null  null
Business Intelligence in
Microsoft SharePoint 2013
Norman P. Warren
Mariano Teixeira Neto
Stacia Misner
Ivan Sanders
Scott A. Helmers
Copyright © 2013 by Norman P. Warren, Mariano Teixeira Neto, Data Inspirations, Inc., Dimension Solutions,
Scott A. Helmers
All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any
means without the written permission of the publisher.
ISBN: 978-0-7356-7543-8
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Contents at a Glance
Introductionxv
Chapter 1
Business intelligence in SharePoint
1
Chapter 2
Planning for business intelligence adoption
21
Chapter 3
The lifecycle of a business intelligence implementation
55
Chapter 4
Using PowerPivot in Excel 2013 97
Chapter 5
Using Power View in Excel 2013
125
Chapter 6
Business intelligence with Excel Services 2013
157
Chapter 7
Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013
189
Chapter 8
Using PerformancePoint Services
213
Chapter 9
Using Visio and Visio Services
269
Chapter 10
Bringing it all together
309
Appendix A
Running scripts to set up a demonstration environment
331
Appendix B
Microsoft and “Big Data”
349
Index361
This page intentionally left blank
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint
1
Leading up to BI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Beware of losing sight of what matters most . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
What is BI?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
The need for BI today. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
What is self-service BI?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Microsoft’s vision for BI and self-service BI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
What SharePoint does for BI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
The BI stack: SQL Server + SharePoint + Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Authoring in Microsoft BI tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Examples of BI in SharePoint 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
PerformancePoint and the BI stack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Power Pivot and BISM Model: A Fulfillment Report for
Tracking Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
The steps to implementation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Sharing with other teams (building user adoption). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
A summary of the fulfillment example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Creating a report by using an Odata feed from a SharePoint list. . . . . . . 19
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Chapter 2 Planning for business intelligence adoption
21
Business user communities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Understanding your audience: Casual users vs. power users. . . . . . 22
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v
Organizational hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
BI communities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
The progression of BI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
The Business Intelligence Maturity Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Road map to analytical competition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Tool selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Excel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Excel Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Reporting Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
SharePoint BI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
PerformancePoint Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Visio Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
An action plan for adoption: Build it and they might come. . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Chapter 3 The lifecycle of a business intelligence
implementation
55
Working together: SQL Server 2012 + SharePoint 2013 + Office 2013. . 57
SQL Server 2012 features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
1 The SQL Server database engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
2 SQL Server Integration Services or other tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3 The Business Intelligence Semantic Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4 Additional BI tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
5 SQL Server Data Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
The lifecycle of a BI implementation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Step 1: Decide what to analyze, measure, or forecast. . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Step 2: Get to trusted data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Step 3 or 4: Load data into a SSDT (Visual Studio) project. . . . . . . . 73
Step 5: Model the data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Step 6: Deploy the model to SSAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Step 7: Create a BISM file in SharePoint 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94
viContents
Chapter 4 Using PowerPivot in Excel 2013 97
The Data Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Creating the Data Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Adding data to the Data Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Creating table relationships by using the Data Model. . . . . . . . . . 109
Working with the Data Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
PowerPivot 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Data refresh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Compatibility issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Calculations with DAX. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
A new DAX function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Importing data from Windows Azure Marketplace. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Paving the ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Chapter 5 Using Power View in Excel 2013
125
Introducing Power View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
A brief history. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Comparing editions of Power View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
What’s new in Power View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
More visualizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Additional formatting options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Key performance indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
New drill functionality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Using Power View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
When do you use Power View?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
When do you avoid using Power View?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Setting up Power View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Creating visualizations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Getting started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Creating a table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Creating a matrix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Creating a chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Contents
vii
Creating a map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Creating cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Using KPIs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Filtering data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Highlighting data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Adding a slicer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Filtering by using tiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Using the Filter pane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Saving a Power View workbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
Chapter 6 Business intelligence with Excel Services 2013
157
A brief history of Excel Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
2007: The introduction of Excel Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
2010: Expanded capabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
2013: Continued expansion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
When to use Excel Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
It’s already Excel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
It’s fast to create and easy to adopt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
It is a great ad hoc tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
It scales Excel files to many users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
The Data Model in Excel Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
Configuring the server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Excel Services security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
External data configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Opening an Excel workbook in the browser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Viewing workbooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Editing workbooks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Configure a simple Excel dashboard by using Web Parts. . . . . . . . 173
viiiContents
Extending Excel Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
UDFs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Excel Web Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
ECMAScript (JavaScript, JScript) object model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Excel Services REST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Excel Interactive View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013
189
A brief history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
When do I use PowerPivot for SharePoint?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Getting started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Installing PowerPivot for SharePoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Publishing to SharePoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
The PowerPivot Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Scheduling data refreshes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Data Refresh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Schedule Details. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Earliest Start Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
E-mail Notifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Credentials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Data Sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Workbooks as a data source. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Monitoring with PowerPivot for SharePoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Infrastructure – Server Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Workbook Activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Data Refresh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
Contents
ix
Chapter 8 Using PerformancePoint Services
213
A brief history of PerformancePoint Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
An overview of PerformancePoint Services components. . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Data sources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Scorecards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Context menu features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Dashboards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Other features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
What’s new in PerformancePoint Services 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
What’s new for designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
New for IT professionals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
When do I use PerformancePoint Services for BI?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
The PerformancePoint Services architecture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
PerformancePoint Services configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Configure security for PerformancePoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Start PerformancePoint Dashboard Designer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Providing a performance solution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Design the KPIs, scorecards, reports, and dashboard. . . . . . . . . . . 236
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .267
Chapter 9 Using Visio and Visio Services
269
Background. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
What’s new in Visio 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
Six reasons to include Visio 2013 in your BI suite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Linking to data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
Visualizing data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
Collaborating to create the best result. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
Validating diagrams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276
Saving as a website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Saving to Visio Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
When do I use Visio and Visio Services?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Netaphor Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284
xContents
Additional case studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
Incorporating Visio into a BI solution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
Visio Services: Example 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Organizing the data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
Creating the Visio diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
Visualizing data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Saving to Visio Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
Visio Services: Example 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Organizing the data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
Creating the Visio diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
Saving to Visio Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Linking to data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Visualizing data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Creating a Web Part page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Refreshing the diagram when data changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .308
Chapter 10 Bringing it all together
309
Dashboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Making dashboards useful. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Tools in SharePoint for authoring dashboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
Which dashboard tool should I use?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312
Dashboard (Web Part) pages in SharePoint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
Using Excel Services in the dashboard (Web Part page). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Creating the Excel workbook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Preparing the workbook for the dashboard: adding parameters . . . . . . 320
Showing the workbook in Web Parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
Setting other Web Part properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
Using the filter added in Excel 2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
Adding to the dashboard (Web Part page). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
Visio Web Access Web Part . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
PerformancePoint Web Parts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
The Web Part page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
Contents
xi
Appendix A Running scripts to set up a demonstration environment331
Hardware considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331
Introducing the scripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332
Step 1: Install the Active Directory Demo Build 2.1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
Prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
Installing the content pack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
Post installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336
Step 2: Install the SQL 2012 SP1 Content Pack Demo Build 2.0.0 . . . . . . 336
Contents of SQL 2012 SP1 Content Pack Demo Build 2.0.0. . . . . . 336
Prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Installing the content pack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
Post installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339
Step 3: Install the SharePoint 2013 Demo Build 2.0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
Prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
Installing the content pack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
Post installations and known issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
Step 4: Install the UserProfile Provisioning Demo 2.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Installing the content pack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Step 5: Install the Self-Service BI Demo 2.0 Content Pack. . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
Installing the content pack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
Post installations/known issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Step 6: Install the Visio Services Demo Content Pack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
Prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347
Installing the content pack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347
xiiContents
Appendix B Microsoft and “Big Data”
349
What is Big Data? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Volume. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Velocity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Variety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
Comparing Big Data to electrification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
The “hype cycle” for Big Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
The Big Data toolset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Hadoop, MapReduce, and HDFS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Pig and Hive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Other tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
What is NoSQL?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
Big players (companies) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Using Microsoft’s Big Data tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
HDInsight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Setting up in Windows Azure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
Getting value from Big Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
Excel-Hive Add-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
The Data Explorer for Excel Add-in (preview). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
Data Quality Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .360
Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .360
Index361
What do you think of this book? We want to hear from you!
Microsoft is interested in hearing your feedback so we can continually improve our
books and learning resources for you. To participate in a brief online survey, please visit:
microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey
Contents
xiii
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Introduction
W
elcome to Business Intelligence for Microsoft SharePoint 2013. Whether you are a SQL Server
business intelligence (BI) developer, a SharePoint Administrator, or a data scientist, this book
shows you how Microsoft is delivering on its commitment to provide useful and actionable insights by
way of BI to its customers. It provides a quick dive into new Microsoft SharePoint 2013 BI features and
offerings and complementing new SQL Server 2012 BI features and tools.
This book provides a getting started guide for many of the SharePoint application services dedicated to BI. Additionally, it introduces features for managing SQL Server 2012 Reporting Services
Power View reports and Excel 2013 PowerPivot in SharePoint.
The SharePoint Server 2013 application services that provide functionality to the BI stack include
the following:
■■
■■
■■
Excel Services A SharePoint Server 2013 service application that you can use to manage,
view, interact, and consume Microsoft Excel client workbooks on SharePoint Server.
Visio Services A service with which users can share and view Visio diagrams on a SharePoint
website. This service also makes it possible for you refresh and update data-connected Microsoft Visio 2013 diagrams from a variety of data sources.
PerformancePoint Services A performance management service that you can use to monitor and analyze your business. This service provides flexible, easy-to-use tools for building
dashboards, scorecards, reports, and key performance indicators (KPIs).
Integrating Microsoft Office 2013, SharePoint Server 2013, and SQL Server 2012 provides the following tools and feature sets, primarily for self-service BI:
■■
■■
PowerPivot in Excel 2013 and SharePoint 2013 A SharePoint 2013 application service
(included in SQL Server 2012) and an extension to Excel that adds support for large-scale data.
It includes an in-memory data store as an option for Analysis Services. Multiple data sources
can be merged to include corporate databases, worksheets, reports, and data feeds. You can
publish Excel documents to SharePoint Server 2013.
Power View in Excel 2013 and SharePoint 2013 With Power View, the Excel user can easily
and quickly turn raw data into beautiful visualizations that reveal patterns and relationships
that exist in that data.
SharePoint administrators, business users, and BI developers, as well as other users and consumers
of BI, will want to understand each of these client tools and services and how they work together to
bring BI to more people through SharePoint.
xv
Who this book is for
In a sense, this book is written to the data scientist. What is a data scientist? A valid description would
be someone who has 25 percent business knowledge, 25 percent analytics expertise, 25 percent
technological capabilities, and 25 percent visualization experience. The following table describes the
breakdown of skills.
Part of a data scientist
Skills taught in this book
25 percent business knowledge
We explain the reasons for business intelligence (Chapter 1) and when and
where you would use each tool (Chapter 2). We also explain where “big data”
fits (Appendix B).
25 percent analytics experience
We show you the new analytic and reporting features in Excel 2013 (PowerPivot
and Power View), PerformancePoint, and Visio. We provide steps on how to use
them with a data warehouse database.
25 percent technological
capabilities
We explain how to connect to the data, model it, and automate a data refresh
(Chapter 3). We also give you the resources to install the complete stack (Office
2013 + SQL Server 2012 + SharePoint 2013) for making all the tools come
together (Appendix A).
25 percent visualization
All the tools have visualization features. In particular, Power View in Excel 2013
(Chapter 5) shows how to very quickly create visualizations from the data that is
pulled into PowerPivot in Excel 2013.
Although anyone interested in using advanced tools to gather and present BI can benefit from this
book, it should also prove especially valuable to the SharePoint administrators, business users, and BI
developers.
SharePoint administrator/developer
Just as a SQL BI developer peeks into SharePoint 2013 products, we want SharePoint administrators
to peek into the tasks involved in developing BI solutions and getting to trusted data. A SharePoint
administrator must be aware that you typically can’t just “turn on” BI in SharePoint or in SQL Server;
rather, you must set up some processes or use existing, trusted data. A SharePoint administrator
should also be aware of the newest BI features and tools as well as existing technologies, and have
some idea of how to set them up. In this book, we give SharePoint administrators an overview of the
latest available BI tools and how they work with SharePoint 2013. This book strives to give SharePoint
administrators an understanding of the work and expertise required for an extensive range of possible BI implementations.
Your advantage is that Microsoft is delivering on its promise to simplify the integration of
self-service BI tools. Your other advantage is that as a SharePoint expert, you already know how to
construct the self-service concept.
xvi Introduction
Business user and data scientist
In this book, the term “business user” describes people who are eager to understand the technologies
that can help them, their teams, and their company or organization to measure, explore data, analyze,
forecast, and report on the most important aspects of their business by using the company’s business
data.
A business user might also be a technical decision-maker, deciding which products work best for
the individual, team, or organization. By understanding how technology and business needs meet
through reporting, measuring, analyzing, and more, we hope that business users will see a return on
investment through increased accountability and better alignment with organizational goals.
Using SharePoint 2013 and other stand-alone tools, business users can benefit from learning about
the end-to-end process for surfacing and presenting insights to decision-makers. Business users know
that trusted insights can change behavior and decisions, which can ultimately help to lead a company
in the right direction.
Business users who can benefit from the integrated BI tools offered by Microsoft Office, SharePoint, and SQL Server include the following:
■■
Data scientists
■■
Business analysts
■■
Business decision-makers
■■
Knowledge workers
■■
Line workers
■■
…and more
Note that the data scientist is a new role that is being deployed in companies. As you will find, this
book does not specifically target one group because we are aware that in many situations IT professionals and business users wear more than one hat.
Each of the preceding roles has its own unique accountabilities. For each role, we provide simple
examples showing how to create BI end results such as the following:
■■
Reports
■■
A dashboard in PerformancePoint Services
■■
KPIs that can be presented by using various tools
■■
PivotTables in Excel
End users might also want to know how to do some tricks in SharePoint, such as how to add a
rating system in a SharePoint list, view a blog post, implementing collaborative decision-making in
SharePoint 2013, or rating BI assets.
Introduction xvii
BI developer
Put simply, the BI developer’s task is to establish trusted data sources (tabular data and Online Analytical Processing [OLAP] cubes) in SQL Server for the various services (Excel, Visio, PerformancePoint)
and for PowerPivot and SQL Server Reporting Services. Broadly, BI developers can also help with
report design, training, and back-end maintenance such as deploying models and automating a data
refresh. All of these things are covered in this book. BI developers also help to create connections to
the trusted data sources and help ensure that the data is the right data.
Organizational BI begins by establishing a single source for trusted data. If users cannot trust the
data that’s in front of them to make decisions, they won’t trust the tools that deliver the data. They
will abandon those tools to seek some other way to get the right data, which likely means abandoning their considerable investment in those tools, in both time and money, to invest in new ones.
Data can come from a variety of sources, and in many cases, companies have spent lots of money
and time to establish a repeatable Extract, Transform, and Load (ETL) process. This requires a BI
developer who knows something about data warehouses (SQL Server), integrating data from various
sources by using SQL Server Integration Services, and developing Transact-SQL (T-SQL) procedures. If
a company decides that creating OLAP cubes is worth the effort, it will also hire (or train) SQL Server
Analysis Services experts to do the job. Microsoft has provided the tools to tie all this data together,
and this book can help you use them to get the best value from your data management tools.
Using the information in this book, BI developers can help decide which tools to use to surface the
data. They can also communicate closely with the SharePoint Administrator for cases in which trusted
data must be shared.
In this book, the authors provide a longer discussion about the new SQL Server 2012 Business
Intelligence Semantic Model (BISM) model, and a shorter discussion of SQL Server Analysis Services
OLAP cubes, because OLAP cubes are the ideal data sources for organizational BI using PerformancePoint Services, for data sources used by the other services (such as Excel Services, Visio Services, and
others). The BISM model applies more to “personal BI” using PowerPivot in Excel and SharePoint and
Power View in Excel and SharePoint.
How this book is organized
This book gives you a comprehensive look at the various features that you will use. It is structured in a
logical approach to all aspects of using BI tools that integrate with SharePoint 2013.
Chapter 1, “Business intelligence in SharePoint 2013,” introduces BI for SharePoint 2013. BI is a
difficult concept to pin down precisely, because it covers a wide range of products and technologies
and thus means slightly different things to different people. This chapter discusses exactly what the
authors mean by the term “business intelligence,” the Microsoft approach to BI, and how SharePoint
fits into the picture.
xviii Introduction
Chapter 2, “Planning for business intelligence adoption,” provides instruction on which tool to use.
People often ask which tools they should use when trying to select among a variety of Microsoft offerings. They’re often confused and need information as to why they might want SQL Server Reporting Services in SharePoint over PerformancePoint Services, or why they might use the Excel 2013
PowerPivot Add-in instead of Excel or Excel Services. After all, each product connects to a database
and surfaces data from an OLAP cube.
The difficulties of making such decisions are compounded because different teams and companies
are at different stages in their ability to surface data to business users for optimal decision making.
Overall, this chapter prepares you for adoption of the right tools for the right job by answering questions about which tools to use, clarifying the purposes and capabilities of the various products, and
helping you choose which ones are most appropriate for your situation.
Chapter 3, “The lifecycle of a business intelligence implementation,” discusses the process and
approach to formalizing a self-service scenario, as described in Chapters 4 and 5, to importing a PowerPivot model into Visual Studio and deploying to SQL Server 2012 Analysis Services.
Chapter 4, “Using PowerPivot in Excel 2013,” introduces PowerPivot in Excel 2013. The PowerPivot
and Data Model experience is designed to feel as seamless as possible to an Excel user. Because
PowerPivot and the Data Model use the xVelocity engine, it extends Excel so that you can work with
millions of rows. Moreover, operations—even with huge volumes of data—are fast! Aggregations that
might have taken a day to calculate in SQL Server Analysis Services take only seconds in PowerPivot.
In this chapter, you’ll see how to mash-up data from different sources, share that data securely via
SharePoint, create Data Analysis Expressions (DAX) queries, and more.
Chapter 5, “Using Power View in Excel 2013,” introduces another enhancement to Excel: Power
View. Using Power View, the Excel user can easily and quickly turn raw data into beautiful visualizations that reveal patterns and relationships existing in that data. These visualizations can use data
imported into an Excel workbook’s Data Model or the more advanced PowerPivot model. This
chapter shows you how to add Power View sheets to a workbook, work with each type of visualization supported in Power View, and use interactive features such as drilling, animated scatter charts,
highlighting, and filtering.
Chapter 6, “Using Excel Services in SharePoint 2013,” provides instruction for sharing your Excel file
in SharePoint 2013. Most BI begins in Excel, which can be considered the most pervasive BI tool that
exists. But, sharing Excel files has always been a huge challenge. Excel Services not only provides the
ability to share Excel-based content safely and securely, it also adds powerful management capabilities. Such features as the PivotTable and PivotChart in Excel improve the look and feel of how data
is presented. Among several hands-on examples, you’ll see how to create a PivotTable and slicers
to provide slice-and-dice capability on the screen for analysis, and how to add your PivotTable to a
simple dashboard webpage so that you can share it.
Introduction xix
Chapter 7, “Using PowerPivot in SharePoint 2013,” introduces you to PowerPivot for SharePoint and
its functionalities that take Excel Services to the next step. This chapter demonstrates how to publish
a PowerPivot workbook to SharePoint and how to schedule data refreshes, how to use workbooks as
data sources for other applications, and it explains how IT professionals can manage PowerPivot for
SharePoint by using the PowerPivot Management Dashboard.
Chapter 8, “Using PerformancePoint Services,” shows the exciting solutions that PerformancePoint
Services offers in its ability to show a dashboard that reflects KPIs, such as the available disk space of
managed servers. This chapter explains how to create a dashboard with scorecards, KPIs, reports, and
connections to data sources.
Chapter 9, “Using Visio and Visio Services,” demonstrates the business intelligence value that Visio
offers. You’ve probably used Visio to create flowcharts, or perhaps network diagrams, or maybe an
org chart or a floor plan. But, should Visio be an integral part of your BI solutions? The goal of this
chapter is to provide a “yes” answer to that question by demonstrating the BI value that Visio offers,
both by itself and when integrated with the products described in other chapters in this book. You will
see examples that employ colorful, data-rich diagrams that you can view with a web browser and that
update automatically when the underlying data changes.
Chapter 10, “Bringing it all together,” helps you capitalize on the concepts and products discussed
in all the preceding chapters by walking through the steps to create a dashboard that shows data
from various sources, such as Excel Web Access Web Parts.
Appendix A, “Installing and configuring scripts to run a demo environment,” provides system
requirements for your demo environment; detailed setup and configuration instructions, including
downloadable scripts; and helpful screen captures so that you can get up and running quickly to work
through the book’s exercises. We also provide instructions for configuring SQL Server 2012, SharePoint Server 2013, and Office Professional 2013, along with links to relevant sites.
Note Trial versions of SQL Server 2012, SharePoint Server 2013, and Office Professional 2013 are
available for evaluation from Microsoft. For information, please visit http://technet.microsoft.com/
en-us/evalcenter/.
Appendix B, “Microsoft and ‘Big Data’”, introduces you to “Big Data” and the role SharePoint
2013 plays and will play in getting value from Big Data investments. We provide instruction for how
Microsoft HDInsight integrates with Hadoop to query and visualize data. You will learn how the tools
described in this book are relevant to getting value from disparate data sources and (un)structured
data.
xx Introduction
What’s not covered in this book
Even though this book covers a wide range of products, it doesn’t cover everything. We chose to
concentrate instead on those technologies that we believe make up the core Microsoft BI tools. Three
of the following BI tools are a part of SharePoint Server 2013, and one of them Reporting Services, is
part of the SQL Server 2012 platform, offering strong reporting and report management features in
SharePoint.
This brief section explains which technologies we chose not to discuss, but if these technologies
also suit your needs, you might consider how you can implement them.
Access Services
Microsoft Access is a relational database management system. Software developers and data architects can use Access to develop application software, and “power users” can use it to build individual
and workgroup-level applications.
Access Services is a service application with which you can host Access databases within SharePoint
Server 2013. Through Access Services, users can edit, update, and create linked Access 2013 databases, which are then both viewed and manipulated by using either a web browser or the Access client. In other words, Access Services extends “access” to Access so that even users who don’t have the
Access client installed on their desktop can perform operations with the Access application through
Access Services.
An Access web app is a new type of database that you build in Access and then use and share with
others as a SharePoint app in a web browser. After you create the Access App, you can import data
from Access desktop databases, Excel files, Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) data sources, text
files, and SharePoint lists. Because all data is now stored in SQL Server, you can use a tool of your
preference to create reports. You are able to connect to the SQL database by using ODBC and can
take advantage of existing skillsets you might have—for example, Excel, and Power View.
There is a self-service element to Access that lets users incorporate rapid application development
(RAD) principles to more quickly create data-driven websites without coding in Microsoft ASP.NET.
This is attractive to smaller companies that have fewer IT resources—sometimes only one or two IT
workers. Access and Access Services also become attractive to larger companies when projects are
prioritized into already-full IT development schedules, or when users want to provide a very quick
proof-of-concept data-driven website.
Introduction xxi
SQL Server 2012 Reporting Services in SharePoint
SQL Server 2012 Reporting Services (SSRS) with SharePoint integration has several new features,
including support for Power View, SharePoint mode for support of SharePoint 2013, a new version of
Reporting Services Add-in for SharePoint 2010 and 2013, and the ability to interact with reports in
Apple Safari on iOS devices. Although we include a chapter about Power View in Excel 2013, we don’t
discuss thoroughly Power View in SharePoint nor do we discuss SSRS Report Builder.
SSRS Report Builder is a report-authoring tool with which you can create ad hoc reports quickly.
The tool helps report creation, collaboration, and consistency by enabling business users to create
and share report components that can be accessed via a shared component library.
We didn’t quite omit this topic entirely; Chapter 3 includes a somewhat longer summary of what
SQL Server Reporting Services is.
Business Connectivity Services
Microsoft Business Connectivity Services (BCS) provides read/write access to external data from Lineof-Business (LoB) systems (such as Microsoft Dynamics, Oracle, or Siebel), web services, databases,
and other external systems from within Microsoft SharePoint 2013. SharePoint 2013 has product features that can use external data directly, both online and offline. BCS enables tools such as Microsoft
Visual Studio 2013 and Microsoft SharePoint Designer 2013 to help make connections to the external
data. Improvements to SharePoint 2013 include Open Data Protocol (OData) support and support
for self-contained apps for SharePoint—developers can package Business Data Connectivity (BDC)
models in an app for SharePoint.
Note OData is an industry-standard web protocol that is used to access data from external systems.
Duet Enterprise
You might have asked, “How is Duet Enterprise different from BCS if it connects to Enterprise Resource Planning data?” Duet Enterprise is an application built on the SharePoint 2013 platform, and it
uses BCS in conjunction with SAP data. Duet Enterprise was developed jointly by two companies: SAP
and Microsoft. SAP is a German software company known primarily for its SAP Enterprise Resource
Planning and SAP Business Objects products. Duet Enterprise enables all employees to consume and
extend SAP applications and data through SharePoint 2013 and Office 2013. Duet Enterprise combines the collaboration and productivity supported by SharePoint and Office with the business data
and processing functionality of SAP applications.
xxii Introduction
For SAP users, Duet reduces the learning curve and provides wider access to enterprise information and policies, resulting in greater user adoption. As a result, organizations can increase corporate
policy compliance, improve decision-making, and save time and money. We mention the product
here because there are a lot of SAP customers and a lot of SAP data; making that data available to
many users was previously difficult or impossible.
Duet’s plan is to continue developing interoperability between SAP and SharePoint in areas such as
system management, single sign-on, and more. By blending the worlds of process and collaboration,
end-to-end solutions will form as tools and feature extensions become available.
More Info To learn more, go to http://www54.sap.com/solutions/tech/collaboration-contentmanagement/software/duet-enterprise/index.html.
Web analytics
Web Analytics in SharePoint Server 2010 has been discontinued and is not available in SharePoint 2013. Analytics processing for SharePoint 2013 is now a component of the Search service.
The reason for the change is this: a new analytics system was required for SharePoint 2013 that
included improvements in scalability and performance, and that had an infrastructure that encompasses SharePoint Online. The Analytics Processing Component in SharePoint 2013 runs analytics jobs
to analyze content in the search index and user actions that are performed on SharePoint sites.
SharePoint 2013 still logs every click in SharePoint sites and still provides a count of hits for every
document. User data is made anonymous early in the logging process and the Analytics Processing
Component is scalable to the service.
This analytics data is used in SharePoint 2013 to provide new item-to-item recommendation features; to show view counts that are embedded in SharePoint 2013 and Search Server user interface; to
provide a report of the top items in a site and list; and to influence the relevancy algorithm of search.
Even though Social features and Search in SharePoint 2013 are not BI tools, you should consider
how to use them to help make BI reports, data dictionaries, and other BI assets more discoverable.
More sharing and conversations around BI assets will help you to take advantage of collective and
interactive discoveries from insights.
Introduction xxiii
Conventions used in this book
This book presents information by using conventions designed to make the information readable and
easy to follow.
■■
■■
Each exercise consists of a series of tasks, presented as numbered steps, listing each action you
must take to complete the exercise.
Boxed elements with labels such as “Note” provide additional information or alternative methods for completing a step successfully.
Companion content
Chapters in this book include exercises by which you can interactively try out new material learned
in the main text. Sample projects are in their post-exercise formats and can be downloaded from the
following page:
http://aka.ms/BI_SP2013/files
Follow the instructions to download the file. The following chapters include content that you can use:
Chapter
Description of content
Chapter 3
Solution files for AdventureWorks model in SQL Server Data Tools
Chapter 4
Completed Excel 2013 file with a PowerPivot model
Chapter 5
Completed Excel 2013 file with a Power View report
Appendix A
Scripts and sample databases (see note)
Note Trial versions of SQL Server 2012, SharePoint Server 2013, and Office Professional 2013 are
available for evaluation from Microsoft at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/evalcenter/.
xxiv Introduction
System Requirements
Appendix A provides Windows PowerShell scripts and instructions to install and configure trial versions of SQL Server 2012 SP1, SharePoint 2013, Office 2013, and sample code. The software and
configuration described are necessary to complete the practice exercises in this book. Additionally,
you will need the following hardware to complete the practice exercises in this book:
■■
A 64-bit computer, 4 cores for small deployments (fewer than 1,000 users)
■■
16 GB of RAM for medium deployments (between 1,000 to 10,000 users)
■■
80 GB of available hard disk space
■■
Internet connection to download software or chapter examples
Depending on your Windows configuration, you might require Local Administrator rights to install
or configure.
Acknowledgments
Norm Warren would like to first thank his wife, KarAnn, and his five children for their patience while
writing the book. He would also like to thank the people who have helped contribute in one way
or another to this book. They include the coauthors of this book, Ancestry.com manager Eric Rios,
Technical Reviewer Carl Rabeler, and other reviewers at Microsoft.
Mariano would like to thank Kay Unkroth, program manager, Lee Graber and Ben Levinn, developers (all from the Analysis Services team at Microsoft), for shedding light on the darkness. And, most
importantly, he would like to thank his family—Bárbara, Sofia, and Miguel—for their support and
love.
Stacia would like to thank Sean Boon for his insights about Power View in addition to everyone
involved in this book—the authors, the editorial team, and the production team.
Scott would like to thank Marilyn, Sara, and Julie for coping with his absence while working on his
chapter, especially because writing it fell in the middle of a six-month-long project to write Microsoft
Visio 2013 Step by Step. Thanks also to Kenyon Brown for the invitation to join Norm, John, Mariano,
and Stacia on this project, and to Krishna Mamidipaka for his insightful comments on the chapter in
progress.
The Authors
May, 2013
Introduction xxv
Support and feedback
The following sections provide information on errata, book support, feedback, and contact
information.
Errata
We’ve made every effort to ensure the accuracy of this book and its companion content. Any errors
that have been reported since this book was published are listed on our Microsoft Press site:
http://aka.ms/BI_SP2013/errata
If you find an error that is not already listed, you can report it to us through the same page.
If you need additional support, email Microsoft Press Book Support at
[email protected]
Please note that product support for Microsoft software is not offered through the addresses
above.
We want to hear from you
At Microsoft Press, your satisfaction is our top priority, and your feedback our most valuable asset.
Please tell us what you think of this book at:
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/booksurvey
The survey is short, and we read every one of your comments and ideas. Thanks in advance for
your input!
Stay in touch
Let’s keep the conversation going! We’re on Twitter at: http://twitter.com/MicrosoftPress.
xxvi Introduction
CHAPTER 1
Business intelligence in SharePoint
T
his chapter introduces the definition of business intelligence (BI) and explains why it is important
to you, your team, and your organization. It also discusses the platforms and tools used to deliver
pervasive BI for a wide variety of users. At the end of the chapter, we provide a peek at what you can
do with BI in SharePoint.
This book is a collaborative effort to show how Microsoft and Microsoft SharePoint BI offerings
can help businesses and technical personnel solve common business problems.
BI in SharePoint is less about a specific technology or product tailored to the needs of a small
percentage of users, and more about a “buffet” of offerings that can aid customers who are trying to
solve a specific problem. One common customer complaint is that much of the published documentation and content is too product-specific, which makes it difficult to get the big picture. Providing
that big picture while also providing quick how-to instructions for getting started is one rationale for
this book.
Even more important, customers need to know which Microsoft offerings they should choose from
the buffet to address which problem. Perhaps one day, the handful of tools that offer a method for
creating key performance indicators (KPIs) will merge into a single product, but for now, customers
are confused and need guidance as to when they should use Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services
in SharePoint 2013 rather than PerformancePoint Services, or why they would use PowerPivot for
Excel 2013 instead of Microsoft Excel or Excel Services. Chapter 2, “Planning for business intelligence
adoption,” offers this guidance, looking at the tools from several angles, including a BI maturity model.
Leading up to BI
So, exactly what does “business intelligence” mean? We could provide a simple, tool-centric definition,
but we have decided to give you the context that can help you make the most sense of what BI is,
why it’s important, and what forces are propelling its integration into nearly all aspects of companies.
It’s fitting to introduce BI with an observation made by Steven R. Covey in his book The Seven
Habits of Highly Effective People (2004, Free Press). He observed that an airplane that travels from
Boston to Los Angeles is off-course for 90 percent of the journey, but the airplane successfully reaches
its destination because the pilot makes continuous course corrections based on instruments that
monitor the flight and provide feedback.
1
Much like an airplane, if a company is not steered, it will likely be off course most of the time.
Figure 1-1 shows an example of the analogy. Most companies have a goal or destination, sometimes called a vision, and to reach that destination, they rely on business insights. These insights are
provided by instruments or measurement tools that help monitor and analyze past, current, and
projected future performance. They give managers the information that they need to make changes,
or “course corrections.” Insights come in the form of reports, scorecards, KPIs, dashboards, and other
information vehicles, supported by a concept called “trusted data.”
FIGURE 1-1 A visual analogy of BI as the cockpit of an aircraft.
Tools such as these as well as others can help a company see the relationships between their business and its highest priorities and strategies. Decision-makers want the visual experience that dashboards offer so that they can determine at a glance whether they’re driving their company toward its
destination.
Fortunately, airplanes are predictably more successful at reaching their destinations than companies are in successfully reaching their goals. Is this success due to the science and precision of the
measurement tools used in the aviation industry?
Over the years, weather conditions, patterns, and other variables that affect flight and direction—
originally considered immeasurable—have become increasingly more measurable and accurate. New
instruments were developed and produced to give pilots precise location coordinates.
Now, the same is occurring for businesses. In his book How to Measure Anything: Finding the
Value of “Intangibles” in Business (2010, Wiley), Douglas W. Hubbard lists a few real-life examples of
variables that companies previously chose not to measure because they were presumed to be immeasurable, including the following:
2 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
■■
The flexibility to create new products
■■
Management effectiveness
■■
Productivity of research
■■
Risk of bankruptcy
■■
Quality
Accounting professionals and academics, including Robert S. Kaplan, Baker Foundation Professor
at Harvard Business School, have developed methodologies for measuring many elements in business that were previously thought of as immeasurable in the performance of companies. Kaplan and
David Norton proposed the concept of a Balanced Scorecard (BSC) as a means of measuring the
performance of a business strategy. The BSC encapsulates the following four main areas that capture
performance metrics:
■■
■■
■■
■■
Financial Measures of profitability and market value to satisfy owners and shareholders
Internal business processes Measures of efficiency and effectiveness for producing a
product or service
Customer satisfaction Measures of perceived quality, low cost, and other related factors to
show how well a company satisfies its customers
Innovation and learning Measures of a company’s ability to develop and utilize human
resources to meet strategic goals in the present and future
These areas can be referred to as Finance, Operations, Sales, and Human Resources. Or, to condense even further, you can refer to them simply as FOSH metrics.
Additional perspectives can include community and social impact, government relations, and
others. These measures of success are sometimes called critical success factors. The BSC and other
methodologies, such as Six Sigma,1 help companies to follow the pattern shown in Figure 1-2.
FIGURE 1-2 From company vision to key performance indicators.
A company vision statement or mission statement is important for getting a company to focus on
what makes it successful. There is an old saying, “You must stand up for something, or you will fall
for everything.” The vision statement helps a company filter which voices it will listen to, because
the vision defines its purpose and reason for existence. Typically, upper management communicates the
vision or mission statement to the company.
1Originators of Six Sigma: http://web.archive.org/web/20051106025733/http://www.motorola.com/content/0,,3079,00.
html.
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint 3
A strategy is a set of policies, procedures, and approaches to business that is intended to produce
long-term success. The strategy reflects the mission of the company.
The mission is also used to develop measurable objectives. When established, objectives help
determine KPIs, which are quantifiable measurements that reflect critical success factors.
KPIs make it possible to monitor the metrics that are aligned with principal objectives. Then,
managers or employees can analyze issues that surface from data that indicate conditions in need
of more attention (these were once called “exception reports”). Action can then be taken to “correct
the course” so that the company reaches its destination. As you will see in this book, in addition to
KPIs, visualizations that include interactive charts and graphs, maps, bubble charts and more prove to
become very powerful because they change behavior and lead to more data drive-decisions.
For illustration purposes, the following example shows how an organization— Adventure Works Bike
Company—designs a KPI, turning data into actionable information:
■■
Mission: To design, build, and market bikes to meet the needs of the mountain bike
community
■■
Strategy: To improve customers’ satisfaction
■■
Objective: To increase repeat customer store sales by 20 percent
■■
KPI: The number of quarterly repeat customer sales
To achieve the objectives, the decision-makers in the Adventure Works Bike Company ask the following questions about the business:
■■
What has happened? (monitoring)
■■
What is happening? (monitoring)
■■
Why is it happening? (analyze)
■■
What will happen? (forecast based on analyzing)
■■
What do we want to have happen? (new hunches spurring new actions based on what you know)
Part of the problem when trying to arrive at the answers to these questions is that much of the
data needed is in a raw format stored in Line-of-Business (LoB) systems and other disparate, disconnected business areas. Chapter 3, “The lifecycle of a business intelligence implementation,” explains
how companies accomplish providing access to this data in a usable form.
Beware of losing sight of what matters most
Companies that develop a vision or mission statement (define who they are and what success is),
make goals, and monitor those goals can then re-evaluate and flourish. This approach is used by
corporations, teams, departments, and not least, individuals (us). Unfortunately, what happens often
is that organizations lose focus of the vision and are deterred or distracted.
4 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
The result of focusing on the wrong things
This is illustrated in the experience of a tragic airplane accident2 that occurred more than 36
years ago. In the middle of the night, a Lockheed 1011 jumbo jet fatally crashed into the Florida
Everglades. All vital parts and systems of the airplane were working perfectly, and the plane
was only 20 miles away from its landing site.
During the approach, a green light failed to illuminate, and the pilots discontinued the approach. The aircraft was set to a circular holding pattern over the pitch-black Everglades while
the crew focused on investigating the failed light. The pilots became so preoccupied with the
light that they failed to notice the plane was gradually descending toward the dark swamp. By
the time someone noticed what was happening, it was too late to avoid the disaster.
The malfunctioning light bulb didn’t cause the accident; it happened because the crew
placed its focus on something that seemed to matter at the moment, causing them to lose
sight of what truly mattered most.
The tendency to focus on the insignificant at the expense of the profound can happen not
only to pilots but to companies, departments, teams, and individuals. Sometimes the things
that distract are not necessarily bad; in fact, they often seem right.
As you will see, BI helps bring to life the mantra, “what is measured gets managed.” We
believe it is worth the time and efforts to ensure that you are measuring the right things. When
you know what to measure, you can stay on course and not be distracted by the insignificant.
What is BI?2
Simply put, BI comprises the tools that help companies to execute performance management. Performance management can be defined as a series of organizational processes and applications designed
to optimize the execution of business strategy.
In this book, we extend this definition of BI to include tools that help individuals, teams, and
organizations simplify information discovery and analysis, making it possible for decision-makers at
all levels of an organization to more easily access, understand, analyze, collaborate, and act upon
information—anytime and anywhere.
In this way, to improve organizational effectiveness, Microsoft BI tools make it possible for
you to create and manage information through an integrated system that includes core business
productivity features, such as collaboration tools, search capabilities, and content management.
This book provides high-level information about the available tools so that you can determine
which tools can best help you reach your destination as an individual, team, or organization.
2The
Crash of Flight 401 (source: http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19721229-0&lang=en).
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint 5
The need for BI today
This following story3 illustrates the importance of winnowing the data that’s truly relevant from massive amounts of raw data and explains how to incorporate that important data into a BI solution:
Two men formed a partnership. They built a small shed beside a busy road. They
rented a truck and drove it to a farmer’s field where they purchased a truckload of
melons for a dollar per melon. They drove the loaded truck to their shed by the road,
where they sold their melons for a dollar per melon. They drove back to the farmer’s
field and bought another truckload of melons for a dollar per melon. Transporting
them to the roadside, they again sold them for a dollar per melon.
As they drove back toward the farmer’s field to get another load, one partner said to
the other, “We’re not making much money on this business, are we?”
“No, we’re not,” his partner replied. “Do you think we need a bigger truck?”
You’ll probably agree that we don’t need a bigger truckload of information. Like the partners in
the story, our bigger need is a clearer focus on how to value and use the information we already have.
Today’s workplace tends to inundate people with information instead of using the right amount of
data to focus on the right problems.
The amount of data that businesses accumulate will continue to grow, and Microsoft and other
companies will continue to develop better methods for moving, storing, retrieving, and displaying
that data in meaningful ways. Companies must continue to increase their capacity to discover useful
data, which will likely come from various systems and will require planning and collaboration to utilize
effectively. Best practices must be developed for converting that relevant information into different
forms or visualizations that can help provide insights and change behavior. See Appendix B, “Microsoft and “Big Data”,” to learn how Microsoft is positioning itself to extract, structure, and get value
from Big Data.
In the words of Bill Baker, former general manager of BI applications for the Microsoft Office Business Platform, “There is no substitute for getting the design right, getting the data right, training your
users, and in general providing them the least amount of data and the most amount of guidance.”
T.S. Eliot, in his poem, “Choruses from The Rock,” described the situation as an “endless cycle” in
which “wisdom” is “lost in knowledge” and “knowledge” is “lost in information.”
Focusing on good BI addresses the problem of losing wisdom in knowledge and losing knowledge
in information. And, as you might have experienced in the work place, bad patterns can seem like an
endless cycle. BI simplifies information discovery and retrieval, making it possible for decision-makers
at all levels of an organization to more easily access, understand, analyze, share, and act on information by helping them reach insights. Insights provide the impetus to improve the behavior of individuals, teams, and organizations. “Insights” is the word Microsoft uses to encapsulate what SharePoint
2013 provides to customers in the way of BI.
3Do
you think we need a bigger truck? (Source: https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2001/04/focus-andpriorities?lang=eng).
6 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
What is self-service BI?
Self-service business intelligence (SSBI) is an approach to data analytics by which business users can
access and work with corporate information without large investments and involvement from the IT
department. The self-service approach makes it possible for end users to create personalized reports
and analytical queries while freeing up IT staffers to focus on other tasks, potentially benefiting both
groups.
IT must still set up self-service BI so that users can take advantage of the underlying data systems
that help make trusted data available (discussed in Chapter 3), deploy the tools, and provide enough
assistance and training to execute a successful implementation.
It should be noted that self-service BI does not replace corporate BI; rather, it supplements it by
providing business users with the features and tools that simplify creating interactive analytics.
Microsoft’s vision for BI and self-service BI
It continues to be Microsoft’s vision to provide BI tools that give all employees access to the data
required for making informed decisions. Employees must also have the flexibility to work in familiar
ways, using tools such as Excel and Microsoft Visio. The fact that Microsoft continues to deliver tools
that are self-service and meant for all is most evident with the release of Excel 2013, for which the
SQL Server 2012 code base for the latest ad hoc reporting tool, Power View, has been included as
an option for users. Also, PowerPivot is no longer a separate download but part of Excel 2013. If you
think about how many people use Excel, you can easily see that it is the most commonly used BI tool.
The analytical paradox states, “Those who make the most decisions have the least information.
Those who make the fewest decisions in the middle of the organization have the most information.”4
Employees on the front line have the ability to take action on insights derived from analytical
capabilities but rarely have the information required to reach those insights on their own. They
must ask the IT department—and then get in line when requests for information from systems are
backlogged. Figure 1-3 summarizes Microsoft’s vision and the direction it has taken to deliver BI
to people to help them solve the analytical paradox (source: http://www.slideshare.net/nicsmith/
business-intelligence-deck-final).
Modern computing power is making BI more and more available to all employees in an organization so that they can make faster, more informed decisions. Microsoft has worked hard to deliver on
the vision and strategy by building the tools that are highlighted in this chapter and in this book.
4Joey
Fitts (http://vimeo.com/11756037), author of the book Drive Business Performance: Enabling a Culture of Intelligent
Execution.
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint 7
FIGURE 1-3 The Microsoft Vision and Strategy.
Figure 1-3 illustrates the flow of right information being delivered at the right time and in the right
format and to the right people. Finding the right amount of information to deliver is critical so as not
to overwhelm business users and, at the same time, help them stay focused. The flow of information
in the illustration touches three decision levels: Strategic, Tactical, and Operational. Each of these is
described as follows:
■■
■■
Strategic At the executive level, decisions are made that center around what a company is
going to do at large, comprising choices such as product lines, manufacturing methods, marketing techniques, and channels.
Tactical Decisions made at this level support the strategic decisions made at the executive
level. At this level, analysts examine whether forecasts meet the financial targets set forth in
the one-to-five-year plan. If they do not, the elements of the forecasts must be changed. For
example, a financial forecast is created in part for the purpose of measuring and monitoring
against a firm’s own general targets as compared to investor expectations. Investor expectations are based on a number of variables, which include industry average, the economy, and
so on.
At this level, pro forma statements are used to accomplish the following objectives:
• Estimate the effect of proposed operating changes, which makes it possible for managers
to conduct “what-if” analysis.
• Anticipate the firm’s future financing needs.
• Forecast free cash flows under different operating plans, forecast capital requirements, and
then choose the plan that maximizes shareholder value.
■■
Operational Operational decisions comprise those made daily by all employees to support
tactical decisions. Their impact is immediate, short term, short range, and usually low cost. The
8 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
consequences of a bad operational decision are usually minimal, although a series of bad or
sloppy operational decisions can cause harm. But when taken together, operational decisions
can have an impact on the success of the company realizing its vision.
Is all of this just another attempt toward a “BI for everyone” utopia? We don’t believe it is. We
think it is important for you to be aware of the work that might be necessary to prepare data so that
insights can be made available to more people—people in positions to do something about problems
or make adjustments toward a better company. We believe it’s worth your time to review the BI maturity model discussed in Chapter 2, which gives you an idea of where your department or company is
in terms of making trusted data available and of having a culture geared toward executing on intelligence. The BI maturity model leads to a well-supported, concerted effort to get data from systems
in a state that can be trusted to help support agile decisions.
Many companies use Excel for gathering BI and yet still have an infinite number of “versions of
the truth.” Also, companies often have some people who are louder than others or have more clout,
so those are the folks who end up getting what they need from the IT department to create reports.
Others know how to create more visual reports and, as a result, are more successful in getting their
data in front of the decision-makers, even when their data is not validated.
We wouldn’t have written this book if we didn’t genuinely believe that you can make a difference in
this space to help make the promises of BI become reality.
What SharePoint does for BI
SharePoint Server 2013 can be used with SQL Server reporting and BI tools to make BI data available
in meaningful ways. SQL Server provides the primary data infrastructure and BI platform for giving
report authors and business users trusted, scalable, and secure data.
Many good reasons support the partnering of SQL Server and SharePoint product groups to integrate products such as PowerPivot and SQL Server Reporting Services, with which you can share and
organize BI assets in SharePoint lists and document libraries.
The following is a list of benefits that SharePoint Server products provide:
■■
■■
■■
If users have adopted SharePoint, they are accustomed to self-service site creation and design
and thus will more likely move toward self-service reporting and analytics, particularly with
Power View and PowerPivot in Excel.
Source data refresh is configured and scheduled in SharePoint. From the Central Administration website, you have interactive reports that help you to manage and analyze all scheduled
jobs that refresh source data. For more information see Chapter 7, “Using PowerPivot for
SharePoint 2013.”
Users can capitalize on the scalability, collaboration, backup and recovery, and disaster
recovery capabilities inherent in SharePoint 2013 to manage BI assets created in PowerPivot,
Excel, Visio, Report Designer, Power View, Report Builder, and PerformancePoint Dashboard
designer.
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint 9
■■
■■
■■
Use of trusted locations limits access to PerformancePoint Services content types, Excel Services, and Visio Services files.
When security and data source connections are established, publishing to a SharePoint website is a quick way to share BI assets that ultimately help employees make better decisions,
faster.
In SharePoint Server, with Analysis Services SharePoint Mode and PowerPivot, Excel Services,
Visio Services, and PerformancePoint Services functioning as service applications, Visio Web
Drawing files, Excel workbooks, and PerformancePoint dashboards and dashboard items are
stored and secured within SharePoint lists and libraries, providing a single security and repository framework.
The BI stack: SQL Server + SharePoint + Office
The architectural diagram presented in Figure 1-4 (described in detail on the Microsoft TechNet site
in “Architecture for Business Intelligence in SharePoint Server 2013”) provides another, more technical
visual aid for how each of the pieces work together.
The following is a very brief summary of what’s new for BI in SharePoint 2013.
■■
■■
Ad hoc report authoring in the browser by using Power View
In Excel 2013, the SQL Server 2012 code base for the latest ad hoc reporting tool, Power View,
is included. Also, PowerPivot is no longer a separate download but is an integral part of Excel
2013.
Report authoring is discussed in the next section. Report viewing can occur in just about any
browser, in Microsoft Office, on Windows 8 phones and other table devices (such as Surface and
iPad), and in SharePoint Search.
10 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
FIGURE 1-4 SharePoint 2013 Services for BI.
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint 11
Authoring in Microsoft BI tools
When it comes to SharePoint and BI, the essential objective is to have the ability to create insights in
the authoring tools that are spread among Office, SharePoint, and SQL Server (see Table 1-1) and then
to share the results in charts, reports, dashboards, and KPIs. These insights can be shared with the
organization, the team or community, or with the individual via a browser.
TABLE 1-1 Microsoft BI authoring tools and platforms
Product or platform
Authoring tool
Comments
Microsoft Office 2013 desktop
applications
PowerPivot and Power View in Excel
2013, Visio 2013 (Professional or
Premium)
Before publishing a worksheet to
SharePoint using Excel Services or
Visio Services, you must have already authored and—if applicable—
connected to a data source.
SharePoint Server 2013
Dashboard Designer and Web Parts
that offer KPIs
You start Dashboard Designer from a
SharePoint website.
BI Web Parts are available to use
individually to create simplified KPIs.
Each client tool also provides Web
Parts to extend your ability to render
reports.
SQL Server 2012
SQL Server Reporting Services
Report
SQL Server Data Tools (Visual
Studio with same functionality as
PowerPivot but deploy to SSAS)
Excel: consumes Analysis Services/
Tabular data via an ODC or BISM
connection file
PowerPivot for SharePoint
Report Builder and Report Designer
was originally designed to help you
create reports.
PowerPivot for SharePoint is a
SharePoint shared service that
integrates PowerPivot into your
SharePoint environment.
Access a deployed SSDT project via a
connection file.
Examples of BI in SharePoint 2013
The following sections look at ways that you can take advantage of SharePoint 2013 features for
developing and strengthening your BI capabilities.
PerformancePoint and the BI stack
Figure 1-5 demonstrates how a solution using PerformancePoint Services in SharePoint 2013, integrated with SQL Server 2012, provides KPIs that drive decisions in an IT department. The IT Operations scorecard shows how simple it is to see where database space, as a percentage, is not meeting
its target. After the following illustration is a brief explanation that maps what is going on under the
hood.
12 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
FIGURE 1-5 From SCOM to PerformancePoint.
1. System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) collects monitor state and performance counter
data from managed servers.
2. The Operations Manager database collects data from the managed servers. Data is pre-
aggregated and stored in tables designed to support production reporting requirements.
3. A small subset of data in the Operations Manager data warehouse (OperationsManagerDW) is
transformed and loaded into the BI framework database (Operations Manager BI). This database contains the star schemas for the Analysis Services Online Analytical Processing (OLAP)
cubes. Alternatively, users can load data into a tabular model from the data warehouse to
make data available in either a pivot table in Excel 2013 or in Power View in Excel 2013.
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint 13
4. Analysis Services OLAP cubes are built and processed from data stored in the Operations
Manager BI database.
5. Data from the OLAP cubes is used to populate PerformancePoint Server scorecards,
dashboards, and analytic reports. These components are originally created by using the
PerformancePoint Services 2013 Dashboard Designer.
6. Scorecards, dashboards, and analytic reports are made available to the user community
through SharePoint Server. After the scorecards, dashboards, and analytic reports are initially
created and deployed, they should not need to be deployed again. These components are
refreshed as new data becomes available in the OLAP cubes.
7. Alternatively, data that is stored in the tabular database is made available to authoring tools
such as Excel 2013 and Power View in Excel 2013.
The IT Operations scorecard on the right side of Figure 1-5 reveals (flagged by the red diamonds)
that free-space targets for the database are not being met.
Power Pivot and BISM Model: A Fulfillment Report for
Tracking Products
This example demonstrates the ease and simplicity of creating an interactive Power View report. But,
don’t misunderstand; getting to trusted data is not as simple as this example might illustrate. The data
that supports it has been massaged, reviewed, and more over the course of several months. This is a
high-level view of the process and steps for getting to a successful product fulfillment dashboard.
The story and report requirements
A team at the call center for Lucerne Publishing manages the fulfillment of orders; specifically, highend user-created books. These books are created online with existing family pictures in the form of
images and often content from individual social networking sites. The team needed an interactive
report with which it could manage the fulfillment of orders by monitoring the various states of an
order as they relate to the fulfillment of that order. This helps it manage third-party vendors who
assist in fulfilling a book order.
Choosing a tool, introducing self-service BI, and planning for adoption
After having an understanding of the team culture, existing infrastructure, and having chosen a toolset for BI, as described in Chapter 2, the IT team chose to set up self-service analytics by using Power
View and underlying data from their data systems, imported into PowerPivot in Excel 2013.
14 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
Understanding the culture The call center at Lucerne Publishing is an important part of the company that maintains a healthy autonomous culture. One user close to all of the teams had already
learned PowerPivot and Power View and was available to assist users with learning and adoption of
new reporting options. The team was well aware that if they approached other teams in the company,
they would likely be put in a waiting period for lack of resources and priority.
BI maturity Users were already accustomed to using Reporting Services reports for filtering,
searching, and analyzing data to manage the order fulfillment. They wanted a report with interactive
visuals for analysis and actionable insights.
Discovering a visual concept for a report
The manager of the company data servers had a good understanding of the team’s needs and what
a visual, interactive fulfillment bar chart should look like. They further investigated by searching on
Bing/images for more examples. Figure 1-6 presents just one example that was found. Quickly, the
goal was set to create a similar report with Lucerne Publishing data.
FIGURE 1-6 An example of fulfillment chart located by Bing Search.
Tip A great method for brainstorming on chart types and uses is to search on Bing/images
with keywords specific to your need.
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint 15
The steps to implementation
What follows are high-level descriptions of the steps to take to implement the described fulfillment
report.
Determine data sources and importing data
In this example, there is data ready for reporting. Because the data server developer understands the
need for a report and existing SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS), reports are already supported
by the data he manages; thus, this is not as difficult process. Of course, every use case is different and
data preparation might be more work-intensive.
Import data into PowerPivot, explore data, and design
PowerPivot in Excel 2013 is the choice for creating proof-of-concepts and for making ad hoc reports.
Users are able to schedule a data-refresh in SharePoint. Sometimes, the next logical step is to formalize the PowerPivot report by importing it into the tabular modeling tool in SQL Server Data Tools
(SSDT). At that point, you can automate a data-refresh (or processing) on a more flexible schedule.
You will find that exploring data in the PowerPivot window is fast and simple. You can filter on
columns and quickly determine what additions should be made to the model by way of calculated
columns and measures such as calculations.
In this case, the SQL table already updates the all-important date/time stamp for each status of the
fulfillment process. Occasionally, however, you will perform a Data Analysis Expressions (DAX) formula
to enrich the data. Figure 1-7 shows is an example of a simple calculated column to provide in a Pivot
Table or Power View the duration of time from when the PO was created to Rendered (or printed), in
a user-friendly format.
FIGURE 1-7 PowerPivot Window and DAX for showing time between PO and Rendering.
Here are the equations used to calculate Seconds, Minutes, Hours and Days.
Days:
=IF(ISBLANK([Rendered]), 0, FLOOR(1. * ([Rendered]-[PO Assigned]), 1))
Hours:
=IF(ISBLANK([Rendered]), 0, FLOOR(MOD(24. * ([Rendered]-[PO Assigned]), 24), 1))
16 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
Minutes:
=IF(ISBLANK([Rendered]), 0, FLOOR(MOD(24. * 60 * ([Rendered]-[PO Assigned]), 60), 1))
Seconds:
=IF(ISBLANK([Rendered]),0, 24. * 60 * 60 * ([Rendered]-[PO Assigned]))
Concatenating:
=CONCATENATE(MyCanvas[PO-RenderHours]&" hrs ", [Minutes]&" min")
Figure 1-8 depicts a finished view of the PivotTable in Excel 2013, where you will test your measures and calculated columns.
FIGURE 1-8 A pivot table showing data for Lucerne Publishing.
Create the Power View report
The next step is to create a Power View report from the data collected in PowerPivot in Excel 2013.
Refer to Chapter 5, “Using Power View in Excel 2013,” to learn how to create reports in Power View.
There are also excellent articles for creating user-friendly reports and dashboards.
Publish to SharePoint
As a best practice, publish the Excel 2013 workbook with a PivotTable and Power View example so
that users can explore the data in the PivotTable and discover the mechanisms in Power View for analyzing via the cross-filtering slicers and visuals (Figure 1-9).
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint 17
FIGURE 1-9 The Lucerne Publishing fulfillment report in presented in Power View for SharePoint.
Modify according to user needs
You modify the report by working on the model. For example, you might simplify or clarify labels or
add value by simplifying the data table for time intelligence and showing the time difference between
each state of an order.
Automate and formalize in SQL Server Data Tools
The data for this particular report needs to be refreshed every 15 minutes, and for this reason we
need to import the PowerPivot into SQL Server 2012 Data Tools, deploy to Analysis Services, and set
up a job that refreshes the data more frequently. We also want to optimize the data-refresh by creating partitions and only refreshing the MyCanvas_Current partition, and processing (refreshing) the
partition, MyCanvas_Historical, only once.
This process is all described in Appendix B.
Sharing with other teams (building user adoption)
Your efforts to promote an extremely useful report should not end until you have shared the report
with other team managers. You now have an example and some code from which you can draw and
reproduce with other teams. This specific example was reproduced for DNA fulfillment and vendor
management analytics and reporting.
Capture what customers say and how the interactive report helps them take preemptive action
on delayed states in the fulfillment process. Make these comments available to other groups that can
also benefit.
18 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
A summary of the fulfillment example
Figure 1-10 illustrates just one of many examples that can become realities as you either combine or
adopt one of several available tools in SharePoint 2013, SQL Server 2012, and Office 2013.
FIGURE 1-10 Power View example of a fulfillment report.
Creating a report by using an Odata feed from a SharePoint list
It’s simply amazing to be able to refresh and consume data from a SharePoint 2013 or 2010 list by
way of an Odata feed in SharePoint 2013. An extremely useful approach is to provide interactive visualizations to the SharePoint lists to which users have been adding, sometimes for a very long time.
Figure 1-11 shows a list that was updated for three years. From discussions with the users, they
asked that the reasons for reshipment be divided into three sections to show responsibility for
replacements and reshipments of products.
Chapter 1 Business intelligence in SharePoint 19
FIGURE 1-11 Power View example derived from SharePoint list data.
Summary
In this chapter, we discussed the purpose and need for BI in a language that is directed at the business user. It showed that companies are much like aircraft in that they have a destination or goal and
must constantly react to feedback provided by instruments that measure and monitor the status of
various inputs. Those instruments are the BI tools we implement so that we have a method for visualizing metrics that tell us what has happened, what is happening, why it is happening, and what will
happen to our business.
The chapter also explained Microsoft’s vision for BI. It explained what SharePoint does for
BI and provided a couple of examples to show the benefits of using SharePoint 2013 in any BI
implementation.
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CHAPTER 7
Using PowerPivot for
SharePoint 2013
T
here are many tools that the business user, or the information worker, can reach to, but by far it
is Microsoft Excel that is used most often. A great deal of today’s business decisions are based on
an Excel workbook. However, there are some drawbacks inherent to this approach, and a few caveats
must be issued:
■■
■■
■■
■■
It’s fairly common to share those workbooks by email or in a file share. This can potentially
raise security issues.
It’s hard to assure that everybody working with a given workbook is using the same version,
because access to that workbook is neither monitored nor controlled.
Refreshing the workbooks with new data can be a lot of work, and potentially, it’s a chore that
needs to be done frequently.
Often, the data sources for those workbooks is used without the knowledge IT personnel.
Therefore, a natural yet inevitable mild tension exists between the users (who want to get things
done quickly) and the IT department (which wants control). There is nothing wrong with the position
of either side. It’s just how things are.
To address the needs from the business user’s perspective but at the same time not forget about
the legitimate concerns of IT, Microsoft developed PowerPivot for Excel, PowerPivot for SharePoint,
and Power View. Together, they are Microsoft’s core implementation of Self-Service Business
Intelligence.
PowerPivot might not solve all the problems, but it is a paradigm-shifter that is bringing business
intelligence (BI) to the business analyst. Here are just a few of the benefits that PowerPivot brings to
the table:
■■
A secure mechanism for sharing the reports You can publish the workbook to SharePoint,
where it becomes an interactive web application through the Excel Services. Users have to
download the workbook; they can open and interact with it in the browser. There is less risk
to sensitive data, and when you publish a new version, everyone receives it the next time they
visit the site.
189
■■
■■
Scheduled, automatic report refresh You can configure the workbooks to be automatically refreshed periodically without human intervention.
Transparency for IT After the workbook is published to a SharePoint location, everything
happens within the realm of IT. IT is able to set the security of the workbooks through SharePoint, learn which data sources are being used by the PowerPivot workbooks, and learn what
workbooks are actually being used and by whom. The list goes on and on.
In a few words, PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 is the integration of the Microsoft SQL Server
Analysis Services 2012 SP1 engine with SharePoint 2013. With PowerPivot for SharePoint, the user can
securely share, manage, and refresh the workbooks, and IT can securely manage and learn about the
workbook’s usage.
A brief history
The genesis of PowerPivot derived from two Microsoft internal papers. The first paper was about
the concept of a BI sandbox, which would be a product that would make the creation of BI applications much easier and in a controlled environment that would include relational databases, multidimensional databases, and a reporting tool. As this first paper gradually shaped PowerPivot from the
concept to the product, many of the original ideas changed (originally, Microsoft Access was the client
application, not Excel), but many that remained are the soul of PowerPivot.
The second paper was about an in-memory BI engine. The business idea was to take advantage of
the market trends in computer hardware (such as decreasing RAM prices, and the increased adoption of multicore processors) that would make an in-memory engine feasible. The in-memory engine
described in the second paper would make some of the ideas in the first paper possible.
Both papers were accepted, and a small incubation team was created to explore the concepts further. This incubation team existed during the SQL Server 2008 R2 development wave, writing specifications, plans, code, and tests under the codename Gemini for what is now PowerPivot. PowerPivot
for Excel 2010 and PowerPivot for SharePoint were released in May, 2010 as part of Microsoft SQL
Server 2008 R2.
In the latest release, PowerPivot and Microsoft Office have been drawn into an even closer relationship. As discussed in Chapter 4, “Using PowerPivot in Excel 2013,” and Chapter 6, “Business intelligence with Excel Services 2013,” PowerPivot and Office are much more integrated. In PowerPivot for
SharePoint 2013, there isn’t much new exposed functionality, but it was completely redesigned under
the hood to make it more reliable and scalable.
190 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
When do I use PowerPivot for SharePoint?
After you have created PowerPivot workbooks by using your desktop Excel application, you’ll probably want to do the following:
■■
Refresh workbooks periodically and automatically
■■
Ensure that all the workbook’s users see its most current version
■■
Turn your workbook into a web BI application, viewing and interacting with it in the browser
■■
Make your workbook a data source for others
■■
■■
Have a special SharePoint document library with enhanced functionality and visualization
modes, called PowerPivot Gallery
Empower the IT professionals with tools to assist with the management of the PowerPivot
workbooks.
PowerPivot for SharePoint is designed to meet the requirements of all the preceding scenarios,
giving you a way to share, refresh, and update workbooks in a secure manner that adheres to IT security policies while providing users with the means to interact with the content of the workbooks from
their browsers.
Getting started
This section briefly introduces you to installing PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013.
Installing PowerPivot for SharePoint
An IT professional must perform the installation of PowerPivot for SharePoint because it will require
administrative access to servers. It can potentially be a very complex task depending on how your
SharePoint farm is configured. Here are a couple of good white papers on how to set up PowerPivot
for SharePoint that the IT professionals can review:
■■
Installing Analysis Services Server in SharePoint Mode for SharePoint 2013:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219067.aspx
■■
Installing PowerPivot for SharePoint Add-In:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fe13ce8b-9369-4126-928a-9426f9119424
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 191
Publishing to SharePoint
After you create a PowerPivot workbook by using PowerPivot for Excel, you’ll likely want to share it
with others in your department or organization. Your workbook becomes much more useful when
others can use it.
To publish your workbook, perform the following procedure:
1. In Excel, on the ribbon, click the File tab to display the Backstage view.
2. Click the Save As tab, as shown in Figure 7-1.
3. In the Save As section, select Computer and then click the Browse button.
4. Type the URL for the SharePoint site to which you want to upload the workbook and click
Save.
If you are publishing to a SharePoint site that has PowerPivot for SharePoint installed, you should
publish it to the PowerPivot Gallery. The PowerPivot Gallery is a special PowerPivot-enable SharePoint
document library that provides additional functionality beyond what’s available in the standard
SharePoint 2013 document libraries.
FIGURE 7-1 Publishing a PowerPivot workbook to SharePoint.
The PowerPivot Gallery
The PowerPivot Gallery is a visually rich SharePoint document library that is installed with PowerPivot
for SharePoint. Its enhanced visual presentation helps you to better interpret the data in each sheet of
a PowerPivot workbook in the Gallery, as demonstrated in Figure 7-2.
192 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
FIGURE 7-2 The PowerPivot Gallery.
Clicking a specific sheet in the PowerPivot workbook opens the workbook in the browser where
you can further analyze it, as illustrated in Figure 7-3.
FIGURE 7-3 Analyzing a PowerPivot workbook in the browser.
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 193
Scheduling data refreshes
PowerPivot for SharePoint provides a data-refresh feature that can automatically retrieve updated
information from the external data sources you used to build the workbook originally. Any PowerPivot workbook owner can schedule data refresh for workbooks saved to the PowerPivot Gallery or
to any other PowerPivot-enabled SharePoint document library. To manage data refresh, perform the
following procedure:
1. In your document library, select the workbook for which you want access refresh settings and
then click the More Options button (the ellipsis icon).
A dialog box opens showing the workbook’s current authentication settings
2. In the lower-right corner of the dialog box that opens, click the More Options button (again,
the ellipsis icon), as depicted in Figure 7-4.
FIGURE 7-4 Accessing the dialog box for a workbook.
3. On the menu that appears, click Manage PowerPivot Data Refresh to schedule a data refresh,
as shown in Figure 7-5.
194 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
FIGURE 7-5 Click Manage PowerPivot Data Refresh on the menu.
PowerPivot Gallery offers another way to get to the data refresh feature. To schedule a data
refresh through the PowerPivot Gallery, SharePoint users who have Contributor permission
can click the Calendar icon shown for each workbook in a PowerPivot Gallery (see Figure 7-6).
Note that if the user does not have sufficient privileges on the workbook, the Calendar icon is
not available on the page.
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 195
FIGURE 7-6 Accessing PowerPivot Data Refresh from a PowerPivot Gallery by using the Calendar icon.
Regardless of how you get to the Manage Data Refresh page, the details on it are the same.
Figure 7-7 shows the initial view of the page.
FIGURE 7-7 Enabling Data Refresh in the Manage Data Refresh page.
196 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
4. Select the Enable check box to make the page active so that you can fill in the values that you
want to use.
The Manage Data Refresh page is organized into six sections. Table 7-1 presents an overview of
each section, and detailed descriptions are given in the subsections that follow.
TABLE 7-1 Manage Data Refresh page sections
Section
General description
Data Refresh
Enable or disable a data refresh schedule.
Schedule Details
Define the frequency and timing details of a data refresh.
Earliest Start Time
Specify the earliest start time for a data refresh.
E-mail Notifications
Specify the e-mail address of the users to be notified in the event of data refresh failures.
Credentials
Provide the credentials that will be used to refresh data on your behalf.
Data Sources
Select which data sources should be automatically refreshed. You also use this section to create
custom schedules that vary for each data source, or specify different authentication methods
for each data source.
Data Refresh
To enable or disable a data refresh schedule, select or clear the Enable check box on the Manage Data
Refresh page. If this check box is selected, you can edit all parts of the data refresh schedule. If the
check box is cleared, the page is read-only, and after you click OK, subsequent data refresh operations are disabled for that workbook.
Schedule Details
In the Schedule Details section, you can specify the frequency and timing details of the data refresh.
There are four options from which to choose:
■■
Daily
■■
Weekly
■■
Monthly
■■
Once
With the Daily option (see Figure 7-8), you can schedule data refresh to occur every n day(s), every
weekday, or on specific days of the week.
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 197
FIGURE 7-8 Daily schedule details options.
If you select the Also Refresh As Soon As Possible check box, data is refreshed as soon as the server
can process it. This refresh occurs in addition to the periodic data refresh schedule. This option is
available for periodic schedules only (that is, daily, weekly, and monthly schedules). Select this check
box if you want to verify that the data refresh will run properly. For example, you might not know
whether data credentials are configured correctly. This option provides a way to test the data refresh
before its scheduled execution time. In short, checking the Also Refresh As Soon As Possible option
refreshes the workbook as soon as possible one time, and then it is refreshed following your periodic
schedule specification.
The Weekly option (see Figure 7-9) is for scheduling data refresh on a weekly basis such as every n
week(s) or on specific days of the week.
FIGURE 7-9 The Weekly schedule details options.
The Monthly option (see Figure 7-10) schedules data refresh to run on a specific day of the month
or on the first, second, third or last specific day of the week every n month(s).
FIGURE 7-10 The Monthly schedule details options.
198 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
The Once option (see Figure 7-11) is for scheduling a one-time data refresh operation that runs as
soon as the server can process the request. After the data refresh is complete, the system disables this
schedule. Notice that the Also Refresh As Soon As Possible check box is not available when this option
is selected.
FIGURE 7-11 The Once schedule details option.
Earliest Start Time
In the Earliest Start Time section, you specify details regarding when you prefer data refresh to occur
(Figure 7-12). You can enter a specific time before which data refresh should not commence, or you
can choose to refresh data after business hours. This page does not determine the time at which
the data refresh actually starts; instead, the schedule is queued and processed based on available
resources. For example, if the server is busy with on-demand queries (which take precedence over
data refresh jobs), the server waits to refresh your data until those queries have been processed. You
can also choose to run a data-refresh operation after business hours. The administrator of the PowerPivot Service Application for your organization determines the definition of “business hours.”
FIGURE 7-12 The Earliest Start Time section on the Manage Data Refresh page.
E-mail Notifications
In this section of the Manage Data Refresh page, you can specify email addresses for individuals or
groups who should be notified when a data refresh fails (Figure 7-13). You can receive notifications of
successful data-refresh operations through the regular SharePoint alerting system for email notification. (The basis of the alert would be a new file added to the target document library.)
FIGURE 7-13 The E-mail Notifications section on the Manage Data Refresh page.
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 199
Credentials
PowerPivot for SharePoint uses the SharePoint Secure Store Service (SSS) to store any credentials used
in data refresh. In the Credentials section of the schedule page, the schedule owner can specify the
Windows credentials that are used to refresh data on his behalf. Any data source that uses trusted
or integrated security is refreshed by using these credentials. For the data refresh to succeed, the
selected credentials must have access to the data sources for the workbook. You can choose from one
of the following options (see also Figure 7-14):
■■
■■
■■
Use the data refresh account configured by the administrator (this is the service application’s
unattended data refresh account)
Use a specific Windows user name and password
Use a predefined SSS target application ID that stores the Windows credentials that you want
to use
FIGURE 7-14 The Credentials options on the Manage Data Refresh page—specifying an account configured by
the administrator.
Both the PowerPivot data refresh account and the predefined SSS target application ID must be
set up by a SharePoint administrator in Central Administration. Because these credentials are shared
among all users, for instance, this option is typically used where additional credentials would be actually used for data access.
A schedule owner can also choose to type the Windows user credentials to be used on the data
refresh, as illustrated in Figure 7-15. These credentials are securely stored in the SharePoint SSS.
FIGURE 7-15 The Credentials options on the Manage Data Refresh page—specifying Windows user credentials.
With the third option (see Figure 7-16), a schedule owner can specify credentials previously saved
in a SSS Target Application ID. To use this option, you must enter the Target Application ID used to
look up the credentials in the SSS. The Target Application ID specified must be a group entry, and
both the interactive user and the PowerPivot System service account must have read access.
200 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
FIGURE 7-16 The Credentials options on the Manage Data Refresh page—specifying a Target Application ID.
Note Setting up and maintaining SSS is beyond the scope of this book. For more information about it, read the TechNet article at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/
ee806866.aspx.
Data Sources
A workbook can have many data sources, each with different characteristics. Figure 7-17 shows that
you can choose to create a data refresh schedule by using different settings for each data source,
or even disable the data refresh for it (by clearing its corresponding check box). You can have, for
instance, one data source scheduled to refresh daily and a second source scheduled monthly.
FIGURE 7-17 The Data Sources section on the Manage Data Refresh page.
The schedule definition page provides options for choosing the data sources to be refreshed, when
to refresh them, and which security options to use for each one. It also provides fields for specifying
database credentials or other non-Windows credentials used on the database connection.
You must select at least one data source to save the schedule. The data source’s credentials are not
used for impersonation but are instead included on the connection string as UserName and Password.
These credentials override those used on the connection string for the original data import.
Figure 7-18 shows that different settings are available for each data source. You can specify a custom schedule data source or use the general schedule specified for the workbook.
Note The only modifiable elements in the connection string are the UserName and
Password elements. To edit any of the other elements—for example, to change the source
server name—you must download the workbook to your desktop, edit it in Excel 2013, and
then republish it to SharePoint.
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 201
FIGURE 7-18 The Data Sources section, showing schedule and credential details for a data source.
Workbooks as a data source
You can use a workbook hosted in a SharePoint site only if you install PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013.
With this feature, you can designate your workbook as a data source for others. For instance, you can
create an Excel 2013 workbook (or other tools like Power View, Panorama, ProClarity, and so on) that
uses another Excel 2013 workbook that is hosted in SharePoint 2013 with PowerPivot for SharePoint.
In the Data Connection Wizard, in the Server Name text box, provide the URL for the workbook in
SharePoint, as demonstrated in the Figure 7-19.
FIGURE 7-19 Using a workbook as a data source.
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In the Log On Credentials section, choose the authentication method (in the example, we use
Windows Authentication) and then click Next. On the Select Database And Table page of the wizard,
the workbook is shown as a Model of type Cube, as illustrated in Figure 7-20.
FIGURE 7-20 Selecting the data model from the workbook.
The actions to complete creating a connection to a data source are no different from the actions
described in Chapter 4, in the section “Creating the Data Model” (see also Figure 4-5).
Monitoring with PowerPivot for SharePoint
The PowerPivot Management Dashboard provides administrators who are responsible for the server
side of PowerPivot with the capabilities they need to understand usage patterns of the PowerPivot
workbooks in SharePoint and to take appropriate actions. For example, the growing size of a particular workbook might indicate the need to acquire more memory. You can access the PowerPivot
Management Dashboard by going to the SharePoint Central Administration page and then clicking
General Application Settings, as depicted in the Figure 7-21.
Note To view some of the Dashboard controls, you need Silverlight installed on the computer on which you are browsing. If you do not have it installed, your browser should
prompt you to install it from the web.
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 203
FIGURE 7-21 Accessing the PowerPivot Management Dashboard.
Clicking the PowerPivot Management Dashboard link takes you to the Dashboard page, as shown
in Figure 7-22.
The PowerPivot Management Dashboard can be broken down into five main areas (Web Parts)
Table 7-2 presents an overview of each area, and detailed descriptions are given in the subsections
that follow.
TABLE 7-2 The PowerPivot Management Dashboard main areas
Web Part
Description
Infrastructure – Server Health
This section provides information about infrastructure; it shows the CPU and memory
usage trends over time. It also contains a histogram of overall query response for the
SQL Server Analysis Services in SharePoint mode.
Workbook Activity
This section provides a high-level representation of the number of users, the number
of queries sent to a workbook, and the size of the workbook in time.
Actions
An administrator can use this section to configure PowerPivot-specific settings within
a SharePoint farm.
Data Refresh
This section provides a breakdown of the recent activities and recent failures for
PowerPivot data refresh in SharePoint.
Reports
An administrator can use this section to view the source Excel workbooks and databases used by the PowerPivot Management Dashboard
204 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
FIGURE 7-22 The PowerPivot Management Dashboard.
Infrastructure – Server Health
This section of the PowerPivot Management Dashboard provides indicators of the server’s health. It
does so through the following indicators:
■■
Query Response Times
■■
Average Instance CPU
■■
Average Instance Memory
■■
Activity
■■
Performance
Query Response Times
The Query Response Times view is the default view of the Server Health Web Part (see Figure 7-23).
The purpose of this chart is to provide a quick overview so that you can determine whether the
majority of the queries are running as expected or running too slowly.
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 205
FIGURE 7-23 The Query Response Times view.
When query response time increases, you will want to determine which queries are running slowly,
and why.
Table 7-3 summarizes the default query response time definitions. These definitions can be
modified by selecting Central Administration | General Application Settings | PowerPivot | Configure
Service Application Settings.
TABLE 7-3 Query Response Times category definitions
Category
Definition (in milliseconds)
Trivial
0 < time < 500
Quick
500 < time < 1000
Expected
1000 < time < 3000
Long
3000 < time < 10000
Exceeded
≥10000
Average Instance CPU
Switching to the Average Instance CPU view (see Figure 7-24) in the Server Health Web Part shows the
CPU load on the SharePoint Application Server on which PowerPivot is installed.
Figure 7-24 shows that for that SharePoint Application Server, the CPU load is not an issue because,
on average, it uses less than 30 percent of the CPU capacity.
206 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
FIGURE 7-24 The Average Instance CPU view.
Average Instance Memory
Memory can become a concern for your environment because the Analysis Services in SharePoint
Mode loads the workbook in memory. As the number of users and the size of their workbooks
grow, they require an increasing portion of the server’s memory. Taking a quick look at the Average
Instance Memory view, you can easily see when more memory is being used over time, as demonstrated in Figure 7-25.
FIGURE 7-25 The Average Instance Memory view.
Activity and Performance
Although you can toggle between the Infrastructure – Server Health Activity and Performance views,
you can get an even better view of this data by using the Workbook Activity And Server Health
reports directly. To do that, click in either the Workbook Activity or the Server Health workbook
located in the Reports area of the PowerPivot Management Dashboard (refer to Figure 7-22).
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 207
Workbook Activity
This area comprises two parts: a Chart and a List.
Chart
This Chart Web Part is a Silverlight control that displays a bubble chart. Figure 7-26 shows that the
chart’s axes represent the number of users and the number of queries sent to a workbook. A sliding bar indicates the date. As you move the pointer over each bubble, the name of the workbook it
corresponds to and the number of users that are connected are displayed, along with the number of
queries sent to the workbook. In addition, as you move the date sliding bar, it shows animation on
bubble size, which represents how the size of the workbook is growing over time.
FIGURE 7-26 The Workbook Activity – Chart.
List
The Workbook Activity – List section provides a quick way to view the current activity attributes
(workbook name, number of queries, users, and size) of the server, as demonstrated in Figure 7-27.
FIGURE 7-27 The Workbook Activity – List.
208 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
Data Refresh
The PowerPivot scheduled data-refresh mechanism has many activities that run in the background.
In the PowerPivot Management Dashboard, you can find a section dedicated to reporting the recent
data refresh–related activities in the environment.
Recent Activity
As the name suggests, this Web Part informs the data-refresh activity in this environment. It reports
the most recent PowerPivot workbook data refreshes along with the time that it completed the
refresh and its duration, as shown in Figure 7-28.
FIGURE 7-28 The Data refresh – Recent Activity Web Part.
Clicking one of the workbooks in the Recent Activity report redirects you to that workbook’s data
refresh history page, on which you can find details related to the failure. Figure 7-29 shows the data
refresh history page for the AdventureWorks2013_Bikes2.xlsx workbook.
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 209
FIGURE 7-29 The Data Refresh History page.
Recent Failures
This Web Part focuses on reporting recent data refresh failures. With this information in hand, you
can go back to Recent Activity Web Part and begin investigating the reason why a particular data
refresh failed.
Reports
As shown in Figure 7-30, the Reports Web Part contains the Excel workbooks that are the source for
the PowerPivot Management Dashboard charts. Clicking one of the workbooks opens that workbook
in the browser, and you can identify the charts shown in the PowerPivot Management Dashboard.
FIGURE 7-30 The Reports Web Part.
210 Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2013
Summary
This chapter briefly introduced you to PowerPivot for SharePoint. It demonstrated how to publish a
PowerPivot workbook to SharePoint and how to schedule data refreshes, and it explained how IT professionals can manage PowerPivot for SharePoint by using the PowerPivot Management Dashboard.
To learn more about PowerPivot, you can look for books dedicated to PowerPivot for Excel and to
PowerPivot for SharePoint. You can also find more information by referencing the following resources:
■■
■■
■■
The official MSDN blog at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/analysisservices/.
Rob Collie’s blog at http://www.powerpivotpro.com (for PowerPivot for Excel). Rob Collie was a
Program Manager in the Analysis Services team that worked on PowerPivot for Excel.
Dave Wickert’s blog at http://www.powerpivotgeek.com (for PowerPivot for SharePoint). Dave
Wickert is a Program Manager on the Analysis Services team, working on PowerPivot for
SharePoint.
Chapter 7 Using PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013 211
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Index
Symbols
= (equals sign) operator, 116
A
Absolute Value option, 148
Actions area, PowerPivot Management Dashboard, 204
Active Directory Content Pack Demo 2.0, 333
Active Directory Demo Build 2.1
hardware requirements, 334
installing content pack, 334–336
overview, 333
post installation, 336
software requirements, 334
ActiveDirectory.zip file, 335
Add-Ins tab, Excel 2013, 113
Add Measure Columns dialog box, 253
Add Measure Filters dialog box, 253
Add Part To list box, 323
Add This Data To The Data Model check box, 102, 104
Add Trusted Data Source Location link, 230
ad hoc tool
Excel Services 2013 as, 162
administration
of Excel Services 2013, 164–166
adult stage, Business Intelligence Maturity Model, 40–
41
AdventureWorks data warehouse, 76
AdventureWorksDW2012 database, 342, 343
AdventureWorksDW2012 sample database, 122–124
AdventureWorksIT database, 346
<a> element, 185
All SharePoint Locations option, 231
Also Refresh As Soon As Possible check box, 198, 199
Analysis Services cube, 28
Analysis Services Cube data source, 236
Analysis Services OLAP cubes, 14
Analysis Services Tabular Project option, 75
analytical competition, 42
Analytic chart report type, 216
Analytic grid report type, 216
Analyze In Excel option, SSDT, 81
APIs (application programming interfaces), 28
application programming interfaces (APIs), 28
Apps, SharePoint. See SharePoint Apps
architectural enhancements
infrastructure improvements. See infrastructure
improvements
architecture. See also infrastructure improvements
for BI, 10–11
infrastructure improvements. See infrastructure
improvements
of PerformancePoint Services, 223–224
audience
understanding, 22–24
authentication
settings for, 171
in workbooks, 168–171
Authentication Unattended Service Account, 239
authoring tools
for BI, 12–19
Automatically Link button, 300
Automatic Link Wizard, 300, 301
automating data processing
for SSAS, 85–89
AutoSalesModel model, 343
AutoSalesSourceDW database, 342
AutoSPInstaller.bat file, 341
AutoSPInstallerDemo15.2.zip file, 341
AutoSPInstallerLaunch.bat file, 341
Average Instance CPU view, 206–207
Average Instance Memory view, 207
Azure Marketplace, Windows, 108, 119
361
backgrounds
B
backgrounds, 128
Balanced Scorecard (BSC), 3
Bar Chart button, Design tab, 138
BCS (Business Connectivity Services), 216, 272
BI (business intelligence), 128
BI Center site, 234
BIDS (Business Intelligence Development Studio), 61, 63
Big Data
Cloudera, 355
Data Explorer for Excel Add-in, 358–359
Data Quality Services for Excel Add-in, 360
Excel-Hive Add-in, 357–358
Flume, 354
Hadoop, 352–353
HDFS, 352–353
HDInsight
enabling in Windows Azure, 356–357
overview, 355–356
Hive, 353–354
Hortonworks, 355
“hype cycle” for, 352
Mahout, 354
MapR, 355
MapReduce, 353
NoSQL databases, 354
overview, 349–350
Pig, 353–354
Sqoop, 354
variety, 351
velocity, 351
volume, 350
vs. electrification, 351
BI Semantic Model, 317
BISM (Business Intelligence Semantic Model), 25
overview, 61
tabular modeling vs. multidimensional
modeling, 61–62
BISM file
adding connection file, 93–94
adding content types, 90–92
creating connection file, 92–93
overview, 90
blank view, 132
BSC (Balanced Scorecard), 3
Business Connectivity Services (BCS), 216, 272
business intelligence (BI), 128
362 Index
architectural diagram for, 10–11
authoring tools for, 12–19
importance of, 6–7
Microsoft vision for, 7–9
self-service BI, 7
SharePoint relationship with, 9–10
Business Intelligence Development Studio (BIDS), 61, 63
Business Intelligence Maturity Model
adult stage, 40–41
chasm, 39–40
child stage, 38–39
gulf, 38
infant stage, 37
overview, 36–37
prenatal stage, 37
sage stage, 41
teenager stage, 39
Business Intelligence Semantic Model
(BISM), 25. See BISM (Business
Intelligence Semantic Model)
business users
organizational BI, 26–30
Excel Services, 28–29
PerformancePoint Services, 29–30
Reporting Services, 27–28
organizational hierarchy, 24–25
overview, 22
self-service BI, 33–35
Excel, 34
PowerPivot in Excel, 35
Power View in Excel, 34
Power View in SharePoint, 34
Report Builder, 35
Visio, 35
team BI, 30–33, 32–33
Excel Services, 32
PerformancePoint Services, 33
PowerPivot for SharePoint, 32
Power View in SharePoint, 33
SharePoint BI, 30–31
Visio Services, 31
understanding audience, 22–24
C
calculated fields, 112
calculations with DAX
creating functions, 118
overview, 116–118
Data Model
Calendar icon, 195
CalendarYear field, 149
cards
changing structure of, 147
converting table to, 146
overview, 146
casual users
vs. power users, 22–24
CDH (Cloudera Distribution Including Apache
Hadoop), 355
Central Administration Console, 164
charts
clustered bar charts, 138–139
configuring multiples, 139–140
overview, 138
scatter charts, 141–144
chasm, Business Intelligence Maturity Model, 39–40
Check Diagram button, 276
child stage, Business Intelligence Maturity
Model, 38–39
Clear Filter button, 150, 154
Click Here To Open The Tool Pane link, 323
Cloudera, 355
Cloudera Distribution Including Apache Hadoop
(CDH), 355
clustered bar charts, 138–139
coauthoring
in Visio 2013, 275–276
Columns box, 136
commenting
in Visio 2013, 274
Comments pane, Visio 2013, 274
communities, BI, 26
company vision statement, 3
compatibility
and PowerPivot in Excel 2013, 115–116
connection file (BISM)
adding connection file, 93–94
adding content types, 90–92
creating connection file, 92–93
overview, 90
Connection Properties dialog box, 170
ContentPackInstaller.exe file, 334
content packs, 332
content types
adding, 90–92
ContosoEnergyDW database, 343
ContosoEnergyModel model, 343
ContosoSchoolsDW database, 343
ContosoSchoolsModel model, 343
Create A Filter Wizard, 257
Create PivotTable dialog box, 108
Create Relationships dialog box, 110
Create tab, 220
credentials
for data refreshes, 200–201
CRM (Customer Relationship Management), 68
customData folder, 115
CustomerProfitability model, 343
Customer Relationship Management (CRM), 68
custom target applications
from secure store, 222
D
Daily option, 197
Dashboard Content page, 265
Dashboard Designer
configuring, 232–235
overview, 218–220
dashboards
best practices for, 310–311
dashboard content in SharePoint folders, 220
Dashboard Designer, 218–220
using Excel Services in, 317–320
filters for, 217–218
in monitoring sales and profitability
example, 262–267
overview, 217–218, 309–310
PerformancePoint Web Parts, 328
permissions for, 220
showing workbook in Web Parts, 322–326
tools for authoring, 311–315
versioning for items in, 220
Visio Web Access Web Part, 328
Web Part pages for, 315–317, 328–329
Dashboards library, 220
dashboards, PerformancePoint Services, 28
Data Analysis Expression (DAX), 35
Data Connections library, 171, 219, 220, 241
Data Connection Wizard, 101, 106, 100
Data Explorer for Excel Add-in, 358–359
data graphics, 273
data mart
vs. data warehouses, 71
data mining tools, 63–66
Data Model
adding data to, 108–109
creating, 99–108
Index 363
data model, Excel
creating table relationships, 109–111
in Excel Services 2013, 162–163
using data from, 111
data model, Excel, 25
data modeling
overview, 79–81
testing in Excel, 81–82
data processing, 64
Data Quality Services for Excel Add-in, 360
data refresh
in PowerPivot for Excel 2013, 114
data refreshes
for diagrams, 306–307
for PowerPivot
enabling, 197
scheduling, 197–199
monitoring, 209–210
for PowerPivot
credentials for, 200–201
data sources for, 201–202
earliest start time for, 199
e-mail notifications for, 199
overview, 194–196
Data Refresh History page, 210
data refreshing, 64
Data Selector wizard, 298
data sources
for data refreshes, 201–202
for PerformancePoint Services, 214–215
section of Manage Data Refresh page, 197
SQL Server as, 229–230
workbook as, 202–203
data warehouses
overview, 70–71
vs. data mart, 71
DAX calculations
creating functions, 118
overview, 116–118
DAX (Data Analysis Expression), 16, 35
Decomposition Tree, 217
Definition tab, Connection Properties dialog
box, 170
democratization, 349
DemoDeata database, 346
demonstration environment
Active Directory Demo Build 2.1
hardware requirements, 334
installing content pack, 334–336
364 Index
overview, 333
post installation, 336
software requirements, 334
hardware considerations, 331–332
scripts for setting up, 332–333
Self-Service BI Demo 2.0 Content Pack
installing content pack, 343–344
known issues, 344–346
overview, 342–343
post installation, 344–346
prerequisites, 343
SharePoint 2013 Demo Build 2.0
installing content pack, 340–341
known issues, 341
overview, 340
post installation, 341
prerequisites, 340
SQL 2012 SP1 Content Pack Demo Build 2.0.0
installing content pack, 338–339
overview, 336
post installation, 339–340
prerequisites, 337–338
UserProfile Provisioning Demo 2.0
installing content pack, 342
overview, 342
prerequisites, 342
Visio Services Demo Content Pack
installing content pack, 347–348
overview, 346
prerequisites, 347
Deploy To dialog box, 266
Design tab, Visio 2013 ribbon, 293
Details pane, 279
Diagram Parts group, 304
diagrams
creating, 296–297
refreshing, 306–307
validating, 276–278
Diagram view, SQL Server Data Tools, 80
Dimensional Data Source Mapping dialog box, 244, 246
dimensions, 71–73
DimProduct table, 117
diskette icon (Save button), 241
DIVIDE function, 118
drilling to details
functionality in Power View for Excel 2013, 128–129
in maps, 145
E
earliest start time
for data refreshes, 199
section of Manage Data Refresh page, 197, 199
ECMAScript object model, 29
extending Excel Services 2013, 183–184
overview, 160
Edit mode, 176
Edit tab, 220
EffectiveUsername property, 222
electrification
vs. Big Data, 351
ellipsis icon, 194
e-mail notifications
for data refreshes, 199
Enable Selection Of Multiple Tables option, 103, 108
EnglishMonthName field, 142
Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), 68
equals sign (=) operator, 116
ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning), 68
ETL (extract, transform, and load), 37, 57
Excel
data model for, 25
self-service BI, 34
testing data modeling using, 81–82
Excel 2013
PowerPivot in
calculations with DAX, 116–119
compatibility issues, 115–116
data refresh in, 114
importing data from Windows Azure
Marketplace, 118–122
overview, 111–114
Power View in
comparing editions of, 125–126
creating Data Model, 131
drill functionality, 128–129
filtering data, 149–155
formatting options, 128
history of, 125
inserting Power View sheet, 131–132
key performance indicators, 128
overview, 125
saving workbook, 155–156
setting up, 131
visualizations in, 126–127
when not to use, 130
when to use, 129–130
Excel-Hive Add-in, 357–358
Excel Web Access View drop-down list
Excel Interactive View. See Interactive View
Excel Services
for organizations, 28–29
for teams, 32
REST API for, 29
Excel Services 2013
authentication in workbooks, 168–171
Authentication Settings dialog box, 170
configuring server
administration, 164–166
external data configuration, 168–171
installation, 163–164
creating Excel dashboard using Web Parts
adding Excel Web Access Web Part, 175–177
configuring web parts, 178–182
creating dashboard page, 174–175
creating workbook, 174
overview, 173–174
data model in, 162–163
editing workbooks, 173
extending
ECMAScript object model, 183–184
Excel Interactive View, 185–187
Excel Web Services, 183
overview, 182
REST API, 184–185
UDFs (User-Defined Functions), 183
history of
availability on Internet, 160
BI support, 158–161
Excel Web Services, 159
extensibility, 160
Interactive View, 161
sharing workbooks, 159
UDFs (User-Defined Functions), 159
overview, 157–158
security for
file security, 166
overview, 166
server security, 166–167
Trusted File Locations page, 167
using in dashboards, 317–320
viewing workbooks, 171–173
when to use
as ad hoc tool, 162
easy adoption, 161–162
scalability, 162
tool of choice for end users, 161
Excel Services report type, 216
Excel Web Access View drop-down list, 325
Index 365
Excel Web Access Web Part
Excel Web Access Web Part
adding, 175–177
filters in, 327
properties for, 178
Excel Web Access Web Parts, 29
Excel Web Services
Excel Services 2013 history, 159
extending Excel Services 2013, 183
extending
Excel Services 2013
ECMAScript object model, 183–184
Excel Interactive View, 185–187
Excel Web Services, 183
overview, 182
REST API, 184–185
UDFs, 183
external data configuration
for Excel Services 2013, 168–171
External Data window, 272, 299
extract, transform, and load (ETL), 37, 57
F
fact data, 71–72, 71–73
FactInternetSales table, 117
FactSales table, 117
Fashion Station example
BI Dashboard, 305
creating Visio diagram, 296–297
creating Web Part page, 304–306
linking to data, 297–301
organizing data, 295
overview, 295
refreshing diagram when data changes, 306–307
saving to Visio Services, 297
visualizing data, 302–305
Field List in Power View, 311
fields
adding to tables, 133–134
file security
for Excel Services 2013, 166
Filter dialog box, 327
filtering data
adding slicers, 150–151
advanced filters, 154–155
basic filters, 153
by using tiles
adding tiles to visualization, 151–152
overview, 151
366 Index
highlighting data, 150
overview, 149
filters
for dashboards, 217–218
enhancements to, 221
in Excel Web Access Web Part, 327
in monitoring sales and profitability
example, 256–257
Filters pane, 132, 142
Filter Web Parts, 29
Finance, Operations, Sales, and Human Resources
(FOSH), 216
First Time Install dialog box, 335
Flume, 354
fonts, 128
Format Text tab, 176
FOSH (Finance, Operations, Sales, and Human
Resources), 216
FOSH metrics, 3
Foundation List option, 298
FQDN (fully qualified domain name), 334
fully qualified domain name (FQDN), 334
G
Get Data From External Data Sources group, 132
get-spserviceinstance command, 344
Go To pane, 279
Grid Height button, Layout tab, 141
Grid Width button, Layout tab, 141
gulf, Business Intelligence Maturity Model, 38
H
Hadoop, 352–353
Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS), 353
hardware
for Active Directory Demo Build 2.1, 334
for demonstration environment, 331–332
Harvard Computing Group (HCG), 284
HCG (Harvard Computing Group), 284
HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File System), 352–353
HDInsight Service
enabling in Windows Azure, 356–357
ODBC driver for, 354
overview, 355–356
HDP (Hortonworks Data Platform), 355
hierarchies
adding to matrix, 137
KPIs (key performance indicators)
highlighting data, 150
history
of Excel Services 2013
availability on Internet, 160
BI support, 158–161
Excel Web Services, 159
extensibility, 160
Interactive View, 161
sharing workbooks, 159
UDFs, 159
of Power View in Excel 2013, 125
of PerformancePoint Services, 213
of PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013, 190
Hive, 353–354
HiveQL language, 354
Home tab, 220
Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP), 355
“hype cycle”, for Big Data, 352
I
IDC (International Data Corporation) report, 350
IIS (Internet Information Services), 223
Import Data dialog box, 99–100, 102, 132
Import From PowerPivot option, 75
Import From Server (Tabular) option, 75
importing data
from Windows Azure Marketplace, 118–122
Include This Action In The Task List check box, 345
indicators, 215
infant stage, Business Intelligence Maturity
Model, 37
infrastructure improvements
workflow framework. See workflow framework
Infrastructure-Server Health area, PowerPivot
Management Dashboard, 204
Insert Chart dialog box, 319
Insert tab, Excel, 131
installation scripts
Active Directory Demo Build 2.1
hardware requirements, 334
installing content pack, 334–336
overview, 333
post installation, 336
software requirements, 334
overview, 332–333
Self-Service BI Demo 2.0 Content Pack
installing content pack, 343–344
known issues, 344–346
overview, 342–343
post installation, 344–346
prerequisites, 343
SharePoint 2013 Demo Build 2.0
installing content pack, 340–341
known issues, 341
overview, 340
post installation, 341
prerequisites, 340
SQL 2012 SP1 Content Pack Demo Build 2.0.0
installing content pack, 338–339
overview, 336
post installation, 339–340
prerequisites, 337
UserProfile Provisioning Demo 2.0
installing content pack, 342
overview, 342
prerequisites, 342
Visio Services Demo Content Pack
installing content pack, 347–348
overview, 346
prerequisites, 347
installing
Excel Services 2013, 163–164
PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013, 191
Install-SPRSService command, 344
Install-SPRSServiceProxy command, 344
Interactive View
Excel Services 2013 history, 161
extending Excel Services 2013, 185–187
International Data Corporation (IDC) report, 350
Internet Information Services (IIS), 223
item.data file, 115
K
Kerberos configuration, 168
Kerberos protocol, 239
key performance indicators (KPIs), 1, 29. See KPIs
(key performance indicators)
KPI Details report type, 216
KPI dialogue box, 242
KPIs (key performance indicators), 1, 29
in Power View for Excel 2013, 128
in monitoring sales and profitability
example, 242–247
overview, 215
using in rules, 277
visualizations in Power View for Excel 2013
Index 367
layouts
defining, 147–149
overview, 147
visualizing, 149
L
layouts
defining for matrix, 136
Library General Settings, SharePoint 2013, 91
lifecycle of BI implementation
creating BISM file
adding connection file, 93–94
adding content types, 90–92
creating connection file, 92–93
overview, 90
deciding what to analyze, 67
deploying model to SSAS
automating data processing, 85–89
overview, 82
partitioning tables, 84–85
roles for, 83
getting to trusted data
data warehouses, 70–71
data warehouse vs. data mart, 71
defined, 69–70
fact data and dimensions, 71–73
moving data using SSIS, 73
loading data into SSDT project
importing PowerPivot model, 76–78
loading data into model, 78–79
overview, 73–76
modeling data
overview, 79–81
testing in Excel, 81–82
overview, 64–66
Line-of-Business (LOB), 68
Line-of-Business (LoB) systems, 4
Link Data To Shapes button, 298
lists, SharePoint
reporting from Odata feed, 19–20
LOB (Line-of-Business), 68
LoB (Line-of-Business) systems, 4
Log On Credentials section, 203
Lucerne Publishing fulfillment report example
BI stack, 12–14
implementation steps
automating processing, 18
creating Power View report, 17
368 Index
customizing report, 18
determining data sources, 16
importing data into PowerPivot, 16–17
publishing to SharePoint, 17–18
overview, 14, 19
planning for, 14–15
reporting using Odata feed from SharePoint
list, 19–20
report requirements, 14
sharing with other teams, 18
visual concept for report, 15
M
macro-enabled Visio diagram, 276
Mahout, 354
Manage Data Refresh page, 196, 199
Manage Excel Services Application page, 166
Manage PerformancePoint Services page, 225
Manage PowerPivot Data Refresh option, 194
Manage Relationships dialog box, 110
Manage Service Applications page, 165
MapReduce, 353
maps
converting table to, 144
drilling to details in, 145
overview, 144
Margin column, 116
Master Data Services (MDS), 360
matrix
adding hierarchies to, 137
converting table to, 135
defining layout of, 136
overview, 135
MDS (Master Data Services), 360
measures, 112
Microsoft
vision for BI from, 7–9
mission statement, 3
MOLAP (multidimensional OLAP) storage, 61
monitoring sales and profitability example
adding report, 258–262
creating dashboard, 262–267
creating filter, 256–257
creating KPIs, 242–247
creating scorecard, 248–256
overview, 235–236
Workspace Browser, 247–248
PDF (Portable Document Format) file
monitoring with PowerPivot
data refreshes, 209–210
overview, 203–205
Reports Web Part, 210
server health
Average Instance CPU, 206–207
Average Instance Memory, 207
overview, 205
performance of, 207
Query Response Times, 205–206
workbook activity, 208
Monthly option, 198
More Options button, 194
moving, tables, 134
MSSQL.ConfigurationFile, 336
MultiDimensional.ConfigurationFile, 337
multidimensional modeling
vs. tabular modeling, 61–62
multidimensional OLAP (MOLAP) storage, 61
multi-diskette icon (Save All button ), 241
multiples, configuring for charts, 139–140
MyCanvas_Current partition, 18
N
Named Item section, 179
Named Item View, 181, 325
Named Item Web Part, 181, 325
Netaphor Software example, 284–285
NetworkDB database, 346
New Data Source configuration page, 239
New Job dialog box, 88
New Job Schedule dialog box, 89
New Proxy Account dialog box, 86
New Report page, 259
None option, 171
NoSQL databases, 354
O
Object Linking and Embedding (OLEDB) data
source, 272
Odata feed
reporting from, 19–20
OData (Open Data Protocol), 161
ODBC (Open Database Connectivity) data
source, 272, 289
.odc connection file, 171
Office 2013
using SharePoint 2013 with, 57–58
using SQL Server 2012 with, 57–58
Office Web Applications, 164
OLAP (Online Analytical Processing), 13, 61
OLAP (Online Analytical Processing) data, 317
OLEDB (Object Linking and Embedding) data
source, 272
OLTP (Online Transaction Processing), 68
Once schedule details option, 199
Online Analytical Processing (OLAP), 13, 61
Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) data, 317
Online Search feature, 359
Online Transaction Processing (OLTP), 68
Only Specific Locations option, 230
Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) data
source, 272, 289
Open Data Protocol (OData), 161
Open dialog box, 78
Opening Documents In The Browser section, 172
operational level, 8
Operations Manager BI, 13
Operations Manager data warehouse
(OperationsManagerDW), 13
OperationsManagerDW (Operations Manager data
warehouse), 13
Options tab, Excel 2013, 112
Organization Chart Wizard template, 288
organizations
Excel Services, 28–29
hierarchy of, 24–25
PerformancePoint Services, 29–30
Reporting Services, 27–28
org chart example
creating Visio diagram, 288–293
organizing data, 287–288
overview, 287–288
saving to Visio Services, 294
visualizing data, 293–295
Org Chart tab, 292
P
Pan and Zoom pane, 279
partitions
for tables, 84–85
Partition Manager dialog box, 84
Password element, 201
PDF (Portable Document Format) file, 27
Index 369
PeoplePackDemo.2.0.zip file
PeoplePackDemo.2.0.zip file, 342
performance
monitoring, 207
PerformancePoint Services
architecture of, 223–224
configuring
Dashboard Designer, 232–235
overview, 224
service application for, 224–226
Content lists, 220
context menu features, 217
dashboards
dashboard content in SharePoint folders, 220
Dashboard Designer, 218–220
filters for, 217–218
overview, 217–218
permissions for, 220
versioning for items in, 220
dashboards for, 28
data sources for, 214–215
filters, 328
for organizations, 29–30
for teams, 33
history of, 213
indicators, 215
KPIs
overview, 215
managing, 226–227
monitoring sales and profitability example
adding report, 258–262
creating dashboard, 262–267
creating filter, 256–257
creating KPIs, 242–247
creating scorecard, 248–256
overview, 235–236
Workspace Browser, 247–248
new features in
BI Center, 222
custom target applications from secure
store, 222
Dashboard Designer in Ribbon, 222
EffectiveUsername property, 222
filter enhancements, 221
filter search, 222
server-side migration, 222
site themes, 221
overview, 213
reports, 216, 328
scorecards, 215, 328
370 Index
security for
data source locations, 230–231
overview, 227–229
SQL Server data source configuration, 229–
230
Web Parts for, 328
when to use, 223
workspace files, 221
Per-User Identity option, 239
pie charts, 126
Pig, 353–354
Pig Latin, 354
PivotTable button, 108
PivotTable Fields, 173
planning
business users
organizational BI, 26–30
organizational hierarchy, 24–25
overview, 22
self-service BI, 33–35
team BI, 30–33
understanding audience, 22–24
for adoption of BI
best practices, 51–53
overview, 51
self-service BI vs. traditional BI, 51
overview, 21
tool selection
Excel, 45–47
Excel Services, 47
overview, 44–45
PerformancePoint Services, 49–50
Reporting Services, 48–49
SharePoint BI, 49
Visio Services, 50
Play Axis, 141
Portable Document Format (PDF) file, 27
power analysts, 32
PowerPivot
importing model using SSDT, 76–78
PowerPivot.ConfigurationFile, 337
PowerPivot for SharePoint 2013
data refreshes
credentials for, 200–201
data sources for, 201–202
earliest start time for, 199
e-mail notifications for, 199
enabling, 197
overview, 194–196
scheduling, 197–199
history of, 190
installing, 191
Management Dashboard for, 204
monitoring with
data refreshes, 209–210
overview, 203–205
Reports Web Part, 210
server health, 205–206
workbook activity, 208
overview, 189–190
PowerPivot Gallery, 192–193
publishing to SharePoint, 192–193
when to use, 191
workbooks as data source, 202–203
PowerPivot Gallery, 192–193
PowerPivot in Excel 2013
calculations with DAX, 116–119
creating functions, 118
overview, 116–118
compatibility issues, 115–116
Data Model, 97–111
adding data to, 108–109
creating, 99–108
creating table relationships, 109–111
using data from, 111
data refresh in, 114
importing data from Windows Azure
Marketplace, 118–122
overview, 111–114
tab for, 114
PowerPivot in Excel, self-service BI, 35
power users
vs. casual users, 22–24
Power View Fields list, 132, 133, 135
Power View in Excel 2013
button for, 131
comparing editions of, 125–126
creating Data Model, 131
drill functionality, 128–129
filtering data
adding slicers, 150–151
advanced filters, 154–155
basic filters, 153
by using tiles, 151–152
highlighting data, 150
overview, 149
formatting options, 128
history of, 125
inserting Power View sheet, 131–132
key performance indicators, 128
progression of BI
overview, 125
saving workbook, 155–156
setting up, 131
visualizations in
creating cards, 146
creating charts, 138–144
creating maps, 144–145
creating matrix, 135–137
creating tables, 133–134
overview, 126–127, 131
using KPIs, 147–149
when not to use, 130
when to use, 129–130
Power View in Excel, self-service BI, 34
Power View in SharePoint
for teams, 33
reports in, 23
self-service BI, 34
predictive analysis, 63
prenatal stage, Business Intelligence Maturity
Model, 37
prerequisites
for Self-Service BI Demo 2.0 Content Pack, 343
for SharePoint 2013 Demo Build 2.0, 340
for SQL 2012 SP1 Content Pack Demo Build
2.0.0, 337
for UserProfile Provisioning Demo 2.0, 342
for Visio Services Demo Content Pack, 347
Process All option, 78
Process Partitions option, 78
Process Table dialog box, 87
Process Table option, 78
Process tab, Visio 2013 ribbon, 277
ProClarity Analytics Server Page report type, 216
progression of BI
Business Intelligence Maturity Model
adult stage, 40–41
chasm, 39–40
child stage, 38–39
gulf, 38
infant stage, 37
overview, 36–37
prenatal stage, 37
sage stage, 41
teenager stage, 39
overview, 35
road map to analytical competition
analytical aspirations, 43
analytical companies, 43–44
analytical competitors, 44
Index 371
Query Response Times view
analytically impaired, 42
localized analytics, 43
overview, 41–42
Q
Query Response Times view, 205–206
R
RDB (Relational Database) systems, 351
RDL (report definition language) files, 24, 28
RDLX file, 23
.rdlx file extension, 35
Refresh button, Excel 2013, 114
Relational Database (RDB) systems, 351
relational OLAP (ROLAP) storage, 61
relationships
button in Data tab, 110
for tables, 109–111
Report Builder
overview, 33
self-service BI, 35
report definition language (RDL) files, 24
Reporting Services
for organizations, 27–28
for teams, 32–33
Reporting Services report type, 216
report parts
defined, 24
Gallery for, 33
reports
building using Excel Services, 158
in monitoring sales and profitability
example, 258–262
overview, 216
Reports area, PowerPivot Management
Dashboard, 204
Reports Web Part, 210
Representational State Transfer (REST) API, 160,
184–185
Reseller Margin field, 142
Reseller Margin KPI, 149
Reseller Sales table, 133, 144
resizing, tables, 134
REST (Representational State Transfer) API, 160,
184–185
Ribbon
Dashboard Designer in, 222
372 Index
road map to analytical competition
analytical aspirations, 43
analytical companies, 43–44
analytical competitors, 44
analytically impaired, 42
localized analytics, 43
road map to analytical competition, 41–42
ROLAP (relational OLAP) storage, 61
roles
for SSAS, 83
Role Manager dialog box, 83
RSIntegrated.ConfigurationFile, 337
Rules Tools group, 278
S
sage stage, Business Intelligence Maturity Model, 41
SalesAmount field, 116, 144
SalesTerritoryCountry chart, 320
SalesTerritoryCountry field, 144, 318
SalesTerritoryGroup field, 137, 139, 144
SalesTerritoryRegion field, 139
Save All button (multi-diskette icon), 241
Save As tab
in Backstage view, 321
in Visio, 294
Save button (diskette icon), 241
saving workbook
Power View in Excel 2013, 155–156
scalability
of Excel Services 2013, 162
scatter charts, 141–144
Schedule Details section, Manage Data Refresh
page, 197
SCOMR2Simulation database, 346
SCOM (System Center Operations Manager), 13
scorecards
in monitoring sales and profitability
example, 248–256
overview, 215
<script> element, 185
scripts, installation
Active Directory Demo Build 2.1
hardware requirements, 334
installing content pack, 334–336
overview, 333
post installation, 336
software requirements, 334
overview, 332–333
Self-Service BI Demo 2.0 Content Pack
installing content pack, 343–344
known issues, 344–346
overview, 342–343
post installation, 344–346
prerequisites, 343
SharePoint 2013 Demo Build 2.0
installing content pack, 340–341
known issues, 341
overview, 340
post installation, 341
prerequisites, 340
SQL 2012 SP1 Content Pack Demo Build 2.0.0
installing content pack, 338–339
overview, 336
post installation, 339–340
prerequisites, 337
UserProfile Provisioning Demo 2.0
installing content pack, 342
overview, 342
prerequisites, 342
Visio Services Demo Content Pack
installing content pack, 347–348
overview, 346
prerequisites, 347
Search pane, 279
secure store
custom target applications from, 222
Secure Store Services (SSS), 168, 200, 224
security
for Excel Services 2013
file security, 166
overview, 166
server security, 166–167
for PerformancePoint Services
data source locations, 230–231
overview, 227–229
SQL Server data source configuration, 229–230
Select A Dashboard Page Template dialog box, 263
Select A Data Source dialog box, 238, 242
Select A Dimension dialog box, 244
Select An Indicator page, Scoring Pattern
Wizard, 250
Select A Report Template dialog box, 259
Select A Scorecard Template dialog box, 252
Select A Workbook page, 323
Select Database And Table dialog box, 100–101
Select Database And Table page, 203
Select Dimension dialog box, 257
sharing, workbooks
Select Members dialog box, 245, 254
Select Scoring Pattern Wizard, 249
self-service BI (business intelligence)
Excel, 34
Microsoft vision for, 7–9
overview, 7
PowerPivot in Excel, 35
Power View in Excel, 34
Power View in SharePoint, 34
Report Builder, 35
Visio, 35
Self-Service BI Demo 2.0 Content Pack
installing content pack, 343–344
known issues, 344–346
overview, 342–343
post installation, 344–346
prerequisites, 343
SelfServiceBIDemo2.0.zip file, 344
Server Name text box, 202
Server Name text box, Table Import Wizard, 100
servers
monitoring
Average Instance CPU, 206–207
Average Instance Memory, 207
overview, 205
performance of, 207
Query Response Times, 205–206
security for Excel Services 2013, 166–167
server-side migration, 222
service application
page for, 165
for PerformancePoint Services, 224–226
Set-ExecutionPolicy command, 334, 341
shadow systems project, 37
Shape Data window, 295
SharePoint
for teams, 30–31
relationship with BI, 9–10
reporting from SharePoint list, 19–20
SharePoint 2013
upgrading to. See upgrading to SharePoint 2013
using Office 2013 with, 57–58
using SQL Server 2012 with, 57–58
SharePoint 2013 Demo Build 2.0
installing content pack, 340–341
known issues, 341
overview, 340
post installation, 341
prerequisites, 340
sharing, workbooks, 159
Index 373
Show Levels button, Design tab
Show Levels button, Design tab, 137
SiteAudit Visualizer, 285
Site Contents page, 174
site themes, for PerformancePoint Services, 221
skunkworks project, 37
SkyDrive folder, 126
slicers, adding, 150–151
software requirements, for Active Directory Demo
Build 2.1, 334
sorting, tables, 134
spreadmarts project, 37
SQL 2012 SP1 Content Pack Demo Build 2.0
installing content pack, 338–339
overview, 336
post installation, 339–340
prerequisites, 337
SQL Server 2012
Business Intelligence Semantic Model (BISM)
overview, 61
tabular modeling vs. multidimensional
modeling, 61–62
database engine, 60
data mining tools, 63
features of, 59
SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT), 63–66
SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS), 60
SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS), 62–63
using Office 2013 with, 57–58
using SharePoint 2013 with, 57–58
SQLServer2012SP1.zip file, 339
SQL Server Analysis Services (SSAS), 63, 222
SQL Server, configuring as data source, 229–230
SQL Server Data Tools (SSDT), 16, 61, 98, 336
SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS), 216
Sqoop, 354
SSAS (SQL Server Analysis Services), 222
deploying model to
automating data processing, 85–89
overview, 82
partitioning tables, 84–85
roles for, 83
overview, 63
SSDT (SQL Server Data Tools), 16, 98, 336
loading data into
importing PowerPivot model, 76–78
loading data into model, 78–79
overview, 73–76
overview, 63
374 Index
SSIS (SQL Server Integration Services)
moving data using, 73
overview, 60
SSRS (SQL Server Reporting Services), 216
overview, 62–63
SSS (Secure Store Services), 168, 200, 224, 228
start time, for data refreshes, 199
Stop Editing on the Page tab, 328
Strata conference, 350
strategic level, 8
Strategy map report type, 216
structure of cards, changing, 147
System Center Operations Manager (SCOM), 13
Systems Center Operation manager, 223
T
tables
adding fields to, 133–134
button on Design tab, 136
converting to card, 146
converting to map, 144
converting to matrix, 135
overview, 133
partitions for, 84–85
relationships for, 109–111
resizing and moving, 134
sorting, 134
Table Import Wizard, 75
tabular model, 28
Tabular Model Designer dialog box, 77
tabular modeling
vs. multidimensional modeling, 61–62
tactical level, 8
TailspinToys database, 343
TailspinToysModel model, 343
Target Application ID, 200
TaskMap add-in, 279
TDWI (The Data Warehousing Institute), 36
team BI
Excel Services, 32
PowerPivot for SharePoint, 32
Power View in SharePoint, 33–34
Reporting Services, 32–33
SharePoint BI, 30–31
Visio Services, 31
TechNet documentation, 230
teenager stage, Business Intelligence Maturity
Model, 39
Visio 2013
The Data Warehousing Institute (TDWI), 36
themes, 128
tiles
filtering data using
adding tiles to visualization, 151–152
overview, 151
Tile By box, 151
Tile Flow mode, 152
Time Dimension list box, 240
Time Intelligence configuration page, 240
Toolbar and User Interface section, 306
tools, for authoring dashboards, 311–315
ToolTip, 143
Totals button, Design tab, 136
TotaProductlCost column, 116
TP (transaction processing) capabilities, 351
transaction processing (TP) capabilities, 351
Transact-SQL (T-SQL), 73
trusted data
data warehouses
overview, 70–71
vs. data mart, 71
defined, 69–70
fact data and dimensions, 71–73
moving data using SSIS, 73
Trusted Data Connection library, 237
Trusted Data Source Locations, 226
Trusted File Locations link, 167
T-SQL (Transact-SQL), 73
Type Of Toolbar section, 181, 326
U
UDFs (User Defined Functions), 354
UDFs (User-Defined Functions)
Excel Services 2013 history, 159
extending Excel Services 2013, 183
UI (user interface), 173, 278
Unattended Service Account, 227
Unattended Service Account text box, 228
upgrading to SharePoint 2013
from SharePoint 2010 site collection. See
also site collections; See site collections
Use A Stored Account option, 171
User Defined Functions (UDFs), 354
user interface (UI), 173, 278
UserName element, 201
UserProfile Provisioning Demo 2.0
installing content pack, 342
overview, 342
prerequisites, 342
Use The Authenticated User’s Account option, 171
V
validation, in diagrams, 276–278
variety, of Big Data, 351
VBA (Visual Basic for Applications), 183
velocity, of Big Data, 351
versioning, for items in dashboards, 220
View All Pages button, 315
virtual machine (VM), 333
Visio 2013
advantages of
coauthoring, 275–276
commenting, 274
linking to data, 272
overview, 271
saving as website, 279–280
saving to Visio Services, 281–283
validating diagrams, 276–278
visualizing data, 273–274
Fashion Station example
creating Visio diagram, 296–297
creating Web Part page, 304–306
linking to data, 297–301
organizing data, 295
overview, 295
refreshing diagram when data changes, 306–307
saving to Visio Services, 297
incorporating into BI solution, 286–287
macro-enabled diagrams, 276
new features in, 270–271
org chart example
creating Visio diagram, 288–293
organizing data, 287–288
overview, 287
saving to Visio Services, 294–295
visualizing data, 293–295
Org Chart Wizard, 287
overview, 269
when to use
case studies for, 286
Netaphor Software example, 284–285
overview, 283–284
Index 375
Visio_BI_FoodMart_Data database
Visio_BI_FoodMart_Data database, 346
VisioDemo database, 346
Visio External Data window, 300
Visio, self-service BI, 35
Visio Services
diagrams, 31
for teams, 31
saving to, 281–283, 294, 297
Visio Services Demo Content Pack
installing content pack, 347–348
overview, 346
prerequisites, 347
Visio Viewer, 281
Visio Web Access Web Part, 31, 328
Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), 183
visualizations in Power View for Excel 2013
adding tiles to, 151–152
creating cards, 146
changing structure of, 146–147
converting table to, 146
overview, 146
creating charts, 138–144
clustered bar charts, 138–139
configuring multiples, 139–140
overview, 138
scatter charts, 141–144
creating maps, 144–145
converting table to, 144
drilling to details in, 145
overview, 144
creating matrix, 135–137
adding hierarchies to, 137
converting table to, 135
defining layout of, 136
overview, 135
creating tables, 133–134
adding fields to, 133–134
overview, 133
resizing and moving, 134
sorting, 134
overview, 126–127, 131
using KPIs, 147–149
defining, 147–149
overview, 147
visualizing, 149
visualizing data in Visio 2013, 273–274, 302–305
volume, of Big Data, 350
VW (virtual machine), 333
376 Index
W
Web Drawing Display section, 307
Web page report type, 216
Web Part pages
for dashboards, 315–317
Web Parts
creating Excel dashboard using
adding Excel Web Access Web Part, 175–177
configuring web parts, 178–182
creating dashboard page, 174–175
creating workbook, 174
overview, 173–174
for dashboards, 328–329
showing workbook in, 322–326
Weekly option, 198
Windows Azure
enabling HDInsight in, 356–357
Windows Azure Marketplace
importing data from, 118–122
Workbook Activity area, PowerPivot Management
Dashboard, 204
Workbook Connections dialog box, 105, 169
workbooks
authentication in, 168–171
as data source, 202–203
editing, 173
monitoring activity for, 208
sharing
Excel Services 2013 history, 159
viewing, 171–173
Workspace Browser, 219, 237, 247–248
workspace files, 221
X
xl/model folder, 115
.xlsx file, 115
xVelocity engine, 61, 98, 102
Z
.zip extension, 115
About the Authors
NORMAN P. WARRE N works for Ancestry.com, which helps people discover,
preserve, and share their family history. There, he works as a BI specialist and
to implement guided and managed self-service business intelligence. He is
organizer and coauthor of Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2010
(2011, Microsoft Press). He earned his Master’s degree in computer information technology and recently earned his MBA with an emphasis in financial accounting.
He was previously a writer for PerformancePoint Server 2007 and SharePoint Server 2010
at Microsoft and has written articles on PerformancePoint Server and business intelligence for the information worker, IT Pro, and SQL Server BI developer audiences. He is an
active member of the community to provide the right content about Microsoft business
intelligence. When not writing, Norm loves spending time with his family, mountain
biking. Additionally, he shares his passion of business intelligence at conferences.
MARIANO TE IXE IR A NE TO is originally from Recife, Brazil. He has a Bache-
lor’s and Master’s degrees in computer science, with research on data synchronization on mobile databases from Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, also
in Brazil. He has more than 10 years of experience on software development
implementing complex systems for search engine, mobile telephony, and oil
companies. At Microsoft since 2007, Mariano is a software development engineer in test on the Analytics team at the SQL Server Business Intelligence, and has been
a part of PowerPivot since its incubation. He has authored scientific papers, whitepapers, and is a coauthor of Business Intelligence in Microsoft SharePoint 2010. When not
working or enjoying his family, he can be found running, biking, or swimming.
STACIA MISNE R is a MCITP-BI and MCTS-BI with a Bachelor’s degree in social
sciences. She is a consultant, educator, author, mentor, and principal of Data
Inspirations. Her career spans more than 25 years with a focus on improving
business practices through technology. Since 2000, she has been providing consulting and education services for Microsoft’s business intelligence
technologies. In addition, she has authored or coauthored several books
covering different components of the Microsoft SQL Server database and business intelligence platform. Stacia has presented at the Professional Association for SQL Server
(PASS), Microsoft’s TechEd, SQL Server Magazine Connections, and various Microsoft
events. She currently lives in Las Vegas. She is also a coauthor of Business Intelligence in
Microsoft SharePoint 2010.
SCOT T A . HE LME RS has been a Microsoft MVP for Visio since 2008 and is the
primary Visio expert at Experts-Exchange.com. The author of Microsoft Visio 2010
Step by Step (2011, Microsoft Press) and Visio 2013 Step by Step (2013, Microsoft
Press), he has taught thousands of people to use Visio and other technologies
more effectively. Scott is a partner at the Harvard Computing Group, a software
and consulting firm that assists clients with understanding and implementing business
process solutions. He is a co-inventor of TaskMap (www.taskmap.com), a Visio add-in that
allows anyone to document all of the important aspects of any business process. For more
than a decade, he was an Adjunct Professor at both Northeastern University and Boston
University, during which time he wrote Data Communications: A Beginner’s Guide to Concepts and Technology (1989, Prentice-Hall). When not working or spending time with his
family, Scott can usually be found on his bicycle or working with a local community-theater
company.
IVAN SANDE RS is a SharePoint MVP and independent consultant with more than 15 years
of broad-based, hands-on experience. He has focused on delivering Microsoft SharePoint
solutions since 2004. He specializes in the design and development of mission-critical applications and innovative information management strategies for the enterprise deployment
of Microsoft products.
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