Succession MX Basics
NN10270-100
Succession Multimedia Xchange
Succession MX Basics
Standard
Succession MX 1.1 (01.02)
July 2003
Nortel Networks Confidential
3
Succession MX basics
Introduction
The Succession MX Basics provides a high-level overview of the entire
Succession Communication Server for Multimedia Xchange (MX) and
the various network elements of which it is comprised. It provides the
Overview, Upgrades, Fault, Configuration, Accounting, and
Performance, Security and Administration (OUFCAPS) information for
the overall Succession MX. The following list shows how the
Succession MX Basics is organized:
•
Overview on page 5
•
Upgrades on page 51
•
Fault management on page 55
•
Configuration management on page 61
•
Accounting management on page 67
•
Performance management on page 69
•
Security and Administration on page 73
•
Appendix A List of acronyms on page 79
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5
Overview
How this chapter is organized
The Overview chapter is organized as follows:
•
Functional description on page 6
— Session Initiation Protocol on page 7
— IP communication on page 8
— Succession MX network on page 8
•
Building blocks on page 10
— Succession MX components on page 11
— Media servers on page 17
— Gateways on page 19
— Access clients on page 19
•
Succession MX interworking on page 25
•
Hardware on page 26
— Succession MX hardware platform on page 26
— Minimum baseline configuration on page 28
•
Software on page 28
•
Software deployment on hardware components page 28
•
High reliability on page 29
— Management and Accounting Modules on page 30
— SIP Application Module on page 30
— Database Module on page 30
— SIP PRI Gateway, SIP Audio Server, and RTP Media Portal on
page 30
— Web Client Manager on page 30
— IP Client Manager on page 30
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•
OAM&P strategy on page 30
•
Interfaces on page 31
— Signaling interfaces on page 31
— Network protocols on page 31
— User interfaces on page 36
•
Features and services on page 36
— SIP Personal Agent features and services on page 37
— SIP Multimedia Web Client features and services on page 37
— SIP Multimedia PC Client features and services on page 38
— SIP Multimedia PC Client Set features and services on page 39
— i2004 Internet Telephone features and services on page 40
•
Basic call flows on page 41
— SIP signaling on page 41
— SIP-to-SIP call on page 43
— SIP-to-PSTN call on page 45
— PSTN-to-SIP call on page 46
•
Customer information on page 48
— Web site information on page 48
— Training and documentation on page 48
— Legal notices on page 49
Functional description
The Nortel Networks Succession Communication Server for
Multimedia Xchange (MX) offers a wide range of next generation
multimedia services in a variety of network configurations. The
Succession MX provides a powerful platform for hosting a full set of SIP
features, a diverse range of Internet Protocol (IP)-based clients, and
gateway and media server components for Session Initiation Protocol
(SIP) interoperability. It revolutionizes business communications. It
customizes Vertical Applications. It provides ultimate reliability and
scalability.
The Succession MX combines SIP multimedia client applications and
services with scalable inter-working, trunking, and routing services.
The Succession MX can integrate into customers’ voice network, which
can include a range of products. It can integrate into the customer’s
private branch exchange (PBX) environments, gracefully migrate them
to IP and next generation SIP services. In addition, Succession MX can
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be introduced into standalone IP environments, extending the newest
SIP multimedia applications to users, including such services as Instant
Messaging, Presence, Collaboration and Video Calling, enhancing the
overall communication experience and taking users to the next level of
application integration.
The Succession MX facilitates the shared benefits of providing a
common service development and execution environment into a client
services infrastructure. Such client services and programmability are
seen as key components of evolving multimedia networks.
The Succession MX is positioned to
•
bring multimedia services to subscribers over an IP network
•
integrate IP network resources with real-time oriented conversation
•
allow subscribers to converse over an IP network
•
provide enhanced terminal devices and applications to enrich and
simplify subscriber experiences
•
provide a full range of services to meet all communication needs,
such as call forwarding/redirect, forking/distribution, Call Processing
Language (CPL) script execution, and basic presence monitoring
and management services
•
provide multi-protocol, multi-vendor IP network controller and
centralized network routing
•
provide number translation, number portability, and billing services
with SIP
Succession Communication Server for MX opens a new realm of
opportunities by unifying voice, video, and data over a single packet
infrastructure.
Session Initiation Protocol
Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is a service-enabling protocol defined
by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). SIP was proposed as a
standard on February 2, 1999, and defined in RFC 2543 (see note for
specific reference). SIP is a text-based protocol similar to the Hypertext
Transfer Protocol (HTTP) that can initiate real-time, multimedia
sessions, which seamlessly integrate voice, data, and video.
Note: (J. Rosenberg et al, SIP: Session Initiation Protocol, Internet
Draft draft-ietf-sip-rfc2543-bis09.txt, IETF, Feb 27, 2002.)
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This protocol's text-based architecture speeds access to new services
with greater flexibility and more scalability than many alternative
multimedia communication protocols in use today.
SIP enables simplified, interactive multimedia services and opens the
way to expand service provider revenue streams with a new breed of
differentiating services. With the emerging Session Initiation Protocol
(SIP), a range of personalized, media-rich services can be delivered
anytime, anywhere. These SIP-enabled services increase productivity,
expand mobility, and enhance interactive communication.
IP communication
The Succession MX focuses on meeting the communications needs
between subscribers on IP access client endpoints. Succession MX
endpoints can communicate directly with each other or with endpoints
that reside on other access networks with which the Succession MX
interoperates.
Due to dynamic addressing schemes, such as Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol (DHCP), and the desire to avoid limiting a
subscriber to a particular device, the Succession MX uses the IP
“domain” concept to define networks of subscribers. A domain is an
overlay in the IP network defining a subset of all subscribers that are
generally served by a single system.
Examples of common domain servers currently in use include e-mail
servers and Web servers. For real-time communication needs, the
Succession MX maintains information related to the actual locations of
subscribers in the network, and then proxies communication requests
to those locations in order to reach the particular subscriber.
Once the signaling communication path is established, the endpoints
can transmit desired data or media between them as indicated during
the setup of the communication path.
In addition to providing Succession MX client devices and applications,
and supporting network servers, the Succession MX also supports
gateways to bridge the IP and existing time division multiplex (TDM)
and public switched telephone network (PSTN) networks, thus enabling
voice communication between IP endpoints and traditional TDM
devices.
Succession MX network
Figure 1, “Succession MX network,” shows the Succession MX
network connectivity.
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Figure 1 Succession MX network
Figure 2, “Succession MX components,” gives a high-level view of
Succession MX network showing all required, optional, and third party
components.
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Figure 2 Succession MX components
Building blocks
Succession Communication Server for MX is a collection of building
blocks that can be combined in different ways to create a variety of
SIP-based IP network solutions. Figure 3, “Succession MX building
blocks,” shows the categories of SIP-enabled building blocks that
comprise the overall portfolio offering. The components are categorized
as base and optional components.
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Figure 3 Succession MX building blocks
The following sections describe each of the categories of SIP-enabled
network elements that comprise the Succession MX:
•
Succession MX components
•
Media servers
•
Gateways
•
Access clients
Succession MX components
Succession MX is a data network-oriented, IP-based Enterprise market
voice communications solution developed to capture a majority of the
emerging VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) market for converged
voice and data networks. Succession MX includes several functional
components, some of which are required and some of which are
optional as shown in the following sections.
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Required functional components
Table 1, “Succession MX functional components (required),” shows the
required functional components that comprise Succession MX.
Table 1 Succession MX functional components (required) (Sheet 1 of 4)
Succession MX
component
Description
SIP Application Module
The SIP Application Module is the service execution
engine that provides the following software
functionality:
• SIP Proxy Server
• back-to-back user agent (BBUA)
• SIP Registrar
• CPL Interpreter
• address resolution and routing capabilities
As an optional software feature of the SIP Application
Module, the SIP Presence Module processes
information for presence subscription and notification.
For more information, refer to Succession MX SIP
Application Module Basics and Succession MX SIP
Presence Basics.
Management Module
The Management Module enables communication
between the System Management Console, Database
Module, and the various application servers. It
provides the software functionality that
• manages the following functions for the
Succession MX components, media server, and
gateways:
— faults
— configuration
— performance
• collects operations, administration, and
maintenance (OAM) information for display on the
System Management Console
The System Management Console is the
administrator’s interface to the Management Module.
For more information on the Management Module,
refer to Succession MX Management Module Basics.
For information on the System Management Console,
refer to Succession MX System Management Console
Basics.
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Table 1 Succession MX functional components (required) (Sheet 2 of 4)
Succession MX
component
Description
Database Module
The Database Module is an Oracle Replication Server
that provides storage and retrieval for
• subscriber location information
• registration status based on information received
with SIP client registration
• routing and translation entries
• system configuration data
For more information on the Database Module, refer to
Succession MX Database Module Basics.
Accounting Module
The Accounting Module provides a mechanism for
collecting, storing, formatting, and transmitting SIP
accounting information for billing purposes.
For more information on the Accounting Module, refer
to Succession MX Accounting Module Basics.
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Table 1 Succession MX functional components (required) (Sheet 3 of 4)
Succession MX
component
Provisioning Module
Description
The Provisioning Module provides the interface for the
SIP Multimedia PC Client to securely access the
network address book stored on the Database Module
for performing the following tasks:
• service provider provisioning through the SIP
Provisioning Client
• customer domain provisioning through the SIP
Provisioning Client
• subscriber self provisioning through the SIP
Personal Agent
• setting up network services functions, such as the
network address book
Within the Provisioning Module, a Sun ONE Web
Server processes HTTP requests from the SIP
Multimedia Web Client, Personal Agent, and
Provisioning Client to support self provisioning and
network-based services.
For more information about the Provisioning Module,
refer to the Succession MX Provisioning Module
Basics and SIP Provisioning Client User Guide. For
more information on provisioning tasks which will be
processed by the Provisioning Module, see the
following documents:
• SIP Multimedia PC Client User Guide
• SIP Multimedia Web Client User Guide
• i2004 Internet Telephone User Guide
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Table 1 Succession MX functional components (required) (Sheet 4 of 4)
Succession MX
component
Succession MX System
Management Console
System Management Console
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Description
The Succession MX System Management Console
has a graphical user interface (GUI). With this GUI you
can
• administer system, database, and service
components
• configure Succession MX system sites, servers,
service components, and services
• monitor the Succession MX system using alarms,
logs, and performance measurements
• manage collection of operations, administration,
accounting, and maintenance information
The Succession MX System Management Console
runs on a customer-provided personal computer (PC)
and communicates with the Management Module. For
more information about the Succession MX System
Management Console, refer to the Succession MX
System Management Console Basics.
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Optional functional components
Table 2, “Succession MX functional components (optional),”The
optional shows the optional components that comprise the Succession
MX.
Table 2 Succession MX functional components (optional)
Succession MX
component
Description
IP Client Manager
The IP Client Manager manages i2004 Internet
Telephones and provides them access to SIP
services. Through the use of i2004 Internet
Telephones, the IP Client Manager also provides
access to the following features:
• instant messaging
• 911 emergency notification
• information delivery services
• session-handling services
• call management services
It performs the SIP- to-UNIStim conversion that
enables the interworking of i2004s with the SIP
Application Module. For more information on the IP
Client Manager, refer to the Succession MX IP Client
Manager Basics and i2004 Internet Telephone User
Guide.
SIP Web Client Manager
The SIP Web Client Manager manages SIP
Multimedia Web Client and enables subscribers to
access Succession MX SIP services from a browser.
The SIP Web Client Manager also provides the SIP
Multimedia Web Client feature set and enables the
interworking of the SIP Multimedia Web Client and the
SIP Application Module.
The SIP Web Client Manager is deployed from the
Succession MX System Management Console as part
of the Web software bundle. For more information on
the SIP Web Client Manager, refer to the Succession
MX SIP Web Client Manager Basics.
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Media servers
Table 3, “Media servers (optional),” provides a high-level description of
the Succession MX media servers.
Table 3 Media servers (optional) (Sheet 1 of 2)
Media server
Description
SIP Audio Server
The SIP Audio Server provides network-wide, ad hoc
audio conferencing capabilities for Succession MX
access clients. These capabilities include
• support for up to 32 port audio conferences
• SIP BYE-ALSO/REFER messaging
• independent Coder/Decoder (CODEC) negotiation
for each conference call port
• mid-session broadcast of SIP info signals to all
conference parties (for example, a Web page URL)
• hold/retrieve
• round-robin resource allocation (for selecting
media resources for conference calls
• long call service
• call transfer
• ability to chain conferences together
• authentication of the SIP Application Module
sending request
For more information on the SIP Audio Server, refer to
the Succession MX SIP Audio Server Basics.
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Table 3 Media servers (optional) (Sheet 2 of 2)
Media server
Description
Media Application Server
The Media Application Server is the IBM server for the
Succession MX solution. It is a SIP-enabled platform,
which supports the building of advanced, new, and
innovative software-based media services. For this
release, it supports the ad hoc conferencing for
Succession MX. For more information on the Media
Application Server, refer to the Media Application
Server Basics.
RTP Media Portal
The RTP Media Portal is a network-distributed
component that provides the following functions:
• performs media-stream network address
translation and network address port translation
(NAT/NAPT)
• provides a media firewall
• provides third-party media controls
• enables the client firewall/NAPT traversal
mechanism
• provides anchor packet gateway, which provides
the third-party media controls (anchor/pivot).
The RTP Media Portal handles media streams using
the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) and Real-time
Transport Control Protocol (RTCP). For more
information on the RTP Media Portal, refer to the
Succession MX RTP Media Portal Basics.
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Gateways
Table 4, “Succession MX PSTN gateway,” includes a high-level
description of the Succession MX PSTN gateway.
Table 4 Succession MX PSTN gateway
PSTN gateway
Description
SIP PRI Gateway
The SIP PRI Gateway converts packet-based voice
streams to circuit-based voice streams to allow SIP
endpoints the ability to connect to PSTN devices.
Some of its functions include:
• PRI call handling
• CODEC negotiation
• call rejection on nodal authentication request
• calling party name and number delivery to SIP
• parameter mapping between SIP and PRI
protocols
For more information on the SIP PRI Gateway, refer to
the Succession MX SIP PRI Gateway Basics.
Access clients
The Succession MX access clients include SIP user agents that
provide subscribers access to the SIP network, administrator and
subscriber provisioning interfaces, and an interface for administrative
system management. User agents can be hardware components, such
as an IP phone, software applications running on a Personal Computer
(PC), or software applications executed from a Web browser.
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Table 5, “Succession MX access clients (optional),” provides a
high-level description of the SIP access clients.
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Table 5 Succession MX access clients (optional) (Sheet 1 of 4)
Access client
Description
SIP Multimedia PC Client
The SIP Multimedia PC Client is a stand-alone
SIP-enabled user agent installed on a Personal
Computer (PC) that provides access to SIP features
and services such as:
• traditional telephone services
• multimedia communications such as
— video calls
— instant messaging
— file sharing/file transferring
— whiteboard session
— Web page push
The SIP Multimedia PC Client accesses the SIP
services network by way of the SIP Application
Module.
Succession MX also offers the Converged PC Client
or Converged Desktop, which allows the customers to
use their existing desktop telephone for voice calls and
SIP Multimedia PC Client for multimedia
communication.
For more information on this multimedia client, see the
SIP Multimedia PC Client User Guide. For more
information on Converged PC Client or Converged
Desktop, see the Succession MX interworking section
in this chapter.
Note: Subscriber access to the SIP services network requires one of the following
clients: the SIP Multimedia PC Client, i2004 Internet Telephone, the SIP Multimedia
Web Client, or the SIP Multimedia Client Set.
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Table 5 Succession MX access clients (optional) (Sheet 2 of 4)
Access client
Description
SIP Multimedia Client Set
When the SIP Multimedia PC Client is configured to
control the i2004 Internet Telephone, the configuration
is known as the SIP Multimedia Client Set. The i2004
Internet Telephone provides voice services, while the
PC provides all other services. The SIP Multimedia PC
Client Set provides access to SIP features and
services such as:
• traditional telephone services
• multimedia communications such as
— video calls
— instant messaging
— file sharing/file transferring
— whiteboard session
— Web page push
For more information on the Multimedia Client Set,
refer to the SIP Multimedia PC Client User Guide and
i2004 Internet Telephone User Guide.
i2004 Internet Telephone
The i2004 Internet Telephone is a Nortel Networks
Succession MX hard client device that provides a
traditional looking telephone set enhanced with
multimedia features for accessing IP-based SIP
services. Some of the i2004 Internet Telephone
advanced features include:
• instant messaging
• stock query
• bulletins
• Quality of Service (QoS) information
The IP-based i2004 Internet Telephone is managed
by the IP Client Manager (IPCM). For more
information on the i2004 Internet Telephone, see the
i2004 Internet Telephone User Guide.
Note: Subscriber access to the SIP services network requires one of the following
clients: the SIP Multimedia PC Client, i2004 Internet Telephone, the SIP Multimedia
Web Client, or the SIP Multimedia Client Set.
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Table 5 Succession MX access clients (optional) (Sheet 3 of 4)
Access client
Description
SIP Provisioning Client
The SIP Provisioning Client is a browser-based tool
that allows service providers to provision:
• administrators
• domains
• gateways
• IP Client Managers
• voice mail servers
• service packages
• telephony routing translations
The SIP Provisioning Client is accessed by
administrators for communicating provisioning data to
the Succession MX network. For more information on
the SIP Provisioning Client, see the SIP Provisioning
Client User Guide.
Note: Subscriber access to the SIP services network requires one of the following
clients: the SIP Multimedia PC Client, i2004 Internet Telephone, the SIP Multimedia
Web Client, or the SIP Multimedia Client Set.
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Table 5 Succession MX access clients (optional) (Sheet 4 of 4)
Access client
Description
SIP Personal Agent
The SIP Personal Agent is a browser-based client that
allows users to perform network-based management
with their own Succession MX services and
communication preferences. Features include:
• Preference Settings
• Directory Management
— manage key contact information
• Call Management
— define how incoming calls will be treated
— “push” Web pages
— block anonymous callers
For more information on the SIP Personal Agent, see
the SIP Personal Agent User Guide.
SIP Multimedia Web Client
The SIP Multimedia Web Client is a Web-based
access client that provides various multimedia and
telephony features such as
• picture caller ID
• instant messaging
• video calls/conferencing
• personal network-based address book
The SIP Multimedia Web Client communicates with
the SIP Web Client Manager using Web Client
Session Control Protocol (WCSCP). The SIP Web
Client Manager then communicates to the SIP
Application Server using SIP.
Because this multimedia client is browser-based, it is
easy to add and deploy new services as they become
available. When the SIP Web Client Manager is
updated, subscribers automatically have access to
any updated SIP Multimedia Web Client
functionalities.
For more information on the SIP Multimedia Web
Client, see the SIP Multimedia Web Client User Guide.
Note: Subscriber access to the SIP services network requires one of the following
clients: the SIP Multimedia PC Client, i2004 Internet Telephone, the SIP Multimedia
Web Client, or the SIP Multimedia Client Set.
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Succession MX interworking
This section provides information on the following topics:
•
Interworking with Nortel Networks products
•
Interworking with third-party products
•
Converged Desktop
Interworking with Nortel Networks products
SIP allows interoperability with other Nortel Networks products. The
Succession MX can interwork with the following Enterprise Business
Networks (EBN) products:
•
Meridian 1 family of PBX's
•
Communication Server Enterprise 1000 (CSE 1000)
•
BCM
•
Meridian SL-100
•
Communication Server Enterprise 2000 (CSE 2000)
•
CallPilot
Interworking with third-party products
The Succession MX can also interwork with the following third-party
products:
•
T1/E1 SIP CPE PRI Gateway - Vega 100: provides an alternative to
the Nortel Networks SIP PRI Gateway.
•
T1/E1 SIP CPE CAS Gateway - Audiocodes Mediant 2000:
interfaces for configurations that choose to deploy Call Pilot Unified
Messaging system directly off the Succession MX.
•
4-port SIP CPE FXS Gateway - Mediatrix 1104: provides
connection for analogue handsets and FAX machines into the
Succession MX solution.
•
4-port SIP FXO Gateway - Mediatrix 1204: provides connection into
the PSTN or Enterprise TDM network.
•
SMDI Voice Mail - Succession MX provides interoperability with
voice mail systems that support SMDI. (GR-283-CORE).
•
SIP Voice Mail - Succession MX provides interoperability with voice
mail systems that support SIP interworking.
Converged Desktop
The Converged Desktop for the Succession MX solution allows end
users to use their PCs for the multimedia portion of their
communication, while using their existing telephony system for voice. A
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Converged Desktop consists of a Time Division Multiplex (TDM)
telephone and a PC running the SIP Multimedia PC Client software.
Some benefits of providing multimedia services using the converged
service are:
•
End users can keep using their existing telephone and its
capabilities.
•
There is no need to replace an existing telephony switch to add
multimedia capabilities.
The Converged Desktop adds the following capabilities to the end
user's telephony service:
•
to redirect calls based on SIP Personal Agent screening rules
•
to set up a call log of all incoming calls
•
to set up the video calling line ID, that is, to receive a picture ID of
the party on the other end of the call
•
to set up automated enhanced routing and screening of incoming
calls based on time of day or based on the calling party's identity
(answer, redirect, answer, pass)
•
to start collaborative applications such as shared whiteboard, file
transfer, and clipboard transfer with the party on the other end of the
call
•
to provide web Co-browsing
•
to send instant messages to the party on the other end of a call and
to provide their Presence state indications
The existing switching system of the user connects to the Succession
MX through a SIP-to-primary rate interface (PRI) gateway. For this
release, the Converged Desktop services are supported over the
following gateways:
•
Vega 100, SIP to PRI (NI-1) gateway
•
Vega 100, SIP to PRI (NI-1 / DMS 100 switch) gateway
Hardware
This section provides information on the following topics:
•
Succession MX hardware platform
•
Minimum baseline configuration
Succession MX hardware platform
The Succession MX Solution consists of Nortel Networks’ software that
resides on industry-standard hardware platforms in addition to a range
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of third-party gateways (hardware) to connect to various resources in
the network. Figure 4, “Succession MX hardware components,” shows
the hardware components of the Succession MX Solution.
Figure 4 Succession MX hardware components
The baseline hardware for the Succession MX Solution includes
•
Sun Fire V 100 servers
•
a 1U high rack-mount unit (a standard platform from Sun running the
Solaris operating system).
Ancillary hardware for the Succession MX Solution includes
•
a terminal server (iTouch unit) for remote access to the servers
•
an L2 switch, such as a BPS 2000 switch or a BS460 switch
The Media Servers for the Succession MX Solution include
•
Media Application Server based on an IBM server
•
SIP Audio Server based on a SAM16 compact PCI chassis
•
RTP Media Portal for unique, multi-domain application (if required)
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Gateways for the Succession MX Solution include
•
SIP PRI Gateway for PRI interface into the PSTN
•
SIP CPE FXS Gateway/SIP FXO Gateway for analog connectivity
•
SIP CPE PRI Gateway for PSTN and TDM PBX connectivity
•
SIP CPE CAS Gateway for Call Pilot integration
Minimum baseline configuration
The baseline configuration for this release is four Sun Fire V 100
servers to support Application, Management/Accounting, Database,
and Client Manager Modules. For redundancy and high reliability, an
eight servers configuration of Sun Fire V100 servers is required. The
Succession MX system can be further expanded up to 13 servers to
meet the need for up to 6000 subscribers for higher reliability and
expanded subscribers capacity.
The base software elements are on four servers in a simplex mode and
eight physical servers in a duplex mode. Duplex mode includes four
additional servers for redundancy with failover.
Software
Succession MX 1.1 can either be a Greenfield installation or an overlay.
Refer to the following documents for detailed software information:
•
For information on software installation, refer to Succession MX
Installation and Commissioning.
•
For information on software delivery and on software maintenance
upgrades strategy, refer to the Upgrades chapter.
Software deployment on hardware components
Figure 5, “Software deployment,” shows the distribution of software on
the various hardware components.
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Overview 29
Figure 5 Software deployment
High reliability
The minimum network configuration for the Succession MX solution
consists of four Sun Fire V 100 servers. One Server is for Management
and Accounting Modules, one for the Database Module, one for IPCM
and Web, and one for the Application Module. However, this minimum
configuration does not offer redundancy. For redundancy and higher
reliability, the customer requires an eight Sun Fire V 100 servers
configuration. This section describes the Succession MX Solution
strategy for hardware and software high reliability for the following
components:
•
Management and Accounting Modules
•
SIP Application Module
•
Database Module
•
SIP PRI Gateway, SIP Audio Server, and RTP Media Portal
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•
Web Client Manager
•
IP Client Manager
Management and Accounting Modules
The Management and Accounting Modules use 1+1 (active/standby)
configuration for high reliability. The failover is a manual process.
Failure is indicated by alarms.
SIP Application Module
The Application Module uses the N+M redundancy for fault tolerance.
It supports automatic failover through the IP Takeover. This means that
when one of the active SIP Application Modules fails, the passive
Module takes over the IP address. The passive Module has now
become active and assumes the responsibilities of the failed Module.
Database Module
The Database Module uses the database replication strategy for high
reliability (that is, 1+1). The failover for this module is automatic. Failure
is indicated by alarms on the Management Console.
SIP PRI Gateway, SIP Audio Server, and RTP Media Portal
The SIP PRI Gateway, SIP Audio Server, and RTP Media Portal are
shared resources with redundancy provided through network
engineering.
Web Client Manager
The Web Client Manager uses a load sharing strategy for high reliability.
The Web Client Manager can be treated as a pooled resource by front
ending it with a web switch.
IP Client Manager
The IP Client Manager uses 1+1 (active/standby) redundancy for high
reliability. The failover for this manager is automatic. When an active IP
Client Manager loses service, the standby server takes over to manage
the i2004 Internet Telephone and subscribers and begins processing
SIP and UNIStim messages.
OAM&P strategy
With the exception of some database administration functions that are
managed through the Oracle Enterprise Manager (OEM), all operation,
administration, maintenance, and provisioning (OAM&P) functions are
performed by the Management Module.
The Management Module provides the services that support
communication between Succession MX components and the System
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Management Console, which is the user interface to the Management
Module. All management functions are performed through this user
interface except for the database administration functions that are
managed through the OEM. All provisioning functions are performed
through the Provisioning Client except for the user provisioning
functions that are managed through the OEM. OEM is launched from
the Management Module, which is a shared resource.
In conjunction with the System Management Console, the
Management Module provides the following functionality:
•
system operations administration
•
system software management
•
system configuration
•
system maintenance
•
fault monitoring
•
system performance monitoring
•
Network Management System interfaces
Interfaces
This section provides information on the following topics:
•
Signaling interfaces
•
Network protocols
•
User interfaces
Signaling interfaces
Multiple protocols can share access through a common NIC interface.
Protocols must allocate different ports for sending and receiving
signaling packets.
Network protocols
Table 6, “Network protocols,” shows the protocols that Succession MX
uses to communicate with its components and network elements.
Succession MX uses these network protocols to report logs and
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alarms, to allow provisioning of services, and to communicate
configuration data.
Table 6 Network protocols (Sheet 1 of 3)
Network protocol
Protocol function
Data Transfer Protocol
The data transfer protocol uses socket-based TCP/IP
communication to transmit collected accounting
information from the SIP Application Module to the
Accounting Module and to provide acknowledgment of
the information receipt from the Accounting Module to
the SIP Application Module.
Hypertext Transfer
Protocol/HTTP Secure
(HTTP/HTTPS)
The Web-based access clients use HTTP/HTTPS to
communicate with the Web server portion of the
Provisioning Module to enable browser-based
communication sessions. Information transmitted in
these sessions includes service provider provisioning,
customer domain provisioning, subscriber self
provisioning, and user network-based service
capabilities.
Media Gateway Control
Protocol+ (MGCP+)
MGCP+ is an augmented version of the MGCP
protocol used for communication between the RTP
Media Portal and the SIP Application Module for
establishing and maintaining required media sessions.
Open management
interface (OMI)
The Management Module uses OMI to communicate
management and configuration data to each of the
managed network elements. OMI uses Extensible
Markup Language (XML) over Transmission Control
Protocol (TCP).
Perfect Channel Protocol
(PCP)
Each of the managed network elements uses PCP to
report performance data, logs, and alarms to the
Management Module for viewing on the System
Management Console.
Primary rate interface (PRI)
The SIP PRI Gateway performs SIP-to-PRI and
PRI-to-SIP protocol conversions to provide access to
and from PSTN and PBX callers.
Real-time Transport
Protocol/Real-time
Transport Control Protocol
(RTP/RTCP)
The RTP Media Portal is used to provide audio and
video streaming capabilities for all SIP call sessions.
RTCP is used to pass statistical data about SIP call
session connections between endpoints.
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Table 6 Network protocols (Sheet 2 of 3)
Network protocol
Protocol function
Web Client Session Control
Protocol (WCSCP)
WCSCP uses socket messaging sent by way of a TCP
connection to enable communication between the SIP
Multimedia Web Client and the Web Client Manager
for session control.
Session Initiation Protocol
(SIP)
SIP is a service-enabling protocol used for real-time,
multimedia sessions to integrate voice, data, and
video. The SIP Application Module uses SIP to
communicate with the SIP Audio Server, SIP PRI
Gateway, Provisioning Module, SIP Web Client
Manager, IP Client manager, SIP Multimedia PC
Client, and SIP Multimedia Client Set.
Structured Query Language
(SQL)
SQL is used over a Java database connectivity (JDBC)
to communicate subscriber location information,
routing and translation data, and system configuration
data from the Database Module to the network
elements.
Unified Network IP Stimulus
(UNIStim) Protocol
UNIStim is a Nortel proprietary protocol used to
provide communication from i2004 Internet Telephone
devices to the IP Client Manager for SIP-based
services. The IP Client Manager performs
UNIStim-to-SIP and SIP-to-UNIStim protocol
conversion, which enables i2004 Internet Telephones
to access SIP services.
Simple Object Access
Protocol (SOAP)
SOAP is an XML-based lightweight protocol for the
exchange of information in a decentralized, distributed
environment. It is used between the Provisioning
Module and the SIP Multimedia PC Client (and the SIP
Multimedia Client Set) to transfer address book
information and service package information. It is also
used by the Command Line Interface and third party
provisioning applications to transfer provisioning data
to the system.
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Table 6 Network protocols (Sheet 3 of 3)
Network protocol
Protocol function
Open Provisioning Interface
(OPI)
Based on the SOAP protocol message structure,
encoding style and messaging rules, the OPI is a web
service that exposes XML remote procedure calls,
enabling the provisioning clients to access the
provisioning data. HTTP/HTTPS functions as its
transport protocol. The Command Line Interface (a
command line provisioning client), third party
applications and the PC Client that need to retrieve,
modify, or store provisioning data use OPI.
Additionally, OPI is used to integrate the provisioning
server with non-Succession MX applications, such as
customer’s records management (CRM) systems.
File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
FTP is used for transferring data from the
Management Module to a northbound management
system for logs and operational
measurements/performance measurements
(OMs/PMs). FTP is also used for transferring
accounting data from the Accounting Module to a
Northbound management system.
Simple Network
Management Protocol
version 2C (SNMPv2C)
Network elements use SNMP v2C to transmit traps
using the reliable fault management information base
(MIB) to the northbound network management
system.
Table 7, “Succession MX component protocol usage,” shows which
Succession MX components use which network protocols.
Table 7 Succession MX component protocol usage (Sheet 1 of 2)
Network protocol
Succession MX components using this protocol
Data transfer protocol
SIP Application Module and Accounting Module
HTTP/HTTPS
Provisioning Module, SIP Provisioning Client,
Personal Agent, and SIP Multimedia Web client
MGCP+
RTP Media Portal and SIP Application Module
OMI
Management Module, Accounting Module, Database
Module, SIP Application Module, SIP Audio Sever, SIP
PRI Gateway, IP Client Manager, RTP Media Portal,
Provisioning Module, and SIP Web Client Manager
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Table 7 Succession MX component protocol usage (Sheet 2 of 2)
Network protocol
Succession MX components using this protocol
PCP
Management Module, Accounting Module, Database
Module, SIP application Module, SIP Audio Sever, SIP
PRI Gateway, IP Client Manager, RTP Media Portal,
Provisioning Module, and SIP Web Client Manager
PRI
SIP PRI Gateway
RTP
RTP Media Portal, i2004 Internet Telephone, SIP
Multimedia PC Client, SIP Multimedia Client Set, SIP
Audio Server, SIP PRI Gateway, SIP Multimedia Web
Client, and CS 2000 interworking communication
WCSCP
SIP Multimedia Web Client and SIP Web Client
Manager
SIP
SIP Application Module, SIP Audio Server, SIP PRI
Gateway, Provisioning Module, SIP Web Client
Manager, IP Client Manager, SIP Multimedia PC
Client, and SIP Multimedia Client Set
SOAP
Provisioning Module, SIP Multimedia Client, and SIP
Multimedia PC Client Set
SQL over JDBC
Database Module, Management Module, SIP
Application Module, IP Client Manager, Provisioning
Module, and SIP Web Client Manager
UNIStim
IP Client Manager, i2004 Internet Telephone, and SIP
Multimedia Client Set
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User interfaces
Succession MX provides the user interfaces shown in Table 8,
“Succession MX user interfaces,” for deploying, configuring, managing,
and monitoring network elements, and for performing provisioning
tasks.
Table 8 Succession MX user interfaces
User Interface
Function
System Management Console
This is the primary Succession MX graphical user
interface (GUI). Use it to deploy, configure,
manage, and monitor Succession MX network
elements.
Oracle Enterprise Manager
(OEM)
Use this Oracle GUI to monitor replication and the
nightly batch jobs that are run to back up the
database. Launch the OEM from the Management
Module.
Note: Use the System Management Console to
monitor database activity.
Command Line Interface (CLI)
Use this basic CLI to bulk provision subscribers
and domains. This user interface is primarily used
by service providers and domain administrators.
Note: The Bulk Provisioning tool enables tasks,
such as the query/import of data to/from flat files
and to update/delete data based on flat file input.
This interface will be changed in the future
release. For more details on the interface, please
contact the support group.
SIP Provisioning Client
Use this Web-based GUI to perform overall
provisioning of the Succession MX. This user
interface is used by service providers to provision
administrators, domains, gateways, IP Client
Managers, voice mail servers, and service
packages.
Features and services
The Succession MX offers a wide variety of multimedia and telephony
features and services to the subscriber. The availability of these
features and services depends on the client devices deployed. The
following sections list features and services associated with each client
device.
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SIP Personal Agent features and services
The SIP Personal Agent is a Web-based self-provisioning interface that
enables subscribers to customize their SIP services. The features and
services associated with the SIP Personal Agent are as follows:
•
Web-based Administration and User Account Profile
•
Subscriber-provisioned Call Screening and Routing (follow me,
sequential ringing)
•
Network-based Address Book
•
Presence
— User-initiated Presence functions include:
– User can create a list of Buddies.
– User can view, add to, and remove from the list of Buddies.
Note: From the SIP Personal Agent the user can add a name
to the list of buddies only if the name already exists in the
Address Book.
For information on using the SIP Personal Agent, refer to the SIP
Personal Agent User Guide.
SIP Multimedia Web Client features and services
The SIP Multimedia Web Client provides subscribers with access to
SIP services through a Web browser. The features and services
associated with the SIP Multimedia Web Client are as follows:
•
Real-time call screening (answer, pass, reject, transfer)
•
Call waiting, call hold
•
Information Delivery Services (calling name, number, subject,
picture)
•
Conference Calling (three-way client-based conferencing and
server-based conferencing with many more ports)
•
Web Push, Co-browsing
•
Video Calls
•
Instant messaging
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•
Easy access to voicemail
•
Presence
— User-initiated Presence functions include:
– User can add to and remove from the list of Buddies.
– User can change their Presence status.
– User can view the status of Buddies.
— Automatic Presence functions include automatic detection for
“inactive” and “on the phone” status of the user.
Note: From the SIP Multimedia Web Client the user can add a
name to the list of buddies only if the name already exists in the
Address Book.
For information on using the SIP Multimedia Web Client, refer to the SIP
Multimedia Web Client User Guide.
SIP Multimedia PC Client features and services
The SIP Multimedia PC Client is a downloadable software client that
provides subscribers with access to SIP services. The features and
services associated with the SIP Multimedia PC Client are as follows:
•
Real time call screening (answer, redirect, decline, ignore)
•
Call waiting, call hold
•
Inbox and outbox
•
Information Delivery Services (calling name, number, subject,
picture)
•
Conference Calling (three-way client-based conferencing and
server-based conferencing with many more ports)
•
Web Push, Co-browsing
•
Video Calls
•
Collaboration (Clipboard/White Board/file transfer)
•
Click to Call using integration with Microsoft Outlook to initiate calls
•
Easy access to voicemail
•
Instant messaging
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•
Three-way calling
•
Presence
— User-initiated Presence functions include:
– User can add to and remove from the list of Buddies.
– User can change their Presence status.
– User can view the status of Buddies.
— Automatic Presence functions include automatic detection for
“inactive” and “on the phone” status of the user.
Note: From the SIP Multimedia PC Client the user can add a
name to the list of buddies only if the name already exists in the
Address Book.
For information on using the SIP Multimedia PC Client, refer to the SIP
Multimedia PC Client User Guide.
SIP Multimedia PC Client Set features and services
The SIP Multimedia PC Client Set is a downloadable software client
that provides subscribers with access to SIP services. The features and
services associated with the SIP Multimedia PC Client Set are as
follows:
•
Real time call screening (answer, redirect, decline, ignore, transfer)
•
Call waiting, call hold
•
Incoming and outgoing call log
•
Information Delivery Services (calling name, number, subject,
picture)
•
Conference calling
•
Web Push, Co-browsing
•
Video calls
•
Collaboration (Clipboard/White Board/file transfer)
•
Click to Call using integration with MS outlook to initiate calls
•
Easy access to voicemail
•
Instant messaging
•
Import contact information from Microsoft Outlook 2000
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•
Presence (user initiated and automatic presence)
— User-initiated Presence functions include:
– User can add to and remove from the list of Buddies.
– User can change their Presence status.
– User can view the status of Buddies.
— Automatic Presence functions include automatic detection for
“inactive” and “on the phone” status of the user.
Note: From the SIP Multimedia PC Client Set the user can
add a name to the list of buddies only if the name already
exists in the Address Book.
For information on using the SIP Multimedia PC Client, refer to the SIP
Multimedia PC Client User Guide.
i2004 Internet Telephone features and services
The i2004 Internet Telephone is a hard client that provides subscribers
with access to SIP services. The features and services associated with
the i2004 Internet Telephone are as follows:
•
Real-time call screening (answer, redirect, reject, pass)
•
Call waiting, call hold, call forward, call transfer
•
Information Delivery Services (calling name, number, subject)
•
Conferencing calling
•
Automatic registration on activation of the device
•
Multiple Users Logon
•
Handset, handsfree, headset support
•
Inbox and outbox
•
Address book
•
Presence
— User-initiated Presence functions include:
– User can change their Presence status.
– User can view their Presence status.
– User can view the Presence status of Buddies (by scrolling
horizontally in the list).
— Automatic Presence functions include automatic detection for
“inactive” and “on the phone” status of the user.
•
Instant messaging
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Overview 41
•
Stock query (obtain stock quotes directly on the i2004 Internet
Telephone display)
•
Bulletins (receive messages from your service provider, such as
news of an upcoming system upgrade, directly on the display screen
of your i2004 Internet Telephone
•
QoS (view RTCP information for the media stream of the call on your
i2004 Internet Telephone. Your service provider can use this
information to analyze network performance.)
For information on using the i2004 Internet Telephone, refer to the
i2004 Internet Telephone User Guide.
Basic call flows
The following sections provide an explanation of SIP signaling as well
as sample diagrams and descriptions of some basic Succession MX
call flows. These flows outline the general flow for basic messaging
scenarios and may omit some details in order to emphasize the overall
concepts involved in call processing. The following sections describe
the flows for the following types of calls:
•
SIP-to-SIP call
•
SIP-to-PSTN call
•
PSTN-to-SIP call
For more information, refer to the messaging information in Succession
MX SIP Application Module Basics, which includes information on
database lookup, registration, authentication, and persistent
acknowledge messages (PRACK).
SIP signaling
To facilitate Voice over IP (VoIP) and integrate multimedia services, the
Succession MX uses SIP as the signaling protocol to establish a
communication path between endpoints. Since SIP uses a simple
text-based command structure with HTTP syntax and URL addressing,
it is well equipped to work with both Internet and Web-based
applications.
The focus of SIP transaction signaling is to open a dialog between
endpoints agreed to by the initiator and by the receiver. Once SIP
establishes a signaling path, any form of dialog can occur between the
participants. For example, the dialog can be used to transfer data such
as files or whiteboarding, or to communicate in real-time audio as in the
case of conference calls.
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With SIP, it is possible to set up media simultaneously between the
participants during the session. Refer to Figure 6, “Basic SIP session.”
Figure 6 Basic SIP session
SIP signaling is transaction-based. An Invite transaction opens the
session and a Bye transaction closes the session. The Succession MX
uses the abbreviated form of headers in its SIP messages. The key to
the abbreviated SIP message headers used in the Succession MX is
shown in Table 9, “SIP message header abbreviations.”
Table 9 SIP message header abbreviations
Abbreviation
Meaning
t:
To:
f:
From:
i:
Call-ID
k:
Supported:
m:
Contact:
c:
Content-Type:
l:
Content-Length:
v:
Via:
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The following example shows a sample SIP message that is an Invite
message for a call from user 353 on an i2004 Internet Telephone to
user 14 on another i2004 Internet Telephone. It is the Invite message
forwarded on behalf of user 353 from the SIP Application Server to the
IP Client Manager hosting the i2004 Internet Telephone for user 14.
Example
Sample SIP message header
INVITE sip:[email protected]:5070;action=proxy;maddr=47.104.12.140 SIP/2.0
t: 14 <sip:[email protected]>
f: 353 <sip:[email protected]>;tag=1947342603
i: [email protected]_app
Allow: REFER,ACK,BYE,CANCEL,INVITE,OPTIONS,INFO,MESSAGE
Max-Forwards: 19
k: com.nortelnetworks.superclient,com.nortelnetworks.firewall,100rel
m:
<sip:[email protected]:5060;nt_end_point=ZaBCAIBBFLFCFEFCCBFFF
GEPFAFBFFEPFAFDEPFAFFFBFLFEFBFGFB>
c: application/sdp
l: 313
v: SIP/2.0/UDP
47.104.12.140:5060;branch=bba919f84defc995e821d1f7453668e4.1
CSeq: 49826 INVITE
SIP-to-SIP call
Figure 7, “SIP-to-SIP call,” shows a basic call flow for a SIP-to-SIP call.
A detailed, step-by-step description follows the illustration.
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Figure 7 SIP-to-SIP call
Steps for SIP-to-SIP call:
1. Invite (SIP) — INVITE sip:[email protected] SIP/2.0
m: <sip:[email protected]:5070>(SDP: A)
2. Trying (SIP) — SIP/2.0 100 Trying
3. Database Lookup (SQL) — send [email protected]
(See “Database Lookup 1.”)
4. New URL (SQL) — return sip:[email protected]:5060;
maddr=216.115.104.112
5. Invite (SIP) — INVITE sip:[email protected]:5060;
maddr= 216.115.104.112 SIP/2.0
m: <sip:[email protected]:5060>(SDP: A’)
6. Trying (SIP) — SIP/2.0 100 Trying
7. Ringing (SIP) — SIP/2.0 180 Ringing
8. Ringing (SIP) — SIP/2.0 180 Ringing
9. OK (SIP) — SIP/2.0 200 OK
m: <sip:[email protected] 216.115.104.112:5060> (SDP: B)
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10. OK (SIP) — SIP/2.0 200 OK
m: <sip:[email protected]:5060> (SDP: B’)
11. ACK (SIP) — ACK sip:[email protected] SIP/2.0
(Note: Originating client will start sending packets.)
12. ACK (SIP) —ACK sip:[email protected] yahoo.com:5060 SIP/2.0
(Note: Terminating client will start sending packets.)
13. Media Path Established.
SIP-to-PSTN call
Figure 8, “SIP-to-PSTN call,” shows a basic call flow for a SIP-to-PSTN
call. A detailed, step-by-step description follows the illustration.
Figure 8 SIP-to-PSTN call
Steps for SIP-to-PSTN call:
1. Invite(SIP)–>INVITEsip:[email protected]/2.0
m: <sip:[email protected]:5060> (SDP: A)
2. Trying (SIP) — SIP/2.0 100 Trying
3. Database Lookup (SQL) — send [email protected]
(See “Database Lookup 2.”)
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4. New URL (SQL) — return sip:[email protected],
maddr=47.100.234.140, user=phone, norteldevice=pri,
norteltrkgrp=pria_t1_8000
5. Invite (SIP) — INVITE
sip:[email protected]:5060;
maddr=47.100.234.140; user=phone
norteltrkgrp=pria_t1_8000 SIP/2.0
m: <sip: [email protected]:5060>(SDP: A’)
6. Trying (SIP) — SIP/2.0 100 Trying
7. SetUp (Q931)
8. Call Proceeding (Q931) — equates to the SIP Trying
9. Alerting or Progress (Q931) — depends on NT or TE mode
10. 183 Ringing (SIP) — SIP/2.0 183 Session Description(SDP: B)
(Note: The Terminating Gateway will start sending ringing tones.)
11. 183 Ringing (SIP) — SIP/2.0 183 Session Description(SDP:B’)
(Note: The originating client will start sending packets when it
receives the 183 with SDP information.)
12. Connect (Q931)
13. OK (SIP) — SIP/2.0 200 OK
m: <sip: [email protected]:5060> (SDP: B)
14. OK (SIP) – SIP/2.0 200 OK
m: <sip: [email protected]:5060>
(SDP: B)
15. ACK (SIP) – ACK sip:[email protected]:5060 SIP/2.0
16. ACK (SIP) – ACK sip:[email protected]:5060;
maddr=47.100.234.140; user=phone; norteltrkgrp=pria_t1_8000
SIP/2.0
17. Media Path Established
PSTN-to-SIP call
Figure 9, “PSTN-to-SIP call,” shows a basic call flow for a PSTN-to-SIP
call. A detailed, step-by-step description follows the illustration.
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Overview 47
Figure 9 PSTN-to-SIP call
Steps for PSTN-to-SIP call:
1. SetUp (Q931).
2. Invite (SIP) — INVITE sip:[email protected];
maddr=47.104.12.150; transport=udp; user=phone;
nortelTrkGrp=pri_t1_8000 SIP/2.0
m: <sip: [email protected]:5060> (SDP: A)
3. Trying (SIP) — SIP/2.0 100 Trying
4. Database Lookup (SQL) — send [email protected]
5. New URL (SQL) — return sip:[email protected]:5060;
maddr=47.100.234.159
6. Invite (SIP) — INVITE sip:[email protected]:5060;
maddr=47.100.234.159; ttl=1; transport=udp SIP/2.0
m: <sip: [email protected]:5060> (SDP: A’)
7. Trying (SIP) — SIP/2.0 100 Trying
8. Ringing (SIP) — SIP/2.0 180 Ringing (SIP clients do not send
SDP
in the 180)
9. Ringing (SIP) — SIP/2.0 180 Ringing
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10. Alerting (Q931)
11. OK (SIP) — SIP/2.0 200 OK
m: sip: [email protected]:5060 (SDP: B)
12. OK (SIP) — SIP/2.0 200 OK
m: <sip: [email protected]:5060>(SDP: B’)
(Note: Originating Gateway will start sending packets.)
13. Connect (Q931)
14. Connect ACK (Q931)
15. ACK (SIP) — ACK sip:[email protected];
maddr=47.104.12.150; transport=udp; user=phone;
nortelTrkGrp=pria_t1_8000 SIP/2.0
16. ACK (SIP) — ACK sip:[email protected]:5060;
transport=udp SIP/2.0
(Note: Terminating client will start sending packets.)
17. Media Path Established
Customer information
This section describes the way in which Nortel Networks provides
customers with the following types of information:
•
Web site information
•
Training and documentation
•
Legal notices
Web site information
Nortel Networks Web site, www.nortelnetworks.com, is a valuable site
for customer information, support, and services. From this site, you can
get information on customer service, training and documentation,
professional services, and other areas of business.
Training and documentation
How to contact Nortel Networks for help on customer information
Contact your Nortel Networks account prime for help on customer
information.
Where to get customer documentation
Documentation for the Communication Server for Enterprise
Multimedia Xchange is delivered on the customer CD.
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Overview 49
Where to get training information
All course descriptions, prerequisites, schedules and locations can be
viewed at www.nortelnetworks.com.
Note: For the most recent curriculum information, please contact
your Nortel Networks Training and Documentation representative.
For enrollment assistance, please contact Training registration at
1-800-4-NORTEL (1-800-466-7835), express routing code #280.
Legal notices
Nortel Networks, the Nortel Networks logo, the Globemark, and Unified
Networks are trademarks of Nortel Networks. This product incorporates
open-source software; relevant copyright and other notices are
displayed in the customer letter, which is included with this product's
documentation distribution.
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51
Upgrades
How this chapter is organized
The Upgrades chapter is organized as follows:
•
Strategy on page 51
•
Tools and utilities on page 52
•
Task flows and sequencing on page 52
Strategy
Maintenance releases are supported for all Nortel Networks
components of the Communication Server for Succession Multimedia
Xchange (MX) network. A maintenance release allows the current
active software to be incremented in order to address emergency or
general maintenance requirements.The update mechanism for the
Succession MX 1.1 maintenance releases
•
supports migration of configuration data from one version to the next
•
provides software rollback capability for use in the event of software
or deployment failure
•
bundles the maintenance release software into an updated package
to decrease the time required to identify the differences between
releases and reduce the time required for the overall update
process
Software update delivery methods
Nortel Networks can deliver Succession MX maintenance release
software update packages on a compact disc (CD).
Once Succession MX maintenance release software update bundles
are delivered, they are loaded onto the SIP Management Server where
property definitions are unbundled to drive the System Management
Console. Once this is accomplished, the software packages are
deployed to the appropriate Succession MX components.
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For instructions on updating component software, refer to the
Succession MX System Management Console Basics.
Update contents
Each Succession MX 1.1 update package contains the following items:
•
the compatible System Management Console to be transferred to
the System Management Console PC
•
a copy of the Installation Methods of Procedure (MOPs)
•
a copy of the Release Notes for the maintenance release, which
outline the contents of the maintenance release
Tools and utilities
All software maintenance release updates are implemented from the
Management Module by way of the System Management Console.
That is, the maintenance software update bundles are loaded onto the
Management Module and are then deployed by way of the System
Management Console. Rollbacks also are accomplished from the
System Management Console.
For information on the Management Module, the System Management
Console, and instructions for performing component software updates
(and rollbacks), refer to the Succession MX Management Module
Basics and Succession MX System Management Console Basics.
Task flows and sequencing
This section provides information on the following topics:
•
High-level maintenance update tasks
•
Deployment order
High-level update tasks
Once the maintenance release software update has been received,
perform the following tasks before the software update bundles can be
deployed:
•
Extract the update software to the Succession MX Management
Server.
•
Install the upgraded System Management Console software on the
PC being used as the administrator’s workstation.
For information on installing the upgraded System Management
Console, refer to the Succession MX System Management Console
Basics.
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Upgrades 53
Deployment order
The order in which the maintenance release software updates to
Succession MX are deployed is extremely important. Failure to perform
updates in the specified order will result in loss of service.
Updates to Succession MX software components must be performed in
the following order:
•
Third-party maintenance releases
•
Database Module
•
Management Module
•
System Management Console PC
•
Provisioning Module
•
Accounting Module
•
SIP Application Module
•
RTP Media Portal
•
IP Client Manager
•
SIP Web Client Manager
•
SIP PRI Gateway
•
SIP Audio Server
Please note that the Database Module is the first Succession MX
component to be updated. Thus, the Database Module is updated
using the existing, old version of the Management Module and the
System Management Console. Once the Database Module is updated,
then the Management Module is updated (from the command line)
using the mgmtdeploy.pl script, and the new version of the System
Management Console is installed onto the user’s PC. With the
Database Module, Management Module, and System Management
Console PC updated, all other Succession MX components are
updated from the System Management Console.
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55
Fault management
How this chapter is organized
The Fault management chapter is organized as follows:
•
Strategy on page 55
•
Tools and utilities on page 56
•
Task flows on page 58
•
Disaster Recovery on page 59
Strategy
The Management Module provides fault management for all
Succession MX system components. Fault data is collected from each
Succession MX core element and then sent to the Management Server.
Software and application alarms are transmitted using the XML and
consolidated at the Management Server. Database Module,
Provisioning Module, RTP Media Portal, SIP Audio Server, and SIP PRI
Gateway send SNMP traps to the Management Server. The fault data
is formatted into Nortel STD logs as well as populated into the Nortel
Networks’ Reliable fault management information base (MIB). The
formatted data may be sent to the Management Console and the
Network Management System. A secure Open Management Interface
(OMI) over Secure Socket Layer (SSL) interface is used by the
Succession MX management console to receive these alarms. For
additional information on the Management Module, refer to the
Succession MX Management Module Basics.
The System Management Console, which is the interface to the
Management Module, is used to view faults and manage the health of
the Succession MX system and its components. For detailed
instructions on using the System Management Console, refer to the
Succession MX System Management Console Basics.
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In addition to being monitored from the System Management Console,
faults also can be pulled directly from the Management Module through
the use of an SNMP stream or FTP session as follows:
•
SNMPv2c feed for alarms only
•
TCP/IP stream for all logs
For a comprehensive list of all Succession MX system alarms, refer to
the Succession MX System Management Console Basics.
For information about a specific component’s faults, refer to the specific
component document.
Tools and utilities
The System Management Console monitors all system-level and
server-level Succession MX alarms and logs. You can access the Alarm
and Log browsers from the Tools menu on the System Management
Console menu bar or by right-clicking on the specific component for
which you want to view alarm or log information.
The rest of this section provides general information on alarms and
logs. For more information on alarms and logs and for information on
using the System Management Console to monitor alarms and logs,
see Succession MX System Management Console Basics.
Alarms
During operation, services may detect faults that represent
malfunctioning under certain conditions. As these faults occur, alarms
are raised by the corresponding services in order to alert the user that
a problem exists.
When an alarm is raised, it is added to a list of currently active alarms.
The alarm remains on the active list until it is resolved. Once the
problem is resolved, the alarm is cleared and removed from the list of
active alarms. Until an alarm is cleared, it remains on the active list.
Note: The process of clearing alarms is automatic; you cannot clear
alarms manually.
The information displayed in the alarm browser depends on the node
selected in the System Management Console hierarchy tree. For
example, if a server is selected, the alarm browser will show the alarms
for all the components hosted on the server; if a component is selected
only the alarms generated by its hosted services are displayed.
Administrators can launch more than one browser, allowing them to
view alarms for specific nodes separately.
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Table 10, “Alarm attribute,” shows all alarm fields viewed in the alarm
browser with their descriptions.
Table 10 Alarm attribute
Alarm attribute
Description
Timestamp
The time when the alarm was raised.
Severity
The severity assigned to the alarm (see Table 11).
Originator
The service originating the alarm.
Alarm Name
The name of the alarm.
Probable Cause
The general problem causing the alarm.
Family Name
Managed object family originating the alarm.
There is a severity level associated with each alarm that indicates how
serious the problem is. The severity levels that can be assigned to
alarms are listed in Table 11, “Alarm severity levels.”
Table 11 Alarm severity levels
Severity level (and #)
Meaning
Critical (5)
The application is malfunctioning and is incapable of
continuing to provide the desired functionality. The
application may not recover until the problems have
been resolved.
Major (4)
The application is experiencing difficulties in
providing the desired level of services and soon may
not be able to provide the services any longer.
Minor (3)
The application has detected a problem that is not
presently affecting services. Services provided by
the application could be affected if the problem
persists.
Warning (6)
A problem may have occurred. It is not affecting
service or the service can recover by itself.
Alarm log format
You also can view alarms through the Log Browser on the Succession
MX System Management Console.
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SNMP alarm reporting
Alarm events are provided through an SNMP management information
base (MIB), which includes a local copy of an active alarms table for
resynchronization.
For more information on alarms, refer to the Succession MX System
Management Console Basics.
Logs
Logs capture and record information about events that occur during
service component operation so that events can be analyzed at a later
time.
Every log event is captured and archived in Standard (STD) format to
disk on the Management Server.
For more information on logs, refer to the Succession MX System
Management Console Basics.
Task flows
Perform all fault management tasks from the System Management
Console. The following procedures outline high-level task flows, but do
not include all possible tasks.
For more information and detailed procedures, refer to the overview
information of each individual Succession MX component.
Procedure 1 Alarm analysis
At the System Management Console
1
View alarms.
2
Analyze alarms.
3
View alarm history.
4
Respond to system faults that caused the alarms.
5
View logs.
6
Analyze logs.
7
View log history.
8
Respond to system faults and conditions captured in the logs.
9
Reload device.
10
Return device to service.
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Fault management 59
Disaster Recovery
This section gives an overview of what may be done in the event of
hardware or software failure.
Hardware failure
The general rule for replacing any hardware is to follow the
documentation that comes with the unit. The following hardware can be
replaced:
•
hard disk drive
•
CPU and memory
•
CD-ROM drive
•
BPS2000
— 10/100 MDA, Gigabit MDA and Cascade Module
•
Terminal Server
Software recovery
The software recovery process provides recovery of all operating
system, application configuration and program store in the event of a
catastrophic server failure. The backup process generates a snapshot
of the software suite on a server that allows that server to be recreated
after failure.
Server backup should be performed after every configuration change or
software update.
Backup and restore procedures should be done in the following order:
•
Backup SIP Management/Accounting/Database Server
•
Restore SIP Management/Accounting/Database Server
•
Backup IP Client Manager/SIP Web Client Manager
•
Restore IP Client Manager/SIP Web Client Manager
•
Backup RTP Media Portal
•
Restore RTP Media Portal
•
Backup SIP PRI Gateway
•
Restore SIP PRI Gateway
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61
Configuration management
How this chapter is organized
The Configuration management chapter is organized as follows:
•
Strategy on page 61
•
Tool and utilities on page 62
•
Task flows on page 62
Strategy
Nortel Networks delivers Communication Server for Enterprise
Multimedia Xchange SIP-based IP network solutions on a
pre-configured basis. All components within these pre-defined
configurations can be ordered separately. Process and tool
development is geared to this strategy. As a result, custom engineering
is only offered at an additional cost through Nortel Networks Services.
Nortel Networks performs standard installation and base
commissioning for the customer. After the base commissioning is done
by Nortel Networks, the customer takes over. Nortel Networks and the
customer assume different responsibilities to make the network fully
operational.
After installation and base commissioning is done by Nortel Networks,
the customer can use the following checklist to verify completion:
•
All appropriate hardware equipment and software loads have been
installed and loaded as follows:
— The network is cabled/connected.
— All cards are installed.
— Grounding is implemented for safety.
•
All network topology (physical characteristics) is implemented as
planned.
•
Installation validation procedures are complete and components are
found to be operational. (For example, when you install and load
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software and turn pieces of equipment on, then the equipment is
commissioned.)
•
The sequence of translations, internal customer testing, and
additional services, applications, and features have been planned.
Tool and utilities
The configuration of a Succession MX SIP-based IP network has three
phases—deploying and configuring the Succession MX components
and network elements and provisioning the Succession MX.
The tool for deploying and configuring all Succession MX components
and network elements is the System Management Console.
The tool for provisioning the Succession MX is the SIP Provisioning
Client, which is a Web-based GUI. A command line interface (CLI) tool
also is provided to enable bulk provisioning. The Bulk Provisioning Tool
provides a command set for bulk provisioning tasks, such as the
query/import of data to/from flat files and to update/delete data based
on flat file input. This interface will change in the future release. For
more details on the interface, please contact the support group.
Task flows
The configuration management and provisioning tasks to be performed
can vary from one Succession MX deployment to another. However,
most of these high-level tasks for configuring Succession MX
components and network elements and for provisioning Succession
MX domains are identified in the following sections:
•
System Management Console configuration tasks
•
SIP Provisioning Client provisioning tasks
When configuring a new Succession MX system at deployment, you
should configure the managed objects on the different nodes and bring
everything online before beginning provisioning tasks.
System Management Console configuration tasks
Table 12, “System Management Console configuration tasks
sequence,” shows the sequence of the Succession MX component and
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network element configuration tasks that a user must follow from the
System Management Console.
Table 12 System Management Console configuration tasks sequence
Step
Description
Tasks
1.
Configure Succession MX
system level elements
(add/remove sites, servers,
and Succession MX service
components)
Add/remove sites, servers, and Succession
MX service components
Configure the Accounting
Server
Add component
2.
Note: Before you can delete a server, you
must delete all the service components for
that server. Similarly, before you can delete a
site, you must delete all the servers from that
site.
Select from the load list
Configure Accounting Manager Service
Component Name
Configure the properties within the Central
Accounting Manager tab
3.
Configure the SIP
Application Server
Add component
Select from the load list
Configure SIP Application Server Service
Component Name
Configure the properties within all tabs of the
SIP Application Server
4.
Configure the IP Client
Manager
Add component
Select from the load list
Configure IP Client Manager Service
Component Name
Configure the properties within all tabs of the
IP Client Manager
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Table 12 System Management Console configuration tasks sequence
Step
Description
Tasks
Configure the Web bundle (SIP Provisioning
Client, SIP Provisioning Server, SIP
Multimedia Web Client, SIP Multimedia Web
Server, SIP Personal Agent)
• add component
• select from the load list
• configure IPCM service component Name
• configure SIP Provisioning Client, SIP
Provisioning Server, SIP Multimedia Web
Client, SIP Multimedia Web Server, and
SIP Personal Agent
deploy the UFTP bundle (required for i2004
Internet Telephone firmware downloads) by
selecting
• Components->Add->BaseSoftware (for
the server to deploy the bundle to)
• UFTP bundle from load list and then
selecting the Apply button
5.
Configure RTP Media
Portal
Add component
Select from the load list
Configure RTP Media Portal Service
Component Name
Configure the properties within all tabs of the
RTP Media Portal
6.
Configure SIP PRI
Gateway
Add component
Select from the load list
Note: Third-party
gateways are configured
from their own console.
Third-party configuration is
not part of Nortel Networks
standard configuration
procedures.
Configure SIP PRI Gateway Service
Component Name
Configure the properties within all tabs of the
SIP PRI Gateway
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Table 12 System Management Console configuration tasks sequence
Step
Description
Tasks
7.
Configure SIP Audio Server Add component
Select from the load list
Configure SIP Audio Server Service
Component Name
Configure the properties within all tabs of the
SIP Audio Server
For more information about configuration management and for
instructions for performing configuration tasks, refer to the Succession
MX System Management Console Basics.
SIP Provisioning Client provisioning tasks
Table 13, “SIP Provisioning Client provisioning tasks sequence,”
shows the sequence of the provisioning tasks that a user must follow
from the SIP Provisioning Client.
Table 13 SIP Provisioning Client provisioning tasks sequence
Step
Description
Task(s)
1.
Define roles and rights and
use to create a new
Administrator
Add role and assign rights
Define new domain(s)
Add domain(s)
2.
Add Admin
Add sub-domain(s) if required
3.
Define service parameters
and assign to domain(s)
Define service parameters
Assign services to domain
4.
Define domain service
package
Create service package
Assign service package(s) to domain(s) and
sub-domain(s)
Assign services to sub-domain(s)
5.
Define voice mail servers
and assign to domain(s)
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Add voice mail serve (SIP/Trunk/Line) and
assign to domain(s)
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Table 13 SIP Provisioning Client provisioning tasks sequence
Step
Description
Task(s)
6
If not deployed through the
System Management
Console, add IPCM and
assign to domain
Add IPCM
7
Add domain status
reason(s)
Add reason
8
Add users to domain(s)
Add user(s)
Assign IPCM to domain
Add user(s) to sub-domains
Add i2004 device properties
9
10
If not autoprovisioning,
assign devices to
domain(s)
Add device
Define gateway, gateway
routes, and trunk groups
Add gateway
Assign users to a device
Add gateway route
Add trunkgroup
11
Define domain telephony
routes and parameters
Add routing Class of Service (COS)
Add telephony routes: Private, SIP, or
Gateway
Change routing parameters
Add route list
12
Define banned users for a
domain
Ban users
For more information on SIP Provisioning Client provisioning tasks and
instructions for using the SIP Provisioning Client to perform these
tasks, refer to the SIP Provisioning Client User Guide.
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67
Accounting management
How this chapter is organized
The Accounting management chapter is organized as follows:
•
Strategy on page 67
•
Tools and utilities on page 68
•
Task flows on page 68
Strategy
The accounting management system for the Succession MX provides
the framework for collecting, formatting, and transmitting accounting
data from the Succession Communication Server for Multimedia
Xchange (MX) System to the service provider’s back-end billing
system. It is comprised of two logically separate entities:
•
the Local Accounting Manager (LAM), which resides on the SIP
Application Module
•
Central Accounting Manager (CAM), which resides on the
Accounting Module
The primary function of the LAM is to collect raw accounting data from
active sessions on the SIP Application Module and transport it to the
CAM.
The functions of the CAM include:
•
formatting the raw accounting data received from the LAM into
IPDR/XML records
•
store IPDR/XML records on disk until manually removed
•
depending on configuration, transmit IPDR/XML records to
pre-configured destinations via TCP/IP or FTP Push or Pull
To ensure high availability of the accounting management system, the
minimum Succession MX network configuration consists of four Sun
Fire V 100 servers. One Server is for Management and Accounting
Modules, one for the Database Module, one for IPCM and Web Client,
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and one for the Application Server. However, this minimum
configuration does not offer redundancy. For redundancy, the customer
requires eight Sun Fire V 100 servers configuration.The LAM only runs
in the SIP Application Module. Since many SIP Application Modules
can run in a site, there can be many LAMs connecting to the CAM.
For additional information on the Succession MX Accounting Module,
refer to the Succession MX Accounting Module Basics.
Tools and utilities
The Succession MX accounting management system is configured,
monitored, and maintained through the System Management Console.
For more information on the Succession MX accounting management
system, refer to the Succession MX Accounting Module Basics. For
information on using the System Management Console to configure,
monitor, and maintain the accounting management system, refer to the
Succession MX System Management Console Basics.
Task flows
This section identifies the high-level Succession MX accounting
management tasks. The specific tasks you need to perform for your
accounting management system will vary depending on the level of
support purchased for your Succession MX.
Accounting management tasks
Configure the following accounting management system properties:
•
Central Accounting Manager (CAM) communications channel
•
Local Accounting Manager (LAM) communications channel
•
Operations support system (OSS) communication channel (TCP/IP
and FTP-push)
•
Manual Failover and Switchback of Accounting Manager if
applicable
For details on all the task flows for Succession MX accounting
management, detailed procedures for performing these tasks, and
details on the Accounting Records produced, refer to the Succession
MX Accounting Module Basics.
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69
Performance management
How this chapter is organized
The Performance management chapter is organized as follows:
•
Strategy on page 69
•
Tools and utilities on page 70
•
Task flows on page 70
Strategy
Performance measurements (PMs) are statistics collected about the
system. Performance is measured by the use of operational
measurements (OMs).
Operational measurements (OMs) provide statistical information on the
server operations and performances. OMs are usually represented in
terms of groups, which contain registers (counters and gauges) that
provide performance related data. For example, call processing can
provide an OM group related to call control and an OM group related to
call progress. One group provides data such as number of successful
calls, number of calls rejected, unauthorized attempts, while the other
group provides data such as average call holding time, duration of a
call, and so on.
There are two types of OMs: active and holding. Active OMs are
displayed as they are reported by the server to the management
server/management console. Holding OMs have already been
archived to files on the Management Server.
As the OM group registers are updated, they are collected into an OM
report. A snapshot of this report can be viewed through the OM Browser
located on the System Management Console.
Succession MX OM data belongs to one of the following categories:
•
Platform-related OMs—Platform-related OMs are obtained from the
SNMP agent(s) at the Succession MX components and System
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Manager Node. The OMs are then channeled through the
Succession MX management framework.
Note: This method applies only to Database Module and
Provisioning Module, not to the entire system.
•
Succession MX applications-related OMs—Application-related
OMs are obtained through the Succession MX management
framework.
Service provider can access OMs through FTP or view OMs using the
OM Browser on the System Management Console. Succession MX
OMs are collected and archived at the Management Module in a
comma separated value (CSV) file format. These files then can be
accessed through FTP by a performance management (PM) System.
For more information on OMs and a comprehensive list of all
Succession MX OMs, refer to the Succession MX System Management
Console Basics.
Tools and utilities
The Management Module provides the performance management
framework for all Succession MX components. The user can configure
performance data collection and reporting from the Management
Console by selecting the "OAM Configuration" menu item. The OAM
Configuration menu option is available when the user has selected a
deployed application or the "System" node in the System tree and then
right clicks (which displays the popup menu). In addition, the user can
monitor performance data from the OM browser on the System
Management console. For information on using the System
Management Console to perform performance management tasks,
refer to the Succession MX System Management Console Basics.
Task flows
Performance tasks for the various Succession MX components are
documented in detail in the performance information provided for each
individual Succession MX component. The following list of performance
management tasks may not apply to every component. In addition, the
order in which these tasks must be performed may vary from
component to component. However, typical Succession MX
performance management tasks include the following activities.
Procedure 2 Performing Succession MX Performance
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Performance management 71
Maintenance Tasks
At the System Management Console
1
Retrieve/view current performance data
2
Retrieve/view archived performance data
3
Configure performance data collection
4
Configure performance data reporting
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73
Security and Administration
How this chapter is organized
The Security and Administration chapter is organized as follows:
•
Security on page 73
•
Administration on page 74
Security
Security Strategy
For the Succession MX solution, Nortel Networks has incorporated
security mechanisms within the SIP protocol for registration and invite
messages. Customer must implement authentication using Digest.
Digest scheme is based on a challenge-response approach. Digest
scheme makes a challenge using a nonce value. Valid response
includes a checksum (MD5 by default - IETF 1321) of the username,
password, given nonce value, the method, and the requested
address/URI. This ensures that the password is not sent in clear.
Additionally, an optional header allows the server to specify the
algorithm used to create the checksum or Digest. As mentioned, MD5
algorithm is used by default. Also, user is authenticated with a
username and password. Endpoints are identified by unique URLs. For
more information on the Succession MX security strategy, refer to the
Succession MX Network Engineering Guide.
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Administration
Tools and utilities
The tools for performing Succession MX administration functions are as
follows:
•
System Manager Console—Depending on the level of
administration access and security privileges, use this GUI to
— add sites and servers
— to deploy and configure Succession MX components
— perform maintenance functions, such as login/logout,
— display system topology in a directory tree
— use maintenance commands
— edit properties
— browse alarms, logs and performance metrics
— monitor admin and operational states
•
SIP Provisioning Client Module—Provisioning administrators use
this tool to manage subscribers at the provider and Enterprise
domain level.
•
SIP Personal Agent—This web-based GUI is used by the system
administrator. It is also used by the subscriber, for example, to
register and fill in person details according to the limits defined by
the Domain Administrator/Administrator. It allows the user to
— enroll for services
— register their PC with the proxy server to answer and place SIP
calls
— view logs of missed calls
— keep a personal phone directory
— maintain routing information
Task flows
Use the administration tools to perform the following tasks. The tasks
and the order in which they must be performed may vary from
component to component. For detailed information on task flows, refer
to the overview information of the individual Succession MX
components or to the manufacturer’s documentation that comes with
the product, for example, the Sun Microsystem’s documentation on Sun
Fire V 100 servers.
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Security and Administration 75
Administration tasks for the System Management Console
An administrator who manages subscriber information may perform the
following types of tasks:
•
adding a user
•
deleting a user
•
editing user information
•
reviewing audit trail
•
changing passwords
•
setting privileges
•
modifying a user
•
listing a user
Additionally, an administrator may perform the following tasks:
•
accessing/starting an element
•
configuration tasks, such as
— deploying, monitoring, modifying, and restarting the element
manager
— changing system behavior
•
performance monitoring tasks, such as
— monitoring disk space usage
— checking operational measurements
— setting thresholds
— checking alarms
•
provisioning tasks, such as
— Gateway routing changes
— domain/subscribers information
— device information
— voice mail information
— service packages
— IP Client Manager
— administrators
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•
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Managing access control (user IDs and passwords)
Note: Only users configured as “system administrators” are
allowed to add/delete/modify user information. This capability can
be further extended to domain information administration.
•
Backing up and restoring system and database includes
— manually backing up and restoring the operating system,
database, and Succession MX software
— saving data to a remote external device using shell scripting.
(This method is used because the Vega 100 platform does not
contain SCSI or DAT drive.)
Administration tasks for the SIP Provisioning Client
Administrators can create, or define, all the necessary provisioning
roles to support their system. They can allow or restrict provisioning
roles to carry out specific actions.Table 14, “Examples of roles and
rights of administrators,” provides examples of several administrator
provisioning roles and the “rights based” restrictions associated with
various provisioning tasks.
Table 14 Examples of roles and rights of administrators
Provisioning role
example
Rights given
Allowed tasks
User administrator
•
User
management with
read, write, and
delete access
Domain
management with
read access only
Can view domain details, and add,
delete, or modify users. Does not have
access to other parts of the system, for
example voicemail, service packages,
and so forth.
Domain
management with
read access
Device
management with
read, write, and
delete access
Cannot add or modify users. Allowed to
add, modify or delete devices.
•
Device
administrator
•
•
System
administrator
Full domain access
Can see all domains, regardless of who
created the domain, or the list of
domains provisioned against the
administrator.
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Security and Administration 77
Diagnostic tools
Use the following diagnostic tools to debug system problems:
•
Unix commands such as “netstat –r,” “ping,” and traceroute
•
Monitoring logs, alarms, operational measurements, and syslog
•
Audits such as the Long Call Duration
•
Loopback IP address testing on all physical ports provided by Sun
Microsystems
•
snoop (sniffer) or port mirroring on Ethernet switch, with sniffer
connected to mirrored port, for monitoring messages
•
Sun IP Multipathing for signals to switch physical interfaces upon
detection of loss of the link
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79
Appendix A List of acronyms
AC
alternating current
ACD
automatic call distribution
ADSL
asynchronous digital subscriber line
BBUA
back-to-back user agent
CAM
central accounting manager
CAS
channel-associated signaling
CD
compact disc
CGI
common gateway interface
CLI
command line interface
CODEC
coder/decoder
CoS
class of service
CPE
customer premise equipment
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CPL
call processing language
CRM
customer’s records management
CS 2000
Communication Server 2000
CSE 1000
Communication Server Enterprise 1000
CSV
comma separated value
DC
direct current
DHCP
dynamic host configuration protocol
DIGMAN
digit manipulation
DLCMI
data link control management interface
DLL
dynamic link library
DMS-100
Digital Multiplex System-100
DNS
domain name server
DSL
digital subscriber line
DSM
distributed software manager
DTMF
dual tone multi frequency
EBIP
enhanced breaker interface panel
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Appendix A List of acronyms 81
EBN
Enterprise Business Networks
ERC
express routing code
FTP
file transfer protocol
GUI
graphical user interface
HDLC
high-level data link control
HSC
hot swap controller
HTTP
Hyper-text Transfer Protocol
HTTPS
Hyper-text Transfer Protocol Secure
IETF
Internet Engineering Task Force
IM
instant messaging
IMS
Interactive Multimedia Server
I/O
input/output
IP
Internet Protocol
IPCM
Internet Protocol Client Manager
IPDR
Internet Protocol Data Records
IPMP
Internet Protocol Multi-pathing
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ISDN
Integrated Services Digital Network
JDBC
Java database connectivity
JPEG
joint photographic experts groupPNG (portable network graphic)
LAM
Local Accounting Manager
LAN
local area network
LCD
liquid crystal display
LI
Legal Intercept (also Lawful Intercept)
MAC
media access control
MAddr
media access control address
MCP
Multimedia Communications Portfolio
ME
managed element
MGCP
Media Gateway Control Protocol
MGCP+
Media Gateway Control Protocol with Extensions
MIB
management information base
MOP
methods of procedure
Meridian SL-100
Meridian SuperNode Logic-100
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Appendix A List of acronyms 83
MS
Microsoft
MWI
message waiting indication
MX
Multimedia Xchange
NAT
network address translator
NAPT
network address port translation
NIC
network interface controller
OAM
operations, administration, and maintenance
OAM&P
operations, administration, maintenance, and provisioning
OCM
originating call model
OEM
Oracle Enterprise Manager
OM
operational measurement
OMI
open management interface
OPI
Open Provisioning Interface
OSS
operations support system
PBX
private branch exchange
PC
personal computer
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PCP
Perfect Channel Protocol
PM
performance measurement
PRACK
persistent acknowledge messages
PRI
primary rate interface
PSTN
public switched telephone network
QFE
quad fast ethernet
QoS
quality of service
RMAN
Recovery Manager
RTCP
Real-time Transport Control Protocol
RTP
Real-time Transport Protocol
RU
recording units
SA
system administrator
SAM16
Service Application Module-16
SC
service consumer
SCTP
Signaling transport control point
SDP
Session Description Protocol
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Appendix A List of acronyms 85
SE
service element
SIP
Session Initiation Protocol
SIP-T
Session Initiation Protocol - Telephony
SMDI
simple message desk interface
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol
SOAP
Simple Object Access Protocol
SQL
structured query language
SS
service session
SSL
Secure Socket Layer
STD format
standard format
TCM
terminating call model
TDM
Time Division Multiplexer
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol
UAS
Universal Audio Server
UDP
Universal Datagram Protocol
UE
usage entry
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UFTP
UNIStim File Transfer Prtocol
UM
unified messaging
UNIStim
Unified Network Internet Protocol Stimulus Protocol
URI
uniform resource identifier
URL
uniform resource locator
USB
universal serial bus
VMS
voice mail server
VoIP
Voice over Internet Protocol
WAN
wide area network
WCSCP
Web Client Session Control Protocol
XML
EXtensible Markup Language
NN10270-100 Standard Succession MX 1.1 (01.02) July 2003
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Succession Multimedia Xchange
Succession MX Basics
Copyright © 2003 Nortel Networks,
All Rights Reserved
NORTEL NETWORKS CONFIDENTIAL: The information contained in this document is the
property of Nortel Networks. Except as specifically authorized in writing by Nortel Networks, the holder of this
document shall keep the information contained herein confidential and shall protect same in whole or in part
from disclosure and dissemination to third parties and use same for evaluation, operation, and maintenance
purposes only. Changes or modifications to the Succession MX Basics without the express consent of Nortel
Networks may void its warranty and void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
Information is subject to change without notice. Nortel Networks reserves the right to make changes in design
or components as progress in engineering and manufacturing may warrant.
*Nortel Networks, the Nortel Networks logo, the Globemark, UNIStim, MCP, Succession MX, Nortel, Northern
Telecom, and NT, are trademarks of Nortel Networks.
Publication number: NN10270-100
Product release: Succession MX 1.1 Standard
Document release: Standard Succession MX 1.1 (01.02)
Date: July 2003
Printed in the United States of America.
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