrus College.
2. Completar la solicitud para estudiantes extranjeros y pagar la
cuota.
24
CITRUS COLLEGE
3. Entregar documentación confidencial sobre sus finanzas.
4. Obtener una calificación de haber
pasado el examen TOEFL: calificación de 450 puntos (si lo tomó por
escrito), 133 puntos (si realizó el
examen en computación), ó 45
puntos (si lo hizo vía Internet)
5. Entregar archivos oficiales de la
preparatoria y/o colegios.
6. Entregar comprobante de prueba
de Tuberculosis (TB).
Se requieren los siguientes documentos de los estudiantes con Visa F-1
actual que se están transfiriendo a
Citrus College:
1. Copia de la I-20
2. Copia de la 1-94
3. Formulario de Transferencia
4. Visa
5. Pasaporte
6. Archivos de colegio
La prueba TOEFL, solicitud de admisión, y toda la documentación requerida deben de recibirse en el día o antes de la fecha límite publicada para el
semestre deseado. Se requiere que
los estudiantes tomen la prueba
‗Accuplacer‘ ESL (Inglés como Segundo Idioma) al llegar al colegio.
Estudiantes de la Preparatoria
Clases para Estudiantes de la
Preparatoria
Citrus College ofrece una selección de
programas y clases para estudiantes
de la preparatoria que están cursando
los grados 11 y 12. Estos estudiantes
deben de estar inscritos de forma
simultánea en su preparatoria y en
Citrus College. Se requiere que llenen
una solicitud de admisión y el formulario ‗High School Registration
Authorization Form‘. Este formulario, que requiere la firma del padre y
de un consejero o director de la escuela, está disponible en el sitio
www.citruscollege.edu/ar.
Los estudiantes de preparatoria que
no cumplen con el requisito del nivel
de grado pueden apelar. El formulario
de apelación puede encontrarse en
internet en www.citruscollege.edu/ar.
Citrus College ofrece clases de verano
en las preparatorias Azusa, Claremont, Duarte y Monrovia a través del
Programa de Clases de No-crédito.
Para mayor información, comuníquese
con la oficina de consejería de estas
escuelas preparatorias.
Programa de Decisión Temprana
El Programa de Decisión Temprana
hace posible que los estudiantes en el
último año de la preparatorias Azusa,
Claremont, Duarte, Gladstone, Glendora y Monrovia que ya sometieron
sus solicitudes a Citrus College, puedan visitar el campus, puedan tomar
la prueba de colocación y se reúnan
con un consejero durante el segundo
semestre de su último año en la preparatoria.
Los estudiantes en su último año en
preparatoria y que asisten a otras
‗high schools‘ y que están interesados
en participar en el proceso de Decisión Temprana pueden comunicarse
con la oficina de Relaciones y Enlace
con Escuelas (School Relations and
Outreach Office) al 626-857-4162.
Cómo Solicitar Admisión
El proceso de solicitar admisión a
Citrus College empieza cuando un
prospecto estudiante somete una solicitud en línea a través de nuestro sitio
de Internet en
https:wingspan.citruscollege.edu. No
hay ningún cobro por someter esta
solicitud y la solicitud se puede llenar
en cualquier momento. Hay computadoras en el lobby del edificio de Servicios Estudiantiles y en otras áreas del
colegio que permiten el acceso al sitio
de Internet del colegio.
Una vez que se somete una solicitud
de admisión, el estudiante nuevo recibirá un correo electrónico de bienvenida a Citrus College ("Welcome to Citrus College") que incluye su número
de identificación de estudiante y su
Número Personal de Identificación
(PIN). El estudiante necesita ambos,
el número de ID y del PIN para inscribirse en las clases, pagar cuotas y de
forma oficial inscribirse en Citrus
College.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Estudiantes de Primer Año
Menores de 18 Años
Se requiere comprobante de graduación para los estudiantes que no
tendrán 18 años el primer día de clases en Citrus College. Se debe entregar una verificación de graduación a
la Oficina de Admisiones y Récords.
Los documentos aceptables de verificación incluyen un diploma de la preparatoria, un diploma de GED, Certificado de Constancia en California
(Certificate of California Proficiency),
una carta en papel membretado de la
escuela indicando que ha cumplido
con el requisito de graduación, o un
archivo sellado que tenga la fecha de
graduación.
Requisitos de Residencia
Como colegio comunitario público,
Citrus College es requerido a verificar
por ley la residencia de cada solicitante según lo indica el Título 5 y el Código de Educación de California. El estatus de Residente, referido como la
fecha de determinación de residencia,
se determina a partir de la fecha en
que empieza cada semestre y establece la cuota y matriculación que se
debe de colectar en el momento de
inscribirse.
Clasificación de Residencia
Las clasificaciones de residencia se
deben determinar para cada estudiante en el momento que solicita admisión.
Residentes de California
Residentes de California asisten a
Citrus College sin pagar cuotas de
residentes y solamente pagan cuotas
de inscripción y otras cuotas.
No Residentes
Los estudiantes que no llenan el requisito de residencia de California,
deben pagar cuotas para los que son
no residentes del estado de California,
además de las cuotas de inscripción y
otras cuotas. Para más información,
visite www.citruscollege.edu/ar.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Exención para No Pagar
Colegiatura como No Residente
de California (AB 540)
Cualquier estudiante, que sea inmigrante extranjero, que llene todos los
siguientes requisitos, estará exento a
pagar cuotas como no residente.
El estudiante debió haber asistido
a la preparatoria (privada o pública) en California por tres o más
años.
El estudiante debió haberse graduado de una preparatoria de
California o haber obtenido el
equivalente antes del comienzo
del semestre; por ejemplo, haber
pasado el GED, el examen de
Constancia de Preparatoria, o la
prueba conocida ‗California High
School Exit Exam‘ (Examen de
Salida de Preparatoria).
Un estudiante indocumentado
que no tiene estatus legal migratorio debe llenar una declaración
jurada (affidavit en inglés) con el
colegio en donde indica que ha
llenado una solicitud para legalizar su estatus migratorio, o que
llenará una solicitud tan pronto él
o ella sea elegible a hacerlo.
Los estudiantes que tienen visas de
no inmigrantes; por ejemplo, Turista
(B-1, B-2), Estudiante Extranjero (F1), NAFTA (TN & TD) o Estudiante de
Intercambio (J), no son elegibles para
recibir esta exención.
Reclasificación de residencia
Los estudiantes que se inscriben en
clases en espera de la notificación de
su aprobación para el semestre son
responsables de pagar la cuota que se
indica. Los estudiantes que son aprobados en base a los documentos que
sometieron, recibirán un reembolso
del pago como no residentes que
hicieron.
La responsabilidad de comprobar la
residencia resta en el solicitante. Para
mayor información visite
www.citruscollege.edu/ar
Cuotas y Costos de 2013-2014
Las cuotas de inscripción de California son fijadas por la Legislatura
Estatal de California y están sujetas a cambios.
Cuota de Inscripción: $46
por unidad
Cuota de Matriculación
para Estudiantes
Internacionales*
$209
por unidad
Cuota de Matriculación
para No-Residentes* $209
por unidad
Cuotas de Servicios del
Campus
Cuotas de Servicios de
Salud
Otoño & Primavera $19
Estudiantes BOGW
$14
Invierno & Verano
$16
Estudiantes BOGW
$11
Cuotas de Estacionamiento
Otoño & Primavera $50
Invierno & Verano
$25
Cuota de Representación para
Estudiantes
Otoño & Primavera $1
Invierno & Verano
$1
Cuota de Servicios
Estudiantiles
Otoño & Primavera $15
Invierno & Verano
$10
*Los estudiantes no-residentes y
estudiantes internacionales están
requeridos a pagar cuotas de
matriculación y cuotas de inscripción por cada unidad.
Adicionalmente, se le puede cobrar
cargos adicionales para materiales
de instrucción o para otros materiales para algunas clases. Estos
materiales incluyen, pero no se
limitan a libros, herramientas,
equipo y vestimenta.
www.citruscollege.edu
25
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Cuota de Servicios de Salud
La Cuota de Servicios de Salud es
obligatoria tanto para estudiantes de
tiempo completo como de medio tiempo. Los siguientes tipos de estudiantes
están exentos a pagar la cuota:
Los estudiantes que dependen de
forma exclusiva en la oración
para sanar de acuerdo a las enseñanzas de una secta religiosa,
denominación u organización.
Para estar exento de esta cuota,
el estudiante debe presentar documentación válida de su membrecía en dicha religión a la oficina del vicepresidente de servicios
estudiantiles.
•
Los estudiantes que asisten a
Citrus College bajo un programa
aprobado de entrenamiento como
aprendiz.
Cuota de Servicios para
Estudiantes
La Cuota de Servicios para Estudiantes es una cuota que se paga de forma voluntaria en apoyo de las actividades del campus, como actividades
deportivas, clubes, eventos culturales,
mejoras en el colegio y otros programas y servicios especiales que benefician de forma directa la vida estudiantil y del campus.
piden no pagar esta cuota, no serán
elegibles para recibir los beneficios
asociados con esta cuota, pero no
para los otros servicios estudiantiles.
el estudiante cambio su estatus de un
horario en el campus a un horario de
Educación a Distancia. No se dan reembolsos en dinero en efectivo.
Cuota de Representación
Estudiantil
La Cuota de Representación Estudiantil es una cuota obligatoria de $1 que
se utiliza exclusivamente para propósitos de abogar a favor de causas en
pro de los estudiantes. Un estudiante
puede rehusarse a pagar esta cuota
por razones políticas, religiosas, financieras o morales. Los estudiantes que
no desean pagar esta cuota, deben
someter por escrito una declaración
justificando sus razones para rehusarse a pagar la cuota.
Se otorgará crédito inmediato a los
pagos realizados con tarjeta de crédito. Sin embargo, el estudiante o portador de la tarjeta debe de estar presente con la tarjeta de crédito y el
recibo de haber hecho el pago con la
tarjeta de crédito, en el momento en
que se solicita el reembolso. De no ser
así, una solicitud de reembolso debe
ser sometida. Las cuotas que se pagaron con dinero en efectivo, cheque o
tarjeta de debito recibirán un reembolso con cheque. Este cheque será
enviado por correo postal a la dirección que se encuentra archivada en la
Oficina de Admisiones y Récords. Por
lo tanto, es importante que la dirección que se encuentra archivada en el
colegio sea la correcta.
Esta solicitud estará sujeta a la aprobación por parte de la Oficina del Decano de Estudiantes.
Cuotas de Material de Instrucción
Se puede solicitar que el estudiante
tenga que pagar una cuota por material instructivo, u otros materiales que
se requieren para una clase específica. Estos materiales pueden incluir,
pero no están limitados a libros,
herramientas, maquinaria y vestimenta especial.
Los estudiantes reciben una calcomanía de ASCC una vez que pagan
estas cuotas. Las calcomanías se pueden recoger junto con el permiso para
estacionarse en la Oficina de la Tesorería (Bursar‘s Office) o la Oficina de
Servicios Estudiantiles ―Student Business Office. El volante adjunto contiene una lista de la gran cantidad de
beneficios y descuentos disponibles
para los estudiantes que pagan la
cuota para servicios y que han recibido la calcomanía. Debido a la gran
cantidad de programas y servicios que
se ofrecen, se les pide a todos los
estudiantes pagar la Cuota de Servicios para Estudiantes.
Políza de Reembolso de Cuotas
Reembolso de estacionamiento, inscripción, matriculación de no residentes, cuotas de salud o servicios para
estudiantes se pueden dar a los estudiantes que son elegibles y que solicitan una petición de reembolso para la
fecha límite establecida por el colegio.
Los estudiantes pueden solicitar no
pagar esta cuota antes de pagar la
matriculación de clases a través de
solicitar un formulario para no pagar
dicha cuota en la Oficina de Vida Estudiantil ‗Office of Student Life‘, ubicada
en la parte central del Campus. Se
requiere comprobante de estar inscrito en el colegio. Los estudiantes que
Es la responsabilidad del estudiante
regresar su permiso de estacionamiento antes de la fecha límite para
recibir el reembolso para poder recibir
un reembolso por el estacionamiento.
Los permisos de estacionamiento deben regresarse una vez que se haya
dado de baja el estudiante de forma
oficial del colegio o en el caso de que
26
CITRUS COLLEGE
En el caso de un miembro activo o de
la reserve del servicio militar que recibe órdenes que como consecuencia
piden que se den de baja de sus clases en Citrus College, se les otorgará
un reembolso completo una vez que
se verifique que hayan recibido dichas
ordenes.
Obligaciones Financieras de los
Estudiantes
Todas las cuotas deben de estar pagadas antes de la fecha límite para
evitar ser dado de baja de la clase,
incluyendo las clases en donde hay
lista de espera. Las fechas límites para
pagar cuotas se encuentran en el
horario de clases y en Internet.
Citrus College no dará a conocer las
calificaciones, no otorgará archivos
oficiales, títulos, o privilegios de inscripción o ninguna combinación de lo
mencionado anteriormente, a ningún
estudiante que ha fallado en pagar
sus obligaciones financieras que se le
deben al colegio. Se retirarán las restricciones en los archivos del estudiante una vez que se haya liquidado la
deuda pendiente. Las deudas deben
liquidarse con dinero en efectivo, o
giro postal: se pudiera cobrar una
cuota de servicio del banco o un recargo.
Ayuda Financiera
La Oficina de Ayuda Financiera es
responsable de iniciar, monitorear, y
de entregar los fondos federales y
estatales. Estos programas se ofrecen
a los estudiantes en formas de becas,
subsidios, empleos y préstamos.
Los programas de ayuda financiera
federal y estatal están diseñados para
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
asistir a todos los estudiantes elegibles de Citrus College. La intención de
estos programas es ayudar a los estudiantes que cursan sus estudios superiores y que no han aún obtenido su
primer título a pagar su educación en
el colegio.
Los estudiantes deben solicitar la
ayuda financiera tan pronto sea
posible después del 1 de enero y
de preferencia antes del 2 de
marzo de cada año. No lo deje
para después. Muchos estudiantes subestiman el tiempo que toma el prepararse para asistir al
colegio. Es importante que ambos, tanto el estudiante como la
Oficina de Ayuda Financiera
cuenten con suficiente tiempo
para preparar el proceso de solicitud con tiempo de anticipación.
Citrus College es 001166. Es importante solicitar temprano; las solicitudes se aceptan tan temprano
como el 1 de enero.
Una vez que el estudiante haya completado de forma satisfactoria la FAFSA, deben estar en contacto con la
Oficina de Ayuda Financiera para revisar el estatus de su solicitud.
La Oficina de Ayuda Financiera pudiera solicitar alguno o todos los siguientes documentos:
La declaración de impuestos del IRS
del estudiante o de sus padres con:
• Formularios W-2
• Comprobante de ingreso libre de
impuestos
• Tarjeta/s de Seguro Social
• Otra información relacionada con
ingresos financieros
Cuando se determina la elegibilidad
financiera, se toman en consideración diversos factores, tales
como:
• Ingreso familiar libre de impuestos y sujeto a impuestos
• Inversión (es)
• Impuestos pagados
• Número de miembros en el hogar
• Número de miembros de la familia en el colegio
CITRUS COLLEGE
Cómo Solicitar Ayuda
Financiera/Llene la FAFSA
Un estudiante puede solicitar ayuda
financiera a través del Internet. Vaya
a www.fafsa.gov. Se requiere un
Número de Identificación Personal
(PIN) para el estudiante y el padre o
adre del estudiante dependiente.
Visite www.pin.ed.gov para solicitar
un PIN en línea.
El personal de la Oficina de Ayuda
Financiera está disponible para asistir
en inglés o español a los estudiantes
a llenar la solicitud FAFSA en línea.
La Oficina de Ayuda Financiera está
ubicada en el edificio de Servicios
Estudiantiles.
Los estudiantes que completan la
FAFSA pudieran ser elegibles para
uno o más de los siguientes programas:
Programas Federales
Los siguientes programas federales
son subsidios, los cuales no se tienen
que pagar:
• Federal Pell Grant es un subsidio para estudiantes que se ha
determinado son elegibles basado
en la metodología federal. Este
programa asiste a los estudiantes
que no han obtenido su título
universitario.
• Federal Supplement Educational Opportunity Grant
(FSEOG) es un subsidio para
estudiantes elegibles con un nivel
muy alto de necesidad económica. Los estudiantes además tienen que ser elegibles a recibir un
subsidio de tipo ‗Pell Grant‘ para
poder recibir el subsidio FSEOG.
• Federal Work Study (FWS) se
otorga a estudiantes que han
indicado en la solicitud FAFSA
estar interesados en participar en
el programa FWS. Le da a los
estudiantes la oportunidad de
obtener fondos a través de trabajar en empleos en el campus o
fuera del campus.
• Préstamos se otorgan a estudiantes en base a su elegibilidad
y son fondos que el estudiante
debe pagar. Préstamos Directos (Subsidiados o No Subsidiados) se otorgan a estudiantes
que los solicitan y que han de
forma satisfactoria completado su
solicitud de ayuda financiera
(FAFSA).
Programas Estatales
AB540—la reciente ley aprobada
‗California Dream Act‘ , está compuesta de las leyes estatales AB 130 y AB
131, las cuales extienden la elegibilidad para ciertos tipos de ayuda institucional y estatal para estudiantes,
incluyendo los estudiantes indocumentados, que califican para estar
exentos de pagar la matriculación
como no residentes bajo la ley AB
540. Los estudiantes elegibles pueden
recibir la exención para no pagar la
matriculación conocida como ―BOG
Fee Waiver‖ y a partir del semestre
del Otoño del 2013 pueden recibir el
subsidio‘ Cal Grant‘. Para mayor información sobre el acta ‗California Dream
Act‘, favor de visitar el sitio de la Comisión de Ayuda Estudiantil de
California o California Student Aid
Commission's website.
La Exención para No Pagar
Matrícula de la Junta de Regentes
(BOGFW por sus siglas en inglés) es
una exención que se otorga a los
residentes de California, incluyendo a
estudiantes AB540, para no pagar la
cuota de matriculación si es que demuestran tener necesidad económica.
Cal Grants, son becas de subsidios
diseñados para asistir a los estudiantes de familias con bajos y medios
ingresos a pagar por sus gastos educativos. Estos subsidios están patrocinados por la Comisión de Ayuda Estudiantil de California (CSAC). La elegibilidad se basa en el promedio de
calificación del estudiante (GPA), el
ingreso del estudiante o de sus padres, y la carrera seleccionada. Para
ser elegible a recibir esta beca, el
estudiante debe completar la solicitud
FAFSA y cumplir con las fechas límites
de las becas Cal Grant, que es el 2 de
septiembre de cada año. Los estudiantes AB540 son elegibles para solicitar becas de subsidio ‗Cal Grants‘.
La disponibilidad de fondos depende
del presupuesto estatal.
Chafee Grants
Si usted se encuentra o estuvo en un
hogar de crianza y tiene necesidad
económica, usted podría calificar para
www.citruscollege.edu
27
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
recibir hasta $5,000 al año para estudiar una carrera o entrenamiento
técnico o ir al colegio. Usted no tiene
que pagar este dinero. También pudiera usar estos fondos para pagar
por gastos de guardería, transportación y renta mientras que asiste a la
escuela. Puede utilizar su Subsidio
‗Chafee Grant‘ en cualquier colegio de
California, o Universidad o escuela de
carreras o educación técnica, así como en escuelas en otros estados.
Para calificar, usted debe de ser un
actual joven de crianza o haber sido
uno, y no haber cumplido aún los 22
años de edad para el 1 de julio del
año en que se otorgan los fondos. La
corte debe de haber establecido su
dependencia mientras que usted tenía
entre 16 y 18 años de edad. (las clasificaciones ‗KinGap youth‘ joven adoptado, colocación con un guardián legal, o colocación voluntaria pudieran
no ser elegible para recibir el subsidio ‗Chafee Grant‘, al menos que la
corte haya establecido la dependencia, en cualquier momento, entre las
edades de 16 y 18 años de edad). El
Departamento de Servicios Sociales
de California verificará la elegibilidad
como joven de crianza.
Becas
A través de su Fundación, Citrus College también ofrece una gran variedad de becas que están disponibles
para estudiantes nuevos, que continúan o que se transfieren a otras instituciones. Se exhorta a los estudiantes
de Citrus College a solicitar becas de
fuentes externas.
Para más información sobre las oportunidades de becas, favor de visitar
en persona la Oficina de Ayuda Financiera o su sitio en Internet en:
www.citruscollege.edu/stdntsrv/
finaid
www.collegeboard.com
www.collegenet.com
www.college-scholarships.com
www.salliemae.com
www.supercollege.com
www.usafunds.org
Otras Fuentes
Se invita y exhorta a los estudiantes a
comunicarse con la Oficina de Ayuda
Financiera o con otras Fuentes para
hacer preguntas sobre los programas
de ayuda financiera, el proceso de
28
CITRUS COLLEGE
solicitud, requisitos de elegibilidad y
fechas de plazos.
Citrus College
Financial Aid Office
Location: Student Services
Building, Primer piso
(626) 914-8592
[email protected]
www.citruscollege.edu/
stdntsrv/finaid
U.S. Department of Education
1-800-4FED-AID
(1-800-433-3243)
Monday through Friday,
8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. EST.
www.ed.gov.
1-800-730-8913
(Línea para sordomudos)
Asesoría y Orientación
¿Qué es la Asesoría?
Se requiere a todos los estudiantes
nuevos que no son exentos de las
actividades del programa ‗Student
Success and Support Program‘ a participar en una asesoría, orientación, o
proceso de consejería académica. Este
proceso está diseñado para asistir a
que los estudiantes logren sus metas
educativas y de carreras.
El proceso de asesoría en Citrus College ofrece información sobre habilidades para lenguaje y matemáticas, y
otras actividades necesarias para tener una experiencia exitosa en el colegio. La información que reporta el
mismo estudiante se utiliza también,
en conjunto con los archivos de la
preparatoria o de otros colegios. Otros
factores también se utilizan para asesorar que tan preparado está el estudiante para asistir al colegio, entre
estos se encuentran evaluación de los
hábitos para estudiar, metas del estudiante y aspiraciones para carrera, y
los resultados en la prueba de colocación.
La asesoría de la información ayuda al
consejero a determinar cuál es el programa educativo a seguir para que el
estudiante pueda lograr sus metas
educativas a largo plazo y poder obtener una carrera.
Se recomienda a los estudiantes que
tienen una discapacidad y que requieren arreglos especiales para tomar
pruebas, comunicarse con la Oficina
DSP&S al (626) 914-8675 para hacer
los arreglos necesarios. Servicios para
sordomudos están disponibles las 24
horas del día (626) 914-8674 TDD.
Revisión de la Colocación
Los estudiantes que no estén de
acuerdo con los resultados de la prueba de colocación y que opinan que
sus habilidades no reflejan el nivel en
que se les asignó, pueden solicitar
una Revisión de la Colocación. Favor
de comunicarse con ‗Counseling and
Advisement Center‘ para solicitar más
información.
Los estudiantes pueden apelar el nivel
de colocación en clases de inglés y/o
matemáticas si pueden demostrar
comprobantes de dominio del curso o
haber estado en ese nivel anteriormente. Si hay circunstancias incontrolables que afectan el nivel de colocación, los estudiantes pueden consultar
al departamento apropiado. Los estudiantes deben de estar preparados
para presentar documentación tales
como archivos de preparatoria o de
colegio, o resultados de pruebas adicionales. Después de que se revisa la
información del estudiante, se pudiera
recomendar que el estudiante vuelva
a tomar la prueba o se pudieran hacer
ajustes en el nivel de colocación.
¿Qué es una Orientación
Requerida?
A partir del verano del 2010, se exhorta a los estudiantes nuevos a Citrus College completar la prueba de
asesoría y DEBEN completar su orientación. No se permitirá ninguna inscripción futura de estudiantes que han
solicitado admisión al colegio y que no
completaron el requisito de orientación dento un plazo de tiempo. Los
estudiantes que creen estar exentos
de este requisito o aquellos que desean leer información sobre el procedimiento para cuestionar estos reglamentos de matriculación pueden referirse a la sección sobre matriculación
que se encuentra en el catálogo de
clases de Citrus College en: http://
www.citruscollege.edu/schedule/
catalog/Pages/default.aspx
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Opciones para la Asesoría/
Orientación
La orientación se puede cumplir a
través de las siguientes opciones:
• Orientación en persona (se
recomienda para los estudiantes
nuevos)
- Orientación después de la
prueba de colocación
- Asesoría/Orientación realizada
en la preparatoria
- Día de Decisión Temprana en
Citrus College (está disponible
únicamente a través de las
preparatorias localizadas en el
distrito del colegio)
• Orientación en línea vía Internet
http:/orientation.citruscollege.edu
El proceso de asesoría y orientación
es un esfuerzo de Citrus College para
ofrecerles a los estudiantes con la
mejor asesoría académica y consejería
disponible. La sesión de Asesoría/
Orientación para estudiantes nuevos
está programada a través de todo el
año. Para mayor información, visite la
página en Internet de las Pruebas de
Colocación en http://
www.citruscollege.edu/testing/Pages/
AcademicTesting.aspx
los requisitos para transferirse a otros
colegios o universidades.
Consejería/Asesoría Académica
Se exhorta a los estudiantes a que se
reúnan con un consejero cada semestre para asegurarse que su plan educativo refleje adecuadamente su meta
educativa.
Es importante que todos los estudiantes cuenten con un Plan Estudiantil
Educativo (SEP) mientras que asisten
a Citrus College. Los consejeros asisten a que los estudiantes desarrollen
estos planes educativos para reflejar
sus metas. Durante el progreso que
tiene el estudiante, el plan puede ser
cambiado tan frecuente como cambie
su meta. Cuando estos cambios ocurren, el estudiante debe reunirse con
su consejero para actualizar su SEP.
El personal del colegio que brinda
consejería ofrece una gran variedad
de servicios, incluyendo pero sin estar
limitados a, planificación de estudios,
asesoría sobre carreras, consejería
sobre transferencia a la universidad,
consejería personal (problemas personales y temas que afectan el progreso
académico del estudiante), Programas
y Servicios para Estudiantes con Discapacidades (DSP&S), Programas de
Oportunidades y Servicios (EOP&S), y
programas de ayuda financiera. Los
consejeros asisten a los estudiantes a
planificar a largo plazo y revisan ciertos requisitos para que el estudiante
pueda cumplir con los requisitos de
graduación y de ciertas clases con
prerrequisitos, puedan obtener su
certificado o licencia de carrera o programa técnico, y puedan cumplir con
CITRUS COLLEGE
Se recomienda a los estudiantes
nuevos y que no están exentos a
reunirse con un consejero. Si no es
posible reunirse con un consejero; se
les recomiendan que tomen los cursos
COUN 156, ‗College Planning Today For Tomorrow‘; o la clase COUN 159, ‗On Course to Success‘; o
COUN 160 ‗Strategies for College
Success‘ durante su primer semestre
en Citrus College.
Se requiere que los estudiantes
que se encuentran en ―probation‖
o probatoria completen un taller en
línea de ―probation‖ en https://
orientation.citruscollege.edu mucho
antes de inscribirse en clases. No se
permitirá ninguna inscripción en clases hasta que este taller se haya completado.
Se requiere a los Veteranos que
tienen planeado recibir beneficios
de G.I. hacer una cita con el Centro
de Veteranos antes de reunirse con
un consejero.
Seguimiento de Consejería
Los servicios de seguimiento están
diseñados para evaluar y monitorear
el progreso académico del estudiante.
Se ofrecen servicios especiales para
los estudiantes que se encuentran en
probatoria académica, en clases de
habilidades básicas, y para los estudiantes que están indecisos sobre sus
metas educativas. Los consejeros
también refieren a programas y servicios apropiados, tanto en el campus
como fuera del campus.
EOP&S/CARE
El programa ‗Extended Opportunity
Programs & Services/Cooperative
Agencies Resources for Education
(EOP&S/CARE)’ ayuda a los estudiantes de la comunidad que asisten al
colegio y que están en desventaja
económica y educativa a lograr su
meta académica y de carrera. Los
servicios de apoyo consisten de información y asistencia para llenar la solicitud de admisión, inscripción, ayuda
financiera, asesoría, y selección de
carrera o especialización.
EOP&S también ofrece:
• Servicios de apoyo tales como
inscripción con prioridad, asistencia para comprar libros, exención
para no pagar cuotas de pruebas,
tutoría y talleres de desarrollo
personal
• Enlace a preparatorias, organizaciones comunitarias y agencias
• Asesoría con jóvenes diseñada
para retener a los estudiantes
utilizando mentores y personas
ejemplares
• Consejeros y asesores académi
cos que ofrecen asesoría académica y consejería personal
• Referencias a otros servicios disponibles en el campus y en la
comunidad
• Programa Puente ‘Summer Bridge
Program‘ de seis semanas en
donde estudiantes potenciales de
escuelas preparatorias locales
asisten a clases, aprenden estrategias para tener éxito en el
colegio y participan en paseos.
El Programa CARE, establecido por la
Legislatura de California (AB 3103),
asiste a los estudiantes de EOP&S que
son padres solteros y que se encuentran recibiendo asistencia pública y
que tienen por lo menos un hijo menor de 14 años de edad.
A través de CARE, los estudiantes
reciben servicios adicionales de apoyo
educativo, tales como consejería, asesoría académica y actividades de enlace con otros jóvenes específicamente
diseñadas para padres solteros de
bajos ingresos.
Adicionalmente, CARE ofrece ayuda
con transportación, compra de libros y
www.citruscollege.edu
29
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
materiales didácticos para asegurar la
retención en el colegio, la persistencia, y las tasas de transferencia entre
estos estudiantes, para que puedan
obtener su meta educativa, que incluye un certificado vocacional, licencias
o constancias, un título de asociado o
la transferencia a una universidad de
cuatro años de estudio.
Educación Continua
Educación Continua en Citrus College
ofrece oportunidades para el desarrollo personal y profesional a los miembros de la comunidad. Las clases
están diseñadas para reforzar las
habilidades profesionales o para ayudar a los estudiantes a aprender actividades nuevas que puedan disfrutar
en su tiempo libre. Las clases de educación continua ofrecen oportunidades
de aprendizaje para enriquecer la vida
de las personas y mejorar la calidad
de vida en nuestras comunidades.
Clases de Educación de
No-Crédito
La educación de clases de no crédito
son un suplemento para el continuo
crecimiento de las habilidades de los
estudiantes en ciertos empleos, a
través de clases que incluyen habilidades básicas, desarrollo de carreras,
salud y ejercicio, preparación vocacional y reentrenamiento para empleos.
La inscripción en clases de educación
continua es gratis y es continua durante todo el año. Ver las páginas
249-255 para la lista disponible de
clases. Todas las clases de no crédito
que se ofrecen están sujetas al presupuesto y al número de estudiantes
inscritos.
Los estudiantes potenciales que pudieran asistir a Citrus College y que se
encuentran indecisos sobre el colegio
pueden empezar o continuar su experiencia del colegio con clases de no
crédito. Hay servicios de consejería
disponibles en el Departamento de
Consejería y Asesoría. Para hacer una
cita con un consejero para clases de
no crédito, favor de llamar al (626)
914-8530.
La educación no-crédito ofrece clases
de Inglés como Segundo Idioma (ESL)
dentro de un formato tradicional de
instrucción en salón de clases para
estudiantes con dominio limitado del
inglés.
30
CITRUS COLLEGE
Visite el departamento de Educación
Continua en el centro ‗Lifelong
Learning Center‘ o llame al (626)
852-8022 .
Visite el departamento de
Educación Continua para mayor
información.
Lista de personal que habla
español:
Admisiones y los Registros
Julie Miranda
(626) 857-4132
Gerald Sequeira
(626) 914-8519
Carrera y la Transferencia
Centrales
Raul Sanchez
(626) 857-4064
Consejería Académica
Claudia Castillo
(626) 914-8537
Laura Villegas
(626) 857-4093
Ayuda Financiera
Guillermo Miranda
(626) 914-8592
Programas Educativos de
Oportunidades y Servicios
(EOP&S)
Joanne Hinojosa
(626) 914-8558
Sylvia Pinedo
(626) 914-8555
Servicios Fiscales
Rosalinda Buchwald
(626) 914-8897
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
What are the Rules?
Academic Policies and Requirements, Attendance and Enrollment
Attendance Policy
Students are expected to attend
all of the classes in which they are
enrolled. Meetings include regularly scheduled course sessions
and other required activities such
as labs, field trips, athletic meets,
and performances. It is the instructor's responsibility to notify
the students of all such required
activities early enough in the semester to enable students to attend all meetings.
Absences
It is the student's responsibility to
speak to the instructor regarding
their absence and arrange to
make up the coursework missed.
Instructors may allow make up
work for excused absences for
reasons that include:
• Illness, bereavement, personal
emergency or medical
appointment
• College-approved field trips,
performances or intercollegiate
events
Adding and Dropping Classes
Students are responsible for dropping their own unwanted classes.
This can be done online via the
students‘ WingSpan account.
Deadlines for dropping classes
with and without record are
posted online for each semester,
along with other vital information
regarding important dates to
remember.
Instructor Drop
An instructor may drop a student
who has missed three class meetings in a regular semester class
that meets two or more times a
week or who has missed two class
meetings in a class that meets
once a week. Instructors teaching
classes that meet less than a full
CITRUS COLLEGE
semester (summer, winter, shortterm) may allow fewer absences.
If a student fails to attend the first
class meeting of a term without
prior permission from the instructor, the instructor may give that
student‘s place to another student
on the waitlist.
Auditing Courses
Auditing classes is not permitted.
Program Changes: Adding and
Dropping Classes
Students wishing to make adjustments in their program (add or
drop a class) may do so according
to the add/drop dates issued by
the Admissions and Records
Office.
Credits, Grades and Academic
Status
All credit courses listed in the
description of courses section
have been reviewed by the Citrus
College Curriculum Committee and
approved by the Board of Trustees
in accordance with California
Education Code requirements.
Units
A unit is the amount of college
credit earned by satisfactory completion of a course taken for one
semester. A unit of credit may be
earned by:
• One hour per week of lecture
or recitation
• Three hours in a laboratory or
other exercises not requiring
outside preparation
Grades
Grade reports will be available
online, a few days after the close
of each semester and session,
through
https://wingspan.citruscollege.edu
Contact the Admissions and Records Office for more information.
Academic Record Symbols and
Grade Points
Evaluative Grades
Evaluative grades are assigned
grade point values, which are
used in calculating a student's
GPA. An instructor's determination
of a student's grade is final if no
evidence of mistakes, fraud, bad
faith or incompetence has been
determined.
Symbol Definition
Grade
Point
4
A
Excellent
B
Good
3
C
Satisfactory
2
D
Less than
satisfactory
1
F
Failing
0
FW
Failing/Withdrawal
0
Indicates that a student ceased
participating in a course after the
drop date without achieving a
final passing grade.
P
Passing
0
At least satisfactory, units
awarded, not counted in grade
point average
NP
No Pass
0
Less than satisfactory, or failing,
units and grade not counted in
grade point average
Minimum Grade Requirements
A C or better is required in
courses that are prerequisites to
other courses. Other instances in
which a C or better is required
include courses taken to:
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31
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
• Satisfy competency for degree
or transfer
• Fulfill major requirements for
the associate degree or transfer
• Complete requirements for a
vocational certificate of
achievement
• Meet statutory regulations
(usually part of a transfer
pattern)
• Complete courses within IGETC
(Intersegmental General
Education Transfer Curriculum)
categories
A D is the minimum acceptable
grade in electives and other limited categories of coursework.
Non-Evaluative Grades
Non-evaluative grades are not
assigned a grade point value and
therefore are not used in calculating GPA. Credits are not issued
when the following non-evaluative
grades are assigned.
Incomplete: I
Incomplete academic work for
unforeseeable, emergency and
justifiable reasons may result in
the I symbol being entered in a
student's record at the end of the
term. The condition for removal of
the I, and the grade to be assigned at the time of its removal,
is stated by the instructor in a
written record. An I will not be
used in calculating units or grade
points.
A copy of the written record is
given to the student and the original is filed in the Admissions and
Records Office. A final grade is
assigned when the required work
has been completed and evaluated, or when the time limit for
completing the work has passed.
An incomplete grade may be
made up within one year following
the end of the term in which it
was assigned.
32
CITRUS COLLEGE
Withdrawal: W
W denotes withdrawal from a
class or classes when a student
withdraws after the no-notation
deadline, but before the drop with
a W deadline. No notation is
made on the academic record of a
student that withdraws before the
no-notation deadline. Please consult the Admissions and Records
Office for deadline dates.
Although W is not used in calculating grade point average, excessive withdrawals are used as factors in calculating academic standing and may result in a student
being placed on progress probation or dismissal. Withdrawals
count towards repetition limits for
courses.
Withdrawal from a class or classes
due to extenuating circumstances—verified cases of accident, illness or other circumstances beyond the control of the
student—may be authorized after
the withdrawal deadline before
the issuance of a grade upon petition by the student.
Military Withdrawal: MW
MW is assigned to active or
reserve members of the military
who receive orders that compel a
withdrawal from courses. Upon
verification of such orders, a MW
will be assigned at any time, during which no notation is made for
withdrawals. A Military Withdrawal shall not be counted in
progress probation and dismissal
calculations, or in course repeatability limits.
In Progress: IP
IP is used only in those courses
that extend beyond the normal
end of an academic term. It indicates that work is "in progress,''
and that a grade will be assigned
upon completion of the work.
When the appropriate evaluative
grade and unit credit is assigned,
it will appear on the student's record for the term in which the
required work of the course is
completed.
Report Delayed: RD
RD is assigned by the registrar
when there is a delay in reporting
the grade of a student, due to
circumstances beyond the control
of the student. It is a temporary
notation and is replaced by a permanent symbol as soon as possible.
Evaluating Academic Progress
President's List
To be eligible for the President's
List, a student must have a 3.8
GPA in at least 6 units completed
in the semester they are being
recognized, and a minimum 24
units completed at Citrus College.
Non-degree applicable courses are
not included.
Dean's List
Dean's List students must have a
3.5 GPA in at least 6 units completed in the semester they are
being recognized, and a minimum
of 24 units completed at Citrus
College. Non-degree applicable
courses are not included.
Notice of Satisfactory/
Unsatisfactory Work
It is the instructor's responsibility
to provide at least two evaluations
of a student's progress, such as
exams and/or papers, before the
mid-semester or before the
withdrawal deadline.
Probation, Dismissal and
Reinstatement
Probation
A student shall be placed on academic probation if he/she has attempted a minimum of 12 semester units of work and has a grade
point average of less than a C
(2.0).
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
A student shall be placed on progress probation if he/she has enrolled in a total of at least 12 semester units and the percentage
of all units in which the student
has enrolled, for which entries of
W, I, NC and NP were recorded
reaches or exceeds fifty percent.
A student who is placed on probation may submit an appeal in accordance with procedures to be
established by the superintendent/
president.
A student on academic probation
shall be removed from probation
when the student's accumulated
grade point average is 2.0 or
higher. A student on progress
probation shall be removed from
probation when the percentage of
units in the categories of W, I, NC
and NP drops below fifty percent.
Notification of Academic and/
or Progress Probation:
A. Each student is entitled to
be notified of his/her
academic status and the
availability of college
support services to
respond to the academic
status before the student
is dismissed.
Notification will consist, at a
minimum, of the following:
After having attempted a
minimum of 12 semester
units at the end of the
semester in which the
student‘s grade point
average falls below 2.0 in
all units attempted, a
probation notice shall
be sent after the fall and
spring semesters to the
student via Citrus College
e-mail informing him/her
that he/she is on academic
probation.
B. At the end of the semester
in which the student is
CITRUS COLLEGE
enrolled in at least 12 units
and the percentage of all
units in which the student
has enrolled, for which entries of W, I, NC and NP
reaches or exceeds 50%,
a probation notice shall be
sent to the student via
Citrus College e-mail
informing him/her that
he/she is on progress
probation.
C. At the end of the fall
semester in which the
student is on academic or
progress probation, a notice
will be sent to the student
via Citrus College e-mail
in forming him/her that
he/she is subject to
dismissal at the end of the
spring semester.
Probationary Notification:
A. The notification advising
the student of probation
will cover, at a minimum,
the significance of being
on probation, a referral to
a counselor, and description of the services available.
B. A student who is on
academic probation and
earns a cumulative Citrus
College grade point average
of 2.0 or better shall be removed from academic
probation status. A student
on progress probation shall
be removed from probation
when the percentage of
units in the categories of
W , I, NC, and NP drop
below fifty percent.
Review of Probation Status
A. A student on probation will
be required to complete an
online probation workshop
and to take corrective
actions to improve academic
standing. A student may be
limited to the number of
units and/or required to
enroll in specific courses.
Dismissal
Standards of Dismissal
A. A student who is on
academic probation shall be
subject to dismissal if the
student has earned a
cumulative grade point
average of less than 2.0 in
all units attempted in each
of two (2) consecutive
semesters. However, any
student on academic
probation whose most
recent semester GPA is 2.0
or higher shall have their
record reviewed by a
counselor and may be
continued on probation. A
student who has been
placed on probation shall be
subject to dismissal if the
percentage of units in which
the student has been
enrolled for which entries of
W, NC, I, and NP are
recorded in at least two (2)
consecutive semesters
reaches or exceeds fifty
percent (50%).
Dismissal Notification:
A. The notification advising
the student that he/she is
subject to dismissal will
cover, at a minimum,
reference to this procedure,
explanation of what
dismissal means, procedure
for reinstatement, and
procedure to appeal the
dismissal.
Petition for Reinstatement
from Dismissal After One
Semester
A. A student who has been
dismissed from Citrus
College may file a written
petition with the Counsel-
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33
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ing and Advisement Center
after one semester has
elapsed since the semester
of dismissal. The student
will be required to make an
appointment with a
counselor to complete the
petition process. A student
may be limited to the
number of units and/or
required to enroll in specific
classes. The petition will be
reviewed by the dean of
counseling and the dean of
admissions.
B. A petition for reinstatement
must be supported with
verification of remedial work
or evidence of readiness to
do successful college work.
The student is required to
meet with a counselor prior
to registration each semester until he/she is removed
from probationary status.
Petition To Appeal Dismissal
Because of Extenuating
Circumstances
A student who has been dismissed
from Citrus College may only appeal the decision if he/she encountered an extenuating situation and can prove that this situation affected his/her scholastic
performance. Petitions will be accepted on a limited basis prior to
the first date of fall registration.
To complete the petition process,
the student will be required to
make an appointment to meet
with a counselor. A student may
be limited to the number of units
he/she can take and/or required
to enroll in specific classes. The
completed petition, along with a
recommendation from the counselor, will be forwarded to the
dean of counseling and the dean
of admissions for approval.
Prior to making an appointment
with a counselor, the student
must provide the following:
34
CITRUS COLLEGE
A. Proof of extenuating
circumstances that kept
the student from succeeding. Some examples of
extenuating circumstances
(and appropriate proof
thereof) are: illness (letter
from a physician), death in
the family (death certificate
of the family member),
incarceration (appropriate
paperwork), car accident
(appropriate paperwork);
and change of work hours
(work documentation).
B. A personal statement
describing the extenuating
circumstance and how the
student‘s school work was
affected.
C. The decision of the dean of
counseling and the dean of
admissions will be communicated to the student. The
dean of counseling will
notify the student of the
action within 10 working
days of receipt of the
student‘s appeal. The
student may appeal the
decision of the dean of
counseling and the dean of
admissions in writing to the
vice president of student
services within 10 working
days of the date of notification of the decision of the
dean of counseling. The
decision of the vice president of student services is
final.
D. If dismissal appeal is
granted, the student will be
continued on probation for
an additional semester. At
the end of the additional
semester, the student‘s
academic record will again
be evaluated to determine
whether the student may be
removed from probation,
should be dismissed, or
should be continued on
probation.
Reinstatement
Reinstatement may be granted,
denied or postponed according to
criteria contained in administrative
procedures.
The superintendent/president
shall develop procedures for the
implementation of this policy that
comply with the Title 5 requirements.
The above standards shall be
applied as the minimum standards
of satisfactory progress for students who are recipients of federal
and state funds administered by
the college.
Reinstatement After
Dismissal
A reinstated student must earn a
grade point average of at least 2.0
and complete more than 50 percent of all units attempted each
semester after reinstatement. This
is mandatory until the student has
achieved a cumulative grade point
average of at least 2.0 and the
number of W, I, NC, and NP units
drops below 50 percent of all
attempted units at Citrus College.
A reinstated student who fails to
meet these criteria will be dismissed again.
Course Repetition
A student may only repeat a
course if allowed by one of the
provisions outlined in Administrative Policies (AP) 4225, 4227,
4228, and 4229.
A student may enroll in a course
and receive a satisfactory grade of
A, B, C, or P only once, unless the
course description in the college
catalog states that the course may
be repeated for credit.
Courses Repeated to Improve
a Non Passing Grade
A student may repeat a course
only once when a D, F, NP, W or
FW has been earned. A student
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
must file a petition and receive
approval prior to attempting a
course for a third time. The
petition will be considered if the
withdrawal or substandard grade
was the result of extenuating
circumstances. Extenuating
circumstances are defined as
verified cases of accident, illness
or other circumstances beyond the
control of the student. If the student earns a non-passing grade
on the third attempt, the student
may not enroll in that course
again unless an exception outlined
in AP 4225, AP 4227,
AP 4228, or AP 4229 applies.
When a D, F, FW or NP is repeated, the units and grade points
of the last grade will be used in
computing the student's grade
point average at Citrus College, so
long as no more than two prior
grades are alleviated.
The permanent academic record
shall be annotated in such a manner that all work remains legible.
A student may repeat a course
one time at another accredited
college to alleviate a final grade of
D, F, FW or NP earned at Citrus
College. The student must file a
petition and verify the grade with
an official college transcript. The
permanent academic record shall
be annotated in such a manner
that all work remains legible.
New Rules on Course
Repeatability and Course
Families
Repeating Courses for Credit
In the past, many classes at Citrus
College were defined as
―Repeatable‖ meaning that a student could take these classes for
credit and receive a passing grade
more than one time. These included Kinesiology activity classes,
hands-on and performance classes
in Fine and Performing Arts and
CITRUS COLLEGE
Communications, Co-operative
Education classes, and classes
designed specifically for students
in the DSPS program.
Recent changes to the rules governing community colleges statewide mean that in most cases
these courses are no longer considered generally repeatable.
There are a few limited cases
where exceptions exist for one of
three categories:
1. Competitive Athletics and
Conditioning courses (KIN
courses numbered 200 and up
and KINC courses)
2. Academic courses specifically
designed for students to participate in a state-recognized
competition.
3. Courses that must be repeated to meet lower-division
degree requirements at transfer institutions.
The new rules also allow individual
students to apply to repeat
courses in DSPS and adapted
physical education. At the time of
this writing the application procedures are still being developed
and will be announced through
the Citrus College web site,
www.citruscollege.edu.
There are also ongoing curriculum
changes in other affected areas of
the curriculum, especially in Kinesiology, Communications, and Fine
and Performing Arts. Some of
these are already in place in this
catalog, but many are still in development at the time of this writing and so will become available in
the Winter and Spring 2014 terms.
Note: These changes do not
affect a student‘s ability to repeat
a course to alleviate a substandard grade (D, F, NP, or W). Also,
these restrictions do not apply to
Non-Credit courses.
Course Families
In addition to the changes in repeatability rules, certain courses in
Kinesiology and Fine and Performing Arts are now grouped into
―families‖ giving similar educational experiences. These families
are listed below as well as in the
individual disciplines in which they
apply (ART, DANC, KIN, MUSC,
MUSE, MUSP, and THEA).
Within any given course family,
students are only permitted four
―experiences‖ while enrolled at
Citrus College. An experience in
this case is defined as taking a
course and receiving any letter
grade, including a substandard
grade (D, F, NP, or W). Once a
student has received four experiences in a given family, they will
not be permitted to enroll in any
other class within that family,
even to alleviate a sub-standard
grade.
This limitation applies to courses
taken prior to Fall 2013. So if a
student has already received a
grade in three courses within a
given a family, then they will only
be permitted one more attempt at
a course within that family. If a
student has four or more experiences in a given family prior to
Fall 2013, they will not be permitted to attempt any more classes in
that family.
In some families there are more
than four courses. Regardless, a
student will only be permitted to
take four of the courses in the
family.
Note: Students can no longer
receive credit for the same course
more than one time unless it is
specifically designated a repeatable course (see Repeating
Courses for Credit above).
www.citruscollege.edu
35
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
The courses included in course
families are:
Art
Fundamentals: ART 110, 111, 130,
140, 143
Ceramics: ART 141, 142, 240, 241
Commercial Ceramics: ART 146
Design: ART 120, 121, 145, 149
Acting Styles: THEA 284, 292
Individual Sports: KIN 101, 102,
103, 106, 108
Team Sports: KIN 130, 134, 135
Directing: THEA 241
Aerobic Fitness: KIN 147, 151,
153, 159
Resistance Training: KIN 145, 152,
154
Progressive Relaxation: KIN 116
Sculpture: ART 180, 181, 182,
183, 184
Drawing: ART 112, 115, 116
Painting: Art 131, 230
Graphic Design: ART 150, 158,
189
Digital Art: ART 153, 162, 167,
168
Advanced Digital Art: ART 163,
253, 267, 268
Dance
Tap: DANC 159, 259, 269, 279
Jazz: DANC 160, 260, 270, 281
Ballet: DANC 162, 262, 272, 292
Modern: DANC 161, 261, 271
Alignment/Correctives: DANC 130
Introduction/Hip Hop: DANC 103,
158, 258
Musical Theatre Dance: DANC
263, 265
Popular Dance: DANC 264, 266,
284, 296
Choreography and Production:
DANC 172, 289
Kinesiology
Aquatics: KIN 142, 143
36
CITRUS COLLEGE
Film and Television: THEA 211A,
211B, 211C, 211D
Combatives: KIN 104
Music
Developmental: MUSE 070, 090
Individual Instruction: MUSP 290,
291, 292
Choral: MUSC 106, MUSP 100,
101, 105, 106, 108, 110, 111, 200,
201
Symphonic: MUSP 145, 146
Jazz: MUSC 122, 123
Commercial: MUSC 100, 102, 103,
104, 110, 112, 204
Chamber: MUSC 142, 144, 146,
MUSP 115, 120, 121, 133, 134,
136, 138, 140, 141, 162
Techniques: MUSC 140, 141, 151,
152, MUSE 130, 131, 160, 161,
180, 188, 189, 225, 230, 231, 288,
MUSP 151
Studio: MUSC 120, 121, 130, 131
Musical Theatre: MUSE 170, 171,
MUSP 170, 171, 173, 178, 181
Career Development: MUSC 118,
170, 171, 172, 175, 177, 271
Theatre
Technique: THEA 104, 201, 202,
205, 206
Writing for Stage and Screen:
THEA 204
Theatre Production: THEA 210*
Experimental Theatre: THEA 220,
221, 222, 294
Touring and Repertory: THEA 250,
290, 293
*This course may be repeated for
credit.
Pass/No Pass Courses
Citrus College students may be
evaluated on a Pass/No Pass grading basis in courses approved for
Pass/No Pass grading by the Curriculum Committee. Pass/No Pass
course options are designated in
the Description of Courses section
of this catalog by the symbol,
Pass/No Pass or P/NP. A student
must declare the Pass/No Pass
option by the fourth Friday of a
full semester or within 30 days of
a term by filing a Pass/No Pass
Petition in the Admissions and Records Office.
Standards for Pass/No Pass
Courses
A passing P grade is defined
as C or better.
Units are awarded and grade
points are not assigned, and
the grade is not used to
compute grade point
average.
A No Pass NP grade is defined
as less than satisfactory (D or
F). Units are not earned and
grades are not used to compute grade point average.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Pass/No Pass Limitations
12 units maximum, in 4 or
more semesters
Limit of one Pass/No Pass
option per semester or
session
Courses exclusively evaluated
on a Pass/No Pass grading
basis are excluded from the
12-unit limitation (see course
descriptions for
details).
Credit by Examination
Individual departments and/or
specialty areas may elect to grant
course credit to enable students,
who can demonstrate proficiency
in bodies of subject matter, to
plan a relevant educational program that will exclude courses in
which essential levels of mastery
of subject matter material have
been previously attained.
Credits acquired by examination
are not applicable to meet unit
load requirements for Selective
Service deferment, Veteran‘s or
Social Security benefits.
The examination shall include
written, oral, skill tests, portfolio
review or a combination of the
aforementioned as determined
appropriate by the department
faculty.
Credits acquired by examination
shall not be counted in determining the 12 semester hours of
credit in residence required for an
associate degree.
Credit by Examination shall be
recorded on the permanent transcript record and shall be designated as credit earned by examination.
Students may earn a maximum of
12 units through district administered ―Credit by Exam.‖
CITRUS COLLEGE
Credit by Examination/
Locally Administered
Examination
Citrus College may grant students course credit through
district-administered examinations
under the following conditions:
The student is currently enrolled at Citrus College and
has earned twelve units.
The student‘s overall GPA in
all college units attempted at
Citrus College is 2.0 or higher.
The student may not be
currently enrolled (beyond
the census date) in the same
course.
The student may not be
currently enrolled in a more
advanced course.
The student has not already
received credit for a more
advanced course which
follows the course in
sequence.
The student has not
previously attempted
credit by exam for this
course.
The course is listed in the
college catalog.
The course has been
approved by the Curriculum
Committee for ―Credit by
Examination‖ or is an
articulated course.
Credit by Examination/
Externally Administered
Examination
The student must be currently
enrolled to receive externally
administered credit by exam.
Advanced Placement
The District will grant three
to ten (3 – 10) units of
elective credit for an
examination score of three,
four or five (3, 4 or 5) in
subjects of the Advanced
Placement (AP) program of
the College Entrance Examination Board. Subject credit,
rather than elective credit,
may be granted upon recommendation of the department.
International
Baccalaureate
The college will grant three
to four (3-4) units of elective
credit for an examination
score of five, six or seven
(5, 6 or 7), in the subjects of
the International Baccalaureate (IB) Higher Level exams.
Subject credit rather than
elective credit may be
granted upon recommendation of the department.
Credit Through the College
Level Examination Program
(CLEP)
The college will grant up to
six (6) units elective credit
for a score of 50 or above in
a general examination of the
College Level Examination
Program (CLEP) of the
College Entrance Examination Board. Subject credit,
rather than elective credit,
may be granted upon
recommendation of the
department.
A student may be granted no
more than 30 units through
any combination of credit by
examination (AP, CLEP, IB or
local examinations) and
evaluation of military service
or other non-classroom experiences.
Credit by Examination –
Articulated Career Technical
Education Courses
A high school student may be issued Career Technical Education
(CTE) course credit under the following conditions:
• An Institutional Articulation
Agreement is in place between the college and the
unified school district (USD)/
www.citruscollege.edu
37
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
•
regional occupational
program (ROP);
A course-to-course articulation agreement has been
approved by faculty and the
course assessment has been
administered as authorized;
Instructional personnel
responsible for the course
have completed, and
submitted, documentation
within 90 days of the administration of the exam;
The student earned a grade of
B or better on the authorized
exam; and
The student is registered at
the college.
Institutional and course-to-course
articulation agreements, secondary course rosters/assessment
results and CTE course credit
documents are administered by
the division dean responsible for
Articulated Career Technical Education course credit/Tech Prep.
Documentation that verifies the
earning of credit by exam will be
provided to Admissions and Records in a timely manner.
Ultimately, the transcript of the
student registered at the college
will reflect the awarding of credit
during the semester it was
earned. Operational procedures
will assist students, with CTE articulated course credit, to enroll
and register in the next level
course in their program of study
upon entry to Citrus College.
38
CITRUS COLLEGE
Credit for Courses Taken at
Other Colleges
Academic credits earned at other
regionally accredited institutions
are evaluated at the time of a student's initial enrollment at
Citrus College. It is therefore
important that the student request
official transcripts from all colleges
previously attended. These transcripts should be sent to the Admissions & Records Office.
A student who has taken coursework at institutions of higher
learning outside of the United
States and who wishes to have
that coursework considered toward his/her educational goal at
Citrus College must have the academic credentials evaluated by a
bonafide independent evaluating
Agency. A list of recommended
agencies is available in
the Admissions and Records
Office.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Citrus College Credit for Advanced Placement (AP) Tests
Students may earn credit for College Entrance Examination Board
(CEEB) Advanced Placement (AP)
tests with scores of 3, 4, or 5. AP
credit can be used to meet IGETC,
CSU GE and A.A. degree
general education (GE) and/or
major requirements.
Students must have the College
Board send AP exam results to the
Counseling Department for review
of the A.A. or GE patterns.
Course credit and units granted at
Citrus College may differ from
course credit and units granted by
a transfer institution.
The next two pages present the
credit granted by Citrus College
for Advanced Placement (AP)
tests. Please note the criteria for a
Citrus College associate degree,
the CSU GE requirements and the
IGETC.
Students must file a Credit by
Examination petition for
evaluation at the Admissions and
Records Office. To qualify for
evaluation a student must be
currently enrolled at Citrus
College. The units earned from AP
credit will not apply toward
financial aid nor can they be used
to satisfy the 12-unit residence
requirement for graduation.
Associate Degree: Students
should be aware that AP test
credit is evaluated by corresponding it to an equivalent Citrus
course, e.g. History 108. A student who receives AP credit and
then takes the equivalent Citrus
College course will have the unit
credit duplication deducted prior
to being awarded the A.A. degree.
If no equivalent exists, general
education area credit will be
CITRUS COLLEGE
given. Credit by Advanced Placement exam is noted and listed on
a student‘s transcript, with units
assigned and no grade.
IGETC: AP exams must be used
in the area indicated regardless of
where the certifying California
community college‘s discipline is
located.
CSU GE: The Advanced Placement examinations may be incorporated into the certification of
CSU General Education-Breath
requirements by any certifying
institution. All CSU campuses will
accept the minimum units earned
and apply them toward fulfillment
of the designated General Education-Breadth area if the examination is included as part of a full or
subject-area certification. Please
note that individual CSU campuses
may choose to grant more units
than those specified toward completion of General EducationBreath requirements.
www.citruscollege.edu
39
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Citrus College Credit for Advanced Placement (AP) Tests
Students may earn credit for College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Advanced Placement (AP) Tests with scores of 3, 4, or 5. AP credit can be
used to meet IGETC, CSU GE and A.A. general education (GE) and/or major requirements.
Students must have the College Board send AP exam results to the Admissions for use on the A.A. or GE patterns.
Course credit and units granted at Citrus College may differ from course credit and units granted by a transfer institution.
EXAM
CITRUS A.A.
(MAJOR/GE)
CSU GE
CSU - UNITS EARNED
TOWARD TRANSFER
IGETC
UC - UNITS EARNED
TOWARD TRANSFER
Art History
Art 101
3 semester units
Area C1 or C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3A or 3B
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
Art (Studio)
No course equivalency
Elective
3 semester units
N/A
3 semester units
N/A
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
Biology
Biology 105
4 semester units
Area B2 and B3
4 semester units
6 semester units
Area 5B (with lab)
4 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
+Calculus AB
MATH 190
4 semester units
Area B4
3 semester units
3 semester units*
Area 2A
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units**
+Calculus BC
MATH 191
4 semester units
Area B4
3 semester units
6 semester units*
Area 2A
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units**
AP CALCULUS EXAM
LIMITATIONS
*Only one exam may
be used toward
transfer
**Maximum credit 8
quarter/5.3 semester units
for both
Chemistry
Chemistry 110
5 semester units
Areas B1 and B3
4 semester units
6 semester units
Area 5A (with lab)
4 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
Chinese Language
& Culture
No course equivalency
GE Humanities
3 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
Computer Science A
CS 111
4 semester units*
N/A
3 semester units**
N/A
2 quarter/1.3 semester
units***
Computer Science AB
No course equivalency
Elective
3 semester units
N/A
6 semester units**
N/A
4 quarter/2.7 semester
units***
AP CS EXAM
LIMITATIONS
*Maximum 6 semester units for both
**Maximum one
exam toward transfer
***Maximum credit 4
quarter/2.7 semester units
for both
Economics Macroeconomics
Economics 101
3 semester units
Area D2
3 semester units
3 semester units
Area 4B
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
Economics Microeconomics
Economics 102
3 semester units
Area D2
3 semester units
3 semester units
Area 4B
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
English - Language
& Composition
English 101
3 semester units
Area A2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 1A
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units*
English - Literature
& Composition
English 101 or ENGL
102
3 semester units
Area A2 and C2
6 semester units
6 semester units
Area 1A or 3B
3 semester units
8 quarter units/5.3 semester
units*
AP ENGLISH EXAM
LIMITATIONS
*8 quarter/5.3 semester
units maximum for both
++ Environmental
Science
BIOL 145
3 semester units
Area B2 and B3 (if taken
prior to Fall 2009) or
Area B1 and B3 (regardless of when taken)
4 semester units
4 semester units
Area 5A (with lab)
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
French Language
Humanities Elective
3 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
French Literature
No course equivalency
GE Humanities
3 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
40
CITRUS COLLEGE
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
EXAM
CITRUS A.A.
(MAJOR/GE)
CSU GE
CSU - UNITS EARNED
TOWARD TRANSFER
UC - UNITS EARNED
TOWARD TRANSFER
UC - UNITS EARNED
TOWARD TRANSFER
German Language
German 101 & 102
10 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
Government & Politics
- Comparative
Political Science
103
3 semester units
Area D8
3 semester units
3 semester units
Area 4H
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
Government and
Politics - U.S.
Political Science
103
3 semester units
Area D8 and US 2*
3 semester units
3 semester units
Area 4H
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
Student can satisfy
*Does not fulfill AHI
California Government the AHI requirement
after transfer
requirement
History - European
No course equivalency
GE Social Science
3 semester units
Area C2 or D6
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B or 4F
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
History - U.S.
History 108
3 semester units
Area C2 or D6
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B or 4F
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
History - World
No course equivalency
GE Social Science
3 semester units
Area C2 or D6
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B or 4F
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
Human Geography
Geography 102
3 semester units
Area D5
3 semester units
3 semester units
Area 4E
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
Italian Language &
Culture
No course equivalency
GE Humanities
3 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
Japanese Language &
Culture
JAPN 101 & 102
10 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
Latin - Vergil
No course equivalency
GE Humanities
3 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
3 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
Latin - Literature
No course equivalency
GE Humanities
3 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
Music Theory
MUSE 103
3 semester units
Area C1
3 semester units
6 semester units
N/A
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
Physics B
Physics 110
4 semester units
B1 and B3
4 semester units*
6 semester units*
Area 5A (with lab)
4 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units**
Physics C - Mechanics
GE Physical Science
4 semester units
Area B1 and B3
4 semester units*
4 semester units*
Area 5A (with lab)
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units**
Physics C - Magnetism GE Physical Science
4 semester units
Area B1 and B3
4 semester units*
4 semester units*
Area 5A (with lab)
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units**
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
*Maximum 4 semester units toward GE
and 6 semester units
toward transfer
AP PHYSICS EXAM
LIMITATIONS
**Maximum 8 quarter/5.3
semester units for both
Psychology
Psychology 101
3 semester units
Area D9
3 semester units
3 semester units
Area 4I
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
Spanish Language
Spanish 101 & 102
10 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
No course equivalency
GE Humanities
3 semester units
Area C2
3 semester units
6 semester units
Area 3B and 6A
3 semester units
8 quarter/5.3 semester units
MATH 165
4 semester units
Area B4
3 semester units
3 semester units
Area 2
3 semester units
4 quarter/2.7 semester units
Spanish Literature
Statistics
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
41
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
AP Placement Exam Notes:
AA: Students should be aware that AP test credit is evaluated by corresponding it to an equivalent Citrus course, e.g. History 107. A student who receives AP credit and
then takes the equivalent Citrus course will have the unit credit for such duplication deducted prior to being awarded the A.A. degree. Credit by Advanced Placement exam
is noted and listed on a student‘s transcript, with units assigned and no grade.
CSU GE: The Advanced Placement examinations may be incorporated into the certification of CSU General Education-Breath requirements by any certifying institution. All
CSU campuses will accept the minimum units shown and apply them toward fulfillment of the designated General Education-Breath area if the examination is included as
part of a full or subject-area certification. Please note that individual CSU campuses may choose to grant more units than those specified toward completion of General
Education-Breath requirements.
IGETC: AP exams must be used in area indicated regardless of where the certifying CCC‘s discipline is located.
+If a student passes more than one AP exam in calculus or computer science, only one examination may be applied to the baccalaureate.
++Students who pass AP Environmental Science earn 4 units of credit. Tests prior to Fall 2009 may apply to either B1+B3 or B2+B3 of GE Breadth. Fall of 09 or later,
those credits may only apply to B1+B3.
+++If a student passes more than one AP exam in physics, only six units of credit may be applied to the baccalaureate, and only four units of credit may be applied to a
certification in GE Breadth.
Citrus College Credit for International Baccalaureate Exams
Students can earn IB credit with minimum score of 5, except where noted.*
EXAM
A.A. Degree
CSU GE
CSU - UNITS EARNED
TOWARD TRANSFER
IGETC
UC - UNITS EARNED
TOWARD TRANSFER
IB BIOLOGY
AREA B. NATURAL SCIENCES
3 semester units
AREA B2
3 semester units
6 semester units
AREA 5B (without lab)
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB CHEMISTRY
AREA B. NATURAL SCIENCES
3 semester units
AREA B1
3 semester units
6 semester units
AREA 5A (without lab)
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB ECONOMICS
AREA D. HISTORY POLITICAL SCIENCE
3 semester units
AREA D2
3 semester units
6 semester units
AREA 4B
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB GEOGRAPHY
AREA D. HISTORY/POLITICAL SCIENCE
3 semester units
AREA D5
3 semester units
6 semester units
AREA 4E
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB HISTORY
AREA D. HISTORY/POLITICAL SCIENCE
3 semester units
AREA C2 OR D6
3 semester units
6 semester units
AREA 3B OR 4F
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB LANGUAGE A1 (ENGLISH)
AREA C. HUMANITIES
3 semester units
AREA 3B +6A
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB LANGUAGE A1 (ANY OTHER LANGUAGE)
AREA C. HUMANITIES
3 semester units
AREA 35 + 6A
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB BIOLOGY HL
IB CHEMISTRY HL
IB ECONOMICS HL
IB GEOGRAPHY HL
IB HISTORY (ANY
REGION) HL
IB LANGUAGE A1
(ANY LANGUAGE
EXCEPT ENGLISH) HL
IB LANGUAGE A2
(ANY LANGUAGE
EXCEPT ENGLISH) HL
*IB LANGUAGE A1
(ANY LANGUAGE) HL
*IB LANGUAGE A2
(ANY OTHER
LANGUAGE) HL
*IB LANGUAGE B (ANY
LANGUAGE) HL
IB LANGUAGE A2 (ENGLISH)
AREA C. HUMANITIES
3 semester units
AREA C2*
3 semester units
6 semester units*
AREA 3B
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB LANGUAGE A2 (ANY OTHER LANGUAGE)
AREA C. HUMANITIES
3 semester units
NA/A
0 units
6 semester units*
AREA 3B
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB LANGUAGE B (LANGUAGE OTHER THEN
ENGLISH)
AREA C. HUMANITIES
3 semester units
NA/A
0 units
6 semester units*
AREA 6A
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB MATHEMATICS
AREA A2 MATHEMATICS
3 semester units
AREA B4*
3 semester units
6 semester units*
AREA 2A
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB PHYSICS
AREA B. NATURAL SCIENCES
3 semester units
AREA B1
3 semester units
6 semester units
AREA 5A (without lab)
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB PSYCHOLOGY
AREA D. SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
3 semester units
AREA D9
3 semester units
3 semester units
AREA 4I
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB THEATRE
AREA C ARTS
3 semester units
AREA C1*
3 semester units
6 semester units*
AREA 3A
3 semester units
5.3 semester units
IB MATHEMATICS HL
IB PHYSICS HL
IB PSYCHOLOGY HL
IB THEATRE HL
42
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
IB Exam Notes:
* a minimum of score of 4 is needed for CSU credit
CSU GE: The IB examinations may be incorporated into the certification of CSU General Education-Breath requirements by any certifying institution. All CSU campuses will
accept the minimum units shown and apply them toward fulfillment of the designated General Education-Breath area if the examination is included as part of a full or
subject-area certification. Please note that individual CSU campuses may choose to grant more units than those specified toward completion of General Education-Breath
requirements. CSU policy can be found at: http://www.calstate.edu/AcadAff/codedmemos/AA-2009-11.pdf
IGETC: IB exams must be used in area indicated regardless of where the certifying CCC‘s discipline is located. Students who have earned credit from an IB exam should
not take a comparable college course because transfer credit will not be granted for both.
The IGETC policy for IB credit can be found at: http://www.asccc.org/icas/Docs/Final%20IGETC_Standards_v1_1_06-04-09.pdf
UC credit earned for transfer and for individual campuses can be found at: http://universityofcalifornia.edu/educators/counselors
CLEP Examinations
Citrus College will give CLEP credit in selected areas. Course credit will not be granted, however, when it duplicates previous course work. A student must be actively enrolled and have completed 12 units at Citrus College when applying for credit by CLEP exam. CLEP credit may not be used to meet any residency requirement. Official CLEP
scores must be sent to the office of Admissions and Records.
CLEP EXAM
Citrus
passing
score
Citrus comparable course
or elective
American Government
American Literature
50
50
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature
Biology
Calculus
Chemistry
50
50
50
50
POLI 103
Humanities Elective
College Algebra
College Algebra –Trigonometry
College of Mathematics
50
50
50
English Composition (no essay)
*English Composition with Essay
English Literature
50
50
50
Financial Accounting
French Level I
French Level II
Freshman College Composition
50
50
50
50
German Level I
German Level II
History, United States I
50
50
50
History, United States II
Human Growth and Development
Humanities
Information Systems and Computer
Applications
Intro to Educational Psychology
50
50
50
Intro Business Law
Introductory Psychology
Introductory Sociology
Natural Sciences
Pre-Calculus
Principles of Accounting
Principles of
Principles of
Principles of
Principles of
Macroeconomics
Management
Marketing
Microeconomics
Social Sciences and History
Spanish Level I
Spanish Level II
Trigonometry
Western Civilization I
Western Civilization II
CITRUS COLLEGE
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
Humanities Elective
Biology Elective
Math 190
CHEM 110
Math 170
Math 170
n/a
n/a
*ENGL 101
Humanities Elective
Business Elective
Humanities Elective
Humanities Elective
n/a
GER 101
GER 102
HIST 107
HIST 108
Behavioral Science Elective
HUM 101
CIS 130
Behavioral Science Elective
Business Elective
Behavioral Science Elective
Behavioral Science Elective
Science Elective
n/a
Business Elective
History/Political Science Elective
BUS 175
BUS 185
History/Political Science Elective
n/a
SPAN 101
SPAN 102
MATH 151
History Elective
History Elective
Units
CSU
passing
score
3
3
50
50
3
3
4
5
50
50
50
50
4
4
0
50
50
50
0
0
3
50
50
50
3
3
3
0
50
50
50
50
5
5
3
50
50
50
3
3
3
50
50
50
3
50
4
3
50
50
3
3
3
50
50
50
3
n/a
3
50
50
50
3
3
3
n/a
50
50
50
50
5
5
4
50
50
50
3
3
50
50
Min.
semester
credits
earned
Semester
credits
towards GE
breadth
American
institutions
and/or GE
breadth area
3
3
3
3
D8
C2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
C2
B4
B1
B4
4
4
0
4
4
0
B4
n/a
n/a
0
0
3
0
0
3
n/a
n/a
n/a
3
6
12
0
0
0
3
0
n/a
C2
n/a
n/a
6
12
3
0
3
3
C2
D6+US-1
D6+US-1
3
3
3
3
3
3
E
C2
n/a
3
0
3
3
0
0
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0
3
3
3
3
0
0
0
3
0
6
12
3
0
3
3
3
3
3
3
n/a
n/a
D9
D0
B1 or B2
B4
n/a
D2
n/a
n/a
D2
n/a
n/a
C2
B4
C2 or D6
D6
www.citruscollege.edu
43
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
1. CLEP exams CANNOT be used to meet requirements for the IGETC.
2. UC DOES NOT accept CLEP exams.
3. If a student passes more than one CLEP test in the same language other than English (e.g., two exams in French), then only one examination may be applied
to the baccalaureate. For each test in a language other than English, a passing score of 50 is considered ―Level I‖ and earns nine quarter units of
baccalaureate credit; the higher score listed for each test is considered ―Level II‖ and earns additional units of credit and placement in Area C2 of GE
Breadth, as noted.
4. * ENGL Composition with essay may fulfill the ENGL COMP Requirement here at Citrus but it CANNOT be used to fulfill the ENGL Composition
requirement at the CSU or UC‘s.
44
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
How Does Citrus College Recognize High Achievement?
Honors Programs and Recognition
Academic Honors
Every fall and spring semester a
press release is sent to the local
media, on behalf of each member
of the board of trustees, listing
each student from their area who
earned a place on the President's
List and the Dean's List. Academic
honors criteria are presented in
the Evaluating Academic Progress
section.
Achievement Awards
Every year, Citrus College hosts its
Academic Achievement Awards, a
banquet and awards ceremony in
honor of the college‘s top students. Awards are given to the
Man of the Year and the Woman
of the Year; the Male Athlete of
the Year and the Female Athlete
of the Year.
At the Achievement Awards, the
college‘s highest academic honor,
the Keys of Knowledge, are
awarded to the 10 students who
have achieved Citrus‘ highest
overall academic performance.
Students who have demonstrated
high academic performance in a
given department are also honored with the Distinguished Student Awards.
Honors at Graduation
Citrus College graduates are
recognized at Commencement for
their permanent membership in
the Alpha Gamma Sigma, Phi
Theta Kappa and Psi Beta honor
societies. In addition, students
who earn a cumulative GPA of
3.30 or more in all college work,
at Citrus College and at other
colleges and universities, are recognized for Highest Honors, 3.804.00 GPA; High Honors, 3.60-3.79
GPA; and Honors, 3.30-3.59 GPA.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Due to the scheduled dates of
Commencement and spring
semester final exams, Honors at
Graduation GPAs do not reflect
spring semester grades.
Honors Program
The Honors Program is for highly
motivated students and provides a
unique learning environment
emphasizing scholastic excellence.
The objective of the program is to
better prepare students for transfer to a four-year institution and
to complete a bachelor's degree.
To enter the Honors Program, a
student must have a minimum
grade point average of 3.25 and
be eligible for English 101.
Honors coursework enhances a
student‘s ability to read, write,
and think critically about current
topics.
Other program benefits include:
• A variety of courses that meet
UC, CSU and private university
transfer requirements
• Enhanced transfer
opportunities
• Interaction with highly
motivated students
• Smaller class sizes
• Honors classes and program
participation noted on Citrus
College transcripts
• Scholarship opportunities
Honor Societies
Alpha Gamma Sigma
Alpha Gamma Sigma (AGS) is the
honor scholarship society of the
California Community Colleges. Its
purpose is to encourage students
to achieve the highest degree of
development in scholastic, leadership, and community service
endeavors while attending Citrus
College.
AGS membership is renewed each
semester and is based on GPA and
number of units completed. After
completing three semesters of
membership, students may be
eligible for lifetime or permanent
membership. For additional information, visit the AGS website
www.ags-honor.org
Phi Theta Kappa
Phi Theta Kappa, an international
honor society of two-year colleges, is the world‘s largest and
most prestigious honor society
serving two-year colleges. Eligibility is based on GPA, number of
units completed and membership
fees.
The organization offers many
opportunities for scholarships,
intellectual enrichment and
personal development through
programs based on Phi Theta
Kappa's four hallmarks of
scholarship, leadership, service
and fellowship.
In recent years, Phi Theta Kappa
members from Citrus College have
achieved prominence in Phi
Theta Kappa at the state level,
through their rankings on the
organization's academic teams.
For more information, visit
www.ptk.org
Psi Beta
Psi Beta® is the psychology
national honor society for community and junior colleges. Its mission is professional development
of psychology students through
promotion and recognition of excellence in scholarship, leadership,
research, and community service.
www.citruscollege.edu
45
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Who Records My Grades and Credits?
Policies Regarding Academic Records
What Are Academic Records?
Academic records consist of student files maintained by Admissions and Records, Counseling and
Assessment, Financial Aid, and
individual departments.
Academic Renewal
Past performance does not always
accurately reflect a student's
current ability. Therefore, Citrus
College has a policy of academic
renewal without course repetition
so students may achieve their
educational goals in spite of past
poor performance.
Criteria for Academic
Renewal
Students may request academic
renewal as a means to achieve the
educational goals of graduation
from Citrus College, completion of
certificate programs, and/or transfer to a four-year college or university. It is not applicable to students who wish to raise their
grade point averages beyond
these stated goals.
1. Only units taken at Citrus
College may be disregarded,
not units from other colleges.
2. A maximum of 24 units may
be alleviated from not more
than three terms of work.
3. A minimum of 18 months
must have elapsed since the
end of the term of substandard work to be disregarded.
4. Since completion of the work
to be disregarded, a minimum
of 15 units must be completed
at any accredited college or
university, with a grade point
average of a 3.0, or 30 units
with at least a 2.5 GPA, or 45
units with at least a 2.0 GPA.
46
CITRUS COLLEGE
In cases where the criteria set
forth herein have been verified,
the academic renewal petition
will be granted and the dean of
admissions and records or
his/her designee will make the
proper annotation on the
student‘s permanent record.
5. A student may only be granted
academic renewal once.
6. Only substandard grades of
D, F, FW, NC, or NP can be
disregarded.
Academic renewal by Citrus
College does not guarantee that
other institutions will honor the
elimination of units from consideration in the grade point average. It is a student‘s responsibility to confirm with a transfer institution whether academic renewal
will be accepted.
When academic renewal is approved, the student's permanent
academic record shall be annotated in such a manner that all
work remains legible, ensuring a
true and complete academic history.
If the student has been granted
academic renewal by another
accredited college, such action
shall be honored under this policy.
However, the number of semester
units allowed to be disregarded
will be reduced by the number
previously disregarded.
Transcripts
See Admission, Registration and
Matriculation sections.
Challenge of Educational
Records
See Grievance Procedures
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Where Do I Find Help and How Do I Become Involved?
Student Services and Student Life
Admissions and Records
The Admissions and Records Office, located on the first floor of
the Student Services Building, is
the gateway to Citrus College. The
office processes applications, registrations and grades.
Admissions and Records is the
official custodian of student records, which include but are not
limited to demographic information, academic history, and data
mandated by the California Community Colleges Chancellor's Office and other government agencies.
Athletics: The Fighting Owls
Citrus College is a member of the
Western State Conference and
Southern California Football
Alliance. Intercollegiate sports
include basketball, football, golf,
cross country, water polo, soccer,
baseball, softball, swimming and
volleyball. In accordance with Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act of
1994, for information concerning
Citrus College intercollegiate athletic programs contact the Citrus
College athletic director.
Competitive Athletics
Eligibility
All athletes prior to their first
season of competition at Citrus
College must have official high
school and college transcripts on
file in admissions to receive final
eligibility certification. The
California Commission on Athletics
governs Citrus College's athletic
eligibility rules. To be eligible, a
student athlete must:
1. Enroll in a minimum of 12
units during participation in a
sport. Nine of these units
must be in academic courses.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Class attendance is required.
2. Second-season student
athletes must pass 24
semester units, 18 of which
must be in academic
courses, before participating
in the same sport. A 2.0
GPA (cumulative) is required.
Student athletes who transfer and
have participated in intercollegiate
athletics at another college are
required to:
1. Complete 24 semester units,
18 of which must be in
academic courses;
or
Complete 36-quarter units,
27 of which must be in
academic classes, before
being eligible for a second
season of participation. A
2.0 GPA (cumulative) is
required.
2. Student athletes transferring
from a California community
college who participated in
intercollegiate athletics must
complete 12 units in
residence prior to the
beginning of the semester of
competition.
3. Student athletes transferring
from an out-of-state
community college must be
eligible to participate in the
upcoming season if they
were to remain at that
institution.
Student athletes who plan to
transfer to a four-year college
must follow specific transfer eligibility requirements. An athletics
counselor is available to advise
student athletes to ensure they
follow the athletic academic plan,
established by the Counseling and
Advisement Center.
Bookstore
Students are required to purchase
books and supplies needed for
their courses. To meet this need,
the Owl Bookshop is owned and
operated by Citrus College as a
service to students, faculty and
staff with the purpose of making
educational materials and related
items available at an economical
cost. Profits from its operation are
used to fund staff, activities,
grants and scholarships, equipment purchases and campus
improvements.
Effective fall 2010, information
about required textbooks for each
class is available for students to
access through the online class
schedule. For more information
call 626-914-8620.
Prices and information on educational materials are subject to
change at any time. Citrus College
and the Owl Bookshop cannot assume any responsibility for errors
on listed information unless the
books purchased in error are purchased from the Owl Bookshop.
Such purchases are subject to the
normal Owl Bookshop return policy. Please be careful how you use
the information presented on our
Web pages.
The Owl Bookshop sells new and
used textbooks at a price
designed to cover the costs of
operating the bookstore and
meeting all other required
financial obligations. This price
includes all expenses associated
with bookstore operations and
personnel. (AB 1548)
www.citruscollege.edu
47
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
The Owl Bookshop accepts
MasterCard, VISA, Discover,
American Express, cash, ATM or
personal check with a valid California Driver's License. Books and
supplies may also be purchased
online at www.owlbookshop.com
The bookshop is located adjacent
to the Campus Center; hours of
operation and textbook information are listed at
www.owlbookshop.com
Refund Policy
Books purchased for any current
semester session may be
returned for refund as indicated
on the refund policy received at
the time of purchase. The books
must be in the same condition as
when originally purchased. Do not
mar, damage or write in your
books. A cash register receipt,
proof of registration and student
ID are required for all refunds.
Students are encouraged to sell
their books back during finals
through ―BUY BACK.‖ A used
book company purchases books
needed by the bookstore at a percentage of the new book price.
The used book company also buys
other books with a current market
value at a wholesale price. Proof
of registration and student ID are
required. The bookstore cannot
guarantee the buy back of any
book.
CalWORKs
California Work Opportunity and
Responsibility for Kids
(CalWORKs) is the state‘s
welfare-to-work program for
families with children that are
receiving Temporary Aid for Needy
Families (TANF). The Citrus College CalWORKs Program works in
collaboration with the Department
of Public Social Services to assist
students with education, training,
and job skills.
48
CITRUS COLLEGE
Citrus College provides short-term
training programs to help
CalWORKs students enhance their
skills and/or develop new skills in
order to find employment and
become self-sufficient. CalWORKs
students receive assistance with
completion of county paperwork,
child care, work-study job placement, and referrals to community
resources.
violation of the Penal Code of the
State of California must be reported to the local police. The
campus emergency procedures
publication states that students
and employees should make a
prompt and accurate report to
Campus Safety in the event of an
emergency. It is their responsibility to make contact with police
agencies.
Additionally, CalWORKs students
have the opportunity to establish
education and career paths, which
will help them as they transition
off of cash aid.
Campus Safety also provides a
safety escort for any member of
the college community from dusk
until dawn. These escorts are for
safety, not convenience.
Campus Safety
Campus Safety ensures the safety
of students, faculty, staff and
visitors while they are on campus
property or involved in collegesponsored programs and activities, as well as protects district
property and facilities.
Career/Transfer Center
The Career/Transfer Center serves
students‘ career development and
transfer needs.
Campus Safety officers patrol the
campus 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week, and they have the authority
to enforce the Standards of
Conduct.
According to the Education Code,
Campus Safety is the liaison with
local law enforcement agencies in
all criminal action cases.
Therefore, in the event of an
emergency, individuals should
promptly report the incident to
Campus Safety. It is Campus
Safety's responsibility to contact
police agencies.
Campus Safety has the authority
to enforce the sections of the
Penal Code, California Vehicle
Code, Education Code, Board
Policies and Administrative Procedures, and the Standards of Student Conduct. Campus Safety
serves as the Citrus College
liaison with local police departments in all cases of criminal
actions. Any action which is a
Career counselors help students
explore occupations and career
fields using comprehensive printed
and computerized resources.
Through workshops as well as
individual counseling, our staff can
help you decide on a career field
and prepare you for the job market. Career assessments are
available to help you identify
which occupations and/or work
environments are a good fit for
you. Through various activities
you will gather information about
yourself in order to make an informed career decision.
The center also has helpful resources for students who plan to
transfer to a university. We provide a variety of transfer support
services and activities to help you
make a seamless transition to a
university such as:
• Library of university catalogs
• Individual transfer advising
by appointment
• University representative
appointments
• University application
assistance
• University field trips
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
• Transfer awareness
workshops
• College Fairs
• Transfer Admission
Guaranteed to several UC
schools (TAG)
• Articulation agreements with
senior institutions
Cashier
See Cashier/Bursar‘s Offices on
page 57.
Center for Teacher Excellence
(CFTE)
Citrus College‘s Center for Teacher
Excellence helps students who are
interested in teaching build an
educational plan that best suits
their interests and goals. Students receive academic advising
and counseling; preparation for
the CBEST and CSET examinations; financial aid and scholarship
assistance; and help with university transfer applications. Students
also receive networking opportunities through the student chapter
of the California Teachers Association and other professional organizations. Students who utilize the
services offered by the Center for
Teacher Excellence develop core
competencies in communication;
as well as creative, critical, and
analytical thinking (problem solving and decision making).
Counseling and Advisement
Center
The Counseling and Advisement
Center is located on the second
floor of the Student Services
Building. Professional counselors
and educational advisors are available by appointment to assist students in their educational,
vocational and personal matters.
Consistent use of counseling and
advisement is necessary due to
the frequent changes in requirements and recommendations for
colleges and universities, as well
as, new developments in career
opportunities.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Students are encouraged to meet
with a counselor during their first
semester to develop an education
plan. This plan will list the courses
needed to complete your educational goal. In addition, courses in
college planning, career exploration, decision-making and communication are taught by counselors
to assist students.
Disabled Students Programs &
Services (DSP&S)
DSP&S provides support to students who have a verifiable disability that limits one or more major life activities. Students with a
physical disability, visual impairment or auditory impairment, psychological disability, permanent or
temporary health concerns, or a
learning disability can receive assistance from specialized personnel. Services and instructional
support may include:
• Adapted testing
• Adapted physical education
• Adaptive computer technology
• Campus referrals
• Citrus College web
accessibility
• Closed-captioned videotapes
• Community liaisons
• Electronic textbooks
• In-class and laboratory
assistance
• Instructor liaisons
• Note taker service
• Registration assistance
• Reader service
• Sign language interpreting
• Specialized counseling
• Specialized equipment
educationally disadvantaged backgrounds achieve their academic
and career goals. The support
services consist of information and
assistance in admissions, enrollment, financial aid, assessment,
and selecting a major and/or a
career.
EOP&S also provides:
• Support services such as
priority registration, textbook
purchase assistance, career
test fee waivers, tutoring and
self-development workshops
• Outreach to high schools,
community-based
organizations and agencies
• Peer advising designed to
retain students using mentors
and positive role models
• Counselors and educational
advisors who provide
academic and personal
counseling
• Referrals to other services
available on campus and in
the community
• A six-week Summer Bridge
program where potential
students from local high
schools attend class, learn
college success strategies and
take field trips.
The CARE Program, established by
the California Legislature (AB
3103), assists EOP&S students
who are single parents on public
assistance with at least one child
under the age of 14.
New students should contact the
DSP&S Office before enrolling to
allow sufficient time to arrange for
requested services.
Through CARE, students receive
supplemental educational support
services, such as counseling, advisement and peer networking
activities specifically designed for
low-income, single parents.
EOP&S/CARE
Extended Opportunity Programs &
Services/Cooperative Agencies
Resources for Education (EOP&S/
CARE) helps community college
students from economically and
In addition, CARE provides grants
and allowances for child care,
transportation, textbooks, and
supplies to ensure strong retention, persistence and transfer
rates among their students as
www.citruscollege.edu
49
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
they work to achieve their chosen
objectives, which include obtaining vocational certificates of
achievement or licenses, earning
an associate degree, and/or transferring to a four-year college or
university.
Financial Aid
The Financial Aid Office is responsible for initiating, monitoring, and
disbursing federal and state funds.
These programs are provided to
students in the form of grants,
scholarships, employment, and
loans.
Federal and state financial aid
programs are designed to assist
all eligible Citrus College students.
The intent of these programs is to
help students who are pursuing
post-secondary education and
who have not earned their first
bachelor's degree pay for their
college education.
Students should apply for
financial aid as soon as possible after January 1 and preferably before March 2 of every
year. Do not procrastinate.
Many students underestimate
the time it takes to prepare
for college. It is important
that both the student and the
Financial Aid Office have
enough time to prepare and
process the applications in a
timely manner.
In order to apply for federal financial aid, all of the following requirements must be satisfied:
1. Citizenship: Financial aid
applicants must be a U.S.
citizen, a U.S. national, or an
eligible non-citizen.
a. Eligible non-citizens
include: U.S. permanent
residents with an I-551
Card; Conditional
Permanent residents with
an I-551 Card; Applicants
50
CITRUS COLLEGE
with an Arrival-Departure
Record (I-94) with one of
the following designations: "Refugee," "Asylum
Granted," "Parole," or
"Cuban-Haitian Entrant."
b. A student who is in the
U.S. on an F1 or F2
student visa, a J1 or J2
exchange visitor visa, or a
G series visa, is not
eligible for Federal
Student Aid.
2. Students must have a valid
Social Security number.
3. Males born after 12/31/1959
must register with Selective
Service. Call 1-847-688-6888
or go online to: www.sss.gov.
for registration guidelines or
to verify registration.
4. A high school diploma, GED,
or high school equivalency.
First time college students who
do not have a high school
diploma or General Education
Diploma (GED), or who have
not passed the California
Proficiency Exam (CPE), or
who do not have a home
school certificate are NOT
eligible for federal or state
financial aid.
5. Financial aid applicants must
be undergraduate students
enrolled in a program that
leads to a certificate,
associate degree, or transfer
program. Students who
hold a bachelor‘s degree
or higher are not eligible
for Federal Pell Grants or
Cal Grants.
6. Students must not owe a
refund to any institution for
grants received; nor be in
loan default in a Stafford or
Perkins Loan.
7. Maintain Satisfactory
Academic Progress (SAP) as
defined by the Financial Aid
Office.
8. Demonstrate financial need,
which is determined by the
Financial Aid Office and
based on the college's cost of
attendance (COA) minus
Expected Family Contribution
(EFC), as defined by the
federal methodology.
Financial Aid Return to Title
IV (R2T4) Policy
Title IV funds are awarded to a
student under the assumption that
the student will attend school for
the entire period for which the
assistance is awarded. When a
student withdraws, the student
may no longer be eligible for the
full amount of Title IV funds that
the student was originally scheduled to receive. If the amount disbursed to the student is greater
than the amount the student
earned, called Title IV
Overpayment, the unearned funds
must be repaid within 45 days
from the date of notification. The
balance of unearned funds is then
reported to the Department of
Education for collection.
In addition to calculating what
percent of aid the student earned,
the Department of Education requires the college to calculate any
institutional charges (fees) that
the college must repay the Department of Education. Beginning
with the Fall 2013 semester, any
cost that the college is required to
repay the Department of Education will be billed to the student as
an Institutional Debt. This debt is
in addition to any Title IV Overpayment the student may owe.
Until the balance is paid, a hold
will be placed on the student‘s
account preventing registration
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
and access to their Citrus College
transcript.
Citrus College collects liabilities
through a program called Chancellor's Office Tax Offset Program
(COTOP). COTOP authorizes the
California State Franchise Tax
Board (FTB) to offset the amount
owed to the District from the
debtor‘s personal state income
tax, lottery winnings or other state
refunds. If the student owes
money to the District and payment is not received, the District
will submit that student debt to
COTOP for collection, including
Institutional Debt. In addition to
the amount owed to the District,
students will also be assessed the
25% collection fee charged by
COTOP. Students should refer to
the Bursar‘s or Cashier‘s Office
webpage for additional payment
information about COTOP.
For Students Who Meet All of
the Requirements
Students, who meet all of the
above-stated requirements, should
complete the Free Application for
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Apply online at www.fafsa.gov.
Citrus College‘s Federal School
Code is 001166. It is important
to apply early; applications
are accepted as early as
January 1.
Once the student has successfully
completed the FAFSA, they should
follow up with the Financial Aid
Office to check the application
status.
The Financial Aid Office may request some or all of the following:
• Student and/or parents' IRS
tax return transcript with
W-2's
• Proof of untaxed income
• Social Security Card(s)
• Other information that
pertains to financial income
CITRUS COLLEGE
When determining financial aid
eligibility, several factors are taken
into consideration, such
as:
• Taxed and non-taxed family
income
• Investment(s)
• Taxes paid
• Household size
• Number of family members in
college
How to Apply for Financial
Aid/Filing the FAFSA
A student can apply for financial
aid through the Internet. Go to
www.fafsa.gov. A Personal Identification Number (PIN) will be required for both the student and
the parent of dependent students.
Visit www.pin.ed.gov to apply for
a PIN.
The Financial Aid Office staff is
available to assist students with
filling out their FAFSA application
online in English and Spanish. The
Financial Aid Office is located in
the Student Services Building.
Students who complete the FAFSA
may qualify for one or more of the
following programs:
Federal Programs
The following federal programs
are grants, which do not have to
be repaid:
• The Federal Pell Grant is
for students who have been
determined eligible based on
the federal methodology. This
program assists students who
have not earned a bachelors
degree.
• The Federal Supplement
Educational Opportunity
Grant (FSEOG) is for eligible
students with exceptionally
high financial need. Students
must be Pell Grant eligible to
receive FSEOG.
• Federal Work Study
(FWS) may be awarded to
students who declared on
their FAFSA that they are
interested in FWS. It provides
students with an opportunity
to earn funds through on or
off campus jobs.
• Loans are awarded to
students based on eligibility
and must be repaid. Direct
Loans (Subsidized and
Unsubsidized) are awarded
to students who apply and
have successfully completed
their financial aid application
(FAFSA).
State Programs
AB540—The recently passed
California Dream Act, comprising
new state laws AB 130 and AB
131, have extended eligibility for
certain types of institutional and
state aid to students, including
undocumented students, who
qualify for nonresident tuition
exemption under AB 540. Eligible
students are able to receive the
BOG Fee Waiver and the Cal Grant
beginning Fall 2013 term. To learn
more about the California Dream
Act, please visit the California
Student Aid Commission's
website.
The Board of Governor‘s Fee
Waiver (BOGFW) is a fee waiver
designed for students who are
California residents, as well as
AB540 students, and demonstrate
financial need.
Cal Grants are designed to assist
students from low and middle income families to help pay for the
students' educational expenses.
These grants are sponsored by
the California Student Aid Commission (CSAC). Eligibility is based
on a student's grade point average (GPA), student/parent(s) income, and the student‘s course of
study. To be eligible students
must complete a FAFSA and meet
the Cal Grant deadline, which is
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51
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
September 2 of every year.
AB540 students are eligible to
apply for Cal Grants. Funding
availability depends on state
budget.
www.collegenet.com
www.college-scholarships.com
www.salliemae.com
www.supercollege.com
www.usafunds.org
Chafee Grants
If you are or were in foster care
and have financial need, you may
qualify for up to $5,000 a year for
career and technical training or
college. You don‘t have to pay this
money back. You may also be
able to use your grant to help pay
for child care, transportation and
rent while you‘re in school. You
can use your Chafee Grant at any
eligible California college or university or career or technical
school, as well as schools in other
states.
Other Sources
Students are invited and encouraged to contact the Financial Aid
Office and other sources with
questions regarding student aid
programs, the application process,
eligibility requirements, and deadlines.
To qualify, you must be a current
or former foster youth and not
have reached your 22nd birthday
as of July 1 of the award year.
The court must have established
your dependency when you were
between the ages of 16 and 18.
(KinGap youth, adopted youth,
guardian placement, and voluntary placement may not be eligible
for the Chafee Grant, unless court
dependence was established, at
anytime, between the ages of 16
and 18). The California Department of Social Services will verify
your foster youth eligibility status.
Scholarships
Through its Foundation, Citrus
College also offers a variety of
scholarships that are available for
new, continuing, and transferring
students. Citrus College students
are also encouraged to apply for
scholarships available from outside sources. For more information on scholarship opportunities,
please visit the Financial Aid
Office or go online to:
www.citruscollege.edu/stdntsrv/
finaid
www.collegeboard.com
52
CITRUS COLLEGE
Citrus College
Financial Aid Office
Location: Student Services
Building, First Floor
(626) 914-8592
[email protected]
www.citruscollege.edu/
stdntsrv/finaid
U.S. Department of
Education
1-800-4FED-AID
(1-800-433-3243)
Monday through Friday,
8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. EST.
www.ed.gov.
1-800-730-8913
(Hearing Impaired)
Veterans Benefits
Veterans benefits information is
available at the Veterans Center,
located in Hayden Hall (HH) Room
756.
Citrus College is an approved,
degree granting institution for
veterans and their eligible dependents. The United States Code
(Title 38, Chapters 30, 31, 35,
1606 and 1607) provides academic and career training opportunities for veterans. Citrus College invites and urges eligible students to take advantage of the
support services available to veterans.
Citrus College cooperates with the
Veterans Administration and with
the California State Bureau of
Vocational Rehabilitation to help
veterans and their eligible
dependents achieve their educational and vocational goals. Our
program is recognized by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary
and Vocational Education in the
Department of Consumer Affairs
for Veterans Education Benefits.
How to Receive Veterans
Benefits
1. Submit an application for
admission to Citrus College;
www.citruscollege.edu/ar
2. Forward official transcripts of
all previous college or
university work completed
and military service credits
to Citrus College. Transcripts
must be evaluated within the
first two terms of enrollment,
in order for a student to
continue receiving Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB) benefits.
3. Meet with a Citrus College
veterans counselor, who
helps students develop a
Student Educational Plan
(SEP). It is important that
the counseling staff knows a
student's veterans status in
order to assign him/her
to someone experienced in
helping veterans.
4. Apply for financial aid.
5. Submit the application for VA
educational benefits,
including member copy 4 of
DD-214.
6. Reserve and National Guard
personnel must submit a
Notice of Basic Eligibility
(VA form DD-2384), which is
issued by the student‘s
reserve or guard unit.
7. Submit all VA educational
benefits paper work to the
Veterans Representative,
located in the Veterans
Center, HH 756, (626)
914-8516.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Additional Information
Regarding VA Benefits
Applications for VA benefits will
not be processed until all college
transcripts have been received
and the previously listed procedures have been completed. Students receiving GI benefits for the
first time must allow eight to 10
weeks from the processing date to
receipt of the first check.
If you are currently in the military,
or were discharged within the past
four years, you are eligible for
priority registration. An active duty
military ID card or DD 214 are
required for verification.
The Veterans Administration holds
both the college and the recipient
liable for overpayments. Overpayments commonly occur due to:
• Failure to process a Program
Change Form when dropping
a course. The Veterans
Administration considers the
recipient ineligible to receive
benefits after the last date of
attendance.
• Failure to report to the
veterans clerk any change in
a student's number of units
or change of address
• Repetition of a course in
which a satisfactory grade
(C or better) was received
• If a student receives an
overpayment, the Veterans
Administration will
automatically stop further
payment until the entire
amount due has been repaid.
Veterans will receive a letter
requesting repayment if the
following categories apply:
• Enrollment in fewer than 6
units and receiving benefits
under Chapters 30, 31, 35,
1606
• Under Chapter 33, students
can take all Distance Ed
classes at a reduced
amount according to units
CITRUS COLLEGE
and percentage. Under
Chapter 33, students taking
under 6 units will get paid
for tuition/fees and book
stipend only, not entitled to
BAH.
• Officially withdrawn from
the college
Hardship
In the case of hardship, a veteran
may apply to the Veterans Administration to arrange for repayment
of the debt with as little inconvenience as possible.
Academic Eligibility
If a VA student's cumulative grade
point average remains below 2.0
for two consecutive terms, the
student will not be certified for VA
educational benefits until his/her
academic status is restored to
good standing.
Food Services
The Stuffed Owl Café, located
downstairs from the Campus
Center, offers a wide range of
food selections. Mondays through
Thursdays, breakfast and items
from the grill are available, such
as fresh pizza, fresh salads, deli
sandwiches, a taco, burrito and
tostada bar, as well as the entrees
of the day. Vending service is
available at various locations on
campus throughout the day and
evening.
Health Center
The Student Health Center,
located on the first floor of the
Student Services Building,
supports the educational process
and overall mission of Citrus
College by providing quality health
services and promoting positive
health outcomes for the Citrus
College community.
College nurses, part-time campus
physicians, part-time nurse practitioners and other health care
workers staff the Student Health
Center. Health services available
to Citrus College students include:
• 12-step program referrals
• Accident and medical
insurance information
• Acute illness/ambulatory
treatment and care
• AIDS information, HIV testing
and referrals
• Crisis intervention
• Commonly used prescription
medications, including oral
contraceptives, prescribed by
the campus physician and/or
nurse practitioner
• Condoms and personal
hygiene items
• Eating disorders information
and referrals
• Family Planning Services
• Health education (audiovisual, brochures and
reference files)
• Hearing and vision screening
• Immunization (diphtheriatetanus, flu, Hepatitis A&B
vaccine)
• Registered nurses and mental
health counseling
• Off-campus referrals as
needed
• Over-the-counter (nonprescription) medications
available from our self help
counter
• Plan B emergency contraception
• Substance abuse counseling,
information and/or referrals
• Testing for sexually
transmitted infections (STI)
• Tuberculin skin tests
• Registered nurses and mental
health counselors
• Off-campus referrals as
needed
• Over-the-counter (nonprescription) medications
available from our self help
counter.
There is no charge for the college
nurse, nurse practitioner or physician services; however, some
www.citruscollege.edu
53
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
tests, medications and procedures
require a minimal fee. For safety
reasons, children are not allowed
in the Health Center.
Visit the Student Health Center or
call (626) 914-8671 for information and/or appointments. Hours
sometimes vary for college health
nurses, nurse practitioners, physicians and other health care personnel.
International Student Center
The International Student Center
directs and coordinates international student activities in compliance with federal regulations. Citrus College‘s international students represent 45 countries,
further enhancing the diversity of
the campus. The interaction and
networking among all students
has proven to be an invaluable
experience for everyone involved.
The International Student Office
also assists students through its
orientation and support programs,
ensuring students' completion of
their objectives.
Refer to the International Student
Admissions section for more
information about registration
and enrollment.
www.citruscollege.edu/stdntsrv/
international
Student Employment Services
Student Employment Services is a
free job referral service for current
Citrus College students and
alumni. Services include:
• An on-line job board listing a
variety of jobs--full and part
time, permanent and temporary,
on-and off-campus
• Resume preparation and
interviewing skills guidance
• The processing of all hiring,
termination, and payroll data
of on-campus student workers
54
CITRUS COLLEGE
Student Government and
Student Affairs
ASCC
The Associated Students of Citrus
College (ASCC) is recognized by
the Board of Trustees as the
official student government
organization, and is open to all
student body members meeting
minimum requirements. An
executive board composed of 19
members conducts ASCC business; 10 are elected members and
nine are appointed members.
ASCC responsibilities include
administering a budget of
approximately $650,000, as well
as planning and implementing
many social, cultural and cocurricular programs. Most
important of all, ASCC board
members represent the interests
of the student body on all
campus wide committees.
Student Activities and
Organizations
Students are encouraged to
become involved in student clubs
and organizations. Club activities
include business meetings,
lectures, discussions, field trips,
publications, exhibits and special
events of interest to the general
student body and to the
community. To coordinate the
club activities and provide more
student representation in school
government, the Inter-Club
Council, represented by student
members, holds weekly meetings.
Citrus College clubs include:
• 180 Philanthropy
• Alpha Gamma Sigma Honor
Society
• American Medical Student
Association
• Anime Connection
• Campus Activities Board
• Citrus Business Association
• Citrus Investing Club
• Chess Club
• Citrus College Veterans
Network
• Cheer Club
• Chemistry Club
• Classy Cuisine Club
• Cosmetology Club
• Computer Programming
• Dental Assisting Club
• DiverCity
• Earth Club
• Evening Cosmetology Club
• Filmmakers Club
• Gamers Guild
• Gay Straight Alliance
• Helping Find Opportunities in
the Pursuit of Education
(H.O.P.E.)
• International Friendship Club
• Latino Unidos Student
Association
• Math Owls
• Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Honor
Society
• Photography Club
• Psi Beta (Psychology honor
society)
• Psychology Club
• Researchers in Paranormal
Treatment of Animals
• Supernatural Society
• United States Green Building
Council
• Vocational Nursing
• Young Americans for Liberty
Veterans Center
The Citrus College Veterans
expand services to the veteran. As
a result, the Veterans Center provides a one-stop location where
students can receive assistance
with GI benefits processing, obtain counseling and referrals for
various transitional needs, and
meet with an academic counselor,
and access services such as,
tutoring, peer support, meet
veteran mentors, get information
on the Veterans Book Fund, and
the Veterans Network club.
Students who are currently in the
military, or were discharged within
the past four years, are eligible for
priority registration. An active duty
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
military ID card or DD 214 are
required for verification.
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
55
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
What Additional Resources are Available at Citrus?
Campus Facilities and Learning Resources
Adapted PE/Fitness Center
The Adapted Physical Education
Center is the home of the Fitness
Center. It is located between the
main gymnasium and tennis
courts. This facility offers exercise
and fitness programs for students,
Citrus College employees and
community members.
The center features cardiovascular
training machines and weight machines also modified to accommodate persons with disabilities.
These machines include treadmills, flexacisers, stationary and
recumbent bicycles, arm ergometers and stand aids. Individual
progress is monitored by checking
blood pressure (if needed),
strength, endurance and flexibility.
The Adapted Physical Education
Program is also conducted at the
Adapted PE facility. Students with
physical limitations can participate
in this exercise and health-related
physical fitness program, which
includes adapted physical education courses and adapted aquatics. For more information visit
www.citruscollege.edu /fitcntr.
Aquatic Center
The Aquatic Center is the home of
the water polo and swim teams,
and is sometimes selected as the
site for regional championship
events.
The Aquatic Center also houses a
therapy pool that is utilized by the
athletic training staff to help treat
injured athletes. Members of the
community have access to the
Aquatic Center during specific
days and times, and it is sometimes chosen as a location for
television and movie shoots.
56
CITRUS COLLEGE
Art & Coffee Bar
The Owl Bookshop, in partnership
with Starbucks, has opened the
Art & Coffee Bar in the Student
Services Building. Citrus College
students, faculty, and staff now
have a place to meet, converse or
study while enjoying a variety of
drinks and great food. Student
employees, trained by Starbucks,
gain retail and business experience.
The new art store offers fine art
supplies and other educational
materials for students. In the
lobby entrance, current student
and alumni art is displayed and
available for sale. Proceeds from
the sale of artwork are split between the student, art department, and bookstore.
Art Gallery
The Art Gallery is located in the
Hayden Memorial Library and
features year-round exhibits by
students, faculty and staff.
Athletics Facilities
Citrus College's athletics facilities
are among the best in Southern
California. The 10,000-seat
football, soccer and track stadium
includes an all-weather track, a
field turf playing surface and a
new turf practice field. Citrus
College athletes have the
advantage of premium practice
facilities: one weight training
room, a double-circuit (64station) fitness center two
equipment rooms and two athletic
training rooms.
The campus' athletic facilities also
feature the two-story Field House,
baseball field, softball complex,
and renovations to the Citrus
College Gymnasium and offices.
The Field House provides facilities
to support football, baseball,
soccer and cross country teams.
The two-story building includes
locker rooms, offices, equipment
storage, and restrooms. The
softball complex has two softball
fields both with artificial turf in the
outfield, dirt infields and state-ofthe-art scoreboards.
Campus Center
The Ross L. Handy Campus Center
is maintained by the Associated
Students of Citrus College and
provides a meeting place for students, faculty, staff and the community. A Campus Center host is
on duty in the lounge area ensuring that the facility is used in accordance with ASCC and district
policies. For their safety, children
visiting the Campus Center must
be accompanied by an adult.
College Success Program
The College Success Program provides educational opportunities for
students to improve their reading,
writing, math and communication
skills. The program, which is designed with student success in
mind, is comprised of the following components:
• College Success Centers offer
tutoring, access to learning
software, grammar clinics, and
free workshops on study skills
and test taking.
• The College Success Counselors
are available to assist students
with class selection, educational
plans, and access to collegewide
services.
• Learning Communities comprised of two or more ―linked‖
classes, create a community of
instructors and students, providing more support for student
success.
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Cashier/Bursar Offices
The Cashier‘s office is located in
the Student Services Building,
room SS 124, and the Bursar‘s
office is located in the ED Building, room 235. Students are able
to pay registration fees at
https://wingspan.citruscollege.edu
or by cash, check, money order or
travelers check at the Cashier‘s
Office. Associated Student (ASCC)
stickers can be picked up at this
location or at the Student Business Office located in the Campus
Center.
The Bursar and Accounts Receivable Offices disburse payroll
checks, process refunds and replacement warrants for financial
aid and fee refunds. Refunds are
processed automatically 4-6
weeks after the first week of class
and mailed to the address listed in
Wingspan. Replacement warrants
for financial aid require approval
from the Financial Aid Department. Once approved, an affidavit
must be completed at the Bursar‘s
Office.
Holds are placed on student accounts by the Bursar‘s Office for
outstanding obligations such as
chemistry breakage fees, library
fines, credit card charge backs
and other financial or nonfinancial responsibilities. Outstanding debts, library fines for
lost books and chemistry fees can
also be paid online using Wingspan.
The Bursar‘s Office submits outstanding student obligations to the
State of California for collection.
Outstanding obligations are
subject to a 33% fee.
Parking permits are purchased
and issued at https://
citruscollege.thepermitstore.com.
Students must pay registration
CITRUS COLLEGE
fees in full prior to receiving access to The Permit Store.
Golf Driving Range
The Range At Citrus features two
hitting surfaces, natural grass and
mats, eight target greens, a sand
trap, 33 stations, a chipping area
and a 2,500 sq. ft. putting green.
This golf practice center, which is
open to the public, offers lessons
from a professional and from
Citrus College instructors. The well
-lighted golf driving range is open
seven days a week. A well-stocked
pro shop and snack bar provide
added convenience. Please contact The Range for hours of operation, (626) 914-8688.
The Range At Citrus is located at
the southwest portion of the campus near the baseball field, with
entrance from Citrus Avenue.
Designated parking for golfers is
available in front of The Range.
Robert D. Haugh Performing
Arts Center
Since 1971, the Robert D. Haugh
Performing Arts Center has
provided cultural and educational
entertainment to the community.
The 1,400-seat theatre offers a
variety of programs from all of the
performing arts disciplines.
The Haugh Main Stage
Presenting Program
The Haugh events include a wide
range of entertainment such as
headliners Debbie Reynolds and
Chita Riviera, world-famous dance
company - The Hungarian Folk
Ensemble, jazz artist Branford
Marsalis, and Tito Puente, Jr., The
Glenn Miller Orchestra, Golden
Dragon Acrobats, the new popular
group SIRO-A from Japan, comedian Paul Reiser, and the Sing-ALong shows: ―Grease,‖ ―The
Sound of Music‖ and the
―Messiah.‖ Themed packages of
events are available at a discount
such as Nostalgia, Contemporary,
Legends, World Music, and Afternoon Tea, which includes tea and
cookies on the west patio.
Kidtastic! Family Event Series
A Saturday afternoon series of
events for young audiences – and
their parents – stimulates new
ideas, provides different views of
the world, and allows them to just
plain have fun! Events include
shorter kid-friendly versions of
main stage shows such as Golden
Dragon Acrobats and technodigital comedians SIRO-A, an intro
to jazz music in ―Big Drum, Small
World‖ with the Metta Quintet,
musical theatre pieces based on
―Stuart Little‖ and ―Snow White,‖
and the popular Gizmo Guys.
Fine & Performing Arts
Department Productions
The vocal music department, including the renowned Citrus Singers, present two major productions each year, including the
popular holiday extravaganza
―Christmas Is…‖
The Blue Note Orchestra, joined
by the jazz band from Azusa Pacific University, hosts sell-out
crowds at the annual ―Battle of
the Big Bands.‖ In addition to
their off-campus concerts, the
award-winning orchestra accompanies or opens for many of the
notable performers on the Haugh
Performing Arts main season.
Sierra Wind Symphony and the
Concert Choir perform classic literature as well as popular film
music in their annual ―‖A Night of
Music From Film.‖
The Citrus Music Theatre Workshop presents fully staged Broadway musicals with spectacular
scenery and costumes such as
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57
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
―Ragtime,‖ ―Chicago,‖ ―Fiddler on
the Roof‖ and ―Shrek.‖ Citrus
Women‘s Ensemble presents an
annual musical revue in the
spring.
The Theatre Department presents
multiple productions each year in
the Citrus Little Theatre including
public performances of their
school touring productions. The
Dance Department presents two
annual concerts in the Haugh Performing Arts Center including
―Holidance,‖ a special holiday
dance concert near Christmas
time.
Learning Center
Located on the second floor of the
ED building, the Learning Center
provides instructional support services and is open to all Citrus
College students with a Citrus ID
card.
Success Center–Language
Arts/Multidisciplinary
The center provides instructional
support for English 098 students
who need to meet their English
lab requirements. Faculty lab staff
are available to provide guidance,
one-on-one assistance, and small
group instruction; clinics are
conducted daily. The lab features
22 multimedia, online, and
networked computer stations.
Language Lab
The Language Lab is an interactive language learning center that
promotes cross-cultural education.
Students can participate in activities such as pronunciation and
conversation classes, reading clinics, and study groups. A Citrus
College ID is required.
Tutorial Services
Peer tutoring, in most subjects, is
available free of charge to all Citrus College students. Students
interested in working with a tutor
must sign up for services.
58
CITRUS COLLEGE
Tutors are Citrus College students
who have completed the tutor
training program and have successfully completed the course(s)
they tutor with a grade of A or B.
An online tutoring program is also
available through the Learning
Center website.
Testing Center
The Testing Center offers:
• Academic test proctoring
• Adapted testing
• Assessment testing
The Testing Center provides administration and proctoring for
Distance Education exams, make
up exams for traditional classes,
the chemistry diagnostic exam,
and Adapted Testing for DSP&S
students. Assessment testing is
administered through a computerized ―smart‖ placement test to
determine students‘ initial placement into reading, English, ESL,
and math courses.
Most assessments are done in
block sessions followed by a counseling orientation session. Please
consult the Citrus College website
for Assessment/Orientation times.
Students who require accommodations due to disabilities or other
circumstances, may arrange to
take their exams through Adapted
Testing. Typical accommodations
provided by Adapted Testing include extended time, large print,
distraction-reduced exam space
and adapted computer equipment.
The Writing Café
The Writing Café is open to all
Citrus College students who need
English tutoring and/or help with
essays, research papers, lab reports, or any other writing assignment. One-on-one writing consultations are limited to two, 45 minute appointments per week. A
Citrus College ID is required.
Library Services
The Floyd S. Hayden Memorial
Library/Learning Resource Center,
is a 33,000 square-foot facility
containing approximately 45,000
print, 7,000 multimedia, 25,000
electronic book titles, and electronic article databases. The
library catalog can be accessed
online through the library‘s home
page.
Library services feature individual
seating for 534, six multi-media
rooms, 12 group study rooms, 106
public computers, five library
catalog computers (including one
that is wheelchair accessible), an
orientation classroom with 40
computers and 10 extra chairs,
and a copy room with five copiers,
one color copier, and black and
white or color printing. The library
also offers wireless internet access. Two scanners are available
to students and three computers
feature an adapted keyboard.
The library also provides the JAWS
and Kurzweil 3000 software
programs for visually impaired
students.
Library reference interviews are
designed to assist students with
research for class assignments
through one-on-one instruction in
person, by telephone, e-mail, text
message or online chat. Instruction includes how to access print
books and periodicals, electronic
books, and audiovisual items using the online library catalog. With
library staff assistance, students
learn about library services and
policies and how to locate books
using the Dewey Decimal System.
Staff may also demonstrate how
to use effective search strategies
to locate articles in various electronic databases and how to cite
those sources appropriately.
A librarian is available to collaborate with instructors to customize
information literacy instruction for
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
specific courses and assignments.
Most instruction is done in the
library orientation classroom with
groups of students and the instructor. A librarian is also available for individual orientations to
meet one-on-one with students
with special needs.
STEM (Science, Technology,
Engineering, Mathematics)
The STEM Resource Center offers
support for students interested in
and/or taking courses in science,
technology, engineering and
mathematics. Services and activities for students include:
Math Tutoring: Drop-in tutoring
is available to all math students in
the Math Success Center (MA
130). Current math textbooks are
available for use and study groups
are welcome.
Supplemental Instruction: Attend out-of-class review sessions
to ensure your success in targeted
math and science courses (MA
129).
Peer Mentoring: First year STEM
students can work one-to-one
with an experienced STEM student
through SIGMA peer mentoring
and facilitated study groups.
Summer Research Experience:
STEM students learn and earn
during 8-week summer research
experiences at local universities
and research institutions. Applications accepted in Feb/Mar each
year.
STEM Counseling: Specialized
counseling for STEM majors and
students interested in STEM is
available in both MA 121A and the
Student Services building.
Students interested in STEM are
encouraged to join the STEM
Academy. Applications are online
CITRUS COLLEGE
at http://www.citruscollege.edu/
stem/academy/. STEM Academy
students receive regular newsletters, advance notice of career
workshops and internships, and
valuable information about college
processes.
Study Abroad
Citrus College students have the
opportunity to study abroad
through Citrus College and the
Southern California Foothills
Consortium for Study Abroad.
Semester-length programs are
offered in London, England (fall)
and Salamanca, Spain (spring).
Students may study in Italy or
Costa Rica during the summer
session. Courses are taught by
Citrus College faculty and faculty
from one of the Consortium member colleges. Most courses are
CSU/UC transferable and meet
general education requirements.
Courses are chosen to maximize
the benefits of studying in the
host country. Selected courses
often include English, humanities,
art history, theatre, history, political science, social science, speech,
communications, philosophy, psychology, and on some programs
foreign language and business.
computers, printers, and software
available to Citrus College students who need computing resources to complete their class
projects and assignments. The
computers, along with other campus computing resources, are also
used to support the curriculum.
This program has introductory and
general interest course offerings
for anyone desiring to learn how
to use computers for personal or
professional purposes, and specialized courses for those who
want to pursue a career in information processing.
Citrus College provides each
student with an e-mail account. All
students are urged to use their
Citrus College e-mail account, as
this is the e-mail address where all
college information will be sent
and where students can access
waitlist.
Visit www.citruscollege.edu/tecs/
studentemail for more
information.
Students who study in Spain are
immersed in Spanish language
and culture.
The Study Abroad experience provides students with a global perspective and knowledge of other
cultures that cannot be gained in
domestic study alone.
Technical Services and
Computer Labs
The Dan Angel Data Processing
Center houses the college's main
computer laboratory, several
classrooms and the TeCS administrative offices. The computer
laboratory has a variety of
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59
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
What Majors and Programs Are Offered at Citrus College?
Citrus College offers associate degrees in 42 fields of study, as well as certificates of achievement and skill
awards in 42 academic and career/technical areas.
These programs offer a variety of academic and career preparation programs that appeal to a variety of interests and provide students with the skills and knowledge needed to transfer to a four-year college, to establish a
career—or to achieve both opportunities. In addition to preparing students to enter the professions or acquire
jobs that require a bachelor‘s degree or higher, the college offers courses of study that prepare students for
jobs in areas such as automotive technology, heath care, law enforcement and information technology.
This table offers an overview of Citrus College‘s degrees and certificates. A more in-depth presentation of Citrus
College‘s associate degrees, certificates of achievement and skill awards are featured in the following sections,
providing information regarding program requirements, student learning outcomes and employment opportunities.
Citrus College Program of Study
A.A
A.A.-T A.S. A.S.-T
Accounting
Administration of Justice
Certificate of Skill
Achievement Award
X
X
X
X
Administrative Office Occupations
X
Architectural Design
X
Audio Recording Technology
X
X
Automotive Research and Development
X
Automotive Service, Diagnosis and Repair—Master
Technician
X
Automotive Service, Diagnosis and Repair—Toyota/
Lexus/Scion Technician
X
Automotive Service, Diagnosis and Repair—
Undercar Drivetrain Specialist
X
Automotive Service, Diagnosis and Repair—
Underhood Specialist
X
Automotive Technology
X
Biological and Physical Science (and Mathematics)
X
Biological Sciences
X
Business
X
Business Administration
X
Ceramics-One Year
X
Ceramics-Two Year
X
Child Development
Child Development Teacher
X
X
Child Development—Associate Teacher
Child Development—Master Teacher
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CITRUS COLLEGE
X
X
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Citrus College Program of Study
A.A
A.A.-T A.S. A.S.-T
Certificate of Skill
Achievement Award
Child Development—Master Teacher/Early
Intervention
X
Commercial Dance
X
Communication Studies
X
Computer-Aided Design (CAD)-Architecture and
Drafting
X
Computer Generated Imagery
X
Cosmetology
Dance
X
X
X
X
X
Dental Assisting
Digital and Web Design
X
Drafting and Design Technology
X
Early Childhood Education
X
Elementary Education
X
Emergency Management and Homeland Security
X
X
Emergency Medical Technician
X
Engine Rebuilding and Machining
X
English
English Literature
X
X
Esthetician
Fine and Performing Arts
X
X
History
X
Home Health Aide
X
Infant and Child Development Associate Teacher
X
Information Technology
X
Kinesiology (formerly Physical Education)
X
Language Arts
X
Liberal Arts: Arts and Humanities
X
Liberal Arts: Math and Science
X
Liberal Arts: Social and Behavioral Sciences
X
Liberal Arts: Technology and Business
X
X
Literature
Mathematics
Medium and Heavy Truck Service, Diagnosis and
Repair Technician
X
X
X
Microsoft Office
CITRUS COLLEGE
X
www.citruscollege.edu
61
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Citrus College Program of Study
Music
A.A
AA-T A.S.
Certificate of Skill
Achievement Award
X
Nurse Assistant
X
Office Clerk
X
Photography
X
Physics
X
X
Psychology
X
Public Works
X
Public Works I
X
Public Works II
X
Registered Nursing
Social and Behavioral Sciences
X
X
Sociology
X
Theatre Arts
X
Theatre Arts—Acting Emphasis
X
X
Theatre Arts—Emerging Theatre Technologies
62
AS-T
X
Vocational Nursing
X
X
Water Technology
X
X
Wildland Resources and Forestry
X
Writing Competency
X
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
How Do I Earn a Degree at Citrus College?
Programs of Study Learning to an Associate Degree
Requirements for Majors
The Associate in Arts and the Associate in Science
degrees require a minimum of 18 units in a major
field of study with grades of C or above in each
course attempted that is counted toward the major.
The 18-unit requirement is in addition to the general
education and proficiency requirements.
Programs of Study Leading to an Associate
Degree for Transfer
Administration of Justice
Business Administration
Communication Studies
Early Childhood Education
Elementary Education
English
History
Kinesiology
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology
Sociology
Theater Arts
Programs of Study Leading to an Associate
Degree
Administration of Justice
Automotive Technology
Biological and Physical Science (and Mathematics)
Biological Sciences
Business
Child Development
Cosmetology
Dance
Dental Assisting
Drafting and Design Technology
Emergency Management and Homeland Security
English Literature
Fine and Performing Arts
Kinesiology (formerly Physical Education)
Language Arts
Liberal Arts with emphases in:
• Arts and Humanities
• Business and Technology
• Math and Science
• Social and Behavioral Sciences
Music
Photography
Public Works
Recording Technology
CITRUS COLLEGE
Registered Nursing
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Theatre Arts
Theatre Arts - Acting Emphasis
Vocational Nursing
Water Technology
The Associate Degrees for Transfer
The Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act
(Senate Bill 1440, now codified in California Education
Code sections 66746-66749) guarantees admission to
the California State University (CSU) system for any
community college student who completes an
―associate degree for transfer,‖ a newly established
variation of the associate degrees traditionally offered
at a California community college.
The Associate in Arts for Transfer (AA-T) or the
Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T) is intended
for students who plan to complete a bachelor's
degree in a similar major at a CSU campus. Students
completing these degrees (AA-T or AS-T) are
guaranteed admission to the CSU system, but not to
a particular campus or major. In order to earn one of
these degrees, students must complete a minimum of
60 required semester units of CSU-transferable
coursework with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Students
transferring to a CSU campus that does accept the
AA-T or AS-T will be required to complete no more
than 60 units after transfer to earn a bachelor‘s degree (unless the major is a designated ―high-unit‖
major). The AA-T or AS-T degree may not be the best
option for students intending to transfer to a particular CSU campus or to a university or college that is
not part of the CSU system. Students should consult
with a counselor when planning to complete the degree in order to receive more information on university admission and transfer requirements.
Citrus College Core Competencies and Student
Learning Outcomes
General education competencies serve as a common
set of core curricular components identified and
defined by faculty. Student learning outcomes are
behaviors based on these competencies.
Any student transferring or completing a degree or
certificate from Citrus College must demonstrate effectively assessed awareness, understanding, knowledge, skills, and abilities in the selected
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63
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
competencies. These learning outcomes address the
general education philosophy of the college (BP 4100,
Graduation Requirements).
5. Technology
Students understand the changing role of
technology in learning and community.
1. Communication
Students read, write, speak, and listen effectively
at the college level.
6. Discipline/Subject Area
Specific Content Material
Students demonstrate college level proficiency in
a pattern of general education courses.
2. Computation
Students demonstrate college level proficiency in
mathematics and data analysis.
3. Creative, Critical, and Analytical Thinking,
Information Competency
Students apply curiosity, creativity, and aesthetic
awareness in decision making based on
evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of college level
material.
Student learning outcomes are written in selected
areas of competency at the course level (course outlines of record), program level (program review reports), and degree and certificate levels. Learning
outcomes are mapped to show the relationships between and among the levels. General education learning outcomes are assessed through systematic analysis of course and program level assessment results.
4. Community/Global Consciousness and
Responsibility
Students assume personal responsibility and
demonstrate respect for others as a measure of
cultural awareness, ethics, and integrity.
64
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Graduation Requirements for an Associate Degree
I. Associate in Art (A.A.) and Associate in
Science (A.S.) Degrees
The Associate in Arts or the Associate in Science
degrees will be granted upon the completion of 60
degree-applicable units of work and fulfillment of
the specific requirements listed below. These graduation requirements shall apply to first time and
returning students enrolling Fall Semester 2013
and thereafter. Students who have maintained
continuous attendance (completed a course with
an academic record symbol, excluding W, each
semester) have the option of meeting these
requirements or those in effect at the time
continuous enrollment began.
1. Scholarship Requirement
A cumulative grade-point average of 2.00 or C
must be earned in all lower division coursework
attempted at Citrus College and at any regionally
accredited post-secondary education institution.
Please note: Only Citrus College courses
numbered 100 – 299 and Cooperative Work
Experience Education may apply toward the
associate degree.
Students may petition to have noncredit courses
counted toward the satisfaction of requirements
for an associate degree.
2. Residence Requirement
a. Completion of a minimum of 12 units in
residence at Citrus College including
attendance during the last semester; or
b. 30 units in residence at Citrus College if the last
semester is not in residence.
3. Major Requirement
A student must complete 18 units and achieve a
grade of C or better in each course attempted
that is counted for the major.
4. General Education Requirements
A student must complete one of the following
options:
a. Option I: 22 units as described on pages
66-70.
or
b. Option II: 39 units as stipulated by the CSU
general education certification requirements,
CITRUS COLLEGE
c.
outlined on pages 72-76.
or
Option III: 34 units as stipulated by the
completion of the IGETC pattern, outlined on
pages 79-82.
There is no limit on the number of units that may
count towards both general education and major requirements. A multicultural course is offered in at
least one of the general education areas listed above.
5. Kinesiology Requirement
a. Three units of kinesiology or dance activity as
outlined on page 70.
or
b. Completion of KIN 170, 171, or 173.
No varsity sports courses may be used to fulfill
a general education requirement.
6. Competency Requirements
a. Writing: Completion of an English Composition
General Education Requirement with a grade of
C or better. Effective for all students admitted
to a California community college for the fall
2009 term or any term thereafter, competence
in written expression shall be demonstrated by
obtaining a satisfactory grade in an English
course at the level of the course typically
known as Freshman Composition (ENGL 101)
or another approved English course at the
same level and with the same rigor. Satisfactory
completion of an English course at the level of
Freshman Composition shall satisfy both this
competency requirement and the coursework
requirement.
b. Mathematics: Proficiency in mathematics
may be satisfied by one of the following:
•
Completion of two years of high school
algebra AND placement at the level of college
algebra or higher on the Math Assessment
Test;
or
• Completion of any mathematics class listed in
the mathematics section of the General
Education Requirements with a grade of C
or better.
Effective for all students admitted to a community
college for the fall 2009 term or any term
thereafter:
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65
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Competence in mathematics shall be demonstrated
by obtaining a satisfactory grade in a mathematics
course at the level of the course typically known as
intermediate algebra (MATH 150). Intermediate
algebra or another approved mathematics approved
course at the same level, with the same rigor and
with elementary algebra as a prerequisite, is
acceptable.
or
the student can complete an assessment deter
mined to be comparable to satisfactory completion
of the specified math course.
C. Reading: Proficiency in reading may be
satisfied by one of the following:
• A satisfactory score on the reading component
of the placement test at the English 101 level;
or
• A grade of C or better in Reading 099 or
English 099.
II. Associate in Arts for Transfer (AA-T) and
Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T)
Requirements for Associate in Arts for Transfer
and Associate in Science for Transfer degrees
differ from those previously listed as follows:
1. All 60 units must be CSU-transferable.
2. While the minimum grade point average
(GPA) is at least 2.0 in all CSU-transferable
course work for admission to the CSU system,
some majors may require a higher GPA.
Please consult with a counselor for more
information.
3. All courses in the major must be completed
with a grade of C or better or a P if the
course is taken on a ―pass-no pass‖ basis.
4. Completion of one of the following General
Education Requirements:
a. Option II: 39 units as stipulated by the
CSU general education certification
requirements, outlined on pages 134-137;
or
b. Option III: 34 units as stipulated by the
completion of the IGETC pattern, outlined on
pages 127-130.
Note that Option I available for A.A. and A.S.
degrees is not available for A.A.-T and A.S.-T
degrees.
5. No additional competency and local area
requirements.
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CITRUS COLLEGE
GENERAL EDUCATION PHILOSOPHY AND
REQUIREMENTS
The awarding of an associate degree is intended to
represent more than an accumulation of units. It
symbolizes a successful attempt on the part of Citrus
College to lead students through patterns of learning
experiences designed to develop certain capabilities
and insights, such as the ability to:
• Think and communicate clearly and effectively
through oral and written expression;
• Develop logical and convincing arguments, reaching
conclusions that are based on comprehensive inquiry;
• Adapt and apply technology to facilitate the
acquisition and effective use of information;
• Understand the modes of inquiry of the major
disciplines;
• Enhance the appreciation of the arts;
• Develop a lifestyle that will enhance physical and
mental health, and wellness;
• Appreciate the contributions of different cultures,
eras, and traditions to the human experience;
• Achieve insights gained through experience in
thinking about ethics, integrity, honesty, selfmanagement and the welfare of others;
• Develop the capacity for self-understanding; and
• Become informed citizens and problem solvers.
In addition to these accomplishments, the student
shall possess sufficient depth in some field of knowledge to contribute to lifetime interest.
Central to an associate degree, General Education is
designed to introduce students to the variety of
means through which people comprehend the modern world. It reflects the conviction of colleges that
those who receive their degrees must possess in common certain basic principles, concepts and methodologies both unique to and shared by the various disciplines. College educated persons must be able to
use this knowledge when evaluating and appreciating
the physical environment, the culture, and the society
in which they live. Most importantly, General Education should lead to better self-understanding.
A Citrus College student must complete 22 units of
general education courses distributed according to
the following pattern (a maximum of 6 units or two
classes from the major requirement may be applied to
the general education requirements).
A. Language and Rationality: (6 or 9 units
minimum)
Students satisfying the mathematics competency
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
requirement through the mathematics assessment are
required to complete two courses, six units minimum,
including one course from English composition and
one course from either mathematics or Communication and Analytical Thinking.
Students who do not satisfy the mathematics competency through the mathematics assessment are required to complete three courses, nine units minimum, including one course from English Composition,
one course from Communication and Analytical Thinking and one course from Mathematics (with a C grade
or better).
Courses in language and rationality develop the principles and applications of language toward logical
thought, clear and precise expression and critical
evaluation of communication in whatever symbol system the student uses.
A1. Language and Rationality - English
Composition
Units
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
3
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition Honors
3
ESL 101
Reading and Composition
3
A2. Language and Rationality - Communication
& Analytical Thinking
CIS 130
Microcomputer Applications I
4
ENGL 103 Composition and Critical Thinking 3
ENGL 103H Composition and Critical
Thinking - Honors
3
ENGL 104 Advanced Rhetoric: The Classical
Essay
3
OFF 101
Introduction to Microsoft Office
Applications
3
OFF 285
Administrative Office Procedures 3
PHIL 110
Philosophy/Logic
3
SPCH 100 Interpersonal Communication
3
SPCH 101 Public Address
3
SPCH 101H Public Address – Honors
3
SPCH 103 Argumentation and Debate
3
SPCH 106 Small Group Communication
3
A3. Language and Rationality: Mathematics
MATH 148 Intermediate Algebra I
2.5
and
MATH 149 Intermediate Algebra II
2.5
MATH 150 Intermediate Algebra
5
MATH 151 Plane Trigonometry
4
MATH 160 Survey of Mathematics
4
MATH 162 Introductory Mathematical
Analysis
4
CITRUS COLLEGE
MATH 165
MATH 168
MATH 169
MATH 170
MATH 175
MATH 190
MATH 191
MATH 210
MATH 211
PSY 103
Introductory Statistics
Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers I
Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II
College Algebra
Pre-Calculus
Calculus with Analytic
Geometry I
Calculus with Analytic
Geometry II
Calculus with Analytic
Geometry III
Differential Equations
Statistics for the Social and
Behavioral Sciences
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
3
B. Natural Sciences: (4 units minimum)
One or two courses, four units minimum, including
one laboratory course or one course from biological
science and one course from physical science (lab
courses in bold). Courses in the natural sciences
examine the physical universe, its life forms, and its
natural phenomena. They assist in developing an appreciation and understanding of the scientific method
and encourage an understanding of the relationships
between science and other human activities.
This category includes introductory or integrative
courses in astronomy, biology, chemistry, general
physical science, geology, physics, physical geography, physical anthropology, and other scientific disciplines.
B1. Natural Sciences - Life Sciences
ANTH 212 Introduction to Physical
Anthropology
ANTH 212L Introduction to Physical
Anthropology Lab
BIOL 102
Human Genetics
BIOL 104
Biology: Contemporary Topics
BIOL 105 General Biology
BIOL 109 Biology for Educators
BIOL 116
HIV and AIDS: Insights and
Implications
BIOL 124 Principles of Biology I
BIOL 125 Principles of Biology II
BIOL 145
Environmental Science
BIOL 200 Human Anatomy
BIOL 201 Human Physiology
BIOL 220 Microbiology
PSY 102
Psychobiology
Units
www.citruscollege.edu
3
1
3
3
4
4
3
5
5
3
4
4
5
3
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
B2 Natural Sciences - Physical Sciences
ASTR 115 Planetary Astronomy
ASTR 115H Planetary Astronomy - Honors
ASTR 116 Stellar Astronomy
ASTR 117 Life In The Universe
CHEM 103 College Chemistry
CHEM 104 College Chemistry
CHEM 106 Physical Science for
Educators
CHEM 110 Beginning General Chemistry
CHEM 111 General Chemistry
CHEM 112 General Chemistry
ESCI 106 Earth and Space Science for
Educators
ESCI 119
Physical Geology without
laboratory
ESCI 120 Physical Geology
ESCI 121 Historical Geology
ESCI 122
Geology: Earth History
ESCI 124
Environmental Geology
ESCI 130
Physical Oceanography
GEOG 118 Physical Geography
PHYS 106 Physical Science for
Educators
PHYS 110 Introduction to College
Physics
PHYS 111 Physics for Life Sciences I
PHYS 112 Physics for Life Sciences II
PHYS 201 Physics A: Mechanics
PHYS 202 Physics B: Thermodynamics
and Electromagnetism
PHYS 203 Physics C: Waves, Optics &
Modern Physics
ART 101
3
3
4
3
5
5
4
5
5
5
4
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
C. Arts and Humanities: (6 units minimum)
Two courses, six units minimum, including one course
from arts and one course from humanities.
Courses in the arts and humanities study the cultural
activities and artistic expressions of human beings.
They assist in developing an awareness of the ways in
which people throughout the ages and in different
cultures have responded to themselves and the world
around them in artistic and cultural creation, and in
developing aesthetic understanding and an ability to
make value judgments. This category includes introductory or integrative courses in the arts, foreign languages, literature, philosophy and religion.
C1. Arts
ARCH 250
ART 100
68
History of Architecture: Prehistory
to Mannerism
3
Art History and Appreciation
Fundamentals
3
CITRUS COLLEGE
Art History and Appreciation—
Ancient
ART 102
Art History and Appreciation—
Medieval
ART 103
Art History and Appreciation—
Renaissance to Rococo
ART 104
Art History and Appreciation—
19th Century Art
ART 105
Art History and Appreciation—
Early 20th Century Art
ART 199
Motion Picture Appreciation
ART 206
History of Latin American Art
ART 207
History of Asian Art China, Korea,
and Japan
COMM 100 Mass Media and Society
COMM 136 Cultural History of American Films
DANC 102 History of Dance
MUSE 109 Music Appreciation
MUSE 110 History of Music I
MUSE 111 History of Music II
MUSE 112 History of Jazz
MUSE 113 History of Rock and Roll
MUSE 114 Introduction to American Music
THEA 101 Introduction to Theatre Arts
THEA 200 The Art of the Theatre
THEA 250 Theatre Appreciation
C2. Humanities
ARCH 251 History of Architecture: Baroque
to the Present Day
ART 200
History of Motion Pictures
ART 201
History of Motion Pictures II
COMM 200 Visual Communications
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literature
ENGL 213 Horror Literature
ENGL 213H Horror Literature – Honors
ENGL 216 American Latino Literature
ENGL 251 Introduction to English
Literature I
ENGL 252 Introduction to English
Literature II
ENGL 261 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
ENGL 262 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient—Early Modern
ENGL 272 Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth Century
ENGL 291 Film as Literature
ENGL 291H Film as Literature—Honors
ENGL 293 Children's Literature
ENGL 293H Children's Literature—Honors
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
ENGL 271
3
3
3
3
3
3
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ENGL 294
ENGL 296
ENGL 298
GER 101
GER 102
GER 201
GER 202
HUM 101
Introduction to Shakespeare
Introduction to Folklore
Literature of the Bible
German I
German II
German III
German IV
Humanities Prehistory through
the Medieval Period
HUM 101H Humanities Prehistory through
the Medieval Period—Honors
HUM 102
Humanities from the Renaissance
through the 19th Century
HUM 110
Humanities in the 20th Century
JPN 101
Japanese I
JPN 102
Japanese II
PHIL 101
Great Religions of the World
PHIL 106
Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 106H Introduction to Philosophy—
Honors
PHIL 108
Philosophy/Ethics
SPAN 101 Spanish I
SPAN 102 Spanish II
SPAN 201 Spanish III
SPAN 202 Spanish IV
SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish for Speakers
of Spanish
SPAN 211 Reading and Composition for
Speakers of Spanish II
3
3
3
5
5
5
5
ECON 102
ETHN 101
ETHN 116
GEOG 102
HIST 103
3
HIST 104
3
HIST 105
3
3
5
5
3
3
HIST 107
3
3
5
5
5
5
5
5
D. Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 units
minimum)
Two courses, six units minimum, including one course
from history and political science and one course from
behavioral science.
Courses in the social and behavioral sciences focus on
people as members of society. They assist in developing an awareness of the methods of inquiry used by
the social and behavioral sciences. Critical thinking is
stimulated about the ways people act and have acted
in response to their societies, and appreciation is developed of how societies and social groups operate.
This category includes introductory or integrative survey courses in cultural anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, sociology, cultural
geography, and related disciplines.
D1. History and Political Science
ECON 100 Survey of Economics
ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 101H Principles of Macroeconomics –
Honors
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
HIST 103H
HIST 107H
HIST 108
HIST 108H
HIST 109
HIST 110
HIST 111
HIST 112
HIST 120
HIST 127
HIST 130
HIST 140
HIST 145
HIST 155
HIST 222
POLI 103
POLI 103H
POLI 104
POLI 105
POLI 116
SPAN 127
SPAN 130
Principles of Microeconomics
3
Introduction to Ethnic Studies
3
Introduction to Chicano Studies
3
Cultural Geography
3
History of World Civilization up
to 1500
3
History of World Civilization up
to 1500 - Honors
3
History of World Civilization since
1500
3
History of World Civilization—The
20th Century
3
History of the United States before
1877
3
History of the United States before
1877 —Honors
3
History of the United States from
1877
3
History of the United States from
1877 – Honors
3
The World in Conflict The 20th
Century, a History
3
A Survey History of Africa
3
History of the African-Americans to
1876
3
History of the African-Americans
since 1876
3
British Civilization
3
Spanish Civilization
3
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3
History of the American West
3
History of Mexico
3
History of the Vietnam War
3
History of World War II
3
American Government and Politics 3
American Government and
Politics – Honors
3
Introduction to Political Science
3
Comparative Politics
3
International Relations
3
Spanish Civilization
3
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3
D2. Behavioral Science
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
3
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology – Honors
3
ANTH 216 Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective
3
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective – Honors
3
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69
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
CHLD 111
CHLD 120
CHLD 121
CHLD 130
CHLD 134
PSY 101
PSY 101H
PSY
PSY
PSY
PSY
110
205
206
213
PSY 220
PSY 226
SOC 114
SOC 118
SOC 201
SOC 201H
SOC 216
Child Development Youth
Adolescence
Literacy for Children
Art for Children
Infant Development and Group
Care
Parent-Child Interaction
Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to Psychology—
Honors
Psychology of Religion I
Developmental Psychology
Child Growth and Development
Survey of Drug and Alcohol Use
and Abuse
Introduction to Social Psychology
Psychology of Women
Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relations
Minorities in America
Introduction to Sociology
Introduction to Sociology–
Honors
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
DANC 281
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
KINESIOLOGY/DANCE REQUIREMENTS
(3 units minimum)
No varsity sports courses may be used.
All students must complete one of the following:
Three units of any KIN activity or DANC
activity courses as listed below:
A1. Dance Activity
DANC 159 Beginning Tap
DANC 160 Jazz Dance Techniques
DANC 161 Beginning Modern Dance
DANC 162 Beginning Ballet
DANC 259 Intermediate Tap I
DANC 260 Intermediate Jazz Dance I
DANC 261 Intermediate Modern Dance I
DANC 262 Intermediate Ballet I
DANC 263 Dance for Musical Theatre
DANC 264 Beginning Popular Dance
Techniques
DANC 265 Musical Staging: Rehearsal and
Performance
DANC 266 Pop Dance: Rehearsal and
Performance- Beginning
DANC 269 Intermediate Tap II
DANC 270 Intermediate Jazz Dance II
DANC 271 Intermediate Modern Dance II
DANC 272 Intermediate Ballet II
DANC 279 Advanced Tap I
70
CITRUS COLLEGE
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
Advanced Jazz Dance I
1
A2. Fitness/Health Science
KIN 170
Fitness for Life
KIN 171
Health Science
KIN 171H Health Science – Honors
KIN 173
Nutrition for Fitness
A3. Kinesiology Activity
KIN 101
Badminton
KIN 102
Bowling
KIN 103
Golf
KIN 104
Self-Defense and Personal Safety
KIN 106
Racquetball
KIN 108
Tennis
KIN 116
Yoga
KIN 130
Basketball
KIN 134
Softball
KIN 135
Volleyball
KIN 142
Swimming Beginning
KIN 143
Swimming Intermediate/
Advanced
KIN 145
Strength Training, Balance and
Agility
KIN 147
Swimming for Cardiovascular
Improvement
KIN 148
Adapted Aquatic Exercises
KIN 150
Adapted Physical Education
KIN 151
Body Conditioning
KIN 152
Weight Training
KIN 153
Walking/Jogging
KIN 154
Advanced Weight Training
KIN 159
Cardiovascular Training
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
Application for Graduation
Graduating students must file a formal application for
graduation with the Counseling and Advisement Department. Students may graduate at the end of the
fall, winter, spring or summer semesters or sessions,
although only one Commencement ceremony is held
in the spring.
A summer graduate may request to participate in the
preceding spring graduation if they file the application
for graduation by that spring graduation deadline,
meet all graduation requirements for summer graduation, and are enrolled in one or two classes for a total
of nine or fewer units in summer.
A student who receives an associate degree may subsequently or simultaneously work on additional degrees. They must complete 18 additional units for
each major.
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
All earned graduation requirements must come from
a single catalog. A degree and/or certificate will not
be released until the student has paid all of his or her
outstanding debts to the college.
All transcripts of prior college work must be on file in
the Admissions and Records Office before the application can be completed; refer to the current class
schedule for application deadlines.
Multiple Majors
Within the graduation requirements for the associate
degree at Citrus College, it is possible for a student to
complete the requirements for more than one major
providing that minimum requirements are met for
each major and that a minimum of 18 units applies
exclusively to each major.
Online Degrees
Associate degrees can be earned online through Distance Education. Visit www.citruscollege.edu/de and
consult a counselor for details.
Associate Degrees for
Transfer
Citrus College offers Associate in Arts for Transfer
(AA-T) and Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T)
degrees. The Student Transfer Achievement Reform
Act (Senate Bill 1440, now codified in California Education Code sections 66746-66749) guarantees admission to the California State University (CSU) system for any community college student who completes an AA-T or AS-T degree. Please refer to pages
63 and 66 for more information.
Additional information can also be obtained by visiting
http://calstate.edu/transfer
Planning For Transfer
In general, courses listed as preparation for a major
may also be applicable as general education requirements. Students should refer to the catalog of the
institution offering their intended major to determine
lower-division major requirements, as well as those
that are recommended or required in preparation for
the major.
In addition, the ASSIST website at www.assist.org, is
the official California statewide database listing a selection of campus-approved articulation/transfer
agreements, general education requirements, and
information on UC and CSU transferable courses.
Students are also advised to contact a Citrus College
counselor for more information and for details regard-
CITRUS COLLEGE
ing other transfer agreements and options not available on ASSIST.
California State University
The California State University (CSU) is the nation's
largest university system, with 23 campuses located
across the state, from Humboldt in the north to San
Diego in the south.
While part of the CSU system, each campus has a
unique identity. CSU campuses have distinct student
populations and programs. Many of their programs
are offered in the late afternoon and evenings for
students who work during the day.
The 23 CSU campuses are:
Bakersfield
Channel Islands
Chico
Dominguez Hills
East Bay
Fresno
Fullerton
Humboldt
Los Angeles
Long Beach
Maritime Academy
Monterey Bay
Northridge
Pomona
Sacramento
San Bernardino
San Diego
San Francisco
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
San Marcos
Sonoma
Stanislaus
Undergraduate Transfers
The CSU generally considers an undergraduate
transfer student as one who has enrolled in a
community college or university other than a CSU
following high school graduation. Students with fewer
than 60 or more transferable semester units are
considered lower division transfers. Students with 60
transferable semester units are considered upper
division transfers.
Lower Division Transfers
Most campuses restrict the admission of lowerdivision transfer students who have earned fewer
than 60 transferable semester units. Some campuses
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71
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
may accept applications from lower-division students
who are applying to science, technology, engineering
or mathematics majors. Lower-division transfers are
eligible if they:
• Have a college grade point average of 2.0 or better
in all transferable college units attempted;
• Are in good standing at the last college or university
attended, i.e., eligible to re-enroll;
• Meet the eligibility index required of a first-time
freshman;
• Meet the college-preparatory course requirements
for a first-time freshman or have successfully
completed necessary courses to make up any
deficiencies in their high school records.
If lower-division transfer students cannot meet the
high school eligibility standards, they should continue
to complete courses at Citrus College or at another
accredited college or university. Students should consider applying when they are eligible for consideration
as upper-division transfers.
Upper-Division Transfers
Grades are obviously an important factor in admission
as an upper-division transfer. It is important to note
that there are different ways grades are used in the
admission process.
Students who have completed a minimum of 60
transferable units with a 2.0 or higher grade point
average in all transferable course work are eligible to
transfer. The 60 transferable units must include at
least 30 units of General Education and one course
each from A1, A2, A3, and B4 of the CSU General
Education Pattern.
Students are strongly encouraged to complete as
many lower division major preparatory requirements
as possible prior to transfer. Grade point average
requirements are higher for high-demand campuses
or majors. A maximum of 70 transferable semester
units in a community college may be applied to the
baccalaureate degree. High demand majors may require supplemental preparation that must be met
prior to transfer.
To make admission decisions, CSU admissions offices
look at three factors:
• College grades
• Completed college coursework, especially in general
education
• Whether the student is in good standing at the last
college or university attended
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CITRUS COLLEGE
Remember these are minimums, and in the case of
high-demand majors and campuses, a 2.0 GPA may
not be high enough to be admitted. High-demand
majors may require a higher GPA in specific core/
major prep courses, a higher cumulative GPA, or a
combination of both.
The key to a successful transfer is early planning to
ensure that students complete courses to meet the
admission, general education, and lower-division major preparation requirements.
Obviously, the better a student prepares at Citrus
College, the more likely admission requirements at
their first-choice CSU campus will be met.
The California State University General
Education - Breadth Requirements
Citrus College may certify that a student has satisfied
the minimum general education requirements of 39
lower division transfer units in accordance with CSU
Executive Order 1033. It is also possible to transfer to
a California State University campus upon completion
of the Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC). The number of units which may
be certified are as follows:
AREA A - COMMUNICATION IN THE ENGLISH
LANGUAGE AND CRITICAL THINKING
9 semester or 12 quarter units required with at
least one course each from A1, A2 and A3
A1 - Oral Communication
SPCH 100 Interpersonal Communication
SPCH 101 Public Address
SPCH 101H Public Address— Honors
SPCH 103 Argumentation and Debate
SPCH 106 Small Group Communication
A2 - Written Communication
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition
— Honors
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literature
ESL 101
Reading and Composition
A3 - Critical Thinking
ENGL 103 Composition and Critical Thinking
ENGL 103H Composition and Critical Thinking
—Honors
ENGL 104 Advanced Rhetoric: The Classical
Essay
PHIL 110
Philosophy/Logic
SPCH 103 Argumentation and Debate
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
AREA B - PHYSICAL UNIVERSE AND ITS LIFE
FORMS
9 semester or 12 quarter units required with at
least one course each from physical science,
life science (at least one to contain a laboratory
component) and mathematics/quantitative
reasoning
B1 - Physical Science (courses listed in bold
face type also meet the B3 Laboratory Activity
requirement)
ASTR 115 Planetary Astronomy
3
ASTR 115H Planetary Astronomy—Honors
3
ASTR 116 Stellar Astronomy
4
ASTR 117 Life In The Universe
3
CHEM 103 College Chemistry
5
CHEM 104 College Chemistry
5
CHEM 106 Physical Science for Educators 4
CHEM 110 Beginning General Chemistry 5
CHEM 111 General Chemistry
5
CHEM 112 General Chemistry
5
CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry
3
CHEM 220 Organic Chemistry
3
ESCI 106 Earth and Space Science for
Educators
4
ESCI 119
Physical Geology without
laboratory
3
ESCI 120 Physical Geology
4
ESCI 121 Historical Geology
4
ESCI 122
Geology: Earth History
3
ESCI 124
Environmental Geology
3
ESCI 130
Physical Oceanography
3
GEOG 118 Physical Geography
3
PHYS 106 Physical Science for
Educators
4
PHYS 110 Introduction to College
Physics
4
PHYS 111 Physics for Life Sciences I
4
PHYS 112 Physics for Life Sciences II
4
PHYS 201 Physics A: Mechanics
5
PHYS 202 Physics B: Thermodynamics
and Electromagnetism
5
B2 - Life Science
ANTH 212 Introduction to Physical
Anthropology
BIOL 102
Human Genetics
BIOL 104
Biology: Contemporary Topics
BIOL 105 General Biology
BIOL 109 Biology for Educators
BIOL 124 Principles of Biology I
BIOL 125 Principles of Biology II
BIOL 145
Environmental Science
BIOL 200 Human Anatomy
BIOL 201 Human Physiology
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
3
4
4
BIOL 220 Microbiology
B3 Laboratory Activity
ANTH 212L Introduction to Physical
Anthropology Lab
B4 - Mathematics/Quantitative Thinking
MATH 151 Plane Trigonometry
MATH 160 Survey of Mathematics
MATH 162 Introductory Mathematical
Analysis
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
MATH 168 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers I
MATH 169 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II
MATH 170 College Algebra
MATH 175 Pre-Calculus
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry I
MATH 191 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry II
MATH 210 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry III
MATH 211 Differential Equations
MATH 212 Introduction to Linear Algebra
PSY 103
Statistics for the Social and
Behavioral Sciences
5
1
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
4
3
AREA C - ARTS, LITERATURE, PHILOSOPHY
AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE
9 semester or 12 quarter units required with at
least one course each in arts and humanities
C1 - Arts, Dance, Music, Theater
ARCH 250 History of Architecture: Prehistory
to Mannerism
ARCH 251 History of Architecture: Baroque
to the Present Day
ART 100
Art History and AppreciationFundamentals
ART 101
Art History and AppreciationAncient
ART 102
Art History and AppreciationMedieval
ART 103
Art History and AppreciationRenaissance to Rococo
ART 104
ART 105
ART
ART
ART
ART
110
111
112
130
Art History and Appreciation19th Century Art
Art History and AppreciationEarly 20th Century Art
Introduction to the Visual Arts
Beginning Drawing
Intermediate Drawing
Beginning Painting
www.citruscollege.edu
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
73
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
140
199
200
201
206
207
Beginning Ceramics
Motion Picture Appreciation
History of Motion Pictures
History of Motion Pictures II
History of Latin American Art
History of Asian Art —China,
Korea, and Japan
COMM 136 Cultural History of American Films
DANC 102 History of Dance
MUSE 109 Music Appreciation
MUSE 110 History of Music I
MUSE 111 History of Music II
MUSE 112 History of Jazz
MUSE 113 History of Rock and Roll
MUSE 114 Introduction to American Music
THEA 101 Introduction to Theatre Arts
THEA 200 The Art of the Theatre
THEA 201 Stage Acting I—Beginning
THEA 202 Stage Acting II—Intermediate
C2 - Humanities
ARCH 250 History of Architecture: Prehistory
to Mannerism
ARCH 251 History of Architecture: Baroque
to the Present Day
CHIN 101 Chinese I
CHIN 102 Chinese II
COMM 200 Visual Communications
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literature
ENGL 120 Introduction to Women's
Literature
ENGL 213 Horror Literature
ENGL 213H Horror Literature Honors
ENGL 216 American Latino Literature
ENGL 251 Introduction to English
Literature I
ENGL 252 Introduction to English
Literature II
ENGL 261 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
ENGL 262 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
ENGL 271 Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient—Early Modern
ENGL 272 Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth Century
ENGL 291 Film as Literature
ENGL 291H Film as Literature—Honors
ENGL 293 Children's Literature
ENGL 293H Children's Literature—Honors
ENGL 294 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENGL 296 Introduction to Folklore
ENGL 298 Literature of the Bible
GER 101
German I
74
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
GER 102
GER 201
GER 202
HIST 103
German II
German III
German IV
History of World Civilization
up to 1500
HIST 103H History of World Civilization up to
1500 Honors
HIST 104
History of World Civilization since
1500
HIST 105
History of World Civilization The
20th Century
HIST 107
History of the United States
before 1877
HIST 107H History of the United States
before 1877 Honors
HIST 108
History of the United States
from 1877
HIST 108H History of the United States from
1877—Honors
HIST 109
The World in Conflict The 20th
Century, a History
HIST 110
A Survey History of Africa
HIST 111
History of the African-Americans
to 1876
HIST 112
History of the African-Americans
since 1876
HIST 127
Spanish Civilization
HIST 130
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
HIST 131
History of Latin America to 1825
HIST 132
History of Modern Latin America
HIST 139
History of California
HIST 140
History of the American West
HIST 145
History of Mexico
HIST 155
History of the Vietnam War
HIST 222
History of World War II
SPAN 127 Spanish Civilization
SPAN 130 Latin American Culture and
Civilization
5
5
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
D7 - Interdisciplinary Social and Behavioral
Science
CHLD 110 Early Childhood Development
3
CHLD 111 Child Development Youth
Adolescence
3
CHLD 114 Home-Child-Community Relations 3
COMM 100 Mass Media and Society
3
HIST 120
British Civilization
3
HIST 127
Spanish Civilization
3
HIST 130
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3
LING 101
Introduction to Language and
Linguistics
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
SOC 114
SPAN 130
Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relations
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3
3
AREA D - SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND
ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS AND
BEHAVIOR, HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
9 semester or 12 quarter units required with courses
in at least two disciplines
D0 - Sociology and Criminology
ANTH 216 Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective—Honors
SOC 118
Minorities in America
SOC 201
Introduction to Sociology
SOC 201H Introduction to Sociology—
Honors
SOC 202
Contemporary Social Problems
SOC 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
D1 - Anthropology and Archeology
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology—Honors
ANTH 212 Introduction to Physical
Anthropology
ANTH 216 Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective—Honors
ANTH 220 Introduction to Archaeology
D2 - Economics
ECON 100 Survey of Economics
ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 101H Principles of Macroeconomics—
Honors
ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics
D3 - Ethnic Studies
ETHN 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
ETHN 116 Introduction to Chicano Studies
HIST 111
History of the African-Americans
to 1876
HIST 112
SOC 118
History of the African-Americans
since 1876
Minorities in America
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
D4 - Gender Studies
ANTH 216 Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective— Honors
PSY 226
Psychology of Women
SOC 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
D5 - Geography
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
GEOG 102 Cultural Geography
D6 - History
HIST 103
History of World Civilization
up to 1500
HIST 103H History of World Civilization up to
1500—Honors
HIST 104
History of World Civilization
Since 1500
HIST 105
History of World Civilization The
20th Century
HIST 107
History of the United States
before 1877
HIST 107H History of the United States
before 1877—Honors
HIST 108
History of the United States
from 1877
HIST 108H History of the United States from
1877—Honors
HIST 109
The World in Conflict The 20th
Century, a History
HIST 110
A Survey History of Africa
HIST 111
History of the African-Americans
to 1876
HIST 112
History of the African-Americans
since 1876
HIST 127
Spanish Civilization
HIST 130
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
HIST 131
History of Latin America to 1825
HIST 132
History of Modern Latin America
HIST 139
History of California
HIST 140
History of the American West
HIST 145
History of Mexico
HIST 155
History of the Vietnam War
HIST 222
History of World War II
SPAN 127 Spanish Civilization
SPAN 130 Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
75
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
D7 - Interdisciplinary Social and Behavioral
Science
CHLD 111 Child Development Youth
Adolescence
3
CHLD 114 Home-Child-Community Relations 3
COMM 100 Mass Media and Society
3
HIST 120
British Civilization
3
HIST 127
Spanish Civilization
3
LING 101
Introduction to Language and
Linguistics
3
SOC 114
Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relations
3
D8 - Political Science, Government, and Legal
Institutions
AJ 101
Introduction to the Administration
of Justice
3
AJ 102
Concepts of Criminal Law
3
POLI 103
American Government and Politics 3
POLI 103H American Government and
Politics—Honors
3
POLI 104
Introduction to Political Science
3
POLI 105
Comparative Politics
3
POLI 116
International Relations
3
D9 - Psychology
CHLD 110 Early Childhood Development
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology
PSY 101H Introduction to Psychology—
Honors
PSY 110
Psychology of Religion I
PSY 203
Research Methods in Psychology
PSY 205
Developmental Psychology
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
PSY 212
Behavioral Disorders
PSY 220
Introduction to Social Psychology
PSY 225
Psychology of Human Sexuality
PSY 226
Psychology of Women
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
AREA E - LIFELONG UNDERSTANDING AND
SELF-DEVELOPMENT
3 semester units
E - Lifelong Understanding and Self
Development
BIOL 116
HIV and AIDS: Insights and
Implications
BUS 146
Personal Finance
COUN 145 Career/Life Planning
KIN 170
Fitness for Life
KIN 171
Health Science
KIN 171H Health Science—Honors
KIN 173
Nutrition for Fitness
76
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
PSY 206
PSY 213
PSY 225
SOC 114
Child Growth and Development
Survey of Drug and Alcohol Use
and Abuse
Psychology of Human Sexuality
Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relations
3
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
California State University Campuses
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
77
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
University of California
The University of California System (UC) consists of
10 campuses
Berkeley
Davis
Irvine
Los Angeles
Merced
Riverside
San Diego
San Francisco (Medical Center)
Santa Barbara
Santa Cruz
Each campus within the UC system has its own
unique geographic and academic character. The UC
offers bachelor‘s, master‘s, and doctoral degrees in a
variety of subject areas.
Articulation agreements between California Community Colleges and individual UC campuses can be
found on www.assist.org. Articulation agreements can
help identify courses to select for course transferability, major preparation and general education requirements.
Many UC campuses offer individual admission agreements that guarantee students space on campus or in
a particular major, provided they complete specific
academic requirements while at a community college.
The Citrus College Career/Transfer Center has Transfer Admission Guarantees (TAGs) with Davis, Irvine,
Merced, Riverside, San Diego, Santa Barbara and
Santa Cruz. Students are urged to secure UC admission by submitting a TAG during the TAG application
filing period, September 1 - 30. TAG criteria can be
found at www.universityofcalifornia.edu/admissions/
transfer/index.html
Transfer Eligibility Requirements
The UC considers a student a transfer applicant if
they are enrolled in a regular session at a college or
university after high school, not including summer
session. The student‘s college record cannot be disregarded; they cannot apply as a freshman. A maximum of 70 semester units of transferable credit will
be accepted for courses completed at a community
college.
The UC gives junior-level community college students
first priority over other transfer applicants, including
those from four-year institutions and UC's own intercampus transfer students.
78
CITRUS COLLEGE
Junior-Level Transfer
To be considered for UC admission as a junior, you
must fulfill both of the following:
1. Complete 60 semester (90 quarter) units of
transferable college credit with a GPA of at least
2.4 (2.8 if you're a nonresident). No more than
14 semester (21 quarter) units may be taken
Pass/No Pass.
2. Complete the following course pattern
requirements, earning a grade of C or better in
each course:
• Two transferable college courses (3 semester
or 4-5 quarter units each) in English
composition
• One transferable college course (3 semester
or 4-5 quarter units) in mathematical
concepts and quantitative reasoning
• Four transferable college courses (3 semester
or 4-5 quarter units each) chosen from at
least two of the following subject areas:
- arts and humanities
- social and behavioral sciences
- physical and biological sciences
Each course in this pattern must be worth at least
three semester units and you must earn a grade of C
or better in each course. For information about which
community college courses are UC transferable and
which are approved for UC Transfer Admissions Eligibility, visit www.assist.org.
Lower-Division Transfer
While all UC campuses welcome a large pool of
junior-level transfers, most admit only a limited
number of lower-division students:
• If you were eligible for admission to UC when
you graduated from high school — meaning you
satisfied the subject, examination and
scholarship requirements or were identified by
UC during your senior year as Eligible in the
Local Context (ELC) and completed the subject
and examination requirements in your senior
year — you are eligible for transfer if you have
a 2.0 GPA in your transferable college course
work (2.8 GPA for non-residents).
• If you met the scholarship requirement in high
school, but did not satisfy the 15-course subject
requirement, you must take transferable college
courses in the missing subjects, earn a C or
better in each required course and have an
overall 2.0 GPA in all transferable coursework to
be eligible to transfer (a 2.8 GPA is required for
nonresidents).
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Nonresident
The minimum admission requirements for nonresidents are very similar to those for residents. NonCalifornia residents must consult with the admissions
office at one of the UC campuses for details. In all
cases, however, nonresidents must have a grade
point average of 2.8 or higher in all transferable college coursework.
Intersegmental General Education
Transfer Curriculum (IGETC)
Completion of all the requirements in the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) will permit a student to transfer from a community college to a campus in either the University of
California (UC) or the California State University (CSU)
systems without the need to complete additional
lower-division general education courses. The IGETC
is not an admission requirement for transfer to UC or
CSU, nor is it the only way to fulfill prior to transfer
the lower-division, general education requirements of
UC or CSU. Students pursuing majors that require
extensive lower-division preparation may not find the
IGETC option to be advantageous. Students who have
taken Advanced Placement (AP) examinations may be
able to use them towards credit for IGETC.
IGETC Area 1: English Communication
CSU - 3 courses required, one each from Group
A, B and C
UC - 2 courses required, one each from Group A
and B
1A: English Composition
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
ENGL 101H Reading and CompositionHonors
1B: Critical Thinking-English Composition
ENGL 103 Composition and Critical Thinking
ENGL 103H Composition and Critical ThinkingHonors
ENGL 104 Advanced Rhetoric: The Classical
Essay
3
3
3
3
3
1C: Oral Communication (CSU requirement
only)
1 course, 3 semester units
SPCH 101 Public Address
3
SPCH 101H Public Address Honors
3
SPCH 103 Argumentation and Debate
3
CITRUS COLLEGE
IGETC Area 2: Mathematical Concepts and
Quantitative Reasoning
1 course, 3 semester units
2A: Mathematics
MATH 162 Introductory Mathematical
Analysis
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
MATH 170 College Algebra
MATH 175 Pre-Calculus
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I
MATH 191 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II
MATH 210 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II
MATH 211 Differential Equations
MATH 212 Introduction to Linear Algebra
PSY 103
Statistics for the Social and
Behavioral Sciences
IGETC Area 3: Arts and Humanities
At least 3 courses, with at least one
course from the arts and one course
from the humanities, 9 semester units
3A: Fine Arts
ARCH 250 History of Architecture:
Prehistory to Mannerism
ARCH 251 History of Architecture: Baroque
to the Present Day
ART 100
Art History and AppreciationFundamentals
ART 101
Art History and AppreciationAncient
ART 102
Art History and AppreciationMedieval
ART 103
Art History and AppreciationRenaissance to Rococo
ART 104
Art History and Appreciation19th Century Art
ART 105
Art History and AppreciationEarly 20th Century Art
ART 110
Introduction to the Visual Arts
ART 199
Motion Picture Appreciation
ART 200
History of Motion Pictures
ART 201
History of Motion Pictures II
ART 206
History of Latin American Art
ART 207
History of Asian Art - China,
Korea, and Japan
COMM 136 Cultural History of American
Films
DANC 102 History of Dance
MUSE 109 Music Appreciation
MUSE 110 History of Music I
MUSE 111 History of Music II
MUSE 112 History of Jazz
MUSE 113 History of Rock and Roll
MUSE 114 Introduction to American Music
www.citruscollege.edu
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
79
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
THEA 101
THEA 200
Introduction to Theatre Arts
The Art of the Theatre
3B: Humanities
ARCH 250 History of Architecture: Prehistory
to Mannerism
ARCH 251 History of Architecture: Baroque to
The Present Day
CHIN 102 Chinese II
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literature
ENGL 120 Introduction to Women's
Literature
ENGL 213 Horror Literature
ENGL 213H Horror Literature - Honors
ENGL 216 American Latino Literature
ENGL 251 Introduction to English Literature I
ENGL 252 Introduction to English Literature II
ENGL 261 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
ENGL 262 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
ENGL 271 Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient - Early Modern
ENGL 272 Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth Century
ENGL 291 Film as Literature
ENGL 291H Film as Literature - Honors
ENGL 293 Children's Literature
ENGL 293H Children's Literature - Honors
ENGL 294 Introduction to Shakespeare
ENGL 296 Introduction to Folklore
ENGL 298 Literature of the Bible
GER 102
German II
GER 201
German III
GER 202
German IV
HIST 103
History of World Civilization up to
1500
HIST 103H History of World Civilization up to
1500 - Honors
HIST 104
History of World Civilization since
1500
HIST 105
History of World CivilizationThe 20th Century
HIST 107
History of the United States before
1877
HIST 107H History of the United States before
1877 - Honors
HIST 108
History of the United States from
1877
HIST 108H History of the United States from
1877 - Honors
HIST 120
British Civilization
HIST 127
Spanish Civilization
HIST 130
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
80
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
3
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
HIST 140
HUM 101
History of the American West
Humanities - Prehistory through the
Medieval Period
HUM 101H Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period - Honors
HUM 102
Humanities from the Renaissance
through the 19th Century
HUM 110
Humanities in the 20th Century
JPN 102
Japanese II
PHIL 101
Great Religions of the World
PHIL 106
Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 106H Introduction to Philosophy Honors
PHIL 108
Philosophy/Ethics
SPAN 102 Spanish II
SPAN 127 Spanish Civilization
SPAN 130 Latin American Culture and
Civilization
SPAN 201 Spanish III
SPAN 202 Spanish IV
SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish for Speakers
of Spanish
SPAN 211 Reading and Composition for
Speakers of Spanish II
3
3
3
3
3
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
5
5
IGETC Area 4 - Social and Behavioral Sciences
At least 3 courses from at least 2 disciplines or
an interdisciplinary sequence, 9 semester units
4A: Anthropology and Archaeology
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology - Honors
ANTH 216 Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective - Honors
ANTH 220 Introduction to Archaeology
SOC 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
4B: Economics
ECON 100 Survey of Economics
ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 101H Principles of Macroeconomics Honors
ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics
4C: Ethnic Studies
ETHN 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
ETHN 116 Introduction to Chicano Studies
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
4D: Gender Studies
ANTH 216 Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective - Honors
SOC 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective
4E: Geography
GEOG 102 Cultural Geography
3
3
3
3
4F: History
HIST 103
History of World Civilization up to
1500
3
HIST 103H History of World Civilization up to
1500 - Honors
3
HIST 104
History of World Civilization since
1500
3
HIST 105
History of World Civilization - The
20th Century
3
HIST 107
History of the United States before
1877
3
HIST 107H History of the United States before
1877 - Honors
3
HIST 108
History of the United States from
1877
3
HIST 108H History of the United States from
1877 - Honors
3
HIST 109
The World in Conflict - The 20th
Century, a History
3
HIST 110
A Survey History of Africa
3
HIST 111
History of the African-Americans
to 1876
3
HIST 112
History of the African-Americans
since 1876
3
HIST 127
Spanish Civilization
3
HIST 130
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3
HIST 131
History of Latin America to
1825
3
HIST 132
History of Modern Latin
America
3
HIST 139
History of California
3
HIST 145
History of Mexico
3
HIST 155
History of the Vietnam War
3
HIST 222
History of World War II
3
SPAN 127 Spanish Civilization
3
SPAN 130 Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3
4G: Interdisciplinary, Social & Behavioral
Sciences
COMM 100 Mass Media and Society
HIST 120
British Civilization
SOC 114
Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relations
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
4H: Political Science, Government & Legal
Institutions
AJ 101
Introduction to the Administration
of Justice
AJ 102
Concepts of Criminal Law
POLI 103
American Government and Politics
POLI 103H American Government and PoliticsHonors
POLI 104
Introduction to Political Science
POLI 105
Comparative Politics
POLI 116
International Relations
4I: Psychology
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology
PSY 101H Introduction to PsychologyHonors
PSY 110
Psychology of Religion I
PSY 203
Research Methods in Psychology
PSY 205
Developmental Psychology
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
PSY 212
Behavioral Disorders
PSY 220
Introduction to Social Psychology
PSY 225
Psychology of Human Sexuality
PSY 226
Psychology of Women
4J: Sociology & Criminology
ANTH 216 Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective - Honors
SOC 118
Minorities in America
SOC 201
Introduction to Sociology
SOC 201H Introduction to Sociology - Honors
SOC 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
IGETC Area 5 - Physical and Biological Sciences
2 courses-one physical science course and one
biological science course; at least one course
must include a laboratory, 7-9 semester units
Courses in bold are lab courses.
5A: Physical Science
ASTR 115 Planetary Astronomy
ASTR 115H Planetary Astronomy - Honors
ASTR 116 Stellar Astronomy
ASTR 117 Life In The Universe
CHEM 103 College Chemistry
CHEM 104 College Chemistry
CHEM 110 Beginning General Chemistry
CHEM 111 General Chemistry
CHEM 112 General Chemistry
CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry
CHEM 220 Organic Chemistry
3
3
4
3
5
5
5
5
5
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
81
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ESCI 119
ESCI 120
ESCI 121
ESCI 122
ESCI 130
GEOG 118
PHYS 110
PHYS 111
PHYS 112
PHYS 201
PHYS 202
PHYS 203
Physical Geology without
laboratory
Physical Geology
Historical Geology
Geology: Earth History
Physical Oceanography
Physical Geography
Introduction to College
Physics
Physics for Life Sciences I
Physics for Life Sciences II
Physics A: Mechanics
Physics B: Thermodynamics
And Electromagnetism
Physics C: Waves, Optics &
Modern Physics
5B: Biological Science
ANTH 212 Introduction to Physical
Anthropology
ANTH 212L Introduction to Physical
Anthropology Lab
BIOL 102
Human Genetics
BIOL 104
Biology: Contemporary Topics
BIOL 105 General Biology
BIOL 124 Principles of Biology I
BIOL 125 Principles of Biology II
BIOL 145
Environmental Science
BIOL 200 Human Anatomy
BIOL 201 Human Physiology
BIOL 220 Microbiology
PSY 102
Psychobiology
82
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
4
4
3
3
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
3
1
3
3
4
5
5
3
4
4
5
3
IGETC Area 6 - Language other than English
(UC Requirement Only)
Proficiency equivalent to two years of high
school study in the same language.
6A: Languages other than English (UC Requirement Only)
CHIN 101 Chinese I
5
CHIN 102 Chinese II
5
GER 101
German I
5
GER 102
German II
5
GER 201
German III
5
GER 202
German IV
5
JPN 101
Japanese I
5
JPN 102
Japanese II
5
SPAN 101 Spanish I
5
SPAN 102 Spanish II
5
SPAN 201 Spanish III
5
SPAN 202 Spanish IV
5
SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish for
Speakers of Spanish
5
Courses listed in multiple areas shall not be certified
in more than one area except for courses in
languages other than English, which can be certified
in both areas 3B and 6A.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
University of California Campuses
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
83
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Associate Degrees
Associate Degrees for Transfer
(AA-T and AS-T)
Administration of Justice
A.S. Transfer Degree
Administration of Justice examines the causes of
crime and the structure, procedures, and decisionmaking processes of agencies that deal with crime
management. The program leading to the Associate
in Science in Administration of Justice for Transfer is
designed to provide a theoretical background of the
criminal justice system in America (police, courts, and
corrections) and familiarize students with academic,
career and volunteer opportunities in the field.
Students who complete this degree will be guaranteed admission with junior status to the California
State University system, and will be given priority admission to our local CSU campus. Students receiving
this transfer degree must meet the following requirements:
(1) Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter
units that are eligible for transfer to the California
State University, including both of the following:
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) A minimum of 18 semester units in a major or
area of emphasis, as determined by the community
college district.
(2) Obtainment of a minimum grade point average of
2.0.
Required core courses
AJ 101
Introduction to the
Administration of Justice
AJ 102
Concepts of Criminal Law
Units
3
3
Select two (2) of the following courses
AJ 103
Legal Aspects of Evidence
AJ 105
Criminal Investigation
AJ 108
Juvenile Procedures
AJ 109
Criminal Procedures
AJ 112
Community Relations
3
3
3
3
3
Select two (2) of the following courses
AJ 103
Legal Aspects of Evidence
3
84
CITRUS COLLEGE
AJ
AJ
AJ
AJ
AJ
AJ
AJ
AJ
AJ
105
106
107
108
109
111
112
121
130
Criminal Investigation
3
Patrol Procedures
3
Traffic Control
3
Juvenile Procedures
3
Criminal Procedures
3
Narcotics and Vice Control
3
Community Relations
3
Death Investigation
3
Introduction to Probation and
Parole
3
AJ 131
Introduction to Corrections
3
AJ 135
Control and Supervision in
Corrections
3
AJ 136
Correctional Interviewing and
Counseling
3
AJ 137
Legal Aspects of Corrections
3
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
4
PHIL 110
Philosophy/Logic
3
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology
3
SOC201
Introduction to Sociology
3
Total Units 18 - 19
A.S.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Administration of Justice
A.S.-Transfer Degree will:
1. Demonstrate a comprehension and appreciation
of the connections, contributions, experiences,
and potential conflicts of various ethnicities, races,
and genders as they interact with the criminal
justice components.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the administration of justice system and how the student as an
individual understands career opportunities in the
field as well as individual/community rights and
responsibilities.
3. Demonstrate an awareness of crime causation,
roles of the components of the administration of
justice system, and social and economic impact of
crime on society.
Business Administration
A.S. Transfer Degree
Business is the study of the practices and products of
commerce.
The Associate in Science in Business Administration
for Transfer (AS-T) provides lower division preparation for students planning to transfer into business or
business administration programs. Students will take
courses in business as well as related fields required
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
for business majors. This degree can lead students
into several areas of concentration at four-year universities, including the following: business management, business law, marketing, finance, business ethics, and business communications.
Students who complete this degree will be guaranteed admission with junior status to the California
State University system, although not a particular
campus or major, and will be given priority admission
to our local CSU campus.
A.S.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Business Administration A.S.Transfer Degree will:
1. Effectively communicate within business organizations.
2. Critically analyze business issues.
3. Understand the functions of business management
and their impact on organizational performance.
4. Understand the environments that impact on
organizational growth.
This degree requires completion of 60 semester units
that are eligible for transfer to the California State
University, including both of the following:
Communication Studies
A.A. Transfer Degree
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) The major preparation courses outlined below.
Students must obtain a minimum grade point average
of 2.0 and a C or better in all courses required for the
major.
Required Core Courses
ACCT 101 Financial Accounting
ACCT 102 Managerial Accounting
Units
4
4
ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics
or
ECON101H Principles of MacroeconomicsHonors
3
ECON102
BUS160
3
Principles of Microeconomics
Business Law and the Legal
Environment I
Select one (1) of the following
courses:
MATH 162 Introductory Mathematical
Analysis
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
Select two (2) of the following
courses:
The course from List A not already chosen
CSIS 130
Microcomputer Applications I
BUS 130
Introduction to Business
BUS 152
Business Communications
Total Units 27 -
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3
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
29
The Associate in Arts in Communication Studies for
Transfer degree focuses on the areas of public communication, small group communication, oral interpretation, and interpersonal communication. It is designed to increase skills in verbal communication and
public speaking, analysis and listening, interpersonal
relationships, teamwork and leadership, motivation
and initiative, and dealing with diversity.
The Associate in Arts in Communication Studies for
Transfer degree provides lower division preparation
for students planning to transfer into Speech Communication and Communication Studies programs. Students should take courses in both Speech Communication and Media Arts. Students who complete this
degree will be guaranteed admission with junior
status to the California State University system, and
will be given priority admission to our local CSU campus.
This degree requires completion of 60 semester units
that are eligible for transfer to the California State
University, including both of the following:
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) The major preparation courses outlined below.
Students must obtain a minimum grade point average
of 2.0 and a C or better in all courses required for the
major.
Students are not required to meet additional competency requirements beyond those listed above.
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85
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Required Core Courses
SPCH 101 Public Address
or
SPCH 101H Public Address - Honors
Units
3
3
Select two (2) of the following
SPCH 100 Interpersonal Communication
SPCH 103 Argumentation and Debate
SPCH 106 Small Group Communication
3
3
3
Select two (2) of the following
COMM 100 Mass Media and Society
COMM 101 Reporting and Writing News
COMM 104 Public Relations
PHTO 101 Basic Photography
3
3
3
3
Select one (1) of the following
COMM 101 Reporting and Writing News
3
COMM 104 Public Relations
3
COMM 136 Cultural History of American Films 3
COMM 200 Visual Communications
3
COMM 230 Desktop Publishing
3
COMM 240 Newspaper Production Staff
3
ENGL 104 Advanced Rhetoric: The Classical
Essay
3
Total Units 18
A.A.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Communication Studies A.A.Transfer Degree will:
1. Interpret and critically assess a variety of media
messages, including those that reflect multicultural
perspectives in order to make connections,
critically compare and contrast ideas, and produce
written, oral, and visual messages.
2. Research, organize, compose, and deliver public
presentations on socially significant and
intellectually challenging topics in order to
demonstrate college-level public speaking skills
and critical thinking.
3. Effectively listen to and critically evaluate others'
messages in order to appreciate audience needs.
Early Childhood Education
A.S. Transfer Degree
Early Childhood Education focuses on the teaching
and care of young children by providing the theoretical background of child development and developmentally appropriate practices of education of young
children. Students who complete this degree may
enter with junior status to the California State Univer-
86
CITRUS COLLEGE
sity system, and will be given priority admission to
our local CSU campus.
Students receiving this transfer degree must meet
the following requirements:
Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter units
that are eligible for transfer to the California State
University, including both of the following:
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) A minimum of 24 semester units in the major
as determined by the community college district.
(Minimum 2.0 GPA for major courses)
Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
Required Major Courses
Units
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
3
CHLD 112 Principles of Early Childhood
Education I
3
CHLD 114 Home-Child-Community Relations 3
CHLD 116 Introduction to Curriculum
3
CHLD 144 Health, Safety and Nutrition for
Young Children
3
CHLD 150 Multi-Culture Anti-Bias Classrooms 3
CHLD 154 Observing and Recording Behavior 3
Required practicum (fieldwork)
courses
CHLD 156 Practicum in Early Childhood
Education
2
and
CHLD 156L Practicum Lab
1
Total Units 24
A.S.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Early Childhood Education
A.S.-Transfer Degree will:
1. Demonstrate the ability to identify, analyze, and
apply theories of early childhood education and
child development.
2. Demonstrate global consciousness as they work
with diverse cultures, families, and individuals
and teach children.
3. Acquire knowledge and foundational teaching
skills necessary to work in the teaching profession.
4. Apply effective guidance and teaching strategies
that support social growth, learning, identity
development and promote self-confidence.
5. Design, implement and evaluate environments
and activities that support positive relationships,
social skills and learning outcomes for children.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
6. Apply ethical standards and professional
behaviors that demonstrate an understanding
knowledge, and a deepening commitment to the
child development profession and early childhood
education.
Elementary Education
A.A. Transfer Degree
The Associate in Arts in Elementary Education for
Transfer degree offers students a breadth of study
across disciplines. In this major students learn to
think critically, communicate clearly and prepare for
transfer into a liberal studies program at a four-year
university. The liberal studies is the most common
"approved major" for teacher preparation and best
prepares students to take the CBEST and CSET
exams.
To qualify for this degree students must complete the
following requirements:
1)Completion of 60 semester units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including
both of the following:
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) All units in the major with a minimum 2.0 GPA for
major courses
2) Obtainment of a minimum grade point average of
2.0.
Students planning to transfer to a four-year college or
university should complete courses (and elective
courses) specific to the transfer institution of choice.
University requirements vary from institution to institution and are subject to change. Therefore, it is important to verify transfer major preparation and general education though consultation with the Center for
Teacher Excellence or the Career and Transfer
Center.
Required Core Courses
Units
CHLD 100 Introduction to Education and
Teaching Grades K-12
3
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literature
3
GEOG 102 Cultural Geography
3
MATH 168 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers I
4
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
3
CITRUS COLLEGE
ESCI 106
Earth and Space Science for
Educators
or
ESCI 120
Physical Geology
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
or
ENGL 101H Reading and CompositionHonors
SPCH 101
4
4
3
3
Public Address
or
SPCH 101H Public Address– Honors
3
BIOL 105
4
BIOL 109
General Biology
or
Biology for Educators
History of World Civilization
up to 1500
or
HIST 103H History of World Civilization up to
1500-Honors
3
4
HIST 103
3
3
POLI 103
American Government and Politics 3
or
POLI 103H American Government and PoliticsHonors
3
HIST 107
History of the United States before
1877
3
or
HIST 107H History of the United States before
1877-Honors
3
Physical Science Courses
Select either CHEM 106 or PHYS 106 or the
combination of CHEM 110 and PHYS 110.
CHEM 106
PHYS 106
PHYS 110
CHEM 110
Physical Science for Educators
or
Physical Science for Educators
or
4
Introduction to College Physics
and
Beginning General Chemistry
4
Select one (1) course from the
following:
ENGL 103 Composition and Critical Thinking
ENGL 103H Composition and Critical
Thinking-Honors
ENGL 104 Advanced Rhetoric: The Classical
Essay
www.citruscollege.edu
4
5
3
3
3
87
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Select one (1) course from the following:
ART 100
Art History and AppreciationFundamentals
3
MUSE 109 Music Appreciation
3
THEA 101 Introduction to Theatre Arts
3
Select any course(s) not selected above or one
(1) course from the following:
CHIN 102 Chinese II
5
ENGL 261 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
3
ENGL 262 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
3
ENGL 271 Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient - Early Modern
3
ENGL 272 Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth Century 3
ENGL 293 Children's Literature
3
GER 102
German II
5
GER 201
German III
5
GER 202
German IV
5
HIST 104 History of World Civilization since
1500
3
HUM 101
Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period
3
HUM 101H Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period- Honors
3
HUM 102
Humanities from the Renaissance
through the 19th Century
3
JPN 102
Japanese II
5
KIN 176
Elementary School Physical
Education
3
MUSE 100 Music Fundamentals
3
PHIL 101
Great Religions of the World
3
PHIL 106
Introduction to Philosophy
3
PHIL 106H Introduction to PhilosophyHonors
3
PHIL 108
Philosophy/Ethics
3
SPAN 102 Spanish II
5
SPAN 201 Spanish III
5
SPAN 202 Spanish IV
5
SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish for
Speakers of Spanish
5
SPAN 211 Reading and Composition for
Speakers of Spanish II
5
Total Units 52 - 59
A.A.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Elementary Education
A.A.-Transfer Degree will:
1. Demonstrate the acquisition of intellectual and
practical skills including critical thinking, inquiry,
and analysis.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of integrated studies
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CITRUS COLLEGE
found in the disciplines in the College of Arts and
Sciences.
3. Increased awareness of personal and social
responsibility needed for working with diverse
peoples by fostering an ethic of social engagement
and citizenship.
4. Demonstrate skills needed for teamwork, creativity,
problem-solving, collaborative decision-making,
and an appreciation of learning.
English
A.A. Transfer Degree
The Associate in Arts Degree in English for Transfer
(AA-T) is for students who intend to complete a
bachelor's degree in English at a CSU. Core course
work explores primarily British and American writers
through an array of literary traditions, providing
opportunities for students to express their understanding and appreciation of the literary world
through analysis, research and composition.
This degree provides lower division preparation for
students planning to transfer into English programs.
Students will take courses in English as well as related
fields required for English majors. Students who complete this degree will be guaranteed admission
with junior status to the California State University,
though not a particular campus or major, and will be
given priority admission to our local CSU campus.
Students receiving this transfer degree must meet the
following requirements:
(1) Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter
units that are eligible for transfer to California State
University, including both of the following:
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) A minimum of 18 semester units in a major or
area of emphasis, as determined by the community
college district.
(2)Obtainment of a minimum grade point average of
2.0.
Required Core Courses
ENGL102
Introduction to Literature
ENGL 104 Advanced Rhetoric: The
Classical Essay
Select three (3) of the following:
ENGL 251 Introduction to English
Literature I
Units
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ENGL 252
ENGL 261
ENGL 262
ENGL 271
ENGL 272
Introduction to English
Literature II
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient - Early Modern
Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth Century
3
3
3
3
5.
3
Select one (1) course not used above or
one (1) of the following:
CHIN 102 Chinese II
5
COMM 101 Reporting and Writing News
3
ENGL 103 Composition and Critical Thinking 3
ENGL 103H Composition and Critical
Thinking-Honors
3
ENGL 213 Horror Literature
3
ENGL 213H Horror Literature - Honors
3
ENGL 291 Film as Literature
3
ENGL 291H Film as Literature - Honors
3
ENGL 293 Children's Literature
3
ENGL 293H Children's Literature - Honors
3
ENGL 294 Introduction to Shakespeare
3
ENGL 296 Introduction to Folklore
3
ENGL 298 Literature of the Bible
3
GER 101
German I
5
GER 102
German II
5
GER 201
German III
5
GER 202
German IV
5
JPN 101
Japanese I
5
JPN 102
Japanese II
5
SPAN 101 Spanish I
5
SPAN 102 Spanish II
5
SPAN 201 Spanish III
5
SPAN 202 Spanish IV
5
SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish for Speakers
of Spanish
5
SPAN 211 Reading and Composition for
Speakers of Spanish II
5
Total Units 18 - 20
A.A.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the English A.A.-Transfer Degree
will:
1. Critically analyze and evaluate the subtext of
literature texts in order to demonstrate knowledge
of literary terminology.
2. Identify and evaluate the writer's use of literature
as a persuasive tool to identify and assess the
effectiveness of literary works.
3. Recognize the historical and cultural context of
CITRUS COLLEGE
4.
6.
7.
material to evaluate the impact of various
cultural phenomena on perspectives presented in
literature.
Employ established modes of reasoning in the
defense and development of thesis/judgments to
clearly demonstrate knowledge of critical analysis
tools in all written work.
Critically analyze and synthesize source material to
demonstrate the ability to write at the college
level.
Demonstrate cultural awareness, personal
responsibility, and ethical behavior in evaluating
and writing about literature.
Demonstrate an appreciation and understanding of
the scientific method of enquiry.
History
A.A. Transfer Degree
This degree provides lower division preparation for
students planning to transfer into History programs at
four-year colleges and universities. Students will take
history courses as well as courses in related fields
required for history majors.
In addition to helping students meet general education and core requirements for transfer to an upperdivision level History program, the courses are designed to give students a foundation in the examination of the record of human development. Special
attention will be given to changing social, political,
economic, and cultural structures and to the trends
and patterns in history as they develop between and
across regions. Students will be exposed to research
methods that will help them contextualize their
historical experience as well as develop skills in
critical thought and writing.
Students who complete this degree will be guaranteed admission with junior status to the California
State University, though not a particular campus or
major, and will be given priority admission to our local
CSU campus.
Students receiving this transfer degree must meet the
following requirements:
(1) Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter
units that are eligible for transfer to California State
University, including both of the following:
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) A minimum of 18 semester units in a major or
area of emphasis, as determined by the community
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89
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
college district.
(2) Obtainment of a minimum grade point average of
2.0.
Required Courses
Units
HIST 107 History of the United States
before 1877
3
or
HIST 107H History of the United States before
1877 - Honors
3
HIST 108
History of the United States from
1877
or
HIST 108H History of the United States from
1877-Honors
History of World Civilization up to
1500
or
HIST 103H History of World Civilization up to
1500- Honors
3
3
HIST 103
HIST 104
History of World Civilization since
1500
Select one (1) of the following courses
HIST 105 History of World Civilization-The
20th Century
HIST 109 The World in Conflict - The 20th
Century, a History
HIST 110 A Survey History of Africa
HIST 111 History of the African-Americans
to 1876
HIST 112 History of the African-Americans
since 1876
HIST 130 Latin American Culture and
Civilization
HIST 131 History of Latin America to 1825
HIST 132 History of Modern Latin America
HIST 145 History of Mexico
HIST 155 History of the Vietnam War
HIST 222 History of World War II
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology-Honors
ANTH 216 Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective-Honors
GER 201
German III
GER 202
German IV
SOC 118
Minorities in America
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3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
3
SOC 216
SPAN 201
SPAN 202
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
Spanish III
Spanish IV
3
5
5
Select one (1) of the following courses:
HIST 105 History of World CivilizationThe 20th Century
3
HIST 109 The World in Conflict The 20th Century, a History
3
HIST 110 A Survey History of Africa
3
HIST 111 History of the African-Americans
to 1876
3
HIST 112 History of the African-Americans
since 1876
3
HIST 120 British Civilization
3
HIST 127 Spanish Civilization
3
HIST 130 Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3
HIST 131 History of Latin America to 1825 3
HIST 132 History of Modern Latin America
3
HIST 139 History of California
3
HIST 140 History of the American West
3
HIST 145 History of Mexico
3
HIST 155 History of the Vietnam War
3
HIST 222 History of World War II
3
HUM 101
Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period
3
HUM 101H Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period- Honors
3
HUM 102
Humanities from the Renaissance
through the 19th Century
3
POLI 103
American Government and
Politics
3
POLI 103H American Government and
Politics-Honors
3
POLI 116
International Relations
3
Total Units 18 - 20
A.A.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the History A.A.-Transfer Degree
will:
1. Demonstrate an ability to write clearly and
accurately about the historical process using
an appropriate vocabulary.
2. Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking about
historical themes to compare and contrast time
periods or groups of people and their experiences.
3. Demonstrate a comprehension and appreciation
of the connections, contributions, and experiences
of various regions, ethnicities, races and
genders in the creation of the modern world to
develop a pluralistic perspective.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
4. Demonstrate quantitative knowledge of important
historical patterns, processes, developments,
figures and events to comprehend the chronology
of historical events and patterns and their
impact on developing societies.
Kinesiology
A.A. Transfer Degree
Students completing this degree, AA-T in Kinesiology
are guaranteed admission to the California State University system, although not necessarily to a particular campus or major of choice. Students should consult with a counselor for more information on university admission and transfer requirements as this AA-T
in Kinesiology degree may not be the best option for
students intending to transfer to a particular CSU
campus or to a college or university that is not part of
the CSU system.
To earn an Associate in Arts in Kinesiology for Transfer, students must complete the following:
(1) Minimum completion of 60 CSU transferrable semester units.
(2) Minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least
2.0 in all CSU-transferrable coursework. While a
minimum of 2.0 is required for admission, some
majors may require a higher GPA.
(3) Completion of 21 -24 specified major units. All
courses in the major must be completed with a
grade of C or better (Title V 55063)
(4) Certified completion of the California State
University General Education - Breadth pattern or
the Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC for CSU) pattern.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Aquatics
KIN 142
KIN 143
KIN 147
The Associate in Arts in Kinesiology for Transfer
(AA-T) program is designed to prepare students for
CSU transfer to complete a bachelor's degree in Kinesiology, Exercise Science, Physical Education, PrePhysical Therapy, Athletic Training and other related
allied health professions. Interested students may
also pursue careers as personal trainers.
Required core courses
KIN 172
Introduction to Kinesiology
BIOL 200
Human Anatomy
BIOL 201
Human Physiology
Select three (3) of the following movement
based courses with not more than one from
each area.
Units
3
4
4
Swimming - Beginning
Swimming - Intermediate/
Advanced
Swimming for Cardiovascular
Improvement
1
1
1
Combatives
KIN 104
Self-Defense and Personal Safety
1
Team Sports
KIN 130
Basketball
KIN 134
Softball
KIN 135
Volleyball
1
1
1
Fitness
KIN 151
KIN 152
KIN 153
KIN 154
KIN 159
Body Conditioning
Weight Training
Walking/Jogging
Advanced Weight Training
Cardiovascular Training
1
1
1
2
1
Individual
KIN 101
KIN 103
KIN 108
KIN 116
Sports
Badminton
Golf
Tennis
Yoga
1
1
1
1
Dance
DANC 161
DANC 261
Beginning Modern Dance
Intermediate Modern Dance I
1
1
Select two courses of the following
courses
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
4
CHEM 104
College Chemistry
or
General Chemistry
5
Physics for Life Sciences I
or
Physics A: Mechanics
4
CHEM 111
PHYS 111
PHYS 201
KIN 177
5
5
First Aid - Responding to
Emergencies
3
Total Units 21 - 25
www.citruscollege.edu
91
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
A.A.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Kinesiology A.A.-Transfer
Degree will:
1. Exhibit awareness and identify the dimensions of
wellness and recognize positive characteristics of
each dimension to live a more healthy lifestyle.
2. Demonstrate competency in fundamental
techniques to improve individual sport specific and
movement skills.
3. Determine current level of fitness.
Mathematics
A.S. Transfer Degree
The purpose of this program is to prepare students
for a career in mathematics. The problem solving
skills taught in mathematics prepare students for a
great number of job opportunities. A four-year degree
could lead to employment in academics, a government agency, or an insurance agency. This major can
also serve as a basis for careers in engineering, science, data processing, actuarial science, and dispensing opticians.
The degree prepares students for transfer into the
junior year of a baccalaureate degree program in
mathematics or related areas such as statistical or
actuarial fields.
Students who complete this degree will be guaranteed admission with junior status to the California
State University system, though not to a specific campus or major, and will be given priority admission to
our local CSU campus.
Select two of the following
MATH 211 Differential Equations
MATH 212 Introduction to Linear Algebra
PHYS 201
5
4
Physics A: Mechanics
5
Total Units 21 - 22
A.S.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Mathematics A.S.-Transfer
Degree will:
1. Develop an understanding of how to use proper
vocabulary and notation when describing
mathematical concepts, including the ability to
read books and documents and extract
quantitative information.
2. Develop appropriate computational skills including
numeric calculation, evaluation of expressions,
analysis of data, and application of concepts.
3. Develop an understanding of the physical world,
which will include the formulation of analytical
skills that will aid in the process of devising questions and proposing quantitative solutions.
3. Demonstrate computational skills and an understanding of mathematical reasoning that will
increase self esteem and set each student on the
path of lifelong learning.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of how to use
instructional software found by navigating the
Web and found in the Windows' environment.
5. Demonstrate competency at levels appropriate to
a particular course, which will prepare students for
the workforce, subsequent courses, and transfer to
other educational institutions.
Students receiving this transfer degree must meet the
following requirements:
(1) Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter
units that are eligible for transfer to the California
State University, including both of the following:
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) Major course work 18-19 semester units identified
as core and elective courses by the program.
(2) Obtainment of a minimum grade point average
of 2.0.
Physics
A.S. Transfer Degree
Required courses:
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic Geometry
MATH 191 Calculus with Analytic Geometry
MATH 210 Calculus with Analytic Geometry
Students who complete this degree will be guaranteed admission with junior status to the California
State University system, and will be given priority admission to our local CSU campus.
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CITRUS COLLEGE
Units
I 4
II 4
III 4
Physics, a natural science, is the scientific study of
matter and energy and of the interaction between the
two. This Associate Degree for Transfer in Physics
provides students with an understanding of the physical world, both conceptually and in the language of
mathematics. The degree prepares students for preprofessional careers and for curriculum at four year
institutions leading to a baccalaureate degree in areas
such as physics, astrophysics, geophysics, mathematics, and engineering.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
This degree requires completion of 60 semester units
that are eligible for transfer to the California State
University, including both of the following:
(A) The Inter-segmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) The 27 semester units in the major preparation
courses outlined below.
Students must obtain a minimum grade point average
of 2.0 and a C or better in all of the major preparation
courses. Students are not required to meet additional
competency requirements beyond those listed above.
Required Courses
Units
PHYS 201 Physics A: Mechanics
5
PHYS 202 Physics B: Thermodynamics
and Electromagnetism
5
PHYS 203 Physics C: Waves, Optics &
Modern Physics
5
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry I
4
MATH 191 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry II
4
MATH 210 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry III
4
Total Units 27
A.S.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Physics A.S.-Transfer Degree
will:
1. Understand and apply fundamental physics
principles conceptually and mathematically
using the appropriate computational skills.
2. Distinguish between scientific and non-scientific
questions and methods by critically analyzing
scientific information.
3. Develop problem-solving, decision-making, and
critical thinking skills and apply them in order to
develop an understanding of interactions in the
physical world.
4. Think logically and coherently about technical/
scientific issues in order to understand
the complex problems involved in science and
engineering and to gain an appreciation for the
global social and political impact of scientific
endeavors.
5. Adeptly use computers for word processing, data
acquisition and analysis, and/or web-based
research as appropriate for each course. For
laboratory courses, students will demonstrate
fundamental aptitudes in the proper use of
mechanical, electrical and/or other
appropriate devices.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Psychology
A.A. Transfer Degree
Psychology is defined as the scientific study of behavior. The Associates in Arts in Psychology for Transfer
degree program allows students to utilize research
methods; evaluate the credibility of research, theories, and applications; understand the core fields,
paradigms and theories; apply psychological concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and
historical trends to questions and issues in personal
experience and contemporary society; recognize the
complexity of social, cultural, and international diversity; and understand the ethical standards in academic and applied psychology.
This degree provides lower division preparation for
students planning to transfer into psychology programs. Students will take courses in psychology as
well as related fields required for psychology
majors. Students who complete this degree will be
guaranteed admission with junior status to the California State University system, though not to a particular campus or major, and will be given priority
admission to our local CSU campus.
Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter units
that are eligible for transfer to the California State
University, including both of the following:
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) The major preparation courses outlines below.
Students must obtain a minimum grade point average
of 2.0 and a C or better in all courses required for the
major.
Students are not required to meet additional competency requirements beyond those listed above.
Required core courses:
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
or
MATH 165H Introductory Statistics
or
PSY 103
Statistics for the Social and
Behavioral Sciences
PSY 101
Units
4
4
4
PSY 101H
Introduction to Psychology
3
or
Introduction to Psychology-Honors 3
PSY 203
Research Methods in Psychology
www.citruscollege.edu
4
93
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Select one (1) of the following:
BIOL 105
General Biology
PSY 102
Psychobiology
Select one (1) of the following:
PSY 205
Developmental Psychology
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
4
3
3
3
Select one (1) of the following:
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
3
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology-Honors
3
ANTH 212 Introduction to Physical
Anthropology
3
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 4
PSY 110
Psychology of Religion I
3
PSY 212
Behavioral Disorders
3
PSY 213
Survey of Drug and Alcohol Use
and Abuse
3
PSY 220
Introduction to Social Psychology 3
PSY 225
Psychology of Human Sexuality
3
PSY 226
Psychology of Women
3
SOC 201
Introduction to Sociology
3
SOC 201H Introduction to Sociology– Honors 3
Total Units 19 - 22
A.A.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Psychology A.A.-Transfer
Degree will:
1. Demonstrate analytical and critical analysis skills
using college level vocabulary and writing skills.
2. Demonstrate proficiency in analyzing or manipulating numerical data in order to critique scientific
study.
3. Analyze a variety of behavioral science research
designs.
4. Demonstrate analytical thinking by comparing and
applying psychological theories to human behavior.
Sociology
A.A. Transfer Degree
This Associate in Arts in Sociology for Transfer degree
provides lower division preparation for students planning to transfer into Sociology programs. Students
will take courses in sociology as well as related fields
required for sociology majors.
Students who complete this degree will be guaranteed admission with junior status to the California
State University system, though not to a particular
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CITRUS COLLEGE
campus or major, and will be given priority admission
to our local CSU campus.
In addition to helping students meet general education and core requirements for transfer to an upperlevel Sociology program, these courses are designed
to help students understand the structure, processes,
and functions of society, the key theoretical
approaches and insights that inform sociology, and
the role of social theory and research methods in understanding society. Further, the program seeks to
foster critical and systemic thinking and increase selfknowledge and awareness of the diversity of the human condition.
This degree requires completion of 60 semester units
that are eligible for transfer to the California State
University, including both of the following:
(A) The Intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) The major preparation courses outlines below.
Students must obtain a minimum grade point average
of 2.0 and a C or better in all courses required for the
major.
Students are not required to meet additional competency requirements beyond those listed above.
Required Core Courses
Units
SOC 201
Introduction to Sociology
3
or
SOC 201H Introduction to Sociology- Honors 3
or
PSY 103
Statistics for the Social and
Behavioral Sciences
3
Select two (2) of the following:
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
PSY 203
Research Methods in Psychology
SOC 202
Contemporary Social Problems
4
4
3
Select two (2) of the following:
SOC 114
Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relations
SOC 118
Minorities in America
PSY 220
Introduction to Social Psychology
3
3
3
SOC 216
ANTH 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
or
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
or
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective-Honors
3
Select one (1) of the following:
ENGL 103 Composition and Critical Thinking 3
ENGL 103H Composition and Critical ThinkingHonors
3
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
3
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology– Honors
3
ANTH 212 Introduction to Physical
Anthropology
3
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology
3
PHIL 110
Philosophy/Logic
3
Total Units 18 - 20
A.A.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Sociology A.A.-Transfer
Degree will:
1. Communicate knowledge of sociological theory
and social research in order to better understand
and explain the social world.
2. Identify the structure of groups, organizations,
and societies.
3. Employ sociological concepts to examine society
in everyday life.
4. Be prepared for transfer.
Theatre Arts
A.A. Transfer Degree
The discipline of theatre arts includes theoretical and
practical courses in all aspects of theatre, providing
preparation in acting, directing, and technical theatre
through productions. The degree program allows for
a course of study that expands and increases
creativity. It is a meaningful journey of personal discovery and self-expansion. It connects the study of
script analysis to creating complex characters or theatrical designs. In addition, a solid foundation of fundamental skills learned through a variety of
performance as well as technical theatre courses will
help the student build confidence and emphasize the
importance of responsibility, dedication, collaboration
and commitment.
This degree provides lower division preparation for
students planning to transfer into Theatre Arts programs. Students who complete this degree will be
guaranteed admission with junior status to the California State University system, though not to a
particular campus or major, and will be given priority
admission to our local CSU campus.
CITRUS COLLEGE
The degree requires completion of 60 semester units
that are eligible for transfer to the California State
University, including both of the following:
(A) The intersegmental General Education Transfer
Curriculum (IGETC) or the California State University
General Education-Breadth Requirements.
(B) The major preparation courses outlines below.
Students must obtain a minimum grade point average
of 2.0 and a C or better in all courses required for the
major.
Students are not required to meet additional competency requirements beyond those listed above.
Core Courses
THEA 101 Introduction to Theatre Arts
THEA 201 Stage Acting I - Beginning
THEA 125
THEA 210
Units
3
3
Technical Theatre Production
or
Rehearsal and Performance
in Production
3
3
Select at least 9 units from the following
courses not selected above
THEA 120 Introduction to Tech for Theatre,
TV and Film
3
THEA 122 Stagecraft
3
THEA 125 Technical Theatre Production
3
THEA 140 Introduction to Lighting for
Theatre, Television and Film
3
THEA 200 The Art of the Theatre
3
THEA 202 Stage Acting II-Intermediate
3
THEA 210 Rehearsal and Performance in
Production
3
Total Units 18
A.A.-Transfer Degree Level Student Learning
Outcomes
Students completing the Theatre Arts A.A.-Transfer
Degree will:
1. Demonstrate acting techniques in a performance
setting.
2. Exhibit fundamental knowledge of play structure
and analysis.
3. Demonstrate a fundamental knowledge in core
theatre elements, including Acting, Technical
Theatre, and Theatre History.
www.citruscollege.edu
95
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Associate Degrees (A.A. and A.S.)
Administration of Justice
A.S. Degree
Administration of Justice offers men and women a
career of personal challenge and rewarding public
service. A great need exists for intelligent, welleducated personnel with a firm commitment to
professional improvement in the justice system.
Citrus College offers courses to prepare students for
employment and promotion in the criminal justice
system.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Select 18 units from the following:
Units
AJ 101
Introduction to the Administration
Of Justice
3
AJ 102
Concepts of Criminal Law
3
AJ 103
Legal Aspects of Evidence
3
AJ 105
Criminal Investigation
3
AJ 106
Patrol Procedures
3
AJ 107
Traffic Control
3
AJ 108
Juvenile Procedures
3
AJ 109
Criminal Procedures
3
AJ 111
Narcotics and Vice Control
3
AJ 112
Community Relations
3
AJ 123
Writing for Criminal Justice
Professionals
3
AJ 130
Introduction to Probation and
Parole
3
AJ 131
Introduction to Corrections
3
AJ 133
Correctional Writing
3
AJ 135
Control and Supervision in
Corrections
3
AJ 136
Correctional Interviewing and
Counseling
3
AJ 137
Legal Aspects of Corrections
3
AJ 698C
Cooperative Education
3
AJ 699C
Cooperative Education
3
PHTO 101 Basic Photography
3
Total Units 18
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Administration of Justice A.S.
Degree will:
1. Demonstrate an ability to write clearly and
accurately about the administration of justice
process using an appropriate vocabulary.
2. Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking about
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CITRUS COLLEGE
issues in the administration of justice system.
3. Demonstrate a comprehension and appreciation of
the connections, contributions, experiences, and
potential conflicts of various ethnic groups, races,
and genders as they interact with the criminal justice system.
4. Demonstrate an awareness of sciences and
emerging technologies as it impacts the
administration of justice.
Automotive Technology
A.S. Degree
This program is designed to prepare students who
wish to seek employment in the automotive technology industry or qualify for a more responsible position
within the field.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Select 18 units from the following:
Units
AUTO 100 Automotive Technology and
Maintenance for the Consumer
3
AUTO 101 Fundamentals of Automotive
Service, Diagnosis and Repair
5
AUTO 151 Engine Service, Diagnosis and
Repair
5
AUTO 154 Chassis Service, Diagnosis, and
Repair
8
AUTO 156 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems I
5
AUTO 162 Drivetrain Service, Diagnosis and
Repair
8
AUTO 166 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems II
3
AUTO 167 Automotive HVAC Service,
Diagnosis and Repair
3
AUTO 168 Engine Control Systems Service,
Diagnosis and Repair
8
AUTO 281 Advanced Toyota Certified
Technician Training
6.5
AUTO 291 Engine Performance
Enhancements and Tuning
3
AUTO 295 Engine Design
4
AUTO 296 Cylinder Head Development
4
AUTO 297 Cylinder Block Development
4
AUTO 298 Special Projects
2
AUTO 696B Special Topics: Automotive
Technology
0.5
AUTO 698A Cooperative Education
1
AUTO 698B Cooperative Education
2
AUTO 698C Cooperative Education
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
AUTO 698D
AUTO 699A
AUTO 699B
AUTO 699C
AUTO 699D
BUS 170
Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education
Small Business Management
Total Units
4
1
2
3
4
3
18
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Automotive Technology A.S.
Degree will:
1. Acquire skills pertinent to industry level national
certification exams in the transportation industry.
2. Exit the program with a personal/professional
commitment to uphold the high standards and
uplift the integrity of the automotive industry.
3. Utilize knowledge acquired in the Automotive
Technology program to maximize employment
potential in the industry through successful
completion of course level outcomes.
Biological and Physical Sciences (and
Mathematics)
A.S. Degree
Courses in the Biological and Physical Sciences and
Mathematics major examine the physical universe, its
life forms, and its natural phenomena. They assist in
developing an appreciation and understanding of the
scientific method and encourage an understanding of
the relationships between science and other human
activities.
This category includes introductory or integrative
courses in astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology,
physics, physical geography, and other scientific disciplines.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Select eighteen (18) units from the
following:
ASTRONOMY
ASTR 115 Planetary Astronomy
ASTR 115H Planetary Astronomy - Honors
ASTR 116 Stellar Astronomy
ASTR 117 Life In The Universe
BIOLOGY
BIOL 100
Introductory Biology
BIOL 102
Human Genetics
CITRUS COLLEGE
Units
3
3
4
3
3
3
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
104
105
109
116
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
BIOL
124
125
145
200
201
220
Biology: Contemporary Topics
General Biology
Biology for Educators
HIV and AIDS: Insights and
Implications
Principles of Biology I
Principles of Biology II
Environmental Science
Human Anatomy
Human Physiology
Microbiology
CHEMISTRY
CHEM 103 College Chemistry
CHEM 104 College Chemistry
CHEM 106 Physical Science for Educators
CHEM 110 Beginning General Chemistry
CHEM 111 General Chemistry
CHEM 112 General Chemistry
CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry
CHEM 211L Organic Chemistry Laboratory
CHEM 220 Organic Chemistry
CHEM 221L Organic Chemistry Laboratory
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
CIS 107
Information Systems and
Applications
CIS 119
Introduction to Web Programming
CIS 130
Microcomputer Applications I
CIS 150
Web Development with
Dreamweaver
CIS 154
Web Development with Fireworks
CIS 156
Web Development with Flash
CIS 162
Electronic Spreadsheets Using
Microsoft Excel
CIS 168
Designing Web Sites
CIS 230
Microcomputer Applications II
Advanced Microsoft Office
COMPUTER SCIENCE
CS 111
Introduction to Programming
Concepts and Design
CS 225
Object Oriented Programming
with C++
EARTH SCIENCE
ESCI 106
Earth and Space Science for
Educators
ESCI 120
Physical Geology
ESCI 121
Historical Geology
ESCI 122
Geology: Earth History
ESCI 124
Environmental Geology
www.citruscollege.edu
3
4
4
3
5
5
3
4
4
5
5
5
4
5
5
5
3
1
3
1
4
3
4
3
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
97
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ESCI 140
ESCI 141
ESCI 142
ESCI 143
ESCI 145
ESCI 146
The Geology of
National Park
The Geology of
Park
The Geology of
National Park
The Geology of
National Park
The Geology of
Park
The Geology of
National Park
Death Valley
Yosemite National
Channel Islands
2
2
2
Joshua Tree
Sequoia National
Kings Canyon
FORESTRY
FOR 101
Introduction to Forestry
FOR 102
Introduction to Forest Ecology
FOR 103
Plant Identification
FOR 104
Introduction to Outdoor
Recreation
FOR 105
Wildland Fire Management
FOR 106
Principles of Wildlife Management
and Ecology
GEOGRAPHY
GEOG 118 Physical Geography
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
IT 104
PC Hardware and Maintenance
IT 107
Network Technology
IT 108
Networking Operating Systems
IT 109
Network and Computer Security
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
MATHEMATICS
MATH 148 Intermediate Algebra I
2.5
MATH 149 Intermediate Algebra II
2.5
MATH 150 Intermediate Algebra
5
MATH 151 Plane Trigonometry
4
MATH 160 Survey of Mathematics
4
MATH 162 Introductory Mathematical
Analysis
4
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
4
MATH 168 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers I
4
MATH 169 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II
4
MATH 170 College Algebra
4
MATH 175 Pre-Calculus
4
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 4
MATH 191 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry II
4
MATH 210 Calculus with Analytic
Geometry III
4
MATH 211 Differential Equations
4
MATH 212 Introduction to Linear Algebra
4
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CITRUS COLLEGE
NATURAL
NAT 180A
NAT 180B
NAT 181A
HISTORY
Natural History Series - Deserts A
Natural History Series - Deserts B
Natural History Series - Coastal
Mountains, Coastlines, Tropical
Regions and Islands A
NAT 181B Natural History Series - Coastal
Mountains, Coastlines, Tropical
Regions and Islands B
NAT 182A Natural History Series - Inland
Mountains, Valleys and Alaska A
NAT 182B Natural History Series - Inland
Mountains, Valleys and Alaska B
OCEANOGRAPHY
ESCI 130
Physical Oceanography
PHYSICS
PHYS 106
PHYS 110
PHYS 111
PHYS 112
PHYS 201A
PHYS 202B
PHYS 203C
2
3
2
3
3
Physical Science for Educators
Introduction to College Physics
Physics for Life Sciences I
General Physics
Physics: Mechanics
Physics: Electromagnetism
Physics: Optics and
Thermodynamics
PHILOSOPHY
PHIL 110
Philosophy/Logic
2
3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
3
Total Units 18
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Biological and Physical
Sciences (and Mathematics) A.S. degree will:
1. Use proper vocabulary and notation when
describing mathematical concepts. They will be
able to read books and documents and extract
quantitative information.
2. Develop level appropriate computational skills.
These will include numeric calculation, evaluation
of expressions, analysis of data, and application
of concepts.
3. Investigate and explain physical phenomena
through application of empirical knowledge using
mathematical and scientific processes and concepts.
4. Develop an understanding of and curiosity towards
the physical world. They will develop the analytical
skills to devise questions and propose quantitative
solutions.
5. Demonstrate computational skills and an understanding of mathematical reasoning that will
increase self esteem and set them on the path of
lifelong learning.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Biological Sciences
A.S. Degree
Business
A.S. Degree
The associate degree in biological science prepares
students for a curriculum at a four-year institution
leading to a baccalaureate degree in such areas as
microbiology, organismal biology, cell and molecular
biology, and teaching.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Business is the study of the practices and products of
commerce. Areas of concentration for this degree can
include business management, business law, marketing, finance, business ethics, and business communications. Students will take courses in business as well
as related fields required for business majors.
Required Courses
Units
BIOL 124
Principles of Biology I
5
BIOL 125
Principles of Biology II
5
CHEM 111 General Chemistry
5
CHEM 112 General Chemistry
5
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 4
MATH 165
MATH 191
Introductory Statistics
4
or
Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 4
Total Units 28
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Biological Sciences A.S.
degree will:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of biological
concepts.
2. Acquire scientific information from multiple sources
including textbooks, the Internet, personal communication with professionals in the field, and educational computer software.
3. Estimate and/or calculate the characteristics of
biological systems and demonstrate an
understanding of these calculations in order to
better understand the natural processes that produce these characteristics.
4. Formulate scientific hypotheses in order to
distinguish between scientific and non-scientific
questions and methods.
5. Develop an understanding of relevant biological
processes as well as processes from related
sciences (e.g. physics, geology, chemistry) and
apply these processes to predict the properties of
biological systems.
6.Examine how human activity has contributed to
positive and negative changes in the environment
to better understand and discuss past, current, and
future environmental issues.
CITRUS COLLEGE
This degree is designed to (1) prepare students for
transfer to non-CSU, four-year institutions by offering
or requiring business-related courses, in addition to
those required for the AS-T degree in business
administration, that fulfill either transfer or elective
requirements for the University of California or
Other private institutions; (2) to ensure that students
interested in using the AS in business as their terminal degree receive sufficient education in businessrelated issues; and/or (3) to prepare students for professional careers or otherwise enhance their personal
growth. The degree requires completion of 60 semester units.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of "C" and
above) of the following major requirements:
Required Core Courses
ACCT 101 Financial Accounting
ACCT 102 Managerial Accounting
ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics
ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics
BUS 130
Introduction to Business
BUS 160
Business Law and the Legal
Environment I
Units
4
4
3
3
3
3
Select one (1) of the following
courses:
MATH 162 Introductory Mathematical Analysis 4
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
4
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 4
Select one (1) of the following
courses:
ACCT 110 Income Tax Accounting
BUS 132
Ethics in Business
BUS 146
Personal Finance
BUS 150
Business English
BUS 152
Business Communications
BUS 161
Business Law and the Legal
Environment II
BUS 170
Small Business Management
BUS 172
Personnel Management
www.citruscollege.edu
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
99
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
BUS 175
BUS 176
BUS 185
BUS 192
CIS 130
OFF 101
REAL 210
Introduction to Management
3
Management for the Office
Professional
3
Elements of Marketing
3
Advertising
3
Microcomputer Applications I
4
Introduction to Microsoft Office
Applications
3
Real Estate Principles
3
Total Units 27 - 28
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Business A.S. Degree will:
1. Have developed an understanding of how to
communicate effectively within business organizations.
2. Have developed an understanding of the need for
critical and analytical skills relating to business.
3. Have knowledge of the functions of business
management and their impact on organizational
performance.
4. Have an understanding of the environments that
impact organizational growth.
Child Development
A.S. Degree
The curriculum leads to an associate in science degree and meets the educational requirements for
employment as a teacher or assistant teacher in
preschools and children's centers.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Category A
Units
Three Units of Child Development
Select one of the following:
CHLD 110 Early Childhood Development
3
or
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
3
Category B
Required Major Courses
CHLD 112 Principles of Early Childhood
Education I
CHLD 114 Home-Child-Community Relations
CHLD 116 Introduction to Curriculum
CHLD 144 Health, Safety and Nutrition for
Young Children
100
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
3
CHLD 150
CHLD 154
Multi-Culture Anti-Bias Classrooms 3
Observing and Recording Behavior 3
Category C
Practicum (Fieldwork) Course & Lab
CHLD 156 Practicum in Early Childhood
Education
2
and
CHLD 156L Practicum Lab
1
Total Units 24
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Child Development A.S.
degree will:
1. Demonstrate the ability to identify, analyze, and
apply theories of early childhood education and
child development.
2. Demonstrate global consciousness as they work
with diverse cultures, families, and individuals
and teach children.
3. Acquire knowledge and foundational skills
necessary to work in the teaching profession.
4. Apply effective guidance and teaching strategies
that support social growth, learning, identity
development and promote self-confidence.
5. Design, implement and evaluate environments
and activities that support positive, developmental
play and learning outcomes for children.
6. Apply ethical standards and professional behaviors
that demonstrate an understanding and a
knowledge, and a deepening commitment to the
child development profession and early childhood
education.
Cosmetology
A.S. Degree
The Cosmetology Program leads to an Associate of
Science degree. This degree requires the successful
completion of 55 units of coursework. Completion of
this degree will also prepare students to be eligible to
take the State Board of Cosmetology examination,
earn a certificate and become a licensed cosmetologist.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Required Courses
COS 141
Introduction to Cosmetology
COS 151
Salon Success
COS 161A Haircolor I
Units
11
4
4
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
COS
COS
COS
COS
COS
COS
COS
161B
172A
172B
178A
178B
181A
181B
COS 182
COS 183
Haircolor II
Hair Design I
Hair Design II
Chemical Texturizing I
Chemical Texturizing II
Hairsculpting I
Hairsculpting II
Skincare
Nail Care
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Total Units 55
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Cosmetology A.S. degree
will:
1. Be prepared to pass the State Board Exam and
acquire California State licensure.
2. Be successfully trained in the study of: haircutting,
hair coloring, chemical training, skin/nails, hairstyling and salon success. This program prepares students for professional employment.
2
Performance Practicum
DANC 289 Dance Concert Production
3
Total Units 18
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Dance A.A. degree major
will:
1. Demonstrate a functional knowledge of ballet,
tap, jazz and modern dance techniques through
the beginning and intermediate level.
2. Exhibit perspective on historical and stylistic
components of dance.
3. Display basic proficiency in kinesiology as
applied to alignment and corrective gait analysis.
4. Demonstrate competency in dance performance
skills and ability.
Dental Assisting
A.S. Degree
Dance
A.A. Degree
This degree provides students with a foundational
dance background, encompassing a strong emphasis
in various dance techniques as well as history, basic
kinesiology and a performance practicum.
Note that all courses listed must be successfully
completed.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Dance Technique
DANC 158 Hip-Hop Dance Techniques
DANC 159 Beginning Tap
DANC 160 Jazz Dance Techniques
DANC 161 Beginning Modern Dance
DANC 162 Beginning Ballet
DANC 259 Intermediate Tap I
DANC 260 Intermediate Jazz Dance I
DANC 262 Intermediate Ballet I
DANC 270 Intermediate Jazz Dance II
DANC 272 Intermediate Ballet II
Units
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Dance History
DANC 102 History of Dance
3
CITRUS COLLEGE
Kinesiology
DANC 130 Alignment and Correctives
The Dental Assisting Program prepares students for
the California State Registered Dental Assistant
Examination. This program is accredited by the
American Dental Association Commission on
Accreditation and the California State Board of Dental
Examiners. Upon completion, the graduate is eligible
to sit for the California State Registered Dental
Assistant Examination and the National Certification
Examination.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Required Coursework
Units
DENT 100 Dental Assisting Basics
2.5
DENT 101 Chairside Assisting
3
DENT 102 Dental Materials
2.5
DENT 121 Preclinical Dental Science
2
DENT 122 Infection Control in the Dental
Office
1.5
DENT 123 Preventive Dental Health
2
DENT 124 Dental Specialties
2
DENT 125 Dental Practice Management
2
DENT 201 Dental Radiology
2
DENT 202 Registered Dental Assistant
4
DENT 203 Dental Practical Experience
5.5
DENT 204 RDA Clinical Procedures
1
Total Units 30
www.citruscollege.edu
101
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Dental Assisting A.S. degree
will:
1. Use correct dental terminology and nomenclature
in the correct context in order to effectively
communicate dental information and concepts to
others.
2. Develop problem-solving and self-assessment
skills and make appropriate decisions regarding
a variety of procedural situations.
3. Demonstrate the ability to interact with patients
and work effectively as a member of the dental
team.
4. Maintain the standard of care during dental treatment and promote oral health.
5. Develop the ability to use and adapt to current
technology used in dental practices.
6. Demonstrate proficiency in the current duties of
an RDA, practicing within the delegated duties
(scope of practice).
7. Develop foundational knowledge of dental
procedures and the ability to communicate and
apply their concepts and principles.
Drafting and Design Technology
A.S. Degree
Drafting and Design Technology includes such
majors as Architecture, Engineering Drawing and
Computer Generated Imagery (CGI). Students
should complete the core courses and one area
of emphasis:
Architecture Emphasis: design principles and CAD
are applied to problems in Architecture, Landscape
Architecture and Urban Planning. Proper and efficient
methods of sketching, story boarding, models and
multifaceted presentations are explored.
Employment opportunities: Entry-level - CADperson/
Design Person
Engineering Drawing Emphasis:, CAD courses
and Mechanical Drawing courses provide a foundation
for such majors as Architecture, Computer Generated
Imagery and Engineering
Employment opportunities: Entry-level Computer
Aided Design (CAD) - CADperson/Draftsperson
Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) Emphasis:
provides for majors such as Architecture, Computer
Generated Imagery (CGI), Engineering and Animation. Design principles, CAD and animation systems
are applied to problems in animation, architecture,
102
CITRUS COLLEGE
landscape architecture, urban planning and engineering. Proper and efficient methods of sketching, story
boarding, 3D digital models, animations and multifaceted presentations‘ are examined.
Employment opportunities: Entry-level - Animation
Modeler.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Strongly Recommended Preparation
Units
DRAF 101 Beginning Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
3
or
One year of High School Drafting
or
One year of Drafting in Industry
Required drafting and design technology core
courses
ARCH 102 Visual Communication
2.5
or
DRAF 102 Visual Communication
2.5
ARCH 100
DRAF 160
DRAF 161
DRAF 290
Introduction to Architecture
Intermediate Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
Advanced Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
Introduction to Maya Practices
ARCHITECTURE EMPHASIS
Required architectural courses
ARCH 110 Introduction to Architectural
Communication and Functional
Design
ARCH 111 Basic Architectural Design
ARCH 200 Portfolio Preparation
ARCH 201 Architectural Design I
ARCH 202 Architectural Design II
ARCH 250 History of Architecture: Prehistory
to Mannerism
ARCH 251 History of Architecture: Baroque
to the Present Day
or
ENGINEERING DRAWING EMPHASIS
Required engineering drawing
Courses
DRAF 103 Advanced Engineering Drawing
3
2.5
2.5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
PHYS 110
Introduction to College Physics
or
COMPUTER GENERATED IMAGERY (CGI)
EMPHASIS
Required computer generated imagery
(CGI) courses
DRAF 291 Learning Maya Transitions
ARCH 200 Portfolio Preparation
ART 111
Beginning Drawing
ART 115
Figure Drawing I
ART 120
Two-Dimensional Design
ART 121
Three-Dimensional Design
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
21
Total Units 23.5 - 37.5
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Drafting and Design
Technology A.S. Degree will:
1. Describe effective architectural, Computer
Generated Imagery (CGI) and engineering
drafting techniques including graphic
communication, orientation, and decision making.
2. Demonstrate the ability to use technology to
prepare architectural, Computer Generated
Imagery (CGI) and engineering hand drawings,
Computer Aided Drawings (CAD), and multimedia
presentations.
3. Demonstrate planning techniques and administration of architectural, Computer Generated Imagery
(CGI) and engineering document control for design
and working drawings.
4. Demonstrate the ability to estimate time, material,
labor and equipment for architectural, Computer
Generated Imagery (CGI) and engineering design
and working drawings.
Emergency Management and Homeland
Security
A.S. Degree
The Associate of Science degree program will provide
both students and currently working emergency managers the required courses and learning domains to
apply for employment with emergency management
agencies, such as the local cities and county governments in California and non-profit organizations such
as the American Red Cross, and federal agencies such
as the Department of Homeland Security (FEMA). Additionally, those currently working in the field will
have a recognized degree.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
CITRUS COLLEGE
Required Courses
Units
EMER 162 Principles of Emergency
Management
3
EMER 163 Terrorism and Emergency
Management
3
EMER 164 Managing Hazardous Materials
Incidents
3
EMER 166 Emergency Planning and
Methodology
3
EMER 167 Practical Applications of
Emergency Management
3
Select at least seven (7) units from
the following
EMER 168 Emergency Operations Center
(EOC) Management
ESCI 180
Introduction to Geographic
Information Systems
HEAL 161 Emergency Medical TechnicianBasic
Total Units
3
4
7
22
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Emergency Management and
Homeland Security A.S. Degree will:
1. Express and understanding of the human physical
consequences of natural and technological
disasters and how to mitigate them.
2. Explain and apply state and local regulations
related to emergency management.
3. Be familiar with the range of technologies used in
emergency management.
4. Critically analyze emergency management plans
and procedures.
English Literature
A.A. Degree
The Associates of Arts Degree in English Literature
provides students with a strong foundation in literature to better prepare them for transfer into a fouryear English program. Core course work explores primarily British and American writers through an array
of literary traditions, providing opportunities for students to express their understanding and appreciation
of the literary world through analysis, research and
composition. This degree requires 18 units, of which
12 are required courses. An additional six units must
be selected from the listed optional courses.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
www.citruscollege.edu
103
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Required Courses
Units
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
3
or
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition - Honors 3
ENGL 103
Composition and Critical Thinking
or
ENGL 103H Composition and Critical Thinking
Honors
or
ENGL 104 Advanced Rhetoric: The Classical
Essay
ENGL 251
ENGL 252
ENGL 261
ENGL 262
ENGL 252
ENGL 261
ENGL 262
ENGL 271
ENGL 272
3
3
3
Fine and Performing Arts
A.A. Degree
3
3
3
Introduction to English Literature I 3
or
Introduction to English Literature II 3
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
or
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
Select two (2) of the following
ENGL 213 Horror Literature
ENGL 213H Horror Literature - Honors
ENGL 216 American Latino Literature
ENGL 251
3
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the English Literature A.A.
Degree will:
1. Critically analyze and evaluate the subtext of
literature texts in order to demonstrate knowledge
of literary terminology.
2. Identify and evaluate the writer's use of literature
as a persuasive tool to identify and assess the
effectiveness of literary works.
3. Recognize the historical and cultural context of
material to evaluate the impact of various cultural
phenomena on perspectives presented in
literature.
4. Employ established modes of reasoning in the
defense and development of thesis/judgments to
clearly demonstrate knowledge of critical analysis
tools in all written work.
5. Critically analyze and synthesize source material to
demonstrate ability to write at the college level.
6. Demonstrate cultural awareness, personal responsibility, and ethical behavior in evaluating and
writing about literature.
Introduction to English
Literature I
Introduction to English
Literature II
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
3
3
3
3
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
3
Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient - Early Modern
3
Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth Century 3
ENGL 291
Film as Literature
or
ENGL 291H Film as Literature - Honors
3
ENGL 293
3
Children's Literature
or
ENGL 293H Children's Literature - Honors
ENGL 294
ENGL 296
ENGL 298
104
3
3
Introduction to Shakespeare
3
Introduction to Folklore
3
Literature of the Bible
3
Total Units 18
CITRUS COLLEGE
The Fine and Performing Arts curriculum offers instruction in theory, practice and history. These three
areas of study provide the foundation needed to begin a career in commercial or fine and performing
arts. The foundation courses meet prerequisite
requirements to UC, CSU systems and four-year art
schools.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Select eighteen (18 )units from the following:
Art
Units
ART 100
Art History and AppreciationFundamentals
3
ART 101
Art History and AppreciationAncient
3
ART 102
Art History and AppreciationMedieval
3
ART 103
Art History and AppreciationRenaissance to Rococo
3
ART 104
Art History and Appreciation19th Century Art
3
ART 105
Art History and AppreciationEarly 20th Century Art
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
110
111
112
115
116
120
121
122
130
131
140
141
142
143
145
146
149
150
153
158
162
163
167
168
180
181
182
183
184
189
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
199
200
201
206
207
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
230
240
241
253
267
268
Dance
DANC 102
DANC 130
DANC 159
DANC 160
DANC 161
DANC 162
DANC 172
DANC 258
Introduction to the Visual Arts
Beginning Drawing
Intermediate Drawing
Figure Drawing I
Figure Drawing II
Two-Dimensional Design
Three-Dimensional Design
Color Theory and Composition
Beginning Painting
Intermediate Painting
Beginning Ceramics
Intermediate Ceramics
Experimental Ceramics
Ceramic Handbuilding
Ceramic Design and Decoration
Ceramics: Tile and Mosaic
Studio Problems in Ceramics
Computer Art Basics
Digital Media Production I
Commercial Graphic Design
Computer Graphics I
Computer Graphics II
Web Design I
Animation I
Beginning Clay Sculpture
Intermediate Clay Sculpture
Advanced Clay Sculpture I
Advanced Clay Sculpture II
Sculpture and Metalwork
Art Portfolio and Resume
Production
Motion Picture Appreciation
History of Motion Pictures
History of Motion Pictures II
History of Latin American Art
History of Asian Art - China,
Korea, and Japan
Advanced Painting
Advanced Ceramics I
Advanced Ceramics II
Digital Media Production II
Web Design II
Animation II
History of Dance
Alignment and Correctives
Beginning Tap
Jazz Dance Techniques
Beginning Modern Dance
Beginning Ballet
Composition in Group Forms
Intermediate Hip-Hop Dance
CITRUS COLLEGE
Units
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
DANC
DANC
DANC
DANC
DANC
DANC
259
260
261
262
263
264
DANC 265
DANC 266
DANC
DANC
DANC
DANC
DANC
DANC
DANC
269
270
271
272
279
281
284
DANC 289
DANC 292
DANC 296
Intermediate Tap I
Intermediate Jazz Dance I
Intermediate Modern Dance I
Intermediate Ballet I
Dance for Musical Theatre
Beginning Popular Dance
Techniques
Musical Staging: Rehearsal and
Performance
Pop Dance: Rehearsal and
Performance- Beginning
Intermediate Tap II
Intermediate Jazz Dance II
Intermediate Modern Dance II
Intermediate Ballet II
Advanced Tap I
Advanced Jazz Dance I
Intermediate Popular Dance
Techniques
Dance Concert Production
Advanced Ballet I
Pop Dance: Rehearsal and
Performance- Intermediate
Music - Commercial
MUSC 100 Styles, Technique, and the
Soul of Popular Singing
MUSC 102 Pop/Rock Ensemble I
MUSC 103 Pop/Rock Ensemble II
MUSC 104 Pop, Rock, and Jazz
Performance Styles I
MUSC 106 Show Choir I
MUSC 110 Pop/Cumbia Ensemble I
MUSC 112 Pop/Salsa Ensemble I
MUSC 118 Music Performance for Events
MUSC 120 Studio Laboratory Band I
MUSC 121 Studio Laboratory Band II
MUSC 122 Jazz Ensemble
MUSC 130 Studio Orchestra I
MUSC 140 Jazz Improvisation I
MUSC 141 Jazz Improvisation II
MUSC 142 Jazz Combos
MUSC 144 Fusion Ensemble
MUSC 146 Chamber Jazz
MUSC 151 Songwriting I
MUSC 152 Songwriting II
MUSC 160 Sight Reading for the Studio I
MUSC 161 Sight Reading for the Studio II
MUSC 170 Citrus Singers Summer Ensemble
(Classical)
MUSC 171 Citrus Singers Tour Ensemble
(Pop)
MUSC 172 Women's Tour Ensemble
MUSC 175 Jazz Ensemble Tour
www.citruscollege.edu
1
1
1
1
4
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
3
1
2
2
2
2
4
4
2
2
1
4
4
4
4
3
3
1
1
4
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
7
105
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MUSC 177
MUSC 190
MUSC 271
Units
Professional Performance
Techniques
3
Career Opportunities in the Music
Entertainment Industry
3
Professional Performance
Techniques (Vocal)
4
Music - Education
MUSE 100 Music Fundamentals
MUSE 101 Musicianship I
MUSE 102 Harmony I
MUSE 103 Musicianship II
MUSE 104 Harmony II
MUSE 109 Music Appreciation
MUSE 110 History of Music I
MUSE 111 History of Music II
MUSE 112 History of Jazz
MUSE 113 History of Rock and Roll
MUSE 114 Introduction to American Music
MUSE 120 Elementary Piano I
MUSE 121 Elementary Piano II
MUSE 130 Voice - Beginning
MUSE 131 Intermediate Voice
MUSE 140 Beginning Guitar I
MUSE 141 Beginning Guitar II
MUSE 160 Standard Percussion
Instrumentation/Techniques
MUSE 161 World Percussion
Instrumentation/Techniques
MUSE 170 Musical Theatre Academy
Techniques
MUSE 171 Musical Theatre Techniques
MUSE 180 Summer Instrumental Music
Academy
MUSE 188 Music Production Software/
Hardware I
MUSE 189 Music Production Software/
Hardware II
MUSE 201 Musicianship III
MUSE 202 Harmony III
MUSE 203 Musicianship IV
MUSE 204 Harmony IV
MUSE 220 Intermediate Piano I
MUSE 221 Intermediate Piano II
MUSE 222 Advanced Piano I
MUSE 223 Advanced Piano II
MUSE 224 Keyboard Skills for the Music
Major
MUSE 225 Popular Piano Styles
MUSE 226 Functional Piano for the Music
Major
MUSE 230 Voice- Intermediate/Advanced
MUSE 231 Voice IV - Advanced
106
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
2
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
3
3
2
2
2
3
2
3
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
2
2
MUSE 240
MUSE 241
Intermediate Guitar I
Intermediate Guitar II
2
2
Music - Performance
MUSP 100 Concert Choir I - Beginning
MUSP 101 Concert Choir II-Intermediate
MUSP 105 Women‘s Ensemble I Beginning
MUSP 106 Women's Ensemble II
Intermediate
MUSP 108 Men's Ensemble
MUSP 110 Vocal Ensemble I Beginning
MUSP 111 Vocal Ensemble II
MUSP 115 Chamber Chorale I Beginning
MUSP 120 Chamber Singers I Beginning
MUSP 121 Chamber Singers II Intermediate
MUSP 133 Brass Choir I
MUSP 134 Brass Choir II
MUSP 136 Percussion Ensemble I
MUSP 138 World Percussion Ensemble I
MUSP 140 Chamber Winds I
MUSP 141 Chamber Winds II
MUSP 145 Wind Symphony I
MUSP 146 Wind Symphony II
MUSP 151 Individual Performance
Techniques
MUSP 162 Handbell Ensemble
MUSP 170 Musical Theatre Academy
Production
MUSP 173 Musical Theatre Production I
Beginning
MUSP 178 Opera Workshop
MUSP 181 Musical Theatre Orchestra
MUSP 290 Applied Music I Beginning
MUSP 291 Applied Music II Intermediate
MUSP 292 Applied Music III Intermediate/
Advanced
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
4
4
4
3
3
1
1
4
4
4
4
2
1
4
4
2
4
2
2
2
Theatre Arts - Drama
THEA 101 Introduction to Theatre Arts
3
THEA 104 Voice and Movement for the Actor 3
THEA 120 Introduction to Tech for Theatre,
TV and Film
3
THEA 122 Stagecraft
3
THEA 125 Technical Theatre Production
3
THEA 130 Introduction to Theatrical Scenery 3
THEA 140 Introduction to Lighting for Theatre,
Television and Film
3
THEA 145 Anatomy of Intelligent Lighting
Instruments
3
THEA 150 Introduction to Intelligent Lighting
Consoles
3
THEA 160 Computer Aided Design for
Theatre
4
THEA 200 The Art of the Theatre
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
201
202
204
210
Stage Acting I - Beginning
Stage Acting II - Intermediate
Stage and Screenwriting
Rehearsal and Performance
in Production
THEA 211A Camera Acting I - Beginning
THEA 220 Rehearsal and Performance II
THEA 240 Introduction to Live Video Event
Production
THEA 241 Fundamentals of Stage Direction
THEA 245 Stage and Project Management
for Theatre, TV and Film
THEA 250 Theatre Appreciation
THEA 255 Entertainment Production for
Theme Parks and Themed
Environments
THEA 260 Introduction to Show Production
Systems
THEA 284 Acting Shakespeare
THEA 290 Citrus Theatre Academy
THEA 292 Special Techniques in Acting
THEA 293 Theatre for Young Audiences
THEA 294 Shakespeare in Production
THEA 698C Cooperative Education
THEA 699A Cooperative Education
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
May select one (1) of the following:
ENGL 294 Introduction to Shakespeare
3
HUM 101
Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period
3
HUM 101H Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period - Honors
3
HUM 102
Humanities from the Renaissance
through the 19th Century
3
HUM 110
Humanities in the 20th Century
3
PHIL 101
Great Religions of the World
3
PHIL 106
Introduction to Philosophy
3
PHIL 106H Introduction to PhilosophyHonors
3
PHIL 108
Philosophy/Ethics
3
Total Units 18
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Fine and Performing Arts
A.A. Degree will:
1. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge of Fine and
Performing Arts history, techniques and theory.
2. Analyze, create, notate and perform examples in a
variety of styles within a studio and/or
performance environment.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Kinesiology
A.S. Degree
Kinesiology studies human anatomy and physiology
and the mechanics of body movement both theoretically and in practice through physical activities. A diverse curriculum includes lower division theory
courses designed for those who want to complete an
Associate Degree in Science in Kinesiology and meet
transfer requirements. There is also a basic instructional program with a wide variety of movement experiences for the development of physical activity
skills and the knowledge necessary for lifetime wellness.
An intercollegiate athletic program offers performance
oriented students opportunities for competition.
Kinesiology also offers adapted activities curriculum
for students with disabilities.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Select twelve (12) to eighteen (18)
units from the following core courses
KIN 169
Introduction to Coaching
KIN 170
Fitness for Life
KIN 171
KIN 171H
KIN
KIN
KIN
KIN
172
173
174
175
KIN 176
KIN 177
KIN 182
Units
3
3
Health Science
or
Health Science - Honors
3
Introduction to Kinesiology
Nutrition for Fitness
Introduction to Team Sports
Introduction to Individual and
Dual Sports
Elementary School Physical
Education
First Aid - Responding to
Emergencies
Care and Prevention of Athletic
Injuries
3
3
3
May select two (2) to six (6) units
from the following courses
Theory Courses
KIN 184
Volleyball Theory
KIN 185
Softball Theory
KIN 186
Baseball Theory
KIN 187
Techniques and Strategy of
Intercollegiate Football
KIN 188
Basketball Theory
www.citruscollege.edu
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
107
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
KIN 191
KIN 192
KIN 193
KIN 194
Theory of Intercollegiate Golf
Aquatic Theory and Techniques
Track and Field Theory and
Techniques
Soccer Theory
Varsity Sport Courses
KINC 209 Women's Varsity Soccer
KINC 211 Women's Varsity Volleyball
KINC 212 Varsity Swimming
KINC 213 Women's Varsity Basketball
KINC 214 Women's Varsity Softball
KINC 215 Varsity Track and Field
KINC 216 Varsity Cross Country
KINC 220 Men's Varsity Football
KINC 221 Men's Varsity Basketball
KINC 224 Men's Varsity Baseball
KINC 225 Men's Varsity Golf
KINC 227 Women's Varsity Golf
KINC 229 Men's Varsity Water Polo
KINC 230 Women's Varsity Water Polo
KINC 231 Men's Varsity Soccer
Biological Science
BIOL 200
Human Anatomy
BIOL 201
Human Physiology
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
4
4
Total Units 18
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Kinesiology A.S. Degree will:
1. Identify the dimensions of wellness and recognize
positive characteristics of each dimension in
order to live a more healthy lifestyle.
2. Demonstrate competency in fundamental tecniques to improve individual sport specific skills.
3. Determine current level of fitness as measured by
one or more of the following tests: resting
heart rate, blood pressure, sit and reach flexibility,
skin fold measurements, muscular endurance
tests, and cardiovascular sub maximal test.
Language Arts
A.A. Degree
Courses in language arts develop the principles and
applications of language toward logical thought, clear
and precise expression and critical evaluation of
communication in whatever symbol system the
student uses.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
108
CITRUS COLLEGE
Select eighteen (18) units from the following:
Communications
Units
COMM 100 Mass Media and Society
3
COMM 101 Reporting and Writing News
3
COMM 103 Freelance Journalism
1
COMM 104 Public Relations
3
COMM 136 Cultural History of American Films 3
COMM 200 Visual Communications
3
COMM 230 Desktop Publishing
3
COMM 240 Newspaper Production Staff
3
COMM 245 Editorial Board Workshop
2
COMM 250 Multimedia Reporting
3
COMM 280 Magazine Production Staff
3
English
ENGL 101
Reading and Composition
3
or
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition- Honors 3
ENGL 102
Introduction to Literature
3
ENGL 103
Composition and Critical Thinking 3
or
ENGL 103H Composition and Critical ThinkingHonors
3
ENGL 104
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
Advanced Rhetoric: The Classical
Essay
120 Introduction to Women's
Literature
210 Creative Writing I
213 Horror Literature
or
213H Horror Literature–Honors
ENGL 216
ENGL 251
ENGL 252
ENGL 261
ENGL 262
ENGL 271
ENGL 272
ENGL 291
American Latino Literature
Introduction to English
Literature I
Introduction to English
Literature II
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient - Early Modern
Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth Century
Film as Literature
or
ENGL 291H Film as Literature - Honors
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ENGL 293
Children's Literature
or
ENGL 293H Children's Literature - Honors
Units
3
3
ENGL 294
ENGL 296
ENGL 298
Introduction to Shakespeare
Introduction to Folklore
Literature of the Bible
3
3
3
German
GER 101
GER 102
GER 201
GER 202
German
German
German
German
5
5
5
5
Spanish
SPAN 101
SPAN 102
SPAN 127
SPAN 141
SPAN 201
SPAN 202
SPAN 210
SPAN 211
Speech
SPCH 100
I
II
III
IV
Spanish I
Spanish II
Spanish Civilization
Intermediate Conversational
Spanish
Spanish III
Spanish IV
Intermediate Spanish for Speakers
of Spanish
Reading and Composition for
Speakers of Spanish II
5
5
3
Interpersonal Communication
3
SPCH 101
3
5
5
5
5
Public Address
or
SPCH 101H Public Address - Honors
3
SPCH 103
SPCH 106
3
3
Argumentation and Debate
Small Group Communication
3
May select up to one (1) of the Following:
ESL 101
Reading and Composition
3
HUM 101
Humanities - Prehistory
through the Medieval Period
3
HUM 101H Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period - Honors
3
HUM 102
Humanities from the Renaissance
through the 19th Century
3
HUM 110
Humanities in the 20th Century
3
Total Units 18
CITRUS COLLEGE
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Language Arts A.A.
Degree will:
1. Demonstrate college-level critical interpretation,
analysis, and synthesis of written material and
media messages that reflect multicultural
perspectives.
2. Demonstrate college-level informed, thoughtful,
effective written, oral, and visual expression in
English or other languages.
3. Demonstrate college-level development of cultural
appreciation through literature in English and other
languages.
4. Demonstrate college-level respect for diverse
perspectives and demonstration of cultural
awareness, personal responsibility, and ethical
behavior within a diverse society.
Liberal Arts: Arts and Humanities
A.A. Degree
The Associate Degree in Liberal Arts is designed for
students who wish a broad knowledge of liberal arts
and sciences plus additional coursework in an ―Area
of Emphasis.‖ These areas of emphasis would be an
ideal choice for students planning on transferring to
the California State University or University of California as the student can satisfy their general education
requirements, plus focus on transferable course work
that relates to majors at CSU or UC. Please consult
with a counselor for specific information regarding
your intended major at the specific colleges/
universities of your choice.
These courses emphasize the study of cultural, literary, humanistic activities and artistic expression of
human beings. Students will evaluate and interpret
the ways in which people through the ages in different cultures have responded to themselves and the
world around them in artistic and cultural creation.
Students will also learn to value aesthetic understanding and incorporate these concepts when constructing
value judgments.
This emphasis includes lower division coursework that
prepares students for possible majors in the areas of
fine arts, foreign languages, literature, and philosophy. This program is intended for students who are
planning to transfer to a four-year university. Students are required to complete the general education
requirements listed on the IGETC or CSU Breadth
advising forms, along with a minimum of 18 units in
one area of emphasis.
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109
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Select 18 units below including at least one
course from each category (A and B)
A. Arts
Units
Art
ART 100
Art History and AppreciationFundamentals
3
ART 101
Art History and AppreciationAncient
3
ART 102
Art History and AppreciationMedieval
3
ART 103
Art History and AppreciationRenaissance to Rococo
3
ART 104
Art History and Appreciation19th Century Art
3
ART 105
Art History and AppreciationEarly 20th Century Art
3
ART 110
Introduction to the Visual Arts
3
ART 111
Beginning Drawing
3
ART 112
Intermediate Drawing
3
ART 120
Two-Dimensional Design
3
ART 121
Three-Dimensional Design
3
ART 130
Beginning Painting
3
ART 140
Beginning Ceramics
3
ART 199
Motion Picture Appreciation
3
ART 200
History of Motion Pictures
3
ART 201
History of Motion Pictures II
3
ART 206
History of Latin American Art
3
ART 207
History of Asian Art - China, Korea,
and Japan
3
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
MUSP
MUSP
110
111
112
113
114
120
201
202
203
204
290
291
History of Music I
History of Music II
History of Jazz
History of Rock and Roll
Introduction to American Music
Elementary Piano I
Musicianship III
Harmony III
Musicianship IV
Harmony IV
Applied Music I Beginning
Applied Music II Intermediate
Photography
PHTO 101 Basic Photography
Theatre
THEA 101
THEA 120
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
125
200
201
202
3
Introduction to Theatre Arts
Introduction to Tech for Theatre,
TV and Film
Technical Theatre Production
The Art of the Theatre
Stage Acting I - Beginning
Stage Acting II - Intermediate
B. Humanities
COMM 200 Visual Communications
English
ENGL 102
ENGL 120
ENGL 210
Dance
DANC 102
DANC 130
DANC 159
DANC 160
DANC 161
DANC 162
DANC 259
DANC 260
DANC 261
DANC 262
DANC 289
History of Dance
Alignment and Correctives
Beginning Tap
Jazz Dance Techniques
Beginning Modern Dance
Beginning Ballet
Intermediate Tap I
Intermediate Jazz Dance I
Intermediate Modern Dance I
Intermediate Ballet I
Dance Concert Production
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
Music
MUSE 109
Music Appreciation
3
110
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Introduction to Literature
Introduction to Women's
Literature
Creative Writing I
ENGL 213
Communications
COMM 100 Mass Media and Society
3
COMM 136 Cultural History of American Films 3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
2
3
2
2
3
3
3
Horror Literature
or
ENGL 213H Horror Literature - Honors
3
ENGL 216
ENGL 251
3
ENGL 252
ENGL 261
ENGL 262
ENGL 271
ENGL 272
American Latino Literature
Introduction to English
Literature I
Introduction to English
Literature II
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient - Early Modern
Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth Century
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ENGL 291
Film as Literature
or
ENGL 291H Film as Literature-Honors
Units
3
ENGL 293
3
Children's Literature
or
ENGL 293H Children's Literature-Honors
3
ENGL 294
ENGL 296
ENGL 298
3
3
3
German
GER 101
GER 102
GER 201
GER 202
Introduction to Shakespeare
Introduction to Folklore
Literature of the Bible
German
German
German
German
I
II
III
IV
History
HIST 103
History of World Civilization
up to 1500
or
HIST 103H History of World Civilization
up to 1500 - Honors
HIST 127
HIST 140
Spanish Civilization
History of the American West
Humanities
HUM 101
Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period
or
HUM 101H Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period - Honors
HUM 102
Humanities from the Renaissance
through the 19th Century
HUM 110
Humanities in the 20th Century
3
5
5
5
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
Philosophy
PHIL 101
Great Religions of the World
3
PHIL 106
Introduction to Philosophy
3
or
PHIL 106H Introduction to Philosophy-Honors 3
Philosophy/Ethics
SPAN 211
Spanish I
5
Spanish II
5
Spanish Civilization
3
Spanish III
5
Spanish IV
5
Intermediate Spanish for
Speakers of Spanish
5
Reading and Composition for
Speakers of Spanish II
5
Total Units 18
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Liberal Arts: Emphasis in
Arts and Humanities A.A. Degree will:
1. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge of Fine and
Performing Arts history, techniques and theory.
2. Analyze, create, notate and perform examples in a
variety of styles within a studio and/or performance environment.
3. Demonstrate college-level critical interpretation,
analysis, and synthesis of written material and
media messages that reflect multicultural perspectives.
4. Demonstrate college-level informed, thoughtful,
effective written, oral, and visual expression in
English or other languages.
5. Demonstrate college-level development of cultural
appreciation through literature in English and
other languages.
6. Demonstrate respect for diverse perspectives and
demonstration of cultural awareness, personal
responsibility, and ethical behavior within a diverse
society.
3
Japanese
JPN 101
Japanese I
JPN 102
Japanese II
PHIL 108
Spanish
SPAN 101
SPAN 102
SPAN 127
SPAN 201
SPAN 202
SPAN 210
3
Liberal Arts: Math and Science
A.A. Degree
The Associate in Liberal Arts is designed for students
who wish a broad knowledge of liberal arts and
sciences plus additional coursework in an ―Area of
Emphasis‖. This area of emphasis would be an ideal
choice for students planning on transferring to the
California State University or University of California
as the student can satisfy their general education
requirements, plus focus on transferable course work
that relates to majors at CSU or UC. Please consult
with a counselor for specific information regarding
your intended major at the specific colleges/
universality of your choice.
These courses emphasize the natural sciences, which
examine the physical universe, its life forms and its
natural phenomena. Courses in math emphasize the
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
111
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
development of mathematical and quantitative reasoning skills beyond the level of intermediate
algebra. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the methodologies of science as investigative tools. Students will also examine the influence
that the acquisition of scientific knowledge has on
human experience.
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
This emphasis includes lower-division coursework that
prepares students for majors in science and engineering, math and health related fields. This program is
intended for students who are planning to transfer to
a four-year university. Students are required to complete the general education requirements listed on
the IGETC or CSU Breadth advising forms, along with
a minimum of 18 units in one area of emphasis.
Earth Science
ESCI 106
Earth and Space Science for
Educators
ESCI 120
Physical Geology
ESCI 121
Historical Geology
ESCI 122
Historical Geology with Lab
ESCI 124
Environmental Geology
ESCI 130
Physical Oceanography
4
4
4
3
3
3
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Geography Units
GEOG 118 Physical Geography
3
Select eighteen (18) units of the following
including at least one course from each of
areas A and B.
A. Science
Units
Anthropology
ANTH 212 Introduction to Physical
Anthropology
3
ANTH 212L Introduction to Physical
Anthropology Lab
1
Astronomy
ASTR 115 Planetary Astronomy
or
ASTR 115H Planetary Astronomy-Honors
3
3
ASTR 116
ASTR 117
Stellar Astronomy
Life In The Universe
4
3
Biology
BIOL 104
BIOL 105
BIOL 109
BIOL 124
BIOL 125
BIOL 145
BIOL 200
BIOL 201
BIOL 220
Biology: Contemporary Topics
General Biology
Biology for Educators
Principles of Biology I
Principles of Biology II
Environmental Science
Human Anatomy
Human Physiology
Microbiology
3
4
4
5
5
3
4
4
5
Chemistry
CHEM 103 College Chemistry
CHEM 104 College Chemistry
112
CITRUS COLLEGE
5
5
106
110
112
210
211L
220
221L
Physics
PHYS 106
PHYS 110
PHYS 111
PHYS 112
PHYS 201
PHYS 202
Physical Science for Educators
Beginning General Chemistry
General Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Physical Science for Educators
Introduction to College Physics
Physics for Life Sciences I
Physics for Life Sciences II
Physics A: Mechanics
Physics B: Thermodynamics and
Electromagnetism
4
5
5
3
1
3
1
4
4
4
4
5
5
B. Mathematics
MATH 151 Plane Trigonometry
4
MATH 160 Survey of Mathematics
4
MATH 162 Introductory Mathematical
Analysis
4
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
4
MATH 169 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II
4
MATH 170 College Algebra
4
MATH 175 Pre-Calculus
4
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 4
MATH 191 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 4
MATH 210 Calculus with Analytic Geometry III 4
MATH 211 Differential Equations
5
MATH 212 Introduction to Linear Algebra
4
Total Units 18
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Liberal Arts: Emphasis in
Math and Science A.A. Degree will:
1. Use proper vocabulary and notation when
describing mathematical concepts. They will be
able to read books and documents and extract
quantitative information.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
2. Develop level appropriate computational skills.
These will include numeric calculation, evaluation
of expressions, analysis of data, and application of
concepts.
3. Investigate and explain physical phenomena
through application of empirical knowledge using
mathematical and scientific processes and
concepts.
4. Develop an understanding of and curiosity toward
the physical world. They will develop the analytical
skills to devise questions and propose quantitative
solutions.
5. Demonstrate computational skills and an under
standing of mathematical reasoning that will increase self esteem and set them on the path of
Lifelong Learning.
Liberal Arts: Social and Behavioral
Sciences
A.A. Degree
The Associate in Liberal Arts is designed for students
who wish a broad knowledge of liberal arts and sciences plus additional coursework in an ―Area of
Emphasis‖. This area of emphasis would be an ideal
choice for students planning on transferring to the
California State University or University of California
as the student can satisfy their general education requirements, plus focus on transferable course work
that relates to majors at CSU or UC. Please consult
with a counselor for specific information regarding
your intended major at the specific colleges/
universality of your choice.
These courses emphasize the perspective, concepts,
theories and methodologies of the variety of disciplines that comprise study in the Social Sciences. Students will study human experience in the context of
the larger society. Students will study how individuals,
social subgroups, and societies operate in relation to
each other.
This emphasis includes lower division coursework that
prepares students for majors in the areas of Social or
Behavioral sciences such as Anthropology, History,
Political Science, Psychology and Sociology. This program is intended for students who are planning to
transfer to a four-year university. Students are required to complete the general education requirements listed on the IGETC or CSU Breadth advising
forms, along with a minimum of 18 units in one area
of emphasis.
CITRUS COLLEGE
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Select eighteen (18) units of following,
including 2 or more disciplines:
Anthropology
Units
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
3
or
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology- Honors
3
ANTH 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective
3
or
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective-Honors
3
ANTH 220
Introduction to Archaeology
3
Economics
ECON 100 Survey of Economics
3
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
or
ECON 101H Principles of MacroeconomicsHonors
3
ECON 102
3
Principles of Microeconomics
3
Ethnic Studies
ETHN 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
3
Geography
GEOG 102 Cultural Geography
3
History
HIST 103
History of World Civilization
up to 1500
or
HIST 103H History of World Civilization
up to 1500-Honors
HIST 104
HIST 105
HIST 107
History of World Civilization
since 1500
History of World Civilization-The
20th Century
History of the United States
before 1877
or
www.citruscollege.edu
3
3
3
3
3
113
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Units
HIST 107H History of the United States
before 1877-Honors
History of the United States from
1877
or
HIST 108H History of the United States from
1877– Honors
3
HIST 108
HIST 109
HIST 110
HIST 111
HIST 112
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
120
127
139
140
145
155
222
The World in Conflict-The 20th
Century, a History
A Survey History of Africa
History of the African-Americans
to 1876
History of the African-Americans
since 1876
British Civilization
Spanish Civilization
History of California
History of the American West
History of Mexico
History of the Vietnam War
History of World War II
Linguistics
LING 101 Introduction to Language and
Linguistics
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Political Science
POLI 103
American Government and Politics 3
or
POLI 103H American Government and PoliticsHonors
3
POLI 104
POLI 105
POLI 116
Introduction to Political Science
Comparative Politics
International Relations
Psychology
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology
or
PSY 101H Introduction to PsychologyHonors
PSY 102
PSY 103
PSY
PSY
PSY
PSY
PSY
PSY
114
110
203
205
206
212
213
Psychobiology
Statistics for the Social and
Behavioral Sciences
Psychology of Religion I
Research Methods in Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Child Growth and Development
Behavioral Disorders
Survey of Drug and Alcohol Use
and Abuse
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
PSY 220
PSY 225
PSY 226
Introduction to Social Psychology
Psychology of Human Sexuality
Psychology of Women
3
3
3
Sociology
SOC 114
Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relations
SOC 118
Minorities in America
3
3
SOC 201
Introduction to Sociology
or
Introduction to Sociology-Honors
3
Contemporary Social Problems
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
3
SOC 201H
SOC 202
SOC 216
3
3
May select one (1) of the following:
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
4
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 4
Total Units 18
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Liberal Arts: Emphasis in
Social and Behavioral Sciences A.A. Degree will:
1. Demonstrate understanding of social and/or
behavioral science issues and vocabulary.
2. Demonstrate analytic thinking by comparing and
applying social and/or behavioral science or
philosophical theories and concepts to human
culture, economics, history, politics, or philosophical questions.
3. Develop an understanding of cultural, social,
economic, historical, philosophical, and/or
political views different from one's own.
Liberal Arts: Technology and
Business
A.A. Degree
The Associate in Liberal Arts is designed for students
who wish a broad knowledge of liberal arts and
sciences plus additional coursework in an ―Area of
Emphasis‖. This area of emphasis would be an ideal
choice for students planning on transferring to the
California State University or University of California
as the student can satisfy their general education
requirements, plus focus on transferable course work
that relates to majors at CSU or UC.
Please consult with a counselor for specific information regarding your intended major at the specific
colleges/universality of your choice.
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
These courses emphasize the integration of theory
and practice within the fields of business and technology. Students will develop the ability to effectively
manage and lead organizations. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the place of business and
technology within the global economy. This emphasis
includes lower division coursework that prepares students for majors in the areas of Technology and Business such as Accounting, Computer Information Systems, Economics, Finance, Human Resources,
International Management and Marketing at a fouryear institution.
ECON 101H Principles of MacroeconomicsHonors
3
ECON 102
3
This program is intended for students who are planning to transfer to a four-year university. Students are
required to complete the general education requirements listed on the IGETC or CSU Breadth advising
forms, along with a minimum of 18 units in one area
of emphasis.
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Liberal Arts: Emphasis in
Technology and Business A.A. Degree will:
1. Understand the functions of business management
and their impact on organizational performance.
2. Understand the environments that impact
organizational growth.
3. Effectively communicate within business organizations.
4. Critically analyze business issues.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Select eighteen (18) units from the following,
including 2 or more disciplines:
Accounting
Units
ACCT 101 Financial Accounting
4
or
ACCT 101H Financial Accounting-Honors
4
ACCT 102 Managerial Accounting
4
Business
BUS 130
BUS 160
BUS 161
Introduction to Business
Business Law and the Legal
Environment I
Business Law and the Legal
Environment II
Computer Information Systems
CIS 130
Microcomputer Applications I
Computer Science
CS 111
Introduction to Programming
Concepts and Design
CS 225
Object Oriented Programming
with C++
Economics
ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics
or
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
4
4
4
3
Principles of Microeconomics
May select one (1) course from the following:
MATH 162 Introductory Mathematical
Analysis
4
MATH 165 Introductory Statistics
4
MATH 190 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 4
MATH 191 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 4
Total Units 18
Music
A.A. Degree
This degree provides students with a foundational
musical background, including music theory, history,
rudimentary piano competency, performance and
techniques/application.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Select one (1) musicianship and one (1)
harmony course from the following:
Units
MUSE 101 Musicianship I
2
MUSE 103 Musicianship II
2
MUSE 201 Musicianship III
2
MUSE 203 Musicianship IV
2
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
MUSE
102
104
202
204
Harmony
Harmony
Harmony
Harmony
I
II
III
IV
3
3
3
3
Select one (1) course from the following
music history courses:
MUSE 109 Music Appreciation
MUSE 110 History of Music I
MUSE 111 History of Music II
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3
3
3
115
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MUSE 112
MUSE 113
MUSE 114
History of Jazz
History of Rock and Roll
Introduction to American Music
Select one (1) course from the following
piano courses:
MUSE 120 Elementary Piano I
MUSE 121 Elementary Piano II
MUSE 220 Intermediate Piano I
MUSE 221 Intermediate Piano II
MUSE 222 Advanced Piano I
MUSE 223 Advanced Piano II
MUSE 224 Keyboard Skills for the Music
Major
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
Select at least two (2) units from the
following techniques/application courses
MUSC 100 Styles, Technique, and the
Soul of Popular Singing
2
MUSC 140 Jazz Improvisation I
3
MUSC 151 Songwriting I
2
MUSC 152 Songwriting II
2
MUSC 160 Sight Reading for the Studio I
3
MUSC 161 Sight Reading for the Studio II
3
MUSC 190 Career Opportunities in the Music
Entertainment Industry
3
MUSE 121 Elementary Piano II
2
MUSE 130 Voice - Beginning
2
MUSE 131 Intermediate Voice
2
MUSE 140 Beginning Guitar I
2
MUSE 141 Beginning Guitar II
2
MUSE 160 Standard Percussion
Instrumentation/Techniques
1
MUSE 161 World Percussion Instrumentation/
Techniques
1
MUSE 188 Music Production Software/
Hardware I
2
MUSE 189 Music Production Software/
Hardware II
2
MUSE 220 Intermediate Piano I
2
MUSE 221 Intermediate Piano II
2
MUSE 222 Advanced Piano I
2
MUSE 223 Advanced Piano II
2
MUSE 224 Keyboard Skills for the Music Major 3
MUSE 225 Popular Piano Styles
2
MUSE 226 Functional Piano for the Music
Major
2
MUSE 230 Voice - Intermediate/Advanced
2
MUSE 231 Voice IV - Advanced
2
MUSE 240 Intermediate Guitar I
2
MUSE 241 Intermediate Guitar II
2
MUSE 288 Electronic Music III
2
MUSP 151 Individual Performance Techniques 2
MUSP 171 Musical Theatre Workshop
4
116
CITRUS COLLEGE
MUSP 173 Musical Theatre Production I
Beginning
MUSP 178 Opera Workshop
4
2
No courses used to satisfy other requirements may
be counted in this section.
Select six (6) units from the following
performance courses:
MUSC 102 Pop/Rock Ensemble I
MUSC 103 Pop/Rock Ensemble II
MUSC 104 Pop, Rock, and Jazz Performance
Styles I
MUSC 105 Pop, Rock, and Jazz Performance
Styles II
MUSC 106 Citrus College Show Choir I
MUSC 110 Pop/Cumbia Ensemble I
MUSC 112 Pop/Salsa Ensemble I
MUSC 120 Studio Laboratory Band I
MUSC 121 Studio Laboratory Band II
MUSC 122 Jazz Ensemble
MUSC 130 Studio Orchestra I
MUSC 131 Studio Orchestra II
MUSC 141 Jazz Improvisation II
MUSC 142 Jazz Combos
MUSC 144 Fusion Ensemble
MUSC 146 Chamber Jazz
MUSC 160 Sight Reading for the Studio I
MUSP 100 Concert Choir I - Beginning
MUSP 101 Concert Choir II-Intermediate
MUSP 105 Women‘s Ensemble I Beginning
MUSP 106 Women's Ensemble II
Intermediate
MUSP 108 Men's Ensemble
MUSP 110 Vocal Ensemble I Beginning
MUSP 111 Vocal Ensemble II
MUSP 115 Chamber Chorale I Beginning
MUSP 120 Chamber Singers I Beginning
MUSP 121 Chamber Singers II Intermediate
MUSP 133 Brass Choir I
MUSP 134 Brass Choir II
MUSP 136 Percussion Ensemble I
MUSP 138 World Percussion Ensemble I
MUSP 140 Chamber Winds I
MUSP 141 Chamber Winds II
MUSP 145 Wind Symphony I
MUSP 146 Wind Symphony II
MUSP 181 Musical Theater Orchestra I
MUSP 200 Concert Choir III Intermediate/
Advanced
MUSP 201 Concert Choir IV- Advanced
Total Units 18 -
2
2
4
4
4
2
2
4
4
4
4
4
3
1
1
4
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
4
4
4
3
3
1
1
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
21
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Music A.A. Degree will:
1. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge in music
theory.
2. Demonstrate a rudimentary piano proficiency.
3. Display basic proficiency in a specific instrumental,
vocal, or creative techniques or styles.
4. Exhibit perspective on historical and stylistic
components of music and musical literature.
5. Demonstrate competency in performance skills and
ability.
Photography
A.S. Degree
The photography program will provide students
careers as an assistant to a professional photographer
or as a lab technician or free-lance photographer.
Students can also obtain positions in retail
photographic outlets.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Required courses:
PHTO 101 Basic Photography
PHTO 102 Intermediate Photography
PHTO 103 Advanced Photography
PHTO 205 Color Photography
Select three (3) of the following:
PHTO 125 Photography as an Art Medium
PHTO 126 Advanced Photography as an Art
Medium
PHTO 202 Photojournalism
PHTO 206 Intermediate Color
Photography
PHTO 213 Studio & Environmental
Portraiture
Units
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
A course may be used only once to fulfill the degree
requirements.
Total Units 21
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Photography A.S. Degree
will:
1. Demonstrate computer proficiency in specialized
programs related to photographs.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of photographic theory in
choosing new products and using them effectively.
CITRUS COLLEGE
3. Review, analyze and critique photographic work of
others.
4. Analyze and evaluate personal and other student's
images through use of evaluation rubrics based on
aesthetic concepts.
Public Works
A.S. Degree
These course offerings prepare new personnel for
public works occupations and provide upgrading
within these occupations. Job opportunities exist in
both the public and private sectors.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Required courses:
Units
PUB 150
Public Works I
3
PUB 151
Street Construction and
Maintenance
3
PUB 155
Public Works Inspection
3
PUB 157
Asphalt and Portland Cement
3
PUB 160
Public Administration
3
PUB 164
Plan Interpretation and Cost
Estimating
3
PUB 166
Supervision in Public Works
3
Total Units 21
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Public Works A.S. Degree
will:
1. Explain how to effectively use resources to
administer infrastructure maintenance.
2. Describe and explain the fundamentals of street
maintenance.
3. Demonstrate knowledge of equipment and
techniques used for street maintenance.
4. Explain preventative methods and materials,
emphasizing the importance of the need for
longevity, in street construction and maintenance.
5. Properly demonstrate a clear understanding of
inspection records, duties, and job diary techniques.
6. Describe and explain the ability to read and
interpret plans.
7. Demonstrate a clear understanding of codes and
ordinances.
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Recording Technology
A.S. Degree
Listening and Live Sound Reinforcement.
The Recording Technology Degree Program is a
hands-on, career education program which develops
critical skills in audio engineering, live sound reinforcement, sound for film, television and gaming.
The program teaches the audio basics necessary to
engineer any kind of music and sound, from rock concerts to classical recordings, movie scenes to video
games. Acceptance into the Recording Technology
Degree Program is by interview only.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Required pre-requisite courses
Units
REC 100
Survey of Entertainment
Technology
4
REC 103
Introduction to Audio Engineering 4
REC 140
Music Theory for Engineers
3
Required core audio courses
REC 105
Fundamentals of Audio
Technology
REC 115
Recording Studio Workshop I
REC 205
Advanced Audio Technology
REC 215
Recording Studio Workshop II
4
4
4
4
Required digital audio courses
REC 125
Digital Audio Technology I
REC 225
Digital Audio Technology II
3
4
Other required courses
REC 135
Live Sound Reinforcement
REC 145
Critical Listening Skills for
Engineers
REC 235
Acoustics for Engineers
REC 245
Music Business/Audio Careers
Total Units
4
3
3
3
47
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Recording Technology A.S.
Degree will:
1. Exhibit proficiency in technical operation,
communication, and production in the recording
studio.
2. Demonstrate proficiency in cross-platform
computer operation and use of multiple software
applications.
3. Successfully integrate as professionals into the
entertainment industry by demonstrating
competency in Music Business, Acoustics, Critical
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CITRUS COLLEGE
Registered Nursing
A.S. Degree
The Citrus College Associate Degree Nursing (ADN)
Program, leading to an Associate in Science Degree
with a major in Nursing, is approved by the
California Board of Registered Nursing (BRN). The
purpose of the nursing program is to educate students for entry-level registered nursing positions
in a variety of multicultural health care settings within
the community. The program consists of course work
in nursing, science, general education and clinical
practice at local hospitals and health agencies. The
graduate of this two-year program is eligible to take
the National Council for Licensure Examination
(NCLEX), and upon successful completion, become
licensed as a Registered Nurse (RN) in the State of
California. There are fees for obtaining licensure by
examination or endorsement, interim permit, and biennial renewal. California law allows for the denial of
registered nursing licensure on the basis of any prior
convictions substantially related to nursing practice.
More information can be obtained by visiting the BRN
website at http://www.rn.ca.gov/applicants/licfaqs.shtml.
The Citrus College ADN Program Philosophy is based
upon the premise that students bring unique learning
abilities, life experiences, goals, responsibilities and
support systems to the educational experience. The
philosophy of the Citrus College ADN Program supports and implements the Mission Statement of Citrus
College. The program and faculty believe that a
sound nursing education program is built on concepts
relating to the individual, health and illness, the environment, and nursing, which includes nursing education and teaching and learning.
In-depth information about the program prerequisites, which are those requirements that must be
completed prior to applying to the ADN Program,
can be obtained by visiting the website, through
Counseling, or by attending Nursing Information
Workshops (posted on the website). To access the
ADN Website, visit www.citruscollege.edu, use the
A to Z index and select Registered Nursing.
REGARDING LICENSURE
The BRN protects the consumer by screening applicants for licensure in order to identify potentially
unsafe practitioners. The BRN may deny
applications for interim permits, temporary licenses,
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
and permanent licensure, if the applicant has been
found guilty of dishonesty, fraud or deceit, felony
child abuse, sex offender crimes, acts involving narcotics, dangerous drugs or devices, assault and/or
battery, and other crimes. Applicants who have questions regarding limitations related to licensure should
contact the BRN at 916 322 3350 or access the BRN
website at www.rn.ca.gov.
Have a current California Vocational Nurse
License (LVN)
Have previously completed Human Physiology, 4
or 5 units with a lab, and Microbiology, 4 or 5
units with a lab; both with a C or better. The application and placement policy for Advanced
Placement also applies to this option (see item 2
above).
ENROLLMENT PROCESS
Separate application must be made into the nursing
program. All ADN applicants selected will be required
to also apply to Citrus College. Several admission and
progression options are available including the Generic Option, the Advanced Placement Option, and
the 30-Unit Option. Specific information is available in
the application packet, on the website, and at scheduled information workshops held by nursing counselors. Visit the website for application dates.
Candidates completing this option are not graduates of Citrus College, will not be awarded a
degree, but are eligible to take the NCLEX. The
prospective student should be aware that they
may not change their status as a 30 unit option RN
with the BRN at any time after licensure. Individuals who become licensed as Registered Nurses
using this option may not be eligible for licensure
in states other than California and may have difficulty transferring to a BSN program even if degree
requirements are completed. The program is accredited by the California Board of Registered
Nursing. They are not eligible to wear the Citrus
College ADN Nursing pin nor graduate from the
Associate Degree Program. Prospective students
must score a minimum of 62% on the TEAS V.
PLACEMENT OPTIONS
1. Generic Option students are those who will complete the entire ADN Program at Citrus College.
The application is submitted, and if qualified, cohort selection is made according to the current
enrollment process. Students must also take the
Testing of Essential Academic Skills, version five
(TEAS). Only TEAS tests taken at Citrus College
will be accepted. The TEAS tests the prospective
student‘s knowledge of basic math, English, reading and applicable science. Prospective students
must score a minimum of 62% on the TEAS V.
2. Advanced Placement Option (LVN to RN) students
are those documented as Licensed Vocational
Nurses in California, with documentation proof of
one year of full-time experience. Students choosing this option must apply to the program, complete all program prerequisites and general education, degree and graduation requirements, pass
the TEAS V with a minimum of 62%, and complete
Role Transition/RNRS 200 with a C or better.
Placement will then be into the third semester of
the ADN Program.
3. Thirty-Unit Option is available to California Licensed
Vocational Nurses. The BRN regulation 1435.5
provides the option of completing 30 semester
units in Nursing and related science courses in or
der to be eligible to take the RN licensure exam
(NCLEX). The Citrus College ADN Program
may accept up to 2% of qualified 30-Unit
Option applicants into a cohort. To qualify for
this option, the applicant must:
CITRUS COLLEGE
4. Transfer students are those who transfer nursing
units to Citrus College from another college. The
education code allows students to transfer only
lower division units to a community college.
Requests for transfer are evaluated on a case-bycase basis. Transfer placement will be made on a
space available basis and is determined by the
course content and number of nursing degree
units completed. If the prospective students has
earned a single non-progression grade (D or F), in
a registered nursing program at another school,
that non-progression grade will be considered
the only allowable failure for that student. A single
further non-progression grade will result in
dismissal from the program, without the ability to
return. Prospective students must score a
minimum of 62% on the TEAS V.
5. Challenge Students are those students admitted to
the ADN program with previous documented experience who may be allowed to challenge certain,
specified content areas (Education Code, Section
5557537), Title 5 of the California Administrative
Code.
*The TEAS requirement applies to all entry options.
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
After all prerequisites have been verified as complete,
and there are more applicants than spaces available,
selection will be based on the enrollment criteria. The
enrollment criteria is based on the recommended Best
Practice for Enrollment prepared by the California
Community Colleges Chancellor‘s Office. Please contact the nursing counselors for further clarification of
the enrollment process.
DEGREE AWARDED
Associate in Science, Nursing (ADN) – Requires degree applicable coursework including ADN Nursing
Program Pre-requisites, Nursing General Education,
ADN General Education for Associate Degree, and
Nursing Option-specific coursework. All requirements
must be completed with a grade of C or better to progress in the program, graduate with an ADN, and
qualify for licensure through NCLEX.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
GENERIC OPTION - See Option
Description Above
ADN NURSING PROGRAM PREREQUISITES/
TAKEN PRIOR TO ENTRY:
BIOL 200 Human Anatomy
BIOL 201 Human Physiology
BIOL 220 Microbiology
ENGL 101
Reading and Composition
or
ENGL 101H Reading and CompositionHonors
Units
4
4
5
3
3
TOTAL FOR PROGRAM PREREQUISITES 16
Citrus College has required prerequisites on anatomy,
physiology, and microbiology. Students who transfer
completed science graduation requirements including
anatomy, physiology and microbiology from another
school not requiring chemistry and general biology as
prerequisites will be granted science credit for
graduation. See the nursing counselor for additional
information.
ADN NURSING PROGRAM REQUIRED
GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES/TAKEN
PRIOR TO ENTRY:
PSY 205
Developmental Psychology
3
SPCH 100
3
SPCH 101
120
Interpersonal Communication
or
Public Address
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
or
SPCH 101H Public Address-Honors
3
ANTH 210
Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
or
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology-Honors
or
SOC 201
Introduction to Sociology
or
SOC 201H Introduction to Sociology-Honors
TOTAL FOR GENERAL EDUCATION
REQUIREMENTS
3
3
3
3
9
ADDITIONAL ASSOCIATE DEGREE
REQUIRED COURSES/TAKEN PRIOR
TO ENTRY:
(These requirements are waived for students who
have a BA or BS from a regionally accredited
institution in the United States.)
History or Political Science
3
Arts—One course from Area 3
3
Humanities—One course from Area
3
Physical Education
3
MATH
(Completion of Intermediate Algebra
(Math 150 or 148 & 149) or any higher level
math course with a grade of C or better and
placement at the level of college algebra or
higher on the math assessment test)
READING
(Completion of READ 099 or ENGL 099 with
a grade of C or better or passing the reading
competency examination).
TOTAL FOR ADDITIONAL REQUIRED
COURSES
5
17
See a counselor for applicable courses.
ADN FIRST YEAR - MAJOR
REQUIREMENTS FIRST SEMESTER
RNRS 190 Foundations of Nursing
RNRS 191 Intro to Medical/Surgical
Nursing I
RNRS 192 Pharmacology for Nurses
SECOND SEMESTER
RNRS 193 Pediatric Nursing
RNRS 194 Obstetrics/Maternity Nursing
RNRS 195 Beginning Medical/Surgical
Nursing II
4
5
2
3.5
3.5
5
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
SECOND YEAR - MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
THIRD SEMESTER
RNRS 201 Medical-Surgical Nursing III
RNRS 203 Mental Health-Psychiatric Nursing
FOURTH SEMESTER
RNRS 251 Medical-Surgical Nursing IV
RNRS 252 Leadership for Professional
Nursing Practice
RNRS 290 Gerontological Nursing
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS FOR
GENERIC OPTION
TOTAL OF ALL UNITS FOR GENERIC
OPTION
5
3
6
2
2
41
83
TOTAL FOR GENERAL EDUCATION
REQUIREMENTS
9
ADDITIONAL ASSOCIATE DEGREE
REQUIRED COURSES/TAKEN PRIOR TO
ENTRY:
Units
These requirements are waived for students
who have a BA or BS from a regionally
accredited institution in the United States.
History or Political Science
3
Arts—One Course from Area
3
Humanities—One Course from Area
3
Physical Education
3
The Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) requires these
Nursing courses be completed to be eligible to take
the RN licensing examination. All of these courses
must be completed with a grade of ―C‖ or better .
MATH
Completion of Intermediate Algebra
(Math 150 or 148 & 149) or any higher level
math course with a grade of C or better and
placement at the level of college algebra or
higher on the math assessment test.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT OPTION (LVN to ADN)
NURSING CURRICULUM - See Option
Description above
NURSING PROGRAM PREREQUISITES/
TAKEN PRIOR TO ENTRY
BIOL 200 Human Anatomy
4
BIOL 201 Human Physiology
4
BIOL 220 Microbiology
5
READING
Completion of READ 099 or ENGL 099 with
a grade of ―C‖ or better or passing the reading
competency examination.
TOTAL FOR ADDITIONAL REQUIRED
COURSES
17
ENGL 101
Reading and Composition
or
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition-Honors
TOTAL FOR NURSING PROGRAM
PREREQUISITES
ADN NURSING GENERAL EDUCATION
COURSES/TAKEN PRIOR TO ENTRY:
PSY 205
Developmental Psychology
SPCH 100 Interpersonal Communication
or
SPCH 101 Public Address
or
SPCH101H Public Address-Honors
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
or
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology-Honors
SOC 201
Introduction to Sociology
or
SOC 201H Introduction to Sociology- Honors
CITRUS COLLEGE
5
See a counselor for applicable courses.
3
3
16
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS LVN TO ADN:
RNRS 200 Role Transition: LVN to RN
3
THIRD SEMESTER
RNRS 201 Medical-Surgical Nursing III
5
RNRS 203 Mental Health-Psychiatric Nursing 3
FOURTH SEMESTER
RNRS 251 Medical-Surgical Nursing IV
6
RNRS 252 Leadership for Professional
Nursing Practice
2
RNRS 290 Gerontological Nursing
2
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS LVN
TO ADN
21
TOTAL UNITS LVN TO ADN
63
The Board of Registered Nursing (BRN) requires
these courses be completed to be eligible to take
the RN licensing examination. All of these courses
must be completed with a grade of ―C‖ or better.
LVN TO RN BY 30 UNIT OPTION
REQUIREMENTS
See Option description above
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121
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
NURSING PROGRAM PREREQUISITES/
TAKEN PRIOR TO ENTRY
BIOL 201 Human Physiology
BIOL 220
Microbiology
4
5
Physiology and Microbiology must be complete at
time of application, no additional science classes will
be required for any student applying for the 30 unit
option. Students planning to take BIOL 201 and BIOL
220 at Citrus College need to meet prerequisite
requirements for those classes. See counselor for
details.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS LVN TO RN
RNRS 200 Role Transition: LVN to RN
TOTAL MAJOR REQUIREMENTS FOR
30-UNIT OPTION
TOTAL FOR 30-UNIT OPTION
6
2
2
21
30
The Board of Registered Nursing (BRN)
requires these courses be completed to be
eligible to take the licensing examination.
All of these courses must be completed with
a grade of C or better.
Total Units 21 - 41
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Registered Nursing A.S.
Degree will:
1. Demonstrate caring behavior toward the client,
significant other/s, peers and other members of
the health care team, providing an environment
that respects individual human rights, values and
cultural and spiritual beliefs.
2. Apply critical thinking to formulate nursing
diagnoses through observation of the client‘s
physical condition and behavior, and through
interpretation of information obtained from the
client and others, including the health care team.
3. Formulate a care plan, from a holistic perspective,
in collaboration with the client, which ensures that
direct and indirect nursing care services provide for
the client‘s safety, comfort, hygiene, and protection, and for disease prevention and restorative
122
CITRUS COLLEGE
5.
Units
3
THIRD SEMESTER
RNRS 201 Medical-Surgical Nursing III
5
RNRS 203 Mental Health-Psychiatric Nursing 3
FOURTH SEMESTER
RNRS 251 Medical-Surgical Nursing IV
RNRS 252 Leadership for Professional
Nursing Practice
RNRS 290 Gerontological Nursing
4.
6.
7.
measures, taking into account the health-illness
continuum.
Demonstrate safe, ethical care delivery across the
lifespan that meets professional standards while
performing skills essential to the kind of nursing
action to be taken, taking into account client
individuality, explaining the health treatment to
the client and family and teaching the client and
family how to care for the client‘s health needs.
Use sound clinical judgment to delegate tasks to
subordinates based on both the legal scope of
practice of the subordinates and on the preparation and capability needed in the tasks to be
delegated, and then to effectively supervise
nursing care being given by subordinates.
Evaluate the effectiveness of the care plan through
observation of the client‘s physical condition and
behavior, signs and symptoms of illness, and reactions to treatment and through communication
with the client and heath team members, and then
to modify the plan as needed.
Act as the client‘s advocate, as circumstances
require by initiating action to promote, improve,
maintain and restore health or to change decisions
or activities which are against the interests or
wishes of the client, and by giving the client the
opportunity to make informed decisions about
health care before it is provided.
Social and Behavioral Sciences
A.A. Degree
Courses in the social and behavioral sciences focus on
people as members of society. They assist in developing an awareness of the methods of inquiry used by
the social and behavioral sciences. Critical thinking is
stimulated about the ways people act and have acted
in response to their societies, and appreciation is developed of how societies and social groups operate.
This category includes introductory or integrative survey courses in cultural anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, sociology, cultural
geography, and related disciplines.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements combined with successful completion (grades of C and
above) of the following major requirements:
Select eighteen (18) units from the following:
ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 210 Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology
Units
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Units
or
ANTH 210H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology - Honors
Introduction to Physical
Anthropology
ANTH 212L Introduction to Physical
Anthropology Lab
CHLD 182
3
ANTH 212
CHLD 183
3
1
ANTH 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective
3
or
ANTH 216H Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective - Honors
3
ANTH 218H Honors Presentation Seminar
ANTH 220 Introduction to Archaeology
CHILD DEVELOPMENT
CHLD 100 Introduction to Education and
Teaching Grades K-12
CHLD 110 Early Childhood Development
CHLD 111 Child Development Youth Adolescence
CHLD 112 Principles of Early Childhood
Education I
CHLD 114 Home-Child-Community Relations
CHLD 120 Literacy for Children
CHLD 121 Art for Children
CHLD 122 Music and Rhythms for Children
CHLD 123 Science Experiences for Children
CHLD 124 Math for Children
CHLD 130 Infant Development and Group
Care
CHLD 134 Parent-Child Interaction
CHLD 140 Before/After-School Programs
CHLD 144 Health, Safety and Nutrition for
Young Children
CHLD 150 Multi-Culture Anti-Bias Classrooms
CHLD 154 Observing and Recording Behavior
CHLD 156 Practicum in Early Childhood
Education
CHLD 156L Practicum A Lab
CHLD 160 Perceptual Motor and Movement
Activities
CHLD 164 The Child with Special Needs
CHLD 166 Speech and Language
Development and Disorders
CHLD 168 Developmental Risk: Infants and
Toddlers
CHLD 169 Managing Challenging and
Disruptive Behaviors
CITRUS COLLEGE
CHLD 181
1
3
CHLD 184
CHLD 190
CHLD 191
CHLD 194
Infant and Toddler Caregiver:
Relationships
Infant and Toddler Caregiver:
Socialization and Emotional
Development
Infant and Toddler Caregiver:
Learning and Development
Infant and Toddler Caregiver:
Environments and Routines
Administration of Early Childhood
Education Programs I
Administration of Early Childhood
Education Programs II
Personnel Issues in Adult
Supervision and Mentoring
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
ECONOMICS
ECON 100 Survey of Economics
3
ECON 101
3
3
3
Principles of Macroeconomics
or
ECON 101H Principles of MacroeconomicsHonors
3
ECON 102
3
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY
GEOG 102 Cultural Geography
3
ETHNIC STUDIES
ETHN 101 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
ETHN 116 Introduction to Chicano Studies
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
HISTORY
HIST 103 History of World Civilization up to
1500
or
HIST 103H History of World Civilization up to
1500 - Honors
HIST 104
2
1
HIST 105
2
3
HIST 107
2
2
Principles of Microeconomics
3
3
3
History of World Civilization since
1500
3
History of World Civilization - The
20th Century
3
History of the United States before
1877
3
or
HIST 107H History of the United States before
1877 - Honors
3
1
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123
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Units
HIST 108
History of the United States from
1877
or
HIST 108H History of the United States from
1877 - Honors
HIST 109
HIST 110
HIST 111
HIST 112
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
120
127
139
140
145
155
222
3
HUM 110
The World in Conflict - The 20th
Century, a History
3
A Survey History of Africa
3
History of the African-Americans to
1876
3
History of the African-Americans
since 1876
3
British Civilization
3
Spanish Civilization
3
History of California
3
History of the American West
3
History of Mexico
3
History of the Vietnam War
3
History of World War II
3
Humanities from the Renaissance
through the 19th Century
3
Humanities in the 20th Century
3
PHILOSOPHY
PHIL 101
Great Religions of the World
3
PHIL 106
Introduction to Philosophy
or
PHIL 106H Introduction to Philosophy Honors
3
PHIL 108
PHIL 110
3
3
Philosophy/Ethics
Philosophy/Logic
3
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLI 103
American Government and Politics 3
or
POLI 103H American Government and Politics Honors
3
POLI 104
POLI 105
POLI 116
124
Introduction to Political Science
Comparative Politics
International Relations
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
HUMANITIES
HUM 101
Humanities - Prehistory through
The Medieval Period
3
or
HUM 101H Humanities - Prehistory through the
Medieval Period - Honors
3
HUM 102
PSYCHOLOGY
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
or
PSY 101H Introduction to PsychologyHonors
PSY 102
PSY 103
PSY
PSY
PSY
PSY
PSY
PSY
110
203
205
206
212
213
PSY
PSY
PSY
PSY
220
225
226
250
Psychobiology
Statistics for the Social and
Behavioral Sciences
Psychology of Religion I
Research Methods in Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Child Growth and Development
Behavioral Disorders
Survey of Drug and Alcohol Use
and Abuse
Introduction to Social Psychology
Psychology of Human Sexuality
Psychology of Women
Honors Topics Seminar
3
3
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
0.5
SOCIOLOGY
SOC 114 Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relations
SOC 118 Minorities in America
3
3
SOC 201
3
Introduction to Sociology
or
SOC 201H Introduction to Sociology - Honors
3
SOC 202
SOC 216
Contemporary Social Problems
3
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
3
SOC 218H Honors Presentation Seminar
1
Total Units 18
Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Social and Behavioral
Sciences A.A. degree will:
1. Demonstrate understanding of social and/or
behavioral science issues and vocabulary.
2. Demonstrate analytical thinking by comparing
and applying social and/or behavioral science or
philosophical theories and concepts to human
culture, economics, history, politics, or
philosophical questions.
3. Develop an understanding of cultural, social,
economic, historical, philosophical, and/or
political views different from one's own.
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Theatre Arts
A.A. Degree
This degree is a fundamental exploration in the area
of Theatre Arts, highlighting acting, technical theatre/
design, theatre history and play analysis.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Theatre Arts A.A. Degree
will:
1. Demonstrate a fundamental knowledge in core
theatre elements, including Acting, Technical
Theatre, and Theatre History.
2. Demonstrate acting techniques in a performance
setting.
3. Exhibit fundamental knowledge of play structure
and analysis.
Required core courses
Units
THEA 101 Introduction to Theatre Arts
3
THEA 120 Introduction to Tech for Theatre,
TV and Film
3
THEA 201 Stage Acting I—Beginning
3
4. Explore various options in theatre doctrine to
enhance the student's area of interest.
Select one (1) of the following play
performance courses
THEA 210 Rehearsal and Performance in
Production
THEA 221 Theatre Practicum/Special
Projects I—Storytelling
THEA 222 Theatre Practicum/Special
Projects II—Physical Life
THEA 293 Theatre for Young Audiences
THEA 294 Shakespeare in Production
This degree is a fundamental exploration in the area
of Theatre Arts focusing on Performance Styles and
Acting Techniques. This degree requires meeting the
Citrus College General Education and proficiency
requirements combined with successful completion
(grades of "C" and above) of the following major
requirements:
Select one (1) of the following play
analysis courses:
THEA 200 The Art of the Theatre
THEA 204 Stage and Screenwriting
THEA 241 Fundamentals of Stage
Direction
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Select one (1) of the following elective
courses:
THEA 130 Introduction to Theatrical Scenery 3
THEA 140 Introduction to Lighting for
Theatre, Television and Film
3
THEA 202 Stage Acting II—Intermediate
3
THEA 205 Stage Acting III — Intermediate/
Advanced
3
THEA 206 Stage Acting IV—Advanced
3
THEA 211A Camera Acting I—Beginning
3
THEA 211B Camera Acting II—Intermediate
3
THEA 211C Camera Acting III—Intermediate/
Advanced
3
THEA 211D Camera Acting IV—Advanced
3
THEA 245 Stage and Project Management
for Theatre, TV and Film
3
THEA 250 Theatre Appreciation
3
THEA 284 Acting Shakespeare
3
THEA 292 Special Techniques in Acting
3
Total Units 18
CITRUS COLLEGE
Theatre Arts—Acting Emphasis
A.A. Degree
Required core courses
Units
THEA 101 Introduction to Theatre Arts
3
THEA 120 Introduction to Tech for Theatre,
TV and Film
3
THEA 202 Stage Acting II-Intermediate
3
*Note* Theatre Arts 201 is a pre-requisite for
Theatre Arts 202.
Select one (1) of the following play
performance courses:
THEA 210 Rehearsal and Performance
in Production
THEA 220 Rehearsal and Performance II
THEA 221 Theatre Practicum/Special
Projects I—Storytelling
THEA 222
Theatre Practicum/Special
Projects II—Physical Life
Select two (2) of the following acting
techniques courses:
THEA 104 Voice and Movement for the
Actor
THEA 205 Stage Acting III - Intermediate/
Advanced
THEA 206 Stage Acting IV - Advanced
THEA 211A Camera Acting I - Beginning
THEA 211B Camera Acting II - Intermediate
www.citruscollege.edu
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
THEA 211C Camera Acting III - Intermediate/
Advanced
THEA 211D Camera Acting IV - Advanced
THEA 284 Acting Shakespeare
THEA 292 Special Techniques in Acting
3
3
3
3
Select one (1) of the following specialty
Courses:
THEA 241 Fundamentals of Stage Direction
THEA 293 Theatre for Young Audiences
THEA 294 Shakespeare in Production
3
3
3
A course may be used only once to fulfill degree
requirements.
VNRS 163
Total Units 21
A.A. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Theatre Arts Acting Emphasis A.A. Degree will:
1. Demonstrate a fundamental knowledge in core
theatre elements, including Acting, Technical
Theatre, and Theatre History.
2. Demonstrate acting techniques in a performance
setting.
3. Exhibit proficiency in acting styles and techniques.
4. Exhibit knowledge in a specialized theatrical area,
such as Directing, Shakespeare, and Theatre for
Young Audiences.
Vocational Nursing
A.S. Degree
Successful completion of Vocational Nursing Program
studies allows the student to become eligible to take
the State Board Examination for Licensed Vocational
Nurses (NCLEX).
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Required Courses
Units
VNRS 150 Fundamentals of Nursing
3
VNRS 151L Fundamentals of Nursing Lab
3
VNRS 152 Pharmacology I
1
VNRS 153A Introductory Nutrition for the
Vocational Nurse
1
VNRS 154 Body Structure and Function for the
Vocational Nurse I
1.5
VNRS 155 Social-Psychology for the Vocational
Nurse
1
VNRS 160 Medical-Surgical Nursing I
3
VNRS 161L Medical-Surgical Nursing I Lab
3
VNRS 162 Pharmacology II
1
126
CITRUS COLLEGE
Diet Therapy for the Vocational
Nurse
1
VNRS 164 Body Structure and Function for the
Vocational Nurse II
1.5
VNRS 165 Growth and Development: Young
Adult - Elderly
1
VNRS 170 Medical-Surgical Nursing II
7
VNRS 171L Medical-Surgical Nursing II Lab
7
VNRS 172 Advanced Pharmacology
2
VNRS 173 Psychology for Vocational Nurses
2
VNRS 180 Pediatric Nursing
3.5
VNRS 181 Growth and Development: InfancyAdolescence
1
VNRS 182 Obstetrical-Gynecological Nursing
4
VNRS 183 Leadership in Nursing
3
Total Units 50.5
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Vocational Nursing A.S.
degree will:
1. Use correct medical terminology and
nomenclature, in the correct context, in order
to effectively communicate health/medical
information and concepts to others.
2. Demonstrate the ability to perform accurate
calculations of intake and output, drug dosages,
and IV rates.
3. Develop problem-solving and self-assessment
skills and make appropriate decisions regarding
a variety of procedural situations.
4. Demonstrate the ability to interact with patients
in a healthcare setting.
5. Develop the ability to use and adapt to current
technologies used in the healthcare setting.
6. Provide patient care that falls within the scope
of practice as set forth by the BVNPT.
Water Technology
A.S. Degree
This program is designed to prepare students who
wish to seek employment in the public water supply
industry or qualify for a more responsible position
within the industry. These courses will be helpful to
students who wish to prepare for the T1, T2, T3, T4
and T5 Water Treatment Operator and D1, D2, D3,
D4, and D5 Water Distribution Operator certification
examinations given by the California Public Health
Department. Coursework also provides contact hours
for Operator certification maintenance requirements.
This degree requires meeting the Citrus College
General Education and proficiency requirements
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
combined with successful completion (grades of C
and above) of the following major requirements:
Required courses for the major:
Units
WATR 150 Introduction to Water Systems
3
WATR 151 Water Resources and Distribution I
3
WATR 153 Water Resources and Distribution II 3
WATR 156 Water Treatment I
3
WATR 157 Water Treatment II
3
Select one (1) course from the following:
WATR 162 Water Conservation
3
BIOL 145 Environmental Science
3
PUB 155
Public Works Inspection
3
PUB 160
Public Administration
3
PUB 161
California Occupational Safety and
Health
3
PUB 166
Supervision in Public Works
3
Total Units 18
A.S. Degree Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Water Technology A.S.
degree will:
1. Demonstrate the safe handling of chemicals used
in the water industry and describe the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
regulations related to public drinking water.
2. Describe and explain regulatory issues that
relate to the public drinking water supply.
3. Diagram and explain the fundamentals of the
water distribution system including SCADA
(supervisory control and data acquisition),
maintenance, pumps, hydraulics, and valves.
4. Given a scenario involving water contamination;
identify the contaminants, recommend the best
treatment, administer the treatment and then
verify the contaminants are below allowable safety
thresholds.
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
127
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
What Career and Technical Programs Does Citrus College Offer?
Programs of Study Leading to a Certificate of Achievement
Citrus College grants certificates of achievement in a
variety of career/technical subject areas. These
certificates of achievement may be used to verify a
student's proficiency in the skills and knowledge
needed for entry-level employment or for career
advancement.
To earn a certificate of achievement, a student must
satisfactorily complete 18 units or more in a specific
sequence of required courses. The number of units
will vary by program; many subject areas require
more than 18 units. At least 50 percent of these
required courses must be completed at Citrus College.
A 2.0 GPA is required.
Programs of Study Leading to a
Certificate of Achievement
Accounting
Digital and Web Design
Administration of Justice
Emergency Management and Homeland Security
Administrative Office Occupations
Emerging Theatre Technologies
Architectural Design
Esthetician
Audio Recording Technology
Information Technology
Automotive Research and Development
Literature
Automotive Service, Diagnosis and Repair—Master
Medium and Heavy Truck Service, Diagnosis, and
Technician
Automotive Service, Diagnosis and Repair - Toyota/
Lexus/Scion Technician
Automotive Service, Diagnosis and Repair—Undercar
Drivetrain Specialist
Automotive Service, Diagnosis and Repair—
Underhood Specialist
Ceramics - One Year
Repair Technician
Photography
Public Works I
Public Works II
Vocational Nursing
Water Technology
Wildland Resources and Forestry
Writing Competency
Ceramics - Two Year
Child Development Teacher
Child Development Master Teacher
Child Development Master Teacher - Early
Intervention
Commercial Dance
Computer-Aided Design (CAD) - Architecture and
Drafting
Computer Generated Imagery
Cosmetology
Dental Assisting
128
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Accounting
Administration of Justice
The Accounting Certificate encompasses an area of
study which includes basic accounting, financial and
managerial accounting principles, income tax accounting and accounting general ledger software. The Accounting Certificate is designed to prepare
students for entry-level accounting positions as accounting clerks and bookkeepers. The Accounting
Certificate courses combine classroom lectures, demonstrations and a wide use of technology to ensure
relevant training.
Administration of Justice offers men and women a
career of personal challenge and rewarding public
service. A great need exists for intelligent, welleducated personnel with a firm commitment toward
professional improvement in the justice system. Citrus
College offers courses to prepare students for employment and promotion in the criminal justice system.
Required Courses
ACCT 101 Financial Accounting
or
ACCT 101H Financial Accounting - Honors
ACCT 102
ACCT 110
BUS 132
Managerial Accounting
Income Tax Accounting
Ethics in Business
Select one (1) of the following:
CIS 130
Microcomputer Applications I
OFF 101
Introduction to Microsoft Office
Applications
OFF 120
Microsoft Excel
Select one (1) of the following:
ACCT 100 Accounting
ACCT 115 QuickBooks
BUS 130
Introduction to Business
BUS 146
Personal Finance
BUS 150
Business English
BUS 152
Business Communications
BUS 160
Business Law and the Legal
Environment I
Total Units 20 -
Units
4
4
4
4
3
4
3
3
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
22
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Accounting Certificate of
Achievement will:
1. Prepare accurate reports for decision-making &
regulatory compliance using general ledger
software & commonly used office software
programs.
2. Possess a working knowledge of accounting and
business terminology and accounting
principles and concepts used in the business
environment.
CITRUS COLLEGE
Required Courses
Units
AJ 101
Introduction to the Administration
of Justice
3
AJ 102
Concepts of Criminal Law
3
AJ 103
Legal Aspects of Evidence
3
AJ 109
Criminal Procedures
3
AJ 112
Community Relations
3
Select one (1) of the following writing courses
AJ 123
Writing for Criminal Justice
Professionals
3
AJ 133
Correctional Writing
3
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
3
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition - Honors
3
Select one (1) of the following Administration
of Justice courses
AJ 105
Criminal Investigation
3
AJ 106
Patrol Procedures
3
AJ 107
Traffic Control
3
AJ 108
Juvenile Procedures
3
AJ 111
Narcotics and Vice Control
3
AJ 121
Death Investigation
3
AJ 130
Introduction to Probation and Parole 3
AJ 131
Introduction to Corrections
3
AJ 135
Control and Supervision in Corrections 3
AJ 136
Correctional Interviewing and
Counseling
3
AJ 137
Legal Aspects of Corrections
3
Employment Opportunities:
Entry-level police cadet/police officer
Total Units 21
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Administration of Justice
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Demonstrate an ability to write clearly and
accurately about the administration of justice
process using an appropriate vocabulary.
2. Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking about
issues in the administration of justice system.
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129
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
3. Demonstrate a comprehension and appreciation of
the connections, contributions, experiences,
and potential conflicts of various ethnic groups,
races, and genders as they interact with the
criminal justice system.
4. Demonstrate an awareness of sciences and
emerging technologies as it impacts the
administration of justice.
Administrative Office Occupations
Students who receive the Administrative Office
Occupations Certificate are prepared for management
assignments in the business office environment. This
certificate is recommended for both experienced office staff as well as entry-level office workers who are
seeking to increase their potential for promotion.
Certificate recipients will have expert office skills and
in-depth software knowledge. The courses leading to
this certificate provide training in office information
systems, human relations, business communications,
and business records management.
Required Courses
Units
OFF 101
Introduction to Microsoft Office
Applications
3
OFF 120
Microsoft Excel
3
OFF 215
Introduction to Microsoft Outlook
2
OFF 260
Computer Keyboarding and Document
Processing
3
OFF 281
Filing and Records Management
3
OFF 285
Administrative Office Procedures
3
OFF 294
Microsoft Word
3
BUS 150
Business English
3
BUS 152
Business Communications
3
Total Units 26
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Administrative Office
Occupations Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Perform all General Office Clerk tasks--use e-mail
to communicate with others; understand and
utilize filing procedures; examine incoming
materials and code it numerically, alphabetically
or by subject matter; enter data electronically in
various storage devices; use electronic calendars;
use correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation in
prepared documents; file data on computer; key
board and file data on computers as well as
access information; keep payroll records and
prepare invoices; make photocopies and take
inventory; set up spreadsheets; work with
customers and answer questions; format letters,
130
CITRUS COLLEGE
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
memos, tables and reports using current office
application programs; compose routine letters
memos and e-mail messages.
Understand current office procedures and
techniques.
Prepare various business forms and documentation
and understand their purpose.
Operate a variety of business machines, including
computer equipment, photocopy machines,
facsimiles, printers, telephone and calculating
machines.
Follow directions as well as demonstrate management initiative, dependability and pride in good
work.
Understand the systems and procedures of
organizing and planning office work, and exercise
leadership skills in the business environment.
Architectural Design
Design principles, complex animation and CAD
systems are applied to problems in architecture,
landscape architecture and urban planning. Proper
and efficient methods of sketching, producing
documents, models, 3D digital models, animations
and multifaceted presentations are examined.
Employment Opportunities
Entry-level - CADPERSON / DESIGN PERSON
Computer Aided Design (CAD)-Architecture and
Drafting - Certificate of Achievement required to be
completed first.
Total Units 19.5
Required Courses
Units
ARCH201 Architectural Design I
3
ARCH202 Architectural Design II
3
ARCH250 History of Architecture: Prehistory
to Mannerism.
3
ARCH251 History of Architecture: Baroque to
the Present Day
3
ART120
Two-Dimensional Design
3
ART121
Three-Dimensional Design
3
DRAF290 Introduction to Maya Practices.
3
Total Units 40.5
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Architectural Design Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Describe effective architectural design principle
techniques including graphic communication,
orientation, and decision making.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
2. Demonstrate the ability to use advanced
technology to prepare architectural design
drawings, Computer Aided Drawings (CAD),
animations and multimedia presentations.
3. Demonstrate complex planning techniques and
administration of document control for
architectural designs, presentations and
animations.
4. Demonstrate the ability to estimate time, material,
labor and equipment for sophisticated architectural
designs, presentations and animations.
Audio Recording
Technology
This is a one year audio recording program intended
to teach you the basis of how to engineer any kind of
music, from hip-hop to classical to movie scenes.
Required Courses
Units
REC 105
Fundamentals of Audio Technology
4
REC 115
Recording Studio Workshop I
4
REC 125
Digital Audio Technology I
3
REC 135
Live Sound Reinforcement
4
REC 145
Critical Listening Skills for Engineers
3
REC 205
Advanced Audio Technology
4
REC 215
Recording Studio Workshop II
4
REC 225
Digital Audio Technology II
4
REC 235
Acoustics for Engineers
3
REC 245
Music Business/Audio Careers
3
Total Units 36
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Audio Recording Technology
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Communicate effectively using proper vocabulary
in written and verbal form to facilitate the
technical and creative outcomes of a product.
2. Apply acoustic concepts and mathematical
formulas to demonstrate understanding of wave
theory, room acoustics, materials, and microphone
and speaker placement.
3. Demonstrate understanding of the fundamental
principles of audio through developing critical
thinking, decision-making and problem solving
skills by applying them to the studio,
post-production and live sound environments.
4. Develop interpersonal skills, empathy, and respect for others by completing team projects in
order to gain key skills expected of professionals
in the field.
CITRUS COLLEGE
5. Demonstrate advanced computer competency by
completing production assignments utilizing
software-based production and editing systems.
6. Understand the technical, creative and interpersonal skills required by the entertainment
industry through demonstrating thorough
knowledge of digital audio workstations and all
audio hardware as appropriate to each course.
Automotive Research and Development
The High Performance Institute offers a Certificate of
Achievement in Automotive Research & Development.
The field of automotive research and development
offers many exciting career opportunities including:
engineering design, prototype building, vehicle
evaluation and engineering, materials engineering,
powertrain tuning and design, regulatory affairs and
advanced technical research.
The Citrus Certificate of Achievement in Automotive
Research & Development area of emphasis is Engine
Research, Development & Testing. The Engine Research, Development & Testing concentration provides a solid background in engine design and
development, as well as testing procedures using
both engine and chassis dynamometers.
The Certificate of Achievement in Automotive Research & Development is a stepping stone to exciting
career opportunities. Completion of the certificate is
excellent preparation for students desiring to transfer
to a four-year university to pursue a degree in
engineering, production technology or industrial technology. Students can also choose to step directly into
the exciting world of the automotive aftermarket or
new vehicle production where a number of entry-level
positions await the highly-motivated student.
Required courses in engine research,
development, and testing
AUTO 291 Engine Performance
Enhancements and Tuning
AUTO 295 Engine Design
AUTO 296 Cylinder Head Development
AUTO 297 Cylinder Block Development
Units
3
4
4
4
Select at least eight (8) units from the
following:
AUTO 299 Engine Dynamometer Operation and
Testing Procedures
2
BUS 130
Introduction to Business
3
www.citruscollege.edu
131
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
BUS 132
PHIL108
BUS 170
DRAF 160
PHYS 110
AUTO 695A
AUTO 695B
AUTO 695C
AUTO 695D
AUTO 696A
AUTO 696B
AUTO 696C
AUTO 696D
AUTO 230A
AUTO 230B
AUTO 230C
AUTO 230D
Ethics in Business
or
Philosophy/Ethics
3
Small Business Management
Intermediate Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
Introduction to College Physics
Special Topics: Automotive
Technology
Special Topics: Automotive
Technology
Special Topics: Automotive
Technology
Special Topics: Automotive
Technology
Special Topics: Automotive
Technology
Special Topics: Automotive
Technology
Special Topics: Automotive
Technology
Special Topics: Automotive
Technology
Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience A
Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience B
Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience C
Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience D
3
3
2.5
4
0.5
1
2
3
0
0.5
0.5
1
1
2
3
4
Special Topics Auto 695 A-D or 696 A-D require
department approval.
Work Experience Auto 230 A-D require department
approval.
Total Units 23
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Automotive Research and
Development Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Be able to test and evaluate the design of systems that effect performance, emissions, energy
production and consumption and will either enter
the automotive aftermarket industry as a research
and development technician or transfer to a fouryear school to continue their education in technology and engineering.
Automotive Service, Diagnosis, and
Repair—Master Technician
The courses listed in the Automotive Service,
Diagnosis and Repair - Master Technician certificate
meet the National Automotive Technicians' Education
Foundation Standards and are selected to provide a
comprehensive set of job skills needed in the automotive industry. In addition to improving the student‘s
employability, the skills developed in the program will
enhance their ability to become an Automotive
Service Excellence (ASE) Master Technician. The
certificate is designed to prepare an individual for
employment or provide the skills needed for career
advancement in the automotive industry.
Required automotive technology
courses
Units
AUTO 101 Fundamentals of Automotive Service,
Diagnosis and Repair
5
AUTO 151 Engine Service, Diagnosis and Repair 5
AUTO 154 Chassis Service, Diagnosis, and Repair 8
AUTO 156 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems I
5
AUTO 162 Drivetrain Service, Diagnosis and
Repair
8
AUTO 166 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems II
3
AUTO 167 Automotive HVAC Service, Diagnosis
& Repair
3
AUTO 168 Engine Control Systems Service,
Diagnosis and Repair
8
Select four (4) units of the following:
AUTO 230A Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience A
AUTO 230B Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience B
AUTO 230C Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience C
AUTO 230D Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience D
1
2
3
4
Select one (1) of the following language arts
courses
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition - Honors
ESL 100
Fundamentals of Composition
ESL 101
Reading and Composition
3
3
4
3
Select one (1) mathematics course
MATH 150 Intermediate Algebra
5
Students may substitute a higher level math course.
Total Units 57 - 58
132
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Automotive Service,
Diagnosis, and Repair - Master Technician Certificate
of Achievement will:
1. Verify the customer‘s vehicle complaint, diagnose
the failure or find the vehicle operating as
designed, estimate the labor and parts cost, and
make a clear needs/recommendations statement
on the repair order citing both complaint and
cause. In addition, once the student receives
authorization, the student will service and/or repair
the vehicle to industry standards, verify the
repair has corrected the customer‘s complaint and
document the remedy within the ―customer pay‖
labor time available in Mitchell, ALLDATA or other
approved labor estimating manual.
Automotive Service, Diagnosis and
Repair—Toyota/Lexus/Scion
Technician
The courses listed in the Automotive Service, Diagnosis and Repair - Toyota/Lexus/Scion Technician
certificate are selected to provide a comprehensive
set of job skills needed by Toyota, Lexus and Scion
technicians. In addition to improving the student‘s
employability, the skills developed in each course will
enhance their ability to become Automotive Service
Excellence (ASE) certified in all eight ASE areas. The
certificate is designed to prepare an individual for employment or provide the skills needed for career
advancement.
Required automotive technology
courses
Units
AUTO 101 Fundamentals of Automotive
Service, Diagnosis and Repair
5
AUTO 151 Engine Service, Diagnosis and Repair 5
AUTO 154 Chassis Service, Diagnosis, and Repair 8
AUTO 156 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems I
5
AUTO 162 Drivetrain Service, Diagnosis and
Repair
8
AUTO 166 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems II
3
AUTO 167 Automotive HVAC Service, Diagnosis
& Repair
3
AUTO 168 Engine Control Systems Service,
Diagnosis and Repair
8
AUTO 281 Advanced Toyota Certified Technician
Training
6.5
CITRUS COLLEGE
Note: AUTO 281 is a capstone course and must be
taken after all other major coursework is completed.
Select four (4) units from the following:
AUTO 230A Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience A
AUTO 230B Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience B
AUTO 230C Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience C
AUTO 230D Automotive Service and Repair Work
Experience D
1
2
3
4
Select one (1) of the following language
arts courses
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition - Honors
ESL 100
Fundamentals of Composition
ESL 101
Reading and Composition
3
3
4
3
Select one (1) mathematics course
MATH 150 Intermediate Algebra
5
Students may substitute a higher level math
course
Total Units 62.5 - 63.5
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Automotive Service,
Diagnosis and Repair - Toyota/Lexus/Scion
Technician Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Given any Toyota/Lexus/Scion vehicle complaint,
verify the customer‘s complaint, diagnose
the failure or find the vehicle operating as
designed, estimate the labor and parts cost, and
make a clear needs/recommendations statement
on the repair order citing both complaint and
cause. In addition, once the student receives
authorization, the student will service and/or repair
the vehicle to industry standards, verify the repair
has corrected the customer‘s complaint and
document the remedy within the ―customer pay‖
labor time available in the Toyota flat-rate Manual.
Automotive Service, Diagnosis &
Repair—Undercar/Drivetrain Specialist
The courses listed in the Undercar/Drivetrain Specialist certificate are selected to provide a comprehensive
set of job skills needed for a technician specializing in
undercar/drivetrain service, diagnosis and repair . In
addition to improving the student‘s employability, the
skills developed in each course will enhance their
ability to become Automotive Service Excellence
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133
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
(ASE) A2, A3, A4 and A5 certified. The certificate is
designed to prepare an individual for employment or
provide the skills needed for career advancement in
the automotive industry.
Required Courses
Units
AUTO 101 Fundamentals of Automotive
Service, Diagnosis and Repair
5
AUTO 154 Chassis Service, Diagnosis,
and Repair
8
AUTO 156 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems I
5
AUTO 162 Drivetrain Service, Diagnosis and
Repair
8
Total Units 26
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Automotive Service,
Diagnosis & Repair - Undercar/Drivetrain Specialist
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Given a chassis or drivetrain related complaint,
verify the customer‘s complaint, diagnose the
failure or find the vehicle operating as designed,
estimate the labor and parts cost, and make a
clear needs/recommendations statement on the
repair order citing both complaint and cause. In
addition, once the student receives authorization,
the student will service and/or repair the
vehicle to industry standards, verify the repair has
corrected the customer‘s complaint and
document the remedy within the ―customer pay‖
labor time available in Mitchell, ALLDATA or
other approved labor estimating manual.
Automotive Service, Diagnosis &
Repair-Underhood Specialist
The courses listed in the Underhood Specialist certificate are selected to provide a comprehensive set of
job skills needed for a technician specializing in
underhood service, diagnosis and repair . In addition
to improving the student‘s employability, the skills
developed in each course will enhance their ability to
become Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) A1, A6,
A7 and A8 certified. The certificate is designed to
prepare an individual for employment or provide the
skills needed for career advancement in the automotive industry.
AUTO 156 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems I
5
AUTO 167 Automotive HVAC Service, Diagnosis
& Repair
3
AUTO 168 Engine Control Systems Service,
Diagnosis and Repair
8
Total Units 26
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Automotive Service,
Diagnosis & Repair - Underhood Specialist Certificate
of Achievement will:
1. Given any engine related, climate control or
charging/starting system vehicle complaint; verify
the customer‘s complaint, diagnose the failure or
find the vehicle operating as designed, estimate
the labor and parts cost, and make a clear needs/
recommendations statement on the repair order
citing both complaint and cause. In addition, once
the student receives authorization, the student will
service and/or repair the vehicle to industry
standards, verify the repair has corrected the
customer‘s complaint and document the remedy
within the ―customer pay‖ labor time available in
Mitchell, ALLDATA or other approved labor
estimating manual.
Ceramics—One Year
Required Courses
ART 111
Beginning Drawing
3
ART 120
Two-Dimensional Design
ART 140
Beginning Ceramics
ART 141
Intermediate Ceramics
ART 145
Ceramic Design and Decoration
Select two (2) of the following
ART 104
Art History and Appreciation 19th Century Art
ART 105
Art History and Appreciation Early 20th Century Art
ART 115
Figure Drawing I
ART 130
Beginning Painting
ART 180
Beginning Clay Sculpture
PHTO 101 Basic Photography
Unit
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Employment Opportunity:
Studio Potter, Ceramic Shop (retail)
Total Units 21
Required Courses
Units
AUTO 101 Fundamentals of Automotive Service,
Diagnosis and Repair
5
AUTO 151 Engine Service, Diagnosis and Repair 5
134
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Ceramics - One Year Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Utilize proper vocabulary in the study and
discussion of Visual Arts and Art History.
2. Analyze and create examples in a variety of styles
within a studio environment.
3. Research, identify, and evaluate historical periods
in Art History.
4. Recognize how societies' world views influence
Visual Arts and Art History traditions.
Ceramics—Two Year
Required Courses
Units
Ceramics—One Year Certificate of Achievement 21
ART 112
Intermediate Drawing
3
ART 121
Three-Dimensional Design
3
ART 240
Advanced Ceramics I
3
ART 241
Advanced Ceramics II
3
Select two (2) of the following :
ART 180
Beginning Clay Sculpture
ART 181
Intermediate Clay Sculpture
ART 182
Advanced Clay Sculpture I
ART 183
Advanced Clay Sculpture II
BUS 185
Elements of Marketing
PHTO 101 Basic Photography
3
3
3
3
3
3
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:
Studio Potter, Ceramics Shop (Retail)
Total Units 39
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Ceramics - Two Year
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Utilize proper vocabulary in the study and
discussion of Visual Arts and Art History.
2. Analyze and create examples in a variety of styles
within a studio environment.
3. Research, identify, and evaluate historical periods
in Art History.
4. Recognize how societies' world views influence
Visual Arts and Art History traditions.
Child Development Teacher
Courses in this certificate lead to the child development associates degree or careers in the field of child
development and early childhood education.
Completion of the program prepares students to work
CITRUS COLLEGE
as a child development aide, assistant teacher, or
teacher in a variety of early childhood programs.
Required Courses
CHLD 110 Early Childhood Development
or
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
CHLD 112
CHLD 114
CHLD 154
Units
3
Principles of Early Childhood
Education I
Home-Child-Community Relations
Observing and Recording Behavior
Select nine (9) units of the following
CHLD 116 Introduction to Curriculum
CHLD 120 Literacy for Children
CHLD 121 Art for Children
CHLD 122 Music and Rhythms for Children
CHLD 123 Science Experiences for Children
CHLD 124 Math for Children
CHLD 134 Parent-Child Interaction
CHLD 144 Health, Safety and Nutrition for
Young Children
CHLD 150 Multi-Culture Anti-Bias Classrooms
CHLD 160 Perceptual Motor and Movement
Activities
CHLD 164 The Child with Special Needs
CHLD 166 Speech and Language Development
and Disorders
Required Supervised Teaching Experience
CHLD 156 Practicum in Early Childhood
Education
CHLD 156L Practicum A Lab
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
3
3
3
2
3
2
2
1
Also Required
16
16 units of general education: one course minimum in
each of the categories - English/Language Arts, Math
or Science, Social Sciences, Humanities and/or Fine
Arts, any general education elective excluding PE.
These GE courses must qualify for graduation credit.
PERMIT INFORMATION: This Certificate meets the
educational requirements for the Teacher Permit
through the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. All coursework must be completed with
the grade of C or better to meet permit requirements.
In order to apply for the State Permit, students must
complete 175 days of 3+ hours per day of
qualifying work experience with young children within
4 years. Specific details may be found at
www.ctc.ca.gov
Total Units 40
www.citruscollege.edu
135
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Child Development Teacher
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Acquire knowledge and foundational skills
necessary to work in the teaching profession.
2. Design, implement and evaluate environments and
activities that support positive, developmental play
and learning outcomes for children.
3. Demonstrate the ability to identify, analyze, and
apply theories of early childhood education and
child development.
4. Apply effective guidance and teaching strategies
that support social growth, learning, and
identity development and promote self-confidence.
NOTE: Administration and core courses are NOT acceptable specializations. CHLD 110, 111, PSY 206,
CHLD 114, 190, 191 and 194 cannot be used for the
"area of specialization".
PERMIT INFORMATION: This certificate meets the
educational requirements for the Master Teacher Permit through the California Commission on Teacher
Credentialing. All coursework must be completed with
a grade of "C" or better to meet permit requirements.
In order to apply for the State Permit, students must
complete 350 days of 3+ hours per day of qualifying
work experience with young children within 4 years.
Specific details may be found at www.ctc.ca.gov
Total Units 49
Child Development—Master Teacher
This certificate is designed for the early childhood
professional who is seeking career advancement and
the educational requirements for the lead teacher or
"Master Teacher" job or employment category.
The certificate program prepares the employed child
development teacher to function as a lead or mentor
teacher to students in training or other adults working
in the same environment. May be eligible to participate in the Mentor Teacher Program, which includes a
stipend for professional development and for supervising identified students in training.
Required Courses
Completion of the Child Development Teacher Certificate of Achievement and the following course work:
Total Units 40
CHLD 194
Personnel Issues in Adult
Supervision and Mentoring
REQUIRED: Six units of area specialization
3
6
Note: The "area of specialization" units are above
and beyond the child development unit requirements
for the Teacher Certificate. The 6 units in your "area
of specialization" may not be counted twice and
should focus on one specific area of service, instruction, or curriculum. Examples of specializations: Infant/Toddler, Teacher/Family Relations, Music/
Movement Experiences, Children with Special Needs,
Speech and Language Development, Health and
Safety, Art and Creative Experiences, Multicultural/
Bilingual Curriculum, Child Abuse/Children at Risk,
Literacy/Children's Literature.
136
CITRUS COLLEGE
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Child Development - Master
Teacher Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Acquire knowledge and foundational skills
necessary to work in the teaching profession.
2. Demonstrate global consciousness in order to be
an effective professional in working with
children and families from diverse cultural back
grounds
3. Apply ethical standards and professional
behaviors that demonstrate an understanding and
a knowledge, and a deepening commitment to the
child development profession and early childhood
education.
4. Apply effective guidance and teaching strategies
that support social growth, learning, and
identity development and promote self-confidence.
Child Development Master Teacher—
Early Intervention
This certificate is designed for the experienced
teacher who desires to develop the additional skills
and knowledge necessary to work with exceptional
children in a special education or inclusive setting.
This inclusive training program meets the education
requirements for child development master teacher.
Emphasis is placed on working with young children
with special needs in preschool and in early intervention programs.
Required Courses
CHLD 110 Early Childhood Development
or
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
Units
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
CHLD 112
Principles of Early Childhood
Education I
CHLD 114 Home-Child-Community Relations
CHLD 120 Literacy for Children
CHLD 150 Multi-Culture Anti-Bias Classrooms
CHLD 154 Observing and Recording Behavior
CHLD 156 Practicum in Early Childhood
Education
CHLD 156L Practicum A Lab
CHLD 160 Perceptual Motor and Movement
Activities
CHLD 164 The Child with Special Needs
CHLD 166 Speech and Language Development
and Disorders
CHLD 168 Developmental Risk: Infants and
Toddlers
CHLD 169 Managing Challenging and Disruptive
Behaviors
CHLD 194 Personnel Issues in Adult Supervision
and Mentoring
3
3
3
3
3
2
1
2
3
2
2
1
3
Also, 16 diversified general education units within the
areas of English, Math/Science, Social Sciences,
Humanities or Fine Arts, any general education excluding PE. GE classes must count for graduation
credit. Please see an academic counselor or adviser.
PERMIT INFORMATION: Certificate meets the educational requirements for the Master Teacher Permit
through the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. All coursework must be completed with
the grade of "C" or better to meet permit requirements. In order to apply for the State Permit, students must complete 350 days of 3+ hours per day
of qualifying work experience with young children
within four years. Specific details may be found at
www.ctc.ca.gov
Recommended: 100 hours of the 350 hours should
be in a special education setting if the student is
seeking the State permit.
Employment Opportunity
Child Development Master Teacher with emphasis in
young child with special needs
Total Units 50
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Child Development Master
Teacher - Early Intervention Certificate of
Achievement will:
1. Apply ethical standards and professional behaviors
that demonstrate understanding, knowledge,
CITRUS COLLEGE
and a deepening commitment to the child development profession and early childhood education.
2. Design, implement and evaluate environments and
activities that support positive, developmental play
and learning outcomes for children.
3. Demonstrate the ability to identify, analyze, and
apply theories of early childhood education and
child development.
4. Apply effective guidance and teaching strategies
that will support social growth, learning, identity
development and promote self-confidence.
Commercial Dance
Dance classes at Citrus prepare you for many
opportunities in the world of dance. Classes are
offered in jazz dance, classical ballet, tap dance and
modern dance.
Recent changes in course repeatability will require
this certificate to be modified. As soon as a revised
version is approved, it will be made available on the
Citrus College web site.
Required Courses
DANC 102 History of Dance
DANC 130 Alignment and Correctives
DANC 172 Composition in Group Forms
DANC 259 Intermediate Tap I
DANC 260 Intermediate Jazz Dance I
DANC 262 Intermediate Ballet I
DANC 269 Intermediate Tap II
DANC 272 Intermediate Ballet II
DANC 289 Dance Concert Production
Units
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
Select thirty-four (34) units of the following :
DANC 159 Beginning Tap
1
DANC 160 Jazz Dance Techniques
1
DANC 161 Beginning Modern Dance
1
DANC 162 Beginning Ballet
1
DANC 171 Introduction to Choreography/
Improvisation
2
DANC 259 Intermediate Tap I
1
DANC 260 Intermediate Jazz Dance I
1
DANC 261 Intermediate Modern Dance I
1
DANC 262 Intermediate Ballet I
1
DANC 269 Intermediate Tap II
1
DANC 270 Intermediate Jazz Dance II
1
DANC 272 Intermediate Ballet II
1
DANC 289 Dance Concert Production
3
MUSE 171 Musical Theatre Techniques
3
These elective classes may be taken multiple times.
Total Units 49
www.citruscollege.edu
137
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Commercial Dance
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Demonstrate a functional knowledge of
alignment, ballet, tap, jazz and modern dance
techniques through the beginning and
intermediate level.
2. Demonstrate the ability to use technology to
prepare hand drawings, Computer Aided Drawings
(CAD), and multimedia presentations.
3. Demonstrate planning techniques and
administration of document control for design and
working drawings.
4. Demonstrate the ability to estimate time, material,
labor and equipment for design and working
drawings.
Computer Aided Design
This Computer Aided Design (CAD)-Architecture and
Drafting Certificate provides a foundation for such
majors as Architecture, Drafting and Computer
Generated Imagery.
Employment Opportunities
Entry-level Computer Aided Design (CAD) Cadperson/Draftsperson
Strongly recommended preparation
Units
DRAF 101 Beginning Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
3
or
One year of high school drafting or industry drafting
experience.
Required Courses
ARCH 100 Introduction to Architecture
ARCH 110 Introduction to Architectural
Communication and Functional
Design
ARCH 111 Basic Architectural Design
DRAF 160 Intermediate Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
DRAF 161 Advanced Computer Aided Design
(CAD)
Select one (1) of the following:
ARCH 102 Visual Communication
DRAF 102 Visual Communication
3
3
3
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
Select one (1) of the following:
ARCH 200 Portfolio Preparation
3
DRAF 103 Advanced Engineering Drawing
3
Total Units 19.5
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Computer Aided Design
(CAD)-Architecture and Drafting Certificate of
Achievement will:
1. Describe effective drafting techniques including
graphic communication, orientation, and
decision making.
138
CITRUS COLLEGE
Computer Generated Imagery
This program provides coursework for majors such as
architecture, computer generated imagery (CGI), engineering and animation. Design principles, CAD and
animation systems are applied to problems in animation, architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning and engineering. Proper and efficient methods of
sketching, story boarding, 3D digital models, animations and multifaceted presentations‘ are examined.
Required Courses
ARCH 200 Portfolio Preparation
ART 111
Beginning Drawing
ART 115
Figure Drawing I
ART 120
Two-Dimensional Design
DRAF 160 Intermediate Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
DRAF 161 Advanced Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
DRAF 290 Introduction to Maya Practices
Units
3
3
3
3
2.5
2.5
3
Select one (1) of the following
ARCH 102 Visual Communication
2.5
DRAF 102 Visual Communication
2.5
Employment Opportunity
Entry-level - Animation Modeler.
Total Units 22.5
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Computer Generated
Imagery (CGI) Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Describe effective Computer Generated Imagery
(CGI) techniques including graphic communication,
orientation, and decision making.
2. Demonstrate the ability to use technology to
prepare Computer Generated Imagery (CGI)
drawings, Computer Aided Drawings (CAD),
animations and multimedia presentations.
3. Demonstrate Computer Generated Imagery (CGI)
planning techniques and administration of file
control for CGI design and animation.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
4. Demonstrate the ability to estimate time, material,
labor and equipment for Computer Generated
Imagery (CGI) design and animation.
Cosmetology
The Cosmetology Certificate of Achievement is a comprehensive curriculum that prepares students for a
wide range of careers within the beauty industry. The
curriculum offers theoretical and practical disciplines
as well as interactive demonstrations and hands-on
applications that train students to possess knowledge,
language and skills for career opportunities in Haircutting, Hairstyling, Colorist, Chemical Specialist, Skin
and Nail Spas, Sales and Entrepreneurship. Students
will understand the importance of professionalism and
artistic endeavor in this diverse industry through inspiration and challenge. This program of study also
enables students to prepare for and pass the California State Board Exam of Cosmetology.
Required Courses
Units
COS 141
Introduction to Cosmetology
11
COS 151
Salon Success
4
COS 161A Haircolor I
4
COS 161B Haircolor II
4
COS 172A Hair Design I
4
COS 172B Hair Design II
4
COS 178A Chemical Texturizing I
4
COS 178B Chemical Texturizing II
4
COS 181A Hairsculpting I
4
COS 181B Hairsculpting II
4
COS 182
Skincare
4
COS 183
Nail Care
4
Total Units 55
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Cosmetology Certificate of
Achievement will:
1. Be prepared to pass the State Board Exam and
acquire California State licensure.
2. Be trained theoretically and practically in the
disciplines of: haircutting, haircoloring, chemical
training, skin/nails, and hairstyling necessary for
the professional stylist.
3. Be inspired and challenged artistically through
industry competitions, projects, community
service and collaborative work with partnering
college disciplines.
CITRUS COLLEGE
DENTAL ASSISTING
The Dental Assisting Program prepares students for
the California State Registered Dental Assistant Examination. This program is accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Accreditation
and the Dental Board of California. Upon completion,
the graduate is eligible to sit for the California State
Registered Dental Assistant Examination and the
National Certification Examination. Students must
maintain a minimum grade of ―C‖ (75%) in all dental
courses.
Required Courses
Units
DENT 100 Dental Assisting Basics
2.5
DENT 101 Chairside Assisting
3
DENT 102 Dental Materials
2.5
DENT 121 Preclinical Dental Science
2
DENT 122 Infection Control in the Dental Office 1.5
DENT 123 Preventive Dental Health
2
DENT 124 Dental Specialties
2
DENT 125 Dental Practice Management
2
DENT 201 Dental Radiology
2
DENT 202 Registered Dental Assistant
4
DENT 203 Dental Practical Experience
5.5
DENT 204 RDA Clinical Procedures
1
Employment Opportunity
Dental Assistant, Registered Dental Assistant
Total Units 30
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Dental Assisting Certificate
of Achievement will:
1. Use correct dental terminology and nomenclature
in the correct context in order to effectively
communicate dental information and concepts to
others.
2. Develop problem-solving and self-assessment skills
and make appropriate decisions regarding a
variety of procedural situations.
3. Demonstrate the ability to interact with patients
and work effectively as a member of the dental
team.
4. Maintain the standard of care during dental
treatment and promote oral health.
5. Develop the ability to use and adapt to current
technology used in dental practices.
6. Demonstrate proficiency in the current duties of an
RDA, practicing with the delegated duties
(scope of practice).
7. Develop foundational knowledge of dental procedures and the ability to communicate and apply
their concepts and principles.
www.citruscollege.edu
139
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Digital and Web Design
The Digital and Web Design certificate is designed to
introduce and develop the basic skills necessary for
success as an entry-level graphic, digital or web
designer. Fundamental to the core of a strong design
sensibility, the computer is an essential tool for
design success and a complement to composition,
design principles, layout, and typography.
Required Courses
Units
ART 111
Beginning Drawing
3
ART 120
Two-Dimensional Design
3
ART 150
Computer Art Basics
3
ART 153
Digital Media Production I
3
ART 158
Commercial Graphic Design
3
ART 162
Computer Graphics I
3
ART 167
Web Design I
3
ART 168
Animation I
3
ART 189
Art Portfolio and Resume Production 3
PHTO 101 Basic Photography
3
Total Units 30
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Digital and Web Design
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Develop design sensibility.
2. Become adept in the use of appropriate computer
graphics software.
3. Gain a greater understanding of the industry
expectations for an entry-level designer.
4. Prepare for university level courses.
5. Build a professional level portfolio.
Emergency Management and Homeland
Security
The certificate of achievement in Emergency
Management and Homeland Security offers the required courses and learning domains for students to
apply for employment with emergency management
agencies, such as the local cities and county governments in California and non-profit organizations such
as the American Red Cross, and federal agencies such
as the Department of Homeland Security (FEMA).
Required Courses
EMER 162 Principles of Emergency
Management
EMER 163 Terrorism and Emergency
Management
EMER 164 Managing Hazardous Materials
Incidents
140
CITRUS COLLEGE
Units
EMER 166 Emergency Planning and
Methodology
3
Select one (1) of the following:
EMER 167 Practical Applications of Emergency
Management
3
EMER 168 Emergency Operations Center
(EOC) Management
3
ESCI 180 Introduction to Geographic
Information Systems
4
Total Units 15-16
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Emergency Management and
Homeland Security Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Express an understanding of the human physical
consequences of natural and technological
disasters and how to mitigate them.
2. Explain and apply state and local regulations
related to emergency management.
3. Be familiar with the range of technologies used in
emergency management.
4. Critically analyze emergency management plans
and procedures.
Emerging Theatre Technologies
The following courses are required for an Emerging
Theatre Technologies certificate.
Required Courses
Units
THEA 101 Introduction to Theatre Arts
3
THEA 130 Introduction to Theatrical Scenery
3
THEA 140 Introduction to Lighting for Theatre,
Television and Film
3
THEA 150 Introduction to Intelligent Lighting
Consoles
3
THEA 160 Computer Aided Design for Theatre 4
THEA 245 Stage and Project Management for
Theatre, TV and Film
3
THEA 260 Introduction to Show Production
Systems
3
THEA 698C Cooperative Education
3
THEA 699A Cooperative Education
1
REC 135
Live Sound Reinforcement
4
REC 255
Advanced Live Sound Reinforcement 4
Total Units 34
3
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Emerging Theatre
Technologies Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Increase their ability to speak articulately and listen
actively by attending various performance classes
and productions, having interactions with faculty
and students from other disciplines as well as their
own, and being exposed to outside professionals in
the areas of acting and design, in order to improve
industry-specific interpersonal skills.
2. Develop and expand writing skills to broaden
communication abilities.
3. Become proficient in technical theatre and
computer aided design through in-class utilization
of appropriate design software, to gain the ability
to make creative and analytical decisions throughout the artistic process.
4. Investigate their personal skill set through
research projects, practicum, progressive
classroom assignments and varied rehearsal
techniques in order to create, evaluate and
execute realistic goals.
5. Develop a variety of learning strategies through an
introduction to various theatrical styles and
techniques presented by outside professionals and
adjunct professors to increase educational
flexibility.
6. Interact with audiences of all ages and backgrounds through touring, public, and outreach
performances, to internalize the importance of
strong community relationships, citizenship and
integrity.
Esthetician
This program is designed to educate and train students in the fundamental skills needed to successfully
complete and pass the California State Board Exam.
The program provides a distinct education in esthetic
applications, values, theoretical science and State
Board preparedness which includes, but is not limited
to, makeup design, training in electrical modalities,
hair removal, facials for specific skin types and proper
sanitation and disinfecting procedures. The program
also provides interpersonal interaction with clients
and other students. The focus is on personal satisfaction, study skills, trained applications, and professionalism which are required to become a successful
licensed esthetician for an entry-level career in the
field of esthetics.
The need for professional estheticians continues to
grow in new and exciting ways, providing ample room
CITRUS COLLEGE
for personal success in a variety of career paths. This
program prepares students for operational and financial success as estheticians.
Required Courses
Units
COS 199 A Esthetician I
8
COS 199 B Esthetician II
8
COS 199 C Esthetician Salon Success
3
Total Units 19
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Esthetician Certificate of
Achievement will:
1. Understand the components of creating a
professional atmosphere.
2. Recognize different facial treatment philosophies.
3. Master the art of makeup design and hair removal
to ensure success in the industry.
4. Develop confidence, proficiency and appreciate the
specialized knowledge required for a lucrative
career within a professional environment.
5. Successfully complete 600 hours and pass the
California State Board exams.
Information Technology
The Information Technology Certificate of Achievement prepares students for careers as: computer
technicians, I.T. sales associates, field service technicians, server administrators, system administrators,
web support specialists, I.T. project managers,
software support technicians, device integration specialists, as well as storage and backup specialists.
Throughout the course of the program, students will
develop the skills sought after by IT employers. These
include networking, security, IP communications, project management, software support, device integration, as well as ethics. During the program the students will have the opportunity to complete industry
certifications from CompTIA which include A+, Network+, Server+, and Security+. Program content
will also cover industry certifications for Macintosh
and Microsoft.
Required Courses
IT 104
PC Hardware and Maintenance
IT 107
Network Technology
IT 108
Networking Operating Systems
IT 109
CIS 109
Network and Computer Security
or
Network and Computer Security
www.citruscollege.edu
Units
4
4
4
4
4
141
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Select six (6) units from the following :
BUS 130
Introduction to Business
BUS 132
Ethics in Business
CSIS 111 Introduction to Programming
Concepts and Design
IT 110
Virtual Computing
IT 698B
Cooperative Education
IT 698D
Cooperative Education
IT 699B
Cooperative Education
IT 699D
Cooperative Education
PHIL 110 Philosophy/Logic
SPCH 100 Interpersonal Communication
3
3
4
4
2
4
2
4
3
3
No more than four (4) units of IT 698/699 may
be used towards the certificate requirements.
Total Units 22
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Information Technology
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Use and possess broad based knowledge of
information and concepts related to installing and
maintaining computer hardware, installing and
maintaining computer networks, and solving
computer hardware and network problems.
2. Apply their knowledge and skills in diverse areas of
Information Technology in order to certify
in various industry certifications.
3. Have the knowledge, skill and behaviors necessary
to obtain an entry-level position as a
computer hardware installer/technician, computer
network technician, field service technician,
network and communication specialist/technician
or other related field of information technology.
Literature
This Certificate of Achievement requires the successful completion of 12 units of Literature courses and
may be used as verification of literature knowledge or
competency for entry-level jobs in fields such as tutoring, editing and publishing, journalism, theater and
entertainment.
Select one (1) of the following U.S. American
literature courses
ENGL 261 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
3
ENGL 262 Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
3
Select one (1) of the following world literature
courses
ENGL 271 Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient - Early Modern
3
ENGL 272 Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth Century
3
Total Units 12
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Literature Certificate of
Achievement will:
1. Critically analyze and evaluate the subtext of
literature selections in order to demonstrate
knowledge of literary terminology.
2. Employ established modes of reasoning in the
defense and development of thesis/judgments to
clearly demonstrate knowledge of critical analysis
tools in all written work.
3. Identify and evaluate the writer's use of literature
as a persuasive tool to identify and assess the
effectiveness of literary works.
4. Critically analyze and synthesize source material to
demonstrate ability to write at the college level.
5. Demonstrate cultural awareness, personal
responsibility, and ethical behavior in evaluating
and writing about literature.
Medium and Heavy Truck Service,
Diagnosis, and Repair Technician
Select one (1) of the following reading and
composition courses
Units
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
3
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition - Honors
3
The courses listed in the Medium and Heavy Duty
Truck Service, Diagnosis and Repair Technician certificate are selected to provide a comprehensive set of
job skills needed by medium and heavy duty truck
technicians, bus technicians and heavy equipment
technicians. In addition to improving the student‘s
employability, the skills developed in the program will
enhance their ability to become an Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Medium/Heavy Truck, Truck
Equipment, School Bus, Transit Bus and/or Alternative
Fuels certified technician.
Select one (1) of the following English
literature courses
ENGL 251 Introduction to English Literature I
ENGL 252 Introduction to English Literature II
Required Courses
Units
AUTO 101 Fundamentals of Automotive Service,
Diagnosis and Repair
5
AUTO 149 Diesel Engine Management Systems 4
142
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
AUTO 156 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems I
MTRK 151 Medium and Heavy Truck Engines
Service, Diagnosis, and Repair
MTRK 152 Medium and Heavy Truck Drivetrain
Service, Diagnosis, and Repair
MTRK 154 Medium and Heavy Truck Chassis
Service, Diagnosis, and Repair
5
5
5
5
Select at least three (3) units from the
following
AUTO 166 Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems II
3
AUTO 167 Automotive HVAC Service,
Diagnosis & Repair
3
AUTO 230A Automotive Service and Repair
Work Experience A
1
AUTO 230B Automotive Service and Repair
Work Experience B
2
AUTO 230C Automotive Service and Repair
Work Experience C
3
AUTO 230D Automotive Service and Repair
Work Experience D
4
AUTO695/
696
Special Topics (department
approval required)
0.5 - 4
AUTO698/
699 Internship
1-2
Total Units 32
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Medium and Heavy Diesel
Truck Service, Diagnosis and Repair Technician
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Listen to and verify the operator‘s concern,
review past maintenance and repair documents,
determine necessary action and perform the
service or repair to industry standards.
2. Obtain ASE Truck technician certification in at least
three areas.
Photography
The photography certificate prepares a student for a
career as an assistant to a professional photographer,
a photographic lab technician or an independent professional free-lance photographer. Students will be
prepared for positions in retail photographic outlets.
Required Courses
PHTO 101 Basic Photography
PHTO 102 Intermediate Photography
PHTO 103 Advanced Photography
PHTO 205 Color Photography
CITRUS COLLEGE
Units
3
3
3
3
Select three (3) of the following:
PHTO 125 Photography as an Art Medium
PHTO 126 Advanced Photography as an Art
Medium
PHTO 202 Photojournalism
PHTO 206 Intermediate Color Photography
PHTO 213 Studio & Environmental Portraiture
3
3
3
3
3
A course may be used only once to fulfill the
certificate requirements.
Total Units 21
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Photography Certificate of
Achievement will:
1. Demonstrate computer proficiency in specialized
programs related to photographs.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of photographic theory in
choosing new products and using them
effectively.
3. Review, analyze and critique photographic work of
others.
4. Analyze and evaluate personal and other students‘
images through use of evaluation rubrics based on
aesthetic concepts.
Public Works I
These course offerings prepare new personnel for
public works occupations and provide upgrading
within these occupations. Job opportunities exist in
both the public and private sectors.
Required Courses
PUB 150
Public Works I
PUB 151
Street Construction and Maintenance
PUB 155
Public Works Inspection
PUB 157
Asphalt and Portland Cement
Select two (2) of the following electives:
PUB 154
Soils - Trenching and Grading
PUB 156
Concrete Structures and Inspection
PUB 158
Municipal and Urban Tree Care
PUB 161
California Occupational Safety and
Health
PUB 162
Traffic Control Standards, Practices,
and Policies
PUB 165
Environmental Management in
Public Works
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Public Works Employees
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total Units 18
www.citruscollege.edu
143
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Public Works I Certificate of
Achievement will:
1. Describe and explain the fundamentals of street
maintenance.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of equipment and
techniques used for street maintenance.
3. Explain preventative methods and materials,
emphasizing the importance of the need for
longevity in street construction and maintenance.
4. Properly demonstrate a clear understanding of
inspection records, duties, and job diary
techniques.
5. Describe and explain the ability to read and
interpret plans and demonstrate a clear
understanding of codes and ordinances.
6. Explain how to effectively use resources to
administer infrastructure maintenance.
Public Works II
This certificate prepares those already working in the
Public Works field for promotion to supervisor or
manager. Job opportunities exist in both the public
and private sectors.
Employment Opportunities
Public Works Crew Leader, Street Division Supervisor,
Maintenance Supervisor, Field Operations Manager.
Students must complete the Public Works I Certificate
of Achievement
18 Units
Required Courses
PUB 160
Public Administration
PUB 164
Plan Interpretation and Cost
Estimating
PUB 166
Supervision in Public Works
CIS 130
Microcomputer Applications I
MATH 150 Intermediate Algebra
Units
3
Select one (1) of the following courses
BUS 172
Personnel Management
BUS 175
Introduction to Management
BUS 176
Management for the Office
Professional
PUB 154
Soils - Trenching and Grading
PUB 156
Concrete Structures and Inspection
PUB 158
Municipal and Urban Tree Care
PUB 161
California Occupational Safety and
Health
PUB 162
Traffic Control Standards, Practices,
and Policies
144
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
4
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
PUB 165
Environmental Management in
Public Works
3
Total Units 39
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Public Works II Certificate of
Achievement will:
1. Demonstrate techniques of Public Works administration in planning, finance, and personnel.
2. Demonstrate the ability to estimate time, material,
labor and equipment needed for Public Works
projects.
3. Describe effective methods of personnel
management including communication,
orientation, training, motivation, decision making,
performance evaluation, and disciplinary action.
4. Demonstrate the ability to use technology to
prepare electronic spreadsheets, database
management systems, and multimedia
presentations.
Vocational Nursing
Successful completion of the program of studies
allows the student to become eligible to take the
State Board Examination for Licensed Vocational
Nurse-NCLEX.
Required Courses
Units
VNRS 150 Fundamentals of Nursing
3
VNRS 151L Fundamentals of Nursing Lab
3
VNRS 152 Pharmacology I
1
VNRS 153 Introductory Nutrition for the
Vocational Nurse
1
VNRS 154 Body Structure and Function for the
Vocational Nurse I
1.5
VNRS 155 Social-Psychology for the
Vocational Nurse
1
VNRS 160 Medical-Surgical Nursing I
3
VNRS 161L Medical-Surgical Nursing I Lab
3
VNRS 162 Pharmacology II
1
VNRS 163 Diet Therapy for the Vocational
Nurse
1
VNRS 164 Body Structure and Function for the
Vocational Nurse II
1.5
VNRS 165 Growth and Development: Young
Adult - Elderly
1
VNRS 170 Medical-Surgical Nursing II
7
VNRS 171L Medical-Surgical Nursing II Lab
7
VNRS 172 Advanced Pharmacology
2
VNRS 173 Psychology for Vocational Nurses
2
VNRS 180 Pediatric Nursing
3.5
VNRS 181 Growth and Development:
Infancy-Adolescence
1
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
VNRS 182
VNRS 183
Obstetrical-Gynecological Nursing
Leadership in Nursing
4
3
Employment Opportunity
Vocational Nurse
Total Units 50.5
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Vocational Nursing
Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Use correct medical terminology and
nomenclature, in the correct context, in order to
effectively communicate health/medical
information and concepts to others.
2. Demonstrate the ability to perform accurate
calculations of intake and output, drug dosages,
and IV rates.
3. Develop problem-solving and self-assessment skills
and make appropriate decisions regarding a
variety of procedural situations.
4. Demonstrate the ability to interact with patients
and work effectively as a member of the health
care team.
5. Develop the ability to use and adapt to current
technologies used in the healthcare setting.
6. Provide patient care that falls within the scope of
practice as set forth by the BVNPT.
Water Technology
This program is designed to prepare students who
wish to seek employment in the public drinking water
supply industry or qualify for a more responsible position within the industry. These courses will be helpful
to students who wish to prepare for the T1, T2,
T3, T4, and T5 Water Treatment Operator and D1,
D2, D3, D4, and D5 Water Distribution Operator certification examinations given by the California Department of Public Health. Coursework also provides contact hours for Operator Certification maintenance
requirements.
Required Courses
Units
WATR 150 Introduction to Water Systems
3
WATR 151 Water Resources and Distribution I
3
WATR 153 Water Resources and Distribution II 3
WATR 156 Water Treatment I
3
WATR 157 Water Treatment II
3
Select one (1) of the following courses
BIOL 145 Environmental Science
PUB 155
Public Works Inspection
PUB 160
Public Administration
CITRUS COLLEGE
3
3
3
PUB 161
California Occupational Safety and
Health
3
PUB 165
Environmental Management in
Public Works
3
WATR 162 Water Conservation
3
Total Units 18
Employment Opportunities
Pumping Station Operator, Water Line Worker, Water
Maintenance Mechanic Helper, Water Motor Installer,
Water Service Dispatcher, Treatment Plant Operator
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Water Technology Certificate
of Achievement will:
1. Describe and explain regulatory issues that relate
to the public drinking water supply.
2. Diagram and explain the fundamentals of the
water distribution system including SCADA
(supervisory control and data acquisition),
maintenance, pumps, hydraulics, and valves.
3. Given a scenario involving water contamination;
identify the contaminants, recommend the
best treatment, administer the treatment and then
verify the contaminants are below allowable
safety thresholds.
4. Demonstrate the safe handling of chemicals used
in the Water industry and describe the
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) regulations related to public drinking
water.
Wildland Resources and Forestry
A Certificate of Achievement in Wildland Resources
and Forestry prepares students for pre-professional
careers and transfer into a four-year university leading to a baccalaureate degree in such areas as biology, botany, conservation, ecology, education, environmental science, forestry, horticulture, organismal
biology, natural resources, rangeland management,
recreation, soil science, wildland fire management
and wildlife management. The Wildland Resources
and Forestry student is also prepared to enter professional programs/careers of specialized study/work in
such areas as agriculture, conservation biology, resource ecology, entomology, environmental protection, fisheries and wildlife, forest management, hydrology, limnology, natural resource, naturalist, park
ranger, soil science, silvicultural practice, wildlife law
enforcement and zoology. Those students who do not
intend to transfer may take the courses for either direct vocational application or for general interest.
www.citruscollege.edu
145
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Required Courses
Units
FOR 101
Introduction to Forestry
3
FOR 102
Introduction to Forest Ecology
3
FOR 103
Plant Identification
3
FOR 104
Introduction to Outdoor Recreation
3
FOR 105
Wildland Fire Management
3
FOR 106
Principles of Wildlife Management
and Ecology
3
ESCI 180 Introduction to Geographic
Information Systems
4
Employment Opportunities
Entry-level positions for federal, state and private employers. Areas of opportunity include biological technician, conservation scientist, environmental technician,
forestry aid, forest biologist, forestry technician, naturalist, park assistant, resource ecologist, survey technician aid, and wildlife biologist.
Total Units 22
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Wildland Resources and
Forestry Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Express knowledge of scientific terminology as it
relates to the management of wildland and
other renewable resources.
2. Collect data and interpret data, tables and graphs
to demonstrate an understanding of the types
of data available in the realm of wildland
resources.
3. Generate scientific hypotheses to distinguish
between scientific and non-scientific questions
and methods that relate to wildland resources to
meet the emerging mandates for conservation,
biodiversity, ecosystem management, and longterm sustainability.
4. Examine how human activities have contributed to
changes in the wildland environment to better
understand and discuss past, current, and future
issues related to wildland resources.
5. Select and use the appropriate scientific
apparatus.
Select one (1) of the following reading and
composition courses
Units
ENGL 101 Reading and Composition
3
ENGL 101H Reading and Composition - Honors
3
ESL 101
Reading and Composition
3
Select one (1) of the following composition and
critical thinking classes
ENGL 103 Composition and Critical Thinking
3
ENGL 103H Composition and Critical Thinking Honors
3
Select one (1) of the following courses
COMM 101 Reporting and Writing News
ENGL 102 Introduction to Literature
ENGL291 Film as Literature
ENGL291H Film as Literature - Honors
3
3
3
3
Required rhetoric course
ENGL 104 Advanced Rhetoric: The Classical
Essay
3
Total Units 12
Certificate of Achievement Level Student
Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Writing Competency Certificate of Achievement will:
1. Employ a variety of rhetorical techniques in order
to write multi-paragraph essays.
2. Use correct spelling, grammar, punctuation and
capitalization in order to demonstrate
knowledge of the conventions of the English
language.
3. Use the Internet and word processing programs in
order to compose and revise written work.
4. Critically analyze and synthesize source material to
demonstrate ability to write at the college level.
Writing Competency
This Certificate of Achievement requires the successful completion of 12 units of English composition
course work and may be used as verification of writing competency for entry-level jobs in fields including
composition tutoring, editing and publishing, journalism, pre-law, theater and entertainment, freelance
writing, and university or college teacher assisting.
146
CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
How Do I Earn a Skill Award from Citrus College?
Programs of Study Leading to a Skill Award
Some Citrus College academic programs, based on
the satisfactory completion of a course or a sequence
of courses, issue a Skill Award. Total units taken for a
Skill Award may not exceed 17.5 units. A Skill Award
may verify and provide documentation of proficiency
for entry-level employment requirements, job
upgrades and application into fields that require documentation of specific coursework.
Programs of Study Leading to a Skill
Award:
Employment Opportunity
This program prepares you to work as a child
development aide or assistant teacher in a variety of
programs.
Total Units 12
Child Development Associate Teacher
Emergency Medical Technician
Engine Rebuilding and Machining
Home Health Aide
Infant & Child Development Associate Teacher
Microsoft Office
Nurse Assistant
Office Clerk
Child Development Associate Teacher
This entry-level program allows the student to explore
the field of child development and prepares the
student to work as a child development aide or assistant teacher in the field of early childhood education.
Required Courses
CHLD 110 Early Childhood Development
or
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
CHLD 112
CHLD 114
Principles of Early Childhood
Education I
Home-Child-Community Relations
Select three (3) units of the following:
CHLD 116 Introduction to Curriculum
CHLD 120 Literacy for Children
CHLD 121 Art for Children
CHLD 122 Music and Rhythms for Children
CHLD 123 Science Experiences for Children
CHLD 124 Math for Children
CHLD 144 Health, Safety and Nutrition for
Young Children
CITRUS COLLEGE
Permit Information
This Skill Award meets the educational requirements
for the Associate Teacher Permit through the
California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. All
coursework must be completed with the grade of "C"
or better to meet permit requirements. In order to
apply for the State Permit, students must complete 50
days of 3+ hours per day of qualifying work experience with young children within two years. Specific
details may be found at www.ctc.ca.gov
Units
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
3
Skill Award Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Child Development Associate
Teacher Skill Award will:
1. Demonstrate the ability to apply theories of early
childhood education and child development.
2. Demonstrate global consciousness to work
effectively with children, their families, and
individuals from diverse cultures.
Emergency Medical Technician
Required course
Units
HEAL 161 Emergency Medical Technician Basic
7
Total Units 7
Skill Award Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Emergency Medical
Technician Skill Award will:
1. Use correct medical terminology and
nomenclature in the correct context in order to
effectively communicate health/medical
information and concepts to others.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical
responsibilities of EMS and other healthcare
providers.
3. Calculate various I.V. drip rates for patients undergoing I.V. therapy.
4. Develop problem solving and self assessment
skills and make appropriate decisions regarding a
variety of procedural situations.
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147
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
5. Identify the signs and symptoms of common
medical emergencies related to various body
systems.
6. Demonstrate the ability to interact with patients
and work effectively as a member of the
emergency medical services team.
7. Discuss various EMS systems both local/state and
international.
8. Develop the ability to use and adapt to current
technology used in emergency medical services
practices.
9. Demonstrate understanding of administering
patient prescribed drugs to patients.
10. Demonstrate proficiency in the current duties of
an EMT, practicing within scope of practice.
Engine Rebuilding and Machining
Required Courses
AUTO295 Engine Design
AUTO296 Cylinder Head Development
AUTO297 Cylinder Block Development
Units
4
4
4
Employment Opportunity
Entry-level engine machinist
Total Units 12
Home Health Aide
Required course
NRS102
Home Health Aide
Employment Opportunity
Home Health Aide
Units
2
Total Units 2
Infant and Child Development
Associate Teacher
This program prepares you to work as a child
development aide or assistant in a public or private
preschool, Headstart program or day care center, or
as a teacher in a private infant or preschool program.
Required Courses
Units
Completion of the Child Development Associate
Teacher Skill Award
12
plus
CHLD 130 Infant Development and Group
Care
3
Total Units 15
148
CITRUS COLLEGE
Microsoft Office
The Microsoft Office Skill Award is given upon completion of a series of courses that provide the student
with mid-level office skills and employment training
for positions in the business office environment. In
addition to all of the courses required for the Office
Clerk Skill Award, the student will take additional
courses designed to significantly increase the student's knowledge and proficiency in professional
office responsibilities.
Required Courses
Units
OFF 120
Microsoft Excel
3
OFF 215
Introduction to Microsoft Outlook
2
OFF 285
Administrative Office Procedures
3
OFF 294
Microsoft Word
3
Total Units 11
Skill Award Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Microsoft Office Skill Award
will:
1. Perform all Office Skill Award tasks such as: use
e-mail to communicate with others; understand
and utilize filing procedures; examine incoming
materials and code it numerically, alphabetically
or by subject matter; enter data electronically in
various storage devices; use electronic calendars;
use correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation in
prepared documents.
2. File data on the computer.
3. Keyboard and file data on computers as well as
access information.
4. Keep payroll records and prepare invoices.
5. Set up spreadsheets.
6. Format letters, memos, tables and reports using
current office application program.
7. Compose routine letters, memos and e-mail
messages.
Nurse Assistant
Required Course
NRS101
Nurse Assistant
Units
5
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Certified Nurse Assistant, Acute Care Nurse Aide
Total Units 5
Skill Award Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Nurse Assistant Skill Award
will:
1. Communicate in English verbally and in writing
using appropriate medical terminology.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
2. Collect, calculate and interpret observations.
3. Develop problem-solving skills and make
appropriate decisions regarding a variety of
situations.
4. Provide culturally specific healthcare to all people.
5. Develop the ability to use and adapt to current
technologies used in the healthcare setting.
6. Provide patient care that falls within the scope of
practice as set forth by the California
Department of Health Services.
Office Clerk
The Office Clerk Award is given upon completion of a
series of courses that provide the student with entrylevel office skills and employment training for entrylevel positions in the business office environment.
Required Courses
Units
OFF260
Computer Keyboarding and
Document Processing
3
OFF101
Introduction to Microsoft Office
Applications
3
OFF281
Filing and Records Management
3
Total Units 9
Skill Award Level Student Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Office Clerk Skill Award will:
1. Understand and utilize filing procedures.
2. Examine incoming materials and code it
numerically, alphabetically or by subject matter.
3. Enter data electronically in various storage
devices.
4. Use correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation in
prepared documents.
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CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Does Citrus College Offer Courses for Growth & Development?
Continuing Education, Noncredit Education and Community Education
Continuing Education
Citrus College Continuing Education offers lifelong personal and
professional development opportunities to members of the community. Classes are designed to
sharpen professional skills or help
students learn new activities they
can enjoy in their leisure time.
Continuing education classes provide opportunities for learning that
enrich the lives of individuals and
improve the quality of living in our
community.
Noncredit Education
Noncredit education supplements
students‘ continued growth and
job skills development through
classes that include basic skills,
career development, health and
fitness, vocational preparation and
job retraining. Enrollment in noncredit classes is free and continues throughout the school year.
See pages 246-252 for a list of
available classes. All noncredit
classes offered are subject to
budget and enrollment.
Potential Citrus College students
who are undecided about college
may begin or continue their college experience with noncredit
classes. Counseling services are
available from the Counseling and
Advisement Department. To
schedule an appointment with a
noncredit counselor, call (626)
914-8530.
Noncredit education provides English as a Second Language (ESL)
classes in the traditional classroom
format for limited English speaking
students.
150
CITRUS COLLEGE
Visit the Continuing Education
department in the Lifelong Learning Center or call (626) 852-8022
for more information.
Customized training is also
available for businesses and
organizations that have staff
development needs.
Community Education
Citrus College Community Education offers lifelong personal and
professional development learning
opportunities to members of the
community. Moderately-priced
classes, workshops, seminars and
activities are available for persons
who want to develop their
professional skills, start or grow a
business, enrich their cultural
experiences, their lives and their
relationships, or participate in entertainment and recreational activities.
Community Education classes,
activities and events are available
on days and at times that meet
the needs of today's active adults.
Class lengths vary from a few
hours to several meeting dates.
Community Education classes are
supported by fees collected from
course participants. Class schedules, published three times
per year, are mailed to Citrus
Community College District residents and can be accessed online
at www.citruscollege.edu/ce
The college also partners with
ED2Go and GES Career Training
Programs to help students
prepare for rewarding careers
through online classes.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
How are Citrus College‘s Academic Programs Organized?
Academic Divisions, Departments, and subject (with subject codes)
(All telephone numbers are area code 626)
Career, Technical and
Continuing Education
Programs
Continuing Education
852-8022
Noncredit (NC)
Cosmetology
914-8710
Cosmetology (COS)
Public Services
852-6402
Public Works (PUB)
Water Technology (WATR)
Technology & Engineering
852-6402
Automotive Technology:
Automobile and Light Truck
Technology (AUTO)
Motorcycle Technology (MOTO)
Medium and Heavy Truck
Technology (MTRK)
Architecture (ARCH)
Computer Information Systems
(CIS)
Computer Science (CS)
Drafting Technology (DRAF)
Engineering (ENGR)
Information Technology (IT)
Office Technology & Computer
Applications (OFF)
Counseling
914-8530
Counseling (COUN)
Disabled Student Programs &
Services (DSPS)
914-8675
CITRUS COLLEGE
Fine and Performing Arts
Fine Arts
914-8580
Art (ART)
Photography (PHTO)
Performing Arts
914-8580
Dance (DANC)
Music—Commercial (MUSC)
Music Education (MUSE)
Music—Performance (MUSP)
Recording Technology (REC)
Theatre Arts (THEA)
Kinesiology (formerly PE)
914-8650
Kinesiology (KIN)
Competitive Athletics (KINC)
Language Arts
914-8856
Communications (COMM)
English (ENGL)
English as a Second Language
(ESL)
Reading and College Preparation
(READ)
Speech (SPCH)
Health Sciences
914-8720
Dental Assisting (DENT)
Emergency Management (EMER)
Health Sciences (HEAL)
Nursing (NRS)
Registered Nursing/Associate
Degree in Nursing (RNRS)
Vocational Nursing (VNRS)
Natural and Physical Sciences
Natural Sciences
914-8789
Biology (BIOL)
Wildland Resources and Forestry
(FOR)
Natural History (NAT)
Physical Sciences
914-8789
Astronomy (ASTR)
Chemistry (CHEM)
Earth Sciences (ESCI)
Physics (PHYS)
Foreign Languages
914-8856
Chinese (CHIN)
German (GER)
Japanese (JPN)
Spanish (SPAN)
Social and Behavioral
Sciences
Social Sciences
914-8860
Economics (ECON)
Geography (GEOG)
History (HIST)
Humanities (HUM)
Leadership (LEAD)
Philosophy (PHIL)
Political Science (POLI)
Mathematics, Business and
Health Sciences
914-8792
Mathematics (MATH)
Accounting (ACCT)
Business (BUS)
Real Estate (REAL)
Behavioral Sciences
Administration of Justice (AJ)
Anthropology (ANTH)
Child Development (CHLD)
Ethnic Studies (ETHN)
Psychology (PSY)
Sociology (SOC)
www.citruscollege.edu
151
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Course Code Directory
ACCT
Accounting
ENGL
English
NC
Noncredit
AJ
Administration of
Justice
ENGR
Engineering
NRS
Nursing
ESCI
Earth Science
OFF
Office Technology
ANTH
Anthropology
ARCH
Architecture
ESL
English as a Second
Language
PHIL
Philosophy
ART
Art
ETHN
Ethnic Studies
PHTO
Photography
ASTR
Astronomy
FOR
Forestry
PHYS
Physics
POLI
Political Science
AUTO
Automotive Technology
GEOG
Geography, Cultural
PSY
Psychology
BIOL
Biology
GER
German
PUB
Public Works
BUS
Business
HEAL
Health Sciences
CHEM
Chemistry
HIST
History
READ
Reading
CHIN
Chinese
HUM
Humanities
REAL
Real Estate
CHLD
Child Development
IT
Information Technology
REC
Recording Technology
RNRS
Registered Nursing
COMM Communications
JPN
Japanese
SOC
Sociology
COS
KIN
Kinesiology
SPAN
Spanish
COUN Counseling
KINC
Kinesiology Conditioning
CIS
LEAD
Leadership
SPCH
Speech
LING
Linguistics
THEA
Theatre Arts
VNRS
Vocational Nursing
CS
DANC
Cosmetology
Computer Information
Systems
Computer Science
Dance
DENT
Dental Assisting
DRAF
Drafting Technology
DSPS
Disabled Student
Programs & Services
ECON
Economics
EMER
Emergency
Management and
Homeland Security
152
CITRUS COLLEGE
MATH Mathematics
WATR Water Technology
MOTO Motorcycle Technology
MTRK
Medium And Heavy
Truck Technology
MUSC
Music—Commercial
MUSE
Music Education
MUSP
Music—Performance
NAT
Natural History
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
A Guide to Understanding the Course Descriptions
1. Course and Department Name
2. Course Number
The course numbering system distinguishes
between courses that are degree applicable and
those that are not. Units from courses numbered
001-099 are appropriate for financial aid and
athletic eligibility, but may not be applied toward
the units required for a degree. Units numbered
100-299 may apply toward the associate degree.
3. The units of credit that can be earned during a
semester



10.Prerequisite: a requirement that must be
satisfied before enrolling in the course.
11.The number of lecture hours and lab hours the
course offers during the semester or session in
which it is offered.

Special rehearsal and public
performance above and beyond normal class
expectations. This course may be taken four times.
18 lecture hours, 36 lab hours, 18 lab hours
arranged. CSU;UC

French Courses

SPAN 101
Spanish I
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass

Strongly Recommended: ENGL 099 or READ
099 if required by English placement exam or
if required by English level.
A course in elementary Spanish grammar,
vocabulary, and pronunciation which focuses on
understanding, speaking, reading, and writing
(including spelling) simple Spanish and serves as an
introduction to the geography, history, and culture
of the Spanish-speaking world. 90 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
8. Grade or P/NP: the student can choose to take
the course to receive a pass/no pass grade
instead of a letter grade.
9. The recommended reading level or skill
preparation a student is expected to have in
order to succeed in the coursework.


5. Course Description
7. Transferable course: designating that the course
is transferable to the California State University
(CSU) or the University of California (UC). To
verify the transfer policies of other colleges and
universities, consult a counselor.
DANC 266
Pop Dance: Rehearsal and
Performance
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Co-Requisite(s): DANC 264.
4. Concurrent enrollment required in a related
course
6. Number of times a course may be taken for
credit
Commercial Courses

SPAN 102
Spanish II
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 101 or two years of
high school Spanish.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL 099 or READ
099 if required by English placement exam or
if required by English level.
A further study of elementary Spanish grammar and
vocabulary that develops understanding, speaking,
reading and writing (including spelling) skills.
Affords opportunities to apply communication skills
to new social, professional, and travel contexts.
Explores the cultural heritage and civilization of
Spain and Latin America through technology and
level-appropriate readings. The class will be taught
primarily in Spanish. 90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
11

CITRUS COLLEGE
www.citruscollege.edu
153
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Accounting
(Business Department)
Accounting is the systematic recording, analysis, explanation and interpretation of the financial transactions
of a business. Topics covered in the
accounting courses offered at Citrus
College include basic accounting, financial and managerial accounting
principles, income tax accounting,
and accounting general ledger software. Accounting courses satisfy general education requirements for an
associate degree, an associate degree
in liberal arts with an emphasis in
business technology, and lower division transfer. ACCT 101 Financial Accounting and ACCT 102 Managerial
Accounting are undergraduate requirements for the bachelors in arts
degree in business. Students may
earn a certificate of achievement in
accounting. The Honors Program includes one course: ACCT 101H Financial Accounting - Honors.
Accounting Courses
ACCT 100
Accounting
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
The objective of this course is to provide an elementary accounting background for business students. Course
content includes development of the
accounts through journalizing, cash
journal entries, sales and purchases,
posting, trial balance, work sheet and
resultant financial statements. 72 lecture hours.
ACCT 101
Financial Accounting
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ACCT
100 or high school bookkeeping,
or related job experience.
The objectives of this course are to
learn the content and meaning of the
basic financial statements and their
impact on the decision-making
process in the business environment.
This course will provide a broad
overview of the importance of ac154
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
counting in the business process as
well as introduce the student to the
double entry system of accounting,
how to record, process and report on
the business transactions and events
and to consider the operating cycles
in business. Topical areas covered in
this class will include cash, accounts,
inventory, property, plant and equipment, intangible assets, current liabilities and stockholder equity. The
importance of internal controls will be
reviewed and the components of the
income statement will also be discussed. 72 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ACCT 101H
Financial Accounting - Honors
4 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ACCT
100 or high school bookkeeping,
or related job experience.
Examines the fundamental concepts
of financial accounting such as: the
basic financial statements: the double
entry system of accounting; financial
analysis and internal controls. Analyze financial data to evaluate performance and formulate appropriate
course of action in the business environment. Students are expected to
work and participate at an honors
level which includes advanced critical
thinking skills, more in depth analysis
of financial statements and presentation skills as demonstrated by group
presentations, class participation and
case study analysis. 72 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ACCT 102
Managerial Accounting
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ACCT 101.
The objectives of this course are to
finish reviewing financial accounting
concepts and to discuss cost and
managerial accounting. Financial accounting concepts such as long-term
debt and cash flows will be covered
before moving into the area of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting objectives are to provide
management and employees timely
feedback on the performance of the
company operations so that management can plan ahead and make appropriate business decisions. Tools
and techniques to evaluate efficiency
and profitability such as process costing, break-even analysis, variance
analysis and capital budgeting
will be reviewed. 72 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ACCT 110
Income Tax Accounting
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
A course designed to study the federal income tax process, federal income tax laws that apply to
individuals, and the application of tax
principles to specific problems. Topics
include gross income and exclusions,
business deductions and itemized deductions, losses, certain tax credits
and property transactions. Study is
also made of California income tax
laws in those areas which differ from
federal tax law. 72 lecture hours. CSU
ACCT 115
QuickBooks
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Instruction in QuickBooks, a computerized accounting system for business. Applies basic accounting
concepts. 36 lecture hours.
Administration of Justice
(Behavioral Sciences
Department)
Administration of Justice examines
the structure, function, laws, procedures, and decision-making processes
of agencies that deal with crime management. Administration of Justice
courses provide both the theoretical
background and practical experience
necessary for employment and promotion in the criminal justice system
and related fields, such as community
responders and volunteers, and for
transfer to four-year institutions.
Courses in Administration of Justice
satisfy general education requirements for an associate degree and
transfer. In addition, students may
also earn a certificate of achievement
in Administration of Justice.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Administration of Justice
Courses
AJ 101
Introduction to the
Administration of Justice
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The history and philosophy of administration of justice in America: recapitulation of the system; identifying
the various sub-systems; role expectations, and their inter-relationships;
theories of crime, punishment, and
rehabilitation; ethics, education and
training for professionalism in the
system. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
AJ 102
Concepts of Criminal Law
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The philosophy and historical development of law, including the provisions of the U.S. Constitution. The
concepts and definitions necessary to
relate court decisions to statutes including those specific to correctional
institutions. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
AJ 103
Legal Aspects of Evidence
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
Origin, development, philosophy and
constitutional basis of evidence, constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and
seizure; kinds and degrees of evidence and rules governing admissibility; judicial decisions interpreting
individual rights and case studies. 54
lecture hours. CSU
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
AJ 105
Criminal Investigation
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Fundamentals of investigation and
the techniques of crime scene recording and search. The collection and
preservation of physical evidence,
modus operandi processes, sources
of information, interview and interrogation, follow-up, and case preparation. 54 lecture hours. CSU
AJ 106
Patrol Procedures
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is a study of the responsibility, techniques, and methods of police patrol. This includes the areas of
patrol distribution, selective enforcement, pull-over and approach methods, emergency pursuit driving,
search of suspects and buildings, field
interrogations, and procedures in
handling "police-called-for" services.
54 lecture hours. CSU
AJ 107
Traffic Control
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
A study covering traffic law enforcement regulation and control, fundamentals of traffic accident
investigation, and the California Vehicle Code. 54 lecture hours. CSU
AJ 108
Juvenile Procedures
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The techniques of handling juvenile
offenders and victims; the prevention
and repression of delinquency; juve-
nile law and procedure; the organization of community resources; and diagnosis and referral. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
AJ 109
Criminal Procedures
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Legal processes from pre-arrest, arrest through trial, sentencing and correctional procedures; a review of the
history of case and common law;
conceptual interpretations of law as
reflected in court decisions; a study
of case law methodology and case research as the decisions impact upon
the procedures of the justice system.
54 lecture hours. CSU
AJ 111
Narcotics and Vice Control
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
History, identification, and effects of
narcotics. Current narcotic and vice
problems. Special emphasis on laws
affecting the control of narcotics and
vice. 54 lecture hours. CSU
AJ 112
Community Relations
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An in-depth exploration of the roles
of the administration of justice practitioners and their agencies. Through
interaction and study the student will
become aware of the interrelationships and role expectations among
the various agencies and the public.
Principal emphasis will be placed
upon the professional image of the
system of justice administration and
the development of positive relationships between members of the system and the public. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
155
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AJ 121
Death Investigation
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AJ 101.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
A multimedia examination of the
medico-legal investigation of death.
Focuses on natural and accidental
deaths, suicides, and homicides. Special attention to deaths by gunshot
wounds, burns, sharp force injury,
blunt force trauma, and multi-casualty incidents. 54 lecture hours. CSU
AJ 123
Writing for Criminal Justice
Professionals
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
Techniques for communicating facts,
information, and ideas effectively in a
simple, clear, and logical manner in
various types of criminal justice reports: letters, memoranda, directives,
and administrative reports. Emphasis
is on criminal justice terminology, use
of English, and organization of information. Students will practice note
taking and report writing as well as
presentation of testimony in court. 54
lecture hours. CSU
AJ 130
Introduction to Probation and
Parole
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by
English level.
A survey of the role of probation and
parole in today's criminal justice system. Career opportunities available in
probation and parole work will be included. 54 lecture hours. CSU
156
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
AJ 131
Introduction to Corrections
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of the field of correctional
science. Historical development, current concepts and practice, explanations of criminal behavior; functions,
and objectives of the criminal justice
system concerned with institutional,
probation, and parole processes as
they modify the offender's behavior
and survey of professional career opportunities in public and private agencies. 54 lecture hours. CSU
AJ 133
Correctional Writing
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The practical aspects of gathering, organizing, and preparing written reports for correctional activities on
local, state, and federal levels. Emphasis on techniques of communicating facts and ideas effectively in the
criminal justice system context. Practical experience in note taking, report
writing, and testifying in court. 54
lecture hours. CSU
AJ 135
Control and Supervision in
Corrections
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by
English level.
Supervision of inmates in the local,
state, and federal correctional institutions. Emphasis on the role of the offender and the correctional worker on
a continuum from institutional living
through crisis situations. Included are
inmate subculture, violence and effects of crowding along with coping
techniques for correctional officers.
Causes and effects of abusive tactics.
54 lecture hours. CSU
AJ 136
Correctional Interviewing and
Counseling
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The techniques in counseling and interviewing available to practitioners in
Corrections. The student will learn
the use of appropriate techniques
and theories in confidence building
which may be used by the correctional employee in client interviews
and counseling. 54 lecture hours.
CSU
AJ 137
Legal Aspects of Corrections
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
The historical legal framework, concepts, and precedents that guide correctional practice. Course material will
broaden the individual's perspective
of the corrections environment, the
civil rights of prisoners, and responsibilities and liabilities of corrections officials. 54 lecture hours. CSU
Anthropology
(Behavioral Sciences Department)
Anthropology is the holistic study of
human behavior from biological, historical, cultural, and social perspectives. Anthropology analyzes the
place of humans in the natural world
and explores cultural assumptions
across the globe. Anthropology
courses satisfy general education requirements for an associate degree,
an associate degree in liberal arts
with an emphasis in social and behavioral sciences, and lower division
transfer. The Honors Program includes three anthropology courses:
ANTH 201H Introduction to Cultural
Anthropology – Honors, ANTH 216H
Sex and Gender in a Cross Cultural
Perspective – Honors and ANTH 218H
Honors Presentation Seminar.
Anthropology Courses
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ANTH 210
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Students will critically examine various societies around the world using
basic cultural concepts such as language, food production, economics,
kinship, art, religion, and magic. The
class is designed to foster a pluralistic
view of the world, teach introductory
anthropological concepts, and
strengthen critical thinking skills. College level reading is strongly advised
for success in the course. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ANTH 210H
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Students will critically examine various societies around the world using
basing cultural concepts such as marriage, family, art, food production,
political organization, and religion.
The class is designed to foster a pluralistic view of the world, teach introductory anthropological concepts,
and strengthen critical thinking. College level reading is strongly advised
for success in the course. Students
are expected to work and participate
at an honors level which includes
strong critical thinking skills, thorough
analysis of anthropological readings,
presentation and leadership skills
demonstrated through class participation/presentation, and service learning in the community. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ANTH 212
Introduction to Physical Anthropology
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
An introductory study of the biological origin of humans. The course will
emphasize the biology of humans,
human evolution, taxonomy, prehuman fossil identification, and adaptation to the environment.
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT WITH
ANTH 212L IS REQUIRED TO RECEIVE LAB SCIENCE CREDIT. College
level reading is highly recommended
for success in the course. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ANTH 212L
Introduction to Physical Anthropology Lab
1 Unit
Grade Only
Co-Requisite(s): ANTH 212.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is the lab component for
Introduction to Physical Anthropology
212. In the lab students will have an
expanded opportunity to work with
anatomy, skeletal identification, taxonomy, and evolutionary trends. Concurrent enrollment with ANTH 212 is
required. College level reading is
highly recommended for success in
the course. 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
ANTH 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level. Also,
ANTH 210 or SOC 201.
A cross-cultural look at different
groups' ideas of sex and gender. The
course will focus on attitudes, beliefs,
and socialization techniques. Theories
behind the formation of gender will
be explored. Both Anthropological
and Sociological terms and concepts
will be utilized for a cross disciplinary
approach. This is primarily a seminar
style course, college level reading and
participation is necessary for successful completion. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ANTH 216H
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
ANTH 210 or SOC 201. Must be a
member of the Citrus College
Honors Program in good standing, or recommendation from an
Honors Instructor.
A cross-cultural look at different
groups' ideas of sex and gender. The
course will focus on attitudes, beliefs,
and socialization techniques. Theories
behind the formation of gender will
be explored. Both Anthropological
and Sociological terms and concepts
will be utilized for a cross disciplinary
approach. College level reading is
strongly advised for success in the
course. Students are expected to
work and participate at an honors
level which includes strong critical
thinking skills, thorough analysis of
readings, presentation, and leadership skills demonstrated through class
participation/presentation. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ANTH 218H
Honors Presentation Seminar
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Must
be a member of the Citrus
College Honors Program in good
standing, or recommendation
from an honors instructor.
A course designed to help honors students further their research skills,
professional presentation skills, and
to promote transfer. Research topics
from previous honors classes will be
enhanced with further research and
presented in a professional manner in
class. Materials will also be submitted
to local honors conferences for presentation to peers. Honors students
should be in good standing and must
be recommended by an honors professor. 18 lecture hours. CSU
www.citruscollege.edu
157
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ANTH 220
Introduction to Archaeology
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory study of the science
of archaeology. The course will emphasize the evolution of human material culture, the laws and theories
governing the science of archaeology,
archaeological processes, and the realities of archaeology versus popular
culture definitions. College level reading is strongly recommended for success in the course. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
Architecture
(Architecture Department)
The Architecture Program concentrates on the built environment. The
curriculum visualizes architecture as a
cultural, creative, and technical practice and discipline with direct social
impact. A balance of architectural, art
and technical design courses provides
students with a diverse foundation of
knowledge in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urban
planning, CAD, and CGI which prepares them for transfer and/or certificates for careers in a wide range of
fields.
Architecture Courses
ARCH 100
Introduction to Architecture
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course for students
interested in exploring the fields of
architecture and architectural technology and developing a working
knowledge of planning and design.
54 lecture hours. CSU
158
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ARCH 102
Visual Communication
2.5 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
DRAF 101.
Visual communication of axonometric,
oblique, and one, and two-point perspective drawings. Natural and manmade forms are analyzed. Color and
texture of form are studied as they
are revealed by light, shade, and
shadow. Students' perceptions of
subject matter are translated into
convincing visual expressions by
learning the graphic skills and the use
of a variety of media. Students
sketch, draw, and render projects. 36
lecture hours, 36 lab hours. CSU
ARCH 110
Introduction to Architectural
Communication and
Functional Design
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
DRAF 101 and ARCH 100.
Introduction to architectural graphic
communication skills including traditional pencil drawing and computer
drawing. Students analyze and apply
architectural theory, principles, techniques and three dimensional model
making. The course includes an examination of presentation types and
how they can be utilized to communicate architectural ideas. 36 lecture
hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
ARCH 111
Basic Architectural Design
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 110.
Strongly Recommended:
DRAF 101.
Architectural design including: details
of construction, framing of walls, ceilings, roofs, exterior elevations, interior elevations and cabinet details.
Design techniques for completing a
set of working drawings are also covered. This course provides students
with a detailed analysis of material
applications and the fundamental
knowledge of methods of construction. Material fee. 36 lecture hours,
72 lab hours. CSU
ARCH 200
Portfolio Preparation
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
ARCH 110, ARCH 111 or ART 111
and ART 120.
A course for students to develop individual student portfolios. Development of portfolios will include
architectural Computer Generated
Imagery (CGI), multimedia, other design technology techniques, free
hand drawing, 2D - 3D art and rendering. Students will develop knowledge of how to interview in various
design professions. 36 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU
ARCH 201
Architectural Design I
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 110.
Explores the tools required to begin
the formulation of design concepts
and structure. This exploration is supported by discussion, observation,
and hands-on experimentation, including research of precedents. The
goal is to develop a process of design
that draws from many sources in
order to solidify a concept. Craftsmanship, clarity, and eloquence are
highly valued in the construction of
design submittals and in written and
verbal presentations. A portfolio of
the assigned design exercises completes the course requirements. 36
lecture hours, 72 lab hours. CSU;UC
ARCH 202
Architectural Design II
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ARCH 110.
Strongly Recommended:
DRAF 101.
Designing and detailing business and
manufacturing buildings. Code requirements, special materials, and
functional requirements are addressed. Students analyze and incor-
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
porate environmental site factors,
simple program requirements and
basic knowledge of building materials. The design process of sustainability, climate and lighting issues are
incorporated as integral components
of an architectural design solution. A
portfolio of the assigned design exercises completes the course requirements 36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CSU;UC
ARCH 250
History of Architecture:
Prehistory to Mannerism
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Development of architecture from
Prehistory, ancient Egypt, ancient
Greece, Rome to the Mannerism period. Influence of geography, religion
and socio-economic movements on
architecture are explored. The role of
a built environment in social, cultural,
and political life: how buildings are
constructed, what they mean, effects
they have on world, and ways they
imagine new futures and shape private and public life. This course Spotlights new possibilities for shaping the
world in which we live, with an emphasis on how architecture extends
to cities, roads, books, and films.
Consideration is given to historical
context and cultural genealogy of
particular buildings and environments, material and economic conditions of building, and more. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
ARCH 251
History of Architecture:
Baroque to the Present Day
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
History of Architecture: Baroque to
the Present Day. Exploration of the
role of a built environment in social,
cultural, and political life: how buildings are constructed, what they
mean, effects they have on the world,
and ways they imagine new futures
and shape private and public life. This
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
course Spotlights a series of contemporary case studies for what each reveals about new possibilities for
shaping the world in which we live,
with an emphasis on how architecture extends to cities, roads, books,
and films. Consideration is given to
historical context and cultural genealogy of particular buildings and environments, material and economic
conditions of building, and more. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
Art
(Fine Arts Department)
Art includes the study of art history
and appreciation as well as theoretical and skills-based courses in traditional artistic expression and
new-genre digital arts. Areas of study
include:
• Fine arts, which focus on painting,
drawing, design, and ceramics;
Drawing and painting often lead to
transfer or become fundamental
training necessary for commercial
art vocational pathways. Ceramics
is collaborating with tile companies
to develop a custom tile design and
manufacturing program;
• Photography, which prepares stu
dents for careers as commercia ad
vertising photographers, photo
journalists, portrait and wedding
photographers, and photographic
laboratory technicians; and
• Commercial art which prepares
students for entry-level positions
as graphic, digital, or web designers with an emphasis on the use
of a computer as a tool to implement the basic principles of design
composition, layout, and typography.
Courses in art satisfy general education requirements for the associate
degree, an associate degree in liberal
arts with an emphasis in arts and humanities, and lower division transfer.
Students may earn certificates of
achievement in photography, ceramics, or digital and web design.
Important Information About
Art Course Descriptions
Art courses are now grouped
together as course “families.”
Students are allowed to take only
four courses from each “family.” All
grades received, including F, WD, and
NC grades count towards the four
courses.
The Art course families are:
Fundamentals
ART 110 – Introduction to Visual Arts
ART 111 – Beginning Drawing
ART 130 – Beginning Painting
ART 140 – Beginning Ceramics
ART 143 – Beginning Handbuilding
Ceramics
ART 141 –
ART 142 –
ART 240 –
ART 241 –
Intermediate Ceramics
Experimental Ceramics
Advanced Ceramics I
Advanced Ceramics II
Design
ART 120 – Two-Dimensional Design
ART 121 – Three-Dimensional Design
ART 145 – Design and Decoration
– Ceramics
ART 149 – Studio Problems in
Ceramics
Sculpture
ART 180 – Beginning Clay Sculpture
ART 181 – Intermediate Clay Sculpture
ART 182 – Advanced Clay Sculpture I
ART 183 – Advanced Clay Sculpture
II
ART 184 – Sculpture and Metalwork
Drawing Family
ART 112 – Intermediate Drawing
ART 115 – Figure Drawing I
ART 116 – Figure Drawing II
Painting Family
ART 131 – Intermediate Painting
ART 230 – Advanced Painting
Graphic Design
ART 150 – Computer Art Basics
ART 158 – Commercial Graphic Design
ART 189 – Art Portfolio and Resume
Production
Digital Art
ART 153 – Digital Media Production I
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159
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ART 162 – Computer Graphics I
ART 167 – Web Design I
ART 168 – Animation I
Advanced Digital Art
ART 163 – Computer Graphics II
ART 253 – Digital Media Production II
ART 267 – Digital Media Production II
ART 268 – Animation II
Commercial Ceramics
ART 146 – Ceramics: Tile and Mosaic
Art Courses
ART 100
Art History and Appreciation Fundamentals
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A study of the basic art principles and
elements and how they are applied to
art forms from prehistoric times to
the present. 54 lecture hours.CSU;UC
ART 101
Art History and Appreciation Ancient
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course covers the history of
western art from its prehistoric beginnings to the fall of Rome. Some of
the course content is concerned with
the appreciation of art as well as its
history. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ART 102
Art History and Appreciation Medieval
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course covers the history of
western art from the fall of Rome to
the beginning of the Renaissance.
Some of the course content is concerned with the fundamentals of art
appreciation as well as its history. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
160
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ART 103
Art History and Appreciation Renaissance to Rococo
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course covers the history of
western art from the early Renaissance through the Rococo period.
This course is concerned with both
the history of art and the fundamentals of the appreciation of art. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ART 104
Art History and Appreciation 19th Century Art
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course covers the history and
fundamental appreciation of western
art from the French Revolution to c.
1900 A.D. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ART 105
Art History and Appreciation Early 20th Century Art
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course covers the history of
western art from the late 19th century to mid 20th century. The course
is concerned with the fundamentals
of art appreciation as well as the history of our times. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ART 110
Introduction to the Visual Arts
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course designed to further the general education of all students. Students will be introduced to the visual
arts through aesthetics, critique, history, and by creating art using various
mediums. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU;UC
ART 111
Beginning Drawing
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A basic course in drawing and composition to develop a student's ability
to perceive and define shape, mass,
contour, volume, space and light,
using a variety of media and subject
matter. This course is required of all
art majors. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU;UC
ART 112
Intermediate Drawing
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 111.
Emphasis is on conceptual art
through advanced, imaginative and
subjective approaches to drawing. Includes experimental use of media,
theoretical and conceptual approaches to content, and examination
of aesthetics within contemporary
drawing concerns. Required of all art
majors. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU;UC
ART 115
Figure Drawing I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to the structural understanding of the human form,
based on study of the figure in history, theory, and aesthetics and its
practical application to drawing from
the live model. 36 lecture hours, 72
lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 116
Figure Drawing II
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 115.
A continuation of the structural study
of the figure with emphasis on the
exploration of expressive concepts,
media, and techniques. Included will
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
be reading for historical, theoretical,
and aesthetic application to class material. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CSU;UC
ART 120
Two-Dimensional Design
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An investigation of the elements of
art: especially color and composition.
Emphasis is placed on individual solutions to visual problems by observing
the principles of design. Required of
all art majors. 36 lecture hours, 72
lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 121
Three-Dimensional Design
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Experiments involving the design elements and principles in the creation
of three-dimensional form and spatial
relationships. Critical evaluation of
designs for aesthetic, technical, and
theoretical concerns. Required of all
art majors. Material fee. 36 lecture
hours, 72 lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 130
Beginning Painting
3 Units
Grade Only
An objective approach to form, space,
and color concepts using oil or acrylic
paint. Includes critical examination of
paintings for technical and aesthetic
concerns, content, and historical/cultural influences. 36 lecture hours, 72
lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 131
Intermediate Painting
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 130.
Development of expressive painting
concepts and techniques in oil and
acrylic, with emphasis on historical,
theoretical, and cultural meanings. 36
lecture hours, 72 lab hours. CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ART 140
Beginning Ceramics
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course explores basic techniques
of pottery making. It includes handbuilding and throwing on the potter's
wheel. Emphasis is on understanding
the qualities of clay, appreciation of
basic pottery forms, simple glazing
technique and the development of
personal expression. Material fee. 36
lecture hours, 72 lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 141
Intermediate Ceramics
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 140.
This course further develops basic
pottery skills by introducing new
forms on the potter's wheel and additional decorating and glazing techniques. Material fee. 36 lecture hours,
72 lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 142
Experimental Ceramics
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course for beginning to advanced
students to explore the creative possibilities of clay in a workshop setting.
Individual projects using handbuilding
or the potter's wheel will be used to
create sculpture or pottery. Material
fee. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CSU;UC
ART 143
Ceramic Handbuilding
3 Units
Grade Only
This course is an introduction to ceramic handbuilding techniques and
processes. Traditional methods of
forming, joinery and construction are
introduced. Material fee. 36 lecture
hours, 72 lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 145
Ceramic Design and Decoration
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 141.
This course involves hand built and
wheel thrown projects that investigate problems in pottery form and
surface enhancement. Other related
topics include the effect of various firing methods and exhibit preparation.
Material fee. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU;UC
ART 146
Ceramics: Tile and Mosaic
3 Units
Grade Only
This course will explore techniques in
creating and glazing handmade tile,
from Cuenca to Cuerda Seca. The tile
industry, cutting, grouting and installation will also be explored. Mosaic
techniques will be a secondary focus.
Material fee. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU;UC
ART 149
Studio Problems in Ceramics
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 141.
Independent study involving intermediate or advanced projects in studio
ceramics. Materials used include clay,
engobe, stain and glaze. Firing techniques, studio practices, display and
exhibition design is included. Material
fee. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab hours.
CSU;UC
ART 150
Computer Art Basics
3 Units
Grade Only
This introductory computer art course
is designed for people interested in
learning the basics of computer art.
Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop are
utilized to create computer graphics
and Microsoft Word is used for word
processing. PC computers with the
Windows operating system, printers,
scanners, and digital cameras are
also explored in this course. Material
fee. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CSU
www.citruscollege.edu
161
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ART 153
Digital Media Production I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ART
150 or portfolio review.
An overview of multimedia production
and associated technology. The
course will use Illustrator, Photoshop
and other software in the development of graphic presentations for use
in business and communications. Students will be provided an opportunity
to produce computer graphics merging images and text for large format
printing. Material fee. 36 lecture
hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
ART 158
Commercial Graphic Design
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ART
111, ART 120, and ART 150.
Students will examine graphic design
in advertising, corporate identity,
video, billboards and print media. Utilizing Illustrator, Photoshop and
Quark software, students will apply
principles of color theory, layout and
typography to their design concepts
preparing them for print. This course
may be taken three times. Material
fee. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CSU
ART 162
Computer Graphics I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ART
150 and/or ART 158.
An introduction and skill development
course using the computer as a tool
for graphic design and page layout
projects where basic design, personal
creativity, typography, illustration, and
production techniques are implemented. An emphasis is placed on
understanding the role of graphic design and the designer in contemporary society and how computer
technology plays a major part in this
rapidly developing career field. Software includes: current software applications. Material fee. 36 lecture
hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
162
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ART 163
Computer Graphics II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ART 162.
This course advances the experiences
in ART 162, through additional projects in graphic design, layout, and
presentation. Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, QuarkXPress, In-Design, and
Dreamweaver computersoftware is
used in combination with digital imaging hardware to create visual communication projects relating to
business, education, and public services. Work produced is to be of portfolio quality. Material fee. 36 lecture
hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
ART 167
Web Design I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ART
150 or portfolio review
An overview of World Wide Web with
emphasis on design and publishing.
This course utilizes various developmental tools in the design of pages to
be used on the Internet for commercial or personal use. 36 lecture hours,
72 lab hours. CSU
ART 168
Animation I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required byEnglish level. Also,
ART 150 and/or portfolio review.
The focus of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of two-dimensional animation with emphasis on
the computer as a tool. Student projects involve scripting, storyboarding,
action, transition, timing, character
development, and portfolio enhancement. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CSU
ART 180
Beginning Clay Sculpture
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Clay sculpture classes will include clay
techniques, application of color,
sculpting methods, and sculpture
concepts. Students will learn the fundamentals of building and coloring
ceramic hand built sculpture. Material
fee. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CSU;UC
ART 181
Intermediate Clay Sculpture
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 180.
Intermediate clay sculpture classes
will include modeling techniques, application of color, clay sculpting methods and sculpture concepts. Students
may work with human models, animals, birds and other topics with emphasis on composition and
craftsmanship. Material fee. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 182
Advanced Clay Sculpture I
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 181.
Clay sculpture classes will include clay
techniques, application of color,
sculpting methods and sculpture concepts. Students will design and construct medium size hand built
sculpture of the human model,
human head, animal, bird, or other
topic. Material fee. 36 lecture hours,
72 lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 183
Advanced Clay Sculpture II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ART 182.
Clay sculpture classes will include clay
techniques, application of color,
sculpting methods, and sculpture
concepts. Students will design and
construct large handbuilt sculpture
pieces of the human model, human
head, animals, or other topic. Material fee. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU;UC
ART 184
Sculpture and Metalwork
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 121.
An introduction to sculpture materials
and techniques. Student explores the
potential of expressive form, struc-
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ture, and space in various materials
and processes. Study of aesthetics,
technique and theoretical concerns as
applied to sculpture. Material fee. 36
lecture hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
ART 189
Art Portfolio and Resume
Production
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ART 153, ART
158, ART 162 and ART 167.
An advanced course to prepare a
portfolio that best represents the student's art/design work for the purpose of a job interview or advanced
university placement. The final presentation will be based upon the student's studio discipline and may
include traditional studio work, computer (CGI) art and graphic design.
Additionally, the production of a professional appearing resume plus participation in mock interviews will be a
part of the class. 36 lecture hours, 72
lab hours.
ART 199
Motion Picture Appreciation
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
An introductory course in which the
student will learn how to analyze
films on technical, aesthetic, and thematic levels. Historically significant
films will be used as source material.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ART 200
History of Motion Pictures
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course in motion picture history covering the years 18951945. The historically significant
technical and thematic developments
of world cinema are analyzed in detail
in the context of production systems.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ART 201
History of Motion Pictures II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 if required by English placement exam or if required by
English level.
A second semester introductory
course continuing with the study of
motion picture history covering the
years 1945-present. The historically
significant thematic developments in
world cinema are analyzed in a technical and production context. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ART 206
History of Latin American Art
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required byEnglish level.
Survey of the art of Mexico and Central and South America from the
Spanish Colonial period forward to
the present. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ART 207
History of Asian Art - China,
Korea, and Japan
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Survey of the arts of ancient China
and their influence on the historical
development of Korean and Japanese
art forms throughout the 19th century, Asian culture and philosophies,
and their relation to the developing
art forms. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ART 230
Advanced Painting
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ART 130 and
ART 131.
Personalized exploration of expressive
painting concepts and techniques in
oil and acrylic paint. Includes critical
examination of paintings for technical
and aesthetic concerns, content, and
historical/cultural influences. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
ART 240
Advanced Ceramics I
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 141.
An advanced course in pottery with
an emphasis on larger forms and development of a distinctive style. Also
included is glaze technology and
basic kiln operation. Material fee. 36
lecture hours, 72 lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 241
Advanced Ceramics II
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ART 240.
A broader experience in ceramics is
the emphasis of this course. Independent visits to craft galleries and
special exhibits, research on selected
topics and time to explore new ideas
in clay. Material fee. 36 lecture hours,
72 lab hours. CSU;UC
ART 253
Digital Media Production II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ART 153.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to the interactive aspects of computer graphics and the
association with multimedia, entertainment and advertising. This course
will use currently available software in
the development of creative and innovative multimedia presentations
appropriate to industry, business and
community. Material fee. 36 lecture
hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
ART 267
Web Design II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ART 167.
Advanced application and integration
of WEB software and various scripting
languages. Students create web environments and applicably utilize various programs, including but not
limited to, Dreamweaver, Fireworks,
Flash and Adobe Photoshop. Emphasis will be placed on design, animation, quality, and application to
employment-related situations. 36
lecture hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
www.citruscollege.edu
163
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ART 268
Animation II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ART 168.
This intermediate level animation
course focuses on the development
of one's personal creativity and the
improvement of computer skills with
the goal of producing a personal
video portfolio. 36 lecture hours, 72
lab hours. CSU
Astronomy
(Physical Sciences
Department)
Astronomy studies celestial bodies
and their structure, origin, and development. Courses in astronomy satisfy
general education requirements for
the associate degree and lower division transfer and can be used to fulfill
some of the major requirements for
the associate degree in Biological and
Physical Sciences and Mathematics.
Astronomy Courses
ASTR 115
Planetary Astronomy
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The astronomy of the solar system
including the history of astronomy,
Newton's and Kepler's laws, light, telescopes, the Sun, terrestrial and
giant planets, satellites, comets, meteors, and the origin of the solar system. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ASTR 115H
Planetary Astronomy - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030.
The astronomy of the solar system
including the history of astronomy,
Newton's and Kepler's laws, light, telescopes, the Sun, terrestrial and
giant planets, satellites, comets, meteors, and the origin of the solar sys164
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
tem. Students are expected to work
and participate at an honors level
which includes strong critical thinking
skills, thorough analysis of astronomical readings, presentation and leadership skills demonstrated through class
participation/presentation, and service learning in the community. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ASTR 116
Stellar Astronomy
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030.
The fundamental areas of stellar astronomy including the structure, classification and evolution of stars,
galaxies and the universe, interstellar
matter, and the theories of Newton
and Einstein. Laboratory exercises include: energy and forces, light, optics, telescopes, stars and their
classification, and galaxies. 54 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
ASTR 117
Life In The Universe
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030.
The origin and evolution of life on
Earth, the processes and conditions
relevant to life elsewhere in the universe, and the ongoing search for extraterrestrial life. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
Automotive Technology
(Technology & Engineering
Department)
Automotive Technology, a career
technical program, provides the theoretical background and practical experience necessary to gain entry-level
employment or advancement in the
automotive technology industry. The
program has a contract with Toyota
Motor Sales that provides students
with training aides, diagnostic equipment and a dealer network that helps
with job placement. The program offers courses that lead to an associate
degree in Automotive Technology as
well as to certificates of achievement
in Automotive Service, Diagnosis, and
Repair—Master Technician; Automotive Service, Diagnosis, and Repair—
Toyota/Lexus/Scion Technician;
Automotive Service, Diagnosis, and
Repair—Undercar/Drivetrain Specialist; Automotive Service, Diagnosis,
and Repair—Underhood Specialist;
and Automotive Development.
Automotive Technology
Courses
For those seeking a career in the automotive service and repair industry,
this NATEF certified course is one
component of the T-TEN and TEC
programs. This course focuses on the
service, diagnosis and repair of the
manual and automatic automotive
drivetrain systems. Appropriate lab
activities in automobile drivetrain inspection, service and repair are included.
AUTO 100
Automotive Technology and
Maintenance for the Consumer
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Intended for non-majors. Automobiles and light trucks will be explained
from the point of view of the consumer. Operation of essential automotive technologies is central to the
course goal of skill development in
the inspection of various automobile
systems for needed repairs and/or
maintenance performed by the enduser. Appropriate lab activities in automobile inspection, service and
repair are included. 54 lecture hours,
18 lab hours. CSU
AUTO 101
Fundamentals of Automotive
Service, Diagnosis and Repair
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 098 if
required by English placement
exam or if required by English
level.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Intended for automotive majors, this
class serves as the pre-requisite for
all automotive certificate and/or degree-applicable courses. Automobiles
and light trucks will be explored from
the point of view of the service technician. Scientific principles and operation of essential automotive
technologies are central to the course
goal of preparing students for entry
into the automotive core curriculum.
Appropriate lab activities in automobile inspection, service and repair are
included. 72 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours. CSU
AUTO 149
Diesel Engine Management
Systems
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 148 or
AUTO 168 or MTRK 151.
Intended for Automotive and
Medium/Heavy Truck students, this
course covers the theory of operation
of 4-stroke diesel engines along with
the theory of operation, testing and
inspection, and service repair of airinlet systems (including forced induction), exhaust systems, fuel-delivery
systems (including mechanical and
electronic engine controls), and emission-control systems. Course prepares students for ASE A9 and/or T2
certification. 72 lecture hours. CSU
AUTO 151
Engine Service, Diagnosis and
Repair
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030 or higher.
Intended for those seeking a career
in the automotive service and repair
industry, this NATEF certified course
is one component of the T-TEN and
TEC programs. The course covers essential engine theory, inspection, diagnosis, service and repair. Engine
disassembly, inspection, measurements and assembly are covered,
with emphasis on in-vehicle repairs.
Course prepares students for ASE Engine Repair (A1) certification exam.
54 lecture hours, 135 lab hours. CSU
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
AUTO 154
Chassis Service, Diagnosis, and
Repair
8 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101 and
AUTO 156.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030 or higher.
Intended for those seeking a career
in the automotive service and repair
industry, this NATEF certified course
is one component of the T-TEN and
TEC programs. The course covers essential chassis system theory, along
with inspection, diagnosis, service
and repair of the following undercar
systems: brake, steering, suspension,
alignment, wheel/tire, ride control
and ABS. Course prepares students
for ASE Suspension and Steering (A4)
and ASE Brakes (A5) certification. 108
lecture hours, 135 lab hours. CSU
AUTO 156
Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems I
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101 or one
year minimum industry experience based on departmental
approval or related coursework.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030 or higher.
Intended for those seeking a career
in the automotive service and repair
industry, this NATEF certified course
is one component of the T-TEN and
TEC programs. This class covers essential electrical and electronic systems theory, along with inspection,
diagnosis, service and repair of specific electrical systems including the
battery, starting systems, charging
systems, lighting systems, gauges,
and instrument-panel warning lights.
Prepares students for ASE
Electrical & Electronic Systems (A6)
certification. 68 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU
AUTO 162
Drivetrain Service, Diagnosis and
Repair
8 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 166.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030 or higher.
Intended for those seeking a career
in the automotive service and repair
industry, this NATEF certified course
is one component of the T-TEN and
TEC programs. This course focuses
on the service, diagnosis and repair
of the manual and automatic
automotive drivetrain systems. Appropriate lab activities in automobile
drivetrain inspection, service and repair are included. The course prepares students for the ASE Automatic
Transmission and Transaxle (A2) and
Manual Drivetrain and Axles (A3) certification exams. 108 lecture hours,
135 lab hours. CSU
AUTO 166
Automotive Electrical/Electronic
Systems II
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 156.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030 or higher.
Intended for those seeking a career
in the automotive service and repair
industry, this NATEF certified course
is one component of the T-TEN and
TEC programs. This class covers advanced electrical and electronic systems theory, along with inspection,
diagnosis, service & repair of specific
accessory systems including supplemental restraint, navigation, entertainment, power windows/locks/
seats, customizable body electronics,
hybrid vehicle controls and multiplex
systems. Prepares students for ASE
Electrical & Electronic Systems (A6)
certification. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours. CSU
www.citruscollege.edu
165
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AUTO 167
Automotive HVAC Service, Diagnosis and Repair
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 156.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030 or higher.
Intended for those seeking a career
in the automotive service and repair
industry, this NATEF certified course
is one component of the T-TEN and
TEC programs. This class covers essential heating, ventilation and air
conditioning system theory, along
with inspection, diagnosis, service &
repair of specific HVAC subsystems
including: Refrigeration, air distribution and automatic temperature control. Course prepares students for
ASE Heating and Air Conditioning
(A7) certification. 36 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU
AUTO 168
Engine Control Systems Service,
Diagnosis and Repair
8 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 151 and
AUTO 166.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030 or higher.
Intended for those seeking a career
in the automotive service and repair
industry, this NATEF certified course
is one component of the T-TEN and
TEC programs. The course covers essential engine management system
theory, along with inspection, diagnosis, service & repair of the following
systems: Ignition, air and fuel delivery, electronic engine controls, and
auxiliary emission controls. Course
prepares students for ASE Engine
Performance (A8) certification. 108
lecture hours, 135 lab hours. CSU
AUTO 230A
Automotive Service and Repair
Work Experience A
1 Unit
Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite: Department consent required prior to enroll-
166
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ment.
Strongly Recommended: Completion of 16 units in automotive
technology coursework.
Automotive technology work experience is designed to extend occupational learning through employment
and coordinate the on-the-job training with program instruction. Individual student goals and learning
objectives will be designed by the
student cooperatively with the employer and faculty adviser. Lab hours
are arranged and completed at the
place of employment. This course is
offered for Pass/No Pass grading
only. 9 lecture hours, 160 lab hours
arranged.
AUTO 230B
Automotive Service and Repair
Work Experience B
2 Units
Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite: Department
consent required prior to
enrollment.
Strongly Recommended:
Completion of 16 units in automotive technology coursework.
Automotive technology work experience is designed to extend occupational learning through employment
and coordinate the on
-the-job training with program instruction. Individual student goals
and learning objectives will be designed by the student cooperatively
with the employer and faculty adviser.
Lab hours are arranged and completed at the place of employment.
This course is offered for Pass/No
Pass grading only. 9 lecture hours,
320 lab hours arranged.
AUTO 230C
Automotive Service and Repair
Work Experience C
3 Units
Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite: Department
consent required prior to
enrollment.
Strongly Recommended:
Completion of 16 units in automotive technology coursework.
Automotive technology work experience is designed to extend occupational learning through employment
and coordinate the on-the-job training with program instruction. Individ-
ual student goals and learning objectives will be designed by the student
cooperatively with the employer and
faculty adviser. Lab hours are
arranged and completed at the place
of employment. This course is offered
for Pass/No Pass grading only. 9 lecture hours, 480 lab hours arranged.
AUTO 230D
Automotive Service and Repair
Work Experience D
4 Units
Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite: Department
consent required prior to
enrollment.
Strongly Recommended:
Completion of 16 units in automotive technology coursework.
Automotive technology work experience is designed to extend occupational learning through employment
and coordinate the on-the-job training with program instruction. Individual student goals and learning
objectives will be designed by the
student cooperatively with the employer and faculty adviser. Lab hours
are arranged and completed at the
place of employment. This course is
offered for Pass/No Pass grading only.
9 lecture hours, 640 lab hours
arranged.
AUTO 281
Advanced Toyota Certified
Technician Training
6.5 Units
Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite: Must currently be a
full-time journeyman level technician with two years of dealership experience or four years
experience at an independent
repair facility.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An advanced-level course specifically
designed to meet the Toyota Certified
Technician Program requirements for
certification in the following University of Toyota technical training
courses: 021, 263, 302, 453, 553,
623, 652, 753, and 852. Only individuals meeting the requirement of the
T-TEN Professional Certificate or the
current T-TEN students that have
completed the NATEF core classes
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
may attend. This course is offered for
Pass/No Pass grading only. 88 lecture
hours, 88 lab hours.
AUTO 291
Engine Performance Enhancements and Tuning
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 168 or
consent of department.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This class covers the engine performance enhancements available for automobiles, light trucks and
motorcycles. The subject areas covered include stand-alone engine management systems, fuel systems,
turbochargers, superchargers, nitrous
oxide, ignition systems, and the use
of the chassis dynamometer as a tuning tool. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours.
AUTO 295
Engine Design
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course designed to teach engine
design principles and analysis of
cylinder heads, cylinder blocks, crankshafts, piston and rings, connecting
rods, camshaft, valve train systems.
The course will also cover the design
and tuning of intake and exhaust systems, turbo charging and supercharging and the use of basic and
advanced engine design formulas. 72
lecture hours. CSU
AUTO 296
Cylinder Head Development
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 295 or
one year of work experience in
the automotive field with an
emphasis on engine machining
or repair.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course designed to teach the skills
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
necessary to develop a cylinder head
for total performance. Emphasis will
be placed on cylinder head development and reconditioning, head CCing,
and basic flowbench operation. 54
lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
AUTO 297
Cylinder Block Development
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 295 or one
year work experience in the automotive field with an emphasis
on engine machining or repair.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course designed to teach the skills
necessary to develop and rebuild a
cylinder block for total performance.
Emphasis will be placed on cylinder
block development and reconditioning, including operation of align-honing, surfacing, boring, and honing
machine operation. 54 lecture hours,
54 lab hours.
AUTO 298
Special Projects
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 295 and
AUTO 296 or AUTO 296 and
AUTO 297 or AUTO 262 and
AUTO 291 and AUTO 292 and
AUTO 293 or consent from instructor.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This laboratory class is designed to
provide hands-on application of skills
and techniques acquired in the High
Performance Institute (HPI) program
series of classes. The HPI program
has a number of designated special
projects that students will take part
in. Students take an active role in
planning, preparation, and completion
of projects during the semester. 108
lab hours.
AUTO 299
Engine Dynamometer Operation
and Testing Procedures
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 295 or one
year experience in the automotive field with an emphasis on
engine machining or chassis
dynamometer operation.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course covers engine dynamometer operation and testing
procedures with evaluation of test
results for performance tuning. 18
lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
Biology
(Natural Sciences
Department)
Biology is the science of life and living
organisms, including their structure,
function, and growth. Courses in biological sciences satisfy general education requirements for the associate
degree and lower division transfer
and lead to associate degrees in Biological Science and in Biological and
Physical Sciences and Mathematics.
Biology Courses
BIOL 102
Human Genetics
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 030.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
General principles of genetics and reproduction in wellness and disease as
applied to humans. Topics include
Mendelian inheritance, extensions
and exceptions to Mendelian inheritance, multifactorial traits, DNA structure, function, and replication, cell
division, population genetics, evolution, immunity, cancer, and genetic
technologies. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
167
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BIOL 104
Biology: Contemporary Topics
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A general biology lecture course for
non-majors which will cover basic life
processes and address contemporary
issues in biology. Biological principles
covered will include chemical foundations of biology, cell structure and
function, cell reproduction, and genetics. Contemporary issues may include such areas as public health,
biotechnology, and environmental science. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
BIOL 105
General Biology
4 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030 and high school
biology or chemistry.
The general biology course, lecture
and laboratory, for non-majors, with
emphasis upon molecular biology, cell
structure and function, energy relationships, human physiological systems (including reproductive
anatomy, reproductive cycles, development, and immunity), genetics,
evolution, ecological interrelationships, and discussion of contemporary issues. The laboratory provides
the student with expanded first-hand
experience in specific areas of course
content. 54 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours. CSU;UC
BIOL 109
Biology for Educators
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 030
or concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides each prospective
multiple subject teacher with an introductory survey of the fundamental
concepts of biology and the interrelationships among living organisms.
168
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Emphasis is placed upon the chemical
basis of life, the role of cells in the
formation of complex organisms, the
relationship between structure and
function in complex organisms like
plants and animals, the role that genetics plays in the evolution of life,
and the relationship between living
organisms and the physical world
around them. This course is recommended for students planning to take
the CSET Multiple Subject Exam to
become credentialed elementary
school teachers in the State of California. 54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
CSU;UC
BIOL 116
HIV and AIDS: Insights and
Implications
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course covering the most common
sexually transmitted infections (STI's)
with emphasis on the complex biological, sociological, and psychological
aspects of the AIDS epidemic. Topics
include history of the infections,
agent(s), current medical knowledge,
transmission, risk reduction, and societal responses. Common myths and
misunderstandings will be identified
to distinguish them from accepted
scientific information. Selected topics
will be presented by guest speakers.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
BIOL 124
Principles of Biology I
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 150.
A principles of biology course designed for biology majors and premed. students. Detailed study of
basic structure and function of living
material, with emphasis on cell and
molecular biology, genetic mechanisms and their control, reproduction
and development, evolution. 72 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
BIOL 125
Principles of Biology II
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 150.
A principles of biology course designed for biology majors and premed. students. Detailed study of
basic structure and function of living
material, with emphasis on the diversity of living material, animal and
plant form, function, reproduction
and development, evolution, and ecological relationships. 72 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU;UC
BIOL 145
Environmental Science
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also
BIOL 104 or BIOL 105.
A lecture course exploring contemporary global environmental concerns.
Basic concepts covered will include
the Earth's life support systems, population dynamics, environmental pollution, food production, and natural
resource utilization. Emphasis will be
placed on recognizing global environmental problems and exploring various solutions for them. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
BIOL 200
Human Anatomy
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 105 or
BIOL 124.
Biology 200 is a lecture/laboratory
course in human anatomy focusing
on the structures and organs of the
human body. Students will be required to learn and understand the
structures from the molecular to
gross levels, using the microscope,
standard anatomical (plastic) models,
and preserved specimens (sheep
heart, sheep brain, and cat). Required of pre-nursing students. 54
lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BIOL 201
Human Physiology
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200 and
CHEM 103 or CHEM 104 or CHEM
110 or CHEM 111 or CHEM 112.
An advanced course in human physiology emphasizing nervous, muscle,
cardiovascular, immune, respiratory,
urinary, gastrointestinal, reproductive,
& endocrine systems. Required of
pre-nursing students. 54 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
BIOL 220
Microbiology
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 103 or
CHEM 104 or CHEM 110 or CHEM
111 or CHEM 112 and BIOL 104
or BIOL 105 or BIOL 124.
An introduction to the biology of microorganisms including bacteria,
viruses, fungi, and protozoa. Metabolism, genetics, culture methods, identification, and control of common
microbes are considered. Emphasis is placed on the virulence mechanisms and control of human
pathogens and on the principles of
immunology and host defense. Laboratory work includes techniques common to the control, culture, and
identification of microbes. Required of
pre-nursing students and medical
technologists. 54 lecture hours, 108
lab hours. CSU;UC
Business
(Business Department)
Business is the study of the practices
and products of commerce. Areas of
concentration within this program include business management, business law, marketing, advertising,
business ethics, personal finance, real
estate, international business, and
business communication skills. Business courses satisfy general education requirements for an associate’s
degree, an associate degree in business, and lower division transfer requirements.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Business Courses
BUS 130
Introduction to Business
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This is a foundation course in business administration. It is recommended for all students planning
further study in this field. Lecture,
discussion and problems involve such
topics as business finance, personnel,
production, distribution, government
regulations, and managerial controls.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
BUS 132
Ethics in Business
3 Units
Grade Only
This course emphasizes development
of managerial decision-making skills
utilizing ethical business standards for
improvement of business organizations, communities, government, and
international trade. 54 lecture hours.
CSU
BUS 146
Personal Finance
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is an integrative approach
to personal finance focusing on practical financial decision making as well
as the social, psychological, and
physiological contexts in which those
decisions are made. Students will examine their relationships with money,
set personal goals, and develop a
plan to meet those goals. Topics include consumerism, debt, healthcare,
investing, retirement, long-term care,
disability, death, and taxes. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
BUS 150
Business English
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course in business
writing, which includes a commonsense approach to the use of English
grammar, punctuation and style in the
business context, and strategies for
effective writing of business-related
communications. Recommended for
business majors. 54 lecture hours.
CSU
BUS 152
Business Communications
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
BUS 150.
A study of principles and strategies
for developing effective written and
oral communication skills for use in
the workplace and in business. Several types of written and oral forms of
business communication are highlighted. Recommended for business
majors. 54 lecture hours. CSU
BUS 160
Business Law and the Legal
Environment I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
A study of law, with an emphasis on
the law's relationship to business.
Topics covered include the legal environment of business, court procedures, jurisdiction, torts and crimes in
the business environment, intellectual
property, principles of contract law,
commercial transactions, and ethical
business practices. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
BUS 161
Business Law and the Legal
Environment II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
A study of law, with an emphasis on
the law's relationship to business.
Topics covered include agency, employment law, consumer law, environmental law, sole proprietorships,
franchises, partnerships, corporations, insurance, real and personal
property, landlord-tenant law, wills
and trusts, elder law, creditors' rights
and remedies, secured transactions,
bankruptcy law, negotiable instruments, antitrust law, professional liability, and international law. 54
lecture hours. CSU; UC
www.citruscollege.edu
169
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BUS 170
Small Business Management
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
ENGL 099 If required by English
placement exam or if required by
English level.
The study of business organization
emphasizing the small independentlyowned business. Instructional topics
include discussion of the benefits of
small business, creation of a new
venture, marketing, managing, financial, and administrative controls. 54
lecture hours. CSU
BUS 172
Personnel Management
3 Units
Grade Only
The study of personnel management
emphasizing employer/employee relationships, communications, employee
selection, job analysis and description, job motivation and productivity,
employee benefits, principles of collective bargaining, labor relations,
O.S.H.A., and affirmative action. 54
lecture hours. CSU
BUS 175
Introduction to Management
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course focusing on communication,
decision making, and leadership for
administrative and managerial positions in business, government, the
professions, and the volunteer sector.
54 lecture hours. CSU
BUS 176
Management for the Office
Professional
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
An overview of office management
for administrative professionals. Topics include: concepts and trends in
administrative office management,
centralizing/decentralizing managerial
authority, communication in the office, managing a culturally diverse
workplace, managing the ergonomic
office environment, automating the
office, managing office information
170
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
systems, and improving office productivity. 54 lecture hours. CSU
BUS 185
Elements of Marketing
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course focusing on the moving of
goods, services, and ideas from producer to consumer. Topics include:
functions and institutions of marketing; marketing research and customer motivation; buying, selling,
pricing and competition; transportation, storage and packaging; banking,
communication, and insurance. 54
lecture hours. CSU
BUS 192
Advertising
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or ifrequired by English level.
A study of media advertising, including magazine, television, radio, newspaper, and direct mail; the purpose
and cycles of advertising; laws affecting advertising; and economic effects
of advertising. 54 lecture hours. CSU
Chemistry
(Physical Sciences
Department)
Chemistry, a natural science, studies
the composition, structure, properties, and reactions of matter, especially of atomic and molecular
systems. Courses include organic and
inorganic chemistry as well as quantitative analysis. Chemistry courses
satisfy general education requirements for the associate degree and
lower division transfer and can be
used to fulfill some of the major requirements for the associate degree
in Biological and Physical Sciences
and Mathematics.
Chemistry Courses
CHEM 103
College Chemistry
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 030.
The first semester of a year program
includes chemistry of inorganic compounds; covers topics of nomenclature, stoichiometry, bonding,
chemical equations, gas laws, solutions, acids and bases, nuclear
processes and chemical equilibrium.
Required for students transferring to
four-year college nursing programs
and students majoring in physical
therapy, occupational therapy and
home economics. 72 lecture hours,
72 lab hours. CSU;UC
CHEM 104
College Chemistry
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 103 or
CHEM 110.
The second semester of a year program includes chemistry of organic
compounds; covers topics in biochemistry including carbohydrates,
fats, proteins, metabolism, nucleic
acids, and nutrition. Required for students transferring to four-year college
nursing programs and students majoring in physical therapy, occupational therapy and home economics.
72 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CSU;UC
CHEM 106
Physical Science for Educators
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 030
or concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides each prospective
multiple subject teacher with an introductory survey of the fundamental
concepts of chemistry and physics
and the relationships among these
disciplines. Emphasis is placed on the
ways in which chemistry and physics
affect everyday life. This course is
recommended for students planning
to take the CSET Multiple Subject
Exam to become credentialed ele-
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
mentary school teachers in the State
of California. PHYS 106 and CHEM
106 are the same course. 54 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU
CHEM 110
Beginning General Chemistry
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 150
or concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course in the fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics
covered are those necessary for understanding chemical structure and
reactivity, and for performing scientific calculations. There is an emphasis on laboratory work and
communication skills. The course is
designed for science and engineering
majors, pre-medical students, and as
a general education class. 54 lecture
hours, 126 lab hours. CSU;UC
CHEM 111
General Chemistry
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 150 and
CHEM 110 or passing score on
Chemistry placement exam.
A general course in the fundamental
principles of chemistry. Topics covered include periodicity, stoichiometry, nomenclature, atomic structure,
bonding, chemical calculations, thermodynamics, intermolecular forces,
gases and organic chemistry. The
course is designed for all science and
engineering majors and pre-medical
students. 54 lecture hours, 126 lab
hours. CSU;UC
CHEM 112
General Chemistry
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111.
A general course in the fundamental
principles of chemistry. Chemistry 112
is a continuation of Chemistry 111
and includes topics of equilibrium, kinetics, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear processes,
coordination chemistry and thermodynamics. 54 lecture hours, 126 lab
hours. CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
CHEM 210
Organic Chemistry
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112.
A course in organic chemistry including the properties and reactions of
alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols,
ethers, thiols, emphasizing fundamental principles and reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry and IR
spectroscopy. First semester of a oneyear course, required for students enrolled in pre-professional programs in
medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary science, biology, and chemistry.
CHEM 211L required concurrently for
most stated majors. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
CHEM 211L
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 210
or concurrent enrollment.
Introduction to organic laboratory
techniques such as melting point,
crystallization, distillation, thin layer
chromatography, extraction. Synthesis of an ether and an alkene. 54 lab
hours. CSU;UC
CHEM 220
Organic Chemistry
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 210.
A course in organic chemistry including the properties and reactions of
aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid derivatives,
enols, enolates, amines, and selected
topics in biochemistry, NMR, and
mass spectrometry. Second semester
course required for students in preprofessional programs in medicine,
dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary science, biology, and chemistry. CHEM
221L is required concurrently for
most of the stated majors. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
CHEM 221L
Organic Chemistry Laboratory
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 220
or concurrent enrollment.
Synthesis of selected organic compounds, including multi-step
processes, techniques of column
chromatography, IR spectroscopy. 54
lab hours. CSU;UC
Chinese Courses
(Foreign Languages
Department)
The Foreign Languages Department
offers proficiency-based instruction in
listening,
speaking, reading, and writing in
these languages: Spanish, German,
Chinese, and Japanese. The study of
each language includes vocabulary,
grammar, syntax, pronunciation, and
cultural and historical understanding.
Intermediate-level courses include a
literature component. Courses combine classroom lectures, guided practice, and language activities with
individual work conducted online.
Chinese Courses
CHIN 101
Chinese I
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course in elementary Chinese
(Mandarin) grammar, vocabulary and
pronunciation which aims at understanding, speaking, reading and writing simple Chinese and serves as an
introduction to Chinese geography
and culture. 90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
CHIN 102
Chinese II
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 101 or
two years of high school Chinese.
Chinese 102 continues to present the
fundamentals of Chinese grammar.
Students are further trained to pronounce Mandarin correctly, to build
their conversational and written vocabulary, and to read and write approximately 300 more Chinese
characters. 90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
171
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Child Development
(Behavioral Sciences
Department)
The Child Development Program explores the theories and concepts necessary for the healthy growth and
development of children from conception through adolescence. Child development courses provide both the
theoretical and practical skills and experiences necessary to obtain a
transfer degree or gain employment
in the field of early childhood education.
Students who complete the appropriate coursework may earn the Early
Childhood Education Associate in Science for Transfer degree (ECE AS-T) .
The transfer degree focuses on the
theoretical background of child development and developmentally appropriate practices of education for
young children. Students who complete this transfer degree will achieve
junior status to the California State
University system, and will be given
priority admission to our local CSU
campus.
Students completing appropriate
coursework may earn the following
certificates of achievement: Child Development Teacher, Child Development Master Teacher, or Child
Development Master Teacher--Early
Intervention. Students completing the
appropriate courses may earn the following Skill Awards: Child Development Associate Teacher or Infant and
Child Development Associate Teacher
Skill Award.
Child Development Classes
CHLD 100
Introduction to Education and
Teaching Grades K-12
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is an introductory course
for students wishing to explore the
teaching profession in the K-12 setting. Topics include an introduction to
teacher performance expectations
172
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
and California Standards for the
teaching profession. Other topics include pedagogical strategies, curriculum design, California subject matter
standards, use of technology in
today's classroom and the importance
of current issues and legislation. In
addition, students are REQUIRED to
observe 45 hours in K-12 classrooms
to complete the course successfully.
54 lecture hours. CSU
CHLD 110
Early Childhood Development
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This introductory course examines
the major physical, psychosocial, and
cognitive/language developmental
milestones for children, both typical
and atypical, from conception
through adolescence. There will be
an emphasis on interactions between
maturational processes and environmental factors. While studying developmental, students will observe
children, evaluate individual differences and analyze characteristics of
development at various stages. 54
lecture hours. CSU
CHLD 111
Child Development Youth Adolescence
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course examines the history and
philosophy of child development from
middle childhood through adolescence (8-18 years). This includes a
survey of parenting and educational
practices as well as examining the responsibilities of teaching and caring
for this age group. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
CHLD 112
Principles of Early Childhood
Education I
3 Units
Grade Only
This course is designed to introduce
students to the theoretical principles
of developmentally appropriate practice as applied to programs and environments with an emphasis on the
role of relationships, constructive
adult-child-parent interactions, and
teaching strategies that support physical, social/emotional, creative and intellectual development for all young
children regardless of their individual
and diverse needs. Observation,
analysis and assessment of programs
for young children will be required.
The course includes a review of the
historical roots of early childhood programs and the evolution of professional practices promoting advocacy,
ethics and professional identity. 54
lecture hours. CSU
CHLD 114
Home-Child-Community
Relations
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An examination of the developing
child in a societal context which focuses on the interrelationships of
family, school and community and
emphasizes historical and sociocultural factors. The processes of socialization and identity development
will be highlighted. The course includes an examination of community
resources, the teacher's role and the
influences of age, gender, diverse
abilities, culture, socio-economic status and public policy factors that affect children and families. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
CHLD 116
Introduction to Curriculum
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will present an overview
of knowledge and skills related to
providing curriculum and environments for young children from birth
through age six. Examination of the
teacher's role in supporting learning
and development in young children
with an emphasis on the essential
role of play. This course provides
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
strategies for developmentally appropriate practice based on observation
and assessments across the curriculum including the following areas: 1)
language and literacy, math and science, 2) creative art and experiences
3) development of physical, socialemotional and cognitive skills. 54 lecture hours. CSU
CHLD 120
Literacy for Children
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will explore teaching
strategies, interactions and environments necessary for nurturing early
language development and literacy
skills in the preschool and early
school-age child. Students will analyze developmentally appropriate curriculum that supports children's
emerging listening, speaking, reading
and writing skills. Students will survey
children's picture books and learn
techniques to enhance literacy development across the curriculum including storytelling, puppetry and other
relevant language arts experiences
for children 0-8 years. 54 lecture
hours.
CHLD 121
Art for Children
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Designed to provide students with
opportunities to experience and evaluate art and crafts materials used
with the preschool and early schoolage child to discover the development
of creativity in children. The student
will design developmentally appropriate art curriculum and explore ways
to support creative thinking and experiences for children. Students will
gain appreciation for art and creative
thinking within diverse cultures and
society at large. 36 lecture hours.
CHLD 122
Music and Rhythms for Children
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
required by English level.
This course will provide the student
with basic skills and techniques for
using musical instruments, recordings
and songs and develop rhythmic
movement activities to use with preschool and early school-age children.
Students will analyze, discuss and
plan developmentally appropriate curriculum that supports children's music
and movement needs. Previous music
experience is not required. 36 lecture
hours.
CHLD 123
Science Experiences for Children
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course focuses on planning and
implementing science experiences
with preschool and early school-age
children. Students will analyze and
plan developmentally appropriate curriculum that supports children's understanding of life, earth and physical
science concepts. This course provides exposure to formal, informal
and incidental science activities and
direct use of science materials. Students will analyze the teacher's role
in incorporating science concepts
within the total program for children.
18 lecture hours.
CHLD 124
Math for Children
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
The student will gain knowledge of
practical mathematics activities to use
with preschool and early-school age
children. The student will plan developmentally appropriate math curriculum activities. This course focuses on
analyzing relevant theories of child
development to provide the student
with opportunities to evaluate mathematical materials and activities for
use in the early childhood education
classroom. 18 lecture hours.
CHLD 130
Infant Development and Group
Care
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course focuses on the development of the infant and on the dynamics of infant group care. Methods of
providing care designed for physical,
emotional, social, and intellectual development will be stressed. The
health and safety requirements of the
state and county are included. 54 lecture hours. CSU
CHLD 134
Parent-Child Interaction
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course explores dynamics of the
parent-child relationship. Students
will analyze the process of being a
parent, stages of parenthood, and
consider both internal and external
forces that influence parent-child interactions. A focus on children from
birth to adolescence will include understanding developmental needs. A
problem solving approach to the parent-child interaction will be examined
to promote positive relationships
within a harmonious family atmosphere. 54 lecture hours. CSU
CHLD 140
Before/After-School Programs
3 Units
Grade Only
An overview of quality school-age
childcare programs based on good
child development principles and
practices. This course includes community resources, environment,
staffing, activities, homework assistance, discipline and relationships.
This class meets the Title XXII licensing requirements for personnel in
school age programs. 54 lecture
hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
173
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CHLD 144
Health, Safety and Nutrition for
Young Children
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
This course provides an overview of
health, safety and nutrition standards, regulations, laws, policies and
procedures and focuses on health,
safety and nutrition program development and curriculum materials in
early childhood education settings.
Key components that ensure physical
and mental health and safety for both
children and staff will be identified.
Emphasis will be placed on the importance of collaborating with families
and health professionals. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
CHLD 150
Multi-Culture Anti-Bias
Classrooms
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or ifrequired by English level.
This course is designed to assist students in becoming more effective
teachers of individuals from backgrounds other than their own. The
course will involve self-reflection of
one's own understanding of educational principles as one integrates
anti-bias goals to better inform teaching practices and program development. Students will examine the
development of social identities in diverse societies including theoretical
and practical implications affecting
young children, families, programs,
teaching and education/schooling. Included is an examination of culturally
relevant and linguistically appropriate
approaches that support all children
in becoming competent members of a
diverse society. 54 lecture hours. CSU
174
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
CHLD 154
Observing and Recording
Behavior
3 Units
Prerequisite(s): CHLD 110 or
CHLD 111 or PSY 206 and CHLD
112.
This course will focus on principles of
observation, collection, organization,
and uses of data. Observation as the
basis for evaluation of children's skills
and the formulation of lesson plans will
be the basis of field work assignments.
Students will practice a variety of techniques in a variety of different settings.
Students will organize data gathered
for use in lesson planning and parent
conferencing. Three hours lecture per
week. 54 lecture hours. CSU
CHLD 156
Practicum in Early Childhood
Education
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): CHLD 154 and
CHLD 116.
Co-Requisite(s): CHLD 156L.
This course is designed to provide the
student with opportunities to plan
and implement developmentally appropriate activities in an early childhood setting. Emphasis is placed on
developing professional relationships,
planning and implementation of curriculum, environment design. A variety of programs and philosophies will
be examined. Students will use practical classroom experiences to make
connections between theory and
practice and are required to be registered in 156L concurrently. 36 lecture
hours. CSU
CHLD 156L
Practicum Lab
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): CHLD 116 and
CHLD 154.
Co-Requisite(s): CHLD 156.
The student will have the opportunity
for application of acquired knowledge
and teaching skills directly in the
early childhood classroom. The students will gain experience teaching
activities to children and developing a
professional attitude. NOTE: This
class should be taken at the same
time as CHLD 156 Practicum. 54 lab
hours arranged. CSU
CHLD 160
Perceptual Motor and Movement
Activities
2 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will focus on evaluation
of motor skills, planning and implementation of perceptual motor and
movement activities appropriate for
normal and motor-delayed young
children. Emphasis will be placed on
the role of the physical and psychomotor domain in the total development of the young child.
Developmental motor activities will be
examined that aid children in acquiring movement abilities and fitness, as
well as facilitate social interaction and
cognitive development. Participants
will develop movement experiences
for use in the classroom and in the
planning of a motor development curriculum. 36 lecture hours.
CHLD 164
The Child with Special Needs
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A presentation of different types of
atypical development that interfere
with normal physical, cognitive, social, behavioral and emotional growth
from preschool through early schoolage children. 54 lecture hours. CSU
CHLD 166
Speech and Language Development
and Disorders
2 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will cover children's acquisition of speech and language
skills from birth to age 5. Emphasis
will be on normal language, articulation, fluency, and voice development.
Included will be children's language
learning strategies, adult teaching
strategies, language and cultural dif-
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ferences, and an overview of communication disorders, as well as appropriate referral to a professional. 36
lecture hours.
CHLD 168
Developmental Risk: Infants and
Toddlers
2 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This class introduces the student to
early intervention strategies that are
positive and cost-effective for use
with children who are developmentally delayed or at risk for developmental delay. Information on Public
Law 99-457 is included. Specific
strategiesfor language intervention
and child abuse reporting are also included. This class is appropriate for
all professionals and paraprofessionals working with young children. 36
lecture hours.
CHLD 169
Managing Challenging and Disruptive Behaviors
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides an overview of
challenging and disruptive behaviors
in preschoolers. Topics of study include attention deficit disorder, aggression, and other related topics.
Students will analyze behavioral issues and explore strategies for classroom management. Students will
develop guidance techniques for
modifying inappropriate behaviors. 18
lecture hours.
CHLD 181
Infant and Toddler Caregiver:
Relationships
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This is one of four one-unit classes in
Infant and Toddler Caregiving based
on the Responsive Caregiving ap-
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
proach. Students in this class will examine the impact of teacher/parent
relationships on the quality of Infant
and Toddler Caregiving and review
and evaluate techniques for supporting families. This class partially meets
the licensing requirement for 3 units
in infant and toddler care and development. 18 lecture hours.
CHLD 182
Infant and Toddler Caregiver:
Socialization and Emotional
Development
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This is one of four one-unit classes in
Infant and Toddler Caregiving based
on the Responsive Caregiving approach. Students in this class will
study infant and toddler temperaments, stages of social and emotional development, appropriate guidance, and responsive curriculum for
group care. This class partially meets
the licensing requirement for 3 units
in infant and toddler care and development. 18 lecture hours.
CHLD 183
Infant and Toddler Caregiver:
Learning and Development
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This is one of four one-unit classes in
Infant and Toddler Caregiving based
on the Responsive Caregiving approach. Students in this class will
learn to recognize cues and to follow
the child's interest in order to facilitate the infant's or toddler's discoveries and learning. Students will learn
to base the curriculum on the child's
interest and readiness. This class partially meets the licensing requirement
for 3 units in infant and toddler care
and development. 18 lecture hours.
CHLD 184
Infant and Toddler Caregiver:
Environments and Routines
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This is one of four one-unit classes in
Infant and Toddler Caregiving based
on the Responsive Caregiving approach. Students in this class will
learn to set up a safe, intimate, and
interesting environment for infants
and toddlers. They will also learn the
techniques of responsive care giving
in daily routines. This class partially
meets the licensing requirement for 6
units in infant and toddler care and
development. 18 lecture hours.
CHLD 190
Administration of Early
Childhood Education Programs I
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): CHLD 110 or
CHLD 111 or PSY 206 and CHLD
112 and CHLD 114.
Students who meet one of the
following conditions may also
qualify for this course:
(1) Students who possess a
California Child Development
"Teacher" level permit on the
statewide permit matrix.
(2) Students with two years of
work experience at the teacher
level in early childhood education.
Introduction to the basic principles of
administration of early childhood education programs. Includes specific
topics of curriculum development and
evaluation; staff selection, supervision and evaluation; laws and regulations; site development and
supervision; budgeting and fiscal
management; parent education;
health and safety supervision; time
management and problem solving
techniques. This class meets state requirements for supervision of Title
XXII preschool programs. 54 lecture
hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
175
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CHLD 191
Administration of Early
Childhood Education Programs II
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): PSY 206 or CHLD
110 and CHLD 112, CHLD 114
and CHLD 116.
Student may substitute other
courses but must have 12+ units
of child development coursework.
Introduction to the policies and procedures specific to state funded programs. Includes Title V regulations,
evaluation of programs utilizing the
state mandated Program Quality Review, development of proposals and
grant requests for state or other
funding, process of promulgating regulations, affecting proposed regulations, staff development and training,
development of program policies. 54
lecture hours.
CHLD 194
Personnel Issues in Adult
Supervision and Mentoring
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): CHLD 156 and
CHLD 156L.
This course addresses those personnel issues most often encountered by
administrators of Early Childhood Education program including: policies
and procedures for selection and supervision of staff; pre-service and inservice education; leadership and
motivation; team building; conflict
resolution; supervision and evaluation. 54 lecture hours.
Computer Information
Systems
(Technology and Engineering
Department)
The CIS program includes microcomputer applications and computer support of business organizations. The
program offers state-of-the-art training in the use of business application
software and hardware to prepare
students for professional careers,
transfer study, and/or personal use.
Students receive hands-on training in
laboratory facilities. Faculty members
work with industry and business to
ensure relevant training. CIS courses
176
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
satisfy general education requirements for an associate degree, an associate degree in liberal arts with an
emphasis in business technology, and
lower division transfer.
Computer Information
Systems Courses
CIS 099
Introduction to Windows and
Personal Computers
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course covers computer literacy
concepts. It provides an introduction
to the personal computer via the Windows operating systems. The course
prepares students to operate a computer using the Windows graphical
user interface. It is designed for students with no previous computer experience. 36 lecture hours.
CIS 107
Information Systems and Applications
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
CIS 099.
This course covers essential concepts
of information technology. Topics include computer hardware, software,
programming concepts, network/Internet technologies, ethics and
emerging technologies. 72 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
CIS 109
Network and Computer Security
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Covers basics of general security concepts, network security, communication security, infrastructure security.
Business continuity, disaster recovery,
planning and prevention will be covered. This course will lay the foundation for attendees to complete the
CompTIA Security+ certification tests.
54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
CIS 119
Introduction to Web
Programming
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): CIS 099 or CIS
107.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides students with
the skills to design and publish Web
pages using the latest version of
XHTML. Students will also work with
XML and JavaScript to create custom
Web pages for personal and professional environments. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
CIS 130
Microcomputer Applications I
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
CIS 099 or CIS 107.
Students will use the personal computer to learn an office suite, such as
Microsoft Office, that includes word
processing, electronic spreadsheets,
database management systems, multimedia/presentation graphics, and
personal information management.
Prepares students to take the Microsoft Office User Specialist certification exams. 72 lecture hours. CSU;UC
CIS 150
Web Development with
Dreamweaver
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
CIS 099.
This course is part of a series exploring the Macromedia Suite
(Dreamweaver, Flash, Fireworks).
This course introduces the basic features of Dreamweaver. Topics include:
the Dreamweaver interface, CSS,
HTML integration, images, tables,
forms, and layers. 54 lecture hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
CIS 154
Web Development with
Fireworks
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): CIS 099 or CIS
107.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
CIS 150.
This course is part of a series exploring the Macromedia Suite
(Dreamweaver, Flash, Fireworks).
This course introduces the basic features of Fireworks to create, modify,
and export graphic objects to Web
design software such as
Dreamweaver. Topics include: the
Fireworks workspace, vector/bitmap
graphics, text enhancements, and
building interactive graphics. 36 lecture hours.
CIS 156
Web Development with Flash
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): CIS 099 or CIS
107.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
CIS 150.
This course is part of a series exploring the Macromedia Suite
(Dreamweaver, Flash, Fireworks).
This course introduces the basic features of Flash to create media-rich elements that integrate with Web
pages. Topics include: the Flash interface, creating animations, adding buttons, actions, and sounds. 36 lecture
hours.
CIS 162
Electronic Spreadsheets Using
Microsoft Excel
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides comprehensive
instruction in the use of spreadsheet
software to create, edit, store, retrieve, and print spreadsheets and
charts. Topics include completing cal-
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
culations, making decisions, organizing and graphing data, developing
professional looking reports, publishing organized data to the Web, and
accessing real-time data from Web
sites. 54 lecture hours. CSU
CIS 230
Microcomputer Applications II Advanced MS Office
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
CIS 130.
A second course in the use of microcomputers for personal and professional productivity. Students will use
the personal computer to learn Microsoft Office (i.e., Word, Excel, Access, & PowerPoint) at an advanced
level. Covers the advantages of
using integrated software over a single application. 72 lecture hours. CSU
CS 111
Introduction to Programming
Concepts and Design
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
CIS 107.
An introduction to the principles of
computer programming and software
development. Topics covered include
the program development cycle, developing algorithms, data and control
structures, structured programming,
and object-oriented programming.
Data types, expressions, control
structures, functions, file and stream
I/O, and structured and abstract data
types are introduced in this course.
Microsoft's Visual Studio will be used
to help illustrate programming concepts common to modern high-level
programming languages. 72 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
CS 225
Object Oriented Programming
with C++
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): CS 111.
Strongly Recommended: MATH
150.
This course is a second semester
course in object-oriented program-
ming using the C++ language. Problem analysis and algorithm design will
serve as the foundation for the use of
functions, control structures, user-defined data types, arrays, searching
and sorting algorithms, use of
streams and external files, structures,
data abstraction, and software development methods. 72 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
Communications
(Language Arts Department)
Communications includes instruction
in mass media and laboratory experiences in media arts and journalism.
The program includes print journalism, publications, broadcasting, narrowcasting, podcasting, public
relations, desktop publishing, film
studies, reporting and writing news,
multimedia reporting, and visual, digital, and mobile communications. Included in the communications
program are critical and analytical
thinking skills, sensitivity to cultural
diversity, and ethical communication.
Courses in communications satisfy
general education requirements for
the associate degree and lower division transfer and can be used to fulfill
some of the requirements for an associate degree major in Language
Arts. The program also offers a transfer degree.
Communications Courses
COMM 100
Mass Media and Society
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey and evaluation of mass
media in economic, historical, political, psychological, and sociological
terms. Focuses on helping the media
consumer understand the power and
significance of mass communications:
books, newspapers, magazines, radio,
television, motion pictures, the Internet, public relations, and advertising.
Discusses the rights and responsibilities and inter-relatedness of media in
a diverse global society. Required for
all communications and journalism
www.citruscollege.edu
177
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
majors; also a general interest
course. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
communications majors. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
COMM 101
Reporting and Writing News
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to defining, gathering, and writing the news. Stresses
accuracy, objectivity, fairness, and
balance. Practice in interviewing techniques, following rules of professional
style, and writing basic news story
structures for print, broadcast and
online publications. Discussion of issues involving press rights and responsibilities, cultural sensitivity,
taste, libel, and ethics. Required of all
communication and journalism majors. 54 lecture hours. CSU
COMM 136
Cultural History of American
Films
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
In considering the history of American commercial motion picture from
its origins to the present, students
will study film language, the social
composition of audiences, the economics of the film industry, major
themes and genres that have appeared in American films, and the relationship between politics and
American motion pictures. Meets
IGETC fine arts requirement. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
COMM 103
Freelance Journalism
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is designed to accommodate students who want to contribute
to the campus newspaper, magazines
and/or student publications websites
but are unable to enroll in regular
staff classes. Students who are interested in advertising, writing, photography, art, graphics and/or page
design may participate in student
publications to a limited extent
through this class. 54 lab hours. CSU
COMM 200
Visual Communications
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to the history of film
and television as visual mass media.
Analysis of seminal films and television programs with emphasis on their
evolution as entertainment media and
their impact on society. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
COMM 104
Public Relations
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of public relations history,
theories, and practices with emphasis
on applications to business, public
agencies and institutions. A practical
approach to using the media, creating
publicity releases, organizing and executing campaigns. Explores job opportunities of particular interest to
178
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
COMM 230
Desktop Publishing
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
COMM 101.
Computer instruction and practice.
Analysis of story structures and effectiveness of written material, rewriting, correction of errors,
proofreading, headline writing, news
and picture evaluation, and page design. Hands-on experience working
on student publications with the college newspaper and magazine staffs.
36 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU
COMM 240
Newspaper Production Staff
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended:
COMM 101.
Staff members gather, evaluate,
write, photograph, and edit the news
for publication in the student media.
Working with the editorial board and
desktop publishing classes as a production team, the staff plans,
budgets, and designs each issue. 36
lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU
COMM 245
Editorial Board Workshop
2 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended:
COMM 101.
A study of the major aspects of editorial responsibilities. Taught in a laboratory setting, the course provides
practical instruction and experience
for campus editors in writing, editing,
and evaluating each issue of the campus newspaper and magazine, as well
as formulating editorial policy. 18 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU
COMM 250
Multimedia Reporting
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
COMM 101.
This convergence journalism course
incorporates print and broadcast
techniques to produce multimedia
pieces for the web. This includes multimedia storytelling incorporating
writing, digital photography, shooting
and editing video, and recording and
editing sound. 54 lecture hours. CSU
COMM 280
Magazine Production Staff
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended:
COMM 101.
A lecture/laboratory course in which
the organization, formula, format,
and production methods of magazines are studied and applied in the
development of a college magazine.
Activities include writing, editing,
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
photography, art, layout, and production. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
CSU
Cosmetology
(Cosmetology Department)
Cosmetology, a career technical program, prepares students for careers
in the beauty industry through training in hair cutting, hair styling, makeup design, skin care, nail care, sales,
and entrepreneurship. The program
uses Pivot Point methodology.
Courses may lead to an associate degree in cosmetology and/or a certificate of achievement in cosmetology.
Upon completion of the courses, students are qualified to take the State
Barbering and Cosmetology exam to
become a licensed cosmetologist.
The Esthetician program, a career
technical program that is a subset of
Cosmetology, provides students with
the fundamental skills and knowledge
related to healthy skin care: theoretical science, sanitation and disinfecting procedures, the safe employment
of electrical modalities, make-up
techniques, and cosmetic hair removal techniques. Courses lead to a
certificate of achievement as an esthetician and can also apply toward
an associate degree in Cosmetology.
The program provides an entry-level
career as an esthetician. Upon completion of the coursework, students
are qualified to take the State Barbering and Cosmetology examination to
become a licensed esthetician.
Cosmetology Courses
COS 140
Introduction to Cosmetology
12 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This is the introductory course for
students majoring in cosmetology.
The course includes the exploration
of a variety of subjects including
sculpting, styling, facials, manicuring,
hair coloring, chemical texturizing and
practical experience in cosmetology.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
162 lecture hours, 162 lab hours.
COS 141
Introduction to Cosmetology
11 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This is the introductory course for
students majoring in cosmetology.
The course includes the exploration
of a variety of subjects including hairsculpting, hairstyling, skin care, nail
care, hair coloring, chemical texturizing and practical experience in cosmetology. Material fee. 144 lecture
hours, 144 lab hours.
COS 151
Salon Success
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or COS
141.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the study of professional ethics, client building skills and
State Board rules and regulations
from Cosmetology 141. Lecture,
demonstration and practical experience in the following areas: communication, character building, goal
setting, client retention and public
safety. 40 lecture hours, 104 lab
hours.
COS 152
Beginning Chemical Hair Reformation
4.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or
COS 141.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional hair sculpting,
chemical reformation and procedures
introduced in COS 140. Lectures,
demonstrations, and practical experience in the following areas: permanent waving, chemical straightening,
chemistry of products, and the proper
use of professional implements. 45
lecture hours, 117 lab hours.
COS 153
Advanced Chemical Reformation
of the Hair
4.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 152.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional haircutting,
permanent waving techniques and
procedures introduced in COS 152.
Lectures, demonstrations, and practical experience in the following areas:
hair reformation, trichology, scalp and
chemical procedures and treatments.
45 lecture hours,117 lab hours. 45
lecture hours, 117 lab hours.
COS 154
Beginning Haircoloring
4.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or
COS 141.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional haircoloring
techniques and procedures introduced in COS 140. Lectures, demonstrations, and practical experience in
the following areas: chemistry of
products and hair analysis. 45 lecture
hours, 117 lab hours.
COS 155
Advanced Haircoloring
4.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 154.
A continuation of the science, theory,
professional haircoloring techniques,
and procedures introduced in COS
154. Lectures, demonstrations, and
practical experience in the following
areas: tinting procedures, bleaching
procedures, specialized color application, and corrective hair color. 45 lecture hours, 117 lab hours.
COS 156
Beginning Manicuring
4.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or
COS 141.
A continuation and expansion of
manicuring, pedicuring techniques
and procedures for the professional
cosmetologist that were introduced in
COS 140. 45 lecture hours, 117 lab
hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
179
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
COS 158
Beginning Restructuring of the
Hair
4.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or
COS 141.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional hairstyling
techniques and procedures completed
in COS 140. Lectures, demonstrations
and practical experience in the following areas: wet hair styling, thermal
styling, hair sculpting, safety, and disinfecting. 45 lecture hours, 117 lab
hours.
COS 161A
Haircolor I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or COS
141 or concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional haircoloring
techniques and procedures introduced in COS 141. Lectures, demonstrations, and practical experience in
the following areas: chemistry of
products, hair analysis, practical application and design principles. Part
one of a two-part course. 40 lecture
hours, 104 lab hours.
COS 161B
Haircolor II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 154 or
COS 161A.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the science, theory,
professional haircoloring techniques,
and procedures following COS 161A.
Lectures, demonstrations, and practical experience in the following areas:
advanced hair coloring procedures,
advanced lightening procedures, specialized color application, and
corrective haircolor. Part two of a
two-part course. 40 lecture hours,
104 lab hours.
180
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
COS 163
Beginning Facial Treatment,
Skin Care and Make-up
4.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or
COS 141.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by
English level.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional skin care,
make-up techniques and procedures
introduced in COS 140. Lectures,
demonstrations and practical experience in the following areas: anatomy
and physiology of the face and neck,
diseases and disorders of the skin,
chemistry of skin care products, electricity and electrical modalities for facials and skin care, light therapy for
skin care, and facial treatments including packs and masks. 45 lecture
hours, 117 lab hours.
COS 165
Esthetician I
10 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course of skin care
treatments, hair removal, make-up
application, anatomy and physiology.
Disease and disorders of the skin,
cosmetic chemistry, electrical current
and modalities for skin care and disinfecting. Part one of a two-part
course. Material fee. 90 lecture hours,
270 lab hours.
COS 166
Esthetician II
10 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 165.
This course completes the two-part
esthetician program. It includes advanced and customized facial treatments, make-up artistry and color
coordination, and product knowledge.
90 lecture hours, 270 lab hours.
COS 167
Cosmetology Licensure
Preparation
2 Units
Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Minimum 1000
course hours earned or valid
cosmetology license from
another state.
This course will focus on preparing
students for the California State
Board Examination. Emphasis on consumer safety, sanitary practice, state
board skills and procedures. This
course is offered for Pass/No Pass
grading only. 36 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours.
COS 172A
Hair Design I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 161B and
COS 181B.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional hairstyling
techniques and procedures completed
in COS 141. Lectures, demonstrations
and practical experience in the following areas: wet hairstyling, thermal
styling and long hair design. Part one
of a two-part course. 40 lecture
hours, 104 lab hours.
COS 172B
Hair Design II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 158 or COS
172A.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional hairstyling
techniques and procedures following
COS 172A. Lectures, demonstrations,
and practical experience in the following areas: Hair care, scalp diseases/
disorders, advanced wet/thermal
hairstyling, advanced long hair design, and creative artistry in hair design. Part two of a two-part course.
40 lecture hours, 104 lab hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
COS 178A
Chemical Texturizing I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 161B and
COS 181B.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional permanent
waving and straightening techniques
and procedures introduced in Cosmetology 141. Lectures, demonstrations,
and practical experience in the following areas: permanent waving, chemical hair straightening and the
chemistry of products. Part one of a
two-part course. 40 lecture hours,
104 lab hours.
COS 181B
Hairsculpting II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 181A.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the theory of professional haircutting techniques and
procedures following COS 181A. Lectures, demonstrations and practical
experience continue with advanced
techniques applied in ladies and male
haircutting. Part two of a two-part
course. 40 lecture hours, 104 lab
hours.
COS 178B
Chemical Texturizing II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 152 or
COS 178A.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional permanent
waving and straightening techniques
and procedures introduced in COS
178A. Lectures, demonstrations and
practical experience in the following
areas: hair reformation, trichology,
scalp and chemical procedures and
treatments. Part two of a two-part
course. 40 lecture hours, 104 lab
hours.
COS 182
Skincare
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or COS
141 or concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional skincare,
make-up techniques and procedures
introduced in COS 141. Lectures,
demonstrations and practical experience in the following areas: anatomy
and physiology, skin diseases and disorder, hair removal, electricity and
electrical modalities for facials/ skincare and facial treatments. 40 lecture
hours, 104 lab hours.
COS 181A
Hairsculpting I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or COS
141 or concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or ifrequired by English level.
A continuation of the theory of professional haircutting techniques and
procedures introduced in COS 141.
Lectures, demonstrations and practical experience in the following areas:
Women's haircutting, men's haircutting and clipper cutting. Part one of a
COS 183
Nail Care
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 140 or COS
141 or concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A continuation of the science and
theory of professional nail care techniques and procedures introduced in
Cosmetology 141. Lectures, demonstrations, and practical experience in
the following areas: natural nail care,
artificial nail enhancements, products,
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
two-part course. 40 lecture hours,
104 lab hours.
procedures and safety measures for
the professional cosmetologist. 40
lecture hours, 104 lab hours.
COS 199 A
Esthetician I
8 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 orREAD 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course of skin care
treatments, hair removal, make-up
application, anatomy and physiology.
This course also includes massage
techniques, sanitation and disinfecting, disease and disorders of the skin,
cosmetic chemistry, electrical current
and modalities for skin care. The
course focuses on the basic skills required to achieve a State Board License. Phase one of a three-part
course. 72 lecture hours, 216 lab
hours.
COS 199 B
Esthetician II
8 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 165 or
COS 199 A.
This course is phase two of the esthetician program. A basic course
which includes state board preparedness, customized facial treatments,
the psychology of services, make-up
artistry, color coordination, product
knowledge and aromatherapy. Must
be completed before entering phase
three, "Salon Fundamentals." 72 lecture hours, 216 lab hours.
COS 199 C
Esthetician Salon Success
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): COS 199 B.
This is the final phase in the completion of the esthetician program. This
course provides students with basic
salon management skills, sales, and
client retention, as well as information required to pass the licensed
exams. Students will focus on personal satisfaction and skilled habits to
ensure success in the industry 36 lecture hours, 79 lab hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
181
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Counseling
(Counseling Department)
The Counseling Program offers specially designed curriculum to meet
the broad psycho-social needs of our
diverse student population. Counseling courses provide a gateway to understanding the programs and
services offered at Citrus College.
Course curriculum addresses the issues of transition to college, educational planning, college success,
transfer, career exploration and decision making, student responsibility,
and educational goal setting.
Counseling Courses
COUN 145
Career/Life Planning
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Through personal exploration, occupational research and the study of
contemporary work issues, students
will increase their understanding of
the relationship of the individual to
the economic community and develop
individual career plans. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
COUN 156
College Planning Today for
Tomorrow
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course in helping students transition to college life. Students will receive practical information about
college services, effective study
habits, and individual educational
planning. Emphasis is on college and
career decisions as catalysts for
growth. 18 lecture hours. CSU
COUN 158
Transfer Planning
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
182
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
required by English level.
This course provides in-depth information and assistance with the transfer process to four-year colleges/
universities. It is designed to enable
students to actively participate in
planning their educational and career
goals by providing information about
the process and requirements for
transferring from a community college to a university. Lower division
major and general education requirements, college/university selection,
admission procedures, application
deadlines, financial aid and scholarship information are covered. 18 lecture hour. CSU
COUN 159
On Course to Success
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course will assist students in
identifying the unique strengths they
possess that will lead toward achieving academic mastery, career, and life
success. Students will learn how they
learn best and utilize this information
to build a personal success plan.
Through an exploration and critical
analysis of the components of a successful student, students will analyze
their reasons for attending college
and develop a "success plan" that addresses maintaining motivation, goal
setting, improving communication,
and maintaining self-esteem, detailing
how they may overcome obstacles.
54 lecture hours.
COUN 160
Strategies for College Success
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course designed to give students
the opportunity to create and change
their habits and vision in order to
have a rich, full, and rewarding
scholastic life through adoption of
positive attitude and critical thinking
techniques. The course integrates the
intellectual, physiological, social, and
psychological aspects of being a college student. Learning strategies will
be introduced that can be immediately and continuously applied so that
students leave the course with confi-
dence, enthusiasm, and a passion to
succeed. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
COUN 161
Higher Education Transitional
Skills for Student Veterans/
Families
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course designed to assist veterans
in re-integrating to civilian life using
physiological, social and psychological
aspects of being a student. This
course is also designed to give the
veteran student the opportunity to
create and change their habits and vision in order to have a rich, full, and
rewarding scholastic life through
adoption of positive attitude and critical thinking techniques. The course
will introduce strategies to increase
self-awareness, build confidence, develop leadership and gain informational tools to help achieve successful habits and implement study skills
addressing the veteran student's
needs. It will provide an essential opportunity to acquire skills applicable
to the student's academic program,
family life, and employability which
will support transition. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
Dance
(Performing Arts Department)
Important Information About
Dance Course Descriptions
Dance courses are now grouped together as course “families.” Students
are allowed to take only four courses
from each “family.” All grades received, including F, WD, and NC
grades count towards the four
courses.
The Dance course families are listed
as follows. New courses are in blue.
Tap
DANC
DANC
DANC
DANC
159
259
269
279
–
–
–
–
Beginning Tap
Intermediate Tap I
Intermediate Tap II
Advanced Tap
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Jazz
DANC 160
DANC 260
Dance I
DANC 270
Dance II
DANC 281
Ballet
DANC 162
DANC 262
DANC 272
DANC 292
– Jazz Dance Techniques
– Intermediate Jazz
– Intermediate Jazz
– Advanced Jazz Dance I
–
–
–
–
Beginning Ballet
Intermediate Ballet I
Intermediate Ballet II
Advanced Ballet I
Modern
DANC 161 – Beginning Modern Dance
DANC 261 – Intermediate Modern
Dance I
DANC 271 – Intermediate Modern
Dance II
Alignment/Correctives
DANC 130 - Alignment/Correctives
Introduction/Hip Hop
DANC 103 - Introduction to Dance
DANC 158 – Beginning Hip Hop
Dance Techniques
DANC 258 – Intermediate Hip
Hop Dance
Musical Theatre Dance
DANC 263 Dance for Musical Theatre
DANC 265 Musical Staging: Rehearsal
and Performance
Popular Dance
DANC 264 - Beginning Popular Dance
Techniques
DANC 266 – Pop Dance: Rehearsal
and Performance
DANC 284 – Intermediate Popular
Dance
DANC 296 – Pop Dance: Rehearsal
and Performance Choreography and
Production
DANC 172 – Composition in Group
Forms
DANC 289 – Dance Concert
Production
The study of dance trains students in
various dance genres, including jazz,
classical ballet, tap, and modern
dance and provides a foundational
dance background in history and kinesiology. Both a transfer and a
career technical education program,
this area of study offers performance
opportunities for both dance majors
and non-majors. The College has a
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
relationship with Cirque du Soleil
which provides students the opportunity for internships. Courses in dance
satisfy general education requirements for the associate degree.
Dance Courses
(See Also Music)
DANC 102
History of Dance
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
A survey of dance from tribal, ethnic,
and folk dance forms including Renaissance Europe, Louis XIV, the
Golden Age of Ballet, and the Diaghilev Era, concluding with 20th
Century dance including jazz, AfricanAmerican influences, neo-classic ballet, modern, hip-hop and world
dance. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
DANC 103
Introduction to Dance
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
An introduction to dance as an art
form through lecture and activity. The
student will experience historical and
contemporary dance forms, such as
ballet, modern jazz, hip hop, and tap.
This is the pre-requisite course for all
beginning level technique classes. 18
lecture hours, 36 lab hours. CSU; UC
DANC 130
Alignment and Correctives
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A class for non-dancers and dancers
seeking an introduction to the structural aspects that affect movement
and gait. Lectures include biomechanical and neuromuscular aspects
of the body. Practical hours include
in-depth study of Pilates mat techniques and Gyro-kinesis. 36 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 158
Beginning Hip-Hop Dance Techniques
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 103 or
Audition.
A survey of the basic skills of hip-hop
dance technique and history. This
class provides basic technique, warmups, stretching, body control and
stamina progressing to hip-hop dance
combinations. This class prepares
students specifically for occupational
dance performance techniques in the
hip-hop commercial dance industry.
18 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
DANC 159
Beginning Tap
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 103 or
Audition.
Designed to instruct students in the
dance technique of beginning tap. 18
lecture hours, 18 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 160
Jazz Dance Techniques
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 103 or
Audition.
A survey of the beginning level skills
in jazz movement. This class provides
basic technique and practice, warmups, stretching, body control, and the
building of stamina and strength progressing to dance combinations. 18
lecture hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 161
Beginning Modern Dance
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
The study of dance through varied individual and group experiences in Beginning Modern Dance, with
emphasis on increasing the individual's ability to use movement
creatively. 18 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. CSU; UC
DANC 162
Beginning Ballet
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 103 or
Audition.
Designed to instruct students in the
beginning level dance technique of
classical ballet. Ballet barre, center
floor and historical context of classical
ballet are covered. 18 lecture hours,
36 lab hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
183
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
DANC 172
Composition in Group Forms
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 160 or
DANC 161 or DANC 162 or
Audition.
A practical course guiding the student
in choreographic structure, designed
specifically for group forms. All movement exploration will be on the basis
of ballet, jazz or modern dance technique. 18 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
CSU;UC
DANC 258
Intermediate Hip-Hop Dance
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 158.
A survey of the intermediate level
skills of hip-hop dance technique and
history. This class provides intermediate level technique, warm-ups,
stretching, body control and stamina
progressing through hip-hop dance
combinations. This class prepares
students specifically for occupational
dance performance techniques in the
hip-hop commercial dance industry.
18 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
DANC 259
Intermediate Tap I
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 159 or
Audition.
Designed to instruct students in the
intermediate dance technique of tap.
More study of the positions and combinations of tap. 18 lecture hours, 18
lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 260
Intermediate Jazz Dance I
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 160 or
Audition.
Development of the techniques necessary to execute modern jazz dance.
This class is designed to further develop the techniques of the student
with intermediate instruction in
stretching, body control, strength,
stamina more challenging dance combinations and progression of personal
style. 18 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
184
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
DANC 261
Intermediate Modern Dance I
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 161 or
Audition.
A continuing study of modern dance
with more in depth instruction in the
technique and creative elements of
the dance form, including individual
and group in-class projects. 18 lecture hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 262
Intermediate Ballet I
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 162 or
Audition.
Designed to instruct students in the
intermediate dance technique of classical ballet. A more in-depth study of
the positions and combinations of
ballet. 18 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
DANC 263
Dance for Musical Theatre
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Co-Requisite(s): MUSP 120 or
MUSP 121.
This course is an in-depth performance experience focusing on styles of
body movement for Musical Theatre
stage productions. The fundamentals
of dance will be reviewed, including
basic ballet positions and exercises
and basics in tap. Concepts of the
history of dance in musical stage will
also be explored. 36 lecture hours,
108 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 264
Beginning Popular Dance
Techniques
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
This course is an in-depth performance experience focusing on beginning level popular dance styles. The
fundamentals of dance will be reviewed, and a focus on modern
dance styles and techniques will be
explored. Concepts of commercial
dance techniques for videos and pop
stage will also be studied. 36 lecture
hours, 126 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 265
Musical Staging: Rehearsal and
Performance
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Co-Requisite(s): DANC 263.
Special rehearsal and public performance above and beyond normal class
expectations. 18 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours. CSU;UC
DANC 266
Pop Dance: Rehearsal and
Performance- Beginning
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Special rehearsal and public performance above and beyond normal class
expectations- beginning level. 18 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 269
Intermediate Tap II
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 259 or
Audition.
A more in-depth study of students'
abilities and techniques in tap dance.
Increased emphasis on style, speed
and accuracy of sounds. 18 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 270
Intermediate Jazz Dance II
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 260 or
Audition.
Designed to instruct students in the
advanced techniques of advanced
jazz dance for the purpose of performance. More challenging dance
combinations and instruction in individual body control, strength, stamina, style, and line. 18 lecture hours,
36 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 271
Intermediate Modern Dance II
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 261 or
Audition.
A more advanced study of modern
dance through varied individual and
group experiences. Includes more
complicated exercises and combinations with emphasis on the individual's use of creative movement.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
18 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
DANC 272
Intermediate Ballet II
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 262 or
Audition.
A course in the advanced techniques
of classical ballet for the purpose of
performance. A more in-depth study
of movement vocabulary centered on
individual style, strength, and technique. 18 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
DANC 279
Advanced Tap I
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 269 or
Audition.
An advanced study of students' abilities and techniques in tap dance. Increased emphasis on style, speed and
accuracy of sounds. 18 lecture hours,
18 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 281
Advanced Jazz Dance I
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 270 or
Audition.
Designed to instruct students in the
advanced techniques of advanced
jazz dance for the purpose of performance. More challenging dance
combinations and instruction in individual body control, strength, stamina, style, and line. 18 lecture hours,
36 lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 284
Intermediate Popular Dance
Techniques
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 264
and/or Audition.
This course is an in-depth performance experience focusing on intermediate level popular dance styles. The
fundamentals of dance will be reviewed, and a focus on
modern dance styles and techniques
will be explored. Concepts of commercial dance techniques for videos
and pop stage will also be studied. 36
lecture hours, 126 lab hours. CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
DANC 289
Dance Concert Production
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Live dance concert production. Students will function as dance members
in a fully produced dance production.
The course is also open to all qualified students who wish to participate
in production. 36 lecture hours, 72
lab hours. CSU;UC
DANC 292
Advanced Ballet I
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 272.
A course in the upper advanced techniques of classical ballet for the purpose of performance level technique
and strength. An intense study of
movement vocabulary centered on individual style, strength, and technique. 18 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
creditation of the American Dental
Association accredit the program.
Dental Assisting Courses
DENT 099
Introduction to Dental Assisting
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Open to anyone wanting to explore
the possibilities of a career in dental
assisting and/or dentistry. This class
emphasizes introductory information
and skills common to a dental assistant. Includes active learning and
hands-on activities. 18 lecture hours,
9 lab hours.
Dental Assisting
(Health Sciences Department)
DENT 100
Dental Assisting Basics
2.5 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will give the beginning
dental assisting student a foundational knowledge of basic terminology, structures of the oral cavity,
tooth morphology, tissues of the
teeth, charting, and oral health care.
The student will be oriented to the
profession of dentistry in terms of
governing bodies, professional organizations, ethics and jurisprudence. 45
lecture hours.
The Dental Assisting Program trains
students in the duties of a registered
dental assistant as identified in the
California Dental Practice Act. Training includes a variety of supportive
duties, front office, and laboratory
skills as well as training in providing
direct patient care. This program
combines theory with hands-on experience in local dental offices. Students
who successfully complete the course
sequence are eligible to take the California Licensing Examination and the
National Certification Exam. They will
also earn a Radiation Safety Certificate, a Coronal Polish Certificate and
a Pit and Fissure Sealant Certificate.
Both the Dental Board of California
and the Commission of Dental Ac-
DENT 101
Chairside Assisting
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 100 or
concurrent enrollment.
This lecture/lab course provides preclinical instruction in four-handed
dentistry techniques and prepares the
student to assist a dentist at chairside. Content includes: the use and
care of dental equipment, oral evacuation, instrument transfer, tray setups, infection control, preparation of
anesthetic syringe, rubber dam, tofflemire matrix, cavity preparation,
and rotary and hand instruments.
Emphasis is placed on the responsibilities of a chairside dental assistant
DANC 296
Pop Dance: Rehearsal and
Performance- Intermediate
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DANC 266.
Special rehearsal and public performance above and beyond normal class
expectations- intermediate level. 18
lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
185
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
during general restorative procedures. 45 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
DENT 102
Dental Materials
2.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 100 or
concurrent enrollment.
This course presents the basic physical and technical aspects of dental
materials utilized in restorative and
laboratory dental procedures. It is designed to develop the manipulative
skills necessary for the application of
these materials. 36 lecture hours, 54
lab hours.
DENT 121
Preclinical Dental Science
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 100 or
concurrent enrollment.
The study of the basic structure and
function of the human anatomy as it
relates to the oral cavity. This course
provides instruction on oral histology
and embryology, head and neck
anatomy, and oral pathology with emphasis on their relationship to and effect on dental treatment. 36 lecture
hours.
DENT 122
Infection Control in the Dental
Office
1.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 100 or
concurrent enrollment.
This course is designed to prepare
the dental assistant in the prevention
of disease transmission in the work
environment. Emphasis is placed on
knowledge of the infectious disease
process, use of barriers, sterilization,
disinfection, OSHA requirements, and
the concept of standard precautions.
27 lecture hours.
DENT 123
Preventive Dental Health
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 100 or
concurrent enrollment.
Fundamental skills involved in assessing the dental patient's health, the effect on dental treatment and the
adjustments to dental treatment
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CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
needed to protect the physical welfare of the patient. This class provides instruction on health history,
vital signs, recognition and management of medical emergencies, nutrition, and pharmacology. 36 lecture
hours.
DENT 124
Dental Specialties
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 100 or
concurrent enrollment.
The scope of this course includes instruction in the fundamental principles, instrumentation and procedures
of various dental specialties with emphasis on the role of the auxiliary in
each specialty. 36 lecture hours.
DENT 125
Dental Practice Management
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 100 and
DENT 101 and/or DENT 102.
This course is designed to provide instruction in the application of skills
and responsibilities of a business assistant in a dental practice. Fundamentals in basic bookkeeping
procedures, communication skills, appointment scheduling, dental insurance, records management,
employment preparation, and banking/financial procedures. Instruction
includes integration of material
through lecture, practical experience
and the use of computers. 36 lecture
hours, 9 lab hours.
DENT 201
Dental Radiology
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 100, DENT
101 and DENT 102.
This course encompasses the preclinical and clinical instruction in radiation
safety, exposing, processing and
mounting of radiographs utilizing traditional and digital methods. Student
must be 18 years of age or older. 18
lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
DENT 202
Registered Dental Assistant
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 101, DENT
102, DENT 121, DENT 122, DENT
123 and DENT 124.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides preclinical and,
where appropriate, clinical practice in
functions delegated to the dental assistant and the registered dental assistant under the jurisdiction of the
California Dental Practice Act
as specified by the rules and regulations of the Board of Dental Examiners. Emphasis is placed on the
practical application of each task,
competency of performance, demonstrated concern for patient safety,
and an acquired background knowledge to support each duty. 60 lecture
hours, 81 lab hours.
DENT 203
Dental Practical Experience
5.5 Units
Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): DENT 122, DENT
124 and DENT 201.
This course provides the student with
the opportunity for application and
performance of acquired knowledge
and skills while assuming the role of a
chairside assistant in a dental school
setting or private dental office. This
course is offered for Pass/No Pass
grading only. 300 lab hours.
DENT 204
RDA Clinical Procedures
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DENT 101, DENT
102, DENT 121, DENT 122, DENT
123 and DENT 124.
This course covers those duties requiring clinical competence for the
RDA: coronal polishing, pit & fissure
sealants and mouth mirror inspection.
12 lecture hours, 28 lab hours.
Drafting Technology
(Technology &Engineering
Department)
Drafting and Design Technology, a career technical and transfer program,
uses hands-on experiences to prepare students for entry-level employment or advancement that requires
graphic communications, including
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
sketches, mechanical drawings, computer-aided design, and illustrations.
Drafting and Design Technology
courses fulfill lower division requirements for transfer majors in architecture, electronics, engineering, and
architecture and lead to an associate
degree in Drafting and Design Technology and certificates of achievement in Drafting and Design
Technology; Computer Aided Design
(CAD)—Architecture and Drafting
Technology; Architectural Design;
Computer Generated Imagery (CGI).
Drafting Courses
DRAF 101
Beginning Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A basic course for pre-engineering,
pre-architecture, and other students
who have no previous Computer
Aided Design (CAD) and mechanical
drawing experience. 36 lecture hours,
72 lab hours. CSU
DRAF 102
Visual Communication
2.5 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended:
DRAF 101.
Visual communication of axonometric,
oblique, and one, and two-point perspective drawings. Natural and manmade forms are analyzed. Color and
texture of form are studied as they
are revealed by light, shade, and
shadow. Students' perceptions of
subject matter are translated into
convincing visual expressions by
learning the graphic skills and the use
of a variety of media. Students
sketch, draw, and render projects. 36
lecture hours, 36 lab hours. CSU
DRAF 103
Advanced Engineering Drawing
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DRAF 101 or
one year high school mechanical
drafting.
Covers the application of the latest
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
industrial design standards of orthographic projection and dimensioning
specifications in the production of
mechanical items and assemblies. Advanced problems in instrumental
drawing, lettering, geometric construction, multi-view projections, sections, auxiliary views and descriptive
geometry. 36 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU
DRAF 160
Intermediate Computer Aided
Design (CAD)
2.5 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: DRAF
101 or one year of high school
drafting, or industry drafting
experience.
An intermediate course in which the
CAD system is applied to special
problems in design. Techniques in
creating symbol libraries are explored. Proper and efficient methods
of producing plan views, sections, details and elevations are introduced
along with dimensioning fundamentals and sheet layout. 36 lecture
hours, 36 lab hours. CSU
DRAF 161
Advanced Computer Aided Design (CAD)
2.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DRAF 160.
Strongly Recommended:
DRAF 101.
An advanced Computer Aided Design
(CAD) course developing 2D and 3D
design projects. 36 lecture hours, 36
lab hours. CSU
DRAF 198
Special Problems
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DRAF 101 or
one year of high school drafting
or industry drafting experience.
Supervised projects in specialized
topics, perspective, site or model
making to meet the needs of students preparing portfolios or for specific job training. 54 lab hours. CSU
DRAF 290
Introduction to Maya Practices
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: DRAF
160 or DRAF 161 or Digital Art
classes.
Introduction to modeling, animation
and rendering using Maya with a
focus on establishing a working
knowledge of Maya's animation tools
and techniques, this course builds a
solid foundation for developing character animation and special effects
sequences. The course uses the two
different sections of the Learning
Maya tutorial book to provide the student with an overview of the Maya
environment and how it can be applied to their work. 36 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU
DRAF 291
Learning Maya Transitions
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): DRAF 290.
Explores how modeling, animating
and rendering using CAD, and other
3D interfaces transition into Maya.
This course builds an advanced foundation using animation and special effects. The course uses the two
different sections of the Learning
Maya Transitions book to provide the
student with an overview of the Maya
environment and how it can be applied to their work. 36 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU
Disabled Student
Programs & Services
(Counseling Department)
DSP&S courses are non-degreeapplicable credit courses that provide
specialized instruction to teach
students with disabilities strategies to
compensate for their disability-related
educational limitations. The courses,
offered as funding allows, are in
laboratory and lecture modes and are
graded pass/no pass.
www.citruscollege.edu
187
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Disabled Student Courses
DSPS 085
E-Text Basics
1 Unit
Pass/No Pass
The course is designed to teach students with text disabilities to access and
effectively utilize electronic text (e-text).
This course is offered for Pass/No
Pass grading only. 18 lecture hours.
DSPS 090
Empowerment for Students with
Disabilities
2 Units
Pass/No Pass
A course designed to facilitate successful transition to the collegiate
level for new students with disabilities. Upon completion of this course,
students will be better prepared to
assert their needs, make decisions,
and practice coping strategies pertinent to their unique situation. This
course is offered for Pass/No Pass
grading only. 36 lecture hours.
DSPS 103L
Technical Assistance Lab:
Adaptive Computer Technology
1 Unit
Pass/No Pass
Specialized instruction designed for
students with disabilities who require
adaptive computer technologies to effectively access the computer. Stu
dents will become empowered
through the use of individualized
learning materials, adaptive computer
technology, and compensatory strategies intended to lessen the
impact of the disability for achieving
success in college. This course is offered for Pass/No Pass grading only.
54 lab hours.
Economics
(Social Sciences Department)
Economics, with applications in both
business and the social sciences, examines the production, distribution,
and consumption of goods and services as well as the theory and management of economies and how the
choices made by individuals, firms,
and governments impact scarce resources. In macroeconomics, the topics include economics resources,
188
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
government expenditures and taxation, unemployment and inflation,
monetary policy and the banking system, national income determination,
business cycles, and fiscal policy. In
microeconomics, the topics include
price determination, economic analysis of firms, market structures, distribution of income, labor and unions,
international economics and economic growth. Economics courses
satisfy general education requirements for an associate degree, a liberal arts degree with an emphasis in
social and behavioral sciences/economics, and lower division transfer.
The Honors Program includes one
economics course: ECON 101H Principles of Economics – Honors. Courses
are offered in the day and evening
and in early and late start and online.
Economics Courses
ECON 100
Survey of Economics
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030.
This is a survey of economics course.
It is designed as a beginning economics class. It involves laying the
basic principles of economic theory
on both the macro and micro levels
and showing how the principles can
be applied to analyze current economic issues such as national health
care, outsourcing, gas prices, the
health of the economy, immigration.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030.
An introductory course that focuses
on aggregate economic analysis. Topics include market systems; economic
cycles including recession, unemployment and inflation; gross domestic
product and national income accounts; money and the financial mar-
kets; monetary and fiscal policy; and
international trade and finance. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
ECON 101H
Principles of Macroeconomics Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030.
A macro economics course that focuses on aggregate economic analysis and its applications. Topics
include: theory of market systems;
economic cycles including recession,
unemployment and inflation; national
income accounts; macroeconomic
equilibrium; money and financial institutions; monetary and fiscal policy;
and international trade and finance.
It also tackles the application of the
theory to different economic issues,
such as the energy market, outsourcing and unemployment, lending practices among financial institutions and
its effects on the real estate market,
the budget deficit, the trade deficit,
national health care proposals, and
immigration. Students are expected
to participate at an honors level
which includes research of the
application cases, analysis of issues,
and strong critical thinking and writing skills to evaluate current policies
and generate optimal solutions. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030.
Microeconomics. An introductory
course that focuses on decision making from the viewpoint of the individual consumer, worker, and firm.
Emphasis is on the price system, allocation of resources and income, supply and demand analysis, structure of the American industry, and
applications to current economic policy and problems. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Emergency Management
(Health Sciences Department)
Emergency management and homeland courses prepare students for
employment with emergency management agencies such as local cites
and county governments in California,
non-profit organizations such as the
American Red Cross, and federal
agencies such as the Department of
Homeland Security (FEMA). Additionally, those currently working in the
field can earn a recognized degree.
Students may earn a certificate of
achievement in Emergency Management and Homeland Security. Coursework satisfies general education
requirements for an associate in science degree.
Emergency Management
Courses
EMER 162
Principles of Emergency
Management
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides an introduction
to the principles of Emergency Management and Disaster Planning. Topics covered include; terrorist profiles,
trends in terrorism, the emergency
operations plan, response consideration to chemical and biological incidents and components of the
emergency management system. 54
lecture hours.
EMER 163
Terrorism and Emergency
Management
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides an instruction to
terrorism and the emergency management of terrorist types of acts.
Topics covered include; concepts of
emergency management, event management, local plans and resources,
general biological terrorism concepts,
medical consequences and planning
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
guidelines. This course will present a
foundation of the threat and explore
mitigation techniques. 54 lecture hours.
pare a draft of an emergency management plan for an organization of
their choice. 54 lecture hours.
EMER 164
Managing Hazardous Materials
Incidents
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides an introduction
to hazardous materials and management. Topics covered include; recognizing what hazardous materials are,
the problems they pose; and how to
begin a safe and effective response
to a Hazmat incident. Upon successful completion of the course students
are eligible to sit for the California
State Specialized Training Institute
(CSTI) certification examination. 54
lecture hours.
EMER 168
Emergency Operations Center
(EOC) Management
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The course provides an instruction to
design, initiate, and operate an Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The
course provides a study of determining the location for an EOC, the physical set-up of the EOC, and the
management of EOC operations both
in emergency and non-emergent situations. 54 lecture hours.
EMER 166
Emergency Planning and
Methodology
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides an introduction
to emergency planning and methodology. The course provides a study of
pre-plan requirements, hazards and
resource assessments, vulnerability
analysis, methodology of planning,
and public policy considerations. 54
lecture hours.
EMER 167
Practical Applications of
Emergency Management
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides principles and
techniques involved in developing an
emergency management plan for a
public or private sector organization.
Explore the processes involved in
data gathering, hazard identification
and vulnerability assessment, and
plan development. Students will pre-
English
(Language Arts Department)
The English discipline focuses on the
appreciation of literature in its cultural context and the development of
composition, critical thinking, and
textual analysis in both basic skills
and transfer-level courses. English
courses provide students with intensive instruction and practice in the
composition, revision, and editing of
academic essays. English courses are
also taught in learning communities.
English 101 Reading and Composition
satisfies the writing competency requirement for the associate degree.
English courses also satisfy general
education requirements for the associate degree and lower division transfer, and can be used to fulfill the
associate degree majors in English
Literature and in Language Arts. Students may also earn one of two certificates of achievement: English
Literature, which provides verification
of literature knowledge or competency for entry-level jobs in tutoring,
editing and publishing, journalism,
theatre or entertainment; and Writing
Competency, which provides verification of writing competency for entrylevel jobs in tutoring, editing and
publishing, journalism, pre-law, theatre, entertainment, freelance writing, and university or college teacher
assisting.
www.citruscollege.edu
189
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
English Courses
ENGL 098
English Fundamentals
2 Units
Grade Only
This course focuses intensively on
English fundamentals including grammar, spelling, and basic literacy skills
such as sentence structure, vocabulary acquisition, mechanics and punctuation, literal comprehension,
reading responses, and student learning strategies. 18 lecture hours, 54
lab hours.
ENGL 099
Introduction to Reading and
Composition
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 030 or
ENGL 040 or ENGL 098 or READ
040 or placement at the ENGL
099 level as defined by the
College.
An introduction to fundamental techniques of reading and writing including sentence skills, paragraph and
essay development, and use of literal
and inferential comprehension for
critical and analytical thinking, reading and writing at the college level.
90 lecture hours.
ENGL 101
Reading and Composition
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 099 or ESL
100 or placement is based on
multiple assessment measures.
A college-level composition course
emphasizing exposition, analysis, argument, and research techniques. Extensive writing practice based upon
reading selections of culturally diverse fiction, nonfiction and verse. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 101H
Reading and Composition Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 099 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
An advanced college level course emphasizing exposition, analysis, evaluation, synthesis, argument, and
190
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
research techniques. Extensive writing practice based upon reading culturally diverse short stories, novels,
and related critical material. In addition, students are expected to work
and participate at an honors level
which includes strong critical thinking
skills, thorough analysis of fiction and
non-fiction literary readings, presentation and leadership skills demonstrated through class participation/
presentation, and service learning in
the community. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ENGL 102
Introduction to Literature
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or
ENGL 101H or ESL 101.
Exploration of culturally diverse literary texts in multiple genres that express a variety of historical,
geographical, and cultural perspectives. Development of critical thinking
skills including analysis and interpretation leading to compositions in
which cross-cultural awareness is emphasized. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 103
Composition and Critical
Thinking
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
This course uses literature as a basis
for the teaching of critical thinking
and composition. The emphasis is
upon the analysis of issues, problems, and situations represented in
fiction, drama and poetry, and on the
development of effective written arguments in support of the analysis.
Meets the IGETC critical thinking requirement. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 103H
Composition and Critical
Thinking - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This honors course uses literature as
a basis for the teaching of in-depth
critical thinking and advanced compo-
sition. The emphasis is upon the
analysis of issues, problems, and situations represented in literature and
on the development of effective written arguments in support of the
analysis. Critical thinking skills are
demonstrated through research papers, in-class presentations, and collaborative exploration of material.
Students are expected to demonstrate honors level work which includes strong critical thinking skills,
thorough analysis of assigned readings, and presentation and leadership
skills demonstrated through class participation. Meets the IGETC critical
thinking requirement. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 104
Advanced Rhetoric: The Classical
Essay
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
In this course, students will develop
critical thinking, writing, and research
skills beyond the ENGL 101 level by
examining and modeling complex
classical methods of invention,
arrangement, and style for writing assignments. Students will read and
critically evaluate (for meaning, purpose, strategy and style) expository
and argumentative essays from classical sources and multi-cultural perspectives. Students will test
prejudices they hold, prove or disprove a hypothesis, evaluate the
opinions of others, explain the effect
of the media, and attempt to synthesize opposing arguments on an issue
through critical thinking. Meets the
IGETC critical thinking requirement.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 120
Introduction to Women's
Literature
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended:
ENGL 101.
This course emphasizes culturally diverse texts written by and about
women. Using a variety of literary
genres, including short fiction, novel,
poetry, drama, and film, students will
critically analyze cultural roles and
images of women from a variety of
theoretical perspectives. Students will
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
explore the challenges women have
faced, the biologically and socially
constructed roles they have assumed
and sometimes rejected, and the successes and accomplishments they
have achieved in a predominantly patriarchal climate. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ENGL 210
Creative Writing I
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Instruction and practice in various
forms of creative expression such as
short story, the novel, poetry, drama,
and/or screenplay. Critical evaluation
of professional and student writing.
54 lecture hours. CSU
ENGL 213
Horror Literature
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
ENGL 103 or ENGL 103H.
An introduction to horror literature,
this course is designed to give students an understanding of the application of literary analysis to horror
literature. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 213H
Horror Literature - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101 or
ENGL 101H.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
ENGL 103 or ENGL 103H.
This honors course is designed to
give the student a knowledge and an
appreciation of Horror literature, both
fiction and non-fiction. Critical analysis of such works from various perspectives is exemplified through
research and written analysis. Special
emphasis is given to the quality of
the impact on literature of selected
classics. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ENGL 216
American Latino Literature
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
The study of American Latino literature emphasizing the development of
literary expression within the Latino
community specifically in the mediums of poetry, short stories, and novels. The course will explore literature
within the context of the Latino culture and examine the impact the
works have had on the Latino and literary community. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ENGL 251
Introduction to English
Literature I
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Significant works of major British
writers in historical perspective. First
semester: Anglo-Saxon period
through the eighteenth century with
emphasis on Chaucer, Milton,
Donne and Johnson. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 252
Introduction to English
Literature II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Significant works of major British
poets, novelists, and essayists from
the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are studied from an historical
perspective with an emphasis on the
Romantic and Victorian periods. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 261
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature I
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by
English level.
Students will explore the context and
influence of American literature from
the Colonial period to the Civil War.
Students will examine specific literary
works and their contributions to our
personal and cultural context. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 262
Introduction to U.S. American
Literature II
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Students will explore the context and
influence of American literature from
the Civil War to the present. Students
examine specific literary works and
their contributions to our culture, the
continuation of traditional themes
and the emergence of new forms and
themes. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 271
Introduction to World Literature:
Ancient - Early Modern
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
English 271 is the study of world literature in translation from the ancient
world through the early modern period. This course emphasizes the development of literary expression and
explores literature within the context
of the culture and time in which
works were written. This course examines the relationship between historical events and literary works and
the impact of works on their age and
ensuing eras. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ENGL 272
Introduction to World Literature:
1600's through Twentieth
Century
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
www.citruscollege.edu
191
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
required by English level.
English 272 is the study of world literature in translation from the early
modern period to the twentieth century. This course emphasizes the development of literary expression and
explores literature within the context
of the culture and time in which
works were written. This course examines the relationship between historical events and literary works and
the impact of works on their age and
ensuing eras. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ENGL 291
Film as Literature
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
ENGL 101.
An introduction to film as literature,
this course is designed to give students an understanding of the application of literary analysis to film. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 291H
Film as Literature - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
ENGL 101 and ENGL 103.
This honors course is an introduction
to film as literature, designed to give
students an understanding of the application of literary analysis to film.
Critical analysis of such works from
various perspectives is exemplified
through research and written analysis. Special emphasis is given to the
quality of writing and illustration of
award-winning books and selected
classics. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 293
Children's Literature
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is designed to give the
student a knowledge and an appreci-
192
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ation of children's books, both fiction
and non-fiction. Special emphasis is
given to the quality of writing and illustration of award winning books
and selected classics. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 293H
Children's Literature - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also
ENGL 101 or ENGL 103.
This honors course is designed to
give the student a knowledge and an
appreciation of children's books, both
fiction and non-fiction. Critical analysis of such works from various perspectives is exemplified through
research and written analysis. Special
emphasis is given to the quality of
writing and illustration of award-winning books and selected classics. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 294
Introduction to Shakespeare
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to the works of
William Shakespeare, including representative tragedies, comedies, and
history plays. The course is designed
to give students an understanding of
the timelessness of Shakespeare's
work. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
ENGL 296
Introduction to Folklore
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory survey course which
includes the basic concepts and vocabulary of traditional folklore and literature. This course emphasizes
content, form, process, and context
of traditional oral, customary, and
material culture: speech and names,
riddles, proverbs, folk tales, ballads,
myths, customs, festivals, games,
crafts, drama, food, etc. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ENG 298
Literature of the Bible
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Reading and discussion of selected
books from English translations of the
Old and New Testaments. Emphasis is
on the religious, social, political ideas,
literary qualities, and textual problems. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
Engineering Courses
(Technology & Engineering
Department)
The Engineering Program encompasses an area of study which includes basic and advanced
engineering, design, management
principles, CAD and Information Technology.
ENGR 135
Engineering Mechanics: Statics
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 201 and
MATH 190.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A vectorial treatment of the principles
of statics with application to engineering problems. Composition and
resolution of co-planar and non-planar force systems; equilibrium of rigid
bodies; distributed forces; forces in
trusses; frames and cables; shear
and bending moments in beams; moments of inertia of areas and bodies
and graphical methods are used to
model force systems and equilibrium
conditions as applied to engineering
statics problems. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Earth Science
(Physical Sciences Department)
Earth Science includes the disciplines
of geology and oceanography, both of
which study the materials and phenomena associated with the development and evolution of the Earth.
Courses in Earth Science satisfy general education requirements for the
associate degree and lower division
transfer and can be used to fulfill
some of the major requirements for
the associate degree in Biological and
Physical Sciences and Mathematics.
Geology Courses
ESCI 106
Earth and Space Science for
Educators
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 030 or
concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides each prospective
multiple subject teacher with an introductory survey of the fundamental
concepts of Earth and space science
and the interrelationships among
these disciplines. Emphasis will be
placed upon the comparative study of
the Earth and the other planets, their
formation and evolution, Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere; the dynamics of each, and
how they are interrelated. This course
is recommended for students planning to take the CSET Multiple Subject Exam to become credentialed
elementary school teachers in the
State of California. 54 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU;UC
ESCI 119
Physical Geology without
Laboratory
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course investigates the dynamic
nature of the Earth through the study
of earth processes including: plate
tectonics, earthquakes and the
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Earth's interior, mineral and rock systems, crustal deformation, weathering processes, glaciers, and deserts.
Students may not receive credit for
both ESCI 119 and 120. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ESCI 120
Physical Geology
4 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course investigates the dynamic
nature of the Earth through the study
of earth processes including: plate
tectonics, earthquakes and the
Earth's interior, mineral and rock systems, crustal deformation, weathering processes, glaciers, and deserts.
Students may not receive credit for
both of ESCI 119 and 120. 54 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
ESCI 121
Historical Geology
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ESCI 120.
The geological events of Earth history
from the origin of our planet to the
present time. Includes a summary of
the evolution of the plants and animals of the Earth and a study of the
fossils of the various periods of geologic time. Field excursions will be
arranged. A transportation fee will be
charged. 54 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours. CSU;UC
ESCI 122
Geology: Earth History
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to the study of the
Earth's geological history, from the
origin of our planet to the present.
Topics include the history and development of life, processes of fossilization, the origin of coal and petroleum,
and plate tectonics with emphasis on
North America. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ESCI 124
Environmental Geology
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Application of geologic principles to
selected environmental problems.
Topics include earthquakes, volcanism, mass movements, climate
change, floods, coastal processes,
mass extinctions, meteorite impacts,
and population growth. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
ESCI 130
Physical Oceanography
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A study of marine geology and topography, physical processes within the
marine environment, such as waves
and currents, tides, sea-floor spreading, marine provinces, marines sediments, and environmental
relationships. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
ESCI 140
The Geology of Death Valley
National Park
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A study of the geologic materials and
processes in Death Valley National
Park. The primary emphasis is on the
unique geomorphology and tectonic
history of the park. Course also includes the study of regional minerals
and rocks, Aeolian processes, and
tectonic features. Includes a weekend
trip to the region. A transportation/
activities fee may be charged. 36
lecture hours. CSU
www.citruscollege.edu
193
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ESCI 141
The Geology of Yosemite
National Park
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A study of the geologic materials and
processes in Yosemite National Park.
The primary emphasis is on the
unique geomorphology and tectonic
history of the park. Course also includes the study of regional minerals
and rocks, igneous processes, glacial
processes, and tectonic features. Includes a weekend trip to the region.
A transportation/activities fee may be
charged. 36 lecture hours. CSU
ESCI 142
The Geology of Channel Islands
National Park
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A study of the geologic materials and
processes in Channel Islands National
Park. The primary emphasis is on the
unique geomorphology and tectonic
history of the park. Course also includes the study of regional minerals
and rocks, coastal processes, and tectonic features. Includes a weekend
trip to the region. A transportation/
activities fee may be charged. 36 lecture hours. CSU
ESCI 143
The Geology of Joshua Tree National Park
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A study of the geologic materials and
processes in Joshua Tree National
Park. The primary emphasis is on the
unique geomorphology and tectonic
history of the park. Course also includes the study of regional minerals
and rocks, desert processes, and tectonic features. Includes a weekend
trip to the region. A transportation/
activities fee may be charged. 36 lec-
194
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ture hours. CSU
ESCI 145
The Geology of Sequoia National
Park
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A study of the geologic materials and
processes in Sequoia National Park.
The primary emphasis is on the
unique geomorphology and tectonic
history of the park. Course also includes the study of regional minerals
and rocks, glacial processes, and tectonic features. Includes a weekend
trip to the region. A transportation/
activities fee may be charged. 36 lecture hours. CSU
ESCI 146
The Geology of Kings Canyon
National Park
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
A study of the geologic materials and
processes in Kings Canyon National
Park. The primary emphasis is on the
unique geomorphology and tectonic
history of the park. Course also includes the study of regional minerals
and rocks, igneous processes, glacial
processes and tectonic features. A
transportation/activities fee may be
charged. May include a backpacking
trip to the region with strenuous
physical activity. 36 lecture hours.
CSU
ESCI 180
Introduction to Geographic
Information Systems
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory GIS course that will
teach the theory and usage of Geographic Information Systems in a
number of fields including business,
resource management, Earth Sciences, and urban planning. Recommended for anyone using spatial data
in their profession. 36 lecture hours,
108 lab hours. CSU;UC
English as a Second
Language
(Language Arts Department)
The English as a Second Language
(ESL) program offers students a
comprehensive selection of courses to
improve their knowledge of and skills
with English for both personal and
academic purposes. The ESL program
also introduces international students
to American culture and customs.
Courses range from pre-collegiate
(non-degree-applicable) through
transfer levels. ESL 101 Reading and
Composition satisfies the graduation
requirement in writing competency
and satisfies a general education
requirement for the associate degree.
ESL 020
English Language Skills II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A course for high-beginning English
language students providing practice
in the four language skills: listening,
speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis on production and comprehension of simple phrases, basic
sentence construction, introductory
reading skills and basic vocabulary.
One of three core courses in ESL
Level 2. NOTE: THE UNITS EARNED
FOR THIS COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR
GRADUATION. 54 lecture hours, 9 lab
hours.
ESL 022
Pronunciation and Conversation
II
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A course for low-intermediate students in comprehension and communication of spoken English. Emphasis
is on building confidence in oral expression and refining pronunciation.
Strongly recommended for students
enrolled in ESL Level 2 core courses.
NOTE: THE UNITS EARNED FOR THIS
COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ESL 024
Reading/Vocabulary II
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A reading and vocabulary course for
low-intermediate ESL students. The
course is designed to help students
expand their vocabulary through oral
and written practice and improve
their reading comprehension. One of
three core courses in ESL Level 2.
NOTE: THE UNITS EARNED FOR
THIS COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED
TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture hours.
ESL 026
Grammar Fundamentals II
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A course for low-intermediate ESL
students seeking to improve their
grammatical accuracy in writing and
speaking. Intensive review and practice of verb tenses, noun forms, adjectives, adverbs and modals, in a
communicative context. One of three
core courses in ESL Level 2. NOTE:
THE UNITS EARNED FOR THIS
COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture hours, 9 lab hours.
ESL 030
English Language Skills III
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 020 or
placement in ESL Level 3 on the
Accuplacer assessment test.
Strongly Recommended: For
students enrolled in ESL Level 3
core courses.
A course for intermediate English language students providing additional
practice in the four language skills listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis on vocabulary building,
developing fluency in speaking, increasing written sentence complexity
and developing reading skills. One of
three core courses in ESL Level 3.
NOTE: THE UNITS EARNED FOR THIS
COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 54 lecture hours, 9 lab hours.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ESL 032
Pronunciation and Conversation
III
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: For
students enrolled in ESL level 3
core courses. Placement is based
on multiple assessment
measures.
A course for intermediate students in
comprehension and communication
of spoken English. Emphasis is on
building confidence in oral expression, refining pronunciation and reducing accent. Strongly
recommended for students enrolled
in ESL Level 3 core courses. NOTE:
THE UNITS EARNED FOR THIS
COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture hours.
ESL 034
Reading/Vocabulary III
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 024 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A reading and vocabulary course for
intermediate ESL students. The
course is designed to help students
further expand vocabulary and reading skills. Emphasis is on building vocabulary through oral and written
practice and improving reading comprehension. One of three core
courses in ESL Level 3. NOTE: THE
UNITS EARNED FOR THIS COURSE
MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE
60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture hours.
ESL 036
Grammar Fundamentals III
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 026 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A course for low-intermediate ESL
students designed to improve their
grammatical accuracy in spoken and
written English. Intensive review and
practice of meaning and use of syntactic structures such as verb tense,
modals, noun and adjective forms,
questions and negatives, passive
voice, adverbs, and articles. One of
three core courses in ESL Level 3.
NOTE: THE UNITS EARNED FOR THIS
COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture hours, 9 lab hours.
ESL 040
English Language Skills IV
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 030 or
placement in ESL Level 4 on the
Accuplacer assessment test.
Strongly Recommended: For students
enrolled in ESL level 4 core courses.
This course prepares high-intermediate ESL students for ESL 100. It includes grammar, vocabulary, usage,
and the writing skills of sentence and
paragraph development. It also previews essay development and writing.
One of three core courses in ESL
Level 4. NOTE: THE UNITS EARNED
FOR THIS COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR
GRADUATION. 54 lecture hours, 9 lab
hours.
ESL 042
Pronunciation and Conversation
IV
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: For
students enrolled in ESL Level 4
core courses. Placement is based
on multiple assessment
measures.
A course for high intermediate students in comprehension and communication of spoken English. Emphasis
is on building confidence in oral expression, refining pronunciation and
reducing accent. Strongly recommended for students enrolled in ESL
Level 4 core courses. NOTE: THE
UNITS EARNED FOR THIS COURSE
MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE
60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture hours.
ESL 044
Reading/Vocabulary IV
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 034 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A reading and vocabulary course for
high intermediate ESL students, designed to facilitate appropriate strategies for improving reading
www.citruscollege.edu
195
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
comprehension and developing vocabulary. Emphasis is on college-level
vocabulary and reading skills. One of
three core courses in ESL Level 4.
NOTE: THE UNITS EARNED FOR THIS
COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture hours.
ESL 046
Grammar Review I
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 036 or
Placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
Strongly Recommended: For
students enrolled in ESL Level 4
core courses.
A course for high-intermediate ESL
students seeking to improve their
grammatical accuracy in writing and
speaking. Intensive review and oral
and written practice of syntactic
structures such as verb tense, passive
voice gerunds and infinitives, and
modal verbs. One of three core
courses in ESL Level 4. NOTE: THE
UNITS EARNED FOR THIS COURSE
MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE
60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture hours, 9 lab hours.
ESL 053
Bridge to College Literature
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 044 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures or
successful completion of ESL
level 4 core courses.
Strongly recommended:
Concurrent enrollment in or
successful completion of ESL
100.
This reading and vocabulary course is
designed to help ESL students develop the skills necessary for analyzing and writing about literature in
English at the college level. NOTE:
THE UNITS FOR THIS COURSE MAY
NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60
UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 36 lecture
hours.
196
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
ESL 054
Bridge to College Reading
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 044 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A reading and vocabulary course for
advanced ESL students designed to
improve their skills in the reading and
analysis of academic text. Students
will develop reading comprehension
and study strategies in preparation
for college-level coursework. 36 lecture hours.
ESL 056
Grammar Review II
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 046 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
Strongly Recommended: For
students enrolled in ESL level 5
core courses.
Strongly recommended: For
students enrolled in ESL level 5
core courses.
A course for advanced ESL students
seeking to improve their grammatical
accuracy in writing and speaking.
Further review and practice of complex syntactic structures such as verb
forms, tag questions, conditional
statements, reported speech, modals
and phrasal verbs, and subordinate
clauses. 36 lecture hours, 9 lab
hours.
ESL 070
American Idioms I
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ESL 030 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A course for intermediate ESL students. The course is designed to introduce to students the most
frequently occurring idiomatic expressions, which in the colloquial
speech often heard outside the classroom. NOTE: THE UNITS FOR THIS
COURSE MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 18 lecture hours.
ESL 100
Fundamentals of Composition
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): ESL 040 or
placement in ESL Level 5 on the
Accuplacer assessment test.
This course parallels ENGL 100,
preparing high-intermediate and advanced ESL students for college-level
writing. It provides a review of English fundamentals and practice in critical thinking, paragraph development
and essay writing with an emphasis
on exposition. Continued practice in
special writing problems common to
second language learners. 72 lecture
hours, 9 lab hours. UC
ESL 101
Reading and Composition
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ESL 100 or
placement in ESL Level 6 on the
Accuplacer assessment test.
A composition and reading course.
Instruction and practice in expository
writing and research techniques. The
course content parallels ENGL 101,
differing in that the reading is primarily non-fiction. (See counselor regarding UC transferability). 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
Energy Systems Technology
(Public Services Department)
This degree program prepares students to work in a variety of building
energy system professions. Core
classes are taken by all students and
pathways are designed to create
mastery in specialty fields. Careers
include design, installation, and
maintenance of building systems.
Energy Systems Technology
Classes
EST 101
Introduction to Building Systems
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course is a basic overview of
building systems. Topics include construction, bidding, operating systems,
codes, heating and air conditioning,
electrical and lighting, fire and life
safety, plumbing, telecommunicawww.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
tions, building automation, and sustainability. 18 lecture hours, 14 lab
hours. CSU
EST 150
Green Building Systems
Technology
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course will explore the value of
sustainability in building systems.
Topics will include sources of energy,
governmental regulations, green
building certifications, construction
management, and green material selection. 54 lecture hours, 16 lab
hours. CSU
Ethnic Studies
(Behavioral Sciences Department)
ETHN 101
Introduction to Ethnic Studies
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course is a historical and cultural
survey of ethnic groups and ethnic
group relations in the U.S. among Anglos, Native Americans, Asian Americans, African Americans, and Mexican
Americans/Latinos from the preColumbian period to the present. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
ETHN 116
Introduction to Chicano Studies
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course is an introductory survey
of Chicano/Latino people in the
United States; examining race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality, social
class, history, politics, institutional
discrimination, culture, migration and
globalization, literature, and the arts.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
Forestry/Wildland Resources
(Natural Sciences Department)
Wildland Resources and Forestry describes the study of natural resources
in a biological community. The program includes introduction to forestry,
forest ecology, plant identification,
outdoor recreation, wildland fire management, wildlife management and
ecology, and geographic information
systems. Courses in Wildland ReCITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
sources and Forestry provide extensive field experience for students.
Forestry/Wildland
Resources Courses
FOR 101
Introduction to Forestry
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Covers the relationship of forests to
our national and local life. The various forest sciences and the uses of
the forest including timber, water,
recreation, grazing, and wildlife. The
forest organizations: federal, state,
county and private. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
FOR 102
Introduction to Forest Ecology
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A lecture course examining forest as
a biological community, through
which sustainability, biodiversity,
ecosystem health and integrity, old
growth, climate change, rainforest,
and clear cutting are evaluated. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
FOR 103
Plant Identification
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if required by English level.
A course examining plant identification with emphasis on wild land
plants. Other topics include plant
physiology, taxonomy, plant communities and plant adaptations. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
FOR 104
Introduction to Outdoor Recreation
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Covers the historical development of
recreation and the role of federal,
state and local government in outdoor recreation. Other topics include
economic impact, supply and demand, private enterprise, education,
planning and management within the
realm of recreation. 54 lecture hours.
CSU
FOR 105
Wildland Fire Management
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course designed to provide knowledge of the factors affecting fire behavior, fire control techniques and
wildland fire prevention. Factors of
topography, fuels and weather will be
included. 54 lecture hours. CSU
FOR 106
Principles of Wildlife
Management and Ecology
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A lecture course examining wildlife
management as a science, through
which a brief history of wildlife management, ecosystems, population
ecology, animal behavior, food and
cover, wildlife diseases, predation, endangered species, economics of
wildlife, and fisheries are discussed.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
Geography
(Social Sciences Department)
Cultural geography is a study of the
patterns of human occupation and
land use over the earth’s surface and
their co-relation with the natural environment with an emphasis on agricultural and industrial economics,
settlement patterns, and population
studies. The cultural geography
course satisfies general education requirements for the associate degree,
an associate degree in liberal arts
www.citruscollege.edu
197
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
with an emphasis in social and behavioral sciences, and lower division
transfer.
Geography Classes
GEOG 102
Cultural Geography
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A study of the patterns of human occupation and land use over the
earth's surface and their co-relation
with the natural environment. Particular emphasis will be given to agricultural and industrial economics,
settlement patterns and population
studies. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
GEOG 118
Physical Geography
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of the basic elements of
physical geography including maps,
seasons, weather, climate, soils, natural vegetation, internal and external
geologic processes, land forms, and
their relationships and distribution
across the face of the earth. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
German
(Foreign Languages Department)
GER 101
German I
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course in elementary German
grammar,vocabulary, and pronunciation which focuses on understanding,
speaking, reading, and writing simple
German and serves as an introduction
to the geography, history, and culture
of the German speaking world. 90
lecture hours. CSU;UC
198
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
GER 102
German II
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): GER 101 or
two years high school German.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A further study of elementary German grammar which develops understanding, speaking, reading and
writing skills. Includes German culture. 90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
GER 201
German III
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): GER 102 or
three years of high school
German.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This intermediate level course is a
study of the German language and
culture. Emphasis is on developing
oral, listening, reading and writing
skills in order to acquire proficiency in German. Reading strategies
and fundamentals of formal composition are introduced in conjunction
with short, level-appropriate literary
selections. The class is largely conducted in German. 90 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
GER 202
German IV
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): GER 201 or
four years of high school
German.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course emphasizing the development of effective skills for reading,
understanding, and interpreting more
advanced readings in German literature and culture. Extensive practice in
oral and written expression at the intermediate-high level is provided.
Grammatical concepts are thoroughly
reviewed and expanded. 90 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
Health Sciences
(Health Sciences Department)
Health science courses prepare students for a range of entry-level work
in the health care and health service
occupations. These occupations supply unique skills for the care of individuals, families, and communities as
well as provide support for other
health care professionals. Students
may earn skills awards in the following health care and health services
specializations: Activity Coordinator,
Activity and Social Service Documentation, Hospital Unit Clerk, and Emergency Medical Technician (EMT).
Successful EMT students are eligible
to sit for the National Registry EMT
examination board exam. The program is accredited by the NREMT and
Los Angeles County Department of
Health Services.
Health Sciences Courses
HEAL 100
Emergency Medical Services
Career Preparation
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Health Occupations 100 is designed
to provide the student with the
knowledge and skills necessary to
begin an entry-level career in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and
other allied health-related fields of
patient care. This course provides beginning concepts of preparatory sciences directly related to the care of
sick and injured persons. It also covers basic knowledge and skills necessary for American Heart Association
(AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation
(CPR) certification. Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in
this course is required for enrollment
into the Emergency Medical Technician Basic Program. Material fee. 36
lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
HEAL 105
Hospital Unit Coordinator
5 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Provides information, training, and
experience needed to perform secretarial or clerical duties on a nursing
unit in a hospital setting. Student will
meet minimum requirements to successfully meet demands of managing
the unit desk, phones, ordering of
labs/tests/supplies, processing and
transcription of physician orders, and
the daily tasks of a hospital nursing
unit. 72 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
HEAL 161
Emergency Medical Technician Basic
7 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): HEAL 100 or
concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The entry-level course in emergency
training for those involved in Emergency Medical Services. 108 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours.
History
(Social Sciences Department)
History is a critical examination of the
record of human development, with
attention to changing social, political,
economic, and cultural structures.
The study of history is the endeavor
to understand the present by becoming knowledgeable about the past.
As the context of all human activity,
students of history strive to understand society and their place in it.
History courses satisfy general education requirements for the associate
degree, a liberal arts degree in social
and behavioral science with an emphasis in history, and lower division
transfer. The Honors Program includes three history courses: HIST
103H History of World Civilization up
to 1500 – Honors, HIST 107H History
of the United States before 1877 –
Honors, and HIST 108H History of
the United States since 1877 - Honors.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
History Courses
HIST 103
History of World Civilization up
to 1500
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The course is a survey of emerging
regional cultures and societies from
the earliest civilizations to 1500. Consideration will be given to comparative and integrative analysis of their
contributions to the fabric of world
civilization. Particular focus will be
given to cultural evolutionary parallels
and the diffusion of ideas through migration and trade on a global scale.
College level reading is strongly advised. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 103H
History of World Civilization up
to 1500 - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The course is a survey of emerging
regional cultures and societies from
the earliest civilizations to 1500. Consideration will be given to comparative and integrative analysis of their
contributions to the fabric of world
civilization. Particular focus will be
given to cultural evolutionary parallels
and the diffusion of ideas through migration and trade on a global scale.
Students are expected to work and
participate at an honors level which
includes strong critical thinking skills,
thorough analysis of historical readings, presentation and leadership
skills demonstrated through class participation/presentation, and service
learning in the community. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
HIST 104
History of World Civilization
since 1500
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The course offers a survey of world
civilizations from 1500's regional isolation to modern-day globalism and
its issues and problems. Consideration will be given to the political, economic, social, and intellectual forces
present in the rise of the modern
world. Particular focus will be given to
the interrelatedness of historical
events and on the comparisons of
cultures and societies in a historical
perspective. College level read
ing is strongly advised. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
HIST 105
History of World Civilization The 20th Century
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of the political, economic,
social and intellectual forces present
in the 20th century. An examination
of the global conflicts and encounters
that shaped ideas, institutions, and
social structures on a global scale. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 107
History of the United States
before 1877
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of the political, economic
and social development of the United
States to 1877. This course meets the
State requirement for American history and is designed for college transfer students. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
HIST 107H
History of the United States
before 1877 - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Meet Honors
Program entrance requirements
that include eligibility for ENG
101 or completion of equivalent.
A survey of the political, economic
and social development of North
www.citruscollege.edu
199
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
America and the United States to
1877, along with a survey of American historiography and the varying interpretations of these developments.
The course meets the state requirement for American history and is designed for college transfer students.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 108
History of the United States from
1877
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of political, economic, diplomatic, and social development of the
U. S. from 1877 to the present. This
course meets the State requirement
for American history and is designed
for college transfer students. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 108H
History of the United States from
1877 - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 099
or READ 099 or placement is
based on multiple measures.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL 101.
A survey of political, economic, diplomatic, and social development of the
U. S. from 1877 to the present along
with a survey of American historiography and the varying interpretations
of these developments. This course
meets the State requirement for
American history and is designed for
college transfer students. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
HIST 109
The World in Conflict - The 20th
Century, a History
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A critical approach to the history of
the 20th Century through major
events and issues. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
200
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
HIST 110
A Survey History of Africa
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of political, economic, social,
and cultural history of Africa from ancient period to the present. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
HIST 111
History of the African-Americans
to 1876
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
An exploration of the cultural development and role of the African-American in the history of the United States
from the African origins to the end of
Reconstruction (1876). 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
HIST 112
History of the African-Americans
since 1876
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An exploration of the cultural development and role of the African-American in the history of the United States
from the end of the Reconstruction
period (1876) to the present. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 120
British Civilization
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An overview of British culture and civilization that considers the history,
politics, economics, culture, and social changes that have formed contemporary British society. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
HIST 127
Spanish Civilization
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Spanish Civilization provides an interdisciplinary global understanding of
the culture and history of Spain. The
course critically analyzes contemporary Spanish society by examining the
social and historical traditions and institutions that shape the Spanish way
of life in the 20th century. HIST 127
and SPAN 127 are the same course.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 130
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Latin American Culture and Civilization is a survey course, providing an
interdisciplinary approach to understanding the culture and history of
Latin America. The course critically
analyzes historical and contemporary
social traditions and institutions in
order to reach an understanding of
modern day Latin America. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
HIST 131
History of Latin America to 1825
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The course is a survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian times
to the independence of Latin American lands. Special emphasis is given
to the institutions of the past which
have shaped the conditions of the
emerging states. Relations between
Latin American nations and the
United States will also be explored.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
HIST 132
History of Modern Latin America
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Students who have
previously taken HIST 130 may
not receive credit for this course.
The course is a survey of the social,
economic and political history of Latin
America from independence to the
present. The legacy of colonialism will
be considered as special emphasis is
given to the development of cultural,
political, and economic institutions.
The course will give attention to the
relationships between Latin America
and the United States foreign policy.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 139
History of California
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of the political, social and
economic development of the State
of California from early PreColumbian American Indian communities and Spanish settlements to the
present. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 140
History of the American West
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey class of the region west of
the Mississippi River designed to acquaint the students with the historical
significance, events and personalities
which made up this period. Primary
emphasis will be on the 19th century.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 145
History of Mexico
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
required by English level.
This course will survey the history of
Mexico from the pre-Columbian period through the Conquest and the
struggle for independence, the Revolution of 1910 and Mexico's emerging
role as a developing country. There
will be a special emphasis placed on
the growing economic and cultural intertwining of the American and Mexican people in the twentieth century.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 155
History of the Vietnam War
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An examination of the background
and involvement of America in the
Vietnam War. The course will primarily focus on the American involvement in Southeast Asia, but will also
examine the origins of Vietnamese
nationalism and the struggle for independence in Vietnam and its global
implications and manifestations. A
Cold War framework developed early
in the course will be utilized to understand U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. The course will conclude
with an assessment of the long term
effects of the Vietnam War on American society and the rest of the world.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
HIST 222
History of World War II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An examination of the circumstances
and events leading to US entry into
World War II. The course will focus
on American involvement in World
War II, but will also examine the systemic fracturing of the world order
through the rise of Japanese, German, and Italian imperialism, assess
the impact of the worldwide economic depression in the 1930s, military strategies and conduct, and
analyze the impact of the war on the
home front, as well as, the long-term
effects on American policy and the
world. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
Humanities
(Social Sciences Department)
As a discipline, Humanities courses
examine cultural traditions through
an integrative and critical examination of human achievements in art,
literature, philosophy, and music. This
academic area focuses on the big
questions of meaning, ethical and
aesthetic value, expression, belief,
and the human spirit. Humanities
courses satisfy general education requirements for an associate degree, a
liberal arts degree with an emphasis
in arts and humanities/history, and
lower division transfer.
Humanities Courses
HUM 101
Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The humanities are approached on
four levels: art, music, literature, and
philosophy. Includes the beginnings
in Egypt, Babylonia, and Greece and
proceeds chronologically through the
Medieval period. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
HUM 101H
Humanities - Prehistory through
the Medieval Period - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The humanities are approached on
four levels: art, music, literature, and
philosophy. Includes the beginnings
in Egypt, Babylonia, and Greece and
proceeds chronologically through the
Medieval period. A critical in-depth
reading of several primary sources is
conducted in a discussion format. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
201
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
HUM 102
Humanities from the Renaissance through the 19th Century
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The humanistic studies are approached on four levels: art, music,
literature, and philosophy. Begins
with the Renaissance and moves to
the 19th century period in the middle
east and Europe. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
HUM 110
Humanities in the 20th Century
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is concerned with critical
analysis of the arts and philosophy
from the late19th century to the contemporary period. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
Information Technology
(Technology and Engineering
Department)
Information Technology, a career
technical program, prepares students
for a variety of entry-level occupations or advancement within this field
with a focus on networks, security, internet protocol communications, project management, software support,
device integration, and ethics. Students in the program have the opportunity to complete industry
certifications from CompTIA, which
include A+, Network+, Server+, and
Security+, as well as certifications
from Macintosh and Microsoft. Information technology courses lead to a
certificate of achievement in Information Technology.
202
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Information Technology
Courses
IT 104
PC Hardware and Maintenance
4 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will be of interest to computer technicians, field service and
help desk support personnel, as well
as, individuals interested in enhancing their technical skills and knowledge of the PC system. The course
starts from the basic entry-level concepts, and quickly progresses into
discussing advanced topics related to
the IT industry. It will lay the foundation for attendees to prepare for the
A+ certification tests. 54 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours.
IT 107
Network Technology
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides information covering the LAN and WAN. Network
topologies and protocols are presented. 54 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours.
IT 108
Networking Operating Systems
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: IT 107.
This course provides information covering the areas of network operating
systems used on local and wide area
networks (LANS and WANS), as well
as popular server software. May be
taken two times. 54 lecture hours, 54
lab hours.
IT 109
Network and Computer Security
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Covers basics of general security con-
cepts, network security, communication security, infrastructure security.
Business continuity, disaster recovery,
planning and prevention will be covered. This course will lay the foundation for attendees to complete the
CompTIA Security+ certification tests.
54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. Non
Transferable
IT 110
Virtual Computing
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Covers the general concepts of virtual
computing including server and desktop virtualization. Students will install
and configure virtualization software
from multiple vendors. This course
will lay the foundation to take industry standard exams. 54 lecture hours,
54 lab hours.
Japanese
(Foreign Languages Department)
The Foreign Languages Department
offers proficiency-based instruction in
listening, speaking, reading, and
writing in these languages: Spanish,
German, Chinese, and Japanese. The
study of each language includes vocabulary, grammar, syntax, pronunciation, and cultural and historical
understanding. Intermediate level
courses include a literature component. Courses combine classroom lectures, guided practice, and language
activities with individual work conducted online.
Japanese Courses
JPN 101
Japanese I
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course in elementary Japanese
grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation which aims at understanding,
speaking, reading, and writing simple
Japanese and serves as an introduction to Japanese geography and culture. This course may be taken three
times. 90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
JPN 102
Japanese II
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): JPN 101 or
two years of high school
Japanese.
A further study of elementary Japanese grammar and vocabulary which
develops understanding, speaking,
reading, and writing skills. Includes
additional study of Japanese culture.
90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
Kinesiology
(Kinesiology Department)
Kinesiology studies human anatomy
and physiology and the mechanics of
body movement both theoretically
and in practice through physical activities.
A diverse curriculum includes
lower division theory courses designed for those who want:
• To complete an associate in
science degree in kinesiology and
transfer;
• A basic instruction program with
a wide variety of movement
experiences for the development
of physical activity skills and with
the knowledge necessary for life
time wellness;
• An adapted activities curriculum
for students with disabilities; and
• An intercollegiate athletic program
that offers performance-oriented
students opportunities for competetion.
Kinesiology courses satisfy general
education requirements for an associate in science degree and lower division transfer. The Honors Program
includes one kinesiology course: KIN
171H Health Science - Honors.
Important Information About
Kinesiology Course Descriptions
Kinesiology courses are now grouped
together as course “families.” Students are allowed to take only four
courses from each “family.” All
grades received, including F, WD, and
NC grades count towards the four
courses.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
The Kinesiology course families are
listed as follows.
Aquatics (Family 1)
KIN 142 - Beginning Swimming
KIN 143 -Intermediate Swimming
Individual Sports (Family 2)
KIN 101 – Badminton
KIN 102 – Bowling
KIN 103 – Golf
KIN 106 – Racquetball
KIN 108 - Tennis
Team Sports (Family 3)
KIN 130 -Basketball
KIN 134 -Softball
KIN 135 -Volleyball
Aerobic Fitness (Family 4)
KIN 147-Swimming for Cardiovascular
Improvement
KIN 151 -Body Conditioning
KIN 153 -Walk/Jog
KIN 159 -Cardiovascular Training
Resistance Training (Family 5)
KIN 145 – Strength Training, Balance,
and Agility
KIN 152 - Weight Training
KIN 154 -Advance Weight Training
Progressive Relaxation
(Family 6)
KIN 116 –Yoga
Combatives (Family 7)
KIN 104 -Self Defense and Personal
Safety
Kinesiology Courses
KIN 101
Badminton
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099
or READ 099 if required by English placement exam or if required by
English level.
Development of skills necessary to
participate in a game of badminton.
Course will improve skills through supervised instruction. 18 lecture hours,
18 lab hours. CSU;UC
KIN 102
Bowling
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will provide a semi-competitive opportunity for the student
with basic to advanced bowling skills.
This program will provide an opportunity for the student to work on the
fundamental and advanced skills of
bowling. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 103
Golf
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will offer a non-competitive environment in which the student
can develop the basic fundamentals
of golf. Instruction will emphasize
woods, long and short irons, bunker
play, putting, golf terminology, rules
and etiquette. 18 lecture hours, 18
lab hours. CSU;UC
KIN 104
Self-Defense and Personal Safety
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The theory and techniques of self-defense and personal safety. Content
focuses on methods of recognizing
and avoiding dangers plus skills and
strategies of employing physical defense when necessary. 18 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours. CSU;UC
KIN 106
Racquetball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Instruction and practice of the various
fundamental skills and techniques of
racquetball that will allow the student
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203
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
to participate in a lifetime activity.
Improve skills by repetition and supervised instruction. 18 lecture hours,
18 lab hours. CSU;UC
KIN 108
Tennis
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Instruction will be concerned with individual growth of fundamentals and
techniques of tennis that will allow
the student to participate in a lifetime
activity. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 116
Yoga
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course focuses on the development of the body/mind through the
use of specific Yoga postures, breathing techniques, stretches, mental exercises, and relaxation exercises. The
goals are to instruct students to
achieve greater concentration, selfdiscipline, and improved physical/
emotional health through instruction
and practice of these skills. 18 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours. CSU;UC
KIN 130
Basketball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Techniques in basketball such as ball
handling, passing, receiving, screening, cutting, shooting, team play and
strategy of the game. Rules are included. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 134
Softball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Instruction in the basic skills and
techniques of play in softball. Stu-
204
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
dents will be required to understand
the statistical aspect of the game.
Course will improve proficiency in
skills by repetition and supervised instruction. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 135
Volleyball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Instruction will be centered upon improving proficiency on the development of basic volleyball skills with an
emphasis on setting, digging, serving,
spiking and team strategies. Development of offensive and defensive
strategies for doubles, 3 on 3, 4 on 4.
18 lecture hours, 18 lab hours.
CSU;UC
KIN 142
Swimming - Beginning
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides basic instruction
and practice in the fundamental elements of swimming including beginning diving and water safety
instruction. The class is designed to
develop proficiency in the basic swim
strokes. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 143
Swimming - Intermediate/
Advanced
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
KIN 142.
This course is designed to develop
knowledge and skill in competitive
swimming strokes. Swimming strokes
to be taught are the freestyle, back
stroke, breast stroke, and dolphin
butterfly. The class will emphasize the
development of cardiovascular aerobic conditioning. 18 lecture hours, 18
lab hours. CSU;UC
KIN 145
Strength Training, Balance and
Agility
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Designed to introduce students to
proprioceptive training. Proprioceptive
training can improve balance, core
strength, quickness, and agility and
reduce the risk of injury. This type of
training can benefit all movements
performed in our daily life, not just
those dealing with sports or athletic
movements. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 147
Swimming for Cardiovascular
Improvement
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Instructor evaluation of swimming skills through application
of swimming stroke pretest.
This course will emphasize swimming
for health and physical fitness. The
class is designed to decrease the risk
of coronary heart disorders by increasing heart efficiency, vital lung
capacity, and the knowledge of each
through the use of aerobic and
anaerobic conditioning. Participating
adults and others seeking a fitness
program may expect to improve their
overall fitness level through aquatic
training. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 148
Adapted Aquatic Exercises
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Physician's
written diagnosis of physical
disability and exercise
limitations.
Designed for the student with a physical disability who is unable to participate in regular physical education
classes. A medical doctor's written
prescription of exercise limitations is
required. This course may be taken
unlimited times with instructors per-
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
mission. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 150
Adapted Physical Education
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): A medical
doctor's written prescription of
exercise limitations.
Designed for the student with a physical disability who is unable to participate in regular physical education
classes. A medical doctor's written
prescription of exercise limitations is
required. This course may be taken
unlimited times with the instructor's
permission. 54 lab hours. CSU
KIN 151
Body Conditioning
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will include general conditioning exercises, aerobic exercises,
and exercises to develop flexibility
and strength. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 152
Weight Training
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is designed to develop
both the large and small group skeletal muscles through a program of
weight lifting, circuit training, power
lifting, Olympic lifting, and conditioning. 18 lecture hours, 18 lab hours.
CSU;UC
KIN 153
Walking/Jogging
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A Walking/Jogging program that consists of cardiovascular activity alternately at a slow to moderate pace.
This program is designed to build car-
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
diorespiratory stamina and endurance, attack excessive weight, relieve psychological tension, and
enhance one's sense of wellbeing. 18
lecture hours, 18 lab hours. CSU;UC
KIN 154
Advanced Weight Training
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: KIN
152 or previous weight training
experience.
This course is designed to study
methods applicable to power lifting,
Olympic lifting, and conditioning. Students will participate in formulation of
individual workout sessions. Emphasis
will be on increasing strength, flexibility, and quickness. 18 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU;UC
KIN 159
Cardiovascular Training
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course will offer a non-competitive environment in which the student
can develop a total fitness program.
This program will promote areas of
muscular strength, flexibility and cardiovascular endurance. A philosophy
of "Fitness for Life" will be the ultimate objective. Every student will be
encouraged to regulate his/her program so that it will be enjoyable on a
long-term basis. 18 lecture hours, 18
lab hours. CSU;UC
KIN 169
Introduction to Coaching
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is to study the different
aspects of coaching including philosophies and techniques. It will provide
the student with a basic understanding of coaching on all levels. The topics included will be recruiting, tryouts,
pre and post season development,
conditioning, weight training, practice
organization, game strategies, motivation techniques, legal aspects, public relations, media, fundraising and
ethics. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 170
Fitness for Life
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course explains the mechanics of
a proper exercise and diet program
through lecture and exercise activities. Various forms of exercise will be
presented for trialby each student to
develop a personal fitness prescription. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 171
Health Science
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is designed to explore the
major areas of health that will have
an effect on the well-being of the individual now and in the future. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 171H
Health Science - Honors
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is designed to explore the
major areas of health that will have
an effect on the well-being of the individual now and in the future. Students are expected to work and
participate at an honors level which
includes strong critical thinking skills,
through analysis of readings, presentation, and leadership skills demonstrated through class participation/
presentation during the investigation
of health/ fitness topics. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 172
Introduction to Kinesiology
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course explores the history and
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205
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
principles of kinesiology, exercise science, and sport. The objectives are to
define and investigate the importance
of kinesiology education with a view
toward developing of a basic philosophy and background for professional
education. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 173
Nutrition for Fitness
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course is designed to provide
knowledge about the basic principles
of nutrition and to study the role nutrition plays in health promotion. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 174
Introduction to Team Sports
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course of study to give the student
entering the field of physical education a survey and basic analysis of
the team sports: football, baseball,
basketball, softball, volleyball, soccer,
badminton, tennis, swimming, water
polo and track. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
KIN 175
Introduction to Individual and
Dual Sports
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course of study to give the student
entering the field of physical education a survey and basic analysis of individual sports: archery, badminton,
bowling, golf, handball, karate, angling, skateboarding, swimming, tennis, track and field, weightlifting and
wrestling. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 176
Elementary School Physical
Education
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
206
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
required byEnglish level.
An introductory course that will acquaint students with physical education programs for grades K-6. The
course will include observation and
visitation with elementary age students. The course will include methods, skills, and activities used in
teaching elementary physical education. The class is recommended for
elementary education and physical
education majors. 54 lecture hours.
CSU
KIN 177
First Aid - Responding to
Emergencies
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Complies with requirements as set
forth by the American National Red
Cross for first aid responding to
emergencies. Students have the option to receive certification cards in
Adult CPR/AED, Child and Infant CPR
and First Aid. There is a lab fee to receive the certification that will be collected in class. Material fee. 54
lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 182
Care and Prevention of Athletic
Injuries
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is an overview of sports
medicine, intended for those students
in the fields of physical education,
coaching and athletic training. This
course covers the basics of exercise
physiology, biomechanics, human
motor learning, sports injuries
and other special topics in sports
medicine. Material fee. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 184
Volleyball Theory
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course focuses on the biomechanical and technical analysis of intercollegiate volleyball. 36 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 185
Softball Theory
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course prepares the student to
administer a softball program. It will
include practice organization, administration, and live game strategy. 36
lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 186
Baseball Theory
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course prepares the student to
administer a baseball program. It will
include teaching methods, practice
organization, administration, scouting
and live game strategy. 36 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 187
Techniques and Strategy of
Intercollegiate Football
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A practical study of game techniques
and strategy used in intercollegiate
football, including techniques of offensive and defensive play. 36 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
KIN 188
Basketball Theory
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Development of game techniques and
strategy used in intercollegiate basketball. The course will also include
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
teaching methods, practice organization, scouting and administration. 36
lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 191
Theory of Intercollegiate Golf
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The course is designed to further the
development of techniques and strategy of match and medal play for the
serious intercollegiate golfer interested in competition. Understanding
the proper use of technical golf rules
and etiquette in competitive play. 36
lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 192
Aquatic Theory and Techniques
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Content focuses on the biomechanical
and technical analysis of intercollegiate water polo, swimming and diving. 36 lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 193
Track and Field Theory and
Techniques
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course prepares the student to
administer a track and field program.
It will include teaching methods,
practice organization, administration
and officiating at track and field
meets. 36 lecture hours. CSU;UC
KIN 194
Soccer Theory
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course focuses on the biomechanical and technical analysis of intercollegiate soccer. 36 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Kinesiology
Competitive Athletics Courses
Participation in varsity sports is available to students who possess the
highest level of athletic proficiency.
Participation includes competition
against other California Community
Colleges.
Student-athletes must be actively enrolled and attending 12 units during
their first semester of competition (9
of which must be academic) including
enrollment in the varsity sport class.
Student-athletes must maintain a 2.0
grade point average and have passed
a cumulative 24 units (18 of which
must be academic) to qualify for their
second season of the same sport.
Student-athletes can only compete in
two years of the same sport.
A student transferring for academic
or athletic participation, who has previously participated in intercollegiate
athletics at another California
Community College, must complete
12 units in residence prior to the beginning of the semester of competition of which a maximum of 8 units
may be earned during the summer
session. Participants must pass a
physical examination prior to being
released to compete. See Athletic Director for more information.
KINC 101
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Volleyball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/ varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
student interested in intercollegiate
volleyball. Students in this course
must provide a current copy of a
physical to the athletic trainers prior
to participation. This course may be
taken four times. 54 lab hours. CSU
KINC 102
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Soccer
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/ varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
student interested in intercollegiate
soccer. Students in this course must
provide a current copy of a physical
to the athletic trainers prior to participation. This course may be taken four
times. 54 lab hours. CSU
KINC 103
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Water Polo
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/ varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
student interested in intercollegiate
Water Polo. Students in this course
must provide a current copy of a
physical to the athletic trainers prior
to participation. This course may be
taken four times. 54 lab hours. CSU
KINC 104
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Football
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/ varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
student interested in intercollegiate
football. Students in this course must
provide a current copy of a physical
to the athletic trainers prior to participation. This course may be taken four
times. 27 lab hours. CSU
KINC 105
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Cross Country
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/ varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
student interested in intercollegiate
Cross Country. Students in this course
must provide a current copy of a
physical to the athletic trainers prior
to participation. This course may be
taken four times. 27 lab hours. CSU
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207
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
KINC 106
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Golf
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/ varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
student interested in intercollegiate
golf. Students in this course must
provide a current copy of a physical
to the athletic trainers prior to participation. This course may be taken four
times. 54 lab hours. CSU
KINC 107
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Softball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
student interested in intercollegiate
softball. Students in this course must
provide a current copy of a physical
to the athletic trainers prior to participation. This course may be taken four
times. 54 lab hours. CSU
KINC 108
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Baseball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/ varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
student interested in intercollegiate
baseball. Students in this course must
provide a current copy of a physical
to the athletic trainers prior to participation. This course may be
taken four times. 54 lab hours. CSU
KINC 109
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Swimming
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/ varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
208
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
student interested in intercollegiate
swimming. Students in this course
must provide a current copy of a
physical to the athletic trainers prior
to participation. This course may be
taken four times. 54 lab hours. CSU
KINC 110
Physical Conditioning for Varsity
Basketball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/ varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course is designed to provide a
physical conditioning program for the
student interested in intercollegiate
basketball. Students in this course
must provide a current copy of a
physical to the athletic trainers prior
to participation. This course may be
taken four times. 54 lab hours. CSU
KINC 130
Off Season Conditioning for Varsity Basketball
1.0 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a college varsity
athlete/college varsity prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course provides intermediate
and advanced instruction and practice
in the skills and strategies of varsity
basketball. This course may be taken
four times. 54 lab hours.
KINC 131
Off Season Conditioning for
Varsity Volleyball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a college varsity
athlete/college varsity prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course provides intermediate
and advanced instruction and practice
in the skills and strategies of varsity
volleyball. This course may be taken
four times. 27 lab hours.
KINC 132
Off Season Conditioning for
Varsity Soccer
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a college varsity
athlete/college varsity prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course provides intermediate
and advanced instruction and practice
in the skills and strategies of varsity
soccer. This course may be taken four
times. 27 lab hours.
KINC 133
Off Season Conditioning for
Varsity Water Polo
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a college varsity
athlete/college varsity prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course provides intermediate
and advanced instruction and practice
in the skills and strategies of varsity
water polo. This course may be taken
four times. 27 lab hours.
KINC 134
Off Season Conditioning for
Varsity Football
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a college varsity
athlete/college varsity prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course provides intermediate
and advanced instruction and practice
in the skills and strategies of varsity
football. This course may be taken
four times. 27 lab hours.
KINC 135
Off Season Conditioning for
Varsity Cross Country
1.0 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a college varsity
athlete/college varsity prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course provides intermediate
and advanced instruction and practice
in the skills and strategies of varsity
cross country. This course may be
taken four times. 27 lab hours
KINC 137
Off Season Conditioning for
Varsity Softball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a college varsity
athlete/college varsity prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course provides intermediate
and advanced instruction and practice
in the skills and strategies of varsity
softball. This course may be taken
four times. 27 lab hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
KINC 138
Off Season Conditioning for
Varsity Baseball
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a college varsity
athlete/college varsity prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course provides intermediate
and advanced instruction and practice
in the skills and strategies of varsity
baseball. This course may be taken
four times. 27 lab hours.
KINC 139
Off Season Conditioning for
Varsity Swimming
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a college varsity
athlete/college varsity prospect
or with coaches' permission.
This course provides intermediate
and advanced instruction and practice
in the skills and strategies of varsity
swimming. This course may be taken
four times. 27 lab hours.
KINC 145
Strength Training, Balance and
Agility for Varsity Athletes
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must be a varsity college
athlete/varsity college prospect
or with coaches' permission.
Designed to introduce student-athletes to proprioceptive training. Proprioceptive training can improve
balance, core
strength, quickness, and agility and
reduce the risk of injury. This type of
training can benefit all movements
performed in our daily life, not just
those dealing with sports or athletic
movements. This course may be
taken four times. 27 lab hours. CSU
KINC 209
Women's Varsity Soccer
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced soccer
skills to participate in a
competitive collegiate
experience.
Intercollegiate competition in
women's varsity soccer. This course
may be taken four times. 160 lab
hours. CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
KINC 211
Women's Varsity Volleyball
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced
volleyball skills to participate in
a competitive collegiate
experience.
Intercollegiate competition in
women's varsity volleyball. This
course may be taken four times. 160
lab hours. CSU;UC
KINC 212
Varsity Swimming
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced
swimming skills to participate in
a competitive collegiate
experience. Must be a varsity
college athlete /varsity college
prospect or have coach's
permission.
Intercollegiate competition in varsity
swimming. This course may be taken
four times. 160 lab hours. CSU;UC
KINC 213
Women's Varsity Basketball
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced
basketball skills to participate in
a competitive collegiate
experience.
Intercollegiate competition in
women's varsity basketball. This
course may be taken four times. 160
lab hours. CSU;UC
KINC 214
Women's Varsity Softball
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced softball
skills to participate in a
competitive collegiate
experience.
Intercollegiate competition in
women's varsity softball. This course
may be taken four times. 160 lab
hours. CSU;UC
KINC 215
Varsity Track and Field
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced track and
field skills to participate in a
competitive collegiate
experience Must be a varsity
college athlete/varsity college
prospect or have coach's
permission.
Varsity athletics. Involves intercollegiate competition for two units of
credit. This course may be taken four
times. 160 lab hours. CSU;UC
KINC 216
Varsity Cross Country
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced cross
country skills to participate in a
competitive collegiate experience Must be a
collegiate varsity athlete/varsity
college prospective athlete or
with coach's permission.
Intercollegiate competition in varsity
cross country. This course may be
taken four times. 160 lab hours.
CSU;UC
KINC 220
Varsity Football
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced football
skills to participate in a
competitive collegiate
experience Must be a collegiate
varsity athlete/varsity college
prospective athlete or with
coach's permission.
Intercollegiate competition in varsity
football. This course may be taken
four times. 160 lab hours. CSU;UC
KINC 221
Men's Varsity Basketball
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced
basketball skills to participate in
a competitive collegiate
experience.
Varsity athletics. Involves intercollegiate competition for two units of
credit. This course may be taken four
times. 160 lab hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
209
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
KINC 224
Men's Varsity Baseball
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced baseball
skills to participate in a
competitive collegiate
experience.
Intercollegiate competition in men's
varsity baseball. This course may be
taken four times. 160 lab hours.
CSU;UC
KINC 225
Men's Varsity Golf
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced golf skills
to participate in a competitive
collegiate program.
Intercollegiate competition in men's
varsity golf. This course may be taken
four times. 160 lab hours. CSU;UC
KINC 227
Women's Varsity Golf
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced golf skills
to participate in a competitive
collegiate experience.
Intercollegiate competition in
women's varsity golf. This course may
be taken four times. 160 lab hours.
CSU;UC
KINC 229
Men's Varsity Water Polo
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced
swimming skills to participate in
a competitive collegiate
experience.
Intercollegiate competition in men's
varsity water polo. This course may
be taken four times. 160 lab hours.
CSU;UC
KINC 230
Women's Varsity Water Polo
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced
swimming skills to participate in
a competitive collegiate
experience.
Intercollegiate competition in
women's varsity water polo. This
course may be taken four times. 160
lab hours. CSU;UC
210
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
KINC 231
Men's Varsity Soccer
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Must possess advanced soccer
skills to participate in a
competitive collegiate
experience.
Intercollegiate competition in men's
varsity soccer. This course may be
taken four times. 160 lab hours.
CSU;UC
Leadership Course
(Office of Student Life and
Leadership)
The program is unique in that one of
its goals is to ensure the continuation
of quality student representation in
the participatory decision making efforts of the district. The program
seeks to instill within its students a
practical sense of dynamics within an
organization and some of the techniques that leaders utilize to enhance
the effectiveness of the group as well
as how to run meetings through the
proper use of parliamentary procedure. In addition, the program places
a heavy emphasis on self-knowledge
based on reflection as the cornerstone of leadership .
LEAD 103
Foundations of Leadership
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of the foundational theories
and applications of leadership. Leadership is examined from the individual
to its applications in the team and organizational settings. Emphasis is
placed on the development of the
student as a leader. This course is required either as a co-requisite
or prerequisite to holding a leadership
position in the campus' student government association. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
Linguistics
(Language Arts Department)
LING 101
Introduction to Language and
Linguistics
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to the study of language and the fundamental concepts
in the field of linguistics. Emphasis is
on the nature of human language, including differences and universalities
of linguistic structures, and the analysis of the syntactic, morphologi- cal,
and phonological systems of languages. First and second language
acquisition and the role of language
in society will also be explored. Does
not meet Major Prep requirements for
Anthropology. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
Mathematics
(Mathematics Department)
Mathematics is the abstract deductive
study of structure and pattern which
serves as the foundation of science
and technology. Transfer courses in
mathematics emphasize the development of mathematical and quantitative reasoning skills beyond the level
of intermediate algebra. Courses satisfy general education requirements
for an associate degree in mathematics, an associate degree in liberal arts
with an emphasis in mathematics,
and lower division transfer.
Mathematics Courses
MATH 020
Arithmetic Fundamentals
1 Unit
Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
The four basic operations of arithmetic on whole numbers, fractions,
and decimals, with applications. Ratios, proportions, and percents with
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
applications. This course is offered for
Pass/No Pass grading only. 54 lab
hours.
MATH 029
Pre-Algebra
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 020 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is designed to prepare a
student for Elementary Algebra. Topics include a review of arithmetic, a
study of signed numbers, an introduction to fundamental algebraic concepts, solving equations, and solving
applied problems. NOTE: THE UNITS
EARNED FOR THIS COURSE MAY
NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE 60
UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 72 lecture
hours.
MATH 030
Elementary Algebra
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 029 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures including
cut-scores.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Fundamental operations with polynomials and rational expressions, products and factoring, linear and
quadratic equations in one variable,
inequalities, exponents, radicals,
graphing linear equations, systems of
equations, applications, and introduction to functions. 90 lecture hours.
MATH 131
Plane Geometry
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 030 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
A first course in geometry. Elementary logic, properties of geometric figures, parallel and perpendicular lines,
ratio and proportion, congruence,
area, and volume.72 lecture hours.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MATH 148
Intermediate Algebra I
2.5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 030 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
Presents the first half of a two-semester alternative to intermediate algebra. This course enables students
to complete Intermediate Algebra
(MATH 150) at a slower pace. Real
number properties, first degree equations and inequalities, absolute value
equations and inequalities, formulas,
applications, exponents, polynomials,
the binomial theorem, factoring, linear systems, and functions. NOTE:
BOTH MATH 148 AND MATH 149
MUST BE COMPLETED TO SATISFY
ANY PREREQUISITE REQUIRING
MATH 150. MAY NOT BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY WITH MATH 150. STUDENTS MAY NOT EARN MORE THAN
FIVE UNITS IN ANY COMBINATION
OF MATH 148, 149 AND 150. 54 lecture hours.
MATH 149
Intermediate Algebra II
2.5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 148 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
Presents the second half of a two-semester course in intermediate algebra. This course enables students to
complete Intermediate Algebra
(MATH 150) at a slower pace. Rational expressions, variation, radicals,
complex numbers, quadratic equations, applications, conics, inverse
functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions. NOTE: BOTH MATH
148 AND MATH 149 MUST BE COMPLETED TO SATISFY ANY PREREQUISITE REQUIRING INTERMEDIATE
ALGEBRA. THIS COURSE MAY NOT
BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY WITH
MATH 150. STUDENTS MAY NOT
EARN MORE THAN A TOTAL OF FIVE
UNITS IN ANY COMBINATION OF
MATH 148, 149 AND 150. 54 lecture
hours.
MATH 150
Intermediate Algebra
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 030 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
Real number properties, first degree
equations and inequalities, absolute
value equations and inequalities, formulas, applications, exponents, polynomials, the binomial theorem,
factoring, linear systems, functions,
rational expressions, variation, radicals, complex numbers, quadratic
equations, conics, inverse functions,
and exponential and logarithmic functions. NOTE: THIS COURSE MAY NOT
BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY WITH EITHER MATH 148 OR 149. STUDENTS
MAY NOT EARN MORE THAN A
TOTAL OF FIVE UNITS IN ANY COMBINATION OF MATH 148, 149 AND
150. 90 lecture hours.
MATH 151
Plane Trigonometry
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 131 or
high school Geometry or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures. Also,
MATH 149 or MATH 150.
Functions, the trigonometric functions: their graphs and identities,
laws of sines and cosines, solutions of
triangles, trigonometric equations, inverse trigonometric functions, polar
coordinates, DeMoivre's Theorem. 72
lecture hours. CSU
MATH 160
Survey of Mathematics
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 149 or
MATH 150 or placement is based
on multiple assessment
measures.
A course in mathematical concepts
for the liberal arts student. Topics include sets and logic, problem solving,
numeration systems, consumer applications, geometry, probability, statistics, and computer applications. 72
lecture hours. CSU
www.citruscollege.edu
211
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MATH 162
Introductory Mathematical
Analysis
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 149 or
MATH 150 or placement is based
on multiple assessment
measures.
Concepts of function and limits: applied calculus emphasizing techniques
of integration and differentiation with
applications in social and life sciences, business administration, economics, and engineering technology.
72 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MATH 165
Introductory Statistics
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 149 or
MATH 150 or placement is based
on multiple assessment
measures.
Introductory course to statistics and
probability, descriptive analysis, and
presentation of data, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, normal
curve, chi-square, and applications in
diverse disciplines. 72 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
MATH 168
Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 149 or
MATH 150 or placement is based
on multiple assessment
measures.
Course is designed for prospective elementary teachers. The course covers sets, logic, number systems,
number theory and algebra functions.
Techniques in instructional delivery
explored. 72 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MATH 169
Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 168.
Second class for elementary school
teachers. Course covers topics in
measurement, geometry, probability
and statistics. Techniques in the design of instruction delivery will be explored. 72 lecture hours. CSU;UC
212
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MATH 170
College Algebra
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 149 or
MATH 150 or placement is based
on multiple assessment
measures.
Polynomial, rational, exponential, and
logarithmic functions; matrices and
determinants; theory of equations;
analytic geometry, and mathematical
induction. 72 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MATH 175
Pre-Calculus
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 151 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
Preparation for calculus; polynomial,
rational, exponential, logarithmic, and
trigonometric functions; analytic
geometry; mathematical induction.
72 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MATH 190
Calculus with Analytic
Geometry I
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 175 or
placement is based on multiple
assessment measures.
Introduction to differential and integral calculus with applications; functions; limits; and continuity;
techniques of differentiation; exponential; logarithmic; and inverse
trigonometric functions. 72 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
MATH 191
Calculus with Analytic
Geometry II
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 190.
Continuation of integral calculus with
applications; techniques of integration; sequences and series; analytic
geometry; plane curves; parametric
equations; and polar coordinates. 72
lecture hours. CSU;UC
MATH 210
Calculus with Analytic
Geometry III
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 191.
Vectors, calculus of functions of more
than one variable, partial derivatives,
multiple integration, vector calculus,
Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem,
and divergence theorem. 72 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
MATH 211
Differential Equations
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MATH 210.
First and Second Order (Linear and
Non-linear) Differential Equations,
with emphasis on modeling applications. Numerical Methods. Basic Linear Algebra. Systems of Linear and
Non-linear Differential Equations and
their applications. Application of Linear Algebra to Systems. Power Series
Methods. 90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MATH 212
Introduction to Linear Algebra
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 191.
An introduction to linear algebra that
complements coursework in calculus.
Topics include systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, vectors and vector spaces,
eigenvalues and eigenvectors
and linear transformations. 72 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
Motorcycle Technology
(Automotive Technology
Department)
Motorcycle Technology, a career technical program, provides the theoretical background and practical
experience necessary to gain entrylevel employment or advancement as
motorcycle technicians. Courses lead
to a certificate of achievement in Motorcycle Service, Diagnosis and Repair
Technician.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Motorcycle Technology
Courses
MOTO 101
Fundamentals of Motorcycle
Service, Diagnosis and Repair
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Intended for motorcycle technology
majors, this class serves as the prerequisite for all motorcycle technology
certificate and/or degree-applicable
courses. Motorcycles, ATVs and
scooters will be explored from the
point of view of the service technician. Scientific principles and operation of essential motorcycle
technologies are central to the course
goal of preparing students for entry
into the motorcycle technology core
curriculum. Appropriate lab activities
in motorcycle inspection, service and
repair are included. 72 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU
to improve their skills. The course
covers essential power transmission
theory; inspection, diagnosis, service
& repair of transmissions primary and
secondary drive systems including
chain, belt, gear, and shaft-drive systems. 72 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
CSU
MOTO 144
Motorcycle Chassis System
Service, Diagnosis & Repair
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101 or
MOTO 101.
Generally intended for those students
majoring in motorcycle technology
and/or currently employed with a motorcycle service/repair establishment.
The course covers essential chassis
system theory; inspection, diagnosis,
service & repair of the following motorcycle systems: Brake, steering,
suspension, alignment, wheels and
tires. ABS and linked-brake systems
are introduced. 72 lecture hours, 54
lab hours. CSU
MOTO 141
Motorcycle Engine Mechanical
Systems Service, Diagnosis &
Repair
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101 or
MOTO 101.
Intended for those students majoring
in motorcycle technology or those
currently employed with a motorcycle
service/repair establishment seeking
to improve their skills. This course
covers essential engine theory, inspection, diagnosis, service and repair. Engine inspection and
measurements are covered, with emphasis on in-vehicle repairs. 54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU
MOTO 146
Motorcycle Electrical System
Service, Diagnosis & Repair
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101 or
MOTO 101.
Generally intended for those students
majoring in automotive technology
and/or currently employed with a motorcycle service/repair establishment.
This course covers essential electrical
and electronic systems theory, along
with inspection, diagnosis, service &
repair of specific electrical systems including the battery, starting systems,
charging systems, lighting systems,
gauges, instrument-panel warning
lights and power accessories. 54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU
MOTO 142
Motorcycle Power Transmission
System Service, Diagnosis & Repair
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101 or
MOTO 101.
Intended for those students majoring
in motorcycle technology or those
currently employed with a motorcycle
service/repair establishment seeking
MOTO 148
Motorcycle Engine Management
System Service, Diagnosis &
Repair
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101 or
MOTO 101 and AUTO 146 or
AUTO 156 or MOTO 146.
Generally intended for those students
majoring in motorcycle technology
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
and/or currently employed with a motorcycle service/repair establishment.
The course covers essential engine
management system theory, along
with inspection, diagnosis, service &
repair of the following systems: Ignition, air and fuel delivery, electronic
engine controls, and auxiliary emission controls. 72 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours. CSU
MOTO 201
Motorcycle Dynamics and
Chassis Systems
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 151 and
AUTO 156.
Intended for students who have completed key automotive technology
courses, this intermediate course
builds on existing technical knowledge to prepare students for a career
as a motorcycle service technician.
Study of motorcycle accessory systems and suspension & brake systems is included. Emphasis is placed
on motorcycle suspension & brake
systems, routine maintenance, routine adjustments, and customization.
54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
MOTO 291
Engine Performance Enhancements and Tuning
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The class covers the engine performance enhancements available for motorcycle vehicles. The subject areas
covered include
stand-alone engine management systems, fuel systems, turbo chargers,
superchargers, nitrous oxide, ignition
systems, and the use of the chassis
dynamometer as a tuning tool. 36
lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
213
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Medium & Heavy Diesel
Truck Technology
(Automotive Technology
Department)
Medium and Heavy Truck Technology,
a career technical program, provides
the theoretical background and practical experience necessary to gain
entry-level employment or advancement as heavy duty truck, bus, and
heavy equipment technicians.
Courses lead to a certificate of
achievement in Medium and Heavy
Truck Service, Diagnosis, and Repair
Technician.
Medium & Heavy Diesel Truck
Classes
MTRK 151
Medium and Heavy Truck
Engines Service, Diagnosis, and
Repair
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 029 or higher.
Intended for those students majoring
in Medium and Heavy Duty Truck or
those currently employed with a
medium and heavy truck service/repair establishment seeking to improve
their skills. This course covers essential engine theory, inspection, diagnosis, service and repair. Engine
inspection and measurements are
covered, with emphasis on in-vehicle
repairs. This course prepares students for ASE Truck Gas and Diesel
Engine Repair (T-, T-2) certification
exam. 54 lecture hours, 126 lab
hours. CSU
MTRK 152
Medium and Heavy Truck
Drivetrain Service, Diagnosis,
and Repair
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 029 or higher.
Intended for those seeking a career
214
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
in the medium and heavy truck service and repair industry. This course
focuses on the service, diagnosis and
repair of the manual and automatic
automotive drivetrain systems. Appropriate lab activities in automobile
drivetrain inspection, service and repair are included. The course prepares students for the ASE Automatic
Transmission (H3, S3) and Manual
Drivetrain(T3) certification exams. 54
lecture hours, 126 lab hours. CSU
MTRK 154
Medium and Heavy Truck Chassis
Service, Diagnosis, and Repair
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): AUTO 101.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 115 or higher.
Intended for those seeking a career
in the medium and heavy duty truck
service and repair industry, this
course covers essential chassis system theory, along with inspection, diagnosis, service & repair of the
following systems: brake, steering,
suspension, alignment, wheel/tire,
and ABS. Course prepares students
for ASE Suspension and Steering (T4)
and ASE Brakes (T5) certification. 54
lecture hours, 126 lab hours. CSU
Music
(Performing Arts Department)
The study of music provides training
in instrumental competency, vocal
competency, performance, techniques,and application and provides
a foundational background for music
appreciation, history and theory.
Music offers courses in four areas of
concentration: commercial music, historyand theory, instrumental, and
vocal. Both a transfer and a career
technical education program, music
offers performance opportunities for
music majors and non-majors.
Courses in music satisfy general educationrequirements for the associate
degree and lower division transfer
requirements.
Important Information About
Music Course Descriptions
Music course numbers and categories
have changed. The following is a list
ofnew course numbers, along with
old course numbers and the course
title.
New Course
Number
MUSC 100
Styles, Technique, and
Popular Singing
Old Course
Number
MUS 172
the "Soul" of
MUSC 102
MUS 129
Pop/Rock Ensemble I
MUSC 103
MUS 139
Pop/Rock Ensemble II
MUSC 104
MUS 145
Pop, Rock, and Jazz Performance
Styles I
MUSC 105
MUS 159
Pop, Rock and Performance Styles II
MUSC 106
Show Choir I
MUS 178
MUSC 110
MUS 146
Pop/Cumbia Ensemble I
MUSC 112
MUS 147
Pop/Salsa Ensemble I
MUSC 118
MUS 132
Music Performance for Events
MUSC 120
MUS 207
Studio Laboratory Band I
MUSC 121
MUS 253
Studio Laboratory Band II
MUSC 122
Jazz Ensemble
MUS 107
MUSC 123
Jazz Ensemble II
MUS 237
MUSC 130
Studio Orchestra I
MUS 208
MUSC 131
Studio Orchestra II
MUS 248
MUSC 140
Jazz Improvisation I
MUS 154
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
New Course
Number
MUSC 141
Jazz Improvisation II
Old Course
Number
MUS 254
New Course
Number
MUSE 100
Music Fundamentals
Old Course
Number
MUS 112
New Course
Old Course
Number
Number
MUSE 170
MUS 220
Musical Theatre Academy Techniques
MUSC 142
Jazz Combos I
MUSC 144 MUS 252
Fusion Ensemble
MUS 152
MUSE 101
Musicianship I
MUS 100
MUSE 171
MUS 214
Musical Theatre Techniques
MUS 102
MUSC 146
Chamber Jazz
MUS 153
MUSE 102
Harmony I
MUSE 180
MUS 229
Summer Instrumental Music Academy
MUS 101
MUSC 151
Songwriting I
MUS 162
MUSE 103
Musicianship II
MUS 103
MUSC 152
Songwriting II
MUS 163
MUSE 104
Harmony II
MUSE 188
MUS 140
Music Production Software/
Hardware I
MUSE 109
Music Appreciation
MUS 114
MUSE 189
MUS 141
Music Production Software/
Hardware II
MUSE 110
History of Music I
MUS 110
MUSE 201
Musicianship III
MUS 200
MUSE 111
History of Music II
MUS 111
MUSE 202
Harmony III
MUS 202
MUSE 112
History of Jazz
MUS 218
MUSE 203
Musicianship IV
MUS 201
MUSE 204
Harmony IV
MUS 203
MUSE 220
Intermediate Piano I
MUS 205
MUSC 160
MUS 170
Sight Reading for the Studio I
MUSC 161
MUS 171
Sight Reading for the Studio II
MUSC 170
MUS 212
Citrus Singers Summer Ensemble
(Classical)
MUSC 171
MUS 211
Citrus Singers Tour Ensemble (Pop)
MUSE 113
MUS 113
History of Rock and Roll
MUSC 172
MUS 222
Women's Tour Ensemble
MUSE 114
MUS 225
Introduction to American Music
MUSC 175
MUS 228
Jazz Ensemble Tour I
MUSE 120
Elementary Piano I
MUS 105
MUSE 221
MUS 206
Intermediate Piano II
MUSC 177
MUS 150
Professional Performance Techniques
MUSE 121
Elementary Piano II
MUS 106
MUSE 222
Advanced Piano I
MUS 235
MUSC 190
MUS 131
Career Opportunities in the Music
Entertainment Industry
MUSE 130
Voice
MUS 115
MUSE 223
Advanced Piano II
MUS 236
MUSE 131
Intermediate Voice
MUS 210
MUSE 224
MUS 161
Keyboard Skills for the Music Major
MUSE 140
Beginning Guitar I
MUS 122
MUSE 225
Popular Piano Styles
MUSE 141
Beginning Guitar II
MUS 123
MUSE 226
MUS 155
Functional Piano for the Music Major
MUSC 204
MUS 245
Pop, Rock, and Jazz Performance
Styles III
MUSC 271
MUS 213
Professional Performance Techniques
(Vocal)
MUSE 070
MUS 070
Foundational Rhythm Section
Pedagogy
MUSE 160
MUS 137
Standard Percussion
Instrumentation/Techniques
MUSE 090
MUS 090
Introduction to Instrumental
Ensemble Performance
MUSE 161
MUS 138
World Percussion
Instrumentation/Techniques
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MUS 160
MUSE 230
MUS 230
Advanced Voice (Classical)
MUSE 231
MUS 231
Advanced Voice (Popular)
MUSE 240
MUS 124
Intermediate Guitar I
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215
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
New Course
Old Course
Number
Number
MUSE 241
MUS 125
Intermediate Guitar II
New Course
Old Course
Number
Number
MUSP 151
MUS 243
Individual Performance Techniques
MUSE 288
Electronic Music III
MUS 240
MUSP 162
Handbell Ensemble
MUSP 100
Concert Choir I
MUS 118
MUSP 101
Concert Choir II
MUS 119
MUSP 170
MUS 209
Musical Theatre Academy
Production I
MUSP 105
Women's Ensemble I
MUS 232
MUSP 106
MUS 242
Women's Ensemble II
MUSP 108
Men's Ensemble
MUS 233
MUSP 110
Vocal Ensemble I
MUS 117
MUSP 111
Vocal Ensemble II
MUS 277
MUSP 115
Chamber Chorale I
MUS 121
MUSP 120
Chamber Singers I
MUS 116
MUSP 121
Chamber Singers II
MUS 126
MUSP 133
Brass Choir I
MUS 216
MUSP 134
Brass Choir II
MUS 226
MUSP 136
MUS 157
Percussion Ensemble I
MUS 223
MUSP 171
MUS 224
Musical Theatre Workshop Production
MUSP 173
MUS 215
Musical Theatre Production I
MUSP 178
Opera Workshop
MUS 120
MUSP 181
MUS 196
Musical Theatre Orchestra I
MUSP 200
Concert Choir III
MUS 238
MUSP 201
Concert Choir IV
MUS 239
MUSP 290
Applied Music
MUS 290
MUSP 292
MUS 292
Applied Music / Individual Instruction
(Pop)
Commercial
MUSC 100 – Styles, Techniques, and
the Soul of Popular Singing
MUSC 102 – Pop/Rock Ensemble I
MUSC 103 – Pop/Rock Ensemble II
MUSC 104 – Pop, Rock, and Jazz
Performance Styles I
MUSC 110 – Pop/Cumbria Ensemble I
MUSC 112 – Pop/Salsa Ensemble I
MUSC 204 – Pop, Rock, and Jazz
Performance Styles II
Important Information About
Music Course Descriptions
MUS 217
MUSP 141
Chamber Winds II
MUS 227
The Music course families are listed
as follows. New courses are in blue.
MUSP 145
Wind Symphony I
MUS 234
MUSP 146
Wind Symphony II
MUS 244
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Symphonic
MUSP 145 – Wind Symphony I
MUSP 146 – Wind Symphony II
Jazz
MUSC 122 – Jazz Ensemble
MUSC 123 – Jazz Ensemble II
MUSP 140
Chamber Winds I
216
Choral
MUSC 106 – Citrus College Show
Choir I
MUSP 100 – Concert Choir I
Beginning
MUSP 101 – Concert Choir II
Intermediate
MUSP 105 – Women’s Ensemble I Beginning
MUSP 106 – Women’s Ensemble II Intermediate
MUSP 108 – Men’s Ensemble
MUSP 110 – Vocal Ensemble I
Beginning
MUSP 111 – Vocal Ensemble II
Intermediate
MUSP 200 – Concert Choir III
Intermediate/Advanced
MUSP 201 – Concert Choir IV
Advanced
MUSP 291
MUS 291
Applied Music / Individual Instruction
(Classical)
Music courses are now grouped together as course “families.” Students
are allowed to take only four courses
from each “family.” All grades
received, including F, WD, and NC
grades count towards the four
courses.
MUSP 138
MUS 158
World Percussion Ensemble I
Individual Instruction
MUSP 290 – Applied Music I
Beginning
MUSP 291 – Applied Music II
Intermediate
MUSP 292 – Applied Music III
Intermediate/Advanced
Developmental
MUSE 070— Foundational Rhythm
Section Pedagogy
MUSE 090 – Introduction to
Instrumental Ensemble Performance
Chamber Music
MUSC 142 – Jazz Combos
MUSC 144 – Fusion Ensemble
MUSC 146 – Chamber Jazz
MUSP 115 – Chamber Chorale I
MUSP 120 – Chamber Singers I
MUSP 121 – Chamber Singers II
MUSP 133 – Brass Choir I
MUSP 134 – Brass Choir II
MUSP 136 – Percussion Ensemble I
MUSP 138 – World Percussion
Ensemble I
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MUSP 140 – Chamber Winds I
MUSP 141 – Chamber Winds II
MUSP 162 – Handbell Ensemble
Techniques
MUSC 140 – Jazz Improvisation I
MUSC 141 – Jazz Improvisation II
MUSC 151 – Songwriting I
MUSC 152 – Songwriting II
MUSE 130 – Voice - Beginning
MUSE 131 – Intermediate Voice
MUSE 160 – Standard Percussion
Instrumentation/Techniques
MUSE 161 – World Percussion
Instrumentation/Techniques
MUSE 180 – Summer Instrumental
Music Academy
MUSE 188 – Music Production
Software/Hardware I
MUSE 189 – Music Production
Software/Hardware II
MUSE 225 – Popular Piano Styles
MUSE 230 –Voice- Intermediate/
Advanced
MUSE 231 –Voice IV - Advanced
MUSE 288 – Electronic Music III
MUSP 151 – Individual
Performance Techniques
Studio
MUSC 120 – Laboratory Band
MUSC 121 – Studio Laboratory
Band II
MUSC 130 – Studio Orchestra I
MUSC 131 – Studio Orchestra II
Musical Theatre
MUSE 170 – Musical Theatre
Academy Techniques
MUSE 171 – Musical Theatre
Techniques
MUSP 170 – Musical Theatre
Academy Production
MUSP 171 – Musical Theatre
Workshop
MUSP 173 – Musical Theatre
Production I
MUSP 178 – Opera Workshop
MUSP 181 – Musical Theatre
Orchestra I
Career Development
MUSC 118 – Music Performance for
Events
MUSC 170 – Citrus Singers Summer
Ensemble (Classical)
MUSC 171 – Citrus Singers Tour
Ensemble (Pop)
MUSC 172 – Women’s Tour Ensemble
MUSC 175 – Jazz Ensemble Tour
MUSC 177 – Professional
Performance Techniques
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MUSC 271 – Professional
Performance Techniques (Vocal)
Commercial Music Courses
MUSC 100
Styles, Technique, and the Soul
of Popular Singing
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Development of basic techniques and
skills appropriate for singing various
styles of commercial and popular
music. Emphasis will be on fundamental singing techniques, song interpretation, and the joy of performing. Some music technology and the
business of music will also be discussed. Solo and ensemble (back-up)
singing performances are included.
This course may be taken four times.
36 lecture hours, 18 lab hours.
MUSC 102
Pop/Rock Ensemble I
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
070 or MUSE 090 will support
audition success.
A course for vocalists and instrumentalists in the techniques from DooWop, Rockabilly, Rhythm and Blues,
"Covers" to Classic Rock, Teen Idols
and Girl Groups, with a focus on the
small ensemble setting. Students will
work extensively on these early rock
and pop stylings and within small
groups, with the intention of public
performance. Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. CSU
MUSC 103
Pop/Rock Ensemble II
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
A course for vocalists and instrumentalists in the techniques from Motown, Soul, Folk-Rock and Psychedelic
Rock of the 60's to contemporary pop
and rock, Tex-Mex and Salsa, and
contemporary vocal jazz groups, with
a focus on the small ensemble setting. Students will work extensively
on these rock and pop stylings and
within the application of a small
group, with the intention of public
performance. Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. CSU
MUSC 104
Pop, Rock, and Jazz Performance
Styles I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
070 or MUSE 090 will support
audition success.
Introductory study and performance
of contemporary Pop, Rock, and Jazz
styles. This course will focus on the
various fusions of these diverse styles
- including appropriate rehearsal and
performance techniques. 36 lecture
hours, 126 lab hours arranged. CSU
MUSC 105
Pop, Rock, and Jazz Performance
Styles II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Strongly recommended:
MUSC 104.
Intermediate study and performance
of contemporary Pop, Rock, and Jazz
styles. This course will focus on the
various fusions of these diverse
styles, including appropriate rehearsal
and performance techniques. 36 lecture hours, 108 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 106
Citrus College Show Choir I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
070 or MUSE 090 will support
audition success.
This class is an introduction to "Show
Choir". This class includes singing,
dance and movement for vocalists
and rhythm section/horn accompaniment. Public Performance is required.
36 lecture hours, 108 lab hours
arranged. CSU;UC
MUSC 110
Pop/Cumbia Ensemble I
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Co-Requisite(s): MUSP 290 or
MUSP 291 or MUSP 292.
A course for vocalists and instrumen-
www.citruscollege.edu
217
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
talists in the study, rehearsal, and
performance of Cumbia, Vallenato,
Merengue, Corridos, and Rancheras
and other Central and Interior and
South American musical styles (notably excluding Mariachi) with a focus
on the medium size (15-20) ensemble
setting. Students will explore the
rhythmic and stylistic idiosyncrasies
of this group of Latin American musical styles in sectional and full ensemble settings, with the intention of
public performance. Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 36
lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 112
Pop/Salsa Ensemble I
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Co-Requisite(s): MUSP 290 or
MUSP 291 or MUSP 292.
A course for vocalists and instrumentalists in the study, rehearsal, and
performance of Salsa, Merengue,
Bolero and other Caribbean and
Coastal South American musical
styles with a focus on the medium
size (15-20) ensemble setting. Students will explore the rhythmic and
stylistic idiosyncrasies of this group of
Latin American musical styles in sectional and full ensemble settings, with
the intention of public performance.
Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 118
Music Performance for Events
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Music Performance for Events is designed for the student to learn and
enjoy the art of performing music for
sports events and related functions.
This course will incorporate the selection of, and the ability to perform the
appropriate material. 72 lab hours.
MUSC 120
Laboratory Band
4 Units
Grade Only
Co-Requisite(s): MUSP 290 or
MUSP 291 or MUSP 292.
Introductory study and performance
of jazz and commercial music. Topics
include scales, chords, patterns, improvisation and development of musi-
218
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
cal style. Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 126 lab
hours arranged. CSU;UC
MUSC 121
Studio Laboratory Band II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Exploration and performance of intermediate (Grade 3) large studio ensemble literature. Topics include the
performance of various contemporary
styles, section playing, and solo
preparation in the studio ensemble
setting. 54 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 122
Jazz Ensemble
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
070 or MUSE 090 will support
audition success.
Study and performance of jazz and
big band music. This course provides
an opportunity to learn the techniques applicable to the large ensemble. Public performance required. 36
lecture hours, 126 lab hours
arranged. CSU;UC
MUSC 123
Jazz Ensemble II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSC 122 and
Audition.
Advanced study and performance of
jazz and big band music. This course
applies jazz techniques to performance situations for the large ensemble. 36 lecture hours, 108 lab hours
arranged. CSU;UC
MUSC 130
Studio Orchestra I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
070 or MUSE 090 will support
audition success.
A beginning study of the studio environment including recording of various musical styles. Public and studio
performance required. 36 lecture
hours, 126 lab hours. CSU
MUSC 131
Studio Orchestra II
4 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended:
MUSC 130.
An intermediate study of the studio
environment including recording of
various musical styles. Public and studio performance required. 36 lecture
hours, 126 lab hours. CSU
MUSC 140
Jazz Improvisation I
3 Units
Grade Only
This is a class for music majors and
performing artists. Fundamental jazz
harmonic theory, techniques, and
practices of jazz improvisation in a
variety of styles will be introduced
and explored. 54 lecture hours, 18
lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 141
Jazz Improvisation II
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
This is a class for music majors and
performing artists. Advanced jazz
harmonic theory, techniques, and
practices of jazz improvisation in a
variety of styles will be introduced
and explored. 54 lecture hours, 18
lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 142
Jazz Combos
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Students will work extensively on improvisation and small group techniques. The study of standard
"be-bop" tunes and their application
in the small group will be covered.
This class will be divided into small
ensembles. Public performance required. 72 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 144
Fusion Ensemble
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Students will work extensively on
contemporary jazz styles including
fusion of rock and jazz elements, post
"Be-Bop" and avant garde styles. This
class will be divided into small
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ensembles. Public performance required. 72 lab hours. CSU;UC
analysis to the sight-reading process.
54 lecture hours. CSU
MUSC 146
Chamber Jazz
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Exploration and performance of
medium-advanced and advanced
(Grade 4 and 5) large jazz ensemble
literature. Topics include the performance of various jazz styles, jazz ensemble section playing, and solo
preparation in the large jazz ensemble setting. Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 126 lab
hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 161
Sight Reading for the Studio II
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSC 160 or
Audition.
A continuation and further expansion
upon the reading and performance
concepts of music covered in Sight
Reading for the Studio I. Public performance is required. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
MUSC 151
Songwriting I
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
MUSE 100.
This course acquaints the student
with commercial songwriting techniques. Included are developing an
idea, writing a melody, melodic expansion, chord progressions, form,
and light orchestration. 36 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours. CSU
MUSC 152
Songwriting II
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
MUSC 151.
This course expands the student's
commercial songwriting techniques.
Included are development of ideas,
writing melodies, melodic expansion,
chord progressions, form, and light
orchestrations. 36 lecture hours, 18
lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 160
Sight Reading for the Studio I
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MUSE 100.
A preparatory course in sight-reading
for the aspiring performer/studio musician. Focus is upon polished/professional performance through the
application of music theory and
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MUSC 170
Citrus Singers Summer Ensemble
(Classical)
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
An advanced course for the vocal performance major. Advanced classical
vocal techniques in a professional
quality performance/tour setting. 54
lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 171
Citrus Singers Tour Ensemble
(Pop)
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
An advanced course for the vocal performance major. Integration of advanced pop vocal techniques, dance,
and body movement, and tour exposure in a professional-quality performance/tour setting. 54 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSC 172
Women’s Tour Ensemble
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
This course prepares the student for
a unique ensemble experience
through classroom instruction, laboratory training, and performance. Emphasis on solo as well as ensemble
study and performance of vocal compositions combined with an in-depth
travel experience. Public performance
required. 54 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours. CSU
MUSC 175
Jazz Ensemble Tour
7 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
070 or MUSE 090 will support
audition success.
This course prepares the student for
a unique instrumental ensemble experience through classroom instruction, laboratory training, and
performance. Emphasis on solos as
well as ensemble, study of jazz compositions, combined with an in-depth
travel experience abroad. Public performance required. 72 lecture hours,
252 lab hours arranged. CSU;UC
MUSC 177
Professional Performance
Techniques
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
The Professional Performance Techniques for the musician class provides
the musician with the necessary fundamentals, to accurately assess a
performance setting and make appropriate decisions for its success. The
course stresses detailed style analysis
in a broad range of musical settings.
Logistical necessities will be examined
and the course will culminate with
musical performances. 18 lecture
hours, 108 lab hours arranged.
MUSC 190
Career Opportunities in the
Music Entertainment Industry
3 Units
Grade Only
This is a class for students interested
in the music entertainment industry.
Practices and procedures of artists
and performers, record companies,
live performance and touring, publishing, management, promotion,
artist, radio station, video, and retail
sales will be examined. Emphasis will
be on prominent guest lecturers from
various fields. 54 lecture hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
219
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MUSC 204
Pop, Rock, and Jazz Performance
Styles II
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MUSC 104 or
Audition.
A more in depth study and performance of contemporary Pop, Rock, and
Jazz styles. 36 lecture hours, 126 lab
hours. CSU
MUSC 271
Professional Performance
Techniques (Vocal)
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequiste(s): Audition.
An advanced course for the vocal
performance major. Advanced vocal
techniques in a professional-quality
setting. Emphasis on rehearsal techniques, total presentation, body
movement, and audience rapport. 54
lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
Music Education Courses
MUSE 070
Foundational Rhythm Section
Pedagogy
3 Units
Grade Only
Placement through skill
assessment.
This course presents an introduction
to fundamental rhythm section instrument functions. Basic preparation for
college level ensemble rehearsal and
performance environments. Included
is an overview of rhythm section
functions in various forms of music.
Introductory musicianship, sight reading and theoretical concepts will be
addressed. NOTE:THE UNITS
EARNED FOR THIS COURSE MAY
NOT BE APPLIED FOR THE 60 UNITS
FOR GRADUATION 36 lecture hours,
72 lab hours.
MUSE 090
Introduction to Instrumental
Ensemble Performance
4 Units
Grade Only
Placement through skill
assessment.
This course presents an introduction
to foundational instrumental ensemble performance skills and concepts.
Basic preparation for college level en-
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CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
semble rehearsal and performance
environments. Included is an
overview of foundational instrumental
pedagogy, instrumental music notation, and terminology. NOTE: THE
UNITS EARNED FOR THIS COURSE
MAY NOT BE APPLIED FOR THE 60
UNITS FOR GRADUATION. 54 lecture
hours, 72 lab hours.
MUSE 100
Music Fundamentals
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course emphasizes basic music
skills. Recommended for all students
desiring a foundation in beginning
theory, notation, ear training, and
composition. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
MUSE 101
Musicianship I
2 Units
Grade Only
Co-Requisite(s): MUSE 102 and
recommendation by instructor(s)
of music courses which require
knowledge of sight singing.
An introductory class for the music
major. Practice and skill development
in melodic and rhythmic dictation, intervals, and sight singing. Required of
all music majors. 36 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
MUSE 102
Harmony I
3 Units
Grade Only
Co-Requisite(s): MUSE 101.
Strongly Recommended:
MUSE 100.
An introductory class in music theory
for the music major. Study of scales,
intervals, chord types, and harmonic
progression. Required of all music
majors. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 103
Musicianship II
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 101 and
MUSE 102.
Co-Requisite(s): MUSE 104 and
ecommendation by instructor(s)
of music courses which require
knowledge of sightsinging.
Continuation of materials and skills
developed in Muse 101. Continued
practice and skill development in
melodic and rhythmic dictation, intervals, and sightsinging. Required of all
music majors. 36 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
MUSE 104
Harmony II
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 102.
Co-Requisite(s): MUSE 103.
Continuation of materials and skills
developed in Muse 102. Additional
study and analysis of scales, intervals, chord types and harmonic progression. Required of all music
majors. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 109
Music Appreciation
3 Units
Grade Only
This course is an introduction to
music from the Middle Ages to the
20th Century. Instruction includes
basic music theory, a study of prominent composers, and a survey of musical forms. Recommended for the
non-music major. Required for music
majors. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 110
History of Music I
3 Units
Grade Only
This is an in-depth course examining
the history of music as well as the
lives and contributions of major composers from Antiquity, the Middle
Ages, the Renaissance, and the
Baroque periods. Required for music
majors. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 111
History of Music II
3 Units
Grade Only
This is an in-depth course examining
the history of music as well as the
lives and contributions of major composers from the Classical, Romantic,
and 20th Century periods. Required
for music majors. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MUSE 112
History of Jazz
3 Units
Grade Only
A survey of jazz music. This course
provides an opportunity to explore
jazz music, its origins, its many
styles, and some of the great names
whose artistry influenced its development. The effect of jazz on other musical forms such as classical and rock
& roll will be explored as well. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 113
History of Rock and Roll
3 Units
Grade Only
This course focuses on the rock musician, the music and the manner in
which sociological, political, and economic conditions merged in the evolution of this art form. - Listening and
classroom discussion will be stressed.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 114
Introduction to American Music
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of American music from the
seventeenth century until the present. Units include the Colonial music,
spirituals, and gospel music, parlor
songs, the ragtime and jazz era, the
rise of classical music, music for the
stage and screen, the blues, folk and
protest music, country and
western, and the birth of rock and
roll. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 120
Elementary Piano I
2 Units
Grade Only
For the beginning music student or
non-music major. Covers all basic elements in elementary piano, including
music reading, rhythm studies, technique, and scales. 36 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MUSE 121
Elementary Piano II
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 120 or
Audition. Minimum of beginning
standards of reading and
performance for piano.
Continuation of skills and techniques
learned in MUSE 120. Emphasis on
reading skills, major scales, compound meters, ensemble playing, harmonization, and elementary classical
keyboard literature. 36 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
MUSE 130
Voice - Beginning
2 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides instruction and
physical participation in the basic
techniques necessary for good
singing including posture, breathing,
range extension and musicality. Additionally, beginning harmonic ear training provides tools for gradual
improvement and musical achievement. 36 lecture hours, 18 lab hours.
CSU:UC
MUSE 131
Intermediate Voice
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 130 or
Audition.
This course provides a review of basic
singing techniques with additional intermediate level instruction in greater
vocal range, tone emission, and song
memorization for the development of
skill in performing literature for the
solo voice. 36 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 140
Beginning Guitar I
2 Units
Grade Only
Stringing, tuning, fingering, playing
techniques, notation, chords and
chord progressions, reading guitar
music, playing simple melodies and
accompaniment. 36 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
MUSE 141
Beginning Guitar II
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 140 or
Audition.
This course continues the development of skill begun in MUS 122. In
addition, the following areas are covered: barre chords, additional accompaniment techniques, and
major and minor scale patterns in
first position. 36 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
MUSE 160
Standard Percussion
Instrumentation/Techniques
1 Unit
Grade Only
This course, for the percussionist, introduces appropriate exercises in
rhythm, technique and consistency.
Special selected studies including
specific techniques and rhythmic patterns are chosen to advance the student's proficiency on the standard
percussion instruments. Study of solo
and ensemble literature from different periods of music chosen to suit
the student's performance level. 18
lecture hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 161
World Percussion
Instrumentation/Techniques
1 Unit
Grade Only
This course introduces appropriate
exercises in rhythm, technique and
consistency. Special selected studies
include specific techniques and
rhythm patterns which are chosen to
advance the students proficiency on
ethnic percussion instruments. Study
of instruments and rhythms from
Latin American, Middle Eastern, and
other ethnic cultures. 18 lecture
hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 170
Musical Theatre Academy Techniques
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Musical Theatre Academy Techniques
course provides students with the
vocal training, dance technique, and
acting fundamentals needed to perform. The course culminates in a final
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221
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
showcase which allows each student
the training, experience, and exposure of performing for a live audience. 36 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU
MUSE 171
Musical Theatre Techniques
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This introductory course provides an
overview of the techniques necessary
for the performer in a live musical
theatre production. Topics include
history of American musical theatre,
audition technique, rehearsal and
performance techniques, and methods of production evaluation. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab hours arranged.
CSU;UC
MUSE 180
Summer Instrumental Music
Academy
3 Units
Grade Only
Summer Instrumental Music Academy
(SIMA) provides high school and college level wind and percussion musicians the opportunity to review,
strengthen and refine performance
skills and techniques. SIMA includes
large ensemble and small ensemble
performance, instrument specific
workshops, performance associated
music theory and musicianship, and
other unique musical explorations.
Topics include sightreading, musical
style and historical contexts, ensemble rehearsal techniques and live and
studio performance preparation.
SIMA culminates with a series of
recording sessions in the Citrus
Recording Technology studios. 18 lecture hours, 108 lab hours arranged.
CSU
MUSE 188
Music Production Software/
Hardware I
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 100 or
MUSE 120 or Audition.
Strongly Recommended:
CIS 099.
An introductory course in the use of
music production software and hardware in the composition and arranging of music. Included are music
sequencing, music revision/editing,
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CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
instrumental mixing, enhancing effects, and CD production. Designed
for the music major. 36 lecture hours.
CSU
MUSE 189
Music Production
Software/Hardware II
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 188 or
Audition.
This course is a continuation of the
use of music production software and
hardware in the computerized realization ('mock up') of a musical composition/arrangement. Included are
advanced concepts in music affected
by the process of sequencing, editing,
mixing and effects. 36 lecture hours.
CSU
MUSE 201
Musicianship III
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 103 and
MUSE 104.
Co-Requisite(s): MUSE 202.
Melodic and rhythmic dictation and
sight-singing. Identification of intervals, chord qualities, scales, phrases
and harmonic function. Required for
transferring music majors. 36 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 202
Harmony III
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 104.
Co-Requisite(s): MUSE 201.
Continuation of first year's study, including seventh chords, secondary
dominants, modality, harmonic structure of the phrase, harmonization of
a given part, harmonic rhythm, irregular resolutions of secondary dominants, analysis of melodies, short
works for piano, chorales, and songs.
Required of all transferring music majors. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 203
Musicianship IV
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 201 and
MUSE 202.
Co-Requisite(s): MUSE 204.
A continuation of MUSE 201. This
course will include more challenging
rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic dictation and solfège. Required for
transferring music majors. 36 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 204
Harmony IV
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 201 and
MUSE 202.
Co-Requisite(s): MUSE 203.
Continuation of first year's study, including seventh chords, secondary
dominants, modality, harmonic structure of the phrase, harmonization of
a given part, harmonic rhythm, irregular resolutions of secondary dominants, analysis of melodies, short
works for piano, chorales, and songs.
Required of all transferring music majors. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 220
Intermediate Piano I
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 121 or
Audition.
Continued development of essential
keyboard skills. This course emphasizes improvisation, melodic harmonization, and reading music at sight.
36 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 221
Intermediate Piano II
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 220 or
Audition.
Continued development of essential
keyboard skills learned in Intermediate Piano I. This course emphasizes
working with lead sheets, interpretation of chord symbols, advanced scale
types, and transcription. 36 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 222
Advanced Piano I
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 221 or
Audition.
This course continues the development of skills begun in MUSE 120,
121, and 220 with emphasis on increased proficiency. Included in the
repertoire are moderately difficult
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
compositions representative of
selected stylistic periods of piano literature. This course, or a similar
background, is required for music
majors. 36 lecture hours. CSU;UC
board familiarity and basic technique
to music theory (harmony), chord
structures in improvisation, melodic
study and music production software.
36 lecture hours.
MUSE 223
Advanced Piano II
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 222 or
Audition.
This course is a continuation of the
first semester of second year piano
and emphasizes the further development of those skills previously set
forth. This course, or a similar background, is highly recommended for all
transferring music majors. 36 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 230
Voice- Intermediate/Advanced
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 131 or
Audition.
This course provides a review of Intermediate vocal techniques and introduces the first processes of
advanced level instruction. Vocal exercises include extension of range,
stylistic analysis, and repertoire development used in performing literature for the solo voice. 36 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 224
Keyboard Skills for the Music
Major
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
A keyboard skills class for music majors. Covers all basic elements of
piano; includes skills that are specifically essential for musicians, such as:
accompaniment, score reading, harmonization, sight-reading, keyboard
harmony, and ensemble playing. 54
lecture hours.
MUSE 225
Popular Piano Styles
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
This course acquaints the student
with the musical concepts employed
by the professional pianist in the
commercial music field. Concepts include construction and identification
of extended (jazz) chords, voicing,
accompanying, fills, substitutions, and
style in view of solo and ensemble
playing. 36 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours.
MUSE 226
Functional Piano for the Music
Major
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
MUSE 100.
Functional piano skills for all music
majors whose primary instrument is
not the piano. Implementation of key-
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MUSE 231
Voice IV - Advanced
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 230 or
Audition.
Advanced vocal exercises and techniques, analysis and repertoire development used in performing literature
for the solo voice. 36 lecture hours,
18 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 240
Intermediate Guitar I
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 141 or
Audition.
Instruction in scales, chords, and
arpeggios in all keys and positions.
Improvising, accompanying, sight
reading, transposing, and performing
of popular and classical styles. 36 lecture hours. CSU;UC
MUSE 241
Intermediate Guitar II
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 240 or
Audition.
This course is a continuation of the
first semester intermediate guitar
(MUSE 240). Course includes solo
guitar playing techniques, and ensemble playing. 36 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
MUSE 288
Electronic Music III
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 189.
Advanced theory and practice of electronic music synthesis including digital synthesizer components and
electronic sound processing, recording, editing, and mixing techniques.
Advanced MIDI applications. 36 lecture hours, 18 lab hours. CSU
Music Performance Courses
MUSP 100
Concert Choir I - Beginning
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended:
MUSE 130 or previous
participation in choral
ensembles.
Open to all students capable of sustaining a vocal harmony part. Instruction in choral literature for the large
choral ensemble. Special attention is
given to choral tone production,
phrasing and interpretation.
Participation in public performances is
required. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 101
Concert Choir II-Intermediate
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSP 100 or
Audition.
Strongly Recommended: MUSE
130 or previous participation in
choral ensembles.
Additional study of standard choral
literature for the large choral ensemble. Students receive intermediate
level instruction in tone production,
phrasing, and interpretation. Participation in public performances is required. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab
hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 105
Women’s Ensemble I Beginning
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
This course prepares the student for
indepth women's ensemble performance at the beginning level. Emphasis
on study and performance of classical
and popular compositions for
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223
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
women's ensemble. Public performance is required. 36 lecture hours,
126 lab hours arranged. CSU;UC
MUSP 106
Women's Ensemble II
Intermediate
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MUSP 105 or
Audition.
This course prepares the student for
in-depth women's ensemble performance at the intermediate level. Emphasis on study and performance of
pop compositions for women's ensemble. Public performance is required. 36 lecture hours, 126 lab
hours arranged. CSU;UC
MUSP 108
Men's Ensemble
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Recommended for all male students
interested in gaining knowledge of
repertoire for the small men's vocal
ensemble. Intensive preparation of
choral literature for public concerts.
Performance required. 36 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 110
Vocal Ensemble I Beginning
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Recommended for all beginning students interested in learning and performing repertoire for the small vocal
ensemble. Includes standard vocal literature for various combinations of
voices with intensive preparation in
choral techniques for public concerts.
Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab hours arranged.
CSU;UC
MUSP 111
Vocal Ensemble II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Recommended for all students interested in furthering and expanding
their knowledge of repertoire for the
small vocal ensemble. Includes more
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CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
in-depth study of standard vocal literature for various combinations of
voices with intensive preparation of
choral literature for public concerts.
Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 115
Chamber Chorale I Beginning
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
This course prepares the student for
more in-depth ensemble experience.
Emphasis on study and performance
of classical and pop compositions for
small vocal ensembles. Public performances are required. 36 lecture
hours, 126 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 120
Chamber Singers I Beginning
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
This course includes the study and
performance of composition for the
mixed chamber choral ensemble. Includes compositions of the Baroque,
Classic, and Romantic style period.
Public performance required. Audition
required 36 lecture hours, 126 lab
hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 121
Chamber Singers II Intermediate
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSP 120 or
Audition.
This course includes the study and
performance of composition for the
mixed chamber chorale setting. Includes traditional compositions as well
those of the contemporary style period. Public performance required. 36
lecture hours, 126 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 133
Brass Choir I
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
090 will support audition
success.
Study and performance of brass ensemble music. This course provides
an opportunity to learn performance
practices of brass music in various
styles through the medium of a large
brass ensemble. Literature from the
Renaissance through the Classical period will be covered. Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 54
lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 134
Brass Choir II
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Study and performance of contemporary brass ensemble music. This
course provides an opportunity to
learn performance practices of brass
music in various styles through the
medium of a large brass ensemble.
Literature from the Romantic Era to
the 20th Century will be covered.
Public performance required. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU
MUSP 136
Percussion Ensemble I
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 160 or
Audition.
A course for percussionists in the
study, rehearsal, and performance of
classical, modern and novelty percussion ensemble chamber music with a
focus on the small to medium size (4
- 16) ensemble setting. Students will
explore the rhythmic and stylistic idiosyncrasies of this group of musical
styles in sectional and full ensemble
settings, with the intention of public
performance. Public performance required. 18 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 138
World Percussion Ensemble I
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): MUSE 161 or
Audition.
A course for percussionists in the
study, rehearsal, and performance
percussion ensemble chamber music
from Latin American, Middle Eastern
and various other ethnic cultures with
a focus on the small to medium size
(4 - 16) ensemble setting. Students
will explore the rhythmic and stylistic
idiosyncrasies of this group of musical
styles in sectional and full ensemble
settings, with the intention of public
performance. Public performance required. 18 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MUSP 140
Chamber Winds I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
090 will support audition
success.
The study and performance of
medium-advanced instrumental
chamber wind literature. Students will
be organized into various chamber
music ensembles to prepare, perform
and record assigned literature. 36 lecture hours, 108 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 141
Chamber Winds II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
The study and performance of advanced instrumental chamber wind
literature. Students will be organized
into various chamber music ensembles to prepare, perform and record
assigned literature. 36 lecture hours,
108 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 145
Wind Symphony I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
090 will support audition
success.
The study and performance of
medium-advanced level wind band literature, with an emphasis on the development of high standards of
personal and musical professionalism.
Field trips required. 36 lecture hours,
108 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 146
Wind Symphony II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
The study and performance of intermediate level wind band literature,
with an emphasis on the development of high standards of personal
and musical professionalism. Public
performance and field trips required.
36 lecture hours, 108 lab hours.
CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MUSP 151
Individual Performance
Techniques
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
This course offers music majors instruction for solo and recital performance. Repertoire selection and
development will be covered. Includes master class and coaching opportunities, programming, solo and
recital attire and etiquette, and accompaniment coordination. 18 lecture
hours, 108 lab hours arranged.
CSU;UC
MUSP 162
Handbell Ensemble
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Co-Requisite(s): MUSP 120.
An advanced course for the music
major. This course provides the skills
of coordination, dexterity and musicianship through the use of 5-octave
English handbells. Emphasis is placed
on skills necessary for the
development of professional quality
musical performance in an ensemble
setting. 9 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
MUSP 170
Musical Theatre Academy
Production
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
An in-depth survey of the skills necessary for the performer in a live musical theatre production. Emphasis on
the audition process, script analysis,
role preparation, theatre and rehearsal etiquette and rehearsal technique culminating in a live, full-length
fully-produced musical. 36 lecture
hours, 126 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 171
Musical Theatre Workshop
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
A practical overview of, and creative
workshop on, the process and skills
of developing, producing, and performing in a musical. Emphasis on
script analysis, character development, production themes, and vocal
production, culminating in a live, full-
length, fully-produced musical. 36
lecture hours, 108 lab hours. CSU
MUSP 173
Musical Theatre Production I
Beginning
4 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Live musical theatre production. Students will function as principles and
ensemble members in a fully produced musical. The course is also
open to qualified musicians and technicians who wish to participate in
production. 36 lecture hours, 108 lab
hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 178
Opera Workshop
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Training and performance in solos,
trios and small ensembles from the
light opera and operatic repertoire.
Introduction to standard literature,
languages/diction, staging, and performance of this repertoire in scenes
or in full opera productions. 18 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 181
Musical Theater Orchestra I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Successful completion of MUSE
070 or MUSE 090 will support
audition success.
Musical Theater Orchestra I offers beginning instruction in instrumental
performance of conducted orchestral
ensemble accompaniment of live
staged dance, drama and song, including contemporary Broadway literature, and film and media
soundtrack. This course introduces
the unique challenges of musical theatre performance that differ from
those of concert stage performance,
including following live dramatic action, pit orchestra orientation, woodwind doubling, underscore, click track
and headphone use, book organization and music marking. 36 lecture
hours, 108 lab hours arranged.
CSU;UC
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225
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MUSP 200
Concert Choir III
Intermediate/Advanced
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSP 101 or
Audition.
An intermediate/advanced study of
standard choral literature of various
periods for the large choral ensemble.
Additional instruction in tone production, phrasing, range extension, and
interpretation. Participation in public
performances is required. 36 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 201
Concert Choir IV - Advanced
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSP 200 or
Audition.
Advanced study of standard choral literature of various musical periods
and vocal techniques as they apply to
the advanced choral singer in a large
choral ensemble. 36 lecture hours, 54
lab hours. CSU;UC
MUSP 290
Applied Music I Beginning
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
A beginning level workshop class in
applied music including a private onehalf hour lesson per week, attendance and participation in a weekly
concert hour and skill and repertoire
building activities. 18 lecture hours,
108 lab hours arranged. CSU;UC
MUSP 291
Applied Music II Intermediate
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSP 290 or
Audition.
An intermediate level workshop class
in applied music with an emphasis on
classical techniques which includes a
private one-half hour lesson per
week, attendance and participation in
a weekly concert hour and skill and
repertoire building activities. 18 lecture hours, 108 lab hours arranged.
CSU;UC
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CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
MUSP 292
Applied Music III Intermediate/Advanced
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MUSP 291 or
Audition.
An advanced level workshop class in
applied music with an emphasis on
popular techniques which includes a
private one-half hour lesson per
week, attendance and participation in
a weekly concert hour and skill and
repertoire building activities. 18 lecture hours, 108 lab hours arranged.
CSU;UC
Natural History
(Natural Sciences Department)
Field work courses in the topography,
climate, geology, ecology, life zones,
wildlife, plant life, and human history
of various geographical areas are offered under the umbrella of Natural
History. Courses in natural history
transfer to CSU as elective units.
Natural History Courses
NAT 180A
Natural History Series Deserts A
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A field course where the topography,
climate, geology, ecology, life zones,
wildlife, plant life, and human history
of the desert region will be covered.
Possible locations of interest but not
restricted to include Death Valley,
high desert, Anza Borrego-Salton
Basin, Western Colorado Plateau,
Eastern Colorado Plateau, Southeastern Arizona, Trans-Pecos or Baja California. There will be three to ten days
of class depending on the region visited. A transportation fee may be assessed. 36 lecture hours. CSU
NAT 180B
Natural History Series Deserts B
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A field course where the topography,
climate, geology, ecology, life zones,
wildlife, plant life, and human history
of the desert region will be covered.
Possible locations of interest but not
restricted to include Death Valley,
high desert, Anza Borrego-Salton
Basin, Western Colorado Plateau,
Eastern Colorado Plateau, Southeastern Arizona, Trans-Pecos or Baja California. There will be three to ten days
of class depending on the region visited. A transportation fee may be assessed. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
NAT 181A
Natural History Series - Coastal
Mountains, Coastlines, Tropical
Regions and Islands A
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A field course where the topography,
climate, geology, ecology, life zones,
wildlife, plant life, and human history
of the region will be covered. Possible
locations of interest include, but are
not restricted to San Gabriel Mountains, southern, central and northern
California Coastlines, Hawaiian Islands, Channel Islands, Oregon
Coast, Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica
or Belize. There will be three to ten
days of class depending on the region
visited. A transportation fee may be
assessed. 36 lecture hours. CSU
NAT 181B
Natural History Series - Coastal
Mountains, Coastlines, Tropical
Regions and Islands B
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A field course where the topography,
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
climate, geology, ecology, life zones,
wildlife, plant life, and human history
of the region will be covered. Possible
locations of interest include, but are
not restricted to San Gabriel Mountains, southern, central and northern
California Coastlines, Hawaiian Islands, Channel Islands, Oregon
Coast, Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica
or Belize. There will be three to ten
days of class depending on the region
visited. A transportation fee may be
assessed. 54 lecture hours. CSU
NAT 182A
Natural History Series - Inland
Mountains, Valleys and Alaska A
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A field course where the topography,
climate, geology, ecology, life zones,
wildlife, plant life, and human history
of the region will be covered. Possible
locations of interest but not restricted
to include Sierra Nevada, Owens Valley, San Andreas Fault Region, Cascades, Banff-Jasper, Alaska, and Rio
Grand Valley. There will be three to
ten days of class depending in the region visited. A transportation fee may
be assessed. 36 lecture hours. CSU
NAT 182B
Natural History Series - Inland
Mountains, Valleys and Alaska B
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A field course where the topography,
climate, geology, ecology, life zones,
wildlife, plant life, and human history
of the region will be covered. Possible
locations of interest but not restricted
to include Sierra Nevada, Owens Valley, San Andreas Fault Region, Cascades, Banff-Jasper, Alaska, and Rio
Grand Valley. There will be three to
ten days of class depending on the
region visited. A transportation fee
may be assessed. 54 lecture hours.
CSU
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Nursing Courses
(Health Sciences Department)
Nursing, a Health Sciences program,
prepares students to care for individuals, families, and communities so
they may attain, maintain, or recover
optimal health and quality of life.
Refer to other sections of this chapter
for information on the Registered
Nursing and Vocational Nursing programs. This page describes programs
at the entry-level of a nursing career;
students may earn a skill award in
Nurse Assistant. Nursing 101 Nurse
Assistant trains students in the theory
and skills needed to care for residents
in a long-term care facility. Upon successful completion of coursework,
students become eligible to take the
California Nurse Assistant Examination for Certification.
NRS 100
Introduction to Vocational
Nursing
3 Units
Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 029.
This course is a prerequisite for entrance into the vocational nursing
program. It offers an introduction to
the fundamental skills needed for a
career as a licensed vocational nurse,
including medical terminology, elements of pharmacology, introductory
anatomy and physiology, legal issues
related to healthcare, and communication skills. The course is offered for
Pass/No Pass grading only. 36 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours.
NRS 101
Nurse Assistant
5 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Provision of basic nursing care to residents in a long-term care facility.
Upon successful completion of this
course, students become eligible to
sit for the nurse assistant competency
exam for certification. 54 lecture
hours, 108 lab hours.
NRS 102
Home Health Aide
2 Units
Grade Only
Co-Requisite(s)): NRS 101.
Preparation of individuals to provide
safe and proper nursing care and
home care services to the elderly, ill,
and infirm. Includes 27 hours in an
extended care facility. 18 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours.
Registered Nursing
(Health Sciences Department)
The registered nursing program prepares students to care for individuals,
families, and communities so they
may attain, maintain, or recover optimal health and quality of life. The
program includes the dual emphasis
of nursing theory and clinical practice
of direct patient care. The program
meets the training requirements identified by the California Board of Registered Nursing and qualifies students
to take the licensure examination
(NCLEX-RN). Upon successful completion of this examination, students are
able to enter practice as a Registered
Nurse. Additionally, completion of the
Associate in Science Degree in Nursing prepares students for transfer to
a four-year institution to study for a
baccalaureate in nursing degree. Advanced placement in the program
may be granted to students with prior
vocational nursing or registered nursing education or equivalent.
Registered Nursing Courses
RNRS 190
Foundations of Nursing
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200 ,BIOL
201 and BIOL 220 and admission
to the ADRN program.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 191 and
RNRS 192.
The first course in the nursing sequence, students are introduced to
the applications of critical thinking
and the nursing process needed to
provide basic care to clients in a variety of community, long term and
acute care settings. Emphasis is on
promoting optimum health across the
health-illness continuum. Clinical exwww.citruscollege.edu
227
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
periences provide the opportunity to
practice basic skills and include campus laboratory and experiences in
community settings. 36 lecture hours,
108 lab hours.
RNRS 191
Intro to Medical/Surgical
Nursing I
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200 , BIOL
201 and BIOL 220 and admission
to the ADRN program.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 190 and
RNRS 192.
Introduction to concepts and practices as they relate to the non-critical
young adult through geriatric adult in
the medical-surgical environment.
Through utilization of the nursing
process, the student will begin to recognize alterations in functioning or illness and formulate age-appropriate
nursing interventions. Selected psychomotor skills associated with the
basic needs, medication administration and intravenous therapy will be
studied and practiced. Introduction to
Medical-Surgical Nursing I introduces
the first year nursing student to concepts and practices as they relate to
the adult patient in the Medical-Surgical environment 36 lecture hours, 162
lab hours.
RNRS 192
Pharmacology for Nurses
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200, BIOL
201 and BIOL 220 and admission
to the ADRN program.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 190 and
RNRS 191.
The course introduces students to
basic understandings of the interaction between drugs and living systems and prepares students for
system application of drug therapy
throughout the remainder of the program. The course includes instruction
in drug classes and schedules, principles of drug administration, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics across
the life span, and legal and ethical issues related to drug administration.
36 lecture hours.
228
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
RNRS 193
Pediatric Nursing
3.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): RNRS 190 ,
RNRS 191 and RNRS 192.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 194 and
RNRS 195.
This course focuses on integration
and application of the nursing
process as it relates to the nursing
care of children and their families.
Emphasis is on the concepts and
skills related to age and developmentally appropriate family centered care.
Clinical experiences will provide opportuneties for students to participate
in therapeutic activities in a variety of
pediatric settings. 36 lecture hours,
81 lab hours.
RNRS 194
Obstetrics/Maternity Nursing
3.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): RNRS 190, RNRS
191 and RNRS 192.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 193 and
RNRS 195.
This course will enable the student to
attain knowledge and skills necessary
to provide safe, effective, culturally
sensitive physiological and psychosocial care using the nursing process
and family centered approach for
childbearing clients and their families.
Clinical experiences will provide opportunities for students to participate
in therapeutic activities during antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum periods; as well as the care and
monitoring of the newborn. 36 lecture hours, 81 lab hours.
RNRS 195
Beginning Medical/Surgical
Nursing II
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): RNRS 190 ,
RNRS 191 and RNRS 192.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 193 and
RNRS 194.
Medical Surgical Nursing II develops
the first year nursing student's knowledge and skills as they relate to the
adult non-critical moderately complex
medical-surgical patient. Through utilization of the nursing process, the
student will recognize alterations in
functioning or illness and formulate
age-appropriate nursing interventions. Psychomotor skills associated
with moderately complex needs,
medication administration and intravenous therapy will be studied and
practiced. The impact of multiple
nursing diagnoses on patient outcomes will be introduced. 45 lecture
hours, 135 lab hours.
RNRS 200
Role Transition: LVN to RN
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200, BIOL
201 and BIOL 220 or current
licensure in California as a
Licensed Vocational Nurse.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is designed to assist the
LVN in transitioning from the LVN role
to the expected role of the ADN student. Course content focuses on educational preparation for nursing,
competencies expected of the graduate, critical thinking, communication,
physical assessment, legal/ethical
concerns and study skills. The oncampus lab provides opportunity for
students to validate nursing skill and
practice physical assessment skills. 36
lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
RNRS 201
Medical-Surgical Nursing III
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): RNRS 193, RNRS
194 and RNRS 195 or RNRS 200
and current standing as an LVN
in California.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 203.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course examines the nursing
care of selected individuals throughout the lifespan who are experiencing
complex alterations in wellness involving multiple systems. Care of
clients experiencing a high-risk pregnancy and high-risk newborns is also
included. Clinical experiences in local
health care agencies and computerized simulation manikins and scenarios provide students opportunity to
apply theoretical concepts to actual
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
care of clients. 45 lecture hours, 135
lab hours.
RNRS 203
Mental Health-Psychiatric
Nursing
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): RNRS 193, RNRS
194 and RNRS 195 or RNRS 200
and current standing as a LVN in
California.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 201.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course presents the principles of
mental health and the social, economic, cultural and physiological factors that predispose a person to
dysfunctional human behavior. Emphasis is placed on the therapeutic
role of the nurse in promoting, preventing, maintaining and restoring individuals to optimal mental
well-being. Concepts of therapeutic
communication, age-related concerns, treatment modalities, and delivery of mental health services are
included. Clinical laboratory experiences are provided in community care
facilities. 27 lecture hours, 81 lab
hours.
RNRS 251
Medical-Surgical Nursing IV
6 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): RNRS 201 and
RNRS 203.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 252.
This course is a continuation of the
nursing care of selected individuals
throughout the life span who are experiencing complex alterations in
wellness involving multiple systems.
Care of clients experiencing multi-system failure and severe trauma is also
included. Clinical experiences in local
health care agencies provide students
opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to actual care of patients. 54
lecture hours, 162 lab hours.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
RNRS 252
Leadership for Professional
Nursing Practice
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): RNRS 201 or
concurrent enrollment.
Co-Requisite(s): RNRS 251.
This course socializes students into
the graduate registered nurse role. It
focuses on the exploration and analysis of contemporary nursing practice,
current trends, and issues impacting
nursing care delivery. Advanced leadership and management concepts are
discussed as part of the nursing role.
Clinical experiences will be provided
in Nursing 251. 36 lecture hours.
RNRS 290
Gerontological Nursing
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): RNRS 195.
This course provides knowledge regarding the care of geriatric clients,
including facts and theories of aging
and cultural perspectives as well as
specific information about each body
system and alterations associated
with aging. The course concludes
with a discussion of gerontological issues. 18 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
Vocational Nursing
(Health Sciences)
Vocational nursing, a career technical
education program, provides the educational opportunity for students to
develop the social, technical, and professional skills required of a licensed
vocational nurse. The program prepares the student for the NCLEX-VN
examination for state licensure
through the Board of Vocational
Nurses and Psychiatric Technicians.
Upon successful completion of this
examination, students are able to
enter practice as Licensed Vocational
Nurses. Successfully completed vocational nursing coursework may be applied toward an associate degree as
electives.
Vocational Nursing Courses
VNRS 150
Fundamentals of Nursing
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): NRS 100.
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 151L and
current admission to the
Vocational Nursing program.
This course presents the evolution of
nursing through history until the
present time, defines the paradigm of
health and illness, explores the issues
of culture and ethnicity, and examines
the nurse-client relationship. The
course presents a wide variety of
basic nursing procedures used in the
practice of vocational nursing, including how to do the procedure, as well
as why and when these procedures
should be done. The course presents
special tools of nursing: the nursing
diagnosis and the nursing process,
which are used to provide individualized care to clients. 54 lecture hours.
VNRS 151L
Fundamentals of Nursing Lab
3 Units
Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): NRS 100.
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 150 and
current admission to the
Vocational Nursing program.
Clinical application of theoretical concepts of basic nursing functions. This
course is offered for Pass/No Pass
grading only. 162 lab hours.
VNRS 152
Pharmacology I
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): NRS 100.
A beginning course in pharmacology.
Elementary use of drug formulas,
conversions, and dosage forms. Interpreting medical orders, and reading
drug labels by learning common abbreviations; calculating I.V. flow rates
is also included. 18 lecture hours.
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229
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
VNRS 153
Introductory Nutrition for the
Vocational Nurse
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): NRS 100 and
current admission to the
Vocational Nursing program.
This course introduces the fundamentals of nutrition to the nursing student by discussing the relationship of
food and health and the body's utilization of the six essential nutrients.
Content also includes the five basic
food groups, the food guide pyramid,
and how to define and achieve a
well-balanced diet. This course establishes the foundation needed for further study of nutrition in VNRS 163.
18 lecture hours.
VNRS 154
Body Structure and Function for
the Vocational Nurse I
1.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): NRS 100 .
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 150,
VNRS 151L, VNRS 152, VNRS
153, and VNRS 155.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Vocational nursing students will explore the basic facts of human
anatomy and the principals of physiology with selected clinical examples.
27 lecture hours.
VNRS 155
Social-Psychology for the Vocational Nurse
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): NRS 100.
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 150,VNRS
151L and VNRS 152.
This course introduces basic concepts
of psychology while helping students
relate them to their patient and
themselves. It includes information
about personality development, wellness, and personal care, assertiveness, job-related communication,
cultural and spiritual differences, employability skills, the role of the LVN,
general legal aspects and nursing
ethics. 18 lecture hours.
230
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
VNRS 160
Medical-Surgical Nursing I
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 150.
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 161L.
This course presents the theory and
principles of nursing care for clients
with illness and/or injury of the musculoskeletal, integumentary, and gastrointestinal systems. The course
presents the principles and skills
needed to perform a beginning level
assessment of clients with alterations
of these systems, within the scope of
practice of the LVN. The course presents the application of the nursing
process to the planning and care of
these clients. 54 lecture hours.
VNRS 161L
Medical-Surgical Nursing I Lab
3 Units
Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 151L.
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 160.
Clinical application of theoretical concepts of nursing care for clients with
illness and/or injury of the musculoskeletal, integumentary, and gastrointestinal systems. This course is
offered for Pass/No Pass grading only.
162 lab hours.
VNRS 162
Pharmacology II
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 150 ,
VNRS 151L , VNRS 152, VNRS
154 and VNRS 155.
Fundamental principles of drug action, the application of specific drugs
in the treatment of disease, and the
appropriate nursing actions to maximize the desired outcome of therapy.
18 lecture hours.
VNRS 163
Diet Therapy for the Vocational
Nurse
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 153.
This course presents nutritional needs
across the lifespan, including the nutritional needs of healthy adults and
the needs of people with certain illnesses, as well as nutritional needs
related to pregnancy and
lactation. Content includes nutritional
assessment and planning, and the
use of therapeutic diets in the treatment of certain illnesses. This course
builds on the fundamentals of nutrition presented in VNRS 153. 18 lecture hours.
VNRS 164
Body Structure and Function for
the Vocational Nurse II
1.5 Units
Grade Only
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 160.
A continuation of body structure and
function for the vocational nurse with
clinical case studies. 27 lecture hours.
VNRS 165
Adult Growth and Development
for the Vocational Nurse
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 150.
Theoretical principles of growth and
development. Nursing assessment
and promotion of health of the adult
from early adulthood through death.
18 lecture hours.
VNRS 170
Medical-Surgical Nursing II
7 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 160, VNRS
161L, VNRS 162, VNRS 163, and
VNRS 164.
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 171L.
Provide advanced nursing students
the theory needed to perform skills
and procedures for the adult in VNRS
171L. By consistently emphasizing
the nursing process and rationale, the
approach to each body system includes basic assessment or data collection, planning, implementation,
evaluation and documentation. Basic
nursing skills are reinforced while advanced skills include those related to
the following body systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological,
genitourinary, endocrine and special
senses. 126 lecture hours.
VNRS 171L
Medical-Surgical Nursing II Lab
7 Units
Pass/No Pass
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 170 and
VNRS 183.
Clinical application of theoretical concepts of medical-surgical nursing of
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
clients with alterations of respiration,
circulation, blood and immune system, endocrine, special senses, neurological, and genito-urinary
conditions. This course is offered for
Pass/No Pass grading only. 378 lab
hours.
VNRS 172
Advanced Pharmacology
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 162.
Fundamental principles of drug action
and the application of specific drugs
for the treatment of for patients with
alterations of respiration, renal system, circulation, the blood, endocrine
function, neurological function, vision,
and hearing. 36 lecture hours.
VNRS 173
Psychology for Vocational Nurses
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 160.
Co-Requisite(s): VNRS 172.
Mental health care for patients and
their families who are experiencing
the pain of mental disorders. Teaches
the nurse to plan and deliver care
and provide health teaching so that
effective self-care is possible when
discharge occurs. 36 lecture hours.
VNRS 180
Pediatric Nursing
3.5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 160, VNRS
161L, VNRS 162, VNRS 163,
VNRS 164. Also, VNRS 181 or
concurrent enrollment.
This course covers normal and abnormal conditions of the child from infancy through adolescence. It
includes pediatric nursing experience
in a local hospital, day care center,
and/or clinic. 36 lecture hours, 90 lab
hours.
VNRS 181
Growth and Development:
Infancy-Adolescence
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 160.
Basic knowledge of child development and guidelines for use in primary health care settings. 18 lecture
hours.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
VNRS 182
Obstetrical-Gynecological
Nursing
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 160, VNRS
161L, VNRS 162, VNRS 163,
VNRS 164 and VNRS 165.
This course covers obstetrical and gynecological conditions of the female
patient, with clinical experience in a
local community hospital. 36 lecture
hours, 126 lab hours.
VNRS 183
Leadership in Nursing
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): VNRS 160, VNRS
161L. Also, VNRS 170 and/or
VNRS 171L or concurrent
enrollment.
Teaches advanced nursing students
the theory needed to perform skills
and procedures used by nursing team
leaders in a clinical setting. 36 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours.
Office Technology and
Computer Applications
(Technology and Engineering
Department)
The Office Technology and Computer
Applications discipline trains students
in the use of current office applications using state-of-the-art equipment
in preparation for professional careers, transfer study, and/or personal
use. The program provides training
appropriate for entry-level office jobs
and administrative assistant positions; to update students’ work skills
in computers, management, keyboarding and other office related
functions; and employment training in
a broad area of study including
records management, purchasing,
business machine skills, office procedures, filing, word processing, scheduling, business English, publishing,
and business mathematics. Students
may earn skill awards in Information/
File Clerk and General Office Clerk.
Students may earn a certificate of
achievement in Administrative
Office Occupations. Courses satisfy
general education requirements for
an associate degree in Business with
an emphasis in Office Occupations.
Office Technology Courses
OFF 057
Computer Keyboarding
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course introduces touch keyboarding using a computer keyboard
and is open to students with no previous keying experience. 18 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours.
OFF 101
Introduction to Microsoft Office
Applications
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
OFF 057.
Introduction to Windows and
Microsoft Office Suite applications.
Computer applications include word
processing, spreadsheets, database
management, presentation graphics,
scheduling/time management, and
the Internet. 54 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. CSU
OFF 120
Microsoft Excel
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
An Excel worksheets and workbooks
course to include: formatting, calculating sums, formulas, charts, enhancing the worksheet, and making
decisions using the IF function, completing financial functions, data lists,
large workbooks using templates,
using advanced sorting and filtering,
creating charts, diagrams, and templates, creating PivotTable, PivotChart
reports, and auditing worksheets,
using data analysis, solver, and scenario features, using macros, and Visual Basic for applications, external
data, database functions, side-by-side
tables, and collaborating with others
and preparing a workbook for distribution. 54 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU
www.citruscollege.edu
231
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
OFF 215
Introduction to Microsoft
Outlook
2 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
An introduction to a scheduling and
organizing program. Topics include
creating and editing a calendar, contacts, task list, journal, notes, synchronizing personal digital assistant,
and communicating with an electronic
mail system. 36 lecture hours.
OFF 260
Computer Keyboarding and
Document Processing
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course introduces skills and techniques fundamental to touch keyboarding on a microcomputer. This
course also introduces document processing of letters, memorandums, reports and tables and is open to
students with no previous keying experience. 54 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. CSU
OFF 281
Filing and Records Management
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
An overview of records management
which involves practical fundamentals
of records management, basic filing
principles, procedures, and systems.
Emphasis is on non-correspondence
records, information storage, and retrieval systems. Management aspects
of records retention, disposition, and
the operation of a records management program. 54 lecture hours.
OFF 285
Administrative Office Procedures
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This is a course in office procedures
and protocol for the person preparing
for an office career. It emphasizes
continuous self-evaluation and selfdevelopment in the areas of basic office skills, professional responsibilities, communication, and human
relations. 54 lecture hours.
232
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
OFF 294
Microsoft Word
3 Units
Grade Only
Word processing concepts with topics
to include: creating and editing text
and printing office documents such
as, letters from templates, research
papers, resume, mail merge, and
newsletters. Creating mailing labels,
using styles and creating multi-level
lists and charts. Using mark-up tools,
building reusable documents, advance table features, creating mass
mailings, creating standardized forms,
working with long documents, embedding, linking objects using
Macros, and integrating Word with
PowerPoint. This course will also include proofreading and editing skills.
54 lecture hours, 18 lab hours.
Philosophy
(Social Sciences Department)
Philosophy is the study of the nature
of reality, knowledge, and values
through a critical analysis of fundamentalassumptions or beliefs. The
study of logic, ethics, and the history
of philosophy provides a means of
systemizing, assimilating, and evaluating information and the development of philosophical perspective.
The study of philosophy is a valuable
background for students interested in
social or natural sciences, or humanities and particularly in law, theology,
and education. Philosophy courses
satisfy general education requirements for an associate degree, a liberal arts degree with an emphasis in
arts and humanities/philosophy, and
lower division transfer. The Honors
Program includes one philosophy
course: PHIL 106H Introduction to
Philosophy—Honors
Philosophy Courses
PHIL 101
Great Religions of the World
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The historical development, principal
ideas and contributions of the world's
religions. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
PHIL 106
Introduction to Philosophy
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The foundations of philosophy in
terms of modes of critical thinking,
significant philosophical problems,
and a representative sampling of primary philosophical writings. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
PHIL 106H
Introduction to Philosophy Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This is a degree-applicable, introductory level course for honors students.
Students are expected to work and
participate at an honors level, which
includes strong critical thinking skills,
thorough analysis of philosophical
writings, and presentation skills as
demonstrated by leading a seminar
discussion. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
PHIL 108
Philosophy/Ethics
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A critical analysis of concepts of the
good life and of morality as articulated by great philosophers, with the
aim of cultivating awareness of the
importance of a reasoned approach
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
to such questions in one's own life.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
PHIL 110
Philosophy/Logic
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course introducing fundamental
problems and principles of formal and
informal logic, featuring proofs of
validity, deductive and inductive
reasoning, and detection and analysis
of fallacies. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
Photography
(Fine Arts Department)
Prepares students to enter the field of
professional photography with the
ability to become successful business
people and highly valued employees.
Career choices include working as
commercial advertising photographers, corporate photographers,
portrait and wedding photographers,
photographic lab technicians.
PHTO 101
Basic Photography
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Fundamental still photography with
emphasis on planning a photograph,
choice of camera, choice of films and
papers, use of natural and artificial
light, function of lenses and shutters,
and techniques for processing sensitized materials. Also basic computer
skills. Material fee. 36 lecture hours,
90 lab hours. CSU;UC
PHTO 102
Intermediate Photography
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): PHTO 101.
Provides emphasis on lighting, control
of lighting and subject contrast, advanced composition and photographic
print quality. Students will acquire intermediate level digital image processing skills. Material fee. 36 lecture
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
hours, 90 lab hours. CSU;UC
PHTO 103
Advanced Photography
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): PHTO 102.
A study of black and white photographic techniques introducing advanced methods and medium and
large format as applied to commercial
and industrial careers working with
more specialized equipment. Material
fee. 36 lecture hours, 90 lab hours.
CSU
PHTO 125
Photography as an Art Medium
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): PHTO 102.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Develop skills in the use of graphic
arts processes and materials as well
as photo techniques currently used
by professional photographers, commercial artists, fashion illustrators,
cinematographers, and graphic
designers. Material fee. 36 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
PHTO 126
Advanced Photography as an Art
Medium
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): PHTO 125.
A continuation of PHTO 125. This
course provides advanced digital
techniques and wet lab processes.
Utilizing materials relevant to the
photography industry today,
students will create artistic photographic images. Material fee. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
PHTO 202
Photojournalism
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
PHTO 101.
Covers the theory and practice of
news photography. Students will capture digital images of live situations
on campus and in nearby communities. Material fee. 36 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU
PHTO 205
Color Photography
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): PHTO 101.
A course on color photography in the
digital/electronic format. Instruction
includes use of cameras, filters, white
balancing, exposure, lighting equipment, and color analysis for color
printing with digital printers. Material
fee. 36 lecture hours, 90 lab hours.
CSU;UC
PHTO 206
Intermediate Color Photography
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): PHTO 205.
Covers the use of electronic flash
equipment and experimental exposures. Students will print from
scanned negatives, slides and different electronic file types. Assignments
will cover control of color balance,
Kelvin temperature and white balance. Material fee. 36 lecture hours,
90 lab hours. CSU
PHTO 213
Studio & Environmental
Portraiture
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
PHTO 101, PHTO 102 and PHTO
215.
Articulates the principles of taking
portraits indoors and outdoors utilizing various lighting equipment for the
professional photographer. Material
fee. 36 lecture hours, 90 lab hours.
PHTO 215
Digital Photographic Imaging
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended PHTO
101 and PHTO 205.
In this practical hands-on introduction, the fundamental technical and
aesthetic principles of digital photographic processes are addressed, including instruction on DSLR camera
operation, composition, and digital
retouching and manipulation. Instruction also includes Adobe Photoshop
software acquisition techniques and
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233
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
output technologies. Discussion covers contemporary digital imaging and
its application within commercial and
fine arts. Assignments demonstrate
mastery of technical skills and individual creative expression. Helps if student has own DSLR but not required.
36 lecture hours, 90 lab hours.
Physics
(Physical Sciences Department)
Physics, a natural science, is the scientific study of matter and energy
and of the interaction between the
two. Courses in physics satisfy general education requirements for the
associate degree and lower division
transfer and can fulfill some of the
major requirements for the associate
degree in Biological and Physical Sciences and Mathematics.
Physics Courses
PHYS 106
Physical Science for Educators
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 030 or
concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides each prospective
multiple subject teacher with an introductory survey of the fundamental
concepts of chemistry and physics
and the relationships among these
disciplines. Emphasis is placed on the
ways in which chemistry and physics
affect everyday life. This course is
recommended for students planning
to take the CSET Multiple Subject
Exam to become credentialed elementary school teachers in the State
of California. PHYS 106 and CHEM
106 are the same course. 54 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU
PHYS 110
Introduction to College Physics
4 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 030.
234
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
A general physics course for non-majors that explores fundamental principles of the physical world, including
kinematics, Newton's laws of motion,
conservation laws, electromagnetism,
waves, optics and modern physics. 54
lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
PHYS 111
Physics for Life Sciences I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 151 or
concurrent enrollment.
The first in a two-course sequence in
algebra/trigonometry-based physics
including mechanics, energy, matter
and thermodynamics with an emphasis on how these concepts apply to
biological systems. This course is designed for students planning to enter
medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, optometry, forestry, and (4 year) nursing. 54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours.
CSU;UC
PHYS 111C
Physics for Life Sciences I
Calculus Supplement
1 Unit
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 190 or
concurrent enrollment.
Co-Requisite(s): PHYS 111.
Application of calculus to topics covered in PHYS 111. The course is intended for students who require
credit for a calculus-based physics for
life science course. 18 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
PHYS 112
Physics for Life Sciences II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 151.
Strongly Recommended:
PHYS 111.
One of two algebra/trigonometry
based physics courses covering
waves, optics, electromagnetism and
modern physics with an emphasis on
how these concepts apply to biological systems. This course is designed
for students planning to enter medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, optometry,
forestry, and (4 year) nursing. (For
transfer as a calculus-based physics
course, students must take PHYS
112C concurrently.) 54 lecture hours,
54 lab hours. CSU;UC
PHYS 201
Physics A: Mechanics
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 190.
Fundamental principles of mechanics,
vectors, motion, work, energy, momentum, and rotational motion. Required of all majors in engineering,
physics, chemistry, and some geology
and mathematics majors. 72 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
PHYS 202
Physics B: Thermodynamics and
Electromagnetism
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 201 and
MATH 191.
Strongly Recommended: MATH
210 (as a pre- or co-requisite).
Core topics include the laws of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, electrostatics, magnetism, DC and AC
circuits, and Maxwell's equations.
This course is part of a three-semester sequence and is required of all
majors in engineering, physics, chemistry, and some geology and mathematics majors. 72 lecture hours, 54
lab hours. CSU;UC
PHYS 203
Physics C: Waves, Optics &
Modern Physics
5 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 201 and
MATH 191 (or concurrent
enrollment).
Core topics are waves, optics and
modern physics. This course is intended for students majoring in physical sciences and engineering and is
part of a three-semester course. 72
lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Political Science
(Social Sciences Department)
Political science, a social science, is
the study of the processes, principles,
and structure of government and political institutions, and the analysis of
issues that governments face in developing policies in the current domestic and global context. Political
science contributes to an understanding of democracy that equips students
to fulfill the obligations of citizenship.
Political science courses satisfy general education requirements for an associate degree, a liberal arts degree
with an emphasis in social and behavioral sciences/political science, and
lower division transfer requirements.
The Honors Program includes: POLI
103H American Government and Politics - Honors.
Political Science Courses
POLI 103
American Government and
Politics
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course deals with the origins and
functions of the government of the
United States with special emphasis
on the background and causes of
present problems. It meets the
United States Constitution graduation
requirement and includes local and
state government. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
POLI 103H
American Government and
Politics - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course deals with the origins and
functions of the government of the
United States with special emphasis
on the background and causes of
present problems. It meets the
United States Constitution graduation
requirement and includes local and
state government. Students are exCITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
pected to work and participate at an
honors level which includes demonstrating strong critical thinking skills
through analysis of social scientific literature and original research in a
seminar style class format. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
POLI 104
Introduction to Political Science
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to the principles and
practices of government. Political theories and contemporary ideologies;
nature of the state; constitution and
law; public opinion; mass media; the
nature of foreign policy and international politics. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
POLI 105
Comparative Politics
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course to acquaint
students with the types of governmental systems which people establish in their various localities around
the world and the competing values
that tend to result in conflicts between opposing groups of people. An
in-depth analysis of contending political ideologies, electoral procedures,
and governing institutions is the
course's main focus. This course is
structured to provide a regional and
comparative approach to the study of
politics at the global level. 54 lecture
hours. CSU; UC
POLI 116
International Relations
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An examination of basic theories of
international relations and their relevance to contemporary world politics.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
Psychology
(Behavioral Sciences Department)
Psychology is the scientific study of
behavior and cognitive processes.
Using the scientific method, this discipline examines thoughts, emotions,
and behavior from biological and
physiological perspectives. Courses in
psychology satisfy general education
requirements for an associate degree
in liberal arts with an emphasis in social and behavioral sciences, and
lower division transfer. The Honors
Program Includes: PSY 101H - Honors Introduction to Psychology and
PSY 250 Honors Topics Seminar.
Psychology Courses
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The course is an introduction to psychology as an empirical science involving a synthesis of theory and
research within the domains of behavior, cognition and affect. Students
are expected to work and participate
using critical thinking skills, thoughtful analysis/synthesis of readings,
presentations and discussions within
the class environment. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
PSY 101H
Introduction to Psychology Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The course is an introduction to psychology as an empirical science involving a synthesis of theory and
research within the domains of behavior, cognition and affect. Students
are expected to work and participate
at an honors level which includes
demonstrating strong critical thinking
skills through analysis of social scientific literature and original research in
a seminar style class format. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
235
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
PSY 102
Psychobiology
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.
Strongly Recommended: BIOL
104 or BIOL 105 and ENGL 101.
Study of the effects of biology upon
behavior, the relationship between
psychological processes and the nervous system, muscular, and glandular
features of the response mechanism,
and the structure and functions of the
sense organs. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
PSY 103
Statistics for the Social and
Behavioral Sciences
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): MATH 150.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An elementary course in statistical
concepts designed especially for students in the social or behavioral sciences area. The development of basic
skills in descriptive statistics and inferential statistics is stressed.
Reliability and validity problems when
generalizing from samples to population will be considered. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
PSY 110
Psychology of Religion I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course explores the connection
between psychology and religion. It
focuses on how different schools of
psychological thought view and interpret religious concepts and experiences. The major psychological
perspectives that are studied include:
Psychoanalytic theory, Behavioristic
and Humanistic theories. The psychological principles embedded in religion
will be studied. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
236
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
PSY 203
Research Methods in Psychology
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 and PSY
103 or MATH 165.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course in research
methodology designed for students in
the behavioral and social sciences.
The application of basic skills in descriptive and inferential statistics is
stressed, as well as critical analysis of
experimental and non-experimental
research methods in basic and applied research settings. 54 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
PSY 205
Developmental Psychology
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Developmental Psychology is the scientific study of progressive changes
in behavior, cognition, and abilities.
Attention is paid to issues related to
the roles of nature and nurture in developmental processes. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
PSY 206
Child Growth and Development
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course examines major physical,
psychosocial, and cognitive/language
developmental milestones as they
pertain to the various ages and
stages in a child's life from the prenatal development through adolescence. Practices of investigative
research methodologies, care giving,
education, teaching, and parenting
that derive from diverse cultural and
theoretical perspectives will be analyzed. Students will learn to observe
and children, evaluate individual differences and analyze characteristics
of development at various stages. Interactions between maturational and
environmental factors will be explored. 54 lecture hours. CSU
PSY 212
Behavioral Disorders
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides an overview of
the various mental disorders as listed
in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM IV-R)and identifies therapies used in treatment of these
disorders. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
PSY 213
Survey of Drug and Alcohol Use
and Abuse
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This survey course includes drug classification, drug physiology and psychopharmacology, theories of
addiction, history and theories of
treatment, dual diagnosis, drug testing and social policy, recovery and rehabilitation, and other related topics.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
PSY 220
Introduction to Social
Psychology
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to the study of social
psychology emphasizes the nature of
socially determined behavior as seen
in the areas of conformity, propaganda, prejudice, social roles, social
process, social perception, and culturally determined personality. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
PSY 225
Psychology of Human Sexuality
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory survey of the psychological bases and dimensions of
human sexuality with emphasis on
the socio-cultural factors involved in
intimate relating, sexuality, and loving. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
PSY 226
Psychology of Women
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course will examine theory and
research on female development from
birth to death, taking into consideration psychological, sociological and
biological factors. Implications for
personal and social change will be
emphasized through critical analysis
of contemporary gender issues, data
and psychological theory. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
PSY 250
Honors Topics Seminar
0.5 Unit
Grade Only
Co-Requesite(s): Enrollment in
approved course as determined
by honors program.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Seminar is designed to enhance the
learning experience for students enrolled in traditional sections of
courses when an honors section is
not available. Seminar will feature the
additional academic components
needed to achieve honors credit. Instructor/student contact is required.
27 lab hours. CSU
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Public Works
(Public Services Department)
Public Works, a career technical program, provides training for entry-level
employment or advancement in public works occupations. Job opportunities include public works maintenance
worker, arborist, and landscape or
park management worker. Upon completion of the courses in this discipline as well as the general education
requirements, students may earn an
associate degree in Public Works.
Students may also earn certificates of
achievement in Public Works I or
Public Works II.
Public Works Courses
PUB 150
Public Works I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Basic course in street maintenance
covering the materials utilized; a review of equipment and techniques
used in their applications. Other subjects include street tree programs,
street painting and signs programs,
street sweeping, weed control, watershed management, and other related
subjects. 54 lecture hours.
PUB 151
Street Construction and
Maintenance
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
PUB 150.
A course in street maintenance covering materials and methods, with emphasis on preventive maintenance of
asphaltic and Portland Cement concrete pavements. Specifications,
records and cost accounting systems,
as well as revenue sources and
budget preparation, will be reviewed.
Other subjects include safety,
drainage, equipment records and
specifications, review of watershed
management, and public relations.
Codes which pertain to improvements
and repair will be reviewed. 54 lecture hours.
PUB 154
Soils - Trenching and Grading
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The course will cover the technology
of soils as they are used in public
works construction. This technology
includes the identification and classification of soils, soil testing, and the
application of these tests in the construction, maintenance, trenching and
grading operations of public works
projects. 54 lecture hours.
PUB 155
Public Works Inspection
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A comprehensive course in public
works inspection, including Portland
cement concrete, asphaltic concrete,
soils, base and subgrade materials.
Contracts and specifications and
plans will be discussed. Utilities, including underground water, sewer
and storm drains will be covered,
with emphasis on the safety aspects
of trenching, tunneling and jacking.
Responsibilities of the contractor, the
engineer, the inspector and the owner
will be included. Surveying and staking will be reviewed. Prime consideration will be given to inspection
records, duties and job diary techniques. 54 lecture hours.
PUB 156
Concrete Structures and
Inspection
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
MATH 115 or higher.
An advanced course in public works
inspection covering Portland cement
concrete culvert and bridge construction beginning with the field work of
www.citruscollege.edu
237
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
site preparation, structural excavation, concrete footings, "false-work"
structures, structural and reinforcing
steel, and concrete placement. Prime
considerations will be given to inspection reporting, records, and new advances in technology. 54 lecture
hours.
PUB 157
Asphalt and Portland Cement
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A comprehensive course in asphaltic
concrete and Portland Cement concrete construction technology following the standards of the Asphalt
Institute, standard specifications for
public works construction, American
Concrete Institute and the Portland
Cement Association. Included will be
design production, placement, consolidation and compaction of the materials. Evaluation of surface defects,
maintenance and safety will be covered. 54 lecture hours.
PUB 158
Municipal and Urban Tree Care
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course in tree care for persons
working in public works or private industry: tree anatomy, physiology,
pruning, cabling, identification, root
structure and its effects on infrastructure, soil management and irrigation.
The course is designed to prepare
students to pass the Tree Worker Certification exam given by Western
Chapter, International Society of Arboriculture. WCISA contact hours
available upon successful completion.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
PUB 159
Urban Forest Management
Planning
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
Successful completion of one or
more Public Works classes.
238
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
This course will guide students in developing an urban forest management plan. It is intended for those
who manage populations of trees:
municipalities, golf courses, educational institutions, public gardens,
and property managers. Plans will be
based on interdisciplinary activities
that influence and are related to
urban forest activities. Students will
create a ready-to-use management
plan and receive peer review. 54 lecture hours. CSU
PUB 160
Public Administration
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A basic course covering the overview
of local government functions; development of the role of public works;
the constraints of operation; techniques of administration in planning,
finance, and personnel; the traditional model of public works organization and new advances in technology.
54 lecture hours.
PUB 161
California Occupational Safety
and Health
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course covering California Occupational Safety and Health standards
and the National Occupational Safety
and Health Act of 1970 as applied to
public works. The safety standards
for excavations, trenches, tunnels,
rock drilling, construction and hauling
equipment, flammable vapors, and
toxic substances. 54 lecture hours.
PUB 162
Traffic Control Standards, Practices, and Policies
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course provides a greater aware-
ness and appreciation of the unique
design, installation, and maintenance
techniques required for the proper
control and regulation of traffic according to the Manual on Uniform
Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD).
Course is intended for public works
personnel. 54 lecture hours.
PUB 164
Plan Interpretation and Cost
Estimating
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course in developing the ability to
read and interpret plans and estimate
time, material, labor and equipment
needed for public works projects. 54
lecture hours.
PUB 165
Environmental Management in
Public Works
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
PUB 150.
This course is an overview of environmental issues in Public Works. Topics
include water quality, watershed
management, integrated waste management, air pollution control, regulatory compliance, sustainability, and
related issues. 54 lecture hours. CSU
PUB 166
Supervision in Public Works
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
ENGL 099 or READ 099 if
required by English placement
exam or if required by English
level.
Fundamentals of supervision focusing
on the public works industry. Topics
to be covered include communications, employee orientation and training, motivating employees, decision
making, performance appraisal writing, and disciplinary action. 54 lecture
hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Reading & College
Preparation
(Language Arts Department)
Reading courses facilitate the development of students’ critical and analytical thinking skills in reading and
comprehending college-level texts.
Courses are offered at the developmental, non-degree-applicable level
and college-level. Courses are also
taught within learning communities.
READ 099 Reading Skills satisfies the
associate degree reading competency
requirement and is strongly recommended for virtually all transfer
courses. Reading is one of the three
core measurements for assessment
and placement.
Reading Courses
READ 019
Literacy Skills
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This course is designed for students
who need a non-competitive environment to develop basic literacy skills
including decoding, vocabulary acquisition, and literal comprehension. 54
lecture hours.
READ 040
Basic Reading Skills
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): READ 019 or
placement based on multiple
measure assessment.
Development of basic reading strategies which focus on word analysis,
vocabulary development, ability to respond orally and in writing to materials read independently from a variety
of textual complexities, patterns, and
forms including reference, informational, persuasive and literary genres.
Designed primarily for students
preparing for READ 099. NOTE: THE
UNITS EARNED FOR THIS COURSE
MAY NOT BE APPLIED TOWARD THE
60 UNITS FOR GRADUATION 54 lecture hours.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
READ 099
Reading Skills
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): READ 040 or ESL
054 and/or placement at the
READ 099 level as defined by the
College and/or successful
completion with a C or better in
ESL 054, as a result of previous
Accuplacer placement in ESL.
An introduction to the fundamental
techniques of college reading designed to develop student's literal and
inferential comprehension while extending critical reading/thinking skills.
This course meets the graduation
reading competency requirement.
Placement based on multiple measure
assessment as defined by the
College, successful completion of
READ 040, or successful completion
of ESL 054. 54 lecture hours.
READ 120
College Reading
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): READ 099
or placement based on multiple
measures.
This course develops students' literal,
interpretive, and critical comprehension skills; expands their critical reading and analysis skills; increases their
reading speed. 54 lecture hours. CSU
Real Estate
(Business Department)
The Real Estate Program encompasses an area of study which includes real estate principles,
pre-license, finance, legal aspects,
appraisal, practice, property management, escrow, and investment
analysis. The Real Estate Program
within the Citrus College Business Department prepares students for professional careers and offers courses
that are transferable for credit to four
year colleges and universities. The
program combines classroom lectures, demonstrations, and individual
hands-on training in work-experience
settings. The faculty works closely
with various industry sectors and professional organizations.
Real Estate Course
REAL 210
Real Estate Principles
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A basic course for those who plan to
enter the real estate field vocationally
or who desire a background in the
subject. Topics include: economics,
history, financing, deeds, leases, and
partial preparation for California Real
Estate Salesperson License Examination. 54 lecture hours. CSU
Recording Technology
(Fine Arts Department)
This is a one-year audio recording
program intended to teach you the
basics of how to engineer any kind of
music, from hip-hop to classical to
movie scenes.
Recording Technology
Courses
REC 100
Survey of Entertainment
Technology
4 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is an introduction to conventional and online entertainment
technology. Includes exploring the
content and creation of recorded
music, television, radio, live
theatre, film, video and electronic
gaming: lecture, demonstration, field
trips and guest professionals; media
creation. 72 lecture hours. CSU
REC 102
Record Production Basics
4 Units
Grade Only
This is a course in the study and implementation of production techniques for the music industry.
Students will develop a selected project from an initial concept to a finished product. 36 lecture hours, 108
lab hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
239
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
REC 103
Introduction to Audio
Engineering
4 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course is an introduction to the
current technology, terminology and
techniques used in audio engineering
for recorded music, video and online
media. Includes the history of audio,
basic audio electronics, microphones,
consoles, computer-based production
systems and related signal processors. 54 lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CSU
REC 105
Fundamentals of Audio
Technology
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): REC 100,
REC 103 and REC 140.
This course is an introduction to
audio technologies and recording
techniques. Units include computer
basics for audio production, the production console, microphones, digital
recording systems, signal processing,
and studio techniques. 54 lecture
hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
REC 115
Recording Studio Workshop I
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): REC 100,
REC 103 and REC 140.
This applied workshop course provides an introduction to basic audio
hardware, software and recording
techniques. Units include digital audio
workstation set-up and operation,
basic microphone techniques, software and hardware-based recording
and mixing. 54 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU
REC 125
Digital Audio Technology I
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): REC 100,
REC 103 and REC 140.
Strongly Recommended: SPCH
100 or have passed a multiple
measures skills assessment.
240
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
This course is the study and implementation of MIDI technology in the
audio recording industry. The course
covers standard software sequencers,
controllers, modules, soft-synths and
applications of the technology in the
industry. 54 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. CSU
REC 135
Live Sound Reinforcement
4 Units
Grade Only
Co-Requisite(s): REC 105 or
THEA 120.
This course focuses on the basic elements of sound reinforcement:
acoustics, equalization, microphone
placement, and mixing techniques.
The major emphasis is on the
acoustics, speaker and microphone
placement and the effects on the final
sonic product. 54 lecture hours, 72
lab hours. CSU
REC 140
Music Theory for Engineers
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course in music theory for the Recording Technology
major. A study of the elements of
music including melody, rhythm,
chords, musical forms, and related
concepts. Music notation, terminology, rehearsal techniques and score
reading is emphasized. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
REC 145
Critical Listening Skills for
Engineers
3 Units
Grade Only
Have passed a Multiple Measures
Skills assessment.
Prerequisite(s): REC 100,
REC 103 and REC 140 or have
passed multiple measures skills
assessment.
Co-Requisite(s): REC 105,
REC 115, REC 125 and REC 135.
A course in aural skills development
for recording engineers. This class
will focus on music, acoustic and
electronic timbres, general instrument
ranges and sonic properties, blend,
balance, equalization, panning, reverb, compression, limiting and other
tools used in the recording process.
54 lecture hours.
REC 205
Advanced Audio Technology
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): REC 105,
REC 115, REC 125, REC 135 and
REC 145.
Co-Requisite(s): REC 215,
REC 225, REC 235 and REC 245.
This course is an advanced study of
new technologies and techniques in
multi-track recording, editing and
mixing, as well as surround recording
and mixing for post-production. 54
lecture hours, 72 lab hours. CSU
REC 215
Recording Studio Workshop II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): REC 105,
REC 115, REC 125, REC 135 and
REC 145.
Co-Requisite(s): REC 205,
REC 225, REC 235 and REC 245.
This course is a project-based course
intended to solidify the core principles
of audio. Projects will include recording, mixing and mastering, post-production and surround mixing
techniques. 54 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU
REC 225
Digital Audio Technology II
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): REC 105,
REC 115, REC 125, REC 135 and
REC 145.
Co-Requisite(s): REC 205,
REC 215, REC 235 and REC 245.
This course focuses on the detailed
workings of digital audio as a whole,
and specifically on the ProTools platform. This is a detailed class in all aspects of digital audio inclusive of
tracking, mixing, repair techniques,
and plug-ins. 54 lecture hours, 72 lab
hours. CSU
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
REC 235
Acoustics for Engineers
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): REC 105,
REC 115, REC 125, REC 135 and
REC 145.
Co-Requisite(s): REC 205,
REC 215, REC 225 and REC 245.
This course is a study of Acoustics
principles and the physics of sound. It
includes sound propagation, hearing
and sound perception, room resonances, acoustic calculations, studio
design and acoustical treatments. 54
lecture hours.
REC 245
Music Business/Audio Careers
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): REC 105,
REC 115, REC 125, REC 135 and
REC 145.
Co-Requisite(s): REC 205,
REC 215, REC 225 and REC 235.
This is a survey focusing on the practices and procedures of record companies, publishing companies,
performing rights societies and
unions. The course will also study the
processes of record and film production as well as career opportunities in
these fields. Also includes an introduction to further courses of study in
a targeted audio field. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
REC 255
Advanced Live Sound
Reinforcement
4 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): REC 135.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course focuses on advanced concepts in sound reinforcement; advanced mixing skills, system
maintenance and troubleshooting,
sound system design for different
types of venues, audio editing for live
applications and live recording. 54
lecture hours, 72 lab hours.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Sociology
(Social Sciences Department)
Sociology is the systematic study of
social interactions and societies. Sociologists examine group structure, social relationships, and how social
processes shape human behavior.
Courses in sociology satisfy general
education requirements for the associate degree, a degree in liberal arts
with an emphasis in social and behavioral sciences, and lower division
transfer. The Honors Program includes two sociology courses: SOC
201H Introduction to Sociology –
Honors and SOC 218H Presentation
Seminar – Honors. Program offers a
transfer degree.
SOC 114
Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relations
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A consideration of the sociological
and psychological factors which influence present day marriages and relationships. Course includes seminar
discussions oriented toward understanding these influences as they relate to the individual. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
SOC 118
Minorities in America
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This course gives an overview of the
psychological, social, economic, and
political aspects of minority groups in
contemporary American culture. It
will emphasize the relationships between these groups and the dominant culture. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
SOC 201
Introduction to Sociology
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Emphasis is placed on the study of
the basic structure of human society,
the main forces that hold groups together or weaken them, as well as
conditions that transform social life,
and basic social concepts. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
SOC 201H
Introduction to Sociology Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Must
be a member in good standing of
the Citrus College Honors
Program or recommendation
from an Honors instructor.
Emphasis is placed on the study of
the basic structure of human society,
the main forces that hold groups together or weaken them, as well as
conditions that transform social life,
and basic social concepts. Students
are expected to work and participate
at an honors level which includes
strong critical thinking skills, thorough
analysis of sociological readings,
presentation, and leadership skills
demonstrated through class participation/presentation, and service learning in the community. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
SOC 202
Contemporary Social Problems
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Emphasis is placed on American society and social problems. Special attention is given to the causes and
effects of social problems. Course
content includes research, field observation studies, seminar discussion
with special resource professionals.
College level reading is strongly rec-
www.citruscollege.edu
241
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ommended for success in the course.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
Spanish
(Foreign Language Department)
SOC 216
Sex and Gender in a Cross
Cultural Perspective
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
ANTH 210 or SOC 201.
A cross-cultural look at different
groups' ideas of sex and gender. The
course will focus on attitudes, beliefs,
and socialization techniques. Theories
behind the formation of gender will
be explored. Both Anthropological
and Sociological terms and concepts
will be utilized for a cross disciplinary
approach. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
The Foreign Languages Department
offers proficiency-based instruction in
listening, speaking, reading, and writing in these languages: Spanish, German, Chinese, and Japanese. The
study of each language includes vocabulary, grammar, syntax, pronunciation, and cultural and historical
understanding. Intermediate level
courses include a literature component. Courses combine classroom lectures, guided practice, and language
activities with individual work conducted online.
SOC 218H
Honors Presentation Seminar
1 Unit
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Must
be a member in good standing of
the Citrus College Honors
Program or recommendation
from an Honors instructor.
A course designed to help honors students further their research skills,
professional presentation skills, and
to promote transfer. Research topics
from previous honors classes will be
enhanced with further research and
presented in a professional manner in
class. Materials will also be submitted
to local honors conferences for presentation to peers. Honors students
should be in good standing and must
be recommended by an honors professor. 18 lecture hours. CSU
242
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Spanish Courses
SPAN 101
Spanish I
5 Units
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course in elementary Spanish
grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation which focuses on understanding,
speaking, reading, and writing (including spelling) simple Spanish and
serves as an introduction to the geography, history, and culture of the
Spanish-speaking world. 90 lecture
hours, CSU;UC
SPAN 102
Spanish II
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 101 or
two years of high school
Spanish.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A further study of elementary Spanish
grammar and vocabulary that develops understanding, speaking, reading
and writing (including spelling) skills.
Affords opportunities to apply communication skills to new social, professional, and travel contexts.
Explores the cultural heritage and
civilization of Spain and Latin America
through technology and level-appropriate readings. The class will be
taught primarily in Spanish. 90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
SPAN 127
Spanish Civilization
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Spanish Civilization provides an interdisciplinary global understanding of
the culture and history of Spain. The
course critically analyzes contemporary Spanish society by examining the
social and historical traditions and institutions that shape the Spanish way
of life in the 20th century. SPAN 127
and HIST 127 are the same course.
54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
SPAN 130
Latin American Culture and
Civilization
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Latin American Culture and Civilization is a survey course providing an
interdisciplinary approach to understanding the culture and history of
Latin America. The course critically
analyzes historical and contemporary
social traditions and institutions in
order to reach an understanding of
modern day Latin America. 54 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
SPAN 141
Intermediate Conversational
Spanish
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 102 or
two years of high school
Spanish.
This course is designed for students
who wish to further improve their oral
proficiency in Spanish. 54 lecture
hours. CSU
SPAN 201
Spanish III
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
fluency in Spanish or completion
of SPAN 102.
This intermediate level course was
created with both native Spanish
speakers and students studying Span-
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ish as a second language in mind.
Current social themes and vocabulary
support a comprehensive review of
Spanish grammar. The discussion
of contemporary cultural topics, the
reading of authentic texts, and the
development of writing skills are all
features of this class that help all intermediate Spanish students to refine
and enjoy using their language skills.
Class is conducted primarily in Spanish. Note that Spanish 3 and 4 do not
need to be taken in order. 90 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
SPAN 202
Spanish IV
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
fluency in Spanish or completion
of SPAN 102.
This intermediate level course, which
may be taken before or after Spanish
3, was designed for both native Spanish speakers and students studying
Spanish as a second language. Contemporary cultural topics and vocabulary will provide a context for the study
of higher level Spanish grammar.
Meaningful readings and the refinement of writing skills will help students
to further develop their cultural and
linguistic competence. This interactive
course is conducted primarily in Spanish. 90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
SPAN 210
Intermediate Spanish for
Speakers
of Spanish
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Oral fluency in
Spanish.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course designed to help students
who are fluent in spoken, informal
Spanish, but who need to improve
writing, reading and grammar skills.
Emphasis on acquiring formal oral
Spanish skills and a knowledge of
Spanish and Latin American literature
and culture. Equivalent to SPAN 201.
90 lecture hours. CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
SPAN 211
Reading and Composition for
Speakers of Spanish II
5 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
fluency in Spanish or completion
of SPAN 210.
A course for students who are fluent
speakers of Spanish but who need to
practice and refine their writing skills
and formal oral skills. Reading in the
literature of Spanish-speaking cultures. Review of grammar. 90 lecture
hours. CSU;UC
Speech Courses
(See Also Communications)
SPCH 100
Interpersonal Communication
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Introduction to interpersonal communication: verbal and non-verbal faceto-face interactions; understanding
messages sent and received; awareness and resolutions of communication barriers. 54 lecture hours. CSU
SPCH 101
Public Address
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introductory course in speaking
skills, including the selection, preparation, and delivery of speeches for
various audiences and situations. The
goal will be the achievement of ethical, purposeful, and effective public
speaking. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
SPCH 101H
Public Address - Honors
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
This is an honors introductory course
in public speaking skills, including research, reasoning, organization, composition, presentation, and evaluation
of informative and persuasive
speeches for various audiences and
situations. The goal will be the
achievement of ethical, purposeful,
and effective public speaking. Students are expected to work and participate at an honors level which
includes strong critical thinking skills,
thorough analysis of readings, presentation and leadership skills demonstrated through class participation/
presentation, and service learning in
the community. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
SPCH 103
Argumentation and Debate
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Basic theories, principles, and methods for various levels and forms of argumentation and debate. Preparation
and presentation of practice debates
on current issues. 54 lecture hours.
CSU;UC
SPCH 106
Small Group Communication
3 UnitsGrade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Principles, techniques, and uses of
discussion in contemporary society.
Training and practice in informal
group discussion, panel discussion,
symposium and forum. Emphasis on
collaborative decision-making. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
243
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Theatre Arts
(Performing Arts Department)
The discipline of theatre arts includes
theoretical and practical courses in all
aspects of theatre, providing preparation in acting, directing, and technical
theatre through productions. Students take courses to prepare for
transfer and/or for professional training. Performance and technical theatre opportunities are available to
both majors and non-majors. Courses
satisfy general educations requirements for the associate degree,
pending Chancellor’s Office approval,
in theatre arts, theatre arts with an
acting emphasis, and theatre arts
with a technical and design emphasis,
and an associate degree in liberal arts
with an emphasis in arts and humanities, and lower division transfer.
Important Information About
Theatre Arts Courses
Theatre arts courses are now
grouped together as course “families.” Students are allowed to take
only four courses from each “family.”
All grades received, including F, WD,
and NC grades count towards the
four courses.
The Theatre Arts course families are
listed as follows. New courses are in
blue.
TECHNIQUE
Theatre 104 – Voice and Movement
for the Actor
Theatre 201 – Stage Acting I
Beginning
Theatre 202 – Stage Acting II
Intermediate
Theatre 205 – Stage Acting III –
Intermediate/Advanced
Theatre 206 – Stage Acting IV –
Advanced
ACTING – Styles
Theatre 284 – Acting Shakespeare
Theatre 292 – Special Techniques in
Acting
FILM AND TELEVISION
Theatre 211A – Camera Acting I –
Beginning
Theatre 211B Camera Acting II –
Intermediate
Theatre 211C Camera Acting III –
Intermediate/Advanced
244
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Theatre 211D Camera Acting IV –
Advanced
DIRECTING
Theatre 241 – Fundamentals of Stage
Directing
WRITING FOR STAGE AND
SCREEN
Theatre 204 – Stage and
Screenwriting
THEATRE PRODUCTION
Theatre 210 – Rehearsal and
Performance in Production
(May be repeated)
EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE
Theatre 220 – Rehearsal and
Performance II
Theatre 221 – Theatre
Practicum/Special Projects I –
Storytelling
Theatre 222 – Theatre
Practicum/Special Projects II –
Physical Life
Theatre 294 – Shakespeare in
Production
TOURING AND REPERTORY
Theatre 250 – Theatre Appreciation
Theatre 290 – Citrus Theatre
Academy
Theatre 293 – Theatre for Young
Audiences
Theatre Arts Classes
THEA 101
Introduction to Theatre Arts
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Background and foundation for appreciation and evaluation of theatre
arts. Course will include a study of
dramatic structure, history of the theatre, plays and playwrights, and a
study of contemporary theatre production. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
THEA 104
Voice and Movement for the
Actor
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
THEA 201 or concurrent
enrollment.
A course in vocal anatomy, physiology, and phonetics as well as the exploration of how the voice and body
work. Designed to develop the actor's
awareness, relaxation, flexibility, and
responsiveness in order to communicate openly and expressively. 54 lecture hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 120
Introduction to Tech for Theatre,
TV and Film
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to the technical areas
of lighting, scenery, sound and costumes for theatre, film and television.
Field trips include area theatres and
studios. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
THEA 122
Stagecraft
3 Units
Grade Only
Co-Requisite(s): THEA 120.
Planning and constructing stage and
television scenery. Use of tools and
stage equipment. Work in the scenic lab
for department productions is required.
54 lecture hours, 18 lab hours. CSU
THEA 125
Technical Theatre Production
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A course in which students will gain
practical experience while participating in a variety of productions in any
of the following: construction crew,
scenery crew, properties crew, costume crew, lighting crew, sound crew,
or running crew. 36 lecture hours, 54
lab hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
THEA 130
Introduction to Theatrical
Scenery
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
THEA 120.
A study of the equipment, processes
and techniques used in planning and
executing scenery for the stage. 36
lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 140
Introduction to Lighting for
Theatre, Television and Film
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): THEA 120 or
concurrent enrollment.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A visual survey through field trips,
lecture, video and computer of lighting design for theatre, television, film
and concerts. 54 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours. CSU;UC
THEA 145
Anatomy of Intelligent Lighting
Instruments
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): THEA 120 and
THEA 140.
The study, dissection and manipulation of intelligent lighting instruments
and their use in various aspects of
the entertainment field 54 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours.
THEA 150
Introduction to Intelligent
Lighting Consoles
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): THEA 120, THEA
125 and THEA 140.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The study, manipulation and application of intelligent lighting consoles
and their use in various aspects of
the entertainment field. 54 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours. UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
THEA 160
Computer Aided Design for
Theatre
4 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
THEA 120 and THEA 130.
Entertainment design and technical
production with an emphasis on the
computer as a design and drafting
tool. Applications include Vectorworks
and Sketch-up. 54 lecture hours, 54
lab hours. CSU
THEA 200
The Art of the Theatre
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Introduction to theatre as an art form
involving the inter-related processes
of all elements of theatre with the
primary focus being on script analysis. Includes the study of plays
throughout history with emphasis on
dramatic analysis and cultural significance. 54 lecture hours. CSU;UC
THEA 201
Stage Acting I - Beginning
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A beginning level performance class
with an introduction to the
Stanislavski Method of Acting. Provides a beginning in memorization,
stage movement, vocal production
and interpretation of text. 54 lecture
hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 202
Stage Acting II - Intermediate
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): THEA 201 or
Audition.
An extension of the concepts as introduced in THEA 201. A more in-depth
approach to contemporary theatre
using the Stanislavski method as well
as other methods of acting in charac-
ter and scene study and analysis.
Students may perform in an Acting
Showcase at semester's end. 54 lecture hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 204
Stage and Screenwriting
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
ENGL 101.
Beginning playwrights and screenwriters discover the basic craft of creating scripts for stage, screen, and
television. The class will concentrate
on current work and/or ideas and examples will be drawn from scripts,
videos, and films that have shaped
our modern consciousness. 54 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours. CSU
THEA 205
Stage Acting III Intermediate/Advanced
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): THEA 202.
An extension of the concepts as introduced in Thea 201 and 202. Creating
roles through intensive scene and
monologue study. Approaches to individual actor problems. Students may
perform in an Acting Showcase at semester's end. 54 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. CSU;UC
THEA 206
Stage Acting IV - Advanced
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): THEA 205.
An extension of the concepts as introduced in Thea 201, 202 and 205. A
more detailed breakdown of the basic
concepts in the Stanislavski System.
A focus on creating more nuanced
characterizations. Students will perform in an Acting Showcase at semester's end. 54 lecture hours, 36 lab
hours. UC;CSU
THEA 210
Rehearsal and Performance in
Production
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Participation in the production of a
full length play for public performance. Productions will be entered into
the American College Theatre Festival
www.citruscollege.edu
245
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
for adjudication and competition. This
course may be taken four times. 18
lecture hours, 108 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 211A
Camera Acting I - Beginning
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The practice and study of the fundamental techniques required in acting
before the camera in film and television in contrast to the variance from
stage work. Students will address
areas of non-verbal imagination work
and movement for the camera; the
structure of film and television settings; marketing strategies; "green
screen" performance and improvisation techniques. 54 lecture hours, 36
lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 211B
Camera Acting II - Intermediate
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): THEA 211A.
A more detailed study of the fundamental techniques required in acting
before the camera in film and television in contrast to the variance from
stage work. Students will address
areas of scripted monologues, blocking, memorization, basic audition
techniques, Voice Overs, ADR techniques and the concept of Continuity.
54 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
THEA 211C
Camera Acting III Intermediate/Advanced
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): THEA 211B.
A build upon the skills developed in
content introduced in Camera Acting
I and II. A more intense and comprehensive introduction to specific performance, terminology, working in
studio and on location front-of-camera experience. Skills addressed are
given circumstances, casting/director
workshops, and the division of labor
on television and film sets 54 lecture
hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
246
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
THEA 211D
Camera Acting IV - Advanced
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): THEA 211C.
A build upon the skills developed in
content introduced in Camera Acting
I, II and III. An introduction to multicamera situations - soap opera, sitcom and film. Group projects
coordinating all the elements in a film
and/or television setting. 54 lecture
hours, 36 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 240
Introduction to Live Video
Event Production
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): THEA 120, THEA
125, THEA 140 and REC 135.
An introduction into multi-imaging;
digital camera systems; high power
video projection from LED scenic
video and large screen displays to
content delivery systems. 54 lecture
hours, 18 lab hours.
THEA 220
Rehearsal and Performance II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): THEA 210.
Continued and more in-depth participation in the production of full-length
play for public performance. 18 lecture hours, 108 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 241
Fundamentals of Stage Direction
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A study of the director's approach to
play analysis, casting, and rehearsal
technique leading to a performance.
Students will receive practical experience in directing short scenes. 36 lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 221
Theatre Practicum/Special
Projects I - Storytelling
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Methods and techniques of storytelling using a variety of scripted
material to enhance and enrich
characterization 18 lecture hours,
108 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 222
Theatre Practicum/Special
Projects II - Physical Life
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Developing the actor's free and responsive body through character
study. A personal in-depth approach
to creating character from the external to the internal through improvisation and physical exercises. 18 lecture
hours, 108 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 245
Stage and Project Management
for Theatre, TV and Film
3 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): THEA 120, THEA
122 , THEA 125 and THEA 140.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A survey of stage management and
project management exploring the relationship between the artistry and
the execution of show production in
the entertainment industry. 36 lecture
hours, 54 lab hours. CSU
THEA 250
Theatre Appreciation
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to methods of evaluating theatre in performance. Students will view and critique at least
five off-campus plays per semester.
Transportation may be provided. 36
lecture hours, 54 lab hours. CSU;UC
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
THEA 255
Entertainment Production for
Theme Parks and Themed
Environments
2 Units
Grade Only
Prerequisite(s): THEA 120, THEA
122, THEA 125 and THEA 140.
An in-depth look at how to produce
and execute themed entertainment
for corporate events/shows and other
non-traditional theatrical venues. 36
lecture hours, 9 lab hours.
THEA 260
Introduction to Show Production
Systems
3 Units
Grade Only
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
The study of show production systems. The function and inter-relation
of complete entertainment staging
systems in a single environment including: physical staging systems,
projection systems, truss systems,
lighting rig, sound rig, computer and
show control methods and rigging,
power and distribution, crew and performer safety and access, trouble
shooting and maintenance. Includes
a study of the technical and design
challenges posed by a variety of venues including, theatre, theme parks,
exhibit and trade shows, conventions,
and cruise lines. College level reading
strongly recommended. 54 lecture
hours, 36 lab hours. CSU
THEA 284
Acting Shakespeare
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An exploration of Shakespeare's plays
and poetry through scene study,
monologues, rehearsal, and performance. This course aims to introduce a
process and technique for analyzing
play scripts and poetry for performance. 54 lecture hours, 36 lab hours.
CSU;UC
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
THEA 290
Citrus Theatre Academy
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Prerequisite(s): Audition.
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Preparation, rehearsal and public performance of college sponsored productions in an organized summer
theatre company. This course provides continuing development of acting, technical theatre and design
skills for Citrus students. When appropriate, students have opportunities to work with outside
professionals and learn the skills of
an understudy. Participants selected
by application and audition. 18 lecture hours, 108 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 292
Special Techniques in Acting
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
Students will critically examine the
Stanislavski Method of Acting and
how it pertains to various acting
styles. Examining stylized scenes and
monologues from World Theatre will
teach the student how the Method
can be utilized in acting genres other
than contemporary realism. 54 lecture hours, 18 lab hours. CSU;UC
THEA 293
Theatre for Young Audiences
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
An introduction to theatre for child
audiences. Students are required to
participate in a theatrical production
for young audiences and lead children
in creative dramatics. May include
workshops. Along with on campus
performances, may include a tour of
a production. In-class and out-ofclass rehearsals may be necessary to
complete production. 54 lecture
hours, 36 lab hours. CSU
THEA 294
Shakespeare in Production
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level. Also,
THEA 284.
Translating the Shakespearean text
into an hour long performance adaptation. Students are required to participate in a theatrical production of a
Shakespearean play for middle and
high school students as well as public
performance. In-class and out-ofclass rehearsals may be necessary in
order to complete production. 54 lecture hours, 42 lab hours. CSU
Water Technology
(Public Services Department)
Water Technology, a career technical
program, prepares students for entrylevel employment or advancement in
the public water sector, including the
distribution and treatment of water.
The courses prepare students to take
Department of Public Health certification examinations to qualify as a
Water Treatment Operator or a Water
Distribution Operator. The program
also sponsors an annual one-day
seminar with multiple fee based
workshops to provide workers
throughout southern California with
required updated professional development in water technology and to
maintain their certifications. Courses
in this discipline lead to either an associate degree in Water Technology
or a certificate of achievement in
Water Technology.
Water Technology Courses
WATR 150
Introduction to Water Systems
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 or READ 099 if required by
English placement exam or if
required by English level.
A basic course in water distribution
and treatment covering water quality
control practices, water sources, public health aspects of water regulations, supply, water treatment
www.citruscollege.edu
247
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
arithmetic, chemical treatment, filtration, corrosion, disinfection, tastes
and odors in water, water system operation and maintenance, valves,
pipes, pumps, and meters. The material covered in this course will be
helpful to those preparing for the D-1
and D-2 Water Distribution Operator's
Certificate examinations and the T-1
Water Treatment Operator's Certificate examination given by the State
of California. 54 lecture hours.
WATR 151
Water Resources and
Distribution I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
WATR 150 and MATH 030.
A course designed for water distribution systems operators. This course
continues WATR 150. Topics include:
water production, types of reservoirs,
water lines, pumps, water chemistry,
water treatment, arithmetic, chemical
treatment, appurtenances, method of
installation, repair of facilities, back
up theory, and administrative functions behind the distribution system.
This course prepares the student for
the D2 and D3 Water Distribution Operator's examinations. 54 lecture
hours.
WATR 153
Water Resources and
Distribution II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: WATR
150, WATR 151 and MATH 030.
A course in practical water supply hydraulics with emphasis on the basic
principles of hydraulics. The purpose
of the course is to clarify pressure,
head, buoyancy, friction loss, forces,
velocity of flow and size capacity relationship of distribution systems. The
course includes the study of pump
characteristics, sizing of pumps,
water chemistry, water treatment,
arithmetic, chemical treatment, and
efficiency test procedures.
248
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
WATR 155
Water Distribution Operator
Exam Preparation
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
WATR 150 or possession of a D-1
Distribution Operator
Certification.
A course in drinking water distribution
designed as a review for water distribution operators preparing to take
the California Department of Public
Health D2 or D3 examinations. 18
lecture hours.
WATR 156
Water Treatment I
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
WATR 150 and MATH 030.
Course covering water resources,
water quality, unit operations of water
treatment, public health requirements, and the basics of water chemistry and aquatic microbiology.
Prepares students for the T1, T2, and
T3 Water Treatment Operator's Certificate examinations given by the
State of California. 54 lecture hours.
WATR 157
Water Treatment II
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
WATR 156.
A course covering water resources,
water quality, unit operations of advanced water treatment systems,
public health, water chemistry and
microbiology, and fluoridation. Prepares students for T3, T4, and T5
Water Treatment Operator's Certificate examinations required by the
California Department of Public
Health. 54 lecture hours.
WATR 162
Water Conservation
3 Units
Grade or Pass/No Pass
This class provides an overview and
technical information on the role of
the water conservation coordinator in
the public water supply industry. Topics include: water supply and cycle,
structure and operations of utilities,
regulatory agencies, best management practices, water conservation
programs and technologies. This class
will help the student prepare for the
AWWA grade one Water Conservation
Practitioner Certification. 54 lecture
hours.
WATR 165
Water Systems Operations and
Technology Update
1 Unit
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended:
WATR 151 or WATR 156.
A course in drinking water distribution
and treatment designed to update
current system operators on the latest improvements in technology and
upcoming regulations in the water
supply field. Students will be introduced to new technologies and methods used in water systems today and
will be given valuable information on
the latest adopted and pending regulations from CDHS, OEHHA, CDRW,
SWRCB, LARWQCB, AQMD, and
CalOSHA. The course will be helpful
to those in need of contact hours to
fulfill California Department of Health
Services requirement for renewal of
Distribution and/or Treatment Operator Certificate. 18 lecture hours.
Cooperative Education
Courses
Cooperative Work Experience (Co-op
Ed) links student learning in a Citrus
College class to a job that relates to
that class. The student, Citrus College
instructor, and the worksite supervisor
all work together to create learning
objectives that the student must
accomplish during the semester at
their place of employment or training
site. The job must pay at least minimum wage though students who volunteerat a nonprofit agency may also
receive Co-op Ed credit. The student
may enroll in one to four Co-op Ed
units, which are determined by the
number of hours they will work towards their learning objectives during
the semester. Students enrolled in
Co-op Ed courses may take classes
for a letter grade or as Pass/No Pass.
Approval is required prior to enrollment. For more information, contact
the academic department.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Citrus College offers Co-op Ed
courses in the following
departments and disciplines.
The series 698 A, B, C, D courses are
the Non-Profit Volunteer work ranging
in units from 1 to 4.
The series 699 A, B, C, D courses are
the Paid Work courses ranging in
units from 1 to 4.
Administration of Justice
Contact department
(626) 914-8860
AJ 698 C
AJ 699 C
Art, Photography, Theatre Arts
Contact department
(626) 914-8580
ART 698 A, B, C, D
ART 699 A, B, C, D
PHTO 698 A, B, C, D
PHTO 699 A, B, C, D
THEA 698 C
THEA 699 A
Automotive Technology,
Drafting,Electronics, Heating and
Air Conditioning, Information
Technology, Motorcycle
Technology, Office Technology
and Computer Applications.
Contact department
(626) 852-6402
AUTO 698 A, B, C, D
AUTO 699 A. B. C, D
DRAF 698 C
DRAF 699 A,C
ELEC 698 A, B, C, D
ELEC 699 A, B, C, D
IT 698 B, D
IT 699 B, D
MTRK 698 A, B, C, D
MTRK 699 A, B, C, D
OFF 698 A, B, C, D
Biology, Chemistry, Earth
Science
Contact department
(626) 914-8789
BIOL 698 A, B, C, D
BIOL 699 A, B, C, D
CHEM 698 A, B, C, D
CHEM 699 A, B, C, D
ESCI 698 A, B, C, D
ESCI 699 A, B, C, D
FOR 698 A, B, C, D
FOR 699 A, B, C, D
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
Dental Assisting
Contact department
(626) 914-8791
DENT 698 A, B, C, D
DENT 699 A, B, C, D
Health Occupations
Contact department
(626) 914-8791
HEAL 698 A, B, C, D
HEAL 699 A, B, C, D
Non-Credit Courses
Non-credit education is designed to
supplement your continued growth
and to enhance your employment opportunities, through classes ranging
from basic skills and health care to
vocational preparation and job retraining. Enrollment in noncredit
classes is free and continues throughout the school year. All non-credit
classes are subject to budget and attendance.
NC 001
Supervised Tutoring
This course provides learning assistance through supervised one-to-one
or group tutoring. Students receive
assistance outside of class time to improve learning and study skills. Content is specific to English, reading and
mathematics. 144 lab hours.
NC 100
Partner Coached Lamaze
This course includes material on the
importance of excellent prenatal care
and its relationship to a safe and satisfying birth, as well as the exercises
and techniques to increase the comfort of natural childbirth delivery
through relaxation and natural
breathing. Partners are encouraged
to attend and are an essential part of
the class. 20 lecture hours.
NC 101
Strategies for the Young/New
Parent
The course examines the theoretical
and practical approaches to parenting
and explores expectations, influences,
and strategies of parenting with a
focus on behaviors and attitudes. It
explores the developmental states
from childbirth to adolescence and
constructive parenting techniques for
working parents, single parents, and
step parents. 30 lecture hours.
NC 200
Preparation for Academic
Success
This course is designed to teach effective college study skills. Topics include time management, textbook
study, lecture notetaking, test taking
strategies, exam preparation, computer-assisted instruction, and career
exploration. 30 lecture hours,
NC 208A
Algebra IA
Placement by high school
counselor or math placement
exam.
This is an integrated course that combines the content of algebra with logical reasoning, statistics, probability,
problem solving, real life situations,
spatial visualization, and introductory
topics in geometry. The course format
will include activity-based investigations with hands on activities and
concepts and applications compliant
with the adopted California State
Mathematics Standards to meet the
minimum course requirements for
high school graduation. 60 lecture
hours.
NC 208B
Algebra IB
Placement by high school
counselor or math placement
exam.
This is a continuation of Algebra IA.
This is an integrated course that combines the content of algebra with logical reasoning, statistics, probability,
problem solving, real life situations,
spatial visualization, and introductory
topics in geometry. The course format
will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities, concepts and applications compliant with
the adopted California State Mathematics Standards to meet the minimum course requirements for high
school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 209A
Algebra IIA
Placement by high school
counselor or math placement
exam.
This course introduces linear functions in two variables, solutions of
www.citruscollege.edu
249
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
systems of equations by various
methods, operations with polynomials
and factoring, quadratic functions, rational functions, radicals and elementary probability. This course combines
algebraic concepts and geometry in
several activities, projects and problems. Through each activity and project the student learns how to write
algebraic expressions, understand the
relationship among equations and
graphs, explore functions, think critically and develop a clear understanding of sequences, series, probability,
and exponential functions. Each activity and project is designed for real-life
application, visual and hands-on approach to solving problems and use
of technology. The course format will
include activity-based investigations
with hands on activities and concepts
and applications compliant with the
adopted California State Mathematics
Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 209B
Algebra IIB
Placement by high school
counselor or math placement
exam.
This is a continuation of Algebra IIA.
This course introduces linear functions in two variables, solutions of
systems of equations by various
methods, operations with polynomials
and factoring, quadratic functions, rational functions, radicals and elementary probability. This course combines
algebraic concepts and geometry in
several activities, projects and problems. Through each activity and project the student learns how to write
algebraic expressions, understand the
relationship among equations and
graphs, explore functions, think critically and develop a clear understanding of sequences, series, probability,
and exponential functions. Each activity and project is designed for real-life
application, visual and hands-on approach to solving problems and use
of technology. The course format will
include activity-based investigations
with hands-on activities and concepts
and applications compliant with the
adopted California State Mathematics
Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
250
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
NC 210A
Freshman English A
Placement by high school
counselor or English placement
exam.
The following disciplines of English
are an integral part of this courses:
reading, writing, vocabulary and
speech. Students will read literature
from the genres of poetry, short stories, novels, and plays. The student
will be introduced to the process of
writing. Spelling and content words
will be chosen from the literature.
Oral reports, oral readings, and memorized orals are incorporated into this
course. The course format will include
activity-based investigations with
hands-on activities and concepts and
applications compliant with the
adopted California State English Standards to meet the minimum course
requirements for high school graduation. 60 lecture hours,
NC 210B
Freshman English B
Placement by high school
counselor or English placement
exam.
The following disciplines of English
are an integral part of this course:
reading, writing, vocabulary and
speech. Students will read literature
from the genres of poetry, short stories, novels, and plays. The student
will be introduced to the process of
writing. Spelling and content words
will be chosen from the literature.
Oral reports, oral readings, and memorized orals are incorporated into this
course. The course format will include
activity-based investigations with
hands-on activities and concepts and
applications compliant with the
adopted California State English Standards to meet the minimum course
requirements for high school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 211A
Sophomore English A
Placement by high school
counselor or English placement
exam.
The main purpose of this course is on
college preparatory writing, introduction to literary analysis, and research
skills. The major genres of literature
are studied, discssed, and analyzed.
Students continue to learn the
processes of drafting, rewiring, and
editing. In addition, students also
learn to critique each others work
and to use these editing skills on their
own papers. Research skills are
learned so the students will know
how to gather information needed for
clarification of reading or the beginning of writing. The course format
will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities and
concepts and applications compliant
with the adopted California State
English Standards to meet the minimum course requirements for high
school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 211B
Sophomore English B
Placement by high school
counselor or English placement
exam.
The main purpose of this course is on
college preparatory writing, introduction to literary analysis, and research
skills. The major genres of literature
are studied, discussed, and analyzed.
Students continue to learn the
processes of drafting, rewriting, and
editing. In addition, students also
learn to critique each others work
and to use these editing skills on their
own papers. Research skills are
learned so the students will know
how to gather information needed for
clarification of reading or the beginning of writing. The course format
will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities and
concepts and applications compliant
with the adopted California State
English Standards to meet the minimum course requirements for high
school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 212A
Junior English A
Placement by high school
counselor or English placement
exam.
This course is a survey of American
literature covering philosophical, religious, political, and literary ideas in
American writing from colonial times
to the present. Emphasis will be
placed on techniques of organizing
and developing critical essays about
fiction, poetry, and drama. Students
will be required to study a major
novel and participate in an independent reading program. The course for-
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
mat will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities and
concepts and applications compliant
with the adopted California State
English Standards to meet the minimum course requirements for high
school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 212B
Junior English B
Placement by high school
counselor or English placement
exam.
This course is a survey of American
literature covering philosophical, religious, political, and literary ideas in
American writing from colonial times
to the present. Emphasis will be
placed on techniques of organizing
and developing critical essays about
fiction, poetry, and drama. Students
will be required to study a major
novel and participate in an independent reading program. The course format will include activity-based
investigations with hands-on activities
and concepts and applications compliant with the adopted California
State English Standards to meet the
minimum course requirements for
high school graduation. 60 lecture
hours.
NC 213A
Senior English A
Placement by high school
counselor or English placement
exam.
Seniors will develop communication
skills for college entrance. Writing,
oral language, vocabulary building,
and reading skills are the goals of the
course. The student will be exposed
to classic literary works, contemporary media such as newspapers, essays, and critical analyses of classic
and contemporary non-fiction works.
The student is challenged to develop
skills of analysis, evaluation, and synthesis in both writing and oral language. The course format will include
activity-based investigations with
hands-on activities and concepts, and
applications compliant with the
adopted California State English Standards to meet the minimum course
requirements for high school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
NC 213B
Senior English B
Placement by high school
counselor or English placement
exam.
Seniors will develop communication
skills for college entrance. Writing,
oral language, vocabulary building,
and reading skills are the goals of the
course. The student will be exposed
to classic literary works, contemporary media such as newspapers, essays, and critical analyses of classic
and contemporary non-fiction works.
The student is challenged to develop
skills of analysis, evaluation, and synthesis in both writing and oral language. The course format will include
activity-based investigations with
hands-on activities and concepts, and
applications compliant with the
adopted California State English Standards to meet the minimum course
requirements for high school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 214A
United States History A
The content will focus on the development of the United States during
the 20th century. This course will enable students to understand the
chronological flow of events, the dynamics of change, and the critical
links between the past and the present in the United States. This course
format will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities
and concepts and applications compliant with the adopted California
State History Standards to meet the
minimum course requirements for
high school graduation. 60 lecture
hours.
NC 214B
United States History B
The content will focus on the development of the United States during
the 20th century. This course will enable students to understand the
chronological flow of events, the dynamics of change, and the critical
links between the past and the present in the United States. This course
format will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities
and concepts and applications compliant with the adopted California
State History Standards to meet the
minimum course requirements for
high school graduation. 60 lecture
hours.
NC 215A
World History A
This course is a study of the major
ideas and turning points that shaped
the modern world historically, geographically, politically, economically
and culturally in the 18th, 19th and
20th centuries. It analyzes the major
ideas, people and events that have
led to the development of today's
contemporary world. The use of discussion groups, audiovisual aids,
maps, student-oriented activities are
employed throughout the course.
This course format will include activity-based investigations with handson activities and concepts, and
applications compliant with the
adopted California State History Standards to meet the minimum course
requirements for high school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 215B
World History B
This course is a study of the major
ideas and turning points that shaped
the modern world historically, geographically, politically, economically
and culturally in the 18th, 19th and
20th centuries. It analyzes the major
ideas, people and events that have
led to the development of today's
contemporary world. The use of discussion groups, audiovisual aids,
maps, student-oriented activities are
employed throughout the course.
This course format will include activity-based investigations with handson activities and concepts, and
applications compliant with the
adopted California State History Standards to meet the minimum course
requirements for high school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 217
Economics
In this course, students will master
fundamental economic concepts, applying the tools (graphs, statistics,
equations) from other subject areas
to the understanding of operations
and institutions of economic systems.
Studied in a historic context are the
basic economic principles of microand macroeconomics, international
economics, comparative economic
www.citruscollege.edu
251
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
systems, measurement, and methods. This course format will include
activity-based investigations with
hands-on activities and concepts, and
applications compliant with the
adopted California State History and
Social Sciences Standards to meet
the minimum course requirements for
high school graduation. 60 lecture
hours.
NC 218A
Biology A
This course deals with the study of
living things following the California
state standards for Biology. It emphasizes modern technological and practical topics such as ecology, genetics
and human structure and function.
Hands on laboratory experiences are
essential to each topic. The course
format will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities
and concepts, and applications compliant with the adopted California
State Standards to meet the minimum course requirements for high
school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 218B
Biology B
This course deals with the study of
living things following the California
state standards for Biology. It emphasizes modern technological and practical topics such as ecology, genetics
and human structure and function.
Hands-on laboratory experiences are
essential to each topic. The course
format will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities
and concepts, and applications compliant with the adopted California
State Standards to meet the minimum course requirements for high
school graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 219A
Physical Science A
This course will examine the eight
study topics in physical sciences, such
as motion, forces, and the structure
of matter, by using a quantitative
mathematically based approach.
Earth, the solar system, chemical reactions, the periodic equation, and
density and buoyancy are additional
topics that will be increased with
mathematical rigor. The course format will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities and
252
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
concepts, and applications compliant
with the adopted California State
Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 219B
Physical Science B
This course will examine the eight
study topics in physical sciences, such
as motion, forces, and the structure
of matter, by using a quantitative
mathematically based approach.
Earth, the solar system, chemical reactions, the periodic equation, and
density and buoyancy are additional
topics that will be increased with
mathematical rigor. The course format will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities and
concepts, and applications compliant
with the adopted California State
Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 220A
Earth Science A
This course includes the study of astronomy, physics, chemistry, geology
and meteorology. Special emphasis is
placed on student experimentation
and observation. This course format
will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities and
concepts, and applications compliant
with the adopted California State Science Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 220B
Earth Science B
This course includes the study of astronomy, physics, chemistry, geology
and meteorology. Special emphasis is
placed on student experimentation
and observation. This course format
will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities and
concepts, and applications compliant
with the adopted California State History Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 221A
Chemistry A
Principles of chemistry are developed
through laboratory observations of
physical properties and chemical re-
actions. The language, formulas, and
equations of chemistry are used in interpreting atomic structure and
chemical bonding; periodic behavior
of elements; rates and energies of
chemical and nuclear change; equilibrium of gaseous systems, acids and
bases, and oxidation-reduction as
well as organic functional groups.
This course format will include activity-based investigations with handson activities and concepts, and
applications compliant with the
adopted California State Science
Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 221B
Chemistry B
Principles of chemistry are developed
through laboratory observations of
physical properties and chemical reactions. The language, formulas, and
equations of chemistry are used in interpreting atomic structure and
chemical bonding; periodic behavior
of elements; rates and energies of
chemical and nuclear change; equilibrium of gaseous systems, acids and
bases, and oxidation-reduction as
well as organic functional groups.
This course format will include activity-based investigations with handson activities and concepts, and
applications compliant with the
adopted California State Science
Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 224A
Geometry A
Placement by high school counselor.
This integrated mathematics college
preparatory course builds on the Algebra I course. Topics taught include
sampling and reasoning, linear systems, matrices, geometry (coordinate
geometry, triangles, circles and
spheres), probability and binomials.
The course format will involve application of mathematics to real world
problems, hands-on classroom activities to investigate concepts and applications compliant with the recently
adopted California State Mathematics
Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
NC 224B
Geometry B
Placement by high school counselor.
This integrated mathematics college
preparatory course builds on the Algebra I course. Topics taught include
sampling and reasoning, linear systems, matrices, geometry (coordinate
geometry, triangles, circles and
spheres), probability and binomials.
The course format will involve application of mathematics to real world
problems, hands-on classroom activities to investigate concepts and applications compliant with the recently
adopted California State Mathematics
Standards to meet the minimum
course requirements for high school
graduation. 60 lecture hours.
NC 225A
Pre-Calculus A
Placement by high school counselor.
This course will further prepare students who have completed two years
of high school algebra in such important areas as graphic techniques, algebraic and transcendental functions,
and analytic geometry. Special interest has been given to the algebra of
calculus. Many examples and exercises consist of algebra problems that
arise in the study of calculus. This
course will include daily homework,
projects, and group activities done in
the classroom setting, investigations
and calculator work. The course format will include activity-based investigations with hands on activities and
concepts and applications compliant
with the adopted California State
Mathematics Standards to meet the
minimum course requirements for
high school graduation. 60 lecture
hours.
NC 225B
Pre-Calculus B
Placement by high school counselor.
This course will further prepare students who have completed two years
of high school algebra in such important areas as graphic techniques, algebraic and transcendental functions,
and analytic geometry. Special interest has been given to the algebra of
calculus. Many examples and exercises consist of algebra problems that
arise in the study of calculus. This
course will include daily homework,
projects, and group activities done in
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
the classroom setting, investigations
and calculator work. The course format will include activity-based investigations with hands-on activities and
concepts and applications compliant
with the adopted California State
Mathematics Standards to meet the
minimum course requirements for
high school graduation. 60 lecture
hours.
NC 303
ESL B: Intermediate ESL
This course builds comprehension
and communication of spoken English
through the practice of the four skills
- listening, speaking, reading, and
writing. The course emphasizes building confidence in oral expression and
refining pronunciation. 108 lecture
hours.
NC 250
PLATO - Basic Reading, Writing
and Mathematics
This course is designed for underprepared students, students looking to
improve their basic skills prior to taking the assessment test, students
seeking supplemental instruction to
their credit courses, and students
needing to improve their reading,
writing and math skills in order to improve their employment opportunities. Students will work through a
series of self-directed computer modules under the supervision of a faculty member. 72 lab hours.
NC 305
ESL Multiskills - Beginning 1
ESL Multiskills - Beginning 1 introduces low-beginning English language learners to basic language
skills that are needed to live in American society. This course teaches performing essential life skills through
reading, writing, speaking, and listening in American English. Open
entry/exit. 192 lecture hours.
NC 300
Academic ESL I
Academic ESL I is a course for noncredit students to prepare for credit
ESL classes by practicing the four language skills - listening, speaking,
reading, and writing. It is an introduction to credit course requirements
that include attendance, homework,
and assessment. The course includes
pronunciation and conversation. 54
lecture hours.
NC 301
Academic ESL II
Academic ESL II facilitates the transition of the noncredit ESL student to
credit ESL. The course focus is to improve the student's skill of listening
to, speaking, reading, and writing the
English language. The course includes pronunciation and conversation to build communication skills and
fluency. 54 lecture hours.
NC 302
ESL A: Beginning
This course develops basic English
skills through the practice of listening,
speaking, reading, and writing. 108
lecture hours.
NC 306
ESL Multiskills - Beginning 2
ESL Multiskills - Beginning 2 expands
on life and language skills learned in
ESL Multiskills - Beginning 1 and is intended for high-beginning English
language learners. This course
teaches performing routine life skills
and basic personal expression
through reading, writing, speaking,
and listening in American English.
Open entry/exit. 192 lecture hours.
NC 307
ESL Multiskills - Intermediate 1
ESL Multiskills - Intermediate 1 expands on life and language skills
learned in ESL Multiskills - Beginning
2 and is designed for low-intermediate English language learners. This
course teaches basic skills needed to
succeed in American society through
reading, writing, speaking, and listening in American English. Open
entry/exit. 192 lecture hours.
NC 309
ESL Multiskills - Advanced
ESL Multiskills - Advanced is designed
for English language learners at the
low-advanced level. This course prepares students for college level
course work, to find or improve a career, and to engage with native English speakers at a comparable level.
Open entry/exit. 192 lecture hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
253
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
NC 501
Basic Life Skills for
Developmentally Disabled Adults
This course is designed for developmentally disabled adults. It will address skills related to basic functions
in everyday life and enhance skills for
supported function in the community.
This course will address the different
cognitive, physical, communication,
and social needs of each student. The
program allows interaction in a group
setting, learning to interact appropriately at all function levels. 40 – 48
lecture hours.
NC 600
AED Training
This course provides the student with
the knowledge and skills necessary to
recognize a victim in need of the Automated External Defibrillation (AED)
device and use the AED. Must have
current adult CPR certification. 2 lecture hours, 2 lab hours.
NC 601
Basic First Aid and CPR
This course prepares individuals to
recognize and treat injuries and sudden illnesses. Meets the requirements
for basic first aid and adult CPR in the
workplace. 5 lecture hours, 3 lab
hours.
NC 602
CPR for Professional Rescuer
This course provides the professional
rescuer with the knowledge and skills
to provide Basic Life Support (BLS) to
a victim in an emergency. Follows the
guidelines of both the American Red
Cross and the American Heart Association. 4 lecture hours, 5 lab hours.
NC 603
Lifeguard Training
This course provides students with
the skills and information to effectively prevent, recognize and respond
to aquatic emergencies. Included are
the evaluation and improvement of
skills necessary for successful certification for the American Red Cross
Lifesaving and the American Red
Cross CPR for the Professional cards.
12 lecture hours, 24 lab hours.
254
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
NC 607
Skilled Nursing Facility Activity
Leader
A course designed to meet minimum
state certification requirements for
activity leaders in skilled nursing care
facilities. This course will also be helpful
to anyone involved with care in an
extended care facility. 90 lecture hours.
NC 610
Advanced Skin Care in
Electro-Therapy
Must be a State Board of Barbering
and Cosmetology licensed esthetician.
This course is an advanced program
for the licensed esthetician. The
course provides professional knowledge and skills needed for a successful career in esthetics. The program
includes, but is not limited to, training
in microdermabrasion, Light Emitting
Diode (LED), and micro current treatments, also, the reaction, response
and effects of electro-therapy. Students will be required to purchase a
kit for this course. 10 lecture hours,
30 lab hours.
NC 611
Advanced Skin Care In Chemical
Exfoliants
Must be a State Board of Barbering
and Cosmetology licensed esthetician.
Advanced skin care program for the
licensed esthetician. The course provides understanding and knowledge
of professional skin care products,
which includes, but not limited to, the
training and education of various
types of chemical exfoliants and
masks; the reaction, response, and
effects of the skin, and the customized blending and applications of
professional products. 10 lecture
hours, 30 lab hours.
NC 612
Advanced Makeup
Must be a State Board of Barbering
and Cosmetology licensed esthetician
or licensed cosmetologist.
Advanced makeup program for the licensed esthetician/cosmetologist.
The course provides advanced knowledge and skills needed for a professional career in makeup artistry. The
program includes the study of facial
features, customized makeup application, including, but not limited to,
theatrical, camouflage, air brush,
bridal and fantasy. 10 lecture hours,
30 lab hours.
NC 613
Advanced Skin Care in
Aromatherapy
Must be a State Board of Barbering
and Cosmetology licensed esthetician.
This course is an advanced skin care
program for the licensed esthetician.
This course provides the knowledge
and skill needed for a professional career in esthetics. The program includes the study of therapeutic
essential oils, botanicals, including,
but not limited to, blending, application, effects, reactions, and holistic
views 10 lecture hours, 30 lab hours.
NC 626
Floral Design I
Application of the principles in the art
of floral design as to form, style, and
composition. Designing of floral
arrangements, wreaths, sprays, baskets, bouquets, funeral and wedding
flowers, corsages and boutonnieres
are included in the laboratory setting.
16 lecture hours, 40 lab hours.
NC 632
Air Conditioning I
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 if required by English
placement exam or if required by
English level. or READ 099 if
required by English placement
exam or if required by English
level.
Topics will include fundamentals of
refrigeration theory and practice, introductory basic electricity, service of
refrigeration equipment and accessories including compressors, condensers, evaporators, and metering
devices. Review for EPA exam. 36 lecture hours, 18 lab hours.
NC 634
Air Conditioning II
Strongly Recommended: NC 632.
A course in the fundamentals of air
conditioning, including ventilation,
evaporation, cycles, charging, air distribution, control, electrical circuiting,
venting, duct systems and diffusions.
Emphasis on equipment selection,
balance, adjustment, maintenance
and service. Prepares students for
EPA examination. 36 lecture hours,
18 lab hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
NC 636
Heating - Electrical and Gas
Strongly Recommended: NC 632
or industry experience.
This course includes absorption systems, heating and humidifying, also
heat load and heat pump systems,
systems controls, boilers, and instruments. 36 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours.
NC 638
Electricity for Heating and Air
Conditioning
Strongly Recommended: ENGL
099 if required by English
placement exam or if required by
English level or READ 099 if
required by English placement
exam or if required by English
level. Also, NC 632 or industry
experience.
A course in electricity covering the
functions and operations of electric
motors and controls used in mechanical systems. 36 lecture hours, 18 lab
hours.
NC 640
HVAC Control Systems
Strongly Recommended: NC 632.
An explanation of HVAC control system theory, control hardware, and
both simple and complex control systems, supervisory controls and the
use of computers in control systems.
36 lecture hours, 18 lab hours.
NC 642
Trouble Shooting Heating and Air
Conditioning
Grade or Pass/No Pass
Strongly Recommended: NC 632.
This course covers the techniques to
locate, identify, and correct the problems that occur in heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration systems,
both domestic and commercial. 36
lecture hours, 18 lab hours.
NC 701
Creative Writing for Older Adults
Creative non-fiction written expression is explored through the development of memoirs, personal essays,
profiles, and nature articles. This
course provides older adults an opportunity to recall, organize, and
share their life experiences about
events, family, health, or work. 30
lecture hours,
CITRUS COLLEGE CATALOG 2013 • 2014
NC 702
Exploring Current Events and
Recent Trends
This course is designed for the active
55+ learner. This course stimulates
discussion of current events and
trends. Sources of news including
print and electronic media will be featured. Featured will be discussion on
the impact of events on the student
or the world around you. 36 – 54 lecture hours.
NC 712
Therapeutic Benefits of Music
This course is designed for older
Community Theatre provides theatrical training in the areas of improvisation, character development, vocal
technique and performance technique. Depending on the age level involved, the course will culminate in
either a production from a scripted
play or from original material generated from the cast. Everyone is guaranteed a performance role. 54 lab
hours.
NC 860
College Life
The purpose of this course is to learn
and adopt methods that promote success in college and in life. This course
is designed to assist new or returning
students in developing practical study
skills to build a successful college experience on. Students will acquire
skills in goal setting and exploration,
time management, test taking, note
taking and study skills, and gain an
understanding of services offered on
our campus. 18 lecture hours.
NC 930
Understanding Drug/Alcohol
Abuse and Treatments
This course is designed to create an
understanding of drug and alcohol
abuse from a sociological and physiological perspective. It is not a replacement for therapy or twelve step
meetings. The intended audience will
be individuals desiring to learn about
the various aspects of recovery
and/or those affected by or wanting
to learn more about the recovery
process. Topics will include: treatments, detox processes, support
groups, and post-recovery issues. 36
lecture hours.
www.citruscollege.edu
255
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
College Policies and Notices: Rules for Safety and Success
Academic Freedom Statement
It is the policy of the Citrus Community College district to support
the principles of academic freedom, built upon the free expression and exchange of ideas that
are inherent in the search for
scholarly truth and upon which a
free and democratic society depends. The district affirms the use
of a variety of teaching methodologies to fulfill its obligation to
raise difficult and meaningful
questions in the educational development of students. Faculty
are entitled to freely discuss issues germane to their subject
matter. This freedom involves the
right to introduce controversial
topics, as long as the manner of
presentation involves objective
reasoning and rational discussion.
Academic Honesty
See Code of Conduct
Academic freedom must be balanced with the obligation of the
district to protect the right of students to learn in an environment
characterized by civility, open inquiry, and freedom from unlawful
discrimination. While faculty have
the right to present ideas and conclusions which they believe to be
in accord with available evidence,
they also have the responsibility to
acknowledge the existence of different opinions and to respect the
right of others to hold those
views. Faculty and students have
a responsibility to engage in
teaching and learning that honors
and respects divergent viewpoints
that are grounded in cultures of
reason, logic, evidence and responsible scholarship.
With the exception of alcohol
products intended fully for use in
classroom scientific experiments
and not intended for human consumption, the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession or use of alcohol or any
other controlled substance is prohibited on district-owned or controlled property, at districtsponsored or supervised functions, or related to or arising from
District attendance or activity.
When faculty (or any other district
employees) speak or write as citizens, care should be taken to
avoid the representation of any
personal view as that of the district or of Citrus College.
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CITRUS COLLEGE
Athletic Eligibility
See Athletics: The Fighting Owls
section
Drug Free Environment and
Drug Prevention Program
References: Drug Free Schools
and Communities Act, 20 U.S.C.
Section 1145g and 34 C.F.R. Section 861 et seq.; Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988, 41 U.S.C. Section 702
The district is committed to maintaining an environment free from
the unlawful possession, use, or
distribution of illegal substances
and alcohol by students and employees.
All employees are required to
comply with this policy as a condition of their employment and continued employment.
Any student or employee who violates this policy will be subject to
disciplinary action, which may include referral to an appropriate
rehabilitation program, suspension, demotion, expulsion or dismissal. Any employee convicted
under a criminal drug and/or alcohol statute for conduct in the
workplace must report this conviction within five days to the superintendent/president.
The superintendent/president
shall assure that the college distributes annually to each student
the information required by the
Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 and
complies with other requirements
of the Act.
Campus Disturbances
The willful disturbance of classes,
college activities, or procedures is
a misdemeanor. (California Penal
Code, Section 626.6)
Cheating and Plagiarism
See Code of Conduct
Code of Conduct
Those representing Citrus College
at any conference, trip or athletic
event will observe this Code of
Conduct.
Basic Responsibilities on
Conferences, Trips or Athletic
Events
1. Participants, students, and
advisers shall recognize their
responsibility for proper
conduct during a trip to or
from, and at the conference
or event.
2. Advisers shall recognize their
responsibility for the actions
of their students. Each
student will be directly
responsible to the adviser.
3. Rules established by the host
organization or location must
be observed.
4. Prior to the conference or trip,
the student participants and
advisers shall have read the
Standards of Conduct.
www.citruscollege.edu
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
5. Attendance at all meetings,
including meals, is considered
part of the participant's
responsibility while at a
conference unless first
excused by the advisers.
6. No student may officially or
unofficially represent Citrus
College at any event away
from the campus without an
adviser or special permission
granted by the Citrus College
administration to be without
an adviser.
Standards of Conduct
The superintendent/president
shall establish procedures for the
imposition of discipline of students
in accordance with the due process requirements of state and federal regulations.
The procedures shall clearly define
the conduct that is subject to discipline, and shall identify potential
disciplinary actions, including but
not limited to the removal, suspension or expulsion of a
student.
The Board of Trustees shall consider any recommendation for a
student’s expulsion received from
the superintendent/president.
The board shall consider an expulsion recommendation in closed
session unless the student requests that the matter be considered in a public meeting. Final
action by the board on the expulsion shall be taken at a public
meeting.
The following infractions are considered good cause for discipline
at Citrus College and are based on
local, state and federal law, as
well as Citrus Community College
District board policy 5500 and
administrative procedures 5520.
1. Causing, attempting to cause,
or threatening to cause
CITRUS COLLEGE
physical injury to another
person.
2. Possession, sale or otherwise
furnishing any firearm, knife,
explosive, or other dangerous
object, including but not
limited to any facsimile
firearm, knife, or explosive,
unless, in the case of possession of any object of this type,
the student has obtained prior
written permission to possess
the item from a District
employee with the concurrence of the Superintendent/
President;
3. Unlawful possession, use,
sale, offer to sell, furnishing,
or being under the influence
of, any controlled substance
listed in Chapter 2
(commencing with Section
11053) of Division 10 of the
California Health and Safety
Code, an alcoholic beverage,
or an intoxicant of any kind;
or unlawful possession of, or
offering, arranging, or negotiating the sale of any drug
paraphernalia, as defined in
California Health and Safety
Code Section 11014.5;
4. Committing or attempting to
commit robbery or extortion;
5. Causing or attempting to
cause damage to District
property or to private property
on campus;
6. Stealing or attempting to steal
District property or private
property on campus, or
knowingly receiving stolen
District property or private
property on campus;
7. Willful or persistent smoking
in any area where smoking is
prohibited by law or by
college or District regulation;
8. Committing unlawful sexual
harassment as defined by
pertinent law;
9. Engaging in unlawful
harassing or discriminatory
behavior based on race,
gender, religion, age, national
origin, disability, or any other
protected characteristic or
classification, as defined by
pertinent law;
10. Willful misconduct which
results in injury or death to a
student or to District
personnel or which results in
cutting, defacing, or other
injury to any real or personal
property owned by the District
or on campus;
11. Disruptive behavior, willful
disobedience, or the open and
persistent defiance of the
authority of, or persistent
abuse of, District personnel;
12. Cheating, plagiarizing
(including plagiarism in
student publications), or
engaging in other forms of
academic dishonesty;
13. Dishonesty; forgery; alteration
or misuse of District documents, records or identification; or knowingly furnishing
false information to the
District;
14. Unauthorized entry upon or
use of District facilities;
15. Lewd, indecent or obscene
conduct on District-owned or
controlled property, or at
District-sponsored or super
vised functions;
16. Engaging in expression which
is obscene; libelous or
slanderous; or which so in
cites students as to create a
clear and present danger of
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257
CATALOG 2013 • 2014
the commission of unlawful
acts on District premises;
17. Violation of lawful District
administrative procedures, or
the substantial disruption of
the orderly operation of the
District;
18. Engaging in persistent,
serious misconduct where
other means of correction
have failed to bring about
proper conduct;
19. Unauthorized preparation,
giving, selling, transfer,
distribution, or publication,
for any commercial purpose,
of any contemporaneous
recording of an academic
presentation in a classroom
or equivalent site of instruction, including but not limited
to handwritten or typewritten
class notes, except as permitted by any Board Policy or
Administrative Procedure;
20. Violation of College rules or
regulations including campus
policies concerning the student organizations, the use of
College facilities, or the time,
place and manner of public
expression;
21. Persistent violation of classroom standards of conduct as
established by the instructor;
22. Any other cause not listed
above which is identified as
―Good Cause‖ by the
Education Code.
For detailed information regarding
student discipline, visit
www.citruscollege.edu and click
Student Life, Student Discipline
and Conduct.
Driving and Parking
The Citrus Community College
District Board of Trustees have
258
CITRUS COLLEGE
adopted traffic and parking regulations in accordance with the
California Vehicle Code. Refer to
the current Schedule of Classes
for details.
Grievance Procedures
Student grievance procedures provide every student with a prompt
and equitable means of seeking
an appropriate resolution for any
alleged violation of his or her
rights. The rights protected under
these procedures include, but are
not limited to, those guaranteed
by the established rules and regulations of the Citrus Community
College District and the Education
Code of the State of California.
The student grievance procedure
does not apply to student
disciplinary actions covered under
separate board policies and
administrative procedures and
parking citations ―tickets‖
obtained on campus.
Students are advised that grievances must be filed within 20
school days of the occurrence.
The procedures do not apply to
the employment rights of students. Sexual harassment or discrimination complaints are made
to the Office of Human Resources.
Citrus College students are, by
law, protected against cap