Starfall Kindergarten
This is a one-week excerpt from the Starfall Kindergarten Teacher’s Guide.
If you have questions or comments, please contact us.
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 1-888-857-8990 or 303-417-6414 Fax: 1-800-943-6666 or 303-417-6434
Starfall
Kindergarten
Teacher’s Guide
Time
Unit 2 • Week 3
Starfall Kindergarten Reading and Language Arts Curriculum
incorporating Science, Social Studies and Technology
Opportunities for child-directed learning Target skills that are introduced, then applied,
integrated, and practiced throughout the year English language learners and struggling
readers learn alongside their peers Interactive technology incorporates visual, auditory, and
kinesthetic learning Appropriate for Kindergarten classrooms and homeschoolers
Teacher-tested, research based, and meets state standards
Motivation for children to learn and have fun at the same time
Starfall Education P.O. Box 359, Boulder, CO 80306 U.S.A.
Phone: 1-888-857-8990 or 303-417-6414
Copyright © 2009, 2012 by Starfall Education. All rights reserved. Starfall® is a registered trademark in the U.S., the European Community and many other countries.
Authors and Credits
Senior Authors
Joan Elliott: 18 years teaching kindergarten in North Carolina and Texas public schools, 12 years teaching in Department of Education, University
of North Carolina at Asheville and University of Texas at Brownsville; recipient of Christa McAuliffe Teaching Award, recipient of Fulbright fellowship
to Korea
Pam Ferguson: 34 year veteran kindergarten teacher, Holy Family Catholic School, St. Petersburg, FL; serves on the Florida Catholic Conference
Accreditation team for past 10 years
Consultants
Dr. Karen Cole, Associate Professor of Education, K-6 Program Coordinator, University of NC - Asheville
Dr. Greta Freeman, School of Education, University of South Carolina
Educators
Myrna Estes, 35 years, NYC; Chester, MA; Pittsfield, MA Public Schools
Judy Goetze, 35 years, Pittsfield, MA Public Schools
Stephanie Riess 15 years Pinellas County, FL Public Schools; 17 years, Diocese of St. Petersburg, FL
Heidi Suburu, 25 years, Fruitvale Public School District, Bakersfield, CA, and Elk Hills Public School District, Tupman, CA
Additional Contributors to this project:
We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of our project team of over 150 kindergarten teachers. This project would not be possible without
their help.
Senior Editor and Designer
Brandi Chase
Layout Design
Marc Buchannan
Senior Artist and Print Designer
Faith Gowan
Contributing Artists and Designers
Matthew Baca, Ric Beemer, Dale Beisel, Kimberly Cooper, Craig Deeley, Catherine George, Stefan Gruber, Heather Hogan, David Lebow, Debby Lee,
Frank Lee, Claire Lenth, Gina and Art Morgan of AMGG, Julie Ann Quinsay, Michael Ramirez, Jared Ramos, Scott Stebbins, and Triska Wasser
Musicians/Composers
Randy Graves, Keith Heldman and Richard James
Engineers and Quality Assurance
Kerry Dezell, Adam Griff, Tom Meyer, Larry Moiola, Steve Patschke, Troy Tazbaz, and Roger Wilson
Starfall gratefully acknowledges the following school districts where the Starfall Kindergarten Program was piloted:
Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy, Las Vegas, NV
Appling County School District, Surrency, GA
Boulder Valley School District, Boulder, CO
Briarcliff Manor School District, Briarcliff Manor, NY
Buncombe County School District, Asheville, NC
Buckner-Fanning Christian School, San Antonio, TX
Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles, Thousand Oaks, CA
Catholic Diocese of St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg, FL
Currituck County School District, Knotts Island, NC
Fruitvale School District, Bakersfield, CA
Episcopal Diocese of Northwest Texas, All Saints Episcopal School,
Lubbock, TX
Kent City Community Schools, Kent City, MI
Fullerton School District, Fullerton, CA
Los Fresnos Consolidated Independent School District, Los Fresnos, TX
Livermore Valley Charter School, Livermore, CA
Matanuska-Susitna Borough School District, Wasilla, AK
Italy Independent School District, Italy, TX
Pittsfield School District, Pittsfield, MA
Ogden City School District, Ogden, UT
Rainbow Dreams Charter School, Las Vegas, NV
Port Jervis City School District, Cuddebackville, NY
Salina School District, Salina, OK
Rhea County School District, Spring City, TN
Screven County School District, Screven, GA
Saugus Union School District, Valencia, CA
South Sarpy School District 46, Springfield, NE
Sierra Sands Unified School District, Ridgecrest, CA
Wayne County School District, Jesup, GA
Vinita Public Schools, Vinita, OK
Waynesville R-VI School District, Ft. Leonard Wood, MO
Special thanks to the Alliance for Catholic Education’s English as a New Language Program (ACE-ENL) at the University of Notre Dame for their help
with the ELD component of this program.
Starfall also wishes to thank:
Stephen Schutz, Karen Bidgood, Tad Elliott, and the Purchasing, Customer Service, and Warehouse teams at SPS Studios.
Starfall
Kindergarten
Time
Unit 2 • Week 3
Frequently Asked Questions
4
Reading Research
5
Week 3 Overview
6
Preparation
7
Rhyming
10
Introduce Today Is Monday by Eric Carle, and Days of the Week
10
Introduce “Alphabet Avenue” Game
11
Introduce Tt /t/
12
Initial and Final Sounds
14
Listening and Writing, Page 4
14
Introduce High-Frequency Words: The, the
15
Introduce Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
16
Listening and Writing, Page 5
17
Introduce Pp /p/
17
Introduce High-Frequency Words: an, at
19
Explore the Alphabet
21
Blending
22
Introduce At School
22
Introduce Writing Journal
23
Listening and Writing, Page 7
24
ASL Days of the Week
25
Introduce Six Center Rotations
25
Today Is Monday
27
UNIT 2 3
Frequently Asked Questions
I noticed there is a lot of
partner sharing. Isn’t this
disruptive?
Actually it is engaging! Partner
sharing prior to responding provides each child the opportunity
to engage in the comprehension
process. Often you find the same
children raising their hands to
answer questions. Many children
are reluctant to answer, or process
information more slowly. Partner
sharing gives those children the
opportunity to actively participate
and build self-confidence. It is
also a social activity and breaks up
teacher talk so children are active
during instruction.
Why is adult writing
important? I thought it
was more important for
children to just write freely.
The kidwriting/adult writing
dynamic creates a safe, responsive
environment that eliminates the requirement to ”get it right.” Children
freely and confidently take risks and
apply their knowledge of letters,
sounds, and mechanics because
they know you will be there to
interpret, guide, and celebrate their
efforts.
Here’s how it works:
When it comes time for children to
write, encourage them to put their
thoughts in writing in whatever
way they can. Some may scribble or
pretend write. Others may attempt
to write the letters that stand for
the sounds they hear in words.
All of these efforts are kidwriting. As
children write, you circulate around
the room, reading and responding to their kidwriting, and adding
adult writing to capture their ideas
(see samples). Adult writing must
occur during, not after, the writing
session. It is equally important that
children share their writings with
each other when they finish.
Children benefit because they:
• take risks without worrying
about being correct.
• receive immediate feedback
delivered in a friendly,
constructive, and collaborative
fashion.
• can refer back to adult writing
in previous compositions and
self-correct.
• receive one-on-one affirmation
of their efforts and successes.
• recognize what they write is
important to themselves and
others.
• associate writing with meaning,
cooperation, and pleasure.
Teachers benefit because they can:
• quickly assess and diagnose
each child’s application of what
they’ve learned.
4
UNIT 2
• note trends that might indicate
the need for whole group
instruction.
• demonstrate correct spelling,
capitalization, and punctuation.
• observe phonetic and speech
errors such as /compuder/
(computer) and /wat/ (rat).
• clearly communicate their
expectations to each writer.
• scaffold feedback to meet
individual learners’ needs.
• encourage children to further
develop their thoughts and
reward their successes.
Example of kidwriting and adult
writing:
I can
cn seeyou.
u
i wnt to go to the prk
park
wt my frend
with
friend.
I want
Do adult writing, then say: I wish I
had gone to the park with you!
What did you do next? I’ll come
back to see what you did!
The child is sure to write more to
share his or her experience with
you!
You will also notice that in Starfall
classrooms, children do not write
daily. Instead we nurture enthusiasm for a topic. When children are
finally asked to write on that topic,
they are bursting to express what
is meaningful to them and share it
with others.
Reading Research
There are times when I think
the activity during Session 2
might work better in a Whole
Group Setting and vice-versa.
Can I make this change?
Yes! However, the lessons need
to be done sequentially. Session
2 is structured to last for a full 30
minutes to accommodate the
Computer and Practice Activity
rotations. The Practice Activities
were designed specifically to
be done independently to
accommodate classrooms that
do not have a paraprofessional
or volunteer to direct the group.
If you have a paraprofessional or
volunteer present, you may wish
to make some adjustments.
There are many factors, such as
the size of your class, maturity
and readiness of your children,
daily schedule of specials, etc.,
that will enter into how you
structure your day. Arrange the
lessons in a way that works best
for you.
Key findings from scientific research on phonics instruction by
the National Institute for Literacy
tell us that systematic and explicit
phonics instruction significantly improves kindergarten children’s word
recognition, spelling, and reading
comprehension. (1) It is effective
for children from various social and
economic levels, and is particularly
beneficial for children who are having difficulty learning to read and
who are at risk for developing future reading problems. NIL research
found that phonics instruction is
most effective when introduced
early. Phonics knowledge is essential to children’s successful reading
and writing development. (2) Exemplary phonics instruction builds
on a strong foundation of phonemic awareness explicitly taught
and integrated into a total reading
program. (3)
Our focused and explicit phonics
instruction establishes children’s
understanding of the Alphabetic
Principle. Starfall children develop
a deep and thorough knowledge
of the systematic and predictable
relationships between the letters
and spelling patterns of written
language and the individual spoken
sounds.
Children demonstrate their growing phonic skills and high-frequency word recognition when writing
in their Starfall Journals.
(1) Armbruster, B., Lehr, F., & Osborn, J. (2001).
Put Reading First: The Research Building Blocks for
Teaching Children to Read. (11-19). Washington,
DC: Center for the Improvement of Early Reading Achievement.
(2) Adams, M. J. (1990). Beginning to Read:
Thinking and Learning about Print, (409-424).
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
(3) Stahl, Steven. (1992). “Saying the ‘P’ Words:
Nine Guidelines for Exemplary Phonics Instruction”, Reading Teacher, 45, 618-625.
We love to hear from you. Keep the
feedback coming!
The Authors,
The children were able to “write”
sooner than I thought using their
Pam Ferguson, Florida
35 years teaching early childhood education
dictionaries and kidwriting. They love
Joan Elliott, Texas
31 years teaching early childhood education
—Tampa, Florida
the adult writing. I‛m amazed!
UNIT 2 5
Week 3 Overview
Time
Children learn about the calendar and days of the week through books, songs,
and rhymes. They become familiar with the signs for the days of the week using
American Sign Language.
This week we will:
• learn about Tt /t/ and Pp /p/.
• use our Starfall Writing Journals.
t
• learn high-frequency words the, an, at.
Literature Selections
T
WEEK 3 —OVERVIEW
t
Today Is Monday—Author Eric Carle is also an artist. Sometimes he draws
hundreds of pictures for just one book. He keeps drawing pictures until they feel just
right. Then he paints tissue paper with different colors using brushes or his fingers.
When the paper is dry, he cuts out strips to make a picture and glues them on a
board. Making pictures in this way is fun but messy. It’s how he illustrates all of his
books. Eric Carle likes cats. He was born in New York but went to school in Germany.
He moved to Massachusetts but retired to a winter home in Florida and a summer
home in North Carolina.
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom—Author John Archambault is also a singer,
songwriter, storyteller and musician. He likes to mingle the jingle with the
rhythm and the rhyme. He learned to love the sound of words from his Montana
grandmother, Rose, who read stories to him when he was young. In the third grade,
he wrote original endings for several books. His teacher, Mrs. Williams, nurtured
his dream of becoming an author. She showed him the row of books in the library
where all the “A” authors were and said his name should be there, too. He grew up
and lives in California near Los Angeles. He once taught first grade in the Bronx, N.Y.
Starfall Books & Other Media
Sing-Along
Backpack Bear’s ABC Rhyme Book
Listening & Writing, pp. 4-7
p
p
p
6
UNIT 2
“Alphabet Avenue”
ASL Poster: Days of the Week
P
Starfall Writing Journals
Predecodable Book 2, At School
Day
y1
Preparation
Each day, prepare Backpack Bear’s message and place it in his backpack.
Generate and prepare Vocabulary Word Cards for Week 3. You will use collage on
Day 1, tangled on Day 2 and journal on Day 4.
Backpack Bear
Day One
Day 2
Day
Prepare two name cards for each child in your class. Children
will play “Concentration” with these cards during this day’s
practice activity. Organize the names into sets that correspond
to the groups of children in each rotation.
I brought in a new
alphabet book. I
hope
we get to read it
later
today!
Love,
Learn the ASL Sign Tt.
Day Two
Do you know Twin
kle,
Twinkle, Little Star
?
My mother used
to
sing that to me! Ca
n
we sing it?
Love,
Vocabulary Word Cards
During calendar time, teach the ASL signs for the days of the week as suggested in
the Read Me First document. These signs can be found on the back of the ASL
poster. Children will begin to discriminate between the initial sounds in /t/ (Tuesday)
and /th/ (Thursday).
Day Three
Learn the ASL sign for Pp.
You will discuss coconut palm trees. Consider bringing a coconut for the children to taste.
Backpack Bear
D y3
Day
I made up a song
for
you about the alph
abet!
I hope you like it.
Love,
Backpack Bear
Day Four
Children will encounter their Starfall Writing Journals for the first time. If you have not
already done so, write the children’s names on the front cover in permanent marker.
Consider having a date stamp on hand for dating the children’s journal entries.
Day Five
Download and prepare the Learning Center Cards. Center suggestions are described
on Day 5. Please feel free to substitute activities of your own choice. The Learning
Center Cards include Activity Icons. If a corresponding icon is not available for your
activity, make your own by taking a photo or drawing a picture of it.
Generate a “Color by Word” practice page and photocopy one for each child.
Prepare word cards for each day of the week.
D y4
Day
You have been such
good friends to m
e.
I want to draw a
picture so I can al
ways
remember you!.
Your pal,
Backpack Bear
D y5
Day
I love learning ab
out
the days of the we
ek.
School days are m
y
favorite.
Your pal,
Backpack Bear
UNIT 2 7
DAY
One
DAY
Two
Reading
Rhyming Words
L&W p. 4
Phonemic Awareness
Tt /t/
Initial Sounds
Phonics
Initial and Final Sounds
High-Frequency (HF) Words
Comprehension Skill:
Sequence
The and
the
“Calendar”
Calendar
ABCs: A, B
Sing Along: Track 36 “Today is
Monday”
BpB’s Books: Row 1,
“A Computer”
ABC: ABC Song
Activity
“Concentration” with names
of children
“Alphabet Avenue”
Listening & Speaking
Today Is Monday
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
“Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star”
Vocabulary: tangled
Print Concepts
HF Words:
Comprehension Skills &
Strategies
WEEK 3 —OVERVIEW
Computer
Literature
“Today Is Monday”
Rhymes, Poems, & Songs
“Tt Tiger Rhyme”
Concept Development
“Letter March Song Tt”
Vocabulary
Days of the week
Following Directions
Same and Different
Vocabulary: collage
Writing
Social Studies
Science
8
UNIT 2
Describe the relative position of
objects by using one reference
DAY
Three
DAY
Four
DAY
Five
L&W p. 5 & 6
L&W p. 7
Sequence
Left to right
Beginning
and Ending
sounds
HF Words: is, for, see, me, the,
The, a, A, at, an
Beginning
and Ending
sounds
Left to right
Pp /p/
Top to bottom
HF Words:
Predecodable Book 2:
At School
an and at
Comprehension Skill:
Retell stories
1
Starfall Free Day
2
Name Formation with Play
Dough
3
ABCs: P, T, M, S, B, A
BpB’s Books: Row 2, “At School”
ABC Rhymes: Pp, Tt
BpB’s Books: Row 1,
“A Computer”
Sing Along: Track 6 “Down by
the A-B-Sea”
Draw coconut tree with letters
climbing
Arrange ABC’s left to right, top
to bottom; match upper and
lowercase letters
At School: Sequencing Activityy
4
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
Vocabulary: journal
“Color by Word” practice page
5
”Alphabet Avenue”
6
“Pp Pizza Rhyme”
“Down by the A, B, Sea”
High-Frequency Word
“Concentration”
At School
Today Is Monday
“Mulberry Bush”
“Today Is Monday”
Days of the Week
Starfall Writing Journals
Spaces between words
Identify major structures of
common plants
Describe the relative position of
objects by using one reference
UNIT 2 9
WEEK 3
Day
Phonemic Awareness Warm-Up
One
Materials
F Sing-Along Track 38
Rhyming
Recite “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.”
Listening & Speaking
Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star
Listen and understand
directions for
performing tasks
• Emphasize the rhythm by patting your hands on
your thighs.
Reading
• Pause after each couplet and ask which two words
rhyme (star/are; high/sky).
Up above the world so high
• Recite the verse again as children supply the rhyming
words in each couplet (star, are, high, sky).
Twinkle, twinkle, little star
Recognize and produce
words that rhyme
Identify a regular beat
and similarities of
sounds in words when
responding to rhythm
and rhyme in nursery
rhymes and other
rhyming selections
Repeat auditory
sequences (e.g. letters,
words, numbers,
rhythmic patterns)
Science
Describe the relative
position of objects by
using one reference
Technology
Use technology
resources to support
learning
Like a diamond in the sky
How I wonder what you are
Materials
Introduce Today Is Monday by Eric Carle,
and Days of the Week
Relate an experience in
a logical sequence
How I wonder what you are
Play Sing-Along Track 38. Children sing the rhyme, and
keep the rhythm by patting their hands on their thighs.
1
Listening & Speaking
Twinkle, twinkle, little star
Point to the classroom calendar. Explain that a week begins
on Sunday and ends on Saturday. The days of the week
create a pattern that repeats.
F Backpack Bear
F Navigate to “Calendar”
F Today Is Monday by
Eric Carle
F Vocabulary Word Card:
collage
F Sing-Along Track 36
Gather in a circle. Say: Let’s name the days of the week. We’ll
pass Backpack Bear around. When he gets to you, say the next day in
the pattern. I’ll start. Sunday. (Pass Backpack Bear to the next child who says, “Monday.”)
Assemble children around a classroom computer navigated to “Calendar.” Follow
the prompts. Children assist as you move through the activity. Say: When we look
at how things are the same, we compare them. Let’s compare our classroom
calendar with Starfall’s online calendar. How are they the same? Discuss.
Display Today Is Monday. Indicate the cover and title and say: Eric Carle is the
illustrator of this story. He is famous for his illustrations. You can recognize
his illustrations because he doesn’t draw pictures. He paints tissue paper
using different colors then cuts the paper into small pieces. He then lays
them on top of each other to make a picture. This is called a collage.
Children repeat, collage.
Explain that no author is listed because the words in this story are words to a song
written long ago. Eric Carle created illustrations to accompany the words of the song.
Children predict what this story might be about from the cover (animals eating).
Say: Listen to find out what foods the animals are eating. Read the book.
When you get to Wednesday, pause and ask: What do you think zoop is? (Children
respond.) Zoop is a nonsense, or make believe word, but the picture shows food
10
UNIT 2
WEEK 3 • DAY 1
in a bowl. Since zoop rhymes with soup, do you think zoop
might be similar to soup?
Today Is Monday
Read the book again. Children:
Today is Monday.
Today is Monday,
Monday, string beans.
• chime in on repetitive phrasing as you read.
All you hungry children,
• describe what they see in the final illustration.
Come and eat it up.
Show the music notations on the last page and remind
children that this book is a song. Review each page as you
sing the song again.
Tuesday, spaghetti.
Play Sing-Along Track 36, “Today Is Monday.” Say: Let’s see how
this song is different from the book. When we look at how
things are different, we contrast them. Children repeat,
contrast. Contrast Starfall’s version of the song with that in
the book. (Thursday differs.)
Saturday, chicken.
2
Wednesday, soup.
Thursday, pizza.
Friday, fresh fish.
Sunday, ice cream.
All you hungry children,
Come and eat it up.
Materials
Introduce “Alphabet Avenue” Game
Place the Uppercase Letter Cards in ABC order in the pocket
chart as you name the letters.
F “Alphabet Avenue,”
spinner, game pieces
F Uppercase Letter
Cards: A-Z
F Pocket chart
Reading
• Children repeat after you.
Recognize and name
uppercase letters of the
alphabet
• When all letters are in place, point to and say the alphabet together.
Listening & Speaking
• Each child locates and names the first letter of his/her name.
Listen carefully and
understand directions
for performing tasks
Display “Alphabet Avenue.” Say: Let’s compare and contrast the alphabet in the
pocket chart to the alphabet on this game board. How are they the same?
How are they different?
Select four or five volunteers to demonstrate the game. Play the game, taking turns
until each child has a chance to play.
• Each player chooses a playing piece and places it in the parking lot near the
start arrow.
Star
St
rfall
al Ki
K ndergarten
t
• Players use the spinner to determine playing order. The lowest number goes first.
• The first player spins the spinner and then moves his or her playing
piece the corresponding number of spaces. If a player lands on a
Starfall character or on the letter that begins his or her name, the
player may take an extra turn. If the player lands on a letter,
he or she names the letter.
• If the player is correct, the other players give him/her a
thumbs up. If the player is not correct, the other players
help determine the correct answer.
• Play then moves to the next player.
• The game ends when all the children reach
Backpack Bear’s picnic!
UNIT 2 11
WEEK 3 • DAY 1
Computer
Technology
• “Calendar”
Use technology
resources to support
learning
• ABCs: A, B
Practice
• Sing Along: Track 36 “Today Is Monday”
Activity
Materials
Children shuffle the deck of name cards, placing them
face-down on a table for “Concentration.” They will play
several times. Remind them to shuffle (“mix up”) the
cards before they begin each new game.
3
F Two name cards for
each child
Materials
F Picture Card: tiger
Introduce Tt /t/
F Letter Cards: T and t
F Wall Card: Tiger /t/
Reading
Step One
Introduce /t/ in the initial position
Recognize and produce
words that rhyme
Read
R
d the
th rhyme
h
“Tt Tiger” on page 43 of the ABC Rhyme Book.
Match consonant
sounds to appropriate
letters
Display the Picture Card tiger. Say: This is a
picture of a tiger. (Children repeat, tiger.) The
word tiger begins with the sound /t/. Watch
my mouth: /t/. Now you say /t/. The words
terrific and tiger begin with the same sound:
/t/. (Children repeat, /t/.) I will read the rhyme again.
Listen for the sound /t/ in terrific and tiger.
Writing
Write lowercase letters
of the alphabet
independently
Technology
Use technology
resources to support
learning
F Whiteboards/markers
F ABC Rhyme Book
Tt Tiger
Terrific tiger, what a sight,
Black and gold with eyes so bright
Your bold roar gives me a fright,
Terrific tiger, please don’t bite!!
Read the rhyme again, then repeat it in unison.
Step Two
Discriminate /t/ in the initial position
A k th
Ask
the children
hild
to stand. Say: I will say some words. If you hear /t/ at the
beginning of a word, touch the top of your head. Ready?
ten
Step Three
ball
toy
tail
Connect /t/ to the spelling Tt
T h children
Teach
hild
the ASL sign for Tt. Children sing “The
Letter March” with the ASL sign for t and sound /t/.
t
12
UNIT 2
Display the Letter Card t. Say: This is the lowercase
letter t. The letter t stands for the sound /t/.
Each time I touch the letter t, say, /t/.
Touch t several times.
Demonstrate the letter’s formation as you write t on
the board. Children mimic the formation by skywriting t
several times.
doll
twinkle
The Letter March: Tt
(Melody: “The Ants Go Marching”)
The letters go marching one by one,
Hurrah! Hurrah!
The letters go marching one by one,
Hurrah! Hurrah!
The letters go marching one by one,
“T” stands for the sound, /t/ /t/ /t/ /t/
And they all go marching ,
In- to a word, to use, their sound
WEEK 3 • DAY 1
Distribute whiteboards and markers. Children write t on their whiteboards.
Say: Let’s play a game. If the word I say begins with the sound /t/, hold up your
whiteboards and say, /t/. If it does not, do nothing! Ready?
tub
ban
television
top
toe
pig
Display the Letter Card T. Say: This is the uppercase letter T. The uppercase letter
T and the lowercase letter t stand for the sound /t/. Each letter of the alphabet
has an uppercase and a lowercase letter.
Demonstrate the letter’s formation as you write T on the board. Children
mimic the formation by skywriting T several times. A volunteer locates Tt
on the Alphabet Chart. Ask: Are the letters T and t near the beginning,
middle, or end of the alphabet? (end)
T
Step Four
Introduce /t/ in the final position
Askk th
A
the riddle:
iddl
cat
I have whiskers and say ‘meow.’ Who am I?
Explain: The word cat ends with the letter t. The letter t stands for the sound /t/.
Emphasize the final /t/ as you say the following words. Children repeat each word
after you.
hat
carrot
heart
night
t
pot
On the computer, navigate to ABCs: Indicate the interpreter button. Say: This
button will show you the American Sign Language sign for each letter of
the alphabet. People who are deaf cannot hear spoken words. They use
their hands to talk with one another. Deaf and hard-of-hearing children learn
the American Sign Language alphabet. Click on the interpreter button. Volunteers
click on the letter t. Review the ASL signs for t, a, and b.
Display the Wall Card at
the end of the lesson.
Star
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Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss T t Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz
a
b
t
UNIT 2 13
WEEK 3
Day
Phonemic Awareness Warm-Up
Two
Initial and Final Sounds
Say: Let’s play the “Picture Card Game”.
Reading
Identify initial and
final phonemes in CVC
words
• Display and identify each of the Picture Cards in
Set One.
Materials
F Set One Picture Cards:
turtle, ten, tub, bell
F Set Two Picture Cards:
hat, cub, jet, net
F Picture Card: tent
F Pocket chart
• Children repeat each Picture Card name and identify the initial sound.
• Children find the picture that does not begin with the sound /t/. (bell)
• Repeat as above for Set Two, finding the picture that does not end with the
sound /t/. (cub)
• Display the Picture Card tent. Children identify the initial and final sounds.
1
Materials
Listening and Writing, Page 4
Reading
Read high-frequency
words
Writing
Write uppercase and
lowercase letters of the
alphabet independently, attending to the form
and proper spacing of
the letters
F L&W, p. 4
F Pencils/crayons
Distribute L&W, p. 4. Children locate and trace over T and t
with their fingers.
Read the sentence Tt is for tiger. Children:
• repeat the sentence.
• locate the high-frequency words is and for and circle them with a pencil.
Name the pictures: taxi, ten, turkey. Explain that all these words begin with the sound
/t/. Children repeat each picture name, emphasizing the initial sound /t/.
Write uppercase T on the board and say T. Children use pencils to trace over the
uppercase T’s; repeat for lowercase t. Children color the pictures.
Move about the room and observe as children tracee over
ssist those who
letters and color pictures. Note their progress and assist
need support. Focus on enhancing what is good about their efforts.
14
UNIT 2
Observe
& Modify
WEEK 3 • DAY 2
2
Materials
Introduce High-Frequency Words: The, the
Say: We have learned five high-frequency words.
What does high-frequency word mean? (a word that we
see often when we are reading)
• Show the High-Frequency Word Card is.
F Whiteboards/markers
F Pocket chart
F Classroom books
F Starfall Dictionaries
F High-Frequency Word
Cards: a, for, me, see,
the, is
• Children read the word.
• Count the number of letters in the word.
• Place is in the pocket chart.
Reading
Write uppercase and
lowercase letters of the
alphabet independently, attending to the form
and proper spacing of
the letters
Read high-frequency
words
• On a whiteboard, write: is.
• Children write is on their whiteboards.
Repeat for high-frequency words: me, see, for, a.
• Show the High-Frequency Word Card the.
Say: This word is a new high-frequency word, the.
• Children repeat the word.
• Children count the number of letters in the word.
• A volunteer uses the word in a sentence.
• Place the in the pocket chart.
Write the words Tuesday and Thursday on the board. Point to each and say:
Tuesday, Thursday. (Children repeat.) What letter do you see at the beginning
of Tuesday? As children respond, make the ASL sign for t.
Continue: Now look at the word Thursday. (Children repeat, Thursday.) You see a T
but you hear /th/. Make the sound /th/, and demonstrate the ASL sign for th (t+h).
Explain: The t and h work together to stand for the sound /th/. (Children repeat,
/th/.) Tuesday begins with /t/ and Thursday begins with /th/.
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Say: Listen to our new high-frequency word the. (Children repeat, the.) Do you
hear a /t/ or /th/ at the beginning of the?
Write the on the board. Children write the on their whiteboards.
Distribute Starfall Dictionaries. Children locate Tt then turn the page to
reveal th. Ask: Do you think the word the belongs with the words that begin
with the sound /t/ or /th/? Yes, we will write the in our dictionaries on the
th page. Watch me. To demonstrate, clearly open your own dictionary and locate
the th page and then print the.
Print The on the board. Say: When we use the word The at the beginning of the
sentence, we use an uppercase T. We will write The again in our dictionaries,
but this time with an uppercase T. Demonstrate in your own dictionary.
UNIT 2 15
WEEK 3 • DAY 2
Computer
Practice
Technology
• Backpack Bear’s Books: Row 1, “A Computer”
Use technology
resources to support
learning
• “Calendar”
• ABC: ABC Song
Activity
Materials
Children recall the rules from Day 1, Session 2 to play
the game independently.
Reading
Recognize and name
uppercase letters of the
alphabet
3
Identify the front cover,
back cover, title, and
illustrator of a book
Ask and answer
questions about
essential elements
of a text
F Game rules: Day 1,
Session 2
Materials
Introduce Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
Reading
F “Alphabet Avenue”
Backpack Bear whispers now would be a good time for that
special ABC book he brought to school.
F Chicka Chicka Boom
Boom by Bill Martin, Jr.
and John Archambault
F Vocabulary Word Card:
tangled
Display Chicka Chicka Boom Boom and say: This is the book Backpack Bear told us
about in his message. It is a book about letters. The title of this book is Chicka
Chicka Boom Boom. Bill Martin, Jr., and John Archambault are the authors of
both this book, and Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? Lois Ehlert is
the illustrator.
Picture-walk through the book, then say: Listen to this story to find out what
happens to the letters. Read the book and ask:
They all fell down
from the tree.
What happened when all the letters reached
the top of the tree?
knee
What part of Dd got hurt when he fell from
the tree?
Who can think of another way to describe a
skinned knee?
stubbed-toe Ee
How did the author describe what happened to Ee?
They got tangled up.
What happened to Hh and Ii?
shoe laces, jump
rope, ribbons
Tangled means twisted or mixed together.
Sometimes your hair gets tangled or messy.
What else could get tangled?
Say: Did you notice the authors made their story rhyme? Let’s read this story
again. Listen for rhyming words. Pause before reading the rhyming pairs and
encourage children to supply them.
16
UNIT 2
WEEK 3
Phonemic Awareness Warm-Up
Materials
Day
F L&W, p. 5
Listening and Writing, Page 5
F Pencils/crayons
Distribute L&W, p. 5. Children will listen for the sound /t/
at the beginning and end of words.
1
Three
Reading
Identify initial and
final phonemes in
CVC words
Materials
F Picture Card: pizza
Introduce Pp /p/
F Letter Cards: P and p
F Wall Card: Pizza /p/
Step One
Introduce /p/ in the initial position
RRead
d the
th rhyme
h
“Pp Pizza” on page 35 of the ABC Rhyme Book.
F Whiteboards/markers
Reading
F ABC Rhyme Book
Recognize and produce
words that rhyme
F L&W, p. 6
Display the Picture Card pizza. Say: This is a picture
of a pizza. Say, pizza. What kind of pizza?
(pepperoni pizza!) The word pizza begins with
the sound /p/. Watch my mouth: /p/. Now you
say /p/. The words pepperoni and pizza begin
with the same sound: /p/. (Children repeat, /p/.) I will read
the rhyme again. Listen for the sound /p/ in pizza.
F Pencils/crayons
Pp Pizza
Pizza in the morning
Pizza at night
Pizza hot, Pizza cold--
Match consonant
sounds to appropriate
letters
Writing
Write lowercase letters
of the alphabet
independently
My tummy’s delight!
Read the rhyme again, then children repeat in unison.
Step Two
Discriminate /p/ in the initial position
A k th
Ask
the children
hild
to stand. Say: I will say some words. If you hear /p/ at the
beginning of a word, rub your tummy! Ready?
paper
tiger
pan
pink
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purse
UNIT 2 17
WEEK 3 • DAY 3
Step Three
Connect /p/ to the spelling Pp
The Letter March: Pp
T h children
Teach
hild
the ASL sign for Pp. Children sing “The
Letter March” with the ASL sign for p and sound /p/.
(Melody: “The Ants Go Marching”)
The letters go marching one by one,
Hurrah! Hurrah!
Display the Letter Card p and say: This is the
lowercase letter p. The letter p stands for the
sound /p/. Each time I touch the letter p,
say, /p/. Touch p several times.
p
The letters go marching one by one,
Hurrah! Hurrah!
The letters go marching one by one,
“P” stands for the sound, /p/ /p/ /p/ /p/
Demonstrate the letter’s formation as you write p on
the board. Children mimic the formation by skywriting
p several times. A volunteer locates Pp on the Alphabet
Chart. Ask: Are the letters P and p near the beginning,
middle, or end of the alphabet? (middle)
p
p
And they all go marching ,
In- to a word, to use, their sound
Distribute whiteboards and markers. Children write p on their whiteboards.
Display the Wall Card at
the end of the lesson.
Say: Let’s play a game. If the word I say begins with the sound /p/, hold up your
board and say, /p/. If it does not, do nothing! Ready?
pet
table
blue
park
nurse
paint
Display the Letter Card P. Say: This is the uppercase letter P. The uppercase letter P and the lowercase letter p stand for the sound /p/.
Each letter of the alphabet has an uppercase and a lowercase letter.
P
Demonstrate the letter’s formation as you write P on the board. Children
mimic the formation by skywriting P.
Step Four
Introduce /p/ in the final position
Askk th
A
the riddle:
iddl
soap
You use me when you are really dirty and take a bath.
I make you nice and clean. What am I?
Explain: The word soap ends with p. The letter p stands for the sound /p/.
Emphasize the final /p/ as you say the following words. Children repeat each word.
stop
ship
soup
hop
cup
Distribute L&W, p. 6 and complete as with similar pages.
Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss T t Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz
a
b
p
p
t
The initial sound /p/ does not exist in Vietnamese. Be suree to
emphasize this sound for children who speak Vietnamese.
e.
18
UNIT 2
ELD
WEEK 3 • DAY 3
2
Materials
F Letter Cards A-Z
Introduce High-Frequency Words: an, at
F Sing-Along Track 4
Say: Backpack Bear has a game he wants us to play with
our letters. Close your eyes and don’t peek!
F Pencils
F Starfall Dictionaries
F High-Frequency Word
Cards: an, at
Select as many alphabet Letter Cards as you have children in
your class. Quickly hide them face-down around the room
on the floor. Children listen to Sing-Along Track 4,
“Backpack Bear’s ABCs” to find out how to play
Backpack Bear’s ABCs
the game. Say: Backpack Bear must have
Backpack Bear runs in the door,
hidden letters around the room on the floor!
And hunts for letters on the floor.
Each of you find one letter and bring it back
He grabs them quick and hides them well,
to your place.
Where he hides them, he won’t tell.
Each child names his or her letter for Backpack Bear.
Children may ask each other for assistance.
Reading
Recognize and name
uppercase and
lowercase letters
of the alphabet
Recognize highfrequency words
Understand that as
letters of words change,
so do the sounds
Listening & Speaking
Communicate effectively when sharing ideas
Off he goes to wait some more,
For you to find them on the floor!
Distribute Starfall Dictionaries. Play “I Spy.”
• Say Aa and print it on the board.
• Children find the letters in their dictionaries. They may help each other.
• When they find the letters, they hold up their dictionaries.
• Children identify the words a and A on the page.
• Repeat for Ii, is; Ff, for; Mm, me; Ss, see; Th, the
Write at on the board. Say: When we blend the /a/ with the /t/, we have a new
high-frequency word, at.
• On the board, write: I go to bed at night.
• Track words as you and the children read the sentence.
• A volunteer circles at.
• Repeat using: I am at school.
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Write at in your own dictionary. Children follow your example.
Ask: What if we keep /a/ and change /t/ to /n/? (Erase t and write n.) Is the word
the same? Let’s blend the sounds together to find out: /a/, /n/, an. When we
changed /t/ to /n/, we made a new word, an.
• On the board, write: I can eat an apple.
• Track the words as you and the children read the sentence.
• A volunteer circles an.
• Repeat using: I can see an orange book.
Write an in your own dictionary. Children follow your example.
UNIT 2 19
WEEK 3 • DAY 3
Computer
Technology
• ABCs: P, T, M, S, B, A
Use technology
resources to support
learning
• ABC Rhymes: Pp, Tt
Reading
Write letters of the
alphabet independently, attending to form
Activity
Children draw a large tree similar to the one illustrated
in Chicka Chicka Boom Boom and add letters “climbing”
up the tree.
Practice
Materials
F Chicka Chicka
Boom Boom
F Drawing paper
F Pencil/crayons
F Classroom Alphabet
Chart
20
UNIT 2
WEEK 3 • DAY 3
3
Materials
F Chicka Chicka
Boom Boom
Explore the Alphabet
F Coconut (optional)
Ask: Do trees change or do they stay the same?
Briefly discuss that trees were once seeds and grew
until they produced leaves. Ask children to name
common trees in your community. Discuss.
Display Chicka Chicka Boom Boom. Say: There is a special
kind of tree in the story Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.
It produces coconuts. It is a coconut tree. Children repeat,
coconut tree.
F Uppercase Letter
Cards: A-Z
F Pocket chart
F Classroom
whiteboard/marker
Reading
Recognize and name
uppercase and
lowercase letters of
the alphabet
F Sing-Along Track 6
Recognize and produce
words that rhyme
F Pointer
Science
Identify major structures
of common plants
On the board, draw a palm tree with coconuts hanging under the leaves. Explain:
Coconuts are large, heavy fruits that grow near the top of coconut trees,
just under the huge leaves. Coconut trees only grow in warm places where
the weather doesn’t change very much. People learn to climb coconut trees
barefoot and pick the fruit! Have you tasted coconut? If you brought in a real
coconut, show the children and pass it around for them to see and touch.
Gather children near the pocket chart. Say: Let’s read Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
again. This book is about the alphabet trying to climb a coconut tree.
After reading the story, arrange the uppercase letters in the pocket chart left to right;
top to bottom. Children name each letter as it is placed in the chart.
Say: Let’s learn a new song, “Down by the
A, B, Sea.” It is similar to Chicka Chicka
Boom Boom. Children listen to Sing-Along
Track 6. Play the song again. Children watch
you point to the letters as you all sing the
song together.
Ask children if they noticed any rhyming words
in the song. Repeat phrases from the song.
Encourage children to provide the rhyming
words (underlined).
Down by the A, B, Sea
Down by the A, B, Sea where the coconuts grow,
There is a place I want to go,
But if I do, my teacher might say:
Did you see A & B or C & D up in the tree?
Did you see E, F, G or H & I up near the sky?
Did you see J & K or L & M joining them?
Did you see N & O or P & Q following you?
Did you see R & S or T & U in front of you?
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Did you see V & W, X, Y or Z up in the tree?
UNIT 2 21
WEEK 3
Day
Phonemic Awareness Warm-Up
Four
Materials
F Large rubber band
Blending
Say: I want to show you an easy way to blend sounds into words. Turn your
back to the children. Hold up a rubber band in your left hand so the children can
see it. Look over your shoulder and say: tab.
Listening & Speaking
Listen carefully and
understand directions
for performing tasks
• Use your right hand to stretch the rubber band in increments as you look
over your shoulder and say each sound in the word: /t/, /a/, /b/.
Reading
Blend individual
phonemes in simple,
one-syllable words
• At the final sound, release one end of the rubber band and allow it to snap
into place as you blend the word: tab.
• Children repeat the word.
Repeat for tap.
Put the rubber band away. Say: Let’s take out our ‘invisible rubber bands’!
We will use them to sound out the high-frequency word at. Stretch your
invisible rubber band to say the sounds in at: /a/ /t/. Now, release your
invisible rubber band and blend the word: at. Repeat for bat.
Say: Learning how to blend sounds together will help you become good
readers and spellers!
1
Materials
Introduce At School
On a computer, navigate to Backpack Bear’s Books: Row 2, “At
School.” Children interact with and discuss the online story
and “High-Frequency Word Game.” Display the Cover Card and
Sentence Strips in the pocket chart. Read the story together.
Reading
Recognize that
sentences in print
are made up of
separate words
Recognize highfrequency words
F Predecodable Book 2,
At School, for
each child
F Cover Card, Sentence
Strips, Word Cards: At
School
F Pocket chart
F Backpack Bear
Model fluency by reading the story with expression and
inflection as cued by the punctuation marks. Briefly discuss
the period, question mark, and exclamation mark.
Distribute Predecodable Book 2 to each child. Children read their books aloud as you
read the Sentence Strip story.
Mix up the Sentence Strips. Children use their books to reorder the story.
Play “High-Frequency Word Detectives.”
See
2
at the
Backpack Bear
table
.
• Write see on the board.
Starfall
Star
fall
At School
See
at the
Backpack Bear
2
2
2
• Children count the number of times see is used in the story. (4)
com
table
2
2
• A volunteer makes 4 tally marks next to see on the board.
Repeat for at (3), the (4), me (2), an (1), a (1), is (2), for (2).
Children read the story together.
22
UNIT 2
WEEK 3 • DAY 4
2
Materials
Introduce Writing Journal
F Starfall Writing
Journals
F Pencils/crayons
Remind children of Backpack Bear’s message. Tell Backpack
Bear that you want to remember him, too, and that you have
the perfect way to do just that!
F Backpack Bear’s
message
F Vocabulary Word Card:
journal
Display a Starfall Writing Journal. Say: This is a writing
journal. A journal is a book with blank pages where you
write and draw about things you want to remember. (Children repeat, journal.)
We keep journals to remember things, such as special days, trips, ideas, and stories.
Distribute writing journals. Say: This is your special Starfall Writing Journal.
• Open your own journal to the first page and indicate the lines and the blank
space above them.
• Children tell you the purpose of the lines (writing) and blank spaces (illustrations).
Say: You will be the authors and illustrators of your journals. You will write your
thoughts and ideas inside these pages. Today we will make our first entry. An
entry is something you write or draw in your journal.
Reading
Recognize and name
uppercase and
lowercase letters
Recognize highfrequency words
Writing
Write by moving from
left to right and top to
bottom
Write uppercase and
lowercase letters of the
alphabet independently, attending to the form
and proper spacing of
letters
Participate in creating a
variety of informational
forms (journal)
Write My Pal on the board. Draw attention to the space between the words My and
Pal. Say: The space is important because it helps us tell where one word ends
and the next one begins. The spaces between words make reading much
easier. Read My Pal. Children echo you.
• Children find the star at the beginning of the first line of the journal and put a
finger on it.
• Explain that this star tells the children where to begin writing.
• Demonstrate by writing My on the writing line next to the star in your own journal.
• Children follow your example.
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Explain: Remember, before we can write Pal, we need to leave a space after the
word My. A good way to make a space is to place your index finger (indicate)
after the word My. Begin to write the word Pal after your finger! Demonstrate
by writing Pal in your own journal.
Children draw pictures of themselves with Backpack Bear in the blank space above
the words My Pal. Gather in small groups to share their first entries.
If children are unable to copy from the board, provide
de index
cards with My Pal printed on them, or dot the wordss in their
journals to trace. If children have difficulty creating spaces between
words, give them craft sticks to use as space markers.
Observe
& Modify
Collect the
journals.
Use a date
stamp on
the childre
n’s entries
until they
are able to
write the d
ate on
their own.
UNIT 2 23
WEEK 3 • DAY 4
Computer
Practice
Technology
• Backpack Bear’s Books: Row 2, “At School”
Use technology
resources to support
learning
• Backpack Bear’s Books: Row 1, “The Computer”
• Sing Along: Track 6 “Down by the A-B-Sea”
Activity
Materials
Children arrange uppercase letters A-Z in the pocket
chart from left to right, top to bottom. After all uppercase letters are ordered, children reference the
Classroom Alphabet Chart to place corresponding
lowercase letters on top of them.
Reading
Recognize and name
uppercase and lowercase letters
F Uppercase and lowercase Letters: Aa-Zz
F Pocket chart
F Classroom Alphabet
Chart
3
Materials
F ABC Rhyme Book
Listening and Writing, Page 7
Reading
Identify initial and final
phonemes in words
F L&W, p. 7
Read “Pp Pizza” on page 35 of the ABC Rhyme Book. Say: The word pizza begins with
the sound /p/. Say pizza. Listen for the sound /p/ at the beginning.
Say: Listen to these words. If you hear /p/ at the beginning of the word, put
your hands on top of your head. If you hear /p/ at the end of the word, put
your hands behind your back.
pond
snap pencil party
cup pretty
stop
Distribute copies of L&W, p.7.
Indicate and name the first picture. (pizza)
Ask: Does pizza begin with the sound /p/? If it does, circle it.
If it does not, put an X on it.
Continue for ants, tent, pencil, pig, ball. Repeat for pictures that
end in the sound /p/ (map, cat, soap, bib, foot, mop).
Children color pictures that begin or end with /p/.
24
UNIT 2
popcorn
WEEK 3
Phonemic Awareness Warm-Up
Materials
Day
F ASL Poster: Days of
the Week
ASL Days of the Week
F Sing-Along Track 22
Remind children that most of the ASL signs for the days
of the week use the first letter of the name for the day. (Sunday is the only one
that differs.) Lead children in saying and signing the days of the week. Discuss
activities the children do routinely on specific days. Ask: Do we do the same
thing every day? Here’s a song
about things we might do on
Mulberry Bush
different days of the week.
Here we go round the mulberry bush, so early in the morning.
Play Sing-Along Track 22. Make
up actions to accompany the
song as you sing.
Ask: What day is missing from
this song? (Sunday) Children
make up something they might
do on Sunday. Repeat the song
using the ASL sign for each day.
Five
Listening & Speaking
Relate an experience in
a logical sequence
Science
Describe the relative
position of objects by
using one reference
This is the way we wash our clothes, so early Monday morning.
…iron our clothes, so early Tuesday morning.
…mend our clothes, so early Wednesday morning.
…sweep the floor, so early Thursday morning.
…scrub the floor, so early Friday morning.
…bake our bread, so early Saturday morning.
1
Materials
Introduce Six Center Rotations
F Six Learning Center
Cards
F Six Blank Group Cards
F
Place the group cards with children’s names listed under
the Center Cards. Explain that the children will work in their
F
assigned centers for fifteen minutes. At the end of fifteen
minutes you will give them a signal. When they hear your
signal they stop the activity and prepare the center for the
next group. At the next signal, all groups move to the next center.
Icons
Listening & Speaking
Pocket chart or
classroom magnetic
whiteboard
To introduce the
new learning center
rotations display and
explain each center
card
1
Computer
Starfa
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Starfall Free Day — Children may navigate to any activity on more.starfall.com.
As they do, they preview skills and build background knowledge. There is no
need to limit their exploration.
Name Formation with Play Dough
Children form their names and the names of others in
their group using play dough.
Materials
Technology
Use technology
resources to support
learning
2
F Play dough
F Children’s name cards
Reading
Recognize uppercase
and lowercase letters
of the alphabet
UNIT 2 25
WEEK 3 • DAY 5
Reading
Read simple onesyllable and highfrequency words
Reading
Read simple onesyllable and highfrequency words
Materials
Children arrange High-Frequency Word Cards face-down
in the pocket chart, then take turns finding matches.
F Two of each HighFrequency Word Cards:
is, for, see, me, the, a, A,
an, at
F Pocket chart or
table/floor
”At School” Sequencing Activity
Materials
Children sequence the book At School by placing the
Sentence Strips and individual Word Cards in story order.
F Predecodable Book
2, At School, for each
child
Relate an experience in
a logical sequence
4
F Cover Card, Sentence
Strips, Word Cards,
At School
Identify sequence of
events in a story
Listening & Speaking
3
High-Frequency Word “Concentration”
F Pocket chart
”Color by Word”
Materials
Children complete the “Color by Word” practice page for
Week 3 according to high-frequency words.
F “Color by Word”
practice page for
Week 3
5
F Pencils/crayons
Science
Describe the relative
position of objects by
using one reference
”Alphabet Avenue”
Reading
Recognize and name
uppercase letters of the
alphabet
26
UNIT 2
Review game rules prior to center rotations.
Materials
F “Alphabet Avenue”
F Game rules: Day 1,
Session 2
6
WEEK 3 • DAY 5
2
Materials
Today Is Monday
Read Today Is Monday. Ask: Did you notice that on each
day of the week, the animals ate different foods? Does
that make you think of the different things we do at
school each day? Here’s an idea. Let’s make up our own
song about the days of the week.
F Today Is Monday
F Pocket chart
F Seven blank index
cards
F Word Cards: Sunday,
Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday,
Friday, Saturday
The following is a sample scenario. Tailor each day to your own schedule. On days
when there are no special activities, children substitute a classroom activity they enjoy.
Writing
Participate in writing
simple stories, poems,
rhymes or song lyrics
Social Studies
Put events in temporal
order using a calendar
Place Monday in a pocket chart. Say: On Mondays we have art. So we could say,
Monday, art.
• On an index card, write the word art.
• Draw a symbol, such as a paint brush, next to the word.
• Place the index card next to the word Monday in the pocket chart.
Place Tuesday in the pocket chart. Ask: Who remembers what we do on Tuesday?
(Music) We’ll show music for Tuesday. Repeat as above. Once you’ve placed the
index card in the pocket chart, say: Monday, art; Tuesday, music.
Continue until you have each day of the week represented. Activities during the
school week might include: art, music, PE, computer, library, free play, centers. For the
weekend, you could suggest swimming, reading, baseball, playing games.
Star
St
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al Ki
K ndergarten
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Sing the song Today Is Monday with your new words!
UNIT 2 27
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