Kings and Queens
Kindergarten
Core Knowledge Language Arts® • New York Edition • Listening & Learning™ Strand
Tell It Again!™ Read-Aloud Supplemental Guide
Kings and Queens
Kings and Queens
Supplemental Guide to the
Tell It Again!™ Read-Aloud Anthology
Listening & Learning™ Strand
KINDERGARTEN
Core Knowledge Language Arts®
New York Edition
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Table of Contents
Kings and Queens
Supplemental Guide to the
Tell It Again!™ Read-Aloud Anthology
Preface to the Supplemental Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
Alignment Chart for Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Introduction to Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Lesson 1: The Royal Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Lesson 2: King Midas and the Golden Touch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Lesson 3: Old King Cole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Lesson 4: Sing a Song of Sixpence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Pausing Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Lesson 5: The Princess and the Pea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Lesson 6: Cinderella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Lesson 7: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Domain Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Domain Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Culminating Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Preface to the Supplemental Guide
Kings and Queens
The Supplemental Guide is designed as a companion to the Core
Knowledge Language Arts Tell It Again! Read-Aloud Anthologies. There
is one Supplemental Guide per domain. This preface to the Supplemental
Guide provides information about the guide’s purpose and target
audience, describes how it can be used flexibly in various classroom
settings, and summarizes the features of the guide that distinguish it from
the Tell It Again! Read-Aloud Anthologies.
Intended Users and Uses
This guide is intended to be used by general education teachers, reading
specialists, English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers, special
education teachers, and teachers seeking an additional resource for
classroom activities. This guide is intended to be both flexible and
versatile. Its use is to be determined by teachers in order to fit the unique
circumstances and specific needs of their classrooms and individual
students. Teachers whose students would benefit from enhanced oral
language practice may opt to use the Supplemental Guide as their
primary guide for Listening & Learning. Teachers may also choose to
begin a domain by using the Supplemental Guide as their primary guide
before transitioning to the Tell It Again! Read-Aloud Anthology, or may
choose individual activities from the Supplemental Guide to augment
the content covered in the Tell It Again! Read-Aloud Anthology. Such
teachers might use the Vocabulary Instructional Activities and some of
the modified read-alouds during small-group instruction time. Reading
specialists and ESL teachers may find that the tiered Vocabulary Charts
are a useful starting point in addressing their students’ vocabulary
learning needs.
The Supplemental Guide is designed to allow flexibility with regard to
lesson pacing, and encourages education professionals to pause and
review when necessary. A number of hands-on activities and graphic
organizers are included in the lessons to assist students with learning the
content presented.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Preface
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
v
Supplemental Guide Contents
The Supplemental Guide contains modified read-alouds, tiered
Vocabulary Charts, Multiple Meaning Word Activities, Syntactic
Awareness Activities, and Vocabulary Instructional Activities. For each
modified read-aloud, a variety of Multiple Meaning Word Activities,
Syntactic Awareness Activities, and Vocabulary Instructional Activities are
available for classroom use, affording students additional opportunities
to use domain vocabulary. The activities integrated into the lessons of
the Supplemental Guide create a purposeful and systematic setting for
English language learning. The read-aloud of each story or nonfiction
text builds upon previously taught vocabulary and ideas, and introduces
language and knowledge needed for the subsequent, more complex
text. The Supplemental Guide’s focus on oral language in the earlier
grades addresses the language learning needs of students with
limited English language skills, who may not be exposed to the kind of
academic language found in written texts outside of a school setting.
Modified Read-Alouds
The modified read-alouds in the Supplemental Guide, like the readalouds in the corresponding Tell It Again! Read-Aloud Anthology, are
content-rich and designed to build students’ listening comprehension,
which is a crucial foundation for their reading comprehension abilities.
You may notice that not all of the read-alouds in the Tell It Again! ReadAloud Anthology appear in the corresponding Supplemental Guide.
Some of the read-alouds were omitted to provide ample time for teachers
to review read-aloud content and language, and to engage students in
extended dialogue about the text. Nonetheless, students who listen to
the Supplemental Guide read-alouds will learn the same core content as
students who listen to read-alouds from the corresponding Tell It Again!
Read-Aloud Anthology.
In the modified read-alouds, the teacher presents core content in a
clear and scaffolded manner. Lessons are designed to be dialogic
and interactive in nature. This allows students to use acquired content
knowledge and vocabulary to communicate ideas and concepts with
their peers and teachers in an accommodating and safe environment.
Maximizing time for student conversation by structuring supportive
situations—where students can engage in meaningful, collaborative
discussions with their teacher and peers—is an important catalyst to oral
language development.
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Tips and Tricks for Managing the Flip Book During the Read-Alouds
Please note that many modified read-alouds ask that you show Flip Book
images in a non-sequential order that differs from the order in which the
images are arranged in the Flip Book. Furthermore, some modified readalouds make use of Flip Book images from two or more separate lessons.
It is highly recommended that you preview each modified readaloud, with the Flip Book in hand, before teaching a lesson. It is
critical that you be familiar with the order of the Flip Book images for a
given read-aloud, so that you are able to confidently present the readaloud text and the appropriate image without searching through pages in
the Flip Book.
We recommend that you consider using one or more of the following tips
in preparing the Flip Book prior to the read-aloud to ensure a smooth
transition in moving from one image to the next:
• Number the Flip Book thumbnails in each read-aloud lesson of the
Supplemental Guide. Place corresponding, numbered sticky notes in
the order Flip Book images will be shown, projecting from the side of
the Flip Book so that each number will be clearly seen. (For example,
if the number “3” is written next to an image thumbnail in the readaloud, write the number “3” on a sticky note, and then place this on
the appropriate image so the sticky note projects from the side of the
Flip Book.)
• Alternatively, write the Flip Book image numbers as they appear in the
read-aloud lesson of the Supplemental Guide (e.g., 4A-3) on sticky
notes that project out from the side of the Flip Book so that image
numbers are clearly visible.
• If you need to show images from two separate, nonconsecutive
lessons, use different colored sticky notes for the different lessons.
Be aware that images are printed on both sides of pages in the Flip
Book. In some instances, you may need to be prepared to physically
turn the Flip Book over to locate the next image and continue the
read-aloud.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Preface
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
vii
Vocabulary Charts
Vocabulary Chart for [Title of Lesson]
Core Vocabulary words are in bold.
Multiple Meaning Word Activity word is underlined.
Vocabulary Instructional Activity words have an asterisk (*).
Suggested words to pre-teach are in italics.
Type of Words
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Domain-Specific Words
General Academic Words
Everyday-Speech Words
Understanding
Multiple Meaning
Phrases
Cognates
Vocabulary Charts at the beginning of each lesson categorize words into
three tiers, which are generally categorized as follows:
• Tier 1 words are words that are likely to appear in the basic repertoire
of native English-speaking students—words such as baby, climb, and
jacket.
• Tier 2 words are highly functional and frequently used general
academic words that appear across various texts and content areas—
words such as analysis, create, and predict.
• Tier 3 words are content-specific and difficult words that are crucial
for comprehending the facts and ideas related to a particular
subject—words such as photosynthesis, alliteration, and democracy.
English Language Learners and students with limited oral language skills
may not necessarily know the meanings of all Tier 1 words, and they may
find Tier 2 and Tier 3 words confusing and difficult to learn. Thus, explicit
explanation of, exposure to, and practice using Tier 1, 2, and 3 words are
essential to successful mastery of content for these students (National
Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State
School Officers 2010, 32–35).
In addition, the Vocabulary Chart indicates whether the chosen words
are vital to understanding the lesson (labeled Understanding); have
multiple meanings or senses (labeled Multiple Meaning); are clusters of
words that often appear together (labeled Phrases); or have a Spanish
word that sounds similar and has a similar meaning (labeled Cognates).
Words in the Vocabulary Chart were selected because they appear
frequently in the text of the read-aloud or because they are words and
phrases that span multiple grade levels and content areas. Teachers
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Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Preface
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
should be aware of and model their use as much as possible before,
during, and after each individual lesson, in addition to using these words
to connect lessons. The Vocabulary Chart is also a good starting point
and reference for keeping track of students’ oral language development
and retention of domain-related and academic vocabulary. These lists
are not meant to be exhaustive, and teachers are encouraged to include
additional words they feel would best serve their students.
Multiple Meaning Word Activities
Multiple Meaning Word Activities help students determine and clarify
the different meanings of individual words. This type of activity supports
a deeper knowledge of content-related words and a realization that
many content words have multiple meanings associated with them.
Students with strong oral language skills may be able to navigate
through the different meanings of some words without much effort.
However, students with limited English language proficiency and
minimal vocabulary knowledge may be less likely to disambiguate the
meanings of words. This is why it is important that teachers have a way
to call students’ attention to words in the lesson that have ambiguous
meanings, and that students have a chance to explore the nuances of
words in contexts within and outside of the lessons.
Syntactic Awareness Activities
Syntactic Awareness Activities call students’ attention to sentence
structure. During the early elementary grades, students are not expected
to read or write lengthy sentences, but might be able to produce complex
sentences in spoken language when given adequate prompting and
support. Syntactic Awareness Activities support students’ awareness
of the structure of written language, relationships between words,
and grammar. Developing students’ oral language through syntactic
awareness provides a solid foundation for written language development
in the later elementary grades and beyond.
Vocabulary Instructional Activities
Vocabulary Instructional Activities are included to build students’ general
academic, or Tier 2, vocabulary. These words are salient because they
appear across content areas and in a variety of written texts. Vocabulary
Instructional Activities support students’ learning of Tier 2 words, and
deepen their knowledge of academic words and the connections of
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Preface
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
ix
these words to other words and concepts. The vocabulary knowledge
students possess is intricately connected to reading comprehension,
as well as the ability to access background knowledge, express ideas,
communicate effectively, and learn about new concepts.
English Language Learners and Students with Disabilities
The Supplemental Guide assists education professionals who serve
students with limited English language skills or students with limited
home-literacy experience, which may include English Language Learners
(ELLs) and students with special needs. Although the use of this guide
is not limited to teachers of ELLs and/or students with special needs,
the following provides a brief explanation of these learners and the
challenges they may face in the classroom. Further, it outlines teaching
strategies that address those challenges.
English Language Learners
The Supplemental Guide is designed to facilitate the academic oral
language development necessary for English Language Learners (ELLs)
to fully participate in the read-alouds and activities in the Tell It Again!
Read-Aloud Anthology, and to strengthen ELLs’ understanding of the
core content presented in the Anthologies.
When teaching ELLs, it is important to keep in mind that they are a
heterogeneous group from a variety of social backgrounds and at
different stages in their language development. There may be some
ELLs who do not speak any English and have little experience in a
formal education setting. There may be some ELLs who seem fluent
in conversational English but do not have the academic language
proficiency to participate in classroom discussions about academic
content. The following is a chart showing the basic stages of second
language acquisition; proper expectations for student behavior and
performance; and accommodations and support strategies for each
stage. Please note that ELLs may have extensive language skills in their
first language, and that they advance to the next stage at various rates
depending on their acculturation, motivation, and prior experiences in an
educational setting.
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Language
Acquisition Stage
Comprehension
and Production
Accommodations and
Support Strategies
Preproduction
(“The Silent Period”)
• Produces little or no English
• May refuse to say or do
anything
• Responds in nonverbal ways
• Has a minimal receptive
vocabulary in English
• Use predictable phrases for set routines
• Use manipulatives, visuals, realia, props
• Use Total Physical Response (TPR) to indicate
comprehension (point, nod, gestures)
• Use lessons that build receptive vocabulary
• Pair with another ELL who is slightly more
advanced in oral language skills for activities and
discussions focused on the English language
• Pair with same-language peers for activities and
discussions focused on content
• Use simple questions that require simple
nonverbal responses (e.g., “Show me…,” “Circle
the…”)
• Use a slow rate of speech, and emphasize key
words
• Model oral language, but do not force student to
produce oral language
Early Production
• Responds with one- or twoword phrases
• Understands basic phrases
and words
• Uses abundant fillers (e.g., “er”
and “um”) when speaking
• Includes frequent, long pauses
when speaking
• Has basic level of English
vocabulary (common words
and phrases)
• Use repetition, gestures, and visual aids to
facilitate comprehension and students’ responses
• Use small-group activities
• Use charades and linguistic guessing games
• Use role-playing activities
• Use lessons that expand receptive and expressive
vocabulary
• Use increasingly more difficult question types as
students’ receptive and expressive language skills
improve:
• Yes/no questions
• Either/or questions
• Questions that require short answers
• Open-ended questions to encourage expressive
responses
• Pair with another ELL who is slightly more
advanced in oral language skills for activities and
discussions focused on the English language
• Pair with same-language peers for activities and
discussions focused on content
• Allow for longer processing time
• Continue to allow participation to be voluntary
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Preface
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
xi
Speech Emergence
(Low Intermediate)
• Speaks in short phrases and
simple sentences
• Makes multiple grammatical
errors
• Begins to use context to infer
the meanings of unknown
words heard or read
• Can produce some narratives
and understand some details
of a story
• Uses many fillers (e.g., “um”
and “like”) when speaking
• Repeats individual phrases
multiple times
• Has a much larger receptive
than expressive vocabulary in
English
•
•
•
•
Model correct language forms
Use more complex stories and books
Start to focus on Tier 2 vocabulary
Pair with high-level English speakers for activities
and discussions focused on the English language
• Provide some extra time to respond
• Use increasingly difficult question types as
students’ receptive and expressive language skills
improve:
• Questions that require short sentence answers
• Why and how questions
• Questions that check for literal and abstract
comprehension
• Engage students in producing language
Intermediate Fluency
(High Intermediate)
•
•
•
•
Engages in conversations
Produces connected narrative
Makes few grammatical errors
Uses some fillers when
speaking
• Shows good comprehension
• Has and uses expanded
vocabulary in English
• Model correct language forms
• Introduce academic terms (e.g., making
predictions and inferences, figurative language)
• Use graphic organizers
• Pair with native English speakers
• Use questions that require opinion, judgment, and
explanation
Advanced Fluency
• Uses English that nearly
approximates the language of
native speakers
• Understands most
conversations and can
maintain a two-way
conversation
• Uses more complex
grammatical structures, such
as conditionals and complex
sentences
• Has and uses an enriched
vocabulary in English
• Continue to build background knowledge
• Build high-level/academic language
• Expand figurative language (e.g., by using
metaphors and idioms)
• Focus on high-level concepts
• Pair with students who have a variety of skills and
language proficiencies
• Use questions that require inference and
evaluation
(Adapted from Hirsch and Wiggins 2009, 362–364; Smyk et al. 2013)
xii
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Preface
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Students with Disabilities and Students with Special Needs
Students with disabilities (SWDs) have unique learning needs that require
accommodations and modifications to the general education curriculum.
When using the Supplemental Guide with SWDs and students with
special needs, it is important to consider instructional accommodations,
tools, strategies, and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Principles,
which promote learning for all students through the use of multiple forms
of representation, expression, and engagement (Hall, Strangman, and
Meyer 2003).
Pacing
Pacing is the purposeful increase or decrease in the speed of instruction.
Educators can break lessons into manageable chunks depending on
the needs of the class, and then follow each portion of the lesson with
a brief review or discussion. This format of instruction ensures that
students are not inundated with information. Additionally, you may want
to allow students to move around the room for brief periods during
natural transition points. When waiting for students to respond, allow at
least three seconds of uninterrupted wait time to increase correctness of
responses, response rates, and level of thinking (Stahl 1990).
Goals and Expectations
Make sure that students know the purpose and desired outcome of each
activity. Have students articulate their own learning goals for the lesson.
Provide model examples of desired end-products. Use positive verbal
praise, self-regulation charts, and redirection to reinforce appropriate
ways for students to participate and behave.
Directions
Provide reminders about classroom rules and routines whenever
appropriate. You may assign a partner to help clarify directions. When
necessary, model each step of an activity’s instructions. Offering explicit
directions, procedures, and guidelines for completing tasks can enhance
student understanding. For example, large assignments can be delivered
in smaller segments to increase comprehension and completion
(Franzone 2009).
Instruction Format and Grouping
Use multiple instruction formats (e.g., small-group instruction, individual
work, collaborative learning, and hands-on instruction). Be sure to group
students in logical and flexible ways that support learning.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Preface
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
xiii
Instructional Strategies
The following evidence-based strategies can assist students with
disabilities in learning content (Scruggs et al. 2010):
•
Mnemonic strategies are patterns of letters and sounds related to
ideas that enhance the retention and recall of information. They can
be used as a tool to encode information.
• Spatial organizers assist student understanding and recall of
information using charts, diagrams, graphs, and/or other graphic
organizers.
•
Peer mediation, such as peer tutoring and cooperative learning
groups, can assist in assignment completion and enhance
collaboration within the classroom.
• Hands-on learning offers students opportunities to gain
understanding of material by completing experiments and hands-on
activities that reinforce content.
•
Explicit instruction utilizes clear and direct teaching using small
steps, guided and independent practice, and explicit feedback.
•
Visual strategies (e.g., picture/written schedules, story maps, task
analyses, etc.) represent content in a concrete manner to increase
focus, communication, and expression (Rao and Gagie 2006).
References
xiv
1.
Biemiller, Andrew. 2010. Words Worth Teaching. Columbus: SRA/
McGrawHill.
2.
Franzone, Ellen L. 2009. “Overview of Task Analysis.” Madison, WI:
National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum
Disorders, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin.
3.
Hall, Tracey, Anne Meyer and Nicole Strangman. 2003.
“Differentiated Instruction and Implications for UDL Implementation.”
National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum.
4.
Hirsch, Jr., E. D. and Alice K. Wiggins. 2009. Core Knowledge
Preschool Sequence and Teacher Handbook. Charlottesville, VA:
Core Knowledge Foundation.
5.
National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of
Chief State School Officers. 2010. “Appendix A,” in Common Core
State Standards: English Language Arts Standards. Washington DC:
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Preface
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of
Chief State School Officers.
6.
Rao, Shaila M. and Brenda Gagie. 2006. “Learning Through Seeing
and Doing: Visual Supports for Children with Autism.” Teaching
Exceptional Children 38 (6): 26–33.
7.
Scruggs, Thomas E., M. A. Mastropieri, Sheri Berkeley, and Janet E.
Graetz. 2010. “Do Special Education Interventions Improve Learning
of Secondary Content? A Meta-Analysis.” Remedial and Special
Education 31: 437–449.
8.
Smyk, Ekaterina, M. Adelaida Restrepo, Joanna S. Gorin, and
Shelley Gray. 2013. “Development and Validation of the SpanishEnglish Language Proficiency Scale (SELPS).” Language, Speech,
and Hearing Services in Schools 44: 252–65.
9.
Stahl, Robert J. 1990. “Using ‘Think-Time’ Behaviors to Promote
Students’ Information Processing, Learning, and On-Task
Participation: An Instructional Module.” Tempe, AZ: Arizona State
University.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Preface
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
xv
Alignment Chart for Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
The following chart contains core content objectives addressed in this
domain. It also demonstrates alignment between the Common Core
State Standards and corresponding Core Knowledge Language Arts
(CKLA) goals.
Lesson
Alignment Chart for
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Core Content Objectives
Describe a royal family
Describe what a king or queen does
Identify and describe royal objects associated with a king or queen
Indicate that kings and queens still exist today, but that there were many more
kings and queens long ago




Describe that kings usually possess gold and other treasures
Discuss the difference between valuing relationships with people and valuing
wealth
Describe characters, settings, and plot in fiction read-alouds
Demonstrate familiarity with a given story or poem



  
     
Reading Standards for Literature: Kindergarten
Key Ideas and Details
STD RL.K.1
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
With prompting and support, ask and answer questions
(e.g., who, what, where, when) requiring literal recall and
understanding of the details and/or facts of a fiction read-aloud
     
Answer questions that require making interpretations,
judgments, or giving opinions about what is heard in a fiction
read-aloud, including answering why questions that require
recognizing cause/effect relationships
     
STD RL.K.2
With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, retell or dramatize fiction readalouds, including characters, and beginning, middle, and end
events of the story in proper sequence
STD RL.K.3
With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, use narrative language to
describe characters, setting, things, events, actions, a scene,
or facts from a fiction read-aloud

 
  

Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Alignment Chart xvii
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Alignment Chart for
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
Lesson
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Craft and Structure
STD RL.K.4
Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about
unknown words in fiction read-alouds and discussions
STD RL.K.5
Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).
CKLA
Goal(s)
Listen to, understand, and recognize a variety of texts,
including fictional stories, fairy tales, fables, nursery rhymes,
and poems
STD RL.K.6
With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the
story.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, describe the role of an author and
illustrator in a fiction text

     



Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
STD RL.K.7
With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, describe illustrations from a
fiction read-aloud, using illustrations to check and support
comprehension of the read-aloud
STD RL.K.9
With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar
stories.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, compare and contrast similarities
and differences within a single fiction read-aloud or between
two or more fiction read-alouds



Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
STD RL.K.10
Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.
CKLA
Goal(s)
Actively engage in fiction read-alouds
     
Reading Standards for Informational Text: Kindergarten
Key Ideas and Details
STD RI.K.1
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
With prompting and support, ask and answer questions
(e.g., who, what, where, when) requiring literal recall and
understanding of the details and/or facts of a nonfiction/
informational read-aloud

Answer questions that require making interpretations,
judgments, or giving opinions about what is heard in a fiction
read-aloud, including answering why questions that require
recognizing cause/effect relationships

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Lesson
Alignment Chart for
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
1
2
3
4
5
6
STD RI.K.3
With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of
information in a text.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, describe the connection between
two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a
nonfiction/informational read-aloud
7

Craft and Structure
STD RI.K.6
Name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a
text.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, describe the role of an author and
illustrator in a nonfiction/informational text

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
STD RI.K.8
With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, identify the reasons or facts an
author gives to support points in a nonfiction/informational
read-aloud
STD RI.K.9
With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic
(e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
CKLA
Goal(s)
With prompting and support, compare and contrast similarities
and differences within a single nonfiction/informational readaloud or between two or more nonfiction/informational readalouds


Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
STD RI.K.10
Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.
CKLA
Goal(s)
Actively engage in nonfiction/informational read-alouds

Writing Standards: Kindergarten
Text Types and Purposes
STD W.K.2
Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they
name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
CKLA
Goal(s)
Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to present
information from a nonfiction/informational read-aloud, naming
the topic and supplying some details
STD W.K.3
Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events,
tell about the events in order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened.
CKLA
Goal(s)
Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate
a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the
events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a
reaction to what happened



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© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
xix
Alignment Chart for
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
Lesson
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Research to Build and Present Knowledge
STD W.K.8
With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from
provided sources to answer a question.
CKLA
Goal(s)
With assistance, categorize and organize facts and information
within a given domain to answer questions

Speaking and Listening Standards: Kindergarten
Comprehension and Collaboration
STD SL.K.1
Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Kindergarten topics and texts with peers
and adults in small and large groups
STD SL.K.1a
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics
and texts under discussion).
CKLA
Goal(s)
Use agreed-upon rules for group discussions (e.g., look at
and listen to the speaker, raise hand to speak, take turns, say
“excuse me” or “please,” etc.)
STD SL.K.1b
Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
CKLA
Goal(s)
Carry on and participate in a conversation over four or five
turns, staying on topic, initiating comments or responding to a
partner’s comments, with either an adult or another child of the
same age
STD SL.K.3
Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.
CKLA
Goal(s)
Ask questions to clarify directions, exercises, and/or classroom
routines



Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
STD SL.K.5
Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
CKLA
Goal(s)
Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as
desired to provide additional detail


Language Standards: Kindergarten
Conventions of Standard English
STD L.K.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
STD L.K.1f
Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language
CKLA
Goal(s)
Answer questions orally in complete sentences
xx
Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Alignment Chart
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

 

Lesson
Alignment Chart for
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
STD L.K.4
Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Kindergarten
reading and content.
STD L.K.4a
Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately (e.g., knowing duck is a bird and learning
the verb to duck).
CKLA
Goal(s)
Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them
accurately (e.g., knowing duck is a bird and learning the verb
to duck)
STD L.K.5
With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
STD L.K.5a
Sort common objects into categories (e.g., shapes, foods) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories
represent.
CKLA
Goal(s)
Sort common objects into categories (e.g., shapes, foods) to
gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent
STD L.K.5b
Demonstrate understanding of frequently occurring verbs and adjectives by relating them to their opposites
(antonyms)
CKLA
Goal(s)
Demonstrate understanding of frequently occurring verbs and
adjectives by relating them to their opposites (antonyms)
STD L.K.5c
Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at school that are colorful).
CKLA
Goal(s)
Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g.,
note places at school that are colorful)
STD L.K.5d
Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs describing the same general action by acting out the meanings.
CKLA
Goal(s)
Distinguish the meaning among verbs describing the same
general action by acting out the meanings
STD L.K.6
Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.
CKLA
Goal(s)
 








Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, being
read to, and responding to texts
Learn the meaning of common sayings and phrases
 
 
  

These goals are addressed in all lessons in this domain. Rather than repeat these goals as lesson
objectives throughout the domain, they are designated here as frequently occurring goals.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Alignment Chart xxi
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xxii Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Alignment Chart
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Kings and Queens
Supplemental Guide Introduction
This introduction includes the necessary background information to be
used in teaching the Kings and Queens domain. The Supplemental Guide
for Kings and Queens contains seven lessons. The first lesson is two
instructional days, and the following six lessons are one instructional day
each.
Lesson Structure
Instructional Day 1
On the first instructional day, Parts A and B of the lesson (50 minutes
total) are to be covered at different intervals during the day. Part A (35
minutes) includes:
• Introducing the Lesson
• Presenting the Read-Aloud
• Discussing the Read-Aloud
If necessary, Part A can be divided into two sessions with 15 minutes for
Introducing the Read-Aloud up to Purpose for Listening, and 20 minutes
for Purpose for Listening, Presenting the Read-Aloud and Discussing the
Read-Aloud.
Later in the day, Part B (15 minutes) will be covered and includes the
activities unique to the Supplemental Guide:
• Multiple Meaning Word Activity
•
Syntactic Awareness Activity
• Vocabulary Instructional Activity
Each activity may take up to 5 minutes to complete. The Multiple
Meaning Word Activity helps students to determine and clarify the
different meanings of words. The Syntactic Awareness Activity calls
students’ attention to sentence structure, word order, and grammar. The
Vocabulary Instructional Activity focuses on building students’ general
academic, or Tier 2, vocabulary. Part B concludes with an interim
assessment opportunity called an End-of-Lesson Check-In. This is a
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
1
dual opportunity for the teacher to 1) focus on a select group of students
to directly assess the students’ language and content knowledge in a
low-stress environment; and 2) gauge which students may be in need of
additional language or content support.
Instructional Day 2
On the second instructional day, Parts C and D of the lesson (50 minutes
total) are to be covered at different intervals during the day. Part C (35
minutes) includes:
• Reviewing the Read-Aloud
• Presenting the Interactive Read-Aloud
• Discussing the Read-Aloud
If necessary, Part C can be divided into two sessions with 10 minutes for
Reviewing the Read-Aloud up to Purpose for Listening, and 25 minutes
for Purpose for Listening, Presenting the Interactive Read-Aloud, and
Discussing the Read-Aloud.
Later in the day, Part D (15 minutes) will be covered and includes
extension activities similar to those of the related lesson in the Tell It
Again! Read-Aloud Anthology for Kings and Queens.
Lessons 2–7
Please note that Lessons 2–7 are one instructional day each. For evennumbered lessons, Extension activities are unique to the Supplemental
Guide. For odd-numbered lessons, Extension activities relate to the
lesson content.
This domain includes a Pausing Point following Lesson 4, after
background information and nursery rhymes about kings and queens
have been introduced. At the end of the domain, a Domain Review, a
Domain Assessment, and Culminating Activities are included to allow
time to review, reinforce, assess, and remediate content knowledge. You
should spend no more than twelve days total on this domain.
2
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Week One: Anthology
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5
Lesson 1A: “What Are
Kings and Queens?”
(35 min.)
Lesson 2A: “The Royal
Family” (35 min.)
Lesson 3A: “King Midas
and the Golden Touch”
(35 min.)
Lesson 4A: “Old King
Cole” (35 min.)
Lesson 5A: “Sing a Song
of Sixpence” (35 min.)
Lesson 1B: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 2B: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 3B: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 4B: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 5B: Extensions
(15 min.)
50 min.
50 min.
50 min.
50 min.
50 min.
#
Week One: Supplemental Guide
#
Day 1
Day 2
#
Day 3
#
Day 4
#
Day 5
#
Lesson 1A: “The Royal
Family” Day 1 of 2
(35 min.)
Lesson 1C: “The Royal
Family” Day 2 of 2
(35 min.)
Lesson 2A: “King Midas
and the Golden Touch”
(35 min.)
Lesson 3A: “Old King
Cole” (35 min.)
Lesson 4A: “Sing a Song
of Sixpence” (35 min.)
Lesson 1B: SG Activities
(15 min.)
Lesson 1D: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 2B: SG Activities
(15 min.)
Lesson 3B: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 4B: SG Activities
(15 min.)
50 min.
50 min.
50 min.
50 min.
50 min.
Week Two: Anthology
Day 6
#
Pausing Point (50 min.)
50 min.
Day 7
#
Day 8

Day 9

Lesson 5A: “The Princess
and the Pea” (35 min.)
Lesson 6A: “Cinderella”
(35 min.)
Lesson 7A: “Snow White
and the Seven Dwarfs”
(35 min.)
Lesson 5B: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 6B: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 7B: Extensions
(15 min.)
50 min.
50 min.
50 min.
Day 10
#
Domain Review (50 min.)
50 min.
Week Two: Supplemental Guide
Day 6
#
Pausing Point (50 min.)
50 min.
Day 7
#
Day 8
#
Day 9

Lesson 6A: “The Princess
and the Pea” (35 min.)
Lesson 7A: “Cinderella”
(35 min.)
Lesson 8A: “Snow White
and the Seven Dwarfs”
(35 min.)
Lesson 6B: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 7B: Extensions
(15 min.)
Lesson 8B: Extensions
(15 min.)
50 min.
50 min.
50 min.
Day 10
Domain Review (50 min.)
50 min.
Week Three
Day 11

Day 12
Domain Assessment
(50 min.)
Culminating Activities
(50 min.)
50 min.
50 min.
#
 Lessons include Student Performance Task Assessments.
# Lessons require advance preparation and/or additional materials; please plan ahead.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
3
Lesson Implementation
It is important to note that the interactive activities in the Supplemental
Guide count on the teacher as the “ideal reader” to lead discussions,
model proper language use, and facilitate interactions among student
partners.
Student Grouping
Teachers are encouraged to assign partner pairs prior to beginning a
domain, and partners should remain together for the duration of the
domain. If possible, English Language Learners should be paired with
native English speakers, and students who have limited English oral
language skills should be paired with students who have strong English
language skills. Keep in mind that in some instances, a group of three
would benefit beginning ELLs, and an older student or adult volunteer
may be a better learning partner for some students with disabilities.
Partnering in this way promotes a social environment where all students
engage in collaborative talk and learn from one another.
In addition, students of the same home language should have
opportunities to work together, fostering their first-language use and
existing knowledge to construct deeper meanings about new information.
Graphic Organizers and Domain-wide Activities
Several different organizers and activity suggestions are included to aid
students in their learning of the content in the Kings and Queens domain.
• Response Cards for Kings and Queens (one per nursery rhyme or
story, six total) can be used to help students identify characters and
talk about the setting and plot of a nursery rhyme or story. Students
can hold up these response cards to respond to class questions.
• Sequencing the Story is a set of six images from a story. There
is a set for “King Midas and the Golden Touch,” “Cinderella,” and
“Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” Students can cut and paste the
images in the correct sequence and use the sequenced images to
retell the story. You may wish to choose three out of the six images
to represent the beginning, middle, and end of the story and have
students put the three images in order.
4
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
C
S
P
• Character, Setting, Plot Map and Image Sheet can be used to help
students organize information about “The Princess and the Pea.” With
your help, students create their own Character, Setting, Plot Map, and
use the provided image sheet to fill in their map. Students may refer
to their Character, Setting, Plot Map during class discussion and to
retell the story. You may also wish to create large Character, Setting,
Plot Maps on chart paper to review the other stories.
• Kings and Queens Around the World—you may wish to use a world
map to pinpoint countries that still have kings and queens. Then,
using colored string, connect the pin to a picture of the current king,
queen, or royal family of that country. You may wish to conduct group
research about a current royal family and learn about that royal family
as a class.
• King or Queen for a Day—you may wish to choose a class king and
queen each day the class is in this domain. Be sure to give every
student a chance to be king or queen. Provide royal props, such as
a robe, scepter, and, of course, a crown. Give each student ageappropriate “royal” responsibilities like being the line leader, passing
out papers, being the only one who can help classmates in need.
Allow them to make a reasonable royal announcement or decree that
the rest of the class needs to follow for the day (e.g., the first three
people in line must go to the back; anyone who is wearing purple gets
to do everything first). At the end of the day, ask the king and queen
to identify some aspects about what he or she liked and disliked
about ruling the “kingdom.”
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
5
Anchor Focus in Kings and Queens
This chart highlights several Common Core State Standards as well as
relevant academic language associated with the activities in this domain.
Anchor Focus
CCSS
Description of Focus and Relevant Academic Language
Writing
W.K.3
Prince/Princess for a Day
“Happily Ever After”
Students will use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to
narrate a single event.
Pretend you are . . ., draw, dictate, tell, discuss, similar, different,
alternate ending
SL.K.1b
Speaking and Listening
Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges
Help students to carry on and participate in extended conversations
of over four turns. There are various opportunities throughout this
domain where students are encouraged to take turns speaking
about the same topic (e.g., retelling a story, talking about fairness).
Consider providing students with the following sentence starters:
I also think that . . .; I think so too; What about . . .; I think . . .
SL.K.3
Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or
clarify something
Prompt students to ask questions when they are unclear about the
directions. Provide them with some phrases to use:
I have a question about
; can you please say the directions
again; what does
mean?
Language
L.K.1f
Produce and expand sentences in shared language activities
L.K.5d
Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs describing the same
general action: gaze/peek/glare; peck/poke; stumble/step
Domain Components
Along with this Supplemental Guide, you will need:
•
Tell It Again! Media Disk or the Tell It Again! Flip Book* for Kings and
Queens
•
Tell It Again! Image Cards for Kings and Queens
•
Tell It Again! Read-Aloud Anthology for Kings and Queens for
reference
*The Tell It Again! Multiple Meaning Word Posters for Kings and Queens
are found at the back of the Tell It Again! Flip Book.
6
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Recommended Resources:
•
Core Knowledge Kindergarten Teacher Handbook, edited by
E.D.Hirsch, Jr. and Souzanne A. Wright (Core Knowledge Foundation,
2004) ISBN: 978-1890517694
Why Kings and Queens Are Important
In the Kings and Queens domain, students will listen to informational and
fiction read-alouds about kings, queens, and royal families. The readalouds will build students’ understanding of the responsibilities, lifestyle,
and customs associated with royalty throughout history. Many of the
nursery rhymes and fairy tales are classic, well-loved tales, including
“King Midas and the Golden Touch,” “Old King Cole,” “The Princess and
the Pea,” and “Cinderella.”
In addition to the selections in this particular domain, students will also
meet various kings and queens in the context of other read-alouds in
the Core Knowledge Language Arts Kindergarten materials. Students
will hear about kings and queens in the Columbus and the Pilgrims
domain. This will provide them a rich contextual background for even
greater understanding of the read-alouds in the Colonial Towns and
Townspeople domain, which describe life in Colonial America. Over
the course of these domains, students will begin to acquire a critical
foundation for understanding different forms of government and specific
historical events, such as the American Revolution, which they will
encounter in later grades.
Please be aware that although these stories are classic tales, some
of the content may be unsettling for students. Preview all read-alouds
and lessons in this domain before presenting them to students. Readaloud selections can be substituted with a trade book from the list
of recommended trade books if you feel doing so would be more
appropriate for your students. As you read, use the same strategies
that you have been using when reading the read-aloud selections in this
Supplemental Guide—pause and ask occasional questions; rapidly clarify
critical vocabulary within the context of the read-aloud; etc. After you
finish reading the trade book, lead students in a discussion as to how the
story or information in the book relates to the read-alouds in this domain.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
7
Core Vocabulary for Kings and Queens
The following list contains all of the core vocabulary words in Kings and
Queens in the forms in which they appear in the domain. These words
may appear in the read-alouds or, in some instances, in the “Introducing
the Read-Aloud” section at the beginning of the lesson. The inclusion
of the words on this list does not mean that students are immediately
expected to be able to use all of these words on their own. However,
through repeated exposure throughout the lessons, they should acquire
a good understanding of most of these words and begin to use some of
them in conversation
Lesson 1
Lesson 3
Lesson 6
advantages
bowl
cinders
crown prince
fiddlers
hearth
disadvantages
merry
merriment
kingdom
soul
stumbled
prosperity
Lesson 4
tattered
reign
dainty
Lesson 7
royal
maid
fairest
rules
pecked
peddler
servants
Lesson 5
pity
Lesson 2
delicate
rage
fond
graceful
stomped
gazed
howled
satisfied
spoiled
treasures
In addition to this core vocabulary list, every lesson includes its own
tiered Vocabulary Chart categorized according to the model for
conceptualizing words presented by Beck, McKeown, and Kucan (2008).
Words in this chart either appear several times in the read-aloud or are
words and phrases that support broader language growth, which is
crucial to the English language development of young students. Most
words on the chart are part of the General Service List of English Words
8
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
(West 1953) or part of the Dale-Chall (1995) list of 3000 familiar words
known by fourth grade. Moreover a conscious effort has been made to
include words from the Primary Priority Words according to Biemiller’s
(2010) Words Worth Teaching. The words on the Vocabulary Chart
are not meant to be exhaustive, and teachers are encouraged to add
additional words they feel would best serve their group of students.
Vocabulary Chart for The Royal Family
Core Vocabulary words are in bold.
Multiple Meaning Word Activity word is underlined.
Vocabulary Instructional Activity words have an asterisk (*).
Suggested words to pre-teach are in italics.
Type of Words
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Domain-Specific Words
General Academic Words
Everyday-Speech Words
Understanding
Charlemagne
England
France
kingdom
Morocco
palace
reign*
royal
scepter
servants
advantages/
disadvantages*
decision
inherit
prosperity
remind
responsibility
symbol*
best
family
king
jewels
prince
princess
queen
crown
orb
rules
power
wear
Multiple Meaning
not all fun and
games
Phrases
crown prince/
princess
It’s good to be king
King George V
King Richard II
Moulay Hassan
royal family
Cognates
Carlomagno
Inglaterra
Francia
Marruecos
palacio
reinado*
real
sirviente(a)
ventaja/
desventaja*
decisión
heredar
prosperidad
responsabilidad
símbolo*
poder
familia
joya
príncipe
princesa
References
1. Beck, Isabel L., Margaret G. McKeown, and Linda Kucan. 2008.
Creating Robust Vocabulary: Frequently Asked Questions and
Extended Examples. New York, NY: Guilford.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
9
2. Biemiller, Andrew. Words Worth Teaching. 2010. Columbus: SRA/
McGrawHill
3. Dale, Edgar, and Jeanne Chall. 1995. Readability Revisited: The New
Dale-Chall Readability Formula.
4. West, Michael. 1953. A General Service List of English Words.
London: Longman, Green and Co.
Comprehension Questions
In the Supplemental Guide for Kings and Queens, there are three types
of comprehension questions.
Literal questions assess students’ recall of key details from the readaloud; these questions are text-dependent, requiring students to
paraphrase and/or refer back to the portion of the read-aloud in which
the specific answer to the question is provided. These questions
generally address Reading Standards for Literature 1 (RL.K.1) and
Reading Standards for Informational Text 1 (RI.K.1).
Inferential questions ask students to infer information from the text and
to think critically; these questions are also text-dependent, but require
students to paraphrase and/or refer back to the different portions of
the read-aloud that provide information leading to and supporting the
inference they are making. These questions generally address Reading
Standards for Literature 2–4 (RL.K.2–RL.K.4) and Reading Standards for
Informational Text 2–4 (RI.K.2–RI.K.4).
Evaluative questions ask students to build upon what they have learned
from the text using analytical and application skills; these questions
are also text-dependent, but require students to paraphrase and/
or refer back to the portion(s) of the read-aloud that substantiate the
argument they are making or the opinion they are offering. Evaluative
questions might ask students to describe how reasons or facts support
specific points in a read-aloud, which addresses Reading Standards for
Informational Text 8 (RI.K.8). Evaluative questions might also ask students
to compare and contrast information presented within a read-aloud or
between two or more read-alouds, addressing Reading Standards for
Literature 9 (RL.K.9) and Reading Standards for Informational Text 9
(RI.K.9).
10
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
The Supplemental Guides include complex texts, thus preparing students
in these early years for the increased vocabulary and syntax demands
that aligned texts will present in later grades. As all of the readings
incorporate a variety of illustrations, Reading Standards for Literature 7
(RL.K.7) and Reading Standards for Informational Text 7 (RI.K.7) are
addressed as well.
Student Performance Task Assessments
In the Supplemental Guide for Kings and Queens, there are numerous
opportunities to assess students’ learning. These assessment
opportunities range from informal observation opportunities, such as the
End-of-Lesson Check-In and some Extension activities, to more formal
written assessments. These Student Performance Task Assessments
(SPTA) are identified with this icon: . There is also an end-of-domain
summative assessment. Use the Tens Conversion Chart located in the
Appendix to convert a raw score on each SPTA into a Tens score. On the
same page, you will also find the rubric for recording observational Tens
scores.
Above and Beyond
In the Supplemental Guide for Kings and Queens, there are numerous
opportunities to challenge students who are ready to attempt activities
that are above grade-level. These activities are identified with this
icon: ➶.
Supplemental Guide Activities
The Supplemental Guide activities that may be particularly relevant
to any classroom are the Multiple Meaning Word Activities and
accompanying Multiple Meaning Word Posters; Syntactic Awareness
Activities; and Vocabulary Instructional Activities. These activities afford
all students additional opportunities to acquire a richer understanding of
the English language. In addition, several multiple meaning words in the
read-alouds are underlined. Supplemental Guide activities are identified
with this icon: .
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
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Recommended Resources for Kings and Queens
Trade Book List
The Supplemental Guide includes a number of opportunities in
Extensions, the Pausing Point, and Culminating Activities for teachers to
select trade books from this list to reinforce domain concepts through
the use of authentic literature. In addition, teachers should consider other
times throughout the day when they might infuse authentic domainrelated literature.
If you recommend that families read aloud with their child each night,
you may wish to suggest that they choose titles from this trade book list
to reinforce the domain concepts. You might also consider creating a
classroom lending library, allowing students to borrow domain-related
books to read at home with their families.
1.
Amazing Grace, by Mary Hoffman. Illustrated by Caroline Binch
(Reading Rainbow Rooks, 1991) ISBN 978-0803710405
2.
Cinder Edna, by Ellen Jackson. Illustrated by Kevin O’Malley
(HarperCollins, 1998) ISBN 978-0688162955
3.
Cinderella, by Charles Perrault. Illustrated by Loek Koopmans.
Translated by Anthea Bell (North-South Books, 2002)
ISBN 978-0735814868
4.
Kate Middleton: Real-Life Princess, by Sarah Tieck (ABDO
Publishing Company, 2011) ISBN 978-1617830204
5.
King Bidgood’s in the Bathtub, by Audrey and Don Wood (Harcourt
Children’s Books, 1985) ISBN 978-0152427306
6.
King Midas and the Golden Touch, by Charlotte Craft. Illustrated by
K.Y. Craft (HarperCollins, 2003) ISBN 978- 0060540630
7.
The King Who Rained, by Fred Gwynne (Aladdin, 1988)
ISBN 978-0671667443
8.
The Kite Princess, by Juliet Clare Bell. Illustrated by Laura-Kate
Chapman (Barefoot Books, 2012) ISBN 978-1846868306
9.
Max and Ruby’s Midas, by Rosemary Wells (Puffin, 2003)
ISBN 978-0142500668
10. Midnight: A Cinderella Alphabet, by Stephanie Perkal. Illustrated
by Spencer Alston Bartsch (Shen’s Books & Supplies, 1997)
ISBN 978-1885008053
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Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
11. Mother Goose Remembers, by Clare Beaton (Barefoot Books, 2006)
ISBN 978-1846860034
12. Prince Cinders, by Babette Cole (Puffin, 1997) ISBN 978- 0698115545
13. Princess Grace, by Mary Hoffman. Illustrated by Cornelius Van
Wright and Ying-Hwa Hu (Dial, 1992) ISBN 978-0803732605
14. The Princess and the Pea, by Rachel Isadora (Puffin, 2009) ISBN
978-0142413937
15. The Princess and the Pig, by Jonathan Emmett. Illustrated by Poly
Bernatene (Walker Childrens, 2011)
ISBN 978-0802723345
16. Prince William: Real-Life Prince, by Sarah Tieck (ABDO Publishing
Company, 2011) ISBN 978-1617830228
17. The Queen’s Knickers, by Nicholas Allan (Transworld Publishers,
2001) ISBN 978-0099413141
18. Rapunzel, by Rachel Isadora (Putnam Juvenile, 2008) ISBN 9780399247729
19. The Rough-Face Girl, by Rafe Martin (Puffin, 1998)
ISBN 978-0698116269
20. The Royal Treasure Measure, by Trudy Harris. Illustrated by
Ivica Stevanovic (Lerner Publishing Company, 2012) ISBN 9780761368069
21. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm.
Illustrated by Nancy Ekholm Burkert. Translated by Randall Jarrell
(Square Fish, 1987) ISBN 978-0374468682
22. Snow White in New York, by Fiona French (Oxford University Press,
USA, 1990) ISBN 978-0192722102
23. Tea for Ruby, by Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of York. Illustrated
by Robin Preiss Glasser (Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books,
2012) ISBN 978-1416954200
24. The Twelve Dancing Princesses, by Rachel Isadora (Puffin, 2009)
ISBN 978-0142414507
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
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Websites and Other Resources
Teacher Resources
1.
Royal Symbols
http://www.monarchist.org.uk/symbols-of-monarchy.html
2.
The Midas Touch
http://www.mythweb.com/today/today04.html
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Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide | Introduction
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
The Royal Family
1
 Lesson Objectives
Core Content Objectives
Students will:
 Describe a royal family
 Describe what a king or queen does
 Identify and describe royal objects associated with a king or queen
 Indicate that kings and queens still exist today, but that there were
many more kings and queens long ago
Language Arts Objectives
The following language arts objectives are addressed in this lesson.
Objectives aligning with the Common Core State Standards are noted
with the corresponding standard in parentheses. Refer to the Alignment
Chart for additional standards addressed in all lessons in this domain.
Students will:
 Recall facts from “The Royal Family” and accurately answer questions
such as who, what, where, and when, with prompting and support
(RI.K.1)
 Interpret information to answer questions and express opinions about
“The Royal Family”, with prompting and support (RI.K.1)
 With prompting and support, describe the connection between
different members in a royal family, and describe the connection
between possessing symbols of royalty and possessing power to rule
(RI.K.3)
 With prompting and support, describe the role of an author and
illustrator in a nonfiction/informational text (RI.K.6)
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 With prompting and support, identify the reasons the author gives to
support the point that there are advantages to being part of a royal
family, and identify the reasons the author gives to show that kings
and queens desired to keep the power to rule within their family
(RI.K.8)
 With prompting and support, compare and contrast the advantages
and disadvantages of being in a royal family, and compare and
contrast students’ families to royal families (RI.K.9)
 Actively engage in the nonfiction/informational read-aloud “The Royal
Family” (RI.K.10)
 Create a drawing of a king or queen using information from the readaloud “The Royal Family” (W.K.2)
 Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a
picture of being prince or princess for a day (W.K.3)
 With assistance, categorize facts about students’ families and royal
families (W.K.8)
 Create a drawing with sufficient detail of a king or queen with their
royal belongings, and create a drawing of self being a prince or
princess for a day (SL.K.5)
 Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activity
(L.K.1f)
 Identify multiple meanings of rule, and use them in appropriate
contexts (L.K.4a)
 Demonstrate understanding of advantage by relating it to its opposite,
disadvantage (L.K.5b)
 Identify real-life connections between words—royal, kingdom, rules,
reign, advantages, and disadvantages—and their use (L.K.5c)
 Learn the meaning of common sayings such as “it’s good to be king”
(L.K.6)
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Core Vocabulary
advantages, n. Things that are good about a situation or circumstance;
benefits
Example: The advantages to having brothers and sisters are that
you always have someone to play with and to help you with your
homework.
Variation(s): advantage
crown prince, n. A king’s oldest son who is next in line to be king
Example: Moulay Hassan is a crown prince in the African country of
Morocco because he will be the next king one day.
Variation(s): crown princes
disadvantages, n. Things that are not good about a situation or
circumstance; setbacks
Example: There are disadvantages to being the youngest child, such as
having to go to bed earlier than your brothers and sisters.
Variation(s): disadvantage
kingdom, n. A place ruled or governed by a king or queen
Example: King Eduardo ruled his kingdom with kindness and fairness.
Variation(s): kingdoms
prosperity, n. Having a lot of money, success, or good luck
Example: One could tell that the royal family had enjoyed long periods
of prosperity because their palace was so large and luxurious.
Variation(s): none
reign, n. The period of time during which a king rules a kingdom
Example: King Louis XIV was the longest-ruling king in European
history. His reign over France lasted for 72 years.
Variation(s): reigns
royal, adj. Anything belonging to a king or queen or other members of their
family, such as a prince or princess
Example: The throne is a royal throne because it belongs to the queen.
Variation(s): none
rules, v. Leads and makes decisions
Example: My mom rules our family; I am not allowed to go outside
unless she says it is okay.
Variation(s): rule, ruled, ruling
servants, n. Men or women who are hired and paid to do things that a king
or queen wants them to do
Example: Kings and queens had many servants who did all of the work
around the castle.
Variation(s): servant
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Vocabulary Chart for The Royal Family
Core Vocabulary words are in bold.
Multiple Meaning Word Activity word is underlined.
Vocabulary Instructional Activity words have an asterisk (*).
Suggested words to pre-teach are in italics.
Type of Words
18
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Domain-Specific Words
General Academic Words
Everyday-Speech Words
Understanding
Charlemagne
England
France
kingdom
Morocco
palace
reign*
royal
scepter
servants
advantages/
disadvantages*
decision
inherit
prosperity
remind
responsibility
symbol*
best
family
king
jewels
prince
princess
queen
crown
orb
rules
power
wear
Multiple Meaning
not all fun and
games
Phrases
crown prince/
princess
It’s good to be king
King George V
King Richard II
Moulay Hassan
royal family
Cognates
Carlomagno
Inglaterra
Francia
Marruecos
palacio
reinado*
real
sirviente(a)
ventaja/
desventaja*
decisión
heredar
prosperidad
responsabilidad
símbolo*
poder
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© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
familia
joya
príncipe
princesa
Image Sequence
This is the order in which Flip Book images will be shown in the readaloud. Preview the order of Flip Book images before teaching the lesson.
Please note that this image sequence uses images from two separate
read-alouds in the Tell It Again! Read-Aloud Anthology.
1. 1A-2: King Richard II
2. 1A-4: Charlemagne
3. 1A-3: Crown
4. 1A-1: Palace
5. 2A-1: King George V and family
6. 2A-2: Palace in Morocco
7. 2A-1: King George V and family
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1A
The Royal Family
At a Glance (Parts A & B)
Exercise
Domain Introduction
Where Are We?
Introducing the Read-Aloud
Day 1 of 2
Materials
Minutes
images of current kings,
queens, royal families
world map
15
Vocabulary Preview:
Kingdom, Royal
Purpose for Listening
Presenting the Read-Aloud
10
The Royal Family
Comprehension Questions
Discussing the Read-Aloud
Word Work: Symbol
images of current kings,
queens, royal families
images or realia of royal
symbols;
images or realia of everyday
symbols
10
 Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
Multiple Meaning Word Activity:
Rules
Extensions
Poster 1M (Rules)
Syntactic Awareness Activity:
Sentence Builder
15
Vocabulary Instructional
Activity: Reign, Rain
End-of-Lesson Check-in
Take-Home Material
20
Family Letter
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© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
drawing paper, drawing tools
Instructional Masters 1B-1–1B-3
Advance Preparation
For the Domain Introduction and Lesson Review, prepare a few pictures
of current kings, queens, and royal families to show students that royalty
still exists today. These pictures can also serve as discussion pieces and
practice for identifying members of a royal family.
For Word Work, provide images or realia of royal objects, such as a royal
orb, scepter, crown, seal, and throne. Help students make the connection
that these items are symbols of royalty and power. In addition, prepare
common symbols that students may see everyday and may be familiar
with such as an American flag, stop sign, no cell phone sign, four-leaf
clover, etc. Briefly discuss what each symbol means.
Note to Teacher
During the End-of-Lesson Check-In, students will have the opportunity to
draw what they have learned. Encourage them to add royal objects to the
picture and to discuss their picture using read-aloud vocabulary.
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Introducing the Read-Aloud
15 minutes
Domain Introduction
 Show image 2A-1: King George V and family
• Say to students, “Tell your partner who you see in this picture. Do you
think this picture was taken recently or long ago? How do you know?”
Allow thirty seconds for students to talk. Call on three students to
share their thoughts.
• Tell students that this is a picture of a royal family.
• Have students say royal family with you.
• Tell students that this is the royal family of King George V. King
George V was the king of England over one hundred years ago.
• Point to each person in the picture as you explain the following: A
king is a man from a royal family who is the leader of a country. A
queen is a woman from a royal family who is the leader of a country.
Their children are called princes and princesses. Some of them will
one day grow up to become kings and queens. This picture shows
four princes, or sons, of the king and queen.
• You may wish to display images of current kings, queens, and royal
families, and identify the members of a royal family: king, queen,
prince, and princess.
Where Are We?
• Tell students that just as the teacher is the leader of the classroom,
the principal is the leader of the school, and the president is the
leader of the Untied States of America, some countries in the world
have a leader called a king or a queen.
• Point to the United States on a world map. Then point out the continent of
Europe, specifically the country of Great Britain. Tell students that Great
Britain has a king or queen. [You may wish to show students a picture,
and tell them the name of the current king or queen of Great Britain.]
Note: In 1707, England, Scotland, and Wales joined together to form
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, often
referred to as Britain or Great Britain. In this Anthology, we will be
referring to the monarchs of this region either as King (or Queen) of
England or King (or Queen) of Great Britain, depending on the time he
or she reigned.
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• Inform students that long ago many countries had kings and queens,
but now fewer countries have kings and queens.
• You may wish to point out some countries that still have kings and
queens today: Cambodia, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Spain,
Tonga, Malaysia, and others.
Vocabulary Preview
Royal
1. Today you will learn about the royal family.
2. Say the word royal with me three times.
3. When you hear the word royal, you know that it belongs to a king,
queen, prince, or princess.
4. The queen sits on a royal chair and drinks from a royal cup.
The prince and princess ride in a royal car.
5. Think of different royal items or things a royal family would have. Use
the word royal when you talk about it. For example, the king sits on a
royal chair. Each partner gets three turns.
Kingdom
1. Today you will hear that a king or queen rules a kingdom.
2. Say the word kingdom with me three times.
3. A kingdom is a place or a land ruled by a king or queen.
4. Long ago, there used to be many kingdoms in the world.
Everyone in the kingdom listened to the king.
5. Tell your partner what you think of when you hear the word kingdom.
[Call on a few students to share. Be sure to elaborate on student
responses with domain vocabulary.]
Purpose for Listening
Tell students that they will hear about the royal family and what it is like to
live in a royal family.
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
 Describe a royal family
 Describe what a king or queen does
 Identify and describe royal objects associated with a king or queen
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Presenting the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
The Royal Family
 Show image 1A-2: King Richard II
“It’s good to be king.” That’s what people say to show that they are
happy they are in charge and to have people listen to them and serve
them, just like a king. If you walked into a palace where the king and
queen lived and you saw this man, you would immediately—or very
quickly—know that this man was the king.
This king’s name is King Richard the second of England.
[Point to England on a map. Have students repeat King Richard the Second of
England.]
[As you read the following paragraph, pause and encourage students to fill in
the numbers for the names of the kings.]
Many of the kings of England were called King [name] the [roman
numeral] like King Richard the Second in this picture. Before King
Richard II there was King Richard the
(First). After King Richard
II, there was King Richard the
(Third). Popular names for the
kings of England include Henry, Richard, Edward, and George.
When King Richard II was king, he was the most important and
powerful person in the kingdom. King Richard II’s kingdom was
England; everyone in his kingdom listened to King Richard and did as
he said—“It’s good to be king!”
The king and his royal family had many advantages—there were
many good things about being in a royal family. The royal family
always got the best of everything: the best houses, the best clothing,
and the best food—“It’s good to be king!”
They did not have to clean up after themselves. They did not have to
cook. They did not even need to dress themselves or brush their own
hair—“It’s good to be king!”
The royal family had servants do all the work inside the palace.
Everything the king and queen had was called royal. Anything that
belonged to the king or queen was royal.
[Point to each item as you mention it.]
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The soft, fluffy robes King Richard II wore were called royal robes.
The slippers he wore were called royal slippers. The throne he sat on
was called the royal throne. If something was royal, only someone in
the royal family was allowed to use it.
Do you see two things that King Richard II is holding in his hands?
[Invite a student to point out the objects.]
In one hand he is holding the royal orb. The royal orb is shaped like a
ball and is made out of gold and decorated with jewels.
[Have students repeat royal orb while making a circle with their hands.]
In the other hand he is holding the royal scepter. The royal scepter
looks like a rod or a wand.
[Have students repeat royal scepter while pretending to hold a rod or a wand.]
The king holds the royal orb and royal scepter to remind—or to make
sure people remember—that he is in charge and has the power—“It’s
good to be king!”
 Show image 1A-4: Charlemagne
What do you see in this king’s hand?
[Invite a student to point out and possibly name the objects.]
In this picture a king named Charlemagne (SHAR-la-main) is holding a
sword and an orb to remind people that he is the king.
Can you think of one more thing a king or queen would wear to show
that they are in power? Tell your partner what that thing might be.
[Call on a few partner pairs to share their answer. Have a student point to the
crown.]
 Show image 1A-3: Crown
Kings and queens wear crowns. Crowns are not regular hats like
the ones you would wear to a baseball game or the hats you wear in
the winter to help keep your head warm. The crown is an important
symbol of the king’s power. A symbol is something that stands for
something else; when we see it, we think of something else. When
people saw the crown, they knew that the person wearing the crown
was important and powerful.
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This crown is made of gold and many pearls and jewels.
[Point to the pearls and jewels.]
 Show image 1A-1: Palace
Can you guess who lives in this building?
[Call on two students to answer.]
Kings and queens had the biggest and best homes in the kingdom.
They are called palaces. Palaces are also sometimes called castles.
This palace belonged to a queen of France. It has 440 rooms inside!
The king or queen rules his or her kingdom from the palace. The king
or queen makes important decisions for the people of the kingdom,
and the people must listen to and obey the king or queen’s rules.
Long ago, there were many, many kingdoms in the world that
were ruled by a king or a queen. But today there are not as many
kingdoms or kings and queens as there used to be.
[You may wish to review and point out some countries that still have kings and
queens.]
 Show image 2A-1: King George V and family
How does someone become the king or queen? Do people vote for
a king? Does the name of the next queen get chosen out of a bag?
What do you think?
[Call on two volunteers to share.]
In order to become a king or queen, you had to be part of the royal
family, such as like the royal family in this picture. This means you would
need to need to be a prince—or the son of the king and queen; or a
princess—the daughter of the king and queen. In this picture you see
four princes; they are the sons of King George V. One of King George
V’s sons will become the king; this son is called the crown prince.
[Have students repeat crown prince with you.]
He is called the crown prince because he will be the next to wear
the crown and rule the kingdom. If there are no princes, the oldest
princess will be the crown princess, and she will be the next person
to wear the crown and rule the kingdom as a queen. Once a person
becomes king, he stays king for the rest of his life. The time he is the
king is called a king’s reign. When the king dies, his reign ends.
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[Have students say reign with you. Mention that a king’s reign is different from
the rain that falls from the sky.]
Once a person becomes queen, she stays queen for the rest of her
life. The time she is the queen is called a queen’s reign. When the
queen dies, her reign ends.
Kings and queens wanted to have many children because children
were important to the prosperity and success of the kingdom.
Having more children meant that there was more chance for the royal
family to keep the riches and treasures. Kings and queens wanted
their children to inherit—or get from the family—all their wealth and
riches. More important, the king and queen wanted to make sure
that their own children, a crown prince or crown princess, inherit
the throne, so the power to rule the kingdom stays within the royal
family. If there is no one left in the royal family, the power to rule the
kingdom will go to another family.
 Show image 2A-2: Palace in Morocco
This is a picture of a palace in Morocco.
[On a world map, point to the continent of Africa, and tell students that
Morocco is a country in Africa.]
The royal family of Morocco lives inside this palace. A boy named
Moulay Hassan lives in this palace. Moulay is the oldest son of the
king of Morocco. Moulay is the crown prince of Morocco and, one
day, will be the next king of Morocco.
There are advantages of being the crown prince. Moulay gets the best
education. He lives in a big palace where he has a lot of room to run and
play. Moulay gets to wear the nicest clothes and eat the best food.
 Show image 2A-1: King George V and family
But being a prince or princess is not all fun and games. There are also
disadvantages—or not-so-good things about being in a royal family.
Princes and princesses cannot do whatever they want. They cannot
play with whomever they want. They do not go to school with all the
other children. They cannot go outside the palace whenever they want
to. They have to be careful about everything they do. They have to
behave in a royal manner at all times. And once they become king or
queen, they will have the big responsibility of making decisions for the
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whole kingdom and all the people living in the kingdom. Everyday
they will have to think about what is best for the kingdom. If they
make a wrong decision, the people will be unhappy with them. So
there are both advantages and disadvantages of being part of a
royal family. Is it really “good to be king”? What do you think?
[Call on a few volunteers to share.]
Discussing the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Comprehension Questions
If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent lines
of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. If students give oneword answers and/or fail to use read-aloud or domain vocabulary in their
responses, acknowledge correct responses by expanding the students’
responses using richer and more complex language. Encourage students
to answer in complete sentences. Model answers using complete
sentences for students.
 Show image 2A-1: King George V and family
1. Literal Who are the people in this photograph?
• They are a royal family.
Can you name the members of this royal family?
• There is a king, queen, and four princes.
[You may wish to show additional pictures of royal families and have
students identify and name the people: king, queen, prince, princess.]
2. Literal What is the daughter of the king and queen called?
• The daughter of the king and queen is called a princess.
What is the son of the king and queen called?
• The son of the king and queen is called a prince.
 Show image 1A-1: Palace
3. Literal Where does the royal family live?
• The royal family lives in a palace or castle.
4. Literal What is a kingdom?
• A kingdom is the land where a king or queen rules and over which the
king and queen have power.
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 Show image 1A-2: King Richard II
 Show image 1A-4: Charlemagne
5. Inferential Tell me about what you see in these two pictures. What
things do these kings have to show that they have power?
• If students have a hard time answering, point to and name the royal orb,
the royal scepter, the royal sword, the crown, and the throne.
6. Inferential In the read-aloud you heard the saying “It’s good to be
king.” What does this saying mean?
• “It’s good to be king” means that it is nice to have anything you want and
to have everyone listen to you and do as you say, just like a king.
Word Work: Symbol
1. In the read-aloud you heard that, “The crown is an important symbol
of the king’s power.”
2. Say the word symbol with me three times.
3. A symbol is something that stands for something else.
4. A crown is a symbol of the king’s power.
The [name of mascot] is a symbol for our school.
5. Can you name other things that are a symbol of the king’s power?
[Ask two or three students. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase the
students’ responses: “
is a symbol of the king’s power.”
If available, show students images or realia of things that are a symbol
of a king’s power.]
6. What’s the word we’ve been talking about?
Use a Word to World activity for follow-up. Directions: A symbol is
something that represents something else. If you look around, you can
see symbols everywhere—in the school, on the road, and around your
neighborhood. For example, what does a green light mean to people who
drive cars?
• Show images of everyday symbols and have students discuss their
meanings.

Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
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© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
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The Royal Family
Extensions
1B
Day 1 of 2
15 minutes
 Multiple Meaning Word Activity
Context Clues: Rules
Note: You may choose to have students hold up one or two fingers to
indicate which image shows the meaning being described, or have a
student walk up to the poster and point to the image being described.
1. [Show Poster 1M (Rules).] In the read-aloud you heard, “The king
or queen rules [the] kingdom.” Here, rules means leads and makes
decisions. Which picture shows this?
• one
2. Rules can also mean other things. Rules can mean directions for how
to do something, like play a game. Which picture shows this?
• two
3. I’m going to say some sentences using the word rules. Hold up one
finger if my sentence tells about rules in picture one; hold up two
fingers if my sentence tells about rules in picture two.
• King Richard III rules England.
• one
•
Are you sure you know the rules for soccer?
• two
• One of the rules in our classroom is [state the rule].
• two
•
Queen Elizabeth II rules Great Britain.
• one
• [Your name or the king or queen of the day] rules this classroom.
• one
• Can you please tell me the rules to this game?
• two
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 Syntactic Awareness Activity
Sentence Builder
 Show image 1A-4: Charlemagne
Directions: Look at the picture. I will call on you one at a time to say
a short sentence about the picture. Then we will put your sentences
together to make a longer sentence.
Note: There may be variations in the sentences created by your
class. Allow for these variations, and restate students’ sentences so
that they are grammatical. If necessary, have students repeat your
sentence.
1. Charlemagne wears a crown.
Charlemagne is a king.
Charlemagne wears a crown and is a king.
Charlemagne wears a crown, so he is a king.
Charlemagne wears a crown because he is a king.
2. Charlemagne is sitting on a throne.
Charlemagne is not smiling.
Charlemagne is sitting on a throne, and he is not smiling.
The king sitting on the throne is not smiling.
➶ Above and Beyond: Have students work with their partner to build
their own sentences and/or to build longer sentences. Model for
students how to take turns saying one thing at a time and how to
combine their ideas into one sentence.
 Vocabulary Instructional Activity
Word Chart: Reign
1. In the read-aloud you heard, “The time [a king] is the king is called a
king’s reign.”
2. Say the word reign with me three times.
3. Reign is the amount of time when a king or ruler is in charge of a
country. Reign can also mean to rule, as in “The French king reigns,
or rules, over the kingdom of France.”
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4. When the king dies, his reign ends, and one of the children from the
royal family becomes the new ruler.
5. Think about who makes the rules in your family. Who do you think
reigns over your family?
[Ask two or three students. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase the
students’ responses: “
reigns over my family because . . .”]
6. What’s the word we’ve been talking about?
Use a Homophones activity for follow-up. Directions: There are some
words that sound the same but mean different things. Which word
sounds like the word reign we learned about when talking about kings
and queens? What about the rain that falls from the sky? These words
sound the same, but have different meanings.
I am going to say several sentences. If the sentence I say describes reign
as in a king’s reign, stand up and boldly say, “That is like a king’s reign.”
If the sentence I say describes rain as in the rain that falls from the sky,
make raindrops motions with your fingers and say, “That is like the rain
that falls from the sky.”
1. You wear boots and use an umbrella to protect you from the rain.
2. My mom reigns over our house; everybody does what she says.
3. The outdoor game was cancelled because of the rain.
4. King Louis XIV’s reign over France lasted for 72 years.
5. Sometimes people say, “It’s raining cats and dogs,” when it is raining
very hard.
 End-of-Lesson Check-In
The Royal Family
Choose four students to focus on and record their scores on the Tens
Recording Chart. For this kind of informal observation, you should
give a score of zero, five, or ten based on your evaluation of students’
understanding and language use.
0
Emergent understanding and language use
5
Developing understanding and language use
10
Proficient understanding and language use
• Remind students that they have learned new words and information
about the royal family.
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• Ask them to talk to their partner about what they have learned today
using as many new words and as much new information as they can.
• Have students draw what they have learned from the read-aloud.
They could draw a king or queen, a prince or a princess, decorating
their clothing and giving them royal objects like the orb and crown.
Have students discuss their illustrations with their partner or homelanguage peers.
Items to listen for:
• the words royal family
• the multiple-meaning word rule
• the vocabulary words reign and symbol
• information related to the royal family
Take-Home Material
Family Letter
Send home Instructional Masters 1B-1, 1B-2, and 1B-3.
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1C
The Royal Family
At a Glance (Parts C&D)
Reviewing the Read-Aloud
Day 2 of 2
Exercise
Materials
Minutes
Two-Column Chart
chart paper
Vocabulary Review:
Royal, Kingdom
world map
10
world map;
pictures of different types of
jewels
15
Purpose for Listening
Presenting the Interactive
Read-Aloud
The Royal Family
Comprehension Questions
Discussing the Read-Aloud
10
Word Work: Advantages/
Disadvantages
 Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
Prince/Princess for a Day
drawing paper, drawing tools
15
Extensions
Domain-Related Trade Book
Advance Preparation
For the Two-Column Chart, prepare a large sheet of chart paper split in
half vertically with the left side labled “Our Families,” and the right side
labled “Royal Families.”
For Presenting the Interactive Read-Aloud, prepare pictures of jewels
such as diamonds emeralds, rubies, and sapphires to show students as
you talk about crown jewels.
Note to Teacher
During the Interactive Read-Aloud, there are two places that present a
royal family succession (for King George V and Moulay Hassan). You
may wish to show students how a royal family keeps the power to rule a
kingdom—or keeps the crown—within the family.
During the Two-Column Chart activity, point out entries on the chart that
are similar for both sides; this way students will realize that there are
not only differences but also similarities between their family and royal
families.
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During the Extension, students will have the opportunity to draw
themselves and what they would do if they were a prince or princess for
a day. Encourage students to narrate—tell a mini-story about—what they
are doing as prince or princess in their picture.
Reviewing the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Two-Column Chart
• Create a two-column chart on chart paper, with one column labeled
“Our Families,” and the other column labeled “Royal Families.” Point
to and name each column.
• Tell students to think about their families, specifically where they live,
what they do during the day, the family members and pets that may
live with them, and what they like to do for fun. Write down key things
about your students’ families in the “Our Families” column.
Note: Explain that you are going to write down what students say,
but they are not expected to be able to read what you have written
because they are still learning all the rules for decoding. Emphasize
that you are writing what they say so that you don’t forget and that
you will read the words to them.
• Remind students that they learned about royal families. Review with
students that kings and queens are leaders who come from royal
families and that royal families always get the best of everything.
• With students’ help, list the characteristics specific to a royal family
in the “Royal Families” column. This list could include king, queen,
prince, princess, palace, fancy clothes, servants, royal orb, and
crown. Reread parts of the read-aloud and study the illustrations with
students, as necessary.
• Review the two columns, and talk about the similarities and
differences.
Vocabulary Review
Royal
1. In the read-aloud you heard, “If something was royal, only someone in
the royal family was allowed to use it.”
2. When you hear the word royal, you know that it belongs to a king,
queen, prince, or princess.
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 Show image 1A-2: King Richard II
3. Name some things that King Richard II has that are royal. (orb,
scepter, crown)
Kingdom
1. In the read-aloud you heard, “Long ago, there were many, many
kingdoms in the world that were ruled by a king or a queen. But today
there are not as many kingdoms or kings and queens as there used to
be.”
2. A kingdom is a place or a land ruled by a king or queen.
3. King Richard II was the king of England. Where was his kingdom?
[Point to England on the map.]
King Muhammad VI is the king of Morocco. Where is his kingdom?
[Point to the country of Morocco in the northwestern part of Africa.]
[You may wish to point out other kingdoms of the world that have
kings and queens: Belgium, Cambodia, Denmark, Japan, Saudi
Arabia, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, and the United Kingdom.]
Purpose for Listening
Tell students that this is the second time they will hear this read-aloud,
but it is different from the first time because they will do most of the
talking about what they have learned about royal families.
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
 Describe a royal family
 Describe what a king or queen does
 Identify and describe royal objects associated with a king or queen
 Indicate that kings and queens still exist today, but that there were
many more kings and queens long ago
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Presenting the Interactive Read-Aloud
15 minutes
The dialogic factors and instructional conversations within the lesson can
be altered based on the needs of the class and professional judgment.
When making changes, please keep in mind the Core Content Objectives
for this lesson.
The Royal Family
 Show image 1A-2: King Richard II
Who is the man in this picture?
[Call on two students to answer]
• The man is a king. He is King Richard II.
With your partner, think of three reasons why you know this man is a
king.
[Allow fifteen seconds for students to talk. Call on two partner pairs to share
their answers.]
This is King Richard II of England. If you were king or queen, tell your
partner what would you like to be called?
[You may need to prompt students with some ideas (e.g., Queen [name of
student] the Fourth of [Room number]). Call on a few students to share their
title.]
King Richard II was the king of England. Where was King Richard II’s
kingdom? Remember, a kingdom is the land that the king or queen
rules.
[Call on a student to answer. Point to England on a map.]
A king is the most important and most powerful person in the
kingdom. The king rules the kingdom.
The soft, fluffy robes King Richard II wore were called royal robes.
[Point to the king’s robes, and have students say royal robes with you.]
When something is royal, it belongs to the king or queen. As I point to
different things in this picture, tell me what they are.
[Point to the slippers (the royal slippers); throne (the royal throne); orb (the royal
orb); scepter (the royal scepter); crown (the royal crown).]
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Can anybody use or touch something that is royal? Who were
allowed to touch royal things?
[Call on two students to answer.]
• If something is royal, only someone in the royal family is allowed to use it.
 Show image 1A-4: Charlemagne
This is Charlemagne, he was a king of Europe.
With your partner, identify three things in the picture that tell you
Charlemagne was a king.
[Allow fifteen seconds for students to talk. Call on two partner pairs to share
their answers.]
 Show image 1A-3: Crown
What is this? What is this a symbol of?
[Call on two students to answer.]
Describe this crown to your partner. Use the words gold, silver, jewels,
pearls.
[If available, show students pictures of different jewels such as diamonds,
rubies, emeralds, and sapphires. Tell them that the jewels on a crown are called
the crown jewels.]
 Show image 1A-1: Palace
What is this? Who would live in a house like this one?
[Call on two students to answer.]
Kings and queens had the biggest and best homes in the kingdom.
They are called palaces. They can also be called castles. This palace
belonged to a queen of France.
[Point to France on the map.]
Long ago, there were many, many kingdoms in the world that
were ruled by a king or a queen. But today there are not as many
kingdoms or kings and queens as there used to be. For example,
France used to be a kingdom with a king or queen, but now it is not a
kingdom and does not have a king or queen.
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 Show image 2A-1: King George V and family
Explain to your partner how someone can become a king or queen.
[Allow fifteen seconds for students to talk. Call on two partner pairs to share
their answers.]
In order to become a king or queen, you had to be part of the royal
family such as the royal family you see in this picture. This means you
would need to be a prince or a princess.
Can you name the people in this picture? Who do you think is the
crown prince, or the next person to be king?
[Call on different students to name the different members of the royal family:
king, queen, prince. Call on a student to guess who the crown prince might be.]
One of King George V’s sons will become the king; this son is called
the crown prince. He is called the crown prince because he will
be the next to wear the crown and rule the kingdom. If there are no
princes, the oldest princess will be the crown princess, and she
will be the next person to wear the crown and rule the kingdom as a
queen.
How long can a person stay king or queen?
[Call on two students to answer.]
Once a person becomes king, he stays king for the rest of his life. The
time he is the king is called a king’s reign. When the king dies, his
reign ends. Once a person becomes queen, she stays queen for the
rest of her life. The time she is the queen is called a queen’s reign.
When the queen dies, her reign ends.
Discuss with your partner why kings and queens wanted to have
many children.
[Allow thirty seconds for students to talk. Call on two partner pairs to share.]
Kings and queens wanted to have many children because children
were important to the prosperity and success of the kingdom. They
wanted their children to inherit—or have—all their wealth and riches.
And more important, they wanted to make sure that a crown prince
or crown princess would inherit the throne, or the power to rule. If
there is no one left in the royal family, the power to rule the kingdom
goes to another family.
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A Royal Family Succession
[You may wish to show how the kingship is inherited using King George V as
an example. You can write the names of his predecessors and successors on
the board. Be sure to repeat what you have written. Stress the fact that the king
and queen wanted their children to inherit the throne and become the next king
or queen.]
• Queen Victoria (She was the granddaughter of an earlier king.)
• King Edward VII (He was the son of Queen Victoria.)
• King George V (He was the grandson of Queen Victoria and the
son of King Edward VII.)
• King Edward VIII (He was the grandson of Edward VII and the son
of King George V. He is the crown prince in this picture.)
 Show image 2A-2: Palace in Morocco
What is this a picture of?
[Call on a student to answer. (This is a picture of a palace in Morocco.) On a
world map, point to the continent of Africa, and tell students that Morocco is a
country in Africa.]
The royal family of Morocco lives inside this palace. A boy named
Moulay Hassan lives in this palace. Moulay is the oldest son of the
king of Morocco.
If Moulay is the oldest son of the king of Morocoo, what does that
make him?
[Call on a student to answer.]
Moulay is the crown prince and will be the next king of Morocco. He
will inherit his father’s crown and position as the king of Morocco.
A Royal Family Succession
[You may wish to show how Moulay Hassan will inherit the kingship. You can
write the names of his predecessors on the board. Be sure to repeat what you
have written.]
• King Mohammad V (He is the great-grandfather of Moulay.)
• King Hassan II (He is the grandfather of Moulay.)
• King Mohammad VI (He is the father of Moulay.)
• Crown prince Moulay Hassan
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 Show image 2A-1: King George V and family
Together with your partner, think of three advantages—or good
things—of being in a royal family. After you have thought of three
advantages, think of three disadvantages—or not-so-good things—
of being part of a royal family.
[Allow one minute for students to talk. Call on three partner pairs to share.]
Do you think it really is “good to be king”?
[You may wish to write the advantages and disadvantages onto a two-column
chart. Then ask whether it really is “good to be king.”]
Discussing the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Comprehension Questions
If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent lines
of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. If students give oneword answers and/or fail to use read-aloud or domain vocabulary in their
responses, acknowledge correct responses by expanding the students’
responses using richer and more complex language. Encourage students
to answer in complete sentences. Model answers using complete
sentences for students.
1. Literal Were there more kings and queens long ago, or are there more
kings and queens now?
• There were more kings and queens long ago than there are kings and
queens now.
2. Literal In a royal family, what is the mother called? What is the
daughter called? What is the son called?
• In a royal family, the mother is called the queen, the daughter is called
the princess, and the son is called the prince.
3. Literal How long can a king or queen reign or rule in the kingdom?
• A king or queen can rule in the kingdom for as long as he or she is alive.
4. Literal What is the person who is next to be king called?
• The person who is next to be king is called the crown prince.
5. Inferential If there is no crown prince, who will be next to wear the
crown?
• If there is no crown prince, the crown will go to the crown princess. If
there is no crown princess, the power will go to another family.
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6. Inferential Why do kings and queens want to have many children?
• Kings and queens want to have many children because they want their
children to inherit the power to rule and to keep the money and power in
their family.
[Please continue to model the Think Pair Share process for students, as
necessary, and scaffold students in their use of the process.]
I am going to ask a few questions. I will give you a minute to think about
the questions, and then I will ask you to turn to your partner and discuss
the questions. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you
discussed with your partner.
Sentence Frames:
Would you like to be a king or a
queen? (Yes/No)
I think I would like …
I think I would dislike . . .
I would like . . ., but I would
dislike . . .
7. Evaluative Think Pair Share: What do you think you would like about
being a king or a queen? What do you think you would dislike?
• Answers may vary.
8. After hearing today’s read-aloud and questions and answers, do
you have any remaining questions? [If time permits, you may wish to
allow for individual, group, or class research of the text and/or other
resources to answer these remaining questions.]
Word Work: Advantages/Disadvantages
1. In the read-aloud, you heard that being a prince or princess had both
advantages and disadvantages.
2. Say the word advantages with me three times.
Say the word disadvantages with me three times.
3. Advantages are the good things about a situation.
Disadvantages are the not-so-good things about a situation.
4. Some advantages to being an older brother or sister may be doing
things that the younger ones cannot do yet, like staying up late
sometimes.
Some disadvantages of being an older brother or sister may be that
your parents expect you to let your younger siblings have their way.
5. Can you think of one more advantage and one more disadvantage
about being the oldest brother or sister? Try to use the words
advantage and disadvantage when you tell about them.
[Ask two or three students. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase the
students’ responses: “An advantage/disadvantage to being the oldest
child is. . .”]
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6. What’s the word we’ve been talking about?
Use a Making Choices activity for follow-up. Directions: I am going to
name a person or thing and then tell you something about it. If what I say
is a good thing for that person or thing, say, “advantage” and tell me why.
If what I say is a bad thing for that person or thing, say, “disadvantage”
and tell me why.
[Alternatively, you may have the students walk carefully to the corners
of the room that are designated “advantage” and “disadvantage,” and
choose a volunteer to explain his or her reasoning.]
1. Kindergartner: getting a new box of crayons
2. Kindergartner: missing three days of school
3. Kindergartner: learning to read
4. Buffalo: roaming onto a large plain with lots of grass
5. Lakota Sioux: having the family tipi break apart
6. Sheep: having no shepherd
7. Farmer: having no rain
8. Crown prince: getting the best education

Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
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© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
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The Royal Family
Extensions
1D
Day 2 of 2
15 minutes
Prince/Princess for a Day
• Have students think about what it might be like to be a prince or
princess of a royal family for one day. Some questions to consider
are: What would they wear? What would they do? What would they
play? Who would they play with?
• Have students draw themselves being a prince or princess for a day.
They may even wish to give themselves a royal name.
Some suggestions for names are below.
• Crown Prince [Name], Archduke [Name], Princeling [Name], for a
boy.
• Crown Princess [Name], Princess Royal [Name], Archduchess
[Name], for a girl.
• Choose a few students to dictate what they have drawn. Be sure to
repeat what they say back to them as you write on their paper.
• Have students share their drawings in small groups or with homelanguage peers. Make sure that students talk about what they are
doing in their pictures. Encourage each one to tell a mini-story of their
life as a prince or princess for a day.
Domain-Related Trade Book
• Refer to the list of recommended trade books in the Introduction, and
choose an informational text about kings and queens to read aloud
to the class. Alternatively, you may wish to read an adapted children’s
version of Mark Twain’s “The Prince and the Pauper.”
• Explain to students that the person who wrote the book is called
the author. Tell students the name of the author of the book. Explain
to students that the person who makes the pictures for the book is
called the illustrator. Tell students the name of the illustrator. Show
students where they can find this information on the cover of the book
or on the title page.
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• As you read, use the same strategies that you have been using
when reading the read-aloud selections—pause and ask occasional
questions; rapidly clarify critical vocabulary within the context of the
read-aloud; etc.
• After you finish reading the trade book aloud, lead students in a
discussion about how the information from the trade book relates to
what they have learned in the read-aloud.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 1D | The Royal Family
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
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King Midas and
the Golden Touch
2
 Lesson Objectives
Core Content Objectives
Students will:
 Describe that kings usually possess gold and other treasures
 Discuss the difference between valuing relationships with people and
valuing wealth
 Describe the characters, setting, and plot of “King Midas and the
Golden Touch”
 Demonstrate familiarity with “King Midas and the Golden Touch”
Language Arts Objectives
The following language arts objectives are addressed in this lesson.
Objectives aligning with the Common Core State Standards are noted
with the corresponding standard in parentheses. Refer to the Alignment
Chart for additional standards addressed in all lessons in this domain.
Students will:
 Recall facts from “King Midas and the Golden Touch” and accurately
answer questions such as who, what, where, and when, with
prompting and support (RL.K.1)
 Interpret information to answer questions and express opinions about
“King Midas and the Golden Touch,” and identify a cause/effect
relationship in the story, with prompting and support (RL.K.1)
 With prompting and support, sequence three or six pictures
illustrating events in the story “King Midas and the Golden Touch,”
retelling the story using the sequenced pictures (RL.K.2)
 Listen to a variety of texts, including a fictional story from Greece—
“King Midas and the Golden Touch” (RL.K.5)
 Actively engage in the fiction read-aloud “King Midas and the Golden
Touch” (RL.K.10)
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 Identify multiple meanings of spoiled, and use them in appropriate
contexts (L.K.4a)
 Identify real-life connections between words—gold, treasure, spoiled,
and satisfied—and their use (L.K.5c)
 Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs—gaze, peek, and glare—
and determine which is the better verb depending on context (L.K.5d)
 Learn the meaning of common sayings such as “having the golden
touch” and phrases such as “fond of” (L.K.6)
Core Vocabulary
fond, adj. Having a strong liking
Example: I am very fond of my best friend.
Variation(s): fonder, fondest
gazed, v. Looked at something for a period of time
Example: The family stopped at the side of the road and gazed at the
mountains around them.
Variation(s): gaze, gazes, gazing
satisfied, adj. Happy, pleased, or content
Example: Pablo put the final touches on his watercolor painting and felt
very satisfied.
Variation(s): none
spoiled, adj. Ruined
Example: The milk became spoiled when Enrique left it on the counter
overnight.
Variation(s): none
treasures, n. Things that are valuable because they cost a lot, such
as gold, or that are valuable because they have a special meaning for
someone, such as a special toy
Example: The pirate spent many days counting his treasures.
Variation(s): treasure
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 2 | King Midas and the Golden Touch
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
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Vocabulary Chart for King Midas and the Golden Touch
Core Vocabulary words are in bold.
Multiple Meaning Word Activity word is underlined.
Vocabulary Instructional Activity words have an asterisk (*).
Suggested words to pre-teach are in italics.
Type of Words
Understanding
Multiple Meaning
Phrases
Cognates
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Domain-Specific Words
General Academic Words
Everyday-Speech Words
basement
buttercups
gold
Marygold
roses
statue
stranger
fond*
gazed*
golden
satisfied*
stored
solid
wiser
daughter
flower
love
palace
touch
water
treasures
spoiled
garden
pitcher
King Midas
The golden touch
estatua
rosa
tesoro
loved
more
than anything in the
world
sólido
flor
palacio
toque
jardín
Image Sequence
This is the order in which Flip Book images will be shown in the readaloud. Please note that this image sequence is the same as the sequence
in the corresponding read-aloud in the Tell It Again! Read-Aloud
Anthology.
1. 3A-1: King Midas and Marygold looking at the sunset
2. 3A-2: King Midas
3. 3A-3: King Midas and stranger
4. 3A-4: King Midas touching his shoes
5. 3A-5: Golden roses
6. 3A-6: King Midas and crying Marygold
7. 3A-7: King Midas and golden Marygold
8. 3A-8: King Midas, stranger, golden Marygold
9. 3A-9: King Midas hugging Marygold
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At a Glance
Exercise
What Have We Learned?
Introducing the Read-Aloud
Introducing “King Midas and the
Golden Touch”
Vocabulary Preview:
Gold, Treasure
Materials
Minutes
Two-Column Chart from
Lesson 1
Instructional Master 2A-1;
world map
15
fake gold coins in a bag; fake
gold jewelry
Purpose for Listening
Presenting the Read-Aloud
Discussing the Read-Aloud
King Midas and the Golden
Touch
realia from the story
Comprehension Questions
Response Card 1
10
10
Word Work: Fond
 Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
Multiple Meaning Word Activity:
Spoiled
Extensions
Poster 2M (Spoiled)
Syntactic Awareness Activity:
What’s the Better Word? Gaze,
Peek, Glare
15
Vocabulary Instructional
Activity: Satisfied
End-of-Lesson Check-in
Image Cards 1–6;
Instructional Master 2B-1;
paper; scissors; glue or tape
Advance Preparation
For What Have We Learned?, use the Two-Column Chart from Lesson 1
to compare students’ families and royal families.
Prepare a copy of Instructional Master 2A-1 for each student. Refer to it
as Response Card 1 (King Midas and the Golden Touch). Students can
use this Response Card for discussion, review, and to answer questions.
For Vocabulary Preview, bring in examples of fake gold coins in a bag
and fake gold jewelry for students to handle and describe.
For Presenting the Read-Aloud, bring in items from the story that can
help bring this story to life, such as actual buttercups and roses or fake
gold coins in a bag, fake gold jewelry, pitcher of water.
For End-of-Lesson Check-In, students will sequence events from the
story (Instructional Master 2B-1). You may wish to reduce the number of
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images to three images that represent the beginning, middle, and end of
the story.
Note to Teacher
This story presents the concepts of greed and the desire of wanting
more of something. You may wish to talk with students about how King
Midas might be feeling when he counts his gold but is still not satisfied.
In the end, King Midas learns an important lesson about valuing people,
especially loved ones, over gold and riches. You may wish to discuss
with students why this is a good lesson to learn.
The popular saying “having the golden touch” is from this story. You may
wish to explain after telling the story that “having a golden touch” is a
saying that could be used to talk about someone who seems to make
money easily, or who is very skillful or good at something. For instance,
if someone keeps scoring points over and over again while playing
basketball, you could say she has the golden touch for basketball. Or if
someone is very good at fixing things, that person has a golden touch for
fixing things.
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King Midas and
the Golden Touch
2A
Introducing the Read-Aloud
15 minutes
What Have We Learned?
• Review with students that kings and queens are rulers of a kingdom.
Kings and queens come from royal families.
• Using the Two-Column Chart showing “Our Families” and “Royal
Families,” review content from the previous lesson. Be sure to point
out the words you are reading from the chart.
• Say to students: “Tell your partner whether you think it is good to be
king, or whether you think it is not so good to be king.” Encourage
students to think about the advantages and disadvantages they
would have if they were king (queen, prince, or princess). Allow thirty
seconds for students to talk. Call on two partner pairs to share.
Introducing “King Midas and the Golden Touch”
• Tell students that they are going to hear a fiction—made-up—story
that was told a long, long time ago in Greece about a king named
Midas.
• Mention that long ago, most people could not read books, so they
told stories to one another. Sometimes those stories taught a lesson,
just like this story has a lesson.
• Distribute Response Card 1 (King Midas and the Golden Touch) to
each student. Tell them that they will use this Response Card to talk
about the story and to answer questions.
Where Are We?
• Show students a map of the world. Point to the United States. Then
point to the country of Greece. Point out that Greece is mainly
surrounded by water, such as the Mediterranean Sea. Tell students
that today’s story comes from Greece.
• You may wish to mention that, like France, long ago Greece had
kings and queens, but now Greece no longer has kings and queens.
Greece’s leader is a president.
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Picture Walk
• Tell students that the story they will hear is called “King Midas and the
Golden Touch.”
• Tell students that you will take a picture walk through some of the
pictures in this story together. Explain that a picture involves looking
at the pictures from the story to become familiar with the story, see
the characters of the story, and make predictions about what might
happen in the story.
• Tell students that these pictures were drawn by someone—that
person is called the illustrator.
• Tell students that this story was written by someone—that person is
called the author. Because this story was told orally a long, long time
ago, the author is unknown.
 Show image 3A-1: King Midas and Marygold looking at the sunset 1
• Identify two characters in the story: King Midas and Marygold. Have
students name these characters with you.
• Mention that Marygold is King Midas’ daughter.
• Ask students: “If Marygold is the only child of King Midas, what would
that make her? What would she be called?” (crown princess)
 Show image 3A-2: King Midas
• Tell students that this is King Midas in the basement with his
treasures. Ask students to point out some of his treasures, e.g., the
golden goblets, the ruby ring, gold coins, gold bar.
• Define basement as a room of a house that is underground. Ask if any
students have a basement in their homes or if they have ever been
inside a basement.
 Show image 3A-3: King Midas and stranger
• Ask students what is special about the other character in this picture.
• Define stranger as someone you do not know.
 Show image 3A-4: King Midas touching his shoes
• Say to students: “Tell your partner if you see something strange in this
picture.” Allow fifteen seconds for students to talk. Call on two partner
pairs to share.
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Vocabulary Preview
Gold
1. Today you will hear a story about a king who loved gold.
2. Say the word gold with me three times.
3. Gold is a precious and valuable metal used to make coins and
jewelry.
[If available, pass around items made of fake gold.]
4. King Midas likes to sit in his basement and count his gold.
Mia’s grandmother has a gold ring.
5. Think of different things that can be made out of gold. For example, a
ring can be made out of gold. Each partner gets two turns.
Treasures
1. In this story, King Midas puts his treasures in the basement.
2. Say the word treasures with me three times.
3. Treasures are things that are worth a lot of money, like gold. Treasures
can also be things that are very special or valuable to a person, like a
special toy or a special person.
4. The pirates found some treasures in a treasure chest.
Juanita and her little brother are their parents’ treasures.
5. Tell your partner about some things that are treasures to you, and
explain why they are treasures to you.
[Sentence frame: “
are treasures to me because . . . ” Call on
three students to share.]
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Purpose for Listening
Tell students that they will hear a story about a rich king who asks for
something but later regrets or feels sorry that he asked for it. Tell them to
listen carefully to find out what he asks for and what lesson he learns in
the end.
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
 Describe that kings usually possess gold and other treasures
 Discuss the difference between valuing relationships with people and
valuing wealth
 Describe the characters, setting, and plot of “King Midas and the
Golden Touch”
 Demonstrate familiarity with “King Midas and the Golden Touch”
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Presenting the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
King Midas and the Golden Touch
 Show image 3A-1: King Midas and Marygold looking at the sunset
Once upon a time, there lived a very rich king whose name was
Midas.
[Ask students: “What do you think people in his kingdom called him?”]
• King Midas)
King Midas lived long ago. Although he lived a long time ago—he lived
in the past—he was very much like some people today: he was fond of
gold. He loved gold more than anything in the world. When he gazed
at the gold-colored clouds of a beautiful sunset, he would wish that the
clouds were real gold.
[Define gaze as to look or stare at something for a long time in a dreamy way.
Demonstrate gazing.]
If King Midas loved anything as much or more than he loved gold, it
was his little daughter, who was named Marygold.
[Invite a student to point to Marygold in the picture. Ask students: “Why do
you think King Midas named his daughter Marygold?” Call on two students to
answer.]
When Marygold would run to meet him with a bunch of buttercups,
[Show students a picture or real examples of buttercups.]
King Midas would say, “Dear child, if these flowers were as golden as
they look, then they would be worth picking.”
[Explain that King Midas wishes the buttercups were made of real gold. He is
not interested in the buttercups; he is interested in gold.]
 Show image 3A-2: King Midas
Every day, King Midas spent many hours locked away in a dark room
in the basement of the palace. In this room he stored his treasures.
[Define treasures as things that are worth a lot of money. Invite a student to
point to King Midas’ treasures.]
He would go inside the room and carefully lock the door behind him.
Then he would take out bags of gold coins, pour the coins in piles,
and run his hands through them.
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[Say to students: “Tell your partner why King Midas stored his treasure in the
basement and why he locked the door behind him when he went to see his
treasures.” Allow fifteen seconds for students to talk. Call on two partner pairs
to share their answers.]
As he did this, he would whisper to himself, “Oh, rich King Midas,
what a happy man you are!”
[Using a bag full of fake gold coins, act out this line: “Oh, rich King Midas, what
a happy man you are!” Invite a few students to do the same.]
But even as he said this, he felt that he was not quite as happy as he
might be. For no matter how much he had, he always wanted more.
[Say to students: “Tell your partner whether you think the king is really happy
with all his gold or whether he is not happy with all his gold. Explain why.”
Allow fifteen seconds for students to talk. Call on two volunteers to answer and
explain.]
 Show image 3A-3: King Midas and stranger
One day, as King Midas was enjoying himself in his treasure room,
he looked up and saw a strange young man, who shone with a golden
glow.
[Trace the golden glow of the stranger. Mention that when something glows, it
looks like it is shining.]
King Midas knew that he had locked the door so that no one could
get into the room, yet here stood this man. And so, King Midas
thought, the stranger must have some magic power. The stranger had
a kind smile, so King Midas felt no fear.
[Explain that because the stranger looked like a nice man, King Midas was not
scared.]
Then the stranger spoke to King Midas: “You are a rich man, King
Midas,” he said.
“Yes, I have some gold,” answered King Midas, “but it is not enough.”
“What!” cried the stranger. “You are not satisfied?”
[Explain that the stranger was surprised that King Midas was not happy, even
with all the gold he had already.]
King Midas shook his head.
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“What would satisfy you? What would make you happy?” asked the
stranger.
King Midas imagined one gold mountain heaped on top of another,
and another, yet still it seemed not enough.
[Using your arms, show mountains heaped one on top of another. Have
students do the same.]
But then a bright idea occurred to him. Suddenly King Midas had
thought of something, and he said to the shining stranger, “I wish that
everything that I touch may turn to gold.”
The stranger smiled and said, “A golden touch! Are you quite sure
you would be satisfied then? Will having the golden touch make you
happy?”
“Yes, I would be perfectly happy and ask for nothing more,” answered
King Midas.
“Then it shall be as you wish,” said the stranger. “Tomorrow, at sunrise,
you shall find yourself gifted with the Golden Touch.” Then suddenly
a great brightness filled the room, causing King Midas to squeeze his
eyes shut. And when he opened them, the stranger was gone!
 Show image 3A-4: King Midas touching his shoes
The next morning, when the sun had hardly peeped into his room,
King Midas jumped out of bed.
He touched a chair. It turned to gold.
He touched the bed and a table, and they were changed to solid gold.
He rushed to put on his shoes,
[Ask students: “What do you think his shoes turned into?” Call on two students
to answer.]
His shoes turned to gold in his hands.
[Say to students: “Tell your partner what you think it means to have the Golden
Touch.” Call on a partner pair to share.]
 Show image 3A-5: Golden roses
In great excitement, he opened the door and ran outside to the
garden. He saw many roses in full bloom.
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[Show students a picture or real examples of roses.]
He went from bush to bush and touched each one, until every flower,
every leaf, and every bud was changed to gold.
 Show image 3A-6: King Midas and crying Marygold
Now King Midas was hungry, so he returned to the palace for his
breakfast. He lifted his cup of coffee and sipped it, but the instant
the liquid touched his lips it turned to gold. He tried to take a bite of a
boiled egg.
[Ask students, “Do you think King Midas will be able to eat the egg?” Call on
two students to answer.]
But the egg, too, turned to gold. “I don’t quite see how I am to get any
breakfast!” said King Midas.
Just then King Midas heard someone crying. He turned to see
Marygold enter the room, crying as if her heart would break.
[Explain that Marygold was very, very sad and upset about something.]
In her hand she held one of the roses that her father had changed to
gold.
Mid-story Check-In
1. Literal What two things does King Midas love the most?
• King Midas loves gold, and he loves his daughter, Marygold.
2. Literal What did King Midas ask the stranger for?
• King Midas asked the stranger for the Golden Touch.
3. Inferential Do you think Marygold liked her father’s Golden Touch?
• Marygold did not like her father’s Golden Touch because it turned her
roses into gold.
“Why, my little lady!” said King Midas. “What is there in this beautiful
golden rose to make you cry?”
“Dear father,” Marygold answered, “it is not beautiful! It is the ugliest
flower that ever grew. As soon as I was dressed this morning, I
ran to the garden to gather roses for you. But what do you think
has happened? All the beautiful sweet-smelling roses have been
spoiled!”
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[Define spoiled as ruined and no longer nice or useable.]
 Show image 3A-7: King Midas and golden Marygold
“My dear little girl,” said King Midas, who hated to see his daughter
sad, “please don’t cry.” Then he bent down and kissed his child. “My
precious Marygold!” he said. But Marygold did not answer.
Alas, what had he done?
[Say to students: “Tell your partner what King Midas had done to Marygold.”
Call on a partner pair to share.]
The moment King Midas’s lips touched Marygold’s head, her sweet,
rosy face turned a glittering, yellow color. Little Marygold was now a
golden statue!
King Midas cried out, wrung his hands, and wished that he were the
poorest man in the world if only he could have his daughter back
again.
[Ask students: “How do you think King Midas felt about what he had done?
Was he sorry?” Call on three students to share.]
 Show image 3A-8: King Midas, stranger, golden Marygold
Then he noticed someone standing in the doorway. It was the young
stranger who had appeared the day before in King Midas’s treasure
room. The stranger still shone with a soft glow, and he smiled as he
asked the king, “Well, King Midas, how do you like your Golden Touch?”
[Ask students: “What do you think King Midas will answer?” Call on two
students to share.]
“I am very unhappy,” said King Midas.
“Unhappy?” asked the stranger. “But don’t you have everything your
heart desired?”
“No,” said King Midas. “Gold is not everything. And I have lost all that
my heart really cared for.”
[Explain that in his heart, King Midas really cared for his daughter Marygold
more than gold.]
Then the stranger asked King Midas, “Which of these two things
do you think is worth the most: the Golden Touch or your own little
Marygold?”
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[Say to students: “Tell your partner which one King Midas will choose.]
“Oh, my child, my dear child!” cried poor King Midas. “I would not
give one hair off her head even if you gave me the power to change
this whole big earth into a solid lump of gold!”
“You are wiser than you were, King Midas. You made the better and
smarter decision,” said the stranger.
“Go and plunge and jump into the river that runs by your garden.
The water will take away the Golden Touch. Then fill this pitcher with
water, and sprinkle everything you have touched.”
[Show students a pitcher of water.]
King Midas bowed low, and when he lifted his head, the shining
stranger was gone.
Then the king ran as fast as he could and jumped into the river. He
filled the pitcher and ran back to the palace. The first thing he did was
to sprinkle handfuls of water over the golden figure of little Marygold.
[You may wish to lightly sprinkle water around the room.]
 Show image 3A-9: King Midas hugging Marygold
[Say to students: “Look at this picture, and tell your partner what happened to
Marygold.” Call on a partner pair to share.]
The rosy color came back into her cheeks. She looked in surprise at
her father, who was still throwing water on her!
“Father, please stop!” she cried. “See how you have soaked my
dress!”
King Midas took Marygold in his arms and kissed her. “Now I’m truly
happy,” he said. “My dear child, you mean more to me than all the
gold in the world!”
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Discussing the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Comprehension Questions
If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent lines
of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. If students give oneword answers and/or fail to use read-aloud or domain vocabulary in their
responses, acknowledge correct responses by expanding the students’
responses using richer and more complex language. Encourage students
to answer in complete sentences. Model answers using complete
sentences for students.
1. Literal Who are the three characters in the story? [Have students
point to each character on Response Card 1 as they name them.]
• The three characters in the story are King Midas, Marygold, and the
stranger.
Who is the main character in the story?
• The main character in the story is King Midas.
2. Literal What did King Midas want more and more of?
• King Midas wanted more and more of gold.
3. Literal What is the Golden Touch?
• The Golden Touch is the power to make everything you touch turn to
gold.
4. Inferential Why did King Midas wish to have the Golden Touch?
• He wished to have the Golden Touch because he loved gold so much
and was not happy with the gold he had.
5. Literal What happened to Marygold when King Midas kissed her
head?
• Marygold turned into a gold statue.
6. Literal How did Marygold change back to become herself again?
• King Midas filled a pitcher with water and sprinkled handfuls of water
over her.
7. Inferential Did King Midas change his mind about having the Golden
Touch? Why?
• Yes, King Midas changed his mind about the Golden Touch because he
turned his daughter into a gold statue and he felt very bad about that.
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8. Evaluative Some parts of this story could really happen, and other
parts of this story are pretend or fantasy. Tell me about some parts
of the story that could be real. [You may wish to show individual Flip
Book images from the story when talking about real/fantasy.]
• There could really be a king named Midas; there could be a king who
lived in Greece; the king could really have a daughter named Marygold;
the king could really have a lot of riches in the basement; the king could
really love gold; the king could really love his daughter.
Tell me parts of the story that are fantasy or could not happen in real
life.
• The stranger with magic power is fantasy; King Midas having the Golden
Touch is fantasy; turning everything into gold with the Golden Touch is
fantasy; Marygold turning into a gold statue is fantasy; sprinkling water
to turn things back to what they really are is fantasy.
[Please continue to model the Think Pair Share process for students, as
necessary, and scaffold students in their use of the process.]
I am going to ask a question. I will give you a minute to think about the
question, and then I will ask you to turn to your partner and discuss the
question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you discussed
with your partner.
Sentence Frames:
Did King Midas learn a lesson in
this story? (Yes/No)
[Gold/Marygold] made King
Midas happier.
9. Evaluative Think Pair Share: What lesson did King Midas learn in this
story? [If students struggle with this question, probe with one of the
following questions: When was King Midas happiest? What made
King Midas happier, his daughter or his gold?]
• King Midas learned that some things, like family, are more valuable or
important than gold.
King Midas learned that . . .
10. After hearing today’s read-aloud and questions and answers, do
you have any remaining questions? [If time permits, you may wish to
allow for individual, group, or class research of the text and/or other
resources to answer these remaining questions.]
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Word Work: Fond
1. In the read-aloud you heard that, “[King Midas] was fond of gold. He
loved gold more than anything in the world.”
2. Say the word fond with me three times.
3. When you are fond of something, you are very interested in it and you
love it very much.
4. King Midas was also very fond of his daughter, Marygold.
Jerome is not fond of spiders. He is not fond of having spiders in his
room.
5. Tell your partner one thing you are fond of or like very much.
Then tell your partner about one thing you are not fond of or do not
like at all.
[Ask two or three students. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase
the students’ responses: “I am fond of
, but I am not fond
of
.”]
6. What’s the word we’ve been talking about?
Use a Making Choices activity for follow-up. Directions: I am going to
name some things. If I say something you are fond of, say, “I am fond
of
.” If I say something you are not fond of, say, I am not fond
of
.”
[You may wish to designate separate corners of the class as “fond of”
and “not fond of,” and have students carefully walk to their choice.]
1. gold
2. pretzels
3. dogs
4. roses
5. books
6. [You may wish to add additional items to briefly extend this
activity.]

Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
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King Midas and
the Golden Touch
Extensions
2B
15 minutes
 Multiple Meaning Word Activity
Associated Phrase: Spoiled
Note: You may choose to have students hold up one or two fingers to
indicate which image shows the meaning being described, or have a
student walk up to the poster and point to the image being described.
1. [Show Poster 2M (Spoiled).] In the read-aloud you heard, “All the
beautiful sweet-smelling roses have been spoiled!” Here, spoiled
means ruined. Which picture shows this? What things are spoiled in
this picture?
• one
2. Spoiled can also be used to describe people who are used to getting
their way all the time and who will get mad if they do not get their way.
Which picture shows this?
• two
3. [Point to the spoiled food and rose.] With your partner, talk about what
you think of when you see this kind of spoiled.
4. [Point to the spoiled boy.] With your partner, talk about what you think
of when you see this kind of spoiled.
 Syntactic Awareness Activity
What’s the Better Word? Gaze, Peek, Glare, Stare
 Show image 3A-1: King Midas and Marygold looking at the sunset
Note: Although the focus of this activity is on word meanings,
students will gain practice in syntax as they respond in complete
sentences.
1. In the read-aloud you heard, “When [King Midas] gazed at the goldcolored clouds, he would wish the clouds were real gold.
2. When you gaze at something, you look at it for a long time.
Sometimes you are thinking about something, and sometimes you are
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daydreaming while you gaze at something. For example, you can gaze
at the stars and make a wish; you can gaze at the clouds in the sky
and daydream. [Have students talk about the picture using the word
gaze or gazing.]
3. Here are two other words that also have to do with looking at
something, but they are different from gaze.
Peek means to quickly look at something. For example, Goldilocks
peeked in the window to see if anybody was home.
Glare means to look at something in an angry way. For example,
Marygold glared at her father when he turned her roses into gold.
[You may wish to come up with motions to show gaze, peek, and
glare.]
4. Directions: Let’s practice using these words: gaze, peek, glare. First
I will say a sentence. Then I will give you two words to choose from.
If you think the first word is the better word, stand up. If you think the
second word is the better word, stay seated. Say your response in a
complete sentence.
1. Sharay looks up at the night sky and thinks about what she wants
to be when she grows up. Would you say Sharay glares at the
night sky or gazes at the night sky? (stay seated)
• Sharay gazes at the night sky.
2. Jordan’s father quickly looks into the car window to see if he left
his cell phone on the seat. Would you say Jordan’s father peeks
into the car window or gazes into the car window? (stand up)
• Jordan’s father peeks into the car window.
3. Daniel and Rhys are playing hide and seek. Rhys takes a quick
look around the corner to see if Daniel is coming. Would you say
Rhys glares around the corner or peeks around the corner? (stay
seated)
• Rhys peeks around the corner.
4. Robin is not happy with her younger sister who drew on her book.
Does Robin glare at her sister or gaze at her sister? (stand up)
• Robin glares at her sister.
5. Luis takes Frances’ toy truck without asking. Does Frances peek
at Luis or glare at Luis? (stay seated)
• Frances glares at Luis.
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6. Tanya looks at the same page of the book for a very long time. Is
Tanya gazing at the page or peeking at the page? (stand up)
• Tanya is gazing at the page.
 Vocabulary Instructional Activity
Word Work: Satisfied
 Show image 3A-3: King Midas and stranger
1. In the read-aloud you heard the stranger ask King Midas, “You are not
satisfied?”
2. Say the word satisfied with me three times.
3. To be satisfied means to be happy with something or to be happy
about the way things are.
4. King Midas was not satisfied with all his gold; he wanted more gold.
Pablo kept painting until he felt satisfied with his painting before
putting it on the drying table.
5. Why wasn’t King Midas satisfied when he met the stranger the first
time? (He wanted more gold.) Why wasn’t King Midas satisfied when he
met the stranger the second time? (His daughter was turned into gold.)
[Ask two or three students. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase the
students’ responses: “ King Midas was not satisfied because . . .”]
6. What’s the word we’ve been talking about?
Use a Making Choices activity for follow-up. Directions: I am going to
name some things that might make you satisfied. If what I name would
satisfy you, say “I’m satisfied.” If they would not satisfy you, say, “I’m not
satisfied.”
[You may wish to designate separate corners of the class as “satisfied”
and “not satisfied,” and have students carefully walk to their choice.]
1. a bag of gold coins
2. a cup of ice water on a very hot day
3. having fifteen minutes of free play
4. learning to tie my shoes
5. counting to one hundred
[You may wish to add additional items to briefly extend this activity.]
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 End-of-Lesson Check-In (Instructional Master 2B-1)
King Midas and the Golden Touch
• Hold up Image Cards 1–6, in order, as the class describes what is
happening in each illustration. Encourage students to use domain
vocabulary and temporal words such as first, next, then, after that,
finally.
• Provide each student with Instructional Master 2B-1, a blank piece
of paper, scissors, and glue or tape. Explain to students that this
worksheet has pictures of events, or what happened, from “King
Midas and the Golden Touch.”
• Have students cut out the six pictures.
• Alternatively, you may wish to choose three pictures (beginning,
middle, and end) for students to focus on.
• Next, have them think about what is happening in each picture.
Students should then arrange the pictures in their correct order to
show the proper sequence of events. Have students glue or tape the
pictures on paper once they have been sequenced.
• As students complete this activity, have them work with their partner,
in small groups, or with home-language peers to retell the story,
referring to the sequenced pictures.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 2B | King Midas and the Golden Touch
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
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Old King Cole
3
 Lesson Objectives
Core Content Objectives
Students will:
 Demonstrate familiarity with the poem “Old King Cole”
Language Arts Objectives
The following language arts objectives are addressed in this lesson.
Objectives aligning with the Common Core State Standards are noted
with the corresponding standard in parentheses. Refer to the Alignment
Chart for additional standards addressed in all lessons in this domain.
Students will:
 Recall facts from “Old King Cole” and accurately answer questions
such as who, what, where, and when, with prompting and support
(RL.K.1)
 Interpret information to make judgments, answer questions, and
express opinions about “Old King Cole,” and identify a cause/effect
relationship in the nursery rhyme, with prompting and support (RL.K.1)
 With prompting and support, describe characters and actions in “Old
King Cole” (RL.K.3)
 Listen to a variety of texts, including nursery rhymes such as “Old
King Cole” (RL.K.5)
 With prompting and support, describe the role of an author and
illustrator (RL.K.6)
 Actively engage in the fiction read-aloud “Old King Cole” (RL.K.10)
 Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activity
(L.K.1f)
 Demonstrate understanding of the adjective merry by relating it to its
opposite, sad (L.K.5b)
 Identify real-life connections between words—soul, fiddler, and
merry—and their use (L.K.5c)
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Core Vocabulary
bowl, n. A large cup or goblet used for drinking
Example: The king drank out of his royal bowl.
Variation(s): bowls
fiddlers, n. People who play stringed musical instruments like the violin
Example: Three fiddlers played music at the park for the children to
dance to.
Variation(s): fiddler
merry, adj. Happy
Example: Josefa is a very merry and upbeat little girl.
Variation(s): merrier, merriest
soul, n. Person
Example: My mother is a kind and understanding soul.
Variation(s): souls
Vocabulary Chart for Old King Cole
Core Vocabulary words are in bold.
Multiple Meaning Word Activity word is underlined.
Vocabulary Instructional Activity words have an asterisk (*).
Suggested words to pre-teach are in italics.
Type of Words
Understanding
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Domain-Specific Words
General Academic Words
Everyday-Speech Words
fiddle
fiddler
king
pipe
compare
merry*
soul
bowl
three
rare
old
Multiple Meaning
Phrases
Old King Cole
merry old soul
call for
comparer
raro(a)
Cognates
tres
Image Sequence
This is the Flip Book image for this read-aloud. It is the same as the
image in the Tell It Again! Read-Aloud Anthology.
1. 4A-1: Old King Cole
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 3 | Old King Cole
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At a Glance
Exercise
Introducing the Read-Aloud
Materials
Story Review
Image Cards 1–6;
Instructional Master 2B-1
Introducing “Old King Cole”
Instructional Master 3A-1
Vocabulary Preview: Soul,
Fiddler
Response Card 2;
music with fiddle tunes;
pictures or examples of
stringed instruments
Minutes
15
Purpose for Listening
Presenting the Read-Aloud
Old King Cole
Comprehension Questions
Discussing the Read-Aloud
music for “Old King Cole”;
video of “Old King Cole”
10
Response Card 2
10
Word Work: Merry
 Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
Rhyming Words
Syntactic Awareness Activity:
Sentence Builder
Extensions
15
Domain-Related Trade Book
Advance Preparation
For Story Review, use the sequence of story events for “King Midas and
the Golden Touch” (Instructional Master 2B-1) and Image Cards 1–6 to
help students retell the story.
Prepare a copy of Instructional Master 3A-1 for each student. Refer to
it as Response Card 2 (Old King Cole). Students can use this Response
Card for discussion, review, and to answer questions.
For Vocabulary Preview, find music with fiddle tunes to play for the class
(e.g., some folk music songs have fiddles in them). You may wish to save
the music for after the lesson and have the class move around to the
beat of the fiddle. In addition, prepare images or examples of various
stringed instruments, (e.g., guitar, ukulele, violin, viola, harp, cello, bass.)
For Presenting the Read-Aloud, find music for “Old King Cole” to play to
the class as they learn this nursery rhyme. You may also wish to find a
child-friendly video of “Old King Cole” for students to enjoy after learning
this nursery rhyme.
For the Domain-Related Trade Book activity, you may wish to tell
students additional nursery rhymes about royalty; (refer to the list of
rhymes in the activity).
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Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 3 | Old King Cole
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3A
Old King Cole
Introducing the Read-Aloud
15 minutes
Story Review
• Using their sequence of events for “King Midas and the Golden
Touch,” have students share the events of the story in partner pairs
or in small groups. Have one student take a turn to say one event and
have the next student follow up with an event, that happened next.
Encourage the use of temporal words: first, next, then, after that, later,
finally.
• You may also wish to have partner pairs try to put Image Cards 1–6 in
order as they retell the story together.
• Ask students if they remember the lesson that King Midas learned
• King Midas learned that family is more valuable than gold.
Introducing “Old King Cole”
• Remind students that they have heard many, many poems in Nursery
Rhymes and Fables and also in Farms, for example, “Baa, Baa, Black
Sheep”; and “This Little Pig Went to Market.” You may wish to have
students share a nursery rhyme with their partner.
• Tell students that they are going to hear a poem about a king called
Old King Cole.
• Distribute Response Card 2 (Old King Cole) to each student.
• Ask students: “Tell me what you see in this picture. Who do you think
is King Cole? How do you know?”
• Have different students point out what they recognize. Make sure that
the king, the pipe, the bowl, and the fiddlers are identified.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 3A | Old King Cole
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Vocabulary Preview
Soul
1. The first line of the poem says, “Old King Cole was a merry old soul.”
2. Say the word soul with me three times.
3. Soul is another way to say person.
4. My mother is a very kind soul.
There are four souls in this poem.
[Point out the four people—or souls—in Response Card 2.]
5. Let’s count how many souls there are in this room.
Fiddler
 Show image 4A-1: Old King Cole
1. In this poem, you will hear that Old King Cole has three fiddlers.
2. Say the word fiddlers with me three times.
3. Fiddlers are people who play the fiddle. Fiddle is another word for
violin, a stringed instrument that is held against the shoulder and
played with a wooden stick called a bow.
[If available, play music that uses the fiddle. Show pictures or
examples of stringed instruments and name them.]
4. The fiddlers played music at the park while the children danced.
5. Tell your partner what the fiddlers are doing in this picture. Do they
look like they enjoy playing the fiddle? Does it seem like they are
moving around while playing the fiddle, or does it seem like they are
standing still? Pretend that you are fiddler. How would you play the
fiddle?
Purpose for Listening
Tell students to listen to the poem and look at the picture to find out
whether Old King Cole was a happy king or a sad king.
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
 Demonstrate familiarity with the poem “Old King Cole”
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Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 3A | Old King Cole
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Presenting the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Old King Cole
First Read
 Show image 4A-1: Old King Cole
Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three.
Every fiddler had a very fine fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he.
Oh, there’s none so rare as can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.
Second Read with Motions
 Show image 4A-1: Old King Cole
[With an exaggerated smile, swing your arms to the beat of the rhyme.]
Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
[Explain that this means that Old King Cole was a very happy person.]
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl,
[Explain that in this poem, a bowl means a cup or a goblet that the king drinks
from. Make the shape of a bowl with your hands.]
And he called for his fiddlers three.
[Remind students that a fiddler is someone who plays the fiddle, or violin.]
[For the second stanza, move your arms back and forth like your are playing the
fiddle to the beat of the rhyme.]
Every fiddler had a very fine fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he.
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[Explain that a fine fiddle is a very nice fiddle.]
Oh, there’s none so rare as can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.
[Explain that this means there are very few things that could be better than
listening to the fiddlers play music.]
Third Read Using Echo Technique
 Show image 4A-1: Old King Cole
Directions: I am going to say the first line of “Old King Cole.” Then you
will echo the words.
[Pause after each line to give students time to echo.]
Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three.
Every fiddler had a very fine fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he.
Oh, there’s none so rare as can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.
Fourth Read Using Echo Technique with Motions
 Show image 4A-1: Old King Cole
Directions: I am going to say the first line of “Old King Cole” and do
the motions that go with it. Then you will echo the words as you also
repeat the motions.
[Pause after each line to give students time to echo and do the motions.]
[Have students swing their arms to the beat of the rhyme with smiles on their
faces.]
Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
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He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl,
[Have students make the shape of a bowl with their hands.]
And he called for his fiddlers three.
[Have students pantomime playing the fiddle.]
[For the second stanza, have students continue to move their arms back and
forth like they are playing the fiddle to the beat of the rhyme.]
Every fiddler had a very fine fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he.
Oh, there’s none so rare as can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.
Singing and Watching “Old King Cole”
• You may wish to sing this rhyme with the students using echo
technique and echo technique with motions.
• You may wish to show a video of “Old King Cole” that has been
previewed for classroom appropriateness.
Discussing the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Comprehension Questions
If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent lines
of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. If students give oneword answers and/or fail to use read-aloud or domain vocabulary in their
responses, acknowledge correct responses by expanding the students’
responses using richer and more complex language. Encourage students
to answer in complete sentences. Model answers using complete
sentences for students.
1. Literal Who is the main character in this poem?
[Have students point to Old King Cole on Response Card 2.]
• Old King Cole is the main character in this poem.
2. Evaluative How do you know that he is a king?
• He is called Old King Cole; he is dressed like a king in the picture; he has
a crown.
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3. Evaluative Does the king look happy?
• Yes, the king looks happy.
Why do you think the king is happy?
• Answers may vary, but might include that he enjoys listening to his
fiddlers; he is happy that he is king; he is happy that he gets what he
wants; etc.
4. Literal What does Old King Cole ask for in this poem?
• Old King Cole asks for his pipe, his bowl, and his three fiddlers.
5. Inferential Can the fiddlers drink from the king’s bowl?
• No, the fiddlers cannot drink from the king’s bowl.
Why not?
• Only members of the royal family can drink from a royal bowl.
[Please continue to model the Think Pair Share process for students, as
necessary, and scaffold students in their use of the process.]
I am going to ask a question. I will give you a minute to think about the
question, and then I will ask you to turn to your partner and discuss the
question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you discussed
with your partner.
Sentence Frames:
If you were King Cole, would you
call—or ask for—something
else? (Yes/No)
I would change
to
.
I would call for
of
.
76
instead
6. Evaluative Think Pair Share: In this poem, Old King Cole called for
three things: his pipe, his bowl, and his three fiddlers, and he got
them right away. If you were king—or queen—what would you change
in this poem? For example, instead of a pipe, you might call for a
pizza; and instead of three fiddlers, you might call for three pianists—
or people who play the piano.
7. After hearing today’s read-aloud and questions and answers, do
you have any remaining questions? [If time permits, you may wish to
allow for individual, group, or class research of the text and/or other
resources to answer these remaining questions.]
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 3A | Old King Cole
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Word Work: Merry
1. In the read-aloud you heard, “Old King Cole was a merry old soul.”
2. Say the word merry with me three times.
3. Merry means happy. We can use merry to describe someone who is
happy. We can also use merry to describe an occasion—or something
that happens—that is happy.
4. Alvaro was merry on the first day of school.
During the month of December, you might hear people wishing each
other Merry Christmas.
5. If merry means happy, than what do you think is the opposite of
merry?
[Call on a few students to share. Tell students that an opposite of
merry is sad.]
6. What’s the word we’ve been talking about? What is its opposite?
Use an Opposites activity for follow-up. Directions: I am going to name
some situations that are merry and some situations that are sad. If I say
something merry, show me a big smiley face and say, “
is merry.”
If I say something that is the opposite of merry, show me a big frowning
face and say, “
is sad.”
1. visiting relatives
2. getting sick
3. winning a soccer game
4. arguing with friends
5. falling down and hurting your knee
6. getting a new book

Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 3A | Old King Cole
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
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Old King Cole
Extensions
3B
15 minutes
Rhyming Words
• Tell students that you will read this nursery rhyme again, but this time
you want them to listen carefully for rhyming words.
• Remind students that rhyming words begin with a different sound
but end with the same sound. Review some rhyming words, or have
students tell you a word that rhymes with the first word: cat/hat; big/
pig; bake/take; ball/hall; etc.
Old King Cole
[Tell students to listen carefully for a word that rhymes with Cole.]
was a merry old soul,
[Soul rhymes with Cole.]
And a merry old soul was he;
[Have students listen for the word that rhymes with soul.]
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl,
[Bowl rhymes with soul. Now have students listen for the word that
rhymes with he.]
And he called for his fiddlers three.
[Three rhymes with he.]
Every fiddler had a very fine fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he.
Oh, there’s none so rare
[Tell students to listen carefully for a word that rhymes with rare.]
as can compare
[Compare rhymes with rare.]
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© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.
• Review the rhyming words in this poem: Cole/soul/bowl; he/three;
rare/compare.
 Syntactic Awareness Activity
Sentence Builder
 Show image 4A-1: Old King Cole
Directions: Look at the picture. I will call on you one at a time to say
a short sentence about the picture. Then we will put your sentences
together to make a longer sentence.
Note: There may be variations in the sentences created by your class.
Allow for these variations, and restate students’ sentences so they are
grammatical. Once students have mentioned two ideas, combine them to
make one sentence. See examples below.
1. The men are dancing.
The men are wearing red.
The men are dancing and wearing red.
The dancing men are wearing red.
The men who are wearing red are dancing.
2. The king has white hair.
The king likes music.
The king has white hair and likes music.
The king with white hair likes music.
➶ Above and Beyond: Have students work with their partner to build
their own sentences and/or to build longer sentences. Model for
students how to take turns saying one thing at a time and how to
combine their ideas into one sentence.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 3B | Old King Cole
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Domain-Related Trade Book
• Refer to the list of recommended trade books in the Introduction, and
choose a fiction text with a king as the main character.
• Alternatively, you may wish to read additional nursery rhymes about
royalty [e.g., “The Queen of Hearts,” “Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat,” “Humpty
Dumpty,” “Crown the King with Carrot Tops” (by Leroy F. Jackson),
“King Kokem” (by Leroy F. Jackson), “Happy Thought” (by Robert
Louis Stevenson), “Little Girl and Queen,” “The Grand Old Duke of
York.”]
• Explain to students that the person who wrote the book is called
the author. Tell students the name of the author of the book. Explain
to students that the person who makes the pictures for the book is
called the illustrator. Tell students the name of the illustrator. Show
students where they can find this information on the cover of the book
or on the title page.
• As you read, use the same strategies that you have been using
when reading the read-aloud selections—pause and ask occasional
questions; rapidly clarify critical vocabulary within the context of the
read-aloud; etc.
• After you finish reading the trade book aloud, lead students in a
discussion about how the information for the trade book or nursery
rhymes relates to what they have learned in the read-alouds.
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Sing a Song of Sixpence
4
 Lesson Objectives
Core Content Objectives
Students will:
 Demonstrate familiarity with the poem “Sing a Song of Sixpence”
Language Arts Objectives
The following language arts objectives are addressed in this lesson.
Objectives aligning with the Common Core State Standards are noted
with the corresponding standard in parentheses. Refer to the Alignment
Chart for additional standards addressed in all lessons in this domain.
Students will:
 Recall facts from “Sing a Song of Sixpence” and accurately answer
questions such as who, what, where, and when, with prompting and
support (RL.K.1)
 Interpret information to answer questions and express opinions about
“Sing a Song of Sixpence,” and identify a cause/effect relationship in
the nursery rhyme, with prompting and support (RL.K.1)
 With prompting and support, identify and describe characters,
settings, and major events in “Sing a Song of Sixpence” (RL.K.3)
 Listen to a variety of texts, including nursery rhymes such as “Sing a
Song of Sixpence” (RL.K.5)
 With prompting and support, compare and contrast similarities and
differences between two nursery rhymes about royalty (RL.K.9)
 Actively engage in the fiction read-aloud “Sing a Song of Sixpence”
(RL.K.10)
 Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activity
(L.K.1f)
 Sort objects and pictures into examples and non-examples of dainty
(L.K.5a)
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© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
 Identify real-life connections between words—rye, maid, and dainty—
and their use (L.K.5c)
 Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs—peck and poke—and
determine which is the better verb depending on context (L.K.5d)
Core Vocabulary
dainty, adj. Fancy, small, and pretty
Example: Look at those dainty cupcakes in the window of the bakery!
Variation(s): daintier, daintiest
maid, n. A person who cleans the inside of a house
Example: The maid tidied the kitchen and swept the floor, whistling
while she worked.
Variation(s): maids
pecked, v. Bit, struck, or poked with a beak
Example: The woodpecker pecked a hole in our apple tree.
Variation(s): peck, pecks, pecking
Vocabulary Chart for Sing a Song of Sixpence
Core Vocabulary words are in bold.
Multiple Meaning Word Activity word is underlined.
Vocabulary Instructional Activity words have an asterisk (*).
Suggested words to pre-teach are in italics.
Type of Words
Understanding
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Domain-Specific Words
General Academic Words
Everyday-Speech Words
blackbirds
maid
sixpence
parlour
rye
dainty*
pecked
baked
counting
king
pie
song
queen
to set before
pocket full of
sing a song
picotazo
contando
Multiple Meaning
Phrases
Cognates
Image Sequence
This is the order in which Flip Book images will be shown for this readaloud. This order is the same as the corresponding read-aloud in the Tell
It Again! Read-Aloud Anthology.
1. 5A-1: Blackbirds
2. 5A-2: King counting and queen eating
3. 5A-3: Maid
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 4 | Sing a Song of Sixpence
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
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At a Glance
Exercise
Materials
Poem Review
music for “Old King Cole”
Introducing “Sing a Song of
Sixpence”
Instructional Master 4A-1;
world map
Vocabulary Preview: Rye, Maid
pictures of rye and rye
products,
samples of rye products
Introducing the Read-Aloud
Minutes
15
Purpose for Listening
Presenting the Read-Aloud
Sing a Song of Sixpence
pictures of sixpence
Music for “Sing a Song of
Sixpence”
video of “Sing a Song of
Sixpence”
Response Card 3
Comprehension Questions
Discussing the Read-Aloud
10
10
Word Work: Dainty
images associated with dainty
 Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
Rhyming Words
Syntactic Awareness Activity:
What’s the Better Word?
Peck, Poke
Extensions
15
Syntactic Awareness Activity:
Sentence Builder
End-of-Lesson Check-in
Response Cards 2, 3
Advance Preparation
For the Poem Review, cue an audio recording of “Old King Cole” for
students to sing along with as they review this poem.
Prepare a copy of Instructional Master 4A-1 for each student. Refer to it
as Response Card 3 (Sing a Song of Sixpence). Students can use this
Response Card for discussion, review, and to answer questions.
For the Vocabulary Preview, prepare pictures of rye and rye products.
You may wish to bring in samples of rye bread and crackers for students
to try.
Note: Be sure to check with your school’s policy regarding food
distribution and allergies.
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For Presenting the Read-Aloud, cue an audio recording of “Sing a Song
of Sixpence” for students to sing along with. You may also wish to find a
student-friendly video of “Sing a Song of Sixpence.”
For Word Work, find several pictures that are examples of dainty (e.g.,
petits fours, mini-cupcakes, tasty food, ballerina, tea set) and several
pictures that are non-examples of dainty (e.g., construction truck, broken
glass, spoiled food, muddy children). These pictures can be placed onto
a two-column chart to show examples and non-examples of the word.
For the End-of-Lesson Check-In, prepare several questions and/or
statements about the two nursery rhymes, “Old King Cole,” and “Sing a
Song of Sixpence,” so that students can hold up the Response Card(s)
that relate to your statements or answer your questions.
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Sing a Song of Sixpence
4A
Introducing the Read-Aloud
15 minutes
Poem Review
• Review the nursery rhyme “Old King Cole” with students. You may
wish to play the song for “Old King Cole” as students sing along and
do the motions for the poem.
• Review the rhyming words in this poem: Cole/soul/bowl; he/three;
rare/compare.
Introducing “Sing a Song of Sixpence”
• Tell students that they are going to hear a nursery rhyme that was
written long ago that describes a king and queen in England.
[Point to England on a world map. Remind students that long ago
England had kings and queens and that today England still has kings and
queens.]
• Distribute Instructional Master 4A-1: Response Card 3 (Sing a Song of
Sixpence) to each student.
• Ask students to identify the king and queen. Ask them to explain how
they know.
• Identify the blackbirds. Ask students whether they see something
unusual about the blackbirds.
Vocabulary Preview
Rye
1. In this poem you will hear the phrase “a pocket full of rye.”
2. Say the word rye with me three times.
3. Rye is a grain, similar to wheat. But unlike wheat, rye can grow in soil
that does not have a lot of nutrients, and rye can grow in bad weather.
People use rye to make flour and bread.
4. Rye bread is usually darker and has a stronger taste than white bread.
[Show images of rye and rye products. If available, pass out samples
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of rye bread and crackers for students to try. Have them make
comparisons between rye bread and white bread.]
Note: Be sure to check with your school’s policy regarding food
distribution and allergies.]
5. Did you taste a difference between rye bread and bread that you
usually eat?
Maid
 Show image 5A-3: Maid
1. In this poem, you will hear that “the maid was in the garden, hanging
out the clothes.”
2. Say the word maid with me three times.
3. A maid is a female, or girl, helper who does a lot of the housework
such as cooking and cleaning.
4. After the maid washed the king’s clothes, she hung them up to dry.
5. Tell your partner why the king and queen have a maid. [Call on three
students to share.]
Purpose for Listening
Tell students they are going to hear a nursery rhyme called “Sing a Song
of Sixpence.” Tell them to listen carefully to hear what happens to the
characters: the king, the queen, and the maid.
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
 Demonstrate familiarity with the poem “Sing a Song of Sixpence”
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 4A | Sing a Song of Sixpence
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Presenting the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Sing a Song of Sixpence
First Read
 Show image 5A-1: Blackbirds
Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye,
Four and twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing;
Now wasn’t that a dainty dish
To set before the king?
 Show image 5A-2: King counting and queen eating
The king was in his counting house
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlour,
Eating bread and honey.
 Show image 5A-3: Maid
The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes,
When down came a blackbird
And pecked at her toes!
Second Read with Explanations
 Show image 5A-1: Blackbirds
Sing a song of sixpence,
[Explain to students that sixpence was a coin used in England long ago. Pence
is similar to the penny that we use today. If available, show images of sixpence.]
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A pocket full of rye,
[Explain that rye is a grain, similar to wheat.]
Four and twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing;
[Tell students that long ago in England, putting birds in a pie was a fancy way to
celebrate a special occasion.]
Now wasn’t that a dainty dish
To set before the king?
[Explain that a dainty dish is food that looks nice and fancy. Dainty also means
small and pretty.]
 Show image 5A-2: King counting and queen eating
The king was in his counting house
Counting out his money;
[Have a student point to all the gold around the king. Then ask students, “Is this
a rich king or a poor king? Which other king did you hear a story about who
also really liked gold?”]
• King Midas
The queen was in the parlour,
[Define that a parlour is a fancy room inside a house where people can sit and
talk.]
Eating bread and honey.
 Show image 5A-3: Maid
The maid was in the garden,
[Remind students that a maid is a female helper who does housework. Here
she is hanging up the clothes she has washed so they can dry outside.]
Hanging out the clothes,
When down came a blackbird
And pecked at her toes!
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[You may wish to explain that other versions of this nursery rhyme have the
blackbird pecking off her nose. Assure students that this does not really
happen in real life; it just makes the poem silly.]
Third Read Using Echo Technique
Directions: I am going to say the first line of “Sing a Song of Sixpence.”
Then you will echo the words.
Note: Be sure to pause after each line so that students can echo.
 Show image 5A-1: Blackbirds
Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye,
Four and twenty blackbirds
Baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing;
Now wasn’t that a dainty dish
To set before the king?
 Show image 5A-2: King counting and queen eating
The king was in his counting house
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlour,
Eating bread and honey.
 Show image 5A-3: Maid
The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes,
When down came a blackbird
And pecked at her toes!
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Singing and Watching “Sing a Song of Sixpence”
• You may wish to sing this rhyme with the students using echo
technique.
• You may wish to show a video of “Sing a Song of Sixpence” that has
been previewed for classroom appropriateness.
Discussing the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Comprehension Questions
If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent lines
of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. If students give oneword answers and/or fail to use read-aloud or domain vocabulary in their
responses, acknowledge correct responses by expanding the students’
responses using richer and more complex language. Encourage students
to answer in complete sentences. Model answers using complete
sentences for students.
1. Literal What is the title of this nursery rhyme?
• The title of this nursery rhyme is “Sing a Song of Sixpence.”
2. Literal Who are the characters, the people, in this rhyme?
[Have students point and name each character on Response Card 3.]
• The king, the queen, and the maid are the characters in this rhyme.
3. Literal Where was the king? What was he doing?
[Have students point to what they are describing on Response
Card 3.]
• The king was in his counting house counting his money.
Where was the queen? What was she doing?
• The queen was in the parlour eating bread and honey.
Where was the maid? What was she doing?
• The maid was in the garden hanging out the clothes.
 Show image 5A-1: Blackbirds
4. Inferential What is special about the pie in this poem?
• Answers may vary, but should include that there were blackbirds in the
pie and the birds were singing.
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5. Evaluative Why would someone give a special pie to the king?
• Answers may vary, but might include that the king is royal and that
people want to make the king happy.
[Please continue to model the Think Pair Share process for students, as
necessary, and scaffold students in their use of the process.]
I am going to ask two questions. I will give you a minute to think about
the questions, and then I will ask you to turn to your partner and discuss
the questions. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you
discussed with your partner.
Sentence Frames:
Would you like to be the queen?
(Yes/No)
I would want to be the
6. Evaluative Think Pair Share: If you could be one of the characters in
this nursery rhyme, who would you want to be: the king, the queen, or
the maid? Why?
.
If I could be one of the characters
in this nursery rhyme, I would
want to be the
because
...
7. After hearing today’s read-aloud and questions and answers, do
you have any remaining questions? [If time permits, you may wish to
allow for individual, group, or class research of the text and/or other
resources to answer these remaining questions.]
Word Work: Dainty
1. In the nursery rhyme you heard, “When the pie was opened, the birds
began to sing; now wasn’t that a dainty dish to set before the king?”
2. Say the word dainty with me three times.
3. Dainty describes something that is fancy, small, and pretty. If
something is a dainty dish that means it looks nice and fancy.
4. Aunt Rosie made a dainty dish of spinach ravioli.
My grandmother likes to drink her tea from dainty teacups.
5. What is the word we’ve been talking about?
Use a Making Choices activity for follow-up. Directions: I will show
you something. If it is dainty, say, “That’s dainty.” If it is not dainty, say,
“That’s not dainty.”
You may wish to have students place the pictures onto a two-column
chart for examples and non-examples of dainty.
• Show students pictures you have prepared, and have them categorize
them as dainty or not dainty.

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Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
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Sing a Song of Sixpence
Extensions
4B
15 minutes
Rhyming Words
• Tell students that you will read this nursery rhyme again, but this time
you want them to listen carefully for rhyming words.
• Remind students that rhyming words begin with a different sound but
end with the same sound. Have students tell you words that rhyme
with jig, play, mat, and pin, respectively.
 Show image 5A-1: Blackbirds
Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye,
Four and twenty blackbirds
[Tell students to raise their hands when they hear a word that rhymes with rye.]
Baked in a pie.
[Point out that pie rhymes with rye.]
When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing;
Now wasn’t that a dainty dish
[Tell students to raise their hands when they hear a word that rhymes with sing.]
To set before the king?
[Point out that king rhymes with sing.]
 Show image 5A-2: King counting and queen eating
The king was in his counting house
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlour,
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[Tell students to raise their hands when they hear a word that rhymes with
money.]
Eating bread and honey.
[Point out that honey rhymes with money.]
 Show image 5A-3: Maid
The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes,
When down came a blackbird
[Tell students to raise their hands when they hear a word that rhymes with
clothes.]
And pecked at her toes!
[Point out that toes rhymes with clothes.]
• Review the rhyming words in this poem: rye/pie; sing/king; money/
honey; clothes/toes
 Syntactic Awareness Activity
What’s the Better Word? Peck, Poke
Note: Although the focus of this activity is on word meanings,
students will gain practice in syntax as they respond in complete
sentences.
 Show image 5A-3: Maid
1. In the read-aloud you heard, “The maid was in the garden, hanging
out the clothes, when down came a blackbird and pecked at her
toes!”
2. When birds peck at something, they use their beaks to quickly and
tap it, like pecking at the ground for feed or worms.
[Remind students that they heard about chickens pecking for feed in the
Farms domain. Have students mime pecking by using their hand as a
beak to peck at the ground.]
What did the blackbird do to the maid?
• The blackbird pecked at the maid’s toes.
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3. Here is another word that has to do with touching something, but it is
different from peck.
Poke means to tap or hit hard with your fingers or other objects. For
example, my friend poked me on the shoulder to get my attention.
Directions: Let’s practice using these words: peck and poke. First I will
say a sentence. Then I will give you two words to choose from. If you
think the first word is the better word, stand up. If you think the second
word is the better word, stay seated. If I call on you to explain your
decision, use a complete sentence.
1. The chickens look for food on the ground. Would you say the
chickens peck for food or poke for food? (stand up)
• The chickens peck for food.
2. My mother gave me a quick kiss on the cheek good night. Would you
say my mother pecked my cheek or poked my cheek. (stand up)
• My mother pecked my cheek.
3. Jillian found a stick that she could use to make a hole in the ground
with. Would you say Jillian pecked a hole in the ground or poked a
hole in the ground? (stay seated)
• Jillian poked a hole in the ground.
4. Be careful with that rod! I don’t want it to hurt your eyes. Would you
say the rod might peck your eyes or poke your eyes. (stay seated)
• The rod might poke your eyes.
5. The ducks eat the bread crumbs off the ground. Would you say
the ducks peck the bread crumbs off the ground or poke the bread
crumbs. (stand up)
• The ducks peck the bread crumbs off the ground.
 Syntactic Awareness Activity
Sentence Builder
 Show image 5A-1: Blackbirds
Directions: Look at the picture. I will call on you one at a time to say
a short sentence about the picture. Then we will put your sentences
together to make a longer sentence.
Note: There may be variations in the sentences created by your class.
Allow for these variations, and restate students’ sentences so they
are grammatical. Once students have mentioned two ideas, combine
them to make one sentence. See examples below.
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1. The king is sitting down.
The king is eating pie.
The king is sitting down and eating pie.
The king is eating pie while sitting down.
2. Blackbirds fly out of the pie.
The king is happy.
The king is happy because blackbirds fly out of the pie.
Blackbirds fly out of the pie and this makes the king happy.
Extending the Activity
• You may wish to use another Flip Book image from this lesson to
build more sentences with the class.
➶ Above and Beyond: Have students work with their partner to build
their own sentences and/or to build longer sentences. Model for
students how to take turns saying one thing at a time and how to
combine their ideas into one sentence.
 End-of-Lesson Check-In
Sing a Song of Sixpence
Choose four students to focus on, and record their scores on the Tens
Recording Chart. For this kind of informal observation, you should
give a score of zero, five, or ten based on your evaluation of students’
understanding and language use.
0
Emergent understanding and language use
5
Developing understanding and language use
10
Proficient understanding and language use
• Remind students that they heard two nursery rhymes, “Old King Cole”
and “Sing a Song of Sixpence.”
• Ask students the questions you have prepared for this activity. Have
students hold up the corresponding Response Card(s) to answer.
• Some example statement/questions might be: I had three fiddlers.
Who am I? (Response Card 2) There is a maid in this poem.
(Response Card 3) The king gets good things. (Response Cards 2
and 3)
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PP
Pausing Point
Note to Teacher
You should pause here and spend one day reviewing, reinforcing, or
extending the material taught thus far.
You may have students do any combination of the activities listed below,
but it is highly recommended that you use the Mid-Domain Student
Performance Task Assessment to assess students’ knowledge of Kings
and Queens. The other activities may be done in any order. You may also
choose to do an activity with the whole class or with a small group of
students who would benefit from the particular activity.
Core Content Objectives Up to This Pausing Point
Students will:
 Describe a royal family
 Describe what a king or queen does
 Identify and describe royal objects associated with a king or queen
 Indicate that kings and queens still exist today, but that there were
many more kings and queens long ago
 Describe that kings usually possess gold and other treasures
 Discuss the difference between valuing relationships with people and
valuing wealth
 Describe the characters, setting, and plot of “King Midas and the
Golden Touch”
 Demonstrate familiarity with “King Midas and the Golden Touch,” “Old
King Cole,” and “Sing a Song of Sixpence”
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Student Performance Task Assessment
 Riddles for Core Content
Materials: Instructional Master PP-1
Note: Name the pictures in each row as you read each riddle to the
students.
Directions: I am going to read a riddle about something you have heard
from the read-alouds. First, you will listen to the riddle. Next, you will look
at the two pictures in the row as I name them. Find and circle the picture
that answers the riddle.
1. I hold a scepter and an orb, and I wear a crown on my head so people
know that I am important. Who am I? (king, maid)
• king
2. We are the most important people in the kingdom. Who are we?
(blackbirds, royal family)
• royal family
3. I turned my daughter into gold! Who am I? (King Midas, maid)
• King Midas
4. I called for three fiddlers to play for me. Who am I?
(Old King Cole, queen)
• Old King Cole
5. We were put into a pie for the king. What are we?
(golden roses, blackbirds)
• blackbirds
Listen and Create
Materials: Music CDs; cardstock; art supplies; glitter, sequins or
fake jewels (emeralds, sapphires, rubies, diamond)
Have students listen to “Old King Cole,” “Sing a Song of Sixpence,” and
other songs about kings and queens while they create their own crowns.
You may wish to introduce different kinds of precious stones that are
found on crowns [e.g., diamonds (clear), emeralds (green), sapphires (blue),
rubies (red)]. Remind students them that the precious stones that are on
crowns are called “crown jewels.” After students have finished making their
crowns, have them wear their crowns and have a “royal parade” around the
classroom or playground. (Students who are king and queen for the day may
wish to wear their crown for the day they are chosen to be king or queen.)
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Image Card Review
Materials: Image Cards 1–6; Instructional Master 2B-1
Review the story “King Midas and the Golden Touch” using Image
Cards 1–6 and Instructional Master 2B-1. In small groups, have students
order the Image Cards and retell the story with the help of their already
completed sequence of the story. You may wish to have home-language
peers retell this story in their home language.
➶ Above and Beyond: Have the small group act this story out.
Kings and Queens Grab Bag
Materials: Various objects related to the read-alouds
Place various objects related to the read-alouds in a bag (e.g., crown,
gold coin, goblet, pie, blackbird). Hold up each object, and ask students
if they remember hearing about these objects. Ask them to match the
objects with the read-alouds by holding up the corresponding Response
Card(s).
Drawing the Read-Aloud
Materials: Drawing paper, drawing tools
Review the sayings “it’s good to be king” and “having the golden touch.”
Have students choose one of the sayings and draw a picture showing
what that saying might look like in real life. Be sure to have students
explain why their picture depicts the particular saying they have chosen.
Domain-Related Trade Book or Student Choice
Materials: Trade book
Read an additional trade book; refer to the books listed in the
Introduction. You may also choose to have students select a read-aloud
to be heard again.
Exploring Student Resources
Materials: Domain-related student websites
Pick appropriate websites from the Internet or from the websites listed in
the Introduction for further exploration of topics already covered in this
domain: life of a royal family, “King Midas and the Golden Touch,” Old
King Cole,” “Sing a Song of Sixpence”.
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Videos of Kings and Queens
Materials: Videos related to kings and queens
Carefully peruse the Internet for short (five minutes or less) videos related
to topics already covered in this domain.
Prepare some questions related to the videos.
Discuss how watching a video is the same as and different from listening
to a storybook.
Have students ask and answer questions using the question words who,
where, what, and why regarding what they see in the videos.
King or Queen for the Day
Materials: Royal props such as a crown, robe, scepter, etc.
If you have not begun this domain-wide activity, you may wish to start.
Draw the names of students, and have them be kings or queens on
different days of the week. Be sure to give every student a chance to
be king or queen. Provide royal props as well, such as a robe, scepter,
and, of course, a crown. Give each student age-appropriate “royal”
responsibilities (such as being the line leader, passing out papers, helping
classmates in need). Have them lead the classroom as much as possible,
while you provide help as their “royal advisor” as necessary. At the end of
the day, ask the particular student to identify some aspects about what
he or she liked and disliked about ruling the “kingdom.”
Kings and Queens Around the World
You may wish to pinpoint on a world map countries that still have kings
and queens. Then choose one country to focus on, and conduct group
research about that country’s royal family.
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The Princess and the Pea
5
 Lesson Objectives
Core Content Objectives
Students will:
 Describe the characters, setting, and plot of “The Princess and the
Pea”
 Demonstrate familiarity with “The Princess and the Pea”
Language Arts Objectives
The following language arts objectives are addressed in this lesson.
Objectives aligning with the Common Core State Standards are noted
with the corresponding standard in parentheses. Refer to the Alignment
Chart for additional standards addressed in all lessons in this domain.
Students will:
 Recall facts from “The Princess and the Pea,” and accurately answer
questions such as who, what, where, and when, with prompting and
support (RL.K.1)
 Interpret information to answer questions and express opinions about
“The Princess and the Pea,” and identify a cause/effect relationship in
the fairy tale, with prompting and support (RL.K.1)
 With prompting and support, retell the story “The Princess and the
Pea” (RL.K.2)
 With prompting and support, describe the characters, setting, and
plot for “The Princess and the Pea” (RL.K.3)
 Listen to a variety of texts, including a fairy tale from Denmark—“The
Princess and the Pea” (RL.K.5)
 With prompting and support, describe the role of an author and
illustrator (RL.K.6)
 Actively engage in the fiction read-aloud “The Princess and the Pea”
(RL.K.10)
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 Identify real-life connections between words—real, delicate, and
graceful—and their use (L.K.5c)
 Learn the meaning of common phrases such as “once upon a time”
(L.K.6)
Core Vocabulary
delicate, adj. Fragile and easily broken
Example: Abby’s mother let her carefully hold the delicate china dolls.
Variation(s): none
graceful, adj. Moving, speaking, or acting in a beautiful way
Example: Even when they are not dancing, ballerinas have a graceful
way of walking.
Variation(s): none
howled, v. Made a long, loud, and sad sound
Example: Tony howled when he hit his elbow against the sharp corner
of his desk.
Variation(s): howl, howls, howling
Vocabulary Chart for The Princess and the Pea
Core Vocabulary words are in bold.
Multiple Meaning Word Activity word is underlined.
Vocabulary Instructional Activity words have an asterisk (*).
Suggested words to pre-teach are in italics.
Type of Words
Understanding
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Domain-Specific Words
General Academic Words
Everyday-Speech Words
castle
howled
kingdom
married
mattress
museum
pea
delicate
graceful*
real
prince
princess
queen
twenty
felt
storm
Multiple Meaning
Phrases
Cognates
castillo
museo
all over the world
a good night’s
sleep
delicado(a)
príncipe
princesa
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Image Sequence
This is the order in which Flip Book images will be shown for this readaloud. Please note that it is the same as the sequence used in the Tell it
Again! Read-Aloud Anthology.
1. 6A-1: Prince searching for a real princess
2. 6A-2: Prince returns home disappointed
3. 6A-3: Princess at the door in a terrible storm
4. 6A-4: Queen prepares room
5. 6A-5: Princess describes her night
6. 6A-6: Happily ever after
At a Glance
Exercise
Materials
Minutes
Instructional Master 5A-1;
frozen or dried peas;
world map
15
What Have We Learned?
Introducing “The Princess and
the Pea”
Introducing the Read-Aloud
Vocabulary Preview:
Real, Delicate
examples of delicate things
Purpose for Listening
Presenting the Read-Aloud
The Princess and the Pea
Comprehension Questions
Discussing the Read-Aloud
world map;
sponges or layers of thick
cloth;
frozen peas
10
Response Card 4
10
Word Work: Graceful
 Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
Character, Setting, Plot Map
Extensions
Image Cards 7–12;
Instructional Masters 5B-1;
drawing paper, drawing tools
15
Domain-Related Trade Book
Take-Home Material
Family Letter
Instructional Masters 5B-2,
5B-3
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Advance Preparation
For What Have We Learned?, choose a few Flip Book images on which
to focus as you review domain concepts covered thus far in the domain
(e.g., the royal family, king’s possession of gold and riches, advantages
and disadvantages of being in a royal family).
Prepare a copy of Instructional Master 5A-1 for each student. Refer to it
as Response Card 4 (The Princess and the Pea). Students can use this
Response Card for discussion, review, and to answer questions.
For the Vocabulary Preview, prepare items that are delicate (e.g.,
glassware, chinaware, collectables, silk/cashmere clothing, art). Remind
students that delicate items are easily broken, so they must ask before
touching, and they must handle the items with care.
For Presenting the Read-Aloud, layer several cushions or pillows on top
of a frozen or dried pea to show how the queen tests the princess by
putting a pea underneath many layers of mattresses and pads. You may
wish to have students try sitting on the cushions to see if they can feel
the pea under so many layers.
C
S
P
For the Character, Setting, Plot Map, help students create their own
three-circle map. Students may choose to cut and paste pictures from
the image sheet or draw their own pictures in the circles for their own
Character, Setting, Plot Map. Alternatively, you may wish to draw the
circles on the board and do this activity as a class.
For the Domain-Related Trade Book, you may wish to introduce students
to another version of “The Princess and the Pea” or another fairy tale by
Hans Christian Anderson that has a royalty theme (e.g., “Thumbelina,”
“The Little Mermaid,” “The Nightingale,” or “The Emperor’s New
Clothes”).
Note to Teacher
Use the Vocabulary Preview to help students understand the concept
of real, providing explanations and examples as needed. In the
Comprehension Questions, students will discuss whether they think this
is a real story; they will also think and talk about which parts of the story
could be real and which parts are make-believe.
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The Princess and the Pea
Introducing the Read-Aloud
5A
15 minutes
What Have We Learned?
• Review the Flip Book images you have chosen to reinforce domain
concepts and vocabulary (e.g., members of the royal family; objects
that relate to royalty).
• Remind students that kings and queens and their children, princes
and princesses, were the most important and powerful people in the
kingdom.
Introducing “The Princess and the Pea”
• Tell students that they are going to hear a fairy tale that was written
long ago in Denmark.
• Point to Denmark on a world map. Tell students that long ago
Denmark had kings and queens and that today Denmark still has
kings and queens.
• Distribute Instructional Master 5A-1: Response Card 4 (The Princess
and the Pea) to each student.
• Have students identify the queen, the prince, and the princess. Ask
them to explain how they know.
• Have students find the little pea in the queen’s hand. Then pass
around some frozen or dried peas for students to touch and describe.
Tell students that the queen uses a pea to do something interesting in
the story.
Note: Be sure to check with your school’s policy regarding food
distribution and allergies.
Picture Walk
• Tell students that the story they will hear is called “The Princess and
the Pea.”
• Tell students that you will take a picture walk through some of the
pictures in this story together. Explain that a picture walk is when they
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look at the pictures from the story to become familiar with the story,
see the characters of the story, and make predictions about what
might happen in the story.
• Tell students that these pictures were drawn by someone—that
person is called the illustrator.
• Tell students that this story was written by someone—that person is
called the author. The author of this story is Hans Christian Anderson.
You may wish to ask if they have heard other stories written by this
author: “The Ugly Duckling,” “The Little Mermaid,” “Thumbelina.”
 Show image 6A-1: Prince searching for a real princess
• Have students point to the prince. Tell students that this prince is
looking for a princess to marry.
 Show image 6A-2: Prince returns home disappointed
• Ask students, “Who do you think this woman is?”
• She is the queen, the prince’s mother.
• Ask how they know this woman is a queen.
• She is wearing royal robes and a crown.
 Show image 6A-3: Princess at the door in a terrible storm
• Tell students that this princess is the third character in this story.
• Explain that there was a terrible storm, and the princess knocked on
the castle door.
• Ask students to predict whether the queen and the prince will let the
princess in.
Vocabulary Preview
Real
1. In this story the prince is looking for a real princess to marry.
2. Say the word real with me three times.
3. When something is real that means it is true and not made-up or fake.
4. The king’s crown had real diamonds and rubies on it.
The prince was not sure if the girls he met were real princesses or just
acting like they were princesses.
5. How would you know whether or not a person was a real princess?
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Delicate
1. In this story you will find out that the princess is delicate.
2. Say the word delicate with me three times.
3. When something is delicate it is not strong and can be easily broken.
4. Be careful when touching something that is delicate.
Abby’s mother let her carefully hold the delicate china dolls.
[Show different delicate items one at a time and discuss with students
why each item is delicate.]
Purpose for Listening
Tell students they are going to hear a fairy tale called “The Princess and
the Pea.” Tell them to listen carefully to hear what the queen does to test
whether the princess is a real princess.
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
 Describe the characters, setting, and plot of “The Princess and the
Pea”
 Demonstrate familiarity with “The Princess and the Pea”
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Presenting the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
The Princess and the Pea
 Show image 6A-1: Prince searching for a real princess
Once upon a time, there was a prince who wanted to marry a
princess—but not just any princess. He wanted to marry a real
princess. So he traveled all over the world looking for a real princess.
[You may wish to point to a few European countries on a world map that have
been introduced in this domain, starting with Denmark, and then Great Britain,
France, and Greece, naming them as you go. Point out that England is now part
of Great Britain.]
He went from kingdom to kingdom, and he met plenty of princesses.
[Ask students, “Do you remember what a kingdom is?]
• A kingdom is land that is ruled by a king or queen.
Of course, they were all beautiful, talented, graceful, and kind.
[Define graceful as moving, speaking, and acting in a beautiful way. Walk
around and bow in a graceful manner.]
But never did the prince feel that he had found an absolutely, totally,
completely real princess. So, sad and disappointed, he returned
home.
 Show image 6A-2: Prince returns home disappointed
Back at the castle, his mother, the queen, asked him, “Did you find a
princess?”
[Ask students to predict the prince’s answer.]
“Oh, I found plenty of princesses,” the prince replied, “but I never felt
sure that I’d found a real princess.”
 Show image 6A-3: Princess at the door in a terrible storm
That night there was a terrible storm. Lightning flashed, thunder
crashed, the wind howled, and the rain pounded down.
[Ask students whether this is good weather to be outdoors. Explain that when
the wind howls, the wind makes a long, loud, and sad sound.]
In the middle of the storm, there was a knock at the palace door. The
maid opened the door and there, standing in the rain, was a princess.
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[With their partner, have students describe the princess. Allow fifteen seconds
for students to talk. Call on two students to share.]
And oh my, she was a mess! Her hair was dripping, her clothes were
torn and muddy, and water poured out of her shoes.
“Who are you?” asked the queen.
“I am a princess,” she said. “Really. A real princess.”
[Ask students, “Does she look like a real princess to you? Do you think she is a
real princess?”]
 Show image 6A-4: Queen prepares room
“Humph!” said the queen, and she thought to herself, We’ll soon see
about that! The queen went into a bedroom and took all the sheets
and blankets off the bed. Then she put one tiny pea on the bed.
[Have a student point out the pea in the queen’s hand. You may wish to pass
around some peas for students to touch and describe.]
And on top of that she piled twenty mattresses, and on top of those,
twenty feather-filled pads.
[For visualization, you may wish to draw twenty mattresses and twenty pads on
top of a little pea, or you may wish to show this with sponges or layers of thick
cloth.]
“Here is where you will sleep tonight,” she said to the princess.
 Show image 6A-5: Princess describes her night
The next morning at the breakfast table, the queen asked the
princess, “Did you have a good night’s sleep?”
“No, not at all,” said the princess. “I tossed and turned all night.
Something in the bed was so hard and lumpy—why, I’m bruised black
and blue all over.”
[Explain that a bruise is something you get when you bump into something
really hard. Students might be able to relate to having a bruised arm, leg, or
forehead.]
So, she had felt the pea through the twenty mattresses and twenty
feather-filled pads.
[Point to your drawing or layers of cloth. You may wish to have a student come up
and sit on a few cushions with a pea underneath to see if s/he can feel the pea.]
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The queen and her son smiled at each other. Surely, only a real
princess could be so delicate and sensitive!
[Define delicate as easily hurt or broken.]
 Show image 6A-6: Happily ever after
So the prince married her and felt happy that he had at last found a
real princess. And as for the pea, it was placed in a museum, where it
may still be seen, if nobody has taken it.
[Ask students if they know what a museum is or if they have ever been to a
museum. Define museum as a place where interesting things are shown, such
as paintings, airplanes, or dinosaur bones. Ask students whether they think the
pea was really put into a museum.]
And that, children, is a real story!
[Have students discuss with their partner whether this is a real story. Reinforce
the concepts of fiction, make-believe, and fantasy versus nonfiction, and
reality.]
Discussing the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Comprehension Questions
If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent lines
of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. If students give oneword answers and/or fail to use read-aloud or domain vocabulary in their
responses, acknowledge correct responses by expanding the students’
responses using richer and more complex language. Encourage students
to answer in complete sentences. Model answers using complete
sentences for students.
1. Literal What is the title of this fairy tale?
• The title of this fairy tale is “The Princess and the Pea.”
2. Literal Who are the characters in this fairy tale?
[Have students point to and name each character on Response
Card 4.]
• The queen, the prince, and the princess are the characters in this fairy
tale.
3. Literal What was the prince doing at the beginning of the story?
• The prince was looking for a real princess to marry.
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4. Literal What happened during the storm?
• A princess knocked on the palace door.
5. Inferential When the queen saw the princess at the door, do you think
the queen believed that she was a real princess?
• No, the queen did not think she was a real princess.
Why not?
• The princess was a mess; her hair was dripping, her clothes were
muddy; she did not look like a princess.
6. Literal What test does the queen use to see if she is a real princess?
• The queen puts a pea under the mattresses and pads. If the girl could
feel the pea, then she must be a real princess.
7. Inferential Was the girl a real princess? Why?
• Yes, the girl was a real princess because she felt the pea under all those
mattresses and pads.
8. Evaluative Which parts of the story could be real?
• A prince looking for a princess to marry, a stormy night, and a queen
helping the prince find a real princess could all be real.
Which parts of the story could not be real?
• The princess getting bruised by a pea under the mattresses could not be
real.
[Please continue to model the Think Pair Share process for students, as
necessary, and scaffold students in their use of the process.]
I am going to ask a question. I will give you a minute to think about the
question, and then I will ask you to turn to your partner and discuss the
question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what you discussed
with your partner.
Sentence Frames:
9. Evaluative Think Pair Share: What are some other ways the princess
Did you believe the girl was a real
could prove that she is a real princess?
princess? (Yes/No)
The princess could…
One other way the princess could
prove she is a real princess is
by…
10. After hearing today’s read-aloud and questions and answers, do
you have any remaining questions? [If time permits, you may wish to
allow for individual, group, or class research of the text and/or other
resources to answer these remaining questions.]
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Word Work: Graceful
1. In the read-aloud you heard, “Of course, [the princesses] were all
beautiful, talented, graceful, and kind.”
2. Say the word graceful with me three times.
3. To be graceful means to move, speak, or act in a beautiful way.
4. The princess looked very graceful as she walked down the stairs.
The ballerina looked graceful as she danced on her tiptoes across the
stage.
5. Tell me if I look graceful or not. If I am graceful, clap. If I am not
graceful, keep your hands to your side. [Model graceful movements
and jerky, awkward movements.]
6. What’s the word we’ve been talking about?
Use a Making Choices activity for follow-up. Directions: I will describe a
situation. If it is an example of something graceful, clap and say, “That is
graceful.” If I give an example of something that is not graceful, keep your
hands to your side and say, “That is not graceful.”
• Sam made a loud, banging sound on the drums.
• That is not graceful.
• Briana danced beautifully on the stage.
• That is graceful.
• Ling tripped and fell as she walked across the room.
• That is not graceful.
• Waleed bumped his head as he tried to get something from under his
desk.
• That is not graceful.
• The princess sang sweetly as she walked around her garden.
• That is graceful.
➶ Above and Beyond: You may wish to call on volunteers to make up
or act out their own examples and non-examples of graceful.

Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
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The Princess and the Pea
5B
Extensions
15 minutes
 Character, Setting, Plot Map (Instructional Master 5B-1)
• Hold up Image Cards 7–12, in order, as the class describes what is
happening in the illustrations. Encourage students to use domain
vocabulary and temporal words such as first, next, then, after that,
and finally. For the first Image Card, begin retelling the story with the
phrase “Once upon a time.” Explain that many fairy tales begin with
this phrase “Once upon a time.”
• Help students make their own Character, Setting, Plot Map by
drawing three large circles on their paper. [You may wish to create a
large Character, Setting, Plot Map on the board and do this activity as
a class.]
• Explain that the first circle is “Characters.” Students may cut
and paste images from the image sheet or draw pictures of the
characters in this story.
• The second circle is “Setting.” Remind students that the setting is
where the story takes place. Students may cut and paste images
or draw their own picture of the settings. (The setting is the palace,
including the room where the princess slept, and the room in
which they had breakfast.)
• The third circle is “Plot.” Remind students that the plot is what
happened in the story. Have students think of a scene from the
story and draw it. (They may use Image Cards 7 – 12 for ideas.)
• As students complete this activity, have them work in small groups
or with home-language peers to retell the story. With your help, have
them attempt to sequence the “Plot” circles drawn by members of
their group.
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Domain-Related Trade Book
• Refer to the list of recommended trade books in the Introduction, and
choose a fiction text about a prince and princesses.
• Alternatively, you may wish to choose to read another version of “The
Princess and the Pea” or another fairy tale with a royalty theme by
Hans Christian Anderson.
• Explain to students that the person who wrote the book is called the
author. For example, the author of “The Princess and the Pea” is Hans
Christian Anderson. Tell students the name of the author of the book.
Explain to students that the person who makes the pictures for the
book is called the illustrator. Tell students the name of the illustrator.
Show students where they can find this information on the cover of
the book or on the title page.
• As you read, use the same strategies that you have been using
when reading the read-aloud selections—pause and ask occasional
questions; rapidly clarify critical vocabulary within the context of the
read-aloud; etc.
• After you finish reading the trade book aloud, lead students in a
discussion about how the information from the trade book relates to
what they have learned in the read-alouds.
Take-Home Material
Family Letter
• Send home Instructional Masters 5B-2, 5B-3
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6
Cinderella
Lesson Objectives
Core Content Objectives
Students will:
 Describe the characters, setting, and plot of “Cinderella”
 Demonstrate familiarity with “Cinderella”
Language Arts Objectives
The following language arts objectives are addressed in this lesson.
Objectives aligning with the Common Core State Standards are noted
with the corresponding standard in parentheses. Refer to the Alignment
Chart for additional standards addressed in all lessons in this domain.
Students will:
 Recall facts from “Cinderella” and accurately answer questions such
as who, what, where, and when, with prompting and support (RL.K.1)
 Interpret information to answer questions about “Cinderella,” and
recognize a cause/effect relationship in the fairy tale, with prompting
and support (RL.K.1)
 With prompting and support, sequence three to six pictures
illustrating events in the story “Cinderella,” retelling the story using the
sequenced pictures (RL.K.2)
 Listen to a variety of texts, including a fairy tale from France—
“Cinderella” (RL.K.5)
 Actively engage in the fiction read-aloud “Cinderella” (RL.K.10)
 Identify multiple meanings of ball, and use them in appropriate
contexts (L.K.4a)
 Identify real-life connections between words—cinders, fairy
godmother, ball, tattered, and announced—and their use (L.K.5c)
 Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs—stumble and step—and
determine which is the better verb depending on context (L.K.5d)
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 Learn the meaning of common phrases such as “once upon a time”
and “happily ever after” (L.K.6)
Core Vocabulary
cinders, n. Small bits of burned wood from the fireplace
Example: Can you please sweep up the cinders that fell out of the
fireplace?
Variation(s): cinder
hearth, n. The floor area in front of a fireplace
Example: A fiery log rolled out of the fireplace and onto the hearth.
Variation(s): hearths
merriment, n. Fun
Example: Her eyes sparked with merriment as her friends sang “Happy
Birthday.”
Variation(s): none
stumbled, v. Tripped
Example: Carolina’s foot caught on the sidewalk and she stumbled.
Variation(s): stumble, stumbles, stumbling
tattered, adj. Torn; worn out
Example: Gema could no longer wear her sister’s old coat because it
was too old and tattered.
Variation(s): none
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Vocabulary Chart for Cinderella
Core Vocabulary words are in bold.
Multiple Meaning Word Activity word is underlined.
Vocabulary Instructional Activity words have an asterisk (*)
Suggested words to pre-teach are in italics.
Type of Words
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Domain-Specific Words
General Academic Words
Everyday-Speech Words
Understanding
Cinderella
cinders
coachman
gown
hearth
kingdom
midnight
primped
stepmother
stepsister
announced*
complain
dazzling
fair/unfair
forgave
merriment
patiently
recognized
stumbled*
tattered*
dance
horses
palace
pumpkin
prince
mice
rat
staircase
wand
Multiple Meaning
ball
coach
toll
snapped
orders
begged her pardon
Phrases
When the clock
strikes twelve
fairy godmother
glass slipper
Cognates
Cenicienta
cenizas
cochero
medianoche
baile
coche
anunciar*
pacientemente
reconocieron
ordenar
palacio
príncipe
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Image Sequence
This is the order in which Flip Book images will be shown for this readaloud. Preview the order of Flip Book images before teaching this lesson.
Please note that it differs from the sequence used in the Tell it Again!
Read-Aloud Anthology.
1. 7A-1: Cinderella scrubbing floor
2. 7A-2: Cinderella listening to her stepsisters talking
3. 7A-3: Stepsisters snapping at Cinderella
4. 7A-4: Fairy godmother
5. 7A-5: Cinderella in a pumpkin patch
6. 7A-7: Cinderella and fairy godmother surrounded by white light
7. 7A-6: Coach
8. 7A-8: Cinderella in a glittering gown
9. 7A-9: Cinderella dancing with the prince
10. 7A-10: Cinderella running from the ball
11. 7A-11: Prince holding slipper
12. 7A-12: Stepsister trying on slipper
13. 7A-13: Cinderella trying on the glass slipper
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At a Glance
Exercise
Materials
Story Review
Image Cards 7–12;
Instructional Master 5B-1
Introducing “Cinderella”
Instructional Master 6A-1;
world map
Introducing the Read-Aloud
Vocabulary Preview: Cinders,
Fairy Godmother
Minutes
15
pieces of coal or chalk
Purpose for Listening
Presenting the Read-Aloud
10
Cinderella
Comprehension Questions
Discussing the Read-Aloud
Response Card 5
examples of tattered
clothing, tattered rags
Word Work: Tattered
10
 Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
Multiple Meaning Word Activity:
Ball
Extensions
Poster 3M (Ball)
Syntactic Awareness Activity:
What’s the Better Word?
Stumble, Step
15
Vocabulary Instructional
Activity: Announced
megaphone or microphone
End-of-Lesson Check-In
Image Cards 13–21;
Instructional Master 6B-1;
paper; scissors; glue or tape
Advanced Preparation
For Story Review, use the Character, Setting, Plot Map for “The Princess
and the Pea.”
Prepare a copy of Instructional Master 6A-1 for each student. Refer to it
as Response Card 5 (Cinderella). Students can use this Response Card
for discussion, review, and to answer questions.
For the Vocabulary Preview, bring in pieces of coal (or chalk) to show
students how easily Cinderella’s skin and clothes can become dirty from
the cinders.
For Word Work, bring in examples of tattered clothing and tattered rags.
For the Vocabulary Instructional Activity, bring in a megaphone or
microphone that students confuse to make announcements.
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For the End-of-Lesson Check-In, students will sequence events from the
story (Instructional Master 6B-1). You may wish to reduce the number
images to three images that represent the beginning, middle, and end of
the story.
Note to Teacher
This story lends itself to rich and deep discussions about fairness. There
are several spots in the read-aloud where you can pause and have
students think about whether the situation is fair to Cinderella.
You may wish to skip the introductory sentence of this story, especially if
you have students sensitive towards remarriages within their own family.
This story presents stepmothers and stepsisters in a negative light. You
may wish to tell students that not all stepmothers and stepsisters are bad
or evil. Remind students that this story is fantasy, not real.
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6A
Cinderella
Introducing the Read-Aloud
15 minutes
Story Review
• Review the characters, setting, and plot of the story “The Princess
and the Pea.” If you have created a large Character, Setting, Plot Map
for this story, use it for review. Encourage the use of temporal words:
first, next, then, after that, later, and finally. In particular, have students
begin the story with the phrase “once upon a time.”
• You may also wish to have partner pairs try to sequence Image
Cards 7–12 as they retell the story.
• Remind students that “The Princess and the Pea” is a fairy tale and
not real.
Introducing “Cinderella”
• Tell students that they are going to hear a fairy tale that was written
long ago in France.
• Point to France on a world map. Tell students that long ago France
had kings and queens. Now France no longer has kings and queens;
now France has a president.
• Distribute Instructional Master 6A-1: Response Card 5 (Cinderella) to
each student.
• Help students identify Cinderella, the stepsisters, and the fairy
godmother.
Picture Walk
• Tell students that the story they will hear is called “Cinderella.”
• Tell students that you will take a picture walk through some of the
pictures in this story together.
• Ask students, “What do you call someone who draws the pictures for
a story?”
• the illustrator
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• Ask students, “What do you call someone who writes the story?”
• the author
• Tell students that the author of this story is Charles Perrault. You may
wish to ask if they have heard other stories written by this author:
“Sleeping Beauty,” “Puss in Boots,” “The Three Wishes,” “Little Red
Riding Hood.”
 Show image 7A-2: Cinderella listening to her stepsisters talking
• Have students point to Cinderella and her stepsisters.
• Ask how each of these characters might be feeling.
 Show image 7A-8: Cinderella in a glittering gown
• Have students point to Cinderella. Ask what has changed about
Cinderella.
• Point to the fairy godmother. Ask students, “Who do you think this
woman is?”
• She is Cinderella’s fairy godmother.
• Tell students to listen to find out where Cinderella is going to go in her
dazzling gown.
Vocabulary Preview
Cinders
1. In this story you will hear that Cinderella would often sit by herself
next to the fireplace among the ashes and cinders.
2. Say the word cinders with me three times.
3. Cinders are small bits of burned wood or coal from the fireplace.
4. Cinderella got her name because she slept near the cinders, which
made her skin and clothes dirty. [Pass around pieces of coal or chalk
so that students can see how easily cinders can stain, or smear onto,
their fingers.]
5. What would happen if you slept among—or with—the cinders? Would
it be easy or hard to keep yourself clean? Would it be a pleasant and
nice place to sleep?
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Fairy Godmother
 Show image 7A-4: Fairy godmother
1. In this story you will meet a character called the fairy godmother.
2. Say the words fairy godmother with me three times.
3. A fairy godmother is an imaginary, or make-believe, woman with
magical powers.
4. With a touch of her wand, the fairy godmother changed Cinderella’s
dirty and soiled clothes into a beautiful dress.
5. Fairy godmothers have magical powers. If you had a fairy godmother,
what would you like her to do for you?
[Have students share with their partner. Call on two volunteers to
share.]
Purpose for Listening
Tell students they are going to hear a fairy tale called “Cinderella.” Tell
them to listen carefully to find out what happens to Cinderella.
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
 Describe the characters, setting, and plot of “Cinderella”
 Demonstrate familiarity with “Cinderella”
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Presenting the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Cinderella
 Show image 7A-1: Cinderella scrubbing floor
[You may wish to begin this story at the second sentence by adding “Once
upon a time, a little girl’s stepmother . . .]
Once upon a time, a little girl’s father married a new wife.
The little girl’s stepmother forced her to do the hardest and dirtiest
work in the house, while the stepsisters did nothing.
[Pause and ask students whether they think this situation is fair to Cinderella.]
When her work was finally done, she would sit, tired and alone, on the
hearth by the fireplace, among the ashes and cinders. And so she
came to be called “Cinderella.”
[Define cinders as small bits of burned wood or coal from the fireplace. You
may wish to show how cinders are able to make things dirty by bringing in
pieces of coal or using chalk to show how they can smear and are able to stain
clothes and skin.]
 Show image 7A-2: Cinderella listening to her stepsisters talking
Cinderella’s stepsisters had fine rooms with soft beds and thick
carpets and mirrors so large that they might see themselves at full
length from head to foot. But poor Cinderella had to sleep on the floor
next to the fire.
[Pause and ask students whether they think this situation is fair to Cinderella.]
Yet she bore it all patiently, and did not complain to her father, for his
new wife ruled him entirely.
[Explain that Cinderella’s stepmother ruled the father and he chose not to speak
up when the stepmother was treating Cinderella badly.]
One day, the king’s son, the prince, announced that he was going to
hold a ball.
[Define ball as a fancy party with dancing; this is different from the ball that
children play with.]
The stepsisters shrieked with excitement at the announcement. All
the young ladies in the kingdom were invited to the palace for a grand
evening of dancing and merriment.
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[Define merriment as having fun; it is made up of the word merry, which means
happy. Remind students they learned about the word merry in “Old King Cole.”]
For days the stepsisters primped in front of their mirrors and talked of
nothing else.
[Define primped as trying out special clothes and trying out different hairstyles
for a special occasion, such as the ball.]
 Show image 7A-3: Stepsisters snapping at Cinderella
The stepsisters snapped at Cinderella, “You must help us get ready
for the ball. Clean our shoes! Comb our hair! Hurry!”
[Ask students whether this is a nice way to ask for help. Ask students what
would be a better way to ask for help.]
Cinderella helped her stepsisters without complaining. Silently,
however, she longed to go to the ball and imagined herself dancing in
the arms of the prince.
At last the day came. The stepsisters and their mother left for the
palace.
[Have students tell their partner how they think Cinderella felt when her
stepsisters and stepmother left. Allow fifteen seconds for students to talk. Call
on two students to share.]
Cinderella watched them as long as she could. When she had lost
sight of them, she began to cry, so miserable and alone did she feel.
 Show image 7A-4: Fairy godmother
But Cinderella was not alone after all, for she heard a gentle voice
ask, “What’s the matter, dear?”
She looked up and saw a woman with a kind face.
“I wish—I wish I could—” began Cinderella, but could not finish for all
her tears and sobbing.
“You wish to go to the ball—is that it?” said the kind woman.
“Then it shall be so!” said the woman, for she was, you see,
Cinderella’s fairy godmother.
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 Show image 7A-5: Cinderella in a pumpkin patch
“Now run into the garden,” she said to Cinderella, “and bring me
a pumpkin.” Cinderella went immediately to the garden, though
she could not imagine what a pumpkin had to do with going to the
ball. She watched her fairy godmother scoop out the inside of the
pumpkin, leaving only the rind.
[Define rind as the outside skin of a fruit or vegetable.]
“Now, dear,” said the fairy godmother, “bring me the mouse trap from
the house.” Cinderella brought the trap, which had six live mice in it.
“Open the door of the trap, dear,” said the fairy godmother. Then, as
each mouse scurried out, she gave them, and the pumpkin rind, a tap
with her wand.
 Show image 7A-7: Cinderella and the fairy godmother surrounded
by white light
Suddenly, Cinderella was surrounded by bright, white light as she
watched the pumpkin rind turn into a dazzling coach lined with satin
and the six mice turn into a fine set of six horses, all a beautiful
mouse-colored gray. The fairy godmother even turned a big rat
nearby into a coachman to drive the coach.
[Define coach as a fancy car. Explain that long ago a coach needed horses to
pull it and a coachman to make sure the horses went in the right direction.]
 Show image 7A-6: Coach
“Well,” said the fairy godmother with a smile, “are you pleased? Are
you ready to go to the ball?”
Mid-story Check-In
1. Literal Who are the characters you have met so far in this story?
• I have met Cinderella, the stepmother, the two stepsisters, and the fairy
godmother.
2. Inferential Where are the stepsisters and stepmother going? Why
does this make Cinderella sad?
• The stepsisters and stepmother are going to the prince’s ball. Cinderella
is sad because she is all alone, and she also really wants to go to the
ball.
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3. Literal Who comes to help Cinderella so that she can attend the ball?
What does she do for Cinderella?
• The fairy godmother comes to help Cinderella by turning a pumpkin into
a coach, six mice into horses, and a rat into a coachman.
4. Evaluative Do you think Cinderella is ready to go to the ball now? Why
or why not?
• Answers may vary.
“Oh yes!” cried Cinderella. “But . . . must I go in these dirty rags?”
 Show image 7A-8: Cinderella in a glittering gown
Her godmother laughed and, with a touch of her wand, changed
Cinderella’s tattered clothes into a glittering gown of gold and silver.
[Define tattered as torn and very worn out. Explain that now Cinderella’s clothes
are new and sparkling.]
And on her feet appeared a pair of glass slippers, the prettiest in the
world.
[Have students briefly discuss with their partner the change they see in
Cinderella’s appearance. Have them talk about how Cinderella might be feeling
now. Allow thirty seconds for students to talk. Call on two partner pairs to
share.]
Cinderella stepped into the coach. But before she left, her fairy
godmother gave her this warning: “Do not stay at the ball after
midnight, not even for a moment! When the clock strikes twelve, the
coach will once again be a pumpkin; the horses, mice; the coachman,
a rat; and your gown, the same old clothes you had on.”
Cinderella promised she would leave before midnight. Then, calling
out her thanks, away she rode in the coach, feeling happier than she
had ever felt before.
 Show image 7A-9: Cinderella dancing with the prince
At the palace, the prince heard that a great princess had arrived, but
no one knew who she was. So he went to meet her, and gave her his
hand, and led her into the great ballroom filled with people. As they
entered, a hush fell upon the room. The dancers stopped dancing; the
musicians stopped playing. Everyone stood still just to look upon the
beauty of the unknown newcomer.
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The prince asked Cinderella to dance with him. They danced together
once, then twice, then again and again. Cinderella’s face shone with
happiness. Everyone at the ball looked on in admiration—everyone,
that is, but the two jealous stepsisters, who glared at the lovely lady,
though they had no idea they were glaring at Cinderella!
[Remind students they learned the word glared in “King Midas and the Golden
Touch.” Have them pretend they are glaring like the stepsisters.]
How quickly time slips away when the heart is happy! As Cinderella
danced again and again with the prince, she heard the great bell of
the palace clock begin to toll or ring: one . . . two . . . three . . .
 Show image 7A-10: Cinderella running from the ball
“Oh!” she gasped. “The clock! What time is it?”
The prince answered, “Midnight.”
[Ask students if they remember what would happen at midnight. Call on a
volunteer to share.]
Midnight! Cinderella’s cheeks grew pale. She turned and, fast as a
deer, ran out of the ballroom, down a long hallway, then down a long
staircase.
At the foot of the staircase she stumbled; one of her glass slippers
fell off! But Cinderella could not stop. Already the clock had sounded
its eleventh stroke. As she leapt breathlessly out of the castle into the
darkness, she heard the clock sound the last stroke of midnight, and
felt her smooth gown turn into the rough cloth of her real clothes.
Her dazzling coach had turned back into a pumpkin, so she ran home
alone. When she got there, she was out of breath, and climbed the
stairs to her cold attic room. Then she noticed: she was still wearing
one glass slipper!
 Show image 7A-11: Prince holding slipper
Now, when Cinderella had run from the palace, the prince had raced
after her. And though he had not been able to catch her, he did find,
at the bottom of the staircase, the glass slipper that had fallen off her
foot.
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And that is why, the very next morning, the sound of trumpets woke
the kingdom, and the prince announced that he would marry the
woman whose foot fit the glass slipper. The prince sent men to try the
slipper on the foot of every woman in the land.
[Have students tell their partner if they think the prince’s idea is a good one.
Allow fifteen seconds for students to talk. Call on two volunteers to share.]
From house to house they went, trying the slipper on foot after foot.
But on one foot the slipper was too long; on another, too short; on
another, too wide; on another, too narrow.
[Repeat this sentence using hand motions to show too long, too short, too
wide, too narrow.]
 Show image 7A-12: Stepsister trying on slipper
And so it went until at last they came to the house of Cinderella and
her stepsisters. One by one, the stepsisters squeezed, pinched, and
pushed, but the slipper would not fit.
[Ask students if the stepsisters were able to fit into the glass slipper.]
Then, from the shadows, Cinderella stepped forth and said, “Let me
see if it will fit me.”
“You!” the stepsisters cried. “Go back to the cinders where you
belong!”
 Show image 7A-13: Cinderella trying on the glass slipper
But one of the prince’s men said that he had orders to try the slipper
on every woman in the kingdom. He placed the slipper on Cinderella’s
foot—and it fit perfectly! The stepsisters’ mouths dropped open in
astonishment. And they were even more shocked when, from her
pocket, Cinderella drew forth the other glass slipper.
And now the stepsisters recognized Cinderella as the beautiful lady they
had seen at the ball. They threw themselves at her feet and begged her
pardon for all of the ways they had treated her so badly. Cinderella was
so kind-hearted that she forgave them and embraced them.
Later, after Cinderella married the prince, she even invited her
stepmother and stepsisters to live at the palace. And there, Cinderella
and the prince lived happily ever after.
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Discussing the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Comprehension Questions
If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent lines
of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. Encourage students to
answer in complete sentences. Model answers using complete sentences
for students.
1. Literal What is the title of this fairy tale?
• The title of this fairy tale is “Cinderella.”
2. Literal Who is the main character in this story?
• Cinderella is the main character in this story.
3. Inferential How did Cinderella get her name?
• Cinderella got her name because she would sleep on the floor next to
the fireplace that had ashes and cinders.
4. Inferential How did Cinderella’s stepmother and stepsisters treat her?
• Answers may vary, but should include that they were unkind and unfair
to her.
5. Inferential Why did Cinderella leave the ball in such a hurry?
• Cinderella left the ball in such a hurry because at midnight everything
would turn back to the way it was: the coach would turn back into a
pumpkin; the horses would turn back into mice; the coachman would
turn back into a rat; and her gown would turn back into the tattered
clothing she usually wears.
6. Evaluative Was this a happy ending for Cinderella? for the prince? for
the stepmother and stepsisters?
• Answers may vary.
7. Evaluative Which parts of this story could be real or could really
happen?
• Some people can really be treated unfairly. People can really go to a ball.
Which parts of this story are make-believe or fantasy?
• The fairy godmother turning a pumpkin into a coach, mice into horses,
a rat into a coachman, and Cinderella’s tattered clothing into a gown is
fantasy.
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[Please continue to model the Think Pair Share process for students,
as necessary, and scaffold students in their use of the process.]
Sentence Frames
Would you forgive them for
being so mean to you? (Yes/No)
I would say . . .
If I were Cinderella, I would . . .
because . . .
I am going to ask a question. I will give you a minute to think about
the question, and then I will ask you to turn to your partner and
discuss the question. Finally, I will call on several of you to share what
you discussed with your partner.
8. Evaluative Think Pair Share If you were Cinderella, how would you
react to the stepsisters at the end of the story?
9. After hearing today’s read-aloud and questions and answers, do
you have any remaining questions? [If time permits, you may wish to
allow for individual, group, or class research of the text and/or other
resources to answer these remaining questions.]
Word Work: Tattered
1. In the read-aloud you heard, “[Cinderella’s fairy] godmother laughed
and, with a touch of her wand, changed Cinderella’s tattered clothes
into a glittering gown of gold and silver.”
2. Say the word tattered with me three times.
3. Tattered describes any object that is torn or worn out, such as a piece
of fabric or clothing.
4. Cinderella only had one dress to work in; it was tattered, full of holes,
and had thread hanging off it.
5. [Show students the tattered objects you have prepared.] Tell me about
what you see. Try to use the word tattered when you tell about it.
[Ask two or three students. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase the
students’ responses: “The
is tattered.”]
6. What’s the word we’ve been talking about?
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Use a Making Choices activity for follow-up. Directions: I am going to
describe several things. If what I describe is something torn or worn out,
say, “
is tattered.” If what I describe is in good condition, say,
“
is not tattered.”
• an old blanket with holes
• An old blanket with holes is tattered.
• a bright, new rug
• A bright, new rug is not tattered.
• a pair of pants with many holes
• A pair of pants with many holes in it is tattered.
• a brand-new shirt
• A brand-new shirt is not tattered.
• a book that is falling apart and is missing pages
• A book that is falling apart and missing pages is tattered.

Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
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6B
Cinderella
Extensions
15 minutes
 Multiple Meaning Word Activity
Definition Detective: Ball
Note: You may choose to have students hold up one, two, or three
fingers to indicate which image shows the meaning being described,
or have a student walk up to the poster and point to the image being
described.
1. In the read-aloud you heard the word ball in the following sentence:
“One day, the king’s son, the prince, announced that he was going to
hold a ball.”
2. With your partner, think of as many meanings for ball as you can, or
discuss ways you can use the word ball.
3. [Show Poster 3M (Ball).] Which picture shows the way ball is used in
the story?
• one
4. Ball can also mean other things. Ball can mean a sports game that
uses a ball. Which picture shows this?
• three
5. Ball can also mean a round object. Which picture shows this?
• two
6. Did you or your partner think of any of these definitions?
7. Now quiz your partner on the different meanings of ball. For example
you could say, “You use me to play basketball. Which ball am I?” And
your partner should hold up two fingers to show that you meant a
round object.
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 Syntactic Awareness Activity
What’s the Better Word? Stumble, Step
Note: Although the focus of this activity is on word meanings,
students will gain practice in syntax as they respond in complete
sentences.
 Show image 7A-10: Cinderella running from the ball
1. In the story you heard, “[Cinderella] turned and, fast as a deer, ran out
of the ballroom, down a long hallway, then down a long staircase. At
the foot of the staircase she stumbled; one of her glass slippers fell
off!”
2. When you stumble, that means you trip and almost fall over.
[Pantomime stumbling.]
What did Cinderella do on the staircase as she was running away?
• Cinderella stumbled on the staircase.
3. Here is another word that has to do with movement, but it is different
from stumble.
Step means to move from one place to another by moving your feet
up and down. For example, Josie carefully and quietly steps across
the room so she does not wake up her baby sister.
Directions: Let’s practice using these words: stumble and step. First I
will say a sentence. Then I will give you two words to choose from. If you
think the first word is the better word, stand up. If you think the second
word is the better word, stay seated. If I call on you to explain your
decision, use a complete sentence.
1. Marco was not paying attention and he tripped over a small crack in
the sidewalk. Would you say Marco stumbled over a small crack in the
sidewalk or stepped over a small crack in the sidewalk? (stumbled/
stand up)
• Marco stumbled over a small crack in the sidewalk.
2. Sarai’s shoelaces are untied, and she almost falls down as she is
running. Does Sarai step or stumble as she is running? (stumble/stay
seated)
• Sarai stumbles as she is running.
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3. Ms. Phillips asks John to go behind Roberto in the line. Does John
stumble behind Roberto or step behind Roberto? (step/stay seated)
• John steps behind Roberto.
4. During hide-and-seek, the children quietly move to their hiding spots.
Do the children quietly step to their spots or stumble to their spots?
(step/stand up)
• The children quietly step to their spots.
5. Melissa is paying attention while she is walking on grass and sees a
large rock. Will she stumble over the rock or step over the rock? (step/
stay seated)
• Melissa will step over the rock.
 Vocabulary Instructional Activity
Word Work: Announced
1. In the story, you heard, “The prince announced that he was going to
hold a ball.”
2. Say the word announced with me three times.
3. Announced means to say something official or important and to say it
so that everyone hears it and understands it.
4. After the prince found Cinderella’s glass slipper, he announced that he
would marry the woman whose foot fit the glass slipper.
5. Have you ever heard something being announced? Tell your partner
what the announcement was about.
[Ask two or three students. If necessary, guide and/or rephrase the
students’ responses: “I heard
announce that . . . ”]
6. What’s the word we’ve been talking about?
Use an Acting and Sharing activity for follow-up. Directions: Pretend
that you are a member in a royal family and everyone in the kingdom is
waiting for you to announce something. What would you announce?
[You may wish to have students make their announcements using a
megaphone or microphone. If applicable, you may wish to implement
the announcements of the students who are the king or queen for the
day.]
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 End-of-Lesson Check-In (Instructional Master 6B-1)
Cinderella
• Hold up Image Cards 13–21 in order and ask the class to describe
what is happening in each illustration. Encourage students to use
domain vocabulary and words such as first, next, then, after that,
and finally. For the first Image Card, begin retelling the story with the
phrase “Once upon a time.” For the final Image Card, end the story
with “happily ever after.” Explain that many fairy tales begin with the
phrase “once upon a time,” and end with the phrase “happily ever
after.”
• Provide each student with Instructional Master 6B-1, a blank piece
of paper, scissors, and glue or tape. Explain to students that
this worksheet has pictures of events, or what happened, from
“Cinderella.” Have students cut out the six pictures.
• Alternatively, you may wish to choose three pictures (beginning,
middle, and end) for students to focus on.
• Next, have them think about what is happening in each picture.
Students should then arrange the pictures in their correct order to
show the proper sequence of events. Have students glue or tape the
pictures on paper once they have been sequenced.
• As students complete this activity, have them work with their partner,
in small groups, or with home-language peers to retell the story,
referring to the sequenced pictures. Encourage them to begin their
retelling with the phrase “once upon a time” and end with “happily
ever after.”
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Snow White and
the Seven Dwarfs
7
Lesson Objectives
Core Content Objectives
Students will:
 Describe the characters, setting, and plot of “Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs”
 Demonstrate familiarity with “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”
Language Arts Objectives
The following language arts objectives are addressed in this lesson.
Objectives aligning with the Common Core State Standards are noted
with the corresponding standard in parentheses. Refer to the Alignment
Chart for additional standards addressed in all lessons in this domain.
Students will:
 Recall facts from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” and accurately
answer questions such as who, what, where, and when, with
prompting and support (RL.K.1)
 Interpret information to answer questions, make judgments, and
express opinions about “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” and
identify a cause/effect relationship in the fairy tale, with prompting
and support (RL.K.1)
 Listen to a variety of texts, including a fairy tale from Germany—
“Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” (RL.K.5)
 With prompting and support, describe the role of an author and
illustrator (RL.K.6)
 With prompting and support, compare and contrast similarities and
differences between the endings of different fairy tales (RL.K.9)
 Actively engage in the fiction read-aloud “Snow White and the Seven
Dwarfs” (RL.K.10)
 Using a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate an
alternate ending to a fairy tale (RL.K.3)
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 Add drawings to alternate ending of fairy tale (SL.K.5)
 Identify multiple meanings of fair, and use them in appropriate
contexts (L.K.4a)
 Identify real-life connections between words—dwarfs, poisonous, and
fair—and their use (L.K.5c)
 Learn the meaning of common phrases such as “happily ever after”
(L.K.6)
Core Vocabulary
fairest, adj. Most beautiful
Example: The kind and lovely princess was the fairest maiden in the
land, because she was beautiful inside and out.
Variation(s): fair, fairer
peddler, n. A person who travels about selling goods
Example: The peddler went from house to house selling eggs.
Variation(s): peddlers
pity, n. Sorrow for someone
Example: Her voice was full of pity when she spoke to the hurt puppy.
Variation(s): none
rage, n. Anger
Example: When Rodolfo’s sister broke his robot, he was so full of
rage his body shook!
Variation(s): rages
stomped, v. Walked heavily
Example: Felipe stomped his feet as he went up the stairs to his room.
Variation(s): stomp, stomps, stomping
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Vocabulary Chart for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
Core Vocabulary words are in bold.
Multiple Meaning word activity word is underlined.
Vocabulary Instructional Activity words have an asterisk (*).
Suggested words to pre-teach are in italics.
Type of Words
Tier 3
Tier 2
Tier 1
Domain-Specific Words
General Academic Words
Everyday-Speech Words
huntsman
kingdom
peddler
queen
stepdaughter
stepmother
fairest
pity
poisonous
rage
recognized
stomped
truth
vain
apple
mirror
mountains
prince
woods
Multiple Meaning
dwarfs
fair
Beware of . . .
Phrases
Turned green with
jealousy
lived happily ever
after
Understanding
Cognates
piedad
reconoció
vano(a)
montaña
príncipe
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Image Sequence
This is the order in which Flip Book images will be shown for this readaloud. Preview the order of Flip Book images before teaching this lesson.
Please note that it is different from the sequence used in the Tell it Again!
Read-Aloud Anthology.
1. 8A-1: Queen and magic mirror
2. 8A-2: Snow White playing outside
3. 8A-1: Queen and magic mirror
4. 8A-3: Huntsman lets Snow White go
5. 8A-4: Dwarfs’ house
6. 8A-5: Seven dwarfs walking down path
7. 8A-6: Snow White with the dwarfs
8. 8A-7: Queen and magic mirror
9. 8A-8: Queen with apple
10. 8A-9: Queen taking bite of apple
11. 8A-10: Queen and magic mirror
12. 8A-11: Weeping dwarfs
13. 8A-12: Prince at dwarfs’ house
14. 8A-13: Wedding
15. 8A-10: Queen and magic mirror
16. 8A-13: Wedding
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At a Glance
Exercise
Introducing the Read-Aloud
Materials
Story Review
Image Cards 13–21;
Instructional Master 6B-1;
Introducing “Snow White and
the Seven Dwarfs”
Instructional Master 7A-1;
world map
Vocabulary Preview: Dwarfs,
Poisonous
images of poisonous things
Minutes
15
Purpose for Listening
Presenting the Read-Aloud
Snow White and the Seven
Dwarfs
Comprehension Questions
Discussing the Read-Aloud
Multiple Meaning Word Activity:
Fair
10
Response Card 6
10
Poster 4M (Fair)
 Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
Happily Ever After
Extensions
drawing paper, drawing
tools
15
Domain-Related Trade Book
Advanced Preparation
For Story Review, use the sequence of events for “Cinderella”
(Instructional Master 6B-1).
Prepare a copy of Instructional Master 7A-1 for each student. Refer to it
as Response Card 6 (Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs). Students can
use this Response Card for discussion, review, and to answer questions.
For the Vocabulary Preview, prepare a few pictures of poisonous things,
such as poisonous plants, insects, and animals.
For the Domain-Related Trade Book, you may wish to introduce students
to other versions of “Cinderella” or “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.”
You may wish to read another fairy tale by Charles Perrault that has a
royalty theme (e.g., “Sleeping Beauty” or “Puss in Boots”) or another fairy
tale from the Brothers Grimm collection (e.g., “The Frog Prince” or “Snow
White and Rose Red”).
Note to Teacher
In the story the queen, Snow White’s stepmother, is very jealous of Snow
White’s beauty. You may wish to have a conversation with students about
jealousy and how it can lead to anger and hurtful actions. For Think
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Pair Share, students have the opportunity to think of alternative and
constructive ways the queen could have acted toward Snow White.
For Presenting the Read-Aloud, you may wish to have half the class or
one partner repeat the lines of the queen, and the other half of the class
or the other partner repeat the lines of the mirror.
For Happily Ever After, you will help students make up their own ending
to one of the fairy tales from this domain. Have a few alternate endings
prepared to serve as examples.
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Snow White and
the Seven Dwarfs
7A
Introducing the Read-Aloud
15 minutes
Story Review
• Using their sequence of events for “Cinderella,” have students share
the events of the story in partner pairs or in small groups. Have one
student take a turn to say one event, and have the next student follow
up with an event that happened next. Encourage the use of temporal
words: first, next, then, after that, later, and finally. In particular, have
students begin the story with the phrase, “once upon a time,” and end
the story with the phrase, “happily ever after.”
• You may also wish to have partner pairs try to sequence Image
Cards 13–21 as they retell the story.
Introducing “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”
• Tell students that they are going to hear a fairy tale that was told long
ago in Germany.
• Point to Germany on a world map. Tell students that long ago
Germany had kings and queens. Now Germany no longer has kings
and queens; now Germany has a president.
• Distribute Instructional Master 7A-1: Response Card 6 (Snow White
and the Seven Dwarfs) to each student.
• Have students identify Snow White and the seven dwarfs
Picture Walk
• Tell students that the story they will hear is called “Snow White and
the Seven Dwarfs.”
• Tell students that you will take a picture walk through some of the
pictures in this story together.
• Ask students, “What do you call someone who draws the pictures for
a story?”
• the illustrator
• Ask students, “What do you call someone who writes the story?”
• the author
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• Tell students that this story became famous because two brothers,
called the Brothers Grimm, put this story in their book. You may wish
to ask if they have heard other stories that became popular because
of the Brothers Grimm: “Tom Thumb,” “Rapunzel,” “The Fisherman
and His Wife,” “The Frog Prince.”
 Show image 8A-1: Queen and magic mirror
• Have students point to the queen.
• Ask how they know the woman in the picture is a queen.
• Tell students that the queen is Snow White’s stepmother. Explain that
the queen is a vain woman who wants to be the most beautiful person
in the kingdom. When she finds out that Snow White is more beautiful
than she, the queen gets jealous and does mean things to Snow
White.
 Show image 8A-6: Snow White with the dwarfs
• Have students point to Snow White and the seven dwarfs.
• Tell students to listen to find out how Snow White met these seven
dwarfs.
 Show image 8A-8: Queen with apple
• Ask students what they see in the peddler’s hands. Explain that a
peddler is someone who travels from place to place to sell things. Ask
students what this peddler sells.
• Tell students to listen to find out what is different about this apple.
Vocabulary Preview
Dwarfs
 Show image 8A-5: Seven dwarfs walking down path
1. In this story Snow White will meet seven dwarfs.
2. Say the word dwarfs with me three times.
3. Dwarfs are very small people.
4. The dwarfs eat at a little table with little plates, little cups, and little
spoons.
5. Choose one of the dwarfs to describe to your partner. See if your
partner can identify the dwarf you describe.
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Poisonous
1. In this story you will hear that the queen makes a poisonous apple.
2. Say the word poisonous with me three times.
3. Poisonous means that something is dangerous and harmful to living
things.
4. We need to be careful of the poisonous things around us. If you see
berries growing on a bush or mushrooms growing in the grass, you
should not eat them because they might be poisonous.
5. [Show students the pictures of poisonous things you gathered in
advance. Briefly discuss how each one is poisonous.]
Purpose for Listening
Tell students they are going to hear a fairy tale called “Snow White and
the Seven Dwarfs.” Tell them to listen to find out what the queen wants to
do to Snow White and what happens to Snow White.
By the end of the lesson, students should be able to:
 Demonstrate familiarity with “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”
 Describe the characters, setting, and plot of “Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs”
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Presenting the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
 Show image 8A-1: Queen and magic mirror
There once was a queen who was very beautiful, but she was very
vain. The queen knew she was very beautiful, and she thought about
her beauty all the time. She could not bear to think that anyone might
be more beautiful than she.
The queen had a magic mirror, and she would look into it and say:
“Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”
[Have half the class repeat the queen’s lines.]
And the mirror would answer:
“You, Queen, are the fairest of us all.”
[Have the other half of the class repeat the mirror’s lines.]
And she was satisfied, for she knew the mirror spoke the truth.
 Show image 8A-2: Snow White playing outside
The queen’s stepdaughter was a darling little girl named Snow White.
As Snow White grew up, she grew prettier and prettier, and when she
was seven years old, she was more beautiful than the queen herself.
 Show image 8A-1: Queen and magic mirror
So one day, when the queen went to her mirror and asked:
“Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”
[Have half the class repeat the queen’s lines.]
The mirror answered:
“Though you are fair, O Queen, ’tis true,
Snow White is fairer still than you.”
[Have the other half of the class repeat the mirror’s lines.]
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When the queen heard this, she turned green with jealousy, and from
that moment her heart turned against Snow White.
[Explain that to “turn green with jealousy” means to really, really want what
someone else has, even to the point of becoming angry. The queen wants to be
the most beautiful and is upset because she is not.]
 Show image 8A-3: Huntsman lets Snow White go
One day she called for a huntsman and said, “Take the child into the
woods and away from my kingdom. I never want to see her again!”
The huntsman took the child into the forest, but he took pity on Snow
White. The huntsman felt sorry for Snow White and did not want to
hurt her, so he told her to run away.
 Show image 8A-4: Dwarfs’ house
As the huntsman galloped away, poor Snow White found herself alone
in the woods. She felt afraid and ran as long as her feet would carry
her, until at last, as evening fell, she came upon a little house deep in
the woods.
[Ask students to tell their partner what they think Snow White will do.]
She went inside to rest. Inside the house everything was very small,
but as neat and clean as possible. By the wall stood seven little beds,
side by side, covered with clean, white quilts. Nearby stood a little
table, covered with a white cloth and set with seven little plates, seven
knives and forks, and seven little drinking cups.
[Ask students how many people they think live in the house.]
Snow White was very hungry, but she didn’t want to eat anyone’s
whole meal, so she took a little porridge and bread from each plate,
and a little sip from each cup. After that, she felt so tired that she lay
down on one of the beds and fell asleep.
 Show image 8A-5: Seven dwarfs walking down path
When it was quite dark, the owners of the little house came home.
They were seven dwarfs, who worked every day in the mountains,
digging with their picks and shovels for gold. When they had lit their
seven candles, they saw that everything in the house was not the
same as they had left it.
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[Ask students, “What did the dwarfs think was different about their house?”]
They looked around and saw Snow White lying asleep in a bed. They
all came running up with their candles, and said, “Oh, goodness
gracious!” She was sleeping so peacefully that they did not wake her.
 Show image 8A-6: Snow White with the dwarfs
The next morning, Snow White woke and saw the seven dwarfs. They
seemed quite friendly, so she told them how the queen had made her
leave the kingdom, and how she had run the whole day long, until at
last she had found their little house.
Then the dwarfs said, “If you will help us take care of the house, you
may stay with us. We will make sure you have everything you need.”
[Ask students whether or not the dwarfs were nice to Snow White.]
Every morning, the dwarfs went to the mountain to dig for gold. When
the dwarfs were away during the day, Snow White was alone in the
house. The dwarfs warned her, saying, “Don’t let anyone in the house!
Beware of the queen, for she may find out you are here.”
Mid-story Check-In
1. Literal Who are the characters you have met so far?
• So far I have met the queen, Snow White, the huntsman, and the seven
dwarfs.
2. Inferential Why did Snow White have to run away from the queen’s
kingdom?
• Snow White had to run away because the queen was jealous of her and
wanted to hurt her.
3. Inferential Do you think the queen will find out Snow White is still
alive?
• Answers may vary.
 Show image 8A-7: Queen and magic mirror
Years passed and Snow White lived happily in the little house deep in
the forest with the seven dwarfs.
Until one day, the queen went to her mirror and said:
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“Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”
[Have half the class repeat the queen’s lines.]
And the mirror answered:
“O Queen, you are of beauty rare,
But Snow White living in the glen
With the seven little men
Is a thousand times more fair.”
[Have the other half of the class repeat the mirror’s lines.]
The queen gasped. She knew the mirror spoke the truth, and that
Snow White must be still in the kingdom. She thought of a plan to get
rid of Snow White.
 Show image 8A-8: Queen with apple
She went to a dark and secret room, and there she made a poisonous
apple. It was so big, beautiful, and red that anyone who saw it would
long for it; anyone who saw it would really want to take a bite of it. But
whoever ate even a little piece of it would sleep forever.
Then the queen made herself look like a peddler who travels
from place to place selling things, and she went across the seven
mountains to the home of the seven dwarfs.
When she knocked at the door, Snow White looked out of the window
to see who was there.
[Ask students whether or not she should let the peddler in.]
Snow White said, “I dare not let anyone in. The seven dwarfs told me
not to.”
“All right, I’ll go,” said the old woman. “But here, let me give you one
of my apples.”
[Ask students whether or not she should take the apple.]
“No,” said Snow White, “I’m not supposed to take anything.”
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 Show image 8A-9: Queen taking a bite of apple
“Goodness, child, you act like the apples are poisoned!” said the old
woman. “Look here, I’ll take a bite of this apple myself, all right?”
[You may wish to present the next section using a real, red apple.]
But the wicked queen had thought of everything: when she made the
poisonous apple, she put the poison only in one side—the side that
she held facing Snow White.
Snow White looked at the lovely apple and wanted it so much that
when she saw the old woman take a bite of the other side—the
side without the poison—Snow White could not resist. She stepped
outside, took the apple, bit the poisonous part of the apple, and fell
down as if she would never get up again.
 Show image 8A-10: Queen and magic mirror
When the queen went home, she rushed to her mirror and asked:
“Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”
[Have half the class repeat the queen’s lines.]
And the mirror answered:
“You are now the fairest of all.”
[Have the other half of the class repeat the mirror’s lines.]
 Show image 8A-11: Weeping dwarfs
The dwarfs came home and found Snow White lying there, as if dead.
They lifted her up and looked for some way to help her, but they found
nothing, and nothing they did helped the child. And they sat around
her, all seven of them, and wept and cried.
Snow White lay in the dwarfs’ home for many years. All the while she
never changed, but looked as if she were asleep. Her skin was still as
white as snow, her lips were still as red as blood, and her hair was still
as black as ebony.
[Repeat this description, pointing to the parts being described and emphasizing
the description: white as snow; red as blood; black as ebony. Explain that
ebony is a type of black wood that is used to make things like black piano keys
and black chess pieces.]
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 Show image 8A-12: Prince at dwarfs’ house
Then one day a prince was riding through the woods. He stopped at
the dwarfs’ house. From there he could see the beautiful Snow White.
She was so beautiful that he felt he wanted to take her back to his
father’s kingdom. As the prince gently lifted Snow White, a piece of
poison apple came out of Snow White’s throat!
Snow White sat up and cried, “Oh! What happened?”
The prince, full of joy, said, “I am a prince. Come with me to my
father’s castle and be my bride.”
[Have students discuss with their partner whether or not Snow White should go
with the prince and be his bride. Allow fifteen seconds for students to talk. Call
on two partner pairs to share.]
 Show image 8A-13: Wedding
A splendid wedding was held for the prince and Snow White. Snow
White’s wicked stepmother, the queen, was invited to the wedding.
 Show image 8A-7: Queen and magic mirror
When she had dressed herself in beautiful clothes, she went to her
mirror and asked:
“Mirror, mirror on the wall,
Who is fairest of us all?”
[Have half the class repeat the queen’s lines.]
And the mirror answered:
“Though you are fair, O Queen, ’tis true,
The new bride is fairer still than you.”
[Have the other half of the class repeat the mirror’s lines.]
The queen screamed with anger.
[Ask students why the queen is so angry.]
At first, she thought she would not go to the wedding. Then she
thought she had to go and see the new bride.
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 Show image 8A-13: Wedding
When she saw the new bride, she recognized her as Snow White, and
she was filled with a terrible rage; she was very, very angry. In a wild
fury, she screamed and stomped her feet and jumped up and down,
as though she were wearing red-hot shoes.
[Invite students to act this part out with you: stomp your feet, jump up and
down as though you are wearing red-hot shoes.]
Then she ran far, far away, never to be seen again. And Snow White
and the prince lived happily ever after.
Discussing the Read-Aloud
10 minutes
Comprehension Questions
If students have difficulty responding to questions, reread pertinent lines
of the read-aloud and/or refer to specific images. Encourage students to
answer in complete sentences. Model answers using complete sentences
for students.
1. Literal What is the title of this fairy tale?
• The title of this fairy tale is “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.”
2. Literal Who is the main character in this story?
• Snow White is the main character in this story.
3. Inferential Why is the queen jealous of Snow White?
• The queen is jealous of Snow White because the mirror said that Snow
White is prettier than the queen.
4. Inferential What are two things the queen did to Snow White that were
unkind?
• The queen told a huntsman to take Snow White away from her kingdom.
The queen poisoned Snow White with an apple.
5. Literal Were the dwarfs able to save Snow White after she had eaten
the poisoned apple?
• No, the dwarfs were not able to save Snow White.
How did Snow White come back to life?
• The prince lifted Snow White up and the piece of poisoned apple came
out of Snow White’s throat.
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6. Evaluative How does this fairy tale end?
• Snow White and the prince lived happily ever after.
Does this story have a happy ending for Snow White? The queen?
The prince? The dwarfs?
• Answers may vary.
7. Evaluative Which parts of this story could be real or could really
happen?
• People can feel jealous and do mean things. People can work in the
mountains to dig for gold. Peddlers can really sell apples.
Which parts of this story is make-believe or fantasy?
• A talking mirror is make-believe. Falling asleep for many years and
coming back to life is make-believe.
8. Evaluative [Repeat the lines of the queen, and have students identify
the rhyming words: wall/all. Repeat the lines of the mirror, and have
students identify the rhyming words: true/you; rare/fair; glen/men.]
[Please continue to model the Think Pair Share process for students,
as necessary, and scaffold students in their use of the process.]
I am going to ask two questions. I will give you a minute to think
about the questions, and then I will ask you to turn to your partner
and discuss the questions. Finally, I will call on several of you to share
what you discussed with your partner.
Sentence Frames
Would you treat Snow White
differently if you were the
queen? (Yes/No)
If I were the queen, I would . . .
If the queen . . ., she might be
able to live happily ever after.
9. Evaluative Think Pair Share: In this story, the queen is very jealous
of Snow White and decides to do mean things to Snow White. If you
were the queen, how would you treat Snow White differently? Do you
think if the queen treated Snow White in a nice way, she could also
have lived happily ever after?
10. After hearing today’s read-aloud and questions and answers, do
you have any remaining questions? [If time permits, you may wish to
allow for individual, group, or class research of the text and/or other
resources to answer these remaining questions.]
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 Multiple Meaning Word Activity
Multiple Choice: Fair
Note: You may choose to have students hold up one, two, or three
fingers to indicate which image shows the meaning being described,
or have a student walk up to the poster and point to the image being
described.
1. In the story you heard the mirror say to the queen, “Though you are
fair, O Queen, ’tis true, Snow White is fairer still than you.” Here fair
means beautiful. Which picture shows this?
• one
2. Fair also means other things. Fair also means treating everyone the
same way; treating everyone equally. Which picture shows this?
• three
3. A fair is also an event that has games, food, and rides. Which picture
shows this?
• two
4. Now that we have gone over the different meanings for fair, quiz your
partner on these different meanings. Try to use complete sentences.
For example, you could say, “We need to play this game by the rules
so it is fair for everyone.” And your partner should respond, “That’s
number three.”

Complete Remainder of the Lesson Later in the Day
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Snow White and
the Seven Dwarfs
Extensions
7B
15 minutes
Happily Ever After
• Briefly review Flip Book images of the different fairy tales presented
in this domain: “The Princess and the Pea,” “Cinderella,” and “Snow
White and the Seven Dwarfs.”
• Say to students, “Tell your partner what all three fairy tales have
in common.” Allow thirty seconds for students to talk. Call on two
volunteers to share.
• Point out that the endings of all the fairy tales are similar—the
princess and the prince live “happily ever after.”
• Have students choose one of the fairy tales and think of a different
“happily ever after” ending. [You may need to provide several
examples of different endings.]
• Have students draw their alternate ending. Choose a few students to
dictate what they have drawn. Be sure to read to the students what
you have written s.
➶ Above and Beyond: If they are able, have each student label or write
a short sentence about his/her pictures.
• As students finish their drawings, group them into small groups
according to the particular fairy tale they have chosen, and have them
share their different endings. Encourage them to make comments
about how their endings may be similar or different from each other.
Domain-Related Trade Book
• Refer to the list of recommended trade books in the Introduction and
choose a fiction text about royalty.
• Alternatively, you may wish to choose to read another version of
“Cinderella” or “Snow White,” or another fairy tale by Charles Perrault.
You might also choose to read an adapted, child-friendly story from
the collected works of the Brothers Grimm.
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• Explain to students that the person who wrote the book is called the
author. For example, the author of “Cinderella” is Charles Perrault.
Tell students the name of the author of the book. Explain to students
that the person who makes the pictures for the book is called the
illustrator. Tell students the name of the illustrator. Show students
where they can find this information on the cover of the book or on
the title page.
• As you read, use the same strategies that you have been using
when reading the read-aloud selections—pause and ask occasional
questions; rapidly clarify critical vocabulary within the context of the
read-aloud; etc.
• After you finish reading the trade book aloud, lead students in a
discussion about the ways in which this book’s information relates to
what they have learned.
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DR
Domain Review
Note to Teacher
You should spend one day reviewing and reinforcing the material in this
domain. You may have students do any combination of the activities
provided, in either whole-group or small-group settings.
Core Content Objectives Addressed in This Domain
Students will:
 Describe what a king or queen does
 Identify and describe royal objects associated with a king or queen
 Indicate that kings and queens still exist today, but that there were
many more kings and queens long ago
 Describe a royal family
 Describe that kings usually possess gold and other treasures
 Discuss the difference between valuing relationships with people and
valuing wealth
 Describe the characters, settings, and plots of a given story
 Demonstrate familiarity with a given story or poem
Review Activities
Sequencing Events in “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”
Materials: Instructional Master DR-1; paper; scissors; glue or tape
Provide each student with Instructional Master DR-1, a blank piece of
paper, scissors, and glue or tape. First have students cut out the small
pictures. Then tell students to sequence the pictures according to the
story. You may wish to choose three pictures to represent the beginning,
middle, and end of the story and have students put those in order. Tell
them to glue or tape their pictures in order on the blank page once they
have checked their choices.
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Have students retell the story with their partners, referring to the
sequenced images to aid in their retelling.
Image Card Review for “Cinderella”
Materials: Image Cards 13–21
In your hand, hold Image Cards 13–21 fanned out like a deck of cards.
Ask a student to choose a card but to not show it to anyone else in the
class. Tell students that these images all have to do with the story of
“Cinderella.” The student must then perform an action or give a clue
about the picture s/he is holding. For example, for the image of the fairy
godmother turning the pumpkin into a coach, a student may pretend to
hold a wand and turn a round object into an imaginary coach. The rest of
the class will guess which event is being described. Proceed to another
card when the correct answer has been given.
Image Card Review for “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”
Materials: Image Cards 22–29
In your hand, hold Image Cards 22–29 fanned out like a deck of cards.
Ask a student to choose a card but to not show it to anyone else in the
class. Tell students that these images all have to do with the story of
“Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” The student must then perform an
action or give a clue about the picture s/he is holding. For example, for
the image of Snow White and the huntsman, a student may pretend to
look afraid as s/he runs off into the forest. The rest of the class will guess
what event is being described. Proceed to another card when the correct
answer has been given.
➶
Above and Beyond: Compare/Contrast Venn Diagram
Materials: Chart paper
Tell students that together you are going to compare and contrast the
stories of “Cinderella” and “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” Explain
to them that this means you will write down how the stories are the same
and how they are different. On chart paper, draw either two columns or a
Venn diagram, depending on the level of understanding in your class. Ask
students how the stories are similar
• They both have princesses as main characters, princes, unfair treatment
of the main characters, magic, happy endings, etc.
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and how they are different?
• Cinderella has stepsisters, a fairy godmother, and a magic pumpkin;
Snow White has dwarfs, a huntsman, and a magic mirror.
Write down what students say while reinforcing with rich vocabulary.
Riddles for Core Content
Materials: Response Cards 1–6
Ask students riddles such as the following to review core content. You
may have students hold up the Response Card(s) that relate to the riddle.
• I searched through many kingdoms for a real princess. Who am I?
• prince from “The Princess and the Pea”
• I felt bruised all over from sleeping on top of a pea that was hidden
underneath a pile of mattresses. “Who am I?”
• The real princess from “The Princess and the Pea”
• I am a king that loves counting my riches. Who am I?
• King Midas or the king from “Sing a Song of Sixpence”
• I sit by the fireplace and the cinders get me dirty. Who am I?
• Cinderella
• The fairy godmother turned me into a coach! What am I?
• the pumpkin from “Cinderella”
• We tried to fit our feet into the glass slipper, but it would not fit! Who
are we?
• the stepsisters from “Cinderella”
• We flew out of a pie that was a gift to the king. Who are we?
• blackbirds from “Sing a Song of Sixpence”
• The queen looks into me all the time and asks me who is the fairest,
or most beautiful. What am I?
• the magic mirror from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”
• I made the queen very angry because the mirror said I was more
beautiful than she was. Who am I?
• Snow White
• We are very short and work in the mountains. Who are we?
• the seven dwarfs
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Kings and Queens Grab Bag
Materials: Various objects for each read-aloud; opaque bag;
Response Cards 1–6
Place various objects related to the read-alouds in a bag (e.g., peas,
coal/cinders, glass slipper, apple, dwarfs). Hold up each object, and ask
students if they remember hearing about these objects. Ask them to
match the objects with the read-alouds by holding up the corresponding
Response Card(s).
Teacher Choice
Select a read-aloud to reread to students.
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DA
Domain Assessment
This domain assessment evaluates each student’s retention of domain
and academic vocabulary words and the core content targeted in Kings
and Queens. The results should guide review and remediation the
following day.
There are two parts to this assessment. You may choose to do the
parts in more than one sitting if you feel this is more appropriate for your
students. Part I (vocabulary assessment) is divided into two sections:
the first assesses domain-related vocabulary, and the second assesses
academic vocabulary. Part II of the assessment addresses the core
content targeted in Kings and Queens.
 Part I (Instructional Master DA-1)
Directions: I am going to say a sentence using a word you have heard in
the read-alouds and in the domain. First I will say the word, and then I
will use it in a sentence. If I use the word correctly in my sentence, circle
the smiling face. If I do not use the word correctly in my sentence, circle
the frowning face. I will say each sentence two times. Let’s do number
one together.
1. Kingdom: A kingdom is the land that kings and queens rule over.
• smiling face
2. Crown Prince: The crown prince will become the next king.
• smiling face
3. Rules: Someone who rules has to listen to what everyone else says.
• frowning face
4. Royal: Anyone is allowed to sit on the queen’s royal throne.
• frowning face
5. Treasures: Things that no one wants are called treasures.
• frowning face
6. Ball: A ball is a fancy party with dancing.
• smiling face
7. Maid: A maid does the housework around the palace.
• smiling face
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8. Palace: The royal family lives in a palace.
• smiling face
9. Dwarfs: Dwarfs are very big and tall people.
• frowning face
10. Fairy godmother: Fairy godmothers are real.
• frowning face
Directions: I am going to read more sentences using other words you
have heard and practiced. First I will say the word, and then I will use it in
a sentence. If I use the word correctly in my sentence, circle the smiling
face. If I do not use the word correctly in my sentence, circle the frowning
face. I will say each sentence two times.
11. Spoiled: When something is spoiled; it is ruined.
• smiling face
12. Dainty: Dainty things are fancy, small, and pretty.
• smiling face
13. Graceful: Bumping into everything as you walk is graceful.
• frowning face
14. Announce: When you want to announce something, you whisper it
softly so no one will hear.
• frowning face
15. Stumble: To stumble means to almost fall over.
• smiling face
 Part II (Instructional Master DA-2)
Directions: Let’s look at each picture in the row and see what story
it represents: “King Midas and the Golden Touch,” “Cinderella,” “The
Princess and the Pea,” and “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” I am
going to read a sentence about one of the stories to you. Circle the picture
of the story my sentence is about.
1. Seven characters in this story are dwarfs.
• Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
2. The main character in this story was not satisfied with the gold he
already had.
• King Midas and the Golden Touch
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3. The main character has a fairy godmother in this story.
• Cinderella
4. The queen tested the girl to find out if the girl was a real princess.
• The Princess and the Pea
5. The king turned his daughter into gold.
• King Midas and the Golden Touch
6. The princess could not sleep because of a pea under all the
mattresses.
• The Princess and the Pea
7. The main character was poisoned by an apple.
• Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
8. The main character lost her glass slipper when she stumbled on the
staircase.
• Cinderella
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Culminating Activities
CA
Note to Teacher
Please use this final day to address class results of the Domain
Assessment. Based on the results of the Domain Assessment and
students’ Tens scores, you may wish to use this class time to provide
remediation opportunities that target specific areas of weakness for
individual students, small groups, or the whole class.
Alternatively, you may also choose to use this class time to extend
or enrich students’ experience with domain knowledge. A number of
enrichment activities are provided below in order to provide students with
opportunities to enliven their experiences with domain concepts.
Remediation
You may choose to regroup students according to particular areas of
weakness, as indicated from Domain Assessment results and students’
Tens scores.
Remediation opportunities include
• targeting Review Activities
• revisiting lesson Extensions
• rereading and discussing select read-alouds
Enrichment
Domain-Related Trade Book or Student Choice
Materials: Trade book
Read a related trade book to review a particular concept; refer to the
books listed in the Introduction. You may also choose to have students
select a read-aloud to be heard again.
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Exploring Student Resources
Materials: Domain-related student websites
Pick appropriate websites from the Internet or from the websites listed
in the Introduction for further exploration of the fairy tales covered in this
domain keep: “The Princess and the Pea,” “Cinderella,” and “Snow White
and the Seven Dwarfs.”
Videos of Today’s Royal Families
Materials: Short videos or pictures of contemporary royal families
Search the Internet for short videos or photographs of today’s royal
families. Discuss with students how today’s royal families are similar and
different from the royal families they have discussed in the domain.
You Were There: Kings and Queens
Have students pretend to be kings and queens or members of the royal
family. Ask students to use what they have learned to imagine and then
describe what they might see and hear as a king, queen, or member of
the royal family. For example, a student may pretend to be a crown prince
who will one day grow up to be king. Have students think about what
they would need to learn and do in order to be king or queen one day.
Royal Tea Party
Tell students that kings and queens were expected to have perfect
manners at all times. Review basic manners with students, such as
saying please and thank you, and waiting patiently for a turn. Hold a
class tea party in which students can sip water (“tea”) and munch on
treats such as muffins or cupcakes (“crumpets”). Remind students to be
on their best tea party behavior and use good manners.
Note: Be sure to check with your school’s policy regarding food
distribution and allergies.
Kings and Queens Around the World
If you have chosen to do so, wrap up group research on the current royal
family your class has chosen. You may wish to make a big poster about
the royal family to show to the rest of the grade or school.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide CA | Culminating Activites 165
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
For Teacher Reference Only:
Instructional Masters for
Kings and Queens
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 167
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
168 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
12B-15
1B-1
Dear Family Member,
Your child will be learning about kings and queens at school. They will learn about the
members of a royal family (king, queen, prince, princess) and the life of a royal family.
Below are some suggestions for activities that you can do at home to reinforce what your
child is learning about kings and queens.
1. King Midas and the Golden Touch
You child will hear the story, “King Midas and the Golden Touch” (included with this
letter). King Midas loved gold so much that he wished that everything he touched would
turn to gold, and his wish came true! At the end of the story, King Midas realizes that his
love for his daughter is more valuable than any amount of gold. Have your child retell this
story using the pictures provided. You can use this story to discuss the importance and
value of relationships with people over love of gold or money.
2. Old King Cole
Enjoy saying or singing their nursery rhyme with your child. Be sure to ask your child
to teach you the motions to this rhyme!
Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he;
He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl,
And he called for his fiddlers three.
Every fiddler had a very fine fiddle,
And a very fine fiddle had he.
Oh, there’s none so rare as can compare
With King Cole and his fiddlers three.
3. Read Aloud Each Day
Reading to your child will help him/her learn to read. The local library or your child’s
teacher may have a variety of books about kings and queens. Attached to this letter is a
list of books about kings and queens.
Encourage your child to share with you the wonderful stories and nursery rhymes about
kings and queens s/he has heard at school.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 169
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Recommended Resources for Kings and Queens
Trade Book List
1.
Amazing Grace, by Mary Hoffman. Illustrated by Caroline
Binch (Reading Rainbow Rooks, 1991) ISBN 978-0803710405
2.
Cinder Edna, by Ellen Jackson. Illustrated by Kevin O’Malley
(HarperCollins, 1998) ISBN 978-0688162955
3.
Cinderella, by Charles Perrault. Illustrated by Loek Koopmans.
Translated by Anthea Bell (North-South Books, 2002)
ISBN 978-0735814868
4.
Kate Middleton: Real-Life Princess, by Sarah Tieck (ABDO
Publishing Company, 2011) ISBN 978-1617830204
5.
King Bidgood’s in the Bathtub, by Audrey and Don Wood
(Harcourt Children’s Books, 1985) ISBN 978-0152427306
6.
King Midas and the Golden Touch, by Charlotte Craft.
Illustrated by K.Y. Craft (HarperCollins, 2003)
ISBN 978-0060540630
7.
The King Who Rained, by Fred Gwynne (Aladdin, 1988)
ISBN 978-0671667443
8.
The Kite Princess, by Juliet Clare Bell. Illustrated by LauraKate Chapman (Barefoot Books, 2012) ISBN 978-1846868306
9.
Max and Ruby’s Midas, by Rosemary Wells (Puffin, 2003)
ISBN 978-0142500668
10. Midnight: A Cinderella Alphabet, by Stephanie Perkal.
Illustrated by Spencer Alston Bartsch (Shen’s Books &
Supplies, 1997) ISBN 978-1885008053
11. Mother Goose Remembers, by Clare Beaton (Barefoot Books,
2006) ISBN 978-1846860034
12. Prince Cinders, by Babette Cole (Puffin, 1997) ISBN Princess
Grace, by Mary Hoffman. Illustrated by Cornelius Van Wright
and Ying-Hwa Hu (Dial, 1992) ISBN 978-0803732605
13. The Princess and the Pea, by Rachel Isadora (Puffin, 2009)
ISBN 978-0142413937
170 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
14. The Princess and the Pig, by Jonathan Emmett. Illustrated by
Poly Bernatene (Walker Childrens, 2011)
ISBN 978-0802723345
15. Prince William: Real-Life Prince, by Sarah Tieck (ABDO
Publishing Company, 2011) ISBN 978-1617830228
16. The Queen’s Knickers, by Nicholas Allan (Transworld
Publishers, 2001) ISBN 978-0099413141
17. Rapunzel, by Rachel Isadora (Putnam Juvenile, 2008)
ISBN 978-0399247729
18. The Rough-Face Girl, by Rafe Martin (Puffin, 1998)
ISBN 978-0698116269
19. The Royal Treasure Measure, by Trudy Harris. Illustrated
by Ivica Stevanovic (Lerner Publishing Company, 2012)
ISBN 978-0761368069
20. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, by Jacob and Wilhelm
Grimm. Illustrated by Nancy Ekholm Burkert. Translated by
Randall Jarrell (Square Fish, 1987) ISBN 978-0374468682
21. Snow White in New York, by Fiona French (Oxford University
Press, USA, 1990) ISBN 978-0192722102
22. Tea for Ruby, by Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of York.
Illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser (Simon & Schuster/Paula
Wiseman Books, 2012) ISBN 978-1416954200
23. The Twelve Dancing Princesses, by Rachel Isadora (Puffin,
2009) ISBN 978-0142414507
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 171
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
172 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
1B-2
Name
Vocabulary List for Kings and Queens (Part 1)
This list includes many important words your child will learn about in Kings and Queens. Try
to use these words with your child in English and in your native language. Next to this list are
suggestions of fun ways your child can practice and use these words at home.


advantages/
disadvantages
crown prince/princess

kingdom

prosperity

reign

royal

rules

servants

gazed

satisfied

spoiled

treasures

fiddlers

merry

dainty
Directions: Help your child pick a word from the vocabulary list.
Then help your child choose an activity and do the activity with
the word. Check off the box for the word. Try to practice a word a
day in English and in your native language.

Draw it

Count the number of letters

Find an example

Tell a friend about it

Act it out

Make up a song using it
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 173
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
174 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
1B-3
Name
King Midas and the Golden Touch
A Royal Greek Story
1
King Midas with his treasures.
2
King Midas speaking to a stranger. King
Midas is not satisfied with his gold.
3
Everything King Midas touches turns
to gold!
4
Marygold turned into a gold statue.
5
King Midas regrets making his wish.
6
King Midas said, “My dear child, you mean
more to me than all the gold in the world!”
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 175
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
176 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
2A-1
1
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 177
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
178 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation

Directions: These six pictures show events from “King Midas and the Golden Touch.” Cut out the pictures.
Think about what is happening in each one. Put the pictures in order to show the beginning, middle, and
end of the story. Glue or tape them in the correct order onto a piece of paper.

2B-1
Name
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 179
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
180 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Name

cont.

2B-1
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 181
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
182 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Directions: These six pictures show events from “King Midas and the Golden Touch.” Cut out the pictures.
Think about what is happening in each one. Put the pictures in order to show the beginning, middle, and
end of the story. Glue or tape them in the correct order onto a piece of paper.
2B-1
Name
Answer Key
1
2
3
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 183
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
184 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
2B-1
cont.
Name
Answer Key
4
5
6
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 185
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
186 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
2
3A-1
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 187
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
188 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
3
4A-1
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 189
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
190 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
PP-1
Name
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 191
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
192 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
PP-1
Name
Answer Key
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 193
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
194 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
5A-1
4
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 195
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
196 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation

5B-1
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 197
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
198 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
12B-15
5B-2
Dear Family Member,
Your child will listen to several fairy tales related to kings and queens at school. Your
child will hear:
• “The Princess and the Pea”
• “Cinderella”
• “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”
Below are some suggestions for activities that you can do at home to reinforce what
your child is learning about kings and queens.
1. Now I Am King/Queen!
Ask your child, “What would you do if you were king or queen?” Encourage your child
to tell you about the advantages and disadvantages of the life of a king or queen. Have
your child make up new rules for the family as you write them down on the back of this
page. This is a good opportunity to remind your child that a ruler needs to think about
what is best for the whole kingdom (your family) and not just him/herself.
2. Royal Sayings: “It’s Good to Be King” and “The Golden Touch”
Your child will learn about these two sayings. Ask your child what these sayings mean.
“It’s good to be king” means that it is great to be in charge and have everyone listen to
you and do things for you.
“The golden touch” means that it is very easy for you to make money or that you are
very good at anything you try (e.g., always scoring points in basketball or being very
good at fixing things).
3. Happily Ever After
Encourage your child to make up his/her own fairy tale using the common phrases
“once upon a time” to begin the story and “happily ever after” to end the story.
4. Read Aloud Each Day
Set aside time to read to your child every day. Please refer to the list of books sent
home with the previous family letter, recommending books related to kings and queens.
Encourage your child to share with you the enjoyable fairy tales about kings and queens
s/he has heard at school.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 199
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Rules of the Kingdom
200 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
5B-3
Name
Vocabulary List for Kings and Queens (Part 2)
This list includes many important words your child will learn about in Kings and Queens. Try
to use these words with your child in English and in your native language. Next to this list are
suggestions of fun ways your child can practice and use these words at home.

delicate

graceful

howled

cinders

hearth

merriment

stumbled

tattered

fairest

peddler

pity

rage

stomped
Directions: Help your child pick a word from the vocabulary list.
Then help your child choose an activity and do the activity with
the word. Check off the box for the word. Try to practice a word a
day in English and in your native language.

Draw it

Count the number of letters

Find an example

Tell a friend about it

Act it out

Make up a song using it
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 201
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
202 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
6A-1
5
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 203
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
204 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation

Directions: These six pictures show events from “Cinderella.” Cut out the pictures. Think about what is happening
in each one. Put the pictures in order to show the beginning, middle, and end of the story. Glue or tape them in the
correct order on a piece of paper.

12B-15
6B-1
Name
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 205
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
206 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Name

cont.

6B-1
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 207
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
208 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Directions: These six pictures show events from “Cinderella.” Cut out the pictures. Think about what is happening
in each one. Put the pictures in order to show the beginning, middle, and end of the story. Glue or tape them in the
correct order on a piece of paper.
6B-1
Name
Answer Key
1
2
3
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 209
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
210 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
6B-1
cont.
Name
Answer Key
4
5
6
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 211
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
212 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
7A-1
Name
6
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 213
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
214 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation

Directions: These six pictures show events from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” Cut out the pictures. Think
about what is happening in each one. Put the pictures in order to show the beginning, middle, and end of the story.
Glue or tape them in the correct order on a piece of paper.

DR-1
Name
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 215
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
216 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Name

cont.

DR-1
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 217
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
218 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Directions: These six pictures show events from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” Cut out the pictures. Think
about what is happening in each one. Put the pictures in order to show the beginning, middle, and end of the story.
Glue or tape them in the correct order on a piece of paper.
DR-1
Name
Answer Key
1
2
3
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 219
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
220 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
DR-1
cont.
Name
Answer Key
4
5
6
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 221
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
222 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Name
DA-1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Directions: Listen to your teacher’s instructions.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.




















Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 223
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.





224 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation





Name
DA-1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Directions: Listen to your teacher’s instructions.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.










Answer Key










Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 225
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.





226 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation





DA-2
Name
Directions: Circle the picture of the story your teacher’s sentence is about.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 227
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
5.
6.
7.
8.
228 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
DA-2
Name
Answer Key
Directions: Circle the picture of the story your teacher’s sentence is about.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 229
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
5.
6.
7.
8.
230 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Tens Recording Chart
Use this grid to record Tens scores. Refer to the Tens Conversion Chart that follows.
Name
Tens Conversion Chart
Number of Questions
Number Correct
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1
0
10
2
0
5
10
3
0
3
7
10
4
0
3
5
8
10
5
0
2
4
6
8
10
6
0
2
3
5
7
8
10
7
0
1
3
4
6
7
9
10
8
0
1
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
9
0
1
2
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
10
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
0
1
2
3
4
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
0
1
2
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
8
9
10
13
0
1
2
2
3
4
5
5
6
7
8
8
9
10
14
0
1
1
2
3
4
4
5
6
6
7
8
9
9
10
15
0
1
1
2
3
3
4
5
5
6
7
7
8
9
9
10
16
0
1
1
2
3
3
4
4
5
6
6
7
8
8
9
9
10
17
0
1
1
2
2
3
4
4
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
18
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
19
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
20
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
20
10
Simply find the number of correct answers the student produced along
the top of the chart and the number of total questions on the worksheet
or activity along the left side. Then find the cell where the column and
the row converge. This indicates the Tens score. By using the Tens
Conversion Chart, you can easily convert any raw score, from 0 to 20,
into a Tens score.
Please note that the Tens Conversion Chart was created to be used
with assessments that have a defined number of items (such as written
assessments). However, teachers are encouraged to use the Tens system
to record informal observations as well. Observational Tens scores are
based on your observations during class. It is suggested that you use the
following basic rubric for recording observational Tens scores.
9–10
Student appears to have excellent understanding
7–8
Student appears to have good understanding
5–6
Student appears to have basic understanding
3–4
Student appears to be having difficulty understanding
1–2
Student appears to be having great difficulty understanding
0
Student appears to have no understanding/does not participate
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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
These materials are the result of the work, advice, and encouragement of numerous individuals over many years. Some of those singled out here already
know the depth of our gratitude; others may be surprised to find themselves thanked publicly for help they gave quietly and generously for the sake of
the enterprise alone. To helpers named and unnamed we are deeply grateful.
CONTRIBUTORS TO EARLIER VERSIONS OF THESE MATERIALS
Susan B. Albaugh, Kazuko Ashizawa, Nancy Braier, Kathryn M. Cummings, Michelle De Groot, Diana Espinal, Mary E. Forbes, Michael L. Ford,
Ted Hirsch, Danielle Knecht, James K. Lee, Diane Henry Leipzig, Martha G. Mack, Liana Mahoney, Isabel McLean, Steve Morrison, Juliane K. Munson,
Elizabeth B. Rasmussen, Laura Tortorelli, Rachael L. Shaw, Sivan B. Sherman, Miriam E. Vidaver, Catherine S. Whittington, Jeannette A. Williams
We would like to extend special recognition to Program Directors Matthew Davis and Souzanne Wright who were instrumental to the early
development of this program.
SCHOOLS
We are truly grateful to the teachers, students, and administrators of the following schools for their willingness to field test these materials and for
their invaluable advice: Capitol View Elementary, Challenge Foundation Academy (IN), Community Academy Public Charter School, Lake Lure Classical
Academy, Lepanto Elementary School, New Holland Core Knowledge Academy, Paramount School of Excellence, Pioneer Challenge Foundation
Academy, New York City PS 26R (The Carteret School), PS 30X (Wilton School), PS 50X (Clara Barton School), PS 96Q, PS 102X (Joseph O. Loretan),
PS 104Q (The Bays Water), PS 214K (Michael Friedsam), PS 223Q (Lyndon B. Johnson School), PS 308K (Clara Cardwell), PS 333Q (Goldie Maple Academy),
Sequoyah Elementary School, South Shore Charter Public School, Spartanburg Charter School, Steed Elementary School, Thomas Jefferson Classical
Academy, Three Oaks Elementary, West Manor Elementary.
And a special thanks to the CKLA Pilot Coordinators Anita Henderson, Yasmin Lugo-Hernandez, and Susan Smith, whose suggestions and day-to-day
support to teachers using these materials in their classrooms was critical.
Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide 233
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
CREDITS
Every effort has been taken to trace and acknowledge copyrights. The editors tender their apologies for any accidental infringement where
copyright has proved untraceable. They would be pleased to insert the appropriate acknowledgment in any subsequent edition of this
publication. Trademarks and trade names are shown in this publication for illustrative purposes only and are the property of their respective
owners. The references to trademarks and trade names given herein do not affect their validity.
The Word Work exercises are based on the work of Beck, McKeown, and Kucan in Bringing Words to Life (The Guilford Press, 2002).
All photographs are used under license from Shutterstock, Inc. unless otherwise noted.
EXPERT REVIEWER
ILLUSTRATORS AND IMAGE SOURCES
John J. Butt
Cover: Steve Morrison/Shutterstock;Title Page Inset: Steve Morrison/Shutterstock;MMW
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Photographs,LC-USZ62-118783;1A-3: Ikiwaner / Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons
Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
deed.en / Modified from Original;1A-4: Shutterstock/Shutterstock;2A-1: Library of
Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-DIG-ggbain-32479;2A-2: Shutterstock/
Shutterstock;2A-3: Shutterstock/Shutterstock;3A-1: Michael Parker;3A-2: Michael
Parker;3A-3: Michael Parker;3A-4: Michael Parker;3A-5: Michael Parker;3A-6: Michael
Parker;3A-7: Michael Parker;3A-8: Michael Parker;3A-9: Michael Parker;4A-1: Steve
Morrison;5A-1: Katy Cummings;5A-2: Katy Cummings;5A-3: Katy Cummings;6A-1: Jake
Wyatt;6A-2: Jake Wyatt;6A-3: Jake Wyatt;6A-4: Jake Wyatt;6A-5: Jake Wyatt;6A-6: Jake
Wyatt;7A-1: Shari Griffiths;7A-2: Shari Griffiths;7A-3: Shari Griffiths;7A-4: Shari Griffiths;7A-5:
Shari Griffiths;7A-6: Shari Griffiths;7A-7: Shari Griffiths;7A-8: Shari Griffiths;7A-9: Shari
Griffiths;7A-10: Shari Griffiths;7A-11: Shari Griffiths;7A-12: Shari Griffiths;7A-13: Shari
Griffiths;8A-1: Kristin Kwan;8A-2: Kristin Kwan;8A-3: Kristin Kwan;8A-4: Kristin Kwan;8A-5:
Kristin Kwan;8A-6: Kristin Kwan;8A-7: Kristin Kwan;8A-8: Kristin Kwan;8A-9: Kristin
Kwan;8A-10: Kristin Kwan;8A-11: Kristin Kwan;8A-12: Kristin Kwan;8A-13: Kristin Kwan;Poster
1M-1: Jean Fouquet / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain;Poster 1M-2: Shutterstock/
Shutterstock;Poster 2M-1 (top): Michael Parker;Poster 2M-1 (bottom): Shutterstock/
Shutterstock;Poster 2M-2: Shutterstock/Shutterstock;Poster 3M-1: Shari Griffiths;Poster 3M2: Shutterstock/Shutterstock;Poster 3M-3: Shutterstock/Shutterstock;Poster 4M-1: Kristin
Kwan;Poster 4M-2: Shutterstock/Shutterstock;Poster 4M-3: Shutterstock/Shutterstock;5:
Core Knowledge Staff/Shutterstock;104: Core Knowledge Staff;1B-1: Steve Morrison;1B-3:
Michael Parker;2A-1: Michael Parker;2B-1: Michael Parker;2A-1 (Answer Key): Michael
Parker;2B-1 (Answer Key): Michael Parker;3A-1: Steve Morrison;4A-1: Katy Cummings;PP-1
(top left): Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs,LC-USZ62-118783;PP-1 (top right):
Katy Cummings;PP-1 (middle top left): Katy Cummings;PP-1 (middle top right): Library of
Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-DIG-ggbain-32479;PP-1 (middle left): Michael
Parker;PP-1 (middle right): Katy Cummings;PP_1 (bottom middle left): Steve Morrison;PP-1
(bottom middle right): Katy Cummings;PP-1 (bottom left): Michael Parker;PP-1 (bottom
right): Katy Cummings;PP-1 (Answer Key)(top left): Library of Congress, Prints and
Photographs,LC-USZ62-118783;PP-1 (Answer Key)(top right): Katy Cummings;PP-1 (Answer
Key)(middle top left): Katy Cummings;PP-1 (Answer Key)(middle top right): Library of
Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-DIG-ggbain-32479;PP-1 (Answer Key)(middle
left): Michael Parker;PP-1 (Answer Key)(middle right): Katy Cummings;PP_1 (Answer
Key) (bottom middle left): Steve Morrison;PP-1 (Answer Key)(bottom middle right): Katy
Cummings;PP-1 (Answer Key)(bottom left): Michael Parker;PP-1 (Answer Key)(bottom
right): Katy Cummings;5A-1: Jake Wyatt;5B-1 (top left): Jake Wyatt;5B-1 (middle left): Jake
Wyatt;5B-1 (bottom left): Jake Wyatt;5B-1 (top right): Marcin Zaleski / Wikimedia Commons
/ Public Domain;5B-1 (bottom right): Shutterstock;5B-2: Core Knowledge Staff;6A-1: Shari
Griffiths;6B-1: Shari Griffiths;6B-1 (Answer Key): Shari Griffiths;7A-1: Kristin Kwan;DR-1: Kristin
Kwan;DR-1 (Answer Key): Kristin Kwan;DA-2 (top left): Michael Parker;DA-2 (center left): Shari
Griffiths;DA-2 (center right): Jake Wyatt;DA-2 (top right): Kristin Kwan;DA-2 (Answer Key) (top
left): Michael Parker;DA-2 (Answer Key) (center left): Shari Griffiths;DA-2 (Answer Key) (center
right): Jake Wyatt;DA-2 (Answer Key) (top right): Kristin Kwan
WRITERS
Michael L. Ford
Regarding the Shutterstock items listed above, please note: “No person or entity shall
falsely represent, expressly or by way of reasonable implication, that the content herein
was created by that person or entity, or any person other than the copyright holder(s) of
that content.”
234 Kings and Queens: Supplemental Guide
© 2013 Core Knowledge Foundation
Kings and Queens
Tell It Again!™ Read-Aloud Supplemental Guide
Listening & Learning™ Strand
kindergarten
The Core Knowledge Foundation
www.coreknowledge.org
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