ZEOS PANTERA User manual

ZEOS PANTERA User manual
The
COMPLETE
GUIDE TO
HIGH-PERFORMANCE
COMPUTING
WITH YOUR
PANTERA
COMPUTER
User’s Guide
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 Copyright 1995
Micron Electronics, Inc.
All rights reserved
ZEOS shall not be held liable for technical or editorial omissions or errors made herein; nor for incidental or
consequential damages resulting from furnishing, performance, or use of this material. This document contains
proprietary information protected by copyright. No part of this document may be photocopied or reproduced by
mechanical, electronic, or other means in any form without prior written permission of ZEOS.
Limitation of remedies and liabilities:
ZEOS’ entire liability and customers’ exclusive and sole remedy for damages from any cause whatsoever
(including without limitation any nonperformance, misrepresentation, or breach of warranty) shall be limited to
returning the products pursuant to the thirty (30) day money-back guarantee, or to repair or replace specific
products or services that do not comply with the Limited Warranty offered by ZEOS. In no event will ZEOS be
liable for any damages caused, in whole or in part, by customer, or for any economic loss, physical injury, lost
revenues, lost profits, lost savings or other indirect, incidental, special or consequential damages incurred by
any person, even if ZEOS has been advised of the possibility of such damage for claims.
Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages for consumer
products, and some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above
limitations or exclusions may not apply to you.
Trademark Acknowledgments
Adaptec is the trademark of Adaptec, Inc.
IBM, XT, AT, and OS/2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation.
UNIX is a trademark of AT&T Laboratories.
Phoenix is the trademark of Phoenix Technologies Ltd.
Quadtel is the trademark of Quadtel Corp., A Phoenix Technologies Ltd. Co.
Intel, 486SX, DX, DX2, DX4, and Pentium are trademarks of Intel Corporation.
XENIX, MS-DOS, GW-Basic, Windows, and Microsoft are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies.
700-0195-02
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ZEOS Computer Systems One Year Limited Warranty
All new ZEOS computer systems come with a One Year Limited Warranty
which provides that the products ZEOS manufactures or assembles, other
than items such as software, disks and related documentation, will remain
in good working condition, free from defects in material and
workmanship under normal use and service, for a period of one year from
the date of shipment from ZEOS. This warranty is limited to the original
purchaser and is not transferable. During this one year period, ZEOS will
repair or replace, at its option, any defective product or parts at no
additional charge to the customer, provided that the defective product or
part is returned, shipment prepaid, to ZEOS. All replaced products and
parts become the property of ZEOS. Replacement parts shall be similar
new or serviceable used parts. This Limited Warranty does not extend to
any products which have been damaged as a result of accident, misuse,
abuse (such as incorrect voltages, power surges, improper or insufficient
ventilation, failure to follow ZEOS’ provided operating instructions, “acts
of God” or other situations beyond the control of ZEOS), or as the result
of service or modification by anyone other than ZEOS. Non-ZEOS
installed parts or components are not covered, nor is damage to ZEOS
provided components covered as a result of their installation. This
warranty does not cover work performed by others, all warranty work
must be performed by ZEOS. ZEOS provides no warranties whatsoever
on software.
EXCEPT AS SPECIFICALLY PROVIDED IN THIS SECTION,
THERE ARE NO OTHER WARRANTIES EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
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Contents
1. The Big Picture .......................................................................... 9
Desktop System At A Glance ................................................... 10
Tower System At A Glance ....................................................... 12
How to Open a Desktop Case ................................................. 14
How to Open a Tower Case ..................................................... 16
Inside a Desktop Computer ..................................................... 18
Inside a Tower Computer ......................................................... 19
2. The Mainboard ........................................................................ 20
Mainboard Features................................................................. 20
PCI Local Bus 32-Bit High Speed Expansion Slots ............................... 21
Secondary Cache Subsystem ............................................................... 21
Continuous Full-Speed Processing ....................................................... 21
On-Board Peripherals ............................................................................ 22
Serial Ports ............................................................................................ 23
Parallel Port ........................................................................................... 24
PCI SCSI/ Ethernet Port ........................................................................ 25
Mainboard Diagram ................................................................. 26
Mainboard Connectors ............................................................ 27
Mainboard Jumpers ................................................................. 28
Jumper Settings ....................................................................... 29
Mainboard Jumpers Described ................................................ 30
FLSH ..................................................................................................... 30
CLR ....................................................................................................... 30
CLK1 ..................................................................................................... 31
CACHE1 ................................................................................................ 31
3. Using SETUP ........................................................................... 32
Main Menu ............................................................................... 33
Main Menu Options .................................................................. 34
System Time .......................................................................................... 34
System Date .......................................................................................... 34
Daylight Savings .................................................................................... 34
Diskette Drive A: .................................................................................... 34
Diskette Drive B: .................................................................................... 34
IDE Adapters (Four Provided) ............................................................... 34
Video System ........................................................................................ 35
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Memory Control ..................................................................................... 36
Memory Shadow .................................................................................... 37
Advanced Menu ....................................................................... 38
Large Disk Access Mode ....................................................................... 38
OS support for more than 64MB ........................................................... 38
Plug & Play O/S..................................................................................... 38
Integrated Peripherals ........................................................................... 38
PCI Devices ........................................................................................... 41
Security Options....................................................................... 42
Supervisor Password is ......................................................................... 42
User Password is .................................................................................. 42
Password on boot .................................................................................. 43
Diskette access ..................................................................................... 43
Fixed disk boot sector ........................................................................... 43
System backup reminder ....................................................................... 43
Virus check reminder ............................................................................. 43
Power Options ......................................................................... 44
Power Savings (DOS and Windows) ..................................................... 44
Exit Menu Options.................................................................... 45
4. Expanding Your System ......................................................... 46
Adding an Expansion Board .................................................... 46
How Disk Drives Work ............................................................. 48
How a Floppy Drive Works ...................................................... 49
How an IDE Hard Drive Works ................................................ 50
How a CD-ROM Drive Works .................................................. 51
Adding System RAM ................................................................ 52
Installing SIMMs ...................................................................... 53
Adding System Cache Memory ............................................... 55
Installing a New CPU ............................................................... 57
5. Mainboard Specifications ...................................................... 59
Mainboard Environmental Specifications ................................. 59
9-Pin Serial Port (J2) Pin Assignment ...................................... 60
25-Pin Serial Port (J3) Pin Assignment .................................... 60
Parallel Port (J4) Pin Assignment ............................................ 62
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Handy Cheat Sheet ..................................................................... 64
Glossary ....................................................................................... 66
Index ............................................................................................. 68
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FCC Compliance Statement
For U.S. and Canadian Users
Warning!
Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party
responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate the
equipment.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15, Subpart B of the FCC Rules. These limits are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential
installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and,
if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications.
However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment on and off, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures.
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which
the receiver is needed.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
The connection of a non-shielded equipment interface cable to this equipment will
invalidate the FCC Certification of this device and may cause interference levels which
exceed the limits established by the FCC for this equipment.
This equipment is a Class B digital apparatus which complies with the Radio
Interference Regulations, C.R.C., c. 1374.
Cet appareil numèrique de la classe B est conformè au Règlement sur le brouillage
radioèlèctrique, C.R.C., ch. 1374.
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Customer Assurance Program
Thirty (30) Day Money-Back Guarantee on Most
Products.
Any product (except for software, software disks, related documentation
and consumables) purchased from ZEOS may be returned within thirty
days from the date it was shipped by ZEOS for a full refund of the
purchase price excluding original shipping charges.
Returned products must be in as new condition, in original packing,
complete with all warranty cards, manuals, cables and other materials as
originally shipped; not modified or damaged.
Any returned product must be shipped prepaid and insured. Any return
must carry a ZEOS Return Merchandise Authorization (RMA) number,
obtained from ZEOS, on the outside of each carton. Returns without
RMA numbers will not be accepted. After thirty days from shipment, all
sales are final and credit or refunds will not be given.
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
1. The Big Picture
Welcome to the ZEOS User’s Guide! The User’s Guide works with the
Getting Started manual to help keep your system running trouble free,
year after year.
This User’s Guide is divided into five chapters.
Chapter 1, The Big Picture gives an overview of a typical desktop and
tower system. It also shows the major components inside the computer
case.
Chapter 2, The Mainboard gives detailed information about your
mainboard.
Chapter 3, Using SETUP explains how to use the SETUP utility
program to customize the built-in features of your system’s BIOS (Basic
Input/Output System).
Chapter 4, Expanding Your System shows how to add components and
enhancements to your system. These include a video adapter card, a
controller card, an internal modem, a floppy drive, an IDE hard drive, a
CD-ROM drive, memory RAM SIMMs, system LEVEL 2 cache, and a
new CPU.
Chapter 5, Mainboard Specifications includes your mainboard
specifications, environmental specifications, plus pin assignments for your
serial and parallel ports.
The Handy Cheat Sheet gives a short summary of some of the most
needed or most forgotten commands.
The Glossary gives short definitions of some common computer terms.
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
Desktop System At A Glance
Brightness
Power LED
Contrast
Hard Disk
(HDD) LED
Monitor
Power Switch
Reset
Button
Computer
Power Switch
(the “ON”
button)
Keyboard
Lock
Turbo Button
(not used)
Drive bays with CDROM drive and 3.5”
Floppy Drive
Turbo LED
(not used)
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
AC Power Cable
110-220V
Switch
Mouse Cable
Connector (9-pin
Serial COMA)
Video
Connector
(location
varies with
model)
Cooling Fan
Parallel Printer Port
Connector (LPT1)
AC Power
Cable
Secondary Serial
Port (25-pin COMB)
Keyboard
Connector
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
Tower System At A Glance
Turbo LED
(not used)
Hard Disk (HDD) LED
Power LED
Turbo
Button
(not used)
Computer Power Switch
(the “ON” button)
Reset
Button
Keyboard Lock
Drive
bays with
CD-ROM
drive and
3.5”
Floppy
Drive
Brightness
Contrast
Monitor Power
Switch
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
Secondary
Serial Port
(25-pin
COMB)
Cooling Fan
AC Power
Cable
Keyboard Connector
Mouse
Cable
Connector
(9-pin
Serial
COMA)
AC Power Cable
Parallel
Printer Port
Connector
(LPT1)
Video Connector
(location varies with model)
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
How to Open a Desktop Case
Caution:
Whenever you open the case or work inside the computer there is
danger of static electric shock. These shocks can permanently damage
your equipment. Always ground yourself by touching the system
cabinet before touching any internal component. We strongly recommend using an antistatic wrist strap attached to cabinet ground.
To open a desktop case:
1. Turn off the monitor and system unit power. Unplug the AC power
cables and disconnect any other cables attached to the back of the
system unit.
2. Remove the plastic bezel from the back of the case by pulling it
away from the case.
3. Unscrew the five mounting screws at the back of the case that hold
the case cover to the system unit chassis.
4. Slide the case cover back and up. Be careful not to snag any cables
or connectors inside the case.
5. Set the case cover aside while you work on your system.
6. When through, reattach the case cover, screws, bezel, and cables in
the reverse order.
The figures opposite show the plastic bezel, screw
locations, and how to remove a desktop PC’s cover.
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
Mounting Screws
Cover
Chassis
Plastic Bezel
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
How to Open a Tower Case
Caution:
Whenever you open the case or work inside the computer there is
danger of static electric shock. These shocks can permanently damage
your equipment. Always ground yourself by touching the system
cabinet before touching any internal component. We strongly recommend using an antistatic wrist strap attached to cabinet ground.
Opening a tower case is almost identical to opening a desktop case.
To open a tower case:
1. Turn off the monitor and system unit power. Unplug the AC power
cables and disconnect any other cables attached to the back of the
system unit.
2. Remove the plastic bezel from the rear of the case by pulling it
away from the case.
3. Unscrew the six mounting screws at the back of the case that hold
the case cover to the system unit chassis.
4. Slide the case cover back and up, taking care not to snag any
cables or connectors inside.
5. Set the case cover aside while you work on your system.
6. Afterwards, reattach the case cover, screws, bezel, and cables in
the reverse order.
The figures opposite show the plastic bezel, screw
locations, and cover motion for a tower case.
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
Mounting Screws
Cover
Plastic Bezel
Chassis
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
Inside a Desktop Computer
Expansion Slots
Power Supply
Hard Disk
Drive
Mainboard
CPU
Front of
Computer
Floppy Drives,
CD-ROM Drives,
and TapeBackup
Units
The mainboard is the large circuit board at the bottom of the chassis. It is
the heart of your system. All of the other components inside the case work
for the mainboard. The power supply delivers electricity to the mainboard.
The disk drives, keyboard connectors, and other parts of the system unit
bring information to and from the mainboard.
The figure above shows some of the most common components inside the
computer.
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Chapter 1 - The Big Picture
Inside a Tower Computer
Floppy Drives,
CD-ROM Drives,
and TapeBackup
Units
Power Supply
Front of
Computer
Expansion
Slots
Hard Disk Drive
CPU
Mainboard
Tower systems have the same components as desktop systems. The figure
above shows the mainboard and typical components inside a Tower case.
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
2. The Mainboard
The mainboard is the largest circuit board in the computer. It contains the
CPU (Central Processing Unit), the Level 2 cache, expansion slots, ports
and connectors for other components, and the system’s main memory, or
RAM (Random Access Memory).
Mainboard Features
Standard Features:
• Intel Pentium (P54C) running at 75, 90, 100, 120, or 133MHz
• Optional 256K or 512K Level 2 system cache, write-back, directmapped
• Integrated onboard floppy drive controller
• Two onboard IDE hard drive interface ports supporting up to 4
IDE devices (both are PCI local bus)
• Bidirectional Parallel Port (configurable through software)
• Two RS232, 16550 high-speed serial ports
• RAM Configurations: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10,12, 16, 32, 64, 128, 192,
384MB, etc. (Banks must hold identical pairs)
• 384Mb maximum RAM capacity
• Flash BIOS, relocatable to system RAM to boost performance
• Five 16-bit ISA expansion slots
• Three 32-bit PCI local bus expansion slots
• Clock/calendar with onboard battery backup
• Energy saving, low power “sleep” mode
Factory Installed Options:
• AMD SCSI host adapter socket on PCI bus
• AMD network controller on PCI bus
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Chapter 2- The Mainboard
PCI Local Bus 32-Bit High Speed Expansion Slots
The three PCI local bus, high speed expansion slots move information at
up to 132 MB/s. This offers a high performance, 32-bit interface to
support local bus peripherals such as video cards, LAN adapters and hard
disk drives.
Secondary Cache Subsystem
The secondary (Level 2) cache subsystem enhances the performance of
the CPU. The onboard cache controller allows cache memory to provide
an ultra high-speed, 12-15-nanosecond buffer between the CPU and
conventional (50, 60, or 70ns) RAM. Your system can accommodate three
cache configurations: 0K, 256K, or 512K of Level 2 cache. The single
cache slot (labelled CACHE) is located next to the CPU.
Continuous Full-Speed Processing
Pantera systems now run continuously at maximum speed, eliminating
Turbo Mode. Because of this, the Turbo button and Turbo LED are not
used on Pantera systems.
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
On-Board Peripherals
Your mainboard has all of the standard peripheral interfaces and many
extras built in. This eliminates the need for many peripheral expansion
cards and greatly enhances system reliability.
Integrated onboard peripherals include:
• Two serial ports (16550 UART)
• Parallel port (bidirectional, assigned through SETUP)
• Floppy drive controller (handles floppy drives up to 2.88Mb)
• Two PCI local bus IDE hard drive controller ports, each capable of
controlling two hard drives
Factory installed options:
• SCSI port (supports both SCSI-1 and -2 type devices)
• Ethernet port
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
Serial Ports
Your mainboard has two RS-232C asynchronous serial ports, which are
usually referred to as COM1 or COMA (9-pin) and COM2 or COMB (25pin) ports. The serial ports are used to attach mice, serial printers,
modems, or other serial peripheral devices. Both serial ports are 16550
UART compatible for higher data transfer rates.
You can install up to two additional serial ports (COM3 and COM4)
simultaneously in your system. However, because MS-DOS does not
manage more than two COM ports simultaneously very well, you
shouldn’t attempt to use more than two COM ports at the same time.
Specifically, don’t try to use COM1 and COM3 at the same time, or
COM2 and COM4 at the same time.
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
Parallel Port
The 25-pin Centronics parallel port is often called the printer port because
it is usually used for printers. However, devices that use this speedy
parallel interface are becoming more common. Your Pantera’s parallel
port is also Bidirectional, allowing data to flow to and from an external
device at the same time.
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
PCI SCSI/ Ethernet Port
The optional onboard SCSI (host adapter allows you to connect and
control up to seven peripheral devices such as SCSI-compatible disk
drives, tape backup units, communications devices, and CD-ROM drives.
The SCSI port is a parallel, multitasking interface which supports both
SCSI-1 and SCSI-2 devices.
The SCSI port is configured from the system SETUP program. For SCSI
system setup parameters, refer to the SCSI Control Menu in Using
SETUP.
The SCSI host adapter socket can also accept an Ethernet LAN controller
chip allowing you to make direct Ethernet LAN connections for high
speed local area network communications.
Note: The onboard SCSI and LAN options are factory installed options only. The
onboard SCSI and LAN option can only be upgraded at the time of purchase.
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
Main
9-pin Serial
Power
Port COMA
Supply
J2
Connectors
PS1
Mainboard Diagram
16 bit ISA
Expansion
Slots
32-bit PCI
Expansion
Slots
BIOS
Chip
16 bit ISA
Expansion
Slots
Keyboard
Connector
J1
25-pin
Serial Port
COMB
J3
Parallel
Port
J4
DB9
Floppy
J4
P10
3v Power Connector
PS2 Secondary
Power Supply
J5
PWR
1
CPU
Clock
Jumper
CLK1
IDE 1 & 2
IDE 3 & 4
System
Battery
J6
J8
J7
Assembly : 010-0050-xx
BNC
Bank 0a
Bank 1a
Bank 0b
Bank 2a
Bank 1b
CACHE1
SCSI
Device
Header
J11
SCSI
RJ-45
Bank 2b
Cache Socket
CACHE1
Jumper
J10
J11
SPEAKER
HDD LED & PC
Speaker Header
J14
LAN/SCSI
Chip Socket
(optional)
U27
KBDLOCK
Power-On LED &
Keyboard Lock
J13
LAN/SCSI Chip
Clock Oscillator
Y3
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10BaseT
Adapter
Header
J10
10BaseT
Filter
Chip
Socket
FD1
PDF
cmax3.cdr
950405
IR1
J13
J14
J15
Mute LED, Mute
Input (not used) &
Reset Input (J15)
RESET
LAN Filter Chip
MUTE_LED
20 or 40MHz Osc.
for AMD chip
Voltage
Regulator
VREG
AMD
LAN/SCSI
Chip
Primary CPU
Level 2 SIMM
Socket (System
Cache)
Socket 5
MUTE
Primary
IDE Hard
Drive
Header
J7
J9
FD1
Primary
CPU
U26
Secondary
IDE Hard
Drive
Header
J8
SIMM
Sockets for
System
RAM
10Base2
Adapter
Header
J9
CLK1
Future
Optional
Secondary
Socket & CPU
Secondary
CPU
(future)
U21
Floppy
Header
J5
J3
CLR
Legacy
ISA
Header
J6
Parallel
J2
DB25
FLSH
slot 5
slot 4
slot 3
Standard Power Connector
P9
P8
slot 8
slot 7
slot 6
slot 2
slot 1
BIOS
5/17/95, 1:35 PM
Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
Mainboard Connectors
Connectors and headers are used to attach peripheral devices to the
mainboard. These devices can be internal (e.g., hard disk indicator lights),
or external (e.g., serial and parallel ports). The most commonly used
connectors are shown in the Mainboard Diagram. The table below
provides a brief summary.
Table 1. - Mainboard Connectors
Connector ID
Description
J1
Keyboard connector
PS1
Main power supply header
PS2
PCI 3.3 volt power supply header
J2
COMA: communications port A (DB9)
J3
COMB: communications port B (DB25)
J4
LPT1: Parallel “printer” port header
J5
Floppy disk drive header
J6
Legacy ISA header
J7
Primary IDE hard drive header (PCI local bus)
J8
Secondary IDE hard drive header (PCI local bus)
J9
10Base2 (BNC) adapter header
J10
10BaseT (RJ45) adapter header
J11
SCSI device header
J13
KBDLOCK: Keyboard Lock input
J14
SPEAKER output, HDD LED output
J15
RESET switch input, Mute LED (not used),
Business Audio Mute (not used)
VREG
Voltage Regulator connector (for future CPUs)
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
Mainboard Jumpers
Floppy
Parallel
J2
DB25
Standard Power Connector
P9
P8
DB9
BIOS
FLSH
Normal
Flash Mode
(Default)
FLSH
J4
CLR
J3
P10
3v Power Connector
PWR
1
(50MHz)
75MHz
Pentium
CPU
CLK1
CLK1
BNC
Bank 0a
Bank 1a
Bank 0b
Bank 2a
SCSI
RJ-45
Default
LAN Filter Chip
Enable
Pipelining
20 or 40MHz Osc.
for AMD chip
AMD
LAN/SCSI
Chip
Primary CPU
VRM
(Default)
Red
Black
Use this setting
for Async Cache
Socket 5
SPEAKER
IR1
RESET
J13
J14
MUTE
1234567
1234567
1234567
1234567
1234567
1234567
1234567
1234567
1234567
1234567
1234567
HDD
J15
PDF
CMAX3JMP.CDR
950414
KBDLOCK
White
Blue
Black
Green
Black
White
Red
Red
Use this setting
for Burst Cache
MUTE_LED
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Disables
Pipelining
(66MHz)
133MHz
Pentium
CPU
CACHE1
Bank 2b
CLK1
CACHE1
Bank 1b
CACHE1
Cache Socket
(60MHz)
120MHz
Pentium
CPU
CLK1
Future
Optional
Secondary
Socket & CPU
(66MHz)
100MHz
Pentium
CPU
CLK1
Assembly : 010-0050-xx
(60MHz)
90MHz
Pentium
CPU
CLK1
IDE 1 & 2
IDE 3 & 4
J6
12345678
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J7 12345678
J8
12345678
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J9
12345678
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J10
12345678
J1112345678
CACHE1
12345678
FD1
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
12345678
CACHE1
12345678
Primary
Secondary
Boot Block
Flash Mode
Battery Enable/Disable
J5
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
Jumper Settings
CLK1 (Adjusts CPU and Bus Frequencies)
CPU Frequency/Bus Frequency (preset at factory)
75MHz CPU/50MHz Bus
90MHz CPU/60MHz Bus
100MHz CPU/66MHz Bus
120MHz CPU/60MHz Bus
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133MHz CPU/66MHz Bus
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FLSH /CLR (Controls Storage of Flash BIOS Data)
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Flash BIOS; CMOS Battery
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FLSH: Reprogram Boot
FLSH: Normal Operation
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Block (software controlled)
(default)
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CLR: CMOS Battery
CLR: CMOS Battery
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Enabled
Disabled
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CACHE1 (Sets Level 2 Cache Modes)
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Asynchronous or Burst; Pipelining Enabled or Disabled
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Asynchronous Cache
(default)
Burst Cache
Enable Pipelining
Disable Pipelining
(default)
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
Mainboard Jumpers Described
Jumpers are small groups of pins that can be connected or disconnected
with jumper caps. To connect a jumper, carefully place the jumper cap
over the pins you wish to connect, then gently press down.
The mainboard uses four jumpers, allowing great system flexibility.
However, most system settings are stored in battery-backed CMOS
(Complimentary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) memory. You can use the
BIOS SETUP program to change settings stored in the CMOS.
Other mainboards use jumpers to configure upgrade options and
parameters on the mainboard. Pantera mainboards use the SETUP
program and the FLASH programming utility instead, making BIOS
changes and upgrades without removing the BIOS chip.
FLSH
The FLSH jumper allows or disallows reprogramming of the FLASH
BIOS with the FLASH utility program. The factory default (NORMAL)
setting allows you to reprogram the BIOS with the FLASH utility.
CLR
The CLR jumper maintains your BIOS settings or allows you to restore
them to factory defaults. Settings are stored in a CMOS (Complimentary
Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) chip. Do not clear these settings unless they
become corrupted and cannot be reprogrammed with the SETUP program,
which also can reset the factory default BIOS settings.
To clear the CMOS memory:
1. Turn off system power and remove the case (pp.14-16).
2. Remove the CLR jumper (p.28). This disconnects the CMOS battery.
3. Turn on system. System will report a dead battery. Turn off system, replace the
CLR jumper. Settings are now cleared.
4. Turn on system, enter SETUP (press the F2 key during bootup).
5. Reconfigure BIOS settings, including passwords and LBA Mode Control (if
your hard drive holds more than 528MB).
6. Save and Exit SETUP.
(continued next page)
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Chapter 2 - The Mainboard
CLK1
The CLK1 jumper sets the speed of the system clock. It will be set
correctly to work with your system, so don’t change this jumper unless
you change CPUs.
Pins Jumpered
CPU Clock Speed (MHz)
Bus Clock Speed (MHz)
1-2 , 5-6
75
50
5-6
90
60
1-2
100
66
3-4, 5-6
120
60
1-2, 3-4
133
66
See the diagram, Mainboard Jumpers, for the location of all jumpers.
CACHE1
A fast CPU operates more efficiently when it has a buffer of ultrafast
RAM between itself and system RAM. The CACHE1 jumper configures
how Level 2 cache is used by your system. 256K to 512K of cache can be
added by inserting a standard cache SIMM. The cache controller is
integrated into the system chipset.
CPU Pipelining
Increases data throughput by allowing the CPU to start the next machine
cycle before it finishes processing the current one.
Burst Cache Module
During a single machine cycle, a bursting CPU generates a beginning
address and a quantity of bytes for the cache to expect. Then the CPU
transfers that quantity of bytes as a single package, without needing to
generate any intermediate addresses.
Asynchronous Cache Module
An asynchronous cache can generate wait states that tell the CPU to delay
transferring information until valid data is ready to be transferred to or
from the cache.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
3. Using SETUP
The SETUP utility program allows you to customize the power-on
initialization parameters of your computer’s BIOS (Basic Input/Output
System). You may need to use the SETUP program if you add components
to your system. To run the BIOS SETUP program, press F2 during system
boot. Once inside SETUP, you can reach different sections by pressing the
right/left arrow keys on your keyboard. Inside each section, you can go
into a subsection (indicated by a right-pointing triangle on the left side of
the screen) by moving to it with the up/down arrow keys, then pressing
the Enter key.
Setup’s five sections are Main, Advanced, Security, Power, and Exit. Each
section contains topics you can view or adjust to suit your system’s needs.
SETUP allows you to customize various system parameters, although our
technicians optimize them for your system as shipped. If you inadvertently
change BIOS values that cause your system to malfunction, you can
simply reload the original factory default settings from ROM by entering
SETUP, then pressing the F9 key. Otherwise, you can load the most
recently saved settings from battery backed CMOS by pressing F10.
Within SETUP, pressing F1 toggles the General Help window, while the
right-hand panel describes the function of the currently highlighted topic.
To change your BIOS settings, first use the arrow keys to highlight the
desired topic, then press the space bar or the <+> or <->key on the
numeric keypad to rotate through the available options. Note: only an item
whose label is surrounded by [square brackets] may be changed; values
not in brackets can only be viewed.
Once you’ve finished customizing your BIOS settings, press the Esc key a
couple times to reach the Exit menu. There you can decide if you really
want to keep your changes, if you’d prefer to return to the factory
defaults, or if you want to go back to using your previously saved values.
In any case, remember you can always change the BIOS settings again
next time you boot up.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Main Menu
Your system’s BIOS settings were configured at the factory to maximize
performance with the options you ordered. Generally, you need to run
SETUP only if you install a new or different hard drive, if the onboard
battery fails, or if you otherwise add to or change your basic hardware.
SETUP’s Main Menu allows you to view and configure several basic
parameters, including system time, date, and daylight savings, Diskette A
and B, system memory (RAM) timing, memory shadowing, boot sequence
options, and video system type.
The Main Menu lets you configure four PCI local bus IDE devices:
• IDE Adapter 0 Master (Drive letter, capacity in megabytes)
• IDE Adapter 0 Slave (Drive letter, capacity in megabytes)
• IDE Adapter 1 Master (Drive letter, capacity in megabytes)
• IDE Adapter 1 Slave (Drive letter, capacity in megabytes)
Each of the four IDE Adapter subsections lets you view and customize the
settings for a separate PCI local bus IDE device attached directly to you
mainboard. The subsections are described on the following pages.
SETUP’s Main Menu also contains subsections for Memory Control,
Memory Shadow, and Boot Sequence. Finally, System Memory and
Extended Memory are displayed. At the very bottom is a chart showing
how to navigate and change values in SETUP.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Main Menu Options
System Time
Sets the real-time clock, using a 24-hour format. During the power-up
sequence, the real time is read and saved in memory for use by the
operating system. After boot up, the operating system updates the system
time.
System Date
Sets the real-time date for month, day, and year. During the power-up
sequence, this information is read and saved in memory for use by the
operating system to determine the current date. After completing the
power-up sequence, the operating system updates the current date.
Daylight Savings
Adjusts system clock for daylight savings time. Default: Enabled.
Diskette Drive A:
Specifies the size and capacity of the floppy-disk drive installed as drive
A. Options are: 360K, 720K, 1.2M, 1.44M, and 2.88M.
Diskette Drive B:
Specifies the size and capacity of the floppy-disk drive installed as drive
B.
IDE Adapters (Four Provided)
Each of the four IDE Adapter subsections allows you to view and change
configurations of the IDE devices attached to your onboard IDE Hard
Drive connectors, J7 and J8. The IDE Adapter subsections list the IDE
devices that are currently installed. Your Primary hard drive (J7) is listed
as IDE Adapter 0 Master. You can attach a second hard drive to the same
cable as IDE Adapter 0 Slave, then two more devices on the Secondary
connector (J8) as IDE Adapter 1 Master, or IDE Adapter 1 Slave. The
following page describes the contents of each IDE Adapter subsection.
Note: If you attach two drives to a single drive cable, it doesn’t matter whether or not
the Master drive is connected to the end connector. Just be sure that one drive
is configured as Master and the other drive is configured as Slave.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Autotype Fixed Disk
This utility detects and configures your IDE Adapter, if the device
conforms to ANSI technical specifications. ZEOS drives are configured at
the factory, so to add a hard drive you just run Autotype. If Autotype is
successful, it will identify your hard drive type and display the drive
parameters. Otherwise, you can select one of the established drive type
numbers from the Type list, or select Type USER to set Cylinders, Heads,
Sectors/Track and Write Precomp yourself (according to the information
supplied by the device’s manufacturer).
Note: Don’t alter drive parameters unless you change or add a hard drive.
Multi-Sector Transfer
Determines the number of sectors per block for multiple sector transfers.
Options are Disabled, 2, 4, 8, and 16. Older hard drives (and even some
newer drives) will not work properly if the number of sectors is set too
high. Default: 16.
Note: Before adding a new hard drive or formatting one from Zeos, first disable MultiSector Transfers, then format the drive, then run FDISK. Later, you can enable
Multi-Sector Transfers again.
Write Precomp
Write Precompensation. In older hard drives, this setting tells the drive to
apply a stronger magnetic field to inner tracks of the disk to compensate
for magnetic drift. Your hard disk manufacturer’s documentation should
tell you if your drive requires this setting.
Default: None (Disabled).
LBA Mode Control
Enables or disables Logical Block Addressing, allowing you to use large
IDE hard drives. This must be enabled for IDE hard drives greater than
528 MB. Default: Set at the factory.
Video System
This option sets the video type. It can be set to Monochrome, CGA 80 x 25
(80 column Color Graphics), or EGA/VGA (Enhanced/Video Graphics
Adapter). Default: EGA/VGA.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Memory Control
The Memory Control subsection lets you view and change DRAM
(system RAM) Timing, enable/disable the L2 (Level 2) External Cache,
and determine which shadowed upper memory regions (in addition to
system and video) are allowed to be cached in a superfast (12-15ns) 256K
or 512K SIMM.
DRAM Timing
Sets the upper limit for DRAM (system RAM) speed to 50, 60, or 70ns
(nanoseconds). DRAM Timing must be set to match the speed of the
slowest SIMM in your memory slots.
Default: 70ns.
External Cache
Allows you to enable/disable the L2 (Level 2) External Cache feature. If
the special Level 2 cache SIMM is present, it offers an ultrafast, 12- to 15nanosecond buffer between your CPU and regular (50-70ns) system
RAM. Normally L2 cache speeds up your system, but because some
software has problems with L2 caching, you may (rarely) need to disable
the External Cache.
Default: Enabled.
Cache Memory Regions
Allows you to choose which specific shadowed BIOS memory regions (in
addition to System code and Video code) will be cached. Regions are
identified by hexadecimal (base 16) addresses.
Default: All specific regions Disabled.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Memory Shadow
BIOS shadowing copies data from portions of the computer’s slower
ROM (Read-Only Memory) chips into much faster DRAM (system RAM)
chips in system memory. This data can then be read more quickly by the
CPU, so system performance improves. The Memory Shadow subsection
lets you make certain regions of your upper memory (other than that
reserved for basic system and video) available for BIOS shadowing.
System Shadow
This setting is not adjustable. System shadow is always Enabled.
Video Shadow
Enables/disables copying of the video BIOS into RAM. Shadowing the
video BIOS code improves video performance.
Default: Enabled.
Shadow Memory Regions
Allows additional specific memory regions (other than System and Video)
to be shadowed in upper RAM memory. When enabled, any ROM data
located in the specified region will be copied to shadow RAM when you
boot up. Regions are identified by hexadecimal (base 16) addresses.
Default: All specific regions Disabled.
Boot Sequence
Determines what drive the system checks first for an operating system.
Choices are A: then C:, C: then A:, and C: only.
Default: A: then C:.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Advanced Menu
Warning!
Setting these items incorrectly could cause your system to malfunction. Never
needlessly change from the defaults.
The Advanced Menu offers the following options:
Large Disk Access Mode
Lets you set your system to expect a large DOS hard disk, or some Other
type of hard disk, such as expected by UNIX or Novell Netware.
Default: DOS.
OS support for more than 64MB
This option allows support for more than 64MB of memory with
operating systems other than DOS, such as OS/2 and Windows NT. On
systems with more than 64MB of memory, set to disable for DOS and
Windows, Enable for OS/2 and Windows NT.
Default: Disabled.
Plug & Play O/S
Enables/disables peripheral add-on features for computers with Plug &
Play operating systems.
Default: No.
Integrated Peripherals
Lets you configure your serial and parallel ports, as well as your onboard
floppy disk controller, your onboard IDE controller, your audio device (if
present), and your PC’s speaker volume. The following list describes each
of these parameters.
(more settings, next page)
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Advanced Menu (continued)
1st COM Port
When 1st COM Port (COM A) is set to Auto, the system will
automatically set the interrupt and IRQ for that port. Otherwise this option
allows you to choose (from a list) the interrupt and I/O address of the 9pin serial port.
Default: Auto.
2nd COM Port
When 2nd COM Port (COM B) is set to Auto, the system will
automatically set the interrupt and IRQ for that port. Otherwise this option
allows you to choose (from a list) the interrupt and I/O address of the 25pin serial port.
Default: Auto.
LPT Port
Sets the parallel port designation. This allows you to specify the parallel
port address and IRQ, which otherwise are factory set.
Default: Auto.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
LPT Mode
Allows you to set the parallel port communication mode to match the
capabilities of your parallel port device. Settings: Unidirectional,
Bidirectional or Enhanced.
Default: Unidirectional.
Floppy Disk Controller
Configures the onboard floppy disk controller to Primary, Secondary, or
Disabled.
Default: Primary.
IDE Controller
Enables/disables the onboard IDE controller, which controls up to four
PCI local bus devices.
Default: Enabled.
PC Speaker volume
Sets PC speaker to low, medium or high volume, or disables it.
Default: Medium.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
PCI Devices
The PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) Devices subsection allows
you to enable or disable the integrated SCSI and LAN options.
Enable Onboard SCSI
Enables/disables the built-in SCSI port, if present.
Default: set at factory.
Onboard Ethernet
Enables/disables the onboard AMD Ethernet controller, if present.
Default: set at factory.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Security Options
The Security Menu allows you to password-protect system access, a way
of safeguarding information. When passwords are enabled, users must
type the proper password to access the protected part of the system.
Note: 1. It’s easy to forget a password, so we strongly recommend writing down your
passwords and storing them in a secure place.
2. If you type the User password on entering SETUP, you cannot change the
Supervisor Password or Diskette Access settings.
Warning!
If you forget the password, your system will not operate. You will have to completely
clear the CMOS memory and reenter your entire system configuration. Write down your
password and store it in a safe place.
The following security items are available:
• Set Supervisor Password
• Set User Password
• Password on Boot
• Diskette Access
• Fixed disk boot sector
• System Backup Reminder
• Virus Check Reminder
Supervisor Password is
Allows you to enter a system supervisor password. This password controls
access to all features of your system.
User Password is
Accessible only after Supervisor Password is enabled, this allows you to
enter a system user password. You can’t use the User Password to alter the
Supervisor Password in SETUP.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Password on boot
When enabled, the system asks you for a password on boot. The system
will boot only after the correct supervisor or user password is entered.
Default: Disabled.
Diskette access
Active only when a Supervisor password is enabled, this specifies which
level of password (Supervisor or User) is required on bootup to use the
floppy disk drives. This can prevent unauthorized transfer of data.
Default: Supervisor.
Note: All diskette drive access can be denied (including system diskettes) by 1) setting a
Supervisor password, 2) setting Password on Boot to Disabled, then 3) setting
Diskette Access to Supervisor.
Fixed disk boot sector
When enabled, write protects the boot sector on your hard drive to protect
against viruses.
Default: Disabled.
System backup reminder
When enabled, this periodically displays a boot reminder message to back
up your system. Options: Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Disabled.
Default: Disabled.
Virus check reminder
When enabled, this periodically displays a boot reminder message to scan
for viruses. Options: Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Disabled.
Default: Disabled.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
Power Options
SETUP’s Power menu lets you tell your system to enter a low-power
Standby mode when it is idle for a specified time. Standby minimizes your
system’s energy consumption while allowing you to resume work within
moments.
Power Savings (DOS and Windows)
Lets you choose when to activate power conservation for your system.
The way you enable Power Savings differs between DOS and Windows,
but both methods reduce power consumption when they kick in (30 Watts
or less in Standby mode). With the power management feature activated,
the system will automatically “go to sleep" after the specified period of
user inactivity, while operating under DOS.
To activate power savings in DOS, go to SETUP during bootup by
pressing the F2 key, then under the Power menu choose Maximum,
Medium, Minimum, or Disabled. This allows you to choose one of three
preset configurations, or to disable power savings altogether.
• Maximum enters Standby mode after 5 minutes
• Medium enters Standby mode after 10 minutes
• Minimum enters Standby mode after 20 minutes
• Disabled prevents power conservation in DOS
Note: In DOS, the system will not go to sleep unless the EMM386 program in
Config.sys is either removed or "REM'd" out.
In Windows, activating power conservation is simpler. Launch the Control
Panel utility from the Main program group. Then enter the “Desktop”
dialog and select the ZEOS screen saver. Now you can select the timeout
period, down to a minimum of one minute. That's all there is to it.
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Chapter 3 - Using SETUP
When the system enters Standby mode, the screen will go dark, the CPU
processing speed will be diminished, and a command will be given to the
hard disk drive to stop spinning. Normally the hard drive shuts down
about 5 minutes after the rest of the system, due to a built-in delay.
In Standby mode, power consumption will be 30 Watts or less.
Note: Power Savings in Windows will not be active unless you select the ZEOS screen
saver.
Exit Menu Options
Offers Exit and Save options for the SETUP program.
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
4. Expanding Your System
Adding an Expansion Board
The five ISA and three PCI expansion slots on your mainboard are
designed to accept a wide variety of add-on cards (many available from
ZEOS). Scanners, tape backup units, video capture devices, and many
other devices come on expansion cards, which communicate with the CPU
via standard expansion slots. Often, adding these components is as easy as
opening the case, slipping the new card into an empty slot, then
connecting the external component (if there is one) to the card.
To add an expansion board:
1. Turn off the monitor and system unit power, then unplug the AC
power cords from the wall outlet.
2. Open the system unit case (see How to Open a Desktop Case,
earlier).
3. Find an empty expansion slot or, if you are replacing an expansion
card already in your system (such as when upgrading your video
card), locate the old card.
4. Unscrew the mounting screw and remove the blank bracket by
sliding it up. If you are removing an old expansion card, carefully
lift it straight up (sometimes you have to wiggle it a little).
5. Set any jumpers or switches on the new card. See the card’s
documentation for the correct jumper settings.
6. Slide the new card into the slot. Press down firmly, so the edge
connector slides completely into the slot.
7. Tighten the mounting screw.
(more steps, next page)
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
How to Add an Expansion Board (continued)
Mounting Screw
Expansion Slot
8. Connect any internal cables to the expansion card.
9. Close the computer case, and turn on the power.
Many expansion cards require you to run diagnostic or installation
software before the new board will work properly. Your expansion card’s
installation manual should have detailed instructions.
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
How Disk Drives Work
There are three main types of disks for storing files - floppy, hard, and
compact disks.
Floppy disks are small, relatively slow, portable disks. Most people use
floppy disks to transfer files or install new programs onto their hard
drives. Floppy disks fit into the floppy disk drives mounted in your system
unit. Although there are some combination drives, most floppy disk drives
are designed to hold only one size of disk.
Hard, or fixed disks, are permanently mounted inside your system unit
case. They are very fast, hold a lot of files, and are not removable without
disassembling your system.
Compact disks fit into CD-ROM drives. Compact disks can store very
large amounts of information.
Floppy, hard, and CD-ROM disk drives all fit into the drive bays in your
system unit. This chapter shows how some of the most common drives
connect to the mainboard. Most drives have two connections - a power
connection and a data connection. For detailed installation and
configuration information, always check the disk drive’s documentation.
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
How a Floppy Drive Works
Floppy drives have two primary connectors, a ribbon cable called the data
cable, and a power connection to the power supply. The ribbon cable
connects the back of the floppy drive with the floppy controller port J5 on
the mainboard. Data ribbon cables often have two connectors. If you have
more than one floppy drive on your system, they often share the same
ribbon cable.
The data cable also has a red stripe. Whenever connecting or
disconnecting the ribbon cable, be sure to attach the cable connectors so
the red stripe is pointing toward pin 1 of the connector. Pin 1 is often
labelled with a small triangle or filled in corner.
Primary Floppy
Drive Connector
Floppy Drive
DC Power from
Power Supply
Second Floppy
Drive Connector
Colored Stripe
(Pin 1)
Colored Stripe
(Pin 1)
Floppy Drive
Ribbon Data
Cable
Mainboard
Floppy Drive
Cable Connector
Pin 1
Mark on
Cable
Connector
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Pin 1 notch
on mainboard
connector
Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
How an IDE Hard Drive Works
IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics) hard drives are the most common hard
drives and are the most likely to be installed on your system. IDE devices
have most of the electronics or “smarts” built into the drive, rather than
installed on a separate controller card or on the motherboard. IDE hard
drives have two main connections – a ribbon cable called the data cable
and a power connection to the power supply. The ribbon cable attaches to
the back of the drive and connects to the IDE controller port J7 or J8 on
the mainboard. Whenever connecting or disconnecting the ribbon cable,
be sure to attach the data cable so the red stripe points toward pin 1 on the
connector.
Most drives also have configuration jumpers at the back of the drive for
setting drive identification and resistors. See your hard drive user’s guide
for complete information.
Keyboard
Connector
J1
Parallel
Port
J4
Floppy
Connector
J5
Colored
Stripe
(pin 1)
Secondary
IDE Hard
Drive
Header
J8
System RAM
SIMM Sockets
Front of
Computer
Primary
IDE Hard
Drive
Header
J7
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
How a CD-ROM Drive Works
CD-ROM drives read information from compact discs, or CDs. The
“ROM” in CD-ROM stands for Read Only Memory. Compact discs are
read-only--you can read information from them, but cannot add new files
or information onto them as you can do with a floppy disk or hard disk.
Despite their limitations, CDs have some distinct advantages. CDs can
store large amounts of information--one compact disk can store as much
information as 500 floppy disks. With the right software, you can even
listen to music on your CD-ROM drive.
There are many types of CD-ROM drives. Most have three primary
connectors, a power connector, a data cable connector, and an audio
connector.
The power connector is just like the DC power connector on floppy drives
and hard disk drives. It accepts DC power from the computer’s internal
power supply.
The data cable is a flat ribbon cable that connects the drive with some type
of controller. Some drives use a dedicated controller card inserted into one
of the expansion slots on the mainboard. Your IDE CD-ROM drive
connects to the 16-bit IDE controller port on the mainboard (J8) or to an
IDE controller card inserted into one of the expansion slots. Still other
drives use a CD-ROM controller port mounted on a sound card in one of
the expansion slots.
Most CD-ROM drives also have an audio connector where you can
connect headphones or computer speakers. If your system has a sound
card and speakers installed, the CD-ROM drive’s audio connector
probably can be connected to the sound card.
For detailed information about your CD-ROM drive, check the
manufacturer’s documentation.
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
Adding System RAM
System memory is often called RAM or Random Access Memory. RAM is
the “thinking space” available to your applications. Usually, the more
system RAM you have, the faster your system will run. Many software
applications simply run much faster and more efficiently when more RAM
is available.
You add RAM by inserting Single In-line Memory Modules (SIMMs)
into SIMM sockets on the mainboard. Your computer’s mainboard will
hold up to six SIMMs of 32-bit RAM. Slots must be filled in sequence
from 0A to 2B. You must have identical pairs of SIMMs in each bank, but
different banks can support various capacities and speeds. The mainboard
will support up to 384Mb of RAM.
Note: SIMMs MUST ALWAYS BE INSTALLED IN SEQUENCE FROM BANK 0A TO
BANK 2B, AND WITHIN THE SAME BANK, THEY MUST BE THE SAME
SPEEDS AND CAPACITIES.
Memory Size
RAM Configurations
SIMMs Used
Memory Scheme
2MB
two 1MB
Page
4MB
two 2MB
Page/Interleaved
8MB
two 4MB
Page/Interleaved
10MB
two 4MB, two 1MB
Page/Interleaved
12MB
six 2MB
Page/Interleaved
16MB
four 4MB
Page/Interleaved
24MB
six 4MB
Page/Interleaved
32MB
four 8MB
Page/Interleaved
64MB
four 16MB
Page/Interleaved
128MB
four 32MB
Page/Interleaved
256MB
four 64MB
Page/Interleaved
384MB
six 64MB
Page/Interleaved
Note: This is just a small sample of possible RAM configurations.
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
Installing SIMMs
When installing SIMMs, use 70ns or faster memory chips for maximum
system performance. Different speed SIMMs may be mixed, but only if
you put them different banks. In addition, always set the CPU/DRAM
Speed option in SETUP to match the slowest SIMM. Note that with
SIMMs, larger numbers mean that more time is used to access information
(a 70ns SIMM is slower than a 60ns SIMM). For best results, use SIMMs
from the same manufacturer.
Caution:
Static electric shocks can permanently damage your equipment.
Always ground yourself by touching the metal part of the computer
case before beginning the following procedure. We strongly recommend using an antistatic wrist strap attached to the case ground.
To Install SIMMs:
1. Remove system cover (see How to Open a Desktop Case, earlier).
2. Remove any SIMMs you are replacing with new SIMMs by gently
pulling the metal socket clips away from the SIMM to release the
SIMM from the socket. Hold them out while you are tilting the
SIMM away from the metal clips. Carefully lift the SIMM up and
out.
Caution:
Never use force to remove the module out of the socket. Failure to
properly release the retainer clips may break the socket, causing
expensive damage which is not covered by your warranty.
3. Grasping a new SIMM by the edge, remove it from the antistatic
bag.
4. Insert the bottom edge into the socket slot. Press down firmly on
the SIMM while maintaining the proper angle of insertion.
(more steps, next page)
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
Installing SIMMs (continued)
Retaining clip
Retaining Clip
Inserting a SIMM
5. Ensure the SIMM seats correctly. If not, remove and repeat Step 4.
6. Gently push the top edge toward the retainer clips until the clips
snap into place.
7. Reinstall system cover.
After completing the installation, your ROM BIOS will determine the
amount of memory installed; however you may need to change the CPU/
DRAM Speed option in your system SETUP program. Refer to Using
SETUP earlier for detailed instructions.
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
Adding System Cache Memory
Secondary cache memory can speed up memory intensive applications
and greatly enhance your CPU’s performance.
You add cache memory by adding a single in-line memory module
(SIMM) into the secondary system cache SIMM socket on the mainboard.
Your system mainboard will hold one cache SIMM of 64-bit, 12- to 15nanosecond memory.
Caution:
You must use a 3-volt SIMM when you add cache memory. If you aren’t sure, contact
ZEOS Technical Support before purchasing or installing a cache SIMM.
Note: System cache SIMMs are not the same as RAM memory SIMMs. Do not try to
install cache SIMMs in your RAM memory sockets, or RAM SIMMs in your
cache SIMM socket.
Although installing secondary cache memory is easy and straightforward,
a few simple precautions will ease the installation. Before you begin,
make note of your system’s current SETUP parameters. You can access
the SETUP screen by pressing F2 at boot. Copy the SETUP parameters to
a piece of paper.
Also, all SIMMs are extremely sensitive to static electricity. Be sure to
use an antistatic wrist band and ground yourself by touching the computer
case before you touch the mainboard or handle any chips.
To install secondary cache memory:
1. Turn off the system power and unplug the AC power cord.
Remove system cover (see Opening the Case, earlier).
2. Locate the secondary system cache memory SIMM socket. The
figure above shows where to find the socket on the mainboard.
3. If you are upgrading your system cache memory, remove the
SIMM you are replacing by gently pulling the SIMM out of the
socket.
4. Grasping a new SIMM by the edge, remove it from the antistatic
bag and press it into the socket.
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
Caution:
Static RAM is extremely sensitive to static electricity. These shocks
can permanently damage your equipment. Use an antistatic wrist
strap attached to cabinet ground. Be sure to ground yourself by
touching the system cabinet before beginning this procedure.
5. Reinstall system cover, plug in AC power, and turn on the
computer as you normally would.
6. Make sure the External Cache option on the Memory Control
Menu of the Advanced System Setup Menu is Enabled. Also check
your system SETUP to be sure it hasn’t changed. If any settings
have changed, reenter the correct values and reboot the system.
SIMM Socket for
Level 2 System
Cache
Pin 1
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
Installing a New CPU
Caution:
Static electricity can permanently destroy your CPU. Always ground
yourself by touching the system cabinet before beginning the following procedure. We strongly recommend using an antistatic wrist strap
attached to cabinet ground.
To install a new CPU:
1. Open the case and locate the CPU socket on the mainboard. If you
need help see How to Open a Desktop Case and Mainboard
Diagram, earlier.
2. Lift up the ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) socket arm to the open
position. This will loosen the pressure on the pins of the old CPU
chip. Carefully lift the old CPU and heat sink out of the socket.
3. Important: You must align the new CPU over the socket on the
board exactly like the old CPU. Make absolutely sure the Pin-1
notch on the CPU chip aligns with Pin-1 on the ZIF socket.
4. Place the new CPU into the socket and press gently. Be careful not
to bend any pins on the CPU. Once the CPU is firmly seated in the
socket, carefully lower the ZIF arm back down to the closed
position.
5. Attach the heat sink to the new CPU. If your new CPU is exactly
the same size as your old CPU, you can reuse your old heat sink. If
your new CPU is not the same size as your old one, you must use
the heat sink supplied with your new CPU. If your heat sink is a
peel and stick type, peel off the adhesive layer and stick the heat
sink onto the new CPU. If your heat sink uses a retaining clip,
place the heat sink on the chip, then slide the retaining clip over
the heat sink until it snaps onto the sides of the CPU.
(more steps, next page)
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Chapter 4 - Expanding Your System
6. Set the CLK jumper to match the speed of your new CPU. If you
need help with this jumper, see Mainboard Jumpers Diagram,
earlier.
7. Close case and boot as you normally would.
CPU
(heat sink
not shown)
Pin 1
Front of
Computer
When ZIF Release Lever is
down and locked, the CPU
cannot be removed.
ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) Release
Lever. When pointing straight up, CPU
chip can be eased into or out of its
socket without forcing it.
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Chapter 5 - Mainboard Specifications
5. Mainboard Specifications
CPU
Intel Pentium (P54C)
Power Consumption
Approx. 25Watts (varies with CPU, memory)
Clock Speeds
75, 90, 100, 120, or 133MHz
Chipset
Intel “Neptune” chipset
ISA bus speed
8.25 MHz for 33MHz systems
8.33 MHz for 25MHz systems
PCI local bus speed
up to 133 MB/s (33MHz)
up to 100 MB/s (25MHz)
Memory Types
1, 2, 4, 16, 32MB x36 or x32 SIMMs
Memory Speeds
50, 60, 70ns
Memory Configurations
See table, page 52
Data path
8, 16, 32, 64-bits
Expansion slots (8)
Five 16-bit ISA
Three 32-bit PCI local bus
Secondary Cache Mapping
Direct-mapped
Secondary Cache Write policy
Write-back
Secondary Cache Capacity
0KB (standard), 256KB, or 512KB
Secondary Cache Type
One 256KB or 512KB SIMM
Secondary Cache Speed
12 or 15-nanosecond
Mainboard Environmental Specifications
Operating Temperature
0°C to 40°C
Storage Temperature
-20°C to 60°C
Operating Humidity
Up to 100% non-condensing
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Chapter 5 - Mainboard Specifications
9-Pin Serial Port (J2) Pin Assignment
Header Pin
Number
DB9 Connector
Pin Number
Signal
1
1
DCD, Data Carrier Detect
2
6
DSR, Data Set Ready
3
2
RXD, Receive Data
4
7
RTS, Request to Send
5
3
TXD, Transmit Data
6
8
CTS, Clear To Send
7
4
DTR, Data Terminal Ready
8
9
RI, Ring Indicator
9
5
GND, Ground
25-Pin Serial Port (J3) Pin Assignment
Header Pin
Number
DB25 Connector
Pin Number
Signal
1
8
DCD, Data Carrier Detect
2
3
RXD, Receive Data
3
2
TXD, Transmit Data
4
20
DTR, Data Terminal Ready
5
7
GND, Ground
6
6
DSR, Data Set Ready
7
4
RTS, Request to Send
8
5
CTS, Clear to Send
9
22
RI, Ring Indicator
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Chapter 5 - Mainboard Specifications
9-Pin Serial Port (J2) Pin Assignment
5 - GND, Ground
9 - RI, Ring Indicator
4 - DTR, Data Terminal Ready
8 - CTS, Clear To Send
3 - TXD, Transmit Data
7 - RTS, Request to Send
2 - RXD, Receive Data
6 - DSR, Data Set Ready
1 - DCD, Data Carrier Detect
25-Pin Serial Port (J3) Pin Assignment
22 - RI, Ring Indicator
8 - DCD, Data Carrier Ready
7 - GND, Ground
20 - DTR, Data Terminal Ready
6 - DSR, Data Set Ready
5 - CTS, Clear to Send
4 - RTS, Request to Send
3 - RXD, Receive Data
2 - TXD, Transmit Data
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Chapter 5 - Mainboard Specifications
Parallel Port (J4) Pin Assignment
Parallel Port
Connector Pin
Number
Header Pin
Number
Signal
1
1
STB, Strobe
3
2
PD0, Data Bit 0
5
3
PD1, Data Bit 1
7
4
PD2, Data Bit 2
9
5
PD3, Data Bit 3
11
6
PD4, Data Bit 4
13
7
PD5, Data Bit 5
15
8
PD6, Data Bit 6
17
9
PD7, Data Bit 7
19
10
ACK, Acknowledge
21
11
Busy, Busy
23
12
PE, Paper Empty
25
13
SLCT, Select
2
14
AFD, Auto Feed
4
15
ERR, Error
6
16
INIT, Initialize
8
17
SLIN, Select Input
10
18
GND, Ground
12
19
GND, Ground
14
20
GND, Ground
16
21
GND, Ground
18
22
GND, Ground
20
23
GND, Ground
22
24
GND, Ground
24
25
GND, Ground
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Chapter 5 - Mainboard Specifications
Parallel Port (J4) Pin Assignment
1 - STB, Strobe
14 - AFD, Auto Feed
2 - PD0, Data Bit 0
15 - ERR, Error
3 - PD1, Data Bit 1
16 - INIT, Initialize
4 - PD2, Data Bit 2
17 - SLIN, Select Input
5 - PD3, Data Bit 3
18 - GND, Ground
6 - PD4, Data Bit 4
19 - GND, Ground
7 - D5, Data Bit 5
20 - GND, Ground
8 - PD6, Data Bit 6
21 - GND, Ground
9 - PD7, Data Bit 7
22 - GND, Ground
10 - ACK, Acknowledge
23 - GND, Ground
11 - Busy, Busy
24 - GND, Ground
12 - PE, Paper Empty
25 - GND, Ground
13 - SLCT, Select
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Handy Cheat Sheet
Here are some of the most often needed or forgotten notes.
CTRL-ALT-DEL ............................................................. Warm Reboot
Reset button, or
Power button ...................................................................... Cold Reboot
F2 during power up ........................................................Access SETUP
CTRL-BREAK, or
CTRL-C ............................. Pause or Break an application or batch file
DOS Commands
COPY [filename] [drive:][path][newfilename] ................... copies a file
FORMAT [drive:] ........................................... erases and formats a disk
DIR [drive:][path]............ lists the files in a certain drive and directory
DEL [filename]................................................................... deletes a file
MD[newdirectory] .............................................. makes a new directory
RD[directoryname] ............ removes and erases an empty, old directory
RENAME [oldfilename][newfilename] ........................... renames a file
CHKDSK [drive:] .............................. displays a status report for a disk
CD[path] ............................................... changes to a different directory
CLS ............................................................................... clears the screen
Common DOS file extensions
.BAK backup file
.BAT ......................................................................................... batch file
.COM ................................................................. command program file
.EXE ................................................................. executable program file
.SYS ....................................................................................... system file
.INI............................................................... Windows initialization file
.PIF ................................................. Windows program information file
README files ................................. text files with special instructions
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Handy Cheat Sheet
Windows Shortcuts
Ctrl-C .......................................................................... copy to clipboard
Ctrl-V .................................................. paste or copy from the clipboard
Ctrl-X ......................................................... delete and copy to clipboard
Alt-Tab ............................................... toggle between open applications
Alt-Esc .................................................... jump to next open application
Wildcards - wildcards are special characters that can represent any other
valid numbers, letters, or symbols in a file name.
*
The asterisk represents any number of other characters.
For example:
*.BAK would represent any file with the extension BAK.
GONOW.* would represent all files named GONOW
with any extension.
?
The question mark represents one single character.
For example:
GONOW.?XE would represent any file named GONOW
with an extension ending in XE.
?ONOW.EX? would represent any five character
filename ending in ONOW with EX as the first two
characters of its extension.
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Glossary
This glossary provides general definitions of key terms. For an expanded list look in
standard reference books on computers.
Address - A number or expression representing the
physical location of a device or a piece of data.
Application Program - A word processor,
spreadsheet, desktop publisher or other program that
allows interaction with the user.
AUTOEXEC.BAT File - An MS-DOS batch file
containing commands which execute automatically
when you turn on your computer.
Batch File - A file containing several commands that
execute in sequence as a group, or batch. MS-DOS
batch files must have a filename extension of .BAT.
Boot - Short for Bootstrap. Transfer of a disk
operating system program from storage on floppy
disk or hard disk drive to computer’s working
memory.
Boot Disk - A disk with an operating system installed
which loads the system on power up.
Character - Anything that can print in a single space
on the page or the screen. Includes numbers, letters,
punctuation marks, and graphic symbols.
Command Processor - The part of an operating
system that processes commands entered by you. The
command processor in MS-DOS is contained in the
COMMAND.COM file.
CPU - Central Processing Unit. The piece of
hardware which interprets instructions, performs the
tasks you indicate, keeps track of stored data, and
controls all input and output operations.
Crash - A malfunction in the computer hardware or
software, usually causing loss of data.
Cursor - The arrow, vertical I-beam or other screen
object that shows where you can click to select
something onscreen. See Insertion point.
Diagnostics - The tests and procedures the computer
performs to check its internal circuitry and set up its
configuration. See POST.
DIP Switches - Small switches on a piece of
hardware such as a CPU, a printer, or an option card.
DIP switch settings control various functions and
provide a system with information about itself. DIP
stands for Dual In-Line Package.
Directory - A list of the files stored on a disk or a
part of a disk. Often depicted onscreen by a small
folder.
Disk Drive - The physical device which allows the
computer to read from and write to a disk. A floppy
disk drive has a disk slot into which you insert floppy
disks. A hard disk drive is permanently fixed inside
the system unit.
DMA - Direct Memory Access. Process where a hard
drive, LAN adapter or other device transfers data
directly to/from system RAM, bypassing the CPU.
DOS - Disk Operating System. A computer program
which continuously runs and mediates between the
computer user and the Application Program, and
allows access to disk data by disk filenames. The Disk
Operating System controls the computer’s input and
output functions. See Operating System.
File - A group of related pieces of information called
records, or entries, stored together on disk. Text files
consist of words and sentences. Program files consist
of codes and are used by computers to interpret and
carry out instructions.
Floppy disk - a flat piece of flexible plastic coated
with magnetic material and used to store data
permanently.
Format - To prepare a new disk (or erase an old one)
so it can receive information. Formatting a disk
divides it into tracks and sectors which create
addressable locations on it.
Hard Disk Drive - Commonly called rigid disk
drives, or fixed disk drives. Unlike floppy disks, hard
disks are fixed in place inside the system unit. They
can process data faster and store many more files than
floppy disks.
Hardware - Any physical component of a computer
system, such as a monitor, printer, keyboard, or CPU.
IDE - Integrated Drive Electronics. An IDE drive has
the controller electronics built into the drive itself and
is connected directly to the mainboard or to an
adapter card.
Insertion Point - A blinking vertical marker which
shows where you can type words or numbers.
Sometimes called Text Cursor. See Cursor.
Jumper - A small electrical connector that alters
some of the computer’s functions. Short (makes a
connection) or Non-Short (no connection).
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Glossary
Kilobyte (KB) - A unit used to measure storage
space (in a computer’s memory or on a disk). One
kilobyte equals 1024 bytes.
LED - Light Emitting Diode. A diode that
illuminates when electricity passes through it, like
the indicator lights on the front panel of the
computer.
Local Bus - A set of addresses, data, and control
signals that interface directly with the host CPU.
Mainboard - also Motherboard. A printed circuit
board into which other circuit boards can be
plugged. Usually, it contains the CPU, connectors
for memory (SIMMs), secondary cache, adapter
sockets and expansion slots for add-on devices.
Memory - Computer chips that make data quickly
available to the CPU. They can store data
permanently (ROM) or temporarily (RAM).
MHz - 1 Megahertz = one million (Mega) cycles per
second (Hertz).
Operating System - A body of programs, such as
MS-DOS, that coordinate the activities of a
computer. It determines how programs run and
supervises all input and output.
PCI - Peripheral Component Interconnect. PCI is
an industry standard for local bus peripheral
expansion. Parallel Port - also Printer Port. A 25pin Input/Output connector usually used for printers.
Peripheral - A device (such as, a printer or a
modem) connected to a computer that depends on
the computer for its operation.
Port - A physical input/output socket on a computer
where you can connect a peripheral.
POST - Power-On Self Test. An initial diagnostic
test a computer performs to check its hardware.
RAM - also DRAM. Random Access Memory. Small
chips or modules that provide the CPU rapid access
to data. Software programs and files reside in RAM
while being used. RAM is called volatile memory
because it “evaporates” when you turn off the
power.
Read - To copy data from one area to another. For
example, when you open a text file stored on disk,
the computer reads the data from the disk and
displays it on the screen.
Reset - To reload a computer’s operating system so
you can retry a task or begin using a different
operating system. Resetting clears RAM.
ROM - Read Only Memory. A portion of memory
that can only be read and cannot be used for
temporary storage. ROM retains its contents even
when you turn off the power.
SETUP - This refers (usually) to the program that is
used to load the CMOS data base with input from the
user. SETUP sets the date, time, and configuration of
disk drives installed on the system.
Software - The programs that enable your computer
to perform the tasks and functions you indicate.
Application programs are software.
SRAM - Static RAM. Memory chips that do not
require refresh circuitry, as do conventional RAM
chips. SRAMs operate in the 10-30 nanosecond
range, which is faster than RAM chips. SRAM is
often used as a buffer between fast CPUs and RAM.
Subdirectory - A directory within another directory.
System Disk - A disk that contains the operating
system. A Boot Disk.
Write - To store data on a disk.
Write-Protect - To prevent a floppy disk from being
overwritten by placing a write-protect tab over the
notch on the side of the floppy disk (5.25") or setting
the write-protect switch (3.5"). When a floppy disk is
write-protected, you cannot erase, change, or record
over its contents.
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Index
A
E
Adding an Expansion Board 46
Adding System Cache Memory 55
Adding System RAM 52
Advanced Menu 38
Asynchronous Cache Module 31
Autotype Fixed Disk 35
Enable On-board SCSI 41
Expansion Board
B
F
Boot Sequence 37
Burst Cache Module 31
Fixed Disk Boot Sector 43
Floppy Disk Controller 40
Floppy Drive 49
C
Adding 46
Expansion Slots
Location 26
External (Level 2) Cache 36
H
Cache Memory
Hard Drive 50
Adding 55
Location 56
Regions 36
I
CD-ROM Drive 51
Com Port A: in SETUP 39
Com Port B: in SETUP 39
CPU
Inserting into ZIF Socket 57
Installing 57
Location 26
CPU Pipelining 31
Customer Assurance Program 8
IDE Adapters 34
IDE Controller 40
Installing a New CPU 57
Installing SIMMs 53
Integrated Peripherals 38
J
Jumpers
CLK1 31
CLR 30
FLSH 30
Settings 29
D
Daylight Savings 34
Desktop System
L
Diagram 10
How to Open 14
Internal Diagram 18
Disk Drives 48
Diskette Access 43
Diskette Drive A: in SETUP 34
Diskette Drive B: in SETUP 34
DRAM Timing 36
Large Disk Access Mode 38
Large Disk DOS Compatibility 38
LBA Mode Control 35
LPT Mode 40
LPT Port 39
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Index
M
S
Mainboard
Diagram 26
Environmental Specifications 59
Jumper Functions 30
Jumpers Diagram 28
Specifications 59
Memory
Control 36
Shadow 37
SCSI Port Features 25
Secondary Cache Subsystem 21
Security 42
Serial Port Features 23
SETUP 32
Shadow Memory Regions 37
SIMMs
Adding 53
Mode, in SETUP 40
Multi-Sector Transfer 35
System
Backup Reminder 43
Date 34
Shadow 37
Time 34
O
On-board Ethernet 41
OS Support for More than 64MB 38
System Memory
P
T
Parallel Port
Tower System
Adding 52
Diagram 12
How to Open 16
Internal Diagram 19
Features 24
in SETUP 39
Password 42
Password on Boot 43
PC Speaker Volume 40
PCI
U
Devices 41
Local Bus 21
SCSI/ Ethernet Port 25
V
User Password 42
Pinouts, Serial and Parallel 60
Plug & Play O/S 38
Power Savings 44
R
Video Shadow 37
Virus Check Reminder 43
W
Write Precomp 35
RAM
Adding 52
700-0195-02
CMM3
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Late Changes
The following changes arrived too late for printing :
p.1: new ZEOS logo.
p.4-6: updated TOC.
p.11: video connector location moved.
p.13: video connector location moved.
p.15: video connector location moved.
p.17: video connector location moved.
p.18: updated mainboard diagram.
p.19: updated mainboard diagram.
p.22: removed Business Audio reference.
p.25: removed Business Audio reference.
p.29: updated FLSH/CLR jumper settings.
p.30: new procedure to clear BIOS settings stored in CMOS.
p.40: removed reference to "Audio Device" (Business Audio).
p.49: moved Pin1 marker on floppy drive connector.
p.56: updated mainboard diagram.
p.58: updated CPU graphic.
p.68-9: updated index.
700-0195-02: CMM3
CM3CHNG2.PM5
1
6/5/95, 1:35 PM
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