Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software

Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
Configuring DC9440-Series
Operator Workplace Console
Software
This manual applies to ENVOX software version P2.0 only. For
earlier versions, retain the manual dated November 1995.
D2C01231202
Configuration Manual
CE11.0:DC9440
Revision B — September 1998
This manual supercedes the issue dated November 1995.
DOCVUE, ENVOX, Fisher-Rosemount Systems, PROFLEX, PROVOX, PROVUE, are marks of one of
the Fisher-Rosemount group of companies.
All other marks are the property of their respective owners.
ã 1998 Fisher-Rosemount Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.
Printed in USA
The contents of this publication are presented for informational purposes only, and while every effort
has been made to ensure their accuracy, they are not to be construed as warranties or guarantees,
express or implied, regarding the products or services described herein or their use or applicability. We
reserve the right to modify or improve the designs or specifications of such products at any time without
notice.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software Your Evaluation Please ...
(Revision B — September 1998)
Name:
Title and Department:
Company:
Years of Experience: ___ Instrumentation ___ Distributed Control
Telephone:
(
)
--
iii
Education: ____High School ____Years College ____Degree
Job Responsibility:
Please indicate your evaluation of this manual. Attach extra sheets if needed.
1. How and when do you use this manual?
2. How well is the manual’s content
organized? Please explain.
V
V
V
V
V
V
Read entire manual before attempting task
V
Good — representative of the product’s
operation, usable
V
V
V
V
Average — usable but can be improved
Read selected sections before attempting task
Read while attempting task
Attempt task first
Read as last resort
Excellent — parallels product’s operation,
very usable
Fair — not very usable, should be improved
Poor — not usable, must be improved
No Opinion
Understandable
3. Is the manual’s content understandable
and applicable to the product’s operation?
Please explain.
4. How well do the manual’s illustrations
convey product information?
Please explain.
Applicable
V
V
Excellent — very easy to understand,
very applicable
V
V
V
V
Good — easy to understand, applicable
V
V
Fair — not very understandable/applicable,
should be improved
V
V
Poor — not understandable/applicable,
must be improved
V
V
No Opinion
Average — applicable but some sections
not easy to understand
V
Excellent — very easy to understand, extremely
usable
V
V
V
Good — easy to understand, very usable
V
Poor — cannot understand, must be improved,
totally unusable
V
No Opinion
Average — fairly easy to understand, usable
Fair — not easy to understand, should be
improved, not very usable
Your Evaluation Please ... Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
iv
5. Describe the amount of usable information
in this manual including tables.
Please explain.
V
Too much information — not all required to
perform task
V
Proper amount provided — not too much nor
too little
V
Too little information — needed additional
information to perform task
V
No Opinion
Sections
6. How well is information cross-referenced in
the manual’s individual sections and index?
Please explain.
7. How useful is the Glossary?
8. What is your overall impression of this
manual? Please explain.
Please FAX or MAIL this form to:
Index
V
V
Excellent — very easy to locate
information, extremely usable
V
V
Good — easy to locate information,
very usable
V
V
Average — fairly easy to locate information,
usable
V
V
Fair — not easy to locate information,
should be improved, not very usable
V
V
Poor — cannot locate information, must be
improved, totally unusable
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
Did Not Use
No Opinion
Useful
Useful but not complete/accurate
Not Useful
Did Not Use
No Opinion
Excellent — met all needs, extremely usable
Good — met most of my needs, very usable
Average — usable
Fair — should be revised, not very usable
Poor — must be revised, totally unusable
No Opinion
Fisher-Rosemount Systems, Inc.
Technical Documentation Editor
8301 Cameron Road, MD#12
Austin, TX 78753
FAX Number: (512) 834-7200
Attention: Technical Documentation Editor
FISHER-ROSEMOUNT SYSTEMS USE ONLY — forwarded to:
V
Lead Writer
V
Engineering
V
Technical Support
V
Marketing
V
Project File
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
Contents
v
Contents
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
1.10
2
2.1
2.1.1
2.1.2
2.2
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.2.3
2.2.4
2.2.5
2.2.6
2.2.7
3
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Revision This Manual Supports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New in This Release . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Structure of This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manual Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warnings, Cautions and Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Find Answers for Product and Document Questions .
1
1
1
2
3
5
6
7
7
7
Product Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Software and Hardware Requirements and Options . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Software Features and Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pop-up Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flexible Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Applications Launch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Always Visible Alarm Indication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Context-sensitive Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
11
12
13
13
17
17
17
17
18
18
Theory of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
3.1
Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1
User Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2
X Terminals and Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.3
Plant Management Areas (PMAs) and Privilege Management
3.1.4
Identifying Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.5
Assigning Base Privilege . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.6
Extending Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.7
Point Control Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2
Alarm Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.1
Alarm Considerations for Continuous Control Processes . . . .
3.2.2
Alarm Considerations for Batch Control Processes . . . . . . . . .
3.2.3
Designing an Alarm Management Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4
Alarm Management Tools and Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4.1
Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4.1.1
Define User Access to Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4.1.2
Define User Access Privileges for Each Console . . . . . . .
19
20
21
22
22
23
24
25
25
25
26
26
28
28
28
28
vi
Contents
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
3.2.4.1.3
Define Logical Plant Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4.1.4
Assign Points to Plant Process Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4.1.5
Define Operational States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4.1.6
Define Alarm Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4.1.7
Assign Alarm Priorities to Alarm Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4.1.8
Define a Hierarchical Alarm Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.4.2
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.5
Plant Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.5.1
Identifying Plant Areas by Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.5.2
Assigning Plant Areas to Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6
Plant Management Areas (PMAs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6.1
PMA Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6.2
Advanced Data Reporting (ADR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6.2.1
Selected Reporting Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6.2.2
Initial PMA Configured Modes and Selected
Reporting Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6.2.3
Dynamic Reporting Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6.3
Modes and Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6.4
PMA Instrument Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6.5
PPA Selection List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.6.6
Structure of PMA Configuration Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.7
Plant Process Areas (PPAs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.7.1
PPA Operational States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.7.2
PPA Instrument Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.7.3
Alarm Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.7.4
PPA Alarm Priorities and Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.7.5
PPA Critical Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.7.6
PPA Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.7.7
Structure of PPA Configuration Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.8
Alarm Priority Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.9
Faceplates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.10
Station Independent Alarming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.11
Global Alarm Acknowledgement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.12
Local Horn Acknowledgement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.13
Multi-tone Horn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.14
Alarm Acknowledgement Printer Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3
Console Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.1
Redundant Console Pairing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.2
Detecting Redundancy Package Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3
Redundant Console Switching Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3.1
Automatic Switchover Enable (ASE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3.1.1
Conditions for Automatically Switching Over . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3.1.2
Rules for Allowing Automatic Switchover Enable . . . . . . .
3.3.3.1.3
Conditions for Disabling Automatic Switchover . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3.2
Manual Switchover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3.2.1
Conditions Preventing Manual Switchover . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
29
29
29
30
30
30
31
31
34
35
37
38
39
41
42
43
44
45
45
46
46
46
51
53
56
57
60
60
61
64
65
66
67
68
69
69
70
71
71
71
72
72
73
73
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
Contents
3.3.3.2.2
Effects of Console-resident Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3.3
Changing Paired Consoles’ Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3.4
Downloading Devices After Changing Pairs . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.4
Redundant Pair Downloading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.5
Console-resident Points and Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.6
Console-resident Point Redundancy Synchronization . . . . . .
3.4
Console Point Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1
Discrete Control Device (DCD) Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1.1
Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1.2
Setpoint Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1.3
Configuring DCDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1.3.1
Operating Discrete Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1.3.2
Detail Display Parameters (DDPs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1.4
Enhanced DCD (EDCD) Point in SR90 Controller . . . . . . . .
3.4.2
Extended Pulse Count Input (EPCI) Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.1
EPCI Point Hosting Rationale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.2
History of the EPCI Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.3
Features and Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.3.1
How the EPCI Point Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.3.2
Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.3.3
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.3.4
Partial Download Effects on the EPCI Point . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.3.5
Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.4
Performance Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.4.1
Configurable EPCI Point Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2.4.2
EPCI Point Detailed Display Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3
Accumulation Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3.1
Features and Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3.1.1
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3.1.2
Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3.1.3
Configured Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3.2
Performance Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3.2.1
Configurable Accumulation Point Parameters . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3.2.2
Accumulation Point Detailed Display Parameters . . . . . . .
3.4.3.2.3
Shift Table Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.4
Maintenance Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.4.1
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.4.2
The Four Bits of the Maintenance Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.4.3
Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.4.4
Maintenance Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.4.5
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.5
Integrity Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.5.1
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.5.2
Guidelines for Integrity Point Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.5.3
Integrity Point Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.5.3.1
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
74
74
74
75
75
75
76
77
77
78
78
79
79
79
80
81
81
82
82
85
86
87
87
88
88
90
91
92
93
93
94
94
95
97
97
98
98
99
100
100
101
101
103
103
104
104
vii
viii
Contents
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
3.4.5.3.2
Status Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.5.4
Configured Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.5.5
Integrity Point Detailed Display Parameters (DDPs) . . . . . .
3.4.6
Console-derived Single-bit Discretes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.6.1
Defining Console-derived Single-bit Discrete Points . . . . . .
3.4.6.2
Downloading Console-derived Single-bit Discrete Points . .
3.4.7
Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.1
Activity Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.1.1
Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.1.2
Abort (A) Alarm Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.1.3
Failure (B) Alarm Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.1.4
Procedure List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.2
Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.2.1
Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.2.2
Point Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.2.3
Batch-End Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.2.4
Console Alarm History Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.2.5
Process Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.3
Targeting the Activity Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4
Activity Point States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.1
NOTLOADED State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.2
IDLE State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.3
ACTIVE State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.4
HOLDING State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.5
UNITWAIT State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.6
AQUIREWT State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.7
FAILED State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.8
WARNING State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.9
ABORTED State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.10
DELAY State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.11
SCHEDULE State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.12
DOWNLOAD State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.13
BATCHEND State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.4.14
PRINTING State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.5
Resource Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.5.1
Resource Allocation for Batch Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.5.2
Batch Processing with Point Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.5.3
Batch Processing with Acquire Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.6
Activity Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.6.1
Data Integrity Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.6.2
Resynchronization of the Standby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.6.3
Process Instruction Lockstepping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.6.4
Switchover Processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.6.5
Redundancy Effects On History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.6.6
Enabling Activity Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.7.7
Partial Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
105
107
110
114
114
115
116
116
116
117
117
117
117
118
119
120
120
122
129
129
133
134
134
135
135
136
136
137
137
138
139
139
139
140
140
141
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
149
149
149
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
Contents
3.5
Operator Action Requests (OARs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.1
OAR Features and Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.2
OAR Priority Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.2.1
OAR Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.2.2
OAR Prioritization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.2.2.1
Priority Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.2.2.2
Acknowledging OARs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6
Remote Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.1
Coordinating With the System Administrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.1.1
Defining Remote Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.1.2
Assigning Remote Applications to Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.2
Setting Up Remote Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.3
Defining VMS Remote Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.3.1
Terminal Session Not Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.3.2
Terminal Window Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.4
Defining UNIX Remote Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7
Printing Hard-copies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7.1
Configuring the Printer and Network Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8
Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.1
Report Headers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.1.1
Report List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.1.2
Changing Report Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.1.3
Report Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.2
Using Report Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8.3
Printer Queues and Buffers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9
Trending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9.1
Trend Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9.2
Trend Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9.3
Trend Traces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9.3.1
Sample Intervals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9.3.2
Mixing Sample Intervals Within a Trend Set . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.9.4
PROVOX Historical Trending Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10
Console Point Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.1
Console Loading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.2
Highway Access Control List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10.3
Targeting Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.11
System Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.11.1
Configuring the System Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.11.2
Downloading the System Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.11.3
Time Synchronization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.11.4
Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.12
Console Downloading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.12.1
Total Downloading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.12.1.1
Total Download Transfer Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.12.1.2
Total Download Configuration Update Phase . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.12.1.3
Monitoring Total Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
150
150
150
150
151
151
152
153
154
154
155
155
156
156
157
157
158
159
159
159
160
160
160
161
164
164
166
166
167
168
169
170
171
171
173
173
174
174
176
176
176
177
177
178
179
179
ix
x
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
Contents
3.12.2
3.12.2.1
3.12.2.2
3.12.2.3
3.12.2.4
4
4.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.1.4
4.1.5
4.1.6
4.1.7
4.1.8
4.2
4.2.1
4.2.2
4.2.2.1
4.2.2.2
4.2.2.3
4.2.3
4.2.3.1
4.2.3.2
4.2.3.3
4.2.3.4
4.2.3.5
4.3
4.4
4.4.1
4.4.2
4.4.3
4.4.4
4.4.5
4.4.6
4.4.7
4.4.8
4.5
4.5.1
4.5.2
4.5.3
4.5.4
4.6
4.6.1
4.6.2
Partial Downloading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Partial Download Transfer Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Partial Download Configuration Update Phase . . . . . . . . . .
Partial Download Database Compress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Partial Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180
181
181
182
183
Creating the Console Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
185
Configuration Engineering and Maintenance Tasks . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Configuration Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trace/Tune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Audit Trail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX User Interfaces and Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating Within the ENVOX Configuration Software . . . . . .
Navigating With a Pointing Device or a Keyboard . . . . . . . . . .
Using a Pointing Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fast Access Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navigating and Entering Data in Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving the Cursor From Field to Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving the Cursor Within a Field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exiting a Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Form Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Device Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Display List Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Access List Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Clock List Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Highway Access Control List Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Preferences Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Limits Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shift Table Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Report List Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Report Header Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equipment List Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PMA List Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Horn Tone Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
185
187
187
188
188
188
188
188
188
189
190
192
193
193
199
199
201
201
202
202
203
203
212
213
218
222
225
226
230
232
236
238
239
241
242
244
247
248
250
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
4.6.3
4.6.4
4.6.5
4.7
4.7.1
4.7.2
4.7.3
4.7.4
4.7.5
4.7.6
4.7.7
4.8
4.8.1
4.8.2
4.8.3
4.8.4
4.8.5
4.8.6
4.8.7
4.8.8
4.8.9
4.8.10
4.8.11
4.9
4.9.1
4.9.2
4.10
4.10.1
4.10.2
4.10.3
4.10.4
4.10.5
4.10.6
4.10.7
4.11
4.11.1
4.11.2
Contents
PMA Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PPA Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alarm Priority Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Procedure Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grade Template Defaults Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grades Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grade Details Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Point Sets Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Point Set Points Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Procedure List Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining and Targeting Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accumulation Point Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activity Point Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console DCD Point Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Point Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console EPCI Point Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Integrity Point Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Discrete Point Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Target Data Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Target Data Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extended Alarms Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DCD Template Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Trend Sets and Traces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trend Set Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trend Trace Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Definitions Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Preferences Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Color Palette Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Application List Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User UDK List Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application Definition Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Defined Key Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copy Console Configuration Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Graphics Display Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
252
254
258
262
264
268
270
272
274
276
278
280
282
285
288
292
295
299
302
304
308
312
314
317
318
320
323
325
328
333
335
336
339
341
348
349
351
Using the Graphics Display Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
353
5.1
Building Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.1
Using Static, Dynamic, and Motif Elements in Displays . . . . .
5.1.2
Using Colors in Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.3
Organizing Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.3.1
Using Display Paths and Hierarchies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.3.2
Using Consistent Patterns in Display Hierarchies . . . . . . . .
5.1.4
Using #CURRENT or Point Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
354
354
355
355
356
358
359
5
xi
xii
Contents
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
5.1.5
Using #STATIONx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.6
Effects of Displays on CPU Load and Draw Times . . . . . . . . .
5.2
Overview of the Graphics Display Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.1
Graphics Display Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.2
Overlaid Selection Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.3
Overlaid Help Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.4
Color Settings Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.5
Color Modify Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.6
Function Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.7
Mode Selection Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.8
Mode Specific Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.9
Magnification Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.10
Display Size Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.11
Display Name Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.12
Number of Free Elements Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.13
Scrolled Message Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.14
Text Input Area (or Status Information Area) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3
Using the Graphics Display Editor Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.1
Accessing the Graphics Display Editor Software . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.2
Using a Pointing Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.3
Using a Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.4
Manipulating the Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.4.1
Moving the Cursor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.4.1.1
Using Graphics Display Window Coordinates . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.4.1.2
Positioning the Cursor by Pixel Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.4.2
Picking Display Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.4.3
Moving Display Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.4.4
Selecting Functions or Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.4.5
Selecting Items From Overlaid Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4
Using the Graphics Display Editor Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.1
Using the SET Mode to Set Default Parameter Values . . . . .
5.4.2
Using the ADD Mode to Add Display Elements . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.3
Using the EDIT Mode to Edit Elements in a Display . . . . . . . .
5.4.4
Using the FILE Mode for File Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.4.1
Saved User Preferences Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.4.2
Saved ISA Symbol Default Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5
Modifying Display Elements, Attributes, and Colors . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.1
Modifying Display Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.2
Modifying Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.3
Adding A Push Button to a Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.3.1
LCP FST Push Button Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.3.2
UDK Push Button Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.3.3
Remote Application Pushbutton Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.4
Adding a Value Field to a Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.5
Modifying Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6
Using Graphics Display Conditionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
360
360
362
363
366
366
366
367
367
368
368
369
369
369
370
370
370
371
371
372
373
379
379
380
380
380
381
382
383
384
384
391
411
414
419
420
420
420
422
424
424
424
425
425
426
427
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
5.6.1
5.6.1.1
5.6.1.2
5.6.2
5.6.2.1
5.6.2.2
5.6.2.3
5.6.2.4
5.6.2.5
5.6.3
5.6.3.1
5.6.3.2
Contents
Using Simple Conditionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Color Conditionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Two-Element Conditionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Conditional Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the ENVOX Language Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Conditional Color Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Conditional Color Expressions in
Graphics Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Conditional Text Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Applying Conditional Text Expressions in Graphics Displays
Simplifying Conditional Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effective Uses of ASSIGN COLOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Use of ASSIGN COLOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
427
428
429
431
433
434
437
438
441
442
442
447
A
Functions Available by Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
449
B
Trendable Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
455
C
Detail Display Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
457
Remote DDPs For Points In Remote Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote DDPs by Point Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote DDPs For Console Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HART-Related Remote DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local DDPs For All Point Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local DDPs Unique to Some Point Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
458
469
469
475
481
484
485
Display Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
487
D.1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2
DDP Display Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.1
GRADE DDP Display Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.2
DDPV, DDPM, and DDPD Display Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.3
DDPR and DDPL Display Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.3.1
Using DDPL and DDPR Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.3.2
Example of DDPL and DDPR Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.2.4
DDP Display Attribute Memory Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3
Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.1
Display Attribute Mnemonics and Explanations . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.2
Display Attributes for Activity Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.3
FST and Unit Operation Failure Index Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D.3.4
Display Attributes for Multivariable Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
487
487
488
488
489
490
491
491
492
492
535
538
540
C.1
C.2
C.2.1
C.2.2
C.3
C.4
C.5
D
xiii
xiv
Contents
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
E
Process Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
545
F
Point Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
549
G
Integrity Point Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
551
H
Report Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
557
History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
559
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
561
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
587
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
Contents
xv
Figures
Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-2.
Figure 2-3.
Figure 2-4.
Figure 3-1.
Figure 3-2.
Figure 3-3.
Figure 3-4.
Figure 3-5.
Figure 3-6.
Figure 3-7.
Figure 3-8.
Figure 3-9.
Figure 3-10.
Figure 3-11.
Figure 3-12.
Figure 3-13.
Figure 3-14.
Figure 3-15.
Figure 3-16.
Figure 3-17.
Figure 3-18.
Figure 3-19.
Figure 3-20.
Figure 3-21.
Figure 3-22.
Figure 4-1.
Figure 4-2.
Figure 4-3.
Figure 4-4.
Figure 4-5.
Figure 4-6.
Figure 4-7.
Figure 4-8.
Figure 4-9.
Figure 4-10.
Figure 4-11.
Figure 4-12.
Figure 4-13.
Figure 4-14.
Figure 4-15.
Figure 4-16.
Typical Operator Workplace Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Window Layout for the Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Software Main Screen (Single Window) . . . . . . .
Console Software Main Window (Split Window) . . . . . . . .
Alarm Priority Versus PPA Operational State and
Alarm Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plant Organization With PMAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plant Organization With PMAs and PPAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Plant Organization With PMAs, PPAs, and Points . . . . . .
Typical PMA Arrangement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typical PMA Instrument Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typical Plant Processing Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typical PPA Instrument Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typical Main Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typical Response to an Alarm Shown in a PMA . . . . . . . .
Alarm States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activity Point Faceplate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PID Point Detail and Full-size Faceplates . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console-resident EPCI Compared to the Targeted EPCI
Data Accumulation Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rate Low Alarm Activation With and Without Deadband .
Activity State Transition Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Batch Processing Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Language Editor—Acquire Instruction . . . . . . . . .
Simplified Diagram of Operator Workplace Installation . .
Trend Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typical System-wide Clock Master Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Tasks and ENVOX Features . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Form Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DEC Keyboard Layout For Use With ENVOX Forms . . . .
IBM Keyboard Layout For Use With ENVOX Forms . . . . .
HP Keyboard Layout For Use With ENVOX Forms . . . . .
PCI Point Item Form Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Device Definition . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Global Items . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Logic Items . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Points Definition . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Device Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Display List Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Access List Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
14
15
16
27
32
32
33
36
44
46
47
49
50
55
62
63
81
84
90
130
142
143
153
165
175
186
191
194
195
196
200
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
218
222
225
xvi
Contents
Figure 4-17.
Figure 4-18.
Figure 4-19.
Figure 4-20.
Figure 4-21.
Figure 4-22.
Figure 4-23.
Figure 4-24.
Figure 4-25.
Figure 4-26.
Figure 4-27.
Figure 4-28.
Figure 4-29.
Figure 4-30.
Figure 4-31.
Figure 4-32.
Figure 4-33.
Figure 4-34.
Figure 4-35.
Figure 4-36.
Figure 4-37.
Figure 4-38.
Figure 4-39.
Figure 4-40.
Figure 4-41.
Figure 4-42.
Figure 4-43.
Figure 4-44.
Figure 4-45.
Figure 4-46.
Figure 4-47.
Figure 4-48.
Figure 4-49.
Figure 4-50.
Figure 4-51.
Figure 4-52.
Figure 4-53.
Figure 4-54.
Figure 4-55.
Figure 4-56.
Figure 4-57.
Figure 4-58.
Figure 4-59.
Figure 4-60.
Figure 4-61.
Figure 4-62.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
System Clock List Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Highway Access Control List Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Preferences Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Preferences Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shift Table Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Report List Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Report Header Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Equipment List Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PMA List Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Horn Tone Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PMA Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PPA Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alarm Priority Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Procedures . . . . . . . . . . .
Procedure Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grade Template Defaults Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grades Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grade Details Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Point Sets Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Point Set Points Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Procedure List Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining and Targeting Points . . .
Accumulation Point Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activity Point Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console DCD Point Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Point Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console EPCI Point Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Integrity Point Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single Discrete Point Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Target Data Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Target Data Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extended Alarms Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DCD Template Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Trend Sets and Traces .
Trend Set Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trend Trace Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Definitions Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Preferences Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Color Palette Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Application List Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User UDK List Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application Definition Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Defined Key Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
227
230
232
236
238
239
241
243
245
247
248
250
252
254
258
263
264
268
270
272
274
276
278
281
282
285
288
292
295
299
302
304
308
312
314
317
318
320
324
325
328
333
335
337
339
341
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
Figure 4-63.
Figure 4-64.
Figure 5-1.
Figure 5-2.
Figure 5-3.
Figure 5-4.
Figure 5-5.
Figure 5-6.
Figure 5-7.
Figure 5-8.
Figure 5-9.
Figure 5-10.
Figure 5-11.
Figure 5-12.
Figure C-1.
Figure C-2.
Figure D-1.
Contents
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copy Console Configuration Form Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Display Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Graphics Display Editor Screen Area on the
Configuration Workstation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DEC Keyboard Layout For Graphics Display Editor . . . . .
IBM Keyboard Layout For Graphics Display Editor . . . . . .
HP Keyboard Layout For Graphics Display Editor . . . . . .
Language Editor Screen with Conditional
Color Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language Editor Screen with Conditional Text Instructions
Optimizing Conditional Expression Performance Under
Normal Operating Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optimizing Conditional Expression Performance Under
Abnormal Operating Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optimizing Conditional Expression Performance Using
the ASSIGN COLOR Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incorrect Use of the ASSIGN COLOR Instruction in a
Conditional Text Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Correct Use of the ASSIGN COLOR Instruction in a
Conditional Text Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Flag Status Bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Device Status Bit Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Display to Map DDP Mnemonics to
Groups and Offsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xvii
348
349
357
362
374
375
376
436
440
443
444
444
445
446
479
482
489
xviii
Contents
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
Tables
Table 1-1.
Table 3-1.
Table 3-2.
Table 3-3.
Table 3-4.
Table 3-5.
Table 3-6.
Table 3-7.
Table 3-8.
Table 3-9.
Table 3-10.
Table 3-11.
Table 3-12.
Table 3-13.
Table 3-14.
Table 3-15.
Table 3-16.
Table 3-17.
Table 3-18.
Table 3-19.
Table 3-20.
Type Style Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Effect of PMA Modes on Reporting and Alarm Modes . . . .
Typical PMA User and Preferred Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PMA Mode Reporting Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exception Overrides for Dynamic Reporting Rates . . . . . . .
PMA Mode Alarm Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alarm Groups and Operational States for an Example PPA
Example Alarm Priority Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Point Types That Support the Percent Output Attribute . . .
Global Alarm Acknowledgment Possibilities . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Horn Acknowledgement Possibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostics for the Multi-Tone Horn Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redundancy Faults and Corrective Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EPCI Processing Periods for PCI Scan Rates . . . . . . . . . . .
Valid Attributes for Accumulating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status Bit Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configured Variable Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example of Using Default Values to Vary Grades . . . . . . . .
Required Privileges and Modes for Console Requests . . .
Required Modes for CHIP Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Status Effects of Global and Local Data Validation on
Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 3-21. The Effects of Switchovers on States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 3-22. OAR Types and Default Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 4-1. Keys for Editing ENVOX Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 4-2. Alphabetic List of ENVOX Forms Used to Configure
Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 4-3. Parameters Automatically Selected for Point Types . . . . . .
Table 4-4. Effect of PMA Modes on Reporting and Alarm Modes . . . .
Table 4-5. Multi-tone Horn Tones Assignable to Alarm Priorities . . . . .
Table 4-6. Sizing Table for Process Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 4-7. LK401 and PC101 Reserved Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 4-8. UDK Operation Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 5-1. Graphics Display Editor Function Menu Options . . . . . . . .
Table 5-2. Graphics Display Editor Key Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 5-3. SET Mode-specific Menu Option Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 5-4. Details of SET Mode-specific Menu Option Group 1 . . . . .
Table 5-5. SET Mode-specific Menu Option Group 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 5-6. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 5-7. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 5-8. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 5-9. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 5-10. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
37
38
40
43
43
52
54
64
65
67
68
70
86
92
93
95
119
131
132
144
147
150
197
205
219
249
251
267
344
345
368
377
385
385
388
391
393
397
401
405
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
Table 5-11.
Table 5-12.
Table 5-13.
Table 5-14.
Table 5-15.
Table 5-16.
Table 5-17.
Table 5-18.
Table 5-19.
Table 5-20.
Table 5-21.
Table A-1.
Table A-2.
Table A-3.
Table A-4.
Table A-5.
Table A-6.
Table A-7.
Table B-1.
Table B-2.
Table B-3.
Table C-1.
Table C-2.
Table C-3.
Table C-4.
Table C-5.
Table C-6.
Table C-7.
Table C-8.
Table C-9.
Table C-10.
Table C-11.
Table C-12.
Table C-13.
Table C-14.
Table C-15.
Table D-1.
Table D-2.
Table D-3.
Table D-4.
Table D-5.
Table D-6.
Table D-7.
Table D-8.
Contents
EDIT Mode-specific Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Details of EDIT Mode-specific Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . .
FILE Mode-specific Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Details of FILE Mode-specific Menu Options . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifiable Characteristics of an Element . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modify Element Function Dedicated Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Results of the Conditional Color Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conditional Color Expression Operands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Results of the Conditional Text Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conditional Text Expression Operands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Valid Color and Integer Value Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . .
Privileges Required for Window Menu Items . . . . . . . . . . . .
Privileges Required for Summaries Menu Items . . . . . . . . .
Privileges Required for Utilities Menu Items . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Privileges Required for Print Menu Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Privileges Required for View Menu Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Privileges Required for Preferences Menu Items . . . . . . . . .
Privileges Required for Miscellaneous Controls . . . . . . . . .
Trendable Attributes for Real-Time Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trendable Attributes for Real-Time Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trendable Attributes for Real-Time Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unit Point Remote DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LCP Remote DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote DCD Point Remote DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console-Resident DCD Point Remote DDPs . . . . . . . . . . .
Console-derived Single-bit Discrete Remote DDPs . . . . . . .
Activity Point Remote DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Integrity Point Remote DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console EPCI Point Remote DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Accumulation Point Remote DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . .
HART-related Remote DDPs
.......................
HART-related Remote DDPs Available by Point Type
.
Local DDPs For All Point Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unit-Point-Specific Local DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activity-Point-Specific Local DDPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DDP Display Attribute Explanations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes
for Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Valid Combinations of PMAs and PPAs With Attributes
for Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attribute Explanations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Point Address (PTAD) Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Point Types (PTYP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Process Variable (PV) and Setpoint (SP) Display Formats
Point Status (STAT) Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
411
412
414
415
421
423
435
436
439
440
448
449
450
450
450
451
451
452
455
456
456
458
469
471
474
475
475
476
476
478
480
481
483
484
485
485
490
493
503
504
528
529
530
531
xix
xx
Contents
Table D-9.
Table D-10.
Table D-11.
Table D-12.
Table D-13.
Table D-14.
Table D-15.
Table D-16.
Table D-17.
Table D-18.
Table D-19.
Table D-20.
Table D-21.
Table E-1.
Table F-1.
Table G-1.
Table H-1.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(Revision B — September 1998)
Point Status (STAT) Conditions for Activity Points . . . . . . . .
Point Status (STAT) Conditions for Unit Points . . . . . . . . . . .
Point Status (STAT) Conditions for DCP Point Types . . . . .
MODE Attribute Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Percent Process Variable (%PV) and Percent Setpoint (%SP)
Attribute Explanations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Action Request Queued (OARQ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activity States (ASTA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fail Value (FVAL) Error Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FST and Unit Operation Failure Index Codes
........
Multivariable Point Data Types (MVPDTYPE) . . . . . . . . . . .
Multivariable Point Fail Index (MVPFLIDX) Types . . . . . . . .
Multivariable Point Status (MVPST) Accumulation Point
Data Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multivariable Point States (MVPSTATE) and Unit Point
States (USTA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Process Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Alarms in the Console-resident Database . . . . .
Integrity Point Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Report Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
532
532
533
533
534
535
535
536
538
541
542
543
543
545
549
552
557
Introduction F Section 1
1
Figure 1-Table 1
1
1
1 Introduction
This Configuration Manual describes how to configure the Operator
Workplace console software to provide custom graphics, alarm
management, batch control, real-time trending, control point operations,
event logging, and all the other functionality required for operators to
easily and effectively control your plant’s processes.
1.1
Intended Audience
This manual is intended for configuration engineers familiar with the
PROVOXr instrumentation system and the ENVOXr configuration
software.
1.2
Software Revision This Manual Supports
This manual supports revision P2.0 of Operator Workplace Software.
1.3
New in This Release
This release of Operator Workplace Console Software contains the
following enhancements:
J
J
J
J
J
Batch ID Stamping — Prints the Batch ID, Batch Iteration, and PPA
as part of console messages
Console Message Format — Provides the selection of 80--character
or 132--character message formats during software installation.
Alarm Direct Access Highlight — Highlights the first DSR element
in the display area for the point in the main instrument area
Auto Parameter Select Enhancement — Automatically moves the
input focus to the correct field for operator entry when the mode of a
point is changed in an instrument area window if Auto Parameter
Select is enabled. See subsection 4.4.2 for more information.
200 Trend Sets/1200 Trend Traces — Increases the number of
trend sets and trend traces to match the capability provided by
ENVOX. See subsections 3.9.4, 4.9.1, and 4.9.2 for more
information.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Section 1 F Introduction
2
J
1
J
SCL Copy File — Provides SCL commands that make it easy to
copy single files to and from the console
Controller P6.0 Support — Provides support for the following
Controller P6.0 changes:
j Setpoint velocity limiting (remote DDPs, point status, point status
summary, display attributes, trending, accumulation)
j Process variable failure (display attribute)
j First fail condition on Enhanced DCD points (indication on
faceplates, printed in DCD alarm messages)
J
J
J
J
1.4
Close and Auto--Reopen Session — Provides a way to close and
automatically reopen operator sessions (preserving the current
view/state) without requiring the operator to use SCL
Trend Cursor Value Color Matches Traces — Coordinates the
color of the trace cursor values with the trend traces in Trend Display
windows
Auto Updating Alarm Summary — Provides enabling of automatic
updating of the Alarm Summary window and setting the update
interval
Text Selection (Mouse and Keyboard) — Allows single/double
mouse clicks or a specific keyboard key to highlight text in text entry
fields
Structure of This Manual
This manual contains the following sections and appendixes:
Section 1 — Introduction: describes the contents of this manual, lists
related documents, and outlines typographic conventions used
throughout this document.
Section 2 — Product Overview: outlines software and hardware
necessary to successfully install and operate the Operator Workplace
console software.
Section 3 — Theory of Operation: explains the theory of Operator
Workplace console software configuration.
Section 4 — Creating the Console Configuration: explains the
ENVOX forms used to configure the Operator Workplace console
software, including defining devices, reports, alarms, procedures, points,
and trends.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Introduction F Section 1
3
Section 5 — Using the Graphics Display Editor: explains how to use
the ENVOX Graphic Display Editor software to build and edit graphic
displays, and to set parameters and modify attributes.
Appendix A — Functions Available by Privileges: shows the menu
selections and miscellaneous functions that the Operator Workplace
console software contains, along with the operator privilege required to
access the function or menu selection.
Appendix B — Trendable Attributes: provides tables of trendable
attributes for fast access in configuring trend traces.
Appendix C — Detail Display Parameters: contains attributes that can
be configured for value and text field elements in displays as well as
reports.
Appendix D — Display Attributes: lists mnemonics and explanations of
display attributes, and provides tables of display attributes for configuring
activity points and multivariable points for graphic displays.
Appendix E — Process Instructions: lists process instructions and
describes their functions.
Appendix F — Point Alarms: provides information and tables relating to
point alarms.
Appendix G — Integrity Point Messages: listing of messages that a
console-resident integrity point can provide regarding Operator
Workplace consoles and other PROVOX devices.
Appendix H — Report Keywords: lists report keywords and describes
their functions.
History: lists the document versions according to the revision level of
software they support.
A glossary and index are provided at the back of the manual.
1.5
Manual Conventions
This manual uses the following conventions:
J
J
Acronyms and Abbreviations — Terms are spelled out the first time
they appear in text. Thereafter, only the acronym or abbreviation is
used. In addition, the glossary defines the acronyms and
abbreviations.
Revision Control — The title page lists the printing date of this
manual. The versions of the product this manual covers are listed on
the title page.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
1
4
Section 1 F Introduction
J
1
J
References — References to other documents include the name
(and catalog number for Fisher-Rosemount Systemsr manuals).
Commands — Command lines shown in this manual include the
operating system prompt. The operating system prompts you see
can be different than shown. Enter commands at the system prompt
on your screen.
Most operating system commands require that you press the Return
or Enter key after entering the command. This manual does not
show these keys in command lines and assumes you use them when
necessary.
Some commands may be too long to fit on one line in this manual.
Enter such commands as a single line.
Table 1-1 describes the type styles this manual uses to distinguish
different kinds of information.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Introduction F Section 1
Table 1-1.
5
Type Style Conventions
When Text Appears
This Way ...
ENVOX Technical
Reference
BACKUP
It Is ...
The title of a manual.
An operating mode, alarm state, status, operand,
keyword, or key function (used instead of a specific
keyboard key).
Select File ® View
from...
Menu options you select (in the order given).
Press the Enter key.
A named keyboard key. The key name is shown as it
appears on the keyboard. An explanation of the key’s
acronym or function immediately follows the first
reference to the key, if required.
Press the F12 key.
Press the Ctrl V key
combination.
Username:
For key combinations, press and hold down the first
key while pressing the second key, then release both
keys.
Text in a source file or a system prompt or other text
that appears on a screen.
Database
$ Write SYS$OUTPUT
1.6
example3.txt
A command you enter at a system prompt or text you
enter in response to a program prompt. You must
enter commands for case-sensitive operating system
exactly as shown.
my_data
Text that you replace with your own text or values
when issuing commands. For example, you would
replace my_data with an appropriate value.
An object is...
A new term or a word being emphasized.
Do not set...
A word or term given special emphasis so that you do
not miss the idea being presented.
Warnings, Cautions and Notes
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes attract attention to essential or critical
information in this manual. The types of information included in each are
explained in the following:
Warning ... All warnings have this form and symbol. Do not disregard
warnings. They are installation, operation, or maintenance
procedures, practices, conditions, statements, and so forth,
which if not strictly observed, may result in personal injury or
loss of life.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
1
Section 1 F Introduction
6
Caution ... All cautions have this form and symbol. Do not disregard
cautions. They are installation, operation, or maintenance
procedures, practices, conditions, statements, and so forth,
which if not strictly observed, may result in damage to, or
destruction of, equipment or may cause a long term health
hazard.
1
Note ... Notes have this form and symbol. Notes contain installation,
operation, or maintenance procedures, practices, conditions,
statements, and so forth, that alert you to important information
which may make your task easier or increase your
understanding.
1.7
Related Documents
In addition to the Operator Workplace manuals listed in the History
section, the following documents may be useful as references during
configuration:
J
Using ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151)
J
Configuring the 20-Series (SR90) Controller Family (CE4.2:CL6633)
J
J
J
Installing and Using the Type SW2011 Data Historian Software
(UM4.3:SW2011)
Installing and Using the Type SW2021 Batch Data Manager (BDM)
(UM4.2:SW2021)
Using Type SPE201 Graphics Toolkit Software (UM5.1:SPE201)
Note ... The documents listed above are periodically revised. Before
using a manual, confirm that it includes information on the
revision level of the product you are interested in. Contact your
Fisher-Rosemount Systems representative or sales office for
copies of individual manuals.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Introduction F Section 1
1.8
7
Online Help
In addition to the OWP manual set, you can access information online for
using the OWP software. You can access this information in a number of
ways.
J
From the Help menu
J
From the Help button
J
By pressing the F1 key on the PC101 keyboard and Help key on the
LK401 keyboard
Note ... Not all dialog windows have help buttons. Help is accessible for
these windows through the Help menu, or through the F1 key
on the PC101 keyboard and Help key on the LK401 keyboard.
1.9
Electronic Documentation
This manual is also available in DOCVUEt Electronic Documentation
which is a CD-ROM set. The CDs contain current and past
Fisher-Rosemount Systems sales literature, manuals, and technical
service bulletins.
DOCVUE documentation runs on OpenVMS, UNIX, and Microsoft
Windows systems with the advantages of full-text searches, menus,
bookmarks, browsing, and point-and-click navigation. We recommend
that you call your Fisher-Rosemount Systems representative or sales
office and find out more about DOCVUE documentation.
1.10
Where to Find Answers for Product and Document
Questions
If you believe that this product is not performing as expected, or if you
have comments about this manual, please contact your
Fisher-Rosemount Systems representative or sales office. You may also
complete and send in the Reader Evaluation Form located in the front of
this manual.
We also appreciate your suggestions on ways to improve any page of
the manual. Please mark your suggestions on a copy of the page and
include it with the evaluation form. Thank you for providing this
information.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
1
8
Section 1 F Introduction
1
Blank page.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Product Overview F Section 2
9
Figure 2-Table 2
2
2 Product Overview
This section introduces you to the DC9440-Series Operator Workplace
Console Software. The topics covered in this section are:
J
J
2.1
The console software’s features and process control functions
The software and hardware requirements and options for
successfully installing, configuring, and operating the console
Software and Hardware Requirements and Options
The Operator Workplace console software is part of the PROVOXr
product line for manufacturing and production facilities that require
control rooms to have access to many different applications from a single
display terminal.
The console software is a client/server application, with the client
platform being the DC9450-Series Operator Workplace Console
Computers and the server being the DC9430-Series X Terminal Operator
Stations.
Figure 2-1 is a block diagram of the Operator Workplace architecture.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
2
Section 2 F Product Overview
10
Other
Networks
2
Remote
Host
Computer
Gateway
Logic
Module
Plant network
Router
1
Process network
Remote
X Terminal
(View access only.
Do not use for
process control.)
Network
Color Printer
Host Computer
for Color Printer
Network
Adaptor
Central Hub
X Terminal
Operator Stations
Logic
Module
AIU
Pointing
Device
Logic
Module
AIU
ENVOX
Host
Logic
Module
AIU
(Alarm Interface Units)
Process
Network
Hub
Highway Data
Link (HDL)
Logic
Module
Bridge
Dedicated Ethernet
Highway Data
Link (HDL)
Logger
WS-Series
Console Computer
CD Drive
PROVOXr Highway
1
How the router is configured is a function of the application. Note that bridging could be the default
operation on some routers. If so, bridging should be turned off.
Figure 2-1.
AIU
Typical Operator Workplace Architecture
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
VT
Terminal
Product Overview F Section 2
11
The Operator Workplace console software is installed onto a hard disk in
the console computer. When the console is booted, other system
software on the compact disk is copied over the Ethernet network to
each X Terminal operator station.
2.1.1
Hardware Requirements
The Operator Workplace product line includes the following hardware:
J
DC9450-Series Operator Workplace Console Computers
The console computers are the platforms for the DC9440-Series
Operator Workplace Console Software and the DC9430-Series X
Terminal Operator Stations.
J
DC9430-Series Operator Stations
The X Terminal operator stations host the primary process control
user interface. All X Terminal operator stations include:
j X Terminal logic module (single-head or dual-head)
j One or two 21-inch (533-mm) flat square tube (FST) color
monitors
j Full-stroke or membrane LK401 or PC101 keyboard (with unique
keys for North American, United Kingdom, French or German
languages)
j Three-button mouse
j Optional alarm interface unit (AIU), with multi-tone alarm horn and
contacts to drive external annunciation devices, such as lights
and horns
J
Type DC9487 Network Color Printer
This color printer is compatible with PostScript file formats and
provides color hard copies of the X Terminal operator stations.
J
Type DC6482 Console Logging Unit
This printer is used to log alarm messages, operator change
messages, state change messages, and reports.
J
DH6040-Series Process Network Management Products
j Type DH6041 and Type DH6043 Process Network Hubs —
provide electrical isolation between network devices and prevents
a cable problem on any single device from bringing down all
devices on the network segment.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
2
12
Section 2 F Product Overview
j Type DH6042 Process Network Bridge — isolates the process
network segment from the plant local area network (LAN) or other
process Ethernet networks. This product is used to control overall
network loading to maintain communications responsiveness.
J
2
Type DH6032 Highway Data Link (HDL)
The HDL provides the interface between the PROVOX Data
Highway, the console computer, and the process network hub.
Note ... For complete descriptions and specifications of the Operator
Workplace hardware and console furniture, contact your
Fisher-Rosemount Systemsr representative or sales office for
the appropriate product bulletins.
2.1.2
Software Requirements
Configuration of the Operator Workplace console database requires that
you use the Type SW3151 ENVOXr Configuration Software, revision
P4.0 or later. Downloading of the console configurations also requires
use of the Type DH6215 Computer/Highway Interface Package (CHIP),
revision P4.0 or later.
Besides ENVOX and CHIP, the Operator Workplace console software is
compatible with other Fisher-Rosemount Systems software products,
such as:
J
Type SW2011 Data Historian
J
Type SW2021 Batch Data Manager
J
Type SW2033 Expert System Data Server
J
Type SW2035 Process Data Server (X-compatible)
J
Type SW9001 SIMVOX Simulation Software
J
Type DB5001 DOCVUEt Electronic Documentation
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Product Overview F Section 2
2.2
13
Console Software Features and Functions
The Operator Workplace console software provides the user interface for
plant operators to monitor and control the entire PROVOX
instrumentation system. The console software provides a graphical,
multi-windowed environment, based on the X Window System and
OSF/Motif standards. The X Window System provides an open network
capability you can use to give operators access to any information or
application on the plant network. Motif establishes a consistent look and
feel to the graphical user interface (GUI).
Note ... Refer to the Using DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console
Software (UM13.0:DC9440) manual for detailed information on:
2.2.1
J
How the user interface is organized
J
How to log into the console software
J
How to navigate through the software
J
How to use the software to control the plant processes
Windows
The Operator Workplace console software interface consists of windows
that permit operators to view and control the plant. The main user
interface can be defined in either of two layouts. The first layout consists
of a single window divided into eight regions (see Figure 2-2).
The regions are sized to balance easy access to critical controls with
maximized space for the graphic display. The default window size is 512
by 390 pixels, but displays can be as small as 50 by 50 pixels and as
large as 2000 by 2000 pixels. The display window includes scroll bars
the operator uses to move around displays that are larger than the
window. The display window also includes ZoomIn and ZoomOut
buttons to size the display within the window.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
2
14
Section 2 F Product Overview
Menu Bar
Display Expandable Text Field (ETF) and Control Area
Point ETF
2
Instrument
Area
Process Graphics
Display Area
Alarm Area
Figure 2-2.
OAR
Area
Display
Stack
Single Window Layout for the Software
The eight regions in the layout are:
J
J
J
J
J
J
Menu Bar — provides access to secondary and utility functions
including summaries, printing, window zooming, and logging in.
Display Control Area — contains controls to select a new display,
page forward and back in the display list, show the previous display,
change the scale of the display, and select a direct screen reference
(DSR).
Point ETF — entry area for a point, plant process area (PPA), or
plant management area (PMA) tag.
Process Graphics Display Area — contains graphics displays,
which are configured with ENVOXr software and downloaded to the
console computer. Also includes scroll bars for moving around
displays that are larger than the window. Displays can appear in up
to 64 colors.
Instrument Area — contains operating information and controls for
the selected point. Information includes operating parameters such
as setpoint, process variable, and output as well as mode buttons.
Alarm Area — provides a means to respond to alarms (equivalent to
the operator attention list in the PROVUEr console).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Product Overview F Section 2
J
J
15
Operator Action Request (OAR) Area — contains a scrolled list of
buttons to handle operator action requests. The buttons are ordered
by OAR priority.
Display Stack — a list of the previously viewed displays. The
operator can lock a list of commonly used displays from which to
operate. This reduces the need for the operator to select displays
from a directory containing hundreds of displays. This results in fast
and easy access to displays.
Figure 2-3 shows the single-window layout of the software as it appears
on a terminal screen. Note that the screen contains other windows
besides the software window. For example, the screen shown in
Figure 2-3 contains a clock window and an X Terminal window. One of
the features of the X Window environment of the software is the ability to
run application software that resides on remote hosts.
Operator Workplace:@8-07:2
Alarms
Ack
Ack Horn
A. Summ
19--Apr--1995
09:34:53
Oars
xclock
O. Summ
/users/smith> _
Figure 2-3.
Console Software Main Screen (Single Window)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
2
16
Section 2 F Product Overview
The alternate layout is a split-window arrangement (see Figure 2-4). The
eight regions are divided among three windows:
J
J
2
J
Alarm Window — Contains the alarm and OAR regions only.
Display Window — Contains the display region, display history
(stack), menu bar, Integrity, Ack, Ack Horn, A. Summ, and O.
Summ buttons, and the time and date fields.
Instrument Window — Contains the primary instrument control area.
On systems that have dual monitors, the operator can place the three
windows in any combination on either of the screens connected to the
same keyboard.
Alarm Area
Operator Workplace:@8-07:2
xclock
Alarms
Instrument Area
OARs
A. Summ
Ack
O. Summ
19--Apr--1995
09:35:54
Ack Horn
/users/smith> _
/users/smith> _
Figure 2-4.
Console Software Main Window (Split Window)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Product Overview F Section 2
2.2.2
17
Pop-up Windows
In addition to the displays and controls available in the main window, the
following items are available in pop-up windows from the window menu:
J
Additional graphics displays
J
Additional instrument areas
J
Trends
J
Faceplates
J
Detail display parameters (DDPs)
Other windows and dialog boxes (error dialogs, confirmation dialogs, and
so on) may appear during use of the software. Windows have controls
for changing the view modes, paging, and setting new contents. Dialog
boxes usually have an entry field or confirmation buttons.
2.2.3
Flexible Preferences
The Operator Workplace is designed to be used by a broad range of
users with varying degrees of experience, education, and training. The
level of flexibility and complexity can be defined with preferences that are
associated with the operator’s password. Some of the user preferences
include:
2.2.4
J
Number of concurrent windows
J
Single-window versus split-window mode
J
Alarm window policy
Display Stack
The display stack is a scrollable list that contains the most recently
accessed displays. The number of displays the stack contains is
determined during console configuration, but the operator can change
the number using a preferences menu selection.
2.2.5
Remote Applications Launch
The Operator Workplace makes it easy for operators to access other
applications on the plant network. Each application can be configured
into a launch list. When the operator selects the application from the
launch list, it automatically executes the network commands required to
bring up the application at the operator’s terminal. Therefore, the
operator is not required to know operating system commands and
network addresses to access these applications.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
2
18
Section 2 F Product Overview
2.2.6
Always Visible Alarm Indication
A windowing environment has the potential to hide crucial alarm
indicators behind other windows. The Operator Workplace provides the
ability to define its window policy such that the alarm window always has
top priority, and therefore cannot be covered by other windows.
2
2.2.7
Context-sensitive Help
Quick access to helpful information about specific buttons, menu
selections, and valid entries for fields is available at the user’s request.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
19
Figure 3-Table 3
3
3 Theory of Operation
This section provides the foundation for configuring a DC9450
WS-Series Operator Workplace Console Computer. The modular
PROVOXr system allows you to configure your plant’s process control
system using various strategies. The following subsections identify and
explain the components used to implement control systems:
3.1
J
Security considerations
J
Alarm management
J
Console redundancy
J
Console point processing
J
Operator action requests (OARs)
J
Remote applications
J
Printing hard-copies
J
Trending
J
Console point reporting
J
System clock
J
Console downloading
Security Considerations
In the Operator Workplace environment there are several aspects of
security:
J
J
Node security—The ability of a node (X Terminal or other X-compliant
workstation) to connect to the console computer
User security—The ability of a user to interact with an operator
session. User security can be divided into:
j Console security—The ability of a user to log in to a console
computer using Session Command Language (SCL)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
20
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
j Operator session security—The ability of a user to log in to an
operator session and change plant process values.
Of these, only the last—operator session security—is configured using
the ENVOX software. All of the others are set during console software
installation and managed from an SCL session.
If the software is not installed properly or nodes or users are not defined
properly, security can be compromised or users will not have the correct
access to the process. This section briefly discusses nodes and users.
For more information on installing the software and defining nodes and
users refer to the manual Installing and Managing DC9440-Series
Operator Workplace Console Software (PN7.2:DC9440).
3
3.1.1
User Types
There are two types of users to consider when designing your plant’s
security:
J
Operators who will be using X terminals dedicated as operator
stations.
These users will not need accounts defined in the console Session
Command Language (SCL) user database, will not need to log in to
the console computer to start an operator session, but will only log in
to an existing operator session with a user name and password that
you define during console configuration on the User Definitions form
(see subsection 4.10.1).
J
Other users (managers, for example) who may want to log in to an
operator session occasionally from an X terminal that is not a
dedicated operator station. These users may view the process.
In addition to console user names and passwords defined on the
User Definitions form, these users must have accounts defined in the
console computer’s SCL user database and the X terminals they use
must be in the console computer’s nodes database (or the $ANY
node must be defined appropriately) so they can start operator
sessions on the console computer.
Given these two types of users, system security of the Operator
Workplace console software depends on two things:
J
The nodes and user databases on the console computer defined and
maintained by the system administrator of the console software.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
21
The nodes database defines the terminals on which users can open
operator sessions and the access level of the terminals. The user
database defines the valid users and their access level to the
console computer. These databases are maintained using the
session command language (SCL) and are not affected by
configuration.
J
Privileges you assign to users of the software during user definition
of the console configuration.
The privileges assigned to users during configuration determine what
process control functions they can access.
Note ... A user who has or knows a login for an SCL session on a
console computer—and the user name and password for an
operator session— can potentially control the process from
anywhere in the world, depending on the interface between the
console computer and the rest of the world.
3.1.2
X Terminals and Access
You can define X Terminals on the process network to be dedicated
operator stations that display a login dialog when the console software
starts.
Note ... X Terminals used for process control must be connected directly
to the process network. These are the only X Terminals that
should have WRITE access.
Other users can establish sessions from other X Terminals when
required. If your installation has X Terminals that are not on the process
network, define them to have VIEW access in the node database. X
Terminals that are on the plant network can perform unpredictably due to
the influence of other nodes on the plant network.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
22
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.1.3
Plant Management Areas (PMAs) and Privilege Management
Plant management areas (PMAs) provide more than just data
management (see subsection 3.2.6). Through user definitions, they also
provide access management for plant personnel. Plant engineers,
operators, maintenance personnel, and other employees need to access
not only information in the control system but also control attributes.
When configuring a PMA, you establish a privilege-management scheme
whereby different people in different areas of the plant have access to
specific types and levels of information in the console database.
Operator access to that information depends on what privilege you
assign to them when you configure the User Definitions form (see
subsection 4.10.1).
3
3.1.4
Identifying Privileges
To control the plant, the operator must have a user name and password
to log on to an operator session at the console. This user name has
specific privileges associated with it. Through the Console Device
Definition form (see subsection 4.4.1), you set console-specific
parameter values. In the User Definitions form (see subsection 4.10.1),
you configure individual user-access passwords. This identifies each
user’s privilege level. When you configure the User Access List form (see
subsection 4.4.4), you specify which users have access to which
consoles.
For example, operators and maintenance personnel receive training to
operate and maintain specific areas of the plant, so they have more
responsibility for these sections than they do for others. Limiting
privileges for areas of the plant for which they have not received training
reduces the opportunity for errors.
Besides identifying the areas of the plant for which certain operators
have responsibility, you must identify what type of access they need in
order to perform their jobs. Depending on their responsibilities, they may
only need to view information, or they may need to operate or tune
equipment in that area. You also need to consider if each individual
should be able to change PMA modes and plant process area (PPA)
alarm states and critical levels on all or part of the database. (See
subsection 3.2.6.1 for information on PMA modes and subsection 3.2.7
for information on PPAs.)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.1.5
23
Assigning Base Privilege
When you assign permissions, you begin by assigning each console
user name a base privilege. Base privileges provide users with their
minimum access level. Because a PMA is a set of equipment that
logically operates together, you configure an operator’s authority as a list
of PMAs plus additional privileges the operator needs in order to operate
and tune those PMAs.
During configuration, you set each operator’s base privilege level when
you complete the User Definitions form (see subsection 4.10.1). In this
list, you establish the privilege level the operator has for all areas of the
console configuration for all PMAs or for selected PMAs. The privileges
are:
J
J
J
J
J
TUNE — permits access to the console’s Help and Utilities
functionality as well as the ability to view displays, change operating
data, execute utility procedures, and change tuning data.
OPERATE — permits limited access to the console’s Help and
Utilities functionality as well as the ability to view displays, change
operating data, and execute utility procedures. The operator is not
permitted to change any tuning data.
ACCESS — permits limited access to the console’s Help and Utilities
functionality as well as the ability to view displays. The operator is not
permitted to change any operating or tuning data.
DOWNLOAD — permits you to download the console and to have
limited access to the console’s Utilities functionality. The operator is
not permitted access to displays or operating and tuning data.
LOCK — permits limited access to the console’s Help and Utilities
functions only. The operator is not permitted access to displays or
operating and tuning data.
You can also provide any operator with PMA or PPA change privilege, or
both, as a base privilege:
J
PPA Change — permits changes to PPA states and critical levels.
J
PMA Change — permits changes to PMA modes.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
24
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Note ... Although PPA and PMA change privileges can be given at the
base level, you must realize that doing so would allow an
operator to change any PMA mode and any PPA alarm state
and critical level, or a combination of them all.
Fisher-Rosemount Systemsr recommends that you carefully
consider these privileges before giving system-wide
permissions.
3
Tables in Appendix A show the menu selections and miscellaneous
functions that the Operator Workplace console software contains, along
with the operator privilege required to access the function or menu
selection.
After you assign base privileges, they are automatically assigned every
time that user logs on to an operator station by password.
3.1.6
Extending Privileges
You can extend an operator’s authority in various parts of the plant over
and above base privilege level on a PMA-by-PMA basis. To extend a
particular operator’s privileges, you independently grant higher operating
privileges for those PMAs for which the operator is responsible. Also, you
may decide to grant PMA and PPA mode change privileges, or both, on
a PMA-by-PMA basis, even though you might not have granted them as
a base privilege.
If you set a particular user’s base privilege level to TUNE, you do not
need to tailor access levels on different PMAs again, because TUNE
gives the ability to access all other levels. However, you can still assign
PMA CHANGE and PPA CHANGE on a PMA basis.
For instance, the operator of a particular piece of equipment might have
permission to change its operating parameters. The operator’s base
privilege level may need to be nothing more than ACCESS, with a
privilege of OPERATE for this equipment’s PMA.
The maintenance technician for the same piece of equipment may only
need to set the PMA mode to MONITOR, so his base privilege would be
ACCESS, with PMA CHANGE privilege for just this equipment’s PMA.
The instrument technician may have permission to tune and operate the
equipment, if necessary. He would have TUNE privileges. This gives him
the ability to look at all the information available for that one PMA.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
25
The console verifies the operator’s privilege level whenever he or she
tries to access, control, or tune a point, PMA, or PPA in the console
database. If he or she initiates any other operator activity, the console
checks only the base privilege assigned to the user name.
Alarm acknowledgement requires the operator to have OPERATE or
TUNE privileges for the point being acknowledged. If he or she does not
have one or the other of those privileges, the point remains
unacknowledged.
3.1.7
Point Control Functionality
When an operator selects a point, the point controls appear in the
instrument area. If the operator does not have OPERATE or TUNE
privilege in a WRITE window, all controls will be insensitive.
3.2
Alarm Management
You can configure a system to have as many as 10,000 points reporting
to and generating alarms on a single console computer. However,
PROVOX system performance requirements do not permit all 10,000
points to report to the console and generate alarms all at the same time.
Even if you could configure such a system, it would be impossible for
operators to use.
To prevent operators from becoming overwhelmed by alarm information
and to enable them to respond to alarms effectively, you need to define
an alarm management strategy. An effective strategy allows the operator
to interact with the process control system efficiently. Through this
strategy, the control system provides alarm information prioritized in such
a way that:
J
J
J
J
3.2.1
Operators see only the alarms for which they are responsible or that
affect their area of responsibility
Related alarms are combined
Alarms are divided between several operator stations on a
process-grouping basis
Historical data of point activity can be kept to provide an audit trail
Alarm Considerations for Continuous Control Processes
In continuous processing operations, alarm management often
resembles a control-by-exception strategy. With this philosophy,
operators can expect normal operations to continue for relatively long
periods of time because the process is relatively stable. Alarms sound
only when the process deviates and develops abnormalities.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
26
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Even in continuous operations, though, there are several reasons alarms
are overused:
J
J
3
3.2.2
An increasing tendency among engineers to over-alarm
Processes run closer to the operating limits to increase efficiency,
which in turn increases the frequency of alarms
J
Overuse and misuse of deviation alarms
J
Overuse of the horn
Alarm Considerations for Batch Control Processes
In batch processing operations, alarms are the main means for
annunciating abnormal events within the process, even though operators
receive process updates regularly through step change messages,
operator action requests (OARs), and other display information.
3.2.3
Designing an Alarm Management Strategy
Use alarm management strategies to enhance the safety, quality, and
profitability of an operation. As you design your strategy, set it up so that
abnormalities are presented to operators in an understandable way that
allows immediate access to the display from which corrective action can
be taken.
Consider the following items when designing an alarm strategy:
J
Decide which users need to access each console.
J
Set user access privileges for plant areas for each console.
J
Define logical areas of the plant that contain related equipment.
J
J
Assign points to the logical plant areas and have them report to
specific consoles.
Determine the plant area operational states that an operator will
encounter. For example, a plant area may have four distinct
operational states: NORMAL, STARTUP, NO-HORN, and
NO-ALARMS. (The actual names you use are not important. For
example, you could use SHUTDOWN instead of NO-ALARMS,
SILENT or QUIET instead of NO-HORN, and ON-LINE instead of
NORMAL.)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
27
Assign an alarm priority to each alarm group you want to use for
each PPA operational state you want. Alarm priorities identify how a
point alarms’ importance varies with the PPA operational state. For
example, a tank low level alarm may be critical during normal
operation, but may be unimportant during shutdown. After you
identify all such alarms, you can create a matrix of operational states
and alarm groups similar to that shown in Figure 3-1. The cells of the
matrix are alarm priorities.
PPA Operational State
NORMAL
STARTUP
NO-HORN
NO-ALARMS
1
HIGH-CRIT
LOW-CRIT
IMPORTANT
IGNORE
2
LOW-CRIT
IMPORTANT
LOW-PRIORITY
IGNORE
3
IMPORTANT
LOW-PRIORITY
IGNORE
IGNORE
OVER-UNDER
OVER-UNDER
OVER-UNDER
IGNORE
Alarm Group
4
Figure 3-1.
Alarm Priority Versus PPA Operational State and Alarm
Group
J
Define alarm behaviors (combinations of priorities and
characteristics) that meet your requirements. For example, you may
want an alarm that is critical during normal operation to behave
differently (different colors, horn tones, and so on) than an alarm that
is critical during shutdown. Assign an alarm behavior to each
combination of operational state and alarm group.
Other alarm behaviors to consider are:
j Does alarm acknowledgment at one console acknowledge the
alarm in all related consoles?
j Does horn acknowledgement at one console acknowledge the
horn at all related consoles?
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
28
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
J
Finally, use a hierarchical alarm structure so that operators are first
alerted to an area of the plant that has a problem and can then use
the console to determine the point that is in alarm to identify and
correct the problem.
The Operator Workplace software provides the tools and features you
need to implement such a strategy.
3
3.2.4
Alarm Management Tools and Features
The Operator Workplace software and the ENVOXr configuration
software provide tools and features to help you manage alarms so the
operator receives only relevant alarm information. The tools are the
configurable items in a PROVOX configuration. The features are built-in
Operator Workplace capabilities.
3.2.4.1
Tools
The Operator Workplace software alarm strategy tools are the items you
configure using the ENVOX configuration forms. You use a number of
forms to implement your design strategy. Some elements of the alarm
strategy require more than one form to complete. Some forms combine
more than one element. The following subsections discuss the forms
necessary to implement the strategy outlined in subsection 3.2.3.
3.2.4.1.1
Define User Access to Consoles
Complete a User Access List form (see subsection 4.4.4) for each
console to define the users who have access to that console. See
subsection 3.1 for a discussion of user access.
3.2.4.1.2
Define User Access Privileges for Each Console
Complete a User Definitions form (see subsection 4.10.1) for each user.
On the form you define the user’s base privileges. For each PMA you
assign to a user, you set the user’s privilege for that PMA, whether the
user can change the PMA mode, and whether the user can change the
operational state and critical level of PPAs in the PMA. See subsection
3.1 for a discussion of user privileges.
Note that there does not have to be a one to one correspondence
between user definitions and operators. It is possible to have more than
one person access the software as the same user.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.2.4.1.3
29
Define Logical Plant Areas
In a PROVOX system there are two levels of plant areas: PPAs (plant
process areas) and PMAs (plant management areas). Use PPAs to
group plant equipment that performs a specific process operation. For
example, you might have a boiler PPA, a cooling tower PPA, and so on.
Use PMAs to associate PPAs into logical groups. For example, if you
have an evaporator, a dissolving tank, and a boiler that are in a plant
chemical recovery area, group them in a PMA.
Defining these logical plant areas requires several forms. Complete a
PPA Definition form (see subsection 4.6.4) for every PPA you want to
create. On the form define the alarm display for the PPA, if desired, and
set the initial critical level of the PPA. The PPA Definition form also
contains the fields you use to create PPA operational states and alarm
groups that define alarm strategy.
Complete a PMA List form (see subsection 4.6.1) for each console to
identify the PMAs that belong to the console and set the initial PMA
mode.
Complete a PMA Definition form (see subsection 4.6.3) to assign PPAs
to each PMA. You can also specify a PMA alarm display if you desire.
Assign PPAs to each PMA.
3.2.4.1.4
Assign Points to Plant Process Areas
When you configure a point use the Target Data form (see subsection
4.8.8) to assign the point to a PPA that belongs to one of the PMAs in
the console you are targeting the point to. On this form you also assign
an alarm group to each of the alarms. The group you assign to an alarm
and the operational state of the PPA determine the alarm characteristics
at the console.
3.2.4.1.5
Define Operational States
Operational states are defined for each PPA on the PPA Definition form
(see subsection 4.6.4).
3.2.4.1.6
Define Alarm Characteristics
Defining alarm characteristics requires several forms. Complete one
Horn Tone Definition form (see subsection 4.6.2) to associate a horn
tone with each of the 12 levels of alarm priority. When a point is in alarm,
its priority level and its PPA’s critical level determine whether the point
tag or PPA tag appears in the alarm indicator at the console when the
point is in alarm.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
30
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Complete an Alarm Priority Definition form (see subsection 4.6.5) for
every set of characteristics you require. For each alarm priority you
define acknowledgement actions, message actions, and foreground and
background colors for the active, inactive, and unacked condition. You
also assign the priority for each condition.
Alarm priority definitions are global database items and have tags, but
the tags do not appear at the console and are used only in the ENVOX
software when you assign an alarm priority on the PPA Definition form.
3
Complete an Option Definition form (see subsection 4.4.2) for every
console. On the form, for consoles in a PPA tracking ring, you specify
whether acknowledging an alarm at the console acknowledges the alarm
at every console in the ring. In addition, you specify if acknowledging the
horn at the console acknowledges the horn at other consoles on the ring.
3.2.4.1.7
Assign Alarm Priorities to Alarm Groups
Use the PPA Definition form (see subsection 4.6.4) to assign an alarm
priority to each alarm group for every PPA operational state. Note that
alarm group 0 (zero) is preset and cannot be changed. Alarms assigned
to alarm group 0 are suppressed and do not appear on the display, the
alarm summary, or alarm list—the operator never sees them.
3.2.4.1.8
Define a Hierarchical Alarm Structure
You have created a hierarchical alarm structure by using PMAs and
PPAs to organize your plant areas into logical groups.
3.2.4.2
Features
The Operator Workplace includes built-in features that operators use to
respond to and correct alarms:
J
J
J
J
Alarm Display — You can configure displays and configure them to
appear when the operator selects a point, PPA, or PMA.
Alarm and Operator Attention List (OAL) Area — An area on the
console’s main window that displays the highest priority alarms at all
times.
Instrument Area — An area on the X terminal operator station’s
main window containing operating information and controls for a
selected point or PPA or PMA.
Faceplates — Pre-configured display elements you assign to points
to provide detailed status and alarm information to the operator
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
31
Station Independent Alarming — The PROVOX system sends
alarms to a console based on the privileges of the currently logged in
users. Alarms outside of the operator’s scope of responsibility are not
sent to the console. Each station receives alarms independent of the
other stations
The following subsections explain in more detail the concepts introduced
in this subsection.
3.2.5
Plant Organization
Organizing your configuration into PMAs and PPAs allows you to reflect
plant equipment layout and personnel assignments in your PROVOX
control system.
3.2.5.1
Identifying Plant Areas by Function
Most plants have areas of related equipment that each perform a
particular task, such as:
J
J
J
The feedstock area where raw materials are brought for short-term
storage
The utilities area where power and steam are produced for the whole
plant
The reactor area where chemical reactions occur in several large
reactor vessels
Although each of these areas is a fairly complex part of the overall plant
operation, each area can operate independently of other areas. In other
words, if one of these areas is down for repair, cleaning, or inspection,
the other areas do not have to be down, or at least not down for the
same reason.
The Operator Workplace software allows you to organize your plant
functionally into PMAs. Figure 3-2 shows an example of PMAs in a
typical paper mill.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
32
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Chemical
Recovery Area
PMA 1
Digester/Washer
Area
PMA 3
Power Plant
PMA 2
Local
Control
Room
3
Paper Machine
Area
PMA 5
Bleach Plant
PMA 4
Figure 3-2.
Central
Control
Room
Future
Process
Area
Plant Organization With PMAs
Many PMAs have equipment whose functions are shared between plant
areas, such as boilers, reactors, or duplicate equipment. In these cases,
you might want to identify these areas or pieces of equipment separately,
so they can report to all the applicable PMAs.
The Operator Workplace software lets you organize each PMA into
several PPAs. Additionally, each PPA can be a part of more than one
PMA. For example, you might want to make a shared boiler a PPA so it
can supply power and steam to several PMAs. Figure 3-3 shows how
PMA 1 and PMA 2 from Figure 3-2 might receive information from the
same PPA (Boiler 1 in this example).
PMA 1
Chemical Recovery
Area
PPA 1
Evaporator
Figure 3-3.
PPA 2
Dissolving
Tank
PMA 2
Power Plant
PPA 3
Boiler 1
PPA 4
Cooling Tower
Plant Organization With PMAs and PPAs
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
PPA 5
Boiler 2
Theory of Operation F Section 3
33
Note ... PPAs are subsets of PMAs (a PMA contains one or more PPAs)
The PPAs in a PMA share a common organizational strategy.
A PMA cannot be part of another PMA, and a PPA cannot be
part of another PPA.
A PPA can be included in several PMAs, but a point can be
assigned to only one PPA.
The next relationship in the process function hierarchy are points, which
get their report and alarm information from the PPA to which you assign
them.
Figure 3-4 illustrates the breakdown of a part of the plant in Figure 3-2
into PPAs, PMAs, and points.
PMA 1
Chemical
Recovery Area
PMA 3
Digester/Washer
Area
PMA 2
Power Plant
PPA 1
Evaporator
PPA 2
Dissolving
Tank
PPA 3
Boiler 1
PPA 4
Cooling
Tower
PPA 5
Boiler 2
PPA 6
Digester
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
PPA 7
Washer
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Point
Figure 3-4.
X00026:DC6460--0
Plant Organization With PMAs, PPAs, and Points
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
34
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
When you identify plant areas as PMA and PPA groupings of equipment,
keep in mind that the Operator Workplace console supports:
3
J
126 PMAs
J
501 PPAs
J
500, 2,000, or 10,000 points
You must assign a unique identification number to every PPA you
configure. The number remains part of that grouping as long as the PPA
exists. For example, once you configure a PPA, the system identifies it
by its assigned number, no matter how many PMAs it may be part of.
PMAs do not have assigned numbers.
3.2.5.2
Assigning Plant Areas to Personnel
Just as the various pieces of equipment in your plant are organized into
areas, the people responsible for the safe and effective operation of the
plant are trained for particular areas. Not all people have the
responsibility or the training to operate all areas of the plant.
To reduce information overload on the console operator, the amount of
information the control system provides must closely match that
operator’s skill level, plant area assignments, and training level. Limiting
an operator’s ability to make changes to the control system in only
assigned areas also protects the process.
An individual may be responsible for one PMA, such as a specific batch
process, or for many PPAs, such as boilers in the power plant. Or the
individual may be responsible for similar PPAs in a variety of PMAs, such
as all of one type of unit operation within several batch processes.
In other words, how you organize your personnel assignments is as
important as how you organize your plant equipment areas when it
comes to how you structure your PMAs and PPAs.
Dividing your plant into these multiple PPAs and PMAs is also an
important feature in establishing alarm priorities and access permissions.
For example, when a large plant generates a large number of alarms in a
short time, an operator must act on the most important alarms first. By
using PMAs and PPAs, you can organize the alarms so the operator only
sees those alarms for which he or she has responsibility. The alarms
appear to the operator in the order of their importance.
The following subsections describe one way to use PMAs and PPAs in
detail.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.2.6
35
Plant Management Areas (PMAs)
Use PMAs to restrict what plant control data the console updates with
the latest values, as well as what the operator can change in the plant
process. PMAs have three purposes:
J
Attaching PPAs (and their assigned points) to one or all consoles
J
Directing alarms to pertinent operators
J
Defining reporting modes
Consider an example plant that has two PMAs: the boiler area and the
production area. Each PMA is assigned to a different console. All points
are sent to both consoles. In the plant control room the plant PMA mode
is ON and the boiler PMA mode is OFF. The reverse is true in the boiler
control room. By setting the PMAs’ reporting mode, each console
receives only the information required to run the PMA assigned to it.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
36
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
If a console in one of the areas is not available, an operator can open a
window from the X Terminal Operator Station on the other console, turn
the PMA for his area ON, and run his part of the plant.
Figure 3-5 shows the organization of several typical PMAs.
PMA 1
PMA 2
PMA 3
PMA 4
Batch
Area
Continuous
Area
Feedstock
Utilities
3
Reactor
1
Distillation
1
PPA 1
PPA 3
Reactor
2
Distillation
2
PPA 5
PPA 6
Feedtank
2
PPA 8
Boiler
2
PPA 9
PPA 7
Amine
Rec.
PPA 2
Feedtank
3
Feedtank
1
PPA 4
Boiler
1
PPA 10
Figure 3-5.
X00027:DC6460--0
Typical PMA Arrangement
A starting point for identifying PMAs is to identify what parts of the plant
will be down, out of service, or operating at the same time. For example,
the operator may be controlling the feedstock area where a railroad car
is not feeding properly, as well as one batch process and one continuous
process.
The operator wants to turn the feedstock area’s points off because he or
she does not want to see alarms or control data until the feed problem is
fixed. However, in shutting off the points in the feedstock area, the
operator does not want to shut off every other point reporting to that
console for any number of reasons. For example:
J
J
The operator needs to see frequent point reports to monitor a batch
reaction (PMA 1) that may be in the middle of a unit operation.
The PMA may be in a continuous operations area (PMA 2) where the
operator needs to monitor points closely to assure operational
stability.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
37
In such situations, the operator may find it easier to control those areas
by setting the PMA operating mode (see subsection 3.2.6.1). The
operator might want the feedstock area OFF, the batch area in BACKUP
mode, the utilities in a MONITOR mode, and the continuous area in an
ON mode. You can configure the system to react this way, thus
segmenting the data coming in and providing different operational views
into the database.
Because the database is segmented into data management areas (that
is, PMAs) that reflect the plant’s organization, the console can update
specific segments of plant operations without inundating the operator
with information from the entire console database.
In addition to operators, each PMA may have several types of users who
need to access certain points within the PMA. For example, a shift
supervisor wants an overall view of the process and its alarms, and an
engineer wants access to the information about any point in the plant.
Through the console’s ability to manage both the system database and
individual permission levels within a PMA, each user can access the type
of information he or she needs to perform specific functions within the
plant.
3.2.6.1
PMA Modes
Each PMA has four possible modes. As shown in Table 3-1, PMA modes
determine the reporting and alarm modes for the PMA’s associated
points. For example, when the PMA mode is BACKUP, the point’s
reporting mode is CHANGE-OF-STATE and the point’s alarm mode is
whatever you configured for each point in the PMA. (See subsection
3.2.6.2.1 for more information on CHANGE-OF-STATE.)
Table 3-1.
Effect of PMA Modes on Reporting and Alarm Modes
If the PMA Mode
is ...
Then the Reporting
Mode is ...
And the Alarm Mode
is ...
ON
As configured in target form
As configured in target form
BACKUP
CHANGE-OF-STATE
As configured in target form
MONITOR
CHANGE-OF-STATE
MUTE
OFF
BACKGROUND
MUTE and OFF
Note ... The PMA mode must be ON for batch activity and unit points.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
38
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Each PMA mode determines:
J
J
3
J
How the system reports the operating information in the console
database
Whether the console displays points with their configured reporting
mode or overrides their configured reporting modes with
CHANGE-OF-STATE or BACKGROUND reporting
Whether the console handles alarms with their configured
characteristics or with muted characteristics
When the operator has the appropriate privilege level, he or she can
change the configured PMA modes during console operation. See
subsection 3.1.3 for more information on PMAs and privilege
management.
For more information on what the PMA modes determine, see the
discussion on alarm priority strategy in subsection 3.2.7.4.
Each mode has a particular audience, and each audience wants to see
specific types of reporting and alarms. Table 3-2 shows the modes that
different users might want for the same PMA.
Table 3-2.
Typical PMA User and Preferred Mode
This Type of User ...
Might Want This PMA Mode ...
Operator with responsibility for this area
ON
Operator monitoring this area
MONITOR
Operator covering another operator
BACKUP
No operator in area, but area configured
for later coverage by another operator
OFF
Supervisor
MONITOR
Engineer
OFF
To accommodate the needs of the different users, you can designate
different PMA modes for each console computer. When several
operators share a console, you want to select a PMA mode that allows
the operator who needs the most up-to-date information to get it.
3.2.6.2
Advanced Data Reporting (ADR)
When a console computer can have as many as 10,000 points, you must
have a way of controlling the load on the console and the rate that
information is presented to the operator. In addition, you need to be able
to configure a console so that it can dynamically back up another
console or another operator. ADR allows you to do this.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
39
ADR features both:
J
Selected point reporting rate
J
Dynamic point reporting rate
You determine a configured reporting rate using the Target Data form
(see subsection 4.8.8). Use the configured reporting rate, along with the
initial PMA mode to set the selected point reporting rate. The console
automatically determines the dynamic reporting rate, which changes
based on the changing requirements of the console operator.
3.2.6.2.1
Selected Reporting Rate
You set the selected reporting rate for each console point by selecting
the initial PMA mode and by configuring the point’s:
J
Reporting mode
J
Deadzone
J
Sample interval
By setting an appropriate reporting rate, you can configure 10,000 points
in a single console by selectively configuring the modes of the PMAs.
For example, you might configure some PMAs in ON, so that the points
report to the console as specified by you in the Target Data form. (This is
the configured reporting mode for each point.) You might configure other
PMAs to be in MONITOR, BACKUP, or OFF modes to reduce the
console CPU loading. Subsection 3.10.1 contains more information on
CPU loading.
By appropriately configuring the reporting mode for points and
downloading the same points to two consoles you can make it possible
for an operator on one console to back up another operator on the
second console.
For example, on the first console you might configure all the PMAs of the
second operator as OFF so these points do not report to the first
operator’s console. When the first operator needs to back up the second
operator, the first operator — or whoever has PMA change privilege —
can set the second console’s PMAs to BACKUP mode. By placing them
in BACKUP mode, the first operator can monitor the additional points for
alarms and discrete changes without overloading his or her own console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
40
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Table 3-3 summarizes how a point’s reporting mode is affected by
changes in the PMA mode.
Table 3-3.
PMA Mode Reporting Characteristics
If the PMA Mode is ...
The Reporting Mode is ...
ON
As configured (PERIODIC,
PERIODIC-BY-EXCEPTION, or
CHANGE-OF-STATE)
BACKUP
CHANGE-OF-STATE
MONITOR
CHANGE-OF-STATE
OFF
BACKGROUND
3
The following paragraphs expand on the table and list exceptions.
When PMA mode is ON
The point target configuration determines the selected reporting rate.
You can configure the point to have one of these reporting modes:
J
J
J
PERIODIC — The system updates point data continuously at a rate
you select when you configure the point’s target configuration (the
point-target sample intervals).
PERIODIC-BY-EXCEPTION — The system updates the point data
whenever the data value either changes by a preset amount or
changes alarm status, but not more often than the point-target
sample interval.
CHANGE-OF-STATE — The system updates point data whenever a
point changes alarm status or a discrete point changes state, or the
point’s operating mode (MAN, AUTO, CMPTR, RSP, DDC, SUPV)
changes.
When PMA mode is BACKUP or MONITOR
The reporting mode is CHANGE-OF-STATE. This way, only discrete
changes to the point cause it to report to the console.
When PMA mode is OFF
The reporting mode is BACKGROUND, which does not regularly
communicate point data. BACKGROUND mode simply acts as a
placeholder for eventual communications. This means that no activity
occurs in the console database until the operator actually looks at the
point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
41
There are a few exceptions to the characteristics listed in Table 3-3:
J
J
J
J
J
3.2.6.2.2
When a PMA is in MONITOR or BACKUP mode, the PMA’s unit
points and points with extended alarms report to the console in their
configured reporting mode.
Points that have extended alarms should not be configured to be
CHANGE-OF-STATE reporting, but can be in the BACKGROUND
mode.
If a PPA (which also includes all points that are part of that PPA) is in
multiple PMAs, the fastest PMA reporting mode determines the
speed at which the points in that PPA report to the console.
Points hosted in this console (activity, DCD, EPCI, and accumulation)
always report to the console in their configured reporting mode.
When a PMA is in OFF mode, points in the PMA that are keeping a
record of alarms for an activity point (common alarms) report to the
console in CHANGE-OF-STATE reporting mode.
Initial PMA Configured Modes and Selected Reporting Rates
The configured initial PMA mode can override the configured point
reporting mode for each point in the PMA. The configured PMA mode is
valid immediately upon a download of the PMA.
The initial reporting mode establishes communications between the
console and the device that generates the point information. This device
programming occurs after a download to the console or during device
re-synchronizing. Table 3-3 shows the point reporting modes valid for
each PMA mode.
If you change a PMA configuration and then do a partial download to the
console, all points in that PMA are programmed to the new initial PMA
mode. If a point in the changed PMA is also in one or more other PMAs,
then the point’s device is programmed to report in the fastest rate of all
the PMAs to which that point reports.
Note ... You must ensure that the point’s configured mode is fast
enough to support the console-resident points (such as activity,
discrete control device, accumulation, and extended pulse
count input [EPCI] points).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
42
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.2.6.2.3
Dynamic Reporting Rate
The dynamic reporting rate feature of the ADR gives the operator
up-to-date information on console displays for points that normally report
infrequently.
3
For example, suppose a point in the console is in a PMA that is in the
OFF mode. This means that the point is in the BACKGROUND reporting
mode and, thus, is not reporting current data to the console. While this
point is in the BACKGROUND mode, the information in the console
concerning the point is not updated and therefore is, or could be, stale.
Such data appears on the screen initially in magenta. (The console
determines this color combination; you cannot configure it.)
When the operator requests a display, the dynamic reporting rate
immediately begins to adjust the reporting rate for each point on the
display. This provides the operator with current and frequently updated
data. Once the operator replaces this display with something else, the
dynamic reporting rate waits for a short time and then sets the reporting
rate back to the original mode (in the example, BACKGROUND mode),
reducing the load on the console’s CPU and on the highway. More
information on CPU loading may be found in subsection 3.10.1.
There are a variety of events that can trigger dynamic reporting rate
changes. They are:
J
Requesting a display that has points that are reporting slower than
the three-second EXCEPTION mode (Note: PERIODIC reporting, all
sample intervals, is considered to be faster than three-second
EXCEPTION reporting.)
J
Selecting a point on a display
J
Requesting a report
J
Displaying a point in an instrument area
The dynamic reporting rate changes triggered by these events fall into
two categories: the 3 second and the 1 second exception overrides. This
means that the console receives updates to the data every 3 seconds or
1 second, depending on what triggered the override. Table 3-4 details
the circumstances under which the overrides occur. The console does
not adjust the dynamic reporting rate so that data arrives at the console
less frequently because of the events previously described.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
Table 3-4.
3.2.6.3
43
Exception Overrides for Dynamic Reporting Rates
The System Updates
Data Every ...
If This Event Occurs ...
3 seconds
A point’s DSR is on a display.
1 second
A point is selected on a display, or is displayed in the
instrument area.
3
Modes and Alarms
The PMA mode determines whether alarms are displayed with their
configured characteristics or with muted characteristics. When alarms
are active for points within a PMA that is in ON or BACKUP mode, the
alarms are characterized as you configured them in the Alarm Priority
Definition form (see subsection 4.6.5 and Table 3-5). The alarm template
provides the alarm characteristics for each alarm including priority,
colors, horn and message triggers, and auto-acknowledgement.
Table 3-5 lists the alarm modes for the four PMA modes.
When the alarm mode is MUTE (that is, the PMA is in MONITOR mode),
the console automatically acknowledges the alarms in that PMA,
disables the horn, and stops the logging unit from logging those alarms.
The alarms are still displayed in the alarm area. Their priority and color
characteristics remain as defined by the associated PPA’s alarm group
definition.
When the alarming mode is OFF (that is, the PMA is in OFF mode),
alarms in that PMA are not displayed in the alarm area or on the PMA
faceplate. These alarms are not reported except when you select a
display containing the point in alarm, or the point is trended. When the
display appears, the alarm or alarms are muted and are not displayed in
the alarm area. The alarms only appear in a point’s alarm block.
Table 3-5.
PMA Mode Alarm Characteristics
This PMA Mode ...
Has This Alarm Mode ...
ON
CONFIGURED
BACKUP
CONFIGURED
MONITOR
MUTE
OFF
OFF
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
44
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.2.6.4
PMA Instrument Area
The instrument area is an overview window through which the operator
can look at the operational state of a particular plant area (see
Figure 3-6). Each PMA instrument area provides the operator with
access to the highest-priority alarms within that PMA, providing the PMA
is in ON, BACKUP, or MONITOR mode.
3
The names of as many as 32 PPAs with the highest-priority alarms in
that PMA appear in the PPA selection list. The PPAs are sorted by alarm
priority and time of arrival. If the PMA mode is OFF, the PPA selection list
is blank, indicating that the console’s alarm information is not complete.
The PPA selection list is also blank if there are no alarms.
SYSTEM PMA
PMA1
Description
Tag
PMA MODE:
ON
Current PMA mode
PMA mode menu
option button
ON
PPAS:
PPA08
PPA06
PPA15
Figure 3-6.
PPA selection list
Typical PMA Instrument Area
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
45
The instrument area provides the operator with the ability to manipulate
information within the PMA. You cannot configure the contents of the
instrument area; it displays a fixed set of information appropriate for the
specified PMA.
Once an operator selects a PMA, it appears in the instrument area. The
operator can change the PMA’s mode (if the operator has this privilege)
or select a PPA from among those listed in the selection list. Refer to the
manual Using the DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(UM13.0:DC9440) for more information on using the PMA instrument
area.
3.2.6.5
PPA Selection List
The PPA selection list includes as many as 32 PPAs that contain the
highest-priority alarms within the PMA. The PPA selection list does not
use the PPA critical level to indicate priority. (For an explanation of
critical levels, see subsection 3.2.7.5.)
The operator can pick the desired PPA from the selection list by clicking
on it with the pointing device’s primary button. When the operator selects
a PPA, the PPA controls appear in the instrument area and the alarm
display for that PPA appears in the graphics display area. If you did not
configure an alarm display, the console goes to the highest-priority
point’s alarm display, if configured.
The alarm priority information that the console needs to properly display
the PPA selection list in a PMA instrument area is not available in the
PMA OFF mode. If the PMA is in the OFF mode, the operator still sees
the point alarm block information through the point faceplates, because
point faceplates have the information available to them through the ADR
updates to the database.
3.2.6.6
Structure of PMA Configuration Forms
You use two forms to configure PMAs: the PMA List form (subsection
4.6.1) and the PMA Definition form (subsection 4.6.3. Use the PMA List
form to create a list of PMAs for a particular console. Use the PMA
Definition form to assign PPAs to PMAs.
Once you complete the basic database-management configuration, you
can customize various PMA access levels through the User Definitions
form (subsection 4.10.1) and the User Access List form (subsection
4.4.4). One function of the User Access List form is to add specific
privileges for specific people on an individual PMA basis (see
Appendix A).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
46
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.2.7
Plant Process Areas (PPAs)
Each PMA contains associated PPAs. A PPA is a collection of points that
supports common process operations and have related alarm
requirements (see Figure 3-7). The PPA alarm requirements, or strategy,
are determined by the alarm states, groups, and characteristics that the
collective points share.
For example, in Figure 3-7, the flow, level, and unit point of a tank all
share the same alarm characteristics. Because they do, they can
logically be grouped together into a PPA to simplify your plant alarm
strategy.
3
PPA
LIC-201A
TK-102
FIC-109
X00028:DC6460--0
Figure 3-7.
3.2.7.1
Typical Plant Processing Area
PPA Operational States
You must configure each PPA to have at least one operational state.
PPAs can have as many as 5 operational states. When you configure
operation states assign them names that express the purpose of the
states. Example names are NORMAL, STARTUP, NO-HORN, and
NO-ALARMS.
Unless a console is included in PPA tracking, the console puts a PPA in
the first operation state you list in the configuration after the initial
download and after any total download. After partial downloads the
console returns each PPA to the operational state it was in before the
download. An operator with PPA change privilege can change to other
states during plant operation.
3.2.7.2
PPA Instrument Area
One way the console notifies operators of point alarms is through the
PPA instrument area. When a PPA is loaded in an instrument area, the
point names with the highest-priority alarms within the PPA are displayed
in a selection list (see Figure 3-8).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
47
The operator can select one of these alarms for action by clicking on that
point with the pointing device’s primary button. Clicking on the point tag
causes the instrument area to load the selected point’s controls and load
the main display area with the configured alarm display for the point. If
no alarm display is configured for the point the main display does not
change.
PPA-DESCRIP
PPA03
PPA #:
3
Description
Tag
PPA number
OP STATE:
Current operational state
NORMAL
Operational state
pushbutton menu
NORMAL
CRITICAL LEVEL
6
6
Current critical level
Critical level entry field
POINTS:
CHIPAI
CHIP--A199
CHIP--A198
CHIP--A197
CHIP--A196
CHIP--A195
Figure 3-8.
Point selection list
Typical PPA Instrument Area
Each PPA instrument area contains a selection list that contains as many
as 32 points with the highest-priority alarms within that PPA.
When the operator selects a point name from the selection list, the
controls for that point appear in the instrument area, and the alarm
display, if configured, appears in the graphics display area.
The operator with PPA change privilege can affect what is shown in the
list by changing the operational state and critical level.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
48
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The hierarchy you can design using PPAs and PMAs allows the operator
to see the relationship between higher- and lower-priority alarms. The
console alarm area showing one point exhibiting a high-priority alarm
also shows a series of lower-priority point alarms that may be
contributing to the higher-priority alarm. From this hierarchical list, the
operator may be able to see that if he or she corrects the lesser
problems, the high-priority alarm clears itself.
3
The alarm priority information that the console needs to properly display
the selection list in a PPA instrument area is not available in the OFF
mode. If the PPA is in the OFF mode, the operator still sees the point’s
alarm information through the point faceplates, because point faceplates
have the information available to them through ADR updates to the
console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
49
Figure 3-9 shows a typical display an operator might see while
controlling a process.
3
Figure 3-9.
Typical Main Window
Figure 3-10 is a flow chart that shows a typical response to a PPA alarm.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
50
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Click on PMA in
display area or use
selection list
The PMA controls
appear in the
instrument area.
Is
an alarm display
configured for
the PMA?
Yes
No
3
The PMA’s alarm
display replaces
the current display
For the PPA with the
highest priority alarm ...
Click on PPA in PMA
instrument area (or
display area)
The PPA controls
appear in the
instrument area.
Is
an alarm display
configured for
the PPA?
Yes
No
The PPA’s alarm
display replaces
the current display
For the point with the
highest priority alarm ...
Click on point alarm
in PPA instrument
area (or display area)
The point controls
appear in the
instrument area.
Is
an alarm display
configured for
the point?
Yes
No
The point’s alarm
display replaces
the current display
Operate point as
necessary
Figure 3-10.
Typical Response to an Alarm Shown in a PMA
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.2.7.3
51
Alarm Groups
Define alarm groups by assigning alarm priorities to alarm groups. Define
alarm groups to reflect the amount of risk the alarms indicate. For
example, how much damage might the problem that triggers an alarm
cause to the product, plant equipment, plant personnel, environment,
and people outside of the plant boundaries? Use a common strategy
consistently to notify the console operator of alarms indicating the same
types of risk. This allows the operator to quickly recognize the extent of
the problem.
Define at least one alarm group for each operational state. You can
define as many as seven alarm groups (1 through 7) for each operational
state. Alarm group 0 (zero) is predefined in the software. Alarms
assigned to alarm group 0 are suppressed and the operator never sees
them. For more information on PPA operational states, see subsection
3.2.7.6 on PPA tracking.
When targeting points to the console assign each point alarm (up to four
standard and four optional on some points) to an alarm group. However,
not all alarms are used by every point. Every operational state within a
PPA must contain the same number of alarm groups.
When defining the number of alarm groups, consider how an alarm
should be treated in each of the operational states. For example, you
may find that an IMPORTANT alarm in the Normal state is
LOW-PRIORITY in the Startup state.
Create a matrix or table of operational states and alarm groups and fill in
the cells of the table with words that indicate the importance of the
alarms. Table 3-6 shows one possible set of operational states and alarm
groups for an example PPA. The intersections of operational state and
alarm group have been filled in with words such as IMPORTANT and
LOW-PRIORITY.
For example, suppose Alarm Group 4 is used by analog input alarms A
and D only. The trip points, deadband, and alarm words are set in the
controller. Alarms A and D apply to analog points only. By assigning
these alarms unique colors, you help the operator to differentiate
between process alarms and over/under range alarms. You can assign
process alarms to groups 1, 2, or 3 in a manner that fits your alarm
strategy.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
52
Table 3-6.
Alarm Groups and Operational States for an Example PPA
Operational States(1)
3
Alarm Group(2)
Normal
Startup
No-Horn
No-Alarms
Alarm Group 1
HIGH-CRIT
LOW-CRIT
IMPORTANT
IGNORE
Alarm Group 2
LOW-CRIT
IMPORTANT
LOW-PRIORITY
IGNORE
Alarm Group 3
IMPORTANT
LOW-PRIORITY
IGNORE
IGNORE
Alarm Group 4
OVER-UNDER
OVER-UNDER
OVER-UNDER
IGNORE
1.
You can configure as many as five operational states for each alarm group.
2.
You can configure as many as seven alarm groups for each operational state. All operational states must have the same
number of alarm groups.
Note:
See Table 3-7 for a typical active alarm priority strategy based on the example alarm groups and states listed in this
table.
The names that you give the intersections of alarm group and
operational state (HIGH-CRIT, IMPORTANT, and so on) become the tag
names for alarm priority definitions. The tags do not appear at the
console.
The PPA alarm group to which an alarm is assigned determines the
characteristics for each alarm in a point. Valid alarm groups are zero
through seven, where zero deactivates the alarm in the console
database so the operator does not see it.
Alarm state changes in the source device still cause unsolicited data to
be sent to the console. Even though the operator does not see the alarm
on the display, the highway and console still have loading because of the
unsolicited packet processing.
Caution ... Think through alarm group assignments carefully before
completing them. If you assign an alarm to alarm group zero in
the point target definition, the operator never sees it.
When an alarm in this group is processed, the console
acknowledges and clears it in the point alarm record. The
console does not generate any alarm instance or history
records, which means that the alarm is never logged to the
printer and no record of the alarm’s occurrence is available.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
53
Even though alarms assigned to alarm group zero are not visible, they
can generate highway traffic. For example, consider a controller point
assigned to alarm group zero continually going in and out of alarm
because the alarm trip point is set too low (or high). Every time the point
goes in or out of alarm it sends an unsolicited message to the console. If
a process has a large number of points that have similar alarm trip point
settings, considerable highway traffic can result even if the alarms are in
group zero.
3.2.7.4
PPA Alarm Priorities and Characteristics
Because an operator can only deal with a limited number of alarms at
one time, giving an alarm a priority allows the operator to deal with the
highest-priority alarms first. These alarms appear first on the selection
lists and alarm buttons, simplifying the operator’s task of identifying the
most important PMA and PPA faceplates.
You create sets of alarm characteristics using the Alarm Priority
Definition form and then assign the tag representing a set to each
combination of alarm group and operational state using the PPA
Definition form. You can create any number of alarm priority definitions.
You can use each alarm priority definition as many times as you like in
any number of PPAs.
Table 3-7 shows example definitions for alarm priorities HIGH-CRIT,
LOW-CRIT, IMPORTANT, OVER-UNDER, LOW-PRIORITY, and
IGNORE. These are typical tags for alarm priorities, but you can call the
priorities anything you wish.
You assign these alarm priority tags to combinations of PPA operational
state and alarm group on the PPA Definition form. Operators do not see
these tags on the console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
54
Table 3-7.
Example Alarm Priority Definitions
Priority Definition Tag
HIGH-CRIT
LOW-CRIT
IMPORTANT
OVERUNDER
Active Unack
12
11
10
9
1
1
Active Ack
5
4
3
2
1
1
Inactive Unack
8
7
1
1
1
1
Auto Ack(1)
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
Horn Enable
Alarm Priority
3
LOWIGNORE
PRIORITY
Alarm
Management
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
Enable(2)
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Log Alarm Active
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
Log Alarm Ack
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
Log Alarm Deact
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
Ack(3)
N
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Yellow Blink/
Red
White Blink/
Red
White Blink/
Dim Red
Red Blink/
Yellow
Black/
Black
Black/
Black
Yellow/
Red
White/
Red
White/
Dim Red
Red/
Yellow
White/
Black
Black/
Black
Yellow Blink/
Grey
White Blink/
Red
Black/
Black
Red Blink/
Grey
Black/
Black
Black/
Black
Display
Inact Auto
Colors
Active
Unacknowledged
Active
Acknowledged
Inactive
Unacknowledged
Note:
1.
If you set Auto Ack to YES, active unacked colors are not important because alarms are acknowledged when they
become inactive.
2.
If you set Display Enable to NO, alarms never appear on the console. The other fields have no effect. To prevent side
effects, if you never want alarms to appear configure the Alarm Management options as shown in the IGNORE column.
3.
If you set Inact Auto Ack to YES, inactive unacked colors are not important because alarms are acknowledged when they
become inactive.
Alarms that indicate risks to people and the environment might have
higher priorities than those that reduce the value of the product, or even
those that cause a part of the product to be ruined.
Adjust the sensitivity of an alarm by:
J
J
J
Raising or lowering the alarm’s priority for each alarm state (ACTIVE
UNACK, ACK ACTIVE, and INACTIVE UNACK)
Indicating if the system should automatically acknowledge active and
inactive alarms, or both, for the operator
Indicating whether the system should print the alarm activation and
deactivation printer messages, use blinking colors on the display, or
sound the horn
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
55
Assigning higher numerical priorities, sounding the horn, using blinking
color combinations, and printing messages are all ways of distinguishing
urgent or high-priority alarms.
As the alarm passes through the various states, or conditions, it changes
its characteristics, which include color, priority, and message status. You
may be more familiar with the term bias than with priority; however, bias
and priority have the same effect on your alarming strategy.
The software identifies alarms by priority. You select the colors and
priorities, as well as whether the console prints alarm messages, when
you configure the different alarm priority definitions. Priorities are less
complex to configure and manage than were biases.
Alarm states dictate alarm priorities and characteristics. Figure 3-11
shows the alarm states and common paths between states. For
instance, if a new alarm comes into the console, the console receives it
as an active, unacknowledged alarm.
In this state, the console assigns it a priority and a color. Then,
depending on its criticality, the alarm may cause an alarm activation
message to be printed and the horn to sound, or both. These
assignments occur as you defined them to when you organized your
alarm priorities, assigned them to PPA alarm groups and operational
states, and then assigned points’ alarms to these groups when targeting
the points.
Active
Unacked
Acknowledged
Active
Acked
Inactive
New Alarm
Acknowledged
Inactive
Inactive
Acked
Figure 3-11.
Inactive
Unacked
X00057:DC6460--0
Alarm States
If the operator acknowledges this same new alarm while it is still active, it
takes a different path to the inactive, acknowledged state. First, it
becomes an active, acknowledged alarm, with a new priority and color.
Once it becomes inactive, an alarm deactivation message might be
printed, and the alarm then passes to the inactive, acknowledged state
where it ceases to appear on console displays.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
56
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
If this alarm becomes inactive before the operator acknowledges it, the
console assigns a new priority and color to it unless it was configured as
Inactive Auto Acknowledged. It may still cause an alarm deactivation
message to be printed because it has become deactivated. Once the
operator acknowledges the alarm, it again changes status to inactive,
acknowledged. At this point, the alarm ceases to appear on console
displays.
The priorities you assign on the Alarm Priorities form are the bases for
alarm hierarchies. You assign characteristics to named alarm priorities
definition, then assign a named definition to each PPAs operational state
and alarm group combination (see subsection 3.2.7.3 and Table 3-6).
3
When two or more alarms have equal priorities, the system compares
the alarm time stamps to resolve the tie. The system resolves the tie
based on whether you elected to see the newest or oldest alarm first
within the same priority when you defined your console device.
3.2.7.5
PPA Critical Level
The alarm buttons list alarms in priority order from left to right. The
console compares the critical level of the PPA with the alarm priority to
determine if the point tag or PPA tag appears on an alarm button.
For example, for all alarms with a priority at or above the PPA critical
level, the individual point names appear on the alarm buttons. For all
alarms below the PPA critical level, the name of the PPA to which the
point belongs appears on the alarm button.
Showing only the PPA name in an alarm indicator is an additional way to
gain the operator’s attention quickly in critical situations. For example, if
three alarms in a PPA are above the critical level and seven in the same
PPA are below the critical level, the operator sees only the point tags for
the three critical alarms, followed by the PPA name on the buttons. The
operator does not see the names of the seven noncritical points because
the PPA name represents all seven.
The color in which the PPA name appears represents the color you
assigned to the highest-priority alarm of the points it encompasses. See
the manual Using the DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console
Software (UM13.0:DC9440) for more information on the alarm area.
You configure the initial PPA critical level during PPA definition. This
critical level can be changed by an operator who has PPA change
privilege on any PMA to which the PPA is assigned.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.2.7.6
57
PPA Tracking
PPA tracking is a system capability that you can enable or disable on a
console-by-console basis during your console device configuration. PPA
tracking occurs without any operator intervention. During tracking, the
system automatically forwards PPA changes to all other consoles that
are tracking PPAs.
The tracking mechanism recognizes PPAs only by number, and once you
create a PPA, you should never change its PPA number. You must
create a new PPA to establish a new tracking number.
PPA tracking is optional on a console basis and is configurable. Although
there is only one PPA tracking mechanism for each system, all local and
network highways of one PROVOX system may be linked together. If
there is a hardware failure, the system temporarily establishes additional
mechanisms, but as soon as the hardware failures are resolved, the
system re-establishes the PPA tracking mechanism.
PPA tracking always uses the most recent value of the operational state
and critical level as the PPA’s current values. When simultaneous
changes occur to a PPA, the tracking mechanism can determine the
result of the changes. The tracking mechanism determines the result
through a rule that requires the value of the PPA to be changed to the
lowest numeric critical level received, or to the first configured alarm
state.
All consoles in the ring track all of the PPA operational-state and
critical-level changes made. Each tracking console maintains the
operational state and critical level even for PPAs not used by points in
this console. PPAs not used by the console provide only partial
information to the console. Operators at this console cannot make
changes to the unused PPAs.
These PPA changes can occur from:
J
J
J
Any station (operator) participating in the tracking mechanism
An SR90 unit operations controller/integrated function controller
(UOC/IFC) function sequence table (FST) instruction
A CHIP P2.0 or later application
This tracking mechanism also performs consistency checks from console
to console, ensuring that PPA states and critical levels among
participating consoles agree at all times.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
58
3
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The first time you download a PPA to a console that participates in the
ring, the initial PPA tracking information, initial configured critical level,
and default initial operational state are set in that console, which the
system recognizes as the first console. When additional consoles are
downloaded for the first time, this first console then passes the download
information around and updates all of the consoles tracking PPA
information. You cannot further change those configured initial values by
changing the PPA configuration.
If you download a console with new initial values for an existing PPA, the
other consoles in the ring update the downloaded PPA’s critical level and
operational-state information to match the current information for this
PPA in other consoles, no matter what you put into the new download.
That is, on-line information overrides the newly configured initial
information. The only time the mechanism accepts new PPA configured
initial value information from a configuration is if the PPA is new or if all
consoles have been shut down completely.
Participating consoles can enter, depart permanently, or temporarily
leave the mechanism without interruption. PPA tracking does not directly
support redundancy. You must configure all consoles, including individual
members of a redundant pair, to be PPA TRACKING YES for them to be
members of the mechanism.
When a console initially enters the mechanism, it receives all current
PPA data from all tracking consoles in about eight minutes.
Caution ... Fisher-Rosemount Systems recommends that you configure the
PPA operational states from the most critical to the least critical.
PPA tracking uses operational state names in the order you
configure them. Altering the order of the operational state
names or removing a name results in inconsistent operational
state names among tracking consoles in the PPA tracking
mechanism.
On a download of any type, the console verifies that the operational
states of all PPAs resident within the downloaded console are within their
configured number of states and groups. For example, if the PPA is out
of its configured range, the console changes the PPAs’ operational
states and critical levels to their initial values.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
59
If PPA tracking receives a tracking change in which the operational state
or critical level is not within the configured range of operational states
and alarm groups, the console that receives the change remains at its
current operational state and critical level. The receiving console then
updates all consoles in the PPA tracking mechanism. This means that
the console originating the change is updated with the substituted PPA
parameters.
Although this does not guarantee that the consoles in the mechanism
have the same operational state name, it does mean that the console
logs as many as two messages on each tracking console’s printer,
indicating changes to the same PPA. To assure that all consoles are
operating with the same information, you need to do a partial download
to each console any time you change a PPA operational state name or
the number of operational states that a PPA has.
Caution ... Generally, you should not use downloads from different ENVOX
databases because this could result in different console device
lists (CDLs) in the same tracking ring. It could also result in
differently defined PPA objects that have the same PPA number
within the same ring.
If multiple databases must be used in a plant, they should not contain
any of the same console addresses, or they should contain all of the
same console addresses.
Remember, all consoles in a particular ENVOX database will be part of
the CDL (thus, in the same PPA tracking ring), regardless of whether or
not PPA tracking is enabled on the console.
Also, if the system clock on the ENVOX device is not correct, problems
with using the correct CDL could arise.
Note ... The successor and predecessor displayed on the integrity
display can easily be misinterpreted. These values are fluid and
will change from time to time. For example, if a console loses
power it drops out of the ring.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
60
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.2.7.7
Structure of PPA Configuration Forms
The PPA Definition form (subsection 4.6.4) allows you to define
individual PPAs, including the PPA’s critical level and the alarm priorities
you want that PPA to have in each operational state. Use the PMA and
PPA alarm display entries on the ENVOX forms to provide the console
operator with quick access to the displays with alarms. For more
information on alarms, refer to subsection 3.2.6.4.
3
3.2.8
Alarm Priority Definitions
The Operator Workplace console is set up to handle four alarms (bits),
with four optional alarms available on some points.
ALARM A = bit 3
ALARM B = bit 2
ALARM C = bit 1
ALARM D = bit 4
or
bit 1 = ALARM C
bit 2 = ALARM B
bit 3 = ALARM A
bit 4 = ALARM D
Note ... The four alarm bits are designated differently for controllers.
They are usually labeled as follows:
ALARM A = bit 2
ALARM B = bit 1
ALARM C = bit 0
ALARM D = bit 3
or
bit 0 = ALARM C
bit 1 = ALARM B
bit 2 = ALARM A
bit 3 = ALARM D
Not all points use all the bits. Some points use none of the bits because
they have no alarms. Some points, such as Analog Input (AI) and Loop,
can have four or more optional alarms configured, if desired.
Alarm handling information is available as local detail display parameters
(DDPs) in the console. The alarm trip points are available as remote
DDPs in the controller.
The AI point makes special use of the four alarms. Alarms B and C can
be configured for the AI point as either LOW or HIGH alarms. Alarms A
and D are set in the controller device definition and are applied to all AI
points in the controller. These alarms are used to indicate over- and
under-range conditions. The trip points are typically set at --10% and
110% so transmitter signals that are too high or too low are brought to
the operator’s attention. The configured words typically used are OVER
and UNDER, or XMITHI and XMITLO. Do not use words like PTFAIL
because the point did not fail, the signal it is processing went out of
normal processing range. The device could be out of calibration or a bad
transmitter could be causing the problem.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
61
An alarm group can be added to a PPA using an alarm priority with a
unique color assigned so the color of the out-of-range alarms presented
to the operator is distinct from the process alarm colors.
Alarms can be managed at four levels:
J
J
J
J
At the bit level by changing trip points of alarms A, B, C, and D, if
allowed
At the point level by tuning LOCAL ALARMS SUPPRESSED to YES
At the PPA level, the operator can change the PPA state, if privileges
allow and more than one state has been configured
At the PMA level, the operator can change the PMA state, if
privileges allow
You can use an FST to change the trip level of an individual alarm,
based on your need. For example, you might set a low-level alarm at
20% during normal operation, but it could be changed to --5% when the
pump is off. Also, an FST can change a PPA state from ON LINE to NO
ALARMS, for example, when the task is complete.
Operator action requests (OARs) are not alarms, but they can sound the
horn if configured to do so, and they have their own list separate from
the alarm list. OARs are only available on SR90 controllers. See
subsection 3.5 for more information on OARs.
3.2.9
Faceplates
In addition to the alarm area and instrument area, the Operator
Workplace software also presents alarm information to the operator
through faceplates.
There are three types of faceplate displays the operator can access.
They are:
J
Detail faceplates
J
Full-size faceplates
J
Custom faceplates
The full-size faceplate is generally presented in a group display with up
to 11 other faceplates, while the detail faceplate generally appears as a
single display.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
62
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Console-resident point faceplates provide status information about points
hosted in the console. In addition to providing point identification
information, a faceplate can give the operator the following information
about the point, depending upon the point type:
3
J
Current batch and procedure
J
Activity state
J
Point status
J
Point operating mode
J
Value of the output variable for the point
J
Additional information based on point type
Figure 3-12 shows a typical activity point faceplate.
Direct screen reference
(DSR)
Current iteration
Procedure name
Point set name
Current process
1
ACTIV - 1
BATCH SAM
CYCLE - 201
TS 13:07:17
CI 1
ADDINGR C
GD HALF GAL
PS
CP FILLING
CS UNITWAIT
HD
ABORT: EN
Current activity state:
NTLOADED,
IDLE, ACTIVE,
MODE
UNITWAIT,
ALARM:
AQUIREWT,
PRINTWT,
SCHEDULE,
HOLDING, DELAY,
PRINTING,
ABORT:
WARNING,
EN - Abort enabled
FAILED,
DI - Abort disabled
ABORTED,
RE - Abort requested
BATCHEND,
DOWNLOAD
Figure 3-12.
MAN
Point tag
Descriptor
Batch ID
Time started
Grade name
HOLD PROCESS:
BLANK - No hold requested
XXXXX - Hold at process
name “XXXXX”
NEXT - Hold at next legal
process
MODE: MAN, CMPTR
Alarms
Point status: UNAV, PUNVL,
DCFG?, CCFG?, ERR, ALMSUP,
OPCSUP, OPMSGS, MSGS,
STATS, PRCFG?, NTSYNC, CONT
Activity Point Faceplate
Remote point faceplates provide status information about points hosted
in another console or device. In addition to providing the same type of
information a console-resident point faceplate provides, a faceplate for a
remote point gives you the value of the output variable for the point,
depending on the point type.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
63
Figure 3-13 shows a remote point faceplate for a point that supports an
output variable field.
10
CONFIG1
CONFIG CTRL
100.000
3
Note:
1
The 10.000% shown for IVP
does not appear on consoles
with P5.2 or earlier software.
10.000%
50.000
10
CONFIG1
CONFIG CTRL
45.000
100.000
10.000%
1
%
RNG
50.000
45.000
%
RNG
0.000
MODE:MAN
ALARM:
ERR
1
% Output
Fields
0.000
RATIO
5.000
MODE:MAN
ALARM:
ERR
VO LO
X01026--A
Figure 3-13.
PID Point Detail and Full-size Faceplates
Table 3-8 shows the point types by name and number for which the
percent output field is valid.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
64
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Table 3-8.
Point Types That Support the Percent Output
Attribute
Point Type Number
Point Type Name
3
209
PID
210
PID with Ratio
211
PID with Bias
212
PID with Ratio and Bias
213
Manual Loader
214
Manual Loader with Ratio
215
Bias and Gain
216
Bias and Gain with Ratio
217
Signal Select
218
Signal Select with Ratio
You can configure a custom faceplate to contain as much information as
you need. Remember, however, that more information requires more
space to display it. For example, a full-size faceplate for a DO or DI point
takes a lot of space to present data for only one bit. Only 12 full-size
faceplates can be put on a display.
You can configure a half-size faceplate that contains all of the data
shown in the full-size faceplate. Each piece of information can be called
out, including the tag, description, PV or SP, alarm window, status
window, and mode, if applicable.
Other examples for custom faceplates are half-size layouts for loop or
analog points that do not use bar graphs. You might place these near a
valve, or wherever appropriate.
3.2.10
Station Independent Alarming
To further improve your effectiveness in managing alarm strategies, the
Operator Workplace console has an additional alarm management
feature known as station independent alarming. This feature ensures
that operators see only the alarms within their area of responsibility. The
feature also enables each station to have alarm annunciation
independent of other stations using the same console computer.
Station independent alarming limits alarm information so that the
operator:
J
J
Sees in the OAL list only alarms for points that are in PMAs for which
the operator has OPERATE or TUNE privilege
Sees in the alarm list only those points that are in PMAs for which the
operator has OPERATE or TUNE privilege
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
J
65
Sees in the OAR list only OARs generated by PMAs or PPAs for
which the operator has OPERATE or TUNE privilege
Hears the horn only for points that are in PMAs for which the
operator has OPERATE or TUNE privilege
The operator still sees all system alarms in the alarm area and
instrument area.
3.2.11
3
Global Alarm Acknowledgement
The global alarm acknowledgement feature allows a single operator to
acknowledge one or more alarms once for all consoles in a PPA tracking
ring. For global alarm acknowledgment to work, all points using it must
be in the highway access control list (HACL).
If global alarm acknowledgement was enabled during console
configuration, the operator can acknowledge system alarms by clicking
on the Ack button with the pointing device’s primary button. Doing this
causes a list of highway access numbers of points being acknowledged
to go into a data highway message. Only those points that are valid in
the tracking ring appear in this message, and the console acknowledges
only those the operator has privilege to operate.
The system acknowledges these alarms at the requesting operator
station first. The message then gets forwarded to the next station in
ascending address order, until all stations have been notified that the
alarms are acknowledged.
For the global alarm acknowledgement feature to operate, the Operator
Workplace console must be part of a PPA tracking ring (however, PPA
tracking does not have to be enabled). If the console is not in a PPA
tracking ring, it will neither send a GLOBAL ACK ALARM message nor
receive such a message from another console. Table 3-9 shows all of the
possibilities for global alarm acknowledgements.
Table 3-9.
Global Alarm Acknowledgment Possibilities
If the Following Conditions Exist ...
The console is part of a PPA tracking ring
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
GLOBAL ACK ALARM is enabled
Yes
No
Yes
No
And the Following Actions Are Taken ...
The Results Are ...
When an operator clicks on the Ack button at the local
station, the console acknowledges the alarms of the PPA
X
X
----
----
When an operator clicks on the Ack button at the local
station, the console sends an ACK ALARM message to the
next console in the ring
X
----
----
----
When an operator clicks on the Ack button at a remote
station, the console acknowledges the alarms of the PPA
----
----
X
----
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
66
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Table 3-9.
Global Alarm Acknowledgment Possibilities (Continued)
If the Following Conditions Exist ...
And the Following Actions Are Taken ...
When an operator clicks on the Ack button at a remote
station, the console sends an ACK ALARM message to the
next console in the ring
Note:
3
3.2.12
The Results Are ...
----
----
X
X
The “local” station is part of the console as configured above. The “remote” stations are
assumed to be in the PPA tracking ring and to have GLOBAL ACK ALARM enabled.
Local Horn Acknowledgement
With the local horn acknowledgement feature, a single operator can
acknowledge one horn once for all consoles on the same highway in a
PPA tracking ring.
If the feature was enabled during console configuration, the operator can
acknowledge system horns by clicking on the Ack Horn button with the
point device’s primary button. Doing this causes a highway message to
be formatted to include the station number the acknowledgement was
requested from.
The system acknowledges the horns at the requesting console first. The
message than gets forwarded to the next console in ascending address
order, until all consoles on the same highway have been notified that the
horns are acknowledged.
Note ... Take care in enabling the local area horn acknowledgement
feature. Remember that when you enable it, all horns will be
silenced, regardless of which alarms caused the horns to
sound.
For the local horn acknowledgment feature to operate, the Operator
Workplace console must be part of a PPA tracking ring (however, PPA
tracking does not have to be enabled). If the console is not in a PPA
tracking ring, it will neither send a LOCAL AREA HORN ACK message or
receive such a message from another console. Table 3-10 shows all of
the possibilities for local horn acknowledgements.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
67
Table 3-10. Local Horn Acknowledgement Possibilities
If the Following Conditions Exist ...
The console is part of a PPA tracking ring
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
LOCAL ACK HORNS is enabled
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
ACK ALL HORNS is enabled (Ack All Station Horns)
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
And the Following Actions Are Taken ...
The Results Are ...
When an operator clicks on the Ack Horn button, the console
silences the horn only at that station
X
----
X
----
X
----
When an operator clicks on the Ack Horn button, the console
silences horns at all of its stations
----
X
----
X
----
X
When an operator clicks on the Ack Horn button, the console
sends an ACK HORN message to the next console in the ring on
the same local area
X
X
----
----
----
----
When an ACK HORN message is received, the console forwards it
to the next console in the ring on the same local area
X
X
X
X
----
----
When an ACK HORN message is received, the console silences
all horns at its stations
----
X
----
----
----
----
3.2.13
Multi-tone Horn
A multi-tone horn feature provides a variety of horn sounds that depend
on the alarm priority setup.
You can associate six unique horn sounds with the 12 available alarm
priorities. The six unique horn tones are the combinations of two tone
pitches (low or high) and three rhythms (continuous, slow beep, fast
beep).
If another alarm comes in while the horn is sounding, the new alarm
triggers the horn only if it has a higher priority assigned than the alarm
that caused the horn to sound in the first place. If multiple alarms of
differing priorities are active simultaneously, only the highest priority
alarm is audible. If an OAR is configured to sound the horn when active,
it will sound the tone configured for the highest priority alarm.
Configuration by ENVOX form definition is required to enable the
multi-tone horn feature (see subsection 4.6.2 for details). There are no
predefined tone characteristics. You can configure each alarm priority
level with any one of six horn tone characteristics. Any changes to the
multi-tone horn configuration require a total download to take effect.
If you do not explicitly configure each alarm priority level, then a default
tone is assigned. The sound of the default tone is determined by DIP
switch settings on the alarm interface unit (AIU) at boot-up.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
68
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The operator cannot enable or disable the multi-tone horn feature, and
there are no screen or printer messages for enabling or disabling this
feature. However, an indication of the state of the multi-horn feature is
given by the second page of the Internal Integrity display. Under the
CONSOLE OPTIONS section, there is an entry for MULTI-TONE HORN.
Table 3-11 lists the three possible states reported for the multi-tone horn.
3
Table 3-11. Diagnostics for the Multi-Tone Horn Feature
If this state is
displayed...
CONFIG
NOT CONFIG
3.2.14
It means...
If the multi-tone horn is not
heard, do this...
The multi-tone horn feature is fully
functional
Check that AIU switch settings are
correct
Disabled because the multi-tone horn
feature was not downloaded
Configure the console with ENVOX P3.2
software or later
Alarm Acknowledgement Printer Messages
An enhancement to the global alarm acknowledgment function (see
subsection 3.2.11) allows alarm acknowledged messages to be printed
for all alarms acknowledged by operators.
You configure this feature using the Alarm Priority Definition form (see
subsection 4.6.5) and the Option Definition form (see subsection 4.4.2).
The operator acknowledges all active, previously unacknowledged
alarms, or only selected point’s alarms (depending upon configuration)
by clicking on the Ack button with the pointing device’s primary button.
You can display the enable status for the alarm acknowledged messages
on custom displays through the display attribute ALMAKMSG (see
Table D-4 for a detailed explanation).
Detail displays will show the enable status if the local console DDP
called ALM ACK MSG? is used. This DDP has occurrence number 0
through 7 signifying alarms C, B, A, and D, and extended alarms 1
through 4, respectively. For a complete list of DDPs, see Appendix C.
Alarm acknowledged messages are printed by the console and will be
formatted the same as the alarm activated and deactivated messages.
The only difference will be that the word ACKNOWLEDGED replaces the
words ACTIVATED or DEACTIVATED. See subsection 3.8 for
information on printing reports.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.3
69
Console Redundancy
You can pair Operator Workplace consoles in the same PROVOX area
so that the console-resident points are redundant. The active console
generates the data for these points. Examples of console-resident points
are activities, discrete control devices (DCDs), extended pulse count
inputs (EPCIs), single-bit discretes, maintenance points, integrity points,
and accumulations.
The configuration for the sourced points must be identical in paired
consoles. However, targeted points, displays, and other nonsource
information may be different between redundant consoles.
Because all devices obtaining information from the pair must know how
to locate the active device, console redundancy is not transparent to
other devices in the system. Only consoles, CHIP/VAX version P3.0 and
later and CHIP/IBM version P1.0 and later can transparently manage
information processing and switchovers from a redundant console pair.
3.3.1
Redundant Console Pairing
As you configure consoles, you can assign redundant pairs. In creating
the partnership, you also configure the primary and secondary
assignments and identify the highway addresses.
A primary console is the master in the redundant pair’s communications.
It becomes active following any disagreement about which console of the
pair should be active.
A secondary console is the slave in the redundant pair. It becomes the
standby console following any disagreement about which console should
be active. The standby console tracks changes made in the active
console, so that if the active console fails, the standby console accepts
and maintains control of the process (becomes the active console)
without a loss of information.
If you source a console-resident point in a simplex console and target it
to other consoles, an operator can operate the point from any of the
other consoles as long as the point’s source console is operating. If the
console that sources the point fails, though, the other consoles show
UNAVL (unavailable) for the point, and it is no longer available for
operation.
However, in redundant pairs, if the active console fails, the standby
console becomes active and resumes operation. By configuring the point
this way, it remains operable even if one of the consoles fails.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
70
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.3.2
Detecting Redundancy Package Faults
Paired consoles exchange redundancy information several times a
minute using a redundancy token. A console may detect a fault and take
the appropriate redundancy action based on the data passed in the
token. A variety of information may appear in the token data, each with
corresponding redundancy actions, as outlined in Table 3-12.
3
Table 3-12. Redundancy Faults and Corrective Actions
If This Event Occurs in the
Token-Sending Console ...
The Token-Receiving Console ...
Both consoles are active
Immediately goes standby
Auto switchover is disabled in the
packet
Disables auto switchover if it is enabled
Console-resident points are not
synchronized
Rejects manual switchover requests until
both consoles’ points are synchronized
Token time stamp differs from that of
the receiving console by more than 5
seconds
If in standby, updates the time to match the
time in the token packet; if active, it
changes the standby console’s time in the
next token exchange
Sequence number of the token is not
what the receiving console expected
Treats the incoming token as a
communications failure and sends no reply.
Retries token communication failures
before initiating redundancy state
determination
Console integrity is bad, which means
either:
· A redundancy token was not passed
and the console cannot talk to the
traffic director (NTD or LTD), or
· A software exception has occurred,
or
· One or both VCIA (DHI) cards have
failed
Marks its backup as unavailable. If
automatic switchover is enabled before the
error condition is detected and the error
occurs in the active console, automatic
switchover occurs. If automatic switchover
was not enabled, you cannot enable it at
this point, and manual switchovers are
allowed only if console-resident points are
in synchronization
Besides token data, paired consoles also use highway integrity requests
to determine redundancy information, such as:
J
J
Current console state — If the partner is in a state where it cannot
generate console-resident point information, the partner’s integrity is
set to BAD.
Redundant partner configuration status — If the integrity response
indicates that the partner console is not configured to be paired with
the requesting console, the partner’s communications status is set to
FAILED.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.3.3
71
Redundant Console Switching Procedures
Console redundancy allows the console to automatically switch from one
state to the other (ACTIVE to STANDBY or STANDBY to ACTIVE). It
also allows the operator to perform switchovers manually.
3.3.3.1
Automatic Switchover Enable (ASE)
If you use the automatic switchover enable (ASE) feature in a redundant
pair of consoles, switchover occurs when the system detects a critical
failure in the active console. The console operator can enable or disable
auto switchover through the utilities menu. After a total download, ASE is
always disabled.
Note ... A critical failure means one of the following has occurred:
G A redundancy token was not passed between
the consoles in the pair and the console cannot
communicate with the traffic director (NTD or
LTD), or
G A software exception in the console has
occurred, or
G One or both communication cards (primary or
secondary) have failed.
3.3.3.1.1
Conditions for Automatically Switching Over
Automatic switchover allows the console pair to pick the best console to
carry out the console-resident point’s functions. Console database
operations can cause switchovers to occur if AUTOMATIC
SWITCHOVER is enabled.
Activities could fail if they are not synchronized when an automatic
switchover occurs. If the console can still communicate to its partner
after a failure of one communication path, automatic switchover does not
occur. A single communication path failure, however, disables ASE in
order to prevent double faults from causing two active consoles.
Conditions that trigger automatic switchover within the console pair are:
J
If good communications exist between the consoles and both
consoles indicate they are active, redundancy makes the secondary
console go standby, regardless of the state of ASE. This prevents
having two consoles active at the same time, either one of which
could potentially communicate to the process.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
72
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Two consoles may become active at the same time only when
partner highway communications are completely broken and the
operator of the standby console manually switches that console to
active.
J
3
J
J
3.3.3.1.2
If the active console detects a critical failure and ASE is enabled, the
active console goes to the standby state. The other console goes to
the ACTIVE state automatically.
If ASE is enabled and if the partner console is in the standby state,
the active console stays in the ACTIVE state if no critical failures
have been detected.
A user must have ACCESS or higher privileges to enable ASE.
Rules for Allowing Automatic Switchover Enable
Four major rules control ASE. They are:
1. Both consoles in the pair must have no software exceptions for ASE
to stay enabled
2. The consoles must be able to exchange redundancy tokens for ASE
to stay enabled
3. A user must request to enable ASE before ASE can be enabled. A
user may also disable ASE from the keyboard
4. Both primary and secondary communication paths must be good
3.3.3.1.3
Conditions for Disabling Automatic Switchover
There are specific conditions governing when automatic switchover is
disabled. Disable ASE:
J
J
If the console is simplex
After a total download. The ENVOX system determines the console’s
initial state (ACTIVE or STANDBY) before ASE is disabled.
J
If either partner console has a software exception
J
If token communications are bad
J
If the primary or secondary communication paths are bad
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
J
3.3.3.2
73
If the console operator has requested that auto switchover be
disabled. The console operator must have OPERATE or higher
privileges to request that ASE be disabled.
If a redundancy switchover occurs. Any change in redundancy state
(ACTIVE to STANDBY or STANDBY to ACTIVE) disables ASE.
Either an automatic or a manual switchover can cause the state to
change.
Manual Switchover
Manual switchovers are initiated from the console’s utilities menu or from
the configuration device’s console diagnostics display. Manual
switchovers do not allow both consoles to be active simultaneously.
During a manual switchover, the active console goes standby before the
standby console goes active.
3.3.3.2.1
Conditions Preventing Manual Switchover
Console redundancy allows manual switchovers under almost all
conditions. However, the console does not accept manual switchover
requests if:
J
J
J
J
Any of the console-resident points are not synchronized and the
console can communicate to the partner. The console indicates that it
can communicate to its partner when either redundancy token
passing is working or it can successfully communicate integrity
requests to the partner. This situation can occur if a total download
changes console-resident point information (refer to
subsection 3.3.6).
The console is in the DISAGREED state. This state occurs when
partner console configuration has fundamental inconsistencies.
Inconsistencies are if both consoles are configured as primary or
secondary, or when the partner’s console does not agree that it is a
redundant partner.
A console state change occurred less than two minutes before the
manual switchover request. This prevents redundancy from making
multiple state changes (ACTIVE to STANDBY or STANDBY to
ACTIVE) before the active console’s resident points (going standby)
have updated the standby console (going active).
The backup console has gone from unavailable to available less than
two minutes before the manual switchover request. This prevents
redundancy from making a state change before the active console’s
console-resident points have updated the standby console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
74
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.3.3.2.2
Effects of Console-resident Points
Console redundancy rejects a manual switchover request while the
points are not synchronized and the console can communicate with its
partner. Disallowing manual switchovers prevents unnecessary failures
caused by switchovers while console-resident points are not
synchronized.
Normally, console-resident points are ready for manual switchover within
three minutes of establishing communications after download. When
batch consoles are forced to have incompatible configurations in order to
run activities, however, synchronization can be delayed indefinitely. You
can correct this situation with a partial download.
3
3.3.3.3
Changing Paired Consoles’ Relationships
If you want to change a redundant console’s pair assignment, you must
do a total download. You must change and download the affected
consoles so they become simplex (nonredundant) before you can create
new redundant pairs. Otherwise, you end up with a disagreement
caused by the newly paired consoles both behaving as the primary
console or both acting as the secondary console.
Note ... The downloads for a redundant pair of consoles must come
from the same configuration database. You cannot generate a
download for the primary console in a separate database from
the secondary console.
3.3.3.4
Downloading Devices After Changing Pairs
If you change the pairing assignments for a pair of consoles, you must
also do a partial download to all devices that obtain data from the
original pair. Items contained in this download generally consist of all
points that get their data from the pair and the redundant console pairing
table.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
75
Note ... If you send a partial download, with no redundancy changes, to
the consoles in a redundant pair and then select UPDATE
CONFIG for the active console, the two consoles will never
synchronize to allow a switchover. However, if you update the
standby console, the pair will re-synchronize, and switchover
occurs.
3.3.4
Redundant Pair Downloading
If you are doing a partial download configuration update on a standby
console, the configuration update has no affect on any console that
obtains data from the pair. If, however, you do a partial download on an
active console, either as part of a redundant pair or as a simplex
console, other devices that get point information from that console
display an unavailable status until the configuration update ends. Follow
the procedures for total and partial downloads outlined in the manuals
Using ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151) and Using
DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(UM13.0:DC9440).
3.3.5
Console-resident Points and Redundancy
When you configure console-resident points in redundant consoles, you
increase system availability by reducing the chance of control being lost.
If something happens to the active console in the pair, control of these
points is transferred to the standby console of the pair, and your plant
operation continues without interruption. For more information on
redundancy, refer to subsection 3.3.
Using the ENVOX configuration workstation, source the console-resident
points (activity, accumulation, DCD, EPCI, maintenance, and integrity) in
the primary console only, and then target them to both the primary and
secondary consoles. Then target any other points that provide
information to both consoles. On the ENVOX configuration workstation,
you must verify that both the primary and secondary consoles appear in
the target list for the point.
3.3.6
Console-resident Point Redundancy Synchronization
Each console-resident point is responsible for verifying the portion of the
console’s database required to perform its function. An example of
complex synchronization is the activity point, which requires that
synchronization information between the pair is communicated following
each statement in a procedure.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
76
Additionally, activities verify configurations after a database operation to
ensure that the changes are consistent in the pair. Another example of
synchronization is the DCD package, which maintains synchronization
with the partner using only DCD point information.
3.4
3
Console Point Processing
The console has seven types of local or console-resident points. These
console-resident points allow you to present information about your
process to the operator in many different ways. You must decide what
capabilities you need, what makes the most sense and what is important
for your application.
A console can report its console-resident points to a maximum of eight
devices. These devices remain the same no matter which points are
being reported.
The console-resident point types described in this section are:
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
Accumulation — Use this point to accrue a flow, rate, or time to
show a total value. It is particularly useful for continuous-process
applications. You must define shift tables to use this point.
Activity — Use this point to operate a batch procedure, including
starting, stopping, or monitoring a procedure. You must have batch
software to use this point.
Discrete Control Device (DCD) — Use this point to operate as
many as 16 discrete inputs and eight discrete outputs, which you
logically operate as a single entity.
Extended Pulse Count Input (EPCI) — Use this point to provide
accumulations and rate calculations at the console for a remote pulse
count input (PCI) point.
Maintenance — Use this point to send alarms about hardware
failures to the operator. It provides minimal information about the
failure. The maintenance point indicates bad device integrity or bad
communications integrity.
Integrity — Use this point to send alarms about hardware failures
and to provide the operator detailed information about the type of
device failure.
Console-derived Single-bit Discrete — Use this point to develop a
comprehensive alarm strategy.
The EPCI point, the integrity point, the accumulation point, and the logic
control point from the UOC are called multivariable points because they
have multiple configured variables (CVs). In some cases, they are
referred to as flex points.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.1
77
Discrete Control Device (DCD) Points
Operator Workplace console-resident discrete control device (DCD)
points are typically used to configure systems with controller devices
without multiple point capability, or with multiple controller schemes.
DCDs use discrete inputs to drive a set of other discrete outputs. A
normal DCD point does not perform any control based on its inputs, but
uses them for failure and alarm processing. It’s outputs are commonly
used to control things like motors, pumps, solenoid valves, and other
discrete devices in a plant through the DM6001 and DM6003
multiplexers and the DH6005 programmable controller interface unit
(PCIU).
DCDs control as many as eight discrete outputs and monitor as many as
16 inputs. During configuration, you define as many as 16 setpoints
(SPs) for each DCD. Each setpoint represents a different operational
state for a discrete device and determines a useful combination of binary
values (0’s and 1’s) for the discrete outputs. By selecting a single DCD
setpoint value, the operator can change multiple discrete-output values.
You can also use the attributes of these points in your displays and
reports. Define the template for a DCD on the DCD Template form
(see subsection 4.8.11).
3.4.1.1
Configuration Parameters
Scan period, transition time, mode, and alarm status are four parameters
that are particularly important in configuring DCDs.
Scan Period — DCD processing is periodic rather than event driven. A
scan period determines how often the console scans the discrete points
to detect failures. Valid scan periods are 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 30, and
60 seconds.
Transition Time — The configured transition time is the amount of time
within which the discrete points should communicate discrete transitions
back to the console under normal conditions. During the transition
period, the console does not classify erroneous setpoints and
indeterminate cases as failures. A period of transition starts each time a
DCD is actuated. The duration of that period is configured or tuned on
the console for each DCD. If at the end of the transition period, the DCD
has not achieved the desired setpoint, either of two things occurs:
J
J
The DCD fails.
The DCD makes a number of retries, specified by configuration or
tuning, or both, and if the DCD does not achieve the desired setpoint,
it fails.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
78
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
During the transition period, the scan period for the point decreases to
one second regardless of the configured scan period. Once the DCD
successfully achieves the intended setpoint, it continues to be monitored
by the DCD point at the configured scan period.
Mode — Each DCD has a mode that determines who can specify the
setpoint. The following describes who can change the setpoint in
different modes.
3
J
J
J
In the MANUAL mode (MAN), the operator can change the setpoint
of a DCD. The console causes the discrete points to change
according to the outputs specified for that setpoint.
In REMOTE SETPOINT mode (RSP), the console changes the
setpoint to match the state of the DCD’s discrete inputs, which have
been changed by a remote device (like a PCIU).
In COMPUTER mode (CMPTR), a user-written program can change
the setpoint by using CHIP.
Alarm Status — The console sets the alarm C status and the DCD
status to FAILED if the transition period or periods including the retries
have expired and the desired setpoint was not achieved.
3.4.1.2
Setpoint Inputs and Outputs
DCDs drive a set of discrete outputs to a discrete setpoint. They also
monitor the status of a set of discrete inputs to assure that they achieve
the discrete setpoint within a user-defined time interval.
The DCD point continually monitors the status of the discrete inputs to
assure that the setpoint you request matches the actual status of the
device. The DCD fails if the actual device status fails within the time
interval you configure for the setpoint (including retries).
The discrete inputs and outputs that are used on a DCD point must
come from 4-bit discrete points in a MUX, programmable controller
interface unit (PCIU), data concentrator unit (DCU), or CHIP. These
same discrete points must also be targeted in the console’s database.
3.4.1.3
Configuring DCDs
One console is designated as the primary (source) console. This is the
console where all DCD processing occurs. Other consoles that target
this point may change the setpoint, mode, and other parameter values of
the DCD. You can configure as many as eight consoles to interact with a
console-resident DCD. That is, you can target the DCD point to as many
as eight other consoles.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
79
DCDs are supported by redundancy. Redundant pairs of consoles must
reside on the same local PROVOX highway network. Consoles
monitoring the DCD point can be in a different local area.
3.4.1.3.1
Operating Discrete Points
An operator can directly manipulate the discrete outputs, which are part
of a DCD. Although manipulating discrete outputs may be desirable in
certain failure situations, it is recommended that you configure the
discrete output points as being OPERATOR CHANGE SUPPRESS =
YES. This means any console prohibits changing the discrete outputs
directly. OPERATOR CHANGE SUPPRESS is a tuning parameter that
the operator can tune if needed.
3.4.1.3.2
Detail Display Parameters (DDPs)
The DCD point has DDPs that appear on a detail display for remote
DDPs. They are as listed in Table C-5. For a complete list of DDPs, see
the other tables in Appendix C.
3.4.1.4
Enhanced DCD (EDCD) Point in SR90 Controller
DCD points residing in the 20-Series (SR90) controller were enhanced in
release P4.0. Enhanced DCDs (EDCDs) include all of the features and
capabilities of standard, normal DCD points, but EDCDs also have the
ability to evaluate conditions and change setpoints based on those
evaluations. With EDCDs, some of the functions which previously had to
be done in FSTs can now be done in the EDCD itself; functions like
interlocking, permissives, mode locking, and setpoint disabling. For
EDCD configuration information, refer to the manual Configuring the
20-Series (SR90) Controller Family (CE10.0:CL6633 Rev. A).
If you want the operator to have access to the EDCD points, you must
target them to the console.
In order for the Operator Workplace software to support the EDCD
points, the DCD faceplates were modified and DDPs were added, as
listed in Table C-4. For information on the EDCD faceplates, refer to the
manual Using DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(UM13.0:DC9440). For a complete list of DDPs, see the other tables in
Appendix C.
Each remote EDCD point has the same display attributes that other DCD
points have, but the following attributes are unique to the EDCD point:
J
DCD Input Values (DCDINVAL)
J
DCD Output Values (DCDOUTVL)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
80
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3
J
DCD Condition Configured (DCDCONCF)
J
DCD Condition Status (DCDCONST)
J
DCD Condition Last Failure (DCDFCOND)
J
DCD Ignore Condition (DCDIGNCN)
J
DCD Ignore All (DCDIGNAL)
J
Mode Locked (MODLCK)
J
DCD Enhanced (DCDENH)
J
DCD Condition Names (DCDCONNM)
J
DCD Setpoint Pending (DCDSPPEN)
J
DCD Setpoint Disabled (DCDSPDIS)
J
DCD Total Condition State (DCDTCNST)
J
DCD First Fail Condition (FRSTFAIL)
These added EDCD point display attributes, which you can use in your
displays and reports, are explained in Table D-4.
3.4.2
Extended Pulse Count Input (EPCI) Point
Before you configure a console-resident extended pulse count input
(EPCI) point, verify that this is the type of EPCI point that best suits your
application. The console EPCI point processes data from a pulse count
input (PCI) point. A PCI point receives data from a field device that
produces electrical pulses, such as a flow meter or contact closures.
Note ... If the device that hosts your PCI point supports EPCI point data
reporting, Fisher-Rosemount Systems strongly recommends
that you host the point in the device that receives the pulse
count instead of in the console.
Devices that support the EPCI point’s unsolicited data reporting are:
J
All 20-Series SR90 unit operations controllers (UOCs), integrated
function controllers (IFCs), and multiplexers (MUXs)
J
20-Series UOCs and IFCs (Release 1.0 and later)
J
10-Series UOCs and IFCs
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.2.1
81
EPCI Point Hosting Rationale
There are two main reasons for hosting the EPCI point in your controller
or MUX instead of in the console:
J
J
To eliminate inaccuracies caused by the highway loading and timing
assumptions for the calculations.
To eliminate the need to depend on the console to distribute the
EPCI point data to all of the devices that have this point targeted to
them.
If your MUX, UOC, or IFC does not support EPCI point data reporting,
you must make your EPCI point reside in the console to get the
additional capabilities the EPCI point functions provide.
3.4.2.2
History of the EPCI Point
Originally, the PCI point calculations that were computed at the
controllers and multiplexers were not available to the console. So, to
inform the operator of the accumulated value or the rate calculations, the
console had to perform the same calculations on the raw data.
For the versions of controllers and multiplexers listed above that support
EPCI unsolicited data reporting, it is no longer necessary for the console
to compute the rate and accumulation. The calculations done in the
controllers and multiplexers are available to all consoles on the highway
to which you target the EPCI point (see Figure 3-14).
PCI Point Calculations Performed by Controller or MUX
Raw Count
Accu
m
Rate
Console-Resident
EPCI Point
Accu
m
Rate
Ext. Alarms
Ext. Alarms
Console-Targeted
EPCI Point
Duplicate
Calculations
Need to be
Performed
No
Calculations
Required
X00152:DC6460--0
Figure 3-14.
Console-resident EPCI Compared to the Targeted EPCI
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
82
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
If a field device, such as a UOC, IFC, or MUX, hosts the EPCI point that
you use, the operator no longer has the capability of tuning the filter time
constant, the deviation limit, or the deadband for alarms. If you need any
of these functions for your application, you may need to host your EPCI
point in the console. However, remember that you are sacrificing
accuracy when you host the EPCI point in your console.
3
3.4.2.3
Features and Benefits
The console-resident EPCI point increases the uses for the PCI point by
making available calculations on the PCI point data. You use the EPCI
point to calculate the rate and total accumulations of a PCI point.
The EPCI point enhances the PCI point, because it reads the raw data
from the PCI and does the rate and accumulation calculations for that
data. Also, the PCI point register is limited to 16 bits, which means that it
can only produce a count from 0 to as many as 65,535. It overflows and
wraps around to zero when it receives the 65,536th pulse. The
console-resident EPCI point accumulation continues to increase in value
even though the register for the PCI point returns to zero.
To configure the EPCI point and use its full capabilities, you must
understand how it works. The following text discusses how the console
EPCI points function. Figure 3-15 shows the flow of information through
this console-resident point.
3.4.2.3.1
How the EPCI Point Works
The console-resident EPCI point starts with the raw count of pulses from
the PCI point. It takes this count and calculates the difference between
this count and the previous count from this point. How much the count
has changed from the last time the EPCI point checked it is called the
delta pulse count. The EPCI point then converts the delta pulse count to
engineering units using the conversion factor that you enter during
configuration. This produces the delta engineering units.
The EPCI point then adds the delta engineering units to the totalled
engineering unit value (previous accumulation) that it calculated
previously to get the accumulated engineering units. The calculation is:
ACCUM = Previous ACCUM + (New Pulse Count -- Old Pulse Count) (Conversion Factor)
The EPCI point stores this new accumulated value in the configured
variable number one (MVPCV1). If you have not enabled the rate
function, the EPCI point does no more processing; it basically acts as an
accumulation point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
83
If the rate function is enabled, the console EPCI point calculates the rate
of change of the accumulation in engineering units per minute using this
equation:
Unfiltered Rate = (New Pulse Count -- Old Pulse Count) (Conversion Factor) (60)
(Number of Updates) (PCI Point Scan Rate)
3
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
84
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
PCI
Raw Count, MVPCV3
Calculation
Delta Count
Delta Pulse Count
3
Calculation
Delta Engineering
Delta Engineering
Units
Update
Accumulation
Value, MVPCV1
Is
Rate Function
Enabled
?
Accumulation
No
Stop
Yes
Rate Calculation
Unfiltered Rate
Unfiltered Rate
Is
Rate Filter
Enabled
?
No
Yes
Filtered Value
Weighted Average
Filter-Time
Constant
Update Rate,
MVPCV2
Figure 3-15.
Rate
Data Accumulation Path
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
85
If you have enabled rate filtering, the EPCI point takes the unfiltered rate
of change and smooths out any momentary variations using a first-order
digital filter. It then stores the filtered rate in configured variable 2
(MVPCV2). You configure the time constant of the filter to meet your
process requirements. If you did not enable rate filtering, the unfiltered
rate becomes the MVPCV2 value.
3.4.2.3.2
Reporting
The PCI point that the console EPCI point references must report to the
console in the PERIODIC reporting mode. The PCI point itself resides in
a MUX, a UOC or UOC+, or an IFC. You must target the PCI point to the
console, set the reporting rate, and set the reporting mode to PERIODIC.
There are a few things to consider when setting the reporting rate for the
PCI point to report to the console. Since the precision of the console’s
rate calculation (CV2) is determined by the PCI point scan rate, you
should define the PCI scan rate for your MUX, UOC, or IFC to be as fast
as possible. This increases the accuracy of the rate calculation.
You also should configure your EPCI reporting rate to be as slow as
possible so that your console receives more counts and the calculated
rates do not deviate greatly. If, after defining the PCI and console EPCI
rates as advised, the EPCI rate still varies widely, enable the rate filter if
you have not already done so.
Also consider that console loading increases with the number of points
and with the speed at which the console has to process those points.
The console must process an EPCI point on a periodic basis, and the
PCI point reporting rate determines the frequency of this processing. The
relationship between the PCI reporting rate and the console processing
are in Table 3-13.
If your console is heavily loaded, you may have to change to a slower
reporting rate for your PCI point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
86
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Table 3-13. EPCI Processing Periods for PCI Scan Rates
This PCI Reporting Rate ...
3
3.4.2.3.3
Has This EPCI Point Processing
Period ...
0.0 Seconds
5 Seconds
0.5 Seconds
5 Seconds
1 Second
5 Seconds
3 Seconds
5 Seconds
5 Seconds
5 Seconds
10 Seconds
15 Seconds
15 Seconds
15 Seconds
60 Seconds
60 Seconds
Alarms
You can configure as many as four alarms for the EPCI point. The alarm
types are:
J
J
ACCUM HIGH (accumulation high) — Indicates that the accumulated
value has gone above the trip level that you specify for this alarm.
Use this alarm to inform the operator that the accumulated value is
above the limit that you set. Note that this alarm type does not have
a deadband.
RATE HIGH — Indicates that the rate value has gone above the trip
level that you specify for this alarm. Use this alarm to inform the
operator that the rate value is above the limit that you have set for
your application. If you configure this alarm type, there is an
associated deadband that you must configure. For this type of alarm,
the deadband is how far below the trip level the rate value must go
for the alarm to clear. It is undesirable to have the alarm triggering
and clearing itself continuously. To avoid this problem, make this
deadband large enough that a noisy signal is not constantly causing
the alarm to trigger.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
J
87
RATE DEVIATION — Indicates that the rate has varied more than
the allowable amount from the reference value that you specify for
your application. You must configure the deviation limit for this alarm
to indicate what is and is not an acceptable amount to shift from the
base value.
RATE LOW — Indicates that the rate value has gone below the trip
level that you specify for this alarm. Use this alarm to inform the
operator that the rate value is below the limit that you have set for
your application. If you configure this alarm type, there is an
associated deadband that you must configure. For this type of alarm,
the deadband is how far above the trip level the rate value must go
for the alarm to clear.
The operator can enable or disable these alarms by tuning a DDP. All
alarm parameter values are in engineering units.
You must assign each alarm for an EPCI point to an alarm group by
specifying the group in the console’s target form. The console processes
these alarms using standard alarming procedures.
3.4.2.3.4
Partial Download Effects on the EPCI Point
The console suspends processing of the EPCI point during a database
merge for a partial download. The console stores the PCI point updates
in a queue and processes them after the database operation is
complete. When the console resumes the EPCI point processing, the
console calculates the rate and accumulation based on the information
in the unsolicited point queue. Under normal loads, no counts are lost for
the accumulation.
If the partial download changes the console EPCI point, the console
re-initializes the rate and accumulation data. If the PCI point changes,
the console uses the last processed count for accumulation, but
re-initializes the rate calculation. The old rate calculation is not used for
filtering.
3.4.2.3.5
Redundancy
Active and standby consoles do not exchange synchronization
information concerning console EPCI points. The standby console gets
unsolicited updates of the EPCI operating parameter values only. When
the standby console becomes active, it uses the raw pulse count
(MVPCV3) from the PCI point to synchronize the accumulation, and it
reinitializes the rate calculation. The old rate calculation is not used for
filtering. Note that as long as fewer than 65,535 pulses have occurred
during the switchover, no counts are lost for the accumulation.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
88
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
DDPs are not tracked between active and standby consoles. When the
standby device becomes active, it uses the conversion constant, filter
time, alarm values, and alarm enables that you configure or that were in
existence the last time the console was active.
3.4.2.4
Performance Parameters
The EPCI point has several parameters, some that you must configure
and others the operator can tune on line. The following subsections
discuss these parameters in detail.
3
3.4.2.4.1
Configurable EPCI Point Parameters
Use the EPCI Point form on the ENVOX configuration workstation to
configure an EPCI point. You must determine values for the EPCI point
parameters listed below during configuration. Refer to subsection 4.8.5
for more information on configuring the EPCI point.
PCI Point — This is the point in the UOC, IFC, or MUX that you want the
console EPCI point to reference. The EPCI point that you configure
performs calculations based on the raw data from this PCI point.
Off Scan — This parameter value indicates whether you want to
suppress the updates for this EPCI point. Typically, you configure a point
to be OFF SCAN - NO. Then while running a process, the operator with
the TUNE privilege can tune this parameter to YES for the purpose of
manual data entry. The need for manual data entry normally occurs
because of necessary maintenance on the field instrument or because
the instrument is not functioning properly.
High Scale Value — This parameter value is the upper range value for
the engineering units scale. The console uses this value for the high-end
value for trend traces when it trends the EPCI point.
Low Scale Value — This value is the lower-range value for engineering
units. The console uses this value for the low-end value for trend traces
when it trends this point.
Units — This is the word or abbreviation you want to use to describe
your engineering units. This word appears on the EPCI point’s standard
faceplates, and you can use it for your custom displays. Try to use a
standard or commonly known amount such as gallons, liters, yards,
pounds, and so on.
Conversion Constant — This is the number of engineering units (EUs)
that each PCI point pulse count represents. Enter the value that
indicates the number of engineering units per pulse (EU/PULSE). The
operator can tune this value on line by changing the remote DDP called
CONV FACTOR. (Refer to subsection 3.4.2.4.2.)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
89
The UOC or IFC also performs calculations on the PCI point’s counts.
These calculations are not available to the console because you are
configuring a console-resident EPCI point and the console does not use
the conversion constant that you configure for the controller. You must
enter a separate conversion factor for the console to use. Typically, the
conversion factor is the same value for both the controllers and the
console.
Rate Function Enbl — This parameter value indicates whether you want
the console to do a rate calculation on the data received from the PCI
point. If you do not enable this function, the console-resident EPCI point
only accumulates the pulses. If you enable this function, you should
enable the rate filter to smooth out any momentary variations with a
first-order digital filter. CV2 for the EPCI point is 0 (zero) if the rate
function is disabled.
Rate Filter Enbl — This parameter value indicates whether you want the
console to filter the rate calculation using a first-order digital filter. If the
rate function is enabled, you should normally enable this function also.
Rate Filter Time — This value is the rate filter time constant in minutes.
You specify how long a new rate value must remain steady before the
console accepts it as the actual rate value. A value of 0 is equal to no
filter. You might use this filter as damping for your rate. Also, the operator
with the TUNE privilege can tune this damping if the field device switches
to a different operating range that requires a different filter rate.
Type — This parameter indicates the type of alarm that you want to
associate with an EPCI point and a particular alarm group. The EPCI
point has four types of alarms. Refer to subsection 3.4.2.3.3 for detailed
explanations of the alarm types. Each alarm can be configured either as
an alarm on high accumulation or, if rate is enabled, as an alarm on high
rate, low rate, or rate deviation.
Initial State Enbl — This indicates whether you want alarms enabled
immediately following a total download. Typically, configure the ALARM
ENABL parameter value to YES to start alarming for this point. If this
parameter value is YES, the console informs the operator of the
associated alarm conditions. In case of instrument problems that cause
annoyance alarms, the operator with the TUNE privilege can change the
parameter value to NO.
High Low Trip/Dev Ref — This value is the trigger level for the HIGH
RATE and LOW RATE alarms, and the reference level for the deviation
alarms.
Deviation Limit — This parameter value is the amount that the rate can
vary from the reference value. If the rate varies more than the value that
you specify here, the console activates a deviation alarm to inform the
operator that the rate is out of your desired process boundaries. Only
use the deviation limit if you configure the rate deviation alarm.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
90
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Deadband — This is the amount a value must change toward the
desired rate to clear an alarm. Consider that a noisy process signal could
cross back and forth across a trigger value and continuously activate and
clear an alarm. This is undesirable and annoying to the operator. To
avoid this problem, specify a deadband that is greater than the typical
process noise in your plant so that if an alarm is activated, it stays that
way until the process actually does change toward a desirable rate.
Refer to Figure 3-16 for a comparison of signals with and without
deadband.
3
Alarm Word — This is the word that you want the console to display
when the EPCI point is in an alarm state. Choose a word that is
meaningful to your operator and indicates the type of alarm that is
occurring.
With
Deadband
Deadband
Without Deadband
Clear Alarm
Alarm Activates
Process
Signal
Process
Signal
Trigger
Level
Figure 3-16.
3.4.2.4.2
3 Alarms Activate
Trigger
Level
Alarms Clear
X00154:DC6460-0
Rate Low Alarm Activation With and Without Deadband
EPCI Point Detailed Display Parameters
The console-resident EPCI point has 27 remote DDPs. The operator can
change 19 of these DDPs on line if he or she has the required privilege
to tune those parameter values. The rest of this subsection discusses
these DDPs in detail. For a complete list of DDPs, see Appendix C.
REMOTE OFS? — The off remote scan parameter indicates whether the
operator has suppressed the updates for this EPCI point. If the operator
tunes the detailed display parameter REMOTE OFS? to YES, no
changes to the point occur. This is typically done for maintenance or
repair of the field-mounted instrument.
CONV FACTOR — This is the current value that the console is using to
convert PCI pulses to engineering units. The operator can tune this
value on line. The value is in the form of engineering units per pulse
(EU/PULSE).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
91
FILTER TIME — This is the value in minutes that a rate must remain
constant before it is accepted by the console. Consider your particular
process. If your process is noisy, containing bumps, consider the
frequency and length of this noise and use this filter to dampen the rate
as needed.
ALARM ENABL — There are as many as four of these DDPs on the
EPCI point’s display; one for each configured alarm (A, B, C, or D). They
perform the same function for each alarm. For instance, ALARM A ENBL
shows whether alarm A is enabled, ALARM B ENBL shows whether
alarm B is enabled, and so on. The operator can also tune these
parameter values by selecting the associated DDP and entering YES or
NO to enable or disable that alarm.
ALARM VALUE — There are as many as four ALARM VALUE DDPs on
the EPCI point’s display, one for each configured alarm (A, B, C, or D).
This DDP is either the trip value or a reference value, depending on the
type of alarm. If the alarm is a deviation alarm, this parameter value is a
reference value. If it is a HIGH or LOW alarm, then this value is the
trigger level for that alarm. Again, ALARM A VALUE shows alarm A’s trip
value, ALARM B VALUE shows alarm B’s trip value, and so on. The
operator can change the associated values for an alarm by tuning these
DDPs.
ALARM DEVLM — This DDP is the deviation limit for a deviation alarm,
and is only present for rate deviation alarms. The operator can tune
these parameters by selecting the associated DDP and entering the new
desired value.
ALARM DBAND — This DDP is the current deadband for an alarm. Four
of these, one for each alarm, are located on the EPCI point’s detailed
display. The operator can tune these parameters by selecting the
associated DDP and entering the new desired value.
3.4.3
Accumulation Points
The accumulation point is a console-resident point that collects, accrues,
totals, and averages data. You might use it to total analog values such
as flow rates into volumes or to determine the total amount of time that a
discrete point is in a particular state. The accumulation point is especially
useful for continuous-process applications where totals are not reset
frequently. The point also has many attributes that you can use in your
displays and reports.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
92
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.4.3.1
Features and Benefits
You can configure the accumulation point to gather data on the attribute
of any point for which accumulation is valid. Refer to Table 3-14 for valid
attributes. You can define a conversion factor for the console to use
when it converts the rate value, such as gallons per minute, to an
accumulated total, such as gallons.
3
For discrete values, the accumulation point keeps track of the duration of
time that a value is in a particular state. You define which state, ON or
OFF, you want this point to monitor. If you select ON, the accumulation
point totals the amount of time the discrete has been ON. You might use
this for equipment that requires maintenance after so many hours of use
or to keep track of installed spare usage.
The accumulation point keeps the accumulated value for the current
hour, shift, and day, and for the last hour, shift and day. You define shift
information by completing the shift table for your console. For more
information on configuring accumulation points, refer to subsection 4.8.1.
Note that for accumulations, the end of an hour is each 60-minute
interval past the previous start of a shift. The end of a shift is the
beginning of the next shift. And the end of a day is defined as the
beginning of the first shift of the next day. If the time is the end of a shift,
it is considered to be the end of an hour. Therefore, if the time is the end
of a day, it is also the end of the shift and the end of the hour.
Table 3-14. Valid Attributes for Accumulating
This Point Type ...
Has These Attributes That Can Be
Accumulated ...
AI
SP, PV
AO
SP, %OUTPUT, AVP
PCI
PV
MUX DI/DO and Maintenance
SP, PV
Monitor
SP, PV
Monitor Deviation
SP, PV
Reference
SP
Reference Deviation
SP, PV
DCP (PID)
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, AVP, INTSP
DCP with Ratio
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, RATIO
PD with Bias
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, %BIAS, AVP, INTSP
PD Bias and Ratio
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, %BIAS, RATIO
Manual Loader
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, AVP
Manual Loader with Ratio
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, RATIO
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
93
Table 3-14. Valid Attributes for Accumulating (Continued)
This Point Type ...
3.4.3.1.1
Has These Attributes That Can Be
Accumulated ...
Bias and Gain
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, %BIAS, AVP
Bias and Gain with Ratio
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, %BIAS, RATIO
Signal Selector
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, AVP
Signal Selector with Ratio
SP, PV, %OUTPUT, RATIO
UOC DI
PV
UOC DO
SP
PDM
SP
PDO
PV
UNIT
UVAR
ASCII
SP
REAL
SP
Integrity
CV11, CV12
LCP
CV1 through CV12
EPCI
CV1, CV2
Alarms
Accumulation points do not have alarms or extended alarms associated
with them.
3.4.3.1.2
Status
The accumulation point keeps track of the integrity of the data it
accumulates. It has a 16-bit status word that provides a mechanism for
the console to detect and display the integrity of the accumulated data.
The status bits that make up this word appear on the point’s detailed
faceplate. A zero value for a bit indicates that the data is good; a one
means the data is questionable. You also may wish to include some of
the status bits in your custom displays for any accumulated data that you
are using on the displays. Table 3-15 defines the 16 status bits.
Table 3-15. Status Bit Definitions
This Status Bit ...
Indicates ...
1
The integrity of the current hour’s total value
2
The integrity of the current hour’s average value
3
The integrity of the current shift’s total value
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
94
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Table 3-15. Status Bit Definitions (Continued)
This Status Bit ...
3
3.4.3.1.3
Indicates ...
4
The integrity of the current shift’s average value
5
The integrity of the current day’s total value
6
The integrity of the current day’s average value
7
The integrity of the previous hour’s total value
8
The integrity of the previous hour’s average value
9
The integrity of the previous shift’s total value
10
The integrity of the previous shift’s average value
11
The integrity of the previous day’s total value
12
The integrity of the previous day’s average value
13
Not Used
14
Not Used
15
Not Used
16
The overall integrity of the point
Configured Variables
The accumulation point has 12 configured variables (CVs) that contain
the totals and averages that the point is calculating. The CVs for the
current hour, shift, and day appear on the accumulation point’s full-sized
faceplate. All 12 of the point’s CVs are on the detailed faceplate for the
point. You can also use any of these CVs in your custom displays where
applicable. When you build your display, refer to the accumulated data
that you wish to display by its CV number. Table 3-16 defines the CVs.
3.4.3.2
Performance Parameters
The accumulation point has several parameters; some you must
configure, and others the operator can tune on-line. The following
subsections discuss these parameters in detail.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
95
Table 3-16. Configured Variable Definitions
This Configured
Variable ...
3.4.3.2.1
Indicates ...
MVP CV1
The current hour’s total value
MVP CV2
The current hour’s average value
MVP CV3
The current shift’s total value
MVP CV4
The current shift’s average value
MVP CV5
The current day’s total value
MVP CV6
The current day’s average value
MVP CV7
The previous hour’s total value
MVP CV8
The previous hour’s average value
MVP CV9
The previous shift’s total value
MVP CV10
The previous shift’s average value
MVP CV11
The previous day’s total value
MVP CV12
The previous day’s average value
Configurable Accumulation Point Parameters
You must determine the parameter values for the accumulation point
parameters listed below during configuration.
Accumulation Value — This parameter value indicates the point tag,
attribute, and, if necessary, the occurrence that you want to accumulate.
You must target the point that has this attribute to the console that hosts
the accumulation point.
Conversion Factor — This is a multiplier for the engineering units of the
attribute you are accumulating. For all points other than pulse count
input (PCI) points and discrete points, the console uses this value to
convert the engineering units being accumulated with respect to a time
reference to a quantity per minute. That is, the console uses the
conversion factor to transform the received value from a quantity per a
unit time to a quantity per minute. Use one of the following values as a
conversion factor:
J
If you are accumulating units per hour, use the value 0.016667.
J
If you are accumulating units per minute, use the number 1.0.
J
If you are accumulating units per second, use the number 60.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
96
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The console ignores this parameter value for discrete point applications.
For PCI points, you can use the conversion factor to convert the value
into the amount it represents. For example, if each PCI pulse means that
5 gallons of product has flowed, then the scale factor could be five so
that the accumulated value would be the total number of gallons of
product.
3
You can also use this factor to control the range of the accumulation
value. For instance, if the PCI counter increments rapidly, this factor
could keep the accumulation value in a range that the console can
display.
Period — This parameter value indicates how often, in seconds, you
want the console to calculate the accumulation value. When you choose
this value, consider your console’s central processing unit (CPU). If your
console’s CPU is heavily loaded, you may wish to pick a larger value.
See subsection 3.10.1 for more information on CPU loading.
Accumulation Time — For discrete values, this indicates whether you
want the accumulation point to time the point’s duration in the ON or
OFF state. The system ignores this field if the accumulation value that
you configure for this accumulation point is not from a discrete point.
Zero Dropout — This is the value below which you do not want the
system to increase the accumulated value. Use this parameter to avoid
adding inaccurate measurements at the low end of a scale. For example,
your plant might have a lot of process noise that can cause inaccurate
measurement on a flowmeter, especially at no flow (dead-head
condition). To avoid adding this process noise to the accumulated value,
set the zero-dropout value just above the noise level.
High Scale Value — This parameter value is the upper range value for
the engineering units scale. The console uses this value for the high-end
value for trend traces when it trends the accumulation point.
Low Scale Value — This value is the lower-range value for the
engineering units scale. The console uses this value for the low-end
value for trend traces when it trends this point.
EU Descriptor — This is the word or abbreviation you want to assign to
your accumulated value. This word appears on the accumulation point’s
standard faceplates, and you can use it for your custom displays. Try to
use a standard or commonly known amount such as gallons, liters,
yards, pounds, and so on.
Auxiliary EU Def — This is the descriptor that you assign to the average
or rate value of your accumulated data. Again use a known standard, for
example, gallons per minute (GPM), liters per minute (LI/MIN), and
so on.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.3.2.2
97
Accumulation Point Detailed Display Parameters
The accumulation point has 39 detailed display parameters (DDPs). The
operator can change 25 of these DDPs on-line if he or she has the
required privilege to tune those parameters. If the operator changes any
of the accumulated values, the corresponding integrity bit changes
to a 1, which indicates that the data is questionable. Table C-10 lists the
accumulation point DDPs as they appear on the console display. It also
lists their mnemonic numbers and indicates whether the parameters are
tunable. For a complete list of DDPs, see the other tables in Appendix C.
The out-of-service (OUT OF SERV) DDP indicates whether the operator
has suppressed updating of the accumulation point. If the operator tunes
the OUT OF SERV parameter to YES, no changes to that point can
occur. This may be desirable immediately following a total download or if
you wish to turn off a device for maintenance purposes. The operator
can start normal operation simply by changing this DDP to NO.
The other tunable parameters are the accumulated values and their
associated status bits. An operator with tune privilege can change the
accumulated values by selecting the corresponding mnemonic number
and entering a value. This may be necessary if for some reason he or
she needs to reset the totals to zero. The operator may also wish to
change the accumulated values after a total download if the plant has a
known standard that has been accumulating data that can be preset into
the point’s accumulated values.
For whatever reason, if the accumulated values are changed, the
associated status bits are set to indicate that the data is questionable.
Once the operator has verified that the new values are correct, he can
also change the status indicator to GOOD. Note that on the DDP display,
a NO indicates the data is good and a YES indicates the data is
questionable.
3.4.3.2.3
Shift Table Configuration Parameters
You must define the shift tables for your console so that the
accumulation point knows when to transfer the current totals and
averages to the last totals and averages. The shifts that you define using
the Shift Table Definition form (see subsection 4.5.1) on the ENVOX
configuration workstation determine when your accumulated data rolls
over. Rollovers move the accumulated values from the current hour to
the previous hour, the current shift to the previous shift, and the current
day to the previous day, depending on which applies. The system sets
the current values to zero when a rollover occurs.
You configure the number of shifts and the length of each shift when you
complete the Shift Table Definition form. Be aware that if your shifts are
inconsistent in length, your accumulations will be inconsistent and hard
to compare to one another.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
98
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Also note that for a shift, hours are defined as 60-minute intervals after
the start of a shift. At the end of each hour, the console must rollover—or
transfer—the hour data to the previous hour data and then reset the
current hour totals. Also at the end of an hour, the console may need to
generate shift reports. You need to give the console time to complete all
of the actions necessary for an hour rollover. If you cannot make your
shifts start exactly on the hour, wait until at least 10 minutes after an hour
rollover to start a new shift.
3
3.4.4
Maintenance Points
A maintenance point is a console-resident point that lets the operator
monitor the status of the devices on the PROVOX Data Highway. The
maintenance point lets the console receive and display a minimal
amount of information from the traffic directors (NTDs or LTDs). A
maintenance point can monitor either the traffic director’s status or the
communication integrity of a device connected to the traffic director.
For better device fault reporting and alarming, use integrity points. (See
subsection 3.4.5 for more information on integrity points.)
3.4.4.1
Configuration
Typically, you configure one maintenance point for each highway
address that an integrity point does not monitor. This includes the NTD
and LTD addresses. This may seem like a lot of loading on the console,
but the console stores information about the integrity of the device using
a special form of the 4-bit discrete point. Thus, maintenance points do
not require a lot of console overhead and do not significantly load the
console’s CPU. See subsection 3.10.1 for more information on CPU
loading.
Maintenance points do, however, affect the traffic director’s free time. Be
aware that if you host maintenance points on every single console in
your system, each console interrogates, or polls, the traffic director to get
integrity information. This could overload the highway.
If you wish to reduce the loading effects on the traffic director, you can
host these points at one console or at a redundant pair of consoles, and
then target the points to the other consoles in your system. Also, you can
disable the polling by failing to configure maintenance points for the local
area you do not want to be polled. If you do not configure maintenance
points, no polling occurs. For more information on configuring
maintenance points, refer to subsection 4.8.4.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.4.2
99
The Four Bits of the Maintenance Point
As mentioned earlier, the maintenance point is a special form of the
four-bit discrete point. Each one of the four bits represents a specific
condition. The following text discusses the meaning of each bit. Note
that a 0 is considered normal for these bits, and a 1 is considered an
alarm or bad status.
Bit 1 — Indicates whether a hardware technician selected a device on
the LTD’s primary highway. The technician selects the device address to
indicate to the traffic director that it needs to poll that address on the
highway. During normal operation, the device stays selected, and this bit
is a 0. If this bit changes to a 1, that indicates that someone deselected
the monitored device on the primary highway.
You must decide if you want the NOT SELECTED condition to be an
alarm or a status indication. If you make it an alarm, the console brings
the condition to the operator’s attention through standard alarm
capabilities. The alarm continues to be active until the problem is
resolved. If you make it a status indicator, the console displays the on
alarm word that you configure in the status block on the point faceplate,
but it does not activate the alarm.
Bit 2 — Indicates a device’s composite integrity. Zero means integrity is
good; 1 indicates that the integrity is bad. Since all devices in normal
operation have a primary CIA, ideally you want this bit to be a 0.
Typically, you configure this bit as an alarm in order to call the
communications failure to the operator’s attention. Therefore, on the
form, you would define this bit as ALARM and not INVERTED if you have
a typical PROVOX system.
Bit 3 — Indicates whether a hardware technician selected a device on
the LTD’s secondary highway. If you have a secondary highway, this
works just like Bit 1, and you have the same decisions to make. If,
however, you do not have a secondary highway, you should invert this
signal. The console then sees a 0 (normal state) when the device is not
selected and a 1 if for some reason the secondary highway becomes
selected.
Bit 4 — Indicates a device’s composite integrity. If you have a secondary
highway, this works just like Bit 2, and you have the same decisions to
make. If, however, you do not have a secondary highway, the hardware
technician usually does not select the secondary CIA. If the secondary is
not selected, the integrity defaults to good.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
100
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The device’s self-test procedure establishes its integrity. This procedure
sets the device’s composite integrity to 1 (bad) whenever the self-test
detects a problem within the device. Some common situations that cause
the composite integrity to be bad are:
3
J
A card fails in the multiplexer input/output (MUX I/O) device
J
The self-test detects a calibration error in the device
J
A printer is bad
J
The device loses its battery back-up
If the device does not respond to CIA interrupt commands when such an
even occurs, the CIA automatically sets the device’s integrity to bad.
Configure these four bits on the Target Data form (subsection 4.8.9).
3.4.4.3
Attributes
Each maintenance point has the same attributes that other discrete
points have, but the following attributes are unique to the maintenance
point:
J
J
3.4.4.4
Process Variable (PV) — The PV attribute contains the INTEGRITY
and SELECTED data. This attribute is one of four possible
occurrences indicating the monitored device’s primary and secondary
integrity and indicating whether the traffic director has the device
selected on the primary and secondary highway.
ALARM — Any value in the primary or secondary internal integrity
occurrences, or in the primary or secondary selected occurrences
can cause a corresponding alarm on the console. Generally, you
configure the internal integrity for the CIAs in your system as alarms
and the selected occurrences as statuses. However, you can
configure the occurrences differently. You must determine whether a
condition is a normal, an alarm, or a status condition when you
configure the individual bits for the maintenance point. You determine
the alarm conditions using the ENVOX configuration workstation.
Maintenance Display
You may wish to configure a maintenance display for your operators. The
console displays a maintenance display whenever the operator clicks on
the maintenance display option in the utilities menu. You define the
maintenance display for a particular console by completing the field
Maint Display v on the Device form (see subsection 4.4.1). This entry
should be a previously defined display tag. For more information, see
subsection 3.2.7.5.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
101
Normally the maintenance display consists of a custom display. If more
than one maintenance display is necessary, you can configure the Bk
and Fwd buttons to move among these displays or create a display
hierarchy for the displays.
3.4.4.5
Operation
The maintenance point alarms and displays work together to inform the
operator of communications problems and to aid in troubleshooting.
If a device’s integrity changes from good to bad and you configured this
condition as an alarm, the alarm on the corresponding maintenance
point becomes active. The console processes this alarm in the same
manner it processes all other alarms in the console, depending on the
alarm group you assign to each alarm during configuration. If the
operator clicks on the maintenance display option in the utilities menu,
the display area shows the display you defined for maintenance points
during configuration. The operator then can acknowledge the alarm.
You determine which method the operator must use to acknowledge
alarms when you complete the Ack Selected Alarm field on the Option
Definition form for your console (see subsection 4.4.2). The operator can
acknowledge maintenance point alarms the same way he or she
acknowledges other point alarms.
3.4.5
Integrity Points
The console software includes a console-resident integrity point. It
provides the operator with integrity information regarding the devices in
your PROVOX control system. Refer to subsection 4.8.6 for information
on configuring integrity points. See Appendix G for a list of messages an
integrity point can show.
The only devices fully supported by console-resident integrity points are
20-Series SR90 controllers and Operator Workplace or PROVUEr
consoles. Only CHIP and Operator Workplace or PROVUE consoles can
display integrity point data; and only SR90s and Operator Workplace or
PROVUE consoles fully support integrity reporting.
The integrity point replaces the maintenance point (see
subsection 3.4.4). You do not need to configure maintenance points for
any of the devices that have integrity points monitoring them, because
the integrity point provides more detailed information about the
monitored device. The integrity point monitors the communication status
and composite integrity from the device’s primary and secondary traffic
directors. It also notifies the operator of device failures and abnormal
device-related conditions in general.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
102
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The integrity point is not a replacement for ENVOX configuration
workstation diagnostics. Rather, the integrity point provides the operator
with sufficient information to determine the severity of problems. The
maintenance personnel still need to apply ENVOX configuration
workstation diagnostics to determine the exact nature of a failure.
3
The purpose of the integrity point is to provide the console operator with
the ability to quickly recognize the severity of device-related problems in
order to determine what actions to take. The console brings
device-related integrity problems to the operator’s attention through
standard console alarm capabilities.
Another purpose of integrity points is integrity reporting for redundant
controller devices. Redundant devices exhibit a problem commonly
referred to as the red out effect, which occurs when a redundant device
loses its backup device. (Red out is derived from the fact that the ERR
condition on CCON, BCON, and LCON consoles causes the overview
element to turn red on the display.)
When this loss occurs, all points that previously had a backup device
display the word ERR to indicate an error condition. Although this does
notify the operator of the problem, it is excessive, and does not tell the
operator how severe the problem is.
With the introduction of the 20-Series SR90 controller four-to-one
backup, the loss of a redundant device’s backup and the number of
ERRs on faceplates becomes more of a problem than a subtle message
would indicate. Consider the situation when one controller in a
four-to-one backup configuration switches to the backup unit. Previously,
all of the points on all four of the controllers would have gone to the ERR
condition because they lost their backups. The integrity point alleviates
the problem of all of these ERRs being displayed on faceplates.
The 20-Series SR90 Controller does a selective red out disable. That is,
the red out disable is only for devices that source the integrity point for
the SR90 or for devices which have the integrity point targeted to them.
However, the console does a total red out disable if any console is
hosting an integrity point for it. For any console that receives unsolicited
data from the monitored console, red out is disabled. Also, the
unsolicited data from the SR90 controller contains the integrity
information for the controller. You can have a device receive unsolicited
data by targeting any point from the monitored device to the device that
you want to receive the unsolicited data.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.5.1
103
Configuration
Typically, you should configure one integrity point for each device that is
fully supported by the integrity point. Configure integrity points using the
Integrity Point form (see subsection 4.8.6) on the ENVOX configuration
workstation. The form contains fields for the source device, monitored
device, DDPs, and alarm words.
A console should not be the source of its own integrity point unless it is
the only console or part of a redundant console pair. Also, if one or more
consoles are cloned from one master, integrity points (one for each
console) must reside in the master and be targeted to the master.
Targeting to the clones is automatic. The integrity point will work if it is
sourced at the same console, but if the console dies, it cannot send
unsolicited data to other devices to produce a failure alarm. Also, you
must configure an integrity point for a particular device so that the
console hosting the integrity point receives unsolicited data from that
device. This is a requirement if you want the red-out-disable feature to
function properly.
If the console does not receive unsolicited data from SR90 devices, no
integrity data is available. Otherwise the console may not request the red
out disable when a monitored device is downloaded or reset. In the case
of redundant console pairs, integrity points for both the primary and the
secondary console can be sourced on the primary console and then
targeted to the secondary console. This way, when the active console
switches over, the integrity point functionality also switches over to the
newly active console.
3.4.5.2
Guidelines for Integrity Point Configuration
Use the following guidelines when configuring integrity points in your
system. How you target and source these points can affect your system’s
performance.
J
J
J
J
A console should host an integrity point for every 20-Series SR90
controller from which it receives unsolicited data.
A console should not be the source of information for its own integrity
point, unless it is part of a redundant pair of consoles, is the console
cloned by all other consoles, or is the only console in the system.
Target one integrity point to a computer running CHIP for every
20-Series SR90 controller and console that CHIP communicates
with. This avoids the problem with ERRs for that particular CHIP if a
switchover occurs.
It is not necessary to configure a maintenance point for devices that
integrity points monitor. The integrity point monitors basically the
same information as a maintenance point, plus a lot more.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
104
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
J
3.4.5.3
3
Include your integrity points on the maintenance display for your
console. The maintenance display is a feature that the console
provides for plant maintenance purposes. For more information on
maintenance displays, refer to subsections 3.4.4, 4.8.4, and
Section 5.
Integrity Point Parameters
The following subsections describe the integrity point parameters. Note
that the integrity point is always in the AUTOMATIC (AUTO) mode. The
mode does not appear on the integrity point’s standard faceplate, but
you can use it in a custom display if you wish.
3.4.5.3.1
Alarms
Whenever a fault condition occurs on the device that an integrity point
monitors, the system activates one of the integrity point’s alarms.
Depending on how you configured the alarm characteristics, this may
cause the system to log an alarm message and sound the console’s
horns. (See Appendix G for a complete list of integrity point messages.)
Four alarms are available. Which alarm the system activates depends on
the fault condition. If a fault condition occurs that would trip an alarm,
and that alarm is already active, the alarm is reactivated and goes to the
unacknowledged state. The system also de-acknowledges the alarm if it
is currently acknowledged, unless it is automatically acknowledged.
You need to assign an alarm word for each type of integrity point alarm.
Choose a word that is meaningful to your operators and reflects the
severity of the situation. Use the capitalized words in the following alarm
definitions if no plant standard words exist.
J
J
J
J
Alarm A — This alarm indicates the potential for a CRITICAL
situation: a device is unavailable or control of at least one loop has
been lost. The operator must take corrective action immediately.
Alarm B — This alarm indicates the potential for an URGENT
situation. Control has not been lost, but may be shortly. The operator
must take corrective action as soon as possible.
Alarm C — This alarm indicates the potential of a WARNING
situation. Control has not been lost, but could be if another failure
occurs. The operator should take corrective action as soon as he or
she can schedule it.
Alarm D — This alarm indicates that the system has detected a
MINOR problem. Control has probably not been affected. The
operator should take corrective action at the next possible
opportunity.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
105
You also need to assign the integrity points to plant process areas
(PPAs) and plant management areas (PMAs). You can configure them
like any other point, but here are some guidelines specific to integrity
points:
J
J
J
J
J
J
Never put an integrity point into OFF mode.
The priority of alarms should follow the severity described previously.
That is, A is highest-priority, then B, then C, and then D. You should
keep them in that order.
Consider using different colors for maintenance alarms to easily
distinguish process alarms from hardware alarms.
The alarms should not be auto-acknowledged, or you defeat the
reactivation mechanism. (Your operator would still get a printer
message if you configure the alarm activation message to YES.)
Configure the alarm activation message to YES on any consoles to
which the integrity point is targeted. On the console hosting the
integrity point, the logging of integrity changes happens in two ways:
as an integrity change message, and as an alarm activation
message. However, on a console to which the integrity point is
targeted, no integrity change message occurs.
Include your integrity points on the maintenance display for your
console. The maintenance display is a feature that the console
provides for plant maintenance purposes. For more information on
the maintenance display, refer to subsections 3.4.4 and Section 5.
Note ... The console does not support hosting multiple integrity points
for the same device. Such a configuration is not logical and
provides no additional benefits. If multiple integrity points for the
same device are hosted on a single console, unpredictable
results occur.
3.4.5.3.2
Status Word
The integrity point introduces a new data type within the PROVOX
communications protocol called a system phrase. Each system phrase
number (SPN) refers to a particular text phrase such as 1 = Information;
2 = All Okay, and so on. The first 12 characters of the phrase are
displayed in a standard sized point faceplate.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
106
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The status word gives the operator more detailed information about the
monitored device. The status word is a 16-bit word that provides a
mechanism for the console to display text strings to indicate a specific
condition.
3
This status word appears on the point’s full faceplate, and some of the
text strings associated with the status bit are on the detail faceplate. You
also may wish to include some of the status bits for the point in your
custom displays. Note that the first two bits of the status word are the
same as the bits for a maintenance point’s integrity information.
The following are the definitions of the status word bits:
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
Status Word Bit 1 — Is the primary local traffic director (LTD) or
network traffic director (NTD) composite integrity. The ON word,
which indicates that there is a problem, is INTG1BAD. The OFF word
is INTG1-OK. This bit is the same as Bit 2 of the maintenance point.
Status Word Bit 2 — Is the secondary LTD or NTD composite
integrity. The ON word, which indicates that there is a problem, is
INTG2BAD. The OFF word is INTG2-OK. This bit is the same as Bit 4
of the maintenance point.
Status Word Bit 3 — Is the primary LTD or NTD communications
status. The ON word, which indicates a problem, is COMM1BAD.
The OFF word is COMM1-OK.
Status Word Bit 4 — Is the secondary LTD or NTD communications
status. The ON word, which indicates a problem, is COMM2BAD.
The OFF word is COMM2-OK.
Status Word Bit 5 — Indicates whether a device is redundant or
simplex. A 1 indicates the device is redundant. The ON word is
REDUNDANT, and the OFF word is SIMPLEX. This indicator’s word
appears on the detail faceplate for the integrity point.
Status Word Bit 6 — Indicates that a device is the backup or
secondary device of a redundant pair. The ON word is SECONDARY,
and the OFF word is PRIMARY. This bit is off and masked if the
device is simplex. The word for this bit appears on the detail
faceplate for the integrity point.
Status Word Bit 7 — Indicates that automatic redundancy
switchover is disabled. The ON word is NOAUTOSW, and the OFF
word is AUTOSWEN. This bit is off and masked if the device is
simplex. This indicator’s word appears on the detail faceplate for the
integrity point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
3.4.5.4
107
Status Word Bit 8 — Indicates that a backup device of a redundant
hardware configuration is not available. The ON word is NOBACKUP,
and the OFF word is BACKUPOK. This bit is off and masked if the
device is simplex. The word associated with this bit appears on the
detail faceplate for the integrity point.
Status Word Bit 9 — Indicates that the primary communication card
has failed. The ON word is CIA1-BAD, and the OFF word is
CIA1-OK.
Status Word Bit 10 — Indicates that the secondary communication
card has failed. The ON word is CIA2-BAD, and the OFF word is
CIA2-OK. This bit can be masked if there is no secondary CIA.
Status Word Bit 11 — Not used. If it is not masked, the ON word is
ST11-ON and the OFF word is ST11-OFF.
Status Word Bit 12 — Indicates the ACTIVE or STANDBY status of
a redundant pair of devices. The ON word is ACTIVE and indicates
that the device is the active partner of a redundant pair. The OFF
word is STANDBY and indicates that the device is the standby
partner of the pair.
Status Word Bit 13 — Indicates that more than six phrases were
available when the hosting console last updated the point. The ON
word is MORE-PHR, and the OFF word is ALL-PHR. This indicator’s
word appears in the detail faceplate for the integrity point.
Status Word Bit 14 — Indicates that some of the points from the
monitored device are unavailable. The ON word is UNAVL ??, and
the OFF word is NO UNAVL. This bit’s ON/OFF word also appears in
the detail faceplate for the integrity point.
Status Word Bit 15 — Not used. If it is not masked, the ON word is
ST15-ON, and the OFF word is ST15-OFF.
Status Word Bit 16 — Indicates that a problem with the device
hosting the integrity point occurred as the device was doing
unsolicited programming on the monitored device. The ON word is
DEVPROG?, and the OFF word is DEVPRGOK. The ON/OFF word
for this bit is in the detail faceplate for the integrity point.
Configured Variables
You can use the following configured variables for the integrity point on
your custom displays. There are two groups of fault CVs, those with text
associated, called qualified faults, and those without text, called
nonqualified faults.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
108
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
J
J
3
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
MVPCV1 — An eight-character ASCII qualifier of the first fault
condition. In some cases, it can be the number representing the
number of the same type of fault.
MVPCV2 — An eight-character ASCII qualifier of the second fault
condition. In some cases it can be the number of errors of the same
type of fault.
MVPCV3 — An eight-character ASCII qualifier of the third fault
condition. In some cases it can be the number of errors of the same
type.
MVPCV4 — The system phrase number for the highest-priority fault
condition with a qualifier. If no fault conditions are present, MVPCV-4
can be used as an informational message.
MVPCV5 — The system phrase number for the second
highest-priority fault condition with a qualifier. If no fault conditions
are present, this may be an informational message.
MVPCV6 — The system phrase number for the third highest-priority
fault condition with a qualifier. If no fault conditions are present, this
may be an informational message.
MVPCV7 — The system phrase number for the highest-priority fault
condition without a qualifier.
MVPCV8 — The system phrase number for the second
highest-priority fault condition without a qualifier.
MVPCV9 — The system phrase number for the third highest-priority
fault condition without a qualifier.
MVPCV10 — The system phrase number for the device type.
MVPCV11 — The percentage of CPU time that the monitored device
is using.
MVPCV12 — The total number, as many as 255, of active detected
errors. If a device has more than 255 active detected errors, this
value remains 255.
The console informs the operator of many fault conditions. The integrity
point’s full-size faceplate displays the first two qualified faults and the first
two nonqualified faults. Also, the highest-priority phrase from each group
appears in the point display line on the console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
109
On the detailed display for the integrity point, qualified faults are in order
of severity within the qualified group, and nonqualified faults are in order
of severity within the nonqualified group. The operator can see as many
as six faults on an integrity point’s detailed display at one time. If the
phrase MORE PHR appears, the operator may need information about
the monitored device obtained from the ENVOX configuration
workstation diagnostics.
On the detailed display, the fault conditions work as follows:
J
J
With faults of the same severity, the order is unspecified.
Qualified faults always precede nonqualified faults with the following
two exceptions:
j If there are more than three qualified faults and fewer than three
nonqualified faults, the lower-severity qualified faults are placed
in the empty nonqualified CVs. However, the qualifier for these
faults is lost.
j If there are fewer than three qualified faults and more than three
nonqualified faults, the lower severity nonqualified faults are
placed in the empty qualified CVs without qualifiers.
Basically, the console informs your operator of any fault condition that
the integrity point monitors and attempts to display as many as possible
of the highest-priority fault conditions.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
110
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.4.5.5
Integrity Point Detailed Display Parameters (DDPs)
For a complete list of DDPs, see Appendix C. The integrity point has all
of the standard console local DDPs. In addition, the package that hosts
the integrity point provides the following remote DDPs:
J
3
J
J
IOS — The out-of-service (IOS) parameter indicates if you or the
operator has suppressed the updating of this integrity point. If you
configure this parameter to be YES or the operator tunes the detailed
display parameter STOP UPD/IOS? to YES, no changes to that point
can occur. This may be desirable immediately following a total
download or if you wish to power down a device for maintenance
purposes. The operator can start normal operation simply by
changing this DDP to NO.
OFS — The off-scan (OFS) parameter indicates if you or the operator
has suppressed the alarms for this integrity point. If you configure
this parameter to be YES or the operator tunes the detailed display
parameter STOP ALM/OFS? to YES, the system deactivates all of
the point’s alarms. However, changes to the point still occur. This
may be desirable immediately following a total download or if you
wish to power down a device for maintenance purposes. The
operator can start normal operation simply by changing this DDP to
NO.
LOG FAULTS — This parameter indicates whether the console log
printer prints the fault conditions when they are detected. This
message is in addition to the alarm logging that occurs as part of
normal point-alarm processing. The logging of fault condition is more
detailed than the logging of alarms, and it occurs only on the console
hosting the integrity point. The fault condition message includes the
date, time, console address, point tag, point description, PPA tag,
and the failure phrase.
For instance, if you receive a C alarm, the console logs the fault
condition every time the system activates the alarm. The message
looks something like this:
24-MAY-1998 14:50:19 @8-9
TAG: INTEG1UOC1
INTEG PT UOC
PPA: INTEG-PPA
BAD BATTERY. BATTERY BACKUP NO LONGER AVAILABLE
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
111
PERIOD — This parameter indicates how often you want a console
to poll a monitored device for integrity information. The 20-Series
SR90 Controllers include their integrity information in their unsolicited
data. However, a console hosting integrity points must periodically
poll other devices to get their integrity information from those
devices. (Only the 20-Series SR90 Controllers report integrity data
through unsolicited reports to consoles.) You can choose 15, 30, 60,
120, or 240 seconds.
j The console monitors the communications and device integrity
bits for devices going from good to bad. When this transition
occurs, the console does a quick update of the associated
integrity point. This feature allows you to configure a slow scan
period and still provide a quick response when an error occurs.
For this reason, you should make the update period two or four
minutes and let the change of state detection take care of
processing the faults when they first occur.
j If you do not wish to configure such a long update period,
consider that the maximum number of outstanding requests is
three when you select this interval. This limits the number and
frequency of integrity point updates. You can determine the
number of integrity point updates that can occur per second by
dividing the number of outstanding requests possible by the
average response time. For example, if the average response
time is 2 seconds, since the number of outstanding requests is
limited to three, then it is possible to update 1.5 integrity points
per second. Thus, a maximum of 10 devices can be updated in a
15-second poll period.
j Also consider how heavily loaded your system is and how critical
the device is to your plant’s operation. Remember that the
integrity point is not intended to be a rapid fault-detection device;
it is intended to help the operator determine the severity of the
situation. Also note that your operator cannot change the update
PERIOD on-line; this requires a configuration change.
J
J
J
J
DEVICE — This is a read-only value that indicates the device
address of the monitored device associated with this integrity point.
HOST DEVICE — This is a read-only value that indicates the
address of the device from which the integrity point gets its
information.
POINT HWY # — This parameter is the highway access number of
the integrity point in the console that provides information to the
integrity point.
H POINT DBI — This parameter is the database index (DBI) of the
integrity point in the console that provides information to the integrity
point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
112
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
J
J
3
J
J
# MONITORING — This parameter is an integer indicating the
number of devices to which this point is targeted.
# MON DEVICE — This parameter is an integer indicating the
number of devices to which the monitored device reports. This
number is only valid for SR90 controllers; the consoles show a -1 for
all other devices.
# UNSOL PROG — This parameter is an integer indicating the
number of unsolicited device reprograms for the monitored device.
This number is only valid for SR90 controllers; the console shows a
-1 for all other devices.
# U REPROG — This parameter indicates the number of times the
console that is hosting the integrity point has programmed this device
to start sending unsolicited data.
The following DDPs are useful for troubleshooting communication
problems. To obtain more detailed information about communication
difficulties, you need to use the ENVOX configuration workstation
diagnostics. These DDPs may help you to isolate a particular area to
troubleshoot.
J
COMM COND — This parameter is a number that indicates the
condition of the communications. Each digit indicates a different
condition. A zero indicates no problem. The digits are as follows:
j 1 — For some unspecified reason other than a transmit failure of
the data highway interface (DHI) driver, a request could not be
sent.
j 10 — The monitored device failed to respond within the highway
time-out interval of 15 seconds.
j 100 — The communications integrity was bad when the DHI
driver started to send the request. This condition should also be
indicated in Bits 3 and 4 of the status word.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
113
j 1000 — The communications request code from the DHI either
was not successful or was one of the common communication
errors; the DHI returned an unrecognized error.
j 10000 — The integrity point was unable to send a request to the
DHI driver.
j 100000 — The DHI driver returned a PCR full error. This only
occurs when the console is trying to send an excessive number
of outgoing messages.
J
INTEG COND — This parameter is a number that indicates how and
what integrity information the console received from the monitored
device. Each digit indicates a different condition. A zero indicates no
problem. The digits are as follows:
j 1 — Indicates that the monitored device supports the sending of
unsolicited integrity information. The only devices that support
this feature are the SR90 controllers.
j 10 — Indicates that the console cannot disable red out. This digit
indicates an error or that the monitored device does not support
the red out disable.
j 100 — Indicates that the monitored device was not sending
unsolicited data to the console when the console sent the
red-out-disable request or that the device is not downloaded
(configured).
j 1000 — Indicates that the console requested the monitored
device to start sending unsolicited integrity data, but it does not
support this feature.
j 10000 — Indicates that the console has not received integrity
data for the monitored device or that the data is invalidated, old
integrity data.
J
REQUEST COND — This parameter is a number that indicates the
condition of requests the console sent to the monitored device. Each
decimal place indicates a different condition. A zero indicates no
problem. The numbers are as follows:
j 0 — Indicates no request is pending for this integrity point. This is
the normal value for this parameter. Any other value, unless it is
for a short interval, indicates an internal error and that the
integrity data for this point is not valid.
j 1 — Indicates that an unsolicited control response for a point’s
target information is pending.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
114
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
j 2 — Indicates that there is an unsolicited control response both to
disable red out and, possibly, to start sending unsolicited integrity
data that is pending.
j 3 — Indicates a detailed internal integrity response is pending.
j 9 — Indicates that this integrity point’s timer has expired, but the
point has not come back to the top of the request list in the
console.
3
j 10 — Indicates an error occurred on the last request message for
red-out-disable. The monitored device returned an unrecognized
error.
j 100 — Indicates an error occurred on the last detailed internal
integrity request message. The monitored device returned an
error to the last request for integrity information.
j 1000 — Indicates an error occurred when the console attempted
to obtain point targeting information from the monitored device.
The last request message for reading target information returned
an error.
3.4.6
Console-derived Single-bit Discretes
While four-bit discrete points are sourced in field devices (specifically the
programmable controller interface unit [PCIU], data concentrator unit
[DCU], CHIP, and multiplexer [MUX]), Operator Workplace software has
the ability to support console-derived single-bit discrete in the field
device. The four-bit discrete point provides all data for the single-bit
discrete points derived from it. The four-bit discrete output point should
be kept in the MANUAL mode when used by a single-bit discrete point.
Otherwise, the following message appears in an error dialog box:
VALUE NOT ACCEPTED
During configuration, you target these single-bit discrete points and their
four-bit master to every console that may use these points.
Discrete point input to DCDs always comes from a four-bit discrete point.
Console-derived single-bit discrete points cannot participate in DCDs
directly.
3.4.6.1
Defining Console-derived Single-bit Discrete Points
A single-bit discrete point is derived from a four-bit discrete point.The
four-bit discrete point may be in a different PPA and a different PMA than
the single-bit discrete points derived from it.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
115
Additionally, all single-bit discrete points derived from a single four-bit
discrete point may each be in a different PMA from each other or from
the corresponding four-bit discrete point. This allows separate alarm
handling capabilities for each console-derived single-bit discrete point,
including completely disabling alarm annunciation on an individual
derived single-bit discrete point.
Derived single-bit discrete points have faceplates identical to existing
single-bit discrete points found in UOC/IFC configurations. Local DDPs in
console-derived single-bit discrete points are also identical to DDPs in
UOC/IFC single-bit discrete points.
The reporting mode of the four-bit discrete point from which a single-bit
discrete point was derived controls the unsolicited update rate for the
single-bit discrete point. The discrete state configured for the four-bit also
governs the discrete state for the console-derived single-bit.
If you want the console-derived single-bit discrete to report to the
secondary console in a redundant pair, you must target the point to the
secondary console. If you don’t care which console in a redundant pair
the console-derived single-bit discrete reports to, you can target the
single-bit discrete to one or both consoles.
3.4.6.2
Downloading Console-derived Single-bit Discrete Points
When you configure a derived single-bit discrete point, the
corresponding four-bit discrete point and as many as four additional
derived single-bit discrete points are also downloaded. The four-bit
discrete point is used for device programming. The individual derived
single-bit discrete points are for user interface and are identical to
UOC/IFC single-bit discrete points, with the following exceptions:
J
J
J
You cannot access the REMOTE O/S and REMOTE OFS DDPs.
You cannot request a process variable (PV) change with a derived
single-bit discrete input.
The remote DDPs for the four-bit discrete point do not have the same
DDPs as the single-bit discrete points derived from it. This prevents
the operator from accidentally changing all four single-bit discrete
points by tuning the DDPs for one of the derived single-bit discrete
points.
You can change the link between a derived single-bit discrete and its
parent four-bit discrete during a partial download only. You cannot
change the linkage on-line.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
116
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.4.7
Activities
An activity is a console-resident point that lets you supervise your batch
operation using an operator console or Computer/Highway Interface
Package (CHIP). You can do unit operation sequencing, resource
control, recipe management, and historic data collection and reporting
with an activity point. This subsection is loosely divided into two parts:
3
J
J
Part one discusses the configuration of activity points and their
associated (subordinate) objects.
Part two gives insight into how activities operate and gives tips on
how you can use them to the best advantage.
For more information on configuring activity points, refer to subsection
4.8.2. For more information on operating and tuning points, refer to
Using the DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(UM13.0:DC9440).
3.4.7.1
Activity Point
When you configure an activity point, you must specify four items: an
initial mode, alarm A and alarm B words, and a procedure list. These are
discussed below.
3.4.7.1.1
Mode
An activity point can be in either MANUAL (MAN) or COMPUTER
(CMPTR) mode. The mode indicates how the activity point is controlled.
When the point is in MANUAL mode, the operator controls the activity
point from the console and the point rejects all change requests from the
CHIP program.
When the point is in CMPTR mode, CHIP can make operator change
requests, but all change requests from the console are rejected. The
system always honors requests to change the point’s mode regardless of
its mode or the origin of the request.
You can set the activity point to a known mode after a total download. If
you want the operator to manually control the point after a download, set
the initial mode to MANUAL when you are configuring the activity point. If
you want CHIP to control the activity point after a download, set the initial
mode to COMPUTER.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.7.1.2
117
Abort (A) Alarm Word
The console displays the alarm A text you configure in the activity
faceplate if a transition to the ABORTED state occurs. This transition can
only occur if the activity receives an abort request from either the
operator or CHIP and abort is enabled.
3.4.7.1.3
Failure (B) Alarm Word
The console displays the alarm B text you configure for the faceplate on
the console if an error condition occurs that causes a transition of the
activity to the FAILED state.
3.4.7.1.4
Procedure List
You define the procedures that an activity point can execute by
assigning a procedure list to the activity point. A procedure list is a group
of procedures you define during configuration. A procedure list can be
unique to an activity point or it can be shared by other activity points. If
procedure lists are not shared, you could configure as many as 1,024
procedures (32 activity points, each with a list of 32 unique procedures).
3.4.7.2
Procedures
A procedure is the outermost level of batch supervision available at the
console. At this level, the activity point coordinates units and requests
unit operations to execute. The procedure maintains the batch identity so
it can track and store batch histories and print batch-end reports.
The procedure consists of four main parts:
J
J
J
J
Product grade data — a numerical list that defines product
parameters for the batch, such as flows, temperatures, reaction
times, volumes, and so on. Product grade data allows for slight
variations of the product from the same sequence of operations.
Point sets — groups of points that the procedure uses for the batch.
Point sets define the equipment path that the batch takes. Typically,
a point set contains unit points.
Batch-end data — information that the console saves about the
batch. The sequence of process instructions causes the system to
implement your strategy for creating a product.
Process instructions — a sequence of instructions for your
procedure.
The following text addresses each of these components.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
118
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.4.7.2.1
Grades
The quantity of materials, the time, the temperature, or any other
variables used in a product may differ from batch to batch. Products that
are similar, using the same process instructions but perhaps differing in
ingredient quantities or reaction times, are considered different grades.
3
A grade is composed of one or more grade registers, each containing
different grade values. You use the grade values to produce different
flavors (grades) of a product while using the same procedure. Grade
values assign quantities to variables in the grade template.
Because each grade in a procedure uses the same grade template,
each grade must have the same number of grade values. You can have
as many as 50 grades for a procedure, and up to 255 grade values per
procedure. See subsection 4.7.3 for information on configuring grades.
Templates — The grade template defines the characteristics of the
grade values—or variables—for your procedure. It contains the range,
units of measurement, and default values for these variables.
You enter the high and low values that determine the range for the grade
values (variables) during configuration and also restrict the values that
they may be tuned to when the procedure is being run by an activity. The
range sets the minimum and maximum quantity for the grade value, thus
limiting the amount of an ingredient that can go into a product.
You also assign the quantity of measurement and the default value for
the grade values. You use the same unit of measurement for the high,
low, and default values, as well as the grade value.
Defaults — Some data is the same for different grades of a product.
Because of this, the ENVOX system allows you to enter default values
for the grade registers. You can enter the most frequently used value for
the grade variable as a default in order to reduce the number of grade
register values that you must manually enter. Subsection 4.7.2 explains
how to configure the grade template defaults.
Table 3-17 indicates how you can use default values. The example is for
a latex paint-making procedure. It has three grades of red paint (dark,
medium, and light), seven registers containing values, and some
suggested default values.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
119
Table 3-17. Example of Using Default Values to Vary Grades
For These Grades of Red
Paint ...
This
Register
Name ...
Dark
Red
Medium
Red
Light
Red
In These
Units of
Measure ...
The
Suggested
Default is ...
Water
10
10
10
Gallons
10
Al Silicate
8
8
7
Gallons
8
Acrylic Resn
5
6
6
Gallons
6
Titanium 02
8
24
48
Ounces
Any one of the
values
Red 107
30
15
5
Ounces
Any one of the
values
Yellow 418
15
7.5
2.5
Ounces
Any one of the
values
Raw Umber
24
12
4
Drops
Any one of the
values
Details — The grade values, which are different from the default values,
are called grade details. You assign a value other than the default value
to specific grade registers using the Grade Details form (see subsection
4.7.4). The assigned value must be within the range that the upper and
lower limits from the Grade Template form established for the register.
For instance, in the previous example, if you use eight for the default
value of the aluminum silicate register (Al Silicate), then for the light
grade, you must enter a grade detail of seven in that register. You would
not need to enter any details for the medium and dark grades of that
particular register. Also note that the lower range limit for that register
must be seven or below.
3.4.7.2.2
Point Sets
Point sets are typically unit points that you group so that a procedure can
reference them during execution. Point sets define a batch path through
a multipath batch process. You can write a generic process that refers to
a point by the point’s position in the procedure’s point set. This position
is identified by the point set index. (For example, POINT SET 1 indicates
the first point in the point set, POINT SET 2 indicates the second point,
and so on.)
The ability to refer to a point by its position in the procedure’s point set
allows the operator to start activities on two different sets of process
units in the plant using the same procedure but different point sets.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
120
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
In other words, the operator must indicate which point set to use when
he or she starts the procedure. A procedure can only use one point set
at a time. To indicate which point set to use, the operator indicates the
procedure and the point set name. After the operator loads the activity,
the system decides which point to use based on how you configured the
point sets.
There can be as many as 16 point tags in a point set and as many as 16
point sets in a procedure. See subsection 4.7.5 for instructions on
configuring point sets. Refer to Using ENVOX Configuration Software
(UM6.1:SW3151) for more information on configuring Unit points.
3
3.4.7.2.3
Batch-End Data
Batch-end data, also called history data, is collected if you answer YES
in the Keep History field on the Procedure form (see subsection 4.7.1).
History data is composed of process start times, unit variable values sent
to the activity point on completion of an operation, batch ID, activity point
state transition messages, activity point alarm activation messages, and
common alarm messages.
The message limit parameter that you configure on the procedure form
limits the number of messages the console saves. If the system
generates more history messages than the cap allows, it places a
message telling that history overflow has occurred with the history data.
3.4.7.2.4
Console Alarm History Records
When you configure the console on the Option Definition form, you must
allocate console memory for the purpose of keeping history records or
batch-end data (see subsection 4.4.2). If you are not configuring a batch
system, the number of alarm history records should be zero.
If you are configuring a batch system, you must calculate the amount of
memory that you need for your history records based on the following
considerations:
J
J
J
The number of batch procedures that you run concurrently
The number of messages allocated for the procedures that run
concurrently
The number of unit variable save areas the procedures use
Each batch procedure that is keeping history in your console requires at
least five history blocks for procedure information if you do not want the
procedure to fail:
J
One for procedure data
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
Two for process start times
J
Two for overflow messages
121
In addition, you usually want a procedure to have room to store
messages and the unit variable save areas that it uses.
A procedure typically receives many change-of-state or alarm messages
during execution. Therefore, to restrict the number of messages that the
console saves, you assign a message limit to each procedure that keeps
history when you configure the procedure.
Note ... The alarm history records that you configure for your console
must be more than the total number of history blocks the
console needs for all of the batch procedures that run
simultaneously.
If you have not allocated enough history records for your console to run
the necessary activities concurrently, at least one of your activity points
will fail with the error number 24, NO HISTORY RECORDS AVAILABLE.
The rule of thumb for calculating console alarm history records is:
Alarm History Records = i ´ (5 + Save Areas + Number of Messages)
where
i = Number of procedures that will run concurrently
Save Areas = Number of unit variable save areas the
procedure uses
Number of Messages = Number of messages you
configure for the procedure
The exact number of records required is the sum of 5 + the UV Save
Areas + the Number of Messages configured for each of the procedures
that will execute concurrently.
Remember that even though you may have 32 activity points, perhaps
not all of them run a procedure at the same time. Also, some procedures
have larger message limits than others, but will the procedures with the
largest message limits run at the same time?
Basically, try to configure the largest number of history records for your
console that you need at one time in your application, not the worst case
possible with all of the activity points and procedures in your
configuration.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
122
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.4.7.2.5
Process Instructions
Process instructions are the procedure statements that:
3
J
Start and queue operations on unit points in the UOC
J
Acquire and release common equipment for resource allocation
J
Wait for specified events to occur before continuing
J
Schedule CHIP programs to run
The following paragraphs describe the process instructions that you can
use and a brief description of each. To configure these instructions, you
must use the language editor on the ENVOX configuration workstation.
Refer to the Using ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151)
manual for complete information on the Language Editor. For a complete
list of the procedure statements and the required operands, refer to
Appendix E.
ABORT DISABLE — The ABORT DISABLE instruction does not
process an abort request received on the console unless it is later
enabled. You usually use the instruction to protect control operations that
must not be interrupted. Abort disable is in effect for an entire procedure
or until the console processes an ABORT ENABLE instruction for the
procedure.
ABORT ENABLE — This instruction either permits the operator to abort
a process, or allows CHIP to abort a process by sending an abort
request. Abort enable is in effect for an entire procedure or until the
console processes an ABORT DISABLE instruction for the procedure.
ABORT IF REQUESTED — Use this instruction in conjunction with the
ABORT DISABLE instruction. When the console processes an ABORT
IF REQUESTED instruction, the activity in progress aborts if a previous
abort request was not honored because abort requests were disabled for
the procedure.
ACQUIRE — The ACQUIRE instruction lets you implement resource
control by decrementing the resource attribute of a point. You can
include a list of points, called an acquire list, after the ACQUIRE
instruction. This list or index is a number from 1 to 16.
When the console processes the acquire list, the first available point in
the list is acquired for the process. The ACQUIRE instruction has from 2
to as many as 17 parameters. The first parameter is always the acquire
index. The next operands are from 1 to as many as 16 point references.
You can reference these points by tag or point-set index. The points
must be UOC points, and you must target them to the console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
123
Once the console processes the ACQUIRE instruction, the activity
verifies that the acquire index that you specified is not already in use. If
that activity is using the index, the activity fails. Otherwise, the activity
sends an acquire request to the UOC for the first point in the acquire list.
If there is only one point, and it is already acquired, the activity enters
the AQUIREWT (acquire wait) state. Every 15 seconds it tries to acquire
that point again.
In the case of a list of points, the activity tries to acquire each point in the
order listed. If those points are not available, the activity waits 15
seconds and tries each point again, starting at the beginning of the list. If
the activity acquires a point, you should operate it using the acquire set
index so that you do not have to be concerned with which point in the list
you did finally acquire.
If your controller is a UOC+ or later revision, it saves information about
the activity that acquires a point. Saving information allows the activity to
interrogate the UOC if a switchover occurs while the activity is
processing the acquire instruction. For more information on switchovers,
refer to subsection 3.3.3.
BATCH END LOG — The BATCH END LOG instruction tells the activity
(the active console in a redundant pair) to print a specific report. The
activity enters the PRINTING state when BATCH END LOG is processed
and the activity waits for the report to finish printing before continuing to
process instructions. The printer on the console that is running the
activity prints the report. The only parameter for this instruction is the
report header for the report that you want printed.
CHANGE UVS — The CHANGE UVS instruction sends a request to a
specified unit point to change as many as 16 unit variables. This
instruction is useful if you wish to operate a unit using more than 16 unit
variables. You can initialize as many as16 variables with the operate
instruction and as many as 16 more with this instruction.
Be aware that the unit variables that you specify in this instruction go
straight to the unit variable locations for immediate use. If you are using
a queue stack, you do not usually use this instruction because you could
change the variables at the wrong time. Note that this instruction is
invalid if an advanced batch enhancement (ABE) UOC hosts the unit
point.
The CHANGE UVS instruction has from 2 to 17 parameters. The first
operand is always the unit point desired. The point tag, point set index,
or acquire set index can reference this unit point. The remaining
operands are as many as 16 unit variable values, which the activity point
sends to the unit.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
124
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The variable values consist of two parts: the unit variable number of the
variable that you want to initialize and the initial value that you want to
assign to that variable. You can specify the initial value in three ways: as
a constant real value, as a reference to a grade value in a specific grade
register, or as a unit point reference. A unit point reference can be a
point tag, a point set reference, or an acquire set reference to a unit
point that indicates that the unit constant is the value.
3
The point you change must be a unit point, must be in COMPUTER
mode, must not be on an ABE UOC, and must be targeted to the
console running the activity. If the point does not have these three
characteristics, the activity fails or goes to the WARNING state,
depending on the fail level.
COMMON ALARM — The COMMON ALARM instruction tells the activity
to either start or stop keeping a history on the alarms of the points listed
in the instruction. If you request a history for the current procedure, the
activity keeps alarm data for the points in the common alarm instruction
with the rest of the procedure data.
An activity can keep alarm data for as many as 32 points at a time. The
activity fails if you try to add more than 32 points to the common alarm
list. These points are typically common resources shared by multiple
units. For points that are used by multiple units and cannot be tied to a
single unit, COMMON ALARM allows that point’s alarms to be saved.
The COMMON ALARM instruction has from 1 to as many as 17
parameters. The first operand is the type of action to take with the
common alarm list: either ADD or REMOVE. If you make REMOVE the
first operand, and don’t include any other operands, then the activity
point removes all of the points from the common alarm list.
Otherwise, the remaining operands are references to the points you want
to add or remove from the common alarm list. You can reference these
points by tag, index in a point set, or index in an acquire set. You must
target these points to the console that is running the activity, and the
activity fails if you attempt to remove a point that is not in the common
alarm list.
This is an example of a COMMON ALARM instruction you might enter:
COMMON ALARM (REMOVE)
DELAY FROM — The DELAY FROM instruction makes the activity delay
until a certain time. The delay can take place from right now, from the
time the procedure started, or from midnight last night.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
125
The DELAY FROM instruction has two parameters. The first parameter
indicates when the delay started. You specify it using the terms now,
start, or midnight. The second operand is always an amount of time,
specified in minutes. The value must be in the range from 0 to 1440
minutes (a day). The value can be either a constant value or a reference
to a grade value in a grade register. This is an example of a DELAY
FROM instruction you might enter:
DELAY FROM (NOW, 10)
This delays the process for 10 minutes from when it receives the
instruction. If the current time was 12:48:02, the process continues at
12:58:02.
If you specify the first operand to be now, the activity enters the DELAY
state until it reaches the delay time. If the first operand is start, the
activity calculates the number of minutes between the present time and
the procedure start time. If the number of minutes that you specify to
delay is more than the number of minutes between the present time and
the start time, then it takes the difference to determine the number of
minutes to delay and enters the DELAY state.
If the first operand is midnight, the activity determines whether the
number of minutes you specified is more than the number of minutes
from midnight to the current time. If the number of minutes that you
specified is more than this amount, then the activity takes the difference
between the two to determine the number of minutes to delay. It then
enters the DELAY state.
FAIL IF NO BACKUP — The FAIL IF NO BACKUP instruction makes
possible protecting critical control sections in a procedure from failures
without a backup. When the console processes the FAIL IF NO BACKUP
instruction, the activity fails if the standby console communications status
is bad. Once the standby console is again operating, the operator or
CHIP can request the activity to retry execution from where the failure
occurred.
FAIL ON — The FAIL ON instruction defines the level of failure that
causes an activity to go to the FAILED state. A lesser-level failure takes
the activity to the WARNING state and then back to the ACTIVE state
where the activity continues.
The FAIL ON instruction has one parameter. Its value must be either
WARNING, ERROR, or FATAL. Because it is possible for operators with
TUNE privileges to start procedures at any process boundary, you
should set your desired fail level using the FAIL ON instruction as the
first instruction of each process. If no FAIL ON instruction is processed in
a procedure, the default value is WARNING.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
126
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Once the activity processes this instruction, the fail level remains at the
value specified until it is changed with another FAIL ON instruction or
until this iteration completes. This is an example of a FAIL ON instruction
you might enter:
FAIL ON (ERROR)
3
For a list of the various failure codes and their associated fail levels, see
Table D-16.
LOG — The LOG instruction is similar to the BATCH-END LOG
instruction in that it tells the activity (the active console in a redundant
pair) to print a specific report. However, the activity continues to process
instructions without waiting for the report to complete printing. The printer
on the console that is running the activity prints the report. The only
parameter for this instruction is the report header for the report that you
want printed.
MESSAGE — The MESSAGE instruction lets you send text to the
STATES and OAR printer. You usually use this capability to print a
message that marks a location in processing. The text can be as long as
80 alphanumeric characters. The STATES and OAR printer on the
console that is running the activity prints the message. If this activity is
running on a console in a redundant pair, the active console prints the
message. The only parameter for the message instruction is the text to
be printed.
OPERATE — The OPERATE instruction lets an activity start an
operation for a unit point, send as many as 16 variables for unit
variables, and collect batch history data. The instruction does this by
sending a request for a unit to begin an operation at a particular phase.
In case the unit is currently running an operation, the OPERATE
instruction causes the new operation to be queued to run.
A unit limit allows one operation to be running while as many as four
additional operations are queued to run on a given unit point. If an
activity tries to queue a fifth operation, the activity fails. You can correct
this by pairing at least one of the five OPERATE instructions with a
corresponding WAITUNTIL instruction, causing the queue to decrement
before exceeding the limit.
In addition, as many as 16 unit variables can be sent to the unit, and
when the unit completes its operation, it sends as many as 16 unit
variables back to the console. If the activity is keeping a history, the
console stores the unit variables sent back to it in one of 16 activity save
areas.
The OPERATE instruction has from 4 to 20 parameters. The first
operand is always the unit point reference. You can refer to the unit point
by its tag, its index in a point set, or its index in the acquire set.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
127
The second operand is always the name of the operation you want to
schedule, and the third is always the phase that you want the operation
to begin at. The fourth operand is the number of the unit-variable-save
area in which the activity stores batch-end data from the UOC.
You enter 0 for no history, or 1 to as many as 16 for the save areas that
you want to use. Note that each OPERATE instruction requiring data
storage must reference a separate save area, even if fewer than 16 unit
variables are stored at a time. Once a batch-end log has been printed,
the save areas can be reused.
The remaining operands specify as many as 16 unit variable values to
be sent to the unit with the operate request. The variable values are
similar to the variable values for the CHANGE UVS instruction. They
consist of two parts: the number of the unit variable that you want to
initialize and the initial value that you want to assign to that variable.
You can specify the initial value in three ways: as a constant real value,
as a reference to a grade value in a specific grade register, or as a unit
point reference. A unit point reference can be a point tag, a point-set
reference, or acquire-set reference to a unit point that indicates that the
unit constant is the value.
Unit variable parameters do not have to be in any order. For example,
assigning values to the variables 6, 1, 19, 4, and 5 in that order is valid.
However, unless the point you operate is a unit point, is in COMPUTER
mode, and is targeted to the console running the activity, the activity
fails. Also, any error response to the operate instruction causes the
activity either to fail or to go to the WARNING state, depending on the
fail level.
RELEASE — The RELEASE instruction increments the resource
attribute of the point specified in the instruction because it releases
control of that point. The RELEASE instruction is the complement of an
ACQUIRE instruction. This instruction has one parameter, which is the
acquire set index of the point to be released.
If the acquire set index does not contain an acquired point, the activity
fails. If the acquire set index does contain an acquired point, the activity
sends a release-resource request to the UOC that sources the point that
index references. If the request is successful, you can acquire another
point using that acquire set index.
If the current iteration of the procedure finishes without releasing an
acquired point, this causes a warning level failure. Also, you cannot
release a point that you did not acquire.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
128
3
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
SCHEDULE — The SCHEDULE instruction lets the activity ask CHIP to
execute a program. The SCHEDULE instruction has from three to as
many as six parameters. The first operand is either WAIT or NO WAIT. It
indicates whether the activity should wait for CHIP to release the activity
before going on. The second operand is the name of the CHIP device,
and the third operand is the name of the program that you want the
computer running CHIP to execute. The last three operands are optional
input parameters for the CHIP program.
If the first operand is WAIT, the activity enters the SCHEDULE WAIT
state. Otherwise, the activity continues processing instructions. Note that
because CHIP can request the activity point to continue, the CHIP
program should change the activity point mode to CMPTR if it is MAN
mode. Otherwise, the activity rejects the continue request and remains in
the SCHEDULE WAIT state.
WAITUNTIL — The WAITUNTIL instruction makes the activity wait for
the specified unit to complete the specified operation before letting the
activity continue processing. This particular operation can be active or in
the queue.
If the unit has already completed the specified operation when the
activity point processes the WAIT UNTIL instruction, the activity
continues processing instructions. If the unit has not completed the
operation when the activity processes the WAIT UNTIL instruction, the
activity enters the UNITWAIT state until the operation does finish. If this
activity did not start the operation, the activity returns a failure message.
The WAITUNTIL instruction has two operands: the unit point reference
and the name of the operation to wait on. As stated earlier, you can refer
to the unit point by its tag, index in a point set, or index in an acquire set.
There are several requirements for the WAIT UNTIL instruction to work
correctly:
J
J
J
The point to wait on must be a unit point and must be targeted to the
console running the activity.
The operation specified must be listed for that unit point in the
console database.
The activity requesting the wait must have started this operation
using the OPERATE instruction.
Note that if you abort the process, the activity stays in the UNITWAIT
state until the operator or CHIP cancels the wait or until the operation
completes.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.7.3
129
Targeting the Activity Point
You must target the activity point to those devices that you want to
receive data from the point. If you target an activity point’s data to a
console, the activity can be operated from that console even though the
activity point data may come from a different console.
The activity point sends data over the data highway to the target devices
at ten-second intervals regardless of the configured rate. The activity
point also sends an update any time a parameter changes. The reporting
mode and sample interval defined on the Target Data form do not apply
to activity points.
The target definition determines both how the console handles alarms for
the point and which display to access when the point is in an alarm state.
When targeting an activity point, you should limit the targeted devices to
eight or fewer. This limit not only keeps the messages from overloading
the highway, it also decreases CPU load on the console where the
activity point resides.
3.4.7.4
Activity Point States
The activity point can be in different states or conditions. Each state has
certain properties or characteristics. The allowable state transitions and
the actions necessary to cause the transition are outlined in Figure 3-17.
An operator must have particular privileges to take actions and make
requests when the point is in a particular state. Only certain requests can
be made from a particular state. Each state, the necessary privileges,
and the possible requests are outlined in detail in Table 3-18 and
Table 3-19. Table 3-18 addresses actions performed at the console, and
Table 3-19 addresses actions performed through the Computer/Highway
Interface Package (CHIP).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
130
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Not
Loaded
Remove
Remove
Load...
Remove
Load...
Retry
3
Idle
Start...
Reports...
Start...
Serious Exception Condition
Warning Exception Condition
Batchend
Load...
Abort
Cancel/Continue
Activity
Complete
Printing
Active
Hold At...
Hold Next
Wait
Condition
Aborted
End Of Log,
Abort
Wait Satisfied
Continue
Cancel/Continue
Abort
Warning
Failed
Warning
Exception
Condition
End Of Log,
Abort
Cancel/Continue
Printing
Schedule Wait
Unit Wait
Acquire Wait
Delay
Printing
Printing
Figure 3-17.
Abort
End Of Log,
Abort
Cancel/Continue
Abort
Aborted
Reports...
Reports...
Serious Exception Condition
Holding
Note:
Remove
All states go to the DOWNLOAD state when you
update the database (do a partial download).
Activity State Transition Diagram
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
131
Table 3-18. Required Privileges and Modes for Console Requests
And the Activity Is in One of these States,
the Operator Must Have This Privilege (1) ...
If the Operator
Takes This Action
at the Console ...
NOTLOADED
AQUIREWT
UNITWAIT
SCHEDULE
PRINTING
IDLE
HOLDING
ABORTED
FAILED
WARNING
ACTIVE
BATCH
END
DELAY
oper (2)
oper
oper
oper
oper
oper
oper
oper
oper
Set to Computer
oper
oper
oper
oper
oper
oper
oper
oper
oper
Load... (6)
oper
oper
----
----
----
----
----
oper
----
Start... (6)
----
default(3)
----
----
----
----
----
default
----
Continue (6)
----
----
----
oper
----
----
----
----
----
Cancel/Continue (6)
----
----
tune (4)
----
----
----
----
----
tune
Retry (6)
Set to Manual
----
----
----
----
----
oper
----
----
----
Next (6)
----
oper
oper
oper
----
oper
oper
oper
oper
Hold At... (6)
----
oper
oper
oper
----
oper
oper
oper
oper
Clear Hold (6)
----
oper
oper
oper
----
oper
oper
oper
oper
Abort (6)
----
----
oper
oper
----
----
oper
----
oper
Clear Abort (6)
----
----
oper
oper
----
oper
oper
oper
oper
Remove (6)
----
oper
----
----
oper
oper
----
oper
----
Report (6)
----
----
----
----
oper
oper
----
oper
----
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
Hold
tune
(5)
Change DDP grade
----
Change DDP point
set
----
tune
tune
tune
----
----
----
tune
tune
Change DDP iteration
----
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
----
tune
Change DDP
continuous iteration
----
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
Change DDP fail level
----
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
Change DDP delay
----
----
----
----
----
----
----
----
tune
Change DDP acquire
set
----
----
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
tune
1.
The activity’s mode must be manual (MAN), except when the operator changes modes.
2.
oper = The operator must have the operate or tune privilege.
3.
default = The operator must accept default values.
4.
tune = Tune privilege is required.
5.
ok = Request is valid in any mode.
6.
The activity point must be in MAN mode to execute this command.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
132
Table 3-19. Required Modes for CHIP Requests
And the Activity Is in One of These States,
the Activity Also Must Be in This Mode ...
If You Take This
Action ...
3
Change mode
NOTLOADED
ok
(1)
IDLE
AQUIREWT
UNITWAIT
SCHEDULE
PRINTING
HOLDING
ABORTED
FAILED
WARNING
ACTIVE
BATCH
END
DELAY
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
Change grade(3)
----
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
Change unit DBI(3)
----
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
Change iteration(3)
----
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
----
mode
Change continuous
iteration(3)
----
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
Change fail level(3)
----
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
mode
Change time delay
----
----
----
----
----
----
----
----
mode
mode
mode
----
----
----
----
----
mode
----
mode
mode
----
----
----
----
----
mode
----
----
mode
----
----
----
----
----
----
----
----
mode
----
----
----
----
----
mode
----
mode
mode
----
----
----
----
----
mode
----
LCON Hold (3)
----
mode
mode
mode
----
mode
mode
mode
mode
Hold (3)
----
mode
mode
mode
----
mode
mode
mode
mode
----
mode
mode
mode
----
mode
mode
mode
mode
----
----
----
mode
----
----
----
----
----
(3)
LCON Load (3)
Load
(3)
LCON Start
(3)
Start (3)
LCON Load and
Start (3)
Clear hold (3)
Proceed
(3)
Cancel wait
(3)
(2)
----
----
mode
----
----
----
----
----
mode
(3)
----
----
----
----
----
mode
----
----
----
Abort (3)
----
----
mode
mode
----
----
mode
----
mode
----
----
mode
mode
----
mode
mode
----
mode
----
mode
----
----
mode
mode
----
mode
----
Request Batch end
log (3)
----
----
----
----
mode
mode
----
mode
----
Change DDP grade
----
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
Change DDP point
set
----
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
Change DDP
iteration
----
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
----
ok
Change DDP
continuous
interaction
----
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
Retry
Clear abort (3)
Remove
(3)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
133
Table 3-19. Required Modes for CHIP Requests (Continued)
And the Activity Is in One of These States,
the Activity Also Must Be in This Mode ...
If You Take This
Action ...
NOTLOADED
IDLE
AQUIREWT
UNITWAIT
SCHEDULE
PRINTING
HOLDING
ABORTED
FAILED
WARNING
ACTIVE
BATCH
END
DELAY
Change DDP fail
level
----
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
Change DDP delay
----
----
----
----
----
----
----
----
ok
Change DDP
acquire set
----
----
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
1.
ok = Request valid in any mode.
2.
mode = Mode of activity point must equal mode of request (manual, computer).
3.
The activity point must be in CMPTR mode to execute this action.
3.4.7.4.1
NOTLOADED State
When an activity point goes to the NOTLOADED state, the system sets
its parameter values as follows:
J
Abort requests are enabled.
J
Abort is not requested.
J
Fail limit is WARNING.
J
J
J
Iteration limit, the current iteration, the statement index, the start
time, the point-set DDPs, the grade data, common alarm data, and
end time are all set to 0.
No holds are set on processes.
The procedure name, grade name, point set name, and process
name are blank.
Two things happen if history information exists or if the point is still
collecting data through the common alarm list at the time the point
changes to the NOT LOADED state. First, the system removes all
common alarm points from the common alarm list. Second, the system
deletes the history information.
An activity point assumes the NOT LOADED state after a total download
or after the operator or CHIP issues a REMOVE command when the
point is in the IDLE, BATCHEND, FAILED, or ABORTED state. If the
operator or CHIP loads the activity point when it is in the NOT LOADED
state, the point changes to the IDLE state.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
134
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.4.7.4.2
IDLE State
When an activity point goes to the IDLE state, the system sets:
3
J
Abort requests enabled
J
Abort is not requested
J
No holds on processes
J
Procedure name, grade name, and point-set name as specified in
the load request
The system also makes a copy of the grade and point-set data as
selected in the load request.
When an activity point is in the IDLE state, you can load it, start it, load
and start it, or remove it. If you load the activity, it returns to the IDLE
state with the new load specifications. While an activity is IDLE, the
grade parameters can be tuned from the console keyboard by an
operator with the TUNE privilege. Once an activity is started, an operator
with the TUNE privilege can still tune the grade parameters, but they
may or may not be sent to the units, depending upon the instructions
already processed by the activity. Loading and starting the activity point
is a CHIP command that takes the activity point to the ACTIVE state.
Starting the activity takes it to the ACTIVE state, and removing the
activity takes it to the NOT LOADED state. Refer to Figure 3-17 for an
overview of activity state transitions.
3.4.7.4.3
ACTIVE State
In the ACTIVE state, the activity processes instructions. If an instruction
requires a wait condition, the point goes to the appropriate WAIT state
(AQUIREWT, UNITWAIT, SCHEDULE, PRINTING, or DELAY). When the
wait ends, the point returns to the ACTIVE state to process the next
instruction.
If abort is enabled for an activity point in the ACTIVE state, and the
operator or CHIP makes an abort request, the activity state becomes
ABORTED. If abort is disabled when the activity point receives an abort
request, the activity remains in the ACTIVE state and ABORT:DI RE
(disabled, requested) is noted on the activity faceplate.
If the procedure ends successfully while the activity point is in the
ACTIVE state, the state changes to BATCHEND. However, if an error
condition occurs, the state changes from ACTIVE to either WARNING or
FAILED, depending on the severity of the error and the current fail level.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.7.4.4
135
HOLDING State
When an activity begins a new process for which a hold has been
requested, the activity point goes into the HOLDING state. The point
remains there until one of the following conditions occurs:
J
J
J
J
3.4.7.4.5
The operator elects to continue the process, or the activity receives a
request from CHIP to proceed. Then the activity point becomes
ACTIVE and processes the first instruction of the process on which it
was holding.
The operator elects to abort the process, or the activity receives a
request from CHIP to abort. Then the activity point becomes
ABORTED.
A redundancy switchover occurs. For more information on
switchovers, refer to subsection 3.4.7.6.
The operator performs an UPDATE CONFIG command. For more
information on database merges, refer to subsection 3.4.7.7.
UNITWAIT State
When an activity processes a WAITUNTIL instruction, it changes to the
UNITWAIT state and waits for the operation to complete. The point
remains there until one of the following conditions occurs:
J
The specified operation completes.
Note ... If the specific operation FAILS and an operator with TUNE
privileges subsequently cancels the OPERATION on the unit
point, the activity point remains in the UNITWAIT state until
either an operator with TUNE privileges or CHIP requests an
activity CANCEL & CONTINUE.
J
J
J
J
An operator with TUNE privileges cancels the current activity wait
state, or the activity receives a cancel-wait request from CHIP.
The operator elects to abort the current procedure, or the activity
receives an abort request from CHIP while abort is enabled.
A redundancy switchover occurs. For more information on
switchovers, refer to subsection 3.4.7.6.
The operator performs an UPDATE CONFIG command. For more
information on database merges, refer to subsection 3.4.7.7.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
136
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.4.7.4.6
AQUIREWT State
When an activity processes an ACQUIRE instruction but cannot acquire
any of the points listed in the instruction because their resource
attributes are zero, the activity point changes to the AQUIREWT state.
The activity point waits 15 seconds and then again tries to acquire the
points. If it still cannot acquire any of the points, it repeats the 15 second
wait-and-retry cycle until one of the following conditions occurs:
3
J
A point is successfully acquired.
J
An error occurs or the activity receives a highway error response.
J
J
J
J
3.4.7.4.7
An operator with TUNE privileges cancels the current activity wait
state, or the activity receives a cancel-wait request from CHIP.
The operator elects to abort the current procedure, or the activity
receives an abort request from CHIP while abort is enabled.
A redundancy switchover occurs. For more information on
switchovers, refer to subsection 3.4.7.6.
The operator performs an UPDATE CONFIG command. For more
information on database merges, refer to subsection 3.4.7.7.
FAILED State
When an activity has a fatal software error or a processing control error
that you determine is unacceptable, the point goes to the FAILED state
and the failure index is displayed on the activity detail display faceplate.
Depending on the PPA mode for the activity point, a transition to the
FAILED state activates the activity point’s B alarm word.
If a history is being kept, the console prints an alarm activation message,
which is logged into the batch history. The point exits the FAILED state
when one of the following conditions occurs:
J
J
J
The operator requests a retry of the procedure statement that caused
the procedure to fail, or the activity receives a retry request from
CHIP. Then the activity point returns to the ACTIVE state and
re-executes the instruction that failed.
The operator requests a report, and enters a report name, or the
activity receives a batch-end log request from CHIP. Then the activity
point enters the PRINTING state until the report prints. The activity
point then returns to the FAILED state.
The operator requests that the activity be removed, or a remove
request is received from CHIP. Then the point goes to the NOT
LOADED state.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.7.4.8
J
A redundancy switchover occurs.
J
The operator performs an UPDATE CONFIG command.
137
WARNING State
If a nonfatal error occurs during the processing of an instruction or if
redundancy communications are bad, the activity point goes to the
WARNING state and the system logs a message. This state does not
indicate the severity of the error; rather, it indicates that the error is below
the current fail level.
Refer to the FAIL ON instruction in subsection 3.4.7.2.5. Also, when the
point goes to the WARNING state, the fail value changes to the number
of the failure that caused the error.
The WARNING state is a transitory state. The activity only enters it long
enough for the system to log a message. Once the system logs the
transition, the activity continues.
3.4.7.4.9
ABORTED State
An activity point changes to the ABORTED state if two things occur:
J
J
Abort must be enabled.
The activity point must receive an abort request from the operator or
from CHIP.
The system defaults to abort enabled when the operator or CHIP loads
the activity point. The procedure statement DISABLE ABORT, however,
can disable abort, while a subsequent ENABLE ABORT can re-enable it.
If abort has been enabled, either the operator or CHIP can request an
ABORT, and the activity state goes to ABORTed. If, however, abort has
been disabled, and the operator or CHIP requests an abort, the system
queues the request, but no abort happens until the activity processes
either the ABORT ENABLE or the ABORT IF REQUESTED instruction. If
an abort is pending, either the operator or CHIP can request a
CLEAR ABORT.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
138
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Depending on the PPA mode for the activity point, a transition to the
ABORTED state may cause the system to print the activity’s alarm
activation message, log the message to history (if the console is keeping
history), and activate the A alarm word, and depending on the current
PPA state, it prints the alarm activation message, displays the configured
A alarm word and logs the message to history. The point exits the
ABORTED state when one of the following conditions occurs:
3
J
J
J
J
3.4.7.4.10
The operator requests a report, and enters a report name, or the
activity receives a batch-end log request from CHIP. Then the activity
point enters the PRINTING state until the report prints. After the
report prints, the activity point returns to the ABORTED state.
The operator requests that the activity be removed, or a remove
request is received from CHIP. Then the point goes to the NOT
LOADED state.
A redundancy switchover occurs. For more information on
switchovers, refer to subsection 3.4.7.6.
The operator performs an UPDATE CONFIG command. For more
information on database merges, refer to subsection 3.4.7.7.
DELAY State
An activity point changes to the DELAY state whenever it processes a
DELAY FROM instruction that has an absolute time to delay greater than
zero. The activity also enters the DELAY state if the delay time is zero,
but only if the instruction is DELAY FROM (NOW).
In this case, the activity delays for one minute. The point exits the
DELAY state when one of the following conditions occurs:
J
J
J
The absolute delay equals the delay timer (unless, of course, this is
the zero case mentioned previously). If this occurs, the process has
completed the delay, and the point returns to the ACTIVE state and
processes the next instruction.
An operator with TUNE privileges tunes the delay timer so that it is
equal to or less than the delay timer on the point’s detailed display
faceplate (unless, of course, this is the zero case mentioned
previously). This tuning satisfies the delay condition. The point
returns to the ACTIVE state and processes the next instruction.
An operator with TUNE privileges cancels the current activity wait
state, or the activity point receives a cancel-wait request from CHIP.
The point returns to the ACTIVE state and processes the next
instruction.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
3.4.7.4.11
139
The operator elects to abort the current procedure, or the activity
point receives an abort request from CHIP while abort is enabled.
Then the point goes to the ABORTED state.
J
A redundancy switchover occurs.
J
The operator performs an UPDATE CONFIG command.
SCHEDULE State
An activity point enters the SCHEDULE state when it processes a
SCHEDULE instruction that has WAIT as a first value. The point exits the
SCHEDULE state when one of the following conditions occurs:
J
J
J
3.4.7.4.12
CHIP notifies the activity point that the program is finished by
sending a cancel-wait request. Then the point returns to the ACTIVE
state and processes the next instruction.
An operator with TUNE privileges cancels the current activity wait
state. Then the point returns to the ACTIVE state and processes the
next instruction.
The operator elects to abort the current procedure, or the activity
point receives an abort request from CHIP while abort is enabled.
Then the point goes to the ABORTED state.
J
A redundancy switchover occurs.
J
The operator performs an UPDATE CONFIG command.
DOWNLOAD State
An activity point enters the DOWNLOAD state when the operator
requests a partial download merge while an activity is running. When the
system completes the merge or the operator cancels the merge, the
point returns to its previous state. An activity point does not accept
operator or CHIP requests while it is in the DOWNLOAD state.
3.4.7.4.13
BATCHEND State
The activity point changes to the BATCHEND state when it finishes
processing a procedure. While in the BATCHEND state, the activity
history is still accessible by requesting a report, and entering a report
name, or through requests from CHIP for batch-end data access.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
140
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
If the operator loads this activity, it changes to the IDLE state. If the
operator requests a start, it goes to the ACTIVE state. If the operator
requests a batch-end log, the activity point enters the PRINTING state
until the system prints the report, and then it returns to the BATCHEND
state.
3.4.7.4.14
3
PRINTING State
An activity goes to the PRINTING state while it waits for a batch end
report to finish printing. The BATCH END LOG instruction also causes a
report to start printing. The point exits the PRINTING state when one of
the following conditions occurs:
J
J
J
3.4.7.5
The printer notifies the activity point that the report is printed. When
the point gets this notification, the point returns to its previous state.
An operator with TUNE privileges cancels the current activity wait
state, or the activity point receives a CHIP cancel-wait request. The
report printing is aborted and the activity point goes to the ACTIVE
state and processes the next instruction if the BATCH END LOG
instruction was processed. If the operator requested the report, the
point returns to the state that it came from.
The operator elects to abort the current procedure, or a CHIP abort
request is received while abort is enabled. Then the point goes to the
ABORTED state if the BATCH END LOG instruction was processed.
If the operator requested the report, the point returns to the state that
it came from.
J
A redundancy switchover occurs.
J
The operator performs an UPDATE CONFIG command.
Resource Allocation
If your plant contains units that are interchangeable between batches,
such as multiple holding tanks or multiple reactors, Fisher-Rosemount
Systems strongly recommends that you implement resource control.
That is, make sure that you have ownership of (control of) equipment
before attempting to operate that equipment.
Fisher-Rosemount Systems refers to the process of gaining ownership of
that equipment as acquiring that equipment. You can implement
resource control using activities capabilities such as acquire sets, the
ACQUIRE instruction, acquire lists, and acquire indexes.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.7.5.1
141
Resource Allocation for Batch Processing
Acquire sets are much like point sets in that they are typically a group of
unit points that a procedure references during execution. By using
acquire sets, you can use the plant process equipment more efficiently.
Unlike point sets, the system builds an acquire set by processing acquire
instructions. The points in the acquire set may change every time the
procedure runs, depending on what equipment is available at the time
the procedure started.
This section discusses some practices that should help you with
resource allocation and should help you avoid potential problem areas.
To discuss these practices, it is necessary to create an example plant.
Refer to the plant area shown in Figure 3-18.
The example shown in Figure 3-18 consists of three holding tanks,
TK-101, TK-102, and TK-103. These holding tanks feed through a
header to two reactors, R-201 and R-202. Imagine that these reactors
have agitators for mixing or reacting.
When the reactors finish mixing the ingredients from the holding tanks,
the batch goes to one of three centrifuges—CF-301, CF-302, or
CF-303—for spinning. The product spins in this centrifuge for some
specified time and then is pumped downstream for further processing.
The procedure requires the use of one holding tank, one reactor, and
one centrifuge. Since there are multiple units, the operator can select the
equipment path as well as the product and grade when he or she uses
the LOAD command to load the activity. These paths are the point sets.
3.4.7.5.2
Batch Processing with Point Sets
Paths that depend on which equipment is available and can be acquired
are called acquire sets. Acquire sets are more efficient than point sets for
this application because they use the available equipment instead of
waiting for the specific equipment in the point set.
For this example plant, you would typically create 18 point sets for this
area to encompass every combination of holding tank, reactor, and
centrifuge. It is good practice to name the point sets so that the operator
can tell by the name what equipment is in the set.
For instance, for the batch path shown in the Figure 3-18, you might
name it T1-R1-CF2 to indicate tank one, reactor one, and centrifuge two.
Normally, you would create the 18 point sets with similar names to
represent each batch path, starting with T1-R1-CF1 and going through
T3-R2-CF3.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
142
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.4.7.5.3
Batch Processing with Acquire Sets
A sample process, described in the following paragraphs and based on
the plant in Figure 3-18, illustrates how to use acquire sets.
Because this application has multiple batch paths, the example process
uses acquire sets. Since acquire sets are dynamic, you should keep
track of the units that your process acquires.
3
Batch Path
TK-101
TK-102
R-201
CF-301
Figure 3-18.
TK-103
Holding Tanks
Reactors
R-202
CF-302
CF-303
Centrifuges
Sample Batch Processing Area
Suppose the operator of this area selects the point set TK1-R2-CF3
when he or she loads the activity that runs your procedure. This set
contains the tank TK-101, the reactor R-202, and centrifuge CF-303.
Within the procedure is the process that you wrote to control the units.
Your process instructions may look something like the example in
Figure 3-19.
Note that the example shows the use of acquire lists and that each
possible unit for that location in the point set is listed in the acquire list.
This is necessary to make your process work with every point set even
though you may be checking the availability of a unit twice.
Notice in the example that the operate instructions always control the
point by its location in the acquire set (the acquire set index). This
ensures that you are operating the unit that you acquired.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
143
Also notice that one of the operations is called TRANSFER. This might
indicate that a batch is transferring from one unit to another.
If such a transfer is possible in your process, it is a good practice to
allocate two of your unit variables to keep track of the previous unit and
current unit in the process, in case a redundancy switchover occurs. If
you decide to reserve two locations for the purpose of tracking your
batch to avoid problems in the event of a switchover, you need to make
provisions in your operations to accommodate those unit variables as
well. For more information on what happens during a redundancy
switchover, refer to subsections 3.3.3 and 3.3.4.
Acquire Index
Acquire List
ACQUIRE (1,POINT SET 1,TK-101, TK-102, TK-103)
OPERATE (ACQUIRE SET 1, DISCHARGE, PHASE,0)
ACQUIRE (2,POINT SET 2, R-201, R-202)
OPERATE (ACQUIRE SET 2, TRANSFER, PHASE,0)
OPERATE (ACQUIRE SET 2, FILL, PHASE,0)
OPERATE (ACQUIRE SET 2, MIX, PHASE,0)
Figure 3-19.
3.4.7.6
ENVOX Language Editor—Acquire Instruction
Activity Redundancy
Activity points, as console-resident points, support a redundancy feature.
If you configure a pair of consoles to be redundant and you source
activity points at one console of the pair and target the points to both
consoles in the pair, you create a backup that can take over in case one
set of electronics fails. The redundancy actions activity points perform
consist of:
J
Data integrity exchange
J
Resynchronization of the standby
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
144
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.4.7.6.1
3
J
Process instruction lockstepping
J
Switchover processing
J
History collection
Data Integrity Exchange
An activity point must determine that the configuration it needs is the
same in both the primary and secondary consoles. The point
accomplishes this with a data exchange between the two consoles (a
global exchange) and with a data exchange between each pair of activity
points (a local exchange). Table 3-20 summarizes the interrelationship of
global and local data integrity exchanges. The following subsections
describe each data integrity exchange in more detail.
Table 3-20. The Status Effects of Global and Local Data Validation on
Redundancy
This Data Validation
Status ...
Has This Effect on Redundancy ...
Global data integrity
exchange is completed
successfully
Normal execution and backup continues. Manual
switchover is allowed, and automatic switchover should
cause no failures.
Local data integrity
exchange succeeds and
is validated, but global
data is not validated
The console reports a warning on global validation.
Normal execution and backup continue. Manual
switchover is allowed, and automatic switchover should
cause no failures.
Local data integrity
succeeds, but one or
more loaded procedures
are not validated.
The console reports a warning on global validation and
on local validation for each procedure that is not
validated. Backup is only available for procedures with a
good local validation. Manual switchover is disabled, and
automatic switchover causes a failure in activity points
with bad local validation.
No procedures are
loaded, and global data is
not validated.
The console reports a warning on global validation.
Normal execution and backup continue. Manual
switchover is allowed, and automatic switchover should
cause no failures.
No procedures are loaded
and global data is
validated.
Normal execution and backup continue. Manual
switchover is allowed, and automatic switchover should
cause no failures.
Global Data Integrity Exchange — The global data integrity information
is composed of the configuration-generation time stamp the ENVOX
configuration workstation embeds in each procedure, a list of the
highway access numbers for each activity point you configure, and the
number of history blocks you configure for the console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
145
After a total download or when the backup status (as determined by
console redundancy) goes from BAD to GOOD, the active console
contacts the standby console and requests its global data integrity
information. If the active console cannot contact the standby, it waits 15
seconds before retrying. This is repeated three times before the active
console concludes that the standby console is unavailable.
The standby console always waits for proper global data validation
before it assumes any redundancy functions after the power-up and
initial download. Therefore, if global data-integrity exchange has not
occurred, the redundant partner does not serve as a backup. If more
than 5 minutes elapse after you download the standby console and the
console does not receive a global data-integrity exchange request from
the active console, the standby console requests that the active console
initiate the global data-integrity exchange.
Local Data Integrity Exchange — To support partial downloads to
redundant pairs, each activity point performs a local data integrity
exchange when the operator or CHIP loads an activity point or activities
(the aggregate of all activity points) re-synchronizes an activity point (see
resynchronization below). The data exchanged by a local integrity
exchange is a subset of the global data integrity exchange (the
configuration-generation time stamp the ENVOX configuration
workstation embeds in a procedure).
If the time stamp for a given procedure is not the same in both consoles,
the active console may execute the procedure but the standby console
does not act as a backup for that activity point. The activity point displays
the status PRCFG? The active console assumes that, because the time
stamp in the procedure is different between the partners, that a change
has been made to the procedure but it has been downloaded to only one
partner. You can rectify this situation by performing a total download to
both partners. Note that an activity point that has the status PRCFG?
always has the status NTSYNC (not synchronized).
3.4.7.6.2
Resynchronization of the Standby
The execution of an activity point’s process instructions occurs only in
the active console of a redundant pair. Every time an activity point’s
internal database changes, that change is reported to the standby
console. The standby console must acknowledge and accept the
updates to insure that it is prepared to begin execution in the event of a
switchover.
If the standby console fails to acknowledge or rejects the update, the
activity point displays the status NTSYNC. This status shows that the
database for this activity point in the active console is not the same as
the same point’s database in the standby console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
146
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Because switching over to the partner when the database cannot be
regarded as being accurate may cause undesirable results in the batch,
Activities disables manual switchovers when at least one activity point’s
status is NTSYNC. Also, if at least one activity point’s status is NTSYNC,
the console redundancy status is NOT SYNCHED on the integrity
display.
The active console tries to recover from this situation by transmitting the
database to the partner for any activity point with a status of NTSYNC.
This operation is called resynchronization.
3
The activity point does not accept operator changes while the
resynchronization operation takes place. This allows the activity point to
be in a steady state while resynchronization is completed.
Note ... The data sent from the active console to the standby console to
accomplish activity resynchronization does not include history
information.
Generally, the cause of NTSYNC is due to one of the following:
J
J
J
3.4.7.6.3
A highway communications failure
A configuration error (such as mis-configuring the highway access
list)
A database merge or total download to the partner
Process Instruction Lockstepping
Some of the database updates between partners for the activity point are
more important than others. When an activity point finishes execution of
a process instruction, it goes to the next instruction (using the statement
index and the process index).
After the activity point proceeds to the next process instruction to be
executed, the activity point sends an update to the standby so that it
knows which instruction is about to be executed in the activity. This
insures that, in the event of a switchover, the standby console would
begin execution at the same process instruction where the activity left
off.
This update is called lockstepping. If a lockstep (updating the standby
with the instruction to be executed) fails, then the activity point generates
fail value 6. Fail value 6 (activity lockstep failure) is a warning-level fail
value.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
147
Note ... You can decide if the procedure should fail when a lockstep
failure occurs. If you do not wish the activity to fail on a lockstep
failure, set your fail level to fail on errors.
3.4.7.6.4
Switchover Processing
The purpose of redundancy is to allow a hot (active) backup to continue
operation if one set of console electronics fails or receives servicing.
Review subsections 3.3 and 3.4 for additional information.
When an activity point is notified by console redundancy that a
switchover is in progress, the point must temporarily pause all activities
to determine what actions to perform to allow the standby console to
take over execution of the activities (to become the active console). The
actions for each state are detailed in Table 3-21.
Table 3-21. The Effects of Switchovers on States
If a Switchover
Occurs in This
State ...
The Activity Point ...
ABORTED
Performs processing necessary to return to the ABORTED state
AQUIREWT
Queries the UOC to determine if an acquire was successful
before the switchover occurred. If a point was acquired before
the switchover, execution resumes with the next instruction.
Otherwise, the current instruction is reexecuted. Note that only
UOC+ and later revisions of UOCs support this query.
ACTIVE
Begin execution at the correct instruction in the newly active
console.
BATCHEND
Performs the processing necessary to return to the BATCHEND
state
DELAY
Performs the processing necessary to return to the DELAY state.
Note that the instruction is reexecuted and so performs the full
delay.
DOWNLOAD
Takes no action until the partial download ends. At that time, the
activity point returns to its former state and then determines what
switchover actions to take.
FAILED
Performs the processing necessary to return to the FAILED state
HOLDING
Accesses the correct procedure, then processes and returns to
the HOLDING state
IDLE
Performs the processing necessary to return to the IDLE state
NTLOADED
Performs the processing necessary to return to the NTLOADED
state
PRINTING
Requests that the printer abort the report (if it is currently printing)
or delete it from the print queue (if it is still waiting to be printed).
The activity point going active then reexecutes the batch-end log
statement, and the report begins printing again.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
148
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Table 3-21. The Effects of Switchovers on States (Continued)
If a Switchover
Occurs in This
The Activity Point ...
State ...
3
SCHEDULE
Performs the processing necessary to return to the SCHEDULE
state. The activity does not again request the program from
CHIP. If the program finishes while the switchover is in progress,
the operator can click on the CANCEL & CONTINUE button with
the pointing device’s primary button to let the activity continue.
UNITWAIT
The current instruction is reexecuted and the activity point
returns to the UNITWAIT state if the operation has not
completed.
WARNING
Reexecute the current instruction in the newly active console.
If a redundant console switchover occurs, the operations in the UOCs
also need special configuration to allow the newly active console to pick
up and continue operating as if no change had occurred. You can
configure each unit operation to either continue or not continue if an
associated console fails.
For example, if an activity in console X sends an OPERATE request to
unit A for operation A, you can configure operation A to not continue on
the associated failed console. That way, if console X fails and control
transfers to console Y, operation A fails on console X and requires
operator intervention to either retry or ignore the failure.
If, however, you configure operation A to continue when the associated
console fails, the operation continues, and no operator intervention is
necessary. This is a decision for the process and configuration engineers
to make as a team.
If automatic switchovers are disabled, the ERR status message appears
on the faceplates of redundant activity points. If an automatic switchover
occurs and an activity point’s status is NTSYNC, the activity point fails
with a fail value 34 (Standby Data Invalid On Switchover —
Fatal). The activity point displays its point data on the console
faceplate (except that the state is FAILED and the fail value is 34).
Note ... Though it is possible to RETRY from a fail value 34, it is not
advisable because the standby console’s data is different from
the active console’s data. Because the differences could be
either trivial or critical, you must verify that the differences are
acceptable before attempting a RETRY.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.4.7.6.5
149
Redundancy Effects On History
For redundant consoles, each console keeps the batch-end history for
an activity point. Because of the potential size of data, batch-end history
is not included in the resynchronization data. As a result, if an activity
point goes into the NTSYNC status, each console may have different
history information for that activity point.
If the problem is caused by different history information, it may be
minimized by setting the fail level to WARNING. Setting it to WARNING
causes a transition to the FAILED state for procedures that keep history
if fail value 7 (Standby Has Lost Backup History) occurs. After
the activity point reports a fail value of 7 and the activity point is
resynchronized with the partner, the activity point reports a fail value of 9
(fail value 9 never causes a failure, regardless of the current fail level).
The history missing from the standby console’s data consists of all
history gathered between fail value 7 and fail value 9. This history is not
available in the standby console if a switchover occurs.
3.4.7.6.6
Enabling Activity Redundancy
Your primary tool for enabling redundant activities is the Highway Access
Control List (HACL). You must configure a highway access control list for
each console in the redundant pair. For each activity point in your HACL,
you must choose a unique number to identify the activity point from all
other points in your system. In other words, it should not appear in any
other highway access control lists unless it identifies the same activity
point. For instructions on configuring HACLs, refer to subsection 4.4.6.
Note ... You must also make HACL entries for any unit points on which
you change unit variables or that you acquire, operate, or
release.
3.4.7.7
Partial Downloads
You may perform partial downloads of activity points and their related
objects. However, you may only change an activity point or its
subordinate objects (procedure list, procedure, process instructions, and
so on) if the activity point is in the NOTLOADED state. If an activity point
in a state other than NOTLOADED is modified or deleted in a partial
download (or any subordinate object), then the console rejects the partial
download. A message is logged to the printer telling you which activity
point was affected and which subordinate object was affected.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
150
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The only exception to this rule is grade values. You can change grade
values in a partial download regardless of the state of any activity points
using those grade values. Note that the new grade values are not
effective until the operator or CHIP reloads the activity point with the
procedure whose grade values are changed.
3.5
3
Operator Action Requests (OARs)
A unit operation may prompt the operator for information it needs to
continue the operation by using an OAR. OARs allow generic unit
operations by asking the operator to input batch-specific information,
such as how much of a reactant to add. Refer to subsection 3.4.7 for
ways to configure the console so that it automatically performs this batch
customizing without operator input.
3.5.1
OAR Features and Benefits
You can prioritize OARs and set them up with alarm characteristics so
they are more effective in getting the operator’s attention. The number of
OAR messages for each UOC is 255. Thus, the ability to prioritize OARs
and assign alarm characteristics provides an effective way for reducing
the complexity of running operations.
3.5.2
OAR Priority Assignments
When you configure the OAR message list, you can assign OAR
priorities on a per-message basis. These priorities operate on a
per-console basis and range from 1 to 200, with 200 being the highest. If
you do not assign a priority, ENVOX software assigns a default priority of
75. To allow complex OAR prioritization schemes, you can configure
duplicate messages with different assigned priorities.
3.5.2.1
OAR Messages
Certain OARs have predefined OAR message text and have a
predefined OAR priority of 76 (see Table 3-22).
Table 3-22. OAR Types and Default Message
This OAR
Type ...
Displays this Default
Message ...
If this Occurs ...
Type 6
ADVANCE CAUSED BY
SINGLE STEP
Incorrectly tuning
DDP147 to YES.
Type 7
ADVANCE CAUSED BY STEP
INSTRUCTIONS DISABLED
Incorrectly tuning
DDP 129 to NO.
Type 8
ADVANCE WHILE IN SINGLE
INSTRUCTION MODE
Incorrectly tuning
DDP 146 to YES.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
151
For a complete list of DDPs, arranged by number, see the tables in
Appendix C.
Having predefined messages and priorities ensures that type 6, 7, and 8
OARs have a higher priority than all other default-priority OARs. If two
operations execute instructions that generate OARs of the same priority,
the console sees the first OAR generated as having a higher priority,
oldest first.
3.5.2.2
OAR Prioritization
In addition to answering OARs, consoles allow the console operator to
acknowledge OARs. If you want the operator to acknowledge OARs
other than message OARs, assign a priority value of 101 or greater to
them. The OAR window, OAR faceplate status word, and entries on the
OAR list then blink until they are either acknowledged or answered.
OARs with priorities lower than 101 are automatically acknowledged
when the console receives them.
3.5.2.2.1
Priority Groups
There are four OAR priority groups:
J
J
J
J
Priority 1-50 — Auto-acknowledged. Always the lowest-priority OARs.
Priority 51-100 — Auto-acknowledged, but competes with
higher-priority OARs that have been acknowledged by the operator.
Priority 101-150 — Requires acknowledgement, but does not sound
the horn. After acknowledgement, the priority is lowered by 50,
placing it into the 51-100 range.
Priority 151-200 — Requires acknowledgement and sounds the horn.
After acknowledgement, the priority is lowered by 100, placing it into
the 51-100 range.
It is important that you not only place the OAR message in the correct
priority group, but that you also place it relative to others in that category.
That way, relative priorities within groups are preserved even after the
OAR has been acknowledged.
Note that the default priority, 75, falls approximately midrange in priority
group 2. This allows OARs in groups 3 and 4 to be configured to have
higher priorities than unprioritized OARs, even after the horn and OAR
are acknowledged.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
152
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.5.2.2.2
Acknowledging OARs
OARs requiring acknowledgement have their priorities lowered when the
operator acknowledges them. An OAR in group 3 (range 101-150) has
its priority lowered by 50 when it is acknowledged. An OAR in group 4
(range 151-200) has its priority lowered by 100 when it is acknowledged.
This allows newer unacknowledged OARs to appear in the OAR window.
3
Operators acknowledge an OAR by clicking on the Ack button with the
pointing device’s primary button. This acknowledges any OARs attached
to unit points represented by a direct screen reference (DSR) number on
the current display if you have configured ACK_SINGLE_POINT in the
Device form (see subsection 4.4.1).
When an OAR times out or when an operator answers it, it is taken off
the OAR list and disappears from the unit faceplate. It also disappears
from the OAR window, if it was there.
It is your responsibility to ensure that all plant management areas
(PMAs) containing unit points are in ON, BACKUP, or MONITOR mode.
Generating OARs causes a change of state within the UOC, the console
receives OAR messages when the unit point is in the
CHANGE-OF-STATE reporting mode.
When PMAs move from ON or BACKUP to MONITOR or OFF, the
system acknowledges all unacknowledged OARs, and they remain
acknowledged regardless of future PMA mode changes. When the PMA
moves from any mode to OFF, OARs are removed from the OAR list and
OAR window, but return to the OAR list and window if they still have the
highest priority and if they are still unanswered when the PMA mode
changes back to any other mode.
When the system acknowledges OARs because they are either in the
MONITOR or OFF mode or are moving to the MONITOR or OFF mode,
the OAR’s priorities are lowered relative to their priority group (151-200
decrease by 100, 101-150 decrease by 50). They remain at the lowered
priority regardless of future PMA mode changes.
When the PMA mode is changed from OFF to any other mode, the order
of the OAR list remains the same, with the possible exception of OARs
having the same priority. The relative priority of OARs with the same
priority is determined by their new time stamps, with the oldest being
highest.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.6
153
Remote Applications
Use remote applications to provide operators and other users with
access to application programs that are installed on other computers.
The application programs can reside on any computer that can
communicate with the operator station X terminal and the console
computer.
This subsection does not go into great detail. Refer to the manual
Installing and Managing DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console
Software (PN7.2:DC9440) for more information on remote applications.
Remote applications do not use the resources of the console computer.
The operator station X terminal provides a window to interact with the
application.
Figure 3-20 shows a simplified block diagram of an Operator Workplace
installation in a plant. The diagram includes both VMS and UNIX remote
hosts and a printer on the plant LAN (local area network) as well as the
console computer and operator station.
VMS
Remote Host
Computer
Printer
UNIX
Remote Host
Computer
Plant LAN
Process
Network
Bridge
Console
Computer
Process
Network
Hub
X Terminal
Operator
Station
Highway
Data
Link
PROVOXr Data Highway
Figure 3-20.
Simplified Diagram of Operator Workplace Installation
When a user starts a VMS remote application, the console computer
creates one or two command files on the remote host and attempts to
establish a DECnet connection to the remote host. The remote host
establishes a connection to the X terminal and opens a window on the X
terminal to display the application. The remote host establishes either a
DECnet or TCP/IP connection to the X terminal depending on the
configuration of your network and how the X terminal is defined in the
nodes database.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
154
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
When a user starts a UNIX remote application the console computer
establishes a TCP/IP connection to the remote host and passes a
command line to the remote host. The remote host establishes a TCP/IP
connection to the X terminal and opens a window on the terminal to
display the application.
The command passed to the remote host includes information on
redirecting the output of the remote application to the X terminal operator
station.
3
3.6.1
Coordinating With the System Administrator
When you set up remote applications there are a couple of areas in
which you will need to coordinate your efforts with those of the network
administrator and system administrator:
J
Defining remote applications
J
Assigning remote applications to users
The two activities are related in that the remote applications can be
defined during console configuration and must be assigned to console
software users during console configuration.
3.6.1.1
Defining Remote Applications
You can define remote applications during console configuration. If the
details of the remote applications are not known at configuration, you
must at least define placeholder remote applications that the console
software system administrator, or other users with TUNE privilege, can
complete from an operator session.
Note ... The user cannot add remote application definitions from an
operator session. The user can only edit existing remote
application definitions, and must have TUNE privilege to do so.
You use the Application Definition form (shown in Figure 4-61) to
configure remote applications. The remote application definition you
define applies to all users you assigned that application.
Console software users with TUNE privilege, can modify remote
application definitions from an operator session. The ENVOX form and
the console software window require the same information.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
155
Refer to the manual Using DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console
Software (UM13.0:DC9440) for more information on defining remote
applications from an operator session.
Changes made to remote application definitions from an operator
session will be overwritten by subsequent downloads to the console. You
must ensure that the console configuration is updated to include any
changes made to remote application definitions from an operator
session.
When a user logs in to an operator session, the software creates a
remote application list that contains the applications assigned to the user
during configuration. A user can access only the remote applications on
the list.
When a user logs in to an operator session, the software loads a copy of
all the remote applications assigned to the user into console memory.
Applications are loaded from the configuration database unless the
applications have been modified since the last download. In that case
the remote applications are loaded from disk.
3.6.1.2
Assigning Remote Applications to Users
You will need to put some thought into assigning remote applications to
users if you want to limit users’ access to particular remote applications.
The ideal method would be to decide which users you want to run which
applications before you configure the console.
If this is not possible, define placeholder remote applications. To create a
placeholder, access the User Definitions form (see subsection 4.10.1)
and select Extra Data and Application List. The only data you need to
enter initially for a placeholder is a unique tag name on the User
Application List form (see subsection 4.10.4) since the system will not
allow duplicates. Assign a few of the placeholder remote applications to
all users so that every user can run some remote applications and divide
the rest of the remote applications among the users. You or the console
software system administrator can edit the placeholder applications from
an operator session when you know which applications you need to
define.
3.6.2
Setting Up Remote Applications
Setting up remote applications includes preparing remote hosts and
defining the remote applications. The system administrator must set up
remote hosts to enable the console software to run remote applications.
The actions necessary depend on whether you are setting up a VMS
host or a UNIX host.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
156
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.6.3
Defining VMS Remote Applications
There are three different ways an application can run on a VMS remote
host:
J
3
J
J
3.6.3.1
An application that does not require a terminal window to run. (The
application manages its own window, like DOCVUEt Electronic
Documentation.)
An application that requires a terminal window to run. (Like Statistical
Quality Charts [SQC], an optional module in the Data Historian
software.)
An application that runs only a terminal window.
Terminal Session Not Required
The first example shows how to set up DOCVUE as a remote
application. In the example, the DOCVUE software runs on VMS remote
host MOOSE at node address 1.234 (node number 1258). The DOCVUE
software does not require a terminal window because it manages its own
window. The remote application is being run from a proxy account and
does not require a password.
To set up the example remote application during configuration, follow
these steps:
Step 1:
Set up remote host.
Step 2:
Access the Application Definition form from the ENVOX Top
Level Form by selecting Add —> GLOBAL ITEMS —>
APPLICATION and entering a valid tag for this form.
Step 3:
Define the remote application by entering the following:
J
J
Application Name — DOCVUE
Application Command —
RUN disk:[directory]IVIEW.EXE
(use your plant’s values for disk and directory)
J
Remote Node Address — 1258
J
Operating System — VMS
J
Terminal Required — NO
J
Password Required — NO
The host name/address can be either a DECnet address or node
number. For example, if the DECnet address is 1.234, the node number
is 1 ¢ 1024 + 234 = 1258.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.6.3.2
157
Terminal Window Required
The second example shows how to set up SQC, a VMS application
running on node BEAR at address 1.329 (node number 1353) for user
engelmann. SQC requires a terminal window.
To set up the example remote application during configuration, follow
these steps:
Step 1:
Set up remote host.
Step 2:
Access the Application Definition form from the ENVOX Top
Level Form by selecting Add —> GLOBAL ITEMS —>
APPLICATION and entering a valid tag for this form.
Step 3:
Define the remote application by entering the following:
J
Application Name — Data History -- SQC
J
Application Command — @DH_COM:MMI
J
Remote Node Address — 1.329
J
Operating System — VMS
J
Terminal Required — YES
J
Password Required — YES (this is a password secured
account; the user will be prompted for the password at run
time)
Make sure that all services needed by Data Historian are running (for
example, CHIP, Data Historian, and the option module SQC). Also, make
sure that the DH_COM system logical is defined and that MMI.COM
exists. Other things to consider are the DECW$TERMINAL default data
files that define the terminal colors and characteristics.
3.6.4
Defining UNIX Remote Applications
To set up a remote application that all operators can use to run vi, follow
these steps:
Step 1:
Set up remote host.
Step 2:
Access the Application Definition form from the ENVOX Top
Level Form by selecting Add —> GLOBAL ITEMS —>
APPLICATION and entering a valid tag for this form.
Step 3:
Define the remote application by entering the following:
J
Application Name — vi editor
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
158
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
J
Application Command — vi
J
Remote Node Address — 172.16.2.181
J
Operating System — UNIX
J
Terminal Required — YES
J
3
Password Required — this toggle button is not selectable
for UNIX remote applications
When one of the operators runs this remote application from the console
software, a window opens with vi running in it. The operator can edit
files. Quitting the application closes the window.
How you set up the remote application for Bob Brown’s access to the
UNIX host depends on what you want him to be able to do. To allow him
normal account access, follow these steps to define the remote
application:
J
Application Name — Bob Brown’s fern terminal window
J
Application Command — xterm
J
Remote Node Address — 172.16.2.181
J
Operating System — UNIX
J
Terminal Required — NO
J
Password Required — this toggle button is not selectable
for UNIX remote applications
When Bob Brown runs this remote application it opens a terminal window
on fern just as if he had logged in to fern. He has all the access that his
account on fern allows.
3.7
Printing Hard-copies
You may define remote applications to print hard-copies of operator
station displays and other screen items. The way you configure a remote
application to print hard-copies depends on whether the remote
computer is a VMS host or a UNIX host and the application you are
using to accomplish the printing.
You can have multiple remote applications to print hard-copies on both
types of hosts. For example, you might want to set up one printing
application to print the entire screen. You might have another application
defined to print only a designated window, and so on.
Refer to the manual Installing DC9400-Series Operator Workplace
(PN7.1:DC9400:OWP) for complete instructions on printing hard copies.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.7.1
159
Configuring the Printer and Network Adapter
Refer to the manual Installing DC9400-Series Operator Workplace
(PN7.1:DC9400:OWP) and the documentation that came with your
printer and network adapter for information on setting up these items for
your site.
3.8
Reports
The type of information available to operators in reports depends on how
you configure the report definition. When you configure a report, make
sure you provide data on all aspects of the process in the definition (see
subsection 4.5). As a rule, you can include in a report any information
you show in a display.
To configure a report using the ENVOX Language Editor, specify the
type of information you want to include through selected keywords (see
Appendix H). These keywords identify specific types of information and
allow you to customize reports based on the report options he or she
selects. For example, if you include the keyword start list in your report
configuration, you can reference a specific equipment list in your report
header, thus allowing you to use the same report format for multiple sets
of data.
3.8.1
Report Headers
Report headers are an important part of your report definition
(subsection 4.5.3 provides information on configuring a report header). In
the report header, you specify the type of report the system or the
operator can submit or request, as well as how often the the system
should generate the report. You can specify one of three types of reports
in the header: demand, schedule, or shift.
Additionally, the report header determines the first time a scheduled
report prints, the frequency with which it prints after the first time, and the
equipment list associated with the report. The header also contains the
name of the report. A single report may be referenced in multiple report
headers, such that a generic report format may be used to generate
various types (demand, shift, schedule) for the same equipment, the
same report type for various equipment sets, or a combination of both.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
160
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.8.1.1
Report List
In addition to defining the report header as part of the report
configuration, you may also define the report list (subsection 4.5.2
provides information on configuring a report list). The report list is a list of
the report headers’ names for those reports that you want the operator to
be able to access from a specific console electronics.
If you do not configure a report header in the report list, you can still
request the report through the report directory, but you cannot request
the report from a remote device (through CHIP or the unit operations
controller [UOC] LOG instruction).
3
3.8.1.2
Changing Report Frequency
There are three reporting types: SCHEDULE reports, which print at a
specific time, DEMAND reports, which print only when requested by an
operator, and SHIFT reports. You can change the frequency of a report
only if it is a schedule report type. If you try to change the frequency on
any other type of report, the system displays an error message on the
console.
After a total or partial download, the console automatically schedules all
reports for printing at their scheduled time. To remove a scheduled report
from the print queue without performing a download, change the report
frequency to 9999 days to effectively turn off the report.
For instructions on requesting reports, refer to the appropriate section in
Using the DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(UM13.0:DC9440).
3.8.1.3
Report Requests
Besides consoles, UOCs and CHIPs issue report requests. These
devices can:
J
J
Start periodic reports — This places a report into the scheduling
queue. The report prints at an interval supplied with the request.
Start scheduled reports — This places a report into the scheduling
queue. The report prints once at a certain time of day, which you
specify with a parameter value in the request.
Note ... Periodic and scheduled reports are the same with the exception
of the request interval associated with each report.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
J
J
J
3.8.2
161
Start demand reports — This causes the printer to print the
requested report from the report list index once.
Suspend reports — This temporarily prevents a remotely scheduled
periodic report from printing.
Continue reports — This counteracts a request to suspend printing.
Delete reports — This deletes a remotely scheduled report from the
scheduling queue.
Using Report Keywords
Report keywords are the instruction code-words that allow you to
configure specific reports. The following paragraphs describe the report
keywords that you can use. To configure these keywords, you must use
the Language Editor on the ENVOX configuration workstation. Refer to
the manual Using ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151) for
complete information on the Language Editor. For a complete list of the
report keywords and the required operands, refer to Appendix H.
Batch History — The BATCH HISTORY keyword allows you to
configure a generic batch-end report that any activity point can use. This
keyword instructs the system to print alarm or state-change messages as
you request them. Note that if you print a report containing the BATCH
HISTORY keyword as a demand report not associated with an activity,
the report does not contain a history.
Blank Lines — The BLANK LINES keyword instructs the printer to
advance a predetermined number of lines. You can instruct the printer to
advance 1 line, or as many as 55 lines. You cannot request that the
printer advance more than 55 lines.
Form Feed — The FORM FEED keyword instructs the printer to
advance to the next top-of-form. Even if the printer is half way through a
form, the printer advances only to the top of the next page.
Layout — Each LAYOUT instruction you define describes the format of a
single output line in your report. The LAYOUT instruction is composed of
text strings and data fields. Data fields are denoted by “at” symbols (@).
They imply a value that the system must obtain from the console
database when the report prints.
For each item (text string or data field) in your LAYOUT instruction, the
ENVOX configuration workstation generates a corresponding PRINT
instruction. You cannot enter PRINT instructions directly from the
LAYOUT instruction; you must have a text string or data field in a
LAYOUT instruction that generates a PRINT instruction.
When you have finished defining your LAYOUT instruction, you can then
edit the PRINT instructions the system generates.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
162
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Give special consideration to how you use the LAYOUT instruction,
because it determines what console data prints in your report, as well as
the data’s format.
3
List History — The LIST HISTORY keyword functions the same as the
POINT HISTORY keyword, except the argument you give the LIST
HISTORY keyword is the point list name. Use the LIST HISTORY
keyword in conjunction with a REPEAT UNTIL keyword and a point list
containing a number of activity points. Using this keyword, you can print
batch-end data for all points in the list.
Next — When you configure a list, the access pointer to the list is always
directed to the first entry in the list. The NEXT instruction moves the
pointer to the next entry in the list until you reach the end of the list.
If your report configuration also includes an UNTIL END keyword, the
pointer goes to the next keyword in the report configuration when you
execute the NEXT instruction at the end of the list. If your report
configuration does not include the UNTIL END instruction, the pointer
remains at the end of the list indefinitely.
Phrase List — The PHRASE LIST keyword allows you to set up a list of
text strings to print out. You can put any word or combination of words
you want in this phrase list.
Point History — The POINT HISTORY keyword allows you to access all
point histories that have been added to a history area by an activity
point. Using the POINT HISTORY keyword, you can print demand
reports for activities, providing that the activity point is in any state other
than NOTLOADED and that you configured Keep History as YES in the
Procedure form. If you try to access point histories for any other type of
point, you get nothing.
Point List — The POINT LIST keyword allows you to specify the
equipment list name to include in the report for a specific point.
Print — In the PRINT instruction you define the characteristics of each
print item. You answer such questions as:
J
J
J
Do you wish the print item underlined?
How should the data item be justified (left, right, or centered in the
data field)?
Which piece of data should the system obtain from the console
database? (The data could be the time and date, or perhaps the
setpoint for a specific point. Perhaps the data field should contain the
description of a point from an earlier-defined POINT LIST instruction).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
163
In configuring reports, the system combines the PRINT instruction with
the LAYOUT instruction to form an OUTPUT STATEMENT to the printer.
For each data field in the LAYOUT instruction, the system creates a
corresponding PRINT instruction. You can open the PRINT instruction to
modify LAYOUT.
LAYOUT is the only report keyword containing a system default. The
default parameter values are left justified, no underline. If you want the
report to appear some other way, you must modify the LAYOUT
instruction. For all other report keywords, you must enter printing
instructions using the PRINT keyword.
If you modify the layout somewhere in the report by adding data fields,
the ENVOX system automatically creates a PRINT instruction at the end
of the PRINT list, rather than in a position parallel to the new data.
If you delete a data field somewhere in the report configuration, the
ENVOX system deletes the last (not necessarily the corresponding)
PRINT instruction in the list.
Repeat, Until — Always use the REPEAT and UNTIL keywords together
to instruct the system to repeat all keywords between the two (REPEAT
and UNTIL) until such time as the end conditions associated with UNTIL
are met. Conditions to complete a REPEAT ... UNTIL loop can take two
forms:
J
J
A NEXT instruction appears between REPEAT and UNTIL. The
system then checks to verify that it has reached the end of the
associated phrase or point list or lists.
A numeric comparison is satisfied. Using REPEAT and UNTIL, you
can specify any combination of raw numbers or tag attribute
occurrences to be repeated until they reach a certain level or repeat
a certain number of times. This condition can only be satisfied by
using a numeric value comparison. You cannot compare any other
types of data to satisfy the conditions required to complete the loop.
For valid attributes, see Table D-4 in Appendix D. If the compare value
says “none,” the attribute cannot be used to satisfy the UNTIL operands.
For example, DSCR:TAG cannot be used because DSCR has no
compare values, but MODE:TAG could be used because valid compare
values for MODE are 0 to 7.
Until End — Although UNTIL END is a separate report keyword, it may
be more logical to think of it as an argument supporting REPEAT UNTIL.
In reality, it is a third condition for completing a REPEAT ... UNTIL loop.
When the UNTIL END keyword is used with the REPEAT keyword, the
loop continues until it reaches the end of the keywords between the two
(REPEAT and UNTIL END).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
164
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.8.3
Printer Queues and Buffers
If a printer is off-line or not operational for a long time, the printer’s queue
overflows. The console throws away all requests that cause the overflow,
but remembers the number of requests that were thrown out. The queue
overflow affects both report requests and message requests. Once the
backlog clears from the printer, a message in the queue appears on the
console, indicating when the overflow occurred, whether the requests
that were lost were messages or reports, and how many requests were
lost.
3
When the printer’s buffer is almost full, the printer tells the console to
stop sending information until it can print the backlog in its buffer. When
this happens, the printer’s integrity appears in a message on the screen
as BUSY. If the printer buffer is full for any reason, the screen message
changes to OFFLINE after enough time has passed to empty the buffer
under normal operating conditions.
3.9
Trending
Trending is the collecting and recording of operational data for the
purpose of comparing current and previous process behavior. Trend
displays enable plant engineers and operators to detect process
changes that require retuning and to observe the results of tuning
changes they made. These windows also allow the engineers and
operators to trace degradations in product quality back to the process
events that caused the degradation.
The operator can study your control system’s behavior and process
variables over a period of time using trending information as a record for
reference or to characterize and statistically analyze your system’s
performance.
The console provides a method for your operator to display a trend that
reflects the value of your data over a period of time. The feature that
collects this data and can provide a visual representation of it is called
console trending. The console graphically displays the data using trend
windows, trend traces, and trend sets.
A trend window is a separate window that the operator requests from a
menu (see Figure 3-21). The window contains all the controls to
manipulate trend sets and individual trend traces. A trend trace is the
data for a single attribute value that the console gathers during a specific
period of time and shows in the trend window. A trend set is a group of
these trend traces.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
Trend trace
Trace selector
Trace time
Trace information
Trace cursor time
Cursor on/off button
Cursor
Menu bar
165
Cursor values
View pane control
Cursor Home button
3
Trend : TREND--SET2 @6--23:2
File
Edit Current_Point
TREND--SET2
Trend Set
Help
Bk
Last
Fwd
Trace# 1
Cursor
100
100
100
Too High
47.23
-- -- -- -- -39.44
-- -- -- -- --- -- -- -- --
Home
0
0
0
12--AUG--1998 04:24:34
TR#
1
2
3
4
5
6
12--AUG--1998 04:32:32
12--AUG--1998
04:36:06
Status
OK
OK
Pt Name
AI-101
AI--123
Pt Descr
AI
AI
Attribute
PV
PV
Eng Units
0% TO 100% RNG
0% TO 100% RNG
Interval
5 secs
2 secs
OK
AO--125
AO
SP
0% TO 100% RNG
5 secs
Figure 3-21. Trend Window
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
166
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3.9.1
Trend Sets
A trend set is a group of trend traces that you logically group for your
particular application. Reasons for grouping your trend traces may
include:
3
J
J
J
The traces are based on data from the same area of the plant, and
the areas are related to each other.
The traces are all based on extremely critical points, and you want
them on one trend window so that your operator can view them
together.
The traces indicate how closely you can control a particular process
variable, for example, how closely your process variable tracks the
setpoint.
Whatever your reasons, consider your operator’s needs when you group
the traces. Each of your trend sets can contain as many as six traces.
The console graphically displays the trend set data in a trend window.
This trend window contains data for each trace in the trend set.
When completing the Trend Set Definition form (see subsection 4.9.1),
remember that you cannot change the number of traces that an operator
can add on line for a particular console unless you perform a total
download. Also note that if you change a trace using a partial download,
the console clears from its database all the data for that trace in this trend
set. If you change a trend set, the console deletes from that trend set all
traces added on-line.
3.9.2
Trend Windows
In the trend window, the horizontal axis represents time, and the vertical
axis represents the value of the attribute that you associate with the trend
trace. The window displays the oldest information at the left of the screen
and the most recent at the right. The window also displays specific
information concerning the trend point.
Configure trends using the Console Device Definition form (see
subsection 4.4.1). The operator can access a console’s trend displays
from the trend window by using the Trend Set expandable text field
(ETF).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
167
If you enter #CURRENT for a trend set name when you create the default
trend display, the console displays the first trend set found in the trend
directory that contains at least one trend trace for the point in the main
instrument area. You can also give the operator the capability of adding
trend traces on-line so that he or she can specify which trendable
attributes to add to a window.
3.9.3
Trend Traces
A trend trace is the data for a single attribute value that the console
gathers during a specific period of time and displays graphically. You
select the attribute when you configure the trend trace, and the operator
selects the attribute when he or she adds a trend trace on-line. For a list
of valid trendable attributes, refer to Appendix B. If you delete a point with
the attribute that a trace represents, you also delete the trace from the
trend set.
For trend traces that you configure high and low range, choose values
that will keep the trace within them. In the trend window, values less than
zero percent of the range are represented as 0%; values greater than 100
percent of the range are represented as 100%.
Real-number engineering-unit high and low limits do not apply to some
point and attribute pairs. Because of this, the ENVOX configuration
workstation does not allow you to configure the end point values for some
trend traces.
For example, if you configure a trend trace to represent the mode of a
point, the console sets the trace range from MAN to HMAN. The
workstation ignores the end point fields for this trace because real
number scaling is not appropriate for the attribute that this trace
represents.
This same condition exists for several other attributes. Many of these
attributes are predefined discrete values. For your convenience, the
console automatically scales them for your trend display. The ENVOX
configuration workstation ignores scaling for trend traces with these
attributes, and the operator cannot change the scale for the traces
on-line. The following is a list of the attributes and points for which the
console provides default scaling:
J
MODE
J
DVAD
J
TRACKING
J
HENTRY
J
UPH
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
168
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
J
USTA
J
SN
J
FI
J
Any trendable attributes for:
j An activity point
3
j A DI/DO point
j A DI point
j A DO point
j A DCD point
j A GROUP point
3.9.3.1
Sample Intervals
Either you or the operator can decide the rate at which the console
updates the trended attribute value. You determine the rate through the
configuration. The operator determines the rate when adding a trace
on-line.
The rate at which the console updates the trended attribute value is called
the sample interval. All traces in a trend set use a horizontal axis that is
240 times the smallest sample interval of the traces in the trend set. The
console can display a maximum of 240 samples of data at one time.
The sample interval ranges from 2 seconds to 72 minutes. If the value
you are trending changes frequently, configure a short time between
updates. If the value that you are trending is steady, use a larger time
interval. Keep in mind that using the longest sample interval that your
application allows reduces loading on the console’s central processing
unit (CPU). Subsection 3.10.1 contains more information on CPU loading.
The trend window can display 240 samples of data. The trend scrolls
each time a new sample is plotted.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.9.3.2
169
Mixing Sample Intervals Within a Trend Set
You can trend traces in a trend set when the traces have different sample
intervals; the console draws the trace with the fastest sample interval first.
This sample interval becomes the unit of measurement for time that the
trend window uses. The trace with the fastest sample interval is the ruler
trace.
For example, if the sample interval for the ruler trace in the trend set is
2 seconds, a single sample in the horizontal axis represents 2-second
intervals (480 seconds total for the window).
In the example above, suppose the next trace has a sample interval of
15 seconds. Because the example window represents a maximum of
480 seconds of time, the window could only show a maximum of 32
samples of the 15-second trace’s samples.
The console does not receive data for a trace with a longer sample
interval as often as it receives data for the ruler trace. So, for a trace with
a longer interval than the ruler trace, the console continues to display the
last valid data sample that it received. When the console receives a new
sample for the longer interval trace, the console updates the data for the
trace.
The operator may or may not see a change in the graph line, depending
on whether the trended value has changed. Keeping the last valid sample
for the display allows the operator to more easily compare data of traces
at a specific time and to more easily see a pattern in the data.
For example, in Figure 3-21 the selected trace has a sample interval of 15
seconds. The ruler trace has a sample interval of 2 seconds. Thus, every
7.5 samples, the console receives new data for the selected trace and
updates the graph.
In this same example, a trace with a 5-second sample interval would only
have 96 of its most recent samples maintained on the display.
Be aware of these conditions when you configure your trend sets.
Because of the effects of sample intervals on the trend window, you
would not want to put traces with 2-second and 72-minute sample
intervals in the same trend set. Your operator would see only one sample
of the trace with a 72-minute sample interval because the trace with the
2-second sample interval would be the ruler trace.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
170
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Also, the data from the trace with a 72-minute sample interval would not
be useful to the operator when it is displayed within such a small time
frame (144 seconds maximum). Basically, if you mix traces with different
sample intervals in a trend set, keep the sample intervals close.
3.9.4
3
PROVOX Historical Trending Options
The console does not have historical trending capabilities; it does
real-time trending. The console can save as many as 240 samples of
data for each of its trend traces, but this data is not recorded or stored on
any type of medium for recall later.
If you need historical trending capabilities, you must launch a remote
application on the server. PROVOX software offers four options for
historical trending:
J
J
J
Console Trend Display (CTD) — The Console Trend Display
software requires that you have the Computer/Highway Interface
Package (CHIP) in order to gather data for trending. CTD collects,
stores, archives, and retrieves the data on as many as 1000 point
attributes, any of which the console could display. The Console Trend
Display supports as many as 96 simultaneous traces for viewing at
the console. For more information on this trend package, refer to the
Type SW2031 Console Trend Display (CTD) User Manual
(UM4.14:SW2031).
Data Historian’s Data Trend (DH-DT) — The Data Trend option of
the Data Historian software package relies on CHIP and on the Data
Historian software package to transfer the historical data file (HDF) to
a trend window of a console. The data trend allows the console to
display historical process information. This data trend option supports
as many as 96 simultaneous traces for viewing. The Data Trend uses
the HDF to perform historic read and write trending. For more
information on the Data Historian Data Trend option, refer to the Data
Historian User Manual (UM4.3:SW2011).
Data Historian Graphic Plot (DH-GP) — The Graphic Plot option of
the Data Historian software package relies on CHIP and on the Data
Historian software package to gather the data for trending in a trend
window of a console. You use this option of the Data Historian
software package for batch applications. Data Historian requires that
you have the Application Window product option for your console
software if you want the operator to be able to view the graphic plot at
the console. The DH-GP supports as many as 999 trend traces;
however the operator can view only six traces at one time on the
graphic plot. For more information on the Data Historian Data Trend
option, refer to the Data Historian User Manual (UM4.3:SW2011).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
J
171
Batch Data Manager (BDM) Graphic Plot — The Graphic Plot
option of the Batch Data Manager software relies on CHIP to gather
the data for trending. You use BDM for batch applications. BDM
requires that you have the Application Window product option for your
console software if you want the operator to be able to view the
graphic plot at the console; this software option does not send data to
the console trend window. The BDM Graphic Plot supports as many
as 999 trend traces; however, the operator can view only six traces at
one time on the graphic plot. For more information on the BDM
Graphic Plot option, refer to the Batch Data Manager User Manual
(UM4.2:SW2021).
The console supports as many as 1200 trend traces. This number
includes the traces the operator adds on-line as well as the traces that
you configure. The software also allows you to add, delete, or modify
trend traces on line using partial downloads.
You logically arrange the trend traces for your console by grouping them
into trend sets. Console trend traces and trend sets are discussed in
further detail in the following text. On the ENVOX configuration
workstation, use the Trend Set Definition form (see subsection 4.9.1) to
configure trend sets and the Trend Trace Definition form to configure
trend traces.
3.10
Console Point Reporting
For your system, you must define reporting rates to determine when the
points send data to the console. You must consider certain limitations of
the system when you configure these values.
3.10.1
Console Loading
Ideally, you might want 10,000 points on your console with instantaneous
reporting and complete redundancy. Unfortunately, this is not possible, so
you need to make some decisions about up-to-date information, console
CPU loading, and highway loading. There are no hard and fast limits, and
you must decide where adjustments can be made for your system. The
following text contains some guidelines and information to assist you in
these decisions.
The console load increases with the number of points and with the speed
at which the console has to process new information about those points.
If at all possible, keep the control processing of a point in the controller or
field device; try to avoid having the console control a point. This allows
more room in the console for higher-level functions that only the console
can perform for the operator.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
172
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
Keeping control processing out of the console reduces console loading
and increases overall system reliability. In particular, remember this when
you are configuring discrete control device (DCD) points and extended
pulse count input (EPCI) points. DCD points are discussed in subsection
3.4.1. EPCI points are discussed in subsection 3.4.2. You may wish to
source these points in another device and simply target them to your
console.
3
When you are addressing console loading and highway loading, consider
the different reporting modes for your console-resident points. For
example, you can effectively achieve the same result for your operator by
making a point’s reporting mode PERIODIC EXCEPTION instead of
PERIODIC.
The PERIODIC EXCEPTION mode requires less processing and reduces
console loading. Therefore, if you need to make a point report in the
PERIODIC mode, use PERIODIC EXCEPTION, if it works for your
application.
Also, if a point is a discrete point, use CHANGE-OF-STATE reporting
through the BACKUP and MONITOR PMA modes. If the point does not
change state, your console won’t have to process it as often. For more
information on reporting modes, refer to subsection 3.2.6.
The console-resident DCD points are deceiving when you are considering
console CPU and highway loading. Although you may configure one DCD
point, this DCD may require as many as 24 other points to provide the
DCD with the information it needs to function. Large or complex displays
can also significantly affect CPU loading (see subsection 5.6.2 for
details).
After you have what you really need to control your process, then you can
enhance the console’s capabilities for your operator. Also, if you have a
multiple console system, consider the console loading when you are
dividing your plant into PPAs. Try to distribute the responsibility for control
of areas of your plant evenly so that the load is distributed between your
consoles and operators.
You may want to evaluate the performance of your console for a period of
time and change some parameters, such as reporting modes or reporting
intervals, to increase either console speed or functionality. You should
tune your console just as you must tune your plant for optimum
performance. Do not consider your first configuration to be the only way
of defining the points for your system; instead, consider this to be an
on-going process.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.10.2
173
Highway Access Control List
A console uses the highway access control list (HACL) index to transfer
information on points to other consoles. Also, a console-resident point in
a primary console of a redundant pair uses the HACL to communicate to
the correct backup point in the secondary console. This list contains all of
the point numbers for all of the points in your PROVOX system.
The HACL is used to route (or translate) highway requests to internal
database references. The HACL allows you to have different
configurations in the primary and secondary console of a redundant pair
and provides CHIP with a method for accessing any console point. The
console-resident point HACL index must match between redundant
partners. However, the internal database indices may be different
because all access to this information is translated by the HACL.
You assign a HACL index to a point using the Highway Access Control
List form (see subsection 4.4.6) on the ENVOX configuration workstation.
If you do not assign a HACL index for your console-resident points, the
ENVOX software assigns an index for you.
For non-console-resident points, it is a good idea to assign the HACL
numbers yourself if you intend for the HACL number to remain fixed. This
is especially true if you are using CHIP programs with hard-coded HACL
numbers.
Note ... You must put unit points in the HACL if you use activities in a
redundant pair.
Adding, deleting, and modifying point configurations could cause the
ENVOX system to delete a point and assign a new HACL index when that
point is added again. Then, if you do not do a partial download to every
device that uses this HACL—including pairs of redundant
consoles—different devices could end up dealing with similar points that
have different HACL indexes. Assigning your own HACL index number
prevents unwanted duplication and the problems that can arise from it.
3.10.3
Targeting Points
On the ENVOX configuration workstation, targeting information for
console-resident points is part of the point configuration. This allows the
point to be targeted to multiple devices without entering the target data
multiple times. The system still allows you to assign different target
parameters for different devices through the use of target groups.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
174
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
A target group for a point is a list of target devices that share the same
target definition (reporting parameters). If the target parameter values are
the same for multiple devices, you do not need to enter data for each of
these devices. You simply add the devices to the target group.
3.11
System Clock
Event time stamping is critical to controlling plants with complex control
strategies and in large control systems. The system clock provides
accurate event time stamping by allowing separate devices within the
PROVOX system to maintain a common time base. Some of the events
the system clock can affect are alarm time stamping, scheduled reports,
batch executions, shift rollover for accumulations and report printing, and
trend-data sampling.
3
Consoles support a master-slave clock relationship similar to that found in
other PROVOX devices. Masters can generate system clock updates for
other highway devices. Slaves can receive system clock updates; they
cannot generate any. Consoles, large database consoles (LCONs), and
CHIP may be either the master clock or the slave. Trend units and SR90
controllers can be slave devices only.
Note ... If the master device is a console, it does not start sending
updates to slave consoles until you or the operator either set the
time on the master console or the master console receives a
time update from another master console — and the time
difference is 75 seconds.
3.11.1
Configuring the System Clock
To activate system clock synchronization, you must configure at least one
master clock device in the PROVOX system. However,
Fisher-Rosemount Systems recommends that you configure one system
clock master for each local area.
You can configure several system clock masters in a hierarchical fashion,
as shown in Figure 3-22. For example, you might want to configure a
network console as a system-wide master clock. This system-wide
master updates the time on other system clock masters in the local areas
of the system.
Having multiple system clock masters minimizes the load on a particular
master console, because it must deal with fewer devices. Multiple system
clock masters also provide some redundancy in time synchronization. If
one of the master clock consoles fails, the other masters continue
synchronizing time in their local areas.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
175
System-Wide
Clock Master
Local Area 1
Clock Master
Local Area 2
Clock Master
3
Device
1
Device
5
Device
3
Device
2
Figure 3-22.
Device
4
Device
1
Device
2
Device
3
X00111:DC6460--0
Typical System-wide Clock Master Hierarchy
You can configure a console as the system clock master console using
the System Clock List form (see subsection 4.4.5). As the master clock
console, it is responsible for periodically updating the time in other
devices on the network.
In defining your system clock configuration, you can set periodic updates
in intervals ranging from 5 to 65,535 seconds. This periodic update rate is
the period of time the console waits between sending update messages
to slave devices.
For example, if there are five slave devices to which one console is a
master and the update rate is 60 seconds, the console updates the time
in every slave within a 5-minute period. A value of 60 seconds is usually a
sufficient update rate when the slave device list is small.
You can also define as many as four daylight savings time rollovers. You
can add, delete, or change these rollovers on-line only if the system clock
has been configured.
Note ... Take into consideration any automatic processes that may be
running on the console when you make system clock changes.
Daylight savings time rollovers and large time changes affect
console-resident points. These changes to console-resident
points could affect batches and other automatic processes, so
set rollovers and do manual time changes carefully. Remember
that rollovers do not occur unless you set them or this console
receives a time update from another master console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
176
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The configured master clock device sends a time-synchronization
message along the PROVOX highway to a slave device list every
notification interval. You identify slave devices in the slave device list in
the System Clock List form.
This slave device list can contain as many as 254 entries for each master
console. However, the notification interval must be small with a large
slave device list. Time updates to the devices on this list are continual;
that is, once a console reaches the end of the list, it starts over, updating
the first device on the list again.
3
3.11.2
Downloading the System Clock
A master clock console suspends notification to all slave devices during a
database operation such as a download. A slave console ignores time
synchronization requests during a database operation.
3.11.3
Time Synchronization
The system clock can synchronize these devices:
J
Consoles
J
SR90 controllers
J
CHIP (when CHIP contains a user program to accept and execute
time-change requests)
J
Trend units
J
LCONs
When a device receives a time-synchronization message, it compares the
time in the message with its own time. If the difference is greater than 5
seconds, it changes its own time to match the time in the synchronization
message.
3.11.4
Redundancy
You cannot configure a secondary console to have a system clock list.
The ENVOX software automatically clones the system clock configuration
of the primary console into the secondary console. Only the active
console of the redundant pair performs the system clock function.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
177
Only configure the master console for daylight savings time roll-overs.
This insures that the times do not get temporarily out-of-sync during
daylight savings time rollovers. However, you can set daylight savings
time rollovers for any console, without regard to whether that console is a
system clock master or slave. This operation is only valid when the
operator has TUNE privilege.
The secondary console performs the system clock function if a switchover
occurs and it becomes the active console. Because of the way
redundancy works, the system automatically maintains the time between
the active and standby consoles.
Note ... Do not configure the secondary console in the primary console’s
system clock list.
As with simplex consoles, you can add, delete, and modify daylight
savings time rollovers on-line for redundant consoles. These changes
only affect the active console in the redundant pair, though. You must
manually change rollovers on the standby console.
3.12
Console Downloading
It is your responsibility both to build and to generate configuration source
files and to download them after completing the configuration. Unlike with
other highway devices, though, console downloading requires action from
both you and the operator. There are two methods of downloading
software to the console: total and partial.
3.12.1
Total Downloading
A total download supplies the console computer with its initial software
configuration. Total downloads are also used when certain configuration
changes require a complete new set of information for the console. For
example, you must do a total download for the console to accept the new
information when there is not enough free RAM to do a partial download,
or when you change the:
J
Pair assignment for a redundant console
J
Percent of maximum objects
J
Percent of maximum named objects
J
Percent of maximum slots
J
Primary device address
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
178
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3
J
Secondary device address
J
Maximum point DBI value
J
Maximum number of points in the highway access list index
J
Maximum number of alarm instances
J
Maximum number of alarm history records
J
Number of configured printers
J
Number of operator stations configured
J
Number of pen recorder outputs
J
Configuration generation
Once you start the total download, the console operator monitors and
controls the download in phases. These phases are:
J
Transfer
J
Configuration update
If all stations have the DOWNLOAD privilege, the console processes the
download in one combined phase.
3.12.1.1
Total Download Transfer Phase
If all users at all operator stations of the console have the DOWNLOAD
privilege, the configuration device transmits the download files directly to
both the console’s on-line database and to the hard disk. The console
cannot be used during this transfer.
If, however, the users at one or more operator stations do not have the
DOWNLOAD privilege, the configuration device transmits the download
files to the hard disk, where the download files are held until the operator
requests a configuration update. The console remains fully functional
during the transfer phase to the hard disk because its on-line database is
not affected.
Note ... Total downloads delete the historic and current state data for
activities. Because of this deletion, any activities running during
a total download cannot continue operating after the download
without operator intervention. If a total download is required, wait
until all activity points have been completed or are in the HOLD
state before performing the total download.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.12.1.2
179
Total Download Configuration Update Phase
Once the system completes the transfer phase, you can integrate the
total download data into the console database in about 15 to 30 seconds.
When you are ready to perform a configuration update, remember that
simplex and redundant consoles require different update procedures. For
complete step-by-step instructions, see Using the DC9440-Series
Operator Workplace Console Software (UM13.0:DC9440).
Once you transfer the new data to the hard disk or to the user
configuration space, update the configuration by moving the new data to
the on-line database.
In a total download, the console replaces all the configured database
elements with the new total download data. While the configuration
update is in progress, the operator cannot use the console. After a total
download configuration update, the console begins processing with all
new console-based process data.
Note ... All users at all operator stations of the console must have
DOWNLOAD privilege to update the console.
3.12.1.3
Monitoring Total Downloads
Operators see varying messages printed, depending on whether all
operators have the DOWNLOAD privilege. If not all operators do, the
message TOTAL PENDING appears in the console’s Integrity window.
However, if all operator station users have the DOWNLOAD privilege:
J
J
J
The console prohibits console-operator interaction during the transfer.
The download updates the configuration as the download files
transfer, and places the download files on the hard disk.
TOTAL PENDING does not appear in the Integrity window.
Note ... When you are downloading a redundant console pair, do not
proceed to the configuration update phase until you transfer the
total download to both consoles in the pair. This minimizes the
time that the consoles must operate with different configurations.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
180
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The console may reject the configuration update request and print a
message. The following lists the messages and the reason the console
prints them:
3
J
CONFIG UPDATE REJECTED - INSUFFICIENT PRIVILEGE
Appears if any of the console station users lack the DOWNLOAD
privilege
J
CONFIG UPDATE REJECTED - NOTHING PENDING
Appears if no data transfer has occurred
J
CONFIG UPDATE REJECTED - DATABASE OPERATION IN
PROGRESS
Appears if the configuration device has already started transmitting a
new download
If the console rejects the configuration update, the original database
remains unchanged. The download remains on the hard disk and the
console continues to run normally.
In rare instances, you may also experience a configuration-update failure.
If this happens, the following message appears:
CONFIG UPDATE FAILED - TOTAL DOWNLOAD REQUIRED
and the console switches to the IDLE state. Call your Fisher-Rosemount
Systems field-service representative if you see this message.
3.12.2
Partial Downloading
A partial download alters an existing console database by changing or
deleting a limited number of original database elements, or by adding new
elements to the original database. The console remains completely
functional during most of the partial download.
The phases of a partial download are:
J
Transfer
J
Configuration update
J
Database compress (as required)
The transfer phase begins when you initiate the total or partial download.
Configuration updates and database compresses require console
operator interaction.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
3.12.2.1
181
Partial Download Transfer Phase
During the transfer phase of a partial download, the configuration device
transmits the download files to the available configuration space (free
RAM) in the console. The free RAM holds these files, and the console
remains completely functional during the entire transfer, since the transfer
does not affect the on-line database. The console saves the partial
download on the hard disk.
3.12.2.2
Partial Download Configuration Update Phase
The console replaces, changes, adds, and deletes data in the database,
as appropriate.
A partial download update may change a single parameter on a single
point, or it may alter nearly every element in the database. While the
configuration update lasts, the operator cannot use the console.
After a partial download configuration update, the console processes
much of the process data received during the update. This data includes
alarm information, operating parameters, print requests, and so on. Using
the DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(UM13.0:DC9440) describes the impact of a partial download
configuration update phase on the database and on console functions.
During a successful configuration update to either member of a redundant
console pair or to a simplex console, the following events occur in
sequence:
1. The configuration update prohibits console-operator interaction
temporarily.
2. The windows disappear.
3. A login window appears.
Once the update is complete, logins are allowed.
Caution ... You cannot abort a configuration update once you have
requested it.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
182
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
The console may reject the configuration update request and print a
message. The following lists the messages and the reason the console
prints them:
3
J
CONFIG UPDATE REJECTED - INSUFFICIENT PRIVILEGE
Appears if any of the console station users lack the DOWNLOAD
privilege
J
CONFIG UPDATE REJECTED - NOTHING PENDING
Appears if no data transfer has occurred
J
CONFIG UPDATE REJECTED - DATABASE OPERATION IN
PROGRESS
Appears if the configuration device has already started transmitting a
new download
If the console rejects the configuration update, the original database
remains unchanged. The download remains on the hard disk, and the
console continues to run normally.
In rare instances, you may also experience a configuration update failure.
If this happens, the following message appears:
CONFIG UPDATE FAILED - TOTAL DOWNLOAD REQUIRED
and the console switches to the IDLE state. Call your Fisher-Rosemount
Systems field-service representative if you see this message.
3.12.2.3
Partial Download Database Compress
A partial download configuration update may fragment the total unused
memory space (free RAM) in the console database into units too small to
be useful. This could cause the console to reject future partial downloads
because the fragmented database could not accommodate the data from
another partial download.
The database compress phase is not always necessary before a
successful partial download; however, you can compress the existing
database in order to provide a single, larger block of free RAM. The
database compress suspends all console functions for a few seconds.
For complete step-by-step instructions on compressing the database, see
Using the DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(UM13.0:DC9440).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Theory of Operation F Section 3
183
The console may reject your request to compress the database and print
a message. The following lists the messages and the reason the console
prints them:
J
COMPRESS REJECTED - INSUFFICIENT PRIVILEGE
Appears if a user for any station does not have the DOWNLOAD
privilege
J
COMPRESS REJECTED - DATABASE NOT FRAGMENTED
Appears if the database does not need to be compressed. There is no
further need for operator action.
J
COMPRESS REJECTED - PARTIAL SAVE IN PROGRESS
Appears if the configuration device is currently transmitting a
download. Wait for the device to finish the transfer and update the
configuration before compressing the database.
In rare instances, you may also experience a database compression
failure. If this happens, the following message is printed:
COMPRESS FAILED - TOTAL DOWNLOAD REQUIRED
and the console switches to the IDLE state. Call your Fisher-Rosemount
Systems field-service representative if you see this message.
3.12.2.4
Monitoring Partial Downloads
The console operator does not need to monitor partial downloads. He or
she simply waits for the configuration device to complete the transfer
before starting the configuration update. During the transfer, the following
message is printed:
PARTIAL
PARTIAL
PARTIAL
PARTIAL
DOWNLOAD
DOWNLOAD
DOWNLOAD
DOWNLOAD
SAVE IN PROGRESS : ID=(number)
BEING SAVED TO DISK : ID=(number)
SAVED TO DISK
SAVED -- AWAITING CONFIG UPDATE
When the transfer is complete, the following message appears in the
console’s Integrity window:
PARTIAL PENDING: ID=(number)
If there is not sufficient free RAM to hold the download files, the console
rejects the transfer. To determine if there is sufficient free RAM, look at
the Integrity window for the console. If the FREE RAM value and the
LARGEST BLOCK value are close in size, you may be able to complete
the partial download. If they differ greatly, you must compress the
database. If there is still not enough free RAM available after
compressing the database, you must do a total download. Refer to the
manual Using the DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software
(UM13.0:DC9440) for instructions on compressing the database.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
3
184
Section 3 F Theory of Operation
3
Blank page.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
185
Figure 4-Table 4
4
4 Creating the Console Configuration
This section briefly describes how you configure the Operator Workplace
console using the ENVOXr software. The following subsections describe:
J
The normal flow of configuration tasks
J
The ENVOX user interfaces and general navigation instructions
J
The forms and items you must use to configure the Operator
Workplace console, and options you can use to customize your
configuration
Note ... Refer to the manual Using ENVOX Configuration Software
(UM6.1:SW3151) for more details on the software organization,
how to log on to the system, and how to navigate through the
software.
This section approaches the topic of configuration assuming that you
have completed an initial top-down design of your process and planned
your configuration strategy (see Section 3 for details). That is, this
sections assumes that you have:
J
J
J
4.1
Illustrated the process flow and I/O needs in P. & I.D. drawings,
instrument indexes or instrument specifications, or perhaps by using
ENVOX instrument signal tags (ISTs)
Documented the loops, batch descriptions, and logic required to
control your process
Defined your control conventions, identified your control strategies
and the input/output (I/O) that supports them, and defined the general
operator interface
Configuration Engineering and Maintenance Tasks
This subsection defines the normal flow of configuration tasks. Figure 4-1
illustrates the ENVOX features used to do the tasks, and subsections
4.1.1 through 4.1.8 define those tasks.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
186
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Configuration Engineering
and Maintenance Tasks
ENVOXr Feature Used
Create Configuration Data
Create Device
Definitions
Create Templates
Item Forms
Create Points
4
Define Users
Create Displays
Graphic Display Editor
Create Algorithms
-- FSTs
-- Operations
-- Procedures
Language Editor
Create Console
Reports
Language Editor
Generate
Forms
(Generation Options)
Download
-----
Note:
Total
Partial
Backup
Emergency
Download Utility
Trace/Tune
Trace/Tune Utility
Upload
Upload Utility
Maintenance
Diagnostics Utility
Document
Document Database
Change Management
Audit Trail
Only the bold outlined portions of this figure are covered in this manual.
The portions of this figure not shown as bold are covered in detail in the
Using ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151) manual.
X00252:SW3151-0
Figure 4-1.
Configuration Tasks and ENVOX Features
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.1.1
187
Creating Configuration Data
Creating the configuration data includes these activities:
Create device definitions — You name the types of hardware devices in
the instrumentation system. You also identify their locations on the
highway, specify the I/O hardware, and establish limits necessary for their
operation. This is the device definition.
Create instrument signal tags (ISTs) — For each field or instrument
signal, you create an item called an instrument signal tag (IST) that
identifies the signal’s file-card-channel (F-C-C) and defines the signal
characteristics, such as signal type, EU range, and alarms. PROVOXr
points reference ISTs for their respective I/O signal characteristics.
Create templates — You create templates as you create points, because
certain types of points reference templates.
Create points — You copy and modify existing points and add new
points. You provide the point with a tag (name) and define its operating,
tuning, and configured parameters. You specify which device each point
is located in. You also specify which devices the point reports data to
(targeting).
Create user definitions — You control user access to the Operator
Workplace console by assigning passwords and privilege levels, and
setting preferences for the operators, individually and console-wide. You
also specify user-defined keys (UDKs) for the operators to perform a
series of operations (or macro) and specify remote applications they can
run from their X terminals.
Create algorithms — Using the ENVOX language editor, you build
function sequence tables (FSTs), reports, operations, procedures, and
color and text conditionals for displays.
Create displays — Using the ENVOX graphic display editor you create
all the displays for the operators. You also specify which consoles contain
which displays.
Create reports — Using the ENVOX language editor, you design reports
that record process changes. You also determine which console manages
each report.
4.1.2
Generate
The ENVOX generate option checks the consistency of the data that the
ENVOX software did not already verify as you entered it. The generate
option then creates download files which are ready to be downloaded to
the Operator Workplace console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
188
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.1.3
Download
The download utility sends the generated data to the console. The
download can be total; that is, the utility sends all the generated data to
all the devices you specify. Or the download can be partial; you limit the
download to include only new or modified data for the devices. The
download can include one or more than one device, depending on your
login privileges.
4
4.1.4
Trace/Tune
After ENVOX software downloads the configuration files to the devices,
the trace/tune utility lets you tune control loops and test FSTs. Without
affecting the process, this utility lets you enter simulated analog and
discrete inputs for an on-line controller. You can observe the controller
outputs resulting from this simulation to determine whether the FST is
functioning correctly.
4.1.5
Upload
Once the devices have their configuration download files and are on-line,
operators can change the device tuning parameter values. Uploading is
the process of updating the ENVOX configuration database with these
changes. Uploading is not available for console points.
4.1.6
Maintenance
Using the ENVOX diagnostics utility, you can identify specific device
errors and even trace the source of intermittent faults. Diagnostic displays
provide extensive coverage of system conditions.
4.1.7
Documentation
Using the documentation utility, you create documents that record your
configuration — all the points, devices, and so on.
4.1.8
Audit Trail
After the initial configuration is complete, you can enable the audit trail
utility to track changes to the database.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.2
189
ENVOX User Interfaces and Navigation
This subsection briefly describes the ENVOX interfaces you use to
configure the Operator Workplace console. The user interfaces include:
J
J
J
J
J
J
Menus — appear as a menu bar on the ENVOX Top-Level Form, as
pull-down menus when you select some menu-bar options, and as
slide-off menus when you select certain options from a pull-down
menu.
Forms — are screens with fields you fill in. Forms let you create
device definitions, points, and global items. They also let you verify
configuration data and generate configuration download files. Smaller,
pop-up forms are prompts, typically used for entering tags. See
subsection 4.2.1 for a description of the elements that most forms
share.
Graphic Display Editor — lets you create and edit graphic displays
for operators. The editor helps you create objects (for example,
boxes, circles, lines, polygons, faceplates, and process control
symbols), and to group, move, and duplicate objects for cut and paste
functions. Section 5 gives detailed procedures for using the Graphic
Display Editor.
Language Editor — lets you create and edit control algorithms for
continuous, discrete, and batch control. Control algorithms include
function sequence tables (FSTs) for continuous or discrete logic,
operations and procedures for batch strategies, and color and text
conditionals for console displays.
Utilities — let you generate, download, and document configuration
data, and manage the database. Other utilities help you test and
debug control strategies, troubleshoot instrument faults. See
subsection 4.11 for details about Operator Workplace-related utilities,
and refer to the Using ENVOX Configuration Software
(UM6.1:SW3151) manual for complete descriptions of the Utilities.
On-line Help — is available for forms, fields in the forms, and
keyboard functions you use with forms.
j Form help — briefly explains how a device definition, point, or
template form works. Form help is available if you are inside a
form and select the Help option from the menu bar; then select
the Form option from the pull-down menu. To exit help, press the
PF1 key followed by X.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
190
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
j Field help — provides information about the field on which the
cursor resides; for example, it might give a description, range,
special conditions, or example of how the field is used. Field help
is available if you select the Help option from the menu bar in
device definition, point, and template forms; then select the Field
option from the pull-down menu. To exit, press the PF1 key
followed by X.
j Keyboard help — lists the function keys available for a form.
Keyboard help is available if you select the Help option from the
menu bar, then select the Keyboard option from the pull-down
menu. To exit, press the PF1 key followed by X.
4
Note ... Help is also available for the Graphic Display Editor and
Language Editor, and is covered in Section 5 and in the manual
Using ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:sw3151),
respectively.
4.2.1
Navigating Within the ENVOX Configuration Software
The ENVOX P3.0 software release was the first to use an open platform
standard known as the portable operating system interface (POSIX). This
enables Fisher-Rosemount Systemsr to deliver the ENVOX software on
a number of major hardware platforms. From the user’s viewpoint, the
man-machine interface has been modified to take full advantage of X
Window System/Motif-based technology, while still maintaining backward
compatibility.
Once installed, the main change noticeable to users of earlier ENVOX
software versions is the appearance of the forms used for configuration.
Workstations with X Window capability display ENVOX forms inside a
Motif window. Motif windows have control buttons in the upper left and
right corners of the window. Workstations without X Window capability
also display ENVOX forms, but without the Motif window control buttons.
When you first log into the ENVOX configuration software, it displays the
ENVOX Top-Level Form. Like most forms, it has the same basic display
elements, shown in Figure 4-2 and described in the following paragraphs.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
Window Manager
Menu Button
X
Add
Motif Window
ENVOX Form Menus
ENVOX Form Name
ENVOX Form
Minimize Button
Maximize Button
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
Utilities More
More Status! Help
Modify!
191
o
Menu
Bar
Generate
Download
->
Menu
Bar Icon
Document
Upload
Diagnostics
IAC Trace/Tune
LCP Trace/Tune
Administration
Dbase
Dbase Management
Management -->
Audit Trail
Work
Area
Export Utility
Import Utility
History
Area
Pointer
Figure 4-2.
Pull-Down Menu
Slide-Off Menu
EV001
ENVOX Form Elements
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
Window Manager Menu Button (X Window Only) — Displays the
Motif window menu, which contains menu items for working with
windows.
Minimize Button (X Window Only) — Lets you shrink a window to
an icon on the workspace.
Maximize Button (X Window Only) — Lets you increase the size of
a window to its maximum allowable size.
ENVOX Form Name — The name of the form that you called up.
Menu Bar — Contains the names of menus and various icons you
can choose from to configure a form.
Work Area — The area for entering and viewing form data. The work
area is also where pull-down and slide-off menus appear.
Pull-Down and Slide-Off Menus — The menus that list related menu
options
Pointer — A pointer that reflects the movement of your mouse or
trackball, if you use one of these pointing devices
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
192
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
J
J
J
4
4.2.2
History Area — The area on item configuration forms where the
history of a database change is shown if the Audit Trail is turned ON
and there has been a change in the database
Menu Keys — A single character that lets you to select a specific
menu option. In a menu name, the highlighted letter indicates the
character to use to select that menu. On the ENVOX forms, the keys
to use are shown by reverse video or underlined characters.
Icons — Symbols that provide easy recognition and navigation, which
include:
X
The exit icon is on the left-hand of the menu bar and on pop-up
forms. Select this icon with the X letter key, or click on the icon
with the pointing device to back the software out of the present
function.
—>
The slide-off menu icon appears next to pull-down menu options
that have slide-off menus. The Dbase Management menu
option in Figure 4-2 shows this icon.
!
This icon has two meanings. It appears next to menu options
with nothing below them in the menu hierarchy. When you
select an option of this type, the software performs the related
action or, in other cases, accesses a new form. Options without
an ! have a pull-down menu. This icon also appears in the menu
bar of the current form when you press the Menu Toggle
function key (see subsection 4.2.2.2) in order to select a menu
in the menu-bar.
@
The user-wait icon appears at the right side of the menu bar
when the software is processing some information. You cannot
use the software while this icon is visible.
o
The overstrike mode icon appears when you are typing in
overstrike mode. No icon indicates that you are working in insert
mode.
P
The P icon appears when you are printing.
«
The scroll icon appears on the right side of the work area. A
scroll icon appearing in the center of the side bar indicates a
scrolling group field. Group fields allow you to access many
rows of data within a small number of lines. A scroll bar
appearing at the top or bottom indicates a scrolling form.
Navigating With a Pointing Device or a Keyboard
The following subsections describe how to select menus and exit from the
ENVOX Top-Level Form using a pointing device (mouse or trackball) or a
keyboard.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.2.2.1
193
Using a Pointing Device
To select a menu from the menu bar of a form with a pointing device:
Step 1:
Point to the menu you want.
Step 2:
Click the primary button. The menu options appear in a
pull-down menu, unless the menu name ends with an ! icon. In
this case, selecting the menu takes you directly to the menu
function.
To select a pull-down menu option:
Step 1:
Move the pointer to the menu option you want and click the
primary button.
Step 2:
Depending on the option you selected, one of three responses
happens: a new form appears, the ENVOX software executes
the command associated with the option, or a slide-off menu
appears if the option has one.
To select a slide-off menu option, move the pointer to the option you want
and click the primary button.
To back through one menu at a time, click on the previous menu.
To back through all the displayed menus, click with the pointer anywhere
off the displayed menus. This action removes all the slide-off and
pull-down menus from the screen. The ENVOX Top Level Form or
form-level menu remains.
To exit from the ENVOX Top Level Form, click on the X icon.
4.2.2.2
Using a Keyboard
ENVOX configuration software version P3.2 supports multiple operating
systems and hardware platforms, and three types of keyboards: DEC,
IBM, and HP. See Figure 4-3, Figure 4-4, and Figure 4-5 for keyboard
layouts, and Table 4-1 for keys to use to edit ENVOX forms.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
PF3
Default
Help
PF1
Enter
Nxt
Scr
Do
Prv
Scr
a
'
b
F12 F13 F14
Help
y
F9
F8
F7
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
Values Find Find
List
Row Null
F10
F11
Help
Insert Prev Next Erase
Row Field Field Row
Menu
Toggle
Enter
Default
4
F17 F18 F19 F20
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Erase
Entry
194
Figure 4-3.
DEC Keyboard Layout For Use With ENVOX Forms
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
.
0
2
1
6
5
4
3
+
Nxt
Scr
Page
Down
7
8
9
-*
/
Num
Lock
Prv
Scr
Page
Up
195
Enter
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
y
a
'
F12
F11
F10
F9
F8
F7
F6
F5
F3
F2
F1
Esc
Values Find Find
List
Row Null
F4
Insert Prev Next Erase Menu Enter Field Erase
Row Field Field Row Toggle Default Help Entry
b
Figure 4-4.
IBM Keyboard Layout For Use With ENVOX Forms
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
3
2
1
Next
--
,
6
5
4
Prev
9
8
7
.
0
Nxt
Scr
4
Prv
Scr
*
/
+
Enter
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Menu Enter Field Erase
Toggle Default Help Entry
196
a
y
'
Figure 4-5.
F8
F7
F6
F5
F3
F2
F1
Values Find
List
Row
Find
Null
F4
Insert Prev Next Erase
Row Field Field Row
b
HP Keyboard Layout For Use With ENVOX Forms
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
Table 4-1.
197
Keys for Editing ENVOX Forms
Function Key
Ctrl
Key
DEC
IBM
HP
Description
Arrow keys
Arrow keys
Arrow keys
Moves the cursor to different fields within a form,
to different choices in a visible choice field, or to
different entries in a valid entries list. Up and
down arrow keys highlight the entries in
pull-down and slide-off menus.
Delete
Delete
Delete
Same as Backspace.
Space Bar
Space Bar
Space Bar
Moves the cursor to the next choice in a single
choice field.
Ctrl-a
------
------
------
Toggles between Insert and Overstrike.
Ctrl-b
Prev Screen
Page Up
Prev
Scrolls a group upward.
Ctrl-c
------
------
------
Interrupts the forms entry, allowing you to exit
the software, or resume.
Ctrl-e
------
------
------
Erases the entry in the current activated field.
Ctrl-f
Next Screen
Page Down
Next
Scrolls a group downward.
Ctrl-h
Backspace
Backspace
Backspace
Deletes previous character in a field.
Ctrl-i
Tab or F13
Tab or F7
Tab or F7
Moves the cursor to the next field.
Ctrl-m
Return
Return
Return
Return.
Ctrl-n
Tab or F13
Tab or F7
Tab or F7
Same as Ctrl-i.
Ctrl-p
F12
F6
F6
Moves the cursor to the previous field.
Ctrl-r
PF1
F9
No label
Moves the cursor between the Work Area and
the Menu Bar Area.
Ctrl-u
------
------
------
Deletes a field entry from the cursor to the end of
the line.
Ctrl-v
F7
F1
F1
Calls up a list of valid entries for fields that
include the v indicator. Press the Return key (or
Menu Toggle function key and Apply), or click
on the entry with the pointing device, to enter a
selected entry into the field; the valid entries list
is automatically exited. Use the Menu Toggle
key and Cancel, or click on Cancel with the
pointing device, to exit the list if no entry is
desired. Where all of the tags in the database
are valid entries (for example, at the Modify
prompt), you must limit the list by supplying an
initial letter or wildcard (other than %).
Ctrl-w
------
------
------
Redraws the screen. Useful if a VAX mail
message is obscuring a form.
Ctrl-x
Backspace
Backspace
Backspace
Deletes the previous character in a field.
Ctrl-z
F6
n/a
n/a
Exits you out of ENVOX software to the
SYBASE DCL prompt without interrupting
current processes. Type logout at the prompt
to return to ENVOX software. Ctrl-z does not
work from the ENVOX Language Editor.
Ctrl-_
------
------
------
Returns the cursor to previous the window.
Ctrl-^
------
------
------
Prints the current form.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
198
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Table 4-1.
Function Key
Ctrl
Key
4
Keys for Editing ENVOX Forms (Continued)
DEC
IBM
HP
Description
F8
F2
F2
Finds a row you specify by row number or some
other identifier, depending on the current list.
F9
F3
F3
Moves the cursor to the next NULL field on the
current form. A NULL field is a field that does not
have any data in it. This is helpful when trying to
find incomplete fields that may have caused a
configuration file generation to fail.
F11
F5
F5
Inserts a blank row of data in a group.
F14
F8
F8
Deletes a row of data from a group.
F17
F10
No label
Fills-in the fields in the displayed form with
default values for this item type.
PF3 or Help
F11
No label
Provides help information about the current field.
To select a menu from the menu bar of a form using the keyboard:
Step 1:
Press the Menu Toggle function key to get to the menu bar.
Step 2:
Type the highlighted or underlined letter of the menu you want
(highlighted in character mode, underscored in X Window
mode). For example, type M for Modify, or O for More, and so
forth.
Or, type the number of the menu location from the left,
beginning with zero. For example, type 0 for X, or 1 for Add,
or 2 for Modify, and so forth.
Or, you can use the left and right arrow keys to select the
menu, then press the Return (or Enter) key.
The menu options appear in a pull-down menu, unless the
menu name ends with an ! icon. In this case, selecting the
menu takes you directly to the menu function.
To select a pull-down menu option:
Step 1:
Type the highlighted letter of the option — the action is taken
without you having to press the Return (or Enter) key.
Or, use the up and down arrow keys to select the desired
option, then press the Return (or Enter) key.
Step 2:
Depending on the option you select, one of three responses
happens: a new form appears, ENVOX software executes the
command associated with the option, or a slide-off menu
appears if the option has one.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
199
To back through one menu at a time, press the left arrow key.
To back through all the displayed menus, press the right arrow key. This
removes all the slide-off and pull-down menus from the screen. The menu
in the menu bar remains.
To exit from the ENVOX Top Level Form, press the Menu Toggle function
key followed by the X letter key. If you wish to confirm the exit, press the
Return (or Enter) key. If you decide not to exit the software, use the right
arrow key to move away from the X, and select a menu from the menu
bar.
4.2.2.3
Fast Access Keys
Fast access keys (sometimes called Accelerator keys) are function
names for hardkeys which represent that menu option selection. These
function names are listed, as appropriate, in the last of a series of slide off
menus. The listing reminds you that you can use the hardkey
corresponding to the function name instead of navigating in the normal
way. For instance, Help is listed next to Field in the pull-down menu
option of the Help menu. This listing reminds you that if you are in a form
and need help understanding the field, you can press the hardkey
corresponding to the Help function, and you will be taken immediately to
the help information.
4.2.3
Navigating and Entering Data in Forms
ENVOX software provides forms for creating device definitions, points,
and templates. Forms have fields, prompts, and menus. Most fields are
blanks into which you enter data. Other fields contain information that the
ENVOX software enters.
Each field has a help screen that defines the prompt and explains the
type of information the field requires. The software checks the validity of
the data as you enter it and displays errors and warnings. Menus on the
forms let you edit, print, and save the data.
Each point, device, and template type has its own form or series of forms.
Figure 4-6 shows an item form for a pulse count input (PCI) point and
identifies some important characteristics described in the following
paragraphs:
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
200
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Prompt
X
Valid Entries List is Available
Edit
Field with Data
PCI POINT
Utilities
Utilities Extra Data
Target!
Visible-Choice Fields
Help
ADD PI-12L
Inlet Flow Rate for Tank #12A
4
Device v : UOC1
Rate Function Enbl :
(Auto)
Index :
Description : TANK-12A INLET
Strategy : TANK12A
Resource Attr :
Off Scan :
NO
YES NO
Rate Filter Enbl : YES
YES NO
Rate Filter Time : 10
Instrument Signal v : PC1-122CH
UOC1
Signal Device
1-6-2
Local MUX Address
Conversion Const
Scan Rate :
YES
YES NO
30.0
0.1 0.2 0.5 1 2 5 10 30
Read-Only Data
Figure 4-6.
EV040
PCI Point Item Form Example
J
J
Prompt — This field contains a word or group of words that indicate
the type of information you might expect to find or input there.
Valid Entries List Available — Any time you see v: following a
prompt, you can view a list of valid entries available for that prompt by
pressing the Values List function key. You can view the list, but you
cannot change items within it. Once you have viewed the list, press
the Values List function key again to exit. To limit the list of available
entires, use one or more of the following wildcards:
j % — Matches any number of characters. For example, FI%
searches for entries that begin with FI.
j _ (underscore) — Matches a single character. For example, FI_
searches for three-character entries that begin with FI.
j [ ] — Matches a single character in the specified range. For
example, FI[d--f] matches FID, FIE, and FIF.
j [^] — Matches a single character that is not in the specified range.
For example, FI[^d--z] matches FIA, FIB, and FIC.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
J
J
J
4.2.3.1
201
Field With Data — The field following the prompt listing is where you
select the appropriate entry from the valid entries list.
Visible Choice Fields — These fields offer you a choice of
selections, which you choose by toggling to the desired choice with
the cursor.
Read-only Data — The data in this field is for informational purposes
only. You cannot change it. Note that all read-only fields are displayed
without colons.
Moving the Cursor From Field to Field
You can move from field to field one of several ways, depending on the
type of field (see subsection 4.2.3.4 for a description of three types of
fields):
J
J
For fields requiring typed input or input from a valid entries list, you
can move by pressing the Return (or Enter) key, Tab key, or Next
Field function key (depending upon your keyboard), or by using the
arrow keys or a pointing device.
For visible choice fields, you can move by pressing the Tab key or
Next Field function key (depending upon your keyboard), or by
clicking on the next field with the pointing device.
All fields on a configuration form are inactive and do not accept data until
you activate them. Moving from one field to the next using the Return (or
Enter) key, Tab key, or Next Field function key (depending upon your
keyboard), or a pointing device activates the next field. Activating a typed
input field or a valid entries list field, causes a broken line to appear next
to the field name, indicating that the field is now ready for data input.
Moving field to field using the arrow keys activates the field containing
the cursor.
4.2.3.2
Moving the Cursor Within a Field
When the cursor is in a field not activated for editing, the cursor moves
left and right in response to the left and right arrow keys. The up and
down arrow keys move the cursor out of the field.
To edit a different field, press the Tab key, Next Field function key, or
Previous Field function key (depending upon your keyboard). Unless you
are in a visible choice field, you can also move the cursor to another field
and press the Return (or Enter) key to activate the field.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
202
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.2.3.3
Exiting a Form
To exit a form, press the Menu Toggle function key to get to the menu
bar, then press the X letter key. Or, if you have a pointing device, click on
the X icon with the primary button. The software asks you to Apply or
Quit. Apply and Quit are options that the software gives you during a
number of different tasks.
Generally, Apply saves data to the database unless you are in an extra
data form. Quit does not save data. The exact consequences of Apply
and Quit depend on the task you are doing. Make sure you read the
descriptions that pertain to the task so that you understand the
consequences.
4
If you decide not to exit the form, use the right arrow key to move away
from the X, and select a menu from the menu bar.
4.2.3.4
Entering Form Data
There are four ways to enter data into a field:
J
J
J
J
Type it in.
Select from choices displayed on the screen. (Fields that display
choices are called visible choice fields.) The default for these fields is
null.
Select from a list that appears if you press the Values List function
key (depending upon your keyboard). Lists that appear when you
press the Values List function key are called valid-entries lists.
Use the default data.
Regardless of how you enter the data, you can edit by back spacing over
the entry and typing in other characters, or for visible-choice fields, by
selecting another visible choice. You can erase an entire field by pressing
the Erase Entry function key (depending upon your keyboard).
Note that when entering an exponential number, the software accepts
numbers according to the format 10.6e-9. The software accepts numbers
within the range of --9.99e+37 to 9.999e+37. However, highway devices
cannot support this same range. For example, UOC/IFC and SR90
controllers have absolute limits as follows:
5.4210e--20 to 9.2233e18 and --2.71e--20 to --9.223e18
ENVOX software allows the entry of 9-character floats. If larger numbers
are required, ISQL can be used and the numbers be displayed with the
correct truncation in forms.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
203
Note ... Refer to the manual Using ENVOX Configuration Software
(UM6.1:SW3151) for detailed information on using valid entry
lists, default data, and pattern tags. Also, see the same manual
for how to navigate and enter data in group fields.
4.2.3.5
Completing Forms
As you go through the forms for your configuration, keep in mind that
there is often additional information you must complete under the Extra
Data menu option. This is particularly true if you plan to target a device or
point to another device.
Note ... If you call up a supplemental configuration form using the Extra
Data menu option, and then enable any field on that form, you
must complete the entire form before exiting. Null is a valid entry
on forms accessed through the Extra Data option.
To toggle between the data entry portion of the form you are configuring
and its menu options, use the Menu Toggle function key (depending
upon your keyboard). If an exclamation point (!) appears in the menu bar,
use the left arrow key to deactivate it, or the right arrow to activate it.
4.3
Configuring the Console
You can access all forms used in configuring the console directly from the
ENVOX Top Level Form. This is the first display that appears on screen
after you log in to the ENVOX software.
During initial console configuration data entry, you will use only the Add
and Utilities options on the menu bar. After initial data entry, you will use
the Modify option most often.
Edit is one of the options appearing in the upper portion of each form.
There is no specific form for this function; however, understanding what
the function does is useful if you ever need to modify forms you have
completed.
You will probably use the Edit menu option more than any other of the
options listed in the upper portion of each form. It is not the only option
you have, though. Other options available to you both in configuring and
in editing forms include Utilities, Extra Data, Help, and form-specific
data such as Target!, Key Defn!, and Reorder!, among others.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
204
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Refer to the Using ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151)
manual for specific information on each of these functions.
Table 4-2 provides an alphabetic list of forms you can use to configure the
Operator Workplace console. This table may be useful for determining
which forms are required to configure the console, and which can be used
to customize your configuration.
4
Figure 4-7 through Figure 4-11 show maps of the forms under each of the
ENVOX top-level menu choices relevant to the Operator Workplace
software. Maps of the forms you need to configure various functional
items appear at the beginning of each major subsection.
Note ... WPCON (Workplace Console) is a naming convention used in
the ENVOX software for forms and menu options that are used
solely to configure Operator Workplace consoles.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
Table 4-2.
Alphabetic List of ENVOX Forms Used to Configure Consoles
This form ...
Is required to
configure
consoles ...
Accumulation Point
Customizes
configurations
for consoles ...
And must be
completed before ...
X
X(1)
Activity Point
Alarm Priority Definition
X
PMA Definition
PPA Definition
Application Definition
X
Color Palette Definition
X
Console DCD Point
X
Console Device Definition
X
Console Preferences
X
Console Target Data
X
Copy Console Configuration
X
DCD Template
X
Display Limits
X
Equipment List
4
DCD Template
X
Console EPCI Point
X
Extended Alarms
X
Extended Alarms
Report Header Definition
X
X(3)
Grade Details
Grades
X
Grade Template Defaults
X(3)
Graphic Display Editor(2)
X
Highway Access Control List
X
Grade Details
X
Horn Tone Definition
X
Integrity Point
X
Editor(2)
X
Maintenance Point
X
Language
205
Operator Display List(4)
Target Data
Console Target Data
Operator Display List(4)
X
Option Definition
X
PMA Definition
X
PPA Definition
User Access List
PMA List
X
PMA Definition
Point Sets
X(3)
Point Set Points
X(3)
PPA Definition
Equipment List
X
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
206
Table 4-2.
Alphabetic List of ENVOX Forms Used to Configure Consoles (Continued)
This form ...
4
Is required to
configure
consoles ...
Procedure
X(3)
Procedure List Definition
X(3)
Customizes
configurations
for consoles ...
Point Sets
Point Sets Point
Report Header Definition(5)
X
Report List Definition
X
Shift Table Definition
X
Single Discrete Point
X
System Clock List
X
Target Data
X
Trend Set Definition
X
Trend Target Data
X
Trend Trace Definition
X
User Access List
X
Report List Definition
Trend Set Definition
User Definitions
PMA List
User Application List
X
User Defined Key
X
User Definitions
And must be
completed before ...
X
Console Device Definition
PMA List
User Preferences
X
User UDK List
X
Notes:
1.
This point is only valid with batch software.
2.
The Graphic Display Editor and Language Editor are ENVOX software interfaces accessed through the ENVOX
Forms interface.
3.
If your plant or process runs a batch operation, this form is a required part of your configuration. If your plant or
process runs a continuous operation, it is not.
4.
You must complete one display before completing the Operator Display List form.
5.
Before you can define a report header, you must define a report. Instructions for defining a report are found in the
manual Using ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
207
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
[Add] --> [DEVICES] --> [WPCON]
CONSOLE DEVICE DEFINITION
[Extra Data]
OPTION DEFINITION
4
SYSTEM CLOCK LIST
SHIFT TABLE DEFINITION
TREND SET DEFINITION
[Extra Data]
TREND TRACE DEFINITION
[Lists]
OPERATOR DISPLAY LIST
CONSOLE PREFERENCES
PMA LIST
HORN TONE DEFINITION
USER ACCESS LIST
DISPLAY LIMITS
REPORT LIST DEFINITION
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-7.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Device Definition
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
208
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
[Add] --> [GLOBAL ITEMS]
DCD TEMPLATE
PMA DEFINITION
PPA DEFINITION
4
ALARM PRIORITY DEFINITION
USER DEFINITIONS
[Extra Data]
USER PREFERENCES
[Extra Data]
COLOR PALETTE DEFINITION
USER APPLICATION LIST
USER UDK LIST
APPLICATION DEFINITION
USER DEFINED KEY
COLOR PALETTE DEFINITION
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-8.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Global Items
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
209
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
[Add] --> [LOGIC]
[CONSOLE REPORTS]
[PROCEDURES]
[CONDITIONAL TEXT]
[CONDITIONAL COLOR]
Report
REPORT HEADER DEFINITION
Conditional Color
Conditional Text
PROCEDURE
EQUIPMENT LIST
[Extra Data]
GRADE TEMPLATE DEFAULTS
GRADES
[Grade!]
GRADE DETAILS
POINT SETS
[Pnt Set!]
POINT SET POINTS
PROCEDURE LIST DEFINITION
KEY
FORM NAME
-- ENVOX Form
[MENU]
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
LE
Figure 4-9.
-- Language Editor
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Logic Items
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
210
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
[Add] --> [CONSOLE POINTS]
ACCUMULATION POINT
[Target!]
[Add] --> [OTHER POINTS]
SINGLE DISCRETE POINT
[Target!]
4
ACTIVITY POINT
[Target!]
CONSOLE DCD POINT
[Target!]
MAINTENANCE POINT
[Target!]
TARGET DATA
[Extra Data]
CONSOLE TARGET DATA
CONSOLE EPCI POINT
[Extra Data]
[Target!]
EXTENDED ALARMS
INTEGRITY POINT
[Target!]
TREND TARGET DATA
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-10.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Points Definition
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
211
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
[Utilities]
HIGHWAY ACCESS CONTROL LIST
COPY CONSOLE CONFIGURATION
GRAPHICS DISPLAY EDITOR
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-11.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Utilities
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
212
4.4
Defining Devices
Console memory is organized into two main categories: a set of tables
containing the names and locations of all the items in the database, and
the items or objects themselves. In this section, we will look at defining a
device as well as the options available for it. See Figure 4-12 for a map of
forms to use to configure the Operator Workplace device definitions.
4
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
Required
[Add] --> [DEVICES] --> [WPCON]
[Utilities]
CONSOLE DEVICE DEFINITION
HIGHWAY ACCESS CONTROL LIST
Required
Required
[Extra Data]
OPTION DEFINITION
Required
[Lists]
OPERATOR DISPLAY LIST
Required
USER ACCESS LIST
Required
SYSTEM CLOCK LIST
Optional
CONSOLE PREFERENCES
Optional
DISPLAY LIMITS
Optional
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-12.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Devices
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.4.1
213
Console Device Definition Form
Use the Console Device Definition form (Figure 4-13) to identify
console-specific parameters. Some of these parameters are the highway
address, revision level, redundancy status, software type, printer
assignments, and database size. You also can indicate whether you want
to duplicate the configuration of another console and use it on this one.
Fields are available for you to list the help, detail, trend and maintenance
displays you want the console to access when the operator makes a
request.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
WPCON
CONSOLE DEVICE DEFINITION
Extra Data
Target!
Help
ADD ____________
Highway No. : __
Device No. : __
Strategy : ________________
Revision
Redundancy Status
Secondary Console v
Clone
Parent Console v
:
:
:
:
:
Help
Detail
Trend
Maint
Display
Display
Display
Display
v
v
v
v
:
:
:
:
________________
________________
________________
________________
______
SIMPLEX PRIMARY SECONDARY
____________
YES NO
Printer 2 Configured : YES NO
____________
PRINTER 1
PRINTER 2
Standard Options :
YES NO
Database Size :
Batch :
______
YES NO
Alarm
Log
Report
State&OAR
:
:
:
:
YES
YES
YES
YES
NO
NO
NO
NO
Last Modified on ____________________ by ____________________
EV198
Figure 4-13.
Console Device Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON.
Use the following information to complete the Console Device Definition
form. Complete only one form for each console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
214
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this case, the name of the console you are configuring appears.
4
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Highway No. — Enter an integer from 0 through 8 to designate the
highway where you want the console to reside. This number, combined
with the device number, designate the console’s highway address. A 0
indicates that the console resides on the network highway. Numbers 1
through 8 indicate that the console’s highway address is on the local
highway to which the integer corresponds.
Device No. — Specify the device number of this console. Numbers 1
through 6 designate a network (on highway 0) device. Numbers 1 through
30 designate devices on highways 1 through 8.
Strategy — Enter a name that you may use to group related items in the
configuration database. The system does not check or process this text in
any way, but it may use this text to sort items by strategy fields. Enter as
many as 16 characters.
Revision — Enter the correct revision level for the software installed in
the device you are configuring. The value you enter must match the
revision level shown on the console’s description display. In order to
complete or view options for the Secondary Console v and Parent
Console v fields on this form, you must enter a revision level.
Redundancy Status — Select SIMPLEX, PRIMARY, or SECONDARY in
this field to indicate whether the console is redundant. SIMPLEX indicates
a console with no redundancy features. PRIMARY indicates that this
console is the primary, or master, console in a redundant pair.
SECONDARY indicates that this console is the backup in a redundant
pair. See subsection 3.3 for more information on redundancy.
If you select PRIMARY, you identify your secondary console in the next
field.
Secondary Console v — If the redundancy status of the console you are
configuring is PRIMARY, enter the name of a backup console into this
field. Any other redundancy status forces this field to be a read-only field.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
215
Clone — Indicate whether you want to use another console’s
configuration for this console. YES indicates that this console replicates
another console’s configuration. NO requires you to configure this
console as a unique, complete console. You often use this cloning
function to duplicate major portions of the configuration of a primary
console in the secondary console. Cloned portions of a console’s
configuration include the Shift Table Definition, Trend Set Definition,
Operator Display List, PMA List, User Access List, and Report List
Definition.
Note ... Any changes you make to the console you originally configured
also appear in the cloned console, with the exception of the
Option Definition and System clock.
Parent Console v — Specify the name of the primary console whose
configuration you want to use for this device. Enter the name of any
console. You may clone a configuration as often as necessary.
Standard Options — Indicate whether this console is a standard or a
nonstandard console. YES indicates that this is a standard (500-, 2000-,
or 10,000-point database) console. NO indicates that this is a
nonstandard console. NO also allows you to alter the size information for
this console, provided that you have the console software that supports
size changes.
Note ... If this is a customized console, Fisher-Rosemount Systems may
have altered some console options. Check your ordering
specifications to verify console options.
Database Size — Enter the appropriate database size for the console
you are configuring. Valid entries are 500 for 500-point consoles, 2000 for
2000-point consoles, and 10,000 for 10,000-point consoles.
Batch — Indicate whether you want this console to run batch
applications.
J
J
YES indicates that the console runs batch and continuous
applications.
NO indicates that the console runs only continuous applications.
The batch control software option must be present on your console if you
select YES.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
216
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Caution ... If there are inconsistencies between the configuration data
entered in the Revision, Database Size, and Batch fields and the
actual console software installed, error messages only appear at
download. If you complete these fields accurately, however, they
are acknowledged during the verify cycle of the ENVOX
diagnostics utility.
4
Help Display v — Specify what configured display you want the operator
to see when he or she enters Help in the Display ETF and presses the
Return key. Enter the name of a graphic display.
Detail Display v — This field is not valid for Operator Workplace devices
and therefore is disabled.
Trend Display v — This field is not valid for Operator Workplace devices
and therefore is disabled.
Maint Display v — Specify what configured display you want the
operator to see when he or she selects Utilities —> Maintenance
Display. Enter the name of a graphic display.
Note ... You must include the display names of the help and
maintenance lists in the Operator Display List form in addition to
identifying them for their specific functions on this form.
Printer 2 Configured — Operator Workplace supports a single printer
only. Therefore, this field is set to NO and cannot be changed by the user.
Alarm (Printer 1) — Indicate if you want Printer 1 to receive alarm
activation, acknowledgement, and deactivation messages for this
console:
J
YES says you want alarm messages printed on Printer 1.
J
NO says you do not want alarm messages printed on Printer 1.
Alarm (Printer 2) — This field is not valid for Operator Workplace
devices and therefore is disabled.
Log (Printer 1) — Indicate whether you want Printer 1 to print operator
change messages from this console:
J
YES says you want operator change messages printed on Printer 1.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
J
217
NO says you do not want operator change messages printed on
Printer 1.
Log (Printer 2) — This field is not valid for Operator Workplace devices
and therefore is disabled.
Report (Printer 1) — Indicate if you want Printer 1 to print the reports for
this console:
J
YES says you want reports printed on Printer 1.
J
NO says you do not want reports printed on Printer 1.
Report (Printer 2) — This field is not valid for Operator Workplace
devices and therefore is disabled.
State&OAR (Printer 1) — Indicate if you want Printer 1 to print the state
and OAR messages for this console:
J
J
YES says you want state and OAR messages printed on Printer 1.
NO says you do not want state and OAR messages printed on
Printer 1.
State&OAR (Printer 2) — This field is not valid for Operator Workplace
devices and therefore is disabled.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
218
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.4.2
Option Definition Form
Use the Option Definition form (Figure 4-14) to identify options that
characterize how the console interacts with the operator and
communicates to other highway devices that you want to assign to this
console. This form allows you to select particular options.
4
X
Edit
Type
Utilities
WPCON
OPTION DEFINITION
Extra Data
Help
Target!
ADD ____________
No. of Alarm Instances :
Ack All Station Horns :
Ack Selected Point :
Auto Point Select : YES NO
Auto Parameter Select : YES NO
No. Alarm History Records :
PPA Tracking : YES NO
Local Area Ack Horns: YES NO
Global Ack Alarms: YES NO
Percent of Max Objects :
Percent of Max Named Objects :
Percent of Max Slots :
YES NO
YES NO
Alarm Select Priority : NEWEST OLDEST
EV208
Figure 4-14.
Option Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra Data —> Option Defn.
Use the following information to complete option definitions. Complete
only one form for each console.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this instance, the name of the console for which you are configuring
options appears.
No. of Alarm Instances — Enter an integer ranging from 50 through
32,767 to specify the maximum number of alarms for which this console
should save arrival time and priority information. If the number you enter
is too small, the second integrity display will show:
# OF ALARM INS EXCEEDED
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
219
Also, if the number is too small, as new alarms occur, they will replace the
instance records of older, lower-priority alarms. This will cause alarms to
be missing in the Alarm Summary, the Alarm List, and the OAL and
increase the console loading. This means you may have alarms active
that are not obvious.
Auto Point Select — This field is not valid for Operator Workplace and is
therefore ignored.
Auto Parameter Select — Indicate whether you want the console to
select a parameter and prepare it for input when an operator selects a
point or changes its mode. If you answer YES, when an operator loads a
point in an instrument area or changes the mode of a point in an
instrument area, one of the input fields for that point may be highlighted
and ready for the operator to enter a value. If you answer NO, the console
does not highlight an input field. Table 4-3 shows the parameter selected
for various point types for Manual and Auto mode.
Table 4-3.
Parameters Automatically Selected for Point Types
Selected Point’s Mode
Selected Point
Type(1)
Manual
Automatic
AO
SETPOINT
None
PID
OUTPUT
SETPOINT
PID RATIO
OUTPUT
SETPOINT
PD BIAS
OUTPUT
SETPOINT
PD BIAS RATIO
OUTPUT
SETPOINT
MANUAL LOADER
OUTPUT
None
MANUAL LOADER RATIO
OUTPUT
None
BIAS GAIN
OUTPUT
SETPOINT
BIAS GAIN RATIO
OUTPUT
SETPOINT
SIGNAL SELECTOR
OUTPUT
None
SIGNAL SELECTOR RATIO
OUTPUT
None
PDO
SETPOINT
None
FLOATING POINT
REFERENCE
None
REFERENCE(2)
REFERENCE
None
REFERENCE
None
REFERENCE
DEVIATION(2)
1.
The following point types do not have a parameter selected automatically: INTEGER, UNIT,
ACTIVITY, ASCII, AI, PCI, PDM, Integrity, LCP, EPCI, ACCUMULATION, Four-bit DI/DO,
MONITOR, MONITOR DEVIATION, Single-bit DI, Single-bit DO, DCD, GROUP
2.
These point types do not have modes but the parameter indicated is automatically selected.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
220
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
PPA Tracking — Indicate if you want the system to inform this console
when plant process areas (PPAs) change in other consoles. Select YES if
you want the system to forward PPA changes in other consoles to this
console. This assures that all consoles using a particular PPA are
operating in the same operating states and critical levels. Select NO if you
do not want this console to receive or transmit PPA changes. If you select
YES, you can access the fields Local Area Ack Horns and Global Ack
Alarms. See subsection 3.2.5 for more information.
4
Local Area Ack Horns — Indicate if you want to acknowledge horns
from consoles in the PPA tracking ring from any console in the ring that is
on the same local highway. Select YES to allow the operator to
acknowledge horns on other consoles. Select NO if you do not want
operators to acknowledge horns on other consoles.
Global Ack Alarms — Indicate if you want to acknowledge alarms from
other consoles in the PPA tracking ring from any console in the ring.
Select YES to enable global acknowledgement. Select NO if you do not
want the operator to acknowledge alarms from other consoles.
For global alarm acknowledgment to work, all points using it must be in
the highway access control list (HACL).
Alarm Select Priority — Specify on the alarm list and on the operator
attention list (OAL), the order in which you want the console to store
alarm information. This field resolves the problem of how to sort alarms of
equal priority by establishing a time-of-receipt priority for them. NEWEST
indicates that the most-recently received alarm within a priority appears
first. OLDEST indicates that the oldest alarm within a priority appears
first.
Ack All Station Horns — Indicate whether you want the operator to
acknowledge each station’s horn at the station where the horn sounds, or
if you want the operator to acknowledge all horns at one time from a
single station. YES requires the operator to acknowledge horns at each
station. NO allows the operator to acknowledge all horns from one
station.
Ack Selected Point — Indicate whether you want the operator to
acknowledge each alarm individually or all alarms on a display at one
time. If you select YES, the operator must acknowledge each alarm
individually by first selecting the point with an unacknowledged alarm and
then clicking on the Ack button with the pointing device’s primary button.
If you select NO, the operator acknowledges all previously
unacknowledged alarms on a single display by clicking on the Ack button.
No. Alarm History Records — Enter an integer from 0 through 32,767 to
identify the number of history records you want to allocate for this
console. If you are controlling a continuous system, enter 0. If you are
controlling a batch system, refer to subsection 3.4.7.2.4 for more
information.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
221
Percent of Max Objects — Indicate what percentage of the database
objects you want to download to this console. When determining this
percentage, you must consider that the number of database objects you
add during a partial download must not cause the partial download to
exceed this percentage. Enter an integer ranging from 25 through 125.
The integer represents a percentage of the maximum value (500, 2000 or
10000) for the particular console database size.
The recommended value is between 50 and 80 percent. The smaller the
number you use, the more room you have for other configured items.
Percent of Max Named Objects — Indicate what percentage of the
named objects you want to download to this console. When you do partial
downloads, any named objects you add must not cause the partial
download to exceed this percentage. Enter an integer ranging from 25
through 125. The integer represents a percentage of the maximum value
for the particular console database size.
The recommended value is between 50 and 80 percent.
Percent of Max Slots — Indicate what percentage of the database
unsolicited communication slots you want to allocate in this console.
When you do partial downloads, any database slots you add must not
cause the partial download to exceed this percentage. Enter an integer
ranging from 25 through 125. The integer represents a percentage of the
maximum value for the maximum number of slots.
The recommended value is between 50 and 80 percent.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
222
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.4.3
Operator Display List Form
Use the Operator Display List form (Figure 4-15) to indicate which
displays are downloaded to a console. Create one display list for each
console. This form also contains fields for the display number, forward
and backward displays, and overview indication. These fields allow you to
arrange the displays so the operator sees them in a logical progression.
You must use the Graphics Display Editor to create the displays identified
on this form before generating a download for this console. The Graphic
Display Editor is described in Section 5. The names in this list must be
display names. Do not duplicate display names in this list.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
ADD ____________
Type WPCON
No.
OPERATOR DISPLAY LIST
Extra Data
Help
Target!
Target!
Display v
Display
No.
Display
Forward v
Display
Backward v
Overview
1
YES NO
2
YES NO
3
4
YES NO
5
6
YES NO
7
YES NO
8
YES NO
9
10
YES NO
11
12
13
YES NO
14
15
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
EV213
Figure 4-15.
Operator Display List Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra Data —> Lists —> Operator Display
List.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
223
Use the following information to configure the operator display list.
Complete only one form for each console.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console to which you are assigning displays
appears.
No. — This is a read-only field containing an integer that the ENVOX
system generates. The integer shows the number of displays you enter in
the order you enter them. For example, the system numbers the first
display you enter as one, the second as two, and so on.
Display v — Enter the name of a display you want to associate with this
console. If a display name is in the display list, then the operator can view
the display from any station of this console. You may enter any display
name for this field.
Display No. — Enter a number to specify the order in which you want
displays to appear on the display directory. Displays appear in ascending
order according to this number. The operator may access a display by
using this number or by using the display name. Enter any integer from 1
through 1050. You may wish to put related displays in groups by display
number. This aids the user of a display directory in locating related
displays.
Note ... If you are configuring a 500-point console, this integer should be
from 1 through 77. For a 2000-point console, valid entries range
from 1 through 212. In a 10,000-point console, valid entries
range from 1 through 1050.
Display Forward v — Enter the name of a display you want the operator
to see when he or she presses the PAGE FWD key while viewing the
display listed in the Display v field. You may want to arrange displays that
are related in nature or progressive in detail so that they appear in logical
progression.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
224
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Display Backward v — Enter the name of a display you want the
operator to see if he or she presses the PAGE BACK key while viewing
the display listed in the Display v field. If you have displays that are
related in nature or progressive in detail, you may want to arrange them
so that this key allows the operator to see them in a logical regression.
You are not required to define the display-backward regression as a
mirror-image of the display-forward progression. However, you may want
to incorporate this tactic to provide a consistent display hierarchy for your
operators.
4
Overview — This field is not valid for Operator Workplace and is
therefore ignored.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.4.4
225
User Access List Form
Use the User Access List form (Figure 4-16) to specify the user names of
the operators you want to have access to a console. The console uses
this list to verify each operator’s authorization whenever he or she
attempts to log on to the console. Enter any of the names of the operators
for which you defined User Definitions forms. Each name on the list must
be unique.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
Type WPCON
USER ACCESS LIST
Target!
Extra Data
Help
Target!
ADD ____________
No.
Username v
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
EV209
Figure 4-16.
User Access List Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra Data —> Lists —> User Access List.
Use the following information to configure a user access list. Complete
only one form for each console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
226
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console for which you are defining valid users
appears.
No. — This is a read-only field containing an integer that the ENVOX
system generates as you enter names in the Username field. The integer
tells you how many names you are entering in the list. You can enter as
many as 255 names for a console.
4
Username v — Identify the operators who you want to have access to
the console. You defined these operators’ privilege levels in the User
Definitions form. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Note ... The first name that you enter on the Users Access List form
must have DOWNLOAD privilege.
4.4.5
System Clock List Form
To maintain synchronization within the system, you can configure a
master system clock. The master clock synchronizes all other devices on
the highway.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
227
Use the System Clock List form (Figure 4-17) to define a master device
that you want to automatically synchronize the internal clocks of certain
other highway devices. You may organize these devices into a hierarchy
of masters and slaves. A master device may have as many as 254
slaves. Operator Workplace consoles, large-database consoles (LCONs),
and computers running the Computer/Highway Interface Package (CHIP)
can be masters or slaves. The 20-Series (SR90) controllers (UOC, IFC,
and MUX) and trend units can be slaves only.
A device must have only one master. Define the master by building a
system clock list for the device on this form. Once you configure and
download the devices, setting the master, the masters inform their slaves
of the time. Use the ENVOX system for PROVOX devices only. If you
want an LCON to be a master, you must configure a different list at the
LCON device. Refer to subsection 3.11 for more information on the
system clock function.
X
Edit
Utilities
Type WPCON
SYSTEM CLOCK LIST
Extra Data
Help
Target!
ADD ____________
No.
No.
Direction
Time
1
2
3
4
FORWARD
FORWARD
FORWARD
FORWARD
Notification Interval :
BACKWARD
BACKWARD
BACKWARD
BACKWARD
Slave Device v
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
EV246
Figure 4-17.
System Clock List Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra Data —> System Clock.
Use the following information to configure the system clock list. Complete
only one form for each console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
228
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console for which you are defining a system
clock list appears.
4
No. — This is a read-only field that contains an integer the ENVOX
system generates. The integer tells you how many daylight savings time
changes you are entering in the Time field.
Time — Enter a date and time for daylight savings time changes. This
change is either forward or backward 1 hour. Use the Fisher-Rosemount
Systems standard format: DD-MMM-YYYY HH:MM:SS. In this format, DD
is day, MMM is month, YYYY is year, HH is hour, MM is minutes, and SS
is seconds. You may include or omit both leading zeros and seconds. For
example, both 01:23:00 and 1:23 are acceptable. This field is changeable
through the Utilities —> Time menu selection.
Note ... Daylight savings time changes can be made on-line only if a
master system clock has been configured.
The ranges for this field are:
J
DD (Day) — 1 through 28, 29, 30 or 31, depending on the month
J
MMM (Month) — Jan through Dec
J
YYYY (Year) — 1950 through 9999
J
HH (Hour) — 00 through 23
J
MM (Minute) — 00 through 59
J
SS (Second) — 00 through 59 (optional)
Direction — Specify which direction the system clock should move,
either forward or backward. This feature allows you to change to daylight
savings time or change to standard time. This field is tunable through the
Utilities —> Time menu selection.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
229
Notification Interval — Specify how long the master device should wait
after sending the time to one slave before sending the time to another
slave. The master updates one slave at a time. When you enter this
value, consider how heavily loaded the highway and central processing
unit (CPU) are. If you have a heavily loaded CPU or highway, you may
want to enter a longer time interval. If you change the time on the master
device, then the time the master requires to update the slaves is this
notification interval times the number of slaves:
(This interval) ´ (The number of slave items) = Seconds to update all slaves
Enter an integer from 5 to as many as 65,535 (seconds) for the interval.
Note ... The Notification Interval field must be filled in to configure a
master system clock.
No. — This is a read-only field that contains an integer the ENVOX
system generates integer as you enter slave item names in the Slave
Device v field. The integer tells you how many slaves you are entering.
The integer can range from 1 through 254.
Slave Device v — This field is optional. Enter the name of an item that
you want to be a slave. Only Operator Workplace consoles, LCONs,
20-Series (SR90) controllers (UOC, IFC, and MUX), computers running
CHIP, and trend units can be slaves. If you include a device in this list, it
receives time updates from the master device. The master synchronizes
the internal clocks of all of the devices on this list. You may enter as many
as 254 slaves for one master. A slave device cannot be assigned on-line.
Note ... The ENVOX software does not allow you to configure a system
clock list for the secondary console of a redundant pair of
consoles. The ENVOX software automatically generates a
system clock configuration for the secondary console that is
identical to the primary console’s configuration when you
download the secondary console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
230
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.4.6
Highway Access Control List Form
The Highway Access Control List form (see Figure 4-18) lets you assign
highway access control list (HACL) numbers for your PROVOX system.
The console where the point resides uses the HACL index to
communicate data to the correct point in a targeted console. HACL
numbers are also used to access console point information from CHIP by
using the HACL index as the point number in the Computer Highway
Access Package (CHIP) request.
In a redundant pair of consoles, the active console uses the HACL index
to communicate to the correct point in the secondary console. The
ENVOX software assigns a default HACL index for any points to which
you have not assigned a HACL index. The HACL index is global
throughout a complete system if the point appears in this list.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
HIGHWAY ACCESS CONTROL LIST
Help
Extra Data
Target!
Max List Size : _______
Ref No
Point Tag
EV214
Figure 4-18.
Highway Access Control List Form Layout
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
231
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Utilities
—> Highway Access Control List.
Note ... In other documents, the highway access control list has been
called the highway reference list, the highway access list, and
the highway control list. All of those names refer to the highway
access control list.
Use the following information to configure the highway access control list.
Complete only one form for each console.
Max List Size — Designate the maximum number of points for which you
are assigning a highway access control list index. Make this number as
large as the number of console-resident points you have in the system,
plus the number of unit points, plus any other points where you want the
HACL number to remain unchanged in the PROVOX system. The default
(original) number for this field is 3072.
Ref No — Enter any integer from 1 to the maximum list size to specify the
highway access control list number (index) you want to assign to this
point. This number is a global item, and all devices that download this
point have the number you indicate here as their highway access control
list number.
Point Tag — Select any valid point tag to specify the point to which you
are assigning a highway access control list index.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
232
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.4.7
Console Preferences Form
Use the Console Preferences form (Figure 4-19) to configure a number of
console-wide preferences for Operator Workplace devices. If entries are
not made in the fields on this form, then default data is used by the
console.
You can also set some of these preferences on a user basis with the User
Preferences form (see subsection 4.10.2). Notes with the field
descriptions indicate if the console preferences will override the user
preferences.
4
X
Edit
Type
Utilities
CONSOLE PREFERENCES
Target!
Extra Data
Help
Target!
WPCON
ADD ____________
Raise Alarm Area
Allow Summary Filters
Max Windows
Session Timeout (mins)
Input Timeout (secs)
:
:
:
:
:
Message Stack Size :
Minor Alarm List Size :
OAR List Size :
Sess Mgr Application v :
DOCVUE Application v :
CS HELP Application v :
Keyboard Type :
View Menu Privilege :
Preferences Menu Privilege :
Default Popup Screen
Figure 4-19.
.ALWAYS
.YES NO
____
____
____
WHEN CHANGED
WHEN SELECTED
____
____
____
____________
____________
_____________
PC-101 LK401
TUNE OPERATE ACCESS
TUNE OPERATE ACCESS
SAME OPPOSITE
Console Preferences Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra Data —> Console Preferences.
Use the following information to complete optional preferences. Complete
only one form for each console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
233
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console to which you are assigning preferences
appears.
Raise Alarm Area — Specify whether the console will automatically raise
the alarm window to the top when obscured by another window. Select
one of the following options to assign a preference: ALWAYS, WHEN
CHANGED, or WHEN SELECTED. If you select ALWAYS, the alarm area
is always on top of other windows. If you select WHEN CHANGED, the
alarm area window moves to the top if the alarm status changes. If you
select WHEN SELECTED, the alarm area window moves to the top only
when selected by the operator. If you do not make a selection, then the
default (ALWAYS) is used.
Note ... If you make a selection in the Raise Alarm Area field, your
preference will override a lower-priority selection on the
equivalent field of the User Preferences form (see subsection
4.10.2).
ALWAYS is considered the highest priority, and WHEN
SELECTED the lowest priority.
Allow Summary Filters — This field is not valid for Operator Workplace
and is therefore ignored.
Max Windows — Enter an integer to set the maximum total number of
windows that all operators sessions on this console can have open at the
same time. The maximum you set applies only to windows that open from
the console software Windows menu, with the following exceptions:
J
Message/Log
J
Shift Comments
J
Macro
Operators can always open these windows and windows that open from
other menus (the Summaries and Utilities menus, for example).
The number you enter should be low enough to ensure that console
resources will be available during a plant upset and high enough to allow
operators a sufficient number of windows to operate efficiently. Specify
the smallest practical number. The valid range is from 1 through 255. If
you do not enter a value, then the console software default (12) is used.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
234
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Note ... If you enter a number in the Max Windows field, it will override
any higher-number entry on the equivalent field of the User
Preferences form (see subsection 4.10.2).
If the operator tries to exceed the Max Windows number, an
error message appears and the operator must close a window
before opening another.
4
Session Timeout (mins) — Enter an integer from 0 through 1024
(minutes) to specify how long a remote user session can remain idle
before the console turns it off. This field may be used to minimize the risk
of unauthorized console use. Zero (0) indicates that user sessions do not
time out regardless of idle time. The maximum entry of 1024 minutes is
17 hours. If you do not enter a value, then the default (480) is used.
Input Timeout (secs) — Enter 0 (zero) or an integer from 30 to 32767
(seconds) to limit how long input focus remains on the instrument area
without operator input. If an operator makes no changes to the point for
the time you specify in the field, the instrument area clears and the
operator must reselect the point to operate it. Zero (0) indicates that the
input focus remains on until de-selected by an operator. The maximum
entry of 32767 seconds is 9 hours. If you do not enter a value, then the
default (120) is used.
Message Stack Size — Enter an integer from 1 through 1024 to specify
how many messages can be listed in the message log area. If you do not
enter a value, then the default (100) is used.
Minor Alarm List Size — Enter an integer from 1 through 27 to specify
how many messages can be displayed in the minor alarm list. If you do
not enter a value, then the default (27) is used.
OAR List Size — Enter an integer from 1 through 32 to specify how
many OARs can be displayed in the OAR list. If you do not enter a value,
then the default (10) is used.
Sess Mgr Application v — This field is not valid for the current release
of Operator Workplace software and should therefore be ignored.
DOCVUE Application v — This field is not valid for the current release of
Operator Workplace software and should therefore be ignored.
CS HELP Application v — This field is not valid for the current release of
Operator Workplace software and should therefore be ignored.
Keyboard Type — Select the type of keyboard this console’s operator
stations has. Note that for best results a console should have only one
keyboard type for all its operator stations.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
235
View Menu Privilege — Select the operator session privilege necessary
to access the following functions from the Operator Workplace View
menu: Tile, Show all DSRs, Track DSRs, and Couple. TUNE means only
operators with TUNE privilege can access the functions, OPERATE
means operators with TUNE or OPERATE privilege can access the
functions, and ACCESS means that operators with TUNE, OPERATE, or
ACCESS can access the functions.
Preferences Menu Privilege — Select the operator session privilege
necessary to access the Operator Workplace Preferences menu. TUNE
means only operators with TUNE privilege can access the menu,
OPERATE means operators with TUNE or OPERATE privilege can
access the menu, and ACCESS means that operators with TUNE,
OPERATE, or ACCESS can access the menu.
Default Popup Screen — Select the screen of a dual-headed operator
station on which secondary windows initially appear. SAME means the
windows appear on the window that initially contained the main window.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
236
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.4.8
Display Limits Form
Use the Display Limits form (Figure 4-20) to configure the maximum
number of the various Motif elements that can be used on a display. If you
do not enter a number in one of the fields, the default value is used.
Each Motif element on a display consumes a significant amount of
console resources. As the number of Motif elements in a display
increases, the time required to open the display on the console increases.
4
X
Edit
Type
Utilities
WPCON
DISPLAY LIMITS
Target!
Extra Data
Target!
Help
ADD ____________
Maximum
Figure 4-20.
Pushbutton :
__
Discrete :
__
Mode Entry :
__
One of N :
__
Scrolled List :
__
Scrolled Text :
__
Slider :
__
Text Field :
__
Console Preferences Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra Data —> Display Limits.
Use the following information to complete optional preferences. Complete
only one form for each console.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console to which you are assigning preferences
appears.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
237
Pushbutton — Enter a number from 6 through 32 to set the maximum
number of pushbutton elements that can appear on a display. The default
number is 6.
Discrete — Enter a number from 4 through 32 to set the maximum
number of discrete elements that can appear on a display. The default
number is 4.
Mode Entry — Enter a number from 4 through 32 to set the maximum
number of mode entry elements that can appear on a display. The default
number is 4.
One of N — Enter a number from 4 through 32 to set the maximum
number of One of N elements that can appear on a display. The default
number is 4.
Scrolled List — Enter a number from 4 through 32 to set the maximum
number of scrolled list elements that can appear on a display. The default
number is 4.
Scrolled Text — Enter a number from 4 through 32 to set the maximum
number of scrolled text elements that can appear on a display. The
default number is 4.
Slider — Enter a number from 4 through 32 to set the maximum number
of slider elements that can appear on a display. The default number is 4.
Text Field — Enter a number from 8 through 32 to set the maximum
number of text fields (text entry elements) that can appear on a display.
The default number is 8.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
238
4.5
Defining Reports
Although defining a report is one of the options you can select for the
console, there is no form for this function. Appendix H provides
information on the valid attributes that can be configured for reports. For
specific instructions on using the ENVOX language editor, please refer to
the manual Using the ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151).
To incorporate a configured report into an Operator Workplace console,
you must also define an equipment list, shift table (for shift reports), report
header, and reports list. The following subsections describe these
definitions.
4
See Figure 4-21 for a map of forms to use to define Operator Workplace
reports.
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
Required
[Add] --> [DEVICES] --> [WPCON]
[Add] --> [LOGIC] --> [CONSOLE REPORTS]
Report
CONSOLE DEVICE DEFINITION
Required
Required
[Extra Data]
REPORT HEADER DEFINITION
SHIFT TABLE DEFINITION
Optional
Optional
[Lists]
EQUIPMENT LIST
REPORT LIST DEFINITION
Optional
Optional
KEY
FORM NAME
-- ENVOX Form
[MENU]
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
LE
Figure 4-21.
-- ENVOX Language Editor
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Reports
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.5.1
239
Shift Table Definition Form
Use the Shift Table Definition form (Figure 4-22) to define the time
intervals at which you want the console to produce shift reports and
accumulation point rollovers. You can define as many as five shifts for
each day by setting the hour and minute at which each shift starts. In
addition, this form defines the times at which you want rollovers to occur.
Rollovers move accumulated values and statuses from the current shift to
the previous shift. The current shift values are then set at zero. This form
defines the number of operator shifts you want the console to use each
day, as well as the length of each shift.
Note ... This option is not available for the secondary console of a
redundant pair. The configuration automatically copies the shift
table from the primary console to the secondary console.
X
Edit
Utilities
Type WPCON
SHIFT TABLE DEFINITION
Extra Data
Help
Target!
Target!
ADD ____________
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
EV216
Figure 4-22.
Shift Table Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —>Extra Data —> Shift Table.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
240
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Use the following information to configure the console shift table. Enter
times for each day of the week. Complete only one form for each console.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console for which you are defining shifts
appears.
4
Sunday (through Saturday) — Enter the time you want shifts to start
each day. The times you enter trigger the system to print shift reports and
to roll over accumulation point data. The system rolls over data at the
beginning of each shift, every hour after the beginning of a shift, and daily,
starting at the beginning of the first shift of the next day.
To assure consistency and predictable results when you create shift
tables, do one of the following:
J
J
Configure shifts to be all the same length of time
If you cannot make your shifts start exactly on the hour, wait until at
least 10 minutes after the hour rollover to start a new shift. For more
information, see subsection 3.4.3.
In the following three examples, starting and ending times for shifts
covering a 24-hour period produce predictable results, because the
sample shifts either are exactly the same length of time or vary by at least
10 minutes. The first and second lines each show three shifts separated
by 8 hours; the third line shows three shifts separated by 8 hours and 10
minutes.
00:00, 08:00, 16:00
00:05, 08:05, 16:05
00:00, 08:10, 16:20
In the first of the following four examples, the shifts vary by only 5
minutes, and the shifts in the subsequent examples vary inconsistently.
This results in inconsistent accumulations from one shift to the next,
which causes unpredictable results.
00:00, 08:05, 16:10
00:05, 08:00, 16:00
00:05, 08:10, 16:05
00:55, 08:00, 16:55
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.5.2
241
Report List Definition Form
Use the Report List Definition form (Figure 4-23) to indicate what report
headers, and their reports, are associated with a particular console. The
report list is a group of as many as 2000 report headers. A console can
command the printer to print any report that the headers reference in this
list.
Define the report headers before defining this report list for a console.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
Type WPCON
REPORT LIST DEFINITION
Extra Data
Help
Target!
Target!
ADD ____________
No. Header v
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
EV218
Figure 4-23.
Report List Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra Data —> Lists —> Reports List.
Use the following information to configure the console’s report list.
Complete only one form for each console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
242
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console to which you are assigning reports
appears.
No. — This is a read-only field containing an integer that the ENVOX
system generates. The integer shows how many report headers you
entered in the report list for your console.
4
Header v — Enter the report header name that you want to assign to a
specific console. The report list indicates which reports the console can
use. The console commands the printer to print the reports associated
with the headers in this list at the time the report header specifies if the
report type is SHIFT or SCHEDULE. The header name should be a
previously defined report header of as many as 12 characters.
4.5.3
Report Header Definition Form
Use the Report Header Definition form (Figure 4-24) to configure the
report headers for the console. This form identifies the type of report the
console or operator can submit or print, as well as when printing starts.
However, you must define the report itself before you can configure the
report header.
If you designate the report type as SCHEDULE on this form, the header
also identifies how often the system generates the report. If it is a SHIFT
report, define the shift tables (on the Shift Table Definition form,
subsection 4.5.1) as well. After you define the header, enter it into the
console report list.
A DEMAND report is one that prints only when specifically requested by
the operator or the console, such as a batch end report. A SHIFT report
prints at the beginning of each operator shift. You define the shift start
times on the Shift Table Definition form. A SCHEDULE report prints at any
scheduled time as defined by the start time and interval. These scheduled
times do not have to correspond to shift changes.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
X
Edit
Utilities
243
REPORT HEADER DEFINITION
Extra Data
Help
Target!
Target!
ADD ____________
Strategy :
4
Report Tag v :
Start Time :
Interval :
Type :
DEMAND SHIFT SCHEDULE
EV217
Figure 4-24.
Report Header Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
LOGIC —> CONSOLE REPORTS —> REPORT HEADER.
Use the following information to configure the report header. Complete
only one form for each header.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are completing this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the report header you are defining appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group related items in
the configuration database. For example, if this report header is used for
a specific batch report, this field may contain the name of the procedure
that requests the report. The system does not check or process this text
in any way, but you may use this text to sort database items by strategy
fields. Enter as many as 16 characters.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
244
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Report Tag v — Identify a specific report (which was defined using the
ENVOX report editor) for the report header. The report this name
identifies takes on the schedule you defined in the report header. Note
that two different report headers may reference the same report. You may
want to do this so that a common report can be used both as a
SCHEDULE and as a SHIFT report. Enter any previously defined report
name.
Start Time — Specify what time you want the report to start printing.
Although this field holds a maximum of four numbers in the format
HH:MM, the console determines the entire date, including day and time
when you download the header to it. This field is valid only for
SCHEDULE reports. Enter any start time in the range of 00:00 through
23:59.
4
Interval — Specify how often you want the system to print a SCHEDULE
report. Exceptions are DEMAND or SHIFT reports, which cannot be
scheduled. Enter a maximum of five numbers in the format HHH:MM. The
time indicates the numbers of hours and minutes you want to elapse
between the initiation of the printing of reports. Enter any interval in the
range of 000:00 through 255:59. This value can be changed on-line.
Type — Indicate if you want the system to print the report on demand, at
the end of a shift, or at a scheduled time interval (as determined in the
Start Time and Interval fields). The range is not tunable and offers only
three options: DEMAND, SHIFT, and SCHEDULE.
4.5.4
Equipment List Form
Use the Equipment List form (Figure 4-25) to indicate which PROVOX
points a report references. The equipment list is a group of as many as
200 point tags. Reports use this list to establish the data content of the
report. If a point is in this equipment list, a report referencing this list may
include any attributes valid for that point.
Define the point names before completing this form. Then define this
equipment list before completing the report definition.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
X
Edit
Utilities
245
EQUIPMENT LIST
Extra Data
Help
Target!
Target!
ADD ____________
Strategy ____________
No.
1
Point
4
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
EV215
Figure 4-25.
Equipment List Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
LOGIC —> CONSOLE REPORTS —> EQUIPMENT LIST.
Use the following information to configure the equipment list. Complete
one form for each equipment list.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the equipment list you are defining appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
246
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Strategy — Enter a name that you want to use to group related items in
the configuration database. For example, if this list is used for a specific
batch report, this field may contain the name of the procedure that
requests the report. The system does not check or process this text in
any way, but you may use this text to sort database items by strategy
fields. Enter as many as 16 characters.
4
No. — This read-only field contains an integer that the ENVOX system
generates. The integer shows the number of points you enter in the order
you enter them. For example, the system numbers the first points you
enter as one, the second as two, and so on.
Point — Enter a tag of a point that you want the console to use for a
specific report that it generates. When you include a point in this
equipment list, the console with the report that references this list
organizes this point’s information in the report’s format. You may
configure the report using the ENVOX Language Editor. Refer to Using
ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151) for more information on
the reports option of the Language Editor.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.6
247
Defining Alarms
Alarms warn the operator of process changes in the plant outside of
normal plant conditions. There are four types of alarms, A, B, C, and D.
Appendix G includes information on what the A, B, C and D alarms
represent for each point type.
For more information on alarms and alarm definitions, see
subsection 3.2.4.
See Figure 4-26 for a map of forms to use to define Operator Workplace
alarms.
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
Required
[Add] --> [DEVICES] --> [WPCON]
[Add] --> [GLOBAL ITEMS]
CONSOLE DEVICE DEFINITION
PMA DEFINITION
Required
Required
[Extra Data]
PPA DEFINITION
Required
ALARM PRIORITY DEFINITION
Required
[Lists]
PMA LIST
Required
HORN TONE DEFINITION
Optional
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-26.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Alarms
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
248
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.6.1
PMA List Form
Use the PMA List form (Figure 4-27) to identify the PMAs that you want in
a particular console. The initial PMA mode you specify in the list is the
initial mode of each PMA after every download.This form lists the PMAs
in the console you are configuring. Make sure that all PMAs you want an
operator to control at this console are in this list.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
Type WPCON
Extra Data
PMA LIST
Target!
Target!
Help
ADD ____________
No.
PMA v
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Initial PMA Mode
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
BACKUP
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
MONITOR
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
EV224
Figure 4-27.
PMA List Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra Data —> Lists —> PMA List.
Use the following information to configure the PMA list. Complete only
one form for each console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
249
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console to which you are assigning PMAs
appears.
No. — This is a read-only field containing a number that the system
generates as you enter PMA names. If you later delete a PMA name, the
system renumbers the remainder of the list. This number does not
necessarily correspond to the PMA number seen on the displays.
PMA v — Enter the name of the PMA you want assigned to this console.
Use any previously defined PMA.
Initial PMA Mode — Specify what the initial mode of the PMA is to be
after a download. Table 4-4 shows the relationship among the PMA
mode, point reporting mode, and alarm modes.
For more information on point reporting modes, refer to subsection
3.2.6.1.
Table 4-4.
Effect of PMA Modes on Reporting and Alarm Modes
PMA Mode
Reporting Mode
Alarm Mode
ON
As configured in target form
As configured in target form
BACKUP
CHANGE-OF-STATE
As configured in target form
MONITOR
CHANGE-OF-STATE
MUTE
OFF
BACKGROUND
MUTE and OFF
Note ... The initial PMA mode is asked for on the PMA List from rather
than the PMA Definition form because that definition data is
global, whereas initial mode is a console data item.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
250
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.6.2
Horn Tone Definition Form
Use the optional Horn Tone Definition form (Figure 4-28) to associate
horn tones to the 12 available alarm priorities. Six horn sounds are
available. The sounds are any combination of the two pitches (low or
high) and the three rhythms (continuous, slow beep, and fast beep). If you
do not explicitly configure each alarm priority level, then a default tone is
assigned. The sound of the default tone is determined by DIP switch
settings on the alarm interface unit (AIU) at boot-up of the console.
4
Note ... For information about the DIP switch settings on the AIU, refer to
Installing DC9400-Series Operator Workplace
(PN7.1:DC9400:OWP).
If the horn is sounding when another alarm comes in, the new alarm
triggers a horn tone change only if it has a higher priority assigned than
the alarm that caused the horn to sound in the first place. If multiple
alarms of differing priorities are active simultaneously, only the highest
priority alarm is audible. If an OAR is configured to sound the horn when
active, it will sound the tone configured for the highest priority alarm.
X
Edit
Type
Utilities
WPCON
HORN TONE DEFINITION
Extra Data
Help
Reorder!
Target!
ADD
Horn Tone v
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Figure 4-28.
Priority 1 :
Priority 2 :
Priority 3 :
Priority 4 :
Priority 5 :
Priority 6 :
Priority 7 :
Priority 8 :
Priority 9 :
Priority 10 :
Priority 11 :
Priority 12 :
Horn Tone Definition Form Layout
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
251
Access the Horn Tone Definition form beginning with the ENVOX Top
Level Form by selecting Add ® DEVICES ® WPCON ® Extra Data ®
Horn Tone Defn.
Use the following information to configure the multi-tone horn feature.
Complete only one form for each console.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console for which you are defining multi-tone
horn values appears.
Alarm Priority XX — This read-only field contains a sequential number
(1 through 12) corresponding to one of the alarm priorities available in the
console software.
Horn Tone v — Specify the characteristics of the tone you want the
multi-tone horn to produce for an alarm of this priority. Type in one of the
tone characteristics listed in Table 4-5, or choose from a values list while
viewing the form.
Table 4-5.
Multi-tone Horn Tones Assignable to Alarm Priorities
Specify one of these characteristics in the Horn Tone v field...
DEFAULT
LOW TONE, CONTINUOUS
LOW TONE, SLOW BEEP
LOW TONE, FAST BEEP
HIGH TONE, CONTINUOUS
HIGH TONE, SLOW BEEP
HIGH TONE, FAST BEEP
Note:
If DEFAULT is entered in the Horn Tone v field, a single default tone sounds, which is
determined by DIP switch settings on the AIU at console boot-up.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
252
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.6.3
PMA Definition Form
Use the PMA Definition form (Figure 4-29) to define a group of PPAs that
you want the operator to operate as a collection. When PPAs are grouped
into a PMA, they have the same data reporting and alarming modes.The
PMA can change the reporting and alarming characteristics for all the
points of its PPAs. For example, if the operator turns the PMA’s mode to
OFF, all points in that PMA stop updating data and displaying alarms at
that station, unless the operator brings up the points on a display or the
points are being trended. The PMA List form defines which PMAs are in a
particular console (see subsection 4.6.1). For more information on PMAs,
refer to subsection 3.2.6.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
PMA DEFINITION
Extra Data
Target!
Help
ADD ____________
Alarm Display :
Alarm Display v :
Description :
Strategy :
No.
YES NO
PPA v
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
EV223
Figure 4-29.
PMA Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
GLOBAL ITEMS —> PMA.
Use the following information to configure the PMA definition. Complete
only one form for each PMA.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
253
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the PMA that you are defining appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write reminders for use during configuration.
Description — Enter a 12-character description of the PMA or its
function in the control system. The station displays the description on the
PMA faceplate.
Strategy — Enter a name that the operator may use to group PMAs. For
example, if the plant consists of a boiler, a reactor, and a tank, the
strategy field of each PMA may contain the label Boiler, Reactor, or Tank.
The system does not check or process this text in any way, but it may use
this text to sort items by strategy fields. Enter as many as 16 characters.
Alarm Display — Indicate YES or NO to indicate whether you want to
configure an alarm display for this PMA.
If you configure an alarm display, the console shows that display
whenever an operator selects the PMA, regardless of alarm conditions. If
you do not configure an alarm display for the PMA, the console uses the
alarm display you configured for the PPA that contains the point with the
highest-priority alarm within the PMA . If you have not configured a
display for this PPA, the system uses the point’s configured alarm display.
If you have not configured an alarm display for the point, the display does
not change. The responses to PMA, PPA, and point display requests are
shown in Figure 3-10.
Alarm Display v — Enter the name of the specific display you want the
operator to see when he or she selects the PMA. Enter the name of any
previously defined display.
Note ... The display must be in the display list of all consoles that use
this PMA.
No. — This is a read-only field containing an integer that the ENVOX
system generates as you enter PPA names. The integer tells you how
many PPA names you have entered. If you later delete a PPA name, the
system renumbers the remainder of the list.
PPA v — Enter the names of the PPAs you want grouped to form the
PMA you are defining. PPAs can belong to more than one PMA.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
254
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.6.4
PPA Definition Form
Use the PPA Definition form (Figure 4-30) to define an individual plant
process area (PPA). The PPA definition defines common process
operations and alarm requirements for a group of points. This allows you
to divide plants into individual process areas, each with its own operating
state, to handle alarms. PPA definitions are global in the ENVOX
database, which means that multiple consoles may use the same PPA
definition. For more information on PPAs, refer to subsection 3.2.7.
Since PPA definitions are global, you must assign points to PPAs that
logically encompass the area where you want the system to handle
alarms in a specific way. Although you can assign each point to only one
PPA, each PPA can have an unlimited number of points assigned to it.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
PPA DEFINITION
Extra Data
Target!
ADD ____________
Help
Select X-List to
exit from device list
Alarm Display :
Alarm Display v :
Critical Level :
Description :
Strategy :
PPA Number :
YES NO
Displayed State Name
No.
No.
State Name
1
2
3
4
5
Priority v
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
EV222
Figure 4-30.
PPA Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
GLOBAL ITEMS —> PPA.
Use the following information to configure the PPA definition. Complete
only one form for each PPA.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
255
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the PPA you are defining appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Description — Enter a 12-character description of the PPA or its function
in the control system. The station displays the description on the PPA
faceplate.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group related database
items. For example, if the plant consists of a boiler, a reactor, and a tank,
the strategy field of each PPA may contain the label Boiler, Reactor, or
Tank. The system does not check or process this text in any way, but you
may use this text to sort items by strategy fields. Enter as many as 16
characters.
PPA Number — Enter an integer from 1 through 501 to uniquely identify
the number of the PPA you are defining.
Note ... An ENVOX database may have as many as 501 defined PPAs
for each unique database. Since PPAs are a global definition, all
consoles in a particular ENVOX database may use this
definition.
Alarm Display — Indicate whether you want to configure an alarm
display for a PPA. Select YES if you want an alarm display for this PPA.
Select NO if you do not.
If you configure an alarm display, the console shows this display
whenever an operator requests the PPA, regardless of alarm conditions.
If you do not configure an alarm display, the console uses the configured
alarm display of the point in that PPA with the highest priority alarm. If,
however, you have not configured an alarm display for that point, the
display does not change.
The responses to PMA, PPA, and point display requests are shown in
Figure 3-10.
Alarm Display v — Indicate the name of the alarm display you want the
operator to see when he or she selects the PPA.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
256
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Note ... You must put the alarm display in the display list of all consoles
that use this PPA.
4
Critical Level — Specify the initial critical level you want a PPA to have
after you first download the configuration. The critical level is the level at
or above which the system displays an alarm’s point name in the alarm
area. This value represents the lowest level at which a point appears in
the alarm area. Enter a value from 1 through 13 in this field, with 1 the
lowest and 13 the highest. A value of 13 assures that all alarms appear
by their PPA names.
Note ... This value is the initial critical level when you first download the
PPA to a console. Once you download the PPA, the console
ignores this value on all subsequent downloads, using instead
the last known critical level for that PPA. In this manner, the
console maintains PPA critical level information for PPA tracking.
Displayed State Name — This is a read-only field that displays the
operational state name for which you are defining valid alarm group
numbers and assigning priorities.
No. (operational state) — This is a read-only field in which the system
displays a number indicating the sequence in which you enter the name
of an operational state state. If you later delete an alarm state name, the
system renumbers the remainder of the list.
State Name — Name an operational state for the PPA you are defining.
You can define as many as five operational states; you must define at
least one. These names appear on the console in PPA faceplates and
instrument areas. Use names that provide a meaningful description of the
operating states for operators. For example, you might designate state
names such as NORMAL, STARTUP, and NO-HORN. Enter as many as
12 characters.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
257
Note ... To move from the State Name field to the Priority v field, finish
entering the state names, then move the cursor to the right
several spaces into the Priority v field. Once the cursor is
positioned within (not at the beginning of) the Priority v field,
press the Return key. This pops the cursor to the top of the
Priority v field and allows you to begin making entries in the field.
No. (alarm group) — This is a read-only field containing an integer from 1
through 7 indicating the alarm groups that you can configure for each
operational state. To relate these alarm groups to a particular alarm state,
select the state, then use free cursor movement to move to the No. field.
The name of the state for which you are defining groups appears in the
Displayed State Name field above No., as described previously. You can
define as many as seven groups for each of the five alarm operational
states.
When you target a point to a PPA, you assign each of its A, B, C, and D
alarms to one of these alarm groups. Each of the four alarms may be in a
different priority group, if you desire.
Priority v — Specify the alarm priority definition associated with the
group number for this specific operational state. The characteristics of
each alarm priority were defined previously in the Alarm Priority Definition
form. Enter the name of any alarm priority definition whose characteristics
you want associated with this alarm group.
Note ... You must configure the alarm priority definition referenced here
before you complete this form.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
258
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.6.5
Alarm Priority Definition Form
Use the Alarm Priority Definition form (Figure 4-31) to configure the alarm
priorities for a console. Alarm priorities are global in the ENVOX
database, which means that multiple consoles may use the same alarm
priority. For more information on alarm priorities, see subsection 3.2.7.4.
This form defines the behaviors and priorities of a point alarm. You must
complete it before the PPA Definition form can reference specific alarm
priority definitions. One or more alarm groups may use this definition.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
ALARM PRIORITY DEFINITION
Extra Data
Help
Target!
Target!
ADD
Strategy :
Active Foreground Color v :
Active Background Color v :
Auto Ack :
Horn :
Alarm Display :
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
Message :
Ack Message :
Clear Message :
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
Inactive Auto Ack :
YES NO
Unacked Foreground Color v :
Unacked Background Color v :
Inactive Foreground Color v :
Inactive Background Color v :
Active Unacked Priority :
Active Acked Priority :
Inactive Unacked Priority :
EV221
Figure 4-31.
Alarm Priority Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
GLOBAL ITEMS —> ALARM PRIORITIES.
Use the following information to configure the alarm priorities. Complete
one form for each alarm priority definition.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the alarm priority you are defining appears.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
259
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group related database
items. For example, if the plant consists of a boiler, a reactor, and a tank,
the strategy field of each alarm priority may contain the label Boiler,
Reactor, or Tank. The system does not check or process this text in any
way, but you may use this text to sort database items by strategy fields.
Enter as many as 16 characters.
Auto Ack — Indicate whether you want the console to automatically
acknowledge an active alarm of this priority. If you select YES, the
console acknowledges the alarm. If you select NO, the operator must
acknowledge the alarm.
Note ... To acknowledge an alarm manually, click on the Ack button with
the pointing device’s primary button.
Horn — Indicate whether you want the horn to sound on the console
when an alarm is triggered. The horn sounds for alarms whose points are
in a plant management area (PMA) that is in the ON or BACKUP mode.
Select YES if you want the operator to hear a horn when an alarm occurs.
Select NO if you do not want the horn to sound.
To use the horn effectively in your system, you should set the horn to YES
only on important alarms.
Alarm Display — Indicate whether the console should display active
alarms on displays and on the operator attention list (OAL). When the
PMA for a point in alarm is in a mode other than OFF, the alarm may
appear on the point faceplate, the operator attention list, the plant process
area (PPA) faceplate, or the PMA faceplate. Whether the system displays
an alarm on a faceplate or on the OAL depends on the alarm’s priority in
relation to other alarms the system is displaying.
Select YES if you want the console to display active alarms. Select NO if
you do not want the console to display active alarms.
Message — Indicate whether you want the printer to log a message
when an alarm becomes active. When the system is set to log alarm
messages, it logs messages for PMA points that are in the ON or
BACKUP modes. Select YES if you want the printer to log a message
when an alarm is activated. Select NO if you do not want the printer to log
alarm activation messages.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
260
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Note ... If the MESSAGE selection is YES, then the local point
SUPPRESS MESSAGE function from the Console Target Data
Form will override (see subsection 4.8.9).
4
Ack Message — If you selected YES for the MESSAGE function (above)
indicating you want the console to print alarm activation messages, then
you can choose whether you want the printer to also log a message when
an alarm is acknowledged. The system is designed to log messages for
PMA points that are in the ON or BACKUP modes. Select YES if you
want the printer to log a message when an alarm acknowledged (only if
the MESSAGE selection is YES). Select NO if you do not want the printer
to log alarm acknowledgment messages.
Note ... If the ACK MESSAGE selection is YES, then the local point
SUPPRESS MESSAGE function from the Console Target Data
Form will override (see subsection 4.8.9).
Clear Message — If you selected YES for the MESSAGE function
(above) indicating you want the console to print alarm activation
messages, then you can choose whether you want the printer to also log
a message when an alarm is deactivated. The system is designed to log
messages for PMA points that are in the ON or BACKUP modes. Select
YES if you want the printer to log a message when an alarm is
deactivated (only if the MESSAGE selection is YES). Select NO if you do
not want the printer to log alarm deactivation messages.
Note ... If the CLEAR MESSAGE selection is YES, then the local point
SUPPRESS MESSAGE function from the Console Target Data
Form will override (see subsection 4.8.9).
Inactive Auto Ack — Indicate whether you want the system to
automatically acknowledge an alarm that is inactive but that has not been
acknowledged in another way. If you select NO, the operator must
acknowledge the alarm by clicking on the Ack button even when the
alarm is no longer active. Answering YES allows the console to
automatically remove alarms that are no longer active.
Active Foreground Color v — Specify the foreground color for the
displayed text for acknowledged active alarms.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
261
Active Background Color v — Specify the background color for the
color strip behind the displayed text for acknowledged active alarms.
Unacked Foreground Color v — Specify the foreground color for the
displayed text for unacknowledged active alarms.
Unacked Background Color v — Specify the background color for the
color strip behind the displayed text that will be used as the color strip
behind the displayed text for unacknowledged active alarms.
Inactive Foreground Color v — Specify the foreground color that will be
used as the displayed text for inactive unacknowledged alarms.
Inactive Background Color v — Specify the background color for the
color strip behind the displayed text for inactive, unacknowledged alarms.
Note ... To retain previous configuration work for alarm definitions in
PROVUEr consoles, a limited set of foreground and background
colors are available:
Red
White
Green
Cyan
Dim Red
Dark Blue
White Blink
Dim Red Blink
Black
Blue
Yellow
Magenta
Grey
Red Blink
Yellow Blink
Green Blink
To access the list of valid colors during configuration, press the
Valid Entries function key.
Active Unacked Priority — Specify the priority number for active,
unacknowledged alarms. The higher the number assigned to an alarm,
the higher the alarm’s priority and importance. Enter a number from 1
through 12, with 1 being the lowest priority and 12, the highest priority.
Active Acked Priority — Specify the priority number for active,
acknowledged alarms. The higher the number assigned to an alarm, the
higher are the alarm’s priority and importance. Enter a number from 1
through 12, with 1 being the lowest priority and 12, the highest priority.
Inactive Unacked Priority — Specify the priority number for inactive,
unacknowledged alarms. The higher the number assigned to an alarm,
the higher are the alarm’s priority and importance. Enter a number from 1
through 12, with 1 being the lowest priority and 12, the highest priority.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
262
4.7
4
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Defining Procedures
A procedure is the top level of automatic batch control logic available from
an Operator Workplace console. It coordinates batch operations running
in unit operations controllers (UOCs) and allows you to define a sequence
of batch unit operations to run in the UOCs. Each procedure must have at
least one process or group of instructions, although you can subdivide a
procedure into as many as 16 processes, if necessary. You can include
product grade data and point sets when you define a procedure and
request that the console keep a history of the procedure, as well as limit
the number of history messages the console keeps. For more information
on procedures, see subsection 3.4.
See Figure 4-32 for a map of forms to use to define Operator Workplace
procedures.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
263
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
Required
[Add] --> [LOGIC] --> [PROCEDURES]
PROCEDURE
Batch — Required
[Extra Data]
GRADE TEMPLATE DEFAULTS
Batch — Required
GRADES
Batch — Optional
[Grade!]
GRADE DETAILS
Batch — Required
POINT SETS
Batch — Required
[Pnt Set!]
POINT SET POINTS
Batch — Required
PROCEDURE LIST DEFINITION
Batch — Required
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-32.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Procedures
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
264
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.7.1
Procedure Form
Use the Procedure form (Figure 4-33) to configure a procedure for an
activity point. You define a procedure in several parts. First, define the
general procedure information, such as history information, process
names, and process hold statuses. Once you define this general
information, you must uniquely define each process by the sequence of
operations it will command in the controllers. Use the ENVOX Language
Editor to accomplish this definition of processes. Appendix E provides
information on the available process statements and their functions.
(Refer to the manual Using ENVOX Configuration Software
[UM6.1:SW3151] manual for more detailed information on the Language
Editor.)
4
This form characterizes the procedure you are configuring. You have
several options about what to include in the procedure, such as grade
data, point sets, and a history of the batch.
X
Edit
Utilities
PROCEDURE
Extra Data
Reorder!
Process!
Help
ADD ____________
Strategy:
Keep History:
Message Limit:
YES NO
Number
Process Name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Hold Enabled
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
EV225
Figure 4-33.
Procedure Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
LOGIC —> PROCEDURES —> PROCEDURE.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
265
Use the following information to configure the general procedure
information. Use the ENVOX Language Editor to define the sequence of
operations portion of the procedure. Complete only one form for each
procedure.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the procedure name appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group related database
items. Enter as many as 16 characters. The system does not check or
process this text in any way, but you may use this text to sort items by
strategy fields.
Keep History — Indicate whether you want the console in which the
activity point running this procedure resides to keep a history of the batch.
Each procedure may have only one history associated with it. That history
includes the procedure name, batch identification, iteration number, unit
variables, start and end times of the procedure, alarm, and state-change
messages, and start times for each process within the procedure.
Answer YES if you want to keep a history on this procedure. Answer NO
if you do not want this procedure history kept at the console.
Message Limit — Enter the number of history blocks you want the
system to allocate to the procedure for alarm and state-change
messages. The console reserves the amount you specify, ranging from 1
to 15,000. Additionally, the console automatically reserves enough history
blocks to store:
J
1 alarm message
J
1 state-change message
J
2 blocks of process start times
J
1 block of procedure data
J
From 0 to as many as 16 UV save areas, depending on the amount
used in the procedure.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
266
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
If there are not enough free history blocks remaining to meet the
procedure’s requirements, the activity fails. You specify the maximum
number of free blocks when you define the device. (See subsection 4.4.1.
For more detailed information, refer to subsection 3.4.7.2.) If you specify
the minimum, but the activity contains more alarm or state changes than
you allow for, it does not fail. Instead, these messages are lost and the
console notifies the operator of missing information by printing in the
batch end report:
4
dd-mmm-yyyy hh:mm:ss @h-dd
HISTORY RECORDS OVERFLOW. LOST MESSAGE COUNT:######
The total number of history blocks for all procedures running
simultaneously must be less than the number of alarm history records you
configure in the console item definition using the Option Definition form.
Number — This is a read-only field containing a number that the system
generates as you enter PMA names. If you later delete a PMA name, the
system renumbers the remainder of the list. This number does not
necessarily correspond to the PMA number seen on the displays.
Process Name — Enter a specific process name for the batch you want
the procedure to use. A process is a basic block of a procedure made up
of one or more process instructions. A process provides the opportunity
for valid hold points within a procedure as well as a name that indicates
where the batch is in the procedure sequence. You can enter as many as
16 processes for a procedure. Each process name must be unique, and
you cannot put blank rows between names in this field. Enter as many as
12 characters.
You may have as many as 512 process instructions for each process.
These instructions are used with the ENVOX Language Editor and are
described in Appendix F. The total size of the process instructions must
be no more than 5120 bytes per process, and no more than 30,000 bytes
total for the console. Use the sizing table (Table 4-6) to calculate whether
the process’s instruction size exceeds the limit. If you exceed this limit,
the configuration fails. The point references the table refers to can be a
point tag, a member of a point set, or a member of an acquire set.
Hold Enabled — Indicate whether the operator can temporarily stop the
console from executing a procedure at the beginning of the process. If
you have configured the process with the HOLD function disabled, the
system ignores HOLD requests for that process. Enabling or disabling
HOLD does not count as an instruction for the procedure and does not
increase the instruction index on the detail faceplate.
Enter YES if you want the operator to have the ability to hold the
procedure at the beginning of this process. Enter NO if you do not want
this process to be a valid hold point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
Table 4-6.
267
Sizing Table for Process Instructions
This
Instruction ...
Is this Size (in bytes) ...
And Can Have a
Maximum Size
(in bytes) of ...
Abort Disable
1
1
Abort Enable
1
1
Abort if
Requested
1
1
3 + (no. of point references x 3)
51
2
2
5 + (no. of unit variables x 6)
101
2 + (no. of point references x 3)
50
Delay From
5
5
Fail if No Backup
1
1
Fail On
2
2
Log
2
2
Message
2 + Length of Message Text
76
Operate
21 + (no. of unit variables x 6)
117
Release
2
2
Schedule
25
25
Wait Until
12
12
Acquire
Batch End Log
Change Unit
Variables
Common Alarm
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
268
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.7.2
Grade Template Defaults Form
Use the Grade Template Defaults form (Figure 4-34) to define the default
material and resource quantities (or default GRADE) for a procedure.
This form allows you to define the range for the grade values by entering
the low and high limits. Assign the units of measurement (engineering
units) and then enter a default value for the variable. If you do not change
the value for this grade variable when you are defining the Grade Details
form, the procedure uses the default value that you enter here. You must
complete this form before you fill in the Grade Details form. Refer to
subsection 3.4.7 for more information.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
GRADE TEMPLATE DEFAULTS
Extra Data
Help
Reorder!
ADD
Reg No
Register
Low Value
High Value
Default
Units
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
EV229
Figure 4-34.
Grade Template Defaults Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
LOGIC —> PROCEDURES —> PROCEDURE —> Extra Data —>
GRADE DEFAULTS.
Use the following information to configure grade template defaults.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
269
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the procedure for which you are defining grade
defaults appears.
Reg No — This is a read-only field that the ENVOX system generates as
you enter grade register data. The integer tells you how many registers
you have defined.
Register — Enter the name of the specific grade register you wish to
configure. You cannot duplicate the register names within this grade. You
may have as many as 255 different registers for each grade. The register
name may have as many as 12 characters.
Low Value — Enter the smallest value that the operator or a CHIP device
can enter for this register variable. This value indicates the low limit for
the grade variable and, thus, limits the least amount of this ingredient or
resource that an operator can add to the batch. This value is in the unit of
measurement that you specify in the Units field of this form. This value
can be any floating-point number.
High Value — Enter the largest value that the operator or a CHIP device
can enter for this register variable. This value indicates the high limit for
the grade variable and, thus, limits the maximum amount of this
ingredient or resource that an operator can add to the batch. This value is
in the unit of measurement that you specify in the Units field of this form.
It can be any floating-point number.
Default — Enter the value that you want the procedure to use if the
operator or the system does not specifically designate a different value for
this variable. Use this default value to reduce the number of grade details
that you must complete by entering the most commonly used value for
this variable in the Default field. If you do not change the value for this
grade variable by using the Grade Details form or through operator or
system inputs, the procedure uses the default value that you enter in this
field. This value can be any floating point number between and including
the high value and low value.
Units — Enter the kind of measurement you want the system to use for
this register variable. You are defining the engineering units for this value.
The units indicate how the amount of material or resource used in the
procedure is measured. For example, units might be pounds per square
inch (PSI), feet per second (FPS), gallons per minute (GPM), degrees
Celsius (DEG C), minutes (MINS), and so on. The Units field may contain
as many as six characters.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
270
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.7.3
Grades Form
The Grades form (Figure 4-35) defines a unique product variation. A
grade is a collection of registers containing grade values. Grades allow
you to make different end materials using the same sequence of
operations, or procedures. You can minimize your configuration time
simply by varying grade data for a procedure rather than by uniquely hard
coding each procedure with its material data. For example, in making
paint, you might use the same procedure to make your product, but by
changing the pigment grade or grades, you change the color.
4
Complete this form only if you want to create grades for a procedure.
X
Edit
Utilities
Extra Data
GRADES
Reorder!
Grade!
Help
ADD
Number
Grade Names
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
EV230
Figure 4-35.
Grades Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
LOGIC —> PROCEDURES —> PROCEDURE —> Extra Data —>
GRADES.
Use the following information to configure grades for a procedure.
Complete only one form for each procedure.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
271
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the procedure to which you are assigning grades
appears.
Number — This is a read-only field containing an integer that the ENVOX
system generates as you enter grade names. The integer tells you how
many names you have entered for this procedure.
Grade Names — Identify a unique kind of product (grade). Each name in
this field must be unique and may contain as many as 12 characters. A
single procedure may have as many as 50 grades.
In this field, you have the option of selecting the grade name of the
current row, erasing a row (a grade and name), inserting a row (a grade
and name), or reordering a particular grade and name. This is a two-step
process:
Step 1:
Select the row you want to move.
Step 2:
Move the cursor to the row below the row to which you want to
move the selected row. Remember, this function always
inserts data at the row immediately preceding the one on
which the cursor is located. The system then renumbers and
reorders all affected rows.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
272
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.7.4
Grade Details Form
Use the Grade Details form (Figure 4-36) to specify exceptions to a
grade’s default values. By defining different material or resource values,
you can vary the grade of a batch, while still using the same sequence of
operations, or procedure. Grades help you minimize configuration time
and maximize system flexibility.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
GRADE DETAILS
Extra Data
Help
ADD
Grade Name
Register
Value
Low
High
Default
Units
EV231
Figure 4-36.
Grade Details Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
LOGIC —> PROCEDURES —> PROCEDURE —> Extra Data —>
GRADES —> Grade!
Use the following information to configure the grade details.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the procedure for which you are defining grade
details appears.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
273
Grade Name — This is a read-only field that indicates the grade you are
defining with this Grade Details form. Make sure that this is the grade for
which you want to configure details.
Register — This read-only field lists all the grade register names that you
configured for this grade on the Grade Template Defaults form. There
may be as many as 255 different grade registers per grade. Move your
cursor to the specific name of the grade register you wish to configure.
Now complete the Value field, described below, for that register.
Value — Enter the quantity of an ingredient or resource for a batch
procedure if that procedure does not use the default amount. The value
must be between the low and high limits for this grade and should not be
the default value. Enter the default value for this field in the Grade
Template Default form. Define the Grade Template Defaults form before
completing this form. This value is in the unit of measurement specified in
the Units field of Grade Template Defaults form.
Low — This read-only field is the smallest value that the operator or the
CHIP device can enter for this variable. It indicates the low limit for the
Value field and, thus, limits the least amount of this ingredient or resource
that an operator or the ENVOX system can add to the batch. This value is
in the unit of measurement you specify in the Units field of the Grades
Template Defaults form.
High — This read-only field is the largest value that the operator or the
CHIP device can enter for this variable. It indicates the high limit for the
Value field and, thus, limits the amount of this ingredient or resource that
an operator can add to the batch. This value is in the unit of measurement
you specify in the Units field of the Grades Template Defaults form.
Default — This read-only field is the value that the procedure uses if you,
the operator, or the system does not specifically designate a different
value for this variable. This value is in the unit of measurement you
specify in the Units field of the Grades Template Defaults form.
Units — This read-only field indicates how the system measures the
amount of material or resource the procedure uses. This value is the unit
of measurement specified in the Units field of the Grade Template
Defaults form.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
274
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.7.5
Point Sets Form
Use the Point Sets form (Figure 4-37) to define a group of point sets that
you want a procedure to reference when the system is executing the
procedure. Point Sets are valid equipment paths that a procedure follows
to make a batch. They allow generic configuration of procedures, so that
one procedure can run on a variety of equipment. If you do not need to
configure one procedure to run a variety of equipment, you can hard code
point names into the procedure instead of using point sets.
You may configure as many as 16 point sets for each procedure. Define
the points within these by selecting the Pnt Set! menu on this form, which
takes you to the Point Sets Point form.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
POINT SETS
Extra Data
Reorder!
Pnt Set!
Help
ADD
Number
Point Set names
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
EV226
Figure 4-37.
Point Sets Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
LOGIC —> PROCEDURES —> PROCEDURE —> Extra Data —>
POINT SETS.
Use the following information to add point sets to a particular procedure.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
275
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the procedure to which you are assigning point
sets appears.
Number — This is a read-only field containing a number that the system
generates as you enter PMA names. If you later delete a PMA name, the
system renumbers the remainder of the list. This number does not
necessarily correspond to the PMA number seen on the displays.
Point Set Names — Enter a maximum of 12 characters to define a name
for a point set. Use this name to assign a specific point set to a
procedure. You may not duplicate point set names on this form. Each
procedure may have as many as 16 point sets. Do not enter blank lines
between point set names on this form.
Note ... This name is the name the operator sees on the softkeys when
selecting the desired point set. If you do not define any point
sets, the operator is not prompted for a point set name.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
276
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.7.6
Point Set Points Form
Use the Point Set Points form (Figure 4-38) to define a group of point
names that a procedure references. The procedure name that appears at
the top of the form indicates the procedure that uses these point set
points. Be sure that this is the procedure you want to be using these point
set points.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
POINT SET POINTS
Extra Data
Help
Reorder!
ADD
Point Set name:
Number
Points
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
EV227
Figure 4-38.
Point Set Points Form Layout
Using point sets and point names, you can write a generic procedure that
refers to a point by indicating the point name’s position in this point set.
This feature allows the operator to start identical procedures on multiple
equipment paths in the plant when those paths use the same procedure
but different point sets.
You may configure as many as 16 point names for each point set. You
must define the point before you identify the point names for this form.
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
LOGIC —> PROCEDURES —> PROCEDURE —> Extra Data —>
POINT SETS —> Pnt Set!
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
277
Use the following information to configure the point set’s points. Complete
only one form for each point set.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the procedure whose point set you are defining
appears.
Point Set name — This is a read-only field that identifies a previously
defined point set name. It indicates the point set that contains the points
you enter on this form. Be sure this is the point set that you want to
configure.
Number — This is a read-only field containing an integer that the ENVOX
system generates as you enter point names. The integer tells you how
many points you have entered for this point set.
Points — Enter the tag for a particular point. This field allows you to
assign this point to a point set. Each point set may have as many as 16
point tags. You must configure the points before you fill in the point tags
for this form. Do not enter blank lines between point tags on this form.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
278
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.7.7
Procedure List Definition Form
Use the Procedure List Definition form (Figure 4-39) to configure a
procedure list for the activity point. This list, when complete, contains the
entry numbers and corresponding procedure names. The forms system
assigns the entry number, which you cannot modify. The list identifies
which procedures can be run from one activity point. You can configure a
different procedure list for each activity point, or you can use the same
procedure list for multiple activity points.
A procedure list contains a group of batch procedures. Its purpose is to
identify the procedures an activity can execute. You assign the list to
particular activity points during activity point configuration. Each list may
contain as many as 32 batch procedures and may be used by more than
one activity point. You must define the procedures before configuring a
procedure list.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
PROCEDURE LIST DEFINITION
Extra Data
Help
Reorder!
Target!
ADD
Strategy :
No.
Procedure v
EV228
Figure 4-39.
Procedure List Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
LOGIC —> PROCEDURES —> PROCEDURE LIST.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
279
Use the following information to configure the procedure list definition.
Complete only one form for each procedure list.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the procedure list you are defining appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group related database
items. Enter as many as 16 characters. The system does not check or
process this text in any way, but it may use this text to sort items by
strategy fields.
No. — This is a read-only field containing a number that the system
generates as you enter batch procedure names. It tells you how many
names you are entering. The integer is a value from 1 through 32.
Procedure v — Enter the name of a batch procedure. Each procedure
name in the procedure list must be unique and may contain as many
as12 characters. Enter the keyword NULL as a placeholder if you want to
add a procedure later using a partial download. When you delete a
procedure out of this list, replace the procedure name with the keyword
NULL to prevent the procedures from being reordered in this list.
Reordering a procedure list might cause the system to reject a partial
download merge to be rejected because the procedure index changed on
a running activity when the list was reordered.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
280
4.8
4
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Defining and Targeting Points
Within each Operator Workplace console and PROVOX controller are
points. Points are the software building blocks of the configuration. Each
point is a storehouse for information within the process control database.
The point includes data (a unique set of operating, tuning, and configured
parameters) and the action necessary to perform a particular control task
(which may be inherently defined by the point, selected from a list of
algorithms, or defined in a template or instruction set). Finally, a point may
also include services (for example, communication services, alarm
handling, and the trace facility).
Configuring point definitions also includes targeting the points to one or
more devices using target groups. A target group is a list of target devices
that share the same target definition. Using target groups keeps you from
having to repeatedly enter the same data if the target parameter values
are the same for more than one device.
See Figure 4-40 for a map of forms to use to define points for an Operator
Workplace console and to target points to that console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
281
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
Required
[Add] --> [CONSOLE POINTS]
ACCUMULATION POINT
Optional
[Target!]
[Add] --> [OTHER POINTS]
[Add] --> [GLOBAL ITEMS]
SINGLE DISCRETE POINT
DCD TEMPLATE
Optional
Optional
[Target!]
4
ACTIVITY POINT
Batch — Optional
[Target!]
TARGET DATA
Optional
[Extra Data]
CONSOLE DCD POINT
Optional
CONSOLE TARGET DATA
Optional
[Target!]
[Extra Data]
MAINTENANCE POINT
EXTENDED ALARMS
Optional
Optional
[Target!]
CONSOLE EPCI POINT
Optional
[Target!]
KEY
INTEGRITY POINT
Optional
[Target!]
Figure 4-40.
FORM NAME
[MENU]
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining and Targeting Points
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
282
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.8.1
Accumulation Point Form
Use the Accumulation Point form (Figure 4-41) to define the accumulation
points for the console. The accumulation point performs certain standard
accumulations and averages. The system displays the calculated values
on the accumulation point faceplate.
There also are numerous attributes available for building graphic displays
and creating reports. The system provides accumulations and calculates
average values for the current hour, shift, and day, and for the previous
hour, shift, and day. You define shifts on the Shift Table Definition form,
where you can define as many as five shift times for each day of the week
(see subsection 4.5.1). Refer to subsection 3.4.3 for more information on
accumulation points.
4
File
X
Edit
Edit
Commands
Options
Utilities
Print
Help
ACCUMULATION POINT
Extra Data
Target!
Target! Help
ADD
Accumulate Time :
Zero Dropout :
Device v :
Description :
Strategy :
ON OFF
Accumulation
value :
Conversion
Factor :
Period :
5 15 30 60 120
High Scale Value
Low Scale Value
EU Descriptor
Auxiliary EU Def
:
:
:
:
EV233
Figure 4-41.
Accumulation Point Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
CONSOLE POINTS —> ACCUMULATION.
Use the following information to configure an accumulation point.
Complete only one form for each point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
283
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the Accumulation Point tag appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Device v — Enter the name of the device where the accumulation point
resides. Enter any previously defined console name.
Description — Enter a descriptor to identify the point or its function in the
control system. The system displays the description on the point faceplate
below the point tag. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Strategy — Enter a character string that you wish to use to group points.
For example, if the accumulation point is related to a boiler, a reactor, or a
tank, the strategy field of each point may contain the label Boiler, Reactor,
or Tank. The system does not check or process this text in any way, but
you may use this text to sort database items by strategy fields. The string
may be as many as 16 characters.
Accumulation Value — Enter the name, attribute, and, if necessary,
occurrence of the PROVOX point that you want the system to accumulate
for this accumulation point. You must target this point to the console
where the accumulation point resides. Enter the information in the
following format:
ATTRIBUTE[OCCURRENCE]:TAG
The following list contains all attributes that are valid for an accumulation
point.
AVP
INTSP
MVPCV1
MVPCV2
MVPCV3
MVPCV4
MVPCV5
MVPCV6
MVPCV7
MVPCV8
MVPCV9
MVPCV10
MVPCV11
MVPCV12
MVP%CV1
MVP%CV2
MVP%CV3
MVP%CV4
MVP%CV5
MVP%CV6
MVP%CV7
MVP%CV8
MVP%CV9
MVP%CV10
MVP%CV11
MVP%CV12
PV
SP
UVAR
%BI
%OUTPUT
To determine if the attribute requires an occurrence number, refer to
Appendix D. For the tag, use any previously defined point tag.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
284
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Conversion Factor — Enter a conversion factor so the system can
change the engineering units (EUs) of a given quantity from a per-unit
time to a quantity per minute. The conversion factor is a scaling factor
that allows the system to convert one set of units to another. The system
ignores this factor for discrete point accumulations. Use the following
values as your conversion factors:
4
J
Units per hour = 0.016667
J
Units per minute = 1.0
J
Units per second = 60
For example, if you are accumulating the number of pulses being
generated by a pump, you will want to convert the number of pulses
(counts) per unit time to a quantity of material pumped per minute. If 10
pulses equals 1 gallon for your pump, and you want to convert the flow to
gallons per hour, your conversion factor is calculated as:
1 gallon
10 counts
1 count
´ 0.016667 hour =
6.0 gallons
hour
Your conversion constant would then be 0.016667. The system uses this
factor to multiply with the number of counts the accumulation point reads
per minute to provide a rate value in gallons per hour.
Conversion Period — Enter the interval in seconds at which you want
the system to calculate the accumulation value. Acceptable entries are 5,
15, 30, 60, and 120.
Accumulate Time — Indicate whether you want the system to
accumulate time when the discrete point is in the ON state or in the OFF
state. This field is ignored if the point is not a discrete type.
Zero Dropout — Enter the value below which you do not want the
system to add accumulations. If the value of the accumulated analog
point falls below this value, the system ignores the value for accumulation
purposes. The system uses this value to prevent inaccurate
measurements at the low end of the scale. Enter any floating-point value.
This field is ignored if the accumulated point is a discrete or extended
pulse count input (EPCI) type.
High Scale Value — Indicate the high-scale value for EUs. Trend uses
this high-scale value as a high end point on traces.
Low Scale Value — Indicate the low-scale value for engineering units.
Trend uses this low-scale value as a low end point on traces.
EU Descriptor — Enter an engineering units descriptor for the
accumulated, or totaled, value. This field may contain as many as six
characters. You can display it on both custom and standard faceplates.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
285
Auxiliary EU Def — Enter the descriptor for the average, or rate, values
of engineering units. For example, if the EU descriptor is LITRES, you
could use LI/MIN for the auxiliary EU definition. The descriptor may
contain as many as six characters.
4.8.2
Activity Point Form
Use the Activity Point form (Figure 4-42) to configure an activity point for
the console. This form defines the activity you are configuring.
An activity point is the highest level of automatic batch control available
from a console. Many of the tasks at this level involve identifying and
scheduling the batch. Activity points schedule the progress of the batch,
coordinate the use of units and unit operations, and provide operator
communications to the batch. Because of this correlation to batch
processing, activity points are only valid on consoles with Batch software.
Refer to subsection 3.4.7 for more information on activities.
X
Edit
Utilities
ACTIVITY POINT
Extra Data
Target!
Target! Help
ADD ____________
Device v :
Description :
Strategy :
Initial Mode v :
Alarm A Word :
Alarm B Word :
Procedure List v :
EV232
Figure 4-42.
Activity Point Form Layout
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
286
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
During console configuration, each activity is defined as a sourced point,
a targeted point, or both, depending on its location in the PROVOX
system. Sourced points reside in the configured console, while targeted
points receive data from another console or CHIP device that has already
been or will be configured. Each console can support 32 activity points,
and each sourced point can send data to many other consoles or
computers that are running the CHIP. For best results, Fisher-Rosemount
Systems, Inc. recommends that you target a console-sourced point to no
more than eight other devices.
4
Before configuring the activity point, first define the procedures
associated with the activity point and create the procedure list. Then,
configure the activity points as either sourced points, targeted points, or
both.
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
CONSOLE POINTS —> ACTIVITY.
Use the following information to configure the activity point. Complete
only one form for each activity point.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the device for
which you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are
in. In this form, the activity point tag appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Device v — Enter the name of a previously defined console in which this
activity point is sourced. Enter as many as 12 characters. If the name is
for a non-Operator Workplace device, the system reports an error.
Description — Enter a descriptor to identify the point or its function in the
control system. The system displays the description on the point faceplate
below the point tag. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group related database
items. For example, if the activity point is part of the boiler, reactor, or tank
plant areas, the strategy field of each point may contain the label Boiler,
Reactor, or Tank. The system does not check or process this text in any
way, but you may use this text to sort items by strategy fields. Enter as
many as 16 characters.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
287
Initial Mode v — Indicate whether you want the operator or CHIP to
operate the activity point after a total download. Enter MANUAL if you want
the operator to operate the activity point manually. Enter COMPUTER if you
want CHIP to control this activity point. The mode can be changed by a
operator even if he or she does not have TUNE privileges.
Alarm A Word — Specify the word you want to appear in the alarm area
of the display when the console aborts an activity point. Enter as many as
eight characters.
An activity point goes to the ABORTED state when the console accepts
an abort request from the operator or CHIP.
Alarm B Word — Specify the word you want to appear in the alarm area
of the display when an activity point is in the FAILED state. Enter as many
as eight characters.
Whether an activity point goes to the FAILED state depends on the
severity levels of activity point errors on which you have defined the
procedure to fail. Refer to the FAIL ON process statement description in
Table 4-6 (subsection 4.7.1).
Note ... If an alarm occurs on the activity point, the console logs
messages containing the alarm words to the history, if the
procedure is keeping a history on this activity.
Procedure List v — Enter the name of a list of batch procedures you
want the activity point to execute. You created and named this list on the
Procedure List Definition form. This list may contain as many as 32
procedures, and more than one activity point may use the same
procedure list. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
288
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.8.3
Console DCD Point Form
Use the Console DCD Point form (Figure 4-43) to configure discrete
control device (DCD) points for the console. A DCD point allows the
operator to use one point to operate as many as 16 discrete inputs and 8
discrete outputs at one time. Besides this form, use the DCD Template
form (subsection 4.8.11) to define the setpoints (SPs) that are available
for the point and that may be shared by multiple DCDs.
An example of a console-resident DCD is a multi-speed pump whose
inputs and outputs are communicated to the console through a
programmable controller interface unit (PCIU). From the console, the
operator can use the DCD to turn the pump on to its various speeds or
turn it off, simply by changing the DCD setpoint.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
CONSOLE DCD POINT
Extra Data
Target!
Target! Help
ADD
Device v :
Description :
Strategy :
Retry Counter :
Transition Time :
Discrete
Point v
Template v :
Initial SP v :
Initial Mode v :
Off Scan : .YES NO
Out of Service : .YES NO
1
2
3
4
Scan Period : .1 3 5 10 15 30 60
Alarm Word :
Number
Output
Input
1
2
3
4
EV234
Figure 4-43.
Console DCD Point Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
CONSOLE POINTS —> DCD.
Use the following information to configure the console-resident DCD
points. Complete only one form for each DCD point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
289
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the device for
which you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are
in. In this form, the DCD name appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Device v — Enter the name of the console where the DCD point resides.
Enter as many as 12 characters for any previously defined console. If the
name identifies a non-Operator Workplace device, the system reports an
error.
Description — Enter a descriptor to identify the point or its function in the
control system. The system displays the description on the point faceplate
below the point tag. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group related database
items. For example, if the DCDs are part of a boiler, a reactor, or a tank,
the strategy field of each DCD may contain the label Boiler, Reactor, or
Tank. The system does not check or process this text in any way, but you
may use this text to sort database items by strategy fields. Enter as many
as 16 characters.
Template v — Enter the name of the template you want the DCD point to
use. This template defines the input and output signal patterns, setpoint,
and process variable (PV) names but does not specify particular inputs or
outputs. Enter as many as 12 characters for any previously defined
Console DCD template.
Initial SP v — Enter the initial setpoint value for the DCD point. Enter as
many as 12 characters. This setpoint simply allows the console to
compare the current PV to an initial value. This setpoint is not sent to field
devices when the console is downloaded.
Note ... You must define this setpoint in the template that this DCD point
uses.
Initial Mode v — Specify the mode you want the DCD point in after the
first download. Acceptable entries in this field are COM (computer), RSP
(remote setpoint), and MAN (manual).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
290
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Off Scan — Indicate whether you want the DCD to scan its discrete input
points immediately after you download the DCD. If the point is OFF
SCAN, the system does not process its inputs during its scan period. The
DCD does, however, accept setpoint and mode changes. If you select NO
for this field, the DCD scans its discrete points. If you select YES, it does
not. Setting this field to YES turns off alarms on the point, since inputs are
not matched against the setpoint.
4
To tune this value, use the remote detail display parameter’s (DDP)
remote off scan (REM OFS?). (Tune privilege on this point is required to
modify any DDP values.)
Out of Service — Indicate if you want the DCD point to send discrete
output signals to the highway devices when an operator changes the
setpoint. Enter YES to put the DCD point out of service so the system
does not process the DCD outputs during its scan period. If you enter
YES, the DCD does not accept setpoint or mode-change requests. Enter
NO if you want the DCD point to process output requests after a setpoint
change. This value is tunable through the DDP remote in or out service
(REM IOS?). (Tune privilege on this point is required to modify any DDP
values.)
Scan Period — Indicate the rate at which you want the system to scan
the discrete points of the DCD for current values. Set the scan period at
intervals of 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 30, or 60 seconds. Set this field as high as
your process allows to reduce the DCD processing load in the console.
Alarm Word — Indicate the word you want the system to display when
the DCD point fails. DCD point failures occur when the process variable
does not match the setpoint that was sent to the highway device after all
retries and transition times are met. Enter as many as eight characters.
Retry Counter — Indicate the number of times after its initial attempt that
the DCD should:
J
Try to drive the outputs
J
Allow the transition time to expire
J
Check the inputs
If the outputs are still incorrect after a maximum of seven attempts, the
DCD fails. Enter a number from 0 through 7 indicating the number of
retries you wish this DCD to attempt.
Transition Time — Specify a maximum time period, in seconds, that can
elapse before the DCD PV must match the SP. This time period ranges
from 1 through 127 seconds. If, after the transition time has elapsed, the
SP and PV do not agree, then the DCD fails unless retries are specified.
This value should account for the time for this DCD’s equipment to
indicate it is running plus some margin to eliminate nuisance failures or
retries.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
291
Discrete Point v — Enter the tag for the 4-bit discrete point you want the
DCD to refer to. The system uses this tag to characterize each input or
output item in the referenced DCD template for this particular DCD point.
Enter as many as 12 characters.
Note ... All names in the output list must reside in the same highway
device.
Number — Specify the bit number you want to use for the input or output
value of the DCD point. Enter a number from 1 through 4, where 1 is bit 1
of the 4-bit discrete, 2 is bit 2, 3 is bit 3, and 4 is bit 4.
Output — This is a read-only field containing an integer that relates the
discrete output tag and bit number to one of the eight possible DCD
output bits as defined by the referenced DCD template.
Input — This is a read-only field containing an integer that relates the
discrete input tag and bit number to one of the 16 possible DCD input bits
as defined by the referenced DCD template.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
292
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.8.4
Maintenance Point Form
Use the Maintenance Point form (Figure 4-44) to configure maintenance
points for the console. Maintenance points reside in the console and allow
the console to receive and display composite integrity information from
the local traffic director (LTD). You can configure a maintenance point to
monitor the composite integrity of any highway device. If you wish to view
more detailed integrity information on a console or on an SR90 controller,
use the integrity point. Refer to subsection 3.4.4 for more information on
maintenance points.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
MAINTENANCE POINT
Extra Data
Help
Target!
ADD
Device v :
Description :
Strategy :
Type v :
Maintenance
Device v :
PRIMARY SELECTED WORDS
Description :
On Alarm Word :
Off Normal Word :
SECONDARY SELECTED WORDS
Description :
On Alarm Word :
Off Normal Word :
PRIMARY CIA INTEGRITY WORDS
Description :
On Alarm Word :
Off Normal Word :
SECONDARY CIA INTEGRITY WORDS
Description :
On Alarm Word :
Off Normal Word :
EV237
Figure 4-44.
Maintenance Point Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
CONSOLE POINTS —> MAINTENANCE.
Use the following information to configure maintenance points. Complete
only one form for each maintenance point. After you complete this form,
go to the Target Data (subsection 4.8.8) and Console Target Data
(subsection 4.8.9) forms to configure the alarm information.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
293
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the mode you are in. In this
form, the tag of the maintenance point appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Device v — Enter a name to identify the console where the maintenance
point resides. Enter as many as 12 characters for any previously defined
console.
Description — Enter a descriptor to identify the point or its function in the
control system. The system displays the description on the point faceplate
below the point tag. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group related database
items. For example, if the maintenance device is part of the boiler,
reactor, or tank areas of the plant, the strategy field of each maintenance
point may contain the label Boiler, Reactor, or Tank. The system does not
check or process this text in any way, but you may use this text to sort
database items by strategy fields. Enter as many as 16 characters.
Type v — Indicate whether information for the maintenance point you are
configuring comes from a device or a traffic director. Enter either DEVICE,
NTD, or LTDn, where n is an integer from 1 through 8 that indicates the
local highway to which the LTD belongs. If you enter NTD (network traffic
director) or LTDn, the cursor skips the Maintenance Device v field.
Maintenance Device v — Enter the name of the PROVOX device for
which this maintenance point is being configured. If you are configuring a
maintenance point for a data concentrator unit (DCU), enter any controller
name associated with that DCU. Enter as many as 12 characters.
PRIMARY SELECTED WORDS —
J
J
Description — Specify what descriptor you want to appear on the
maintenance point’s faceplate to indicate if the maintenance device is
currently selected for polling at the primary LTD. An example of a
description is PRI SEL, which indicates primary LTD selected by the
maintenance device for polling. Enter as many as 16 characters.
On Alarm Word — Specify the word you want the system to display
to indicate that the item is not selected on the primary LTD. An
example of this on alarm word is NOT SEL. Enter as many as eight
characters.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
294
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
J
Off Normal Word — Specify the word you want the system to display
to indicate that the item is selected on the primary LTD. An example of
this off normal word is SELECTED. Enter as many as eight
characters.
SECONDARY SELECTED WORDS
J
4
J
J
Description — Specify the descriptor you want to appear on the
maintenance point’s faceplate to indicate if the maintenance device is
currently selected for polling at the secondary LTD. An example of a
description is SEC SEL, which indicates secondary LTD selected by
the maintenance device for polling. Enter as many as 16 characters.
On Alarm Word — Specify the word you want the system to display
when the item is not selected on the secondary LTD. An example of
this on alarm word is NOT SEL. Enter as many as eight characters.
Off Normal Word — Specify the word you want the system to display
when the item is selected on the secondary LTD. An example of this
off normal word is SELECTED. Enter as many as eight characters.
PRIMARY CIA INTEGRITY WORDS
J
J
J
Description — Specify the descriptor you want to appear to indicate
the composite integrity of the maintenance device as reported by the
device’s primary communications interface assembly (CIA). An
example of such a description is PRI INT, which means primary CIA
integrity. Enter as many as 16 characters.
On Alarm Word — Specify the word you want the system to display
to indicate a bad overall integrity of the device as indicated by the
primary CIA. An example of this on alarm word is BAD. Enter as many
as eight characters.
Off Normal Word — Specify the word you want the system to display
to indicate a good overall integrity of the device as indicated by the
primary CIA. An example of this off normal word is GOOD. Enter as
many as eight characters.
SECONDARY CIA INTEGRITY WORDS
J
J
Description — Specify the descriptor you want the system to display
to indicate the composite integrity of the maintenance device as
reported by the device’s secondary CIA. An example of such a
description is SEC INT, which means secondary CIA integrity. Enter
as many as 16 characters.
On Alarm Word — Specify the word you want the system to display
to indicate a bad overall integrity of the device as indicated by the
secondary CIA. An example of this on alarm word is BAD. Enter as
many as eight characters.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
Off Normal Word — Specify the word you want the system to display
to indicate a good overall integrity of the device as reported by the
device’s secondary CIA. An example of this off normal word is GOOD.
Enter as many as eight characters.
J
4.8.5
295
Console EPCI Point Form
Use the Console EPCI Point form (Figure 4-45) to configure extended
pulse count input (EPCI) points for the console. An EPCI point calculates
rate and total accumulations data for a controller-based pulse count input
(PCI) point. The EPCI point receives the pulse count from a field device,
such as a unit operations controller (UOC), reporting in the periodic
reporting mode. You can define the EPCI point for any console and target
it to any other consoles for display, as well as to a CHIP device. This form
defines an EPCI point for the console. Refer to subsection 3.4.2 for more
information on EPCI points.
X
Edit
Utilities
CONSOLE EPCI POINT
Extra Data
Help
Target!
ADD ____________
High Scale Value :
Low Scale Value :
Units :
Device v :
Description :
Strategy :
Conversion Constant
Rate Function Enbl
Rate Filter Enbl
Rate Filter Time
PCI Point v :
Off Scan : YES NO
Alarm Type v
A
B
C
D
Initial
State Enbl
YES
YES
YES
YES
High Low Trip
/Dev Ref
Deviation
Limit
Deadband
:
:
:
:
YES NO
YES NO
Alarm Word
NO
NO
NO
NO
EV236
Figure 4-45.
Console EPCI Point Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
CONSOLE POINTS —> EPCI.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
296
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Use the following information to configure the EPCI points. Complete only
one form for each EPCI point.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the tag of the EPCI point appears.
4
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Device v — Enter a name to identify the console where the EPCI point
resides. Enter as many as 12 characters for any previously defined
console. If the name is a non-Operator Workplace device, the system
reports an error.
Description — Enter a descriptor to identify the point or its function in the
control system. The system displays the description on the point faceplate
below the point tag. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group related database
items. For example, if the EPCI point is related to a boiler, a reactor, or a
tank, the strategy field of the point may contain the label Boiler, Reactor,
or Tank. The system does not check or process this text in any way, but
you may use this text to sort database items by strategy fields. Enter as
many as 16 characters.
PCI Point v — Enter the name of the PCI point that the EPCI point uses.
The PCI point provides the raw count data for the EPCI point. The range
includes any valid names that identify a unit operations controller (UOC)
PCI point, integrated function controller (IFC) PCI point, multiplexer
(MUX) PCI point, or CHIP integer point types.
Off Scan — Indicate whether you want the EPCI point to be ON or OFF
scan upon download. In ON scan, the EPCI point performs these
functions:
J
Error checking
J
Pulse count update
J
Accumulation calculation
J
Rate calculation
J
Alarm
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
297
NO indicates that the EPCI point is ON scan. YES indicates that the EPCI
point is OFF scan. The system does not update an EPCI point in OFF
scan.
Tune this field through the remote DDP (REM OFS?). (Tune privilege on
this point is required to modify any DDP values.)
High Scale Value — Enter a floating-point number to indicate the high
scale value for EUs. The system does not display the value on the
standard EPCI point faceplate. Trend uses the value as a high end point.
Low Scale Value — Enter a floating-point number to indicate the low
scale for EUs. The system does not display the value on the standard
EPCI point faceplate. Trend uses the value as a low end point.
Units — Identify the engineering units descriptor. The system displays
the descriptor on both full and detail faceplates. Enter as many as six
characters.
Conversion Constant — Specify a floating-point value you want the
system to multiply the pulse count value by in order to change the number
of pulses to engineering units. For example, if one pulse count represents
8 gallons, the conversion constant you use is eight. The field is tunable
through the point’s remote DDPs, if the operator has TUNE privilege.
Rate Function Enbl — Indicate whether you want the system to perform
a rate calculation. If you select YES, the system performs a rate
calculation. If you select NO, the system does not perform a rate
calculation. The result of enabling this function is a calculated rate at
which pulses arrive, scaled to the correct engineering units.
Rate Filter Enbl — Indicate whether you want the system to pass the
rate through a first-order filter. A first-order rate filter keeps chattering
signals from appearing as unsteady rates. For example, a calculated rate
which is not passed through a filter may continuously change from 39
gallons per minute to 41 gallons per minute, although the majority of the
time the flow is actually 40 gallons per minute. Passing this rate
calculation through a filter would require that the new value, 39 gallons
per minute for example, be constant for some specified time interval
before it is accepted as the new, actual rate.
Select YES to enable the rate filter; select NO to disable the rate filter. If
you enable this field and also enter a rate filter time in the Rate Filter
Time field, you enable the rate function.
Rate Filter Time — Enter the rate filter time constant in minutes. The rate
filter time is the delay time used for the first-order rate filter. In the
previous example, you might specify that the calculated rate remain
steady at the new value for 1 minute (the rate filter time) before it is
accepted as the actual rate. You must enable the rate filter for this field to
work. A value of zero is equal to no filtering.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
298
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
The field is tunable and may contain any valid positive real number. Tune
the rate filter time on the console using the DDP 771 FILTER TIME.
Alarm — This is a read-only field that contains the name of the alarm
being entered.
Type v — Identify the alarm type for a specific alarm in this field.
Acceptable entries for this field are ACCUM HIGH, RATE HIGH, RATE
DEVIATION, and RATE LOW.
4
Initial State Enbl — Indicate if you want the EPCI point to ignore this
alarm condition. If you select YES, the EPCI point checks for alarm
conditions. If you select NO, the EPCI point does not check for alarm
conditions.
High Low Trip/Dev Ref — Indicate either the trigger values for ACCUM
HIGH, RATE HIGH, and RATE LOW alarms, or the reference value for
RATE DEVIATION alarms. The deviation reference value is the base
value from which the deviation alarm is measured.
Deviation Limit — Specify the amount you want the rate to vary from the
reference value before the console triggers a deviation alarm. Enter any
positive floating-point value. Only RATE DEVIATION alarms use this
value.
Deadband — Specify the amount by which a value in alarm must return
above or below the trip value or reference value before the system clears
the alarm. This helps reduce the alarm sensitivity to a noisy signal.
Alarm Word — Specify a word you want to appear in the console’s alarm
field when the EPCI point is in an alarm state. Enter as many as eight
characters. However, only four characters are displayed in a standard
(full-sized) faceplate.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.8.6
299
Integrity Point Form
Use the Integrity Point form (Figure 4-46) to configure an integrity point.
An integrity point provides integrity information in some detail for consoles
and 20-Series (SR90) controller devices. In addition to clearing the ERR
condition on points whose backup controller is unavailable, the integrity
point also provides to the operator four severity levels of alarms and
prioritized integrity messages.
The integrity information allows the operator to quickly recognize
device-related problems. The console notifies the operator of how severe
the device failures are so that the operator can determine what actions to
take. The integrity point alarms can then be integrated into the standard
console alarm scheme to bring device-related integrity problems to the
operator’s attention on a prioritized basis. This point provides a
significantly enhanced superset of integrity information as compared to
the maintenance point. Refer to subsection 3.4.5 for more information on
integrity points. Refer to Appendix G for a list of messages an integrity
point can show.
X
Edit
Utilities
INTEGRITY POINT
Extra Data
Help
Target!
ADD ____________
Device v :
Description :
Strategy :
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
Alarm
A
B
C
D
Word
Word
Word
Word
:
:
:
:
Monitor Device v :
Off Scan :
Out of Service :
Period :
YES NO
YES NO
Log Faults :
YES NO
15 30 60 120 240
EV238
Figure 4-46.
Integrity Point Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
CONSOLE POINTS —> INTEGRITY.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
300
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Use the following information to configure the integrity point. Complete
one form for each integrity point.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the tag of the integrity point appears.
4
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Device v — Enter the name of the console you want this integrity point to
reside in. Select any previously defined console for this field.
Description — Enter a descriptor to identify the point or its function in the
control system. The system displays the description on the point faceplate
below the point tag. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group points. For
example, if the integrity point relates to a device that is controlling a boiler,
a reactor, or a tank, the strategy field of that point may contain the label
Boiler, Reactor, or Tank. The system does not check or process this text
in any way, but you may use this text to sort database items by strategy
fields. The name may have as many as 16 characters.
Monitor Device v — Enter the name of the device that you want the
integrity point to monitor for failures or abnormal conditions. The integrity
point you are configuring gathers integrity information on the device that
you indicate in this field. Enter any previously configured Operator
Workplace, SR90 controller, or PROVUE device name.
Off Scan — Indicate whether you want the system to suppress alarms for
the integrity point after a total download. If you select YES, the system
suppresses all of the point’s alarms until the operator tunes the point’s
detail display parameter STOP ALM/OFS?. This starts configured
alarming and operation of the point. Select YES if you want the system to
suppress alarms to the integrity point. Select NO if you want the integrity
point to function as configured immediately following a download of the
point.
Out of Service — Indicate whether you want the system to suppress
updates to the integrity point total after a total download. If you select
YES, the system does not update the point until the operator tunes the
point’s detail display parameter STOP UPD/IOS?, which starts configured
point operation. Select YES if you want the system to suppress updates
for the integrity point. Select NO if you want the integrity point to function
as configured immediately following a download of the point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
301
Period — Specify in seconds how often you want the console to poll the
monitor device for integrity information. Enter 15, 30, 60, 120, or 240
seconds.
Note ... A slow poll rate may be used because the system monitors the
device’s composite integrity for changes. When the system
detects a change from GOOD to BAD, an immediate integrity
point update takes place.
4
Alarm A Word — Enter the word you want the operator to see when the
A alarm for this point is active. An A alarm indicates the potential for a
critical situation, that is, corrective action is required immediately.
Examples of problems that trigger the A alarm include both the primary
and backup I/O highway failing, or an unavailable device. Enter as many
as eight characters in this field.
Alarm B Word — Enter the word you want the operator to see when the
B alarm for this point is active. A B alarm indicates the potential for an
urgent situation: control is not lost but may be lost shortly. The operator
must take corrective action soon. Examples of problems that trigger the B
alarm include application module failures and configurations in excess of
application module size. Enter as many as eight characters in this field.
Alarm C Word — Enter the word you want the operator to see when the
C alarm for this point is active. A C alarm indicates the potential for a
warning situation: control is not lost, but could be if another failure occurs.
The operator should take action as soon as he or she can schedule it.
Examples of problems that trigger the C alarm include loss of battery
backup, backup I/O card or application module failures, CIA failures, and
disabling of automatic redundancy switchovers. Enter as many as eight
characters in this field.
Alarm D Word — Enter the word you want the operator to see when the
D alarm for this point is active. A D alarm indicates that the system has
detected a minor problem: control is probably not affected. The operator
should take corrective action at the next possible opportunity. Examples
of problems that trigger the D alarm include excessive CPU loads, bad
VDU or VDUs, touch screens and/or keyboards, plus X terminals or AIUs,
virtual point resynchronization errors, and printer failures. Enter as many
as eight characters in this field.
Log Faults — Select YES if you want faults logged to the printer of the
console hosting the integrity point. Select NO if you do not. The operator
can tune this field through the point’s remote DDPs if he or she has TUNE
privilege.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
302
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.8.7
Single Discrete Point Form
Use the Single Discrete Point form (see Figure 4-47) to define alarms for
the channels (bits) of certain four-bit point types (MUX STD DO, MUX
EXT DO, MUX DI, IAC DISCRETE ICP, and PCIU DISCRETE). You can
configure a single discrete point for each channel of these input point
types. See subsection 3.4.6 for additional information on console-derived
single-bit discretes.
4
X
Edit
UtilitieS
SINGLE DISCRETE POINT
Extra Data
Target!
Help
ADD ____________
____________________________________________________________________________
Device v : ____________
Description :
Strategy :
On Alarm Word :
Off Normal Word :
Input Point v :
Channel No. :
EV239
Figure 4-47.
Single Discrete Point Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
OTHER POINTS —> SINGLE DISCRETE.
Use the following information to configure a single discrete point.
Complete one form for each channel (bit) of a four-bit point.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the point you are
targeting appears next to the edit mode you are in. In this form, the point
tag appears.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
303
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Device v — Enter the tag of the source device for the input point for the
console-derived single discrete point (or press the Values List key to
view a list of tags). The device type must be MUX, PCIU, or IAC
CONTROLLER. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Note ... The tag requested in the Device v field is used as a link, and is
not where the point resides.
Description — Enter a descriptor to identify the single discrete point or
its function in the control system. The system displays the description on
the point faceplate below the point tag. Enter as many as 12 characters.
Strategy — Enter a name that you wish to use to group points. For
example, if the single discrete point relates to a solenoid valve that
controls the flow of water to a boiler, the strategy field of that point may
contain the label BoilerSV1. The system does not check or process this
text in any way, but you may use this text to sort database items by
strategy fields. The name may have as many as 16 characters.
On Alarm Word — Enter the text that you wish to be displayed when the
bit that represents the discrete point is set to 1 (on or active). For
example, for a discrete valve that controls a solenoid valve, you might
specify OPEN as the On Alarm Word. Enter as many as eight characters
(including spaces) in this field.
Off Normal Word — Enter the text that you wish to be displayed when
the bit that represents the discrete point is set to 0 (off or not active). For
example, for a discrete valve that controls a solenoid valve, you might
specify CLOSED as the Off Normal Word. Enter as many as eight
characters (including spaces) in this field.
Input Point v — Enter the name of the point that includes the channel
(bit) for the single discrete point (or press the Values List key to view a list
of names). The point must be one of the following types: MUX STD DO,
MUX EXT DO, MUX DI, IAC DISCRETE ICP, or PCIU DISCRETE. Enter
as many as 12 characters.
Channel No. — Enter a number from 1 through 4 specifying the channel
(bit) of the input point that you are using for the console-derived single
discrete point. The specified channel triggers the On Alarm Word and Off
Normal Word for the single discrete point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
304
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.8.8
Target Data Form
Use the Target Data form (Figure 4-48) to define items related to targeting
a point to PROVOX devices. Refer to subsection 3.4.7.3 for additional
information on targeting points. Refer to the Using ENVOX Configuration
Software (UM6.1:SW3151) manual for instructions on creating target
groups.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
TARGET DATA
Extra Data
New!
Next!
ADD ____________
DEVICE LIST
Current?
Reporting Mode v :
Deadzone :
Sample Interval :
CONSOLE DATA
Alarm Display :
Alarm Display v :
Device v
0.03125 0.0625
0 0.5 1 3 5
YES NO
Help
X-List!
Select X-List to
exit from device list
Type
0.125 0.25
10 15 60
Index
0.5
1
2
4
PPA v :
Alarm Group A : _ B : _ C : _ D : _
EV239
Figure 4-48.
Target Data Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
[POINT TYPE] —> Target!. You can reach this form from any point type.
There are additional parameter values you must specify when targeting
this point to UOC, and Operator Workplace or PROVUE devices. Access
these additional forms from the Extra Data menu option.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
305
Use the following information to target data to points. Complete one form
for each point.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the point you are
targeting appears next to the edit mode you are in. In this form, the point
tag appears.
Select X-List ... — Once you finish making entries in the Device v field,
you must select this menu option from the top of the form to complete the
rest of the Target Data form.
Note ... You only need to configure the Device List information (fields
Current? through Index) for points you are targeting to CHIP
devices.
Current? — This is a read-only field that indicates whether the device
you specify in the Device v field is in the current target device group. A
target device group is made up of all the devices that have the same
reporting mode, sample interval and deadzone. Also, to be in the same
target group, consoles must all have the same values as you enter in
these fields: Alarm Display, Alarm Display v, PPA v, and Alarm Group A,
B, C, and D.
Device v — Enter the name of the devices you want this point to be
targeted to. For consoles, you can select a maximum of eight targets. For
other devices, you can select a maximum of 24 targets. You must enter a
name in this field to complete or view the options in the Deadzone,
Sample Interval, and Alarm Display fields.
Type — This read-only field displays the device type of the target device.
This field aids in identifying specific revision levels or names of devices
you are targeting the point to.
Index — Enter a unique integer that you want to assign to this point in the
target device. This number is called the database index (DBI) in the
console and in CHIP and, the relative DBI in the UOC/IFC. For consoles,
you can also leave the field blank. Then, when you download the console,
it automatically assigns a DBI to each point. If you let the console assign
the DBI, when you modify this form at a later time, the information in the
Index field says 0 (AUTO), indicating that the console automatically
assigned the index at the last download.
This index is local to the target device and is not a system-wide reference
number like the HACL number (subsection 3.10.2).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
306
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Reporting Mode v — Enter the reporting mode that you want the system
to use—along with the deadzone and sample interval—to determine how
often a particular point sends data over the data highway to devices in the
current target group. The reporting modes available depend on the device
types in the current target group. When targeting points to the console,
enter one of the following:
J
J
4
J
J
BACKGROUND — Points do not report unless called up on display.
CHANGE-OF-STATE — Communicates the point’s operating data if
the alarm status changes a discrete point changes state, or the point’s
operating mode (MAN, AUTO, CMPTR, RSP, DDC, SUPV) changes.
PERIODIC — Communicates the point’s operating data at the end of
its sample interval regardless of whether any of the point’s operating
parameter values changed by more than the deadzone value.
EXCEPTION — Communicates the point’s operating data at the end
of its sample interval if it has exceeded a dead zone value (analog), or
if its alarms, PV, or SP changes (discrete). There are two types of
exception reporting:
j PERIODIC BY EXCEPTION WITH REFRESH REPORTING —
This reporting mode allows you to tune the communication loading
of the DCS system by adjusting two parameters: the reporting
interval and the deadzone value. The reporting interval is the
period of time in which the system examines exception conditions.
If an exception condition exists, the point’s operating parameter
data is sent to the targeted device.
An analog exception exists when an analog operating parameter
value changes by more than the deadzone value (expressed in
percent). A discrete exception exists when an alarm, PV, or SP
change occurs.
If an exception condition does not exist, operating parameter data
is not sent to the targeted device. If a point does not generate an
exception condition within a predefined time period, the point is
forced to report to the targeted device (refresh). The redefined
time periods are point-type-dependent. For example, from a UOC,
the refresh time period for a loop point is 30 seconds, and for a
discrete input, it is 10 minutes.
In addition to normal exceptions, there are also quick exceptions.
A quick exception occurs on an alarm state change, and forces an
immediate report of operating parameter data to the targeted
device.
j PERIODIC BY EXCEPTION WITHOUT REFRESH
REPORTING — This reporting mode is similar to that described
above, except that refresh reporting is never done.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
307
Caution ... Do not enter BACKGROUND or EXCEPTION NO REFRESH in
the Reporting Mode v field. Entering these modes may lead to
operational difficulties for points not displayed.
Deadzone — Enter the amount, in percent of span, by which an analog
value must change before the value is transmitted over the data highway
when the reporting mode is EXCEPTION. Valid entries are 0.03125,
0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0, 1, 2, and 4.
Sample Interval — Enter the rate at which you want this point to send its
operating data to the target devices when the reporting mode is
PERIODIC or the rate at which the operating data is checked for an
exception condition when the reporting mode is EXCEPTION (with or
without REFRESH). Valid entries are 0, 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 60
seconds.
Alarm Display — Indicate whether you want an alarm display to appear
when an operator selects this point. Select YES if you want an alarm
display. Select NO if you do not want an alarm display.
Alarm Display v — Enter the name of the specific display that you want
to appear when an operator selects this point. The display must be in the
display list of all the consoles to which you are targeting the point.
PPA v — Enter the name of the plant process area (PPA) to which you
want to assign this point. Place this point into a PPA with other points that
use the same alarm strategy.
Alarm Group A — Enter the number of the alarm group to which you
assigned the A alarm for this point. The number determines the alarm’s
priority level, as well as how the system handles the alarm. The valid
range for this value is 0 through 7.
Alarm Group B — Enter the number of the alarm group to which you
assigned the B alarm for this point. The number determines the alarm’s
priority level, as well as how the system handles the alarm. The valid
range for this value is 0 through 7.
Alarm Group C — Enter the number of the alarm group to which you
assigned the C alarm for this point. The number determines the alarm’s
priority level, as well as how the system handles the alarm. The valid
range for this value is 0 through 7.
Alarm Group D — Enter the number of the alarm group to which you
assigned the D alarm for this point. The number determines the alarm’s
priority level, as well as how the system handles the alarm. The valid
range for this value is 0 through 7.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
308
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.8.9
Console Target Data Form
Use the Console Target Data form (Figure 4-49) to define items related to
targeting a point to a console. This information applies to all consoles in
the current target group.
You complete the Bit fields only if you completed the Maintenance Point
form or configured certain other source points.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
CONSOLE TARGET DATA
Extra Data
Help
Next!
ADD ____________
DEVICE LIST
Current?
Device
Reporting Mode
Deadzone
Sample Interval
Suppress Local Alarm
Suppress Operator Change
Suppress Message
Suppress Operator
Change Message
Suppress State Message
Suppress Step Message
: YES NO
: YES NO
: YES NO
: YES NO
: YES NO
: YES NO
Unit Point : YES NO
Unit Point v :
Decimal Places :
Scale :
Unit Constant :
Expected Value :
Bit
Bit
Bit
Bit
1
2
3
4
:
:
:
:
STATUS
STATUS
STATUS
STATUS
ALARM
ALARM
ALARM
ALARM
INVERTED
INVERTED
INVERTED
INVERTED
EV240
Figure 4-49.
Console Target Data Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
[POINT TYPE] —> Target! —> Extra Data —> CONSOLE DATA.
Use the following information to target points to a console. Complete one
form for each console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
309
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in.
Current? — This is a read-only field that indicates whether the device
you specify in the Device field is in the current target device group. You
define this field on the Target Data form.
Device — This is a read-only field listing all the devices to which you are
targeting this point. You define this field on the Target Data form.
Reporting Mode — This is a read-only field indicating the reporting mode
of the console. You define this field on the Target Data form.
Deadzone — This is a read-only field that identifies the amount, in
percent of span, by which an analog value must change before the value
is transmitted over the highway when the reporting mode is EXCEPTION.
You define this field on the Target Data form.
Sample Interval — This is a read-only field that indicates the rate at
which this point sends its operating data to the target devices. You define
this field on the Target Data form.
Suppress Local Alarm — Indicate whether you want the console to
suppress alarms for this point. Select YES to suppress alarms and
prevent the console from printing alarm messages for this point. Select
NO if you want the console to process alarms normally, using alarm
priority, PPA state, and PMA mode information. You can tune this field
using local detail display parameters (DDPs).
Suppress Operator Change — Indicate whether you want the operator
to be able to change the operating parameter values of this point from the
console. Select YES to disable operating parameter changes. Select NO
to enable them. You can tune this field using local detail display
parameters (DDPs).
Suppress Message — Indicate whether you want the printer to print this
point’s alarm and state change messages. Select YES to prevent the
printer from printing alarm and state change messages. Select NO to
enable printing of alarm and state change messages based on alarm
priorities, PPA state, and PMA mode information. You can tune this field
using local detail display parameters (DDPs).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
310
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Note ... The local point SUPPRESS MESSAGE function will override the
YES selections of the MESSAGE, ACK MESSAGE, and CLEAR
MESSAGE functions on the Alarm Priority Definition Form (see
subsection 4.6.5).
SUPPRESS MESSAGE will also override the YES selection of
the SUPPRESS STATE MESSAGE and SUPPRESS STEP
MESSAGE functions in this form.
4
Suppress Operator Change Message — Indicate whether you want the
printer to print this point’s operator change messages. Selecting YES to
prevent the printer from printing operator change messages. Select NO to
enable printing of operator change messages. You can tune this field
using local detail display parameters (DDPs).
Suppress State Message — Indicate whether you want the printer to
print messages when this point changes state. Select YES to disable
printing of change-of-state messages. Select NO to cause change of
state messages to be printed. You can tune this field using local detail
display parameters (DDPs). Entries to this field are only valid for activity
and unit points.
Suppress Step Message — Indicate whether you want the printer to
print messages when a unit operation changes steps. Select YES to
disable printing. Select NO to enable printing. Entries to this field are only
valid for unit points.
Unit Point — Indicate whether you want this point to be attached to a unit
point for the purpose of monitoring alarms for a batch-end log. Use this
field only for points unique to a particular unit point. Select YES to permit
entering the name of a unit point. Select NO to disable the ability to store
alarm data for batch-end logs.
Unit Point v — Enter the name of the unit point that stores this point’s
alarm data. The alarm data may be used for printing batch-end logs
whenever the specified unit is used.
Decimal Places — Enter an integer from 0 through 7. This specifies the
number of decimal places the system displays throughout the consoles.
The number of decimal places specified applies to all faceplate and value
fields for this point. This field is only valid for analog input (AI) points,
analog output (AO) points, logic control points (LCPs), and loop points.
Scale — Enter an integer between from 1 through 100. This identifies the
percent of span representing the full scale on the deviation bar in the
overview display. This field is valid only for AI points and loop points.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
311
Unit Constant — Enter any floating-point value to identify a particular
unit point within a batch path. By using the value entered in the process
instructions, the procedure and the operator can track the batch. The
recommended value is this unit point’s DBI. Entries to this field are only
valid for unit points.
Expected Value — Enter any floating-point value. This field represents a
reference value that may be compared to the process variable. This field
is only valid for AI points.
Note ... The Bit 1, Bit 2, Bit 3, and Bit 4 fields are only valid for four-bit
discrete, MUX discrete input (DI), PCIU discrete input (DI), and
maintenance points.
When these fields are configured, the operator will see ON as
the normal alarm word, or OFF as the inverted alarm word.
Bit 1 — Indicate how you want the system to interpret the point. STATUS
causes the console to display the on or off word in the status block of the
point, and no alarm is activated. ALARM causes the point to go into
Alarm C when the bit contains a logic 1. INVERTED causes the point to
go into alarm when the bit contains a logic 0.
Bit 2 — Indicate how you want the system to interpret the maintenance
point. STATUS causes the console to display only the on or off word in
the status block of the point, and no alarm is activated. ALARM causes
the point to go into Alarm B when the bit contains a logic 1. INVERTED
causes the point to go into alarm when the bit contains a logic 0.
Bit 3 — Indicate how you want the system to interpret the point. STATUS
causes the console to display only the on or off word in the status block of
the point, and no alarm is activated. ALARM causes the point to go into
Alarm A when the bit contains a logic 1. INVERTED causes the point to
go into alarm when the bit contains a logic 0.
Bit 4 — Indicate how you want the system to interpret the point. STATUS
causes the console to display only the on or off word in the status block of
the point, and no alarm is activated. ALARM causes the point to go into
Alarm D when the bit contains a logic 1. INVERTED causes the point to
go into alarm when the bit contains a logic 0.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
312
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.8.10
Extended Alarms Form
Use the Extended Alarms form (Figure 4-50) to define as many as four
alarms for a point for display to the operator. Extended alarms are local to
the console, and are not related to the internal extended alarms for a
UOC, IFC, or MUX, but can mirror those device-resident alarms at the
console for the operator.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
EXTENDED ALARMS
Extra Data
Help
ADD ____________
Alarm
No.
Alarm
Type v
Attr
v
Alarm
Word
Group
No.
Trip/
Dev Limit
Deadband
1
2
3
4
EV241
Figure 4-50.
Extended Alarms Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
[POINT TYPE] —> Target! —> Extra Data —> CONSOLE DATA
—>Extra Data —> EXTENDED ALARMS.
Use the following information to target extended alarms to a console.
Complete one form for each console.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in.
Alarm No. — This read-only field contains a number that the ENVOX
software generates as you configure each extended alarm in the range 1
through 4.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
313
Alarm Type v — Indicate whether you want the alarm to be a high, low or
deviation alarm.
Attr v — Indicate the attribute you want the system to monitor. The valid
attributes are:
J
PV (process variable)
J
RA (ratio value)
J
SP (setpoint)
J
%BI (percent bias value)
J
%OUTPUT (percent output value)
For deviation alarms, enter either SP and PV; however, the deviation is
always calculated as the difference between those two attributes. They
may only be compared to each other, not to any other attributes. Not all
attributes are valid for all point types.
Alarm Word — Enter the word you want the console to display when the
extended alarm is active. Enter as many as eight characters.
Group No. — Indicate the number of the alarm group to which you want
to assign this alarm. Enter 0 through 7.
Trip/Dev Limit — Enter any positive floating-point number. The deviation
limit is the amount by which a value must vary from the reference value to
trigger a deviation alarm. The trip value is the value at which an alarm is
triggered for non-deviation alarms.
Deadband — Enter any positive floating-point number. The alarm
deadband may be used to prevent unnecessary alarm reactivation when
the measured variable is close to the alarm trip point. The value of the
monitored attribute must move away from the trip point towards the
setpoint by more than the deadband before the alarm clears.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
314
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.8.11
DCD Template Form
Use the DCD Template form (Figure 4-51) to define the required discrete
outputs and the resulting discrete inputs for a discrete control device
(DCD). Each specific combination of input and output values is called a
setpoint. For each setpoint, you enter the appropriate bit pattern (1’s and
0’s) required on the outputs to produce the input bit pattern. Once you
have defined the DCD template, you can assign it to multiple DCDs when
you complete their Console DCD Point forms.
Define as many as 16 discrete inputs and as many as 8 discrete outputs
for the setpoints of a DCD. When the operator requests a setpoint change
from the keyboard, the console generates the discrete output pattern that
you configure for that setpoint. When the field devices are working
properly, the discrete inputs the devices return match the specific pattern
you configure for the inputs. Because the addresses of the individual
input and output channels are defined on the Console DCD Point form,
the setpoints defined in the DCD template contain only the bit patterns of
the inputs and outputs (see Figure 4-51).
4
X
Edit
Utilities
DCD TEMPLATE
Extra Data
Target!
Help
ADD ____________
Strategy :
Entry
Number of Outputs :
Number of Inputs :
SP Name
Outputs
Inputs
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
EV235
Figure 4-51.
DCD Template Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
GLOBAL ITEMS —> DCD TEMPLATE.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
315
Use the following information to configure the DCD template. Complete
only one form for each DCD point.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the DCD point tag appears.
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not downloaded.
Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use during
configuration.
Strategy — Enter a name that the operator may use to group related
database items. For example, if the DCDs are part of a boiler, a reactor,
or a tank, the strategy field of each DCD may contain the label Boiler,
Reactor, or Tank. The system does not check or process this text in any
way, but it may use this text to sort items by strategy fields. Enter as
many as 16 characters.
Number of Outputs — Enter the number of outputs for the point you are
configuring. Each point may have as many as 8 outputs.
Number of Inputs — The number of inputs must equal the number of
discrete input channels monitored by this point. You may have as many
as 16 inputs. The addresses of the input channels are entered when you
configure the DCD point.
Entry — This is a read-only field that contains the number of the item
being entered.
SP Name — Enter a name that reflects the state of the DCD. For
example, if the DCD controls a pump, you may name that setpoint
DRAINING, PUMPING, or some other appropriate name. Each group of
inputs and outputs requires a unique SP name. This name can have as
many as 12 characters, and must contain at least one alphabetic
character. ENVOX will not accept DCD or group template setpoint names
that are all numeric characters.
Note ... A DCD template can contain a maximum of 16 setpoints.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
316
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Outputs — Enter 0 or 1. The outputs are the expected bit pattern of the
discrete output values that correspond to the expected inputs. The
number of outputs entered must equal the number of discrete output
channels configured for the DCD point. The order of the outputs must
match the order of the output channel addresses on the instrument signal
tag for the DCD point.
4
Inputs — Enter 0 or 1. The number of inputs entered must equal the
number of discrete input channels configured for this DCD point. The
order of the inputs must match the order of the input channel addresses
on the instrument signal tag for the DCD point. The inputs are the
expected bit pattern of the discrete input values after the discrete output
values have been issued. The DCD evaluates the input patterns to
determine the PV of the point.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.9
317
Defining Trend Sets and Traces
During configuration, you set the maximum number of trend traces that an
operator can add on-line. You can configure up to 200 trend sets and
1200 trend traces.
See Figure 4-52 for a map of forms to use to define trend sets and trend
traces.
4
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
Required
[Add] --> [DEVICES] --> [WPCON]
CONSOLE DEVICE DEFINITION
Required
[Extra Data]
TREND SET DEFINITION
Optional
[Extra Data]
TREND TRACE DEFINITION
Optional
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-52.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Trend Sets and Traces
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
318
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.9.1
Trend Set Definition Form
Use the Trend Set Definition form (Figure 4-53) to define the maximum
number of trend traces an operator can add on-line and to assign names
to each of the trend sets. You can configure as many as 200 trend sets.
You may configure six trend traces for each trend set using the Trend
Trace Definition form, or you can allow the operator to add the trend
traces on-line.
This form defines the number of trend traces you want the system to
produce within each trend set.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
TREND SET DEFINITION
Extra Data
Help
Target!
ADD ____________
Number Added Online :
No.
Trend Set Name
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
EV243
Figure 4-53.
Trend Set Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra Data —> Trend Set Defn.
Use the following information to configure the trend set names. Complete
only one form for each console.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
319
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console for which you are assigning trend sets
appears.
Number Added Online — Specify the number of trend traces you want
the operator to be able to add on-line. The total number of trend traces
(those you configure plus those the operator adds on-line) cannot exceed
1200 traces.
Note ... Changing the number of trend traces the operator can add
on-line requires a total download. Size this field as large as
possible, while keeping the total number of traces below the
console maximum.
No. — This is a read-only field containing an integer that the ENVOX
system generates as you enter trend set names. The integer tells you
how many trend traces you have entered. The integer ranges from 1
through 200.
Trend Set Name — Enter as many as 12 characters in this field to
identify the name of a particular trend set. Each name must be unique
within this console. The operator uses this name to reference the trend
set in the trend directory, as well as when calling up trend sets to build
displays.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
320
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.9.2
Trend Trace Definition Form
The Trend Trace Definition form (see Figure 4-54) lets you configure
trend traces for a console. You can configure as many as 1200 trend
traces (up to six per trend set). You can configure trend traces so that the
system automatically starts trending traces after you complete the
configuration download.
Use the Trend Trace Definition form to configure real-time trend traces.
Real-time trending resides in the console. The system can perform
historic types of trends only with an application package, such as Data
Historian, that supports the trend option. To record historic trend data, you
must also configure at least one trend device for your system.
4
Any existing configuration data that has historic trend traces defined will
be accepted by the console without any errors, although the trend
information displayed will not be historic.
X
Edit
Utilities
Type WPCON
TREND TRACE DEFINITION
Extra Data
Help
Target!
Target!
ADD ____________
Trend Set Name
No.
Type v
Trended Value
High
Endpoint
Low
Endpoint
Int v
1
2
3
4
5
6
EV244
Figure 4-54.
Trend Trace Definition Form Layout
Access this form by selecting Add —> DEVICES —> WPCON —> Extra
Data —> Trend Set Defn —> Trend Trace.
Use the following information to configure the trend traces. Complete only
one form for each trend set on which you want configured traces.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
321
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen and
whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for which
you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you are in. In
this form, the name of the console for which you are configuring trend
traces appears.
Trend Set Name — This is a read-only field that indicates the trend set
whose traces you are configuring with this Trend Trace Definition form.
Make sure this is the trend set for which you want to configure these
traces.
No. — This is a read-only field containing an integer that the ENVOX
system generates as you enter trended values. The integer tells you how
many trended values you have entered. You can enter as many as six
trended values per trend set.
Type v — Enter REALTIME, which is the only type of trending the
Operator Workplace console will associate with a trended value.
Note ... If you enter HISTORIC WRITE, HISTORIC READ, or
VOLATILE, the system will report the following error: F3333:
ERROR - Invalid trend type
Trended Value — Enter the name, attribute, and, if necessary, the
occurrence of the point you want to use for trending data. Follow the
format:
ATTRIBUTE[OCCURRENCE] : TAG
To find out if you need to use an occurrence, refer to the table that
contains valid console point types and their trendable attributes in
Appendix B.
High Endpoint — Enter the upper-range value for the trend trace scale in
engineering units. This value may be any floating-point value that is
greater than the low end point value that you enter. This field can be
modified at the console through the trend window.
Low Endpoint — Enter the low-range value for the trend trace scale in
engineering units. This value may be any floating-point value that is less
than the high end point value that you enter. This field can be modified at
the console through the trend window.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
322
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Int v — Specify the rate at which you want the system to update the
trended value. If the value you are trending changes frequently, use a
brief time interval between updates. If, however, the value is a slow,
steady point like a level or temperature, use a longer time interval. Enter
2, 5, 15, or 30 seconds for short time intervals, and 1, 4, 8, 24, or 72
minutes for longer update intervals.
4
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.10
323
Defining Users
To control user access to the Operator Workplace console, you assign
passwords and privilege levels, and set preferences for the operators,
individually and console-wide. You can also specify user-defined keys
(UDKs) for the operators to perform a series of operations (or macro)
and specify remote applications they can run from their X terminals.
See Figure 4-55 for a map of forms to use to define Operator Workplace
users.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
324
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
Required
[Add] --> [GLOBAL ITEMS]
USER DEFINITIONS
Required
[Extra Data]
4
USER PREFERENCES
Optional
[Extra Data]
COLOR PALETTE DEFINITION
Optional
USER APPLICATION LIST
Optional
USER UDK LIST
Optional
APPLICATION DEFINITION
Optional
USER DEFINED KEY
Optional
COLOR PALETTE DEFINITION
Optional
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-55.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for Defining Users
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.10.1
325
User Definitions Form
Use the User Definition form (Figure 4-56) to configure user access
passwords for the console. This form identifies the privilege levels of
users. In this form, you assign a password and privilege level to a user.
You can identify base privileges and then add specific supplemental
privileges for individual plant management areas (PMAs).
Once you configure the User Definition form for a particular user, you can
use the information defined in this form with any console in the system.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
USER DEFINITIONS
Extra Data
Help
Target!
ADD ____________
Password
Base Privilege
Base PMA Change
Base PPA Change
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
:
: DOWNLOAD TUNE OPERATE ACCESS LOCK
: YES NO
: YES NO
PMA v
TUNE
TUNE
TUNE
TUNE
TUNE
TUNE
TUNE
TUNE
TUNE
Privilege
OPERATE ACCESS
OPERATE ACCESS
OPERATE ACCESS
OPERATE ACCESS
OPERATE ACCESS
OPERATE ACCESS
OPERATE ACCESS
OPERATE ACCESS
OPERATE ACCESS
LOCK
LOCK
LOCK
LOCK
LOCK
LOCK
LOCK
LOCK
LOCK
PMA Change
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
PPA Change
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
YES NO
EV208a
Figure 4-56.
User Definitions Form Layout
This form is a global form and can be accessed from the ENVOX Top
Level Form by selecting Add —> GLOBAL ITEMS —> USER
DEFINITIONS and entering a valid tag for this form.
Use the following information to configure the user access privileges.
Complete only one form for each user name.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
326
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen
and whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for
which you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you
are in. In this instance, the User Definitions tag you entered appears.
4
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not
downloaded. Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use
during configuration.
Password — Indicate the unique character sequence that an operator
must enter on the keyboard. To log on to the station, the operator must
type this password. This should be unique so that the operator has the
privileges, and only the privileges you define for him or her on this form.
Enter as many as 16 characters. The user name is printed when the user
correctly enters his password.
Base Privilege — Specify the default privilege that the operator has
across a console’s entire database. To provide more access than the
base privilege on specific plant areas, you must define a privilege for
those PMAs in the later fields of this form. Select one of the following
options to assign a privilege: DOWNLOAD, OPERATE, LOCK, TUNE, or
ACCESS.
Base PMA Change — Indicate whether you want the operator to have
the privilege to change all PMA modes. If you select YES, the operator
has the privilege to change all PMAs in the console. If you select NO, the
operator does not have this privilege.
Note ... You may grant privileges to change a mode on a specific PMA
by further defining the individual PMA privilege in later portions
of this form.
Base PPA Change — Indicate whether you want a particular operator to
have the privilege to change all PPA operational states and critical
levels. If you select YES, the operator has the privilege to change all
PPAs in a console. If you select NO, the operator does not have this
base privilege.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
327
Note ... You may grant privileges to change all PPA’s in specific PMA’s
by further defining the individual PMA privilege in the later
portions of this form.
No. — This field is a read-only integer that the ENVOX system
generates. The integer shows you how many PMAs you have extended
privileges to for this operator.
PMA v — Enter the name of a PMA for which you want to extend this
operator’s privileges beyond his or her base privilege level.
Privilege — Indicate the operator’s privilege level for a particular PMA
and its corresponding PPA’s and points. Whatever privilege level you
assign for this PMA is added to the operator’s base privilege level when
he or she is operating points in the selected PMA.
The options are TUNE, OPERATE, ACCESS, and LOCK. Select one
privilege for each PMA for which you are extending privileges.
PMA Change — Indicate whether you want the operator to have the
privilege to change the mode for the PMA. If you select YES, the
operator can change that PMA mode. If you select NO, the operator
cannot change the PMA mode. Refer to subsection 3.2.6 for more
information on PMA modes and mode changes.
PPA Change — Indicate whether you want the operator to have the
privilege to change the operational state and critical level for all PPAs in
a particular PMA. If you select YES, the operator can change all PPAs
within the PMA. If you select NO, the operator cannot change the PPAs
within the PMA. Refer to subsection 3.2.7 for more information on PPA
operational states and critical levels.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
328
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.10.2
User Preferences Form
Use the User Preferences form (Figure 4-57) to set preferences for an
operator. If entries are not made in the fields on this form, then default
data is used by the console.
You can also set some of these preferences on a console-wide basis
with the Console Preferences form (see subsection 4.4.7). Notes with
the field descriptions indicate if the console preferences will override the
user preferences.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
USER PREFERENCES
Extra Data
Target!
Help
ADD ____________
Remote Login Name :
Alarm Window on Top :
Cursor Shape v :
.ALWAYS
WHEN CHANGED
.SMALL
Language :
.ENGLISH
Directory Dialog Size :
Window Presentation :
Instrument Area Position :
Macro Window Orientation :
Default Screen Template :
Color Palette v :
Max Windows :
Initial Display v :
Display Stack Size :
WHEN SELECTED
________________________
Font Set :
Directory Sorting :
Figure 4-57.
______________________________
MEDIUM
LARGE
OTHER
.ALPHABETIC
NUMERIC
.FULL
QUARTER
HALF
EIGHTH
.SINGLE SPLIT
.LEFT RIGHT
HORIZONTAL VERTICAL
_________________________________
____________
___
____________
___
Display Update Interval : ___
Pointer Acceleration : __
Pointer Threshold : __
User Preferences Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
GLOBAL ITEMS —> USER DEFINITIONS —> Extra Data —>
Preferences.
Use the following information to set user preferences. Complete only one
form for each user.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
329
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen
and whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for
which you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you
are in. In this case, the User Definitions tag appears.
Remote Login Name — Enter the account name (up to 32 characters)
on the remote host that remote applications run on. The account name
characters must be valid for the remote host operating system. No
default is provided for this field.
Alarm Window on Top — Specify whether the console will automatically
raise the alarm window to the top when obscured by another window.
Select one of the following options to assign a preference: ALWAYS,
WHEN CHANGED, or WHEN SELECTED. If you select ALWAYS, the
alarm area is always on top of other windows. If you select WHEN
CHANGED, the alarm area window moves to the top if the alarm status
changes. If you select WHEN SELECTED, the alarm area window
moves to the top only when selected by the operator. If you do not make
a selection, then the default (ALWAYS) is used.
Note ... If you make a selection in the Alarm Window on Top field, your
preference will be overridden if a higher-priority is selected on
the equivalent field of the Console Preferences form (see
subsection 4.4.7).
ALWAYS is considered the highest priority, and WHEN
SELECTED the lowest priority.
Cursor Shape v — Enter the shape of the cursor for this user. Press the
values list key for a list of valid shapes. If you do not enter a shape, then
the default (LEFT PTR) is used.
Font Set — This selection is not fully implemented in the Operator
Workplace software. This field affects the site of dialog windows created
but not the font size used in them. Do not use the SMALL selection; the
font used is too large for the small dialog windows.
Language — This selection is not implemented in the Operator
Workplace software. Any selection has no effect.
Directory Sorting — Select the method the console uses to sort
directories. If you select ALPHABETIC, the console displays directory
entries alphabetically. If you select NUMERIC, the console displays
directory entries numerically by their list indices. If you do not make a
selection, then the default (NUMERIC) is used.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
330
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Directory Dialog Size — Select the size of the directory dialog window
for this user. Select the FULL, HALF, QUARTER, or EIGHTH option to
assign a preference. Depending upon your selection, the window will
appear as the full height, half height, one quarter height, or one eighth
height of the screen. If you do not make a selection, then the default
(QUARTER) is used.
4
Window Presentation — Select how the presentation of the display
area, instrument area, and alarm area will appear to the operator. If you
select SINGLE, all of the areas will be arranged in a single window. If
you select SPLIT, each area appears as a separate window, which the
operator can arrange as desired. If you do not make a selection, then the
default (SINGLE) is used.
Note ... If you select SINGLE in the Window Presentation field, you can
place the instrument area on the left or right of the display area
using the Instrument Area Position field on this form.
Instrument Area Position — This field is disabled if the Window
Presentation field is set to SPLIT. If not, select the position of the
instrument area displayed for the operator. If you select LEFT, the area is
shown on the left of the display area; or RIGHT, on the right of the
display area. If you do not make a selection, then the default (RIGHT) is
used.
Macro Window Orientation — Select whether the macro window is
horizontal (wider than it is tall) or vertical.
Default Screen Template — Enter the name of the screen template that
in effect when the user first logs in to an operator session.
Color Palette v — Enter the name of a set of colors (color palette) to be
used in the Operator Workplace user interface. To determine the colors
used for DSR outline boxes, the instrument area, the main window area,
the alarm area, the menu bar, and the control buttons, type in a valid tag
with up to 12 characters (use upper-case characters if you are specifying
a user-definable palette, or lower-case for a system palette), or press the
values list key for a list of available color palette names. The list also
identifies the color palettes as either system or user-definable. If you do
not enter a name or tag, then the system “default” color palette is used.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
331
Note ... System color palettes are included with the ENVOX
configuration software and cannot be modified. You can define
and modify user-definable palettes with the Color Palette
Definition form (see subsection 4.10.3).
Max Windows — Enter an integer to set the maximum total number of
windows that this user can have open at the same time. The maximum
you set applies only to windows that open from the console software
Windows menu, with the following exceptions:
J
Message/Log
J
Shift Comments
J
Macro
Operators can always open these windows and windows that open from
other menus (the Summaries and Utilities menus, for example).
The number you enter should be low enough to ensure that console
resources will be available during a plant upset and high enough to allow
operators a sufficient number of windows to operate efficiently. Specify
the smallest practical number. The valid range is from 1 through 255. If
you do not enter a value, then the console software default (12) is used.
Note ... A number you enter in the Max Windows field is overridden by
any lower-number entry on the Max Windows field of the
Console Preferences form (see subsection 4.4.7).
If the operator tries to exceed the Max Windows number, an
error message appears and the operator must close a window
before opening another.
Initial Display v — Enter the tag of the display that appears when a
user logs-on to the console following a download or reboot. Type in a
valid tag with up to 12 letters, numbers, other characters (. , / --), or
spaces, or press the values list key for a list of display tags. If you do not
enter a value, then the Fisher-Rosemount Systems logo will be
displayed.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
332
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Display Stack Size — Enter an integer from 1 through 255 to specify
how many display names can appear in the display stack The display
stack lists the most recently selected displays so the operator can quickly
access one again by clicking on it with a pointing device. The operator
can also freeze the current contents of the list at his or her station.
To provide a list of displays long enough to include those most frequently
accessed, but not long enough to require extensive scrolling, specify the
smallest practical number. If you do not enter a value, then the default
(10) is used.
4
Display Update Interval — Enter an integer from 1 through 255
(seconds) to specify the frequency at which the system updates display
parameters for this user. If you do not enter a value, then the default (5)
is used.
Pointer Acceleration — Enter a number in the range of 1 through 99.
The Pointer Acceleration value determines the speed at which the
pointer moves across the screen. If you do not enter a value in this field
the server default settings determine the speed of the pointer.
Pointer Threshold — Enter a number in the range of 1 through 99.
Pointer threshold is the number of pixels the pointer must move before
the pointer acceleration takes effect.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.10.3
333
Color Palette Definition Form
Use the Color Palette Definition form (Figure 4-58) to specify colors used
by the Operator Workplace X-terminal for DSR outline boxes and
foreground and background colors of the instrument area, the main
window area, the alarm area, and the menu bar.
You can assign a different color palette to each user, if you like. Or you
can assign any one of several system color palettes included with the
ENVOX software. However, a system color palette cannot be modified.
4
X
Edit
Utilities
COLOR PALETTE DEFINITION
Target!
Extra Data
Help
ADD ____________
Description : ________________
Strategy : ________________
DSR Indication Color v : ________________
DSR Selection Color v : ________________
Foreground Color v
Background Color v
Instrument Area : ____________________
____________________
Main Window Area : ____________________
____________________
Alarm Area : ____________________
____________________
Menu Bar : ____________________
____________________
Control Buttons : ____________________
____________________
EV201
Figure 4-58.
Color Palette Definition Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
GLOBAL ITEMS —> USER PALETTE and entering a valid tag for this
form. This form can also be accessed from the User Preferences form if
the name entered in the Color Palette v field was not that of a system
color palette (see subsection 4.10.2). The access path for this alternative
is: Add —> GLOBAL ITEMS —> USER DEFINITIONS —> Extra Data
—> Preferences —> Extra Data —> Color Palette Defn.
Use the following information to define color palettes. Complete only one
form for each user.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
334
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen
and whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for
which you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you
are in. In this form, the Color Palette Definition tag appears.
4
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not
downloaded. Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use
during configuration.
Description — Enter a 12-character name or a tag for the color palette
you are assigning to the user interface.
Strategy — Enter a name that you may use to group related items in the
configuration database. The system does not check or process this text
in any way, but it may use this text to sort items by strategy fields. Enter
as many as 16 characters.
DSR Indication Color v — Enter a valid color name, or press the values
list key for a list of the 64 available colors. This field determines the color
of a DSR outline box when the operator points to the box (but has not
yet selected a particular DSR). If you do not enter a value, then the
default color is used.
DSR Selection Color v — Enter a valid color name, or press the values
list key for a list of the 64 available colors. This field determines the color
of a DSR outline box when the operator has selected a particular DSR. If
you do not enter a value, then the default color is used.
Instrument Area, Main Window Area, and Alarm Area (Foreground
Color v and Background Color v) — Enter a valid color name in each
of these fields, or press the values list key for a list of the 64 available
colors. These fields determine the foreground and background colors of
these areas on the Operator Workplace user interface screen. If you do
not enter a value, then the default foreground and background colors are
used.
Menu Bar (Foreground Color v and Background Color v) — Enter a
valid color name in each of these fields, or press the values list key for a
list of the 64 available colors. These fields determine the foreground and
background colors of the menu bar. If you do not enter a value, then the
default foreground and background colors are used.
Control Buttons (Foreground Color v and Background Color v) —
Enter a valid color name in each of the fields, or press the values list key
for a list of the 64 available colors. These fields determine the foreground
and background colors of the control buttons. If you do not enter a value,
then the default foreground and background colors are used.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.10.4
335
User Application List Form
Use the User Application List form (Figure 4-59) to list the software
applications this user can run from the Operator Workplace X-terminal.
Note ... You define the software applications listed on this form using
the Application Definition form (see subsection 4.10.6).
4
X
Edit
Utilities
USER APPLICATION LIST
Extra Data
Help
Target!
ADD ____________
No. Application v
1
____________
2
____________
3
____________
4
____________
5
____________
6
____________
7
____________
8
____________
9
____________
10
____________
11
____________
12
____________
13
____________
14
____________
15
____________
16
____________
EV203
Figure 4-59.
User Application List Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
GLOBAL ITEMS —> USER DEFINITIONS —> Extra Data —>
Application List.
Use the following information to list remote applications. Complete only
one form for each user.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
336
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen
and whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for
which you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you
are in. In this case, the User Definitions tag appears.
No. — This is a read-only field in which the system displays a number
indicating the sequence in which you enter the tag of a software
application. If you later delete an application tag, the system renumbers
the remainder of the list.
4
Application v — Enter a valid application tag, or press the values list
key for a list of available application tags and their names. This field
specifies a remote application this operator can run from the console.
4.10.5
User UDK List Form
Use the User UDK List form (Figure 4-60) to list the user-defined keys
(UDKs) this operator can use to execute a series of operations. You can
list up to 128 UDK tags on this form. Function keys should be uniquely
assigned to each user.
Note ... You define the UDKs listed on this form using the User Defined
Key form (see subsection 4.10.7).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
X
Edit
Utilities
USER UDK LIST
Target!
Extra Data
337
Help
ADD ____________
No.
UDK v
Key
1
_______________
_________
2
_______________
_________
3
_______________
_________
4
_______________
_________
5
_______________
_________
6
_______________
_________
7
_______________
_________
8
_______________
_________
9
_______________
_________
10
_______________
_________
11
_______________
_________
12
_______________
_________
13
_______________
_________
14
_______________
_________
15
_______________
_________
16
_______________
_________
4
EV205
Figure 4-60.
User UDK List Form Layout
Access this form from the ENVOX Top Level Form by selecting Add —>
GLOBAL ITEMS —> USER DEFINITIONS —> Extra Data —>
UDK List.
Use the following information to list the UDKs. Complete only one form
for each user.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen
and whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for
which you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you
are in. In this case, the User Definitions tag appears.
No. — This is a read-only field in which the system displays a number
indicating the sequence in which you enter the tag of a UDK. If you later
delete a UDK tag, the system renumbers the remainder of the list.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
338
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
UDK v — Enter a valid UDK tag, or press the values list key for a list of
available UDK tags and their names. This field is used to specify UDKs
for a particular operator.
If an invalid, duplicate, or non-existent UDK tag is entered, a warning is
reported. The User UDK List cannot be saved to the database if it
contains duplicate UDK tags.
4
Key — This is a read-only field that the system fills in automatically with
the name of the key mapped by the UDK listed in the corresponding
field.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.10.6
339
Application Definition Form
Use the Application Definition form (Figure 4-61) to specify a remote
application to be started from an Operator Workplace X-terminal.
Note ... The remote application defined using this form may be started
by any operator who has access to the application — provided
you included its tag in the User Application List form for that
user (see subsection 4.10.4).
The remote application can be launched from the Operator Workplace
utilities menu or from a custom display. A custom display can be
configured to have an application button element associated with a
remote application. The application can be started by any user that has
permission to access the application by selecting the application button
on the display (see Section 5 for details on building such a display).
APPLICATION DEFINITION
X
Edit
Utilities
Extra Data
Target!
Help
ADD ____________
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Strategy : ____________________
Application Name : _____________________________________________________
Application Command
___________________________________________________________________________
Remote Node Address : _______________
Operating System v : _______________
Terminal Required : .YES
NO
Password Required : .YES
NO
EV202
Figure 4-61.
Application Definition Form Layout
This form is a global form and can be accessed from the ENVOX Top
Level Form by selecting Add —> GLOBAL ITEMS —> APPLICATION
and entering a valid tag for this form.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
340
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Use the following information to configure the remote application.
Complete only one form for each application.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen
and whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for
which you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you
are in. In this instance, the Application Definition tag you entered
appears.
4
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not
downloaded. Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use
during configuration.
Strategy — Enter a name that you may use to group related items in the
configuration database. The system does not check or process this text
in any way, but it may use this text to sort items by strategy fields. Enter
as many as 16 characters.
Application Name — Enter up to 55 characters to specify how the
remote application will be named in the pop-up window. ENVOX software
stores this name in the same case you enter it. The operator can start
the application by selecting the name from the pop-up window.
Application Command — Enter up to 255 characters to specify the full
command string required to start the remote application. The command
string must include all necessary qualifiers and parameters. ENVOX
software stores this string in the same case you enter it.
Remote Node Address — Enter the address of the node on which the
remote application resides. The remote node must be reachable on the
network. Valid entries include a DECnet address for VMS systems, or a
TCP/IP address for UNIX systems.
Operating System v — Enter VMS or UNIX to specify the operating
system the remote application runs on.
Terminal Required — Indicate whether the remote application requires
user interface support at the operator’s station. Select YES if the
application requires a DECterm or an Xterm. Select NO if the application
manages its own window.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
341
Password Required — Select YES or NO to indicate whether or not the
the remote node account for this application requires the operator to use
a password.
Note ... Passwords are only valid for VMS remote applications.
4.10.7
4
User Defined Key Form
Use the User Defined Key form (Figure 4-62) to define a UDK (user
defined key) that an operator can use as a shortcut to perform some
routine task. Note that the definitions you create and the UDK operation
depend on the keyboard and X Server the Operator Station X Terminal
uses.
X
Edit
Utilities
USER DEFINED KEY
Extra Data
Target!
Help
ADD ____________
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Strategy : ________________
Button Label : ___________________________________
Function Key : .YES
NO
Modifier : .CTRL
ALT
SHIFT
META
Key : ____
No.
Operation Keyword v
Data
1
________________________________ ____________________
2
________________________________ ____________________
3
________________________________ ____________________
4
________________________________ ____________________
5
________________________________ ____________________
6
________________________________ ____________________
7
________________________________ ____________________
EV204
Figure 4-62.
User Defined Key Form Layout
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
342
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
This form is a global form and can be accessed from the ENVOX Top
Level Form by selecting Add —> GLOBAL ITEMS —> USER DEFINED
KEY and entering a valid tag for this form.
The UDKs you define using this form are available to operators (if the
UDK is included in their UDK lists) by the key or key combination you
define and by the click of the pointing device on a button in the Operator
Workplace Macros window. The Macros window button label for UDKs
you create will be the first of the following that is configured or defined:
4
1. The button label configured in the User Defined Key form
2. The key or key combination defined in the User Defined Key form
3. The UDK tag
Note ... The UDK you define with this form may be used by any
operator — provided you include the UDK’s tag in the User UDK
List form for that user (see subsection 4.10.5).
You define the UDK’s behavior with a series of operation keywords and
associated data. For example, the definition of a UDK that loads the
main display area with the display BOILER 1, selects the point LIC-1,
changes the point to MAN mode, changes the setpoint to 90.99, and
changes the point mode to AUTO mode looks like:
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
Operation Keyword v
DISPLAY.........................
POINT...........................
MAN.............................
ATTRIBUTE.......................
VALUE...........................
AUTO.......................
Data
BOILER 1.
LIC-1....
.........
SP.......
90.99....
The UDK can be assigned to a keyboard key, a Macros window
pushbutton, and a pushbutton element in a graphics display.
Use the following information to configure the UDK operation. Complete
only one form for each UDK.
ADD — This read-only field tells you the type of edit you have selected
for this form. Besides add, the edit types modify, delete, copy, or view
may appear in this area of the form, depending on the type of screen
and whether you have configured that screen. The name of the item for
which you are configuring this form appears next to the edit mode you
are in. In this instance, the User Defined Key tag you entered appears.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
343
The dashed line appearing between the ADD field and the other fields on
the form is a 75-character free-form comment line that is not
downloaded. Use this field to write prompts and reminders for your use
during configuration.
Strategy — Enter a name that you may use to group related items in the
configuration database. The system does not check or process this text
in any way, but it may use this text to sort items by strategy fields. Enter
as many as 16 characters.
Button Label — This is an optional field. You can enter up to 40
characters to specify a label for the UDK. What you enter in this field
appears on the screen as a label for a button in the Macros window. This
allows you to execute the UDK operation with a single click of the
primary button on a pointing device. The label may also appear in a
pushbutton display element if you use this UDK in a custom display (see
Section 5 for details on building displays with UDK elements).
Function Key — Indicate whether the operator can execute the UDK
operations by pressing a function key on the keyboard. If you select
YES, the Modifier and Key fields are enabled. If you select NO, the
Modifier and Key fields are disabled.
Modifier — Select a modifier key that the operator must press in
combination with a single character key specified in the Key field. The
available modifier keys are CTRL, ALT, SHIFT, and META.
You can also select a modifier key to precede a standard function key
(see the Key field description for exceptions).
Key — Enter a single character or a standard function key). Valid single
characters include letters, numbers, or any printable symbol (such as +,
#, and !). If you use a printable symbol you must use the CTRl, ALT, or
META modifier with it. You cannot use a printable symbol by itself or with
the SHIFT modifier.
Note ... Operator Workplace Operator Stations use two kinds of
keyboards: PC101 and LK401.
A UDK cannot be configured with more than one modifier and
one key selection.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
344
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Caution ... Do not assign UDKs to:
Keys or key combinations that result in printable characters
or symbols (A or Shift #, for example)
Keys that enter or edit text (Backspace, for example)
Keys or key combinations used by the Operator Workplace
software, X Windows, or the X Terminal server.
4
Table 4-7 lists, for the LK401 and PC101 keyboards, the keys and key
combinations that Operator Workplace software and its window manager
uses. Do not assign UDKs to these keys and key combinations.
Table 4-7.
LK401 and PC101 Reserved Keys
Category
Key/Combination
Function
Window
Mnemonics
Alt c
Alt e
Alt f
Alt h
Alt p
Alt r
Alt s
Alt u
Alt v
Alt w
User configured help
Edit
File
Help
Print
Preferences
Summaries
Utilities
View
Windows
Window
Accelerators
Ctrl a
Ctrl c
Ctrl l
Ctrl m
Ctrl r
Ctrl s
Show all DSRs
Clear
Login window
Messages/Log window
Refresh
Reset Display
Motif Window
Manager
Alt/Meta F3
Alt/Meta F4
Alt/Meta F5
Alt/Meta F7
Alt/Meta F8
Alt/Meta F9
Alt/Meta F10
Alt/Meta F12
Lower
Close
Restore
Move
Size
Minimize
Maximize
Transfer
X Terminal
Server
F1 (PC101 only)
F3 (LK401 only)
F10
F11
F13--20 (PC101 only)
F15 (LK401 only)
F16 (LK401 only)
Help
Launcher
Move to menu bar
Cancel/Escape
Not present on PC101
Help
Do
Others
(LK401 only)
Ctrl F3
Shift F1
Shift F2
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
345
The Operator Station X Terminal server may also define keys or key
combinations. Refer to the manual for the X Terminal server. Do not
assign UDKs to any key or key combination that the X Terminal server
uses.
No. — This is a read-only field in which the system displays a number (1
through 32) indicating the sequence in which you enter the Operation
Keyword value and its associated Data. If the list of keywords is not
contiguous, the data on this form cannot be saved to the database.
However, if you later delete a keyword, the system renumbers the
remainder of the list.
Operation Keyword v — Enter a valid keyword for an operation the
UDK performs, or press the values list key for a list of available
keywords. Keywords are available for typical operator functions such as
selecting a display, selecting a DSR number, or changing a point.
Table 4-8 lists the operation keywords that are implemented in Operator
Workplace software.
Table 4-8.
UDK Operation Keywords
Keyword
Data Type
Function
ACK ALARM
------
Acknowledges the alarm.
ACK HORN
------
Acknowledges the horn.
ATTRIBUTE
string
Sets up a subsequent UDK operation on the point in the
main instrument area.
AUTO
------
Changes the point in main instrument area to AUTO mode.
CLEAR
------
Clears the main instrument area and display area
COMPUTER
------
Changes the point in main instrument area to COMPUTER
mode.
DBI
#
Loads the point with the specified database index number
into the main instrument area.
DDC
------
Changes the point in main instrument area to DDC mode.
DISPLAY
string
Loads the main display area with the specified display.
DISPLAY NO
#
Loads the main display area with the display that has the
specified index number.
DSR
#
Selects the specified DSR on display in main display area.
LAST
------
Replaces current display in main display area with most
recently displayed display.
MANUAL
------
Changes the point in main instrument area to MAN mode.
OCCURRENCE
#
Uses the specified occurrence number with an attribute
loaded with a previous ATTRIBUTE keyword to set up a
subsequent UDK operation.
PAGE BACK
------
Replaces the current display in the main display area with
the display configured as display back.
PAGE FORWARD
------
Replaces the current display in the main display area with
the display configured as display forward.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
346
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Table 4-8.
4
UDK Operation Keywords (Continued)
Keyword
Data Type
Function
PAUSE
#
Pauses UDK execution for the specified number of seconds
(1 through 255).
POINT
string
Loads the point with the specified tag into the main
instrument area.
REFRESH
------
Refreshes the main display and main instrument area.
REMOTE APP
string
Starts the specified remote application.
RESET SCREEN
------
Removes all Operator Workplace windows except the main
display area, main instrument area, and alarm area.
RSP
------
Changes the point in main instrument area to RSP mode.
SCREEN TEMPLATE
string or blank
Applies the specified screen template. If no template
specified, opens the Screen Template dialog.
SHOW TREND
string or blank
Opens a new Trend window and loads the trend set with the
specified name. If no name is specified, loads the first trend
set containing a trace from the point in the main instrument
area.
SUP
------
Changes the point in main instrument area to SUP mode.
TOP ALARM
------
Loads the main instrument area with the point associated
with the highest-priority alarm and replaces the main display
with the corresponding alarm display.
TOP OAR
------
Loads the main instrument area with the point associated
with the highest-priority OAR and replaces the main display
with the corresponding display.
UDK CALL
string
Runs the specified UDK and returns.
VALUE
#
Sets the value of the point attribute (and occurrence, if any)
specified in previous operation.
Note:
The following keywords appear in the Ctrl V list but are not implemented in the Operator Workplace software:
ACK INTEG, ALARM LIST SUMM, ALARM SUMM, AUTOSWITCH, COMM FAIL SUMM, COMPRESS DB,
LOGIN NAME, LOGIN PASSWORD, NEW WINDOW, OAR SUMM, POINT SUMM, PRIMARY DISPLAY,
PRIMARY DISPLAY DBI, PRINT REPORT, PRINT REPORT NO, PRINT SHIFT CMTS, PRINT SUMM,
REFRESH CURRENT, RESYNC SUMM, SWITCHOVER, UPDATE DB, and UPDATE RATE.
Caution ... A UDK can include as many as 32 operations, including one to
call another UDK. However, the other UDK cannot, itself, call
another UDK.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
347
Data — Enter any data required by the associated Operation Keyword.
Table 4-8 lists the data types required for keywords valid for Operator
Workplace software. For example, the keyword POINT requires a point
tag in the Data field.
Note ... UDKs that attempt to change the value of DDP attributes
(DDPLOV, DDPLV, DDPROV, and DDPRV) will fail unless the
DDP is currently being polled.
4
Note ... A common mistake to avoid is entering the tag of the UDK you
are configuring in the Data field of a UDK CALL keyword. In
such cases, an error is reported.
If there is no data associated with a keyword, the system disables the
Data field on that line.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
348
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4.11
Utilities
The ENVOX configuration software provides a wide range of utilities that
let you generate, download, and document configuration data, and
manage the database. Other utilities help you test and debug control
strategies, and troubleshoot instrument faults.
4
Two utilities are closely related to configuration of the Operator Workplace
console; the Copy Console Configuration utility is described in this
subsection and the Graphics Display Editor is described in Section 5.
Note ... For detailed descriptions of the ENVOX configuration utilities,
refer to Using ENVOX Configuration Software (UM6.1:SW3151)
manual.
ENVOX TOP LEVEL FORM
Required
[Utilities]
COPY CONSOLE CONFIGURATION
Optional
GRAPHICS DISPLAY EDITOR
Optional (See Section 5)
KEY
FORM NAME
[MENU]
Figure 4-63.
-- ENVOX Form
-- Menu Choice Paths to Forms
ENVOX Forms Map for WPCON Utilities
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
4.11.1
349
Copy Console Configuration Form
Use the Copy Console Configuration form (Figure 4-64) to copy a
complete Operator Workplace console configuration. This utility creates a
device definition for a new Operator Workplace console, replicates the
data from the existing console, and makes the data part of the new
console. Note the following:
J
J
J
J
X
Copy!
The console being copied to must not exist before using the Copy
Console Configuration utility.
The Copy Console Configuration utility does not copy the highway
address. You must modify the new console device definition to specify
the highway address.
The Copy Console Configuration utility does not copy hosted points
such as activities and accumulations, but will target these points to
the new console.
Once a console configuration has been copied, modifying the device
definition of either console does not affect the configuration of the
other console. Note that the clone option on the console device form
does establish a relationship between consoles that causes their
configurations to track in this manner.
View Source!
COPY CONSOLE CONFIGURATION
Help
COPY CONSOLE
Copy from v:
Copy to
v:
Type
Processing #
Copy to
Status
out of #
Copy
EV068
Figure 4-64.
Copy Console Configuration Form Layout
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
4
350
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
Be aware that there are certain types of data that, if copied, can cause
errors. The following lists data that should receive special attention to
avoid such errors:
J
J
4
J
J
J
J
J
J
Index Numbers — Index numbers, such as those for operations,
must be unique throughout the system. When copying items that have
an index, the software assigns a new index number to the destination
item.
PPA Number — The PPA number on the PPA Definition form must be
unique throughout the system. The software sets this field to null in
the destination item.
User Password — the password for any user definition must be
unique throughout the system. The software sets this field to null in
the destination item.
Instrument Signal File-Card-Channel — In some circumstances it is
invalid to have more than one instrument signal referencing the same
file-card-channel (for example, the file-card-channel references for
each instrument signal associated with a MUX device). The software
sets the file-card-channel fields to null in the destination item.
Instrument Signal Tag — An instrument signal must be unique for
each MUX point. Although it is not invalid to have an instrument signal
referenced by more than one UOC point, it is not a usual situation.
The system does not copy instrument signals specified for a UOC or
MUX.
Device Address — The device address must be unique for each
device. When you copy a device using Overwrite, the system does
not copy the device address.
Slave Devices — Slave devices can only be defined once throughout
the system. The software does not copy slave devices from a console
system clock list to the destination item.
Console Device Redundancy fields — The system does not copy
the Secondary Console and Parent Console field values to the
destination device. The software sets the Clone field in the destination
device to NO.
Access the Copy Console Configuration form from the ENVOX Top Level
Form by selecting Utilities —> Copy Console Configuration.
Use the following information to copy an Operator Workplace console
configuration to another console.
Copy from v — Enter the tag of the console you cant to copy from, or
press the values list field for a list of valid tags and their names.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Creating the Console Configuration F Section 4
351
Copy to v — Enter the tag of the console you wish to create, or press the
values list field for a list of valid tags and their names.
Type — This field is filled in automatically if you selected the tag for the
device you want to copy from the values list field. Otherwise, enter the
name for the device type in this field (for example, WPCON).
Processing # ... out of # ...
Copy to
Status
4
Copy
These are all read-only fields that let you confirm that you have selected
the correct consoles, and that the system is ready to made the copy.
To start the copy process, select Copy! on the menu bar. The software
prompts you with a Confirm Action pop-up window, allowing you to
proceed or cancel the copy operation.
4.11.2
Graphics Display Editor
The Graphics Display Editor is described in detail in Section 5.
Access the Graphics Display Editor from the ENVOX Top Level Form by
selecting Utilities —> Display Editor.
Once the Graphics Display Editor screen appears, select the SET
mode-specific menu WPCON option (see subsection 5.3.4.4).
Use a pointing device to click on the WPCON option, or press the key
corresponding to yellow softkey number S5 (and repeat, if necessary)
until the following message appears in the scrolled message area of the
screen:
WPCON options not suppressed
Note ... WPCON (Workplace Console) is a naming convention used in
the ENVOX P3.2 software for forms and menu options that are
used solely to configure the DC9440-Series Operator Workplace
Console Software.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
352
Section 4 F Creating the Console Configuration
4
Blank page.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
353
Figure 5-Table 5
5
5 Using the Graphics Display Editor
This section introduces you to the Graphics Display Editor software, and:
J
J
J
J
Describes the theory of building and organizing graphics displays for
operators to use
Describes the screen areas, menus, and color and function indicators
Explains how to access the software, how to navigate with a pointing
device or keyboard, and how to manipulate the displays
Describes how to use the SET, ADD, EDIT, and FILE modes and
their specific menu options to accomplish most configuration tasks
J
Describes how to modify display elements, attributes, and colors
J
Describes how to use graphics display conditionals effectively
The Graphics Display Editor software runs as part of the ENVOXr
software and is used to configure graphics displays. The Graphics
Display Editor software is interactive; all additions or modifications to a
display are shown as you make them. Once you have finished creating
the displays, referencing them in a display list, and generated the rest of
the configuration, the displays are subsequently downloaded to the
Operator Workplace console. After downloading, they become part of the
information available to console operators.
Note ... The maximum number of displays you can configure is 77 for a
500-point console, 212 for a 2000-point console, and 1,050 for
a 10,000-point console.
The following subsections describe how you, the configuration engineer,
can use the Graphics Display Editor to create console displays that will
focus the operators’ attention on critical areas to monitor and control the
PROVOXr system.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
354
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
5.1
Building Displays
When you create a display, it is usually for one of two reasons:
J
To provide general information to plant personnel
J
To allow control of the plant process by the operators
Because there are two main reasons for creating displays, there are two
main types of displays:
J
5
J
General displays convey overview information. Such displays are not
extremely detailed, usually, and are primarily for reference by plant
personnel or possibly visitors. For example, one general display may
be a block diagram of the plant layout and another a set of 100 or
more bar graphs indicating point statuses.
Detailed displays provide as much information as is necessary to
control a specific area of a plant. For example, one of these control
displays might be a graphical representation of a reactor and its
associated equipment, or a set of 12 faceplates for the reactor and
equipment. Such displays usually contain a great deal of information.
The operator should have a lot of input about the content of his or her
control displays. Consult with the operators when you are building
displays. Get his or her thoughts and ideas about how you should
arrange the display elements and visually represent the data. The
complexity of the display should depend on the operator’s level of
expertise, and may need to be changed as the operator’s skill level and
knowledge increase.
5.1.1
Using Static, Dynamic, and Motif Elements in Displays
When you build a display, you can add static, dynamic, and Motif
elements. Static elements do not change in a display. Static elements
are lines, boxes, circles, arcs, polygons, text-strings, and Instrument
Society of America (ISA) symbols.
Dynamic elements are associated with changing process values. The
dynamic components of a display are bar graphs, deviation bar graphs,
value displays, and color conditionals. You can use dynamic bar graphs
for faceplates as well as to simulate process conditions such as
changing tank levels or flow through pipes. (You can also make static
elements dynamic by using conditionals to change their colors.)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
355
Motif elements are graphic objects that allow the user to perform actions
directly using a pointing device such as a mouse, trackball, or touch
screen. This is in contrast to static and dynamic elements in which the
user indirectly specifies actions. Motif elements are scrolled text fields;
entry fields; slider bars; mode set, discrete, and OneOfN windows; push
buttons; and scrolled lists.
Try to decide which elements you want to be static, dynamic, and Motif
before building the display.
5.1.2
Using Colors in Displays
Also, before building a display, you should consider which colors you
want to use. You have 64 screen colors to work with. The system
determines some color combinations when you create conditional color
and text expressions; you can select others.
Colors can greatly enhance a display and increase its usefulness. You
may use a particular color to indicate a specific condition, or a certain
part of your process. For example, you might choose red to indicate a
critical situation and green to indicate normal operating conditions. The
console uses magenta to indicate stale data.
If the operator uses either the color or black-and-white printing
capabilities of the Operator Workplace software, be sure to read
subsection 3.7 on printers. Some colors do not show up well on the
printout if they are used with other colors. Be especially careful in setting
up color-on-color conditionals in displays and reports you plan to print.
Both color and black-and-white printers have a narrower range of color
translations than the screen does.
Also, some operators who use the displays you build may be color-blind.
People who have a red-green deficiency (that is, they cannot distinguish
between the two) see the screen colors magenta and cyan as the same.
If you are not familiar with the appropriate color selections to
compensate for color blindness, check with your plant safety or medical
office for clarification.
5.1.3
Organizing Displays
You can logically arrange displays and create a sensible path through
them when you define a display list for a console. If you have displays
that are closely related or progressive in detail, arrange them so that the
operator can logically step through the displays. Continue this path when
you complete the Operator Display List form (see subsection 4.4.3).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
356
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Fisher-Rosemount Systemsr recommends that you either order the
displays as:
J
Mirror images — Paging forward and then back cancel each other
or
J
Supplemental detail — Paging back always goes to a specific
display showing greater detail than the current display
For example, you may link the displays in the Operator Display List form
so that when the operator accesses a display by paging forward, then
pages back, it behaves like paging last (that is, the last display shown
before is re-displayed).
5
On the other hand, you may want to page forward through a series of
process displays, but page back to a specific trend or detail display. You
have the option of setting the paths either way—mirror image or
supplemental detail; just make sure that the paths are logical in both
directions.
5.1.3.1
Using Display Paths and Hierarchies
Paging forward and back is one method you can use to group related
displays and establish a general sequence for your display strategy.
However, you may be able to more accurately represent your system’s
information using a display hierarchy in conjunction with paging forward
and back. This is a particularly useful feature if you have a large,
complex system to portray.
Another reason for using a display hierarchy is the need to logically
divide information because you cannot put it all on one display. A
hierarchy is a way of organizing your displays by levels so that each
lower level is subordinate to the preceding level. Typically, the lower level
contains more detail than the previous level and refers to a particular
section of the previous level. By using a display hierarchy, the operator
can progress through the displays in a logical manner (see Figure 5-1).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
357
Overview Display
1
Holding
Tank
Holding Tank
Graphic Display
1
2
DSRs
2
3
Reactor
Centrifuge
Reactor
Graphic Display
3
1
2
Centrifuge
Graphic Display
3
1
2
3
5
Faceplate
Interlock
Text
Faceplate
Interlock
Text
Faceplate
Interlock
Text
X00191:DC6460--0
Figure 5-1.
Example Display Hierarchy
To create a display hierarchy, consider the levels of detail or complexity
that your information requires. This is much like solving any complex
problem; you must break the problem into pieces that you can deal with
and use effectively.
After you have logically divided and subdivided the information, start at
the top-level and create a general display that contains an element
relating to each subordinate display. You may wish to make this general
display an overview display. Attached to these elements, you should
create a display direct screen reference (DSR) that refers to the
subordinate display in the next level down in detail.
Using the DSR, your operator can go straight to the display associated
with the element. Next, create the necessary subordinate displays with
their components. Depending on the complexity of your system and the
information that you wish to convey, you may need to create several
levels for your hierarchy.
You may use display hierarchies for many different objectives. A
common use of the display hierarchy is for console maintenance
information. If you have a large or complex system, you may not be able
to represent all of the maintenance information on one display. Instead,
you might create a maintenance display representing all the areas of
your plant, and subordinate displays representing the specific areas.
From the first level maintenance display, the operator could select a
specific area using the DSR of the display for that area.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
358
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
In the area display, you might have components that represent individual
control rooms. In the control room display, you might have individual
cabinets, and in the cabinets display, you might have individual devices.
By using this display hierarchy, the operator could access the
maintenance information for all of the points in your system.
A similar hierarchy might be used to move from a plant overview, to an
area, to a specific reactor or vessel.
5.1.3.2
5
Using Consistent Patterns in Display Hierarchies
If you have several display hierarchies in your console configuration,
establish a pattern in these hierarchies to ensure consistency. Such a
consistent pattern is helpful to the operator and reduces training time.
You might even create User Defined Keys (UDKs), or macros, to help the
operator follow the pattern that you establish (see subsection 4.10.7 for
details).
With the display hierarchies, UDKs or macros, and paging, you can
make a complex system much easier for your operator to manage and
access.
As an example, suppose your system had a process train containing a
holding tank, a reactor, and a centrifuge. You might create an overview
graphics display representing the entire process train. This overview
display could contain three display DSRs for accessing graphics displays
representing the holding tank, reactor, and centrifuge.
For each of these major pieces of equipment, you might create:
J
J
J
A faceplate display containing the critical points for controlling that
equipment
An interlock-indication display reflecting the status of equipment
interlocks
A text display that alphabetically lists the points associated with that
piece of equipment, or that provides help information to the operator
in the event that common problems occur.
You might make the graphics display the top-level display for that piece
of equipment, and the other three displays subordinate. Creating these
same types of displays for each major piece of equipment establishes
consistency for the operator.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
359
You should also create consistency in the method the operator uses to
access these displays. Suppose that on each graphics display for a
piece of equipment you include three display DSRs: 1 refers to the
faceplate display, 2 to the interlock display, and 3 to the text display. Also
assume that on the top-level graphics display for each of the three
pieces of equipment, you use the same DSR numbers: 1 for each of the
faceplate displays, 2 for each of the interlock displays, and 3 for each of
the text displays associated with this equipment. Refer to Figure 5-1 for a
graphic representation of this example.
As long as you use the same number for the DSR of a particular display
type, you could then create a macro that accesses the faceplate display,
the interlock display, or the text display regardless of the equipment that
your operator is viewing.
The display paging functions can also help your operator control a
complex system. For instance, using the same example, you might
define paging forward and back to take the operator from one screen to
the next on the same level of the hierarchy. When the operator is viewing
one of the subordinate displays, he or she might then access the
higher-level display by selecting a display DSR that you create to
reference the next level up the hierarchy.
There are countless combinations of display hierarchies, macros, and
display paging features you can use. Using patterns for consistency is a
very useful and effective tool to help your operator control a large
process. Look at different ways to divide your system logically and see
what works best for your application.
5.1.4
Using #CURRENT or Point Tags
You can enter #CURRENT in places where the display editor asks for a
point tag when creating graphics displays. When the operator calls up
such a display and has a point selected, the console presents the
display as if it had been created using that point’s tag.
By creating displays using #CURRENT you reduce the number of custom
displays you must define. If you have a custom display that is common
for several points, use #CURRENT instead of a point tag. Be careful not
to use text or other elements that are specific to a particular point tag in
a display, faceplate, or window where you entered #CURRENT.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
360
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
5.1.5
Using #STATIONx
Use #STATIONx (where x is in the range of 1 through 16) on a display
to identify the user currently logged onto a particular operator station. For
example, #STATION2 displays the user name for the user currently
logged onto operator station 2 of the Operator Workplace console. If no
one is currently logged onto that operator station, ### will be displayed.
(This tag is used in conjunction with the attribute STATUSER.)
5.1.6
5
Effects of Displays on CPU Load and Draw Times
The size and content of displays affect both the load on the console’s
CPU and the time required to draw the display.
The effect a display has on the console’s CPU load is determined by
these factors:
J
J
J
J
Number of display elements — As would be expected, the greater
the number of graphic elements on a display, the more complex the
display will be and the longer it will take to draw. The type of display
element also affects the display complexity. A dynamic element takes
longer to draw than a static element; the dynamic element must do a
database access to get the information and then possibly a
conditional expression before displaying the data. A standard graphic
element such as a line, circle, or box is much easier to draw than a
Motif widget such as a slider or text entry field.
Number of Motif widgets
Number of database accesses — Dynamic elements configured on
the screen represent a value in the OWP console’s database. When a
dynamic element is initially drawn or is being updated, a database
access must be made to obtain the value for displaying. Each database
access places some load on the CPU.
Number and configuration of conditional elements
Factors affecting the display draw time include:
J
J
OWP CPU free time — The amount of CPU free time directly affects
the time required to draw a display. If the CPU is heavily loaded,
there are not enough CPU cycles to draw the display quickly.
Subsection 3.10.1 contains more information on CPU loading.
Display complexity — Display complexity is difficult to determine. A
display may look relatively simple, but may in fact be very demanding
on the OWP console due to the number of database accesses and
conditional expressions. Likewise , a display that fills the display area
with static graphics and very few dynamic elements may look
complex but in fact be simple from the OWP console’s standpoint.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
J
J
361
Network topology/loading — A heavily loaded network can result in
increased display draw times due to high bandwidth utilization and an
increased number of collisions and subsequent packet
retransmissions. Both of these conditions can be minimized by
correct network installation using routers/bridges and by following
FRSI recommendations and standard network installation practices.
X Terminal resources — Just as a heavily loaded console CPU will
increase the display draw times, a heavily loaded X Terminal will also
slow down display drawing. X Terminal load is caused by the number
of windows and additional applications running. Additional
applications may consume too much memory and prevent an OWP
window from opening.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
362
5.2
Overview of the Graphics Display Editor
The Graphics Display Editor screen area is divided into 12 main parts, as
illustrated in Figure 5-2 and described in the following subsections.
Graphic Display
Window
Overlaid Selection Menu
or Help Information
(not shown)
Function
Menu
Color Modify
Area
Color Settings
Area
abc
abc
5
Select to Open
Page 1
1--- . . . . DISPLAY---1
2--- . . . . FIC---101B
3--- . . . . PLANT---AREA---2
4--- . . . . PLANT---OVERVW
5--- . . . . MIXING---TANK
fill / no fill
...
9
LoadDis LoadBuf Restore
3999 free
[?]
Delete
courier
[ Pg---]
MAINTENANCE
Text Input Scrolled
Number of
Current
Area
Message Free Elements Font
Area
Indicator
Figure 5-2.
Modify Element
Modify Color
Modify Size
Modify Font
Modify Motif
Move
Cancel
Find position
Unmake conditnl
Zoom Out / Prev
Zoom In / Next
Zoom to 511x389
-- -- -- HELP -- -- --
[Pg+]
Save to
abc
Close
Exit
Open
New
Print
View
511 x 389 x1.00 FILE ADD EDIT SET
Display Display
Name
Size
Indicator Indicator
MagnifiMode
Mode
cation
Specific Selection
Factor Menu Options Menu
Graphics Display Editor Screen Area on the Configuration
Workstation
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
5.2.1
363
Graphics Display Window
The main portion of the Graphics Display Editor screen area is the
electronic easel on which you design displays. Except for a cursor that
points to the center of the window and the date and time in the upper
right corner, the graphics display window is blank when it first appears.
You can move the cursor within this window to position graphic elements.
The types of elements you can include in a graphics display window are:
J
J
Common geometric shapes (line, box, circle, arc, and polygon) and
text strings, all known as graphic primitives
Instrument Society of America (ISA) process-control symbols
Common graphic shapes, text strings, and ISA symbols can be
assigned any color. The box, circle, arc, and polygon can be filled
with any color or left unfilled. You can size and rotate most of these
elements.
These common shapes, text strings, and ISA symbols are static
elements. However, they can be made dynamic or conditional by
having their colors change, depending upon the value of a process
attribute or a change in a process condition, respectively.
J
Dynamic elements, which provide graphic representations of
changing process attribute values, include:
j Bar graphs — which show the value of a process attribute
j Deviation bar graphs — which show the difference between two
process attributes
j Value displays — which use numbers or text to show the value of
a process attribute
Usually these elements also include dynamic color selections.
Typically, dynamic elements represent attributes of process variables
and setpoints.
J
Motif elements, which allow the user to perform actions directly using
a pointing device such as a mouse, trackball, or touch screen,
include:
j Entry fields — which display floating point values, and allow them
to be edited and written to the highway
j Slider bars — which display the value of attributes as
percentages of engineering units, and allow them to be changed
and written to the highway
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
364
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
j Mode set windows — which change the mode push buttons for
points
j Discrete windows — which display binary value point and
attribute items
j OneOfN windows — which display items with multiple discrete
choices
j Push buttons — which initiate a “one shot” action
j Scrolled lists — which display a list of items of indeterminate
length
5
j Scrolled text fields — which display large strings of ASCII text
Motif elements are used in the instrument area of the Operator
Workplace software’s Main Screen, and pertain only to limited sets of
points and their attributes. Only the scrolled text fields and entry
fields have additional uses, as described in Table 5-10.
J
Conditional elements, which change color or text on the display
based on a process condition
A condition is a comparison of a console database value (point,
attribute, and, if applicable, occurrence) to another database value or
to a constant. The appearance of the display changes depending
upon the conditions you have defined. For example, if a process
variable rises above its set-point value, then you can have a box on
the display appear in red; otherwise the box is blue.
J
Faceplates, which show the most important information about a
process control point
When you add a faceplate, a template of a predefined size and
shape appears on the screen so that you can see how it looks and
how big it is. You must then place the faceplate at the desired
location in the display.
You can also design your own faceplates of custom size and
containing information specific to your needs.
Faceplates are divided into two main categories:
j Control point faceplates contain predefined dynamic fields that
indicate the values for certain attributes of the point that does the
control function, the mode of the point, and any alarms that might
be active on the point. These points generally display process
information.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
365
j Non-control faceplates include faceplates for plant management
areas (PMAs), plant process areas (PPAs), maintenance points,
and integrity points. The PMA and PPA faceplates give the
operator a view of alarm conditions, and the maintenance and
integrity faceplates indicate device conditions to the operator.
J
Information and control windows
Fields in these windows can show:
j Alarm information
j Status information
j Trends, which appear as big pushbuttons that you can click on to
access Motif-based windows
You also can configure these windows so the operator can use them
for direct screen references (DSRs), that is, for moving directly from
one display to another or for selecting a point.
Note ... Detail display parameters (DDPs) can be downloaded, but are
ignored by the Operator Workplace software.
J
Header information
Headers allow you to establish the names and basic characteristics
of displays. Such characteristics include background color and
whether the time and date appear in the display. You can configure
only one header for each display.
In addition to creating the display elements described in this subsection,
you can also:
J
J
J
J
Modify background and foreground colors from a palette of 64 colors,
some of which are available in dim shades or flashing
Move display elements and change the size of symbols, but not
shapes (boxes, circles, polygons, and so forth)
Magnify portions of a display
Make the appearance of display items depend on whether some
condition you specify is true or false
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
366
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Note ... The following subsections refer to areas of the Graphics Display
Editor screen, illustrated in Figure 5-2.
5.2.2
Overlaid Selection Menus
Overlaid selection menus appear over a portion of the graphics displays.
Primarily they are used to list options for FILE mode operations (see
subsection 5.4.4 for details). See subsection 5.3.4.5 for ways to scroll
through the menu pages and select items.
5
5.2.3
Overlaid Help Information
Help is provided for every operation in a Graphics Display Editor session.
Two types of help are provided:
J
General help — displays all the available menu options in the current
mode of operation when Help is selected for a primary menu option,
or for most secondary options.
For example, if you select the EDIT mode, then Help, all the possible
edit options are displayed. If the color modify area is currently active,
then selecting Help lists the colors available (for color-blind users).
J
Specific help — provides information about valid entries for specific
fields when Help is selected during an operation.
For example, if the operator text input area is active when you select
Help, then the available options for the current field are displayed.
5.2.4
Color Settings Area
The color settings area indicates the current default color settings. A
small box on the left shows the default outline color and fill color for
graphic elements. A text string (ABC) on the right shows the default
colors for text and its background strip.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
5.2.5
367
Color Modify Area
The color modify area contains buttons for selecting from a pallet of 64
colors. Some colors are available in dim shades or blinking. There is also
a fill / nofill indicator. If you select one or more display elements, then
click on a color button, the outline of each selected element changes
color. Similarly, if you select elements, click on the fill / nofill indicator
and then on a color button, each selected element is filled with the
chosen color. If no elements are selected, then changing the color only
affects the default colors.
5.2.6
Function Menu
The function menu area lists universal options to manipulate display
elements. You can select an option by clicking on it with a pointing
device. Table 5-1 lists the available options and their functions.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
368
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-1.
Graphics Display Editor Function Menu
Options
When You Select
The Display Editor...
This Option...
Modify Element
5
5.2.7
Allows you to modify non-geometric attributes of a:
J
Display element
J
ISA symbol
J
Text element
J
Polygon (open or closed)
Modify Color
Allows you to modify the color of most display elements
Modify Size
Allows you to modify the size of the selected display element
Modify Font
Allows you to change the size of selected text as well as
toggle whether the text is bold and italic
Modify Motif
Allows you to modify the Motif resource attributes of Operator
Workplace elements
Move
Allows you to move selected elements
Cancel
Cancels the current operation
Find position
Moves the cursor to a specified X, Y position
Unmake conditnl
Cancels the conditions determining the appearance of a
selected element
Zoom Out / Prev
Redraws the display at its normal size, or goes to the previous
option/attribute
Zoom In / Next
Magnifies the display to twice its current size, or goes to the
next option/attribute
Zoom to 511x389
Zooms the display to 511 by 389 pixels (this ensures that text
is legible on displays that have been changed to be larger than
the standard 511 by 389 pixels)
Help
Displays specific help on your current operation, or allows you
to view a general help display.
Mode Selection Menu
The mode selection menu area is divided into spaces for the four modes
(FILE, ADD, EDIT, and SET). Selecting a mode causes the mode
specific menu options to change on the line above (see subsections
5.2.8 and 5.4).
5.2.8
Mode Specific Menu Options
The mode-specific menu options area extends across the screen area
below the graphics display window and the function menu. This area is
divided into three groups of four option spaces each, separated by two
smaller blank spaces. The 12 menu options are laid out in the same
order as their corresponding 12 function keys on the keyboard (see
subsection 5.3.3 for details).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
369
In addition, each set of four menu options appears in one of three colors,
depending upon which block of function keys is to be used:
J
White for function keys F7--F10
J
Yellow for function keys F11--F14
J
Cyan for function keys F17--F20
The ADD and SET modes each have more than 12 menu options, so
arrows (<-- and -->) appear in the far left and right option spaces.
Clicking on an arrow brings up another set of menu options.
5.2.9
Magnification Factor
Any selected portion of the graphics display window at its original size
can be magnified by selecting the Zoom In function. The magnification
factor space shows the number by which the original size is multiplied
(for example, x4.0 indicates four levels of zooming in). When the Zoom
Out function is selected, the graphics display returns to its original size
(that is, x1.0).
5.2.10
Display Size Indicator
The display size indicator shows the size of the current graphics display
window expressed in pixels (from 50x50 to 2048x2048 pixels,
inclusive). Clicking on the display size indicator prompts you for the
desired resolution.
5.2.11
Display Name Indicator
When you open a display, you are prompted for a display tag. The
system checks to see if the name you entered matches an existing
database display and if it is unlocked, meaning the display is not in use
by another user (that is, OPENed in the Graphics Display Editor or being
generated). If that is the case, the system brings up the display and its
name appears in the display name indicator space. Otherwise, the
display name indicator will show Un-named.
Note ... Only one person at a time can edit a particular display. The
system locks the display being worked on to prevent multiple
users from accessing the display.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
370
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
5.2.12
Number of Free Elements Indicator
The number of free elements indicator shows how many display
elements you can add to the current display. The ENVOX software
version P3.3 sets a limit of 4,000 elements per display; however, the real
limit is the size of the Operator Workplace download data, which cannot
exceed 64 kilobytes per display. The actual number of elements that you
can configure varies depending upon the element types (that is, the
download data size per element type varies greatly). Therefore, it is
unlikely that you will be able to generate a display with 4,000 elements
unless they are very simple.
The size of the download data per display is given in the Generate
report, which is created when displays are generated. Therefore,
periodically regenerating the Operator Workplace device is a good idea,
if possible, as you develop the displays.
5
5.2.13
Scrolled Message Area
The scrolled message area can contain up to three lines of information at
a time. Three types of messages can be displayed:
J
J
J
Error messages (shown in white text on a red background, with two
audible beeps)
Warning messages (shown in yellow text on a black background, with
one beep)
Information messages (shown in white text on a black background,
with no beep)
At the end of the operation, the scrolled message area is cleared.
5.2.14
Text Input Area (or Status Information Area)
The text input area is where you respond to prompts and view system
information. Typical prompts that might appear in this area include:
Enter display tag “ ”
and
Faceplate on “?” DSR#1
In the first example, you can enter a new tag. In the second example, the
cursor appears over the first character of the existing tag so you can edit
it, or enter a new tag (see subsection 5.5.2 for details on editing
non-geometric attributes).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
371
When in the SET mode, the following types of status information might
be shown:
5.3
J
Default attribute
J
Default occurrence
J
Default tag
J
Auto-modify status indicator (ON or OFF)
J
Auto-update status indicator (ON or OFF)
J
Flash suppression indicator (ON or OFF)
J
Status of conditionals (displayed TRUE or FALSE)
Using the Graphics Display Editor Interface
This section explains how to access the Graphics Display Editor
software, how to navigate with a pointing device or a keyboard, and how
to manipulate displays.
5.3.1
Accessing the Graphics Display Editor Software
If the ENVOX configuration software is already running, all you need to
do to access the Graphics Display Editor is follow these steps:
1. Go to the ENVOX Top-Level Form
2. Select the Utilities pull-down menu
3. Select the Display Editor option
4. Once the Graphics Display Editor screen appears, select the SET
mode-specific menu WPCON option (see subsection 5.3.4.4).
5. Use a pointing device to click on the WPCON option, or press the
key corresponding to yellow softkey number S5 (and repeat, if
necessary) until the following message appears in the scrolled
message area of the screen:
WPCON options not suppressed
Note ... WPCON (Workplace Console) is a naming convention used in
the ENVOX P3.2 software for forms and menu options that are
used solely to configure the DC9440-Series Operator
Workplace Console Software.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
372
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
5.3.2
Using a Pointing Device
The Graphics Display Editor supports the use of a mouse, track-ball, or
touch-screen as the primary means of navigation and selection within the
software.
The mouse or trackball must have three function buttons as well as
cursor positioning capability. Since some pointing devices can be
reconfigured for left- or right-handed users, the three function buttons
are identified in this manual as the primary, center, and secondary
buttons. Their functions are:
J
5
Primary button — This button (left button on right-handed mouse)
allows you to:
j Take action (equivalent to Do, Enter, or Return)
j Select an option from menus, including the function menu,
overlaid menus, or the color modify area
j Pick an element (equivalent to pressing Enter twice)
j Pick a box (rubber banding can be achieved by positioning the
cursor, holding down the button and moving the cursor to a
diagonally opposite corner, then releasing the button)
j Mark a position (used to mark reference positions)
j Modify an element (by pressing the button when the cursor is in
the scrolled message area or the operator input area)
J
J
Center button — This button is used only when the cursor is in the
graphics display window. In this window, you can move selected
element(s) by pressing and holding the button, moving the cursor to
the desired location, then releasing the button (equivalent to the
EDIT mode-specific menu’s Move option).
Secondary button — This button (right button on right-handed
mouse) is operational only when the cursor is in the graphics display
window. In this window, the button allows you to:
j Cancel the current operation
j Deselect all elements (equivalent to Unpick All)
j Complete a polygon (equivalent to pressing Enter twice to select
the Polygon option from the ADD mode-specific menu)
j Complete setting colors for certain SET mode options
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
5.3.3
373
Using a Keyboard
ENVOX configuration software version P3.2 and later supports multiple
operating systems and hardware platforms, and three types of
keyboards: DEC, IBM, and HP. See Figure 5-3, Figure 5-4, and
Figure 5-5 for keyboard layouts, and Table 5-2 for keys to use with the
Graphics Display Editor.
Note ... Only 12 function keys are used with the Graphics Display Editor.
The F1 through F6 keys on the DEC keyboard are not used.
5
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F8
F9
F10
F11
F12 F13 F14
------------ Yellow ------------
Figure 5-3.
Do
Nxt
Scr
Zoom
Unpick Out /
Zoom In
All
Prv Fld / Nxt Fld
Select Prv
Scr
Find
Modify
Position Element Cancel
Find Insert ReHere move
Help
5
F7
------------ While --------------
a
2
0
Show
Position
1
5
4
Home
8
Add
7
File
.
3
6
9
Edit
Enter
Move
,
--
Modify
Color
Set
PF1 PF2 PF3 PF4
F17 F18 F19 F20
------------ Cyan --------------
374
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
y
'
b
DEC Keyboard Layout For Graphics Display Editor
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Esc
F1
F2
F3
F4
------------ While -------------F5
F6
F7
F8
------------ Yellow -------------F9
F10
F11
F12
------------ Cyan ----------------
Figure 5-4.
Cancel
Unpick
All
Zoom
In /
Nxt Fld
Delete End Page
Down
Prv
Scr
Insert Home Page
Up
Help
a
2
Home
5
8
0 Show
Position
1
4
7
Num
/
Lock
File Add
3
6
Enter
Move
+
Set
Edit
9
-*
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
375
.
y
'
b
IBM Keyboard Layout For Graphics Display Editor
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
F4
F6
F7
F8
Figure 5-5.
Unpick
All
Select
F5
F3
F1
Zoom
In /
Nxt Fld
Next
Zoom
Out /
Prv Fld
2
0 Show
Position
1
Home
5
4
Prev
Find
Position
8
7
Cancel
/
Add
*
File
3
6
9
Move
,
Enter
-Set
+
Edit
------------ Cyan ----------------
Insert Delete
char char
Modify
Element
Insert Delete
line
line
Help
5
F2
------------ Yellow --------------
------------ While --------------
376
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
.
y
a
'
b
HP Keyboard Layout For Graphics Display Editor
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-2.
377
Graphics Display Editor Key Definitions
DEC
IBM
HP
Display Editor
Label/Meaning
F7
F1
F1
(S1) softkey 1
White menu option 1
F8
F2
F2
(S2) softkey 2
White menu option 2
F9
F3
F3
(S3) softkey 3
White menu option 3
F10
F4
F4
(S4) softkey 4
White menu option 4
F11
F5
F5
(S5) softkey 5
Yellow menu option 1
F12
F6
F6
(S6) softkey 6
Yellow menu option 2
F13
F7
F7
(S7) softkey 7
Yellow menu option 3
F14
F8
F8
(S8) softkey 8
Yellow menu option 4
F17
F9
No label
(S9) softkey 9
Cyan menu option 1
F18
F10
No label
(S10) softkey 10
Cyan menu option 2
F19
F11
No label
(S11) softkey 11
Cyan menu option 3
F20
F12
No label
(S12) softkey 12
Cyan menu option 4
Help
Print Scr
Clear line
Do
N/A
N/A
PF1
Num
Lock
*
Display Editor Description
Display specific help on current operation
or
View general help displays
Same as Enter
FILE
Select FILE mode
PF2
/
/
ADD
Select ADD mode
PF3
*
+
EDIT
Select EDIT mode
PF4
--
--
SET
Select SET defaults
Find
Insert
Insert
char
Find Position
Insert
Here
Home
Insert
line
Modify Element
Remove
Delete
Delete
line
Cancel
Move cursor to specified X, Y position
Modify non-geometric attributes of an element
or
ISA symbol
or
text element
or
polygon (open/closed)
Cancel the current operation
Select
End
Select
Unpick All
Deselect all selected elements
Prev scr
Page
Up
Prev
Zoom Out / Prev
Redraw display at normal size
or
Go to previous option/attribute
Next scr
Page
Down
Next
Zoom In / Next
(Up Arrow)
Up
Redraw display at twice current size
or
Go to next option/attribute
Move cursor up one pixel
or
Next value for modify field
or
Next menu option
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
378
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-2.
DEC
Graphics Display Editor Key Definitions (Continued)
IBM
HP
(Down Arrow)
5
KP ,
Display Editor
Label/Meaning
Down
Display Editor Description
Move cursor down one pixel
or
Previous value for modify field
or
Previous menu option
(Left Arrow)
Left
(Right Arrow)
Right
Keypad (KP) 7
North-west
KP 8
North
KP 9
North-east
KP 4
West
Move cursor west one character cell
KP 5
Home
Move cursor to display center
KP 6
East
KP 1
South-west
KP 2
South
KP 3
South-east
KP 0
Show Cursor
KP +
KP ,
Move
Tab
Unmake conditnl
Enter
Enter / Do
Return
Return
(Delete)
Move cursor left one pixel
Move cursor right one pixel
Move cursor northwest one character cell
Move cursor north one character cell
Move cursor northeast one character cell
Move cursor east one character cell
Move cursor southwest one character cell
Move cursor south one character cell
Move cursor southeast one character cell
Show the current cursor position
Move selected element(s)
Unmake a conditional element
Take action
or
Start a pick box
Same as Enter (except in ADD Text,
where a new line is started)
Delete a character in text operation
Otherwise cancel operation
Ctrl W
Refresh
Ctrl A
Insert / Overstrike
or
Abort Load
Ctrl N
Window Resize
Refresh entire screen
(and abort current operation)
Switch between insert and overstrike mode
when in text operations
or
Aborts LoadDis and LoadBuf options
Resize Graphics Display Editor window
to next size (choice of four sizes)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
5.3.4
379
Manipulating the Display
Actions taken by the Graphics Display Editor are determined by you
selecting the appropriate option from the menus displayed, or by
pressing the appropriate keys.
This subsection describes several basic kinds of display manipulation
because you will use them repeatedly as you perform most tasks. They
are:
J
Moving and positioning the cursor
J
Picking display elements
J
Moving display elements
J
Selecting functions and menu options
J
Selecting items from overlaid menus
All other forms of display manipulation are covered in later subsections.
5.3.4.1
Moving the Cursor
The cursor is moved easiest by using a pointing device, and this is the
default mode the Graphics Display Editor assumes when you start.
Note ... The default is referred to as the mouse mode. You can toggle
between the mouse mode and the cursor movement mode by
selecting the SET mode-specific menu’s Mouse option (see
subsection 5.4.1 for details).
When you use a pointing device, the current cursor position is not
important because any option requiring a reference point prompts you to
mark the desired position by clicking the primary button. However, if you
use the keyboard mode, then the current cursor position is important
because the reference point for any display operation is the cursor’s
present position.
Note that even when you are in the pointing device mode, if you are
prompted for a reference point, you can press the Enter key to specify
the current cursor position. If you are in the keyboard mode, you can
position the cursor with a pointing device, then click the primary button to
mark its current position, before selecting any option requiring the
current cursor position.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
380
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
More precise cursor movement can be performed in the keyboard mode.
Pressing an arrow key moves the cursor up/down/left/right by one pixel
at a time, or pressing a keypad number key moves the cursor by one
character cell at a time. Pressing one of these keys once moves the
cursor one pixel or character cell at a time. Holding down the key moves
the cursor rapidly in the chosen direction until you release the key.
5.3.4.1.1
Using Graphics Display Window Coordinates
The graphics display window has a standard pixel resolution of 512
pixels horizontally by 390 pixels vertically. This translates to an X, Y
coordinates range of 0, 0 to 511, 389. The display window in character
cells is a grid of 85.3333 characters horizontally by 39 characters
vertically.
5
5.3.4.1.2
Positioning the Cursor by Pixel Number
You can also position the cursor by pixel number. This feature aids in
positioning elements in one display in exactly the same place in another
display.
To position the cursor by pixel number, follow these steps:
5.3.4.2
Step 1:
Press the Find key (LK401 keyboard) or the Insert key
(PC101 keyboard). A prompt then asks for the position
numbers.
Step 2:
Enter the coordinate numbers. Press the Return key after
each coordinate, and the cursor moves to the exact position.
Picking Display Elements
When no other operation is occurring, the Graphics Display Editor is in
the pick mode. The pick mode allows you to either:
J
J
Pick elements within the graphics display window
Select one of the available functions or menu options (see
subsection 5.3.4.4 for details)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
381
You can pick one or more elements in a display in three ways:
J
J
When in the pick mode, move the cursor over a display element and
click the primary button on the pointing device, or press Enter twice.
If the element was already picked, then it will become unpicked.
Use a pick box. Move the cursor to a start position, hold down the
primary button and move the pointing device to make a pick box,
then release the button when all the required elements are enclosed.
You can also do this by pressing Enter once, moving the cursor to
open up a pick box (which should enclose the required display
elements), then pressing Enter again.
J
Pick all display elements by selecting the EDIT mode-specific menu’s
Pick All option.
Picked elements are highlighted by handles that surround and show the
extent of each element.
5.3.4.3
Moving Display Elements
Once you have picked a display element (as described in subsection
5.3.4.2), you can move it by one of the following means:
J
J
J
Use a pointing device to pick the element, then press and hold the
center button, move the cursor to the desired position in the graphics
display window, and release the button.
Use a pointing device to pick the element, then click on the Move
indicator in the function menu. Move the cursor to the desired
position in the graphics display window, and click the secondary
button.
Using the keyboard, first select the EDIT mode from the mode
selection menu. (Modes are discussed in subsection 5.4.) Pick the
element to be moved by pressing the Do or Enter key twice. Then
press the appropriate key corresponding to the Move function (see
Table 5-2), and use the arrow keys or numeric keypad keys to move
the cursor to the desired position in the graphics display window.
Finally, press the appropriate key corresponding to the Cancel
function to end the operation.
If you are concerned about losing part of a complex element or group
during a move, you may also move elements using the cut-and-paste
method. Follow these steps using a pointing device (or a keyboard; see
Table 5-2 for the appropriate keys to press to use the functions and
menu options mentioned):
Step 1:
Select the EDIT mode from the mode selection menu.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
382
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
5
5.3.4.4
Step 2:
Pick the element or group of elements to be moved.
Step 3:
Select the Copy option from the EDIT mode-specific menu to
copy the selected element or group into the current
database’s unnamed paste buffer.
Step 4:
Move the cursor to the position where you want the element
to appear.
Step 5:
Select the Paste option from the EDIT mode-specific menu to
paste the element onto the graphics display window at the
new location.
Step 6:
Deselect the element you just pasted.
Step 7:
Again pick the element you copied from and are replacing,
then select the Delete option from he EDIT mode-specific
menu to remove the original element from the current display.
Selecting Functions or Menu Options
As noted earlier, when no other operation is occurring, the Graphics
Display Editor is in the pick mode. The pick mode allows you to select
any of the displayed functions or menu options in one of the following
ways:
J
J
J
Use a pointing device to move the cursor over the desired function
indicator or menu option space, and click the primary button (see
subsections 5.3.2 and 5.3.4.1 for details).
Press a key corresponding to a function menu indicator. See
subsection 5.3.3, which describes the available keyboards, and
Table 5-2, which identifies which keys relate to the functions.
Press a function key whose position corresponds to that a
mode-specific menu option. The positions are referenced by softkey
numbers S1 through S12, and the displayed menu options are color
coded. See subsection 5.3.3, which describes the available
keyboards, and Table 5-2, which identifies which function keys relate
to the softkey numbers and menu option colors.
Also, if you are using the SET mode or ADD mode and you press a
function key corresponding to either softkey S1 or S12, a new group
of menu options appears. See subsections 5.4.1 and 5.4.2,
respectively, for details on the mode-specific menu options available
with the SET and ADD modes.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
5.3.4.5
383
Selecting Items From Overlaid Menus
Overlaid selection menus can have up to nine selectable items displayed
per page, and they can be several pages in length. You can scroll
through the menu pages by doing one of the following:
J
J
J
Selecting the Zoom Out / Prev or Zoom In / Next function indicator
Pressing the appropriate keys corresponding to these functions (see
Table 5-2)
Positioning the cursor over the [Pg--] or [Pg+] icon and clicking the
primary button of a pointing device
To select an item from an overlaid menu, do one of the following:
J
J
J
Click on the desired item with the primary button of a pointing device
Press the number key corresponding to the desired item on the
numeric keypad (see Table 5-2) which highlights the item, and press
Enter or click the primary button on a pointing device
Use arrow keys to move the highlight up or down the menu until you
find the desired item
If no item is initially highlighted, pressing the down arrow key
highlights the first item in the list, and pressing the up arrow
highlights the last item. (The arrow keys also cause the list to
roll-around from first to last items).
To select the highlighted item, either press Enter or click the primary
button on a pointing device
J
Click on the [?] icon on the last line of the menu, or press the zero
(0) key on the alpha-numeric keyboard to cause the prompt Find ?
to appear in the operator text input area.
You can then enter an abbreviated or the full name of the item you
wish to select from the list, even if it is not on the currently displayed
page. (This is useful if you know what you want to select from a long
list.) When the system finds the entry, it displays the appropriate
menu page with the item highlighted.
If you enter an ambiguous string of text, the system highlights the
last item it finds that corresponds to the string. For example, if you
enter a string containing two or more tags or device names, the
system highlights the last tag or name in the string.
To select the highlighted item, either press Enter or click the primary
button on a pointing device.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
384
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
To abort a selection from an overlaid menu, you can:
J
J
J
5.4
Click on the Cancel function indicator, or press the key
corresponding to this function (see Table 5-2)
Select another function
Click the secondary button of the pointing device while the cursor is
positioned in the overlaid menu
Using the Graphics Display Editor Modes
You build displays using four modes:
5
J
J
J
J
SET — You use this mode to set the Graphics Display Editor’s
default parameter values, such as colors, attributes, and tags.
ADD — You use this mode to add new elements to a display.
EDIT — You use this mode to edit elements already present in the
display.
FILE — You use this mode for file operations, such as opening,
closing, restoring, saving, and deleting files.
You access these modes by selecting them from the mode selection
menu area of the screen, or by pressing the appropriate key (see
Table 5-2).
The following subsections describe how to use the four modes, and their
mode-specific menu options.
5.4.1
Using the SET Mode to Set Default Parameter Values
Before you begin building a display, you should set specific default
parameter values for that display. Setting default values keeps you from
having to continually select values as you build a display.
You start this procedure by selecting the SET mode from the mode
selection menu. Doing so causes one of two sub-menus to be displayed
in the mode-specific menu area (which are listed in Table 5-3). You can
view either of these sub-menus by clicking on the arrow at either end of
the row, or by pressing the key corresponding to softkey 1 (S1) or 12
(S12), which brings up the other sub-menu not currently visible. (See
Table 5-2 for which function keys correspond to the softkeys.)
Although you can select the mode-specific menu options in any order,
the order in which the following tables list the menu options is a useful
and logical order.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-3.
385
SET Mode-specific Menu Option Groups
Softkey and
Option Color
Menu Option
Group 1
Menu Option
Group 2
S1 white
<-- --
<-- --
S2 white
Tag
Grid
S3 white
Attribt
Grid Sp
S4 white
Backgnd
SnapGrd
S5 yellow
Cnd Col
WPCON
S6 yellow
Mouse
DspSize
S7 yellow
Cursor
Neutral
S8 yellow
AutoMod
GridCol
S9 cyan
Update
FontFam
S10 cyan
Flash
FontDef
S11 cyan
T/F
BackSto
S12 cyan
-- -->
Warning
Notes: 1. The SET mode-specific menu options listed in this table are all for the Motif
version of the Graphics Display Editor software only.
2. The DspSize, FontFam, and FontDef options will only be displayed if the
WPCON options are not suppressed.
The following tables describe all the SET mode-specific menu options.
Table 5-4 describes Group 1 and Table 5-5 describes Group 2.
Table 5-4.
Details of SET Mode-specific Menu Option Group 1
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
<-- --
The Display Editor ...
Brings up the previous sub-menu not currently visible.
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 1).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S1.
Tag
Lets you set the default tag that will appear when you add a dynamic element (Dev Bar,
Bargrph, or Value) or other elements that have tags, to the current display.
3.
Select Tag from the SET options.
4.
When the prompt “?” appears in the operator text input area, enter a new tag
between the question marks. (See the Note at the end of this table.)
5.
Click the primary button (or press Do, Enter, or Return).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
386
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-4.
Details of SET Mode-specific Menu Option Group 1 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Attribt
(Attribute)
5
Backgnd
(Background
Color)
Cnd Col
(Conditional Color)
Mouse
The Display Editor ...
Lets you set the default attribute that will be used when you add a Dev Bar, Bargrph,
conditional element, or another element that has attributes, to the current display.
1.
Select Attribt from the SET options.
2.
When the prompt PV[0], or last set attribute and occurrence, appears in the
operator text input area, position the cursor over the attribute field (PV), and select
HELP from the function menu. A help window opens that lists the available attribute
options.
3.
Enter the appropriate attribute tag to replace the prompt PV[0], or the last set
attribute and occurrence. (See the Note at the end of this table.)
4.
Click the primary button (or press Do, Enter, or Return).
Lets you set a new background color for the current display.
1.
Select Backgnd from the SET options.
2.
Move the cursor to the button for the desired background color in the color modify
area, and click the primary button. If you are satisfied with the background color
shown in the color settings area, then click the secondary button.
Lets you set default colors for color conditional elements you add to the current display.
1.
Select Cnd Col from the SET options.
2.
Move the cursor to the outlined box at the top of the color modify area, and click the
primary button. Then move the cursor to the button for the desired outline color, and
click the primary button again. If you are satisfied with the outline color shown in the
color settings area, then click the secondary button.
3.
Repeat Step 2, but select the filled box at the top first, then the desired color button.
Once you are satisfied, complete the color setting by clicking the secondary button.
Switches between mouse mode and cursor movement mode. The default is mouse
mode.
J
Select Mouse from the SET options to toggle between the current mode and the other
mode (initially, you will switch from the mouse mode to the cursor movement mode).
When in the mouse mode, adding any display element that requires a reference point will
prompt you to mark that point (by moving the cursor to the required position and clicking
the primary button).
When in the cursor movement mode, however, the reference point for any display
element is the current cursor position. In this case, you can set the current cursor
position by clicking the primary button to mark the point before you select any display
element that requires a reference point.
(Or use the keyboard to position the cursor at the required reference point, and press
Enter to specify it.)
Cursor
Switches the default pick cursor style.
J
Select Cursor from the SET options to toggle between an arrow and a cross-hair
shaped cursor.
The arrow style is most suited to pick-type applications (see subsection 5.3.4.2). The
cross-hair style is useful when you need exact alignment while adding or moving
elements (or for precisely selecting pixels).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-4.
387
Details of SET Mode-specific Menu Option Group 1 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
AutoMod
(Auto-modify
Mode)
The Display Editor ...
Activates the auto-modify mode as you add certain elements to the current display.
J
Select AutoMod from the SET options to toggle the auto-modify mode on and off.
In the auto-modify mode, a modify line automatically appears in the operator text input
area when you add an element with non-geometric attributes. The element’s attributes
can then be immediately modified (see subsection 5.5.2 for details).
This is not a valid option for Operator Workplace displays
Update
Suppresses all flashing elements on the display.
Flash
J
Select Flash from the SET options to toggle certain elements displayed as flashing or
non-flashing.
Selecting this option does not actually modify the chosen colors for the elements. You
use it only to eliminate any annoyance caused by working with flashing displays.
T/F
(True/False)
Toggles the appearance of all conditional elements between their true and false states.
J
Select T/F from the SET options to toggle all conditional elements on the current
display between their appearance when the condition is true and when the condition is
false.
Selecting this option does not actually change the condition of the elements. You use it
only to view the elements’ states.
-- -->
Brings up the next sub-menu not currently visible.
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 12).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S12.
Note:
You use a tag to define the point to which a dynamic element (Dev Bar, Bargrph, and Value) refers.
The following formats are permitted in specifying a tag:
J Up to 12 characters (at least one character must be alphabetic). Tags are forced into upper case
and leading spaces are ignored. The only characters permitted are: A to Z, 0 to 9, and . , / J #NNNNN where NNNNN is a point’s assigned database index (DBI) number (where N is in the range
of 1 through 32767). For example, if point FIC-101 has a DBI of 29, enter FIC-101 or #29 as the tag.
J #CURRENT to reference the currently selected point. (Be sure not to use individual point tags in a
display, faceplate, or window that contains #CURRENT.)
#STATIONn to identify the user currently logged onto a particular station (where n is in the range of
1 through 16). For example, #STATION2 displays the USERNAME for the operator currently logged
onto Station 2. If no one is currently logged onto that station, ### is displayed. (This tag is also used
in conjunction with the attribute STATUSER.)
J
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
388
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-5.
SET Mode-specific Menu Option Group 2
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
<-- --
The Display Editor ...
Brings up the previous sub-menu not currently visible.
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 1).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S1.
Grid
Toggles showing a grid over the current display,
J
Select Grid from the SET options to toggle the display of a grid on or off (initially, the
grid is not displayed).
The grid appears as a number of gray horizontal and vertical lines. The grid is not part of
the display itself, but is overlaid on the display to help with alignment.
5
Grid Sp
(Grid Spacing)
Lets you specify grid spacings on the current display.
1.
Select Grid Sp from the SET options.
A modify line appears in the operator text input area. It contains the X and Y spacing
of the grid (in character increments).
2.
Change character increments for the X and Y grid spacing, and click the primary
button (or press Do, Enter, or Return).
Once you complete the modify line changes, the grid is redrawn with the specified grid
spacing.
SnapGrd
(Cursor Snap Grid)
Toggles a cursor snap grid on and off.
J
Select SnapGrd from the SET options to enable or disable a cursor snap grid.
The cursor snap grid is in units of 1 character by 0.5 character (6 by 5 pixels). The cursor
snap grid is not visible on the display.
When the cursor snap grid is enabled, only certain cursor coordinates that align to the
cursor snap grid are allowed. If you specify any other cursor coordinates, they are
rounded to the nearest point on the snap grid.
This option is especially useful when you use a pointing device to align different display
elements, or to draw a vertical or horizontal line. Performing these two types of
operations with the cursor snap grid disabled can be difficult because of the sensitivity of
the pointing device.
WPCON
(Operator
Workplace
Options)
Toggles the menu options for Operator Workplace elements on and off.
J
Select WPCON from the SET options to enable or disable the menu options for
Operator Workplace elements (the default is enabled).
When WPCON is disabled, the ADD mode-specific menu options for the Operator
Workplace elements (see Table 5-10 ) and the SET mode-specific menu’s DspSize
option are not available. Also, only 16 colors will be available, and not 48 additional
colors used by the Operator Workplace software.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-5.
389
SET Mode-specific Menu Option Group 2 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
DspSize
(Display Size)
The Display Editor ...
Lets you specify a different size for the current display.
Note:
1.
This option is only available when the SET mode-specific menu’s WPCON
option is enabled.
Select DspSize from the SET options.
A modify line appears in the operator text input area. It contains the X and Y size (in
pixels) for the current display (the default size is 511 by 389 pixels).
2.
Change the number of pixels for the X and Y dimensions, and click the primary
button (or press Do, Enter, or Return).
Once you complete the modify line changes, the display is redrawn at the specified size.
There are limits on what sizes should be specified:
J
J
J
If you change the size from the default size (511 by 389 pixels), the display can only
be downloaded to the WS20 console electronics unit (not to a PROVUEr console
electronics unit).
If you set the size smaller than the default size, then the display is shown inside the
regular graphics display window so you can see how it relates to the default size.
If you set the size larger than the default size, the display is shown at full-screen size.
It is possible at the larger size that two pixels will map onto a single pixel space on the
screen. Two adjacent lines could appear as one, for example, making the text
unreadable. If this happens, select the Zoom to 511x389 function to zoom in so the
text is readable.
J
J
J
The Graphics Display Editor does not scale elements, so you should be careful when
using this option. You should specify the default size when starting a display. However,
there may be times when you will want to change the size slightly of existing displays.
Any existing elements appear in the lower left of the screen (the extra space is added
to the top and right side of the display). If the size is reduced, the reverse takes place
(that is, space is removed from the top and right of the display). Any elements that
would extend off the display will be moved to be totally within the new display size.
Size is an attribute of each display. When another display is opened, it appears in its
own display size, not that of the previous display. Size is also part of the preferences
data (just like other default values), so when a new display is opened, it appears in the
same size used for the last display (even if you exited from the Graphics Display
Editor).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
390
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-5.
SET Mode-specific Menu Option Group 2 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Neutral
(Neutral Color)
The Display Editor ...
Lets you set the color for displaying pick boxes or rubber-band lines, boxes, circles, etc.
Changing the neutral color also affects the text fields on overlaid selection menus.
Pick boxes and rubber bands are used to add, move, or select elements or modify text.
The default color for pick boxes and rubber bands is white. However, if you change the
background color, then the complement mode determines their color. For example, if the
background is white, then the pick boxes and rubber bands are shown in black rather
than white (on a blue background, they are shown in yellow).
Using the complement mode should mean that the object being drawn is always visible,
regardless of the background color. However, this cannot be guaranteed for certain
workstations because of the way they map colors.
5
If you experience problems with the visibility of the pick boxes or rubber bands, then you
can change them to any of the available 64 colors.
GridCol
(Grid Color)
1.
Select Neutral from the SET options.
2.
Move the cursor to the button for the desired color, and click the primary button
again. If you are satisfied with the outline color shown in the color settings area,
then click the secondary button.
Lets you set the color for displaying the grid on the current display.
This option is similar to setting the Neutral color. The grid (when displayed) is drawn
using the complement mode and is normally shown in white, but is changed to a
contrasting color if a different background color is used.
However, you may prefer to set the grid to a different color. For example, using a different
color from that chosen for the neutral color can be useful if you need to line up elements
exactly on a grid line.
FontFam
(Font Family)
1.
Select GridCol from the SET options.
2.
Move the cursor to the button for the desired color, and click the primary button
again. If you are satisfied with the outline color shown in the color settings area,
then click the secondary button.
Lets you set the font family for the current display. You can use only one font per display.
If you change the font, all existing text on the display changes to the new font.
The available fonts are Helvetica, Courier, and Times.
FontDef
(Font properties)
Lets you define the default text properties. You can change the font size and toggle
whether text is bold and italic.
Valid font sizes are 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 20, 24, and 34
BackSto
(Backing Store)
Enables and disables backing store. You must restart the display editor for a change to
take effect.
Backing store can speed up some editing actions, but uses additional memory.
Warning
(Invalid Tag
Warning)
Enables and disables a warning message that appears when an invalid tag is used in the
editor.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
5.4.2
391
Using the ADD Mode to Add Display Elements
You use the ADD mode to add elements to a display. This is the
Graphics Display Editor’s initial mode of operation. However, you can
select the ADD mode at any time from the mode selection menu.
In the ADD mode, one of four sub-menus is displayed in the
mode-specific menu area (which are listed in Table 5-6). You can see
any of these sub-menus by clicking on the arrow at either end of the row,
or by pressing the key corresponding to softkey 1 (S1) or 12 (S12),
which brings up the next sub-menu not currently visible. (See Table 5-2
for which function keys correspond to the softkeys.)
Table 5-6.
5
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Groups
Softkey and
Option Color
Menu Option
Group 1
Menu Option
Group 2
Menu Option
Group 3
Menu Option
Group 4
S1 white
<-- --
<-- --
<-- --
<-- --
S2 white
Symbol
Con Col
Ovrview
Entry
S3 white
Text x2
Con Txt
DDP
Mode
S4 white
Circle
Color V
DSR
Slider
S5 yellow
Arc
Color C
Status
Discret
S6 yellow
Text
Condt V
Alarm
OneOfN
S7 yellow
Polygon
Condt C
Trend
Button
S8 yellow
Box
Dev Bar
1/2 Trd
Scd Lst
S9 cyan
Line
Bargrph
1/4 Trd
Scd Txt
S10 cyan
Time
Value
Det Fpl
------
S11 cyan
Date
Applicn
Ful Fpl
------
S12 cyan
-- -->
-- -->
-- -->
-- -->
Note:
The ADD mode-specific menu options in Group 4 are all Motif elements for Operator Workplace; they
are only displayed if the SET mode-specific menu’s WPCON option is enabled (see subsection 5.4.1).
The following tables describe all of the ADD mode-specific menu
options. Table 5-7 describes Group 1, Table 5-8 describes Group 2,
Table 5-9 describes Group 3, and Table 5-10 describes Group 4.
Listed below are tips for adding display elements:
J
As you add new elements to the display, they will normally appear on
top of existing elements (that is, they will be stacked on top).
However, the software always draws static elements (line, box, circle,
arc, polygon, and text string) before it draws dynamic elements (bar
graph, deviation bar graph, and value field) on the display. Also, the
software always draws Operator Workplace elements (see Table 5-6,
Group 4) after both static and dynamic elements are drawn. This
stacking order may affect how you pick the display elements (see
subsection 5.3.4.2).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
392
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
J
J
5
J
J
J
Fisher-Rosemount Systems strongly recommends that you do not
add any elements against the outer edges of a display; instead leave
a little room on all sides because Motif allows the Operator
Workplace software only limited control over the eventual size of
elements.
When an operator changes Operator Workplace window scale
factors, rounding errors can cause misalignment of display elements.
Distortion is less if some precautions are taken during configuration.
For example, to add labels under symbols, each label should be a
separate text string. A long line of labels with the text separated by
character spaces causes problems when the Operator Workplace
window is scaled. The font size changes, and so does the distance
between labels (if made up of character spaces), which causes
misalignment with the symbols.
Some users need control over tab sequencing within a display, so
that by pressing the Tab key, the cursor will move to the “next” field
within a logical grouping of elements (for example. if several Entry
fields are stacked vertically). You must add the Motif elements to the
display in the order you want the tab sequence to be. If the elements
already exist, you can reposition them in the desired tab sequence
with the Graphics Display Editor. Note that modifying an element will
not reposition it.
Motif element attributes (such as shadow thickness and border color)
are not currently supported. They can be configured in ENVOX and
downloaded safely to the console, but they will have no effect on the
displays.
Using point/attribute combinations other than those recommended for
each Motif element will cause unpredictable and possibly undesirable
results.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-7.
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 1
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
<-- --
393
The Display Editor ...
Brings up the previous sub-menu not currently visible.
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 1).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S1.
Symbol
Adds an ISA symbol to the display.
1.
Select Symbol from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the required position for the symbol (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
A modify line appears in the operator text input area. It contains the symbol
mnemonic of the last symbol selected.
3.
Change the mnemonic, if needed, to that for the required symbol. Select the HELP
function for a list of available symbols.
ACTR Actuator
BINN Bin
BVLV Butterfly valve
CNVR Conveyer
CYCL Cyclone seprt.
EPCP Electrostat. pr.
FFXR Fin fan exchangr.
FURN Furnace
JKTV Jacketed vessel
MACT Manual actuatr.
PACT Pneum. actuatr.
RCMP Recipr. compr.
RSEP Rotary separator
SCRB Scrubber
STAT State indicator
VFLT Vacuum filter
VSSL Vessel
XCHG Heat exchanger
AGIT Agitator
BLWR Blower
CBRK Circuit breaker
CONT Contact
DIST Distillation tower
EVPR Evaporator
FTNK Floating tank
GTNK Gas tank
KILN Kiln
MILL Mill
PTNK Press. stor. tank
RCTR Reactor
RSTD Roll stand
SDRY Spray dryer
TRAN Transformer
VLV2 2-way valve
WHOP Weigh hopper
ATNK Atmosph. tank
BTNK Bulk stor. tank
CMPR Compressor
CTWR Cooling tower
DLTA Delta connection
FEVP Finned evapratr.
FUSE Fuse
IMIX Inline mixer
LFLT Liquid filter
MOTR Motor
PUMP Pump
RFDR Rotary feeder
SCNV Screw conveyr.
SEPR Separator
TURB Turbine
VLV3 3-way valve
WYEC Wye connectn.
Once a mnemonic is entered, the ISA symbol is added to the display in its default scale,
direction, and outline color. Select the Modify Color function to change the symbol’s
colors. Select the Modify Element function to scale the symbol’s size or rotate it
(depending upon the actual symbol).
Note:
Text x2
The ISA symbols and their mnemonics listed above are a subset of those
described in ISA DS5.5 document Graphics Symbols for Process Displays.
Adds a double-sized text field to the display.
1.
Select Text x2 from the ADD options.
2.
Press text keys to cause the corresponding letters to appear on the display at twice
the normal text size.
Each letter is a separate cut-and-paste buffer. The double-sized characters behave like
polygons and lines, so functions such as Modify element or Modify color will not
behave as you might expect for modifying the text.
This option is equivalent to the EDIT mode’s Paste.. option.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
394
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-7.
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 1 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
The Display Editor ...
Circle
Adds a circle to the display.
1.
Select Circle from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the center for the required circle (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark a point on the circle’s circumference. A stretchy circle appears if you hold
down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the
button to mark the final position.
(Or use the keyboard to move the cursor to obtain the required radius for the circle,
then press Enter or Do.)
5
The radius of the circle is limited to 255 pixels.
The circle is added in the current line and fill colors. Select the Modify color function to
change the circle’s colors.
Arc
Adds an arc (or pie-wedge shape) to the display.
1.
Select Arc from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the start point for the required arc (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark the end point for the required arc. A stretchy chord appears if you hold down
the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the button to
mark the final position.
(Or use the keyboard to move the cursor to indicate the end of the arc, then press
Enter or Do.)
4.
Mark the center point for the required arc. A stretchy pie wedge appears if you hold
down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the
button to mark the final position.
(Or use the keyboard to convert the element into a pie wedge by moving the cursor
in any direction, then press Enter or Do again.)
The arc is added in the current line and fill colors. Select the Modify color function to
change the arc’s colors.
If any portion of the the arc extends off the display area, the arc is clipped by retaining
the arc’s center but reducing the arc radius (thus changing the chord). The radius of the
arc is limited to 255 pixels.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-7.
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 1 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Text
(Text Field)
395
The Display Editor ...
Adds a text field to the display.
1.
Select Text from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the start point for the text (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
3.
A cursor appears in the operator text input area. Type the required text. To edit the
text, use the left or right arrow keys and the Ctrl A key combination to toggle
between insert and overlay modes.
Press the Return key to end a line of text and start a new line beginning under the
first character of the previous line.
4.
Press Enter or Do when the text is complete.
A text element is limited to 80 characters, or to the right edge of the display.
The text is added in the current text and background strip colors. Select the Modify
Color function to change the text colors. Select the Modify Element function to go into
the text modification mode.
Note: Fonts vary slightly between the display editor and the console. These variations in
fonts may cause text fields to appear differently between the editor and the console. Text
fields intended to hide DSRs may not work as expected.
Polygon
Adds a polygon to the display.
1.
Select Polygon from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first vertex for the polygon (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
3.
Mark the next vertex for the polygon (and repeat this step for all other vertices). A
stretchy line appears if you hold down the primary button and move the pointing
device, before you release the button to mark the final position.
(Or use the keyboard to move the cursor to indicate the vertex, then press Enter or
Do.)
4.
Complete the polygon by clicking the secondary button once, or place the next
vertex at the same position as the first vertex, or add the maximum 19th vertex.
(If you use the keyboard, a prompt for the next vertex appears repeatedly -- for a
maximum of 19 vertices -- or until you return the cursor to the first vertex and press
Enter or Do.)
If the last specified vertex is the same as the first, then the polygon is a closed shape;
otherwise, the polygon is an open shape.
When all vertices are added, the polygon is added in the current line and fill colors.
Select the Modify Color function to change the polygon’s colors. Select the Modify
Element function to toggle the element open or closed.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
396
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-7.
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 1 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Box
The Display Editor ...
Adds a box to the display.
1.
Select Box from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the box (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the box. A stretchy box appears if you hold down the
primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the button to mark
the final position.
(Or use the keyboard arrow keys to move the cursor to opposite corner, then press
Enter or Do.)
5
The box is added in the current line and fill colors. Select the Modify Color function to
change the box’s colors.
Line
Adds a line to the display.
1.
Select Line from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the start of the line (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
3.
Mark the end of the line. A rubber-band line appears if you hold down the primary
button and move the pointing device, before you release the button to mark the final
position.
(Or use the keyboard to move the cursor to the end of the line, which is expandable,
then press Enter or Do.)
The line is added in the current line color. Select the Modify Color function to change the
line’s color.
Time
(Time Field)
Adds a time field to the display.
1.
Select Time from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the required position (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
Only one time field is allowed per display. The time, represented by the field HH:MM:SS,
is added in the current text colors. Select the Modify Color function to change the time
field’s colors.
The Time field can be configured and downloaded, but it does not appear in displays.
Date
(Date Field)
Adds a date field to the display.
1.
Select Date from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the required position (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
Only one date field is allowed per display. The date, represented by the field
DD-MMM-YYYY, is added in the current text colors. Select the Modify Color function to
change the date field’s colors.
The Date field can be configured and downloaded, but it does not appear in displays.
-- -->
Brings up the next sub-menu not currently visible.
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 12).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S12.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-8.
397
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 2
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
The Display Editor ...
Brings up the previous sub-menu not currently visible.
<-- --
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 1).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S1.
Con Col
(Conditional Color
Expression)
Makes a conditional color expression element on the display (see subsection 5.6).
1.
Add and select one or more of the following types of elements:
Circle, Arc, ISA Symbols, Box, Polygon, Line, Bargrph, Value, and Text
2.
Select Con Col from the ADD options.
The selected elements are grouped together and highlighted by surrounding handles
that show their extent. The elements are outlined to show that the element has a
conditional attached. For a conditional color expression, the outline is a dotted line style
(that is, ........). For text elements, the text is underlined.
See subsection 5.6.2.3 for more information on applying conditional color expressions in
graphics displays.
Select the Modify Color function to change colors. Select the Modify Element function
to change the condition of the selected element.
Con Txt
(Conditional Text
Expression)
Adds a conditional text expression element on the display (see subsection 5.6).
J
Select Con Txt from the ADD options.
The conditional text expression element is not underlined since it is easily recognizable
by ?s against the background.
See subsection 5.6.2.4 for more information on creating conditional text expressions in
graphics displays.
Select the Modify Color function to change colors. Select the Modify Element function
to change the condition of the selected element.
Color V
(Color Conditional
By Comparison To
Another Value)
Determines the color of a single element or group by comparing one of its conditions to
the condition of another database value (an attribute or an occurrence of an attribute).
1.
Add and select one or more of the following types of elements:
Circle, Arc, ISA Symbols, Box, Polygon, Line, Bargrph, Value, and Text
2.
Select Color V from the ADD options.
The selected elements are grouped together and highlighted by surrounding handles
that show their extent. The elements are outlined to show that the element has a
conditional attached. For simple color conditionals, the outline is a solid line style (that is,
________) in the default color conditional colors. For text elements, the text is
underlined.
Select the Modify Color function to change colors. Select the Modify Element function
to change the condition of the selected elements.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
398
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-8.
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 2 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Color C
(Color Conditional
By Comparison To
a Constant)
The Display Editor ...
Determines the color of a single element or group by comparing one its conditions to the
value of a constant.
1.
Add and select one or more of the following types of elements:
Circle, Arc, ISA Symbols, Box, Polygon, Line, Bargrph, Value, and Text
2.
Select Color C from the ADD options.
The selected elements are grouped together and highlighted by surrounding handles
that show their extent. The elements are outlined to show that the element has a
conditional attached. For simple color conditionals, the outline is a solid line style (that is,
________) in the default color conditional colors. For text elements, the text is
underlined.
5
Select the Modify Color function to change colors. Select the Modify Element function
to change the condition of selected elements.
Condt V
(Two-element
Conditional By
Comparison To
Another Attribute)
Determines which of two elements appears on the display by comparing a condition to
the value of a database value (an attribute or an occurrence of an attribute).
1.
Pick the two elements you wish to be conditionally displayed from the following
types of elements:
Circle, Arc, ISA Symbols, Box, Polygon, Line, Bargrph, Value, and Text
The most common use of Condt V is two words, with one exactly on top of the
other.
2.
Select Condt V from the ADD options.
An outline surrounds both elements to show that they have a conditional attached, but
only one element is visible depending upon the current setting of the conditional state.
For two-element conditionals, the outline is a dashed/dotted line style (that is,
._._._._._.) in the default color conditional colors. For text elements, the text is
underlined.
Select the Modify Color function to change colors. Select the Modify Element function
to change the condition of the selected elements.
Condt C
(Two-element
Conditional By
Comparison To a
Constant)
Determines which of two elements appears on the display by comparing a condition to
the value of a constant.
1.
Pick the two elements you wish to be conditionally displayed from the following
types of elements:
Circle, Arc, ISA Symbols, Box, Polygon, Line, Bargrph, Value, and Text
The most common use of Condt C is two words, with one exactly on top of the
other.
2.
Select Condt C from the ADD options.
An outline surrounds both elements to show that they have a conditional attached, but
only one element is visible depending upon the current setting of the conditional state.
For two-element conditionals, the outline is a dashed/dotted line style (that is,
._._._._._.) in the default color conditional colors. For text elements, the text is
underlined.
Select the Modify Color function to change colors. Select the Modify Element function
to change the condition of the selected elements.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-8.
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 2 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Dev Bar
(Deviation
Bar graph)
399
The Display Editor ...
Adds a deviation bar graph to the display. (A deviation bar graph shows the value of an
attribute index minus the value of the deviation attribute.)
1.
Select Dev Bar from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the bar graph (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the bar graph. A stretchy box appears if you hold down
the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the button to
mark the final position.
(Or use the keyboard arrow keys to move the cursor to opposite corner, then press
Enter or Do.)
If the height of the added box is greater than its width, then the bar graph will be vertical;
otherwise horizontal.
The deviation bar graph appears on the screen in red with white outlines, limit marks,
and center line. You cannot configure these colors.
The default for the bar graph is to refer to the deviation between the current tag/attribute
and the current comparison tag/attribute. (See the note on defining tags at the end of this
table.) The limit marks default to 80 percent of maximum deviation.
The comparison can be between two different attributes on the same tag, or two different
tags with the same attribute.
Note:
All values on a bar graph should be in percent (that is, use %attribute).
Select the Modify Element function to change the tag-attribute, deviation tag-attribute, or
limit marks.
Bargrph
(Bar graph)
Adds a bar graph to the display. (A bar graph shows the value of a process attribute.)
1.
Select Bargrph from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the bar graph (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the bar graph. A stretchy box appears if you hold down
the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the button to
mark the final position.
(Or use the keyboard arrow keys to move the cursor to opposite corner, then press
Enter or Do.)
If the height of the added box is greater than its width, then the bar graph will be vertical;
otherwise horizontal.
The bar graph appears on the screen in the current line and fill colors. Select the Modify
Color function to change the bar graph’s colors.
The default for the bar graph is to refer to the current tag/attribute (see the note on
defining tags at the end of this table), and have a base value of 0.0 percent and a
maximum value of 100.0 percent. Select the Modify Element function to change the bar
graph’s direction, tag-attribute, or minimum and maximum values.
Note:
All values on a bar graph should be in percent (that is, use %attribute).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
400
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-8.
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 2 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Value
(Value Field)
The Display Editor ...
Adds a value field to the display. (A value display shows the number or ASCII value of a
process attribute.)
1.
Select Value from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the start position for the required value (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
The value represented by the field LLLLLL is added in the current text colors. Select the
Modify Color function to change the colors.
The default field is six characters wide, and left-justified. You can change the characters
in this field for different justifications: L is left-justified, C is center-justified, and R is
right-justified.
5
To modify the justification, field length, parameter tag (see the note on defining tags at
the end of this table), attribute, occurrence number, or decimal place, select the Modify
Element function.
Note 1: As a general rule, use yellow on black for PV and white for SP values to be
consistent with faceplate colors.
Note 2: The number of decimal places to be used ranges from --1 to 15, with --1 or 0 as
the default (--1 must be used for PROVUE software prior to the P5.2 version).
Applicn
(Application)
The Application Window option is not supported by Operator Workplace software. To
allow access to other application packages, use remote applications (see subsection
4.10).
You can configure an Applicn element but it is not downloaded.
-- -->
Brings up the next sub-menu not currently visible.
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 12).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S12.
Note:
You use a tag to define the point to which a dynamic element (Dev Bar, Bargrph, and Value) refers.
The following formats are permitted in specifying a tag:
J Up to 12 characters (at least one character must be alphabetic). Tags are forced into upper case
and leading spaces are ignored. The only characters permitted are: A to Z, 0 to 9, and . , / -
#NNNNN where NNNNN is a point’s assigned database index (DBI) number (where N is in the range
of 1 through 32767). For example, if point FIC-101 has a DBI of 29, enter FIC-101 or #29 as the
tag.
J
J #CURRENT to reference the currently selected point. (Be sure not to use individual point tags in a
display, faceplate, or window that contains #CURRENT.)
#STATIONn to identify the user currently logged onto a particular station (where n is in the range
of 1 through 16). For example, #STATION2 displays the USERNAME for the operator currently
logged onto Station 2. If no one is currently logged onto that station, ### is displayed. (This tag is also
used in conjunction with the attribute STATUSER.)
J
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-9.
401
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 3
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
The Display Editor ...
Brings up the previous sub-menu not currently visible.
<-- --
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 1).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S1.
Ovrview
(Overview)
This is not a valid option for Operator Workplace displays.
DDP
(Detail Display
Parameter)
This is not a valid option for Operator Workplace displays.
DSR
(Direct Screen
Reference)
Adds a DSR selectable window to the display.
1.
Select DSR from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the DSR window (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the DSR window. A stretchy box appears if you hold
down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the
button to mark the final position.
(Or use the keyboard arrow keys to move the cursor to opposite corner, then press
Enter or Do.)
The DSR window appears on the screen; its minimum size is 16 by 13 pixels.
The system automatically refers the DSR to the current tag and sets it to the lowest
unused DSR number. You do not need to set the DSR value, but you can change the
DSR number, tag, or contact number by selecting the Modify Element function.
Note:
Although a box is drawn to represent the selected area, on-line this box will
only be visible when the DSR is selected. If the boundary of the selected region
is to be visible when the DSR is not selected, then you need to add a box of the
appropriate size to the display.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
402
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-9.
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 3 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Status
(Status Block)
5
The Display Editor ...
Adds a status block to the display.
1.
Select Status from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the status block (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the status block. A stretchy box appears if you hold
down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the
button to mark the final position.
(Or use the keyboard arrow keys to move the cursor to opposite corner, then press
Enter or Do.)
The status block appears on the screen; its minimum size is six characters long by one
character high. Select the Modify Color function to change colors.
The status block refers to the current tag and has a status word length of five, by default.
Select the Modify Element function to modify the status parameter values for the
following items:
J
J
J
J
The tag of the point to be displayed in the window. Enter a tag name or #CURRENT to
display the active status words for the console’s currently selected point.
The window height, equal to the vertical height of the window in status words. For
example, entering a value of 2 makes the window two status words high.
The word length, equal to the number of characters to be displayed for each status
word.
The number of words, equal to the horizontal width of the window in status words. For
example, entering a value of 2 makes the window two status words wide.
Note 1: Refer to Table D-8 through Table D-11 for point status conditions.
Note 2: To show all status messages, it is useful to add a status window that is eight
words high, and one word (eight characters) wide.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Table 5-9.
403
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 3 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Alarm
(Alarm Block)
The Display Editor ...
Adds an alarm block to the display.
1.
Select Alarm from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the alarm block (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the alarm block. A stretchy box appears if you hold
down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the
button to mark the final position.
(Or use the keyboard arrow keys to move the cursor to opposite corner, then press
Enter or Do.)
The alarm block appears on the screen; its minimum size is six characters long by one
character high. Do not use the Modify Color function. The displayed colors are based
on the characteristics of the alarm groups defined and assigned for the referenced point.
The alarm block refers to the current tag and has a status word length of five, by default.
Select the Modify Element function to modify the alarm parameter values for the
following items:
J
J
J
J
The tag of the point to be displayed in the window. Enter a tag name or #CURRENT to
display the active alarms for the console’s currently selected point.
The window height, equal to the vertical height of the window in alarm words. For
example, entering a value of 2 makes the window two alarm words high.
The word length, equal to the number of characters to be displayed for each alarm
word.
The number of words, equal to the horizontal width of the window in alarm words. For
example, entering a value of 2 makes the window two alarm words wide.
Note:
Trend
(Full-size Trend
Window)
or
1/2 Trd
(Half-size Trend
Window)
or
1/4 Trd
(Quarter-size
Trend Window)
To show all 15 characters of the four possible standard alarms, plus four
extended alarms available on some points, it is useful to add an alarm block
that is eight words high and one word (15 characters) wide.
These options are displayed as large pushbuttons on the Operator Workplace main
window. When clicked on with the pointing device’s primary button, the pushbutton
opens a trend window.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
404
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-9.
ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 3 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option ...
Det Fpl
(Detailed
Faceplate)
or
Ful Fpl
(Full Faceplate)
-- -->
5
The Display Editor ...
Adds a detailed faceplate or a full faceplate to the display.
1.
Select Det Fpl or Ful Fpl from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the required left-hand corner (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
A faceplate appears, referencing the current tag and allocated to the lowest available
DSR, by default. To change the tag or DSR number, select the Modify Element function.
Brings up the next sub-menu not currently visible.
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 12).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S12.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
405
Table 5-10. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 4
When You
Select This
Menu Option*...
The Display Editor ...
Brings up the previous sub-menu not currently visible.
<-- --
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 1).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S1.
Entry
(Text Entry Field)
Adds an entry field to the display, which allows the operator to edit and write
floating-point values to the highway. The entry field can display any numeric value, but
only the point/attribute combinations listed below should be used to edit and write to the
highway:
201 AI:PV
202 AO:SP
203 PCI:PV
207 REF:SP
208 REF DEV:SP
209 PID:PV, SP, %OUTPUT
210 PID with Ratio:RA, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
211 PD with Bias:%BI, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
212 PD with Bias and Ratio:RA, %BI, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
213 MAN LOADER:PV, SP, %OUTPUT
214 MAN LOADER RAT:RA, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
215 BIAS GAIN:%BI, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
216 BIAS GAIN RAT:RA, %BI, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
217 SIG SELECT:PV, SP, %OUTPUT
218 SIG SELECT RAT:RA, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
223 PDM:PV
224 PDO:SP
227 ASCII:ASCIIMSG, SP
228 REAL:SP
229 LCP: MVPCV1 through MVPCV12 (CV1 through CV12)
229 EPCI: MVPCV1 (CV1)
230 INTEGER:PV
PPA:CRITLVL
1.
Select Entry from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the start position for the required value (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the required entry window. A stretchy box appears if
you hold down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release
the button to mark the final position.
A representation of an entry field is added. The entry field is represented by the field
L----L (similar to a Value element which is represented by the field LLLLLL) and is in
the current text colors.
Note1: Though you can change the justification in the editor to C (center) or R (right),
entry fields are always left--justified when displayed on the console.
Note 2: The maximum number of Entry elements that can be in a display is
configurable up to a maximum of 32.
Note 3: An Entry element does not indicate that point data is stale (does not turn
magenta) when brought up in custom displays. Add a Value field by each
Entry element to show the value as well as the stale data indication.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
406
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-10. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 4 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option*...
Mode
(Mode Set)
5
The Display Editor ...
Adds a set of mode buttons to the display, which allows the operator to change mode
push buttons for points. The mode entry window is used in the instrument area of the
Operator Workplace software’s Main Screen for all points except the following, which do
not have any valid modes:
201 AI
203 PCI
205 MON
206 MON DEV
207 REF
208 REF DEV
219 UOC DI
223 PDM
230 INTEGER
PPA
PMA
1.
Select Mode from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the required mode entry window (or press Enter for the
current cursor position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the required mode entry window. A stretchy box
appears if you hold down the primary button and move the pointing device, before
you release the button to mark the final position.
Note 1: The maximum number of Mode elements that can be in a display is
configurable up to a maximum of 32.
Note 2: A Mode element does not indicate that point data is stale (does not turn
magenta) when brought up in custom displays. Add a Value field by each
Mode element to show the value as well as the stale data indication.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
407
Table 5-10. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 4 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option*...
Slider
(Slider Bar)
The Display Editor ...
Adds a slider to the display, which shows the value of an attribute as a percentage of the
engineering units (it is capped if less than zero [0] percent or more than 100 percent).
Manipulating the slider writes changes to the highway. The slider is used in the
instrument area of the Operator Workplace software’s Main Screen for the following
point/attribute combinations only:
201 AI:PV
202 AO:SP
207 REF:SP
208 REF DEV:PV, SP
209 PID:PV, SP, %OUTPUT
210 PID with Ratio:RA, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
211 PD with Bias:%BI, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
212 PD with Bias and Ratio:RA, %BI, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
213 MAN LOADER:PV, SP, %OUTPUT
214 MAN LOADER RAT:RA, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
215 BIAS GAIN:%BI, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
216 BIAS GAIN RAT:RA, %BI, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
217 SIG SELECT:PV, SP, %OUTPUT
218 SIG SELECT RAT:RA, PV, SP, %OUTPUT
1.
Select Slider from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the required slider (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the required slider. A stretchy box appears if you hold
down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the
button to mark the final position.
4.
The system prompts for the attribute/occurrence/tag of the point for the slider.
Note 1: All Slider elements appear vertically on Operator Workplace displays.
Note 2: Only skinny Slider elements (for example 1/2-inch wide by 4-inches tall)
appear on Operator Workplace displays as configured in Graphics Display
Editor displays.
Note 3: The maximum number of Slider elements that can be in a display is
configurable up to a maximum of 32.
Note 4: A Slider element does indicate that point data is stale (does not turn magenta)
when brought up in custom displays. Add a Value field by each Slider element
to show the value as well as the stale data indication.
Note 5: Sliders only allow changes within the 0 to 100% range. If your configuration
contains attributes that are routinely outside the 0 to 100% range you may
want to rescale them before attaching them to a slider element or configure
entry fields for the attributes in addition to the sliders so that operators can
change the values from the keyboard.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
408
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-10. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 4 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option*...
Discret
(Discrete Window)
The Display Editor ...
Adds a discrete window to the display, which is used with binary-value point/attribute
items. The discrete window is used in the instrument area of the Operator Workplace
software’s Main Screen for the following point/attribute combinations only:
204 DI/DO:SP[1] through SP[4]
219 DI:PV
220 DO:SP
229 LCP: MVPCV9 through MVPCV12 (CV9 through CV12)
5
1.
Select Discret from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the required discrete window (or press Enter for the current
cursor position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the required discrete window. A stretchy box appears if
you hold down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release
the button to mark the final position.
4.
The system prompts for the attribute/occurrence/tag of the point for the discrete
window.
Note 1: The maximum number of Discret elements that can be in a display is
configurable up to a maximum of 32.
Note 2: A Discret element does not indicate that point data is stale (does not turn
magenta) when brought up in custom displays. Add a Value field by each
Discret element to show the value as well as the stale data indication.
OneOfN
(One of N Window)
Adds a One of N window to the display, which is used with items having multiple discrete
choices. The One of N window is used in the instrument area of the Operator Workplace
software’s Main Screen for the following point/attribute combinations only:
221 DCD:PV, SP
222 GROUP:PV, SP
PMA:PMAMODE
PPA:OPSTATE
1.
Select OneOfN from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the required One of N window (or press Enter for the
current cursor position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the required One of N window. A stretchy box appears
if you hold down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you
release the button to mark the final position.
4.
The system prompts for the attribute/occurrence/tag of the point for the One of N
window.
Note 1: The maximum number of OneOfN elements that can be in a display is
configurable up to a maximum of 32.
Note 2: A OneOfN element does not indicate that point data is stale (does not turn
magenta) when brought up in custom displays. Add a Value field by each
OneOfN element to show the value as well as the stale data indication.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
409
Table 5-10. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 4 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option*...
Button
(Push Button)
The Display Editor ...
Adds a push button to the display, which is used to initiate a “one shot” action. The push
button is used in the instrument area of the Operator Workplace software’s main window
for the following point/attribute combination only:
229 LCP:START FST, STOP FST, ADVANCE FST
UDKs and Remote Applications
You can also configure pushbuttons to run UDKs and Remote Applications
1.
Select Button from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the required button (or press Enter for the current cursor
position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the required button. A stretchy box appears if you hold
down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the
button to mark the final position.
Note:
Scd Lst
(Scrolled List)
The maximum number of Button elements that can be in a display is
configurable up to a maximum of 32.
Adds a scrolled list window to the display, which is used to display a list of items of
indeterminate length. The scrolled list is used in the instrument area of the Operator
Workplace software’s main screen for the following only:
PPA list of points in alarm
PMA list of PPAs in alarm
LCP list of configured variables
1.
Select Scd Lst from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the required scrolled list (or press Enter for the current
cursor position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the required scrolled list. A stretchy box appears if you
hold down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the
button to mark the final position.
Note:
The maximum number of Scd Lst elements that can be in a display is
configurable up to a maximum of 32.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
410
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-10. ADD Mode-specific Menu Option Group 4 (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option*...
Scd Txt
The Display Editor ...
Adds a scrolled text field to the display, which is used to display large ASCII strings. The
scrolled text field is used in the instrument area of the Operator Workplace software’s
Main Screen for the following point/attribute combinations:
225 UNIT:OARMSG (not writable to the highway)
227 ASCII:ASCIIMSG (writable to the highway)
This field could display any valid point/attribute/occurrence (PT:ATTR[OCC]) value, but it
is recommended that all other instances of this field not be writable to the highway.
5
1.
Select Scd Txt from the ADD options.
2.
Mark the first corner for the required scrolled text field (or press Enter for the
current cursor position).
3.
Mark the opposite corner for the required scrolled list. A stretchy box appears if you
hold down the primary button and move the pointing device, before you release the
button to mark the final position.
Note 1: Scd Txt fields are read only. Use Entry fields if text entry is required.
Note 2: The maximum number of Scd Txt elements that can be in a display is
configurable up to a maximum of 32.
Note 3: A Scd Txt element does indicate that point data is stale (by turning magenta).
-- -->
Brings up the next sub-menu not currently visible.
J
Click on this arrow (or press the key corresponding to softkey 12).
See Table 5-2 for which function key corresponds to S12.
Note:
*The ADD mode-specific menu options in Group 4 are all Motif elements for Operator Workplace; they
are only displayed if the SET mode-specific menu’s WPCON option is enabled (see subsection 5.4.1).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
5.4.3
411
Using the EDIT Mode to Edit Elements in a Display
You use the EDIT mode to edit elements already present in a display.
You can select the EDIT mode at any time from the mode selection
menu.
In the EDIT mode, only one sub-menu is displayed in the mode-specific
menu area. The options are listed in Table 5-11.
Table 5-11. EDIT Mode-specific Menu Options
Softkey and Option Color
Menu Option Group
S1 white
Copy...
S2 white
Paste..
S3 white
Group
S4 white
Ungroup
S5 yellow
Duplict
S6 yellow
Front
S7 yellow
Points
S8 yellow
PickAll
S9 cyan
Cut
S10 cyan
Copy
S11 cyan
Paste
S12 cyan
Delete
To edit elements, in most cases, you first select a portion of the current
display, then select the required EDIT mode-specific menu option
(described in Table 5-12). However, you do not need to select any
elements on the current display before selecting the PickAll, Paste, or
Paste menu options.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
412
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-12. Details of EDIT Mode-specific Menu Options
When You
Select This
Menu Option...
Copy...
(Copy to Buffer)
The Display Editor ...
Copies the selected elements on the display to a named cut/paste butter.
1.
Pick one or more elements within the graphics displays window.
2.
Select Copy... from the EDIT options.
3.
A prompt in the operator text input area asks for the name of the cut/paste buffer,
which can be up to 12 characters long.
If the buffer name exists, but it is a database display, you must re-specify the buffer
name or cancel the operation.
5
If the buffer name exists, but it is a cut/paste buffer, you can overwrite the existing
buffer, re-specify the buffer name, or cancel the operation.
You can recall elements copied in this way both during the current editing session and in
subsequent editing sessions. You can paste these elements into any display, except
perhaps for Time and Date fields, which should only appear once per display.
Note:
Paste..
(Paste from Buffer)
Each database has separately named cut/paste buffers. If more than one
database needs to use named cut/paste buffers, you must first load the
required cut/paste buffers from the other databases by using the FILE
mode-specific menu’s LoadBuf option (see subsection 5.4.4).
Adds the contents of a named cut/paste buffer to the current display.
1.
Select Paste.. from the EDIT options.
2.
A prompt in the operator text input area asks for the name of a cut/paste buffer.
If you enter a question mark (?) in the cut/paste buffer name field, and press Enter,
an overlaid list of all buffer names in the current database appears.
3.
Mark a reference point where you want the lower left extent of the requested
elements pasted (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
Note:
Group
Pasting Operator Workplace elements (see Table 5-10) from a cut/paste buffer
enables the SET mode-specific menu’s WPCON option, if it was previously
disabled (see subsection 5.4.1).
Groups all selected elements together so they behave as a single element.
1.
Pick more than one element within the graphics displays window.
You can also pick previously grouped elements with single elements or other
groups. Time and Data fields should not be picked for grouping.
2.
Select Group from the EDIT options.
All of the elements (or groups) involved are redrawn with only one set of handles
showing the extent of the new group.
Ungroup
Separates the elements of a selected group.
1.
Pick one or more groups within the graphics displays window.
2.
Select Ungroup from the EDIT options.
All of the grouped elements (or groups) involved are redrawn with sets of handles
showing the extent of each element (or group) that made up the selected groups.
Note:
Repeated picking of groups and selecting Ungroup will separate grouped
elements stage by stage as they were originally grouped.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
413
Table 5-12. Details of EDIT Mode-specific Menu Options (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option...
The Display Editor ...
Duplicates selected elements in the current display.
Duplict
(Duplicate)
1.
Pick one or more elements within the graphics displays window.
2.
Select Duplict from the EDIT options.
3.
Mark a reference point where you want the lower left extent of the requested
elements duplicated (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
The duplicated elements become the currently selected elements in the display.
Makes selected elements appear in the immediate foreground of the current display.
Front
1.
Pick one or more elements within the graphics displays window.
2.
Select Front from the EDIT options.
The selected elements overlay other elements in the display area. However, the stacking
order does not change for static elements, which are drawn first, followed by dynamic
elements, followed by Operator Workplace elements. So, for example, a static element
cannot be drawn on top of a dynamic element (see subsection 5.4.2 for details).
Allows you to modify any database points configured within selected elements in the
display.
Points
1.
Pick one or more dynamic elements within the graphics displays window.
2.
Select Points from the EDIT options.
A list of tag names for the selected elements appears in an overlaid menu.
3.
PickAll
(Pick All Elements)
Selects all elements in the current display.
J
Cut
You can select a particular tag and change it in the operator text input area. Click
the primary button (or press Do, Enter, or Return) to exit this function.
Select PickAll from the EDIT options.
Deletes selected elements or groups of elements after copying them into the current
database’s unnamed paste buffer.
1.
Pick one or more elements or groups of elements within the graphics displays
window.
2.
Select Cut from the EDIT options.
Cut is like the Copy option, except the selected elements disappear from the current
display. (Also see the Paste option in this table.)
Copy
Copies selected elements or groups of elements into the current database’s unnamed
paste buffer.
1.
Pick one or more elements or groups of elements within the graphics displays
window.
Time and Data fields should not be picked for copying.
2.
Select Copy from the EDIT options.
Each user in a Graphics Displays Editor session has a separate unnamed paste buffer.
The unnamed paste buffer is deleted from the system when you end the Graphics
Display Editor session. (Also see the Paste option in this table.)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
414
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-12. Details of EDIT Mode-specific Menu Options (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option...
Paste
The Display Editor ...
Adds the contents of the current database’s unnamed paste buffer into the current
display.
1.
Select Paste from the EDIT options.
2.
Mark a reference point where you want the lower left extent of the elements from
the unnamed paste buffer added (or press Enter for the current cursor position).
The pasted elements become the currently selected elements in the display.
The unnamed paste buffer is deleted from the system when you end the Graphics
Display Editor session. (Also see the Copy option in this table.)
5
Delete
Deletes all selected elements from the current display.
1.
Pick one or more elements or groups of elements within the graphics displays
window.
2.
Select Delete from the EDIT options.
Delete removes selected elements from the current display, with no recovery possible.
(Also see the Cut and Paste options in this table.)
5.4.4
Using the FILE Mode for File Operations
You use the FILE mode for file operations, such as opening, closing,
restoring, saving, and deleting files. You can select the FILE mode at
any time from the mode selection menu.
In the FILE mode, only one sub-menu is displayed in the mode-specific
menu area. The options are listed in Table 5-13.
Table 5-13. FILE Mode-specific Menu Options
Softkey and Option Color
Menu Option Group
S1 white
LoadDis
S2 white
LoadBuf
S3 white
Restore
S4 white
Delete
S5 yellow
------
S6 yellow
Save to
S7 yellow
Close
S8 yellow
Exit
S9 cyan
Open
S10 cyan
New
S11 cyan
Print
S12 cyan
View
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
415
To use the Graphics Display Editor file operations, you must select the
required FILE mode-specific menu option described in Table 5-14.
Table 5-14. Details of FILE Mode-specific Menu Options
When You
Select This
Menu Option...
LoadDis
(Load in Display)
The Display Editor ...
Loads one or more database displays from another database into the current database.
1.
Select LoadDis from the FILE options.
2.
An overlaid menu appears that lists all of the databases authorized for the user.
Select the database from which to load displays. The default database is
ENVOX_READONLY.
3.
When prompted by the overlaid menu, specify whether you want all displays or only
selected displays loaded.
If selected displays are to be loaded, then a list of displays in that database
appears. Selecting an entry from the list causes that display to be loaded into the
current database.
If the display you select has the same name as an existing display, then the system
prompts you to overwrite the display, re-specify the name*, or cancel the operation.
If the specified display is locked, then an error message appears and the operation is
cancelled.
If the display you select has the same name as a non-display tag or a cut/paste buffer in
the current database, then the system prompts you to either re-specify the name* or
cancel the operation.
(*See the Note on display names at the end of this table).
The load operation does not affect the current display.
LoadBuf
(Load in Buffer)
Loads one or more cut/paste buffers from another database into the current database.
1.
Select LoadBuf from the FILE options.
2.
An overlaid menu appears that lists all of the databases authorized for the user.
Select the database from which to load buffers. The default database is
ENVOX_READONLY.
3.
When prompted by the overlaid menu, specify whether you want all buffers or only
selected buffers loaded.
If selected buffers are to be loaded, then a list of buffers in that database appears.
Selecting an entry from the list causes that buffer to be loaded into the current
database.
If the buffer you select has the same name as an existing buffer, then the system
prompts you to overwrite the buffer, re-specify the name,* or cancel the operation.
If the specified buffer is locked, then an error message appears and the operation is
cancelled.
If the buffer you select has the same name as an existing database display, then the
system prompts you to either re-specify the name* or cancel the operation.
(*See the Note on display names at the end of this table).
The load operation does not affect the current display.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
416
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-14. Details of FILE Mode-specific Menu Options (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option...
Restore
5
The Display Editor ...
Restores a display or cut/paste buffer erroneously marked for deletion during the current
editing session.
1.
Select Restore from the FILE options.
2.
When prompted, specify whether you want Database Displays or Cut/paste Buffers
restored.
3.
A list of displays or cut/paste buffers marked for deletion during the current editing
session appears. Selecting an entry from the list causes that display or buffer to be
restored into the current database.
Note:
Delete
Marks for deletion an existing display or cut/paste buffer from the current database.
1.
Select Delete from the FILE options.
2.
When prompted, specify whether you want Database Displays or Cut/paste Buffers
deleted.
3.
A list of existing displays or cut/paste buffers appears. Selecting an entry from the
list causes that display or buffer to be marked for deletion. Marked items are not
removed from the current database until the editing session ends.
Note:
Save to
Only those displays or buffers marked for deletion during the current session
can be restored.
You cannot delete any displays locked by another user.
Saves a display file you are editing to the current database.
1.
Select Save to from the FILE options.
2.
When prompted, enter a name for the display*.
If the name you enter is identical to an existing display, the system prompts you to
overwrite the display, re-specify the name*, or cancel the operation.
If the display you named is locked, then an error message appears and the
operation is cancelled.
If the display name you enter is identical to a non-display tag or a cut/paste buffer in
the current database, then the system prompts you to either re-specify the name*
or cancel the operation.
(*See the Note on display names at the end of this table).
Note:
The Save to operation does not affect the current display, except its name
becomes the name you entered, and this display is write-locked to prevent
other users from modifying it.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
417
Table 5-14. Details of FILE Mode-specific Menu Options (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option...
Close
The Display Editor ...
Terminates editing of a display and saves the display to the current database.
1.
Select Close from the FILE options.
2.
If the display is unnamed, the system prompts you to enter a name for the display*.
If the name you enter is identical to an existing display, the system prompts you to
overwrite the display, re-specify the name*, or cancel the operation.
If the display you named is locked, then an error message appears and the
operation is cancelled.
If the display name you enter is identical to a non-display tag or a cut/paste buffer in
the current database, then the system prompts you to either re-specify the name*
or cancel the operation.
(*See the Note on display names at the end of this table).
If the display is named, then it is closed and unlocked so other users can modify it.
Note:
Exit
After closing the named display, the screen shows the default unnamed display.
Terminates the Graphics Display Editor session.
1.
Select Exit from the FILE options.
2.
An overlaid menu appears, and the system prompts you to confirm this action.
If the current display has been modified, the system prompts you to close or abort
this display.
Note:
Open
Any displays or cut/paste buffers marked for deletion during the Graphic
Display Editor session are deleted from the current database.
Opens an existing display in the current database for editing.
1.
Select Open from the FILE options.
2.
If the current display has been modified, an overlaid menu appears, and the system
prompts you to close or abort the display.
3.
A list of existing displays appears.
If you select a display from this list and it is locked by another user, then an error
message appears and the operation is cancelled.
Otherwise, the specified display is write locked to prevent other users from
modifying it, then it is opened and becomes the current display for editing.
Note:
New
Opening a display with Operator Workplace elements (see Table 5-10) enables
the SET mode-specific menu’s WPCON option, if it was previously disabled
(see subsection 5.4.1).
Clears any existing display currently being edited, and restarts with a default unnamed
display (showing only Time and Date fields, in their default positions).
1.
Select New from the FILE options.
2.
If the current display has been modified, an overlaid menu appears, and the system
prompts you to close or abort the display.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
418
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-14. Details of FILE Mode-specific Menu Options (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option...
Print
(Print Display)
The Display Editor ...
Produces hard-copy printouts of selected displays from any database.
1.
Select Print from the FILE options.
2.
A list of existing databases appears in an overlaid menu. The system prompts you
to select a database. The default selection is the current database.
If you select a database from this list, another overlaid menu appears that lists all
displays in that database. You can select the display to be printed (even if the
display is locked).
5
3.
The selected display appears in the graphics displays window, and the system
prompts you to select one of the following types of printouts:
J Gray scale (LA210) — uses eight different pixel patterns for all the colors
available. A pixel map of the display is sent to an LA210 printer, which prints the
gray-scale print in a landscape format on approximately one-and-a-third sheets of
paper.
Outline (LA210/Laser) — uses just two pixel patterns (on and off) to show only
outlines of the various display elements. A pixel map of the display is sent to either
an LA210 or laser printer, which prints in portrait format. An outline print is
approximately one quarter of the area of a gray-scale printout. This type of printout
can be processed much faster than a gray-scale printout.
J
J Gray scale (Laser/LA210) — similar to the LA210 gray-scale printout, except the
print is smaller so a display fits onto a single A4-size sheet. This option can be used
to print displays on any DEC laser printer. It can also be used on LA210 printers, but
the printouts are not very clear.
J Gray scale (PostScript) — produces much higher quality printouts on any
printers that support PostScript. This type of printout can be used on any platform.
J Color (PostScript) — similar to the PostScript gray-scale printout, except the
print is in color.
Note:
Once you select the printout style, the system uses a background process to
create the printout. Print processing can take some time, so this feature allows
you to continue editing displays during this time.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
419
Table 5-14. Details of FILE Mode-specific Menu Options (Continued)
When You
Select This
Menu Option...
View
The Display Editor ...
Lets you look at — but not edit — one or more displays in the current database, or any
other database on the system.
1.
Select View from the FILE options.
2.
A list of all databases that you have privilege to access appears in an overlaid
menu. The system prompts you to select a database. The default selection is the
current database.
3.
If you select a database from this list, another overlaid menu appears that lists all
displays in that database. You can select the display to view (even if the display is
locked).
The selected display then appears in the graphics displays area. You can view, but
not modify this display.
4.
If you wish to view another display, enter the display name in the operator text input
area, or repeat Steps 1 to 3 and select that display from the overlaid menu list.
5.
When you are finished viewing displays, select the Cancel function (see subsection
5.2.6).
The display present when you selected the View option will be redrawn and you
can continue editing.
Note:
Display names follow the same rules as other tags in the database:
J Up to 12 characters (at least one character must be alphabetic). Tags are forced into upper case
and leading spaces are ignored. The only characters permitted are: A to Z, 0 to 9, and . , / J
5.4.4.1
Names cannot be in the form of an exponential number (for example, 22E--0006 or 13E5).
Saved User Preferences Data
When you exit from the Graphics Display Editor software, user
preferences data is saved in the ENVOX database (one set of data per
database). This data is restored the next time the Graphics Display
Editor software is invoked.
You set up most of the user preferences data using the SET mode, so
saving and restoring this data means you retain your own preferences
between Graphics Display Editor sessions (assuming you are the only
user of the database).
The following types of user preferences data are saved in the ENVOX
database:
J
Auto-modify mode
J
Update mode
J
Flash on/off
J
Cursor style
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
420
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
5
5.4.4.2
J
Default tag, attribute, and occurrence
J
Display background color
J
Default color settings
J
Default conditional colors
J
Grid on/off
J
Grid spacing
J
Default symbol (that is, the last symbol added)
J
Default display size (that is, the last display size set)
J
WPCON options enabled/disabled
Saved ISA Symbol Default Data
In a similar way to the user preferences data, exiting from the Graphics
Display Editor saves default values for each ISA symbol. The values
saved (also on a per database basis) are the last direction and scale
factor set for each ISA symbol using the ADD mode and Modify
element function.
5.5
Modifying Display Elements, Attributes, and Colors
This subsection deals the Modify element and Modify color options
from the function menu, and describes their effects on display elements,
attributes, and colors.
5.5.1
Modifying Display Elements
To modify elements of a display, you begin by selecting the Modify
element indicator on the function menu, or pressing the key
corresponding to that function (see Table 5-2). Alternatively, you can
select the Modify element function with a pointing device by clicking the
primary button anywhere in the scrolled message area or the operator
text input area.
What happens when you select the Modify element function depends
on which element you pick to modify. If you select more than one
element, nothing happens. If you select only one element, the Graphics
Display Editor may or may not take some action, as listed in Table 5-15.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
421
Table 5-15. Modifiable Characteristics of an Element
For This
Display
Element ...
Alarm
You Can Modify ...
Tag reference, word length, window height, number of words
Applicn
(Application)
DSR, terminal ID, node area, node address, user name,
password
Bargrph
(Bar graph)
Direction, tag--attribute, minimum, maximum
Button
Tag-attribute, button function, label, justification
See subsection 5.5.3 for more information on adding pushbuttons
to a display.
Con Col
(Conditional Color)
Con Txt
(Conditional Text)
Color V
Color C
Condt V
Condt C
Dev Bar
(Deviation Bar)
DDP
Discret
(Discrete Window)
DSR
Condition
Tag--attribute, deviation tag--attribute, limit marks
Tag reference, DSR
Tag--attribute
Tag reference, DSR
Entry
(Entry Field)
Tag--attribute, justification, field length, decimal places
Det Fpl
Ful Fpl
(Faceplate)
Tag reference, DSR
Mode
(Mode Entry)
Tag reference
OneOfN
(One of N Window)
Tag--attribute
Ovrview
(Overview)
Polygon
Scd Lst
(Scrolled List)
Starting point, number of points
Toggle open or close
Tag--attribute, item in list
Slider
Tag--attribute
Status
Tag reference, word length, window height, number of words
Symbol
(ISA Symbol)
Text
Scale and direction
All text (go to text modification mode)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
422
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-15. Modifiable Characteristics of an Element (Continued)
For This
Display
Element ...
You Can Modify ...
Trend
Tag reference, DSR
Value
Tag--attribute, justification, field length, decimal places
You cannot modify characteristics of the following Operator Workplace elements:
5
5.5.2
J
Arc
J
Box
J
Circle
J
Line
J
Date
J
Time
Modifying Attributes
To modify attributes of a display element, select the element and pick the
Modify element function, or press the key corresponding to that function
(see Table 5-2). A modify line then appears in the operator text input
area. Initially, the modify line describes the current values of the
attributes of the selected element.
The modify line is divided into a number of modifiable fields, separated
by non-modifiable description fields. For example:
Bargraph on %PV[0]: “FIC-101A” Min = 0.0 Max = 100.0 Direction UP
The modifiable fields are the attribute (%PV), the occurrence number (0),
the tag (FIC-101A), and the bar graph minimum (0.0), maximum
(100.0), and direction (UP). All other contents of the modify line are
fixed and cannot be modified.
When the modify line appears, the cursor is positioned at the start of the
first modifiable field (in the example line above, the cursor is initially over
the % of %PV).
Certain keys have special meanings within the Modify element function.
Table 5-16 lists these dedicated keys.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
423
Table 5-16. Modify Element Function Dedicated Keys
Press This
DEC Key...
Press This
IBM Key...
Press This
HP Key...
To Get This
Result ...
With This Effect ...
Cursor right
Moves the cursor right within a field. At the
right edge, the cursor skips to the next field,
or if you are at the last field, it skips to the
first field.
Cursor left
Moves the cursor left within a field. At the
left edge, the cursor skips to the previous
field, or if the current field is the first field, it
skips to the last field.
Next value
Displays in the field the next valid value for
the field
Previous value
Displays in the field the previous valid value
for the field
Prev scr
Page Up
Prev
Previous
screen
Attempts to accept the current field and
skips to the previous field. If the current
field is the first field, it skips to the last field.
Next scr
Page Down
Next
Next screen
Attempts to accept the current field and
skips to the next field. If the current field is
the last field, it skips to the first field.
Remove
Delete
Delete line
Abort
Aborts the element modification without
making any changes to previous values.
Next field
Attempts to accept the current field and
skips to the next field. If the current field is
the last field, it accepts the entire modify
line.
Enter
Accepts modify
Attempts to accept the current field.
Accepts the entire modify line.
Ctrl A
Mode toggle
Toggles between insert and overlay modes
(the default mode is overlay when entering
the Graphics Display Editor).
Option list
Displays a list of valid options for the
current field. The list remains on the screen
until the cursor is moved to another field
Delete
In EDIT mode, deletes the character to the
left of the cursor. In the insert mode, it
contracts the field. In the overlay mode, it
replaces the character with a space and
moves the cursor left. However, if the
cursor is at the left edge of a field, it deletes
the entire field.
Return
Help
Print Scr
(Delete)
Clear line
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
424
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
5.5.3
Adding A Push Button to a Display
After you add a button (push button) to a display using the ADD
mode-specific menu, you can configure the push button to start, stop, or
advance an LCP (logic control point) FST (function sequence table) or to
run a UDK (user defined key or macro) or remote application. When you
modify a push button a modify line similar to the following appears:
Button on PTYP : “?” function “?” label “” Justify CENTER
The fields you can modify are tag and attribute, function, and label. The
Justify field is ignored. Button labels are always centered.
The attribute (PTYP) field is ignored. The tag field (the first ?) can
contain either an LCP tag or the tag of a UDK or remote application. The
content of the function field (the second ?) depends on the tag field. If
the tag field is an LCP tag, the function field can contain START FST,
STOP FST, or ADVANCE FST.
5
If the tag field is the tag of a UDK or remote application, leave the
function field as a question mark (?).
For example, to configure a push button to run a remote application
whose tag is REMAPP, the modify line would look like:
Button on PTYP : “REMAPP” function “?” label “Remote App” Justify CENTER
Note that the label you assign to a push button from the display editor
applies only to the push button on the display.
5.5.3.1
LCP FST Push Button Labels
For buttons that peform one of the FST functions (start, stop, or advance
FST), the label that appears on the button is the label defined in the
display editor. If no label is defined the button label is the configured FST
function (Start FST, Stop FST, or Advance FST).
5.5.3.2
UDK Push Button Labels
For buttons that run UDKs the label that appears on the button when an
operator is viewing the display on the console depends on several
things. However, the label will usually be the first of the following that is
configured or defined:
1. The button label defined in the display editor
2. The button label configured in the User Defined Key form (see
subsection 4.10.7)
3. The key or key combination defined in the User Defined Key form
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
425
4. The UDK tag
There are three special cases in which the label can be something else.
All three special cases indicate the pushbutton is not currently functional:
J
J
J
5.5.3.3
If a button label is configured in the display editor but the UDK is not
in any operator’s UDK list, the label is the button label defined in the
display editor, but it appears stippled or faded.
If a button label is not configured in the display editor and the UDK is
not in any operator’s UDK list, the label is Invalid and appears
stippled or faded.
If a button label is not configured in the display editor and the UDK is
in some operators’ UDK lists but not in the current operator’s list the
label is Macro.
Remote Application Pushbutton Labels
For buttons that run remote applications the label that appears on the
display will be either the label configured in the display editor, or if that
does not exist, the tag of the remote application.
5.5.4
Adding a Value Field to a Display
When adding a Value field to a display using the ADD mode-specific
menu, allow sufficient length for the size of the value and its plus or
minus sign (+ or -). This is particularly important for floating-point values.
The Operator Workstation software truncates decimal places, as
necessary, to make the value fit into the field. The display cannot show
values to the desired number of decimal places if the field is too short.
When you enter a value into any field, the system only accepts valid
characters for that field; other characters are ignored. If the field only
accepts uppercase characters, then any lowercase characters you enter
will automatically be converted to upper case.
Each field will only accept up to a certain number of characters (the
number depends upon the maximum width required for a valid value in
that field). Any characters entered beyond the maximum width are
ignored.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
426
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
5.5.5
Modifying Colors
The color modify area is always active. Use it to modify colors in selected
elements or to modify default colors. There are four basic types of
elements whose colors you can modify:
5
J
Line color of a shape
J
Fill color of a shape
J
Text color
J
Color of a strip where text appears
Icons for these four color modification types appears at the top of the
color modify area. There is also a fill / nofill indicator in this area.
If you pick specific elements before selecting the Modify Color function,
you change the colors of the selected elements only. If you have not
picked any elements before you select Modify Color, you change the
default colors.
To select a color using a pointing device:
Step 1:
Move the cursor to the required color-type icon, and if it is not
already highlighted, click the primary button on it.
Step 2:
Once the icon is selected, move the cursor to the appropriate
color box and click the primary button on it.
To select a fill color, click on the fill / nofill indicator, then move the
cursor to the appropriate color box and click the primary button on it.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
5.6
427
Using Graphics Display Conditionals
Graphics display conditionals let you configure graphics displays
elements so that they change color or generate display messages based
on changing point attributes.
In most instances, you set the conditional parameters using the Graphics
Display Editor when you create the displays. You can also modify color
and text conditions through the ENVOX Top Level Form using the Add
menu’s LOGIC option.
A conditional is a comparison of a console database value (a point,
attribute, and, if applicable, occurrence) to another database value or to
a constant. You change the appearance of a display depending upon the
conditionals you define. A conditional can be short and simple, or long
and complex.
There are two categories of conditionals:
J
Simple conditionals — are used when the display element only
requires two states (true/false or on/off, for instance) to let the
operator see its conditions. Conditions that are true produce one
result; conditions that are false produce a different result. For
example, if a two-position valve is open, you might make it green,
and if it is closed, then red.
There are two types of simple conditionals:
j Color conditionals
j Two-element conditionals
J
Conditional expressions — let you configure more complex
conditionals using the ENVOX language editor. There are two types
of conditional expressions:
j Conditional color expressions
j Conditional text expressions
Subsection 5.6.1 describes simple conditionals and subsection 5.6.2
describes conditional expressions and how to configure them to enhance
your graphics displays. Subsection 5.6.3 provides tips for improving the
performance of conditional expressions.
5.6.1
Using Simple Conditionals
Simple conditionals can apply to circles, arcs, boxes, polygons, lines, bar
graphs, values, text elements, and ISA symbols.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
428
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Two types of simple conditionals are:
J
J
5
5.6.1.1
Color conditionals — in which the foreground and background colors
of one or more elements depend on whether the condition is true or
false (on or off, or any pair of opposites). For example, you could
configure an element to appear red when it is not operating, but blue
when it is operating.
Two-element conditionals — in which one or the other of two
elements appears when an operator brings up a display, according to
whether the condition is true or false at that time. For example, you
could configure two words, such as START and STOP, to appear in
the same footprint space if certain conditions apply.
Creating Color Conditionals
An example of a color conditional is a black bar graph that appears
outlined in cyan if a point’s percent process variable equals a second
point’s percent output, but outlined in red if the percent values are not
equal.
The following steps describe how to create a color conditional that
displays one color when certain elements are on and another color if the
elements are off.
Follow these steps using a pointing device (or a keyboard; see Table 5-2
for the appropriate keys to press to use the functions and menu options
mentioned):
Step 1:
Select the ADD mode, then the mode-specific menu’s
Symbol option.
Step 2:
When the overlaid window appears, select an ISA symbol you
want to display.
Step 3:
Mark a position for the symbol in the graphics display window,
and click the secondary button to add it to the display.
Step 4:
Move the cursor to the symbol and pick it, then select the
Color V or Color C option from the ADD mode-specific menu.
Selecting the Color V option creates a conditional that
compares the attribute (database value) of two tags.
Selecting the Color C option creates a conditional that
compares the attribute of a tag with a constant value set by
the ENVOX database.
Step 5:
Select the SET mode, then the mode-specific menu’s T/F
(true/false) option.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
429
To unmake the conditional, select the element or group of elements
containing the conditional, and click on the Unmake conditnl function
indicator. See subsection 5.5.2 for details on modifying attributes.
In Step 4, if you selected the Color V option — which creates a
conditional that compares the attribute (database value) of two tags —
you can modify these fields:
J
Tag
J
Attribute
J
Occurrence
J
Relation
J
Comparison key
J
Comparison attribute
J
Comparison occurrence
In Step 4, if you selected the Color C option — which creates a
conditional that compares the attribute of a tag with a constant value set
by the ENVOX database — you can modify these fields:
5.6.1.2
J
Tag
J
Attribute
J
Occurrence
J
Relation
J
Value
Creating Two-Element Conditionals
The following steps describe how to create a two-element conditional
that displays the word running or stopped to define the current condition
of a piece of equipment. You can use other conditions, of course, as long
as they are opposites.
Follow these steps using a pointing device (or a keyboard; see Table 5-2
for the appropriate keys to press to use the functions and menu options
mentioned):
Step 1:
Select the ADD mode, then the mode-specific menu’s Text
option.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
430
5
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Step 2:
Type the word RUNNING and press the Return or Enter key.
Then type the word STOPPED and click the secondary button
on the pointing device.
Step 3:
Move the cursor to the word STOPPED and pick it. Hold down
the center button and move the word STOPPED on top of the
word RUNNING, and release the button.
Step 4:
Move the cursor to the lower left edge of the word STOPPED.
Hold down the primary button and move the cursor to create a
pick box surrounding the word STOPPED, then release the
button.
Step 5:
Select the Condt C option from the ADD mode-specific menu.
An extend box appears surrounding both words, but only the
word STOPPED is visible.
Note ... In this example, selecting the Condt C option creates a
conditional that compares the attribute of a tag with a constant
value set by the ENVOX database. In other cases, you might
select the Condt V option, which creates a conditional that
compares the attribute (database value) of two tags.
Selecting either the Condt C or Condt V option causes one of
the elements to disappear from the display.
Step 6:
Select the SET mode, then the mode-specific menu’s T/F
(true/false) option.
Now only the word RUNNING is visible.
Step 7:
To modify the colors of the element that the system is
displaying, select the SET mode-specific menu’s T/F option.
Click on the Modify color function indicator. Click on the color
button you want, then click the secondary button.
Step 8:
You may now want to modify the colors of the element that
disappeared when you selected the Condt C option (or
Condt V in other cases) in Step 5. To modify the colors, again
select the T/F option, then click on the Modify color function
indicator. Select a color that contrasts with the first color you
selected. Click on the appropriate color button, then click the
secondary button.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
Step 9:
431
The condition you set in Step 5 initially uses the default value.
To modify the condition, pick the conditional element and click
on the Modify element function indicator. This allows you to
change the conditional value by entering another value. Then
click the secondary button.
To unmake the conditional, select the element or group of elements
containing the conditional, and click on the Unmake conditnl function
indicator. See subsection 5.5.2 for details on modifying attributes.
In Step 5, if you selected the Condt C option — which creates a
conditional that compares the attribute of a tag with a constant value set
by the ENVOX database — you can modify these fields:
J
Tag
J
Attribute
J
Occurrence
J
Relation
J
Comparison value
In Step 5, had you selected the Condt V option — which creates a
conditional that compares the attribute (database value) of two tags —
you could modify these fields:
5.6.2
J
Tag
J
Attribute
J
Occurrence
J
Relation
J
Comparison tag
J
Comparison attribute
J
Comparison occurrence
Using Conditional Expressions
Conditional expressions are logic sequences that you create using the
ENVOX language editor. A conditional color expression lets you change
the foreground and background colors of display elements based on a
list of conditions. A conditional text expression lets you display a
message in a graphics display based on a list of conditions. In either
case, the conditional is made up of ASSIGN COLOR, DEFINE COLOR,
IF, THEN, ELSE, ENDIF, and OTHERWISE instructions.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
432
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
The list of conditions uses one or two console database points. When
you create the conditional using the language editor, you use variable
names: POINT1 and POINT2. When you create the display in the
Graphics Display Editor, you reference the appropriate conditional and
supply the tags you want the conditional to use (for example, FIC-127
and FIC-128) and the display element that you want the conditional to
affect. This allows you to configure a general conditional and use it many
times.
5
To maximize efficiency of the Operator Workplace console, it is important
that you write efficient conditional expressions. Bear in mind that
performance and speed decrease as complexity increases. This is
especially true when you use a large conditional expression, or a large
number of conditional expressions in a single display.
You have seven instructions to choose from in creating conditional
expressions. They are:
J
J
J
J
J
J
J
ASSIGN COLOR — assigns to a display element an alarm color you
previously defined in the Alarm Priority Definition, or a color based on
an integer value returned by any other point attribute
DEFINE COLOR — defines a display element color when an IF
instruction is evaluated and found to be TRUE. This statement was
added to improve readability, and is virtually interchangeable with the
THEN statement
ELSE — instructs the Operator Workplace software to stop
processing a conditional after a TRUE condition is encountered
ENDIF — defines an end to an IF condition that meets specific
default parameters
IF — defines parameters a condition must meet to invoke the
conditional expression
OTHERWISE — defines a default color
THEN — defines a display element color when an IF instruction is
evaluated and found to be TRUE. This statement is virtually
interchangeable with the DEFINE COLOR statement
The operands for each of these instructions are described in Table 5-18
for conditional color expressions, and in Table 5-20 for conditional text
expressions.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
433
To give you the most flexibility in designing conditional expressions, the
Operator Workplace software places very few restrictions on the size and
complexity of conditional expressions. However, there are two
restrictions that you should be aware of:
J
The only limit to the number of conditional expressions configured on
a display is a 64 kilobyte limitation on download data produced from
displays.
Consequently, it is possible to configure a display that consumes all
the available CPU free time on a console. Refer to subsection 5.1.6
for more information.
J
If all of your text phrases for a particular conditional text expression
are not the same length, you should add enough spaces to the text
area on your screen that references the conditional to make all text
the same length.
The console does not erase the field or fill the field with trailing
spaces. Thus, unless you add spaces at the end of your shorter
texts, part of your previous text could remain in the text field and
confuse your operator.
5.6.2.1
Using the ENVOX Language Editor
To configure complex conditional expressions, you must use the ENVOX
language editor.
To access the language editor, select Add menu on the ENVOX
Top-Level Form, and the LOGIC option. Slide off the LOGIC option to
the next menu and select either CONDITIONAL COLOR or
CONDITIONAL TEXT, depending on which conditional you wish to
define.
You can also access the language editor from the Graphics Display
Editor when you supply the names for conditional expressions. Follow
these steps using a pointing device (or a keyboard; see Table 5-2 for the
appropriate keys to press to use the functions and menu options
mentioned):
Step 1:
Pick the display element.
Step 2:
Select the Modify color or Modify element function indicator.
Step 3:
Enter the following text:
Conditional, POINT1, POINT2.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
434
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
An overlaid menu appears, giving you the option of continuing
the editing session or entering the ENVOX language editor. If
you select the first option (Edit), the display editor session
continues. If you enter the second option (Color or Text
Expression Instruction Editor), you can write or
modify the conditional expression.
Step 4:
Select the Edit option to go directly into the language editor.
The language editor expects you to use a specific syntax so that it can
interpret your conditionals. Complex conditional expressions are made
up of particular IF expression statements. See subsection 5.6.2.2 for
information on creating conditional color expressions, or subsection
5.6.2.4 for creating conditional text expressions.
5
Note ... For more information on the language editor, refer to the Using
ENVOX Configuration Software (UM4.14:SW3151) manual.
5.6.2.2
Creating Conditional Color Expressions
To create a conditional color expression and use it to affect a graphics
display element, do these two things, in either order:
J
J
In the language editor, create the conditional color expression.
In the display editor, apply the conditional color expression to circles,
arcs, boxes, polygons, lines, bar graphs, values, text elements, or
ISA symbols (see subsection 5.6.1). For each element, identify the
points the expression uses for POINT1 and POINT2.
Note ... If POINT2 is not used in the conditional color expression, enter
“?” for the tag.
If you apply a conditional expression to a display element before the
conditional exists, you must create it before ENVOX software can
successfully generate the console.
Color conditionals are defined with IF expression THEN color on
color statements. You can have as many as 16 such statements in
one color conditional.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
435
Also, each conditional expression can relate its two points with as many
as four AND and OR statements. For example, you could have an IF ...
THEN statement like:
IF SP[0]:Point1 <= 50 AND PV[0]:Point1 = SP[0]:Point1 or
SP[0]:Point2 <50 or PV[0]:Point2 <50 THEN color on color.
The system evaluates the AND and OR conditions of each IF ... THEN
statement from left to right. The last IF ... THEN statement it evaluates
as true determines the colors the console uses for the display element.
The OTHERWISE statement at the end of each conditional provides a
configurable default color pattern, which the system can use if none of
the specified conditions is met. The following is an example of a color
conditional that does not have the IF statements nested:
Tag “Condition1”,
if SP[0]:Point1 <= 50 AND SP[0]:Point2 <50 then Blue on
Black,
if SP[0]:Point1 = 51
then Green on Black,
if SP[0]:Point2 = 52
then Yellow on Black,
if SP[0]:Point2 = SP[0]:Point1
then Red Blink on Black,
Otherwise
White on Black.
The previous color expression produces the results in Table 5-17 for an
object to which you assign this conditional color. Note that the last true
expression determines the color of a conditional expression.
Table 5-17. Results of the Conditional Color Expression
These Inputs ...
Produce These
Outputs ...
Color
Point1 SP[0]
Point 2 SP[0]
50
0
Blue on Black
51
0
Green on Black
51
52
Yellow on Black
52
52
Red Blink on Black
54
53
White on Black
Figure 5-6 is an example of a user-written conditional color expression
from the language editor. The figure shows each instruction in open
form, that is, with the operands displayed. The language editor actually
only shows one instruction in open format at a time.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
436
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
ASSIGN COLOR (
attribute
comment
IF
AND/OR
{ Assign Color }
>> ACOLNOR[8]:POINT1
>> normal alarm color
used if point is in alarm
(
{ If Condition }
attribute
>> PV:POINT1
relation
>> >
attribute or value >> 20
As many
as 16
instructions
Operands
Instruction
attribute
>> PV:POINT2
relation
>> <
attribute or value >> 20
As many as four AND/OR
statements for each IF instruction
THEN (
{ Then set element color}
outline color >> GREEN
fill color
>> RED
comment
>> sample then
ELSE ( { Else Action }
comment
>>
DEFINE COLOR (
{ Set element Color }
outline color >> GREEN
fill color
>> RED
comment
>> sample define color
ENDIF
(
{ End If Condition }
comment
>> sample endif
5
X0058:DC6460A
Figure 5-6.
Language Editor Screen with Conditional Color Instructions
Table 5-18 describes the operands for each instruction you can use to
create conditional color expressions.
Table 5-18. Conditional Color Expression Operands
Using this
Instruction ...
ASSIGN COLOR
Which
Has This
Operand ...
Valid Entries are ...
attribute
attrib[occur]: followed by POINT1 or POINT2.
For example: ACOLNOR[2]:POINT1
For the attribute ACOLNOR, the occurrence number (0 through 7)
signifies an alarm C, B, A, D, or an extended alarm 1 through 4,
respectively. Occurrence 8 signifies the highest priority alarm in the
current PPA state. If no occurrence is entered, the occurrence
defaults to 0.
See Table D-4 for other attributes to use in ASSIGN COLOR
statements.
DEFINE COLOR
comment
As many as 80 characters.
outline color
Any valid graphics display color
fill color
Any valid graphics display color
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
437
Table 5-18. Conditional Color Expression Operands (Continued)
Which
Has This
Operand ...
Valid Entries are ...
comment
As many as 80 characters
ELSE
none
For an IF/ELSE expression, precedes the code executed when the
IF expression is false. Must always include a matching ENDIF
instruction. An IF expression, ASSIGN COLOR instruction, THEN
instruction, or DEFINE COLOR instruction can follow an ELSE
instruction.
ENDIF
none
Required for all IF/ELSE instructions in a conditional expression.
Any time you use ENDIF one or more times in a conditional
expression, you must use it in all IF instructions in that conditional
expression.
Using this
Instruction ...
IF
attribute
:POINT1 or :POINT2 preceded by a point attribute mnemonic and a
valid occurrence number in brackets. For example:
ALM[2]:POINT1
relation
=, <, >, <=, >=, or <>
attribute or
value
For an attribute, :POINT1 or :POINT2 preceded by a point attribute
mnemonic and a valid occurrence number in brackets. For example:
ALM[1]:POINT2
For a value, any integer.
THEN
OTHERWISE
5.6.2.3
AND/OR
AND or OR
comment
As many as 80 characters
outline color
Any valid graphics display color
fill color
Any valid graphics display color
comment
As many as 80 characters
outline color
Any valid graphics display color
fill color
Any valid graphics display color
comment
As many as 80 characters
Applying Conditional Color Expressions in Graphics Displays
To apply a conditional color expression to a graphics display, follow
these steps using a pointing device (or a keyboard; see Table 5-2 for the
appropriate keys to press to use the functions and menu options
mentioned):
Step 1:
Access the graphics display you want.
Step 2:
Pick one or more display elements (same types as simple
conditionals) you want to be affected by the expression.
Step 3:
Select the ADD mode, then the mode-specific menu’s
Con Col option.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
438
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Step 4:
Click on the Modify color function indicator. The software
prompts you for the following information:
Conditional Color:
“”
“”
Point1
“”Point2
Step 5:
For Conditional Color, enter the name you assigned to
the expression when you created it (or the name you will give
the expression when you create it).
Step 6:
For Point1, enter the point tag you want the expression to
use for POINT1.
Step 7:
For Point2, enter the point tag you want the expression to
use for POINT2 and press the Return or Enter key. If the
expression does not include a POINT2 reference, click the
secondary button on the pointing device.
Step 8:
Click the primary button while the cursor is in the operator text
input area or scrolled message area (or press the Return or
Enter key).
5
An overlaid menu appears, giving you the option of continuing
the editing session or entering the ENVOX Color Expression
Instruction Editor. If you select the second option
(Continue), the display editor session continues. If you enter
the first option (Edit Color Expression), you can write
or modify the color expression.
Step 9:
5.6.2.4
Select the Edit option to go directly into the language editor.
Creating Conditional Text Expressions
To create a conditional text expression and use it to affect a graphics
display element, do these two things, in either order:
J
J
In the language editor, create the conditional text expression.
In the display editor, create a conditional text field that will show the
resultant text from your expression. For each field, identify the points
the expression uses for POINT1 and POINT2.
Note ... If POINT2 is not used in the conditional text expression, enter
“?” for the tag.
If you create a conditional text field before the conditional expression
exists, you must build the conditional before the ENVOX software can
successfully generate the console display.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
439
The conditional text expression is identical to the color expression except
that it also contains a message with as many as 80 characters.
You make text conditionals with IF expression THEN color on
color text statements. You also can have as many as 16 statements
in one text conditional, and you can use as many as four AND and OR
combinations within an expression.
The following is an example of a text conditional:
Tag “Cond1”,
if SP[0]:Point1 = 50
then Blue on Black text “Setpoint Equals 50”,
if SP[0]:Point1 = 51
then Green on Black text “Setpoint Equals 51”,
if SP[0]:Point2 = 52
then Yellow on Black text “Setpoint Equals 52”,
if SP[0]:Point2 = point1:SP[0]
Otherwise
then Red on Black text “Equilibrium
Condition”,
White on Black text “Check for high and low flow”.
This text expression produces the results in Table 5-19.
Table 5-19. Results of the Conditional Text Expression
These Inputs ...
Produce These Outputs ...
Point1 SP[0]
Point 2 SP[0]
Color
Text
50
0
Blue on Black
Setpoint Equals 50
51
0
Green on Black
Setpoint Equals 51
51
52
Yellow on Black
Setpoint Equals 52
52
52
Red on Black
Equilibrium Condition
54
53
White on Black
Check for high and low flow
Figure 5-7 is an example of a user-written conditional text expression
from the language editor. The figure shows each instruction in open
form, that is, with the operands displayed. The language editor actually
only shows one instruction in open format at a time.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
440
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
ASSIGN COLOR ( { Assign Alarm Color }
color attribute >> ACOLNOR[8]:POINT1
text
>> text field
comment
>> sample assign color
IF (
{ If condition}
attribute
>> PV:POINT1
relation
>> >
attribute or value >> 20
THEN ( { Then Set Text Color }
text color
>> RED
strip color
>> GREEN
text
>> text field
comment
>> sample then
ELSE ( { Else Action }
comment
>> sample else
DEFINE COLOR (
{ Set Text Color }
text color
>> GREEN
strip color
>> RED
text
>> text field
comment
>> sample define color
ENDIF (
{ End If Condition }
comment
>> sample endif
5
Instruction
Operands
X00059:DC6460A
Figure 5-7.
Language Editor Screen with Conditional Text Instructions
Table 5-20 describes the operands for each instruction you can use to
create conditional text expressions.
Table 5-20. Conditional Text Expression Operands
Using This
Instruction ...
ASSIGN COLOR
Which
Has This
Operand ...
Valid Entries Are ...
attribute
attrib[occur]: followed by POINT1 or POINT2.
For example: ACOLNOR[2]:POINT1
For the attribute ACOLNOR, the occurrence number (0 through 7)
signifies an alarm C, B, A, D, or an extended alarm 1 through 4,
respectively. Occurrence 8 signifies the highest priority alarm in the
current PPA state. If no occurrence is entered, the occurrence
defaults to 0.
See Table D-4 for other attributes to use in ASSIGN COLOR
statements.
DEFINE COLOR
ELSE
comment
As many as 80 characters.
outline color
Any valid graphics display color
fill color
Any valid graphics display color
comment
As many as 80 characters
none
For an IF/ELSE expression, precedes the code executed when the
IF expression is false. Must always include a matching ENDIF
instruction. An IF expression, ASSIGN COLOR instruction, THEN
instruction, or DEFINE COLOR instruction can follow an ELSE
instruction.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
441
Table 5-20. Conditional Text Expression Operands (Continued)
Using This
Instruction ...
ENDIF
IF
Which
Has This
Operand ...
Valid Entries Are ...
none
Required for all IF/ELSE instructions in a conditional expression.
Any time you use ENDIF one or more times in a conditional
expression, you must use it after all IF instructions in the conditional
expression.
attribute
:POINT1 or :POINT2 preceded by a point attribute mnemonic and a
valid occurrence number in brackets. For example: PV[8] :POINT1
relation
=, <, >, <=, >= or <>
attribute or
value
For an attribute, :POINT1 or :POINT2 preceded by a point attribute
mnemonic and a valid occurrence number in brackets. For
example: ALM[2] :POINT2
For a value, any integer or floating point value.
THEN
OTHERWISE
5.6.2.5
AND/OR
AND or OR
comment
As many as 80 characters
text color
Any valid graphics display color
strip color
Any valid graphics display color
text
As many as 80 characters. If the text is shorter than the text in the
OTHERWISE instruction, add spaces to make the fields the same
size.
comment
As many as 80 characters
text color
Any valid graphics display color
strip color
Any valid graphics display color
text
As many as 80 characters. If the text is shorter than the text in the
THEN instruction, add spaces to make the fields the same size.
comment
As many as 80 characters
Applying Conditional Text Expressions in Graphics Displays
To apply a conditional text expression to a graphics display, follow these
steps using a pointing device (or a keyboard; see Table 5-2 for the
appropriate keys to press to use the functions and menu options
mentioned)::
Step 1:
Access the graphics display you want.
Step 2:
Select the starting position for the text field.
Step 3:
Select the ADD mode, then the mode-specific menu’s
Con Txt option.
Step 4:
The software prompts you for the following information:
Text: “”
“”
Point1
“”
Point2
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
442
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Step 5:
For Text, enter either the name you assigned to the
conditional text expression when you created it (or the name
you will give the expression when you create it).
Step 6:
For Point1, enter the point tag you want the expression to
use for POINT1.
Step 7:
For Point2, enter the point tag you want the expression to
use for POINT2 and press the Return or Enter key. If the
expression does not include a POINT2 reference, click the
secondary button on the pointing device.
Step 8:
Click the primary button while the cursor is in the operator text
input area or scrolled message area (or press the Return or
Enter key).
5
An overlaid menu appears, giving you the option of continuing
the editing session or entering the ENVOX Text Expression
Instruction Editor. If you select the second option
(Continue), the display editor session continues. If you enter
the first option (Edit Text Expression), you can write or
modify the text expression.
Step 9:
5.6.3
Select the Edit option to go directly into the language editor.
Simplifying Conditional Expressions
The simplest way to improve the performance of a conditional expression
is to limit the number of database accesses. Any time you use a point
attribute in a conditional expression, the database must be accessed
each time you evaluate that expression. One method of limiting the
number of database accesses is to use the ELSE and ASSIGN COLOR
statements when you create conditional expressions.
5.6.3.1
Effective Uses of ASSIGN COLOR
The ELSE statement allows you to minimize Operator Workplace
console database accesses by stopping conditional expression
processing whenever a true condition is found. By placing the condition
that is most likely to be true at the beginning of the conditional
expression, you can shorten the processing time considerably. This way,
you have the option of optimizing performance during either normal
operating conditions or abnormal conditions.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
443
You may want to balance the conditional expressions so that some are
optimized during normal conditions, while others are optimized during
abnormal conditions. Figure 5-8 shows an example of how you may
optimize performance under normal operating conditions. Figure 5-9
shows an example of how you may optimize performance under
abnormal conditions. A default color (either the color you used when you
created the element in the display editor, or the OTHERWISE color used
in the conditional expression) requires no database access, and should
always be used for one of the conditions.
0001:
0002:
0003:
0004:
0005:
0006:
0007:
0008:
IF (PV:POINT1, <=, 50.0, , , , , , , , , , , )
THEN (GREEN, BLACK) { normal condition }
ELSE
IF (PV:POINT1, >, 50.0, AND, PV:POINT1, <, 60.0, , , , , , , )
THEN (YELLOW, BLACK) { slightly abnormal condition }
ENDIF
ENDIF
OTHERWISE (RED BLINK, BLACK) { very abnormal condition }
Figure 5-8.
Optimizing Conditional Expression Performance Under Normal
Operating Conditions
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
444
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
0001:
0002:
0003:
0004:
0005:
0006:
0007:
0008:
5
IF (PV:POINT, >, 60.0, , , , , , , , , , , )
THEN (RED BLINK, BLACK) { very abnormal condition }
ELSE
IF (PV:POINT1, >, 50.0, AND, PV:POINT1, <, 60.0, , , , , , , )
THEN (YELLOW, BLACK) { slightly abnormal condition }
ENDIF
ENDIF
OTHERWISE (GREEN, BLACK) { normal condition }
Figure 5-9.
Optimizing Conditional Expression Performance Under Abnormal
Operating Conditions
The ASSIGN COLOR statement allows you to assign to any display
element the colors you configured in the alarm priority definition for the
current PPA state. If there are no active alarms, the display element
appears in its default color.
Figure 5-10 shows a conditional expression example that assigns the
alarm window color of the highest priority alarm to a display element
when the point is in alarm or is unacknowledged. This example uses the
default color when the point is not in alarm. Structuring a conditional
expression this way requires only one database access.
0001:
0002:
ASSIGN COLOR (ACOLNOR[8]:POINT1)
OTHERWISE (GREEN, BLACK)
Figure 5-10.
Optimizing Conditional Expression Performance Using the ASSIGN
COLOR Instruction
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
445
Note ... Do not use this type of expression for conditional text. Because
there is no text field configured in the alarm priority definition,
the ASSIGN COLOR statement only provides the alarm color.
Because of the way the Operator Workplace software processes the
conditional text expression, the text field in the ASSIGN COLOR
statement always overwrites the default text field. Figure 5-11 shows an
example of the incorrect way to use the ASSIGN COLOR statement in a
conditional text expression.
5
0001:
0002:
ASSIGN COLOR (ACOLNOR[8]:POINT1, Alarm text field)
OTHERWISE (GREEN, BLACK, Normal text field))
Figure 5-11.
Incorrect Use of the ASSIGN COLOR Instruction in a Conditional
Text Expression
This type of statement always uses the Alarm Text field, even when the
point is not in alarm. Because there is no true IF condition in this
expression, there is no way for the console software to determine which
text field to use.
Instead of using the above example, use a static text field with a
conditional color expression like the one in Figure 5-10 attached to it to
correctly implement the ASSIGN COLOR instruction. This gives you the
same result in a less confusing way.
If you want to have different text fields based on the alarm condition, and
have ASSIGN COLOR capability, use a conditional expression similar to
Figure 5-12.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
446
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
0001:
0002:
0003:
5
IF (PTCOND:POINT1, EQ, 3, OR, PTCOND:POINT1, EQ, 4)
ASSIGN COLOR (ACOLNOR[8]:POINT1, Alarm text field)
OTHERWISE (GREEN, BLACK, Normal text field)
Figure 5-12.
Correct Use of the ASSIGN COLOR Instruction in a Conditional Text
Expression
By structuring a conditional expression this way, the console software
uses the Alarm Text field with the alarm color when POINT1 has an
active or unacknowledged alarm. If there are no active alarms, the
console software displays the Normal Text field with the default color
(GREEN, BLACK). A conditional expression structured like Figure 5-12
requires only two or three database accesses.
Note ... To improve readability of conditional expressions, always use
indentation as shown in the preceding examples. The
Instruction Editor allows you to indent instructions after you
create them. Simply place the cursor in front of the instruction
and press the space bar to move the instruction to the right. To
move the instruction to the left, position the cursor in front of the
instruction and press the delete or backspace key.
Remember that you can modify the alarm priority colors by using the
following alarm color attributes:
J
J
J
J
ACOLNOR — Uses the colors exactly as they were configured
ACOLINV — Uses the outline (foreground) color as the fill
(background) color or the fill color as the outline color
ACOLFGD — Uses the outline (foreground) color as both the outline
and fill (background) colors
ACOLBGD — Uses the fill (background) color as both the outline
(foreground) and fill colors
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Using the Graphics Display Editor F Section 5
447
Note ... ISA symbols cannot use fill colors.
5.6.3.2
Advanced Use of ASSIGN COLOR
The ASSIGN COLOR command allows you to use an integer value to
assign a color to a display element. This integer value can be a setpoint
or PV of a DCD or Group Point, or any integer value stored in the integer
registers of an LCP Point. The only requirements are that the integer
value must correspond to a valid color combination (outline and fill), and
the integer value must be returned by a valid point attribute (such as SP.
PV, MVPCV5, and so on).
Note ... The SP and PV must be from a point type that normally returns
an integer value for these attributes, such as a DCD or a Group
Point. If the value returned does not correspond with a valid
color combination, the color of the display element is not
changed or updated.
For example, if you want to use the first integer register of LCP Point
EXAMPLE-LCP to set the color of a valve on a display, use the following
procedure:
Step 1:
Create the following conditional color expression:
ASSIGN COLOR (MVPCV5:POINT1)
Step 2:
Attach the conditional color expression to the valve by
following the steps in subsection 5.6.2.3. Specify that POINT1
is EXAMPLE-LCP.
Whatever value is stored in the first integer register of
EXAMPLE-LCP then determines the color of the valve.
Determine the integer value for a particular color combination by using
Table 5-21 and the formula following the table.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
5
448
Section 5 F Using the Graphics Display Editor
Table 5-21. Valid Color and Integer Value Combinations
Color
5
Value
Color
Value
Color
Value
Black
0
Light Brick
22
Light Ochre
43
Red
1
Light Cherry
23
Mid Ochre
44
Blue
2
Mid Purple
24
Dark Ochre
45
Magenta
3
Mid Slate Blue
25
Light Yellow
46
Green
4
Mid Teal
26
Mid Yellow
47
Yellow
5
Mid Green
27
Cool Grey 8
48
Cyan
6
Mid Khaki
28
Cool Grey 7
49
White
7
Mid Rust
29
Cool Grey 6
50
Green Blink
8
Mid Brick
30
Cool Grey 5
51
Dim Red
9
Mid Cherry
31
Cool Grey 4
52
Grey
10
Dark Purple
32
Cool Grey 3
53
Full Blue
11
Dark Slate Blue
33
Cool Grey 2
54
Dim Red Blink
12
Dark Teal
34
Cool Grey 1
55
Yellow Blink
13
Dark Green
35
Warm Grey 8
56
Red Blink
14
Dark Khaki
36
Warm Grey 7
57
White Blink
15
Dark Rust
37
Warm Grey 6
58
Light Purple
16
Dark Brick
38
Warm Grey 5
59
Light Slate Blue
17
Dark Cherry
39
Warm Grey 4
60
Light Teal
18
Light Orange
40
Warm Grey 3
61
Light Green
19
Mid Orange
41
Warm Grey 2
62
Light Khaki
20
Dark Orange
42
Warm Grey 1
63
Light Rust
21
Note:
If you change the default mix of these colors, this table will no longer have any meaning.
To calculate the integer value for a specific color combination, use the
following formula:
Outline color number + (Fill color number X 256) = INTEGER VALUE
For example, to get a red outline with a black fill, use this equation:
1 + (0 X 256) = 1
To get a magenta outline with a cyan fill, use this equation:
3 + (6 X 256) = 1536
To get a green blink outline with a red fill, use this equation:
8 + (1 X 256) = 264
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Functions Available by Privileges F Appendix A
449
Figure A-Table A
Appendix A
A Functions Available by Privileges
The following tables show the menu selections and miscellaneous
functions that the Operator Workplace console software contains, along
with the operator privilege required to access the function or menu
selection. The key to the privileges is:
J
A — Access
J
O — Operate
J
T — Tune
J
D — Download
J
L — Lock
A
Table A-1. Privileges Required for Window Menu Items
Windows Menu
Operator Privilege
New Display
A, O, T
New Instrument Area
A, O, T
DDPs
A, O, T
Faceplate
A, O, T
Trend Display
A, O, T
Messages/Log
D, L, A, O, T
Surveillance
Shift Comments
Macros(1)
1.
A, O, T
D, A, O, T
D, L, A, O, T
Menu option is available only if user has been assigned UDKs during console configuration.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
450
Appendix A F Functions Available by Privileges
Table A-2. Privileges Required for Summaries Menu Items
Summaries Menu(1)
Operator Privilege
Alarm Summary
A, O, T
Point Status Summary
A, O, T
Communications Failure Summary
A, O, T
OAR Summary
A, O, T
Resync Summary
A, O, T
1.
Privilege necessary for the Summaries menu is set during console configuration and can be
configured as ACCESS, OPERATE, or TUNE.
Table A-3. Privileges Required for Utilities Menu Items
A
Utilities Menu
Operator Privilege
Login
D, L, A, O, T
Close and Auto--Reopen
Run Remote
Session(1)
D, L, A, O, T
Application(2)
A, O, T
Database Operations
D
Time ® Set Date/Time
D, O, T
Time ® Daylight Savings
T
Test Screen
D, A, O, T
Switchover ® Manual
O, T
Switchover ® Auto Enable
A, O, T
Switchover ® Auto Disable
O, T
Maintenance Display
A, O, T
1.
Menu option is available only if user has privilege enabled in the X--resource file (OWS.DAT).
2.
Menu option is available only if user has been assigned remote applications during console
configuration.
Table A-4. Privileges Required for Print Menu Items
Print Menu(1)
Operator Privilege
Summaries
A, O, T
Reports
A, O, T
Report Frequency
Abort Printer
1.
T
O, T
Privilege necessary for the Print menu is set during console configuration and can be
configured as ACCESS, OPERATE, or TUNE.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Functions Available by Privileges F Appendix A
451
Table A-5. Privileges Required for View Menu Items
View Menu(1)
Operator Privilege
Refresh
A, O, T
Clear
A, O, T
Reset Display
A, O, T
Tile(2)
A, O, T
Screen Template
A, O, T
Show All DSRs(3)
A, O, T
Track DSRs(3)
A, O, T
Couple(3)
A, O, T
1.
Privilege necessary for the View menu is ACCESS, OPERATE, or TUNE.
2.
Menu option is available only if main window is split--window orientation.
3.
Privilege necessary for these selections is set during console configuration from the Console
Options form and can be configured as ACCESS, OPERATE, or TUNE.
Table A-6. Privileges Required for Preferences Menu Items
Preferences Menu(1)
Operator Privilege
Apply Preferences
A, O, T
Remote Login Name
A, O, T
Appearance
A, O, T
Orientation
Alarm Window On
A, O, T
Top(2)
Directories
Displays ® Display Update Rate
A, O, T
A, O, T
T
Displays ® Initial Display
A, O, T
Displays ® Display Stack Size(3)
A, O, T
Displays ® Remember Zoom
A, O, T
Pointer Acceleration
A, O, T
Alarm Summary Update Interval
A, O, T
Default Screen Template
A, O, T
1.
Privilege necessary for the Preferences menu is set during console configuration and can be
configured as ACCESS, OPERATE, or TUNE.
2.
Menu option is stippled and insensitive when the console wide preference is set to Always in
the console configuration.
3.
Display Stack must be unlocked. If the Display Stack is locked this menu option is stippled
and insensitive.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
A
452
Appendix A F Functions Available by Privileges
Table A-7.
Privileges Required for Miscellaneous Controls
Control or Function
Operator Privilege
Instrument Area
Point ETF
A, O, T
Point Forward
A, O, T
Point Backward
A, O, T
Point Last
A, O, T
All Point Controls
O, T
Main Window
A
Display ETF
A, O, T
Display Forward
A, O, T
Display Backward
A, O, T
Display Last
A, O, T
ZoomIn
A, O, T
ZoomOut
A, O, T
Display Stack
A, O, T
Display Stack Lock
A, O, T
Select DSR
A, O, T
Integrity Button
D, L, A, O, T
Button(1)
O, T
Ack Horn Button
D, L, A, O, T
A. Summ Button
A,O,T
O. Summ Button
A,O,T
Buttons(2)
A, O, T
Ack
Alarm
OAR List
Buttons(2)
A, O, T
1.
The Ack button appears sensitive to all users but is active only for users with the access and
privileges shown.
2.
The Alarm and OAR List buttons are sensitive but will always be blank for users with
ACCESS privilege
Trend Window
Trend Set ETF
A, O, T
Select Trace
A, O, T
Add Trace
A, O, T
Modify Trace
A, O, T
Reset Trace
A, O, T
Remove Trace
A, O, T
Hide/Show Trace
A, O, T
Cursor On/Off
A, O, T
Home Cursor
A, O, T
DDP Window
DDP Point ETF
A, O, T
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Functions Available by Privileges F Appendix A
Table A-7.
453
Privileges Required for Miscellaneous Controls (Continued)
Control or Function
Operator Privilege
DDP Remote Detail
A, O, T
DDP Local Detail
A, O, T
Select DDP from row
A, O, T
Modify
Modify (with DDP Oper Priv Attribute)
Show List/Show All
T
O, T
A, O, T
Other Functions
Shift Comments Clear
D, A, O, T
Surveillance Window buttons
A, O, T
Edit Surveillance List Window buttons
A, O, T
Surveillance ® Edit ® File: Apply or OK
A, O, T
Surveillance ® Edit ® File: Add or Delete
T
Edit Remote Application
T
Screen Templates Apply or OK
Screen Templates Add or Delete
All Popup Windows: Close
All Popup Windows: Selected Point Items
A, O, T
T
D, L, A, O, T
A, O, T
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
A
454
Appendix A F Functions Available by Privileges
A
Blank page.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Trendable Attributes F Appendix B
455
Figure B-Table B
Appendix B
B Trendable Attributes
Table B-1, Table B-2, and Table B-3 show trendable attributes for
real-time trends for all available point types. The information is divided
into three tables to logically organize the information by attribute.
Table B-1. Trendable Attributes for Real-Time Trends
INTSP
INTSP
SPTRCK
TRACKING(2)
INTRCK
TRACKING(1)
VOTRCK
TRACKING(0)
RATIO
RA
BIAS
%BI
OUTPUT
%OUTPUT
PV
PV
SP
SP
MODE
MODE
Point Type
AVP
AVP
Attributes([)
AI
--
--
--
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
AO
X
X
X
--
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
PCI
--
--
--
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
DI/DO (4-bit discrete)
--
X
2
2
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
MON
--
--
--
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
MON DEV
--
--
X
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
REF
--
--
3
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
REF DEV
--
--
3
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
DCP
X
X
X
X
X
--
--
X
X
X
X
DCP RAT
--
X
X
X
X
--
X
X
X
X
--
DCP BI
X
X
X
X
X
X
--
X
X
X
X
DCP BI RAT
--
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
--
MAN LOADER
X
X
X
X
X
--
--
X
X
X
--
MAN LOADER RAT
--
X
X
X
X
--
X
X
X
X
--
BIAS GAIN
X
X
X
X
X
X
--
X
X
X
--
BIAS GAIN RAT
--
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
--
SIG SELECT
X
X
X
X
X
--
--
X
X
X
--
SIG SELECT RAT
--
X
X
X
X
--
X
X
X
X
--
DI
--
--
--
1
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
DO
--
X
1
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
PDM
--
--
--
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
PDO
--
X
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
B
456
Appendix B F Trendable Attributes
Table B-1. Trendable Attributes for Real-Time Trends (Continued)
INTSP
INTSP
SPTRCK
TRACKING(2)
INTRCK
TRACKING(1)
VOTRCK
TRACKING(0)
RATIO
RA
BIAS
%BI
OUTPUT
%OUTPUT
PV
PV
SP
SP
MODE
ASCII
--
X
3
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
REAL
--
X
3
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
INTEGER
--
--
--
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
Note:
B
MODE
Point Type
AVP
AVP
Attributes([)
[-- First word in each column shows attributes as they appear in ENVOX software.
Second word shows attributes as they appear on the console except as noted.
1 -- This attribute appears on the console as CNTCT1.
2 -- This attribute appears on the console as CNTCT1, CNTCT2, and CNTCT3.
3 -- This attribute appears on the console as REF.
Table B-2. Trendable Attributes for Real-Time Trends
Attributes([)
Point
Type
MODE
SP
PV
DVAD
MVPFLIDX
MVPCV1-MVPCV12
MVPSTATE
CPR
FVAL
INST
ITRC
ASTA
FAIL
CV1-- CV12
CS
CP
FAIL
STMT
CI
CS
MODE
SP
PV
DVAD
DCD
X
X
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
GROUP
X
X
X
--
X
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
ACTIVITY
X
--
--
X
--
--
--
X
X
X
X
X
FLEX
X
--
--
X
X
X
X
--
--
--
--
--
Note:
[-- Top row shows attributes as they appear in ENVOXr software.
Second row shows attributes as they appear on the console except as noted.
Table B-3. Trendable Attributes for Real-Time Trends
Attributes([)
Point Type
UNIT
Note:
MODE
FI
MODE
FAIL
X
X
UPH
USTA
SN
PHASE
CS
STEP
X
X
UVAR[1]-- UVAR[32]
UVAR1-- UVAR32
X
X
[-- Top row shows attributes as they appear in ENVOX software.
Second row shows attributes as they appear on the console except as noted.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
457
Figure C-Table C
Appendix C
C Detail Display Parameters
This appendix consists of detail display parameter (DDP) lists, arranged
by number. The lists include the DDP mnemonic, a description, whether
or not the DDP is tunable, and to what devices the DDP is applicable.
There are two types of DDPs:
J
J
Remote DDPs — Tuning parameters used by and stored within a
controller or other remote device.
Local DDPs — Tuning parameters used by and stored in the console.
The terms Local DDP and Remote DDP indicate the relationship of the
DDP to the console. That is, Local DDPS reside in the local console and
Remote DDPs reside in remote devices. Remote devices are usually
controllers, but can be other consoles.
Remote DDPs determine how the point functions in the controller or other
remote device. Changing a remote DDP directly affects the point.
Local DDPs determine how point information appears at the console.
Changing a local DDP does not affect the point.
Tables are arranged with DDPs in numerical order. The order of
appearance of DDPs in the console varies with the remote device.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
458
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
C.1
Remote DDPs For Points In Remote Devices
Table C-1 contains a list of all the remote DDPs for remote devices.
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points
DDP
Number(1)(2)
C
Mnemonic and Name
Devices(3)
1
EU 0%
Engineering units 0 percent value
CFG, IAC,
MUX, UOC
2
EU 100%
Engineering units 100 percent value
CFG, IAC,
MUX, UOC
3
GAIN
Gain
CFG, IAC,
MUX, UOC
4
GAIN LM
Gain limit error squared
IAC
5
RESET
Reset (or integral)
CFG, IAC,
UOC
6
RATE
Rate (or derivative)
CFG, IAC,
UOC
7
RAMP TIM
Transfer ramp time
CFG, IAC
8
PV FTIM
PV filter time constant
CFG, MUX,
UOC
9
REV ACT?
Reverse or direct control action
CFG, IAC,
UOC
10
INC CLO?
Increase opens, increase closes
CFG, IAC,
MUX, UOC
11
ALM A TR
Alarm A trip point
CFG, IAC,
MUX, UOC
12
ALM B TR
Alarm B trip point
CFG, IAC,
MUX, UOC
13
ALM C TR
Alarm C trip point
CFG, IAC,
MUX, UOC
14
ALM DBND
Alarm deadband
CFG, IAC,
MUX, UOC
15
SP VL LM
Setpoint velocity limit
IAC, UOC
16
SP LO LM
Setpoint low limit
CFG, IAC,
UOC
17
SP HI LM
Setpoint high limit
CFG, IAC,
UOC
18
VO LO LM
Valve close limit
CFG, IAC,
UOC
19
VO HI LM
Valve open limit
CFG, IAC,
UOC
20
ARW LOLM
Anti-reset windup low limit
CFG, IAC,
UOC
21
ARW HILM
Anti-reset windup high limit
CFG, IAC,
UOC
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
459
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
Mnemonic and Name
Devices(3)
22
FF GAIN
Feedforward gain
CFG, UOC
23
FF REV?
Feedforward reverse/direct action
CFG, UOC
24
FF FTIM
Feedforward filter time constant
CFG, UOC
25
TK FTIM
Track filter time constant
CFG, UOC
26
WDOG TIM
Watchdog timer timeout
IAC
27
BCKUP MD
DDC or supervisory backup mode
selection
IAC
28
RST MD
Restart mode
CFG, IAC,
UOC
29
RST VO
Restart valve position
CFG, IAC,
UOC
30
RST SP
Restart setpoint
CFG, IAC,
UOC
31
RST BIAS
Restart bias
CFG, IAC,
UOC
32
RST RAT
Restart ratio
IAC
33
NTC LOBP
Notch low breakpoint
IAC
34
NTC HIBP
Notch high breakpoint
IAC
35
NTC RAT
Notch ratio
IAC
36
PV LOBP
PV low breakpoint
IAC
37
PV HIBP
PV high breakpoint
IAC
38
PV LOGF
PV gain factor low
IAC
39
PV HIGF
PV gain factor high
IAC
40
DEV LOBP
Deviation low breakpoint
IAC
41
DEV HIBP
Deviation high breakpoint
IAC
42
DEV LOGF
Deviation low gain factor
IAC
43
DEV HIGF
Deviation high gain factor
IAC
44
VO LOBP
Valve position low breakpoint
IAC
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
460
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
C
Devices(3)
Mnemonic and Name
45
VO HIBP
Valve position high breakpoint
IAC
46
VO LOGF
Valve position low gain factor
IAC
47
VO HIGF
Valve position high gain factor
IAC
48
DURATION
Momentary duration for DO points
Not
tunable
UOC
49
DEADBAND
TPO deadband for AO points
Not
tunable
UOC
50
BASE PER
TPO base period for AO points
Not
tunable
UOC
51
AV LOBP
Analog value low breakpoint
IAC
52
AV HIBP
Analog value high breakpoint
IAC
53
AV LOGF
Analog value low gain factor
IAC
54
AV HIGF
Analog value high gain factor
IAC
55
DSC GF
Discrete gain factor
IAC
56
DTC GAIN
DTC process gain
IAC
57
DTC TIM
DTC process time constant
IAC
58
DTC DTIM
DTC process deadline
IAC
59
GCI ON
GCI time on
IAC
60
GCI OFF
GCI time off
IAC
61
FF MULT?
Feedforward multiplier enable
IAC
62
FF MGAIN
Feedforward multiplier gain
IAC
63
FF MREV?
Feedforward multiplier reverse or direct
IAC
64
FF SUM?
Feedforward summer enable
IAC
65
FF SGAIN
Feedforward summer gain
IAC
66
FF SREV?
Feedforward summer reverse or direct
IAC
70, 1—2
FILT TIM
First order digital filter time constant
IAC
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
461
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
Devices(3)
Mnemonic and Name
71
INT GAIN
Integrator gain
IAC
72
VEL LM
Velocity limiter
IAC
73
DEAD TIM
Dead time
IAC
74
TIMR TIM
Timer time
IAC
75
CNT/RMP
Counter or ramp time
IAC
76
LL GAIN
Lead or lag gain
IAC
77
LL LEAD
Lead or lag lead time
IAC
78
LL LAG
Lead or lag lag time
IAC
79
MRNG ALM
Mid-selector range alarm
IAC
80
X3 COEF
Polynomial coefficient x3
IAC
81
X2 COEF
Polynomial coefficient x2
IAC
82
X1 COEF
Polynomial coefficient x1
IAC
83
X0 COEF
Polynomial coefficient x0
IAC
87
RGR DSC
Reference discrete general register
IAC
88
MGR DSC
Monitor discrete general register
89
RGR FLT
Reference floating-point general
register
90
MGR FLT
Monitor floating-point general register
91, 1—X
M/R DSC
Monitor or reference discrete general
register; configuration establishes the
number of possible occurrence
numbers
IAC
92, 1—X
M/R FLT
Monitor or reference floating-point
general register; configuration
establishes the number of possible
occurrence numbers
IAC
93
PV
Process variable
Not
tunable
IAC
IAC
Not
tunable
Not
tunable
IAC
IAC
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
462
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
C
Devices(3)
Mnemonic and Name
94
SP
Setpoint
Not
tunable
IAC
95
VO
Valve output
Not
tunable
IAC
96
MODE
Mode
Not
tunable
IAC
97
BIAS
Bias
Not
tunable
IAC
98
RATIO
Ratio
Not
tunable
IAC
99
0% AEU
Auxiliary engineering units 0 percent
endpoint
IAC
100
100% AEU
Auxiliary engineering units 100 percent
endpoint
IAC
102
PRC HIGH
Process high range
UOC
103
PRC LOW
Process low range
UOC
104
MN ENBL?
Manual mode enable
UOC
105
BCD CNV?
Binary-coded-decimal/binary
conversion
UOC
106
MCOR
Model correction type
UOC
107
MDTM
Model deadtime
UOC
108
MGAN
Model gain
UOC
109
MLIM
Model correction limit
UOC
110
MRAT
Model storage rate
111
MTIM
Model time constant
UOC
112
RATIO
Ratio of setpoint
UOC
113
BHLO
Alarm B high or low?
UOC
114
CHLO
Alarm C high or low?
UOC
115
TRPB
Alarm B trip point
UOC
116
TRPC
Alarm C trip point
UOC
Not
tunable
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
UOC
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
463
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
Devices(3)
Mnemonic and Name
117
ALM EN?
Discrete input alarm enable
UOC
118
INTSP
Internal setpoint
119
ALM VAL
Discrete input alarm value
UOC
120
CONFK
Pulse count conversation constant
UOC
121
FAILSAFE
Group/DCD failsafe setpoint
122
FAILSAFE
Discrete output or PDO failsafe value
123
CONTINUE
Continue on console failure
124
FAILSAFE
Loop/analog output failsafe value
125, 1—8
DOSTAT
Discrete output channel status
Not
tunable
UOC
126, 1—16
DISTAT
Discrete input channel status
Not
tunable
UOC
127
TRANTIME
Transition time
UOC
128
RTRYCNTR
Retry counter
UOC
129
STINEN
Step instruction enable
UOC
130
INVERT?
Discrete invert
UOC
131
NOQDOPRN
Number of queued operations
132
REM OFS?
Remote off scan
UOC
133
REM O/S?
Remote out of service
UOC
134
FAILSTEP
Fail step
Not
tunable
UOC
135
RTRYSTEP
Retry step number
Not
tunable
UOC
136, 1—16
GLOBAL
Global variable
UOC
137
OPTLONG
Operation too long
UOC
138, 1—4
UTIMER
Unit timer
UOC
139, 1—16
BOOLEAN
Unit Boolean variable
UOC
Not
tunable
Not
tunable
UOC
UOC
UOC
Not
tunable
UOC
UOC
Not
tunable
UOC
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
464
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
C
Devices(3)
Mnemonic and Name
140, 1—4
INTGRT
Unit integrator
UOC
141
PT ENA?
Pressure or temperature compensation
enable
142, 1—32
UNITVAR
Unit variable
UOC
143
RESCATTR
Resource counter attribute
UOC
144
OUT ENA?
Outputs enabled
UOC
145
SINUMB
Step instruction number
146
SINENA?
Single instruction enable?
UOC
147
SSTENA?
Single step enable
UOC
148
EA ENA?
Extended alarms enable
UOC
149
EREF
Extended alarm reference value
UOC
150
SCAN PER
Scan period
151
DI INV?
Discrete input invert
MUX
152
OFFSCAN?
Off scan
MUX
154
PV LM DB
PV limit deadband
Not
tunable
MUX
155
PV LO LM
PV low limit
Not
tunable
MUX
156
PV HI LM
PV high limit
Not
tunable
MUX
160
AO FS VL
Analog output failsafe value
MUX
161
AO FS TM
Analog output failsafe timer
MUX
162, 1—4
DO FS VL
Discrete output failsafe value
MUX
163
DO FS TM
Discrete output failsafe timer
MUX
164
MAN SPMD
SP mode for MAN
Not
tunable
UOC
165
DDC SPMD
SP mode for DDC
Not
tunable
UOC
170, 1—16
CHIP VAL
CHIP value
Not
tunable
Not
tunable
Not
tunable
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
UOC
UOC
MUX, UOC
CHIP
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
465
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
Devices(3)
Mnemonic and Name
171, 1—4
Q OPRTN
Queued operation
Not
tunable
UOC
172, 1—4
Q PHASE
Queued phase
Not
tunable
UOC
173, 1—4
Q HD PHA
Queued hold phase
Not
tunable
UOC
174, 1—4
Q ACTIV
Queued activity
Not
tunable
UOC
175
SVD
LCP signal value discrete
Not
tunable
UOC
176
SVP
LCP signal value percent
Not
tunable
UOC
177
SVA
Not
tunable
UOC
178, 1—2
TRC SVD
Trace in or out discrete value
UOC
179, 1—2
TRC SVC
Trace in or out percent-integer value
UOC
180, 1—2
TRC SVA
Trace in or out real value
MUX
181, 0—5(4)
FIRSTFAIL
First failure index
UOC
182, 1—2
FAILENABL
Failure enable (1 = two failure enable,
2 = disable all failures)
Not
tunable
UOC
183, 1—2
LCPNUM
Input or output LCP numbers
Not
tunable
UOC
184, 1—4
DENBL
LCP discrete write enable
UOC
185, 1—4
IEN BL
LCP integer write enable
UOC
186, 1—4
FPENBL
LCP floating-point write enable
UOC
187, 1—31
BOOL REG
LCP Boolean register
UOC
188, 1—31
INT REG
LCP integer register
UOC
189, 1—31
FP REG
LCP floating-point register
UOC
190, 1—32
G BREG
LCP global boolean register
UOC
191, 1—32
G IREG
LCP global integer register
UOC
192, 1—32
G FPREG
LCP global floating-point register
UOC
193
RES LOC
Resume FST instruction number
LCP signal value analog
Not
tunable
UOC
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
466
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
C
Devices(3)
Mnemonic and Name
194
FAILINST
FST fail instruction number where first
LCP failure occurred; clear in tune
mode
UOC
195
TRCFST
Trace FST number
196
LCPTYP
LCP type (0 = one shot,
1 = continuous, 2 = loop)
197
LOOPNO
Relative DBI number of a loop to which
this LCP is attached
198
TRC INST
FST instruction number specified by
the TRC FST displayed by IO SUx
UOC
199
PC VALUE
Programmable controller value
PCIU
200
AO DBI
Analog output database index
UOC
201, 1—4
MV DBI
Measured variable database index
UOC
202, 1—2
DI DBI
Discrete input database index
UOC
203, 1—4
MVE 1—4
Measured variable 1—4 enable
UOC
204
ACTENABL
Action discrete input enable
Not
tunable
UOC
205
LASTSTEP
Last step number
Not
tunable
UOC
206
PFSTEP
Power fail step number
Not
tunable
UOC
207
PFTIME
Power fail timer
Not
tunable
UOC
208
WDT MODE
Timeout mode
UOC
209
WDR TIME
Timeout time
UOC
210
PV V NTV
PV volatile interval
Trend
211
# PV BLK
Number of PV sample blocks
Trend
212
SP V NTV
Setpoint volatile interval
Trend
213
# SP BLK
Number of setpoint sample blocks
Trend
214
VO V NTV
Valve output volatile interval
Trend
Not
tunable
UOC
UOC
Not
tunable
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
UOC
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
467
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
Devices(3)
Mnemonic and Name
215
# VO BLK
Number of valve output sample blocks
Trend
216
BI V NTV
Bias volatile interval
Trend
217
# BI BLK
Number of bias sample blocks
Trend
218
RT V NTV
Ratio volatile interval
Trend
219
# RT BLK
Number of ratio sample blocks
Trend
220
SMT VAL
Value of SMART variable
Not
tunable
UOC
221
SMT UNIT
Units of SMART variable
Not
tunable
UOC
222
SMT HIGH
High range for SMART variable
UOC
223
SMT LOW
Low range for SMART variable
UOC
224
TCALHI
Transmitter high range limit
UOC
225
TCALLO
Transmitter low range limit
UOC
226
PCALHI
Process high range limit
UOC
227
PCALLO
Process low range limit
UOC
228
UPPER LP
Loop number of the upper loop
UOC
229
LOWER LP
Loop number of the lower loop
UOC
230
PV H NTV
PV historic interval
Trend
231
SP H NTV
Setpoint historic interval
Trend
232
VO H NTV
Valve output historic interval
Trend
233
BI H NTV
Bias historic interval
Trend
234
RT H NTV
Ratio historic interval
Trend
235, 0 -- 5(4)
DEVSTAT
Device status byte
Not
tunable
UOC
236, 0 -- 5(4)
DIGCOMM
Digital communications
Not
tunable
UOC
237, 0 -- 16(4)
IFCC
Input file-card-channel
Not
tunable
UOC
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
468
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-1. Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points (Continued)
DDP
Number(1)(2)
C
Devices(3)
Mnemonic and Name
238, 0 -- 8(4)
OFCC
Output file-card-channel
239
IOFVAL
I/O fail value
240
NTV SECS
Interval 5 seconds
Not
tunable
Trend
241
NTV SECS
Interval 15 seconds
Not
tunable
Trend
242
NTV SECS
Interval 30 seconds
Not
tunable
Trend
243
NTV MINS
Interval 1 minute
Not
tunable
Trend
244
NTV MINS
Interval 4 minutes
Not
tunable
Trend
245
NTV MINS
Interval 8 minutes
Not
tunable
Trend
246
NTV MINS
Interval 24 minutes
Not
tunable
Trend
247
NTV MINS
Interval 72 minutes
Not
tunable
Trend
248, 1 -- 8
LASTFAILCOND
State of interlock conditions at time of
last failure
Not
tunable
UOC
249, 1 -- 8
IGNORE COND?
State of condition ignore flags
UOC
250
IGNORE ALL?
State of ignore all flag
UOC
251, 1 -- 8
COND VALUE
Value of operand 2 of the condition
UOC
252
MODE LOCKED?
Locks mode of DCD
UOC
253, 1 -- 8
COND TIMER
Configured condition timer values
UOC
1.
2.
3.
4.
Not
tunable
UOC
UOC
All DDPs are tunable unless otherwise noted in the Mnemonic and Name column.
This column also shows the ranges of possible occurrence numbers.
Devices to which the DDP pertains:
CFG
= configurable controller (via a data concentrator)
CHIP
= computer/highway interface package
IAC
= computing or interactive controller (via a data concentrator)
MUX
= multiplexer
PCIU
= programmable controller interface unit
PVUE = PROVUEr console
WPCON = Operator Workplace console
Trend = trend unit
UOC
= unit operations controller, integrated function controller, SR90 controller, or
UNIVOXR or microPROVOX automation system
Occurrence 0 is valid for point types that have a maximum of one occurrence of this DDP.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
C.2
469
Remote DDPs by Point Type
The tables in this subsection show the remote DDPs available for various
point types.
C.2.1
Remote DDPs for Remote Device Points
Table C-2 contains a list of the remote DDPs for unit points.
Table C-2. Unit Point Remote DDPs
DDP #
Mnemonic
Tune? Description
104
MN ENBL?
Y
Manual mode enable. Allows the unit
point mode to be changed to manual if
enabled.
123
CONTINUE
N
Indicates you want the operation to
continue executing if the console that
started this unit point running fails
129
STINEN
Y
Step instruction enable. Must be enabled
for this unit to execute operation step
instructions. Normally should be YES.
131
NOQDOPRN
N
Number of queued operations. Maximum
of 4.
133
REM O/S?
Y
Remote out of service. Will keep the unit
from running operations.
134
FAILSTEP
N
Indicates the step at which the operation
restarts if failed.
135
RTRYSTEP
N
Retry step. After an operation fails, it will
return to this step if a retry is attempted.
GLOBAL
Y
There are 16 global variables per UOC.
These are just an extension of unit
variables.
OPTLONG
Y
Operation too long. Given in seconds,
this indicates that the operation must be
completed before getting an OPTL
alarm.
UTIMER
Y
Unit timer. Each unit can have 4 timers
configured for it. These values are in
seconds.
BOOLEAN
Y
There are 16 Boolean variables per unit
point. They are mainly used as flags,
where YES = 1 and NO = 0.
INTGRT
Y
Integrator. Each unit can have 4
integrators configured for it.
UNITVAR
Y
There are 32 unit variables per unit
(20 series SR90). These are floating
point registers.
RESCATTR
Y
Resource attribute. Used by operations
and activities for the ACQUIRING and
RELEASING of common points.
136.1—136.16
137
138.1—138.4
139.1—139.16
140.1—140.4
142.1—142.32
143
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
470
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-2. Unit Point Remote DDPs (Continued)
DDP #
C
Mnemonic
Tune?
Description
144
OUT ENA?
Y
Output definition enable. Must be
enabled to execute the output definition
portion of your operation. Normally
should be YES.
145
SINUMB
N
Step instruction number. Tells you the
step instruction number that is current
being executed. Shows instruction
number if in gosubbed step.
146
SINENA ?
Y
Single instruction enable. Used to step
through your operation one instruction at
a time. It is mainly used to troubleshoot
operation problems. Normally should be
NO.
147
SSTENA ?
Y
Single step enable. Allows you to
execute an operation 1 step at a time,
using OARs. Normally should be NO.
171.1—171.4
Q OPRTN
N
Queued operations. Displays the index
of the operations that have been queued
up. Maximum of 4.
172.1—172.4
Q PHASE
N
Queued phase. Displays the phase
number at which the associated queued
operation will start. Maximum of 4.
173.1—173.4
Q HD PHA
N
Queued hold phase. Allows the
associated queued operation to be
queued to hold at a particular phase
number once it has been started.
Maximum of 4.
174.1—174.4
Q ACTIV
N
Queued activity. Displays the Activity
point’s highway access number
associated with the corresponding
queued operation.
181.1—181.5
FIRSTFAIL
Y
First Failure Data. Only 181.1 can be
zeroed.
1 = Failure Index
2 = Fail Step
3 = Change DBI
4 = Reference Info
5 = Requestor Reference
182.1—182.2
FAILENABL
Y
Failure Enable.
1 = two failure enable
2 = disable all failures
194
FAILINST
N
Failure Instruction Number
205
LASTSTEP
N
Indicates the last step that was
executed.
206
PFSTEP
N
Power fail step. Indicates which step you
will retry after a power failure.
207
PFTIME
N
Power fail time. If a power failure occurs,
it counts the time in seconds that power
was lost to the UOC. This value will stay
set until the next power failure.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
471
Table C-3 contains a list of remote DDPs for LCP points.
Table C-3. LCP Remote DDPs
DDP #
Mnemonic
Tune? Description
1
EU 0%
Y
Engineering Unit 0% value.
2
EU 100%
Y
Engineering Unit 100% value.
104
MN ENBL?
Y
Manual Mode Enable,allows operator to
change mode from CMPTR to MAN.
133
REM O/S?
Y
Remote Out of Service. When the LCP
is out of service it stays at its current
state (ACTIVE or IDLE), but does not
process any FST instructions.
143
RESCATTR
Y
Resource attribute,would be used if the
LCP point was being ACQUIRED and
RELEASED by Unit Operations.
145
SINUMB
N
Step Instruction Number. Contains the
last reported FST instruction that was
executed.
146
SINENA
Y
Single Instruction Enable. Allows you to
step through your FST one instruction at
a time. Use ADVANCE to execute the
next instruction.
150
SCAN PER
N
Scan Period, indicates the time period
from starting execution of an FST to
starting the next execution of an FST
(1—60 seconds).
175
SVD
N
Signal Value Discrete. Contains the last
reported value in the SVD accumulator.
The SVD is also known as Boolean
Register 0.
176
SVP
N
Signal Value Percent. Contains the last
reported percent in the SVP
accumulator. The SVP is also known as
Integer Register 0.
177
SVA
N
Signal Value Analog. Contains the last
reported analog value in the SVA
accumulator. The SVA is also known as
the Floating Point Register 0.
178.1
TRC SVD
N
Displays the SVD input to the instruction
specified by parameters TRC FST and
TRC INST.
178.2
TRC SVD
N
Displays the SVD output from the
instruction specified by parameters TRC
FST and TRC INST.
179.1
TRC SVP
N
Displays the SVP input to the instruction
specified by parameters TRC FST and
TRC INST.
179.2
TRC SVP
N
Displays the SVP output to the
instruction specified by parameters TRC
FST and TRC INST.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
472
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-3. LCP Remote DDPs (Continued)
DDP #
C
Mnemonic
Tune?
Description
180.1
TRC SVA
N
Displays the SVA input to the instruction
specified by parameters TRC FST and
TRC INST.
180.2
TRC SVA
N
Displays the SVA output to the
instruction specified by parameters TRC
FST and TRC INST.
181.1—181.5
FIRSTFAIL
Y
First Failure. Tells where this FST’s first
failure occurred since this FST started.
You may clear it in tune mode.
184.1—184.4
DENBL
Y
Discrete Write Enable. Allows operation
of discrete parameters 9 through 12,
which are accessed from the LCP
faceplate. (These are actually LCP
registers B1 through B4.)
185.1—185.4
IENBL
Y
Integer Write Enable. Allows operation of
integer/percent parameters 5 through 8,
which are accessed from the LCP
faceplate. (These are actually LCP
registers I1 through I4.)
186.1—186.4
FPENBL
Y
Floating Point Write Enable. Allows
operation of floating point parameters 1
through 4, which are accessed from the
LCP faceplate. (These are actually LCP
registers F1 through F4.)
187.1—187.31
BOOL REC
Y
Internal Boolean Register. Each LCP
has 32 internal Boolean registers, with
boolean register 0 being the SVD.
188.1—188.31
INT REG
Y
Internal Integer Register. Each LCP has
32 internal integer registers, with integer
register 0 being the SVI.
189.1—189.31
FP REG
Y
Internal Floating Point Register. Each
LCP has 32 internal floating point
registers, with floating point register 0
being the SVA.
190.1—190.32
G BREG
Y
Global Boolean Register. Each LCP may
display a block of 32 global boolean
registers. The block displayed is
determined by the LCP point
configuration.
191.1—191.32
G IREG
Y
Global Integer Register. Each LCP may
display a block of 32 global integer
registers. The block displayed is
determined by the LCP point
configuration.
192.1—192.32
G FPREG
Y
Global Floating Point Register. Each
LCP may display a block of 32 global
floating point registers. The block
displayed is determined by the LCP
point configuration.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
473
Table C-3. LCP Remote DDPs (Continued)
DDP #
Mnemonic
Tune?
Description
193
RES LOC
N
Resume Location. If no RESUME FST
instruction has been executed, this is 0
and the FST starts at the first instruction
in the FST. If a RESUME command is
used in an FST, this DDP displays the
instruction that the FST begins at on the
next scan, or will begin in the event you
issue an ADVANCE command.
194
FAILINST
Y
Fail Instruction. The FST instruction
number where first LCP failure occurred.
This may be cleared in TUNE mode.
195
TRC FST
Y
The index number in the global database
of the FST used to display IO SVx
parameters.
196
LCPTYP
Y
LCP Type. Displays the 3 LCP types for
this LCP.
0 = One Shot
1 = Continuous
2 = Loop
This value may be tuned only on loop
type LCPs, from 2 to 1 and back, for
single step troubleshooting of the
LCP FST.
197
LOOPNO
N
Loop Number. If this LCP is attached to
a loop, it contains the relative DBI of that
loop, otherwise it contains 0.
198
TRC INST
Y
The number of the instruction in the FST
specified by TRC FST, which will be
displayed by parameters IO SVx.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
474
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-4 contains a list of the remote DDPs for remote DCD points.
Table C-4. Remote DCD Point Remote DDPs
C
DDP #
Mnemonic
Description and Value
121
FAILSAFE
Integer
DCD failsafe setpoint
No
125, 1 — 8
DOSTAT
0 or 1 discrete output channel
status
No
126, 1 — 16
DISTAT
0 or 1 discrete input channel status
No
127
TRANTIME
Integer
Transition time
Yes
128
RTRYCNTR
Integer
Retry counter
Yes
132
REM OFS?
YES/NO remote off scan
Yes
133
REM O/S?
YES/NO remote out of service
Yes
143
RESCATTR
Integer
Resource attribute
Yes
181(3)
FIRSTFAIL
Real
First fail value
237, 1 — 16(3)
IFCC
@F-C-C
Input File-Card-Channel
No
238, 1 — 8(3)
OFCC
@F-C-C
Ouput File-Card-Channel
No
248, 1 — 8(2)
LASTFAILCOND
YES/NO state of interlock
conditions at time of last failure
No
249, 1 — 8(2)
IGNORE COND?
YES/NO state of condition-ignore
flags
Yes
250(2)
IGNORE ALL?
YES/NO state of ignore-all flag
Yes
COND VALUE
Real
Value of operand 2 of the condition
Yes
MODE LOCKED?
YES/NO locks mode of DCD
Yes
COND TIMER
Integer
Configured condition timer values
Yes
251, 1 —
8(2)
252(1)
253, 1 —
1.
2.
3.
4.
8(2)
P4.0 SR90 Controller standard and Enhanced DCD points.
P4.0 SR90 Controller Enhanced DCD points.
P5.0 SR90 Controller.
The value can be cleared to 0 (zero) only.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Tune?
Yes(4)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
C.2.2
475
Remote DDPs For Console Points
Table C-5 contains a list of remote DDPs for console-resident DCD
points. Console-resident DCD points are used to control MUX, DCU, and
PCIU four-bit points.
Table C-5.
Console-Resident DCD Point Remote DDPs
Number
Mnemonic
Value
125.1 - 125.8
DOSTAT
6 digit code (1)
No
126.1 - 126.16
DISTAT
6 digit code (1)
No
127
TRANTIME
Integer
Yes
128
RTRYCNTR
Integer
Yes
132
REM OFS?
YES/NO
Yes
133
REM O/S?
YES/NO
Yes
150
SCAN PER
Integer
No
1.
Tune?
The value displayed is a series of 1’s and 0’s from 1 to 6 digits in length. The first digit
(right-hand side) represents the status of the discrete input or output. A value of 1 in any
location other than the right-hand position indicates a problem with the discrete or the DCD
point. The example below defines the significance of each digit and suggests corrective
action where appropriate.
111111 First 1 — DI or DO is ON
Second 1 — Discrete failure
Third 1 — Invalid configuration input or output. Check the discrete point
configuration
Fourth 1 — Discrete output request failure. Check configuration. (A value of 1 can
appear only for discrete outputs)
Fifth 1 — DCD configuration is invalid. Check configuration.
Sixth 1 — Standby console in a redundant pair is bad.
Table C-6 contains a list of remote DDPs for console-derived single-bit
discrete points.
Table C-6. Console-derived Single-bit Discrete Remote DDPs
DDP
Number(2)
Mnemonic and Description
769
SRC PNT #
Point number of the source (4-bit discrete) point
770
SRC HWY #
Highway access number of the source (4-bit discrete) point
771
SRC CHAN #
Channel number (1 -- 4) in the source (4-bit discrete) point to
which this single-bit discrete is linked
Note:
None of these DDPs is tunable.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
476
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-7 contains a list of remote DDPs for Activity points.
Table C-7. Activity Point Remote DDPs
DDP #
Mnemonic
Description
306
ITERN LIMIT
Y
Activity Iteration Limit
326
FAIL LEVEL
Y
Current Activity Fail Level
331.1—331.16
POINT SET
Y
Activity Point Set (Hwy Acc No)
332.1—332.16
ACQUIRED SET
N
Activity Point Acquired Set
(Hwy Acc No)
333
DELAY LIMIT
Y
Current Activity Delay Time Limit
334
CONT ITER?
Y
Current Activity Executing
Continuous Iterations
user defined unit
name (12 or fewer
characters)(1)
Y
Activity Grade Register 1 through
255
769..1023
1.
C
Tune?
This is the procedure grade register name; it is user-configured.
Table C-8 contains a list of remote DDPs for Integrity points.
Table C-8. Integrity Point Remote DDPs
DDP #
Mnemonic
Description
769
STOP UPD/IOS
YES or NO parameter. When the DDP is in the YES state, the
console places the integrity point out-of-service and suspends
all processing.
770
STOP ALM/OFS
YES or NO parameter. When the DDP is in the YES
state, the console places the integrity point off-scan,
and deactivates all alarms. No further alarms occur.
771
LOG FAULTS
YES or NO parameter. When the DDP is in the YES
state, the console logs fault conditions on the printer as
they are detected.
772
PERIOD
Integrity point update period. Valid values are 15, 30,
60, 120, and 240 seconds.
773
DEVICE
Address of the device the integrity point represents
774
HOST DEVICE
Address of the device sourcing the integrity point
775
POINT HWY #
Highway access number for the device sourcing the
integrity point
776
H POINT DBI
Data base index number for the device sourcing the
integrity point
777
# MONITORING
Number of devices the point is being reported to
778
# MON DEVICE
Number of devices the related device is reported to. If
this information is not available, a minus one (--1) is
returned.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
477
Table C-8. Integrity Point Remote DDPs (Continued)
DDP #
Mnemonic
Description
779
# UNSOL PROG
Number of times any device has requested a related
SR90 device to start sending unsolicited data. For a
nonSR90 device, this number is --1.
780
# U REPROG
Number of times the hosting console has requested the
associated device to start sending unsolicited data.
781
COMM COND
Provides information about the hosting console’s ability
to communicate with the related device.
782
INTEG COND
Provides information about the device’s integrity.
783
REQUEST
COND
Provides information about the requests the hosting
console makes to obtain integrity point information.
C
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
478
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-9 contains a list of remote DDPs for console EPCI points.
Table C-9. Console EPCI Point Remote DDPs
Number
C
1.
Mnemonic
Description
769
REMOTE OFS?
Tunable remote off scan.
770
CONV FACTOR
Tunable conversion constant.
771
FILTER TIME
Tunable filter time.
772
EPCI PERIOD
Read-only EPCI calculation period.
773
EPCI DBI
Read-only console database index for console-based
EPCI point in an active console.
774
EPCI HWY #
Read-only highway reference number
775
EPCI DEV A
Read-only EPCI device address in an active console.
776
PCI DBI
Read-only controller PCI database index.
777
PCI PNT #
Read-only console database index for PCI point in an
active console
778
PCI DEV A
Read-only PCI device address (controller address)
779
ERROR FLAGS
Read-only status bits(1)
785
ALM A ENABL
Tunable alarm A enable.
786
ALM A VALUE
Tunable alarm A value.
787
ALM A DEVLM
Tunable alarm A deviation limit.
788
ALM A DBAND
Tunable alarm A deadband.
789
ALM B ENABL
Tunable alarm B enable.
790
ALM B VALUE
Tunable alarm B value.
791
ALM B DEVLM
Tunable alarm B deviation limit.
792
ALM B DBAND
Tunable alarm B deadband.
793
ALM C ENABL
Tunable alarm C enable.
794
ALM C VALUE
Tunable alarm C value.
795
ALM C DEVLM
Tunable alarm C deviation limit.
796
ALM C DBAND
Tunable alarm C deadband.
797
ALM D ENABL
Tunable alarm D enable.
798
ALM D VALUE
Tunable alarm D value.
799
ALM D DEVLM
Tunable alarm D deviation limit.
800
ALM D DBAND
Tunable alarm D deadband.
Error Flag status bits are listed in Figure C-1.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
479
110111
PCI card has a problem (ERR)
Field device not communicating (UNAV or PUNVL)
Check PCI point configuration (SFULL, DFULL, DCFG?, or CCFG?)
Unused
Check EPCI point configuration
Redundancy takeover not possible
Figure C-1. Error Flag Status Bits
C
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
480
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Table C-10 contains a list of remote DDPs for console Accumulation
points.
Table C-10. Console Accumulation Point Remote DDPs
Number
C
Mnemonic
Description
769
770
771
772
773
OUT OF SERV
CONV FACTOR
ZERO DROPOUT
TIME BASE
ACCUM TYPE
Out of service
Conversion factor
Zero dropout value
Accumulations time base (always 60)
Accumulations type (always 1)
Not tunable
Not tunable
Not tunable
Not tunable
774
775
776
777
778
ACCUM PERIOD
ACCUM DBI
ACCUM HWY #
ACCUM DEV A
ACCUMED DBI
Accumulations period
Accumulations target DBI
Accumulations target highway number
Accumulations target device address
Accumulated point DBI
Not tunable
Not tunable
Not tunable
Not tunable
Not tunable
779
780
781
782
783
ACCUMED PNT
ACCUMED DEV
TIME HOUR
TIME SHIFT
TIME DAY
Accumulated point highway number
Accumulated point device address
Elapsed time this hour (seconds)
Elapsed time this shift (seconds)
Elapsed time this day (seconds)
Not tunable
Not tunable
Not tunable
Not tunable
Not tunable
785
786
787
788
789
HOUR TOTAL
HOUR AVER
SHIFT TOTAL
SHIFT AVER
DAY TOTAL
Current hour total
Current hour average
Current shift total
Current shift average
Current day total
790
791
792
793
794
DAY AVER
LAST HR TOT
LAST HR AVE
LAST SH TOT
LAST SH AVE
Current day average
Last hour total
Last hour average
Last shift total
Last shift average
795
796
801
802
803
LAST DAY TOT
LAST DAY AVE
HOUR TOTAL?
HOUR AVER?
SHIFT TOTAL?
Last day total
Last day average
Current hour total integrity
Current hour average integrity
Current shift total integrity
804
805
806
807
808
SHIFT AVER?
DAY TOTAL?
DAY AVER?
LST HR TOT?
LST HR AVE?
Current shift average integrity
Current day total integrity
Current day average integrity
Last hour total integrity
Last hour average integrity
809
810
811
812
LST SH TOT?
LST SH AVE?
LST DAY TOT?
LST DAY AVE?
Last shift total integrity
Last shift average integrity
Last day total integrity
Last day average integrity
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
C.3
481
HART-Related Remote DDPs
This subsection contains information on HART-related DDPs. Table C-11
describes each of the HART-related remote DDPs and Table C-12 lists
the point types for which the DDPs are available.
For more information on HART DDPs see the manual Integrating Smart
Devices into PROVOX Systems (TR3.0:CL6825).
Table C-11. HART-related Remote DDPs
PROVOXr
DDP No.(1)
PROVOX
DDP
Mnemonic
Tune
?
1
EU 0%
Y
FIELDVUEr variable 198 — EU 0% value.
Range checks = None.
2
EU 100%
Y
FIELDVUE variable 197 — EU 100% value.
Range checks = None.
10
INC CLO?
Y
FIELDVUE variable 74 — Increase to close.
Range checks = 0 or 1.
28
RST MD
Y
FIELDVUE variable 201 — Restart control mode.
Range checks = 1...6.
102
PRC HIGH
Y
Process high range shown as a floating point number.
103
PRC LOW
Y
Process low range shown as a floating point number.
133
REM O/S
Y
FIELDVUE variable 11 — Instrument out of service.
Range checks = 0 or 1.
220, 1--16
SMT VAL
N
Current value of the variable being read at the smart field device,
shown in engineering units.
221, 1--16
SMT UNIT
N
Units of measure configured for the smart field device variable,
usually shown as a text string.
222, 1--16
SMT HIGH
Y
Upper range value for the primary variable, or sensor high limit
for non-primary variables.
223, 1--16
SMT LOW
Y
Lower range value for the primary variable, or the sensor low
limit for non-primary variables.
224
TCALHI
Y
Transmitter high range limit shown as a floating point number.
225
TCALLO
Y
Transmitter low range limit shown as a floating point number.
226
PCALHI
Y
Process high range limit shown as a floating point number.
227
Description
PCALLO
Y
Process low range limit shown as a floating point number.
0--5(2)
DEVSTAT
N
Device status byte shown as a bit pattern (see Figure C-2).(3)
236, 0--5(2)
235,
DIGCOMM
N
Digital communication shown as GOOD or BAD.
0--16(2)
IFCC
N
Input file-card-channel shown as @F-C-C.
238, 0--8(2)
OFCC
N
Output file-card-channel shown as @F-C-C.
239
IOFVAL
Y
I/O fail value shown as a floating point number.
237,
Notes:
(1)
(2)
(3)
This column also shows the ranges of possible occurrence numbers.
Occurrence 0 is valid for point types that have a maximum of one occurrence of this DDP.
The device status byte is also available as a display attribute, or in the controller for FSTs
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
482
Bit Pattern
MSB
7
LSB
0
00000000
Bit Meaning
for Smart Device Input or Output Cards
(0 = false, 1=true)
Input: Primary Variable Out of Range
Output: Same as Input
Input: Non-Primary Variable Out of Limits
Output: Internal Sensor Out of Limits
Input: Analog Output Saturated (Output from transmitter to PROVOXr system)
Output: Analog Input Saturated (Input to valve from PROVOX system)
Input: Output Current Fixed
Output: Not Used
Input: More Status Available
Output: Same as Input
Input: Cold Power-up
Output: Same as Input
C
Input: Configuration Changed
Output: Same as Input
Input: Field Device Malfunction
Output: Same as Input
Figure C-2. Device Status Bit Pattern
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
483
Table C-12. HART-related Remote DDPs Available by Point Type
103 PRC LOW
133 REM O/S
220 SMT VAL [16]
221 SMT UNIT [16]
222 SMT HIGH [16]
223 SMT LOW [16]
224 TCALHI
225 TCALLO
226 PCALHI
227 PCALLO
W
W
W
W
R
R
W
W
W
W
W
W
Bias and
Gain
W
Signal Select
W
(1)
W
W
W
W
W
W
R
R
W
W
W
W
W
W
(1)
W
W
W
--
--
W
R
R
W
W
--
--
--
--
(1)
Proportional
Derivative
W
PID
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
R
R
W
W
W
W
W
W
(1)
W
W
W
W
W
W
R
R
W
W
W
W
W
W
(1)
239 IOFVAL
102 PRC HIGH
W
238 OFCC [0--8]
28 RST MD
W
237 IFCC [0--16]
10 INC CLO?
W
236 DIGCOMM [0--5]
EU 100%
2
Manual
Loader
Point
Type
T
235 DEVSTAT [0--5]
EU 0%
1
Detail Display Parameters
R
R
R
R
W
(2)
(2)
(4)
(5)
R
R
R
R
(2)
(2)
(4)
(5)
R
R
R
R
(2)
(2)
(4)
(5)
R
R
R
R
(2)
(2)
(4)
(5)
R
R
R
R
(2)
(2)
(4)
(5)
W
-W
W
Unit
--
--
--
--
--
--
W
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
Group
--
--
--
--
--
--
W
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
DCD
--
--
--
--
--
--
W
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
R
R
--
Analog
Output
W
W
W
--
--
--
W
R
R
W
W
--
--
--
--
--
R
--
Discrete
Output
--
Parallel
Discrete
Output
--
Analog Input
W
--
--
--
--
--
W
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
R
R
(3)
(3)
--
--
(3)
--
R
--
(3)
--
--
--
--
--
W
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
R
--
(3)
Discrete
Input
--
Discrete
Monitor
--
PCI
--
W
--
W
--
W
--
W
--
---
R
R
R
R
W
W
W
W
W
--
W
--
W
--
W
--
R
R
R
(3)
(3)
(3)
--
W
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
R
--
--
R
(3)
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
R
(3)
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
R
(3)
Logic
Control Point
W
W
W
--
--
W
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
EPCI
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
(3)
Notes: R = Read-only attribute
W = Read/Write attribute
-- = Attribute invalid for point type
[n] = Occurrence number, 1 to n
(1) Station type may not be manual.
(2) The first four occurrences are for the MV [1--4] inputs and the fifth is for the CO1 output.
(3) These points only have one occurrence of this DDP. Occurrence 0 must always be used.
(4) The first four occurrences are for the MV [1--4] inputs, and the fifth and sixth are DI [1--2], respectively.
(5) The first occurrence is CO1, and the second through eighth are DO [1--7], respectively.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
C
484
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
C.4
Local DDPs For All Point Types
Table C-13 lists all the Local DDPs for all points. Most DDPs are available
for all points. A few are available only for a small number of point types.
Table C-13. Local DDPs For All Point Types
C
DDP #
Mnemonic
Tune?
Description
347.1—347.8
INAT AUTOAK?
N
Autoacknowledges alarms that
become inactive
348
C/L EU 0%
Y
Console Engineering Units 0% value
349
C/L EU 100%
Y
Console Engineering Units 100%
value
350
POINT #
N
Console DBI/Point number
352
PNT TYPE
N
Console Point Type
353
DEV ADDR
N
Source Device Address
354
PNT ADDR
N
Source Point Address
355
HWY ACC #
N
Console Highway Access Number
358
PPA #
N
PPA number
359
PPA OS #
N
PPA Operational State
360
PPA CRIT LVL
N
PPA Critical Level
363
L CHANG SUP?
Y
Local Operator Change Suppress
364
L ALARM SUP?
Y
Local Alarm Suppress
365
L MSG SUP?
Y
Local Message Suppress
366.1—366.8
AUTOACK?
N
Auto Acknowledge Enable
367.1—367.8
HORN ENABLE?
N
Horn Enable
368.1—368.8
ALM ACT MSG?
N
Alarm Activation Message Enable
369.1—369.8
ALM CLR MSG?
N
Alarm Clearance Message Enable
370.1—370.8
DISPLAY ALM?
N
Display Alarms in Alarm List
371.1—371.8
ALARM PRIO
N
0—12 Current Alarm Priority
372.1—372.8
ACT UNAK PR
N
0—12 Active Unacknowledged Alarm
Priority
373.1—373.8
INAT UNAK PR
N
0—12 Inactive Unacknowledged
Alarm Priority
374.1—374.8
ACT ACK PR
N
0—12 Active Acknowledged Alarm
Priority
375.1—375.8
ALARM GRP
N
0—7 Alarm Group Assignment
377
EXP VAL
Y
Expected Value
379
STATEMSGSUP
Y
State Message Suppress
380
STEP MSGSUP
Y
Step Message Suppress
381
UNT CNST
Y
Unit Constant Value
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Detail Display Parameters F Appendix C
485
Table C-13. Local DDPs For All Point Types (Continued)
C.5
DDP #
Mnemonic
Tune?
Description
382
OP MSG SUP?
Y
Operator Change Message Suppress
383,1—4
EALM TYPE
N
Extended Alarm Type
384,1—4
EALM LIMIT
Y
Extended Alarm Limit
385,1—4
EALM DBND
Y
Extended Alarm Deadband
386.1—386.8
ALM ACK MSG?
N
Alarm Acknowledge Message Enable
Local DDPs Unique to Some Point Types
Table C-14. Unit-Point-Specific Local DDPs
DDP #
Mnemonic
Tune?
Description
379
STATEMSGSUP
Y
State Message Suppress
380
STEP MSGSUP
Y
Step Message Suppress
381
UNT CNST
Y
Unit Constant Value
C
Table C-15. Activity-Point-Specific Local DDPs
DDP #
Mnemonic
379
STATEMSGSUP
Tune?
Y
Description
State Message Suppress
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
486
Appendix C F Detail Display Parameters
Blank page.
C
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
487
Figure D-Table D
Appendix D
D Display Attributes
This appendix contains information about the attributes you can use to
display point information in graphics displays.
Some of the display attributes, if they are associated with entry elements,
allow operators to change DDPs from graphics displays.
D.1
Introduction
To use display attributes you add an element (a value element or one of
the Motif elements) to a graphics display, then use the display editor’s
Modify Element function to assign a display attribute, occurrence
number (if needed), and point tag to the element. After configuration and
downloading, the point data corresponding to the display attribute
appears in the element.
D.2
DDP Display Attributes
The ENVOXr software includes display attributes you can use to display
and, in some cases, allow operators to change DDP values from a
graphics display:
J
J
J
The GRADED, GRADEM, and GRADEP DDP display attributes
display information about activity procedures. (There is a GRADENM
display attribute but it is not a DDP display attribute so is not included
in this discussion.)
The DDPV, DDPM, and DDPD display attributes display the value,
mnemonic, and descriptor of any DDP.
The collection of display attributes that begin with DDPR and DDPL
(known as point attribute DSRs) also allow access to any DDP, but
are easier to use and some of the attributes allow operators to change
DDPs from graphics displays as well. (The four trend DDP display
attributes beginning with DDPT are not implemented in the Operator
Workplace software).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
488
Appendix D F Display Attributes
D.2.1
GRADE DDP Display Attributes
The DDP display attributes GRADEP, GRADED, and GRADEM provide
access to DDP data. However, because DDP data, unlike most other
attribute data, uses request and response reporting rather than
unsolicited reporting, both the update intervals and the volume of reported
data are limited.
Using the GRADE DDP display attributes (GRADEP, GRADEM, and
GRADED) is straightforward. The occurrence number specifies the grade
you want.
Improved performance results from using blocks of consecutive
occurrence numbers for a particular point on a display or report, rather
than scattering the grade data. The console software handles the data in
groups of 16 grades. To improve performance, keep the number of
groups to a minimum. For example, requesting grade data for grades 1
through 16 uses only one group, but requesting grade data for grades 1,
17, 33, and 49 uses four groups. When DDP data is requested for one
member of a group, the entire group is reported.
D.2.2
D
DDPV, DDPM, and DDPD Display Attributes
Because of the wide variety of DDP data that is available and the many
different ways each device reports its DDP data, the use of the DDP
display attributes DDPV, DDPM, and DDPD is more complicated than the
use of the GRADE DDP display attributes. The group and offset of a
particular DDP may vary according to point type, device type, and even
the way a particular point is configured.
The DDP window displays the DDP data as it is reported from the other
devices. To use the DDP display attributes to access this data, you must
know which group it is in (GROUP NUMBER), the type of DDP group
(remote, local, or trend), and where in the group it is located (OFFSET).
The DDP window does not provide the group number and offset.
To determine the group number and offset of a particular DDP, create a
display that shows all the mnemonic numbers for each group number and
offset. Figure D-1 shows an example of this type of display for remote
DDPs.
You can select one of two group type numbers (0 = remote DDPs and
1 = local DDPs).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
489
The occurrence number is calculated using the following formula:
occurrence number = (group type * 4096) + (group number * 16) + offset
For each offset, use a value display element with #CURRENT for the point
and DDPM for the attribute. Several displays are needed to map all of the
groups and offsets for every point type.
To determine the group and offset for any DDP, download the displays to
a console and change #CURRENT to the point you want.
Note ... The device that hosts the point must be in operation.
GROUP 1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
1
2
102.1
102.2
106.1
55
57
72.9
98.6
99.44
10.6
11.0
6
7
8
9
#CURRENT DDPM[16]
#CURRENT DDPM[17]
#CURRENT DDPM[18]
1
2
GROUP 1
GROUP 2
GROUP 3
GROUP 4
GROUP 5
GROUP 6
GROUP 7
GROUP 8
Notes:
1
2
16 = (0 x 4096) + (1 x 16) + 0
17 = (0 x 4096) + (1 x 16) + 1
X01117--A38
Figure D-1. Example Display to Map DDP Mnemonics to Groups
and Offsets
Improved performance results from using blocks of consecutive
occurrence numbers for a particular point on a display, as explained in
subsection D.2.1.
D.2.3
DDPR and DDPL Display Attributes
Table D-1 lists the collection of DDP display attributes you can use to
display any DDP. The last two or three letters in the attributes’ names
indicate their purpose, as shown in the table footnote.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
490
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-1. DDP Display Attribute Explanations
This Attribute ...
DDPRM
Mnemonic for remote DDP.
DDPRD
Descriptor for remote DDP.
DDPRV
Remote DDP value. Operators with TUNE privilege can
change the value if it is written to an entry element.
DDPROV
Remote DDP value. Operators with TUNE or OPERATE
privilege can change the value if it is written to an entry
element.
DDPLM
Mnemonic for local DDP.
DDPLD
Descriptor for local DDP.
DDPLV
Local DDP value. Operators with TUNE privilege can
change the value if it is written to an entry element.
DDPLOV
Note:
Displays ...
L = local
R = remote
M = mnemonic
Local DDP value. Operators with TUNE or OPERATE
privilege can change the value if it is written to an entry
element.
D = description
V = value to change with tune privilege
OV = value to change with operate privilege
Use the DDP display attributes on custom displays to present information
for DDPs the operator may need to know and to allow direct changes via
a Motif entry element. If you use one of the DDP display attributes ending
in V or OV and attach it to an entry element, an operator can change the
value. If you use an attribute ending in V, an operator with TUNE privilege
can change the value. If you use an attribute ending in OV, an operator
with OPERATE or TUNE privilege can change the value.
D
D.2.3.1
Using DDPL and DDPR Attributes
Decide which DDPs you want the operator to monitor and change from a
graphics display. Use value display elements to display the mnemonic,
description and, optionally, the value of each DDP.
To allow access to DDPs that have occurrence numbers, the DDP display
attributes require that you specify a two-part occurrence number in the
form [part1.part2]. The first part is the mnemonic number of the DDP you
want to access. The second part is the occurrence number, if any, of the
DDP you want to access. If the DDP you are accessing does not have
occurrences, use 0 (zero) for part2 of the DDP display attribute
occurrence. The valid range for part1 is 1 through 1023 (256, 512, and
768 are invalid). The valid range for part2 is 0 through 63.
The DDP display attributes provide special access to DDP data. However,
because DDP data, unlike most other attribute data, uses request and
response reporting rather than unsolicited reporting, both the update
intervals and the volume of reported data are limited.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
491
Use the DDP access attributes sparingly and only in applications that do
not require rapid updating of data. Do not use DDP access attributes in
conditional expressions or any other applications that require immediate
comparisons of data.
D.2.3.2
Example of DDPL and DDPR Attributes
For example, to allow an operator with OPERATE privilege to change the
value of a global integer register from a graphics display, add an entry
element to the display. With the entry element selected, click on the
Modify Element function. A line similar to the following appears in the
text input area:
Entry on PTYP
:”?”
Columns 12
Rows 12
Justification LEFT
Dec. places -1
The numbers you see for the Columns and Rows fields depend on how
you drew the entry element.
Table D-1 shows the DDP display attribute DDPROV allows an operator
with OPERATE or TUNE privilege to change the value of a remote DDP.
After you enter DDPROV and press the Return key, the entry line looks
like:
Entry on DDPROV [1.0] :”?”
Columns 12
Rows 12
Justification LEFT
Dec. places -1
The DDP number for global integer registers is 191. The occurrence
number of DDP 191 is the register number. For this example assume you
want the operator to be able to change the value of register 27. The
example point tag is LOGIC-1. After you enter this information the first
part of the entry in the display editor entry area looks like:
Entry on DDPROV [191.27] :”LOGIC-1”...
The remainder of the line (not shown) defines the properties of the entry
field: number of columns, number of rows, left or right justification, and
number of decimal places.
You can use #CURRENT instead of a point tag. When the operator
changes #CURRENT, the element’s DDP value is updated with
information from the current point.
If the DDP you have specified does not exist for the point, fields for the
DDP display attributes are presented as spaces.
D.2.4
DDP Display Attribute Memory Usage
The console allocates a limited amount of memory for storing DDP data.
If the DDP memory storage is not adequate, some of the DDP data will
disappear and reappear, and some of the data may not be displayed at
all.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
492
Appendix D F Display Attributes
If more than one operator station is displaying different DDP data, you
can sometimes correct the problem by removing the DDP displays from
other stations. This solution frees up some of the DDP memory for the
data that is currently required.
Ultimately, the solution to DDP memory usage problems is to reduce the
number of DDP display attributes used on the display that causes the
problem.
D.3
Tables
The remainder of this appendix contains three subsections:
J
J
J
D
D.3.1
Subsection D.3.1 contains 14 tables listing attribute explanations,
compare values, display words, and point types.
Subsection D.3.2 contains two tables listing display attributes for
activity states and fail value error codes.
Subsection D.3.4 contains four tables listing multivariable point data
types, fail index types, status and accumulation point data integrity,
plus multivariable point and unit point states.
Display Attribute Mnemonics and Explanations
This subsection contains the following tables:
J
J
Table D-2 — Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for
Display
Table D-3 — Valid Combinations of PMAs and PPAs with Attributes
for Display
J
Table D-4 — Attribute Explanations
J
Table D-5 — Point Address (PTAD) Scheme
J
Table D-6 — Point Types (PTYP)
J
Table D-7 — Process Variables (PV) and Setpoint (SP) Display
Formats
J
Table D-8 — Point Status (STAT) Conditions
J
Table D-9 — Point Status (STAT) Conditions for Activity Points
J
Table D-10 — Point Status (STAT) Conditions for Unit Points
J
J
Table D-11 — Point Status (STAT) Conditions for CHIP (DEC PRO)
Point Types
Table D-12 — MODE Attribute Modes
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
J
J
493
Table D-13 — Percent Process Variable (%PV) and Percent Setpoint
(%SP) Attribute Explanations
Table D-14 — Operator Action Request Queued (OARQ)
Use these tables with the information in Section 5 to define graphic
displays.
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display
Its
Number is
...
If the Point
Type is ...
Analog Input
(AI)
201
And The Valid Attributes are ...
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
PVFAIL
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%PV
%SP
Analog Output
(AO)
202
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALERTS
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
AVP
AVPEN
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%OUTPUT
%SP
Pulse Count
Input (PCI)
203
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALFCTR
STAT
TAG
%PV
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
494
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
If the Point
Type is ...
Its
Number is
...
And The Valid Attributes are ...
MUX DI/DO,
and
Maintenance
(DI/DO)
204
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%PV
%SP
Monitor
(MON)
205
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%PV
%SP
Monitor
Deviation
(MON DEV)
206
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%PV
%SP
D
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
495
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
Its
Number is
...
If the Point
Type is ...
And The Valid Attributes are ...
Reference
(REF)
207
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%SP
Reference
Deviation
(REF DEV)
208
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%PV
%SP
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALERTS
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
AVP
AVPEN
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
INTSP
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
PVFAIL
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%INTSP
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
Proportional
Integral
Derivative (PID)
(also known as
Direct Control
Point)
209
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
496
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
If the Point
Type is ...
Its
Number is
...
And The Valid Attributes are ...
Direct Control
Point with Ratio
(PID with
RATIO)
210
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
RA
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
Direct Control
Point with Bias
(PD with BIAS)
211
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALERTS
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
AVP
AVPEN
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
INTSP
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
PVFAIL
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%BI
%INTSP
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
Direct Control
Point with Bias
and Ratio
(PD with BIAS
RAT)
212
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
RA
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%BI
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
D
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
497
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
Its
Number is
...
If the Point
Type is ...
And The Valid Attributes are ...
Manual Loader
(MAN
LOADER)
213
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALERTS
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
AVP
AVPEN
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
PVFAIL
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
Manual Loader
with Ratio
(MAN LOADER
RAT)
214
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
RA
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALERTS
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
AVP
AVPEN
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
PVFAIL
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%BI
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
Bias and Gain
(BIAS GAIN)
215
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
498
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
If the Point
Type is ...
Its
Number is
...
And The Valid Attributes are ...
Bias and Gain
with Ratio
(BIAS GAIN
RAT)
216
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
RA
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%BI
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
Signal Selector
(SIG SELECT)
217
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALERTS
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
AVP
AVPEN
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
Signal Selector
with Ratio
(SIG SELECT
RAT)
218
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
OUTSPLM
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
RA
SCALDEV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
TRACKING
%OUTPUT
%PV
%SP
D
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
499
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
Its
Number is
...
If the Point
Type is ...
And The Valid Attributes are ...
UOC DI
(DI)
219
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%PV
UOC DO
(DO)
220
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%SP
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DCDCONCF(1)
DCDCONNM
DCDCONST(1)
DCDENH
DCDFCOND(1)
DCDIGNAL(2)
DCDIGNCN(1)
DCDINVAL(1)
DCDOUTVL(1)
DCDSPDIS(2)
DCDSPPEN(2)
DCDTCNST
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
FRSTFAIL(1)
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
DCD
(Includes
Console DCD,
Remote DCD,
and Remote
Enhanced DCD
(EDCD))
221
1.
Valid for EDCD points only
2.
Not meaningful for console DCD points
LOEC
MODE
MODLCK(2)
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%PV
%SP
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
500
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
If the Point
Type is ...
Its
Number is
...
And The Valid Attributes are ...
Remote Group
(GROUP)
222
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
MVPFLIDX
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%PV
%SP
Parallel
Discrete
Monitor
(PDM)
223
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALFCTR
STAT
TAG
%PV
Parallel
Discrete Output
(PDO)
224
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
STAT
TAG
%SP
D
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
501
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
If the Point
Type is ...
Its
Number is
...
UNIT
225
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
ATAG
BATCHID
COP
CRITLVL
CWEN
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
FI
GRADENM
HDPH
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
NUMOPS
OARMSG
OARQ
OPEN
OPSTATE
OPTL
OT
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PRCDRMN
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
SIEN
SN
SPMS
SPT
SSEN
ST
STAT
STIN
STMS
TAG
UCVL
UOP
UPH
USTA
UVAR
Activity
(ACT)
226
ABEN
ABRQ
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
ASTA
BATCHID
CPR
CRITLVL
DATS
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
FVAL
GRADED
GRADEM
GRADENUM
GRADEP
HBATCHID
HBATCHIT
HDNX
HDPR
HENTRY
HGRADENM
HIEC
HPNTSET
HPRCDRNM
HPROCTM
HTMEND
HTMSTART
HUVSAVE
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
INST
ITRC
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PRCDES
PRCDRNM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
ST
STAT
TAG
TIMS
USET
ASCII
227
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
ASCIIMSG
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%SP
And The Valid Attributes are ...
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
502
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
If the Point
Type is ...
Its
Number is
...
REAL
228
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
SP
STAT
TAG
%SP
Multivariable
LCP and
Accumulation
(FLEX)
229
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
MVPCV1
MVPCV2
MVPCV3
MVPCV4
MVPCV5
MVPCV6
MVPCV7
MVPCV8
MVPCV9
MVPCV10
MVPCV11
MVPCV12
MVPDTYPE
MVPFLIDX
MVPMST
MVPMSTBT
MVPST
MVPSTATEM
VPSTMSK
MVP%CV1
MVP%CV2
MVP%CV3
MVP%CV4
MVP%CV5
MVP%CV6
MVP%CV7
MVP%CV8
MVP%CV9
MVP%CV10
MVP%CV11
MVP%CV12
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
STAT
TAG
Multivariable
EPCI (FLEX)
229
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
MVPCV1
MVPCV2
MVPCV3
MVPDTYPE
MVPFLIDX
MVPMST
MVPMSTBT
MVPST
MVPSTATE
MVPSTMSK
MVP%CV1
MVP%CV2
MVP%CV3
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
STAT
TAG
D
And The Valid Attributes are ...
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
503
Table D-2. Valid Combinations of Point Types and Attributes for Display (Continued)
Its
Number is
...
If the Point
Type is ...
And The Valid Attributes are ...
Multivariable
Integrity
(FLEX)
229
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
MVPCV1
MVPCV2
MVPCV3
MVPCV4
MVPCV5
MVPCV6
MVPCV7
MVPCV8
MVPCV9
MVPCV10
MVPCV11
MVPCV12
MVPDTYPE
MVPFLIDX
MVPMST
MVPMSTBT
MVPST
MVPSTATE
MVPSTMSK
MVP%CV11
MVP%CV12
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
SCALFCTR
STAT
TAG
INTEGER
230
ACTACKPR
ACTUAKPR
AKAL
ALM
ALMAACK
ALMACK
ALMACT
ALMAKMSG
ALMAMSG
ALMCMSG
ALMDISP
ALMGRP
ALMHORN
ALMIAACK
ALMPRIO
CRITLVL
DDPD
DDPLD
DDPLM
DDPLOV
DDPLV
DDPM
DDPRD
DDPRM
DDPROV
DDPRV
DDPV
DREF
DSCR
DVAD
EBAL
EU
FCPLTYPE
HENTRY
HIEC
HWYACNUM
IATUAKPR
LISTINDX
LOEC
MODE
OPSTATE
PMANUM
PPANUM
PTAD
PTCOND
PTYP
PV
SCALFCTR
STAT
TAG
%PV
Table D-3. Valid Combinations of PMAs and PPAs With Attributes for Display
If the Group
is a ...
And the Number
is ...
Plant Process
Area (PPA)
85
CRITLVL
DREF
DSCR
FCPLTYPE
LISTINDX
OPSTATE
PMAMODE
PPANUM
PTYPE
TAG
Plant
Management Area
(PMA)
86
DREF
DSCR
FCPLTYPE
LISTINDX
PMAMODE
PMANUM
PTYPE
TAG
The Valid Attributes are ...
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
504
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations
This
Attribute ...
Indicates ...
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
ABEN
(Abort Enable)
Whether aborts are enabled (ENABLED) or disabled
(DISABLED) for any activity point
0 = enabled
1 = disabled
ABRQ
(Abort
Request)
Whether aborts have been (REQUESTED) or have not been
(spaces) requested for an activity point.
0 = not requested
1 = requested
ACOLBGD
(Alarm Color
Background)
That a conditional expression is structured to use the alarm color
configured in the Alarm Definition form in a display element.
When you use this attribute, the background fill color is used as
both the fill (background) and outline (foreground) color in a
display element
N/A
(Used only in an
ASSIGN COLOR
statement)
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively. Occurrence number 8
signifies the highest priority alarm in the current PPA state.
ACOLFGD
(Alarm Color
Foreground)
That a conditional expression is structured to use the alarm color
configured in the Alarm Definition form in a display element.
When you use this attribute, the outline foreground color is used
as both the fill (background) and outline (foreground) color for a
display element.
N/A
(Used only in an
ASSIGN COLOR
statement)
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively. Occurrence number 8
signifies the highest priority alarm in the current PPA state.
D
ACOLINV
(Alarm Color
Inverted)
That a conditional expression is structured to use the alarm color
configured in the Alarm Definition form in a display element.
When you use this attribute, the outline (foreground) color is
used as the fill (background) color and to permit the fill color to
be used as the outline color for a display element.
N/A
(Used only in an
ASSIGN COLOR
statement)
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively. Occurrence number 8
signifies the highest priority alarm in the current PPA state.
ACOLNOR
(Alarm Color
Normal)
That a conditional expression is structured to use the alarm color
configured in the Alarm Definition form in a display element.
ACTACKPR
(Alarm Active
Acknowledged
Priority)
Alarm priority number for the active, acknowledged alarm
condition.
ACTUAKPR
(Alarm Active
Unacknowledged Priority)
Alarm priority number for the active, unacknowledged alarm
condition.
AKAL
(Acknowledge
Alarm)
Whether any alarm for a point has not been acknowledged.
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively. Occurrence number 8
signifies the highest priority alarm in the current PPA state.
N/A
(Used only in an
ASSIGN COLOR
statement)
1 through 12
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
1 through 12
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
0 = all alarms
acknowledged
1 = not all alarms
acknowledged
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
505
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
ALERTS
(SMART card
ALERTS)
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
Indicates ...
State of ALERTS bits.
Valid occurrence range is 0 through 8.
Occurrence number 0 returns the value of the byte field.
Occurrences 1 through 8 return the bit values. Occurrence 1 is
the least significant bit (LSB) and occurrence 8 is the most
significant (MSB) bit. Refer to the diagram for an explanation of
the individual bits.
Bit Pattern
00000000
Bit Meaning
Auxiliary Terminal Status (LSB)
Drive Signal Alert
Travel/Pressure Accum Alert
Cycle Alert
Setpoint Limited Alert
Travel/Pressure Alert (Low)
Travel/Pressure Alert (High)
Travel Pressure Deviation Alert (MSB)
ALM
(Alarm Status)
Bit Value
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
Status of alarms for the selected point (inactive--acknowledged,
active--acknowledged, inactive--unacknowledged, or
active--unacknowledged). Occurrence numbers 0 through 7
signify alarms C, B, A, D, and extended alarms 1 through 4,
respectively.
If the alarm is active, the alarm word is padded with blanks
through the 9th character and the word ACTIVE appears in the
10th through 15th character positions.
ALMAACK
(Alarm AutoAcknowledge)
Occurrence 0:
0 through 255
Occurrences
1 through 8:
0 = false
1 = true
Whether an alarm is acknowledged (YES) or is not
acknowledged (NO) automatically when the alarm changes from
the inactive, acknowledged state to the active, unacknowledged
state.
0 = inactive,
acknowledged
1 = active,
acknowledged
2 = inactive,
unacknowledged
3 = active,
unacknowledged
0 = not auto
acknowledged
1 = auto
acknowledged
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
ALMACK
(Alarm
Acknowledge)
Whether an active alarm has been acknowledged (ACKED) or
has not been acknowledged (UNACKED).
ALMACT
(Alarm Active)
State of alarms for the selected point (inactive or active).
0 = unacknowledged
1 = acknowledged
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
0 = inactive
1 = active
If the alarm is active, the alarm word is padded with blanks
through the 9th character and the word ACTIVE appears in the
10th through 15th character positions.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
506
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
Indicates ...
ALMAKMSG
(Alarm
Acknowledge
Message
Enable)
When an alarm is acknowledged, whether the alarm
acknowledged message is logged (YES) or is not logged (NO)
on the system printer.
ALMAMSG
(Alarm
Activation
Message
Enable)
When an alarm changes from inactive to active, whether the
alarm activation message is logged (YES) or is not logged (NO)
on the system printer.
ALMCMSG
(Alarm Clear
Message
Enable)
When an alarm changes from active to inactive, whether the
alarm clear message is (YES) or is not (NO) logged on the
system printer.
ALMDISP
(Alarm Display
Enable)
If YES, that the alarm word of an active alarm appears in a
display alarm window, in the alarm list, and in the alarm
summary; also that the point tag of primary control display name
can appear in the alarm direct-access window. If NO, that none
of these conditions occurs.
D
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
0 = not logged
1 = logged
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
0 = not logged
1 = logged
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
0 = not logged
1 = logged
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
0 = word not displayed
1 = word displayed
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
ALMGRP
(Alarm Group)
Alarm group number for an alarm.
ALMHORN
(Alarm Horn
Enable)
When an alarm changes from inactive to active, whether the
console horn sounds (YES) or does not sound (NO).
ALMIAACK
(Alarm Inactive
Auto
Acknowledge)
When an unacknowledged alarm changes from active to
inactive, whether the console does (YES) or does not (NO)
automatically acknowledge the alarm; if YES, the alarm is
automatically cleared from the console.
0 through 7
Occurrence 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and extended
alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
0 = does not sound
1 = sounds
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
0 = not auto
acknowledge
1 = auto
acknowledge
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
ALMIACOL
This display attribute is not implemented.
------
ALMPRIO
(Alarm Priority)
Current priority of an alarm. Priority of an inactive acknowledged
alarm is 0.
0 through 12
Occurrence numbers 0 through 7 signify alarms C, B, A, D, and
extended alarms 1 through 4, respectively.
For an active, unacknowledged alarm, the priority is the active,
unacknowledged priority. For an active, acknowledged alarm,
priority is the active acknowledged priority. For an inactive,
unacknowledged alarm, priority is the inactive, unacknowledged
priority.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
507
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
Indicates ...
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
ASCIIMSG
(ASCII
Message)
ASCII string from an ASCII point. The occurrence number 0 or 1
starts the field with the first character of the message string, the
occurrence number 2 starts the field with the second character of
the message string, and so forth. Maximum field width is as
many as 80 characters.
none
ASTA
(Activity State)
Current state of an activity point, displayed as NTLOADED,
IDLE, ACTIVE, and so forth. Table D-15 lists all the states, with
corresponding compare values.
0 through 14
ATAG
(Activity Point
Tag)
Tag of the activity point that started the operation of the current
unit point (Tag appears as spaces if the activity and unit points
are in different consoles.)
none
AVP
(SMART card
AVP value)
SMART card AVP (actual valve position) value.
floating point
AVPEN
(SMART card
AVP and
ALERTS
enable)
SMART card AVP and ALERTS enable.
0 = disabled
1 = enabled
BATCHID
(Batch
Identifier
Name)
For an activity point, the name that an operator assigns to a
batch when loading a procedure in order to track the batch;
displayed in as many as 12 characters
none
COP
(Completed
Unit Operation
Name)
Name of the operation last completed, displayed in as many as
12 characters
none
CPR
(Current
Process Name)
Configured name of the process that corresponds to the
occurrence number, in the currently executing procedure,
displayed in an ASCII string containing as many as 12
characters; if the occurrence number is 0, the name of the
current process
1 through 255
CRITLVL
(Critical Level)
Number that determines whether an alarm is critical:
1 through 13
(See Table D-15)
For a unit point (whose current operation was started by an
activity), the name that an operator assigns to a batch when
loading a procedure in order to track the batch; displayed in as
many as 12 characters
· For PPAs, the current PPA critical level; for all other points,
the critical level of the PPA it is assigned to.
· If an alarm priority is less than the critical level, the alarm is
not critical; the PPA name for the point is added to the
operator attention list (OAL).
· If an alarm priority is greater than or equal to the critical level,
the alarm is critical; the point tag is added to the OAL.
CWEN
(Cancel Wait
Enabled)
Whether a CANCEL WAIT command is (CANWAEN) or is not
(spaces) allowed
0 = not allowed
1 = allowed
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
508
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
DATS
(Date Activity
Started)
Indicates ...
Date the current activity iteration started, displayed in the format
DD-MMM-YYYY. Exceptions:
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
none
· If no activity has started, displayed as spaces
· For a field width of one, displayed as an exclamation point
D
DCDCONCF
(DCD
Condition
Configured)
That a condition has been configured.
DCDCONNM
(DCD
Condition
Names)
The condition names as configured up to 12 characters.
DCDCONST
(DCD
Condition
Status)
The evaluation of a configured condition.
DCDENH
(DCD
Enhanced)
That the DCD is enhanced.
0 = not enhanced
1 = enhanced
DCDFCOND
(DCD
Condition Last
Failure)
State of condition at the time of the last failure.
Occurrence 0:
0 through 255
Occurrences
1 through 8:
0 = false
1 = true
DCDIGNAL
(DCD Ignore
All)
That all conditions are ignored.
DCDIGNCN
(DCD Ignore
Condition)
That the condition is ignored.
DCDINVAL
(DCD Input
Values)
Current input values of discrete I/O channels.
Valid occurrence range is 0 through 8.
Occurrence number 0 returns the value of the byte field.
Occurrences 1 through 8 return the bit values. Occurrence 1 is
the least significant bit (LSB) and occurrence 8 is the most
significant (MSB) bit.
Occurrence 0:
0 through 255
Occurrences
1 through 8:
0 = not configured
1 = configured
none
Valid occurrence range is 0 through 8.
Occurrence number 0 returns the condition name of the first
condition that evaluates as ACTIVE or TRUE. Occurrences 1
through 8 return the condition name.
Valid occurrence range is 0 through 8.
Occurrence number 0 returns the value of the byte field.
Occurrences 1 through 8 return the bit values. Occurrence 1 is
the least significant bit (LSB) and occurrence 8 is the most
significant (MSB) bit.
Valid occurrence range is 0 through 8.
Occurrence number 0 returns the value of the byte field.
Occurrences 1 through 8 return the bit values. Occurrence 1 is
the least significant bit (LSB) and occurrence 8 is the most
significant (MSB) bit.
If this attribute is not used in a conditional expression, it will
return a blank string when false, and a string “IGNORE ALL”
when true.
Valid occurrence range is 0 through 8.
Occurrence number 0 returns the value of the byte field.
Occurrences 1 through 8 return the bit values. Occurrence 1 is
the least significant bit (LSB) and occurrence 8 is the most
significant (MSB) bit.
Valid occurrence range is 0 through 16.
Occurrence number 0 returns the value of the two-byte field.
Occurrences 1 through 16 return the bit values. Occurrence 1 is
the least significant bit (LSB) and occurrence 16 is the most
significant (MSB) bit.
Occurrence 0:
0 through 255
Occurrences
1 through 8:
0 = condition inactive
1 = condition active
0 = not ignored
1 = ignored
Occurrence 0:
0 through 255
Occurrences
1 through 8:
0 = not ignored
1 = ignored
Occurrence 0:
--32768
through 32767
Occurrences
1 through 16:
0 = false
1 = true
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
509
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
Indicates ...
DCDOUTVL
(DCD Output
Values)
Current output values of discrete I/O channels.
DCDSPDIS
(DCD Setpoint
Disabled)
That a setpoint is disabled and cannot be selected.
DCDSPPEN
(DCD Setpoint
Pending)
That the DCD has a setpoint pending.
DCDTCNST
(DCD Total
Condition
State)
The current total state of a condition.
Valid occurrence range is 0 through 8.
Occurrence number 0 returns the value of the byte field.
Occurrences 1 through 8 return the bit values. Occurrence 1 is
the least significant bit (LSB) and occurrence 8 is the most
significant (MSB) bit.
Valid occurrence range is 0 through 16.
Occurrence number 0 returns the value of the two-byte field.
Occurrences 1 through 16 return the bit values. Occurrence 1 is
the least significant bit (LSB) and occurrence 16 is the most
significant (MSB) bit.
If this attribute is not used in a conditional expression, it will
return a blank string when false, and the string “SP PENDING”
when true.
This attribute is used to determine the colors displayed in the
detail-size faceplate for condition names, and the full-size
faceplate for condition status indicators.
Valid occurrence range is 1 through 8.
DDPD (DDP
Description)
DDP description for the DDP with the group and offset specified
by the occurrence.
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
Occurrence 0:
0 through 255
Occurrences
1 through 8:
0 = false
1 = true
Occurrence 0:
--32768
through 32767
Occurrences
1 through 16:
0 = false
1 = true
0 = not pending
1 = pending
0 = not enhanced
1 = not configured
2 = inactive
3 = active
4 = inactive and ignored
5 = active and ignored
6 = inactive and first fail
7 = inactive and first fail
none
The occurrence is computed as:
(Group type x 4096) + (Group number x 16) + Offset
where:
Group type 0 = Remote DDPs
Group type 1 = Console-resident DDPs
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOXr DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
DDPLD
(Local DDP
Description)
Description of the local DDP specified by the two part
occurrence number.
none
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
510
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
DDPLM
(Local DDP
Mnemonic
Number)
Indicates ...
Mnemonic (number) of the local DDP specified by the two part
occurrence number.
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
none
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
DDPLOV
(Local DDP
Value:
OPERATE
Privilege)
Value of the local DDP specified by the two part occurrence
number.
floating point number
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
D
User with OPERATE or TUNE privilege can change value (if in
entry field)
DDPLV
(Local DDP
Value:
TUNE
privilege)
Value of the local DDP specified by the two part occurrence
number.
floating point number
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
User with TUNE privilege can change value (if in entry field)
DDPM
(DDP
Mnemonic
Number)
DDP mnemonic number for the DDP with the group and offset
specified by the occurrence.
none
The occurrence is computed as:
(Group type x 4096) + (Group number x 16) + Offset
where:
Group type 0 = Remote DDPs
Group type 1 = Console-resident DDPs
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
511
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
DDPRD
(Remote DDP
Description)
Indicates ...
Description of the remote DDP specified by the two part
occurrence number.
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
none
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
DDPRM
(Remote DDP
Mnemonic
Number)
Mnemonic (number) of the remote DDP specified by the two part
occurrence number.
none
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
DDPROV
(Remote DDP
Value:
OPERATE
Privilege)
Value of the remote DDP specified by the two part occurrence
number.
floating point number
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
User with OPERATE or TUNE privilege can change value (if in
entry field)
DDPRV
(Remote DDP
Value:
TUNE
Privilege)
Value of the remote DDP specified by the two part occurrence
number.
floating point number
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
User with TUNE privilege can change value (if in entry field).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
D
512
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
DDPTD
(Trend DDP
description)
Indicates ...
Trend attribute: Not implemented for Operator Workplace
software.
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
none
Description of the trend DDP specified by the two part
occurrence number.
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
DDPTM
(Trend DDP
mnemonic)
Trend attribute: Not implemented for Operator Workplace
software.
none
Mnemonic (number) of the trend DDP specified by the two part
occurrence number.
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
D
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
DDPTOV
(Trend DDP
value)
Trend attribute: Not implemented for Operator Workplace
software.
floating point number
Value of the trend DDP specified by the two part occurrence
number.
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
User with OPERATE or TUNE privilege can change value (if in
entry field).
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
513
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
DDPTV
(Trend DDP
value)
Indicates ...
Trend attribute: Not implemented for Operator Workplace
software.
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
floating point number
Value of the trend DDP specified by the two part occurrence
number.
The two-part occurrence number is [part1.part2] where:
part1 = DDP number (mnemonic)
part2 = DDP occurrence number
(If the DDP has no occurrence numbers, use 0 for part2)
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
User with TUNE privilege can change value (if in entry field).
DDPV (DDP
Value)
DDP value for the DDP with the group and offset specified by the
occurrence.
floating point number
The occurrence is computed as:
(Group type x 4096) + (Group number x 16) + Offset
where:
Group type 0 = Remote DDPs
Group type 1 = Console-resident DDPs
D
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
DREF
(Display
Reference)
Name of the configured primary control display (alarm display) of
the selected point, PPA, or PMA displayed in as many as 12
characters
Index of the display
name in the
user-defined display
list
DSCR
(Description)
Usually, the configured description of the selected point,
displayed in as many as 12 characters. Exceptions:
none
· If the occurrence number is 1 through 4 and the point type is
DI or DO, displayed as the configured description of the
corresponding I/O channel
· If the occurrence number is 1 through 12 and the point type
is MVP, displayed as the configured description of the
corresponding configured variable (see attributes
MVPCV1-MVPCV12)
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
514
Appendix D F Display Attributes
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This
Attribute ...
DVAD
(Device
Address)
Indicates ...
Highway address of the device that sends unsolicited data to the
selected point.
And Has This
Use or Compare
Value ...
none
The occurrence number 0 selects the active device address; the
occurrence number 1 selects the primary device address; and
the occurrence number 2 selects the redundant device address.
Addresses appear in the format @x-yy:
· If x = 0, it identifies the network area, so that the value of yy
(1 through 6) identifies the network device (if yy = 0, it
identifies the network traffic director)
· if x = 1—8, it identifies a local area, so the value of yy
(1—30) identifies the local device (if yy = 0, it identifies the
area local traffic director)
D
EBAL
Whether any of a point’s alarms is active or the point’s status is
DEVICE UNAVAILABLE (UNAV), DIRECTORY UNAVAILABLE
(DFULL), SLOTS UNAVAILABLE (SFULL), INVALID
CONFIGURATION RESPONSE (DCFG?), CONSOLE VS
HIGHWAY MISMATCH (CCFG?), POINT UNAVAILABLE
(PUNVL), or DATA QUESTIONABLE (ERR).
0 = no alarms; point
status is GOOD.
1 = one or more alarms;
point status is BAD.
EU
(Engineering
Units
Descriptor)
Usually, the configured engineering units descriptor for the
selected point, displayed in as many as 12 characters.
Exception: if the occurrence number is 1 through 12 and the
point type is MVP, the EU descriptor corresponds to the
configured variable (see MVPCV1 through MVPCV12)
none
FCPLTYPE
(Faceplate
Type)
Number that defines which faceplate type is used for the
selected point
0 through 255
FI
(Failure Index)
· For a group point, which, if any, DCD has failed; displayed as
Group:
0 through 8
· Numeric code for the cause of an LCP or unit failure, where 0
LCP:
0 through 255
(See Table D-17)
0, if no DCDs have failed, or as the index number (1 through
8) of a DCD that has failed
means no failure. Table D-17 explains these codes.
FRSTFAIL
(EDCD First
Failure)
EDCD first fail condition.
0 = none
1 through 8 = condition
FVAL
(Failure Value)
Numeric code for the cause of an activity failure, where 0 means
no failure, codes 1 through 7 indicate warnings, and codes 15
through 64 indicate either an error or fatal error. Table D-16
explains these codes.
0 through 64
GRADED
(Grade
Description)
Description of the grade parameter in an Activity procedure.
Accessible through Batch End reports and custom displays and
reports.
none
(See Table D-16)
Valid occurrence range is 1 through 255.
Use this attribute sparingly because it uses the PROVOX DDP
reporting method. This method has a slower update rate than the
reporting method used by other attributes. It also receives a
limited amount of point data.
Configuring DC9440-Series Operator Workplace Console Software (Revision B — September 1998)
Display Attributes F Appendix D
515
Table D-4. Attribute Explanations (Continued)
This